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Sample records for beta cell secretory

  1. Evaluation of beta-cell secretory capacity using glucagon-like peptide 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilsbøll, Tina; Nielsen, Mette Toft; Krarup, T

    2000-01-01

    Beta-cell secretory capacity is often evaluated with a glucagon test or a meal test. However, glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) is the most insulinotropic hormone known, and the effect is preserved in type 2 diabetic patients.......Beta-cell secretory capacity is often evaluated with a glucagon test or a meal test. However, glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) is the most insulinotropic hormone known, and the effect is preserved in type 2 diabetic patients....

  2. Deletion of glutamate dehydrogenase in beta-cells abolishes part of the insulin secretory response not required for glucose homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carobbio, Stefania; Frigerio, Francesca; Rubi, Blanca

    2009-01-01

    Insulin exocytosis is regulated in pancreatic ss-cells by a cascade of intracellular signals translating glucose levels into corresponding secretory responses. The mitochondrial enzyme glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) is regarded as a major player in this process, although its abrogation has not bee...... weight gain was preserved. The results demonstrate that GDH is essential for the full development of the secretory response in beta-cells. However, maximal secretory capacity is not required for maintenance of glucose homeostasis in normo-caloric conditions....

  3. [Analysis of the effect of diabetes type 2 duration on beta cell secretory function and insulin resistance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popović, Ljiljana; Zamaklar, Miroslava; Lalić, Katarina; Vasović, Olga

    2006-01-01

    Diabetes type 2 is a chronic metabolic disorder. Pathogenesis of diabetes type 2 results from the impaired insulin secretion, impaired insulin action and increased endogenous glucose production. Diabetes evolves through several phases characterized by qualitative and quantitative changes of beta cell secretory function. The aim of our study was to analyze the impact of diabetes duration on beta cell secretory function and insulin resistance. The results indicated significant negative correlation of diabetes duration and fasting insulinemia, as well as beta cell secretory function assessed by HOMA beta index. Our study also found significant negative correlation of diabetes duration and insulin resistance assessed by HOMA IR index. Significant positive correlation was established between beta cell secretory capacity (fasting insulinemia and HOMA beta) and insulin resistance assessed by HOMA IR index, independently of diabetes duration. These results indicate that: beta cell secretory capacity, assessed by HOMA beta index, significantly decreases with diabetes duration. In parallel with decrease of fasting insulinemia, reduction of insulin resistance assessed by HOMA IR index was found as well.

  4. Analysis of the effect of diabetes type 2 duration on beta cell secretory function and insulin resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popović Ljiljana

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes type 2 is a chronic metabolic disorder. Pathogenesis of diabetes type 2 results from the impaired insulin secretion, impaired insulin action and increased endogenous glucose production. Diabetes evolves through several phases characterized by qualitative and quantitative changes of beta cell secretory function. The aim of our study was to analyze the impact of diabetes duration on beta cell secretory function and insulin resistance. The results indicated significant negative correlation of diabetes duration and fasting insulinemia, as well as beta cell secretory function assessed by HOMA β index. Our study also found significant negative correlation of diabetes duration and insulin resistance assessed by HOMA IR index. Significant positive correlation was established between beta cell secretory capacity (fasting insulinemia and HOMA β and insulin resistance assessed by HOMA IR index, independently of diabetes duration. These results indicate that: beta cell secretory capacity, assessed by HOMA β index, significantly decreases with diabetes duration. In parallel with decrease of fasting insulinemia, reduction of insulin resistance assessed by HOMA IR index was found as well.

  5. Molecular mechanisms involved in secretory vesicle recruitment to the plasma membrane in beta-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varadi, Aniko; Ainscow, E K; Allan, V J; Rutter, G A

    2002-04-01

    Glucose stimulates the release of insulin in part by activating the recruitment of secretory vesicles to the cell surface. While this movement is known to be microtubule-dependent, the molecular motors involved are undefined. Active kinesin was found to be essential for vesicle translocation in live beta-cells, since microinjection of cDNA encoding dominant-negative KHC(mut) (motor domain of kinesin heavy chain containing a Thr(93)-->Asn point mutation) blocked vesicular movements. Moreover, expression of KHC(mut) strongly inhibited the sustained, but not acute, stimulation of secretion by glucose. Thus, vesicles released during the first phase of insulin secretion exist largely within a translocation-independent pool. Kinesin-driven anterograde movement of vesicles is then necessary for the sustained (second phase) of insulin release. Kinesin may, therefore, represent a novel target for increases in intracellular ATP concentrations in response to elevated extracellular glucose and may be involved in the ATP-sensitive K+channel-independent stimulation of secretion by the sugar.

  6. Glucose metabolism and glutamate analog acutely alkalinize pH of insulin secretory vesicles of pancreatic beta-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eto, Kazuhiro; Yamashita, Tokuyuki; Hirose, Kenzo; Tsubamoto, Yoshiharu; Ainscow, Edward K; Rutter, Guy A; Kimura, Satoshi; Noda, Mitsuhiko; Iino, Masamitsu; Kadowaki, Takashi

    2003-08-01

    We studied acute changes of secretory vesicle pH in pancreatic beta-cells with a fluorescent pH indicator, lysosensor green DND-189. Fluorescence was decreased by 0.66 +/- 0.10% at 149 +/- 16 s with 22.2 mM glucose stimulation, indicating that vesicular pH was alkalinized by approximately 0.016 unit. Glucose-responsive pH increase was observed when cytosolic Ca2+ influx was blocked but disappeared when an inhibitor of glycolysis or mitochondrial ATP synthase was present. Glutamate dimethyl ester (GME), a plasma membrane-permeable analog of glutamate, potentiated glucose-stimulated insulin secretion at 5 mM without changing cellular ATP content or cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]). Application of GME at basal glucose concentration decreased DND-189 fluorescence by 0.83 +/- 0.19% at 38 +/- 2 s. These results indicated that the acutely alkalinizing effect of glucose on beta-cell secretory vesicle pH was dependent on glucose metabolism but independent of modulations of cytosolic [Ca2+]. Moreover, glutamate derived from glucose may be one of the mediators of this alkalinizing effect of glucose, which may have potential relevance to the alteration of secretory function by glutamate.

  7. The Fas pathway is involved in pancreatic beta cell secretory function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schumann, Desiree M; Maedler, Kathrin; Franklin, Isobel

    2007-01-01

    Pancreatic beta cell mass and function increase in conditions of enhanced insulin demand such as obesity. Failure to adapt leads to diabetes. The molecular mechanisms controlling this adaptive process are unclear. Fas is a death receptor involved in beta cell apoptosis or proliferation, depending......-kappaB-inducing kinase and RelB. This led to increased PDX-1 and insulin production independent of changes in cell turnover. The results support a previously undescribed role for the Fas pathway in regulating insulin production and release....

  8. Characterization of phospholipids in insulin secretory granules and mitochondria in pancreatic beta cells and their changes with glucose stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Michael J; Ade, Lacmbouh; Ntambi, James M; Ansari, Israr-Ul H; Stoker, Scott W

    2015-04-24

    The lipid composition of insulin secretory granules (ISG) has never previously been thoroughly characterized. We characterized the phospholipid composition of ISG and mitochondria in pancreatic beta cells without and with glucose stimulation. The phospholipid/protein ratios of most phospholipids containing unsaturated fatty acids were higher in ISG than in whole cells and in mitochondria. The concentrations of negatively charged phospholipids, phosphatidylserine, and phosphatidylinositol in ISG were 5-fold higher than in the whole cell. In ISG phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylethanolamine, and sphingomyelin, fatty acids 12:0 and 14:0 were high, as were phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylinositol containing 18-carbon unsaturated FA. With glucose stimulation, the concentration of many ISG phosphatidylserines and phosphatidylinositols increased; unsaturated fatty acids in phosphatidylserine increased; and most phosphatidylethanolamines, phosphatidylcholines, sphingomyelins, and lysophosphatidylcholines were unchanged. Unsaturation and shorter fatty acid length in phospholipids facilitate curvature and fluidity of membranes, which favors fusion of membranes. Recent evidence suggests that negatively charged phospholipids, such as phosphatidylserine, act as coupling factors enhancing the interaction of positively charged regions in SNARE proteins in synaptic or secretory vesicle membrane lipid bilayers with positively charged regions in SNARE proteins in the plasma membrane lipid bilayer to facilitate docking of vesicles to the plasma membrane during exocytosis. The results indicate that ISG phospholipids are in a dynamic state and are consistent with the idea that changes in ISG phospholipids facilitate fusion of ISG with the plasma membrane-enhancing glucose-stimulated insulin exocytosis.

  9. Involvement of conventional kinesin in glucose-stimulated secretory granule movements and exocytosis in clonal pancreatic beta-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varadi, Aniko; Ainscow, Edward K; Allan, Victoria J; Rutter, Guy A

    2002-11-01

    Recruitment of secretory vesicles to the cell surface is essential for the sustained secretion of insulin in response to glucose. At present, the molecular motors involved in this movement, and the mechanisms whereby they may be regulated, are undefined. To investigate the role of kinesin family members, we labelled densecore vesicles in clonal beta-cells using an adenovirally expressed, vesicle-targeted green fluorescent protein (phogrin.EGFP), and employed immunoadsorption to obtain highly purified insulin-containing vesicles. Whereas several kinesin family members were expressed in this cell type, only conventional kinesin heavy chain (KHC) was detected in vesicle preparations. Expression of a dominant-negative KHC motor domain (KHC(mut)) blocked all vesicular movements with velocity >0.4 micro m second(-1), which demonstrates that kinesin activity was essential for vesicle motility in live beta-cells. Moreover, expression of KHC(mut) strongly inhibited the sustained, but not acute, stimulation of secretion by glucose. Finally, vesicle movement was stimulated by ATP dose-dependently in permeabilized cells, which suggests that glucose-induced increases in cytosolic [ATP] mediate the effects of the sugar in vivo, by enhancing kinesin activity. These data therefore provide evidence for a novel mechanism whereby glucose may enhance insulin release.

  10. Phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase serves as a metabolic sensor and regulates priming of secretory granules in pancreatic beta cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Hervør L; Hoy, Marianne; Zhang, Wei;

    2003-01-01

    on phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase (PI 4-kinase) activity and that inhibition of this enzyme suppresses glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Intracellular application of phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P(2)] stimulated exocytosis by promoting the priming of secretory...

  11. Unremitting Cell Proliferation in the Secretory Phase of Eutopic Endometriosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco-Murillo, Yanira; Miranda-Rodríguez, José Antonio; Rendón-Huerta, Erika; Montaño, Luis F.; Cornejo, Gerardo Velázquez; Gómez, Lucila Poblano; Valdez-Morales, Francisco Javier; Gonzalez-Sanchez, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Endometriosis is linked to altered cell proliferation and stem cell markers c-kit/stem cell factor (SCF) in ectopic endometrium. Our aim was to investigate whether c-kit/SCF also plays a role in eutopic endometrium. Design: Eutopic endometrium obtained from 35 women with endometriosis and 25 fertile eumenorrheic women was analyzed for in situ expression of SCF/c-kit, Ki67, RAC-alpha serine/threonine-protein kinase (Akt), phosphorylated RAC-alpha serine/threonin-protein kinase (pAkt), Glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK3β), and phosphorylated glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (pGSK3β), throughout the menstrual cycle. Results: Expression of Ki67 and SCF was higher in endometriosis than in control tissue (P < .05) and greater in secretory rather than proliferative (P < .01) endometrium in endometriosis. Expression of c-kit was also higher in endometriosis although similar in both phases. Expression of Akt and GSK3β was identical in all samples and cycle phases, whereas pAkt and pGSK3β, opposed to control tissue, remained overexpressed in the secretory phase in endometriosis. Conclusion: Unceasing cell proliferation in the secretory phase of eutopic endometriosis is linked to deregulation of c-kit/SCF-associated signaling pathways. PMID:25194152

  12. Rab18 inhibits secretory activity in neuroendocrine cells by interacting with secretory granules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez-Martinez, Rafael; Cruz-Garcia, David; Duran-Prado, Mario; Peinado, Juan R; Castaño, Justo P; Malagon, Maria M

    2007-07-01

    Rab proteins comprise a complex family of small GTPases involved in the regulation of intracellular membrane trafficking and reorganization. In this study, we identified Rab18 as a new inhibitory player of the secretory pathway in neuroendocrine cells. In adrenal chromaffin PC12 cells and pituitary AtT20 cells, Rab18 is located at the cytosol but associates with a subpopulation of secretory granules after stimulation of the regulated secretory pathway, strongly suggesting that induction of secretion provokes Rab18 activation and recruitment to these organelles. In support of this, a dominant-inactive Rab18 mutant was found to distribute diffusely in the cytosol, whereas a dominant-active Rab18 mutant was predominantly associated to secretory granules. Furthermore, interaction of Rab18 with secretory granules was associated to an inhibition in the secretory activity of PC12 and AtT20 cells in response to stimulatory challenges. Association of Rab18 with secretory granules was also observed by immunoelectron microscopy in normal, non-tumoral endocrine cells (pituitary melanotropes), wherein Rab18 protein content is inversely correlated to the level of secretory activity of cells. Taken together, these findings suggest that, in neuroendocrine cells, Rab18 acts as a negative regulator of secretory activity, likely by impairing secretory granule transport.

  13. Remodeling of bovine oviductal epithelium by mitosis of secretory cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Sayaka; Kobayashi, Yoshihiko; Yamamoto, Yuki; Kimura, Koji; Okuda, Kiyoshi

    2016-11-01

    Two types of oviductal epithelial cells, secretory and ciliated, play crucial roles in the first days after fertilization in mammals. Secretory cells produce various molecules promoting embryo development, while ciliated cells facilitate transport of oocytes and zygotes by ciliary beating. The proportions of the two cell types change during the estrous cycle. The proportion of ciliated cells on the oviductal luminal surface is abundant at the follicular phase, whereas the proportion of secretory cells gradually increases with the formation of the corpus luteum. In the present study, we hypothesize that the proportions of ciliated and secretory epithelial cells are regulated by mitosis. The proportion of the cells being positive for FOXJ1 (a ciliated cell marker) or Ki67 (a mitosis marker) in epithelial cells during the estrous cycle were immunohistochemically examined. Ki67 and FOXJ1 or PAX8 (a secretory cell marker), were double-stained to clarify which types of epithelial cells undergo mitosis. In the ampulla, the percentage of FOXJ1-positive cells was highest at the day of ovulation (Day 0) and decreased by about 50 % by Days 8-12, while in the isthmus it did not change during the estrous cycle. The proportion of Ki67-positive cells was highest at around the time of ovulation in both the ampulla and isthmus. All the Ki67-positive cells were PAX8-positive and FOXJ1-negative in both the ampulla and isthmus. These findings suggest that epithelial remodeling, which is regulated by differentiation and/or proliferation of secretory cells of the oviduct, provides the optimal environment for gamete transport, fertilization and embryonic development.

  14. Characterization of mast cell secretory granules and their cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azouz, Nurit Pereg; Hammel, Ilan; Sagi-Eisenberg, Ronit

    2014-10-01

    Exocytosis and secretion of secretory granule (SG) contained inflammatory mediators is the primary mechanism by which mast cells exert their protective immune responses in host defense, as well as their pathological functions in allergic reactions and anaphylaxis. Despite their central role in mast cell function, the molecular mechanisms underlying the biogenesis and secretion of mast cell SGs remain largely unresolved. Early studies have established the lysosomal nature of the mast cell SGs and implicated SG homotypic fusion as an important step occurring during both their biogenesis and compound secretion. However, the molecular mechanisms that account for key features of this process largely remain to be defined. A novel high-resolution imaging based methodology allowed us to screen Rab GTPases for their phenotypic and functional impact and identify Rab networks that regulate mast cell secretion. This screen has identified Rab5 as a novel regulator of homotypic fusion of the mast cell SGs that thereby regulates their size and cargo composition.

  15. Identification and cloning of a novel isoform of mouse secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor, mSLPI-beta, overexpressed in murine leukemias and a highly liver metastatic tumor, IMC-HA1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, M; Arakawa, H; Nishimura, S

    1999-01-01

    Several genes showing transcriptional alteration in a highly liver metastatic murine carcinoma cell line, IMC-HA1, were identified by mRNA differential display system. Among them, a gene identical to mSLPI was isolated as mSLPI-alpha and -beta. They were produced through an alternative splicing. Their full-length cDNA sequences were determined, and their expression in various murine tumors and normal tissues was analysed. The deduced translation product of mSLPI-alpha showed 59% identity to hSLPI. Although mSLPI-beta had the same 103-amino-acid sequence from the carboxyl terminus, the amino terminus showed hydrophilicity opposite mSLPI-alpha or hSLPI. The mSLPI-alpha was expressed ubiquitously in various tumor cell lines. Interestingly, however, mSLPI-beta expression was only observed in P388 and L1210 leukemias and IMC-HA1 cells, and in lower amounts in three normal tissues (thymus, lung and spleen), suggesting that mSLPI, and in particular the unusual splicing product, mSLPI-beta, plays a specific role in these cells, including malignant processes of tumor cells.

  16. Beta cell dynamics: beta cell replenishment, beta cell compensation and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerf, Marlon E

    2013-10-01

    Type 2 diabetes, characterized by persistent hyperglycemia, arises mostly from beta cell dysfunction and insulin resistance and remains a highly complex metabolic disease due to various stages in its pathogenesis. Glucose homeostasis is primarily regulated by insulin secretion from the beta cells in response to prevailing glycemia. Beta cell populations are dynamic as they respond to fluctuating insulin demand. Beta cell replenishment and death primarily regulate beta cell populations. Beta cells, pancreatic cells, and extra-pancreatic cells represent the three tiers for replenishing beta cells. In rodents, beta cell self-replenishment appears to be the dominant source for new beta cells supported by pancreatic cells (non-beta islet cells, acinar cells, and duct cells) and extra-pancreatic cells (liver, neural, and stem/progenitor cells). In humans, beta cell neogenesis from non-beta cells appears to be the dominant source of beta cell replenishment as limited beta cell self-replenishment occurs particularly in adulthood. Metabolic states of increased insulin demand trigger increased insulin synthesis and secretion from beta cells. Beta cells, therefore, adapt to support their physiology. Maintaining physiological beta cell populations is a strategy for targeting metabolic states of persistently increased insulin demand as in diabetes.

  17. Regulation of beta cell replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Ying C; Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    2008-01-01

    Beta cell mass, at any given time, is governed by cell differentiation, neogenesis, increased or decreased cell size (cell hypertrophy or atrophy), cell death (apoptosis), and beta cell proliferation. Nutrients, hormones and growth factors coupled with their signalling intermediates have been...... suggested to play a role in beta cell mass regulation. In addition, genetic mouse model studies have indicated that cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases that determine cell cycle progression are involved in beta cell replication, and more recently, menin in association with cyclin-dependent kinase...... inhibitors has been demonstrated to be important in beta cell growth. In this review, we consider and highlight some aspects of cell cycle regulation in relation to beta cell replication. The role of cell cycle regulation in beta cell replication is mostly from studies in rodent models, but whether...

  18. Beta cell adaptation in pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    2016-01-01

    Pregnancy is associated with a compensatory increase in beta cell mass. It is well established that somatolactogenic hormones contribute to the expansion both indirectly by their insulin antagonistic effects and directly by their mitogenic effects on the beta cells via receptors for prolactin...... and growth hormone expressed in rodent beta cells. However, the beta cell expansion in human pregnancy seems to occur by neogenesis of beta cells from putative progenitor cells rather than by proliferation of existing beta cells. Claes Hellerström has pioneered the research on beta cell growth for decades...... in the expansion of the beta cell mass in human pregnancy, and the relative roles of endocrine factors and nutrients....

  19. Calcium dynamics in the secretory granules of neuroendocrine cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Javier

    2012-01-01

    Cellular Ca(2+)signaling results from a complex interplay among a variety of Ca(2+) fluxes going across the plasma membrane and across the membranes of several organelles, together with the buffering effect of large numbers of Ca(2+)-binding sites distributed along the cell architecture. Endoplasmic and sarcoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria and even nucleus have all been involved in cellular Ca(2+) signaling, and the mechanisms for Ca(2+) uptake and release from these organelles are well known. In neuroendocrine cells, the secretory granules also constitute a very important Ca(2+)-storing organelle, and the possible role of the stored Ca(2+) as a trigger for secretion has attracted considerable attention. However, this possibility is frequently overlooked, and the main reason for that is that there is still considerable uncertainty on the main questions related with granular Ca(2+) dynamics, e.g., the free granular [Ca(2+)], the physical state of the stored Ca(2+) or the mechanisms for Ca(2+) accumulation and release from the granules. This review will give a critical overview of the present state of knowledge and the main conflicting points on secretory granule Ca(2+) homeostasis in neuroendocrine cells.

  20. Epithelial Cell Culture from Human Adenoids: A Functional Study Model for Ciliated and Secretory Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia González

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Mucociliary transport (MCT is a defense mechanism of the airway. To study the underlying mechanisms of MCT, we have both developed an experimental model of cultures, from human adenoid tissue of ciliated and secretory cells, and characterized the response to local chemical signals that control ciliary activity and the secretion of respiratory mucins in vitro. Materials and Methods. In ciliated cell cultures, ciliary beat frequency (CBF and intracellular Ca2+ levels were measured in response to ATP, UTP, and adenosine. In secretory cultures, mucin synthesis and secretion were identified by using immunodetection. Mucin content was taken from conditioned medium and analyzed in the presence or absence of UTP. Results. Enriched ciliated cell monolayers and secretory cells were obtained. Ciliated cells showed a basal CBF of 10.7 Hz that increased significantly after exposure to ATP, UTP, or adenosine. Mature secretory cells showed active secretion of granules containing different glycoproteins, including MUC5AC. Conclusion. Culture of ciliated and secretory cells grown from adenoid epithelium is a reproducible and feasible experimental model, in which it is possible to observe ciliary and secretory activities, with a potential use as a model to understand mucociliary transport control mechanisms.

  1. Cx36 makes channels coupling human pancreatic beta-cells, and correlates with insulin expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Serre-Beinier, Veronique; Bosco, Domenico; Zulianello, Laurence; Charollais, Anne; Caille, Dorothee; Charpantier, Eric; Gauthier, Benoit R.; Diaferia, Giuseppe R.; Giepmans, Ben N.; Lupi, Roberto; Marchetti, Piero; Deng, Shaoping; Buhler, Leo; Berney, Thierry; Cirulli, Vincenzo; Meda, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have documented that the insulin-producing beta-cells of laboratory rodents are coupled by gap junction channels made solely of the connexin36 (Cx36) protein, and have shown that loss of this protein desynchronizes beta-cells, leading to secretory defects reminiscent of those observ

  2. Cx36 makes channels coupling human pancreatic beta-cells, and correlates with insulin expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Serre-Beinier, Veronique; Bosco, Domenico; Zulianello, Laurence; Charollais, Anne; Caille, Dorothee; Charpantier, Eric; Gauthier, Benoit R.; Diaferia, Giuseppe R.; Giepmans, Ben N.; Lupi, Roberto; Marchetti, Piero; Deng, Shaoping; Buhler, Leo; Berney, Thierry; Cirulli, Vincenzo; Meda, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have documented that the insulin-producing beta-cells of laboratory rodents are coupled by gap junction channels made solely of the connexin36 (Cx36) protein, and have shown that loss of this protein desynchronizes beta-cells, leading to secretory defects reminiscent of those observ

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  1. File list: DNS.Utr.50.AllAg.Fallopian_tube_secretory_epithelial_cell [Chip-atlas[Archive

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  4. File list: NoD.Utr.50.AllAg.Fallopian_tube_secretory_epithelial_cell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  5. Partitioning and Exocytosis of Secretory Granules during Division of PC12 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nickolay Vassilev Bukoreshtliev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The biogenesis, maturation, and exocytosis of secretory granules in interphase cells have been well documented, whereas the distribution and exocytosis of these hormone-storing organelles during cell division have received little attention. By combining ultrastructural analyses and time-lapse microscopy, we here show that, in dividing PC12 cells, the prominent peripheral localization of secretory granules is retained during prophase but clearly reduced during prometaphase, ending up with only few peripherally localized secretory granules in metaphase cells. During anaphase and telophase, secretory granules exhibited a pronounced movement towards the cell midzone and, evidently, their tracks colocalized with spindle microtubules. During cytokinesis, secretory granules were excluded from the midbody and accumulated at the bases of the intercellular bridge. Furthermore, by measuring exocytosis at the single granule level, we showed, that during all stages of cell division, secretory granules were competent for regulated exocytosis. In conclusion, our data shed new light on the complex molecular machinery of secretory granule redistribution during cell division, which facilitates their release from the F-actin-rich cortex and active transport along spindle microtubules.

  6. Co-culture of clonal beta cells with GLP-1 and glucagon-secreting cell line impacts on beta cell insulin secretion, proliferation and susceptibility to cytotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Alastair D; Vasu, Srividya; Moffett, R Charlotte; Flatt, Peter R

    2016-06-01

    We investigated the direct effects on insulin releasing MIN6 cells of chronic exposure to GLP-1, glucagon or a combination of both peptides secreted from GLUTag L-cell and αTC1.9 alpha-cell lines in co-culture. MIN6, GLUTag and αTC1.9 cell lines exhibited high cellular hormone content and release of insulin, GLP-1 and glucagon, respectively. Co-culture of MIN6 cells with GLUTag cells significantly increased cellular insulin content, beta-cell proliferation, insulin secretory responses to a range of established secretogogues and afforded protection against exposure cytotoxic concentrations of glucose, lipid, streptozotocin or cytokines. Benefits of co-culture of MIN6 cells with αTC1.9 alphacells were limited to enhanced beta-cell proliferation with marginal positive actions on both insulin secretion and cellular protection. In contrast, co-culture of MIN6 with GLUTag cells plus αTC1.9 cells, markedly enhanced both insulin secretory responses and protection against beta-cell toxins compared with co-culture with GLUTag cells alone. These data indicate important long-term effects of conjoint GLP-1 and glucagon exposure on beta-cell function. This illustrates the possible functional significance of alpha-cell GLP-1 production as well as direct beneficial effects of dual agonism at beta-cell GLP-1 and glucagon receptors.

  7. Ultrastructural immunohistochemical localization of Clara cell secretory protein in pulmonary epithelium of rabbits.

    OpenAIRE

    Patton, S E; Gupta, R. P.; Nishio, S.; Eddy, E M; Jetten, A. M.; Plopper, C. G.; Nettesheim, P; Hook, G E

    1991-01-01

    Highly purified Clara cells (93 +/- 3%) isolated from the lungs of rabbits were used to produce an antiserum against Clara cell secretory proteins. This antiserum was used to identify and study the biosynthesis and secretion of [35S]methionine-labeled proteins from isolated Clara cells. The antiserum recognized one major secretory protein with apparent molecular weight of 6 kDa and reacted weakly with a higher molecular weight protein of about 180 kDa. Biosynthesis and secretion of these prot...

  8. Beta cell adaptation in pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    2016-01-01

    Pregnancy is associated with a compensatory increase in beta cell mass. It is well established that somatolactogenic hormones contribute to the expansion both indirectly by their insulin antagonistic effects and directly by their mitogenic effects on the beta cells via receptors for prolactin and...

  9. Do Neural Cells Communicate with Endothelial Cells via Secretory Exosomes and Microvesicles?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil R. Smalheiser

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurons, glial, cells, and brain tumor cells tissues release small vesicles (secretory exosomes and microvesicles, which may represent a novel mechanism by which neuronal activity could influence angiogenesis within the embryonic and mature brain. If CNS-derived vesicles can enter the bloodstream as well, they may communicate with endothelial cells in the peripheral circulation and with cells concerned with immune surveillance.

  10. The use of lectins as markers for differentiated secretory cells in planarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zayas, Ricardo M; Cebrià, Francesc; Guo, Tingxia; Feng, Junjie; Newmark, Phillip A

    2010-11-01

    Freshwater planarians have reemerged as excellent models to investigate mechanisms underlying regeneration. The introduction of molecular tools has facilitated the study of planarians, but cell- and tissue-specific markers are still needed to examine differentiation of most cell types. Here we report the utility of fluorescent lectin-conjugates to label tissues in the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea. We show that 16 lectin-conjugates stain planarian cells or tissues; 13 primarily label the secretory cells, their cytoplasmic projections, and terminal pores. Thus, we examined regeneration of the secretory system using lectin markers and functionally characterized two genes expressed in the secretory cells: marginal adhesive gland-1 (mag-1) and Smed-reticulocalbin1 (Smed-rcn1). RNAi knockdown of these genes caused a dramatic reduction of secretory cell lectin staining, suggesting a role for mag-1 and Smed-rcn1 in secretory cell differentiation. Our results provide new insights into planarian secretory system regeneration and add new markers for labeling several planarian tissues.

  11. Expression of ODC Antizyme Inhibitor 2 (AZIN2 in Human Secretory Cells and Tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiina Rasila

    Full Text Available Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC antizyme inhibitor 2 (AZIN2, originally called ODCp, is a regulator of polyamine synthesis that we originally identified and cloned. High expression of ODCp mRNA was found in brain and testis. We reported that AZIN2 is involved in regulation of cellular vesicle transport and / or secretion, but the ultimate physiological role(s of AZIN2 is still poorly understood. In this study we used a peptide antibody (K3 to human AZIN2 and by immunohistochemistry mapped its expression in various normal tissues. We found high expression in the nervous system, in type 2 pneumocytes in the lung, in megakaryocytes, in gastric parietal cells co-localized with H,K-ATPase beta subunit, in selected enteroendocrine cells, in acinar cells of sweat glands, in podocytes, in macula densa cells and epithelium of collecting ducts in the kidney. The high expression of AZIN2 in various cells with secretory or vesicle transport activity indicates that the polyamine metabolism regulated by AZIN2 is more significantly involved in these events than previously appreciated.

  12. Excretory-secretory products (ESP) from Fasciola hepatica induce tolerogenic properties in myeloid dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcón, Cristian; Carranza, Franco; Martínez, Fernando F; Knubel, Carolina P; Masih, Diana T; Motrán, Claudia C; Cervi, Laura

    2010-09-15

    Fasciola hepatica is a helminth trematode that migrates through the host tissues until reaching bile ducts where it becomes an adult. During its migration the parasite releases different excretory-secretory products (ESP), which are in contact with the immune system. In this study, we focused on the effect of ESP on the maturation and function of murine bone marrow derived-dendritic cells (DC). We found that the treatment of DC with ESP failed to induce a classical maturation of these cells, since ESP alone did not activate DC to produce any cytokines, although they impaired the ability of DC to be activated by TLR ligands and also their capacity to stimulate an allospecific response. In addition, using an in vitro ovalbumin peptide-restricted priming assay, ESP-treated DC exhibited a capacity to drive Th2 and regulatory T cell (Treg) polarization of CD4(+) cells from DO11.10 transgenic mice. This was characterized by increased IL-4, IL-5, IL-10 and TGF-beta production and the expansion of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) cells. Our results support the hypothesis that ESP from F. hepatica modulate the maturation and function of DC as part of a generalized immunosuppressive mechanism that involves a bias towards a Th2 response and Treg development.

  13. Insulin-producing cells generated from dedifferentiated human pancreatic beta cells expanded in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holger A Russ

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Expansion of beta cells from the limited number of adult human islet donors is an attractive prospect for increasing cell availability for cell therapy of diabetes. However, attempts at expanding human islet cells in tissue culture result in loss of beta-cell phenotype. Using a lineage-tracing approach we provided evidence for massive proliferation of beta-cell-derived (BCD cells within these cultures. Expansion involves dedifferentiation resembling epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT. Epigenetic analyses indicate that key beta-cell genes maintain open chromatin structure in expanded BCD cells, although they are not transcribed. Here we investigated whether BCD cells can be redifferentiated into beta-like cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: Redifferentiation conditions were screened by following activation of an insulin-DsRed2 reporter gene. Redifferentiated cells were characterized for gene expression, insulin content and secretion assays, and presence of secretory vesicles by electron microscopy. BCD cells were induced to redifferentiate by a combination of soluble factors. The redifferentiated cells expressed beta-cell genes, stored insulin in typical secretory vesicles, and released it in response to glucose. The redifferentiation process involved mesenchymal-epithelial transition, as judged by changes in gene expression. Moreover, inhibition of the EMT effector SLUG (SNAI2 using shRNA resulted in stimulation of redifferentiation. Lineage-traced cells also gave rise at a low rate to cells expressing other islet hormones, suggesting transition of BCD cells through an islet progenitor-like stage during redifferentiation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings demonstrate for the first time that expanded dedifferentiated beta cells can be induced to redifferentiate in culture. The findings suggest that ex-vivo expansion of adult human islet cells is a promising approach for generation of insulin-producing cells for

  14. Histological and histochemical characterization of the secretory cells of Choeradoplana iheringi Graff, 1899 (Platyhelminthes: Tricladida: Terricola

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. de Souza

    Full Text Available The present study aims at providing a detailed description of the histology, as well as the first histochemical characterization, of the secretory cells of the epidermis, pharynx, and copulatory organs of Choeradoplana iheringi, in order to give further support to studies on the physiology of these organs. The secretory cells are distinguished on the basis of secretion morphology and its staining properties, using trichrome methods and histochemical reactions. Four cell types open through the epidermis of Ch. iheringi, three of them secreting basic protein and a fourth containing glycosaminoglycan mucins. The epidermal lining cells store glycogen. In the pharynx, four secretory cell types were distinguished. Two types produce glycoprotein, a third type secretes basic protein, and another one produces glycosaminoglycan mucins. In the male copulatory organs, the prostatic vesicle receives four secretory cell types containing basic protein, except for one type which produces glycoprotein. The two secretory cell types opening into the male atrium secrete, respectively, glycoprotein, and glycosaminoglycan mucins. In the female copulatory organs, the female atrium and its proximal diverticulum, the vagina, receive two types of secretory cells producing, respectively, basic protein and glycosaminoglycan mucins. Another secretory cell type constitutes the so-called shell glands which open into the common glandular duct, secreting basic protein. The lining cells of the male and female atria produce a mucous secretion containing glycosaminoglycans. In addition, the lining epithelium of the female atrium presents an apical secretion of a proteic nature. The occurrence of a kind of spermatophore is reported for the first time for a species of Choeradoplana. This structure is located in the male or female atria in different specimens, and characterized by erythrophil, xanthophil, and/or mixed secretions associated with sperm.

  15. Modulation of dendritic cell function by Trichomonas vaginalis-derived secretory products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Min-Ji; Lee, Jong-Joo; Nam, Young Hee; Kim, Tae-Gyun; Chung, Youn Wook; Kim, Mikyoung; Choi, Ye-Eun; Shin, Myeong Heon; Kim, Hyoung-Pyo

    2015-02-01

    Trichomoniasis caused by the parasitic protozoan Trichomonas vaginalis is the most common sexually transmitted disease in the world. Dendritic cells are antigen presenting cells that initiate immune responses by directing the activation and differentiation of naïve T cells. In this study, we analyzed the effect of Trichomonas vaginalis-derived Secretory Products on the differentiation and function of dendritic cells. Differentiation of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells in the presence of T. vaginalis-derived Secretory Products resulted in inhibition of lipopolysaccharide-induced maturation of dendritic cells, down-regulation of IL-12, and up-regulation of IL-10. The protein components of T. vaginalis-derived Secretory Products were shown to be responsible for altered function of bone marrow- derived dendritic cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated that IL-12 expression was regulated at the chromatin level in T. vaginalis-derived Secretory Productstreated dendritic cells. Our results demonstrated that T. vaginalis- derived Secretory Products modulate the maturation and cytokine production of dendritic cells leading to immune tolerance.

  16. Glucose Driven Changes in Beta Cell Identity Are Important for Function and Possibly Autoimmune Vulnerability during the Progression of Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, Gordon C.; Bonner-Weir, Susan

    2017-01-01

    This commentary explores the hypothesis that when autoimmunity leads to a fall of beta cell mass during the progression of type 1 diabetes (T1D), rising glucose levels cause major changes in beta cell identity. This then leads to profound changes in secretory function and less well-understood changes in beta cell susceptibility to autoimmune destruction, which may influence of rate of progression of beta cell killing. PMID:28174593

  17. Monounsaturated fatty acids prevent the deleterious effects of palmitate and high glucose on human pancreatic beta-cell turnover and function

    OpenAIRE

    Maedler, Kathrin; Oberholzer, José; Bucher, Pascal Alain Robert; Spinas, Giatgen A.; Donath, Marc

    2003-01-01

    Glucotoxicity and lipotoxicity contribute to the impaired beta-cell function observed in type 2 diabetes. Here we examine the effect of saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids at different glucose concentrations on human beta-cell turnover and secretory function. Exposure of cultured human islets to saturated fatty acid and/or to an elevated glucose concentration for 4 days increased beta-cell DNA fragmentation and decreased beta-cell proliferation. In contrast, the monounsaturated palmitol...

  18. Dense core secretory vesicles revealed as a dynamic Ca(2+) store in neuroendocrine cells with a vesicle-associated membrane protein aequorin chimaera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, K J; Pinton, P; Varadi, A; Tacchetti, C; Ainscow, E K; Pozzan, T; Rizzuto, R; Rutter, G A

    2001-10-01

    The role of dense core secretory vesicles in the control of cytosolic-free Ca(2+) concentrations ([Ca(2+)](c)) in neuronal and neuroendocrine cells is enigmatic. By constructing a vesicle-associated membrane protein 2-synaptobrevin.aequorin chimera, we show that in clonal pancreatic islet beta-cells: (a) increases in [Ca(2+)](c) cause a prompt increase in intravesicular-free Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]SV), which is mediated by a P-type Ca(2+)-ATPase distinct from the sarco(endo) plasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase, but which may be related to the PMR1/ATP2C1 family of Ca(2+) pumps; (b) steady state Ca(2+) concentrations are 3-5-fold lower in secretory vesicles than in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) or Golgi apparatus, suggesting the existence of tightly bound and more rapidly exchanging pools of Ca(2+); (c) inositol (1,4,5) trisphosphate has no impact on [Ca(2+)](SV) in intact or permeabilized cells; and (d) ryanodine receptor (RyR) activation with caffeine or 4-chloro-3-ethylphenol in intact cells, or cyclic ADPribose in permeabilized cells, causes a dramatic fall in [Ca(2+)](SV). Thus, secretory vesicles represent a dynamic Ca(2+) store in neuroendocrine cells, whose characteristics are in part distinct from the ER/Golgi apparatus. The presence of RyRs on secretory vesicles suggests that local Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release from vesicles docked at the plasma membrane could participate in triggering exocytosis.

  19. Altered pulmonary response to hyperoxia in Clara cell secretory protein deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, C J; Mango, G W; Finkelstein, J N; Stripp, B R

    1997-08-01

    Clara cell secretory protein (CCSP) is an abundant component of the extracellular lining fluid of airways. Even though the in vivo function of CCSP is unknown, in vitro studies support a potential role of CCSP in the control of inflammatory responses. CCSP-deficient mice (CCSP -/-) were generated to investigate the in vivo function of this protein (13). In this study, we used hyperoxia exposure as a model to investigate phenotypic consequences of CCSP deficiency following acute lung injury. The pathologic response of the mouse lung to hyperoxia, and recovery of the lung, include inflammatory cell infiltrate and edema. Continuous exposure to > 95% O2 was associated with significantly reduced survival time among CCSP -/- mice as compared with strain-, age-, and sex-matched wild-type control mice. Differences in survival were associated with early onset of lung edema in CCSP -/- mice as compared with wild-type controls. To further investigate these differences in response, mice were exposed to > 95% O2 for either 48 h or 68 h with one group receiving 68 h of hyperoxia followed by room-air recovery. Lung RNA was characterized for changes in the abundance of cytokine messenger RNA (mRNA) using a ribonuclease (RNase) protection assay. After 68 h of hyperoxia, interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-1beta, and IL-3 mRNAs were 14-, 3-, and 2.5-fold higher, respectively, in CCSP -/- mice than in similarly exposed wild-type control mice. Increased expression of IL-1beta mRNA in hyperoxia-exposed CCSP -/- mice was localized principally within the lung parenchyma, suggesting that the effects of CCSP deficiency were not confined to the airway epithelium. We conclude that CCSP deficiency results in increased sensitivity to hyperoxia-induced lung injury as measured by increased mortality, early onset of lung edema, and induction of proinflammatory cytokine mRNAs.

  20. The cell outgrowth secretory endosome (COSE): a specialized compartment involved in neuronal morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberts, Philipp; Galli, Thierry

    2003-10-01

    The role of intracellular membrane trafficking in cellular morphogenesis is still unclear. We propose here a prominent function of a recently identified compartment that we propose to call the cell outgrowth secretory endosome (COSE), the exocytosis of which is controlled by the v-SNARE TIVAMP and by cell-cell adhesion.

  1. Localization of Cyclo-Oxygenase and Prostaglandin E2 in the Secretory Granule of the Mast Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    cascade during exocytosis. Keywords: Cyclo-oxygenase; Prostaglandin E2; Secretory granules; Mast cell ; Exocytosis; Lipid mediators; Inflammation; Arachidonic acid; Eicosanoids; Immunocytochemistry; Reprints. (KT)

  2. Dipeptidyl peptidase IV is sorted to the secretory granules in pancreatic islet A-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Mona Dam; Hansen, Gert Helge; Dabelsteen, Erik

    1993-01-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DP IV:EC 3.4.14.5) was localized in endocrine cells of pig pancreas by immunohistochemical and enzyme histochemical methods. Immunolight microscopy with both monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies demonstrated DP IV immunoreactivity in cells located in the peripheral part...... labeling using a monoclonal glucagon antibody as the second primary antibody. These results show that DP IV is sorted to secretory granules in the pig pancreatic islet A-cells. Furthermore, this secretory granule enzyme, as opposed to intestinal brush border DP IV, is suggested to be a soluble protein...

  3. Rab3D is critical for secretory granule maturation in PC12 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Kögel

    Full Text Available Neuropeptide- and hormone-containing secretory granules (SGs are synthesized at the trans-Golgi network (TGN as immature secretory granules (ISGs and complete their maturation in the F-actin-rich cell cortex. This maturation process is characterized by acidification-dependent processing of cargo proteins, condensation of the SG matrix and removal of membrane and proteins not destined to mature secretory granules (MSGs. Here we addressed a potential role of Rab3 isoforms in these maturation steps by expressing their nucleotide-binding deficient mutants in PC12 cells. Our data show that the presence of Rab3D(N135I decreases the restriction of maturing SGs to the F-actin-rich cell cortex, blocks the removal of the endoprotease furin from SGs and impedes the processing of the luminal SG protein secretogranin II. This strongly suggests that Rab3D is implicated in the subcellular localization and maturation of ISGs.

  4. Chronic antidiabetic sulfonylureas in vivo: reversible effects on mouse pancreatic beta-cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Sara Remedi

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pancreatic beta-cell ATP-sensitive potassium (K ATP channels are critical links between nutrient metabolism and insulin secretion. In humans, reduced or absent beta-cell K ATP channel activity resulting from loss-of-function K ATP mutations induces insulin hypersecretion. Mice with reduced K ATP channel activity also demonstrate hyperinsulinism, but mice with complete loss of K ATP channels (K ATP knockout mice show an unexpected insulin undersecretory phenotype. Therefore we have proposed an "inverse U" hypothesis to explain the response to enhanced excitability, in which excessive hyperexcitability drives beta-cells to insulin secretory failure without cell death. Many patients with type 2 diabetes treated with antidiabetic sulfonylureas (which inhibit K ATP activity and thereby enhance insulin secretion show long-term insulin secretory failure, which we further suggest might reflect a similar progression. METHODS AND FINDINGS: To test the above hypotheses, and to mechanistically investigate the consequences of prolonged hyperexcitability in vivo, we used a novel approach of implanting mice with slow-release sulfonylurea (glibenclamide pellets, to chronically inhibit beta-cell K ATP channels. Glibenclamide-implanted wild-type mice became progressively and consistently diabetic, with significantly (p < 0.05 reduced insulin secretion in response to glucose. After 1 wk of treatment, these mice were as glucose intolerant as adult K ATP knockout mice, and reduction of secretory capacity in freshly isolated islets from implanted animals was as significant (p < 0.05 as those from K ATP knockout animals. However, secretory capacity was fully restored in islets from sulfonylurea-treated mice within hours of drug washout and in vivo within 1 mo after glibenclamide treatment was terminated. Pancreatic immunostaining showed normal islet size and alpha-/beta-cell distribution within the islet, and TUNEL staining showed no evidence of apoptosis

  5. Intestinal Mucus Gel and Secretory Antibody are Barriers to Campylobacter jejuni Adherence to INT 407 Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-06-01

    An in vitro mucus assay was developed to study the role of mucus gel and secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA) in preventing attachment of Campylobacter ... jejuni to INT 407 cells. An overlay of rabbit small intestinal mucus was found to impede the attachment of C. jejuni to a monolayer of INT 407 cells

  6. Tracheobronchial epithelium of the sheep: IV. Lectin histochemical characterization of secretory epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariassy, A T; Plopper, C G; St George, J A; Wilson, D W

    1988-09-01

    Conventional histochemical characterization of the mucus secretory apparatus is often difficult to reconcile with the biochemical analysis of respiratory secretions. This study was designed to examine the secretory glycoconjugates in airways using lectins with biochemically defined affinities for main sugar residues of mucus. We used five biotinylated lectins--DBA (Dolichos biflorus) and SBA (Glycine max) for N-acetyl galactosamine (galNAc), BSA I (Bandeiraea simplicifolia) and PNA (Arachis hypogea) for galactose (gal), and UEA I (Ulex europeus)--for detection of fucose (fuc) in HgCl2-fixed, paraffin-embedded, serially sectioned trachea, lobar and segmental bronchi and bronchioles of nine sheep. Lectins selectively localized the carbohydrate residues in luminal secretions, on epithelial cell surfaces, and in secretory cells. In proximal airways, the major carbohydrate residues in luminal secretions, cell surfaces, goblet cells, and glands were fuc and gal-NAc. PNA reacted mainly with apical granules of less than 10% of goblet cells, and gal residues were only detected in some of the mucous cells and on basolateral cell surfaces. Distal airways contained sparse secretion in the lumen, mucous cells contained weakly reactive fuc and gal-NAc, and the epithelial surfaces of Clara cells contained gal. Sugars abundant in the airway secretions were also the major component of cells in glands. We conclude that there is a correlation between specific sugar residues in secretory cells, glycocalyx, and luminal secretions in proximal and distal airways. This suggests that lectins may be used to obtain information about airway secretory cell composition from respiratory secretions.

  7. Network reconstruction of the mouse secretory pathway applied on CHO cell transcriptome data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anne Mathilde; Kaas, Christian Schrøder; Brandl, Julian

    2017-01-01

    of the literature on the yeast, human, and mouse secretory pathway, we have compiled a comprehensive catalogue of characterized proteins with functional annotation and their interconnectivity. Thus we have established the most elaborate reconstruction (RECON) of the functional secretion pathway network to date...... regulation of protein secretion than healthy mouse cells.  Conclusions: The RECON of the secretory pathway represents a strong tool for interpretation of data related to protein secretion as illustrated with transcriptomic data of Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells, the main platform for mammalian protein...

  8. Zinc transport complexes contribute to the homeostatic maintenance of secretory pathway function in vertebrate cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Kaori; Yamazaki, Tomohiro; Ishida, Yoko; Suzuki, Tomoyuki; Oda, Kimimitsu; Nagao, Masaya; Yamaguchi-Iwai, Yuko; Kambe, Taiho

    2006-06-30

    Zinc transporters play important roles in a wide range of biochemical processes. Here we report an important function of ZnT5/ZnT6 hetero-oligomeric complexes in the secretory pathway. The activity of human tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (ALP) expressed in ZnT5(-)ZnT7(-/-) cells was significantly reduced compared with that expressed in wild-type cells as in the case of endogenous chicken tissue-nonspecific ALP activity. The inactive human tissue-nonspecific ALP in ZnT5(-)ZnT7(-/-) cells was degraded by proteasome-mediated degradation without being trafficked to the plasma membrane. ZnT5(-)ZnT7(-/-) cells showed exacerbation of the unfolded protein response as did the wild-type cells cultured under a zinc-deficient condition, revealing that both complexes play a role in homeostatic maintenance of secretory pathway function. Furthermore, we showed that expression of ZnT5 mRNA was up-regulated by the endoplasmic reticulum stress in various cell lines. The up-regulation of the hZnT5 transcript was mediated by transcription factor XBP1 through the TGACGTGG sequence in the hZnT5 promoter, and this sequence was highly conserved in the ZnT5 genes of mouse and chicken. These results suggest that zinc transport into the secretory pathway is strictly regulated for the homeostatic maintenance of secretory pathway function in vertebrate cells.

  9. The Role of Adenoid Mast Cells in the Pathogenesis of Secretory Otitis Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Faruk Oktay

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the possible role of adenoid mast cells in the etiology of secretory otitis media. Between 2001-2002, 25 patients with chronic adenoitis and chronic secretory otitis media and 25 patients with isolated adenoid hypertrophy were included to the study. Adenoidectomy performed to the all patients under general anesthesia. Adenoidectomy specimens were evaluated under the light microscopy and the number of mast cells were calculated for each patient. The number of mast cells were compared between two groups. The number of mast cells were between 4-84 in the otitis media with effusion and adenoid hypertrophy group (median:52, however it was between 2-63 (median: 23 in the isolated adenoid hypertrophy group. When comparing the two groups using Mann-Withney U test, the number of mast cells found to be significantly higher in the chronic secretory otitis media group (p<0.001.Based on our findings there is a relationship between increased adenoid mast cells and otitis media with effusion and these cells may have a possible role in the etiology of chronic secretory otitis media.

  10. Polyamines are present in mast cell secretory granules and are important for granule homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianni García-Faroldi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mast cell secretory granules accommodate a large number of components, many of which interact with highly sulfated serglycin proteoglycan (PG present within the granules. Polyamines (putrescine, spermidine and spermine are absolutely required for the survival of the vast majority of living cells. Given the reported ability of polyamines to interact with PGs, we investigated the possibility that polyamines may be components of mast cell secretory granules. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Spermidine was released by mouse bone marrow derived mast cells (BMMCs after degranulation induced by IgE/anti-IgE or calcium ionophore A23187. Additionally, both spermidine and spermine were detected in isolated mouse mast cell granules. Further, depletion of polyamines by culturing BMMCs with α-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO caused aberrant secretory granule ultrastructure, impaired histamine storage, reduced serotonin levels and increased β-hexosaminidase content. A proteomic approach revealed that DFMO-induced polyamine depletion caused an alteration in the levels of a number of proteins, many of which are connected either with the regulated exocytosis or with the endocytic system. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together, our results show evidence that polyamines are present in mast cell secretory granules and, furthermore, indicate an essential role of these polycations during the biogenesis and homeostasis of these organelles.

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  19. Beta Cell Workshop 2013 Kyoto

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heller, R Scott; Madsen, Ole D; Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    2013-01-01

    The very modern Kyoto International Conference Center provided the site for the 8th workshop on Beta cells on April 23-26, 2013. The preceding workshops were held in Boston, USA (1991); Kyoto, Japan (1994); Helsingør, Denmark (1997); Helsinki, Finland (2003); El Perello, Spain (2006); Peebles...

  20. Synthesis of Prostaglandins and Eicosanoids by the Mast Cell Secretory Granule

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    constituents of the so-called "slow reacting substance of anaphylaxis" (SRS-A) (1,3). Like many other cell types, the mast cell can incorporate exogenous...arachidonic acid into its cellular phospholipid. The stimulation of mast cells which have been pre-loaded with radioactive arachidonic acid can result in...synthesis of eicosanoids has not been identified. Recently, we found that the secretory granule of the quiescent mast cell contains a large amount of matrix

  1. The Arabidopsis P4-ATPase ALA3 localizes to the golgi and requires a beta-subunit to function in lipid translocation and secretory vesicle formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, Lisbeth Rosager; López-Marqués, Rosa Laura; McDowell, Stephen C; Okkeri, Juha; Licht, Dirk; Schulz, Alexander; Pomorski, Thomas; Harper, Jeffrey F; Palmgren, Michael Gjedde

    2008-03-01

    Vesicle budding in eukaryotes depends on the activity of lipid translocases (P(4)-ATPases) that have been implicated in generating lipid asymmetry between the two leaflets of the membrane and in inducing membrane curvature. We show that Aminophospholipid ATPase3 (ALA3), a member of the P(4)-ATPase subfamily in Arabidopsis thaliana, localizes to the Golgi apparatus and that mutations of ALA3 result in impaired growth of roots and shoots. The growth defect is accompanied by failure of the root cap to release border cells involved in the secretion of molecules required for efficient root interaction with the environment, and ala3 mutants are devoid of the characteristic trans-Golgi proliferation of slime vesicles containing polysaccharides and enzymes for secretion. In yeast complementation experiments, ALA3 function requires interaction with members of a novel family of plant membrane-bound proteins, ALIS1 to ALIS5 (for ALA-Interacting Subunit), and in this host ALA3 and ALIS1 show strong affinity for each other. In planta, ALIS1, like ALA3, localizes to Golgi-like structures and is expressed in root peripheral columella cells. We propose that the ALIS1 protein is a beta-subunit of ALA3 and that this protein complex forms an important part of the Golgi machinery required for secretory processes during plant development.

  2. Beta Cell Breakthroughs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... supply one person's insulin needs. Floating in a coffee cup–sized flask of reddish liquid in Melton's ... cells with nutrients and oxygen and transport their waste away. If the box is too big, only ...

  3. Lactadherin inhibits secretory phospholipase A2 activity on pre-apoptotic leukemia cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen Nyegaard

    Full Text Available Secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2 is a critical component of insect and snake venoms and is secreted by mammalian leukocytes during inflammation. Elevated secretory PLA2 concentrations are associated with autoimmune diseases and septic shock. Many sPLA2's do not bind to plasma membranes of quiescent cells but bind and digest phospholipids on the membranes of stimulated or apoptotic cells. The capacity of these phospholipases to digest membranes of stimulated or apoptotic cells correlates to the exposure of phosphatidylserine. In the present study, the ability of the phosphatidyl-L-serine-binding protein, lactadherin to inhibit phospholipase enzyme activity has been assessed. Inhibition of human secretory phospholipase A2-V on phospholipid vesicles exceeded 90%, whereas inhibition of Naja mossambica sPLA2 plateaued at 50-60%. Lactadherin inhibited 45% of activity of Naja mossambica sPLA2 and >70% of human secretory phospholipase A2-V on the membranes of human NB4 leukemia cells treated with calcium ionophore A23187. The data indicate that lactadherin may decrease inflammation by inhibiting sPLA2.

  4. Secretory leukocyte proteinase inhibitor-competent DNA deposits are potent stimulators of plasmacytoid dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skrzeczynska-Moncznik, Joanna; Wlodarczyk, Agnieszka; Zabieglo, Katarzyna

    2012-01-01

    Secretory leukocyte proteinase inhibitor (SLPI) is a well-established inhibitor of serine proteases such as human neutrophil elastase (HNE) and a NF-κB regulatory agent in immune cells. In this paper, we report that SLPI plays a previously uncharacterized role in regulating activation of plasmacy...

  5. Increased biogenesis of glucagon-containing secretory granules and glucagon secretion in BIG3-knockout mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyu Li

    2015-03-01

    Conclusions: Together with our previous studies, the current data reveal a conserved role for BIG3 in regulating alpha- and beta-cell functions. We propose that BIG3 negatively regulates hormone production at the secretory granule biogenesis stage and that such regulatory mechanism may be used in secretory pathways of other endocrine cells.

  6. Nuclear DNA content and ultrastructure of secretory cells of Vicia faba L. stigma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Wróbel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The object of study was the level of nuclear DNA and the ultrastructural transformations in the secretory cells of the stigma in Vicia faba L. It has been found that the stigmal cells which are active in biogenesis and exudate secretion are diploid cells whose differentiation starts from 2C DNA level. The presence of a population of nuclei with an amount DNA of about 2.5 C suggests that the metabolic activity of those cells may be regulated through supplementary incomplete replication. The ultrastructural transformations of secretory cells point to three stages of biogenesis and secretion of exudate. Stage I, before the start of the cell's secretory functions, is characterized by the development of the protein synthesizing apparatus and the activity of dictyosomes. In development stage II vesicular electron-transparent exudate is secreted. Stage III of exudate biogenesis is production of lipids. They form mainly in the plastids and are secreted with the involvement of the cell's vacuolar system.

  7. Kinetic evaluation of cell membrane hydrolysis during apoptosis by human isoforms of secretory phospholipase A2.

    OpenAIRE

    Olson, Erin D.; Nelson, Jennifer; Griffith, Katalyn; Nguyen, Thaothanh; Streeter, Michael; Wilson-Ashworth, Heather A.; Michael H Gelb; Judd, Allan M.; Bell, John D.

    2010-01-01

    Some isoforms of secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) distinguish between healthy and damaged or apoptotic cells. This distinction reflects differences in membrane physical properties. Because various sPLA2 isoforms respond differently to properties of artificial membranes such as surface charge, they should also behave differently as these properties evolve during a dynamic physiological process such as apoptosis. To test this idea, S49 lymphoma cell death was induced by glucocorticoid (6–48 h...

  8. Effect of fluoroquinolones on mitochondrial function in pancreatic beta cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaly, Hany; Jörns, Anne; Rustenbeck, Ingo

    2014-02-14

    Hyper- and hypoglycaemias are known side effects of fluoroquinolone antibiotics, resulting in a number of fatalities. Fluoroquinolone-induced hypoglycaemias are due to stimulated insulin release by the inhibition of the KATP channel activity of the beta cell. Recently, it was found that fluoroquinolones were much less effective on metabolically intact beta cells than on open cell preparations. Thus the intracellular effects of gatifloxacin, moxifloxacin and ciprofloxacin were investigated by measuring NAD(P)H- and FAD-autofluorescence, the mitochondrial membrane potential, and the adenine nucleotide content of isolated pancreatic islets and beta cells. 100 μM of moxifloxacin abolished the NAD(P)H increase elicited by 20mM glucose, while gatifloxacin diminished it and ciprofloxacin had no significant effect. This pattern was also seen with islets from SUR1 Ko mice, which have no functional KATP channels. Moxifloxacin also diminished the glucose-induced decrease of FAD-fluorescence, which reflects the intramitochondrial production of reducing equivalents. Moxifloxacin, but not ciprofloxacin or gatifloxacin significantly reduced the effect of 20mM glucose on the ATP/ADP ratio. The mitochondrial hyperpolarization caused by 20mM glucose was partially antagonized by moxifloxacin, but not by ciprofloxacin or gatifloxacin. Ultrastructural analyses after 20 h tissue culture showed that all three compounds (at 10 and 100 μM) diminished the number of insulin secretory granules and that gatifloxacin and ciprofloxacin, but not moxifloxacin induced fission/fusion configurations of the beta cell mitochondria. In conclusion, fluoroquinolones affect the function of the mitochondria in pancreatic beta cells which may diminish the insulinotropic effect of KATP channel closure and contribute to the hyperglycaemic episodes.

  9. The secretory peptide gene EPF1 enforces the stomatal one-cell-spacing rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Kenta; Kajita, Ryoko; Torii, Keiko U; Bergmann, Dominique C; Kakimoto, Tatsuo

    2007-07-15

    Stomata are innovations of land plants that allow regulated gas exchange. Stomatal precursor cells are produced by asymmetric cell division, and once formed, signal their neighbors to inhibit the formation of stomatal precursors in direct contact. We report a gene of Arabidopsis thaliana, EPIDERMAL PATTERNING FACTOR 1 (EPF1) that encodes a small secretory peptide expressed in stomatal cells and precursors and that controls stomatal patterning through regulation of asymmetric cell division. EPF1 activity is dependent on the TOO MANY MOUTHS receptor-like protein and ERECTA family receptor kinases, suggesting that EPF1 may provide a positional cue interpreted by these receptors.

  10. Intracellular ion concentrations and cell volume during cholinergic stimulation of eccrine secretory coil cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takemura, T.; Sato, F.; Saga, K.; Suzuki, Y.; Sato, K. (Univ. of Iowa College of Medicine, Iowa City (USA))

    1991-02-01

    Methacholine (MCh)-induced changes in intracellular concentrations of Na, K, and Cl (( Na)i, (K)i, and (Cl)i, respectively) and in cellular dry mass (a measure of cell shrinkage) were examined in isolated monkey eccrine sweat secretory coils by electron probe X-ray microanalysis using the peripheral standard method. To further confirm the occurrence of cell shrinkage during MCh stimulation, the change in cell volume of dissociated clear and dark cells were directly determined under a light microscope equipped with differential interference contrast (DIC) optics. X-ray microanalysis revealed a biphasic increase in cellular dry mass in clear cells during continuous MCh stimulation; an initial increase of dry mass to 158% (of control) followed by a plateau at 140%, which correspond to the decrease in cell volume of 37 and 29%, respectively. The latter agrees with the MCh-induced cell shrinkage of 29% in dissociated clear cells. The MCh-induced increase in dry mass in myoepithelial cells was less than half that of clear cells. During the steady state of MCh stimulation, both (K+)i and (Cl)i of clear cells decreased by about 45%, whereas (Na)i increased in such a way to maintain the sum of (Na) i + (K)i constant. There was a small (12-15 mM) increase in (Na)i and a decrease in (K)i in myoepithelial cells during stimulation with MCh. Dissociated dark cells failed to significantly shrink during MCh stimulation. The decrease in (Cl)i in the face of constant (Na)i + (K)i suggests the accumulation of unknown anion(s) inside the clear cell during MCh stimulation.

  11. Immunocytochemical detection of beta-defensins and cathelicidins in the secretory granules of the tongue in the lizard Anolis carolinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alibardi, Lorenzo

    2015-04-01

    Previous molecular studies indicated that antimicrobial peptides in lizard are expressed in the skin and tongue among other epithelial organs. The present ultrastructural immunogold study aimed to detect the specific location of three broadly expressed antimicrobial peptides in the tongue of the lizard Anolis carolinensis. The immunocytochemical study indicated that beta-defensin-15, the likely main defensin of granulocytes and skin, is poorly expressed in some dense and medium-dense granules of glandular cells of the papillated tongue. Conversely beta-defensin-27 appears highly expressed in numerous pale and cribriform dense granules of glandular cells and is also secreted on the tongue surface. The immunostaining for cathelicidin-1 indicated a variable but however positive immunolabeling in numerous granules in the tongue glands, suggesting that this antimicrobial peptide previously found on the epidermal surface is also present in the tongue secretions and participates to the formation of the anti-microbial oral barrier. The study suggests that among the numerous beta-defensins and cathelicidins identified in the genome of this lizard is present a specific distribution of different peptide subtypes in various body regions, including the tongue, and that these peptides contribute to the formation of local antimicrobial barriers.

  12. Nutrient sensing by absorptive and secretory progenies of small intestinal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishida, Kunihiro; Pearce, Sarah C; Yu, Shiyan; Gao, Nan; Ferraris, Ronaldo P

    2017-06-01

    Nutrient sensing triggers responses by the gut-brain axis modulating hormone release, feeding behavior and metabolism that become dysregulated in metabolic syndrome and some cancers. Except for absorptive enterocytes and secretory enteroendocrine cells, the ability of many intestinal cell types to sense nutrients is still unknown; hence we hypothesized that progenitor stem cells (intestinal stem cells, ISC) possess nutrient sensing ability inherited by progenies during differentiation. We directed via modulators of Wnt and Notch signaling differentiation of precursor mouse intestinal crypts into specialized organoids each containing ISC, enterocyte, goblet, or Paneth cells at relative proportions much higher than in situ as determined by mRNA expression and immunocytochemistry of cell type biomarkers. We identified nutrient sensing cell type(s) by increased expression of fructolytic genes in response to a fructose challenge. Organoids comprised primarily of enterocytes, Paneth, or goblet, but not ISC, cells responded specifically to fructose without affecting nonfructolytic genes. Sensing was independent of Wnt and Notch modulators and of glucose concentrations in the medium but required fructose absorption and metabolism. More mature enterocyte- and goblet-enriched organoids exhibited stronger fructose responses. Remarkably, enterocyte organoids, upon forced dedifferentiation to reacquire ISC characteristics, exhibited a markedly extended lifespan and retained fructose sensing ability, mimicking responses of some dedifferentiated cancer cells. Using an innovative approach, we discovered that nutrient sensing is likely repressed in progenitor ISCs then irreversibly derepressed during specification into sensing-competent absorptive or secretory lineages, the surprising capacity of Paneth and goblet cells to detect fructose, and the important role of differentiation in modulating nutrient sensing.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Small intestinal stem cells differentiate into several

  13. Clusters of conserved beta cell marker genes for assessment of beta cell phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geert A Martens

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND METHODOLOGY: The aim of this study was to establish a gene expression blueprint of pancreatic beta cells conserved from rodents to humans and to evaluate its applicability to assess shifts in the beta cell differentiated state. Genome-wide mRNA expression profiles of isolated beta cells were compared to those of a large panel of other tissue and cell types, and transcripts with beta cell-abundant and -selective expression were identified. Iteration of this analysis in mouse, rat and human tissues generated a panel of conserved beta cell biomarkers. This panel was then used to compare isolated versus laser capture microdissected beta cells, monitor adaptations of the beta cell phenotype to fasting, and retrieve possible conserved transcriptional regulators. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A panel of 332 conserved beta cell biomarker genes was found to discriminate both isolated and laser capture microdissected beta cells from all other examined cell types. Of all conserved beta cell-markers, 15% were strongly beta cell-selective and functionally associated to hormone processing, 15% were shared with neuronal cells and associated to regulated synaptic vesicle transport and 30% with immune plus gut mucosal tissues reflecting active protein synthesis. Fasting specifically down-regulated the latter cluster, but preserved the neuronal and strongly beta cell-selective traits, indicating preserved differentiated state. Analysis of consensus binding site enrichment indicated major roles of CREB/ATF and various nutrient- or redox-regulated transcription factors in maintenance of differentiated beta cell phenotype. CONCLUSIONS: Conserved beta cell marker genes contain major gene clusters defined by their beta cell selectivity or by their additional abundance in either neural cells or in immune plus gut mucosal cells. This panel can be used as a template to identify changes in the differentiated state of beta cells.

