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Sample records for beta compact toroid

  1. Confinement and heating of high beta plasma with emphasis on compact toroids. Compact toroid research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two older projects associated with very high energy density plasmas, specifically the High Density Field Reversed Configuration and the Liner Plasma Compression Experiment, have been completed. Attention has been turned to compact toroid experiments of more conventional density, and three experiments have been initiated. These include the Coaxial Slow Source Experiment, the Variable Length FRC Experiment, and Variable Angle CthetaP Experiment. In each case, the project was begun in order to provide basic plasma physics information on specific unresolved issues of progammatic importance to the national CT Program

  2. Ideal magnetohydrodynamic simulations of low beta compact toroid injection into a hot strongly magnetized plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Wei [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hsu, Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Li, Hui [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    We present results from three-dimensional ideal magnetohydrodynamic simulations of low {beta} compact toroid (CT) injection into a hot strongly magnetized plasma, with the aim of providing insight into CT fueling of a tokamak with parameters relevant for ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor). A regime is identified in terms of CT injection speed and CT-to-background magnetic field ratio that appears promising for precise core fueling. Shock-dominated regimes, which are probably unfavorable for tokamak fueling, are also identified. The CT penetration depth is proportional to the CT injection speed and density. The entire CT evolution can be divided into three stages: (1) initial penetration, (2) compression in the direction of propagation and reconnection, and (3) coming to rest and spreading in the direction perpendicular to injection. Tilting of the CT is not observed due to the fast transit time of the CT across the background plasma.

  3. Confinement and heating of high beta plasmas with emphasis on compact toroids: Final progress report period ending February 15, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes work performed at the University of Washington Aerospace and Energetics Research Program involving the ''compact toroid'' approach to magenetic confinement of plasmas. The five experiments comprising the effort are: The coaxial slow source experiment; the CSS project; the variable length experiment; the merging spheromak experiment; and the variable angle conical theta pinch experiment

  4. Development of compact toroids injector for direct plasma controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of the compact toroids injector for direct plasma controls has been investigated. The compact toroids injection can fuel particles directly into the core of the plasma and modify the plasma profiles at the desired locations. The acceleration tests of the compact toroids have been conducted at Himeji Institute of Technology. The tests showed that the hydrogen compact toroid was accelerated up to 80km/s and the plasma density of the compact toroid was compressed to 1.2 x 1021m-3. (orig.)

  5. Compact toroid injection into C-2U

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Thomas; Gota, H.; Garate, E.; Asai, T.; Matsumoto, T.; Sekiguchi, J.; Putvinski, S.; Allfrey, I.; Beall, M.; Cordero, M.; Granstedt, E.; Kinley, J.; Morehouse, M.; Sheftman, D.; Valentine, T.; Waggoner, W.; the TAE Team

    2015-11-01

    Sustainment of an advanced neutral beam-driven FRC for a period in excess of 5 ms is the primary goal of the C-2U machine at Tri Alpha Energy. In addition, a criteria for long-term global sustainment of any magnetically confined fusion reactor is particle refueling. To this end, a magnetized coaxial plasma-gun has been developed. Compact toroids (CT) are to be injected perpendicular to the axial magnetic field of C-2U. To simulate this environment, an experimental test-stand has been constructed. A transverse magnetic field of B ~ 1 kG is established (comparable to the C-2U axial field) and CTs are fired across it. As a minimal requirement, the CT must have energy density greater than that of the magnetic field it is to penetrate, i.e., 1/2 ρv2 >=B2 / 2μ0 . This criteria is easily met and indeed the CTs traverse the test-stand field. A preliminary experiment on C-2U shows the CT also capable of penetrating into FRC plasmas and refueling is observed resulting in a 20 - 30% increase in total particle number per single-pulsed CT injection. Results from test-stand and C-2U experiments will be presented.

  6. Sawtooth Instability in the Compact Toroidal Hybrid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herfindal, J. L.; Maurer, D. A.; Hartwell, G. J.; Ennis, D. A.; Knowlton, S. F.

    2015-11-01

    Sawtooth instabilities have been observed in the Compact Toroidal Hybrid (CTH), a current-carrying stellarator/tokamak hybrid device. The sawtooth instability is driven by ohmic heating of the core plasma until the safety factor drops below unity resulting in the growth of an m = 1 kink-tearing mode. Experiments varying the vacuum rotational transform from 0.02 to 0.13 are being conducted to study sawtooth property dependance on vacuum flux surface structure. The frequency of the sawtooth oscillations increase from 2 kHz to 2.8 kHz solely due the decrease in rise time of the oscillation, the crash time is unchanged. CTH has three two-color SXR cameras, a three-channel 1mm interferometer, and a new bolometer system capable of detecting the signatures of sawtooth instabilities. The new bolometer system consists of two cameras, each containing a pair of diode arrays viewing the plasma directly or through a beryllium filter. Electron temperature measurements are found with the two-color SXR cameras through a ratio of the SXR intensities. Impurity radiation can drastically affect the electron temperature measurement, therefore new filters consisting of aluminum and carbon were selected to avoid problematic line radiation while maximizing the signal for a 100 eV plasma. This work is supported by U.S. Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG02-00ER54610.

  7. Compact-Toroid development: status and technical needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document contains the description, goals, status, plans, and strategy for the technical development of a class of magnetic confinement configurations collectively identified as Compact Toroids. This component of the magnetic fusion development program has been characterized by its potential for physical compactness and range of output power

  8. Experimental study of high beta toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments on the Wisconsin Levitated Toroidal Octupole have produced a wide range of stable high β plasmas with β significantly above single fluid MHD theory predictions. A stable β approx. 8% plasma, twice the fluid limit, is obtained with 5 rho/sub i/ approx. L/sub n/ and tau/sub β/ approx. = 6000 tau/sub Alfven/ = 600 μsec. The enhanced stability is explained with a kinetic treatment that includes the effect of finite ion gyroradius which couples the ballooning mode to an ion drift wave. In a more collisional, large gyroradius (2 rho/sub i/ approx. L/sub n/) regime, a stable β approx. 35% plasma is obtained with a decay time of 1000 Alfven times. Measurement of the equilibrium magnetic field in this regime indicates that the diamagnetic current density is five times smaller than predicted by ideal MHD, probably due to ion gyroviscosity. Particle transport is anomalous and ranges from agreement with the classical diffusion rate at the highest beta, lowest field plasma (B/sub P/ = 200 G), to thirteen times the classical rate in a β=11%, high field plasma (B/sub P/ = 860 G) where the level of enhancement increase with magnetic field. Fluctuations in density, electrostatic potential, and magnetic field have been studied in plasmas with β from 0.1% to 40%

  9. Theoretical studies of non inductive current drive in compact toroids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farengo, R; Lifschitz, AF; Caputi, KI; Arista, NR; Clemente, RA

    2002-01-01

    Three non inductive current drive methods that can be applied to compact toroids axe studied. The use of neutral beams to drive current in field reversed configurations and spheromaks is studied using a Monte Carlo code that includes a complete ionization package and follows the exact particle orbit

  10. Compact toroid development. Resource needs for field reversed configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document contains the goals and technical approach for the five years 1985 to 1990 for the investigation of the properties of a magnetic configuration for plasma confinement identified as the field reversed configuration (FRC). The included material represents the third phase of FRC program planning. The first was reported in DOE/ER-0160: Compact Toroid Development, Status and Technical Needs, February 1983. The second was reported in DOE/ER-0197: Compact Toroid Development, Activity Plans for Field Reversed Configurations, June 1984. This planning identifies the facilities and resources needed to achieve the goals set forth in the first two phases. The information in this document is based on technical recommendations provided by the FRC community

  11. Two novel compact toroidal concepts with Stellarator features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two novel compact toroidal concepts are presented. One is the Stellarator-Spheromak (SSP) and another is the Extreme-Low-Aspect-Ratio Stellarator (ELARS). An SSP device represents a hybrid between a spherical stellarator (SS) and a spheromak. This configuration retains the main advantages of spheromaks ans has a potential for improving the spheromak concept regarding its main problems. The MHD equilibrium in an SSP with very high β of the confined plasma is demonstrated. Another concept, ELARS, represents an extreme limit of the SS approach, and considers devices with stellarator features and aspect ratios A ∼ 1. We have succeeded in finding ELARS configurations with extremely compact, modular, and simple design compatible with significant rotational transform, large plasma volume, and good particle transport characteristics

  12. Compact toroid development: activity plan for field reversed configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document contains the description, goals, status, plans, and approach for the investigation of the properties of a magnetic configuration for plasma confinement identified as the field reversed configuration (FRC). This component of the magnetic fusion development program has been characterized by its potential for physical compactness and a flexible range of output power. The included material represents the second phase of FRC program planning. The first was completed in February 1983, and was reported in DOE/ER-0160; Compact Toroid Development. This planning builds on that previous report and concentrates on the detailed plans for the next several years of the current DOE sponsored program. It has been deliberately restricted to the experimental and theoretical efforts possible within the present scale of effort. A third phase of this planning exercise will examine the subsequent effort and resources needed to achieve near term (1987 to 1990) FRC technical objectives

  13. Dynamic processes in field-reversed-configuration compact toroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this lecture, the dynamic processes involved in field-reversed configuration (FRC) formation, translation, and compression will be reviewed. Though the FRC is related to the field-reversed mirror concept, the formation method used in most experiments is a variant of the field-reversed Θ-pinch. Formation of the FRC eqilibrium occurs rapidly, usually in less than 20 μs. The formation sequence consists of several coupled processes: preionization; radial implosion and compression; magnetic field line closure; axial contraction; equilibrium formation. Recent experiments and theory have led to a significantly improved understanding of these processes; however, the experimental method still relies on a somewhat empirical approach which involves the optimization of initial preionization plasma parameters and symmetry. New improvements in FRC formation methods include the use of lower voltages which extrapolate better to larger devices. The axial translation of compact toroid plasmas offers an attractive engineering convenience in a fusion reactor. FRC translation has been demonstrated in several experiments worldwide, and these plasmas are found to be robust, moving at speeds up to the Alfven velocity over distances of up to 16 m, with no degradation in the confinement. Compact toroids are ideal for magnetic compression. Translated FRCs have been compressed and heated by imploding liners. Upcoming experiments will rely on external flux compression to heat a translater FRC at 1-GW power levels. 39 refs

  14. A short introduction to the status and motivation for reversed field pinch and compact toroid research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potential commercial fusion power systems must be acceptable from a safety and environmental standpoint. They must also promise to be competitive with other sources of energy (i.e., fossil, fission, etc.) when considered from the standpoint of the cost of electricity (COE) and the unit direst cost (UDC) in ($/kWe). These costs are affected by a host of factors including recirculating power, plant availability, construction time, capital cost etc., and are, thus, influenced by technological complexity. In a attempt to meet these requirements, the emphasis of fusion research in the United States has been moving toward smaller, lower-cost systems. There is increased interest in higher beta tokamaks and stellarators, and in compact alternate concepts such as the Reversed Field Pinch (RFP) and the Compact Toroids (CTs) which are, in part, the subject of this paper

  15. Confinement and heating of high-beta plasmas with emphasis on compact toroids, Task II: high-beta Q-machine experiment. Annual report, period ending May 31, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes work done on the high-beta Q machine (HBQM), which is a 3-meter long, low-compression theta pinch with a 22-cm diameter segmented compression coil with a minimum axial peridicity length of 10 cm. The main activities are low-density field-reversed cell formation and radiofrequency fast-wave heating experiment on a zero-bias plasma column. In addition we report further engineering improvements on the HBQM and on the digital data acquisition system

  16. Multiple-applications of Accelerated Compact Toroid Injection for MFE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, David; Horton, Robert; Evans, Russell; Liu, Fei; Zhu, Ben; Hong, Sean; Buchenauer, Dean

    2010-11-01

    The CTIX experiment has explored the potential applications of launching a fast moving magnetized compact toroid for Magnetic Fusion experiments. These applications include central fueling of a MFE device such as tokamaks, stellarators, etc. At present, the UC Davis CTIX accelerator has achieved densities at mid to upper 10^15 per cc, at speeds reaching over 200 km/sec. In order to meet the parameters of even larger fusion devices, the technology of the accelerator needs to incorporate the latest plasma wall interaction findings. As a result of the next step in CT development, UC Davis will be collaborating with the Fusion Technology group at Sandia National Laboratory in Livermore California. We will be designing new plasmas facing electrodes that can reduce electrode impurities and increase electrode lifetime. In addition to producing high density CTs, we will include the updated conical compression results from our previous installed drift section compressor. In addition of the MFE applications, the ability to enhance the CT density, fields as well as speed can be useful to other fusion areas such as MIF, etc.

  17. Behavior of Compact Toroid in the External Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukumoto, N.; Ioroi, A.; Nagata, M.; Uyama, T.

    1999-11-01

    We have investigated the possibility of refueling and density control of tokamak plasmas by the spheromak-type Compact Toroid (CT) injection in the JFT-2M tokamak in collaboration with JAERI. We demonstrated the CT injection into OH plasmas and observed the core penetration at B_T=0.8 T. The tokamak electron density increased ~0.2× 10^19m-3 at a rate of 2× 10^21m-3/s. We also observed the decrease of the CT velocity by the external magnetic field of the tokamak, which is applied across the CT acceleration region. We have examined the behavior of the CT translated in the external fields B_ext using the magnetic probes and the fast framing camera at Himeji Inst. of tech.. CT plasma in the acceleration region is deformed by the Lorentz force of Jg × B_ext, where Jg is the gun current for CT acceleration. The magnetic field structures of a long CT in the drift region has been revealed to be the mixed relaxed state of m=0 and m=1. Results from CT acceleration and injection in a transverse field will be presented.

  18. Control of Compact-Toroid Characteristics by External Copper Shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, T.; Sekiguchi, J.; Asai, T.; Gota, H.; Roche, T.; Allfrey, I.; Cordero, M.; Garate, E.; Kinley, J.; Valentine, T.; Waggoner, W.; the TAE Team

    2015-11-01

    A collaborative research project by Tri Alpha Energy and Nihon University has been conducted for several years, which led to the development of a new compact toroid (CT) injector for efficient FRC particle refueling in the C-2U experiment. The CT is formed by a magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG), consisting of coaxial cylindrical electrodes. In CT formation via MCPG, the magnetic helicity content of the generated CT is one of the critical parameters. A bias coil is inserted into the inner electrode to generate a poloidal flux. The resultant bias magnetic field is spread out of MCPG with time due to its low-frequency bias current. To obtain a more effectively distributed bias magnetic field as well as to improve the voltage breakdown between electrodes, the MCPG incorporates a novel ~ 1 mm thick copper shell mounted outside of the outer electrode. This allows for reliable and controlled operation and more robust CT generation. A detailed discussion of the copper shell and experimental test results will be presented.

  19. Development of Compact Toroid Injector for C-2 FRCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Tadafumi; Sekiguchi, Junichi; Asai, Tomohiko; Gota, Hiroshi; Garate, Eusebio; Allfrey, Ian; Valentine, Travis; Smith, Brett; Morehouse, Mark; TAE Team

    2014-10-01

    Collaborative research project with Tri Alpha Energy has been started and we have developed a new compact toroid (CT) injector for the C-2 device, mainly for fueling field-reversed configurations (FRCs). The CT is formed by a magnetized coaxial plasma-gun (MCPG), which consists of coaxial cylinder electrodes; a spheromak-like plasma is generated by discharge and pushed out from the gun by Lorentz force. The inner diameter of outer electrode is 83.1 mm and the outer diameter of inner electrode is 54.0 mm. The surface of the inner electrode is coated with tungsten in order to reduce impurities coming out from the electrode. The bias coil is mounted inside of the inner electrode. We have recently conducted test experiments and achieved a supersonic CT translation speed of up to ~100 km/s. Other typical plasma parameters are as follows: electron density ~ 5 × 1021 m-3, electron temperature ~ 40 eV, and the number of particles ~0.5-1.0 × 1019. The CT injector is now planned to be installed on C-2 and the first CT injection experiment will be conducted in the near future. The detailed MCPG design as well as the test experimental results will be presented.

  20. Proceedings of the third symposium on the physics and technology of compact toroids in the magnetic fusion energy program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document contains papers contributed by the participants of the Third Symposium on Physics and Technology of Compact Toroids in the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program. Subjects include reactor aspects of compact toroids, energetic particle rings, spheromak configurations (a mixture of toroidal and poloidal fields), and field-reversed configurations

  1. Proceedings of the third symposium on the physics and technology of compact toroids in the magnetic fusion energy program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siemon, R.E. (comp.)

    1981-03-01

    This document contains papers contributed by the participants of the Third Symposium on Physics and Technology of Compact Toroids in the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program. Subjects include reactor aspects of compact toroids, energetic particle rings, spheromak configurations (a mixture of toroidal and poloidal fields), and field-reversed configurations (FRC's that contain purely poloidal field).

  2. Use of field-reversed compact plasma toroids for tokamak plasma make-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Main requirements to the parameters of compact plasma toroids, injection of which into tokamak plasma can be used for fuel make-up, are considered. The numeric modelling results attest that minimum disturbances of tokamak magnetic configuration can be expected when the injection direction is close to torus tangent line. In addition, an experimental device SAPFIR used for studying the formation of toroids of high value at plasma accelerators is described briefly. 7 refs.; 3 figs

  3. Stability of toroidally compact Kaluza-Klein theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blau, S.K.; Guendelman, E.I.; Taormina, A.; Wijewardhana, L.C.R.

    1984-08-23

    The authors study the stability at the one loop level, of finite temperature Kaluza-Klein theories coupled to matter fields. They restrict their attention to space-times containing compact manifolds which are toruses and Klein bottles. If the cosmological constant is chosen so that the effective potential vanishes at its minimum, and if twisted bosons or untwisted fermions are introduced into the theory, then these space-times are stable below a critical temperature of the order of the particle masses. The authors also discuss some subtleties that arise when Fermi fields are defined on non-simply connected manifolds.

  4. On the stability of toroidally compact Kaluza-Klein theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blau, S. K.; Guendelman, E. I.; Taormina, A.; Wijewardhana, L. C. R.

    1984-08-01

    We study the stability ar the one loop level, of finite temperature Kaluza-Klein theories coupled to matter fields. We restrict our attention to space-times containing compact manifolds which are toruses and Klein bottles. If the cosmological constant is chosen so that the effective potential vanishes at its minimum, and if twisted bosons or untwisted fermions are introduced into the theory, then these space-times are stable below a critical temperature of the order of the particle masses. We also discuss some subtleties that arises when Fermi fields are defined on non-simply connected manifolds.

  5. Stability of toroidally compact Kaluza-Klein theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blau, S.K.; Guendelman, E.I.; Wijewardhana, L.C.R. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge (USA). Lab. for Nuclear Science; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge (USA). Dept. of Physics); Taormina, A. (Mons Univ. (Belgium). Faculte des Sciences)

    1984-08-23

    We study the stability at the one loop level, of finite temperature Kaluza-Klein theories coupled to matter fields. We restrict our attention to space-times containing compact manifolds which are toruses and Klein bottles. If the cosmological constant is chosen so that the effective potential vanishes at its minimum, and if twisted bosons or untwisted fermions are introduced into the theory, then these space-times are stable below a critical temperature of the order of the particle masses. We also discuss some subtleties that arise when Fermi fields are defined on non-simply connected manifolds.

  6. Finite beta and compressibility effects on stability of resistive modes in toroidal geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leboeuf, J.-N.G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Kurita, Gen-ichi

    1998-03-01

    Linear resistive stability results obtained from the toroidal magnetohydrodynamic codes FAR developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in United States of America and AEOLUS developed at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute are compared for carefully constructed benchmark profiles and parameters. These are unstable to a tearing mode with toroidal mode number n=1. The eigenvalues and eigenfunctions calculated with both codes are in close agreement and show that the effect of compressibility is weak for these modes. The effect of finite plasma beta is considered, and the eigenvalues calculated by the FAR and AEOLUS codes also show good agreement. It is shown that the finite beta has a stabilizing effect on the toroidal tearing mode, but that the compressibility also has little effect on finite beta tearing modes. (author)

  7. Demountable Toroidal Field Magnets for Use in a Compact Modular Fusion Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangiarotti, F. J.; Goh, J.; Takayasu, M.; Bromberg, L.; Minervini, J. V.; Whyte, D.

    2014-05-01

    A concept of demountable toroidal field magnets for a compact fusion reactor is discussed. The magnets generate a magnetic field of 9.2 T on axis, in a 3.3 m major radius tokamak. Subcooled YBCO conductors have a critical current density adequate to provide this large magnetic field, while operating at 20 K reduces thermodynamic cooling cost of the resistive electrical joints. Demountable magnets allow for vertical replacement and maintenance of internal components, potentially reducing cost and time of maintenance when compared to traditional sector maintenance. Preliminary measurements of contact resistance of a demountable YBCO electrical joint between are presented.

  8. Observations of toroidal and poloidal rotation in the high beta tokamak Torus II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The macroscopic rotation of plasma in a toroidal containment device is an important feature of the equilibrium. Toroidal and poloidal rotation in the high beta tokamak Torus II is measured experimentally by examining the Doppler shift of the 4685.75 A He II line emitted from the plasma. The toroidal flow at an average velocity of 1.6 x 106 cm/sec, a small fraction of the ion thermal speed, moves in the same direction as the toroidal plasma current. The poloidal flow follows the ion diamagnetic current direction, also at an average speed of 1.6 x 106 cm/sec. In view of certain ordering parameters, the toroidal flow is compared with predictions from neoclassical theory in the collosional, Pfirsch-Schluter regime. The poloidal motion, however results from an E x B drift in a positive radial electric field, approaching a stable ambipolar state. This radial electric field is determined from theory by using the measured poloidal velocity. Mechanisms for the time evolution of rotation are also examined. It appears that the circulation damping is governed by a global decay of the temperature and density gradients which, in turn, may be functions of radiative cooling, loss of equilibrium due to external field decay, or the emergence of a growing instability, occasionally observed in CO2 interferometry measurements

  9. Summary of US-Japan Exchange 2004 New Directions and Physics for Compact Toroids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Intrator, T; Nagata, M; Hoffman, A; Guo, H; Steinhauer, L; Ryutov, D; Miller, R; Okada, S

    2005-08-15

    This exchange workshop was an open meeting coordinated by the P-24 Plasma Physics Group at Los Alamos National Laboratory. We brought together scientists from institutions in the US and Japan who are researching the various and complementary types of Compact Toroids (CT). Many concepts, including both experimental and theoretical investigations, are represented. The range spans Field Reversed Configuration (FRC), spheromak, Reversed Field Pinch (RFP), spherical tokamaks, linear devices dedicated to fundamental physics studies, and hybrid transitions that bridge multiple configurations. The participants represent facilities on which significant experiments are now underway: FRC Injection experiment (FIX), Translation Confinement experiment (TCS), Nihon-University Compact Torus Experiment (NUCTE), HITSI (Helicity Injection experiment, Steady Inductive Helicity Injection (HIT-SIHI)), Field Reversed Configuration experiment-Liner (FRX-L), TS-3/4, Sustained Spheromak Experiment (SSPX), Relaxation Scaling Experiment (RSX), HIST, Caltech Spheromak, or in the design process such as MRX-FRC (PPPL), Pulsed High Density experiment (PHD at UW). Several new directions and results in compact toroid (CT) research have recently emerged, including neutral-beam injection, rotating magnetic fields, flux build up from Ohmic boost coils, electrostatic helicity injection techniques, CT injection into other large devices, and high density configurations for applications to magnetized target fusion and translational compression of CT's. CT experimental programs in both the US and Japan have also shown substantial progress in the control and sustainment of CT's. Both in theory and experiment, there is increased emphasis on 3D dynamics, which is also related to astrophysical and space physics issues. 3D data visualization is now frequently used for experimental data display. There was much discussion of the effects of weak toroidal fields in FRC's and possible implications

  10. Global kink and ballooning modes in high-beta systems and stability of toroidal drift modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A numerical code (HBT) has been developed which solves for the equilibrium, global stability and high-n stability of plasmas with arbitrary cross-section. Various plasmas are analysed for their stability to these modes in the high-beta limit. Screw-pinch equilibria are stable to high-n ballooning modes up to betas of 18%. The eigenmode equation for drift waves is analysed numerically. The toroidal branch is shown to be destabilized by the non-adiabatic response of trapped and circulating particles. (author)

  11. Remote replacement of TF [toroidal field] and PF [poloidal field] coils for the compact ignition tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of deuterium-tritium fuel in the Compact Ignition Tokamak will require applying remote handling technology for ex-vessel maintenance and replacement of machine components. Highly activated and contaminated components of the fusion devices auxiliary systems, such as diagnostics and RF heating, must be replaced using remotely operated maintenance equipment in the test cell. In-vessel remote maintenance included replacement of divertor and first wall hardware, faraday shields, and for an in-vessel inspection system. Provision for remote replacement of a vacuum vessel sector, toroidal field coil or poloidal field ring coil was not included in the project baseline. As a result of recent coil failures experienced at a number of facilities, the CIT project decided to reconsider the question of remote recovery from a coil failure and, in January of 1990, initiated a coil replacement study. This study focused on the technical requirements and impact on fusion machine design associated with remote recovery from any coil failure

  12. Divertor detachment, He exhaust and compact toroid injection on TdeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progressive detachment with increasing density is shown to proceed with a marked reduction of the ion flux to the divertor plates, a pressure gradient between a ionization front and the plate, and strong cross-field transport in the divertor. The divertor He exhaust is not affected by detachment although the He enrichment remains low but constant. A moderate density of n-bare ∼ 5 x 1019 m-3 seems to be sufficient both for efficient peak power load reduction at the plate and good He exhaust through the divertor. Simulations indicate possible divertor geometry improvements which will soon be verified experimentally in the new TdeV-96 divertor upgrade. Finally, central fuelling with compact toroid injection is reported with no detrimental effects on the plasma. (author). 16 refs, 8 figs

  13. Development of Multi-pulse Compact Toroid Injector System for C-2U

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allfrey, I.; Garate, E.; Morehouse, M.; Roche, T.; Gota, H.; Valentine, T.; Waggoner, W.; Putvinski, S.; Cordero, M.; Asai, T.; Matsumoto, T.; Sekiguchi, J.; the TAE Team

    2015-11-01

    The C-2U experiment aims at sustaining a dynamically formed field reversed configuration (FRC) for 5 + ms via injection of 10 +MW of neutral beams. One of the systems currently used to refuel the C-2U plasma is a single pulse compact toroid injector (CTI). The CTI is a magnetized co-axial plasma gun, which generates a spheromak-like plasma that is injected into the core of the advanced beam-driven FRC of C-2U. In order to refuel the recent long-lived plasmas in C-2U, a multi-pulse CTI system, whose modular design allows for expandable burst numbers, is being designed. Details of the pulsed power systems used to energize the single pulse and the upgraded multi-pulse CTI will be discussed. Results of injector performance carried out on a dedicated test stand as well as some refueling data on C-2U will also be presented.

  14. Characterization of compact-toroid injection during formation, translation, and field penetration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, T.; Roche, T.; Allfrey, I.; Sekiguchi, J.; Asai, T.; Gota, H.; Cordero, M.; Garate, E.; Kinley, J.; Valentine, T.; Waggoner, W.; Binderbauer, M.; Tajima, T.

    2016-11-01

    We have developed a compact toroid (CT) injector system for particle refueling of the advanced beam-driven C-2U field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasma. The CT injector is a magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG), and the produced CT must cross the perpendicular magnetic field surrounding the FRC for the refueling of C-2U. To simulate this environment, an experimental test stand has been constructed. A transverse magnetic field of ˜1 kG is established, which is comparable to the C-2U axial magnetic field in the confinement section, and CTs are fired across it. On the test stand we have been characterizing and studying CT formation, ejection/translation from the MCPG, and penetration into transverse magnetic fields.

  15. Elastic-plastic analysis of the toroidal field coil inner leg of the compact ignition tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elastic-plastic analyses were made for the inner leg of the Compact Ignition Tokamak toroidal field (TF) coil, which is made of copper-Inconel composite material. From the result of the elastic-plastic analysis, the effective Young's moduli of the inner leg were determined by the analytical equations. These Young's moduli are useful for the three-dimensional, elastic, overall TF coil analysis. Comparison among the results of the baseline design (R = 1.324 m), the bucked pressless design, the 1.527-m major radius design, and the 1.6-m major radius design was also made, based on the elastic-plastic TF coil inner leg analyses

  16. High-beta equilibria in tokamaks with pressure anisotropy and toroidal flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layden, B.; Hole, M. J.; Ridden-Harper, R.

    2015-12-01

    We extend previous analytical calculations of 2D high-β equilibria in order-unity aspect ratio tokamaks with toroidal flow to include pressure anisotropy, assuming guiding-center theory for a bi-Maxwellian plasma and the ideal MHD Ohm's law. Equilibrium solutions are obtained in the core region (which fills most of the plasma volume) and the boundary layer. We find that pressure anisotropy with p∥>p⊥ ( p∥Ωmin ) were previously found to suppress the field-free region (diamagnetic hole) that exists in static isotropic high-β equilibria. We find that all equilibrium solutions with pressure anisotropy suppress the diamagnetic hole. For the static case with a volume-averaged toroidal beta of 70%, plasmas with max (p∥/p⊥)>α1=1.07 have equilibrium solutions. We find that α1 decreases with increasing toroidal flow speed, and above the flow threshold Ωmin we find α1=1 , so that all p∥>p⊥ plasmas have equilibrium solutions. On the other hand, for p∥p⊥ , while the converse is true for p∥

  17. Formation of compact toroidal plasmas by magnetized coaxial plasma gun injection into an oblate flux conserver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Initial results are reported on the formation of compact toroidal plasmas in an oblate shaped metallic flux conserver. A schematic of the experimental apparatus is shown. The plasma injector is a coaxial plasma gun with solenoid coils wound on the inner and outer electrodes. The electrode length is 100 cm, the diameter of the inner (outer) electrode is 19.3 cm (32.4 cm). Deuterium gas is puffed into the region between electrodes by eight pulsed valves located on the outer electrode 50 cm from the end of the gun. The gun injects into a cylindrically symmetrical copper shell (wall thickness = 1.6 mm) which acts as a flux conserver for the time scale of experiments reported here. The copper shell consists of a transition cylinder 30 cm long, 34 cm in diameter, a cylindrical oblate pill box 40 cm long, 75 cm in diameter and a downstream cylinder 30 cm long, 30 cm in diameter. The gap between the gun and transition cylinder is 6 cm. An axial array of coils outside the vacuum chamber can be used to establish an initial uniform bias field

  18. First Results from a Coherence Imaging Diagnostic for the Compact Toroidal Hybrid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennis, D. A.; Hartwell, G. J.; Johnson, C. A.; Maurer, D. A.; Allen, S. L.

    2015-11-01

    An optical coherence imaging diagnostic is being commissioned for time-resolved measurements (~ 10 ms) of ion emissivity, velocity, and temperature in the Compact Toroidal Hybrid (CTH) experiment. The Coherence Imaging (CI) technique measures the spectral coherence of an emission line with an imaging interferometer of fixed delay. CI has a number of advantages when compared to dispersive Doppler spectroscopy, including higher throughput and the capability to provide 2D spectral images, making it advantageous for investigating the non-axisymmetric geometry of CTH plasmas. A spectral survey of the visible and ultraviolet emission for a range of CTH discharges has identified helium and carbon impurity lines that will be utilized for CI measurements in CTH. First CI measurements of He II (468.6 nm) emission from CTH plasmas will be presented along with interferograms from a calibration light source and details of the instrument design. Results from this diagnostic will aid in characterizing the equilibrium ion parameters in both the edge and core of CTH plasmas for planned island divertor and MHD mode-locking experiments. Work supported by USDoE grant DE-FG02-00ER54610.

  19. Thomson scattering diagnostic system design for the Compact Toroidal Hybrid experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traverso, P. J., E-mail: pjt0002@auburn.edu; Maurer, D. A.; Ennis, D. A.; Hartwell, G. J.; Goforth, M. M.; Loch, S. D.; Pearce, A. J.; Cianciosa, M. R. [Physics Department, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama 36849 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    A new Thomson scattering system using standard commercially available components has been designed for the non-axisymmetric plasmas of the Compact Toroidal Hybrid (CTH). The beam, generated by a frequency doubled Continuum PL DLS 2 J Nd:YAG laser, is passed vertically through an entrance Brewster window and an aperturing baffle system to minimize the stray laser light that could enter the collection optics. The beam line has been designed with an 8 m propagation distance to the mid-plane of the CTH device with the beam diameter kept less than 3 mm inside the plasma volume. The beam exits the vacuum system through another Brewster window and enters a beam dump, again to minimize the stray light in the vacuum chamber. Light collection, spectral processing, and signal detection are accomplished with an f/#∼ 1 aspheric lens, a commercially available Holospec f/1.8 spectrometer, and an Andor iStar DH740-18U-C3 image intensified camera. Spectral rejection of stray laser light, if needed, can be performed with the use of an optional interference filter at the spectrometer input. The system has been developed for initial single point measurements of plasmas with core electron temperatures of approximately 20–300 eV and densities of 5 × 10{sup 18} to 5 × 10{sup 19} m{sup −3} dependent upon operational scenario.

  20. Design and implementation of a Thomson scattering diagnostic for the Compact Toroidal Hybrid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traverso, P. J.; Maurer, D. A.; Hartwell, G. J.; Knowlton, S. F.; Archmiller, M. C.; Goforth, M. M.

    2013-10-01

    The Compact Toroidal Hybrid (CTH) experiment is investigating the avoidance of disruptions in ohmically driven torsaton plasmas as the ratio of vacuum transform to the total transform is changed. To better characterize these plasmas under this wide range of magnetic configurations, a new Thomson scattering diagnostic is being implemented to measure electron temperature and density profiles. These important internal profile measurements will be incorporated into the V3FIT code to enable better 3D equilibrium reconstruction. The Thomson scattering system uses a frequency doubled Continuum PL DLS 2 J Nd:YaG laser. The incident beam is passed vertically through an entrance Brewster window and a baffle system to minimize stray laser light. The beam exits through another Brewster window to an external beam dump. Polarization optics are planned to maximize the scattered light directed to the collection system for the specific scattering geometry of CTH. This work is supported by the USDoE under grant DE-FG02-00ER54610.

  1. Design and implementation of a Thomson scattering diagnostic for the Compact Toroidal Hybrid Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traverso, P. J.; Maurer, D. A.; Ennis, D. A.; Hartwell, G. J.; Goforth, M. M.; Loch, S. D.; Pearce, A. J.; Cianciosa, M. R.

    2014-10-01

    A Thomson scattering system using standard commercially available components has been designed for the non-axisymmetric plasmas of the Compact Toroidal Hybrid (CTH). The initial system takes a single point measurement and will be used to assess options for an upgrade to a multi-point system providing electron temperature and density profiles. This single point measurement will reduce the uncertainty in the reconstructed peak pressure by an order of magnitude for both ohmically driven, current-carrying plasmas and future gyrotron-heated stellarator plasmas. A principle design goal is to minimize stray laser light, geometrically on the machine side and spectrally on the collection side, to allow measurements of both full and half Thomson scattered spectral profiles. The beam, generated by a frequency doubled Continuum 2 J Nd:YaG laser, is passed vertically through an entrance Brewster window and an aperturing baffle system to minimize stray light. Light collection, spectral processing, and signal detection are accomplished with an f / # ~ 1 aspheric lens, a Holospec f/1.8 spectrometer, and an Andor iStar DH740-18U-C3 image intensified camera. The estimated number of scattered photons per channel will be of the order of 5 ×103 with a signal to noise ratio of S / N = 19 This work is supported by U.S. Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG02-00ER54610.

  2. Spectral characterization of Compact Toroidal Hybrid plasmas in preparation for Thomson scattering measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goforth, M. M.; Loch, S. D.; Maurer, D. A.; Pearce, A. J.; Traverso, P. J.

    2014-10-01

    A Thomson scattering system is in development for the Compact Toroidal Hybrid (CTH) experiment to provide localized, internal electron temperature and density measurements. Thomson scattering yields accurate information on the internal plasma electron pressure profile, which will aid in the equilibrium reconstruction of CTH plasmas using the V3FIT code. The expected Thomson scattered signal is approximately 1015 times less than the incident laser light, and can be overwhelmed by stray laser light, background plasma emission, and intrinsic detector noise. Background plasma emission measurements in the visible spectral region near the planned laser wavelength of 532 nm are underway using a Holospec f/1.8 spectrometer and an And or iStar image intensified CCD camera to quantify line and continuum background levels. In addition, impurity line identification and plans for a separate line-of-sight averaged impurity temperature and density measurement capability employing the Thomson spectrometer are in progress. This work is supported by US DOE Grant DE-FG-02-00ER54610 and by the Auburn University Undergraduate Research Fellowship.

  3. Thomson scattering diagnostic system design for the Compact Toroidal Hybrid experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traverso, P J; Maurer, D A; Ennis, D A; Hartwell, G J; Goforth, M M; Loch, S D; Pearce, A J; Cianciosa, M R

    2014-11-01

    A new Thomson scattering system using standard commercially available components has been designed for the non-axisymmetric plasmas of the Compact Toroidal Hybrid (CTH). The beam, generated by a frequency doubled Continuum PL DLS 2 J Nd:YAG laser, is passed vertically through an entrance Brewster window and an aperturing baffle system to minimize the stray laser light that could enter the collection optics. The beam line has been designed with an 8 m propagation distance to the mid-plane of the CTH device with the beam diameter kept less than 3 mm inside the plasma volume. The beam exits the vacuum system through another Brewster window and enters a beam dump, again to minimize the stray light in the vacuum chamber. Light collection, spectral processing, and signal detection are accomplished with an f/#∼ 1 aspheric lens, a commercially available Holospec f/1.8 spectrometer, and an Andor iStar DH740-18U-C3 image intensified camera. Spectral rejection of stray laser light, if needed, can be performed with the use of an optional interference filter at the spectrometer input. The system has been developed for initial single point measurements of plasmas with core electron temperatures of approximately 20-300 eV and densities of 5 × 10(18) to 5 × 10(19) m(-3) dependent upon operational scenario. PMID:25430265

  4. Active Stability Control of a High-Beta Self-Organized Compact Torus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: A magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG) has been proposed as an effective device for control of a high-beta self-organized compact torus of field-reversed configuration (FRC). The initial results demonstrate that the application of an MCPG suppresses the most prominent FRC instability of the centrifugally-driven interchange mode with toroidal mode number n = 2. This observation was made on the Nihon University Compact Torus Experiment (NUCTE), a flexible theta-pinch-based FRC facility. In the series of experiments, a MCPG generates a spheromak-like plasmoid which can then travel axially to merge with a pre-existing FRC. Since the MCPG is mounted on-axis and generates a significant helicity, it provides the FRC-relevant version of coaxial helicity injection (CHI) that has been applied in both spheromaks and spherical tokamaks. When CHI is applied, the onset of elliptical deformation of FRC cross-section is delayed until 45 - 50 μs from FRC formation compared to the onset time of 25 μs in the case without CHI. Besides delaying instability, MCPG application reduces the toroidal rotation frequency from 67 kHz to 41 kHz. Moreover, the flux decay time is extended from 57 to 67 μs. These changes have been made despite the quite modest flux content of the plasmoid: ∼0.05 mWb of poloidal and 0.01 mWb of toroidal flux, compared with the 0.4 mWb of poloidal flux in the pre-formed FRC. The observed global stabilization and confinement improvements suggest that the MCPG can actively control the rotational instability. This global instability can also be suppressed by externally applied static multipole fields. However, it has been known that nonaxisymmetric multipole fields have adverse effects on confinement. This indicates an advantage of MCPG in that it shows both improved confinement and stability. The conventional technique does not slow the toroidal rotation down. Therefore, MCPG introduces a different stabilization mechanism that may be the same as that

  5. Magnetized plasma flow injection into tokamak and high-beta compact torus plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Hiroyuki; Komoriya, Yuuki; Tazawa, Hiroyasu; Asai, Tomohiko; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Steinhauer, Loren; Itagaki, Hirotomo; Onchi, Takumi; Hirose, Akira

    2010-11-01

    As an application of a magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG), magnetic helicity injection via injection of a highly elongated compact torus (magnetized plasma flow: MPF) has been conducted on both tokamak and field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas. The injected plasmoid has significant amounts of helicity and particle contents and has been proposed as a fueling and a current drive method for various torus systems. In the FRC, MPF is expected to generate partially spherical tokamak like FRC equilibrium by injecting a significant amount of magnetic helicity. As a circumstantial evidence of the modified equilibrium, suppressed rotational instability with toroidal mode number n = 2. MPF injection experiments have also been applied to the STOR-M tokamak as a start-up and current drive method. Differences in the responses of targets especially relation with beta value and the self-organization feature will be studied.

  6. Installation of a Thomson scattering diagnostic on the Compact Toroidal Hybrid Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traverso, P. J.; Maurer, D. A.; Ennis, D. A.; Hartwell, G. J.; Cianciosa, M. R.

    2015-11-01

    A Thomson scattering system is being commissioned for the non-axisymmetric plasmas of the Compact Toroidal Hybrid (CTH), a five-field period current-carrying torsatron. The initial system takes a single point measurement on the magnetic axis and will be used to assess options for an expansion to a multi-point system to enable better 3D equilibrium reconstructions using the V3FIT code. A single point measurement will reduce the uncertainty in the reconstructed peak pressure by an order of magnitude for both current-carrying plasmas and future gyrotron-heated stellarator plasmas. The beam, generated by a frequency doubled Continuum 2 J, Nd:YaG laser, is passed vertically through an entrance Brewster window and a two-aperture optical baffle system to minimize stray light. The beam line is designed to propagate ~ 8 m to the mid-plane of the CTH device with the beam diameter < 3 mm inside the plasma volume. An Andor iStar DH740-18U-C3 image intensified CCD camera is used in conjunction with a Holospec f/1.8 spectrograph to collect the red-shifted scattered light from 532-580 nm. A single point system will initially measure plasmas with core electron temperatures of 100 to 200 eV and densities of 5 ×1018 to 5 ×1019 m-3. This work is supported by U.S. Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG02-00ER54610.

  7. Proceedings of the seventh symposium on the physics and technology of compact toroids in the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Seventh Symposium on Compact Toroid (CT) Research was held in Santa Fe, New Mexico, on May 21-23, 1985. As has been the case for the last few CT symposia, CT research progress was reported in a combination of invited talks and poster sessions. The following record of these presentations in the form of four page papers is in keeping with the format followed in previous years. We have continued the practice of dividing the papers into three subject categories - spheromak, FRC (Field Reversed Configuration), and other (mostly particle rings)

  8. Compact Toroid Theory Planning Workshop. A panel report to the Director, Division of Applied Plasma Physics, Office of Fusion Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the Workshop was to identify the most important physics issues that need to be addressed in the near term in order to assure the optimal design and timely interpretation of Compact Toroid (CT) experiments. The Panel was also asked to assess the levels of effort required to obtain priority information on appropriate time scales compatible with DOE plans to design a CT proof-of-principle experiment. The fiscal year cost anticipated for the effort recommended by the Workshop Panel (excluding costs for computing) is estimated to be approximately $5.7M. CT theory is currently funded at a level of approximately $2.0M per year

  9. Increase in compact toroid mass by accelerator-region ionization of high-Z noble gas on CTIX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Robert D.; Hwang, David Q.; Liu, Fei; Hong, Sean; Klauser, Ruth; Evans, Russell W.; Buchenauer, Dean A.

    2012-10-01

    A promising technique for runaway electron (RE) mitigation in large-tokamak disruptions is the injection of compact toroid (CT) plasmas of high atomic number. With sufficient kinetic energy density, high-Z CTs can reach the tokamak magnetic axis where RE effects are strongest. At CT velocities of 100 km/s or more, penetration to the axis occurs on a sub-millisecond time scale. In addition to reducing avalanche RE production by collisions, high-Z CTs can cool RE by bremsstrahung effects. From theoretical calculations, using Xe ions, bremsstrahlung cooling exceeds the effect of collisions at RE energy above about 10 MeV, a value expected to be well exceeded in large tokamaks. Past experiments on the CTIX compact-toroid injector have demonstrated increased CT mass using snowplow accretion of puffed noble gas by an initial hydrogenic CT. These experiments will be continued using a higher ratio of accreted high-Z plasma to H plasma, to maximize CT kinetic energy density. Results will be compared with a 1D model using external circuit effects, coaxial railgun kinetics, and ionization. The model will be used to predict performance of CT injectors of greater energy, suitable for RE suppression on mid-sized tokamaks.

  10. Development of a magnetized coaxial plasma gun for compact toroid injection into the C-2 field-reversed configuration device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, T; Sekiguchi, J; Asai, T; Gota, H; Garate, E; Allfrey, I; Valentine, T; Morehouse, M; Roche, T; Kinley, J; Aefsky, S; Cordero, M; Waggoner, W; Binderbauer, M; Tajima, T

    2016-05-01

    A compact toroid (CT) injector was developed for the C-2 device, primarily for refueling of field-reversed configurations. The CTs are formed by a magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG), which consists of coaxial cylindrical electrodes and a bias coil for creating a magnetic field. First, a plasma ring is generated by a discharge between the electrodes and is accelerated by Lorenz self-force. Then, the plasma ring is captured by an interlinkage flux (poloidal flux). Finally, the fully formed CT is ejected from the MCPG. The MCPG described herein has two gas injection ports that are arranged tangentially on the outer electrode. A tungsten-coated inner electrode has a head which can be replaced with a longer one to extend the length of the acceleration region for the CT. The developed MCPG has achieved supersonic CT velocities of ∼100 km/s. Plasma parameters for electron density, electron temperature, and the number of particles are ∼5 × 10(21) m(-3), ∼40 eV, and 0.5-1.0 × 10(19), respectively.

  11. Development of a magnetized coaxial plasma gun for compact toroid injection into the C-2 field-reversed configuration device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, T; Sekiguchi, J; Asai, T; Gota, H; Garate, E; Allfrey, I; Valentine, T; Morehouse, M; Roche, T; Kinley, J; Aefsky, S; Cordero, M; Waggoner, W; Binderbauer, M; Tajima, T

    2016-05-01

    A compact toroid (CT) injector was developed for the C-2 device, primarily for refueling of field-reversed configurations. The CTs are formed by a magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG), which consists of coaxial cylindrical electrodes and a bias coil for creating a magnetic field. First, a plasma ring is generated by a discharge between the electrodes and is accelerated by Lorenz self-force. Then, the plasma ring is captured by an interlinkage flux (poloidal flux). Finally, the fully formed CT is ejected from the MCPG. The MCPG described herein has two gas injection ports that are arranged tangentially on the outer electrode. A tungsten-coated inner electrode has a head which can be replaced with a longer one to extend the length of the acceleration region for the CT. The developed MCPG has achieved supersonic CT velocities of ∼100 km/s. Plasma parameters for electron density, electron temperature, and the number of particles are ∼5 × 10(21) m(-3), ∼40 eV, and 0.5-1.0 × 10(19), respectively. PMID:27250428

  12. On the development of a compact toroid injector at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christenson, Michael; Jung, Soonwook; Stemmley, Steven; Sang, Xia; Kalathiparambil, Kishor; Ruzic, David

    2015-11-01

    The ThermoElectric-driven Liquid-metal plasma-facing Structures (TELS) device is a gas-puff driven, theta pinched, transient plasma source used to simulate extreme events incident on materials in the edge and divertor regions of a tokamak plasma. Previous work has shown that in its current form, TELS can bombard a target with a peak energy of 0.08 MJ m-2 over a 0.15 ms pulse, leading to a total heat flux of 0.5 GW m-2. While these values are sufficient to mimic Type 1 ELMs in smaller devices, the plasma energy of TELS must be improved by a factor of greater than two to adequately simulate larger-scale Type 1 ELMs. It is for this reason that modifications to the existing TELS device have been proposed in the form of developing a compact toroid (CT) injector since the new self-contained structure allows for higher densities and energies delivered onto a target. The new setup will use a bias field, generating a peak magnetic field greater than 0.1 T and a peak magnetic flux greater than 2 mWb, surrounding the existing plasma gun arrangement to create the CT and the existing theta pinch to compress and translate the plasmoid. Preliminary results and analyses are presented and discussed in relationship to interactions with both solid and liquid metal targets. Supported by DOE Grant DE-SC0008587.

  13. Experiments on linear high beta helical axis stellarators to study simulated toroidal effects and Alfven-Wave heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses the following topics: Nonaxisymmetric radio- frequency heating in an l = 1 stellarator and in a linear plasma column; measurement of induced current in a hardcore theta pinch; externally driven tilt mode study on an FRC; elimination of induced plasma current in a hardcore theta pinch; and simulated toroidicity studies

  14. US-Japan workshop on field-reversed configurations with steady-state high-temperature fusion plasmas and the 11th US-Japan workshop on compact toroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US-Japan Workshop on Field-Reversed Configurations with Steady-State High-Temperature Fusion Plasma and the 11th US-Japan Workshop on Compact Toroids were held at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico on November 7--9, 1989. These proceedings contain the papers presented at the workshops as submitted by the authors. These papers have been indexed separately

  15. US-Japan workshop on field-reversed configurations with steady-state high-temperature fusion plasmas and the 11th US-Japan workshop on compact toroids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, D.C.; Fernandez, J.C.; Rej, D.J. (comps.)

    1990-05-01

    The US-Japan Workshop on Field-Reversed Configurations with Steady-State High-Temperature Fusion Plasma and the 11th US-Japan Workshop on Compact Toroids were held at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico on November 7--9, 1989. These proceedings contain the papers presented at the workshops as submitted by the authors. These papers have been indexed separately.

  16. Experiments on linear high beta helical axis stellarators to study simulated toroidal effects and Alfven-wave heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses induced axial current studies in a hardcore Theta-Pinch; nonaxisymmetric RF heating of a high-Beta plasma column; formation of Axisymmetric hardcore theta pinches with notched hardcore current; and externally driven till made experiments on the high-beta Q machine field reversed configuration

  17. An interim report on the materials and selection criteria analysis for the Compact Ignition Tokamak Toroidal Field Coil Turn-to-Turn Insulation System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Design criteria for the Compact Ignition Tokamak, Toroidal-Field (TF) Coil, Turn-to-Turn Insulation System require an insulation sheet and bonding system that will survive cryogenic cycling in a radiation environment and maintain structural integrity during exposure to the significant compressive and shear loads associated with each operating cycle. For thermosetting resin systems, a complex interactive dependency exists between optimum peak value, in-service property performance capabilities of candidate generic materials; key handling and processing parameters required to achieve their optimum in-service property performance as an insulation system; and suitability of their handling and processing parameters as a function of design configuration and assembly methodology. This dependency is assessed in a weighted study matrix in which two principal programmatic approaches for the development of the TF Coil Subassembly Insulation System have been identified. From this matrix study, two viable approaches to the fabrication of the insulation sheet were identified: use of a press-formed sheet bonded in place with epoxy for mechanical bonding and tolerance take-up and formation of the insulation sheet by placement of dry cloth and subsequent vacuum pressure impregnation. Laboratory testing was conducted to screen a number of combinations of resins and hardeners on a generic basis. These combinations were chosen for their performance in similar applications. Specimens were tested to screen viscosity, thermal-shock tolerance, and cryogenic tolerance. Cryogenic shock and cryogenic temperature proved to be extremely lethal to many combinations of resin, hardener, and cure. Two combinations survived: a heavily flexibilized bisphenol A resin with a flexibilized amine hardener and a bisphenol A resin with cycloaliphatic amine hardener. 7 refs., 12 figs., 6 tabs

  18. Predictions and observations of low-shear beta-induced shear Alfven-acoustic eigenmodes in toroidal plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorelenkov, N.N. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University (United States)], E-mail: ngorelen@pppl.gov; Berk, H.L. [IFS, Austin, Texas (United States); Fredrickson, E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University (United States); Sharapov, S.E. [Euroatom/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire (United States)

    2007-10-08

    New global MHD eigenmode solutions arising in gaps in the low frequency Alfven-acoustic continuum below the geodesic acoustic mode (GAM) frequency have been found numerically and have been used to explain relatively low frequency experimental signals seen in NSTX and JET tokamaks. These global eigenmodes, referred to here as Beta-induced Alfven-Acoustic Eigenmodes (BAAE), exist in the low magnetic safety factor region near the extrema of the Alfven-acoustic continuum. In accordance to the linear dispersion relations, the frequency of these modes shifts as the safety factor, q, decreases. We show that BAAEs can be responsible for observations in JET plasmas at relatively low beta <2% as well as in NSTX plasmas at relatively high-beta >20%. In contrast to the mostly electrostatic character of GAMs the new global modes also contain an electromagnetic (magnetic field line bending) component due to the Alfven coupling, leading to wave phase velocities along the field line that are large compared to the sonic speed. Qualitative agreement between theoretical predictions and observations are found.

