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Sample records for beta cell expansion

  1. Beta1 integrin-mediated adhesion signalling is essential for epidermal progenitor cell expansion.

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    Aleksandra Piwko-Czuchra

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is a major discrepancy between the in vitro and in vivo results regarding the role of beta1 integrins in the maintenance of epidermal stem/progenitor cells. Studies of mice with skin-specific ablation of beta1 integrins suggested that epidermis can form and be maintained in their absence, while in vitro data have shown a fundamental role for these adhesion receptors in stem/progenitor cell expansion and differentiation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To elucidate this discrepancy we generated hypomorphic mice expressing reduced beta1 integrin levels on keratinocytes that developed similar, but less severe defects than mice with beta1-deficient keratinocytes. Surprisingly we found that upon aging these abnormalities attenuated due to a rapid expansion of cells, which escaped or compensated for the down-regulation of beta1 integrin expression. A similar phenomenon was observed in aged mice with a complete, skin-specific ablation of the beta1 integrin gene, where cells that escaped Cre-mediated recombination repopulated the mutant skin in a very short time period. The expansion of beta1 integrin expressing keratinocytes was even further accelerated in situations of increased keratinocyte proliferation such as wound healing. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data demonstrate that expression of beta1 integrins is critically important for the expansion of epidermal progenitor cells to maintain epidermal homeostasis.

  2. Beta1 integrin-mediated adhesion signalling is essential for epidermal progenitor cell expansion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piwko-Czuchra, Aleksandra; Koegel, Heidi; Meyer, Hannelore

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is a major discrepancy between the in vitro and in vivo results regarding the role of beta1 integrins in the maintenance of epidermal stem/progenitor cells. Studies of mice with skin-specific ablation of beta1 integrins suggested that epidermis can form and be maintained in thei...... of increased keratinocyte proliferation such as wound healing. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data demonstrate that expression of beta1 integrins is critically important for the expansion of epidermal progenitor cells to maintain epidermal homeostasis....... that developed similar, but less severe defects than mice with beta1-deficient keratinocytes. Surprisingly we found that upon aging these abnormalities attenuated due to a rapid expansion of cells, which escaped or compensated for the down-regulation of beta1 integrin expression. A similar phenomenon...... was observed in aged mice with a complete, skin-specific ablation of the beta1 integrin gene, where cells that escaped Cre-mediated recombination repopulated the mutant skin in a very short time period. The expansion of beta1 integrin expressing keratinocytes was even further accelerated in situations...

  3. Early peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma regulated genes involved in expansion of pancreatic beta cell mass

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    Vivas Yurena

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The progression towards type 2 diabetes depends on the allostatic response of pancreatic beta cells to synthesise and secrete enough insulin to compensate for insulin resistance. The endocrine pancreas is a plastic tissue able to expand or regress in response to the requirements imposed by physiological and pathophysiological states associated to insulin resistance such as pregnancy, obesity or ageing, but the mechanisms mediating beta cell mass expansion in these scenarios are not well defined. We have recently shown that ob/ob mice with genetic ablation of PPARγ2, a mouse model known as the POKO mouse failed to expand its beta cell mass. This phenotype contrasted with the appropriate expansion of the beta cell mass observed in their obese littermate ob/ob mice. Thus, comparison of these models islets particularly at early ages could provide some new insights on early PPARγ dependent transcriptional responses involved in the process of beta cell mass expansion Results Here we have investigated PPARγ dependent transcriptional responses occurring during the early stages of beta cell adaptation to insulin resistance in wild type, ob/ob, PPARγ2 KO and POKO mice. We have identified genes known to regulate both the rate of proliferation and the survival signals of beta cells. Moreover we have also identified new pathways induced in ob/ob islets that remained unchanged in POKO islets, suggesting an important role for PPARγ in maintenance/activation of mechanisms essential for the continued function of the beta cell. Conclusions Our data suggest that the expansion of beta cell mass observed in ob/ob islets is associated with the activation of an immune response that fails to occur in POKO islets. We have also indentified other PPARγ dependent differentially regulated pathways including cholesterol biosynthesis, apoptosis through TGF-β signaling and decreased oxidative phosphorylation.

  4. Beta cell adaptation in pregnancy

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    Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    2016-01-01

    Pregnancy is associated with a compensatory increase in beta cell mass. It is well established that somatolactogenic hormones contribute to the expansion both indirectly by their insulin antagonistic effects and directly by their mitogenic effects on the beta cells via receptors for prolactin...... and growth hormone expressed in rodent beta cells. However, the beta cell expansion in human pregnancy seems to occur by neogenesis of beta cells from putative progenitor cells rather than by proliferation of existing beta cells. Claes Hellerström has pioneered the research on beta cell growth for decades...... in the expansion of the beta cell mass in human pregnancy, and the relative roles of endocrine factors and nutrients....

  5. Clonal expansion of T-cell receptor beta gene segment in the retrocochlear lesions of EAE mice.

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    Cheng, K C; Lee, K M; Yoo, T J

    1998-01-01

    It has been reported that the T cell receptor V beta 8.2 (TcrbV8.2) gene segment is predominantly expressed in encephalomyelitic T cells responding to myelin basic protein (MBP) in experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) mice. We have demonstrated retrocochlear hearing loss in EAE mice in previous studies. Administration of a monoclonal antibody specific to the T cell receptor V beta 8 (TcrbV8) subfamily prevented both this type of hearing loss and the central nerve disease. In this study, we examined the role of the TcrbV8.2 gene segment in the retrocochlear lesions of EAE mice. A clonal expression of T cell receptor beta chain gene segment (TcrbV8.2-TcrbD2-TcrbJ2.7) was identified in the retrocochlear lesions. The TcrbV8.2 gene segment appears to recombine only with TcrbJ2.1 (32.1%) and TcrbJ2.7 (67.9%) gene segments. The TcrbJ2.7 gene segment has also been previously identified as the dominant TcrbJ gene in the lymph nodes of EAE mice. Only TcrbD2, with a length of 4 amino acids, was observed recombining with these TcrbV8.2 sequences. G and C nucleotides are predominantly expressed at the N regions between the V-D and D-J junctions. This dominant TcrbV gene segment (TcrbV8.2-TcrbD2-TcrbJ2.7) observed in the retrocochlear lesions has been identified in the MBP-specific T cells from the lymph nodes of EAE mice. These results suggest that a small subset of antigen-specific T cells migrate to, and expand at, the retrocochlear lesions, which leads to hearing loss.

  6. Regulation of beta cell replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Ying C; Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    2008-01-01

    Beta cell mass, at any given time, is governed by cell differentiation, neogenesis, increased or decreased cell size (cell hypertrophy or atrophy), cell death (apoptosis), and beta cell proliferation. Nutrients, hormones and growth factors coupled with their signalling intermediates have been...... suggested to play a role in beta cell mass regulation. In addition, genetic mouse model studies have indicated that cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases that determine cell cycle progression are involved in beta cell replication, and more recently, menin in association with cyclin-dependent kinase...... inhibitors has been demonstrated to be important in beta cell growth. In this review, we consider and highlight some aspects of cell cycle regulation in relation to beta cell replication. The role of cell cycle regulation in beta cell replication is mostly from studies in rodent models, but whether...

  7. Hausdorff dimension of unique beta expansions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong, Derong; Li, Wenxia

    2015-01-01

    Given an integer N ⩾ 2 and a real number β > 1, let Γ β, N be the set of all x=∑ i=1 ∞ d i /β i with d i  ∈ {0, 1, ···, N − 1} for all i ⩾ 1. The infinite sequence (d i ) is called a β-expansion of x. Let U β,N be the set of all x's in Γ β,N which have unique β-expansions. We give explicit formula of the Hausdorff dimension of U β,N for β in any admissible interval [β L , β U ], where β L is a purely Parry number while β U is a transcendental number whose quasi-greedy expansion of 1 is related to the classical Thue–Morse sequence. This allows us to calculate the Hausdorff dimension of U β,N for almost every β > 1. In particular, this improves the main results of Gábor Kallós (1999, 2001). Moreover, we find that the dimension function f(β) = dim H U β,N fluctuates frequently for β ∈ (1, N). (paper)

  8. Quasi-Periodic beta-Expansions and Cut Languages

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šíma, Jiří; Savický, Petr

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 720, 11 April (2018), s. 1-23 ISSN 0304-3975 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP202/12/G061 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : beta-expansion * quasi-periodicity * Pisot number * cut language * Chomsky hierarchy Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science OBOR OECD: Computer sciences, information science, bioinformathics (hardware development to be 2.2, social aspect to be 5.8) Impact factor: 0.698, year: 2016

  9. Quasi-Periodic beta-Expansions and Cut Languages

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šíma, Jiří; Savický, Petr

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 720, 11 April (2018), s. 1-23 ISSN 0304-3975 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP202/12/G061 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : beta-expansion * quasi-periodicity * Pisot number * cut language * Chomsky hierarchy Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science OBOR OECD: Computer science s, information science , bioinformathics (hardware development to be 2.2, social aspect to be 5.8) Impact factor: 0.698, year: 2016

  10. Beta Cell Workshop 2013 Kyoto

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heller, R Scott; Madsen, Ole D; Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    2013-01-01

    The very modern Kyoto International Conference Center provided the site for the 8th workshop on Beta cells on April 23-26, 2013. The preceding workshops were held in Boston, USA (1991); Kyoto, Japan (1994); Helsingør, Denmark (1997); Helsinki, Finland (2003); El Perello, Spain (2006); Peebles...

  11. Transgenic overexpression of active calcineurin in beta-cells results in decreased beta-cell mass and hyperglycemia.

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    Ernesto Bernal-Mizrachi

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Glucose modulates beta-cell mass and function through an initial depolarization and Ca(2+ influx, which then triggers a number of growth regulating signaling pathways. One of the most important downstream effectors in Ca(2+ signaling is the calcium/Calmodulin activated serine threonine phosphatase, calcineurin. Recent evidence suggests that calcineurin/NFAT is essential for beta-cell proliferation, and that in its absence loss of beta-cells results in diabetes. We hypothesized that in contrast, activation of calcineurin might result in expansion of beta-cell mass and resistance to diabetes.To determine the role of activation of calcineurin signaling in the regulation of pancreatic beta-cell mass and proliferation, we created mice that expressed a constitutively active form of calcineurin under the insulin gene promoter (caCn(RIP. To our surprise, these mice exhibited glucose intolerance. In vitro studies demonstrated that while the second phase of Insulin secretion is enhanced, the overall insulin secretory response was conserved. Islet morphometric studies demonstrated decreased beta-cell mass suggesting that this was a major component responsible for altered Insulin secretion and glucose intolerance in caCn(RIP mice. The reduced beta-cell mass was accompanied by decreased proliferation and enhanced apoptosis.Our studies identify calcineurin as an important factor in controlling glucose homeostasis and indicate that chronic depolarization leading to increased calcineurin activity may contribute, along with other genetic and environmental factors, to beta-cell dysfunction and diabetes.

  12. Intersections of homogeneous Cantor sets and beta-expansions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong, Derong; Li, Wenxia; Dekking, F Michel

    2010-01-01

    Let Γ β,N be the N-part homogeneous Cantor set with β in (1/(2N − 1), 1/N). Any string (j l ) l=1 ∞ with j l in {0, ±1, ..., ±(N − 1)} such that t=Σ l=1 ∞ j l β l-1 (1-β)/(N-1) is called a code of t. Let U β,±N be the set of t in [−1, 1] having a unique code, and let S β,±N be the set of t element of U β,±N which makes the intersection Γ β,N intersection (Γ β,N + t) a self-similar set. We characterize the set U β,±N in a geometrical and algebraical way, and give a sufficient and necessary condition for t element of S β,±N . Using techniques from beta-expansions, we show that there is a critical point β c in (1/(2N − 1), 1/N), which is a transcendental number, such that U β,±N has positive Hausdorff dimension if β in (1/(2N − 1), β c ), and contains countably infinite many elements if β in (β c , 1/N). Moreover, there exists a second critical point α c =[N+1-√((N-1)(N+3))]/2 element of (1/(2N-1),β c ) such that S β,±N has positive Hausdorff dimension if β in (1/(2N − 1), α c ), and contains countably infinite many elements if β in [α c , 1/N)

  13. Insulin-producing cells generated from dedifferentiated human pancreatic beta cells expanded in vitro.

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    Holger A Russ

    Full Text Available Expansion of beta cells from the limited number of adult human islet donors is an attractive prospect for increasing cell availability for cell therapy of diabetes. However, attempts at expanding human islet cells in tissue culture result in loss of beta-cell phenotype. Using a lineage-tracing approach we provided evidence for massive proliferation of beta-cell-derived (BCD cells within these cultures. Expansion involves dedifferentiation resembling epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT. Epigenetic analyses indicate that key beta-cell genes maintain open chromatin structure in expanded BCD cells, although they are not transcribed. Here we investigated whether BCD cells can be redifferentiated into beta-like cells.Redifferentiation conditions were screened by following activation of an insulin-DsRed2 reporter gene. Redifferentiated cells were characterized for gene expression, insulin content and secretion assays, and presence of secretory vesicles by electron microscopy. BCD cells were induced to redifferentiate by a combination of soluble factors. The redifferentiated cells expressed beta-cell genes, stored insulin in typical secretory vesicles, and released it in response to glucose. The redifferentiation process involved mesenchymal-epithelial transition, as judged by changes in gene expression. Moreover, inhibition of the EMT effector SLUG (SNAI2 using shRNA resulted in stimulation of redifferentiation. Lineage-traced cells also gave rise at a low rate to cells expressing other islet hormones, suggesting transition of BCD cells through an islet progenitor-like stage during redifferentiation.These findings demonstrate for the first time that expanded dedifferentiated beta cells can be induced to redifferentiate in culture. The findings suggest that ex-vivo expansion of adult human islet cells is a promising approach for generation of insulin-producing cells for transplantation, as well as basic research, toxicology studies, and drug

  14. Clusters of conserved beta cell marker genes for assessment of beta cell phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martens, Geert A; Jiang, Lei; Hellemans, Karine H

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish a gene expression blueprint of pancreatic beta cells conserved from rodents to humans and to evaluate its applicability to assess shifts in the beta cell differentiated state. Genome-wide mRNA expression profiles of isolated beta cells were compared to those...... of a large panel of other tissue and cell types, and transcripts with beta cell-abundant and -selective expression were identified. Iteration of this analysis in mouse, rat and human tissues generated a panel of conserved beta cell biomarkers. This panel was then used to compare isolated versus laser capture...

  15. IFN-beta inhibits T cell activation capacity of central nervous system APCs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teige, Ingrid; Liu, Yawei; Issazadeh-Navikas, Shohreh

    2006-01-01

    We have previously investigated the physiological effects of IFN-beta on chronic CNS inflammation and shown that IFN-beta(-/-) mice develop a more severe experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis than their IFN-beta(+/-) littermates. This result was shown to be associated with a higher activation...... state of the glial cells and a higher T cell cytokine production in the CNS. Because this state suggested a down-regulatory effect of IFN-beta on CNS-specific APCs, these results were investigated further. We report that IFN-beta pretreatment of astrocytes and microglia (glial cells) indeed down......-modulate their capacity to activate autoreactive Th1 cells. First, we investigated the intrinsic ability of glial cells as APCs and report that glial cells prevent autoreactive Th1 cells expansion while maintaining Ag-specific T cell effector functions. However, when the glial cells are treated with IFN-beta before...

  16. Clusters of conserved beta cell marker genes for assessment of beta cell phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martens, Geert A; Jiang, Lei; Hellemans, Karine H

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish a gene expression blueprint of pancreatic beta cells conserved from rodents to humans and to evaluate its applicability to assess shifts in the beta cell differentiated state. Genome-wide mRNA expression profiles of isolated beta cells were compared to those...... of a large panel of other tissue and cell types, and transcripts with beta cell-abundant and -selective expression were identified. Iteration of this analysis in mouse, rat and human tissues generated a panel of conserved beta cell biomarkers. This panel was then used to compare isolated versus laser capture...... microdissected beta cells, monitor adaptations of the beta cell phenotype to fasting, and retrieve possible conserved transcriptional regulators....

  17. Beta cell proliferation and growth factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Høiriis; Svensson, C; Møldrup, Annette

    1999-01-01

    Formation of new beta cells can take place by two pathways: replication of already differentiated beta cells or neogenesis from putative islet stem cells. Under physiological conditions both processes are most pronounced during the fetal and neonatal development of the pancreas. In adulthood little...... increase in the beta cell number seems to occur. In pregnancy, however, a marked hyperplasia of the beta cells is observed both in rodents and man. Increased mitotic activity has been seen both in vivo and in vitro in islets exposed to placental lactogen (PL), prolactin (PRL) and growth hormone (GH...... and activation of the tyrosine kinase JAK2 and the transcription factors STAT1 and 3. The activation of the insulin gene however also requires the distal part of the receptor and activation of calcium uptake and STAT5. In order to identify putative autocrine growth factors or targets for growth factors we have...

  18. Role of MicroRNAs in Islet Beta-Cell Compensation and Failure during Diabetes

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    Valérie Plaisance

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic beta-cell function and mass are markedly adaptive to compensate for the changes in insulin requirement observed during several situations such as pregnancy, obesity, glucocorticoids excess, or administration. This requires a beta-cell compensation which is achieved through a gain of beta-cell mass and function. Elucidating the physiological mechanisms that promote functional beta-cell mass expansion and that protect cells against death, is a key therapeutic target for diabetes. In this respect, several recent studies have emphasized the instrumental role of microRNAs in the control of beta-cell function. MicroRNAs are negative regulators of gene expression, and are pivotal for the control of beta-cell proliferation, function, and survival. On the one hand, changes in specific microRNA levels have been associated with beta-cell compensation and are triggered by hormones or bioactive peptides that promote beta-cell survival and function. Conversely, modifications in the expression of other specific microRNAs contribute to beta-cell dysfunction and death elicited by diabetogenic factors including, cytokines, chronic hyperlipidemia, hyperglycemia, and oxidized LDL. This review underlines the importance of targeting the microRNA network for future innovative therapies aiming at preventing the beta-cell decline in diabetes.

  19. Expansion of mycobacterium-reactive gamma delta T cells by a subset of memory helper T cells.

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    Vila, L M; Haftel, H M; Park, H S; Lin, M S; Romzek, N C; Hanash, S M; Holoshitz, J

    1995-04-01

    Human gamma delta T cells expressing the V gamma 9/V delta 2 T-cell receptor have been previously found to proliferate in response to certain microorganisms and to expand throughout life, presumably because of extrathymic activation by foreign antigens. In vitro expansion of V gamma 9/V delta 2 cells by mycobacteria has been previously shown to be dependent on accessory cells. In order to gain an insight into the mechanisms involved in the expansion of these cells, we have undertaken to identify the peripheral blood subset of cells on which proliferation of V gamma 9/V delta 2 cells in response to mycobacteria is dependent. Contrary to their role in antigen presentation to alpha beta T cells, professional antigen-presenting cells, such as monocytes, B cells, and dendritic cells, were unable to provide the cellular support for the expansion of V gamma 9/V delta 2 cells. Selective depletion of T-cell subsets, as well as the use of highly purified T-cell populations, indicated that the only subset of peripheral blood cells that could expand V gamma 9/V delta 2 cells were CD4+ CD45RO+ CD7- alpha beta T cells. These cells underwent distinct intracellular signaling events after stimulation with the mycobacterial antigen. Expansion of V gamma 9/V delta 2 cells by alpha beta T cells was dependent on cell-cell contact. This is the first evidence that a small subset of the memory helper T-cell population is exclusively responsible for the peripheral expansion of V gamma 9/V delta 2 cells. These data illustrate a unique aspect of antigen recognition by gamma delta T cells and provide new means to study their immune defense role.

  20. Proton microprobe analysis of pancreatic. beta. cells

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    Lindh, U [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Gustaf Werner Inst.; Juntti-Berggren, L; Berggren, P O; Hellman, B [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)

    1985-01-01

    Freeze-dried pancreas sections from obese hyperglycemic mice were subjected to proton bombardment and the elemental contents in the ..beta.. cells and the exocrine part were obtained from the characteristic X-rays emitted. Quantitative data were provided for 18 different elements. The mole ratio between K and Na exceeded 10, implying that neither the sample preparation nor the irradiation had induced significant diffuse changes. With the demonstration of this high K/Na ratio it seems likely that also the ..beta.. cells are equipped with an efficient Na/sup +//K/sup +/ pump. The ..beta.. cells contained about 70 mmoles Cl per litre cell water. Observed amounts of Ca and Mg were equivalent to those previously recorded by electrothermal atomic absorption spectroscopy. The significant role of Zn for the storage of insulin was emphasized by the demonstration of 3 times as much of this element in the ..beta.. cells as compared with the exocrine pancreas. In addition, the sensitivity of the proton microprobe enabled measurements of various trace elements such as Rb, Cr, Cu, Al and Pb not previously demonstrated in the pancreatic ..beta.. cells.

  1. What are the potential benefits of clinical beta-cell imaging in diabetes mellitus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göke, Burkhard

    2010-05-01

    Previously, studies of the endocrine pancreatic beta-cell were mainly performed ex vivo by morphological means. This data supported the analysis of pathophysiological changes in the pancreatic islet during insults such as diabetes mellitus. Metabolic testing of the pancreatic islet by assaying hormone parameters such als plasma insulin or C-peptide combined with more or less sophisticated calculations allowed conclusions about states of insulin resistance or secretory failure. It also allowed certain correlations of endocrine function with beta-cell mass. Today, with firmer pathophysiological concepts about beta-cell failure, modern protocols of islet transplantation, and drugs on the market coming with promises of preservation or even expansion of beta-cell mass in diabetes mellitus it has become very attractive to search for tools measuring beta-cell mass, if possible even repeatingly in the same organism in vivo. From a clinical point of view, the potential of pancreatic beta-cell mass imaging technologies is looked upon with high expectations. Methodologically, the decisive question is whether it is likely that future beta-cell imaging will provide significant advantages over the metabolic methods already in hand. With new in vivo tools, studies of beta-cell mass and function may offer even new approaches stratifying patients to anti-diabetic therapies.

  2. Redox Homeostasis in Pancreatic beta Cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ježek, Petr; Dlasková, Andrea; Plecitá-Hlavatá, Lydie

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 2012, č. 2012 (2012), s. 932838 ISSN 1942-0900 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/10/0346; GA ČR(CZ) GPP304/10/P204 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : beta cells * reactive oxygen species homeostasis * mitochondria Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition Impact factor: 3.393, year: 2012

  3. Characterization of a Commercial Silicon Beta Cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foxe, Michael P.; Hayes, James C.; Mayer, Michael F.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Sivels, Ciara B.; Suarez, Rey

    2016-01-01

    Silicon detectors are of interest for the verification of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) due to their enhanced energy resolution compared to plastic scintillators beta cells. Previous work developing a figure-of-merit (FOM) for comparison of beta cells suggests that the minimum detectable activity (MDA) could be reduced by a factor of two to three with the use of silicon detectors. Silicon beta cells have been developed by CEA (France) and Lares Ltd. (Russia), with the PIPSBox developed by CEA being commercially available from Canberra for approximately $35k, but there is still uncertainty about the reproducibility of the capabilities in the field. PNNL is developing a high-resolution beta-gamma detector system in the shallow underground laboratory, which will utilize and characterize the operation of the PIPSBox detector. Throughout this report, we examine the capabilities of the PIPSBox as developed by CEA. The lessons learned through the testing and use of the PIPSBox will allow PNNL to strategically develop a silicon detector optimized to better suit the communities needs in the future.

  4. In vitro proliferation of adult human beta-cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Rutti

    Full Text Available A decrease in functional beta-cell mass is a key feature of type 2 diabetes. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1 analogues induce proliferation of rodent beta-cells. However, the proliferative capacity of human beta-cells and its modulation by GLP-1 analogues remain to be fully investigated. We therefore sought to quantify adult human beta-cell proliferation in vitro and whether this is affected by the GLP-1 analogue liraglutide.Human islets from 7 adult cadaveric organ donors were dispersed into single cells. Beta-cells were purified by FACS. Non-sorted cells and the beta-cell enriched ("beta-cells" population were plated on extracellular matrix from rat (804G and human bladder carcinoma cells (HTB9 or bovine corneal endothelial ECM (BCEC. Cells were maintained in culture+/-liraglutide for 4 days in the presence of BrdU.Rare human beta-cell proliferation could be observed either in the purified beta-cell population (0.051±0.020%; 22 beta-cells proliferating out of 84'283 beta-cells counted or in the non-sorted cell population (0.055±0.011%; 104 proliferating beta-cells out of 232'826 beta-cells counted, independently of the matrix or the culture conditions. Liraglutide increased human beta-cell proliferation on BCEC in the non-sorted cell population (0.082±0.034% proliferating beta-cells vs. 0.017±0.008% in control, p<0.05.These results indicate that adult human beta-cell proliferation can occur in vitro but remains an extremely rare event with these donors and particular culture conditions. Liraglutide increases beta-cell proliferation only in the non-sorted cell population and only on BCEC. However, it cannot be excluded that human beta-cells may proliferate to a greater extent in situ in response to natural stimuli.

  5. Expression of transforming growth factor beta (TGF beta) receptors and expression of TGF beta 1, TGF beta 2 and TGF beta 3 in human small cell lung cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damstrup, L; Rygaard, K; Spang-Thomsen, M

    1993-01-01

    A panel of 21 small cell lung cancer cell (SCLC) lines were examined for the presence of Transforming growth factor beta receptors (TGF beta-r) and the expression of TGF beta mRNAs. By the radioreceptor assay we found high affinity receptors to be expressed in six cell lines. scatchard analysis......(r) = 65,000 and 90,000 and the betaglycan (type III) with M(r) = 280,000. Northern blotting showed expression of TGF beta 1 mRNA in ten, TGF beta 2 mRNA in two and TGF beta 3 mRNA in seven cell lines. Our results provide, for the first time, evidence that a large proportion of a broad panel of SCLC cell...... lines express TGF beta-receptors and also produce TGF beta mRNAs....

  6. Application of inverse models and XRD analysis to the determination of Ti-17 {beta}-phase coefficients of thermal expansion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freour, S. [GeM, Institut de Recherche en Genie Civil et Mecanique (UMR CNRS 6183), Universite de Nantes, Ecole Centrale de Nantes, 37 Boulevard de l' Universite, BP 406, 44 602 Saint-Nazaire cedex (France)]. E-mail: freour@crttsn.univ-nantes.fr; Gloaguen, D. [GeM, Institut de Recherche en Genie Civil et Mecanique (UMR CNRS 6183), Universite de Nantes, Ecole Centrale de Nantes, 37 Boulevard de l' Universite, BP 406, 44 602 Saint-Nazaire cedex (France); Francois, M. [Laboratoire des Systemes Mecaniques et d' Ingenierie Simultanee (LASMIS FRE CNRS 2719), Universite de Technologie de Troyes, 12 Rue Marie Curie, BP 2060, 10010 Troyes (France); Guillen, R. [GeM, Institut de Recherche en Genie Civil et Mecanique (UMR CNRS 6183), Universite de Nantes, Ecole Centrale de Nantes, 37 Boulevard de l' Universite, BP 406, 44 602 Saint-Nazaire cedex (France)

    2006-04-15

    scope of this work is the determination of the coefficients of thermal expansion of the Ti-17 {beta}-phase. A rigorous inverse thermo-elastic self-consistent scale transition micro-mechanical model extended to multi-phase materials was used. The experimental data required for the application of the inverse method were obtained from both the available literature and especially dedicated X-ray diffraction lattice strain measurements performed on the studied ({alpha} + {beta}) two-phase titanium alloy.

  7. Fetal liver stromal cells promote hematopoietic cell expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Kun; Hu, Caihong; Zhou, Zhigang; Huang, Lifang; Liu, Wenli; Sun, Hanying

    2009-01-01

    Future application of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) in clinical therapies largely depends on their successful expansion in vitro. Fetal liver (FL) is a unique hematopoietic organ in which hematopoietic cells markedly expand in number, but the mechanisms involved remain unclear. Stromal cells (StroCs) have been suggested to provide a suitable cellular environment for in vitro expansion of HSPCs. In this study, murine StroCs derived from FL at E14.5, with a high level of Sonic hedgehog (Shh) and Wnt expression, were found to have an increased ability to support the proliferation of HSPCs. This effect was inhibited by blocking Shh signaling. Supplementation with soluble Shh-N promoted the proliferation of hematopoietic cells by activating Wnt signaling. Our findings suggest that FL-derived StroCs support proliferation of HSPCs via Shh inducing an autocrine Wnt signaling loop. The use of FL-derived StroCs and regulation of the Shh pathway might further enhance HPSC expansion.

  8. Chronology of endocrine differentiation and beta-cell neogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyatsuka, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is a chronic and incurable disease, which results from absolute or relative insulin insufficiency. Therefore, pancreatic beta cells, which are the only type of cell that expresses insulin, is considered to be a potential target for the cure of diabetes. Although the findings regarding beta-cell neogenesis during pancreas development have been exploited to induce insulin-producing cells from non-beta cells, there are still many hurdles towards generating fully functional beta cells that can produce high levels of insulin and respond to physiological signals. To overcome these problems, a solid understanding of pancreas development and beta-cell formation is required, and several mouse models have been developed to reveal the unique features of each endocrine cell type at distinct developmental time points. Here I review our understanding of pancreas development and endocrine differentiation focusing on recent progresses in improving temporal cell labeling in vivo.

  9. Expansion of Adult Human Pancreatic Tissue Yields Organoids Harboring Progenitor Cells with Endocrine Differentiation Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindy J.M. Loomans

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Generating an unlimited source of human insulin-producing cells is a prerequisite to advance β cell replacement therapy for diabetes. Here, we describe a 3D culture system that supports the expansion of adult human pancreatic tissue and the generation of a cell subpopulation with progenitor characteristics. These cells display high aldehyde dehydrogenase activity (ALDHhi, express pancreatic progenitors markers (PDX1, PTF1A, CPA1, and MYC, and can form new organoids in contrast to ALDHlo cells. Interestingly, gene expression profiling revealed that ALDHhi cells are closer to human fetal pancreatic tissue compared with adult pancreatic tissue. Endocrine lineage markers were detected upon in vitro differentiation. Engrafted organoids differentiated toward insulin-positive (INS+ cells, and circulating human C-peptide was detected upon glucose challenge 1 month after transplantation. Engrafted ALDHhi cells formed INS+ cells. We conclude that adult human pancreatic tissue has potential for expansion into 3D structures harboring progenitor cells with endocrine differentiation potential. : In the context of β cell replacement therapy for diabetes, de Koning and colleagues describe a 3D culture platform that supports ex vivo expansion of human pancreatic tissue as organoids. These organoids harbor a subpopulation of ALDHhi cells that display proliferative capacity and can differentiate to an endocrine fate. Keywords: pancreas, organoid, human, ALDH, endocrine differentiation, beta cells, insulin, progenitor, fetal, diabetes

  10. Proliferation of sorted human and rat beta cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parnaud, G; Bosco, D; Berney, T

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine whether purified beta cells can replicate in vitro and whether this is enhanced by extracellular matrix (ECM) and growth factors.......The aim of the study was to determine whether purified beta cells can replicate in vitro and whether this is enhanced by extracellular matrix (ECM) and growth factors....