  14. Secretory vesicle transport velocity in living cells depends on the myosin-V lever arm length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schott, Daniel H; Collins, Ruth N; Bretscher, Anthony

    2002-01-01

    Myosins are molecular motors that exert force against actin filaments. One widely conserved myosin class, the myosin-Vs, recruits organelles to polarized sites in animal and fungal cells. However, it has been unclear whether myosin-Vs actively transport organelles, and whether the recently challenged lever arm model developed for muscle myosin applies to myosin-Vs. Here we demonstrate in living, intact yeast that secretory vesicles move rapidly toward their site of exocytosis. The maximal speed varies linearly over a wide range of lever arm lengths genetically engineered into the myosin-V heavy chain encoded by the MYO2 gene. Thus, secretory vesicle polarization is achieved through active transport by a myosin-V, and the motor mechanism is consistent with the lever arm model.

  15. Reversal by EGTA of the enhanced secretory responsiveness of mast cells due to treatment with ouabain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Torben; Knudsen, T; Bertelsen, Niels Haldor

    1990-01-01

    The effect of EGTA on the enhancement by ouabain of compound 48/80-induced secretion from mast cells was compared with the effect on the Na(+)-K+ pump activity. The time-dependent secretory enhancement by ouabain was blocked by addition of EGTA to the cell suspension concomitantly with the addition...... of ouabain, and EGTA caused a large increase in the pump activity. Addition of 10 microM EGTA to ouabain-treated cells stopped but did not reverse the enhancement. The experiments show that the effect of ouabain was due to changes in a calcium pool utilized in compound 48/80-induced secretion following...

  16. The Ultrastructure of Secretory Cells of the Islets of Langerhans in South American Catfish Rhamdia quelen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Luchini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work shows that a detailed description of the ultrastructure of the secretory cells of the South American catfish Rhamdia quelen pancreatic islets is presented. Evidence is offered to support the contention that the α-granules consist of a central and an outer portion of different electron densities and solubilities, that the δ-cells are most probably morphologically altered but viable α-cells, and that the β-granules possibly possess a repeating substructure and may therefore represent an intracellular crystalline storage form of insulin.

  17. Metabolic signalling in pancreatic beta cells

    OpenAIRE

    Piipari, K.

    2011-01-01

    The main function of pancreatic beta cells is to maintain correct glucose homeostasis within the body by secretion of insulin in response to increased blood glucose concentration. Beta cell dysfunction contributes to the pathogenesis of diabetes. Using transgenic mouse models, the work described in this thesis has investigated the role of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) in beta cell function and their role in the regulation of ...

  18. Monoclonal Antibodies as Probes for Unique Antigens in Secretory Cells of Mixed Exocrine Organs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basbaum, C. B.; Mann, J. K.; Chow, A. W.; Finkbeiner, W. E.

    1984-07-01

    In the past, it has been difficult to identify the secretory product and control mechanisms associated with individual cell types making up mixed exocrine organs. This report establishes the feasibility of using immunological methods to characterize both the biochemical constituents and regulatory mechanisms associated with secretory cells in the trachea. Monoclonal antibodies directed against components of tracheal mucus were produced by immunizing mice with dialyzed, desiccated secretions harvested from tracheal organ culture. An immunofluorescence assay revealed that of the total 337 hybridomas screened, 100 produced antibodies recognizing goblet cell granules; 64, gland cell granules; and 3, antigen confined to the ciliated apical surface of the epithelium. The tracheal goblet cell antibody described in this report was strongly cross-reactive with intestinal goblet cells, as well as with a subpopulation of submandibular gland cells, but not with cells of Brunner's glands or the ciliated cell apical membrane. The serous cell antibody was not cross-reactive with goblet, Brunner's gland, or submandibular cells, or the ciliated cell apical membrane. The antibody directed against the apical membrane of ciliated cells did not cross-react with gland or goblet cells or the apical membrane of epithelial cells in the duodenum. Monoclonal antibodies, therefore, represent probes by which products unique to specific cells or parts of cells in the trachea can be distinguished. The antibodies, when used in enzyme immunoassays, can be used to quantitatively monitor secretion by individual cell types under a variety of physiological and pathological conditions. They also provide the means for purification and characterization of cell-specific products by immunoaffinity chromatography.

  19. Lipopolysaccharide-binding protein: localization in secretory granules of Paneth cells in the mouse small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Gert H; Rasmussen, Karina; Niels-Christiansen, Lise-Lotte;

    2009-01-01

    in closer detail the synthesis and storage of LBP in the intestinal mucosal epithelium, we performed an immunolocalization of LBP in mouse small intestine. By immunofluorescence microscopy, an antibody recognizing the 58-60 kDa protein of LBP distinctly labeled a small population of cells located deep......Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-binding protein (LBP) is an acute-phase protein involved in the host's response to endotoxin and mainly synthesized and secreted to the blood by the liver. But in addition, LBP is also made by extrahepatic cells, including the enterocyte-like cell line Caco-2. To study...... into the crypts. This cell population was also positive for lysozyme and alpha-defensin 4, identifying Paneth cells as the main intestinal LBP-producing cells. By immunogold electron microscopy, intense labeling was observed in the secretory granules of these cells. We conclude that Paneth cells express LBP...

  20. The Fas pathway is involved in pancreatic β cell secretory function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Desiree M.; Maedler, Kathrin; Franklin, Isobel; Konrad, Daniel; Størling, Joachim; Böni-Schnetzler, Marianne; Gjinovci, Asllan; Kurrer, Michael O.; Gauthier, Benoit R.; Bosco, Domenico; Andres, Axel; Berney, Thierry; Greter, Melanie; Becher, Burkhard; Chervonsky, Alexander V.; Halban, Philippe A.; Mandrup-Poulsen, Thomas; Wollheim, Claes B.; Donath, Marc Y.

    2007-01-01

    Pancreatic β cell mass and function increase in conditions of enhanced insulin demand such as obesity. Failure to adapt leads to diabetes. The molecular mechanisms controlling this adaptive process are unclear. Fas is a death receptor involved in β cell apoptosis or proliferation, depending on the activity of the caspase-8 inhibitor FLIP. Here we show that the Fas pathway also regulates β cell secretory function. We observed impaired glucose tolerance in Fas-deficient mice due to a delayed and decreased insulin secretory pattern. Expression of PDX-1, a β cell-specific transcription factor regulating insulin gene expression and mitochondrial metabolism, was decreased in Fas-deficient β cells. As a consequence, insulin and ATP production were severely reduced and only partly compensated for by increased β cell mass. Up-regulation of FLIP enhanced NF-κB activity via NF-κB-inducing kinase and RelB. This led to increased PDX-1 and insulin production independent of changes in cell turnover. The results support a previously undescribed role for the Fas pathway in regulating insulin production and release. PMID:17299038

  1. Spatial partitioning of secretory cargo from Golgi resident proteins in live cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    White Jamie

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To maintain organelle integrity, resident proteins must segregate from itinerant cargo during secretory transport. However, Golgi resident enzymes must have intimate access to secretory cargo in order to carry out glycosylation reactions. The amount of cargo and associated membrane may be significant compared to the amount of Golgi membrane and resident protein, but upon Golgi exit, cargo and resident are efficiently sorted. How this occurs in live cells is not known. Results We observed partitioning of the fluorescent Golgi resident T2-CFP and fluorescent cargo proteins VSVG3-YFP or VSVG3-SP-YFP upon Golgi exit after a synchronous pulse of cargo was released from the ER. Golgi elements remained stable in overall size, shape and relative position as cargo emptied. Cargo segregated from resident rapidly by blebbing into micron-sized domains that contained little or no detectable resident protein and that appeared to be continuous with the parent Golgi element. Post-Golgi transport carriers (TCs exited repeatedly from these domains. Alternatively, entire cargo domains exited Golgi elements, forming large TCs that fused directly with the plasma membrane. However, domain formation did not appear to be an absolute prerequisite for TC exit, since TCs also exited directly from Golgi elements in the absence of large domains. Quantitative cargo-specific photobleaching experiments revealed transfer of cargo between Golgi regions, but no discrete intra-Golgi TCs were observed. Conclusions Our results establish domain formation via rapid lateral partitioning as a general cellular strategy for segregating different transmembrane proteins along the secretory pathway and provide a framework for consideration of molecular mechanisms of secretory transport.

  2. Clusters of conserved beta cell marker genes for assessment of beta cell phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martens, Geert A; Jiang, Lei; Hellemans, Karine H

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish a gene expression blueprint of pancreatic beta cells conserved from rodents to humans and to evaluate its applicability to assess shifts in the beta cell differentiated state. Genome-wide mRNA expression profiles of isolated beta cells were compared to those...

  3. Clusters of conserved beta cell marker genes for assessment of beta cell phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martens, Geert A; Jiang, Lei; Hellemans, Karine H

    2011-01-01

    of a large panel of other tissue and cell types, and transcripts with beta cell-abundant and -selective expression were identified. Iteration of this analysis in mouse, rat and human tissues generated a panel of conserved beta cell biomarkers. This panel was then used to compare isolated versus laser capture......The aim of this study was to establish a gene expression blueprint of pancreatic beta cells conserved from rodents to humans and to evaluate its applicability to assess shifts in the beta cell differentiated state. Genome-wide mRNA expression profiles of isolated beta cells were compared to those...

  4. Connexins and beta-cell functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cigliola, V.; Chellakudam, V.; Arabi Eter, W.; Meda, P.

    2013-01-01

    Proper functioning of pancreatic islets requires that numerous beta-cells are properly coordinated. With evolution, many mechanisms have converged, which now allow individual beta-cells to sense the state of activity of their neighbors as well as the changes taking place in the extracellular medium,

  5. De novo epidermal regeneration using human eccrine sweat gland cells: higher competence of secretory over absorptive cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontiggia, Luca; Biedermann, Thomas; Böttcher-Haberzeth, Sophie; Oliveira, Carol; Braziulis, Erik; Klar, Agnieszka S; Meuli-Simmen, Claudia; Meuli, Martin; Reichmann, Ernst

    2014-06-01

    In our previous work, we showed that human sweat gland-derived epithelial cells represent an alternative source of keratinocytes to grow a near normal autologous epidermis. The role of subtypes of sweat gland cells in epidermal regeneration and maintenance remained unclear. In this study, we compare the regenerative potential of both secretory and absorptive sweat gland cell subpopulations. We demonstrate the superiority of secretory over absorptive cells in forming a new epidermis on two levels: first, the proliferative and colony-forming efficiencies in vitro are significantly higher for secretory cells (SCs), and second, SCs show a higher frequency of successful epidermis formation as well as an increase in the thickness of the formed epidermis in the in vitro and in vivo functional analyses using a 3D dermo-epidermal skin model. However, the ability of forming functional skin substitutes is not limited to SCs, which supports the hypothesis that multiple subtypes of sweat gland epithelial cells hold regenerative properties, while the existence and exact localization of a keratinocyte stem cell population in the human eccrine sweat gland remain elusive.

  6. Secretory clusterin inhibits osteoclastogenesis by attenuating M-CSF-dependent osteoclast precursor cell proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Bongkun; Kang, Soon-Suk [Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Sang-Wook [Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Cell Dysfunction Research Center and BMIT, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Min, Bon-Hong [Department of Pharmacology, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul 136-705 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Eun-Jin; Song, Da-Hyun; Kim, Sang-Min [Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Youngsup [Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Cell Dysfunction Research Center and BMIT, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Seung-Yong [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Cell Dysfunction Research Center and BMIT, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Eun-Ju, E-mail: ejchang@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Cell Dysfunction Research Center and BMIT, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • We describe the expression and secretion of clusterin in osteoclasts. • Endogenous clusterin deficiency does not affect osteoclast formation. • Exogenous treatment with secretory clusterin decreases osteoclast differentiation. • Secretory clusterin attenuates osteoclast precursor cell proliferation by inhibiting M-CSF-mediated ERK activation. - Abstract: Secretory clusterin (sCLU)/apolipoprotein J is a multifunctional glycoprotein that is ubiquitously expressed in various tissues. Reduced sCLU in the joints of patients with bone erosive disease is associated with disease activity; however, its exact role has yet to be elucidated. Here, we report that CLU is expressed and secreted during osteoclastogenesis in mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs) that are treated with receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF). CLU-deficient BMMs obtained from CLU{sup −/−} mice exhibited no significant alterations in OC differentiation in comparison with BMMs obtained from wild-type mice. In contrast, exogenous sCLU treatment significantly inhibited OC formation in both BMMs and OC precursor cultures. The inhibitory effect of sCLU was more prominent in BMMs than OC precursor cultures. Interestingly, treating BMMs with sCLU decreased the proliferative effects elicited by M-CSF and suppressed M-CSF-induced ERK activation of OC precursor cells without causing apoptotic cell death. This study provides the first evidence that sCLU reduces OC formation by inhibiting the actions of M-CSF, thereby suggesting its protective role in bone erosion.

  7. Effects of ORP150 on appearance and function of pancreatic beta cells following acute necrotizing pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Wen-Hong; Chen, Chen; Wang, Wei-Xing; Yu, Jia; Li, Jin-You; Liu, Lei

    2011-06-15

    Pancreatic beta cells produce and release insulin, which decreases the blood glucose level. Endoplasmic reticulum stress caused pancreatic beta cell dysfunction and death in acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP). The 150kD oxygen-regulated protein (ORP150) took part in the process of endoplasmic reticulum stress. This study investigated the effect of ORP150 on appearance and function of pancreatic beta cells in ANP. Acute necrotizing pancreatitis relied on retrograde infusion of 5% sodium taurocholate into the bile-pancreatic duct. The severity of ANP was estimated by serum amylase, secretory phospholipase A(2,) and pancreatic histopathology. The changes in appearance and function of pancreatic beta cells were detected by light and electron microscopy and the levels of serum glucose, insulin, and C-peptide. ORP150 expression was studied using western blot and immunohistochemisty assay. The expression of ORP150 mainly appeared on pancreatic beta cells and decreased gradually during the pathogenesis of ANP. The results of light and electron microscopy indicated pancreatic beta cell dysfunction and death, concomitant with elevation of serum glucose, insulin, and C-peptide in ANP. These results imply a probable role of ORP150 in the changes in appearance and function of pancreatic beta cells following acute necrotizing pancreatitis, through the pathway of endoplasmic reticulum stress.

  8. Rab Proteins and the Secretory Pathway: The Case of Rab18 in Neuroendocrine Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RAFAEL eVAZQUEZ-MARTINEZ

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The secretory pathway is a process characteristic of cells specialized in secretion such as endocrine cells and neurons. It consists of different stages that are dependent on specific transport of proteins in vesicular-tubular carriers. Biochemical analyses have unveiled a number of protein families that confer identity to carrier vesicles and specificity to their transport. Among them is the family of Rab proteins, Ras-like small GTPases that anchor to the surface of transport vesicles and participate in vesicle formation from the donor compartment, transport along cytoskeletal tracks, and docking and fusion with the acceptor compartment. All of these functions are accomplished through the recruitment of effector proteins, such as sorting adaptors, tethering factors, kinases, phosphatases and motors. The numerous Rab proteins have distinct subcellular distributions throughout the endomembrane system, which ensures efficient cargo transfer. Rab proteins act as molecular switches that alternate between a cytosolic GDP-bound, inactive form and a membrane-associated GTP-bound, active conformation. Cycling between inactive and active states is a highly regulated process that enables Rabs to confer spatio-temporal precision to the different stages through which a vesicle passes during its lifespan. This review focuses on our current knowledge on Rab functioning, from their structural features to the multiple regulatory proteins and effectors that control Rab activity and translate Rab function. Furthermore, we also summarize the information available on a particular Rab protein, Rab18, which has been linked to the control of secretory granule traffic in neuroendocrine cells.

  9. Multiple effects of the phenylhydrazone derivative FCCP on the secretory pathway in rat plasma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoine, J C; Jouanne, C

    1986-10-01

    We studied the sensitivity of the last steps of the secretory process of antibody-producing cells to carbonylcyanide-p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP) and sodium azide (NaN3), agents which lower the cellular ATP content by inhibiting oxidative phosphorylation and mitochondrial electron transport, respectively. Popliteal lymph node cells or purified plasma cells from rats immunized against horseradish peroxidase were incubated with the drugs. The rate of secretion of anti-HRP antibodies was measured by an enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay or after biosynthetic labeling with L-[3H]fucose. FCCP as well as NaN3 were shown to rapidly inhibit (in less than 5 min) the secretion of immunoglobulins (Ig) and to partially block the release of fucosylated Ig. This indicates that the drugs inhibit the transport of Ig from the Golgi apparatus (GA) (where fucose is added to Ig) to the plasma membrane. However, the degree of inhibition reached 40 to 50% with NaN3 and 70 to 80% with FCCP, whereas both drugs similarly depleted ATP stores by 45 to 55%. These results are consistent with multiple effects of FCCP on the secretion pathway of Ig. As a tentative explanation, we suggest that FCCP, because of its protonophore properties, not only reduces cellular ATP levels but may also neutralize the Golgi or post-Golgi acidic compartments recently shown to be involved in the transport of plasma membrane and secretory proteins.

  10. TRPM4 controls insulin secretion in pancreatic beta-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Henrique; Beck, Andreas; Launay, Pierre; Gross, Stefan A; Stokes, Alexander J; Kinet, Jean-Pierre; Fleig, Andrea; Penner, Reinhold

    2007-01-01

    TRPM4 is a calcium-activated non-selective cation channel that is widely expressed and proposed to be involved in cell depolarization. In excitable cells, TRPM4 may regulate calcium influx by causing the depolarization that drives the activation of voltage-dependent calcium channels. We here report that insulin-secreting cells of the rat pancreatic beta-cell line INS-1 natively express TRPM4 proteins and generate large depolarizing membrane currents in response to increased intracellular calcium. These currents exhibit the characteristics of TRPM4 and can be suppressed by expressing a dominant negative TRPM4 construct, resulting in significantly decreased insulin secretion in response to a glucose stimulus. Reduced insulin secretion was also observed with arginine vasopressin stimulation, a Gq-coupled receptor agonist in beta-cells. Moreover, the recruitment of TRPM4 currents was biphasic in both INS-1 cells as well as HEK-293 cells overexpressing TRPM4. The first phase is due to activation of TRPM4 channels localized within the plasma membrane followed by a slower secondary phase, which is caused by the recruitment of TRPM4-containing vesicles to the plasma membrane during exocytosis. The secondary phase can be observed during perfusion of cells with increasing [Ca(2+)](i), replicated with agonist stimulation, and coincides with an increase in cell capacitance, loss of FM1-43 dye, and vesicle fusion. Our data suggest that TRPM4 may play a key role in the control of membrane potential and electrical activity of electrically excitable secretory cells and the dynamic translocation of TRPM4 from a vesicular pool to the plasma membrane via Ca(2+)-dependent exocytosis may represent a key short- and midterm regulatory mechanism by which cells regulate electrical activity.

  11. Calcineurin is universally involved in vesicle endocytosis at neuronal and nonneuronal secretory cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xin-Sheng; Zhang, Zhen; Zhao, Wei-Dong; Wang, Dongsheng; Luo, Fujun; Wu, Ling-Gang

    2014-05-22

    Calcium influx triggers and accelerates endocytosis in nerve terminals and nonneuronal secretory cells. Whether calcium/calmodulin-activated calcineurin, which dephosphorylates endocytic proteins, mediates this process is highly controversial for different cell types, developmental stages, and endocytic forms. Using three preparations that previously produced discrepant results (i.e., large calyx-type synapses, conventional cerebellar synapses, and neuroendocrine chromaffin cells containing large dense-core vesicles), we found that calcineurin gene knockout consistently slowed down endocytosis, regardless of cell type, developmental stage, or endocytic form (rapid or slow). In contrast, calcineurin and calmodulin blockers slowed down endocytosis at a relatively small calcium influx, but did not inhibit endocytosis at a large calcium influx, resulting in false-negative results. These results suggest that calcineurin is universally involved in endocytosis. They may also help explain the discrepancies among previous pharmacological studies. We therefore suggest that calcineurin should be included as a key player in mediating calcium-triggered and -accelerated vesicle endocytosis.

  12. Beta cell proliferation and growth factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Høiriis; Svensson, C; Møldrup, Annette

    1999-01-01

    Formation of new beta cells can take place by two pathways: replication of already differentiated beta cells or neogenesis from putative islet stem cells. Under physiological conditions both processes are most pronounced during the fetal and neonatal development of the pancreas. In adulthood little...... increase in the beta cell number seems to occur. In pregnancy, however, a marked hyperplasia of the beta cells is observed both in rodents and man. Increased mitotic activity has been seen both in vivo and in vitro in islets exposed to placental lactogen (PL), prolactin (PRL) and growth hormone (GH......). Receptors for both GH and PRL are expressed in islet cells and are upregulated during pregnancy. By mutational analysis we have identified different functional domains of the cytoplasmic part of the GH receptor. Thus the mitotic signaling only requires the membrane proximal part of the receptor...

  13. Regulation by L channels of Ca(2+)-evoked secretory responses in ouabain-treated chromaffin cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pascual, Ricardo; Colmena, Inés; Ruiz-Pascual, Lucía; Baraibar, Andrés Mateo; Egea, Javier; Gandía, Luis; García, Antonio G

    2016-10-01

    It is known that the sustained depolarisation of adrenal medullary bovine chromaffin cells (BCCs) with high K(+) concentrations produces an initial sharp catecholamine release that subsequently fades off in spite depolarisation persists. Here, we have recreated a sustained depolarisation condition of BCCs by treating them with the Na(+)/K(+) ATPase blocker ouabain; in doing so, we searched experimental conditions that permitted the development of a sustained long-term catecholamine release response that could be relevant during prolonged stress. BCCs were perifused with nominal 0Ca(2+) solution, and secretion responses were elicited by intermittent application of short 2Ca(2+) pulses (Krebs-HEPES containing 2 mM Ca(2+)). These pulses elicited a biphasic secretory pattern with an initial 30-min period with secretory responses of increasing amplitude and a second 30-min period with steady-state, non-inactivating responses. The initial phase was not due to gradual depolarisation neither to gradual increases of the cytosolic calcium transients ([Ca(2+)]c) elicited by 2Ca(2+) pulses in BBCs exposed to ouabain; both parameters increased soon after ouabain addition. Νifedipine blocked these responses, and FPL64176 potentiated them, suggesting that they were triggered by Ca(2+) entry through non-inactivating L-type calcium channels. This was corroborated by nifedipine-evoked blockade of the L-type Ca(2+) channel current and the [Ca(2+)]c transients elicited by 2Ca(2+) pulses. Furthermore, the plasmalemmal Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX) blocker SEA0400 caused a mild inhibition followed by a large rebound increase of the steady-state secretory responses. We conclude that these two phases of secretion are mostly contributed by Ca(2+) entry through L calcium channels, with a minor contribution of Ca(2+) entry through the reverse mode of the NCX.

  14. An FNA pitfall: Mammary analog secretory carcinoma mistaken for acinic cell carcinoma due to cytoplasmic granules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nouf Hijazi, MD

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the salivary gland, a key differential feature of Mammary analog secretory carcinoma (MASC from acinic cell carcinoma (ACC is the lack of cytoplasmic granules. We report a case of a parotid mass incorrectly diagnosed on fine needle aspirate as acinic cell carcinoma due to many cells with basophilic granules suggesting serous acinar differention. Tumor resection revealed a tumor consistent with low grade adenocarcinoma that had eosinophilic, microvacuolar cytoplasm with distinct basophilic granules staining with PASD and mucicarmine. The diagnosis of MASC was confirmed with stains for GCDF-15, mammoglobin, and S100 and FISH consistent with a t(12;15 translocation. Relying on the absence of cytoplasmic granules as a feature to distinguish ACC from MASC is a diagnostic pitfall.

  15. Mitochondrial calcium in the life and death of exocrine secretory cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronina, Svetlana; Tepikin, Alexei

    2012-07-01

    The remarkable recent discoveries of the proteins mediating mitochondrial Ca(2+) transport (reviewed in this issue) provide an exciting opportunity to utilise this new knowledge to improve our fundamental understanding of relationships between Ca(2+) signalling and bioenergetics and, importantly, to improve the understanding of diseases in which Ca(2+) toxicity and mitochondrial malfunction play a crucial role. Ca(2+) is an important activator of exocrine secretion, a regulator of the bioenergetics of exocrine cells and a contributor to exocrine cell damage. Exocrine secretory cells, exocrine tissues and diseases affecting exocrine glands (like Sjögren's syndrome and acute pancreatitis) will, therefore, provide worthy research areas for the application of this new knowledge of the Ca(2+) transport mechanisms in mitochondria.

  16. Extracellular magnesium decreases the secretory response of rat peritoneal mast cells to compound 48/80 in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Niels Haldor; Johansen, Torben

    1991-01-01

    Exposure of rat peritoneal mast cells to magnesium in the absence of extracellular calcium resulted in a time- and dose-dependent decrease in the secretory response induced by compound 48/80. The decrease was prevented by a low extracellular concentration of calcium. Furthermore, the decreased...... and the secretory stimulus. A dose-dependent decrease in antigen induced histamine secretion that was reversed by calcium was also observed. Exposure of the mast cells to magnesium for 15 min resulted in a parallel decrease in histamine secretion and in the cellular content of 45Ca2+. These observations suggest...... secretory responsiveness was dose-dependently restored by the addition of calcium to the cells simultaneously with compound 48/80. Preincubation with magnesium also inhibited antigen-induced histamine secretion in a dose-dependent manner. This was reversed by the simultaneous addition of calcium...

  17. Long-term primary culture of secretory cells of Bothrops jararaca venom gland for venom production in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanouye, Norma; Kerchove, Celine Marie; Moura-da-Silva, Ana Maria; Carneiro, Sylvia M; Markus, Regina P

    2006-01-01

    This protocol details the optimal conditions to establish a long-term primary culture of secretory cells from the venom gland of the Bothrops jararaca snake. Furthermore, these conditions allow the production and secretion of venom into the culture medium. Snake venom is a rich source of active molecules and has been used for bioprospection studies. However, obtaining enough venom from snakes is a major obstacle. Secretory cells of venom glands are capable of producing active toxins. Therefore, a culture of secretory cells is a good in vitro system to acquire the venom of snakes without capturing the animal from the wild. The protocol described here provides a rapid (approximately 4 h) and reproducible means of producing sufficient amounts of snake venom for biological investigations.

  18. Secretory Transactivating Transcription-apoptin fusion protein induces apoptosis in hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Su-Xia Han; Jin-Lu Ma; Yi Lv; Chen Huang; Hai-Hua Liang; Kang-Min Duan

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether SP-TAT-apoptin induces apoptosis and also maintains its tumor cell specificity.METHODS: In this study, we designed a secretory protein by adding a secretory signal peptide (SP) to the N terminus of Transactivating Transcription (TAT)-apoptin (SP-TAT-apoptin), to test the hypothesis that it gains an additive bystander effect as an anti-cancer therapy. We used an artificial human secretory SP whose amino acid sequence and corresponding cDNA sequence were generated by the SP hidden Markov model.RESULTS: In human liver carcinoma HepG2 cells, SP-TAT-apoptin expression showed a diffuse pattern in the early phase after transfection. After 48h, however, it translocated into the nuclear compartment and caused massive apoptotic cell death, as determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and annexin-V binding assay. SP-TAT-apoptin did not, however, cause any cell death in non-malignant human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Most importantly, the conditioned medium from Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells transfected with SP-TAT-apoptin also induced significant cell death in HepG2 cells, but not in HUVECs.CONCLUSION: The data demonstrated that SP-TAT-apoptin induces apoptosis only in malignant cells, and its secretory property might greatly increase its potency once it is delivered in vivo for cancer therapy.

  19. Novel method for isolation of murine clara cell secretory protein-expressing cells with traces of stemness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Yang Wang

    Full Text Available Clara cells are non-ciliated, secretory bronchiolar epithelial cells that serve to detoxify harmful inhaled substances. Clara cells also function as stem/progenitor cells for repair in the bronchioles. Clara cell secretory protein (CCSP is specifically expressed in pulmonary Clara cells and is widely used as a Clara cell marker. In addition CCSP promoter is commonly used to direct gene expression into the lung in transgenic models. The discovery of CCSP immunoreactivity in plasma membranes of airway lining cells prompted us to explore the possibility of enriching Clara cells by flow cytometry. We established a novel and simple method for the isolation of CCSP-expressing cell Clara cells using a combination of mechanical and enzymatic dissociation followed by flow cytometry sorting technology. We showed that ∼25% of dissociated cells from whole lung expressed CCSP. In the resulting preparation, up to 98% of cells expressed CCSP. Notably, we found that several common stem cell markers including CD44, CD133, Sca-1 and Sox2 were expressed in CCSP(+ cells. Moreover, CCSP(+ cells were able to form spheroid colonies in vitro with 0.97‰ efficiency. Parallel studies in vivo confirmed that a small population of CCSP(-expressing cells in mouse airways also demonstrates stem cell-like properties such as label retention and harboring rare bronchioalveolar stem cells (BASCs in terminal bronchioles (TBs. We conclude that CCSP(+ cells exhibit a number of stem cell-like features including stem cell marker expression, bronchosphere colony formation and self-renewal ability. Clara cell isolation by flow cytometry sorting is a useful method for investigating the function of primary Clara cells in stem cell research and mouse models.

  20. Epidermal cell density is autoregulated via a secretory peptide, EPIDERMAL PATTERNING FACTOR 2 in Arabidopsis leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Kenta; Yokoo, Toshiya; Kajita, Ryoko; Onishi, Takaaki; Yahata, Saiko; Peterson, Kylee M; Torii, Keiko U; Kakimoto, Tatsuo

    2009-06-01

    Regulation of the number of cells is critical for development of multicellular organisms. During plant epidermal development, a protodermal cell first makes a fate decision of whether or not to be the meristemoid mother cell (MMC), which undergoes asymmetric cell division forming a meristemoid and its sister cell. The MMC-derived lineage produces all stomatal guard cells and a large proportion of non-guard cells. We demonstrate that a small secretory peptide, EPIDERMAL PATTERING FACTOR 2 (EPF2), is produced by the MMC and its early descendants, and negatively regulates the density of guard and non-guard epidermal cells. Our results suggest that EPF2 inhibits cells from adopting the MMC fate in a non-cell-autonomous manner, thus limiting the number of MMCs. This feedback loop is critical for regulation of epidermal cell density. The amino acid sequence of EPF2 resembles that of EPF1, which is known to control stomatal positioning. Over-expression of EPF1 also inhibits stomatal development, but EPF1 can act only on a later developmental process than EPF2. Overexpression and promoter swapping experiments suggested that the protein functions of EPF1 and EPF2, rather than the expression patterns of the genes, are responsible for the specific functions. Although targets of EPF1 and EPF2 are different, both EPF1 and EPF2 require common putative receptor components TOO MANY MOUTHS (TMM), ERECTA (ER), ERECTA LIKE 1 (ERL1) and ERL2 in order to function.

  1. Glucose activates prenyltransferases in pancreatic islet {beta}-cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goalstone, Marc [Department of Medicine, University of Colorado, VA Medical Center, Denver, CO 80220 (United States); Kamath, Vasudeva [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Wayne State University, VA Medical Center, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Kowluru, Anjaneyulu, E-mail: akowluru@med.wayne.edu [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Wayne State University, VA Medical Center, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States)

    2010-01-01

    A growing body of evidence implicates small G-proteins [e.g., Cdc42 and Rac1] in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion [GSIS] in the islet {beta}-cell. These signaling proteins undergo post-translational modifications [e.g., prenylation] at their C-terminal cysteine residue and appear to be essential for the transport and fusion of insulin-containing secretory granules with the plasma membrane and the exocytotic secretion of insulin. However, potential regulation of the prenylating enzymes by physiological insulin secretogues [e.g., glucose] has not been investigated thus far. Herein, we report immunological localization, sub-cellular distribution and regulation of farnesyltransferases [FTases] and geranylgeranyltransferase [GGTase] by glucose in insulin-secreting INS 832/13 {beta}-cells and normal rat islets. Our findings suggest that an insulinotropic concentration of glucose [20 mM] markedly stimulated the expression of the {alpha}-subunits of FTase/GGTase-1, but not the {beta}-subunits of FTase or GGTase-1 without significantly affecting the predominantly cytosolic distribution of these holoenzymes in INS 832/13 cells and rodent islets. Under these conditions, glucose significantly stimulated [2.5- to 4.0-fold over basal] the activities of both FTase and GGTase-1 in both cell types. Together, these findings provide the first evidence to suggest that GSIS involves activation of the endogenous islet prenyltransferases by glucose, culminating in the activation of their respective G-protein substrates, which is necessary for cytoskeletal rearrangement, vesicular transport, fusion and secretion of insulin.

  2. Expression of {beta}{sub 1} integrins in human endometrial stromal and decidual cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiokawa, Shigetatsu; Yoshimura, Yasunori; Nakamura, Yukio [Kyorin Univ. School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the expression of {beta}{sub 1} integrins in human endometrium and decidua using flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry, and immunoprecipitation. Fluorescence-activated flow cytometry demonstrated the greater expression of the {beta}{sub 1}, {alpha}{sub 1}, {alpha}{sub 2}, and {alpha}{sub 5} subunits of the {beta}{sub 1} integrin family in cultured stromal cells from the midsecretory phase, than in those of the early proliferative phase. The addition of estradiol (E{sub 2}) and progesterone (P) to cultured stromal cells in the early proliferative phase increased the expression of {beta}{sub 1} integrins in vitro. Flow cytometry also demonstrated the expression of the {beta}{sub 1}, {alpha}{sub 1}, {alpha}{sub 2}, {alpha}{sub 3}, {alpha}{sub 5}, and {alpha}{sub 6} subunits of {beta}{sub 1} integrin family in cultured decidual cells, and the enriched-fraction of prolactin (PRL)-producing decidual cells isolated by Percoll gradients showed high levels of {beta}{sub 1} integrins expression. Immunohistochemistry confirmed the {beta}{sub 1} integrin cell surface phenotypes in cultured decidual cells observed by flow cytometry. In summary, the present study demonstrated that endometrial stromal and decidual cells expressed {beta}{sub 1} integrin subunits at their surfaces. The expression exhibited a variability throughout the menstrual cycles, being predominantly detected in the secretory phase, and was maintained highly in the decidua. Thus, {beta}{sub 1} integrins in human endometrium and decidua may be important in mediating the organization of extracellular matrix proteins derived from embryos during the early stage of implantation. 43 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Effect of yoghurt containing Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12® on faecal excretion of secretory immunoglobulin A and human beta-defensin 2 in healthy adult volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabeerdoss, Jayakanthan; Devi, R Shobana; Mary, R Regina; Prabhavathi, D; Vidya, R; Mechenro, John; Mahendri, N V; Pugazhendhi, Srinivasan; Ramakrishna, Balakrishnan S

    2011-12-23

    Probiotics are used to provide health benefits. The present study tested the effect of a probiotic yoghurt on faecal output of beta-defensin and immunoglobulin A in a group of young healthy women eating a defined diet. 26 women aged 18-21 (median 19) years residing in a hostel were given 200 ml normal yoghurt every day for a week, followed by probiotic yoghurt containing Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12® (10⁹ in 200 ml) for three weeks, followed again by normal yoghurt for four weeks. Stool samples were collected at 0, 4 and 8 weeks and assayed for immunoglobulin A and human beta-defensin-2 by ELISA. All participants tolerated both normal and probiotic yoghurt well. Human beta-defensin-2 levels in faeces were not altered during the course of the study. On the other hand, compared to the basal sample, faecal IgA increased during probiotic feeding (P = 0.0184) and returned to normal after cessation of probiotic yoghurt intake. Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12® increased secretory IgA output in faeces. This property may explain the ability of probiotics to prevent gastrointestinal and lower respiratory tract infections.

  4. Effect of yoghurt containing Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12® on faecal excretion of secretory immunoglobulin A and human beta-defensin 2 in healthy adult volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kabeerdoss Jayakanthan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Probiotics are used to provide health benefits. The present study tested the effect of a probiotic yoghurt on faecal output of beta-defensin and immunoglobulin A in a group of young healthy women eating a defined diet. Findings 26 women aged 18-21 (median 19 years residing in a hostel were given 200 ml normal yoghurt every day for a week, followed by probiotic yoghurt containing Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12® (109 in 200 ml for three weeks, followed again by normal yoghurt for four weeks. Stool samples were collected at 0, 4 and 8 weeks and assayed for immunoglobulin A and human beta-defensin-2 by ELISA. All participants tolerated both normal and probiotic yoghurt well. Human beta-defensin-2 levels in faeces were not altered during the course of the study. On the other hand, compared to the basal sample, faecal IgA increased during probiotic feeding (P = 0.0184 and returned to normal after cessation of probiotic yoghurt intake. Conclusions Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12® increased secretory IgA output in faeces. This property may explain the ability of probiotics to prevent gastrointestinal and lower respiratory tract infections.

  5. Ionic and secretory response of pancreatic islet cells to minoxidil sulfate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antoine, M.H.; Hermann, M.; Herchuelz, A.; Lebrun, P. (Laboratory of Pharmacology, Brussels Free University School of Medicine (Belgium))

    1991-07-01

    Minoxidil sulfate is an antihypertensive agent belonging to the new class of vasodilators, the K+ channel openers. The present study was undertaken to characterize the effects of minoxidil sulfate on ionic and secretory events in rat pancreatic islets. The drug unexpectedly provoked a concentration-dependent decrease in 86Rb outflow. This inhibitory effect was reduced in a concentration-dependent manner by glucose and tolbutamide. Minoxidil sulfate did not affect 45Ca outflow from islets perfused in the presence of extracellular Ca++ and absence or presence of glucose. However, in islets exposed to a medium deprived of extracellular Ca++, the drug provoked a rise in 45Ca outflow. Whether in the absence or presence of extracellular Ca++, minoxidil sulfate increased the cytosolic free Ca++ concentration of islet cells. Lastly, minoxidil sulfate increased the release of insulin from glucose-stimulated pancreatic islets. These results suggest that minoxidil sulfate reduces the activity of the ATP-sensitive K+ channels and promotes an intracellular translocation of Ca++. The latter change might account for the effect of the drug on the insulin-releasing process. However, the secretory response to minoxidil sulfate could also be mediated, at least in part, by a modest Ca++ entry.

  6. Syntaxin clusters assemble reversibly at sites of secretory granules in live cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barg, S; Knowles, M K; Chen, X; Midorikawa, M; Almers, Wolfhard

    2010-11-30

    Syntaxin resides in the plasma membrane, where it helps to catalyze membrane fusion during exocytosis. The protein also forms clusters in cell-free and granule-free plasma-membrane sheets. We imaged the interaction between syntaxin and single secretory granules by two-color total internal reflection microscopy in PC12 cells. Syntaxin-GFP assembled in clusters at sites where single granules had docked at the plasma membrane. Clusters were intermittently present at granule sites, as syntaxin molecules assembled and disassembled in a coordinated fashion. Recruitment to granules required the N-terminal domain of syntaxin, but not the entry of syntaxin into SNARE complexes. Clusters facilitated exocytosis and disassembled once exocytosis was complete. Syntaxin cluster formation defines an intermediate step in exocytosis.

  7. Acute overexpression of lactate dehydrogenase-A perturbs beta-cell mitochondrial metabolism and insulin secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainscow, E K; Zhao, C; Rutter, G A

    2000-07-01

    Islet beta-cells express low levels of lactate dehydrogenase and have high glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase activity. To determine whether this configuration favors oxidative glucose metabolism via mitochondria in the beta-cell and is important for beta-cell metabolic signal transduction, we have determined the effects on glucose metabolism and insulin secretion of acute overexpression of the skeletal muscle isoform of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH)-A. Monitored in single MIN6 beta-cells, LDH hyperexpression (achieved by intranuclear cDNA microinjection or adenoviral infection) diminished the response to glucose of both phases of increases in mitochondrial NAD(P)H, as well as increases in mitochondrial membrane potential, cytosolic free ATP, and cystolic free Ca2+. These effects were observed at all glucose concentrations, but were most pronounced at submaximal glucose levels. Correspondingly, adenoviral vector-mediated LDH-A overexpression reduced insulin secretion stimulated by 11 mmol/l glucose and the subsequent response to stimulation with 30 mmol/l glucose, but it was without significant effect when the concentration of glucose was raised acutely from 3 to 30 mmol/l. Thus, overexpression of LDH activity interferes with normal glucose metabolism and insulin secretion in the islet beta-cell type, and it may therefore be directly responsible for insulin secretory defects in some forms of type 2 diabetes. The results also reinforce the view that glucose-derived pyruvate metabolism in the mitochondrion is critical for glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in the beta-cell.

  8. Expression of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) receptors, TGF-beta 1 and TGF-beta 2 production and autocrine growth control in osteosarcoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloen, P; Jennings, C L; Gebhardt, M C; Springfield, D S; Mankin, H J

    1994-08-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) is a polypeptide with multiple physiological functions. Isoforms of this growth factor have important roles in control of the cell cycle, in regulation of cell-cell interactions and in growth and development. Malignant transformation has been shown to be associated with increased expression of TGF-beta. Since bone is the largest storage site and producer of TGF-beta, we speculated on the existence of an autocrine mechanism in osteosarcoma, a malignant bone tumor. Expression of TGF-beta cell surface receptors, effects on growth of TGF-beta and TGF-beta antibodies and production of 2 TGF-beta isoforms were studied in a panel of 7 osteosarcoma cell lines. In contrast to most previous reports on the effects of TGF-beta on osteosarcoma cell growth, we found a mitogenic effect of TGF-beta 1 in 4 of 7 osteosarcoma cell lines. Receptor profiles for TGF-beta were aberrant in 5 of the 7 cell lines tested, and production of TGF-beta 1 and TGF-beta 2 varied among cell lines. Addition of anti-TGF-beta antagonized the effects of endogenous TGF-beta. Our results suggest a potential role of TGF-beta in autocrine growth control of osteosarcoma cells.

  9. Isoprenoid biosynthesis. Metabolite profiling of peppermint oil gland secretory cells and application to herbicide target analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, B M; Ketchum, R E; Croteau, R B

    2001-09-01

    Two independent pathways operate in plants for the synthesis of isopentenyl diphosphate and dimethylallyl diphosphate, the central intermediates in the biosynthesis of all isoprenoids. The mevalonate pathway is present in the cytosol, whereas the recently discovered mevalonate-independent pathway is localized to plastids. We have used isolated peppermint (Mentha piperita) oil gland secretory cells as an experimental model system to study the effects of the herbicides fosmidomycin, phosphonothrixin, methyl viologen, benzyl viologen, clomazone, 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl diphosphate, alendronate, and pamidronate on the pools of metabolites related to monoterpene biosynthesis via the mevalonate-independent pathway. A newly developed isolation protocol for polar metabolites together with an improved separation and detection method based on liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry have allowed assessment of the enzyme targets for a number of these herbicides.

  10. [The role of mitochondrial uniporter in calcium-homeostasis of the exorbital lacrimal gland secretory cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotliarova, A B; Merlavs'kyĭ, V M; Dorosh, O M; Man'ko, V V

    2014-01-01

    The role of mitochondrial calcium-uniporter in calcium-homeostasis maintenance and correlations of calcium-uniporter with other calcium-transport systems of the rat exorbital lacrimal gland secretory cells were studied. The experiments were performed on intact and digitonin-permeabilized cells. The interdependence of calcium-uniporter and other calcium-transporting systems functioning was estimated on the basis of additivity of their inhibitors/agonists effects, which was accompanied with a decrease in the Ca2+ content in the gland cells. It was found that in conditions of simultaneously inhibition of sarco endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA) and mitochondrial calcium-uniporter Ca2+ passively released from different calcium stores, because the effects of these calcium-transport systems inhibitors (thapsigargin and ruthenium red, respectively) were additive. Similarly, the processes of inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) activation and calcium-uniporter inhibition were additive. In contrast, the effects of ryanodine and ruthenium red on the Ca2+ content in cells were significantly non-additive. In addition, ryanodine at concentrations 1-3 μM reduced respiration rate of studied cells in dose-dependent manner, and this effect was persisted at cells preincubation with ruthenium red or tapsigargin. Thus, besides the activation of ryanodine receptors (RyRs) in endoplasmic reticulum, ryanodine inhibits Ca2+ influx to the mitochondrial matrix, that was insensitive to ruthenium red.

  11. Serglycin determines secretory granule repertoire and regulates natural killer cell and cytotoxic T lymphocyte cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Vivien R; Brennan, Amelia J; Ellis, Sarah; Danne, Jill; Thia, Kevin; Jenkins, Misty R; Voskoboinik, Ilia; Pejler, Gunnar; Johnstone, Ricky W; Andrews, Daniel M; Trapani, Joseph A

    2016-03-01

    The anionic proteoglycan serglycin is a major constituent of secretory granules in cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL)/natural killer (NK) cells, and is proposed to promote the safe storage of the mostly cationic granule toxins, granzymes and perforin. Despite the extensive defects of mast cell function reported in serglycin gene-disrupted mice, no comprehensive study of physiologically relevant CTL/NK cell populations has been reported. We show that the cytotoxicity of serglycin-deficient CTL and NK cells is severely compromised but can be partly compensated in both cell types when they become activated. Reduced intracellular granzyme B levels were noted, particularly in CD27(+) CD11b(+) mature NK cells, whereas serglycin(-/-) TCR-transgenic (OTI) CD8 T cells also had reduced perforin stores. Culture supernatants from serglycin(-/-) OTI T cells and interleukin-2-activated NK contained increased granzyme B, linking reduced storage with heightened export. By contrast, granzyme A was not significantly reduced in cells lacking serglycin, indicating differentially regulated trafficking and/or storage for the two granzymes. A quantitative analysis of different granule classes by transmission electronmicroscopy showed a selective loss of dense-core granules in serglycin(-/-) CD8(+) CTLs, although other granule types were maintained quantitatively. The findings of the present study show that serglycin plays a critical role in the maturation of dense-core cytotoxic granules in cytotoxic lymphocytes and the trafficking and storage of perforin and granzyme B, whereas granzyme A is unaffected. The skewed retention of cytotoxic effector molecules markedly reduces CTL/NK cell cytotoxicity, although this is partly compensated for as a result of activating the cells by physiological means.

  12. American ginseng modulates pancreatic beta cell activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luo Luguang

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The mechanism of the beneficial effects of Panax quinquefolius (Xiyangshen, American ginseng on diabetes is yet to be elucidated. Recent studies show that Panax quinquefolius increases insulin production and reduces the death of pancreatic beta cells. Mechanism studies indicate that Panax quinquefolius improves cell's immuno-reactivity and mitochondrial function through various factors. Clinical studies show that Panax quinquefolius improves postprandial glycemia in type 2 diabetic patients. Further studies to identify the component(s of Panax quinquefolius linked with pancreatic islets/beta cells in vitro and in vivo are warranted for better understanding of the full effects of Panax quinquefolius.

  13. Lactadherin inhibits secretory phospholipase A2 activity on pre-apoptotic leukemia cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyegaard, Steffen; Novakovic, Valerie A.; Rasmussen, Jan Trige

    2013-01-01

    Secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) is a critical component of insect and snake venoms and is secreted by mammalian leukocytes during inflammation. Elevated secretory PLA2 concentrations are associated with autoimmune diseases and septic shock. Many sPLA2’s do not bind to plasma membranes...

  14. From differentiation to proliferation: The secretory amyloid precursor protein as a local mediator of growth in thyroid epithelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Pietrzik, Claus Ulrich; Hoffmann, Jens; Stöber, Kai; Chen, Chun-yan; Bauer, Christoph; Otero, Deborah A.C.; Roch, Jean-Marc; Herzog, Volker

    1998-01-01

    In various species, thyrotropin (TSH) is known to stimulate both differentiation and proliferation of thyroid follicle cells. This cell type has also been shown to express members of the Alzheimer amyloid precursor (APP) protein family and to release the secretory N-terminal domain of APP (sAPP) in a TSH-dependent fashion. In this study on binding to the cell surfaces, exogenously added recombinant sAPP stimulated phosphorylation mediated by mitogen-activated protein kinase and effectively ev...

  15. Nitric oxide contributes to cytokine-induced apoptosis in pancreatic beta cells via potentiation of JNK activity and inhibition of Akt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Størling, J; Binzer, J; Andersson, Annica;

    2005-01-01

    Pro-inflammatory cytokines cause beta cell secretory dysfunction and apoptosis--a process implicated in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes. Cytokines induce the expression of inducible nitric oxide (NO) synthase (iNOS) leading to NO production. NO contributes to cytokine-induced apoptosis, but t...

  16. Beta-cell dysfunction and low insulin clearance in insulin-resistant human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients with lipodystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugaard, Steen B; Andersen, Ove; Vølund, Aage;

    2005-01-01

    of diabetes mellitus or impaired glucose tolerance. Prehepatic insulin secretion rates were estimated by deconvolution of C-peptide concentrations. A composite measure of insulin sensitivity was derived from the OGTT. RESULTS: Beta-cell secretory capacity (i.e. the rate of change in insulin secretion per unit...

  17. Protection of Human Colon Cells from Shiga Toxin by Plant-based Recombinant Secretory IgA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Katsuhiro; Morikane, Shota; Ichikawa, Shiori; Kurohane, Kohta; Niwa, Yasuo; Akimoto, Yoshihiro; Matsubara, Sachie; Kawakami, Hayato; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Imai, Yasuyuki

    2017-01-01

    Shiga toxin is a major virulence factor of food-poisoning caused by Escherichia coli such as O157:H7. Secretory immunoglobulin (Ig) A (SIgA) is supposed to prevent infection of the mucosal surface and is a candidate agent for oral immunotherapy. We previously established a recombinant monoclonal antibody (mAb) consisting of variable regions from a mouse IgG mAb specific for the binding subunit of Shiga toxin 1 (Stx1) and the Fc region of mouse IgA. Here we produced a secretory form of the recombinant IgA (S-hyIgA) with transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plant. All the S-hyIgA cDNAs (heavy, light, J chain and secretory component) were expressed under the control of a bidirectional promoter of a chlorophyll a/b-binding protein of A. thaliana without using a viral promoter. The plant-based S-hyIgA exhibited antigen binding, and was modified with plant-specific N-linked sugar chains. The Ig heavy chain and secretory components were observed in an intracellular protein body-like structure of the transgenic leaves on immuno-electron microscopy. An extract of the transgenic leaves neutralized the cytotoxicity of Stx1 toward butyrate-treated Caco-2 cells, a human colon carcinoma cell line. These results will contribute to the development of edible therapeutic antibodies such as those for the treatment of mucosal infection. PMID:28368034

  18. An imidazoline compound completely counteracts interleukin-1[beta] toxic effects to rat pancreatic islet [beta] cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papaccio, Gianpaolo; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Pisanti, Francesco A

    2002-01-01

    In vitro studies have demonstrated that interleukin (IL)-1beta decreases insulin and DNA contents in pancreatic islet beta cells, causing structural damage, that it is toxic to cultured human islet beta cells and that it is able to induce apoptosis in these cells....

  19. THE EFFECT OF CURCUMIN ON SECRETORY ACTIVITY, PROLIFERATION AND APOPTOSIS OF THE PORCINE OVARIAN GRANULOSA CELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attila Kádasi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this in vitro study was to examine the effect of natural plant (Curcuma longa molecule curcumin on secretory activity, proliferation and apoptosis of porcine granulosa cells. The secretion of steroid hormones (progesterone, testosterone, accumulation of PCNA (marker of proliferation and bax (marker of apoptosis in granulosa cells of swine ovaries after curcumin treatment at the doses 0, 1, 10, 100 μg.mL-1 was determined by RIA and immunocytochemistry. It was observed that, addition of curcumin stimulated progesterone (at doses 1 and 10 μg.mL-1, but not 100 μg.mL-1 and testosterone at (100 μg.mL-1 but not 1 and 10 μg.mL-1 release. The number of cells contained PCNA was down-regulated by curcumin administration (at dose of 10 μg.mL-1, but not of 1 and 100 μg.mL-1. Bax expression was stimulated by curcumin at all doses added. Our results suggest a direct effect of curcumin on ovarian functions: steroidogenesis, proliferation and apoptosis. This could suggest antireproductive properties of curcumin in swine ovaries.

  20. N-cadherin is dispensable for pancreas development but required for beta-cell granule turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Jenny K; Voss, Ulrikke; Kesavan, Gokul; Kostetskii, Igor; Wierup, Nils; Radice, Glenn L; Semb, Henrik

    2010-06-01

    The cadherin family of cell adhesion molecules mediates adhesive interactions that are required for the formation and maintenance of tissues. Previously, we demonstrated that N-cadherin, which is required for numerous morphogenetic processes, is expressed in the pancreatic epithelium at E9.5, but later becomes restricted to endocrine aggregates in mice. To study the role of N-cadherin during pancreas formation and function we generated a tissue-specific knockout of N-cadherin in the early pancreatic epithelium by inter-crossing N-cadherin-floxed mice with Pdx1Cre mice. Analysis of pancreas-specific ablation of N-cadherin demonstrates that N-cadherin is dispensable for pancreatic development, but required for beta-cell granule turnover. The number of insulin secretory granules is significantly reduced in N-cadherin-deficient beta-cells, and as a consequence insulin secretion is decreased.

  1. Effect of vagus nerve stimulation on the secretory-granule volume of the principal cells of the mouse gallbladder epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlin, T; Hulliger, M; Axelsson, H

    1979-07-01

    Experiments in mice were performed in order to investigate whether vagal activity could affect glycoprotein secretion from gallbladder principal cells. This cell type was studied with the electron microscope in control animals and after electric stimulation of the right or left nervus vagus. The volume density of glycoprotein containing granules was determined using morphometry. It was found that stimulation of the left vagus nerve significantly reduced the relative cellular volume of secretory granules in the principal cells of the gallbladder. Right vagus stimulation was accompanied by a weak but insignificant increase in secretory granule content. It is suggested that the left vagus nerve may exert a direct influence on glycoprotein secretion from gallbladder principal cells.

  2. Agglutinating secretory IgA preserves intestinal epithelial cell integrity during apical infection by Shigella flexneri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathias, Amandine; Longet, Stéphanie; Corthésy, Blaise

    2013-08-01

    Shigella flexneri, by invading intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) and inducing inflammatory responses of the colonic mucosa, causes bacillary dysentery. Although M cells overlying Peyer's patches are commonly considered the primary site of entry of S. flexneri, indirect evidence suggests that bacteria can also use IECs as a portal of entry to the lamina propria. Passive delivery of secretory IgA (SIgA), the major immunoglobulin secreted at mucosal surfaces, has been shown to protect rabbits from experimental shigellosis, but no information exists as to its molecular role in maintaining luminal epithelial integrity. We have established that the interaction of virulent S. flexneri with the apical pole of a model intestinal epithelium consisting of polarized Caco-2 cell monolayers resulted in the progressive disruption of the tight junction network and actin depolymerization, eventually resulting in cell death. The lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-specific agglutinating SIgAC5 monoclonal antibody (MAb), but not monomeric IgAC5 or IgGC20 MAbs of the same specificity, achieved protective functions through combined mechanisms, including limitation of the interaction between S. flexneri and epithelial cells, maintenance of the tight junction seal, preservation of the cell morphology, reduction of NF-κB nuclear translocation, and inhibition of proinflammatory mediator secretion. Our results add to the understanding of the function of SIgA-mediated immune exclusion by identifying a mode of action whereby the formation of immune complexes translates into maintenance of the integrity of epithelial cells lining the mucosa. This novel mechanism of protection mediated by SIgA is important to extend the arsenal of effective strategies to fight against S. flexneri mucosal invasion.

  3. Beta-cell dysfunction and low insulin clearance in insulin-resistant human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients with lipodystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugaard, Steen B; Andersen, Ove; Vølund, Aage

    2005-01-01

    of diabetes mellitus or impaired glucose tolerance. Prehepatic insulin secretion rates were estimated by deconvolution of C-peptide concentrations. A composite measure of insulin sensitivity was derived from the OGTT. RESULTS: Beta-cell secretory capacity (i.e. the rate of change in insulin secretion per unit...... and diabetes mellitus (63%vs. 20%, P insulin sensitivity despite simultaneous reduction in insulin clearance.......OBJECTIVE: To obtain a better understanding of the physiological aspects of glucose homeostasis in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients with lipodystrophy, we evaluated separately beta-cell function and insulin sensitivity after an oral glucose load. DESIGN: Beta-cell function...

  4. Heparin-binding secretory transforming gene (hst) facilitates rat lactotrope cell tumorigenesis and induces prolactin gene transcription.

    OpenAIRE

    Shimon, I; Hüttner, A; Said, J; Spirina, O M; Melmed, S

    1996-01-01

    We have shown previously that human prolactinomas express transforming sequences of the heparin-binding secretory transforming gene (hst) which encodes fibroblast growth factor-4 (FGF-4). To elucidate the role of hst in pituitary tumorigenesis we treated primary rat pituitary and pituitary tumor cell cultures with recombinant FGF-4 and also stably transfected pituitary cell lines with full-length human hst cDNA. Transfectants were screened for hst mRNA expression and FGF-4 production. FGF-4 (...

  5. TCF7L2 regulates late events in insulin secretion from pancreatic islet beta-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Xavier, Gabriela; Loder, Merewyn K; McDonald, Angela; Tarasov, Andrei I; Carzaniga, Raffaella; Kronenberger, Katrin; Barg, Sebastian; Rutter, Guy A

    2009-04-01

    Polymorphisms in the human TCF7L2 gene are associated with reduced insulin secretion and an increased risk of type 2 diabetes. However, the mechanisms by which TCF7L2 affect insulin secretion are still unclear. We define the effects of TCF7L2 expression level on mature beta-cell function and suggest a potential mechanism for its actions. TCF7L2 expression in rodent islets and beta-cell lines was altered using RNAi or adenoviral transduction. Beta-cell gene profiles were measured by quantitative real-time PCR and the effects on intracellular signaling and exocytosis by live cell imaging, electron microscopy, and patch clamp electrophysiology. Reducing TCF7L2 expression levels by RNAi decreased glucose- but not KCl-induced insulin secretion. The glucose-induced increments in both ATP/ADP ratio and cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) were increased compared with controls. Overexpression of TCF7L2 exerted minor inhibitory effects on glucose-regulated changes in [Ca2+]i and insulin release. Gene expression profiling in TCF7L2-silenced cells revealed increased levels of mRNA encoding syntaxin 1A but decreased Munc18-1 and ZnT8 mRNA. Whereas the number of morphologically docked vesicles was unchanged by TCF7L2 suppression, secretory granule movement increased and capacitance changes decreased, indicative of defective vesicle fusion. TCF7L2 is involved in maintaining expression of beta-cell genes regulating secretory granule fusion. Defective insulin exocytosis may thus underlie increased diabetes incidence in carriers of the at-risk TCF7L2 alleles.

  6. Kinetic Evaluation of Cell Membrane Hydrolysis during Apoptosis by Human Isoforms of Secretory Phospholipase A2*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Erin D.; Nelson, Jennifer; Griffith, Katalyn; Nguyen, Thaothanh; Streeter, Michael; Wilson-Ashworth, Heather A.; Gelb, Michael H.; Judd, Allan M.; Bell, John D.

    2010-01-01

    Some isoforms of secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) distinguish between healthy and damaged or apoptotic cells. This distinction reflects differences in membrane physical properties. Because various sPLA2 isoforms respond differently to properties of artificial membranes such as surface charge, they should also behave differently as these properties evolve during a dynamic physiological process such as apoptosis. To test this idea, S49 lymphoma cell death was induced by glucocorticoid (6–48 h) or calcium ionophore. Rates of membrane hydrolysis catalyzed by various concentrations of snake venom and human groups IIa, V, and X sPLA2 were compared after each treatment condition. The data were analyzed using a model that evaluates the adsorption of enzyme to the membrane surface and subsequent binding of substrate to the active site. Results were compared temporally to changes in membrane biophysics and composition. Under control conditions, membrane hydrolysis was confined to the few unhealthy cells present in each sample. Increased hydrolysis during apoptosis and necrosis appeared to reflect substrate access to adsorbed enzyme for the snake venom and group X isoforms corresponding to weakened lipid-lipid interactions in the membrane. In contrast, apoptosis promoted initial adsorption of human groups V and IIa concurrent with phosphatidylserine exposure on the membrane surface. However, this observation was inadequate to explain the behavior of the groups V and IIa enzymes toward necrotic cells where hydrolysis was reduced or absent. Thus, a combination of changes in cell membrane properties during apoptosis and necrosis capacitates the cell for hydrolysis differently by each isoform. PMID:20139082

  7. P2X7 receptors trigger ATP exocytosis and modify secretory vesicle dynamics in neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Martín, Yolanda; Bustillo, Diego; Gómez-Villafuertes, Rosa; Sánchez-Nogueiro, Jesús; Torregrosa-Hetland, Cristina; Binz, Thomas; Gutiérrez, Luis Miguel; Miras-Portugal, María Teresa; Artalejo, Antonio R

    2011-04-01

    Previously, we reported that purinergic ionotropic P2X7 receptors negatively regulate neurite formation in Neuro-2a (N2a) mouse neuroblastoma cells through a Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase II-related mechanism. In the present study we used this cell line to investigate a parallel though faster P2X7 receptor-mediated signaling pathway, namely Ca(2+)-regulated exocytosis. Selective activation of P2X7 receptors evoked exocytosis as assayed by high resolution membrane capacitance measurements. Using dual-wavelength total internal reflection microscopy, we have observed both the increase in near-membrane Ca(2+) concentration and the exocytosis of fluorescently labeled vesicles in response to P2X7 receptor stimulation. Moreover, activation of P2X7 receptors also affects vesicle motion in the vertical and horizontal directions, thus, involving this receptor type in the control of early steps (docking and priming) of the secretory pathway. Immunocytochemical and RT-PCR experiments evidenced that N2a cells express the three neuronal SNAREs as well as vesicular nucleotide and monoamine (VMAT-1 and VMAT-2) transporters. Biochemical measurements indicated that ionomycin induced a significant release of ATP from N2a cells. Finally, P2X7 receptor stimulation and ionomycin increased the incidence of small transient inward currents, reminiscent of postsynaptic quantal events observed at synapses. Small transient inward currents were dependent on extracellular Ca(2+) and were abolished by Brilliant Blue G, suggesting they were mediated by P2X7 receptors. Altogether, these results suggest the existence of a positive feedback mechanism mediated by P2X7 receptor-stimulated exocytotic release of ATP that would act on P2X7 receptors on the same or neighbor cells to further stimulate its own release and negatively control N2a cell differentiation.

  8. Mast cell mediators: Their differential release and the secretory pathways involved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae Chul eMoon

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Mast cells (MC are widely distributed throughout the body and are common at mucosal surfaces, a major host-environment interface. MC are functionally and phenotypically heterogeneous depending on the microenvironment in which they mature. Although MC have been classically viewed as effector cells of IgE-mediated allergic diseases, they are also recognized as important in host defense, innate and acquired immunity, homeostatic responses, and immunoregulation. MC activation can induce release of preformed mediators such as histamine from their granules, as well as release of de novo synthesized lipid mediators, cytokines and chemokines that play diverse roles, not only in allergic reactions but also in numerous physiological and pathophysiological responses. Indeed, MC release their mediators in a discriminating and chronological manner, depending upon the stimuli involved and their signaling cascades (e.g., IgE-mediated or Toll Like Receptor-mediated. However, the precise mechanisms underlying differential mediator release in response to these stimuli are poorly known. This review summarizes our knowledge of MC mediators and will focus on what is known about the discriminatory release of these mediators dependent upon diverse stimuli, MC phenotypes and species of origin, as well as on the intracellular synthesis, storage and secretory processes involved.

  9. The Role of Oxidative Stress and Hypoxia in Pancreatic Beta-Cell Dysfunction in Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Philipp A; Rutter, Guy A

    2017-04-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a frequent precursor of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D), a disease that currently affects ∼8% of the adult population worldwide. Pancreatic beta-cell dysfunction and loss are central to the disease process, although understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms is still fragmentary. Recent Advances: Oversupply of nutrients, including glucose and fatty acids, and the subsequent overstimulation of beta cells, are believed to be an important contributor to insulin secretory failure in T2D. Hypoxia has also recently been implicated in beta-cell damage. Accumulating evidence points to a role for oxidative stress in both processes. Although the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) results from enhanced mitochondrial respiration during stimulation with glucose and other fuels, the expression of antioxidant defense genes is unusually low (or disallowed) in beta cells. Not all subjects with metabolic syndrome and hyperglycemia go on to develop full-blown diabetes, implying an important role in disease risk for gene-environment interactions. Possession of common risk alleles at the SLC30A8 locus, encoding the beta-cell granule zinc transporter ZnT8, may affect cytosolic Zn(2+) concentrations and thus susceptibility to hypoxia and oxidative stress. Loss of normal beta-cell function, rather than total mass, is increasingly considered to be the major driver for impaired insulin secretion in diabetes. Better understanding of the role of oxidative changes, its modulation by genes involved in disease risk, and effects on beta-cell identity may facilitate the development of new therapeutic strategies to this disease. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 26, 501-518.