  19. Predictions and Observations of Low-shear Beta-induced Alfvén-acoustic Eigenmodes in Toroidal Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorelenkov, N. N.; Berk, H. L.; Fredrickson, E.; Sharapov, S. E.

    2007-07-02

    New global MHD eigenmode solutions arising in gaps in the low frequency Alfvén -acoustic continuum below the geodesic acoustic mode (GAM) frequency have been found numerically and have been used to explain relatively low frequency experimental signals seen in NSTX and JET tokamaks. These global eigenmodes, referred to here as Beta-induced Alfvén-Acoustic Eigenmodes (BAAE), exist in the low magnetic safety factor region near the extrema of the Alfvén-acoustic continuum. In accordance to the linear dispersion relations, the frequency of these modes shifts as the safety factor, q, decreases. We show that BAAEs can be responsible for observations in JET plasmas at relatively low beta < 2% as well as in NSTX plasmas at relatively high beta > 20%. In contrast to the mostly electrostatic character of GAMs the new global modes also contain an electromagnetic (magnetic field line bending) component due to the Alfvén coupling, leading to wave phase velocities along the field line that are large compared to the sonic speed. Qualitative agreement between theoretical predictions and observations are found.

  20. Axisymmetric Toroidal Equilibrium with Sheared Toroidal Flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石秉仁

    2002-01-01

    Problem of the axisymmetric toroidal equilibrium with pure sheared toroidal flow is involved. For standard tokamak equilibrium, general approximate solutions are analytically pursued for arbitrary current profile and non-circular cross-section. Equilibrium properties including the flow-induced density asymmetry are analyzed.

  1. Toroidal circular dichroism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raybould, T. A.; Fedotov, V. A.; Papasimakis, N.; Kuprov, I.; Youngs, I. J.; Chen, W. T.; Tsai, D. P.; Zheludev, N. I.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate that the induced toroidal dipole, represented by currents flowing on the surface of a torus, makes a distinct and indispensable contribution to circular dichroism. We show that toroidal circular dichroism supplements the well-known mechanism involving electric dipole and magnetic dipole transitions. We illustrate this with rigorous analysis of the experimentally measured polarization-sensitive transmission spectra of an artificial metamaterial, constructed from elements of toroidal symmetry. We argue that toroidal circular dichroism will be found in large biomolecules with elements of toroidal symmetry and should be taken into account in the interpretation of circular dichroism spectra of organics.

  2. Recent results in the Los Alamos compact torus program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuszewski, M.; Armstrong, W.T.; Barnes, C.W.

    1983-01-01

    A Compact Toroid is a toroidal magnetic-plasma-containment geometry in which no conductors or vacuum-chamber walls pass through the hole in the torus. Two types of compact toroids are studied experimentally and theoretically at Los Alamos: spheromaks that are oblate in shape and contain both toroidal and poloidal magnetic fields, and field-reversed configurations (FRC) that are very prolate and contain poloidal field only.

  3. Confinement and heating of high-beta plasmas with emphasis on compact toroids. Task I. Annual report for period ending May 31, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results are given for work during this period on each of the following areas: (1) spheromak production using conical theta pinch guns; (2) detection of CT fluctuation spectra via CO2 forward scattering; (3) high density field reversal experiment; (4) plasma compression experiment; (5) material end plugging experiment; and (6) design of computerized data acquisition systems

  4. New Toroid shielding design

    CERN Multimedia

    Hedberg V

    On the 15th of June 2001 the EB approved a new conceptual design for the toroid shield. In the old design, shown in the left part of the figure above, the moderator part of the shielding (JTV) was situated both in the warm and cold areas of the forward toroid. It consisted both of rings of polyethylene and hundreds of blocks of polyethylene (or an epoxy resin) inside the toroid vacuum vessel. In the new design, shown to the right in the figure above, only the rings remain inside the toroid. To compensate for the loss of moderator in the toroid, the copper plug (JTT) has been reduced in radius so that a layer of borated polyethylene can be placed around it (see figure below). The new design gives significant cost-savings and is easier to produce in the tight time schedule of the forward toroid. Since the amount of copper is reduced the weight that has to be carried by the toroid is also reduced. Outgassing into the toroid vacuum was a potential problem in the old design and this is now avoided. The main ...

  5. Toroid magnet test facility

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Because of its exceptional size, it was not feasible to assemble and test the Barrel Toroid - made of eight coils - as an integrated toroid on the surface, prior to its final installation underground in LHC interaction point 1. It was therefore decided to test these eight coils individually in a dedicated test facility.

  6. Induced toroid structures and toroid polarizabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The frequency-dependent toroid dipole polarizability γ(ω) of a (nonrelativistic, spinless) hydrogen-like atom in its ground state is calculated analytically in terms of two Gauss hypergeometric functions. The static result reads simply γ(ω=0)=(23/60)α2Z-4a05 (α - fine structure constant, Z - nucleus charge number, a0 - Bohr radius). Comparing the present evaluations for H-like atoms with previous ones for pions, one sees that the role of the induced toroid moments (as against that of the usual electric ones) increases considerably when passing from atomic to particle physics

  7. Axisymmetric Toroidal Equilibrium with Sheared Toroidal Flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHIBingren

    2002-01-01

    Since the early 1960' s, the developments of the tokamak research make plasma flows a reality in many devices where neutral beam injections were used as heating in general and refueling in particular. Compared to the static axi-symmetric toroidal equilibrium that

  8. Invisibility cloaks for toroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Yu; Kattawar, George W; Yang, Ping

    2009-04-13

    The material properties of toroidal invisibility cloaks are derived based on the coordinate transformation method. The permittivity and permeability tensors for toroidal cloaks are substantially different from those for spherical cloaks, but quite similar to those for 2D cylindrical cloaks because a singularity is involved at the inner boundary in both the cases. The cloaking effect is confirmed by the electric field distribution in the vicinity of toroidal cloaks simulated from the generalized discrete-dipole approximation (DDA) method. This study extends the concept of electromagnetic cloaking of arbitrarily-shaped objects to a complex geometry. PMID:19365485

  9. NCSX Toroidal Field Coil Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalish, M.; Rushinski, J.; Myatt, L.; Brooks, A.; Dahlgren, F.; Chrzanowski, J.; Reiersen, W.; Freudenberg, K.

    2005-10-07

    The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) is an experimental device whose design and construction is underway at the Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). The primary coil systems for the NCSX device consist of the twisted plasma-shaping Modular Coils, the Poloidal Field Coils, and the Toroidal Field (TF) Coils. The TF Coils are D-shaped coils wound from hollow copper conductor, and vacuum impregnated with a glass-epoxy resin system. There are 18 identical, equally spaced TF coils providing 1/R field at the plasma. They operate within a cryostat, and are cooled by LN2, nominally, to 80K. Wedge shaped castings are assembled to the inboard face of these coils, so that inward radial loads are reacted via the nesting of each of the coils against their adjacent partners. This paper outlines the TF Coil design methodology, reviews the analysis results, and summarizes how the design and analysis support the design requirements.

  10. Drift waves in general toroidal geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A model, based on gyro-kinetic ions and fluid electrons, to study drift waves in low-beta [beta = (kinetic pressure)/(magnetic pressure)] stellarator plasmas is presented. The model equations are written in straight-field-line coordinates and are valid for arbitrary, fully three-dimensional configurations with closed, nested magnetic surfaces. An implicit method, coupled with a subcycling technique for the electrons, is used to solve the time-dependent, along-the-field-line equations. Numerical calculations are carried out for a 3-field-period toroidal heliac. The geometrical effects that enter the model equations are calculated and displayed in physical space using advanced visualization techniques

  11. Drift in toroidal configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelidis, E. A.

    1990-12-01

    This paper considers possible mechanisms involved in amplifying the drift velocity of plasma particles, under conditions of toroidal geometry. It is shown that particles constrained to move on an axisymmetric circular spheroidal surface, develop a sinusoidal motion with a characteristic frequency which depends on the energy of the particles, the value of the isoflux surface, and the value of the general momentum. It is also shown that the incorporation of the effects of toroidal geometry in the Lorentz equation produces a nonambipolar charge-dependent particle flux amplified by a factor 2(q/epsilon) squared.

  12. Design of the national compact stellarator experiment (NCSX)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, B.E. E-mail: nelsonbe@ornl.gov; Berry, L.A.; Brooks, A.B.; Cole, M.J.; Chrzanowski, J.C.; Fan, H.-M.; Fogarty, P.J.; Goranson, P.L.; Heitzenroeder, P.J.; Hirshman, S.P.; Jones, G.H.; Lyon, J.F.; Neilson, G.H.; Reiersen, W.T.; Strickler, D.J.; Williamson, D.E

    2003-09-01

    The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) [http://www.pppl.gov/ncsx/Meetings/CDR/CDRFinal/EngineeringOverview{sub R}2.pdf] is being designed as a proof of principal test of a quasi-axisymmetric compact stellarator. This concept combines the high beta and good confinement features of an advanced tokamak with the low current, disruption-free characteristics of a stellarator. NCSX has a three-field-period plasma configuration with an average major radius of 1.4 m, an average minor radius of 0.33 m and a toroidal magnetic field on axis of up to 2 T. The stellarator core is a complex assembly of four coil systems that surround the highly shaped plasma and vacuum vessel. Heating is provided by up to four, 1.5 MW neutral beam injectors and provision is made to add 6 MW of ICRH. The experiment will be built at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, with first plasma expected in 2007.

  13. Elongated toroid fusion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A device for achieving ignition of a plasma with ohmic heating is described comprising: means for defining a toroidal plasma chamber,a and confining gas therein, and means including electrically conductive coils for generating plasma within the chamber and for confining and shaping such plasma substantially into and filling a predetermined single region of the chamber without an axisymmetric internal separatix and ohmically heating the confined plasma to ignition. The predetermined region is toroidal with a major axis defining an axial direction parallel thereto and a transaxial direction perpendicular to the axis and having an axial cross section with an elongation, k, greater than 4, where k is the ratio of the maximum axial dimension of the cross section to the maximum transaxial dimension of the cross section

  14. Physics aspects of the compact ignition tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) is a proposed modest-size ignition experiment designed to study the physics of alpha particle heating. The basic concept is to achieve ignition in a modest-size minimum cost experiment by using a high plasma density to achieve nτE ≅ 2 x 1020 s/m3 required for ignition. The high density requires a high toroidal field (10 T). The high toroidal field allows a large plasma current (10 MA) which provides a high level of ohmic heating, improves the energy confinement, and allows a relatively high beta (≅ 6%). The present CIT design also has a high degree of elongation (κ ≅ 1.8) to aid in producing the large plasma current. A double null poloidal divertor and pellet injection are part of the design to provide impurity and particle control, improve the confinement, and provide flexibility for improving the plasma profiles. Auxiliary heating is expected to be necessary to achieve ignition, and 10-20 MW of ICRF is to be provided. (orig.)

  15. On the Toroidal Leibniz Algebras

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong LIU; Lei LIN

    2008-01-01

    Toroidal Leibniz algebras are the universal central extensions of the iterated loop algebras gOC[t±11 ,...,t±v1] in the category of Leibniz algebras. In this paper, some properties and representations of toroidal Leibniz algebras are studied. Some general theories of central extensions of Leibniz algebras are also obtained.

  16. Experiments on linear high beta helical axis stellarators to study simulated toroidal effects and Alfven-wave heating: [Annual] progress report No. 1, February 16, 1987-November 15, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses experiments on linear high beta helical axis stellarators. Experiments considered are: formation of linear high beta heliac plasma configurations; Alfven wave heating in a straight tube and in a linear high beat stellarator; shifted hardcore heliac studies; a system for measuring the timing of high-current switches in a pulsed high voltage fusion experiment; HBQM general refurbishment; and proposed experiment on excitation of the m = 1 tilt mode in field-reversed configurations

  17. Toroidal Multipole Confinement Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Confinement of plasma is studied in the General Atomic toroidal octopole machine. The magnetic field is produced by four current carrying rings supported inside a contoured conductor. The rings are energized by a transformer core linking the machine. The major radius of the machine is 63.5 cm with an aspect ratio of 5. The magnetic field on the minor axis is zero and increases to 3500 G at the wall between the rings. After crowbarring, the field decays in 6 msec to its half value. The MHD stability calculation has been carried out and the stability is assured up to the plasma pressure of 1016 eV cm-3. Hydrogen plasmas from either a coaxial gun or a pinch gun with ion energies of 50 to 200 eV and with densities of 1014 cm-3 are successfully injected through a port located at the outer conductor wall. After the injection, plasma spreads azimuthally, filling the machine. Electric probes, magnetic probes, and calorimetric probes have been used extensively. Optical spectrometers and particle detectors are also used. The initial plasma density of 1013 cm-'3 decays with a time constant of 700 μsec. The electron temperature decays more quickly in about 100 μsec. No electric or magnetic fluctuations have been observed on any of the probes. Since no provision is made to avoid the plasma loss to the ring supports which penetrate the plasma region, the decay of ion temperature may be attributed to the support loss. (author)

  18. Influence of toroidal effects on the stability of the internal kink mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galvao, R.M.O.; Sakanaka, P.H.; Shigueoka, H.

    1978-09-25

    Using the sigma-stability technique, we study the stability of the internal kink mode in toroidal geometry. We show that there are two unstable regions separated by a stable on in a ..beta..-q/sub c/ stability diagram. In one of these regions toroidal effects are stabilizing and in the other they are destabilizing. Discrepant results of previous analytical theories and experimental results are explained.

  19. Compact torus experiments and theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two types of compact toroids have been studied: spheromaks and field-reversed configurations (FRC). Spheromaks, which contain both toroidal and poloidal fields, have been formed with a magnetized coaxial injector and trapped in both prolate and oblate flux conservers. As expected from theory, the prolate configuration always tilts, but the oblate configuration can be made stable even in the presence of a guide field. Observations include 150μs lifetimes, approx. 1014 cm-3, and a decrease of field fluctuations by a factor of 100 at the time of complete reconnection. Theoretical studies of the FRC (no toroidal field) have been compared with the results of two field-reversed theta-pinches, FRX-A and FRX-B

  20. Heavy ion toroidal collective accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments on HIPAC at Maxwell Laboratories have shown that almost all of the confined electrons are trapped and do not go around the torus. A toroidal electric field produces a negligible toroidal electron current. An ion accelerator where electrons are magnetically contained and their space charge contains ions is considered. A toroidal electric field of suitable magnitude can be applied so that it accelerates all of the ions but does not accelerate most of the electrons. This is possible if the magnetic moment of electrons μsub(e) > μsub(i)/Z, where μsub(i) is the ion magnetic moment and Z is the charge of the ion. Ions would be contained by the electron space-charge electric field E, for energies up to ZeER/2 approximately 100 GeV where Z = 60, E = 107 V/cm and the major radius of the torus is R = 3.3 metres. (author)

  1. RF breakdown by toroidal helicons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S K P Tripathi; D Bora; M Mishra

    2001-04-01

    Bounded whistlers are well-known for their efficient plasma production capabilities in thin cylindrical tubes. In this paper we shall present their radio frequency (RF) breakdown and discharge sustaining capabilities in toroidal systems. Pulsed RF power in the electronmagnetohydrodynamic (EMHD) frequency regime is fed to the neutral background medium. After the breakdown stage, discharge is sustained by toroidal bounded whistlers. In these pulsed experiments the behaviour of the time evolution of the discharge could be studied in four distinct phases of RF breakdown, steady state attainment, decay and afterglow. In the steady state average electron density of ≈ 1012 per cc and average electron temperature of ≈ 20 eV are obtained at 10-3 mbar of argon filling pressure. Experimental results on toroidal mode structure, background effects and time evolution of the electron distribution function will be presented and their implications in understanding the breakdown mechanism are discussed.

  2. Hybrid winding concept for toroids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Henrik; Andersen, Thomas; Knott, Arnold;

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a hybrid winding concept for toroids using the traces in a printed circuit board to make connection to bended copper foil cutouts. In a final product a number of strips with a certain thickness would be held by a former and the whole assembly could be placed by pick...... and placement machinery. This opens up the possibility for both an automated manufacturing process and an automated production process of toroidal magnetics such as power inductors, filtering inductors, air core inductors, transformers etc. Both the proposed hybrid and the common wire wound winding...

  3. The complex and unique ATLAS Toroid family

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Big parts for the toroid magnets that will be used in the ATLAS experiment have been continuously arriving at CERN since March. These structures will create the largest superconducting toroid magnet ever.

  4. Bootstrap transition to high beta equilibrium in helical system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown theoretically and computationally that helical magnetic field, produced by continuous winding helical coils and without the toroidal coil, can sustain MHD stable high beta plasma. Pressure driven toroidal current (bootstrap current) cancels the external magnetic field and reduces the MHD potential energy, depending on the plasma beta values. Ramp-up of heating power input induces bootstrap transition to higher beta plasmas with flat-top pressure profiles. Helical pitch parameter dependence of MHD stability is analyzed. (author)

  5. Intrinsic rotation of toroidally confined magnetohydrodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Morales, Jorge; Bos, Wouter; Schneider, Kai; Montgomery, David

    2012-01-01

    The spatiotemporal self-organization of viscoresistive magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) in a toroidal geometry is studied. Curl-free toroidal magnetic and electric fields are imposed. It is observed in our simulations that a flow is generated, which evolves from dominantly poloidal to toroidal when the Lundquist numbers are increased. It is shown that this toroidal organization of the flow is consistent with the tendency of the velocity field to align with the magnetic field. Up-down asymmetry of t...

  6. ATLAS End Cap toroid in upstanding position

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    End Cap toroid The ATLAS End Cap toroid weights 240-ton and is 12-m diameter high. The parts of this vacuum vessel had to be integrated and tested so that End Cap Toroid has no leaks. After that it could be cooled down to 80 K.

  7. Extremely high Q-factor toroidal metamaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Basharin, Alexey A; Volsky, Nikita; Kafesaki, Maria; Economou, Eleftherios N; Ustinov, Alexey V

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that, owing to the unique topology of the toroidal dipolar mode, its electric/magnetic field can be spatially confined within subwavelength, externally accessible regions of the metamolecules, which makes the toroidal planar metamaterials a viable platform for high Q-factor resonators due to interfering toroidal and other dipolar modes in metamolecules.

  8. Technology of toroidal plasma devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After research into many different magnetic confinement systems, there is now general agreement that the most favorable ones for future fusion reactors are all based on toroidal geometry, as distinct from having open ends like mirror machines. For this reason plasma physics research, even when not aimed directly at the fusion problems, has in recent years increasingly concentrated on toroidal systems. One reason is that by using their good confinement properties the experimenter has available a range of high temperature plasma parameters in quasisteady (or even steady) state conditions not otherwise available on Earth. Despite the wide variety of both geometrical possibilities and sizes, ranging from table-top experiments with plasmas a few centimetres across to near reactor scale ones like JET with plasmas several metres across, toroidal systems have many common features, both in their physical principles and of experimental design: the purpose of this paper is to highlight those common features, using some specific examples for illustration, and emphasizing some of the more practical aspects. It will also try to point out important differences between two of the main classes of toroidal systems

  9. Lowering the first ATLAS toroid

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    The ATLAS detector on the LHC at CERN will consist of eight toroid magnets, the first of which was lowered into the cavern in these images on 26 October 2004. The coils are supported on platforms where they will be attached to form a giant torus. The platforms will hold about 300 tonnes of ATLAS' muon chambers and will envelop the inner detectors.

  10. Toroidal solutions in Horava Gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Ghodsi, Ahmad

    2009-01-01

    Recently a new four-dimensional non relativistic renormalizable theory of gravity was proposed by Horava. This gravity reduces to Einstein gravity at large distances. In this paper by using the new action for gravity we present different toroidal solutions to the equations of motion. Our solutions describe the near horizon geometry with slow rotating parameter.

  11. Intrinsic rotation of toroidally confined magnetohydrodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Jorge A; Bos, Wouter J T; Schneider, Kai; Montgomery, David C

    2012-10-26

    The spatiotemporal self-organization of viscoresistive magnetohydrodynamics in a toroidal geometry is studied. Curl-free toroidal magnetic and electric fields are imposed. It is observed in our simulations that a flow is generated, which evolves from dominantly poloidal to toroidal when the Lundquist numbers are increased. It is shown that this toroidal organization of the flow is consistent with the tendency of the velocity field to align with the magnetic field. Up-down asymmetry of the geometry causes the generation of a nonzero toroidal angular momentum. PMID:23215195

  12. Design and Simulation of Toroidal Twister Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Huifang; LIN Xizhen; ZENG Qinqin

    2006-01-01

    Toroidal composite vessel winded with fiber is a new kind of structural pressure vessels, which not only has high structure efficiency of compound materials pressure vessel, good security and so on, but also has special shape and the property of utilizing toroidal space, and the prospect of the application of toroidal composite vessel winded with fiber is extremely broad. By introducing parameters establishment of toroidal vessel and elaborating the principle of filament winding for toroidal vessel, the design model of filament winding machine for toroidal vessel has been introduced, and the design model has been dynamically simulated by the software of ADAMS, which will give more referrence for the design of real toroidal vessel twister.

  13. International school of plasma physics course on instabilities and confinement in toroidal plasmas. Varenna (Italy), September 27-October 9, 1971

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The lectures of a Varenna Summer School about the theme Instabilities and Confinement in toroidal Plasmas are given. The topics included are: high-beta toroidal pinches, non-MHD instabilities and anomalous transport, analogy between turbulent transfer in velocity space and plasma collisioned transport in real space, the magnetohydrodynamic approach of plasma confinement in closed magnetic configurations, properties of isodynamical equilibrium configurations and their generalization, transport theory for toroidal plasmas, plasma physics, low-β toroidal machines, the neoclassical theory of transit time magnetic pumping, radio frequency heating of toroidal plasmas, plasma heating at lower hybrid frequency, RF-plasma heating with L-structures, numerical simulation, dynamical stabilization of low frequency waves in inhomogeneous plasmas, dynamic and feedback stabilization of plasmas and problems with nuclear fusion reactors

  14. Plasma transport in a Compact Ignition Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nominal predicted plasma conditions in a Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) are illustrated by transport simulations using experimentally calibrated plasma transport models. The range of uncertainty in these predictions is explored by using various models that have given almost equally good fits to experimental data. Using a transport model that best fits the data, thermonuclear ignition occurs in a CIT design with a major radius of 1.32 m, plasma half-width of 0.43 mn, elongation of 2.0, and toroidal field and plasma current ramped in 6 s from 1.7 to 10.4 T and 0.7 to 10 MA, respectively. Ignition is facilitated by 20 MW of heating deposited off the magnetic axis near the /sup 3/He minority cyclotron resonance layer. Under these conditions, sawtooth oscillations are small and have little impact on ignition. Tritium inventory is minimized by preconditioning most discharges with deuterium. Tritium is injected, in large frozen pellets, only after minority resonance preheating. Variations of the transport model, impurity influx, heating profile, and pellet ablation rates have a large effect on ignition and on the maximum beta that can be achieved

  15. Position indicating split toroid for the RACE experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurst, B. [Nuclear Engineering Teaching Laboratory, University of Texas, 10100 Burnet Road, Austin, TX 78758 (United States)]. E-mail: bhurst@mail.utexas.edu; Folkman, K. [Idaho Accelerator Center, Idaho State University, Pocatello, ID 83201 (United States)

    2007-08-15

    Aspects of the recent reactor accelerator coupled experiments (RACE) carried out at University of Texas Nuclear Engineering Teaching Laboratory will be discussed. In particular, a compact instrument that allowed a continuous non-invasive means of determining the relative electron beam position was developed. The operation of the instrument is similar to an inductive current pick up toroid except that the core is sectioned radially, which allows spatial information to be derived from the induced voltages. Results of initial tests, both in beam and with a pulser, will be presented along with plans to optimize future designs.

  16. Prospects for toroidal fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Work on the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) tokamak has refined understanding of the realities of a deuterium-tritium (D-T) burning magnetic fusion reactor. An ITER-like tokamak reactor using ITER costs and performance would lead to a cost of electricity (COE) of about 130 mills/kWh. Advanced tokamak physics to be tested in the Toroidal Physics Experiment (TPX), coupled with moderate components in engineering, technology, and unit costs, should lead to a COE comparable with best existing fission systems around 60 mills/kWh. However, a larger unit size, ∼2000 MW(e), is favored for the fusion system. Alternative toroidal configurations to the conventional tokamak, such as the stellarator, reversed-field pinch, and field-reversed configuration, offer some potential advantage, but are less well developed, and have their own challenges

  17. Classification of symmetric toroidal orbifolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Maximilian; Ratz, Michael; Torrado, Jesus [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Physik-Department; Vaudrevange, Patrick K.S. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2012-09-15

    We provide a complete classification of six-dimensional symmetric toroidal orbifolds which yield N{>=}1 supersymmetry in 4D for the heterotic string. Our strategy is based on a classification of crystallographic space groups in six dimensions. We find in total 520 inequivalent toroidal orbifolds, 162 of them with Abelian point groups such as Z{sub 3}, Z{sub 4}, Z{sub 6}-I etc. and 358 with non-Abelian point groups such as S{sub 3}, D{sub 4}, A{sub 4} etc. We also briefly explore the properties of some orbifolds with Abelian point groups and N=1, i.e. specify the Hodge numbers and comment on the possible mechanisms (local or non-local) of gauge symmetry breaking.

  18. TFTR toroidal field coil design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) Toroidal Field (TF) magnetic coils is described. The TF coil is a 44-turn, spiral-wound, two-pancake, water-cooled configuration which, at a coil current of 73.3 kiloamperes, produces a 5.2-Tesla field at a major radius of 2.48 meters. The magnetic coils are installed in titanium cases, which transmit the loads generated in the coils to the adjacent supporting structure. The TFTR utilizes 20 of these coils, positioned radially at 180 intervals, to provide the required toroidal field. Because it is very highly loaded and subject to tight volume constraints within the machine, the coil presents unique design problems. The TF coil requirements are summarized, the coil configuration is described, and the problems highlighted which have been encountered thus far in the coil design effort, together with the development tests which have been undertaken to verify the design

  19. Transporting the first ATLAS toroid

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    The first coil for the ATLAS toroid magnet is transported from its assembly hall at the CERN Meyrin site to the storage hall above the ATLAS cavern. This involves driving the massive transportation vehicle first through the Meyrin site and then across a main road only metres from the France-Swiss border. Eight magnets in total will be transported in this way before being lowered into the experimental cavern where they will be mounted in a huge ring surrounding the detector.

  20. Alpha particle destabilization of the toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high frequency, low mode number toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes (TAE) are shown to be driven unstable by the circulating and/or trapped α-particles through the wave-particle resonances. Satisfying the resonance condition requires that the α-particle birth speed vα ≥ vA/2|m-nq|, where vA is the Alfven speed, m is the poloidal model number, and n is the toroidal mode number. To destabilize the TAE modes, the inverse Landau damping associated with the α-particle pressure gradient free energy must overcome the velocity space Landau damping due to both the α-particles and the core electrons and ions. The growth rate was studied analytically with a perturbative formula derived from the quadratic dispersion relation, and numerically with the aid of the NOVA-K code. Stability criteria in terms of the α-particle beta βα, α-particle pressure gradient parameter (ω*/ωA) (ω* is the α-particle diamagnetic drift frequency), and (vα/vA) parameters will be presented for TFTR, CIT, and ITER tokamaks. The volume averaged α-particle beta threshold for TAE instability also depends sensitively on the core electron and ion temperature. Typically the volume averaged α-particle beta threshold is in the order of 10-4. Typical growth rates of the n=1 TAE mode can be in the order of 10-2ωA, where ωA=vA/qR. Other types of global Alfven waves are stable in D-T tokamaks due to toroidal coupling effects

  1. Magnetic Properties of 3D Printed Toroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollig, Lindsey; Otto, Austin; Hilpisch, Peter; Mowry, Greg; Nelson-Cheeseman, Brittany; Renewable Energy; Alternatives Lab (REAL) Team

    Transformers are ubiquitous in electronics today. Although toroidal geometries perform most efficiently, transformers are traditionally made with rectangular cross-sections due to the lower manufacturing costs. Additive manufacturing techniques (3D printing) can easily achieve toroidal geometries by building up a part through a series of 2D layers. To get strong magnetic properties in a 3D printed transformer, a composite filament is used containing Fe dispersed in a polymer matrix. How the resulting 3D printed toroid responds to a magnetic field depends on two structural factors of the printed 2D layers: fill factor (planar density) and fill pattern. In this work, we investigate how the fill factor and fill pattern affect the magnetic properties of 3D printed toroids. The magnetic properties of the printed toroids are measured by a custom circuit that produces a hysteresis loop for each toroid. Toroids with various fill factors and fill patterns are compared to determine how these two factors can affect the magnetic field the toroid can produce. These 3D printed toroids can be used for numerous applications in order to increase the efficiency of transformers by making it possible for manufacturers to make a toroidal geometry.

  2. Global stability of plasmas with helical boundary deformation and net toroidal current against n=1,2 external modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ardela, A.; Cooper, W.A. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale, Lausanne (Switzerland). Centre de Recherche en Physique des Plasma (CRPP)

    1996-09-01

    In this paper we resume a numerical study of the global stability of plasma with helical boundary deformation and non null net toroidal current. The aim was to see whether external modes with n=1,2 (n toroidal mode number) can be stabilized at values of {beta} inaccessible to the tokamak. L=2,3 configurations with several aspect ratios and different numbers of equilibrium field periods are considered. A large variety of toroidal current densities and different pressure profiles are taken into account. Mercier stability is also investigated. (author) 4 figs., 6 refs.

  3. Beam Transport in Toroidal Magnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Joshi, N; Meusel, O; Ratzinger, U

    2016-01-01

    The concept of a storage ring with toroidal magnetic field was presented in the two previous EPAC conferences. Here we report the first results of experiments performed with beam transport in toroidal magnetic fields and details of the injection system. The beam transport experiments were carried out with 30 degree toroidal segments with an axial magnetic field of 0.6T. The multi turn injection system relies on a transverse injection coil together with an electric kicker system.

  4. Pellet injection and toroidal confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proceedings of a technical committee meeting on pellet injection and toroidal confinement, held in Gut Ising, Federal Republic of Germany, 24-26 October, 1988, are given in this report. Most of the major fusion experiments are using pellet injectors; these were reported at this meeting. Studies of confinement, which is favorably affected, impurity transport, radiative energy losses, and affects on the ion temperature gradient instability were given. Studies of pellet ablation and effects on plasma profiles were presented. Finally, several papers described present and proposed injection guns. Refs, figs and tabs

  5. Toroidal Theory of MHD Instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We continue with the adventures of the Alfven wave and its two magnetosonic companions as they travel in the curved space of magnetic surfaces and field lines (Sec. 2), find themselves trapped in singularities of an unprecedented richness (Sec. 3), decide to get themselves better maps of the landscape to do the required twisting while some of their youthful energy is leaking away (Sec. 4), cause trouble at the edge of a powerful empire (Sec. 5), and finally see the light in a distant future (Sec. 6). Needed on the trip are the evolution equations of both ideal and resistive MHD 'derived' in reference [1], the solutions to the toroidal equilibrium equations discussed in reference [2], the general background on spectral theory of inhomogeneous plasmas presented in reference [3], which is extended in the two directions of toroidal geometry and resistivity in this lecture [4]. This leads to such intricate dynamics that numerical techniques are virtually the only way to proceed. This aspect is further elaborated in reference [5] on numerical techniques

  6. Optimization of Shielded PCB Air-Core Toroids for High-Efficiency DC-DC Converters

    CERN Document Server

    Orlandi, S; Buso, S; Michelis, S; Fuentes, C A; Kayal, M; Faccio, F; Spiazzi, G

    2011-01-01

    The paper describes the design of optimized printed circuit board (PCB) air-core toroids for high-frequency dc-dc converters with strict requirements in terms of volume and noise. The effect of several design parameters on the overall inductor volume, on dc and ac winding resistance, and on the radiated noise will be investigated. PCB toroids are compared to standard air-core solenoids and other state-of-the-art air-core toroids both theoretically and experimentally: at first, using ANSOFT Maxwell and ANSOFT Q3D simulation tools, and subsequently, with laboratory measurements (irradiated noise, efficiency, and frequency response) on several prototypes. These very flexible and rather easy to manufacture inductors appear very attractive for compact high-frequency dc-dc converters where high efficiency, low volume, and low noise are of primary concern.

  7. Fast Dump of the ATLAS Toroids

    CERN Document Server

    Dudarev, A; Volpini, Giovanni; Dudarev, Alexey; Kate, Herman Ten

    2010-01-01

    The toroidal magnet system of the ATLAS Detector at CERN consists of a Barrel Toroid (BT) and two End Cap Toroids (ECT-A and ECT-C). Each toroid is built up from eight racetrack coils wound with an aluminum stabilized NbTi conductor and indirectly cooled by forced flow liquid helium. The three toroids operate in series at 20.5 kA with a total stored energy of 1.5 GJ. In order to verify the reliability and effectiveness of the quench protection system, series of fast dump tests have been performed first of the single toroids and finally of the entire toroidal magnet system. In this paper a model to simulate the fast dump of the ATLAS toroids in single mode operation and in full system configuration is presented. The model is validated through comparison with measured data extracted from the ramp-and-quench runs. The calculated energy dissipation in the various coils is in very good agreement (within 1-2\\%) with the enthalpy changes estimated from the temperature measurements of the different parts of the cold ...

  8. Electrostatics of a Family of Conducting Toroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekner, John

    2009-01-01

    An exact solution is found for the electrostatic potential of a family of conducting charged toroids. The toroids are characterized by two lengths "a" and "b", with "a" greater than or equal to "2b". They are closed, with no hole in the "doughnut". The results are obtained by considering the potential of two equal charges, displaced from the…

  9. Toroidal Alfven wave stability in ignited tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, C.Z.; Fu, G.Y.; Van Dam, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of fusion-product alpha particles on the stability of global-type shear Alfven waves in an ignited tokamak plasma are investigated in toroidal geometry. Finite toroidicity can lead to stabilization of the global Alfven eigenmodes, but it induces a new global shear Alfven eigenmodes, which is strongly destabilized via transit resonance with alpha particles. 8 refs., 2 figs.

  10. Toroidal Vortices in Resistive Magnetohydrodynamic Equilibria

    CERN Document Server

    Montgomery, D C; Li, S; Montgomery, David; Bates, Jason W.; Li, Shuojun

    1996-01-01

    Resistive steady states in toroidal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), where Ohm's law must be taken into account, differ considerably from ideal ones. Only for special (and probably unphysical) resistivity profiles can the Lorentz force, in the static force-balance equation, be expressed as the gradient of a scalar and thus cancel the gradient of a scalar pressure. In general, the Lorentz force has a curl directed so as to generate toroidal vorticity. Here, we calculate, for a collisional, highly viscous magnetofluid, the flows that are required for an axisymmetric toroidal steady state, assuming uniform scalar resistivity and viscosity. The flows originate from paired toroidal vortices (in what might be called a ``double smoke ring'' configuration), and are thought likely to be ubiquitous in the interior of toroidally driven magnetofluids of this type. The existence of such vortices is conjectured to characterize magnetofluids beyond the high-viscosity limit in which they are readily calculable.

  11. Toroidal effects on drift wave turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LeBrun, M.J.; Tajima, T.; Gray, M.G.; Furnish, G.; Horton, W.

    1992-09-23

    The universal drift instability and other drift instabilities driven by density and temperature gradients in a toroidal system are investigated in both linear and nonlinear regimes via particle simulation. Runs in toroidal and cylindrical geometry show dramatic differences in plasma behavior, primarily due to the toroidicity-induced coupling of rational surfaces through the poloidal mode number m. In the toroidal system studied, the eigenmodes are seen to possess (i) an elongated, nearly global radial extent (ii) a higher growth rate than in the corresponding cylindrical system, (iii) an eigenfrequency nearly constant with radius, (iv) a global temperature relaxation and enhancement of thermal heat conduction. Most importantly, the measured Xi shows an increase with radius and an absolute value on the order of that observed in experiment. On the basis of our observations, we argue that the increase in Xi with radius observed in experiment is caused by the global nature of heat convection in the presence of toroidicity-induced mode coupling.

  12. Development of Toroidal Core Transformers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leon, Francisco

    2014-05-31

    The original objective of this project was to design, build and test a few prototypes of singlephase dry-type distribution transformers of 25 kVA, 2.4 kV primary to 120 V transformers using cores made of a continuous steel strip shaped like a doughnut (toroid). At different points during the development of the project, the scope was enhanced to include the more practical case of a 25 kVA transformer for a 13.8 kV primary system voltage. Later, the scope was further expanded to design and build a 50 kVA unit to transformer voltage from 7.62 kV to 2x120 V. This is a common transformer used by Con Edison of New York and they are willing to test it in the field. The project officially started in September 2009 and ended in May 2014. The progress was reported periodically to DOE in eighteen quarterly reports. A Continuation Application was submitted to DOE in June 2010. In May 2011 we have requested a non-cost extension of the project. In December 2011, the Statement of Project Objectives (SOPO) was updated to reflect the real conditions and situation of the project as of 2011. A second Continuation Application was made and funding was approved in 2013 by DOE and the end date was extended to May 2014.The technical challenges that were overcome in this project include: the development of the technology to pass the impulse tests, derive a model for the thermal performance, produce a sound mechanical design, and estimate the inrush current. However, the greatest challenge that we faced during the development of the project was the complications of procuring the necessary parts and materials to build the transformers. The actual manufacturing process is relatively fast, but getting all parts together is a very lengthy process. The main products of this project are two prototypes of toroidal distribution transformers of 7.62 kV (to be used in a 13.8 kV system) to 2x120 V secondary (standard utilization voltage); one is rated at 25 kVA and the other at 50 kVA. The 25 k

  13. ATF [Advanced Toroidal Facility]-2 studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Design studies for a low-aspect-ratio, large next-generation stellarator, ATF-II, with high-current-density, high-field, stable NbTi/Cu helical windings are described. The design parameters are an average plasma radius of 0.52 m, a major radius of 2 m, and a field on axis of 4-5 T, with 10 to 15 MW of heating power. Such a device would be comparable in scope to other next-generation stellarators but would have roughly the same aspect ratio as the tokamaks without, however, the need for current drive to sustain steady-state operation. A number of low-aspect-ratio physics issues need to be addressed in the design of ATF-II, primarily compromises between high-beta capability and good confinement properties. A six-field-period Compact Torsatron is chosen as a reference design for ATF-II, and its main features and performance predictions are discussed. An integrated (beta capability and confinement) optimization approach and optimization of superconducting windings are also discussed. 36 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs

  14. Tokamak with in situ magnetohydrodynamic generation of toroidal magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffer, Michael J.

    1986-01-01

    A tokamak apparatus includes an electrically conductive metal pressure vessel for defining a chamber and confining liquid therein. A liner disposed within said chamber defines a toroidal space within the liner and confines gas therein. The metal vessel provides an electrically conductive path linking the toroidal space. Liquid metal is forced outwardly through the chamber outside of the toroidal space to generate electric current in the conductive path and thereby generate a toroidal magnetic field within the toroidal space. Toroidal plasma is developed within the toroidal space about the major axis thereof.

  15. Sliding joint concept for toroidal field coils of a tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A low-cost, compact, copper-coil ignition tokamak is the focus of design studies in FY85. For a minimum-cost machine, the toroidal field (TF) coils must be as compact as practical. On the other hand, smaller TF coils inhibit the assembly and maintenance of the components entrapped by the TF coils, such as the plasma vacuum vessel, limiter, poloidal field coils, etc. If the compact TF coil has at least two demountable electrical joints, removal of the outer part of the TF coil would permit servicing of the entrapped components. The vertical straight leg of a TF coil has the smallest cross-sectional area, but it experiences the largest tensile and compressive forces. The tensile load on the vertical leg can be eliminated if the demountable joints can slide. A possible sliding joint design concept is described in this paper. This sliding joint transfers only current. No forces are transferred from the outer curved leg to the straight leg of the TF coils. The outer curved leg can be separated at the sliding joint to gain access to the components inside the TF coil bore

  16. Pareto optimal design of sectored toroidal superconducting magnet for SMES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhunia, Uttam, E-mail: ubhunia@vecc.gov.in; Saha, Subimal; Chakrabarti, Alok

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • The optimization approach minimizes both the magnet size and necessary cable length of a sectored toroidal SMES unit. • Design approach is suitable for low temperature superconducting cable suitable for medium size SMES unit. • It investigates coil parameters with respect to practical engineering aspects. - Abstract: A novel multi-objective optimization design approach for sectored toroidal superconducting magnetic energy storage coil has been developed considering the practical engineering constraints. The objectives include the minimization of necessary superconductor length and torus overall size or volume, which determines a significant part of cost towards realization of SMES. The best trade-off between the necessary conductor length for winding and magnet overall size is achieved in the Pareto-optimal solutions, the compact magnet size leads to increase in required superconducting cable length or vice versa The final choice among Pareto optimal configurations can be done in relation to other issues such as AC loss during transient operation, stray magnetic field at outside the coil assembly, and available discharge period, which is not considered in the optimization process. The proposed design approach is adapted for a 4.5 MJ/1 MW SMES system using low temperature niobium–titanium based Rutherford type cable. Furthermore, the validity of the representative Pareto solutions is confirmed by finite-element analysis (FEA) with a reasonably acceptable accuracy.

  17. LASL toroidal reversed-field pinch programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The determination of the absolute energy loss due to radiation from impurities in the LASL toroidal reversed-field pinch experiment ZT-S is reported. The measurements show that over half the energy loss is accounted for by this mechanism. Thomson-scattering electron density measurements indicate only a gradual increase in temperature as the filling pressure is reduced, indicating an increased energy loss at lower pressures. Cylindrical and toroidal simulations of the experiment indicate either that a highly radiative pinch boundary or anomalous transport is needed to match the experimental results. New effects on the equilibrium due to plasma flows induced by the toroidal geometry are predicted by the toroidal simulations. The preliminary results on the low-temperature discharge cleaning of the ZT-S torus are reported. A description of the upgrade of the ZT-S experiment and the objectives, construction and theoretical predictions for the new ZT-40 experiment are given. (author)

  18. Toroidal Horizons in Binary Black Hole Mergers

    CERN Document Server

    Bohn, Andy; Teukolsky, Saul A

    2016-01-01

    We find the first binary black hole event horizon with a toroidal topology. It had been predicted that generically the event horizons of merging black holes should briefly have a toroidal topology, but such a phase has never been seen prior to this work. In all previous binary black hole simulations, in the coordinate slicing used to evolve the black holes, the topology of the event horizon transitions directly from two spheres during the inspiral to a single sphere as the black holes merge. We present a coordinate transformation to a foliation of spacelike hypersurfaces that "cut a hole" through the event horizon surface, resulting in a toroidal event horizon. A torus could potentially provide a mechanism for violating topological censorship. However, these toroidal event horizons satisfy topological censorship by construction, because we can always trivially apply the inverse coordinate transformation to remove the topological feature.

  19. Toroidal horizons in binary black hole mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohn, Andy; Kidder, Lawrence E.; Teukolsky, Saul A.

    2016-09-01

    We find the first binary black hole event horizon with a toroidal topology. It has been predicted that generically the event horizons of merging black holes should briefly have a toroidal topology. However, such a phase has never been seen in numerical simulations. Instead, in all previous simulations, the topology of the event horizon transitions directly from two spheres during the inspiral to a single sphere as the black holes merge. We find a coordinate transformation to a foliation of spacelike hypersurfaces that "cut a hole" through the event horizon surface, resulting in a toroidal event horizon, thus reconciling the numerical work with theoretical expectations. The demonstration requires extremely high numerical precision, which is made possible by a new event horizon code described in a companion paper. A torus could potentially provide a mechanism for violating topological censorship. However, these toroidal event horizons satisfy topological censorship by construction, because we can always trivially apply the inverse coordinate transformation to remove the topological feature.

  20. OCLATOR (One Coil Low Aspect Toroidal Reactor)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new approach to construct a tokamak-type reactor(s) is presented. Basically the return conductors of toroidal field coils are eliminated and the toroidal field coil is replaced by one single large coil, around which there will be placed several tokamaks or other toroidal devices. The elimination of return conductors should, in addition to other advantages, improve the accessibility and maintainability of the tokamaks and offer a possible alternative to the search for special materials to withstand large neutron wall loading, as the frequency of changeover would be increased due to minimum downtime. It also makes it possible to have a low aspect ratio tokamak which should improve the β limit, so that a low toroidal magnetic field strength might be acceptable, meaning that the NbTi superconducting wire could be used. This system is named OCLATOR

  1. Experimental study of toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmode (TAE) stability at high q(0)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batha, S.H.; Levinton, F.M. [Fusion Physics and Technology, Torrance, CA (United States); Spong, D.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1995-07-01

    Experiments to destabilize the Toroidicity-induced Alfven Eigenmode (TAE) by energetic alpha particles were performed on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor using deuterium and tritium fuel. To decrease the alpha particle pressure instability threshold, discharges with an elevated value of q(0) > 1.5 were used. By raising q(0), the radial location of the low toroidal-mode-number TAE gaps moves toward the magnetic axis and into alignment with the region of maximum alpha pressure gradient, thereby (in theory) lowering the value of {beta}{sub {alpha}}(0) required for instability. No TAE activity was observed when the central alpha particle {beta}{sub {alpha}} reached 0.08% in a discharge with fusion power of 2.4 MW. Calculations show that the fusion power is within a factor of 1.5 to 3 of the instability threshold.

  2. Low-n shear Alfven spectra in axisymmetric toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In toroidal plasmas, the toroidal magnetic field is nonuniform over a magnetic surface and causes coupling of different poloidal harmonics. It is shown both analytically and numerically that the toroidicity not only breaks up the shear Alfven continuous spectrum, but also creates new, discrete, toroidicity-induced shear Alfven eigenmodes with frequencies inside the continuum gaps. Potential applications of the low-n toroidicity-induced shear Alfven eigenmodes on plasma heating and instabilities are addressed. 17 refs., 4 figs

  3. Anomalous transport in toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When the magnetic moment of particle is conserved, there are three mechanisms which cause anomalous transport. These are: variation of magnetic field strength in flux surface, variation of electrostatic potential in flux surface, and destruction of flux surface. The anomalous transport of different groups of particles resulting from each of these mechanisms is different. This fact can be exploited to determine the cause of transport operative in an experimental situation. This approach can give far more information on the transport than the standard confinement time measurements. To implement this approach, we have developed Monte Carlo codes for toroidal geometries. The equations of motion are developed in a set of non-canonical, practical Boozer co-ordinates by means of Jacobian transformations of the particle drift Hamiltonian equations of motion. Effects of collisions are included by appropriate stochastic changes in the constants of motion. Effects of the loop voltage on particle motions are also included. We plan to apply our method to study two problems: the problem of the hot electron tail observed in edge region of ZT-40, and the energy confinement time in TOKAPOLE II. For the ZT-40 problem three situations will be considered: a single mode in the core, a stochastic region that covers half the minor radius, a stochastic region that covers the entire plasma. A turbulent spectrum of perturbations based on the experimental data of TOKAPOLE II will be developed. This will be used to simulate electron transport resulting from ideal instabilities and resistive instabilities in TOKAPOLE II

  4. Celebrating the Barrel Toroid commissioning

    CERN Multimedia

    Peter Jenni

    ATLAS invited Funding Agency representatives and Laboratory Heads directly related to the funding and construction of the Barrel Toroid for a small ceremony on 13th December 2006 at Point 1, in order to mark the successful first full excitation of the BT (see last eNews). On that date, which was during the December CERN Council week, several of the Funding Agency Heads or their representatives could be present, representing CEA France, INFN Italy, BMBF Germany, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Russia, JINR Dubna and CERN. Speeches were delivered by the ATLAS spokesperson Peter Jenni thanking the Funding Partners in the name of the Collaboration, by Magnet Project Leader Herman ten Kate tracing the BT construction history, and by the CERN Director-General Robert Aymar congratulating all those who have contributed to the successful project. Herman ten Kate addressing the delegates. The text of the introductory address by Peter Jenni is reproduced here. "It is a great pleasure for me to welcome you all here...

  5. Time-Dependent of Accretion Flow with Toroidal Magnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Khesali, Alireza

    2008-01-01

    In the present study time evolution of quasi-spherical polytropic accretion flow with toroidal magnetic field was investigated. The study especially focused the astrophysically important case in which the adiabatic exponent $\\gamma=5/3$. In this scenario, it was assumed that the angular momentum transport is due to viscous turbulence and used $\\alpha$-prescription for kinematic coefficient of viscosity. The equations of accretion flow are solved in a simplified one-dimensional model that neglects the latitudinal dependence of the flow. In order to solve the integrated equations which govern the dynamical behavior of the accretion flow, self-similar solution was used. The solution provides some insight into the dynamics of quasi-spherical accretion flow and avoids many of the strictures of the steady self-similar solution. The effect of the toroidal magnetic field is considered with additional variable $\\beta[=p_{mag}/p_{gas}]$, where $p_{mag}$ and $p_{gas}$ are the magnetic and gas pressure, respectively. The...

  6. Deconfinement in Yang-Mills Theory through Toroidal Compactification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simic, Dusan; Unsal, Mithat; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC

    2011-08-12

    We introduce field theory techniques through which the deconfinement transition of four-dimensional Yang-Mills theory can be moved to a semi-classical domain where it becomes calculable using two-dimensional field theory. We achieve this through a double-trace deformation of toroidally compactified Yang-Mills theory on R{sup 2} x S{sub L}{sup 1} x S{sub {beta}}{sup 1}. At large N, fixed-L, and arbitrary {beta}, the thermodynamics of the deformed theory is equivalent to that of ordinary Yang-Mills theory at leading order in the large N expansion. At fixed-N, small L and a range of {beta}, the deformed theory maps to a two-dimensional theory with electric and magnetic (order and disorder) perturbations, analogs of which appear in planar spin-systems and statistical physics. We show that in this regime the deconfinement transition is driven by the competition between electric and magnetic perturbations in this two-dimensional theory. This appears to support the scenario proposed by Liao and Shuryak regarding the magnetic component of the quark-gluon plasma at RHIC.

  7. Stabilisation of ballooning modes in torsatrons with an externally applied toroidal current

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, W.A. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale, Lausanne (Switzerland). Centre de Recherche en Physique des Plasma (CRPP)

    1996-09-01

    It has been found that ideal ballooning modes can impose very restrictive volume average {beta} limits in torsatrons much below the typical values close to 5% that are required to be economically realisable as reactor systems and it has been shown that externally applied toroidal currents that are peaked can destabilise the Mercier criterion in this type of configuration. We will show here that if the applied currents are hollow, they can stabilise the ballooning modes without triggering Mercier instabilities and as a result raise the limiting {beta}* from 2% to 5%. (author) 3 figs., 10 refs.

