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Sample records for beta drift waves

  1. Theory and calculation of finite beta drift wave turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using numerical techniques, we calculate eigenmodes of the nonlinear universal mode with finite beta in order to determine the scaling of the saturation level of the instability with beta. We use two different renormalizations in the calculations and find that using the appropriate renormalization, we are able to recover Alcator density scaling, as originally found in analytic work by Molvig and Hirshman. We also find that the universal mode should be stable in ohmically heated tokamaks above a critical beta on the order of 0.02

  2. Electromagnetic drift waves dispersion for arbitrarily collisional plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Wonjae, E-mail: wol023@ucsd.edu; Krasheninnikov, Sergei I., E-mail: skrash@mae.ucsd.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Angus, J. R. [Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Avenue, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    The impacts of the electromagnetic effects on resistive and collisionless drift waves are studied. A local linear analysis on an electromagnetic drift-kinetic equation with Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook-like collision operator demonstrates that the model is valid for describing linear growth rates of drift wave instabilities in a wide range of plasma parameters showing convergence to reference models for limiting cases. The wave-particle interactions drive collisionless drift-Alfvén wave instability in low collisionality and high beta plasma regime. The Landau resonance effects not only excite collisionless drift wave modes but also suppress high frequency electron inertia modes observed from an electromagnetic fluid model in collisionless and low beta regime. Considering ion temperature effects, it is found that the impact of finite Larmor radius effects significantly reduces the growth rate of the drift-Alfvén wave instability with synergistic effects of high beta stabilization and Landau resonance.

  3. Collisional drift fluids and drift waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The usual theoretical description of drift-wave turbulence (considered to be one possible cause of anomalous transport in a plasma), e.g. the Hasegawa-Wakatani theory, makes use of various approximations, the effect of which is extremely difficult to assess. This concerns in particular the conservation laws for energy and momentum. The latter is important as concerns charge separation and resulting electric fields which are possibly related to the L-H transition. Energy conservation is crucial for the stability behaviour; it will be discussed via an example. New collisional multispecies drift-fluid equations were derived by a new method which yields in a transparent way conservation of energy and total angular momentum, and the law for energy dissipation. Both electrostatic and electromagnetic field variations are considered. The method is based primarily on a Lagrangian for dissipationless fluids in drift approximation with isotropic pressures. The dissipative terms are introduced by adding corresponding terms to the ideal equations of motion and of the pressures. The equations of motion, of course, no longer result from a Lagrangian via Hamilton's principle. Their relation to the ideal equations imply, however, also a relation to the ideal Lagrangian of which one can take advantage. Instead of introducing heat conduction one can also assume isothermal behaviour, e.g. Tν(x)=const. Assumptions of this kind are often made in the literature. The new method of introducing dissipation is not restricted to the present kind of theories; it can equally well be applied to theories such as multi-fluid theories without using the drift approximation of the present paper. Linear instability is investigated via energy considerations and the implications of taking ohmic resistivity into account are discussed. (orig./WL)

  4. Drift waves in general toroidal geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A model, based on gyro-kinetic ions and fluid electrons, to study drift waves in low-beta [beta = (kinetic pressure)/(magnetic pressure)] stellarator plasmas is presented. The model equations are written in straight-field-line coordinates and are valid for arbitrary, fully three-dimensional configurations with closed, nested magnetic surfaces. An implicit method, coupled with a subcycling technique for the electrons, is used to solve the time-dependent, along-the-field-line equations. Numerical calculations are carried out for a 3-field-period toroidal heliac. The geometrical effects that enter the model equations are calculated and displayed in physical space using advanced visualization techniques

  5. Clumps in drift wave turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pecseli, H. L.; Mikkelsen, Torben

    1986-01-01

    , two-dimensional random flow serves as a particularly simple illustration. For this case particles can be trapped for all times in a local vortex (macro-clump). A small test-cloud of particles (micro-clump) chosen arbitrarily in a realization will on the other hand expand on average. A formulation is...... proposed in terms of conditional eddies, in order to discriminate turbulent flows where macro-clumps may be observed. The analysis is illustrated by results from experimental investigations of strongly turbulent, resistive drift-wave fluctuations. The related problem for electrostatic turbulence in...

  6. Counting of discrete Rossby/drift wave resonant triads

    CERN Document Server

    Bustamante, Miguel D; Lynch, Peter; Quinn, Brenda

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this note is to remove the confusion about counting of resonant wave triads for Rossby and drift waves in the context of the Charney-Hasegawa-Mima equation. In particular, we aim to point out a major error of over-counting of triads in the paper "Discrete exact and quasi-resonances of Rossby/drift waves on beta-plane with periodic boundary conditions", by Kartashov and Kartashova, arXiv:1307.8272v1 [physics.flu-dyn] (2013).

  7. Drift wave in pair-ion plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Samiran Ghosh; Nikhil Chakrabarti; Manoranjan Khan; M R Gupta

    2013-02-01

    The conditions for the existence of low-frequency electrostatic drift wave in pair-ion plasma are discussed. It is shown that the temperature and/or mass difference of both species could produce drift wave in a pair-ion plasma. The results are discussed in the context of the fullerene pair-ion plasma experiment.

  8. Anomalous bootstrap current due to drift waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An anomalous parallel current driven by radial flux in tokamak is discussed. Drift waves, which cause an anomalous cross field diffusion, can generate a parallel current in a sheared magnetic field, if the fluctuation level has radial dependence. (author)

  9. Drift waves in a weakly ionized plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popovic, M.; Melchior, H.

    1968-01-01

    A dispersion relation for low frequency drift waves in a weakly ionized plasma has been derived, and through numerical calculations the effect of collisions between the charged and the neutral particles is estimated.......A dispersion relation for low frequency drift waves in a weakly ionized plasma has been derived, and through numerical calculations the effect of collisions between the charged and the neutral particles is estimated....

  10. Drift Wave Turbulence and Magnetic Reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, L.; Drake, J. F.; Swisdak, M.

    2015-12-01

    An important feature in collisionless magnetic reconnection is the development of sharp discontinuities along the separatrices bounding the Alfvenic outflow. The typical scale length of these features is ρs (the Larmor radius based on the sound speed) for guide field reconnection. Temperature gradients in the inflowing plasma (as might be found in the magnetopause and the magnetotail) can lead to instabilities at these separatrices, specifically drift wave turbulence. We present standalone 2D and 3D PIC simulations of drift wave turbulence to investigate scaling properties and growth rates. We specifically consider stabilization of the lower hybrid drift instability (LHDI) and the development of this instability in the presence of a sheared magnetic field. Further investigations of the relative importance of drift wave turbulence in the development of reconnection will also be considered.

  11. Collisional drift fluid equations and implications for drift waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The usual theoretical description of drift-wave turbulence (considered to be one possible cause of anomalous transport in a plasma), e.g. the Hasegawa-Wakatani theory, makes use of various approximations, the effects of which are extremely difficult to assess. This concerns in particular the conservation laws for energy and momentum. The latter law is important in relation to charge separation and the resulting electric fields, which are possibly related to the L-H transition. Energy conservation is crucial to the stability behaviour, it will be discussed by means of an example. New collisional multi-species drift-fluid equations were derived by a new method which yields, in a transparent way, conservation of energy and total angular momentum and the law for energy dissipation. Both electrostatic and electromagnetic field variations are considered. The only restriction involved is the validity of the drift approximation; in particular, there are no assumptions restricting the geometry of the system. The method is based primarily on a Lagrangian for dissipationless fluids in the drift approximation with isotropic pressures. The dissipative terms are introduced by adding corresponding terms to the ideal equations of motion and of the pressures. The equations of motion, of course, no longer result from a Lagrangian via Hamilton's principle. However, their relation to the ideal equations also implies a relation to the ideal Lagrangian, which can be used to advantage. Instead of introducing heat conduction one can also assume isothermal behaviour, e.g. Tv(x) = constant. Assumptions of this kind are often made in the literature. The new method of introducing dissipation is not restricted to the present kind of theory; it can equally well be applied to theories such as multi-fluid theories without using the drift approximation of the present paper. (author)

  12. Nonlinear dynamics of resistive electrostatic drift waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsholm, Søren Bang; Michelsen, Poul; Pécseli, H.L.

    1999-01-01

    The evolution of weakly nonlinear electrostatic drift waves in an externally imposed strong homogeneous magnetic field is investigated numerically in three spatial dimensions. The analysis is based on a set of coupled, nonlinear equations, which are solved for an initial condition which...

  13. Drift wave solitons in an inhomogeneous magnetized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The shears of electron diamagnetic drift velocity and ExB drift velocity are theoretically verified to give nonlinearities and establish a soliton of drift wave. Experimentally, a drift wave soliton is observed. Both of the propagation velocity of the soliton and the inverse of the soliton width get large with an increase in amplitude. (author)

  14. Nonlinear saturation spectra of electric fields and density fluctuations in drift wave turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, M. C.

    1982-01-01

    The detection of drift waves in the nonlinear evolution of a space plasma process driven at long wavelengths is considered, adducing measurements of the electric field and density fluctuation power spectra as evidence. Since the driving mechanism is clearly at long wavelengths, the detection of drift waves suggests that they may play an important role in the transfer of wave energy from long to short wavelengths in a low beta plasma. The saturated spectral density is compared with theoretical results in order to estimate the anomalous diffusion rate. The observed spectral form and amplitude is in excellent agreement with drift wave predictions.

  15. The Absence of Stokes Drift in Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Chafin, Clifford

    2015-01-01

    Stokes drift has been as central to the history of wave theory as it has been distressingly absent from experiment. Neither wave tanks nor experiments in open bodies detect this without nearly canceling "eulerian flows." Acoustic waves have an analogous problem that is particularly problematic in the vorticity production at the edges of beams. Here we demonstrate that the explanation for this arises from subtle end-of-packet and wavetrain gradient effects such as microbreaking events and wave-flow decomposition subtleties required to conserve mass and momentum and avoid fictitious external forces. These losses occur at both ends of packets and can produce a significant nonviscous energy loss for translating and spreading surface wave packets and wavetrains. In contrast, monochromatic sound wave packets will be shown to asymmetrically distort to conserve momentum. This provides an interesting analogy to how such internal forces arise for gradients of electromagnetic wavetrains in media. Such examples show that...

  16. Drift wave vortices and anomalous transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theory and computer simulations are used to describe the inelastic vortex-vortex and vortex-wave interactions that lead to the quasi-coherent transport of plasma across the magnetic field. Monopole and dipole drift wave vortices with radii r0 large compared with the ion inertial scale length /rho//sub s/ are shown to produce transport at the rate un/sub υ/∫dσ(b) ≤ n/sub υ/υ/sub de/r/sub o/ where n/sub υ/ is the vortex line density and dσ(b) is the inelastic collision cross-section for impact parameter b. The transport during collisions and mergings is evaluated from the evolution of a passively convected scalar concentration of test particles. 24 refs., 4 figs

  17. Global kink and ballooning modes in high-beta systems and stability of toroidal drift modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A numerical code (HBT) has been developed which solves for the equilibrium, global stability and high-n stability of plasmas with arbitrary cross-section. Various plasmas are analysed for their stability to these modes in the high-beta limit. Screw-pinch equilibria are stable to high-n ballooning modes up to betas of 18%. The eigenmode equation for drift waves is analysed numerically. The toroidal branch is shown to be destabilized by the non-adiabatic response of trapped and circulating particles. (author)

  18. Anomalous drift of spiral waves in heterogeneous excitable media

    CERN Document Server

    Sridhar, S; Panfilov, Alexander V

    2009-01-01

    We study the drift of spiral waves in a simple model of heterogeneous excitable medium, having gradients in local excitability or cellular coupling. For the first time, we report the anomalous drift of spiral waves towards regions having higher excitability, in contrast to all earlier observations in reaction-diffusion models of excitable media. Such anomalous drift can promote the onset of complex spatio-temporal patterns, e.g., those responsible for life-threatening arrhythmias in the heart.

  19. Nonlinear propagation of short wavelength drift-Alfven waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shukla, P. K.; Pecseli, H. L.; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    1986-01-01

    Making use of a kinetic ion and a hydrodynamic electron description together with the Maxwell equation, the authors derive a set of nonlinear equations which governs the dynamics of short wavelength ion drift-Alfven waves. It is shown that the nonlinear drift-Alfven waves can propagate as two...

  20. Experiment and theory of a drift wave in the levitated octupole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A very coherent 30 kHz drift wave is observed in the Levitated Toroidal Octupole at the University of Wisconsin - Madison. The density and floating potential fluctuations have a well-defined spatial structure in the poloidal magnetic field. Radially the wave has a standing wave structure with amplitude peaked in regions of locally bad magnetic curvature. Poloidally the wave has a standing wave structure with odd symmetry; nodes are located in the regions of locally good magnetic curvature. The wave propagates toroidally in the electron diamagnetic drift direction with a wavelength of 20 centimeters. No changes occur in the wave structure as the plasma is varied over three orders of magnitude in density and beta

  1. Resistive drift wave turbulence in a three-dimensional geometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsholm, Søren Bang; Michelsen, Poul; Naulin, V.

    1999-01-01

    The Hasegawa-Wakatani model describing resistive drift waves is investigated analytically and numerically in a three-dimensional periodic geometry. After an initial growth of the energy the drift waves couple nonlinearly to convective cells, which eventually dominate the system completely. An app...... approach to include more physical boundary conditions to the system is presented. This changes the results of the simulations significantly. (C) 1999 American Institute of Physics.......The Hasegawa-Wakatani model describing resistive drift waves is investigated analytically and numerically in a three-dimensional periodic geometry. After an initial growth of the energy the drift waves couple nonlinearly to convective cells, which eventually dominate the system completely. An...

  2. Two-fluid MHD Regime of Drift Wave Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shang-Chuan; Zhu, Ping; Xie, Jin-Lin; Liu, Wan-Dong

    2015-11-01

    Drift wave instabilities contribute to the formation of edge turbulence and zonal flows, and thus are believed to play essential roles in the anomalous transport processes in tokamaks. Whereas drift waves are generally assumed to be local and electrostatic, experiments have often found regimes where the spatial scales and the magnetic components of drift waves approach those of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) processes. In this work we study such a drift wave regime in a cylindrical magnetized plasma using a full two-fluid MHD model implemented in the NIMROD code. The linear dependency of growth rates on resistivity and the dispersion relation found in the NIMROD calculations qualitatively agree with theoretical analysis. As the azimuthal mode number increases, the drift modes become highly localized radially; however, unlike the conventional local approximation, the radial profile of the drift mode tends to shift toward the edge away from the center of the density gradient slope, suggesting the inhomogeneity of two-fluid effects. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China Grant 11275200 and National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China Grant 2014GB124002.

  3. Drift of Spiral Waves in Complex Ginzburg-Landau Equation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The spontaneous drift of the spiral wave in a finite domain in the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation is investigated numerically. By using the interactions between the spiral wave and its images, we propose a phenomenological theory to explain the observations.

  4. Toroidal effects on drift wave turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LeBrun, M.J.; Tajima, T.; Gray, M.G.; Furnish, G.; Horton, W.

    1992-09-23

    The universal drift instability and other drift instabilities driven by density and temperature gradients in a toroidal system are investigated in both linear and nonlinear regimes via particle simulation. Runs in toroidal and cylindrical geometry show dramatic differences in plasma behavior, primarily due to the toroidicity-induced coupling of rational surfaces through the poloidal mode number m. In the toroidal system studied, the eigenmodes are seen to possess (i) an elongated, nearly global radial extent (ii) a higher growth rate than in the corresponding cylindrical system, (iii) an eigenfrequency nearly constant with radius, (iv) a global temperature relaxation and enhancement of thermal heat conduction. Most importantly, the measured Xi shows an increase with radius and an absolute value on the order of that observed in experiment. On the basis of our observations, we argue that the increase in Xi with radius observed in experiment is caused by the global nature of heat convection in the presence of toroidicity-induced mode coupling.

  5. Drift and ion acoustic wave driven vortices with superthermal electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali Shan, S. [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, PINSTECH, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); National Centre For Physics (NCP), Shahdra Valley Road, QAU Campus, 44000 Islamabad (Pakistan); Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences (PIEAS), Islamabad (Pakistan); Haque, Q. [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, PINSTECH, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); National Centre For Physics (NCP), Shahdra Valley Road, QAU Campus, 44000 Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2012-08-15

    Linear and nonlinear analysis of coupled drift and acoustic mode is presented in an inhomogeneous electron-ion plasma with {kappa}-distributed electrons. A linear dispersion relation is found which shows that the phase speed of both the drift wave and the ion acoustic wave decreases in the presence of superthermal electrons. Several limiting cases are also discussed. In the nonlinear regime, stationary solutions in the form of dipolar and monopolar vortices are obtained. It is shown that the condition for the boundedness of the solution implies that the speed of drift wave driven vortices reduces with increase in superthermality effect. Ignoring density inhomogeniety, it is investigated that the lower and upper limits on the speed of the ion acoustic driven vortices spread with the inclusion of high energy electrons. The importance of results with reference to space plasmas is also pointed out.

  6. Toroidal drift waves with an equilibrium velocity field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author investigated the effect of a radially sheared poloidal velocity field on the toroidal drift wave which is well known to escape magnetic shear damping through toroidal coupling between different poloidal harmonics centered on individual rational surfaces. He endeavored to model the velocity profile according to that observed at the plasma edge during H-mode shots. The resultant wave formed by the interference of different poloidal harmonics now sees an antiwell created by the H-mode type velocity profile in the radial direction (in contrast to a well formed by the diamagnetic frequency in the absence of velocity fields). The wave, therefore, convects energy outward and hence undergoes damping. Outgoing wave boundary condition then introduces a negative imaginary contribution to the global eigenvalue -- once again confirming the stabilizing role of H-mode type velocity profiles. On the other hand, L-mode type velocity profiles have destabilizing action on toroidal drift waves

  7. Point vortex description of drift wave vortices: Dynamics and transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Point vortex description for drift wave vortices is formulated based on the Hasegawa-Mima equation to study elementary processes for the interactions of vortices as well as statistical properties like vortex diffusion. Dynamical properties of drift wave vortices known by numerical experiments are recovered. Furthermore a vortex diffusion model discussed by Horton based on numerical simulations is shown to be analytically obtained. A variety of phenomena arising from the short-range nature of the interaction force of point vortices are suggested. 9 refs., 6 figs

  8. Transport of parallel momentum by collisionless drift wave turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diamond, P.H.; McDevitt, C.J.; Gürcan, O.D.;

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a novel, unified approach to the theory of turbulent transport of parallel momentum by collisionless drift waves. The physics of resonant and nonresonant off-diagonal contributions to the momentum flux is emphasized, and collisionless momentum exchange between waves and partic......This paper presents a novel, unified approach to the theory of turbulent transport of parallel momentum by collisionless drift waves. The physics of resonant and nonresonant off-diagonal contributions to the momentum flux is emphasized, and collisionless momentum exchange between waves...... contributes significantly to the residual stress. A general equation for mean k(parallel to) () is derived and used to develop a generalized theory of symmetry breaking. The resonant particle momentum flux is calculated, and pinch and residual stress effects are identified. The implications...

  9. Transport of parallel momentum by collisionless drift wave turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diamond, P.H.; McDevitt, C.J.; Gurcan, O.E.;

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a novel, unified approach to the theory of turbulent transport of parallel momentum by collisionless drift waves. The physics of resonant and non‐resonant off‐diagonal contributions to the momentum flux is emphasized, and collisionless momentum exchange between waves and parti......This paper presents a novel, unified approach to the theory of turbulent transport of parallel momentum by collisionless drift waves. The physics of resonant and non‐resonant off‐diagonal contributions to the momentum flux is emphasized, and collisionless momentum exchange between waves...... contributes significantly to the residual stress. A general equation for mean κ∥(〈κ∥〉) is derived and used to develop a generalized theory of symmetry breaking. The resonant particle momentum flux is calculated, and pinch and residual stress effects are identified. The implications of the theory for intrinsic...

  10. Counting of discrete Rossby/drift wave resonant triads (again)

    CERN Document Server

    Bustamante, Miguel D; Lynch, Peter; Quinn, Brenda

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of our earlier note (arXiv:1309.0405 [physics.flu-dyn]) was to remove the confusion over counting of resonant wave triads for Rossby and drift waves in the context of the Charney-Hasegawa-Mima equation. A comment by Kartashov and Kartashova (arXiv:1309.0992v1 [physics.flu-dyn]) on that note has further confused the situation. The present note aims to remove this obfuscation.

  11. Three-dimensional drift chambers of the DCBA experiment for neutrinoless double beta decay search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishikawa, T., E-mail: ishikawat@hakone.phys.metro-u.ac.j [Tokyo Metropolitan University, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0398 (Japan); Igarashi, H.; Sumiyoshi, T. [Tokyo Metropolitan University, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0398 (Japan); Ishihara, N.; Iwai, G.; Iwase, H.; Kato, Y.; Kawai, M.; Kondou, Y.; Haruyama, T.; Inagaki, T.; Makida, Y.; Ohama, T.; Takahashi, K.; Yamada, Y. [High Energy Accel, Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Tashiro, E.; Ishizuka, T. [Shizuoka University, Naka, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka 432-8011 (Japan); Kitamura, S. [Nihon Institute of Medical Science, Iruma-gun, Saitama 350-0435 (Japan); Teramoto, Y. [Osaka City University, Sumiyoshi, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); Nakano, I. [Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan)

    2011-02-01

    The aim of the DCBA (Drift Chamber Beta-ray Analyzer) experiment is to search for neutrinoless double beta decay (0{nu}{beta}{beta}). The half-life of 0{nu}{beta}{beta} is expected to give us the information of Majorana nature and the absolute mass scale of neutrinos. A prototype test apparatus DCBA-T2 has the energy resolution of about 150 keV (FWHM) around 1 MeV. In order to check the detector performance, engineering runs detecting double beta decay of {sup 100}Mo started in May 2009 using natural Mo, which contains 9.6% of {sup 100}Mo. Ten candidates of the double beta decay ({beta}{beta}) have been detected so far. It has been found that the background events due to {sup 214}Bi decay are distinguishable from the double beta decays by detecting {alpha}-particles from {sup 214}Po.

  12. Global Theory to Understand Toroidal Drift Waves in Steep Gradient

    CERN Document Server

    Xie, Hua-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Toroidal drift waves with unconventional mode structures and non-ground eigenstates, which differ from typical ballooning structure mode, are found to be important recently by large scale global gyrokinetic simulations and especially become dominant at strong gradient edge plasmas [cf., Xie and Xiao, Phys. Plasmas, 22, 090703 (2015)]. The global stability and mode structures of drift wave in this steep edge density and temperature gradients are examined by both direct numerical solutions of a model two-dimensional eigen equation and analytical theory employing WKB-ballooning approach. Theory agrees with numerical solutions quite well. Our results indicate that (i) non-ground eigenstates and unconventional mode structures generally exist and can be roughly described by two parameters `quantum number' $l$ and ballooning angle $\\vartheta_k$, (ii) local model can overestimate the growth rate largely, say, $>50\\%$, and (iii) the narrow steep equilibrium profile leads to twisting (triangle-like) radial mode structu...

  13. Shock drift acceleration in the presence of waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, R. B.; Vlahos, L.

    1985-01-01

    Attention is given to the initial results of a model designed to study the modification of the scatter-free, shock drift acceleration of energetic test particles by wave activity in the vicinity of a quasi-perpendicular, fast-mode MHD shock. It is emphasized that the concept of magnetic moment conservation is a valid approximation only in the perpendicular and nearly perpendicular regimes, when the angle theta-Bn between the shock normal and the upstream magnetic field vector is in the range from 70 deg to 90 deg. The present investigation is concerned with one step in a program which is being developed to combine the shock drift and diffusive processes at a shock of arbitrary theta-Bn.

  14. Light-Gradient-Induced Spiral Wave Drifts in a Belousov-Zhabotinsky Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hui-Jie; WANG Peng-Ye; ZHAO Ying-Ying

    2005-01-01

    @@ The dynamic behaviour of spiral tip in the light-sensitive Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction under the influence of an externally applied light gradient was experimentally studied. The gradient causes different drifts for different spiral patterns. The centre of the spiral wave moved toward the region of lower light intensity. The direction of an additional perpendicular drift depended on the chirality of the spiral wave. The dependences of the drifting angle and the drifting velocity on light gradient have been measured.

  15. Dust gravitational drift wave in complex plasma under gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dispersion relation of electrostatic waves in a complex plasma under gravity is presented. It is assumed that the waves propagate parallel to the external fields. The effects of weak electric field, neutral drag force, and ion drag force are also taken into account. The dispersion relation is numerically examined in an appropriate parameter space in which the gravity plays the dominant role in the dynamics of microparticles. The numerical results show that, in the low pressure complex plasma under gravity, a low frequency drift wave can be developed in the long wavelength limit. The stability state of this wave is switched at a certain critical wavenumber in such a way that the damped mode is transformed into a growing one. Furthermore, the influence of the external fields on the dispersion properties is analyzed. It is shown that the wave instability is essentially due to the electrostatic streaming of plasma particles. It is also found that by increasing the electric field strength, the stability switching occurs at smaller wavenumbers

  16. Global theory to understand toroidal drift waves in steep gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hua-sheng; Li, Bo

    2016-08-01

    Toroidal drift waves with unconventional mode structures and non-ground eigenstates, which differ from a typical ballooning structure mode, are found to be important recently by large scale global gyrokinetic simulations and especially become dominant at strong gradient edge plasmas [cf. H. S. Xie and Y. Xiao, Phys. Plasmas 22, 090703 (2015)]. The global stability and mode structures of drift wave in this steep edge density and temperature gradients are examined by both direct numerical solutions of a model two-dimensional eigen equation and analytical theory employing WKB-ballooning approach. Theory agrees with numerical solutions quite well. Our results indicate that (i) non-ground eigenstates and unconventional mode structures generally exist and can be roughly described by two parameters "quantum number" l and ballooning angle ϑk , (ii) local model can overestimate the growth rate largely, say, >50 % , and (iii) the narrow steep equilibrium profile leads to twisting (triangle-like) radial mode structures. With velocity space integral, semi-local theory predicts that the critical jump gradient of the most unstable ion temperature gradient mode from ground state l = 0 to non-ground state l = 1 is LT-1R ˜50 . These features can have important consequences to turbulent transport.

  17. Coherent structures and transport in drift wave plasma turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang Korsholm, S.

    2011-12-15

    Fusion energy research aims at developing fusion power plants providing safe and clean energy with abundant fuels. Plasma turbulence induced transport of energy and particles is a performance limiting factor for fusion devices. Hence the understanding of plasma turbulence is important for optimization. The present work is a part of the puzzle to understand the basic physics of transport induced by drift wave turbulence in the edge region of a plasma. The basis for the study is the Hasegawa-Wakatani model. Simulation results for 3D periodic and nonperiodic geometries are presented. The Hasegawa-Wakatani model is further expanded to include ion temperature effects. Another expansion of the model is derived from the Braginskii electron temperature equation. The result is a self-consistent set of equations describing the dynamical evolution of the drift wave fluctuations of the electron density, electron temperature and the potential in the presence of density and temperature gradients. 3D simulation results of the models are presented. Finally, the construction and first results from the MAST fluctuation reflectometer is described. The results demonstrate how L- to H-mode transitions as well as edge-localized-modes can be detected by the relatively simple diagnostic system. The present Risoe report is a slightly updated version of my original PhD report which was submitted in April 2002 and defended in August 2002. (Author)

  18. Coherent structures and transport in drift wave plasma turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fusion energy research aims at developing fusion power plants providing safe and clean energy with abundant fuels. Plasma turbulence induced transport of energy and particles is a performance limiting factor for fusion devices. Hence the understanding of plasma turbulence is important for optimization. The present work is a part of the puzzle to understand the basic physics of transport induced by drift wave turbulence in the edge region of a plasma. The basis for the study is the Hasegawa-Wakatani model. Simulation results for 3D periodic and nonperiodic geometries are presented. The Hasegawa-Wakatani model is further expanded to include ion temperature effects. Another expansion of the model is derived from the Braginskii electron temperature equation. The result is a self-consistent set of equations describing the dynamical evolution of the drift wave fluctuations of the electron density, electron temperature and the potential in the presence of density and temperature gradients. 3D simulation results of the models are presented. Finally, the construction and first results from the MAST fluctuation reflectometer is described. The results demonstrate how L- to H-mode transitions as well as edge-localized-modes can be detected by the relatively simple diagnostic system. The present Risoe report is a slightly updated version of my original PhD report which was submitted in April 2002 and defended in August 2002. (Author)

  19. Dynamics of zonal flows and self-regulating drift-wave turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a theory of zonal flow - drift wave dynamics. Zonal flows are generated by modulational instability of a drift wave spectrum, and are damped by collisions. Drift waves undergo random shearing-induced refraction, resulting in increased mean square radial wavenumber. Drift waves and zonal flows together form a simple dynamical system, which has a single stable fixed point. In this state, the fluctuation intensity and turbulent diffusivity are ultimately proportional to the collisional zonal flow damping. The implications of these results for transport models is discussed. (author)

  20. Drift-wave spectra in plasmas with magnetic shear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nonlinear radial eigenmode equation governing the evolution of drift waves in a weakly turbulent state is obtained under the assumption that ion nonlinear scattering (nonlinear ion Landau damping) is the dominant saturation mechanism. The poloidal spectrum is to be derived from the eigenvalue equation. The local character of the interaction in frequencies allows the transformation of the otherwise integral wave kinetic equation (i.e., the eigenvalue equation) into a system of two first-order differential equations coupling the spectra I(k/sub theta/) and I(k/sup dagger//sub theta/) if ω(k/sup dagger//sub theta/) = ω(k/sub theta/). The density fluctuation spectrum is obtained analytically in the limit of the small temperature ratio T/sub i//T/sub e/. Some features are: (i) the spectral index at high mode numbers agrees well with experimental values; (ii) the long-wavelength spectrum peaks at k/sub theta/a/sub s/approx. =0.62 (a/sub s/ equivalentsound Larmor radius), (iii) the cross-field diffusion is mostly induced by the high-mode-number fluctuations, whereas the major contribution to the density fluctuations is in the long wavelengths; (iv) the frequency spectrum of the beat waves peaks at ω = 0 (they then have a convective cell character); and (v) the turbulence level is a factor L/sub n//L/sub s/ (ratio of density and shear lengths) smaller than with former theories

  1. Time-spectral modelling of drift wave turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffel, Jan

    2013-10-01

    Time spectral methods for initial-value partial differential equations avoid the time stepping being characteristic for temporal finite difference schemes. Large gains in efficiency should then be within reach for problems in plasma physics with widely separated time scales. In the recently developed Generalized Weighted Residual Method GWRM, temporal, spatial and parameter domains are all handled using a Chebyshev polynomial solution ansatz. The coefficients of the ansatz are determined using a generalized weighted residual method, for which a new efficient equation system solver has been applied. In addition, subdomain methods for the temporal and spatial domains have been developed and employed successfully in a number of test problems. We will here also present a related method, being based on least square minimization of the residual rather than on the Galerkin method. Both methods are applied to problems in drift wave turbulence from which results will be presented.

  2. Coherent Structures of Dust-Drift Waves in a Dusty Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈银华; 陆玮; 王舸

    2001-01-01

    A new type of very low-frequency electrostatic wave in a dusty plasma, called the dust-drift wave, has been investigated with the three-component fluid model. The dispersion of the waves depends strongly on the dust grain content in plasma. Due to their nonlinear interaction, the dust-drift waves can form two-dimensional diphump and multi-peak localized structures. The amplitudes of those structures decrease with the increasing dust content.

  3. Effect of a Dissipative Term in the Drift Waves Hamiltonian System

    CERN Document Server

    Oyarzabal, Ricardo S; Batista, Antonio M; Caldas, Iberê L; Viana, Ricardo L; Iarosz, Kelly C

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyses the Hamiltonian model of drift waves which describes the chaotic transport of particles in the plasma confinement. With one drift wave the system is integrable and it presents stable orbits. When one wave is added the system may or may not be integrable depending on the phase of each wave velocity. If the two waves have the same phase velocity, the system is integrable. When the phase velocities between the two waves are different, the system shows chaotic behaviour. In this model we add a small dissipation. In the presence of a weak dissipation, for different initial conditions, we observe transient orbits which converge to periodic attractors.

  4. Drift of scroll waves in thin layers caused by thickness features: asymptotic theory and numerical simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biktasheva, I V; Dierckx, H; Biktashev, V N

    2015-02-13

    A scroll wave in a very thin layer of excitable medium is similar to a spiral wave, but its behavior is affected by the layer geometry. We identify the effect of sharp variations of the layer thickness, which is separate from filament tension and curvature-induced drifts described earlier. We outline a two-step asymptotic theory describing this effect, including asymptotics in the layer thickness and calculation of the drift of so-perturbed spiral waves using response functions. As specific examples, we consider drift of scrolls along thickness steps, ridges, ditches, and disk-shaped thickness variations. Asymptotic predictions agree with numerical simulations.

  5. Spatial mode structures of electrostatic drift waves in a collisional cylindrical helicon plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schröder, C.; Grulke, O.; Klinger, T.;

    2004-01-01

    In a cylindrical helicon plasma, mode structures of coherent drift waves are studied in the poloidal plane, the plane perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field. The mode structures rotate with a constant angular velocity in the direction of the electron diamagnetic drift and show significant...

  6. Effects of Periodic Forcing Amplitude on the Spiral Wave Resonance Drift

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Ning-Jie; LI Bing-Wei; YING He-Ping

    2006-01-01

    @@ We study dynamics of spiral waves under a uniform periodic temporal forcing in an excitable medium. With a specific combination of frequency and amplitude of the external periodic forcing, a resonance drift of a spiral wave occurs along a straight line, and it is accompanied by a complicated ‘flower-like’ motion on each side of this bifurcate boundary line. It is confirmed that the straight-line drift frequency of spiral waves is not locked to the nature rotation frequency as the forcing amplitude expends the range of the spiral wave frequency. These results are further verified numerically for a simplified kinematical model.

  7. Thermal-wave balancing flow sensor with low-drift power feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A control system using a low-drift power-feedback signal was implemented applying thermal waves, giving a sensor output independent of resistance drift and thermo-electric offset voltages on interface wires. Kelvin-contact sensing and power control is used on heater resistors, thereby inhibiting the influence of heater resistance drift. The thermal waves are detected with a sensing resistor using a lock-in amplifier and are mutually cancelled by a thermal-wave balancing controller. Offset due to thermal gradient across the chip and resistor drift are eliminated by the lock-in amplifier and power controller, and therefore do not influence the sensor output signal. A microchannel thermal-wave balancing flow sensor with integrated Al resistors has successfully been fabricated. The thermal flow sensor is capable of measuring water flow rates with nl ⋅ min−1 precision, up to about 500 nl ⋅ min−1 full scale. Measurement results are in good agreement with a dynamic model of the flow sensor. Drift measurements show the sensor output signal to be compensated for resistance drift and thermal gradient across the chip. (paper)

  8. Nonlocal analysis of the excitation of the geodesic acoustic mode by drift waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guzdar, P.N.; Kleva, R.G.; Chakrabarti, N.;

    2009-01-01

    The geodesic acoustic modes (GAMs) are typically observed in the edge region of toroidal plasmas. Drift waves have been identified as a possible cause of excitation of GAMs by a resonant three wave parametric process. A nonlocal theory of excitation of these modes in inhomogeneous plasmas typical...

  9. Filament tension and phase-locked drift of meandering scroll waves

    OpenAIRE

    Dierckx, Hans; Biktasheva, Irina V.; Verschelde, Henri; Panfilov, Alexander V.; Biktashev, Vadim N.

    2016-01-01

    Rotating scroll waves are self-organising patterns which are found in many oscillating or excitable systems. Here we show that quasi-periodic (meandering) scroll waves, which include the rotors that organise cardiac arrhythmias, exhibit filament tension when averaged over the meander cycle. With strong filament curvature or medium thickness gradients, however, scroll wave dynamics are governed by phase-locked drift instead of filament tension. Our results are validated in computational models...

  10. Drift-Alfvén waves in space plasmas – theory and mode identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Krasnoselskikh

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The theory of drift-Alfvén waves with the spatial scales comparable to the ion Larmor radius is developed. The dispersion relation, the wave impedance and variations of the plasma density perturbations versus the wave frequency are investigated. The relevance of theoretical results obtained to the Cluster observations in the cusp and near a reconnection X line in the Earth's magnetopause is discussed.

  11. Eddy, drift wave and zonal flow dynamics in a linear magnetized plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, H.; Inagaki, S.; Sasaki, M.; Kosuga, Y.; Kobayashi, T.; Kasuya, N.; Nagashima, Y.; Yamada, T.; Lesur, M.; Fujisawa, A.; Itoh, K.; Itoh, S.-I.

    2016-09-01

    Turbulence and its structure formation are universal in neutral fluids and in plasmas. Turbulence annihilates global structures but can organize flows and eddies. The mutual-interactions between flow and the eddy give basic insights into the understanding of non-equilibrium and nonlinear interaction by turbulence. In fusion plasma, clarifying structure formation by Drift-wave turbulence, driven by density gradients in magnetized plasma, is an important issue. Here, a new mutual-interaction among eddy, drift wave and flow in magnetized plasma is discovered. A two-dimensional solitary eddy, which is a perturbation with circumnavigating motion localized radially and azimuthally, is transiently organized in a drift wave - zonal flow (azimuthally symmetric band-like shear flows) system. The excitation of the eddy is synchronized with zonal perturbation. The organization of the eddy has substantial impact on the acceleration of zonal flow.

  12. Lattice Boltzmann model for collisionless electrostatic drift wave turbulence obeying Charney-Hasegawa-Mima dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Held, M

    2015-01-01

    A lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) approach to the Charney-Hasegawa-Mima (CHM) model for adiabatic drift wave turbulence in magnetised plasmas, is implemented. The CHM-LBM model contains a barotropic equation of state for the potential, a force term including a cross-product analogous to the Coriolis force in quasigeostrophic models, and a density gradient source term. Expansion of the resulting lattice Boltzmann model equations leads to cold-ion fluid continuity and momentum equations, which resemble CHM dynamics under drift ordering. The resulting numerical solutions of standard test cases (monopole propagation, stable drift modes and decaying turbulence) are compared to results obtained by a conventional finite difference scheme that directly discretizes the CHM equation. The LB scheme resembles characteristic CHM dynamics apart from an additional shear in the density gradient direction. The occuring shear reduces with the drift ratio and is ascribed to the compressible limit of the underlying LBM.

  13. Discrete exact and quasi-resonances of Rossby/drift waves on $\\b$-plane with periodic boundary conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Kartashov, A

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of resonance clustering in weakly nonlinear dispersive wave systems, also called discrete wave turbulent systems, is a new methodology successfully used in the last years for characterizing energy transport due to exact and quasi-resonances. Quite recently this methodology has been used in the paper by M. D. Bustamante, U. Hayat "Complete classification of discrete resonant Rossby/drift wave triads on periodic domains", \\cite{BH13}, in order to show that resonance clustering is very sparse and quasi-resonances (that is, resonances with small enough detuning) play major role in the energy transport in this specific wave system. On the other hand, in the paper by M. Yamada, T. Yoneda "Resonant interaction of Rossby waves in two-dimensional flow on $\\beta$-plane", \\cite{YaYo13}, the same physical system is studied and a mathematically rigorous theorem is proven: at high $\\b$, the flow dynamics is governed exclusively by resonant interactions. In our present paper we demonstrate that this seeming contrad...

  14. Models for electrostatic drift waves with density variations along magnetic field lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, O. E.; Pécseli, H. L.

    2013-11-01

    Drift waves with vertical magnetic fields in gravitational ionospheres are considered where the unperturbed plasma density is enhanced in a magnetic flux tube. The gravitational field gives rise to an overall decrease of plasma density for increasing altitude. Simple models predict that drift waves with finite vertical wave vector components can increase in amplitude merely due to a conservation of energy density flux of the waves. Field-aligned currents are some of the mechanisms that can give rise to fluctuations that are truly unstable. We suggest a self-consistent generator or "battery" mechanism that in the polar ionospheres can give rise to magnetic field-aligned currents even in the absence of electron precipitation. The free energy here is supplied by steady state electric fields imposed in the direction perpendicular to the magnetic field in the collisional lower parts of the ionosphere or by neutral winds that have similar effects.

  15. The Entropy and Complexity of Drift waves in a LAPTAG Plasma Physics Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birge-Lee, Henry; Gekelman, Walter; Pribyl, Patrick; Wise, Joe; Katz, Cami; Baker, Bob; Marmie, Ken; Thomas, Sam; Buckley-Bonnano, Samuel

    2015-11-01

    Drift waves grow from noise on a density gradient in a narrow (dia = 3 cm, L = 1.5 m) magnetized (Boz = 160G) plasma column. A two-dimensional probe drive measured fluctuations in the plasma column in a plane transverse to the background magnetic field. Correlation techniques determined that the fluctuations were that of electrostatic drift waves. The time series data was used to generate the Bandt-Pompe/Shannon entropy, H, and Jensen-Shannon complexity, CJS. C-H diagrams can be used to tell the difference between deterministic chaos, random noise and stochastic processes and simple waves, which makes it a powerful tool in nonlinear dynamics. The C-H diagram in this experiment, reveal that the combination of drift waves and other background fluctuations is a deterministically chaotic system. The PDF of the time series, the wave spectra the spatial dependence of the entropy wave complexity will be presented. LAPTAG is a university-high school alliance outreach program, which has been in existence for over 20 years. Work done at BaPSF at UCLA and supported by NSF and DOE.

  16. Drift-Alfven turbulence of a parallel shearing flow of the finite beta plasma with warm ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailenko, V. V.; Mikhailenko, V. S.; Lee, Hae June

    2016-09-01

    It was predicted [Mikhailenko et al., Phys. Plasmas 23, 020701 (2016)] that two distinct drift-Alfven instabilities may be developed in the parallel shearing flow of finite beta plasmas ( 1 ≫β≫me/mi ) with comparable ion and electron temperatures. The first one is the shear-flow-modified drift-Alfven instability, which develops due to the inverse electron Landau damping and exists in the shearless plasma as well. The second one is the shear-flow-driven drift-Alfven instability, which develops due to the combined effect of the velocity shear and ion Landau damping and is absent in the shearless plasma flows. In the present paper, these drift-Alfven instabilities are examined numerically and analytically by including the electromagnetic response of the ions. The levels of the drift-Alfven turbulence, resulted from the development of both instabilities, are determined from the renormalized nonlinear dispersion equation, which accounts for the nonlinear effect of ion scattering by the electromagnetic turbulence. The renormalized quasilinear equation for the ion distribution function, which accounts for the same nonlinear effect of ion scattering, is derived and employed for the analysis of the ion viscosity and ions heating resulting from the interactions of ions with drift-Alfven turbulence.

  17. Electromagnetic backscattering from one-dimensional drifting fractal sea surface I: Wave-current coupled model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Xie; Shang-Zhuo, Zhao; William, Perrie; He, Fang; Wen-Jin, Yu; Yi-Jun, He

    2016-06-01

    To study the electromagnetic backscattering from a one-dimensional drifting fractal sea surface, a fractal sea surface wave-current model is derived, based on the mechanism of wave-current interactions. The numerical results show the effect of the ocean current on the wave. Wave amplitude decreases, wavelength and kurtosis of wave height increase, spectrum intensity decreases and shifts towards lower frequencies when the current occurs parallel to the direction of the ocean wave. By comparison, wave amplitude increases, wavelength and kurtosis of wave height decrease, spectrum intensity increases and shifts towards higher frequencies if the current is in the opposite direction to the direction of ocean wave. The wave-current interaction effect of the ocean current is much stronger than that of the nonlinear wave-wave interaction. The kurtosis of the nonlinear fractal ocean surface is larger than that of linear fractal ocean surface. The effect of the current on skewness of the probability distribution function is negligible. Therefore, the ocean wave spectrum is notably changed by the surface current and the change should be detectable in the electromagnetic backscattering signal. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 41276187), the Global Change Research Program of China (Grant No. 2015CB953901), the Priority Academic Development Program of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions (PAPD), Program for the Innovation Research and Entrepreneurship Team in Jiangsu Province, China, the Canadian Program on Energy Research and Development, and the Canadian World Class Tanker Safety Service.

  18. Wave interactions with EBT plasmas in the magnetic drift frequency range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We calculate the particle and energy transport and heating that results from the resonant, quasilinear interaction of EBT plasma particles with waves in the magnetic drift frequency range. Substantial transport can occur even for relatively small wave field amplitudes. For example, for flute perturbations of relative amplitude deltaB/B, the wave induced diffusion can exceed neoclassical diffusion in the collisionless regime for deltaB/B approx. (nu/ωdel)/sup 1/2/ A-1, where A-1 is the inverse aspect ratio and nu, ωdel are the collision and thermal grad B drift frequencies, respectively. The diffusion is selective and can cause preferential transport of a single sign of charge or energy component. Possible applications include plasma pressure and ambipolar potential profile modification, instability induced transport arising from curvature or drift modes and α-ash removal. In addition, this type of wave-particle interaction may play a role in the observed changes in EBT-S electron ring parameters during ICH experiments

  19. Beta Distribution of Surface Elevation of Random Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张军; 徐德伦

    2001-01-01

    A probability density function (PDF) is derived of beta distribution with both λ3 (skewness) and λ4 (kurtosis) as parameters for weakly nonlinear wave surface elevation by use of a method recently proposed by Srokosz. This PDF not only has a simpler form than the well-known Gram-Charlier Series PDF derived by Longuet-Higgins, but also overcomes an obvious shortcoming of the latter that when the series is unsuitably truncated, the resulting PDF is locally negative. To test the derived beta PDF, laboratorial experiments of wind waves are conducted. The experimental data indicate that the theoretical requirements of the parameters in the beta PDF are fulfilled. The experimental results show that the present PDF is in better agreement with the measured data than the beta PDF only including parameter λ3, and also than the Gram-Charlier Series PDF truncated up to the term of H6.

  20. Convective cell formation and anomalous diffusion due to electromagnetic drift wave turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Convective cell formation and spectral cascade processes due to gravitational drift Alfven waves are studied using a new type of model equation. Conservation relations are derived and explosive instability is found for systems near marginal finite β stability. This instability also remains when the effects of poor as well as favorable curvature regions are included, i.e., for ballooning modes. The anomalous diffusion due to convective cells and quasi-linear effects are compared

  1. An analysis of the role of drift waves in equatorial spread F

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labelle, J.; Kelley, M. C.; Seyler, C. E.

    1986-01-01

    An account is given of results of rocket measurements of the wave number spectrum of equatorial spread F irregularities, with emphasis on wavelengths less than 100 m. The measurements were made from two sounding rockets launched from Peru as part of Project Condor. The Condor density fluctuation spectra display a break at a wavelength near 100 m, identical to that found in the PLUMEX experiment (Kelley et al., 1982). The Condor data also confirm a subrange in which the density and the wave potential obey the Boltzmann relation - a strong indication of the presence of low-frequency electrostatic waves with finite wavelength parallel to the magnetic field, perhaps low-frequency drift waves as proposed by Kelley et al. The Condor data are also consistent with the previous conjecture that drift waves only exist above 300 km altitude. To investigate the difference in spectra observed over two altitude ranges, the data must be fitted to a form for the power spectrum taken from Keskinen and Ossakow (1981). The fitted spectrum, along with empirically determined growth and dissipation rates, is used to calculate the energy pumped into the spectrum at long wavelengths as well as the energy dissipated at shorter wavelengths. It is found that the energy is balanced by classical collisional effects in the low-altitude case, but energy balance in the high-altitude case requires an enhanced dissipation of about 500 times that due to classical diffusion. The model is consistent with, but does not uniquely imply, an inverse cascade of drift wave turbulence in equatorial spread F.

  2. Complete classification of discrete resonant Rossby/drift wave triads on periodic domains

    CERN Document Server

    Bustamante, Miguel D

    2013-01-01

    We consider the set of Diophantine equations that arise in the context of the barotropic vorticity equation on periodic domains, when nonlinear wave interactions are studied to leading order in the amplitudes. The solutions to this set of Diophantine equations are of interest in atmosphere (Rossby waves) and Tokamak plasmas (drift waves), because they provide the values of the spectral wavevectors that interact resonantly via three-wave interactions. These come in "triads", i.e., groups of three wavevectors. We provide the full solution to the Diophantine equations in the case of infinite Rossby deformation radius. The method is completely new, and relies on mapping the unknown variables to rational points on quadratic forms of "Minkowski" type. Classical methods invented centuries ago by Fermat, Euler, Lagrange and Minkowski, are used to classify all solutions to our original Diophantine equations, thus providing a computational method to generate numerically all the resonant triads in the system. Our method...

  3. Drift wave excitation in the THETA-pinch high pressure plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Excitation of low-frequency (LF) drift waves has been experimentally investigated in a high-pressure plasma in a gas discharge of the direct THETA-pinch type. The electrodeless inductive gas discharge is produced in an alundum tube of 150 cm length and 6.5 cm internal diameter filled with hydrogen at the pressure of (1-20).10-3 mm Hg. The discharge magnetic field (MF) has been investigated by a system of five magnetic probes both oriented along the radius and the length of the discharge chamber. The longitudinal temperature of electrons reaches 4 keV at the 6 kV voltage on the coil. Successive development of two types of instability has been observed: HF ''starting'' and LF ones. The LF oscillations observed have been identified as drift waves in a system with large β. The amplitude of the MF oscillations for the given instability may be compared with the value of the main MF, and the transverse wave lengths for these oscillations are of the order of the plasma filament radius. The longitudinal wave lengths are comparable with the magnetic system length

  4. Wave Grouping of a Drifting Spiral Wave in the Presence of an External Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Hu-Jiang; YANG Jun-Zhong; HU Gang

    2007-01-01

    The phenomenon of wave grouping, in which the dense waves and the sparse waves can form groups in front of the spiral tip when the spiral wave is meandering, has been reported in a chemical reaction system recently. We present a method to realize the phenomenon of wave grouping by applying an external field to the system. The numerical simulations are carried out on the basis of the FitzHugh-Nagumo equations.

  5. Effects of water depth and spectral bandwidth on Stokes drift estimation based on short-term variation of wave conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myrhaug, Dag; Wang, Hong; Holmedal, Lars Erik

    2016-04-01

    The Stokes drift represents an important transport component of ocean circulation models. Locally it is responsible for transport of e.g. contaminated ballast water from ships, oil spills, plankton and larvae. It also plays an important role in mixing processes across the interphase between the atmosphere and the ocean. The Stokes drift is the mean Lagrangian velocity obtained from the water particle trajectory in the wave propagation direction; it is maximum at the surface, decreasing rapidly with the depth below the surface. The total mean mass transport is obtained by integrating the Stokes drift over the water depth; this is also referred to as the volume Stokes transport. The paper provides a simple analytical method which can be used to give estimates of the Stokes drift in moderate intermediate water depth based on short-term variation of wave conditions. This is achieved by using a joint distribution of individual wave heights and wave periods together with an explicit solution of the wave dispersion equation. The mean values of the surface Stokes drift and the volume Stokes transport for individual random waves within a sea state are presented, and the effects of water depth and spectral bandwidth parameter are discussed. Furthermore, example of results corresponding to typical field conditions are presented to demonstrate the application of the method, including the Stokes drift profile in the water column beneath the surface. Thus, the present analytical method can be used to estimate the Stokes drift in moderate intermediate water depth for random waves within a sea state based on available wave statistics.

  6. Global Theories of Geodesic Acoustic Modes: Excitation by Energetic Particles and Drift Wave Turbulences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Excitation of Geodesic Acoustic Modes (GAMs) by both energetic particles (EPs) and drift wave (DW) turbulences taking into account plasma nonuniformities are investigated in this work. The global radial mode structures of EP induced GAM (EGAM) are systematically studied and their properties are found to depend on the nonuniformities of both the GAM continuous spectrum and EP radial profile. For a radially broad EP drive, the eigenmode equation valid for arbitrary EP drift orbit width is derived, and then solved using a Fourier transformation technique. The excited EGAM is shown to strongly couple to the GAM continuous spectrum; resulting in a finite drive threshold in EP density. The cross-scale couplings between micro-, meso- and macro-scales, discussed in this work, are mediated by the EP dynamics and have many interesting similarities with complex behaviors, expected in burning plasmas of fusion interest. The excitation of GAM by DW turbulence accounting for various kinetic dispersiveness and nonuniformities is also investigated, with the paradigm of three-wave resonant parametric decay instability. Considering the scale length of linear DW eigenmode envelope is much smaller than that of particle diamagnetic drift frequency L*, in the linear growth phase, the parametric instability is convective for typical tokamak parameters, when the finite group velocities of GAM and DW sideband are taken into account. This is a case of less practical interest. However, if we look at longer time scales, and finite L* effects are taken into account, the convectively amplified GAM-DW wave-packet pair is reflected at the DW linear turning points, resulting in a quasi-exponentially growing absolute instability. DW turbulence spreading with the excitation of GAM is also investigated, with emphasis on quantitative understanding of the dispersiveness associated with kinetic GAM. (author)

  7. Dispersion relation of drift-wave instability in a collisionless plasma with sheared magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detailed measurements are performed on drift-wave instability in a collisionless plasma column under a sheared magnetic field. The instability is found to be destabilized by the small magnetic shear and has a maximum amplitude at the shear length, where the electron thermal speed is nearly equal to the axial phase velocity (controlled by the shear) of the instability. The dispersion relation of the instability agrees with the local theory, which yields almost the same results as the non-local theory taking into account the measured radial density profile of a slender plasma column. (author)

  8. Scattering of lower-hybrid waves by drift-wave density fluctuations: solutions of the radiative transfer equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The investigation of the scattering of lower-hybrid waves by density fluctuations arising from drift waves in tokamaks is distinguished by the presence in the wave equation of a large, random, derivative-coupling term. The propagation of the lower-hybrid waves is well represented by a radiative transfer equation when the scale size of the density fluctuations is small compared to the overall plasma size. The radiative transfer equation is solved in two limits: first, the forward scattering limit, where the scale size of density fluctuations is large compared to the lower-hybrid perpendicular wavelength, and second, the large-angle scattering limit, where this inequality is reversed. The most important features of these solutions are well represented by analytical formulas derived by simple arguments. Based on conventional estimates for density fluctuations arising from drift waves and a parabolic density profile, the optical depth tau for scattering through a significant angle, is given by tauroughly-equal(2/N2/sub parallel/) (#betta#/sub p/i0/#betta#)2 (m/sub e/c2/2T/sub i/)/sup 1/2/ [c/α(Ω/sub i/Ω/sub e/)/sup 1/2/ ], where #betta#/sub p/i0 is the central ion plasma frequency and T/sub i/ denotes the ion temperature near the edge of the plasma. Most of the scattering occurs near the surface. The transmission through the scattering region scales as tau-1 and the emerging intensity has an angular spectrum proportional to cos theta, where sin theta = k/sub perpendicular/xB/sub p//(k/sub perpendicular/B/sub p/), and B/sub p/ is the poloidal field

  9. Drift wave spectra and enhanced transport in plasmas with magnetic shear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the potentialities of nonlinear scattering of waves off ions as a stabilizing mechanism of drift turbulence in plasmas with magnetic shear. The failure of the random phase averaging procedure and the local character of the interaction in frequency space are the starting point of a reformulation of weak turbulence theory. In particular, the usual integral equation is transformed into a system of two first order differential equations coupling the spectra I(ksub(theta)) and I(ksub(theta)-1). The density fluctuation spectrum, which is obtained analytically, has some desirable features in reference to experiment. Firstly, |eta tilde|ksub(theta)2 behaves asymptotically (ksub(theta) → infinity) as ksub(theta)-4; secondly, the high mode numbers (ksub(theta)asub(s) >1) contribute about 80% to the cross field diffusion while the low mode numbers (ksub(theta)asub(s) <1) provide about 80% of the squared density fluctuation. In discussing the transport properties we emphasize the possible role of anomalous heat transfer from electrons to ions. The spectrum of convective cells formed in the interaction of drift waves is obtained; their contribution to the diffusion is found to be negligible, at least in the plasma core. (author)

  10. Simulating the coupled evolution of drift-wave turbulence and the tearing mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, S. D.; Brennan, D. P.; Izacard, O.; Holland, C.

    2015-11-01

    Numerical simulations of turbulence and MHD instabilities such as the tearing mode can be computationally expensive and only recently have simulations begun to address their coupled, self-consistent interactions. The disparate scales involved in simulating the coupled evolution of small-scale turbulence and the larger-scale tearing mode make this a challenging numerical problem. Using the newly developed code, TURBO, we have performed nonlinear simulations of Hasegawa-Wakatani drift-wave turbulence coupled to Ohm's law. An equilibrium with prescribed stability properties and turbulent drives is used to examine the impact of drift-wave turbulence on the stability of the tearing mode and the energy transport between them in the context of a turbulent resistivity and turbulent viscosity. We find that the spatial structure of the density flux and these transport coefficients are asymmetric in the poloidal direction and peaked away from the X-point in the presence of an island in a poloidal flow. Similar effects are seen in simulations of ITG turbulence in the presence of a magnetic island and we discuss the connections to our work. Supported by US DOE Grant DE-SC0007851.

  11. Plasma-Maser Instability of the Electromagnetic Radiation In The Presence Of Electrostatic Drift Wave Turbulence in Inhomogeneous Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahinder Singh

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The generation mechanism of the electromagnetic radiation in case of inhomogeneous plasma on the basis of plasma-maser interaction in presence of drift wave turbulence is studied. The drift wave turbulence is taken as the low-frequency mode field and is found to be strongly in phase relation with thermal particles and may transfer its wave energy nonlinearly through a modulated field of high-frequency extraordinary mode (X-mode wave. It has been found that amplification of X-mode wave is possible at the expense of drift wave turbulent energy. This type of high-frequency instability can leads to auroral kilometric radiation (AKR. The growth rate of the X-mode wave, in the form of AKR, has been calculated with the involvement of spatial density gradient parameter. This result may be particularly important for stability of various drift modes in magnetically confined plasma as well as for transport of momentum and energy in such inhomogeneous plasma

  12. Discrete exact and quasi-resonances of Rossby/drift waves on $\\b$-plane with periodic boundary conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Kartashov, A.; E. Kartashova

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of resonance clustering in weakly nonlinear dispersive wave systems, also called discrete wave turbulent systems, is a new methodology successfully used in the last years for characterizing energy transport due to exact and quasi-resonances. Quite recently this methodology has been used in the paper by M. D. Bustamante, U. Hayat "Complete classification of discrete resonant Rossby/drift wave triads on periodic domains", \\cite{BH13}, in order to show that resonance clustering is very ...