  10. Human group IIA secretory phospholipase A2 induces neuronal cell death via apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagami, Tatsurou; Ueda, Keiichi; Asakura, Kenji; Hata, Satoshi; Kuroda, Takayuki; Sakaeda, Toshiyuki; Takasu, Nobuo; Tanaka, Kazushige; Gemba, Takefumi; Hori, Yozo

    2002-01-01

    Expression of group IIA secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2-IIA) is documented in the cerebral cortex (CTX) after ischemia, suggesting that sPLA2-IIA is associated with neurodegeneration. However, how sPLA2-IIA is involved in the neurodegeneration remains obscure. To clarify the pathologic role of sPLA2-IIA, we examined its neurotoxicity in rats that had the middle cerebral artery occluded and in primary cultures of cortical neurons. After occlusion, sPLA2 activity was increased in the CTX. An sPLA2 inhibitor, indoxam, significantly ameliorated not only the elevated activity of the sPLA2 but also the neurodegeneration in the CTX. The neuroprotective effect of indoxam was observed even when it was administered after occlusion. In primary cultures, sPLA2-IIA caused marked neuronal cell death. Morphologic and ultrastructural characteristics of neuronal cell death by sPLA2-IIA were apoptotic, as evidenced by condensed chromatin and fragmented DNA. Before apoptosis, sPLA2-IIA liberated arachidonic acid (AA) and generated prostaglandin D2 (PGD2), an AA metabolite, from neurons. Indoxam significantly suppressed not only AA release, but also PGD2 generation. Indoxam prevented neurons from sPLA2-IIA-induced neuronal cell death. The neuroprotective effect of indoxam was observed even when it was administered after sPLA2-IIA treatment. Furthermore, a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor significantly prevented neurons from sPLA2-IIA-induced PGD2 generation and neuronal cell death. In conclusion, sPLA2-IIA induces neuronal cell death via apoptosis, which might be associated with AA metabolites, especially PGD2. Furthermore, sPLA2 contributes to neurodegeneration in the ischemic brain, highlighting the therapeutic potential of sPLA2-IIA inhibitors for stroke.

  11. Vildagliptin, a dipeptidyl peptidase-IV inhibitor, improves model-assessed beta-cell function in patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mari, A; Sallas, W M; He, Y L;

    2005-01-01

    .8 +/- 1.6 pmol/liter; P P function in diabetic patients by increasing the insulin secretory tone....... in diabetic patients, suggesting that more sophisticated measures are necessary to ascertain the influence of vildagliptin on beta-cell function. METHODS: This study examined the effects of 28-d treatment with vildagliptin (100 mg, twice daily; n = 9) vs. placebo (n = 11) on beta-cell function in diabetic...... patients using a mathematical model that describes the insulin secretory rate as a function of glucose levels (beta-cell dose response), the change in glucose with time (derivative component), and a potentiation factor, which is a function of time and may reflect the actions of nonglucose secretagogues...

  12. Membrane secretory component is cleaved on the cell surface of rat hepatocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musil, L.S.; Baenziger, J.U.

    1986-03-05

    Transcellular transport of polymeric IgA from serum to bile by rat hepatocytes is mediated by a 105Kd membranous form of secretory component (mSC). In the presence or absence of IgA, mSC is cleaved and released into bile as a soluble 80Kd protein (fSC). They used monolayer cultures of rat hepatocytes, which synthesize mSC and efficiently cleave it to fSC, to determine the site of this conversion. (/sup 35/S)Cys-mSC accumulated in hepatocytes in the presence of leupeptin and was released as fSC when hepatocytes were placed in leupeptin-free media at 37/sup 0/. Small amounts of fSC were also produced when leupeptin was removed at 4/sup 0/, suggesting cleavage might occur on the cell membrane. Lactoperoxidase-catalyzed iodination of hepatocytes at 4/sup 0/ selectively labeled surface mSC which remained trypsin sensitive at 4/sup 0/. Hepatocytes maintained at 4/sup 0/ released significant amounts of /sup 125/I-mSC as fSC. Anti-SC antiserum reduced fSC generation at 4/sup 0/ by 70%. Following incubation at 37/sup 0/ for 10 min, /sup 125/I-mSC became resistant to degradation by trypsin and no production of fSC was seen if the cells were returned to 4/sup 0/. /sup 125/I-mSC was also cleaved to fSC following disruption by Dounce homogenization if cells were maintained at 4/sup 0/ following iodination but not if they were incubated at 37/sup 0/ for 10 min. They propose that mSC is cleaved to fSC at the plasma membrane but not intracellularly. This may reflect localization of the protease at the cell surface in a bile canalicular-like domain.

  13. Dynamics of glucose-induced membrane recruitment of protein kinase C beta II in living pancreatic islet beta-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinton, Paolo; Tsuboi, Takashi; Ainscow, Edward K; Pozzan, Tullio; Rizzuto, Rosario; Rutter, Guy A

    2002-10-01

    The mechanisms by which glucose may affect protein kinase C (PKC) activity in the pancreatic islet beta-cell are presently unclear. By developing adenovirally expressed chimeras encoding fusion proteins between green fluorescent protein and conventional (betaII), novel (delta), or atypical (zeta) PKCs, we show that glucose selectively alters the subcellular localization of these enzymes dynamically in primary islet and MIN6 beta-cells. Examined by laser scanning confocal or total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, elevated glucose concentrations induced oscillatory translocations of PKCbetaII to spatially confined regions of the plasma membrane. Suggesting that increases in free cytosolic Ca(2+) concentrations ([Ca(2+)](c)) were primarily responsible, prevention of [Ca(2+)](c) increases with EGTA or diazoxide completely eliminated membrane recruitment, whereas elevation of cytosolic [Ca(2+)](c) with KCl or tolbutamide was highly effective in redistributing PKCbetaII both to the plasma membrane and to the surface of dense core secretory vesicles. By contrast, the distribution of PKCdelta.EGFP, which binds diacylglycerol but not Ca(2+), was unaffected by glucose. Measurement of [Ca(2+)](c) immediately beneath the plasma membrane with a ratiometric "pericam," fused to synaptic vesicle-associated protein-25, revealed that depolarization induced significantly larger increases in [Ca(2+)](c) in this domain. These data demonstrate that nutrient stimulation of beta-cells causes spatially and temporally complex changes in the subcellular localization of PKCbetaII, possibly resulting from the generation of Ca(2+) microdomains. Localized changes in PKCbetaII activity may thus have a role in the spatial control of insulin exocytosis.

  14. Characterization of a Commercial Silicon Beta Cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foxe, Michael P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hayes, James C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mayer, Michael F. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); McIntyre, Justin I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Sivels, Ciara B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Suarez, Rey [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-03-31

    Silicon detectors are of interest for the verification of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) due to their enhanced energy resolution compared to plastic scintillators beta cells. Previous work developing a figure-of-merit (FOM) for comparison of beta cells suggests that the minimum detectable activity (MDA) could be reduced by a factor of two to three with the use of silicon detectors. Silicon beta cells have been developed by CEA (France) and Lares Ltd. (Russia), with the PIPSBox developed by CEA being commercially available from Canberra for approximately $35k, but there is still uncertainty about the reproducibility of the capabilities in the field. PNNL is developing a high-resolution beta-gamma detector system in the shallow underground laboratory, which will utilize and characterize the operation of the PIPSBox detector. Throughout this report, we examine the capabilities of the PIPSBox as developed by CEA. The lessons learned through the testing and use of the PIPSBox will allow PNNL to strategically develop a silicon detector optimized to better suit the communities needs in the future.

  15. Identification of colonic fibroblast secretomes reveals secretory factors regulating colon cancer cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sun-Xia; Xu, Xiao-En; Wang, Xiao-Qing; Cui, Shu-Jian; Xu, Lei-Lei; Jiang, Ying-Hua; Zhang, Yang; Yan, Hai-Bo; Zhang, Qian; Qiao, Jie; Yang, Peng-Yuan; Liu, Feng

    2014-10-14

    Stromal microenvironment influences tumor cell proliferation and migration. Fibroblasts represent the most abundant stromal constituents. Here, we established two pairs of normal fibroblast (NF) and cancer-associated fibroblast (CAF) cultures from colorectal adenocarcinoma tissues and the normal counterparts. The NFs and CAFs were stained positive for typical fibroblast markers and inhibited colon cancer (CC) cell proliferation in in vitro cocultures and in xenograft mouse models. The fibroblast conditioned media were analyzed using LC-MS and 227 proteins were identified at a false discovery rate of 1.3%, including 131 putative secretory and 20 plasma membrane proteins. These proteins were enriched for functional categories of extracellular matrix, adhesion, cell motion, inflammatory response, redox homeostasis and peptidase inhibitor. Secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine, transgelin, follistatin-related protein 1 (FSTL1) and decorin was abundant in the fibroblast secretome as confirmed by Western blot. Silencing of FSTL1 and transgelin in colonic fibroblast cell line CCD-18Co induced an accelerated proliferation of CC cells in cocultures. Exogenous FSTL1 attenuates CC cell proliferation in a negative fashion. FSTL1 was upregulated in CC patient plasma and cancerous tissues but had no implication in prognosis. Our results provided novel insights into the molecular signatures and modulatory role of CC associated fibroblasts. In this study, a label-free LC-MS was performed to analyze the secretomes of two paired primary fibroblasts, which were isolated from fresh surgical specimen of colorectal adenocarcinoma and adjacent normal colonic tissues and exhibited negative modulatory activity for colon cancer cell growth in in vitro cocultures and in vivo xenograph mouse models. Follistatin-related protein 1 was further revealed to be one of the stroma-derived factors of potential suppression role for colon cancer cell proliferation. Our results provide novel

  16. Early events of secretory granule formation in the rat parotid acinar cell under the influence of isoproterenol. An ultrastructural and lectin cytochemical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F D’Amico

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The events involved in the maturation process of acinar secretory granules of rat parotid gland were investigated ultrastructurally and cytochemically by using a battery of four lectins [Triticum vulgaris agglutinin (WGA, Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA-I, Glycine max agglutinin (SBA, Arachys hypogaea agglutinin (PNA]. In order to facilitate the study, parotid glands were chronically stimulated with isoproterenol to induce secretion. Specimens were embedded in the Lowicryl K4M resin. The trans-Golgi network (TGN derived secretory granules, which we refer to as immature secretory granules, were found to be intermediate structures in the biogenesis process of the secretory granules in the rat parotid acinar cell. These early structures do not seem to be the immediate precursor of the mature secretory granules: in fact, a subsequent interaction process between these early immature granule forms and TGN elements seems to occur, leading, finally, to the mature granules. These findings could explain the origin of the polymorphic subpopulations of the secretory granules in the normal acinar cells of the rat parotid gland. The lectin staining patterns were characteristic of each lectin. Immature and mature secretory gran- ules were labelled with WGA, SBA, PNA, and lightly with UEA-I. Cis and intermediate cisternae of the Golgi apparatus were labelled with WGA, and trans cisternae with WGA and SBA.

  17. VAMP-2 and cellubrevin are expressed in pancreatic beta-cells and are essential for Ca(2+)-but not for GTP gamma S-induced insulin secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regazzi, R; Wollheim, C B; Lang, J; Theler, J M; Rossetto, O; Montecucco, C; Sadoul, K; Weller, U; Palmer, M; Thorens, B

    1995-01-01

    VAMP proteins are important components of the machinery controlling docking and/or fusion of secretory vesicles with their target membrane. We investigated the expression of VAMP proteins in pancreatic beta-cells and their implication in the exocytosis of insulin. cDNA cloning revealed that VAMP-2 and cellubrevin, but not VAMP-1, are expressed in rat pancreatic islets and that their sequence is identical to that isolated from rat brain. Pancreatic beta-cells contain secretory granules that store and secrete insulin as well as synaptic-like microvesicles carrying gamma-aminobutyric acid. After subcellular fractionation on continuous sucrose gradients, VAMP-2 and cellubrevin were found to be associated with both types of secretory vesicle. The association of VAMP-2 with insulin-containing granules was confirmed by confocal microscopy of primary cultures of rat pancreatic beta-cells. Pretreatment of streptolysin-O permeabilized insulin-secreting cells with tetanus and botulinum B neurotoxins selectively cleaved VAMP-2 and cellubrevin and abolished Ca(2+)-induced insulin release (IC50 approximately 15 nM). By contrast, the pretreatment with tetanus and botulinum B neurotoxins did not prevent GTP gamma S-stimulated insulin secretion. Taken together, our results show that pancreatic beta-cells express VAMP-2 and cellubrevin and that one or both of these proteins selectively control Ca(2+)-mediated insulin secretion. Images PMID:7796801

  18. The secretory pathway calcium ATPase PMR-1/SPCA1 has essential roles in cell migration during Caenorhabditis elegans embryonic development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vida Praitis

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Maintaining levels of calcium in the cytosol is important for many cellular events, including cell migration, where localized regions of high calcium are required to regulate cytoskeletal dynamics, contractility, and adhesion. Studies show inositol-trisphosphate receptors (IP3R and ryanodine receptors (RyR, which release calcium into the cytosol, are important regulators of cell migration. Similarly, proteins that return calcium to secretory stores are likely to be important for cell migration. The secretory protein calcium ATPase (SPCA is a Golgi-localized protein that transports calcium from the cytosol into secretory stores. SPCA has established roles in protein processing, metal homeostasis, and inositol-trisphosphate signaling. Defects in the human SPCA1/ATP2C1 gene cause Hailey-Hailey disease (MIM# 169600, a genodermatosis characterized by cutaneous blisters and fissures as well as keratinocyte cell adhesion defects. We have determined that PMR-1, the Caenorhabditis elegans ortholog of SPCA1, plays an essential role in embryogenesis. Pmr-1 strains isolated from genetic screens show terminal phenotypes, such as ventral and anterior enclosure failures, body morphogenesis defects, and an unattached pharynx, which are caused by earlier defects during gastrulation. In Pmr-1 embryos, migration rates are significantly reduced for cells moving along the embryo surface, such as ventral neuroblasts, C-derived, and anterior-most blastomeres. Gene interaction experiments show changing the activity of itr-1/IP3R and unc-68/RyR modulates levels of embryonic lethality in Pmr-1 strains, indicating pmr-1 acts with these calcium channels to regulate cell migration. This analysis reveals novel genes involved in C. elegans cell migration, as well as a new role in cell migration for the highly conserved SPCA gene family.

  19. The secretory pathway calcium ATPase PMR-1/SPCA1 has essential roles in cell migration during Caenorhabditis elegans embryonic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praitis, Vida; Simske, Jeffrey; Kniss, Sarah; Mandt, Rebecca; Imlay, Leah; Feddersen, Charlotte; Miller, Michael B; Mushi, Juliet; Liszewski, Walter; Weinstein, Rachel; Chakravorty, Adityarup; Ha, Dae-Gon; Schacht Farrell, Angela; Sullivan-Wilson, Alexander; Stock, Tyson

    2013-05-01

    Maintaining levels of calcium in the cytosol is important for many cellular events, including cell migration, where localized regions of high calcium are required to regulate cytoskeletal dynamics, contractility, and adhesion. Studies show inositol-trisphosphate receptors (IP3R) and ryanodine receptors (RyR), which release calcium into the cytosol, are important regulators of cell migration. Similarly, proteins that return calcium to secretory stores are likely to be important for cell migration. The secretory protein calcium ATPase (SPCA) is a Golgi-localized protein that transports calcium from the cytosol into secretory stores. SPCA has established roles in protein processing, metal homeostasis, and inositol-trisphosphate signaling. Defects in the human SPCA1/ATP2C1 gene cause Hailey-Hailey disease (MIM# 169600), a genodermatosis characterized by cutaneous blisters and fissures as well as keratinocyte cell adhesion defects. We have determined that PMR-1, the Caenorhabditis elegans ortholog of SPCA1, plays an essential role in embryogenesis. Pmr-1 strains isolated from genetic screens show terminal phenotypes, such as ventral and anterior enclosure failures, body morphogenesis defects, and an unattached pharynx, which are caused by earlier defects during gastrulation. In Pmr-1 embryos, migration rates are significantly reduced for cells moving along the embryo surface, such as ventral neuroblasts, C-derived, and anterior-most blastomeres. Gene interaction experiments show changing the activity of itr-1/IP3R and unc-68/RyR modulates levels of embryonic lethality in Pmr-1 strains, indicating pmr-1 acts with these calcium channels to regulate cell migration. This analysis reveals novel genes involved in C. elegans cell migration, as well as a new role in cell migration for the highly conserved SPCA gene family.

  20. The regulated secretory pathway in CD4(+ T cells contributes to human immunodeficiency virus type-1 cell-to-cell spread at the virological synapse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare Jolly

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Direct cell-cell spread of Human Immunodeficiency Virus type-1 (HIV-1 at the virological synapse (VS is an efficient mode of dissemination between CD4(+ T cells but the mechanisms by which HIV-1 proteins are directed towards intercellular contacts is unclear. We have used confocal microscopy and electron tomography coupled with functional virology and cell biology of primary CD4(+ T cells from normal individuals and patients with Chediak-Higashi Syndrome and report that the HIV-1 VS displays a regulated secretion phenotype that shares features with polarized secretion at the T cell immunological synapse (IS. Cell-cell contact at the VS re-orientates the microtubule organizing center (MTOC and organelles within the HIV-1-infected T cell towards the engaged target T cell, concomitant with polarization of viral proteins. Directed secretion of proteins at the T cell IS requires specialized organelles termed secretory lysosomes (SL and we show that the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env localizes with CTLA-4 and FasL in SL-related compartments and at the VS. Finally, CD4(+ T cells that are disabled for regulated secretion are less able to support productive cell-to-cell HIV-1 spread. We propose that HIV-1 hijacks the regulated secretory pathway of CD4(+ T cells to enhance its dissemination.

  1. The Regulated Secretory Pathway in CD4+ T cells Contributes to Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type-1 Cell-to-Cell Spread at the Virological Synapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolly, Clare; Welsch, Sonja; Michor, Stefanie; Sattentau, Quentin J.

    2011-01-01

    Direct cell-cell spread of Human Immunodeficiency Virus type-1 (HIV-1) at the virological synapse (VS) is an efficient mode of dissemination between CD4+ T cells but the mechanisms by which HIV-1 proteins are directed towards intercellular contacts is unclear. We have used confocal microscopy and electron tomography coupled with functional virology and cell biology of primary CD4+ T cells from normal individuals and patients with Chediak-Higashi Syndrome and report that the HIV-1 VS displays a regulated secretion phenotype that shares features with polarized secretion at the T cell immunological synapse (IS). Cell-cell contact at the VS re-orientates the microtubule organizing center (MTOC) and organelles within the HIV-1-infected T cell towards the engaged target T cell, concomitant with polarization of viral proteins. Directed secretion of proteins at the T cell IS requires specialized organelles termed secretory lysosomes (SL) and we show that the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) localizes with CTLA-4 and FasL in SL-related compartments and at the VS. Finally, CD4+ T cells that are disabled for regulated secretion are less able to support productive cell-to-cell HIV-1 spread. We propose that HIV-1 hijacks the regulated secretory pathway of CD4+ T cells to enhance its dissemination. PMID:21909273

  2. Excretory/secretory products of the carcinogenic liver fluke are endocytosed by human cholangiocytes and drive cell proliferation and IL6 production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaiyadet, Sujittra; Smout, Michael; Johnson, Michael; Whitchurch, Cynthia; Turnbull, Lynne; Kaewkes, Sasithorn; Sotillo, Javier; Loukas, Alex; Sripa, Banchob

    2015-10-01

    Liver fluke infection caused by Opisthorchis viverrini remains a major public health problem in many parts of Asia including Thailand, Lao PDR, Vietnam and Cambodia, where there is a strikingly high incidence of cholangiocarcinoma (CCA - hepatic cancer of the bile duct epithelium). Among other factors, uptake of O. viverrini excretory/secretory products (OvES) by biliary epithelial cells has been postulated to be responsible for chronic inflammation and proliferation of cholangiocytes, but the mechanisms by which cells internalise O. viverrini excretory/secretory products are still unknown. Herein we incubated normal human cholangiocytes (H69), human cholangiocarcinoma cells (KKU-100, KKU-M156) and human colon cancer (Caco-2) cells with O. viverrini excretory/secretory products and analysed the effects of different endocytic inhibitors to address the mechanism of cellular uptake of ES proteins. Opisthorchis viverrini excretory/secretory products was internalised preferentially by liver cell lines, and most efficiently/rapidly by H69 cells. There was no evidence for trafficking of ES proteins to cholangiocyte organelles, and most of the fluorescence was detected in the cytoplasm. Pretreatment with clathrin inhibitors significantly reduced the uptake of O. viverrini excretory/secretory products, particularly by H69 cells. Opisthorchis viverrini excretory/secretory products induced proliferation of liver cells (H69 and CCA lines) but not intestinal (Caco-2) cells, and proliferation was blocked using inhibitors of the classical endocytic pathways (clathrin and caveolae). Opisthorchis viverrini excretory/secretory products drove IL6 secretion by H69 cells but not Caco-2 cells, and cytokine secretion was significantly reduced by endocytosis inhibitors. This the first known study to address the endocytosis of helminth ES proteins by host epithelial cells and sheds light on the pathways by which this parasite causes one of the most devastating forms of cancer in south

  3. In vitro proliferation of adult human beta-cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Rutti

    Full Text Available A decrease in functional beta-cell mass is a key feature of type 2 diabetes. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1 analogues induce proliferation of rodent beta-cells. However, the proliferative capacity of human beta-cells and its modulation by GLP-1 analogues remain to be fully investigated. We therefore sought to quantify adult human beta-cell proliferation in vitro and whether this is affected by the GLP-1 analogue liraglutide.Human islets from 7 adult cadaveric organ donors were dispersed into single cells. Beta-cells were purified by FACS. Non-sorted cells and the beta-cell enriched ("beta-cells" population were plated on extracellular matrix from rat (804G and human bladder carcinoma cells (HTB9 or bovine corneal endothelial ECM (BCEC. Cells were maintained in culture+/-liraglutide for 4 days in the presence of BrdU.Rare human beta-cell proliferation could be observed either in the purified beta-cell population (0.051±0.020%; 22 beta-cells proliferating out of 84'283 beta-cells counted or in the non-sorted cell population (0.055±0.011%; 104 proliferating beta-cells out of 232'826 beta-cells counted, independently of the matrix or the culture conditions. Liraglutide increased human beta-cell proliferation on BCEC in the non-sorted cell population (0.082±0.034% proliferating beta-cells vs. 0.017±0.008% in control, p<0.05.These results indicate that adult human beta-cell proliferation can occur in vitro but remains an extremely rare event with these donors and particular culture conditions. Liraglutide increases beta-cell proliferation only in the non-sorted cell population and only on BCEC. However, it cannot be excluded that human beta-cells may proliferate to a greater extent in situ in response to natural stimuli.

  4. Metabolic Stress and Compromised Identity of Pancreatic Beta Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swisa, Avital; Glaser, Benjamin; Dor, Yuval

    2017-01-01

    Beta cell failure is a central feature of type 2 diabetes (T2D), but the molecular underpinnings of the process remain only partly understood. It has been suggested that beta cell failure in T2D involves massive cell death. Other studies ascribe beta cell failure to cell exhaustion, due to chronic oxidative or endoplasmic reticulum stress leading to cellular dysfunction. More recently it was proposed that beta cells in T2D may lose their differentiated identity, possibly even gaining features of other islet cell types. The loss of beta cell identity appears to be driven by glucotoxicity inhibiting the activity of key beta cell transcription factors including Pdx1, Nkx6.1, MafA and Pax6, thereby silencing beta cell genes and derepressing alternative islet cell genes. The loss of beta cell identity is at least partly reversible upon normalization of glycemia, with implications for the reversibility of T2D, although it is not known if beta cell failure reaches eventually a point of no return. In this review we discuss current evidence for metabolism-driven compromised beta cell identity, key knowledge gaps and opportunities for utility in the treatment of T2D.

  5. The impact of beta-elemene on beta-tubulin of human hepatoma hepg2 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuqiu Mao; Liying Ban; Jielin Zhang; Li Hou; Xiaonan Cui

    2014-01-01

    Objective:The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of beta-elemene injection on the growth and beta-tubulin of human hepatocarcinoma HepG2 cells. Methods:cellproliferation was assessed by MTT assay. cellcycle distribution was detected by flow cytometry (FCM). The mRNA expression of beta-tubulin was measured by RT-PCR. West-ern blot analysis was used to determine protein expression of beta-tubulin and the polymerization of beta-tubulin. Results:Beta-elemene injection inhibited HepG2 cells proliferation in a dose-and time-dependent manner;FCM analysis indicated beta-elemene injection induced cellcycle arrested at S phase. RT-PCR and western-blot analysis showed that beta-elemene injection down-regulated beta-tubulin expression at both mRNA and protein levels, presenting a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, beta-elemene injection reduced the polymerization of microtubules in a dose-dependent manner. Conclusion:Beta-elemene injection can inhibit the proliferation of hepatoma HepG2 cells, the mechanism might be partly related to the down-regulation of beta-tubulin and inhibition of microtubular polymerization.

  6. Increased androgen levels in rats impair glucose-stimulated insulin secretion through disruption of pancreatic beta cell mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongdong; Wang, Xiaping; Zhu, Yunxia; Chen, Fang; Sun, Yujie; Han, Xiao

    2015-11-01

    Although insulin resistance is recognized to contribute to the reproductive and metabolic phenotypes of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), pancreatic beta cell dysfunction plays an essential role in the progression from PCOS to the development of type 2 diabetes. However, the role of insulin secretory abnormalities in PCOS has received little attention. In addition, the precise changes in beta cells and the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we therefore attempted to elucidate potential mechanisms involved in beta cell alterations in a rat model of PCOS. Glucose-induced insulin secretion was measured in islets isolated from DHT-treated and control rats. Oxygen consumption rate (OCR), ATP production, and mitochondrial copy number were assayed to evaluate mitochondrial function. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion is significantly decreased in islets from DHT-treated rats. On the other hand, significant reductions are observed in the expression levels of several key genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and in mitochondrial OCR and ATP production in DHT-treated rat islets. Meanwhile, we found that androgens can directly impair beta cell function by inducing mitochondrial dysfunction in vitro in an androgen receptor dependent manner. For the first time, our study demonstrates that increased androgens in female rats can impair glucose-stimulated insulin secretion partly through disruption of pancreatic beta cell mitochondrial function. This work has significance for hyperandrogenic women with PCOS: excess activation of the androgen receptor by androgens may provoke beta cell dysfunction via mitochondrial dysfunction.

  7. Subcellular localization of SV2 and other secretory vesicle components in PC12 cells by an efficient method of preembedding EM immunocytochemistry for cell cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanner, V A; Ploug, Thorkil; Tao-Cheng, J H

    1996-01-01

    We demonstrated the subcellular localization of SV2, a transmembrane protein associated with neuroendocrine secretory vesicles, in NGF-treated PC12 cells by preembedding EM immunocytochemistry (ICC), using a small gold probe followed by silver enhancement. The use of a multiwell chamber slide...

  8. Measurement of the intracellular ph in human stomach cells: a novel approach to evaluate the gastric acid secretory potential of coffee beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Carola; Rubach, Malte; Lang, Roman; Seebach, Elisabeth; Blumberg, Simone; Frank, Oliver; Hofmann, Thomas; Somoza, Veronika

    2010-02-10

    As the consumption of coffee beverages sometimes is reported to cause gastric irritation, for which an increased stomach acid secretion is one of the promoting factors, different processing technologies such as steam-treatment have been developed to reduce putative stomach irritating compounds. There is evidence-based data neither on the effect of detailed processing variations nor on individual coffee components affecting the proton secretory activity (PSA). This work aimed at developing a screening model suitable for investigating the effects of commercial coffee beverages and components thereof on human parietal cells. Human gastric cancer cells (HGT-1) were treated with reconstituted freeze-dried coffee beverages prepared from customary coffee products such as regular coffee (RC, n = 4), mild bean coffee (MBC, n = 5), stomach friendly coffee (SFC, n = 4), and SFC decaffeinated (SFCD, n = 3). PSA was analyzed by flow cytometry using the pH-sensitive dye SNARF-AM. Treatment of the cells with MBC did not result in a PSA different from RC treatment (p component analysis of putative stomach irritating compounds revealed significantly reduced contents of (beta)N-alkanoyl-5-hydroxytryptamides, caffeine, N-methylpyridinium, and catechol in SFCD compared to RC. However, none of these compounds seem to act as the sole key bioactive reducing the PSA of SFCD, since their contents in MBC and SFC samples were not different from those in RC samples, although the PSA of these beverages was significantly lower than that of reconstituted freeze-dried RC beverage.

  9. Impact of simulated microgravity on the secretory and adhesive activity of cultured human vascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudimov, Evgeny; Buravkova, Ludmila; Pogodina, Margarita; Andrianova, Irina

    The layer of vascular endothelial cells (ECs) is a dynamic,disseminated organ that perform the function of an interface between the blood and vascular wall. The endothelial monolayer is able to quickly respond to changes in the microenvironment due to its synthesis of vasoactive substances, chemokines, adhesion molecules expression, etc. ECs are highly sensitive to gravitational changes and capable of short-term and long-term responses (Sangha et al., 2001; Buravkova et al., 2005; Infanger et al., 2006, 2007. However, the question remains how to reflect the impact of microgravity on endothelium under the inflammatory process. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate secretory and adhesive activity of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) during simulated microgravity and TNF-a activation. HUVECs were isolated according to Gimbrone et al. (1978) in modification A. Antonov (1981) and used for experiments at 2-4 passages. HUVECs were activated by low level of TNF-a (2 ng/ml). Microgravity was generated by Random Positioning Machine (RPM, Dutch Space, Leiden) placed into the thermostat at 37°C. After 24 hours of clinorotation we measured adhesion molecules expression on the cell surface (ICAM-1, VCAM-1, PECAM-1, E-selectin, CD144, endoglin (CD105)) and cell viability using a flow cytometry. To evaluate the level of target gene expression was used the real time RT-PCR. IL-6 and IL-8 concentration was measured in the conditioned medium of HUVECs by using the ELISA test. We found that simulated microgravity within 24 hours caused a decrease of ICAM-1, CD144, and E-selectin expression, at the same time not affect the cell viability, endoglin and PECAM-1 expression on the surface HUVEC. Furthermore, there were no changes of the level of IL-6 and IL-8 gene expression and their products in the culture medium. TNF-activated HUVECs showed an increase in gene expression of interleukins and molecules involved in the adhesion process, which also was confirmed

  10. Elevation of susceptibility to ozone-induced acute tracheobronchial injury in transgenic mice deficient in Clara cell secretory protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plopper, C G; Mango, G W; Hatch, G E; Wong, V J; Toskala, E; Reynolds, S D; Tarkington, B K; Stripp, B R

    2006-05-15

    Increases in Clara cell abundance or cellular expression of Clara cell secretory protein (CCSP) may cause increased tolerance of the lung to acute oxidant injury by repeated exposure to ozone (O3). This study defines how disruption of the gene for CCSP synthesis affects the susceptibility of tracheobronchial epithelium to acute oxidant injury. Mice homozygous for a null allele of the CCSP gene (CCSP-/-) and wild type (CCSP+/+) littermates were exposed to ozone (0.2 ppm, 8 h; 1 ppm, 8 h) or filtered air. Injury was evaluated by light and scanning electron microscopy, and the abundance of necrotic, ciliated, and nonciliated cells was estimated by morphometry. Proximal and midlevel intrapulmonary airways and terminal bronchioles were evaluated. There was no difference in airway epithelial composition between CCSP+/+ and CCSP-/- mice exposed to filtered air, and exposure to 0.2 ppm ozone caused little injury to the epithelium of both CCSP+/+ and CCSP-/- mice. After exposure to 1.0 ppm ozone, CCSP-/- mice suffered from a greater degree of epithelial injury throughout the airways compared to CCSP+/+ mice. CCSP-/- mice had both ciliated and nonciliated cell injury. Furthermore, lack of CCSP was associated with a shift in airway injury to include proximal airway generations. Therefore, we conclude that CCSP modulates the susceptibility of the epithelium to oxidant-induced injury. Whether this is due to the presence of CCSP on the acellular lining layer surface and/or its intracellular distribution in the secretory cell population needs to be defined.

  11. Urethral glands of the male mouse contain secretory component and immunoglobulin A plasma cells and are targets of testosterone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parr, M B; Ren, H P; Russell, L D; Prins, G S; Parr, E L

    1992-12-01

    The occurrence and possible functions of mucosal immunity in the male urogenital tract have not been extensively investigated. In this study we used immunolabeling to localize secretory component (SC) and immunoglobulin (Ig) A in the urogenital tract of the male mouse. SC was located in the ventral prostate, while SC and IgA plasma cells were both detected in the urethral glands in the pelvic and bulbous portions of the urethra. SC and IgA were not observed elsewhere in the urogenital tract. We also examined the ventral prostate and urethral glands of sham-castrated, oil-treated castrated, and testosterone-treated castrated mice. There was a striking reduction in the size of the ventral prostate and urethral glands in oil-treated castrates compared to the other two groups, based on gross and histological morphology. Morphometric analysis showed that the cell and nuclear sizes of the urethral gland acinar cells were reduced after castration and restored to normal size by testosterone treatment. Androgen receptors (AR) were localized in the nuclei of urethral gland cells by immunocytochemistry using anti-AR antibodies. Labeling of SC and IgA plasma cells was similar in the urethral glands and ventral prostates of sham- and testosterone-treated castrates, but was reduced or absent at these sites in oil-treated castrates. These studies show that the ventral prostate and urethral glands may be sites for secretory immunity in the male murine urogenital tract, and that the urethral glands are targets for testosterone.

  12. Hydrogen sulfide induces hyperpolarization and decreases the exocytosis of secretory granules of rat GH3 pituitary tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafina, Alsu N; Yakovlev, Aleksey V; Gaifullina, Aisylu Sh; Weiger, Thomas M; Hermann, Anton; Sitdikova, Guzel F

    2015-10-02

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) on the membrane potential, action potential discharge and exocytosis of secretory granules in neurosecretory pituitary tumor cells (GH3). The H2S donor - sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) induced membrane hyperpolarization, followed by truncation of spontaneous electrical activity and decrease of the membrane resistance. The NaHS effect was dose-dependent with an EC50 of 152 μM (equals effective H2S of 16-19 μM). NaHS effects were not altered after inhibition of maxi conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels by tetraethylammonium or paxilline, but were significantly reduced after inhibition or activation of ATP-dependent potassium channels (KATP) by glibenclamide or by diazoxide, respectively. In whole-cell recordings NaHS increased the amplitude of KATP currents, induced by hyperpolarizing pulses and subsequent application of glibenclamide decreased currents to control levels. Using the fluorescent dye FM 1-43 exocytosis of secretory granules was analyzed in basal and stimulated conditions (high K(+) external solution). Prior application of NaHS decreased the fluorescence of the cell membrane in both conditions which links with activation of KATP currents (basal secretion) and activation of KATP currents and BK-currents (stimulated exocytosis). We suggest that H2S induces hyperpolarization of GH3 cells by activation of KATP channels which results in a truncation of spontaneous action potentials and a decrease of hormone release.

  13. Functional expression of a Kir2.1-like inwardly rectifying potassium channel in mouse mammary secretory cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamikawa, Akihiro; Ishikawa, Toru

    2014-02-01

    K(+) channels in mammary secretory (MS) cells are believed to play a role in transcellular electrolyte transport and thus determining ionic composition of the aqueous phase of milk. However, direct evidence for specific K(+) channel activity in native MS cells is lacking at the single-cell level. Here, we show for the first time that an inwardly rectifying K(+) (Kir) channel is functionally expressed in fully differentiated MS cells that were freshly isolated from the mammary gland of lactating mice. Using the standard whole cell patch-clamp technique, we found that mouse MS cells consistently displayed a K(+) current, whose electrophysiological properties are similar to those previously reported for Kir2.x channels, particularly Kir2.1: 1) current-voltage relationship with strong inward rectification, 2) slope conductance approximately proportional to the square root of external K(+) concentration, 3) voltage- and time-dependent and high-affinity block by external Ba(2+), and 4) voltage-dependent inhibition by external Cs(+). Accordingly, RT-PCR analysis revealed the gene expression of Kir2.1, but not Kir2.2, Kir2.3, and Kir2.4, in lactating mouse mammary gland, and immunohistochemical staining showed Kir2.1 protein expression in the secretory cells. Cell-attached patch recordings from MS cells revealed that a 31-pS K(+) channel with strong inward rectification was likely active at the resting membrane potential. Collectively, the present work demonstrates that a functional Kir2.1-like channel is expressed in lactating mouse MS cells. We propose that the channel might be involved, at least in part, in secretion and/or preservation of ionic components of milk stored into the lumen of these cells.

  14. Apoptosis of beta cells in diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anuradha, Rachakatla; Saraswati, Mudigonda; Kumar, Kishore G; Rani, Surekha H

    2014-11-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a multifactorial metabolic disorder characterized by hyperglycemia. Apoptosis in beta cells has been observed in response to diverse stimuli, such as glucose, cytokines, free fatty acids, leptin, and sulfonylureas, leading to the activation of polyol, hexosamine, and diacylglycerol/protein kinase-C (DAG/PKC) pathways that mediate oxidative and nitrosative stress causing the release of different cytokines. Cytokines induce the expression of Fas and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) by activating the transcription factor, nuclear factor-κb, and signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT-1) in the β cells in the extrinsic pathway of apoptosis. Cytokines produced in beta cells also induce proapoptotic members of the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis. The genetic alterations in apoptosis signaling machinery and the pathogenesis of diabetes include Fas, FasL, Akt, caspases, calpain-10, and phosphatase and tensin homolog (Pten). The other gene products that are involved in diabetes are nitric oxide synthase-2 (NOS2), small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO), apolipoprotein CIII (ApoCIII), forkhead box protein O1 (FOXO1), and Kruppel-like zinc finger protein Gli-similar 3 (GLIS3). The gene products having antiapoptotic nature are Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL. Epigenetic mechanisms play an important role in type I and type II diabetes. Further studies on the apoptotic genes and gene products in diabetics may be helpful in pharmacogenomics and individualized treatment along with antioxidants targeting apoptosis in diabetes.

  15. TGF-beta and BMP in breast cancer cell invasion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naber, Hildegonda Petronella Henriëtte

    2012-01-01

    TGF-beta and BMPs are members of the TGF-beta superfamily of cytokines which play an important role in a multitude of processes. In cancer, TGF-beta is known for its dual role: in early stages it inhibits cancer cell proliferation, whereas in later stages it promotes invasion and metastasis. In this

  16. The Relationship between the Ionic Composition of the Environment and the Secretory Activity of the Endocrine Cell Types of Stannius Corpuscles in the Teleost Gasterosteus aculeatus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wendelaar Bonga, S.E.; Greven, J.A.A.; Veenhuis, M.

    1976-01-01

    The corpuscles of Stannius of threespined sticklebacks contain two glandular cell types of presumed endocrine nature. To elucidate the function of both cell types the secretory activity of the cells was studied in fully adapted seawater and freshwater fishes and in specimens transferred from sea

  17. Dopamine D2-like receptors are expressed in pancreatic beta cells and mediate inhibition of insulin secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubí, Blanca; Ljubicic, Sanda; Pournourmohammadi, Shirin; Carobbio, Stefania; Armanet, Mathieu; Bartley, Clarissa; Maechler, Pierre

    2005-11-04

    Dopamine signaling is mediated by five cloned receptors, grouped into D1-like (D1 and D5) and D2-like (D2, D3 and D4) families. We identified by reverse transcription-PCR the presence of dopamine receptors from both families in INS-1E insulin-secreting cells as well as in rodent and human isolated islets. D2 receptor expression was confirmed by immunodetection revealing localization on insulin secretory granules of INS-1E and primary rodent and human beta cells. We then tested potential effects mediated by the identified receptors on beta cell function. Dopamine (10 microM) and the D2-like receptor agonist quinpirole (5 microM) inhibited glucose-stimulated insulin secretion tested in several models, i.e. INS-1E beta cells, fluorescence-activated cell-sorted primary rat beta cells, and pancreatic islets of rat, mouse, and human origin. Insulin exocytosis is controlled by metabolism coupled to cytosolic calcium changes. Measurements of glucose-induced mitochondrial hyperpolarization and ATP generation showed that dopamine and D2-like agonists did not inhibit glucose metabolism. On the other hand, dopamine decreased cell membrane depolarization as well as cytosolic calcium increases evoked by glucose stimulation in INS-1E beta cells. These results show for the first time that dopamine receptors are expressed in pancreatic beta cells. Dopamine inhibited glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, an effect that could be ascribed to D2-like receptors. Regarding the molecular mechanisms implicated in dopamine-mediated inhibition of insulin release, our results point to distal steps in metabolism-secretion coupling. Thus, the role played by dopamine in glucose homeostasis might involve dopamine receptors, expressed in pancreatic beta cells, modulating insulin release.

  18. Imaging the Beta-cell mass: why and how

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saudek, Frantisek; Brogren, Carl-Henrik; Manohar, Srirang

    2008-01-01

    Diabetes is a disorder characterized by beta-cell loss or exhaustion and insulin deficiency. At present, knowledge is lacking on the underlying causes and for the therapeutic recovery of the beta-cell mass. A better understanding of diabetes pathogenesis could be obtained through exact monitoring...... of the native beta-cell mass is still limited to autopsy studies. Endeavors to find a biological structure specific for beta-cells led to the discovery of potential candidates that have been tested for noninvasive imaging. Among them are the ligand to the vesicular monoamine transporter type 2 (VMAT-2), which...... is called dihydrotetrabenazine (DTBZ), antibodies to zinc transporter (ZnT-8) and the monoclonal antibody IC2. While DTBZ and antibodies to ZnT-8 showed binding activities to more than beta-cells, the anti-IC2 monoclonal antibody showed binding properties exclusively to insulin-producing beta...

  19. Illuminating cellular structure and function in the early secretory pathway by multispectral 3D imaging in living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rietdorf, Jens; Stephens, David J.; Squire, Anthony; Simpson, Jeremy; Shima, David T.; Paccaud, Jean-Pierre; Bastiaens, Philippe I.; Pepperkok, Rainer

    2000-04-01

    Membrane traffic between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the Golgi complex is regulated by two vesicular coat complexes, COPII and COPI. COPII has been implicated in selective packaging of anterograde cargo into coated transport vesicles budding from the ER. COPI-coated vesicles are proposed to mediate recycling of proteins from the Golgi complex to the ER. We have used multi spectral 3D imaging to visualize COPI and COPII behavior simultaneously with various GFP-tagged secretory markers in living cells. This shows that COPII and COPI act sequentially whereby COPI association with anterograde transport complexes is involved in microtubule-based transport and the en route segregation of ER recycling molecules from secretory cargo within TCS in transit to the Golgi complex. We have also investigated the possibility to discriminate spectrally GFP fusion proteins by fluorescence lifetime imaging. This shows that at least two, and possibly up to three GFP fusion proteins can be discriminated and localized in living cells using a single excitation wavelength and a single broad band emission filter.

  20. Expression of transforming growth factor beta (TGF beta) receptors and expression of TGF beta 1, TGF beta 2 and TGF beta 3 in human small cell lung cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damstrup, L; Rygaard, K; Spang-Thomsen, M;

    1993-01-01

    A panel of 21 small cell lung cancer cell (SCLC) lines were examined for the presence of Transforming growth factor beta receptors (TGF beta-r) and the expression of TGF beta mRNAs. By the radioreceptor assay we found high affinity receptors to be expressed in six cell lines. scatchard analysis...... of the binding data demonstrated that the cells bound between 4.5 and 27.5 fmol mg-1 protein with a KD ranging from 16 to 40 pM. TGF beta 1 binding to the receptors was confirmed by cross-linking TGF beta 1 to the TGF beta-r. Three classes of TGF beta-r were demonstrated, type I and type II receptors with M......(r) = 65,000 and 90,000 and the betaglycan (type III) with M(r) = 280,000. Northern blotting showed expression of TGF beta 1 mRNA in ten, TGF beta 2 mRNA in two and TGF beta 3 mRNA in seven cell lines. Our results provide, for the first time, evidence that a large proportion of a broad panel of SCLC cell...

  1. Excretory/secretory products of Fasciola hepatica but not recombinant phosphoglycerate kinase induce death of human hepatocyte cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bąska, Piotr; Norbury, Luke J; Wiśniewski, Marcin; Januszkiewicz, Kamil; Wędrychowicz, Halina

    2013-06-01

    The liver fluke Fasciola hepatica infects a wide range of hosts, and has a considerable impact on the agriculture industry, mainly through infections of sheep and cattle. Further, human infection is now considered of public health importance and is hyperendemic in some regions. The fluke infection causes considerable damage to the hosts' liver. However, the mechanisms of liver destruction have not yet been completely elucidated. In the present report we incubated a human liver cell line in the presence of either F. hepatica excretory/secretory material (FhES) or recombinant phosphoglycerate kinase (FhPGK). Dosedependent cytotoxicity in the presence of FhES was observed, indicating that FhES is capable of killing human hepatocytes, supporting a role for FhES in damaging host liver cells during infection; while treatment with a recombinant intracellular protein - FhPGK, had no impact on cell survival.

  2. GTP- and GDP-Dependent Rab27a Effectors in Pancreatic Beta-Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaoka, Mami; Ishizaki, Toshimasa; Kimura, Toshihide

    2015-01-01

    Small guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) participate in a wide variety of cellular functions including proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, and intracellular transport. Conventionally, only the guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP)-bound small GTPase interacts with effector proteins, and the resulting downstream signals control specific cellular functions. Therefore, the GTP-bound form is regarded as active, and the focus has been on searching for proteins that bind the GTP form to look for their effectors. The Rab family small GTPase Rab27a is highly expressed in some secretory cells and is involved in the control of membrane traffic. The present study reviews recent progress in our understanding of the roles of Rab27a and its effectors in pancreatic beta-cells. In the basal state, GTP-bound Rab27a controls insulin secretion at pre-exocytic stages via its GTP-dependent effectors. We previously identified novel guanosine 5'-diphosphate (GDP)-bound Rab27-interacting proteins. Interestingly, GDP-bound Rab27a controls endocytosis of the secretory membrane via its interaction with these proteins. We also demonstrated that the insulin secretagogue glucose converts Rab27a from its GTP- to GDP-bound forms. Thus, GTP- and GDP-bound Rab27a regulate pre-exocytic and endocytic stages in membrane traffic, respectively. Since the physiological importance of GDP-bound GTPases has been largely overlooked, we consider that the investigation of GDP-dependent effectors for other GTPases is necessary for further understanding of cellular function.

  3. PLACENTAL SECRETORY FACTORS INFLUENCE TO THP-1 CELLS PHENOTYPE AND THP-1 CELLS TRANSENDOTHELIAL MIGRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. I. Stepanova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Decidual and placental macrophage pools are renewed due to its transendothelial monocyte migration from peripheral blood. Tissue macrophages control placental development and provide fetomaternal immunological tolerance. Preeclamptic pregnancy is accompanied by increased monocyte migration to decidual tissue and local inflammatory events. Regulatory mechanisms of monocyte recruitment to placental and decidual tissues is still unclear. Therefore we investigated the influence soluble placental factors (SPFs during the first- and third-trimester normal pregnancy, as compared to effects of these factors in preeclamptic pregnancy. We studied biological actions of SPF upon transendothelial migration of monocyte-like THP-1 cells and their phenotypic pattern. Transendothelial migration of THP-1 cells was more intensive with firsttrimester SPFs from normal pregnancy, when compared with third-trimester samples, and it was accompanied by decreased CD11a expression. SPFs from pre-eclamptic pregnancy caused an increase in transendothelial migration of THP-1 cells, as compared to SPFs from normal pregnancies, being accompanied by increased CD11b expression. The present study was supported by grants ГК №  02.740.11.0711, НШ-3594.2010.7, МД-150.2011.7 and a grant from St.-Petersburg Goverment for young scientists.

  4. Secretory function of ovarian cells and myometrial contractions in cow are affected by chlorinated insecticides (chlordane, heptachlor, mirex) in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrobel, Michael Hubert; Mlynarczuk, Jaroslaw

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of chlordane, heptachlor and mirex, on hormonal regulation of the force of myometrial contractions. Myometrial, endometrial, granulosa and luteal cells as well as strips of myometrium from non-pregnant cows were incubated with three insecticides at environmentally relevant doses (0.1, 1 or 10ng/ml). None of the insecticides affected the viability of studied cells. Chlordane stimulated, while heptachlor and mirex inhibited, secretion of testosterone and estradiol from granulosa cells as well as secretion of progesterone from luteal cells, respectively. Secretion of oxytocin (OT) from granulosa cells was increased after incubation with all studied insecticides. Only mirex stimulated OT secretion from luteal cells, while heptachlor inhibited this effect. None of them affected synthesis of OT in luteal cells and prostaglandins (PGF2 and PGE2) secretion from uterine cells, except PGE2 secretion from endometrial cells was decreased when the cells were incubated with 0.1ng/ml of chlordane. Basal and OT-stimulated myometrial contractions were increased by mirex and decreased by heptachlor. The data show that the insecticides altered secretory function of ovarian cells. Heptachlor and mirex affected also myometrial contractions in vitro, but uterine secretion of prostaglandins were not involved in the mechanism of that adverse effect of insecticides. The data indicate on potential of these insecticides to disturb fertilisation, blastocyst implantation or even the length of gestation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Ryanodine receptor type I and nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate receptors mediate Ca2+ release from insulin-containing vesicles in living pancreatic beta-cells (MIN6).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Kathryn J; Lai, F Anthony; Rutter, Guy A

    2003-03-28

    We have demonstrated recently (Mitchell, K. J., Pinton, P., Varadi, A., Tacchetti, C., Ainscow, E. K., Pozzan, T., Rizzuto, R., and Rutter, G. A. (2001) J. Cell Biol. 155, 41-51) that ryanodine receptors (RyR) are present on insulin-containing secretory vesicles. Here we show that pancreatic islets and derived beta-cell lines express type I and II, but not type III, RyRs. Purified by subcellular fractionation and membrane immuno-isolation, dense core secretory vesicles were found to possess a similar level of type I RyR immunoreactivity as Golgi/endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes but substantially less RyR II than the latter. Monitored in cells expressing appropriately targeted aequorins, dantrolene, an inhibitor of RyR I channels, elevated free Ca(2+) concentrations in the secretory vesicle compartment from 40.1 +/- 6.7 to 90.4 +/- 14.8 microm (n = 4, p < 0.01), while having no effect on ER Ca(2+) concentrations. Furthermore, nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP), a novel Ca(2+)-mobilizing agent, decreased dense core secretory vesicle but not ER free Ca(2+) concentrations in permeabilized MIN6 beta-cells, and flash photolysis of caged NAADP released Ca(2+) from a thapsigargin-insensitive Ca(2+) store in single MIN6 cells. Because dantrolene strongly inhibited glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (from 3.07 +/- 0.51-fold stimulation to no significant glucose effect; n = 3, p < 0.01), we conclude that RyR I-mediated Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release from secretory vesicles, possibly potentiated by NAADP, is essential for the activation of insulin secretion.

  6. The bHLH transcription factor Ascl1a is essential for the specification of the intestinal secretory cells and mediates Notch signaling in the zebrafish intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flasse, Lydie C; Stern, David G; Pirson, Justine L; Manfroid, Isabelle; Peers, Bernard; Voz, Marianne L

    2013-04-15

    Notch signaling has a fundamental role in stem cell maintenance and in cell fate choice in the intestine of different species. Canonically, Notch signaling represses the expression of transcription factors of the achaete-scute like (ASCL) or atonal related protein (ARP) families. Identifying the ARP/ASCL genes expressed in the gastrointestinal tract is essential to build the regulatory cascade controlling the differentiation of gastrointestinal progenitors into the different intestinal cell types. The expression of the ARP/ASCL factors was analyzed in zebrafish to identify, among all the ARP/ASCL factors found in the zebrafish genome, those expressed in the gastrointestinal tract. ascl1a was found to be the earliest factor detected in the intestine. Loss-of-function analyses using the pia/ascl1a mutant, revealed that ascl1a is crucial for the differentiation of all secretory cells. Furthermore, we identify a battery of transcription factors expressed during secretory cell differentiation and downstream of ascl1a. Finally, we show that the repression of secretory cell fate by Notch signaling is mediated by the inhibition of ascl1a expression. In conclusion, this work identifies Ascl1a as a key regulator of the secretory cell lineage in the zebrafish intestine, playing the same role as Atoh1 in the mouse intestine. This highlights the diversity in the ARP/ASCL family members acting as cell fate determinants downstream from Notch signaling. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A Western Blot-based Investigation of the Yeast Secretory Pathway Designed for an Intermediate-Level Undergraduate Cell Biology Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood-DeGrenier, Jennifer K.

    2008-01-01

    The movement of newly synthesized proteins through the endomembrane system of eukaryotic cells, often referred to generally as the secretory pathway, is a topic covered in most intermediate-level undergraduate cell biology courses. An article previously published in this journal described a laboratory exercise in which yeast mutants defective in…

  8. A Western Blot-based Investigation of the Yeast Secretory Pathway Designed for an Intermediate-Level Undergraduate Cell Biology Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood-DeGrenier, Jennifer K.

    2008-01-01

    The movement of newly synthesized proteins through the endomembrane system of eukaryotic cells, often referred to generally as the secretory pathway, is a topic covered in most intermediate-level undergraduate cell biology courses. An article previously published in this journal described a laboratory exercise in which yeast mutants defective in…

  9. Inflammatory cues modulate the expression of secretory product genes, Golgi sulfotransferases and sulfomucin production in LS174T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croix, Jennifer A; Bhatia, Shikha; Gaskins, H Rex

    2011-12-01

    The signals that mediate goblet cell expression of specific mucin chemotypes are poorly defined. Animal and in vitro studies show that acidomucin chemotypes may be altered by inflammation and changes in intestinal microbiota. To examine factors that may elicit this response, human adenocarcinoma-derived LS174T cells, which have a goblet cell-like phenotype and produce both sulfo- and sialomucins, were used to examine the effects of selected microbial and host factors on expression of goblet cell secretory product genes, sulfotransferases and sulfomucin production. Expression of genes encoding mucin 2 (MUC2), resistin-like molecule β (RETNLB), and trefoil factor 3 (TFF3) and Golgi sulfotransferases, carbohydrate (N-acetylglucosamine 6-O) sulfotransferase 5 (CHST5) and galactose-3-O-sulfotransferase 2 (GAL3ST2), was measured by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction following treatment with bacterial flagellin, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) or the mucogenic cytokine interleukin-13 (IL-13). Expression of the toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5) gene was also analysed. Sulfomucin expression was examined via high-iron diamide/alcian blue (HID/AB) histochemistry and immunofluorescent staining for the Sulfo Le(a) antigen, which is synthesized in part by GAL3ST2. Flagellin, IL-13 and TNF-α all significantly increased GAL3ST2, MUC2, TFF3 and TLR5 expression, while only IL-13 increased RETNLB and CHST5 expression. Based on HID/AB histochemistry, mucin sulfation was significantly increased in response to both flagellin and IL-13 but not TNF-α. Only treatment with flagellin increased the expression of the Sulfo Le(a) antigen. Collectively, these results indicate that bacterial flagellin, IL-13 and TNF-α differentially modulate the expression of goblet cell secretory product genes, sulfotransferases and sulfomucin production.

  10. Mechanisms of pancreatic beta-cell growth and regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    1989-01-01

    Information about the mechanism of beta-cell growth and regeneration may be obtained by studies of insulinoma cells. In the present study the growth and function of the rat insulinoma cell lines RINm5F and 5AH were evaluated by addition of serum, hormones, and growth factors. It was found...... of insulin mRNA content showed that the insulinoma cells only contained about 2% of that of normal rat beta-cells. These results are discussed in relation to the role of growth factors, oncogenes, and differentiation in the growth and regeneration of beta-cells....

  11. Senescence-Associated Secretory Phenotypes Reveal Cell-Nonautonomous Functions of Oncogenic RAS and the p53 Tumor Suppressor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copp& #233; , Jean-Philippe; Patil, Christopher; Rodier, Francis; Sun, Yu; Munoz, Denise; Goldstein, Joshua; Nelson, Peter; Desprez, Pierre-Yves; Campisi, Judith

    2008-10-24

    Cellular senescence suppresses cancer by arresting cell proliferation, essentially permanently, in response to oncogenic stimuli, including genotoxic stress. We modified the use of antibody arrays to provide a quantitative assessment of factors secreted by senescent cells. We show that human cells induced to senesce by genotoxic stress secrete myriad factors associated with inflammation and malignancy. This senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) developed slowly over several days and only after DNA damage of sufficient magnitude to induce senescence. Remarkably similar SASPs developed in normal fibroblasts, normal epithelial cells, and epithelial tumor cells after genotoxic stress in culture, and in epithelial tumor cells in vivo after treatment of prostate cancer patients with DNA-damaging chemotherapy. In cultured premalignant epithelial cells, SASPs induced an epithelial-mesenchyme transition and invasiveness, hallmarks of malignancy, by a paracrine mechanism that depended largely on the SASP factors interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8. Strikingly, two manipulations markedly amplified, and accelerated development of, the SASPs: oncogenic RAS expression, which causes genotoxic stress and senescence in normal cells, and functional loss of the p53 tumor suppressor protein. Both loss of p53 and gain of oncogenic RAS also exacerbated the promalignant paracrine activities of the SASPs. Our findings define a central feature of genotoxic stress-induced senescence. Moreover, they suggest a cell-nonautonomous mechanism by which p53 can restrain, and oncogenic RAS can promote, the development of age-related cancer by altering the tissue microenvironment.

  12. A human-like senescence-associated secretory phenotype is conserved in mouse cells dependent on physiological oxygen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Philippe Coppé

    Full Text Available Cellular senescence irreversibly arrests cell proliferation in response to oncogenic stimuli. Human cells develop a senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP, which increases the secretion of cytokines and other factors that alter the behavior of neighboring cells. We show here that "senescent" mouse fibroblasts, which arrested growth after repeated passage under standard culture conditions (20% oxygen, do not express a human-like SASP, and differ from similarly cultured human cells in other respects. However, when cultured in physiological (3% oxygen and induced to senesce by radiation, mouse cells more closely resemble human cells, including expression of a robust SASP. We describe two new aspects of the human and mouse SASPs. First, cells from both species upregulated the expression and secretion of several matrix metalloproteinases, which comprise a conserved genomic cluster. Second, for both species, the ability to promote the growth of premalignant epithelial cells was due primarily to the conserved SASP factor CXCL-1/KC/GRO-alpha. Further, mouse fibroblasts made senescent in 3%, but not 20%, oxygen promoted epithelial tumorigenesis in mouse xenographs. Our findings underscore critical mouse-human differences in oxygen sensitivity, identify conditions to use mouse cells to model human cellular senescence, and reveal novel conserved features of the SASP.

  13. Senescence-associated secretory phenotypes reveal cell-nonautonomous functions of oncogenic RAS and the p53 tumor suppressor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Philippe Coppé

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Cellular senescence suppresses cancer by arresting cell proliferation, essentially permanently, in response to oncogenic stimuli, including genotoxic stress. We modified the use of antibody arrays to provide a quantitative assessment of factors secreted by senescent cells. We show that human cells induced to senesce by genotoxic stress secrete myriad factors associated with inflammation and malignancy. This senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP developed slowly over several days and only after DNA damage of sufficient magnitude to induce senescence. Remarkably similar SASPs developed in normal fibroblasts, normal epithelial cells, and epithelial tumor cells after genotoxic stress in culture, and in epithelial tumor cells in vivo after treatment of prostate cancer patients with DNA-damaging chemotherapy. In cultured premalignant epithelial cells, SASPs induced an epithelial-mesenchyme transition and invasiveness, hallmarks of malignancy, by a paracrine mechanism that depended largely on the SASP factors interleukin (IL-6 and IL-8. Strikingly, two manipulations markedly amplified, and accelerated development of, the SASPs: oncogenic RAS expression, which causes genotoxic stress and senescence in normal cells, and functional loss of the p53 tumor suppressor protein. Both loss of p53 and gain of oncogenic RAS also exacerbated the promalignant paracrine activities of the SASPs. Our findings define a central feature of genotoxic stress-induced senescence. Moreover, they suggest a cell-nonautonomous mechanism by which p53 can restrain, and oncogenic RAS can promote, the development of age-related cancer by altering the tissue microenvironment.

  14. Adverse influence of coumestrol on secretory function of bovine luteal cells in the first trimester of pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Młynarczuk, J; Wróbel, M H; Kotwica, J

    2013-07-01

    Coumestrol is one of a few biologically active substances present in leguminous plants, which are widely used as fodder for ruminants. Depending on the doses, coumestrol acts on the reproductive processes as an estrogen-like factor or antiestrogen to evoke a decrease in ovulation frequency, elongation of estrous cycle duration. The aim of the current investigations was to study the influence of coumestrol on secretory function of luteal cells obtained from first trimester of pregnant cows. Luteal cells (2.5 × 10(5) /mL) from 3rd to 5th, 6th to 8th, and 9th to 12th week of pregnancy were preincubated for 24 h and incubated with coumestrol (1 × 10(-6) M) for successive 48 h and the medium concentrations of progesterone (P4), oxytocin (OT), prostaglandin (PG) E2 and F2α were determined. Moreover, the expression of mRNA for neurophysin-I/oxytocin (NP-I/OT; precursor of OT) and peptidyl-glycine-α-amidating mono-oxygenase (PGA, an enzyme responsible for post-translational OT synthesis) was determined after 8 h of treatment. Coumestrol did not affect P4 secretion but increased the secretion of OT from the cells collected at all stages of gestation studied. Hence, the ratio of P4 to OT was markedly decreased. Simultaneously, coumestrol increased the expression of NP-I/OT mRNA during 9th to 12th weeks of pregnancy, and mRNA for PGA during 3rd to 5th and 9th to 12th weeks of gestation. Furthermore, coumestrol decreased PGE2 secretion from luteal cells in all studied stages of pregnancy, while it affected PGF2α metabolite (PGFM) concentration only from week 3 to 5 of pregnancy. Obtained results suggest that coumestrol impairs secretory function of the corpus luteum (CL) and this way it can affect the maintenance of pregnancy in the cow.

  15. Proliferation of sorted human and rat beta cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parnaud, G; Bosco, D; Berney, T;

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine whether purified beta cells can replicate in vitro and whether this is enhanced by extracellular matrix (ECM) and growth factors.......The aim of the study was to determine whether purified beta cells can replicate in vitro and whether this is enhanced by extracellular matrix (ECM) and growth factors....

  16. Loss of ascl1a prevents secretory cell differentiation within the zebrafish intestinal epithelium resulting in a loss of distal intestinal motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Gillian; Heath Wallace, Rachel; Cameron, Amy; Emrah Ozel, Rifat; Hongay, Cintia F; Baral, Reshica; Andreescu, Silvana; Wallace, Kenneth N

    2013-04-15

    The vertebrate intestinal epithelium is renewed continuously from stem cells at the base of the crypt in mammals or base of the fold in fish over the life of the organism. As stem cells divide, newly formed epithelial cells make an initial choice between a secretory or enterocyte fate. This choice has previously been demonstrated to involve Notch signaling as well as Atonal and Her transcription factors in both embryogenesis and adults. Here, we demonstrate that in contrast to the atoh1 in mammals, ascl1a is responsible for formation of secretory cells in zebrafish. ascl1a-/- embryos lack all intestinal epithelial secretory cells and instead differentiate into enterocytes. ascl1a-/- embryos also fail to induce intestinal epithelial expression of deltaD suggesting that ascl1a plays a role in initiation of Notch signaling. Inhibition of Notch signaling increases the number of ascl1a and deltaD expressing intestinal epithelial cells as well as the number of developing secretory cells during two specific time periods: between 30 and 34hpf and again between 64 and 74hpf. Loss of enteroendocrine products results in loss of anterograde motility in ascl1a-/- embryos. 5HT produced by enterochromaffin cells is critical in motility and secretion within the intestine. We find that addition of exogenous 5HT to ascl1a-/- embryos at near physiological levels (measured by differential pulse voltammetry) induce anterograde motility at similar levels to wild type velocity, distance, and frequency. Removal or doubling the concentration of 5HT in WT embryos does not significantly affect anterograde motility, suggesting that the loss of additional enteroendocrine products in ascl1a-/- embryos also contributes to intestinal motility. Thus, zebrafish intestinal epithelial cells appear to have a common secretory progenitor from which all subtypes form. Loss of enteroendocrine cells reveals the critical need for enteroendocrine products in maintenance of normal intestinal motility.

  17. Dense core secretory vesicles revealed as a dynamic Ca2+ store in neuroendocrine cells with a vesicle-associated membrane protein aequorin chimaera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Kathryn J.; Pinton, Paolo; Varadi, Aniko; Tacchetti, Carlo; Ainscow, Edward K.; Pozzan, Tullio; Rizzuto, Rosario; Rutter, Guy A.