  11. The islet beta-cell: fuel responsive and vulnerable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Christopher J; Prentki, Marc

    2008-10-01

    The pancreatic beta-cell senses blood nutrient levels and is modulated by neurohormonal signals so that it secretes insulin according to the need of the organism. Nutrient sensing involves marked metabolic activation, resulting in the production of coupling signals that promote insulin biosynthesis and secretion. The beta-cell's high capacity for nutrient sensing, however, necessitates reduced protection to nutrient toxicity. This potentially explains why in susceptible individuals, chronic fuel surfeit results in beta-cell failure and type 2 diabetes. Here we discuss recent insights into first, the biochemical basis of beta-cell signaling in response to glucose, amino acids and fatty acids, and second, beta-cell nutrient detoxification. We emphasize the emerging role of glycerolipid/fatty acid cycling in these processes.

  12. Progress in molecular nuclear medicine imaging of pancreatic beta cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Haifei; Yin Hongyan; Liu Shuai; Zhang Yifan

    2010-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a common and frequently occurring disease which seriously threaten the health of human beings. Type 1 and type 2 diabetes respectively results from being destroyed and insufficient beta-cell mass. The associated symptoms appear until 50%-60% decrease of beta-cell mass. Because pancreas is deeply located in the body, with few beta-cell mass, the current methods of clinical diagnosis are invasive and late. So diagnosis of metabolism disease of beta-cell early non-invasively becomes more and more popular, imaging diagnosis of diabetes mellitus becomes the focus of researches, but how to estimate the mass of beta-cell still an important subject in imaging technology. (authors)

  13. Application of inverse models and XRD analysis to the determination of Ti-17 beta-phase Coefficients of Thermal Expansion

    OpenAIRE

    Fréour , Sylvain; Gloaguen , David; François , Marc; Guillén , Ronald

    2006-01-01

    International audience; The scope of this work is the determination of the coefficients of thermal expansion of the Ti-17 beta-phase. A rigorous inverse thermo-elastic self-consistent scale transition inicro-mechanical model extended to multi-phase materials was used. The experimental data required for the application of the inverse method were obtained from both the available literature and especially dedicated X-ray diffraction lattice strain measurements performed on the studied (alpha + b...

  14. Coupling of solute transport and cell expansion in pea stems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmalstig, J. G.; Cosgrove, D. J.

    1990-01-01

    As cells expand and are displaced through the elongation zone of the epicotyl of etiolated pea (Pisum sativum L. var Alaska) seedlings, there is little net dilution of the cell sap, implying a coordination between cell expansion and solute uptake from the phloem. Using [14C] sucrose as a phloem tracer (applied to the hypogeous cotyledons), the pattern of label accumulation along the stem closely matched the growth rate pattern: high accumulation in the growing zone, little accumulation in nongrowing regions. Several results suggest that a major portion of phloem contents enters elongating cells through the symplast. We propose that the coordination between phloem transport and cell expansion is accomplished via regulatory pathways affecting both plasmodesmata conductivity and cell expansion.

  15. Beta-Cell Replacement: Pancreas and Islet Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niclauss, Nadja; Meier, Raphael; Bédat, Benoît; Berishvili, Ekaterine; Berney, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Pancreas and islet transplantation are 2 types of beta-cell replacement therapies for type 1 diabetes mellitus. Since 1966, when pancreas transplantation was first performed, it has evolved to become a highly efficient procedure with high success rates, thanks to advances in surgical technique and immunosuppression. Pancreas transplantation is mostly performed as simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation in patients with end-stage nephropathy secondary to diabetes. In spite of its efficiency, pancreas transplantation is still a major surgical procedure burdened by high morbidity, which called for the development of less invasive and hazardous ways of replacing beta-cell function in the past. Islet transplantation was developed in the 1970s as a minimally invasive procedure with initially poor outcomes. However, since the report of the 'Edmonton protocol' in 2000, the functional results of islet transplantation have substantially and constantly improved and are about to match those of whole pancreas transplantation. Islet transplantation is primarily performed alone in nonuremic patients with severe hypoglycemia. Both pancreas transplantation and islet transplantation are able to abolish hypoglycemia and to prevent or slow down the development of secondary complications of diabetes. Pancreas transplantation and islet transplantation should be seen as two complementary, rather than competing, therapeutic approaches for beta-cell replacement that are able to optimize organ donor use and patient care. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Hematopoietic stem cell expansion : challenges and opportunities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walasek, Marta A.; van Os, Ronald; de Haan, Gerald; Kanz, L; Fibbe, WE; Lengerke, C; Dick, JE

    2012-01-01

    Attempts to improve hematopoietic reconstitution and engraftment potential of ex vivo-expanded hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) have been largely unsuccessful due to the inability to generate sufficient stem cell numbers and to excessive differentiation of the starting cell

  17. Imaging the Beta-cell mass: why and how

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saudek, Frantisek; Brogren, Carl-Henrik; Manohar, Srirang

    2008-01-01

    is called dihydrotetrabenazine (DTBZ), antibodies to zinc transporter (ZnT-8) and the monoclonal antibody IC2. While DTBZ and antibodies to ZnT-8 showed binding activities to more than beta-cells, the anti-IC2 monoclonal antibody showed binding properties exclusively to insulin-producing beta...

  18. Re-exposure to beta cell autoantigens in pancreatic allograft recipients with preexisting beta cell autoantibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujtaba, Muhammad Ahmad; Fridell, Jonathan; Book, Benita; Faiz, Sara; Sharfuddin, Asif; Wiebke, Eric; Rigby, Mark; Taber, Tim

    2015-11-01

    Re-exposure to beta cell autoantigens and its relevance in the presence of donor-specific antibodies (DSA) in pancreatic allograft recipients is not well known. Thirty-three patients requiring a pancreas transplant were enrolled in an IRB approved study. They underwent prospective monitoring for DSA and beta cell autoantibody (BCAA) levels to GAD65, insulinoma-associated antigen 2 (IA-2), insulin (micro-IAA [mIAA]), and islet-specific zinc transporter isoform-8 (ZnT8). Twenty-five (75.7%) had pre-transplant BCAA. Twenty had a single antibody (mIAA n = 15, GAD65 n = 5); five had two or more BCAA (GAD65 + mIAA n = 2, GAD65 + mIAA+IA-2 n = 2, GA65 + mIAA+IA-2 + ZnT8 = 1). No changes in GAD65 (p > 0.29), IA-2 (>0.16), and ZnT8 (p > 0.07) were observed between pre-transplant and post-transplant at 6 or 12 months. A decrease in mIAA from pre- to post-6 months (p BCAA was observed at one yr. Seven (21.0%) developed de novo DSA. The incidence of DSA was 24% in patients with BCAA vs. 25% in patients without BCAA (p = 0.69). Pancreatic allograft function of patients with vs. without BCAA, and with and without BCAA + DSA was comparable until last follow-up (three yr). Re-exposure to beta cell autoantigens by pancreas transplant may not lead to increased levels or development of new BCAA or pancreatic allograft dysfunction. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. On the coherent behavior of pancreatic beta cell clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loppini, Alessandro, E-mail: a.loppini@unicampus.it [Nonlinear Physics and Mathematical Modeling Lab, University Campus Bio-Medico, Via A. del Portillo 21, I-00128 Rome (Italy); Capolupo, Antonio, E-mail: capolupo@sa.infn.it [Physics Department, University of Salerno, Fisciano, 84084 (Italy); Cherubini, Christian, E-mail: c.cherubini@unicampus.it [Nonlinear Physics and Mathematical Modeling Lab, University Campus Bio-Medico, Via A. del Portillo 21, I-00128 Rome (Italy); International Center for Relativistic Astrophysics, University Campus Bio-Medico, Via A. del Portillo 21, I-00128, Rome (Italy); Gizzi, Alessio, E-mail: a.gizzi@unicampus.it [Nonlinear Physics and Mathematical Modeling Lab, University Campus Bio-Medico, Via A. del Portillo 21, I-00128 Rome (Italy); Bertolaso, Marta, E-mail: m.bertolaso@unicampus.it [Faculty of Engineering and Institute of Philosophy of Scientific and Technological Practice, University Campus Bio-Medico, Via A. del Portillo 21, I-00128 Rome (Italy); Filippi, Simonetta, E-mail: s.filippi@unicampus.it [Nonlinear Physics and Mathematical Modeling Lab, University Campus Bio-Medico, Via A. del Portillo 21, I-00128 Rome (Italy); International Center for Relativistic Astrophysics, University Campus Bio-Medico, Via A. del Portillo 21, I-00128, Rome (Italy); Vitiello, Giuseppe, E-mail: vitiello@sa.infn.it [Physics Department, University of Salerno, Fisciano, 84084 (Italy)

    2014-09-12

    Beta cells in pancreas represent an example of coupled biological oscillators which via communication pathways, are able to synchronize their electrical activity, giving rise to pulsatile insulin release. In this work we numerically analyze scale free self-similarity features of membrane voltage signal power density spectrum, through a stochastic dynamical model for beta cells in the islets of Langerhans fine tuned on mouse experimental data. Adopting the algebraic approach of coherent state formalism, we show how coherent molecular domains can arise from proper functional conditions leading to a parallelism with “phase transition” phenomena of field theory. - Highlights: • Beta cells in pancreas are coupled oscillators able to synchronize their activity. • We analyze scale free self-similarity features for beta cells. • We adopt the algebraic approach of coherent state formalism. • We show that coherent molecular domains arise from functional conditions.

  20. Assessment of affinities of beta-CIT, beta-CIT-FE, and beta-CIT-FP for monoamine transporters permanently expressed in cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Tomoya; Fujita, Masahiro; Shimada, Shoichi; Sato, Kohji; Schloss, Patrick; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Itoh, Yasushi; Tohyama, Masaya; Nishimura, Tsunehiko

    1998-01-01

    We investigated the effects of three cocaine analogs, beta-CIT (2-beta-carbomethoxy-3-beta-(4-iodophenyl)-tropane), beta-CIT-FE (2-beta-carbomethoxy-3-beta-(4-iodophenyl)-N-(2-fluoroethyl)-nortropane), and beta-CIT-FP (2-beta-carbomethoxy-3-beta-(4-iodophenyl)-N-(3-fluoropropyl)-nortropane), on the uptake of [ 3 H]dopamine(DA), serotonin(5-HT), and 1-norepinephrine (NE) using cell lines permanently expressing DA, 5-HT, and NE transporters, respectively, to determine their affinities for these three transporters. We generated cell lines stably expressing DA, 5-HT, and NE transporters, respectively, by the Chen-Okayama method, and then tested the abilities of (-)cocaine, beta-CIT, beta-CIT-FE, beta-CIT-FP, and clomipramine to inhibit the uptake of [ 3 H]DA, 5-HT, and 1-NE. Ki values of beta-CIT, beta-CIT-FE, and beta-CIT-FP for [ 3 H]DA, 5-HT, 1-NE uptake were 6, 29, and 33 nM, 91, 133, and 130 nM, and 28, 113 and 70 nM, respectively, whereas those of cocaine and clomipramine were 316, 581, and 176 nM and > 10,000, 437, and 851 nM, respectively. Beta-CIT, beta-CIT-FE, and beta-CIT-FP were shown to be potent DA, 5-HT, and NE uptake inhibitors. Beta-CIT and beta-CIT-FP were highly potent and selective dopamine uptake inhibitors, and therefore might be useful for imaging of DA transporter with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) or positron emission tomography (PET)

  1. Mechanisms of pancreatic beta-cell growth and regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    1989-01-01

    Information about the mechanism of beta-cell growth and regeneration may be obtained by studies of insulinoma cells. In the present study the growth and function of the rat insulinoma cell lines RINm5F and 5AH were evaluated by addition of serum, hormones, and growth factors. It was found...... of insulin mRNA content showed that the insulinoma cells only contained about 2% of that of normal rat beta-cells. These results are discussed in relation to the role of growth factors, oncogenes, and differentiation in the growth and regeneration of beta-cells....... that transferrin is the only obligatory factor whereas growth hormone, epidermal growth factor, fibroblast growth factor, and TRH had modulating effects. A heat-labile heparin binding serum factor which stimulated thymidine incorporation but not cell proliferation was demonstrated in human serum. Measurements...

  2. TGF-beta and 'adaptive' Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wanjun; Konkel, Joanne E

    2010-02-01

    In naïve T cells transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) induces Foxp3, a transcription factor essential for programming and developing T regulatory cells (Treg cells). This finding reveals a physiological factor which can turn on the Foxp3 gene and establishes an experimental approach to induce antigen-specific Treg cells as a potential therapy for human diseases. While this role for TGF-beta is well confirmed, several critical questions remain largely unanswered and await further investigation. In this regard, it is imperative to understand the molecular pathways by which TGF-beta signaling initiates and regulates Foxp3 expression. It is also important to elucidate which factors and/or cytokines influence the TGF-beta-mediated conversion of naïve T cells and how to create an immunologically regulatory milieu to facilitate Treg cell generation in vivo. In this short article, we will highlight the key findings and recent progress in the field, discuss the molecular mechanisms underlying the TGF-beta-mediated induction of Foxp3, and attempt to outline the challenges ahead.

  3. An Arabidopsis kinase cascade influences auxin-responsive cell expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enders, Tara A; Frick, Elizabeth M; Strader, Lucia C

    2017-10-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MPK) cascades are conserved mechanisms of signal transduction across eukaryotes. Despite the importance of MPK proteins in signaling events, specific roles for many Arabidopsis MPK proteins remain unknown. Multiple studies have suggested roles for MPK signaling in a variety of auxin-related processes. To identify MPK proteins with roles in auxin response, we screened mpk insertional alleles and identified mpk1-1 as a mutant that displays hypersensitivity in auxin-responsive cell expansion assays. Further, mutants defective in the upstream MAP kinase kinase MKK3 also display hypersensitivity in auxin-responsive cell expansion assays, suggesting that this MPK cascade affects auxin-influenced cell expansion. We found that MPK1 interacts with and phosphorylates ROP BINDING PROTEIN KINASE 1 (RBK1), a protein kinase that interacts with members of the Rho-like GTPases from Plants (ROP) small GTPase family. Similar to mpk1-1 and mkk3-1 mutants, rbk1 insertional mutants display auxin hypersensitivity, consistent with a possible role for RBK1 downstream of MPK1 in influencing auxin-responsive cell expansion. We found that RBK1 directly phosphorylates ROP4 and ROP6, supporting the possibility that RBK1 effects on auxin-responsive cell expansion are mediated through phosphorylation-dependent modulation of ROP activity. Our data suggest a MKK3 • MPK1 • RBK1 phosphorylation cascade that may provide a dynamic module for altering cell expansion. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Generation of Transplantable Beta Cells for Patient-Specific Cell Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojie Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Islet cell transplantation offers a potential cure for type 1 diabetes, but it is challenged by insufficient donor tissue and side effects of current immunosuppressive drugs. Therefore, alternative sources of insulin-producing cells and isletfriendly immunosuppression are required to increase the efficiency and safety of this procedure. Beta cells can be transdifferentiated from precursors or another heterologous (non-beta-cell source. Recent advances in beta cell regeneration from somatic cells such as fibroblasts could circumvent the usage of immunosuppressive drugs. Therefore, generation of patient-specific beta cells provides the potential of an evolutionary treatment for patients with diabetes.

  5. Foodborne cereulide causes beta-cell dysfunction and apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Vangoitsenhoven

    Full Text Available To study the effects of cereulide, a food toxin often found at low concentrations in take-away meals, on beta-cell survival and function.Cell death was quantified by Hoechst/Propidium Iodide in mouse (MIN6 and rat (INS-1E beta-cell lines, whole mouse islets and control cell lines (HepG2 and COS-1. Beta-cell function was studied by glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS. Mechanisms of toxicity were evaluated in MIN6 cells by mRNA profiling, electron microscopy and mitochondrial function tests.24 h exposure to 5 ng/ml cereulide rendered almost all MIN6, INS-1E and pancreatic islets apoptotic, whereas cell death did not increase in the control cell lines. In MIN6 cells and murine islets, GSIS capacity was lost following 24 h exposure to 0.5 ng/ml cereulide (P<0.05. Cereulide exposure induced markers of mitochondrial stress including Puma (p53 up-regulated modulator of apoptosis, P<0.05 and general pro-apoptotic signals as Chop (CCAAT/-enhancer-binding protein homologous protein. Mitochondria appeared swollen upon transmission electron microscopy, basal respiration rate was reduced by 52% (P<0.05 and reactive oxygen species increased by more than twofold (P<0.05 following 24 h exposure to 0.25 and 0.50 ng/ml cereulide, respectively.Cereulide causes apoptotic beta-cell death at low concentrations and impairs beta-cell function at even lower concentrations, with mitochondrial dysfunction underlying these defects. Thus, exposure to cereulide even at concentrations too low to cause systemic effects appears deleterious to the beta-cell.

  6. Wall relaxation and the driving forces for cell expansive growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1987-01-01

    When water uptake by growing cells is prevented, the turgor pressure and the tensile stress in the cell wall are reduced by continued wall loosening. This process, termed in vivo stress relaxation, provides a new way to study the dynamics of wall loosening and to measure the wall yield threshold and the physiological wall extensibility. Stress relaxation experiments indicate that wall stress supplies the mechanical driving force for wall yielding. Cell expansion also requires water absorption. The driving force for water uptake during growth is created by wall relaxation, which lowers the water potential of the expanding cells. New techniques for measuring this driving force show that it is smaller than believed previously; in elongating stems it is only 0.3 to 0.5 bar. This means that the hydraulic resistance of the water transport pathway is small and that rate of cell expansion is controlled primarily by wall loosening and yielding.

  7. Phenotypical and functional characterization of double-negative (CD4-CD8-) alpha beta T-cell receptor positive cells from an immunodeficient patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Illum, N; Ralfkiaer, E; Pallesen, G

    1991-01-01

    We have characterized CD4-CD8- double-negative (DN) alpha beta TCR+ T cells from a patient with immunodeficiency, lymphocytosis, lymphadenopathy, and hepatosplenomegaly. The majority of peripheral blood lymphocytes were DN alpha beta TCR+ T cells as evaluated by FACS and biochemical analysis...... (MoAbs) indicated a polyclonal T-cell expansion. Thymic biopsy showed normal histology, whereas lymph node biopsy samples showed altered histological and immunohistological patterns with markedly expanded paracortical areas containing the DN T cells of the same phenotype as found in peripheral blood T...

  8. The physiology of rodent beta-cells in pancreas slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupnik, M

    2009-01-01

    Beta-cells in pancreatic islets form complex syncytia. Sufficient cell-to-cell electrical coupling seems to ensure coordinated depolarization pattern and insulin release that can be further modulated by rich innervation. The complex structure and coordinated action develop after birth during fast proliferation of the endocrine tissue. These emergent properties can be lost due to various reasons later in life and can lead to glucose intolerance and diabetes mellitus. Pancreas slice is a novel method of choice to study the physiology of beta-cells still embedded in their normal cellulo-social context. I present major advantages, list drawbacks and provide an overview on recent advances in our understanding of the physiology of beta-cells using the pancreas slice approach.

  9. Strain-dependent differences in sensitivity of rat beta-cells to interleukin 1 beta in vitro and in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimers, J I; Andersen, H U; Mauricio, D

    1996-01-01

    /kg) or vehicle for 5 days. All the strains investigated were susceptible to IL-1 beta-induced changes in body weight, food intake, temperature, and plasma glucagon and corticosterone. However, IL-1 beta induced hyperglycemia and impairment of beta-cell glucose responsiveness in WK/Mol and LS/Mol rats...

  10. Effects of exendin-4 on glucose tolerance, insulin secretion, and beta-cell proliferation depend on treatment dose, treatment duration and meal contents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arakawa, Masayuki; Ebato, Chie; Mita, Tomoya; Hirose, Takahisa; Kawamori, Ryuzo; Fujitani, Yoshio; Watada, Hirotaka

    2009-01-01

    Beta-cell proliferation is regulated by various metabolic demands including peripheral insulin resistance, obesity, and hyperglycemia. In addition to enhancement of glucose-induced insulin secretion, agonists for glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) stimulate proliferation and inhibit apoptosis of beta-cells, thereby probably preserve beta-cell mass. To evaluate the beta-cell preserving actions of GLP-1R agonists, we assessed the acute and chronic effects of exendin-4 on beta-cell proliferation, mass and glucose tolerance in C57BL/6J mice under various conditions. Short-term administration of high-dose exendin-4 transiently stimulated beta-cell proliferation. Comparative transcriptomic analysis showed upregulation of IGF-1 receptor and its downstream effectors in islets. Treatment of mice with exendin-4 daily for 4 weeks (long-term administration) and feeding high-fat diet resulted in significant inhibition of weight gain and improvement of glucose tolerance with reduced insulin secretion and beta-cell mass. These findings suggest that long-term GLP-1 treatment results in insulin sensitization of peripheral organs, rather than enhancement of beta-cell proliferation and function, particularly when animals are fed high-fat diet. Thus, the effects of exendin-4 on glucose tolerance, insulin secretion, and beta-cell proliferation largely depend on treatment dose, duration of treatment and meal contents. While GLP-1 enhances proliferation of beta-cells in some diabetic mice models, our results suggest that GLP-1 stimulates beta-cell growth only when expansion of beta-cell mass is required to meet metabolic demands.

  11. Effects of exendin-4 on glucose tolerance, insulin secretion, and beta-cell proliferation depend on treatment dose, treatment duration and meal contents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arakawa, Masayuki; Ebato, Chie; Mita, Tomoya [Department of Medicine, Metabolism and Endocrinology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Hirose, Takahisa [Department of Medicine, Metabolism and Endocrinology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Center for Therapeutic Innovations in Diabetes, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Kawamori, Ryuzo [Department of Medicine, Metabolism and Endocrinology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Center for Therapeutic Innovations in Diabetes, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Center for Beta Cell Biology and Regeneration, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Sportology Center, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Fujitani, Yoshio, E-mail: fujitani@juntendo.ac.jp [Department of Medicine, Metabolism and Endocrinology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Center for Therapeutic Innovations in Diabetes, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Watada, Hirotaka, E-mail: hwatada@juntendo.ac.jp [Department of Medicine, Metabolism and Endocrinology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Sportology Center, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)

    2009-12-18

    Beta-cell proliferation is regulated by various metabolic demands including peripheral insulin resistance, obesity, and hyperglycemia. In addition to enhancement of glucose-induced insulin secretion, agonists for glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) stimulate proliferation and inhibit apoptosis of beta-cells, thereby probably preserve beta-cell mass. To evaluate the beta-cell preserving actions of GLP-1R agonists, we assessed the acute and chronic effects of exendin-4 on beta-cell proliferation, mass and glucose tolerance in C57BL/6J mice under various conditions. Short-term administration of high-dose exendin-4 transiently stimulated beta-cell proliferation. Comparative transcriptomic analysis showed upregulation of IGF-1 receptor and its downstream effectors in islets. Treatment of mice with exendin-4 daily for 4 weeks (long-term administration) and feeding high-fat diet resulted in significant inhibition of weight gain and improvement of glucose tolerance with reduced insulin secretion and beta-cell mass. These findings suggest that long-term GLP-1 treatment results in insulin sensitization of peripheral organs, rather than enhancement of beta-cell proliferation and function, particularly when animals are fed high-fat diet. Thus, the effects of exendin-4 on glucose tolerance, insulin secretion, and beta-cell proliferation largely depend on treatment dose, duration of treatment and meal contents. While GLP-1 enhances proliferation of beta-cells in some diabetic mice models, our results suggest that GLP-1 stimulates beta-cell growth only when expansion of beta-cell mass is required to meet metabolic demands.

  12. Linear thermal expansion coefficient measurement technology in hot cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Dae Gyu; Choo, Yong Sun; Ahn, Sang Bok; Hong, Kwon Pyo; Lee, K. S.

    1998-06-01

    To establish linear thermal expansion coefficient measurement technology in hot cell, we reviewed and evaluated various measuring technology by paper and these were compared with the data produced with pre-installed dilatometer in hot cell. Detailed contents are as follows; - The theory of test. - Review of characteristics for various measurement technology and compatibility with hot cell. - Review of standard testing regulations(ASTM). - System calibration of pre-installed dilatometer. - Performance test of pre-installed dilatometer. (author). 12 refs., 15 tabs., 8 figs

  13. Dynamics and Synchrony of Pancreatic beta-cells and Islets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Morten Gram

    2006-01-01

    description of these processes and their interactions would provide important input in the search for a better treatment of the disease. The thesis describes several aspects of mathematical modeling of beta-cells relevant for the understanding of glucose stimulated insulin secretion. It consists...... and the synchronized behavior of many coupled beta-cells as well as to the synchrony of islets. Rather than developing new biophysical models, the thesis investigates existing models, their integration and simplifications, and analyzed the corresponding dynamics, in order to use these models for investigating...

  14. Microculture system for studying monolayers of functional beta-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobersen, M J; Scharff, J E; Notkins, A L

    1980-04-01

    A method is described for growing monolayers of newborn rat beta-cells in microculture trays. After disruption of the pancreas with collagenase, islets were isolated by Ficoll density gradient centrifugation, trypsinized to obtain individual cells, and plated in 96-well tissue culture trays. The cells were incubated for the first 3 days in growth medium containing 0.1 mM 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine to promote monolayer formation. The cultures could be maintained in a functional state, as defined by their responsiveness to known modulators of insulin secretion, for at least 2 weeks. As few as 1 X 10(3) islet cells/well gave results that were reproducible within +/- 10%. It is suggested that the microculture system for islet cells might prove to be a rapid and reproducible screening technique for studying drugs, viruses, or other agents that affect beta-cell function.

  15. A Figure-of-Merit for Beta Cell Detector Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foxe, Michael P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Miller, Brian W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Suarez, Rey [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hayes, James C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-09-02

    In order to decrease the minimum detectable activities (MDAs) of beta-gamma radioxenon detectors, it is important to increase the ability to resolve the individual isotopes. One proposed method for doing this is to increase the energy resolution of the beta cell through the use of silicon detectors. While silicon detectors can improve the energy resolution, it is accompanied with a decrease in detection efficiency compared to plastic scintillator beta cells. Due to the uncertainty on the impact of the competing variables, we have developed a figure-of-merit (FOM) capable of determining the impact of detector parameters on the MDAs. By utilizing the FOM to analyze different detectors, we are able to directly compare current and future detectors and estimate their impact on the radioxenon MDAs.

  16. The Role of Auxin in Cell Wall Expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majda, Mateusz; Robert, Stéphanie

    2018-03-22

    Plant cells are surrounded by cell walls, which are dynamic structures displaying a strictly regulated balance between rigidity and flexibility. Walls are fairly rigid to provide support and protection, but also extensible, to allow cell growth, which is triggered by a high intracellular turgor pressure. Wall properties regulate the differential growth of the cell, resulting in a diversity of cell sizes and shapes. The plant hormone auxin is well known to stimulate cell elongation via increasing wall extensibility. Auxin participates in the regulation of cell wall properties by inducing wall loosening. Here, we review what is known on cell wall property regulation by auxin. We focus particularly on the auxin role during cell expansion linked directly to cell wall modifications. We also analyze downstream targets of transcriptional auxin signaling, which are related to the cell wall and could be linked to acid growth and the action of wall-loosening proteins. All together, this update elucidates the connection between hormonal signaling and cell wall synthesis and deposition.

  17. Cellulose synthesis inhibition, cell expansion, and patterns of cell wall deposition in Nitella internodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richmond, P.A.; Metraux, J.P.

    1984-01-01

    The authors have investigated the pattern of wall deposition and maturation and correlated it with cell expansion and cellulose biosynthesis. The herbicide 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile (DCB) was found to be a potent inhibitor of cellulose synthesis, but not of cell expansion in Nitella internodal cells. Although cellulose synthesis is inhibited during DCB treatment, matrix substances continue to be synthesized and deposited. The inhibition of cellulose microfibril deposition can be demonstrated by various techniques. These results demonstrate that matrix deposition is by apposition, not by intussusception, and that the previously deposited wall moves progressively outward while stretching and thinning as a result of cell expansion

  18. Insulin-like growth factors and pancreas beta cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haeften, T.W. van; Twickler, M.

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) have been implicated in normal growth, and especially foetal pancreas beta-cell development. As low birth weight has been implicated in the development of obesity and type 2 diabetes, much research has evolved into the importance of IGF and their

  19. Insulin-like growth factors and pancreas beta cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Haeften, T. W.; Twickler, TB

    Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) have been implicated in normal growth, and especially foetal pancreas beta-cell development. As low birth weight has been implicated in the development of obesity and type 2 diabetes, much research has evolved into the importance of IGF and their signalling

  20. Insulin-like growth factors and pancreas beta cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Haeften, T. W.; Twickler, Th B.

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) have been implicated in normal growth, and especially foetal pancreas beta-cell development. As low birth weight has been implicated in the development of obesity and type 2 diabetes, much research has evolved into the importance of IGF and their

  1. Regulation of laminin beta2 chain gene expression in human cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durkin, M E; Nielsen, F C; Loechel, F

    2001-01-01

    of the human laminin beta2 chain gene generates two isoforms of the 5' untranslated region of the beta2 chain mRNA. The translational efficiencies of the two laminin beta2 chain leaders did not differ significantly, when assayed by polysome profile analysis of endogenous clone A cell beta2 chain m......RNA, transient transfection of chimeric beta2 chain leader/luciferase expression plasmids in clone A cells, and translation of in vitro synthesized RNAs in rabbit reticulocyte lysates....

  2. Pancreatic beta-cell overexpression of the glucagon receptor gene results in enhanced beta-cell function and mass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gelling, Richard W; Vuguin, Patricia M; Du, Xiu Quan

    2009-01-01

    in vivo, we generated mice overexpressing the Gcgr specifically on pancreatic beta-cells (RIP-Gcgr). In vivo and in vitro insulin secretion in response to glucagon and glucose was increased 1.7- to 3.9-fold in RIP-Gcgr mice compared with controls. Consistent with the observed increase in insulin release...

  3. Beta-cell lines derived from transgenic mice expressing a hybrid insulin gene-oncogene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Efrat, S; Linde, S; Kofod, Hans

    1988-01-01

    Three pancreatic beta-cell lines have been established from insulinomas derived from transgenic mice carrying a hybrid insulin-promoted simian virus 40 tumor antigen gene. The beta tumor cell (beta TC) lines maintain the features of differentiated beta cells for about 50 passages in culture. The ...... both to immortalize a rare cell type and to provide a selection for the maintenance of its differentiated phenotype....

  4. The potential role of SOCS-3 in the interleukin-1beta-induced desensitization of insulin signaling in pancreatic beta-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emanuelli, Brice; Glondu, Murielle; Filloux, Chantal

    2004-01-01

    insulin signaling is required for the optimal beta-cell function, we assessed the effect of IL-1beta on the insulin pathway in a rat pancreatic beta-cell line. We show that IL-1beta decreases insulin-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of the insulin receptor (IR) and insulin receptor substrate (IRS...