  13. Kinetic water-bag model of global collisional drift waves and ion temperature gradient instabilities in cylindrical geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collisional drift waves and ion temperature gradient (ITG) instabilities are studied using a linear water-bag kinetic model [P. Morel et al., Phys. Plasmas 14, 112109 (2007)]. An efficient spectral method, already validated in the case of drift waves instabilities [E. Gravier et al., Eur. Phys. J. D 67, 7 (2013)], allows a fast solving of the global linear problem in cylindrical geometry. The comparison between the linear ITG instability properties thus computed and the ones given by the COLUMBIA experiment [R. G. Greaves et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 34, 1253 (1992)] shows a qualitative agreement. Moreover, the transition between collisional drift waves and ITG instabilities is studied theoretically as a function of the ion temperature profile.

  14. Seismic architecture and morphology of Neogenic sediment waves and drifts, offshore West Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baglioni, Luca; Bonamini, Enrico

    2013-04-01

    The three dimension visualisation softwares of seismic data and the recent development of semi-automatic interpretation tools allow to define the 3D morphology of ancient depositional systems at a resolution never achieved before. This study analyses a Neogenic stratigraphic interval in the deep water of the West African margin. The purpose of the work is the understanding of the sedimentary architectures and the link with the genetic depositional processes. The study is mainly based on the interpretation of seismic geometries and amplitude/isochron maps derived from newly-interpreted seismic horizons. The seismic stratigraphy reveals abrupt changes in depositional styles and sedimentary processes. Transitions between Sediment Drifts (SD), Sediment Waves (SWs) and Mass Transport Complexes (MTCs) are here frequently observed, suggesting that cyclically either bottom-current intensity decreased or gravity-flow input overwhelmed the bottom-current signal. The lower studied interval corresponds to a SD sequence, made up of stacked individual packages and having a maximum thickness of 300 ms. The landward drift morphology is characterized by convex-upward, mounded seismic reflections. Each drift onlaps on a seaward-dipping reflection interpreted as paleo-slope. These contouritic deposits are concentrated near the base of slope, and fade out downdip. The drift appears to be grown from the deeper part of the basin and backstepped up the slope. It is inferred that the deposition of the drifts took place under the influence of a marine current, subparallel to the southern margin of West African coast. The backstepping of the onlapping architecture may have resulted from bottom current acceleration across the ramp. The intermediate studied interval represents a transitional sequence in which SW are alternated with MTDs of minor size (up to 60 ms thick). In this transition interval, onlap relationships and thickness variations suggest that gravity flow deposits preferentially

  15. Influence of Ion Nonlinear Polarization Drift and Warm Ions on Solitary Kinetic Alfven Wave

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUANSu-Ping; LIZhong-Yuan

    2003-01-01

    Considering the effects of ion nonlinear polarization drift and warm ions, we adopt two-fluid model to investigate the character of low-frequency Solitary Kinetic Alfven Wave (SKAW hereafter) in a magnetic plasma. The results derived in this paper indicate that dip SKAW and hump SKAW both exist in a wide range in magnetosphere (for the pressure parameter β-10-5 -0.01, where β is the ratio of thermal pressure to magnetic pressure, i.e.β=2μonT/B02 ). These two kinds of SKAWs propagate at either Super-Alfvenic velocity or Sub-Alfvenic velocity. In the inertial region β>β>>me/mi. These results are different from previous ones. That indicates that the effects of ion nonlinear polarization drift and warm ions are important and they cannot be neglected. The SKAW has an electric field parallel to the ambient magnetic field, which makes the SKAW take an important role in the acceleration and energization of field-aligned charged particles in magnetic plasmas. And the SKAW is also important for the heating of a local plasma.So it makes a novel physical mechanism of energy transmission possible.

  16. Small scale coherent vortex generation in drift wave-zonal flow turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a paradigm for the generation of small scale coherent vortex (SSCV) in drift wave-zonal flow (DW-ZF) turbulence. We demonstrate that phases of DWs can couple coherently, mediated by the ZF shearing. A SSCV is formed when the phases of the DWs are “attracted” to form a stable “phase cluster.” We show that the ZF shearing induces asymmetry between “attractive” and “repulsive” phase couplings, so that a net attractive phase coupling results. The turbulent DWs will (partially)synchronize into a stable SSCV at locations, where the attractive phase coupling induced by the ZF shearing exceeds the “detuning” effects by the DW dispersion and random phase scattering. We also discuss the “self-binding” effect of the newly formed SSCV

  17. Precursor wave structure, prereversal vertical drift, and their relative roles in the development of post sunset equatorial spread-F

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdu, Mangalathayil; Sobral, José; alam Kherani, Esfhan; Batista, Inez S.; Souza, Jonas

    2016-07-01

    The characteristics of large-scale wave structure in the equatorial bottomside F region that are present during daytime as precursor to post sunset development of the spread F/plasma bubble irregularities are investigated in this paper. Digisonde data from three equatorial sites in Brazil (Fortaleza, Sao Luis and Cachimbo) for a period of few months at low to medium/high solar activity phases are analyzed. Small amplitude oscillations in the F layer true heights, representing wave structure in polarization electric field, are identified as upward propagating gravity waves having zonal scale of a few hundred kilometers. Their amplitudes undergo amplification towards sunset, and depending on the amplitude of the prereversal vertical drift (PRE) they may lead to post sunset generation of ESF/plasma bubble irregularities. On days of their larger amplitudes they appear to occur in phase coherence on all days, and correspondingly the PRE vertical drift velocities are larger than on days of the smaller amplitudes of the wave structure that appear at random phase on the different days. The sustenance of these precursor waves structures is supported by the relatively large ratio (approaching unity) of the F region-to- total field line integrated Pedersen conductivities as calculated using the SUPIM simulation of the low latitude ionosphere. This study examines the role of the wave structure relative to that of the prereversal vertical drift in the post sunset spread F irregularity development.

  18. Rossby and drift wave turbulence and zonal flows: The Charney-Hasegawa-Mima model and its extensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connaughton, Colm; Nazarenko, Sergey; Quinn, Brenda

    2015-12-01

    A detailed study of the Charney-Hasegawa-Mima model and its extensions is presented. These simple nonlinear partial differential equations suggested for both Rossby waves in the atmosphere and drift waves in a magnetically-confined plasma, exhibit some remarkable and nontrivial properties, which in their qualitative form, survive in more realistic and complicated models. As such, they form a conceptual basis for understanding the turbulence and zonal flow dynamics in real plasma and geophysical systems. Two idealised scenarios of generation of zonal flows by small-scale turbulence are explored: a modulational instability and turbulent cascades. A detailed study of the generation of zonal flows by the modulational instability reveals that the dynamics of this zonal flow generation mechanism differ widely depending on the initial degree of nonlinearity. The jets in the strongly nonlinear case further roll up into vortex streets and saturate, while for the weaker nonlinearities, the growth of the unstable mode reverses and the system oscillates between a dominant jet, which is slightly inclined to the zonal direction, and a dominant primary wave. A numerical proof is provided for the extra invariant in Rossby and drift wave turbulence-zonostrophy. While the theoretical derivations of this invariant stem from the wave kinetic equation which assumes weak wave amplitudes, it is shown to be relatively well-conserved for higher nonlinearities also. Together with the energy and enstrophy, these three invariants cascade into anisotropic sectors in the k-space as predicted by the Fjørtoft argument. The cascades are characterised by the zonostrophy pushing the energy to the zonal scales. A small scale instability forcing applied to the model has demonstrated the well-known drift wave-zonal flow feedback loop. The drift wave turbulence is generated from this primary instability. The zonal flows are then excited by either one of the generation mechanisms, extracting energy from

  19. Rossby and Drift Wave Turbulence and Zonal Flows: the Charney-Hasegawa-Mima model and its extensions

    CERN Document Server

    Connaughton, Colm; Quinn, Brenda

    2014-01-01

    A detailed study of the Charney-Hasegawa-Mima model and its extensions is presented. These simple nonlinear partial differential equations suggested for both Rossby waves in the atmosphere and also drift waves in a magnetically-confined plasma exhibit some remarkable and nontrivial properties, which in their qualitative form survive in more realistic and complicated models, and as such form a conceptual basis for understanding the turbulence and zonal flow dynamics in real plasma and geophysical systems. Two idealised scenarios of generation of zonal flows by small-scale turbulence are explored: a modulational instability and turbulent cascades. A detailed study of the generation of zonal flows by the modulational instability reveals that the dynamics of this zonal flow generation mechanism differ widely depending on the initial degree of nonlinearity. A numerical proof is provided for the extra invariant in Rossby and drift wave turbulence -zonostrophy and the invariant cascades are shown to be characterised...

  20. Early stages of wind wave and drift current generation under non-stationary wind conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles-Diaz, Lucia; Ocampo-Torres, Francisco J.; Branger, Hubert

    2016-04-01

    Generation and amplification mechanisms of ocean waves are well understood under constant wind speed or limited fetch conditions. Under these situations, the momentum and energy transfers from air to water are also quite well known. However during the wind field evolution over the ocean, we may observe sometime high wind acceleration/deceleration situations (e.g. Mexican Tehuano or Mediterranean Mistral wind systems). The evolution of wave systems under these conditions is not well understood. The purpose of these laboratory experiments is to better understand the early stages of water-waves and surface-drift currents under non-stationary wind conditions and to determine the balance between transfers creating waves and surface currents during non-equilibrium situations. The experiments were conducted in the Institut Pythéas wind-wave facility in Marseille-France. The wave tank is 40 m long, 2.7 m wide and 1 m deep. The air section is 50 m long, 3 m wide and 1.8 m height. We used 11 different resistive wave-gauges located along the tank. The momentum fluxes in the air column were estimated from single and X hot-film anemometer measurements. The sampling frequency for wind velocity and surface displacement measurements was 256 Hz. Water-current measurements were performed with a profiling velocimeter. This device measures the first 3.5 cm of the water column with a frequency rate of 100Hz. During the experiments, the wind intensity was abruptly modified with a constant acceleration and deceleration over time. We observed that wind drag coefficient values for accelerated wind periods are lower than the ones reported in previous studies for constant wind speed (Large and Pond 1981; Ocampo-Torres et al. 2010; Smith 1980; Yelland and Taylor 1996). This is probably because the turbulent boundary layer is not completely developed during the increasing-wind sequence. As it was reported in some theoretical studies (Miles 1957; Phillips 1957; Kahma and Donelan 1988), we

  1. Experimental investigations of structure and dynamics of drift-wave turbulence in stellarator geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For more than 60 years, fusion scientists try to confine a plasma by means of external magnetic fields in order to achieve appropriately high densities and temperatures for the ignition of nuclear fusion. Despite of great progress in the design of confinement concepts, which are considered for the confinement of burning plasmas in the near future, theoretical plasma physics promises further confinement improvements using novel magnetic field geometries. Therefor, the key is the minimization of turbulent transport by choosing appropiate magnetic field geometries, which necessitates a fundamental understanding of the influence of magnetic field geometry on plasma turbulence. There are several theoretical works on turbulent plasma dynamics in three-dimensional geometries, but only a few experimental studies for validation of the theoretical results exist. Hence, the present work aims at providing experimental data for comparison with theory and to gain insights into the interplay between drift-wave turbulence and magnetic field geometry. By means of two multi-probe arrays, local density and potential fluctuations are measured in low-temperature plasmas at 128 positions on a single flux surface of the stellarator TJ-K with high temporal resolution. Using methods of statistical timeseries analysis structure sizes and dynamic properties of the drift-wave turbulence in TJ-K are determined. Thereby, it is shown that the size of turbulent structures perpendicular to the magnetic field is reduced in regions of high absolute local magnetic shear. In addition, a poloidal displacement with respect to the magnetic field lines and a complex propagation pattern of parallelly extended turbulent structures is found. Also, poloidal profiles of turbulent transport are calculated from the probe data. The maximum transport is found to be poloidally localized in a region of negative normal curvature (unfavourable curvature). In addition, the results point to an influence of geodesic

  2. Modification of low-frequency drift oscillation spectra in the field of HF pumping wave near the lower hybrid resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of a high-frequency pumping wave on ionic-sound drift oscillations, whose frequency exceeds the ionic cyclotron one, is experimentally studied. A cylinder pinch was produced in a homogeneous magnetic field by a beam of low-energy electrons. The strength of a stationary magnetic field oriented along the plasma cylinder axis amounted to 400-600 Oe. The concentration of plasma was approximately 1010 cm3, the temperature of electrons approximately 6 eV, the pressure of a neutral gas (argon) was approximately 2-3x10-4 Tor. Low-frequency drift oscillations were recorded by single probes operating in a regime of saturation ionic current, and also by a photomultiplier tube according to integral luminous radiation of plasma. It is shown that threshold-less modificatjon of frequency spectrum of ionic-sound drift oscillations takes place with increasing high-frequency pumping field, and that they are incompletely suppressed from the side of hjgher frequencies. Displacement of peaks in the spectra of drift oscillations to the side of high values of frequency was observed at the values of a high-frequency pumping field Esub(0) <= 3 V/cm. It is shown that the less is the frequency of a pumping wave the sharper is the decrease in the drift oscillation intensity with increasing Esub(0). A comparison of experimental and theoretical data shows that the HF-field component normal to the magnetic fjeld may produce an essential influence upon the dynamics of drift-dissipative instability

  3. Complete classification of discrete resonant Rossby/drift wave triads on periodic domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante, Miguel D.; Hayat, Umar

    2013-09-01

    We consider the set of Diophantine equations that arise in the context of the partial differential equation called "barotropic vorticity equation" on periodic domains, when nonlinear wave interactions are studied to leading order in the amplitudes. The solutions to this set of Diophantine equations are of interest in atmosphere (Rossby waves) and Tokamak plasmas (drift waves), because they provide the values of the spectral wavevectors that interact resonantly via three-wave interactions. These wavenumbers come in "triads", i.e., groups of three wavevectors. We provide the full solution to the Diophantine equations in the physically sensible limit when the Rossby deformation radius is infinite. The method is completely new, and relies on mapping the unknown variables via rational transformations, first to rational points on elliptic curves and surfaces, and from there to rational points on quadratic forms of "Minkowski" type (such as the familiar space-time in special relativity). Classical methods invented centuries ago by Fermat, Euler, Lagrange, Minkowski, are used to classify all solutions to our original Diophantine equations, thus providing a computational method to generate numerically all the resonant triads in the system. Computationally speaking, our method has a clear advantage over brute-force numerical search: on a 10,0002 grid, the brute-force search would take 15 years using optimised C codes on a cluster, whereas our method takes about 40 min using a laptop. Moreover, the method is extended to generate so-called quasi-resonant triads, which are defined by relaxing the resonant condition on the frequencies, allowing for a small mismatch. Quasi-resonant triads' distribution in wavevector space is robust with respect to physical perturbations, unlike resonant triads' distribution. Therefore, the extended method is really valuable in practical terms. We show that the set of quasi-resonant triads form an intricate network of connected triads, forming

  4. Observational evidence for Hall drift and Hall waves in the crusts of isolated young neutron stars

    CERN Document Server

    Xie, Yi

    2013-01-01

    The observed long-term spin-down evolution of isolated radio pulsars cannot be explained by the standard magnetic dipole radiation with a constant braking torque. However how and why the torque varies still remains controversial, which is an outstanding problem in our understanding of neutron stars. Many pulsars have been observed with significant long-term changes of their spin-down rates modulated by quasi-periodic oscillations. Applying the phenomenological model of pulsar timing noise we developed recently to the observed precise pulsar timing data, here we show that, the Hall drift and Hall waves in their crusts are responsible for the observed long-term evolution of the spin-down rates and their quasi-periodic modulations, respectively. Consequently the majority of dipolar magnetic field lines are restricted to their outer crusts, rather than penetrating the cores of the neutron stars. Understanding of the nature of pulsar timing noise not only reveals the interior physics of neutron stars, but also all...

  5. Simulation of drift wave turbulence: Trapped structures and a new nonadiabatic electron model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of trapped structures in decaying and saturated drift wave turbulence is studied via computer simulation. A two-dimensional electrostatic fluid model is used. The turbulence which evolves in the pure decay runs (no nonadiabatic electrons) is characterized by tightly bound monopole vortices and a very narrow frequency spectrum. These results are qualitatively similar to results found in two dimensional Navier-Stokes simulations. For the studies of saturated turbulence, rather than simply introducing the linear growth rate, a new nonadiabatic electron model is used. This model takes into account the effects of broadening and shifting of the frequency spectrum which results from the strongly nonlinear character of the problem--effects which are found to be very important in the turbulent states which are studied. These states are characterized by broadened frequency spectra, with strong damping on the nonadiabatic electrons at high-k and along the kx-axis. Trapped structures are observed in many of the saturated simulations, even in the presence of moderately broad frequency spectra. The extent of the trapping varied dramatically, becoming a much stronger effect as the RMS electric field increased. 71 refs., 39 figs., 11 tabs

  6. Effects of drift gas on collision cross sections of a protein standard in linear drift tube and traveling wave ion mobility mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurneczko, Ewa; Kalapothakis, Jason; Campuzano, Iain D G; Morris, Michael; Barran, Perdita E

    2012-10-16

    There has been a significant increase in the use of ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) to investigate conformations of proteins and protein complexes following electrospray ionization. Investigations which employ traveling wave ion mobility mass spectrometry (TW IM-MS) instrumentation rely on the use of calibrants to convert the arrival times of ions to collision cross sections (CCS) providing "hard numbers" of use to structural biology. It is common to use nitrogen as the buffer gas in TW IM-MS instruments and to calibrate by extrapolating from CCS measured in helium via drift tube (DT) IM-MS. In this work, both DT and TW IM-MS instruments are used to investigate the effects of different drift gases (helium, neon, nitrogen, and argon) on the transport of multiply charged ions of the protein myoglobin, frequently used as a standard in TW IM-MS studies. Irrespective of the drift gas used, recorded mass spectra are found to be highly similar. In contrast, the recorded arrival time distributions and the derived CCS differ greatly. At low charge states (7 ≤ z ≤ 11) where the protein is compact, the CCS scale with the polarizability of the gas; this is also the case for higher charge states (12 ≤ z ≤ 22) where the protein is more unfolded for the heavy gases (neon, argon, and nitrogen) but not the case for helium. This is here interpreted as a different conformational landscape being sampled by the lighter gas and potentially attributable to increased field heating by helium. Under nanoelectrospray ionization (nESI) conditions, where myoglobin is sprayed from an aqueous solution buffered to pH 6.8 with 20 mM ammonium acetate, in the DT IM-MS instrument, each buffer gas can yield a different arrival time distribution (ATD) for any given charge state.

  7. Effects of drift gas on collision cross sections of a protein standard in linear drift tube and traveling wave ion mobility mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurneczko, Ewa; Kalapothakis, Jason; Campuzano, Iain D G; Morris, Michael; Barran, Perdita E

    2012-10-16

    There has been a significant increase in the use of ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) to investigate conformations of proteins and protein complexes following electrospray ionization. Investigations which employ traveling wave ion mobility mass spectrometry (TW IM-MS) instrumentation rely on the use of calibrants to convert the arrival times of ions to collision cross sections (CCS) providing "hard numbers" of use to structural biology. It is common to use nitrogen as the buffer gas in TW IM-MS instruments and to calibrate by extrapolating from CCS measured in helium via drift tube (DT) IM-MS. In this work, both DT and TW IM-MS instruments are used to investigate the effects of different drift gases (helium, neon, nitrogen, and argon) on the transport of multiply charged ions of the protein myoglobin, frequently used as a standard in TW IM-MS studies. Irrespective of the drift gas used, recorded mass spectra are found to be highly similar. In contrast, the recorded arrival time distributions and the derived CCS differ greatly. At low charge states (7 ≤ z ≤ 11) where the protein is compact, the CCS scale with the polarizability of the gas; this is also the case for higher charge states (12 ≤ z ≤ 22) where the protein is more unfolded for the heavy gases (neon, argon, and nitrogen) but not the case for helium. This is here interpreted as a different conformational landscape being sampled by the lighter gas and potentially attributable to increased field heating by helium. Under nanoelectrospray ionization (nESI) conditions, where myoglobin is sprayed from an aqueous solution buffered to pH 6.8 with 20 mM ammonium acetate, in the DT IM-MS instrument, each buffer gas can yield a different arrival time distribution (ATD) for any given charge state. PMID:22974196

  8. Spatial structure and dispersion of drift mirror waves coupled with Alfvén waves in a 1-D inhomogeneous plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Yu. Klimushkin

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper employs the frame of a 1-D inhomogeneous model of space plasma,to examine the spatial structure and growth rate of drift mirror modes, often suggested for interpreting some oscillation types in space plasma. Owing to its coupling with the Alfvén mode, the drift mirror mode attains dispersion across magnetic shells (dependence of the frequency on the wave-vector's radial component, kr. The spatial structure of a mode confined across magnetic shells is studied. The scale of spatial localization of the wave is shown to be determined by the plasma inhomogeneity scale and by the azimuthal component of the wave vector. The wave propagates across magnetic shells, its amplitude modulated along the radial coordinate by the Gauss function. Coupling with the Alfvén mode strongly influences the growth rate of the drift mirror instability. The mirror mode can only exist in a narrow range of parameters. In the general case, the mode represents an Alfvén wave modified by plasma inhomogeneity.

  9. Resolving Structural Isomers of Monosaccharide Methyl Glycosides Using Drift Tube and Traveling Wave Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Hongli; Giles, Kevin; Bendiak, Brad; Kaplan, Kimberly; Siems, William F.; Hill, Herbert H.

    2012-01-01

    Monosaccharide structural isomers including sixteen methyl-D-glycopyranosides and four methyl-N-acetylhexosamines were subjected to ion mobility measurements by electrospray ion mobility mass spectrometry. Two ion mobility-MS systems were employed: atmospheric pressure drift tube ion mobility time-of-flight mass spectrometry and a Synapt G2 HDMS system which incorporates a low pressure traveling wave ion mobility separator. All the compounds were investigated as [M+Na]+ ions in the positive m...

  10. A statistical study of gyro-averaging effects in a reduced model of drift-wave transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Fonseca, J. D.; del-Castillo-Negrete, D.; Sokolov, I. M.; Caldas, I. L.

    2016-08-01

    A statistical study of finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects on transport driven by electrostatic drift-waves is presented. The study is based on a reduced discrete Hamiltonian dynamical system known as the gyro-averaged standard map (GSM). In this system, FLR effects are incorporated through the gyro-averaging of a simplified weak-turbulence model of electrostatic fluctuations. Formally, the GSM is a modified version of the standard map in which the perturbation amplitude, K0, becomes K0J0(ρ ̂ ) , where J0 is the zeroth-order Bessel function and ρ ̂ is the Larmor radius. Assuming a Maxwellian probability density function (pdf) for ρ ̂ , we compute analytically and numerically the pdf and the cumulative distribution function of the effective drift-wave perturbation amplitude K0J0(ρ ̂ ) . Using these results, we compute the probability of loss of confinement (i.e., global chaos), Pc, and the probability of trapping in the main drift-wave resonance, Pt. It is shown that Pc provides an upper bound for the escape rate, and that Pt provides a good estimate of the particle trapping rate. The analytical results are compared with direct numerical Monte-Carlo simulations of particle transport.

  11. A statistical study of gyro-averaging effects in a reduced model of drift-wave transport

    CERN Document Server

    da Fonseca, J D; Sokolov, M; Caldas, I L

    2016-01-01

    A statistical study of finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects on transport driven by electrostatic drift-waves is presented. The study is based on a reduced discrete Hamiltonian dynamical system known as the gyro-averaged standard map (GSM). In this system, FLR effects are incorporated through the gyro-averaging of a simplified weak-turbulence model of electrostatic fluctuations. Formally, the GSM is a modified version of the standard map in which the perturbation amplitude, $K_0$, becomes $K_0 J_0(\\hat{\\rho})$, where $J_0$ is the zeroth-order Bessel function and $\\hat{\\rho}$ is the Larmor radius. Assuming a Maxwellian probability density function (pdf) for $\\hat{\\rho}$, we compute analytically and numerically the pdf and the cumulative distribution function of the effective drift-wave perturbation amplitude $K_0 J_0(\\hat{\\rho})$. Using these results we compute the probability of loss of confinement (i.e., global chaos), $P_{c}$, and the probability of trapping in the main drift-wave resonance, $P_{t}$. It is sho...

  12. A note on the drift waves in the presence of electrons added by meteors by ablation phenomena or by thermionic emissions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V H Kulkarni; Shobha Kadam

    2012-07-01

    The role of added electrons on the drift dissipative instability in a nonuniform collisional plasma is analysed. We observe the presence of a drift wave that depends entirely on the added electrons through the collision frequency coupling and there is an additional damping. The present study is applied to the density irregularities caused by meteor ionization in the ionosphere.

  13. Simulating the effects of stellarator geometry on gyrokinetic drift-wave turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgaertel, Jessica Ann

    Nuclear fusion is a clean, safe form of energy with abundant fuel. In magnetic fusion energy (MFE) experiments, the plasma fuel is confined by magnetic fields at very high temperatures and densities. One fusion reactor design is the non-axisymmetric, torus-shaped stellarator. Its fully-3D fields have advantages over the simpler, better-understood axisymmetric tokamak, including the ability to optimize magnetic configurations for desired properties, such as lower transport (longer confinement time). Turbulence in the plasma can break MFE confinement. While turbulent transport is known to cause a significant amount of heat loss in tokamaks, it is a new area of research in stellarators. Gyrokinetics is a good mathematical model of the drift-wave instabilities that cause turbulence. Multiple gyrokinetic turbulence codes that had great success comparing to tokamak experiments are being converted for use with stellarator geometry. This thesis describes such adaptations of the gyrokinetic turbulence code, GS2. Herein a new computational grid generator and upgrades to GS2 itself are described, tested, and benchmarked against three other gyrokinetic codes. Using GS2, detailed linear studies using the National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) geometry were conducted. The first compares stability in two equilibria with different β=(plasma pressure)/(magnetic pressure). Overall, the higher β case was more stable than the lower β case. As high β is important for MFE experiments, this is encouraging. The second compares NCSX linear stability to a tokamak case. NCSX was more stable with a 20% higher critical temperature gradient normalized by the minor radius, suggesting that the fusion power might be enhanced by ˜ 50%. In addition, the first nonlinear, non-axisymmetric GS2 simulations are presented. Finally, linear stability of two locations in a W7-AS plasma were compared. The experimentally-measured parameters used were from a W7-AS shot in which measured heat fluxes

  14. Morning sector drift-bounce resonance driven ULF waves observed in artificially-induced HF radar backscatter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. J. Baddeley

    Full Text Available HF radar backscatter, which has been artificially-induced by a high power RF facility such as the EISCAT heater at Tromsø, has provided coherent radar ionospheric electric field data of unprecedented temporal resolution and accuracy. Here such data are used to investigate ULF wave processes observed by both the CUTLASS HF radars and the EISCAT UHF radar. Data from the SP-UK-OUCH experiment have revealed small-scale (high azimuthal wave number, m -45 waves, predominantly in the morning sector, thought to be brought about by the drift-bounce resonance processes. Conjugate observations from the Polar CAM-MICE instrument indicate the presence of a non-Maxwellian ion distribution function. Further statistical analysis has been undertaken, using the Polar TIMAS instrument, to reveal the prevalence and magnitude of the non-Maxwellian energetic particle populations thought to be responsible for generating these wave types.

    Key words. Ionosphere (active experiments; wave-particle interactions Magnetospheric physics (MHD waves and instabilities

  15. Drift-wave spectra obtained from the theory of nonlinear ion-Landau damping in sheared magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The local character, in poloidal mode-number space, of the resonant nonlinear interaction of drift waves with ions in a sheared magnetic field permits an analytical determination of the spectrum. Important processes underlying the stabilization are energy cascade and transfer, respectively, in ''close'' (k'/sub Theta/approx. =k/sub Theta/) and ''distant'' (k'/sub Theta/a/sub s/approx. =1/k/sub Theta/a/sub s/) interactions. The spectral index n = 4 of the high-mode-number tail is independent of the excitation mechanism

  16. Effect of parallel ion motion in three-drift-wave interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nonlinear interaction of three drift modes, including parallel ion motion, is discussed analytically and numerically. An intrinsic stochastic interaction between the fluctuating electric field and the parallel ion current is observed and the saturation level is of the expected magnitude. (orig.)

  17. Co-existence of Whistler Waves with Kinetic Alfven Wave Turbulence for the High-beta Solar Wind Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Mithaiwala, Manish; Crabtree, Chris; Ganguli, Gurudas

    2012-01-01

    It is shown that the dispersion relation for whistler waves is identical for a high or low beta plasma. Furthermore in the high-beta solar wind plasma whistler waves meet the Landau resonance with electrons for velocities less than the thermal speed, and consequently the electric force is small compared to the mirror force. As whistlers propagate through the inhomogeneous solar wind, the perpendicular wave number increases through refraction, increasing the Landau damping rate. However, the whistlers can survive because the background kinetic Alfven wave turbulence creates a plateau by quasilinear diffusion in the solar wind electron distribution at small velocities. It is found that for whistler energy density of only ~10^-3 that of the kinetic Alfven waves, the quasilinear diffusion rate due to whistlers is comparable to KAW. Thus very small amplitude whistler turbulence can have a significant consequence on the evolution of the solar wind electron distribution function.

  18. Two corrections to the drift-wave kinetic equation in the context of zonal-flow physics

    CERN Document Server

    Ruiz, D E; Shi, E L; Dodin, I Y

    2016-01-01

    The drift-wave (DW) kinetic equation, that is commonly used in studies of zonal flows (ZF), excludes the exchange of enstrophy between DW and ZF and also effects beyond the geometrical-optics limit. Using the quasilinear approximation of the generalized Hasegawa--Mima model, we propose a modified theory that accounts for these effects within a wave kinetic equation (WKE) of the Wigner--Moyal type, which is commonly known in quantum mechanics. In the geometrical-optics limit, this theory features additional terms beyond the traditional WKE that ensure exact conservation of the \\textit{total} enstrophy and energy in the DW-ZF system. Numerical simulations are presented to illustrate the importance of these additional terms. The proposed theory can be viewed as a reformulation of the second-order cumulant expansion (also known as the CE2) in a more intuitive manner, namely, in terms of canonical phase-space variables.

  19. Impact of Resonant Magnetic Perturbations on Zonal Modes, Drift-Wave Turbulence and the L-H Transition Threshold

    CERN Document Server

    Leconte, M; Xu, Y

    2013-01-01

    We study the effects of Resonant Magnetic Perturbations (RMPs) on turbulence, flows and confinement in the framework of resistive drift-wave turbulence. This work was motivated, in parts, by experiments reported at the IAEA 2010 conference [Y. Xu {\\it et al}, Nucl. Fusion \\textbf{51}, 062030] which showed a decrease of long-range correlations during the application of RMPs. We derive and apply a zero-dimensional predator-prey model coupling the Drift-Wave Zonal Mode system [M. Leconte and P.H. Diamond, Phys. Plasmas \\textbf{19}, 055903] to the evolution of mean quantities. This model has both density gradient drive and RMP amplitude as control parameters and predicts a novel type of transport bifurcation in the presence of RMPs. This model allows a description of the full L-H transition evolution with RMPs, including the mean sheared flow evolution. The key results are: i) The L-I and I-H power thresholds \\emph{both} increase with RMP amplitude $|\\bx|$, the relative increase of the L-I threshold scales as $\\D...

  20. Stability of drift-cyclotron loss-cone waves in H-mode plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, W. A.; Morales, G. J.

    2016-06-01

    The drift-cyclotron loss-cone mode was first studied in mirror machines. In such devices, particles with small pitch angles are not confined, creating a hole in the velocity distribution function that is a source of free energy and leads to micro-instabilities in the cyclotron-range of frequencies. In the edge region of tokamak devices operating under H-mode conditions, ion loss also occurs. In this case, gradient drift carries ions moving opposite to the plasma current preferentially into the divertor, creating a one-sided loss cone. A simple analysis shows that for the quiescent H-mode plasmas in DIII-D the critical gradient for instability is exceeded within 2 cm of the separatrix, and the maximum growth rate at the separatrix is 3  ×  107 s‑1.

  1. Measurement of helicon wave coupling for current drive and anticipated role for high beta KSTAR plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S. J.; Kim, H. J.; Joung, M.; Jeong, J. H.; Kim, J. H.; Bae, Y. S.; Kwak, J. G.; Wi, H. H.; Kim, H.-S.

    2015-11-01

    Helicon wave current drive has been suggested for efficient off-axis current drive in high electron beta tokamak plasmas. Fast wave drives centrally peaking current in the frequency range up to several ion cyclotron harmonics in the present tokamaks, such as KSTAR. Increasing fast wave frequency up to LH resonance frequency at the plasma edge, the spiral propagation of wave at the outer region of plasma lengthens the wave path to the plasma center. Also, optical thickness increases with frequency. It is expected that these effects produce efficient off-axis power deposition depending on the electron beta and magnetic field pitch. A low power TWA for helicon wave was installed and tested in KSTAR tokamak which is aiming for the steady-state high beta plasma requiring off-axis current drive. The power coupling properties of TWA at various plasma conditions will be presented. In addition to the coupling efficiency, issues such as load sensitivity and unwanted slow wave coupling will be addressed. Also, the simulation of plasma performance with the combination of helicon wave current drive and other conventional heating and current drive power in KSTAR will be discussed. This work was supported by the Korean Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning and by R&D Program through the National Fusion Research Institute of Korea (NFRI) funded by the Government funds.

  2. Spiral wave drift and complex-oscillatory spiral waves caused by heterogeneities in two-dimensional in vitro cardiac tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, Sung-Jae; Hong, Jin Hee; Kim, Tae Yun; Bae, Byung Wook; Lee, Kyoung J [CRI Center for Neurodynamics and Department of Physics, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: kyoung@nld.korea.ac.kr

    2008-01-15

    Understanding spiral reentry wave dynamics in cardiac systems is important since it underlies various cardiac arrhythmia including cardiac fibrillation. Primary cultures of dissociated cardiac cells have been a convenient and useful system for studying cardiac wave dynamics, since one can carry out systematic and quantitative studies with them under well-controlled environments. One key drawback of the dissociated cell culture is that, inevitably, some spatial inhomogeneities in terms of cell types and density, and/or the degree of gap junction connectivity, are introduced to the system during the preparation. These unintentional spatial inhomogeneities can cause some non-trivial wave dynamics, for example, the entrainment dynamics among different spiral waves and the generation of complex-oscillatory spiral waves. The aim of this paper is to quantify these general phenomena in an in vitro cardiac system and provide explanations for them with a simple physiological model having some realistic spatial inhomogeneities incorporated.

  3. Dispersive waves induced by self-defocusing temporal solitons in a beta-barium-borate crystal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Binbin; Bache, Morten

    2015-01-01

    We experimentally observe dispersive waves in the anomalous dispersion regime of a beta-barium-borate (BBO) crystal, induced by a self-defocusing few-cycle temporal soliton. Together the soliton and dispersive waves form an energetic octave-spanning supercontinuum. The soliton was excited...... in the normal dispersion regime of BBO through a negative cascaded quadratic nonlinearity. Using pump wavelengths from 1.24 to 1.4 μm, dispersive waves are found from 1.9 to 2.2 μm, agreeing well with calculated resonant phasematching wavelengths due to degenerate four-wave mixing to the soliton. We also...

  4. Existence of a directional Stokes drift in asymmetrical three-dimensional travelling gravity waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iooss, Gérard; Plotnikov, Pavel

    2009-09-01

    We consider periodic travelling gravity waves at the surface of an infinitely deep perfect fluid. The pattern is non-symmetric with respect to the propagation direction of the waves and we consider a general non-resonant situation. Defining a couple of amplitudes ɛ,ɛ along the basis of wave vectors which satisfy the dispersion relation, following Iooss and Plotnikov (2009), travelling waves exist with an asymptotic expansion in powers of ɛ,ɛ, for nearly all pair of angles made by the basic wave vectors with the critical propagation direction, and for values of the couple (ɛ12,ɛ22) in a subset of the plane, with asymptotic full measure at the origin. We prove the remarkable property that on the free surface, observed in the moving frame, the propagation direction of the waves differs from the asymptotic direction taken by fluid particles, by a small angle which is computed. To cite this article: G. Iooss, P. Plotnikov, C. R. Mecanique 337 (2009).

  5. Second order kinetic theory of parallel momentum transport in collisionless drift wave turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Gao, Zhe; Chen, Jiale

    2016-08-01

    A second order kinetic model for turbulent ion parallel momentum transport is presented. A new nonresonant second order parallel momentum flux term is calculated. The resonant component of the ion parallel electrostatic force is the momentum source, while the nonresonant component of the ion parallel electrostatic force compensates for that of the nonresonant second order parallel momentum flux. The resonant component of the kinetic momentum flux can be divided into three parts, including the pinch term, the diffusive term, and the residual stress. By reassembling the pinch term and the residual stress, the residual stress can be considered as a pinch term of parallel wave-particle resonant velocity, and, therefore, may be called as "resonant velocity pinch" term. Considering the resonant component of the ion parallel electrostatic force is the transfer rate between resonant ions and waves (or, equivalently, nonresonant ions), a conservation equation of the parallel momentum of resonant ions and waves is obtained.

  6. Absorption of magnetoacoustic waves in high beta plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The oscillations of a radially inhomogeneous high-β plasma column are investigated experimentally and theoretically. The high-β plasma is produced by a theta pinch discharge. The waves are launched during the post implosion phase in the frequency range of about 1 MHz. The spatial distribution of the wave fields is determined and a high absorption is observed. The absorption of magnetoacoustic waves is an efficient mechanism to heat a plasma. It was investigated under various conditions in the past. In this paper we present theoretical and experimental investigations in the transition region from the collision dominated to the collisionless regime. In the theoretical treatment the linearised MHD-equations are used where viscous and resistive effects are included. (orig./HT)

  7. Dispersive waves induced by self-defocusing temporal solitons in a beta-barium-borate crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Binbin; Bache, Morten

    2015-09-15

    We experimentally observe dispersive waves in the anomalous dispersion regime of a beta-barium-borate (BBO) crystal, induced by a self-defocusing few-cycle temporal soliton. Together the soliton and dispersive waves form an energetic octave-spanning supercontinuum. The soliton was excited in the normal dispersion regime of BBO through a negative cascaded quadratic nonlinearity. Using pump wavelengths from 1.24 to 1.4 μm, dispersive waves are found from 1.9 to 2.2 μm, agreeing well with calculated resonant phase-matching wavelengths due to degenerate four-wave mixing to the soliton. We also observe resonant radiation from nondegenerate four-wave mixing between the soliton and a probe wave, which was formed by leaking part of the pump spectrum into the anomalous dispersion regime. We confirm the experimental results through simulations.

  8. Dispersive waves induced by self-defocusing temporal solitons in a beta-barium-borate crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Binbin; Bache, Morten

    2015-09-15

    We experimentally observe dispersive waves in the anomalous dispersion regime of a beta-barium-borate (BBO) crystal, induced by a self-defocusing few-cycle temporal soliton. Together the soliton and dispersive waves form an energetic octave-spanning supercontinuum. The soliton was excited in the normal dispersion regime of BBO through a negative cascaded quadratic nonlinearity. Using pump wavelengths from 1.24 to 1.4 μm, dispersive waves are found from 1.9 to 2.2 μm, agreeing well with calculated resonant phase-matching wavelengths due to degenerate four-wave mixing to the soliton. We also observe resonant radiation from nondegenerate four-wave mixing between the soliton and a probe wave, which was formed by leaking part of the pump spectrum into the anomalous dispersion regime. We confirm the experimental results through simulations. PMID:26371910

  9. Studies of waves and instabilities using increased beta, warm ion plasmas in LAPD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Troy; Dorfman, Seth; Gekelman, Walter; Vincena, Steve; van Compernolle, Bart; Tripathi, Shreekrishna; Pribyl, Pat; Morales, George

    2015-11-01

    A new plasma source based on a Lanthanum Hexaboride (LAB6) emissive cathode has been developed and installed on the LArge Plasma Device (LAPD) at UCLA. The new source provides a much higher discharge current density (compared to the standard LAPD Barium Oxide source) resulting in a factor of ~ 50 increase in plasma density and a factor of ~ 2 - 3 increase in electron temperature. Due to the increased density the ion-electron energy exchange time is shorter in the new plasma, resulting in warm ions (measured spectroscopically to be ~ 5 - 6 eV, up from unity. Topics under investigation include the physics of Alfvén waves in increased β plasmas (dispersion and kinetic damping on ions), electromagnetic effects and magnetic transport in drift-Alfvén wave turbulence, and the excitation of ion-temperature-anisotropy driven modes such as the mirror and firehose instabilities. The capabilities of the new source will be discussed along with initial experimental resuls on electromagnetic drift-Alfvén wave turbulence and Alfvén wave propagation with increased plasma β. Supported by NSF and DOE.

  10. Orientation and Rate Dependence of Wave Propagation in Shocked Beta-SiC from Atomistic Simulations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Qin; WU Heng-An; WANG Yu; WANG Xiu-Xi

    2009-01-01

    The orientation dependence of planax wave propagation in beta-SiC is studied via the molecular dynamics (MD) method. Simulations axe implemented under impact loadings in four main crystal directions, i.e., , ,, and . The dispersion of stress states in different directions increases with rising impact velocity, which implies the anisotropic characteristic of shock wave propagation for beta-SiC materials. We also obtain the Hugoniot relations between the shock wave velocity and the impact velocity, and find that the shock velocity falls into a plateau above a threshold of impact velocity. The shock velocity of the plateaux is dependent on the shock directions, while and can be regarded as equivalent directions as they almost reach the same plateau.A comparison between the atomic stress from MD and the stress from Rankine--Hugoniot jump conditions is also made, and it is found that they agree with each other very well.

  11. The effects of nonthermal electron distributions on ion-temperature-gradient driven drift-wave instabilities in electron-ion plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batool, Nazia [Theoretical Plasma Physics Group, Department of Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); National Center of Physics (NCP), Quaid-i-Azam University campus, Islamabad (Pakistan); Masood, W. [National Center of Physics (NCP), Quaid-i-Azam University campus, Islamabad (Pakistan); Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, PINSTECH P. O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Mirza, Arshad M. [Theoretical Plasma Physics Group, Department of Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan)

    2012-08-15

    The effects of nonthermal electron distributions on electrostatic ion-temperature-gradient (ITG) driven drift-wave instabilities in the presence of equilibrium density, temperature, and magnetic field gradients are investigated here. By using Braginskii's transport equations for ions and Cairns as well as Kappa distribution for electrons, the coupled mode equations are derived. The modified ITG driven modes are derived, and it is found both analytically as well as numerically that the nonthermal distribution of electrons significantly modify the real frequencies as well as the growth rate of the ITG driven drift wave instability. The growth rate of ion-temperature-gradient driven instability is found to be maximum for Cairns, intermediate for Kappa, and minimum for the Maxwellian distributed electron case. The results of present investigation might be helpful to understand several wave phenomena in space and laboratory plasmas in the presence of nonthermal electrons.

  12. Phase dependent advection-diffusion in drift wave - zonal flow turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Moradi, Sara

    2016-01-01

    In plasma turbulence theory, due to the complexity of the system with many non-linearly interacting waves, the dynamics of the phases is often disregarded and the so-called random-phase approximation (RPA) is used assuming the existence of a Chirikov-like criterion for the onset of wave stochasticity. The dynamical amplitudes are represented as complex numbers, $\\psi = \\psi_r + i\\psi_i = ae^{i\\theta}$, with the amplitudes slowly varying whereas the phases are rapidly varying and, in particular, distributed uniformly over the interval $[0;2\\pi)$. However, one could expect that the phase dynamics can play a role in the self-organisation and the formation of coherent structures. In the same manner it is also expected that the RPA falls short to take coherent interaction between phases into account. In this work therefore, we studied the role of phase dynamics and the coupling of phases between different modes on the characteristic time evolution of the turbulent. We assume a simple turbulent system where the so-...

  13. Standardized F1: a consistent measure of strength of modulation of visual responses to sine-wave drifting gratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wypych, M; Wang, C; Nagy, A; Benedek, G; Dreher, B; Waleszczyk, W J

    2012-11-01

    The magnitude of spike-responses of neurons in the mammalian visual system to sine-wave luminance-contrast-modulated drifting gratings is modulated by the temporal frequency of the stimulation. However, there are serious problems with consistency and reliability of the traditionally used methods of assessment of strength of such modulation. Here we propose an intuitive and simple tool for assessment of the strength of modulations in the form of standardized F1 index, zF1. We define zF1 as the ratio of the difference between the F1 (component of amplitude spectrum of the spike-response at temporal frequency of stimulation) and the mean value of spectrum amplitudes to standard deviation along all frequencies in the spectrum. In order to assess the validity of this measure, we have: (1) examined behavior of zF1 using spike-responses to optimized drifting gratings of single neurons recorded from four 'visual' structures (area V1 of primary visual cortex, superior colliculus, suprageniculate nucleus and caudate nucleus) in the brain of commonly used visual mammal - domestic cat; (2) compared the behavior of zF1 with that of classical statistics commonly employed in the analysis of steady-state responses; (3) tested the zF1 index on simulated spike-trains generated with threshold-linear model. Our analyses indicate that zF1 is resistant to distortions due to the low spike count in responses and therefore can be particularly useful in the case of recordings from neurons with low firing rates and/or low net mean responses. While most V1 and a half of caudate neurons exhibit high zF1 indices, the majorities of collicular and suprageniculate neurons exhibit low zF1 indices. We conclude that despite the general shortcomings of measuring strength of modulation inherent in the linear system approach, zF1 can serve as a sensitive and easy to interpret tool for detection of modulation and assessment of its strength in responses of visual neurons. PMID:23000273

  14. Low-frequency waves in a high-beta collisionless plasma Polarization, compressibility and helicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary, S. P.

    1986-01-01

    This paper considers the linear theory of waves near and below the ion cyclotron frequency in an isothermal electron-ion Vlasov plasma which is isotropic, homogeneous and magnetized. Numerical solutions of the full dispersion equation for the magnetosonic/whistler and Alfven/ion cyclotron modes at beta(i) = 1.0 are presented, and the polarizations, compressibilities, helicities, ion Alfven ratios and ion cross-helicities are exhibited and compared. At sufficiently large beta(i) and theta, the angle of propagation with respect to the magnetic field, the real part of the polarization of the Alfven/ion cyclotron wave changes sign, so that, for such parameters, this mode is no longer left-hand polarized. The Alfven/ion cyclotron mode becomes more compressive as the wavenumber increases, whereas the magnetosonic/whistler becomes more compressive with increasing theta.

  15. Music genre preference and tempo alter alpha and beta waves in human non-musicians

    OpenAIRE

    Hunter Gentry; Ethan Humphries; Sebastian Pena; Aldijana Mekic; Nicole Hurless; David F Nichols

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effects of music genre and tempo on brain activation patterns in 10 nonmusicians.Two genres (rock and jazz) and three tempos (slowed, medium/normal, andquickened) were examined using EEG recording and analyzed through Fast Fourier Transform(FFT) analysis. When participants listened to their preferred genre, an increase in alpha waveamplitude was observed. Alpha waves were not significantly affected by tempo. Beta waveamplitude increased significantly as the tempo incre...

  16. Electron acceleration during the decay of nonlinear Whistler waves in low-beta electron-ion plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umeda, Takayuki; Saito, Shinji [Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Nagoya University, Nagoya City, Aichi 464-8601 (Japan); Nariyuki, Yasuhiro, E-mail: umeda@stelab.nagoya-u.ac.jp, E-mail: saito@stelab.nagoya-u.ac.jp, E-mail: nariyuki@edu.u-toyama.ac.jp [Faculty of Human Development, University of Toyama, Toyama City, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan)

    2014-10-10

    Relativistic electron acceleration through dissipation of a nonlinear, short-wavelength, and monochromatic electromagnetic whistler wave in low-beta plasma is investigated by utilizing a one-dimensional fully relativistic electromagnetic particle-in-cell code. The nonlinear (large-amplitude) parent whistler wave decays through the parametric instability which enhances electrostatic ion acoustic waves and electromagnetic whistler waves. These waves satisfy the condition of three-wave coupling. Through the decay instability, the energy of electron bulk velocity supporting the parent wave is converted to the thermal energy perpendicular to the background magnetic field. Increase of the perpendicular temperature triggers the electron temperature anisotropy instability which generates broadband whistler waves and heats electrons in the parallel direction. The broadband whistler waves are inverse-cascaded during the relaxation of the electron temperature anisotropy. In lower-beta conditions, electrons with a pitch angle of about 90° are successively accelerated by inverse-cascaded whistler waves, and selected electrons are accelerated to over a Lorentz factor of 10. The result implies that the nonlinear dissipation of a finite-amplitude and short-wavelength whistler wave plays an important role in producing relativistic nonthermal electrons over a few MeV especially at lower beta plasmas.

  17. Influence of plasma beta on the generation of lower hybrid and whistler waves by an ion velocity ring distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winske, D., E-mail: winske@lanl.gov; Daughton, W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    We present results of three-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations of the lower hybrid ion ring instability, similar to our earlier results [D. Winske and W. Daughton, Phys. Plasma 19, 072109 (2012)], but at higher electron beta (β{sub e} = ratio of electron thermal pressure to magnetic pressure = 0.06, rather than at 0.006) with T{sub i} = T{sub e}. At higher electron beta, the level of lower hybrid waves at saturation normalized to the ion thermal energy (β{sub i} = 0.06 also) is only slightly smaller, but the corresponding magnetic fluctuations are about an order of magnitude larger, consistent with linear theory. After saturation, the waves evolve into whistler waves, through a number of possible mechanisms, with an average growth rate considerably smaller than the linear growth rate of the lower hybrid waves, to a peak fluctuation level that is about 20% above the lower hybrid wave saturation level. The ratio of the peak magnetic fluctuations associated with the whistler waves relative to those of the saturated lower hybrid waves, the ratio of the nonlinear growth rate of whistlers relative to the linear growth rate of lower hybrid waves, the amount of energy extracted from the ring, and the amount of heating of the background ions and electrons are comparable to those in the lower electron beta 3D simulation. This suggests that even at higher electron beta, the linear and nonlinear physics of the lower hybrid ion ring instability is dominated by electrostatic, wave-particle rather than wave-wave interactions.

  18. Initial Results of DC Electric Fields, Associated Plasma Drifts, Magnetic Fields, and Plasma Waves Observed on the C/NOFS Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaff, R.; Freudenreich, H.; Bromund, K.; Klenzing, J.; Rowland, D.; Maynard, N.

    2010-01-01

    Initial results are presented from the Vector Electric Field Investigation (VEFI) on the Air Force Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite, a mission designed to understand, model, and forecast the presence of equatorial ionospheric irregularities. The VEFI instrument includes a vector DC electric field detector, a fixed-bias Langmuir probe operating in the ion saturation regime, a flux gate magnetometer, an optical lightning detector, and associated electronics including a burst memory. Compared to data obtained during more active solar conditions, the ambient DC electric fields and their associated E x B drifts are variable and somewhat weak, typically density appears nearly quiescent. Data from successive orbits reveal that the vertical drifts and plasma density are both clearly organized with longitude. The spread-F density depletions and corresponding electric fields that have been detected thus far have displayed a preponderance to appear between midnight and dawn. Associated with the narrow plasma depletions that are detected are broad spectra of electric field and plasma density irregularities for which a full vector set of measurements is available for detailed study. Finally, the data set includes a wide range of ELF/VLF/HF oscillations corresponding to a variety of plasma waves, in particular banded ELF hiss, whistlers, and lower hybrid wave turbulence triggered by lightning-induced sferics. The VEFI data represents a new set of measurements that are germane to numerous fundamental aspects of the electrodynamics and irregularities inherent to the Earth's low latitude ionosphere.

  19. Influence of Ion Nonlinear Polarization Drift and Warm Ions on Solitary Kinetic Alfvén Wave

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Su-Ping; LI Zhong-Yuan

    2003-01-01

    Considering the effects of ion nonlinear polarization drift and warm ions, we adopt two-fluid model to results derived in this paper indicate that dip SKAW and hump SKAW both exist in a wide range in magnetosphere(for the pressure parameter β ~ 10-5 ~ 0.01, where βis the ratio of thermal pressure to magnetic pressure, i.e.region 1 > β > me/mi. These results are different from previous ones. That indicates that the effects of ion nonlinear polarization drift and warm ions are important and they cannot be neglected. The SKAW has an electric field parallel to the ambient magnetic field, which makes the SKAW take an important role in the acceleration and energization of field-aligned charged particles in magnetic plasmas. And the SKAW is also important for the heating of a local plasma.So it makes a novel physical mechanism of energy transmission possible.

  20. Design Study on Medium beta SC Half-Wave Resonator at IMP

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, An-Dong; Yue, Wei-Ming; Li, Yong-Ming; Jiang, Tian-Cai; Wang, Feng-Feng; Zhang, Sheng-Xue; Huang, Ran; He, Yuan; Zhao, Hong-Wei

    2015-01-01

    A superconducting half-wave resonator has been designed with the frequency of 325 MHz and beta of 0.51. Different geometry parameters and shapes of inner conductors (racetrack, ring-shape and elliptical-shape) were optimized to decrease the peak electromagnetic fields to obtain higher accelerating gradients and minimize the dissipated power on the cavity walls. To suppress the operation frequency shift caused by the helium pressure fluctuations and maximize the tuning ranges, the frequency shifts and mechanical properties were studied on the electric and magnetic areas separately. At the end, the helium vessel was also designed to keep the mechanical structure as robust as possible. The fabrication and test of the prototype will be completed in the beginning of 2016.

  1. Instability of coupled gravity-inertial-Rossby waves on a {beta}-plane in solar system atmospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKenzie, J.F. [KwaZulu-Natal Univ., Durban (South Africa). Astrophysics and Cosmology Research Unit, School of Mathematical Sciences; Alabama Univ., AL (United States). Dept. of Physics, CSPAR; King' s College, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2009-07-01

    This paper provides an analysis of the combined theory of gravity-inertial-Rossby waves on a {beta}-plane in the Boussinesq approximation. The wave equation for the system is fifth order in space and time and demonstrates how gravity-inertial waves on the one hand are coupled to Rossby waves on the other through the combined effects of {beta}-, the stratification characterized by the Vaeisaelae-Brunt frequency N, the Coriolis frequency f at a given latitude, and vertical propagation which permits buoyancy modes to interact with westward propagating Rossby waves. The corresponding dispersion equation shows that the frequency of a westward propagating gravity-inertial wave is reduced by the coupling, whereas the frequency of a Rossby wave is increased. If the coupling is sufficiently strong these two modes coalesce giving rise to an instability. The instability condition translates into a curve of critical latitude {theta}{sub c} versus effective equatorial rotational Mach number M, with the region below this curve exhibiting instability. ''Supersonic'' fast rotators are unstable in a narrow band of latitudes around the equator. For example {theta}{sub c}{proportional_to}12 for Jupiter. On the other hand slow ''subsonic'' rotators (e.g. Mercury, Venus and the Sun's Corona) are unstable at all latitudes except very close to the poles where the {beta}- effect vanishes. ''Transonic'' rotators, such as the Earth and Mars, exhibit instability within latitudes of 34 and 39 , respectively, around the Equator. Similar results pertain to Oceans. In the case of an Earth's Ocean of depth 4km say, purely westward propagating waves are unstable up to 26 about the Equator. The nonlinear evolution of this instability which feeds off rotational energy and gravitational buoyancy may play an important role in atmospheric dynamics. (orig.)

  2. Doppler effect in a solid medium: Spin wave emission by a precessing domain wall drifting in spin current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Hong; Chen, Jie; Zeng, Xiaoyan; Yan, Ming

    2016-04-01

    The Doppler effect is a fundamental physical phenomenon observed for waves propagating in vacuum or various media, commonly gaseous or liquid. Here, we report on the occurrence of a Doppler effect in a solid medium. Instead of a real object, a topological soliton, i.e., a magnetic domain wall (DW) traveling in a current-carrying ferromagnetic nanowire, plays the role of the moving wave source. The Larmor precession of the DW in an external field stimulates emission of monochromatic spin waves (SWs) during its motion, which show a significant Doppler effect, comparable to the acoustic one of a train whistle. This process involves two prominent spin-transfer-torque effects simultaneously, the current-driven DW motion and the current-induced SW Doppler shift. The latter gives rise to an interesting feature, i.e., the observed SW Doppler effect appears resulting from a stationary source and a moving observer, contrary to the laboratory frame.

  3. Comment to the note "Counting of discrete Rossby/drift wave resonant triads", arXiv:1309.0405

    CERN Document Server

    Kartashov, A

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of this note is clarify the following misunderstanding apparent in the note arXiv:1309.0405 by M. Bustamante, U. Hayat, P. Lynch, B. Quinn; [1]: the authors erroneously assume that in the manuscript arXiv:1307.8272 by A. Kartashov and E. Kartashova, [2], resonant triads with real amplitudes are counted whereas it can be seen explicitly from the form of dynamical system that wave amplitudes are complex.