  8. Average beta measurement in EXTRAP T1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beginning with the ideal MHD pressure balance equation, an expression for the average poloidal beta, ΒΘ, is derived. A method for unobtrusively measuring the quantities used to evaluate ΒΘ in Extrap T1 is described. The results if a series of measurements yielding ΒΘ as a function of externally applied toroidal field are presented. (author)

  9. Optical force on toroidal nanostructures: toroidal dipole versus renormalized electric dipole

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Xu-Lin; Lin, Zhifang; Sun, Hong-Bo; Chan, C T

    2015-01-01

    We study the optical forces acting on toroidal nanostructures. A great enhancement of optical force is unambiguously identified as originating from the toroidal dipole resonance based on the source-representation, where the distribution of the induced charges and currents is characterized by the three families of electric, magnetic, and toroidal multipoles. On the other hand, the resonant optical force can also be completely attributed to an electric dipole resonance in the alternative field-representation, where the electromagnetic fields in the source-free region are expressed by two sets of electric and magnetic multipole fields based on symmetry. The confusion is resolved by conceptually introducing the irreducible electric dipole, toroidal dipole, and renormalized electric dipole. We demonstrate that the optical force is a powerful tool to identify toroidal response even when its scattering intensity is dwarfed by the conventional electric and magnetic multipoles.

  10. ORNL Levitated Toroidal Multipole Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We are studying confinement of gun-injected and microwave-produced plasmas in a levitated toroidal quadrupole in which internal hoop supports are not present to limit plasma confinement. Electromagnetic levitation is made possible by reducing the 60 Hz skin depth in the copper walls with liquid nitrogen cooling. The cooling also increases the magnetic field lifetime so that an e-folding time of 17 ms was measured after crowbarring. Computations indicate that in a properly designed, larger device, an e-folding time of 100 ms can be reached. Washer-gun hydrogen plasmas and Bostick-type lithium gun plasmas were injected into the levitated quadrupole with typical parameters: B ≥ 3 kG, Te ≈ 3 eV, ni ≈ 109 cm-3, and 1 i i ≈ 1010 cm-3, Te ≈ 30 eV, and τ/τBohm ≈ 30. Density fluctuations (Δn/n) in the region of good field curvature were less than 0.05 and in the region of bad curvature 0.10-0.25. With the removal of the magnetic well (by removing the inner hoop), τ/τBohm and ni each dropped a factor of 4 and Δn/n became greater than 0.25. Recent experiments using 200 W at λ = 3 cm have produced plasmas with higher densities (n > 1011 cm-3 assuming Te ≈ 100 eV), higher temperatures (Te ≈ 100 eV) and longer lifetimes (τ ≈ 80 μs ≈ 40 τBohm) than in the λ = 12 cm experiments. Detailed probe measurements of density and temperature are consistent with models for plasma behaviour based on computed magnetic field plots. Probe data show clear evidence of the changes in heating zones during the variation of the sinusoidal magnetic field and a large obstacle intercepting all flux lines effectively prevents the formation of the plasma. We are also studying a levitated helical hexapole, whose advantages over the quadrupole are a better ratio of connection length to radius of bad curvature and more confinement volume. (author)

  11. A Classification Scheme For Toroidal Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Berger, J; Berger, Jorge; Avron, Joseph E.

    1995-01-01

    We construct a class of periodic tilings of the plane, which corresponds to toroidal arrangements of trivalent atoms, with pentagonal, hexagonal and heptagonal rings. Each tiling is characterized by a set of four integers and determines a toroidal molecule. The tiling rules are motivated by geometric considerations and the tiling patterns are rich enough to describe a wide class of toroidal carbon molecules, with a broad range of shapes and numbers of atoms. The molecular dimensions are simply related to the integers that determine the tiling. The configurational energy and the delocalisation energy of several molecules obtained in this way were computed for Tersoff and H\\"uckel models. The results indicate that many of these molecules are not strained, and may be expected to be stable. We studied the influence of size on the H\\"{u}ckel spectrum: it bears both similarities and differences as compared with the case of tubules.

  12. Ferroic nature of magnetic toroidal order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Anne S; Meier, Dennis; Fiebig, Manfred

    2014-09-05

    Electric dipoles and ferroelectricity violate spatial inversion symmetry, and magnetic dipoles and ferromagnetism break time-inversion symmetry. Breaking both symmetries favours magnetoelectric charge-spin coupling effects of enormous interest, such as multiferroics, skyrmions, polar superconductors, topological insulators or dynamic phenomena such as electromagnons. Extending the rationale, a novel type of ferroic order violating space- and time-inversion symmetry with a single order parameter should exist. This existence is fundamental and the inherent magnetoelectric coupling is technologically interesting. A uniform alignment of magnetic vortices, called ferrotoroidicity, was proposed to represent this state. Here we demonstrate that the magnetic vortex pattern identified in LiCoPO4 exhibits the indispensable hallmark of such a ferroic state, namely hysteretic poling of ferrotoroidic domains in the conjugate toroidal field, along with a distinction of toroidal from non-toroidal poling effects. This consolidates ferrotoroidicity as fourth form of ferroic order.

  13. Packing of charged chains on toroidal geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zhenwei; de la Cruz, Monica Olvera

    2013-01-01

    We study a strongly adsorbed flexible polyelectrolyte chain on tori. In this generalized Thomson problem, the patterns of the adsorbed chain are analyzed in the space of the toroidal coordinates and in terms of the orientation of each chain segment. Various patterns are found, including double spirals, disclination-like structures, Janus tori, and uniform wrappings, arising from the long-range electrostatic interaction and the toroidal geometry. Their broken mirror symmetry is quantitatively characterized by introducing an order parameter, an integral of the torsion. The uniform packing, which breaks the mirror symmetry the least, has the lowest value of the order parameter. In addition, it is found that the electrostatic energy of confined chains on tori conforms to a power law regardless of the screening effect in some typical cases studied. Furthermore, we study random walks on tori that generate chain configurations in the large screening limit or at large thermal fluctuation; some features associated with the toroidal geometry are discussed.

  14. Anomalous transport equations in toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reduced transport equations for a toroidal plasma with fluctuations are derived. These equations include the effects of both anomalous and standard neoclassical transport, and allow clarification of the structure of convective fluxes caused by electrostatic and magnetic fluctuations. Special attention is paid to the combined effects of fluctuations and toroidicity on the transport. The formulation retains the effects of a magnetic field inhomogeneity on the anomalous transport. It is shown that phase space diffusion caused by the gradient in the equilibrium magnetic field appears as a pinch flux in the real space

  15. Models for large superconducting toroidal magnet systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prior to the design of large GJ toroidal magnet systems it is appropriate to procure small scale models, which can simulate their pertinent properties and allow to investigate their relevant phenomena. The important feature of the model is to show under which circumstances the system performance can be extrapolated to large magnets. Based on parameters such as the maximum magnetic field and the current density, the maximum tolerable magneto-mechanical stresses, a simple method of designing model magnets is presented. It is shown how pertinent design parameters are changed when the toroidal dimensions are altered. In addition some conductor cost estimations are given based on reactor power output and wall loading

  16. Toroidal Horizons in Binary Black Hole Mergers

    OpenAIRE

    Bohn, Andy; Kidder, Lawrence E.; Teukolsky, Saul A.

    2016-01-01

    We find the first binary black hole event horizon with a toroidal topology. It had been predicted that generically the event horizons of merging black holes should briefly have a toroidal topology, but such a phase has never been seen prior to this work. In all previous binary black hole simulations, in the coordinate slicing used to evolve the black holes, the topology of the event horizon transitions directly from two spheres during the inspiral to a single sphere as the black holes merge. ...

  17. Toroidal Precession as a Geometric Phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.W. Burby and H. Qin

    2012-09-26

    Toroidal precession is commonly understood as the orbit-averaged toroidal drift of guiding centers in axisymmetric and quasisymmetric configurations. We give a new, more natural description of precession as a geometric phase effect. In particular, we show that the precession angle arises as the holonomy of a guiding center's poloidal trajectory relative to a principal connection. The fact that this description is physically appropriate is borne out with new, manifestly coordinate-independent expressions for the precession angle that apply to all types of orbits in tokamaks and quasisymmetric stellarators alike. We then describe how these expressions may be fruitfully employed in numerical calculations of precession.

  18. Some properties of toroidal isodynamic magnetostatic equilibria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aly, J.-J. [AIM, Unite Mixte de Recherche CEA, CNRS, Universite Paris VII, UMR no 7158, Centre d' Etudes de Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France)

    2011-09-15

    We establish some general properties of a 3D isodynamic magnetostatic equilibrium admitting a family of nested toroidal flux surfaces. In particular, we use the virial theorem to prove a simple relation between the total pressure (magnetic + thermal) and the magnetic pressure on each flux surface, and we derive some useful consequences of the latter. We also show the constancy on each rational surface of two integrals along magnetic lines. As a simple application of our results, we show the nonexistence of an equilibrium with vanishing toroidal current, and of an equilibrium with closed lines.

  19. The effect of sheared toroidal rotation on pressure driven magnetic islands in toroidal plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegna, C. C.

    2016-05-01

    The impact of sheared toroidal rotation on the evolution of pressure driven magnetic islands in tokamak plasmas is investigated using a resistive magnetohydrodynamics model augmented by a neoclassical Ohm's law. Particular attention is paid to the asymptotic matching data as the Mercier indices are altered in the presence of sheared flow. Analysis of the nonlinear island Grad-Shafranov equation shows that sheared flows tend to amplify the stabilizing pressure/curvature contribution to pressure driven islands in toroidal tokamaks relative to the island bootstrap current contribution. As such, sheared toroidal rotation tends to reduce saturated magnetic island widths.

  20. Electromagnetic toroidal excitations in matter and free space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papasimakis, N; Fedotov, V A; Savinov, V; Raybould, T A; Zheludev, N I

    2016-03-01

    The toroidal dipole is a localized electromagnetic excitation, distinct from the magnetic and electric dipoles. While the electric dipole can be understood as a pair of opposite charges and the magnetic dipole as a current loop, the toroidal dipole corresponds to currents flowing on the surface of a torus. Toroidal dipoles provide physically significant contributions to the basic characteristics of matter including absorption, dispersion and optical activity. Toroidal excitations also exist in free space as spatially and temporally localized electromagnetic pulses propagating at the speed of light and interacting with matter. We review recent experimental observations of resonant toroidal dipole excitations in metamaterials and the discovery of anapoles, non-radiating charge-current configurations involving toroidal dipoles. While certain fundamental and practical aspects of toroidal electrodynamics remain open for the moment, we envision that exploitation of toroidal excitations can have important implications for the fields of photonics, sensing, energy and information. PMID:26906961

  1. On the stabilization of toroidal pinches by finite larmor radius effects and toroidal magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radial eigenvalue problem for internal modes in a large aspect ratio toriodal pinch has been solved. A particularly stable regime for a weak but nonzero toroidal magnetic field has been found. (31 refs.)

  2. ATLAS: Full power for the toroid magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The 9th of November was a memorable day for ATLAS. Just before midnight, the gigantic Barrel toroid magnet reached its nominal field of 4 teslas in the coil windings, with an electrical current of 21000 amperes (21 kA) passing through the eight superconducting coils (as seen on the graph). This achievement was obtained after several weeks of commissioning. The ATLAS Barrel Toroid was first cooled down for about six weeks in July-August to -269°C (4.8 K) and then powered up step-by-step in successive test sessions to 21 kA. This is 0.5 kA above the current required to produce the nominal magnetic field. Afterwards, the current was safely switched off and the stored magnetic energy of 1.1 gigajoules was dissipated in the cold mass, raising its temperature to a safe -218°C (55 K). 'We can now say that the ATLAS Barrel Toroid is ready for physics,' said Herman ten Kate, project leader for the ATLAS magnet system. The ATLAS barrel toroid magnet is the result of a close collaboration between the magnet la...

  3. Reduced Magnetohydrodynamic Equations in Toroidal Geometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Shen-Ming; YU Guo-Yang

    2001-01-01

    By applying a new assumption of density, I.e. R2 p = const, the continuity equation is satisfied to the order ofe2`+with e being the inverse aspect ratio. In the case of large aspect ratio, a set of reduced magnetohydrodynamicequations in toroidal geometry are obtained. The new assumption about the density is supported by experimentalobservation to some extent.

  4. Chiral Anomaly in Toroidal Carbon Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Sasaki, K.

    2001-01-01

    It is pointed out that the chiral anomaly in 1+1 dimensions should be observed in toroidal carbon nanotubes on a planar geometry with varying magnetic field. We show that the chiral anomaly is closely connected with the persistent current in a one-dimensional metallic ring.

  5. Celebration for the ATLAS Barrel Toroid magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Representatives from Funding Agencies and Barrel Toroid Magnet Laboratories during the ceremony. From left to right: Jean Zinn-Justin (Head of DAPNIA/CEA/Saclay), CERN Director-General Robert Aymar, and Roberto Petronzio (President INFN).Allan Clark (DPNC University Geneva) and Enrique Fernandez (IFAE Barcelona) were among the guests visiting the ATLAS cavern. The barrel toroid is visible in the background. A celebration took place at Point 1 on 13 December to toast the recent powering-up of the ATLAS barrel toroid magnet to full field (Bulletin No. 47-48/06). About 70 guests were invited to attend, mainly composed of representatives from funding partners and key members of the laboratory management teams of the barrel toroid magnet, representing CEA France, INFN Italy, BMBF Germany, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Russia, JINR Dubna and CERN. An introductory speech by ATLAS spokesperson Peter Jenni the scene for evening. This was followed by the ATLAS magnet system project leader Herman Ten Kate's account of the...

  6. ATLAS Barrel Toroid magnet reached nominal field

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

     On 9 November the barrel toroid magnet reached its nominal field of 4 teslas, with an electrical current of 21 000 amperes (21 kA) passing through the eight superconducting coils as shown on this graph

  7. Matter in the form of toroidal electromagnetic vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, Wilhelm F.

    2015-09-01

    The creation of charged elementary particles from neutral photons is explained as a conversion process of electromagnetic (EM) energy from linear to circular motion at the speed of light into two localized, toroidal shaped vortices of trapped EM energy that resist change of motion, perceptible as particles with inertia and hence mass. The photon can be represented as a superposition of left and right circular polarized transverse electric fields of opposite polarity originating from a common zero potential axis, the optical axis of the photon. If these components are separated by interaction with a strong field (nucleon) they would curl up into two electromagnetic vortices (EMV) due to longitudinal magnetic field components forming toroids. These vortices are perceptible as opposite charged elementary particles e+/- . These spinning toroids generate extended oscillating fields that interact with stationary field oscillations. The velocity-dependent frequency differences cause beat signals equivalent to matter waves, leading to interference. The extended fields entangled with every particle explain wave particle duality issues. Spin and magnetic moment are the natural outcome of these gyrating particles. As the energy and hence mass of the electron increases with acceleration so does its size shrink proportional to its reduced wavelength. The artificial weak and strong nuclear forces can be easily explained as different manifestations of the intermediate EM forces. The unstable neutron consists of a proton surrounded by a contracted and captured electron. The associated radial EM forces represent the weak nuclear force. The deuteron consists of two axially separated protons held together by a centrally captured electron. The axial EM forces represent the strong nuclear force, providing stability for "neutrons" only within nucleons. The same principles were applied to determine the geometries of force-balanced nuclei. The alpha-particle emerges as a very compact

  8. Dynamical model for the toroidal sporadic meteors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokorný, Petr; Vokrouhlický, David [Institute of Astronomy, Charles University, V Holešovičkách 2, CZ-18000 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Nesvorný, David [Department of Space Studies, Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut Street, Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States); Campbell-Brown, Margaret; Brown, Peter, E-mail: petr.pokorny@volny.cz, E-mail: vokrouhl@cesnet.cz, E-mail: davidn@boulder.swri.edu, E-mail: margaret.campbell@uwo.ca, E-mail: pbrown@uwo.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 3K7 (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    More than a decade of radar operations by the Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar have allowed both young and moderately old streams to be distinguished from the dispersed sporadic background component. The latter has been categorized according to broad radiant regions visible to Earth-based observers into three broad classes: the helion and anti-helion source, the north and south apex sources, and the north and south toroidal sources (and a related arc structure). The first two are populated mainly by dust released from Jupiter-family comets and new comets. Proper modeling of the toroidal sources has not to date been accomplished. Here, we develop a steady-state model for the toroidal source of the sporadic meteoroid complex, compare our model with the available radar measurements, and investigate a contribution of dust particles from our model to the whole population of sporadic meteoroids. We find that the long-term stable part of the toroidal particles is mainly fed by dust released by Halley type (long period) comets (HTCs). Our synthetic model reproduces most of the observed features of the toroidal particles, including the most troublesome low-eccentricity component, which is due to a combination of two effects: particles' ability to decouple from Jupiter and circularize by the Poynting-Robertson effect, and large collision probability for orbits similar to that of the Earth. Our calibrated model also allows us to estimate the total mass of the HTC-released dust in space and check the flux necessary to maintain the cloud in a steady state.

  9. Compact Lumps

    CERN Document Server

    Bazeia, D; Menezes, R

    2015-01-01

    We study the presence of lumplike solutions in models described by a single real scalar field with standard kinematics in two-dimensional spacetime. The results show several distinct models that support the presence of bell-shaped, lumplike structures which may live in a compact space.

  10. Internal Kink Mode Dynamics in High-beta NSTX Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.E. Menard; R.E. Bell; E.D. Fredrickson; D.A. Gates; S.M. Kaye; B.P. LeBlanc; S.S. Medley; W. Park; S.A. Sabbagh; A. Sontag; D. Stutman; K. Tritz; W. Zhu; the NSTX Research Team

    2004-12-22

    Saturated internal kink modes have been observed in many of the highest toroidal {beta} discharges of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). These modes often cause rotation flattening in the plasma core, can degrade energy confinement, and in some cases contribute to the complete loss of plasma angular momentum and stored energy. Characteristics of the modes are measured using soft X-ray, kinetic profile, and magnetic diagnostics. Toroidal flows approaching Alfvenic speeds, island pressure peaking, and enhanced viscous and diamagnetic effects associated with high-{beta} may contribute to mode nonlinear stabilization. These saturation mechanisms are investigated for NSTX parameters and compared to experimental data.

  11. Toroidal dipole excitations in metamolecules formed by interacting plasmonic nanorods

    CERN Document Server

    Watson, Derek W; Ruostekoski, Janne; Fedotov, Vassili A; Zheludev, Nikolay I

    2015-01-01

    We show how the elusive toroidal dipole moment appears as a radiative excitation eigenmode in a metamolecule resonator that is formed by pairs of plasmonic nanorods. We analyze one such nanorod configuration - a toroidal metamolecule. We find that the radiative interactions in the toroidal metamolecule can be qualitatively represented by a theoretical model based on an electric point dipole arrangement. Both a finite-size rod model and the point dipole approximation demonstrate how the toroidal dipole moment is subradiant and difficult to excite by incident light. By means of breaking the geometric symmetry of the metamolecule, the toroidal mode can be excited by linearly polarized light and we provide simple optimization protocols for maximizing the toroidal dipole mode excitation. This opens up possibilities for simplified control and driving of metamaterial arrays consisting of toroidal dipole unit-cell resonators.

  12. Compact NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bluemich, Bernhard; Haber-Pohlmeier, Sabina; Zia, Wasif [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Technische und Makromolekulare Chemie (ITMC)

    2014-06-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is the most popular method for chemists to analyze molecular structures, while Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a non-invasive diagnostic tool for medical doctors that provides high-contrast images of biological tissue. In both applications, the sample (or patient) is positioned inside a large, superconducting magnet to magnetize the atomic nuclei. Interrogating radio-frequency pulses result in frequency spectra that provide the chemist with molecular information, the medical doctor with anatomic images, and materials scientist with NMR relaxation parameters. Recent advances in magnet technology have led to a variety of small permanent magnets to allow compact and low-cost instruments. The goal of this book is to provide an introduction to the practical use of compact NMR at a level nearly as basic as the operation of a smart phone.

  13. Compact NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is the most popular method for chemists to analyze molecular structures, while Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a non-invasive diagnostic tool for medical doctors that provides high-contrast images of biological tissue. In both applications, the sample (or patient) is positioned inside a large, superconducting magnet to magnetize the atomic nuclei. Interrogating radio-frequency pulses result in frequency spectra that provide the chemist with molecular information, the medical doctor with anatomic images, and materials scientist with NMR relaxation parameters. Recent advances in magnet technology have led to a variety of small permanent magnets to allow compact and low-cost instruments. The goal of this book is to provide an introduction to the practical use of compact NMR at a level nearly as basic as the operation of a smart phone.

  14. Solar concentrator with a toroidal relay module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jhe-Syuan; Liang, Chao-Wen

    2015-10-01

    III-V multijunction solar cells require solar concentrators with a high concentration ratio to reduce per watt cost and to increase solar energy transforming efficiency. This paper discusses a novel solar concentrator design that features a high concentration ratio, high transfer efficiency, thin profile design, and a high solar acceptance angle. The optical design of the concentrator utilizes a toroidal relay module, which includes both the off-axis relay lens and field lens design in a single concentric toroidal lens shape. The optical design concept of the concentrator is discussed and the simulation results are shown. The given exemplary design has an aspect ratio of 0.24, a high averaged optical concentration ratio 1230×, a maximum efficiency of 76.8%, and the solar acceptance angle of ±0.9°.

  15. Antimicrobial Peptides in Toroidal and Cylindrical Pores

    OpenAIRE

    Mihajlovic, Maja; Lazaridis, Themis

    2010-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are small, usually cationic peptides, which permeabilize biological membranes. Their mechanism of action is still not well understood. Here we investigate the preference of alamethicin and melittin for pores of different shapes, using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the peptides in pre-formed toroidal and cylindrical pores. When an alamethicin hexamer is initially embedded in a cylindrical pore, at the end of the simulation the pore remains cylindrical or ...

  16. Kinetic Damping of Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G.Y. Fu; H.L. Berk; A. Pletzer

    2005-05-03

    The damping of Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes in JET plasmas is investigated by using a reduced kinetic model. Typically no significant damping is found to occur near the center of the plasma due to mode conversion to kinetic Alfven waves. In contrast, continuum damping from resonance near the plasma edge may be significant, and when it is, it gives rise to damping rates that are compatible with the experimental observations.

  17. Toroidal geometry subroutines for MORSE-CG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The equations, coding, and procedures that are required to include a torus in the Combinatorial Geometry subroutines of the MORSE-CG code are described. The derivation and solutions of the quartic equation that describes a torus along with additional subroutines and the modifications to existing subroutines required to carry out the transport of neutrons and gamma rays in toroidal geometry are presented. The input requirements and a sample problem are included

  18. Stellarator approach to toroidal plasma confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overview is presented of the development and current status of the stellarator approach to controlled thermonuclear confinement. Recent experimental, theoretical, and systems developments have made this concept a viable option for the evolution of the toroidal confinement program. Some experimental study of specific problems associated with departure from two-dimensional symmetry must be undertaken before the full advantages and opportunities of steady-state, net-current-free operation can be realized

  19. Aspects of Tokamak toroidal magnet protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, R.W.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1979-07-01

    Simple but conservative geometric models are used to estimate the potential for damage to a Tokamak reactor inner wall and blanket due to a toroidal magnet field collapse. The only potential hazard found to exist is due to the MHD pressure rise in a lithium blanket. A survey is made of proposed protection methods for superconducting toroidal magnets. It is found that the two general classifications of protection methods are thermal and electrical. Computer programs were developed which allow the toroidal magnet set to be modeled as a set of circular filaments. A simple thermal model of the conductor was used which allows heat transfer to the magnet structure and which includes the effect of temperature dependent properties. To be effective in large magnets an electrical protection system should remove at least 50% of the stored energy in the protection circuit assuming that all of the superconductor in the circuit quenches when the circuit is activated. A protection system design procedure based on this criterion was developed.

  20. Pareto optimal design of sectored toroidal superconducting magnet for SMES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhunia, Uttam; Saha, Subimal; Chakrabarti, Alok

    2014-10-01

    A novel multi-objective optimization design approach for sectored toroidal superconducting magnetic energy storage coil has been developed considering the practical engineering constraints. The objectives include the minimization of necessary superconductor length and torus overall size or volume, which determines a significant part of cost towards realization of SMES. The best trade-off between the necessary conductor length for winding and magnet overall size is achieved in the Pareto-optimal solutions, the compact magnet size leads to increase in required superconducting cable length or vice versa The final choice among Pareto optimal configurations can be done in relation to other issues such as AC loss during transient operation, stray magnetic field at outside the coil assembly, and available discharge period, which is not considered in the optimization process. The proposed design approach is adapted for a 4.5 MJ/1 MW SMES system using low temperature niobium-titanium based Rutherford type cable. Furthermore, the validity of the representative Pareto solutions is confirmed by finite-element analysis (FEA) with a reasonably acceptable accuracy.

  1. Macroscopic electromagnetic response of metamaterials with toroidal resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Savinov, V; Zheludev, N I

    2013-01-01

    Toroidal dipole, first described by Ia. B. Zeldovich [Sov. Phys. JETP 33, 1184 (1957)], is a distinct electromagnetic excitation that differs both from the electric and the magnetic dipoles. It has a number of intriguing properties: static toroidal nuclear dipole is responsible for parity violation in atomic spectra; interactions between static toroidal dipole and oscillating magnetic dipole are claimed to violate Newton's Third Law while non-stationary charge-current configurations involving toroidal multipoles have been predicted to produce vector potential in the absence of electromagnetic fields. Existence of the toroidal response in metamaterials was recently demonstrated and is now a growing field of research. However, no direct analytical link has yet been established between the transmission and reflection of macroscopic electromagnetic media and toroidal dipole excitations. To address this essential gap in electromagnetic theory we have developed an analytical approach linking microscopic and macrosc...

  2. An overview on research developments of toroidal continuously variable transmissions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    As environmental protection agencies enact new regulations for automotive fuel economy and emission, the toroidal continuously variable transmissions (CVTs) keep on contribute to the advent of system technologies for better fuel consumption of automobiles with internal combustion engines (ICE). Toroidal CVTs use infinitely adjustable drive ratios instead of stepped gears to achieve optimal performance. Toroidal CVTs are one of the earliest patents to the automotive world but their torque capacities and reliability have limitations in the past. New developments and implementations in the control strategies, and several key technologies have led to development of more robust toroidal CVTs, which enables more extensive automotive application of toroidal CTVs. This paper concerns with the current development, upcoming and progress set in the context of the past development and the traditional problems associated with toroidal CVTs.

  3. Toroid cavity/coil NMR multi-detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerald, II, Rex E.; Meadows, Alexander D.; Gregar, Joseph S.; Rathke, Jerome W.

    2007-09-18

    An analytical device for rapid, non-invasive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of multiple samples using a single spectrometer is provided. A modified toroid cavity/coil detector (TCD), and methods for conducting the simultaneous acquisition of NMR data for multiple samples including a protocol for testing NMR multi-detectors are provided. One embodiment includes a plurality of LC resonant circuits including spatially separated toroid coil inductors, each toroid coil inductor enveloping its corresponding sample volume, and tuned to resonate at a predefined frequency using a variable capacitor. The toroid coil is formed into a loop, where both ends of the toroid coil are brought into coincidence. Another embodiment includes multiple micro Helmholtz coils arranged on a circular perimeter concentric with a central conductor of the toroid cavity.

  4. Macroscopic electromagnetic response of metamaterials with toroidal resonances

    OpenAIRE

    Savinov, V.; Fedotov, V. A.; Zheludev, N. I.

    2013-01-01

    Toroidal dipole, first described by Ia. B. Zeldovich [Sov. Phys. JETP 33, 1184 (1957)], is a distinct electromagnetic excitation that differs both from the electric and the magnetic dipoles. It has a number of intriguing properties: static toroidal nuclear dipole is responsible for parity violation in atomic spectra; interactions between static toroidal dipole and oscillating magnetic dipole are claimed to violate Newton's Third Law while non-stationary charge-current configurations involving...

  5. Toroidal magnetic fields for protecting astronauts from ionizing radiation in long duration deep space missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papini, Paolo; Spillantini, Piero

    2014-11-01

    Among the configurations of superconducting magnet structures proposed for protecting manned spaceships or manned deep space bases from ionizing radiation, toroidal ones are the most appealing for the efficient use of the magnetic field, being most of the incoming particle directions perpendicular to the induction lines of the field. The parameters of the toroid configuration essentially depend from the shape and volume of the habitat to be protected and the level of protection to be guaranteed. Two options are considered: (1) the magnetic system forming with the habitat a unique complex (compact toroid) to be launched as one piece; (2) the magnetic system to be launched separately from the habitat and assembled around it in space (large toroid). In first option the system habitat+toroid is assumed to have a cylindrical shape, with the toroid surrounding a cylindrical habitat, and launched with its axis on the axis of the launching system. The outer diameter is limited by the diameter of the shroud, which for present and foreseeable launching systems cannot be more than 9 m. The habitat is assumed to be 10 m long and have a 4 m diameter, leaving about 2 m all around for the protecting magnetic field. The volume of the habitat results about 100 m3, barely sufficient to a somewhat small crew (4-5 members) for a long duration (≅2 years) mission. Technological problems and the huge magnetic pressure exerted on the inner cylindrical conductor of the toroid limit to not more than 4 T the maximum intensity of the magnetic field. With these parameters the mitigation of the dose inside the habitat due to the galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) is about 70% at minimum solar activity, while also most intense solar events cannot significantly contribute to the dose. The toroidal magnetic field can be produced by a large number of windings of the superconducting cable, arranged in cylindrical symmetry around the habitat to form continuous inner and outer cylindrical surfaces

  6. Compact extra dimensions in cosmologies with f(T) structure

    CERN Document Server

    Fiorini, Franco; Vasquez, Yerko

    2013-01-01

    The presence of compact extra dimensions in cosmological scenarios in the context of f(T)-like gravities is discussed. For the case of toroidal compactifications, the analysis is performed in an arbitrary number of extra dimensions. Spherical topologies for the extra dimensions are then carefully studied in six and seven spacetime dimensions, where the proper vielbein fields responsible for the parallelization process are found.

  7. Toroidal plasma enhanced CVD of diamond films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An inductively coupled toroidal plasma source is used as an alternative to microwave plasmas for chemical vapor deposition of diamond films. The source, operating at a frequency of 400 kHz, synthesizes diamond films from a mixture of argon, methane, and hydrogen. The toroidal design has been adapted to create a highly efficient environment for diamond film deposition: high gas temperature and a short distance from the sample to the plasma core. Using a toroidal plasma geometry operating in the medium frequency band allows for efficient (≈90%) coupling of AC line power to the plasma and a scalable path to high-power and large-area operation. In test runs, the source generates a high flux of atomic hydrogen over a large area, which is favorable for diamond film growth. Using a deposition temperature of 900–1050 °C and a source to sample distance of 0.1–2.0 cm, diamond films are deposited onto silicon substrates. The results showed that the deposition rate of the diamond films could be controlled using the sample temperature and source to sample spacing. The results also show the films exhibit good-quality polycrystalline diamond as verified by Raman spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy. The scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction results show that the samples exhibit diamond (111) and diamond (022) crystallites. The Raman results show that the sp3 peak has a narrow spectral width (FWHM 12 ± 0.5 cm−1) and that negligible amounts of the sp2 band are present, indicating good-quality diamond films

  8. 3D Printing the ATLAS' barrel toroid

    CERN Document Server

    Goncalves, Tiago Barreiro

    2016-01-01

    The present report summarizes my work as part of the Summer Student Programme 2016 in the CERN IR-ECO-TSP department (International Relations – Education, Communication & Outreach – Teacher and Student Programmes). Particularly, I worked closely with the S’Cool LAB team on a science education project. This project included the 3D designing, 3D printing, and assembling of a model of the ATLAS’ barrel toroid. A detailed description of the project' development is presented and a short manual on how to use 3D printing software and hardware is attached.

  9. Polar interface phonons in ionic toroidal systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, N D; Evrard, R; Stroscio, Michael A

    2016-09-01

    We use the dielectric continuum model to obtain the polar (Fuchs-Kliewer like) interface vibration modes of toroids made of ionic materials either embedded in a different material or in vacuum, with applications to nanotoroids specially in mind. We report the frequencies of these modes and describe the electric potential they produce. We establish the quantum-mechanical Hamiltonian appropriate for their interaction with electric charges. This Hamiltonian can be used to describe the effect of this interaction on different types of charged particles either inside or outside the torus. PMID:27357246

  10. Plasma current resonance in asymmetric toroidal systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazeltine, R. D. [Institute for Fusion Studies, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Catto, Peter J. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 167 Albany Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    The well-known singularity in the magnetic differential equation for plasma current in an asymmetric toroidal confinement system is resolved by including in the pressure tensor corrections stemming from finite Larmor radius. The result provides an estimate of the amplitude of spikes in the parallel current that occur on rational magnetic surfaces. Resolution of the singularity is shown to depend on both the ambipolarity condition—the requirement of zero surface-averaged radial current—and the form of the magnetic differential equation near the rational surface.

  11. Toroidal membrane vesicles in spherical confinement

    CERN Document Server

    Bouzar, Lila; Müller, Martin Michael

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the morphology of a toroidal fluid membrane vesicle confined inside a spherical container. The equilibrium shapes are assembled in a geometrical phase diagram as a function of scaled area and reduced volume of the membrane. For small area the vesicle can adopt its free form. When increasing the area, the membrane cannot avoid contact and touches the confining sphere along a circular contact line, which extends to a zone of contact for higher area. The elastic energies of the equilibrium shapes are compared to those of their confined counterparts of spherical topology to predict under which conditions a topology change is favored energetically.

  12. Toroidal membrane vesicles in spherical confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzar, Lila; Menas, Ferhat; Müller, Martin Michael

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the morphology of a toroidal fluid membrane vesicle confined inside a spherical container. The equilibrium shapes are assembled in a geometrical phase diagram as a function of scaled area and reduced volume of the membrane. For small area the vesicle can adopt its free form. When increasing the area, the membrane cannot avoid contact and touches the confining sphere along a circular contact line, which extends to a zone of contact for higher area. The elastic energies of the equilibrium shapes are compared to those of their confined counterparts of spherical topology to predict under which conditions a topology change is favored energetically.

  13. Polar interface phonons in ionic toroidal systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, N D; Evrard, R; Stroscio, Michael A

    2016-09-01

    We use the dielectric continuum model to obtain the polar (Fuchs-Kliewer like) interface vibration modes of toroids made of ionic materials either embedded in a different material or in vacuum, with applications to nanotoroids specially in mind. We report the frequencies of these modes and describe the electric potential they produce. We establish the quantum-mechanical Hamiltonian appropriate for their interaction with electric charges. This Hamiltonian can be used to describe the effect of this interaction on different types of charged particles either inside or outside the torus.

  14. Polar interface phonons in ionic toroidal systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, N. D.; Evrard, R.; Stroscio, Michael A.

    2016-09-01

    We use the dielectric continuum model to obtain the polar (Fuchs–Kliewer like) interface vibration modes of toroids made of ionic materials either embedded in a different material or in vacuum, with applications to nanotoroids specially in mind. We report the frequencies of these modes and describe the electric potential they produce. We establish the quantum-mechanical Hamiltonian appropriate for their interaction with electric charges. This Hamiltonian can be used to describe the effect of this interaction on different types of charged particles either inside or outside the torus.

  15. General Atomic's superconducting toroidal field coil concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    General Atomic's concept for a superconducting toroidal field coil is presented. The concept is generic for large tokamak devices, while a specific design is indicated for a 3.8 meter (major radius) ignition/burn machine. The concept utilizes bath cooled NbTi conductor to generate a peak field of 10 tesla at 4.2 K. The design is simple and straightforward, requires a minimum of developmental effort, and draws extensively upon the perspective of past experience in the design and construction of large superconducting magnets for high energy physics. Thus, the primary emphasis is upon economy, reliability, and expeditious construction scheduling. (author)

  16. Pulsar Wind Nebulae with Thick Toroidal Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Chevalier, Roger A.; Reynolds, Stephen P.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate a class of pulsar wind nebulae that show synchrotron emission from a thick toroidal structure. The best studied such object is the small radio and X-ray nebula around the Vela pulsar, which can be interpreted as the result of interaction of a mildly supersonic inward flow with the recent pulsar wind. Such a flow near the center of a supernova remnant can be produced in a transient phase when the reverse shock reaches the center of the remnant. Other nebulae with a thick toroida...

  17. Compact ignition tokamak physics and engineering basis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) is a high-field, compact tokamak design whose objective is the study of physics issues associated with burning plasmas. The toroidal and poloidal field coils employ a copper-steel laminate, manufactured by explosive-bonding techniques, to support the forces generated by the design fields: 10 T toroidal field at the plasma center; 21 T in the OH solenoid. A combination of internal and external PF coils provides control of the equilibrium and the ability to sweep the magnetic separatrix across the divertor plates during a pulse. At temperatures and βα levels characteristic of ITER designs, the fusion power in CIT approaches 800 MW and can be the limiting factor in the pulse length. Ignition requires that the confinement time exceed present L-mode scalings by about a factor of two, which is anticipated to occur as a result of the operational flexibility incorporated into the design. Conventional operating limits given by 20 e and qψ ≤ 3.2 have been chosen and, in the case of MHD limits, have been justified by ideal stability analysis. The power required for CIT ignition ranges from 10 MW to 40 MW or more, depending on confinement assumptions, and either ICRF or ECRF heating, or both, will be used. (author). 17 refs, 6 figs, 1 tab

  18. Microwave produced plasma in a Toroidal Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, A. K.; Edwards, W. F.; Held, E. D.

    2010-11-01

    A currentless toroidal plasma device exhibits a large range of interesting basic plasma physics phenomena. Such a device is not in equilibrium in a strict magneto hydrodynamic sense. There are many sources of free energy in the form of gradients in plasma density, temperature, the background magnetic field and the curvature of the magnetic field. These free energy sources excite waves and instabilities which have been the focus of studies in several devices in last two decades. A full understanding of these simple plasmas is far from complete. At Utah State University we have recently designed and installed a microwave plasma generation system on a small tokamak borrowed from the University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada. Microwaves are generated at 2.45 GHz in a pulsed dc mode using a magnetron from a commercial kitchen microwave oven. The device is equipped with horizontal and vertical magnetic fields and a transformer to impose a toroidal electric field for current drive. Plasmas can be obtained over a wide range of pressure with and without magnetic fields. We present some preliminary measurements of plasma density and potential profiles. Measurements of plasma temperature at different operating conditions are also presented.

  19. Aspects of Tokamak toroidal magnet protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simple but conservative geometric models are used to estimate the potential for damage to a Tokamak reactor inner wall and blanket due to a toroidal magnet field collapse. The ofly potential hazard found to exist is due to the MHD pressure rise in a lithium blanket. A survey is made of proposed protection methods for superconducting torgidal magnets. It is found that the two general classificatigls of protectign methods are thermal and electrical. Computer programs were developed which aldow the toroidal magnet set to be modeled as a set of circular filaments. A simple thermal model of the conductor was used which allows heat transfer to the magnet structure and which includes the effect of temperature dependent properties. To be effective in large magnets an electrical protection system should remove at least 50% of the stored energy in the protection circuit assuming that all of the superconductor in the circuit quenches when the circuit is activated. A protection system design procedure based on this criterion was developed

  20. Propulsion using the electron spiral toroid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new propulsion method is proposed which could potentially reduce propellant needed for space travel by three orders of magnitude. It uses the newly patented electron spiral toroid (EST), which stores energy as magnetic field energy. The EST is a hollow toroid of electrons, all spiraling in parallel paths in a thin outer shell. The electrons satisfy the coupling condition, forming an electron matrix. Stability is assured as long as the coupling condition is satisfied. The EST is held in place with a small external electric field; without an external magnetic field. The EST system is contained in a vacuum chamber. The EST can be thought of as an energetic entity, with electrons at 10,000 electron volts. Propulsion would not use combustion, but would heat propellant through elastic collisions with the EST surface and eject them for thrust. Chemical rocket combustion heats propellant to 4000 deg. C; an EST will potentially heat the propellant 29,000 times as much, reducing propellant needs accordingly. The thrust can be turned ON and OFF. The EST can be recharged as needed

  1. Transport and Dynamics in Toroidal Fusion Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnack, Dalton D

    2006-05-16

    This document reports the successful completion of the OFES Theory Milestone for FY2005, namely, Perform parametric studies to better understand the edge physics regimes of laboratory experiments. Simulate at increased resolution (up to 20 toroidal modes), with density evolution, late into the nonlinear phase and compare results from different types of edge modes. Simulate a single case including a study of heat deposition on nearby material walls. The linear stability properties and nonlinear evolution of Edge Localized Modes (ELMs) in tokamak plasmas are investigated through numerical computation. Data from the DIII-D device at General Atomics (http://fusion.gat.com/diii-d/) is used for the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibria, but edge parameters are varied to reveal important physical effects. The equilibrium with very low magnetic shear produces an unstable spectrum that is somewhat insensitive to dissipation coefficient values. Here, linear growth rates from the non-ideal NIMROD code (http://nimrodteam.org) agree reasonably well with ideal, i.e. non-dissipative, results from the GATO global linear stability code at low toroidal mode number (n) and with ideal results from the ELITE edge linear stability code at moderate to high toroidal mode number. Linear studies with a more realistic sequence of MHD equilibria (based on DIII-D discharge 86166) produce more significant discrepancies between the ideal and non-ideal calculations. The maximum growth rate for the ideal computations occurs at toroidal mode index n=10, whereas growth rates in the non-ideal computations continue to increase with n unless strong anisotropic thermal conduction is included. Recent modeling advances allow drift effects associated with the Hall electric field and gyroviscosity to be considered. A stabilizing effect can be observed in the preliminary results, but while the distortion in mode structure is readily apparent at n=40, the growth rate is only 13% less than the non-ideal MHD

  2. Modular Coil Design Developments for the National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williamson, David E [ORNL; Brooks, A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Brown, T. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Chrzanowski, J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Cole, Michael J [ORNL; Fan, H-M. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Freudenberg, Kevin D [ORNL; Fogarty, Paul J [ORNL; Hargrove, Tom [ORNL; Heitzenroeder, P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Lovett, G. [MK Technologies, Knoxville, TN; Miller, P. [MK Technologies, Knoxville, TN; Myatt, R. [Myatt Consulting, Norfolk, MA; Nelson, Brad E [ORNL; Reiersen, W. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Strickler, Dennis J [ORNL

    2005-01-01

    The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) is a quasi-axisymmetric facility that combines the high beta and good confinement features of an advanced tokamak with the low current, disruption-free characteristics of a stellarator. The experiment is based on a three field-period plasma configuration with an average major radius of 1.4 m, a minor radius of 0.3m, and a toroidal magnetic field on axis of up to 2 T. The modular coils are set in a complex assembly of four coil systems that surround the highly shaped plasma. There are six each of three coil types in the assembly for a total of 18 modular coils. The coils are constructed by winding copper cable onto a cast stainless steel winding form that has been machined to high accuracy, so that the current center of the winding pack is within 1.5 mm of its theoretical position. The modular coils operate at a temperature of 80K and are subjected to rapid heating and stress during a pulse. At this time, the project has completed construction of several prototype components which validate the fabrication and inspection processes that are planned for the production coils. In addition, some advanced techniques for error-field compensation and assembly simulation using computer-aided design (CAD) have been developed.

  3. Modular coil design developments for the National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williamson, D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6169 (United States)]. E-mail: williamsonde@ornl.gov; Brooks, A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, NJ 08502 (United States); Brown, T. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, NJ 08502 (United States); Chrzanowski, J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, NJ 08502 (United States); Cole, M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6169 (United States); Fan, H.-M. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, NJ 08502 (United States); Freudenberg, K. [BWXT Y-12, P.O. Box 2009, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-8073 (United States); Fogarty, P. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6169 (United States); Hargrove, T. [Hargrove Engineering, 118 Colonial Dr, Scottsboro, AL 35768 (United States); Heitzenroeder, P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, NJ 08502 (United States); Lovett, G. [MK Technologies, P.O. Box 30197, Knoxville, TN 37930 (United States); Miller, P. [MK Technologies, P.O. Box 30197, Knoxville, TN 37930 (United States); Myatt, R. [Myatt Consulting, Norfolk, MA 02056 (United States); Nelson, B. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6169 (United States); Reiersen, W. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, NJ 08502 (United States); Strickler, D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6169 (United States)

    2005-11-15

    The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) is a quasi-axisymmetric facility that combines the high beta and good confinement features of an advanced tokamak with the low current, disruption-free characteristics of a stellarator. The experiment is based on a three field-period plasma configuration with an average major radius of 1.4 m, a minor radius of 0.3 m, and a toroidal magnetic field on axis of up to 2 T. The modular coils are one set in a complex assembly of four coil systems that surround the highly shaped plasma. There are six, each of three coil types in the assembly for a total of 18 modular coils. The coils are constructed by winding copper cable onto a cast stainless steel winding form that has been machined to high accuracy, so that the current center of the winding pack is within {+-}1.5 mm of its theoretical position. The modular coils operate at a temperature of 80 K and are subjected to rapid heating and stress during a pulse. At this time, the project has completed construction of several prototype components which validate the fabrication and inspection processes that are planned for the production coils. In addition, some advanced techniques for error-field compensation and assembly simulation using computer-aided design (CAD) have been developed.

  4. Quench propagation and protection analysis of the ATLAS Toroids

    CERN Document Server

    Dudarev, A; ten Kate, H H J; Baynham, D Elwyn; Courthold, M J D; Lesmond, C

    2000-01-01

    The ATLAS superconducting magnet system consists of the Barrel Toroid, two End Cap Toroids and the Central Solenoid. However, the Toroids of eight coils each are magnetically separate systems to the Central Solenoid. The Toroids are electrically connected in series and energized by a single power supply. The quench protection system is based on the use of relatively small external dump resistances in combination with quench-heaters activated after a quench event detection to initiate the internal dump of stored energy in all the coils. A rather strong quench-back effect due to eddy-currents in the coil casings at the transport current decay is beneficial for the quench protection efficiency in the event of heater failures. The quench behaviour of the ATLAS Toroids was computer simulated for normal operation of the quench protection system and its complete non-operation (failure) mode. (3 refs).

  5. Perturbing macroscopic magnetohydrodynamic stability for toroidal plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comer, Kathryn J.

    We have introduced a new perturbative technique to rapidly explore the dependence of long wavelength ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities on equilibrium profiles, shaping properties, and wall parameters. Traditionally, these relations are studied with numerical parameter scans using computationally intensive stability codes. Our perturbative technique first finds the equilibrium and stability using traditional methods. Subsequent small changes in the original equilibrium parameters change the stability. We quickly find the new stability with an expansion of the energy principle, rather than with another run of the stability codes. We first semi-analytically apply the technique to the screw pinch after eliminating compressional Alfven wave effects. The screw pinch results validate the approach, but also indicate that allowable perturbations to equilibria with certain features may be restricted. Next, we extend the approach to toroidal geometry using experimental equilibria and a simple constructed equilibrium, with the ideal MHD stability code GATO. Stability properties are successfully predicted from perturbed toroidal equilibria when only the vacuum beyond the plasma is perturbed (through wall parameter variations), rather than the plasma itself. Small plasma equilibrium perturbations to both experimental and simple equilibria result in very large errors to the predicted stability, and valid results are found only over a narrow range of most perturbations. Despite the large errors produced when changing plasma parameters, the wall perturbations revealed two useful applications of this technique. Because the calculations are non-iterative matrix multiplications, the convergence issues that can disrupt a full MHD stability code are absent. Marginal stability, therefore, is much easier to find with the perturbative technique. Also, the perturbed results can be input as the initial guess for the eigenvalue for a full stability code, and improve subsequent

  6. Compact Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weyl's Gauge Principle of 1929 has been used to establish Weyl's Quantum Principle (WQP) that requires that the Weyl scale factor should be unity. It has been shown that the WQP requires the following: quantum mechanics must be used to determine system states; the electrostatic potential must be non-singular and quantified; interactions between particles with different electric charges (i.e. electron and proton) do not obey Newton's Third Law at sub-nuclear separations, and nuclear particles may be much different than expected using the standard model. The above WQP requirements lead to a potential fusion reactor wherein deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei. Because the deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei at temperatures and energies lower than specified by the standard model there is no harmful radiation as a byproduct of this fusion process. Therefore, a reactor using this reaction does not need any shielding to contain such radiation. The energy released from each reaction and the absence of shielding makes the deuterium-plus-deuterium-to-helium (DDH) reactor very compact when compared to other reactors, both fission and fusion types. Moreover, the potential energy output per reactor weight and the absence of harmful radiation makes the DDH reactor an ideal candidate for space power. The logic is summarized by which the WQP requires the above conditions that make the prediction of DDH possible. The details of the DDH reaction will be presented along with the specifics of why the DDH reactor may be made to cause two deuterium nuclei to preferentially fuse to a helium nucleus. The presentation will also indicate the calculations needed to predict the reactor temperature as a function of fuel loading, reactor size, and desired output and will include the progress achieved to date

  7. Helicity of a toroidal vortex with swirl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannikova, E. Yu.; Kontorovich, V. M.; Poslavsky, S. A.

    2016-04-01

    Based on the solutions of the Bragg-Hawthorne equation, we discuss the helicity of a thin toroidal vortex in the presence of swirl, orbital motion along the torus directrix. The relation between the helicity and circulations along the small and large linked circumferences (the torus directrix and generatrix) is shown to depend on the azimuthal velocity distribution in the core of the swirling ring vortex. In the case of nonuniform swirl, this relation differs from the well-known Moffat relation, viz., twice the product of such circulations multiplied by the number of linkages. The results can find applications in investigating the vortices in planetary atmospheres and the motions in the vicinity of active galactic nuclei.

  8. Helicity of the toroidal vortex with swirl

    CERN Document Server

    Bannikova, Elena Yu; Poslavsky, Sergey A

    2016-01-01

    On the basis of solutions of the Bragg-Hawthorne equations we discuss the helicity of thin toroidal vortices with the swirl - the orbital motion along the torus diretrix. It is shown that relationship of the helicity with circulations along the small and large linked circles - directrix and generatrix of the torus - depends on distribution of the azimuthal velocity in the core of the swirling vortex ring. In the case of non-homogeneous swirl this relationship differs from the well-known Moffat relationship - the doubled product of such circulations multiplied by the number of links. The results can be applied to vortices in planetary atmospheres and to vortex movements in the vicinity of active galactic nuclei.

  9. Fluid interaction with spinning toroidal tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fester, D. A.; Anderson, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to evaluate propellant behavior in spinning torroidal tanks that could be used in a retropropulsion system of an advanced outer-planet Pioneer orbiter. Information on propellant slosh and settling and on ullage orientation and stability was obtained. The effects of axial acceleration, spin rate, spin-rate change, and spacecraft wobble, both singly and in combination, were evaluated using a one-eighth scale transparent tank in one-g and low-g environments. Liquid loadings ranged from 5% to 96% full. The impact of a surface tension acquisition device was assessed by comparison with bare-tank results. The testing simulated the behavior of the fluorine/hydrazine and nitrogen textroxide/monomethylhydrazine propellants. Results are presented that indicate that no major fluid behavior problems would be encountered with any of the four propellants in the toroidal tanks of a spin-stabilized orbiter spacecraft.

  10. The theory of toroidally confined plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    White, Roscoe B

    2014-01-01

    This graduate level textbook develops the theory of magnetically confined plasma, with the aim of bringing the reader to the level of current research in the field of thermonuclear fusion. It begins with the basic concepts of magnetic field description, plasma equilibria and stability, and goes on to derive the equations for guiding center particle motion in an equilibrium field. Topics include linear and nonlinear ideal and resistive modes and particle transport. It is of use to workers in the field of fusion both for its wide-ranging account of tokamak physics and as a kind of handbook or formulary. This edition has been extended in a number of ways. The material on mode-particle interactions has been reformulated and much new information added, including methodology for Monte Carlo implementation of mode destabilization. These results give explicit means of carrying out mode destabilization analysis, in particular for the dangerous fishbone mode. A new chapter on cyclotron motion in toroidal geometry has ...