  5. Targeting of beta 1 integrins impairs DNA repair for radiosensitization of head and neck cancer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dickreuter, E.; Eke, I.; Krause, M.; Borgmann, K.; van Vugt, M. A.; Cordes, N.

    2016-01-01

    beta 1 Integrin-mediated cell-extracellular matrix interactions allow cancer cell survival and confer therapy resistance. It was shown that inhibition of beta 1 integrins sensitizes cells to radiotherapy. Here, we examined the impact of beta 1 integrin targeting on the repair of radiation-induced

  6. TGF-{beta}-stimulated aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin via the ERK signaling pathway in cultured retinal pigment epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Eun Jee [Department of Ophthalmology, National Health Insurance Corporation Ilsan Hospital, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Chun, Ji Na; Jung, Sun-Ah [Konyang University Myunggok Medical Research Institute, Kim' s Eye Hospital, Konyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Jin Won [Department of Biology, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon-dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Joon H., E-mail: joonhlee@konyang.ac.kr [Konyang University Myunggok Medical Research Institute, Kim' s Eye Hospital, Konyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGF-{beta} induces aberrant expression of {beta}III in RPE cells via the ERK pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGF-{beta} increases O-GlcNAc modification of {beta}III in RPE cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mature RPE cells have the capacity to express a neuron-associated gene by TGF-{beta}. -- Abstract: The class III {beta}-tubulin isotype ({beta}{sub III}) is expressed exclusively by neurons within the normal human retina and is not present in normal retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells in situ or in the early phase of primary cultures. However, aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin has been observed in passaged RPE cells and RPE cells with dedifferentiated morphology in pathologic epiretinal membranes from idiopathic macular pucker, proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR). Transforming growth factor-{beta} (TGF-{beta}) has been implicated in dedifferentiation of RPE cells and has a critical role in the development of proliferative vitreoretinal diseases. Here, we investigated the potential effects of TGF-{beta} on the aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin and the intracellular signaling pathway mediating these changes. TGF-{beta}-induced aberrant expression and O-linked-{beta}-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNac) modification of class III {beta}-tubulin in cultured RPE cells as determined using Western blotting, RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry. TGF-{beta} also stimulated phosphorylation of ERK. TGF-{beta}-induced aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin was significantly reduced by pretreatment with U0126, an inhibitor of ERK phosphorylation. Our findings indicate that TGF-{beta} stimulated aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin via activation of the ERK signaling pathway. These data demonstrate that mature RPE cells have the capacity to express a neuron-associated gene in response to TGF-{beta} stimulation and provide useful information

  7. Perfluoroalkyl substances and beta cell deficient diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Baqiyyah; Innes, Karen E; Long, Dustin

    2016-08-01

    Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are synthetic hydrocarbons shown to preserve pancreatic islet cell viability and reduce islet cell hypoxia and apoptosis. We investigated the relationship of serum PFAS with diabetes, and whether this varied by diabetes type. 6,460 individuals with and 60,439 without diabetes from the C8 Health Project, were categorized into three groups: type 1 (n=820), type 2 (n=4,291), or uncategorized diabetes (n=1,349, missing data on diabetes type or diabetes based on blood sugar at study entry). Four PFAS were investigated: perfluorohexane sulfonate (PFHxS), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), and perfluorononaoic acid (PFNA). PFAS levels were significantly lower in those with diabetes, and lowest in those with type 1 diabetes. In age and sex adjusted analyses, ORs (CI) for type 1, type 2, and uncategorized diabetes compared to no diabetes were 0.59 (0.54-0.64), 0.74 (0.71-0.77), 0.84 (0.78-0.90), respectively for PFHxS; 0.69 (0.65-0.74), 0.87 (0.89-0.91), 0.92 (0.88-0.97), respectively for PFOA; 0.65 (0.61-0.70), 0.86 (0.82-0.90), 0.93 (0.86-1.03), respectively for PFOS; and 0.65 (0.57-0.74), 0.94 (0.88-1.00), 0.95 (0.85-1.06), respectively for PFNA. Further adjustment for eGFR and other covariates did not eliminate these inverse associations. PFAS levels were negatively associated with diabetes. This inverse relationship was strongest for type 1 diabetes, suggesting the relationship with serum PFAS may vary with the severity of islet cell deficiency. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Ultraviolet B irradiation induces expansion of intraepithelial tumor cells in a tissue model of early cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudgil, Adarsh V; Segal, Nadav; Andriani, Frank; Wang, Youai; Fusenig, Norbert E; Garlick, Jonathan A

    2003-07-01

    Ultraviolet B irradiation is thought to enable skin cancer progression as clones of genetically damaged keratinocytes escape apoptosis and expand at the expense of adjacent normal cells. Mechanisms through which potentially malignant cells in human skin undergo clonal expansion, however, are not well understood. The goal of this study was to characterize the role of ultraviolet B irradiation on the intraepithelial expansion of early stage human tumor cells in organotypic skin cultures. To accomplish this, we have studied the effect of ultraviolet B irradiation on organotypic cultures that were fabricated by mixing normal human keratinocytes with beta-galactosidase-marked, intraepithelial tumor cells (HaCaT-ras, clone II-4), which bear mutations in both p53 alleles and harbor an activated H-ras oncogene. We found that when organotypic mixtures were exposed to an ultraviolet B dose of 50 mJ per cm2, intraepithelial tumor cells underwent a significant degree of proliferative expansion compared to nonirradiated cultures. To understand this response, organotypic cultures of nor-mal keratinocytes were exposed to ultraviolet B and showed a dose-dependent increase in numbers of sunburn cells and TUNEL-positive cells although their proliferation was suppressed. In contrast, neither the apoptotic nor the proliferative response of II-4 cells was altered by ultraviolet B in organotypic cultures. The differential response of these cell types suggested that II-4 cells were resistant to ultraviolet-B-induced alterations, which allowed these intraepithelial tumor cells to gain a selective growth and survival advantage relative to neighboring normal cells. These findings demonstrate that ultraviolet B exposure can induce the intraepithelial expansion of apoptosis-resistant, p53-mutant, and ras-activated keratinocytes, suggesting that this agent can act to promote the early stages of epithelial carcinogenesis.

  9. Addition and multiplication of beta-expansions in generalized Tribonacci base

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Ambrož

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available We study properties of β-numeration systems, where β > 1 is the real root of the polynomial x 3  - mx 2  - x - 1, m ∈ ℕ, m ≥ 1. We consider arithmetic operations on the set of β-integers, i.e., on the set of numbers whose greedy expansion in base β has no fractional part. We show that the number of fractional digits arising under addition of β-integers is at most 5 for m ≥ 3 and 6 for m = 2, whereas under multiplication it is at most 6 for all m ≥ 2. We thus generalize the results known for Tribonacci numeration system, i.e., for m = 1. We summarize the combinatorial properties of infinite words naturally defined by β-integers. We point out the differences between the structure of β-integers in cases m = 1 and m ≥ 2.

  10. Expansion of CD16-Negative Natural Killer Cells in the Peripheral Blood of Patients with Metastatic Melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shernan G. Holtan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Altered natural killer (NK cell function is a component of the global immune dysregulation that occurs in advanced malignancies. Another condition associated with altered NK homeostasis is normal pregnancy, where robust infiltration with CD16− CD9+ NK cells can be identified in decidual tissues, along with a concomitant expansion of CD16− NK cells in the maternal peripheral blood. In metastatic melanoma, we identified a similar expansion of peripheral blood CD16− NK cells (median 7.4% in 41 patients with melanoma compared with 3.0% in 29 controls, P<.001. A subset of NK cells in melanoma patients also expresses CD9, which is characteristically expressed only on NK cells within the female reproductive tract. Expansion of CD16− NK cells was associated with elevated plasma transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β levels (median 20 ng/ml, Spearman's ρ=0.81,P=.015. These findings suggest the possibility of exploring anti-TGF-β therapy to restore NK function in melanoma.

  11. Ins1 Cre knock-in mice for beta cell-specific gene recombination

    OpenAIRE

    Thorens Bernard; Tarussio David; Maestro Miguel Angel; Maestro Miguel Angel; Rovira Meritxell; Rovira Meritxell; Heikkilä Eija; Ferrer Jorge; Ferrer Jorge; Ferrer Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Pancreatic beta cells play a central role in the control of glucose homeostasis by secreting insulin to stimulate glucose uptake by peripheral tissues. Understanding the molecular mechanisms that control beta cell function and plasticity has critical implications for the pathophysiology and therapy of major forms of diabetes. Selective gene inactivation in pancreatic beta cells, using the Cre-lox system, is a powerful approach to assess the role of particular genes in beta cel...

  12. T cell precursor migration towards beta 2-microglobulin is involved in thymus colonization of chicken embryos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dunon, D; Kaufman, J; Salomonsen, J

    1990-01-01

    beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2m) attracts hemopoietic precursors from chicken bone marrow cells in vitro. The cell population responding to beta 2m increases during the second period of thymus colonization, which takes place at days 12-14 of incubation. The precursors from 13.5 day old embryos were...... isolated after migration towards beta 2m in vitro and shown to be able to colonize a 13 day old thymus in ovo, where they subsequently acquire thymocyte markers. In contrast these beta 2m responsive precursors did not colonize embryonic bursa, i.e. differentiate into B lymphocytes. During chicken...... embryogenesis, peaks of beta 2m transcripts and of free beta 2m synthesis can only be detected in the thymus. The peak of free beta 2m synthesis in the thymus and the increase of beta 2m responding bone marrow cells both occur concomitantly with the second wave of thymus colonization in chicken embryo, facts...

  13. Fibronectin regulates the activation of THP-1 cells by TGF-beta1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, A C; Fu, L

    2001-03-01

    To determine how fibronectin regulates the immunomodulatory effects of transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta on THP-1 cells. THP-1 monocytic cell line. THP-1 cells were primed for 48 h in the presence or absence of 250 pM TGF-beta1. Assays or assessments carried out, together with statistical test applied. We found that adherence to fibronectin dramatically modulates the effects of TGF-beta1 on the human monocytic cell line THP-1. TGF-beta did not significantly affect constitutive interleukin (IL)-8 secretion or IL-1beta-induced IL-8 secretion from suspended cells. In contrast, TGF-beta stimulated IL-8 secretion as well as augmented IL-1beta-induced IL-8 secretion from adherent cells. The differential effects of TGF-beta1 on IL-8 secretion from suspended and adherent cells could not be explained by differences in IL-1 receptor antagonist production. The effects of fibronectin on TGF-beta1 induced IL-8 secretion from THP-1 cells were mimicked by adhesion to immobilized anti-a4beta1 integrin antibody and to a fibronectin fragment containing the CS-1 domain. These results indicate that alpha4beta1-mediated adhesion to fibronectin may play a key role during inflammation by profoundly influencing the effects of TGF-beta1 on monocytes.

  14. An increase in immature β-cells lacking Glut2 precedes the expansion of β-cell mass in the pregnant mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine A Beamish

    Full Text Available A compensatory increase in β-cell mass occurs during pregnancy to counter the associated insulin resistance, and a failure in adaptation is thought to contribute to gestational diabetes. Insulin-expressing but glucose-transporter-2-low (Ins+Glut2LO progenitor cells are present in mouse and human pancreas, being predominantly located in extra-islet β-cell clusters, and contribute to the regeneration of the endocrine pancreas following induced ablation. We therefore sought to investigate the contribution of Ins+Glut2LO cells to β-cell mass expansion during pregnancy. Female C57Bl/6 mice were time mated and pancreata were collected at gestational days (GD 6, 9, 12, 15, and 18, and postpartum D7 (n = 4/time-point and compared to control (non-pregnant animals. Beta cell mass, location, proliferation (Ki67+, and proportion of Ins+Glut2LO cells were measured using immunohistochemistry and bright field or confocal microscopy. Beta cell mass tripled by GD18 and β-cell proliferation peaked at GD12 in islets (≥6 β-cells and small β-cell clusters (1-5 β-cells. The proportion and fraction of Ins+Glut2LO cells undergoing proliferation increased significantly at GD9 in both islets and clusters, preceding the increase in β-cell mass and proliferation, and their proliferation within clusters persisted until GD15. The overall number of clusters increased significantly at GD9. Quantitative PCR showed a significant increase in Pdx1 presence at GD9 vs. GD18 or control pancreas, and Pdx1 was visualized by immunohistochemistry within both Ins+Glut2LO and Ins+Glut2HI cells within clusters. These results indicate that Ins+Glut2LO cells are likely to contribute to β-cell mass expansion during pregnancy.

  15. Acquisition and Expansion of Adult Rat Bone Marrow Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šulla I.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This study was initiated in order to test a mini-invasive method of mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells (MS/PCs isolation from a rat bone marrow (BM, and subsequently their expansion, differentiation, and evaluation of their immunophenotypic characteristics; and later their preservation as donor cells in an optimal condition for potential autotransplantation. The study group comprised of 6 adult male Sprague-Dawley (S-D rats, weighing 480—690 g. The rats were anaesthetised by isoflurane with room air in a Plexiglas box and maintained by inhalation of a mixture of isoflurane and O2. Their femurs were surgically exposed and their diaphyses double-trephined. Then BM cells were flushed out by saline with heparin and aspirated into a syringe with a solution of DMEM (Dulbecco’s modified eagle’s medium and heparin. The mononuclear cells from the BM were isolated by centrifugation and expanded in a standard culture medium supplemented with ES-FBS (es-cell-qualified foetal bovine serum, L-glutamine and rh LIF (recombinant human leukemia inhibitory factor. Following 14 days of passaging cultures, the cells were split into 2 equal parts. The first culture continued with the original medium. The second culture received additional supplementation with a human FGFβ (fibroblast growth factor beta and EGF (epidermal growth factor. The populations of these cells were analysed by light-microscopy, then the mean fluorescence intensities (MFIs of CD90 and Nestin were evaluated by a tricolour flow cytometry using monoclonal antibodies. The type of general anaesthesia used proved to be appropriate for the surgical phase of the experiments. All rats survived the harvesting of the BM without complications. The total number of mononuclear cells was 1.5—4.0 × 106 per sample and the proportion of CD90/Nestin expressing cells was < 1 %. Following 14 days of expansion, the cells became larger, adherent, with fibrillary morphology; the proportion of cells expressing

  16. Phloem unloading and cell expansion in pea stems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmalstig, J.G.; Cosgrove, D.J.

    1989-01-01

    Phloem unloading into elongating stems of dark-grown pea seedlings was greater in regions with higher relative growth rates. Phloem transport was monitored over 1 h by measuring accumulation of radiolabel from 14 C-sucrose added between the cotyledons. The apical hook and plumule and 8 mm of the growing region of an intact plant were sealed in a pressure chamber and the pressure was raised to stop elongation. Phloem unloading was inhibited in the pressurized zone of elongation and accelerated in the apical hook and plumule, with the result that the magnitude of phloem transport into the stem was unchanged. The results demonstrate a coupling between cell expansion and phloem unloading

  17. Co-culture of clonal beta cells with GLP-1 and glucagon-secreting cell line impacts on beta cell insulin secretion, proliferation and susceptibility to cytotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Alastair D; Vasu, Srividya; Moffett, R Charlotte; Flatt, Peter R

    2016-06-01

    We investigated the direct effects on insulin releasing MIN6 cells of chronic exposure to GLP-1, glucagon or a combination of both peptides secreted from GLUTag L-cell and αTC1.9 alpha-cell lines in co-culture. MIN6, GLUTag and αTC1.9 cell lines exhibited high cellular hormone content and release of insulin, GLP-1 and glucagon, respectively. Co-culture of MIN6 cells with GLUTag cells significantly increased cellular insulin content, beta-cell proliferation, insulin secretory responses to a range of established secretogogues and afforded protection against exposure cytotoxic concentrations of glucose, lipid, streptozotocin or cytokines. Benefits of co-culture of MIN6 cells with αTC1.9 alphacells were limited to enhanced beta-cell proliferation with marginal positive actions on both insulin secretion and cellular protection. In contrast, co-culture of MIN6 with GLUTag cells plus αTC1.9 cells, markedly enhanced both insulin secretory responses and protection against beta-cell toxins compared with co-culture with GLUTag cells alone. These data indicate important long-term effects of conjoint GLP-1 and glucagon exposure on beta-cell function. This illustrates the possible functional significance of alpha-cell GLP-1 production as well as direct beneficial effects of dual agonism at beta-cell GLP-1 and glucagon receptors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and Société française de biochimie et biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  18. A novel monoclonal antibody of human stem cell factor inhibits umbilical cord blood stem cell ex vivo expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Jie

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Stem cell factor (SCF activates hematopoietic stem cell (HSC self-renewal and is being used to stimulate the ex vivo expansion of HSCs. The mechanism by which SCF supports expansion of HSCs remains poorly understood. In cord blood ex vivo expansion assays, a newly produced anti-SCF monoclonal antibody (clone 23C8 was found to significantly inhibit the expansion of CD34+ cells. This antibody appears to bind directly to a part of SCF that is critical for biological activity toward expansion of CD34+ cells, which is located in the first 104 amino acids from the NH2-terminus.

  19. Glucose activates prenyltransferases in pancreatic islet {beta}-cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goalstone, Marc [Department of Medicine, University of Colorado, VA Medical Center, Denver, CO 80220 (United States); Kamath, Vasudeva [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Wayne State University, VA Medical Center, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Kowluru, Anjaneyulu, E-mail: akowluru@med.wayne.edu [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Wayne State University, VA Medical Center, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States)

    2010-01-01

    A growing body of evidence implicates small G-proteins [e.g., Cdc42 and Rac1] in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion [GSIS] in the islet {beta}-cell. These signaling proteins undergo post-translational modifications [e.g., prenylation] at their C-terminal cysteine residue and appear to be essential for the transport and fusion of insulin-containing secretory granules with the plasma membrane and the exocytotic secretion of insulin. However, potential regulation of the prenylating enzymes by physiological insulin secretogues [e.g., glucose] has not been investigated thus far. Herein, we report immunological localization, sub-cellular distribution and regulation of farnesyltransferases [FTases] and geranylgeranyltransferase [GGTase] by glucose in insulin-secreting INS 832/13 {beta}-cells and normal rat islets. Our findings suggest that an insulinotropic concentration of glucose [20 mM] markedly stimulated the expression of the {alpha}-subunits of FTase/GGTase-1, but not the {beta}-subunits of FTase or GGTase-1 without significantly affecting the predominantly cytosolic distribution of these holoenzymes in INS 832/13 cells and rodent islets. Under these conditions, glucose significantly stimulated [2.5- to 4.0-fold over basal] the activities of both FTase and GGTase-1 in both cell types. Together, these findings provide the first evidence to suggest that GSIS involves activation of the endogenous islet prenyltransferases by glucose, culminating in the activation of their respective G-protein substrates, which is necessary for cytoskeletal rearrangement, vesicular transport, fusion and secretion of insulin.

  20. Acquired TGF beta 1 sensitivity and TGF beta 1 expression in cell lines established from a single small cell lung cancer patient during clinical progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, P; Damstrup, L; Rygaard, K

    1996-01-01

    Three small cell lung cancer cell lines established from a single patient during longitudinal follow-up were examined for in vitro expression of TGF beta and TGF beta receptors, i.e. the components of an autocrine loop. GLC 14 was established prior to treatment, GLC 16 on relapse after chemotherapy...... was found in GLC 16 and GLC 19. These cell lines were also growth inhibited by exogenously administrated TGF beta 1. TGF beta 1 mRNA and protein in its latent form was only expressed in the radiotherapy-resistant cell line, GLC 19. The results indicate that disease progression in this patient was paralleled...... II receptor gene, as examined by Southern blotting. Also, the type I receptor could not be detected by ligand binding assay in this cell line, despite expression of mRNA for this receptor. This agrees with previous findings that type I receptor cannot bind TGF beta 1 without co-expression of the type...

  1. Hydroxyurea responses in clinically varied beta, HbE-beta thalassaemia and sickle cell anaemia patients of Eastern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Tridip; Chakravarty, Amit; Chakravarty, Sudipa

    2018-05-01

    The haematological and clinical response to hydroxyurea was estimated in HbE-beta, beta thalassaemia and sickle cell anaemia patients of Eastern India, with variable clinical severity and transfusion requirement to determine whether hydroxyurea can help these patients to maintain their steady haemoglobin level without blood transfusions. Three hundred patients (189 HbE-beta thalassaemia, 95 beta thalassaemia and 16 other haemoglobinopathies including sickle cell anaemia) were selected for hydroxyurea therapy and were followed up for 48-60 months. Results suggest significant response to hydroxyurea therapy in 19 beta and 99 HbE-beta patients in the transfusion-dependent group (GR-I). All of them became transfusion-independent while on hydroxyurea therapy. The majority of responding patients were IVS1-5(G-C) in one of their alleles in HbE-beta cases (83 out of 119). Though IVS1-5(G-C) was found to be the commonest mutation in our selected patients, the mutational background of the patients does not found to have any significant correlation with the response category towards hydroxyurea as per the results observed in our study. But, the drug works pretty well in most of the transfusion-dependent patients, as these patients were withdrawn from regular blood transfusion. At the same time, partial or no response to the drug hydroxyurea was also recorded in our study.

  2. Inactivation of the transforming growth factor beta type II receptor in human small cell lung cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, S; Nørgaard, P; Abrahamsen, N

    1999-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) exerts a growth inhibitory effect on many cell types through binding to two types of receptors, the type I and II receptors. Resistance to TGF-beta due to lack of type II receptor (RII) has been described in some cancer types including small cell lung...

  3. Regulatory T cells (CD4(+)CD25(bright)FoxP3(+)) expansion in systemic sclerosis correlates with disease activity and severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slobodin, Gleb; Ahmad, Mohammad Sheikh; Rosner, Itzhak; Peri, Regina; Rozenbaum, Michael; Kessel, Aharon; Toubi, Elias; Odeh, Majed

    2010-01-01

    The role and function of T regulatory (Treg) cells have not been fully investigated in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc). Ten patients with SSc donated 20ml of peripheral blood. Activity (Valentini) and severity (Medsger) scores for SSc were calculated for all patients. Healthy volunteers (controls) were matched to each patient by gender and age. CD4(+) cells were separated using the MACS system. The numbers of Treg cells were estimated by flow cytometry after staining for CD4, CD25, and FoxP3 and calculated as patient-to-control ratio separately for each experiment. Correlations with activity and severity indices of the disease were performed. Twenty-four-hour production of TGF-beta and IL-10 by activated CD4(+) cells was measured by ELISA in culture supernatants. The numbers of Treg cells, expressed as patient-to-control ratio, correlated significantly with both activity and severity indices (r=0.71, p=0.034 and r=0.67, p=0.044, respectively). ELISA-measured production of TGF-beta and IL-10 by CD4(+) cells was similar in patients and controls. Increased numbers of Treg cells are present in patients with SSc, correlating with activity and severity of the disease. This expansion of Treg cells was not accompanied, however, by heightened TGF-beta or IL-10 production. Further studies to elaborate the causes and functional significance of Treg cell expansion in SSc are needed. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Thymosin {beta}4 promotes the migration of endothelial cells without intracellular Ca{sup 2+} elevation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selmi, Anna [Department of Molecular and Medical Biophysics, Medical University of Lodz, 92-215 Lodz (Poland); Malinowski, Mariusz [Institute of Medical Biology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Lodz (Poland); Brutkowski, Wojciech [Nencki Institute of Experimental Biology, Polish Academy of Sciences, 02-093 Warsaw (Poland); Bednarek, Radoslaw [Department of Molecular and Medical Biophysics, Medical University of Lodz, 92-215 Lodz (Poland); Cierniewski, Czeslaw S., E-mail: czeslaw.cierniewski@umed.lodz.pl [Department of Molecular and Medical Biophysics, Medical University of Lodz, 92-215 Lodz (Poland); Institute of Medical Biology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Lodz (Poland)

    2012-08-15

    Numerous studies have demonstrated the effects of T{beta}4 on cell migration, proliferation, apoptosis and inflammation after exogenous treatment, but the mechanism by which T{beta}4 functions is still unclear. Previously, we demonstrated that incubation of endothelial cells with T{beta}4 induced synthesis and secretion of various proteins, including plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 and matrix metaloproteinases. We also showed that T{beta}4 interacts with Ku80, which may operate as a novel receptor for T{beta}4 and mediates its intracellular activity. In this paper, we provide evidence that T{beta}4 induces cellular processes without changes in the intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration. External treatment of HUVECs with T{beta}4 and its mutants deprived of the N-terminal tetrapeptide AcSDKP (T{beta}4{sub AcSDKPT/4A}) or the actin-binding sequence KLKKTET (T{beta}4{sub KLKKTET/7A}) resulted in enhanced cell migration and formation of tubular structures in Matrigel. Surprisingly, the increased cell motility caused by T{beta}4 was not associated with the intracellular Ca{sup 2+} elevation monitored with Fluo-4 NW or Fura-2 AM. Therefore, it is unlikely that externally added T{beta}4 induces HUVEC migration via the surface membrane receptors known to generate Ca{sup 2+} influx. Our data confirm the concept that externally added T{beta}4 must be internalized to induce intracellular mechanisms supporting endothelial cell migration.

  5. A review of decellularized stem cell matrix: a novel cell expansion system for cartilage tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Pei

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Cell-based therapy is a promising biological approach for the treatment of cartilage defects. Due to the small size of autologous cartilage samples available for cell transplantation in patients, cells need to be expanded to yield a sufficient cell number for cartilage repair. However, chondrocytes and adult stem cells tend to become replicatively senescent once they are expanded on conventional plastic flasks. Many studies demonstrate that the loss of cell properties is concomitant with the decreased cell proliferation capacity. This is a significant challenge for cartilage tissue engineering and regeneration. Despite much progress having been made in cell expansion, there are still concerns over expanded cell size and quality for cell transplantation applications. Recently, in vivo investigations in stem cell niches have suggested the importance of developing an in vitro stem cell microenvironment for cell expansion and tissue-specific differentiation. Our and other investigators’ work indicates that a decellularized stem cell matrix (DSCM may provide such an expansion system to yield large-quantity and high-quality cells for cartilage tissue engineering and regeneration. This review briefly introduces key parameters in an in vivo stem cell niche and focuses on our recent work on DSCM for its rejuvenating or reprograming effect on various adult stem cells and chondrocytes. Since research in DSCM is still in its infancy, we are only able to discuss some potential mechanisms of DSCM on cell proliferation and chondrogenic potential. Further investigations of the underlying mechanism and in vivo regeneration capacity will allow this approach to be used in clinics.

  6. Planar Cell Polarity Controls Pancreatic Beta Cell Differentiation and Glucose Homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cortijo, Cedric; Gouzi, Mathieu; Tissir, Fadel

    2012-01-01

    glucose clearance. Loss of Celsr2 and 3 leads to a reduction of Jun phosphorylation in progenitors, which, in turn, reduces beta cell differentiation from endocrine progenitors. These results highlight the importance of the PCP pathway in cell differentiation in vertebrates. In addition, they reveal.......5 synchronously to apicobasal polarization of pancreas progenitors. Loss of function of the two PCP core components Celsr2 and Celsr3 shows that they control the differentiation of endocrine cells from polarized progenitors, with a prevalent effect on insulin-producing beta cells. This results in a decreased...

  7. Expression and functional importance of collagen-binding integrins, alpha 1 beta 1 and alpha 2 beta 1, on virus-activated T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Susanne Ø; Thomsen, Allan R; Koteliansky, Victor E

    2003-01-01

    decreased responses were seen upon transfer of alpha(1)-deficient activated/memory T cells. Thus, expression of alpha(1)beta(1) and alpha(2)beta(1) integrins on activated T cells is directly functionally important for generation of inflammatory responses within tissues. Finally, the inhibitory effect......Adhesive interactions are crucial to cell migration into inflammatory sites. Using murine lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus as an Ag model system, we have investigated expression and function of collagen-binding integrins, alpha(1)beta(1) and alpha(2)beta(1), on activated and memory T cells. Using...... this system and MHC tetramers to define Ag-specific T cells, we demonstrate that contrary to being VLAs, expression of alpha(1)beta(1) and alpha(2)beta(1) can be rapidly induced on acutely activated T cells, that expression of alpha(1)beta(1) remains elevated on memory T cells, and that expression of alpha(1...

  8. Workshop on programming beta cell development, impairment and regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heller, Scott; Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    2012-01-01

    Helsingør, the city of Hamlet in Denmark, provided the site for the workshop "Programming Beta Cell Development, Impairment and Regeneration" on October 23-26th, 2011. The same location has held two EASD Islet study group meetings, while the previous three workshops were held in Helsinki, Finland...... (2003), El Perello, Spain (2006) and Peebles, Scotland (2009). The meeting drew 190 attendees from 12 different countries. There were 37 main oral presentations, and 68 posters covered virtually all aspects of the pancreas and provided a dynamic snapshot of the most interesting areas of current...

  9. Cocoa Phenolic Extract Protects Pancreatic Beta Cells against Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Bravo

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is associated with reductions in glutathione, supporting the critical role of oxidative stress in its pathogenesis. Antioxidant food components such as flavonoids have a protective role against oxidative stress-induced degenerative and age-related diseases. Flavonoids constitute an important part of the human diet; they can be found in most plant foods, including green tea, grapes or cocoa and possess multiple biological activities. This study investigates the chemo-protective effect of a cocoa phenolic extract (CPE containing mainly flavonoids against oxidative stress induced by tert-butylhydroperoxide (t-BOOH on Ins-1E pancreatic beta cells. Cell viability and oxidative status were evaluated. Ins-1E cells treatment with 5–20 μg/mL CPE for 20 h evoked no cell damage and did not alter ROS production. Addition of 50 μM t-BOOH for 2 h increased ROS and carbonyl groups content and decreased reduced glutathione level. Pre-treatment of cells with CPE significantly prevented the t-BOOH-induced ROS and carbonyl groups and returned antioxidant defences to adequate levels. Thus, Ins-1E cells treated with CPE showed a remarkable recovery of cell viability damaged by t-BOOH, indicating that integrity of surviving machineries in the CPE-treated cells was notably protected against the oxidative insult.

  10. Cdc42 controls progenitor cell differentiation and beta-catenin turnover in skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Xunwei; Quondamatteo, Fabio; Lefever, Tine

    2006-01-01

    for differentiation of skin progenitor cells into HF lineage and that it regulates the turnover of beta-catenin. In the absence of Cdc42, degradation of beta-catenin was increased corresponding to a decreased phosphorylation of GSK3beta at Ser 9 and an increased phosphorylation of axin, which is known to be required...... for binding of beta-catenin to the degradation machinery. Cdc42-mediated regulation of beta-catenin turnover was completely dependent on PKCzeta, which associated with Cdc42, Par6, and Par3. These data suggest that Cdc42 regulation of beta-catenin turnover is important for terminal differentiation of HF...