  4. Diffuse reflection infrared Fourier transform (DRIFT) spectra and high-temperature DRIFT spectra of beta-Ni(IO3)2.4H2O, Ni(IO3)2.2H2O, Mg(OH)2, and Zn(OH)F: novel embedding materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pracht, G; Weckler, B; Lutz, H D

    2003-10-01

    Diffuse reflection infrared Fourier transform (DRIFT) spectra of the hydroxides Mg(OH)2 and Zn(OH)F and the iodate hydrates beta-Ni(IO3)2.4H2O and Ni(IO3)2.2H2O have been recorded at ambient and high temperature. Spectra without shifts of the band maxima compared to those of conventional infrared transmission spectra and without inversion of the bands were obtained by dilution of the compounds to about 2-10% with an appropriate embedding material. alpha-Al2O3, TiO2, ZrO2, PbF2, MgO, BaO, ZnO, Na2SiO3, SiO2 (aerosil), and powdered copper, aluminum, and magnesium were tested as diluents for hydrates and hydroxides, especially at elevated temperatures, as alternatives for the commonly used KBr. Thus, alpha-Al2O3, PbF2, and powdered copper were established as the most favorable diluents. Using these novel embedding materials, high-temperature DRIFT spectra are obtainable at temperatures not accessible with KBr discs. Dehydration and decomposition of the iodate hydrates under study were shown by change or disappearance of the respective water bands. PMID:14639754

  5. Surface drift prediction in the Adriatic Sea using hyper-ensemble statistics on atmospheric, ocean and wave models: Uncertainties and probability distribution areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rixen, M.; Ferreira-Coelho, E.; Signell, R.

    2008-01-01

    Despite numerous and regular improvements in underlying models, surface drift prediction in the ocean remains a challenging task because of our yet limited understanding of all processes involved. Hence, deterministic approaches to the problem are often limited by empirical assumptions on underlying physics. Multi-model hyper-ensemble forecasts, which exploit the power of an optimal local combination of available information including ocean, atmospheric and wave models, may show superior forecasting skills when compared to individual models because they allow for local correction and/or bias removal. In this work, we explore in greater detail the potential and limitations of the hyper-ensemble method in the Adriatic Sea, using a comprehensive surface drifter database. The performance of the hyper-ensembles and the individual models are discussed by analyzing associated uncertainties and probability distribution maps. Results suggest that the stochastic method may reduce position errors significantly for 12 to 72??h forecasts and hence compete with pure deterministic approaches. ?? 2007 NATO Undersea Research Centre (NURC).

  6. 一种基于漂移和波动思想的遗传算法%A New Genetic Algorithm Based on Drift and Wave Thought

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李松芳; 刘伟; 徐怀祥

    2014-01-01

    In order to make full use of the optimal individual information , referring to thought of drift and wave to design the new crossover and mutation operator , it proposes a new genetic algorithm;The new al-gorithm uses the chaotic strategy for processing infeasible individuals , with the new operator combined with optimal individual information , so it has the capability of global search and local search .Simulation experiments show that the new algorithm can improve the algorithm convergence speed and accuracy , and that the proposed method is effective and feasible .%为充分利用最优个体的信息,借鉴于漂移和波动思想设计出新的交叉与变异算子,提出一种新的遗传算法。新算法采用混沌策略处理不可行个体,新算子结合最优个体信息,兼具全局搜索与局部搜索性能。仿真实验表明,新算法不但加快了算法的收敛速度,而且提高了求解精度,是一种有效性算法。

  7. Current-driven electron drift solitons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Ali, E-mail: aliahmad79@hotmail.com [National Centre for Physics (NCP), Shahdara Valley Road, 44000 Islamabad (Pakistan); Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology (CIIT) Islamabad (Pakistan); Saleem, H. [National Centre for Physics (NCP), Shahdara Valley Road, 44000 Islamabad (Pakistan); Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology (CIIT) Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2013-12-09

    The soliton formation by the current-driven drift-like wave is investigated for heavier ion (such as barium) plasma experiments planned to be performed in future. It is pointed out that the sheared flow of electrons can give rise to short scale solitary structures in the presence of stationary heavier ions. The nonlinearity appears due to convective term in the parallel equation of motion and not because of temperature gradient unlike the case of low frequency usual drift wave soliton. This higher frequency drift-like wave requires sheared flow of electrons and not the density gradient to exist.

  8. Dissipative drift instability in dusty plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilakshi Das

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available An investigation has been done on the very low-frequency electrostatic drift waves in a collisional dusty plasma. The dust density gradient is taken perpendicular to the magnetic field B0⃗, which causes the drift wave. In this case, low-frequency drift instabilities can be driven by E1⃗×B0⃗ and diamagnetic drifts, where E1⃗ is the perturbed electric field. Dust charge fluctuation is also taken into consideration for our study. The dust- neutral and ion-neutral collision terms have been included in equations of motion. It is seen that the low-frequency drift instability gets damped in such a system. Both dust charging and collision of plasma particles with the neutrals may be responsible for the damping of the wave. Both analytical and numerical techniques have been used while developing the theory.

  9. Linear MHD Wave Propagation in Time-Dependent Flux Tube. III. Leaky Waves in Zero-Beta Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, A.; Erdélyi, R.

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we evaluate the time-dependent wave properties and the damping rate of propagating fast magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) waves when energy leakage into a magnetised atmosphere is considered. By considering a cold plasma, initial investigations into the evolution of MHD wave damping through this energy leakage will take place. The time-dependent governing equations have been derived previously in Williamson and Erdélyi (2014a, Solar Phys. 289, 899 - 909) and are now solved when the assumption of evanescent wave propagation in the outside of the waveguide is relaxed. The dispersion relation for leaky waves applicable to a straight magnetic field is determined in both an arbitrary tube and a thin-tube approximation. By analytically solving the dispersion relation in the thin-tube approximation, the explicit expressions for the temporal evolution of the dynamic frequency and wavenumber are determined. The damping rate is, then, obtained from the dispersion relation and is shown to decrease as the density ratio increases. By comparing the decrease in damping rate to the increase in damping for a stationary system, as shown, we aim to point out that energy leakage may not be as efficient a damping mechanism as previously thought.

  10. Study of high-beta supra-thermal plasma events in the vicinity of magneto-hydrodynamic shock-waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. K. Marhavilas

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The ratio value – known as plasma parameter “beta” (β - of the interplanetary-plasma pressure (thermal pressure to themagnetic field’s (magnetic pressure or of their energy densities, is critical for the space plasmas and has important consequencesto their properties. Although in the scientific literature the contribution of the supra-thermal particles to the plasmapressure is generally assumed negligible, we deduced, by analyzing energetic particles and magnetic field measurementsrecorded by the Ulysses spacecraft, that in a series of events, the energy density contained in the supra-thermal tail of theparticle distribution is comparable to or even higher than the energy density of the magnetic field, creating conditions ofhigh-beta plasma. In particular, in this paper we analyze Ulysses measurements of the energy density ratio (parameter βep ofthe supra-thermal (20 keV to ~5 MeV ions’ (by the HI-SCALE instrument to the magnetic field’s (by the VHM/FGM instrumentin order to find occurrences of high-beta (βep >1 supra-thermal plasma conditions in the vicinity of interplanetaryshock-waves. These high-beta ion events are associated with energetic particle intensity enhancements which have beenproduced by reacceleration at the shock fronts.

  11. Theory for resonant ion acceleration by nonlinear magnetosonic fast and slow waves in finite beta plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Korteweg--de Vries equation that is applicable to both the nonlinear magnetosonic fast and slow waves is derived from a two-fluid model with finite ion and electron pressures. As in the cold plasma theory, the fast wave has a critical angle theta/sub c/. For propagation angles greater than theta/sub c/ (quasiperpendicular propagation), the fast wave has a positive soliton, whereas for angles smaller than theta/sub c/, it has a negative soliton. Finite β effects decrease the value of theta/sub c/. The slow wave has a positive soliton for all angles of propagation. The magnitude of resonant ion acceleration (the v/sub p/ x B acceleration) by the nonlinear fast and slow waves is evaluated. In the fast wave, the electron pressure makes the acceleration stronger for all propagation angles. The decrease in theta/sub c/ resulting from finite β effects results in broadening of the region of strong acceleration. It is also found that fairly strong ion acceleration can occur in the nonlinear slow wave in high β plasmas. The possibility of unlimited acceleration of ions by quasiperpendicular magnetosonic fast waves is discussed

  12. Proton gyroresonance with parallel waves in a low-beta solar flare plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinacker, Juergen; Miller, James A.

    1992-01-01

    We consider the gyroresonant interaction of protons with parallel electromagnetic plasma waves. These waves have either right- or left-hand circular polarization and include as a subset Alfven and whistler waves. We identify three comoving gyroresonances, which can lead to divergences in the Fokker-Planck coefficients. Taking into account thermal damping, we calculate the Fokker-Planck coefficient along with momentum diffusion coefficient D(p) and the mean-free path. Resulting acceleration time scales are compared with solar flare observations.

  13. Drift reversal capability in helical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The maximum-J (J is the second adiabatic invariant) capability, i.e., the drift reversal capability, is examined in quasi-axisymmetric (QAS) stellarators and quasi-poloidally symmetric (QPS) stellarators as a possible mechanism for turbulent transport suppression. Due to the existence of non-axisymmetry of the magnetic field strength in QAS configurations, a local maximum of J is created to cause the drift reversal. The increase of magnetic shear in finite beta equilibria also has favorable effect in realizing the drift reversal. The radial variation of the uniform magnetic field component plays a crucial role for the drift reversal in a QPS configuration. Thus, the drift reversal capability and its external controllability are demonstrated for QAS and QPS stellarators, by which the impact of magnetic configuration on turbulent transport can be studied in experiments. (author)

  14. Rossby wave radiation by an eddy on a beta-plane: Experiments with laboratory altimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y.; Afanasyev, Y. D., E-mail: afanai@mun.ca [Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John’s, Newfoundland A1B 3X7 (Canada)

    2015-07-15

    Results from the laboratory experiments on the evolution of vortices (eddies) generated in a rotating tank with topographic β-effect are presented. The focus of the experiments is on the far-field flow which contains Rossby waves emitted by travelling vortices. The surface elevation and velocity fields are measured by the altimetric imaging velocimetry. The experiments are supplemented by shallow water numerical simulations as well as a linear theory which describes the Rossby wave radiation by travelling vortices. The cyclonic vortices observed in the experiments travel to the northwest and continuously radiate Rossby waves. Measurements show that initially axisymmetric vortices develop a dipolar component which enables them to perform translational motion. A pattern of alternating zonal jets to the west of the vortex is created by Rossby waves with approximately zonal crests. Energy spectra of the flows in the wavenumber space indicate that a wavenumber similar to that introduced by Rhines for turbulent flows on the β-plane can be introduced here. The wavenumber is based on the translational speed of a vortex rather than on the root-mean-square velocity of a turbulent flow. The comparison between the experiments and numerical simulations demonstrates that evolving vortices also emit inertial waves. While these essentially three-dimensional non-hydrostatic waves can be observed in the altimetric data, they are not accounted for in the shallow water simulations.

  15. On the study of ion-acoustic solitary waves and double-layers in a drift multicomponent plasma with electron-inertia

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S N Paul; S Chattopadhyaya; S K Bhattacharya; B Bera

    2003-06-01

    Using the pseudopotential method, theoretical investigation has been made on the first-order Korteweg-deVries ion-acoustic solitons in a multicomponent plasma consisting of warm positive ions, negative ions and isothermal electrons. The effects of electron-inertia and drift motion of the ions on the amplitudes and widths of the solitons have been studied in a plasma having (H+, Cl-), (H+, O-), (He+, H-) and (He+, O-) ions. Ion-acoustic double-layers have also been investigated for such plasmas. It has been found that drift velocity and electron-inertia have significant contribution on the formation of double-layers in multicomponent plasma.

  16. Dependence of the relative backscatter cross section of 1-m density fluctuations in the auroral electrojet on the angle between electron drift and radar wave vector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the STARE radar system it is possible to measure, with high spatial and temporal resolution the electron drift velocity V/sub D/ and the relative amplitude of electron density fluctuations of 1-m wavelength in the auroral electrojet. These density fluctuations are generated by the combined effects of the two-stream and the gradient drift instabilities. We have determined the angular dependence of the backscatter intensity (which is proportional to the square of the amplitude of the density fluctuations) on the angle theta betweeen the electron drift direction and the direction from the scattering volume to the radar in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field. We find a fluctuation minimum for theta = 900 and an increase towards theta = 00 over the whole velocity range up to 1000 m/s. This increase is small for velocities below the ion acoustic velocity C/sub N/ but reaches over 20 dB gain in the backscatter intensity (corresponding to a density fluctuation more than 10 times as great) for higher velocities. We explain that the backscatter is caused mainly by two-stream instability in the range cos theta>C/sub S//V/sub d/ and by secondary gradient drift instability elsewhere

  17. Low-frequency waves in a high-beta collisionless plasma: polarization, compressibility and helicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The linear theory of waves near and below the ion cyclotron frequency in an isothermal electron-ion Vlasov plasma which is isotropic, homogeneous and magnetized is considered. Numerical solutions of the full dispersion equation for the magnetosonic whistler and Alfven/ion cyclotron modes at βsub(i)=1.0 are presented, and the polarizations, compressibilities, helicities, ion Alfven ratios and ion cross-helicities are exhibited and compared. At sufficiently large βsub(i) and theta, the angle of propagation with respect to the magnetic field, the real part of the polarization of the Alfven/ion cyclotron wave changes sign, so that, for such parameters, this mode is no longer left-hand polarized. The Alfven/ion cyclotron mode becomes more compressive as the wavenumber increases, whereas the magnetosonic/whistler becomes more compressive with increasing theta. At oblique propagation, the helicity of both modes approaches zero in the long-wavelength limit; in contrast, the ion cross-helicity is of order unity for the Alfven/ion cyclotron wave and decreases as theta increases for the magnetosonic/whistler mode. (author)

  18. Transient chaotic transport in dissipative drift motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyarzabal, R. S.; Szezech, J. D.; Batista, A. M.; de Souza, S. L. T.; Caldas, I. L.; Viana, R. L.; Sanjuán, M. A. F.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate chaotic particle transport in magnetised plasmas with two electrostatic drift waves. Considering dissipation in the drift motion, we verify that the removed KAM surfaces originate periodic attractors with their corresponding basins of attraction. We show that the properties of the basins depend on the dissipation and the space-averaged escape time decays exponentially when the dissipation increases. We find positive finite time Lyapunov exponents in dissipative drift motion, consequently the trajectories exhibit transient chaotic transport. These features indicate how the transient plasma transport depends on the dissipation.

  19. Drift chamber detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of High Energy Physics detectors based on drift chambers is presented. The ionization, drift diffusion, multiplication and detection principles are described. Most common drift media are analysied, and a classification of the detectors according to its geometry is done. Finally the standard read-out methods are displayed and the limits of the spatial resolution are discussed. (Author)

  20. The Tuning System for the HIE-ISOLDE High-Beta Quarter Wave Resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, P; Arnaudon, L; Artoos, K; Calatroni, S; Capatina, O; D'Elia, A; Kadi, Y; Mondino, I; Renaglia, T; Valuch, D; Delsolaro, W Venturini

    2014-01-01

    A new linac using superconducting quarter-wave resonators (QWR) is under construction at CERN in the framework of the HIE-ISOLDE project. The QWRs are made of niobium sputtered on a bulk copper substrate. The working frequency at 4.5 K is 101.28 MHz and they will provide 6 MV/m accelerating gradient on the beam axis with a total maximum power dissipation of 10 W on cavity walls. A tuning system is required in order to both minimize the forward power variation in beam operation and to compensate the unavoidable uncertainties in the frequency shift during the cool-down process. The tuning system has to fulfil a complex combination of RF, structural and thermal requirements. The paper presents the functional specifications and details the tuning system RF and mechanical design and simulations. The results of the tests performed on a prototype system are discussed and the industrialization strategy is presented in view of final production.

  1. Statistical state dynamics of jet/wave coexistence in beta-plane turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Constantinou, Navid C; Ioannou, Petros J

    2015-01-01

    Jets are commonly observed to coexist in the turbulence of planetary atmospheres with planetary scale waves and embedded vortices. These large-scale coherent structures arise and are maintained in the turbulence on time scales long compared to dissipation or advective time scales. The emergence, equilibration at finite amplitude, maintenance and stability of these structures pose fundamental theoretical problems. The emergence of jets and vortices from turbulence is not associated with an instability of the mean flow and their equilibration and stability at finite amplitude does not arise solely from the linear or nonlinear dynamics of these structures in isolation from the turbulence surrounding them. Rather the dynamics of these large-scale structures arises essentially from their cooperative interaction with the small-scale turbulence in which they are embedded. It follows that fundamental theoretical understanding of the dynamics of jets and vortices in turbulence requires adopting the perspective of the ...

  2. Evolution with Drifting Targets

    CERN Document Server

    Kanade, Varun; Vaughan, Jennifer Wortman

    2010-01-01

    We consider the question of the stability of evolutionary algorithms to gradual changes, or drift, in the target concept. We define an algorithm to be resistant to drift if, for some inverse polynomial drift rate in the target function, it converges to accuracy 1 -- \\epsilon , with polynomial resources, and then stays within that accuracy indefinitely, except with probability \\epsilon , at any one time. We show that every evolution algorithm, in the sense of Valiant (2007; 2009), can be converted using the Correlational Query technique of Feldman (2008), into such a drift resistant algorithm. For certain evolutionary algorithms, such as for Boolean conjunctions, we give bounds on the rates of drift that they can resist. We develop some new evolution algorithms that are resistant to significant drift. In particular, we give an algorithm for evolving linear separators over the spherically symmetric distribution that is resistant to a drift rate of O(\\epsilon /n), and another algorithm over the more general prod...

  3. The Copper Substrate Developments for the HIE-ISOLDE High-Beta Quarter Wave Resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Alberty, L; Aviles, I; Calatroni, S; Capatina, O; Foffano, G; Kadi, Y; Moyret, P; Schirm, K-M; Tardy, T; Venturini Delsolaro, W; D'Elia, A

    2013-01-01

    A new Linac using superconducting Quarter-Wave Resonators (QWRs) is under construction at CERN in the framework of the HIE-ISOLDE project. The QWRs are made by niobium sputtered on a bulk copper substrate. The working frequency at 4.5 K is 101.28 MHz and they will provide 6 MV/m accelerating gradient on the beam axis with a total maximum power dissipation of 10 W. The properties of the cavity substrate have a direct impact on the final cavity performance. The copper substrate has to ensure an optimum surface for the niobium sputtered layer. It has also to fulfil the required geometrical tolerances, the mechanical stability during operation and the thermal performance to optimally extract the RF dissipated power on cavity walls. The paper presents the mechanical design of the high β cavities. The procurement process of the copper raw material is detailed, including specifications and tests. The manufacturing sequence of the complete cavity is then explained and the structural and thermo-mechanical behaviour...

  4. Drift solitons and their two-dimensional stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gell, Y.

    1977-07-01

    The nonlinear equation governing low-frequency drift waves is considered. Utilizing the linear dispersion relation for such waves, it is shown that there exists a parameter range for which the drift waves are governed by a modified Korteweg--de Vries equation having a solitary solution in one and two dimensions. The one-dimensional solitons are unstable with respect to perturbations in the direction perpendicular to their motion.

  5. Study of electric and magnetic field fluctuations from lower hybrid drift instability waves in the terrestrial magnetotail with the fully kinetic, semi-implicit, adaptive multi level multi domain method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innocenti, M. E.; Norgren, C.; Newman, D.; Goldman, M.; Markidis, S.; Lapenta, G.

    2016-05-01

    The newly developed fully kinetic, semi-implicit, adaptive multi-level multi-domain (MLMD) method is used to simulate, at realistic mass ratio, the development of the lower hybrid drift instability (LHDI) in the terrestrial magnetotail over a large wavenumber range and at a low computational cost. The power spectra of the perpendicular electric field and of the fluctuations of the parallel magnetic field are studied at wavenumbers and times that allow to appreciate the onset of the electrostatic and electromagnetic LHDI branches and of the kink instability. The coupling between electric and magnetic field fluctuations observed by Norgren et al. ["Lower hybrid drift waves: Space observations," Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 055001 (2012)] for high wavenumber LHDI waves in the terrestrial magnetotail is verified. In the MLMD simulations presented, a domain ("coarse grid") is simulated with low resolution. A small fraction of the entire domain is then simulated with higher resolution also ("refined grid") to capture smaller scale, higher frequency processes. Initially, the MLMD method is validated for LHDI simulations. MLMD simulations with different levels of grid refinement are validated against the standard semi-implicit particle in cell simulations of domains corresponding to both the coarse and the refined grid. Precious information regarding the applicability of the MLMD method to turbulence simulations is derived. The power spectra of MLMD simulations done with different levels of refinements are then compared. They consistently show a break in the magnetic field spectra at k⊥di˜30 , with di the ion skin depth and k⊥ the perpendicular wavenumber. The break is observed at early simulated times, Ωcit <6 , with Ωci the ion cyclotron frequency. It is due to the initial decoupling of electric and magnetic field fluctuations at intermediate and low wavenumbers, before the development of the electromagnetic LHDI branch. Evidence of coupling between electric and magnetic

  6. Dike/Drift Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. Gaffiney

    2004-11-23

    This report presents and documents the model components and analyses that represent potential processes associated with propagation of a magma-filled crack (dike) migrating upward toward the surface, intersection of the dike with repository drifts, flow of magma in the drifts, and post-magma emplacement effects on repository performance. The processes that describe upward migration of a dike and magma flow down the drift are referred to as the dike intrusion submodel. The post-magma emplacement processes are referred to as the post-intrusion submodel. Collectively, these submodels are referred to as a conceptual model for dike/drift interaction. The model components and analyses of the dike/drift interaction conceptual model provide the technical basis for assessing the potential impacts of an igneous intrusion on repository performance, including those features, events, and processes (FEPs) related to dike/drift interaction (Section 6.1).

  7. Dike/Drift Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents and documents the model components and analyses that represent potential processes associated with propagation of a magma-filled crack (dike) migrating upward toward the surface, intersection of the dike with repository drifts, flow of magma in the drifts, and post-magma emplacement effects on repository performance. The processes that describe upward migration of a dike and magma flow down the drift are referred to as the dike intrusion submodel. The post-magma emplacement processes are referred to as the post-intrusion submodel. Collectively, these submodels are referred to as a conceptual model for dike/drift interaction. The model components and analyses of the dike/drift interaction conceptual model provide the technical basis for assessing the potential impacts of an igneous intrusion on repository performance, including those features, events, and processes (FEPs) related to dike/drift interaction (Section 6.1)

  8. A silicon drift photodiode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avset, B.S.; Evensen, L.; Ellison, J.A.; Hall, G.; Roe, S.; Wheadon, R.; Hansen, T.E.

    1989-02-01

    A low capacitance photodiode based on the principle of the solid state drift chamber has been constructed and tested. The device is based on a cellular design with an anode at the centre of each of five cells allowing electrons liberated by ionisation to drift up to 1mm to the read out strip. Results on the performance of the detector, including leakage current, capacitance and drift properties, are presented and compared with simulations.

  9. Experiments on linear high beta helical axis stellarators to study simulated toroidal effects and Alfven-wave heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses induced axial current studies in a hardcore Theta-Pinch; nonaxisymmetric RF heating of a high-Beta plasma column; formation of Axisymmetric hardcore theta pinches with notched hardcore current; and externally driven till made experiments on the high-beta Q machine field reversed configuration

  10. Abstraction of Drift Seepage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.T. Birkholzer

    2004-11-01

    This model report documents the abstraction of drift seepage, conducted to provide seepage-relevant parameters and their probability distributions for use in Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA). Drift seepage refers to the flow of liquid water into waste emplacement drifts. Water that seeps into drifts may contact waste packages and potentially mobilize radionuclides, and may result in advective transport of radionuclides through breached waste packages [''Risk Information to Support Prioritization of Performance Assessment Models'' (BSC 2003 [DIRS 168796], Section 3.3.2)]. The unsaturated rock layers overlying and hosting the repository form a natural barrier that reduces the amount of water entering emplacement drifts by natural subsurface processes. For example, drift seepage is limited by the capillary barrier forming at the drift crown, which decreases or even eliminates water flow from the unsaturated fractured rock into the drift. During the first few hundred years after waste emplacement, when above-boiling rock temperatures will develop as a result of heat generated by the decay of the radioactive waste, vaporization of percolation water is an additional factor limiting seepage. Estimating the effectiveness of these natural barrier capabilities and predicting the amount of seepage into drifts is an important aspect of assessing the performance of the repository. The TSPA-LA therefore includes a seepage component that calculates the amount of seepage into drifts [''Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) Model/Analysis for the License Application'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168504], Section 6.3.3.1)]. The TSPA-LA calculation is performed with a probabilistic approach that accounts for the spatial and temporal variability and inherent uncertainty of seepage-relevant properties and processes. Results are used for subsequent TSPA-LA components that may handle, for example, waste package

  11. Ion tails and lower-hybrid-drift turbulence in the ELMO Bumpy Torus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is demonstrated that a low level of lower-hybrid-drift waves could explain the hot-ion tails observed in EBT; the tail temperature is related to the lower-hybrid-drift wave energy. The effect of these waves on the bulk ion distribution is also analyzed

  12. Drift Degradation Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The outputs from the drift degradation analysis support scientific analyses, models, and design calculations, including the following: (1) Abstraction of Drift Seepage; (2) Seismic Consequence Abstraction; (3) Structural Stability of a Drip Shield Under Quasi-Static Pressure; and (4) Drip Shield Structural Response to Rock Fall. This report has been developed in accordance with ''Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Modeling of Drift Degradation, Waste Package and Drip Shield Vibratory Motion and Seismic Consequences'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171520]). The drift degradation analysis includes the development and validation of rockfall models that approximate phenomenon associated with various components of rock mass behavior anticipated within the repository horizon. Two drift degradation rockfall models have been developed: the rockfall model for nonlithophysal rock and the rockfall model for lithophysal rock. These models reflect the two distinct types of tuffaceous rock at Yucca Mountain. The output of this modeling and analysis activity documents the expected drift deterioration for drifts constructed in accordance with the repository layout configuration (BSC 2004 [DIRS 172801])

  13. Modeling concept drift

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borchani, Hanen; Martinez, Ana Maria; Masegosa, Andrés R.;

    2015-01-01

    graphical models, that explicitly represents concept drift using latent variables. To ensure efficient inference and learning, we re- sort to a variational Bayes inference scheme. As a proof of concept, we demonstrate and analyze the proposed framework using synthetic data sets as well as a real financial......An often used approach for detecting and adapting to concept drift when doing classification is to treat the data as i.i.d. and use changes in classification accuracy as an indication of concept drift. In this paper, we take a different perspective and propose a framework, based on probabilistic...

  14. Development of drifting buoys

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nayak, M.R.; Peshwe, V.B.; Tengali, S.

    Polar orbiting satellites equipped with random access data collection and position fixing systems have made long-term remote oceanographic/meteorological observations possible by means of instrumented drifting buoys fitted with ARGOS telementry...

  15. On The Propagation, Reflexion, Transmission and Stability of Atmospheric Rossby-Gravity Waves on a Beta-Plane in the Presence of Latitudinally Sheared Zonal Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, B. M.; Eltayeb, I. A.

    1980-08-01

    The propagation properties of Rossby-gravity waves in an isothermal atmosphere on a beta-plane are investigated in the presence of a latitudinally sheared zonal flow. The perturbation equation is found to possess seven regular singularities provided the fluid is non-Boussinesq, and only five for Boussinesq fluids. In slowly varying shear a local dispersion relation is derived and used to study the wave normal surfaces and ray trajectories. The cross sections of the wave normal surfaces in horizontal planes possess three critical latitudes occurring where the intrinsic frequency hat{ω} takes the values 0, ± N, where N is the Brunt-Vaisalla frequency. The former is the usual Rossby wave critical latitude (R.w.c.l.) and the latter are essentially gravity wave critical latitudes (g.w.c.l.). Waves can propagate only on one side of a R.w.c.l. while propagation is possible on both sides of a g.w.c.l. provided the vertical wavenumber, m, there is real and non-zero. Also for real values of m and provided the atmosphere is non-Boussinesq the g.w.c.l. exhibits valve-like behaviour. Such valve behaviour is shown to be responsible for aiding high frequency waves (i.e. gravity waves) to penetrate jet-like wind streams and may facilitate the transfer of energy and momentum across latitudes. The full wave treatment shows that the system possesses a wave-invariant which has a simple physical interpretation only when m is real in which case it represents the conservation of the total northward wave energy flux. The invariant is used, together with the legitimate solutions near the critical latitudes, to study the influence of each of the critical latitudes on the intensity of the wave. It is found that the R.w.c.l. can be associated with energy absorption or emission, depending on certain specified conditions, but the g.w.c.l. is always associated with energy absorption although the amount of energy absorbed depends crucially on whether m is real or imaginary. The reflexion

  16. Ionospheric vertical drift response at a mid-latitude station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouba, Daniel; Koucká Knížová, Petra

    2016-07-01

    equinox. In general, the detected values of the observed vertical drift are of lower magnitudes compare to low latitudes. Drift data in midlatitudes seems to be more influenced by the atmospheric waves than data in lower latitudes.

  17. Drift Scale THM Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Rutqvist

    2004-10-07

    This model report documents the drift scale coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical (THM) processes model development and presents simulations of the THM behavior in fractured rock close to emplacement drifts. The modeling and analyses are used to evaluate the impact of THM processes on permeability and flow in the near-field of the emplacement drifts. The results from this report are used to assess the importance of THM processes on seepage and support in the model reports ''Seepage Model for PA Including Drift Collapse'' and ''Abstraction of Drift Seepage'', and to support arguments for exclusion of features, events, and processes (FEPs) in the analysis reports ''Features, Events, and Processes in Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport and Features, Events, and Processes: Disruptive Events''. The total system performance assessment (TSPA) calculations do not use any output from this report. Specifically, the coupled THM process model is applied to simulate the impact of THM processes on hydrologic properties (permeability and capillary strength) and flow in the near-field rock around a heat-releasing emplacement drift. The heat generated by the decay of radioactive waste results in elevated rock temperatures for thousands of years after waste emplacement. Depending on the thermal load, these temperatures are high enough to cause boiling conditions in the rock, resulting in water redistribution and altered flow paths. These temperatures will also cause thermal expansion of the rock, with the potential of opening or closing fractures and thus changing fracture permeability in the near-field. Understanding the THM coupled processes is important for the performance of the repository because the thermally induced permeability changes potentially effect the magnitude and spatial distribution of percolation flux in the vicinity of the drift, and hence the seepage of water into the drift. This is important because

  18. Experiments on linear high beta helical axis stellarators to study simulated toroidal effects and Alfven-wave heating: [Annual] progress report No. 1, February 16, 1987-November 15, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses experiments on linear high beta helical axis stellarators. Experiments considered are: formation of linear high beta heliac plasma configurations; Alfven wave heating in a straight tube and in a linear high beat stellarator; shifted hardcore heliac studies; a system for measuring the timing of high-current switches in a pulsed high voltage fusion experiment; HBQM general refurbishment; and proposed experiment on excitation of the m = 1 tilt mode in field-reversed configurations

  19. Drift Degradation Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degradation of underground openings as a function of time is a natural and expected occurrence for any subsurface excavation. Over time, changes occur to both the stress condition and the strength of the rock mass due to several interacting factors. Once the factors contributing to degradation are characterized, the effects of drift degradation can typically be mitigated through appropriate design and maintenance of the ground support system. However, for the emplacement drifts of the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, it is necessary to characterize drift degradation over a 10,000-year period, which is well beyond the functional period of the ground support system. This document provides an analysis of the amount of drift degradation anticipated in repository emplacement drifts for discrete events and time increments extending throughout the 10,000-year regulatory period for postclosure performance. This revision of the drift degradation analysis was developed to support the license application and fulfill specific agreement items between the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The earlier versions of ''Drift Degradation Analysis'' (BSC 2001 [DIRS 156304]) relied primarily on the DRKBA numerical code, which provides for a probabilistic key-block assessment based on realistic fracture patterns determined from field mapping in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) at Yucca Mountain. A key block is defined as a critical block in the surrounding rock mass of an excavation, which is removable and oriented in an unsafe manner such that it is likely to move into an opening unless support is provided. However, the use of the DRKBA code to determine potential rockfall data at the repository horizon during the postclosure period has several limitations: (1) The DRKBA code cannot explicitly apply dynamic loads due to seismic ground motion. (2) The DRKBA code cannot explicitly apply loads due to thermal stress. (3) The DRKBA

  20. Drift Degradation Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Kicker

    2004-09-16

    Degradation of underground openings as a function of time is a natural and expected occurrence for any subsurface excavation. Over time, changes occur to both the stress condition and the strength of the rock mass due to several interacting factors. Once the factors contributing to degradation are characterized, the effects of drift degradation can typically be mitigated through appropriate design and maintenance of the ground support system. However, for the emplacement drifts of the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, it is necessary to characterize drift degradation over a 10,000-year period, which is well beyond the functional period of the ground support system. This document provides an analysis of the amount of drift degradation anticipated in repository emplacement drifts for discrete events and time increments extending throughout the 10,000-year regulatory period for postclosure performance. This revision of the drift degradation analysis was developed to support the license application and fulfill specific agreement items between the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The earlier versions of ''Drift Degradation Analysis'' (BSC 2001 [DIRS 156304]) relied primarily on the DRKBA numerical code, which provides for a probabilistic key-block assessment based on realistic fracture patterns determined from field mapping in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) at Yucca Mountain. A key block is defined as a critical block in the surrounding rock mass of an excavation, which is removable and oriented in an unsafe manner such that it is likely to move into an opening unless support is provided. However, the use of the DRKBA code to determine potential rockfall data at the repository horizon during the postclosure period has several limitations: (1) The DRKBA code cannot explicitly apply dynamic loads due to seismic ground motion. (2) The DRKBA code cannot explicitly apply loads due to thermal

  1. Study and analysis of drift chamber parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work deals mainly with drift chambers. In the first chapter a summary of drift chamber properties is presented. The information has been collected from the extensive bibliography available in this field. A very simple calculation procedure of drift chamber parameters has been developed and is presented in detail in the second chapter. Some prototypes have been made following two geometries (multidrift chamber and Z-chambers). Several installations have been used for test and calibration of these prototypes. A complete description of these installations is given in the third chapter. Cosmic rays, beta particles from a Ru106 radiactive source and a test beam in the WA (West Area) of SPS at CERN have been used for experimental purposes. The analysis and the results are described for the different setups. The experimental measurements have been used to produce a complete cell parametrization (position as function of drift time) and to obtain spatial resolution values (in the range of 200-250 um). Experimental results are in good agreement with numerical calculations. (Author)

  2. Toroidal electron temperature gradient drive drift modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electron temperature gradient in tokamak geometry is shown to drive a short wavelength lower hybrid drift wave turbulence due to the unfavorable magnetic curvature on the outside of the torus. Ballooning mode theory is used to determine the stability regimes and the complex eigenfrequencies. At wavelengths of order the electron gyroradius the polarization is electrostatic and the growth rate is greater than the electron transit time aroud the torus. At longer wavelengths of order the collisionless skin depth the polarization is electromagnetic with electromagnetic vortices producing the dominant transport. The small scale electrostatic component of the turbulence produces a small by (m/sub e/m/sub i/)/sup 1/2/ drift wave anomalous transport of both the trapped and passing electrons while the c/ω/sub pe/ scale turbulene produces a neo-Alcator type transport from the stochastic diffusion of the trapped electrons. 15 refs., 5 figs

  3. Theoretical Studies of Drift-Alfven and Energetic Particle Physics in Fusion Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Chen

    2005-07-06

    Nonlinear equations for the slow space-time evolution of the radial drift-wave envelope and zonal flow amplitude have been self-consistently derived for a model nonuniform tokamak equilibrium within the coherent four-wave drift wave-zonal flow modulation interaction model of Chen, Lin, and White [Phys. Plasmas 7, 3129 (2000)]. Solutions clearly demonstrate turbulence spreading due to nonlinearly dispersiveness and, consequently, the device-size dependence of the saturated wave intensities and transport coefficients.

  4. On plasma density blobs in drift turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Krasheninnikov, S I

    2016-01-01

    By keeping nonlinear Boltzmann factor in electron density dependence on electrostatic potential it is demonstrated that large plasma density blobs, often seen in experiment inside separatrix, can exist within the framework of drift wave dynamics. The estimates show that plasma density in a blob can be ~3 times higher that average plasma density, but hardly exceeds this limit, which in a ball park is in agreement with experimental observations.

  5. An experimental study of lower-hybrid wave driven high-poloidal beta plasmas in the Versator II tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Squire, J.P.

    1993-01-01

    High poloidal beta plasma equilibria have been produced by both toroidally asymmetric and symmetric lower-hybrid rf injection in the Versator II tokamak. (Here [beta][sub p] is the ratio of the plasma pressure to the poloidal magnetic field pressure, and [epsilon] = a/R[sub 0] is the inverse aspect ratio). In both cases the plasma current was fully sustained by the rf, with the loop voltage negligibly small. The rf-created high energy electron distribution function, which provides a large fraction of plasma current and pressure in these plasmas, is studied by means of X-ray spectroscopy of the electron-ion perpendicular to the toroidal magnetic field and emission measurements at a full range of angles to the toroidal magnetic field have been carried out. For low plasma current equilibria, [beta][sub p] is enhanced, and an outward shift in major radius of the X-ray emission profile peak was observed, corresponding to a Shafranov shift of the magnetic axis. The LHCD equilibrium current profiles was determined from the X-ray emission profile. The LHCD X-ray data indicate a highly anisotropic energetic electron distribution function with a density approximately 1% of the bulk electron density at the center. The stored energy of this distribution is much larger than the bulk energy and the global energy confinement time scales in agreement with the Kaye-Goldston L-mode scaling. At high values of [beta][sub p] [approximately] 3, LHH generates nearly the same plasma current as LHCD. The LHH equilibria has a reduction of up to a factor of four in the high energy X-ray emission flux, as compared to LHCD. Modeling of the electron distribution function in the LHH case indicates that only one third of the current is carried by the high energy electrons. At lower values of [beta][sub p] [approximately] 1.5, LHH requires the assistance of a small applied loop voltage to maintain the plasma current and the high energy electrons carry a majority of the plasma current.

  6. High resolution drift chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High precision drift chambers capable of achieving less than or equal to 50 μm resolutions are discussed. In particular, we compare so called cool and hot gases, various charge collection geometries, several timing techniques and we also discuss some systematic problems. We also present what we would consider an ''ultimate'' design of the vertex chamber. 50 refs., 36 figs., 6 tabs

  7. Negative Drift in Populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehre, Per Kristian

    2011-01-01

    An important step in gaining a better understanding of the stochastic dynamics of evolving populations, is the development of appropriate analytical tools. We present a new drift theorem for populations that allows properties of their long-term behaviour, e.g. the runtime of evolutionary algorithms...

  8. IN DRIFT CORROSION PRODUCTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.M. Jolley

    1999-12-02

    As directed by a written development plan (CRWMS M&O 1999a), a conceptual model for steel and corrosion products in the engineered barrier system (EBS) is to be developed. The purpose of this conceptual model is to assist Performance Assessment Operations (PAO) and its Engineered Barrier Performance Department in modeling the geochemical environment within a repository drift, thus allowing PAO to provide a more detailed and complete in-drift geochemical model abstraction and to answer the key technical issues (KTI) raised in the NRC Issue Resolution Status Report (IRSR) for the Evolution of the Near-Field Environment (NFE) Revision 2 (NRC 1999). This document provides the conceptual framework for the in-drift corrosion products sub-model to be used in subsequent PAO analyses including the EBS physical and chemical model abstraction effort. This model has been developed to serve as a basis for the in-drift geochemical analyses performed by PAO. However, the concepts discussed within this report may also apply to some near and far-field geochemical processes and may have conceptual application within the unsaturated zone (UZ) and saturated zone (SZ) transport modeling efforts.

  9. Effect of magnetic field on light-induced ion drift

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paper is devoted to theoretical study of the force aspect of magnetic field effect on the light-induced ion drift. One studied three-component (electrons, single-charge positive ions and neutral atoms) slightly ionized gas in the constant homogeneous magnetic field. One derived formulae describing ion drift under the effect of mobile monochromatic light wave. It was determined that in slightly ionized gas at superposition of the external magnetic field a component of light-induced ion drift speed that was transverse to the radiation propagation direction might occur. One estimates the magnetic field value when the projection of ion drift speed on radiation direction should change its sign. In this case, one may observe anomalous light-induced ion drift

  10. Dike Propagation Near Drifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NA

    2002-03-04

    The purpose of this Analysis and Model Report (AMR) supporting the Site Recommendation/License Application (SR/LA) for the Yucca Mountain Project is the development of elementary analyses of the interactions of a hypothetical dike with a repository drift (i.e., tunnel) and with the drift contents at the potential Yucca Mountain repository. This effort is intended to support the analysis of disruptive events for Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA). This AMR supports the Process Model Report (PMR) on disruptive events (CRWMS M&O 2000a). This purpose is documented in the development plan (DP) ''Coordinate Modeling of Dike Propagation Near Drifts Consequences for TSPA-SR/LA'' (CRWMS M&O 2000b). Evaluation of that Development Plan and the work to be conducted to prepare Interim Change Notice (ICN) 1 of this report, which now includes the design option of ''Open'' drifts, indicated that no revision to that DP was needed. These analyses are intended to provide reasonable bounds for a number of expected effects: (1) Temperature changes to the waste package from exposure to magma; (2) The gas flow available to degrade waste containers during the intrusion; (3) Movement of the waste package as it is displaced by the gas, pyroclasts and magma from the intruding dike (the number of packages damaged); (4) Movement of the backfill (Backfill is treated here as a design option); (5) The nature of the mechanics of the dike/drift interaction. These analyses serve two objectives: to provide preliminary analyses needed to support evaluation of the consequences of an intrusive event and to provide a basis for addressing some of the concerns of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) expressed in the Igneous Activity Issue Resolution Status Report.

  11. Stochastic gyroresonant electron acceleration in a low-beta plasma. I - Interaction with parallel transverse cold plasma waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinacker, Juergen; Miller, James A.

    1992-01-01

    The gyroresonance of electrons with parallel transverse cold plasma waves is considered, and the Fokker-Planck equation describing the evolution of the electron distribution function in the presence of a spectrum of turbulence is derived. A new resonance which produces a divergence in the Fokker-Planck coefficients is identified; it results when the electron is in gyroresonance with a wave that has a group velocity equal to the velocity of the electron along the magnetic field. Under the assumption of a power-law spectral density, the Fokker-Planck coefficients are calculated numerically, and their complicated momentum and pitch-angle dependence, as well as the influence of various approximations to the dispersion relation, gyroresonance condition, and spectral density are discussed. It is found that there is no resonance gap at any pitch angle as long as the full gyroresonance condition is used and waves propagating on both directions are present.

  12. Style drift in private equity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Cumming; G. Fleming; A. Schwienbacher

    2009-01-01

    We introduce the concept of style drift to private equity investment. We present theory and evidence pertaining to style drifts in terms of a fund manager's stated focus on particular stages of entrepreneurial development. We develop a model that derives conditions under which style drifts are less

  13. Curvature-drift instability fails to generate pulsar radio emission

    OpenAIRE

    Kaganovich, Alexander; Lyubarsky, Yuri

    2010-01-01

    The curvature drift instability has long been considered as a viable mechanism for pulsar radio emission. We reconsidered this mechanism by finding an explicit solution describing propagation of short-wave electro-magnetic waves in a plasma flow along curved magnetic field lines. We show that even though the waves could be amplified, the amplification factor remains very close to unity therefore this mechanism is unable to generate high brightness temperature emission from initial weak fluctu...

  14. Drift-Diffusion Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Banoo

    1998-01-01

    equation in the discrete momentum space. This is shown to be similar to the conventional drift-diffusion equation except that it is a more rigorous solution to the Boltzmann equation because the current and carrier densities are resolved into M×1 vectors, where M is the number of modes in the discrete momentum space. The mobility and diffusion coefficient become M×M matrices which connect the M momentum space modes. This approach is demonstrated by simulating electron transport in bulk silicon.

  15. Emplacement Drift System Description Document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Emplacement Drift System is part of the Engineered Barrier System and provides the interface between the various waste package (WP) systems and the Ground Control System. In conjunction with the various WPs, the Emplacement Drift System limits the release and transport of radionuclides from the WP to the Natural Barrier following waste emplacement. Collectively, the Emplacement Drift System consists of the structural support hardware (emplacement drift invert and WP emplacement pallet) and any performance-enhancing barriers (drip shields and invert ballast) installed or placed in the emplacement drifts. The Emplacement Drift System is entirely located within the emplacement drifts in the subsurface portion of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR); specifically, it is physically bounded by the Subsurface Facility System, the Ground Support System, and the Natural Barrier. The Emplacement Drift System supports the key MGR functions of limiting radionuclide release to the Natural Barrier, minimizing the likelihood of a criticality external to the WPs, limiting natural and induced environmental effects, and providing WP support. The Emplacement Drift System limits radionuclide release to the Natural Barrier by controlling the movement of radionuclides within the emplacement drift and to the Natural Barrier, and by limiting water contact with the WPs. The Emplacement Drift System provides physical support and barriers for emplaced WPs that reduce water contact. The Emplacement Drift WP spacing supports the thermal loading performance by complimenting drift layout and orientation as described in the system description document for the Subsurface Facility System. The Emplacement Drift System supports the WP and also provides an environment that aids in enhancing WP confinement performance. As part of the Engineered Barrier System, the Emplacement Drift System interfaces with the WP systems. The Emplacement Drift System also interfaces with the Natural Barrier

  16. The Impact of Defects on Q0 for HIE-ISOLDE High-Beta Quarter-Wave Resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, P; Venturini Delsolari, W

    2014-01-01

    Superconducting quarter-wave resonators (QWRs) will be used in the SC linac for the HIE-ISOLDE project at CERN. The QWRs will be working at 4.5 K with an operating frequency of 101.28 MHz. The maximum dissipated power in the cavity is required to be 10 W at a gradient of 6 MV/m. The QWRs are niobium coated on copper substrates, thus the niobium film quality has a direct impact on the cavity performance. This note calculates the impact of defects on cavity Q0 at different locations on the cavity inner surface.

  17. Wave

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2008-01-01

    Estimates for the amount of potential wave energy in the world range from 1-10 TW. The World Energy Council estimates that a potential 2TW of energy is available from the world’s oceans, which is the equivalent of twice the world’s electricity production. Whilst the recoverable resource is many...... times smaller it remains very high. For example, whilst there is enough potential wave power off the UK to supply the electricity demands several times over, the economically recoverable resource for the UK is estimated at 25% of current demand; a lot less, but a very substantial amount nonetheless....

  18. Drift in toroidal configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelidis, E. A.

    1990-12-01

    This paper considers possible mechanisms involved in amplifying the drift velocity of plasma particles, under conditions of toroidal geometry. It is shown that particles constrained to move on an axisymmetric circular spheroidal surface, develop a sinusoidal motion with a characteristic frequency which depends on the energy of the particles, the value of the isoflux surface, and the value of the general momentum. It is also shown that the incorporation of the effects of toroidal geometry in the Lorentz equation produces a nonambipolar charge-dependent particle flux amplified by a factor 2(q/epsilon) squared.

  19. Fingermark ridge drift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Alcaraz-Fossoul, Josep; Roberts, Katherine A; Feixat, Carme Barrot; Hogrebe, Gregory G; Badia, Manel Gené

    2016-01-01

    Distortions of the fingermark topography are usually considered when comparing latent and exemplar fingerprints. These alterations are characterized as caused by an extrinsic action, which affects entire areas of the deposition and alters the overall flow of a series of contiguous ridges. Here we introduce a novel visual phenomenon that does not follow these principles, named fingermark ridge drift. An experiment was designed that included variables such as type of secretion (eccrine and sebaceous), substrate (glass and polystyrene), and degrees of exposure to natural light (darkness, shade, and direct light) indoors. Fingermarks were sequentially visualized with titanium dioxide powder, photographed and analyzed. The comparison between fresh and aged depositions revealed that under certain environmental conditions an individual ridge could randomly change its original position regardless of its unaltered adjacent ridges. The causes of the drift phenomenon are not well understood. We believe it is exclusively associated with intrinsic natural aging processes of latent fingermarks. This discovery will help explain the detection of certain dissimilarities at the minutiae/ridge level; determine more accurate "hits"; identify potentially erroneous corresponding points; and rethink identification protocols, especially the criteria of "no single minutiae discrepancy" for a positive identification.

  20. The DRIFT Dark Matter Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Daw, E; Fox, J R; Gauvreau, J -L; Ghag, C; Harmon, L J; Harton, J L; Gold, M; Lee, E R; Loomba, D; Miller, E H; Murphy, A St J; Paling, S M; Landers, J M; Phan, N; Pipe, M; Pushkin, K; Robinson, M; Sadler, S W; Snowden-Ifft, D P; Spooner, N J C; Walker, D; Warner, D

    2011-01-01

    The current status of the DRIFT (Directional Recoil Identification From Tracks) experiment at Boulby Mine is presented, including the latest limits on the WIMP spin-dependent cross-section from 1.5 kg days of running with a mixture of CS2 and CF4. Planned upgrades to DRIFT IId are detailed, along with ongoing work towards DRIFT III, which aims to be the world's first 10 m3-scale directional Dark Matter detector.

  1. Density drift instabilities and weak collisions. [in space plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary, S. P.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Cole, T. E.

    1983-01-01

    A model is developed which describes the effects of weak collisions on the linear kinetic theory of electrostatic density drift instabilities. A dispersion equation valid at all frequencies and wave numbers is derived using the assumptions of a weak, uniform density gradient; a uniform magnetic field; and the BGK collision operator with a modification of the local approximation. The properties of the universal and collisional density drift instabilities at maximum growth rates are examined in detail. The thresholds of the instabilities are examined for an ionospheric model which includes ion-neutral, electron-neutral, and electron-ion collisions, and are compared with the threshold of the lower hybrid density drift instability. It is concluded that the k to the -5th short wavelength density power spectra observed above 280 km in the PLUMEX experiment are due to the effects of the universal density drift instability.

  2. Drift-Scale Radionuclide Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Houseworth

    2004-09-22

    The purpose of this model report is to document the drift scale radionuclide transport model, taking into account the effects of emplacement drifts on flow and transport in the vicinity of the drift, which are not captured in the mountain-scale unsaturated zone (UZ) flow and transport models ''UZ Flow Models and Submodels'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169861]), ''Radionuclide Transport Models Under Ambient Conditions'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 164500]), and ''Particle Tracking Model and Abstraction of Transport Process'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170041]). The drift scale radionuclide transport model is intended to be used as an alternative model for comparison with the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport model ''EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169868]). For that purpose, two alternative models have been developed for drift-scale radionuclide transport. One of the alternative models is a dual continuum flow and transport model called the drift shadow model. The effects of variations in the flow field and fracture-matrix interaction in the vicinity of a waste emplacement drift are investigated through sensitivity studies using the drift shadow model (Houseworth et al. 2003 [DIRS 164394]). In this model, the flow is significantly perturbed (reduced) beneath the waste emplacement drifts. However, comparisons of transport in this perturbed flow field with transport in an unperturbed flow field show similar results if the transport is initiated in the rock matrix. This has led to a second alternative model, called the fracture-matrix partitioning model, that focuses on the partitioning of radionuclide transport between the fractures and matrix upon exiting the waste emplacement drift. The fracture-matrix partitioning model computes the partitioning, between fractures and matrix, of diffusive radionuclide transport from the invert (for drifts without seepage) into the rock water

  3. Drift-induced Benjamin-Feir instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Patti, F.; Fanelli, D.; Carletti, T.

    2016-06-01

    A modified version of the Ginzburg-Landau equation is introduced which accounts for asymmetric couplings between neighbors sites on a one-dimensional lattice, with periodic boundary conditions. The drift term which reflects the imposed microscopic asymmetry seeds a generalized class of instabilities, reminiscent of the Benjamin-Feir type. The uniformly synchronized solution is spontaneously destabilized outside the region of parameters classically associated to the Benjamin-Feir instability, upon injection of a nonhomogeneous perturbation. The ensuing patterns can be of the traveling wave type or display a patchy, colorful mosaic for the modulus of the complex oscillators amplitude.

  4. Wave-Ice interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈奚海莉

    2001-01-01

    The growth and movement of sea ice cover are influenced by the presence of wave field. Inturn, the wave field is influenced by the presence of ice cover. Their interaction is not fully understood.In this paper, we discuss some current understanding on wave attenuation when it propagates through frag-mented ice cover, ice drift due to the wave motion, and the growth characteristics of ice cover in wave field.

  5. Electromagnetic effects on dynamics of high-beta filamentary structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Wonjae; Krasheninnikov, Sergei I., E-mail: skrash@mae.ucsd.edu [University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Umansky, Maxim V. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Angus, J. R. [Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Avenue, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2015-01-15

    The impacts of the electromagnetic effects on blob dynamics are considered. Electromagnetic BOUT++ simulations on seeded high-beta blobs demonstrate that inhomogeneity of magnetic curvature or plasma pressure along the filament leads to bending of the blob filaments and the magnetic field lines due to increased propagation time of plasma current (Alfvén time). The bending motion can enhance heat exchange between the plasma facing materials and the inner scrape-off layer (SOL) region. The effects of sheath boundary conditions on the part of the blob away from the boundary are also diminished by the increased Alfvén time. Using linear analysis and BOUT++ simulations, it is found that electromagnetic effects in high temperature and high density plasmas reduce the growth rate of resistive drift wave instability when resistivity drops below a certain value. The blobs temperature decreases in the course of its motion through the SOL and so the blob can switch from the electromagnetic to the electrostatic regime where resistive drift waves become important again.

  6. DRIFT EFFECTS IN HGCDTE DETECTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. PAVAN KUMAR

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The characteristics of temporal drift in spectral responsivity of HgCdTe photodetectors is investigated and found to have an origin different from what has been reported in literature. Traditionally, the literature attributes the cause of drift due to the deposition of thin film of ice water on the active area of the cold detector. The source of drift as proposed in this paper is more critical owing to the difficulties in acquisition of infrared temperature measurements. A model explaining the drift phenomenon in HgCdTe detectors is described by considering the deep trapping of charge carriers and generation of radiation induced deep trap centers which are meta-stable in nature. A theoretical model is fitted to the experimental data. A comparison of the model with the experimental data shows that the radiation induced deep trap centers and charge trapping effects are mainly responsible for the drift phenomenon observed in HgCdTe detectors.

  7. Surface Wave Propagation in non--ideal plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Pandey, B P

    2015-01-01

    The properties of surface waves in a partially ionized, compressible magnetized plasma slab are investigated in this work. The waves are affected by the nonideal magnetohydrodynamic effects which causes finite drift of the magnetic field in the medium. When the magnetic field drift is ignored, the characteristics of the wave propagation in a partially ionized plasma fluid is similar to the fully ionized ideal MHD except now the propagation properties depend on the fractional ionization as well as on the compressibility of the medium. The phase velocity of the sausage and kink waves increases marginally (by a few percent) due to the compressibility of the medium in both ideal as well as Hall diffusion dominated regimes. However, unlike ideal regime, only waves below certain cut off frequency can propagate in the medium in Hall dominated regime. This cut off for a thin slab has a weak dependence on the plasma beta whereas for thick slab no such dependence exists. More importantly, since the cut off is introduce...

  8. Drifting oscillations in axion monodromy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flauger, Raphael [Pittsburgh Univ., PA (United States). Dept. of Physics; McAllister, Liam [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States). Dept. of Physics; Silverstein, Eva [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States). Dept. of Physics; Stanford National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford, CA (United States); Westphal, Alexander [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2014-12-15

    We study the pattern of oscillations in the primordial power spectrum in axion monodromy inflation, accounting for drifts in the oscillation period that can be important for comparing to cosmological data. In these models the potential energy has a monomial form over a super-Planckian field range, with superimposed modulations whose size is model-dependent. The amplitude and frequency of the modulations are set by the expectation values of moduli fields. We show that during the course of inflation, the diminishing energy density can induce slow adjustments of the moduli, changing the modulations. We provide templates capturing the effects of drifting moduli, as well as drifts arising in effective field theory models based on softly broken discrete shift symmetries, and we estimate the precision required to detect a drifting period. A non-drifting template suffices over a wide range of parameters, but for the highest frequencies of interest, or for sufficiently strong drift, it is necessary to include parameters characterizing the change in frequency over the e-folds visible in the CMB. We use these templates to perform a preliminary search for drifting oscillations in a part of the parameter space in the Planck nominal mission data.

  9. Drifting oscillations in axion monodromy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the pattern of oscillations in the primordial power spectrum in axion monodromy inflation, accounting for drifts in the oscillation period that can be important for comparing to cosmological data. In these models the potential energy has a monomial form over a super-Planckian field range, with superimposed modulations whose size is model-dependent. The amplitude and frequency of the modulations are set by the expectation values of moduli fields. We show that during the course of inflation, the diminishing energy density can induce slow adjustments of the moduli, changing the modulations. We provide templates capturing the effects of drifting moduli, as well as drifts arising in effective field theory models based on softly broken discrete shift symmetries, and we estimate the precision required to detect a drifting period. A non-drifting template suffices over a wide range of parameters, but for the highest frequencies of interest, or for sufficiently strong drift, it is necessary to include parameters characterizing the change in frequency over the e-folds visible in the CMB. We use these templates to perform a preliminary search for drifting oscillations in a part of the parameter space in the Planck nominal mission data.

  10. Outer Belt Radial Transport Signatures in Drift Phase Structure - Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Paul; Green, Janet; Fennell, Joseph; Claudepierre, Seth; Roeder, James; Kwan, Betty; Mulligan Skov, Tamitha

    2016-07-01

    During geomagnetic storms, the Earth's outer radiation belt experiences enhanced radial transport. Different modes of radial transport have different temporal signatures in the particle phase-space density on timescales shorter than a drift period. We use such drift phase structure in time series particle flux observations to identify transport signatures of impulsive and oscillatory drift resonant transport. We perform multiple case studies of geomagnetic storms using particle flux taken near geostationary orbit. We estimate the radial diffusion coefficients from the drift phase structures. We show how these radial diffusion coefficients derived from particle data compare to transport coefficients deduced from wave observations.