  11. Epithelial Proliferation on Curved Toroidal Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ya-Wen; Cruz, Ricardo; Fragkopoulos, Alexandros; Marquez, Samantha; Garcia, Andres; Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto

    Cellular environment influences a multitude of cellular functions by providing chemical and physical signals that modulate cell behavior, dynamics, development, and eventually survival. In strongly interacting epithelial cells, cells coordinate their behavior to respond to mechanical constraints in 2D. Local differences in tissue tension has also been shown to impact cell reproduction within an epithelial-cell sheet. Much less is known about how cells respond to out-of-plane curvatures. Here, we describe the proliferation of MDCK on toroidal hydrogel substrates, which unlike spheres or planes, have regions of both positive and negative Gaussian curvature. Additionally, the range of curvatures can be controlled by varying the size and aspect ratio of the torus, allowing us to quantify the relation between substrate curvature and cell proliferation.

  12. Nonideal magnetohydrodynamic instabilities and toroidal magnetic confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The marked divergence of experimentally observed plasma instability phenomena from the predictions of ideal magnetohydrodynamics led in the early 1960s to the formulations of finite-resistivity stability theory. Beginning in the 1970s, advanced plasma diagnostics have served to establish a detailed correspondence between the predictions of the finite-resistivity theory and experimental plasma behavior - particularly in the case of the resistive kink mode and the tokamak plasma. Nonlinear resistive-kink phenomena have been found to govern the transport of magnetic flux and plasma energy in the reversed-field pinch. The other predicted finite-resistivity instability modes have been more difficult to identify directly and their implications for toroidal magnetic confinement are still unresolved

  13. Nonideal magnetohydrodynamic instabilities and toroidal magnetic confinement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furth, H.P.

    1985-05-01

    The marked divergence of experimentally observed plasma instability phenomena from the predictions of ideal magnetohydrodynamics led in the early 1960s to the formulations of finite-resistivity stability theory. Beginning in the 1970s, advanced plasma diagnostics have served to establish a detailed correspondence between the predictions of the finite-resistivity theory and experimental plasma behavior - particularly in the case of the resistive kink mode and the tokamak plasma. Nonlinear resistive-kink phenomena have been found to govern the transport of magnetic flux and plasma energy in the reversed-field pinch. The other predicted finite-resistivity instability modes have been more difficult to identify directly and their implications for toroidal magnetic confinement are still unresolved.

  14. Damping of toroidal ion temperature gradient modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugama, H. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    1999-04-01

    The temporal evolution of linear toroidal ion temperature gradient (ITG) modes is studied based on a kinetic integral equation including an initial condition. It is shown how to evaluate the analytic continuation of the integral kernel as a function of a complex-valued frequency, which is useful for analytical and numerical calculations of the asymptotic damping behavior of the ITG mode. In the presence of the toroidal {nabla}B-curvature drift, the temporal dependence of the density and potential perturbations consists of normal modes and a continuum mode, which correspond to contributions from poles and from an integral along a branch cut, respectively, of the Laplace-transformed potential function of the complex-valued frequency. The normal modes have exponential time dependence with frequencies and growth rates determined by the dispersion relation while the continuum mode, which has a ballooning structure, shows a power law decay {proportional_to} t{sup -2} in the asymptotic limit, where t is the time variable. Therefore, the continuum mode dominantly describes the long-time asymptotic behavior of the density and potential perturbations for the stable system where all normal modes have negative growth rates. By performing proper analytic continuation for the homogeneous version of the kinetic integral equation, dependences of the normal modes` growth rate, real frequency, and eigenfunction on {eta}{sub i} (the ratio of the ion temperature gradient to the density gradient), k{sub {theta}} (the poloidal wavenumber), s (the magnetic shear parameter), and {theta}{sub k} (the ballooning angle corresponding to the minimum radial wavenumber) are numerically obtained for both stable and unstable cases. (author)

  15. Modeling and control of plasma rotation for NSTX using Neoclassical Toroidal Viscosity (NTV) and Neutral Beam Injection (NBI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goumiri, Imene; Rowley, Clarence; Sabbagh, Steven; Gates, David; Gerhardt, Stefan

    2014-10-01

    A model-based system to control plasma rotation in a magnetically confined toroidal fusion device is developed to maintain plasma stability for long pulse operation. This research uses experimental measurements from the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) and is aimed to control plasma rotation by using momentum from injected neutral beams and viscosity generated by three-dimensional applied magnetic fields as actuators. Based on the data driven model obtained, a feedback controller is designed to theoretically sustain the toroidal momentum of the plasma in a stable fashion and to achieve desired plasma rotation profiles. On going work includes extending this method to NSTX Upgrade which has more complete radial coverage of the neutral beams momentum sources which enable simultaneous control of plasma stored energy (Beta control).

  16. Toroidal Spiral Strings in Higher-dimensional Spacetime

    CERN Document Server

    Igata, Takahisa

    2010-01-01

    We report on our progress in research of separability of the Nambu-Goto equation for test strings with a symmetric configuration in a shape of toroidal spiral in a five-dimensional Kerr-AdS black hole. In particular, for a Hopf loop string which is a special class of the toroidal spirals, we show the complete separation of variables occurs in two cases, Kerr background and Kerr-AdS background with equal angular momenta. We also obtain the dynamical solution for the Hopf loop around a black hole and for the general toroidal spiral in Minkowski background.

  17. Toroidal dipole resonances in the relativistic random phase approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Vretenar, D; Ring, P

    2002-01-01

    The isoscalar toroidal dipole strength distributions in spherical nuclei are calculated in the framework of a fully consistent relativistic random phase approximation, based on effective mean-field Lagrangians with nonlinear meson self-interaction terms. It is suggested that the recently observed "low-lying component of the isoscalar dipole mode" might in fact correspond to the toroidal giant dipole resonance. Although predicted by several theoretical models, the existence of toroidal resonances has not yet been confirmed in experiment. In the present analysis the vortex dynamics of these states is displayed by the corresponding velocity fields.

  18. Kinetic effect of toroidal rotation on the geodesic acoustic mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, W., E-mail: wfguo@ipp.ac.cn; Ye, L.; Zhou, D.; Xiao, X. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Wang, S. [Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2015-01-15

    Kinetic effects of the toroidal rotation on the geodesic acoustic mode are theoretically investigated. It is found that when the toroidal rotation increases, the damping rate increases in the weak rotation regime due to the rotation enhancement of wave-particle interaction, and it decreases in the strong rotation regime due to the reduction of the number of resonant particles. Theoretical results are consistent with the behaviors of the geodesic acoustic mode recently observed in DIII-D and ASDEX-Upgrade. The kinetic damping effect of the rotation on the geodesic acoustic mode may shed light on the regulation of turbulence through the controlling the toroidal rotation.

  19. Performance of a Folded-Strip Toroidally Wound Induction Machine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bogi Bech; Jack, Alan G.; Atkinson, Glynn J.;

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the measured experimental results from a four-pole toroidally wound induction machine, where the stator is constructed as a pre-wound foldable strip. It shows that if the machine is axially restricted in length, the toroidally wound induction machine can have substantially...... shorter stator end-windings than conventionally wound induction machines, and hence that a toroidally wound induction machine can have lower losses and a higher efficiency. The paper also presents the employed construction method, which emphasizes manufacturability, and highlights the advantages...

  20. Laser-induced production of large carbon-based toroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the production of large carbon-based toroids (CBTs) from fullerenes. The process involves two-step laser irradiation of a mixed fullerene target (76% C60, 22% C70). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) clearly identifies toroidal-shaped structures as well as Q-shaped constructs. The typical diameters of the CBTs are ∼0.2-0.3 μm with tubular diameters of ∼50-100 nm, but toroids as wide as 0.5 μm are observed making them nanostructures on the verge of being microstructures

  1. The effect of toroidal field on the rotating magnetic field current drive in rotamak plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong Fang-Chuan; Huang Tian-Sen; Petrov Yuri

    2007-01-01

    A rotamak is one kind of compact spherically shaped magnetic-confinement device. In a rotamak the plasma current is driven by means of rotating magnetic field (RMF). The driven current can reverse the original equilibrium field and generate a field-reversed-configuration. In a conventional rotamak, a toroidal field (TF) is not necessary for the RMF to drive plasma current, but it was found that the present of an additional TF can influence the RMF current drive. In this paper the effect of TF on the RMF current drive in a rotamak are investigated in some detail.The experimental results show that addition of TF increases the RMF driven current greatly and enhances the RMF penetration dramatically. Without TF, the RMF can only penetrate into plasma in the edge region. When a TF is added, the RMF can reach almost the whole plasma region. This is an optimal strength of toroidal magnetic field for getting maximum plasma current when Bv and radio frequency generator power are fixed. Besides driving current,the RMF generates high harmonic fields in rotamak plasma. The effect of TF on the harmonic field spectra are also reported.

  2. Influence of toroidal rotation on resistive tearing modes in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, S.; Ma, Z. W., E-mail: zwma@zju.edu.cn [Institute for Fusion Theory and Simulation, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2015-12-15

    Influence of toroidal equilibrium plasma rotation on m/n = 2/1 resistive tearing modes is studied numerically using a 3D toroidal MHD code (CLT). It is found that the toroidal rotation with or without shear can suppress the tearing instability and the Coriolis effect in the toroidal geometry plays a dominant role on the rotation induced stabilization. For a high viscosity plasma (τ{sub R}/τ{sub V} ≫ 1, where τ{sub R} and τ{sub V} represent resistive and viscous diffusion time, respectively), the effect of the rotation shear combined with the viscosity appears to be stabilizing. For a low viscosity plasmas (τ{sub R}/τ{sub V} ≪ 1), the rotation shear shows a destabilizing effect when the rotation is large.

  3. Influence of toroidal rotation on resistive tearing modes in tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S.; Ma, Z. W.

    2015-12-01

    Influence of toroidal equilibrium plasma rotation on m/n = 2/1 resistive tearing modes is studied numerically using a 3D toroidal MHD code (CLT). It is found that the toroidal rotation with or without shear can suppress the tearing instability and the Coriolis effect in the toroidal geometry plays a dominant role on the rotation induced stabilization. For a high viscosity plasma (τR/τV ≫ 1, where τR and τV represent resistive and viscous diffusion time, respectively), the effect of the rotation shear combined with the viscosity appears to be stabilizing. For a low viscosity plasmas (τR/τV ≪ 1), the rotation shear shows a destabilizing effect when the rotation is large.

  4. Toroidicity Dependence of Tokamak Edge Safety Factor and Shear

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHIBingren

    2002-01-01

    In large tokamak device and reactor designs, the relationship between the toroidal current and the edge safety factor is very important because this will determine the eventual device or reactor size according to MHD stability requirements. In many preliminary

  5. Effect of toroidicity during lower hybrid mode conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of toroidicity during lower hybrid mode conversion is examined by treating the wave propagation in an inhomogeneous medium as an eigenvalue problem for ω2(m,n),m,n poloidal and toroidal wave numbers. Since the frequency regime near ω2 = ω/sub LH/2 is an accumulation point for the eigenvalue spectrum, the degenerate perturbation technique must be applied. The toroidal eigenmodes are constructed by a zeroth order superposition of monochromatic solutions with different poloidal dependence m, thus they generically exhibit a wide spectrum in k/sub parallel/ for given fixed ω2 even for small inverse aspect ratio epsilon. In case that the average is in the neighborhood of k/sub min/, the minimum wave number for accessibility of the mode conversion regime, it is expected that excitation of toroidal modes rather than geometric optics will determine the wave coupling to the plasma

  6. Review of compact, alternate concepts for magnetic confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report documents a study of compact alternate magnetic confinement fusion experiments and conceptual reactor designs. The purpose of this study is to identify those devices with a potential to burn tritium in the near future. The bulk of the report is made up of a review of the following compact alternates: compact toroids, high power density tokamaks, linear magnetic systems, compact mirrors, reversed field pinches and some miscellaneous concepts. Bumpy toruses and stellarators were initially reviewed but were not pursued since no compact variations were found. Several of the concepts show promise of either burning tritium or evolving into tritium burning devices by the early 1990's: RIGGATRON, Ignitor, OHTE, Frascati Tokamak upgrade, several driven (low or negative net power) mirror experiments and several Reversed Field Pinch experiments that may begin operation around 1990. Of the above only the Frascati Tokamak Upgrade has had funds allocated. Also identified in this report are groups who may have tritium burning experiments in the mid to late 1990's. There is a discussion of the differences between the reviewed devices and the mainline tokamak experiments. This discussion forms the basis of recommendations for R and D aimed at the compact alternates and the applicability of the present CFFTP program to the needs of the compact alternates. These recommendations will be presented in a subsequent report

  7. Inductive Eigenmodes of a resistive toroidal surface in vacuum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo Surdo, C. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Frascati, Rome (Italy). Dipt. Innovazione

    1999-07-01

    In this paper it has been studied the Electro-Magnetic (EM) Eigenmodes, sufficiently slow as to legitimate the pre-Maxwell approximation of Maxwell's system (or inductive Eigenmodes), of a given smooth, toroidal-un knotted, electrically resistive surface {tau} with given smooth (surface) resistivity 0 < {rho}{sub d}egree < {infinity}, and lying in the (empty) R{sup 3}. Within the above limitations (to be made more precise), the geometry of {tau} is arbitrary. With the eigenvalue associated with the generic Eigenmode being defined as the opposite of its logarithmic time-derivative, one expects that the resulting spectrum be discrete and strictly positive. It shall be interested into the degenerate case where {tau} be cut (i.e. electrically broken) along one or more of its irreducible cycles. This case will be analyzed autonomously, rather than as a limit (for {rho}{sub d}egree {yields} {infinity} along the cuts) of the regular case. Without cuts, the Eigenproblem under consideration is nothing but the two-dimensional (2-dim) generalization of the classical case of a smooth, unknotted, electrically conductive, simple coil in infinite vacuum. Its analysis hinges on the classical potential theory, and turns out to be a special application of the linear, integrodifferential (elliptic) equation theory on a compact, multiply connected, 2-dim manifold. The attention and approach will be confined to strong (or classical) solutions, both in {tau} and C {tau} = R{sup 3} / {tau}. This study is divided in two parts: a General Part (Sects 1 divided 4) is devoted to the case of generic {tau} and {rho}{sub d}egree (within the convenient smoothness requirements), whereas a Special Part (Sects 5 divided 7) deals with the (more or less formal) discussion of a couple of particular cases ({tau} {identical_to} a canonical torus), both of which with uniform {rho}{sub d}egree. Some propaedeutical/supplementary information is provided in a number of Appendices. [Italian] Il presente

  8. Numerical solution of quasilinear kinetic diffusion equations in toroidal plasmas

    OpenAIRE

    Höök, Lars Josef

    2013-01-01

    One of the main challenges for the realization of a working fusion power plant is an increased detailed understanding of kinetic phenomena in toroidal plasmas. The tokamak is a toroidal, magnetically confined plasma device and is currently the main line towards a power plant. The spatial and temporal scales in a tokamak plasma are extreme and the only tractable path for quantitative studies is to rely on computer simulations. Present day simulation codes can resolve only some of these scales....

  9. Relation of E1 pygmy and toroidal resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Nesterenko, V O; Reinhard, P -G; Kvasil, J

    2014-01-01

    A possible relation of the low-lying E1 (pygmy resonance) and toroidal strengths is analyzed by using Skyrme-RPA results for the strength functions, transition densities and current fields in $^{208}$Pb. It is shown that the irrotational pygmy motion can appear as a local manifestation of the collective vortical toroidal dipole resonance (TDR) at the nuclear surface. The RPA results are compared to unperturbed (1ph) ones.

  10. Low-aspect-ratio toroidal equilibria of electron clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toroidal electron clouds with a low aspect ratio (as small as 1.3) and lasting for thousands of poloidal rotation periods have been formed in the laboratory. Characteristic toroidal effects like a large inward shift of the minor axis of equipotential contours, elliptical and triangular deformations, etc., have been observed experimentally for the first time. The results of new analytic and numerical investigations of low-aspect-ratio electron cloud equilibria, which reproduce many of the observed features, are also presented

  11. Toroidal bubble entrapment under an impacting drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoraval, Marie-Jean; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T.; Takehara, Kohsei; Etoh, Takeharu Goji

    2012-11-01

    We use ultra-high-speed imaging and numerical simulations (GERRIS, http://gfs.sf.net) to observe and analyze the formation of up to 14 air tori when a water drop impacts on a thin liquid film of water or other miscible liquids. They form during the early contact between the drop and the pool by the vertical oscillations of the ejecta sheet. They then break in micro-bubble rings by the Rayleigh instability. Their formation is associated with the shedding of an axisymmetric vortex street into the liquid from the free surface. These vorticity structures and their dynamics are made apparent by the dynamics of the micro-bubbles, added seed particles and the difference of refractive index for different liquids in the drop and the pool. More robust entrapments are observed for a thin film of ethanol or methanol. We show that while the non-spherical drop shape is not responsible for the toroidal bubble entrapments, the number of rings is increasing for more oblate drops. Individual bubble entrapments are also observed from azimuthal destabilizations of the neck between the drop and the pool.

  12. Tearing Mode Stability of Evolving Toroidal Equilibria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pletzer, A.; McCune, D.; Manickam, J.; Jardin, S. C.

    2000-10-01

    There are a number of toroidal equilibrium (such as JSOLVER, ESC, EFIT, and VMEC) and transport codes (such as TRANSP, BALDUR, and TSC) in our community that utilize differing equilibrium representations. There are also many heating and current drive (LSC and TORRAY), and stability (PEST1-3, GATO, NOVA, MARS, DCON, M3D) codes that require this equilibrium information. In an effort to provide seamless compatibility between the codes that produce and need these equilibria, we have developed two Fortran 90 modules, MEQ and XPLASMA, that serve as common interfaces between these two classes of codes. XPLASMA provides a common equilibrium representation for the heating and current drive applications while MEQ provides common equilibrium and associated metric information needed by MHD stability codes. We illustrate the utility of this approach by presenting results of PEST-3 tearing stability calculations of an NSTX discharge performed on profiles provided by the TRANSP code. Using the MEQ module, the TRANSP equilibrium data are stored in a Fortran 90 derived type and passed to PEST3 as a subroutine argument. All calculations are performed on the fly, as the profiles evolve.

  13. Pseudo-Anosov flows in toroidal manifolds

    CERN Document Server

    Barbot, Thierry

    2010-01-01

    We first prove rigidity results for pseudo-Anosov flows in prototypes of toroidal 3-manifolds: we show that a pseudo-Anosov in a Seifert fibered manifold is up to finite covers topologically conjugate to a geodesic flow. We also show that a pseudo-Anosov flow in a solv manifold is topologically conjugate to a suspension Anosov flow. Then we analyse immersed and embedded incompressible tori in optimal position with respect to a pseudo-Anosov flow. We also study the interaction of a pseudo-Anosov flow with possible Seifert fibered pieces in the torus decomposition: if the fiber is associated to a periodic orbit of the flow, we produce a standard form for the flow in the piece using Birkhoff annuli. Finally we introduce several new classes of examples, some of which are generalized pseudo-Anosov flows which have one prong singularities. The examples show that the results above in Seifert fibered and solvable manifolds do not apply to one prong pseudo-Anosov flows. In addition we also construct a large new class ...

  14. Turbulent Equipartition Theory of Toroidal Momentum Pinch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T.S. Hahm, P.H. Diamond, O.D. Gurcan, and G. Rewaldt

    2008-01-31

    The mode-independet part of magnetic curvature driven turbulent convective (TuroCo) pinch of the angular momentum density [Hahm et al., Phys. Plasmas 14,072302 (2007)] which was originally derived from the gyrokinetic equation, can be interpreted in terms of the turbulent equipartition (TEP) theory. It is shown that the previous results can be obtained from the local conservation of "magnetically weighted angular momentum density," nmi U|| R/B2, and its homogenization due to turbulent flows. It is also demonstrated that the magnetic curvature modification of the parallel acceleration in the nonlinear gyrokinetic equation in the laboratory frame, which was shown to be responsible for the TEP part of the TurCo pinch of angular momentum density in the previous work, is closely related to the Coriolis drift coupling to the perturbed electric field. In addition, the origin of the diffusive flux in the rotating frame is highlighted. Finally, it is illustratd that there should be a difference in scalings between the momentum pinch originated from inherently toroidal effects and that coming from other mechanisms which exist in a simpler geometry.

  15. ''Turbulent Equipartition'' Theory of Toroidal Momentum Pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mode-independent part of magnetic curvature driven turbulent convective (TuroCo) pinch of the angular momentum density (Hahm et al., Phys. Plasmas 14,072302 (2007)) which was originally derived from the gyrokinetic equation, can be interpreted in terms of the turbulent equipartition (TEP) theory. It is shown that the previous results can be obtained from the local conservation of 'magnetically weighted angular momentum density', nmi U#parallel# R/B2, and its homogenization due to turbulent flows. It is also demonstrated that the magnetic curvature modification of the parallel acceleration in the nonlinear gyrokinetic equation in the laboratory frame, which was shown to be responsible for the TEP part of the TurCo pinch of angular momentum density in the previous work, is closely related to the Coriolis drift coupling to the perturbed electric field. In addition, the origin of the diffusive flux in the rotating frame is highlighted. Finally, it is illustrated that there should be a difference in scalings between the momentum pinch originated from inherently toroidal effects and that coming from other mechanisms which exist in a simpler geometry.

  16. 3D blob dynamics in toroidal geometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anders Henry; Reiser, Dirk

    In this paper we study the simple case of the dynamics of a density perturbation localized in the edge region of a medium sized tokamak in a full 3D geometry. The 2D evolution of such a perturbation has been studied in details on the low-field side, where the gradient of the magnetic field always...... dynamics in a full 3D tokamak geometry including the edge and SOL region as well. Previous studies with the ATTEMPT code proved that density blobs appear for typical parameters in the TEXTOR tokamak. The code has been prepared for flux driven simulations with detailed control of the blob initial state....... The DIESEL code is an extension of the ESEL code [1]. It solves a simple interchange model in full 3D tokamak geometry, where the toroidal direction is divided into a number of drift planes. On each drift plane the equations are solved in a domain corresponding to the full 2D cross section of the tokamak...

  17. An important step for the ATLAS toroid magnet

    CERN Document Server

    2000-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment's prototype toroid coil arrives at CERN from the CEA laboratory in Saclay on 6 October. The world's largest superconducting toroid magnet is under construction for the ATLAS experiment. A nine-metre long fully functional prototype coil was delivered to CERN at the beginning of October and has since been undergoing tests in the West Area. Built mainly by companies in France and Italy under the supervision of engineers from the CEA-Saclay laboratory near Paris and Italy's INFN-LASA, the magnet is a crucial step forward in the construction of the ATLAS superconducting magnet system. Unlike any particle detector that has gone before, the ATLAS detector's magnet system consists of a large toroidal system enclosing a small central solenoid. The barrel part of the toroidal system will use eight toroid coils, each a massive 25 metres in length. These will dwarf the largest toroids in the world when ATLAS was designed, which measure about six metres. So the ATLAS collaboration decided to build a...

  18. Spontaneous toroidal flow generation due to negative effective momentum diffusivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Ben F.

    2015-02-01

    Spontaneous structure formation, and in particular, zonal flows, is observed in a broad range of natural and engineered systems, often arising dynamically as the saturated state of a linear instability. Flows in tokamaks are known to self-organise on small scales, but large scale toroidal flows also arise even when externally applied torques are zero. This has previously been interpreted as the result of small externally imposed breaking of a symmetry. However, we show that for large enough field line pitch, a robust spontaneous symmetry breaking occurs, leading to the generation of strong toroidal flow structures; parameters are typical of Spherical Tokamak discharges with reversed shear profiles. The short wavelength dynamics are qualitatively similar to the growth of poloidal flow structures, and toroidal flow gradients nonlinearly saturate at levels where the shearing rate is comparable to linear growth rate. On long wavelengths, we measure Prandtl numbers of around zero for these systems, in conjunction with the formation of structured toroidal flows, and we show that this is consistent with a model of momentum transport where fluxes act to reinforce small flow gradients: the effective momentum diffusivity is negative. Toroidal flow structures are largely unaffected by collisional damping, so this may allow toroidal bulk flows of order the ion thermal velocity to be maintained with zero momentum input. This phenomenon also provides a mechanism for the generation of localised meso-scale structures like transport barriers.

  19. Toroidal momentum pinch velocity due to the coriolis drift effect on small scale instabilities in a toroidal plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, A G; Angioni, C; Strintzi, D

    2007-06-29

    In this Letter, the influence of the "Coriolis drift" on small scale instabilities in toroidal plasmas is shown to generate a toroidal momentum pinch velocity. Such a pinch results because the Coriolis drift generates a coupling between the density and temperature perturbations on the one hand and the perturbed parallel flow velocity on the other. A simple fluid model is used to highlight the physics mechanism and gyro-kinetic calculations are performed to accurately assess the magnitude of the pinch. The derived pinch velocity leads to a radial gradient of the toroidal velocity profile even in the absence of a torque on the plasma and is predicted to generate a peaking of the toroidal velocity profile similar to the peaking of the density profile. Finally, the pinch also affects the interpretation of current experiments.

  20. Fluctuations and symmetry breaking during regeneration of Hydra vulgaris tissue toroids

    CERN Document Server

    Krahe, Michael; Lin, Kao-Nung; Fischer, Julia; Fütterer, Claus

    2012-01-01

    While much is known in single cell mechanics, the mechanics of regeneration of naturally grown tissues and cell assemblies is largely unexplored. We found a symmetry breaking scenario accompanied by shape fluctuations in dissected regenerating Hydra vulgaris tissue tori. A subsequent folding and merging process leads finally to a regenerating spheroid. These phenomena are related to the dynamics of fluorescent beta- and trans-cellular alpha-actin structures. By embedding the tissues in a hydro-gel the fluctuations could be studied over a longer period of time. The power spectrum of the torus-fluctuations shows a non-trivial energy distribution dynamics depending on the gel stiffness. During the transition, many higher modes where found but in the end the 2nd mode wins in most cases. The toroid builds up an uniform alpha-actin ring along the inner edge of the torus. We found this ring in the inner cellular layer to be responsible for the force generation destabilizing the toroid shape. This actin structure is ...

  1. Advances in the simulation of toroidal gyro Landau fluid model turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waltz, R.E. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Kerbel, G.D.; Milovich, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Hammett, G.W. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.

    1994-12-01

    The gyro-Landau fluid (GLF) model equations for toroidal geometry have been recently applied to the study ion temperature gradient (ITG) mode turbulence using the 3D nonlinear ballooning mode representation (BMR). The present paper extends this work by treating some unresolved issues conceming ITG turbulence with adiabatic electrons. Although eddies are highly elongated in the radial direction long time radial correlation lengths are short and comparable to poloidal lengths. Although transport at vanishing shear is not particularly large, transport at reverse global shear, is significantly less. Electrostatic transport at moderate shear is not much effected by inclusion of local shear and average favorable curvature. Transport is suppressed when critical E{times}B rotational shear is comparable to the maximum linear growth rate with only a weak dependence on magnetic shear. Self consistent turbulent transport of toroidal momentum can result in a transport bifurcation at suffciently large r/(Rq). However the main thrust of the new formulation in the paper deals with advances in the development of finite beta GLF models with trapped electron and BMR numerical methods for treating the fast parallel field motion of the untrapped electrons.

  2. Compact Stellarator Path to DEMO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, J. F.

    2007-11-01

    Issues for a DEMO reactor are sustaining an ignited/high-Q plasma in steady state, avoiding disruptions and large variations in power flux to the wall, adequate confinement of thermal plasma and alpha-particles, control of a burning plasma, particle and power handling, etc. Compact stellarators have key advantages -- steady-state high-plasma-density operation without external current drive or disruptions, stability without a close conducting wall or active feedback systems, and low recirculating power -- in addition to moderate plasma aspect ratio, good confinement, and high-beta potential. The ARIES-CS study established that compact stellarators can be competitive with tokamaks as reactors. Many of the issues for a compact stellarator DEMO can be answered using results from large tokamaks, ITER D-T experiments and fusion materials, technology and component development programs, in addition to stellarators in operation, under construction or in development. However, a large next-generation stellarator will be needed to address some physics issues: size scaling and confinement at higher parameters, burning plasma issues, and operation with a strongly radiative divertor. Technology issues include simpler coils, structure, and divertor fabrication, and better cost information.

  3. System studies of compact ignition tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The new Tokamak Systems Code, used to investigate Compact Ignition Tokamaks (CITs), can simultaneously vary many parameters, satisfy many constraints, and minimize or maximize a figure of merit. It is useful in comparing different CIT design configurations over wide regions of parameter space and determining a desired design point for more detailed physics and engineering analysis, as well as for performing sensitivity studies for physics or engineering issues. Operational windows in major radius (R) and toroidal field (B) space for fixed ignition margin are calculated for the Ignifed and Inconel candidate CITs. The minimum R bounds are predominantly physics limited, and the maximum R portions of the windows are engineering limited. For a modified Kaye-Goldston plasma-energy-confinement scaling, the minimum size is 1.15 m for the Ignifed device and 1.25 m for the Inconel device. With the Ignition Technical Oversight Committee (ITOC) physics guidance of B2a/q and I/sub p/ >10 MA, the Ignifed and Base-line Inconel devices have a minimum size of 1.2 and 1.25 m and a toroidal field of 11 and 10.4 T, respectively. Sensitivity studies show Ignifed to be more sensitive to coil temperature changes than the Inconel device, whereas the Inconel device is more sensitive to stress perturbations

  4. System studies of compact ignition tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galambos, J.D.; Blackfield, D.T.; Peng, Y.K.M.; Reid, R.L.; Strickler, D.J.; Selcow, E.

    1987-08-01

    The new Tokamak Systems Code, used to investigate Compact Ignition Tokamaks (CITs), can simultaneously vary many parameters, satisfy many constraints, and minimize or maximize a figure of merit. It is useful in comparing different CIT design configurations over wide regions of parameter space and determining a desired design point for more detailed physics and engineering analysis, as well as for performing sensitivity studies for physics or engineering issues. Operational windows in major radius (R) and toroidal field (B) space for fixed ignition margin are calculated for the Ignifed and Inconel candidate CITs. The minimum R bounds are predominantly physics limited, and the maximum R portions of the windows are engineering limited. For a modified Kaye-Goldston plasma-energy-confinement scaling, the minimum size is 1.15 m for the Ignifed device and 1.25 m for the Inconel device. With the Ignition Technical Oversight Committee (ITOC) physics guidance of B/sup 2/a/q and I/sub p/ >10 MA, the Ignifed and Base-line Inconel devices have a minimum size of 1.2 and 1.25 m and a toroidal field of 11 and 10.4 T, respectively. Sensitivity studies show Ignifed to be more sensitive to coil temperature changes than the Inconel device, whereas the Inconel device is more sensitive to stress perturbations.

  5. Physics aspects of the Compact Ignition Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Post, D.; Bateman, G.; Houlberg, W.; Bromberg, L.; Cohn, D.; Colestock, P.; Hughes, M.; Ignat, D.; Izzo, R.; Jardin, S.

    1986-11-01

    The Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) is a proposed modest-size ignition experiment designed to study the physics of alpha-particle heating. The basic concept is to achieve ignition in a modest-size minimum cost experiment by using a high plasma density to achieve the condition of ntau/sub E/ approx. 2 x 10/sup 20/ sec m/sup -3/ required for ignition. The high density requires a high toroidal field (10 T). The high toroidal field allows a large plasma current (10 MA) which improves the energy confinement, and provides a high level of ohmic heating. The present CIT design also has a gigh degree of elongation (k approx. 1.8) to aid in producing the large plasma current. A double null poloidal divertor and a pellet injector are part of the design to provide impurity and particle control, improve the confinement, and provide flexibility for impurity and particle control, improve the confinement, and provide flexibility for improving the plasma profiles. Since auxiliary heating is expected to be necessary to achieve ignition, 10 to 20 MW of Ion Cyclotron Radio Frequency (ICRF) is to be provided.

  6. Scintillator based beta batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rensing, Noa M.; Tiernan, Timothy C.; Shirwadkar, Urmila; O'Dougherty, Patrick; Freed, Sara; Hawrami, Rastgo; Squillante, Michael R.

    2013-05-01

    Some long-term, remote applications do not have access to conventional harvestable energy in the form of solar radiation (or other ambient light), wind, environmental vibration, or wave motion. Radiation Monitoring Devices, Inc. (RMD) is carrying out research to address the most challenging applications that need power for many months or years and which have undependable or no access to environmental energy. Radioisotopes are an attractive candidate for this energy source, as they can offer a very high energy density combined with a long lifetime. Both large scale nuclear power plants and radiothermal generators are based on converting nuclear energy to heat, but do not scale well to small sizes. Furthermore, thermo-mechanical power plants depend on moving parts, and RTG's suffer from low efficiency. To address the need for compact nuclear power devices, RMD is developing a novel beta battery, in which the beta emissions from a radioisotope are converted to visible light in a scintillator and then the visible light is converted to electrical power in a photodiode. By incorporating 90Sr into the scintillator SrI2 and coupling the material to a wavelength-matched solar cell, we will create a scalable, compact power source capable of supplying milliwatts to several watts of power over a period of up to 30 years. We will present the latest results of radiation damage studies and materials processing development efforts, and discuss how these factors interact to set the operating life and energy density of the device.

  7. Physics models in the toroidal transport code PROCTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howe, H.C.

    1990-08-01

    The physics models that are contained in the toroidal transport code PROCTR are described in detail. Time- and space-dependent models are included for the plasma hydrogenic-ion, helium, and impurity densities, the electron and ion temperatures, the toroidal rotation velocity, and the toroidal current profile. Time- and depth-dependent models for the trapped and mobile hydrogenic particle concentrations in the wall and a time-dependent point model for the number of particles in the limiter are also included. Time-dependent models for neutral particle transport, neutral beam deposition and thermalization, fusion heating, impurity radiation, pellet injection, and the radial electric potential are included and recalculated periodically as the time-dependent models evolve. The plasma solution is obtained either in simple flux coordinates, where the radial shift of each elliptical, toroidal flux surface is included to maintain an approximate pressure equilibrium, or in general three-dimensional torsatron coordinates represented by series of helical harmonics. The detailed coupling of the plasma, scrape-off layer, limiter, and wall models through the neutral transport model makes PROCTR especially suited for modeling of recycling and particle control in toroidal plasmas. The model may also be used in a steady-state profile analysis mode for studying energy and particle balances starting with measured plasma profiles.

  8. Toroidal linear force-free magnetic fields with axial symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandas, M.; Romashets, E.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: Interplanetary magnetic flux ropes are often described as linear force-free fields. To account for their curvature, toroidal configurations must be used. The aim is to find an analytic description of a linear force-free magnetic field of the toroidal geometry in which the cross section of flux ropes can be controlled. Methods: The solution is found as a superposition of fields given by linear force-free cylinders tangential to a generating toroid. The cylindrical field is expressed in a series of terms that are not all cylindrically symmetric. Results: We found the general form of a toroidal linear force-free magnetic field. The field is azimuthally symmetric with respect to the torus axis. It depends on a set of coefficients that enables controlling the flux rope shape (cross section) to some extent. By varying the coefficients, flux ropes with circular and elliptic cross sections were constructed. Numerical comparison suggests that the simple analytic formula for calculating the helicity in toroidal flux ropes of the circular cross section can be used for flux ropes with elliptic cross sections if the minor radius in the formula is set to the geometric mean of the semi-axes of the elliptic cross section.

  9. Physics models in the toroidal transport code PROCTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The physics models that are contained in the toroidal transport code PROCTR are described in detail. Time- and space-dependent models are included for the plasma hydrogenic-ion, helium, and impurity densities, the electron and ion temperatures, the toroidal rotation velocity, and the toroidal current profile. Time- and depth-dependent models for the trapped and mobile hydrogenic particle concentrations in the wall and a time-dependent point model for the number of particles in the limiter are also included. Time-dependent models for neutral particle transport, neutral beam deposition and thermalization, fusion heating, impurity radiation, pellet injection, and the radial electric potential are included and recalculated periodically as the time-dependent models evolve. The plasma solution is obtained either in simple flux coordinates, where the radial shift of each elliptical, toroidal flux surface is included to maintain an approximate pressure equilibrium, or in general three-dimensional torsatron coordinates represented by series of helical harmonics. The detailed coupling of the plasma, scrape-off layer, limiter, and wall models through the neutral transport model makes PROCTR especially suited for modeling of recycling and particle control in toroidal plasmas. The model may also be used in a steady-state profile analysis mode for studying energy and particle balances starting with measured plasma profiles

  10. Beta-limiting Instabilities and Global Mode Stabilization in NSTX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbagh, Steven

    2001-10-01

    Low aspect ratio and high edge q theoretically alter the plasma stability and mode structure compared to standard tokamak configurations. Below the no-wall limit, stability calculations with PEST, GATO, and DCON show the perturbed radial field is maximized near the center column and DCON and VALEN calculations show that mode stability is not greatly improved by a nearby conducting wall due to the short poloidal wavelength in this region. In contrast, as beta reaches and exceeds the no-wall limit, the mode becomes strongly ballooning with long poloidal wavelength at large major radius and is highly wall stabilized. In this way, wall stabilization is more effective at higher beta in low aspect ratio geometry. Research on the stability of spherical torus plasmas at and above the no-wall beta limit is being addressed on NSTX, which has produced low aspect ratio plasmas, R/a = 1.27 at plasma current up to 1.4 MA with high energy confinement (TauE/TauE-ITER89P = 2). Toroidal and normalized beta have reached 22%, and 4.3, respectively in q = 7 plasmas. The beta limit is observed to increase with increasing plasma internal inductance, li, and the stability factor betaN/li has reached 5.8, limited by sudden beta collapses at low li that was achieved by use of high-harmonic fast wave heating (HHFW). DCON stability analysis of equilibria reconstructed with EFIT using external magnetics show that the plasmas are below or at the no-wall beta limit for the n = 1 mode, which has characteristics of a current-driven kink. With more peaked current profiles (li greater than 0.7), core MHD instabilities are observed which saturate or slowly degrade beta. Sawteeth with large inversion radii can also cause substantial beta collapses, although current profile modification using HHFW, altered plasma growth, and increased toroidal field have each been successful in mitigating this effect.

  11. Optical toroidal dipolar response by an asymmetric double-bar metamaterial

    CERN Document Server

    Dong, Zheng-Gao; Rho, Junsuk; Li, Jia-Qi; Lu, Changgui; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, X; 10.1063/1.4757613

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate that the toroidal dipolar response can be realized in the optical regime by designing a feasible nanostructured metamaterial, comprising asymmetric double-bar magnetic resonators assembled into a toroid-like configuration. It is confirmed numerically that an optical toroidal dipolar moment dominates over other moments. This response is characterized by a strong confinement of an E-field component at the toroid center, oriented perpendicular to the H-vortex plane. The resonance-enhanced optical toroidal response can provide an experimental avenue for various interesting optical phenomena associated with the elusive toroidal moment.

  12. Poloidal beta and internal inductance measurement on HT-7 superconducting tokamak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, B; Sun, Y W; Wan, B N; Qian, J P

    2007-09-01

    Poloidal beta beta(theta) and internal inductance l(i) measurements are very important for tokamak operation. Much more plasma parameters can be inferred from the two parameters, such as the plasma energy confinement time, the plasma toroidal current profile, and magnetohydrodynamics instability. Using diamagnetic and compensation loop, combining with poloidal magnetic probe array signals, poloidal beta beta(theta) and internal inductance l(i) are measured. In this article, the measurement system and arithmetic are introduced. Different experimental results are given in different plasma discharges on HT-7 superconducting tokamak.

  13. Axion Haloscopes with Toroidal Geometry at CAPP/IBS

    CERN Document Server

    Ko, B R

    2016-01-01

    The present state of the art axion haloscope employs a cylindrical resonant cavity in a solenoidal field. We, the Center for Axion and Precision Physics Research (CAPP) of the Institute for Basic Science (IBS) in Korea, are also pursuing halo axion discovery using this cylindrical geometry. However, the presence of end caps of cavities increases challenges as we explore higher frequency regions for the axion at above 2 GHz. To overcome these challenges we exploit a toroidal design of cavity and magnetic field. A toroidal geometry offers several advantages, two of which are a larger volume for a given space and greatly reduced fringe fields which interfere with our preamps, in particular the planned quantum-based devices. We introduce the concept of toroidal axion haloscopes and present ongoing research activities and plans at CAPP/IBS.

  14. Toroidal and poloidal momentum transport studies in JET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tala, T.; Andrew, Y.; Crombe, K.;

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on the recent studies of toroidal and poloidal momentum transport in JET. The ratio of the global energy confinement time to the momentum confinement is found to be close to tau(E)/tau(phi) = 1 except for the low density or low collisionality discharges where the ratio is tau...... of toroidal velocity using the Weiland model and GLF23 also confirm that the ratio chi(phi)/chi(i) approximate to 0.4 reproduces the core toroidal velocity profiles well and similar accuracy with the ion temperature profiles. Concerning poloidal velocities on JET, the experimental measurements show...... is the turbulence driven flow through the Reynolds stress. Both CUTIE and TRB turbulence codes show the existence of an anomalous poloidal velocity, being significantly larger than the neo-classical values. And similarly to experiments, the poloidal velocity profiles peak in the vicinity of the ITB and seem...

  15. Dynamics of the Disruption Halo Current Toroidal Asymmetry in NSTX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.P. Gerhardt

    2012-09-27

    This paper describes the dynamics of disruption halo current non-axisymmetries in the lower divertor of the National Spherical Torus Experiment [M. Ono, et al. Nuclear Fusion 40, 557 (2000)]. While. The halo currents typically have a strongly asymmetric structure where they enter the divertor floor, and this asymmetry has been observed to complete up to 7 toroidal revolutions over the duration of the halo current pulse. However, the rotation speed and toroidal extend of the asymmetry can vary significantly during the pulse. The rotation speed, halo current pulse duration, and total number of revolutions tend to be smaller in cases with large halo currents. The halo current pattern is observed to become toroidally symmetric at the end of the halo current pulse. It is proposed that this symmeterization is due to the loss of most or all of the closed field line geometry in the final phase of the vertical displacement event.

  16. Analytical solutions for Tokamak equilibria with reversed toroidal current

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Caroline G. L.; Roberto, M.; Braga, F. L. [Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica, Sao Jose dos Campos, Sao Paulo 12228-900 (Brazil); Caldas, I. L. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, 05315-970 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-08-15

    In tokamaks, an advanced plasma confinement regime has been investigated with a central hollow electric current with negative density which gives rise to non-nested magnetic surfaces. We present analytical solutions for the magnetohydrodynamic equilibria of this regime in terms of non-orthogonal toroidal polar coordinates. These solutions are obtained for large aspect ratio tokamaks and they are valid for any kind of reversed hollow current density profiles. The zero order solution of the poloidal magnetic flux function describes nested toroidal magnetic surfaces with a magnetic axis displaced due to the toroidal geometry. The first order correction introduces a poloidal field asymmetry and, consequently, magnetic islands arise around the zero order surface with null poloidal magnetic flux gradient. An analytic expression for the magnetic island width is deduced in terms of the equilibrium parameters. We give examples of the equilibrium plasma profiles and islands obtained for a class of current density profile.

  17. Bi-2223 HTS winding in toroidal configuration for SMES coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondratowicz-Kucewicz, B; Kozak, S; Kozak, J; Wojtasiewicz, G; Majka, M [Electrotechnical Institute in Warsaw (Poland); Janowski, T, E-mail: t.janowski@pollub.p [Lublin University of Technology (Poland)

    2010-06-01

    Energy can be stored in the magnetic field of a coil. Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) is very promising as a power storage system for load levelling or power stabilizer. However, the strong electromagnetic force caused by high magnetic field and large coil current is a problem in SMES systems. A toroidal configuration would have a much less extensive external magnetic field and electromagnetic forces in winding. The paper describes the design of HTS winding for SMES coil in modular toroid configuration consist of seven Bi-2223 double-pancakes as well as numerical analysis of SMES magnet model using FLUX 3D package. As the results of analysis the paper presents the optimal coil configuration and the parameters such as radius of toroidal magnet, energy stored in magnet and magnetic field distribution.

  18. Toroidal drift waves with an equilibrium velocity field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author investigated the effect of a radially sheared poloidal velocity field on the toroidal drift wave which is well known to escape magnetic shear damping through toroidal coupling between different poloidal harmonics centered on individual rational surfaces. He endeavored to model the velocity profile according to that observed at the plasma edge during H-mode shots. The resultant wave formed by the interference of different poloidal harmonics now sees an antiwell created by the H-mode type velocity profile in the radial direction (in contrast to a well formed by the diamagnetic frequency in the absence of velocity fields). The wave, therefore, convects energy outward and hence undergoes damping. Outgoing wave boundary condition then introduces a negative imaginary contribution to the global eigenvalue -- once again confirming the stabilizing role of H-mode type velocity profiles. On the other hand, L-mode type velocity profiles have destabilizing action on toroidal drift waves

  19. Vlasov tokamak equilibria with sheared toroidal flow and anisotropic pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuiroukidis, Ap, E-mail: kouirouki@astro.auth.gr [Technological Education Institute of Serres, 62124 Serres (Greece); Throumoulopoulos, G. N., E-mail: gthroum@uoi.gr [Department of Physics, University of Ioannina, GR 451 10 Ioannina (Greece); Tasso, H., E-mail: het@ipp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2015-08-15

    By choosing appropriate deformed Maxwellian ion and electron distribution functions depending on the two particle constants of motion, i.e., the energy and toroidal angular momentum, we reduce the Vlasov axisymmetric equilibrium problem for quasineutral plasmas to a transcendental Grad-Shafranov-like equation. This equation is then solved numerically under the Dirichlet boundary condition for an analytically prescribed boundary possessing a lower X-point to construct tokamak equilibria with toroidal sheared ion flow and anisotropic pressure. Depending on the deformation of the distribution functions, these steady states can have toroidal current densities either peaked on the magnetic axis or hollow. These two kinds of equilibria may be regarded as a bifurcation in connection with symmetry properties of the distribution functions on the magnetic axis.

  20. Pioneering Structural Solutions for Compact High Field Experiments Developed for the Alcator and the Ignitor Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvetti, M.; Coppi, B.

    2015-11-01

    Recently there has been an increased awareness of the fact that the line of research based on compact high field machines is the most promising to approach ignition conditions in DT burning plasmas and has acquired new perspectives for its applications. Then the technological solutions that have made these machines possible have become subject to new attention and, in some cases, to rediscovery. The Alcator Program and, followed by Ignitor Program, has led to invent the coupled air-core former poloidal field system that has made compact machine possible and has been adopted on all advanced toroidal machines that came after Alcator. A recently rediscovered solution aimed at reducing the mechanical stresses in the inner legs of the toroidal magnet coils is the ``Upper and Lower Bracing Rings'' system that has had a key role in the design of the Ignitor machine and its evolution. Another solution to minimize the machine dimensions while maintaining high toroidal fields, in order to achieve high plasma current densities, is that of ``bucking and wedging'' of the toroidal magnet by coupling it mechanically to the central solenoid. Sponsored in part by the U.S. DoE.

  1. CPS Transformation of Beta-Redexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danvy, Olivier; Nielsen, Lasse

    2005-01-01

    The extra compaction of the most compacting CPS transformation in existence, which is due to Sabry and Felleisen, is generally attributed to (1) making continuations occur first in CPS terms and (2) classifying more redexes as administrative. We show that this extra compaction is actually...... independent of the relative positions of values and continuations and furthermore that it is solely due to a context-sensitive transformation of beta-redexes. We stage the more compact CPS transformation into a first-order uncurrying phase and a context-insensitive CPS transformation. We also define a context......-insensitive CPS transformation that provides the extra compaction. This CPS transformation operates in one pass and is dependently typed....

  2. CPS Transformation of Beta-Redexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danvy, Olivier; Nielsen, Lasse R.

    2000-01-01

    The extra compaction of the most compacting CPS transformation in existence, which is due to Sabry and Felleisen, is generally attributed to (1) making continuations occur first in CPS terms and (2) classifying more redexes as administrative. We show that this extra compaction is actually...... independent of the relative positions of values and continuations and furthermore that it is solely due to a context-sensitive transformation of beta-redexes. We stage the more compact CPS transformation into a first-order uncurrying phase and a context-insensitive CPS transformation. We also define a context......-insensitive CPS transformation that provides the extra compaction. This CPS transformation operates in one pass and is dependently typed....

  3. Development and verification of printed circuit board toroidal transformer model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pejtersen, Jens; Mønster, Jakob Døllner; Knott, Arnold

    2013-01-01

    by comparing calculated parameters with 3D finite element simulations and experimental measurement results. The developed transformer model shows good agreement with the simulated and measured results. The model can be used to predict the parameters of printed circuit board toroidal transformer configurations......An analytical model of an air core printed circuit board embedded toroidal transformer configuration is presented. The transformer has been developed for galvanic isolation of very high frequency switch-mode dc-dc power converter applications. The theoretical model is developed and verified...

  4. Experiments with a fully toroidal Extrap Z-pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the Extrap plasma confinement scheme, a Z-pinch is produced along the null of an octupole field generated by currents in external conductors. In the paper, studies of the discharge startup process in a fully toroidal configuration are described. Startup involves first breaking down a toroidal discharge and then driving up the current in order to reach the pinch parameter regime. Current densities of 2x106 A·m-2 have been achieved. The estimated plasma density is 6x1020m-3, and the temperature is about 4 eV. These parameters correspond to pinch conditions. (author)

  5. Toroidal Spiral Strings in Higher-dimensional Spacetime

    OpenAIRE

    Igata, Takahisa; Ishihara, Hideki

    2010-01-01

    We report on our progress in research of separability of the Nambu-Goto equation for test strings with a symmetric configuration in a shape of toroidal spiral in a five-dimensional Kerr-AdS black hole. In particular, for a Hopf loop string which is a special class of the toroidal spirals, we show the complete separation of variables occurs in two cases, Kerr background and Kerr-AdS background with equal angular momenta. We also obtain the dynamical solution for the Hopf loop around a black ho...

  6. Comparative study between toroidal coordinates and the magnetic dipole field

    CERN Document Server

    Chávez-Alarcón, Esteban

    2012-01-01

    There is a similar behaviour between the toroidal coordinates and the dipole magnetic field produced by a circular loop. In this work we evaluate up to what extent the former can be used as a representation of the latter. While the tori in the toroidal coordinates have circular cross sections, those of the circular loop magnetic field are nearly elliptical ovoids, but they are very similar for large aspect ratios.The centres of the latter displace from the axis faster than the former. By making a comparison between tori of similar aspect ratios, we find quantitative criteria to evaluate the accuracy of the approximation.

  7. Induction Motor with Switchable Number of Poles and Toroidal Winding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MUNTEANU, A.

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study of an induction motor provided with toroidal stator winding. The ring-type coils offer a higher versatility in obtaining a different number of pole pairs by means of delta/star and series/parallel connections respectively. As consequence, the developed torque can vary within large limits and the motor can be utilized for applications that require, for example, high load torque values for a short time. The study involves experimental tests and FEM simulation for an induction machine with three configurations of pole pairs. The conclusions attest the superiority of the toroidal winding for certain applications such as electric vehicles or lifting machines.

  8. Reevaluation of the Braginskii viscous force for toroidal plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Robert W

    2009-01-01

    The model by Braginskii for the viscous stress tensor is used to determine the shear and gyroviscous forces acting within a toroidally confined plasma. Comparison is made to previous evaluations which contain an inconsistent treatment of the radial derivative and neglect the effect of the pitch angle. A radial gyroviscous force is found to survive the limit of constant density and rigid toroidal rotation of the flux surface, and a radial shear viscous force may develop for sufficient vertical asymmetry to the ion velocity profile.

  9. The Linear Evolution of Tearing Mode in Toroidal Geometry*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任慎明; 俞国扬

    2001-01-01

    A set of linearly-reduced MHD equations in toroidal geometry has been solved numerically in flux coordinate with toroidal coupling. In the case of q > 1 on the magnetic axis.where q is the safety factor, the result shows that an unstable 2/1 tearing mode destabilizes both 1/1 and 3/1 modes. The 1/1 and 3/1 modes contribute local perturbations on the resonant surface of q = 2. And the 2/1 mode also contributes a local perturbation on the resonant surface of q = 3.``

  10. Toroidal vortices as a solution to the dust migration problem

    CERN Document Server

    Loren-Aguilar, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    In an earlier letter, we reported that dust settling in protoplanetary discs may lead to a dynamical dust-gas instability that produces global toroidal vortices. In this letter, we investigate the evolution of a dusty protoplanetary disc with two different dust species (1 mm and 50 cm dust grains), under the presence of the instability. We show how toroidal vortices, triggered by the interaction of mm grains with the gas, stop the radial migration of metre-sized dust, potentially offering a natural and efficient solution to the dust migration problem.