  11. Neonatal colonisation expands a specific intestinal antigen-presenting cell subset prior to CD4 T-cell expansion, without altering T-cell repertoire.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte F Inman

    Full Text Available Interactions between the early-life colonising intestinal microbiota and the developing immune system are critical in determining the nature of immune responses in later life. Studies in neonatal animals in which this interaction can be examined are central to understanding the mechanisms by which the microbiota impacts on immune development and to developing therapies based on manipulation of the microbiome. The inbred piglet model represents a system that is comparable to human neonates and allows for control of the impact of maternal factors. Here we show that colonisation with a defined microbiota produces expansion of mucosal plasma cells and of T-lymphocytes without altering the repertoire of alpha beta T-cells in the intestine. Importantly, this is preceded by microbially-induced expansion of a signal regulatory protein α-positive (SIRPα(+ antigen-presenting cell subset, whilst SIRPα(-CD11R1(+ antigen-presenting cells (APCs are unaffected by colonisation. The central role of intestinal APCs in the induction and maintenance of mucosal immunity implicates SIRPα(+ antigen-presenting cells as orchestrators of early-life mucosal immune development.

  12. The Fas pathway is involved in pancreatic beta cell secretory function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schumann, Desiree M; Maedler, Kathrin; Franklin, Isobel

    2007-01-01

    Pancreatic beta cell mass and function increase in conditions of enhanced insulin demand such as obesity. Failure to adapt leads to diabetes. The molecular mechanisms controlling this adaptive process are unclear. Fas is a death receptor involved in beta cell apoptosis or proliferation, depending...... on the activity of the caspase-8 inhibitor FLIP. Here we show that the Fas pathway also regulates beta cell secretory function. We observed impaired glucose tolerance in Fas-deficient mice due to a delayed and decreased insulin secretory pattern. Expression of PDX-1, a beta cell-specific transcription factor...... regulating insulin gene expression and mitochondrial metabolism, was decreased in Fas-deficient beta cells. As a consequence, insulin and ATP production were severely reduced and only partly compensated for by increased beta cell mass. Up-regulation of FLIP enhanced NF-kappaB activity via NF...

  13. Implications for the offspring of circulating factors involved in beta cell adaptation in pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nalla, Amarnadh; Ringholm, Lene; Søstrup, Birgitte

    2014-01-01

    is able to stimulate proliferation of rat beta cells. We have identified several circulating factors that may contribute to beta cell adaptation to pregnancy. Further studies are needed to elucidate their possible role in glucose homeostasis in the mother and her offspring.......OBJECTIVE: Several studies have shown an increase in beta cell mass during pregnancy. Somatolactogenic hormones are known to stimulate the proliferation of existing beta cells in rodents whereas the mechanism in humans is still unclear. We hypothesize that in addition to somatolactogenic hormones...... there are other circulating factors involved in beta cell adaptation to pregnancy. This study aimed at screening for potential pregnancy-associated circulating beta cell growth factors. SAMPLES: Serum samples from nonpregnant and pregnant women. METHODS: The effect of serum from pregnant women...

  14. Semi-automated digital measurement as the method of choice for beta cell mass analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violette Coppens

    Full Text Available Pancreas injury by partial duct ligation (PDL activates beta cell differentiation and proliferation in adult mouse pancreas but remains controversial regarding the anticipated increase in beta cell volume. Several reports unable to show beta cell volume augmentation in PDL pancreas used automated digital image analysis software. We hypothesized that fully automatic beta cell morphometry without manual micrograph artifact remediation introduces bias and therefore might be responsible for reported discrepancies and controversy. However, our present results prove that standard digital image processing with automatic thresholding is sufficiently robust albeit less sensitive and less adequate to demonstrate a significant increase in beta cell volume in PDL versus Sham-operated pancreas. We therefore conclude that other confounding factors such as quality of surgery, selection of samples based on relative abundance of the transcription factor Neurogenin 3 (Ngn3 and tissue processing give rise to inter-laboratory inconsistencies in beta cell volume quantification in PDL pancreas.

  15. Activation of Beta-Catenin Signaling in Androgen Receptor–Negative Prostate Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xinhai; Liu, Jie; Lu, Jing-Fang; Tzelepi, Vassiliki; Yang, Jun; Starbuck, Michael W.; Diao, Lixia; Wang, Jing; Efstathiou, Eleni; Vazquez, Elba S.; Troncoso, Patricia; Maity, Sankar N.; Navone, Nora M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To study Wnt/beta-catenin in castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) and understand its function independently of the beta-catenin–androgen receptor (AR) interaction. Experimental Design We performed beta-catenin immunocytochemical analysis, evaluated TOP-flash reporter activity (a reporter of beta-catenin–mediated transcription), and sequenced the beta-catenin gene in MDA PCa 118a, MDA PCa 118b, MDA PCa 2b, and PC-3 prostate cancer (PCa) cells. We knocked down beta-catenin in AR-negative MDA PCa 118b cells and performed comparative gene-array analysis. We also immunohistochemically analyzed beta-catenin and AR in 27 bone metastases of human CRPCs. Results Beta-catenin nuclear accumulation and TOP-flash reporter activity were high in MDA PCa 118b but not in MDA PCa 2b or PC-3 cells. MDA PCa 118a and 118b cells carry a mutated beta-catenin at codon 32 (D32G). Ten genes were expressed differently (false discovery rate, 0.05) in MDA PCa 118b cells with downregulated beta-catenin. One such gene, hyaluronan synthase 2 (HAS2), synthesizes hyaluronan, a core component of the extracellular matrix. We confirmed HAS2 upregulation in PC-3 cells transfected with D32G-mutant beta-catenin. Finally, we found nuclear localization of beta-catenin in 10 of 27 human tissue specimens; this localization was inversely associated with AR expression (P = 0.056, Fisher’s exact test), suggesting that reduced AR expression enables Wnt/beta-catenin signaling. Conclusion We identified a previously unknown downstream target of beta-catenin, HAS2, in PCa, and found that high beta-catenin nuclear localization and low or no AR expression may define a subpopulation of men with bone-metastatic PCa. These findings may guide physicians in managing these patients. PMID:22298898

  16. Effect of beta-carotene-rich tomato lycopene beta-cyclase ( tlcy-b) on cell growth inhibition in HT-29 colon adenocarcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palozza, Paola; Bellovino, Diana; Simone, Rossella; Boninsegna, Alma; Cellini, Francesco; Monastra, Giovanni; Gaetani, Sancia

    2009-07-01

    Lycopene beta-cyclase (tlcy-b) tomatoes, obtained by modulating carotenogenesis via genetic engineering, contain a large amount of beta-carotene, as clearly visible by their intense orange colour. In the present study we have subjected tlcy-b tomatoes to an in vitro simulated digestion and analysed the effects of digestate on cell proliferation. To this aim we used HT-29 human colon adenocarcinoma cells, grown in monolayers, as a model. Digested tomatoes were diluted (20 ml, 50 ml and 100 ml/l) in culture medium and added to the cells for different incubation times (24 h, 48 h and 72 h). Inhibition of cell growth by tomato digestate was dose-dependent and resulted from an arrest of cell cycle progression at the G0/G1 and G2/M phase and by apoptosis induction. A down-regulation of cyclin D1, Bcl-2 and Bcl-xl expression was observed. We also found that heat treatment of samples before digestion enhanced beta-carotene release and therefore cell growth inhibition. To induce with purified beta-carotene solubilised in tetrahydrofuran the same cell growth inhibition obtained with the tomato digestate, a higher amount of the carotenoid was necessary, suggesting that beta-carotene micellarised during digestion is utilised more efficiently by the cells, but also that other tomato molecules, reasonably made available during digestion, may be present and cooperate with beta-carotene in promoting cell growth arrest.

  17. The endoplasmic reticulum exerts control over organelle streaming during cell expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefano, Giovanni; Renna, Luciana; Brandizzi, Federica

    2014-03-01

    Cytoplasmic streaming is crucial for cell homeostasis and expansion but the precise driving forces are largely unknown. In plants, partial loss of cytoplasmic streaming due to chemical and genetic ablation of myosins supports the existence of yet-unknown motors for organelle movement. Here we tested a role of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) as propelling force for cytoplasmic streaming during cell expansion. Through quantitative live-cell analyses in wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana cells and mutants with compromised ER structure and streaming, we demonstrate that cytoplasmic streaming undergoes profound changes during cell expansion and that it depends on motor forces co-exerted by the ER and the cytoskeleton.

  18. Pancreatic Beta-Cell Purification by Altering FAD and NAD(PH Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. de Vos

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Isolation of primary beta cells from other cells within in the pancreatic islets is of importance for many fields of islet research. However, up to now, no satisfactory method has been developed that gained high numbers of viable beta cells, without considerable alpha-cell contamination. In this study, we investigated whether rat beta cells can be isolated from nonbeta endocrine cells by manipulating the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD and nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAD(PH autofluorescence. Beta cells were isolated from dispersed islets by flow cytometry, based on their high FAD and NAD(PH fluorescence. To improve beta cell yield and purity, the cellular FAD and NAD(PH contents were altered by preincubation in culture media containing varying amounts of D-glucose and amino acids. Manipulation of the cellular FAD and NAD(PH fluorescence improves beta cell yield and purity after sorting. This method is also a fast and reliable method to measure beta cell functional viability. A conceivable application is assessing beta cell viability before transplantation.

  19. Dysregulation of Dicer1 in Beta Cells Impairs Islet Architecture and Glucose Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amitai D. Mandelbaum

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available microRNAs (miRNAs play important roles in pancreas development and in regulation of insulin expression in the adult. Here we show that loss of miRNAs activity in beta-cells during embryonic development results in lower beta-cell mass and in impaired glucose tolerance. Dicer1-null cells initially constitute a significant portion of the total beta-cell population. However, during postnatal development, Dicer1-null cells are depleted. Furthermore, wild-type beta cells are repopulating the islets in complex compensatory dynamics. Because loss of Dicer1 is also associated with changes in the distribution of membranous E-cadherin, we hypothesized that E-cadherin activity may play a role in beta cell survival or islet architecture. However, genetic loss of E-cadherin function does not impair islet architecture, suggesting that miRNAs likely function through other or redundant effectors in the endocrine pancreas.

  20. Bleb Expansion in Migrating Cells Depends on Supply of Membrane from Cell Surface Invaginations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudarzi, Mohammad; Tarbashevich, Katsiaryna; Mildner, Karina; Begemann, Isabell; Garcia, Jamie; Paksa, Azadeh; Reichman-Fried, Michal; Mahabaleshwar, Harsha; Blaser, Heiko; Hartwig, Johannes; Zeuschner, Dagmar; Galic, Milos; Bagnat, Michel; Betz, Timo; Raz, Erez

    2017-12-04

    Cell migration is essential for morphogenesis, organ formation, and homeostasis, with relevance for clinical conditions. The migration of primordial germ cells (PGCs) is a useful model for studying this process in the context of the developing embryo. Zebrafish PGC migration depends on the formation of cellular protrusions in form of blebs, a type of protrusion found in various cell types. Here we report on the mechanisms allowing the inflation of the membrane during bleb formation. We show that the rapid expansion of the protrusion depends on membrane invaginations that are localized preferentially at the cell front. The formation of these invaginations requires the function of Cdc42, and their unfolding allows bleb inflation and dynamic cell-shape changes performed by migrating cells. Inhibiting the formation and release of the invaginations strongly interfered with bleb formation, cell motility, and the ability of the cells to reach their target. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Nuclear orphan receptor TLX affects gene expression, proliferation and cell apoptosis in beta cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Xiaoli; Xiong, Xiaokan; Dai, Zhe; Deng, Haohua; Sun, Li; Hu, Xuemei; Zhou, Feng; Xu, Yancheng, E-mail: oxyccc@163.com

    2015-12-04

    Nuclear orphan receptor TLX is an essential regulator of the growth of neural stem cells. However, its exact function in pancreatic islet cells is still unknown. In the present study, gene expression profiling analysis revealed that overexpression of TLX in beta cell line MIN6 causes suppression of 176 genes and upregulation of 49 genes, including a cadre of cell cycle, cell proliferation and cell death control genes, such as Btg2, Ddit3 and Gadd45a. We next examined the effects of TLX overexpression on proliferation, apoptosis and insulin secretion in MIN6 cells. Proliferation analysis using EdU assay showed that overexpression of TLX increased percentage of EdU-positive cells. Cell cycle and apoptosis analysis revealed that overexpression of TLX in MIN6 cells resulted in higher percentage of cells exiting G1 into S-phase, and a 58.8% decrease of cell apoptosis induced by 0.5 mM palmitate. Moreover, TLX overexpression did not cause impairment of insulin secretion. Together, we conclude that TLX is among factors capable of controlling beta cell proliferation and survival, which may serve as a target for the development of novel therapies for diabetes. - Highlights: • TLX overexpression in MIN6 cell causes significant expression changes of 225 genes. • TLX overexpression promotes MIN6 cell proliferation and decreases cell apoptosis. • TLX overexpression does not cause impairment of insulin secretion.

  2. Nuclear orphan receptor TLX affects gene expression, proliferation and cell apoptosis in beta cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Xiaoli; Xiong, Xiaokan; Dai, Zhe; Deng, Haohua; Sun, Li; Hu, Xuemei; Zhou, Feng; Xu, Yancheng

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear orphan receptor TLX is an essential regulator of the growth of neural stem cells. However, its exact function in pancreatic islet cells is still unknown. In the present study, gene expression profiling analysis revealed that overexpression of TLX in beta cell line MIN6 causes suppression of 176 genes and upregulation of 49 genes, including a cadre of cell cycle, cell proliferation and cell death control genes, such as Btg2, Ddit3 and Gadd45a. We next examined the effects of TLX overexpression on proliferation, apoptosis and insulin secretion in MIN6 cells. Proliferation analysis using EdU assay showed that overexpression of TLX increased percentage of EdU-positive cells. Cell cycle and apoptosis analysis revealed that overexpression of TLX in MIN6 cells resulted in higher percentage of cells exiting G1 into S-phase, and a 58.8% decrease of cell apoptosis induced by 0.5 mM palmitate. Moreover, TLX overexpression did not cause impairment of insulin secretion. Together, we conclude that TLX is among factors capable of controlling beta cell proliferation and survival, which may serve as a target for the development of novel therapies for diabetes. - Highlights: • TLX overexpression in MIN6 cell causes significant expression changes of 225 genes. • TLX overexpression promotes MIN6 cell proliferation and decreases cell apoptosis. • TLX overexpression does not cause impairment of insulin secretion.

  3. Cell specificity of the cytoplasmic Ca2+ response to tolbutamide is impaired in beta-cells from hyperglycemic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustavsson, Natalia; Larsson-Nyrén, Gerd; Lindström, Per

    2006-01-01

    We recently reported that the timing and magnitude of the nutrient-induced Ca(2+) response are specific and reproducible for each isolated beta-cell. We have now used tolbutamide and arginine to test if the cell specificity exists also for the response to non-nutrient stimulation of beta-cells an...

  4. Enhancing pancreatic Beta-cell regeneration in vivo with pioglitazone and alogliptin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Yin

    Full Text Available Pancreatic beta-cells retain limited ability to regenerate and proliferate after various physiologic triggers. Identifying therapies that are able to enhance beta-cell regeneration may therefore be useful for the treatment of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes.In this study we investigated endogenous and transplanted beta-cell regeneration by serially quantifying changes in bioluminescence from beta-cells from transgenic mice expressing firefly luciferase under the control of the mouse insulin I promoter. We tested the ability of pioglitazone and alogliptin, two drugs developed for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, to enhance beta-cell regeneration, and also defined the effect of the immunosuppression with rapamycin and tacrolimus on transplanted islet beta mass.Pioglitazone is a stimulator of nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma while alogliptin is a selective dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitor. Pioglitazone alone, or in combination with alogliptin, enhanced endogenous beta-cell regeneration in streptozotocin-treated mice, while alogliptin alone had modest effects. In a model of syngeneic islet transplantation, immunosuppression with rapamycin and tacrolimus induced an early loss of beta-cell mass, while treatment with insulin implants to maintain normoglycemia and pioglitazone plus alogliptin was able to partially promote beta-cell mass recovery.These data highlight the utility of bioluminescence for serially quantifying functional beta-cell mass in living mice. They also demonstrate the ability of pioglitazone, used either alone or in combination with alogliptin, to enhance regeneration of endogenous islet beta-cells as well as transplanted islets into recipients treated with rapamycin and tacrolimus.

  5. Structure of the T cell receptor in a Ti alpha V beta 2, alpha V beta 8-positive T cell line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, X; Dietrich, J; Kuhlmann, J

    1994-01-01

    not known; however, it has been suggested that each TcR contains two Ti dimers. To gain insight into the structure of the TcR we constructed a Ti alpha V beta 2, alpha V beta 8-positive T cell line which expressed the endogenous human TiV beta 8 and the transfected mouse TiV beta 2 both in association......The T cell receptor (TcR) is composed of at least six different polypeptide chains consisting of the clonotypic Ti heterodimer (Ti alpha beta or Ti gamma delta) and the noncovalently associated CD3 chains (CD3 gamma delta epsilon zeta). The exact number of subunits constituting the TcR is still...... with the endogenous Ti alpha and CD3 chains at the cell surface. Preclearing experiments with radioiodinated cell lysate prepared with digitonin lysis buffer demonstrated that depleting the lysate of Ti alpha V beta 8 by immunoprecipitation with anti V beta 8 monoclonal antibody (mAb) did not reduce the amount of Ti...

  6. Atkinesin-13A Modulates Cell-Wall Synthesis and Cell Expansion in Arabidopsis thaliana via the THESEUS1 Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujikura, Ushio; Elsaesser, Lore; Breuninger, Holger; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Clara; Ivakov, Alexander; Laux, Thomas; Findlay, Kim; Persson, Staffan; Lenhard, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Growth of plant organs relies on cell proliferation and expansion. While an increasingly detailed picture about the control of cell proliferation is emerging, our knowledge about the control of cell expansion remains more limited. We demonstrate here that the internal-motor kinesin AtKINESIN-13A (AtKIN13A) limits cell expansion and cell size in Arabidopsis thaliana, with loss-of-function atkin13a mutants forming larger petals with larger cells. The homolog, AtKINESIN-13B, also affects cell expansion and double mutants display growth, gametophytic and early embryonic defects, indicating a redundant role of the two genes. AtKIN13A is known to depolymerize microtubules and influence Golgi motility and distribution. Consistent with this function, AtKIN13A interacts genetically with ANGUSTIFOLIA, encoding a regulator of Golgi dynamics. Reduced AtKIN13A activity alters cell wall structure as assessed by Fourier-transformed infrared-spectroscopy and triggers signalling via the THESEUS1-dependent cell-wall integrity pathway, which in turn promotes the excess cell expansion in the atkin13a mutant. Thus, our results indicate that the intracellular activity of AtKIN13A regulates cell expansion and wall architecture via THESEUS1, providing a compelling case of interplay between cell wall integrity sensing and expansion. PMID:25232944

  7. Repetitive in vivo treatment with human recombinant interleukin-1 beta modifies beta-cell function in normal rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wogensen, L D; Reimers, J; Nerup, J

    1992-01-01

    It is unknown whether interleukin-1 exerts a bimodal effect on Beta-cell function in vivo, and whether interleukin-1 has a diabetogenic action in normal animals. We therefore studied: (a) acute effects 2 h after an intraperitoneal bolus injection of 4 micrograms of recombinant human interleukin-1...

  8. Reduced Expression of the Liver/Beta-Cell Glucose Transporter Isoform in Glucose-Insensitive Pancreatic Beta Cells of Diabetic Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorens, Bernard; Weir, Gordon C.; Leahy, John L.; Lodish, Harvey F.; Bonner-Weir, Susan

    1990-09-01

    Rats injected with a single dose of streptozocin at 2 days of age develop non-insulin-dependent diabetes 6 weeks later. The pancreatic beta islet cells of these diabetic rats display a loss of glucose-induced insulin secretion while maintaining sensitivity to other secretagogues such as arginine. We analyzed the level of expression of the liver/beta-cell glucose transporter isoform in diabetic islets by immunofluorescence staining of pancreas sections and by Western blotting of islet lysates. Islets from diabetic animals have a reduced expression of this beta-cell-specific glucose transporter isoform and the extent of reduction is correlated with the severity of hyperglycemia. In contrast, expression of this transporter isoform in liver is minimally modified by the diabetes. Thus a decreased expression of the liver/beta-cell glucose transporter isoform in beta cells is associated with the impaired glucose sensing characteristic of diabetic islets; our data suggest that this glucose transporter may be part of the beta-cell glucose sensor.

  9. Suppressor of cytokine signalling (SOCS)-3 protects beta cells against IL-1beta-mediated toxicity through inhibition of multiple nuclear factor-kappaB-regulated proapoptotic pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsen, Allan Ertman; Heding, P E; Frobøse, H

    2004-01-01

    The proinflammatory cytokine IL-1beta induces apoptosis in pancreatic beta cells via pathways dependent on nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB), mitogen-activated protein kinase, and protein kinase C. We recently showed suppressor of cytokine signalling (SOCS)-3 to be a natural negative feedback reg...... regulator of IL-1beta- and IFN-gamma-mediated signalling in rat islets and beta cell lines, preventing their deleterious effects. However, the mechanisms underlying SOCS-3 inhibition of IL-1beta signalling and prevention against apoptosis remain unknown....

  10. Beta Cell Mass Restoration in Alloxan-Diabetic Mice Treated with EGF and Gastrin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imane Song

    Full Text Available One week of treatment with EGF and gastrin (EGF/G was shown to restore normoglycemia and to induce islet regeneration in mice treated with the diabetogenic agent alloxan. The mechanisms underlying this regeneration are not fully understood. We performed genetic lineage tracing experiments to evaluate the contribution of beta cell neogenesis in this model. One day after alloxan administration, mice received EGF/G treatment for one week. The treatment could not prevent the initial alloxan-induced beta cell mass destruction, however it did reverse glycemia to control levels within one day, suggesting improved peripheral glucose uptake. In vitro experiments with C2C12 cell line showed that EGF could stimulate glucose uptake with an efficacy comparable to that of insulin. Subsequently, EGF/G treatment stimulated a 3-fold increase in beta cell mass, which was partially driven by neogenesis and beta cell proliferation as assessed by beta cell lineage tracing and BrdU-labeling experiments, respectively. Acinar cell lineage tracing failed to show an important contribution of acinar cells to the newly formed beta cells. No appearance of transitional cells co-expressing insulin and glucagon, a hallmark for alpha-to-beta cell conversion, was found, suggesting that alpha cells did not significantly contribute to the regeneration. An important fraction of the beta cells significantly lost insulin positivity after alloxan administration, which was restored to normal after one week of EGF/G treatment. Alloxan-only mice showed more pronounced beta cell neogenesis and proliferation, even though beta cell mass remained significantly depleted, suggesting ongoing beta cell death in that group. After one week, macrophage infiltration was significantly reduced in EGF/G-treated group compared to the alloxan-only group. Our results suggest that EGF/G-induced beta cell regeneration in alloxan-diabetic mice is driven by beta cell neogenesis, proliferation and recovery of

  11. Lysine deacetylase inhibition prevents diabetes by chromatin-independent immunoregulation and beta-cell protection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Christensen, D.P.; Gysemans, C.; Lundh, M.; Dahllof, M.S.; Noesgaard, D.; Schmidt, S.F.; Mandrup, S; Birkbak, N.; Workman, C.T.; Piemonti, L.; Blaabjerg, L.; Monzani, V.; Fossati, G.; Mascagni, P.; Paraskevas, S.; Aikin, R.A.; Billestrup, N.; Grunnet, L.G.; Dinarello, C.A.; Mathieu, C.; Mandrup-Poulsen, T.

    2014-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes is due to destruction of pancreatic beta-cells. Lysine deacetylase inhibitors (KDACi) protect beta-cells from inflammatory destruction in vitro and are promising immunomodulators. Here we demonstrate that the clinically well-tolerated KDACi vorinostat and givinostat revert diabetes

  12. Regulation of pancreatic beta-cell mass and proliferation by SOCS-3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, K; Rønn, S G; Tornehave, D

    2005-01-01

    Growth hormone and prolactin are important growth factors for pancreatic beta-cells. The effects exerted by these hormones on proliferation and on insulin synthesis and secretion in beta-cells are largely mediated through the Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription (ST...

  13. Demonstration of interleukin-1 beta transcripts in acute myeloblastic leukemic cells by in situ hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, M; Kanakura, Y; Furukawa, Y; Ernst, T J; Griffin, J D

    1990-07-01

    The cells from some patients with acute myeloblastic leukemia will secrete autostimulatory cytokines in tissue culture without the addition of stimulators such as phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. Production of interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta), for example, has been observed in up to 50% of cases. In order to investigate the nature of the cell secreting IL-1 beta in AML, we used an antisense RNA probe to detect specific IL-1 beta transcripts in individual leukemic cells by in situ hybridization. In fresh, uncultured cells, IL-1 beta transcripts were observed in 1-40% of undifferentiated leukemic blast cells in 17 of 19 cases. In situ hybridization was at least as sensitive as Northern blot analysis in detecting IL-1 beta transcripts. No correlation of IL-1 beta transcript expression with FAB classification was observed. Normal blood and bone marrow mononuclear cells did not contain cells expressing IL-1 beta transcripts. These results support the concept that the regulation of cytokine genes in AML cells is aberrant.

  14. Serum adipokines as biomarkers of beta-cell function in patients with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pham, Minh Nguyet; Kolb, Hubert; Mandrup-Poulsen, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the adipokines adiponectin, leptin and resistin as serum biomarkers of beta-cell function in patients with type 1 diabetes.......We investigated the adipokines adiponectin, leptin and resistin as serum biomarkers of beta-cell function in patients with type 1 diabetes....

  15. Lysine deacetylases are produced in pancreatic beta cells and are differentially regulated by proinflammatory cytokines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundh, M; Christensen, D P; Rasmussen, D N

    2010-01-01

    Cytokine-induced beta cell toxicity is abrogated by non-selective inhibitors of lysine deacetylases (KDACs). The KDAC family consists of 11 members, namely histone deacetylases HDAC1 to HDAC11, but it is not known which KDAC members play a role in cytokine-mediated beta cell death. The aim...

  16. Ectopic production of beta-HCG by a maxillary squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholl, P D; Jurco, S; Austin, J R

    1997-12-01

    Paraneoplastic syndromes of the head and neck are rare. Hypercalcemia and leukocytosis have been described. The literature was reviewed, and a case of a squamous cell carcinoma of the maxilla producing beta human chorionic gonadotropin (beta-HCG) is presented. A 47-year-old white man with a T4N1M0 squamous cell carcinoma of the left maxilla was treated with a maxillectomy and neck dissection for an N1 positive neck. After completing his planned radiotherapy, he developed distant metastases, which included an axillary node that stained positive for human beta-HCG. Retrospective review of the primary specimen showed beta-HCG positivity in an anaplastic component of the tumor along with vascular invasion. The first case in the literature of a paraneoplastic syndrome with beta-HCG production in association with squamous cell carcinoma of the maxilla is presented. This case history fits the aggressive nature of beta HCG producing tumors elsewhere in the body.

  17. Cytokines interleukin-1beta and tumor necrosis factor-alpha regulate different transcriptional and alternative splicing networks in primary beta-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ortis, Fernanda; Naamane, Najib; Flamez, Daisy

    2010-01-01

    by the cytokines interleukin (IL)-1beta + interferon (IFN)-gamma and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha + IFN-gamma in primary rat beta-cells. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Fluorescence-activated cell sorter-purified rat beta-cells were exposed to IL-1beta + IFN-gamma or TNF-alpha + IFN-gamma for 6 or 24 h......-cells, with temporal differences in the number of genes modulated by IL-1beta + IFNgamma or TNF-alpha + IFN-gamma. These cytokine combinations induced differential expression of inflammatory response genes, which is related to differential induction of IFN regulatory factor-7. Both treatments decreased the expression...... of genes involved in the maintenance of beta-cell phenotype and growth/regeneration. Cytokines induced hypoxia-inducible factor-alpha, which in this context has a proapoptotic role. Cytokines also modified the expression of >20 genes involved in RNA splicing, and exon array analysis showed cytokine...

  18. Do post-translational beta cell protein modifications trigger type 1 diabetes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Størling, Joachim; Overgaard, Anne Julie; Brorsson, Caroline Anna

    2013-01-01

    beta cell-specific neo-epitopes. We suggest that the current paradigm of type 1 diabetes as a classical autoimmune disease should be reconsidered since the immune response may not be directed against native beta cell proteins. A modified model for the pathogenetic events taking place in islets leading...... diabetes exists in the published literature. Furthermore, we report that cytokines change the expression levels of several genes encoding proteins involved in PTM processes in human islets, and that there are type 1 diabetes-associated polymorphisms in a number of these. In conclusion, data from...... the literature and presented experimental data support the notion that PTM of beta cell proteins may be involved in triggering beta cell destruction in type 1 diabetes. If the beta cell antigens recognised by the immune system foremost come from modified proteins rather than native ones, the concept of type 1...

  19. Cell Expansion-Dependent Inflammatory and Metabolic Profile of Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, Patricia; Fernández-Velasco, María; Fernández-Santos, María E; Sánchez, Pedro L; Terrón, Verónica; Martín-Sanz, Paloma; Fernández-Avilés, Francisco; Boscá, Lisardo

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell therapy has emerged as a promising new area in regenerative medicine allowing the recovery of viable tissues. Among the many sources of adult stem cells, bone marrow-derived are easy to expand in culture via plastic adherence and their multipotentiality for differentiation make them ideal for clinical applications. Interestingly, several studies have indicated that MSCs expansion in vitro may be limited mainly due to "cell aging" related to the number of cell divisions in culture. We have determined that MSCs exhibit a progressive decline across successive passages in the expression of stem cell markers, in plasticity and in the inflammatory response, presenting low immunogenicity. We have exposed human MSCs after several passages to TLRs ligands and analyzed their inflammatory response. These cells responded to pro-inflammatory stimuli (i.e., NOS-2 expression) and to anti-inflammatory cytokines (i.e., HO1 and Arg1) until two expansions, rapidly declining upon subculture. Moreover, in the first passages, MSCs were capable to release IL1β, IL6, and IL8, as well as to produce active MMPs allowing them to migrate. Interestingly enough, after two passages, anaerobic glycolysis was enhanced releasing high levels of lactate to the extracellular medium. All these results may have important implications for the safety and efficacy of MSCs-based cell therapies.