  11. Nonlinear Evolution of Lower-Hybrid Drift Instability in Harris Current Sheet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Fan; LU Quan-Ming; GUO Jun; WANG Shui

    2008-01-01

    We perform 2.5-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations to investigate the nonlinear evolution of the lower hybrid drift instability (LHDI) in Harris current sheet. Due to the drift motion of electrons in the electric field of the excited low hybrid drift (LHD) waves, the electrons accumulate at the outer layer, and therefore there is net positive charge at the inner edge of the current sheet. This redistribution of charge can create an electrostatic field along the z direction, which then modifies the motions of the electrons along the y direction by E×B drift. This effect strongly changes the structure of the current sheet.

  12. Relative drifts and temperature anisotropies of protons and $\\alpha$ particles in the expanding solar wind -- 2.5D hybrid simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Maneva, Y G; Viñas, A

    2014-01-01

    We perform 2.5D hybrid simulations to investigate the origin and evolution of relative drift speeds between protons and $\\alpha$ particles in the collisionless turbulent low-$\\beta$ solar wind plasma. We study the generation of differential streaming by wave-particle interactions and absorption of turbulent wave spectra. Next we focus on the role of the relative drifts for the turbulent heating and acceleration of ions in the collisionless fast solar wind streams. The energy source is given by an initial broad-band spectrum of parallel propagating Alfv\\'en-cyclotron waves, which co-exists with the plasma and is self-consistently coupled to the perpendicular ion bulk velocities. We include the effect of a gradual solar wind expansion, which cools and decelerates the minor ions. This paper for the first time considers the combined effect of self-consistently initialized dispersive turbulent Alfv\\'enic spectra with differentially streaming protons and $\\alpha$ particles in the expanding solar wind outflows withi...

  13. Drift modes of a quasi-two-dimensional current sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artemyev, A. V.; Malova, Kh. V.; Popov, V. Yu.; Zelenyi, L. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Space Research Institute (Russian Federation)

    2012-03-15

    Stability of a plasma configuration consisting of a thin one-dimensional current sheet embedded into a two-dimensional background current sheet is studied. Drift modes developing in plasma as unstable waves along the current direction are considered. Dispersion relations for kink and sausage perturbation modes are obtained depending on the ratio of parameters of thin and background current sheets. It is shown that the existence of the background sheet results in a decrease in the instability growth rates and a significant increase in the perturbation wavelengths. The role of drift modes in the excitation of oscillations observed in the current sheet of the Earth's magnetotail is discussed.

  14. Diffusive shock acceleration with magnetic field amplification and Alfvenic drift

    CERN Document Server

    Kang, Hyesung

    2012-01-01

    We explore how wave-particle interactions affect diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) at astrophysical shocks by performing time-dependent kinetic simulations, in which phenomenological models for magnetic field amplification (MFA), Alfvenic drift, thermal leakage injection, Bohm-like diffusion, and a free escape boundary are implemented. If the injection fraction of cosmic-ray (CR) particles is greater than 2x10^{-4}, for the shock parameters relevant for young supernova remnants, DSA is efficient enough to develop a significant shock precursor due to CR feedback, and magnetic field can be amplified up to a factor of 20 via CR streaming instability in the upstream region. If scattering centers drift with Alfven speed in the amplified magnetic field, the CR energy spectrum can be steepened significantly and the acceleration efficiency is reduced. Nonlinear DSA with self-consistent MFA and Alfvenic drift predicts that the postshock CR pressure saturates roughly at 10 % of the shock ram pressure for strong shocks...

  15. Search for neutrinoless double beta decay with DCBA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A project called DCBA (Drift Chamber Beta-ray Analyzer) is in progress at KEK in order to search for the events of neutrinoless double beta decay. For investigating technical problems, a test apparatus called DCBA-T has been constructed. The preliminary results of its engineering run are described together with the simulation studies of backgrounds originating from 214Bi and 208Tl

  16. Modelling substorm chorus events in terms of dispersive azimuthal drift

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. Collier

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The Substorm Chorus Event (SCE is a radio phenomenon observed on the ground after the onset of the substorm expansion phase. It consists of a band of VLF chorus with rising upper and lower cutoff frequencies. These emissions are thought to result from Doppler-shifted cyclotron resonance between whistler mode waves and energetic electrons which drift into a ground station's field of view from an injection site around midnight. The increasing frequency of the emission envelope has been attributed to the combined effects of energy dispersion due to gradient and curvature drifts, and the modification of resonance conditions and variation of the half-gyrofrequency cutoff resulting from the radial component of the ExB drift.

    A model is presented which accounts for the observed features of the SCE in terms of the growth rate of whistler mode waves due to anisotropy in the electron distribution. This model provides an explanation for the increasing frequency of the SCE lower cutoff, as well as reproducing the general frequency-time signature of the event. In addition, the results place some restrictions on the injected particle source distribution which might lead to a SCE.

    Key words. Space plasma physics (Wave-particle interaction – Magnetospheric physics (Plasma waves and instabilities; Storms and substorms

  17. Characteristic parameters of drift chambers calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present here the methods we used to analyse the characteristic parameters of drift chambers. The algorithms to calculate the electric potential in any point for any drift chamber geometry are presented. We include the description of the programs used to calculate the electric field, the drift paths, the drift velocity and the drift time. The results and the errors are discussed. (Author) 7 refs

  18. Nozzle Classification for Drift Reduction in Orchard Spraying: Identification of Drift Reduction Class Threshold Nozzles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zande, van de J.C.; Holterman, H.J.; Wenneker, M.

    2008-01-01

    In fruit growing high values of spray drift are found compared to arable field applications. In arable spraying drift reducing nozzles are certified for use as drift reducing measures. The nozzles which may potentially reduce drift in fruit growing are not jet classified as drift reducing nozzles, a

  19. Atlas of Dutch drift sands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riksen, Michel; Jungerius, Pieter

    2013-04-01

    The Netherlands is well known for its aeolian landscapes. Frequent storms during the High Middle Ages (1000-1300 AD) reactivated Pleistocene coversands and river dunes and are responsible for the formation of the Holocene drift sands at a scale which is unique for Europe. A hypothesized relationship with farmer practices for making plaggensoils has recently been refuted, because drift sand formation began centuries earlier. The coastal dune belt with their parabolic dunes dates from the same period as the drift sand. An estimate of the extent of drift sands can be made from soil maps: drift sands are too young to show much profile development (Regosols). With this method Koster estimated the maximum extent of Holocene drift sands in the Netherlands to be about 800 km2 (Koster 2005). Laser altimetry allows a more precise estimate of the total surface affected by wind from the characteristic relief patterns produced by the Holocene wind, which is different from the smooth surface of cover sand deposits. Laser altimetry has been used before to investigate the mechanism of drift sand formation (Jungerius & Riksen 2010). Most of the surface affected by wind is not active anymore, but the tell-tale rough surface survived ages of different landuse. The total affected surface amounts to 825 km2. It is noteworthy that both methods give comparable results. We recorded a total number of 367 of affected areas of varying shapes, ranging in size from 1.6 ha to a large complex of drif sands of 7,119.5 ha. As is to be expected from their mode of origin, most occurrences are associated with cover sands, and with river dunes along the river Meuse and smaller rivers in other parts of the country. Particularly the final phases of cover sand and river dunes that show more relief as parabolic dunes were affected. There are also small aeolian deposits at the lee side blown from fallow agricultural fields but they are (sub)recent. Most of the relief is irregular, but the larger

  20. In-Drift Microbial Communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Jolley

    2000-11-09

    As directed by written work direction (CRWMS M and O 1999f), Performance Assessment (PA) developed a model for microbial communities in the engineered barrier system (EBS) as documented here. The purpose of this model is to assist Performance Assessment and its Engineered Barrier Performance Section in modeling the geochemical environment within a potential repository drift for TSPA-SR/LA, thus allowing PA to provide a more detailed and complete near-field geochemical model and to answer the key technical issues (KTI) raised in the NRC Issue Resolution Status Report (IRSR) for the Evolution of the Near Field Environment (NFE) Revision 2 (NRC 1999). This model and its predecessor (the in-drift microbial communities model as documented in Chapter 4 of the TSPA-VA Technical Basis Document, CRWMS M and O 1998a) was developed to respond to the applicable KTIs. Additionally, because of the previous development of the in-drift microbial communities model as documented in Chapter 4 of the TSPA-VA Technical Basis Document (CRWMS M and O 1998a), the M and O was effectively able to resolve a previous KTI concern regarding the effects of microbial processes on seepage and flow (NRC 1998). This document supercedes the in-drift microbial communities model as documented in Chapter 4 of the TSPA-VA Technical Basis Document (CRWMS M and O 1998a). This document provides the conceptual framework of the revised in-drift microbial communities model to be used in subsequent performance assessment (PA) analyses.

  1. In-Drift Microbial Communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As directed by written work direction (CRWMS M and O 1999f), Performance Assessment (PA) developed a model for microbial communities in the engineered barrier system (EBS) as documented here. The purpose of this model is to assist Performance Assessment and its Engineered Barrier Performance Section in modeling the geochemical environment within a potential repository drift for TSPA-SR/LA, thus allowing PA to provide a more detailed and complete near-field geochemical model and to answer the key technical issues (KTI) raised in the NRC Issue Resolution Status Report (IRSR) for the Evolution of the Near Field Environment (NFE) Revision 2 (NRC 1999). This model and its predecessor (the in-drift microbial communities model as documented in Chapter 4 of the TSPA-VA Technical Basis Document, CRWMS M and O 1998a) was developed to respond to the applicable KTIs. Additionally, because of the previous development of the in-drift microbial communities model as documented in Chapter 4 of the TSPA-VA Technical Basis Document (CRWMS M and O 1998a), the M and O was effectively able to resolve a previous KTI concern regarding the effects of microbial processes on seepage and flow (NRC 1998). This document supercedes the in-drift microbial communities model as documented in Chapter 4 of the TSPA-VA Technical Basis Document (CRWMS M and O 1998a). This document provides the conceptual framework of the revised in-drift microbial communities model to be used in subsequent performance assessment (PA) analyses

  2. Drift effects on electromagnetic geodesic acoustic modes

    CERN Document Server

    Sgalla, Reneé J F

    2014-01-01

    A two fluid model with parallel viscosity is employed to derive the dispersion relation for electromagnetic geodesic acoustic modes (GAMs) in the presence of drift (diamagnetic) effects. Concerning the influence of the electron dynamics on the high frequency GAM, it is shown that the frequency of the electromagnetic GAM is independent of the equilibrium parallel current but, in contrast with purely electrostatic GAMs, significantly depends on the electron temperature gradient. The electromagnetic GAM may explain the discrepancy between the $f\\sim 40$ kHz oscillation observed in TCABR [Yu. K. Kuznetsov $\\textit{et al.}$, Nucl. Fusion $\\bf{52}$, 063044 (2012)] and the former prediction for the electrostatic GAM frequency. The radial wave length associated with this oscillation, estimated presently from this analytical model, is $\\lambda_r\\sim 25$ cm, i. e., an order of magnitude higher than the usual value for zonal flows (ZFs).

  3. Drift effects on electromagnetic geodesic acoustic modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sgalla, R. J. F., E-mail: reneesgalla@gmail.com [Institute of Physics, University of São Paulo, São Paulo 05508-900 (Brazil)

    2015-02-15

    A two fluid model with parallel viscosity is employed to derive the dispersion relation for electromagnetic geodesic acoustic modes (GAMs) in the presence of drift (diamagnetic) effects. Concerning the influence of the electron dynamics on the high frequency GAM, it is shown that the frequency of the electromagnetic GAM is independent of the equilibrium parallel current but, in contrast with purely electrostatic GAMs, significantly depends on the electron temperature gradient. The electromagnetic GAM may explain the discrepancy between the f ∼ 40 kHz oscillation observed in tokamak TCABR [Yu. K. Kuznetsov et al., Nucl. Fusion 52, 063044 (2012)] and the former prediction for the electrostatic GAM frequency. The radial wave length associated with this oscillation, estimated presently from this analytical model, is λ{sub r} ∼ 25 cm, i.e., an order of magnitude higher than the usual value for zonal flows (ZFs)

  4. The CLAS drift chamber system

    CERN Document Server

    Mestayer, M D; Asavapibhop, B; Barbosa, F J; Bonneau, P; Christo, S B; Dodge, G E; Dooling, T; Duncan, W S; Dytman, S A; Feuerbach, R; Gilfoyle, G P; Gyurjyan, V; Hicks, K H; Hicks, R S; Hyde-Wright, C E; Jacobs, G; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Kossov, M; Kuhn, S E; Magahiz, R A; Major, R W; Martin, C; McGuckin, T; McNabb, J; Miskimen, R A; Müller, J A; Niczyporuk, B B; O'Meara, J E; Qin, L M; Raue, B A; Robb, J; Roudot, F; Schumacher, R A; Tedeschi, D J; Thompson, R A; Tilles, D; Tuzel, W; Vansyoc, K; Vineyard, M F; Weinstein, L B; Wilkin, G R; Yegneswaran, A; Yun, J

    2000-01-01

    Experimental Hall B at Jefferson Laboratory houses the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer, the magnetic field of which is produced by a superconducting toroid. The six coils of this toroid divide the detector azimuthally into six sectors, each of which contains three large multi-layer drift chambers for tracking charged particles produced from a fixed target on the toroidal axis. Within the 18 drift chambers are a total of 35,148 individually instrumented hexagonal drift cells. The novel geometry of these chambers provides for good tracking resolution and efficiency, along with large acceptance. The design and construction challenges posed by these large-scale detectors are described, and detailed results are presented from in-beam measurements.

  5. The CLAS drift chamber system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mestayer, M.D.; Carman, D.S.; Asavaphibhop, B. [and others

    1999-04-01

    Experimental Hall B at Jefferson Laboratory houses the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer, the magnetic field of which is produced by a superconducting toroid. The six coils of this toroid divide the detector azimuthally into six sectors, each of which contains three large multi-layer drift chambers for tracking charged particles produced from a fixed target on a toroidal axis. Within the 18 drift chambers are a total of 35,148 individually instrumented hexagonal drift cells. The novel geometry of these chambers provides for good tracking resolution and efficiency, along with large acceptance. The design and construction challenges posed by these large-scale detectors are described, and detailed results are presented from in-beam measurements.

  6. drift tube for linear accelerator

    CERN Multimedia

    A drift tube from the Linac 1. This was the first tank of the linear accelerator Linac1, the injection system for the Proton Synchrotron, It ran for 34 years (1958 - 1992). Protons entered at the far end and were accelerated between the copper drift tubes by an oscillating electromagnetic field. The field flipped 200 million times a second (200 MHz) so the protons spent 5 nanoseconds crossing a drift tube and a gap. Moving down the tank, the tubes and gaps had to get longer as the protons gained speed. The tank accelerated protons from 500 KeV to 10 MeV. Linac1 was also used to accelerate deutrons and alpha particles for the Intersecting Storage Rings and oxygen and sulpher ions for the Super Proton Synchrotron heavy ion programme.

  7. Drift tubes of Linac 2

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    With the advent of the 800 MeV PS Booster in 1972, the original injector of the PS, a 50 MeV Alvarez-type proton linac, had reached its limits, in terms of intensity and stability. In 1973 one therefore decided to build a new linac (Linac 2), also with a drift-tube Alvarez structure and an energy of 50 MeV. It had a new Cockcroft-Walton preinjector with 750 keV, instead of the previous one with 500 keV. Linac 2 was put into service in 1980. The old Linac 1 was then used for the study of, and later operation with, various types of ions. This picture shows Linac 2 drift-tubes, suspended on stems coming from the top, in contrast to Linac 1, where the drift-tubes stood on stems coming from the bottom.

  8. Predicting public sector accountability : From agency drift to forum drift

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schillemans, Thomas; Busuioc, Madalina

    2015-01-01

    Principal-agent theory has been the dominant theory at the heart of public sector accountability research. The notion of the potentially drifting agent-such as independent public agencies, opaque transnational institutions, or recalcitrant street-level bureaucrats-has been the guiding paradigm in em

  9. Experimental study of high beta toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments on the Wisconsin Levitated Toroidal Octupole have produced a wide range of stable high β plasmas with β significantly above single fluid MHD theory predictions. A stable β approx. 8% plasma, twice the fluid limit, is obtained with 5 rho/sub i/ approx. L/sub n/ and tau/sub β/ approx. = 6000 tau/sub Alfven/ = 600 μsec. The enhanced stability is explained with a kinetic treatment that includes the effect of finite ion gyroradius which couples the ballooning mode to an ion drift wave. In a more collisional, large gyroradius (2 rho/sub i/ approx. L/sub n/) regime, a stable β approx. 35% plasma is obtained with a decay time of 1000 Alfven times. Measurement of the equilibrium magnetic field in this regime indicates that the diamagnetic current density is five times smaller than predicted by ideal MHD, probably due to ion gyroviscosity. Particle transport is anomalous and ranges from agreement with the classical diffusion rate at the highest beta, lowest field plasma (B/sub P/ = 200 G), to thirteen times the classical rate in a β=11%, high field plasma (B/sub P/ = 860 G) where the level of enhancement increase with magnetic field. Fluctuations in density, electrostatic potential, and magnetic field have been studied in plasmas with β from 0.1% to 40%

  10. Job satisfaction and preference drift.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Maassen van den Brink; W.J.N. Groot

    1999-01-01

    Most empirical studies do not find that higher wages lead to more job satisfaction. In this paper we argue that the insignificant effect of wages on job satisfaction is due to preference drift. We adapt the standard ordered response model to allow for preference shifts. The empirical results support

  11. Drift, Violence, and the Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besag, Frank P.

    This paper begins by discussing David Matza's concept of "Drift" as a causal factor in violence and delinquent behavior. Matza's theory of delinquency contends that youth are prone to feelings of injustice, neutralization, preparation, and desperation. According to Matza, no one characteristic of the potential delinquent is sufficient, although…

  12. Drift in LED based Photometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paasch, Kasper

    1999-01-01

    During the development of a low cost industrial optical sensor an unexpected drift phenomenon has shown to be critical to performance. The sensor is based on LED's as light sources and the main source of error could be tracked to the instability of the spatial radiation pattern of the LED...

  13. Electromagnetic transport components and sheared flows in drift-Alfven turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naulin, V.

    2003-01-01

    Results from three-dimensional numerical simulations of drift-Alfven turbulence in a toroidal geometry with sheared magnetic field are presented. The simulations show a relation between self-generated poloidal shear flows and magnetic field perturbations. For large values of the plasma beta we...

  14. An asymmetric outer retinal response to drifting sawtooth gratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddell, Nina; Hugrass, Laila; Jayasuriya, Jude; Crewther, Sheila G; Crewther, David P

    2016-05-01

    Electroretinogram (ERG) studies have demonstrated that the retinal response to temporally modulated fast-ON and fast-OFF sawtooth flicker is asymmetric. The response to spatiotemporal sawtooth stimuli has not yet been investigated. Perceptually, such drifting gratings or diamond plaids shaded in a sawtooth pattern appear brighter when movement produces fast-OFF relative to fast-ON luminance profiles. The neural origins of this illusion remain unclear (although a retinal basis has been suggested). Thus we presented toad eyecups with sequential epochs of sawtooth, sine-wave, and square-wave gratings drifting horizontally across the retina at temporal frequencies of 2.5-20 Hz. All ERGs revealed a sustained direct-current (DC) transtissue potential during drift and a peak at drift offset. The amplitudes of both phenomena increased with temporal frequency. Consistent with the human perceptual experience of sawtooth gratings, the sustained DC potential effect was greater for fast-OFF cf. fast-ON sawtooth. Modeling suggested that the dependence of temporal luminance contrast on stimulus device frame rate contributed to the temporal frequency effects but could not explain the divergence in response amplitudes for the two sawtooth profiles. The difference between fast-ON and fast-OFF sawtooth profiles also remained following pharmacological suppression of postreceptoral activity with tetrodotoxin (TTX), 2-amino-4-phosphonobutric acid (APB), and 2,3 cis-piperidine dicarboxylic acid (PDA). Our results indicate that the DC potential difference originates from asymmetries in the photoreceptoral response to fast-ON and fast-OFF sawtooth profiles, thus pointing to an outer retinal origin for the motion-induced drifting sawtooth brightness illusion. PMID:26888098

  15. Studies of electron drift velocity in nitrogen and isobutane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncalves, Josemary A.C.; Botelho, Suzana; Tobias, Carmen C.B. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Pontificia Univ. Catolica de Sao Paulo (PUC/SP), SP (Brazil); Vivaldini, Tulio C.; Lima, Iara B. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Ridenti, Marco A.; Pascholati, Paulo R. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica. Lab. do Acelerador Linear; Fonte, Paulo; Mangiarotti, Alessio [Universidade de Coimbra (Portugal). Dept. de fisica. Lab. de Instrumentacao e Fisica Experimental de Particulas

    2009-07-01

    Full text: The electron drift velocity is one of the most important transport parameters used to describe the physical behaviour of gas discharges and the development of avalanches in gaseous detectors, mainly when temporal information is significant, as in drift chambers and in the recent Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs). Although many filling gases, isobutane is frequently used in RPCs, due to its excellent timing properties, but at high electric fields conditions there are insufficient data available in literature. In the present work we report the preliminary results related to the dependence of the electron drift velocity for isobutane as function of the reduced electric field E/N, in the range of 100 Td up to 216 Td. There are different methods to determine electron drift velocity in a gas, and our measurements were based on the Pulsed Townsend technique, which consists of extracting electrons from a metallic cathode and accelerates them toward the anode by a uniform electric field. Once the drift distance and the transit time are known, the drift velocities can be determined. In our system, the incidence of a nitrogen laser beam (LTB MNL200-LD) liberates electron from the cathode made of aluminium (40mm diameter). By means of a high voltage supply (Bertan, 225-30), these electrons are accelerated toward the anode (made of a high resistivity glass - 2:10{sup 12}{omega} cm) and this movement produces a fast electric signal in the anode, which is digitalized in an oscilloscope (LeCroy WavePro 7000) with 1 GHz bandwidth and 10 GS/s. The values obtained were compared to that ones of a Bolsig+ simulation code. In order to validate the technique and to analyze non-uniformity effects, results for nitrogen are also presented. (author)

  16. An Obliquely Propagating Electromagnetic Lower-Hybrid-Drift Instability in Plasmas with Negative Ions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Feihu; ZHANG Zhou; CHEN Yinhua; HUANG Feng

    2007-01-01

    In this study,by employing a local fluid theory for warm plasma containing negative ions,an obliquely propagating electromagnetic instability in the lower hybrid frequency range driven by cross-field currents or relative drifts between electrons and ions Was investigated.It is found that the growth rate of the lower-hybrid-drift instability(LHDI)can be controlled by appropriate selection of the propagation direction,the wave number and the relative population of the negative ions.

  17. Drift Chambers detectors; Detectores de deriva

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duran, I.; Martinez laso, L.

    1989-07-01

    We present here a review of High Energy Physics detectors based on drift chambers. The ionization, drift diffusion, multiplication and detection principles are described. Most common drift media are analysed, and a classification of the detectors according to its geometry is done. Finally the standard read-out methods are displayed and the limits of the spatial resolution are discussed. (Author) 115 refs.

  18. A numerical estimation of the impact of Stokes drift on upper ocean temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xiaoshuang; WANG Zhifeng; WANG Bin; WU Kejian; HAN Guijun; LI Wei

    2014-01-01

    The impact of Stokes drift on the mixed layer temperature variation was estimated by taking into account an advective heat transport term induced by the Stokes drift in the equation of mixed layer temperature and using the oceanic and wave parameters from a global ocean circulation model (HYCOM) and a wave model ( Wave Watch III). The dimensional analysis and quantitative estimation method were conducted to assess the importance of the effect induced by the Stokes drift and to analyze its spatial distribution and seasonal variation characteristics. Results show that the contribution of the Stokes drift to the mixed layer tempera-ture variation at mid-to-high latitudes is comparable with that of the mean current, and a substantial part of mixed layer temperature change is induced by taking the Stokes drift effect into account. Although the advection heat transport induced by the Stokes drift is not the leading term for the mixed layer temperature equation, it cannot be neglected and even becomes critical in some regions for the simulation of the upper-ocean temperature.

  19. A Pascalian lateral drift sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, H.

    2016-09-01

    A novel concept of a layer-wise produced semiconductor sensor for precise particle tracking is proposed herein. In contrast to common semiconductor sensors, local regions with increased doping concentration deep in the bulk termed charge guides increase the lateral drift of free charges on their way to the read-out electrode. This lateral drift enables charge sharing independent of the incident position of the traversing particle. With a regular grid of charge guides the lateral charge distribution resembles a normalised Pascal's triangle for particles that are stopped in depths lower than the depth of the first layer of the charge guides. For minimum ionising particles a sum of binomial distributions describes the lateral charge distribution. This concept decouples the achievable sensor resolution from the pitch size as the characteristic length is replaced by the lateral distance of the charge guides.

  20. MPS II drift chamber system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platner, E.D.

    1982-01-01

    The MPS II detectors are narrow drift space chambers designed for high position resolution in a magnetic field and in a very high particle flux environment. Central to this implementation was the development of 3 multi-channel custom IC's and one multi-channel hybrid. The system is deadtimeless and requires no corrections on an anode-to-anode basis. Operational experience and relevance to ISABELLE detectors is discussed.

  1. The HERMES Back Drift Chambers

    OpenAIRE

    al, S. Bernreuther et

    1998-01-01

    The tracking system of the HERMES spectrometer behind the bending magnet consists of two pairs of large planar 6-plane drift chambers. The design and performance of these chambers is described. This description comprises details on the mechanical and electronical design, information about the gas mixture used and its properties, results on alignment, calibration, resolution, and efficiencies, and a discussion of the experience gained through the first three years of operation.

  2. Dispersal of invasive species by drifting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.C. VAN RIEL; G. VAN DER VELDE; A. BIJ DE VAATE

    2011-01-01

    Drifting can be an effective way for aquatic organisms to disperse and colonise new areas.Increasing connectivity between European large rivers facilitates invasion by drifting aquatic macroinvertebrates.The present study shows that high abundances of invasive species drift in the headstream of the river Rhine.Dikerogammarus villosus and Chelicorophium curvispinum represented up to 90% of the total of drifting macroinvertebrates.Drift activity shows seasonal and diel patterns.Most species started drifting in spring and were most abundant in the water column during the summer period.Drift activity was very low during the winter period.Diel patterns were apparent; most species,including D.villosus,drifted during the night.Drifting macroinvertebrates colonised stony substrate directly from the water column.D.villosus generally colonised the substrate at night,while higher numbers of C.curvispinum colonised the substrate during the day.It is very likely that drifting functions as a dispersal mechanism for crustacean invaders.Once waterways are connected,these species are no longer necessarily dependent on dispersal vectors other than drift for extending their distribution range [Current Zoology 57 (6):818-827,2011].

  3. Measurement of the Drift Velocity and Transverse Diffusion of Electrons in Liquid Xenon with the EXO-200 Detector

    CERN Document Server

    :,; Barbeau, P S; Beck, D; Belov, V; Breidenbach, M; Brunner, T; Burenkov, A; Cao, G F; Cen, W R; Chambers, C; Cleveland, B; Coon, M; Craycraft, A; Daniels, T; Danilov, M; Daugherty, S J; Daughhetee, J; Davis, J; Delaquis, S; Der Mesrobian-Kabakian, A; DeVoe, R; Didberidze, T; Dilling, J; Dolgolenko, A; Dolinski, M J; Dunford, M; Fairbank, W; Farine, J; Feyzbakhsh, S; Fierlinger, P; Fudenberg, D; Gornea, R; Graham, K; Gratta, G; Hall, C; Hughes, M; Jewell, M J; Johnson, A; Johnson, T N; Johnston, S; Karelin, A; Kaufman, L J; Killick, R; Koffas, T; Kravitz, S; Krucken, R; Kuchenkov, A; Kumar, K S; Lan, Y; Leonard, D S; Licciardi, C; Lin, Y H; MacLellan, R; Marino, M G; Mong, B; Moore, D; Njoya, O; Nelson, R; Odian, A; Ostrovskiy, I; Piepke, A; Pocar, A; Prescott, C Y; Retiere, F; Rowson, P C; Russell, J J; Schubert, A; Sinclair, D; Smith, E; Stekhanov, V; Tarka, M; Tolba, T; Tsang, R; Twelker, K; Vuilleumier, J -L; Waite, A; Walton, J; Walton, T; Weber, M; Wen, L J; Wichoski, U; Wood, J; Yang, L; Yen, Y -R; Zeldovich, O Ya; Zettlemoyer, J

    2016-01-01

    The EXO-200 Collaboration is searching for neutrinoless double beta decay using a liquid xenon (LXe) time projection chamber. This measurement relies on modeling the transport of charge deposits produced by interactions in the LXe to allow discrimination between signal and background events. Here we present measurements of the transverse diffusion constant and drift velocity of electrons at drift fields between 20~V/cm and 615~V/cm using EXO-200 data. At the operating field of 380~V/cm EXO-200 measures a drift velocity of 1.705$_{-0.010}^{+0.014}$~mm/$\\mu$s and a transverse diffusion coefficient of 55$\\pm$4~cm$^2$/s.

  4. Broad resonances and beta-decay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisager, K.; Fynbo, H. O. U.; Hyldegaard, S.;

    2015-01-01

    Beta-decay into broad resonances gives a distorted lineshape in the observed energy spectrum. Part of the distortion arises from the phase space factor, but we show that the beta-decay matrix element may also contribute. Based on a schematic model for p-wave continuum neutron states it is argued...

  5. A Stokes drift approximation based on the Phillips spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Breivik, Øyvind; Janssen, Peter A E M

    2016-01-01

    A new approximation to the Stokes drift velocity pro?le based on the exact solution for the Phillips spectrum is explored. The pro?file is compared with the monochromatic pro?file and the recently proposed exponential integral profi?le. ERA-Interim spectra and spectra from a wave buoy in the central North Sea are used to investigate the behaviour of the profi?le. It is found that the new profi?le has a much stronger gradient near the surface and lower normalized deviation from the pro?le computed from the spectra. Based on estimates from two open-ocean locations, an average value has been estimated for a key parameter of the profi?le. Given this parameter, the profi?le can be computed from the same two parameters as the monochromatic profi?le, namely the transport and the surface Stokes drift velocity.

  6. Experimental work on drift chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experimental work made on drift chambers is described in two chapters. In the firt chapter we present the description of the experimental installation used, as well as some details on the data adquisition systems and the characteristics on three ways used for calibration proposes (cosmic muons, β radiation and test beam using SPS at CERN facilities). The second chapter describes the defferent prototypes studied. The experimental set up and the analysis are given. Some results are discussed. The magnetic field effect is also studied. (Author)

  7. Micro-heterogeneity and micro-rheological properties of high-viscosity barley beta-glucan solutions studied by diffusion wave spectroscopy (DWS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soluble fiber ß-glucan is one of the key dietary material in healthy food products known for reducing serum cholesterol levels. The micro-structural heterogeneity and micro-rheology of high-viscosity barley ß-glucan solutions were investigated by the diffusion wave spectroscopy (DWS) technology. By ...

  8. Spiral biasing adaptor for use in Si drift detectors and Si drift detector arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zheng; Chen, Wei

    2016-07-05

    A drift detector array, preferably a silicon drift detector (SDD) array, that uses a low current biasing adaptor is disclosed. The biasing adaptor is customizable for any desired geometry of the drift detector single cell with minimum drift time of carriers. The biasing adaptor has spiral shaped ion-implants that generate the desired voltage profile. The biasing adaptor can be processed on the same wafer as the drift detector array and only one biasing adaptor chip/side is needed for one drift detector array to generate the voltage profiles on the front side and back side of the detector array.

  9. Limits to Drift Chamber Resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Riegler, Werner

    1998-01-01

    ATLAS (A Large Toroidal LHC Apparatus) will be a general-purpose experiment at the Large Hadron Collider that will be operational at CERN in the year 2004. The ATLAS muon spectrometer aims for a momentum resolution of 10% for a transverse momentum of pT=1TeV. The precision tracking devices in the muon system will be high pressure drift tubes (MDTs) with a single wire resolution of 1100 chambers covering an area of ≈ 2500m2. The high counting rates in the spectrometer as well as the aim for excellent spatial resolution and high efficiency put severe constraints on the MDT operating parameters. This work describes a detailed study of all the resolution limiting factors in the ATLAS environment. A ’full chain’ simulation of the MDT response to photons and charged particles as well as quantitative comparisons with measurements was performed. The good agreement between simulation and measurements resulted in a profound understanding of the drift chamber processes and the individual contributions to the spat...

  10. Radon in the DRIFT-II directional dark matter TPC: emanation, detection and mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battat, J. B. R.; Brack, J.; Daw, E.; Dorofeev, A.; Ezeribe, A. C.; Fox, J. R.; Gauvreau, J.-L.; Gold, M.; Harmon, L. J.; Harton, J. L.; Landers, J. M.; Lee, E. R.; Loomba, D.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Miller, E. H.; Monte, A.; Murphy, A. StJ.; Paling, S. M.; Phan, N.; Pipe, M.; Robinson, M.; Sadler, S. W.; Scarff, A.; Snowden-Ifft, D. P.; Spooner, N. J. C.; Telfer, S.; Walker, D.; Warner, D.; Yuriev, L.

    2014-11-01

    Radon gas emanating from materials is of interest in environmental science and also a major concern in rare event non-accelerator particle physics experiments such as dark matter and double beta decay searches, where it is a major source of background. Notable for dark matter experiments is the production of radon progeny recoils (RPRs), the low energy (~ 100 keV) recoils of radon daughter isotopes, which can mimic the signal expected from WIMP interactions. Presented here are results of measurements of radon emanation from detector materials in the 1 m3 DRIFT-II directional dark matter gas time projection chamber experiment. Construction and operation of a radon emanation facility for this work is described, along with an analysis to continuously monitor DRIFT data for the presence of internal 222Rn and 218Po. Applying this analysis to historical DRIFT data, we show how systematic substitution of detector materials for alternatives, selected by this device for low radon emanation, has resulted in a factor of ~ 10 reduction in internal radon rates. Levels are found to be consistent with the sum from separate radon emanation measurements of the internal materials and also with direct measurement using an attached alpha spectrometer. The current DRIFT detector, DRIFT-IId, is found to have sensitivity to 222Rn of 2.5 μBql-1 with current analysis efficiency, potentially opening up DRIFT technology as a new tool for sensitive radon assay of materials.

  11. PARTICLE ACCELERATION IN PLASMOID EJECTIONS DERIVED FROM RADIO DRIFTING PULSATING STRUCTURES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishizuka, N. [National Institute of Information and Communications Technology, 4-2-1, Nukui-Kitamachi, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8795 (Japan); Karlický, M.; Bárta, M. [Astronomical Institute of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, 25165 Ondřejov (Czech Republic); Janvier, M., E-mail: nishizuka.naoto@nict.go.jp [Department of Mathematics, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 4HN (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-01

    We report observations of slowly drifting pulsating structures (DPSs) in the 0.8-4.5 GHz frequency range of the RT4 and RT5 radio spectrographs at Ondřejov Observatory, between 2002 and 2012. We found 106 events of DPSs, which we classified into four cases: (I) single events with a constant frequency drift (12 events), (II) multiple events occurring in the same flare with constant frequency drifts (11 events), (III) single or multiple events with increasing or decreasing frequency drift rates (52 events), and (IV) complex events containing multiple events occurring at the same time in a different frequency range (31 events). Many DPSs are associated with hard X-ray (HXR) bursts (15-25 keV) and soft X-ray (SXR) gradient peaks, as they typically occurred at the beginning of HXR peaks. This indicates that DPS events are related to the processes of fast energy release and particle acceleration. Furthermore, interpreting DPSs as signatures of plasmoids, we measured their ejection velocity, their width, and their height from the DPS spectra, from which we also estimated the reconnection rate and the plasma beta. In this interpretation, constant frequency drift indicates a constant velocity of a plasmoid, and an increasing/decreasing frequency drift indicates a deceleration/acceleration of a plasmoid ejection. The reconnection rate shows a good positive correlation with the plasmoid velocity. Finally we confirmed that some DPS events show plasmoid counterparts in Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly images.

  12. Precision alignment of permanent magnet drift tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) technique of drift-tube alignment has been resurrected at Los Alamos for the precision alignment of 1-cm-core drift tubes that carry high gradient rare-earth-cobalt quadrupoles. Because the quadrupoles cannot be switched off, this technique is not applicable to a drift-tube assembly, but tests indicate that individual magnetic centers can be detected with a precision of +/-0.003 mm. Methods of transferring this information to machined alignment flats on the sides of the drift-tube body are discussed. With measurements of drift tubes designed for a 100-mA, 425-MHz drift-tube linac, offsets between the geometric and magnetic axes of up to +/-0.05 mm were detected following final assembly and welding. This degree of offset is serious if not accommodated, because it represents the entire alignment tolerance for the 40-cell tank. The measurement equipment and technique are described

  13. Drift chamber tracking with neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss drift chamber tracking with a commercial log VLSI neural network chip. Voltages proportional to the drift times in a 4-layer drift chamber were presented to the Intel ETANN chip. The network was trained to provide the intercept and slope of straight tracks traversing the chamber. The outputs were recorded and later compared off line to conventional track fits. Two types of network architectures were studied. Applications of neural network tracking to high energy physics detector triggers is discussed

  14. Drift chamber tracking with neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindsey, C.S.; Denby, B.; Haggerty, H.

    1992-10-01

    We discuss drift chamber tracking with a commercial log VLSI neural network chip. Voltages proportional to the drift times in a 4-layer drift chamber were presented to the Intel ETANN chip. The network was trained to provide the intercept and slope of straight tracks traversing the chamber. The outputs were recorded and later compared off line to conventional track fits. Two types of network architectures were studied. Applications of neural network tracking to high energy physics detector triggers is discussed.

  15. Very high energy emission of Crab-like pulsars driven by the Cherenkov drift radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Osmanov, Z

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we study the generation of very high energy (VHE) emission in Crab-like pulsars driven by means of the feedback of Cherenkov drift waves on distribution of magnetospheric electrons. We have found that the unstable Cherenkov drift modes lead to the quasi-linear diffusion (QLD), keeping the pitch angles from vanishing, which in turn, maintains the synchrotron mechanism. Considering the Crab-like pulsars it has been shown that the growth rate of the Cherenkov drift instability (ChDI) is quite high, indicating high efficiency of the process. Analyzing the mechanism for the typical parameters we have found that the Cherenkov drift emission from the extreme UV to hard $X$-rays is strongly correlated with the VHE synchrotron emission in the GeV band.

  16. Gravitational radiation from neutron stars deformed by crustal Hall drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suvorov, A. G.; Mastrano, A.; Geppert, U.

    2016-07-01

    A precondition for the radio emission of pulsars is the existence of strong, small-scale magnetic field structures (`magnetic spots') in the polar cap region. Their creation can proceed via crustal Hall drift out of two qualitatively and quantitatively different initial magnetic field configurations: a field confined completely to the crust and another which penetrates the whole star. The aim of this study is to explore whether these magnetic structures in the crust can deform the star sufficiently to make it an observable source of gravitational waves. We model the evolution of these field configurations, which can develop, within ˜104-105 yr, magnetic spots with local surface field strengths ˜1014 G maintained over ≳106 yr. Deformations caused by the magnetic forces are calculated. We show that, under favourable initial conditions, a star undergoing crustal Hall drift can have ellipticity ɛ ˜ 10-6, even with sub-magnetar polar field strengths, after ˜105 yr. A pulsar rotating at ˜102 Hz with such ɛ is a promising gravitational wave source candidate. Since such large deformations can be caused only by a particular magnetic field configuration that penetrates the whole star and whose maximum magnetic energy is concentrated in the outer core region, gravitational wave emission observed from radio pulsars can thus inform us about the internal field structures of young neutron stars.

  17. RF Breakdown in Drift Tube Linacs

    CERN Document Server

    Stovall, J; Lown, R

    2009-01-01

    The highest RF electric field in drift-tube linacs (DTLs) often occurs on the face of the first drift tube. Typically this drift tube contains a quadrupole focusing magnet whose fringing fields penetrate the face of the drift tube parallel to the RF electric fields in the accelerating gap. It has been shown that the threshold for RF breakdown in RF cavities may be reduced in the presence of a static magnetic field. This note offers a “rule of thumb” for picking the maximum “safe” surface electric field in DTLs based on these measurements.

  18. Demonstration of long-term reliability of a 266-nm, continuous-wave, frequency-quadrupled solid-state laser using beta-BaB(2)O(4).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, K; Oka, M; Wada, H; Fukui, T; Umezu, N; Tatsuki, K; Kubota, S

    1998-02-01

    We report what we believe to be the first operation of more than 1000 h of a 266-nm (cw) frequency-quadrupled solid-state laser with a 100-mW output. We used beta-BaB(2)O(4)(BBO) crystal grown by the Czochralski method to double the green-light (532-nm) wavelength, using an external resonant cavity. The green light was generated with an intracavity frequency-doubled Nd:YVO(4)laser pumped by a 4-W laser diode. When the incident 532-nm power on the external resonant doubler was 500 mW, we generated 100 mW of cw 266-nm radiation with the BBO crystal. The degradation rate seems to be proportional to the strength of the UV optical electric field. We also obtained a relative intensity noise of -130dB/Hz at frequencies of 2 to 10 MHz for 266-nm laser light.

  19. Demonstration of long-term reliability of a 266-nm, continuous-wave, frequency-quadrupled solid-state laser using beta-BaB(2)O(4).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, K; Oka, M; Wada, H; Fukui, T; Umezu, N; Tatsuki, K; Kubota, S

    1998-02-01

    We report what we believe to be the first operation of more than 1000 h of a 266-nm (cw) frequency-quadrupled solid-state laser with a 100-mW output. We used beta-BaB(2)O(4)(BBO) crystal grown by the Czochralski method to double the green-light (532-nm) wavelength, using an external resonant cavity. The green light was generated with an intracavity frequency-doubled Nd:YVO(4)laser pumped by a 4-W laser diode. When the incident 532-nm power on the external resonant doubler was 500 mW, we generated 100 mW of cw 266-nm radiation with the BBO crystal. The degradation rate seems to be proportional to the strength of the UV optical electric field. We also obtained a relative intensity noise of -130dB/Hz at frequencies of 2 to 10 MHz for 266-nm laser light. PMID:18084457

  20. Momentum analyzers DCBA for neutrinoless double beta decay experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Momentum analyzers called Drift Chamber Beta-ray Analyzer (DCBA) are being developed at KEK in order to search for neutrinoless double beta decays of nuclei. A test prototype, DCBA-T2, has been constructed to confirm the principle detecting electron tracks in a uniform magnetic field. Another prototype, DCBA-T3, is now under construction to improve the energy resolution. The test results and the present statuses of these prototypes are presented.

  1. Momentum analyzers DCBA for neutrinoless double beta decay experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishihara, Nobuhiro, E-mail: nobuhiro.ishihara@kek.j [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)

    2010-11-01

    Momentum analyzers called Drift Chamber Beta-ray Analyzer (DCBA) are being developed at KEK in order to search for neutrinoless double beta decays of nuclei. A test prototype, DCBA-T2, has been constructed to confirm the principle detecting electron tracks in a uniform magnetic field. Another prototype, DCBA-T3, is now under construction to improve the energy resolution. The test results and the present statuses of these prototypes are presented.

  2. Supersensitive avalanche silicon drift photodetector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Physical principles of performance and main characteristics of a novel avalanche photodetector developed on the basis of MOS (metal-oxide-silicon) technology are presented. The photodetector contains a semitransparent gate electrode and a drain contact to provide a drift of multiplied charge carriers along the semiconductor surface. A high gain (more than 104) of the photocurrent was achieved due to the local negative feedback effect realized on the Si -- SiO2 boundary. Special attention is paid to the possibilities of the development of a supersensitive avalanche CCD (charge-coupled device) for the detection of individual photons in visible and ultraviolet spectral regions. The experimental results obtained with a two-element CCD prototype are discussed. (author)

  3. Implementering af drift i byggeri

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Torben; Erichsen, Pia Bruun

    På trods af, at der løbende er udgivet materiale der argumenterer for at tænke drift ind i byggeprocesser, er der problemer med, at det faktisk sker. Undersøgelser viser, at forskellige barrierer kan være årsag til problemerne. Disse barrierer kan opstilles inden for følgende kategorier: Projekt...... med i byggeriet. Som følge af dette skal der løbende skabes nye relationer mellem parterne, og der skal arbejdes sammen på nye måder. De forskellige barrierer syntes at være mest fremtrædende ved offentlige byggerier, men også private innovative byggerier er præget af barriererne. Der er flere...

  4. Drift effects in CANDU reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diffusion equation is an approximation to the transport equation which relies on the validity of Fick's law. Since this law is not explicitly integrated in the transport equation it can only be derived approximately using homogenization theories. However, such homogenization theories state that when the cell is not symmetric Fick's law breaks down due to the presence of an additional term to the neutron current, called the drift term. In fact, this term can be interpreted as a transport correction to Fick's law which tends to increase the neutron current in a direction opposite to that specified by the flux gradient. In this paper, we investigate how the presence of asymmetric liquid zone controllers will modify the flux distribution inside a CANDU core. 5 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  5. The Genetic Drift Inventory: A Tool for Measuring What Advanced Undergraduates Have Mastered about Genetic Drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Rebecca M.; Andrews, Tessa C.; McElhinny, Teresa L.; Mead, Louise S.; Abraham, Joel K.; Thanukos, Anna; Perez, Kathryn E.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding genetic drift is crucial for a comprehensive understanding of biology, yet it is difficult to learn because it combines the conceptual challenges of both evolution and randomness. To help assess strategies for teaching genetic drift, we have developed and evaluated the Genetic Drift Inventory (GeDI), a concept inventory that measures…

  6. 40 CFR 1065.672 - Drift correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Drift correction. 1065.672 Section 1065.672 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calculations and Data Requirements § 1065.672 Drift correction. (a) Scope...

  7. Do Arctic waders use adaptive wind drift?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Green, M; Alerstam, T; Gudmundsson, GA; Hedenstrom, A; Piersma, T; Gudmundsson, Gudmundur A.; Hedenström, Anders

    2004-01-01

    We analysed five data sets of night directions of migrating arctic waders ill relation to,winds, recorded by tracking radar and optical range finder, in order to find out if these birds compensate for wind drift, or allow themselves to be drifted by winds. Our purpose was to investigate whether arct

  8. Biology Undergraduates' Misconceptions about Genetic Drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, T. M.; Price, R. M.; Mead, L. S.; McElhinny, T. L.; Thanukos, A.; Perez, K. E.; Herreid, C. F.; Terry, D. R.; Lemons, P. P.

    2012-01-01

    This study explores biology undergraduates' misconceptions about genetic drift. We use qualitative and quantitative methods to describe students' definitions, identify common misconceptions, and examine differences before and after instruction on genetic drift. We identify and describe five overarching categories that include 16 distinct…

  9. TBV 361 RESOLUTION ANALYSIS: EMPLACEMENT DRIFT ORIENTATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this To Be Verified/To Be Determined (TBX) resolution analysis is to release ''To Be Verified'' (TBV)-361 related to the emplacement drift orientation. The system design criterion in ''Subsurface Facility System Description Document'' (CRWMS M andO 1998a, p.9) specifies that the emplacement drift orientation relative to the dominant joint orientations should be at least 30 degrees. The specific objectives for this analysis include the following: (1) Collect and evaluate key block data developed for the repository host horizon rock mass. (2) Assess the dominant joint orientations based on available fracture data. (3) Document the maximum block size as a function of drift orientation. (4) Assess the applicability of the drift orientation/joint orientation offset criterion in the ''Subsurface Facility System Description Document'' (CRWMS M andO 1998a, p.9). (5) Consider the effects of seepage on drift orientation. (6) Verify that the viability assessment (VA) drift orientation complies with the drift orientation/joint orientation offset criterion, or provide justifications and make recommendations for modifying the VA emplacement drift layout. In addition to providing direct support to the System Description Document (SDD), the release of TBV-361 will provide support to the Repository Subsurface Design Department. The results from this activity may also provide data and information needs to support the MGR Requirements Department, the MGR Safety Assurance Department, and the Performance Assessment Organization

  10. Effect of unsteady wind on drifting snow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cierco, F.-X.; Naaim-Bouvet, F.; Naaim, M.

    2003-04-01

    Wind is not always a steady flow. It can oscillate producing blasts. However most of the current numerical models of drifting snow are constrained by one major assumption : forcing winds are steady and uniform. Experiments done in the CSTB climatic wind tunnel (with a data acquisition frequency of 1 Hz both for wind and drifting snow) showed that drifting snow is in a state of permanent disequilibrium in the presence of fluctuating airflows : mass flux and velocity were poorly matched. However, the study of wind and drifting snow gust factors done at Col du Lac Blanc (parameters recorded every 15 min with a scan rate of 1 s) shown that the largest drifting snow episodes appear during periods of roughly constant strong wind whereas a short but strong blast does not produce significant drifting snow. In order to better understand the effect of unsteady wind on drifting snow processes, these first investigations have been completed during winter 2003 by increasing the acquisition frequency during snow storms at Col du Lac Blanc using an ultrasonic anemometer and a profile of six drifting snow acoustic sensors set up side by side.

  11. Experimental study of the Maxwell stress in electromagnetic collisional drift turbulence

    OpenAIRE

    Taheri, Nazli

    2008-01-01

    We present experimental results for magnetic field fluctuations observed in an Argon plasma column produced in Controlled Shear Decorrelation Experiment (CSDX), operated with a helicon waves source. The observed magnetic fluctuations have power spectra, spatial distributions, and parametric variations that are similar to the potential and density fluctuations, which have been previously shown to be collisional drift waves. The magnitude of the normalized magnetic field fluctuations is much sm...

  12. Magnetohydrodynamic Slow Mode with Drifting He$^{++}$: Implications for Coronal Seismology and the Solar Wind

    CERN Document Server

    Hollweg, Joseph V; Chandran, Benjamin D G

    2014-01-01

    The MHD slow mode wave has application to coronal seismology, MHD turbulence, and the solar wind where it can be produced by parametric instabilities. We consider analytically how a drifting ion species (e.g. He$^{++}$) affects the linear slow mode wave in a mainly electron-proton plasma, with potential consequences for the aforementioned applications. Our main conclusions are: 1. For wavevectors highly oblique to the magnetic field, we find solutions that are characterized by very small perturbations of total pressure. Thus, our results may help to distinguish the MHD slow mode from kinetic Alfv\\'en waves and non-propagating pressure-balanced structures, which can also have very small total pressure perturbations. 2. For small ion concentrations, there are solutions that are similar to the usual slow mode in an electron-proton plasma, and solutions that are dominated by the drifting ions, but for small drifts the wave modes cannot be simply characterized. 3. Even with zero ion drift, the standard dispersion ...

  13. Impact of groyne fields on the littoral drift: A hybrid morphological modelling study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, S. E.; Drønen, N.; Deigaard, R.;

    2016-01-01

    length and the littoral transport on the undisturbed coastline Qgeo* is the transport occurring outside the tip of the groynes divided by the total transport. It is found that the sensitivity of the littoral drift to variations in groyne spacing and the angle, of the approaching waves, is inversely...

  14. Ground Control for Emplacement Drifts for LA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y. Sun

    2004-07-09

    The purpose of this calculation is to analyze the stability of repository emplacement drifts during the preclosure period, and to provide a final ground support method for emplacement drifts for the License Application (LA). The scope of the work includes determination of input parameter values and loads, selection of appropriate process and methods for the calculation, application of selected methods, such as empirical or analytical, to the calculation, development and execution of numerical models, and evaluation of results. Results from this calculation are limited to use for design of the emplacement drifts and the final ground support system installed in these drifts. The design of non-emplacement openings and their ground support systems is covered in the ''Ground Control for Non-Emplacement Drifts for LA'' (BSC 2004c).

  15. Ground Control for Emplacement Drifts for LA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this calculation is to analyze the stability of repository emplacement drifts during the preclosure period, and to provide a final ground support method for emplacement drifts for the License Application (LA). The scope of the work includes determination of input parameter values and loads, selection of appropriate process and methods for the calculation, application of selected methods, such as empirical or analytical, to the calculation, development and execution of numerical models, and evaluation of results. Results from this calculation are limited to use for design of the emplacement drifts and the final ground support system installed in these drifts. The design of non-emplacement openings and their ground support systems is covered in the ''Ground Control for Non-Emplacement Drifts for LA'' (BSC 2004c)

  16. Waves and instabilities in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The contents of this book are: Plasma as a Dielectric Medium; Nyquist Technique; Absolute and Convective Instabilities; Landau Damping and Phase Mixing; Particle Trapping and Breakdown of Linear Theory; Solution of Viasov Equation via Guilding-Center Transformation; Kinetic Theory of Magnetohydrodynamic Waves; Geometric Optics; Wave-Kinetic Equation; Cutoff and Resonance; Resonant Absorption; Mode Conversion; Gyrokinetic Equation; Drift Waves; Quasi-Linear Theory; Ponderomotive Force; Parametric Instabilities; Problem Sets for Homework, Midterm and Final Examinations

  17. Poloidal drift enhancement for improved collisionless alpha particle confinement in stellarator configurations in the quasi-isodynamic category

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poloidal closure of contours of the second adiabatic invariant has been reported to be an essential issue in the realization of good collisionless alpha particle confinement in stellarator configurations in the quasi-isodynamic category. This common feature is examined from a different aspect, that of the poloidal drift enhancement. This is realized by radial variation of the uniform magnetic field component with a diamagnetic effect for finite beta equilibria in the W7-X stellarator, which gives poloidal drift enhancement everywhere on a flux surface. On the other hand, the additional helicity introduced to the vacuum field in the quasi-isodynamic configuration can also enhance poloidal drift. The different methods for poloidal drift enhancement are clarified systematically on the basis of the magnetic field spectrum and the magnetic topography. (author)

  18. Drift mechanism of laser-induced electron acceleration in vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgovsky, L.

    2015-12-01

    Laser-induced electron acceleration in vacuum is possible due to the ejection of electrons from the beam as a consequence of the transverse drift orthogonal to the propagation direction. The transverse drift is derived from the general solution of the equations of motion of the electrons in the field of a plane electromagnetic wave with arbitrary polarization. It is shown that the energy gain is proportional to the square of the field strength additionally modulated by the function of the injection and ejection phases. In particular, for a linearly polarized beam this function is reduced to the squared difference between the cosines of these phases. The finite laser pulse duration restricts the range of the field strength suitable for direct electron acceleration in vacuum within certain limits. It is demonstrated that the high efficiency of energy transfer from the laser wave into the kinetic energy of the accelerated electrons demands phase matching between the electron quiver phase at the exit point and the phase of the energy transfer.

  19. DKE: a fast numerical solver for the 3-D relativistic bounce-averaged electron drift kinetic equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decker, J.; Peysson, Y

    2004-12-01

    A new original code for solving the 3-D relativistic and bounce-averaged electron drift kinetic equation is presented. It designed for the current drive problem in tokamak with an arbitrary magnetic equilibrium. This tool allows self-consistent calculations of the bootstrap current in presence of other external current sources. RF current drive for arbitrary type of waves may be used. Several moments of the electron distribution function are determined, like the exact and effective fractions of trapped electrons, the plasma current, absorbed RF power, runaway and magnetic ripple loss rates and non-thermal Bremsstrahlung. Advanced numerical techniques have been used to make it the first fully implicit (reverse time) 3-D solver, particularly well designed for implementation in a chain of code for realistic current drive calculations in high {beta}{sub p} plasmas. All the details of the physics background and the numerical scheme are presented, as well a some examples to illustrate main code capabilities. Several important numerical points are addressed concerning code stability and potential numerical and physical limitations. (authors)

  20. Wind-induced drift of objects at sea: the leeway field method

    CERN Document Server

    Breivik, Øyvind; Maisondieu, Christophe; Roth, Jens Christian; 10.1016/j.apor.2011.01.005

    2011-01-01

    A method for conducting leeway field experiments to establish the drift properties of small objects (0.1-25 m) is described. The objective is to define a standardized and unambiguous procedure for condensing the drift properties down to a set of coefficients that may be incorporated into existing stochastic trajectory forecast models for drifting objects of concern to search and rescue operations and other activities involving vessels lost at sea such as containers with hazardous material. An operational definition of the slip or wind and wave-induced motion of a drifting object relative to the ambient current is proposed. This definition taken together with a strict adherence to 10 m wind speed allows us to refer unambiguously to the leeway of a drifting object. We recommend that all objects if possible be studied using what we term the direct method, where the object's leeway is studied directly using an attached current meter. We divide drifting objects into four categories, depending on their size. For th...

  1. Solving the drift control problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melda Ormeci Matoglu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We model the problem of managing capacity in a build-to-order environment as a Brownian drift control problem. We formulate a structured linear program that models a practical discretization of the problem and exploit a strong relationship between relative value functions and dual solutions to develop a functional lower bound for the continuous problem from a dual solution to the discrete problem. Refining the discretization proves a functional strong duality for the continuous problem. The linear programming formulation is so badly scaled, however, that solving it is beyond the capabilities of standard solvers. By demonstrating the equivalence between strongly feasible bases and deterministic unichain policies, we combinatorialize the pivoting process and by exploiting the relationship between dual solutions and relative value functions, develop a mechanism for solving the LP without ever computing its coefficients. Finally, we exploit the relationship between relative value functions and dual solutions to develop a scheme analogous to column generation for refining the discretization so as to drive the gap between the discrete approximation and the continuous problem to zero quickly while keeping the LP small. Computational studies show our scheme is much faster than simply solving a regular discretization of the problem both in terms of finding a policy with a low average cost and in terms of providing a lower bound on the optimal average cost.