  11. Polygonal silica toroidal microcavity for controlled optical coupling

    CERN Document Server

    Kato, Takumi; Tanabe, Takasumi

    2012-01-01

    We fabricated polygonal silica toroidal microcavities to achieve stable mechanical coupling with an evanescent coupler such as a tapered fiber. The polygonal cavity was fabricated by using a combination of isotropic etching, anisotropic etching and laser reflow. It offers both high and low coupling efficiencies with the cavity mode even when the coupler is in contact with the cavity, which offers the possibility of taking the device outside the laboratory. A numerical simulation showed that an octagonal silica toroidal microcavity had an optical quality factor of 8.8\\times10^6.

  12. Field calculation of D0 toroids and comparison with measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, R.; Ostiguy, F.; Brzezniak, J.

    1992-06-01

    The magnetic structure of the D0 detector is described in an earlier report. The two-dimensional code POISSON was used for the initial design of the magnetic structures and the magnetic properties of the D0 toroids. During the construction, the two-dimensional code ANSYS was used to perform more detailed calculations. Full three-dimensional analysis was also performed using the code TOSCA. These new results are reported here and compared with measurements. In this study the magnetic flux in all toroids, CF, EF, and SAMUS is set in the same direction.

  13. Effects of Toroidal Rotation Sshear on Toroidicity-induced Alfven Eigenmodes in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podesta, M; Fredrickson, E D; Gorelenkov, N N; LeBlanc, B P; Heidbrink, W W; Crocker, N A; Kubota, S

    2010-08-19

    The effects of a sheared toroidal rotation on the dynamics of bursting Toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes are investigated in neutral beam heated plasmas on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40 557 (2000)]. The modes have a global character, extending over most of the minor radius. A toroidal rotation shear layer is measured at the location of maximum drive for the modes. Contrary to results from other devices, no clear evidence of increased damping is found. Instead, experiments with simultaneous neutral beam and radio-frequency auxiliary heating show a strong correlation between the dynamics of the modes and the instability drive. It is argued that kinetic effects involving changes in the mode drive and damping mechanisms other than rotation shear, such as continuum damping, are mostly responsible for the bursting dynamics of the modes.

  14. Effects of Toroidal Rotation Shear on Toroidicity-induced Alfven Eigenmodes in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of a sheared toroidal rotation on the dynamics of bursting Toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes are investigated in neutral beam heated plasmas on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) (M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40 557 (2000)). The modes have a global character, extending over most of the minor radius. A toroidal rotation shear layer is measured at the location of maximum drive for the modes. Contrary to results from other devices, no clear evidence of increased damping is found. Instead, experiments with simultaneous neutral beam and radio-frequency auxiliary heating show a strong correlation between the dynamics of the modes and the instability drive. It is argued that kinetic effects involving changes in the mode drive and damping mechanisms other than rotation shear, such as continuum damping, are mostly responsible for the bursting dynamics of the modes.

  15. Controlling the toroidal excitations in metamaterials for high-Q response

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Yuancheng; Fu, Quanhong; Wei, Zeyong; Li, Hongqiang

    2016-01-01

    The excitation of toroidal multipoles in metamaterials was investigated for high-Q response at a subwavelength scale. In this study, we explored the optimization of toroidal excitations in a planar metamaterial comprised of asymmetric split ring resonators (ASRRs). It was found that the scattering power of toroidal dipole can be remarkably strengthened by adjusting the characteristic parameter of ASRRs: asymmetric factor. Interestingly, the improvement in toroidal excitation accompanies increasing of the Q-factor of the toroidal metamaterial, it is shown that both the scattering power of toroidal dipole and the Q-factor were increased near one order by changing the asymmetric factor of ASRRs. The optimization in excitation of toroidal multipoles provide opportunity to further increase the Q-factor of toroidal metamaterial and boost light-matter interactions at the subwavelength scale for potential applications in low-power nonlinear processing and sensitive photonic applications.

  16. Transport and Dynamics in Toroidal Fusion Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sovinec, Carl [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2016-09-07

    The study entitled, "Transport and Dynamics in Toroidal Fusion Systems," (TDTFS) applied analytical theory and numerical computation to investigate topics of importance to confining plasma, the fourth state of matter, with magnetic fields. A central focus of the work is how non-thermal components of the ion particle distribution affect the "sawtooth" collective oscillation in the core of the tokamak magnetic configuration. Previous experimental and analytical research had shown and described how the oscillation frequency decreases and amplitude increases, leading to "monster" or "giant" sawteeth, when the non-thermal component is increased by injecting particle beams or by exciting ions with imposed electromagnetic waves. The TDTFS study applied numerical computation to self-consistently simulate the interaction between macroscopic collective plasma dynamics and the non-thermal particles. The modeling used the NIMROD code [Sovinec, Glasser, Gianakon, et al., J. Comput. Phys. 195, 355 (2004)] with the energetic component represented by simulation particles [Kim, Parker, Sovinec, and the NIMROD Team, Comput. Phys. Commun. 164, 448 (2004)]. The computations found decreasing growth rates for the instability that drives the oscillations, but they were ultimately limited from achieving experimentally relevant parameters due to computational practicalities. Nonetheless, this effort provided valuable lessons for integrated simulation of macroscopic plasma dynamics. It also motivated an investigation of the applicability of fluid-based modeling to the ion temperature gradient instability, leading to the journal publication [Schnack, Cheng, Barnes, and Parker, Phys. Plasmas 20, 062106 (2013)]. Apart from the tokamak-specific topics, the TDTFS study also addressed topics in the basic physics of magnetized plasma and in the dynamics of the reversed-field pinch (RFP) configuration. The basic physics work contributed to a study of two-fluid effects on interchange dynamics, where

  17. Self-Compacting Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Okamura, Hajime; OUCHI, Masahiro

    2003-01-01

    Self-compacting concrete was first developed in 1988 to achieve durable concrete structures. Since then, various investigations have been carried out and this type of concrete has been used in practical structures in Japan, mainly by large construction companies. Investigations for establishing a rational mix-design method and self-compactability testing methods have been carried out from the viewpoint of making self-compacting concrete a standard concrete.

  18. Mechanics of tissue compaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turlier, Hervé; Maître, Jean-Léon

    2015-12-01

    During embryonic development, tissues deform by a succession and combination of morphogenetic processes. Tissue compaction is the morphogenetic process by which a tissue adopts a tighter structure. Recent studies characterized the respective roles of cells' adhesive and contractile properties in tissue compaction. In this review, we formalize the mechanical and molecular principles of tissue compaction and we analyze through the prism of this framework several morphogenetic events: the compaction of the early mouse embryo, the formation of the fly retina, the segmentation of somites and the separation of germ layers during gastrulation.

  19. Finding regions of interest on toroidal meshes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Kesheng; Sinha, Rishi R; Shoshani, Arie [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Jones, Chad; Ma, Kwan-Liu [University of California, Davis, CA (United States); Ethier, Stephane [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ (United States); Klasky, Scott [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Winslett, Marianne, E-mail: kwu@lbl.gov [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

    2011-01-15

    Fusion promises to provide clean and safe energy, and a considerable amount of research effort is under way to turn this aspiration into a reality. This work focuses on a building block for analyzing data produced from the simulation of microturbulence in magnetic confinement fusion devices: the task of efficiently extracting regions of interest. Like many other simulations where a large number of data are produced, the careful study of 'interesting' parts of the data is critical to gain understanding. In this paper, we present an efficient approach for finding these regions of interest. Our approach takes full advantage of the underlying mesh structure in magnetic coordinates to produce a compact representation of the mesh points inside the regions and an efficient connected component labeling algorithm for constructing regions from points. This approach scales linearly with the surface area of the regions of interest instead of the volume as shown with both computational complexity analysis and experimental measurements. Furthermore, this new approach is hundreds of times faster than a recently published method based on Cartesian coordinates.

  20. Finding Regions of Interest on Toroidal Meshes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fusion promises to provide clean and safe energy, and a considerable amount of research effort is underway to turn this aspiration intoreality. This work focuses on a building block for analyzing data produced from the simulation of microturbulence in magnetic confinement fusion devices: the task of efficiently extracting regions of interest. Like many other simulations where a large amount of data are produced, the careful study of 'interesting' parts of the data is critical to gain understanding. In this paper, we present an efficient approach for finding these regions of interest. Our approach takes full advantage of the underlying mesh structure in magnetic coordinates to produce a compact representation of the mesh points inside the regions and an efficient connected component labeling algorithm for constructing regions from points. This approach scales linearly with the surface area of the regions of interest instead of the volume as shown with both computational complexity analysis and experimental measurements. Furthermore, this new approach is 100s of times faster than a recently published method based on Cartesian coordinates.

  1. Finding regions of interest on toroidal meshes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fusion promises to provide clean and safe energy, and a considerable amount of research effort is under way to turn this aspiration into a reality. This work focuses on a building block for analyzing data produced from the simulation of microturbulence in magnetic confinement fusion devices: the task of efficiently extracting regions of interest. Like many other simulations where a large number of data are produced, the careful study of 'interesting' parts of the data is critical to gain understanding. In this paper, we present an efficient approach for finding these regions of interest. Our approach takes full advantage of the underlying mesh structure in magnetic coordinates to produce a compact representation of the mesh points inside the regions and an efficient connected component labeling algorithm for constructing regions from points. This approach scales linearly with the surface area of the regions of interest instead of the volume as shown with both computational complexity analysis and experimental measurements. Furthermore, this new approach is hundreds of times faster than a recently published method based on Cartesian coordinates.

  2. Active trajectory control for a heavy ion beam probe on the compact helical system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 200 keV heavy ion beam probe (HIBP) on the Compact Helical System torsatron/heliotron uses a newly proposed method in order to control complicated beam trajectories in non-axisymmetrical devices. As a result, the HIBP has successfully measured potential profiles of the toroidal helical plasma. The article will describe the results of the potential profile measurements, together with the HIBP hardware system and procedures to realize the method. (author)

  3. Homogeneous Construction of the Toroidal Lie Algebra of Type A1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haifeng Lian; Cui Chen; Qinzhu Wen

    2007-01-01

    In this paper,we consider an analogue of the level two homogeneous construc-tion of the affine Kac-Moody algebra A1(1) by vertex operators.We construct modules for the toroidal Lie algebra and the extended toroidal Lie algebra of type A1.We also prove that the module is completely reducible for the extended toroidal Lie algebra.

  4. Toroidal, compression, and vortical dipole strengths in 124Sn

    CERN Document Server

    Kvasil, J; Repko, A; Kleinig, W; Reinhard, P -G; Iudice, N Lo

    2012-01-01

    The toroidal, compression and vortical dipole strength functions in semi-magic $^{124}$Sn (and partly in doubly-magic $^{100,132}$Sn) are analyzed within the random-phase-approximation method with the SkT6, SkI3, SLy6, SV-bas, and SkM* Skyrme forces. The isoscalar (T=0), isovector (T=1), and electromagnetic ('elm') channels are considered. Both convection $j_c$ and magnetization $j_m$ nuclear currents are taken into account. The calculations basically confirm the previous results obtained for $^{208}$Pb with the force SLy6. In particular, it is shown that the vortical and toroidal strengths are dominated by $j_c$ in T=0 channel and by $j_m$ in T=1 and 'elm' channels. The compression strength is always determined by $j_c$. It is also shown that the 'elm' strength (relevant for (e,e') reaction) is very similar to T=1 one. The toroidal mode resides in the region of the pygmy resonance. So, perhaps, this region embraces both irrotational (pygmy) and vortical (toroidal) flows.

  5. Plasma Processes : Minimum dissipative relaxed states in toroidal plasmas

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Bhattacharyya; M S Janaki; B Dasgupta

    2000-11-01

    Relaxation of toroidal discharges is described by the principle of minimum energy dissipation together with the constraint of conserved global helicity. The resulting Euler-Lagrange equation is solved in toroidal coordinates for an axisymmetric torus by expressing the solutions in terms of Chandrasekhar-Kendall (C-K) eigenfunctions analytically continued in the complex domain. The C-K eigenfunctions are obtained as hypergeometric functions that are solutions of scalar Helmholtz equation in toroidal coordinates in the large aspect-ratio approximation. Equilibria are constructed by assuming the current to vanish at the edge of plasma. For the = 0; = 0 ( and are the poloidal and toroidal mode numbers respectively) relaxed states, the magnetic field, current, (safety factor) and pressure profiles are calculated for a given value of aspect-ratio of the torus and for different values of the eigenvalue 0. The new feature of the present model is that solutions allow for both tokamak as well as RFP-like behaviour with increase in the values of 0, which is related directly to volt-sec in the experiment.

  6. Evidence of Inward Toroidal Momentum Convection in the JET Tokamak

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tala, T.; Zastrow, K.-D.; Ferreira, J.;

    2009-01-01

    Experiments have been carried out on the Joint European Torus tokamak to determine the diffusive and convective momentum transport. Torque, injected by neutral beams, was modulated to create a periodic perturbation in the toroidal rotation velocity. Novel transport analysis shows the magnitude an...

  7. First ATLAS Barrel Toroid coil casing arrives at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The first of eight 25-metre long coil casings for the ATLAS experiment's barrel toroid magnet system arrived at CERN on Saturday 2 March by road from Heidelberg. This structure will be part of the largest superconducting toroid magnet ever made.   The first coil casing for the toroidal magnets of Atlas arrives at Building 180. This is the start of an enormous three-dimensional jigsaw puzzle. Each of the eight sets of double pancake coils will be housed inside aluminium coil casings, which in turn will be held inside a stainless steel vacuum vessel. A huge construction, the casing that arrived at CERN measures 25 metres in length and 5 metres in width. It weighs 20 tones. And this is just the beginning of the toroid jigsaw: by early April a batch of four double pancake coils, which altogether weighs 65 tones, will arrive from Ansaldo in Italy. The first vacuum vessel will also be arriving from Felguera in Spain this month. It will take about two years for all these 25 m long structures of casings, coils a...

  8. Stability of toroidal magnetic fields in stellar interiors

    CERN Document Server

    Ibañez-Mejia, Juan C

    2015-01-01

    We present 3D MHD simulations of purely toroidal and mixed poloidal-toroidal magnetic field configurations to study the behavior of the Tayler instability. For the first time the simultaneous action of rotation and magnetic diffusion are taken into account and the effects of a poloidal field on the dynamic evolution of unstable toroidal magnetic fields is included. In the absence of diffusion, fast rotation (rotation rate compared to Alfv\\'en frequency) is able to suppress the instability when the rotation and magnetic axes are aligned and when the radial field strength gradient p 1.5, rapid rotation does not suppress the instability but instead introduces a damping factor to the growth rate in agreement with the analytic predictions. For the mixed poloidal-toroidal fields we find an unstable axisymmetric mode, not predicted analytically, right at the stability threshold for the non-axisymmetric modes; it has been argued that an axisymmetric mode is necessary for the closure of the Tayler-Spruit dynamo loop.

  9. Flat-band assembly for toroidal transformer cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mclyman, W. T.

    1973-01-01

    Toroidal transformer cores are often banded together by means of strap. Spot welds secure strap. Proper tension is obtained by use of special fixture in conjunction with winding of wire which is placed temporarily on core; winding is excited by dc current to hold core halves together magnetically during alignment.

  10. An Overview of Plasma Confinement in Toroidal Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Dini, Fatemeh; Baghdadi, Reza; Amrollahi, Reza; Khorasani, Sina

    2009-01-01

    This overview presents a tutorial introduction to the theory of magnetic plasma confinement in toroidal confinement systems with particular emphasis on axisymmetric equilibrium geometries, and tokamaks. The discussion covers three important aspects of plasma physics: Equilibrium, Stability, and Transport. The section on equilibrium will go through an introduction to ideal magnetohydrodynamics, curvilinear system of coordinates, flux coordinates, extensions to axisymmetric equilibrium, Grad-Sh...

  11. ATLAS-Lowering the first Barrel Toroid coil

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Cranes lowered the first of ATLAS's eight Barrel Toroid coils into the cavern. The part is 25 metres long and the cranes had to hold the 100 tonne coil at a sharp angle while it passed through the 18-metre diameter vertical shaft into the cavern. Then they laid the magnet to a horisontal robust platform. Images from Camera 1

  12. ATLAS-Lowering the first Barrel Toroid coil

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Audiovisual Unit

    2004-01-01

    Cranes lowered the first of ATLAS's eight Barrel Toroid coils into the cavern. The part is 25 meters long and the cranes had to hold the 100 tonne coil at a sharp angle while it passed through the 18-meter diameter vertical shaft into the cavern. Then they laid the magnet to a horizontal robust platform. Images from Camera 2

  13. The Superconducting Toroid for the New International AXion Observatory (IAXO)

    CERN Document Server

    Shilon, I; Silva, H; Wagner, U; Kate, H H J ten

    2013-01-01

    IAXO, the new International AXion Observatory, will feature the most ambitious detector for solar axions to date. Axions are hypothetical particles which were postulated to solve one of the puzzles arising in the standard model of particle physics, namely the strong CP (Charge conjugation and Parity) problem. This detector aims at achieving a sensitivity to the coupling between axions and photons of one order of magnitude beyond the limits of the current detector, the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST). The IAXO detector relies on a high-magnetic field distributed over a very large volume to convert solar axions to detectable X-ray photons. Inspired by the ATLAS barrel and end-cap toroids, a large superconducting toroid is being designed. The toroid comprises eight, one meter wide and twenty one meters long racetrack coils. The assembled toroid is sized 5.2 m in diameter and 25 m in length and its mass is about 250 tons. The useful field in the bores is 2.5 T while the peak magnetic field in the windings is 5....

  14. Preparing an ATLAS toroid magnet end-cap for lowering

    CERN Multimedia

    Claudia Marcelloni

    2007-01-01

    One of the two 13-m high toroid magnet end-caps for the ATLAS experiment being transported from the construction hall to the experimental area. The end-cap will be lowered into the ATLAS cavern and attached to an end of the detector.

  15. Theory of the M = 1 Kink Mode in Toroidal Plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Blank, H. J.; Schep, T. J.

    1991-01-01

    The energy principle of ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) is used to study the ideal MHD stability of the m = 1 internal kink mode in a toroidal plasma. The equilibrium configurations that are considered allow for a broad region where the safety factor q is close to unity. This region may extend to t

  16. Barrel Toroid fully charged to nominal field, and it works!

    CERN Multimedia

    Herman ten Kate

    After a few weeks of testing up to intermediate currents, finally, on Thursday evening November 9, the current in the Barrel Toroid was pushed up to its nominal value of 20500 A and even 500 A beyond this value to prove that we have some margin. It went surprisingly well. Of course, the 8 coils forming the toroid were already tested individually at the surface but still, some surprise may have come from those parts added to the toroid in the cavern for the first time like the 8 cryoring sections linking the coils as well as the valve box at the bottom in sector 13 regulating the helium flow or the current lead cryostat on the top in sector 5. No training quenches, nothing to worry about, and the test was concluded with a fast dump triggered at 00:40 in the very early morning of November 10. (left) The toroid current during the evening and night of November 9. (right) The test crew oscillated between fear and hope while looking at the control panels as the current approached 21kA. Big relief was in the...

  17. Construction and initial operation of the Advanced Toroidal Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) torsatron was designed on a physics basis for access to the second stability regime and on an engineering basis for independent fabrication of high-accuracy components. The actual construction, assembly, and initial operation of ATF are compared with the characteristics expected during the design of ATF. 31 refs., 19 figs., 2 tabs

  18. A toroidal inductor integrated in a standard CMOS process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vandi, Luca; Andreani, Pietro; Temporiti, Enrico;

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a toroidal inductor integrated in a standard 0.13 um CMOS process. Finite-elements preliminary simulations are provided to prove the validity of the concept. In order to extract fundamental parameters by means of direct calculations, two different and well-known approaches...

  19. Plasma Heating and Losses in Toroidal Multipole Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armentrout, C. J.; Barter, J. D.; Breun, R. A.; Cavallo, A. J.; Drake, J. R.; Etzweiler,; Greenwood, J. R.

    1974-09-01

    The heating and loss of plasmas have been studied in three pulsed, toroidal multipole devices: a large levitated octupole, a small supported octupole and a very .small supported quadrupole. Plasmas are produced by gun injection and heated by electron and ion cyclotron resonance heating and ohmic heating. Electron cyclotron heating rates have been measured over a wide range of parameters, and the results are in quantitative agreement with stochastic heating theory. Electron cyclotron resonance heating produces ions with energies larger than predicted by theory. With the addition of a toroidal field, ohmic heating gives densities as high as 10{sup 13}cm{sup -3} in the toroidal quadrupole and 10{sup 12}cm{sup -3} in the small octupole. Plasma losses for n=5 x 10{sup 9}cm{sup -3} plasmas are inferred from Langmuir probe and Fabry-Perot interferometer measurements, and measured with special striped collectors on the wall and rings. The loss to a levitated ring is measured using a modulated light beam telemeter. The confinement is better than Bohm but considerably worse than classical. Low frequency convective cells which are fixed in space are observed. These cells around the ring are diminished when a weak toroidal field is added, and loss collectors show a vastly reduced flux to the rings. Analysis of the spatial density profile shows features of B-independent diffusion. The confinement is sensitive to some kinds of dc field errors, but surprisingly insensitive to perturbations of the ac confining field.

  20. Compaction properties of isomalt

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolhuis, Gerad K.; Engelhart, Jeffrey J. P.; Eissens, Anko C.

    2009-01-01

    Although other polyols have been described extensively as filler-binders in direct compaction of tablets, the polyol isomalt is rather unknown as pharmaceutical excipient, in spite of its description in all the main pharmacopoeias. In this paper the compaction properties of different types of ispoma

  1. Observation of Fano resonance and classical analog of electromagnetically induced transparency in toroidal metamaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Song; Yang, Helin [College of Physical Science and Technology, Central China Normal University, Wuhan (China); Cong, Lonqing; Singh, Ranjan [Division of Physics and Applied Physics, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (Singapore); Centre for Disruptive Photonic Technologies, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (Singapore); Gao, Fei [Division of Physics and Applied Physics, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (Singapore)

    2016-05-15

    Toroidal multipoles have recently been explored in various scientific communities, ranging from atomic and molecular physics, electrodynamics, and solid-state physics to biology. Here we experimentally and numerically demonstrate a three-dimensional toroidal metamaterial where two different toroidal dipoles along orthogonal directions have been observed. The chosen toroidal metamaterial also simultaneously supports Fano resonance and the classical analog of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) phenomena in the transmission spectra that originate from the electric-toroidal dipole and electric-magnetic dipole destructive interference. The intriguing properties of the toroidal resonances may open up avenues for applications in toroidal moments generator, sensing and slow-light devices. (copyright 2016 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  2. Small Valdivia compact spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Kubi's, W; Kubi\\'s, Wieslaw; Michalewski, Henryk

    2005-01-01

    We prove a preservation theorem for the class of Valdivia compact spaces, which involves inverse sequences of ``simple'' retractions. Consequently, a compact space of weight $\\loe\\aleph_1$ is Valdivia compact iff it is the limit of an inverse sequence of metric compacta whose bonding maps are retractions. As a corollary, we show that the class of Valdivia compacta of weight at most $\\aleph_1$ is preserved both under retractions and under open 0-dimensional images. Finally, we characterize the class of all Valdivia compacta in the language of category theory, which implies that this class is preserved under all continuous weight preserving functors.

  3. Compact boson stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartmann, Betti [School of Engineering and Science, Jacobs University, Postfach 750 561, D-28725 Bremen (Germany); Kleihaus, Burkhard; Kunz, Jutta [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Oldenburg, Postfach 2503, D-26111 Oldenburg (Germany); Schaffer, Isabell, E-mail: i.schaffer@jacobs-university.de [School of Engineering and Science, Jacobs University, Postfach 750 561, D-28725 Bremen (Germany)

    2012-07-24

    We consider compact boson stars that arise for a V-shaped scalar field potential. They represent a one parameter family of solutions of the scaled Einstein-Gordon equations. We analyze the physical properties of these solutions and determine their domain of existence. Along their physically relevant branch emerging from the compact Q-ball solution, their mass increases with increasing radius. Employing arguments from catastrophe theory we argue that this branch is stable, until the maximal value of the mass is reached. There the mass and size are on the order of magnitude of the Schwarzschild limit, and thus the spiraling respectively oscillating behaviour, well known for compact stars, sets in.

  4. The sensitivity of barley, field beans and sugar beet to soil compaction

    OpenAIRE

    Brereton, Jeremy Charles

    1986-01-01

    The sensitivity of spring barley (Hordeum vulgare, cv. Carnival), field beans (Vicia faba, ev. Maris Bead) and sugar beet (Beta vulgaris,cv. Monoire) to topsoil compaction induced by tractor wheelings, post sowing, on a coarse gravelly loam of the Arrow series was investigated in 1983 and 1984. The study revealed that in both years topsoil compaction increased the dry bulk density, vane shear strength and cone resistance of the soil. Although compaction reduced only the plant population o...

  5. Experimental investigation of transitional flow in a toroidal pipe

    CERN Document Server

    Kühnen, J; Hof, B; Kuhlmann, H

    2015-01-01

    The flow instability and further transition to turbulence in a toroidal pipe (torus) with curvature (tube-to-coiling diameter) 0.049 is investigated experimentally. The flow inside the toroidal pipe is driven by a steel sphere fitted to the inner pipe diameter. The sphere is moved with constant azimuthal velocity from outside the torus by a moving magnet. The experiment is designed to investigate curved pipe flow by optical measurement techniques. Using stereoscopic particle image velocimetry, laser Doppler velocimetry and pressure drop measurements, the flow is measured for Reynolds numbers ranging from 1000 to 15000. Time- and space-resolved velocity fields are obtained and analysed. The steady axisymmetric basic flow is strongly influenced by centrifugal effects. On an increase of the Reynolds number we find a sequence of bifurcations. For Re=4075 a supercritical bifurcation to an oscillatory flow is found in which waves travel in the streamwise direction with a phase velocity slightly faster than the mean...

  6. Stabilization of ballooning modes with sheared toroidal rotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new code demonstrates the stabilization of MHD ballooning modes by sheared toroidal rotation. A shifted-circle model is used to elucidate the physics, and numerically reconstructed equilibria are used to analyze DIII-D discharges. In the ballooning representation, the modes shift periodically along the field line to the next point of unfavorable curvature. The shift frequency (dΩ/dq, where Ω is the angular toroidal velocity and q is the safety factor) is proportional to the rotation shear and inversely proportional to the magnetic shear. Stability improves with increasing shift frequency and, in the shifted circle model, direct stable access to the second stability regime occurs when this frequency is a fraction of the Alfven frequency, ωA = VA/qR. Shear stabilization is also demonstrated for an equilibrium reconstruction of a DIII-D VH-mode. (author). 9 refs, 3 figs

  7. Cooling of Neutron Stars with Strong Toroidal Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Page, D; Küker, M; Page, Dany; Geppert, Ulrich; Kueker, Manfred

    2007-01-01

    We present models of temperature distribution in the crust of a neutron star in the presence of a strong toroidal component superposed to the poloidal component of the magnetic field. The presence of such a toroidal field hinders heat flow toward the surface in a large part of the crust. As a result, the neutron star surface presents two warm regions surrounded by extended cold regions and has a thermal luminosity much lower than in the case the magnetic field is purely poloidal. We apply these models to calculate the thermal evolution of such neutron stars and show that the lowered photon luminosity naturally extends their life-time as detectable thermal X-ray sources.

  8. Low-frequency fluctuations in a pure toroidal magnetized plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P K Sharma; R Singh; D Bora

    2009-12-01

    A magnetized, low- plasma in pure toroidal configuration is formed and extensively studied with ion mass as control parameter. Xenon, krypton and argon plasmas are formed at a fixed toroidal magnetic field of 0.024 T, with a peak density of ∼ 1011 cm-3, ∼ 4 × 1010 cm-3 and ∼ 2 × 1010 cm−3 respectively. The experimental investigation of time-averaged plasma parameter reveals that their profiles remain insensitive to ion mass and suggests that saturated slab equilibrium is obtained. Low-frequency (LF) coherent fluctuations ( < ci) are observed and identified as flute modes. Here ci represents ion cyclotron frequency. Our results indicate that these modes get reduced with ion mass. The frequency of the fluctuating mode decreases with increase in the ion mass. Further, an attempt has been made to discuss the theory of flute modes to understand the relevance of some of our experimental observations.

  9. An Overview of Plasma Confinement in Toroidal Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Dini, Fatemeh; Amrollahi, Reza; Khorasani, Sina

    2009-01-01

    This overview presents a tutorial introduction to the theory of magnetic plasma confinement in toroidal confinement systems with particular emphasis on axisymmetric equilibrium geometries, and tokamaks. The discussion covers three important aspects of plasma physics: Equilibrium, Stability, and Transport. The section on equilibrium will go through an introduction to ideal magnetohydrodynamics, curvilinear system of coordinates, flux coordinates, extensions to axisymmetric equilibrium, Grad-Shafranov Equation (GSE), Green's function formalism, as well as analytical and numerical solutions to GSE. The section on stability will address topics including Lyapunov Stability in nonlinear systems, energy principle, modal analysis, and simplifications for axisymmetric machines. The final section will consider transport in toroidal systems. We present the flux-surface-averaged system of equations describing classical and non-classical transport phenomena. Applications to the small-sized high-aspect-ratio Damavand tokam...

  10. Toroidal AC transformer for beam intensity measurements in CSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The intensity of a pulsed beam of charged particles in the Cooling Storage Ring Project of Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL-CSR) will be measured with a toroidal current transformer. By comparing and analyzing the properties of kinds of magnetic cores, a strip wound toroidal core is adopted, which is made of a high-permeability alloy and can measure a pulsed beam with frequency range of 0.2 to 2 MHz. The permeability of Fe-based nanocrystalline alloy varying with frequency is measured and the noises in the circuit are analyzed. By adding a low-noise operational amplifier into the circuit, the current down to 1 μA can be detected

  11. Reevaluation of the Braginskii viscous force for toroidal plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Robert W.

    2011-12-01

    The model by Braginskii [1] (Braginskii, S. I. 1965 Transport processes in plasma. In: Review of Plasma Physics, Vol. 1 (ed. M.A. Leontovich). New York, NY: Consultants Bureau, pp. 205-311) for the viscous stress tensor is used to determine the shear and gyroviscous forces acting within a toroidally confined plasma. Comparison is made to a previous evaluation, which contains an inconsistent treatment of the radial derivative and neglects the effect of the pitch angle. Parallel viscosity contributes a radial shear viscous force, which may develop for sufficient vertical asymmetry to the ion velocity profile. An evaluation is performed of this radial viscous force for a tokamak near equilibrium, which indicates qualitative agreement between theory and measurement for impure plasma discharges with strong toroidal flow.

  12. Nonlinear particle simulation of ion cyclotron waves in toroidal geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuley, A., E-mail: akuley@uci.edu; Lin, Z. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California Irvine, CA-92697 (United States); Bao, J. [Fusion Simulation Center, Peking University, Beijing (China); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California Irvine, CA-92697 (United States); Wei, X. S.; Xiao, Y. [Institute of Fusion Theory and Simulation, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China)

    2015-12-10

    Global particle simulation model has been developed in this work to provide a first-principles tool for studying the nonlinear interactions of radio frequency (RF) waves with plasmas in tokamak. In this model, ions are considered as fully kinetic particles using the Vlasov equation and electrons are treated as guiding centers using the drift kinetic equation with realistic electron-to-ion mass ratio. Boris push scheme for the ion motion has been developed in the toroidal geometry using magnetic coordinates and successfully verified for the ion cyclotron and ion Bernstein waves in global gyrokinetic toroidal code (GTC). The nonlinear simulation capability is applied to study the parametric decay instability of a pump wave into an ion Bernstein wave side band and a low frequency ion cyclotron quasi mode.

  13. ATLAS barrel toroid integration and test area in building 180

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    The ATLAS barrel toroid system consists of eight coils, each of axial length 25.3 m, assembled radially and symmetrically around the beam axis. The coils are of a flat racetrack type with two 'double-pancake' windings made of 20.5 kA aluminium-stabilized niobium-titanium superconductor. The barrel toroid is being assembled in building 180 on the Meyrin site. In the first phase of assembly, the coils are packed into their aluminium-alloy casing. These photos show the double-pancake coils from ANSALDO and the coil casings from ALSTOM. In the foreground is the tooling from COSMI used to turn over the coil casings during this first phase. In the right background is the yellow lifting gantry manufactured at JINR-Dubna, Russia which will transport the coil casings to a heating table for prestressing. Two test benches with magnetic mirror are also visible.

  14. Counterformal contacts of full toroidal continuously variable transmission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ATTIA Nabil Abdulla; QIN Da-tong

    2005-01-01

    The point and the line contacts of a toroidal continuously variable transmission (CVT) are studied. The contact shapes between the roller and input and output disks are formulated by using the classical Hertz contact theory. Based on the formulated equations, different system factors affecting the maximum Hertz stress in the elliptical and strip contacts of the full toroidal CVT are explored, which include the properties of the contacting material (Young's modulus), operating condition (pushing load) and geometrical parameters (aspect cavity ratio, aspect roller ratio). The comparative results reveal the relations between the maximum Hertz stress and the speed ratio in the form of graphs. These graphs give useful information for designer to know the maximum Hertz stress during operation in such systems.

  15. Quasars a supermassive rotating toroidal black hole interpretation

    CERN Document Server

    Spivey, R J

    2000-01-01

    A supermassive rotating toroidal black hole (TBH) is proposed as the fundamental structure of quasars and other jet-producing active galactic nuclei. Rotating protogalaxies gather matter from the central gaseous region leading to the birth of massive toroidal stars whose internal nuclear reactions proceed very rapidly. Once the nuclear fuel is spent, gravitational collapse produces a slender ring-shaped TBH remnant. These events are typically the first supernovae of the host galaxies. Given time the TBH mass increases through continued accretion by several orders of magnitude, the event horizon swells whilst the central aperture shrinks. The difference in angular velocities between the accreting matter and the TBH induces a magnetic field that is strongest in the region of the central aperture and innermost ergoregion. Due to the presence of negative energy states when such a gravitational vortex is immersed in an electromagnetic field, circumstances are near ideal for energy extraction via non-thermal radiat...

  16. MINERVA: Ideal MHD stability code for toroidally rotating tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiba, N.; Tokuda, S.; Furukawa, M.; Snyder, P. B.; Chu, M. S.

    2009-08-01

    A new linear MHD stability code MINERVA is developed for investigating a toroidal rotation effect on the stability of ideal MHD modes in tokamak plasmas. This code solves the Frieman-Rotenberg equation as not only the generalized eigenvalue problem but also the initial value problem. The parallel computing method used in this code realizes the stability analysis of both long and short wavelength MHD modes in short time. The results of some benchmarking tests show the validity of this MINERVA code. The numerical study with MINERVA about the toroidal rotation effect on the edge MHD stability shows that the rotation shear destabilizes the intermediate wavelength modes but stabilizes the short wavelength edge localized MHD modes, though the rotation frequency destabilizes both the long and the short wavelength MHD modes.

  17. Roller compaction of theophylline

    OpenAIRE

    Hadzovic, Ervina

    2008-01-01

    1. Summary Direct compaction requires a very good flowability and compressibility of the materials. Those parameters become even more critical if the formulation contains large amount of active substance. To overcome these problems, several alternatives have been used. Roller compaction is a very attractive technology in the pharmaceutical industry. It is a fast and efficient way of producing granules, especially suitable for moisture sensitive materials. The intention of this work was to ...

  18. Path Integral Quantization for a Toroidal Phase Space

    OpenAIRE

    Bodmann, Bernhard G.; Klauder, John R.

    1999-01-01

    A Wiener-regularized path integral is presented as an alternative way to formulate Berezin-Toeplitz quantization on a toroidal phase space. Essential to the result is that this quantization prescription for the torus can be constructed as an induced representation from anti-Wick quantization on its covering space, the plane. When this construction is expressed in the form of a Wiener-regularized path integral, symmetrization prescriptions for the propagator emerge similar to earlier path-inte...

  19. Self-Sustained Magnetic Braiding in Toroidal Plasmas

    OpenAIRE

    Itoh, K; Fukuyama, A.; Itoh, S.-I.; Yagi, M.; Azumi, M.

    1994-01-01

    Theory for the magnetic braiding in toroidal plasmas, which is caused by microscopic pressure-gradient-driven turbulence, is developed. When the pressure gradient exceeds a threshold, the self-sustaining of the magnetic braiding and enhanced anomalous transport occur. The balance between the nonlinear destabilization and nonlinear stabilization, which determines the stationary turbulence, is solved analytically for the case of interchange mode. The enhanced thermal conductivity and magneti...

  20. Toroidal field coil system for STARFIRE, a preliminary assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An important element of STARFIRE is the 12-coil superconducting toroidal field coil system which is required to generate 5.6 tesla at the 7.0 m plasma axis, with a peak-to-peak field ripple of 1% (maximum). Internal spatial requirements dictate a clear bore about 15 1/2 m high x 10 m wide, resulting in a total stored energy of 67 GJ

  1. 18–22 cm VLBA Observational Evidence for Toroidal B-Field Components in Six AGN Jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Cristina Motter

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The formation of relativistic jets in Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN is related to accretion onto their central supermassive black holes, and magnetic (B fields are believed to play a central role in launching, collimating, and accelerating the jet streams from very compact regions out to kiloparsec scales. We present results of Faraday rotation studies based on Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA data obtained at 18–22 cm for six well known AGN (OJ 287, 3C 279, PKS 1510-089, 3C 345, BL Lac, and 3C 454.3, which probe projected distances out to tens of parsecs from the observed cores. We have identified statistically significant, monotonic, transverse Faraday rotation gradients across the jets of all but one of these sources, indicating the presence of toroidal B fields, which may be one component of helical B fields associated with these AGN jets.

  2. Neoclassical offset toroidal velocity and auxiliary ion heating in tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzaro, E.

    2016-05-01

    In conditions of ideal axisymmetry, for a magnetized plasma in a generic bounded domain, necessarily toroidal, the uniform absorption of external energy (e.g., RF or any isotropic auxiliary heating) cannot give rise to net forces or torques. Experimental evidence on contemporary tokamaks shows that the near central absorption of RF heating power (ICH and ECH) and current drive in presence of MHD activity drives a bulk plasma rotation in the co- I p direction, opposite to the initial one. Also the appearance of classical or neoclassical tearing modes provides a nonlinear magnetic braking that tends to clamp the rotation profile at the q-rational surfaces. The physical origin of the torque associated with P RF absorption could be due the effects of asymmetry in the equilibrium configuration or in power deposition, but here we point out also an effect of the response of the so-called neoclassical offset velocity to the power dependent heat flow increment. The neoclassical toroidal viscosity due to internal magnetic kink or tearing modes tends to relax the plasma rotation to this asymptotic speed, which in absence of auxiliary heating is of the order of the ion diamagnetic velocity. It can be shown by kinetic and fluid calculations, that the absorption of auxiliary power by ions modifies this offset proportionally to the injected power thereby forcing the plasma rotation in a direction opposite to the initial, to large values. The problem is discussed in the frame of the theoretical models of neoclassical toroidal viscosity.

  3. Toroidal Continuously Variable Transmission Systems: Terminology and Present Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet YILDIZ

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of continuously variable transmission systems in many different areas such as aerospace, robotics, machinery and automotive industries as an alternative to conventional speed changers with constant ratio becomes widely.Especially in the automotive industry, these systems have been used increasingly, since they enable that internal combustion engines in vehicles run at optimal speeds, and consequently provide considerable fuel savings and therefore lower emission values and also they provide powerful acceleration and quiet working. CVT systems have several constructive variants such as belted, chained, balled, toroidal etc. In this paper, toroidal CVT systems based on elastohydrodynamic principles are concerned with, and fundamental works of last two decades in this field are reviewed. However, the relevant terminology and dynamics along with the control of these systems are briefly treated for better understanding of the literature mentioned. Attention is drawn to the lack of some significant issues in present research works, and potential future works are pointed out. This paper, to the authors’ knowledge, will be the first review on toroidal CVT systems in Turkish literature

  4. 3D toroidal physics: Testing the boundaries of symmetry breakinga)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spong, Donald A.

    2015-05-01

    Toroidal symmetry is an important concept for plasma confinement; it allows the existence of nested flux surface MHD equilibria and conserved invariants for particle motion. However, perfect symmetry is unachievable in realistic toroidal plasma devices. For example, tokamaks have toroidal ripple due to discrete field coils, optimized stellarators do not achieve exact quasi-symmetry, the plasma itself continually seeks lower energy states through helical 3D deformations, and reactors will likely have non-uniform distributions of ferritic steel near the plasma. Also, some level of designed-in 3D magnetic field structure is now anticipated for most concepts in order to provide the plasma control needed for a stable, steady-state fusion reactor. Such planned 3D field structures can take many forms, ranging from tokamaks with weak 3D edge localized mode suppression fields to stellarators with more dominant 3D field structures. This motivates the development of physics models that are applicable across the full range of 3D devices. Ultimately, the questions of how much symmetry breaking can be tolerated and how to optimize its design must be addressed for all fusion concepts. A closely coupled program of simulation, experimental validation, and design optimization is required to determine what forms and amplitudes of 3D shaping and symmetry breaking will be compatible with the requirements of future fusion reactors.

  5. The Geometry on Smooth Toroidal Compactifications of Siegel varieties

    CERN Document Server

    Yau, Shing-Tung

    2012-01-01

    This is a part of our joint program. The purpose of this paper is to study smooth toroidal compactifications of Siegel varieties and their applications, we also try to understand the K\\"ahler-Einstein metrics on Siegel varieties through the compactifications. Let $A_{g,\\Gamma}:=H_g/\\Gamma$ be a Siegel variety, where $H_g$ is the genus-$g$ Siegel space and $\\Gamma$ is an arithmetic subgroup in $\\Aut(H_g)$. There are four aspects of this paper : 1.There is a correspondence between the category of degenerations of Abelian varieties and the category of limits of weight one Hodge structures. We show that any cusp of Siegel space $\\frak{H}_g$ can be identified with the set of certain weight one polarized mixed Hodge structures. 2.In general, the boundary of a smooth toroidal compactification $\\bar{A}_{g,\\Gamma}$ of $A_{g,\\Gamma}$ has self-intersections.For most geometric applications, we would like to have a nice toroidal compactification such that the added infinity boundary $D_\\infty =\\bar{A}_{g,\\Gamma}-A_{g,\\Gam...

  6. 3D toroidal physics: Testing the boundaries of symmetry breaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spong, Donald A., E-mail: spongda@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6169 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Toroidal symmetry is an important concept for plasma confinement; it allows the existence of nested flux surface MHD equilibria and conserved invariants for particle motion. However, perfect symmetry is unachievable in realistic toroidal plasma devices. For example, tokamaks have toroidal ripple due to discrete field coils, optimized stellarators do not achieve exact quasi-symmetry, the plasma itself continually seeks lower energy states through helical 3D deformations, and reactors will likely have non-uniform distributions of ferritic steel near the plasma. Also, some level of designed-in 3D magnetic field structure is now anticipated for most concepts in order to provide the plasma control needed for a stable, steady-state fusion reactor. Such planned 3D field structures can take many forms, ranging from tokamaks with weak 3D edge localized mode suppression fields to stellarators with more dominant 3D field structures. This motivates the development of physics models that are applicable across the full range of 3D devices. Ultimately, the questions of how much symmetry breaking can be tolerated and how to optimize its design must be addressed for all fusion concepts. A closely coupled program of simulation, experimental validation, and design optimization is required to determine what forms and amplitudes of 3D shaping and symmetry breaking will be compatible with the requirements of future fusion reactors.

  7. Expansions of non-symmetric toroidal magnetohydrodynamic equilibria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitzner, Harold

    2016-06-01

    Expansions of non-symmetric toroidal ideal magnetohydrodynamic equilibria with nested flux surfaces are carried out for two cases. The first expansion is in a topological torus in three dimensions, in which physical quantities are periodic of period 2 π in y and z. Data is given on the flux surface x = 0. Despite the possibility of magnetic resonances the power series expansion can be carried to all orders in a parameter which measures the flux between x = 0 and the surface in question. Resonances are resolved by appropriate addition resonant fields, as by Weitzner, [Phys. Plasmas 21, 022515 (2014)]. The second expansion is about a circular magnetic axis in a true torus. It is also assumed that the cross section of a flux surface at constant toroidal angle is approximately circular. The expansion is in an analogous flux coordinate, and despite potential resonance singularities, may be carried to all orders. Non-analytic behavior occurs near the magnetic axis. Physical quantities have a finite number of derivatives there. The results, even though no convergence proofs are given, support the possibility of smooth, well-behaved non-symmetric toroidal equilibria.

  8. Spectroscopic study of turbulent heating in the high beta tokamak - Torus II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visible spectroscopy, involving line profile and line intensity measurements, was used to study the turbulent heating of the rectangular cross-section high-beta tokamak Torus II. The spectroscopy was done in the visible wave-length region using a six channel polychrometer having 0.2 A resolution, which is capable of radial scans of the plasma. The plasma, obtained by ionizing helium, is heated by poloidal skin currents, induced by a rapid (tau/sub R/ approx. = 1.7 μsec) change of the toroidal magnetic field either parallel or anti-parallel to the initial toroidal bias magnetic field, which converts a cold toroidal Z-pinch plasma into a hot tokamak plasma

  9. Spectroscopic study of turbulent heating in the high beta tokamak - Torus II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Georgiou, G.E.

    1979-01-01

    Visible spectroscopy, involving line profile and line intensity measurements, was used to study the turbulent heating of the rectangular cross-section high-beta tokamak Torus II. The spectroscopy was done in the visible wave-length region using a six channel polychrometer having 0.2 A resolution, which is capable of radial scans of the plasma. The plasma, obtained by ionizing helium, is heated by poloidal skin currents, induced by a rapid (tau/sub R/ approx. = 1.7 ..mu..sec) change of the toroidal magnetic field either parallel or anti-parallel to the initial toroidal bias magnetic field, which converts a cold toroidal Z-pinch plasma into a hot tokamak plasma.

  10. Compactness theorems of fuzzy semantics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The relationship among diverse fuzzy semantics vs. the corresponding logic consequence operators has been analyzed systematically. The results that compactness and logical compactness of fuzzy semantics are equivalent to compactness and continuity of the logic consequence operator induced by the semantics respectively have been proved under certain conditions. A general compactness theorem of fuzzy semantics have been established which says that every fuzzy semantics defined on a free algebra with members corresponding to continuous functions is compact.

  11. Toroidal modeling of interaction between resistive wall mode and plasma flow

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Yueqiang

    2013-01-01

    The non-linear interplay between the resistive wall mode (RWM) and the toroidal plasma flow is numerically investigated in a full toroidal geometry, by simultaneously solving the initial value problems for the n=1 RWM and the n=0 toroidal force balance equation. Here n is the toroidal mode number. The neoclassical toroidal viscous torque is identified as the major momentum sink that brakes the toroidal plasma flow during the non-linear evolution of the RWM. This holds for a mode that is initially either unstable or stable. For an initially stable RWM, the braking of the flow, and hence the eventual growth of the mode, depends critically on the initial perturbation amplitude.

  12. CENTORI: a global toroidal electromagnetic two-fluid plasma turbulence code

    CERN Document Server

    Knight, P J; Edwards, T D; Hein, J; Romanelli, M; McClements, K G

    2011-01-01

    A new global two-fluid electromagnetic turbulence code, CENTORI, has been developed for the purpose of studying magnetically-confined fusion plasmas. This code is used to evolve the combined system of electron and ion fluid equations and Maxwell equations in fully toroidal geometry, and is applicable to tokamaks of arbitrary aspect ratio and high plasma beta. A predictor corrector, semi-implicit finite difference scheme is used to compute the time evolution of fluid quantities and fields. Vector operations and the evaluation of flux surface averages are speeded up by choosing the Jacobian of the transformation from laboratory to plasma coordinates to be a function of the equilibrium poloidal magnetic flux. A subroutine, GRASS, is used to co-evolve the plasma equilibrium by computing the steady-state solutions of a diffusion equation with a pseudo-time derivative. The code is written in Fortran 95 and is efficiently parallelized using Message Passing Interface (MPI). Illustrative examples of output from a simu...

  13. Toroidal Spiral Nambu-Goto Strings around Higher-Dimensional Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Igata, Takahisa

    2009-01-01

    We present solutions of the Nambu-Goto equation for test strings in a shape of toroidal spiral in five-dimensional spacetimes. In particular, we show that stationary toroidal spirals exist around the five-dimensional Myers-Perry black holes. We also show the existence of innermost stationary toroidal spirals around the five-dimensional black holes like geodesic particles orbiting around four-dimensional black holes.

  14. PARTICLE-HOLE NATURE OF THE LIGHT HIGH-SPIN TOROIDAL ISOMERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staszczak, A. [Maria Curie-Sklodowska University, Poland; Wong, Cheuk-Yin [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Nuclei under non-collective rotation with a large angular momentum above some threshold can assume a toroidal shape. In our previous work, we showed by using cranked Skyrme Hartree Fock approach that even even, N = Z, high-K, toroidal isomeric states may have general occurrences for light nuclei with 28 < A < 52. We present here some additional results and systematics on the particle-hole nature of these high-spin toroidal isomers.

  15. Compact Dynamical Foliations

    CERN Document Server

    Carrasco, Pablo D

    2011-01-01

    According to the work of Dennis Sullivan, there exists a smooth flow on the 5-sphere all of whose orbits are periodic although there is no uniform bound on their periods. The question addressed in this article is whether such an example can occur in the partially hyperbolic context. That is, does there exist a partially hyperbolic diffeomorphism of a compact manifold such that all the leaves of its center foliation are compact although there is no uniform bound for their volumes. We will show that the previous question has negative answer under very natural hypothesis as one-dimensional center foliation, transitivity or in the volume preserving case. Moreover we study the dynamical properties of partially hyperbolic maps preserving a compact center foliation. We prove in particular that if the number of center leaves with non-trivial holonomy is finite then the map is plaque expansive.

  16. Toroidal maps : Schnyder woods, orthogonal surfaces and straight-line representations

    CERN Document Server

    Gonçalves, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    A Schnyder wood is an orientation and coloring of the edges of a planar map satisfying a simple local property. We propose a generalization of Schnyder woods to toroidal maps with application to graph drawing. We prove the existence of these Schnyder woods for toroidal triangulations. We show that Schnyder woods can be used to embed the universal cover of a toroidal map on an infinite and periodic orthogonal surface. Finally we use this embedding to obtain a straight-line flat torus representation of any toroidal map in a polynomial size grid.

  17. Toroidal Imploding Detonation Wave Initiator for Pulse Detonation Engines

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, S. I.; Shepherd, J. E.

    2007-01-01

    Imploding toroidal detonation waves were used to initiate detonations in propane–air and ethylene–air mixtures inside of a tube. The imploding wave was generated by an initiator consisting of an array of channels filled with acetylene–oxygen gas and ignited with a single spark. The initiator was designed as a low-drag initiator tube for use with pulse detonation engines. To detonate hydrocarbon–air mixtures, the initiator was overfilled so that some acetylene oxygen spilled into the tube. The...

  18. Fabrication of toroidal composite pressure vessels. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for fabricating composite pressure vessels having toroidal geometry was evaluated. Eight units were fabricated using fibrous graphite material wrapped over a thin-walled aluminum liner. The material was wrapped using a machine designed for wrapping, the graphite material was impregnated with an epoxy resin that was subsequently thermally cured. The units were fabricated using various winding patterns. They were hydrostatically tested to determine their performance. The method of fabrication was demonstrated. However, the improvement in performance to weight ratio over that obtainable by an all metal vessel probably does not justify the extra cost of fabrication

  19. Fabrication of toroidal composite pressure vessels. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodge, W.G.; Escalona, A.