  20. Nuclear orphan receptor TLX affects gene expression, proliferation and cell apoptosis in beta cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiaoli; Xiong, Xiaokan; Dai, Zhe; Deng, Haohua; Sun, Li; Hu, Xuemei; Zhou, Feng; Xu, Yancheng

    Nuclear orphan receptor TLX is an essential regulator of the growth of neural stem cells. However, its exact function in pancreatic islet cells is still unknown. In the present study, gene expression profiling analysis revealed that overexpression of TLX in beta cell line MIN6 causes suppression of 176 genes and upregulation of 49 genes, including a cadre of cell cycle, cell proliferation and cell death control genes, such as Btg2, Ddit3 and Gadd45a. We next examined the effects of TLX overexpression on proliferation, apoptosis and insulin secretion in MIN6 cells. Proliferation analysis using EdU assay showed that overexpression of TLX increased percentage of EdU-positive cells. Cell cycle and apoptosis analysis revealed that overexpression of TLX in MIN6 cells resulted in higher percentage of cells exiting G1 into S-phase, and a 58.8% decrease of cell apoptosis induced by 0.5 mM palmitate. Moreover, TLX overexpression did not cause impairment of insulin secretion. Together, we conclude that TLX is among factors capable of controlling beta cell proliferation and survival, which may serve as a target for the development of novel therapies for diabetes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Ex vivo expansion of human umbilical cord blood hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Kusadasi (Nuray)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractThe goal of this thesis research is to establish ex vivo expansion conditions for HSCs derived from UCB. To realize the expansion of HSCs, CD34+ or ACJ33+ UCB cells were cultured in the absence or presence of various cocktails of early acting cytokines including Flt3-L, Tpo, SCF or IL6

  2. Activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in pancreatic beta cells during the compensatory islet hyperplasia in prediabetic mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maschio, D.A.; Oliveira, R.B.; Santos, M.R.; Carvalho, C.P.F.; Barbosa-Sampaio, H.C.L.; Collares-Buzato, C.B.

    2016-01-01

    The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, also known as the canonical Wnt pathway, plays a role in cell proliferation and differentiation in several tissues/organs. It has been recently described in humans a relationship between type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and mutation in the gene encoding the transcription factor TCF7L2 associated to the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. In the present study, we demonstrated that hyperplastic pancreatic islets from prediabetic mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD) for 60 d displayed nuclear translocation of active β-catenin associated with significant increases in protein content and gene expression of β-catenin as well as of cyclins D1, D2 and c-Myc (target genes of the Wnt pathway) but not of Tcf7l2 (the transcription factor). Meanwhile, these alterations were not observed in pancreatic islets from 30 d HFD-fed mice, that do not display significant beta cell hyperplasia. These data suggest that the Wnt/β-catenin pathway is activated in pancreatic islets during prediabetes and may play a role in the induction of the compensatory beta cell hyperplasia observed at early phase of T2DM. - Highlights: • Exposure to high-fat diet for 60 days induced prediabetes and beta cell mass expansion. • Hyperplastic pancreatic islets displayed nuclear translocation of active β-catenin. • Hyperplastic islets showed increased expression of target genes of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. • Wnt/β-catenin pathway is activated during compensatory beta cell hyperplasia in mice.

  3. Microenvironmental cues enhance mesenchymal stem cell-mediated immunomodulation and regulatory T-cell expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadle, Rohini L; Abdou, Salma A; Villarreal-Ponce, Alvaro P; Soares, Marc A; Sultan, Darren L; David, Joshua A; Massie, Jonathan; Rifkin, William J; Rabbani, Piul; Ceradini, Daniel J

    2018-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are known to both have powerful immunosuppressive properties and promote allograft tolerance. Determining the environmental oxygen tension and inflammatory conditions under which MSCs are optimally primed for this immunosuppressive function is essential to their utilization in promoting graft tolerance. Of particular interest is the mechanisms governing the interaction between MSCs and regulatory T cells (Tregs), which is relatively unknown. We performed our experiments utilizing rat bone marrow derived MSCs. We observed that priming MSCs in hypoxia promotes maintenance of stem-like characteristics, with greater expression of typical MSC cell-surface markers, increased proliferation, and maintenance of differentiation potential. Addition of autologous MSCs to CD4+/allogeneic endothelial cell (EC) co-culture increases regulatory T cell (Treg) proliferation, which is further enhanced when MSCs are primed in hypoxia. Furthermore, MSC-mediated Treg expansion does not require direct cell-cell contact. The expression of indolamine 2,3-dioxygenase, a mediator of MSC immunomodulation, increases when MSCs are primed in hypoxia, and inhibition of IDO significantly decreases the expansion of Tregs. Priming with inflammatory cytokines IFNγ and TNFα increases also expression of markers associated with MSC immunomodulatory function, but decreases MSC proliferation. The expression of IDO also increases when MSCs are primed with inflammatory cytokines. However, there is no increase in Treg expansion when MSCs are primed with IFNγ, suggesting an alternate mechanism for inflammatory-stimulated MSC immunomodulation. Overall, these results suggest that MSCs primed in hypoxia or inflammatory conditions are optimally primed for immunosuppressive function. These results provide a clearer picture of how to enhance MSC immunomodulation for clinical use.

  4. Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Phenotype is not Influenced by Confluence during Culture Expansion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haack-Sørensen, Mandana; Hansen, Susanne Kofoed; Hansen, Louise

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Accumulating preclinical and clinical evidence indicates that human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are good candidates for cell therapy. For clinical applications of MSCs extensive in vitro expansion is required to obtain an adequate number of cells. It is evident that the pursuit...... differentiation. This phenotype persisted independent of increasing cell densities. DISCUSSION: These data demonstrate that MSC characteristics and plasticity can be maintained during culture expansion from bone marrow mononuclear cells to MSCs and that a homogeneous phenotype of undifferentiated MSCs which...... persists independent of cell density can be used for clinical therapies....

  5. Resistin enhances the expansion of regulatory T cells through modulation of dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Seung

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Resistin, a member of adipokine family, is known to be involved in the modulation of immune responses including inflammatory activity. Interestingly, resistin is secreted by adipocytes in mice and rats whereas it is secreted by leukocytes in humans. However, the mechanism behind the effect of resistin on the expansion of regulatory T cells (Tregs remains poorly understood. Therefore, we examined regulatory effect of resistin on the induction and cellular modification of Tregs. Results Both protein and mRNA expression of FoxP3, a representative marker of Tregs, increased in a dose-dependent manner when peripheral blood mononuclear cells were treated with resistin. At the same time, resistin had no direct effect on the induction of FoxP3 in CD4+ T cells, suggesting an indirect role through other cells type(s. Since DCs are an important player in the differentiation of T cells, we focused on the role of DCs in the modulation of Tregs by resistin. Resistin suppressed the expression of interferon regulatory factor (IRF-1 and its target cytokines, IL-6, IL-23p19 and IL-12p40, in DCs. Furthermore, FoxP3 expression is increased in CD4+ T cells when co-cultured with DCs and concomitantly treated with resistin. Conclusion Our results suggest that resistin induces expansion of functional Tregs only when co-cultured with DCs.

  6. Expression profiling of genes regulated by TGF-beta: Differential regulation in normal and tumour cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahashi Takashi

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background TGF-beta is one of the key cytokines implicated in various disease processes including cancer. TGF-beta inhibits growth and promotes apoptosis in normal epithelial cells and in contrast, acts as a pro-tumour cytokine by promoting tumour angiogenesis, immune-escape and metastasis. It is not clear if various actions of TGF-beta on normal and tumour cells are due to differential gene regulations. Hence we studied the regulation of gene expression by TGF-beta in normal and cancer cells. Results Using human 19 K cDNA microarrays, we show that 1757 genes are exclusively regulated by TGF-beta in A549 cells in contrast to 733 genes exclusively regulated in HPL1D cells. In addition, 267 genes are commonly regulated in both the cell-lines. Semi-quantitative and real-time qRT-PCR analysis of some genes agrees with the microarray data. In order to identify the signalling pathways that influence TGF-beta mediated gene regulation, we used specific inhibitors of p38 MAP kinase, ERK kinase, JNK kinase and integrin signalling pathways. The data suggest that regulation of majority of the selected genes is dependent on at least one of these pathways and this dependence is cell-type specific. Interestingly, an integrin pathway inhibitor, RGD peptide, significantly affected TGF-beta regulation of Thrombospondin 1 in A549 cells. Conclusion These data suggest major differences with respect to TGF-beta mediated gene regulation in normal and transformed cells and significant role of non-canonical TGF-beta pathways in the regulation of many genes by TGF-beta.

  7. TGF-beta1 expression in EL4 lymphoma cells overexpressing growth hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, John T; Weigent, Douglas A

    2006-03-01

    Our previous studies show that growth hormone overexpression (GHo) upregulates the expression of the IGF-1R and IGF-2R resulting in the protection of the EL4 lymphoma cell line from apoptosis. In this study, we report that GHo also increases TGF-beta1 protein expression measured by luciferase promoter assay, Western analysis, and ELISA. Further, the data show that antibody to TGF-betaR2 decreases TGF-beta1 promoter activity to the level of vector alone control cells. GHo cells treated with (125)I-rh-latent TGF-beta1 showed increased activation of latent TGF-beta1 as measured by an increase in the active 24kDa, TGF-beta1 compared to vector alone control cells. The ability of endogenous GH to increase TGF-beta1 expression is blocked in EL4 cells by antisense but not sense oligodeoxynucleotides or in cells cultured with antibody to growth hormone (GH). The data suggest that endogenous GH may protect from apoptosis through the IGF-1R receptor while limiting cellular growth through increased expression and activation of TGF-beta1.

  8. Allogeneic cell therapy bioprocess economics and optimization: single-use cell expansion technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simaria, Ana S; Hassan, Sally; Varadaraju, Hemanthram; Rowley, Jon; Warren, Kim; Vanek, Philip; Farid, Suzanne S

    2014-01-01

    For allogeneic cell therapies to reach their therapeutic potential, challenges related to achieving scalable and robust manufacturing processes will need to be addressed. A particular challenge is producing lot-sizes capable of meeting commercial demands of up to 10(9) cells/dose for large patient numbers due to the current limitations of expansion technologies. This article describes the application of a decisional tool to identify the most cost-effective expansion technologies for different scales of production as well as current gaps in the technology capabilities for allogeneic cell therapy manufacture. The tool integrates bioprocess economics with optimization to assess the economic competitiveness of planar and microcarrier-based cell expansion technologies. Visualization methods were used to identify the production scales where planar technologies will cease to be cost-effective and where microcarrier-based bioreactors become the only option. The tool outputs also predict that for the industry to be sustainable for high demand scenarios, significant increases will likely be needed in the performance capabilities of microcarrier-based systems. These data are presented using a technology S-curve as well as windows of operation to identify the combination of cell productivities and scale of single-use bioreactors required to meet future lot sizes. The modeling insights can be used to identify where future R&D investment should be focused to improve the performance of the most promising technologies so that they become a robust and scalable option that enables the cell therapy industry reach commercially relevant lot sizes. The tool outputs can facilitate decision-making very early on in development and be used to predict, and better manage, the risk of process changes needed as products proceed through the development pathway. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Intra-hydrogel culture prevents transformation of mesenchymal stem cells induced by monolayer expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Tongmeng; Liu, Junting; Ouyang, Yiqiang; Wu, Huayu; Zheng, Li; Zhao, Jinmin; Zhang, Xingdong

    2018-05-01

    In this study, we report that the intra-hydrogel culture system mitigates the transformation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) induced by two-dimensional (2D) expansion. MSCs expanded in monolayer culture prior to encapsulation in collagen hydrogels (group eMSCs-CH) featured impaired stemness in chondrogenesis, comparing with the freshly isolated bone marrow mononuclear cells seeded directly in collagen hydrogels (group fMSCs-CH). The molecular mechanism of the in vitro expansion-triggered damage to MSCs was detected through genome-wide microarray analysis. Results indicated that pathways such as proteoglycans in cancer and pathways in cancer expansion were highly enriched in eMSCs-CH. And multiple up-regulated oncoma-associated genes were verified in eMSCs-CH compared with fMSCs-CH, indicating that expansion in vitro triggered cellular transformation was associated with signaling pathways related to tumorigenicity. Besides, focal adhesion (FA) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways were also involved in in vitro expansion, indicating restructuring of the cell architecture. Thus, monolayer expansion in vitro may contribute to vulnerability of MSCs through the regulation of FA and MAPK. This study indicates that intra-hydrogel culture can mitigate the monolayer expansion induced transformation of MSCs and maintain the uniformity of the stem cells, which is a viable in vitro culture system for stem cell therapy.

  10. The effect of interferon-{beta} on mouse neural progenitor cell survival and differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirsch, Marek [Neurology Department, University of Vermont College of Medicine, Burlington, VT (United States); Knight, Julia [Neuroscience Department, University of Vermont College of Medicine, Burlington, VT (United States); Tobita, Mari; Soltys, John; Panitch, Hillel [Neurology Department, University of Vermont College of Medicine, Burlington, VT (United States); Mao-Draayer, Yang, E-mail: yang.mao-draayer@vtmednet.org [Neurology Department, University of Vermont College of Medicine, Burlington, VT (United States)

    2009-10-16

    Interferon-{beta} (IFN-{beta}) is a mainstay therapy for relapse-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS). However, the direct effects of IFN-{beta} on the central nervous system (CNS) are not well understood. To determine whether IFN-{beta} has direct neuroprotective effects on CNS cells, we treated adult mouse neural progenitor cells (NPCs) in vitro with IFN-{beta} and examined the effects on proliferation, apoptosis, and differentiation. We found that mouse NPCs express high levels of IFN{alpha}/{beta} receptor (IFNAR). In response to IFN-{beta} treatment, no effect was observed on differentiation or proliferation. However, IFN-{beta} treated mouse NPCs demonstrated decreased apoptosis upon growth factor withdrawal. Pathway-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) arrays demonstrated that IFN-{beta} treatment upregulated the STAT 1 and 2 signaling pathway, as well as GFRA2, NOD1, Caspases 1 and 12, and TNFSF10. These results suggest that IFN-{beta} can directly affect NPC survival, possibly playing a neuroprotective role in the CNS by modulating neurotrophic factors.

  11. Selective destruction of mouse islet beta cells by human T lymphocytes in a newly-established humanized type 1 diabetic model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yong, E-mail: yongzhao@uic.edu [Department of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Guo, Chengshan; Hwang, David; Lin, Brian; Dingeldein, Michael; Mihailescu, Dan; Sam, Susan; Sidhwani, Seema [Department of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Zhang, Yongkang [Department of Pharmacology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Jain, Sumit [Department of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Skidgel, Randal A. [Department of Pharmacology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Prabhakar, Bellur S. [Department of Immunology and Microbiology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Mazzone, Theodore [Department of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Holterman, Mark J. [Department of Surgery, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States)

    2010-09-03

    Research highlights: {yields} Establish a human immune-mediated type 1 diabetic model in NOD-scid IL2r{gamma}{sup null} mice. {yields} Using the irradiated diabetic NOD mouse spleen mononuclear cells as trigger. {yields} The islet {beta} cells were selectively destroyed by infiltrated human T cells. {yields} The model can facilitate translational research to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. -- Abstract: Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is caused by a T cell-mediated autoimmune response that leads to the loss of insulin-producing {beta} cells. The optimal preclinical testing of promising therapies would be aided by a humanized immune-mediated T1D model. We develop this model in NOD-scid IL2r{gamma}{sup null} mice. The selective destruction of pancreatic islet {beta} cells was mediated by human T lymphocytes after an initial trigger was supplied by the injection of irradiated spleen mononuclear cells (SMC) from diabetic nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice. This resulted in severe insulitis, a marked loss of total {beta}-cell mass, and other related phenotypes of T1D. The migration of human T cells to pancreatic islets was controlled by the {beta} cell-produced highly conserved chemokine stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1) and its receptor C-X-C chemokine receptor (CXCR) 4, as demonstrated by in vivo blocking experiments using antibody to CXCR4. The specificity of humanized T cell-mediated immune responses against islet {beta} cells was generated by the local inflammatory microenvironment in pancreatic islets including human CD4{sup +} T cell infiltration and clonal expansion, and the mouse islet {beta}-cell-derived CD1d-mediated human iNKT activation. The selective destruction of mouse islet {beta} cells by a human T cell-mediated immune response in this humanized T1D model can mimic those observed in T1D patients. This model can provide a valuable tool for translational research into T1D.

  12. Human skeletal muscle-derived stem cells retain stem cell properties after expansion in myosphere culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Yan; Li, Yuan; Chen, Chao; Stoelzel, Katharina; Kaufmann, Andreas M.; Albers, Andreas E.

    2011-01-01

    Human skeletal muscle contains an accessible adult stem-cell compartment in which differentiated myofibers are maintained and replaced by a self-renewing stem cell pool. Previously, studies using mouse models have established a critical role for resident stem cells in skeletal muscle, but little is known about this paradigm in human muscle. Here, we report the reproducible isolation of a population of cells from human skeletal muscle that is able to proliferate for extended periods of time as floating clusters of rounded cells, termed 'myospheres' or myosphere-derived progenitor cells (MDPCs). The phenotypic characteristics and functional properties of these cells were determined using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry. Our results showed that these cells are clonogenic, express skeletal progenitor cell markers Pax7, ALDH1, Myod, and Desmin and the stem cell markers Nanog, Sox2, and Oct3/4 significantly elevated over controls. They could be maintained proliferatively active in vitro for more than 20 weeks and passaged at least 18 times, despite an average donor-age of 63 years. Individual clones (4.2%) derived from single cells were successfully expanded showing clonogenic potential and sustained proliferation of a subpopulation in the myospheres. Myosphere-derived cells were capable of spontaneous differentiation into myotubes in differentiation media and into other mesodermal cell lineages in induction media. We demonstrate here that direct culture and expansion of stem cells from human skeletal muscle is straightforward and reproducible with the appropriate technique. These cells may provide a viable resource of adult stem cells for future therapies of disease affecting skeletal muscle or mesenchymal lineage derived cell types.

  13. Megakaryocytes promote murine osteoblastic HSC niche expansion and stem cell engraftment after radioablative conditioning

    OpenAIRE

    Olson, Timothy S.; Caselli, Anna; Otsuru, Satoru; Hofmann, Ted J.; Williams, Richard; Paolucci, Paolo; Dominici, Massimo; Horwitz, Edwin M.

    2013-01-01

    After radioablative conditioning, host megakaryocytes promote endosteal HSC niche expansion and donor stem cell engraftment.Thrombopoietin administration before radiation and bone marrow transplant enhances megakaryocyte promotion of HSC engraftment.

  14. Occurrence of thymosin beta4 in human breast cancer cells and in other cell types of the tumor microenvironment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, L.-I.; Holck, Susanne

    2007-01-01

    that there is a considerable heterogeneity in the cellular distribution of thymosin beta4 in breast cancer. In most tumors examined, cancer cells showed low or intermediate reactivity for thymosin beta4, whereas leukocytes and macrophages showed intense reactivity. In addition, endothelial cells showed variable reactivity...... to thymosin beta4, whereas myofibroblasts were negative. There was no correlation between the intensity of tumor cell staining and histological grade, whereas there was a tendency toward a correlation between endothelial cell staining and grade. These results demonstrate that multiple cell types within...

  15. Co-culture of neural crest stem cells (NCSC and insulin producing beta-TC6 cells results in cadherin junctions and protection against cytokine-induced beta-cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anongnad Ngamjariyawat

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Transplantation of pancreatic islets to Type 1 diabetes patients is hampered by inflammatory reactions at the transplantation site leading to dysfunction and death of insulin producing beta-cells. Recently we have shown that co-transplantation of neural crest stem cells (NCSCs together with the islet cells improves transplantation outcome. The aim of the present investigation was to describe in vitro interactions between NCSCs and insulin producing beta-TC6 cells that may mediate protection against cytokine-induced beta-cell death. PROCEDURES: Beta-TC6 and NCSC cells were cultured either alone or together, and either with or without cell culture inserts. The cultures were then exposed to the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IFN-γ for 48 hours followed by analysis of cell death rates (flow cytometry, nitrite production (Griess reagent, protein localization (immunofluorescence and protein phosphorylation (flow cytometry. RESULTS: We observed that beta-TC6 cells co-cultured with NCSCs were protected against cytokine-induced cell death, but not when separated by cell culture inserts. This occurred in parallel with (i augmented production of nitrite from beta-TC6 cells, indicating that increased cell survival allows a sustained production of nitric oxide; (ii NCSC-derived laminin production; (iii decreased phospho-FAK staining in beta-TC6 cell focal adhesions, and (iv decreased beta-TC6 cell phosphorylation of ERK(T202/Y204, FAK(Y397 and FAK(Y576. Furthermore, co-culture also resulted in cadherin and beta-catenin accumulations at the NCSC/beta-TC6 cell junctions. Finally, the gap junction inhibitor carbenoxolone did not affect cytokine-induced beta-cell death during co-culture with NCSCs. CONCLUSION: In summary, direct contacts, but not soluble factors, promote improved beta-TC6 viability when co-cultured with NCSCs. We hypothesize that cadherin junctions between NCSC and beta-TC6 cells promote powerful signals that maintain beta-cell

  16. Colony Expansion of Socially Motile Myxococcus xanthus Cells Is Driven by Growth, Motility, and Exopolysaccharide Production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pintu Patra

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Myxococcus xanthus, a model organism for studies of multicellular behavior in bacteria, moves exclusively on solid surfaces using two distinct but coordinated motility mechanisms. One of these, social (S motility is powered by the extension and retraction of type IV pili and requires the presence of exopolysaccharides (EPS produced by neighboring cells. As a result, S motility requires close cell-to-cell proximity and isolated cells do not translocate. Previous studies measuring S motility by observing the colony expansion of cells deposited on agar have shown that the expansion rate increases with initial cell density, but the biophysical mechanisms involved remain largely unknown. To understand the dynamics of S motility-driven colony expansion, we developed a reaction-diffusion model describing the effects of cell density, EPS deposition and nutrient exposure on the expansion rate. Our results show that at steady state the population expands as a traveling wave with a speed determined by the interplay of cell motility and growth, a well-known characteristic of Fisher's equation. The model explains the density-dependence of the colony expansion by demonstrating the presence of a lag phase-a transient period of very slow expansion with a duration dependent on the initial cell density. We propose that at a low initial density, more time is required for the cells to accumulate enough EPS to activate S-motility resulting in a longer lag period. Furthermore, our model makes the novel prediction that following the lag phase the population expands at a constant rate independent of the cell density. These predictions were confirmed by S motility experiments capturing long-term expansion dynamics.

  17. Colony Expansion of Socially Motile Myxococcus xanthus Cells Is Driven by Growth, Motility, and Exopolysaccharide Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Pintu; Kissoon, Kimberley; Cornejo, Isabel; Kaplan, Heidi B; Igoshin, Oleg A

    2016-06-01

    Myxococcus xanthus, a model organism for studies of multicellular behavior in bacteria, moves exclusively on solid surfaces using two distinct but coordinated motility mechanisms. One of these, social (S) motility is powered by the extension and retraction of type IV pili and requires the presence of exopolysaccharides (EPS) produced by neighboring cells. As a result, S motility requires close cell-to-cell proximity and isolated cells do not translocate. Previous studies measuring S motility by observing the colony expansion of cells deposited on agar have shown that the expansion rate increases with initial cell density, but the biophysical mechanisms involved remain largely unknown. To understand the dynamics of S motility-driven colony expansion, we developed a reaction-diffusion model describing the effects of cell density, EPS deposition and nutrient exposure on the expansion rate. Our results show that at steady state the population expands as a traveling wave with a speed determined by the interplay of cell motility and growth, a well-known characteristic of Fisher's equation. The model explains the density-dependence of the colony expansion by demonstrating the presence of a lag phase-a transient period of very slow expansion with a duration dependent on the initial cell density. We propose that at a low initial density, more time is required for the cells to accumulate enough EPS to activate S-motility resulting in a longer lag period. Furthermore, our model makes the novel prediction that following the lag phase the population expands at a constant rate independent of the cell density. These predictions were confirmed by S motility experiments capturing long-term expansion dynamics.

  18. Osteocalcin protects pancreatic beta cell function and survival under high glucose conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kover, Karen, E-mail: kkover@cmh.edu [Division of Endocrine/Diabetes, Children' s Mercy Hospital & Clinics, Kansas City, MO 64108 (United States); University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine, Kansas City, MO 64108 (United States); Yan, Yun; Tong, Pei Ying; Watkins, Dara; Li, Xiaoyu [Division of Endocrine/Diabetes, Children' s Mercy Hospital & Clinics, Kansas City, MO 64108 (United States); University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine, Kansas City, MO 64108 (United States); Tasch, James; Hager, Melissa [Kansas City University Medical Biosciences, Kansas City, MO (United States); Clements, Mark; Moore, Wayne V. [Division of Endocrine/Diabetes, Children' s Mercy Hospital & Clinics, Kansas City, MO 64108 (United States); University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine, Kansas City, MO 64108 (United States)

    2015-06-19

    Diabetes is characterized by progressive beta cell dysfunction and loss due in part to oxidative stress that occurs from gluco/lipotoxicity. Treatments that directly protect beta cell function and survival in the diabetic milieu are of particular interest. A growing body of evidence suggests that osteocalcin, an abundant non-collagenous protein of bone, supports beta cell function and proliferation. Based on previous gene expression data by microarray, we hypothesized that osteocalcin protects beta cells from glucose-induced oxidative stress. To test our hypothesis we cultured isolated rat islets and INS-1E cells in the presence of normal, high, or high glucose ± osteocalcin for up to 72 h. Oxidative stress and viability/mitochondrial function were measured by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} assay and Alamar Blue assay, respectively. Caspase 3/7 activity was also measured as a marker of apoptosis. A functional test, glucose stimulated insulin release, was conducted and expression of genes/protein was measured by qRT-PCR/western blot/ELISA. Osteocalcin treatment significantly reduced high glucose-induced H{sub 2}O{sub 2} levels while maintaining viability/mitochondrial function. Osteocalcin also significantly improved glucose stimulated insulin secretion and insulin content in rat islets after 48 h of high glucose exposure compared to untreated islets. As expected sustained high glucose down-regulated gene/protein expression of INS1 and BCL2 while increasing TXNIP expression. Interestingly, osteocalcin treatment reversed the effects of high glucose on gene/protein expression. We conclude that osteocalcin can protect beta cells from the negative effects of glucose-induced oxidative stress, in part, by reducing TXNIP expression, thereby preserving beta cell function and survival. - Highlights: • Osteocalcin reduces glucose-induced oxidative stress in beta cells. • Osteocalcin preserves beta cell function and survival under stress conditions. • Osteocalcin reduces glucose

  19. Osteocalcin protects pancreatic beta cell function and survival under high glucose conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kover, Karen; Yan, Yun; Tong, Pei Ying; Watkins, Dara; Li, Xiaoyu; Tasch, James; Hager, Melissa; Clements, Mark; Moore, Wayne V.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is characterized by progressive beta cell dysfunction and loss due in part to oxidative stress that occurs from gluco/lipotoxicity. Treatments that directly protect beta cell function and survival in the diabetic milieu are of particular interest. A growing body of evidence suggests that osteocalcin, an abundant non-collagenous protein of bone, supports beta cell function and proliferation. Based on previous gene expression data by microarray, we hypothesized that osteocalcin protects beta cells from glucose-induced oxidative stress. To test our hypothesis we cultured isolated rat islets and INS-1E cells in the presence of normal, high, or high glucose ± osteocalcin for up to 72 h. Oxidative stress and viability/mitochondrial function were measured by H 2 O 2 assay and Alamar Blue assay, respectively. Caspase 3/7 activity was also measured as a marker of apoptosis. A functional test, glucose stimulated insulin release, was conducted and expression of genes/protein was measured by qRT-PCR/western blot/ELISA. Osteocalcin treatment significantly reduced high glucose-induced H 2 O 2 levels while maintaining viability/mitochondrial function. Osteocalcin also significantly improved glucose stimulated insulin secretion and insulin content in rat islets after 48 h of high glucose exposure compared to untreated islets. As expected sustained high glucose down-regulated gene/protein expression of INS1 and BCL2 while increasing TXNIP expression. Interestingly, osteocalcin treatment reversed the effects of high glucose on gene/protein expression. We conclude that osteocalcin can protect beta cells from the negative effects of glucose-induced oxidative stress, in part, by reducing TXNIP expression, thereby preserving beta cell function and survival. - Highlights: • Osteocalcin reduces glucose-induced oxidative stress in beta cells. • Osteocalcin preserves beta cell function and survival under stress conditions. • Osteocalcin reduces glucose-induced TXNIP

  20. Ex Vivo Expansion of Hematopoietic Stem Cells to Improve Engraftment in Stem Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Kap-Hyoun; Nordon, Robert; O'Brien, Tracey A; Symonds, Geoff; Dolnikov, Alla

    2017-01-01

    The efficient use of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) for transplantation is often limited by the relatively low numbers of HSC collected. The ex vivo expansion of HSC for clinical use is a potentially valuable and safe approach to increase HSC numbers thereby increasing engraftment and reducing the risk of morbidity from infection. Here, we describe a protocol for the robust ex vivo expansion of human CD34(+) HSC isolated from umbilical cord blood. The protocol described can efficiently generate large numbers of HSC. We also describe a flow cytometry-based method using high-resolution division tracking to characterize the kinetics of HSC growth and differentiation. Utilizing the guidelines discussed, it is possible for investigators to use this protocol as presented or to modify it for their specific needs.

  1. Identification of clonally rearranged T-cell receptor beta chain genes in HTLV-I carriers as a potential instrument for early detection of neoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. Sales

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed the genetic recombination pattern of the T-cell receptor beta-chain gene (TCR-beta in order to identify clonal expansion of T-lymphocytes in 17 human T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I-positive healthy carriers, 7 of them with abnormal features in the peripheral blood lymphocytes. Monoclonal or oligoclonal expansion of T-cells was detected in 5 of 7 HTLV-I-positive patients with abnormal lymphocytes and unconfirmed diagnosis by using PCR amplification of segments of TCR-beta gene, in a set of reactions that target 102 different variable (V segments, covering all members of the 24 V families available in the gene bank, including the more recently identified segments of the Vbeta-5 and Vbeta-8 family and the two diversity beta segments. Southern blots, the gold standard method to detect T-lymphocyte clonality, were negative for all of these 7 patients, what highlights the low sensitivity of this method that requires a large amount of very high quality DNA. To evaluate the performance of PCR in the detection of clonality we also analyzed 18 leukemia patients, all of whom tested positive. Clonal expansion was not detected in any of the negative controls or healthy carriers without abnormal lymphocytes. In conclusion, PCR amplification of segments of rearranged TCR-beta is reliable and highly suitable for the detection of small populations of clonal T-cells in asymptomatic HTLV-I carriers who present abnormal peripheral blood lymphocytes providing an additional instrument for following up these patients with potentially higher risk of leukemia.

  2. TGF-beta3 is expressed in taste buds and inhibits proliferation of primary cultured taste epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Shin-ichi; Kawai, Takayuki; Kamakura, Takashi; Ookura, Tetsuya

    2010-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-betas (TGF-betas), expressed in various tissues, play important roles in embryonic development and adult tissue homeostasis through their effects on cell proliferation, cell differentiation, cell death, and cell motility. However, expression of TGF-beta signaling components and their biological effect on taste epithelia has not been elucidated. We performed expression analysis of TGF-beta signaling components in taste epithelia and found that the TGF-beta3 mRNA was specifically expressed in taste buds. Type II TGF-betas receptor (TbetaR-II) mRNA was specifically expressed in the tongue epithelia including the taste epithelia. To elucidate the biological function of TGF-beta3 in taste epithelia, we performed proliferation assay with primary cultured taste epithelial cells. In the presence of TGF-beta3, percentage of BrdU-labeled cells decreased significantly, suggesting that the TGF-beta3 inhibited the proliferation of cultured taste epithelial cells through inhibiting cell-cycle entry into S phase. By quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assay, we found that the TGF-beta3 resulted in an increased level of expression of p15Ink4b and p21Cip1, suggesting that the TGF-beta3 inhibited the taste epithelial cell proliferation through inhibiting G1cyclin-Cdk complexes. Taken together, these results suggested that the TGF-beta3 may regulate taste epithelial cell homeostasis through controlling cell proliferation.