    2001-01-01

    The role of dense core secretory vesicles in the control of cytosolic-free Ca2+ concentrations ([Ca2+]c) in neuronal and neuroendocrine cells is enigmatic. By constructing a vesicle-associated membrane protein 2–synaptobrevin.aequorin chimera, we show that in clonal pancreatic islet β-cells: (a) increases in [Ca2+]c cause a prompt increase in intravesicular-free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]SV), which is mediated by a P-type Ca2+-ATPase distinct from the sarco(endo) plasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase, but which may be related to the PMR1/ATP2C1 family of Ca2+ pumps; (b) steady state Ca2+ concentrations are 3–5-fold lower in secretory vesicles than in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) or Golgi apparatus, suggesting the existence of tightly bound and more rapidly exchanging pools of Ca2+; (c) inositol (1,4,5) trisphosphate has no impact on [Ca2+]SV in intact or permeabilized cells; and (d) ryanodine receptor (RyR) activation with caffeine or 4-chloro-3-ethylphenol in intact cells, or cyclic ADPribose in permeabilized cells, causes a dramatic fall in [Ca2+]SV. Thus, secretory vesicles represent a dynamic Ca2+ store in neuroendocrine cells, whose characteristics are in part distinct from the ER/Golgi apparatus. The presence of RyRs on secretory vesicles suggests that local Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release from vesicles docked at the plasma membrane could participate in triggering exocytosis. PMID:11571310

  18. Mitochondrial dynamics and morphology in beta-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiles, Linsey; Shirihai, Orian S

    2012-12-01

    Mitochondrial dynamics contribute to the regulation of mitochondrial shape as well as various mitochondrial functions and quality control. This is of particular interest in the beta-cell because of the key role mitochondria play in the regulation of beta-cell insulin secretion function. Moreover, mitochondrial dysfunction has been suggested to contribute to the development of Type 2 Diabetes. Genetic tools that shift the balance of mitochondrial fusion and fission result in alterations to beta-cell function and viability. Additionally, conditions that induce beta-cell dysfunction, such as exposure to a high nutrient environment, disrupt mitochondrial morphology and dynamics. While it has been shown that mitochondria display a fragmented morphology in islets of diabetic patients and animal models, the mechanism behind this is currently unknown. Here, we review the current literature on mitochondrial morphology and dynamics in the beta-cell as well as some of the unanswered question in this field.

  19. Identification of chondroitin sulfate E proteoglycans and heparin proteoglycans in the secretory granules of human lung mast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, R.L.; Austen, K.F. (Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (USA)); Fox, C.C.; Lichtenstein, L.M. (Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (USA))

    1988-04-01

    The predominant subclasses of mast cells in both the rat and the mouse can be distinguished from one another by their preferential synthesis of {sup 35}S-labeled proteoglycans that contain either heparin or oversulfated chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycans. Although ({sup 35}S)heparin proteoglycans have been isolated from human lung mast cells of 40-70% purity and from a skin biopsy specimen of a patient with urticaria pigmentosa, no highly sulfated chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan has been isolated from any enriched or highly purified population of human mast cells. The authors demonstrate that human lung mast cells of 96% purity incorporate ({sup 35}S)sulfate into separate heparin and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans in an {approx}2:1 ratio. As assessed by HPLC of the chondroitinase ABC digests, the chondroitin ({sup 35}S)sulfate proteoglycans isolated from these human lung mast cells contain the same unusual chondroitin sulfate E disaccharide that is present in proteoglycans produced by interleukin 3-dependent mucosal-like mouse mast cells. Both the chondroitin ({sup 35}S)sulfate E proteoglycans and the ({sup 35}S)heparin proteoglycans were exocytosed from the ({sup 35}S)sulfate-labeled cells via perturbation of the IgE receptor, indicating that both types of {sup 35}S-labeled proteoglycans reside in the secretory granules of these human lung mast cells.

  20. Deletion of the mitochondrial flavoprotein apoptosis inducing factor (AIF induces beta-cell apoptosis and impairs beta-cell mass.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabienne T Schulthess

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Apoptosis is a hallmark of beta-cell death in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Understanding how apoptosis contributes to beta-cell turnover may lead to strategies to prevent progression of diabetes. A key mediator of apoptosis, mitochondrial function, and cell survival is apoptosis inducing factor (AIF. In the present study, we investigated the role of AIF on beta-cell mass and survival using the Harlequin (Hq mutant mice, which are hypomorphic for AIF. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Immunohistochemical evaluation of pancreata from Hq mutant mice displayed much smaller islets compared to wild-type mice (WT. Analysis of beta-cell mass in these mice revealed a greater than 4-fold reduction in beta-cell mass together with an 8-fold increase in beta-cell apoptosis. Analysis of cell cycle dynamics, using BrdU pulse as a marker for cells in S-phase, did not detect significant differences in the frequency of beta-cells in S-phase. In contrast, double staining for phosphorylated Histone H3 and insulin showed a 3-fold increase in beta-cells in the G2 phase in Hq mutant mice, but no differences in M-phase compared to WT mice. This suggests that the beta-cells from Hq mutant mice are arrested in the G2 phase and are unlikely to complete the cell cycle. beta-cells from Hq mutant mice display increased sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis, which was confirmed in human islets in which AIF was depleted by siRNA. AIF deficiency had no effect on glucose stimulated insulin secretion, but the impaired effect of hydrogen peroxide on beta-cell function was potentiated. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results indicate that AIF is essential for maintaining beta-cell mass and for oxidative stress response. A decrease in the oxidative phosphorylation capacity may counteract the development of diabetes, despite its deleterious effects on beta-cell survival.

  1. Isolation of a sesquiterpene synthase expressing in specialized epithelial cells surrounding the secretory cavities in rough lemon (Citrus jambhiri).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uji, Yuya; Ozawa, Rika; Shishido, Hodaka; Taniguchi, Shiduku; Takabayashi, Junji; Akimitsu, Kazuya; Gomi, Kenji

    2015-05-15

    Volatile terpenoids such as monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes play multiple roles in plant responses and are synthesized by terpene synthases (TPSs). We have previously isolated a partial TPS gene, RlemTPS4, that responds to microbial attack in rough lemon. In this study, we isolated a full length RlemTPS4 cDNA from rough lemon. RlemTPS4 localized in the cytosol. The recombinant RlemTPS4 protein was obtained using a prokaryotic expression system and GC-MS analysis of the terpenes produced by the RlemTPS4 enzymatic reaction determined that RlemTPS4 produces some sesquiterpenes such as δ-elemene. The RlemTPS4 gene was specifically expressed in specialized epithelial cells surrounding the oil secretory cavities in rough lemon leaf tissue.

  2. Isoprenoid Biosynthesis. Metabolite Profiling of Peppermint Oil Gland Secretory Cells and Application to Herbicide Target Analysis1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, B. Markus; Ketchum, Raymond E.B.; Croteau, Rodney B.

    2001-01-01

    Two independent pathways operate in plants for the synthesis of isopentenyl diphosphate and dimethylallyl diphosphate, the central intermediates in the biosynthesis of all isoprenoids. The mevalonate pathway is present in the cytosol, whereas the recently discovered mevalonate-independent pathway is localized to plastids. We have used isolated peppermint (Mentha piperita) oil gland secretory cells as an experimental model system to study the effects of the herbicides fosmidomycin, phosphonothrixin, methyl viologen, benzyl viologen, clomazone, 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl diphosphate, alendronate, and pamidronate on the pools of metabolites related to monoterpene biosynthesis via the mevalonate-independent pathway. A newly developed isolation protocol for polar metabolites together with an improved separation and detection method based on liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry have allowed assessment of the enzyme targets for a number of these herbicides. PMID:11553758

  3. Detailed transcriptome atlas of the pancreatic beta cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutlu, Burak; Burdick, David; Baxter, David; Rasschaert, Joanne; Flamez, Daisy; Eizirik, Decio L; Welsh, Nils; Goodman, Nathan; Hood, Leroy

    2009-01-15

    Gene expression patterns provide a detailed view of cellular functions. Comparison of profiles in disease vs normal conditions provides insights into the processes underlying disease progression. However, availability and integration of public gene expression datasets remains a major challenge. The aim of the present study was to explore the transcriptome of pancreatic islets and, based on this information, to prepare a comprehensive and open access inventory of insulin-producing beta cell gene expression, the Beta Cell Gene Atlas (BCGA). We performed Massively Parallel Signature Sequencing (MPSS) analysis of human pancreatic islet samples and microarray analyses of purified rat beta cells, alpha cells and INS-1 cells, and compared the information with available array data in the literature. MPSS analysis detected around 7600 mRNA transcripts, of which around a third were of low abundance. We identified 2000 and 1400 transcripts that are enriched/depleted in beta cells compared to alpha cells and INS-1 cells, respectively. Microarray analysis identified around 200 transcription factors that are differentially expressed in either beta or alpha cells. We reanalyzed publicly available gene expression data and integrated these results with the new data from this study to build the BCGA. The BCGA contains basal (untreated conditions) gene expression level estimates in beta cells as well as in different cell types in human, rat and mouse pancreas. Hierarchical clustering of expression profile estimates classify cell types based on species while beta cells were clustered together. Our gene atlas is a valuable source for detailed information on the gene expression distribution in beta cells and pancreatic islets along with insulin producing cell lines. The BCGA tool, as well as the data and code used to generate the Atlas are available at the T1Dbase website (T1DBase.org).

  4. Detailed transcriptome atlas of the pancreatic beta cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eizirik Decio L

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene expression patterns provide a detailed view of cellular functions. Comparison of profiles in disease vs normal conditions provides insights into the processes underlying disease progression. However, availability and integration of public gene expression datasets remains a major challenge. The aim of the present study was to explore the transcriptome of pancreatic islets and, based on this information, to prepare a comprehensive and open access inventory of insulin-producing beta cell gene expression, the Beta Cell Gene Atlas (BCGA. Methods We performed Massively Parallel Signature Sequencing (MPSS analysis of human pancreatic islet samples and microarray analyses of purified rat beta cells, alpha cells and INS-1 cells, and compared the information with available array data in the literature. Results MPSS analysis detected around 7600 mRNA transcripts, of which around a third were of low abundance. We identified 2000 and 1400 transcripts that are enriched/depleted in beta cells compared to alpha cells and INS-1 cells, respectively. Microarray analysis identified around 200 transcription factors that are differentially expressed in either beta or alpha cells. We reanalyzed publicly available gene expression data and integrated these results with the new data from this study to build the BCGA. The BCGA contains basal (untreated conditions gene expression level estimates in beta cells as well as in different cell types in human, rat and mouse pancreas. Hierarchical clustering of expression profile estimates classify cell types based on species while beta cells were clustered together. Conclusion Our gene atlas is a valuable source for detailed information on the gene expression distribution in beta cells and pancreatic islets along with insulin producing cell lines. The BCGA tool, as well as the data and code used to generate the Atlas are available at the T1Dbase website (T1DBase.org.

  5. The Herbal Medicine Cordyceps sinensis Protects Pancreatic Beta Cells from Streptozotocin-Induced Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hong; Cao, Diyong; Liu, Hua; Liu, Xinghai; Mai, Wenli; Lan, Haitao; Huo, Wen; Zheng, Qian

    2016-08-01

    Our previous work found that Cordyceps sinensis (CS) improves the activity and secretory function of pancreatic islet beta cells. The objective was to observe a further possible role of CS in the protection of insulin-secreting cells. A rat model of type 2 diabetes mellitus was developed with streptozotocin (STZ) and a high-energy fat diet (HFD). CS was administered in the successful model of rats with type 2 diabetes. After 4 weeks, the biochemistry index of blood samples was measured, and pathologic observation was performed by immunohistochemistry. In the rats with type 2 diabetes induced by a HFD and STZ, the levels of fasting blood glucose and fasting insulin were elevated, and the insulin sensitivity index was decreased. Pathologic examination found an increased number of apoptotic cells, an elevated protein expression of pro-apoptotic C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) and an increased c-Jun level by means of JNK phosphorylation, responsive to the endoplasmic reticulum stress of islet beta cells. With treatment by CS for 4 weeks, the elevated levels of both fasting blood glucose and fasting insulin in the rats with type 2 diabetes were significantly lower, and the decreased insulin sensitivity index was reversed. Compared to the control rats with type 2 diabetes, CS application significantly reduced the number of apoptotic cells and decreased protein expression of both CHOP and c-Jun. The herbal compound CS could protect pancreatic beta cells from the pro-apoptotic endoplasmic reticulum stress induced by HFD-STZ. This suggests an alternative approach to treating type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Synergy by secretory phospholipase A2 and glutamate on inducing cell death and sustained arachidonic acid metabolic changes in primary cortical neuronal cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolko, M; DeCoster, M A; de Turco, E B

    1996-01-01

    Secretory and cytosolic phospholipases A2 (sPLA2 and cPLA2) may contribute to the release of arachidonic acid and other bioactive lipids, which are modulators of synaptic function. In primary cortical neuron cultures, neurotoxic cell death and [3H]arachidonate metabolism was studied after adding ...

  7. Down-regulation of zinc transporter 8 (SLC30A8) in pancreatic beta-cells promotes cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The pancreatic islet contains high levels of zinc in granular vesicles of ß-cells where insulin is matured, crystallized, and stored before secretion. Zinc is an essential co-factor for insulin crystallization forming dense cores in secretory granules. In insulin-containing secretory granules, zinc ...

  8. Pob1 ensures cylindrical cell shape by coupling two distinct rho signaling events during secretory vesicle targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Kentaro; Toya, Mika; Yoneda, Aki; Asami, Yukiko; Yamashita, Akira; Kamasawa, Naomi; Osumi, Masako; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2011-06-01

    Proper cell morphogenesis requires the co-ordination of cell polarity, cytoskeletal organization and vesicle trafficking. The Schizosaccharomyces pombe mutant pob1-664 has a curious lemon-like shape, the basis of which is not understood. Here, we found abundant vesicle accumulation in these cells, suggesting that Pob1 plays a role in vesicle trafficking. We identified Rho3 as a multicopy suppressor of this phenotype. Because Rho3 function is related to For3, an actin-polymerizing protein, and Sec8, a component of the exocyst complex, we analyzed their functional relationship with Pob1. Pob1 was essential for the formation of actin cables (by interacting with For3) and for the polarized localization of Sec8. Although neither For3 nor Sec8 is essential for polarized growth, their simultaneous disruption prevented tip growth and yielded a lemon-like cell morphology similar to pob1-664. Thus, Pob1 may ensure cylindrical cell shape of S. pombe by coupling actin-mediated vesicle transport and exocyst-mediated vesicle tethering during secretory vesicle targeting.

  9. AtGRIP protein locates to the secretory vesicles of trans Golgi-network in Arabidopsis root cap cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Ying; ZHANG Wei; ZHAO Lei; LI Yan

    2008-01-01

    GRIP domain proteins, locating to the trans-Golgi network, are thought to play an essential role in Golgi apparatus trafficking in yeast and animal cells. In the present study, AtGRIP cDNA was amplified by reverse transcriptase PCR from RNA isolated from Arabidopsis seedling. The GST fusion protein of AtGRIP was affinity-purified and its rabbit polyclonal antibody was obtained. Immuno-blotting with the purified anti-AtGRIP polyclonal antibody demonstrated that the molecular mass of AtGRIP protein is about 92 kD, and its expression is not tissue-specific in Arabidopsis. Immunoflourescent labeling and confocal microscopy revealed that the AtGRIP protein was co-localized with Golgi stacks in Arabidop-sis root cells. Immuno-gold labeling and electron microscopy observation showed that AtGRIP protein was mainly located to the membrane of the secretory vesicles of trans-Golgi network in Arabidopsis root cap cells. Taken together, these results indicate that the localization of GRIP domain proteins be-tween plants and animal cells are conserved. These results also suggest that the AtGRIP may be in-volved in regulating the formation or sorting of Golgi-associated vesicles in plant cells.

  10. Nilotinib Does Not Alter the Secretory Functions of Carotid Artery Endothelial Cells in a Prothrombotic or Antithrombotic Fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katgı, Abdullah; Sevindik, Ömür Gökmen; Gökbulut, Aysun Adan; Özsan, Güner Hayri; Yüksel, Faize; Solmaz, Şerife Medeni; Alacacıoğlu, İnci; Özcan, Mehmet Ali; Demirkan, Fatih; Baran, Yusuf; Pişkin, Özden

    2015-10-01

    There have been concerns about the possible prothrombotic effects of nilotinib, especially in patients having cardiovascular risk factors. The potential mechanism behind the increased risk of thromboembolic events is still not clear. In this study, we aimed to evaluate possible harmful effects of nilotinib on endothelial cells. To this aim, we examined proliferative capacity and secretory functions of healthy human carotid artery endothelial cells (HCtAECs) in response to nilotinib. 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazolyl-2)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) cell proliferation method was used to determine antiproliferative effects of nilotinib on HCtAECs. The HCtAECs were incubated with 5, 10, and 100 nmol/L doses of nilotinib for 72 hours. Then, in order to assess the endothelial function, levels of nitric oxide (NO), von Willebrand factor (vWF), tissue plasminogen activator, plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1), and endothelin 1 (ET-1) were evaluated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay from tissue culture supernatants. There were slight but statistically significant decreases in cell proliferation in response to nilotinib. Nilotinib increased the secretion of t-PA, PAI-1, and vWF in a dose-dependent manner when compared with the untreated control group. The ET-1 secretion was lower in 5 nmol/L and higher in 10 and 100 nmol/L nilotinib-treated cells as compared to untreated cells. Regarding NO secretion, lower levels were observed in 5 and 10 nmol/L, and higher levels were detected in 100 nmol/L nilotinib-treated cells as compared to untreated control group cells. Considering the results obtained in our study, nilotinib does not affect the functions of endothelial cells either in a prothrombotic or an antithrombotic fashion, despite a dose-dependent decline in cell viability. © The Author(s) 2014.

  11. Re-exposure to beta cell autoantigens in pancreatic allograft recipients with preexisting beta cell autoantibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujtaba, Muhammad Ahmad; Fridell, Jonathan; Book, Benita; Faiz, Sara; Sharfuddin, Asif; Wiebke, Eric; Rigby, Mark; Taber, Tim

    2015-11-01

    Re-exposure to beta cell autoantigens and its relevance in the presence of donor-specific antibodies (DSA) in pancreatic allograft recipients is not well known. Thirty-three patients requiring a pancreas transplant were enrolled in an IRB approved study. They underwent prospective monitoring for DSA and beta cell autoantibody (BCAA) levels to GAD65, insulinoma-associated antigen 2 (IA-2), insulin (micro-IAA [mIAA]), and islet-specific zinc transporter isoform-8 (ZnT8). Twenty-five (75.7%) had pre-transplant BCAA. Twenty had a single antibody (mIAA n = 15, GAD65 n = 5); five had two or more BCAA (GAD65 + mIAA n = 2, GAD65 + mIAA+IA-2 n = 2, GA65 + mIAA+IA-2 + ZnT8 = 1). No changes in GAD65 (p > 0.29), IA-2 (>0.16), and ZnT8 (p > 0.07) were observed between pre-transplant and post-transplant at 6 or 12 months. A decrease in mIAA from pre- to post-6 months (p BCAA was observed at one yr. Seven (21.0%) developed de novo DSA. The incidence of DSA was 24% in patients with BCAA vs. 25% in patients without BCAA (p = 0.69). Pancreatic allograft function of patients with vs. without BCAA, and with and without BCAA + DSA was comparable until last follow-up (three yr). Re-exposure to beta cell autoantigens by pancreas transplant may not lead to increased levels or development of new BCAA or pancreatic allograft dysfunction.

  12. Macrophage colony-stimulating factor augments beta-amyloid-induced interleukin-1, interleukin-6, and nitric oxide production by microglial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, G M; Yang, L; Cordell, B

    1998-08-14

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD), a chronic cerebral inflammatory state is thought to lead to neuronal injury. Microglia, intrinsic cerebral immune effector cells, are likely to be key in the pathophysiology of this inflammatory state. We showed that macrophage colony-stimulating factor, a microglial activator found at increased levels in the central nervous system in AD, dramatically augments beta-amyloid peptide (betaAP)-induced microglial production of interleukin-1, interleukin-6, and nitric oxide. In contrast, granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor, another hematopoietic cytokine found in the AD brain, did not augment betaAP-induced microglial secretory activity. These results indicate that increased macrophage colony-stimulating factor levels in AD could magnify betaAP-induced microglial inflammatory cytokine and nitric oxide production, which in turn could intensify the cerebral inflammatory state by activating astrocytes and additional microglia, as well as directly injuring neurons.

  13. Group IIA secretory phospholipase A2 stimulates exocytosis and neurotransmitter release in pheochromocytoma-12 cells and cultured rat hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, S; Ong, W Y; Thwin, M M; Fong, C W; Farooqui, A A; Gopalakrishnakone, P; Hong, W

    2003-01-01

    Recent evidence shows that secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) may play a role in membrane fusion and fission, and may thus affect neurotransmission. The present study therefore aimed to elucidate the effects of sPLA2 on vesicle exocytosis. External application of group IIA sPLA2 (purified crotoxin subunit B or purified human synovial sPLA2) caused an immediate increase in exocytosis and neurotransmitter release in pheochromocytoma-12 (PC12) cells, detected by carbon fiber electrodes placed near the cells, or by changes in membrane capacitance of the cells. EGTA and a specific inhibitor of sPLA2 activity, 12-epi-scalaradial, abolished the increase in neurotransmitter release, indicating that the effect of sPLA2 was dependent on calcium and sPLA2 enzymatic activity. A similar increase in neurotransmitter release was also observed in hippocampal neurons after external application of sPLA2, as detected by changes in membrane capacitance of the neurons. In contrast to external application, internal application of sPLA2 to PC12 cells and neurons produced blockade of neurotransmitter release. Our recent studies showed high levels of sPLA2 activity in the normal rat hippocampus, medulla oblongata and cerebral neocortex. The sPLA2 activity in the hippocampus was significantly increased, after kainate-induced neuronal injury. The observed effects of sPLA2 on neurotransmitter release in this study may therefore have a physiological, as well as a pathological role.

  14. Cell therapies for pancreatic beta-cell replenishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okere, Bernard; Lucaccioni, Laura; Dominici, Massimo; Iughetti, Lorenzo

    2016-07-11

    The current treatment approach for type 1 diabetes is based on daily insulin injections, combined with blood glucose monitoring. However, administration of exogenous insulin fails to mimic the physiological activity of the islet, therefore diabetes often progresses with the development of serious complications such as kidney failure, retinopathy and vascular disease. Whole pancreas transplantation is associated with risks of major invasive surgery along with side effects of immunosuppressive therapy to avoid organ rejection. Replacement of pancreatic beta-cells would represent an ideal treatment that could overcome the above mentioned therapeutic hurdles. In this context, transplantation of islets of Langerhans is considered a less invasive procedure although long-term outcomes showed that only 10 % of the patients remained insulin independent five years after the transplant. Moreover, due to shortage of organs and the inability of islet to be expanded ex vivo, this therapy can be offered to a very limited number of patients. Over the past decade, cellular therapies have emerged as the new frontier of treatment of several diseases. Furthermore the advent of stem cells as renewable source of cell-substitutes to replenish the beta cell population, has blurred the hype on islet transplantation. Breakthrough cellular approaches aim to generate stem-cell-derived insulin producing cells, which could make diabetes cellular therapy available to millions. However, to date, stem cell therapy for diabetes is still in its early experimental stages. This review describes the most reliable sources of stem cells that have been developed to produce insulin and their most relevant experimental applications for the cure of diabetes.

  15. Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) and programmed cell death in the vertebrate retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duenker, Nicole

    2005-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a precisely regulated phenomenon essential for the homeostasis of multicellular organisms. Developmental systems, particularly the nervous system, have provided key observations supporting the physiological role of PCD. We have recently shown that transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) plays an important role in mediating ontogenetic PCD in the nervous system. As part of the central nervous system the developing retina serves as an ideal model system for investigating apoptotic processes during neurogenesis in vivo as it is easily accessible experimentally and less complex due to its limited number of different neurons. This review summarizes data indicating a pivotal role of TGF-beta in mediating PCD in the vertebrate retina. The following topics are discussed: expression of TGF-beta isoforms and receptors in the vertebrate retina, the TGF-beta signaling pathway, functions and molecular mechanisms of PCD in the nervous system, TGF-beta-mediated retinal apoptosis in vitro and in vivo, and interactions of TGF-beta with other pro- and anti-apoptotic factors.

  16. JAM-A promotes wound healing by enhancing both homing and secretory activities of mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Minjuan; Ji, Shizhao; Xiao, Shichu; Kong, Zhengdong; Fang, He; Zhang, Yunqing; Ji, Kaihong; Zheng, Yongjun; Liu, Houqi; Xia, Zhaofan

    2015-10-01

    The homing ability and secretory function of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are key factors that influence cell involvement in wound repair. These factors are controlled by multilayer regulatory circuitry, including adhesion molecules, core transcription factors (TFs) and certain other regulators. However, the role of adhesion molecules in this regulatory circuitry and their underlying mechanism remain undefined. In the present paper, we demonstrate that an adhesion molecule, junction adhesion molecule A (JAM-A), may function as a key promoter molecule to regulate skin wound healing by MSCs. In in vivo experiments, we show that JAM-A up-regulation promoted both MSC homing to full-thickness skin wounds and wound healing-related cytokine secretion by MSCs. In vitro experiments also showed that JAM-A promoted MSC proliferation and migration by activating T-cell lymphoma invasion and metastasis 1 (Tiam1). We suggest that JAM-A up-regulation can increase the proliferation, cytokine secretion and wound-homing ability of MSCs, thus accelerating the repair rate of full-thickness skin defects. These results may provide insights into a novel and potentially effective approach to improve the efficacy of MSC treatment.

  17. Immunomodulatory effects of adult Haemonchus contortus excretory/secretory products on human monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Z U; Knight, J S; Koolaard, J; Simpson, H V; Pernthaner, A

    2015-12-01

    The levels of expression of surface molecules and release of cytokines and chemokines of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells were determined after their exposure to adult H. contortus excretory/secretory (ES) products or a combination of ES products and bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Worm products provoked a weak response and only partial maturation of the dendritic cells, consistent with the hyporesponsiveness and more tolerogenic immune environment present in parasitized animals and humans. Co-stimulation with LPS demonstrated that H. contortus secretions, like those of other helminths, contain immunomodulators capable of reducing some aspects of the strong T(H)1/T(H)2 response evoked by bacterial LPS. There were significant reductions in the release of some cytokine/chemokines by LPS-stimulated mdDCs and a trend (although not significant at P < 0.05) for reduced expression levels of CD40, CD80 and HLA-DR. A prominent feature was the variability in responses of dendritic cells from the four donors, even on different days in repeat experiments, suggesting that generalized conclusions may be difficult to make, except in genetically related animals. Such observations may therefore be applicable only to restricted populations. In addition, previous exposure to parasites in a target population for immunomodulatory therapy may be an important factor in assessing the likelihood of adverse reactions or failures in the treatment to worm therapy.

  18. Stem cells to pancreatic beta-cells: new sources for diabetes cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Tingxia; Hebrok, Matthias

    2009-05-01

    The number of patients worldwide suffering from the chronic disease diabetes mellitus is growing at an alarming rate. Insulin-secreting beta-cells in the islet of Langerhans are damaged to different extents in diabetic patients, either through an autoimmune reaction present in type 1 diabetic patients or through inherent changes within beta-cells that affect their function in patients suffering from type 2 diabetes. Cell replacement strategies via islet transplantation offer potential therapeutic options for diabetic patients. However, the discrepancy between the limited number of donor islets and the high number of patients who could benefit from such a treatment reflects the dire need for renewable sources of high-quality beta-cells. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are capable of self-renewal and can differentiate into components of all three germ layers, including all pancreatic lineages. The ability to differentiate hESCs into beta-cells highlights a promising strategy to meet the shortage of beta-cells. Here, we review the different approaches that have been used to direct differentiation of hESCs into pancreatic and beta-cells. We will focus on recent progress in the understanding of signaling pathways and transcription factors during embryonic pancreas development and how this knowledge has helped to improve the methodology for high-efficiency beta-cell differentiation in vitro.

  19. Glucose- and interleukin-1beta-induced beta-cell apoptosis requires Ca2+ influx and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 activation and is prevented by a sulfonylurea receptor 1/inwardly rectifying K+ channel 6.2 (SUR/Kir6.2) selective potassium channel opener in human islets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maedler, Kathrin; Størling, Joachim; Sturis, Jeppe

    2004-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that a progressive decrease in the functional beta-cell mass is the hallmark of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The underlying causes, beta-cell apoptosis and impaired secretory function, seem to be partly mediated by macrophage production of interleukin (IL)-1beta......-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2, an effect that was abrogated by 3 micromol/l NN414. Similarly, 1 micromol/l of the mitogen-activated protein kinase/ERK kinase 1/2 inhibitor PD098059 or 1 micromol/l of the l-type Ca(2+) channel blocker nimodipine prevented glucose- and IL-1beta-induced ERK activation, beta...

  20. Effect of yoghurt containing Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12® on faecal excretion of secretory immunoglobulin A and human beta-defensin 2 in healthy adult volunteers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kabeerdoss, Jayakanthan; Devi, R Shobana; Mary, R Regina; Prabhavathi, D; Vidya, R; Mechenro, John; Mahendri, N V; Pugazhendhi, Srinivasan; Ramakrishna, Balakrishnan S

    2011-01-01

    Probiotics are used to provide health benefits. The present study tested the effect of a probiotic yoghurt on faecal output of beta-defensin and immunoglobulin A in a group of young healthy women eating a defined diet...

  1. Generation of Transplantable Beta Cells for Patient-Specific Cell Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojie Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Islet cell transplantation offers a potential cure for type 1 diabetes, but it is challenged by insufficient donor tissue and side effects of current immunosuppressive drugs. Therefore, alternative sources of insulin-producing cells and isletfriendly immunosuppression are required to increase the efficiency and safety of this procedure. Beta cells can be transdifferentiated from precursors or another heterologous (non-beta-cell source. Recent advances in beta cell regeneration from somatic cells such as fibroblasts could circumvent the usage of immunosuppressive drugs. Therefore, generation of patient-specific beta cells provides the potential of an evolutionary treatment for patients with diabetes.

  2. Novel aspects on pancreatic beta-cell signal-transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibiger, Ingo B; Brismar, Kerstin; Berggren, Per-Olof

    2010-05-21

    Pancreatic beta-cells release insulin in appropriate amounts in order to keep blood glucose levels within physiological limits. Failure to do so leads to the most common metabolic disorder in man, diabetes mellitus. The glucose-stimulus/insulin-secretion coupling represents a sophisticated interplay between glucose and a variety of modulatory factors. These factors are provided by the blood supply (such as nutrients, vitamins, incretins etc.), the nerval innervations, cell-cell contacts as well as by paracrine and autocrine feedback loops within the pancreatic islet of Langerhans. However, the underlying mechanisms of their action remain poorly understood. In the present mini-review we discuss novel aspects of selective insulin signaling in the beta-cell and novel insights into the role of higher inositol phosphates in insulin secretion. Finally we present a newly developed experimental platform that allows non-invasive and longitudinal in vivo imaging of pancreatic islet/beta-cell biology at single-cell resolution.

  3. Present and future cell therapies for pancreatic beta cell replenishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Bendala, Juan; Ricordi, Camillo

    2012-12-21

    If only at a small scale, islet transplantation has successfully addressed what ought to be the primary endpoint of any cell therapy: the functional replenishment of damaged tissue in patients. After years of less-than-optimal approaches to immunosuppression, recent advances consistently yield long-term graft survival rates comparable to those of whole pancreas transplantation. Limited organ availability is the main hurdle that stands in the way of the widespread clinical utilization of this pioneering intervention. Progress in stem cell research over the past decade, coupled with our decades-long experience with islet transplantation, is shaping the future of cell therapies for the treatment of diabetes. Here we review the most promising avenues of research aimed at generating an inexhaustible supply of insulin-producing cells for islet regeneration, including the differentiation of pluripotent and multipotent stem cells of embryonic and adult origin along the beta cell lineage and the direct reprogramming of non-endocrine tissues into insulin-producing cells.

  4. Present and future cell therapies for pancreatic beta cell replenishment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juan Domínguez-Bendala; Camillo Ricordi

    2012-01-01

    If only at a small scale,islet transplantation has successfully addressed what ought to be the primary endpoint of any cell therapy:the functional replenishment of damaged tissue in patients.After years of less-thanoptimal approaches to immunosuppression,recent advances consistently yield long-term graft survival rates comparable to those of whole pancreas transplantation.Limited organ availability is the main hurdle that stands in the way of the widespread clinical utilization of this pioneering intervention.Progress in stem cell research over the past decade,coupled with our decades-long experience with islet transplantation,is shaping the future of cell therapies for the treatment of diabetes.Here we review the most promising avenues of research aimed at generating an inexhaustible supply of insulin-producing cells for islet regeneration,including the differentiation of pluripotent and multipotent stem cells of embryonic and adult origin along the beta cell lineage and the direct reprogramming of non-endocrine tissues into insulin-producing cells.

  5. Topologically heterogeneous beta cell adaptation in response to high-fat diet in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellenbroek, J.H.; Tons, H.A.; de Graaf, N.; Loomans, C.J.; Engelse, M.A.; Vrolijk, H.; Voshol, P.J.; Rabelink, T.J.; Carlotti, F.; de Koning, E.J.

    2013-01-01

    AIMS: Beta cells adapt to an increased insulin demand by enhancing insulin secretion via increased beta cell function and/or increased beta cell number. While morphological and functional heterogeneity between individual islets exists, it is unknown whether regional differences in beta cell adaptati

  6. Histological characterization of the special venom secretory cells in the stinger of rays in the northern waters of Persian Gulf and Oman Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghani, Hadi; Sajjadi, Mir Masoud; Parto, Paria; Rajaian, Hamid; Mokhlesi, Amin

    2010-06-01

    Rays are common elasmobranches in the northern waters of Persian Gulf and Oman Sea that may have one or more mineralized serrated stingers on the whip-like tail. The stingers are covered by epidermal cells among which some can produce venom. When these animals are dorsally touched, the stinger can be introduced into the aggressor by a whip reflex mechanism of the tail when the pectoral fins are touched, causing severe mechanical injuries and inoculating the venom. The exact localization of the venom secretory cells in the stinger of different species is controversial, but it is known that the cells are preferentially located in the ventro-lateral grooves in marine stingrays. A comparative morphological characterization of the stinger epidermal tissue of different ray species in the northern part of Persian Gulf and Oman Sea was carried out in this study. EDTA was used for decalcification of stings and conventional histological processes were subsequently employed. The results indicated that structure of dermis and epidermis layers of stings in all species are similar to the structure of corresponding layers in other parts of fish's body. The results of the present study have shown that all examined species of Dasyatidae family, but not Myliobatidae and Gymnuridae families, had venom secretory cells. Distribution of venom secretory cells varies in each species and is often located around or inside the stinger ventro-lateral grooves. These differences among the stingers of various species may explain the envenomation severity in these species. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Foodborne cereulide causes beta-cell dysfunction and apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Vangoitsenhoven

    Full Text Available To study the effects of cereulide, a food toxin often found at low concentrations in take-away meals, on beta-cell survival and function.Cell death was quantified by Hoechst/Propidium Iodide in mouse (MIN6 and rat (INS-1E beta-cell lines, whole mouse islets and control cell lines (HepG2 and COS-1. Beta-cell function was studied by glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS. Mechanisms of toxicity were evaluated in MIN6 cells by mRNA profiling, electron microscopy and mitochondrial function tests.24 h exposure to 5 ng/ml cereulide rendered almost all MIN6, INS-1E and pancreatic islets apoptotic, whereas cell death did not increase in the control cell lines. In MIN6 cells and murine islets, GSIS capacity was lost following 24 h exposure to 0.5 ng/ml cereulide (P<0.05. Cereulide exposure induced markers of mitochondrial stress including Puma (p53 up-regulated modulator of apoptosis, P<0.05 and general pro-apoptotic signals as Chop (CCAAT/-enhancer-binding protein homologous protein. Mitochondria appeared swollen upon transmission electron microscopy, basal respiration rate was reduced by 52% (P<0.05 and reactive oxygen species increased by more than twofold (P<0.05 following 24 h exposure to 0.25 and 0.50 ng/ml cereulide, respectively.Cereulide causes apoptotic beta-cell death at low concentrations and impairs beta-cell function at even lower concentrations, with mitochondrial dysfunction underlying these defects. Thus, exposure to cereulide even at concentrations too low to cause systemic effects appears deleterious to the beta-cell.

  8. Key role of mast cells and their major secretory products in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao-Heng He

    2004-01-01

    Hirtoncally, mast cells were known as a key cell type involved in type I hypersensitivity Until last two decades, this cell type was recognized to be widely involved in a number of non-allergic diseases including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Markedly increased numbers of mast cells were observed in the mucosa of the iieum and colon of patients with IBD, which was accompanied by great changes of the content in mart cells such as dramatically increaed expression of TNFα, IL-16 and substance P.The evidence of mast cell degranulation was found in the wall of intestine from patients with IBD with immunohistochemistry technique. The highly elevated histamine and tryptase levels were detected in mucosa of petienta with IBD, strongly suggesting that mast cell degranulation is involved in the pathogenesis of IBD.However, Iittle is known of the actions of histamine, tryptase,chymase and carboxypeptidase in IBD. Over the lart decade,heparin has been used to treat IBD in clinical practice. The low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) was effective as adjuvant therapy, and the petienis showed good clinical and laberatory respense with no senous advere effectd. The roles of PGD2, LTC4, PAF and mast cell cytokines in IBD were also discussed. Recently, a series of experiments with dispersed colon mast cells suggested there should be at least two pathways in man for mast colls to amplify their own activationdegranulation signals in an autocrine or paracrine mannec.The hypethesis is that mast cell secretogogues induce mart cell degranulation, release histamine, then stimulate the adjacent mast cells or positively feedback to further stimulate its host mast cells through H1 recepton.Whereas released tryptase acts similarly to hirtamine, but activates mart cells through its receptor PAR-2. The connections between current anti-IBD therapies or potential therapies for IBD with mast cells were discussed, implicating further that mast cell is a key cell type that is involved in the

  9. Cdc42-dependent actin dynamics controls maturation and secretory activity of dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulz, Anna M; Stutte, Susanne; Hogl, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Cell division cycle 42 (Cdc42) is a member of the Rho guanosine triphosphatase family and has pivotal functions in actin organization, cell migration, and proliferation. To further study the molecular mechanisms of dendritic cell (DC) regulation by Cdc42, we used Cdc42-deficient DCs. Cdc42...... disruption, our results propose that Cdc42 control of actin dynamics keeps DCs in an immature state, and cessation of Cdc42 activity during DC maturation facilitates secretion as well as rapid up-regulation of intracellular molecules to the cell surface....

  10. Strain-dependent differences in sensitivity of rat beta-cells to interleukin 1 beta in vitro and in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimers, J I; Andersen, H U; Mauricio, D

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether strain-dependent differences in beta-cell sensitivity to interleukin (IL) 1 beta exist in vitro and in vivo and if so, whether these differences correlate to variations in IL-1 beta-induced islet inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA expressi...

  11. The position of mitochondria and ER in relation to that of the secretory sites in chromaffin cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva, José; Viniegra, Salvador; Gimenez-Molina, Yolanda; García-Martinez, Virginia; Expósito-Romero, Giovanna; del Mar Frances, Maria; García-Sancho, Javier; Gutiérrez, Luis M

    2014-12-01

    Knowledge of the distribution of mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in relation to the position of exocytotic sites is relevant to understanding the influence of these organelles in tuning Ca(2+) signals and secretion. Confocal images of probes tagged to mitochondria and the F-actin cytoskeleton revealed the existence of two populations of mitochondria, one that was cortical and one that was perinuclear. This mitochondrial distribution was also confirmed by using electron microscopy. In contrast, ER was sparse in the cortex and more abundant in deep cytoplasmic regions. The mitochondrial distribution might be due to organellar transport, which experiences increasing restrictions in the cell cortex. Further study of organelle distribution in relation to the position of SNARE microdomains and the granule fusion sites revealed that a third of the cortical mitochondria colocalized with exocytotic sites and another third located at a distance closer than two vesicle diameters. ER structures were also present in the vicinity of secretory sites but at a lower density. Therefore, mitochondria and ER have a spatial distribution that suggests a specialized role in modulation of exocytosis that fits with the role of cytosolic Ca(2+) microdomains described previously. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  12. Proteomic Analysis of Excretory-Secretory Products of Mesocestoides corti Metacestodes Reveals Potential Suppressors of Dendritic Cell Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendelova, Emilia; Camargo de Lima, Jeferson; Lorenzatto, Karina Rodrigues; Monteiro, Karina Mariante; Mueller, Thomas; Veepaschit, Jyotishman; Grimm, Clemens; Brehm, Klaus; Hrčková, Gabriela; Lutz, Manfred B.; Ferreira, Henrique B.

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidences have assigned a central role to parasite-derived proteins in immunomodulation. Here, we report on the proteomic identification and characterization of immunomodulatory excretory-secretory (ES) products from the metacestode larva (tetrathyridium) of the tapeworm Mesocestoides corti (syn. M. vogae). We demonstrate that ES products but not larval homogenates inhibit the stimuli-driven release of the pro-inflammatory, Th1-inducing cytokine IL-12p70 by murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs). Within the ES fraction, we biochemically narrowed down the immunosuppressive activity to glycoproteins since active components were lipid-free, but sensitive to heat- and carbohydrate-treatment. Finally, using bioassay-guided chromatographic analyses assisted by comparative proteomics of active and inactive fractions of the ES products, we defined a comprehensive list of candidate proteins released by M. corti tetrathyridia as potential suppressors of DC functions. Our study provides a comprehensive library of somatic and ES products and highlight some candidate parasite factors that might drive the subversion of DC functions to facilitate the persistence of M. corti tetrathyridia in their hosts. PMID:27736880

  13. Human Beta Cells Produce and Release Serotonin to Inhibit Glucagon Secretion from Alpha Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Joana Almaça; Judith Molina; Danusa Menegaz; Pronin, Alexey N.; Alejandro Tamayo; Vladlen Slepak; Per-Olof Berggren; Alejandro Caicedo

    2016-01-01

    In the pancreatic islet, serotonin is an autocrine signal increasing beta cell mass during metabolic challenges such as those associated with pregnancy or high-fat diet. It is still unclear whether serotonin is relevant for regular islet physiology and hormone secretion. Here, we show that human beta cells produce and secrete serotonin when stimulated with increases in glucose concentration. Serotonin secretion from beta cells decreases cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels in neighboring alpha cells via ...

  14. Secretory phospholipase A2-mediated neuronal cell death involves glutamate ionotropic receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Turco, Elena B; Diemer, Nils Henrik; Bazan, Nicolas G

    2002-01-01

    To define the significance of glutamate ionotropic receptors in sPLA -mediated neuronal cell death we used the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 and the AMPA receptor antagonist PNQX. In primary neuronal cell cultures both MK-801 and PNQX inhibited sPLA - and glutamate-induced neuronal death. [ H]A...

  15. Excretory/secretory-products of Echinococcus multilocularis larvae induce apoptosis and tolerogenic properties in dendritic cells in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Komguep Nono

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Alveolar echinococcosis, caused by Echinococcus multilocularis larvae, is a chronic disease associated with considerable modulation of the host immune response. Dendritic cells (DC are key effectors in shaping the immune response and among the first cells encountered by the parasite during an infection. Although it is assumed that E.multilocularis, by excretory/secretory (E/S-products, specifically affects DC to deviate immune responses, little information is available on the molecular nature of respective E/S-products and their mode of action. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We established cultivation systems for exposing DC to live material from early (oncosphere, chronic (metacestode and late (protoscolex infectious stages. When co-incubated with Echinococcus primary cells, representing the invading oncosphere, or metacestode vesicles, a significant proportion of DC underwent apoptosis and the surviving DC failed to mature. In contrast, DC exposed to protoscoleces upregulated maturation markers and did not undergo apoptosis. After pre-incubation with primary cells and metacestode vesicles, DC showed a strongly impaired ability to be activated by the TLR ligand LPS, which was not observed in DC pre-treated with protoscolex E/S-products. While none of the larvae induced the secretion of pro-inflammatory IL-12p70, the production of immunosuppressive IL-10 was elevated in response to primary cell E/S-products. Finally, upon incubation with DC and naïve T-cells, E/S-products from metacestode vesicles led to a significant expansion of Foxp3+ T cells in vitro. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first report on the induction of apoptosis in DC by cestode E/S-products. Our data indicate that the early infective stage of E. multilocularis is a strong inducer of tolerance in DC, which is most probably important for generating an immunosuppressive environment at an infection phase in which the parasite is highly vulnerable to host attacks. The

  16. Cdc42-dependent actin dynamics controls maturation and secretory activity of dendritic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Anna M.; Stutte, Susanne; Hogl, Sebastian; Luckashenak, Nancy; Dudziak, Diana; Leroy, Céline; Forné, Ignasi; Imhof, Axel; Müller, Stephan A.; Brakebusch, Cord H.; Lichtenthaler, Stefan F.

    2015-01-01

    Cell division cycle 42 (Cdc42) is a member of the Rho guanosine triphosphatase family and has pivotal functions in actin organization, cell migration, and proliferation. To further study the molecular mechanisms of dendritic cell (DC) regulation by Cdc42, we used Cdc42-deficient DCs. Cdc42 deficiency renders DCs phenotypically mature as they up-regulate the co-stimulatory molecule CD86 from intracellular storages to the cell surface. Cdc42 knockout DCs also accumulate high amounts of invariant chain–major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II complexes at the cell surface, which cannot efficiently present peptide antigens (Ag’s) for priming of Ag-specific CD4 T cells. Proteome analyses showed a significant reduction in lysosomal MHC class II–processing proteins, such as cathepsins, which are lost from DCs by enhanced secretion. As these effects on DCs can be mimicked by chemical actin disruption, our results propose that Cdc42 control of actin dynamics keeps DCs in an immature state, and cessation of Cdc42 activity during DC maturation facilitates secretion as well as rapid up-regulation of intracellular molecules to the cell surface. PMID:26553928

  17. The role of secretory immunoglobulin A in the natural sensing of commensal bacteria by mouse Peyer's patch dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rol, Nicolas; Favre, Laurent; Benyacoub, Jalil; Corthésy, Blaise

    2012-11-16

    The mammalian gastrointestinal (GI) tract harbors a diverse population of commensal species collectively known as the microbiota, which interact continuously with the host. From very early in life, secretory IgA (SIgA) is found in association with intestinal bacteria. It is considered that this helps to ensure self-limiting growth of the microbiota and hence participates in symbiosis. However, the importance of this association in contributing to the mechanisms ensuring natural host-microorganism communication is in need of further investigation. In the present work, we examined the possible role of SIgA in the transport of commensal bacteria across the GI epithelium. Using an intestinal loop mouse model and fluorescently labeled bacteria, we found that entry of commensal bacteria in Peyer's patches (PP) via the M cell pathway was mediated by their association with SIgA. Preassociation of bacteria with nonspecific SIgA increased their dynamics of entry and restored the reduced transport observed in germ-free mice known to have a marked reduction in intestinal SIgA production. Selective SIgA-mediated targeting of bacteria is restricted to the tolerogenic CD11c(+)CD11b(+)CD8(-) dendritic cell subset located in the subepithelial dome region of PPs, confirming that the host is not ignorant of its resident commensals. In conclusion, our work supports the concept that SIgA-mediated monitoring of commensal bacteria targeting dendritic cells in the subepithelial dome region of PPs represents a mechanism whereby the host mucosal immune system controls the continuous dialogue between the host and commensal bacteria.

  18. Conditional expression of Smad7 in pancreatic beta cells disrupts TGF-beta signaling and induces reversible diabetes mellitus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora G Smart

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Identification of signaling pathways that maintain and promote adult pancreatic islet functions will accelerate our understanding of organogenesis and improve strategies for treating diseases like diabetes mellitus. Previous work has implicated transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta signaling as an important regulator of pancreatic islet development, but has not established whether this signaling pathway is required for essential islet functions in the adult pancreas. Here we describe a conditional system for expressing Smad7, a potent inhibitor of TGF-beta signaling, to identify distinct roles for this pathway in adult and embryonic beta cells. Smad7 expression in Pdx1+ embryonic pancreas cells resulted in striking embryonic beta cell hypoplasia and neonatal lethality. Conditional expression of Smad7 in adult Pdx1+ cells reduced detectable beta cell expression of MafA, menin, and other factors that regulate beta cell function. Reduced pancreatic insulin content and hypoinsulinemia produced overt diabetes that was fully reversed upon resumption of islet TGF-beta signaling. Thus, our studies reveal that TGF-beta signaling is crucial for establishing and maintaining defining features of mature pancreatic beta cells.

  19. Gene expression profiling defined pathways correlated with fibroblast cell proliferation induced by Opisthorchis viverrini excretory/secretory product

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chanitra Thuwajit; Peti Thuwajit; Kazuhiko Uchida; Daoyot Daorueang; Sasithorn Kaewkes; Sopit Wongkham; Masanao Miwa

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the mechanism of fibroblast cell proliferation stimulated by the Opisthorchis viverrini excretory/secretory (ES) product.METHODS: NIH-3T3, mouse fibroblast cells were treated with O. viverrini ES product by non-contact co-cultured with the adult parasites. Total RNA from NIH-3T3 treated and untreated with O. viverrini was extracted, reverse transcribed and hybridized with the mouse 15K complementary DNA (cDNA) array. The result was analyzed by ArrayVision version 5 and GeneSpring version 5 softwares. After normalization, the ratios of gene expression of parasite treated to untreated NIH3T3 cells of 2-and more-fold upregulated was defined as the differentially expressed genes. The expression levels of the signal transduction genes were validated by semiquantitative SYBR-based real-time RT-PCR.RESULTS: Among a total of 15 000 genes/ESTs, 239genes with established cell proliferation-related function were 2 fold-and more-up-regulated by O. viverrini ES product compared to those in cells without exposure to the parasitic product. These genes were classified into groups including energy and metabolism, signal transduction, protein synthesis and translation, matrix and structural protein, transcription control, cell cycle and DNA replication. Moreover, the expressions of serinethreonine kinase receptor, receptor tyrosine kinase and collagen production-related genes were up-regulated by O. viverrini ES product. The expression level of signal transduction genes; pkC, pdgfrα, jak 1, eps 8, tgfβ 1/4,strap and h ras measured by real-time RT-PCR confirmed their expression levels to those obtained from cDNA array. However, only the up-regulated expression of pkC, eps 8 and tgfβ 1/4 which are the downstream signaling molecules of either epidermal growth factor (EGF) or transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) showed statistical significance (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: O. viverrini ES product stimulates the significant changes of gene expression in several

  20. MicroRNA-34a Induces Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Senescence by SIRT1 Downregulation and Promotes the Expression of Age-Associated Pro-inflammatory Secretory Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badi, Ileana; Burba, Ilaria; Ruggeri, Clarissa; Zeni, Filippo; Bertolotti, Matteo; Scopece, Alessandro; Pompilio, Giulio; Raucci, Angela

    2015-11-01

    Arterial aging is a major risk factor for the occurrence of cardiovascular diseases. The aged artery is characterized by endothelial dysfunction and vascular smooth muscle cells altered physiology together with low-grade chronic inflammation. MicroRNA-34a (miR-34a) has been recently implicated in cardiac, endothelial, and endothelial progenitor cell senescence; however, its contribution to aging-associated vascular smooth muscle cells phenotype has not been explored so far. We found that miR-34a was highly expressed in aortas isolated from old mice. Moreover, its well-known target, the longevity-associated protein SIRT1, was significantly downregulated during aging in both endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells. Increased miR-34a as well as decreased SIRT1 expression was also observed in replicative-senescent human aortic smooth muscle cells. miR-34a overexpression in proliferative human aortic smooth muscle cells caused cell cycle arrest along with enhanced p21 protein levels and evidence of cell senescence. Furthermore, miR-34a ectopic expression induced pro-inflammatory senescence-associated secretory phenotype molecules. Finally, SIRT1 protein significantly decreased upon miR-34a overexpression and restoration of its levels rescued miR-34a-dependent human aortic smooth muscle cells senescence, but not senescence-associated secretory phenotype factors upregulation. Taken together, our findings suggest that aging-associated increase of miR-34a expression levels, by promoting vascular smooth muscle cells senescence and inflammation through SIRT1 downregulation and senescence-associated secretory phenotype factors induction, respectively, may lead to arterial dysfunctions.

  1. Structures, Components and Functions of Secretory Tissues in Houttuynia cordata

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi-Lu Ni; Li Peng; Wen-Zhe Liu

    2007-01-01

    Houttuynia cordata Thunb., traditionally used as a therapeutic plant in folk medicine, has shown antioxidant and anticancer activities.The species, as a core component of paleoherbs, is normally characterized based on the presence of different types of secretory tissue: oil cells, three types of secretory cells and glandular hairs.The aim of this work was to study the structural, componential, and the functional characteristics of the secretory tissues in both the floral and vegetative parts.The results indicate that oll cells and secretory cells are distributed in all organs of the plant, while glandular hairs are situated on the aerial stems and leaves.Both oil cells and glandular hairs initiate from the protoderm, but their developmental processes are different.Although three types of secretory cells initiate from different primary meristems, the developmental pattems of different secretory cells are the same.Also, although the origins of secretory cells are different from oil cells, their early developmental processes are the same.Histochemical results show that oil cells, secretory cells and glandular hairs produce flavonoids, phenolic compounds, tannins, lipids, aldehyde and ketone-compounds.In addition, there are terpenoids and pectic-like substances in oil cells, alkaloids in secretory cells of aerial stems, and terpenoids and alkaloids in glandular hairs.These compounds play very important roles in protecting plants from being eaten by herbivores (herbivory) and infected by microbial pathogens.The oil cell and secretory cell, as unicellular secretory tissues, are intermediates between the primitive surface glandular and secretory cavity and canal during the evolution of secretory structures.

  2. Morphological and biochemical analysis of the secretory pathway in melanoma cells with distinct metastatic potential

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ayala, [No Value; Babia, T; Baldassarre, M; Pompeo, A; Fabra, A; Kok, JW; Luini, A; Buccione, R; Egea, G

    1999-01-01

    In this report, we have investigated whether alterations of the morphological and functional aspects of the biosecretory membrane system are associated with the metastatic potential of tumor cells. To this end, we have analyzed the morphology of the Golgi complex, the cytoskeleton organization and m

  3. Senescent cells and their secretory phenotype as targets for cancer therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velarde, Michael C; Demaria, Marco; Campisi, Judith

    2013-01-01

    Cancer is a devastating disease that increases exponentially with age. Cancer arises from cells that proliferate in an unregulated manner, an attribute that is countered by cellular senescence. Cellular senescence is a potent tumor-suppressive process that halts the proliferation, essentially

  4. Mechanisms of Beta Cell Dysfunction Associated With Viral Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzold, Antje; Solimena, Michele; Knoch, Klaus-Peter

    2015-10-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) results from genetic predisposition and environmental factors leading to the autoimmune destruction of pancreatic beta cells. Recently, a rapid increase in the incidence of childhood T1D has been observed worldwide; this is too fast to be explained by genetic factors alone, pointing to the spreading of environmental factors linked to the disease. Enteroviruses (EVs) are perhaps the most investigated environmental agents in relationship to the pathogenesis of T1D. While several studies point to the likelihood of such correlation, epidemiological evidence in its support is inconclusive or in some instances even against it. Hence, it is still unknown if and how EVs are involved in the development of T1D. Here we review recent findings concerning the biology of EV in beta cells and the potential implications of this knowledge for the understanding of beta cell dysfunction and autoimmune destruction in T1D.

  5. Pancreatic beta cell protection/regeneration with phytotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azar Hosseini

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Although currently available drugs are useful in controlling early onset complications of diabetes, serious late onset complications appear in a large number of patients. Considering the physiopathology of diabetes, preventing beta cell degeneration and stimulating the endogenous regeneration of islets will be essential approaches for the treatment of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. The current review focused on phytochemicals, the antidiabetic effect of which has been proved by pancreatic beta cell protection/regeneration. Among the hundreds of plants that have been investigated for diabetes, a small fraction has shown the regenerative property and was described in this paper. Processes of pancreatic beta cell degeneration and regeneration were described. Also, the proposed mechanisms for the protective/regenerative effects of such phytochemicals and their potential side effects were discussed.

  6. A Western blot-based investigation of the yeast secretory pathway designed for an intermediate-level undergraduate cell biology laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood-Degrenier, Jennifer K

    2008-01-01

    The movement of newly synthesized proteins through the endomembrane system of eukaryotic cells, often referred to generally as the secretory pathway, is a topic covered in most intermediate-level undergraduate cell biology courses. An article previously published in this journal described a laboratory exercise in which yeast mutants defective in two distinct steps of protein secretion were differentiated using a genetic reporter designed specifically to identify defects in the first step of the pathway, the insertion of proteins into the endoplasmic reticulum (Vallen, 2002). We have developed two versions of a Western blotting assay that serves as a second way of distinguishing the two secretory mutants, which we pair with the genetic assay in a 3-wk laboratory module. A quiz administered before and after students participated in the lab activities revealed significant postlab gains in their understanding of the secretory pathway and experimental techniques used to study it. A second survey administered at the end of the lab module assessed student perceptions of the efficacy of the lab activities; the results of this survey indicated that the experiments were successful in meeting a set of educational goals defined by the instructor.

  7. In situ localization of gene transcriptions for monoterpene synthesis in irregular parenchymic cells surrounding the secretory cavities in rough lemon (Citrus jambhiri).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Yumiko; Akimitsu, Kazuya

    2007-11-01

    A cDNA (RlemispF) encoding 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol 2,4-cyclodiphosphate synthase, an enzyme of the methyl erythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway, and two homologs (RlemTPS1 and RlemTPS2) of citrus monoterpene synthase cDNA were isolated from the rough lemon (Citrus jambhiri). Transient localization of all or a part of RlemispF fused to a green fluorescence protein using particle gun-mediated DNA delivery localized RlemispF in the chloroplast. Transcripts of RlemispF and other monoterpene synthase genes are constitutively expressed in leaves of rough lemon. Transcript accumulations of RlemispF and RlemTPS1 were not induced by microbe attacks, but microbe attack weakly induced RlemTPS2 expression. Wounding decreased RlemispF expression. RlemispF and two different monoterpene synthase genes were specifically expressed in the epithelial tissue cells with dense cytoplasm that surround secretory cavities, which form a broadly round package containing a large volume of essential oils composed of monoterpenes. Interestingly, although expressions of RlemTPS1 and RlemTPS2 were detected at both mature and developing secretory cavities, the RlemispF-expressing cells were found more at around developing secretory cavities.

  8. Two distinct secretory vesicle–priming steps in adrenal chromaffin cells

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Yuanyuan; Schirra, Claudia; Edelmann, Ludwig; Matti, Ulf; Rhee, JeongSeop; Hof, Detlef; Bruns, Dieter; Brose, Nils; Rieger, Heiko; Stevens, David R.; Rettig, Jens

    2010-01-01

    Priming of large dense-core vesicles (LDCVs) is a Ca2+-dependent step by which LDCVs enter a release-ready pool, involving the formation of the soluble N-ethyl-maleimide sensitive fusion protein attachment protein (SNAP) receptor complex consisting of syntaxin, SNAP-25, and synaptobrevin. Using mice lacking both isoforms of the calcium-dependent activator protein for secretion (CAPS), we show that LDCV priming in adrenal chromaffin cells entails two distinct steps. CAPS is required for primin...

  9. Matrix stiffness-modulated proliferation and secretory function of the airway smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkumatov, Artem; Thompson, Michael; Choi, Kyoung M; Sicard, Delphine; Baek, Kwanghyun; Kim, Dong Hyun; Tschumperlin, Daniel J; Prakash, Y S; Kong, Hyunjoon

    2015-06-01

    Multiple pulmonary conditions are characterized by an abnormal misbalance between various tissue components, for example, an increase in the fibrous connective tissue and loss/increase in extracellular matrix proteins (ECM). Such tissue remodeling may adversely impact physiological function of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) responsible for contraction of airways and release of a variety of bioactive molecules. However, few efforts have been made to understand the potentially significant impact of tissue remodeling on ASMCs. Therefore, this study reports how ASMCs respond to a change in mechanical stiffness of a matrix, to which ASMCs adhere because mechanical stiffness of the remodeled airways is often different from the physiological stiffness. Accordingly, using atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements, we found that the elastic modulus of the mouse bronchus has an arithmetic mean of 23.1 ± 14 kPa (SD) (median 18.6 kPa). By culturing ASMCs on collagen-conjugated polyacrylamide hydrogels with controlled elastic moduli, we found that gels designed to be softer than average airway tissue significantly increased cellular secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Conversely, gels stiffer than average airways stimulated cell proliferation, while reducing VEGF secretion and agonist-induced calcium responses of ASMCs. These dependencies of cellular activities on elastic modulus of the gel were correlated with changes in the expression of integrin-β1 and integrin-linked kinase (ILK). Overall, the results of this study demonstrate that changes in matrix mechanics alter cell proliferation, calcium signaling, and proangiogenic functions in ASMCs.

  10. Effects of Hyperglycemia on Angiotensin II Receptor Type 1 Expression and Insulin Secretion in an INS-1E Pancreatic Beta-Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwan Keung Leung

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Context A local pancreatic islet renin-angiotensin system has been identified and found to be upregulated in type 2 diabetes mellitus. Inhibition of this system improves beta-cell function and structure. The effects of hyperglycemia, a condition observed in diabetes, on angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R expression and beta-cell secretory function have yet to be explored. Objective This study investigated the effects of chronic hyperglycemia (glucotoxicity on the expression of AT1Rs, and possibly thereby on oxidative stress-induced insulin release, in an INS-1E beta-cell line. Settings INS-1E beta-cells cultured and incubated in different glucose concentrations with a varying time course. Main outcome measures Immunocytochemistry was employed for the precise localization of AT1Rs in INS-1E cells. The effects of hyperglycemia-induced AT1R expression changes in gene and protein levels were examined by real-time RT-PCR and Western blot analysis, respectively. AT1R activation-mediated oxidative stress was assessed by changes in NADPH oxidase expression, and the level of superoxide production was determined by nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT assay. Glucotoxicity-induced AT1R activation- mediated secretory dysfunction was also assessed by insulin release from INS-1E cells Results AT1R immunoreactivity was found to be localized specifically on the cell membrane. Chronic hyperglycemia resulted in dose-dependent upregulation of AT1R gene and protein expression accompanied by concomitantly-enhanced oxidative stress. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion via AT1R activation was impaired by hyperglycemia. Conclusion These data indicate that hyperglycemia-induced AT1R activation impairs insulin secretion; this impairment may be mediated via AT1R-dependent oxidative stress.

  11. Trophic actions of oral vanadium and improved glycemia on the pancreatic beta-cell ultrastructure of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Mohammad Taghi; Pirmoradi, Leila; Mesbah, Fakhrodin; Safaee, Akbar; Dehghani, Gholam Abbas

    2014-11-28

    Oral vanadyl sulfate (vanadium) has potent hypoglycemic effects in diabetes animals, but data about its actions on pancreatic beta-cells (BC) ultrastructure is limited. Partial diabetic rats were treated with vanadium and insulin injection and their effects on BC ultrastructure are studied. Male rats were made diabetic with intravenous streptozotocin injection (STZ, 40 mg/kg). Animals were randomly divided to control (CD), vanadium-treated (1 mg/mL VOSO4 + 5H2O in base solution, VTD) and insulin-treated (80 U/kg/day NPH insulin injection, ITD) diabetic groups. Treatments started 10 days after STZ injection and terminated after 2 months. Intermittent tail blood samples were taken for measurements of blood glucose (BG) and plasma insulin (PI). Finally animals were sacrificed and pancreata prepared for assessments of BC ultrastructure, islets histology and insulin immunoreactivity (IIR). Vanadium decreased BG (P<0.0001), elevated the reduced PI (P<0.001), prevented islet atrophy and restored BC ultrastructure. Low BG seen during treatment in VTD and ITD only persisted in VTD after vanadium withdrawal. Hyperglycemia worsened in CD and repaired in ITD shortly after insulin withdrawal. CD islets were atrophied, had scattered IIR spots. BC had pyknotic nuclei, vacuolated cytoplasm and few tiny insulin secretory granules. VTD islets looked normal with compact centered IIR spots. BC had well-developed endoplasmic reticulum, many insulin secretory granules and mitochondria. ITD islet structure was slightly better than CD and BC had some immature insulin secretory granules. The trophic actions of vanadium in diabetic rats effectively renovated beta cell ultrastructure and prevented pancreatic islets atrophy, whereas the relief of glucotoxicity seen with insulin treatment could repair some beta cells and partially prevented islet atrophy.

  12. The Effect of Secretory Factors of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells on Human Keratinocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo-Wan Nam

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The beneficial effects of adipose-derived stem cell conditioned medium (ADSC-CM on skin regeneration have been reported. Although the mechanism of how ADSC-CM promotes skin regeneration is unclear, ADSC-CM contained various growth factors and it is an excellent raw material for skin treatment. ADSC-CM produced in a hypoxia condition of ADSC—in other words, Advanced Adipose-Derived Stem cell Protein Extract (AAPE—has great merits for skin regeneration. In this study, human primary keratinocytes (HKs, which play fundamental roles in skin tissue, was used to examine how AAPE affects HK. HK proliferation was significantly higher in the experimental group (1.22 μg/mL than in the control group. DNA gene chip demonstrated that AAPE in keratinocytes (p < 0.05 notably affected expression of 290 identified transcripts, which were associated with cell proliferation, cycle and migration. More keratinocyte wound healing and migration was shown in the experimental group (1.22 μg/mL. AAPE treatment significantly stimulated stress fiber formation, which was linked to the RhoA-ROCK pathway. We identified 48 protein spots in 2-D gel analysis and selected proteins were divided into 64% collagen components and 30% non-collagen components as shown by the MALDI-TOF analysis. Antibody array results contained growth factor/cytokine such as HGF, FGF-1, G-CSF, GM-CSF, IL-6, VEGF, and TGF-β3 differing from that shown by 2-D analysis. Conclusion: AAPE activates HK proliferation and migration. These results highlight the potential of the topical application of AAPE in the treatment of skin regeneration.