    1996-11-24

    A method for fabricating composite pressure vessels having toroidal geometry was evaluated. Eight units were fabricated using fibrous graphite material wrapped over a thin-walled aluminum liner. The material was wrapped using a machine designed for wrapping, the graphite material was impregnated with an epoxy resin that was subsequently thermally cured. The units were fabricated using various winding patterns. They were hydrostatically tested to determine their performance. The method of fabrication was demonstrated. However, the improvement in performance to weight ratio over that obtainable by an all metal vessel probably does not justify the extra cost of fabrication.

  20. Hydraulic jumps in inhomogeneous strongly coupled toroidal dust flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piel, Alexander; Wilms, Jochen

    2016-07-01

    The inhomogeneous flow of strongly coupled dust particles in a toroidal particle trap with harmonic radial confinement is analyzed in the incompressible fluid limit. It is shown that the flow can spontaneously generate shock-like events, which are similar to the hydraulic jump in open channel flows. A definition of the Froude number for this model is given and the critical speed is recovered as the group velocity of surface waves. This hydraulic model is compared with molecular-dynamics simulations, which show that a sudden bifurcation of the flow lines and a localized temperature peak appear just at the point where the critical condition for the hydraulic jump is located.

  1. Symbolic derivation of bicycle kinematics with toroidal wheels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Everett X.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bicycle kinematics with toroidal wheels is presented in this paper. Using symbolic mathematic tool Maple, we obtain two holonomic and four nonholonomic constraint equations due to front and rear wheels of a bicycle. We show that the two holonomic constraints cannot be expressed in quartic form for bicycle rear body pitch angle unless the minor (crown radius of the torus are the same for both the front and rear wheels. In addition, we show that all the constraints can be written in differential form, from which a constraint matrix is constructed, according to standard procedure for developing dynamics in robotics.

  2. Application of toroidal multipoles to facilitate tokamak reactor studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method of calculating the vacuum magnetic flux for plasma equilibrium over a range of aspect ratio A and major radius R is presented. Toroidal multipoles are used to fit the vacuum flux for a set of reference equilibria and the fitted moments are then used to parametrize the flux over the design space in A and R. An example is given in which the equilibrium flux for a D-shaped tokamak plasma is predicted and compared with the actual equilibrium code vacuum flux

  3. Stationary motion of a self gravitating toroidal incompressible liquid layer

    CERN Document Server

    Fusco, Giorgio; Oliva, Waldyr M

    2012-01-01

    We consider an incompressible fluid contained in a toroidal stratum which is only subjected to Newtonian self-attraction. Under the assumption of infinitesimal tickness of the stratum we show the existence of stationary motions during which the stratum is approximatly a round torus (with radii r, R and R>>r) that rotates around its axis and at the same time rolls on itself. Therefore each particle of the stratum describes an helix-like trajectory around the circumference of radius R that connects the centers of the cross sections of the torus.

  4. Total and paired domination numbers of toroidal meshes

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Fu-Tao

    2011-01-01

    Let $G$ be a graph without isolated vertices. The total domination number of $G$ is the minimum number of vertices that can dominate all vertices in $G$, and the paired domination number of $G$ is the minimum number of vertices in a dominating set whose induced subgraph contains a perfect matching. This paper determines the total domination number and the paired domination number of the toroidal meshes, i.e., the Cartesian product of two cycles $C_n$ and $C_m$ for any $n\\ge 3$ and $m\\in\\{3,4\\}$, and gives some upper bounds for $n, m\\ge 5$.

  5. A Rotating Bose-Einstein Condensation in a Toroidal Trap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    文渝川; 张鹏鸣; 李师杰

    2011-01-01

    We have studied the ground state configurations of a rotating Bose-Einstein condensation in a toroidal trap as the radius of the central Ganssian potentiaJ expands adiabatically. Firstly, we observe that the vortices are devoured successively into the central hole of the condensate to form a giant vortex as the radius of the trap expands. When all the pre-existing vortices are absorbed, the angular momentum of the system still increase as the radius of the ganssian potential enlarges. When increasing the interaction strength, we find that more singly quantized vortices are squeezed into the condensate, but the giant vortex does not change.

  6. Comments on structural types of toroidal carbon nanotubes

    CERN Document Server

    Chuang, Chern; Jin, Bih-Yaw

    2012-01-01

    We clarify the relationships between the eight structural types of toroidal carbon nanotubes (TCNTs), which can be identified as the eight corners of a cube of structural transformation. The four families with Dnh symmetry can be related by rim rotations, and the same is true for those with Dnd symmetries. These two sets are then connected by horizontal shiftings, thereby completing the cube. Moreover, we further point out that there are five more highly symmetric Dnh structural types that can be derived from performing the generalized Stone-Wales transformatoin on certain TCNTs with Dnh structural types.

  7. Meshing analysis of toroidal drive by computer algebra system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Presents the meshing analysis based on the Computer Algebra System to make it easier to deduce complex formulas while the expression of more complicated surface equations are visualized, by which, the contact line, mesh ing bordlines and undercut bordlines of toroidal drive are deduced, and the results obtained are consistent with the re sults discussed in literature[1] , and concludes that the absolute value of the induced normal curvature is usually smaller (less than 0.12, for example), and it increases as parameters ψ2, V and R increase, decreases as parameter r in creases, and hardly varies with W2, and the variation with a, i21 is not definite.

  8. Free-boundary toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Eugene Y.; Berk, H. L.; Breizman, B.; Zheng, L. J.

    2011-05-01

    A numerical study is presented for the n = 1 free-boundary toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes (TAE) in tokamaks, which shows that there is considerable sensitivity of n = 1 modes to the position of the conducting wall. An additional branch of the TAE is shown to emerge from the upper continuum as the ratio of conducting wall radius to plasma radius increases. Such phenomena arise in plasma equilibria with both circular and shaped cross sections, where the shaped profile studied here is similar to that found in Alcator C-Mod.

  9. Tachyons in Compact Spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Suyama, T

    2005-01-01

    We discuss condensations of closed string tachyons localized in compact spaces. Time evolution of an on-shell condensation is naturally related to the worldsheet RG flow. Some explicit tachyonic compactifications of Type II string theory is considered, and some of them are shown to decay into supersymmetric theories known as the little string theories.

  10. Overview of the Lockheed Martin Compact Fusion Reactor (CFR) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    The Lockheed Martin Compact Fusion Reactor (CFR) Program endeavors to quickly develop a compact fusion power plant with favorable commercial economics and military utility. An overview of the concept and its diamagnetic, high beta magnetically encapsulated linear ring cusp confinement scheme will be given. The analytical model of the major loss mechanisms and predicted performance will be discussed, along with the major physics challenges. Key features of an operational CFR reactor will be highlighted. The proposed developmental path following the current experimental efforts will be presented. ©2015 Lockheed Martin Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Magnetic Bunch Compression for a Compact Compton Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamage, B. [ODU; Satogata, Todd J. [JLAB

    2013-12-01

    A compact electron accelerator suitable for Compton source applications is in design at the Center for Accelerator Science at Old Dominion University and Jefferson Lab. Here we discuss two options for transverse magnetic bunch compression and final focus, each involving a 4-dipole chicane with M_{56} tunable over a range of 1.5-2.0m with independent tuning of final focus to interaction point $\\beta$*=5mm. One design has no net bending, while the other has net bending of 90 degrees and is suitable for compact corner placement.

  12. BETA-S, Multi-Group Beta-Ray Spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1 - Description of program or function: BETA-S calculates beta-decay source terms and energy spectra in multigroup format for time-dependent radionuclide inventories of actinides, fission products, and activation products. Multigroup spectra may be calculated in any arbitrary energy-group structure. The code also calculates the total beta energy release rate from the sum of the average beta-ray energies as determined from the spectral distributions. BETA-S also provides users with an option to determine principal beta-decaying radionuclides contributing to each energy group. The CCC-545/SCALE 4.3 (or SCALE4.2) code system must be installed on the computer before installing BETA-S, which requires the SCALE subroutine library and nuclide-inventory generation from the ORIGEN-S code. 2 - Methods:Well-established models for beta-energy distributions are used to explicitly represent allowed, and 1., 2. - and 3. -forbidden transition types. Forbidden non-unique transitions are assumed to have a spectral shape of allowed transitions. The multigroup energy spectra are calculated by numerically integrating the energy distribution functions using an adaptive Simpson's Rule algorithm. Nuclide inventories are obtained from a binary interface produced by the ORIGEN-S code. BETA-S calculates the spectra for all isotopes on the binary interface that have associated beta-decay transition data in the ENSDF-95 library, developed for the BETA-S code. This library was generated from ENSDF data and contains 715 materials, representing approximately 8500 individual beta transition branches. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The algorithms do not treat positron decay transitions or internal conversion electrons. The neglect of positron transitions in inconsequential for most applications involving aggregate fission products, since most of the decay modes are via electrons. The neglect of internal conversion electrons may impact on the accuracy of the spectrum in the low

  13. Fusion potential for spherical and compact tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandzelius, Mikael

    2003-02-01

    The tokamak is the most successful fusion experiment today. Despite this, the conventional tokamak has a long way to go before being realized into an economically viable power plant. In this master thesis work, two alternative tokamak configurations to the conventional tokamak has been studied, both of which could be realized to a lower cost. The fusion potential of the spherical and the compact tokamak have been examined with a comparison of the conventional tokamak in mind. The difficulties arising in the two configurations have been treated from a physical point of view concerning the fusion plasma and from a technological standpoint evolving around design, materials and engineering. Both advantages and drawbacks of either configuration have been treated relative to the conventional tokamak. The spherical tokamak shows promising plasma characteristics, notably a high {beta}-value but have troubles with high heat loads and marginal tritium breeding. The compact tokamak operates at a high plasma density and a high magnetic field enabling it to be built considerably smaller than any other tokamak. The most notable down-side being high heat loads and neutron transport problems. With the help of theoretical reactor studies, extrapolating from where we stand today, it is conceivable that the spherical tokamak is closer of being realized of the two. But, as this study shows, the compact tokamak power plant concept offers the most appealing prospect.

  14. Toroidal modelling of RMP response in ASDEX Upgrade: coil phase scan, q 95 dependence, and toroidal torques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yueqiang; Ryan, D.; Kirk, A.; Li, Li; Suttrop, W.; Dunne, M.; Fischer, R.; Fuchs, J. C.; Kurzan, B.; Piovesan, P.; Willensdorfer, M.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team; the EUROfusion MST1 Team

    2016-05-01

    The plasma response to the vacuum resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields, produced by the ELM control coils in ASDEX Upgrade experiments, is computationally modelled using the MARS-F/K codes (Liu et al 2000 Phys. Plasmas 7 3681, Liu et al 2008 Phys. Plasmas 15 112503). A systematic investigation is carried out, considering various plasma and coil configurations as in the ELM control experiments. The low q plasmas, with {{q}95}˜ 3.8 (q 95 is the safety factor q value at 95% of the equilibrium poloidal flux), responding to low n (n is the toroidal mode number) field perturbations from each single row of the ELM coils, generates a core kink amplification effect. Combining two rows, with different toroidal phasing, thus leads to either cancellation or reinforcement of the core kink response, which in turn determines the poloidal location of the peak plasma surface displacement. The core kink response is typically weak for the n  =  4 coil configuration at low q, and for the n  =  2 configuration but only at high q ({{q}95}˜ 5.5 ). A phase shift of around 60 degrees for low q plasmas, and around 90 degrees for high q plasmas, is found in the coil phasing, between the plasma response field and the vacuum RMP field, that maximizes the edge resonant field component. This leads to an optimal coil phasing of about 100 (-100) degrees for low (high) q plasmas, that maximizes both the edge resonant field component and the plasma surface displacement near the X-point of the separatrix. This optimal phasing closely corresponds to the best ELM mitigation observed in experiments. A strong parallel sound wave damping moderately reduces the core kink response but has minor effect on the edge peeling response. For low q plasmas, modelling shows that both the resonant electromagnetic torque and the neoclassical toroidal viscous (NTV) torque (due to the presence of 3D magnetic field perturbations) contribute to the toroidal flow damping, in particular near the

  15. Incorporation of toroidal boundary conditions into program POISSON

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A technique is developed for introduction of a boundary condition applicable to relaxation computations for magnetic problems with axial symmetry and with no sources (currents, or magnetized material) external to the boundary. The procedure as described in this note is restricted to cases in which the (toroidal) boundary will surround completely the region of physical interest but will not encompass the axis of rotational symmetry. The technique accordingly provides the opportunity of economically excluding from the relaxation process regions of no direct concern in the immediate neighborhood of the symmetry axis and hence can have useful application to annular magnetic devices with axial symmetry. The procedure adopted makes use internally of the characteristic form of the vector-potential function, in a source-free region, when expressed in toroidal coordinates. The relevant properties of associated Legendre functions of half-integral degree are summarized in this connection and their introduction into the program POISSON is outlined. Results of some test cases are included, to illustrate the application of this technique for configurations with median-plane symmetry. 8 refs., 9 figs

  16. Inversion of the Abel equation for toroidal density distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Ciotti, L

    1999-01-01

    In this paper I present three new results of astronomical interest concerning the theory of Abel inversion. 1) I show that in the case of a spatial emissivity that is constant on toroidal surfaces and projected along the symmetry axis perpendicular to the torus' equatorial plane, it is possible to invert the projection integral. From the surface (i.e. projected) brightness profile one then formally recovers the original spatial distribution as a function of the toroidal radius. 2) By applying the above-described inversion formula, I show that if the projected profile is described by a truncated off-center gaussian, the functional form of the related spatial emissivity is very simple and - most important - nowhere negative for any value of the gaussian parameters, a property which is not guaranteed - in general - by Abel inversion. 3) Finally, I show how a generic multimodal centrally symmetric brightness distribution can be deprojected using a sum of truncated off-center gaussians, recovering the spatial emis...

  17. Cryogenic Characteristics of the ATLAS Barrel Toroid Superconducting Magnet

    CERN Document Server

    Pengo, R; Delruelle, N; Pezzetti, M; Pirotte, O; Passardi, Giorgio; Dudarev, A; ten Kate, H

    2008-01-01

    ATLAS, one of the experiments of the LHC accelerator under commissioning at CERN, is equipped with a large superconducting magnet the Barrel Toroid (BT) that has been tested at nominal current (20500 A). The BT is composed of eight race-track superconducting coils (each one weights about 45 tons) forming the biggest air core toroidal magnet ever built. By means of a large throughput centrifugal pump, a forced flow (about 10 liter/second at 4.5 K) provides the indirect cooling of the coils in parallel. The paper describes the results of the measurements carried out on the complete cryogenic system assembled in the ATLAS cavern situated 100 m below the ground level. The measurements include, among other ones, the static heat loads, i.e., with no or constant current in the magnet, and the dynamic ones, since additional heat losses are produced, during the current ramp-up or slow dump, by eddy currents induced on the coil casing.

  18. Baryonic torii: Toroidal baryons in a generalized Skyrme model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudnason, Sven Bjarke; Nitta, Muneto

    2015-02-01

    We study a Skyrme-type model with a potential term motivated by Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs), which we call the BEC Skyrme model. We consider two flavors of the model: the first is the Skyrme model, and the second has a sixth-order derivative term instead of the Skyrme term, both with the added BEC-motivated potential. The model contains toroidally shaped Skyrmions, and they are characterized by two integers P and Q , representing the winding numbers of two complex scalar fields along the toroidal and poloidal cycles of the torus, respectively. The baryon number is B =P Q . We find stable Skyrmion solutions for P =1 ,2 ,3 ,4 ,5 with Q =1 , while for P =6 and Q =1 , it is only metastable. We further find that configurations with higher Q >1 are all unstable and split into Q configurations with Q =1 . Finally we discover a phase transition, possibly of first order, in the mass parameter of the potential under study.

  19. Saturation of single toroidal number Alfvén modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X.; Briguglio, S.

    2016-08-01

    The results of numerical simulations are presented to illustrate the saturation mechanism of a single toroidal number Alfvén mode, driven unstable, in a tokamak plasma, by the resonant interaction with energetic ions. The effects of equilibrium geometry non-uniformities and finite mode radial width on the wave-particle nonlinear dynamics are discussed. Saturation occurs as the fast-ion density flattening produced by the radial flux associated to the resonant particles captured in the potential well of the Alfvén wave extends over the whole region where mode-particle power exchange can take place. The occurrence of two different saturation regimes is shown. In the first regime, dubbed resonance detuning, that region is limited by the resonance radial width (that is, the width of the region where the fast-ion resonance frequency matches the mode frequency). In the second regime, called radial decoupling, the power exchange region is limited by the mode radial width. In the former regime, the mode saturation amplitude scales quadratically with the growth rate; in the latter, it scales linearly. The occurrence of one or the other regime can be predicted on the basis of linear dynamics: in particular, the radial profile of the fast-ion resonance frequency and the mode structure. Here, we discuss how such properties can depend on the considered toroidal number and compare simulation results with the predictions obtained from a simplified nonlinear pendulum model.

  20. Last End Cap Toroid installation : The Pharaonic enterprise

    CERN Multimedia

    Arnaud Foussat

    After the successful and impressive transport feat from Building 191 to Point 1 was carried out by the Friderici crew on 28th June, the second and last Toroid End Cap, ECT-C, was transferred into the surface building, SX1, on 2nd July. The ECT-C was installed in the ATLAS cavern on the C-side on 12th July. As the person responsible for the project, in my opinion, one of the crucial points of this project was to design all the tooling and installation sequences taking into account the building infrastructure dimensional constraints. View of the ECT installation tooling and preparation for the ECT-C descent into the ATLAS 80m-shaft by the ATLAS magnet group and DBS teams. The movement of the 240-ton magnet and 12-m diameter toroid end-cap was achieved in collaboration with SCALES, a subcontractor company, using a hydraulic gantry able to lower the ECT inside the shaft by 5m below the floor level . This allowed the DBS team to attach the end-cap with the 2 x 140 tons overhead crane and lower it onto the c...

  1. Design study of toroidal traction CVT for electric vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raynard, A. E.; Kraus, J.; Bell, D. D.

    1980-01-01

    The development, evaluation, and optimization of a preliminary design concept for a continuously variable transmission (CVT) to couple the high-speed output shaft of an energy storage flywheel to the drive train of an electric vehicle is discussed. An existing computer simulation program was modified and used to compare the performance of five CVT design configurations. Based on this analysis, a dual-cavity full-toroidal drive with regenerative gearing is selected for the CVT design configuration. Three areas are identified that will require some technological development: the ratio control system, the traction fluid properities, and evaluation of the traction contact performance. Finally, the suitability of the selected CVT design concept for alternate electric and hybrid vehicle applications and alternate vehicle sizes and maximum output torques is determined. In all cases the toroidal traction drive design concept is applicable to the vehicle system. The regenerative gearing could be eliminated in the electric powered vehicle because of the reduced ratio range requirements. In other cases the CVT with regenerative gearing would meet the design requirements after appropriate adjustments in size and reduction gearing ratio.

  2. Theoretical Analysis of the Electron Spiral Toroid Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambier, Jean-Luc; Micheletti, David A.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This report describes the analysis of the Electron Spiral Toroid (EST) concept being promoted by Electron Power Systems Inc. (EPS). The EST is described as a toroidal plasma structure composed Of ion and electron shells. It is claimed that the EST requires little or no external confinement, despite the extraordinarily large energy densities resulting from the self-generating magnetic fields. The present analysis is based upon documentation made available by EPS, a previous description of the model by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and direct discussions with EPS and MIT. It is found that claims of absolute stability and large energy storage capacities of the EST concept have not been substantiated. Notably, it can be demonstrated that the ion fluid is fundamentally unstable. Although various scenarios for ion confinement were subsequently suggested by EPS and MIT, none were found to be plausible. Although the experimental data does not prove the existence of EST configurations, there is undeniable experimental evidence that some type of plasma structures whose characteristics remain to be determined are observed. However, more realistic theoretical models must first be developed to explain their existence and properties before applications of interest to NASA can he assessed and developed.

  3. Kinetic and electromagnetic transport processes in toroidal devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief review of transport processes in toroidal devices is presented. Particular attention is given to radial transport of power by the Poynting's vector and kinetic electron flow. This work is primarily focused on the Reversed Field Pinch (RFP) which holds the added complexity of a dynamo process that sustains poloidal current in the edge region, where the toroidal field is reversed. The experimental observation of superthermal unidirectional electrons in the plasma edge of ZT-40M and HBTX1C is noted, and the rapid, nonclassical ion heating in RFPs is taken account of. Radial transport parallel to fluctuating magnetic field lines is deemed a likely candidate for both electromagnetic and kinetic energy transport. Two models are discussed and compared. It is concluded that electromagnetic transport using a local Ohm's law best describes nonclassical ion heating, and the transport of kinetic energy by long mean free path electrons best represents the half-Maxwellian of electrons observed in the edge of several RFPs. A nonlocal Ohm's law is essential for the kinetic electron model. 18 refs

  4. Shear-Alfven dynamics of toroidally confined plasmas. Part A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent developments in the stability theory of toroidally confined plasmas are reviewed, with the intention of providing a picture comprehensible to non-specialists. The review considers a class of low-frequency, electromagnetic disturbances that seem especially pertinent to modern high-temperature confinement experiments. It is shown that such disturbances are best unified and understood through consideration of a single, exact fluid moment: the shear-Alfven law. Appropriate versions of this law and its corresponding closure relations are derived - essentially from first principles - and applied in a variety of mostly, but not exclusively, linear contexts. Among the specific topics considered are: flux coordinates (including Hamada coordinates), the Newcomb solubility condition. Shafranov geometry, magnetic island evolution, reduced MHD and its generalizations, drift-kinetic electron response, classical tearing, twisting, and kink instabilities, pressure-modified tearing instability (Δ-critical), collisionless and semi-collisional tearing modes, the ballooning representation in general geometry, ideal ballooning instability, Mercier criterion, near-axis expansions, the second stability region, and resistive and kinetic ballooning modes. The fundamental importance of toroidal topology and curvature is stressed

  5. Safety and deterministic failure analyses in high-beta D-D tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safety and deterministic failure analyses were performed to compare major component failure characteristics for different high-beta D-D tokamak reactors. The primary focus was on evaluating damage to the reactor facility. The analyses also considered potential hazards to the general public and operational personnel. Parametric designs of high-beta D-D tokamak reactors were developed, using WILDCAT as the reference. The size, and toroidal field strength were reduced, and the fusion power increased in an independent manner. These changes were expected to improve the economics of D-D tokamaks. Issues examined using these designs were radiation induced failurs, radiation safety, first wall failure from plasma disruptions, and toroidal field magnet coil failure

  6. Current drive, heating and fueling by compact torus injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility of injecting small compact-torus (CT) plasma rings into magnetic fusion devices is considered. This discussion concentrates on a proposed new method for efficient current drive in Tokamaks and other toroidal devices in which the magnetic flux in the CT acts to excite the current. In addition to this aspect, CTs may be selectively loaded with matter or energetic particles, or may be accelerated to high kinetic energy (0.1 to 1 MeV/ion) to provide fuel or auxiliary heating for low-density fusion devices including tandem mirrors. The potential exists for high-Q (approx. 100) Tokamak operation as well as penetration to distances well beyond those available by neutral beams or fuel particles

  7. Calculation of modification to the toroidal magnetic field of the Tokamak Novillo. Part II; Calculo de modificacion al campo magnetico toroidal del Tokamak nivillo. Parte II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melendez L, L.; Chavez A, E.; Colunga S, S.; Valencia A, R.; Lopez C, R.; Gaytan G, E

    1992-03-15

    In a cylindrical magnetic topology. the confined plasma experiences 'classic' collisional transport phenomena. When bending the cylinder with the purpose of forming a toro, the magnetic field that before was uniform now it has a radial gradient which produces an unbalance in the magnetic pressure that is exercised on the plasma in the transverse section of the toro. This gives place to transport phenomena call 'neo-classicist'. In this work the structure of the toroidal magnetic field produced by toroidal coils of triangular form, to which are added even of coils of compensation with form of half moon is analyzed. With this type of coils it is looked for to minimize the radial gradient of the toroidal magnetic field. The values and characteristics of B (magnetic field) in perpendicular planes to the toro in different angular positions in the toroidal direction, looking for to cover all the cases of importance are exhibited. (Author)

  8. Investigation of toroidal acceleration and potential acceleration forces in EAST and J-TEXT plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Fudi; Pan, Xiayun; Cheng, Zhifeng; Chen, Jun; Cao, Guangming; Wang, Yuming; Han, Xiang; Li, Hao; Wu, Bin; Chen, Zhongyong; Bitter, Manfred; Hill, Kenneth; Rice, John; Morita, Shigeru; Li, Yadong; Zhuang, Ge; Ye, Minyou; Wan, Baonian; Shi, Yuejiang

    2014-01-01

    In order to produce intrinsic rotation, bulk plasmas must be collectively accelerated by the net force exerted on them, which results from both driving and damping forces. So, to study the possible mechanisms of intrinsic rotation generation, it is only needed to understand characteristics of driving and damping terms because the toroidal driving and damping forces induce net acceleration which generates intrinsic rotation. Experiments were performed on EAST and J-TEXT for ohmic plasmas with net counter- and co-current toroidal acceleration generated by density ramping up and ramping down. Additionally on EAST, net co-current toroidal acceleration was also formed by LHCD or ICRF. For the current experimental results, toroidal acceleration was between - 50 km/s^2 in counter-current direction and 70 km/s^2 in co-current direction. According to toroidal momentum equation, toroidal electric field (E\\-(\\g(f))), electron-ion toroidal friction, and toroidal viscous force etc. may play roles in the evolution of toroi...

  9. Geodesic Acoustic Mode in Toroidally Axisymmetric Plasmas with Non-Circular Cross Sections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Bing-Ren; LI Ji-Quan; DONG Jia-Qi

    2005-01-01

    @@ The geodesic acoustic mode in general toroidally axisymmetric plasmas such as Tokamak and spherical torus is studied in detail. The mode structure is found and the dispersion equation is derived and solved for arbitrary toroidally axi-symmetric plasmas. Besides the finite aspect ratio, effects of elongation and triangularity on this mode are clarified.

  10. Compact fusion reactors

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    Fusion research is currently to a large extent focused on tokamak (ITER) and inertial confinement (NIF) research. In addition to these large international or national efforts there are private companies performing fusion research using much smaller devices than ITER or NIF. The attempt to achieve fusion energy production through relatively small and compact devices compared to tokamaks decreases the costs and building time of the reactors and this has allowed some private companies to enter the field, like EMC2, General Fusion, Helion Energy, Lawrenceville Plasma Physics and Lockheed Martin. Some of these companies are trying to demonstrate net energy production within the next few years. If they are successful their next step is to attempt to commercialize their technology. In this presentation an overview of compact fusion reactor concepts is given.

  11. Compact torsatron reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low-aspect-ratio torsatron configurations could lead to compact stellarator reactors with R0 = 8--11m, roughly one-half to one-third the size of more conventional stellarator reactor designs. Minimum-size torsatron reactors are found using various assumptions. Their size is relatively insensitive to the choice of the conductor parameters and depends mostly on geometrical constraints. The smallest size is obtained by eliminating the tritium breeding blanket under the helical winding on the inboard side and by reducing the radial depth of the superconducting coil. Engineering design issues and reactor performance are examined for three examples to illustrate the feasibility of this approach for compact reactors and for a medium-size (R0 ≅ 4 m,/bar a/ /approx lt/ 1 m) copper-coil ignition experiment. 26 refs., 11 figs., 7 tabs

  12. Simulation study of toroidal flow generation of minority ions by local ICRF heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The toroidal flow generation of minority ions by the local ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) heating is investigated in a tokamak plasma by applying the GNET code, which can solve the drift kinetic equation in the 5-D phase space. An asymmetry of velocity distribution function in the parallel direction is found and two types of toroidal averaged flow of minority ions are observed. One is the sheared flow near the RF power absorption region depending on the sign of k∥, and the other is the toroidal flow, which is larger than the previous one, independent of the sign of k∥. It is found that the k∥-sign-independent toroidal flow is generated by the net toroidal motion of energetic tail ions and that the k∥-sign-dependent flow is related to the mechanism proposed by Ohkawa. (author)

  13. The Experiment of Modulated Toroidal Current on HT-7 and HT-6M Tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The Experiments of Modulated Toroidal Current were done on the HT-6M tokamakand HT-7 superconducting tokamak. The toroidal current was modulated by programming theOhmic heating field. Modulation of the plasma current has been used successfully to suppressMHD activity in discharges near the density limit where large MHD m = 2 tearing modes weresuppressed by sufficiently large plasma current oscillations. The improved Ohmic confinementphase was observed during modulating toroidal current (MTC) on the Hefei Tokamak-6M (HT-6M) and Hefei superconducting Tokamak-7 (HT-7). A toroidal frequency-modulated current,induced by a modulated loop voltage, was added on the plasma equilibrium current. The ratio ofA.C. amplitude of plasma current to the main plasma current △Ip/Ip is about 12% ~ 30%. Thedifferent formats of the frequency-modulated toroidal current were compared.

  14. Toroidal high-spin isomers in light nuclei with N not equal to Z

    CERN Document Server

    Staszczak, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    The combined considerations of both the bulk liquid-drop-type behavior and the quantized aligned rotation with cranked Skyrme-Hartree-Fock approach revealed previously that even-even, N=Z, toroidal high-spin isomeric states have general occurrences for light nuclei with A between 28 and 52. We find that in this mass region there are in addition N not equal to Z toroidal high-spin isomers when the single-particle shells for neutrons and protons occur at the same cranked frequency $\\hbar \\omega$. Examples of N not equal to Z toroidal high-spin isomers, $^{36}_{16}$S$_{20}$($I$=74$\\hbar$) and $^{40}_{18}$Ar$_{22}$($I$=80,102$\\hbar$), are located and examined. The systematic properties of these N not equal to Z toroidal high-spin isomers fall into the same regular (muti-particle)-(muti-hole) patterns as other N=Z toroidal high-spin isomers.

  15. Compactly Generated Domain Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Battenfeld, Ingo; Schröder, Matthias; Simpson, Alexander

    2006-01-01

    We propose compactly generated monotone convergence spaces as a well-behaved topological generalisation of directed-complete partial orders (dcpos). The category of such spaces enjoys the usual properties of categories of 'predomains' in denotational semantics. Moreover, such properties are retained if one restricts to spaces with a countable pseudobase in the sense of E. Michael, a fact that permits connections to be made with computability theory, realizability semantics and recent work on ...

  16. Energy report compact 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Energy Report compact 2015 from the Ministry of the Environment, Climate Protection and the Energy Sector and the State Office for Statistics Baden-Wuerttemberg provides an overview on the energy sector developments in Baden-Wuerttemberg in 2013. It contains numerous information on the energy consumption in Baden-Wuerttemberg, the energy productivity, the share of renewable energy sources, power generation and the energy-related CO2 emissions.

  17. Compact Quantum Groupoids

    OpenAIRE

    Landsman, N.P.

    1999-01-01

    Quantum groupoids are a joint generalization of groupoids and quantum groups. We propose a definition of a compact quantum groupoid that is based on the theory of C*-algebras and Hilbert bimodules. The essential point is that whenever one has a tensor product over the complex numbers in the theory of quantum groups, one now uses a certain tensor product over the base algebra of the quantum groupoid.

  18. Compact Torsatron configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low-aspect-ratio stellarator configurations can be realized by using torsatron winding. Plasmas with aspect ratios in the range of 3.5 to 5 can be confined by these Compact Torsatron configurations. Stable operation at high Β should be possible in these devices, if a vertical field coil system is adequately designed to avoid breaking of the magnetic surfaces at finite Β. 17 refs., 21 figs., 1 tab

  19. 3D toroidal physics: testing the boundaries of symmetry breaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spong, Don

    2014-10-01

    Toroidal symmetry is an important concept for plasma confinement; it allows the existence of nested flux surface MHD equilibria and conserved invariants for particle motion. However, perfect symmetry is unachievable in realistic toroidal plasma devices. For example, tokamaks have toroidal ripple due to discrete field coils, optimized stellarators do not achieve exact quasi-symmetry, the plasma itself continually seeks lower energy states through helical 3D deformations, and reactors will likely have non-uniform distributions of ferritic steel near the plasma. Also, some level of designed-in 3D magnetic field structure is now anticipated for most concepts in order to lead to a stable, steady-state fusion reactor. Such planned 3D field structures can take many forms, ranging from tokamaks with weak 3D ELM-suppression fields to stellarators with more dominant 3D field structures. There is considerable interest in the development of unified physics models for the full range of 3D effects. Ultimately, the questions of how much symmetry breaking can be tolerated and how to optimize its design must be addressed for all fusion concepts. Fortunately, significant progress is underway in theory, computation and plasma diagnostics on many issues such as magnetic surface quality, plasma screening vs. amplification of 3D perturbations, 3D transport, influence on edge pedestal structures, MHD stability effects, modification of fast ion-driven instabilities, prediction of energetic particle heat loads on plasma-facing materials, effects of 3D fields on turbulence, and magnetic coil design. A closely coupled program of simulation, experimental validation, and design optimization is required to determine what forms and amplitudes of 3D shaping and symmetry breaking will be compatible with future fusion reactors. The development of models to address 3D physics and progress in these areas will be described. This work is supported both by the US Department of Energy under Contract DE

  20. Engineering, Manufacture and Preliminary Testing of the ITER Toroidal Field (TF) Magnet Helium Cold Circulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rista, P. E. C.; Shull, J.; Sargent, S.

    2015-12-01

    The ITER cryodistribution system provides the supercritical Helium (SHe) forced flow cooling to the magnet system using cold circulators. The cold circulators are located in each of five separate auxiliary cold boxes planned for use in the facility. Barber-Nichols Inc. has been awarded a contract from ITER-India for engineering, manufacture and testing of the Toroidal Field (TF) Magnet Helium Cold Circulator. The cold circulator will be extensively tested at Barber-Nichols’ facility prior to delivery for qualification testing at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency's (JAEA) test facility at Naka, Japan. The TF Cold Circulator integrates features and technical requirements which Barber-Nichols has utilized when supplying helium cold circulators worldwide over a period of 35 years. Features include a vacuum-jacketed hermetically sealed design with a very low helium leak rate, a heat shield for use with both nitrogen & helium cold sources, a broad operating range with a guaranteed isentropic efficiency over 70%, and impeller design features for high efficiency. The cold circulator will be designed to meet MTBM of 17,500 hours and MTBF of 36,000 hours. Vibration and speed monitoring are integrated into a compact package on the rotating assembly with operation and health monitoring in a multi-drop PROFIBUS communication environment using an electrical cabinet with critical features and full local and network PLC interface and control. For the testing in Japan and eventual installation in Europe, the cold circulator must be certified to the Japanese High Pressure Gas Safety Act (JHPGSA) and CE marked in compliance with the European Pressure Equipment Directive (PED) including Essential Safety Requirements (ESR). The test methodology utilized at Barber-Nichols’ facility and the resulting test data, validating the high efficiency of the TF Cold Circulator across a broad operating range, are important features of this paper.

  1. Toroidal field magnets for ZEPHYR tape and bitter concepts conductor and insulation materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The general design aspects of the Toroidal Field Magnet System for a compact ignition experiment ZEPHYR are discussed. The 17 Tesla field calls for a steel reinforcement of the copper conductor. Two different types of magnet systems, a tape magnet and a Bitter magnet, are possible. In both systems the coils will be arranged in a steel casing. Force transfer is achieved by steel wedges between the coil casings. The mechanical stresses of the magnet structure were calculated by employing finite element methods. The pulse-operated magnet system will be force-cooled by liquid nitrogen to an initial starting temperature of 80 K before each single field pulse is applied. The problems of spacer cooling as well as the finally chosen channel cooling are discussed. The steel-reinforced copper conductor was developed in collaboration with industry, resulting in a high strength (700 N/mm2) copper/austenite compound. The insulation system consisting of a glass/kapton wrapping of the conductors and of vacuum impregnation with an epoxy resin has to withstand high mechanical loads and a neutron/gamma irradiation in the order of 5 x 109 rad. The static and cyclic fatigue strength of different insulation systems at ambient and liquid nitrogen temperature has been investigated in mechanical tests of tension, compression and shear samples. The radiation resistance of the insulation resin was tested with gamma and neutron/gamma irradiation to doses of 1010 rad. The aspects of field diffusion in the tape magnet are given in the appendix. (orig.)

  2. Hydraulic conductivity of compacted zeolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oren, A Hakan; Ozdamar, Tuğçe

    2013-06-01

    Hydraulic conductivities of compacted zeolites were investigated as a function of compaction water content and zeolite particle size. Initially, the compaction characteristics of zeolites were determined. The compaction test results showed that maximum dry unit weight (γ(dmax)) of fine zeolite was greater than that of granular zeolites. The γ(dmax) of compacted zeolites was between 1.01 and 1.17 Mg m(-3) and optimum water content (w(opt)) was between 38% and 53%. Regardless of zeolite particle size, compacted zeolites had low γ(dmax) and high w(opt) when compared with compacted natural soils. Then, hydraulic conductivity tests were run on compacted zeolites. The hydraulic conductivity values were within the range of 2.0 × 10(-3) cm s(-1) to 1.1 × 10(-7) cm s(-1). Hydraulic conductivity of all compacted zeolites decreased almost 50 times as the water content increased. It is noteworthy that hydraulic conductivity of compacted zeolite was strongly dependent on the zeolite particle size. The hydraulic conductivity decreased almost three orders of magnitude up to 39% fine content; then, it remained almost unchanged beyond 39%. Only one report was found in the literature on the hydraulic conductivity of compacted zeolite, which is in agreement with the findings of this study.

  3. A compact PC-based X-ray imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asimidis, A. [Physics Department, Laboratory B, University of Ioannina, GR-45110 Ioannina (Greece)]. E-mail: aasimid@cc.uoi.gr; Evangelou, I. [Physics Department, Laboratory B, University of Ioannina, GR-45110 Ioannina (Greece); Kokkas, P. [Physics Department, Laboratory B, University of Ioannina, GR-45110 Ioannina (Greece); Manthos, N. [Physics Department, Laboratory B, University of Ioannina, GR-45110 Ioannina (Greece); Triantis, F. [Physics Department, Laboratory B, University of Ioannina, GR-45110 Ioannina (Greece); Speller, R.D. [Medical Physics and Bioengineering Department, University College London, 11-20 Capper Street, London WC1E 6JA (United Kingdom); Hall, G. [Physics Department, Imperial College, London SW7 2BW (United Kingdom); Stelt, P.F. van der [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam, NL 1066 EA Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2007-04-01

    A compact, portable PC-based X-ray imaging system has been developed based on a 2D silicon microstrip sensor and particle physics readout electronics. The sensor is housed in a specially built hybrid, which also hosts the front-end electronics. The control and the readout electronics used are based on the standard PCI and PMC architectures and were originally developed for High Energy Physics Experiments. The use of PCI based electronics and the development of the control software for the PC-Linux platform led to a compact, portable, low cost imaging system. The system was initially tested and evaluated with beta particles from a {sup 90}Sr radioactive source, gamma rays from an {sup 241}Am radioactive source and cosmic rays, and it displayed consistent response. It was then operated using a compact X-ray machine with Mo tube and images of various targets were reconstructed offline using the ROOT data analysis package.

  4. Stress Distribution on the Fe Based Amorphous Toroidal Transducer Core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Göktepe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The basic principles of sensors are the transmission of energy from one system to another. In general, an electrical signal is produced by the change of a physical property induced by the applied change of a second parameter. In the case of magnetic transducers either the property or the parameter would have a magnetic context. For example, in magnetoelastic toroidal transducers, the induced changes of a physical property, that is, the variation of permeability caused by the applied external force are used to produce a variation in output signal. The linearity, magnitude, sensitivity, and repeatability of the relationship between the output signal of the transducer and the physical property define the quality of the transducer.

  5. The use of toroidal boundary conditions in the program POISSON

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In circular particle accelerators of moderate size, one cannot entirely neglect the curvature of the structure and of the guide field. In practice, one may wish to restrict the region of analysis to that near the working aperture, while excluding a very substantial area closer to (and including) the axis of rotational symmetry. In this way, a more efficient mesh can be generated for a program such as POISSON. In restricting the solution to the region of interest, there must be concern regarding a suitable termination of the problem at the boundary of the mesh. For these reasons, we have employed toroidal coordinates in constructing the boundary to a relaxation mesh, and in formulating the boundary conditions that then would be imposed at such boundaries. 11 refs., 6 figs

  6. Effect of loss cone on confinement in toroidal helical device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analytical estimation is given on the loss cone in the toroidal helical devices in the presence of the radial electric field and the modulation of the helical ripple. The minimum energy of particles entering the loss cone is calculated. The modulation is not always effective in reducing the loss in the presence of the radial electric field. The plasma loss due to the loss cone is estimated in the collisionless limit. The radial electric field is estimated in the presence of the loss cone. It is found that the transition to the solution with positive radial electric field, which is necessary to achieve the high-ion-temperature mode, becomes difficult. This difficulty is large for the systems with the small helical ripple. (author)

  7. Ion temperature and toroidal rotation in JET's low torque plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardo, J.; Nave, M. F. F.; Giroud, C.; Reyes Cortes, S.; Bizarro, João P. S.

    2016-11-01

    This paper reports on the procedure developed as the best method to provide an accurate and reliable estimation of the ion temperature Ti and the toroidal velocity vϕ from Charge-eXchange Recombination Spectroscopy (CXRS) data from intrinsic rotation experiments at the Joint European Torus with the carbon wall. The low impurity content observed in such plasmas, resulting in low active CXRS signal, alongside low Doppler shifts makes the determination of Ti and vϕ particularly difficult. The beam modulation method will be discussed along with the measures taken to increase photon statistics and minimise errors from the absolute calibration and magneto-hydro-dynamics effects that may impact the CXRS passive emission.

  8. Geodesic Acoustic Mode in Toroidally Rotating Anisotropic Tokamaks

    CERN Document Server

    Ren, Haijun

    2015-01-01

    Effects of anisotropy on the geodesic acoustic mode (GAM) is analyzed by using gyro-kinetic equations applicable to low-frequency microinstabilities in a toroidally rotating tokamak plasma. Dispersion relation in the presence of arbitrary Mach number $M$, anisotropy strength $\\sigma$, and the temperature ration $\\tau$ is analytically derived. It is shown that when $\\sigma$ is less than $ 3 + 2 \\tau$, the increased electron temperature with fixed ion parallel temperature increases the normalized GAM frequency. When $\\sigma$ is larger than $ 3 + 2 \\tau$, the increasing of electron temperature decreases the GAM frequency. The anisotropy $\\sigma$ always tends to enlarge the GAM frequency. The Landau damping rate is dramatically decreased by the increasing $\\tau$ or $\\sigma$.

  9. Stability of the toroidal magnetic field in stellar radiation zones

    CERN Document Server

    Bonanno, Alfio

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the stability of the magnetic field in radiation zones is of crucial importance for various processes in stellar interior like mixing, circulation and angular momentum transport. The stability properties of a star containing a prominent toroidal field in a radiation zone is investigated by means of a linear stability analysis in the Boussinesq approximation taking into account the effect of thermal conductivity. The growth rate of the instability is explicitly calculated and the effects of stable stratification and heat transport are discussed in detail. It is argued that the stabilizing influence of gravity can never entirely suppress the instability caused by electric currents in radiation zones although the stable stratification can significantly decrease the growth rate of instability

  10. Transport Bifurcation Induced by Sheared Toroidal Flow in Tokamak Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Highcock, E G; Parra, F I; Schekochihin, A A; Roach, C M; Cowley, S C

    2011-01-01

    First-principles numerical simulations are used to describe a transport bifurcation in a differentially rotating tokamak plasma. Such a bifurcation is more probable in a region of zero magnetic shear, where the component of the sheared toroidal flow that is perpendicular to the magnetic field has the strongest suppressing effect on the turbulence, than one of finite magnetic shear. Where the magnetic shear is zero, there are no growing linear eigenmodes at any finite value of flow shear. However, subcritical turbulence can be sustained, owing to the transient growth of modes driven by the ion temperature gradient (ITG) and the parallel velocity gradient (PVG). Nonetheless, in a parameter space containing a wide range of temperature gradients and velocity shears, there is a sizeable window where all turbulence is suppressed. Combined with the relatively low transport of momentum by collisional (neoclassical) mechanisms, this produces the conditions for a bifurcation from low to high temperature and velocity gr...

  11. Advances in the Fabrication of Toroidal Field Coil Prototypes*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzuto, A.; Cucchiaro, A.; Frosi, R.; Ramogida, G.; Boert, F.; Wobker, H. G.; Bianchi, A.; Parodi, B.; Coppi, B.

    2006-10-01

    The Bitter-type Toroidal Field Coils (TFC) adopted for Ignitor consist of plates that are cooled down to 30 K by Helium gas. Copper OFHC has been selected for these plates, allowing for an Electron Beam (EB) welding solution of the cooling channels. Kabel Metal set up the welding parameters and qualified the process to achieve full joint penetration with acceptable metallurgical structure. The qualification covers both the welding of the cooling channels and the inlet/outlet tube made on two full size samples. A metallographic examination and vacuum and pressure tests have been preformed to validate the basic suitability of the EB welding process. *Sponsored in part by ENEA of Italy and by the U.S. DOE.

  12. Heterotic free fermionic and symmetric toroidal orbifold models

    CERN Document Server

    Athanasopoulos, P; Nibbelink, S Groot; Mehta, V M

    2016-01-01

    Free fermionic models and symmetric heterotic toroidal orbifolds both constitute exact backgrounds that can be used effectively for phenomenological explorations within string theory. Even though it is widely believed that for Z2xZ2 orbifolds the two descriptions should be equivalent, a detailed dictionary between both formulations is still lacking. This paper aims to fill this gap: We give a detailed account of how the input data of both descriptions can be related to each other. In particular, we show that the generalized GSO phases of the free fermionic model correspond to generalized torsion phases used in orbifold model building. We illustrate our translation methods by providing free fermionic realizations for all Z2xZ2 orbifold geometries in six dimensions.

  13. Modeling transport in toroidal plasmas: Status and issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The scope and detail of physics contained in computational models for fluid (density, momentum, energy) transport in toroidal plasmas have steadily increased during the past two decades. There has been considerable success in the development and verification of models for sources and sinks of particles, energy, momentum, and magnetic flux. Transport codes have collectively become very useful tools in interpreting experimental data and in providing guidance for new experiments. However, a more thorough understanding of the fundamental transport processes of magnetically confined plasmas and development of improved computational models are needed to enhance the predictive capabilities of transport codes. It is argued that fluid transport modeling by itself cannot lead to a complete understanding of transport---there must be a very strong collaboration among theory, experiment, and modeling on both the fluid and kinetic levels

  14. Gasdynamic characteristics of toroidal shock and detonation wave converging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TENG Honghui; JIANG Zonglin

    2005-01-01

    The modified CCW relation is applied to analyzing the shock, detonation wave converging and the role of chemical reactions in the process. Results indicate that the shock wave is strengthened faster than the detonation wave in the converging at the same initial Mach number. Euler equations implemented with a detailed chemical reaction model are solved to simulate toroidal shock and detonation wave converging. Gasdynamic characteristics of the converging are investigated, including wave interaction patterns, observable discrepancies and physical phenomena behind them. By comparing wave diffractions, converging processes and pressure evolutions in the focusing area, the different effects of chemical reactions on diffracting and converging processes are discussed and the analytic conclusion is demonstrated through the observation of numerical simulations.

  15. First assembly phase for the ATLAS toroid coils

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    The ATLAS barrel toroid system consists of eight coils, each of axial length 25.3 m, assembled radially and symmetrically around the beam axis. The coils are of a flat racetrack type with two double-pancake windings made of 20.5 kA aluminium-stabilized niobium-titanium superconductor. In the first phase of assembly, the two 'pancakes' are packed into their vacuum vessel. This is done using bladders filled with resin and glass microbeads under pressure. The resin is heated and, once cooled, holds the pancakes in place. The operation has to be performed on both sides of the coil, which necessitated a special technique to turn the coils over and then transport them to the heating table. Photos 01, 02, 03: Transporting the coil to the heating table using a special lifting gantry manufactured at JINR-Dubna, Russia in preparation for the 'bladderisation' operation.

  16. Analysis of recurrent patterns in toroidal magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, Allen R; Chen, Guoning; Tricoche, Xavier; Pugmire, David; Kruger, Scott; Breslau, Joshua

    2010-01-01

    In the development of magnetic confinement fusion which will potentially be a future source for low cost power, physicists must be able to analyze the magnetic field that confines the burning plasma. While the magnetic field can be described as a vector field, traditional techniques for analyzing the field's topology cannot be used because of its Hamiltonian nature. In this paper we describe a technique developed as a collaboration between physicists and computer scientists that determines the topology of a toroidal magnetic field using fieldlines with near minimal lengths. More specifically, we analyze the Poincaré map of the sampled fieldlines in a Poincaré section including identifying critical points and other topological features of interest to physicists. The technique has been deployed into an interactive parallel visualization tool which physicists are using to gain new insight into simulations of magnetically confined burning plasmas.

  17. High-frequency toroidal sensor of superconducting quantum magnetometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The toroidal sensor consists of a superconducting induction loop electrically closed with a superconducting weak junction. The sensor features a cylindrical body. The body is integral and is made of superconducting material. It is provided with tow O-shape cavities in which cylindrical signal and exciting coils are installed. The precise cavity geometry and coil fitting is described on an example and shown in figures. The advantages of the configuration include suppression of spurious signals and improvement of the internal sensor shielding against external electromagnetic fields. The device is used for measuring low intensity magnetic fields, e.g., in the measurement of nuclear magnetic resonance, in particle detection, thermometry, geology, medicine, etc. (E.J.). 5 figs

  18. Global Theory to Understand Toroidal Drift Waves in Steep Gradient

    CERN Document Server

    Xie, Hua-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Toroidal drift waves with unconventional mode structures and non-ground eigenstates, which differ from typical ballooning structure mode, are found to be important recently by large scale global gyrokinetic simulations and especially become dominant at strong gradient edge plasmas [cf., Xie and Xiao, Phys. Plasmas, 22, 090703 (2015)]. The global stability and mode structures of drift wave in this steep edge density and temperature gradients are examined by both direct numerical solutions of a model two-dimensional eigen equation and analytical theory employing WKB-ballooning approach. Theory agrees with numerical solutions quite well. Our results indicate that (i) non-ground eigenstates and unconventional mode structures generally exist and can be roughly described by two parameters `quantum number' $l$ and ballooning angle $\\vartheta_k$, (ii) local model can overestimate the growth rate largely, say, $>50\\%$, and (iii) the narrow steep equilibrium profile leads to twisting (triangle-like) radial mode structu...

  19. Magnetic surfaces of toroidal helical fields in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is proposed to analyse theoretically the disruptive instability that occurs in confined plasmas in tokamaks, through investigation of the influence of resonant helical fields on their equilibrium; With this aim, a superposition of the magnetic field of the plasma in static MHD equilibrium with the field associated with the resonances is considered, taking into account the toroidal geometry of the tokamak. Due to the lack of symmetry, the lines of the total magnetic field resulting from this superposition must form magnetic surfaces only around some regions of the plasma. using the averaging method, functions of approximate magnetic surfaces are obtained (analytically) around the regions of resonances of the plasma (they contain the lines of this total magnetic field). It was verified that these approximate surfaces have structures of magnetic islands. (author)

  20. Toroidal bubbles with circulation in ideal hydrodynamics: A variational approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruban, V.P.; Juul Rasmussen, J.

    2003-01-01

    Incompressible, inviscid, irrotational, unsteady flows with circulation Gamma around a distorted toroidal bubble are considered. A general variational principle that determines the evolution of the bubble shape is formulated. For a two-dimensional (2D) cavity with a constant area A, exact...... pseudodifferential equations of motion are derived, based on variables that determine a conformal mapping of the unit circle exterior into the region occupied by the fluid. A closed expression for the Hamiltonian of the 2D system in terms of canonical variables is obtained. Stability of a stationary drifting 2D...... hollow vortex is demonstrated, when the gravity is small, gA(3/2)/Gamma(2)flows a simplified Lagrangian is suggested, inasmuch as the bubble shape is well described by the center line R(xi,t) and by an approximately circular cross section...