  3. Planar Cell Polarity Controls Pancreatic Beta Cell Differentiation and Glucose Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cedric Cortijo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Planar cell polarity (PCP refers to the collective orientation of cells within the epithelial plane. We show that progenitor cells forming the ducts of the embryonic pancreas express PCP proteins and exhibit an active PCP pathway. Planar polarity proteins are acquired at embryonic day 11.5 synchronously to apicobasal polarization of pancreas progenitors. Loss of function of the two PCP core components Celsr2 and Celsr3 shows that they control the differentiation of endocrine cells from polarized progenitors, with a prevalent effect on insulin-producing beta cells. This results in a decreased glucose clearance. Loss of Celsr2 and 3 leads to a reduction of Jun phosphorylation in progenitors, which, in turn, reduces beta cell differentiation from endocrine progenitors. These results highlight the importance of the PCP pathway in cell differentiation in vertebrates. In addition, they reveal that tridimensional organization and collective communication of cells are needed in the pancreatic epithelium in order to generate appropriate numbers of endocrine cells.

  4. Expansion and conversion of human pancreatic ductal cells into insulin-secreting endocrine cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonghyeob; Sugiyama, Takuya; Liu, Yinghua; Wang, Jing; Gu, Xueying; Lei, Ji; Markmann, James F; Miyazaki, Satsuki; Miyazaki, Jun-Ichi; Szot, Gregory L; Bottino, Rita; Kim, Seung K

    2013-11-19

    Pancreatic islet β-cell insufficiency underlies pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus; thus, functional β-cell replacement from renewable sources is the focus of intensive worldwide effort. However, in vitro production of progeny that secrete insulin in response to physiological cues from primary human cells has proven elusive. Here we describe fractionation, expansion and conversion of primary adult human pancreatic ductal cells into progeny resembling native β-cells. FACS-sorted adult human ductal cells clonally expanded as spheres in culture, while retaining ductal characteristics. Expression of the cardinal islet developmental regulators Neurog3, MafA, Pdx1 and Pax6 converted exocrine duct cells into endocrine progeny with hallmark β-cell properties, including the ability to synthesize, process and store insulin, and secrete it in response to glucose or other depolarizing stimuli. These studies provide evidence that genetic reprogramming of expandable human pancreatic cells with defined factors may serve as a general strategy for islet replacement in diabetes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00940.001.

  5. Proteomic profiling of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells upon TGF-beta stimulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Daojing; Park, Jennifer S.; Chu, Julia S.F.; Ari, Krakowski; Luo, Kunxin; Chen, David J.; Li, Song

    2004-08-08

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can differentiate into different types of cells, and have tremendous potential for cell therapy and tissue engineering. Transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF-{beta}) plays an important role in cell differentiation and vascular remodeling. We showed that TGF-{beta} induced cell morphology change and an increase in actin fibers in MSCs. To determine the global effects of TGF-{beta} on MSCs, we employed a proteomic strategy to analyze the effect of TGF-{beta} on the human MSC proteome. By using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and electrospray ionization coupled to Quadrupole/time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometers, we have generated a proteome reference map of MSCs, and identified {approx}30 proteins with an increase or decrease in expression or phosphorylation in response to TGF-{beta}. The proteins regulated by TGF-{beta} included cytoskeletal proteins, matrix synthesis proteins, membrane proteins, metabolic enzymes, etc. TGF-{beta} increased the expression of smooth muscle (SM) {alpha}-actin and decreased the expression of gelsolin. Over-expression of gelsolin inhibited TGF-{beta}-induced assembly of SM {alpha}-actin; on the other hand, knocking down gelsolin expression enhanced the assembly of {alpha}-actin and actin filaments without significantly affecting {alpha}-actin expression. These results suggest that TGF-{beta} coordinates the increase of {alpha}-actin and the decrease of gelsolin to promote MSC differentiation. This study demonstrates that proteomic tools are valuable in studying stem cell differentiation and elucidating the underlying molecular mechanisms.

  6. Pancreatic beta-cell lipotoxicity induced by overexpression of hormone-sensitive lipase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winzell, Maria Sörhede; Svensson, Håkan; Enerbäck, Sven

    2003-01-01

    Lipid perturbations associated with triglyceride overstorage in beta-cells impair insulin secretion, a process termed lipotoxicity. To assess the role of hormone-sensitive lipase, which is expressed and enzymatically active in beta-cells, in the development of lipotoxicity, we generated transgenic...... mice overexpressing hormone-sensitive lipase specifically in beta-cells. Transgenic mice developed glucose intolerance and severely blunted glucose-stimulated insulin secretion when challenged with a high-fat diet. As expected, both lipase activity and forskolin-stimulated lipolysis was increased...

  7. Targeting Cellular Calcium Homeostasis to Prevent Cytokine-Mediated Beta Cell Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Amy L; Kanekura, Kohsuke; Lavagnino, Zeno; Spears, Larry D; Abreu, Damien; Mahadevan, Jana; Yagi, Takuya; Semenkovich, Clay F; Piston, David W; Urano, Fumihiko

    2017-07-17

    Pro-inflammatory cytokines are important mediators of islet inflammation, leading to beta cell death in type 1 diabetes. Although alterations in both endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and cytosolic free calcium levels are known to play a role in cytokine-mediated beta cell death, there are currently no treatments targeting cellular calcium homeostasis to combat type 1 diabetes. Here we show that modulation of cellular calcium homeostasis can mitigate cytokine- and ER stress-mediated beta cell death. The calcium modulating compounds, dantrolene and sitagliptin, both prevent cytokine and ER stress-induced activation of the pro-apoptotic calcium-dependent enzyme, calpain, and partly suppress beta cell death in INS1E cells and human primary islets. These agents are also able to restore cytokine-mediated suppression of functional ER calcium release. In addition, sitagliptin preserves function of the ER calcium pump, sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca 2+ -ATPase (SERCA), and decreases levels of the pro-apoptotic protein thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP). Supporting the role of TXNIP in cytokine-mediated cell death, knock down of TXNIP in INS1-E cells prevents cytokine-mediated beta cell death. Our findings demonstrate that modulation of dynamic cellular calcium homeostasis and TXNIP suppression present viable pharmacologic targets to prevent cytokine-mediated beta cell loss in diabetes.

  8. Characterization of DNA polymerase. beta. mRNA: cell-cycle growth response in cultured human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zmudzka, B Z; Fornace, A; Collins, J; Wilson, S H

    1988-10-25

    DNA polymerase ..beta.. (..beta..-polymerase) is a housekeeping enzyme involved in DNA repair in vertebrate cells. The authors used a cDNA probe to study abundance of ..beta..-polymerase mRNA in cultured human cells. The mRNA level in synchronized HeLa cells, representing different stages of the cell-cycle, varied only slightly. Contact inhibited fibroblasts AG-1522 contained the same level of mRNA as growing cells. The steady-state level of mRNA in fibroblasts is equivalent to 6 molecules per cell. The results indicate that the ..beta..-polymerase transcript is low abundance and is neither cell-cycles nor growth phase responsive.

  9. Analysis of interleukin (IL)-1 beta and transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta-induced signal transduction pathways in IL-2 and TGF-beta secretion and proliferation in the thymoma cell line EL4.NOB-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siese, A; Jaros, P P; Willig, A

    1999-02-01

    In the present study we investigated the interleukin (IL)-1beta and transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1)-mediated proliferation, and production of IL-2 and TGF-beta, in the murine T-cell line, EL4.NOB-1. This cell line is resistant to TGF-beta concerning growth arrest but not autoinduction or suppression of IL-1-induced IL-2 production. When cocultured with IL-1beta, TGF-beta showed growth-promoting activity that could be antagonized by adding the phosphatidyl choline-dependent phospholipase C (PC-PLC) inhibitor, D609. Using specific enzyme inhibitors of protein kinases (PK) C and A, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), phospholipase A2 (PLA2), phosphatidylinositol-dependent (PI)-PLC and PC-PLC, we showed that IL-1beta-induced IL-2 synthesis was dependent on all investigated kinases and phospholipases, except PC-PLC. TGF-beta1 was able to inhibit IL-2 synthesis by the activation of PKA and MAPK. The same kinases are involved in TGF-beta autoinduction that is accompanied by a secretion of the active but not the latent growth factor and is antagonized by IL-1beta. Addition of the PI-PLC inhibitor, ET 18OCH3, or the PLA2 inhibitor (quinacrine) alone, resulted in secretion of latent TGF-beta and, in the case of ET 18OCH3, active TGF-beta. These data implicate a role for PI-PLC and PLA2 in the control of latency and secretion. Analysis of specific tyrosine activity and c-Fos expression showed synergistic but no antagonistic effects. These events are therefore not involved in IL- and TGF-beta-regulated IL-2 and TGF-beta production, but might participate in IL-1/TGF-beta-induced growth promotion.

  10. Engineered artificial antigen presenting cells facilitate direct and efficient expansion of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coukos George

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Development of a standardized platform for the rapid expansion of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs with anti-tumor function from patients with limited TIL numbers or tumor tissues challenges their clinical application. Methods To facilitate adoptive immunotherapy, we applied genetically-engineered K562 cell-based artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPCs for the direct and rapid expansion of TILs isolated from primary cancer specimens. Results TILs outgrown in IL-2 undergo rapid, CD28-independent expansion in response to aAPC stimulation that requires provision of exogenous IL-2 cytokine support. aAPCs induce numerical expansion of TILs that is statistically similar to an established rapid expansion method at a 100-fold lower feeder cell to TIL ratio, and greater than those achievable using anti-CD3/CD28 activation beads or extended IL-2 culture. aAPC-expanded TILs undergo numerical expansion of tumor antigen-specific cells, remain amenable to secondary aAPC-based expansion, and have low CD4/CD8 ratios and FOXP3+ CD4+ cell frequencies. TILs can also be expanded directly from fresh enzyme-digested tumor specimens when pulsed with aAPCs. These "young" TILs are tumor-reactive, positively skewed in CD8+ lymphocyte composition, CD28 and CD27 expression, and contain fewer FOXP3+ T cells compared to parallel IL-2 cultures. Conclusion Genetically-enhanced aAPCs represent a standardized, "off-the-shelf" platform for the direct ex vivo expansion of TILs of suitable number, phenotype and function for use in adoptive immunotherapy.

  11. Characterization and Application of a Disposable Rotating BedBioreactor for Mesenchymal Stem Cell Expansion

    OpenAIRE

    Neumann, Anne; Lavrentieva, Antonina; Heilkenbrinker, Alexandra; Loenne, Maren; Kasper, Cornelia

    2014-01-01

    Recruitment of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) into the field of tissue engineering is a promising development since these cells can be expanded vivo to clinically relevant numbers and, after expansion, retain their ability to differentiate into various cell lineages. Safety requirements and the necessity to obtain high cell numbers without frequent subcultivation of cells raised the question of the possibility of expanding MSC in one-way (single-use) disposable bioreactors. In this study, u...

  12. The ectopic expression of Pax4 in the mouse pancreas converts progenitor cells into alpha and subsequently beta cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Collombat, Patrick; Xu, Xiaobo; Ravassard, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    We have previously reported that the loss of Arx and/or Pax4 gene activity leads to a shift in the fate of the different endocrine cell subtypes in the mouse pancreas, without affecting the total endocrine cell numbers. Here, we conditionally and ectopically express Pax4 using different cell......-specific promoters and demonstrate that Pax4 forces endocrine precursor cells, as well as mature alpha cells, to adopt a beta cell destiny. This results in a glucagon deficiency that provokes a compensatory and continuous glucagon+ cell neogenesis requiring the re-expression of the proendocrine gene Ngn3. However......, the newly formed alpha cells fail to correct the hypoglucagonemia since they subsequently acquire a beta cell phenotype upon Pax4 ectopic expression. Notably, this cycle of neogenesis and redifferentiation caused by ectopic expression of Pax4 in alpha cells is capable of restoring a functional beta cell...

  13. LGR5 and Nanog identify stem cell signature of pancreas beta cells which initiate pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amsterdam, Abraham; Raanan, Calanit; Schreiber, Letizia; Polin, Nava; Givol, David

    2013-04-05

    Pancreas cancer, is the fourth leading cause of cancer death but its cell of origin is controversial. We compared the localization of stem cells in normal and cancerous pancreas using antibodies to the stem cell markers Nanog and LGR5. Here we show, for the first time, that LGR5 is expressed in normal pancreas, exclusively in the islets of Langerhans and it is co-localized, surprisingly, with Nanog and insulin in clusters of beta cells. In cancerous pancreas Nanog and LGR5 are expressed in the remaining islets and in all ductal cancer cells. We observed insulin staining among the ductal cancer cells, but not in metastases. This indicates that the islet's beta cells, expressing LGR5 and Nanog markers are the initiating cells of pancreas cancer, which migrated from the islets to form the ductal cancerous tissue, probably after mutation and de-differentiation. This discovery may facilitate treatment of this devastating cancer. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Clonal expansion of renal cell carcinoma-infiltrating T lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sittig, Simone; Køllgaard, Tania; Grønbæk, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    T lymphocytes can mediate the destruction of cancer cells by virtue of their ability to recognize tumor-derived antigenic peptides that are presented on the cell surface in complex with HLA molecules and expand. Thus, the presence of clonally expanded T cells within neoplastic lesions is an indic......T lymphocytes can mediate the destruction of cancer cells by virtue of their ability to recognize tumor-derived antigenic peptides that are presented on the cell surface in complex with HLA molecules and expand. Thus, the presence of clonally expanded T cells within neoplastic lesions...... is an indication of ongoing HLA-restricted T cell-mediated immune responses. Multiple tumors, including renal cell carcinomas (RCCs), are often infiltrated by significant amounts of T cells, the so-called tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs). In the present study, we analyzed RCC lesions (n = 13) for the presence...... of expanded T-cell clonotypes using T-cell receptor clonotype mapping. Surprisingly, we found that RCCs comprise relatively low numbers of distinct expanded T-cell clonotypes as compared with melanoma lesions. The numbers of different T-cell clonotypes detected among RCC-infiltrating lymphocytes were...

  15. Essential role of TGF-beta/Smad pathway on statin dependent vascular smooth muscle cell regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Rodríguez-Vita

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase inhibitors (also called statins exert proven beneficial effects on cardiovascular diseases. Recent data suggest a protective role for Transforming Growth Factor-beta (TGF-beta in atherosclerosis by regulating the balance between inflammation and extracellular matrix accumulation. However, there are no studies about the effect of statins on TGF-beta/Smad pathway in atherosclerosis and vascular cells. METHODOLOGY: In cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs statins enhanced Smad pathway activation caused by TGF-beta. In addition, statins upregulated TGF-beta receptor type II (TRII, and increased TGF-beta synthesis and TGF-beta/Smad-dependent actions. In this sense, statins, through Smad activation, render VSMCs more susceptible to TGF-beta induced apoptosis and increased TGF-beta-mediated ECM production. It is well documented that high doses of statins induce apoptosis in cultured VSMC in the presence of serum; however the precise mechanism of this effect remains to be elucidated. We have found that statins-induced apoptosis was mediated by TGF-beta/Smad pathway. Finally, we have described that RhoA inhibition is a common intracellular mechanisms involved in statins effects. The in vivo relevance of these findings was assessed in an experimental model of atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E deficient mice: Treatment with Atorvastatin increased Smad3 phosphorylation and TRII overexpression, associated to elevated ECM deposition in the VSMCs within atheroma plaques, while apoptosis was not detected. CONCLUSIONS: Statins enhance TGF-beta/Smad pathway, regulating ligand levels, receptor, main signaling pathway and cellular responses of VSMC, including apoptosis and ECM accumulation. Our findings show that TGF-beta/Smad pathway is essential for statins-dependent actions in VSMCs.

  16. Transforming growth factor beta 1 modulates extracellular matrix organization and cell-cell junctional complex formation during in vitro angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merwin, J R; Anderson, J M; Kocher, O; Van Itallie, C M; Madri, J A

    1990-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) is angiogenic in vivo. In two-dimensional (2-D) culture systems microvascular endothelial cell proliferation is inhibited up to 80% by TGF-beta 1; however, in three-dimensional (3-D) collagen gels TGF-beta 1 is found to have no effect on proliferation while eliciting the formation of calcium and magnesium dependent tube-like structures mimicking angiogenesis. DNA analyses performed on 3-D cell cultures reveal no significant difference in the amount of DNA or cell number in control versus TGF-beta 1 treated cultures. In 2-D cultures TGF-beta 1 is known to increase cellular fibronectin accumulation; however, in 3-D cultures no difference is seen between control and TGF-beta 1 treated cells as established by ELISA testing for type IV collagen, fibronectin, and laminin. In 3-D cultures there is increased synthesis and secretion of type V collagen in both control and TGF-beta 1 treated cultures over 2-D cultures. Even though an equal amount of type V collagen is seen in both 3-D conditions, there is a reorganization of the protein with concentration along an organizing basal lamina in TGF-beta 1 treated cultures. EM morphological analyses on 3-D cultures illustrate quiescent, control cells lacking cell contacts. In contrast, TGF-beta 1 treated cells show increased pseudopod formation, cell-cell contact, and organized basal lamina-like material closely apposed to the "abluminal" plasma membranes. TGF-beta 1 treated cells also appear to form junctional complexes between adjoining cells. Immunofluorescence using specific antibodies to the tight junction protein ZO-1 results in staining at apparent cell-cell junctions in the 3-D cultures. Northern blots of freshly isolated microvascular endothelium, 2-D and 3-D cultures, using cDNA and cRNA probes specific for the ZO-1 tight junction protein, reveal the presence of the 7.8 kb mRNA. Western blots of rat epididymal fat pad endothelial cells (RFC) monolayer lysates probed with

  17. Expression and autoregulation of transforming growth factor beta receptor mRNA in small-cell lung cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, P; Spang-Thomsen, M; Poulsen, H S

    1996-01-01

    In small-cell lung cancer cell lines resistance to growth inhibition by transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta 1, was previously shown to correlate with lack of TGF-beta receptor I (RI) and II (RII) proteins. To further investigate the role of these receptors, the expression of mRNA for RI, RII...... and beta-glycan (RIII) was examined. The results showed that loss of RII mRNA correlated with TGF-beta 1 resistance. In contrast, RI-and beta-glycan mRNA was expressed by all cell lines, including those lacking expression of these proteins. According to Southern blot analysis, the loss of type II m......RNA was not due to gross structural changes in the gene. The effect of TGF-beta 1 on expression of TGF-beta receptor mRNA (receptor autoregulation) was examined by quantitative Northern blotting in four cell lines with different expression of TGF-beta receptor proteins. In two cell lines expressing all three TGF...

  18. Isolation and in vitro expansion of human colonic stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jung, P.; Sato, T.; Merlos-Suarez, A.; Barriga, F.M.; Iglesias, M.; Rossell, D.; Auer, H.; Gallardo, M.; Blasco, M.A.; Sancho, E.; Clevers, H.; Batlle, E.

    2011-01-01

    Here we describe the isolation of stem cells of the human colonic epithelium. Differential cell surface abundance of ephrin type-B receptor 2 (EPHB2) allows the purification of different cell types from human colon mucosa biopsies. The highest EPHB2 surface levels correspond to epithelial colonic

  19. Spatial organisation of cell expansion by the cytoskeleton

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ketelaar, T.

    2002-01-01

    The shape of plants is determined by the sum of cell division and cell growth. The cytoskeleton plays an important role in both processes. This thesis presents research that pinpoints how the cytoskeleton controls plant cell growth. Root hairs of the model plant Arabidopsis have been used as a model

  20. Association of. beta. -glucosidase with intact cells of thermoactinomyces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haegerdal, B; Harris, H; Pye, E K

    1979-03-01

    The location of the ..beta..-glucosidase activity in a whole culture broth of the thermophilic organism Thermoactinomyces has been studied. Little ..beta..-glucosidase activity was found in the culture filtrate, while the culture solids contained the major part of the activity of the whole culture broth. The activity does not appear to be adsorbed to the culture solids; rather there is evidence that it is an intracellular soluble enzyme(s). The pH and temperature optima for a crude ..beta..-glucosidase preparation were determined to be pH 6.5 and 50 to 55/sup 0/C. Enzyme activity studies indicate that the same enzyme(s) accounts for the ..beta..-glucosidase and the cellobiase activities. The validity of using the filter paper activity of culture filtrates from Thermoactinomyces to predict the total saccharification of cellulosic materials to glucose is discussed.

  1. Beta-endorphin Cell Therapy for Cancer Prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Changqing; Murugan, Sengottuvelan; Boyadjieva, Nadka; Jabbar, Shaima; Shrivastava, Pallavi; Sarkar, Dipak K.

    2014-01-01

    Beta-endorphin (BEP) producing neuron in the hypothalamus plays a key role in brining the stress axis to a state of homeostasis and maintaining body immune defense system. Long-term delivery of BEP to obtain beneficial effect on chemoprevention is challenging, since the peptide rapidly develop tolerance. Using rats as animal model, we show here that transplantation of beta-endorphin neurons into the hypothalamus suppressed carcinogens- and hormone-induced cancers in various tissues and preven...

  2. Cell fiber-based three-dimensional culture system for highly efficient expansion of human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Nagata, Shogo; Okitsu, Teru; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2017-06-06

    Human pluripotent stem cells are a potentially powerful cellular resource for application in regenerative medicine. Because such applications require large numbers of human pluripotent stem cell-derived cells, a scalable culture system of human pluripotent stem cell needs to be developed. Several suspension culture systems for human pluripotent stem cell expansion exist; however, it is difficult to control the thickness of cell aggregations in these systems, leading to increased cell death likely caused by limited diffusion of gases and nutrients into the aggregations. Here, we describe a scalable culture system using the cell fiber technology for the expansion of human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. The cells were encapsulated and cultured within the core region of core-shell hydrogel microfibers, resulting in the formation of rod-shaped or fiber-shaped cell aggregations with sustained thickness and high viability. By encapsulating the cells with type I collagen, we demonstrated a long-term culture of the cells by serial passaging at a high expansion rate (14-fold in four days) while retaining its pluripotency. Therefore, our culture system could be used for large-scale expansion of human pluripotent stem cells for use in regenerative medicine.

  3. Cholesterol enhances amyloid {beta} deposition in mouse retina by modulating the activities of A{beta}-regulating enzymes in retinal pigment epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jiying [Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8519 (Japan); Ohno-Matsui, Kyoko, E-mail: k.ohno.oph@tmd.ac.jp [Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8519 (Japan); Morita, Ikuo [Section of Cellular Physiological Chemistry, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8519 (Japan)

    2012-08-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cholesterol-treated RPE produces more A{beta} than non-treated RPE. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neprilysin expression and activity decreased in cholesterol-treated RPE. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {alpha}-Secretase expression and activity decreased in cholesterol-treated RPE. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cholesterol-enriched diet induced subRPE deposits in aged mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A{beta} were present in cholesterol-enriched-diet-induced subRPE deposits in aged mice. -- Abstract: Subretinally-deposited amyloid {beta} (A{beta}) is a main contributor of developing age-related macular degeneration (AMD). However, the mechanism causing A{beta} deposition in AMD eyes is unknown. Hypercholesterolemia is a significant risk for developing AMD. Thus, we investigated the effects of cholesterol on A{beta} production in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells in vitro and in the mouse retina in vivo. RPE cells isolated from senescent (12-month-old) C57BL/6 mice were treated with 10 {mu}g/ml cholesterol for 48 h. A{beta} amounts in culture supernatants were measured by ELISA. Activity and expression of enzymes and proteins that regulate A{beta} production were examined by activity assay and real time PCR. The retina of mice fed cholesterol-enriched diet was examined by transmission electron microscopy. Cholesterol significantly increased A{beta} production in cultured RPE cells. Activities of A{beta} degradation enzyme; neprilysin (NEP) and anti-amyloidogenic secretase; {alpha}-secretase were significantly decreased in cell lysates of cholesterol-treated RPE cells compared to non-treated cells, but there was no change in the activities of {beta}- or {gamma}-secretase. mRNA levels of NEP and {alpha}-secretase (ADAM10 and ADAM17) were significantly lower in cholesterol-treated RPE cells than non-treated cells. Senescent (12-month-old) mice fed cholesterol-enriched chow developed subRPE deposits containing A{beta}, whereas

  4. Isolation of beta-glucan from the cell wall of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokri, Hojjatollah; Asadi, Farzad; Khosravi, Ali Reza

    2008-03-20

    Beta-glucan, one of the major cell wall components of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae), has been found to enhance immune functions. At present study, we developed an optimal procedure to extract and purify beta-glucan. At first, yeast cells were grown in sabouraud dextrose agar and then cultured in yeast extract-peptone-glucose (YPG) broth. After incubation, cells were harvested, washed and disrupted by means of sonication method. The obtained cell walls were used to prepare alkali-soluble beta-glucan (glucan-S1). In this regard, 2% sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and 3% acetic acid were used in alkaline-acid extraction, respectively. This preparation contained 2.4% protein. In the next step, DEAE sephacel chromatography was used to remove remaining proteins (glucan-S2). Subsequently this preparation was applied into concanavalin-A sepharose column to remove manann. Finally, beta-glucan free of mannoprotein complexes was prepared (glucan-S3).

  5. Effect of aerobic exercise on Pancreas Beta-cells function in adult obese males

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Eizadi

    2014-08-01

    Conclusion: Aerobic exercise training increases beta cells function and decreases FBS in obese men. These findings support the hypothesis that regular physical activity postpones the occurrence of type 2 diabetes in adult obese subjects.

  6. Influence and timing of arrival of murine neural crest on pancreatic beta cell development and maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plank, Jennifer L; Mundell, Nathan A; Frist, Audrey Y; LeGrone, Alison W; Kim, Thomas; Musser, Melissa A; Walter, Teagan J; Labosky, Patricia A

    2011-01-15

    Interactions between cells from the ectoderm and mesoderm influence development of the endodermally-derived pancreas. While much is known about how mesoderm regulates pancreatic development, relatively little is understood about how and when the ectodermally-derived neural crest regulates pancreatic development and specifically, beta cell maturation. A previous study demonstrated that signals from the neural crest regulate beta cell proliferation and ultimately, beta cell mass. Here, we expand on that work to describe timing of neural crest arrival at the developing pancreatic bud and extend our knowledge of the non-cell autonomous role for neural crest derivatives in the process of beta cell maturation. We demonstrated that murine neural crest entered the pancreatic mesenchyme between the 26 and 27 somite stages (approximately 10.0 dpc) and became intermingled with pancreatic progenitors as the epithelium branched into the surrounding mesenchyme. Using a neural crest-specific deletion of the Forkhead transcription factor Foxd3, we ablated neural crest cells that migrate to the pancreatic primordium. Consistent with previous data, in the absence of Foxd3, and therefore the absence of neural crest cells, proliferation of insulin-expressing cells and insulin-positive area are increased. Analysis of endocrine cell gene expression in the absence of neural crest demonstrated that, although the number of insulin-expressing cells was increased, beta cell maturation was significantly impaired. Decreased MafA and Pdx1 expression illustrated the defect in beta cell maturation; we discovered that without neural crest, there was a reduction in the percentage of insulin-positive cells that co-expressed Glut2 and Pdx1 compared to controls. In addition, transmission electron microscopy analyses revealed decreased numbers of characteristic insulin granules and the presence of abnormal granules in insulin-expressing cells from mutant embryos. Together, these data demonstrate that

  7. Cumulus Cell Expansion, Its Role in Oocyte Biology and Perspectives of Measurement: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevoral J.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cumulus expansion of the cumulus-oocyte complex is necessary for meiotic maturation and acquiring developmental competence. Cumulus expansion is based on extracellular matrix synthesis by cumulus cells. Hyaluronic acid is the most abundant component of this extracellular matrix. Cumulus expansion takes place during meiotic oocyte maturation under in vivo and in vitro conditions. Quantification and measurement of cumulus expansion intensity is one possible method of determining oocyte quality and optimizing conditions for in vitro cultivation. Currently, subjective methods of expanded area and more exact cumulus expansion measurement by hyaluronic acid assessment are available. Among the methods of hyaluronic acid measurement is the use of radioactively labelled synthesis precursors. Alternatively, immunological and analytical methods, including enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, spectrophotometry, and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC in UV light, could be utilized. The high sensitivity of these methods could provide a precise analysis of cumulus expansion without the use of radioisotopes. Therefore, the aim of this review is to summarize and compare available approaches of cumulus expansion measurement, respecting special biological features of expanded cumuli, and to suggest possible solutions for exact cumulus expansion analysis.

  8. Integrated processes for expansion and differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells in suspended microcarriers cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lam, Alan Tin-Lun; Chen, Allen Kuan-Liang; Ting, Sherwin Qi-Peng; Reuveny, Shaul; Oh, Steve Kah-Weng

    2016-01-01

    Current methods for human pluripotent stem cells (hPSC) expansion and differentiation can be limited in scalability and costly (due to their labor intensive nature). This can limit their use in cell therapy, drug screening and toxicity assays. One of the approaches that can overcome these limitations is microcarrier (MC) based cultures in which cells are expanded as cell/MC aggregates and then directly differentiated as embryoid bodies (EBs) in the same agitated reactor. This integrated process can be scaled up and eliminate the need for some culture manipulation used in common monolayer and EBs cultures. This review describes the principles of such microcarriers based integrated hPSC expansion and differentiation process, and parameters that can affect its efficiency (such as MC type and extracellular matrix proteins coatings, cell/MC aggregates size, and agitation). Finally examples of integrated process for generation cardiomyocytes (CM) and neural progenitor cells (NPC) as well as challenges to be solved are described. - Highlights: • Expansion of hPSC on microcarriers. • Differentiation of hPSC on microcarriers. • Parameters that can affect the expansion and differentiation of hPSC on microcarriers. • Integration of expansion and differentiation of hPSC on microcarriers in one unit operation.

  9. Integrated processes for expansion and differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells in suspended microcarriers cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, Alan Tin-Lun, E-mail: alan_lam@bti.a-star.edu.sg; Chen, Allen Kuan-Liang; Ting, Sherwin Qi-Peng; Reuveny, Shaul; Oh, Steve Kah-Weng, E-mail: steve_oh@bti.a-star.edu.sg

    2016-05-06

    Current methods for human pluripotent stem cells (hPSC) expansion and differentiation can be limited in scalability and costly (due to their labor intensive nature). This can limit their use in cell therapy, drug screening and toxicity assays. One of the approaches that can overcome these limitations is microcarrier (MC) based cultures in which cells are expanded as cell/MC aggregates and then directly differentiated as embryoid bodies (EBs) in the same agitated reactor. This integrated process can be scaled up and eliminate the need for some culture manipulation used in common monolayer and EBs cultures. This review describes the principles of such microcarriers based integrated hPSC expansion and differentiation process, and parameters that can affect its efficiency (such as MC type and extracellular matrix proteins coatings, cell/MC aggregates size, and agitation). Finally examples of integrated process for generation cardiomyocytes (CM) and neural progenitor cells (NPC) as well as challenges to be solved are described. - Highlights: • Expansion of hPSC on microcarriers. • Differentiation of hPSC on microcarriers. • Parameters that can affect the expansion and differentiation of hPSC on microcarriers. • Integration of expansion and differentiation of hPSC on microcarriers in one unit operation.