  2. Genetic drift of HIV populations in culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yegor Voronin

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Populations of Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1 undergo a surprisingly large amount of genetic drift in infected patients despite very large population sizes, which are predicted to be mostly deterministic. Several models have been proposed to explain this phenomenon, but all of them implicitly assume that the process of virus replication itself does not contribute to genetic drift. We developed an assay to measure the amount of genetic drift for HIV populations replicating in cell culture. The assay relies on creation of HIV populations of known size and measurements of variation in frequency of a neutral allele. Using this assay, we show that HIV undergoes approximately ten times more genetic drift than would be expected from its population size, which we defined as the number of infected cells in the culture. We showed that a large portion of the increase in genetic drift is due to non-synchronous infection of target cells. When infections are synchronized, genetic drift for the virus is only 3-fold higher than expected from its population size. Thus, the stochastic nature of biological processes involved in viral replication contributes to increased genetic drift in HIV populations. We propose that appreciation of these effects will allow better understanding of the evolutionary forces acting on HIV in infected patients.

  3. Coherent structures and transport in drift wave plasma turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsholm, Søren Bang

    Fusion energy research aims at developing fusion power plants providing safe and clean energy with abundant fuels. Plasma turbulence induced transport of energy and particles is a performance limiting factor for fusion devices. Hence the understanding of plasma turbulence is important...

  4. Drift-Wave Turbulence in Low-β Plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pécseli, Hans

    1982-01-01

    Experimental investigations of strong turbulence associated with the radial inhomogeneities in a plasma column are reported. The experiment is designed to make Taylor's hypothesis effective. The spectral index of the turbulent potential fluctuations is determined and the variation of the spectral...

  5. Drift wave turbulence in low-β plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Torben; Larsen, Søren Ejling; Pécseli, Hans

    1983-01-01

    Experimental investigations of strong turbulence associated with the radial density gradient of a rotating magnetized plasma column are reported. The experiment is designed to make Taylor's hypothesis effective, in order to allow a simple interpretation of measured frequency spectra in terms...... of wavenumber spectra. The spectral index of the turbulent potential fluctuations is determined and the variation of the spectral intensity is investigated for varying magnetic fields. The results compare favourably with theoretical predictions. The importance of distinguishing subranges in the turbulent...

  6. Do Arctic waders use adaptive wind drift?

    OpenAIRE

    Green, M.; Alerstam, T; Gudmundsson, GA; Hedenstrom, A; Piersma, T; Gudmundsson, Gudmundur A.; Hedenström, Anders

    2004-01-01

    We analysed five data sets of night directions of migrating arctic waders ill relation to,winds, recorded by tracking radar and optical range finder, in order to find out if these birds compensate for wind drift, or allow themselves to be drifted by winds. Our purpose was to investigate whether arctic waders use adaptive wind drift strategies or not. The data sets were collected in Siberia (two sets) and Canada during post-breeding (autumn) migration, and in Mauritania and South Sweden during...

  7. Pixelated CdZnTe drift detectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuvvetli, Irfan; Budtz-Jørgensen, Carl

    2005-01-01

    A technique, the so-called Drift Strip Method (DSM), for improving the CdZnTe detector energy response to hard X-rays and gamma-rays was applied as a pixel geometry. First tests have confirmed that this detector type provides excellent energy resolution and imaging performance. We specifically...... report on the performance of 3 mm thick prototype CZT drift pixel detectors fabricated using material from eV-products. We discuss issues associated with detector module performance. Characterization results obtained from several prototype drift pixel detectors are presented. Results of position...

  8. Nonlinear Gyrokinetic Theory With Polarization Drift

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. Wang and T.S. Hahm

    2010-03-25

    A set of the electrostatic toroidal gyrokinetic Vlasov equation and the Poisson equation, which explicitly includes the polarization drift, is derived systematically by using Lie-transform method. The polarization drift is introduced in the gyrocenter equations of motion, and the corresponding polarization density is derived. Contrary to the wide-spread expectation, the inclusion of the polarization drift in the gyrocenter equations of motion does not affect the expression for the polarization density significantly. This is due to modification of the gyrocenter phase-space volume caused by the electrostatic potential [T. S. Hahm, Phys. Plasmas 3, 4658 (1996)] .

  9. Coronal Shock Waves, EUV waves, and Their Relation to CMEs. I. Reconciliation of "EIT waves", Type II Radio Bursts, and Leading Edges of CMEs

    OpenAIRE

    Grechnev, V. V.; Uralov, A. M.; Chertok, I. M.; Kuzmenko, I. V.; Afanasyev, A. N.; Meshalkina, N. S.; Kalashnikov, S. S.; Kubo, Y.

    2011-01-01

    We show examples of excitation of coronal waves by flare-related abrupt eruptions of magnetic rope structures. The waves presumably rapidly steepened into shocks and freely propagated afterwards like decelerating blast waves that showed up as Moreton waves and EUV waves. We propose a simple quantitative description for such shock waves to reconcile their observed propagation with drift rates of metric type II bursts and kinematics of leading edges of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Taking acco...

  10. High-beta plasma blobs in the morningside plasma sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Haerendel

    Full Text Available Equator-S frequently encountered, i.e. on 30% of the orbits between 1 March and 17 April 1998, strong variations of the magnetic field strength of typically 5–15-min duration outside about 9RE during the late-night/early-morning hours. Very high-plasma beta values were found, varying between 1 and 10 or more. Close conjunctions between Equator-S and Geotail revealed the spatial structure of these "plasma blobs" and their lifetime. They are typically 5–10° wide in longitude and have an antisymmetric plasma or magnetic pressure distribution with respect to the equator, while being altogether low-latitude phenomena 
    (≤ 15°. They drift slowly sunward, exchange plasma across the equator and have a lifetime of at least 15–30 min. While their spatial structure may be due to some sort of mirror instability, little is known about the origin of the high-beta plasma. It is speculated that the morningside boundary layer somewhat further tailward may be the source of this plasma. This would be consistent with the preference of the plasma blobs to occur during quiet conditions, although they are also found during substorm periods. The relation to auroral phenomena in the morningside oval is uncertain. The energy deposition may be mostly too weak to generate a visible signature. However, patchy aurora remains a candidate for more disturbed periods.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (plasma convection; plasma sheet; plasma waves and instabilities

  11. Line-of-Sight Path Following for Dubins Paths with Adaptive Sideslip Compensation of Drift Forces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fossen, Thor Inge; Pettersen, Kristin Ytterstad; Galeazzi, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    guidance law is intended for maneuvering in the horizontal-plane at given speeds and typical applications are marine craft, autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs), unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) as well as other vehicles and craft where the goal is to follow a predefined parametrized curve without time......We present a nonlinear adaptive path-following controller that compensates for drift forces through vehicle sideslip. Vehicle sideslip arises during path following when the vehicle is subject to drift forces caused by ocean currents, wind and waves. The proposed algorithm is motivated by a lineof...... constraints. Two vehicle cases studies are included to verify the theoretical results....

  12. An Obliquely Propagating Electromagnetic Drift Instability in the Lower Hybrid Frequency Range

    CERN Document Server

    Ji, H; Fox, W; Yamada, M; Ji, Hantao; Kulsrud, Russell; Fox, William; Yamada, Masaaki

    2005-01-01

    By employing a local two-fluid theory, we investigate an obliquely propagating electromagnetic instability in the lower hybrid frequency range driven by cross-field current or relative drifts between electrons and ions. The theory self-consistently takes into account local cross-field current and accompanying pressure gradients. It is found that the instability is caused by reactive coupling between the backward propagating whistler (fast) waves in the moving electron frame and the forward propagating sound (slow) waves in the ion frame when the relative drifts are large. The unstable waves we consider propagate obliquely to the unperturbed magnetic field and have mixed polarization with significant electromagnetic components. A physical picture of the instability emerges in the limit of large wavenumber characteristic of the local approximation. The primary positive feedback mechanism is based on reinforcement of initial electron density perturbations by compression of electron fluid via induced Lorentz forc...

  13. An analytical model of iceberg drift

    CERN Document Server

    Wagner, Till J W; Eisenman, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Iceberg drift and decay and the associated freshwater release are increasingly seen as important processes in Earth's climate system, yet a detailed understanding of their dynamics has remained elusive. Here, an idealized model of iceberg drift is presented. The model is designed to include the most salient physical processes that determine iceberg motion while remaining sufficiently simple to facilitate physical insight into iceberg drift dynamics. We derive an analytical solution of the model, which helps build understanding and also enables the rapid computation of large numbers of iceberg trajectories. The long-standing empirical rule of thumb that icebergs drift at 2% of the wind velocity, relative to the ocean current, is derived here from physical first principles, and it is shown that this relation only holds in the limit of strong winds or small icebergs, which approximately applies for typical icebergs in the Arctic. It is demonstrated that the opposite limit of weak winds or large icebergs approxim...

  14. CROSS DRIFT ALCOVE/NICHE UTILITIES ANALYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Goodin

    1999-07-08

    The purpose of this analysis is to provide the design basis and general arrangement requirements of the non-potable water, waste water, compressed air and ventilation (post excavation) utilities required in support of the Cross Drift alcoves and niches.

  15. Self-shielding flex-circuit drift tube, drift tube assembly and method of making

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, David Alexander

    2016-04-26

    The present disclosure is directed to an ion mobility drift tube fabricated using flex-circuit technology in which every other drift electrode is on a different layer of the flex-circuit and each drift electrode partially overlaps the adjacent electrodes on the other layer. This results in a self-shielding effect where the drift electrodes themselves shield the interior of the drift tube from unwanted electro-magnetic noise. In addition, this drift tube can be manufactured with an integral flex-heater for temperature control. This design will significantly improve the noise immunity, size, weight, and power requirements of hand-held ion mobility systems such as those used for explosive detection.

  16. On the electron drift velocity in plasma devices with E × B drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapurin, O.; Smolyakov, A.

    2016-06-01

    The structure and various components of the electron drift velocity are discussed in application to plasma discharges with the E × B drift. In high density plasmas, the contribution of the diamagnetic drift can be of the same order magnitude as the E × B drift. It is pointed out that curvature and gradient drifts associated with magnetic field inhomogeneities manifest themselves via the electron pressure anisotropy. Estimates show that the components of the diamagnetic drift related to the electron pressure anisotropy and magnetic field gradients can be important for the parameters of modern magnetrons and Hall thrusters. Similar additional terms appear in the momentum balance as mirror forces which may affect the distribution of the electrostatic potential in Hall devices.

  17. The Bipolar Quantum Drift-diffusion Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiu Qing CHEN; Li CHEN

    2009-01-01

    A fourth order parabolic system, the bipolar quantum drift-diffusion model in semiconductor simulation, with physically motivated Dirichlet-Neumann boundary condition is studied in this paper. By semidiscretization in time and compactness argument, the global existence and semiclassical limit are obtained, in which semiclassical limit describes the relation between quantum and classical drift-diffusion models. Furthermore, in the case of constant doping, we prove the weak solution exponentially approaches its constant steady state as time increases to infinity.

  18. SEEPAGE MODEL FOR PA INCLUDING DRIFT COLLAPSE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Tsang

    2004-09-22

    The purpose of this report is to document the predictions and analyses performed using the seepage model for performance assessment (SMPA) for both the Topopah Spring middle nonlithophysal (Tptpmn) and lower lithophysal (Tptpll) lithostratigraphic units at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Look-up tables of seepage flow rates into a drift (and their uncertainty) are generated by performing numerical simulations with the seepage model for many combinations of the three most important seepage-relevant parameters: the fracture permeability, the capillary-strength parameter 1/a, and the percolation flux. The percolation flux values chosen take into account flow focusing effects, which are evaluated based on a flow-focusing model. Moreover, multiple realizations of the underlying stochastic permeability field are conducted. Selected sensitivity studies are performed, including the effects of an alternative drift geometry representing a partially collapsed drift from an independent drift-degradation analysis (BSC 2004 [DIRS 166107]). The intended purpose of the seepage model is to provide results of drift-scale seepage rates under a series of parameters and scenarios in support of the Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA). The SMPA is intended for the evaluation of drift-scale seepage rates under the full range of parameter values for three parameters found to be key (fracture permeability, the van Genuchten 1/a parameter, and percolation flux) and drift degradation shape scenarios in support of the TSPA-LA during the period of compliance for postclosure performance [Technical Work Plan for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone (BSC 2002 [DIRS 160819], Section I-4-2-1)]. The flow-focusing model in the Topopah Spring welded (TSw) unit is intended to provide an estimate of flow focusing factors (FFFs) that (1) bridge the gap between the mountain-scale and drift-scale models, and (2) account for variability in local percolation flux due to

  19. Beam test results of a drift velocity monitoring system for silicon drift detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Nouais, D; Bonvicini, V; Cerello, P; Giubellino, P; Hernández-Montoya, R; Kolojvari, A; Mazza, G; Nissinen, J; Rashevsky, A; Rivetti, A; Tosello, F; Vacchi, A

    2002-01-01

    We report results on drift velocity monitoring using MOS charge injectors in silicon drift detectors obtained in beam test conditions. The correction of velocity variations as small as 0.03% caused by temperature variations of the order of 0.04 K allowed to get an average space resolution along all the drift path of 28 mu m. Preliminary result demonstrating the possibility to correct for temperature gradients along the anode axis are also presented.

  20. Thermodynamics Insights for the Redshift Drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ming-Jian; Liu, Wen-Biao

    2015-01-01

    The secular redshift drift is a potential measurement to directly probe the cosmic expansion. Previous study on the redshift drift mainly focused on the model-dependent simulation. Apparently, the physical insights on the redshift drift are very necessary. So in this paper, it is investigated using thermodynamics on the apparent, Hubble and event horizons. Thermodynamics could analytically present the model-independent upper bounds of redshift drift. For specific assumption on the cosmological parameters, we find that the thermodynamics bounds are nearly one order of magnitude larger than the expectation in standard ΛCDM model. We then examine ten observed redshift drift from Green Bank Telescope at redshift 0.09 < z < 0.69, and find that these observational results are inconsistent with the thermodynamics. The size of the errorbars on these measurements is about three orders of magnitude larger than the effect of thermodynamical bounds for the redshift drift. Obviously, we have not yet hit any instrumental systematics at the shift level of 1m s-1 yr-1.

  1. Calibration of the CMS Drift Tube Chambers and Measurement of the Drift Velocity with Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Chatrchyan, S; Sirunyan, A M; Adam, W; Arnold, B; Bergauer, H; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Eichberger, M; Erö, J; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hammer, J; Hänsel, S; Hoch, M; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kasieczka, G; Kastner, K; Krammer, M; Liko, D; Magrans de Abril, I; Mikulec, I; Mittermayr, F; Neuherz, B; Oberegger, M; Padrta, M; Pernicka, M; Rohringer, H; Schmid, S; Schöfbeck, R; Schreiner, T; Stark, R; Steininger, H; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Teischinger, F; Themel, T; Uhl, D; Wagner, P; Waltenberger, W; Walzel, G; Widl, E; Wulz, C E; Chekhovsky, V; Dvornikov, O; Emeliantchik, I; Litomin, A; Makarenko, V; Marfin, I; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Solin, A; Stefanovitch, R; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Tikhonov, A; Fedorov, A; Karneyeu, A; Korzhik, M; Panov, V; Zuyeuski, R; Kuchinsky, P; Beaumont, W; Benucci, L; Cardaci, M; De Wolf, E A; Delmeire, E; Druzhkin, D; Hashemi, M; Janssen, X; Maes, T; Mucibello, L; Ochesanu, S; Rougny, R; Selvaggi, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Adler, V; Beauceron, S; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; De Weirdt, S; Devroede, O; Heyninck, J; Kalogeropoulos, A; Maes, J; Maes, M; Mozer, M U; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Villella, I; Bouhali, O; Chabert, E C; Charaf, O; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Dero, V; Elgammal, S; Gay, A P R; Hammad, G H; Marage, P E; Rugovac, S; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wickens, J; Grunewald, M; Klein, B; Marinov, A; Ryckbosch, D; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Vanelderen, L; Verwilligen, P; Basegmez, S; Bruno, G; Caudron, J; Delaere, C; Demin, P; Favart, D; Giammanco, A; Grégoire, G; Lemaitre, V; Militaru, O; Ovyn, S; Piotrzkowski, K; Quertenmont, L; Schul, N; Beliy, N; Daubie, E; Alves, G A; Pol, M E; Souza, M H G; Carvalho, W; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Mundim, L; Oguri, V; Santoro, A; Silva Do Amaral, S M; Sznajder, A; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Ferreira Dias, M A; Gregores, E M; Novaes, S F; Abadjiev, K; Anguelov, T; Damgov, J; Darmenov, N; Dimitrov, L; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Piperov, S; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Trayanov, R; Vankov, I; Dimitrov, A; Dyulendarova, M; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Marinova, E; Mateev, M; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Toteva, Z; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Guan, W; Jiang, C H; Liang, D; Liu, B; Meng, X; Tao, J; Wang, J; Wang, Z; Xue, Z; Zhang, Z; Ban, Y; Cai, J; Ge, Y; Guo, S; Hu, Z; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Teng, H; Zhu, B; Avila, C; Baquero Ruiz, M; Carrillo Montoya, C A; Gomez, A; Gomez Moreno, B; Ocampo Rios, A A; Osorio Oliveros, A F; Reyes Romero, D; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, K; Plestina, R; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Dzelalija, M; Brigljevic, V; Duric, S; Kadija, K; Morovic, S; Fereos, R; Galanti, M; Mousa, J; Papadakis, A; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Tsiakkouri, D; Zinonos, Z; Hektor, A; Kadastik, M; Kannike, K; Müntel, M; Raidal, M; Rebane, L; Anttila, E; Czellar, S; Härkönen, J; Heikkinen, A; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Klem, J; Kortelainen, M J; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Mäenpää, T; Nysten, J; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Ungaro, D; Wendland, L; Banzuzi, K; Korpela, A; Tuuva, T; Nedelec, P; Sillou, D; Besancon, M; Chipaux, R; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Descamps, J; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Gentit, F X; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Malcles, J; Marionneau, M; Millischer, L; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Rousseau, D; Titov, M; Verrecchia, P; Baffioni, S; Bianchini, L; Bluj, M; Busson, P; Charlot, C; Dobrzynski, L; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Haguenauer, M; Miné, P; Paganini, P; Sirois, Y; Thiebaux, C; Zabi, A; Agram, J L; Besson, A; Bloch, D; Bodin, D; Brom, J M; Conte, E; Drouhin, F; Fontaine, J C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Gross, L; Juillot, P; Le Bihan, A C; Patois, Y; Speck, J; Van Hove, P; Baty, C; Bedjidian, M; Blaha, J; Boudoul, G; Brun, H; Chanon, N; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Depasse, P; Dupasquier, T; El Mamouni, H; Fassi, F; Fay, J; Gascon, S; Ille, B; Kurca, T; Le Grand, T; Lethuillier, M; Lumb, N; Mirabito, L; Perries, S; Vander Donckt, M; Verdier, P; Djaoshvili, N; Roinishvili, N; Roinishvili, V; Amaglobeli, N; Adolphi, R; Anagnostou, G; Brauer, R; Braunschweig, W; Edelhoff, M; Esser, H; Feld, L; Karpinski, W; Khomich, A; Klein, K; Mohr, N; Ostaptchouk, A; Pandoulas, D; Pierschel, G; Raupach, F; Schael, S; Schultz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Sprenger, D; Thomas, M; Weber, M; Wittmer, B; Wlochal, M; Actis, O; Altenhöfer, G; Bender, W; Biallass, P; Erdmann, M; Fetchenhauer, G; Frangenheim, J; Hebbeker, T; Hilgers, G; Hinzmann, A; Hoepfner, K; Hof, C; Kirsch, M; Klimkovich, T; Kreuzer, P; Lanske, D; Merschmeyer, M; Meyer, A; Philipps, B; Pieta, H; Reithler, H; Schmitz, S A; Sonnenschein, L; Sowa, M; Steggemann, J; Szczesny, H; Teyssier, D; Zeidler, C; Bontenackels, M; Davids, M; Duda, M; Flügge, G; Geenen, H; Giffels, M; Haj Ahmad, W; Hermanns, T; Heydhausen, D; Kalinin, S; Kress, T; Linn, A; Nowack, A; Perchalla, L; Poettgens, M; Pooth, O; Sauerland, P; Stahl, A; Tornier, D; Zoeller, M H; Aldaya Martin, M; Behrens, U; Borras, K; Campbell, A; Castro, E; Dammann, D; Eckerlin, G; Flossdorf, A; Flucke, G; Geiser, A; Hatton, D; Hauk, J; Jung, H; Kasemann, M; Katkov, I; Kleinwort, C; Kluge, H; Knutsson, A; Kuznetsova, E; Lange, W; Lohmann, W; Mankel, R; Marienfeld, M; Meyer, A B; Miglioranzi, S; Mnich, J; Ohlerich, M; Olzem, J; Parenti, A; Rosemann, C; Schmidt, R; Schoerner-Sadenius, T; Volyanskyy, D; Wissing, C; Zeuner, W D; Autermann, C; Bechtel, F; Draeger, J; Eckstein, D; Gebbert, U; Kaschube, K; Kaussen, G; Klanner, R; Mura, B; Naumann-Emme, S; Nowak, F; Pein, U; Sander, C; Schleper, P; Schum, T; Stadie, H; Steinbrück, G; Thomsen, J; Wolf, R; Bauer, J; Blüm, P; Buege, V; Cakir, A; Chwalek, T; De Boer, W; Dierlamm, A; Dirkes, G; Feindt, M; Felzmann, U; Frey, M; Furgeri, A; Gruschke, J; Hackstein, C; Hartmann, F; Heier, S; Heinrich, M; Held, H; Hirschbuehl, D; Hoffmann, K H; Honc, S; Jung, C; Kuhr, T; Liamsuwan, T; Martschei, D; Mueller, S; Müller, Th; Neuland, M B; 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Cline, D; Cousins, R; Erhan, S; Hauser, J; Ignatenko, M; Jarvis, C; Mumford, J; Plager, C; Rakness, G; Schlein, P; Tucker, J; Valuev, V; Wallny, R; Yang, X; Babb, J; Bose, M; Chandra, A; Clare, R; Ellison, J A; Gary, J W; Hanson, G; Jeng, G Y; Kao, S C; Liu, F; Liu, H; Luthra, A; Nguyen, H; Pasztor, G; Satpathy, A; Shen, B C; Stringer, R; Sturdy, J; Sytnik, V; Wilken, R; Wimpenny, S; Branson, J G; Dusinberre, E; Evans, D; Golf, F; Kelley, R; Lebourgeois, M; Letts, J; Lipeles, E; Mangano, B; Muelmenstaedt, J; Norman, M; Padhi, S; Petrucci, A; Pi, H; Pieri, M; Ranieri, R; Sani, M; Sharma, V; Simon, S; Würthwein, F; Yagil, A; Campagnari, C; D'Alfonso, M; Danielson, T; Garberson, J; Incandela, J; Justus, C; Kalavase, P; Koay, S A; Kovalskyi, D; Krutelyov, V; Lamb, J; Lowette, S; Pavlunin, V; Rebassoo, F; Ribnik, J; Richman, J; Rossin, R; Stuart, D; To, W; Vlimant, J R; Witherell, M; Apresyan, A; Bornheim, A; Bunn, J; Chiorboli, M; Gataullin, M; Kcira, D; Litvine, V; Ma, Y; Newman, H B; Rogan, C; Timciuc, V; Veverka, J; Wilkinson, R; Yang, Y; Zhang, L; Zhu, K; Zhu, R Y; Akgun, B; Carroll, R; Ferguson, T; Jang, D W; Jun, S Y; Paulini, M; Russ, J; Terentyev, N; Vogel, H; Vorobiev, I; Cumalat, J P; Dinardo, M E; Drell, B R; Ford, W T; Heyburn, B; Luiggi Lopez, E; Nauenberg, U; Stenson, K; Ulmer, K; Wagner, S R; Zang, S L; Agostino, L; Alexander, J; Blekman, F; Cassel, D; Chatterjee, A; Das, S; Gibbons, L K; Heltsley, B; Hopkins, W; Khukhunaishvili, A; Kreis, B; Kuznetsov, V; Patterson, J R; Puigh, D; Ryd, A; Shi, X; Stroiney, S; Sun, W; Teo, W D; Thom, J; Vaughan, J; Weng, Y; Wittich, P; Beetz, C P; Cirino, G; Sanzeni, C; Winn, D; Abdullin, S; Afaq, M A; Albrow, M; Ananthan, B; Apollinari, G; Atac, M; Badgett, W; Bagby, L; Bakken, J A; Baldin, B; Banerjee, S; Banicz, K; Bauerdick, L A T; Beretvas, A; Berryhill, J; Bhat, P C; Biery, K; Binkley, M; Bloch, I; Borcherding, F; Brett, A M; Burkett, K; Butler, J N; Chetluru, V; Cheung, H W K; Chlebana, F; Churin, I; Cihangir, S; Crawford, M; Dagenhart, W; Demarteau, M; Derylo, G; Dykstra, D; Eartly, D P; Elias, J E; Elvira, V D; Evans, D; Feng, L; Fischler, M; Fisk, I; Foulkes, S; Freeman, J; Gartung, P; Gottschalk, E; Grassi, T; Green, D; Guo, Y; Gutsche, O; Hahn, A; Hanlon, J; Harris, R M; Holzman, B; Howell, J; Hufnagel, D; James, E; Jensen, H; Johnson, M; Jones, C D; Joshi, U; Juska, E; Kaiser, J; Klima, B; Kossiakov, S; Kousouris, K; Kwan, S; Lei, C M; Limon, P; Lopez Perez, J A; Los, S; Lueking, L; Lukhanin, G; Lusin, S; Lykken, J; Maeshima, K; Marraffino, J M; Mason, D; McBride, P; Miao, T; Mishra, K; Moccia, S; Mommsen, R; Mrenna, S; Muhammad, A S; Newman-Holmes, C; Noeding, C; O'Dell, V; Prokofyev, O; Rivera, R; Rivetta, C H; Ronzhin, A; Rossman, P; Ryu, S; Sekhri, V; Sexton-Kennedy, E; Sfiligoi, I; Sharma, S; Shaw, T M; Shpakov, D; Skup, E; Smith, R P; Soha, A; Spalding, W J; Spiegel, L; Suzuki, I; Tan, P; Tanenbaum, W; Tkaczyk, S; Trentadue, R; Uplegger, L; Vaandering, E W; Vidal, R; Whitmore, J; Wicklund, E; Wu, W; Yarba, J; Yumiceva, F; Yun, J C; Acosta, D; Avery, P; Barashko, V; Bourilkov, D; Chen, M; Di Giovanni, G P; Dobur, D; Drozdetskiy, A; Field, R D; Fu, Y; Furic, I K; Gartner, J; Holmes, D; Kim, B; Klimenko, S; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotov, K; Kropivnitskaya, A; Kypreos, T; Madorsky, A; Matchev, K; Mitselmakher, G; Pakhotin, Y; Piedra Gomez, J; Prescott, C; Rapsevicius, V; Remington, R; Schmitt, M; Scurlock, B; Wang, D; Yelton, J; Ceron, C; Gaultney, V; Kramer, L; Lebolo, L M; Linn, S; Markowitz, P; Martinez, G; Rodriguez, J L; Adams, T; Askew, A; Baer, H; Bertoldi, M; Chen, J; Dharmaratna, W G D; Gleyzer, S V; Haas, J; Hagopian, S; Hagopian, V; Jenkins, M; Johnson, K F; Prettner, E; Prosper, H; Sekmen, S; Baarmand, M M; Guragain, S; Hohlmann, M; Kalakhety, H; Mermerkaya, H; Ralich, R; Vodopiyanov, I; Abelev, B; Adams, M R; Anghel, I M; Apanasevich, L; Bazterra, V E; Betts, R R; Callner, J; Castro, M A; Cavanaugh, R; Dragoiu, C; Garcia-Solis, E J; Gerber, C E; Hofman, D J; Khalatian, S; Mironov, C; Shabalina, E; Smoron, A; Varelas, N; Akgun, U; Albayrak, E A; Ayan, A S; Bilki, B; Briggs, R; Cankocak, K; Chung, K; Clarida, W; Debbins, P; Duru, F; Ingram, F D; Lae, C K; McCliment, E; Merlo, J P; Mestvirishvili, A; Miller, M J; Moeller, A; Nachtman, J; Newsom, C R; Norbeck, E; Olson, J; Onel, Y; Ozok, F; Parsons, J; Schmidt, I; Sen, S; Wetzel, J; Yetkin, T; Yi, K; Barnett, B A; Blumenfeld, B; Bonato, A; Chien, C Y; Fehling, D; Giurgiu, G; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Maksimovic, P; Rappoccio, S; Swartz, M; Tran, N V; Zhang, Y; Baringer, P; Bean, A; Grachov, O; Murray, M; Radicci, V; Sanders, S; Wood, J S; Zhukova, V; Bandurin, D; Bolton, T; Kaadze, K; Liu, A; Maravin, Y; Onoprienko, D; Svintradze, I; Wan, Z; Gronberg, J; Hollar, J; Lange, D; Wright, D; Baden, D; Bard, R; Boutemeur, M; Eno, S C; Ferencek, D; Hadley, N J; Kellogg, R G; Kirn, M; Kunori, S; Rossato, K; Rumerio, P; Santanastasio, F; Skuja, A; Temple, J; Tonjes, M B; Tonwar, S C; Toole, T; Twedt, E; Alver, B; Bauer, G; Bendavid, J; Busza, W; Butz, E; Cali, I A; Chan, M; D'Enterria, D; Everaerts, P; Gomez Ceballos, G; Hahn, K A; Harris, P; Jaditz, S; Kim, Y; Klute, M; Lee, Y J; Li, W; Loizides, C; Ma, T; Miller, M; Nahn, S; Paus, C; Roland, C; Roland, G; Rudolph, M; Stephans, G; Sumorok, K; Sung, K; Vaurynovich, S; Wenger, E A; Wyslouch, B; Xie, S; Yilmaz, Y; Yoon, A S; Bailleux, D; Cooper, S I; Cushman, P; Dahmes, B; De Benedetti, A; Dolgopolov, A; Dudero, P R; Egeland, R; Franzoni, G; Haupt, J; Inyakin, A; Klapoetke, K; Kubota, Y; Mans, J; Mirman, N; Petyt, D; Rekovic, V; Rusack, R; Schroeder, M; Singovsky, A; Zhang, J; Cremaldi, L M; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Perera, L; Rahmat, R; Sanders, D A; Sonnek, P; Summers, D; Bloom, K; Bockelman, B; Bose, S; Butt, J; Claes, D R; Dominguez, A; Eads, M; Keller, J; Kelly, T; Kravchenko, I; Lazo-Flores, J; Lundstedt, C; Malbouisson, H; Malik, S; Snow, G R; Baur, U; Iashvili, I; Kharchilava, A; Kumar, A; Smith, K; Strang, M; Alverson, G; Barberis, E; Boeriu, O; Eulisse, G; Govi, G; McCauley, T; Musienko, Y; Muzaffar, S; Osborne, I; Paul, T; Reucroft, S; Swain, J; Taylor, L; Tuura, L; Anastassov, A; Gobbi, B; Kubik, A; Ofierzynski, R A; Pozdnyakov, A; Schmitt, M; Stoynev, S; Velasco, M; Won, S; Antonelli, L; Berry, D; Hildreth, M; Jessop, C; Karmgard, D J; Kolberg, T; Lannon, K; Lynch, S; Marinelli, N; Morse, D M; Ruchti, R; Slaunwhite, J; Warchol, J; Wayne, M; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Gilmore, J; Gu, J; Killewald, P; Ling, T Y; Williams, G; Adam, N; Berry, E; Elmer, P; Garmash, A; Gerbaudo, D; Halyo, V; Hunt, A; Jones, J; Laird, E; Marlow, D; Medvedeva, T; Mooney, M; Olsen, J; Piroué, P; Stickland, D; Tully, C; Werner, J S; Wildish, T; Xie, Z; Zuranski, A; Acosta, J G; Bonnett Del Alamo, M; Huang, X T; Lopez, A; Mendez, H; Oliveros, S; Ramirez Vargas, J E; Santacruz, N; Zatzerklyany, A; Alagoz, E; Antillon, E; Barnes, V E; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Everett, A; Garfinkel, A F; Gecse, Z; Gutay, L; Ippolito, N; Jones, M; Koybasi, O; Laasanen, A T; Leonardo, N; Liu, C; Maroussov, V; Merkel, P; Miller, D H; Neumeister, N; Sedov, A; Shipsey, I; Yoo, H D; Zheng, Y; Jindal, P; Parashar, N; Cuplov, V; Ecklund, K M; Geurts, F J M; Liu, J H; Maronde, D; Matveev, M; Padley, B P; Redjimi, R; Roberts, J; Sabbatini, L; Tumanov, A; Betchart, B; Bodek, A; Budd, H; Chung, Y S; de Barbaro, P; Demina, R; Flacher, H; Gotra, Y; Harel, A; Korjenevski, S; Miner, D C; Orbaker, D; Petrillo, G; Vishnevskiy, D; Zielinski, M; Bhatti, A; Demortier, L; Goulianos, K; Hatakeyama, K; Lungu, G; Mesropian, C; Yan, M; Atramentov, O; Bartz, E; Gershtein, Y; Halkiadakis, E; Hits, D; Lath, A; Rose, K; Schnetzer, S; Somalwar, S; Stone, R; Thomas, S; Watts, T L; Cerizza, G; Hollingsworth, M; Spanier, S; Yang, Z C; York, A; Asaadi, J; Aurisano, A; Eusebi, R; Golyash, A; Gurrola, A; Kamon, T; Nguyen, C N; Pivarski, J; Safonov, A; Sengupta, S; Toback, D; Weinberger, M; Akchurin, N; Berntzon, L; Gumus, K; Jeong, C; Kim, H; Lee, S W; Popescu, S; Roh, Y; Sill, A; Volobouev, I; Washington, E; Wigmans, R; Yazgan, E; Engh, D; Florez, C; Johns, W; Pathak, S; Sheldon, P; Andelin, D; Arenton, M W; Balazs, M; Boutle, S; Buehler, M; Conetti, S; Cox, B; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Neu, C; Phillips II, D; Ronquest, M; Yohay, R; Gollapinni, S; Gunthoti, K; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Mattson, M; Sakharov, A; Anderson, M; Bachtis, M; Bellinger, J N; Carlsmith, D; Crotty, I; Dasu, S; Dutta, S; Efron, J; Feyzi, F; Flood, K; Gray, L; Grogg, K S; Grothe, M; Hall-Wilton, R; Jaworski, M; Klabbers, P; Klukas, J; Lanaro, A; Lazaridis, C; Leonard, J; Loveless, R; Magrans de Abril, M; Mohapatra, A; Ott, G; Polese, G; Reeder, D; Savin, A; Smith, W H; Sourkov, A; Swanson, J; Weinberg, M; Wenman, D; Wensveen, M; White, A

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the calibration procedure for the drift tubes of the CMS barrel muon system and reports the main results obtained with data collected during a high statistics cosmic ray data-taking period. The main goal of the calibration is to determine, for each drift cell, the minimum time delay for signals relative to the trigger, accounting for the drift velocity within the cell. The accuracy of the calibration procedure is influenced by the random arrival time of cosmic muons. A more refined analysis of the drift velocity was performed during the offline reconstruction phase, which takes into account this feature of cosmic ray events.

  2. Beta systems error analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    The atmospheric backscatter coefficient, beta, measured with an airborne CO Laser Doppler Velocimeter (LDV) system operating in a continuous wave, focussed model is discussed. The Single Particle Mode (SPM) algorithm, was developed from concept through analysis of an extensive amount of data obtained with the system on board a NASA aircraft. The SPM algorithm is intended to be employed in situations where one particle at a time appears in the sensitive volume of the LDV. In addition to giving the backscatter coefficient, the SPM algorithm also produces as intermediate results the aerosol density and the aerosol backscatter cross section distribution. A second method, which measures only the atmospheric backscatter coefficient, is called the Volume Mode (VM) and was simultaneously employed. The results of these two methods differed by slightly less than an order of magnitude. The measurement uncertainties or other errors in the results of the two methods are examined.

  3. Scintillator based beta batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rensing, Noa M.; Tiernan, Timothy C.; Shirwadkar, Urmila; O'Dougherty, Patrick; Freed, Sara; Hawrami, Rastgo; Squillante, Michael R.

    2013-05-01

    Some long-term, remote applications do not have access to conventional harvestable energy in the form of solar radiation (or other ambient light), wind, environmental vibration, or wave motion. Radiation Monitoring Devices, Inc. (RMD) is carrying out research to address the most challenging applications that need power for many months or years and which have undependable or no access to environmental energy. Radioisotopes are an attractive candidate for this energy source, as they can offer a very high energy density combined with a long lifetime. Both large scale nuclear power plants and radiothermal generators are based on converting nuclear energy to heat, but do not scale well to small sizes. Furthermore, thermo-mechanical power plants depend on moving parts, and RTG's suffer from low efficiency. To address the need for compact nuclear power devices, RMD is developing a novel beta battery, in which the beta emissions from a radioisotope are converted to visible light in a scintillator and then the visible light is converted to electrical power in a photodiode. By incorporating 90Sr into the scintillator SrI2 and coupling the material to a wavelength-matched solar cell, we will create a scalable, compact power source capable of supplying milliwatts to several watts of power over a period of up to 30 years. We will present the latest results of radiation damage studies and materials processing development efforts, and discuss how these factors interact to set the operating life and energy density of the device.

  4. Synchrotron emission driven by the Cherenkov-drift instability in active galactic nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Osmanov, Zaza

    2012-01-01

    In the present paper we study generation of the synchrotron emission by means of the feedback of Cherenkov drift waves on the particle distribution via the diffusion process. It is shown that despite the efficient synchrotron losses the excited Cherenkov drift instability leads to the quasi-linear diffusion (QLD), effect of which is balanced by dissipation factors and as a result the pitch angles are prevented from damping, maintaining the corresponding synchrotron emission. The model is analyzed for a wide range of physical parameters and it is shown that the mechanism of QLD guarantees the generation of electromagnetic radiation from soft $X$-rays up to soft $\\gamma$-rays, strongly correlated with Cherenkov drift emission ranging from IR up to UV energy domains.

  5. A New Method to Measure the Drift Mobility in Doped Manganite Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王立; 陈坤基; 黄信凡; 殷江; 黄少云; 徐骏; 刘治国

    2001-01-01

    The travelling wave method has been used to measure the drift mobility in the paramagnetic-insulator state of La0.75Sr0.11 Ca0.14MnO3 films. The thermal activation of the drift mobility in manganites has been measured for the first time. The mobility varies from 2.5 × 10-2 cm2/Vs at 310K to about 9.2 × 10-2 cm2/Vs at 400K. The Arrhenius behaviours of the conductivity and drift mobility indicate that the transport process in manganites above the Curie temperature is dominated by the thermally assisted hopping of small polarons.

  6. BETA-S, Multi-Group Beta-Ray Spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1 - Description of program or function: BETA-S calculates beta-decay source terms and energy spectra in multigroup format for time-dependent radionuclide inventories of actinides, fission products, and activation products. Multigroup spectra may be calculated in any arbitrary energy-group structure. The code also calculates the total beta energy release rate from the sum of the average beta-ray energies as determined from the spectral distributions. BETA-S also provides users with an option to determine principal beta-decaying radionuclides contributing to each energy group. The CCC-545/SCALE 4.3 (or SCALE4.2) code system must be installed on the computer before installing BETA-S, which requires the SCALE subroutine library and nuclide-inventory generation from the ORIGEN-S code. 2 - Methods:Well-established models for beta-energy distributions are used to explicitly represent allowed, and 1., 2. - and 3. -forbidden transition types. Forbidden non-unique transitions are assumed to have a spectral shape of allowed transitions. The multigroup energy spectra are calculated by numerically integrating the energy distribution functions using an adaptive Simpson's Rule algorithm. Nuclide inventories are obtained from a binary interface produced by the ORIGEN-S code. BETA-S calculates the spectra for all isotopes on the binary interface that have associated beta-decay transition data in the ENSDF-95 library, developed for the BETA-S code. This library was generated from ENSDF data and contains 715 materials, representing approximately 8500 individual beta transition branches. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The algorithms do not treat positron decay transitions or internal conversion electrons. The neglect of positron transitions in inconsequential for most applications involving aggregate fission products, since most of the decay modes are via electrons. The neglect of internal conversion electrons may impact on the accuracy of the spectrum in the low

  7. Gravitational radiation from neutron stars deformed by crustal Hall drift

    CERN Document Server

    Suvorov, Arthur George; Geppert, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    A precondition for the radio emission of pulsars is the existence of strong, small-scale magnetic field structures (`magnetic spots') in the polar cap region. Their creation can proceed via crustal Hall drift out of two qualitatively and quantitatively different initial magnetic field configurations: a field confined completely to the crust and another which penetrates the whole star. The aim of this study is to explore whether these magnetic structures in the crust can deform the star sufficiently to make it an observable source of gravitational waves. We model the evolution of these field configurations, which can develop, within $\\sim 10^4$ -- $10^5$ yr, magnetic spots with local surface field strengths $\\sim 10^{14}$ G maintained over $\\gtrsim 10^6$ yr. Deformations caused by the magnetic forces are calculated. We show that, under favourable initial conditions, a star undergoing crustal Hall drift can have ellipticity $\\epsilon\\sim 10^{-6}$, even with sub-magnetar polar field strengths, after $\\sim 10^5$ ...

  8. Drift emplaced waste package thermal response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal calculations of the effects of radioactive waste decay heat on the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, have been conducted by the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) at Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL) in conjunction with the B ampersand W Fuel Co. For a number of waste package spacings, these 3D transient calculations use the TOPAZ3D code to predict drift wall temperatures to 10,000 years following emplacement. Systematic temperature variation occurs as a function of fuel age at emplacement and Areal Mass Loading (AML) during the first few centuries after emplacement. After about 1000 years, emplacement age is not a strong driver on rock temperature; AML has a larger impact. High AMLs occur when large waste packages are emplaced end-to-end in drifts. Drift emplacement of equivalent packages results in lower rock temperatures than borehole emplacement. For an emplacement scheme with 50% of the drift length occupied by packages, an AML of 138 MTU/acre is about three times higher than the Site Characterization Plan-Conceptual Design (SCP-CD) value. With this higher AML (requiring only 1/3 of the SCP-CD repository footprint), peak drift wall temperatures do not exceed 160 degrees C, but rock temperatures exceed the boiling point of water for about 3000 years. These TOPAZ3D results have been compared with reasonable agreement with two other computer codes

  9. Electron drift velocities in fast Argon and CF4 based drift gases

    CERN Document Server

    van Apeldoorn, G

    1998-01-01

    98-063 Electron drift velocities in gas mixtures were measured in a tabletop experiment using a nitrogen laser to create the primary electrons. The maximum drift times for electrons in a 5 mm (10 mm) honeycomb drift cell at 2200 V anode voltage were 28 ns (53 ns) and 21 ns (61 ns) for Ar-Cf4-CH4 (75/18/6) and Ar-CF4-CO2 (68/27/5), respectively. Changing the ratio of the latter mix did not change the drift velocity very much. The gains of the gases are ~10^4 for a single primary electron. CF4 causes electron attachment. The measured drift times agree well with GARFIELD simulations.

  10. Drift chamber tracking with neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the very high event rates projected for experiments at the SSC and LHC, it is important to investigate new approaches to on line pattern recognition. The use of neural networks for pattern recognition. The use of neural networks for pattern recognition in high energy physics detectors has been an area of very active research. The authors discuss drift chamber tracking with a commercial analog VLSI neural network chip. Voltages proportional to the drift times in a 4-layer drift chamber were presented to the Intel ETANN chip. The network was trained to provide the intercept and slope of straight tracks traversing the chamber. The outputs were recorded and later compared off line to conventional track fits. Two types of network architectures were studied. Applications of neural network tracking to high energy physics detector triggers is discussed

  11. Epigenetic drift, epigenetic clocks and cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Shijie C; Widschwendter, Martin; Teschendorff, Andrew E

    2016-05-01

    It is well-established that the DNA methylation landscape of normal cells undergoes a gradual modification with age, termed as 'epigenetic drift'. Here, we review the current state of knowledge of epigenetic drift and its potential role in cancer etiology. We propose a new terminology to help distinguish the different components of epigenetic drift, with the aim of clarifying the role of the epigenetic clock, mitotic clocks and active changes, which accumulate in response to environmental disease risk factors. We further highlight the growing evidence that epigenetic changes associated with cancer risk factors may play an important causal role in cancer development, and that monitoring these molecular changes in normal cells may offer novel risk prediction and disease prevention strategies.

  12. Epigenetic drift, epigenetic clocks and cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Shijie C; Widschwendter, Martin; Teschendorff, Andrew E

    2016-05-01

    It is well-established that the DNA methylation landscape of normal cells undergoes a gradual modification with age, termed as 'epigenetic drift'. Here, we review the current state of knowledge of epigenetic drift and its potential role in cancer etiology. We propose a new terminology to help distinguish the different components of epigenetic drift, with the aim of clarifying the role of the epigenetic clock, mitotic clocks and active changes, which accumulate in response to environmental disease risk factors. We further highlight the growing evidence that epigenetic changes associated with cancer risk factors may play an important causal role in cancer development, and that monitoring these molecular changes in normal cells may offer novel risk prediction and disease prevention strategies. PMID:27104983

  13. Realtime vision-based lateral drift correction

    OpenAIRE

    Hübner, T; Pajarola, R.

    2009-01-01

    A major drawback in many robotics projects is the dependance on a specific environment and the otherwise uncertain behavior of the hardware. Simple navigation tasks like driving in a straight line can lead to a strong lateral drift over time in an unknown environment. In this paper we propose a fast and simple solution for the lateral drift problem for vision guided robots by real-time scene analysis. Without an environment-specific calibration of the robot’s drive system, we balance the ...

  14. Relativistic Electron Shock Drift Acceleration in Low Mach Number Galaxy Cluster Shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Matsukiyo, Shuichi; Yamazaki, Ryo; Umeda, Takayuki

    2011-01-01

    An extreme case of electron shock drift acceleration in low Mach number collisionless shocks is investigated as a plausible mechanism of initial acceleration of relativistic electrons in large-scale shocks in galaxy clusters where upstream plasma temperature is of the order of 10 keV and a degree of magnetization is not too small. One-dimensional electromagnetic full particle simulations reveal that, even though a shock is rather moderate, a part of thermal incoming electrons are accelerated and reflected through relativistic shock drift acceleration and form a local nonthermal population just upstream of the shock. The accelerated electrons can self-generate local coherent waves and further be back-scattered toward the shock by those waves. This may be a scenario for the first stage of the electron shock acceleration occurring at the large-scale shocks in galaxy clusters such as CIZA J2242.8+5301 which has well defined radio relics.

  15. Beta Gyres in Global Analysis Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun-Hee KIM; H.Joe KWON; R.L.ELSBERRY

    2009-01-01

    A three-component decomposition is applied to global analysis data to show the existence of a beta gyre,which causes Tropical Cyclone (TC) to drift from a large-scale environmental steering current.Analyses from the Global Data Assimilation and Prediction System (GDAPS) of the Korea Meteorological Administration (KMA),the Global Forecast System (GFS) of NCEP,and the Navy Operational Global Atmospheric Prediction System (NOGAPS) are used in this study.The structure of the beta gyre obtained in our analyses is in good agreement with the theoretical structure,with a cyclonic circulation to the southwest of the TC center,an anticyclonic circulation to the northeast,and a ventilation flow directed northwestward near the center.The circulation of the beta gyre is strongest at the 850-hPa level where the cyclonically swirling primary circulation is strongest,and decreases with height,in a pyramid shape similar to the primary circulation.The individual structure of the beta gyre is case- and model-dependent.At a certain analysis time,one model may clearly reveal a well-defined beta gyre,but the other models may not.Within one model,the beta gyre may be well defined at some analysis times,but not at other times.The structure of the beta gyre in the analysis field is determined by the nature of the vortex initialization scheme and the model behavior during the 6-h forecast in the operational data assimilation cycle.

  16. Final Report for DUSEL R&D: BetaCage: A Screener of Ultra-Low-Level Radioactive Surface Contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golwala, Sunil R. [California Institute of Technology

    2013-12-20

    The eventual full-size, radiopure BetaCage will be a low-background, atmospheric-pressure neon drift chamber with unprecedented sensitivity to emitters of low-energy electrons and alpha particles. We expect that the prototype BetaCage already developed will be an excellent screener of alpha particles. Both the prototype and final BetaCage will provide new infrastructure for rare-event science.

  17. Detection relic gravitational waves in thermal case

    CERN Document Server

    Ghayour, Basem

    2016-01-01

    The thermal spectrum of relic gravitational waves causes the new amplitude that called `modified amplitude'. Our analysis shows that, there exist some chances for detection of the thermal spectrum in addition to the usual spectrum by Adv.LIGO and Dml detectors. The behaviour of the inflation and reheating stages are often known as power law expansion like $S(\\eta)\\propto \\eta^{1+\\beta}$, $S(\\eta)\\propto \\eta^{1+\\beta_s}$ respectively. The $\\beta$ and $\\beta_s$ have an unique effect on the shape of the spectrum. We find some upper bounds on the $\\beta$ and $\\beta_s$ by comparison the usual and thermal spectrum with the Adv.LIGO and Dml. As this result gives us more information about the nature of the evolution of inflation and reheating stages.

  18. Coronal Shock Waves, EUV waves, and Their Relation to CMEs. I. Reconciliation of "EIT waves", Type II Radio Bursts, and Leading Edges of CMEs

    CERN Document Server

    Grechnev, V V; Chertok, I M; Kuzmenko, I V; Afanasyev, A N; Meshalkina, N S; Kalashnikov, S S; Kubo, Y

    2011-01-01

    We show examples of excitation of coronal waves by flare-related abrupt eruptions of magnetic rope structures. The waves presumably rapidly steepened into shocks and freely propagated afterwards like decelerating blast waves that showed up as Moreton waves and EUV waves. We propose a simple quantitative description for such shock waves to reconcile their observed propagation with drift rates of metric type II bursts and kinematics of leading edges of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Taking account of different plasma density falloffs for propagation of a wave up and along the solar surface, we demonstrate a close correspondence between drift rates of type II bursts and speeds of EUV waves, Moreton waves, and CMEs observed in a few known events.

  19. Particle acceleration in tangential discontinuities by lower hybrid waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Spicer

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the role that the lower-hybrid wave turbulence plays in providing the necessary resistivity at collisionless reconnection sights. The mechanism for generating the waves is considered to be the lower-hybrid drift instability. We find that the level of the wave amplitude is sufficient enough to heat and accelerate both electrons and ions.

  20. Shear Flow Dispersion Under Wave and Current

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The longitudinal dispersion of solute in open channel flow with short period progressive waves is investigated. The waves induce second order drift velocity in the direction of propagation and enhance the mixing process in concurrent direction. The 1-D wave-period-averaged dispersion equation is derived and an expression for the wave-current induced longitudinal dispersion coefficient (WCLDC) is proposed based on Fischer's expression (1979) for dispersion in unidirectional flow. The result shows that the effect of waves on dispersion is mainly due to the cross-sectional variation of the drift velocity. Furthermore, to obtain a more practical expression of the WCLDC, the longitudinal dispersion coefficient due to Seo and Cheong (1998) is modified to incluee the effect of drift velocity. Laboratory experiments have been conducted to verify the proposed expression. The experimental results, together with dimensional analysis, show that the wave effect can be reflected by the ratio between the wave amplitude and wave period. A comparative study between the cases with and without waves demonstrates that the magnitude of the longitudinal dispersion coefficient is increased under the presence of waves.

  1. Stability analysis of abandoned drift for alternative utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bo-Hyun; Yoo, In-Kol; Kim, Moon-Seob; Kim, Ryang-Hee [Korea Resources Corp., Seoul(Korea); Yang, Hyung-Sik [Chonnam National University, Kwangju(Korea); Lee, Hi-Keun [Seoul National University, Seoul(Korea); Kim, Jae-Dong [Kangwon National University, Chuncheon(Korea)

    2000-04-30

    This study was performed to find the way that is alternative utilization of the drift that had been abandoned by coal industry promotion. To determine whether abandoned drift would be maintained without supports or not, the safety inspection that consists of drift survey, laboratory tests, rock mass classification and numerical analysis was performed. According to the result, there were discontinuity sets those had unfavorable orientation to the drift and rock mass around the drift had generally poor condition. So, it would be much difficult that abandoned drift is maintained without supports. (author). 15 refs., 8 tabs., 7 figs.

  2. Asymptotic dynamics of reflecting spiral waves

    OpenAIRE

    Langham, Jacob; Biktasheva, Irina; Barkley, Dwight

    2014-01-01

    Resonantly forced spiral waves in excitable media drift in straight-line paths, their rotation centers behaving as point-like objects moving along trajectories with a constant velocity. Interaction with medium boundaries alters this velocity and may often result in a reflection of the drift trajectory. Such reflections have diverse characteristics and are known to be highly nonspecular in general. In this context we apply the theory of response functions, which via numerically computable inte...

  3. Visualizing CMS muon drift tubes’ currents

    CERN Document Server

    Hamarik, Lauri

    2015-01-01

    This report documents my work as a summer student in the CMS DT group at CERN in July and August of 2015. During that time, I have participated in relocating DT monitoring experiment to GIF++ site and creating software to analyze drift tubes’ wires current dependence on luminosity and radioactivity.

  4. Low-drift micro flow sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Marcel

    2009-01-01

    The emerging fields of micro total-analysis systems (micro-TAS), micro-reactors and bio-MEMS drives the need for further miniaturisation of sensors measuring quantities such as pressure, temperature and flow. The research described in this thesis concerns the development of low-drift micro flow sens

  5. Stable discrete representation of relativistically drifting plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Kirchen, Manuel; Godfrey, Brendan B; Dornmair, Irene; Jalas, Soeren; Peters, Kevin; Vay, Jean-Luc; Maier, Andreas R

    2016-01-01

    Representing the electrodynamics of relativistically drifting particle ensembles in discrete, co-propagating Galilean coordinates enables the derivation of a Particle-in-Cell algorithm that is intrinsically free of the Numerical Cherenkov Instability, for plasmas flowing at a uniform velocity. Application of the method is shown by modeling plasma accelerators in a Lorentz-transformed optimal frame of reference.

  6. Plate Tectonics and Continental Drift: Classroom Ideas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stout, Prentice K.

    1983-01-01

    Suggests various classroom studies related to plate tectonics and continental drift, including comments on and sources of resource materials useful in teaching the topics. A complete list of magazine articles on the topics from the Sawyer Marine Resource Collection may be obtained by contacting the author. (JN)

  7. Electromagnetic backscattering from one-dimensional drifting fractal sea surface II:Electromagnetic backscattering model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢涛; William Perrie; 赵尚卓; 方贺; 于文金; 何宜军

    2016-01-01

    Sea surface current has a significant influence on electromagnetic (EM) backscattering signals and may constitute a dominant synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging mechanism. An effective EM backscattering model for a one-dimensional drifting fractal sea surface is presented in this paper. This model is used to simulate EM backscattering signals from the drifting sea surface. Numerical results show that ocean currents have a significant influence on EM backscattering signals from the sea surface. The normalized radar cross section (NRCS) discrepancies between the model for a coupled wave-current fractal sea surface and the model for an uncoupled fractal sea surface increase with the increase of incidence angle, as well as with increasing ocean currents. Ocean currents that are parallel to the direction of the wave can weaken the EM backscattering signal intensity, while the EM backscattering signal is intensified by ocean currents propagating oppositely to the wave direction. The model presented in this paper can be used to study the SAR imaging mechanism for a drifting sea surface.

  8. Electromagnetic backscattering from one-dimensional drifting fractal sea surface II: Electromagnetic backscattering model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Xie; William, Perrie; Shang-Zhuo, Zhao; He, Fang; Wen-Jin, Yu; Yi-Jun, He

    2016-07-01

    Sea surface current has a significant influence on electromagnetic (EM) backscattering signals and may constitute a dominant synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging mechanism. An effective EM backscattering model for a one-dimensional drifting fractal sea surface is presented in this paper. This model is used to simulate EM backscattering signals from the drifting sea surface. Numerical results show that ocean currents have a significant influence on EM backscattering signals from the sea surface. The normalized radar cross section (NRCS) discrepancies between the model for a coupled wave-current fractal sea surface and the model for an uncoupled fractal sea surface increase with the increase of incidence angle, as well as with increasing ocean currents. Ocean currents that are parallel to the direction of the wave can weaken the EM backscattering signal intensity, while the EM backscattering signal is intensified by ocean currents propagating oppositely to the wave direction. The model presented in this paper can be used to study the SAR imaging mechanism for a drifting sea surface. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 41276187), the Global Change Research Program of China (Grant No. 2015CB953901), the Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions, China, the Program for the Innovation Research and Entrepreneurship Team in Jiangsu Province, China, the Canadian Program on Energy Research and Development, and the Canadian World Class Tanker Safety Service Program.

  9. An obliquely propagating electromagnetic drift instability in the lower hybrid frequency range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Hantao; Kulsrud, Russell; Fox, William; Yamada, Masaaki

    2005-08-01

    By employing a local two-fluid theory, we investigate an obliquely propagating electromagnetic instability in the lower hybrid frequency range driven by cross-field current or relative drifts between electrons and ions. The theory self-consistently takes into account local cross-field current and accompanying pressure gradients. It is found that the instability is caused by reactive coupling between the backward propagating whistler (fast) wave in the electron frame and the forward propagating sound (slow) wave in the ion frame when the relative drifts are large. The unstable waves we consider propagate obliquely to the unperturbed magnetic field and have mixed polarization with significant electromagnetic components. A physical picture of the instability emerges in the limit of a large wave number characteristic of the local approximation. The primary positive feedback mechanism is based on reinforcement of initial electron density perturbations by compression of electron fluid via induced Lorentz force. The resultant waves are qualitatively consistent with the measured electromagnetic fluctuations in reconnecting current sheet in a laboratory plasma.