  13. The CC chemokine CK beta-11/MIP-3 beta/ELC/Exodus 3 mediates tumor rejection of murine breast cancer cells through NK cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, S E; Chen, K; Foster, R G; Kim, C H; Hromas, R; Kaplan, M H; Broxmeyer, H E; Cornetta, K

    2000-04-15

    CK beta-11 chemoattracts T cells, B cells, dendritic cells, macrophage progenitors, and NK cells and facilitates dendritic cell and T cell interactions in secondary lymphoid tissues. We hypothesized that expression of CK beta-11 in tumor cells may generate antitumor immunity through these interactions. After transduction with the retroviral vector L(CK beta 11)SN, the murine breast cancer cell line C3L5 (C3L5-CK beta 11) showed expression of retroviral mRNA by Northern analysis and production of functional CK beta-11 by chemotaxis of human NK cells to C3L5-CK beta 11 supernatant. Only 10% of mice injected with C3L5-CK beta 11 developed tumors, compared with 100% of mice injected with a transduced control C3L5 line (C3L5-G1N). Importantly, the in vitro growth characteristics of the CK beta-11-transduced cell line were unaffected, suggesting the difference in growth in vivo was a result of chemokine production. Vaccination with C3L5-CK beta 11 partially protected animals from parental C3L5 challenge. Immunodepletion with anti-asialo-GM1 or anti-CD4 during C3L5-CK beta 11 vaccination significantly reduced CK beta-11 antitumor activity compared with control and anti-CD8-treated groups. Splenocytes from NK-depleted animals transferred the acquired immunity generated with C3L5-CK beta 11 vaccination, while splenocytes from the CD4-depleted animals did not. These results indicate, for the first time, that expression of CK beta-11 in a breast cancer cell line mediates rejection of the transduced tumor through a mechanism involving NK and CD4+ cells. Furthermore, CK beta-11-transduced tumor cells generate long-term antitumor immunity that requires CD4+ cells. These studies demonstrate the potential role of CK beta-11 as an adjuvant in stimulating antitumor responses.

  14. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) protects against oleate-induced INS-1E beta cell dysfunction by preserving carbohydrate metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigerio, F; Brun, T; Bartley, C

    2009-01-01

    and investigated key metabolic pathways and genes responsible for metabolism-secretion coupling during a culture period of 3 days in the presence of 0.4 mmol/l oleate. RESULTS: In INS-1E cells, the secretory dysfunction primarily induced by oleate was aggravated by silencing of PPARalpha. Conversely, PPARalpha....../INTERPRETATION: PPARalpha protected INS-1E beta cells from oleate-induced dysfunction, promoting both preservation of glucose metabolic pathways and fatty acid turnover.......AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Pancreatic beta cells chronically exposed to fatty acids may lose specific functions and even undergo apoptosis. Generally, lipotoxicity is triggered by saturated fatty acids, whereas unsaturated fatty acids induce lipodysfunction, the latter being characterised by elevated basal...

  15. Two distinct secretory vesicle-priming steps in adrenal chromaffin cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuanyuan; Schirra, Claudia; Edelmann, Ludwig; Matti, Ulf; Rhee, JeongSeop; Hof, Detlef; Bruns, Dieter; Brose, Nils; Rieger, Heiko; Stevens, David R; Rettig, Jens

    2010-09-20

    Priming of large dense-core vesicles (LDCVs) is a Ca(2+)-dependent step by which LDCVs enter a release-ready pool, involving the formation of the soluble N-ethyl-maleimide sensitive fusion protein attachment protein (SNAP) receptor complex consisting of syntaxin, SNAP-25, and synaptobrevin. Using mice lacking both isoforms of the calcium-dependent activator protein for secretion (CAPS), we show that LDCV priming in adrenal chromaffin cells entails two distinct steps. CAPS is required for priming of the readily releasable LDCV pool and sustained secretion in the continued presence of high Ca(2+) concentrations. Either CAPS1 or CAPS2 can rescue secretion in cells lacking both CAPS isoforms. Furthermore, the deficit in the readily releasable LDCV pool resulting from CAPS deletion is reversed by a constitutively open form of syntaxin but not by Munc13-1, a priming protein that facilitates the conversion of syntaxin to the open conformation. Our data indicate that CAPS functions downstream of Munc13s but also interacts functionally with Munc13s in the LDCV-priming process.

  16. Regulation of lipid synthesis genes and milk fat production in human mammary epithelial cells during secretory activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Mahmoud A; Haymond, Morey W

    2013-09-15

    Expression of genes for lipid biosynthetic enzymes during initiation of lactation in humans is unknown. Our goal was to study mRNA expression of lipid metabolic enzymes in human mammary epithelial cell (MEC) in conjunction with the measurement of milk fatty acid (FA) composition during secretory activation. Gene expression from mRNA isolated from milk fat globule (MFG) and milk FA composition were measured from 6 h to 42 days postpartum in seven normal women. Over the first 96 h postpartum, daily milk fat output increased severalfold and mirrored expression of genes for all aspects of lipid metabolism and milk FA production, including lipolysis at the MEC membrane, FA uptake from blood, intracellular FA transport, de novo FA synthesis, FA and glycerol activation, FA elongation, FA desaturation, triglyceride synthesis, cholesterol synthesis, and lipid droplet formation. Expression of the gene for a key lipid synthesis regulator, sterol regulatory element-binding transcription factor 1 (SREBF1), increased 2.0-fold by 36 h and remained elevated over the study duration. Expression of genes for estrogen receptor 1, thyroid hormone-responsive protein, and insulin-induced 2 increased progressively to plateau by 96 h. In contrast, mRNA of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ decreased severalfold. With onset of lactation, increased de novo synthesis of FA was the most prominent change in milk FA composition and mirrored the expression of FA synthesis genes. In conclusion, milk lipid synthesis and secretion in humans is a complex process requiring the orchestration of a wide variety of pathways of which SREBF1 may play a primary role.

  17. Ubiquitin fold modifier 1 (UFM1 and its target UFBP1 protect pancreatic beta cells from ER stress-induced apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katleen Lemaire

    Full Text Available UFM1 is a member of the ubiquitin like protein family. While the enzymatic cascade of UFM1 conjugation has been elucidated in recent years, the biological function remains largely unknown. In this report we demonstrate that the recently identified C20orf116, which we name UFM1-binding protein 1 containing a PCI domain (UFBP1, and CDK5RAP3 interact with UFM1. Components of the UFM1 conjugation pathway (UFM1, UFBP1, UFL1 and CDK5RAP3 are highly expressed in pancreatic islets of Langerhans and some other secretory tissues. Co-localization of UFM1 with UFBP1 in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER depends on UFBP1. We demonstrate that ER stress, which is common in secretory cells, induces expression of Ufm1, Ufbp1 and Ufl1 in the beta-cell line INS-1E. siRNA-mediated Ufm1 or Ufbp1 knockdown enhances apoptosis upon ER stress. Silencing the E3 enzyme UFL1, results in similar outcomes, suggesting that UFM1-UFBP1 conjugation is required to prevent ER stress-induced apoptosis. Together, our data suggest that UFM1-UFBP1 participate in preventing ER stress-induced apoptosis in protein secretory cells.

  18. Ubiquitin fold modifier 1 (UFM1) and its target UFBP1 protect pancreatic beta cells from ER stress-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaire, Katleen; Moura, Rodrigo F; Granvik, Mikaela; Igoillo-Esteve, Mariana; Hohmeier, Hans E; Hendrickx, Nico; Newgard, Christopher B; Waelkens, Etienne; Cnop, Miriam; Schuit, Frans

    2011-04-06

    UFM1 is a member of the ubiquitin like protein family. While the enzymatic cascade of UFM1 conjugation has been elucidated in recent years, the biological function remains largely unknown. In this report we demonstrate that the recently identified C20orf116, which we name UFM1-binding protein 1 containing a PCI domain (UFBP1), and CDK5RAP3 interact with UFM1. Components of the UFM1 conjugation pathway (UFM1, UFBP1, UFL1 and CDK5RAP3) are highly expressed in pancreatic islets of Langerhans and some other secretory tissues. Co-localization of UFM1 with UFBP1 in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) depends on UFBP1. We demonstrate that ER stress, which is common in secretory cells, induces expression of Ufm1, Ufbp1 and Ufl1 in the beta-cell line INS-1E. siRNA-mediated Ufm1 or Ufbp1 knockdown enhances apoptosis upon ER stress. Silencing the E3 enzyme UFL1, results in similar outcomes, suggesting that UFM1-UFBP1 conjugation is required to prevent ER stress-induced apoptosis. Together, our data suggest that UFM1-UFBP1 participate in preventing ER stress-induced apoptosis in protein secretory cells.

  19. Profile of blood glucose and ultrastucture of beta cells pancreatic islet in alloxan compound induced rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Nyoman Suarsana

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is marked by elevated levels of blood glucose, and progressive changes of the structure of pancreatic islet histopathology. The objective of this research was to analyse the glucose level and histophatological feature in pancreatic islet in alloxan compound induced rats. A total of ten male Spraque Dawley rats of 2 months old were used in this study. The rats were divided into two groups: (1 negative control group (K-, and (2 positif induced alloxan group (diabetic group =DM. The rats were induced by a single dose intraperitonial injection of alloxan compound 120 mg/kg of body weight. The treatment was conducted for 28 days. Blood glucose levels of rats were analysed at 0, 4, 7, 14, 21, and 28 days following treatment. At the end of the experiment, rats were sacrificed by cervical dislocation. Pancreas was collected for analysis of histopathological study by Immunohistochemical technique, and ultrastructural study using transmission electron microscope (TEM. The result showed that Langerhans islet of diabetic rat (rat of DM group showed a marked reduction of size, number of Langerhans islet of diabetic rat decrease, and characterized by hyperglycemic condition. By using TEM, beta cells of DM group showed the rupture of mitochondrial membrane, the lost of cisternal structure of inner membrane of mitocondria, reduction of insulin secretory granules, linkage between cells acinar with free Langerhans islet, and the caryopicnotic of nucleus.

  20. Cyclin D2 is sufficient to drive beta cell self-renewal and regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschen, Shuen-Ing; Zeng, Chun; Field, Loren; Dhawan, Sangeeta; Bhushan, Anil; Georgia, Senta

    2017-08-01

    Diabetes results from an inadequate mass of functional beta cells, due to either beta cell loss caused by autoimmune destruction (Type I diabetes) or beta cell failure in response to insulin resistance (Type II diabetes). Elucidating the mechanisms that regulate beta cell mass may be key to developing new techniques that foster beta cell regeneration as a cellular therapy to treat diabetes. While previous studies concluded that cyclin D2 is required for postnatal beta cell self-renewal in mice, it is not clear if cyclin D2 is sufficient to drive beta cell self-renewal. Using transgenic mice that overexpress cyclin D2 specifically in beta cells, we show that cyclin D2 overexpression increases beta cell self-renewal post-weaning and results in increased beta cell mass. Beta cells that overexpress cyclin D2 are responsive to glucose stimulation, suggesting they are functionally mature. Beta cells that overexpress cyclin D2 demonstrate an enhanced regenerative capacity after injury induced by streptozotocin toxicity. To understand if cyclin D2 overexpression is sufficient to drive beta cell self-renewal, we generated a novel mouse model where cyclin D2 is only expressed in beta cells of cyclin D2(-/-) mice. Transgenic overexpression of cyclin D2 in cyclin D2(-)(/)(-) beta cells was sufficient to restore beta cell mass, maintain normoglycaemia, and improve regenerative capacity when compared to cyclin D2(-/-) littermates. Taken together, our results indicate that cyclin D2 is sufficient to regulate beta cell self-renewal and that manipulation of its expression could be used to enhance beta cell regeneration.

  1. BAT3 interacts with transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) receptors and enhances TGF-beta1-induced type I collagen expression in mesangial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Joon Hyeok; Kim, Sung Il; Kim, Jin Kuk; Choi, Mary E

    2008-07-11

    Transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) plays essential roles in a wide array of cellular processes, such as in development and the pathogenesis of tissue fibrosis, including that associated with progressive kidney diseases. Tight regulation of its signaling pathways is critical, and proteins that associate with the TGF-beta receptors may exert positive or negative regulatory effects on TGF-beta signaling. In the present study we employed a yeast-based two-hybrid screening system to identify BAT3 (HLA-B-associated transcript 3) as a TGF-beta receptor-interacting protein. Analysis of endogenously expressed BAT3 in various tissues including the kidney reveals the existence of approximately 140-kDa full-length protein as well as truncated forms of BAT3 whose expression is developmentally regulated. Endogenous BAT3 protein interacts with TGF-beta receptors type I and type II in renal mesangial cells. Functional assays show that expression of full-length BAT3 results in enhancement of TGF-beta1-stimulated transcriptional activation of p3TP-Lux reporter, and these effects require the presence of functional TGF-beta signaling receptors as demonstrated in R-1B and DR-26 mutant cells. Moreover, expression of full-length BAT3, but not C-terminal truncated mutant of BAT3, enhanced TGF-beta1-induced type I collagen expression in mesangial cells, whereas knock down of BAT3 protein expression by small interfering RNA suppressed the expression of type I collagen induced by TGF-beta1. Our findings suggest that BAT3, a TGF-beta receptor-interacting protein, is capable of modulating TGF-beta signaling and acts as a positive regulator of TGF-beta1 stimulation of type I collagen expression in mesangial cells.

  2. beta-Catenin signaling is required for TGF-beta(1)-induced extracellular matrix production by airway smooth muscle cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baarsma, Hoeke A.; Menzen, Mark H.; Halayko, Andrew J.; Meurs, Herman; Kerstjens, Huib A. M.; Gosens, Reinoud

    2011-01-01

    Baarsma HA, Menzen MH, Halayko AJ, Meurs H, Kerstjens HA, Gosens R. beta-Catenin signaling is required for TGF-beta(1)-induced extracellular matrix production by airway smooth muscle cells. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol 301: L956-L965, 2011. First published September 9, 2011; doi: 10.1152/ajplu

  3. A Figure-of-Merit for Beta Cell Detector Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foxe, Michael P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Miller, Brian W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Suarez, Rey [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hayes, James C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-09-02

    In order to decrease the minimum detectable activities (MDAs) of beta-gamma radioxenon detectors, it is important to increase the ability to resolve the individual isotopes. One proposed method for doing this is to increase the energy resolution of the beta cell through the use of silicon detectors. While silicon detectors can improve the energy resolution, it is accompanied with a decrease in detection efficiency compared to plastic scintillator beta cells. Due to the uncertainty on the impact of the competing variables, we have developed a figure-of-merit (FOM) capable of determining the impact of detector parameters on the MDAs. By utilizing the FOM to analyze different detectors, we are able to directly compare current and future detectors and estimate their impact on the radioxenon MDAs.

  4. Insulin-like growth factors and pancreas beta cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haeften, T.W. van; Twickler, M.

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) have been implicated in normal growth, and especially foetal pancreas beta-cell development. As low birth weight has been implicated in the development of obesity and type 2 diabetes, much research has evolved into the importance of IGF and their signallin

  5. Insulin-like growth factors and pancreas beta cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Haeften, TW; Twickler, TB

    2004-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) have been implicated in normal growth, and especially foetal pancreas beta-cell development. As low birth weight has been implicated in the development of obesity and type 2 diabetes, much research has evolved into the importance of IGF and their signalling pathway

  6. Workshop on programming beta cell development, impairment and regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heller, Scott; Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    2012-01-01

    Helsingør, the city of Hamlet in Denmark, provided the site for the workshop "Programming Beta Cell Development, Impairment and Regeneration" on October 23-26th, 2011. The same location has held two EASD Islet study group meetings, while the previous three workshops were held in Helsinki, Finland...

  7. Exendin-4 Promotes Beta Cell Proliferation via PI3k/Akt Signalling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaoxun Wang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Prevention of diabetes requires maintenance of a functional beta-cell mass, the postnatal growth of which depends on beta cell proliferation. Past studies have shown evidence of an effect of an incretin analogue, Exendin-4, in promoting beta cell proliferation, whereas the underlying molecular mechanisms are not completely understood. Methods: Here we studied the effects of Exendin-4 on beta cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo through analysing BrdU-incorporated beta cells. We also analysed the effects of Exendin-4 on beta cell mass in vivo, and on beta cell number in vitro. Then, we applied specific inhibitors of different signalling pathways and analysed their effects on Exendin-4-induced beta cell proliferation. Results: Exendin-4 increased beta cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo, resulting in significant increases in beta cell mass and beta cell number, respectively. Inhibition of PI3K/Akt signalling, but not inhibition of either ERK/MAPK pathway, or JNK pathway, significantly abolished the effects of Exendin-4 in promoting beta cell proliferation. Conclusion: Exendin-4 promotes beta cell proliferation via PI3k/Akt signaling pathway.

  8. Pancreatic beta-cell overexpression of the glucagon receptor gene results in enhanced beta-cell function and mass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gelling, Richard W; Vuguin, Patricia M; Du, Xiu Quan

    2009-01-01

    in response to glucagon and glucose, the glucose excursion resulting from both a glucagon challenge and intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (IPGTT) was significantly reduced in RIP-Gcgr mice compared with controls. However, RIP-Gcgr mice display similar glucose responses to an insulin challenge. beta...... in vivo, we generated mice overexpressing the Gcgr specifically on pancreatic beta-cells (RIP-Gcgr). In vivo and in vitro insulin secretion in response to glucagon and glucose was increased 1.7- to 3.9-fold in RIP-Gcgr mice compared with controls. Consistent with the observed increase in insulin release...... and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) were reduced in RIP-Gcgr mice compared with controls. Furthermore, the insulin response of RIP-Gcgr mice to an IPGTT was twice that of controls when fed the HFD. These data indicate that increased pancreatic beta-cell expression of the Gcgr increased insulin secretion...

  9. Disparate effects of p24alpha and p24delta on secretory protein transport and processing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeroen R P M Strating

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The p24 family is thought to be somehow involved in endoplasmic reticulum (ER-to-Golgi protein transport. A subset of the p24 proteins (p24alpha(3, -beta(1, -gamma(3 and -delta(2 is upregulated when Xenopus laevis intermediate pituitary melanotrope cells are physiologically activated to produce vast amounts of their major secretory cargo, the prohormone proopiomelanocortin (POMC. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we find that transgene expression of p24alpha(3 or p24delta(2 specifically in the Xenopus melanotrope cells in both cases causes an effective displacement of the endogenous p24 proteins, resulting in severely distorted p24 systems and disparate melanotrope cell phenotypes. Transgene expression of p24alpha(3 greatly reduces POMC transport and leads to accumulation of the prohormone in large, ER-localized electron-dense structures, whereas p24delta(2-transgenesis does not influence the overall ultrastructure of the cells nor POMC transport and cleavage, but affects the Golgi-based processes of POMC glycomaturation and sulfation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Transgenic expression of two distinct p24 family members has disparate effects on secretory pathway functioning, illustrating the specificity and non-redundancy of our transgenic approach. We conclude that members of the p24 family furnish subcompartments of the secretory pathway with specific sets of machinery cargo to provide the proper microenvironments for efficient and correct secretory protein transport and processing.

  10. Exploring functional beta-cell heterogeneity in vivo using PSA-NCAM as a specific marker.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melis Karaca

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The mass of pancreatic beta-cells varies according to increases in insulin demand. It is hypothesized that functionally heterogeneous beta-cell subpopulations take part in this process. Here we characterized two functionally distinct groups of beta-cells and investigated their physiological relevance in increased insulin demand conditions in rats. METHODS: Two rat beta-cell populations were sorted by FACS according to their PSA-NCAM surface expression, i.e. beta(high and beta(low-cells. Insulin release, Ca(2+ movements, ATP and cAMP contents in response to various secretagogues were analyzed. Gene expression profiles and exocytosis machinery were also investigated. In a second part, beta(high and beta(low-cell distribution and functionality were investigated in animal models with decreased or increased beta-cell function: the Zucker Diabetic Fatty rat and the 48 h glucose-infused rat. RESULTS: We show that beta-cells are heterogeneous for PSA-NCAM in rat pancreas. Unlike beta(low-cells, beta(high-cells express functional beta-cell markers and are highly responsive to various insulin secretagogues. Whereas beta(low-cells represent the main population in diabetic pancreas, an increase in beta(high-cells is associated with gain of function that follows sustained glucose overload. CONCLUSION: Our data show that a functional heterogeneity of beta-cells, assessed by PSA-NCAM surface expression, exists in vivo. These findings pinpoint new target populations involved in endocrine pancreas plasticity and in beta-cell defects in type 2 diabetes.

  11. A subset of human pancreatic beta cells express functional CD14 receptors: a signaling pathway for beta cell-related glycolipids, sulfatide and ß-galactosylceramide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østerbye, Thomas; Funda, David P; Fundová, Petra;

    2010-01-01

    T1DM is a T-cell-mediated autoimmune disease targeting insulin-producing beta-cells. Multiple factors may contribute to the development of T1DM. Among these, the metabolic state of beta-cells and pro-inflammatory cytokines, produced by infiltrating immune cells, have been implicated in the precip...

  12. Two Rab proteins, vesicle-associated membrane protein 2 (VAMP-2) and secretory carrier membrane proteins (SCAMPs), are present on immunoisolated parietal cell tubulovesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, B C; Goldenring, J R

    1997-01-01

    The tubulovesicles of gastric parietal cells sequester H+/K+-ATPase molecules within resting parietal cells. Stimulation of parietal cell secretion elicits delivery of intracellular H+/K+-ATPase to the apically oriented secretory canaliculus. Previous investigations have suggested that this process requires the regulated fusion of intracellular tubulovesicles with the canalicular target membrane. We have sought to investigate the presence of critical putative regulators of vesicle fusion on immunoisolated gastric parietal cell tubulovesicles. Highly purified tubulovesicles were prepared by gradient fractionation and immunoisolation on magnetic beads coated with monoclonal antibodies against the alpha subunit of H+/K+-ATPase. Western blot analysis revealed the presence of Rab11, Rab25, vesicle-associated membrane protein 2 (VAMP-2) and secretory carrier membrane proteins (SCAMPs) on immunoisolated vesicles. The same cohort of proteins was recovered on vesicles immunoisolated with monoclonal antibodies against SCAMPs and VAMP-2. In contrast, whereas immunoreactivities for syntaxin 1A/1B and synaptosome-associated protein (SNAP-25) were present in gradient-isolated vesicles, none of the immunoreactivity was associated with immunoisolated vesicles. The observation of VAMP-2 and two Rab proteins on immunoisolated H+/K+-ATPase-containing tubulovesicles supports the role for tubulovesicles in a regulated vesicle fusion process. In addition, the presence of SCAMPs along with Rab11 and Rab25 implicates the tubulovesicles as a critical apical recycling vesicle population. PMID:9230141

  13. Induction of human pancreatic beta cell replication by inhibitors of dual specificity tyrosine regulated kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Alvarez-Perez, Juan-Carlos; Felsenfeld, Dan P.; Liu, Hongtao; Sivendran, Sharmila; Bender, Aaron; Kumar, Anil; Sanchez, Roberto; Scott, Donald K.; Garcia-Ocaña, Adolfo; Stewart, Andrew F.

    2015-01-01

    Types 1 and 2 diabetes affect some 380 million people worldwide. Both result ultimately from a deficiency of functional pancreatic insulin-producing beta cells. Beta cells proliferate in humans during a brief temporal window beginning around the time of birth, with peak beta cell labeling indices achieving approximately 2% in first year of life1-4. In embryonic life and after early childhood, beta cell replication rates are very low. While beta cell expansion seems an obvious therapeutic approach to beta cell deficiency, adult human beta cells have proven recalcitrant to such efforts1-8. Hence, there remains an urgent need for diabetes therapeutic agents that can induce regeneration and expansion of adult human beta cells in vivo or ex vivo. Here, we report the results of a high-throughput small molecule screen (HTS) revealing a novel class of human beta cell mitogenic compounds, analogues of the small molecule, harmine. We also define dual specificity tyrosine-regulated kinase-1a (DYRK1A) as the likely target of harmine, and the Nuclear Factors of activated T-cells (NFAT) family of transcription factors as likely mediators of human beta cell proliferation as well as beta cell differentiation. These observations suggest that harmine analogues (“harmalogs”) may have unique therapeutic promise for human diabetes therapy. Enhancing potency and beta cell specificity are important future challenges. PMID:25751815

  14. Beta-cell lines derived from transgenic mice expressing a hybrid insulin gene-oncogene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Efrat, S; Linde, S; Kofod, Hans

    1988-01-01

    Three pancreatic beta-cell lines have been established from insulinomas derived from transgenic mice carrying a hybrid insulin-promoted simian virus 40 tumor antigen gene. The beta tumor cell (beta TC) lines maintain the features of differentiated beta cells for about 50 passages in culture. The ...... both to immortalize a rare cell type and to provide a selection for the maintenance of its differentiated phenotype....

  15. Reg4+ deep crypt secretory cells function as epithelial niche for Lgr5+ stem cells in colon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sasaki, Nobuo; Sachs, Norman; Wiebrands, Kay; Ellenbroek, Saskia I J; Fumagalli, Arianna; Lyubimova, Anna; Begthel, Harry; van den Born, Maaike; van Es, Johan H; Karthaus, Wouter R; Li, Vivian S W; López-Iglesias, Carmen; Peters, Peter J; van Rheenen, Jacco; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Clevers, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein coupled receptor 5-positive (Lgr5(+)) stem cells reside at crypt bottoms of the small and large intestine. Small intestinal Paneth cells supply Wnt3, EGF, and Notch signals to neighboring Lgr5(+) stem cells. Whereas the colon lacks Paneth cells, deep crypt

  16. File list: Oth.Pan.05.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  17. File list: DNS.Pan.50.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  18. File list: DNS.Pan.05.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Pan.05.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells mm9 DNase-seq Pancreas Pancreatic beta cells... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Pan.05.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells.bed ...

  19. File list: Oth.Pan.20.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Pan.20.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells mm9 TFs and others Pancreas Pancreatic beta ...cells SRX445035,SRX445033,SRX445034 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Pan.20.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells.bed ...

  20. File list: Pol.Pan.50.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  1. File list: His.Pan.50.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  2. File list: DNS.Pan.20.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Pan.20.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells mm9 DNase-seq Pancreas Pancreatic beta cells... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Pan.20.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells.bed ...

  3. File list: Pol.Pan.20.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  4. File list: Pol.Pan.05.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Pan.05.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells mm9 RNA polymerase Pancreas Pancreatic beta ...cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Pan.05.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells.bed ...

  5. File list: His.Pan.20.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  6. File list: DNS.Pan.10.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  7. File list: Unc.Pan.50.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  8. File list: Oth.Pan.50.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Pan.50.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells mm9 TFs and others Pancreas Pancreatic beta ...cells SRX445035,SRX445033,SRX445034 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Pan.50.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells.bed ...

  9. File list: Unc.Pan.20.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  10. File list: His.Pan.05.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  11. File list: His.Pan.10.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  12. File list: Unc.Pan.05.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  13. File list: Pol.Pan.10.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  14. File list: Unc.Pan.10.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  15. TGF-{beta}-stimulated aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin via the ERK signaling pathway in cultured retinal pigment epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Eun Jee [Department of Ophthalmology, National Health Insurance Corporation Ilsan Hospital, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Chun, Ji Na; Jung, Sun-Ah [Konyang University Myunggok Medical Research Institute, Kim' s Eye Hospital, Konyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Jin Won [Department of Biology, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon-dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Joon H., E-mail: joonhlee@konyang.ac.kr [Konyang University Myunggok Medical Research Institute, Kim' s Eye Hospital, Konyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGF-{beta} induces aberrant expression of {beta}III in RPE cells via the ERK pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGF-{beta} increases O-GlcNAc modification of {beta}III in RPE cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mature RPE cells have the capacity to express a neuron-associated gene by TGF-{beta}. -- Abstract: The class III {beta}-tubulin isotype ({beta}{sub III}) is expressed exclusively by neurons within the normal human retina and is not present in normal retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells in situ or in the early phase of primary cultures. However, aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin has been observed in passaged RPE cells and RPE cells with dedifferentiated morphology in pathologic epiretinal membranes from idiopathic macular pucker, proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR). Transforming growth factor-{beta} (TGF-{beta}) has been implicated in dedifferentiation of RPE cells and has a critical role in the development of proliferative vitreoretinal diseases. Here, we investigated the potential effects of TGF-{beta} on the aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin and the intracellular signaling pathway mediating these changes. TGF-{beta}-induced aberrant expression and O-linked-{beta}-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNac) modification of class III {beta}-tubulin in cultured RPE cells as determined using Western blotting, RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry. TGF-{beta} also stimulated phosphorylation of ERK. TGF-{beta}-induced aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin was significantly reduced by pretreatment with U0126, an inhibitor of ERK phosphorylation. Our findings indicate that TGF-{beta} stimulated aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin via activation of the ERK signaling pathway. These data demonstrate that mature RPE cells have the capacity to express a neuron-associated gene in response to TGF-{beta} stimulation and provide useful information

  16. Effect of coriander seed (Coriandrum sativum L.) ethanol extract on insulin release from pancreatic beta cells in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eidi, Maryam; Eidi, Akram; Saeidi, Ali; Molanaei, Saadat; Sadeghipour, Alireza; Bahar, Massih; Bahar, Kamal

    2009-03-01

    Coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) is grown as a spice crop all over the world. The seeds have been used to treat indigestion, diabetes, rheumatism and pain in the joints. In the present study, an ethanol extract of the seeds was investigated for effects on insulin release from the pancreatic beta cells in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Blood samples were drawn from the retro-orbital sinus before and 1.5, 3 and 5 h after administration of the seed extract. Serum glucose levels were determined by the glucose oxidase method. To determine the insulin releasing activity, after extract treatment the animals were anaesthetized by diethyl ether, the pancreas was excised, fixed in 10% formaldehyde and embedded in paraffin for sectioning. Pancreatic sections of 5 microm were processed for examination of insulin-releasing activity using an immunocytochemistry kit. The results showed that administration of the ethanol extract (200 and 250 mg/kg, i.p.) exhibited a significant reduction in serum glucose. Administration of streptozotocin decreased the number of beta cells with insulin secretory activity in comparison with intact rats, but treatment with the coriander seed extract (200 mg/kg) increased significantly the activity of the beta cells in comparison with the diabetic control rats. The extract decreased serum glucose in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats and increased insulin release from the beta cells of the pancreas.

  17. Beta4 tubulin identifies a primitive cell source for oligodendrocytes in the mammalian brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chuanshen; Chang, Ansi; Smith, Maria C; Won, Roy; Yin, Xinghua; Staugaitis, Susan M; Agamanolis, Dimitri; Kidd, Grahame J; Miller, Robert H; Trapp, Bruce D

    2009-06-17

    We have identified a novel population of cells in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the mammalian brain that expresses beta4 tubulin (betaT4) and has properties of primitive neuroectodermal cells. betaT4 cells are scattered throughout the SVZ of the lateral ventricles in adult human brain and are significantly increased in the SVZs bordering demyelinated white matter in multiple sclerosis brains. In human fetal brain, betaT4 cell densities peak during the latter stages of gliogenesis, which occurs in the SVZ of the lateral ventricles. betaT4 cells represent 95% of cells in neurospheres treated with the anti-mitotic agent Ara C. betaT4 cells produce oligodendrocytes, neurons, and astrocytes in vitro. We compared the myelinating potential of betaT4-positive cells with A2B5-positive oligodendrocyte progenitor cells after transplantation (25,000 cells) into postnatal day 3 (P3) myelin-deficient rat brains. At P20, the progeny of betaT4 cells myelinated up to 4 mm of the external capsule, which significantly exceeded that of transplanted A2B5-positive progenitor cells. Such extensive and rapid mature CNS cell generation by a relatively small number of transplanted cells provides in vivo support for the therapeutic potential of betaT4 cells. We propose that betaT4 cells are an endogenous cell source that can be recruited to promote neural repair in the adult telencephalon.

  18. Suramin inhibits growth and transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) binding in osteosarcoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloen, P; Jennings, C L; Gebhardt, M C; Springfield, D S; Mankin, H J

    1994-01-01

    Autocrine production of growth factors has been shown to be involved in the multistep process of tumorigenesis. The ability of suramin, a polyanionic anti-parasitic drug, to block growth factor-induced cell proliferation makes it a potential antineoplastic drug. We studied the effects of suramin on seven osteosarcoma cell lines. Using clinically achievable concentrations of suramin (50-400 micrograms/ml), we found a time- and dose-dependent inhibition of [3H]thymidine incorporation. We also showed that suramin is able, dose-dependently, to prevent binding of transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta 1 to its receptors. DNA synthesis inhibition by suramin was attenuated by TGF-beta 1 in some cell lines. Two cell lines that were inhibited by TGF-beta 1 were affected similarly by suramin as cell lines that were stimulated by TGF-beta 1. In conclusion, in five out of seven osteosarcoma cell lines, we showed a correlation between inhibition of growth factor-stimulated mitogenesis and binding of TGF-beta 1 to its receptor. Similar effects in TGF-beta 1-inhibited osteosarcoma cell lines suggest involvement of other mechanisms and/or growth factors. However, suramin proves to be a potent inhibitor of osteosarcoma cell proliferation in vitro.

  19. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of insulin-producing beta TC6-F7 cells in microcapsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, D; Sun, A M; Li, X; Mamujee, S N; Vacek, I; Georgiou, J; Wheeler, M B

    1998-05-01

    In the present study, the insulin secretory capacity of beta TC6-F7 cells in microcapsules was evaluated. The cell mass within capsules was found to expand in a three-dimensional fashion, in contrast to cells seeded on plates that grew as a monolayer. In in vitro studies, both free and encapsulated cells were found to secrete insulin in the absence of glucose, at 13.6 +/- 1.1 and 14.5 +/- 0.9 ng.10(6) cells-1.60 min-1, respectively, with the response rising to a maximum of 26.0 +/- 0.8 and 31 +/- 2.3 ng.10(6) cells-1.60 min-1 in the presence of 16.8 mM glucose. Encapsulated cells were able to produce Ca2+ responses in the presence of KCl (50 mM) and BAY K 8644 (100 microM). In in vivo studies, intraperitoneal transplantation of 3.0 x 10(6) microencapsulated cells into mice (n = 5) with streptozotocin-induced diabetes resulted in the restoration of normoglycemia up to 57 days. Insulin concentrations rose from 0.4 +/- 0.1 ng/ml before the graft administration to 2.2 +/- 0.8 ng/ml after the transplantation in the normoglycemic recipients. An oral glucose challenge in transplant recipients demonstrated a flat glucose response, suggesting extremely high glucose clearance rates. These data demonstrate the potential use of the immunoisolated beta-cell lines for the treatment of diabetes.

  20. Thymosin beta 4 induces hair growth via stem cell migration and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philp, Deborah; St-Surin, Sharleen; Cha, Hee-Jae; Moon, Hye-Sung; Kleinman, Hynda K; Elkin, Michael

    2007-09-01

    Thymosin beta 4 is a small 43-amino-acid molecule that has multiple biological activities, including promotion of cell migration angiogenesis, cell survival, protease production, and wound healing. We have found that thymosin beta 4 promotes hair growth in various rat and mice models including a transgenic thymosin beta 4 overexpressing mouse. We have also determined the mechanism by which thymosin beta 4 acts to promote hair growth by examining its effects on follicle stem cell growth, migration, differentiation, and protease production.

  1. Glucose- and interleukin-1beta-induced beta-cell apoptosis requires Ca2+ influx and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 activation and is prevented by a sulfonylurea receptor 1/inwardly rectifying K+ channel 6.2 (SUR/Kir6.2) selective potassium channel opener in human islets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maedler, Kathrin; Størling, Joachim; Sturis, Jeppe

    2004-01-01

    -regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2, an effect that was abrogated by 3 micromol/l NN414. Similarly, 1 micromol/l of the mitogen-activated protein kinase/ERK kinase 1/2 inhibitor PD098059 or 1 micromol/l of the l-type Ca(2+) channel blocker nimodipine prevented glucose- and IL-1beta-induced ERK activation, beta......Increasing evidence indicates that a progressive decrease in the functional beta-cell mass is the hallmark of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The underlying causes, beta-cell apoptosis and impaired secretory function, seem to be partly mediated by macrophage production of interleukin (IL)-1beta...... and/or high-glucose-induced beta-cell production of IL-1beta. Treatment of type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients with the potassium channel opener diazoxide partially restores insulin secretion. Therefore, we studied the effect of diazoxide and of the novel potassium channel opener NN414, selective...

  2. T cell precursor migration towards beta 2-microglobulin is involved in thymus colonization of chicken embryos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dunon, D; Kaufman, J; Salomonsen, J;

    1990-01-01

    beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2m) attracts hemopoietic precursors from chicken bone marrow cells in vitro. The cell population responding to beta 2m increases during the second period of thymus colonization, which takes place at days 12-14 of incubation. The precursors from 13.5 day old embryos were...... isolated after migration towards beta 2m in vitro and shown to be able to colonize a 13 day old thymus in ovo, where they subsequently acquire thymocyte markers. In contrast these beta 2m responsive precursors did not colonize embryonic bursa, i.e. differentiate into B lymphocytes. During chicken...... embryogenesis, peaks of beta 2m transcripts and of free beta 2m synthesis can only be detected in the thymus. The peak of free beta 2m synthesis in the thymus and the increase of beta 2m responding bone marrow cells both occur concomitantly with the second wave of thymus colonization in chicken embryo, facts...

  3. PAX4 enhances beta-cell differentiation of human embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chee Gee Liew

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human embryonic stem cells (HESC readily differentiate into an apparently haphazard array of cell types, corresponding to all three germ layers, when their culture conditions are altered, for example by growth in suspension as aggregates known as embryoid bodies (EBs. However, this diversity of differentiation means that the efficiency of producing any one particular cell type is inevitably low. Although pancreatic differentiation has been reported from HESC, practicable applications for the use of beta-cells derived from HESC to treat diabetes will only be possible once techniques are developed to promote efficient differentiation along the pancreatic lineages. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Here, we have tested whether the transcription factor, Pax4 can be used to drive the differentiation of HESC to a beta-cell fate in vitro. We constitutively over-expressed Pax4 in HESCs by stable transfection, and used Q-PCR analysis, immunocytochemistry, ELISA, Ca(2+ microfluorimetry and cell imaging to assess the role of Pax4 in the differentiation and intracellular Ca(2+ homeostasis of beta-cells developing in embryoid bodies produced from such HESC. Cells expressing key beta-cell markers were isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting after staining for high zinc content using the vital dye, Newport Green. CONCLUSION: Constitutive expression of Pax4 in HESC substantially enhances their propensity to form putative beta-cells. Our findings provide a novel foundation to study the mechanism of pancreatic beta-cells differentiation during early human development and to help evaluate strategies for the generation of purified beta-cells for future clinical applications.

  4. RLIM interacts with Smurf2 and promotes TGF-{beta} induced U2OS cell migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Yongsheng [State Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering, Institute of Genetics, School of Life Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); State Key Laboratory of Biomembrane and Membrane Biotechnology, Department of Biological Sciences and Biotechnology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Yang, Yang; Gao, Rui; Yang, Xianmei [State Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering, Institute of Genetics, School of Life Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Yan, Xiaohua [State Key Laboratory of Biomembrane and Membrane Biotechnology, Department of Biological Sciences and Biotechnology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Wang, Chenji; Jiang, Sirui [State Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering, Institute of Genetics, School of Life Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Yu, Long, E-mail: longyu@fudan.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering, Institute of Genetics, School of Life Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)

    2011-10-14

    Highlights: {yields} RLIM directly binds to Smurf2. {yields} RLIM enhances TGF-{beta} responsiveness in U2OS cells. {yields} RLIM promotes TGF-{beta} driven migration of osteosarcoma U2OS cells. -- Abstract: TGF-{beta} (transforming growth factor-{beta}), a pleiotropic cytokine that regulates diverse cellular processes, has been suggested to play critical roles in cell proliferation, migration, and carcinogenesis. Here we found a novel E3 ubiquitin ligase RLIM which can directly bind to Smurf2, enhancing TGF-{beta} responsiveness in osteosarcoma U2OS cells. We constructed a U2OS cell line stably over-expressing RLIM and demonstrated that RLIM promoted TGF-{beta}-driven migration of U2OS cells as tested by wound healing assay. Our results indicated that RLIM is an important positive regulator in TGF-{beta} signaling pathway and cell migration.

  5. Modulation of estrogen receptor-beta isoforms by phytoestrogens in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappelletti, Vera; Miodini, Patrizia; Di Fronzo, Giovanni; Daidone, Maria Grazia

    2006-05-01

    High consumption of phytoestrogen-rich food correlates with reduced incidence of breast cancer. However, the effect of phytoestrogens on growth of pre-existing breast tumors presents concerns when planning the use of phytoestrogens as chemoprevention st rategy. Genistein, the active phytoestrogen in soy, displays weak estrogenic activity mediated by estrogen receptor (ER) with a preferential binding for the ER-beta species. However, no information is at present available on the interaction between phytoestrogens and the various isoforms generated by alternative splicing. In two human breast cancer cell lines, T47D and BT20, which express variable levels of ER-beta, the effect of genistein and quercetin was evaluated singly and in comparison with 17beta-estradiol, on mRNA expression of estrogen receptor-beta (ER-beta) isoforms evaluated by a triple primer RT-PCR assay. In T47D cells estradiol caused a 6-fold up-regulation of total ER-beta, and modified the relative expression pattern of the various isoforms, up-regulating the beta2 and down-regulating the beta5 isoform. Genistein up-regulated ER-beta2 and ER-beta1 in T47D cells, and after treatment the ER-beta2 isoform became prevalent, while in BT20 cells it almost doubled the percent contribution of ER-beta1 and ER-beta2 to total ER-beta. Quercetin did not alter the total levels nor the percent distribution of ER-beta isoforms in either cell line. Genistein, through the modulation of ER-beta isoform RNA expression inhibited estrogen-promoted cell growth, without interfering on estrogen-regulated transcription. ER-beta and its ER-beta mRNA isoforms may be involved in a self-limiting mechanism of estrogenic stimulation promoted either by the natural hormone or by weaker estrogen agonists like genistein.

  6. CD44 and beta1 integrin mediate ovarian carcinoma cell adhesion to peritoneal mesothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessan, K; Aguiar, D J; Oegema, T; Siebenson, L; Skubitz, A P

    1999-05-01

    Epithelial cancer of the ovary spreads by implantation of tumor cells onto the mesothelial cells lining the peritoneal cavity. The aim of this study was to identify the adhesion molecules involved in the interaction of ovarian carcinoma cells with mesothelial cells. The human ovarian carcinoma cell lines SKOV3 and NIH:OVCAR5 as well as LP9 cells, a human peritoneal mesothelial cell line, were analyzed by flow cytometry for the expression of CD44 and the beta1 integrin subunit. An in vitro adhesion assay was developed whereby LP9 cells were grown as confluent monolayers, and radiolabeled ovarian carcinoma cells were monitored for their ability to adhere to the mesothelial monolayer in the presence of potential inhibitors. Each cell line was evaluated for the presence of a pericellular matrix by a particle exclusion assay. A monoclonal antibody (MAb) against the beta1 integrin subunit significantly reduced the adhesion of SKOV3 cells to LP9 cells, whereas NIH:OVCAR5 adhesion to LP9 cells was significantly inhibited by a CD44 MAb. The LP9 cells produced both hyaluronic acid (a ligand for CD44) as well as several extracellular matrix molecules (ligands for the beta1 integrin heterodimers). These results suggest that both CD44 and the beta1 integrin heterodimers may play a role in mediating the adhesion of ovarian carcinoma cells to mesothelial cells.

  7. File list: ALL.Pan.10.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Pan.10.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells mm9 All antigens Pancreas Pancreatic beta ce...3,SRX1035140,SRX1035148,SRX1035145 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Pan.10.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells.bed ...

  8. File list: ALL.Pan.05.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Pan.05.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells mm9 All antigens Pancreas Pancreatic beta ce...2,SRX1035148,SRX1035140,SRX1035145 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Pan.05.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells.bed ...

  9. File list: ALL.Pan.20.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Pan.20.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells mm9 All antigens Pancreas Pancreatic beta ce...2,SRX1035144,SRX1035145,SRX1035140 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Pan.20.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells.bed ...

  10. File list: ALL.Pan.50.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Pan.50.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells mm9 All antigens Pancreas Pancreatic beta ce...6,SRX1035143,SRX1035140,SRX1035142 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Pan.50.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells.bed ...

  11. Stochastic and coherent dynamics of single and coupled beta cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    phenomenon, modeled by a slow-fast nonlinear system of ordinary differential equations (ODEs). The single cell oscillations are complex as the dynamical behavior is a result of traversing a series of saddle node and homoclinic bifurcations, controlled by the slow variable. We shall present results...... is the simplest reaction-diffusion partial differential equation....... on the burst period as function of an external applied stochastic term and use a technique for reducing the stochastic differential equations to ODEs for the average and higher order moments. The later method is approximate and we shall discuss the limits of validity. The individual beta cells are coupled...

  12. Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Expression in Muscle Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Ronald B.; Bridge, K.; Vaughn, J. R.

    1999-01-01

    beta-adrenergic receptor (bAR) agonists presumably exert their physiological action on skeletal muscle cells through the bAR. Since the signal generated by the bAR is cyclic AMP (cAMP), experiments were initiated in primary chicken muscle cell cultures to determine if artificial elevation of intracellular cAMP by treatment with forskolin would alter the population of bAR expressed on the surface of muscle cells. Chicken skeletal muscle cells after 7 days in culture were employed for the experiments because muscle cells have attained a steady state with respect to muscle protein metabolism at this stage. Cells were treated with 0-10 uM forskolin for a total of three days. At the end of the 1, 2, and 3 day treatment intervals, the concentration of cAMP and the bAR population were measured. Receptor population was measured in intact muscle cell cultures as the difference between total binding of [H-3]CGP-12177 and non-specific binding of [H-3]CGP-12177 in the presence of 1 uM propranolol. Intracellular cAMP concentration was measured by radioimmunoassay. The concentration of cAMP in forskolin-treated cells increased up to 10-fold in a dose dependent manner. Increasing concentrations of forskolin also led to an increase in (beta)AR population, with a maximum increase of approximately 50% at 10 uM. This increase in (beta)AR population was apparent after only 1 day of treatment, and the pattern of increase was maintained for all 3 days of the treatment period. Thus, increasing the intracellular concentration of cAMP leads to up-regulation of (beta)AR population. Clenbuterol and isoproterenol gave similar effects on bAR population. The effect of forskolin on the quantity and apparent synthesis rate of the heavy chain of myosin (mhc) were also investigated. A maximum increase of 50% in the quantity of mhc was observed at 0.2 UM forskolin, but higher concentrations of forskolin reduced the quantity of mhc back to control levels.

  13. Inhibition of histone deacetylases prevents cytokine-induced toxicity in beta cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, L; Tonnesen, M; Ronn, S G

    2007-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: The immune-mediated elimination of pancreatic beta cells in type 1 diabetes involves release of cytotoxic cytokines such as IL-1beta and IFNgamma, which induce beta cell death in vitro by mechanisms that are both dependent and independent of nitric oxide (NO). Nuclear factor kappa...... deacetylases (HDAC), and positive effects of HDAC inhibition have been obtained in several inflammatory diseases. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate whether HDAC inhibition protects beta cells against cytokine-induced toxicity. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The beta cell line, INS-1, or intact rat islets...

  14. Proliferative Effect of sTRAIL on Mouse Pancreatic Beta Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevim Kahraman

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Beta cell loss/impairment of function appears as a significant problem in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. TRAIL (TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand was recently correlated with both types of diabetes with a proposed protective effect. TRAIL was also shown to promote survival and proliferation in different cells such as vascular smooth muscle cells and human vascular endothelial cells. Recently, TRAIL was claimed to protect pancreatic beta cells against cytokine-related harm. We hypothesized a proliferative effect for TRAIL on beta cells, and used Min6 mouse pancreatic beta cell line to test our hypothesis.

  15. Distinct glucose lowering and beta cell protective effects of vanadium and food restriction in streptozotocin-diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cam, M C; Rodrigues, B; McNeill, J H

    1999-11-01

    Vanadium is an oral insulin-mimetic agent that diminishes hyperglycemia, improves beta-cell insulin store and secretory function, and can reverse the diabetic state chronically after withdrawal from treatment. As food restriction has been reported to enhance insulin sensitivity and reduce insulin demand, we assessed the contribution of a reduced food intake to the glucose lowering and beta-cell protective effects of vanadium. Streptozotocin (STZ)-diabetic rats were untreated (D) or administered vanadyl sulfate in the drinking water (DT) at one week prior to and for 5 weeks following the administration of STZ. An additional group was pair-fed (DP) with an equal amount of food as that consumed by the DT group. Shortly after the induction of diabetes, hyperglycemic D rats demonstrated a significant rise in plasma insulin to levels that initially exceeded that of the controls. This was followed by a steady reduction over several weeks, suggesting a gradual depletion of functional beta-cells. Both vanadium treatment and pair-feeding abolished the insulin hypersecretory response following STZ administration. Glucose lowering was enhanced in DT animals when administered higher concentrations of vanadium, despite no further reduction in food intake, and all DT animals (10/10) were normoglycemic by 5 weeks. Mean pancreatic insulin content in DT rats was improved fourfold and was associated with a greater number of granulated beta-cells. Conversely, food restriction only modestly improved glycemia and the pancreatic insulin store and, unlike DT, DP rats remained highly glucose-intolerant. At 5 weeks of diabetes, fed circulating glucose and insulin levels were strongly correlated (P=0.0002) in the D and DP groups, supporting the notion that glucose lowering with food restriction is dependent on improved plasma insulin levels. A separate correlation was observed in DT animals within a lower range of plasma insulin, suggesting that vanadium, unlike food restriction, reduced

  16. The replication of beta cells in normal physiology, in disease and for therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Peter C; Meier, Juris J; Butler, Alexandra E; Bhushan, Anil

    2007-11-01

    Replication of beta cells is an important source of beta-cell expansion in early childhood. The recent linkage of type 2 diabetes with several transcription factors involved in cell cycle regulation implies that growth of the beta-cell mass in early childhood might be an important determinant of risk for type 2 diabetes. Under some circumstances, including obesity and pregnancy, the beta-cell mass is adaptively increased in adult humans. The mechanisms by which this adaptive growth occurs and the relative contributions of beta-cell replication or of mechanisms independent of beta-cell replication are unknown. Also, although there is interest in the potential for beta-cell regeneration as a therapeutic approach in both type 1 and 2 diabetes, little is yet known about the potential sources of new beta cells in adult humans. In common with other cell types, replicating beta cells have an increased vulnerability to apoptosis, which is likely to limit the therapeutic value of inducing beta-cell replication in the proapoptotic environment of type 1 and 2 diabetes unless applied in conjunction with a strategy to suppress increased apoptosis.

  17. Engineering the cellular protein secretory pathway for enhancement of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator expression in Chinese hamster ovary cells: effects of CERT and XBP1s genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimpour, Azam; Vaziri, Behrouz; Moazzami, Reza; Nematollahi, Leila; Barkhordari, Farzaneh; Kokabee, Leila; Adeli, Ahmad; Mahboudi, Fereidoun

    2013-08-01

    Cell line development is the most critical and also the most time-consuming step in the production of recombinant therapeutic proteins. In this regard, a variety of vector and cell engineering strategies have been developed for generating high-producing mammalian cells; however, the cell line engineering approach seems to show various results on different recombinant protein producer cells. In order to improve the secretory capacity of a recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA)-producing Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line, we developed cell line engineering approaches based on the ceramide transfer protein (CERT) and X-box binding protein 1 (XBP1) genes. For this purpose, CERT S132A, a mutant form of CERT that is resistant to phosphorylation, and XBP1s were overexpressed in a recombinant t-PA-producing CHO cell line. Overexpression of CERT S132A increased the specific productivity of t-PA-producing CHO cells up to 35%. In contrast, the heterologous expression of XBP1s did not affect the t-PA expression rate. Our results suggest that CERTS132A- based secretion engineering could be an effective strategy for enhancing recombinant t- PA production in CHO cells.

  18. Alpha cells secrete acetylcholine as a non-neuronal paracrine signal priming human beta cell function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Diaz, Rayner; Dando, Robin; Jacques-Silva, M. Caroline; Fachado, Alberto; Molina, Judith; Abdulreda, Midhat; Ricordi, Camillo; Roper, Stephen D.; Berggren, Per-Olof; Caicedo, Alejandro

    2011-01-01

    Acetylcholine is a neurotransmitter that plays a major role in the function of the insulin secreting pancreatic beta cell1,2. Parasympathetic innervation of the endocrine pancreas, the islets of Langerhans, has been shown to provide cholinergic input to the beta cell in several species1,3,4, but the role of autonomic innervation in human beta cell function is at present unclear. Here we show that, in contrast to mouse islets, cholinergic innervation of human islets is sparse. Instead, we find that the alpha cells of the human islet provide paracrine cholinergic input to surrounding endocrine cells. Human alpha cells express the vesicular acetylcholine transporter and release acetylcholine when stimulated with kainate or a lowering in glucose concentration. Acetylcholine secretion by alpha cells in turn sensitizes the beta cell response to increases in glucose concentration. Our results demonstrate that in human islets acetylcholine is a paracrine signal that primes the beta cell to respond optimally to subsequent increases in glucose concentration. We anticipate these results to revise models about neural input and cholinergic signaling in the endocrine pancreas. Cholinergic signaling within the islet represents a potential therapeutic target in diabetes5, highlighting the relevance of this advance to future drug development. PMID:21685896

  19. Role of MicroRNAs in Islet Beta-Cell Compensation and Failure during Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valérie Plaisance

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic beta-cell function and mass are markedly adaptive to compensate for the changes in insulin requirement observed during several situations such as pregnancy, obesity, glucocorticoids excess, or administration. This requires a beta-cell compensation which is achieved through a gain of beta-cell mass and function. Elucidating the physiological mechanisms that promote functional beta-cell mass expansion and that protect cells against death, is a key therapeutic target for diabetes. In this respect, several recent studies have emphasized the instrumental role of microRNAs in the control of beta-cell function. MicroRNAs are negative regulators of gene expression, and are pivotal for the control of beta-cell proliferation, function, and survival. On the one hand, changes in specific microRNA levels have been associated with beta-cell compensation and are triggered by hormones or bioactive peptides that promote beta-cell survival and function. Conversely, modifications in the expression of other specific microRNAs contribute to beta-cell dysfunction and death elicited by diabetogenic factors including, cytokines, chronic hyperlipidemia, hyperglycemia, and oxidized LDL. This review underlines the importance of targeting the microRNA network for future innovative therapies aiming at preventing the beta-cell decline in diabetes.

  20. Regulating the beta cell mass as a strategy for type-2 diabetes treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Imane; Muller, Christo; Louw, Johan; Bouwens, Luc

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) increases dramatically worldwide and has created an enormous health care burden. Obesity, dyslipidemia and insulin resistance are major risk factors for the development of T2D, but the major factor leading to the disease is failure of the insulin-producing beta cell mass to compensate for increasing insulin demands of the body. Progression of the disease further diminishes the beta cell mass as a result of lipotoxicity and glucotoxicity for which beta cells are particularly sensitive. Hence, treatment aiming to prevent beta cell loss or increase the number of beta cells could inhibit diabetes progression or lead to restoration of normal metabolism. Whereas current and new antidiabetic drugs are mainly targeting insulin secretion and action or glucose uptake, newer interventions must be found that prevent beta cell loss or increase beta cell number. The targets for this are beta cell proliferation, neogenesis and survival. This review examines major evidence from animal experiments suggesting that it is feasible to regulate the beta cell mass by bioactive compounds like growth factors, cytokines, hormones, phytochemicals and small molecules. Often the mode of action remains unclear due to inadequate methods to assess the effects of the compounds on the beta cell dynamics. Furthermore, a major challenge is to identify compounds with sufficient specificity in order to avoid unwanted effects on other cell types. Provided such safety issues can be solved, this may provide a curative approach for diabetes treatment.

  1. Human microRNA-24 modulates highly pathogenic avian-origin H5N1 influenza A virus infection in A549 cells by targeting secretory pathway furin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loveday, Emma-Kate; Diederich, Sandra; Pasick, John; Jean, François

    2015-01-01

    A common critical cellular event that many human enveloped viruses share is the requirement for proteolytic cleavage of the viral glycoprotein by furin in the host secretory pathway. For example, the furin-dependent proteolytic activation of highly pathogenic (HP) influenza A (infA) H5 and H7 haemagglutinin precursor (HA0) subtypes is critical for yielding fusion-competent infectious virions. In this study, we hypothesized that viral hijacking of the furin pathway by HP infA viruses to permit cleavage of HA0 could represent a novel molecular mechanism controlling the dynamic production of fusion-competent infectious virus particles during the viral life cycle. We explored the biological role of a newly identified furin-directed human microRNA, miR-24, in this process as a potential post-transcriptional regulator of the furin-mediated activation of HA0 and production of fusion-competent virions in the host secretory pathway. We report that miR-24 and furin are differentially expressed in human A549 cells infected with HP avian-origin infA H5N1. Using miR-24 mimics, we demonstrated a robust decrease in both furin mRNA levels and intracellular furin activity in A549 cells. Importantly, pretreatment of A549 cells with miR-24 mimicked these results: a robust decrease of H5N1 infectious virions and a complete block of H5N1 virus spread that was not observed in A549 cells infected with low-pathogenicity swine-origin infA H1N1 virus. Our results suggest that viral-specific downregulation of furin-directed microRNAs such as miR-24 during the life cycle of HP infA viruses may represent a novel regulatory mechanism that governs furin-mediated proteolytic activation of HA0 glycoproteins and production of infectious virions.

  2. High ω-3:ω-6 fatty acids ratio increases fatty acid binding protein 4 and extracellular secretory phospholipase A2IIa in human ectopic endometrial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanaki, Korosh; Sadeghi, Mohammad Reza; Akhondi, Mohammad Mehdi; Darabi, Masoud; Mehdizadeh, Amir; Shabani, Mahdi; Rahimipour, Ali; Nouri, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Background: Endometriosis, a common chronic inflammatory disorder, is defined by the atypical growth of endometrium- like tissue outside of the uterus. Secretory phospholipase A2 group IIa (sPLA2-IIa) and fatty acid binding protein4 (FABP4) play several important roles in the inflammatory diseases. Objective: Due to reported potential anti-inflammatory effects of ω-3 and ω-6 fatty acids, the purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of ω-3 and ω-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) on fatty acid binding protein 4 and extracellular secretory phospholipase A2IIa in cultured endometrial cells. Materials and Methods: Ectopic and eutopic endometrial tissues obtained from 15 women were snap frozen. After thawing and tissue digestion, primary mixed stromal and endometrial epithelial cell culture was performed for 8 days in culture mediums supplemented with normal and high ratios of ω-3 and ω-6 PUFA. sPLA2-IIa in the culture medium and FABP4 level was determined using enzyme immuno assay (EIA) technique. Results: Within ectopic endometrial cells group, the level of cellular FABP4 and extracellular sPLA2-IIa were remarkably increased under high ω-3 PUFA exposure compared with control condition (p=0.014 and p=0.04 respectively). Conclusion: ω-3 PUFAs may increase the level of cellular FABP4 and extracellular sPLA2-IIa in ectopic endometrial cells, since sPLAIIa and FABP4 may affect endometriosis via several mechanisms, more relevant studies are encouraged to know the potential effect of increased cellular FABP4 and extracellular sPLA2-IIa on endometriosis. PMID:25709631

  3. DJ-1 Protects Pancreatic Beta Cells from Cytokine- and Streptozotocin-Mediated Cell Death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Jain

    Full Text Available A hallmark feature of type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus is the progressive dysfunction and loss of insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells, and inflammatory cytokines are known to trigger beta cell death. Here we asked whether the anti-oxidant protein DJ-1 encoded by the Parkinson's disease gene PARK7 protects islet cells from cytokine- and streptozotocin-mediated cell death. Wild type and DJ-1 knockout mice (KO were treated with multiple low doses of streptozotocin (MLDS to induce inflammatory beta cell stress and cell death. Subsequently, glucose tolerance tests were performed, and plasma insulin as well as fasting and random blood glucose concentrations were monitored. Mitochondrial morphology and number of insulin granules were quantified in beta cells. Moreover, islet cell damage was determined in vitro after streptozotocin and cytokine treatment of isolated wild type and DJ-1 KO islets using calcein AM/ethidium homodimer-1 staining and TUNEL staining. Compared to wild type mice, DJ-1 KO mice became diabetic following MLDS treatment. Insulin concentrations were substantially reduced, and fasting blood glucose concentrations were significantly higher in MLDS-treated DJ-1 KO mice compared to equally treated wild type mice. Rates of beta cell apoptosis upon MLDS treatment were twofold higher in DJ-1 KO mice compared to wild type mice, and in vitro inflammatory cytokines led to twice as much beta cell death in pancreatic islets from DJ-1 KO mice versus those of wild type mice. In conclusion, this study identified the anti-oxidant protein DJ-1 as being capable of protecting pancreatic islet cells from cell death induced by an inflammatory and cytotoxic setting.

  4. DJ-1 Protects Pancreatic Beta Cells from Cytokine- and Streptozotocin-Mediated Cell Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Deepak; Weber, Gesine; Eberhard, Daniel; Mehana, Amir E; Eglinger, Jan; Welters, Alena; Bartosinska, Barbara; Jeruschke, Kay; Weiss, Jürgen; Päth, Günter; Ariga, Hiroyoshi; Seufert, Jochen; Lammert, Eckhard

    2015-01-01

    A hallmark feature of type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus is the progressive dysfunction and loss of insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells, and inflammatory cytokines are known to trigger beta cell death. Here we asked whether the anti-oxidant protein DJ-1 encoded by the Parkinson's disease gene PARK7 protects islet cells from cytokine- and streptozotocin-mediated cell death. Wild type and DJ-1 knockout mice (KO) were treated with multiple low doses of streptozotocin (MLDS) to induce inflammatory beta cell stress and cell death. Subsequently, glucose tolerance tests were performed, and plasma insulin as well as fasting and random blood glucose concentrations were monitored. Mitochondrial morphology and number of insulin granules were quantified in beta cells. Moreover, islet cell damage was determined in vitro after streptozotocin and cytokine treatment of isolated wild type and DJ-1 KO islets using calcein AM/ethidium homodimer-1 staining and TUNEL staining. Compared to wild type mice, DJ-1 KO mice became diabetic following MLDS treatment. Insulin concentrations were substantially reduced, and fasting blood glucose concentrations were significantly higher in MLDS-treated DJ-1 KO mice compared to equally treated wild type mice. Rates of beta cell apoptosis upon MLDS treatment were twofold higher in DJ-1 KO mice compared to wild type mice, and in vitro inflammatory cytokines led to twice as much beta cell death in pancreatic islets from DJ-1 KO mice versus those of wild type mice. In conclusion, this study identified the anti-oxidant protein DJ-1 as being capable of protecting pancreatic islet cells from cell death induced by an inflammatory and cytotoxic setting.

  5. Thymosin {beta}4 promotes the migration of endothelial cells without intracellular Ca{sup 2+} elevation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selmi, Anna [Department of Molecular and Medical Biophysics, Medical University of Lodz, 92-215 Lodz (Poland); Malinowski, Mariusz [Institute of Medical Biology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Lodz (Poland); Brutkowski, Wojciech [Nencki Institute of Experimental Biology, Polish Academy of Sciences, 02-093 Warsaw (Poland); Bednarek, Radoslaw [Department of Molecular and Medical Biophysics, Medical University of Lodz, 92-215 Lodz (Poland); Cierniewski, Czeslaw S., E-mail: czeslaw.cierniewski@umed.lodz.pl [Department of Molecular and Medical Biophysics, Medical University of Lodz, 92-215 Lodz (Poland); Institute of Medical Biology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Lodz (Poland)

    2012-08-15

    Numerous studies have demonstrated the effects of T{beta}4 on cell migration, proliferation, apoptosis and inflammation after exogenous treatment, but the mechanism by which T{beta}4 functions is still unclear. Previously, we demonstrated that incubation of endothelial cells with T{beta}4 induced synthesis and secretion of various proteins, including plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 and matrix metaloproteinases. We also showed that T{beta}4 interacts with Ku80, which may operate as a novel receptor for T{beta}4 and mediates its intracellular activity. In this paper, we provide evidence that T{beta}4 induces cellular processes without changes in the intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration. External treatment of HUVECs with T{beta}4 and its mutants deprived of the N-terminal tetrapeptide AcSDKP (T{beta}4{sub AcSDKPT/4A}) or the actin-binding sequence KLKKTET (T{beta}4{sub KLKKTET/7A}) resulted in enhanced cell migration and formation of tubular structures in Matrigel. Surprisingly, the increased cell motility caused by T{beta}4 was not associated with the intracellular Ca{sup 2+} elevation monitored with Fluo-4 NW or Fura-2 AM. Therefore, it is unlikely that externally added T{beta}4 induces HUVEC migration via the surface membrane receptors known to generate Ca{sup 2+} influx. Our data confirm the concept that externally added T{beta}4 must be internalized to induce intracellular mechanisms supporting endothelial cell migration.

  6. Pancreatic Beta-Cell Purification by Altering FAD and NAD(P)H Metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smelt, M. J.; Faas, M. M.; de Haan, B. J.; de Vos, P.

    2008-01-01

    Isolation of primary beta cells from other cells within in the pancreatic islets is of importance for many fields of islet research. However, up to now, no satisfactory method has been developed that gained high numbers of viable beta cells, without considerable alpha-cell contamination. In this stu

  7. Differential alterations of positive and negative regulators of beta catenin enhance endogenous expression and activity of beta catenin in A549 non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supratim Ghatak

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Beta catenin has been well documented in previous studies to be involved in non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Beta catenin abundance and transcriptional activity are significantly regulated by several factors. Though it is well known that Akt and Gsk3 beta are respective positive and negative regulators of beta catenin, however, no single study has so far documented how the expression and activity of both positive as well as negative regulators play favorable role on beta catenin expression and activity in NSCLC. In this study, we compared expression and activity of beta catenin and its regulators in normal lung cell WI38 and NSCLC cell A549 by western blot, qRT-PCR and luciferase assay. We observed that beta catenin positive regulators (Akt and Hsp90 and negative regulators (Gsk3 beta and microRNA-214 have differential expression and/or activity in NSCLC cell A549. However the differentially altered statuses of both the positive and negative regulators rendered cumulative positive effect on beta catenin expression and activity in A549. Our study thus suggests that chemotherapeutic modulations of regulating factors are crucial when abrogation and/or inhibition of key oncogenic proteins are necessary for cancer chemotherapy.