  10. Pleural mesothelial cells promote expansion of IL-17-producing CD8+ T cells in tuberculous pleural effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X; Zhou, Q; Yang, W B; Xiong, X Z; Du, R H; Zhang, J C

    2013-05-01

    IL-17-producing CD8(+) T lymphocytes (Tc17 cells) have recently been detected in many cancers and autoimmune diseases. However, the possible implication of Tc17 cells in tuberculous pleural effusion remains unclarified. In this study, distribution and phenotypic features of Tc17 cells in both tuberculous pleural effusion (TPE) and peripheral blood from patients with tuberculosis were determined. The effects of proinflammatory cytokines and local accessory cells (pleural mesothelial cells) on Tc17 cell expansion were also explored. We found that TPE contained more Tc17 cells than the blood. Compared with IFN-γ-producing CD8(+) T cells, Tc17 cells displayed higher expression of chemokine receptors (CCRs) and lower expression of cytotoxic molecules. In particularly, Tc17 cells in TPE exhibited high expression levels of CCR6, which could migrate in response to CCL20. Furthermore, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-23, or their various combinations could promote Tc17 cell expansion from CD8(+) T cells, whereas the proliferative response of Tc17 cells to above cytokines was lower than that of Th17 cells. Pleural mesothelial cells (PMCs) were able to stimulate Tc17 cell expansion via cell contact in an IL-1β/IL-6/IL-23 independent fashion. Thus this study demonstrates that Tc17 cells marks a subset of non-cytotoxic, CCR6(+) CD8(+) T lymphocytes with low proliferative capacity. The overrepresentation of Tc17 cells in TPE may be due to Tc17 cell expansion stimulated by pleural proinflammatory cytokines and to recruitment of Tc17 cells from peripheral blood. Additionally, PMCs may promote the production of IL-17 by CD8(+) T cells at sites of TPE via cell-cell interactions.

  11. Clonal expansion under the microscope: studying lymphocyte activation and differentiation using live-cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polonsky, Michal; Chain, Benjamin; Friedman, Nir

    2016-03-01

    Clonal expansion of lymphocytes is a hallmark of vertebrate adaptive immunity. A small number of precursor cells that recognize a specific antigen proliferate into expanded clones, differentiate and acquire various effector and memory phenotypes, which promote effective immune responses. Recent studies establish a large degree of heterogeneity in the level of expansion and in cell state between and within expanding clones. Studying these processes in vivo, while providing insightful information on the level of heterogeneity, is challenging due to the complex microenvironment and the inability to continuously track individual cells over extended periods of time. Live cell imaging of ex vivo cultures within micro fabricated arrays provides an attractive methodology for studying clonal expansion. These experiments facilitate continuous acquisition of a large number of parameters on cell number, proliferation, death and differentiation state, with single-cell resolution on thousands of expanding clones that grow within controlled environments. Such data can reveal stochastic and instructive mechanisms that contribute to observed heterogeneity and elucidate the sequential order of differentiation events. Intercellular interactions can also be studied within these arrays by following responses of a controlled number of interacting cells, all trapped within the same microwell. Here we describe implementations of live-cell imaging within microwell arrays for studies of lymphocyte clonal expansion, portray insights already gained from these experiments and outline directions for future research. These tools, together with in vivo experiments tracking single-cell responses, will expand our understanding of adaptive immunity and the ways by which it can be manipulated.

  12. Evaluation of beta-cell secretory capacity using glucagon-like peptide 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilsbøll, Tina; Nielsen, Mette Toft; Krarup, T

    2000-01-01

    Beta-cell secretory capacity is often evaluated with a glucagon test or a meal test. However, glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) is the most insulinotropic hormone known, and the effect is preserved in type 2 diabetic patients.......Beta-cell secretory capacity is often evaluated with a glucagon test or a meal test. However, glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) is the most insulinotropic hormone known, and the effect is preserved in type 2 diabetic patients....

  13. Interleukin-1{beta} regulates cell proliferation and activity of extracellular matrix remodelling enzymes in cultured primary pig heart cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zitta, Karina; Brandt, Berenice [Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel (Germany); Wuensch, Annegret [Institute of Molecular Animal Breeding and Biotechnology, Ludwig Maximilians University, Munich (Germany); Meybohm, Patrick; Bein, Berthold; Steinfath, Markus; Scholz, Jens [Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel (Germany); Albrecht, Martin, E-mail: Albrecht@anaesthesie.uni-kiel.de [Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel (Germany)

    2010-09-03

    Research highlights: {yields} Levels of IL-1{beta} are increased in the pig myocardium after infarction. {yields} Cultured pig heart cells possess IL-1 receptors. {yields} IL-1{beta} increases cell proliferation of pig heart cells in-vitro. {yields} IL-1{beta} increases MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity in pig heart cells in-vitro. {yields} IL-1{beta} may be important for tissue remodelling events after myocardial infarction. -- Abstract: After myocardial infarction, elevated levels of interleukins (ILs) are found within the myocardial tissue and IL-1{beta} is considered to play a major role in tissue remodelling events throughout the body. In the study presented, we have established a cell culture model of primary pig heart cells to evaluate the effects of different concentrations of IL-1{beta} on cell proliferation as well as expression and activity of enzymes typically involved in tissue remodelling. Primary pig heart cell cultures were derived from three different animals and stimulated with recombinant pig IL-1{beta}. RNA expression was detected by RT-PCR, protein levels were evaluated by Western blotting, activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) was quantified by gelatine zymography and cell proliferation was measured using colorimetric MTS assays. Pig heart cells express receptors for IL-1 and application of IL-1{beta} resulted in a dose-dependent increase of cell proliferation (P < 0.05 vs. control; 100 ng/ml; 24 h). Gene expression of caspase-3 was increased by IL-1{beta} (P < 0.05 vs. control; 100 ng/ml; 3 h), and pro-caspase-3 but not active caspase was detected in lysates of pig heart cells by Western blotting. MMP-2 gene expression as well as enzymatic activities of MMP-2 and MMP-9 were increased by IL-1{beta} (P < 0.05 vs. control; 100 ng/ml; 3 h for gene expression, 48 and 72 h for enzymatic activities of MMP-2 and MMP-9, respectively). Our in vitro data suggest that IL-1{beta} plays a major role in the events of tissue remodelling in the heart. Combined

  14. The Cytotoxic Role of Intermittent High Glucose on Apoptosis and Cell Viability in Pancreatic Beta Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Glucose fluctuations are both strong predictor of diabetic complications and crucial factor for beta cell damages. Here we investigated the effect of intermittent high glucose (IHG on both cell apoptosis and proliferation activity in INS-1 cells and the potential mechanisms. Methods. Cells were treated with normal glucose (5.5 mmol/L, constant high glucose (CHG (25 mmol/L, and IHG (rotation per 24 h in 11.1 or 25 mmol/L for 7 days. Reactive oxygen species (ROS, xanthine oxidase (XOD level, apoptosis, cell viability, cell cycle, and expression of cyclinD1, p21, p27, and Skp2 were determined. Results. We found that IHG induced more significant apoptosis than CHG and normal glucose; intracellular ROS and XOD levels were more markedly increased in cells exposed to IHG. Cells treated with IHG showed significant decreased cell viability and increased cell proportion in G0/G1 phase. Cell cycle related proteins such as cyclinD1 and Skp2 were decreased significantly, but expressions of p27 and p21 were increased markedly. Conclusions. This study suggested that IHG plays a more toxic effect including both apoptosis-inducing and antiproliferative effects on INS-1 cells. Excessive activation of cellular stress and regulation of cyclins might be potential mechanism of impairment in INS-1 cells induced by IHG.

  15. Umbilical cord bloods hematopoietic stem cells ex vivo expansion (the literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Shamanskaya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Umbilical cord blood (CB is now an attractive source of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs for transplantation in pediatric and adult patients with various malignant and non-malignant diseases. However, its clinical application is limited by low cells numbers in graft, which correlates with delayed engraftment, an extension of time to platelets and neutrophils recovery and increasing risk of infectious complications. Several strategies have been suggested to overcome this limitation, one of which is obtaining a sufficient number of hematopoietic progenitor cells by ex vivo expansion. Literature review about CB HSCs expansion in given article is presented.

  16. Growth arrest- and DNA-damage-inducible 45beta gene inhibits c-Jun N-terminal kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase and decreases IL-1beta-induced apoptosis in insulin-producing INS-1E cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Claus Morten; Døssing, M G; Papa, S

    2006-01-01

    IL-1beta is a candidate mediator of apoptotic beta cell destruction, a process that leads to type 1 diabetes and progression of type 2 diabetes. IL-1beta activates beta cell c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and p38, all of which are members of the mitogen...

  17. Regulation of Pancreatic Beta Cell Stimulus-Secretion Coupling by microRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan L. S. Esguerra

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Increased blood glucose after a meal is countered by the subsequent increased release of the hypoglycemic hormone insulin from the pancreatic beta cells. The cascade of molecular events encompassing the initial sensing and transport of glucose into the beta cell, culminating with the exocytosis of the insulin large dense core granules (LDCVs is termed “stimulus-secretion coupling.” Impairment in any of the relevant processes leads to insufficient insulin release, which contributes to the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D. The fate of the beta cell, when exposed to environmental triggers of the disease, is determined by the possibility to adapt to the new situation by regulation of gene expression. As established factors of post-transcriptional regulation, microRNAs (miRNAs are well-recognized mediators of beta cell plasticity and adaptation. Here, we put focus on the importance of comprehending the transcriptional regulation of miRNAs, and how miRNAs are implicated in stimulus-secretion coupling, specifically those influencing the late stages of insulin secretion. We suggest that efficient beta cell adaptation requires an optimal balance between transcriptional regulation of miRNAs themselves, and miRNA-dependent gene regulation. The increased knowledge of the beta cell transcriptional network inclusive of non-coding RNAs such as miRNAs is essential in identifying novel targets for the treatment of T2D.

  18. The effect of suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 on GH signaling in beta-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønn, Sif G; Hansen, Johnny A; Lindberg, Karen

    2002-01-01

    GH is an important regulator of cell growth and metabolism. In the pancreas, GH stimulates mitogenesis as well as insulin production in beta-cells. The cellular effects of GH are exerted mainly through activation of the Janus kinase-signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) pathway...... stable transfection of the beta-cell lines with plasmids expressing SOCS-3 under the control of an inducible promoter, a time- and dose-dependent expression of SOCS-3 in the cells was obtained. EMSA showed that SOCS-3 is able to inhibit GH-induced DNA binding of both STAT3 and STAT5 in RIN-5AH cells...

  19. Effects of ethanol on pancreatic beta-cell death: interaction with glucose and fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembele, Korami; Nguyen, K Hoa; Hernandez, Tiffany A; Nyomba, B L Grégoire

    2009-04-01

    Western lifestyle plays an important role in the prevalence of type 2 diabetes by causing insulin resistance and pancreatic beta-cell dysfunction, a prerequisite for the development of diabetes. High fat diet and alcohol are major components of the western diet. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of ethanol and fatty acids on beta-cell survival and metabolism. We treated the rat beta-cell line RINm5F with ethanol, a mixture of palmitic and oleic acids, or both. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were determined by (5-(and-6)-chloromethyl-2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate) (CM-H2DCFDA) fluorescence assay, and mitochondrial activity was assessed by 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) reduction assay and by determining ATP production. Cell viability was assessed with a cell counter and trypan blue exclusion, and the mode of cell death by Hoechst33342 and propidium iodide staining. With both ethanol and fatty acid treatments, MTT reduction and ATP production decreased, whereas ROS production increased. Ethanol treatment had no effect on cell number, whereas fatty acid treatment reduced the cell number. Cell incubation with ethanol, fatty acids, or both increased the number of Hoechst 33342-positive nuclei. However, the majority of nuclei from fatty acid-treated cells were stained with propidium iodide, indicating a loss of plasma membrane integrity. We conclude that both ethanol and fatty acids generate cellular oxidative stress, and affect mitochondrial function in RINm5F beta-cells. However, ethanol causes beta-cell death by apoptosis, whereas fatty acids cause cell death predominantly by necrosis. It is not known whether these results are applicable to human beta-cells.

  20. Tumor cell adhesion to endothelial cells is increased by endotoxin via an upregulation of beta-1 integrin expression.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Andrews, E J

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Recent studies have demonstrated that metastatic disease develops from tumor cells that adhere to endothelial cells and proliferate intravascularly. The beta-1 integrin family and its ligand laminin have been shown to be important in tumor-to-endothelial cell adhesion. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has been implicated in the increased metastatic tumor growth that is seen postoperatively. We postulated that LPS increases tumor cell expression of beta-1 integrins and that this leads to increased adhesion. METHODS: The human metastatic colon cancer cell line LS174T was labeled with an enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) using retroviral transfection. Cell cultures were treated with LPS for 1, 2, and 4 h (n = 6 each) and were subsequently cocultured for 30 or 120 min with confluent human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), to allow adherence. Adherent tumor cells were counted using fluorescence microscopy. These experiments were carried out in the presence or absence of a functional blocking beta-1 integrin monoclonal antibody (4B4). Expression of beta-1 integrin and laminin on tumor and HUVECs was assessed using flow cytometric analysis. Tumor cell NF-kappaB activation after incubation with LPS was measured. RESULTS: Tumor cell and HUVEC beta-1 integrin expression and HUVEC expression of laminin were significantly (P < 0.05) enhanced after incubation with LPS. Tumor cell adhesion to HUVECs was significantly increased. Addition of the beta-1 integrin blocking antibody reduced tumor cell adhesion to control levels. LPS increased tumor cell NF-kappaB activation. CONCLUSIONS: Exposure to LPS increases tumor cell adhesion to the endothelium through a beta-1 integrin-mediated pathway that is NF-kappaB dependent. This may provide a target for immunotherapy directed at reducing postoperative metastatic tumor growth.

  1. Suitability of human mesenchymal stem cells for gene therapy depends on the expansion medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apel, Anja; Groth, Ariane; Schlesinger, Sabine; Bruns, Helge; Schemmer, Peter; Buechler, Markus W.; Herr, Ingrid

    2009-01-01

    Great hope is set in the use of mesenchymal stem cells for gene therapy and regenerative medicine. Since the frequency of this subpopulation of stem cells in bone marrow is low, mesenchymal stem cells are expanded ex vivo and manipulated prior to experimental or clinical use. Different methods for isolation and expansion are available, but the particular effect on the stem cell character is unclear. While the isolation of mesenchymal stem cells by density centrifugation followed by selection of the plastic adherent fraction is frequently used, the composition of expansion media differs. Thus, in the present study we cultured mesenchymal stem cells isolated from five healthy young volunteers in three widely used expansion media and performed a detailed analysis of the effect on morphology, proliferation, clonogenicity, passaging, differentiation and senescence. By this way we clearly show that the type of expansion medium used determines the stem cell character and time of senescence which is critical for future gene therapeutic and regenerative approaches using mesenchymal stem cells

  2. The effect of smoking cessation pharmacotherapies on pancreatic beta cell function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woynillowicz, Amanda K.; Raha, Sandeep; Nicholson, Catherine J.; Holloway, Alison C.

    2012-01-01

    The goal of our study was to evaluate whether drugs currently used for smoking cessation (i.e., nicotine replacement therapy, varenicline [a partial agonist at nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR)] and bupropion [which acts in part as a nAChR antagonist]) can affect beta cell function and determine the mechanism(s) of this effect. INS-1E cells, a rat beta cell line, were treated with nicotine, varenicline and bupropion to determine their effects on beta cell function, mitochondrial electron transport chain enzyme activity and cellular/oxidative stress. Treatment of INS-1E cells with equimolar concentrations (1 μM) of three test compounds resulted in an ablation of normal glucose-stimulated insulin secretion by the cells. This disruption of normal beta cell function was associated with mitochondrial dysfunction since all three compounds tested significantly decreased the activity of mitochondrial electron transport chain enzyme activity. These results raise the possibility that the currently available smoking cessation pharmacotherapies may also have adverse effects on beta cell function and thus glycemic control in vivo. Therefore whether or not the use of nicotine replacement therapy, varenicline and bupropion can cause endocrine changes which are consistent with impaired pancreatic function warrants further investigation. -- Highlights: ► Smoking cessation drugs have the potential to disrupt beta cell function in vitro. ► The effects of nicotine, varenicline and bupropion are similar. ► The impaired beta cell function is mediated by mitochondrial dysfunction. ► If similar effects are seen in vivo, these drugs may increase the risk of diabetes.

  3. The effect of smoking cessation pharmacotherapies on pancreatic beta cell function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woynillowicz, Amanda K. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada L8N 3Z5 (Canada); Raha, Sandeep [Department of Pediatrics, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada L8N 3Z5 (Canada); Nicholson, Catherine J. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada L8N 3Z5 (Canada); Holloway, Alison C., E-mail: hollow@mcmaster.ca [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada L8N 3Z5 (Canada)

    2012-11-15

    The goal of our study was to evaluate whether drugs currently used for smoking cessation (i.e., nicotine replacement therapy, varenicline [a partial agonist at nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR)] and bupropion [which acts in part as a nAChR antagonist]) can affect beta cell function and determine the mechanism(s) of this effect. INS-1E cells, a rat beta cell line, were treated with nicotine, varenicline and bupropion to determine their effects on beta cell function, mitochondrial electron transport chain enzyme activity and cellular/oxidative stress. Treatment of INS-1E cells with equimolar concentrations (1 μM) of three test compounds resulted in an ablation of normal glucose-stimulated insulin secretion by the cells. This disruption of normal beta cell function was associated with mitochondrial dysfunction since all three compounds tested significantly decreased the activity of mitochondrial electron transport chain enzyme activity. These results raise the possibility that the currently available smoking cessation pharmacotherapies may also have adverse effects on beta cell function and thus glycemic control in vivo. Therefore whether or not the use of nicotine replacement therapy, varenicline and bupropion can cause endocrine changes which are consistent with impaired pancreatic function warrants further investigation. -- Highlights: ► Smoking cessation drugs have the potential to disrupt beta cell function in vitro. ► The effects of nicotine, varenicline and bupropion are similar. ► The impaired beta cell function is mediated by mitochondrial dysfunction. ► If similar effects are seen in vivo, these drugs may increase the risk of diabetes.

  4. Induction of cell scattering by expression of beta1 integrins in beta1-deficient epithelial cells requires activation of members of the rho family of GTPases and downregulation of cadherin and catenin function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gimond, C; van Der Flier, A; van Delft, S

    1999-01-01

    different beta1-null cell lines, epithelial GE11 and fibroblast-like GD25 cells. Expression of beta1A or the cytoplasmic splice variant beta1D, induced the disruption of intercellular adherens junctions and cell scattering in both GE11 and GD25 cells. In GE11 cells, the morphological change correlated...... for a complete morphological transition towards the spindle-shaped fibroblast-like phenotype. The expression of an interleukin-2 receptor (IL2R)-beta1A chimera and its incorporation into focal adhesions also induced the disruption of cadherin-based adhesions and the reorganization of ECM-cell contacts...

  5. Effect on pancreatic beta cells and nerve cells by low let x-ray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Kwang Hun [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Kyungbuk National University Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kgu Hwan [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Daegu health College, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    Cultured pancreatic beta cells and nerve cells, it is given normal condition of 10% FBS (fetal bovine serum), 11.1 mM glucose and hyperglycemia condition of 1% FBS, 30 mM glucose. For low LET X-ray irradiated with 0.5 Gy/hr dose-rate(total dose: 0.5 to 5 Gy). Survival rates were measured by MTT assay. When non irradiated, differentiated in the pancreatic beta cells experiment is hyperglycemia conditions survival rate compared to normal conditions survival rate seemed a small reduction. However increasing the total dose of X-ray, the survival rate of normal conditions decreased slightly compared to the survival rate of hyperglycemia conditions, the synergistic effect was drastically reduced. When non irradiated, undifferentiated in the nerve cells experiment is hyperglycemia conditions survival rate compared to normal conditions survival rate seemed a large reduction. As the cumulative dose of X-ray normal conditions and hyperglycemia were all relatively rapid cell death. But the rate of decreased survivals by almost parallel to the reduction proceed and it didn't show synergistic effect.

  6. The Importance of REST for Development and Function of Beta Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin, David; Grapin-Botton, Anne

    2017-01-01

    that are crucial for both neuronal and pancreatic endocrine function, through the recruitment of multiple transcriptional and epigenetic co-regulators. REST targets include genes encoding transcription factors, proteins involved in exocytosis, synaptic transmission or ion channeling, and non-coding RNAs. REST......Beta cells are defined by the genes they express, many of which are specific to this cell type, and ensure a specific set of functions. Beta cells are also defined by a set of genes they should not express (in order to function properly), and these genes have been called forbidden genes. Among...... these, the transcriptional repressor RE-1 Silencing Transcription factor (REST) is expressed in most cells of the body, excluding most populations of neurons, as well as pancreatic beta and alpha cells. In the cell types where it is expressed, REST represses the expression of hundreds of genes...

  7. Mechanical feedback coordinates cell wall expansion and assembly in yeast mating morphogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    The shaping of individual cells requires a tight coordination of cell mechanics and growth. However, it is unclear how information about the mechanical state of the wall is relayed to the molecular processes building it, thereby enabling the coordination of cell wall expansion and assembly during morphogenesis. Combining theoretical and experimental approaches, we show that a mechanical feedback coordinating cell wall assembly and expansion is essential to sustain mating projection growth in budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Our theoretical results indicate that the mechanical feedback provided by the Cell Wall Integrity pathway, with cell wall stress sensors Wsc1 and Mid2 increasingly activating membrane-localized cell wall synthases Fks1/2 upon faster cell wall expansion, stabilizes mating projection growth without affecting cell shape. Experimental perturbation of the osmotic pressure and cell wall mechanics, as well as compromising the mechanical feedback through genetic deletion of the stress sensors, leads to cellular phenotypes that support the theoretical predictions. Our results indicate that while the existence of mechanical feedback is essential to stabilize mating projection growth, the shape and size of the cell are insensitive to the feedback. PMID:29346368

  8. Inflammatory stress of pancreatic beta cells drives release of extracellular heat-shock protein 90α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocaña, Gail J; Pérez, Liliana; Guindon, Lynette; Deffit, Sarah N; Evans-Molina, Carmella; Thurmond, Debbie C; Blum, Janice S

    2017-06-01

    A major obstacle in predicting and preventing the development of autoimmune type 1 diabetes (T1D) in at-risk individuals is the lack of well-established early biomarkers indicative of ongoing beta cell stress during the pre-clinical phase of disease. Recently, serum levels of the α cytoplasmic isoform of heat-shock protein 90 (hsp90) were shown to be elevated in individuals with new-onset T1D. We therefore hypothesized that hsp90α could be released from beta cells in response to cellular stress and inflammation associated with the earliest stages of T1D. Here, human beta cell lines and cadaveric islets released hsp90α in response to stress induced by treatment with a combination of pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukin-1β, tumour necrosis factor-α and interferon-γ. Mechanistically, hsp90α release was found to be driven by cytokine-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress mediated by c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), a pathway that can eventually lead to beta cell apoptosis. Cytokine-induced beta cell hsp90α release and JNK activation were significantly reduced by pre-treating cells with the endoplasmic reticulum stress-mitigating chemical chaperone tauroursodeoxycholic acid. The hsp90α release by cells may therefore be a sensitive indicator of stress during inflammation and a useful tool in assessing therapeutic mitigation of cytokine-induced cell damage linked to autoimmunity. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. CRFR1 is expressed on pancreatic beta cells, promotes beta cell proliferation, and potentiates insulin secretion in a glucose-dependent manner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huising, Mark O; van der Meulen, Talitha; Vaughan, Joan M

    2009-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), originally characterized as the principal neuroregulator of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis, has broad central and peripheral distribution and actions. We demonstrate the presence of CRF receptor type 1 (CRFR1) on primary beta cells and show that acti...

  10. Diagnostic significance of red cell indices in beta-thalassaemia trait

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, Z.; Malik, N.; Chughtai, A.S.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the formulae for the diagnosis of beta-thalassemia trait cases in settings where electrophoreses is not available. The study included 50 cases of beta-thalassaemia trait already diagnosed by Hb electrophoresis. CBC samples were analyzed on Sysmex K4500 and red cell indices were used to evaluate formulae for differentiating beta thalassaemia trait from iron deficiency anemia. The formula MCV/RBC and MCH/RBC identified 56% of the cases. Formula MCV - (5 x Hb)- RBC - 8.4 identified 54% of beta thalassemia trait cases. The formula MCV x MCH identified 92% of cases. RBC indices given by 100 electronic counters can be used to differentiate iron deficiency anemia from beta-thalassaemia trait at least provisionally in areas where Hb electrophoresis is not available. (author)

  11. Xeno-Free Strategies for Safe Human Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cell Expansion: Supplements and Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cimino

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Human mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (hMSCs have generated great interest in regenerative medicine mainly due to their multidifferentiation potential and immunomodulatory role. Although hMSC can be obtained from different tissues, the number of available cells is always low for clinical applications, thus requiring in vitro expansion. Most of the current protocols for hMSC expansion make use of fetal bovine serum (FBS as a nutrient-rich supplement. However, regulatory guidelines encourage novel xeno-free alternatives to define safer and standardized protocols for hMSC expansion that preserve their intrinsic therapeutic potential. Since hMSCs are adherent cells, the attachment surface and cell-adhesive components also play a crucial role on their successful expansion. This review focuses on the advantages/disadvantages of FBS-free media and surfaces/coatings that avoid the use of animal serum, overcoming ethical issues and improving the expansion of hMSC for clinical applications in a safe and reproducible way.

  12. Sustained beta-cell dysfunction but normalized islet mass in aged thrombospondin-1 deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl Johan Drott

    Full Text Available Pancreatic islet endothelial cells have in recent years been shown to support beta-cell mass and function by paracrine interactions. Recently, we identified an islets endothelial-specific glycoprotein, thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1, that showed to be of importance for islet angiogenesis and beta-cell function in young mice. The present study aimed to investigate long-term consequences for islet morphology and beta-cell function of TSP-1 deficiency. Islet and beta-cell mass were observed increased at 10-12 weeks of age in TSP-1 deficient mice, but were normalized before 16 weeks of age when compared to wild-type controls. Islet vascularity was normal in 10-12 and 16-week-old TSP-1 deficient animals, whereas islets of one-year-old animals lacking TSP-1 were hypervascular. Beta-cell dysfunction in TSP-1 deficient animals was present at similar magnitudes between 10-12 and 52 weeks of age, as evaluated by glucose tolerance tests. The insulin secretion capacity in vivo of islets in one-year-old TSP-1 deficient animals was only ∼15% of that in wild-type animals. Using a transplantation model, we reconstituted TSP-1 in adult TSP-deficient islets. In contrast to neonatal TSP-1 deficient islets that we previously reported to regain function after TSP-1 reconstitution, adult islets failed to recover. We conclude that TSP-1 deficiency in islets causes changing vascular and endocrine morphological alterations postnatally, but is coupled to a chronic beta-cell dysfunction. The beta-cell dysfunction induced by TSP-1 deficiency is irreversible if not substituted early in life.

  13. T Cell-Mediated Beta Cell Destruction: Autoimmunity and Alloimmunity in the Context of Type 1 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam L. Burrack

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes (T1D results from destruction of pancreatic beta cells by T cells of the immune system. Despite improvements in insulin analogs and continuous blood glucose level monitoring, there is no cure for T1D, and some individuals develop life-threatening complications. Pancreas and islet transplantation have been attractive therapeutic approaches; however, transplants containing insulin-producing cells are vulnerable to both recurrent autoimmunity and conventional allograft rejection. Current immune suppression treatments subdue the immune system, but not without complications. Ideally a successful approach would target only the destructive immune cells and leave the remaining immune system intact to fight foreign pathogens. This review discusses the autoimmune diabetes disease process, diabetic complications that warrant a transplant, and alloimmunity. First, we describe the current understanding of autoimmune destruction of beta cells including the roles of CD4 and CD8 T cells and several possibilities for antigen-specific tolerance induction. Second, we outline diabetic complications necessitating beta cell replacement. Third, we discuss transplant recognition, potential sources for beta cell replacement, and tolerance-promoting therapies under development. We hypothesize that a better understanding of autoreactive T cell targets during disease pathogenesis and alloimmunity following transplant destruction could enhance attempts to re-establish tolerance to beta cells.

  14. Microencapsulation Technology: A Powerful Tool for Integrating Expansion and Cryopreservation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malpique, Rita; Brito, Catarina; Jensen, Janne; Bjorquist, Petter; Carrondo, Manuel J. T.; Alves, Paula M.

    2011-01-01

    The successful implementation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs)-based technologies requires the production of relevant numbers of well-characterized cells and their efficient long-term storage. In this study, cells were microencapsulated in alginate to develop an integrated bioprocess for expansion and cryopreservation of pluripotent hESCs. Different three-dimensional (3D) culture strategies were evaluated and compared, specifically, microencapsulation of hESCs as: i) single cells, ii) aggregates and iii) immobilized on microcarriers. In order to establish a scalable bioprocess, hESC-microcapsules were cultured in stirred tank bioreactors. The combination of microencapsulation and microcarrier technology resulted in a highly efficient protocol for the production and storage of pluripotent hESCs. This strategy ensured high expansion ratios (an approximately twenty-fold increase in cell concentration) and high cell recovery yields (>70%) after cryopreservation. When compared with non-encapsulated cells, cell survival post-thawing demonstrated a three-fold improvement without compromising hESC characteristics. Microencapsulation also improved the culture of hESC aggregates by protecting cells from hydrodynamic shear stress, controlling aggregate size and maintaining cell pluripotency for two weeks. This work establishes that microencapsulation technology may prove a powerful tool for integrating the expansion and cryopreservation of pluripotent hESCs. The 3D culture strategy developed herein represents a significant breakthrough towards the implementation of hESCs in clinical and industrial applications. PMID:21850261

  15. PDX1, Neurogenin-3, and MAFA: critical transcription regulators for beta cell development and regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaxi Zhu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Transcription factors regulate gene expression through binding to specific enhancer sequences. Pancreas/duodenum homeobox protein 1 (PDX1, Neurogenin-3 (NEUROG3, and V-maf musculoaponeurotic fibrosarcoma oncogene homolog A (MAFA are transcription factors critical for beta cell development and maturation. NEUROG3 is expressed in endocrine progenitor cells and controls islet differentiation and regeneration. PDX1 is essential for the development of pancreatic exocrine and endocrine cells including beta cells. PDX1 also binds to the regulatory elements and increases insulin gene transcription. Likewise, MAFA binds to the enhancer/promoter region of the insulin gene and drives insulin expression in response to glucose. In addition to those natural roles in beta cell development and maturation, ectopic expression of PDX1, NEUROG3, and/or MAFA has been successfully used to reprogram various cell types into insulin-producing cells in vitro and in vivo, such as pancreatic exocrine cells, hepatocytes, and pluripotent stem cells. Here, we review biological properties of PDX1, NEUROG3, and MAFA, and their applications and limitations for beta cell regenerative approaches. The primary source literature for this review was acquired using a PubMed search for articles published between 1990 and 2017. Search terms include diabetes, insulin, trans-differentiation, stem cells, and regenerative medicine.