  10. Barber's Point, Oahu, Hawaii Drift Card Study 2002-2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Drift cards were be released from Barber's Point, Oahu, approximately once a month during the two year span to get an idea of the distribution of card drift under...

  11. Strategies for Dealing with Drift during Implementation of ERP Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.J. van Baalen (Peter); P.C. van Fenema (Paul)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractResearch on the relationship between Information Technology (IT) and organizations emphasizes the complexity of adaptation processes and the potential of drifting. Drifting means that an organization encounters unexpected circumstances that show the incompleteness and possible failure of

  12. Exploring Genetic Drift and Natural Selection through a Simulation Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maret, Timothy J.; Rissing, Steven W.

    1998-01-01

    Reports on the development of a laboratory exercise that would allow students to explore the concept of genetic drift. Discusses the concept of genetic drift that is coincident with natural selection and that closely models the real world. (DDR)

  13. Drift-Scale THC Seepage Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this report (REV04) is to document the thermal-hydrologic-chemical (THC) seepage model, which simulates the composition of waters that could potentially seep into emplacement drifts, and the composition of the gas phase. The THC seepage model is processed and abstracted for use in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for the license application (LA). This report has been developed in accordance with ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Coupled Processes (Mountain-Scale TH/THC/THM, Drift-Scale THC Seepage, and Post-Processing Analysis for THC Seepage) Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 172761]). The technical work plan (TWP) describes planning information pertaining to the technical scope, content, and management of this report. The plan for validation of the models documented in this report is given in Section 2.2.2, ''Model Validation for the DS THC Seepage Model,'' of the TWP. The TWP (Section 3.2.2) identifies Acceptance Criteria 1 to 4 for ''Quantity and Chemistry of Water Contacting Engineered Barriers and Waste Forms'' (NRC 2003 [DIRS 163274]) as being applicable to this report; however, in variance to the TWP, Acceptance Criterion 5 has also been determined to be applicable, and is addressed, along with the other Acceptance Criteria, in Section 4.2 of this report. Also, three FEPS not listed in the TWP (2.2.10.01.0A, 2.2.10.06.0A, and 2.2.11.02.0A) are partially addressed in this report, and have been added to the list of excluded FEPS in Table 6.1-2. This report has been developed in accordance with LP-SIII.10Q-BSC, ''Models''. This report documents the THC seepage model and a derivative used for validation, the Drift Scale Test (DST) THC submodel. The THC seepage model is a drift-scale process model for predicting the composition of gas and water that could enter waste emplacement drifts and the effects of mineral alteration on flow in rocks surrounding drifts. The DST THC submodel uses a drift

  14. Drift-Scale THC Seepage Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C.R. Bryan

    2005-02-17

    The purpose of this report (REV04) is to document the thermal-hydrologic-chemical (THC) seepage model, which simulates the composition of waters that could potentially seep into emplacement drifts, and the composition of the gas phase. The THC seepage model is processed and abstracted for use in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for the license application (LA). This report has been developed in accordance with ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Coupled Processes (Mountain-Scale TH/THC/THM, Drift-Scale THC Seepage, and Post-Processing Analysis for THC Seepage) Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 172761]). The technical work plan (TWP) describes planning information pertaining to the technical scope, content, and management of this report. The plan for validation of the models documented in this report is given in Section 2.2.2, ''Model Validation for the DS THC Seepage Model,'' of the TWP. The TWP (Section 3.2.2) identifies Acceptance Criteria 1 to 4 for ''Quantity and Chemistry of Water Contacting Engineered Barriers and Waste Forms'' (NRC 2003 [DIRS 163274]) as being applicable to this report; however, in variance to the TWP, Acceptance Criterion 5 has also been determined to be applicable, and is addressed, along with the other Acceptance Criteria, in Section 4.2 of this report. Also, three FEPS not listed in the TWP (2.2.10.01.0A, 2.2.10.06.0A, and 2.2.11.02.0A) are partially addressed in this report, and have been added to the list of excluded FEPS in Table 6.1-2. This report has been developed in accordance with LP-SIII.10Q-BSC, ''Models''. This report documents the THC seepage model and a derivative used for validation, the Drift Scale Test (DST) THC submodel. The THC seepage model is a drift-scale process model for predicting the composition of gas and water that could enter waste emplacement drifts and the effects of mineral

  15. Seasonal and longitudinal dependence of equatorialdisturbance vertical plasma drifts

    OpenAIRE

    Fejer, Bela G.; Jensen, J. W.; Su, S.Y.

    2008-01-01

    [1] We used equatorial measurements from the ROCSAT-1 satellite to determine the seasonal and longitudinal dependent equatorial F region disturbance vertical plasma drifts. Following sudden increases in geomagnetic activity, the prompt penetration vertical drifts are upward during the day and downward at night, and have strong local time dependence at all seasons. The largest prompt penetration drifts near dusk and dawn occur during June solstice. The daytime disturbance dynamo drifts are sma...

  16. Electromagnetic drift modes in an inhomogeneous electron gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shukla, P. K.; Pecseli, H. L.; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    1986-01-01

    A pair of nonlinear equations is derived which describes the dynamics of the electromagnetic drift oscillations in a nonuniform magnetized electron gas. It is shown that the nonlinear electromagnetic drift modes can propagate in the form of dipole vortices......A pair of nonlinear equations is derived which describes the dynamics of the electromagnetic drift oscillations in a nonuniform magnetized electron gas. It is shown that the nonlinear electromagnetic drift modes can propagate in the form of dipole vortices...

  17. Ocean modelling aspects for drift applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephane, L.; Pierre, D.

    2010-12-01

    Nowadays, many authorities in charge of rescue-at-sea operations lean on operational oceanography products to outline research perimeters. Moreover, current fields estimated with sophisticated ocean forecasting systems can be used as input data for oil spill/ adrift object fate models. This emphasises the necessity of an accurate sea state forecast, with a mastered level of reliability. This work focuses on several problems inherent to drift modeling, dealing in the first place with the efficiency of the oceanic current field representation. As we want to discriminate the relevance of a particular physical process or modeling option, the idea is to generate series of current fields of different characteristics and then qualify them in term of drift prediction efficiency. Benchmarked drift scenarios were set up from real surface drifters data, collected in the Mediterranean sea and off the coasts of Angola. The time and space scales that we are interested in are about 72 hr forecasts (typical timescale communicated in case of crisis), for distance errors that we hope about a few dozen of km around the forecast (acceptable for reconnaissance by aircrafts) For the ocean prediction, we used some regional oceanic configurations based on the NEMO 2.3 code, nested into Mercator 1/12° operational system. Drift forecasts were computed offline with Mothy (Météo France oil spill modeling system) and Ariane (B. Blanke, 1997), a Lagrangian diagnostic tool. We were particularly interested in the importance of the horizontal resolution, vertical mixing schemes, and any processes that may impact the surface layer. The aim of the study is to ultimately point at the most suitable set of parameters for drift forecast use inside operational oceanic systems. We are also motivated in assessing the relevancy of ensemble forecasts regarding determinist predictions. Several tests showed that mis-described observed trajectories can finally be modelled statistically by using uncertainties

  18. Longevity of Emplacement Drift Ground Support Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, David H.

    2001-05-30

    The purpose of this analysis is to evaluate the factors affecting the longevity of emplacement drift ground support materials and to develop a basis for the selection of materials for ground support that will function throughout the preclosure period of a potential repository at Yucca Mountain. REV 01 ICN 01 of this analysis is developed in accordance with AP-3.10Q, Analyses and Models, Revision 2, ICN 4, and prepared in accordance with the Technical Work Plan for Subsurface Design Section FY 01 Work Activities (CRWMS M&O 2001a). The objective of this analysis is to update the previous analysis (CRWMS M&O 2000a) to account for related changes in the Ground Control System Description Document (CRWMS M&O 2000b), the Monitored Geologic Repository Project Description Document, which is included in the Requirements and Criteria for Implementing a Repository Design that can be Operated Over a Range of Thermal Modes (BSC 2001), input information, and in environmental conditions, and to provide updated information on candidate ground support materials. Candidate materials for ground support are carbon steel and cement grout. Steel is mainly used for steel sets, lagging, channel, rock bolts, and wire mesh. Cement grout is only considered in the case of grouted rock bolts. Candidate materials for the emplacement drift invert are carbon steel and granular natural material. Materials are evaluated for the repository emplacement drift environment based on the updated thermal loading condition and waste package design. The analysis consists of the following tasks: (1) Identify factors affecting the longevity of ground support materials for use in emplacement drifts. (2) Review existing documents concerning the behavior of candidate ground support materials during the preclosure period. (3) Evaluate impacts of temperature and radiation effects on mechanical and thermal properties of steel. Assess corrosion potential of steel at emplacement drift environment. (4) Evaluate factors

  19. Ion mobility mass spectrometry of peptide, protein, and protein complex ions using a radio-frequency confining drift cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Samuel J; Giles, Kevin; Gilbert, Tony; Bush, Matthew F

    2016-02-01

    Ion mobility mass spectrometry experiments enable the characterization of mass, assembly, and shape of biological molecules and assemblies. Here, a new radio-frequency confining drift cell is characterized and used to measure the mobilities of peptide, protein, and protein complex ions. The new drift cell replaced the traveling-wave ion mobility cell in a Waters Synapt G2 HDMS. Methods for operating the drift cell and determining collision cross section values using this experimental set up are presented within the context of the original instrument control software. Collision cross sections for 349 cations and anions are reported, 155 of which are for ions that have not been characterized previously using ion mobility. The values for the remaining ions are similar to those determined using a previous radio-frequency confining drift cell and drift tubes without radial confinement. Using this device under 2 Torr of helium gas and an optimized drift voltage, denatured and native-like ions exhibited average apparent resolving powers of 14.2 and 16.5, respectively. For ions with high mobility, which are also low in mass, the apparent resolving power is limited by contributions from ion gating. In contrast, the arrival-time distributions of low-mobility, native-like ions are not well explained using only contributions from ion gating and diffusion. For those species, the widths of arrival-time distributions are most consistent with the presence of multiple structures in the gas phase. PMID:26739109

  20. Ion mobility mass spectrometry of peptide, protein, and protein complex ions using a radio-frequency confining drift cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Samuel J; Giles, Kevin; Gilbert, Tony; Bush, Matthew F

    2016-02-01

    Ion mobility mass spectrometry experiments enable the characterization of mass, assembly, and shape of biological molecules and assemblies. Here, a new radio-frequency confining drift cell is characterized and used to measure the mobilities of peptide, protein, and protein complex ions. The new drift cell replaced the traveling-wave ion mobility cell in a Waters Synapt G2 HDMS. Methods for operating the drift cell and determining collision cross section values using this experimental set up are presented within the context of the original instrument control software. Collision cross sections for 349 cations and anions are reported, 155 of which are for ions that have not been characterized previously using ion mobility. The values for the remaining ions are similar to those determined using a previous radio-frequency confining drift cell and drift tubes without radial confinement. Using this device under 2 Torr of helium gas and an optimized drift voltage, denatured and native-like ions exhibited average apparent resolving powers of 14.2 and 16.5, respectively. For ions with high mobility, which are also low in mass, the apparent resolving power is limited by contributions from ion gating. In contrast, the arrival-time distributions of low-mobility, native-like ions are not well explained using only contributions from ion gating and diffusion. For those species, the widths of arrival-time distributions are most consistent with the presence of multiple structures in the gas phase.

  1. Levered and unlevered Beta

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandez, Pablo

    2003-01-01

    We prove that in a world without leverage cost the relationship between the levered beta ( L) and the unlevered beta ( u) is the No-costs-of-leverage formula: L = u + ( u - d) D (1 - T) / E. We also analyze 6 alternative valuation theories proposed in the literature to estimate the relationship between the levered beta and the unlevered beta (Harris and Pringle (1985), Modigliani and Miller (1963), Damodaran (1994), Myers (1974), Miles and Ezzell (1980), and practitioners) and prove that all ...

  2. Simplified Drift Analysis for Proving Lower Bounds in Evolutionary Computation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oliveto, Pietro S.; Witt, Carsten

    2011-01-01

    Drift analysis is a powerful tool used to bound the optimization time of evolutionary algorithms (EAs). Various previous works apply a drift theorem going back to Hajek in order to show exponential lower bounds on the optimization time of EAs. However, this drift theorem is tedious to read and to...

  3. Compact drift-chambers for the OPAL forward detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two planes of four chambers are mounted in front of the forward calorimeter at each end of OPAL. Beam tests at CERN show good linearity (within 0.5 mm over 130 mm maximum drift) and good resolution in the drift direction (average 300 μm over the whole range of drift distances). The resolution along the wire is ±1 mm. (orig.)

  4. Effectiveness of spray adjuvants on reduction of spray drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numerous drift reduction adjuvants and spray deposition aids are available to applicators of crop production and protection chemicals. Performance of many of the newly introduced drift control adjuvants has not been well documented for aerial application. Five new drift control adjuvants were sele...

  5. Wave-induced mixing and transport of buoyant particles: application to the Statfjord A oil spill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drivdal, M.; Broström, G.; Christensen, K. H.

    2014-12-01

    This study focuses on how wave-current and wave-turbulence interactions modify the transport of buoyant particles in the ocean. Here the particles can represent oil droplets, plastic particles, or plankton such as fish eggs and larvae. Using the General Ocean Turbulence Model (GOTM), modified to take surface wave effects into account, we investigate how the increased mixing by wave breaking and Stokes shear production, as well as the stronger veering by the Coriolis-Stokes force, affects the drift of the particles. The energy and momentum fluxes, as well as the Stokes drift, depend on the directional wave spectrum obtained from a wave model. As a first test, the depth and velocity scales from the model are compared with analytical solutions based on a constant eddy viscosity (i.e., classical Ekman theory). Secondly, the model is applied to a case in which we investigate the oil drift after an oil spill off the west coast of Norway in 2007. During this accident the average net drift of oil was observed to be both slower and more deflected away from the wind direction than predicted by oil-drift models. In this case, using wind and wave forcing from the ERA Interim archive it is shown that the wave effects are important for the resultant drift and have the potential to improve drift forecasting.

  6. Realized Beta GARCH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Peter Reinhard; Lunde, Asger; Voev, Valeri Radkov

    2014-01-01

    as the beta. We apply the model to a large set of assets and find the conditional betas to be far more variable than usually found with rolling-window regressions based exclusively on daily returns. In the empirical part of the paper, we examine the cross-sectional as well as the time variation...... of the conditional beta series during the financial crises....

  7. Drift mode accelerometry for spaceborne gravity measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Conklin, John W

    2014-01-01

    A drift mode accelerometer is a precision device that overcomes the much of the acceleration noise and readout dynamic range limitations of traditional electrostatic accelerometers. It has the potential of achieving acceleration noise performance of drag-free systems over a restricted frequency band without the need for external drag-free control or spacecraft propulsion. Like traditional accelerometers, the drift mode accelerometer contains a high-density test mass surrounded by an electrode housing, which can control and sense all six degrees of freedom of the test mass. Unlike traditional accelerometers, the suspension system is operated with a low duty cycle so that the limiting suspension force noise only acts over brief, known time intervals, which can be neglected in the data analysis. The readout is performed using a laser interferometer which is immune to the dynamic range limitations of even the best voltage references typically used to determine the inertial acceleration of electrostatic accelerome...

  8. Effects of Drifting Macroalgae in Eelgrass Ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canal Vergés, Paula; Valdemarsen, Thomas Bruun; Kristensen, Erik;

    2010-01-01

    It has been suggested that current-driven macroalge transport in shallow lagoons and estuaries may negatively impact eelgrass through increased turbidity and physical stress. Increased turbidity and lower light availability for eelgrass may result when drifting macroalgae erode surface sediment...... and physical damage on eelgrass can occur when macroalgae are drifting as bedload. The ballistic effect of moving macroalgae on surface sediment was tested in the field as well as in a series of annular flume experiments, where simultaneous measurements of macroalgae transport and turbidity were measured...... at increasing current velocity. In flume experiments with macroalgae, sediment erosion always started at lower current velocities (2-4 cm s-1) than in control experiments without macroalgae (18-27 cm s-1). When macroalgae started to move, the turbidity increased immediately from a background concentration of 7...

  9. Gas sensor with attenuated drift characteristic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ing-Shin [Danbury, CT; Chen, Philip S. H. [Bethel, CT; Neuner, Jeffrey W [Bethel, CT; Welch, James [Fairfield, CT; Hendrix, Bryan [Danbury, CT; Dimeo, Jr., Frank [Danbury, CT

    2008-05-13

    A sensor with an attenuated drift characteristic, including a layer structure in which a sensing layer has a layer of diffusional barrier material on at least one of its faces. The sensor may for example be constituted as a hydrogen gas sensor including a palladium/yttrium layer structure formed on a micro-hotplate base, with a chromium barrier layer between the yttrium layer and the micro-hotplate, and with a tantalum barrier layer between the yttrium layer and an overlying palladium protective layer. The gas sensor is useful for detection of a target gas in environments susceptible to generation or incursion of such gas, and achieves substantial (e.g., >90%) reduction of signal drift from the gas sensor in extended operation, relative to a corresponding gas sensor lacking the diffusional barrier structure of the invention

  10. A Standard Law for the Equatorward Drift of the Sunspot Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathaway, David H.

    2012-01-01

    The latitudinal location of the sunspot zones in each hemisphere is determined by calculating the centroid position of sunspot areas for each solar rotation from May 1874 to June 2012. When these centroid positions are plotted and analyzed as functions of time from each sunspot cycle maximum there appears to be systematic differences in the positions and equatorward drift rates as a function of sunspot cycle amplitude. If, instead, these centroid positions are plotted and analyzed as functions of time from each sunspot cycle minimum then most of the differences in the positions and equatorward drift rates disappear. The differences that remain disappear entirely if curve fitting is used to determine the starting times (which vary by as much as 8 months from the times of minima). The sunspot zone latitudes and equatorward drift measured relative to this starting time follow a standard path for all cycles with no dependence upon cycle strength or hemispheric dominance. Although Cycle 23 was peculiar in its length and the strength of the polar fields it produced, it too shows no significant variation from this standard. This standard law, and the lack of variation with sunspot cycle characteristics, is consistent with Dynamo Wave mechanisms but not consistent with current Flux Transport Dynamo models for the equatorward drift of the sunspot zones.

  11. OpenDrift - an open source framework for ocean trajectory modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagestad, Knut-Frode; Breivik, Øyvind; Ådlandsvik, Bjørn

    2016-04-01

    We will present a new, open source tool for modeling the trajectories and fate of particles or substances (Lagrangian Elements) drifting in the ocean, or even in the atmosphere. The software is named OpenDrift, and has been developed at Norwegian Meteorological Institute in cooperation with Institute of Marine Research. OpenDrift is a generic framework written in Python, and is openly available at https://github.com/knutfrode/opendrift/. The framework is modular with respect to three aspects: (1) obtaining input data, (2) the transport/morphological processes, and (3) exporting of results to file. Modularity is achieved through well defined interfaces between components, and use of a consistent vocabulary (CF conventions) for naming of variables. Modular input implies that it is not necessary to preprocess input data (e.g. currents, wind and waves from Eulerian models) to a particular file format. Instead "reader modules" can be written/used to obtain data directly from any original source, including files or through web based protocols (e.g. OPeNDAP/Thredds). Modularity of processes implies that a model developer may focus on the geophysical processes relevant for the application of interest, without needing to consider technical tasks such as reading, reprojecting, and colocating input data, rotation and scaling of vectors and model output. We will show a few example applications of using OpenDrift for predicting drifters, oil spills, and search and rescue objects.

  12. Unintended Positional Drift and Its Potential Solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Niels Christian; Serafin, Stefania; Nordahl, Rolf

    2013-01-01

    Walking-In-Place interaction techniques seem particularly useful in relation to immersive virtual environments where the user's movement is greatly constrained by a limited physical space. However, current techniques may not be particularly useful in combination with head-mounted displays since...... many users unintentionally move forward while walking in place. We refer to this phenomenon accidental movement as Unintended Positional Drift. The poster presents evidence of the phenomenon's existence and subsequently discusses different design solutions which potentially could circumvent the problem....

  13. Review of cooling tower drift deposition models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, N.C.J.

    1977-05-04

    The behavior, basic assumptions, and limitations of ten different models for calculating the drift deposition rate from wet cooling towers are reviewed and then their predicted results for such deposition with a common set of input parameters are compared. The predicted maximum deposition differs among the models by two orders of magnitude with a wide range in peak location. Comments and suggestions to improve the models are included.

  14. CLASSIFICATION OF THE MGR EMPLACEMENT DRIFT SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.A. Ziegler

    2001-02-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to document the Quality Assurance (QA) classification of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) emplacement drift system structures, systems and components (SSCs) performed by the MGR Preclosure Safety and Systems Engineering Section. This analysis also provides the basis for revision of YMP/90-55Q, Q-List (YMP 2000). The Q-List identifies those MGR SSCs subject to the requirements of DOE/RW-0333P7 Quality Assurance Requirements and Description (QARD) (DOE 2000).

  15. Average Drift Analysis and Population Scalability

    OpenAIRE

    He, Jun; Yao, Xin

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to study how the population size affects the computation time of evolutionary algorithms in a rigorous way. The computation time of an evolutionary algorithm can be measured by either the expected number of generations (hitting time) or the expected number of fitness evaluations (running time) to find an optimal solution. Population scalability is the ratio of the expected hitting time between a benchmark algorithm and an algorithm using a larger population size. Average drift...

  16. THERMAL DRIFT CHARACTERISTICS OF CAPACITIVE PRESSURE SENSORS

    OpenAIRE

    ABDELAZIZ BEDDIAF; FOUAD KERROUR; SALAH KEMOUCHE

    2016-01-01

    The capacitive pressure sensors based on silicon are characterized by their very high sensitivities and their low power consumption. Nevertheless, their thermal behavior remains more or less unpredictable because they can indicate very high thermal coefficients. The study of the thermal behavior of these sensors is essential to define the parameters that cause the output characteristics drift. In this study, we modeled the thermal behavior of this sensors, using Finite Element Analysis (FE...

  17. Redshift drift constraints on holographic dark energy

    OpenAIRE

    He, Dong-Ze; Zhang, Jing-Fei; Xin ZHANG

    2016-01-01

    The Sandage-Loeb (SL) test is a promising method for probing dark energy because it measures the redshift drift in the spectra of Lyman-$\\alpha$ forest of distant quasars, covering the "redshift desert" of $2\\lesssim z\\lesssim5$, which is not covered by existing cosmological observations. Therefore, it could provide an important supplement to current cosmological observations. In this paper, we explore the impact of SL test on the precision of cosmological constraints for two typical holograp...

  18. The 'Diogene' detector, 4π drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'Diogene' is a detector with a solid angle near the steradian 4π, mainly comprising a drift chamber and capable of detecting in coincidence several tens of charged particles. Built by several laboratories (Dph-N/Saclay, CRN/Strasbourg and LPC/Clermont-Ferrand) it should be ready round about June 1980 to use the heavy ion beams of Saturne II for studying the multiple production of pions and protons in central collisions of relativistic heavy ions

  19. Inertial Orientation Trackers with Drift Compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foxlin, Eric M.

    2008-01-01

    A class of inertial-sensor systems with drift compensation has been invented for use in measuring the orientations of human heads (and perhaps other, similarly sized objects). These systems can be designed to overcome some of the limitations of prior orientation-measuring systems that are based, variously, on magnetic, optical, mechanical-linkage, and acoustical principles. The orientation signals generated by the systems of this invention could be used for diverse purposes, including controlling head-orientation-dependent virtual reality visual displays or enabling persons whose limbs are paralyzed to control machinery by means of head motions. The inventive concept admits to variations too numerous to describe here, making it necessary to limit this description to a typical system, the selected aspects of which are illustrated in the figure. A set of sensors is mounted on a bracket on a band or a cap that gently but firmly grips the wearer s head to be tracked. Among the sensors are three drift-sensitive rotationrate sensors (e.g., integrated-circuit angular- rate-measuring gyroscopes), which put out DC voltages nominally proportional to the rates of rotation about their sensory axes. These sensors are mounted in mutually orthogonal orientations for measuring rates of rotation about the roll, pitch, and yaw axes of the wearer s head. The outputs of these rate sensors are conditioned and digitized, and the resulting data are fed to an integrator module implemented in software in a digital computer. In the integrator module, the angular-rate signals are jointly integrated by any of several established methods to obtain a set of angles that represent approximately the orientation of the head in an external, inertial coordinate system. Because some drift is always present as a component of an angular position computed by integrating the outputs of angular-rate sensors, the orientation signal is processed further in a drift-compensator software module.

  20. Sunrise enhancement of equatorial vertical plasma drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Libo; Zhang, Ruilong; Le, Huijun

    2016-04-01

    Sunrise enhancement in vertical plasma drift over equatorial regions is not discernible in the statistical picture compared with the significant enhancement during dusk hours. In this report, it is the first time to investigate the occurrence of the dawn enhancement in the equatorial ionospheric vertical plasma drift from ROCSAT-1 observations during geomagnetic quiet times. The dawn enhancements occur most frequently in June solstice and least frequently in December solstice. The statistical survey shows that the occurrence depends on the magnetic declination. The enhancement has the strongest amplitude in regions near 320° longitude and peaks during June solstice. The dawn enhancement reaches its peak after the sunrise in conjugated E regions. Furthermore, it is found that the dawn enhancement is closely related to the difference between the sunrise times in the conjugated E regions (sunrise time lag). The dawn enhancement occurs easily in regions with a large sunrise time lag. Moreover, we will report the effects of the sunrise enhancement of vertical plasma drift on the equatorial ionosphere as indicated from the observations and model simulations. We thanks National Central University of Taiwan providing the ROCSAT-1 data. The Ap and F107 indices are obtained from the National Geophysical Data Center (http://spidr.ngdc.noaa.gov/spidr/). This research is supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (41231065), the Chinese Academy of Sciences project (KZZD-EW-01-3), National Key Basic Research Program of China (2012CB825604) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (41321003).

  1. Ambipolar Drift Heating in Turbulent Molecular Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Padoan, P; Nordlund, A A; Padoan, Paolo

    1999-01-01

    Although thermal pressure is unimportant dynamically in most molecular gas, the temperature is an important diagnostic of dynamical processes and physical conditions. This is the first of two papers on thermal equilibrium in molecular clouds. We present calculations of frictional heating by ion-neutral (or ambipolar) drift in three-dimensional simulations of turbulent, magnetized molecular clouds. We show that ambipolar drift heating is a strong function of position in a turbulent cloud, and its average value can be significantly larger than the average cosmic ray heating rate. The volume averaged heating rate per unit volume due to ambipolar drift, H_AD ~ |JxB|^2 ~ B^4/L_B^2, is found to depend on the rms Alfvenic Mach number, M_A, and on the average field strength, as H_AD ~ M_A^2^4. This implies that the typical scale of variation of the magnetic field, L_B, is inversely proportional to M_A, which we also demonstrate.

  2. Monitored Drift Chambers in the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Herten, G

    Monitored Drift Chambers (MDT) are used in the ATLAS Detector to measure the momentum of high energy muons. They consist of drift tubes, which are filled with an Ar-CO2 gas mixture at 3 bar gas pressure. About 1200 drift chambers are required for ATLAS. They are up to 6 m long. Nevertheless the position of every wire needs to be known with a precision of 20 µm within a chamber. In addition, optical alignment sensors are required to measure the relative position of adjacent chambers with a precision of 30µm. This gigantic task seems impossible at first instance. Indeed it took many years of R&D to invent the right tools and methods before the first chamber could be built according to specifications. Today, at the time when 50% of the chambers have been produced, we are confident that the goal for ATLAS can be reached. The mechanical precision of the chambers could be verified with the x-ray tomograph at CERN. This ingenious device, developed for the MDT system, is able to measure the wire position insid...

  3. THERMAL DRIFT CHARACTERISTICS OF CAPACITIVE PRESSURE SENSORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ABDELAZIZ BEDDIAF

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The capacitive pressure sensors based on silicon are characterized by their very high sensitivities and their low power consumption. Nevertheless, their thermal behavior remains more or less unpredictable because they can indicate very high thermal coefficients. The study of the thermal behavior of these sensors is essential to define the parameters that cause the output characteristics drift. In this study, we modeled the thermal behavior of this sensors, using Finite Element Analysis (FEA made in COMSOL. The model solved by COMSOL environment takes into account the entire sensor and thermal effects due to the temperature considering the materials’ properties, the geometric shape and also the heat transfer mechanisms. By COMSOL we determine how the temperature affects the sensor during the manufacturing process. For that end, we calculated the thermal drift of capacitance at rest, the thermal coefficients and we compared them with experimental results to validate our model. Further, we studied the thermal drift of sensor characteristics both at rest and under constant and uniform pressure. Further, our study put emphasis on the geometric influence parameters on these characteristics to optimize the sensor performance. Finally, this study allows us to predict the sensor behavior against temperature and to minimize this effect by optimizing the geometrical parameters.

  4. Wind tunnel observations of drifting snow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterna, Enrico; Crivelli, Philip; Lehning, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Drifting snow has a significant impact on snow redistribution in mountains, prairies as well as on glaciers, ice shelves, and sea ice. In all these environments, the local mass balance is highly influenced by drifting snow. Understanding the dynamic of snow saltation is crucial to the accurate description of the process. We applied digital shadowgraphy in a cold wind tunnel to measure drifting snow over natural snow covers. The acquisition and evaluation of time-resolved shadowgraphy images allowed us to resolve a large part of the saltation layer. The technique has been successfully compared to the measurements obtained from a Snow Particle Counter, considered the most robust technique for snow mass-flux measurements so far. The streamwise snow transport is dominated by large-scale events. The vertical snow transport has a more equal distribution of energy across the scales, similarly to what is observed for the flow turbulence velocities. It is hypothesized that the vertical snow transport is a quantity that reflects the local entrainment of the snow crystals into the saltation layer while the streamwise snow transport results from the streamwise development of the trajectories of the snow particles once entrained, and therefore is rather a non-local quantity.

  5. Longevity of Emplacement Drift Ground Support Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Tang

    2000-01-07

    The purpose of this analysis is to evaluate the factors affecting the longevity of emplacement drift ground support materials and to develop a basis for selection of materials for ground support that will function throughout the preclosure period. The Development Plan (DP) for this analysis is given in CRWMS M&O (Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management and Operating Contractor) (1999a). The candidate materials for ground support are steel (carbon steel, ductile cast iron, galvanized steel, and stainless steel, etc.) and cement. Steel will mainly be used for steel sets, lagging, channels, rock bolts, and wire mesh. Cement usage is only considered in the case of grouted rock bolts. The candidate materials for the invert structure are steel and crushed rock ballast. The materials shall be evaluated for the repository emplacement drift environment under a specific thermal loading condition based on the proposed License Application Design Selection (LADS) design. The analysis consists of the following tasks: (1) Identify factors affecting the longevity of ground control materials for use in emplacement drifts. (2) Review existing documents concerning behavior of candidate ground control materials during the preclosure period. The major criteria to be considered for steel are mechanical and thermal properties, and durability, of which corrosion is the most important concern. (3) Evaluate the available results and develop recommendations for material(s) to be used.

  6. Internal Clock Drift Estimation in Computer Clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hicham Marouani

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Most computers have several high-resolution timing sources, from the programmable interrupt timer to the cycle counter. Yet, even at a precision of one cycle in ten millions, clocks may drift significantly in a single second at a clock frequency of several GHz. When tracing the low-level system events in computer clusters, such as packet sending or reception, each computer system records its own events using an internal clock. In order to properly understand the global system behavior and performance, as reported by the events recorded on each computer, it is important to estimate precisely the clock differences and drift between the different computers in the system. This article studies the clock precision and stability of several computer systems, with different architectures. It also studies the typical network delay characteristics, since time synchronization algorithms rely on the exchange of network packets and are dependent on the symmetry of the delays. A very precise clock, based on the atomic time provided by the GPS satellite network, was used as a reference to measure clock drifts and network delays. The results obtained are of immediate use to all applications which depend on computer clocks or network time synchronization accuracy.

  7. Correlated Energy Exchange in Drifting Sea Ice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Chmel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The ice floe speed variations were monitored at the research camp North Pole 35 established on the Arctic ice pack in 2008. A three-month time series of measured speed values was used for determining changes in the kinetic energy of the drifting ice floe. The constructed energy distributions were analyzed by methods of nonextensive statistical mechanics based on the Tsallis statistics for open nonequilibrium systems, such as tectonic formations and drifting sea ice. The nonextensivity means the nonadditivity of externally induced energy changes in multicomponent systems due to dynamic interrelation of components having no structural links. The Tsallis formalism gives one an opportunity to assess the correlation between ice floe motions through a specific parameter, the so-called parameter of nonextensivity. This formalistic assessment of the actual state of drifting pack allows one to forecast some important trends in sea ice behavior, because the level of correlated dynamics determines conditions for extended mechanical perturbations in ice pack. In this work, we revealed temporal fluctuations of the parameter of nonextensivity and observed its maximum value before a large-scale sea ice fragmentation (faulting of consolidated sea ice. The correlation was not detected in fragmented sea ice where long-range interactions are weakened.

  8. Longevity of Emplacement Drift Ground Support Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this analysis is to evaluate the factors affecting the longevity of emplacement drift ground support materials and to develop a basis for selection of materials for ground support that will function throughout the preclosure period. The Development Plan (DP) for this analysis is given in CRWMS M and O (Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management and Operating Contractor) (1999a). The candidate materials for ground support are steel (carbon steel, ductile cast iron, galvanized steel, and stainless steel, etc.) and cement. Steel will mainly be used for steel sets, lagging, channels, rock bolts, and wire mesh. Cement usage is only considered in the case of grouted rock bolts. The candidate materials for the invert structure are steel and crushed rock ballast. The materials shall be evaluated for the repository emplacement drift environment under a specific thermal loading condition based on the proposed License Application Design Selection (LADS) design. The analysis consists of the following tasks: (1) Identify factors affecting the longevity of ground control materials for use in emplacement drifts. (2) Review existing documents concerning behavior of candidate ground control materials during the preclosure period. The major criteria to be considered for steel are mechanical and thermal properties, and durability, of which corrosion is the most important concern. (3) Evaluate the available results and develop recommendations for material(s) to be used

  9. Giving cosmic redshift drift a whirl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Alex G.; Linder, Eric V.; Edelstein, Jerry; Erskine, David

    2015-03-01

    Redshift drift provides a direct kinematic measurement of cosmic acceleration but it occurs with a characteristic time scale of a Hubble time. Thus redshift observations with a challenging precision of 10-9 require a 10 year time span to obtain a signal-to-noise of 1. We discuss theoretical and experimental approaches to address this challenge, potentially requiring less observer time and having greater immunity to common systematics. On the theoretical side we explore allowing the universe, rather than the observer, to provide long time spans; speculative methods include radial baryon acoustic oscillations, cosmic pulsars, and strongly lensed quasars. On the experimental side, we explore beating down the redshift precision using differential interferometric techniques, including externally dispersed interferometers and spatial heterodyne spectroscopy. Low-redshift emission line galaxies are identified as having high cosmology leverage and systematics control, with an 8 h exposure on a 10-m telescope (1000 h of exposure on a 40-m telescope) potentially capable of measuring the redshift of a galaxy to a precision of 10-8 (few ×10-10). Low-redshift redshift drift also has very strong complementarity with cosmic microwave background measurements, with the combination achieving a dark energy figure of merit of nearly 300 (1400) for 5% (1%) precision on drift.

  10. Comparison of drift velocities of nighttime equatorial plasma depletions with ambient plasma drifts and thermospheric neutral winds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, G.; England, S.L.; Frey, H.U.; Immel, T.J.; Lin, C.S.; Pacheco, E.E.; Häusler, K.; Doornbos, E.N.

    2013-01-01

    This is the first study to compare plasma depletion drifts with the ambient plasma drifts and neutral winds in the post sunset equatorial ionosphere using global-scale satellite observations. The local time and latitude variations of the drift velocities of O+ plasma depletions at 350–400 km altitud

  11. Hydroelastic responses of pontoon type very large floating offshore structures. 2nd Report. Effect of the water depth and the drift forces; Pontoon gata choogata futaishiki kaiyo kozobutsu no harochu chosei oto ni kansuru kenkyu. 2. Senkai eikyo to hyoryuryoku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeda, H.; Miyajima, S. [The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan). Institute of Industrial Science; Masuda, K.; Ikoma, T. [Nihon University, Tokyo (Japan). College of Science and Technology

    1996-12-31

    Steady-state drift force in regular waves is theoretically analyzed. It is also studied under combined external force experimentally using a two-dimensional water tank. The fluid forces are analyzed by the pressure distribution method based on the potential theory, in which the effects of water depth are taken into account to discuss the effects of elastic deformation of the floating structure on the drift characteristics of steady-state waves. The tests were carried out using a wave-making circulating water tank equipped with a wind duct to create wind, waves and tidal flow. Drift force under a combined external force by wind, wave and/or tidal flow cannot be accurately predicted by arithmetically adding these components. For predicting drift force by tidal flow, it is necessary to take into account drag force in current at the floating structure bottom as well as that in wind at the front face. Drift force by tidal flow is affected by shallowness of water, which should be taken into account for drag forces. The floating structure will be deformed along the wave face as its stiffness decreases, basically decreasing steady-state drift force. 9 refs., 14 figs.

  12. Concept of a solid-state drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The operation of a solid state drift chamber is described, and its use in a high rate, high multiplicity environment is discussed. The Solid State Drift Chamber (SSDCH) is a thin wafer of a high purity n-type silicon (few cm2 x a few hundreds μm thick) with a single small-area, small-capacitance anode readout. The drift voltage is supplied to an array of drift electrodes on both sides of the wafer to produce a uniform drift field parallel to the surface of the wafer and to ensure the complete depletion of the wafer

  13. Dynamics of Vortex-Wave under a Travelling-Wave Modulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Ning-Jie; MA Jun; CUI Jing-An; YING He-Ping

    2008-01-01

    @@ The mechanism of destabilization is studied for the rotating vortices (scroll waves and spiral waves) in excitable media induced by a parameter modulation in the form of a travelling-wave.It is found that a rigid rotating spiral in the two-dimensional (2D) system undergoes a synchronized drift along a straight line, and a 3D scroll ring with its filament closed into a circle can be reoriented only if the direction of wave number of a travelling-wave perturbation is parallel to the ring plane.Then, in order to describe the behaviour of the synchronized drift of spiral wave and the reorientation of scroll ring, the approximate formulas are given to exhibit qualitative agreements with the observed results.

  14. Ground Control for Emplacement Drifts for SR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y. Sun

    2000-04-07

    This analysis demonstrates that a satisfactory ground control system can be designed for the Yucca Mountain site, and provides the technical basis for the design of ground support systems to be used in repository emplacement and non-emplacement drifts. The repository ground support design was based on analytical methods using acquired computer codes, and focused on the final support systems. A literature review of case histories, including the lessons learned from the design and construction of the ESF, the studies on the seismic damages of underground openings, and the use of rock mass classification systems in the ground support design, was conducted (Sections 6.3.4 and 6.4). This review provided some basis for determining the inputs and methodologies used in this analysis. Stability of the supported and unsupported emplacement and non-emplacement drifts was evaluated in this analysis. The excavation effects (i.e., state of the stress change due to excavation), thermal effects (i.e., due to heat output from waste packages), and seismic effects (i.e., from potential earthquake events) were evaluated, and stress controlled modes of failure were examined for two in situ stress conditions (k_0=0.3 and 1.0) using rock properties representing rock mass categories of 1 and 5. Variation of rock mass units such as the non-lithophysal (Tptpmn) and lithophysal (Tptpll) was considered in the analysis. The focus was on the non-lithophysal unit because this unit appears to be relatively weaker and has much smaller joint spacing. Therefore, the drift stability and ground support needs were considered to be controlled by the design for this rock unit. The ground support systems for both emplacement and non-emplacement drifts were incorporated into the models to assess their performance under in situ, thermal, and seismic loading conditions. Both continuum and discontinuum modeling approaches were employed in the analyses of the rock mass behavior and in the evaluation of the

  15. Ground Control for Emplacement Drifts for SR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This analysis demonstrates that a satisfactory ground control system can be designed for the Yucca Mountain site, and provides the technical basis for the design of ground support systems to be used in repository emplacement and non-emplacement drifts. The repository ground support design was based on analytical methods using acquired computer codes, and focused on the final support systems. A literature review of case histories, including the lessons learned from the design and construction of the ESF, the studies on the seismic damages of underground openings, and the use of rock mass classification systems in the ground support design, was conducted (Sections 6.3.4 and 6.4). This review provided some basis for determining the inputs and methodologies used in this analysis. Stability of the supported and unsupported emplacement and non-emplacement drifts was evaluated in this analysis. The excavation effects (i.e., state of the stress change due to excavation), thermal effects (i.e., due to heat output from waste packages), and seismic effects (i.e., from potential earthquake events) were evaluated, and stress controlled modes of failure were examined for two in situ stress conditions (k0=0.3 and 1.0) using rock properties representing rock mass categories of 1 and 5. Variation of rock mass units such as the non-lithophysal (Tptpmn) and lithophysal (Tptpll) was considered in the analysis. The focus was on the non-lithophysal unit because this unit appears to be relatively weaker and has much smaller joint spacing. Therefore, the drift stability and ground support needs were considered to be controlled by the design for this rock unit. The ground support systems for both emplacement and non-emplacement drifts were incorporated into the models to assess their performance under in situ, thermal, and seismic loading conditions. Both continuum and discontinuum modeling approaches were employed in the analyses of the rock mass behavior and in the evaluation of the

  16. Abstraction of Drift-Scale Coupled Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Analysis/Model Report (AMR) describes an abstraction, for the performance assessment total system model, of the near-field host rock water chemistry and gas-phase composition. It also provides an abstracted process model analysis of potentially important differences in the thermal hydrologic (TH) variables used to describe the performance of a geologic repository obtained from models that include fully coupled reactive transport with thermal hydrology and those that include thermal hydrology alone. Specifically, the motivation of the process-level model comparison between fully coupled thermal-hydrologic-chemical (THC) and thermal-hydrologic-only (TH-only) is to provide the necessary justification as to why the in-drift thermodynamic environment and the near-field host rock percolation flux, the essential TH variables used to describe the performance of a geologic repository, can be obtained using a TH-only model and applied directly into a TSPA abstraction without recourse to a fully coupled reactive transport model. Abstraction as used in the context of this AMR refers to an extraction of essential data or information from the process-level model. The abstraction analysis reproduces and bounds the results of the underlying detailed process-level model. The primary purpose of this AMR is to abstract the results of the fully-coupled, THC model (CRWMS M andO 2000a) for effects on water and gas-phase composition adjacent to the drift wall (in the near-field host rock). It is assumed that drift wall fracture water and gas compositions may enter the emplacement drift before, during, and after the heating period. The heating period includes both the preclosure, in which the repository drifts are ventilated, and the postclosure periods, with backfill and drip shield emplacement at the time of repository closure. Although the preclosure period (50 years) is included in the process models, the postclosure performance assessment starts at the end of this initial period

  17. Airborne organophosphate pesticides drift in Mediterranean climate: The importance of secondary drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zivan, Ohad; Segal-Rosenheimer, Michal; Dubowski, Yael

    2016-02-01

    Pesticide application is a short-term air-pollution episode with near and far field effects due to atmospheric drift. In order to better evaluate resulting air concentrations in nearby communities following pesticide application, measurements of airborne pesticides were conducted at ∼70 m from field edge. This was done following three different application events of the organophosphate pesticide Chlorpyrifos in a persimmon orchard. Complementary information on larger spatial scale was obtained using CALPUFF modeling in which application and meteorological data was used to better evaluate dispersion patterns. Measurements indicated high airborne concentrations during application hours (few μg m-3 for 8 h average), which dropped to tens of ng m-3 in the following days. Measured atmospheric concentrations show that secondary drift (i.e., post-application drift) involves significant loads of pesticides and hence should not be ignored in exposure considerations. Furthermore, CALPUFF modeling revealed the complex dispersion pattern when weak winds prevailed, and showed that during the 24 h after application air concentrations reached levels above the hourly Texas effect screening level (0.1 μg m-3). Interestingly, weak winds on the night after application resulted in a secondary peak in measured and modeled air concentrations. Long exposure time (when secondary drift is considered) and concentrations measured following such common air-assisted orchard application, suggest pesticide drift may have health repercussions that are currently unknown, and emphasize the need for further epidemiological studies.

  18. Radon in the DRIFT-II directional dark matter TPC: emanation, detection and mitigation

    CERN Document Server

    Battat, J B R; Daw, E; Dorofeev, A; Ezeribe, A C; Fox, J R; Gauvreau, J -L; Gold, M; Harmon, L J; Harton, J L; Landers, J M; Lee, E R; Loomba, D; Matthews, J A J; Miller, E H; Monte, A; Murphy, A StJ; Paling, S M; Phan, N; Pipe, M; Robinson, M; Sadler, S W; Scarff, A; Snowden-Ifft, D P; Spooner, N J C; Telfer, S; Walker, D; Warner, D; Yuriev, L

    2014-01-01

    Radon gas emanating from materials is of interest in environmental science and also a major concern in rare event non-accelerator particle physics experiments such as dark matter and double beta decay searches, where it is a major source of background. Notable for dark matter experiments is the production of radon progeny recoils (RPRs), the low energy (~100 keV) recoils of radon daughter isotopes, which can mimic the signal expected from WIMP interactions. Presented here are results of measurements of radon emanation from detector materials in the 1 metre cubed DRIFT-II directional dark matter gas time projection chamber experiment. Construction and operation of a radon emanation facility for this work is described, along with an analysis to continuously monitor DRIFT data for the presence of internal 222Rn and 218Po. Applying this analysis to historical DRIFT data, we show how systematic substitution of detector materials for alternatives, selected by this device for low radon emanation, has resulted in a f...

  19. Wave induced mixing and transport of buoyant particles: application to the Statfjord A oil spill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Drivdal

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The modelling of wave-current and wave-turbulence interactions have received much attention in recent years. In this study the focus is on how these wave effects modify the transport of particles in the ocean. Here the particles are buoyant tracers that can represent oil droplets, plastic particles or plankton, for example fish eggs and larvae. Using the General Ocean Turbulence Model (GOTM, modified to take surface wave effects into account, we investigate how the increased mixing by wave breaking and Stokes shear production as well as the stronger veering by the Coriolis–Stokes force affect the drift of the particles. The energy and momentum fluxes as well as the Stokes drift depend on the directional wave spectrum that can be obtained from a wave model or from observations. As a first test the depth and velocity scales from the model are compared with analytical solutions based on a constant eddy viscosity (e.g. classical Ekman theory. Secondly the model is applied to a case where we investigate the oil drift after an offshore oil spill outside the western coast of Norway in 2007. During this accident the average net drift of oil was observed to be both slower and more deflected away from the wind direction than predicted by empirical models. With wind and wave forcing from the ERA Interim archive, it is shown that the wave effects are important for the resultant drift in this case, and has the potential to improve drift forecasting.

  20. Wave induced mixing and transport of buoyant particles: application to the Statfjord A oil spill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drivdal, M.; Broström, G.; Christensen, K. H.

    2014-05-01

    The modelling of wave-current and wave-turbulence interactions have received much attention in recent years. In this study the focus is on how these wave effects modify the transport of particles in the ocean. Here the particles are buoyant tracers that can represent oil droplets, plastic particles or plankton, for example fish eggs and larvae. Using the General Ocean Turbulence Model (GOTM), modified to take surface wave effects into account, we investigate how the increased mixing by wave breaking and Stokes shear production as well as the stronger veering by the Coriolis-Stokes force affect the drift of the particles. The energy and momentum fluxes as well as the Stokes drift depend on the directional wave spectrum that can be obtained from a wave model or from observations. As a first test the depth and velocity scales from the model are compared with analytical solutions based on a constant eddy viscosity (e.g. classical Ekman theory). Secondly the model is applied to a case where we investigate the oil drift after an offshore oil spill outside the western coast of Norway in 2007. During this accident the average net drift of oil was observed to be both slower and more deflected away from the wind direction than predicted by empirical models. With wind and wave forcing from the ERA Interim archive, it is shown that the wave effects are important for the resultant drift in this case, and has the potential to improve drift forecasting.

  1. Remote sensing of seawater and drifting ice in Svalbard fjords by compact Raman LIDAR

    CERN Document Server

    Bunkin, Alexey F; Lednev, Vasily N; Lushnikov, Dmitry L; Marchenko, Aleksey V; Morozov, Eugene G; Pershin, Sergey M; Yulmetov, Renat N

    2013-01-01

    A compact Raman LIDAR system for remote sensing of sea and drifting ice was developed at the Wave Research Center at the Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the RAS. The developed system is based on a diode pumped solid state YVO4:Nd laser combined with compact spectrograph equipped with gated detector. The system exhibits high sensitivity and can be used for mapping or depth profiling of different parameters within many oceanographic problems. Light weight (~20 kg) and low power consumption (300 W) make possible to install the device on any vehicle including unmanned aircraft or submarine system. The Raman LIDAR presented was used for Svalbard fjords study and analysis of different influence of the open sea and glaciers on the water properties. Temperature, phytoplankton, and dissolved organic matter distributions in the seawater were studied in the Ice Fjord, Van Mijen Fjord and Rinders Fjord. Drifting ice and seawater in the Rinders Fjord were characterized by the Raman spectroscopy and fluorescence. It...

  2. Penetration of lower hybrid current drive waves in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lower hybrid (LH) ray propagation in toroidal plasma is shown to be controlled by combination of the azimuthal spectrum launched by the antenna, the poloidal variation of the magnetic field, and the scattering of the waves by the drift wave fluctuations. The width of the poloidal and radial radio frequency wave spectrum increases rapidly as the rays penetrate into higher density and scatter from the drift waves. The electron temperature gradient (ETG) spectrum is particularly effective in scattering the LH waves due to its comparable wavelengths and phase velocities. ETG turbulence is also driven by the radial gradient of the electron current profile giving rise to an anomalous viscosity spreading the LH driven plasma currents. The LH wave scattering is derived from a Fokker-Planck equation for the distribution of the ray trajectories with diffusivities derived from the drift wave fluctuations. The condition for chaotic diffusion for the rays is derived. The evolution of the poloidal and radial mode number spectrum of the lower hybrid waves are both on the antenna spectrum and the spectrum of the drift waves. Antennas launching higher poloidal mode number spectra drive off-axis current density profiles producing negative central shear [RS] plasmas with improved thermal confinement from ETG transport. Core plasma current drive requires antennas with low azimuthal mode spectra peaked at m = 0 azimuthal mode numbers

  3. Penetration of lower hybrid current drive waves in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horton, W. [The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Aix-Marseille University, 58, Bd Charles Livon, 13284 Marseille (France); Goniche, M.; Peysson, Y.; Decker, J.; Ekedahl, A.; Litaudon, X. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez Durance (France)

    2013-11-15

    Lower hybrid (LH) ray propagation in toroidal plasma is shown to be controlled by combination of the azimuthal spectrum launched by the antenna, the poloidal variation of the magnetic field, and the scattering of the waves by the drift wave fluctuations. The width of the poloidal and radial radio frequency wave spectrum increases rapidly as the rays penetrate into higher density and scatter from the drift waves. The electron temperature gradient (ETG) spectrum is particularly effective in scattering the LH waves due to its comparable wavelengths and phase velocities. ETG turbulence is also driven by the radial gradient of the electron current profile giving rise to an anomalous viscosity spreading the LH driven plasma currents. The LH wave scattering is derived from a Fokker-Planck equation for the distribution of the ray trajectories with diffusivities derived from the drift wave fluctuations. The condition for chaotic diffusion for the rays is derived. The evolution of the poloidal and radial mode number spectrum of the lower hybrid waves are both on the antenna spectrum and the spectrum of the drift waves. Antennas launching higher poloidal mode number spectra drive off-axis current density profiles producing negative central shear [RS] plasmas with improved thermal confinement from ETG transport. Core plasma current drive requires antennas with low azimuthal mode spectra peaked at m = 0 azimuthal mode numbers.

  4. Effects of the ring current and plasmasphere on ULF waves in the inner magnetosphere based on the GEMSIS-RC model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, K.; Amano, T.; saito, S.; Miyoshi, Y.; Matsumoto, Y.; Umeda, T.; Miyashita, Y.; Ebihara, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Acceleration mechanisms of electrons to cause drastic variation of the Earth's outer radiation belt is one of outstanding issues of the geospace researches. While the radial diffusion of the electrons driven by ULF waves has been considered as one of the candidate mechanisms, efficiency of the mechanism under realistic ULF characteristics and distribution is far from understood. GEMSIS (Geospace Environment Modeling System for Integrated Studies) of STEL, Nagoya University, is the observation-based modeling project for understanding energy and mass transportation from the Sun to the Earth in the geospace environment. Aiming at understanding the dynamics of the inner magnetosphere during the geospace storms, the GEMSIS-Magnetosphere working team has developed a new physics-based model for the global dynamics of the ring current (GEMSIS-RC model). The GEMSIS-RC model is a self-consistent and kinetic numerical simulation code solving the five-dimensional collisionless drift-kinetic equation for the ring-current ions in the inner-magnetosphere coupled with Maxwell equations. We applied the GEMSIS-RC model for simulation of global distribution of ULF waves to test its capability of describing fast time scale phenomena like SCs and ULF waves. Two cases of background profile, i.e., cases without/with plasmapause in the simulation domain, are compared. The result shows that existence of plasmapause strengthens ULFs outside the plasmapause and widens the MLT region where the E_r (toroidal) component is excited from initially-given E_phi (poloidal) component. Comparison between runs with/without ring current ions show that the existence of hot ring current ions can deform and amplify the original sinusoidal waveforms. The deformation causes the energy cascade to higher frequency range (Pc4 and Pc3 ranges). The cascade is more pronounced in the high beta case. Combination with GEMSIS-RB model reproduced rapid radial transport by the drift resonance for ions with drift period

  5. New interpretation of laser gyro drifts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Discuss and develop some contents which are relevant to the IEEE Std 647TM-2006 in this paper. The IEEE Std only involves Allan variance, and decomposes it into five primary noise terms, in which, however, the noise nature of the so called "rate random walk noise" and the "rate ramp" is doubted by the IEEE Std editors. Here we use a mathematical identity to entirely affirm the first query and partially the second query as mentioned above. Besides, we argue that only the classical variance can be used in navigation, not the Allan variance. In order to seek the true nature of all drift terms in the variance, we adopt our original work that represents the noises as damped oscillations, to obtain the power spectral density (PSD) of the noises which is then transformed back into time domain. When the damped time constant is much longer than the sampling interval, the re-sulting slow variation term may be expanded into three terms: ordinary bias instability, rate random walk, and rate ramp. Therefore, these "noise terms" are not independent, and they are more of deterministic errors than random noises, and can be explained quantitatively. The resulting fast variation drift may be expanded into two terms. The first term is the same as angle random noise, while the second term adds to the true quantization noise term to form a new combined term called "quantiza-tion noise term". As the result of our research, not only the IEEE Std editors’ suspicions above are answered completely, but a new theory to analyze the laser gyro drifts is also presented, with several supporting examples to explain and verify the theory.

  6. Daytime plasma drifts in the equatorial lower ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Debrup; Fejer, Bela G.

    2015-11-01

    We have used extensive radar measurements from the Jicamarca Observatory during low solar flux periods to study the quiet time variability and altitudinal dependence of equatorial daytime vertical and zonal plasma drifts. The daytime vertical drifts are upward and have largest values during September-October. The day-to-day variability of these drifts does not change with height between 150 and 600 km, but the bimonthly variability is much larger in the F region than below about 200 km. These drifts vary linearly with height generally increasing in the morning and decreasing in the afternoon. The zonal drifts are westward during the day and have largest values during July-October. The 150 km region zonal drifts have much larger day-to-day, but much smaller bimonthly variability than the F region drifts. The daytime zonal drifts strongly increase with height up to about 300 km from March through October, and more weakly at higher altitudes. The December solstice zonal drifts have generally weaker altitudinal dependence, except perhaps below 200 km. Current theoretical and general circulation models do not reproduce the observed altitudinal variation of the daytime equatorial zonal drifts.

  7. Demersally drifting invertebrates from Kongsfjorden, Svalbård (Arctic Ocean)-a comparison of catches from drift-pump and drift-nets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahms, Hans-Uwe; Joo, Hyoung-Min; Lee, Jae Hyung; Yun, Mi Sun; Ahn, So Hyun; Lee, Sang Heon

    2015-12-01

    Demersally drifting organisms were collected at Ny Ålesund (Svalbård-Arctic Ocean) to study the taxon composition and relative abundances in the Arctic summer. Catch potentials of two collection devices for demersal drift were compared. A lowvolume submersible drift-pump and a drift-net unit were employed for the collection of demersally drifting biota, particularly for shallow aquatic habitats. With the exception of Appendicularia, Chaetognatha, Coelenterata, and Ctenophora, which were damaged at times, the pump catches were in good condition and sufficient for identification and quantification of less mobile fauna. A comparison of the two devices revealed that the drift-pump collected more specimens than the drift-net. However, the drift-net may have caused an underestimation of the abundances of invertebrates. No differences in identified taxon number and indices of richness, evenness and diversity were found. However, the proportion of invertebrate animals in the two devices was different for the three groups: zooplankton, macrofauna and meiofauna. At Svalbård, zooplankton, larvae of macrofauna, and meiofauna were successfully collected by the two collecting devices. However, the catchibility of the two devices in collecting various invertebrate taxa was different and, therefore, a sound `Device Effect' was revealed.

  8. Indoor spray measurement of spray drift potential using a spray drift test bench : effect of drift-reducing nozzle types, spray boom height, nozzle spacing and forward speed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moreno Ruiz, J.R.