  8. DJ-1 Protects Pancreatic Beta Cells from Cytokine- and Streptozotocin-Mediated Cell Death

    OpenAIRE

    Deepak Jain; Gesine Weber; Daniel Eberhard; Mehana, Amir E; Jan Eglinger; Alena Welters; Barbara Bartosinska; Kay Jeruschke; Jürgen Weiss; Günter Päth; Hiroyoshi Ariga; Jochen Seufert; Eckhard Lammert

    2015-01-01

    A hallmark feature of type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus is the progressive dysfunction and loss of insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells, and inflammatory cytokines are known to trigger beta cell death. Here we asked whether the anti-oxidant protein DJ-1 encoded by the Parkinson's disease gene PARK7 protects islet cells from cytokine- and streptozotocin-mediated cell death. Wild type and DJ-1 knockout mice (KO) were treated with multiple low doses of streptozotocin (MLDS) to induce inflam...

  9. Dynamics and Synchrony of Pancreatic beta-cells and Islets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Morten Gram

    2006-01-01

    biological hypotheses. The subjects addressed are: Quasi-steady-state approximations of enzyme reactions, the effect of noise on bursting electrical behavior, exciation wave propagation in pancreatic islets, intra- and inter-islet synchronization and pulsatile insulin secretion, and mitochondrial dynamics.......Pancreatic beta-cells secrete insulin in response to raised glucose levels. Malfunctioning of this system plays an important role in the metabolic disease diabetes. The biological steps from glucose stimulus to the final release of insulin are incompletely understood, and a more complete...

  10. Expression and functional importance of collagen-binding integrins, alpha 1 beta 1 and alpha 2 beta 1, on virus-activated T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Susanne Ø; Thomsen, Allan R; Koteliansky, Victor E

    2003-01-01

    Adhesive interactions are crucial to cell migration into inflammatory sites. Using murine lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus as an Ag model system, we have investigated expression and function of collagen-binding integrins, alpha(1)beta(1) and alpha(2)beta(1), on activated and memory T cells. Using...... this system and MHC tetramers to define Ag-specific T cells, we demonstrate that contrary to being VLAs, expression of alpha(1)beta(1) and alpha(2)beta(1) can be rapidly induced on acutely activated T cells, that expression of alpha(1)beta(1) remains elevated on memory T cells, and that expression of alpha(1...... decreased responses were seen upon transfer of alpha(1)-deficient activated/memory T cells. Thus, expression of alpha(1)beta(1) and alpha(2)beta(1) integrins on activated T cells is directly functionally important for generation of inflammatory responses within tissues. Finally, the inhibitory effect...

  11. Acquired TGF beta 1 sensitivity and TGF beta 1 expression in cell lines established from a single small cell lung cancer patient during clinical progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, P; Damstrup, L; Rygaard, K;

    1996-01-01

    was found in GLC 16 and GLC 19. These cell lines were also growth inhibited by exogenously administrated TGF beta 1. TGF beta 1 mRNA and protein in its latent form was only expressed in the radiotherapy-resistant cell line, GLC 19. The results indicate that disease progression in this patient was paralleled...... by a gain in sensitivity to the growth inhibition by TGF beta 1 due to type II TGF beta receptor, and a gain of latent TGF beta 1 protein. Lack of type II receptor expression in GLC 14, which was also resistant to growth inhibition by exogenous TGF beta 1, was not due to gross structural changes in the type...

  12. Beta-interferon inhibits cell infection by Trypanosoma cruzi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierszenbaum, F.; Sonnenfeld, G.

    1984-01-01

    Beta interferon has been shown to inhibit the capacity of bloodstream forms of the flagellate Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas' disease, to associate with and infect mouse peritoneal macrophages and rat heart myoblasts. The inhibitory effect was abrogated in the presence of specific antibodies to the interferon. Pretreatment of the parasites with interferon reduced their infectivity for untreated host cells, whereas pretreament of either type of host cell did not affect the interaction. The effect of interferon on the trypanosomes was reversible; the extent of the inhibitory effect was significantly reduced afer 20 min, and was undetectable after 60 min when macrophages were used as host cells. For the myoblasts, 60 min elapsed before the inhibitory effect began to subside and 120 min elapsed before it became insignificant or undetectable.

  13. The potential role of SOCS-3 in the interleukin-1beta-induced desensitization of insulin signaling in pancreatic beta-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emanuelli, Brice; Glondu, Murielle; Filloux, Chantal

    2004-01-01

    Defects in insulin secretion, resulting from loss of function or destruction of pancreatic beta-cells, trigger diabetes. Interleukin (IL)-1beta is a proinflammatory cytokine that is involved in type 1 and type 2 diabetes development and impairs beta-cell survival and function. Because effective i...

  14. Cocoa Phenolic Extract Protects Pancreatic Beta Cells against Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Bravo

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is associated with reductions in glutathione, supporting the critical role of oxidative stress in its pathogenesis. Antioxidant food components such as flavonoids have a protective role against oxidative stress-induced degenerative and age-related diseases. Flavonoids constitute an important part of the human diet; they can be found in most plant foods, including green tea, grapes or cocoa and possess multiple biological activities. This study investigates the chemo-protective effect of a cocoa phenolic extract (CPE containing mainly flavonoids against oxidative stress induced by tert-butylhydroperoxide (t-BOOH on Ins-1E pancreatic beta cells. Cell viability and oxidative status were evaluated. Ins-1E cells treatment with 5–20 μg/mL CPE for 20 h evoked no cell damage and did not alter ROS production. Addition of 50 μM t-BOOH for 2 h increased ROS and carbonyl groups content and decreased reduced glutathione level. Pre-treatment of cells with CPE significantly prevented the t-BOOH-induced ROS and carbonyl groups and returned antioxidant defences to adequate levels. Thus, Ins-1E cells treated with CPE showed a remarkable recovery of cell viability damaged by t-BOOH, indicating that integrity of surviving machineries in the CPE-treated cells was notably protected against the oxidative insult.

  15. Cocoa phenolic extract protects pancreatic beta cells against oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, María Angeles; Ramos, Sonia; Cordero-Herrero, Isabel; Bravo, Laura; Goya, Luis

    2013-07-31

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with reductions in glutathione, supporting the critical role of oxidative stress in its pathogenesis. Antioxidant food components such as flavonoids have a protective role against oxidative stress-induced degenerative and age-related diseases. Flavonoids constitute an important part of the human diet; they can be found in most plant foods, including green tea, grapes or cocoa and possess multiple biological activities. This study investigates the chemo-protective effect of a cocoa phenolic extract (CPE) containing mainly flavonoids against oxidative stress induced by tert-butylhydroperoxide (t-BOOH) on Ins-1E pancreatic beta cells. Cell viability and oxidative status were evaluated. Ins-1E cells treatment with 5-20 μg/mL CPE for 20 h evoked no cell damage and did not alter ROS production. Addition of 50 μM t-BOOH for 2 h increased ROS and carbonyl groups content and decreased reduced glutathione level. Pre-treatment of cells with CPE significantly prevented the t-BOOH-induced ROS and carbonyl groups and returned antioxidant defences to adequate levels. Thus, Ins-1E cells treated with CPE showed a remarkable recovery of cell viability damaged by t-BOOH, indicating that integrity of surviving machineries in the CPE-treated cells was notably protected against the oxidative insult.

  16. Parathyroid Hormone-Related Peptide (1-36 Enhances Beta Cell Regeneration and Increases Beta Cell Mass in a Mouse Model of Partial Pancreatectomy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anaïs Mozar

    Full Text Available Finding ways to stimulate the regeneration of endogenous pancreatic beta cells is an important goal in the treatment of diabetes. Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP, the full-length (1-139 and amino-terminal (1-36 peptides, enhance beta cell function, proliferation, and survival. Therefore, we hypothesize that PTHrP(1-36 has the potential to regenerate endogenous beta cells.The partial pancreatectomy (PPx mouse model of beta cell injury was used to test this hypothesis. Male Balb/c mice underwent either sham-operation or PPx, and were subsequently injected with PTHrP(1-36 (160μg/kg or vehicle (veh, for 7, 30, or 90 days. The four groups of mice, sham-veh, sham-PTHrP, PPx-veh, and PPx-PTHrP were assessed for PTHrP and receptor expression, and glucose and beta cell homeostasis.PTHrP-receptor, but not the ligand, was significantly up-regulated in islets from mice that underwent PPx compared to sham-operated mice. This suggests that exogenous PTHrP could further enhance beta cell regeneration after PPx. PTHrP did not significantly affect body weight, blood glucose, plasma insulin, or insulin sensitivity, in either sham or PPx mice. Glucose tolerance improved in the PPx-PTHrP versus PPx-veh mice only in the early stages of treatment. As hypothesized, there was a significant increase in beta cell proliferation in PPx-PTHrP mice at days 7 and 30; however, this was normalized by day 90, compared to PPx-veh mice. Enhanced beta cell proliferation translated to a marked increase in beta cell mass at day 90, in PPx-PTHrP versus PPx-veh mice.PTHrP(1-36 significantly enhances beta cell regeneration through increased beta cell proliferation and beta cell mass after PPx. Future studies will determine the potential of PTHrP to enhance functional beta cell mass in the setting of diabetes.

  17. Occurrence of thymosin beta4 in human breast cancer cells and in other cell types of the tumor microenvironment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, L.-I.; Holck, Susanne

    2007-01-01

    that there is a considerable heterogeneity in the cellular distribution of thymosin beta4 in breast cancer. In most tumors examined, cancer cells showed low or intermediate reactivity for thymosin beta4, whereas leukocytes and macrophages showed intense reactivity. In addition, endothelial cells showed variable reactivity...... the tumor microenvironment produce thymosin beta4 and that such expression varies from tumor to tumor. Such heterogeneity of expression should be taken into account when the role of thymosin beta4 in tumor biology is assessed....

  18. Extracellular heat shock protein HSP90{beta} secreted by MG63 osteosarcoma cells inhibits activation of latent TGF-{beta}1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Shigeki [Functional Genomics Section, Laboratory of Cell and Developmental Biology, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Kulkarni, Ashok B., E-mail: ak40m@nih.gov [Functional Genomics Section, Laboratory of Cell and Developmental Biology, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2010-07-30

    Transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-{beta}1) is secreted as a latent complex, which consists of latency-associated peptide (LAP) and the mature ligand. The release of the mature ligand from LAP usually occurs through conformational change of the latent complex and is therefore considered to be the first step in the activation of the TGF-{beta} signaling pathway. So far, factors such as heat, pH changes, and proteolytic cleavage are reportedly involved in this activation process, but the precise molecular mechanism is still far from clear. Identification and characterization of the cell surface proteins that bind to LAP are important to our understanding of the latent TGF-{beta} activation process. In this study, we have identified heat shock protein 90 {beta} (HSP90{beta}) from the cell surface of the MG63 osteosarcoma cell line as a LAP binding protein. We have also found that MG63 cells secrete HSP90{beta} into extracellular space which inhibits the activation of latent TGF-{beta}1, and that there is a subsequent decrease in cell proliferation. TGF-{beta}1-mediated stimulation of MG63 cells resulted in the increased cell surface expression of HSP90{beta}. Thus, extracellular HSP90{beta} is a negative regulator for the activation of latent TGF-{beta}1 modulating TGF-{beta} signaling in the extracellular domain. -- Research highlights: {yields} Transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-{beta}1) is secreted as a latent complex. {yields} This complex consists of latency-associated peptide (LAP) and the mature ligand. {yields} The release of the mature ligand from LAP is the first step in TGF-{beta} activation. {yields} We identified for the first time a novel mechanism for this activation process. {yields} Heat shock protein 90 {beta} is discovered as a negative regulator for this process.

  19. Massive parallel gene expression profiling of RINm5F pancreatic islet beta-cells stimulated with interleukin-1beta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rieneck, K; Bovin, L F; Josefsen, K

    2000-01-01

    Interleukin 1 (IL-1) is a pleiotropic cytokine with the potential to kill pancreatic beta-cells, and this unique property is thought to be involved in the pathogenesis of type I diabetes mellitus. We therefore determined the quantitative expression of 24,000 mRNAs of RINm5F, an insulinoma cell line...

  20. Endoglin promotes endothelial cell proliferation and TGF-beta/ALK1 signal transduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lebrin, F; Goumans, MJ; Jonker, L; Carvalho, RLC; Valdimarsdottir, G; Thorikay, M; Mummery, C; Arthur, HM; ten Dijke, P

    2004-01-01

    Endoglin is a transmembrane accessory receptor for transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) that is predominantly expressed on proliferating endothelial cells in culture and on angiogenic blood vessels in vivo. Endoglin, as well as other TGF-beta signalling components, is essential during angiogen

  1. Cdc42 controls progenitor cell differentiation and beta-catenin turnover in skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Xunwei; Quondamatteo, Fabio; Lefever, Tine

    2006-01-01

    Differentiation of skin stem cells into hair follicles (HFs) requires the inhibition of beta-catenin degradation, which is controlled by a complex containing axin and the protein kinase GSK3beta. Using conditional gene targeting in mice, we show now that the small GTPase Cdc42 is crucial...... for differentiation of skin progenitor cells into HF lineage and that it regulates the turnover of beta-catenin. In the absence of Cdc42, degradation of beta-catenin was increased corresponding to a decreased phosphorylation of GSK3beta at Ser 9 and an increased phosphorylation of axin, which is known to be required...... for binding of beta-catenin to the degradation machinery. Cdc42-mediated regulation of beta-catenin turnover was completely dependent on PKCzeta, which associated with Cdc42, Par6, and Par3. These data suggest that Cdc42 regulation of beta-catenin turnover is important for terminal differentiation of HF...

  2. Fatty acid metabolism and insulin secretion in pancreatic beta cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaney, G C; Corkey, B E

    2003-10-01

    Increases in glucose or fatty acids affect metabolism via changes in long-chain acyl-CoA formation and chronically elevated fatty acids increase total cellular CoA. Understanding the response of pancreatic beta cells to increased amounts of fuel and the role that altered insulin secretion plays in the development and maintenance of obesity and Type 2 diabetes is important. Data indicate that the activated form of fatty acids acts as an effector molecule in stimulus-secretion coupling. Glucose increases cytosolic long-chain acyl-CoA because it increases the "switch" compound malonyl-CoA that blocks mitochondrial beta-oxidation, thus implementing a shift from fatty acid to glucose oxidation. We present arguments in support of the following: (i) A source of fatty acid either exogenous or endogenous (derived by lipolysis of triglyceride) is necessary to support normal insulin secretion; (ii) a rapid increase of fatty acids potentiates glucose-stimulated secretion by increasing fatty acyl-CoA or complex lipid concentrations that act distally by modulating key enzymes such as protein kinase C or the exocytotic machinery; (iii) a chronic increase of fatty acids enhances basal secretion by the same mechanism, but promotes obesity and a diminished response to stimulatory glucose; (iv) agents which raise cAMP act as incretins, at least in part, by stimulating lipolysis via beta-cell hormone-sensitive lipase activation. Furthermore, increased triglyceride stores can give higher rates of lipolysis and thus influence both basal and stimulated insulin secretion. These points highlight the important roles of NEFA, LC-CoA, and their esterified derivatives in affecting insulin secretion in both normal and pathological states.

  3. Implications for the offspring of circulating factors involved in beta cell adaptation in pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nalla, Amarnadh; Ringholm, Lene; Søstrup, Birgitte

    2014-01-01

    is able to stimulate proliferation of rat beta cells. We have identified several circulating factors that may contribute to beta cell adaptation to pregnancy. Further studies are needed to elucidate their possible role in glucose homeostasis in the mother and her offspring.......OBJECTIVE: Several studies have shown an increase in beta cell mass during pregnancy. Somatolactogenic hormones are known to stimulate the proliferation of existing beta cells in rodents whereas the mechanism in humans is still unclear. We hypothesize that in addition to somatolactogenic hormones...... there are other circulating factors involved in beta cell adaptation to pregnancy. This study aimed at screening for potential pregnancy-associated circulating beta cell growth factors. SAMPLES: Serum samples from nonpregnant and pregnant women. METHODS: The effect of serum from pregnant women...

  4. Inhibition of beta cell growth and function by bone morphogenetic proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Christine; Christensen, Gitte Lund; Jacobsen, Marie L B

    2014-01-01

    of diabetes, there is an increase in the expression of inhibitory factors that prevent the beta cells from adapting to the increased need for insulin. We evaluated the effects of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) 2 and -4 on beta cells. METHODS: The effects of BMP2 and -4 on beta cell proliferation, apoptosis......: BMP2 and -4 were found to inhibit basal as well as growth factor-stimulated proliferation of primary beta cells from rats and mice. Bmp2 and Bmp4 mRNA and protein were expressed in islets and regulated by inflammatory cytokines. Neutralisation of endogenous BMP activity resulted in enhanced....../INTERPRETATION: These data show that BMP2 and -4 exert inhibitory actions on beta cells in vitro and suggest that BMPs exert regulatory roles of beta cell growth and function....

  5. Importance of Beta Cell Function for the Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshifumi Saisho

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes (T2DM is characterized by insulin resistance and beta cell dysfunction. Recent evidence has emerged that beta cell dysfunction is a common pathogenetic feature of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and T2DM never develops without beta cell dysfunction. Therefore, treatment of T2DM should aim to restore beta cell function. Although the treatment of T2DM has greatly improved over the past few decades, remaining issues in the current treatment of T2DM include (1 hypoglycemia; (2 body weight gain; (3 peripheral hyperinsulinemia and (4 postprandial hyperglycemia, which are all associated with inappropriate insulin supplementation, again underpinning the important role of endogenous and physiological insulin secretion in the management of T2DM. This review summarizes the current knowledge on beta cell function in T2DM and discusses the treatment strategy for T2DM in relation to beta cell dysfunction.

  6. Production of N-acetylgalactosaminyl-transferase 2 (GalNAc-T2) fused with secretory signal Igκ in insect cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horynová, Milada; Takahashi, Kazuo; Hall, Stacy; Renfrow, Matthew B; Novak, Jan; Raška, Milan

    2012-02-01

    The human UDP-N-acetyl-α-d-galactosamine:polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyl-transferase 2 (GalNAc-T2) is one of the key enzymes that initiate synthesis of hinge-region O-linked glycans of human immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1). We designed secreted soluble form of human GalNAc-T2 as a fusion protein containing mouse immunoglobulin light chain kappa secretory signal and expressed it using baculovirus and mammalian expression vectors. The recombinant protein was secreted by insect cells Sf9 and human HEK 293T cells in the culture medium. The protein was purified from the media using affinity Ni-NTA chromatography followed by stabilization of purified protein in 50mM Tris-HCl buffer at pH 7.4. Although the purity of recombinant GalNAc-T2 was comparable in both expression systems, the yield was higher in Sf9 insect expression system (2.5mg of GalNAc-T2 protein per 1L culture medium). The purified soluble recombinant GalNAc-T2 had an estimated molecular mass of 65.8kDa and its amino-acid sequence was confirmed by mass-spectrometric analysis. The enzymatic activity of Sf9-produced recombinant GalNAc-T2 was determined by the quantification of enzyme-mediated attachment of GalNAc to synthetic IgA1 hinge-region peptide as the acceptor and UDP-GalNAc as the donor. In conclusion, murine immunoglobulin kappa secretory signal was used for production of secreted enzymatically active GalNAc-T2 in insect baculovirus expression system.

  7. Activation of MAPK Is Required for ROS Generation and Exocytosis in HMC-1 Cells Induced by Trichomonas vaginalis-Derived Secretory Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narantsogt, Giimaa; Min, Arim; Nam, Young Hee; Lee, Young Ah; Kim, Kyeong Ah; Agvaandaram, Gurbadam; Dorjsuren, Temuulen; El-Benna, Jamel; Shin, Myeong Heon

    2015-10-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is a flagellated protozoan parasite that causes vaginitis and cervicitis in women and asymptomatic urethritis and prostatitis in men. Mast cells have been reported to be predominant in vaginal smears and vaginal walls of patients infected with T. vaginalis. Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), activated by various stimuli, have been shown to regulate the transcriptional activity of various cytokine genes in mast cells. In this study, we investigated whether MAPK is involved in ROS generation and exocytotic degranulation in HMC-1 cells induced by T. vaginalis-derived secretory products (TvSP). We found that TvSP induces the activation of MAPK and NADPH oxidase in HMC-1 cells. Stimulation with TvSP induced phosphorylation of MAPK and p47(phox) in HMC-1 cells. Stimulation with TvSP also induced up-regulation of CD63, a marker for exocytosis, along the surfaces of human mast cells. Pretreatment with MAPK inhibitors strongly inhibited TvSP-induced ROS generation and exocytotic degranulation. Finally, our results suggest that TvSP induces intracellular ROS generation and exocytotic degranulation in HMC-1 via MAPK signaling.

  8. MST1 is a novel regulator of apoptosis in pancreatic beta-cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardestani, Amin; Khobragade, Vrushali; Yuan, Ting; Frogne, Thomas; Tao, Wufan; Oberholzer, Jose; Pattou, Francois; Conte, Julie Kerr; Maedler, Kathrin

    2014-01-01

    Apoptotic cell death is a hallmark of the loss of insulin producing beta-cells in all forms of diabetes mellitus. Current treatment fails to halt the decline in functional beta-cell mass. Strategies to prevent beta-cell apoptosis and dysfunction are urgently needed. Here, we identified Mammalian Sterile 20-like kinase 1 (MST1) as a critical regulator of apoptotic beta-cell death and function. MST1 was strongly activated in beta-cells under diabetogenic conditions and correlated with beta-cell apoptosis. MST1 specifically induced the mitochondrial-dependent pathway of apoptosis in beta-cells through up-regulation of the BH3-only protein Bim. MST1 directly phosphorylated PDX1 at Thr11, resulting in its ubiquitination, degradation and impaired insulin secretion. Mst1 deficiency completely restored normoglycemia, beta-cell function and survival in vitro and in vivo. We show MST1 as novel pro-apoptotic kinase and key mediator of apoptotic signaling and beta-cell dysfunction, which may serve as target for the development of novel therapies for diabetes. PMID:24633305

  9. Alterations of expression and regulation of transforming growth factor beta in human cancer prostate cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchère, M; Saunier, E; Mestayer, C; Broshuis, M; Mowszowicz, I

    2002-11-01

    TGF beta can promote and/or suppress prostate tumor growth through multiple and opposing actions. Alterations of its expression, secretion, regulation or of the sensitivity of target cells can lead to a favorable environment for tumor development. To gain a better insight in TGF beta function during cancer progression, we have used different cultured human prostate cells: preneoplastic PNT2 cells, the androgen-dependent LNCaP and the androgen-independent PC3 and DU145 prostate cancer cell lines. We have studied by specific ELISA assays in conditioned media (CM), the secretion of TGF beta 1 and TGF beta 2 in basal conditions and after hormonal treatment (DHT or E2) and the expression of TGF beta 1 mRNA by Northern blot. We have also compared the effect of fibroblast CM on TGF beta secretion by the different cell types. Compared to PNT2 cells, cancer cell lines secrete lower levels of active TGF beta which are not increased in the presence of fibroblast CM. LNCaP cells respond to androgen or estrogen treatment by a 10-fold increase of active TGF beta secretion while PC3 and DU145 are unresponsive. In conclusion, prostate cancer cell lines have lost part of their ability to secrete and activate TGF beta, and to regulate this secretion through stromal-epithelial interactions. Androgen-sensitive cancer cells may compensate this loss by hormonal regulation.

  10. Polarity of response to transforming growth factor-beta1 in proximal tubular epithelial cells is regulated by beta-catenin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mei; Lee, Chien-Hung; Luo, Dong Dong; Krupa, Aleksandra; Fraser, Donald; Phillips, Aled

    2007-09-28

    Transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1)-mediated loss of proximal tubular epithelial cell-cell interaction is regulated in a polarized fashion. The aim of this study was to further explore the polarity of the TGF-beta1 response and to determine the significance of R-Smad-beta-catenin association previously demonstrated to accompany adherens junction disassembly. Smad3 signaling response to TGF-beta1 was assessed by activity of the Smad3-responsive reporter gene construct (SBE)(4)-Lux and by immunoblotting for phospho-Smad proteins. Similar results were obtained with both methods. Apical application of TGF-beta1 led to increased Smad3 signaling compared with basolateral stimulation. Association of Smad proteins with beta-catenin was greater following basolateral TGFbeta-1 stimulation, as was the expression of cytoplasmic Triton-soluble beta-catenin. Inhibition of beta-catenin expression by small interfering RNA augmented Smad3 signaling. Lithium chloride, a GSK-3 inhibitor, increased expression of beta-catenin and attenuated TGF-beta1-dependent Smad3 signaling. Lithium chloride did not influence degradation of Smad3 but resulted in decreased nuclear translocation. Smad2 activation as assessed by Western blot analysis and activity of the Smad2-responsive reporter constructs ARE/MF1 was also greater following apical as compared with basolateral TGFbeta-1 stimulation, suggesting that this is a generally applicable mechanism for the regulation of TGF-beta1-dependent R-Smads. Caco-2 cells are a colonic carcinoma cell line, with known resistance to the anti-proliferative effects of TGF-beta1 and increased expression of beta-catenin. We used this cell line to address the general applicability of our observations. Inhibition of beta-catenin in this cell line by small interfering RNA resulted in increased TGF-beta1-dependent Smad3 phosphorylation and restoration of TGF-beta1 anti-proliferative effects.

  11. Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) protects beta cells against glucotoxicity and increases cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathanoori, Ramasri; Olde, Björn; Erlinge, David; Göransson, Olga; Wierup, Nils

    2013-02-01

    Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) is an islet peptide that promotes glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in beta cells via cAMP/PKA-dependent pathways. In addition, CART is a regulator of neuronal survival. In this study, we examined the effect of exogenous CART 55-102 on beta cell viability and dissected its signaling mechanisms. Evaluation of DNA fragmentation and chromatin condensation revealed that CART 55-102 reduced glucotoxicity-induced apoptosis in both INS-1 (832/13) cells and isolated rat islets. Glucotoxicity in INS-1 (832/13) cells also caused a 50% reduction of endogenous CART protein. We show that CART increased proliferation in INS-1 (832/13) cells, an effect that was blocked by PKA, PKB, and MEK1 inhibitors. In addition, CART induced phosphorylation of CREB, IRS, PKB, FoxO1, p44/42 MAPK, and p90RSK in INS-1 (832/13) cells and isolated rat islets, all key mediators of cell survival and proliferation. Thus, we demonstrate that CART 55-102 protects beta cells against glucotoxicity and promotes proliferation. Taken together our data point to the potential use of CART in therapeutic interventions targeted at enhancing functional beta cell mass and long-term insulin secretion in T2D.

  12. A crucial role for the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway in nicotinic cholinergic signaling to secretory protein transcription in pheochromocytoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, K; Wu, H; Mahata, S K; O'Connor, D T

    1998-07-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway plays a pivotal role in intracellular signaling, and this cascade may impinge on cAMP response elements (CREs) of target genes. Both the MAPK pathway and chromogranin A expression may be activated by cytosolic calcium influx, and calcium-dependent signals map onto the chromogranin A promoter proximal CRE. We therefore probed the role of the MAPK pathway in chromogranin A biosynthesis after secretory stimulation of PC12 pheochromocytoma cells by the nicotinic cholinergic pathway, the physiological secretory trigger. Chemical inhibition of either MAPK or MAPK kinase blocked the response of a transfected chromogranin A promoter to nicotine or protein kinase C activation [by phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA)], although nicotine-evoked catecholamine secretion was unaffected. Activation of the MAP kinase cascade (Ras, Raf, MAPK, or CREB kinase) by cotransfection of pathway components stimulated the chromogranin A promoter. Cotransfection of MAPK pathway dominant negative mutants (for Raf, MAPK, or CREB kinase) blocked nicotinic or PMA activation of chromogranin A, although a dominant negative Ras mutant was without effect. MAPK pathway enzymatic activity was stimulated by both nicotine and PMA. Point mutations of the chromogranin A CRE suggested that this element was necessary in cis for stimulation by nicotine, PMA, or chemical activation of the MAPK pathway. Transfer of the CRE to a heterologous promoter conferred inducibility by not only nicotine or cAMP but also MAPK activation. Expression of the CREB antagonist KCREB blocked the response of the chromogranin A promoter to nicotine, cAMP, or MAPK pathway activation by either chemical stimulation or cotransfection of active cascade components. Chromogranin A mRNA responded to MAPK pathway manipulation in a fashion similar to the transfected chromogranin A promoter, in both direction and magnitude. We conclude that the MAPK pathway is a necessary intermediate in

  13. Beta-lactamase induction and cell wall metabolism in Gram-negative bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ximin eZeng

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Production of beta-lactamases, the enzymes that degrade beta-lactam antibiotics, is the most widespread and threatening mechanism of antibiotic resistance. In the past, extensive research has focused on the structure, function, and ecology of beta-lactamases while limited efforts were placed on the regulatory mechanisms of beta-lactamases. Recently, increasing evidence demonstrate a direct link between beta-lactamase induction and cell wall metabolism in Gram-negative bacteria. Specifically, expression of beta-lactamase could be induced by the liberated murein fragments, such as muropeptides. This article summarizes current knowledge on cell wall metabolism, beta-lactam, and beta lactamases. In particular, we comprehensively reviewed recent studies on the beta-lactamase induction by muropeptides via two major molecular mechanisms (the AmpG-AmpR-AmpC pathway and BlrAB-like two-component regulatory system in Gram-negative bacteria. The signaling pathways for beta-lactamase induction offer a broad array of promising targets for the discovery of new antibacterial drugs used for combination therapies. Therefore, to develop effective mitigation strategies against the widespread beta-lactam resistance, examination of the molecular basis of beta-lactamase induction by cell wall fragment is highly warranted.

  14. Crystalline structures in human pancreatic beta cell adenoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, H; Kawai, T; Tanaka, T; Fujii, M; Takahashi, M; Miyashita, T

    1978-05-01

    An electron microscopic observation on a pancreatic tumor removed from a 34-year-old woman revealed the fine structural morphology of a functional beta cell adenoma. Characteristic PAS positive crystalline structures were frequently observed in the cytoplasm of the tumor cells. They were not bounded by a membrane and had a rectangular or irregular hexagonal shape. Highly regular patterns were seen as such as lattice or honeycomb and parallel ripple structures. They are similar to the Reinke's crystal or crystalline structures reported in human hepatocytes suffering from several different diseases and considered as a protein-carbohydrate complex. Occasionally, small paracrystalline structures appeared to indicate an immature type of these structures in the opaque fine fibrillar mass. Crystalline or paracrystalline structures were not detected in the normal pancreatic tissue removed with the tumor from the patient.

  15. LGR5 and Nanog identify stem cell signature of pancreas beta cells which initiate pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amsterdam, Abraham; Raanan, Calanit; Schreiber, Letizia; Polin, Nava; Givol, David

    2013-04-01

    Pancreas cancer, is the fourth leading cause of cancer death but its cell of origin is controversial. We compared the localization of stem cells in normal and cancerous pancreas using antibodies to the stem cell markers Nanog and LGR5. Here we show, for the first time, that LGR5 is expressed in normal pancreas, exclusively in the islets of Langerhans and it is co-localized, surprisingly, with Nanog and insulin in clusters of beta cells. In cancerous pancreas Nanog and LGR5 are expressed in the remaining islets and in all ductal cancer cells. We observed insulin staining among the ductal cancer cells, but not in metastases. This indicates that the islet's beta cells, expressing LGR5 and Nanog markers are the initiating cells of pancreas cancer, which migrated from the islets to form the ductal cancerous tissue, probably after mutation and de-differentiation. This discovery may facilitate treatment of this devastating cancer.

  16. Beta1 integrins differentially control extravasation of inflammatory cell subsets into the CNS during autoimmunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bauer, Martina; Brakebusch, Cord; Coisne, Caroline

    2009-01-01

    Inhibiting the alpha(4) subunit of the integrin heterodimers alpha(4)beta(1) and alpha(4)beta(7) with the monoclonal antibody natalizumab is an effective treatment for multiple sclerosis (MS). However, the pharmacological action of natalizumab is not understood conclusively. Previous studies...... suggested that natalizumab inhibits activation, proliferation, or extravasation of inflammatory cells. To specify which mechanisms, cell types, and alpha(4) heterodimers are affected by the antibody treatment, we studied MS-like experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in mice lacking the beta(1...... cells are the main target of anti-alpha(4)-antibody blockade. We demonstrate that beta(1)-integrin expression on encephalitogenic T cells is critical for EAE development, and we therefore exclude alpha(4)beta(7) as a target integrin of the antibody treatment. T cells lacking beta(1) integrin are unable...

  17. The vicious cycle of apoptotic beta-cell death in type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminitz, Ayelet; Stein, Jerry; Yaniv, Isaac; Askenasy, Nadir

    2007-01-01

    Autoimmune insulitis, the cause of type 1 diabetes, evolves through several discrete stages that culminate in beta-cell death. In the first stage, antigenic epitopes of B-cell-specific peptides are processed by antigen presenting cells in local lymph nodes, and auto-reactive lymphocyte clones are propagated. Subsequently, cell-mediated and direct cytokine-mediated reactions are generated against the beta-cells, and the beta-cells are sensitized to apoptosis. Ironically, the beta-cells themselves contribute some of the cytokines and chemokines that provoke the immune reaction within the islets. Once this vicious cycle of autoimmunity is fully developed, the fate of the beta-cells in the islets is sealed, and clinical diabetes inevitably ensues. Differences in various aspects of these concurrent events appear to underlie the significant discrepancies in experimental data observed in experimental models that simulate autoimmune insulitis.

  18. Identification of CTLA2A, DEFB29, WFDC15B, SERPINA1F and MUP19 as Novel Tissue-Specific Secretory Factors in Mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jibin Zhang

    Full Text Available Secretory factors in animals play an important role in communication between different cells, tissues and organs. Especially, the secretory factors with specific expression in one tissue may reflect important functions and unique status of that tissue in an organism. In this study, we identified potential tissue-specific secretory factors in the fat, muscle, heart, lung, kidney and liver in the mouse by analyzing microarray data from NCBI's Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO public repository and searching and predicting their subcellular location in GeneCards and WoLF PSORT, and then confirmed tissue-specific expression of the genes using semi-quantitative PCR reactions. With this approach, we confirmed 11 lung, 7 liver, 2 heart, 1 heart and muscle, 7 kidney and 2 adipose and liver-specific secretory factors. Among these genes, 1 lung-specific gene--CTLA2A (cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated protein 2 alpha, 3 kidney-specific genes--SERPINA1F (serpin peptidase inhibitor, Clade A, member 1F, WFDC15B (WAP four-disulfide core domain 15B and DEFB29 (defensin beta 29 and 1 liver-specific gene--MUP19 (major urinary protein 19 have not been reported as secretory factors. These genes were tagged with hemagglutinin at the 3'end and then transiently transfected to HEK293 cells. Through protein detection in cell lysate and media using Western blotting, we verified secretion of the 5 genes and predicted the potential pathways in which they may participate in the specific tissue through data analysis of GEO profiles. In addition, alternative splicing was detected in transcripts of CTLA2A and SERPINA1F and the corresponding proteins were found not to be secreted in cell culture media. Identification of novel secretory factors through the current study provides a new platform to explore novel secretory factors and a general direction for further study of these genes in the future.

  19. Macrophageal/microglial cell activation and cerebral injury induced by excretory-secretory products secreted by Paragonimus westermani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Chul; Cho, Geum-Sil; Kwon, Jae Hyun; Shin, Myeong Heon; Lim, Ji Hyae; Kim, Won-Ki

    2006-02-01

    Cerebral paragonimiasis causes various neurological disorders including seizures, visual impairment and hemiplegia. The excretory-secretory product (ESP) released by Paragonimus westermani has a cysteine protease activity and plays important roles in its migration in the host tissue and modulation of host immune responses. To gain more insight into the pathogenesis of ESP in the brain, we investigated the inflammatory reaction and cerebral injury following microinjection of ESP into rat striatum. The size of injury was maximally observed 3 days after microinjection of ESP and then declined to control levels as astrocytes have repopulated the injury. ED1-positive monocytes and microglia were confluently found inside the injury. The mRNA expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) occurred as early as 9h after ESP injection and then declined to control levels within 1 day. The iNOS inhibitor aminoguanidine largely decreased the expression of iNOS but did not reduce the size of lesion caused by ESP. Interestingly, however, heat inactivation of ESP caused a decrease of injury formation with no altered expression of iNOS. The data indicate that ESP produces brain tissue injury by recruiting activated monocytes/microglia via heat-labile protease activity.

  20. Evolution of apicomplexan secretory organelles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubbels, Marc-Jan; Duraisingh, Manoj T.

    2013-01-01

    The alveolate superphylum includes many free-living and parasitic organisms, which are united by the presence of alveolar sacs lying proximal to the plasma membrane, providing cell structure. All species comprising the apicomplexan group of alveolates are parasites and have adapted to the unique requirements of the parasitic lifestyle. Here the evolution of apicomplexan secretory organelles that are involved in the critical process of egress from one cell and invasion of another is explored. The variations within the Apicomplexa and how these relate to species-specific biology will be discussed. In addition, recent studies have identified specific calcium-sensitive molecules that coordinate the various events and regulate the release of these secretory organelles within apicomplexan parasites. Some aspects of this machinery are conserved outside the Apicomplexa, and are beginning to elucidate the conserved nature of the machinery. Briefly, the relationship of this secretion machinery within the Apicomplexa will be discussed, compared with free-living and predatory alveolates, and how these might have evolved from a common ancestor. PMID:23068912

  1. Balsamic Vinegar Improves High Fat-Induced Beta Cell Dysfunction via Beta Cell ABCA1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Seok

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe aim of this study was to investigate the effects of balsamic vinegar on β-cell dysfunction.MethodsIn this study, 28-week-old Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF rats were fed a normal chow diet or a high-fat diet (HFD and were provided with tap water or dilute balsamic vinegar for 4 weeks. Oral glucose tolerance tests and histopathological analyses were performed thereafter.ResultsIn rats fed both the both chow diet and the HFD, the rats given balsamic vinegar showed increased insulin staining in islets compared with tap water administered rats. Balsamic vinegar administration also increased β-cell ATP-binding cassette transporter subfamily A member 1 (ABCA1 expression in islets and decreased cholesterol levels.ConclusionThese findings provide the first evidence for an anti-diabetic effect of balsamic vinegar through improvement of β-cell function via increasing β-cell ABCA1 expression.

  2. Planar Cell Polarity Controls Pancreatic Beta Cell Differentiation and Glucose Homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cortijo, Cedric; Gouzi, Mathieu; Tissir, Fadel

    2012-01-01

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) refers to the collective orientation of cells within the epithelial plane. We show that progenitor cells forming the ducts of the embryonic pancreas express PCP proteins and exhibit an active PCP pathway. Planar polarity proteins are acquired at embryonic day 11.......5 synchronously to apicobasal polarization of pancreas progenitors. Loss of function of the two PCP core components Celsr2 and Celsr3 shows that they control the differentiation of endocrine cells from polarized progenitors, with a prevalent effect on insulin-producing beta cells. This results in a decreased...... glucose clearance. Loss of Celsr2 and 3 leads to a reduction of Jun phosphorylation in progenitors, which, in turn, reduces beta cell differentiation from endocrine progenitors. These results highlight the importance of the PCP pathway in cell differentiation in vertebrates. In addition, they reveal...

  3. Pancreas and beta-cell development: from the actual to the possible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murtaugh, L Charles

    2007-02-01

    The development of insulin-producing pancreatic beta (beta)-cells represents the culmination of a complex developmental program. Cells of the posterior foregut assume a pancreatic identity, cells within the expanding pancreatic primordia adopt an endocrine fate, and a subset of these precursors becomes competent to generate beta-cells. Postnatally, beta-cells are primarily maintained by self-duplication rather than new differentiation. Although major gaps in our knowledge still persist, experiments across several organisms have shed increasing light on the steps of beta-cell specification and differentiation. Increasing our understanding of the extrinsic, as well as intrinsic, mechanisms that control these processes should facilitate efforts to regenerate this important cell type in humans.

  4. Dysregulation of Dicer1 in Beta Cells Impairs Islet Architecture and Glucose Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amitai D. Mandelbaum

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available microRNAs (miRNAs play important roles in pancreas development and in regulation of insulin expression in the adult. Here we show that loss of miRNAs activity in beta-cells during embryonic development results in lower beta-cell mass and in impaired glucose tolerance. Dicer1-null cells initially constitute a significant portion of the total beta-cell population. However, during postnatal development, Dicer1-null cells are depleted. Furthermore, wild-type beta cells are repopulating the islets in complex compensatory dynamics. Because loss of Dicer1 is also associated with changes in the distribution of membranous E-cadherin, we hypothesized that E-cadherin activity may play a role in beta cell survival or islet architecture. However, genetic loss of E-cadherin function does not impair islet architecture, suggesting that miRNAs likely function through other or redundant effectors in the endocrine pancreas.

  5. Proliferation and Cytokine Production of Human Mesangial Cells Stimulated by Secretory IgA Isolated from Patients with IgA Nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Liang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: IgA nephropathy (IgAN is the most common form of primary glomerulonephritis, and often aggravates by mucosal infection. Secretory IgA (SIgA is the dominant immunoglobulin in mucosal immunity, and is deposited in the mesangium in IgAN. The biological effects of SIgA on mesangial cells are poorly understood. Methods: Deposition of SIgA in frozen renal sections from IgAN patients was detected and the association between deposition of SIgA and patients characteristics was analyzed. The biological effects of SIgA and polymeric IgA (pIgA on human renal mesangial cells were compared. We also studied the molecular mechanism of microRNA regulating the inflammatory effects of SIgA on mesangial cells. Results: Fifty-five of 176 patients had SIgA deposition with higher incidence of infection history and hematuria, lower serum cystatin C, β2 microglobulin, blood urea nitrogen and T-grade in the Oxford classification, compared with patients without SIgA deposition. SIgA stimulated mesangial cells at a higher ratio of proliferation and higher production of interleukin (IL-6, IL-8, monocyte chemotactic protein 1, transforming growth factor-β1 and fibronectin, compared with SIgA from healthy volunteers. The proliferation and cytokines production in mesangial cells stimulated by SIgA were significantly lower than that stimulated by pIgA. miR-16 targeted the 3′-untranslated region of IL-6 and suppressed its translation in mesangial cells induced by SIgA. Conclusions: The biological effects of SIgA on mesangial cells differ from those of pIgA. SIgA stimulates mesangial cell proliferation and production of proinflammatory cytokines. IL-6 production is regulated by miR-16 in mesangial cells.

  6. Calcium-containing phosphopeptides pave the secretory pathway for efficient protein traffic and secretion in fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Juan F

    2014-01-01

    Casein phosphopeptides (CPPs) containing chelated calcium drastically increase the secretion of extracellular homologous and heterologous proteins in filamentous fungi. Casein phosphopeptides released by digestion of alpha - and beta-casein are rich in phosphoserine residues (SerP). They stimulate enzyme secretion in the gastrointestinal tract and enhance the immune response in mammals, and are used as food supplements. It is well known that casein phosphopeptides transport Ca2+ across the membranes and play an important role in Ca2+ homeostasis in the cells. Addition of CPPs drastically increases the production of heterologous proteins in Aspergillus as host for industrial enzyme production. Recent proteomics studies showed that CPPs alter drastically the vesicle-mediated secretory pathway in filamentous fungi, apparently because they change the calcium concentration in organelles that act as calcium reservoirs. In the organelles calcium homeostasis a major role is played by the pmr1 gene, that encodes a Ca2+/Mn2+ transport ATPase, localized in the Golgi complex; this transporter controls the balance between intra-Golgi and cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentrations. A Golgi-located casein kinase (CkiA) governs the ER to Golgi directionality of the movement of secretory proteins by interacting with the COPII coat of secretory vesicles when they reach the Golgi. Mutants defective in the casein-2 kinase CkiA show abnormal targeting of some secretory proteins, including cytoplasmic membrane amino acid transporters that in ckiA mutants are miss-targeted to vacuolar membranes. Interestingly, addition of CPPs increases a glyceraldehyde-3-phpshate dehydrogenase protein that is known to associate with microtubules and act as a vesicle/membrane fusogenic agent. In summary, CPPs alter the protein secretory pathway in fungi adapting it to a deregulated protein traffic through the organelles and vesicles what results in a drastic increase in secretion of heterologous and also of

  7. Differential sensitivity to beta-cell secretagogues in cultured rat pancreatic islets exposed to human interleukin-1 beta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eizirik, D L; Sandler, S; Hallberg, A; Bendtzen, K; Sener, A; Malaisse, W J

    1989-08-01

    The early stages of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus are characterized by a selective inability to secrete insulin in response to glucose, coupled to a better response to nonnutrient secretagogues. The deficient glucose response may be a result of the autoimmune process directed toward the beta-cells. Interleukin-1 (IL-1) has been suggested to be one possible mediator of immunological damage of the beta-cells. In the present study we characterized the sensitivity of beta-cells to different secretagogues after human recombinant IL-1 beta (rIL-1 beta) exposure. Furthermore, experiments were performed to clarify the biochemical mechanisms behind the defective insulin response observed in these islets. Rat pancreatic islets were isolated and kept in tissue culture (medium RPMI-1640 plus 10% calf serum) for 5 days. The islets were subsequently exposed to 60 pM human recombinant IL-1 beta during 48 h in the same culture conditions as above and examined immediately after IL-1 exposure. The rIL-1 beta-treated islets showed a marked reduction of glucose-stimulated insulin release. Stimulation with arginine plus different glucose concentrations, and leucine plus glutamine partially counteracted the rIL-1 beta-induced reduction of insulin release. The activities of the glycolytic enzymes hexokinase, glucokinase, and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, were similar in control and IL-1-exposed islets. Treatment with IL-1 also did not impair the activities of NADH+- and NADPH+-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase, glutamate-aspartate transaminase, glutamate-alanine transaminase, citrate synthase, and NAD+-linked isocitrate dehydrogenase. The oxidation of D-[6-14C]glucose and L-[U-14C]leucine were decreased by 50% in IL-1-treated islets. Furthermore, there was a significant decrease in the ratios of [2-14C]pyruvate oxidation/[1-14C]pyruvate decarboxylation and L-[U-14C]leucine oxidation/L-[1-14C]leucine decarboxylation, indicating that IL-1 decreases the proportion of

  8. Effects of exposure to electromagnetic radiation at 835 MHz on growth, morphology and secretory characteristics of a mast cell analogue, RBL-2H3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnellan, M; McKenzie, D R; French, P W

    1997-07-01

    A mast cell line, RBL-2H3, was exposed to 835 MHz for 20 minutes, three times per day for 7 days at a power density of 8.1 +/- 3 mW/cm2. From day 4 onwards, it was observed that the rate of DNA synthesis and cell replication increased, that actin distribution and cell morphology became altered, and the amount of beta-hexosaminidase (a marker of granule secretion) released in response to a calcium ionophore was significantly enhanced, in comparison to unexposed cultures. There were no effects seen on levels of cytoskeletal protein synthesis or of beta-actin mRNA. Morphological changes persisted following subculture for at least 7 days in the absence of further exposure. It is hypothesized that effects of exposure to an electromagnetic field at 835 MHz may be mediated via a signal transduction pathway.

  9. Uptake of neutral alpha- and beta-amino acids by human proximal tubular cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, H; Røigaard, H; Jacobsen, Christian

    1996-01-01

    The transport characteristics of amino acids in primary cell cultures from the proximal tubule of human adults (AHKE cells) were examined, using alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) and beta-alanine as representatives of alpha- and beta-amino acids, respectively. The Na(+)-gradient dependent influx...... experiments revealed that all the neutral amino acids tested reduced the uptake of AIB, whereas there was no effect of taurine, L-aspartic acid, and L-arginine. By contrast, the influx of beta-alanine was only drastically reduced by beta-amino acids, whereas the inhibition by neutral alpha-amino acids...... was relatively low. Nor did L-arginine and L-aspartic acid affect the uptake of beta-alanine into AHKE cells. Comparison with the results obtained for normal (NHKE) and immortalized (IHKE) embryonic cells suggested an unaltered expression of the types of transport carriers for neutral alpha- and beta-amino acids...

  10. Secretory Structure, Histochemistry and Phytochemistry Analyses of Stimulant Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umah, C.; Dorly; Sulistyaningsih, Y. C.

    2017-03-01

    Plants that are used as stimulant supposed to contains various metabolit compounds that are produced or secreted by secretory structures. This study aimed to identify the secretory structure of plant used as stimulant and chemical compounds accumulated in it. The secretory structure and its histochemistry were observed on plant material that are used as herbal ingredient. Phytochemical content was analyzed by using a qualitative test. The result showed that the idioblast cells and secretory cavities were found in the leaves of Decaspermum fruticosum, and Polyalthia rumphii. Most idioblast cells contained lipophilic substances and terpenoids or alkaloids, while secretory cavity contained alkaloid. Phytochemical analysis for D. fruticosum, and P. rumphii contain terpenoids, phenols, steroids, and flavonoids

  11. Conversion of embryonic stem cells into pancreatic beta-cell surrogates guided by ontogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, Justin G; Tuch, Bernard E

    2006-05-01

    Cellular therapies to treat Type 1 diabetes are being devised and the use of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) offers a solution to the issue of supply, because hESCs can be maintained in a pluripotent state indefinitely. Furthermore, hESCs have advantages in terms of their plasticity and reduced immunogenicity. Several strategies that have so far been investigated indicate that hESCs are capable of differentiating into insulin producing beta-cell surrogates. However the efficiency of the differentiation procedures used is generally quite low and the cell populations derived are often highly heterogenous. A strategy that appears to have long term potential is to design differentiation procedures based on the ontogeny of the beta-cell. The focus of this strategy is to replicate signaling processes that are known to be involved in the maturation of a beta-cell. The earliest pancreatic progenitors found in the developing vertebrate fetus are produced via a process known as gastrulation and form part of the definitive endoderm germ layer. hESCs have recently been differentiated into definitive endoderm with high efficiency using a differentiation procedure that mimics the signaling that occurs during gastrulation and the formation of the definitive endoderm. Subsequent events during pancreas development involve a section of the definitive endoderm forming into pancreatic epithelium, which then branches into the pancreatic mesenchyme to form islet clusters of endocrine cells. A proportion of the endocrine precursor cells within islets develop into insulin producing beta-cells. The challenge currently is to design hESC differentiation procedures that mimic the combined events of these stages of beta-cell development.

  12. Diabetic beta-cells can achieve self-protection against oxidative stress through an adaptive up-regulation of their antioxidant defenses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grégory Lacraz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Oxidative stress (OS, through excessive and/or chronic reactive oxygen species (ROS, is a mediator of diabetes-related damages in various tissues including pancreatic beta-cells. Here, we have evaluated islet OS status and beta-cell response to ROS using the GK/Par rat as a model of type 2 diabetes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Localization of OS markers was performed on whole pancreases. Using islets isolated from 7-day-old or 2.5-month-old male GK/Par and Wistar control rats, 1 gene expression was analyzed by qRT-PCR; 2 insulin secretion rate was measured; 3 ROS accumulation and mitochondrial polarization were assessed by fluorescence methods; 4 antioxidant contents were quantified by HPLC. After diabetes onset, OS markers targeted mostly peri-islet vascular and inflammatory areas, and not islet cells. GK/Par islets revealed in fact protected against OS, because they maintained basal ROS accumulation similar or even lower than Wistar islets. Remarkably, GK/Par insulin secretion also exhibited strong resistance to the toxic effect of exogenous H(2O(2 or endogenous ROS exposure. Such adaptation was associated to both high glutathione content and overexpression (mRNA and/or protein levels of a large set of genes encoding antioxidant proteins as well as UCP2. Finally, we showed that such a phenotype was not innate but spontaneously acquired after diabetes onset, as the result of an adaptive response to the diabetic environment. CONCLUSIONS: The GK/Par model illustrates the effectiveness of adaptive response to OS by beta-cells to achieve self-tolerance. It remains to be determined to what extend such islet antioxidant defenses upregulation might contribute to GK/Par beta-cell secretory dysfunction.

  13. Structure of the T cell receptor in a Ti alpha V beta 2, alpha V beta 8-positive T cell line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, X; Dietrich, J; Kuhlmann, J

    1994-01-01

    The T cell receptor (TcR) is composed of at least six different polypeptide chains consisting of the clonotypic Ti heterodimer (Ti alpha beta or Ti gamma delta) and the noncovalently associated CD3 chains (CD3 gamma delta epsilon zeta). The exact number of subunits constituting the TcR is still...... not known; however, it has been suggested that each TcR contains two Ti dimers. To gain insight into the structure of the TcR we constructed a Ti alpha V beta 2, alpha V beta 8-positive T cell line which expressed the endogenous human TiV beta 8 and the transfected mouse TiV beta 2 both in association...... with the endogenous Ti alpha and CD3 chains at the cell surface. Preclearing experiments with radioiodinated cell lysate prepared with digitonin lysis buffer demonstrated that depleting the lysate of Ti alpha V beta 8 by immunoprecipitation with anti V beta 8 monoclonal antibody (mAb) did not reduce the amount of Ti...

  14. Enhancing pancreatic Beta-cell regeneration in vivo with pioglitazone and alogliptin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Yin

    Full Text Available AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Pancreatic beta-cells retain limited ability to regenerate and proliferate after various physiologic triggers. Identifying therapies that are able to enhance beta-cell regeneration may therefore be useful for the treatment of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. METHODS: In this study we investigated endogenous and transplanted beta-cell regeneration by serially quantifying changes in bioluminescence from beta-cells from transgenic mice expressing firefly luciferase under the control of the mouse insulin I promoter. We tested the ability of pioglitazone and alogliptin, two drugs developed for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, to enhance beta-cell regeneration, and also defined the effect of the immunosuppression with rapamycin and tacrolimus on transplanted islet beta mass. RESULTS: Pioglitazone is a stimulator of nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma while alogliptin is a selective dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitor. Pioglitazone alone, or in combination with alogliptin, enhanced endogenous beta-cell regeneration in streptozotocin-treated mice, while alogliptin alone had modest effects. In a model of syngeneic islet transplantation, immunosuppression with rapamycin and tacrolimus induced an early loss of beta-cell mass, while treatment with insulin implants to maintain normoglycemia and pioglitazone plus alogliptin was able to partially promote beta-cell mass recovery. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: These data highlight the utility of bioluminescence for serially quantifying functional beta-cell mass in living mice. They also demonstrate the ability of pioglitazone, used either alone or in combination with alogliptin, to enhance regeneration of endogenous islet beta-cells as well as transplanted islets into recipients treated with rapamycin and tacrolimus.

  15. In vitro reprogramming of pancreatic alpha cells towards a beta cell phenotype following ectopic HNF4α expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangan, Caroline B; Jover, Ramiro; Heimberg, Harry; Tosh, David

    2015-01-05

    There is currently a shortage of organ donors available for pancreatic beta cell transplantation into diabetic patients. An alternative source of beta cells is pre-existing pancreatic cells. While we know that beta cells can arise directly from alpha cells during pancreatic regeneration we do not understand the molecular basis for the switch in phenotype. The aim of the present study was to investigate if hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha (HNF4α), a transcription factor essential for a normal beta cell phenotype, could induce the reprogramming of alpha cells towards potential beta cells. We utilised an in vitro model of pancreatic alpha cells, the murine αTC1-9 cell line. We initially characterised the αTC1-9 cell line before and following adenovirus-mediated ectopic expression of HNF4α. We analysed the phenotype at transcript and protein level and assessed its glucose-responsiveness. Ectopic HNF4α expression in the αTC1-9 cell line induced a change in morphology (1.7-fold increase in size), suppressed glucagon expression, induced key beta cell-specific markers (insulin, C-peptide, glucokinase, GLUT2 and Pax4) and pancreatic polypeptide (PP) and enabled the cells to secrete insulin in a glucose-regulated manner. In conclusion, HNF4α reprograms alpha cells to beta-like cells.

  16. Nuclear orphan receptor TLX affects gene expression, proliferation and cell apoptosis in beta cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Xiaoli; Xiong, Xiaokan; Dai, Zhe; Deng, Haohua; Sun, Li; Hu, Xuemei; Zhou, Feng; Xu, Yancheng, E-mail: oxyccc@163.com

    2015-12-04

    Nuclear orphan receptor TLX is an essential regulator of the growth of neural stem cells. However, its exact function in pancreatic islet cells is still unknown. In the present study, gene expression profiling analysis revealed that overexpression of TLX in beta cell line MIN6 causes suppression of 176 genes and upregulation of 49 genes, including a cadre of cell cycle, cell proliferation and cell death control genes, such as Btg2, Ddit3 and Gadd45a. We next examined the effects of TLX overexpression on proliferation, apoptosis and insulin secretion in MIN6 cells. Proliferation analysis using EdU assay showed that overexpression of TLX increased percentage of EdU-positive cells. Cell cycle and apoptosis analysis revealed that overexpression of TLX in MIN6 cells resulted in higher percentage of cells exiting G1 into S-phase, and a 58.8% decrease of cell apoptosis induced by 0.5 mM palmitate. Moreover, TLX overexpression did not cause impairment of insulin secretion. Together, we conclude that TLX is among factors capable of controlling beta cell proliferation and survival, which may serve as a target for the development of novel therapies for diabetes. - Highlights: • TLX overexpression in MIN6 cell causes significant expression changes of 225 genes. • TLX overexpression promotes MIN6 cell proliferation and decreases cell apoptosis. • TLX overexpression does not cause impairment of insulin secretion.

  17. Repetitive in vivo treatment with human recombinant interleukin-1 beta modifies beta-cell function in normal rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wogensen, L D; Reimers, J; Nerup, J

    1992-01-01

    It is unknown whether interleukin-1 exerts a bimodal effect on Beta-cell function in vivo, and whether interleukin-1 has a diabetogenic action in normal animals. We therefore studied: (a) acute effects 2 h after an intraperitoneal bolus injection of 4 micrograms of recombinant human interleukin-1...

  18. Influence of 4-hydroxylated polychlorinated biphenyls on the secretory function of bovine ovarian cells: role of the steroidogenic factor-1 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlynarczuk, Jaroslaw; Kotwica, Jan

    2015-04-01

    The hydroxy-derivatives (OHPCBs) of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) can accumulate in the tissues of the reproductive tract in animals and humans and may still have estrogen-like properties. Moreover, the "orphan" nuclear receptor Steroidogenic Factor-1 (SF-1) can be the target of PCBs. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect 4OH4CB and 4OH3CB on the secretion of estradiol (E2), progesterone (P4), and oxytocin (OT) from granulosa cells of follicles 1cm in diameter and from luteal cells collected at four stages of the estrous cycle of cows. Furthermore, the possibility that 4OHPCBs have an effect on OT synthesis and secretion via the SF receptor was studied using receptor blocker (F0160). Used OHPCBs increased the secretion of P4 from the granulosa cells of follicles of both sizes and increased the secretion of OT from follicles with a diameter of >1cm. These increases were inhibited by an SF-1 receptor blocker. In luteal cells, 4OH3CB increased the secretion of P4 and OT from luteal cells at all phases of the estrous cycle, while 4OH4CB increased OT secretion during the first half of the estrous cycle. Concomitant with the increase in OT secretion from the cells, an increase in the expression of OT precursor mRNA (NP-I/OT) was observed. This effect was inhibited by SF-1 receptor blocker. These results indicate that 4OHPCBs impair the secretory function of ovarian steroidogenic cells by disrupting steroidogenesis and increasing OT secretion, and the receptor SF-1 appears to be essentially involved in these processes.

  19. Suppressor of cytokine signalling (SOCS)-3 protects beta cells against IL-1beta-mediated toxicity through inhibition of multiple nuclear factor-kappaB-regulated proapoptotic pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsen, Allan Ertman; Heding, P E; Frobøse, H;

    2004-01-01

    The proinflammatory cytokine IL-1beta induces apoptosis in pancreatic beta cells via pathways dependent on nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB), mitogen-activated protein kinase, and protein kinase C. We recently showed suppressor of cytokine signalling (SOCS)-3 to be a natural negative feedback...... regulator of IL-1beta- and IFN-gamma-mediated signalling in rat islets and beta cell lines, preventing their deleterious effects. However, the mechanisms underlying SOCS-3 inhibition of IL-1beta signalling and prevention against apoptosis remain unknown....

  20. Cocoa-rich diet attenuates beta cell mass loss and function in young Zucker diabetic fatty rats by preventing oxidative stress and beta cell apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Millán, Elisa; Cordero-Herrera, Isabel; Ramos, Sonia; Escrivá, Fernando; Alvarez, Carmen; Goya, Luis; Martín, María Angeles

    2015-04-01

    We have recently shown that cocoa flavanols may have anti-diabetic potential by promoting survival and function of pancreatic beta-cells in vitro. In this work, we investigated if a cocoa-rich diet is able to preserve beta-cell mass and function in an animal model of type 2 diabetes and the mechanisms involved. Our results showed that cocoa feeding during the prediabetic state attenuates hyperglycaemia, reduces insulin resistant, and increases beta cell mass and function in obese Zucker diabetic rats. At the molecular level, cocoa-rich diet prevented beta-cell apoptosis by increasing the levels of Bcl-xL and decreasing Bax levels and caspase-3 activity. Cocoa diet enhanced the activity of endogenous antioxidant defenses, mainly glutathione peroxidase, preventing thus oxidative injury induced by the pre-diabetic condition and leading to apoptosis prevention. These findings provide the first in vivo evidence that a cocoa-rich diet may delay the loss of functional beta-cell mass and delay the progression of diabetes by preventing oxidative stress and beta-cell apoptosis.

  1. Pancreatic Beta Cell G-Protein Coupled Receptors and Second Messenger Interactions: A Systems Biology Computational Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridlyand, Leonid E; Philipson, Louis H

    2016-01-01

    Insulin secretory in pancreatic beta-cells responses to nutrient stimuli and hormonal modulators include multiple messengers and signaling pathways with complex interdependencies. Here we present a computational model that incorporates recent data on glucose metabolism, plasma membrane potential, G-protein-coupled-receptors (GPCR), cytoplasmic and endoplasmic reticulum calcium dynamics, cAMP and phospholipase C pathways that regulate interactions between second messengers in pancreatic beta-cells. The values of key model parameters were inferred from published experimental data. The model gives a reasonable fit to important aspects of experimentally measured metabolic and second messenger concentrations and provides a framework for analyzing the role of metabolic, hormones and neurotransmitters changes on insulin secretion. Our analysis of the dynamic data provides support for the hypothesis that activation of Ca2+-dependent adenylyl cyclases play a critical role in modulating the effects of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and catecholamines. The regulatory properties of adenylyl cyclase isoforms determine fluctuations in cytoplasmic cAMP concentration and reveal a synergistic action of glucose, GLP-1 and GIP on insulin secretion. On the other hand, the regulatory properties of phospholipase C isoforms determine the interaction of glucose, acetylcholine and free fatty acids (FFA) (that act through the FFA receptors) on insulin secretion. We found that a combination of GPCR agonists activating different messenger pathways can stimulate insulin secretion more effectively than a combination of GPCR agonists for a single pathway. This analysis also suggests that the activators of GLP-1, GIP and FFA receptors may have a relatively low risk of hypoglycemia in fasting conditions whereas an activator of muscarinic receptors can increase this risk. This computational analysis demonstrates that study of second messenger

  2. An adenylate kinase is involved in KATP channel regulation of mouse pancreatic beta cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schulze, D.U.; Dufer, M.; Wieringa, B.; Krippeit-Drews, P.; Drews, G.

    2007-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: In a previous study, we demonstrated that a creatine kinase (CK) modulates K(ATP) channel activity in pancreatic beta cells. To explore phosphotransfer signalling pathways in more detail, we examined whether K(ATP) channel regulation in beta cells is determined by a metabolic intera

  3. NOX, NOX who is there?, The contribution of NADPH Oxidase to beta cell dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eTaylor-Fishwick

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Predictions of diabetes prevalence over the next decades warrant the aggressive discovery of new approaches to stop or reverse loss of functional beta cell mass. Beta cells are recognized to have a relatively high sensitivity to reactive oxygen species (ROS and become dysfunctional under oxidative stress conditions. New discoveries have identified NADPH oxidases in beta cells as contributors to elevated cellular ROS. Reviewed are recent reports that evidence a role for NADPH oxidase-1 (NOX-1 in beta cell dysfunction. NOX-1 is stimulated by inflammatory cytokines that are elevated in diabetes. First, regulation of cytokine-stimulated NOX-1 expression has been linked to inflammatory lipid mediators derived from 12-lipoxyganase activity. For the first time in beta cells these data integrate distinct pathways associated with beta cell dysfunction. Second, regulation of NOX-1 in beta cells involves feed-forward control linked to elevated ROS and Src-kinase activation. This potentially results in unbridled ROS generation and identifies candidate targets for pharmacologic intervention. Third, consideration is provided of new, first-in-class, selective inhibitors of NOX-1. These compounds could have an important role in assessing a disruption of NOX-1/ROS signaling as a new approach to preserve and protect beta cell mass in diabetes.

  4. An adenylate kinase is involved in KATP channel regulation of mouse pancreatic beta cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schulze, D.U.; Dufer, M.; Wieringa, B.; Krippeit-Drews, P.; Drews, G.