  1. The angular momentum transport by unstable toroidal magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Ruediger, G; Spada, F; Tereshin, I

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate with a nonlinear MHD code that angular momentum can be transported due to the magnetic instability of toroidal fields under the influence of differential rotation, and that the resulting effective viscosity may be high enough to explain the almost rigid-body rotation observed in radiative stellar cores. The fields are assumed strong enough and the density stratification weak enough that the influence of the 'negative' buoyancy in the radiative zones can be neglected. Only permanent current-free fields and only those combinations of rotation rates and magnetic field amplitudes which provide maximal numerical values of the viscosity are considered. We find that the dimensionless ratio of the turbulent over molecular viscosity, \

  2. Evolution of toroidal Alfven eigenmode instability in TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, K.L.; Majeski, R.; Petrov, M. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.] [and others

    1996-07-01

    The nonlinear behavior of the Toroidal Alfven Eigenmode (TAE) driven unstable by energetic ions in TFTR is studied. The evolution of instabilities can take on several scenarios: a single mode or several modes can be driven unstable at the same time, the spectrum can be steady or pulsating and there can be negligible or anomalous loss associated with the instability. This paper presents a comparison between experimental results and recently developed nonlinear theory. The authors find many features observed in experiment are compatible with the consequences of the nonlinear theory. Examples include the structure of the saturated pulse that emerges from the onset of instability of a single mode and the decrease but persistence of TAE signals when the applied rf power is reduced or shut off.

  3. New results from the BATES Large Acceptance Spectrometer Toroid (BLAST)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experiment using the novel technique of scattering a longitudinally polarized electron beam from polarized internal hydrogen/deuterium gas targets was carried out in the South Hall Ring at the MIT-Bates Accelerator Center. The scattered particles were detected by the Bates Large Acceptance Spectrometer Toroid (BLAST) detector. The proton electric to magnetic form factor ratio, GEp/GMp at Q2 = 0.1 - 0.65 (GeV/c)2 has been determined from the experiment by measuring the spin-dependent ep elastic scattering asymmetry in the two symmetric sectors of the BLAST simultaneously for the first time. The neutron electric form factor GEn in the same Q2 range has been extracted by measuring the spin-dependent asymmetry from the d-vector(e-vector, e′n) process with a vector polarized deuterium target. These results on the nucleon form factors from the BLAST experiment are presented. (author)

  4. Equilibrium and Stability of Partial Toroidal Plasma Discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The equilibrium and stability of partial toroidal flux ropes are studied in detail in the laboratory, motivated by ubiquitous loop structures on the solar surface. The flux ropes studied here are magnetized arc discharges formed in the Magnetic Reconnection Experiment (MRX). It is found that these loops robustly maintain their equilibrium on time scales much longer than the Alfven time over a wide range of plasma current, guide eld strength, and angle between electrodes, even in the absence of a strapping field. Additionally, the external kink stability of these flux ropes is found to be governed by the Kruskal-Shafranov limit for a flux rope with line-tied boundary conditions at both ends (q > 1).

  5. Quasars: a supermassive rotating toroidal black hole interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivey, R. J.

    2000-08-01

    A supermassive rotating toroidal black hole (TBH) is proposed as the fundamental structure of quasars and other jet-producing active galactic nuclei. Rotating protogalaxies gather matter from the central gaseous region leading to the birth of massive toroidal stars, the internal nuclear reactions of which proceed very rapidly. Once the nuclear fuel is spent, gravitational collapse produces a slender ring-shaped TBH remnant. Transitory electron and neutron degeneracy stabilized collapse phases, although possible, are unlikely owing to the large masses involved thus these events are typically the first supernovae of the host galaxies. Given time, the TBH mass increases through continued accretion by several orders of magnitude, the event horizon swells whilst the central aperture shrinks. The difference in angular velocities between the accreting matter and the TBH induces a magnetic field that is strongest in the region of the central aperture and innermost ergoregion. Owing to the presence of negative energy states when such a gravitational vortex is immersed in an electromagnetic field, circumstances are near ideal for energy extraction via non-thermal radiation including the Penrose process and superradiant scattering. This establishes a self-sustaining mechanism whereby the transport of angular momentum away from the quasar by relativistic bi-directional jets reinforces both the modulating magnetic field and the TBH/accretion disc angular velocity differential. Continued mass-capture by the TBH results in contraction of the central aperture until the TBH topology transitions to being spheroidal, extinguishing quasar behaviour. Similar mechanisms may be operating in microquasars, supernovae and sources of repeating gamma-ray bursts when neutron density or black hole tori arise. Long-term TBH stability seems to require either a negative cosmological constant, a non-stationary space-time resulting from the presence of accreting matter or the intervention of quantum

  6. Confinement studies of ECRH plasmas in a toroidal heliac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The SHEILA heliac is a toroidal device of major radius Ro=18.75 cm and mean minor radius a (last closed flux surface) of about 3.1 cm. 24 toroidal field coils displaced 2.5 cm about a poloidal ring coil (radius Ro) form a N=3 period helical axis stellarator. SHEILA has been converted to a flexible heliac by an additional l=1 helical winding about the ring coil. Considerable variation in the magnetic geometry can be obtained by adjusting the current ratio C=Ih/Ir between -0.16 to +0.25, equivalent to the range 0.55≥ι(0)≥1.86, where Ih and Ir are the currents in the helical winding and poloidal ring. The vacuum flux surfaces are generally bean-shaped in cross section, but change considerably with variations in the helical current. The |B| surfaces, however, remain roughly circular, concentric with the poloidal ring coil. Plasma formation by electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) depends critically on the position of the fundamental resonance surface, and also the second harmonic surface at low field strengths, relative to the plasma column and the launching antenna. In this paper we investigate the particle confinement properties of the heliac geometry as the rotational transform is varied using up to 2.5 kW peak 10 ms wide pulses of microwave ECR power at 2.45 GHz. Cool (Te=6-10eV) but highly ionized argon plasmas with very reproducible characteristics are generated by discrete dipole/monopole or helical antennae positioned close to the plasma surface. Depending on the magnetic geometry and field strength the antennae can launch either from the high field side (HFS) or the low field side (LFS) of the fundamental resonance surface. (author) 3 refs., 5 figs

  7. Compact Q-balls

    CERN Document Server

    Bazeia, D; Marques, M A; Menezes, R; da Rocha, R

    2016-01-01

    In this work we deal with non-topological solutions of the Q-ball type in two space-time dimensions, in models described by a single complex scalar field that engenders global symmetry. The main novelty is the presence of stable Q-balls solutions that live in a compact interval of the real line and appear from a family of models controlled by two distinct parameters. We find analytical solutions and study their charge and energy, and show how to control the parameters to make the Q-balls classically and quantum mechanically stable.

  8. Compact synchrotron light sources

    CERN Document Server

    Weihreter, Ernst

    1996-01-01

    This book covers a new niche in circular accelerator design, motivated by the promising industrial prospects of recent micromanufacturing methods - X-ray lithography, synchrotron radiation-based micromachining and microanalysis techniques. It describes the basic concepts and the essential challenges for the development of compact synchrotron radiation sources from an accelerator designer's point of view and gives an outline of the actual state of the art. The volume is intended as an introduction and as a reference for physicists, engineers and managers involved in this rapidly developing fiel

  9. Compact LINAC for deuterons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurennoy, S S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; O' Hara, J F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rybarcyk, L J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    We are developing a compact deuteron-beam accelerator up to the deuteron energy of a few MeV based on room-temperature inter-digital H-mode (IH) accelerating structures with the transverse beam focusing using permanent-magnet quadrupoles (PMQ). Combining electromagnetic 3-D modeling with beam dynamics simulations and thermal-stress analysis, we show that IHPMQ structures provide very efficient and practical accelerators for light-ion beams of considerable currents at the beam velocities around a few percent of the speed of light. IH-structures with PMQ focusing following a short RFQ can also be beneficial in the front end of ion linacs.

  10. A compact SADM family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbet, Vincent; Le Quintrec, Cyrille; Jeandot, Xavier; Chaix, Alain; Grain, Eric; Roux, Jerome

    2005-07-01

    Alcatel Space has developed a new SADM family driven by cost, modularity, mass and performances. The modularity concept is based on separating the rotation drive function from the electrical transfer function. The drive actuator has been designed for various applications where pointing and reliability is needed. It can be associated with high dissipative rotary devices (SA collectors, RF joints..). The design goal was to minimize the number of parts in order to reach the most simple and compact mechanism. Mass reduction was achieved by reducing as much as possible the load path between the Solar Array interface and the spacecraft interface. Following these guidelines, the drive actuator was developed and qualified on ATV SADM (part od Alcatel Space Solar Array Drive Sub System for ATV). Further more a high power integrated collector was qualified inside the SADM for Geo-stationary telecom satellite (SPACEBUS platforms). Fine thermal and mechanical modeling was necessary to predict SADM behaviors for the numerous thermal environments over the missions (steady and transient cases). These modeling were well correlated through mechanical and thermal balances qualification tests. The challenging approach of thermal dissipation in a compact design leads to a family of 3 SADM capabilities form 2kW up to 15kW per SADM weighing less than 4.5 kg each.

  11. Preliminary Study of Ideal Operational MHD Beta Limit in HL-2A Tokamak Plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Yong; DONG Jiaqi; HE Hongda; A. D. TURNBULL

    2009-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) n=1 kink mode with n the toroidal mode number is studied and the operational beta limit, constrained by the mode, is calculated for the equilibrium of HL-2A by using the GATO code. Approximately the same beta limit is obtained for configurations with a value of the axial safety factor q0 both larger and less than 1. Without the stabilization of the conducting wall, the beta limit is found to be 0.821% corresponding to a normalized beta value of βcN=2.56 for a typical HL-2A discharge with a plasma current Ip=0.245 MA, and the scaling of βcN~constant is confirmed.

  12. Preliminary Study of Ideal Operational MHD Beta Limit in HL-2A Tokamak Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yong; Dong, Jiaqi; He, Hongda; D. Turnbull, A.

    2009-04-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) n = 1 kink mode with n the toroidal mode number is studied and the operational beta limit, constrained by the mode, is calculated for the equilibrium of HL-2A by using the GATO code. Approximately the same beta limit is obtained for configurations with a value of the axial safety factor q0 both larger and less than 1. Without the stabilization of the conducting wall, the beta limit is found to be 0.821% corresponding to a normalized beta value of βcN = 2.56 for a typical HL-2A discharge with a plasma current Ip = 0.245 MA, and the scaling of βcN ~constant is confirmed.

  13. Dynamics of Toroidal Spiral Strings around Five-dimensional Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Igata, Takahisa

    2009-01-01

    We examine the separability of the Nambu-Goto equation for test strings in a shape of toroidal spiral in a five-dimensional Kerr-AdS black hole. In particular, for a `{\\it Hopf loop}\\rq string which is a special class of the toroidal spiral strings, we show the complete separation of variables occurs in two cases, Kerr background and Kerr-AdS background with equal angular momenta. We also obtain the dynamical solution for the Hopf loop around a black hole and for the general toroidal spiral in Minkowski background.

  14. Dynamics of Toroidal Spiral Strings around Five-dimensional Black Holes

    OpenAIRE

    Igata, Takahisa; Ishihara, Hideki

    2009-01-01

    We examine the separability of the Nambu-Goto equation for test strings in a shape of toroidal spiral in a five-dimensional Kerr-AdS black hole. In particular, for a `{\\it Hopf loop}\\rq string which is a special class of the toroidal spiral strings, we show the complete separation of variables occurs in two cases, Kerr background and Kerr-AdS background with equal angular momenta. We also obtain the dynamical solution for the Hopf loop around a black hole and for the general toroidal spiral i...

  15. Theoretical studies of possible toroidal high-spin isomers in the light-mass region

    CERN Document Server

    Staszczak, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    We review our theoretical knowledge of possible toroidal high-spin isomers in the light mass region in 28$\\le$$A$$\\le$52 obtained previously in cranked Skyrme-Hartree-Fock calculations. We report additional toroidal high-spin isomers in $^{56}$Ni with $I$=114$\\hbar$ and 140$\\hbar$, which follow the same (multi-particle)--(multi-hole) systematics as other toroidal high-spin isomers. We examine the production of these exotic nuclei by fusion of various projectiles on $^{20}$Ne or $^{28}$Si as an active target in time-projection-chamber (TCP) experiments.

  16. Theoretical studies of possible toroidal high-spin isomers in the light-mass region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staszczak, Andrzej; Wong, Cheuk-Yin

    2016-05-01

    We review our theoretical knowledge of possible toroidal high-spin isomers in the light mass region in 28≤A≤52 obtained previously in cranked Skyrme-Hartree-Fock calculations. We report additional toroidal high-spin isomers in 56Ni with I=114ħ and 140ħ, which follow the same (multi-particle)-(multi-hole) systematics as other toroidal high-spin isomers. We examine the production of these exotic nuclei by fusion of various projectiles on 20Ne or 28Si as an active target in time-projection-chamber (TPC) experiments.

  17. Levered and unlevered Beta

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandez, Pablo

    2003-01-01

    We prove that in a world without leverage cost the relationship between the levered beta ( L) and the unlevered beta ( u) is the No-costs-of-leverage formula: L = u + ( u - d) D (1 - T) / E. We also analyze 6 alternative valuation theories proposed in the literature to estimate the relationship between the levered beta and the unlevered beta (Harris and Pringle (1985), Modigliani and Miller (1963), Damodaran (1994), Myers (1974), Miles and Ezzell (1980), and practitioners) and prove that all ...

  18. Design and manufacture of a toroidal-type SMES for combination with real-time digital simulator (RTDS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwang-min; Kim, A.-Rong; Park, Minwon; Yu, In-Keun; Eom, Bum-Yong; Sim, Kidoek; Kim, Seok-Ho; Sohn, Myung-Hwan; Kim, Hae-Jong; Bae, Joon-Han; Seong, Ki-Cheol

    2011-06-01

    The authors designed and manufactured a toroidal-type superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) system. The toroidal-type SMES was designed using a 3D CAD program. The toroidal-type magnet consists of 30 double pancake coils (DPCs). The single pancake coils (SPCs), which constitute the double pancake coils, are arranged at an angle of 6° from each other, based on the central axis of the toroidal-type magnet. The cooling method used for the toroidal-type SMES is the conduction cooling type. When the cooling method for the toroidal-type SMES was designed, the two-stage Gifford-McMahon (GM) refrigerator was considered. The Bi-2223 HTS wire, which was made by soldering brass on both sides of the superconductor, is used for the magnet winding. Finally, the authors connected the toroidal-type SMES to a real-time digital simulator (RSCAD/RTDS) to simulate voltage sag compensation in a power utility.

  19. EMC3-EIRENE modeling of toroidally-localized divertor gas injection experiments on Alcator C-Mod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lore, J.D., E-mail: lorejd@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Reinke, M.L. [York Plasma Institute, Department of Physics, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); LaBombard, B. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Lipschultz, B. [York Plasma Institute, Department of Physics, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Churchill, R.M. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Pitts, R.A. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Feng, Y. [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Greifswald (Germany)

    2015-08-15

    Experiments on Alcator C-Mod with toroidally and poloidally localized divertor nitrogen injection have been modeled using the three-dimensional edge transport code EMC3-EIRENE to elucidate the mechanisms driving measured toroidal asymmetries. In these experiments five toroidally distributed gas injectors in the private flux region were sequentially activated in separate discharges resulting in clear evidence of toroidal asymmetries in radiated power and nitrogen line emission as well as a ∼50% toroidal modulation in electron pressure at the divertor target. The pressure modulation is qualitatively reproduced by the modeling, with the simulation yielding a toroidal asymmetry in the heat flow to the outer strike point. Toroidal variation in impurity line emission is qualitatively matched in the scrape-off layer above the strike point, however kinetic corrections and cross-field drifts are likely required to quantitatively reproduce impurity behavior in the private flux region and electron temperatures and densities directly in front of the target.

  20. Realized Beta GARCH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Peter Reinhard; Lunde, Asger; Voev, Valeri Radkov

    2014-01-01

    as the beta. We apply the model to a large set of assets and find the conditional betas to be far more variable than usually found with rolling-window regressions based exclusively on daily returns. In the empirical part of the paper, we examine the cross-sectional as well as the time variation...... of the conditional beta series during the financial crises....

  1. Soil compaction in forest soils

    OpenAIRE

    TURGUT, Bülent

    2012-01-01

    Soil compaction is a widespread degradation process in forest sites. Soil degradation occurring on the structural formation of a natural soil system by rainfall or mechanical outer forces generally results in soil particles to be rearranged tighter than its previous status. In this case, soil compaction -defined as the increase in bulk density of soil- develops with negative effects on soil-plant-water relations. With the compaction, the density of soil increases while the porosity rate decre...

  2. Compaction properties of agricultural soils

    OpenAIRE

    TANG, Anh Minh; CUI, Yu Jun; Eslami, Javad; DEFOSSEZ BERTHOUD, Pauline

    2007-01-01

    The compaction of field soils due to repeated rolling of agricultural vehicles is one of the main reasons for the agricultural soil degradation. A good understanding of the compaction properties of these soils is essential for an optimum organisation of agricultural activities, and therefore for environmental protection in terms of nitrate migrations. In the present work, the compaction properties of agricultural soils from four sites in France are studied after experimental data ...

  3. Metastable strange matter and compact quark stars

    CERN Document Server

    Malheiro, M; Taurines, A R

    2003-01-01

    Strange quark matter in beta equilibrium at high densities is studied in a quark confinement model. Two equations of state are dynamically generated for the {\\it same} set of model parameters used to describe the nucleon: one corresponds to a chiral restored phase with almost massless quarks and the other to a chiral broken phase. The chiral symmetric phase saturates at around five times the nuclear matter density. Using the equation of state for this phase, compact bare quark stars are obtained with radii and masses in the ranges $R\\sim 5 - 8$ km and $M\\sim M_\\odot$. The energy per baryon number decreases very slowly from the center of the star to the periphery, remaining above the corresponding values for the iron or the nuclear matter, even at the edge. Our results point out that strange quark matter at very high densities may not be absolutely stable and the existence of an energy barrier between the two phases may prevent the compact quarks stars to decay to hybrid stars.

  4. Vacuum currents in braneworlds on AdS bulk with compact dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Bellucci, S; Vardanyan, V

    2015-01-01

    The two-point function and VEV of the current density are investigated for a massive charged scalar field with arbitrary curvature coupling in the geometry of a brane on background of AdS spacetime with partial toroidal compactification.The presence of a gauge field flux enclosed by compact dimensions is assumed.On the brane the field obeys Robin boundary condition and along compact dimensions periodicity conditions with general phases are imposed.There is a range in the space of values for the coefficient in the boundary condition where Poincare vacuum is unstable.This range depends on the brane location.In models with compact dimensions the stability condition is less restrictive than for AdS bulk with trivial topology.Vacuum charge density and components of current along non-compact dimensions vanish. VEV of the current density along compact dimensions is a periodic function of the gauge field flux with a period equal to the flux quantum.It is decomposed into the boundary-free and brane-induced contributio...

  5. Toroidal Discharge in a Varying Longitudinal Magnetic Field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors present results on the behaviour of a current-carrying toroidal plasma column in a strong longitudinal magnetic field whose magnitude is varied (increased) considerably during discharge in order to constrict the plasma column and reduce its interaction with the walls of the discharge chamber. These experiments are a continuation of the work of Ivanov and Razumova and were carried out on Tokamak TM-1, which is similar in its dimensions and main parameters to the Tokamak TM-2. The large radius of its toroidal chamber is R = 40 cm and the small radius a = 10 cm. The discharge current is 9 to 15 kA and lasts 3.2 ms. It is found that the quasi-stationary stabilizing longitudinal magnetic field can vary by 8 kOe over a period of 1 ms at any time during discharge. The total magnetic field reaches 16 kOe. The discharge current, the bypass voltage and the displacement of the current column relative to the centre of the cross-section of the discharge chamber are measured. In addition, a streak photograph is made of the luminescence of the cross-section of the discharge. Measurements are also made of the density with a microwave radio-interferometer on three channels located at various points in the cross-section of the plasma column. Discharge processes are attained in which plasma conductivity, displacement of the current column and density of the charged particles in the constant magnetic field are weakly dependent on the magnitude of the latter, beginning about 8 kOe. In such processes an increase in the magnetic field during discharge leads to a concentration of the current, the velocity of which is estimated by the jump in bypass voltage at the moment when the field begins to increase and by the change in the displacement of the current column. However, no substantial change in the density distribution over the plasma column cross-section is observed, at least when the magnetic field H/H is increasing at rates not in excess of 103 s-1. Possible explanations

  6. Electrostatic instabilities and turbulence in a toroidal magnetized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Thesis aims at characterizing the linear properties of electrostatic drift instabilities arising in a toroidal plasma and the mechanisms leading to their development into turbulence. The experiments are performed on the TORoidal Plasma EXperiment (TORPEX) at CRPP-EPFL, Lausanne. The first part of the Thesis focuses on the identification of the nature of the instabilities observed in TORPEX, using a set of electrostatic probes, designed and built for this purpose. The global features of fluctuations, analyzed for different values of control parameters such as the magnetic field, the neutral gas pressure and the injected microwave power, are qualitatively similar in different experimental scenarios. The maximum of fluctuations is observed on the low field side, where the pressure gradient and the gradient of the magnetic field are co-linear, indicating that the curvature of the magnetic field lines has an important role in the destabilization of the waves. The power spectrum is dominated by electrostatic fluctuations with frequencies much lower than the ion cyclotron frequency. Taking advantage of the extended diagnostics coverage, the spectral properties of fluctuations are measured over the whole poloidal cross-section. Both drift and interchange instabilities develop and propagate on TORPEX, with the stability of both being affected by the curvature of the magnetic field. It is shown that modes of different nature are driven at separate locations over the plasma cross-section and that the wavenumber and frequency spectra, narrow at the location where the instabilities are generated, broaden during convection, suggesting an increase in the degree of turbulence. The transition from coherent to turbulent spectral features and the role of nonlinear coupling between modes in the development of turbulence are treated in the second part of this work. It is found that nonlinear mode-mode coupling is responsible for the redistribution of spectral energy from the

  7. Compact SPS - Power delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pospisil, M.; Pospisilova, L.

    1982-09-01

    The power deliverable by a compact solar Space Power Station (SPS) is a function of its outer surface shape. Methods of fitting the power delivery curve of such a system to different patterns of daily power demand are considered that involve the appropriate choice of the number of satellites, their maximal power, height to width ratio and the shift of longitude with respect to the receiving station. Changes in the daily delivery curve can be made by altering the longitudes and orientations of the satellites. Certain limitations to the choice of parameters exist, such as: the height to width ratio should be near 1.2, and the sum of longitude and orientation changes will probably not be greater than 50 deg. The optimization of the peak to average power ratio is also discussed.

  8. Compact semiconductor lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Siyuan; Lourtioz, Jean-Michel

    2014-01-01

    This book brings together in a single volume a unique contribution by the top experts around the world in the field of compact semiconductor lasers to provide a comprehensive description and analysis of the current status as well as future directions in the field of micro- and nano-scale semiconductor lasers. It is organized according to the various forms of micro- or nano-laser cavity configurations with each chapter discussing key technical issues, including semiconductor carrier recombination processes and optical gain dynamics, photonic confinement behavior and output coupling mechanisms, carrier transport considerations relevant to the injection process, and emission mode control. Required reading for those working in and researching the area of semiconductors lasers and micro-electronics.

  9. Compact cryocooler heat exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compact heat exchangers are subject to different constraints as a room temperature gas is cooled down by a cold stream returning from a JT valve (or a similar cryoprocess component). In particular, the optimization of exchangers for liquid helium systems has to cover a wide range in temperature and density of the fluid. In the present work we address the following thermodynamic questions: 1. The optimization of intermediate temperatures which optimize stage operation (a stage is assumed to have a constant cross section); 2. The optimum temperature difference available for best overall economic performance values. The results are viewed in the context of porous media concepts applied to rather low speeds of fluid flow in narrow passages. In this paper examples of fluid/solid constraints imposed in this non-classical low temperature area are presented

  10. Plasma drift equilibrium (GYRATION) in toroidal systems with complex magnetic-field geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A theoretical study is made of plasma gyration in toroidal systems. Allowance is made for the dependence of the curvature of the magnetic axis on the longitudinal coordinate, and for the magnetic-field corrugation. The aspect ratio is assumed large, and the magnetic surfaces round. General equations are derived for the relaxation of poloidal and toroidal velocities. These equations are analyzed for the frequent-collision regime (the Pfirsch-Schlueter regime). It is shown that the relaxation due to longitudinal viscosity sets up equilibrium with zero toroidal velocity in corrugated toroidal systems. A general formula is derived for the poloidal velocity in the Pfirsch-Schlueter regime. As in the case of a tokamak, this velocity is proportional to the ion-temperature gradient and is independent of both the density gradient and the radial electric field

  11. Three Cycles of the Solar Toroidal Magnetic Field and This Peculiar Minimum

    CERN Document Server

    Lo, Leyan; Scherrer, Phil

    2010-01-01

    Thirty-four years of WSO (Wilcox Solar Observatory) and thirteen years of SOHO/MDI (Michelson Doppler Imager on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory) magnetograms have been studied to measure the east-west inclination angle, indicating the toroidal component of the photospheric magnetic field. This analysis reveals that the large-scale toroidal component of the global magnetic field is antisymmetric around the equator and reverses direction in regions associated with flux from one solar cycle compared to the next. The toroidal field revealed the first early signs of cycle 24 at high latitudes, especially in the northern hemisphere, appearing as far back as 2003 in the WSO data and 2004 in MDI. As in previous cycles, the feature moves gradually equatorward. Cycles overlap and the pattern associated with each cycle lasts about 17 years. Even though the polar field at the current solar minimum is significantly lower than the three previous minima, the toroidal field pattern is similar.

  12. Hall Equilibria: Solutions with toroidal and poloidal magnetic fields in Neutron Star Crusts

    CERN Document Server

    Gourgouliatos, K N; Lyutikov, M; Reisenegger, A

    2013-01-01

    We present Hall equilibrium solutions for neutron stars crusts containing toroidal and poloidal magnetic field. Some simple cases are solved analytically while more complicated configurations are found numerically through a Gauss-Seidel elliptic partial differential equation solver.

  13. Heat characteristic analysis of a conduction cooling toroidal-type SMES magnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, K.M.; Kim, A.R.; Kim, J.G.; Kim, D.W.; Park, M. [Changwon National University, 9 Sarim-dong, Changwon 641-773 (Korea, Republic of); Yu, I.K., E-mail: yuik@changwon.ac.k [Changwon National University, 9 Sarim-dong, Changwon 641-773 (Korea, Republic of); Eom, B.Y.; Sim, K.; Kim, S.H.; Shon, M.H.; Kim, H.J.; Bae, H.J.; Seong, K.C. [Superconducting Device and Cryogenics Group, Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, Changwon 641-120 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-01

    This paper analyzed the heat characteristics of a conduction cooling toroidal-type SMES magnet. The authors designed and manufactured a conduction cooling toroidal-type SMES magnet which consists of 30 double pancake coils. One (a single pancake coil) of a double pancake coil is arranged at an angle of 6{sup o} from each other. The shape of the toroidal-type SMES magnet was designed by a 3D CAD program. The heat invasion was investigated under no-load condition and the thermal characteristic of the toroidal-type SMES magnet was analyzed using the Finite Elements Method program. Both the analyzed and the experiment results are compared and discussed in detail.

  14. TORQUE CAPACITY AND CONTACT EFFICIENCY OF A HALF TOROIDAL CONTINUOUSLY VARLABLE TRANSMISSIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nabil Abdulla Attia; Qin Datong; Shi Wankai; Amir Ibrahim Ali

    2004-01-01

    The automotive industry is seeking new concepts for a continuously variable transmission (CVT) in the driveline. One possible solution for a CVT design is half toroidal traction drive, providing a high torque capacity with quick ratio change. An analytical study on the contact points of the half toroidal CVT has been detailed. The shapes of the contact areas among the input disk, power roller and output disk are considered ellipses. Mathematical equations for estimating the torque capacity, power loss due to spin action, and contact efficiency of the elliptical contacts of the half toroidal CVT are formulated and expressed in the form of integrals which can be readily evaluated by numerical scheme. The contact efficiency calculations of the half toroidal CVT have been developed for the proper spin point locations under the effect of system parameters. Numerical results are presented in graphical forms for considered parameters, which can help the designer to select the proper system parameters to minimize the undesirable spin effects.

  15. Evolution of views on the structure of the ambipolar electric field in toroidal magnetic confinement systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovrizhnykh, L. M., E-mail: lmkov@fpl.gpi.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Prokhorov General Physics Institute (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    Various methods of determining the ambipolar electric field in toroidal magnetic systems (predominantly, in stellarators) and the evolution of views on this problem are discussed. Paradoxes encountered in solving this problem are analyzed, and ways of resolving them are proposed.

  16. From non- to super-radiating manipulation of a dipolar emitter coupled to a toroidal metastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Xin, Xing-Xing; Shao, Jian; Wang, Ying-Hua; Li, Jia-Qi; Zhou, Lin; Dong, Zheng-Gao

    2015-11-16

    Toroidal dipolar response in a metallic metastructure, composed of double flat rings, is utilized to manipulate the radiation pattern of a single dipolar emitter (e.g., florescent molecule/atom or quantum dot). Strong Fano-type radiation spectrum can be obtained when these two coupling dipoles are spatially overlapped, leading to significant radiation suppression (so-called nonradiating source) attributed to the dipolar destructive interference. Moreover, this nonradiating configuration will become a directionally super-radiating nanoantenna after a radial displacement of the emitter with respect to the toroidal flat-ring geometry, which emits linearly polarized radiation with orders of power enhancement in a particular orientation. The demonstrated radiation characteristics from a toroidal-dipole-mediated dipolar emitter indicate a promising manipulation capability of the dipolar emission source by intriguing toroidal dipolar response. PMID:26698422

  17. Application of poloidal beta and plasma internal inductance in determination of input power time of Damavand tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noori, Ehsanallah; Sadeghi, Yahya; Ghoranneviss, Mahmood

    2016-10-01

    In this study, magnetic measurement of poloidal fields were used to determine poloidal beta and plasma internal inductance of Damavand tokamak combination of poloidal beta and plasma internal inductance (β _p+{l_i}/{2} ), known as Shafranov parameter, was obtained experimentally in terms of normal and tangential components of the magnetic field. Plasma internal inductance and poloidal beta were obtained using parametrization method based on analytical solution of Grad-Shafranov equation (GSE) and compared with parabolic-like profile of toroidal current density approach for determination of the plasma internal inductance. Finding evolution of β _p+{l_i}/{2} and plasma internal inductance. Finding poloidal beta (Shafranov parameter and internal inductance) and using energy balance equation, thermal energy and energy confinement were determined qualitatively in terms of poloidal beta during a regular discharge of Damavand tokamak.

  18. Three Cycles of the Solar Toroidal Magnetic Field and This Peculiar Minimum

    OpenAIRE

    Lo, Leyan; Hoeksema, Todd; Scherrer, Phil

    2010-01-01

    Thirty-four years of WSO (Wilcox Solar Observatory) and thirteen years of SOHO/MDI (Michelson Doppler Imager on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory) magnetograms have been studied to measure the east-west inclination angle, indicating the toroidal component of the photospheric magnetic field. This analysis reveals that the large-scale toroidal component of the global magnetic field is antisymmetric around the equator and reverses direction in regions associated with flux from one solar cyc...

  19. Plasma Theory: Toroidal Field Ripple Induced Excursion of Banana Orbit in Tokamak Plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAOQingdi

    2003-01-01

    Magnetic confinement of thermonuclear plasma ions within a tokamak must be achieved with a finite number of toroidal field(TF) coils. This results in a rippled toroidal field structure, and consequent distortions in fast ion orbits with potentially rapid loss of the affected ions. The ripple loss is an important issue for the design of future tokamak reactors such as ITER because it results in reduced alpha heating as well as potentially severe localized wallreactors.

  20. The turbulent diffusion of toroidal magnetic flux as inferred from properties of the sunspot butterfly diagram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, R. H.; Schüssler, M.

    2016-06-01

    Context. In order to match observed properties of the solar cycle, flux-transport dynamo models require the toroidal magnetic flux to be stored in a region of low magnetic diffusivity, typically located at or below the bottom of the convection zone. Aims: We infer the turbulent magnetic diffusivity affecting the toroidal field on the basis of empirical data. Methods: We considered the time evolution of mean latitude and width of the activity belts of solar cycles 12-23 and their dependence on cycle strength. We interpreted the decline phase of the cycles as a diffusion process. Results: The activity level of a given cycle begins to decline when the centers of its equatorward propagating activity belts come within their (full) width (at half maximum) from the equator. This happens earlier for stronger cycles because their activity belts are wider. From that moment on, the activity and the belt width decrease in the same manner for all cycles, independent of their maximum activity level. In terms of diffusive cancellation of opposite-polarity toroidal flux across the equator, we infer the turbulent diffusivity experienced by the toroidal field, wherever it is located, to be in the range 150-450 km2 s-1. Strong diffusive latitudinal spreading of the toroidal flux underneath the activity belts can be inhibited by an inflow toward the toroidal field bands in the convection zone with a magnitude of several meters per second. Conclusions: The inferred value of the turbulent magnetic diffusivity affecting the toroidal field agrees, to order of magnitude, with estimates based on mixing-length models for the solar convection zone. This is at variance with the requirement of flux-transport dynamo models. The inflows required to keep the toroidal field bands together before they approach the equator are similar to the inflows toward the activity belts observed with local helioseismology.

  1. Calculation about a modification to the toroidal magnetic field of the Tokamak Novillo. Part I; Calculo sobre una modificacion al campo magnetico toroidal del Tokamak Novillo. Parte I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavez A, E.; Melendez L, L.; Colunga S, S.; Valencia A, R.; Lopez C, R.; Gaytan G, E

    1991-07-15

    The charged particles that constitute the plasma in the tokamaks are located in magnetic fields that determine its behavior. The poloidal magnetic field of the plasma current and the toroidal magnetic field of the tokamak possess relatively big gradients, which produce drifts on these particles. These drifts are largely the cause of the continuous lost of particles and of energy of the confinement region. In this work the results of numerical calculations of a modification to the 'traditional' toroidal magnetic field that one waits it diminishes the drifts by gradient and improve the confinement properties of the tokamaks. (Author)

  2. Validation of Helium Inlet Design for ITER Toroidal Field Coil

    CERN Document Server

    Boyer, C; Hamada, K; Foussat, A; Le Rest, M; Mitchell, N; Decool, P; Savary, F; Sgobba, S; Weiss, K-P

    2014-01-01

    The ITER organization has performed design and its validation tests on a helium inlet structure for the ITER Toroidal Field (TF) coil under collaboration with CERN, KIT, and CEA-Cadarache. Detailed structural analysis was performed in order to optimize the weld shape. A fatigue resistant design on the fillet weld between the shell covers and the jacket is an important point on the helium inlet structure. A weld filler material was selected based on tensile test at liquid helium temperature after Nb3Sn reaction heat treatment. To validate the design of the weld joint, fatigue tests at 7 K were performed using heat-treated butt weld samples. A pressure drop measurement of a helium inlet mock-up was performed by using nitrogen gas at room temperature in order to confirm uniform flow distribution and pressure drop characteristic. These tests have validated the helium inlet design. Based on the validation, Japanese and European Union domestic agencies, which have responsibilities of the TF coil procurement, are pr...

  3. The angular momentum transport by unstable toroidal magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüdiger, G.; Gellert, M.; Spada, F.; Tereshin, I.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate with a nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code that angular momentum can be transported because of the magnetic instability of toroidal fields under the influence of differential rotation, and that the resulting effective viscosity may be high enough to explain the almost rigid-body rotation observed in radiative stellar cores. We only consider stationary, current-free fields, and only those combinations of rotation rates and magnetic field amplitudes which provide maximal numerical values of the viscosity. We find that the dimensionless ratio of the effective over molecular viscosity, νT/ν, linearly grows with the Reynolds number of the rotating fluid multiplied by the square-root of the magnetic Prandtl number, which is approximately unity for the considered red subgiant star KIC 7341231. For the interval of magnetic Reynolds numbers considered - which is restricted by numerical constraints of the nonlinear MHD code - the magnetic Prandtl number has a remarkable influence on the relative importance of the contributions of the Reynolds stress and the Maxwell stress to the total viscosity, which is magnetically dominated only for Pm ≳ 0.5. We also find that the magnetized plasma behaves as a non-Newtonian fluid, i.e., the resulting effective viscosity depends on the shear in the rotation law. The decay time of the differential rotation thus depends on its shear and becomes longer and longer during the spin-down of a stellar core.

  4. Design study of toroidal magnets for tokamak experimental power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains the results of a six-month study of superconducting toroidal field coils for a Tokamak Experimental Power Reactor to be built in the late 1980s. The designs are for 8 T and 12 T maximum magnetic field at the superconducting winding. At each field level two main concepts were generated; one in which each of the 16 coils comprising the system has an individual vacuum vessel and the other in which all the coils are contained in a single vacuum vessel. The coils have a D shape and have openings of 11.25 m x 7.5 m for the 8 T coils and 10.2 m x 6.8 m for the 12 T coils. All the designs utilize rectangular cabled conductor made from copper stabilized Niobium Titanium composite which operates at 4.2 K for the 8 T design and at 2.5 K for the 12 T design. Manufacturing procedures, processes and schedule estimates are also discussed

  5. Worming Their Way into Shape: Toroidal Formations in Micellar Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardiel Rivera, Joshua J.; Tonggu, Lige; Dohnalkova, Alice; de la Iglesia, Pablo; Pozzo, Danilo C.; Shen, Amy

    2013-11-01

    We report the formation of nanostructured toroidal micellar bundles (nTMB) from a semidilute wormlike micellar solution, evidenced by both cryogenicelectron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy images. Our strategy for creating nTMB involves a two-step protocol consisting of a simple prestraining process followed by flow through a microfluidic device containing an array of microposts, producing strain rates in the wormlike micelles on the order of 105 s^1. In combination with microfluidic confinement, these unusually large strain rates allow for the formation of stable nTMB. Electron microscopy images reveal a variety of nTMB morphologies and provide the size distribution of the nTMB. Small-angle neutron scattering indicates the underlying microstructural transition from wormlike micelles to nTMB. We also show that other flow-induced approaches such as sonication can induce and control the emergence of onion-like and nTMB structures, which may provide a useful tool for nanotemplating.

  6. Reference Magnetic Coordinates (RMC) for toroidal confinement systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharov, Leonid; Kolemen, Egemen; Lazerson, Samuel

    2012-03-01

    Because of intrinsic anisotropy of high temperature plasma with respect to magnetic field, use of proper coordinates is of high priority for both theory and numerical methods. While in axisymmetric case, the poloidal flux function Y(r,z)=const determines proper flux coordinates, in 3-D, such a function does not exist. The destruction of nested magnetic surfaces even by small 3-D perturbations leads to a sudden change of topology of magnetic field. As a result, the coordinate systems can no longer be based on tracing the magnetic field lines resulting in difficulties for theory and 3-D numerical simulations. The RMC coordinates a,θ,ζ presented here (introduced in 1998 but not really used) are nested toroidal coordinates, which are best aligned with an ergodic confinement fields. In particular, in RMC the vector potential of the magnetic field has an irreducible form A = φ00(a)∇θ +[Y00(a) +ψ^*(a,θ,ζ)]∇ζ , where 3-D function ψ^* contains only resonant Fourier harmonics of angle coordinates. RMC can be generated and advanced using a fast (Newton) algorithm not involving the field line tracing.

  7. Tokamak equilibria with strong toroidal current density reversal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, G. O.; Rodrigues, Paulo; Bizarro, João P. S.

    2013-05-01

    The equilibrium of large magnetic islands in the core of a tokamak under conditions of strong toroidal current density reversal is investigated by a new method. The method uses distinct spectral representations to describe each simply connected region as well as the containing shell geometry. This ideal conducting shell may substitute for the plasma edge region or take a virtual character representing the external equilibrium field effect. The internal equilibrium of the islands is solved within the framework of the variational moment method. Equivalent surface current densities are defined on the boundaries of the islands and on the thin containing shell, giving a straightforward formulation to the interaction between regions. The equilibrium of the island-shell system is determined by matching moments of the Dirichlet boundary conditions. Finally, the macroscopic stability against a class of tilting displacements is examined by means of an energy principle. It is found out that the up-down symmetric islands are stable to this particular perturbation and geometry but the asymmetric system presents a bifurcation in the equilibrium.

  8. First assembly phase for the ATLAS toroid coils

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2003-01-01

    The ATLAS barrel toroid system consists of eight coils, each of axial length 25.3 m, assembled radially and symmetrically around the beam axis. The coils are of a flat racetrack type with two double-pancake windings made of 20.5 kA aluminium-stabilized niobium-titanium superconductor. In the first phase of assembly, the two 'pancakes' are packed into their vacuum vessel. This is done using bladders filled with resin and glass microbeads under pressure. The resin is heated and, once cooled, holds the pancakes in place. The operation has to be performed on both sides of the coil, which necessitated a special technique to turn the coils over and then transport them to the heating table. Photos 01, 02, 03: Use of the overhead travelling crane to hoist the coil up and then tilt it over, the coil frame's metal feet being used as rotational pivots, supporting half the coil's weight. Once it has been turned over, the coil, now with only half the frame, is transported to the heating table using a special lifting gant...

  9. Second Barrel Toroid Coil Installed in ATLAS Cavern

    CERN Multimedia

    Tappern, G.

    The second barrel toroid coil was lowered into the ATLAS Cavern on Friday, 26 November. The operation takes approximately five hours of precision crane and winch operations. Before lowering, several checks are made to ensure that no loose items have been left on the coil which would fall during the lowering down the shaft. This is a very difficult, but very important check, with the first coil in position, and partly below the shaft. After changing the winch tooling on Wednesday December 1st, the coil was lifted, rotated and placed into the feet. The girders which support the coil and the Z direction stops had all been pre-set before putting the coil in the feet. The angle is controlled by an inclinometer. When the final adjustments of position have been made, which will locate the coils at the plus/minus two mm level, the connection beams (voussoirs and struts) will be put in place; this requires a complex shimming procedure. This will lock together the two coils into the feet and forms the foundation for th...

  10. Global theory to understand toroidal drift waves in steep gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hua-sheng; Li, Bo

    2016-08-01

    Toroidal drift waves with unconventional mode structures and non-ground eigenstates, which differ from a typical ballooning structure mode, are found to be important recently by large scale global gyrokinetic simulations and especially become dominant at strong gradient edge plasmas [cf. H. S. Xie and Y. Xiao, Phys. Plasmas 22, 090703 (2015)]. The global stability and mode structures of drift wave in this steep edge density and temperature gradients are examined by both direct numerical solutions of a model two-dimensional eigen equation and analytical theory employing WKB-ballooning approach. Theory agrees with numerical solutions quite well. Our results indicate that (i) non-ground eigenstates and unconventional mode structures generally exist and can be roughly described by two parameters "quantum number" l and ballooning angle ϑk , (ii) local model can overestimate the growth rate largely, say, >50 % , and (iii) the narrow steep equilibrium profile leads to twisting (triangle-like) radial mode structures. With velocity space integral, semi-local theory predicts that the critical jump gradient of the most unstable ion temperature gradient mode from ground state l = 0 to non-ground state l = 1 is LT-1R ˜50 . These features can have important consequences to turbulent transport.

  11. A new approach to observe toroidal magnetic fields of magnetars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, H.; Makishima, K.; Enoto, T.; Nakano, T.; Furuta, Y.; Nakazawa, K.

    2016-06-01

    Over the last decade, observational evidence has amounted that magnetars harbor enormous surface dipole magnetic fields (MFs) of B_{d} = 10^{14-15} {G}. Theoretically, we expect even stronger toroidal MFs B_{t} (e.g., Takiwaki+2009), which is observationally supported by a discovery of low-B_{d} magnetars (e.g., SGR 0418+5729; Rea+2013). Here, we will present a new approach to access B_{t} more directly. Suzaku allows us to simultaneously observe a soft thermal component and a distinct hard X-ray tail of magnetars. Extensively analyzing two magnetars, 4U 0142+61 and 1E 1547.0-5408, we found that their hard X-ray pulses suffered from slow phase modulations (Makishima+2014, 2015). This can be interpreted as a manifestation of free precession, under an axial deformation by ˜0.01%. If this effect is attributed to the magnetic stress, B_{t}˜10^{16} G is inferred. We further found that, within 6 years observation of 4U 0142+61, the modulation periods remained constant, while the amplitude gradually increased from < 0.4 to ˜1.3 sec. These results suggest the shift of the hard X-ray emission region (or direction).

  12. Extension of TFTR operations to higher toroidal field levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the past year, TFTR has sometimes operated at extended toroidal field (TF) levels. The extension to 5.6 Tesla (79 kA) was crucial for TFTR's November 1994 10.7 MW DT fusion power record. The extension to 6.0 Tesla (85 kA) was commissioned on 9 September 1995. There are several reasons that one could expect the TF coils to survive the higher stresses that develop at higher fields. They were designed to operate at 5.2 Tesla with a vertical field of 0.5 Tesla, whereas the actual vertical field needed for the plasma does not exceed 0.35 Tesla. Their design specification explicitly required they survive some pulses at 6.0 Tesla. TF coil mechanical analysis computer models available during coil design were crude, leading to conservative design. And design analyses also had to consider worst-case misoperations that TFTR's real time Coil Protection Calculators (CPCs) now positively prevent from occurring

  13. Runaway studies in the ATF [Advanced Toroidal Facility] torsatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulsed torsatrons and heliotrons are susceptible to runaway electron formation and confinement resulting from the inherent good containment in the vacuum fields and the high loop voltages during the initiation and termination of the helical and vertical fields (''field ramping''). Because runaway electrons can cause an unacceptable level of hard X rays near the machine, a runaway suppression system was designed and included in the initial operation of the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF). The main component of the system is a rotating paddle that is normally left in the vacuum chamber during the field ramps. This device proved to be very effective in reducing the runaway population. Measurements of hard X rays from ATF have shown that the runaways are produced primarily during the field ramping but that usually a small steady-state runaway component is also present during the ''flat-top'' portion of the fields. The paddle is the main source of the hard X rays (thick-target bremsstrahlung), although other objects in the vacuum chamber also serve as targets for the runaways at various times. The maximum X-ray energy found by pulse height analysis is /approximately/12--15 MeV; the mean energy appears to be a few mega-electron-volts. A noticeable forward peaking of the bremsstrahlung from the paddle is evident. The limiters do not appear to be major sources of bremsstrahlung. 17 refs., 14 figs

  14. Equilibrium models of relativistic stars with a toroidal magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Frieben, Joachim

    2012-01-01

    We have computed models of rotating relativistic stars with a toroidal magnetic field and investigated the combined effects of magnetic field and rotation on the apparent shape (i.e. the surface deformation), which could be relevant for the electromagnetic emission, and on the internal matter distribution (i.e. the quadrupole distortion), which could be relevant for the emission of gravitational waves. Using a sample of eight different cold nuclear-physics equations of state, we have computed models of maximum field strength, as well as the distortion coefficients for the surface and the quadrupolar deformations. Surprisingly, we find that non-rotating models admit arbitrary levels of magnetisation, accompanied by a growth of size and quadrupole distortion to which we could not find a limit. Rotating models, on the other hand, are subject to a mass-shedding limit at frequencies well below the corresponding ones for unmagnetised stars. Overall, the space of solutions can be split into three distinct classes fo...

  15. EMPACT: Electrons Muons Partons with Air Core Toroids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marx, M.D. (State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (USA))

    1990-05-25

    The EMPACT experiment utilizes a broad approach to maximize its discovery potential for new phenomena accessible at the SSC. The high resolution detector has a balances emphasis on, and large acceptance for, electrons, muons, jets, and noninteracting particles, and is capable of utilizing the ultimate luminosity of the SSC. The detector emphasizes excellent calorimetry augmented by TRD tracking, and employs an innovative system of superconducting air core toroids for muon measurements. Significant engineering effort has established the feasibility of a baseline detector concept and has addressed the related issues of support facilities, assembly, and detector integration. The design has been tested against the challenges of predicted phenomena, with the expectation that this will optimize the capacity for observing the unexpected. EMPACT's international collaboration has unprecedented support from major aerospace industries who are providing tools and expertise for project design and integration, which will assure that a detector optimized for performance and cost will be available for the first collisions at the new laboratory.

  16. Phase Relationships of Solar Hemispheric Toroidal and Poloidal Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraközy, J.

    2016-08-01

    The solar northern and southern hemispheres exhibit differences in their intensities and time profiles of the activity cycles. The time variation of these properties was studied in a previous article covering the data from Cycles 12-23. The hemispheric phase lags exhibited a characteristic variation: the leading role was exchanged between hemispheres every four cycles. The present work extends the investigation of this variation using the data of Staudacher and Schwabe in Cycles 1-4 and 7-10 as well as Spörer’s data in Cycle 11. The previously observed variation cannot be clearly recognized using the data of Staudacher, Schwabe, and Spörer. However, it is more interesting that the phase lags of the reversals of the magnetic fields at the poles follow the same variations as those of the hemispheric cycles in Cycles 12-23, i.e., one of the hemispheres leads in four cyles and the leading role jumps to the opposite hemisphere in the next four cycles. This means that this variation is a long-term property of the entire solar dynamo mechanism, for both the toroidal and poloidal fields, which hints at an unidentified component of the process responsible for the long-term memory.

  17. The Meaning of a Compact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasescha, Anna

    2016-01-01

    To mark the 30th anniversary of "Campus Compact," leaders from across the network came together in the summer of 2015 to reaffirm a shared commitment to the public purposes of higher education. Campus Compact's 30th Anniversary Action Statement of Presidents and Chancellors is the product of that collective endeavor. In signing the…

  18. The Finslerian compact star model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahaman, Farook; Paul, Nupur [Jadavpur University, Department of Mathematics, Kolkata, West Bengal (India); De, S.S. [University of Calcutta, Department of Applied Mathematics, Kolkata (India); Ray, Saibal [Government College of Engineering and Ceramic Technology, Department of Physics, Kolkata, West Bengal (India); Jafry, M.A.K. [Shibpur Dinobundhoo Institution, Department of Physics, Howrah, West Bengal (India)

    2015-11-15

    We construct a toy model for compact stars based on the Finslerian structure of spacetime. By assuming a particular mass function, we find an exact solution of the Finsler-Einstein field equations with an anisotropic matter distribution. The solutions are revealed to be physically interesting and pertinent for the explanation of compact stars. (orig.)

  19. Zonal Toroidal Harmonic Expansions of External Gravitational Fields for Ring-like Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Toshio

    2016-08-01

    We present an expression of the external gravitational field of a general ring-like object with axial and plane symmetries such as oval toroids or annular disks with an arbitrary density distribution. The main term is the gravitational field of a uniform, infinitely thin ring representing the limit of zero radial width and zero vertical height of the object. The additional term is derived from a zonal toroidal harmonic expansion of a general solution of Laplace’s equation outside the Brillouin toroid of the object. The special functions required are the point value and the first-order derivative of the zonal toroidal harmonics of the first kind, namely, the Legendre function of the first kind of half integer degree and an argument that is not less than unity. We developed a recursive method to compute them from two pairs of seed values explicitly expressed by some complete elliptic integrals. Numerical experiments show that appropriately truncated expansions converge rapidly outside the Brillouin toroid. The truncated expansion can be evaluated so efficiently that, for an oval toroid with an exponentially damping density profile, it is 3000–10,000 times faster than the two-dimensional numerical quadrature. A group of the Fortran 90 programs required in the new method and their sample outputs are available electronically.