    2014-01-01

    In a series of indoor experiments spray drift potential was assessed when spraying over a spray drift testbench with two different driving speeds, 2m/s and 4m/s, two different spray boom heights, 30 cm and 50 cm, and two different nozzle spacing, 25 cm and 50 cm, for six different nozzle types. The

  9. Crowdsourcing and annotating NER for Twitter #drift

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fromreide, Hege; Hovy, Dirk; Søgaard, Anders

    2014-01-01

    We present two new NER datasets for Twitter; a manually annotated set of 1,467 tweets (kappa=0.942) and a set of 2,975 expert-corrected, crowdsourced NER annotated tweets from the dataset described in Finin et al. (2010). In our experiments with these datasets, we observe two important points: (a......) language drift on Twitter is significant, and while off-the-shelf systems have been reported to perform well on in-sample data, they often perform poorly on new samples of tweets, (b) state-of-the-art performance across various datasets can beobtained from crowdsourced annotations, making it more feasible...

  10. A drift formulation of Gresham's Law

    OpenAIRE

    Reginald D. Smith

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we analyze Gresham's Law, in particular, how the rate of inflow or outflow of currencies is affected by the demand elasticity of arbitrage and the difference in face value ratios inside and outside of a country under a bimetallic system. We find that these equations are very similar to those used to describe drift in systems of free charged particles. In addition, we look at how Gresham's Law would play out with multiple currencies and multiple countries under a variety of conne...

  11. Drift Tube Linac Conditioning of Tank1

    CERN Document Server

    Shafqat, N; Toor, W A

    2014-01-01

    Tank1 of the Drift Tube Linac (DTL) of the Linac4 has been conditioned at the Linac4 tunnel. The tank was tuned for resonance at 352.2 MHz, and stable operation has been achieved with 725 µs long RF pulses at a repetition rate of 1 Hz. The maximum RF level that has been reached is 810 kW with a pulse width of 600 µs. Since this was the first RF structure exclusively conditioned in the Linac4 tunnel with the operation and control software of Linac4, some related issues and limitations had to be taken into account.

  12. DRIFT study of pitches and separated mesophase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machnikowski, J.; Krzton, A.; Weber, J.V.; Zimny, T.; Petryniak, J.; Wiecek, I. [Technical University of Wroclaw, Wroclaw (Poland). Institute of Chemistry and Technology of Petroleum and Coal

    1995-12-31

    Diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFT) was used to assess the structural changes associated with an early stage of carbonization in pitches of different origin, including coal tar, coal hydrogenation product and petroleum pitch. It was shown that an increase in aromaticity was rather slight in the case of coal tar pitch. It was confirmed that the chemical structure of the mesophase produced at an early stage of carbonization was controlled mostly by the nature of the parent pitch. 4 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  13. T cell precursor migration towards beta 2-microglobulin is involved in thymus colonization of chicken embryos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dunon, D; Kaufman, J; Salomonsen, J;

    1990-01-01

    beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2m) attracts hemopoietic precursors from chicken bone marrow cells in vitro. The cell population responding to beta 2m increases during the second period of thymus colonization, which takes place at days 12-14 of incubation. The precursors from 13.5 day old embryos were...... isolated after migration towards beta 2m in vitro and shown to be able to colonize a 13 day old thymus in ovo, where they subsequently acquire thymocyte markers. In contrast these beta 2m responsive precursors did not colonize embryonic bursa, i.e. differentiate into B lymphocytes. During chicken...... embryogenesis, peaks of beta 2m transcripts and of free beta 2m synthesis can only be detected in the thymus. The peak of free beta 2m synthesis in the thymus and the increase of beta 2m responding bone marrow cells both occur concomitantly with the second wave of thymus colonization in chicken embryo, facts...

  14. Betting Against Beta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frazzini, Andrea; Heje Pedersen, Lasse

    We present a model with leverage and margin constraints that vary across investors and time. We find evidence consistent with each of the model’s five central predictions: (1) Since constrained investors bid up high-beta assets, high beta is associated with low alpha, as we find empirically for U.......S. equities, 20 international equity markets, Treasury bonds, corporate bonds, and futures; (2) A betting-against-beta (BAB) factor, which is long leveraged low beta assets and short high-beta assets, produces significant positive risk-adjusted returns; (3) When funding constraints tighten, the return...... of the BAB factor is low; (4) Increased funding liquidity risk compresses betas toward one; (5) More constrained investors hold riskier assets....

  15. Betting against Beta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frazzini, Andrea; Heje Pedersen, Lasse

    2014-01-01

    We present a model with leverage and margin constraints that vary across investors and time. We find evidence consistent with each of the model's five central predictions: (1) Because constrained investors bid up high-beta assets, high beta is associated with low alpha, as we find empirically...... for US equities, 20 international equity markets, Treasury bonds, corporate bonds, and futures. (2) A betting against beta (BAB) factor, which is long leveraged low-beta assets and short high-beta assets, produces significant positive risk-adjusted returns. (3) When funding constraints tighten......, the return of the BAB factor is low. (4) Increased funding liquidity risk compresses betas toward one. (5) More constrained investors hold riskier assets....

  16. Roughing up Beta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bollerslev, Tim; Li, Sophia Zhengzi; Todorov, Viktor

    Motivated by the implications from a stylized equilibrium pricing framework, we investigate empirically how individual equity prices respond to continuous, or \\smooth," and jumpy, or \\rough," market price moves, and how these different market price risks, or betas, are priced in the cross......-section of expected returns. Based on a novel highfrequency dataset of almost one-thousand individual stocks over two decades, we find that the two rough betas associated with intraday discontinuous and overnight returns entail significant risk premiums, while the intraday continuous beta is not priced in the cross......-section. An investment strategy that goes long stocks with high jump betas and short stocks with low jump betas produces significant average excess returns. These higher risk premiums for the discontinuous and overnight market betas remain significant after controlling for a long list of other firm characteristics...

  17. Neutrinoless double beta decay experiment DCBA using a magnetic momentum-analyzer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishihara, N., E-mail: nobuhiro.ishihara@kek.jp [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, 305-0801 (Japan); Kato, Y.; Inagaki, T.; Ohama, T.; Takeda, S.; Yamada, Y. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, 305-0801 Japan (Japan); Ukishima, N.; Teramoto, Y. [Osaka City University, Sumiyoshi, Osaka, 558-8585 (Japan); Morishima, Y.; Nakano, I. [Okayama University, Okayama, 700-8530 (Japan); Kitamura, S. [Tokyo Metropolitan University, Arakawa, Tokyo, 116-8551 (Japan); Sakamoto, Y. [Tohoku Gakuin University, Izumi, Sendai, 981-3193 (Japan); Nagasaka, Y. [Hiroshima Institute of Technology, Saeki, Hiroshima, 731-5193 (Japan); Tamura, N. [Niigata University, Niigata, 950-2181 (Japan); Tanaka, K. [BTE, Minato, Tokyo, 105-0011 (Japan); Ito, R. [ZTJ, Chiyoda, Tokyo, 101-0047 (Japan)

    2011-12-15

    A magnetic momentum-analyzer is being developed at KEK for neutrinoless double beta decay experiment called DCBA (Drift Chamber Beta-ray Analyzer, inverted ABCD). A lot of thin plates of {sup 150}Nd compound are installed in tracking detectors located in a uniform magnetic field. The three-dimensional position information is obtained for the helical track of a beta ray. More R and D will be studied using the second test apparatus DCBA-T2, which is now under construction.

  18. Noncommutative Einstein-Maxwell pp-waves

    OpenAIRE

    Ruiz Ruiz, Fernando; Marculescu, S.

    2006-01-01

    The field equations coupling a Seiberg-Witten electromagnetic field to noncommutative gravity, as described by a formal power series in the noncommutativity parameters $\\theta^{\\alpha\\beta}$, is investigated. A large family of solutions, up to order one in $\\theta^{\\alpha\\beta}$, describing Einstein-Maxwell null pp-waves is obtained. The order-one contributions can be viewed as providing noncommutative corrections to pp-waves. In our solutions, noncommutativity enters the spacetime metric thr...

  19. Field experiment on spray drift: Deposition and airborne drift during application to a winter wheat crop

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolters, A.; Linnemann, V.; Zande, van de J.C.; Vereecken, H.

    2008-01-01

    A field experiment was performed to evaluate various techniques for measuring spray deposition and airborne drift during spray application to a winter wheat crop. The application of a spraying agent containing the fluorescent dye Brilliant Sulfo Flavine by a conventional boom sprayer was done accord

  20. The OML-SprayDrift model for predicting pesticide drift and deposition from ground boom sprayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løfstrøm, Per; Bruus, Marianne; Andersen, Helle Vibeke;

    2013-01-01

    . The Gaussian tilting plume principle was applied inside the stayed track. The model was developed on one set of field experiments using a flat-fan nozzle and validated against another set of field experiments using an air-induction nozzle. The vertical spray-drift profile was measured using hair curlers...

  1. The activity and radial dependence of anomalous diffusion by pitch angle scattering on split magnetic drift shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, T. P.

    2015-01-01

    in the magnetospheric magnetic field produce drift shell splitting, which causes the radial (drift shell) invariant to sometimes depend on pitch angle. Where drift shell splitting is significant, pitch angle scattering leads to diffusion in all three invariants of the particle's motion, including cross diffusion. We examine the magnitude of drift shell splitting-related anomalous diffusion for outer zone electrons compared to conventional diffusion in the absence of drift shell splitting. We assume that the primary local scattering process is wave-particle interactions with chorus. We find that anomalous radial diffusion can exceed that of conventional drift-resonant radial diffusion for particles with energies near 0.1 MeV at all radial distances outside the plasmasphere during quiet to moderate geomagnetic activity, and it is significant at 0.5 MeV. Cross diffusion involving the radial invariant can exceed the geometric mean of the corresponding pure diffusion coefficients at 0.1 MeV, and that such cross diffusion is significant even at 0.5-1 MeV. At 1 MeV, cross diffusion is often significant. The highest radial distances and magnetic activity levels in our study do not always exhibit as much significant anomalous diffusion as moderate radial distances and activity levels. This can be explained by (a) stronger dependence of conventional diffusion on magnetic activity and radius, and (b) strongest drift shell splitting at moderate magnetic activity. Simulation codes that neglect the possibility for cross terms will likely systematically underperform, especially for 0.1-0.5 MeV electrons, for much of the outer zone for quiet to moderate levels of magnetic activity.

  2. Metabolic drift in the aging brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanisevic, Julijana; Stauch, Kelly L; Petrascheck, Michael; Benton, H Paul; Epstein, Adrian A; Fang, Mingliang; Gorantla, Santhi; Tran, Minerva; Hoang, Linh; Kurczy, Michael E; Boska, Michael D; Gendelman, Howard E; Fox, Howard S; Siuzdak, Gary

    2016-05-01

    Brain function is highly dependent upon controlled energy metabolism whose loss heralds cognitive impairments. This is particularly notable in the aged individuals and in age-related neurodegenerative diseases. However, how metabolic homeostasis is disrupted in the aging brain is still poorly understood. Here we performed global, metabolomic and proteomic analyses across different anatomical regions of mouse brain at different stages of its adult lifespan. Interestingly, while severe proteomic imbalance was absent, global-untargeted metabolomics revealed an energymetabolic drift or significant imbalance in core metabolite levels in aged mouse brains. Metabolic imbalance was characterized by compromised cellular energy status (NAD decline, increased AMP/ATP, purine/pyrimidine accumulation) and significantly altered oxidative phosphorylation and nucleotide biosynthesis and degradation. The central energy metabolic drift suggests a failure of the cellular machinery to restore metabostasis (metabolite homeostasis) in the aged brain and therefore an inability to respond properly to external stimuli, likely driving the alterations in signaling activity and thus in neuronal function and communication. PMID:27182841

  3. Ground Control for Non-Emplacement Drifts for LA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Tang

    2004-02-26

    The purpose of this calculation is to analyze the stability of repository non-emplacement drifts during the preclosure period, and to provide a final ground support method for non-emplacement drifts for the License Application (LA). This calculation will provide input for the development of LA documents. The scope of this calculation is limited to the non-emplacement drifts including access mains, ramps, exhaust mains, turnouts, intersections between access mains and turnouts, and intersections between exhaust mains and emplacement drifts, portals, TBM launch chambers, observation drift and test alcove in the performance confirmation (PC) facilities, etc. The calculation is limited to the non-emplacement drifts subjected to a combined loading of in-situ stress, seismic stress, and/or thermal stress. Other effects such as hydrological and chemical effects are not considered in this analysis.

  4. Weak drifts of infinitely divisible distributions and their applications

    CERN Document Server

    Sato, Ken-iti

    2012-01-01

    Weak drift of an infinitely divisible distribution $\\mu$ on $\\mathbb{R}^d$ is defined by analogy with weak mean; properties and applications of weak drift are given. When $\\mu$ has no Gaussian part, the weak drift of $\\mu$ equals the minus of the weak mean of the inversion $\\mu'$ of $\\mu$. Applying the concepts of having weak drift 0 and of having weak drift 0 absolutely, the ranges, the absolute ranges, and the limit of the ranges of iterations are described for some stochastic integral mappings. For L\\'{e}vy processes the concepts of weak mean and weak drift are helpful in giving necessary and sufficient conditions for the weak law of large numbers and for the weak version of Shtatland's theorem on the behavior near $t=0$; those conditions are obtained from each other through inversion.

  5. Ground Control for Non-Emplacement Drifts for LA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this calculation is to analyze the stability of repository non-emplacement drifts during the preclosure period, and to provide a final ground support method for non-emplacement drifts for the License Application (LA). This calculation will provide input for the development of LA documents. The scope of this calculation is limited to the non-emplacement drifts including access mains, ramps, exhaust mains, turnouts, intersections between access mains and turnouts, and intersections between exhaust mains and emplacement drifts, portals, TBM launch chambers, observation drift and test alcove in the performance confirmation (PC) facilities, etc. The calculation is limited to the non-emplacement drifts subjected to a combined loading of in-situ stress, seismic stress, and/or thermal stress. Other effects such as hydrological and chemical effects are not considered in this analysis

  6. In-Drift Precipitates/Salts Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report documents the development and validation of the in-drift precipitates/salts (IDPS) model. The IDPS model is a geochemical model designed to predict the postclosure effects of evaporation and deliquescence on the chemical composition of water within the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) in support of the Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA). Application of the model in support of TSPA-LA is documented in ''Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169860]). Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport In-Drift Geochemistry Model Report Integration (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171156]) is the technical work plan (TWP) for this report. It called for a revision of the previous version of the report (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167734]) to achieve greater transparency, readability, data traceability, and report integration. The intended use of the IDPS model is to estimate and tabulate, within an appropriate level of confidence, the effects of evaporation, deliquescence, and potential environmental conditions on the pH, ionic strength, and chemical compositions of water and minerals on the drip shield or other location within the drift during the postclosure period. Specifically, the intended use is as follows: (1) To estimate, within an appropriate level of confidence, the effects of evaporation and deliquescence on the presence and composition of water occurring within the repository during the postclosure period (i.e., effects on pH, ionic strength, deliquescence relative humidity, total concentrations of dissolved components in the system Na-K-H-Mg-Ca-Al-Cl-F-NO3-SO4-Br-CO3-SiO2-CO2-O2-H2O, and concentrations of the following aqueous species that potentially affect acid neutralizing capacity: HCO3-, CO32-, OH-, H+, HSO4-, Ca2+, Mg2+, CaHCO3+, MgHCO3+, HSiO3-, and MgOH+); (2) To estimate, within an appropriate level of confidence, mineral precipitation resulting from the evaporation of

  7. In-Drift Precipitates/Salts Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Mariner

    2004-11-09

    This report documents the development and validation of the in-drift precipitates/salts (IDPS) model. The IDPS model is a geochemical model designed to predict the postclosure effects of evaporation and deliquescence on the chemical composition of water within the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) in support of the Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA). Application of the model in support of TSPA-LA is documented in ''Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169860]). Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport In-Drift Geochemistry Model Report Integration (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171156]) is the technical work plan (TWP) for this report. It called for a revision of the previous version of the report (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167734]) to achieve greater transparency, readability, data traceability, and report integration. The intended use of the IDPS model is to estimate and tabulate, within an appropriate level of confidence, the effects of evaporation, deliquescence, and potential environmental conditions on the pH, ionic strength, and chemical compositions of water and minerals on the drip shield or other location within the drift during the postclosure period. Specifically, the intended use is as follows: (1) To estimate, within an appropriate level of confidence, the effects of evaporation and deliquescence on the presence and composition of water occurring within the repository during the postclosure period (i.e., effects on pH, ionic strength, deliquescence relative humidity, total concentrations of dissolved components in the system Na-K-H-Mg-Ca-Al-Cl-F-NO{sub 3}-SO{sub 4}-Br-CO{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}-CO{sub 2}-O{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O, and concentrations of the following aqueous species that potentially affect acid neutralizing capacity: HCO{sub 3}{sup -}, CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}, OH{sup -}, H{sup +}, HSO{sub 4}{sup -}, Ca{sup 2+}, Mg{sup 2+}, CaHCO{sub 3}{sup +}, MgHCO{sub 3

  8. Wave-induced mixing and transport of buoyant particles: application to the Statfjord A oil spill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Drivdal

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on how wave–current and wave–turbulence interactions modify the transport of buoyant particles in the ocean. Here the particles can represent oil droplets, plastic particles, or plankton such as fish eggs and larvae. Using the General Ocean Turbulence Model (GOTM, modified to take surface wave effects into account, we investigate how the increased mixing by wave breaking and Stokes shear production, as well as the stronger veering by the Coriolis–Stokes force, affects the drift of the particles. The energy and momentum fluxes, as well as the Stokes drift, depend on the directional wave spectrum obtained from a wave model. As a first test, the depth and velocity scales from the model are compared with analytical solutions based on a constant eddy viscosity (i.e., classical Ekman theory. Secondly, the model is applied to a case in which we investigate the oil drift after an oil spill off the west coast of Norway in 2007. During this accident the average net drift of oil was observed to be both slower and more deflected away from the wind direction than predicted by oil-drift models. In this case, using wind and wave forcing from the ERA Interim archive it is shown that the wave effects are important for the resultant drift and have the potential to improve drift forecasting.

  9. Climatology of F region zonalplasma drifts over Jicamarca

    OpenAIRE

    Fejer, Bela G.; J. R. Souza; Santos, A. S.; Costa Pereira, A. E.

    2005-01-01

    [1] We use extensive incoherent scatter radar observations made at the Jicamarca Radio Observatory between 1970 and 2003 to study and model empirically the equatorial zonal plasma drifts near the F region peak using Bernstein polynomials as base functions. Our quiet-time model results confirm that the daytime drifts are westward and are nearly season and solar cycle independent. The nighttime drifts are eastward, have larger magnitudes, and increase strongly with solar flux, particularly near...

  10. Full-field drift Hamiltonian particle orbits in 3D geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, W A; Graves, J P; Brunner, S [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, Association Euratom-Confederation Suisse, CH1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Isaev, M Yu, E-mail: wilfred.cooper@epfl.ch [Nuclear Fusion Institute, RRC ' Kurchatov Institute' , 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2011-02-15

    A Hamiltonian/Lagrangian theory to describe guiding centre orbit drift motion which is canonical in the Boozer coordinate frame has been extended to include full electromagnetic perturbed fields in anisotropic pressure 3D equilibria with nested magnetic flux surfaces. A redefinition of the guiding centre velocity to eliminate the motion due to finite equilibrium radial magnetic fields and the choice of a gauge condition that sets the radial component of the electromagnetic vector potential to zero are invoked to guarantee that the Boozer angular coordinates retain the canonical structure. The canonical momenta are identified and the guiding centre particle radial drift motion and parallel gyroradius evolution are derived. The particle coordinate position is linearly modified by wave-particle interactions. All the nonlinear wave-wave interactions appear explicitly only in the evolution of the parallel gyroradius. The radial variation of the electrostatic potential is related to the binormal component of the displacement vector for MHD-type perturbations. The electromagnetic vector potential projections can then be determined from the electrostatic potential and the radial component of the MHD displacement vector.

  11. Stability of relativistic laminar flow equilibria for electrons drifting in crossed fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stability of the electron flow in magnetically insulated transmission lines and diodes, and in microwave devices is an important issue. Presented in this paper are the results of an electromagnetic, linear stability analysis of transverse magnetic waves propagating along the direction of electron drift in a planar system described by a relativistic laminar flow equilibrium. In general, this equilibrium features cold electrons executing E x B drifts in self-consistently calculated electromagnetic fields. For this paper, a class of laminar flow equilibria in which the relativistic plasma and cyclotron frequencies are multiples of one another was chosen, and the electrons were taken to be confined to a layer placed in a vacuum gap between two conductors. This configuration is driven unstable by two separate mechanisms which tap the free energy associated with the sheared velocity field of the layer. At long wavelengths, the interaction of positive and negative energy surface waves results in the diocotron instability. At shorter wavelengths, the interaction of surface waves and sheets of electrons resonant at the local Doppler-shifted cyclotron frequencies leads to a pair of unstable branches of the dispersion relation which are referred to collectively as the magnetron instability. The scaling of the growth rates with equilibrium parameters and the relative importance of the two instabilities are discussed

  12. Kinetic equation and clipping - two limits of wave turbulence theory

    OpenAIRE

    E. Kartashova

    2005-01-01

    Different dynamics, described by kinetic equation and clipping method is shown as well as a role of approximate resonances in wave turbulence theory. Applications of clipping method are sketched for gravity-capillary and drift waves. Brief discussion of possible transition from continuous spectrum (= kinetic equation) to discrete spectrum (= clipping) is given at the end.

  13. THERMAL TEST ALCOVE HEATED DRIFT GROUND SUPPORT ANALYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Bonabian

    1996-10-03

    The main purpose and objective of this analysis is to analyze the stability of the Thermal Test Facility Heated Drift and to design a ground support system. The stability of the Heated Drift is analyzed considering in situ, seismic, and thermal loading conditions. A ground support system is recommended to provide a stable opening for the Heated Drift. This report summarizes the results of the analyses and provides the details of the recommended ground support system for the Heated Drift. The details of the ground support system are then incorporated into the design output documents for implementation in the field.

  14. HF doppler sounder measurements of the ionospheric signatures of small scale ULF waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baddeley, L. J.; Yeoman, T. K.; Wright, D. M.

    2005-07-01

    An HF Doppler sounder, DOPE (DOppler Pulsation Experiment) with three azimuthally-separated propagation paths is used to provide the first statistical examination of small scale-sized, high m waves where a direct measurement of the azimuthal wavenumber m, is made in the ionosphere. The study presents 27 events, predominantly in the post-noon sector. The majority of events are Pc4 waves with azimuthal m numbers ranging from 100 to 200, representing some of the smallest scale waves ever observed in the ionosphere. 4 Pc5 waves are observed in the post-noon sector. The fact that measurements for the wave azimuthal m number and the wave angular frequency are available allows the drift-bounce resonance condition to be used to hypothesise potential particle populations which could drive the waves through either a drift or drift-bounce resonance interaction mechanism. These results are compared with the statistical study presented by Baddeley et al. (2004) which investigated the statistical likelihood of such driving particle populations occurring in the magnetospheric ring current. The combination of these two studies indicates that any wave which requires a possible drift resonance interaction with particles of energies >60 keV, is statistically unlikely to be generated by such a mechanism. The evidence presented in this paper therefore suggests that in the pre-noon sector the drift-bounce resonance mechanism is statistically more likely implying an anti-symmetric standing wave structure while in the post-noon sector both a drift or drift-bounce resonance interaction is statistically possible, indicating both symmetric and anti-symmetric standing mode structures. A case study is also presented investigating simultaneous observations of a ULF wave in ground magnetometer and DOPE data. The event is in the lower m range of the statistical study and displays giant pulsation (Pg) characteristics. Keywords. Ionosphere (Ionosphere-magnetosphere interactions) Magnetospheric

  15. Production of Magnetic Turbulence by Cosmic Rays Drifting Upstream of Supernova Remnant Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroman, Thomas; Niemiec, Jacek; Pohl, Martin; Nishikawa, Ken-ichi

    2008-01-01

    I will present results of our recent two- and three-dimensional Particle-In-Cell simulations of magnetic-turbulence production by cosmic-ray ions drifting upstream of supernova remnant shocks. These studies' aim is twofold: test recent predictions of strong amplification in short wavelength, non-resonant wave modes, and study the subsequent evolution of the magnetic turbulence, including its backreaction on cosmic-ray trajectories. We confirm that the drifting cosmic rays give rise to a turbulent magnetic field, but show that an oblique filamentary mode grows more rapidly than the non-resonant parallel modes found in analytical theory. The field perturbations grow more slowly than estimated using a quasi-linear analytical approach for the parallel plane-wave mode, and saturate in amplitude at deltaB/B approximately equal to 1. The backreaction of the magnetic turbulence on the particles leads to an alignment of the bulk-flow velocities of the cosmic rays and the background medium. This is an essential characteristic of cosmic ray-modified shocks: the upstream flow speed is continuously changed by the cosmic rays. The reduction of relative drift between cosmic rays and background medium accounts for the saturation of the instability at only moderate magnetic-field amplitudes. It is possible that the prolonged magnetic field growth observed in recent MHD simulations results from a cosmic-ray current assumed to be constant and thus immune to the backreaction from the turbulent field. We speculate that the parallel plane-wave mode found in analytical treatments very quickly leads co filamentation, which we observe in our PIC modeling and is also apparent in the MHD simulations.

  16. Forward-Looking Betas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Peter; Jacobs, Kris; Vainberg, Gregory

    -looking. This paper introduces a radically different approach to estimating market betas. Using the tools in Bakshi and Madan (2000) and Bakshi, Kapadia and Madan (2003) we employ the information embedded in the prices of individual stock options and index options to compute our forward-looking market beta...

  17. Flashing coupled density wave oscillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experiment was performed on the test loop (HRTL-5), which simulates the geometry and system design of the 5 MW reactor. The phenomenon and mechanism of different kinds of two-phase flow instabilities, namely geyser instability, flashing instability and flashing coupled density wave instability are described. The especially interpreted flashing coupled density wave instability has never been studied well, it is analyzed by using a one-dimensional non-thermo equilibrium two-phase flow drift model computer code. Calculations are in good agreement with the experiment results. (5 refs.,5 figs., 1 tab.)

  18. Measurements of electron drift and diffusion properties in a large cylindrical drift chamber (TPC) with parallel electric and magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work describes measurements on the drift of electrons in gases, using the TPC90, the prototype of the ALEPH Time Projection Chamber. Tracks which were created by UV-Laser ionization have been drifted over distances of up to 1.3 m in parallel electric and magnetic fields. Electron drift properties have been systematically measured as a function of these, in several gas mixtures. (orig./HSI)

  19. Indoor spray measurement of spray drift potential using a spray drift test bench : effect of drift-reducing nozzle types, spray boom height, nozzle spacing and forward speed

    OpenAIRE

    Moreno Ruiz, J.R.

    2014-01-01

    In a series of indoor experiments spray drift potential was assessed when spraying over a spray drift testbench with two different driving speeds, 2m/s and 4m/s, two different spray boom heights, 30 cm and 50 cm, and two different nozzle spacing, 25 cm and 50 cm, for six different nozzle types. The nozzles types used were the standard flat fan XR as a reference nozzle and the DG, XLTD, IDN, AIXR and AIRmix as drift reducing nozzles types. A Patternator was used to check the cross distribution...

  20. Irradiation response of straw drift tubes

    CERN Document Server

    Dünnweber, W; Neumayr, J; Platzer, K

    2003-01-01

    Drift tubes filled with Ar/CF//4/CO//2 (74:20:6) were exposed to 26 MeV proton beams from the Munich Tandem accelerator to study the radiation effects and operation characteristics expected for the COMPASS experiment at CERN. Stable operation with no significant loss of gain and no significant Malter current was observed up to charge accumulations of 1.1 C/cm. For comparison, with Ar/CH//4 (90:10) the same detectors show a 23% loss of gain and large Malter currents under the same irradiation condition. For Ar/CF//4/CO//2 a thin ( less than 0.1 mum) surface layer is observed by means of SEM on the anode wire in the irradiated detector section. As revealed by an ERDA study, the prominent components of this layer are C, O and Si.

  1. Drift ordered short mean free path closure

    CERN Document Server

    Catto, P J; Catto, Peter J.; Simakov, Andrei N.

    2004-01-01

    The complete short mean free path description of magnetized plasma in the drift ordering has recently been derived. The results correct the previous expressions for the ion pressure anisotropy (or parallel ion viscosity) and the perpendicular ion viscosity - the ion gyro-viscosity is unchanged. In addition, the electron problem is solved for the first time to obtain the electron pressure anisotropy (parallel electron viscosity) and the electron gyro-viscosity - the perpendicular electron viscosity is negligible. The results have been used to obtain a reduced fluid description appropriate to the edge of a tokamak. In addition, the complete description has been used to evaluate the radial transport of toroidal angular momentum that determines the radial electric field and flows in a tokamak.

  2. Wet drift chambers for precise luminosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A set of high-precision compact drift chambers has been a vital component of the OPAL luminosity monitor since the start of data-taking at LEP. They were augmented in 1992 by the addition of Small Angle Reference Chambers with a very similar design to the original chamber. The performance of the chambers is reviewed, highlighting both the importance of using polyalkylene glycol (Breox) to maintain a uniform and parallel electric field and the construction techniques used to sustain the required field strength. We describe some of the operating problems, with their solutions, and show how the chambers have been used in achieving a systematic error of 0.41% on the luminosity measurement. ((orig.))

  3. Emergent gravity and ether-drift experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Consoli, M

    2009-01-01

    In principle, ether-drift experiments could distinguish phenomenologically emergent-gravity approaches, where an effective curvature emerges from hydrodynamic distortions of the same physical, flat-space vacuum, from the more conventional scenario where curvature is considered a fundamental property of space-time down to extremely small length scales and the speed of light represents a universal constant. From an experimental point of view, in this particular context, besides time modulations that might be induced by the Earth's rotation (and its orbital revolution), one should also consider the possibility of random fluctuations of the signal. These might reflect the stochastic nature of the underlying 'quantum ether' and be erroneously interpreted as mere instrumental noise. To test the present interpretation, we have extracted the mean amplitude of the signal from various experiments with different systematics, operating both at room temperature and in the cryogenic regime. They all give the same consisten...

  4. Nonlinear analysis of the gradient drift instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Rafael; Vega, Matías de la

    An analytical study of the gradient drift instability in the equatorial electrojet of wavelengths in the order of one kilometer is presented. Different mechanisms, linear, non-local and turbulent, are found in the literature to explain the predominance of the 1 km wavelength in the electrojet. In the present work a simplified model is proposed in which the nonlinear evolution of three coupled modes is followed. By considering that one of the modes attains the stationary state, the evolution of the other two is obtained, and it is found that they follow equations of the Lotka-Volterra type. A stable stationary nonlinear solution for these equations is also found, and the conditions under which periodic solutions are possible are analyzed.

  5. Giving Cosmic Redshift Drift a Whirl

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Alex G; Edelstein, Jerry; Erskine, David

    2014-01-01

    Redshift drift provides a direct kinematic measurement of cosmic acceleration but it occurs with a characteristic time scale of a Hubble time. Thus redshift observations with a challenging precision of $10^{-9}$ require a 10 year time span to obtain a signal-to-noise of 1. We discuss theoretical and experimental approaches to address this challenge, potentially requiring less observer time and having greater immunity to common systematics. On the theoretical side we explore allowing the universe, rather than the observer, to provide long time spans; speculative methods include radial baryon acoustic oscillations, cosmic pulsars, and strongly lensed quasars. On the experimental side, we explore beating down the redshift precision using differential interferometric techniques, including externally dispersed interferometers and spatial heterodyne spectroscopy. Low-redshift emission line galaxies are identified as having high cosmology leverage and systematics control, with an 8 hour exposure on a 10-meter telesc...

  6. Sonic drifting: sound, city and psychogeography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budhaditya Chattopadhyay

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Studying and perceiving an emerging city by listening to its sounds might be phenomenologically reductive in approach, but it can lead to a framework for understanding the fabric of the urban environment through artistic practice. This paper describes a sound work, Elegy for Bangalore, and examines its artistic processes in order to shed light on the methodologies for listening to an expanding city by engaging with multilayered urban contexts and, subsequently, evoking the psychogeography of the city through sound-based artistic practice. The paper further investigates the project’s approach, development and method to speculate on present urban conditions in countries like India experiencing rapid growth. Devising the unfolding auditory situation of an Indian city in corresponding acts of drifting, listening, recording and composing, this paper examines the processes of perceiving an apparently chaotic and disorganised urban environment with its multisensory complexity.

  7. EU law revisions and legislative drift

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borghetto, Enrico; Mäder, Lars Kai

    2014-01-01

    European Union research has made great strides in understanding the dynamics of the European Union decision-making process. In contrast to this progress, the dynamics unfolding after the enactment of a European Union secondary legislative act has largely been ignored. Some of these acts remain...... in force in their original form for several years while others are revised soon after their enactment. What factors account for this variation? We empirically analyze the proposition that in the presence of ‘legislative drift,’ i.e. the intertemporal variation of decision-makers’ preferences, major...... revisions of European Union legislative acts are more likely to occur. Based on an analysis of the revision histories of 158 major European Union acts in the time period between 1958 and 2003, we find significant support for this hypothesis....

  8. Redshift drift exploration for interacting dark energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, Jia-Jia; Li, Yun-He; Zhang, Jing-Fei [Northeastern University, Department of Physics, College of Sciences, Shenyang (China); Zhang, Xin [Northeastern University, Department of Physics, College of Sciences, Shenyang (China); Peking University, Center for High Energy Physics, Beijing (China)

    2015-08-15

    By detecting redshift drift in the spectra of the Lyman-α forest of distant quasars, the Sandage-Loeb (SL) test directly measures the expansion of the universe, covering the ''redshift desert'' of 2 drift observations would help break the geometric degeneracies in a meaningful way, thus the measurement precisions of Ω{sub m}, H{sub 0}, w, and γ could be substantially improved using future probes. (orig.)

  9. Redshift drift exploration for interacting dark energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By detecting redshift drift in the spectra of the Lyman-α forest of distant quasars, the Sandage-Loeb (SL) test directly measures the expansion of the universe, covering the ''redshift desert'' of 2 drift observations would help break the geometric degeneracies in a meaningful way, thus the measurement precisions of Ωm, H0, w, and γ could be substantially improved using future probes. (orig.)

  10. THE DIAGNOSTIC VALUE OF PULSED WAVE TISSUE DOPPLER IMAGING IN ASYMPTOMATIC BETA- THALASSEMIA MAJOR CHILDREN AND YOUNG ADULTS ; RELATION TO CHEMICAL BIOMARKERS OF LEFT VENTRICULAR FUNCTION AND IRON OVERLOAD .

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seham Ragab

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cardiac iron toxicity is the leading cause of death among  β-halassaemia major (TM  patients.  Once  heart failure becomes overt , it will be  difficult to reverse . Objectives: To investigate non overt cardiac dysfunctions  in TM patients using  pulsed wave Tissue Doppler  Imaging (TD I and its relation to the iron overload and brain natruritic peptide (BNP. Methods: Thorough  clinical , conventional echo and  pulsed  wave TDI  parameters were compared between  asymtomatic 25 β-TM  patients  and 20 age and gender matched individuals. Serum ferritin and plasma BNP  levels were assayed by  ELISA .  Results: TM patients had significant higher mitral inflow early diastolic (E wave and  non significant other conventional echo  parameters. Pulsed wave TDI revealed systolic and diastolic dysfunctions in the form of significant higher  isovolumetric contraction time (ICT , ejection time ( E T and  isovolumetric relaxation time (IRT with significantly lower  mitral annulus  early diastolic velocity E` (12.07 ±2.06 vs 15.04±2.65 ,P= 0.003  in patients compared to  controls. Plasma BNP was higher in patients compared to the controls.  Plasma BNP and serum ferritin had significant correlation with each other and with pulsed wave conventional and TDI indices of systolic and diastolic functions.  Patients with E/E` ≥ 8 had  significant higher  serum ferritin  and plasma BNP levels compared to those with E/E` ratio < 8 without difference in Hb levels .Conclusion:  Pulsed wave TDI  is an  important diagnostic tool for latent cardiac dysfunction in iron loaded TM patients and is related to iron overload and BNP .

  11. Corrugation of Relativistic Magnetized Shock Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemoine, Martin; Ramos, Oscar; Gremillet, Laurent

    2016-08-01

    As a shock front interacts with turbulence it develops corrugation, which induces outgoing wave modes in the downstream plasma. For a fast shock wave, the incoming wave modes can either be fast magnetosonic waves originating downstream, outrunning the shock, or eigenmodes of the upstream plasma drifting through the shock. Using linear perturbation theory in relativistic MHD, this paper provides a general analysis of the corrugation of relativistic magnetized fast shock waves resulting from their interaction with small amplitude disturbances. Transfer functions characterizing the linear response for each of the outgoing modes are calculated as a function of the magnetization of the upstream medium and as a function of the nature of the incoming wave. Interestingly, if the latter is an eigenmode of the upstream plasma, we find that there exists a resonance at which the (linear) response of the shock becomes large or even diverges. This result may have profound consequences on the phenomenology of astrophysical relativistic magnetized shock waves.

  12. Spectroscopic measurements with a silicon drift detector having a continuous implanted drift cathode-voltage divider

    CERN Document Server

    Bonvicini, V; D'Acunto, L; Franck, D; Gregorio, A; Pihet, P; Rashevsky, A; Vacchi, A; Vinogradov, L I; Zampa, N

    2000-01-01

    A silicon drift detector (SDD) prototype where the drift electrode also plays the role of a high-voltage divider has been realised and characterised for spectroscopic applications at near-room temperatures. Among the advantages of this design, is the absence of metal on the sensitive surface which makes this detector interesting for soft X-rays. The detector prototype has a large sensitive area (2x130 mm sup 2) and the charge is collected by two anodes (butterfly-like detector). The energy resolution of a such a detector has been investigated at near-room temperatures using a commercial, hybrid, low-noise charge-sensitive preamplifier. The results obtained for the X-ray lines from sup 5 sup 5 Fe and sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Am are presented.

  13. Observations of ULF wave related equatorial electrojet and density fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yizengaw, E.; Zesta, E.; Biouele, C. M.; Moldwin, M. B.; Boudouridis, A.; Damtie, B.; Mebrahtu, A.; Anad, F.; Pfaff, R. F.; Hartinger, M.

    2013-10-01

    We report on Pc5 wave related electric field and vertical drift velocity oscillations at the equator as observed by ground magnetometers for an extended period on 9 August 2008. We show that the magnetometer-estimated equatorial E×B drift oscillates with the same frequency as ULF Pc5 waves, creating significant ionospheric density fluctuations. We also show ionospheric density fluctuations during the period when we observed ULF wave activity. At the same time, we detect the ULF activity on the ground using ground-based magnetometer data from the African Meridian B-field Education and Research (AMBER) and the South American Meridional B-field Array (SAMBA). From space, we use magnetic field observations from the GOES 12 and the Communication/Navigation Outage and Forecast System (C/NOFS) satellites. Upstream solar wind conditions are provided by the ACE spacecraft. We find that the wave power observed on the ground also occurs in the upstream solar wind and in the magnetosphere. All these observations demonstrate that Pc5 waves with a likely driver in the solar wind can penetrate to the equatorial ionosphere and modulate the equatorial electrodynamics. While no direct drift measurements from equatorial radars exist for the 9 August 2008 event, we used JULIA 150 km radar drift velocities observed on 2 May 2010 and found similar fluctuations with the period of 5-8 min, as a means of an independent confirmation of our magnetometer derived drift dynamics.

  14. An overview of spray drift reduction testing of spray nozzles

    Science.gov (United States)

    The importance of the development and testing of drift reduction technologies (DRTs) is increasing. Common spray drift reduction technologies include spray nozzles and spray adjuvants. Following draft procedures developed for a DRT program, three spray nozzles were tested under high air speed cond...

  15. The initial value problem in Lagrangian drift kinetic theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burby, J. W.

    2016-06-01

    > Existing high-order variational drift kinetic theories contain unphysical rapidly varying modes that are not seen at low orders. These unphysical modes, which may be rapidly oscillating, damped or growing, are ushered in by a failure of conventional high-order drift kinetic theory to preserve the structure of its parent model's initial value problem. In short, the (infinite dimensional) system phase space is unphysically enlarged in conventional high-order variational drift kinetic theory. I present an alternative, `renormalized' variational approach to drift kinetic theory that manifestly respects the parent model's initial value problem. The basic philosophy underlying this alternate approach is that high-order drift kinetic theory ought to be derived by truncating the all-orders system phase-space Lagrangian instead of the usual `field particle' Lagrangian. For the sake of clarity, this story is told first through the lens of a finite-dimensional toy model of high-order variational drift kinetics; the analogous full-on drift kinetic story is discussed subsequently. The renormalized drift kinetic system, while variational and just as formally accurate as conventional formulations, does not support the troublesome rapidly varying modes.

  16. Spin drift and spin diffusion currents in semiconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Idrish Miah

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of a spin drift-diffusion model, we show how the spin current is composed and find that spin drift and spin diffusion contribute additively to the spin current, where the spin diffusion current decreases with electric field while the spin drift current increases, demonstrating that the extension of the spin diffusion length by a strong field does not result in a significant increase in spin current in semiconductors owing to the competing effect of the electric field on diffusion. We also find that there is a spin drift-diffusion crossover field for a process in which the drift and diffusion contribute equally to the spin current, which suggests a possible method of identifying whether the process for a given electric field is in the spin drift or spin diffusion regime. Spin drift-diffusion crossover fields for GaAs are calculated and are found to be quite small. We derive the relations between intrinsic spin diffusion length and the spin drift-diffusion crossover field of a semiconductor for different electron statistical regimes. The findings resulting from this investigation might be important for semiconductor spintronics.

  17. Filtering and analysis on the random drift of FOG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yun-Peng; Yang, Xiao-Jun; Guo, Yun-Zeng; Liu, Feng

    2015-10-01

    Fiber optic gyro (FOG) is an optical gyroscope which is based on the Sagnac effect and uses the optical fiber coil as light propagation channel. Gyro drift consists of two components: systemic drift and random drift. Systemic drift can be compensated by testing and calibrating. Random drift changes with time, so it becomes an important indicator to measure the precision of gyroscope, which has a great impact on the inertial navigation system. It can't be compensated by the simple method. Random drift is a main error of fiber optic gyro (FOG). The static output of FOG is a random project and it has more random noise when as the inertial navigation sensor, which will affect the measurement accuracy. It is an efficient method to reduce the random drift and improve the accuracy by modeling and compensation from the output of FOG. According to the characteristic of fiber optic gyro, the random drift model is studied. Using the time series method, the constant component of the random noise original data is extracted. After stationarity and normality tests, a normal random process is acquired. Based on this, the model is established using the recursive least squares, and then the model is applied to the normal Kalman and adaptive Kalman, finally the data is process with the filter. After experimental verification, the noise variance was reduced after filtering, and the effect is obvious.

  18. SEMICLASSICAL LIMIT FOR BIPOLAR QUANTUM DRIFT-DIFFUSION MODEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ju Qiangchang; Chen Li

    2009-01-01

    Semiclassical limit to the solution of transient bipolar quantum drift-diffusion model in semiconductor simulation is discussed. It is proved that the semiclassical limit ofthis solution satisfies the classical bipolar drift-diffusion model. In addition, the authors also prove the existence of weak solution.

  19. The Semiclassical Limit in the Quantum Drift-Diffusion Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiang Chang JU

    2009-01-01

    Semiclassical limit to the solution of isentropic quantum drift-diffusion model in semicon-ductor simulation is discussed. It is proved that the semiclassical limit of this solution satisfies the classical drift-diffusion model. In addition, we also proved the global existence of weak solutions.

  20. Wright and Fisher on Inbreeding and Random Drift

    OpenAIRE

    Crow, James F

    2010-01-01

    Sewall Wright and R. A. Fisher often differed, including on the meaning of inbreeding and random gene frequency drift. Fisher regarded them as quite distinct processes, whereas Wright thought that because his inbreeding coefficient measured both they should be regarded as the same. Since the effective population numbers for inbreeding and random drift are different, this would argue for the Fisher view.

  1. The electronics readout system for the OPAL Vertex Drift Chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Vertex Drift Chamber for the OPAL experiment at LEP provides high quality track co-ordinates using multi-hit sub-nanosecond timing to detect the drifted electrons. This paper explains the electronic techniques that have been devised and implemented for the detector. The overall performance of the system is demonstrated with measurements from the final OPAL chamber. (author)

  2. Electron drift in a large scale solid xenon

    CERN Document Server

    Yoo, J

    2015-01-01

    A study of charge drift in a large scale optically transparent solid xenon is reported. A pulsed high power xenon light source is used to liberate electrons from a photocathode. The drift speeds of the electrons are measured using a 8.7\\,cm long electrode in both the liquid and solid phase of xenon. In the liquid phase (163\\,K), the drift speed is 0.193 $\\pm$ 0.003 cm/$\\mu$s while the drift speed in the solid phase (157\\,K) is 0.397 $\\pm$ 0.006 cm/$\\mu$s at 900 V/cm over 8.0\\,cm of uniform electric fields. Therefore, it is demonstrated that a factor two faster electron drift speed in solid phase xenon compared to that in liquid in a large scale solid xenon.

  3. Drifting sub-pulses in two newly discovered pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ord, S. M.; Edwards, R.; Bailes, M.

    2001-12-01

    We have detected the rare phenomenon of stable, drifting sub-pulse behaviour in two pulsars discovered in the recent Swinburne intermediate latitude pulsar survey. The pulsars, PSR J1231-47 and PSR J1919+0134, have approximate periods (P) of 1.873 and 1.6039s respectively. Both pulsars have multicomponent profiles, and distinct drifting is observed across them. We have identified a single drift mode in both pulsars: the drift rate for PSR J1231-47 being 5.4(1) ms P-1 and 5.8(2) ms P-1 for PSR 1919+0134. The drifting is linear across the profile with no departure from linearity at the edges within the sensitivity of our observations.

  4. Surface Waves in the paritally ionized solar plasma slab

    CERN Document Server

    Pandey, B P

    2013-01-01

    The properties of surface waves in the partially ionized, incompressible magnetized plasma slab are investigated in the present work. The waves are affected by the non ideal MHD effects which causes the finite drift of the magnetic field in the medium. When the finite drift of the magnetic field is ignored, the characteristics of the wave propagation in the partially ionized plasma fluid is similar to the ideal MHD except now the propagation properties depend on the fractional ionization of the medium. In the presence of Hall diffusion, the propagation of the sausage and kink surface waves depends on the level of fractional ionization of the medium. When both the Hall and Pedersen diffusion are present in the medium, the waves undergoes damping. For typical solar parameters, waves may damp over few minutes.

  5. Spiral Wave Dynamics in a Response System Subjected to a Spiral Wave Forcing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Guang-Zhao; CHEN Yong-Qi; TANG Guo-Ning; LIU Jun-Xian

    2011-01-01

    @@ Unidirectional linear error feedback coupling of two excitable medium systems displaying spiral waves is considered.The spiral wave in the response system is thus subjected to a spiral wave forcing.We find that the unidirectional feedback coupling can lead to richer behaviour than the mutual coupling.The spiral wave dynamics in the response system depends on the coupling strength and frequency mismatch.When the coupling strength is small, the feedback coupling induces the drift or meander of the forced spiral wave.When the coupling strength is large enough, the feedback coupling may lead to the transition from spiral wave to anti-target or target-like wave.The generation of anti-target wave in coupled excitable media is observed for the first time.Furthermore, when the coupling strength is strong, the synchronization between two subsystems can be established.%Unidirectional linear error feedback coupling of two excitable medium systems displaying spiral waves is considered. The spiral wave in the response system is thus subjected to a spiral wave forcing. We find that the unidirectional feedback coupling can lead to richer behaviour than the mutual coupling. The spiral wave dynamics in the response system depends on the coupling strength and frequency mismatch. When the coupling strength is small, the feedback coupling induces the drift or meander of the forced spiral wave. When the coupling strength is large enough, the feedback coupling may lead to the transition from spiral wave to anti-target or target-like wave. The generation of anti-target wave in coupled excitable media is observed for the first time. Furthermore,when the coupling strength is strong, the synchronization between two subsystems can be established.

  6. Non-twist map bifurcation of drift-lines and drift-island formation in saturated 3D MHD equilibria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfefferle, David; Cooper, Wilfred A.; Graves, Jonathan P.

    2015-11-01

    Based on non-canonical perturbation theory, guiding-centre drift equations are identified as perturbed magnetic field-line equations. The topology of passing-particle orbits, called drift-lines, is completely determined by the magnetic configuration. In axisymmetric tokamak fields, drift-lines lie on shifted flux-surfaces, called drift-surfaces. Field-lines and drift-lines are subject to island structures at rational surfaces only when a non-axisymmetric component is added. The picture is different in the case of 3D saturated MHD equilibrium like the helical core associated with a non-resonant internal kink mode. In assuming nested flux-surfaces, these bifurcated states, expected for a reversed q-profile with qmin close yet above unity and conveniently obtained in VMEC, feature integrable field-lines. The helical drift-lines however become resonant with the axisymmetric component in the region of qmin and spontaneously generate drift-islands. Due to the locally reversed sheared q-profile, the drift-island structure follows the bifurcation/reconnection mechanism of non-twist maps. This result provides a theoretical interpretation of NBI fast ion helical hot-spots in Long-Lived Modes as well as snake-like impurity density accumulation in internal MHD activity.

  7. Neutrinoless double beta decay

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kai Zuber

    2012-10-01

    The physics potential of neutrinoless double beta decay is discussed. Furthermore, experimental considerations as well as the current status of experiments are presented. Finally, an outlook towards the future, work on nuclear matrix elements and alternative processes is given.

  8. Beta-carotene

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... chemotherapy for a blood cancer called lymphoblastic leukemia. Mental performance. Some evidence suggests that taking beta-carotene ... One is water-based, and the other is oil-based. Studies show that the water-based version ...

  9. Surface tension: Floater clustering in a standing wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkovich, G.; Weinberg, A.; Denissenko, P.; Lukaschuk, S.

    2005-06-01

    How do waves affect the distribution of small particles that float on water? Here we show that drifting small particles concentrate in either the nodes or antinodes of a standing wave, depending on whether they are hydrophilic or hydrophobic, as a result of a surface-tension effect that violates Archimedes' law of buoyancy. This clustering on waves may find practical application in particle separation and provides insight into the patchy distribution on water of, for example, plastic litter or oil slicks.

  10. Scaling observations of surface waves in the Beaufort Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Madison Smith; Jim Thomson

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The rapidly changing Arctic sea ice cover affects surface wave growth across all scales. Here, in situ measurements of waves, observed from freely-drifting buoys during the 2014 open water season, are interpreted using open water distances determined from satellite ice products and wind forcing time series measured in situ with the buoys. A significant portion of the wave observations were found to be limited by open water distance (fetch) when the wind duration was sufficient for th...

  11. [High beta tokamak research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our activities on High Beta Tokamak Research during the past 20 months of the present grant period can be divided into six areas: reconstruction and modeling of high beta equilibria in HBT; measurement and analysis of MHD instabilities observed in HBT; measurements of impurity transport; diagnostic development on HBT; numerical parameterization of the second stability regime; and conceptual design and assembly of HBT-EP. Each of these is described in some detail in the sections of this progress report

  12. In-Drift Precipitates/Salts Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As directed by ''Technical Work Plan For: Engineered Barrier System Department Modeling and Testing FY03 Work Activities'' (BSC 2003 [165601]), the In-Drift Precipitates/Salts (IDPS) model is developed and refined to predict the aqueous geochemical effects of evaporation in the proposed repository. The purpose of this work is to provide a model for describing and predicting the postclosure effects of evaporation and deliquescence on the chemical composition of water within the proposed Engineered Barrier System (EBS). Application of this model is to be documented elsewhere for the Total System Performance Assessment License Application (TSPA-LA). The principal application of this model is to be documented in REV 02 of ''Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model'' (BSC 2003 [165601]). The scope of this document is to develop, describe, and validate the IDPS model. This model is a quasi-equilibrium model. All reactions proceed to equilibrium except for several suppressed minerals in the thermodynamic database not expected to form under the proposed repository conditions within the modeling timeframe. In this revision, upgrades to the EQ3/6 code (Version 8.0) and Pitzer thermodynamic database improve the applicable range of the model. These new additions allow equilibrium and reaction-path modeling of evaporation to highly concentrated brines for potential water compositions of the system Na-K-H-Mg-Ca-Al-Cl-F-NO3-SO4-Br-CO3-SiO2-CO2-O2-H2O at temperatures in the range of 0 C to 125 C, pressures in the atmospheric range, and relative humidity in the range of 0 to 100 percent. This system applies to oxidizing conditions only, and therefore limits the model to applications involving oxidizing conditions. A number of thermodynamic parameters in the Pitzer database have values that have not been determined or verified for the entire temperature range. In these cases, the known values are used to approximate the values for the rest of the

  13. In-Drift Precipitates/Salts Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Mariner

    2003-10-21

    As directed by ''Technical Work Plan For: Engineered Barrier System Department Modeling and Testing FY03 Work Activities'' (BSC 2003 [165601]), the In-Drift Precipitates/Salts (IDPS) model is developed and refined to predict the aqueous geochemical effects of evaporation in the proposed repository. The purpose of this work is to provide a model for describing and predicting the postclosure effects of evaporation and deliquescence on the chemical composition of water within the proposed Engineered Barrier System (EBS). Application of this model is to be documented elsewhere for the Total System Performance Assessment License Application (TSPA-LA). The principal application of this model is to be documented in REV 02 of ''Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model'' (BSC 2003 [165601]). The scope of this document is to develop, describe, and validate the IDPS model. This model is a quasi-equilibrium model. All reactions proceed to equilibrium except for several suppressed minerals in the thermodynamic database not expected to form under the proposed repository conditions within the modeling timeframe. In this revision, upgrades to the EQ3/6 code (Version 8.0) and Pitzer thermodynamic database improve the applicable range of the model. These new additions allow equilibrium and reaction-path modeling of evaporation to highly concentrated brines for potential water compositions of the system Na-K-H-Mg-Ca-Al-Cl-F-NO{sub 3}-SO{sub 4}-Br-CO{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}-CO{sub 2}-O{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O at temperatures in the range of 0 C to 125 C, pressures in the atmospheric range, and relative humidity in the range of 0 to 100 percent. This system applies to oxidizing conditions only, and therefore limits the model to applications involving oxidizing conditions. A number of thermodynamic parameters in the Pitzer database have values that have not been determined or verified for the entire temperature range. In these cases

  14. {beta} - amyloid imaging probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Jae Min [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    Imaging distribution of {beta} - amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease is very important for early and accurate diagnosis. Early trial of the {beta} -amyloid plaques includes using radiolabeled peptides which can be only applied for peripheral {beta} - amyloid plaques due to limited penetration through the blood brain barrier (BBB). Congo red or Chrysamine G derivatives were labeled with Tc-99m for imaging {beta} - amyloid plaques of Alzheimer patient's brain without success due to problem with BBB penetration. Thioflavin T derivatives gave breakthrough for {beta} - amyloid imaging in vivo, and a benzothiazole derivative [C-11]6-OH-BTA-1 brought a great success. Many other benzothiazole, benzoxazole, benzofuran, imidazopyridine, and styrylbenzene derivatives have been labeled with F-18 and I-123 to improve the imaging quality. However, [C-11]6-OH-BTA-1 still remains as the best. However, short half-life of C-11 is a limitation of wide distribution of this agent. So, it is still required to develop an Tc-99m, F-18 or I-123 labeled agent for {beta} - amyloid imaging agent.

  15. Asymptotic theory for spiral wave reflections

    CERN Document Server

    Langham, Jacob; Barkley, Dwight

    2014-01-01

    Resonantly forced spiral waves in excitable media drift in straight-line paths, their rotation centers behaving as point-like objects moving along trajectories with a constant velocity. Interaction with medium boundaries alters this velocity and may often result in a reflection of the drift trajectory. Such reflections have diverse characteristics and are known to be highly non-specular in general. In this context we apply the theory of response functions, which via numerically computable integrals, reduces the reaction-diffusion equations governing the whole excitable medium to the dynamics of just the rotation center and rotation phase of a spiral wave. Spiral reflection trajectories are computed by this method for both small and large-core spiral waves. Such calculations provide insight into the process of reflection as well as explanations for differences in trajectories across parameters, including the effects of incidence angle and forcing amplitude. Qualitative aspects of these results are preserved fa...

  16. Quasineutral limit of a standard drift diffusion model for semiconductors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO; Ling

    2002-01-01

    [1]Brenier, Y., Grenier, E., Limite singuliere de Vlasov-Poisson dans le regime de quasi neutralite: le cas independent du temps, C. R. Acad. Sci. Paris, 1994, 318: 121-124.[2]Cordier, S., Grenier, E., Quasineutral limit of Euler-Poisson system arising from plasma physics, Commun. in P. D. E., 2000, 23: 1099-1113.[3]Jüungel, A., Qualitative behavior of solutions of a degenerate nonlinear drift-diffusion model for semiconductors, Math. Models Methods Appl. Sci., 1995, 5: 497-518.[4]Chen, F., Introduction to Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion, Vol. 1, New York: Plenum Press, 1984.[5]Ringhofer, C., An asymptotic analysis of a transient p-n-junction model, SIAM J. Appl. Math., 1987, 47: 624-642.[6]Cordier, S., Degond, P., Markowich, P. A. et al., Traveling waves analysis and jump relations for the Euler-Poisson model in the quasineutral limit, Asymptotic Anal., 1995, 11: 209-224.[7]Brézis, H., Golse, F., Sentis, R., Analyse asymptotique de l'équation de Poisson couplée  la relation de Boltzmann, Quasi-neutralité des plasmas, C. R. Acad. Sci. Paris, 1995, 321: 953-959.[8]Simon, J., Compact set in the space Lp(0, T; B), Anal. Math. Pure Appl., 1987, 166: 65-96.[9]Lions, J. L., Quelques méthodes des Résolution des Problémes aux Limites non Linéaires, Paris: Dunod-Gauthier-Villard, 1969.