    2007-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: In a previous study, we demonstrated that a creatine kinase (CK) modulates K(ATP) channel activity in pancreatic beta cells. To explore phosphotransfer signalling pathways in more detail, we examined whether K(ATP) channel regulation in beta cells is determined by a metabolic

  5. Regulation of pancreatic islet beta-cell mass by growth factor and hormone signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yao; Chang, Yongchang

    2014-01-01

    Dysfunction and destruction of pancreatic islet beta cells is a hallmark of diabetes. Better understanding of cellular signals in beta cells will allow development of therapeutic strategies for diabetes, such as preservation and expansion of beta-cell mass and improvement of beta-cell function. During the past several decades, the number of studies analyzing the molecular mechanisms, including growth factor/hormone signaling pathways that impact islet beta-cell mass and function, has increased exponentially. Notably, somatolactogenic hormones including growth hormone (GH), prolactin (PRL), and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and their receptors (GHR, PRLR, and IGF-1R) are critically involved in beta-cell growth, survival, differentiation, and insulin secretion. In this chapter, we focus more narrowly on GH, PRL, and IGF-1 signaling, and GH-IGF-1 cross talk. We also discuss how these signaling aspects contribute to the regulation of beta-cell proliferation and apoptosis. In particular, our novel findings of GH-induced formation of GHR-JAK2-IGF-1R protein complex and synergistic effects of GH and IGF-1 on beta-cell signaling, proliferation, and antiapoptosis lead to a new concept that IGF-1R may serve as a proximal component of GH/GHR signaling.

  6. Do post-translational beta cell protein modifications trigger type 1 diabetes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Størling, Joachim; Overgaard, Anne Julie; Brorsson, Caroline Anna;

    2013-01-01

    forms capable of specifically triggering beta cell destruction. In other immune-mediated diseases, autoantigens targeted by the immune system have undergone post-translational modification (PTM), thereby creating tissue-specific neo-epitopes. In a similar manner, PTM of beta cell proteins might create...

  7. Coupling of Insulin Secretion and Display of a Granule-resident Zinc Transporter ZnT8 on the Surface of Pancreatic Beta Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qiong; Merriman, Chengfeng; Zhang, Hao; Fu, Dax

    2017-03-10

    The islet-specific zinc transporter ZnT8 mediates zinc enrichment in the insulin secretory granules of the pancreatic beta cell. This granular zinc transporter is also a major self-antigen found in type 1 diabetes patients. It is not clear whether ZnT8 can be displayed on the cell surface and how insulin secretion may regulate the level of ZnT8 exposure to extracellular immune surveillance. Here we report specific antibody binding to the extracellular surface of rat insulinoma INS-1E cells that stably expressed a tagged human zinc transporter ZnT8. Flow cytometry analysis after fluorescent antibody labeling revealed strong correlations among the levels of ZnT8 expression, its display on the cell surface, and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). Glucose stimulation increased the surface display of endogenous ZnT8 from a basal level to 32.5% of the housekeeping Na(+)/K(+) ATPase on the cell surface, thereby providing direct evidence for a GSIS-dependent surface exposure of the ZnT8 self-antigen. Moreover, the variation in tagged-ZnT8 expression and surface labeling enabled sorting of heterogeneous beta cells to subpopulations that exhibited marked differences in GSIS with parallel changes in endogenous ZnT8 expression. The abundant surface display of endogenous ZnT8 and its coupling to GSIS demonstrated the potential of ZnT8 as a surface biomarker for tracking and isolating functional beta cells in mixed cell populations.

  8. Possible Role of DNA Polymerase beta in Protecting Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells Against Cytotoxicity of Hydroquinone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DA-LIN HU; JIAN-PING YANG; DAO-KUI FANG; YAN SHA; XIAO-ZHI TU; ZHI-XIONG ZHUANG; HUAN-WEN TANG; HAI-RONG LIANG; DONG-SHENG TANG; YI-MING LIU; WEI-DONG JI; JIAN-HUI YUAN; YUN HE; ZHENG-YU ZHU

    2007-01-01

    Objective To explore the toxicological mechanism of hydroquinone in human bronchial epithelial cells and to investigate whether DNA polymerase beta is involved in protecting cells from damage caused by hydroquinone. Methods DNA polymerase beta knock-down cell line was established via RNA interference as an experimental group. Normal human bronchial epithelial cells and cells transfected with the empty vector of pEGFP-Cl were used as controls. Cells were treated with different concentrations of hydroquinone (ranged from 10 μmol/L to 120 μmol/L) for 4 hours. MTT assay and Comet assay [single-cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE)] were performed respectively to detect the toxicity of hydroquinone. Results MTT assay showed that DNA polymerase beta knock-down cells treated with different concentrations of hydroquinone had a lower absorbance value at 490 nm than the control cells in a dose-dependant manner. Comet assay revealed that different concentrations of hydroquinone caused more severe DNA damage in DNA polymerase beta knock-down cell line than in control cells and there was no significant difference in the two control groups. Conclusions Hydroquinone has significant toxicity to human bronchial epithelial cells and causes DNA damage. DNA polymerase beta knock-down cell line appears more sensitive to hydroquinone than the control cells. The results suggest that DNA polymerase beta is involved in protecting cells from damage caused by hydroquinone.

  9. Hyperinsulinism induced by targeted suppression of beta cell KATP channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koster, J C; Remedi, M S; Flagg, T P; Johnson, J D; Markova, K P; Marshall, B A; Nichols, C G

    2002-12-24

    ATP-sensitive K+ (K(ATP)) channels couple cell metabolism to electrical activity. To probe the role of K(ATP) in glucose-induced insulin secretion, we have generated transgenic mice expressing a dominant-negative, GFP-tagged K(ATP) channel subunit in which residues 132-134 (Gly-Tyr-Gly) in the selectivity filter were replaced by Ala-Ala-Ala, under control of the insulin promoter. Transgene expression was confirmed by both beta cell-specific green fluorescence and complete suppression of channel activity in those cells ( approximately 70%) that did fluoresce. Transgenic mice developed normally with no increased mortality and displayed normal body weight, blood glucose levels, and islet architecture. However, hyperinsulinism was evident in adult mice as (i) a disproportionately high level of circulating serum insulin for a given glucose concentration ( approximately 2-fold increase in blood insulin), (ii) enhanced glucose-induced insulin release from isolated islets, and (iii) mild yet significant enhancement in glucose tolerance. Enhanced glucose-induced insulin secretion results from both increased glucose sensitivity and increased release at saturating glucose concentration. The results suggest that incomplete suppression of K(ATP) channel activity can give rise to a maintained hyperinsulinism.

  10. Legionella pneumophila induces human beta Defensin-3 in pulmonary cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hippenstiel Stefan

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Legionella pneumophila is an important causative agent of severe pneumonia in humans. Human alveolar epithelium and macrophages are effective barriers for inhaled microorganisms and actively participate in the initiation of innate host defense. The beta defensin-3 (hBD-3, an antimicrobial peptide is an important component of the innate immune response of the human lung. Therefore we hypothesize that hBD-3 might be important for immune defense towards L. pneumophila. Methods We investigated the effects of L. pneumophila and different TLR agonists on pulmonary cells in regard to hBD-3 expression by ELISA. Furthermore, siRNA-mediated inhibition of TLRs as well as chemical inhibition of potential downstream signaling molecules was used for functional analysis. Results L. pneumophila induced release of hBD-3 in pulmonary epithelium and alveolar macrophages. A similar response was observed when epithelial cells were treated with different TLR agonists. Inhibition of TLR2, TLR5, and TLR9 expression led to a decreased hBD-3 expression. Furthermore expression of hBD-3 was mediated through a JNK dependent activation of AP-1 (c-Jun but appeared to be independent of NF-κB. Additionally, we demonstrate that hBD-3 elicited a strong antimicrobial effect on L. pneumophila replication. Conclusions Taken together, human pulmonary cells produce hBD-3 upon L. pneumophila infection via a TLR-JNK-AP-1-dependent pathway which may contribute to an efficient innate immune defense.

  11. Update on the Protective Molecular Pathways Improving Pancreatic Beta-Cell Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Puddu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary function of pancreatic beta-cells is to produce and release insulin in response to increment in extracellular glucose concentrations, thus maintaining glucose homeostasis. Deficient beta-cell function can have profound metabolic consequences, leading to the development of hyperglycemia and, ultimately, diabetes mellitus. Therefore, strategies targeting the maintenance of the normal function and protecting pancreatic beta-cells from injury or death might be crucial in the treatment of diabetes. This narrative review will update evidence from the recently identified molecular regulators preserving beta-cell mass and function recovery in order to suggest potential therapeutic targets against diabetes. This review will also highlight the relevance for novel molecular pathways potentially improving beta-cell dysfunction.

  12. Pancreatic beta-cell lipotoxicity induced by overexpression of hormone-sensitive lipase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winzell, Maria Sörhede; Svensson, Håkan; Enerbäck, Sven

    2003-01-01

    Lipid perturbations associated with triglyceride overstorage in beta-cells impair insulin secretion, a process termed lipotoxicity. To assess the role of hormone-sensitive lipase, which is expressed and enzymatically active in beta-cells, in the development of lipotoxicity, we generated transgenic...... mice overexpressing hormone-sensitive lipase specifically in beta-cells. Transgenic mice developed glucose intolerance and severely blunted glucose-stimulated insulin secretion when challenged with a high-fat diet. As expected, both lipase activity and forskolin-stimulated lipolysis was increased...... results highlight the importance of mobilization of the islet triglyceride pool in the development of beta-cell lipotoxicity. We propose that hormone-sensitive lipase is involved in mediating beta-cell lipotoxicity by providing ligands for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors and other lipid...

  13. Lentivectors encoding immunosuppressive proteins genetically engineer pancreatic beta-cells to correct diabetes in allogeneic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojaoghlanian, T; Joseph, A; Follenzi, A; Zheng, J H; Leiser, M; Fleischer, N; Horwitz, M S; DiLorenzo, T P; Goldstein, H

    2009-03-01

    The effectiveness of genetic engineering with lentivectors to protect transplanted cells from allogeneic rejection was examined using, as a model, type 1 diabetes treatment with beta-cell transplantation, whose widespread use has been limited by the requirement for sustained immunosuppressive treatment to prevent graft rejection. We examined whether lentivectors expressing select immunosuppressive proteins encoded by the adenoviral genome early region 3 (AdE3) would protect transplanted beta-cells from an alloimmune attack. The insulin-producing beta-cell line beta TC-tet (C3HeB/FeJ-derived) was transduced with lentiviruses encoding the AdE3 proteins gp19K and RID alpha/beta. The efficiency of lentiviral transduction of beta TC-tet cells exceeded 85%. Lentivector expression of gp19K decreased surface class I major histocompatibility complex expression by over 90%, whereas RID alpha/beta expression inhibited cytokine-induced Fas upregulation by over 75%. beta TC-tet cells transduced with gp19K and RID alpha/beta lentivectors, but not with a control lentivector, provided prolonged correction of hyperglycemia after transplantation into diabetic BALB/c severe combined immunodeficient mice reconstituted with allogeneic immune effector cells or into diabetic allogeneic BALB/c mice. Thus, genetic engineering of beta-cells using gp19K- and RID alpha/beta-expressing lentiviral vectors may provide an alternative that has the potential to eliminate or reduce treatment with the potent immunosuppressive agents necessary at present for prolonged engraftment with transplanted islets.

  14. beta-Sitosterol inhibits HT-29 human colon cancer cell growth and alters membrane lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, A B; Chen, Y C; Fink, C S; Hennessey, T

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of beta-sitosterol, the main dietary phytosterol on the growth of HT-29 cells, a human colon cancer cell line. In addition, the incorporation of this phytosterol into cellular membranes and how this might influence the lipid composition of the membranes were investigated. Tumor cells were grown in DMEM containing 10% FBS and supplemented with sterols (cholesterol or beta-sitosterol) at final concentrations up to 16 microM. The sterols were supplied to the media in the form of sterol cyclodextrin complexes. The cyclodextrin used was 2-hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin. The sterol to cyclodextrin molar ratio was maintained at 1:300. The study indicated that 8 and 16 microM beta-sitosterol were effective at cel growth inhibition as compared to cholesterol or to the control (no sterol supplementation). After supplementation with 16 microM beta-sitosterol for 9 days, cell growth was only one-third that of cells supplemented with equimolar concentration of cholesterol. No effect was observed on total membrane phospholipid concentration. At 16 microM beta-sitosterol supplementation, membrane cholesterol was reduced by 26%. Cholesterol supplementation resulted in a significant increase in the cholesterol/phospholipid ratio compared to either beta-sitosterol supplemented cells or controls. There was a 50% reduction in membrane sphingomyelin (SM) of cells grown in 16 microM beta-sitosterol. Additional changes were observed in the fatty acid composition of minor phospholipids of beta-sitosterol supplemented cells, such as SM, phosphatidylserine (PS), and phosphatidylinositol (PI). Only in the case of PI, was there an effect of these fatty acid changes on the unsaturation index, beta-sitosterol incorporation resulted in an increase in the U.I. It is possible that the observed growth inhibition by beta-sitosterol may be mediated through the influence of signal transduction pathways that involve membrane phospholipids.

  15. Detection of intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes, goblet cells and secretory IgA in the intestinal mucosa during Newcastle disease virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Quan; Shang, Yunlian; She, Ruiping; Jiang, Taozhen; Wang, Decheng; Ding, Ye; Yin, Jun

    2013-12-01

    Newcastle disease, which is caused by Newcastle disease virus (NDV), is a highly contagious viral disease of poultry and other bird species. The mucosa is the first line of defence to invading pathogens, including NDV, and it has been confirmed that the mucosa can contribute to host protection. This study was conducted to evaluate the intestinal mucosal immunology in NDV infection. Forty specific-pathogen-free chickens were divided into two groups, 20 birds in each group. Group 1 was inoculated with NDV by the intravenous route. Group 2 was used as the control group and was given sterile phosphate-buffered saline by the same route. At 24, 48, 72, and 96 h post infection (h.p.i.), five chickens from each treatment were killed. Samples of the duodenum, jejunum, and ileum were collected to quantify intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL), goblet cells and secretory IgA (sIgA) by cytochemistry and immunohistochemistry analysis. The results indicated that IEL were increased from 24 to 72 h.p.i. in the infected tissues, and were significantly higher than in the control group at 48 h.p.i. (P lining of the intestinal mucosa. These data suggest that IEL, goblet cells, and sIgA were involved in the intestinal mucosal immunity against NDV infection.

  16. Effects of Statins and Xuezhikang on the Expression of Secretory Phospholipase A2, Group IIA in Rat Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Qiang; Zhang, Dan

    2017-02-07

    Atherosclerosis is a multifactorial vascular disease characterized by formation of inflammatory lesions. Secretory phospholipase A2, group IIA (sPLA2-IIA) is involved in this process and plays a critical role. However, the exact role of sPLA2-IIA in cardiovascular inflammation is more complicated and remains unclear. Furthermore, both statins and Xuezhikang (XZK) are widely used in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease risk because of their pleiotropic effects on the cardiovascular system. However, their effects on sPLA2-IIA are still controversial. We investigated the regulation of sPLA2-IIA by rat thoracic aorta smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in culture. Cells were first incubated with IL-1β alone to induce expression of sPLA2-IIA and then treated with several concentrations of statins or XZK for different times in the absence or presence of IL-1β. We tested the expression of sPLA2-IIA, including sPLA2-IIA mRNA, protein, as well as activity. We found that statins or IL-1β increase the expression of sPLA2-IIA in VSMCs and the effect is based on a synergetic relationship between them. However, for the first time, we observed that XZK effectively reduces sPLA2-IIA expression in IL-1β-treated VSMCs. Our findings may shine a new light on the clinical use of XZK and statins in the prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis-related thrombosis.

  17. Beta-cell function and mass in type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Marianne O

    2009-08-01

    The aim of the work described here was to improve our understanding of beta-cell function (BCF) and beta-cell mass (BCM) and their relationship in vivo using the minipig as a model for some of the aspects of human type 2 diabetes (T2DM). More specifically, the aim was to evaluate the following questions: How is BCF, especially high frequency pulsatile insulin secretion, affected by a primary reduction in BCM or by primary obesity or a combination of the two in the minipig? Can evaluation of BCF in vivo be used as a surrogate measure to predict BCM in minipigs over a range of BCM and body weight? We first developed a minipig model of reduced BCM and mild diabetes using administration of a combination of streptozotocin (STZ) and nicotinamide (NIA) as a tool to study effects of a primary reduction of BCM on BCF. The model was characterized using a mixed-meal oral glucose tolerance test and intravenous stimulation with glucose and arginine as well as by histology of the pancreas after euthanasia. It was shown that stable, moderate diabetes can be induced and that the model is characterized by fasting and postprandial hyperglycemia, reduced insulin secretion and reduced BCM. Several defects in insulin secretion are well documented in human T2DM; however, the role in the pathogenesis and the possible clinical relevance of high frequency (rapid) pulsatile insulin secretion is still debated. We therefore investigated this phenomenon in normal minipigs and found easily detectable pulses in peripheral vein plasma samples that were shown to be correlated with pulses found in portal vein plasma. Furthermore, the rapid kinetics of insulin in the minipig strongly facilitates pulse detection. These characteristics make the minipig particularly suitable for studying the occurrence of disturbed pulsatility in relation to T2DM. Disturbances of rapid pulsatile insulin secretion have been reported to be a very early event in the development of T2DM and include disorderliness of pulses

  18. PANCREATIC BETA-CELL FUNCTION AND ISLET-CELL PROLIFERATION - EFFECT OF HYPERINSULINEMIA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KOITER, TR; WIJKSTRA, S; VANDERSCHAAFVERDONK, GCJ; MOES, H; SCHUILING, GA

    1995-01-01

    Pancreatic beta-cell function was studied in adult female rats, in which endogenous insulin demand was fully met by SC infusion of human insulin (4.8 IU/24 h) for 6 days, resulting in hyperinsulinaemia and severe hypoglycaemia. The amount of pancreatic endocrine tissue declined by 40%, (pro)insulin

  19. Combined beta FSH and beta LH response to TRH in patients with clinically non-functioning pituitary adenomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somjen, D; Tordjman, K; Kohen, F; Baz, M; Razon, N; Ouaknine, G; Stern, N

    1997-05-01

    'Paradoxical' responses of LH, FSH, alpha-subunits and beta LH to TRH have previously been reported in individuals with clinically non-functioning pituitary tumours (NFT). The present study was designed to assess the in vivo and in vitro responses of beta FSH to TRH in NFT. We further examined the possibility that a TRH challenge with combined measurement of beta FSH and beta LH will identify a common anomalous secretory pattern in patients with NFT. Forty patients with NFT underwent a standard TRH test (400 micrograms intravenously). Blood samples for the determination of beta FSH, beta LH, FSH and LH were collected prior to TRH as well as 15, 30, 45, 60 and 90 minutes following injection. Additionally, cultured adenomatous cells from eight to these patients were exposed to TRH in the absence and presence of octreotide and gonadotropin subunits were determined. TRH elicited a marked rise in circulating beta FSH in 29 of 40 individuals and in beta LH in 28 of 36 patients with NFT. In a subgroup of eight individuals whose tumours were harvested during surgery and cultured for 7-21 days, TRH increased beta FSH or beta LH and alpha-subunit release in cultured adenomatous cells in all cases, including tumours from subjects not responding to TRH in vivo. In this subgroup of patients octreotide inhibited basal beta FSH secretion but not basal beta LH secretion both in vivo and in primary cultures of NFT cells. Both the in vivo and in vitro beta FSH, beta LH and alpha-subunit responses to TRH were entirely inhibited by octreotide. In all, 38 of the 40 subjects could be identified by either elevated basal beta FSH or beta LH levels and/or an abnormal rise in either beta FSH or beta LH in response to TRH. The measurement of basal and TRH-stimulated beta-FSH and beta-LH levels identifies an abnormal hormonal secretory pattern in the vast majority (> 90%) of patients with clinically nonfunctioning pituitary tumours.

  20. Glycemic control promotes pancreatic beta-cell regeneration in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric J Grossman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pancreatic beta-cells proliferate following administration of the beta-cell toxin streptozotocin. Defining the conditions that promote beta-cell proliferation could benefit patients with diabetes. We have investigated the effect of insulin treatment on pancreatic beta-cell regeneration in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice, and, in addition, report on a new approach to quantify beta-cell regeneration in vivo. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Streptozotocin-induced diabetic were treated with either syngeneic islets transplanted under the kidney capsule or subcutaneous insulin implants. After either 60 or 120 days of insulin treatment, the islet transplant or insulin implant were removed and blood glucose levels monitored for 30 days. The results showed that both islet transplants and insulin implants restored normoglycemia in the 60 and 120 day treated animals. However, only the 120-day islet and insulin implant groups maintained euglycemia (<200 mg/dl following discontinuation of insulin treatment. The beta-cell was significantly increased in all the 120 day insulin-treated groups (insulin implant, 0.69+/-0.23 mg; and islet transplant, 0.91+/-0.23 mg compared non-diabetic control mice (1.54+/-0.25 mg. We also show that we can use bioluminescent imaging to monitor beta-cell regeneration in living MIP-luc transgenic mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results show that insulin treatment can promote beta-cell regeneration. Moreover, the extent of restoration of beta-cell function and mass depend on the length of treatment period and overall level of glycemic control with better control being associated with improved recovery. Finally, real-time bioluminescent imaging can be used to monitor beta-cell recovery in living MIP-luc transgenic mice.

  1. Balancing needs and means: the dilemma of the beta-cell in the modern world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibowitz, G; Kaiser, N; Cerasi, E

    2009-11-01

    The insulin resistance of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), although important for its pathophysiology, is not sufficient to establish the disease unless major deficiency of beta-cell function coexists. This is demonstrated by the fact that near-physiological administration of insulin (CSII) achieved excellent blood glucose control with doses similar to those used in insulin-deficient type 1 diabetics. The normal beta-cell adapts well to the demands of insulin resistance. Also in hyperglycaemic states some degree of adaptation does exist and helps limit the severity of disease. We demonstrate here that the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) system might play an important role in this adaptation, because blocking mTORC1 (complex 1) by rapamycin in the nutritional diabetes model Psammomys obesus caused severe impairment of beta-cell function, increased beta-cell apoptosis and progression of diabetes. On the other hand, under exposure to high glucose and FFA (gluco-lipotoxicity), blocking mTORC1 in vitro reduced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and beta-cell death. Thus, according to the conditions of stress, mTOR may have beneficial or deleterious effects on the beta-cell. beta-Cell function in man can be reduced without T2DM/impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). Prospective studies have shown subjects with reduced insulin response to present, several decades later, an increased incidence of IGT/T2DM. From these and other studies we conclude that T2DM develops on the grounds of beta-cells whose adaptation capacity to increased nutrient intake and/or insulin resistance is in the lower end of the normal variation. Inborn and acquired factors that limit beta-cell function are diabetogenic only in a nutritional/metabolic environment that requires high functional capabilities from the beta-cell.

  2. Nuclear orphan receptor TLX affects gene expression, proliferation and cell apoptosis in beta cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiaoli; Xiong, Xiaokan; Dai, Zhe; Deng, Haohua; Sun, Li; Hu, Xuemei; Zhou, Feng; Xu, Yancheng

    Nuclear orphan receptor TLX is an essential regulator of the growth of neural stem cells. However, its exact function in pancreatic islet cells is still unknown. In the present study, gene expression profiling analysis revealed that overexpression of TLX in beta cell line MIN6 causes suppression of 176 genes and upregulation of 49 genes, including a cadre of cell cycle, cell proliferation and cell death control genes, such as Btg2, Ddit3 and Gadd45a. We next examined the effects of TLX overexpression on proliferation, apoptosis and insulin secretion in MIN6 cells. Proliferation analysis using EdU assay showed that overexpression of TLX increased percentage of EdU-positive cells. Cell cycle and apoptosis analysis revealed that overexpression of TLX in MIN6 cells resulted in higher percentage of cells exiting G1 into S-phase, and a 58.8% decrease of cell apoptosis induced by 0.5 mM palmitate. Moreover, TLX overexpression did not cause impairment of insulin secretion. Together, we conclude that TLX is among factors capable of controlling beta cell proliferation and survival, which may serve as a target for the development of novel therapies for diabetes.

  3. Planar Cell Polarity Controls Pancreatic Beta Cell Differentiation and Glucose Homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cortijo, Cedric; Gouzi, Mathieu; Tissir, Fadel

    2012-01-01

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) refers to the collective orientation of cells within the epithelial plane. We show that progenitor cells forming the ducts of the embryonic pancreas express PCP proteins and exhibit an active PCP pathway. Planar polarity proteins are acquired at embryonic day 11.......5 synchronously to apicobasal polarization of pancreas progenitors. Loss of function of the two PCP core components Celsr2 and Celsr3 shows that they control the differentiation of endocrine cells from polarized progenitors, with a prevalent effect on insulin-producing beta cells. This results in a decreased...

  4. Neutrophil elastase reduces secretion of secretory leukoproteinase inhibitor (SLPI by lung epithelial cells: role of charge of the proteinase-inhibitor complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiemstra Pieter S

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Secretory leukoproteinase inhibitor (SLPI is an important inhibitor of neutrophil elastase (NE, a proteinase implicated in the pathogenesis of lung diseases such as COPD. SLPI also has antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory properties, but the concentration of SLPI in lung secretions in COPD varies inversely with infection and the concentration of NE. A fall in SLPI concentration is also seen in culture supernatants of respiratory cells exposed to NE, for unknown reasons. We investigated the hypothesis that SLPI complexed with NE associates with cell membranes in vitro. Methods Respiratory epithelial cells were cultured in the presence of SLPI, varying doses of proteinases over time, and in different experimental conditions. The likely predicted charge of the complex between SLPI and proteinases was assessed by theoretical molecular modelling. Results We observed a rapid, linear decrease in SLPI concentration in culture supernatants with increasing concentration of NE and cathepsin G, but not with other serine proteinases. The effect of NE was inhibited fully by a synthetic NE inhibitor only when added at the same time as NE. Direct contact between NE and SLPI was required for a fall in SLPI concentration. Passive binding to cell culture plate materials was able to remove a substantial amount of SLPI both with and without NE. Theoretical molecular modelling of the structure of SLPI in complex with various proteinases showed a greater positive charge for the complex with NE and cathepsin G than for other proteinases, such as trypsin and mast cell tryptase, that also bind SLPI but without reducing its concentration. Conclusion These data suggest that NE-mediated decrease in SLPI is a passive, charge-dependent phenomenon in vitro, which may correlate with changes observed in vivo.

  5. Improving the secretory capacity of Chinese hamster ovary cells by ectopic expression of effector genes: Lessons learned and future directions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Henning Gram; Pristovsek, Nusa; Kildegaard, Helene Faustrup;

    2017-01-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are the preferred cell factory for the production of therapeutic glycoproteins. Although efforts primarily within bioprocess optimization have led to increased product titers of recombinant proteins (r-proteins) expressed in CHO cells, post-transcriptional bottle...

  6. Leptin upregulates beta3-integrin expression and interleukin-1beta, upregulates leptin and leptin receptor expression in human endometrial epithelial cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, R R; Leavis, P

    2001-10-01

    Human endometrium and endometrial epithelial cells (EECs) either cultured alone or cocultured with human embryos express leptin and leptin receptor. This study compares the effect of leptin with that of interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) on the expression of beta3-EEC integrin, a marker of endometrial receptivity. Both cytokines increased the expression of beta3-EEC at concentrations in the range of 0.06-3 nM; however, leptin exhibited a significantly greater effect than IL-1beta. We also determined the regulatory effects of IL-1beta on leptin secretion and on the expression of leptin and leptin receptor at the protein level in both EEC and endometrial stromal cell (ESC) cultures. In EEC cultures, IL-1beta upregulated secretion of leptin and expression of both leptin and leptin receptors. No effect of IL-1beta was found in the ESC cultures. However, leptin exhibited marginal upregulation of leptin receptor. The upregulation of beta3-integrin and leptin/leptin receptor expression by IL-1beta in EEC cultures indicates that both cytokines may be implicated in embryonic-maternal cross-talk during the early phase of human implantation. Our present data also raise the possibility that leptin is an endometrial molecular effector of IL-1beta action on beta3-integrin upregulation. Thus, a new role for leptin in human reproduction as an autocrine/paracrine regulator of endometrial receptivity is proposed.

  7. Stringent V beta requirement for the development of NK1.1+ T cell receptor-alpha/beta+ cells in mouse liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohteki, T; MacDonald, H R

    1996-03-01

    The liver of C57BL/6 mice contains a major subset of CD4+8- and CD4-8- T cell receptor (TCR)-alpha/beta+ cells expressing the polymorphic natural killer NK1.1 surface marker. Liver NK1.1+TCR-alpha/beta+ (NK1+ T) cells require interaction with beta2-microglobulin-associated, major histocompatibility complex I-like molecules on hematopoietic cells for their development and have a TCR repertoire that is highly skewed to Vbeta8.2, Vbeta7, and Vbeta2. We show here that congenic C57BL/6.Vbeta(a) mice, which lack Vbeta8- expressing T cells owing to a genomic deletion at the Vbeta locus, maintain normal levels of liver NK1+ T cells owing to a dramatic increase in the proportion of cells expressing Vbeta7 and Vbeta2 (but not other Vbetas). Moreover, in C57BL/6 congenic TCR-V Vbeta3 and -Vbeta8.1 transgenic mice (which in theory should not express other Vbeta, owing to allelic exclusion at the TCR-beta locus), endogenous TCR-Vbeta8.2, Vbeta7, and Vbeta2 (but not other Vbetas) are frequently expressed on liver NK1+T cells but absent on lymph node T cells. Finally, when endogenous V beta expression is prevented in TCR-Vbeta3 and Vbeta8.1 transgenic mice (by introduction of a null allele at the C beta locus), the development of liver NK1+T cells is totally abrogated. Collectively, our data indicate that liver NK1+T cells have a stringent requirement for expression of TCR-Vbeta8.2, Vbeta7, or Vbeta2 for their development.

  8. Expression profiling of genes regulated by TGF-beta: Differential regulation in normal and tumour cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahashi Takashi

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background TGF-beta is one of the key cytokines implicated in various disease processes including cancer. TGF-beta inhibits growth and promotes apoptosis in normal epithelial cells and in contrast, acts as a pro-tumour cytokine by promoting tumour angiogenesis, immune-escape and metastasis. It is not clear if various actions of TGF-beta on normal and tumour cells are due to differential gene regulations. Hence we studied the regulation of gene expression by TGF-beta in normal and cancer cells. Results Using human 19 K cDNA microarrays, we show that 1757 genes are exclusively regulated by TGF-beta in A549 cells in contrast to 733 genes exclusively regulated in HPL1D cells. In addition, 267 genes are commonly regulated in both the cell-lines. Semi-quantitative and real-time qRT-PCR analysis of some genes agrees with the microarray data. In order to identify the signalling pathways that influence TGF-beta mediated gene regulation, we used specific inhibitors of p38 MAP kinase, ERK kinase, JNK kinase and integrin signalling pathways. The data suggest that regulation of majority of the selected genes is dependent on at least one of these pathways and this dependence is cell-type specific. Interestingly, an integrin pathway inhibitor, RGD peptide, significantly affected TGF-beta regulation of Thrombospondin 1 in A549 cells. Conclusion These data suggest major differences with respect to TGF-beta mediated gene regulation in normal and transformed cells and significant role of non-canonical TGF-beta pathways in the regulation of many genes by TGF-beta.

  9. Regulation of laminin beta2 chain gene expression in human cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durkin, M E; Nielsen, F C; Loechel, F

    2001-01-01

    The laminin beta2 chain is a basement membrane component expressed in a tissue- and developmental stage-specific manner. In this report we have examined the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of the human laminin beta2 chain in human tumor cell lines. Both the A204 rhabdomyosarcoma...... and clone A colon carcinoma cells express the laminin beta2 chain mRNA, but only the A204 cells secrete laminin heterotrimers containing the beta2 chain. Segments of the beta2 chain gene promoter region were cloned into luciferase reporter vectors, and their ability to stimulate transcription was tested...... by transient transfection. Sequences downstream of the transcription start site between nucleotides +91 and +120 were found to be essential for luciferase activity in the two cell lines. Additional positive regulatory regions were present further upstream, between nucleotides -164 to -667 and between...

  10. Pancreatic beta cells synthesize neuropeptide Y and can rapidly release peptide co-transmitters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew D Whim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In addition to polypeptide hormones, pancreatic endocrine cells synthesize a variety of bioactive molecules including classical transmitters and neuropeptides. While these co-transmitters are thought to play a role in regulating hormone release little is known about how their secretion is regulated. Here I investigate the synthesis and release of neuropeptide Y from pancreatic beta cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: NPY appears to be an authentic co-transmitter in neonatal, but not adult, beta cells because (1 early in mouse post-natal development, many beta cells are NPY-immunoreactive whereas no staining is observed in beta cells from NPY knockout mice; (2 GFP-expressing islet cells from an NPY(GFP transgenic mouse are insulin-ir; (3 single cell RT-PCR experiments confirm that the NPY(GFP cells contain insulin mRNA, a marker of beta cells. The NPY-immunoreactivity previously reported in alpha and delta cells is therefore likely to be due to the presence of NPY-related peptides. INS-1 cells, a beta cell line, are also NPY-ir and contain NPY mRNA. Using the FMRFamide tagging technique, NPY secretion was monitored from INS-1 beta cells with high temporal resolution. Peptide release was evoked by brief depolarizations and was potentiated by activators of adenylate cyclase and protein kinase A. Following a transient depolarization, NPY-containing dense core granules fused with the cell membrane and discharged their contents within a few milliseconds. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that after birth, NPY expression in pancreatic islets is restricted to neonatal beta cells. The presence of NPY suggests that peptide co-transmitters could mediate rapid paracrine or autocrine signaling within the endocrine pancreas. The FMRFamide tagging technique may be useful in studying the release of other putative islet co-transmitters in real time.

  11. Adaptation and failure of pancreatic beta cells in murine models with different degrees of metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-Gomez, Gema; Yetukuri, Laxman; Velagapudi, Vidya; Campbell, Mark; Blount, Margaret; Jimenez-Linan, Mercedes; Ros, Manuel; Oresic, Matej; Vidal-Puig, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    The events that contribute to the expansion of beta-cell mass and enhanced beta-cell function in insulin-resistant states have not been elucidated fully. Recently, we showed that beta-cell adaptation failed dramatically in adult, insulin-resistant POKO mice, which contrasts with the appropriate expansion of beta cells in their ob/ob littermates. Thus, we hypothesised that characterisation of the islets in these mouse models at an early age should provide a unique opportunity to: (1) identify mechanisms involved in sensing insulin resistance at the level of the beta cells, (2) identify molecular effectors that contribute to increasing beta-cell mass and function, and (3) distinguish primary events from secondary events that are more likely to be present at more advanced stages of diabetes. Our results define the POKO mouse as a model of early lipotoxicity. At 4 weeks of age, it manifests with inappropriate beta-cell function and defects in proliferation markers. Other well-recognised pathogenic effectors that were observed previously in 16-week-old mice, such as increased reactive oxygen species (ROS), macrophage infiltration and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, are also present in both young POKO and young ob/ob mice, indicating the lack of predictive power with regards to the severity of beta-cell failure. Of interest, the relatively preserved lipidomic profile in islets from young POKO mice contrasted with the large changes in lipid composition and the differences in the chain length of triacylglycerols in the serum, liver, muscle and adipose tissue in adult POKO mice. Later lipotoxic insults in adult beta cells contribute to the failure of the POKO beta cell. Our results indicate that the rapid development of insulin resistance and beta-cell failure in POKO mice makes this model a useful tool to study early molecular events leading to insulin resistance and beta-cell failure. Furthermore, comparisons with ob/ob mice might reveal important adaptive mechanisms

  12. Uptake of ascorbic acid by freshly isolated cells and secretory granules from the intermediate lobe of ox hypophyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, A; Matsumoto, T; Farver, O

    1990-01-01

    of uptake occurred when mechanically isolated cells were incubated with increasing ascorbic acid concentrations up to 0.6 mM. But if such cells were purified on a Percoll gradient, a clear saturation of uptake could be observed. Acetylsalicylic acid reduced the uptake markedly. When cells loaded with L-[14C......Mechanically isolated cells from the intermediate lobe of ox hypophyses contained 40.6 +/- 3.7 nmol mg-1 protein (mean +/- SE, n = 5) of ascorbic acid. They accumulated radioactivity time dependently, on incubation with L-[14C]ascorbic acid in ionic medium dominated by NaCl. No definite saturation......]ascorbic acid were homogenized and placed on a Percoll gradient, the radioactivity was recovered in several subcellular fractions. Decrease of the Na+ concentration or presence of ouabain in the medium did not cause noticeable changes in uptake by non-purified cells, whereas uptake by purified cells was clearly...

  13. Trichuris suis excretory secretory products (ESP) elicit interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-10 secretion from intestinal epithelial cells (IPEC-1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parthasarathy, G; Mansfield, L S

    2005-08-10

    Immune responses to gastrointestinal helminth infections have received increasing attention due to similarities to allergen-induced responses. In fact, the whipworm parasite of swine, Trichuris suis, has been used in beginning clinical trials as an antidote to inflammatory bowel disease. This strategy was based on this similarity and the recognition that other worms have been documented to induce anti-inflammatory responses in the host. In an effort to understand the basis for this response, we hypothesized that the proteins and peptides secreted by T. suis stimulate local intestinal epithelial cells to produce anti-inflammatory cytokines. To test this hypothesis in a correlate system of the natural swine host, T. suis excretory secretory products (ESP) were used to treat both differentiated and undifferentiated intestinal pig epithelial cells (IPEC-1) in vitro as a model for the effect on villus tip and crypt epithelial cells in the vicinity of the worms. IPEC-1 were exposed to low-level doses (0.3mg/ml) of T. suis ESP, and IL-4, IL-6 and IL-10 cytokine responses were measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA). IL-6 was the predominant cytokine produced, accompanied by moderate IL-10 secretion from both differentiated and undifferentiated cells. As expected, IL-4 was not produced by IPEC-1. Additionally, IL-6 and IL-10 cytokines were produced within 24h, suggesting that these two cytokines form part of the primary host response to T. suis infections. These data suggest that T. suis ESP could enhance host immune responses and modulation through the induction of enteric IL-6 and IL-10.

  14. The responses of I beta cells to increases in the rate of lung inflation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, P L; Davies, R O; Pack, A I

    1981-08-31

    The activity of inspiratory cells in the region of the nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS) was recorded extracellularly in paralyzed, artificially ventilated cats either during chloralose-urethane anesthesia or following midcollicular decerebration. Twenty-three of the 68 inspiratory cells recorded in the region of the NTS were classified as I beta cells on the basis of their response to withholding lung inflation. The dynamic sensitivity of I beta cells was determined by studying their response to increases in the rate of lung inflation at constant peak volume. The I beta cells in this study showed 3 distinct patterns of response to increases in the rate of inflation. Five cells showed no change in firing pattern (fixed firing pattern). Ten cells showed an increase in the rate of rise of cell activity but no change in peak frequency (low dynamic sensitivity). Eight cells showed increases in both the rate of rise of cell activity and peak frequency (high dynamic sensitivity). It was concluded that I beta cells are not a functionally homogeneous population, at least in terms of their dynamic sensitivity. Cells showing fixed firing patterns have the characteristics of off-switch neurons. Cells with low levels of dynamic sensitivity may receive afferents from pulmonary stretch receptors. Cells showing a high degree of dynamic sensitivity may receive afferents from rapidly adapting receptors. The fact that I beta cells are not a functionally homogeneous population may explain the many divergent observations reported from studies of these cells.

  15. p16(Ink4a)-induced senescence of pancreatic beta cells enhances insulin secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helman, Aharon; Klochendler, Agnes; Azazmeh, Narmen; Gabai, Yael; Horwitz, Elad; Anzi, Shira; Swisa, Avital; Condiotti, Reba; Granit, Roy Z; Nevo, Yuval; Fixler, Yaakov; Shreibman, Dorin; Zamir, Amit; Tornovsky-Babeay, Sharona; Dai, Chunhua; Glaser, Benjamin; Powers, Alvin C; Shapiro, A M James; Magnuson, Mark A; Dor, Yuval; Ben-Porath, Ittai

    2016-04-01

    Cellular senescence is thought to contribute to age-associated deterioration of tissue physiology. The senescence effector p16(Ink4a) is expressed in pancreatic beta cells during aging and limits their proliferative potential; however, its effects on beta cell function are poorly characterized. We found that beta cell-specific activation of p16(Ink4a) in transgenic mice enhances glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). In mice with diabetes, this leads to improved glucose homeostasis, providing an unexpected functional benefit. Expression of p16(Ink4a) in beta cells induces hallmarks of senescence--including cell enlargement, and greater glucose uptake and mitochondrial activity--which promote increased insulin secretion. GSIS increases during the normal aging of mice and is driven by elevated p16(Ink4a) activity. We found that islets from human adults contain p16(Ink4a)-expressing senescent beta cells and that senescence induced by p16(Ink4a) in a human beta cell line increases insulin secretion in a manner dependent, in part, on the activity of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ proteins. Our findings reveal a novel role for p16(Ink4a) and cellular senescence in promoting insulin secretion by beta cells and in regulating normal functional tissue maturation with age.

  16. Expression and autoregulation of transforming growth factor beta receptor mRNA in small-cell lung cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, P; Spang-Thomsen, M; Poulsen, H S

    1996-01-01

    In small-cell lung cancer cell lines resistance to growth inhibition by transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta 1, was previously shown to correlate with lack of TGF-beta receptor I (RI) and II (RII) proteins. To further investigate the role of these receptors, the expression of mRNA for RI, RII...

  17. Selective activation of beta3-adrenoceptors by octopamine: comparative studies in mammalian fat cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpéné, C; Galitzky, J; Fontana, E; Atgié, C; Lafontan, M; Berlan, M

    1999-04-01

    Numerous synthetic agonists selectively stimulate beta3-adrenoceptors (ARs). The endogenous catecholamines, noradrenaline and adrenaline, however, stimulate all the beta-AR subtypes, and no selective physiological agonist for beta3-ARs has been described so far. The aim of this study was to investigate whether any naturally occurring amine can stimulate selectively beta3-ARs. Since activation of lipolysis is a well-known beta-adrenergic function, the efficacy and potency of various biogenic amines were compared with those of noradrenaline, isoprenaline, and beta3-AR agonists 4-(-{[2-hydroxy-(3-chlorophenyl)ethyl]-amino} propyl)phenoxyacetate (BRL 37,344) and (R,R)-5-(2-{[2-(3-chlorophenyl )-2-hydroxyethyl]-amino} propyl)-1,3-benzo-dioxole-2,2-dicarboxylate (CL 316,243) by testing their lipolytic action in white fat cells. Five mammalian species were studied: rat, hamster and dog, in which selective beta-AR agonists act as full lipolytic agents, and guinea-pigs and humans, in which beta3-AR agonists are less potent activators of lipolysis. Several biogenic amines were inefficient (e.g. dopamine, tyramine and beta-phenylethylamine) while others (synephrine, phenylethanolamine, epinine) were partially active in stimulating lipolysis in all species studied. Their actions were inhibited by all the beta-AR antagonists tested, including those selective for beta1- or beta2-ARs. Octopamine was the only amine fully stimulating lipolysis in rat, hamster and dog fat cells, while inefficient in guinea-pig or human fat cells, like the beta3-AR agonists. In rat white fat cells, beta-AR antagonists inhibited the lipolytic effect of octopamine with a relative order of potency very similar to that observed against CL 316,243. Competitive antagonism of octopamine effect resulted in the following apparent pA2 [-log(IC50), where IC50 is the antagonist concentration eliciting half-maximal inhibition] values: 7.77 (bupranolol), 6.48 [3-(2-ethyl-phenoxy)-1[(1 S)-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphth-1

  18. Expression Quantitative Trait Locus Mapping Studies in Mid-secretory Phase Endometrial Cells Identifies HLA-F and TAP2 as Fecundability-Associated Genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Courtney K Burrows

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Fertility traits in humans are heritable, however, little is known about the genes that influence reproductive outcomes or the genetic variants that contribute to differences in these traits between individuals, particularly women. To address this gap in knowledge, we performed an unbiased genome-wide expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL mapping study to identify common regulatory (expression single nucleotide polymorphisms (eSNPs in mid-secretory endometrium. We identified 423 cis-eQTLs for 132 genes that were significant at a false discovery rate (FDR of 1%. After pruning for strong LD (r2 >0.95, we tested for associations between eSNPs and fecundability (the ability to get pregnant, measured as the length of the interval to pregnancy, in 117 women. Two eSNPs were associated with fecundability at a FDR of 5%; both were in the HLA region and were eQTLs for the TAP2 gene (P = 1.3x10-4 and the HLA-F gene (P = 4.0x10-4, respectively. The effects of these SNPs on fecundability were replicated in an independent sample. The two eSNPs reside within or near regulatory elements in decidualized human endometrial stromal cells. Our study integrating eQTL mapping in a primary tissue with association studies of a related phenotype revealed novel genes and associated alleles with independent effects on fecundability, and identified a central role for two HLA region genes in human implantation success.

  19. Delineation of glutamate pathways and secretory responses in pancreatic islets with β-cell-specific abrogation of the glutamate dehydrogenase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vetterli, Laurène; Carobbio, Stefania; Pournourmohammadi, Shirin;

    2012-01-01

    In pancreatic β-cells, glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) modulates insulin secretion, although its function regarding specific secretagogues is unclear. This study investigated the role of GDH using a β-cell-specific GDH knockout mouse model, called βGlud1(-/-). The absence of GDH in islets isolated ...

  20. Osteocalcin protects pancreatic beta cell function and survival under high glucose conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kover, Karen, E-mail: kkover@cmh.edu [Division of Endocrine/Diabetes, Children' s Mercy Hospital & Clinics, Kansas City, MO 64108 (United States); University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine, Kansas City, MO 64108 (United States); Yan, Yun; Tong, Pei Ying; Watkins, Dara; Li, Xiaoyu [Division of Endocrine/Diabetes, Children' s Mercy Hospital & Clinics, Kansas City, MO 64108 (United States); University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine, Kansas City, MO 64108 (United States); Tasch, James; Hager, Melissa [Kansas City University Medical Biosciences, Kansas City, MO (United States); Clements, Mark; Moore, Wayne V. [Division of Endocrine/Diabetes, Children' s Mercy Hospital & Clinics, Kansas City, MO 64108 (United States); University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine, Kansas City, MO 64108 (United States)

    2015-06-19

    Diabetes is characterized by progressive beta cell dysfunction and loss due in part to oxidative stress that occurs from gluco/lipotoxicity. Treatments that directly protect beta cell function and survival in the diabetic milieu are of particular interest. A growing body of evidence suggests that osteocalcin, an abundant non-collagenous protein of bone, supports beta cell function and proliferation. Based on previous gene expression data by microarray, we hypothesized that osteocalcin protects beta cells from glucose-induced oxidative stress. To test our hypothesis we cultured isolated rat islets and INS-1E cells in the presence of normal, high, or high glucose ± osteocalcin for up to 72 h. Oxidative stress and viability/mitochondrial function were measured by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} assay and Alamar Blue assay, respectively. Caspase 3/7 activity was also measured as a marker of apoptosis. A functional test, glucose stimulated insulin release, was conducted and expression of genes/protein was measured by qRT-PCR/western blot/ELISA. Osteocalcin treatment significantly reduced high glucose-induced H{sub 2}O{sub 2} levels while maintaining viability/mitochondrial function. Osteocalcin also significantly improved glucose stimulated insulin secretion and insulin content in rat islets after 48 h of high glucose exposure compared to untreated islets. As expected sustained high glucose down-regulated gene/protein expression of INS1 and BCL2 while increasing TXNIP expression. Interestingly, osteocalcin treatment reversed the effects of high glucose on gene/protein expression. We conclude that osteocalcin can protect beta cells from the negative effects of glucose-induced oxidative stress, in part, by reducing TXNIP expression, thereby preserving beta cell function and survival. - Highlights: • Osteocalcin reduces glucose-induced oxidative stress in beta cells. • Osteocalcin preserves beta cell function and survival under stress conditions. • Osteocalcin reduces glucose

  1. Beta-cell ARNT is required for normal glucose tolerance in murine pregnancy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sue Mei Lau

    Full Text Available AIMS: Insulin secretion increases in normal pregnancy to meet increasing demands. Inability to increase beta-cell function results in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM. We have previously shown that the expression of the transcription factor ARNT (Aryl-hydrocarbon Receptor Nuclear Translocator is reduced in the islets of humans with type 2 diabetes. Mice with a beta-cell specific deletion of ARNT (β-ARNT mice have impaired glucose tolerance secondary to defective insulin secretion. We hypothesised that ARNT is required to increase beta-cell function during pregnancy, and that β-ARNT mice would be unable to compensate for the beta-cell stress of pregnancy. The aims of this study were to investigate the mechanisms of ARNT regulation of beta-cell function and glucose tolerance in pregnancy. METHODS: β-ARNT females were mated with floxed control (FC males and FC females with β-ARNT males. RESULTS: During pregnancy, β-ARNT mice had a marked deterioration in glucose tolerance secondary to defective insulin secretion. There was impaired beta-cell proliferation in late pregnancy, associated with decreased protein and mRNA levels of the islet cell-cycle regulator cyclinD2. There was also reduced expression of Irs2 and G6PI. In contrast, in control mice, pregnancy was associated with a 2.1-fold increase in ARNT protein and a 1.6-fold increase in cyclinD2 protein, and with increased beta-cell proliferation. CONCLUSIONS: Islet ARNT increases in normal murine pregnancy and beta-cell ARNT is required for cyclinD2 induction and increased beta-cell proliferation in pregnancy.

  2. Co-culture of neural crest stem cells (NCSC and insulin producing beta-TC6 cells results in cadherin junctions and protection against cytokine-induced beta-cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anongnad Ngamjariyawat

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Transplantation of pancreatic islets to Type 1 diabetes patients is hampered by inflammatory reactions at the transplantation site leading to dysfunction and death of insulin producing beta-cells. Recently we have shown that co-transplantation of neural crest stem cells (NCSCs together with the islet cells improves transplantation outcome. The aim of the present investigation was to describe in vitro interactions between NCSCs and insulin producing beta-TC6 cells that may mediate protection against cytokine-induced beta-cell death. PROCEDURES: Beta-TC6 and NCSC cells were cultured either alone or together, and either with or without cell culture inserts. The cultures were then exposed to the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IFN-γ for 48 hours followed by analysis of cell death rates (flow cytometry, nitrite production (Griess reagent, protein localization (immunofluorescence and protein phosphorylation (flow cytometry. RESULTS: We observed that beta-TC6 cells co-cultured with NCSCs were protected against cytokine-induced cell death, but not when separated by cell culture inserts. This occurred in parallel with (i augmented production of nitrite from beta-TC6 cells, indicating that increased cell survival allows a sustained production of nitric oxide; (ii NCSC-derived laminin production; (iii decreased phospho-FAK staining in beta-TC6 cell focal adhesions, and (iv decreased beta-TC6 cell phosphorylation of ERK(T202/Y204, FAK(Y397 and FAK(Y576. Furthermore, co-culture also resulted in cadherin and beta-catenin accumulations at the NCSC/beta-TC6 cell junctions. Finally, the gap junction inhibitor carbenoxolone did not affect cytokine-induced beta-cell death during co-culture with NCSCs. CONCLUSION: In summary, direct contacts, but not soluble factors, promote improved beta-TC6 viability when co-cultured with NCSCs. We hypothesize that cadherin junctions between NCSC and beta-TC6 cells promote powerful signals that maintain beta-cell

  3. File list: InP.Pan.10.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  11. Divergent effects of retinoic acids on the expression of ERalpha and 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 in endometrial carcinoma cells (RL 95-2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Hong; Li, Hui; Xiao, Zhi-Jie; Piao, Yun-Shang

    2002-02-01

    The effects of E2 are dependent on ERs and local E2 concentration in target cells. Modulation of intracellular E2 concentration involves the action of 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17HSD) type 2, the enzyme converting E2 to estrone. In the present study, the influence of RAs on the growth of endometrial cancer cell line RL 95-2 as well as the expression of ERs and 17HSD type 2 have been investigated. It was found that RAs repress the growth of RL 95-2 cells, which express all subtypes of RXR and RAR, as examined by RT-PCR. Also, quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that both ERalpha and ERbeta are present in RL 95-2 cells, and Western blot assay further revealed that ERalpha expression was decreased by all trans-RA treatment. In contrast, RAs induced 17HSD type 2 mRNA expression in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. This stimulatory effect was also detected at the level of in vivo oxidative 17HSD activity in cultured cells. On the other hand, the abundance of 17HSD type 2 mRNA was not altered by RAs in cultured normal epithelial cells isolated from human early- and late-secretory endometrium. The data indicate that RAs have an inhibitory effect on the growth of RL 95-2 cells and a cross-talk with the estrogen pathway in estrogen-responsive endometrial cancer cells.

  12. Lupeol inhibits proliferation of human prostate cancer cells by targeting beta-catenin signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, Mohammad; Murtaza, Imtiyaz; Tarapore, Rohinton S; Suh, Yewseok; Adhami, Vaqar Mustafa; Johnson, Jeremy James; Siddiqui, Imtiaz Ahmad; Khan, Naghma; Asim, Mohammad; Hafeez, Bilal Bin; Shekhani, Mohammed Talha; Li, Benyi; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2009-05-01

    Lupeol, a dietary triterpene, was shown to decrease serum prostate-specific antigen levels and inhibit the tumorigenicity of prostate cancer (CaP) cells in vivo. Here, we show that Lupeol inhibits the proliferative potential of CaP cells and delineated its mechanism of action. Employing a focused microarray of human CaP-associated genes, we found that Lupeol significantly modulates the expression level of genes such as ERBB2, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-3, cyclin D1 and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 that are known to be associated with proliferation and survival. A common feature of these genes is that all of them are known to either regulate or act as downstream target of beta-catenin signaling that is highly aberrant in CaP patients. Lupeol treatment significantly (1) reduced levels of beta-catenin in the cytoplasmic and nuclear fractions, (2) modulated expression levels of glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK3beta)-axin complex (regulator of beta-catenin stability), (3) decreased the expression level and enzymatic activity of MMP-2 (downstream target of beta-catenin), (4) reduced the transcriptional activation of T Cell Factor (TCF) responsive element (marker for beta-catenin signaling) in pTK-TCF-Luc-transfected cells and (5) decreased the transcriptional activation of MMP-2 gene in pGL2-MMP-2-Luc-transfected cells. Effects of Lupeol treatment on beta-catenin degradation were significantly reduced in CaP cells where axin is knocked down through small interfering RNA transfection and GSK3beta activity is blocked. Collectively, these data suggest the multitarget efficacy of Lupeol on beta-catenin-signaling network thus resulting in the inhibition CaP cell proliferation. We suggest that Lupeol could be developed as an agent for chemoprevention as well as chemotherapy of human CaP.

  13. Characterization of beta-adrenergic receptors in dispersed rat testicular interstitial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poyet, P.; Labrie, F.

    1987-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that beta-adrenergic agents stimulate steroidogenesis and cyclic AMP formation in mouse Leydig cells in culture. To obtain information about the possible presence and the characteristics of a beta-adrenergic receptor in rat testicular interstitial cells, the potent beta-adrenergic antagonist (/sup 125/I)cyanopindolol (CYP) was used as ligand. Interstitial cells prepared by collagenase dispersion from rat testis were incubated with the ligand for 2 h at room temperature. (/sup 125/I)cyanopindolol binds to a single class of high affinity sites at an apparent KD value of 15 pM. A number of sites of 6,600 sites/cell is measured when 0.1 microM (-) propranolol is used to determine non-specific binding. The order of potency of a series of agonists competing for (/sup 125/I)cyanopindolol binding is consistent with the interaction of a beta 2-subtype receptor: zinterol greater than (-) isoproterenol greater than (-) epinephrine = salbutamol much greater than (-) norepinephrine. In addition, it was observed that the potency of a large series of specific beta 1 and beta 2 synthetic compounds for displacing (/sup 125/I)cyanopindolol in rat interstitial cells is similar to the potency observed for these compounds in a typical beta 2-adrenergic tissue, the rat lung. For example, the potency of zinterol, a specific beta 2-adrenergic agonist, is 10 times higher in interstitial cells and lung than in rat heart, a typical beta 1-adrenergic tissue. Inversely, practolol, a typical beta 1-antagonist, is about 50 times more potent in rat heart than in interstitial cells and lung.

  14. [Endoplasmic-mitochondrial Ca(2+)-functional unit: dependence of respiration of secretory cells on activity of ryanodine- and IP3 - sensitive Ca(2+)-channels].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velykopols'ka, O Iu; Man'ko, B O; Man'ko, V V

    2012-01-01

    Using Clark oxygen electrode, dependence of mitochondrial functions on Ca(2+)-release channels activity of Chironomus plumosus L. larvae salivary glands suspension was investigated. Cells were ATP-permeabilized in order to enable penetration of exogenous oxidative substrates. Activation of plasmalemmal P2X-receptors (as well as P2Y-receptors) per se does not modify the endogenous respiration of salivary gland suspension. That is, Ca(2+)-influx from extracellular medium does not influence functional activity of mitochondria, although they are located along the basal part of the plasma membrane. Activation of RyRs intensifies endogenous respiration and pyruvate-malate-stimulated respiration, but not succinate-stimulated respiration. Neither activation of IP3Rs (via P2Y-receptors activation), nor their inhibition alters endogenous respiration. Nevertheless, IP3Rs inhibition by 2-APB intensifies succinate-stimulated respiration. All abovementioned facts testify that Ca2+, released from stores via channels, alters functional activity of mitochondria, and undoubtedly confirm the existence of endoplasmic-mitochondrial Ca(2+)-functional unit in Ch. plumosus larvae salivary glands secretory cells. In steady state of endoplasmic-mitochondrial Ca(2+)-functional unit the spontaneous activity of IP3Rs is observed; released through IP3Rs, Ca2+ is accumulated in mitochondria via uniporter and modulates oxidative processes. Activation of RyRs induces the transition of endoplasmic-mitochondrial Ca(2+)-functional unit to the active state, which is required to intensify cell respiration and oxidative phosphorylation. As expected, the transition of endoplasmic-mitochondrial Ca(2+)-functional unit to inactivated state (i. e. inhibition of Ca(2+)-release channels at excessive [Ca2+]i) limits the duration of signal transduction, has protective nature and prevents apoptosis.

  15. Molecular heterogeneity of beta-thalassemia alleles in Spain and its importance in the diagnosis and prevention of beta-thalassemia major and sickle cell disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Maria del Mar Mañú; Dalmau, Anna Cabot; Corrons, Joan-Lluis Vives

    2009-01-01

    In the last 20 years, migratory flows have changed the pattern of beta-thalassemia (beta-thal) mutations in Catalonia and have also increased beta(S) prevalence, either alone or in association with beta-thal alleles. Characterization of the beta gene is needed for genetic counseling for beta-thal major and also for sickle cell diseases. The purpose of this study was to investigate the current distribution pattern of beta-thal mutations. Seventy nine individuals were characterized at the molecular level. As a first step, frequent mutations in the Mediterranean region were screened and when none of these mutations were identified, the beta-globin gene was sequenced. Screening for common mutations allowed the characterization of 60 individuals. In the remaining 19 cases, 11 different mutations were identified. beta-Thalassemia heterogeneity in Spain has markedly increased, leading to the requirement of including new methods for genetic diagnosis. Prevention of beta-thal major and sickle cell disease are necessary since their prevalence in Spain is increasing dramatically.

  16. Characterization of Acyl-CoA synthetase isoforms in pancreatic beta cells: Gene silencing shows participation of ACSL3 and ACSL4 in insulin secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Israr-Ul H; Longacre, Melissa J; Stoker, Scott W; Kendrick, Mindy A; O'Neill, Lucas M; Zitur, Laura J; Fernandez, Luis A; Ntambi, James M; MacDonald, Michael J

    2017-03-15

    Long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases (ACSLs) convert fatty acids to fatty acyl-CoAs to regulate various physiologic processes. We characterized the ACSL isoforms in a cell line of homogeneous rat beta cells (INS-1 832/13 cells) and human pancreatic islets. ACSL4 and ACSL3 proteins were present in the beta cells and human and rat pancreatic islets and concentrated in insulin secretory granules and less in mitochondria and negligible in other intracellular organelles. ACSL1 and ACSL6 proteins were not seen in INS-1 832/13 cells or pancreatic islets. ACSL5 protein was seen only in INS-1 832/13 cells. With shRNA-mediated gene silencing we developed stable ACSL knockdown cell lines from INS-1 832/13 cells. Glucose-stimulated insulin release was inhibited ∼50% with ACSL4 and ACSL3 knockdown and unaffected in cell lines with knockdown of ACSL5, ACLS6 and ACSL1. Lentivirus shRNA-mediated gene silencing of ACSL4 and ACSL3 in human pancreatic islets inhibited glucose-stimulated insulin release. ACSL4 and ACSL3 knockdown cells showed inhibition of ACSL enzyme activity more with arachidonate than with palmitate as a substrate, consistent with their preference for unsaturated fatty acids as substrates. ACSL4 knockdown changed the patterns of fatty acids in phosphatidylserines and phosphatidylethanolamines. The results show the involvement of ACLS4 and ACLS3 in insulin secretion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Docking of Secretory Vesicles Is Syntaxin Dependent

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wit, Heidi; Cornelisse, L. Niels; Toonen, Ruud F.G.; Verhage, Matthijs

    2006-01-01

    Secretory vesicles dock at the plasma membrane before they undergo fusion. Molecular docking mechanisms are poorly defined but believed to be independent of SNARE proteins. Here, we challenged this hypothesis by acute deletion of the target SNARE, syntaxin, in vertebrate neurons and neuroendocrine cells. Deletion resulted in fusion arrest in both systems. No docking defects were observed in synapses, in line with previous observations. However, a drastic reduction in morphologically docked secretory vesicles was observed in chromaffin cells. Syntaxin-deficient chromaffin cells showed a small reduction in total and plasma membrane staining for the docking factor Munc18-1, which appears insufficient to explain the drastic reduction in docking. The sub-membrane cortical actin network was unaffected by syntaxin deletion. These observations expose a docking role for syntaxin in the neuroendocrine system. Additional layers of regulation may have evolved to make syntaxin redundant for docking in highly specialized systems like synaptic active zones. PMID:17205130

  18. Docking of secretory vesicles is syntaxin dependent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi de Wit

    Full Text Available Secretory vesicles dock at the plasma membrane before they undergo fusion. Molecular docking mechanisms are poorly defined but believed to be independent of SNARE proteins. Here, we challenged this hypothesis by acute deletion of the target SNARE, syntaxin, in vertebrate neurons and neuroendocrine cells. Deletion resulted in fusion arrest in both systems. No docking defects were observed in synapses, in line with previous observations. However, a drastic reduction in morphologically docked secretory vesicles was observed in chromaffin cells. Syntaxin-deficient chromaffin cells showed a small reduction in total and plasma membrane staining for the docking factor Munc18-1, which appears insufficient to explain the drastic reduction in docking. The sub-membrane cortical actin network was unaffected by syntaxin deletion. These observations expose a docking role for syntaxin in the neuroendocrine system. Additional layers of regulation may have evolved to make syntaxin redundant for docking in highly specialized systems like synaptic active zones.

  19. Identification of Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase beta-subunit in alveolar epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X L; Danto, S I; Borok, Z; Eber, J T; Martín-Vasallo, P; Lubman, R L

    1997-01-01

    The Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase is a heterodimeric plasma membrane protein that consists of a catalytic alpha-subunit and a smaller glycosylated beta-subunit that has not been fully characterized in alveolar epithelial cells (AEC) to date. In this study, we identified the Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase beta-subunit protein in rat AEC and lung membranes using immunochemical techniques. Rat AEC grown in primary culture and rat lung, brain, and kidney membranes were solubilized in either 2% sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) sample buffer for SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis or in 1% Nonidet P-40 lysis buffer for immunoprecipitation studies. Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase beta-subunit was not detected in either AEC or lung membranes on Western blots when probed with a panel of antibodies (Ab) against beta-subunit isoforms, whereas brain and kidney beta-subunit were recognized as broad approximately 50-kDa bands. AEC, lung, and kidney membranes were immunoprecipitated with anti-beta Ab IEC 1/48, a monoclonal Ab that recognizes beta-subunit protein only in its undenatured state. The beta-subunit was detected in the immunoprecipitate (IP) from kidney membranes by several different anti-beta-subunit Ab. The beta-subunit was faintly detectable from AEC and lung IP as a broad approximately 50-kDa band when blotted with the polyclonal anti-beta 1-subunit Ab SpET but could not be detected by blotting with other anti-beta Ab. Treatment of the IP from kidney, lung, and AEC with N-glycosidase F for 2 h at 37 degrees C resulted in immunodetection of identical approximately 35 kDa bands when probed with all anti-beta 1 Ab on Western blots. From these results, we conclude that rat lung and AEC possess immunoreactive beta-subunit protein that is only readily detectable after deglycosylation. Because anti-beta Ab fail to detect the Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase beta-subunit in rat lung or AEC by standard Western blotting techniques under the conditions of these experiments, our results suggest that lung beta-subunit may be

  20. Bimodal effect on pancreatic β-cells of secretory products from normal or insulin-resistant human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouzakri, Karim; Plomgaard, Peter; Berney, Thierry;

    2011-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is characterized by insulin resistance with a relative deficiency in insulin secretion. This study explored the potential communication between insulin-resistant human skeletal muscle and primary (human and rat) ß-cells.......Type 2 diabetes is characterized by insulin resistance with a relative deficiency in insulin secretion. This study explored the potential communication between insulin-resistant human skeletal muscle and primary (human and rat) ß-cells....