  20. First End Cap Toroid knocking on the door of SX1

    CERN Multimedia

    Herman Ten Kate

    On Tuesday May 29, the first Toroid End Cap for the A-side was transported from its test station next to B180 to the front of the ATLAS surface building SX1. The 240-ton and 12-m high toroid end-cap moved on a special trailer at walking speed, got over various slopes and survived the difficult turn left in front of the entrance at gate B. The toroid had to wait for almost two months to commence its journey to its destination as the cryogenic test down to 80K was already successfully completed by early April. In the next days, the toroid will slide into the SX1 building, turn around its axes by 90 degrees and then gently slide over the first shaft and land on top of the A-side shaft on Wednesday. There, it will descend by 5 m into the shaft using special lifting tooling before it can be connected to the 2x140 tons overhead cranes which will let the toroid go further down to the cavern. End Cap Toroid A on the trailer on its way to the cavern at Point 1. Crossing the main road near entrance A while t...

  1. Warm compacting behavior of stainless steel powders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖志瑜; 柯美元; 陈维平; 召明; 李元元

    2004-01-01

    The warm compacting behaviors of four different kinds of stainless steel powders, 304L, 316L, 410L and 430L, were studied. The results show that warm compaction can be applied to stainless steel powders. The green densities and strengths of compacts obtained through warm compaction are generally higher than those obtained through cold compaction. The compacting behaviors in warm compaction and cold compaction are similar.Under the compacting pressure of 700 MPa, the warm compacted densities are 0. 10 - 0.22 g/cm3 higher than the cold compacted ones, and the green strengths are 11.5 %-50 % higher. The optimal warm compacting temperature is 100 - 110 ℃. In the die wall lubricated warm compaction, the optimum internal lubricant content is 0.2%.

  2. Boundaries of flat compact surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røgen, Peter

    1999-01-01

    This paper deals with the problem: ``Which knots or links in 3-space bound flat (immersed) compact surfaces?''. In a previous paper by the author it was proven that: Any simple closed space curve can be deformed until it bounds a flat orientable compact (Seifert) surface. The main results...... of this paper are: There exist knots that do not bound any flat compact surfaces. The lower bound of total curvature of a knot bounding an orientable non-negatively curved compact surface can, for varying knot type, be arbitrarily much greater than the infimum of curvature needed for the knot to have its knot...... type. The number of $3$-singular points (points of zero curvature or if not then of zero torsion) on the boundary of a flat immersed compact surface is greater than or equal to twice the absolute value of the Euler characteristic of the surface. A set of necessary and, in a weakened sense, sufficient...

  3. Magnetic Configuration Effects on Fast Ion Losses Induced by Fast Ion Driven Toroidal Alfv~n Eigenmodes in the Large Helical Device

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K. OGAWA; M. ISOBE; K. TOI; F. WATANABE; D. A. SPONG; A. SHIMIZU; M. OSAKABE; D. S. DARROW; S. OHDACHI; S. SAKAKIBARA; LHD Experiment -Group

    2012-01-01

    Beam-ion losses induced by fast-ion-driven toroidal Alfven eigenmodes (TAE) were measured with a scintillator-based lost fast-ion probe (SLIP) in the large helical device (LHD). The SLIP gave simultaneously the energy E and the pitch angle X=arccos(v///v) distribution of the lost fast ions. The loss fluxes were investigated for three typical magnetic configurations of Rax-vac=3.60 m, 3.75 m. and 3.90 m, where Rax-vac is the magnetic axis position of the vacuum field. Dominant losses induced by TAEs in these three configurations were observed in the E/X regions of 50-190 keV/40°, 40-170 keV/25°, and 30-190 keV/30°, respectively. Lost-ion fluxes induced by TAEs depend clearly on the amplitude of TAE magnetic fluctuations, Rax-vac and the toroidal field strength Bt. The increment of the loss fluxes has the dependence of (bTAE/Bt)s. The power s increases from s = 1 to 3 with the increase of the magnetic axis position in finite beta plasmas.

  4. Applications of the integrated-blanket-coil concept to the compact reversed-field pinch reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compact reactors, by their nature, are high-power-density devices. They place a premium on space usage within the system volume, and access to the fusion power core components is limited. The integrated-blanket-coil (IBC) concept relaxes some of these requirements by combining the functions of the breeding blanket with those of the magnet systems. In this paper, the IBC potential is analyzed for the compact reversed-field pinch reactor (CRFPR) coil sets: (a) the toroidal field (TF) system; (b) the polidal field (PF) system; (c) the ohmic heating (OH) subsystem of the PF system; and (d) the divertor coils in the impurity control system. Use is made of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) RFP systems code with suitable modifications, to estimate ohmic losses, coil masses, and economic (cost of electricity) impact of the different configurations. Preliminary evaluations indicate that a symmetric toroidal divertor would be suitable for the CRFPR. This presents a special attraction for use of IBC divertor coils. Since the minority field (TF) is < 1 T at the plasma edge, the required nulling current is modest. In addition, IBC coils can be placed closer to the plasma, allowing a trade-off between the higher resistive losses and reduced current requirements. Perhaps most importantly, use of IBC divertor coils would improve the tritium breeding ratio, which is somewhat marginal with copper divertor coils

  5. A Compact Ring Design with Tunable Momentum Compaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Y.; /SLAC

    2012-05-17

    A storage ring with tunable momentum compaction has the advantage in achieving different RMS bunch length with similar RF capacity, which is potentially useful for many applications, such as linear collider damping ring and predamping ring where injected beam has a large energy spread and a large transverse emittance. A tunable bunch length also makes the commissioning and fine tuning easier in manipulating the single bunch instabilities. In this paper, a compact ring design based on a supercell is presented, which achieves a tunable momentum compaction while maintaining a large dynamic aperture.

  6. Betting Against Beta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frazzini, Andrea; Heje Pedersen, Lasse

    We present a model with leverage and margin constraints that vary across investors and time. We find evidence consistent with each of the model’s five central predictions: (1) Since constrained investors bid up high-beta assets, high beta is associated with low alpha, as we find empirically for U.......S. equities, 20 international equity markets, Treasury bonds, corporate bonds, and futures; (2) A betting-against-beta (BAB) factor, which is long leveraged low beta assets and short high-beta assets, produces significant positive risk-adjusted returns; (3) When funding constraints tighten, the return...... of the BAB factor is low; (4) Increased funding liquidity risk compresses betas toward one; (5) More constrained investors hold riskier assets....

  7. Betting against Beta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frazzini, Andrea; Heje Pedersen, Lasse

    2014-01-01

    We present a model with leverage and margin constraints that vary across investors and time. We find evidence consistent with each of the model's five central predictions: (1) Because constrained investors bid up high-beta assets, high beta is associated with low alpha, as we find empirically...... for US equities, 20 international equity markets, Treasury bonds, corporate bonds, and futures. (2) A betting against beta (BAB) factor, which is long leveraged low-beta assets and short high-beta assets, produces significant positive risk-adjusted returns. (3) When funding constraints tighten......, the return of the BAB factor is low. (4) Increased funding liquidity risk compresses betas toward one. (5) More constrained investors hold riskier assets....

  8. Roughing up Beta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bollerslev, Tim; Li, Sophia Zhengzi; Todorov, Viktor

    Motivated by the implications from a stylized equilibrium pricing framework, we investigate empirically how individual equity prices respond to continuous, or \\smooth," and jumpy, or \\rough," market price moves, and how these different market price risks, or betas, are priced in the cross......-section of expected returns. Based on a novel highfrequency dataset of almost one-thousand individual stocks over two decades, we find that the two rough betas associated with intraday discontinuous and overnight returns entail significant risk premiums, while the intraday continuous beta is not priced in the cross......-section. An investment strategy that goes long stocks with high jump betas and short stocks with low jump betas produces significant average excess returns. These higher risk premiums for the discontinuous and overnight market betas remain significant after controlling for a long list of other firm characteristics...

  9. Asymptotic and spectral analysis of the gyrokinetic-waterbag integro-differential operator in toroidal geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besse, Nicolas; Coulette, David

    2016-08-01

    Achieving plasmas with good stability and confinement properties is a key research goal for magnetic fusion devices. The underlying equations are the Vlasov-Poisson and Vlasov-Maxwell (VPM) equations in three space variables, three velocity variables, and one time variable. Even in those somewhat academic cases where global equilibrium solutions are known, studying their stability requires the analysis of the spectral properties of the linearized operator, a daunting task. We have identified a model, for which not only equilibrium solutions can be constructed, but many of their stability properties are amenable to rigorous analysis. It uses a class of solution to the VPM equations (or to their gyrokinetic approximations) known as waterbag solutions which, in particular, are piecewise constant in phase-space. It also uses, not only the gyrokinetic approximation of fast cyclotronic motion around magnetic field lines, but also an asymptotic approximation regarding the magnetic-field-induced anisotropy: the spatial variation along the field lines is taken much slower than across them. Together, these assumptions result in a drastic reduction in the dimensionality of the linearized problem, which becomes a set of two nested one-dimensional problems: an integral equation in the poloidal variable, followed by a one-dimensional complex Schrödinger equation in the radial variable. We show here that the operator associated to the poloidal variable is meromorphic in the eigenparameter, the pulsation frequency. We also prove that, for all but a countable set of real pulsation frequencies, the operator is compact and thus behaves mostly as a finite-dimensional one. The numerical algorithms based on such ideas have been implemented in a companion paper [D. Coulette and N. Besse, "Numerical resolution of the global eigenvalue problem for gyrokinetic-waterbag model in toroidal geometry" (submitted)] and were found to be surprisingly close to those for the original gyrokinetic

  10. First-principles approach to investigate toroidal property of magnetoelectric multiferroic GaFeO{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nie, Yung-mau, E-mail: ymnie@ncnu.edu.tw [Department of Applied Materials and Optoelectronic Engineering, National Chi Nan University (NCNU), Nantou County 54561, Taiwan (China)

    2016-01-14

    A first-principles approach incorporating the concept of toroidal moments as a measure of the spin vortex is proposed and applied to simulate the toroidization of magnetoelectric multiferroic GaFeO{sub 3}. The nature of space-inversion and time-reversal violations of ferrotoroidics is reproduced in the simulated magnetic structure of GaFeO{sub 3}. For undoped GaFeO{sub 3}, a toroidal moment of −22.38 μ{sub B} Å per unit cell was obtained, which is the best theoretical estimate till date. Guided by the spin vortex free-energy minimization perturbed by an externally applied field, it was discovered that the minority spin markedly biases the whole toroidization. In summary, this approach not only calculates the toroidal moment but provides a way to understand the toroidal nature of magnetoelectric multiferroics.

  11. Development of ITER toroidal field insert. International collaboration with Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Central Solenoid (CS) model coil programme was performed since 1992 as one of the projects in the Engineering Design Activity (EDA) of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor(ITER). The CS model coil programme involves a plan to develop the Toroidal Field (TF) insert to demonstrate the conductor performance of ITER TF coils under a magnetic flux density of 13T. The TF insert was fabricated by Russia and tested by Japan under the framework of the ITER-EDA. The TF insert developed a single-layer solenoid with nine turns. It is wound with a cable-in-conduit (CIC) conductor which consists of 1,152 Nb3Sn strands, a thin titanium jacket and a central channel. The outer diameter, height and weight of the TF insert are 1.56 m, 3.2 m and 3.1 ton, respectively. Fabrication of the TF insert was completed in May 2001 at the D.V.Efremov Scientific Research Institute for Electrophysical Apparatus (Efremov institute) in St. Petersburg, Russia. The TF insert was then transported to the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). Installation of the TF insert to CS model coil test facility was completed in August, 2001. Experiments including the cooldown and warmup processes, were completed in November 2001. The TF insert was charged to 13T with 46 kA without any instability under a back up magnetic field from the CS model coil. This report introduces an overview of the fabrication, installation and experiments for the TF insert conducted under collaboration between Japan and Russia. (author)

  12. Transport bifurcation induced by sheared toroidal flow in tokamak plasmasa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Highcock, E. G.; Barnes, M.; Parra, F. I.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Roach, C. M.; Cowley, S. C.

    2011-10-01

    First-principles numerical simulations are used to describe a transport bifurcation in a differentially rotating tokamak plasma. Such a bifurcation is more probable in a region of zero magnetic shear than one of finite magnetic shear, because in the former case the component of the sheared toroidal flow that is perpendicular to the magnetic field has the strongest suppressing effect on the turbulence. In the zero-magnetic-shear regime, there are no growing linear eigenmodes at any finite value of flow shear. However, subcritical turbulence can be sustained, owing to the existence of modes, driven by the ion temperature gradient and the parallel velocity gradient, which grow transiently. Nonetheless, in a parameter space containing a wide range of temperature gradients and velocity shears, there is a sizeable window where all turbulence is suppressed. Combined with the relatively low transport of momentum by collisional (neoclassical) mechanisms, this produces the conditions for a bifurcation from low to high temperature and velocity gradients. A parametric model is constructed which accurately describes the combined effect of the temperature gradient and the flow gradient over a wide range of their values. Using this parametric model, it is shown that in the reduced-transport state, heat is transported almost neoclassically, while momentum transport is dominated by subcritical parallel-velocity-gradient-driven turbulence. It is further shown that for any given input of torque, there is an optimum input of heat which maximises the temperature gradient. The parametric model describes both the behaviour of the subcritical turbulence (which cannot be modelled by the quasi-linear methods used in current transport codes) and the complicated effect of the flow shear on the transport stiffness. It may prove useful for transport modelling of tokamaks with sheared flows.

  13. Accretion theory for 'spontaneous' rotation of toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accretion theory of spontaneous toroidal rotation connects this phenomenon to the energy and particle transport properties of the plasma column and to the relevant collective modes. The consequent prediction that an inversion of the velocity direction in the transition from the H to the L regime should occur has been verified by the experiments. The theory is consistent also with the observation that the velocity is depressed when a peaked density profile appears as a result of a transport barrier. The fact that the rotation velocity increases with the total energy content is explained by the fact that the inflow of angular momentum, whose source is at the edge of the plasma column, results from the excitation of modes driven by the plasma pressure gradient. A quasi-linear derivation of the angular momentum transport produced by these modes, whose novel feature is the inflow, is given and a model of the relevant (transport) equation is solved. Fluctuations at the edge of the plasma column are considered responsible for the scattering, out of confinement, of particles that transfer, to the surrounding material wall, angular momentum in the same direction as that of the phase velocity of the prevalent modes. Thus the fact that the plasma rotates in the direction of the ion diamagnetic velocity in the H-regime, when the prevalent modes are expected to have phase velocity in the direction of the electron diamagnetic velocity, can be explained and the rate of rotation decrease, as the plasma current is increased, can be justified. (author)

  14. Accretion theory of 'spontaneous' rotation in toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accretion theory of 'spontaneous' toroidal rotation connects this phenomenon to the energy and particle transport properties of the plasma column and to the relevant collective modes. The consequent prediction that an inversion of the velocity direction in the transition from the H to the L regime should occur has been verified by the experiments. The theory is consistent also with the observation that the velocity is depressed when a peaked density profile appears as a result of a transport barrier. The fact that the rotation velocity increases with the total energy content is explained by the fact that the inflow of angular momentum, whose source is at the edge of the plasma column, results from the excitation of modes driven by the plasma pressure gradient. A quasi-linear derivation of the angular momentum transport produced by these modes, whose novel feature is the inflow, is given. A model of the relevant (transport) equation that can be easily solved is discussed. Fluctuations at the edge of the plasma column are considered responsible for the scattering out of confinement of particles that transfer to the surrounding material wall angular momentum in the same direction as that of the phase velocity of the prevalent modes. Thus the fact that the plasma rotates in the direction of the ion diamagnetic velocity in the H regime, when the prevalent modes are expected to have phase velocity in the direction of the electron diamagnetic velocity, can be explained. The rate of rotation decrease observed when the plasma current is increased is also justified. (author)

  15. Compact Grism Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teare, S. W.

    2003-05-01

    Many observatories and instrument builders are retrofitting visible and near-infrared spectrometers into their existing imaging cameras. Camera designs that reimage the focal plane and have the optical filters located in a pseudo collimated beam are ideal candidates for the addition of a spectrometer. One device commonly used as the dispersing element for such spectrometers is a grism. The traditional grism is constructed from a prism that has had a diffraction grating applied on one surface. The objective of such a design is to use the prism wedge angle to select the desired "in-line" or "zero-deviation" wavelength that passes through on axis. The grating on the surface of the prism provides much of the dispersion for the spectrometer. A grism can also be used in a "constant-dispersion" design which provides an almost linear spatial scale across the spectrum. In this paper we provide an overview of the development of a grism spectrometer for use in a near infrared camera and demonstrate that a compact grism spectrometer can be developed on a very modest budget that can be afforded at almost any facility. The grism design was prototyped using visible light and then a final device was constructed which provides partial coverage in the near infrared I, J, H and K astronomical bands using the appropriate band pass filter for order sorting. The near infrared grism presented here provides a spectral resolution of about 650 and velocity resolution of about 450 km/s. The design of this grism relied on a computer code called Xspect, developed by the author, to determine the various critical parameters of the grism. This work was supported by a small equipment grant from NASA and administered by the AAS.

  16. Compact instantaneous water heater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azevedo, Jorge G.W.; Machado, Antonio R.; Ferraz, Andre D.; Rocha, Ivan C.C. da; Konishi, Ricardo [Companhia de Gas de Santa Catarina (SCGAS), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Lehmkuhl, Willian A.; Francisco Jr, Roberto W.; Hatanaka, Ricardo L.; Pereira, Fernando M.; Oliveira, Amir A.M. [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents an experimental study of combustion in an inert porous medium in a liquid heating device application. This project aims to increase efficiency in the application of natural gas in residential and commercial sectors with the use of advanced combustion and heat transfer. The goal is to facilitate the development of a high performance compact water heater allowing hot water supply for up to two simultaneous showers. The experiment consists in a cylindrical porous burner with an integrated annular water heat exchanger. The reactants were injected radially into the burner and the flame stabilizes within the porous matrix. The water circulates in a coiled pipe positioned at the center of the burner. This configuration allows for heat transfer by conduction and radiation from the solid matrix to the heat exchanger. This article presented preliminary experimental results of a new water heater based on an annular porous burner. The range of equivalence ratios tested varied from 0.65 to 0.8. The power range was varied from 3 to 5 kW. Increasing the equivalence ratio or decreasing the total power input of the burner resulted in increased thermal efficiencies of the water heater. Thermal efficiencies varying from 60 to 92% were obtained. The condition for the goal of a comfortable bath was 20 deg C for 8-12 L/min. This preliminary prototype has achieved water temperature of 11deg C for 5 L/min. Further optimizations will be necessary in order to achieve intense heating with high thermal efficiency. (author)

  17. Vacuum expectation values of the current density and energy-momentum tensor for a charged scalar field in curved spacetime with toroidally compactified spatial dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saharian, Aram; Kotanjyan, Anna; Sargsyan, Hayk; Simonyan, David

    2016-07-01

    The models with compact spatial dimensions appear in a number of fundamental physical theories. In particular, the idea of compactified dimensions has been extensively used in supergravity and superstring theories. In quantum field theory, the modification of the vacuum fluctuations spectrum by the periodicity conditions imposed on the field operator along compact dimensions leads to a number of interesting physical effects. A well known example of this kind, demonstrating the close relation between quantum phenomena and global geometry, is the topological Casimir effect. In models with extra compact dimensions, the Casimir energy creates a nontrivial potential for the compactification radius. This can serve as a stabilization mechanism for moduli fields and for the effective gauge couplings. The Casimir effect has also been considered as a possible origin for the dark energy in Kaluza-Klein-type and braneworld models. In the resent presentation we investigate the effects of the gravity and topology on the local properties of the quantum vacuum for a charged scalar field in the presence of a classical gauge field. Vacuum expectation value of the energy-momentum tensor and current density are investigated for a charged scalar field in dS spacetime with toroidally compact spatial dimensions in the presence of a classical constant gauge field. Due to the nontrivial topology, the latter gives rise to Aharonov-Bohm-like effect on the vacuum characteristics. The vacuum current density, energy density and stresses are even periodic functions of the magnetic flux enclosed by compact dimensions. For small values of the comoving lengths of compact dimensions, compared with the dS curvature radius, the effects of gravity on the topological contributions are small and the expectation values are expressed in terms of the corresponding quantities in the Minkowski bulk by the standard conformal relation. For large values of the comoving lengths, depending on the field mass, two

  18. What Is Business's Social Compact?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avishai, Bernard

    1994-01-01

    Under the "new" social compact, businesses must focus on continuous learning and thus have both an obligation to support teaching and an opportunity to profit from it. Learning organizations must also be teaching organizations. (SK)

  19. Compact energy conversion module Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This STTR project delivers a compact vibration-based Energy Conversion Module (ECM) that powers sensors for purposes like structural health monitoring (SHM). NASA...

  20. Compact, Ultrasensitive Formaldehyde Monitor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Small Business Innovative Research Phase II proposal seeks to develop a compact UV laser ?based sensor for Earth science and planetary atmosphere exploration....

  1. Countably determined compact abelian groups

    CERN Document Server

    Dikranjan, Dikran

    2008-01-01

    For an abelian topological group G let G^* be the dual group of all continuous characters endowed with the compact open topology. A subgroup D of G determines G if the restriction homomorphism G^* --> D^* of the dual groups is a topological isomorphism. Given a scattered compact subset X of an infinite compact abelian group G such that |X|compact abelian group determined by its countable subgroup must be metrizable. This gives a negative answer to questions of Comfort, Hernandez, Macario, Raczkowski and Trigos-Arrieta, as well as provides short proofs of main results established in three manuscripts by these authors.

  2. Compact, Airborne Multispecies Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Small Business Innovative Research Phase I proposal seeks to develop a compact mid-infrared laser spectrometer to benefit Earth science research activities. To...

  3. Compact Massive Object in Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Melo, I Tosta e

    2016-01-01

    The central regions of galaxies show the presence of super massive black holes and/or very dense stellar clusters. Both objects seem to follow similar host-galaxy correlations, suggesting that they are members of the same family of Compact Massive Objects. We investigate here a huge data collection of Compact Massive Objects properties to correlate them with absolute magnitude, velocity dispersion and mass of their host galaxies.

  4. Feedback control of resistive wall modes in toroidal devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feedback of nonaxisymmetric resistive wall modes (RWM) is studied analytically for cylindrical plasmas and computationally for high beta tokamaks. Internal poloidal sensors give superior performance to radial sensors, and this is explained by the distribution of poles and residues for the transfer functions. A single poloidal array of feedback coils allows robust control with respect to variations in plasma pressure, current and rotation velocity. The control analysis is applied to advanced scenarios for ITER. Studies are also shown of configurations with multiple poloidal coils and of feedback systems for nonresonant MHD instabilities in reversed field pinches. (author)

  5. Forward-Looking Betas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Peter; Jacobs, Kris; Vainberg, Gregory

    -looking. This paper introduces a radically different approach to estimating market betas. Using the tools in Bakshi and Madan (2000) and Bakshi, Kapadia and Madan (2003) we employ the information embedded in the prices of individual stock options and index options to compute our forward-looking market beta...

  6. Characteristics for beam focusing of a magnetically insulated diode with a toroidal magnetic field (TMID)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the purpose of focusing intense pulsed ion beams, an ion diode insulated for electrons with a toroidal magnetic field (TMID) has been designed and tested as a preliminary experiment. The annular diode assembly is contained in the toroidal field produced with a toroidal coil. The diode power was supplied from a pulsed power supply ''ERIDATRON-II'' at a stored energy of 5kJ. Ion beams of 10 - 20kA with energies of 250 - 350 keV have been produced with an efficiency of about 10 %. It is suggested from observations of circulating current around the anode in nearly E x B direction, that the diode efficiency will be enhanced by increasing the toroidal field strength much above the critical magnetic field for insulation. The measured ion orbits agree well with the calculated single-particle ion orbits in this field even when the conditions for cross-field propagation are satisfied. The toroidal field was found to act as a magnetic lens as well as the insulating field for electrons in the diode. The features of the TMID appear to be very useful for obtaining a well focused ion beam in a simple device. (author)

  7. Simulation Study of Toroidal Flow Generation of Minority Ions by Local ICRF Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Sadayoshi; Itoh, Kimitaka; Zheng, Linjin; Van Dam, James W.; Fukuyama, Atsushi

    2015-12-01

    The toroidal flow generation of minority ions by the local ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) heating is investigated in a tokamak plasma by applying the GNET code, which can solve the drift kinetic equation in the 5-D phase space. An asymmetry of velocity distribution function in the parallel direction is found and two types of toroidal averaged flow of minority ions are observed. One is the sheared flow near the RF power absorption region depending on the sign of k||, and the other is the toroidal flow, which is larger than the previous one, independent of the sign of k||. It is found that the k||-sign-independent toroidal flow is generated by the net toroidal motion of energetic tail ions and that the k||-sign-dependent flow is related to the mechanism proposed by Ohkawa [ext-link ext-link-type="uri" xlink:href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.2047629" xlink:type="simple">Phys. Plasmas 12, 094506 (2005)ext-link>].

  8. Destabilization mechanism of edge-localized MHD modes by a toroidal rotation in tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiba, Nobuyuki; Furukawa, Masaru; Hirota, Makoto; Tokuda, Shinji

    2009-11-01

    In JT-60U, some experimental results showed that the ELM frequency depends on the toroidal rotation, and the rapid rotation in the counter direction of the plasma current changes from Type-I ELM to Grassy ELM, whose frequency is high and the amplitude is small [1]. Since both Type-I and Grassy ELMs are considered as ideal MHD modes destabilizing near the plasma surface, theoretical and numerical analyses about the toroidal rotation effects on the edge localized MHD mode are important to understand this dependence of the ELM frequency on the toroidal rotation frequency. Our previous works have illustrated that the toroidal rotation with shear can destabilize low/intermediate-n (Rotenberg equation. Particularly, we pay attention to the destabilizing effects of the toroidal rotation shear and the centrifuged force on not only equilibrium but also change of equation of motion. [1] N. Oyama et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 49, 249 (2007). [2] N. Aiba et al., Nucl. Fusion 49, 065015 (2009).

  9. Optimal $\\mathfrak{L}^{\\beta}$-Control for the Global Cauchy Problem of the Relativistic Vlasov-Poisson System

    OpenAIRE

    Young, Brent

    2010-01-01

    Recently, M.K.-H. Kiessling and A.S. Tahvildar-Zadeh proved that a unique global classical solution to the relativistic Vlasov-Poisson system exists whenever the positive, integrable initial datum is spherically symmetric, compactly supported in momentum space, vanishes on characteristics with vanishing angular momentum, and for $\\beta \\ge 3/2$ has $\\mathfrak{L}^{\\beta}$-norm strictly below a positive, critical value $\\mathcal{C}_{\\beta}$. Everything else being equal, data leading to finite t...

  10. ARC: A compact, high-field, fusion nuclear science facility and demonstration power plant with demountable magnets

    OpenAIRE

    Sorbom, B. N.; Ball, J.; Palmer, T. R.; Mangiarotti, F. J.; Sierchio, J. M.; Bonoli, P.; Kasten, C.; Sutherland, D. A.; Barnard, H. S.; Haakonsen, C. B.; Goh, J.; Sung, C; Whyte, D. G.

    2014-01-01

    The affordable, robust, compact (ARC) reactor conceptual design study aims to reduce the size, cost, and complexity of a combined fusion nuclear science facility (FNSF) and demonstration fusion Pilot power plant. ARC is a 200-250 MWe tokamak reactor with a major radius of 3.3 m, a minor radius of 1.1 m, and an on-axis magnetic field of 9.2 T. ARC has rare earth barium copper oxide (REBCO) superconducting toroidal field coils, which have joints to enable disassembly. This allows the vacuum ves...

  11. Quantum field theory on toroidal topology: Algebraic structure and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khanna, F.C., E-mail: khannaf@uvic.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8P 5C2 (Canada); TRIUMF, Vancouver, BC, V6T 2A3 (Canada); Malbouisson, A.P.C., E-mail: adolfo@cbpf.br [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas/MCT, 22290-180, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Malbouisson, J.M.C., E-mail: jmalboui@ufba.br [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal da Bahia, 40210-340, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Santana, A.E., E-mail: asantana@unb.br [International Center for Condensed Matter Physics, Instituto de Física, Universidade de Brasília, 70910-900, Brasília, DF (Brazil)

    2014-06-01

    The development of quantum theory on a torus has a long history, and can be traced back to the 1920s, with the attempts by Nordström, Kaluza and Klein to define a fourth spatial dimension with a finite size, being curved in the form of a torus, such that Einstein and Maxwell equations would be unified. Many developments were carried out considering cosmological problems in association with particle physics, leading to methods that are useful for areas of physics, in which size effects play an important role. This interest in finite size effect systems has been increasing rapidly over the last decades, due principally to experimental improvements. In this review, the foundations of compactified quantum field theory on a torus are presented in a unified way, in order to consider applications in particle and condensed matter physics. The theory on a torus Γ{sub D}{sup d}=(S{sup 1}){sup d}×R{sup D−d} is developed from a Lie-group representation and c{sup ∗}-algebra formalisms. As a first application, the quantum field theory at finite temperature, in its real- and imaginary-time versions, is addressed by focusing on its topological structure, the torus Γ{sub 4}{sup 1}. The toroidal quantum-field theory provides the basis for a consistent approach of spontaneous symmetry breaking driven by both temperature and spatial boundaries. Then the superconductivity in films, wires and grains are analyzed, leading to some results that are comparable with experiments. The Casimir effect is studied taking the electromagnetic and Dirac fields on a torus. In this case, the method of analysis is based on a generalized Bogoliubov transformation, that separates the Green function into two parts: one is associated with the empty space–time, while the other describes the impact of compactification. This provides a natural procedure for calculating the renormalized energy–momentum tensor. Self interacting four-fermion systems, described by the Gross–Neveu and Nambu

  12. Neoclassical Drift of Circulating Orbits Due toToroidal Electric Field in Tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Qin; Guan, Xiaoyin; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2011-07-19

    In tokamaks, Ware pinch is a well known neoclassical effect for trapped particles in response to a toroidal electric field. It is generally believed that there exists no similar neoclassical effect for circulating particles without collisions. However, this belief is erroneous, and misses an important effect. We show both analytically and numerically that under the influence of a toroidal electric field parallel to the current, the circulating orbits drift outward toward the outer wall with a characteristic velocity O ({var_epsilon}{sup -1}) larger than the E x B velocity, where {var_epsilon} is the inverse aspect-ratio of a tokamak. During a RF overdrive, the toroidal electric field is anti-parallel to the current. As a consequence, all charged particles, including backward runaway electrons, will drift inward towards the inner wall.

  13. Quantitative measurement of in-vessel dust velocity and its correlation with toroidal rotation of plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Suk-Ho, E-mail: sukhhong@nfri.re.kr [National Fusion Research Institute, 169-147 Gwahangno, YuSung-Gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nuclear Fusion and Plasma Physics, Korea University of Science and Technology, 169-147 Gwahangno, YuSung-Gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Department of Electrical Engineering, HanYang University, 222 Wangsimni-ro, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyung-Rae [Department of Nuclear Fusion and Plasma Physics, Korea University of Science and Technology, 169-147 Gwahangno, YuSung-Gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Won-Ha; Nam, YongUn [National Fusion Research Institute, 169-147 Gwahangno, YuSung-Gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nuclear Fusion and Plasma Physics, Korea University of Science and Technology, 169-147 Gwahangno, YuSung-Gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    In-vessel dust velocity and its distribution have been evaluated by using dedicated software developed at KSTAR. The dust velocities are well described by log-normal distribution function in a range from ∼10 m/s up to ∼460 m/s. The peak velocity of the distribution increases through three campaigns from 2010 to 2012, mainly due to the increase of the input energy level. From the force balance, it is expected that the dust velocity is strongly correlated with the toroidal plasma flow due to the ion drag force acting on dusts. To confirm this, toroidal rotation velocity is measured by using charge exchange spectroscopy (CES) as a function of normalized stored energy (W/I{sub p}), which is similar with Rice scaling. As a consequence, it is found that the dust velocity is linearly proportional to W/I{sub p}, thus to the toroidal rotation velocity of the plasmas.

  14. On the toroidal nature of the low-energy E1 mode

    CERN Document Server

    Repko, A; Nesterenko, V O; Kvasil, J

    2012-01-01

    The nature of E1 low-energy strength (LES), often denoted as a "pygmy dipole resonance", is analyzed within the random-phase-approximation (RPA) in $^{208}$Pb using Skyrme forces in fully self-consistent manner. A first overview is given by the strength functions for the dipole, compressional and toroidal operators. More detailed insight is gained by averaged transition densities and currents where the latter provide very illustrative flow pattern. The analysis reveals clear isoscalar toroidal flow in the low-energy bin 6.0-8.8 MeV of the LES and a mixed isoscalar/isovector toroidal/compression flow in the higher bin 8.8-10.5 MeV. Thus the modes covered by LES embrace both vortical and irrotational motion. The simple collective picture of the LES as a "pygmy" mode (oscillations of the neutron excess against the nuclear core) is not confirmed.

  15. Magnetohydrodynamic calculations with a nonmonotonic q profile and equilibrium, sheared toroidal flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Held, E.D. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Center for Plasma Theory and Computation; Leboeuf, J.N.; Carreras, B.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Fusion Energy Div.

    1998-07-01

    The linear and nonlinear stability of a nonmonotonic q profile is examined using a reduced set of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations with an equilibrium, sheared toroidal flow. The reversed shear profile is shown to be unstable to a rich variety of resistive MHD modes including pressure-driven instabilities and tearing instabilities possessing a tearing/interchange character at low Lundquist number, S, and taking on a double/triple tearing structure at high S. Linear calculations show that the destabilizing effect of toroidal velocity shear on tearing modes is enhanced at finite pressure seen previously for tearing modes at high S. Nonlinear calculations show the generation of a large, m = 1, n = 0, Reynolds-stress-driven poloidal flow in the absence of significant flow damping. Calculations in which the poloidal flow was heavily damped show that sub-Alfvenic, sheared toroidal flows have a minimal effect on weakly-coupled, localized instabilities.

  16. Instability of Non-uniform Toroidal Magnetic Fields in Accretion Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Hirabayashi, Kota

    2016-01-01

    A new type of instability that is expected to drive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence from a purely toroidal magnetic field in an accretion disk is presented. It is already known that in a differentially rotating system, the uniform toroidal magnetic field is unstable due to a magnetorotational instability (MRI) under a non-axisymmetric and vertical perturbation, while it is stable under a purely vertical perturbation. Contrary to the previous study, this paper proposes an unstable mode completely confined to the equatorial plane, driven by the expansive nature of the magnetic pressure gradient force under a non-uniform toroidal field. The basic nature of this growing eigenmode, to which we give a name "magneto-gradient driven instability", is studied using linear analysis, and the corresponding nonlinear evolution is then investigated using two-dimensional ideal MHD simulations. Although a single localized magnetic field channel alone cannot provide sufficient Maxwell stress to contribute significantly to...

  17. A Generic Minimal Discrete Model for Toroidal Moments and Its Experimental Realization

    CERN Document Server

    Xiang, Hong; Liu, Liang; Jiang, Tianshu; Zhang, Z Q; Chan, C T; Han, Dezhuan

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that a closed loop of magnetic dipoles can give rise to the rather elusive toroidal moment. However, artificial structures required to generate the necessary magnetic moments are typically optically large, complex to make and easily compromised by the kinetic inductance at high frequencies. Instead of using magnetic dipoles, we propose a minimal model based on just three aligned discrete electric dipoles in which the occurrence of resonant toroidal modes is guaranteed by symmetry. The advantage of this model is its simplicity and the same model supports toroidal moments from the microwave regime up to optical frequencies as exemplified by a three-antenna array and a system consisting of three nano-sized plasmonic particles. Both the microwave and high-frequency configurations exhibit non-radiating "anapoles". Experiments in the microwave regime confirm the theoretical predictions.

  18. Observations of toroidicity-induced Alfvén eigenmodes in a reversed field pinch plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regnoli, G.; Bergsâker, H.; Tennfors, E.; Zonca, F.; Martines, E.; Serianni, G.; Spolaore, M.; Vianello, N.; Cecconello, M.; Antoni, V.; Cavazzana, R.; Malmberg, J.-A.

    2005-04-01

    High frequency peaks in the spectra of magnetic field signals have been detected at the edge of Extrap-T2R [P. R. Brunsell, H. Bergsåker, M. Cecconello, J. R. Drake, R. M. Gravestijn, A. Hedqvist, and J.-A. Malmberg, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion, 43, 1457 (2001)]. The measured fluctuation is found to be mainly polarized along the toroidal direction, with high toroidal periodicity n and Alfvénic scaling (f∝B/√mini ). Calculations for a reversed field pinch plasma predict the existence of an edge resonant, high frequency, high-n number toroidicity-induced Alfvén eigenmode with the observed frequency scaling. In addition, gas puffing experiments show that edge density fluctuations are responsible for the rapid changes of mode frequency. Finally a coupling with the electron drift turbulence is proposed as drive mechanism for the eigenmode.

  19. A toroidal vortex field as an origin of the narrow mass spectrum of neutron stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontorovich, V. M.

    2016-03-01

    The evolution and collapse of a gaseous, self-gravitating sphere in the presence of an internal massive toroidal vortex analogous to the vortex created by the toroidal magnetic field of the Sun is considered. When thermal pressure is taken into account, for sufficiently high masses, the instability is preserved even for a polytropic index γ neutrons differs appreciably. In the ultrarelativistic limit, an interval of stablemasses arises in a neutron gas, between a minimum mass that depends on the circulation velocity in the vortex and the critical mass for the formation of a black hole. This suggests toroidal vortex fields as a possible physical origin for the observed narrow spectrum of neutron-star masses.

  20. Compact boson stars in K field theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, C.; Grandi, N.; Klimas, P.; Sánchez-Guillén, J.; Wereszczyński, A.

    2010-11-01

    We study a scalar field theory with a non-standard kinetic term minimally coupled to gravity. We establish the existence of compact boson stars, that is, static solutions with compact support of the full system with self-gravitation taken into account. Concretely, there exist two types of solutions, namely compact balls on the one hand, and compact shells on the other hand. The compact balls have a naked singularity at the center. The inner boundary of the compact shells is singular, as well, but it is, at the same time, a Killing horizon. These singular, compact shells therefore resemble black holes.

  1. Compact boson stars in K field theories

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, C; Klimas, P; Sánchez-Guillén, J; Wereszczynski, A

    2009-01-01

    We study a scalar field theory with a non-standard kinetic term minimally coupled to gravity. We establish the existence of compact boson stars, that is, static solutions with compact support of the full system with self-gravitation taken into account. Concretely, there exist two types of solutions, namely compact balls on the one hand, and compact shells on the other hand. The compact balls have a naked singularity at the center. The inner boundary of the compact shells is singular, as well, but it is, at the same time, a Killing horizon. These singular, compact shells therefore resemble black holes.

  2. Induced anapole (toroid) moments, a new type of polarizability and some related effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Physical systems not possessing intrinsic toroid anapole moments may well acquire induced ones in the presence of an external current even if there is no P, T-violation. The role of a new γ polarizability in the Compton scattering arising in this way is being studied, and the polarizability is demonstrated to lead to additional Van-der-Waals forces with the potential V(r)=-(639/4π)γ1γ2r-11. The γ-polarizability of the charged pion is estimated. Other toroid polarizability of the off-diagonal type are introduced and their role in some P, T-violating effects is briefly noted

  3. Bifurcation to 3D helical magnetic equilibrium in an axisymmetric toroidal device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergerson, W F; Auriemma, F; Chapman, B E; Ding, W X; Zanca, P; Brower, D L; Innocente, P; Lin, L; Lorenzini, R; Martines, E; Momo, B; Sarff, J S; Terranova, D

    2011-12-16

    We report the first direct measurement of the internal magnetic field structure associated with a 3D helical equilibrium generated spontaneously in the core of an axisymmetric toroidal plasma containment device. Magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium bifurcation occurs in a reversed-field pinch when the innermost resonant magnetic perturbation grows to a large amplitude, reaching up to 8% of the mean field strength. Magnetic topology evolution is determined by measuring the Faraday effect, revealing that, as the perturbation grows, toroidal symmetry is broken and a helical equilibrium is established.

  4. Toroidal resonance: relation to pygmy mode, vortical properties and anomalous deformation splitting

    CERN Document Server

    Nesterenko, V O; Repko, A; Kleinig, W; Reinhard, P -G

    2016-01-01

    We review a recent progress in investigation of the isoscalar toroidal dipole resonance (TDR). A possible relation of the TDR and low-energy dipole strength (also called a pygmy resonance) is analyzed. It is shown that the dipole strength in the pygmy region can by understood as a local manifestation of the collective vortical toroidal motion at the nuclear surface. Application of the TDR as a measure of the nuclear dipole vorticity is discussed. Finally, an anomalous splitting of the TDR in deformed nuclei is scrutinized.

  5. Hamiltonian guiding center drift orbit calculation for toroidal plasmas of arbitrary cross section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Hamiltonian guiding center drift orbit formalism is developed which permits the efficient calculation of particle trajectories in toroidal devices of arbitrary cross section with arbitrary plasma β. The magnetic field is assumed to be a small perturbation from a zero order toroidal equilibrium field possessing either axial or helical symmetry. The equilibrium field can be modelled analytically or obtained numerically from equilibrium codes. A numerical code based on the formalism is used to study particle orbits in circular and bean-shaped tokamak configurations

  6. Beamlines on Indus-1 with special reference to a toroidal grating monochromator based beamline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief account of the beamlines available on Indus-1 and typical applications is given. A toroidal grating monochromator based beamline is discussed with more details. By performing the design calculations sing ray tracing one can obtain a reasonable idea about the characteristics of the beam with respect to resolution, photon flux and the spot size. In the case of the above mentioned beamline the spot size at the sample will be 2 mm x 0.5 mm and a photon flux of 1012 photons/sec. at 100 mA Indus-1 current. This will help the experimentalists to plan their experiment on Indus-1 toroidal grating monochromator beamline

  7. Stability properties of a toroidal z-pinch in an external magnetic multipole field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MHD stability of m=1, axisymmetric, external modes of a toroidal z-pinch immersed in an external multipole field (Extrap configuration) is studied. The description includes the effects of a weak toroidicity, a non-circular plasma cross-section and the influence of induced currents in the external conductors. It is found that the non-circularity of the plasma cross-section always has a destabilizing effect but that the m=1 mode can be stabilized by the external feedback if the non-circularity is small. (author)

  8. Entropy of quantum field in toroidal black hole without brick wall

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Bo-Bo

    2008-01-01

    In this paper the entropy of a toroidal black hole due to a scalar field is investigated by using the DLM scheme.The entropy is renormalized to the standard Bekenstein-Hawking formula with a one-loop correction arising from the higher curvature terms of the gravitational action. For the scalar field,the renormalized Newton constant and two renormalized coupling constants in the toroidal black hole are the same as those in the Reissner-Nordstrom black hole except for other one.

  9. Role of Pressure Gradient on Intrinsic Toroidal Rotation in Tokamak Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The toroidal plasma rotation generated by the external momentum input and by the plasma itself (intrinsic rotation) has been separated through a novel momentum transport analysis in the JT-60U tokamak device. The toroidal rotation, which is not determined by the momentum transport coefficients and the external momentum input, has been observed. It is found that this intrinsic rotation is locally determined by the local pressure gradient and increases with increasing pressure gradient. This trend is almost the same for various plasmas: low and high confinement mode, co and counterrotating plasmas

  10. Characterisation of the Interaction between Toroidal Vortex Structures and Flame Front Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, E. J.; Hargrave, G. K.; Jarvis, S.; Justham, T.; Halliwell, N.

    2006-07-01

    Experimental laser diagnostic data is presented for flame characterisation during interactions with toroidal vortices generated in the wake of an annular obstacle. A novel twin section combustion chamber has been utilised to allow the controlled formation of stable eddy structures into which a flame front can propagate. High speed laser sheet visualisation was employed to record the flow field and flame front temporal development and high-speed digital particle image velocimetry was used to quantify the velocity field of the unburnt mixture ahead of the flame front. Results provide characterisation of the toroidal vortex/flame front interaction for a range of vortex scales of and recirculation strengths.

  11. Characterisation of the Interaction between Toroidal Vortex Structures and Flame Front Propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental laser diagnostic data is presented for flame characterisation during interactions with toroidal vortices generated in the wake of an annular obstacle. A novel twin section combustion chamber has been utilised to allow the controlled formation of stable eddy structures into which a flame front can propagate. High speed laser sheet visualisation was employed to record the flow field and flame front temporal development and high-speed digital particle image velocimetry was used to quantify the velocity field of the unburnt mixture ahead of the flame front. Results provide characterisation of the toroidal vortex/flame front interaction for a range of vortex scales of and recirculation strengths

  12. Design and Measurement of Planar Toroidal Transformers for Very High Frequency Power Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knott, Arnold; Pejtersen, Jens

    2012-01-01

    core loss. The drawback of most air-core magnetics is that the magnetic field is not contained within a closed shape, and it is thus prone to cause electro magnetic interference. A toroidal air-core inductor configuration can be used to contain the magnetic field. This work presents a novel air......-core toroidal transformer configuration for use in very high frequency power conversion applications. Two prototype transformers (10:10 and 12:12) have been implemented using conventional four layer printed circuit board technology. The transformers have been characterized by two port Z-parameters, which have...

  13. Bifurcation to 3D Helical Magnetic Equilibrium in an Axisymmetric Toroidal Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergerson, W. F.; Auriemma, F.; Chapman, B. E.; Ding, W. X.; Zanca, P.; Brower, D. L.; Innocente, P.; Lin, L.; Lorenzini, R.; Martines, E.; Momo, B.; Sarff, J. S.; Terranova, D.

    2011-12-01

    We report the first direct measurement of the internal magnetic field structure associated with a 3D helical equilibrium generated spontaneously in the core of an axisymmetric toroidal plasma containment device. Magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium bifurcation occurs in a reversed-field pinch when the innermost resonant magnetic perturbation grows to a large amplitude, reaching up to 8% of the mean field strength. Magnetic topology evolution is determined by measuring the Faraday effect, revealing that, as the perturbation grows, toroidal symmetry is broken and a helical equilibrium is established.

  14. Design and Comparison of a 1 MW / 5s HTS SMES with Toroidal and Solenoidal Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Morandi, Antonio; Gholizad, Babak; Grilli, Francesco; Sirois, Frédéric; Zermeño, Víctor M R

    2015-01-01

    The design of a HTS SMES coil with solenoidal and toroidal geometry is carried out based on a commercially available 2G HTS conductor. A SMES system of practical interest (1 MW / 5 s) is considered. The comparison between ideal toroidal and solenoidal geometry is first discussed and the criteria used for choosing the geometrical parameters of the coils' bore are explained. The design of the real coil is then carried out and the final amount of conductor needed is compared. A preliminary comparison of the two coils in terms of AC loss during one charge discharge cycle is also discussed.

  15. Turbulence simulations of blob formation and radial propagation in toroidally magnetized plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia, O.E.; Naulin, V.; Nielsen, A.H.;

    2006-01-01

    Two- dimensional numerical fluid turbulence simulations demonstrating the formation and radial propagation of blob structures in toroidally magnetized plasmas are presented and analysed in detail. A salient feature of the model is a linearly unstable edge plasma region with localized sources...... to a dynamical regulation by self- sustained differential rotation of the plasma layer. Radial propagation of the blob structures follows from a vertical charge polarization due to magnetic guiding centre drifts in the toroidally magnetized plasma. Statistical analysis of the particle density, radial electric...

  16. Using numerical simulations to extract parameters of toroidal electron plasmas from experimental data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ha, B. N.; Stoneking,, M. R.; Marler, Joan

    2009-01-01

    features of the induced image charge signal. This paper presents a numerical study which finds that the frequency of the image charge signal due to the toroidal version of the m=1 diocotron mode is proportional to the total trapped charge and inversely proportional to magnetic field strength......, as in the cylindrical case. In the toroidal case, additional information about the m=1 motion of the plasma can be obtained by analysis of the image charge signal amplitude and shape. Finally, results from the numerical simulations are compared to experimental data from the LNT II and plasma characteristics...

  17. A feasibility study of developing toroidal tanks for a spinning spacecraft. Part 2: Evaluation of fluid behavior in spinning toroidal tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, J. E.

    1974-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted for the purpose of evaluating propellant behavior characteristics in spinning toroidal tanks. The effects of typical mission requirements, and related phenomena upon propellant slosh and settling, and orientation and stability of the ullage were investigated in a subscale model tank under both one-g and low-g acceleration environments. Specific conditions included were axial acceleration, spin rate, spinrate change, and spacecraft wobble, both singly and in combination. Methanol and water in combination with appropriate spin-rates and accelerations of the scale model system were used to simulate the behavior of fluorine, nitrogen tetroxide, monomethylhydrazine, and hydrazine. The experimental results indicate that no major fluid behavior problems would be encountered with the use of toroidal tanks containing any of the four propellants in a proposed spin-stabilized orbiter spacecraft.

  18. Co-compact Gabor Systems on Locally Compact Abelian Groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Mads Sielemann; Lemvig, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    characterization results via the Zak transform. From these results we derive non-existence results for critically sampled continuous Gabor frames. We obtain general characterizations in time and in frequency domain of when two Gabor generators yield dual frames. Moreover, we prove the Walnut and Janssen......-compact subgroups. Our results only rely on the assumption that either one of the translation and modulation group (in some cases both) are co-compact subgroups of the time and frequency domain. This presentation offers a unified approach to the study of continuous and the discrete Gabor frames....

  19. Viral RNAs are unusually compact.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajaykumar Gopal

    Full Text Available A majority of viruses are composed of long single-stranded genomic RNA molecules encapsulated by protein shells with diameters of just a few tens of nanometers. We examine the extent to which these viral RNAs have evolved to be physically compact molecules to facilitate encapsulation. Measurements of equal-length viral, non-viral, coding and non-coding RNAs show viral RNAs to have among the smallest sizes in solution, i.e., the highest gel-electrophoretic mobilities and the smallest hydrodynamic radii. Using graph-theoretical analyses we demonstrate that their sizes correlate with the compactness of branching patterns in predicted secondary structure ensembles. The density of branching is determined by the number and relative positions of 3-helix junctions, and is highly sensitive to the presence of rare higher-order junctions with 4 or more helices. Compact branching arises from a preponderance of base pairing between nucleotides close to each other in the primary sequence. The density of branching represents a degree of freedom optimized by viral RNA genomes in response to the evolutionary pressure to be packaged reliably. Several families of viruses are analyzed to delineate the effects of capsid geometry, size and charge stabilization on the selective pressure for RNA compactness. Compact branching has important implications for RNA folding and viral assembly.

  20. Experimental demonstration of compact torus compression and acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tests of compact torus (CT) compression on the RACE device [Phys. Rev. Lett. 61, 2843 (1988)] have successfully demonstrated stable compression by a factor of 2 in radius, field amplification by factors of 2--3 to 20 kG, and compressed densities exceeding 1016 cm-3. The results are in good agreement with two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the CT dynamics. The CT is formed between a pair of coaxial conical conductors that serve as both a flux conserver for stable, symmetric formation and as electrodes for the compression and acceleration phases. The CT is compressed by JxB forces (poloidal current, toroidal field) when a 120 kV, 260 kJ capacitor bank is discharged across the electrodes. The CT reaches two-fold compression to a radius of 8 cm and a length of 20--30 cm near the time of peak current, 10 μsec (many Alfven times) after the accelerator fire time, and is subsequently accelerated in a 150 cm straight coaxial section to velocities in the range 1.5--6.5x107 cm/sec. A new set of acceleration/focusing electrodes 740 cm in length are projected to give an additional factor of 3 in radial compression with final velocities of 1--3x108 cm/sec (similar to previously achieved on RACE) and incident power densities of a few x1011 W/cm2. Compact torus accelerators scaled to multimegajoules have the potential to achieve unprecedented plasma velocities and power densities with many applications in high-energy-density physics