  17. Redshift drift constraints on holographic dark energy

    CERN Document Server

    He, Dong-Ze; Zhang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    The Sandage-Loeb (SL) test is a promising method for probing dark energy because it measures the redshift drift in the spectra of Lyman-$\\alpha$ forest of distant quasars, covering the "redshift desert" of $2\\lesssim z\\lesssim5$, which is not covered by existing cosmological observations. Therefore, it could provide an important supplement to current cosmological observations. In this paper, we explore the impact of SL test on the precision of cosmological constraints for two typical holographic dark energy models, i.e., the original holographic dark energy (HDE) model and the Ricci holographic dark energy (RDE) model. To avoid data inconsistency, we use the best-fit models based on current combined observational data as the fiducial models to simulate 30 mock SL test data. The results show that SL test can effectively break the existing strong degeneracy between the present-day matter density $\\Omega_{m0}$ and the Hubble constant $H_0$ in other cosmological observations. For the considered two typical dark e...

  18. Admixture and Drift in Oscillating Fluid Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Vladimirov, V A

    2010-01-01

    The motions of a passive scalar $\\hat{a}$ in a general high-frequency oscillating flow are studied. Our aim is threefold: (i) to obtain different classes of general solutions; (ii) to identify, classify, and develop related asymptotic procedures; and (iii) to study the notion of drift motion and the limits of its applicability. The used mathematical approach combines a version of the two-timing method, the Eulerian averaging procedure, and several novel elements. Our main results are: (i) the scaling procedure produces two independent dimensionless scaling parameters: inverse frequency $1/\\omega$ and displacement amplitude $\\delta$; (ii) we propose the \\emph{inspection procedure} that allows to find the natural functional forms of asymptotic solutions for $1/\\omega\\to 0, \\delta\\to 0$ and leads to the key notions of \\emph{critical, subcritical, and supercritical asymptotic families} of solutions; (iii) we solve the asymptotic problems for an arbitrary given oscillating flow and any initial data for $\\hat{a}$; ...

  19. Yucca Mountain drift scale test progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apps, J.; Birkholzer, J.T.; Peterson,J.E.; Sonnenthal, E.; Spycher, N.; Tsang, Y.W.; Williams, K.H.

    1999-01-01

    The Drift Scale Test (DST) is part of the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) Thermal Test being conducted underground at the potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The purpose of the ESF Thermal Test is to acquire a more in-depth understanding of the coupled thermal, mechanical, hydrological, and chemical processes likely to be encountered in the rock mass surrounding the potential geological repository at Yucca Mountain. These processes are monitored by a multitude of sensors to measure the temperature, humidity, gas pressure, and mechanical displacement, of the rock formation in response to the heat generated by the heaters. In addition to collecting passive monitoring data, active hydrological and geophysical testing is also being carried out periodically in the DST. These active tests are intended to monitor changes in the moisture redistribution in the rock mass, to collect water and gas samples for chemical and isotopic analysis, and to detect microfiacturing due to heating. On December 3, 1998, the heaters in the DST were activated. The planned heating phase of the DST is 4 years, and the cooling phase following the power shutoff will be of similar duration. The present report summarizes interpretation and analysis of thermal, hydrological, chemical, and geophysical data for the first 6 months; it is the first of many progress reports to be prepared during the DST.

  20. The PHENIX Drift Chamber Front End Electroncs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pancake, C.; Velkovska, J.; Pantuev, V.; Fong, D.; Hemmick, T.

    1998-04-01

    The PHENIX Drift Chamber (DC) is designed to operate in the high particle flux environment of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and provide high resolution track measurements. It is segmented into 80 keystones with 160 readout channels each. The Front End Electronics (FEE) developed to meet the demanding operating conditions and the large number of readout channels of the DC will be discussed. It is based on two application specific integrated circuits: the ASD8 and the TMC-PHX1. The ASD8 chip contains 8 channels of bipolar amplifier-shaper-discriminator with 6 ns shaping time and ≈ 20 ns pulse width, which satisfies the two track resolution requirements. The TMC-PHX1 chip is a high-resolution multi-hit Time-to-Digital Converter. The outputs from the ASD8 are digitized in the Time Memory Cell (TMC) every (clock period)/32 or 0.78 ns (at 40 MHz), which gives the intrinsic time resolution of the system. A 256 words deep dual port memory keeps 6.4 μs time history of data at 40 MHz clock. Each DC keystone is supplied with 4 ASD8/TMC boards and one FEM board, which performs the readout of the TMC-PHX1's, buffers and formats the data to be transmitted over the Glink. The slow speed control communication between the FEM and the system is carried out over ARCNET. The full readout chain and the data aquisition system are being tested.

  1. Redshift drift exploration for interacting dark energy

    CERN Document Server

    Geng, Jia-Jia; Zhang, Jing-Fei; Zhang, Xin

    2015-01-01

    By detecting redshift drift in the spectra of Lyman-$\\alpha$ forest of distant quasars, Sandage-Loeb (SL) test directly measures the expansion of the universe, covering the "redshift desert" of $2 \\lesssim z \\lesssim5$. Thus this method is definitely an important supplement to the other geometric measurements and will play a crucial role in cosmological constraints. In this paper, we quantify the ability of SL test signal by a CODEX-like spectrograph for constraining interacting dark energy. Four typical interacting dark energy models are considered: (\\romannumeral1) $Q=\\gamma H\\rho_c$, (\\romannumeral2) $Q=\\gamma H\\rho_{de}$, (\\romannumeral3) $Q=\\gamma H_0\\rho_c$, and (\\romannumeral4) $Q=\\gamma H_0\\rho_{de}$. The results show that for all the considered interacting dark energy models, relative to the current joint SN+BAO+CMB+$H_0$ observations, the constraints on $\\Omega_m$ and $H_0$ would be improved by about 60\\% and 30--40\\%, while the constraints on $w$ and $\\gamma$ would be slightly improved, with a 30-y...

  2. Travelling fronts in stochastic Stokes’ drifts

    KAUST Repository

    Blanchet, Adrien

    2008-10-01

    By analytical methods we study the large time properties of the solution of a simple one-dimensional model of stochastic Stokes\\' drift. Semi-explicit formulae allow us to characterize the behaviour of the solutions and compute global quantities such as the asymptotic speed of the center of mass or the effective diffusion coefficient. Using an equivalent tilted ratchet model, we observe that the speed of the center of mass converges exponentially to its limiting value. A diffuse, oscillating front attached to the center of mass appears. The description of the front is given using an asymptotic expansion. The asymptotic solution attracts all solutions at an algebraic rate which is determined by the effective diffusion coefficient. The proof relies on an entropy estimate based on homogenized logarithmic Sobolev inequalities. In the travelling frame, the macroscopic profile obeys to an isotropic diffusion. Compared with the original diffusion, diffusion is enhanced or reduced, depending on the regime. At least in the limit cases, the rate of convergence to the effective profile is always decreased. All these considerations allow us to define a notion of efficiency for coherent transport, characterized by a dimensionless number, which is illustrated on two simple examples of travelling potentials with a sinusoidal shape in the first case, and a sawtooth shape in the second case. © 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Frequency Control Loop for Drift Tube Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Hyeok Jung; Kim, Han Sung; Seol, Kyung Tae; Song, Young Gi; Jang, Ji Ho; Cho, Yong Sub [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    In this paper, the preparation of the frequency tracking of the RCCS by connecting the RCCS to low level RF (LLRF) system is described. KOMAC 100-MeV proton accelerator is under operation and supply beam to users. We are developing frequency control function in the LLRF system to control the RCCS in frequency control mode. After the test in the test bench, the system will be applied to the 100-MeV DTL RCCS in order to supply better quality beam to users. A 100-MeV proton accelerator has been developed and the operation and beam service started at Korea Multipurpose Accelerator Complex (KOMAC) in June 2013. The accelerator consists of a 50-keV proton injector, a 3-MeV radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) and 100-MeV drift tube linac (DTL). The resonance frequency of the DTL tanks are controlled by using the resonance frequency control cooling system (RCCS), which are installed at every each tank. Until now, the RCCS has been operating in constant temperature mode which means that the frequency was measured with respect to the RCCS supply temperature before the RF operation, and then the RCCS operates with that temperature throughout the whole operation. The constant temperature operation is simple but the RF stability is not good because many perturbations such as RCCS supply temperature error can cause a frequency change. To stabilize the system better, it is necessary to operate the RCCS in frequency tracking mode.

  4. Background Assay and Rejection in DRIFT

    CERN Document Server

    Brack, Jeff; Dorofeev, Alexei; Ezeribe, Anthony; Gauvreau, Jean-Luc; Gold, Michael; Harton, John; Lafler, Randy; Lauer, Robert; Lee, Eric R; Loomba, Dinesh; Matthews, John; Miller, Eric H; Monte, Alissa; Murphy, Alex; Paling, Sean; Phan, Nguyen; Sadler, Steve; Scarff, Andrew; Snowden-Ifft, Daniel; Spooner, Neil; Telfer, Sam; Walker, Daniel; Williams, Matt; Yuriev, Leonid

    2014-01-01

    The DRIFT-IId dark matter detector is a m$^3$-scale low-pressure TPC with directional sensitivity to WIMP-induced nuclear recoils. Its primary backgrounds were due to alpha decays from contamination on the central cathode. Efforts to reduce these backgrounds led to replacing the 20 \\mu m wire central cathode with one constructed from 0.9 \\mu m aluminized mylar, which is almost totally transparent to alpha particles. Detailed modeling of the nature and origin of the remaining backgrounds led to an in-situ, ppt-sensitive assay of alpha decay backgrounds from the central cathode. This led to further improvements in the thin-film cathode resulting in over 2 orders of magnitude reduction in backgrounds compared to the wire cathode. Finally, the addition of O$_2$ to CS$_2$ gas was found to produce multiple species of electronegative charge carriers, providing a method to determine the absolute position of nuclear recoils and reject all known remaining backgrounds while retaining a high efficiency for nuclear recoil...

  5. Simulation of Bounce Resonance ULF Wave-Particle Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, Robert; Wang, Chengrui; Sydorenko, Dmytro; Wang, Yongfu; Zong, Quigang

    2016-04-01

    Poloidal mode ultra-low-frequency (ULF) waves with high azimuthal mode number (high-m) are common throughout Earth's magnetosphere. It is speculated that substantial electric fields in these waves, on the order of tens of millivolts per metre, can energize ions and electrons efficiently via drift- and drift-bounce-resonance wave-particle interactions. We present test-particle simulations of drift-bounce resonance using a new numerical model of ULF waves. The model can use an arbitrary magnetic field and includes a realistic ionosphere with height-resolved Pedersen and Hall conductivity. An interesting finding is that fundamental mode poloidal waves in the ULF model rapidly transform into toroidal mode waves. Second harmonic high-m waves do not exhibit this behaviour. It is demonstrated that second-harmonic poloidal mode waves are very efficient at energizing ions. The test-particle simulations of bounce-resonance 2nd-harmonic wave-particle interactions are shown to produce particle signatures that reproduce ion flux oscillations observed by satellites from the Cluster mission. The expected significance of the results in the context current satellite missions such as the Van Allen Probes and up-coming ERG satellite mission will be briefly discussed.

  6. Drift power supply for Si(Li) detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A drift power supply for Si(Li) detector has been developed, which is completely different from many other power supplies for common use. The drift power supply provides the most extensive useful voltage range of 0∼1000 V, and is continuously adjustable. It has good stability, constant power and compact structure, and the maximum output current is 100 mA. Since SCR's (silicon-controlled-rectifier) with trigger diodes and other new components are adopted and a power restriction circuit is considered in design, so during the operation when the resistance rate of silicon pieces in drifting process changes with the temperature, the power remains constant. The lower the resistance rate when the temperature raises, the higher the drift current and lower the voltage on the silicon piece. On the contrast, the higher the resistance rate when the temperature lowers, the lower the drift current, and higher the voltage on the silicon piece. Forty pieces of Si(Li) detector have been successfully drifted by using this drift power supply

  7. Adaptive Online Sequential ELM for Concept Drift Tackling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budiman, Arif; Fanany, Mohamad Ivan; Basaruddin, Chan

    2016-01-01

    A machine learning method needs to adapt to over time changes in the environment. Such changes are known as concept drift. In this paper, we propose concept drift tackling method as an enhancement of Online Sequential Extreme Learning Machine (OS-ELM) and Constructive Enhancement OS-ELM (CEOS-ELM) by adding adaptive capability for classification and regression problem. The scheme is named as adaptive OS-ELM (AOS-ELM). It is a single classifier scheme that works well to handle real drift, virtual drift, and hybrid drift. The AOS-ELM also works well for sudden drift and recurrent context change type. The scheme is a simple unified method implemented in simple lines of code. We evaluated AOS-ELM on regression and classification problem by using concept drift public data set (SEA and STAGGER) and other public data sets such as MNIST, USPS, and IDS. Experiments show that our method gives higher kappa value compared to the multiclassifier ELM ensemble. Even though AOS-ELM in practice does not need hidden nodes increase, we address some issues related to the increasing of the hidden nodes such as error condition and rank values. We propose taking the rank of the pseudoinverse matrix as an indicator parameter to detect "underfitting" condition. PMID:27594879

  8. Adaptive Online Sequential ELM for Concept Drift Tackling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budiman, Arif; Fanany, Mohamad Ivan; Basaruddin, Chan

    2016-01-01

    A machine learning method needs to adapt to over time changes in the environment. Such changes are known as concept drift. In this paper, we propose concept drift tackling method as an enhancement of Online Sequential Extreme Learning Machine (OS-ELM) and Constructive Enhancement OS-ELM (CEOS-ELM) by adding adaptive capability for classification and regression problem. The scheme is named as adaptive OS-ELM (AOS-ELM). It is a single classifier scheme that works well to handle real drift, virtual drift, and hybrid drift. The AOS-ELM also works well for sudden drift and recurrent context change type. The scheme is a simple unified method implemented in simple lines of code. We evaluated AOS-ELM on regression and classification problem by using concept drift public data set (SEA and STAGGER) and other public data sets such as MNIST, USPS, and IDS. Experiments show that our method gives higher kappa value compared to the multiclassifier ELM ensemble. Even though AOS-ELM in practice does not need hidden nodes increase, we address some issues related to the increasing of the hidden nodes such as error condition and rank values. We propose taking the rank of the pseudoinverse matrix as an indicator parameter to detect "underfitting" condition.

  9. Adaptive Online Sequential ELM for Concept Drift Tackling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arif Budiman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A machine learning method needs to adapt to over time changes in the environment. Such changes are known as concept drift. In this paper, we propose concept drift tackling method as an enhancement of Online Sequential Extreme Learning Machine (OS-ELM and Constructive Enhancement OS-ELM (CEOS-ELM by adding adaptive capability for classification and regression problem. The scheme is named as adaptive OS-ELM (AOS-ELM. It is a single classifier scheme that works well to handle real drift, virtual drift, and hybrid drift. The AOS-ELM also works well for sudden drift and recurrent context change type. The scheme is a simple unified method implemented in simple lines of code. We evaluated AOS-ELM on regression and classification problem by using concept drift public data set (SEA and STAGGER and other public data sets such as MNIST, USPS, and IDS. Experiments show that our method gives higher kappa value compared to the multiclassifier ELM ensemble. Even though AOS-ELM in practice does not need hidden nodes increase, we address some issues related to the increasing of the hidden nodes such as error condition and rank values. We propose taking the rank of the pseudoinverse matrix as an indicator parameter to detect “underfitting” condition.

  10. Het effect van spuitboombeweging en windvector op de drift : Randvariatie metingen 2007-2008

    OpenAIRE

    Groot, T.T.; Stallinga, H.; Michielsen, J.G.P.; Velde, van der, G.; Zande, van de, J.C.

    2014-01-01

    Spray drift measurements have been performed to quantify the effect of variations in wind angle and wind speed during application and the sprayer boom movement alongside the sprayed edge of the field on spray drift deposition alongside a sprayed potato field (2007-2008). Results of these spray drift measurements are used to develop spray drift models incorporating the effects of wind variability and sprayer boom movement on spray drift deposition. Measured spray drift deposition patterns are ...

  11. Drift-Scale Coupled Processes (DST and TH Seepage) Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Birkholzer; S. Mukhopadhyay

    2004-09-29

    The purpose of this report is to document drift-scale modeling work performed to evaluate the thermal-hydrological (TH) behavior in Yucca Mountain fractured rock close to waste emplacement drifts. The heat generated by the decay of radioactive waste results in rock temperatures elevated from ambient for thousands of years after emplacement. Depending on the thermal load, these temperatures are high enough to cause boiling conditions in the rock, giving rise to water redistribution and altered flow paths. The predictive simulations described in this report are intended to investigate fluid flow in the vicinity of an emplacement drift for a range of thermal loads. Understanding the TH coupled processes is important for the performance of the repository because the thermally driven water saturation changes affect the potential seepage of water into waste emplacement drifts. Seepage of water is important because if enough water gets into the emplacement drifts and comes into contact with any exposed radionuclides, it may then be possible for the radionuclides to be transported out of the drifts and to the groundwater below the drifts. For above-boiling rock temperatures, vaporization of percolating water in the fractured rock overlying the repository can provide an important barrier capability that greatly reduces (and possibly eliminates) the potential of water seeping into the emplacement drifts. In addition to this thermal process, water is inhibited from entering the drift opening by capillary forces, which occur under both ambient and thermal conditions (capillary barrier). The combined barrier capability of vaporization processes and capillary forces in the near-field rock during the thermal period of the repository is analyzed and discussed in this report.

  12. DRIFT-SCALE COUPLED PROCESSES (DST AND TH SEEPAGE) MODELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.T. Birkholzer; S. Mukhopadhyay

    2005-01-13

    The purpose of this report is to document drift-scale modeling work performed to evaluate the thermal-hydrological (TH) behavior in Yucca Mountain fractured rock close to waste emplacement drifts. The heat generated by the decay of radioactive waste results in rock temperatures elevated from ambient for thousands of years after emplacement. Depending on the thermal load, these temperatures are high enough to cause boiling conditions in the rock, giving rise to water redistribution and altered flow paths. The predictive simulations described in this report are intended to investigate fluid flow in the vicinity of an emplacement drift for a range of thermal loads. Understanding the TH coupled processes is important for the performance of the repository because the thermally driven water saturation changes affect the potential seepage of water into waste emplacement drifts. Seepage of water is important because if enough water gets into the emplacement drifts and comes into contact with any exposed radionuclides, it may then be possible for the radionuclides to be transported out of the drifts and to the groundwater below the drifts. For above-boiling rock temperatures, vaporization of percolating water in the fractured rock overlying the repository can provide an important barrier capability that greatly reduces (and possibly eliminates) the potential of water seeping into the emplacement drifts. In addition to this thermal process, water is inhibited from entering the drift opening by capillary forces, which occur under both ambient and thermal conditions (capillary barrier). The combined barrier capability of vaporization processes and capillary forces in the near-field rock during the thermal period of the repository is analyzed and discussed in this report.

  13. Drift correction of the dissolved signal in single particle ICPMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelis, Geert; Rauch, Sebastien

    2016-07-01

    A method is presented where drift, the random fluctuation of the signal intensity, is compensated for based on the estimation of the drift function by a moving average. It was shown using single particle ICPMS (spICPMS) measurements of 10 and 60 nm Au NPs that drift reduces accuracy of spICPMS analysis at the calibration stage and during calculations of the particle size distribution (PSD), but that the present method can again correct the average signal intensity as well as the signal distribution of particle-containing samples skewed by drift. Moreover, deconvolution, a method that models signal distributions of dissolved signals, fails in some cases when using standards and samples affected by drift, but the present method was shown to improve accuracy again. Relatively high particle signals have to be removed prior to drift correction in this procedure, which was done using a 3 × sigma method, and the signals are treated separately and added again. The method can also correct for flicker noise that increases when signal intensity is increased because of drift. The accuracy was improved in many cases when flicker correction was used, but when accurate results were obtained despite drift, the correction procedures did not reduce accuracy. The procedure may be useful to extract results from experimental runs that would otherwise have to be run again. Graphical Abstract A method is presented where a spICP-MS signal affected by drift (left) is corrected (right) by adjusting the local (moving) averages (green) and standard deviations (purple) to the respective values at a reference time (red). In combination with removing particle events (blue) in the case of calibration standards, this method is shown to obtain particle size distributions where that would otherwise be impossible, even when the deconvolution method is used to discriminate dissolved and particle signals.

  14. Distribution of drifting seaweeds in eastern East China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Teruhisa; Tatsukawa, Kenichi; Filippi, Jean B.; Sagawa, Tatsuyuki; Matsunaga, Daisuke; Mikami, Atsuko; Ishida, Kenichi; Ajisaka, Tetsuro; Tanaka, Katsuhiko; Aoki, Masakazu; Wang, Wei-Ding; Liu, Hui-Fei; Zhang, Shou-Du; Zhou, Min-Dong; Sugimoto, Takashige

    2007-09-01

    In offshore waters with relatively low primary production, drifting seaweeds composed of Sargassum species form an identical ecosystem such as an oasis in desert. Commercially important pelagic fishes such as jack mackerel ( Trachurus japonicus) and yellow tail ( Seriola quinqueradiata) spawn in East China Sea pass their juvenile period accompanying drifting seaweeds. Therefore drifting seaweeds are very important not only in offshore ecosystem but also fishery resources. However the distribution of drifting seaweeds in East China Sea has scarcely known. Then we conducted two research cruises of R/V Hakuho-Maru in May 2002 and in March 2004. During the cruises, drifting seaweeds were visually observed from the bridge and sampled with a towing net. The observation revealed that the drifting seaweeds were distributed along the front between the Kuroshio Current and coastal waters and mainly composed of one seaweed species, Sargassum horneri (Turner) C. Agardh from spring to early summer. There are no reports on geographical distribution of this species in the coasts south of southern Kyushu Island in Japan. Kuroshio Current flows northeastward there. Buoys with GPS attached to drifting seaweeds released off Zhejiang Province, China, in March 2005 to track their transport. Their positions monitored by ORBCOM satellite showed that they were transported to the area in East China Sea, where the drifting seaweeds were observed during the cruises, in 2 months. These facts suggest that S. horneri detached from Chinese coast in March or months earlier than March could be transported to fringe area of continental shelf and waters influenced by Kuroshio Current from March to May. Therefore the Sargassum forests, especially S. horneri, along the Chinese coast play a very important role in the ecosystem of the East China Sea as a source of drifting seaweeds.

  15. Corrugation of relativistic magnetized shock waves

    CERN Document Server

    Lemoine, M; Gremillet, L

    2016-01-01

    As a shock front interacts with turbulence, it develops corrugation which induces outgoing wave modes in the downstream plasma. For a fast shock wave, the incoming wave modes can either be fast magnetosonic waves originating from downstream, outrunning the shock, or eigenmodes of the upstream plasma drifting through the shock. Using linear perturbation theory in relativistic MHD, this paper provides a general analysis of the corrugation of relativistic magnetized fast shock waves resulting from their interaction with small amplitude disturbances. Transfer functions characterizing the linear response for each of the outgoing modes are calculated as a function of the magnetization of the upstream medium and as a function of the nature of the incoming wave. Interestingly, if the latter is an eigenmode of the upstream plasma, we find that there exists a resonance at which the (linear) response of the shock becomes large or even diverges. This result may have profound consequences on the phenomenology of astrophys...

  16. General ignition requirements in TMR's with drift pumping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drift pumping of collisionally trapped DT ions and thermal alpha ash in the transitions and thermal barriers of TMR plugs can be shown by simple models to dominate the central cell energy losses, requiring in fact more radial ion loss by drift pumping than axial ion loss through the potential plugs, and setting a minimum central cell length for ignition. Induced electron transport due to drift pumping is shown to be small, so grids are not needed on the direct converter to separate ion and electron currents

  17. Zonal drifts of irregularities imparted by meridional winds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldman, H.; Da Rosa, A. V.

    1973-01-01

    In a uniform ionosphere, meridional winds cause only meridional motions of irregularities. It is shown, however, that, if F-region irregularities are considered in a real ionosphere in which there is a highly conductive E-layer, zonal motions occur. During the day a substantial westward drift takes place, while at night the drift is eastward but smaller, owing to the much smaller E-layer conductivity. Thus, the effect of meridional winds is to impart a net westward drift to small irregularities in the ionization, provided such irregularities persist long enough.

  18. Agricultural sprays in cross-flow and drift

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farooq, M.; Balachandar, R.; Wulfsohn, Dvoralai;

    2001-01-01

    The droplet size and velocity characteristics of an agricultural spray were studied in a wind tunnel in the presence of a non-uniform cross-flow. The spray was generated at three nozzle-operating pressures. The droplet size and velocity was measured in both the cross-flow direction and the vertical....... A size-velocity correlation factor was adopted to discuss the potential drift of the droplets. For the lower pressure, at a distance of 100 mm below the nozzle exit, the droplets are prone to drift at all downstream locations. dt the higher pressure, the droplets are prone to drift beyond a distance...

  19. Temperature Induced Voltage Offset Drifts in Silicon Carbide Pressure Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okojie, Robert S.; Lukco, Dorothy; Nguyen, Vu; Savrun, Ender

    2012-01-01

    We report the reduction of transient drifts in the zero pressure offset voltage in silicon carbide (SiC) pressure sensors when operating at 600 C. The previously observed maximum drift of +/- 10 mV of the reference offset voltage at 600 C was reduced to within +/- 5 mV. The offset voltage drifts and bridge resistance changes over time at test temperature are explained in terms of the microstructure and phase changes occurring within the contact metallization, as analyzed by Auger electron spectroscopy and field emission scanning electron microscopy. The results have helped to identify the upper temperature reliable operational limit of this particular metallization scheme to be 605 C.

  20. Alfvén ship waves: high-m ULF pulsations in the magnetosphere generated by a moving plasma inhomogeneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Yu. Klimushkin

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The generation of a high-m Alfvén wave by substorm injected energetic particles in the magnetosphere is studied. The wave is supposed to be emitted by an alternating current created by the drifting particle cloud or ring current inhomogeneity. It is shown that the wave appears in some azimuthal location simultaneously with the particle cloud arrival at the same spot. The value of the azimuthal wave number is determined as m~ω/ωd, where ω is the eigenfrequency of the standing Alfvén wave and ωd is the particle drift frequency. The wave propagates westward, in the direction of the proton drift. Under the reasonable assumption about the density of the energetic particles, the amplitude of the generated wave is close to the observed amplitudes of poloidal ULF pulsations.

  1. Beta-plane turbulence: experiments with altimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Y

    2013-01-01

    Results from a new series of experiments on flows generated by an electromagnetic method in a rotating tank with topographic beta-effect are presented. The velocity fields are measured by the Altimetric Imaging Velocimetry. The turbulent flows observed in the experiments develop zonal jets which are latent in a stationary forced-dissipative regime of the flow but become prominent in the decaying flow. The two-dimensional energy spectra of the flows exhibit the development of anisotropy towards zonal motions. The experiments demonstrate dual turbulent cascade with energy and enstrophy ranges. The frequency-wavenumber spectra reveal the presence of Rossby waves at low wavenumbers which are excited by the turbulent motions. The experimental results are compared with available theory of beta-plane turbulence.

  2. Hemispheric Asymmetries of the Subauroral Ion Drifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, F.; Zhang, X.; Wang, W.; Chen, B.

    2015-12-01

    A large database of subauroral ion drifts (SAID) events from DMSP observations from 1987 to 2012 is used to systematically investigate the features of SAID. SAID occurs mostly at ~ 62° / -60° magnetic latitude (MLAT) and ~ 2215 / 2245 magnetic local time (MLT) for geomagnetically quiet conditions and at ~ 58°/ -56° MLAT and ~ 2215 / 2245 MLT for geomagnetically disturbed conditions in the North Hemisphere (NH) / South Hemisphere (SH), respectively. Significant north-south asymmetries in SAID occurrence, shape, and geomagnetic activity variations are found in this statistical study. The latitudinal width of a SAID is larger in the NH than in the SH. An interesting finding of this work is that the SAID occurrence probability peaks have a ~ 180° difference in longitude between the two hemispheres in the geographic coordinates for both geomagnetically quiet and disturbed conditions. The SAID width peaks in almost the same geomagnetic meridian zone with a geomagnetic longitude of ~ 80°-120° in both hemispheres. Significant hemispheric asymmetries and spike signatures with sharpe dips are found in all the latitudinal profiles of the horizontal velocities of SAIDs.The SAID is highly correlated to geomagnetic activity, indicating that the location and evolution of the SAID might be influenced by global geomagnetic activity, auroral dynamics, and the dynamics of ring currents. The hemispheric asymmetries of SAID may possibly be related with the differences of the hemispheric power, the cross-polar cap potential, and the density of region-2 field-aligned currents in the two hemispheres. Detailed investigations will be presented in future.

  3. Stochastic and coherent dynamics of single and coupled beta cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    phenomenon, modeled by a slow-fast nonlinear system of ordinary differential equations (ODEs). The single cell oscillations are complex as the dynamical behavior is a result of traversing a series of saddle node and homoclinic bifurcations, controlled by the slow variable. We shall present results...... through gap-junctions within the islets of Langerhans. Thereby the beta cells form a network of complex oscillators. The network of beta-cells could be viewed as a prototype example of complexity nets and hence constitute an example of broader interest than for biology. We shall present results on coupled...... beta cells in the simple one dimensional case and show how wave patterns can arise and propagate along the chain. These wave patterns can be blocked by inhomogeneous glucose concentration along the chain, and we shall show how the coupled cell model can be connected to the Fishers equation, which...

  4. The Geodiversity in Drift Sand Landscapes of The Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Ancker, Hanneke; Jungerius, Pieter Dirk; Riksen, Michel

    2015-04-01

    The authors carried out detailed field studies of more than twelve drift sand landscapes in The Netherlands. The objective of these studies was to restore Natura-2000 values by restoring the wind activity. Active drift sands occur almost exclusively in The Netherlands, Natura 2000 habitat 2330 'Inland dunes with open Corynephorus and Agrostis grasslands', for which reason our country is largely responsible for this European landscape. Active drift sands had almost disappeared for two reasons: first, the stabilization of the drift sands by air pollution, mainly nitrogen, which stimulates the growth of algae and grasses that initiate soil formation, and second, by the growth of forests surrounding the sands, which decreases the wind force. The restoration studies revealed differences in the geodiversity between and within the drift sand areas. Whereas the drift sands on geological and soil maps show as almost homogenous areas, they have in fact highly variable geo-conditions of which examples will be given. These geodiversity aspects concern differences in geomorphological structure, origin, sediments and age of the drift sands. Differences in wind and water erosion, trampling and soil formation add to the geodiversity within the drift sand areas. Especially in the primary stages of succession the differences in geodiversity are relevant for the Natura-2000 values. We discerned three main types of active sands. Firstly, the impressive drift sands with large parabolic dune structures, often consisting of series of interlocking parabolic dunes. They developed from the northeast towards the southwest, against the direction of the dominant wind, and must have taken centuries to develop. Small parts of these systems are still active, other parts show different degrees of soil formation. Their origin is still unclear but probably dates from medieval times (Heidinga, 1985, Jungerius & Riksen, 2008). Second are the drift sand areas with irregular hills from 0.5 to about 2

  5. Modeling of Drift Effects on Solar Tower Concentrated Flux Distributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis O. Lara-Cerecedo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel modeling tool for calculation of central receiver concentrated flux distributions is presented, which takes into account drift effects. This tool is based on a drift model that includes different geometrical error sources in a rigorous manner and on a simple analytic approximation for the individual flux distribution of a heliostat. The model is applied to a group of heliostats of a real field to obtain the resulting flux distribution and its variation along the day. The distributions differ strongly from those obtained assuming the ideal case without drift or a case with a Gaussian tracking error function. The time evolution of peak flux is also calculated to demonstrate the capabilities of the model. The evolution of this parameter also shows strong differences in comparison to the case without drift.

  6. Professional Drift, "Yahweh Complex" Erode J-Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Sam G.

    1979-01-01

    Proposes that journalism education in general has been drifting in a strong research current for some years and is at present uncertain how to treat growing opposition by professional journalists to such a research emphasis. (RL)

  7. Transport of Na48 Drift Chambers to Dubna

    CERN Multimedia

    GOLOVATYUK, V

    2010-01-01

    On 22 July, in the occasion of the departure of the Na48 Drift Chambers from CERN, Mikhail Itkis (acting Director of the JIINR) and Rolf Heuer (CERN Director General) visited the NA62 experimental area.

  8. Nonequilibrium drift-diffusion model for organic semiconductor devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felekidis, Nikolaos; Melianas, Armantas; Kemerink, Martijn

    2016-07-01

    Two prevailing formalisms are currently used to model charge transport in organic semiconductor devices. Drift-diffusion calculations, on the one hand, are time effective but assume local thermodynamic equilibrium, which is not always realistic. Kinetic Monte Carlo models, on the other hand, do not require this assumption but are computationally expensive. Here, we present a nonequilibrium drift-diffusion model that bridges this gap by fusing the established multiple trap and release formalism with the drift-diffusion transport equation. For a prototypical photovoltaic system the model is shown to quantitatively describe, with a single set of parameters, experiments probing (1) temperature-dependent steady-state charge transport—space-charge limited currents, and (2) time-resolved charge transport and relaxation of nonequilibrated photocreated charges. Moreover, the outputs of the developed kinetic drift-diffusion model are an order of magnitude, or more, faster to compute and in good agreement with kinetic Monte Carlo calculations.

  9. Teaching Evolutionary Mechanisms: Genetic Drift and M&M's.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staub, Nancy L.

    2002-01-01

    Describes a classroom activity that teaches the mechanism of genetic drift to undergraduates. Illustrates a number of concepts that are critical in developing evolution literacy by sampling M&M milk chocolate candies. (MM)

  10. Silicon drift detector with reduced lateral diffusion: experimental results

    CERN Document Server

    Sonsky, J; Huizenga, John R; Hollander, R W; Eijk, C W E; Sarro, P M

    2000-01-01

    In a standard multi-anode silicon drift detector electron cloud broadening during the drifting towards the anode pixels deteriorates the energy and position resolution. This makes the detector less applicable for detection of low-energy X-rays. The signal charge sharing between several anodes can be eliminated by introducing sawtooth-shaped p sup + field strips. The sawtooth structure results in small electric fields directed parallel to the sensor surface and perpendicular to the drift direction which produce gutters. The drifting electrons are confined in these gutters of one saw tooth period wide. For a detector with a sawtooth period of 500 mu m, we have measured the maximum number of fully confined electrons as a function of the potential gutter depth induced by different sawtooth angles.

  11. A theoretical model of asymmetric wave ripples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blondeaux, P.; Foti, E.; Vittori, G.

    2015-01-01

    The time development of ripples under sea waves is investigated by means of the weakly nonlinear stability analysis of a flat sandy bottom subjected to the viscous oscillatory flow that is present in the boundary layer at the bottom of propagating sea waves. Second-order effects in the wave steepness are considered, to take into account the presence of the steady drift generated by the surface waves. Hence, the work of Vittori & Blondeaux (1990 J. Fluid Mech. 218, 19–39 (doi:10.1017/S002211209000091X)) is extended by considering steeper waves and/or less deep waters. As shown by the linear analysis of Blondeaux et al. (2000 Eur. J. Mech. B 19, 285–301 (doi:10.1016/S0997-7546(90)00106-I)), because of the presence of a steady velocity component in the direction of wave propagation, ripples migrate at a constant rate that depends on sediment and wave characteristics. The weakly nonlinear analysis shows that the ripple profile is no longer symmetric with respect to ripple crests and troughs and the symmetry index is computed as a function of the parameters of the problem. In particular, a relationship is determined between the symmetry index and the strength of the steady drift. A fair agreement between model results and laboratory data is obtained, albeit further data and analyses are necessary to determine the behaviour of vortex ripples and to be conclusive. PMID:25512587

  12. Observation of upper drift modes in radio frequency produced magnetized plasmas with frequency above ion cyclotron frequency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a RF produced magnetized argon plasma expanding into a larger expansion chamber, electrostatic modes propagating azimuthally in the direction of the electron diamagnetic drift and frequency greater than the ion cyclotron frequency are observed. In the radial direction, the mode amplitude peaks at a location where the radial density gradient is maximum. The modes are detected at axial locations up to 16 cm away from the entrance aperture. For fixed values of the neutral pressure and magnetic field, the mode frequency is found to be independent of the location at which it is measured. The modes exhibit drift wave characteristics revealing a radial structure with the azimuthal mode number m = 1 at the lower radial locations (r ∼ 3.0 cm) while the m = 2 mode is located in the outer region. Theoretical modeling using a local dispersion relation based on the fluid equations predicts destabilization of the modes with frequency greater than the ion-cyclotron frequency by electron-neutral collisions and exhibiting other drift wave features

  13. Drift chamber tracking with a VLSI neural network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have tested a commercial analog VLSI neural network chip for finding in real time the intercept and slope of charged particles traversing a drift chamber. Voltages proportional to the drift times were input to the Intel ETANN chip and the outputs were recorded and later compared off line to conventional track fits. We will discuss the chamber and test setup, the chip specifications, and results of recent tests. We'll briefly discuss possible applications in high energy physics detector triggers

  14. Measurements of electron drift velocity in pure isobutane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vivaldini, Tulio C.; Lima, Iara B.; Goncalves, Josemary A.C.; Botelho, Suzana; Tobias, Carmen C.B., E-mail: ccbueno@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Ridenti, Marco A.; Pascholati, Paulo R. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica. Lab. do Acelerador Linear; Fonte, Paulo; Mangiarotti, Alessio [Universidade de Coimbra (Portugal). Dept de Fisica. Lab. de Instrumentacao e Fisica Experimental de Particulas

    2009-07-01

    In this work we report on preliminary results related to the dependence of the electron drift velocity for pure isobutane as a function of reduced electric field (E/N) in the range from 100 Td up to 216 Td. The measurements of electron drift velocity were based on the Pulsed Townsend technique. In order to validate the technique and analyzing non-uniformity effects, results for nitrogen are also presented and compared with a numerical simulation of the Bolsig+ code. (author)

  15. Drift load in populations of small size and low density

    OpenAIRE

    Willi, Y; Griffin, P.; Van Buskirk, J

    2012-01-01

    According to theory, drift load in randomly mating populations is determined by past population size, because enhanced genetic drift in small populations causes accumulation and fixation of recessive deleterious mutations of small effect. In contrast, segregating load due to mutations of low frequency should decline in smaller populations, at least when mutations are highly recessive and strongly deleterious. Strong local selection generally reduces both types of load. We tested these predict...

  16. Modeling Influenza Antigenic Shift and Drift with LEGO Bricks

    OpenAIRE

    Boriana Marintcheva

    2016-01-01

    The concepts of antigenic shift and drift could be found in almost every microbiology and virology syllabus, usually taught in the context of Influenza virus biology. They are central to understanding viral diversity and evolution and have direct application to anti-flu vaccine design and effectiveness. To aid student understanding of the concepts, I have developed an exercise to visualize the mechanistic aspects of antigenic shift and drift using LEGO bricks. This hands-on/minds-on exercise ...

  17. BaBar Level 1 Drift Chamber Trigger Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Halyo, V

    2002-01-01

    As PEP-II is exceeding the original design luminosity, BaBar is currently upgrading its Level 1 Drift Chamber Trigger (DCT) to reduce the rate of background Level 1 triggers by more than 50% while preserving the high Level 1 trigger physics efficiency. New Z-Pt-Discriminator VME boards (ZPD) utilizing the stereo hit information from the drift chamber are being built to extract the track z coordinate at the beam line with a resolution of a few centimeters.

  18. Large drift tube arrays with external delay line readout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The construction and performance of 2 meter long, 5 cm diameter, circular drift tubes made of 1 mm thick bakelite paper coated inside with conductive paint. The longitudinal coordinate is read-out with an external delay line system. The measured spatial resolution obtained from the drift time is close to 180 μm (one standard deviation). A system of 1100 tubes has been built for a muon experiment

  19. Beta and Gamma Gradients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løvborg, Leif; Gaffney, C. F.; Clark, P. A.;

    1985-01-01

    Experimental and/or theoretical estimates are presented concerning, (i) attenuation within the sample of beta and gamma radiation from the soil, (ii) the gamma dose within the sample due to its own radioactivity, and (iii) the soil gamma dose in the proximity of boundaries between regions...... of differing radioactivity. It is confirmed that removal of the outer 2 mm of sample is adequate to remove influence from soil beta dose and estimates are made of the error introduced by non-removal. Other evaluations include variation of the soil gamma dose near the ground surface and it appears...

  20. Double beta decay experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The great sensitivity of double beta decay to neutrino mass and right handed currents has motivated many new and exciting attempts to observe this elusive nuclear phenomenon directly. Experiments in operation and other coming on line in the next one or two years are expected to result in order-of-magnitude improvements in detectable half lives for both the two-neutrino and no-neutrino modes. A brief history of double beta decay experiments is presented together with a discussion of current experimental efforts, including a gas filled time projection chamber being used to study selenium-82. (author)

  1. Beta-limiting Instabilities and Global Mode Stabilization in NSTX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbagh, Steven

    2001-10-01

    Low aspect ratio and high edge q theoretically alter the plasma stability and mode structure compared to standard tokamak configurations. Below the no-wall limit, stability calculations with PEST, GATO, and DCON show the perturbed radial field is maximized near the center column and DCON and VALEN calculations show that mode stability is not greatly improved by a nearby conducting wall due to the short poloidal wavelength in this region. In contrast, as beta reaches and exceeds the no-wall limit, the mode becomes strongly ballooning with long poloidal wavelength at large major radius and is highly wall stabilized. In this way, wall stabilization is more effective at higher beta in low aspect ratio geometry. Research on the stability of spherical torus plasmas at and above the no-wall beta limit is being addressed on NSTX, which has produced low aspect ratio plasmas, R/a = 1.27 at plasma current up to 1.4 MA with high energy confinement (TauE/TauE-ITER89P = 2). Toroidal and normalized beta have reached 22%, and 4.3, respectively in q = 7 plasmas. The beta limit is observed to increase with increasing plasma internal inductance, li, and the stability factor betaN/li has reached 5.8, limited by sudden beta collapses at low li that was achieved by use of high-harmonic fast wave heating (HHFW). DCON stability analysis of equilibria reconstructed with EFIT using external magnetics show that the plasmas are below or at the no-wall beta limit for the n = 1 mode, which has characteristics of a current-driven kink. With more peaked current profiles (li greater than 0.7), core MHD instabilities are observed which saturate or slowly degrade beta. Sawteeth with large inversion radii can also cause substantial beta collapses, although current profile modification using HHFW, altered plasma growth, and increased toroidal field have each been successful in mitigating this effect.

  2. Use of beta blockers in various clinical states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radović Vesna V.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. According to the convincing evidence, a decline in mortality rate has been achieved with beta-blockers in patients with an acute myocardial infarction and in post-infarction follow-up. In fact, there has been a clear reduction of sudden coronary death. The necessary condition for the efficiency of beta-blockers is an early use. They are also a medication of choice for angina after an infarction. The objective of this work was to evaluate the use of beta-blockers after a myocardial infarction in various clinical states and to eliminate doubts concerning their prescription. Beta blockers Even in conditions considered contraindications for administration of beta blockers such as old age, diabetes, non-Q-wave myocardial infarction, peripheral vascular disease, arterial disease, heart insufficiency, ventricular arrhythmias, renal disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma and depression, patients benefit from beta blockers when they are given along with a right choice of the medication and a regular follow-up of the patient. Preference is given to cardioselective beta blockers in patients with diabetes or lung disease. Beta-blockers do not cause long-term lipid alterations. Therefore, the matter of clinically significant alterations of lipids or blood glucose levels should not need further consideration as a problem of the treatment of diabetics. Discussion and conclusion. Investigations have proved that the use of beta-blockers reduces the development of cerebrovascular accidents, heart insufficiency and hypertension. Despite strong arguments and numerous recommendations, beta-blockers have not been accepted to a sufficient extent as an integral part of treatment of acute coronary syndrome and related diseases, to the detriment of many lost lives and in spite of favourable pharmaco-economic aspect.

  3. Measurement of Spray Drift with a Specifically Designed Lidar System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregorio, Eduard; Torrent, Xavier; Planas de Martí, Santiago; Solanelles, Francesc; Sanz, Ricardo; Rocadenbosch, Francesc; Masip, Joan; Ribes-Dasi, Manel; Rosell-Polo, Joan R

    2016-01-01

    Field measurements of spray drift are usually carried out by passive collectors and tracers. However, these methods are labour- and time-intensive and only provide point- and time-integrated measurements. Unlike these methods, the light detection and ranging (lidar) technique allows real-time measurements, obtaining information with temporal and spatial resolution. Recently, the authors have developed the first eye-safe lidar system specifically designed for spray drift monitoring. This prototype is based on a 1534 nm erbium-doped glass laser and an 80 mm diameter telescope, has scanning capability, and is easily transportable. This paper presents the results of the first experimental campaign carried out with this instrument. High coefficients of determination (R² > 0.85) were observed by comparing lidar measurements of the spray drift with those obtained by horizontal collectors. Furthermore, the lidar system allowed an assessment of the drift reduction potential (DRP) when comparing low-drift nozzles with standard ones, resulting in a DRP of 57% (preliminary result) for the tested nozzles. The lidar system was also used for monitoring the evolution of the spray flux over the canopy and to generate 2-D images of these plumes. The developed instrument is an advantageous alternative to passive collectors and opens the possibility of new methods for field measurement of spray drift. PMID:27070613

  4. Genetic drift and the population history of the Irish travellers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relethford, John H; Crawford, Michael H

    2013-02-01

    The Irish Travellers are an itinerant group in Ireland that has been socially isolated. Two hypotheses have been proposed concerning the genetic origin of the Travellers: (1) they are genetically related to Roma populations in Europe that share a nomadic lifestyle or (2) they are of Irish origin, and genetic differences from the rest of Ireland reflect genetic drift. These hypotheses were tested using data on 33 alleles from 12 red blood cell polymorphism loci. Comparison with other European, Roma, and Indian populations shows that the Travellers are genetically distinct from the Roma and Indian populations and most genetically similar to Ireland, in agreement with earlier genetic analyses of the Travellers. However, the Travellers are still genetically distinct from other Irish populations, which could reflect some external gene flow and/or the action of genetic drift in a small group that was descended from a small number of founders. In order to test the drift hypothesis, we analyzed genetic distances comparing the Travellers to four geographic regions in Ireland. These distances were then compared with adjusted distances that account for differential genetic drift using a method developed by Relethford (Hum Biol 68 (1996) 29-44). The unadjusted distances show the genetic distinctiveness of the Travellers. After adjustment for the expected effects of genetic drift, the Travellers are equidistant from the other Irish samples, showing their Irish origins and population history. The observed genetic differences are thus a reflection of genetic drift, and there is no evidence of any external gene flow.

  5. DRIFT-INDUCED PERPENDICULAR TRANSPORT OF SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsh, M. S.; Dalla, S.; Kelly, J.; Laitinen, T., E-mail: mike.s.marsh@gmail.com [Jeremiah Horrocks Institute, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, PR1 2HE (United Kingdom)

    2013-09-01

    Drifts are known to play a role in galactic cosmic ray transport within the heliosphere and are a standard component of cosmic ray propagation models. However, the current paradigm of solar energetic particle (SEP) propagation holds the effects of drifts to be negligible, and they are not accounted for in most current SEP modeling efforts. We present full-orbit test particle simulations of SEP propagation in a Parker spiral interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), which demonstrate that high-energy particle drifts cause significant asymmetric propagation perpendicular to the IMF. Thus in many cases the assumption of field-aligned propagation of SEPs may not be valid. We show that SEP drifts have dependencies on energy, heliographic latitude, and charge-to-mass ratio that are capable of transporting energetic particles perpendicular to the field over significant distances within interplanetary space, e.g., protons of initial energy 100 MeV propagate distances across the field on the order of 1 AU, over timescales typical of a gradual SEP event. Our results demonstrate the need for current models of SEP events to include the effects of particle drift. We show that the drift is considerably stronger for heavy ion SEPs due to their larger mass-to-charge ratio. This paradigm shift has important consequences for the modeling of SEP events and is crucial to the understanding and interpretation of in situ observations.

  6. Quantifying vapor drift of dicamba herbicides applied to soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, J Franklin; Mortensen, David A

    2012-05-01

    Recent advances in biotechnology have produced cultivars of corn, soybean, and cotton resistant to the synthetic-auxin herbicide dicamba. This technology will allow dicamba herbicides to be applied in new crops, at new periods in the growing season, and over greatly expanded areas, including postemergence applications in soybean. From past and current use in corn and small grains, dicamba vapor drift and subsequent crop injury to sensitive broadleaf crops has been a frequent problem. In the present study, the authors measured dicamba vapor drift in the field from postemergence applications to soybean using greenhouse-grown soybean as a bioassay system. They found that when the volatile dimethylamine formulation is applied, vapor drift could be detected at mean concentrations of 0.56 g acid equivalent dicamba/ha (0.1% of the applied rate) at 21 m away from a treated 18.3 × 18.3 m plot. Applying the diglycolamine formulation of dicamba reduced vapor drift by 94.0%. With the dimethylamine formulation, the extent and severity of vapor drift was significantly correlated with air temperature, indicating elevated risks if dimethylamine dicamba is applied early to midsummer in many growing regions. Additional research is needed to more fully understand the effects of vapor drift exposures to nontarget crops and wild plants. PMID:22362509

  7. Darwinian drift: Effects of Wake Vortices and Multiple Obstacles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melkoumian, Sergei; Protas, Bartosz

    2015-11-01

    When a body passes through an unbounded fluid, it induces a net displacement of fluid particles. The difference between the initial and final positions of a fluid particle is defined as the Darwinian drift and plays an important role in the characterization of the stirring occurring in multiphase flows and in the context of biogenic mixing. Traditional studies of drift have mainly focused on single obstacles moving in a potential flow. In the present investigation we consider the effect of wake vorticity, represented by a pair of Föppl point vortices, and the combined effect of multiple obstacles. The drift in various configurations is determined using methods of complex analysis and careful numerical computations. It is demonstrated that, while the total drift increases with the size of the wake for large vortex strengths, it is actually decreased for small circulation values. We also discuss how the interaction of two obstacles affects the drift in comparison to the case of two isolated obstacles. In particular, we identify the lower and upper bound on the drift due to two identical cylinders. In certain cases our results are supported by asymptotic analysis. A physical explanation of the observed affects is offered in terms of the trajectories of individual particles.

  8. Freak waves in white dwarfs and magnetars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabry, R. [Theoretical Physics Group, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Damietta University, New Damietta 34517 (Egypt); Department of Physics, College of Science and Humanitarian Studies, Salman bin Abdulaziz University, Alkharj (Saudi Arabia); International Centre for Advanced Studies in Physical Sciences, Faculty of Physics and Astronomy, Ruhr University Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Moslem, W. M. [International Centre for Advanced Studies in Physical Sciences, Faculty of Physics and Astronomy, Ruhr University Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Port Said University, Port Said (Egypt); Centre for Theoretical Physics, The British University in Egypt (BUE), El-Shorouk City, Cairo (Egypt); Shukla, P. K. [International Centre for Advanced Studies in Physical Sciences, Faculty of Physics and Astronomy, Ruhr University Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and Center for Energy Research, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

    2012-12-15

    We report properties of ion acoustic freak waves that propagate in a plasma composed of warm ions and ultrarelativistic electrons and positrons. The dynamics of the nonlinear freak waves is governed by the nonlinear Schroedinger equation. The possible region for the freak waves to exist is defined precisely for typical parameters of white dwarfs and magnetars corona. It is found that for low wave number, the nonlinear ion-acoustic wave packets are structurally stable in magnetars corona than in white dwarfs. However, for large wave numbers the situation is opposite. The critical wave number threshold (k{sub c}), which indicates where the modulational instability sets in, is defined for both applications. It is seen that near to k{sub c} the freak wave amplitude becomes high, but it decreases whenever we stepped away from k{sub c}. For the wave numbers close to k{sub c}, the increase of the unperturbed density ratio of positrons-to-electrons ({beta}) would lead to increase the freak wave amplitude, but for larger wave numbers the amplitude decreases with the increase of {beta}.

  9. Spray Deposition and Drift Characteristics of a Low Drift Nozzle for Aerial Application at Different Application Altitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    A complex interaction of controllable and uncontrollable factors is involved in aerial application of crop production and protection materials. Although it is difficult to completely characterize spray deposition and drift, these important factors can be estimated with appropriate sampling protocol ...

  10. RIA Superconducting Drift Tube Linac R & D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Popielarski; J. Bierwagen; S. Bricker; C. Compton; J. DeLauter; P. Glennon; T. Grimm; W. Hartung; D. Harvell; M. Hodek; M. Johnson; F. Marti; P. Miller; A. Moblo; D. Norton; L. Popielarski; J. Wlodarczak; R. C. York; A. Zeller

    2009-05-22

    Cavity and cryomodule development work for a superconducting ion linac has been underway for several years at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory. The original application of the work was the proposed Rare Isotope Accelerator. At present, the work is being continued for use with the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB). The baseline linac for FRIB requires 4 types of superconducting cavities to cover the velocity range needed to accelerate an ion beam to 200 MeV/u: 2 types of quarter-wave resonator (QWR) and 2 types of half-wave resonator (HWR). Superconducting solenoids are used for focussing. Active and passive shielding is required to ensure that the solenoids’ field does not degrade the cavity performance. First prototypes of both QWR types and one HWR type have been fabricated and tested. A prototype solenoid has been procured and tested. A test cryomodule has been fabricated and tested. The test cryomodule contains one QWR, one HWR, one solenoid, and one super-ferric quadrupole. This report covers the design, fabrication, and testing of this cryomodule

  11. Drifting solutions with elliptic symmetry for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations with density-dependent viscosity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Hongli, E-mail: kaixinguoan@163.com [College of Science, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China); Yuen, Manwai, E-mail: nevetsyuen@hotmail.com [Department of Mathematics and Information Technology, The Hong Kong Institute of Education, 10 Po Ling Road, Tai Po, New Territories (Hong Kong)

    2014-05-15

    In this paper, we investigate the analytical solutions of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations with dependent-density viscosity. By using the characteristic method, we successfully obtain a class of drifting solutions with elliptic symmetry for the Navier-Stokes model wherein the velocity components are governed by a generalized Emden dynamical system. In particular, when the viscosity variables are taken the same as Yuen [M. W. Yuen, “Analytical solutions to the Navier-Stokes equations,” J. Math. Phys. 49, 113102 (2008)], our solutions constitute a generalization of that obtained by Yuen. Interestingly, numerical simulations show that the analytical solutions can be used to explain the drifting phenomena of the propagation wave like Tsunamis in oceans.

  12. Evaluation of neutrino masses from $m_{\\beta\\beta}$ values

    CERN Document Server

    Khrushchov, V V

    2008-01-01

    A neutrino mass matrix is considered under conditions of the CP invariance and the negligible reactor mixing $\\theta_{13}$ angle. Absolute mass values for three neutrinos are evaluated in normal and inverted hierarchy spectra on the ground of data for oscillation mixing neutrino parameters and effective neutrino mass entering into a probability of neutrinoless two beta decay $m_{\\beta\\beta}$ values.

  13. Trichoderma .beta.-glucosidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2006-01-03

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl3, and the corresponding BGL3 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL3, recombinant BGL3 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  14. Applied Beta Dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rich, B.L.

    1986-01-01

    Measurements of beta and/or nonpenetrating exposure results is complicated and past techniques and capabilities have resulted in significant inaccuracies in recorded results. Current developments have resulted in increased capabilities which make the results more accurate and should result in less total exposure to the work force. Continued development of works in progress should provide equivalent future improvements.

  15. Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay

    CERN Document Server

    Päs, Heinrich

    2015-01-01

    We review the potential to probe new physics with neutrinoless double beta decay $(A,Z) \\to (A,Z+2) + 2 e^-$. Both the standard long-range light neutrino mechanism as well as short-range mechanisms mediated by heavy particles are discussed. We also stress aspects of the connection to lepton number violation at colliders and the implications for baryogenesis.

  16. Spray drift of reducing nozzle types spraying a bare soil surface with a boom sprayer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zande, van de J.C.; Michielsen, J.G.P.; Stallinga, H.; Velde, van P.

    2014-01-01

    In the Netherlands spray drift reduction measures are obligatory when spraying alongside waterways. Drift Reducing Technology (DRT) is certified through standardised spray drift measurements in the field and by means of the classification of drift reducing nozzle types in the laboratory. Approved DR

  17. Interferon Beta-1b Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interferon beta-1b injection is used to reduce episodes of symptoms in patients with relapsing-remitting (course ... and problems with vision, speech, and bladder control). Interferon beta-1b is in a class of medications ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: beta thalassemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Disease Control and Prevention Centre for Genetics Education (Australia) Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory: Your Genes Your Health Disease InfoSearch: Beta Thalassemia Genomics Education Programme (UK) MalaCards: dominant beta-thalassemia Merck Manual ...

  19. Laminated wave turbulence: Generic algorithms iii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartashova, Elena; Kartashov, Alexey

    2007-07-01

    Model of laminated wave turbulence allows to study statistical and discrete layers of turbulence in the frame of the same model. Statistical layer is described by Zakharov-Kolmogorov energy spectra in the case of irrational enough dispersion function. Discrete layer is covered by some system(s) of Diophantine equations while their form is determined by wave dispersion function. This presents a very special computational challenge to solve Diophantine equations in many variables, usually 6 to 8, in high degrees, say 16, in integers of order 1016 and more. Generic algorithms for solving this problem in the case of irrational dispersion function have been presented in our previous papers (corresponds to many types of water waves). In this paper, we present a new algorithm for the case of rational dispersion functions (atmospheric planetary waves, drift waves, etc.)

  20. Beta emitters and radiation protection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jødal, Lars

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Beta emitters, such as 90Y, are increasingly being used for cancer treatment. However, beta emitters demand other precautions than gamma emitters during preparation and administration, especially concerning shielding. AIM. To discuss practical precautions for handling beta emitters...... on the outside of the primary shielding material. If suitable shielding is used and larger numbers of handlings are divided among several persons, then handling of beta emitters can be a safe procedure....