  1. Bimodal effect on pancreatic β-cells of secretory products from normal or insulin-resistant human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouzakri, Karim; Plomgaard, Peter; Berney, Thierry;

    2011-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is characterized by insulin resistance with a relative deficiency in insulin secretion. This study explored the potential communication between insulin-resistant human skeletal muscle and primary (human and rat) β-cells.......Type 2 diabetes is characterized by insulin resistance with a relative deficiency in insulin secretion. This study explored the potential communication between insulin-resistant human skeletal muscle and primary (human and rat) β-cells....

  2. beta-cell hyperexcitability: from hyperinsulinism to diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, C G; Koster, J C; Remedi, M S

    2007-11-01

    Nutrient oxidation in beta cells generates a rise in [ATP]:[ADP] ratio. This reduces K(ATP) channel activity, leading to depolarization, activation of voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels, Ca(2+) entry and insulin secretion. Consistent with this paradigm, loss-of-function mutations in the genes (KCNJ11 and ABCC8) that encode the two subunits (Kir6.2 and SUR1, respectively) of the ATP-sensitive K(+) (K(ATP)) channel underlie hyperinsulinism in humans, a genetic disorder characterized by dysregulated insulin secretion. In mice with genetic suppression of K(ATP) channel subunit expression, partial loss of K(ATP) channel conductance also causes hypersecretion, but unexpectedly, complete loss results in an undersecreting, mildly glucose-intolerant phenotype. When challenged by a high-fat diet, normal mice and mice with reduced K(ATP) channel density respond with hypersecretion, but mice with more significant or complete loss of K(ATP) channels cross over, or progress further, to an undersecreting, diabetic phenotype. It is our contention that in mice, and perhaps in humans, there is an inverse U-shaped response to hyperexcitabilty, leading first to hypersecretion but with further exacerbation to undersecretion and diabetes. The causes of the overcompensation and diabetic susceptibility are poorly understood but may have broader implications for the progression of hyperinsulinism and type 2 diabetes in humans.

  3. Inflammatory Cytokines Stimulate Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 Expression and Release from Pancreatic Beta Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Urizar, Adriana Ibarra; Friberg, Josefine; Christensen, Dan Ploug;

    2016-01-01

    The proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) play important roles in the progressive loss of beta-cell mass and function during development of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. We have recently showed that bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2 and -4...

  4. Absolute beta-catenin concentrations in Wnt pathway-stimulated and non-stimulated cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sievers, S; Fritzsch, C; Grzegorczyk, M; Kuhnen, C; Muller, O

    2006-01-01

    The intracellular level of the proto-oncoprotein beta-catenin is a parameter for the activity of the Wnt pathway, which has been linked to carcinogenesis. The paper introduces a novel sandwich-based ELISA for the determination of the beta-catenin concentration in lysates from cells or tissues. The a

  5. Proteomic profiling of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells upon TGF-beta stimulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Daojing; Park, Jennifer S.; Chu, Julia S.F.; Ari, Krakowski; Luo, Kunxin; Chen, David J.; Li, Song

    2004-08-08

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can differentiate into different types of cells, and have tremendous potential for cell therapy and tissue engineering. Transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF-{beta}) plays an important role in cell differentiation and vascular remodeling. We showed that TGF-{beta} induced cell morphology change and an increase in actin fibers in MSCs. To determine the global effects of TGF-{beta} on MSCs, we employed a proteomic strategy to analyze the effect of TGF-{beta} on the human MSC proteome. By using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and electrospray ionization coupled to Quadrupole/time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometers, we have generated a proteome reference map of MSCs, and identified {approx}30 proteins with an increase or decrease in expression or phosphorylation in response to TGF-{beta}. The proteins regulated by TGF-{beta} included cytoskeletal proteins, matrix synthesis proteins, membrane proteins, metabolic enzymes, etc. TGF-{beta} increased the expression of smooth muscle (SM) {alpha}-actin and decreased the expression of gelsolin. Over-expression of gelsolin inhibited TGF-{beta}-induced assembly of SM {alpha}-actin; on the other hand, knocking down gelsolin expression enhanced the assembly of {alpha}-actin and actin filaments without significantly affecting {alpha}-actin expression. These results suggest that TGF-{beta} coordinates the increase of {alpha}-actin and the decrease of gelsolin to promote MSC differentiation. This study demonstrates that proteomic tools are valuable in studying stem cell differentiation and elucidating the underlying molecular mechanisms.

  6. Planar Cell Polarity Controls Pancreatic Beta Cell Differentiation and Glucose Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cedric Cortijo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Planar cell polarity (PCP refers to the collective orientation of cells within the epithelial plane. We show that progenitor cells forming the ducts of the embryonic pancreas express PCP proteins and exhibit an active PCP pathway. Planar polarity proteins are acquired at embryonic day 11.5 synchronously to apicobasal polarization of pancreas progenitors. Loss of function of the two PCP core components Celsr2 and Celsr3 shows that they control the differentiation of endocrine cells from polarized progenitors, with a prevalent effect on insulin-producing beta cells. This results in a decreased glucose clearance. Loss of Celsr2 and 3 leads to a reduction of Jun phosphorylation in progenitors, which, in turn, reduces beta cell differentiation from endocrine progenitors. These results highlight the importance of the PCP pathway in cell differentiation in vertebrates. In addition, they reveal that tridimensional organization and collective communication of cells are needed in the pancreatic epithelium in order to generate appropriate numbers of endocrine cells.

  7. Component composition of essential oils and ultrastructure of secretory cells of resin channel needles Juniperus communis (Cupressaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Gerling

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The results of determining the qualitative and quantitative composition of essential oil Juniperus communis, growing under the canopy of spruce blueberry sphagnum subzone middle taiga. Juniperus communis essential oil is liquid light yellow color. The content of essential oil was 0.46 % in shoots with needles. 37 substances of components identified. Mass fraction of components in the essential oil of Juniperus communis reached 89 %. The highest percentage of occupied fraction of monoterpenes (82.3 %, the proportion of sesquiterpenes less than 0.5 % of the total composition of essential oils, alcohols 3.5 and 0.7 % esters. In monoterpenes fraction predominant α-pinene (24.5–32.6 %, β-pinene (15–20.3 % and α-phellandrene (6.4–8.8 %. Essential oil of Juniperus communis is characterized by high content of monoterpenoids in contrast to other conifers of the taiga zone. All stages of biosynthesis essential oils occur in the epithelial cells of the resin channel (terpenoidogennyh cells. An oval shape have epithelial cells of the resin channel needles in transverse sections the Juniperus communis, which is situated vacuole in the center. Large number of lipid globules (up to 40 noted in the hyaloplasm of explored cells. Leucoplasts surrounded by membranes of smooth endoplasmic reticulum in cross sections of epithelial cells in resin channel of juniper. Endoplasmic reticulum is poorly developed in epithelial cells, which corresponds to the low content of sesquiterpenes in the needles during the study period. Development of large leucoplasts and large number of mitochondria associated with predominance of synthesis monoterpenoids the in the epithelium cells resin channel.

  8. The effects of glucagon-like peptide-1 on the beta cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilsbøll, Tina

    2009-01-01

    to stimulate glucose-dependent insulin secretion. Furthermore, GLP-1 appears to have multiple positive effects on beta cells. However, GLP-1 is rapidly degraded by dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4), which limits the clinical relevance of GLP-1 for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Two main classes of GLP-1-based......Type 2 diabetes is a progressive disease characterized by insulin resistance and impaired beta-cell function. Treatments that prevent further beta-cell decline are therefore essential for the management of type 2 diabetes. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin hormone that is known...

  9. Lysine deacetylases are produced in pancreatic beta cells and are differentially regulated by proinflammatory cytokines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundh, M; Christensen, D P; Rasmussen, D N;

    2010-01-01

    Cytokine-induced beta cell toxicity is abrogated by non-selective inhibitors of lysine deacetylases (KDACs). The KDAC family consists of 11 members, namely histone deacetylases HDAC1 to HDAC11, but it is not known which KDAC members play a role in cytokine-mediated beta cell death. The aim...... of the present study was to examine the KDAC gene expression profile of the beta cell and to investigate whether KDAC expression is regulated by cytokines. In addition, the protective effect of the non-selective KDAC inhibitor ITF2357 and interdependent regulation of four selected KDACs were investigated....

  10. Characterization of GLP-1 effects on beta-cell function after meal ingestion in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahrén, Bo; Holst, Jens Juul; Mari, Andrea

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) is an incretin that augments insulin secretion after meal intake and is developed for treatment of type 2 diabetes. As a novel therapeutic agent, characteristics of its beta-cell effects are important to establish. Previously, beta-cell effects of GLP-1...... overnight were served a breakfast (450 kcal) with intravenous infusion of saline or synthetic GLP-1 (0.75 pmol x kg(-1) x min(-1)), and beta-cell function was evaluated by estimating the relationship between glucose concentration and insulin secretion (calculated by deconvolution of C-peptide data). RESULTS...

  11. Regulation of pancreatic beta-cell mass and proliferation by SOCS-3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, K; Rønn, S G; Tornehave, D

    2005-01-01

    Growth hormone and prolactin are important growth factors for pancreatic beta-cells. The effects exerted by these hormones on proliferation and on insulin synthesis and secretion in beta-cells are largely mediated through the Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription (ST......-type littermates following an oral glucose-tolerance test. Together these data suggest that SOCS-3 modulates cytokine signaling in pancreatic beta-cells and therefore potentially could be a candidate target for development of new treatment strategies for diabetes.......Growth hormone and prolactin are important growth factors for pancreatic beta-cells. The effects exerted by these hormones on proliferation and on insulin synthesis and secretion in beta-cells are largely mediated through the Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT......) signaling pathway. Suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS) proteins are specific inhibitors of the JAK/STAT pathway acting through a negative-feedback loop. To investigate in vivo effects of SOCS-3 in growth hormone (GH)/prolactin signaling in beta-cells we generated transgenic mice with beta...

  12. Ricinus communis L. stem bark extracts regulate ovarian cell functions and secretory activity and their response to Luteinising hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, S; Kadasi, A; Grossmann, R; Sirotkin, A V; Kolesarova, A; Talukdar, A D; Choudhury, M D

    2015-01-01

    Ricinus communis L. has ethnopharmacological contraceptive reputation but its stem bark has unexplored mechanisms of action in female reproductive system. In the present study, the effect of methanolic and aqueous extracts from the stem bark of the plant was examined on basic porcine ovarian granulosa cell functions and its response to Luteinising hormone (LH)-the upstream hormonal regulator. Systemic treatment of methanolic and aqueous extracts stimulated cell proliferation (proliferating cell nuclear antigen, PCNA) and also promoted cell apoptosis (caspase-3). Aqueous extract has inverted the stimulatory effect of LH on PCNA but not on caspase-3. Methanolic extract stimulated as well as inhibited progesterone release and stimulated testosterone secretion. Whereas aqueous extract inhibited both steroid releases and suppressed the stimulatory effect of LH on progesterone release and promoted the inhibitory effect of LH on testosterone release. In conclusion, the present study unveils the mechanism of action of R. communis stem bark in in vitro condition. These suggest its possible contraceptive efficacy by exerting its regulatory role over LH and on basic ovarian cell functions and secretion activity.

  13. Transcription factor p53 can regulate proliferation, apoptosis and secretory activity of luteinizing porcine ovarian granulosa cell cultured with and without ghrelin and FSH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirotkin, A V; Benco, A; Tandlmajerova, A; Vasícek, D; Kotwica, J; Darlak, K; Valenzuela, F

    2008-11-01

    The aim of our in vitro experiments was to examine the role of transcription factor p53 in controlling the basic functions of ovarian cells and their response to hormonal treatments. Porcine ovarian granulosa cells, transfected and non-transfected with a gene construct encoding p53, were cultured with ghrelin and FSH (all at concentrations of 0, 1, 10, or 100 ng/ml). Accumulation of p53, of apoptosis-related (MAP3K5) and proliferation-related (cyclin B1) substances was evaluated by immunocytochemistry. The secretion of progesterone (P(4)), oxytocin (OT), prostaglandin F (PGF), and E (PGE) was measured by RIA. Transfection with the p53 gene construct promoted accumulation of this transcription factor within cells. It also stimulated the expression of a marker of apoptosis (MAP3K5). Over-expression of p53 resulted in reduced accumulation of a marker of proliferation (cyclin B1), P(4), and PGF secretion and increased OT and PGE secretion. Ghrelin, when added alone, did not affect p53 or P(4), but reduced MAP3K5 and increased PGF and PGE secretion. Over-expression of p53 reversed the effect of ghrelin on OT, caused it to be inhibitory to P(4) secretion, but did not modify its action on MAP3K5, PGF, or PGE. FSH promoted the accumulation of p53, MAP3K5, and cyclin B1; these effects were unaffected by p53 transfection. These multiple effects of the p53 gene construct on luteinizing granulosa cells, cultured with and without hormones 1) demonstrate the effects of ghrelin and FSH on porcine ovarian cell apoptosis and secretory activity, 2) confirm the involvement of p53 in promoting apoptosis and inhibiting P(4) secretion in these cells, 3) provide the first evidence that p53 suppress proliferation of ovarian cells, 4) provide the first evidence that p53 is involved in the control of ovarian peptide hormone (OT) and prostaglandin (PGF and PGE) secretion, and 5) suggest that p53 can modulate, but probably not mediate, the effects of ghrelin and FSH on the ovary.

  14. DNA structures decorated with cathepsin G/secretory leukocyte proteinase inhibitor stimulate IFNI production by plasmacytoid dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skrzeczynska-Moncznik, Joanna; Wlodarczyk, Agnieszka; Banas, Magdalena

    2013-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) and neutrophils are detected in psoriatic skin lesions and implicated in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. pDCs specialize in the production of type I interferon (IFNI), a cytokine that plays an important role in chronic autoimmune-like inflammation, including pso...

  15. Essential role of TGF-beta/Smad pathway on statin dependent vascular smooth muscle cell regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Rodríguez-Vita

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase inhibitors (also called statins exert proven beneficial effects on cardiovascular diseases. Recent data suggest a protective role for Transforming Growth Factor-beta (TGF-beta in atherosclerosis by regulating the balance between inflammation and extracellular matrix accumulation. However, there are no studies about the effect of statins on TGF-beta/Smad pathway in atherosclerosis and vascular cells. METHODOLOGY: In cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs statins enhanced Smad pathway activation caused by TGF-beta. In addition, statins upregulated TGF-beta receptor type II (TRII, and increased TGF-beta synthesis and TGF-beta/Smad-dependent actions. In this sense, statins, through Smad activation, render VSMCs more susceptible to TGF-beta induced apoptosis and increased TGF-beta-mediated ECM production. It is well documented that high doses of statins induce apoptosis in cultured VSMC in the presence of serum; however the precise mechanism of this effect remains to be elucidated. We have found that statins-induced apoptosis was mediated by TGF-beta/Smad pathway. Finally, we have described that RhoA inhibition is a common intracellular mechanisms involved in statins effects. The in vivo relevance of these findings was assessed in an experimental model of atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E deficient mice: Treatment with Atorvastatin increased Smad3 phosphorylation and TRII overexpression, associated to elevated ECM deposition in the VSMCs within atheroma plaques, while apoptosis was not detected. CONCLUSIONS: Statins enhance TGF-beta/Smad pathway, regulating ligand levels, receptor, main signaling pathway and cellular responses of VSMC, including apoptosis and ECM accumulation. Our findings show that TGF-beta/Smad pathway is essential for statins-dependent actions in VSMCs.

  16. Incretin effect potentiates beta-cell responsivity to glucose as well as to its rate of change: OGTT and matched intravenous study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campioni, Marco; Toffolo, Gianna; Shuster, Lynne T; Service, F John; Rizza, Robert A; Cobelli, Claudio

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study is to gain greater insight into the mechanism whereby "incretins" (greater insulinemia after oral than intravenous glucose) enhance insulin secretion. To do so, we use a model of C-peptide secretion to reanalyze data from a previously published study in which glycemic profiles observed following glucose ingestion were matched in the same 10 subjects by means of an intravenous glucose infusion. We report that incretins increase insulin secretion by enhancing both the dynamic (to the rate of increase of glucose) and static (to given glucose concentration) response with an increase of 58% for the static (Phi(s) = 16.4 +/- 1.8 vs. 24.6 +/- 2.0 10(-9) min(-1), P = 0.01) and 63% for the dynamic (Phi(d) = 278 +/- 32 vs. 463 +/- 86 10(-9), P = 0.02) indexes. Since increases in the dynamic response to glucose are believed to be due to an increase in the rate of docking, and exocytosis of insulin containing granules and increases in the static response to glucose are believed to be caused by a shift in the sensitivity of the beta-cell to glucose, these results suggest that incretins may modulate more than one step in the beta-cell insulin secretory cascade.

  17. Effects of meal size and composition on incretin, alpha-cell, and beta-cell responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rijkelijkhuizen, Josina M; McQuarrie, Kelly; Girman, Cynthia J

    2009-01-01

    The incretins glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) regulate postprandial insulin release from the beta-cells. We investigated the effects of 3 standardized meals with different caloric and nutritional content in terms of postprandial glucose...... of beta-cell function and incremental areas under the curve of glucose, insulin, C-peptide, glucagon, GLP-1, and GIP were calculated. Mixed models and Friedman tests were used to test for differences in meal responses. The large CH-rich meal and fat-rich meal resulted in a slightly larger insulin response...... GLP-1 secretion. Differences in meal size and composition led to differences in insulin and incretin responses but not to differences in postprandial glucose levels of the well-controlled patients with diabetes....

  18. Roles of Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling in epithelial differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yajing; Sun, Zhaorui; Qiu, Xuefeng [Immunology and Reproductive Biology Laboratory, Medical College of Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Molecular Medicine, Nanjing 210093 (China); Li, Yan [Jiangsu Centers for Diseases Prevention and Control, Nanjing 210009 (China); Qin, Jizheng [Immunology and Reproductive Biology Laboratory, Medical College of Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Molecular Medicine, Nanjing 210093 (China); Han, Xiaodong, E-mail: hanxd@nju.edu.cn [Immunology and Reproductive Biology Laboratory, Medical College of Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Molecular Medicine, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2009-12-25

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been demonstrated to be able to differentiate into epithelial lineage, but the precise mechanisms controlling this process are unclear. Our aim is to explore the roles of Wnt/{beta}-catenin in the epithelial differentiation of MSCs. Using indirect co-culture of rat MSCs with rat airway epithelial cells (RTE), MSCs expressed several airway epithelial markers (cytokeratin 18, tight junction protein occudin, cystic fibrosis transmembrance regulator). The protein levels of some important members in Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling were determined, suggested down-regulation of Wnt/{beta}-catenin with epithelial differentiation of MSCs. Furthermore, Wnt3{alpha} can inhibit the epithelial differentiation of MSCs. A loss of {beta}-catenin induced by Dickkopf-1 can enhance MSCs differentiation into epithelial cells. Lithium chloride transiently activated {beta}-catenin expression and subsequently decreased {beta}-catenin level and at last inhibited MSCs to differentiate into airway epithelium. Taken together, our study indicated that RTE cells can trigger epithelial differentiation of MSCs. Blocking Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling may promote MSCs to differentiate towards airway epithelial cells.

  19. Molecular bases of K+ secretory cells in the inner ear: shared and distinct features between birds and mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilms, Viviane; Köppl, Christine; Söffgen, Chris; Hartmann, Anna-Maria; Nothwang, Hans Gerd

    2016-01-01

    In the cochlea, mammals maintain a uniquely high endolymphatic potential (EP), which is not observed in other vertebrate groups. However, a high [K+] is always present in the inner ear endolymph. Here, we show that Kir4.1, which is required in the mammalian stria vascularis to generate the highly positive EP, is absent in the functionally equivalent avian tegmentum vasculosum. In contrast, the molecular repertoire required for K+ secretion, specifically NKCC1, KCNQ1, KCNE1, BSND and CLC-K, is shared between the tegmentum vasculosum, the vestibular dark cells and the marginal cells of the stria vascularis. We further show that in barn owls, the tegmentum vasculosum is enlarged and a higher EP (~+34 mV) maintained, compared to other birds. Our data suggest that both the tegmentum vasculosum and the stratified stria vascularis evolved from an ancestral vestibular epithelium that already featured the major cell types of the auditory epithelia. Genetic recruitment of Kir4.1 specifically to strial melanocytes was then a crucial step in mammalian evolution enabling an increase in the cochlear EP. An increased EP may be related to high-frequency hearing, as this is a hallmark of barn owls among birds and mammals among amniotes. PMID:27680950

  20. Cloning of the Zygosaccharomyces bailii GAS1 homologue and effect of cell wall engineering on protein secretory phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dato Laura

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Zygosaccharomyces bailii is a diploid budding yeast still poorly characterized, but widely recognised as tolerant to several stresses, most of which related to industrial processes of production. Because of that, it would be very interesting to develop its ability as a cell factory. Gas1p is a β-1,3-glucanosyltransglycosylase which plays an important role in cell wall construction and in determining its permeability. Cell wall defective mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia pastoris, deleted in the GAS1 gene, were reported as super-secretive. The aim of this study was the cloning and deletion of the GAS1 homologue of Z. bailii and the evaluation of its deletion on recombinant protein secretion. Results The GAS1 homologue of Z. bailii was cloned by PCR, and when expressed in a S. cerevisiae GAS1 null mutant was able to restore the parental phenotype. The respective Z. bailii Δgas1 deleted strain was obtained by targeted deletion of both alleles of the ZbGAS1 gene with deletion cassettes having flanking regions of ~400 bp. The morphological and physiological characterization of the Z. bailii null mutant resulted very similar to that of the corresponding S. cerevisiae mutant. As for S. cerevisiae, in the Z. bailii Δgas1 the total amount of protein released in the medium was significantly higher. Moreover, three different heterologous proteins were expressed and secreted in said mutant. The amount of enzymatic activity found in the medium was almost doubled in the case of the Candida rugosa lipase CRL1 and of the Yarrowia lipolytica protease XPR2, while for human IL-1β secretion disruption had no relevant effect. Conclusions The data presented confirm that the engineering of the cell wall is an effective way to improve protein secretion in yeast. They also confirmed that Z. bailii is an interesting candidate, despite the knowledge of its genome and the tools for its manipulation still need to be improved. However, as

  1. Specific silencing of the REST target genes in insulin-secreting cells uncovers their participation in beta cell survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Martin

    Full Text Available The absence of the transcriptional repressor RE-1 Silencing Transcription Factor (REST in insulin-secreting beta cells is a major cue for the specific expression of a large number of genes. These REST target genes were largely ascribed to a function of neurotransmission in a neuronal context, whereas their role in pancreatic beta cells has been poorly explored. To identify their functional significance, we have generated transgenic mice expressing REST in beta cells (RIP-REST mice, and previously discovered that REST target genes are essential to insulin exocytosis. Herein we characterized a novel line of RIP-REST mice featuring diabetes. In diabetic RIP-REST mice, high levels of REST were associated with postnatal beta cell apoptosis, which resulted in gradual beta cell loss and sustained hyperglycemia in adults. Moreover, adenoviral REST transduction in INS-1E cells led to increased cell death under control conditions, and sensitized cells to death induced by cytokines. Screening for REST target genes identified several anti-apoptotic genes bearing the binding motif RE-1 that were downregulated upon REST expression in INS-1E cells, including Gjd2, Mapk8ip1, Irs2, Ptprn, and Cdk5r2. Decreased levels of Cdk5r2 in beta cells of RIP-REST mice further confirmed that it is controlled by REST, in vivo. Using siRNA-mediated knock-down in INS-1E cells, we showed that Cdk5r2 protects beta cells against cytokines and palmitate-induced apoptosis. Together, these data document that a set of REST target genes, including Cdk5r2, is important for beta cell survival.

  2. TGF-beta expression during rat pregnancy and activity on decidual cell survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Déry Marie-Claude

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During early rat pregnancy, trophoblast of the tiny embryo joins with the endometrium and epithelial cells undergo apoptosis. Near the end of pregnancy, regression of the decidua basalis (DB is also observed (from day 14 to 20. However, little is known about the intra-cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in apoptosis regulation in the uterus during pregnancy. The objective of the present study was to investigate the presence and the developmental expression of transforming growth factor-beta isoforms (TGF-beta well known differentiation factor in the rat endometrium throughout pregnancy and its action in vitro using cultured endometrial stromal cells. Methods In vivo: Rats were killed at different days of pregnancy (days 2–20 and uteri removed to collect endometrial protein extracts or the uteri were fixed, embedded and sectioned for immunohistochemistry (IHC and in situ cell death analyses using TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL. In vitro: Rats were ovariectomized and decidualization was induced using sex steroids. Endometrial stromal decidual cells were then collected and cultured. Results An increase of apoptosis in the DB on days 14, 16 and 18 was observed. Cleaved caspase-3 was clearly detected during regression of the DB by Western analysis and immunofluorescence. Western analyses using endometrial protein extracts demonstrated that TGF-beta1, TGF-beta2 and TGF-beta3 were highly expressed at the time of DB regression (day 14. During early pregnancy, TGF-beta1 and -beta2 expressions raised at days 5.5 to 6.5. TGF-beta3 protein was not detected during early pregnancy. IHC analyses revealed that TGF-beta1 and -2 were found surrounding both epithelium (luminal and glandular in the stroma compartment at the implantation site, and TGF-beta3 was mainly located surrounding endometrial epithelium in the stroma compartment. Smad2 phosphorylation was increased at the time of DB regression. In vitro studies using

  3. GLP-1 derivative liraglutide in rats with beta-cell deficiencies: influence of metabolic state on beta-cell mass dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sturis, Jeppe; Gotfredsen, Carsten F; Rømer, John

    2003-01-01

    (1) Liraglutide is a long-acting GLP-1 derivative, designed for once daily administration in type II diabetic patients. To investigate the effects of liraglutide on glycemic control and beta-cell mass in rat models of beta-cell deficiencies, studies were performed in male Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF...... was 2-3-fold higher during a normal 24-h feeding period (PJudged by pair feeding, approximately 53% of the antihyperglycemic effect observed on 24-h glucose profiles was mediated by a reduction in food intake, which persisted throughout the study and averaged 16% (P

  4. Gut-homing CD4+ T cell receptor alpha beta+ T cells in the pathogenesis of murine inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudolphi, A; Boll, G; Poulsen, S S

    1994-01-01

    reconstituted a CD3+ T cell receptor alpha beta+ CD4+ T cell subset. CD4+ cells of this subset expressed the surface phenotype of mucosa-seeking, memory T cells. In the immunodeficient scid host, this gut-derived CD4+ T cell subset was found in spleen, peritoneal cavity, mesenteric lymph nodes (LN), epithelial...

  5. Cholesterol enhances amyloid {beta} deposition in mouse retina by modulating the activities of A{beta}-regulating enzymes in retinal pigment epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jiying [Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8519 (Japan); Ohno-Matsui, Kyoko, E-mail: k.ohno.oph@tmd.ac.jp [Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8519 (Japan); Morita, Ikuo [Section of Cellular Physiological Chemistry, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8519 (Japan)

    2012-08-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cholesterol-treated RPE produces more A{beta} than non-treated RPE. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neprilysin expression and activity decreased in cholesterol-treated RPE. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {alpha}-Secretase expression and activity decreased in cholesterol-treated RPE. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cholesterol-enriched diet induced subRPE deposits in aged mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A{beta} were present in cholesterol-enriched-diet-induced subRPE deposits in aged mice. -- Abstract: Subretinally-deposited amyloid {beta} (A{beta}) is a main contributor of developing age-related macular degeneration (AMD). However, the mechanism causing A{beta} deposition in AMD eyes is unknown. Hypercholesterolemia is a significant risk for developing AMD. Thus, we investigated the effects of cholesterol on A{beta} production in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells in vitro and in the mouse retina in vivo. RPE cells isolated from senescent (12-month-old) C57BL/6 mice were treated with 10 {mu}g/ml cholesterol for 48 h. A{beta} amounts in culture supernatants were measured by ELISA. Activity and expression of enzymes and proteins that regulate A{beta} production were examined by activity assay and real time PCR. The retina of mice fed cholesterol-enriched diet was examined by transmission electron microscopy. Cholesterol significantly increased A{beta} production in cultured RPE cells. Activities of A{beta} degradation enzyme; neprilysin (NEP) and anti-amyloidogenic secretase; {alpha}-secretase were significantly decreased in cell lysates of cholesterol-treated RPE cells compared to non-treated cells, but there was no change in the activities of {beta}- or {gamma}-secretase. mRNA levels of NEP and {alpha}-secretase (ADAM10 and ADAM17) were significantly lower in cholesterol-treated RPE cells than non-treated cells. Senescent (12-month-old) mice fed cholesterol-enriched chow developed subRPE deposits containing A{beta}, whereas

  6. The secretory synapse: the secrets of a serial killer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossi, Giovanna; Trambas, Christina; Booth, Sarah; Clark, Richard; Stinchcombe, Jane; Griffiths, Gillian M

    2002-11-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) destroy their targets by a process involving secretion of specialized granules. The interactions between CTLs and target can be very brief; nevertheless, adhesion and signaling proteins segregate into an immunological synapse. Secretion occurs in a specialized secretory domain. Use of live and fixed cell microscopy allows this secretory synapse to be visualized both temporally and spatially. The combined use of confocal and electron microscopy has produced some surprising findings, which suggest that the secretory synapse may be important both in delivering the lethal hit and in facilitating membrane transfer from target to CTL. Studies on the secretory synapse in wild-type and mutant CTLs have been used to identify proteins involved in secretion. Further clues as to the signals required for secretion are emerging from comparisons of inhibitory and activating synapses formed by natural killer cells.

  7. Radioiodinated Naphthylalanine Derivatives Targeting Pancreatic Beta Cells in Normal and Nonobese Diabetic Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amartey, John K.; Shi, Yufei; Al-Jammaz, Ibrahim; Esguerra, Celestina; Al-Otaibi, Basem; Al-Mohanna, Futwan

    2008-01-01

    An imaging method capable of using a signal from pancreatic beta cells to determine their mass would be of immense value in monitoring the progression of diabetes as well as response to treatment. Somatostatin receptors (SSTRs) are expressed on beta cells and are a potential target for imaging. The main objective of this study was to investigate whether pancreatic beta cells are a target for radiolabeled naphthylalanine derivatives. The molecules were subjected to in vitro and ex vivo evaluations. Pancreatic uptake of radioactivity was lower in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice than normal mice at all time points investigated (P < .05) and correlated with the number of islets in tissue sections of both control and NOD mice. Immunohistochemical and confocal fluorescent microscopic studies showed colocalization of insulin and the conjugate radioligand in the pancreas. The results demonstrated that pancreatic uptake is receptor-mediated, and that beta cells are the primary target. PMID:18483609

  8. Effect of aerobic exercise on Pancreas Beta-cells function in adult obese males

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Eizadi

    2014-08-01

    Conclusion: Aerobic exercise training increases beta cells function and decreases FBS in obese men. These findings support the hypothesis that regular physical activity postpones the occurrence of type 2 diabetes in adult obese subjects.

  9. Novel aspects on signal-transduction in the pancreatic beta-cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berggren, Per-Olof; Leibiger, Ingo B

    2006-03-01

    The glucose-stimulus/insulin-secretion-coupling by the pancreatic beta-cell, which guarantees the maintenance of glucose homeostasis in man, is regulated by a sophisticated interplay between glucose and a plethora of additional factors. Besides other nutrients, incretins, nerval innervation, systemic growth factors as well as autocrine and paracrine regulatory loops within the islet of Langerhans modulate the function of the insulin-producing beta-cell. Although the modulatory role of these factors is well appreciated, the underlying molecular mechanisms involved remain poorly understood. However, in most cases beta-cell membrane receptors coupled primarily to either G-proteins or tyrosine kinases, which subsequently activate respective second messenger cascades, are involved. In the present mini-review we will discuss the role of signaling through some of these receptor-operated effector systems in the light of pancreatic beta-cell signal-transduction.

  10. New ways to test beta cell functionality in health and diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsgaard, Thomas Vagn

    . Within the context of control theory, the beta cell functionality is usually modelled as versions of a classic Proportional-Integral-Differential (PID) controller, and the different phases of insulin secretion are described in relation to the different control component, with the first phase of insulin......Beta cell functionality is often characterised by indices describing different phases of insulin secretion. The typical biphasic insulin secretion pattern observed with a square wave glucose stimulation has laid the foundation for most modelling work regarding quantification of beta cell function...... secretion being related to the differential control component, and the second (late) phase to the integral control component. This is, of course, a phenomenological description. We propose a model of the glucose sensing mechanisms in the beta cell describing the timedependent physiological processes...

  11. Effect of iron on pancreatic beta cell function and insulin resistance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    concentration, insulin resistance and pancreatic beta cell function increased significantly with increased concentration of iron. .... RESULTS. Effect of Iron on Blood Glucose Concentration .... Gillum, R.F., (2001). Association of serum ferritin and.

  12. Massive parallel gene expression profiling of RINm5F pancreatic islet beta-cells stimulated with interleukin-1beta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rieneck, K; Bovin, L F; Josefsen, K

    2000-01-01

    the genes into groups according to functional relations on the basis of knowledge of the structure or function ascribed to the individual genes. Many of the differentially regulated genes are known to play a role in immune- and stress-related pathways as well as in insulin secretion and vesicle trafficking...... found that 146 full-length genes and a large number of expressed sequence tags were differentially regulated 3-fold or more. Most of the differentially regulated transcripts have not previously been described to be regulated by IL-1beta in beta-cells. We have analysed the expression data and sorted......, e.g. alpha-endosulfine and K+ channel Kir6.2 are differentially regulated. A number of transcripts in the biosynthesis pathway for cholesterol are also differentially regulated....

  13. Production of beta-globin and adult hemoglobin following G418 treatment of erythroid precursor cells from homozygous beta(0)39 thalassemia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvatori, Francesca; Breveglieri, Giulia; Zuccato, Cristina; Finotti, Alessia; Bianchi, Nicoletta; Borgatti, Monica; Feriotto, Giordana; Destro, Federica; Canella, Alessandro; Brognara, Eleonora; Lampronti, Ilaria; Breda, Laura; Rivella, Stefano; Gambari, Roberto

    2009-11-01

    In several types of thalassemia (including beta(0)39-thalassemia), stop codon mutations lead to premature translation termination and to mRNA destabilization through nonsense-mediated decay. Drugs (for instance aminoglycosides) can be designed to suppress premature termination, inducing a ribosomal readthrough. These findings have introduced new hopes for the development of a pharmacologic approach to the cure of this disease. However, the effects of aminoglycosides on globin mRNA carrying beta-thalassemia stop mutations have not yet been investigated. In this study, we have used a lentiviral construct containing the beta(0)39-thalassemia globin gene under control of the beta-globin promoter and a LCR cassette. We demonstrated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis the production of beta-globin by K562 cell clones expressing the beta(0)39-thalassemia globin gene and treated with G418. More importantly, after FACS and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analyses, erythroid precursor cells from beta(0)39-thalassemia patients were demonstrated to be able to produce beta-globin and adult hemoglobin after treatment with G418. This study strongly suggests that ribosomal readthrough should be considered a strategy for developing experimental strategies for the treatment of beta(0)-thalassemia caused by stop codon mutations. Am. J. Hematol., 2009. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Does physiological beta cell turnover initiate autoimmune diabetes in the regional lymph nodes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearl-Yafe, Michal; Iskovich, Svetlana; Kaminitz, Ayelet; Stein, Jerry; Yaniv, Isaac; Askenasy, Nadir

    2006-05-01

    The initial immune process that triggers autoimmune beta cell destruction in type 1 diabetes is not fully understood. In early infancy there is an increased beta cell turnover. Recurrent exposure of tissue-specific antigens could lead to primary sensitization of immune cells in the draining lymph nodes of the pancreas. An initial immune injury to the beta cells can be inflicted by several cell types, primarily macrophages and T cells. Subsequently, infiltrating macrophages transfer antigens exposed by apoptotic beta cells to the draining lymph nodes, where antigen presenting cells process and amplify a secondary immune reaction. Antigen presenting cells evolve as dual players in the activation and suppression of the autoimmune reaction in the draining lymph nodes. We propose a scenario where destructive insulitis is caused by recurrent exposure of specific antigens due to the physiological turnover of beta cells. This sensitization initiates the evolution of reactive clones that remain silent in the regional lymph nodes, where they succeed to evade regulatory clonal deletion.

  15. Glucocorticoids Inhibit Basal and Hormone-Induced Serotonin Synthesis in Pancreatic Beta Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Moina Hasni Ebou; Amrit Singh-Estivalet; Jean-Marie Launay; Jacques Callebert; François Tronche; Pascal Ferré; Jean-François Gautier; Ghislaine Guillemain; Bernadette Bréant; Bertrand Blondeau; Jean-Pierre Riveline

    2016-01-01

    International audience; Diabetes is a major complication of chronic Glucocorticoids (GCs) treatment. GCs induce insulin resistance and also inhibit insulin secretion from pancreatic beta cells. Yet, a full understanding of this negative regulation remains to be deciphered. In the present study, we investigated whether GCs could inhibit serotonin synthesis in beta cell since this neurotransmitter has been shown to be involved in the regulation of insulin secretion. To this aim, serotonin synth...

  16. Angiogenesis in differentiated placental multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells is dependent on integrin alpha5beta1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Yi Lee

    Full Text Available Human placental multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (hPMSCs can be isolated from term placenta, but their angiogenic ability and the regulatory pathways involved are not known. hPMSCs were shown to express integrins alpha(v, alpha(4, alpha(5, beta(1, beta(3, and beta(5 and could be induced to differentiate into cells expressing endothelial markers. Increases in cell surface integrins alpha(5 and beta(1, but not alpha(4, alpha(vbeta(3, or alpha(vbeta(5, accompanied endothelial differentiation. Vascular endothelial growth factor-A augmented the effect of fibronectin in enhancing adhesion and migration of differentiated hPMSC through integrin alpha(5beta(1, but not alpha(vbeta(3 or alpha(vbeta(5. Formation of capillary-like structures in vitro from differentiated cells was inhibited by pre-treatment with function-blocking antibodies to integrins alpha(5 and beta(1. When hPMSCs were seeded onto chick chorioallantoic membranes (CAM, human von Willebrand factor-positive cells were observed to engraft in the chick endothelium. CAMs transplanted with differentiated hPMSCs had a greater number of vessels containing human cells and more incorporated cells per vessel compared to CAMs transplanted with undifferentiated hPMSCs, and overall angiogenesis was enhanced more by the differentiated cells. Function-blocking antibodies to integrins alpha(5 and beta(1 inhibited angiogenesis in the CAM assay. These results suggest that differentiated hPMSCs may contribute to blood vessel formation, and this activity depends on integrin alpha(5beta(1.

  17. Adenoviruses Expressing PDX-1, BETA2/NeuroD and MafA Induces the Transdifferentiation of Porcine Neonatal Pancreas Cell Clusters and Adult Pig Pancreatic Cells into Beta-Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Hye You

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundA limitation in the number of insulin-producing pancreatic beta-cells is a special feature of diabetes. The identification of alternative sources for the induction of insulin-producing surrogate beta-cells is a matter of profound importance. PDX-1/VP16, BETA2/NeuroD, and MafA overexpression have been shown to influence the differentiation and proliferation of pancreatic stem cells. However, few studies have been conducted using adult animal pancreatic stem cells.MethodsAdult pig pancreatic cells were prepared from the non-endocrine fraction of adult pig pancreata. Porcine neonatal pancreas cell clusters (NPCCs were prepared from neonatal pigs aged 1-2 days. The dispersed pancreatic cells were infected with PDX-1/VP16, BETA2/NeuroD, and MafA adenoviruses. After infection, these cells were transplanted under the kidney capsules of normoglycemic nude mice.ResultsThe adenovirus-mediated overexpression of PDX-1, BETA2/NeuroD and MafA induced insulin gene expression in NPCCs, but not in adult pig pancreatic cells. Immunocytochemistry revealed that the number of insulin-positive cells in NPCCs and adult pig pancreatic cells was approximately 2.6- and 1.1-fold greater than those in the green fluorescent protein control group, respectively. At four weeks after transplantation, the relative volume of insulin-positive cells in the grafts increased in the NPCCs, but not in the adult porcine pancreatic cells.ConclusionThese data indicate that PDX-1, BETA2/NeuroD, and MafA facilitate the beta-cell differentiation of NPCCs, but not adult pig pancreatic cells. Therefore PDX-1, BETA2/NeuroD, and MafA-induced NPCCs can be considered good sources for the induction of pancreatic beta-cells, and may also have some utility in the treatment of diabetes.

  18. The ectopic expression of Pax4 in the mouse pancreas converts progenitor cells into alpha and subsequently beta cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Collombat, Patrick; Xu, Xiaobo; Ravassard, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    We have previously reported that the loss of Arx and/or Pax4 gene activity leads to a shift in the fate of the different endocrine cell subtypes in the mouse pancreas, without affecting the total endocrine cell numbers. Here, we conditionally and ectopically express Pax4 using different cell......, the newly formed alpha cells fail to correct the hypoglucagonemia since they subsequently acquire a beta cell phenotype upon Pax4 ectopic expression. Notably, this cycle of neogenesis and redifferentiation caused by ectopic expression of Pax4 in alpha cells is capable of restoring a functional beta cell...

  19. SCR96, a small cysteine-rich secretory protein of Phytophthora cactorum, can trigger cell death in the Solanaceae and is important for pathogenicity and oxidative stress tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao-Ren; Li, Yan-Peng; Li, Qi-Yuan; Xing, Yu-Ping; Liu, Bei-Bei; Tong, Yun-Hui; Xu, Jing-You

    2016-05-01

    Peptides and small molecules produced by both the plant pathogen Phytophthora and host plants in the apoplastic space mediate the relationship between the interplaying organisms. Various Phytophthora apoplastic effectors, including small cysteine-rich (SCR) secretory proteins, have been identified, but their roles during interaction remain to be determined. Here, we identified an SCR effector encoded by scr96, one of three novel genes encoding SCR proteins in P. cactorum with similarity to the P. cactorum phytotoxic protein PcF. Together with the other two genes, scr96 was transcriptionally induced throughout the developmental and infection stages of the pathogen. These genes triggered plant cell death (PCD) in the Solanaceae, including Nicotiana benthamiana and tomato. The scr96 gene did not show single nucleotide polymorphisms in a collection of P. cactorum isolates from different countries and host plants, suggesting that its role is essential and non-redundant during infection. Homologues of SCR96 were identified only in oomycetes, but not in fungi and other organisms. A stable protoplast transformation protocol was adapted for P. cactorum using green fluorescent protein as a marker. The silencing of scr96 in P. cactorum caused gene-silenced transformants to lose their pathogenicity on host plants and these transformants were significantly more sensitive to oxidative stress. Transient expression of scr96 partially recovered the virulence of gene-silenced transformants on plants. Overall, our results indicate that the P. cactorum scr96 gene encodes an important virulence factor that not only causes PCD in host plants, but is also important for pathogenicity and oxidative stress tolerance.

  20. Phospholipase C-beta 2 promotes mitosis and migration of human breast cancer-derived cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertagnolo, Valeria; Benedusi, Mascia; Brugnoli, Federica; Lanuti, Paola; Marchisio, Marco; Querzoli, Patrizia; Capitani, Silvano

    2007-08-01

    Like most human neoplasm, breast cancer has aberrations in signal transduction elements that can lead to increased proliferative potential, apoptosis inhibition, tissue invasion and metastasis. Due to the high heterogeneity of this tumor, currently, no markers are clearly associated with the insurgence of breast cancer, as well as with its progression from in situ lesion to invasive carcinoma. We have recently demonstrated an altered expression of the beta2 isoform of the phosphoinositide-dependent phospholipase C (PLC) in invasive breast tumors with different histopathological features. In primary breast tumor cells, elevated amounts of this protein are closely correlated with a poor prognosis of patients with mammary carcinoma, suggesting that PLC-beta2 may be involved in the development and worsening of the malignant phenotype. Here we demonstrate that PLC-beta2 may improve some malignant characteristics of tumor cells, like motility and invasion capability, but it fails to induce tumorigenesis in non-transformed breast-derived cells. We also report that, compared with the G(0)/G(1) phases of the cell cycle, the cells in S/G(2)/M phases show high PLC-beta2 expressions that reach the greatest levels during the late mitotic stages. In addition, even if unable to modify the proliferation rate and the expression of cell cycle-related enzymes of malignant cells, PLC-beta2 may promote the G(2)/M progression, a critical event in cancer evolution. Since phosphoinositides, substrates of PLC, are involved in regulating cytoskeleton architecture, PLC-beta2 in breast tumor cells may mediate the modification of cell shape that characterizes cell division, motility and invasion. On the basis of these data, PLC-beta2 may constitute a molecular marker of breast tumor cells able to monitor the progression to invasive cancers and a target for novel therapeutic breast cancer strategies.

  1. Interferon (IFN)-beta induces apoptotic cell death in DHL-4 diffuse large B cell lymphoma cells through tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehadian, Amaylia; Koide, Naoki; Mu, Mya Mya; Hassan, Ferdaus; Islam, Shamima; Yoshida, Tomoaki; Yokochi, Takashi

    2005-07-08

    The effect of interferon (IFN)-alpha, beta and gamma on the growth of DHL-4 diffuse large B cell lymphoma cells was studied. IFN-beta significantly inhibited the cell growth, and the effect was stronger than that of IFN-alpha. IFN-gamma did not inhibit the cell growth because of lack of IFN-gamma receptors. IFN-beta caused apoptotic cell death which was accompanied by DNA fragmentation, caspase 3 activation and annexin V binding. IFN-beta lead to the expression of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) mRNA. Anti-TRAIL antibody significantly prevented IFN-beta-induced apoptosis. It was suggested that IFN-beta might cause apoptosis in DHL-4 cells through TRAIL.

  2. Interleukin-1{beta} regulates cell proliferation and activity of extracellular matrix remodelling enzymes in cultured primary pig heart cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zitta, Karina; Brandt, Berenice [Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel (Germany); Wuensch, Annegret [Institute of Molecular Animal Breeding and Biotechnology, Ludwig Maximilians University, Munich (Germany); Meybohm, Patrick; Bein, Berthold; Steinfath, Markus; Scholz, Jens [Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel (Germany); Albrecht, Martin, E-mail: Albrecht@anaesthesie.uni-kiel.de [Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel (Germany)

    2010-09-03

    Research highlights: {yields} Levels of IL-1{beta} are increased in the pig myocardium after infarction. {yields} Cultured pig heart cells possess IL-1 receptors. {yields} IL-1{beta} increases cell proliferation of pig heart cells in-vitro. {yields} IL-1{beta} increases MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity in pig heart cells in-vitro. {yields} IL-1{beta} may be important for tissue remodelling events after myocardial infarction. -- Abstract: After myocardial infarction, elevated levels of interleukins (ILs) are found within the myocardial tissue and IL-1{beta} is considered to play a major role in tissue remodelling events throughout the body. In the study presented, we have established a cell culture model of primary pig heart cells to evaluate the effects of different concentrations of IL-1{beta} on cell proliferation as well as expression and activity of enzymes typically involved in tissue remodelling. Primary pig heart cell cultures were derived from three different animals and stimulated with recombinant pig IL-1{beta}. RNA expression was detected by RT-PCR, protein levels were evaluated by Western blotting, activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) was quantified by gelatine zymography and cell proliferation was measured using colorimetric MTS assays. Pig heart cells express receptors for IL-1 and application of IL-1{beta} resulted in a dose-dependent increase of cell proliferation (P < 0.05 vs. control; 100 ng/ml; 24 h). Gene expression of caspase-3 was increased by IL-1{beta} (P < 0.05 vs. control; 100 ng/ml; 3 h), and pro-caspase-3 but not active caspase was detected in lysates of pig heart cells by Western blotting. MMP-2 gene expression as well as enzymatic activities of MMP-2 and MMP-9 were increased by IL-1{beta} (P < 0.05 vs. control; 100 ng/ml; 3 h for gene expression, 48 and 72 h for enzymatic activities of MMP-2 and MMP-9, respectively). Our in vitro data suggest that IL-1{beta} plays a major role in the events of tissue remodelling in the heart. Combined

  3. In vitro effect of leptin on anterior pituitary cells LH secretory activity during early pregnancy in pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siawrys, G; Gajewska, A

    2017-03-28

    Leptin modulates reproductive activity but its potential influence on LH secretion from anterior pituitary (AP) cells during implantation period in pigs (days 14-16 of pregnancy) remained unexplored. This study focused on determination whether leptin affects basal and GnRH-induced LH secretion and intracellular accumulation and whether leptin receptor (OB-Rb) mRNA is expressed in the AP gland during implantation in pigs. Four individual AP glands were developed into separate primary cultures. 2×105 cells/ml were preincubated (72 h) and next, for 3.5 h, experimentally treated with GnRH (100 ng/ml), leptin (10-11, 10-9, 10-7, 10-6 M) alone, or given in respective combinations with GnRH. In the AP gland, OB-Rb mRNA expression was determined by real-time PCR method. Leptin activated LH secretion and its concentration-dependent effect was observed as stimulation shown in a full range tested (culture 1) and exhibited only at 10-6 M (culture 2). A pooled data analysis revealed that basal LH secretion increased at 10-9, 10-7 and 10-6 M, but GnRH-induced LH release decreased at 10-6 M. Leptin down-regulated GnRH-induced LH secretion in all cultures, but only culture 3 exhibited sensitivity for all concentrations tested. Basal LH accumulation was activated in culture 1 (at 10-11 M) and inhibited in culture 4 (at 10-9 M). In the presence of GnRH leptin up-regulated LH accumulation with individual culture leptin-sensitivity (culture 1-3), while down-regulated LH accumulation in culture 4. Obtained data indicate that OB-Rb mRNA is expressed in the AP gland and leptin alone and in combination with GnRH specifically modulates LH activity during early pregnancy in pigs.

  4. Accumulation of phosphorylated beta-catenin enhances ROS-induced cell death in presenilin-deficient cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung H Boo

    Full Text Available Presenilin (PS is involved in many cellular events under physiological and pathological conditions. Previous reports have revealed that PS deficiency results in hyperproliferation and resistance to apoptotic cell death. In the present study, we investigated the effects of PS on beta-catenin and cell mortality during serum deprivation. Under these conditions, PS1/PS2 double-knockout MEFs showed aberrant accumulation of phospho-beta-catenin, higher ROS generation, and notable cell death. Inhibition of beta-catenin phosphorylation by LiCl reversed ROS generation and cell death in PS deficient cells. In addition, the K19/49R mutant form of beta-catenin, which undergoes normal phosphorylation but not ubiquitination, induced cytotoxicity, while the phosphorylation deficient S37A beta-catenin mutant failed to induce cytotoxicity. These results indicate that aberrant accumulation of phospho-beta-catenin underlies ROS-mediated cell death in the absence of PS. We propose that the regulation of beta-catenin is useful for identifying therapeutic targets of hyperproliferative diseases and other degenerative conditions.

  5. Improved cartilage regeneration utilizing mesenchymal stem cells in TGF-beta1 gene-activated scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, Huajia; Wang, Jinliang; Shen, Chao; Xia, Suhua; Guo, Ting; Dong, Lei; Zhang, Chenyu; Chen, Jiangning; Zhao, Jianning; Zhang, Junfeng

    2009-09-01

    Recently, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been paid more attention for cartilage regeneration. This study evaluated the potential of using MSCs seeded in plasmid transforming growth factor beta1 (pTGF-beta1)-activated three-dimensional chitosan/gelatin scaffolds for improving cartilage repair in vivo. Significant cell proliferation and transforming growth factor beta1 protein expression were observed in vitro in pTGFbeta1-activated scaffolds. Transforming growth factor beta1-activated scaffolds showed high collagen type II and aggrecan expression and low collagen type I expression during in vitro cultivation. MSC-based pTGF-beta1-activated scaffolds also exhibited cartilage histology with high secretion of collagen type II in vitro under the stimulation of pTGF-beta1. In rabbits with full-thickness cartilage defects, the implantation of MSC-based pTGF-beta1-activated scaffolds not only significantly promoted chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs and hyalin-like cartilage matrix synthesis, but also remarkably improved the overall repair of rabbit cartilage defects and exhibited favorable tissue integrity at 10 weeks postsurgery. These results suggest that MSC-based localized pTGF-beta1-activated scaffolds have potential applications for in vivo cartilage repair.

  6. The Cytotoxic Role of Intermittent High Glucose on Apoptosis and Cell Viability in Pancreatic Beta Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Glucose fluctuations are both strong predictor of diabetic complications and crucial factor for beta cell damages. Here we investigated the effect of intermittent high glucose (IHG on both cell apoptosis and proliferation activity in INS-1 cells and the potential mechanisms. Methods. Cells were treated with normal glucose (5.5 mmol/L, constant high glucose (CHG (25 mmol/L, and IHG (rotation per 24 h in 11.1 or 25 mmol/L for 7 days. Reactive oxygen species (ROS, xanthine oxidase (XOD level, apoptosis, cell viability, cell cycle, and expression of cyclinD1, p21, p27, and Skp2 were determined. Results. We found that IHG induced more significant apoptosis than CHG and normal glucose; intracellular ROS and XOD levels were more markedly increased in cells exposed to IHG. Cells treated with IHG showed significant decreased cell viability and increased cell proportion in G0/G1 phase. Cell cycle related proteins such as cyclinD1 and Skp2 were decreased significantly, but expressions of p27 and p21 were increased markedly. Conclusions. This study suggested that IHG plays a more toxic effect including both apoptosis-inducing and antiproliferative effects on INS-1 cells. Excessive activation of cellular stress and regulation of cyclins might be potential mechanism of impairment in INS-1 cells induced by IHG.

  7. Growth arrest- and DNA-damage-inducible 45beta gene inhibits c-Jun N-terminal kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase and decreases IL-1beta-induced apoptosis in insulin-producing INS-1E cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Claus Morten; Døssing, M G; Papa, S;

    2006-01-01

    IL-1beta is a candidate mediator of apoptotic beta cell destruction, a process that leads to type 1 diabetes and progression of type 2 diabetes. IL-1beta activates beta cell c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and p38, all of which are members of the mitogen...

  8. Glycemic control in diabetes is restored by therapeutic manipulation of cytokines that regulate beta cell stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasnain, Sumaira Z; Borg, Danielle J; Harcourt, Brooke E; Tong, Hui; Sheng, Yonghua H; Ng, Choa Ping; Das, Indrajit; Wang, Ran; Chen, Alice C-H; Loudovaris, Thomas; Kay, Thomas W; Thomas, Helen E; Whitehead, Jonathan P; Forbes, Josephine M; Prins, Johannes B; McGuckin, Michael A

    2014-12-01

    In type 2 diabetes, hyperglycemia is present when an increased demand for insulin, typically due to insulin resistance, is not met as a result of progressive pancreatic beta cell dysfunction. This defect in beta cell activity is typically characterized by impaired insulin biosynthesis and secretion, usually accompanied by oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. We demonstrate that multiple inflammatory cytokines elevated in diabetic pancreatic islets induce beta cell oxidative and ER stress, with interleukin-23 (IL-23), IL-24 and IL-33 being the most potent. Conversely, we show that islet-endogenous and exogenous IL-22, by regulating oxidative stress pathways, suppresses oxidative and ER stress caused by cytokines or glucolipotoxicity in mouse and human beta cells. In obese mice, antibody neutralization of IL-23 or IL-24 partially reduced beta cell ER stress and improved glucose tolerance, whereas IL-22 administration modulated oxidative stress regulatory genes in islets, suppressed ER stress and inflammation, promoted secretion of high-quality efficacious insulin and fully restored glucose homeostasis followed by restitution of insulin sensitivity. Thus, therapeutic manipulation of immune regulators of beta cell stress reverses the hyperglycemia central to diabetes pathology.

  9. Regulation of Pancreatic Beta Cell Stimulus-Secretion Coupling by microRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan L. S. Esguerra

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Increased blood glucose after a meal is countered by the subsequent increased release of the hypoglycemic hormone insulin from the pancreatic beta cells. The cascade of molecular events encompassing the initial sensing and transport of glucose into the beta cell, culminating with the exocytosis of the insulin large dense core granules (LDCVs is termed “stimulus-secretion coupling.” Impairment in any of the relevant processes leads to insufficient insulin release, which contributes to the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D. The fate of the beta cell, when exposed to environmental triggers of the disease, is determined by the possibility to adapt to the new situation by regulation of gene expression. As established factors of post-transcriptional regulation, microRNAs (miRNAs are well-recognized mediators of beta cell plasticity and adaptation. Here, we put focus on the importance of comprehending the transcriptional regulation of miRNAs, and how miRNAs are implicated in stimulus-secretion coupling, specifically those influencing the late stages of insulin secretion. We suggest that efficient beta cell adaptation requires an optimal balance between transcriptional regulation of miRNAs themselves, and miRNA-dependent gene regulation. The increased knowledge of the beta cell transcriptional network inclusive of non-coding RNAs such as miRNAs is essential in identifying novel targets for the treatment of T2D.

  10. Role of metabolic programming in the pathogenesis of beta-cell failure in postnatal life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Rebecca A

    2007-06-01

    Intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) has been linked to later development of type 2 diabetes in adulthood. Human studies indicate that individuals who were growth retarded at birth have impaired insulin secretion and insulin resistance. Multiple animal models of IUGR demonstrate impaired beta-cell function and development. We have developed a model of IUGR in the rat that leads to diabetes in adulthood with the salient features of most forms of type 2 diabetes in the human: progressive defects in insulin secretion and insulin action prior to the onset of overt hyperglycemia. Decreased beta-cell proliferation leads to a progressive decline in beta-cell mass. Using this model, we have tested the hypothesis that uteroplacental insufficiency disrupts the function of the electron transport chain in the fetal beta-cell and leads to a debilitating cascade of events: increased production of reactive oxygen species, which in turn damage mitochondrial (mt) mtDNA and causes further production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The net result is progressive loss of beta-cell function and eventual development of type 2 diabetes in the adult. Studies in the IUGR rat also demonstrate that an abnormal intrauterine environment induces epigenetic modifications of key genes regulating beta-cell development; experiments directly link chromatin remodeling with suppression of transcription. Future research will be directed at elucidating the mechanisms underlying epigenetic modifications in offspring.

  11. Studies on responsiveness of hepatoma cells to catecholamines. II. Comparison of beta-adrenergic responsiveness of rat ascites hepatoma cells with cultured normal rat liver cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, K; Matsunaga, T; Takemoto, N; Sanae, F; Koshiura, R

    1985-05-01

    The pharmacological properties of beta-adrenoceptors in rat ascites hepatoma cells were compared with those in normal rat liver cells which were cultured for 24 hr after collagenase digestion. Adenylate cyclases in the homogenates of cultured normal rat liver cells and rat ascites hepatoma cells, AH44, AH66, AH109A, AH130 and AH7974, were all activated by isoproterenol or NaF to different degrees. The enzyme in rat liver cells was activated by several beta 2-agonists but those in all hepatoma cells hardly responded. Furthermore, salbutamol, a beta 2-partial agonist, antagonized the cyclase activation by isoproterenol in AH130 cells. The Kact value of isoproterenol for the activation of adenylate cyclase in AH130 cells was smaller than that in rat liver cells. A comparison of the Ki values of beta-antagonists for the inhibition of isoproterenol-stimulated cyclase activity shows that while the Ki values of propranolol and butoxamine in AH130 cells were similar to those in rat liver cells, a significant difference was observed in the values for beta 1-selective antagonists between AH130 cells and rat liver cells. The Ki values of metoprolol and atenolol for AH130 cells were 137- and 90-fold lower, respectively, than for normal rat liver cells. From these findings, it is strongly suggested that beta-adrenoceptors in rat ascites hepatoma cells including AH130 cells have similar properties to the mammalian beta 1-receptor.

  12. The effect of smoking cessation pharmacotherapies on pancreatic beta cell function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woynillowicz, Amanda K. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada L8N 3Z5 (Canada); Raha, Sandeep [Department of Pediatrics, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada L8N 3Z5 (Canada); Nicholson, Catherine J. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada L8N 3Z5 (Canada); Holloway, Alison C., E-mail: hollow@mcmaster.ca [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada L8N 3Z5 (Canada)

    2012-11-15

    The goal of our study was to evaluate whether drugs currently used for smoking cessation (i.e., nicotine replacement therapy, varenicline [a partial agonist at nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR)] and bupropion [which acts in part as a nAChR antagonist]) can affect beta cell function and determine the mechanism(s) of this effect. INS-1E cells, a rat beta cell line, were treated with nicotine, varenicline and bupropion to determine their effects on beta cell function, mitochondrial electron transport chain enzyme activity and cellular/oxidative stress. Treatment of INS-1E cells with equimolar concentrations (1 μM) of three test compounds resulted in an ablation of normal glucose-stimulated insulin secretion by the cells. This disruption of normal beta cell function was associated with mitochondrial dysfunction since all three compounds tested significantly decreased the activity of mitochondrial electron transport chain enzyme activity. These results raise the possibility that the currently available smoking cessation pharmacotherapies may also have adverse effects on beta cell function and thus glycemic control in vivo. Therefore whether or not the use of nicotine replacement therapy, varenicline and bupropion can cause endocrine changes which are consistent with impaired pancreatic function warrants further investigation. -- Highlights: ► Smoking cessation drugs have the potential to disrupt beta cell function in vitro. ► The effects of nicotine, varenicline and bupropion are similar. ► The impaired beta cell function is mediated by mitochondrial dysfunction. ► If similar effects are seen in vivo, these drugs may increase the risk of diabetes.

  13. Alpha9beta1 integrin in melanoma cells can signal different adhesion states for migration and anchorage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lydolph, Magnus C; Morgan-Fisher, Marie; Høye, Anette M

    2009-01-01

    Cell surface integrins are the primary receptors for cell migration on extracellular matrix, and exist in several activation states regulated in part by ectodomain conformation. The alpha9 integrin subunit, which pairs only with beta1, has specific roles in the immune system and may regulate cell...... migration. Melanoma cells express abundant alpha9beta1 integrin, and its role in cell migration was assessed. Ligands derived from Tenascin-C and ADAM12 supported alpha9beta1 integrin-mediated cell attachment and GTP-Rac dependent migration, but not focal adhesion formation. Manganese ions induced alpha9......beta1 integrin- and Rho kinase-dependent focal adhesion and stress fibre formation, suggesting that the activation status of alpha9beta1 integrin was altered. The effect of manganese ions in promoting focal adhesion formation was reproduced by beta1 integrin activating antibody. The alpha9beta1...

  14. Tumor cell adhesion to endothelial cells is increased by endotoxin via an upregulation of beta-1 integrin expression.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Andrews, E J

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Recent studies have demonstrated that metastatic disease develops from tumor cells that adhere to endothelial cells and proliferate intravascularly. The beta-1 integrin family and its ligand laminin have been shown to be important in tumor-to-endothelial cell adhesion. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has been implicated in the increased metastatic tumor growth that is seen postoperatively. We postulated that LPS increases tumor cell expression of beta-1 integrins and that this leads to increased adhesion. METHODS: The human metastatic colon cancer cell line LS174T was labeled with an enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) using retroviral transfection. Cell cultures were treated with LPS for 1, 2, and 4 h (n = 6 each) and were subsequently cocultured for 30 or 120 min with confluent human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), to allow adherence. Adherent tumor cells were counted using fluorescence microscopy. These experiments were carried out in the presence or absence of a functional blocking beta-1 integrin monoclonal antibody (4B4). Expression of beta-1 integrin and laminin on tumor and HUVECs was assessed using flow cytometric analysis. Tumor cell NF-kappaB activation after incubation with LPS was measured. RESULTS: Tumor cell and HUVEC beta-1 integrin expression and HUVEC expression of laminin were significantly (P < 0.05) enhanced after incubation with LPS. Tumor cell adhesion to HUVECs was significantly increased. Addition of the beta-1 integrin blocking antibody reduced tumor cell adhesion to control levels. LPS increased tumor cell NF-kappaB activation. CONCLUSIONS: Exposure to LPS increases tumor cell adhesion to the endothelium through a beta-1 integrin-mediated pathway that is NF-kappaB dependent. This may provide a target for immunotherapy directed at reducing postoperative metastatic tumor growth.

  15. Secretory cavities and volatiles of Myrrhinium atropurpureum Schott var. atropurpureum (Myrtaceae): an endemic species collected in the restingas of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victório, Cristiane Pimentel; Moreira, Claudio B; Souza, Marcelo da Costa; Sato, Alice; Arruda, Rosani do Carmo de Oliveira

    2011-07-01

    In this study, we investigated the leaf anatomy and the composition of volatiles in Myrrhinium atropurpureum var. atropurpureum endemic to Rio de Janeiro restingas. Particularly, leaf secretory structures were described using light microscopy, and histochemical tests were performed from fresh leaves to localize the secondary metabolites. To observe secretory cavities, fixed leaf samples were free-hand sectioned. To evaluate lipophilic compounds and terpenoids the following reagents were employed: Sudans III and IV, Red oil O and Nile blue. Leaf volatiles were characterized by gas chromatography after hydrodistillation (HD) or simultaneous distillation-extraction (SDE). Leaf analysis showed several cavities in mesophyll that are the main sites of lipophilic and terpenoid production. Monoterpenes, which represented more than 80% of the major volatiles, were characterized mainly by alpha- and beta-pinene and 1,8-cineole. In order to provide tools for M. atropurpureum identification, the following distinguishing characteristics were revealed by the following data: 1) adaxial face clear and densely punctuated by the presence of round or ellipsoidal secretory cavities randomly distributed in the mesophyll; 2) the presence of cells overlying the upper neck cells of secretory cavities; 3) the presence of numerous paracytic stomata distributed on the abaxial leaf surface, but absent in vein regions and leaf margin; and 4) non-glandular trichomes on both leaf surfaces. Our study of the compounds produced by the secretory cavities of M. atropurpureum led us to conclude that volatile terpenoid class are the main secretory compounds and that they consist of a high concentration of monoterpenes, which may indicate the phytotherapeutic importance of this plant.