  16. Islet immunity and beta cell reserve of indigenous Black South Africans with ketoacidosis at initial diagnosis of diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekpebegh, Chukwuma; Longo-Mbenza, Benjamin; Blanco-Blanco, Ernesto

    2013-01-01

    Islet immunity and beta cell reserve status were utilized to classify persons with ketoacidosis as the initial manifestation of diabetes. The clinical features of the various diabetes classes were also characterized. Prospective cross sectional study. Nelson Mandela Academic Hospital, Mthatha, Eastern Cape Province, South Africa. Indigenous Black South Africans with ketoacidosis as the initial manifestation of diabetes. Islet immunity and beta cell reserve were respectively assessed using serum anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD) antibody and serum C-peptide after 1 mg of intravenous glucagon. Serum anti-GAD 65 antibody > or = 5 units/L and or = 0.5 ng/mL and < 0.5 ng/mL, respectively. The proportions of patients with A+beta-, A+beta+, A-beta- and A-beta+ and their clinical characteristics were determined. Of the 38 males and 33 females who participated in the study, patients were categorized in various classes: A-beta+, 46.5% (n=33/ 71); A-beta-, 26.8% (n=19/71); A+beta-, 22.5% (n=16/71); and A+beta+, 4.2% (n=3/71). The ages of the various classes were: 41.8 +/- 13.8 years for A-beta+ (n=33); 36.5 +/- 14.6 years for A-beta- (n=19); and 20.6 +/- 7.1 years for the combination of A+beta- with A+beta+ (n=19) (P<.0001, P<.0001 for the combination of A+beta- and A+beta+ vs A-beta+, P=.001 for the combination of A+beta- and A+beta+ vs A-beta-and P=.2 for A-beta- vs A-beta+. The clinical features of type 2 diabetes were most prevalent in A-beta+ class while the A+beta- and A+beta+ groups had the clinical profile of type 1A diabetes. Most of the indigenous Black South African patients with ketoacidosis as the initial manifestation of diabetes had islet immunity, beta cell reserve status and clinical profiles of type 2 diabetes.

  17. Effect of long-term transfusion therapy on the glycometabolic status and pancreatic beta cell function in patients with beta Thalassemia major

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamalakshi G Bhat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes mellitus is a major complication of iron overload in patients with beta thalassemia major. Design: This is a descriptive study conducted in a Tertiary Care Teaching Hospital to analyze beta cell function and insulin resistance, and their relation to iron overload status in beta thalassemia major. Fasting glucose, two-hour post load glucose, fasting insulin, alanine amino transaminase (ALT, and ferritin were used as outcome measures. The homeostatic model assessment (HOMA model was used to calculate the beta cell function and insulin resistance index. Results: Of the 30 cases, 20% had impaired fasting glucose, 3.3% had impaired glucose tolerance, and none had diabetes. Fasting glucose was not significant between the cases and controls (P = 0.113. Fasting insulin (P = 0.001, ferritin (P = 0.001, and ALT (P = 0.001 levels were significantly high in the cases. Insulin resistance index was significantly higher in the cases (P = 0.001 as also the beta cell function (P = 0.001. With increase in age and the number of units transfused there is a decline in beta cell function, fasting insulin, and insulin resistance after attaining the maximum level. This suggests that initial insulin resistance is followed by insulin depletion due to loss of beta cell function, leading to diabetes mellitus. Conclusion: Impaired glucose tolerance (IGT and insulin resistance precede the onset of insulin-dependent diabetes and adequate chelation therapy is essential for delaying the onset or for prevention of diabetes.

  18. A human beta cell line with drug inducible excision of immortalizing transgenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benazra, Marion; Lecomte, Marie-José; Colace, Claire; Müller, Andreas; Machado, Cécile; Pechberty, Severine; Bricout-Neveu, Emilie; Grenier-Godard, Maud; Solimena, Michele; Scharfmann, Raphaël; Czernichow, Paul; Ravassard, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Access to immortalized human pancreatic beta cell lines that are phenotypically close to genuine adult beta cells, represent a major tool to better understand human beta cell physiology and develop new therapeutics for Diabetes. Here we derived a new conditionally immortalized human beta cell line, EndoC-βH3 in which immortalizing transgene can be efficiently removed by simple addition of tamoxifen. Methods We used lentiviral mediated gene transfer to stably integrate a tamoxifen inducible form of CRE (CRE-ERT2) into the recently developed conditionally immortalized EndoC βH2 line. The resulting EndoC-βH3 line was characterized before and after tamoxifen treatment for cell proliferation, insulin content and insulin secretion. Results We showed that EndoC-βH3 expressing CRE-ERT2 can be massively amplified in culture. We established an optimized tamoxifen treatment to efficiently excise the immortalizing transgenes resulting in proliferation arrest. In addition, insulin expression raised by 12 fold and insulin content increased by 23 fold reaching 2 μg of insulin per million cells. Such massive increase was accompanied by enhanced insulin secretion upon glucose stimulation. We further observed that tamoxifen treated cells maintained a stable function for 5 weeks in culture. Conclusions EndoC βH3 cell line represents a powerful tool that allows, using a simple and efficient procedure, the massive production of functional non-proliferative human beta cells. Such cells are close to genuine human beta cells and maintain a stable phenotype for 5 weeks in culture. PMID:26909308

  19. Beta-irradiation used for systemic radioimmunotherapy induces apoptosis and activates apoptosis pathways in leukaemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friesen, Claudia; Lubatschofski, Annelie; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Kotzerke, Joerg; Buchmann, Inga; Reske, Sven N.

    2003-01-01

    Beta-irradiation used for systemic radioimmunotherapy (RIT) is a promising treatment approach for high-risk leukaemia and lymphoma. In bone marrow-selective radioimmunotherapy, beta-irradiation is applied using iodine-131, yttrium-90 or rhenium-188 labelled radioimmunoconjugates. However, the mechanisms by which beta-irradiation induces cell death are not understood at the molecular level. Here, we report that beta-irradiation induced apoptosis and activated apoptosis pathways in leukaemia cells depending on doses, time points and dose rates. After beta-irradiation, upregulation of CD95 ligand and CD95 receptor was detected and activation of caspases resulting in apoptosis was found. These effects were completely blocked by the broad-range caspase inhibitor zVAD-fmk. In addition, irradiation-mediated mitochondrial damage resulted in perturbation of mitochondrial membrane potential, caspase-9 activation and cytochrome c release. Bax, a death-promoting protein, was upregulated and Bcl-x L , a death-inhibiting protein, was downregulated. We also found higher apoptosis rates and earlier activation of apoptosis pathways after gamma-irradiation in comparison to beta-irradiation at the same dose rate. Furthermore, irradiation-resistant cells were cross-resistant to CD95 and CD95-resistant cells were cross-resistant to irradiation, indicating that CD95 and irradiation used, at least in part, identical effector pathways. These findings demonstrate that beta-irradiation induces apoptosis and activates apoptosis pathways in leukaemia cells using both mitochondrial and death receptor pathways. Understanding the timing, sequence and molecular pathways of beta-irradiation-mediated apoptosis may allow rational adjustment of chemo- and radiotherapeutic strategies. (orig.)

  20. Characterization of estrogen receptors alpha and beta in uterine leiomyoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valladares, Francisco; Frías, Ignacio; Báez, Delia; García, Candelaria; López, Francisco J; Fraser, James D; Rodríguez, Yurena; Reyes, Ricardo; Díaz-Flores, Lucio; Bello, Aixa R

    2006-12-01

    Cellular and subcellular localization of estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha) and estrogen receptor beta (ERbeta) in uterine leiomyomas. Retrospective study. University of La Laguna (ULL) and Canary University Hospital (HUC). Premenopausal and postmenopausal women with uterine leiomyomas. Hysterectomy and myomectomy. Estrogen receptor alpha was only present in smooth muscle cells with variation in the subcellular location in different leiomyomas. Estrogen receptor beta was widely distributed in smooth muscle, endothelial, and connective tissue cells with nuclear location in all cases studied; variations were only found in the muscle cells for this receptor. Estrogens operate in leiomyoma smooth muscle cells through different receptors, alpha and beta. However they only act through the ERbeta in endothelial and connective cells.

  1. Differential response of cell-cycle and cell-expansion regulators to heat stress in apple (Malus domestica) fruitlets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaishman, Moshe A; Peles, Yuval; Dahan, Yardena; Milo-Cochavi, Shira; Frieman, Aviad; Naor, Amos

    2015-04-01

    Temperature is one of the most significant factors affecting physiological and biochemical aspects of fruit development. Current and progressing global warming is expected to change climate in the traditional deciduous fruit tree cultivation regions. In this study, 'Golden Delicious' trees, grown in a controlled environment or commercial orchard, were exposed to different periods of heat treatment. Early fruitlet development was documented by evaluating cell number, cell size and fruit diameter for 5-70 days after full bloom. Normal activities of molecular developmental and growth processes in apple fruitlets were disrupted under daytime air temperatures of 29°C and higher as a result of significant temporary declines in cell-production and cell-expansion rates, respectively. Expression screening of selected cell cycle and cell expansion genes revealed the influence of high temperature on genetic regulation of apple fruitlet development. Several core cell-cycle and cell-expansion genes were differentially expressed under high temperatures. While expression levels of B-type cyclin-dependent kinases and A- and B-type cyclins declined moderately in response to elevated temperatures, expression of several cell-cycle inhibitors, such as Mdwee1, Mdrbr and Mdkrps was sharply enhanced as the temperature rose, blocking the cell-cycle cascade at the G1/S and G2/M transition points. Moreover, expression of several expansin genes was associated with high temperatures, making them potentially useful as molecular platforms to enhance cell-expansion processes under high-temperature regimes. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of heat tolerance associated with genes controlling cell cycle and cell expansion may lead to the development of novel strategies for improving apple fruit productivity under global warming. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The Role of Oxidative Stress and Hypoxia in Pancreatic Beta-Cell Dysfunction in Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Philipp A; Rutter, Guy A

    2017-04-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a frequent precursor of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D), a disease that currently affects ∼8% of the adult population worldwide. Pancreatic beta-cell dysfunction and loss are central to the disease process, although understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms is still fragmentary. Recent Advances: Oversupply of nutrients, including glucose and fatty acids, and the subsequent overstimulation of beta cells, are believed to be an important contributor to insulin secretory failure in T2D. Hypoxia has also recently been implicated in beta-cell damage. Accumulating evidence points to a role for oxidative stress in both processes. Although the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) results from enhanced mitochondrial respiration during stimulation with glucose and other fuels, the expression of antioxidant defense genes is unusually low (or disallowed) in beta cells. Not all subjects with metabolic syndrome and hyperglycemia go on to develop full-blown diabetes, implying an important role in disease risk for gene-environment interactions. Possession of common risk alleles at the SLC30A8 locus, encoding the beta-cell granule zinc transporter ZnT8, may affect cytosolic Zn 2+ concentrations and thus susceptibility to hypoxia and oxidative stress. Loss of normal beta-cell function, rather than total mass, is increasingly considered to be the major driver for impaired insulin secretion in diabetes. Better understanding of the role of oxidative changes, its modulation by genes involved in disease risk, and effects on beta-cell identity may facilitate the development of new therapeutic strategies to this disease. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 26, 501-518.

  3. Intraclonal Cell Expansion and Selection Driven by B Cell Receptor in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Monica; Cutrona, Giovanna; Reverberi, Daniele; Fabris, Sonia; Neri, Antonino; Fabbi, Marina; Quintana, Giovanni; Quarta, Giovanni; Ghiotto, Fabio; Fais, Franco; Ferrarini, Manlio

    2011-01-01

    The mutational status of the immunoglobulin heavy-chain variable region (IGHV) genes utilized by chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) clones defines two disease subgroups. Patients with unmutated IGHV have a more aggressive disease and a worse outcome than patients with cells having somatic IGHV gene mutations. Moreover, up to 30% of the unmutated CLL clones exhibit very similar or identical B cell receptors (BcR), often encoded by the same IG genes. These “stereotyped” BcRs have been classified into defined subsets. The presence of an IGHV gene somatic mutation and the utilization of a skewed gene repertoire compared with normal B cells together with the expression of stereotyped receptors by unmutated CLL clones may indicate stimulation/selection by antigenic epitopes. This antigenic stimulation may occur prior to or during neoplastic transformation, but it is unknown whether this stimulation/selection continues after leukemogenesis has ceased. In this study, we focused on seven CLL cases with stereotyped BcR Subset #8 found among a cohort of 700 patients; in six, the cells expressed IgG and utilized IGHV4-39 and IGKV1-39/IGKV1D-39 genes, as reported for Subset #8 BcR. One case exhibited special features, including expression of IgM or IgG by different subclones consequent to an isotype switch, allelic inclusion at the IGH locus in the IgM-expressing cells and a particular pattern of cytogenetic lesions. Collectively, the data indicate a process of antigenic stimulation/selection of the fully transformed CLL cells leading to the expansion of the Subset #8 IgG-bearing subclone. PMID:21541442

  4. ROS signaling, oxidative stress and Nrf2 in pancreatic beta-cell function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pi Jingbo; Zhang Qiang; Fu Jingqi; Woods, Courtney G.; Hou Yongyong; Corkey, Barbara E.; Collins, Sheila; Andersen, Melvin E.

    2010-01-01

    This review focuses on the emerging evidence that reactive oxygen species (ROS) derived from glucose metabolism, such as H 2 O 2 , act as metabolic signaling molecules for glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) in pancreatic beta-cells. Particular emphasis is placed on the potential inhibitory role of endogenous antioxidants, which rise in response to oxidative stress, in glucose-triggered ROS and GSIS. We propose that cellular adaptive response to oxidative stress challenge, such as nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-mediated antioxidant induction, plays paradoxical roles in pancreatic beta-cell function. On the one hand, induction of antioxidant enzymes protects beta-cells from oxidative damage and possible cell death, thus minimizing oxidative damage-related impairment of insulin secretion. On the other hand, the induction of antioxidant enzymes by Nrf2 activation blunts glucose-triggered ROS signaling, thus resulting in reduced GSIS. These two premises are potentially relevant to impairment of beta-cells occurring in the late and early stage of Type 2 diabetes, respectively. In addition, we summarized our recent findings that persistent oxidative stress due to absence of uncoupling protein 2 activates cellular adaptive response which is associated with impaired pancreatic beta-cell function.

  5. Coordinate expansion of murine hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem cell compartments by SHIPi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, R; Iyer, S; Akada, H; Neelam, S; Russo, C M; Chisholm, J D; Kerr, W G

    2015-03-01

    Promoting the expansion of adult stem cell populations offers the potential to ameliorate radiation or chemotherapy-induced bone marrow failure and allows for expedited recovery for patients undergoing these therapies. Previous genetic studies suggested a pivotal role for SH2 domain-containing inositol-5-phosphatase 1 (SHIP1) in limiting the size of the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) compartment. The aim of this study was to determine whether our recent development of small molecule SHIP1 inhibitors offers the potential for pharmacological expansion of the HSC compartment in vivo. We show here that treatment of mice with aminosteroid inhibitors of SHIP1 (SHIPi) more than doubles the size of the adult mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) compartment while simultaneously expanding the HSC pool sixfold. Consistent with its ability to target SHIP1 function in vivo, SHIPi also significantly increases plasma granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) levels, a growth factor that supports proliferation of HSC. Here, we show that SHIPi-induced G-CSF production mediates HSC and MSC expansion, as in vivo neutralization of G-CSF abrogates the SHIPi-induced expansion of both the HSC and MSC compartments. Due to its expansionary effect on adult stem cell compartments, SHIPi represents a potential novel strategy to improve declining stem cell function in both therapy induced and genetically derived bone marrow failure syndromes. © 2014 AlphaMed Press.

  6. In Vitro Efficient Expansion of Tumor Cells Deriving from Different Types of Human Tumor Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Turin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Obtaining human tumor cell lines from fresh tumors is essential to advance our understanding of antitumor immune surveillance mechanisms and to develop new ex vivo strategies to generate an efficient anti-tumor response. The present study delineates a simple and rapid method for efficiently establishing primary cultures starting from tumor samples of different types, while maintaining the immuno-histochemical characteristics of the original tumor. We compared two different strategies to disaggregate tumor specimens. After short or long term in vitro expansion, cells analyzed for the presence of malignant cells demonstrated their neoplastic origin. Considering that tumor cells may be isolated in a closed system with high efficiency, we propose this methodology for the ex vivo expansion of tumor cells to be used to evaluate suitable new drugs or to generate tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes or vaccines.

  7. Gene expression patterns related to osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells during ex vivo expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granchi, Donatella; Ochoa, Gorka; Leonardi, Elisa; Devescovi, Valentina; Baglìo, Serena Rubina; Osaba, Lourdes; Baldini, Nicola; Ciapetti, Gabriela

    2010-06-01

    Bone marrow is commonly used as a source of adult multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), defined for their ability to differentiate in vitro into multiple lineages. The ex vivo-expanded MSCs are currently being evaluated as a strategy for the restoration of function in damaged skeletal tissue, both in cell therapy and tissue engineering applications. The aim of this study was to define gene expression patterns underlying the differentiation of MSCs into mature osteoblasts during the expansion in vitro, and to explore a variety of cell functions that cannot be easily evaluated using morphological, cytochemical, and biochemical assays. Cell cultures were obtained from bone marrow samples of six individuals undergoing total hip replacement, and a large-scale transcriptome analysis, using Affymetrix HG-U133A Plus 2.0 array (Affymetrix((R)), Santa Clara, CA), was performed at the occurrence of specific events, including the appearance of MSC surface markers, formation of colonies, and deposition of mineral nodules. We focused our attention on 213 differentially upregulated genes, some belonging to well-known pathways and some having one or more Gene Ontology annotations related to bone cell biology, including angiogenesis, bone-related genes, cell communication, development and morphogenesis, transforming growth factor-beta signaling, and Wnt signaling. Twenty-nine genes, whose role in bone cell pathophysiology has not been described yet, were found. In conclusion, gene expression patterns that characterize the early, intermediate, and late phases of the osteogenic differentiation process of ex vivo-expanded MSCs were defined. These signatures represent a useful tool to monitor the osteogenic process, and to analyze a broad spectrum of functions of MSCs cultured on scaffolds, especially when the constructs are conceived for releasing growth factors or other signals to promote bone regeneration.

  8. Tissue-specific methylation of human insulin gene and PCR assay for monitoring beta cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed I Husseiny

    Full Text Available The onset of metabolic dysregulation in type 1 diabetes (T1D occurs after autoimmune destruction of the majority of pancreatic insulin-producing beta cells. We previously demonstrated that the DNA encoding the insulin gene is uniquely unmethylated in these cells and then developed a methylation-specific PCR (MSP assay to identify circulating beta cell DNA in streptozotocin-treated mice prior to the rise in blood glucose. The current study extends to autoimmune non-obese diabetic (NOD mice and humans, showing in NOD mice that beta cell death occurs six weeks before the rise in blood sugar and coincides with the onset of islet infiltration by immune cells, demonstrating the utility of MSP for monitoring T1D. We previously reported unique patterns of methylation of the human insulin gene, and now extend this to other human tissues. The methylation patterns of the human insulin promoter, intron 1, exon 2, and intron 2 were determined in several normal human tissues. Similar to our previous report, the human insulin promoter was unmethylated in beta cells, but methylated in all other tissues tested. In contrast, intron 1, exon 2 and intron 2 did not exhibit any tissue-specific DNA methylation pattern. Subsequently, a human MSP assay was developed based on the methylation pattern of the insulin promoter and human islet DNA was successfully detected in circulation of T1D patients after islet transplantation therapy. Signal levels of normal controls and pre-transplant samples were shown to be similar, but increased dramatically after islet transplantation. In plasma the signal declines with time but in whole blood remains elevated for at least two weeks, indicating that association of beta cell DNA with blood cells prolongs the signal. This assay provides an effective method to monitor beta cell destruction in early T1D and in islet transplantation therapy.

  9. Cyclodextrin-facilitated bioconversion of 17 beta-estradiol by a phenoloxidase from Mucuna pruriens cell cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woerdenbag, H.J.; Pras, N.; Frijlink, H.W.; Lerk, C.F.; Malingré, T.M.

    1990-01-01

    After complexation with beta-cyclodextrin, the phenolic steroid 17 beta-estradiol could be ortho-hydroxylated into a catechol, mainly 4-hydroxyestradiol, by a phenoloxidase from in vitro grown cells of Mucuna pruriens. By complexation with beta-cyclodextrin the solubility of the steroid increased

  10. Incorporation of a hinge domain improves the expansion of chimeric antigen receptor T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Qin

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple iterations of chimeric antigen receptors (CARs have been developed, mainly focusing on intracellular signaling modules. However, the effect of non-signaling extracellular modules on the expansion and therapeutic efficacy of CARs remains largely undefined. Methods We generated two versions of CAR vectors, with or without a hinge domain, targeting CD19, mesothelin, PSCA, MUC1, and HER2, respectively. Then, we systematically compared the effect of the hinge domains on the growth kinetics, cytokine production, and cytotoxicity of CAR T cells in vitro and in vivo. Results During in vitro culture period, the percentages and absolute numbers of T cells expressing the CARs containing a hinge domain continuously increased, mainly through the promotion of CD4+ CAR T cell expansion, regardless of the single-chain variable fragment (scFv. In vitro migration assay showed that the hinges enhanced CAR T cells migratory capacity. The T cells expressing anti-CD19 CARs with or without a hinge had similar antitumor capacities in vivo, whereas the T cells expressing anti-mesothelin CARs containing a hinge domain showed enhanced antitumor activities. Conclusions Hence, our results demonstrate that a hinge contributes to CAR T cell expansion and is capable of increasing the antitumor efficacy of some specific CAR T cells. Our results suggest potential novel strategies in CAR vector design.

  11. The ectopic expression of Pax4 in the mouse pancreas converts progenitor cells into alpha and subsequently beta cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collombat, Patrick; Xu, Xiaobo; Ravassard, Philippe; Sosa-Pineda, Beatriz; Dussaud, Sébastien; Billestrup, Nils; Madsen, Ole D; Serup, Palle; Heimberg, Harry; Mansouri, Ahmed

    2009-08-07

    We have previously reported that the loss of Arx and/or Pax4 gene activity leads to a shift in the fate of the different endocrine cell subtypes in the mouse pancreas, without affecting the total endocrine cell numbers. Here, we conditionally and ectopically express Pax4 using different cell-specific promoters and demonstrate that Pax4 forces endocrine precursor cells, as well as mature alpha cells, to adopt a beta cell destiny. This results in a glucagon deficiency that provokes a compensatory and continuous glucagon+ cell neogenesis requiring the re-expression of the proendocrine gene Ngn3. However, the newly formed alpha cells fail to correct the hypoglucagonemia since they subsequently acquire a beta cell phenotype upon Pax4 ectopic expression. Notably, this cycle of neogenesis and redifferentiation caused by ectopic expression of Pax4 in alpha cells is capable of restoring a functional beta cell mass and curing diabetes in animals that have been chemically depleted of beta cells.

  12. Rat beta-LPH, gamma-LPH and beta-endorphin biosynthesized by isolated cells of pars intermedia and pars distalis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gianoulakis, C.; Seidah, N.G.; Routhier, R.; Chretien, M.

    1980-01-01

    Rats pars intermedia cells were incubated for 3 h with the following amino-acids: a) 35 S-methionine and 3 H-phenylalamine; b) 3 H-valine; and c) 3 H-valine and 3 H-lysine. Radioactive gamma-lipotropin, beta-lipotropin and beta-endorphin were purified on carboxy- methyl-cellulose and characterized by polyacrylamide disc gel electrophoresis af pH 4.5, molecular weight estimation and microsequencing. Rat gamma-lipotropin was shown to differ slightly from ovine gamma-lipotropin in its NH 2 -terminal amino acid sequence, in containing no methionine and having phenylalanine at position 6, valine at positions 13 and 27, and lysine at position 20. The same variations were observed in the sequence of rat beta-lipotropin, while rat beta-endorphin was shown to be identical to the ovine beta-endorphin. Following a 3-h pulse of rat pars distalis, the cells were extracted with care to avoid beta-lipotropin degradation by proteolytic enzymes. A peptide was purified and identified to be rat beta-endorphin, thus demonstrating that beta-endorphin is biosynthesized in pars distalis and is not an extraction artifact. (author)

  13. 9-{beta}-arabinofuranosyladenine preferentially sensitizes radioresistant squamous cell carcinoma cell lines to x-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heaton, D. [Rush Univ. Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States). Therapeutic Radiology; Mustafi, R. [Chicago Univ., IL (United States). Dept. of Radiation and Cellular Oncology; Schwartz, J.L. [Chicago Univ., IL (United States). Dept. of Radiation and Cellular Oncology]|[Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1992-06-01

    The effect of 9-{beta}-arabinofuranosyladenine (ara-A) on sensitivity to the deleterious effects of x-rays was studied in six squamous cell carcinoma cell lines. Three lines were relatively radioresistant, having D{sub 0} values of 2.31 to 2.89 Gy, and the other three lines were relatively radiosensitive, having D{sub 0} values of between 1.07 and 1.45 Gy. Ara-A (50 or 500 {mu}M) was added to cultures 30 min prior to irradiation and removed 30 min after irradiation, and sensitivity was measured in terms of cell survival. The radiosensitizing effect of ara-A was very dependent on the inherent radiosensitivity of the tumor cell line. Fifty micromolar concentrations of ara-A sensitized only the two most radioresistant lines, SCC-12B.2 and JSQ-3. Five hundred micromolar concentrations of ara-A sensitized the more sensitive cell lines, SQ-20B and SQ-9G, but failed to have any effect on the radiation response of the two most sensitive cell lines, SQ-38 and SCC-61. Concentrations of ara-A as low as 10 {mu}M were equally efficient in inhibiting DNA synthesis in all six cell lines. These results suggest that the target for the radiosensitizing effect of ara-A is probably related to the factor controlling the inherent radiosensitivity of human tumor cells. Therefore, ara-A might be useful in overcoming radiation resistance in vivo.

  14. A Simple Matter of Life and Death—The Trials of Postnatal Beta-Cell Mass Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Tarabra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic beta-cells, which secrete the hormone insulin, are the key arbiters of glucose homeostasis. Defective beta-cell numbers and/or function underlie essentially all major forms of diabetes and must be restored if diabetes is to be cured. Thus, the identification of the molecular regulators of beta-cell mass and a better understanding of the processes of beta-cell differentiation and proliferation may provide further insight for the development of new therapeutic targets for diabetes. This review will focus on the principal hormones and nutrients, as well as downstream signalling pathways regulating beta-cell mass in the adult. Furthermore, we will also address more recently appreciated regulators of beta-cell mass, such as microRNAs.

  15. Mycophenolate mofetil modulates adhesion receptors of the beta1 integrin family on tumor cells: impact on tumor recurrence and malignancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engl, Tobias; Makarević, Jasmina; Relja, Borna; Natsheh, Iyad; Müller, Iris; Beecken, Wolf-Dietrich; Jonas, Dietger; Blaheta, Roman A

    2005-01-01

    Tumor development remains one of the major obstacles following organ transplantation. Immunosuppressive drugs such as cyclosporine and tacrolimus directly contribute to enhanced malignancy, whereas the influence of the novel compound mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) on tumor cell dissemination has not been explored. We therefore investigated the adhesion capacity of colon, pancreas, prostate and kidney carcinoma cell lines to endothelium, as well as their beta1 integrin expression profile before and after MMF treatment. Tumor cell adhesion to endothelial cell monolayers was evaluated in the presence of 0.1 and 1 μM MMF and compared to unstimulated controls. beta1 integrin analysis included alpha1beta1 (CD49a), alpha2beta1 (CD49b), alpha3beta1 (CD49c), alpha4beta1 (CD49d), alpha5beta1 (CD49e), and alpha6beta1 (CD49f) receptors, and was carried out by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. Adhesion of the colon carcinoma cell line HT-29 was strongly reduced in the presence of 0.1 μM MMF. This effect was accompanied by down-regulation of alpha3beta1 and alpha6beta1 surface expression and of alpha3beta1 and alpha6beta1 coding mRNA. Adhesion of the prostate tumor cell line DU-145 was blocked dose-dependently by MMF. In contrast to MMF's effects on HT-29 cells, MMF dose-dependently up-regulated alpha1beta1, alpha2beta1, alpha3beta1, and alpha5beta1 on DU-145 tumor cell membranes. We conclude that MMF possesses distinct anti-tumoral properties, particularly in colon and prostate carcinoma cells. Adhesion blockage of HT-29 cells was due to the loss of alpha3beta1 and alpha6beta1 surface expression, which might contribute to a reduced invasive behaviour of this tumor entity. The enhancement of integrin beta1 subtypes observed in DU-145 cells possibly causes re-differentiation towards a low-invasive phenotype

  16. Mycophenolate mofetil modulates adhesion receptors of the beta1 integrin family on tumor cells: impact on tumor recurrence and malignancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beecken Wolf-Dietrich

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tumor development remains one of the major obstacles following organ transplantation. Immunosuppressive drugs such as cyclosporine and tacrolimus directly contribute to enhanced malignancy, whereas the influence of the novel compound mycophenolate mofetil (MMF on tumor cell dissemination has not been explored. We therefore investigated the adhesion capacity of colon, pancreas, prostate and kidney carcinoma cell lines to endothelium, as well as their beta1 integrin expression profile before and after MMF treatment. Methods Tumor cell adhesion to endothelial cell monolayers was evaluated in the presence of 0.1 and 1 μM MMF and compared to unstimulated controls. beta1 integrin analysis included alpha1beta1 (CD49a, alpha2beta1 (CD49b, alpha3beta1 (CD49c, alpha4beta1 (CD49d, alpha5beta1 (CD49e, and alpha6beta1 (CD49f receptors, and was carried out by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. Results Adhesion of the colon carcinoma cell line HT-29 was strongly reduced in the presence of 0.1 μM MMF. This effect was accompanied by down-regulation of alpha3beta1 and alpha6beta1 surface expression and of alpha3beta1 and alpha6beta1 coding mRNA. Adhesion of the prostate tumor cell line DU-145 was blocked dose-dependently by MMF. In contrast to MMF's effects on HT-29 cells, MMF dose-dependently up-regulated alpha1beta1, alpha2beta1, alpha3beta1, and alpha5beta1 on DU-145 tumor cell membranes. Conclusion We conclude that MMF possesses distinct anti-tumoral properties, particularly in colon and prostate carcinoma cells. Adhesion blockage of HT-29 cells was due to the loss of alpha3beta1 and alpha6beta1 surface expression, which might contribute to a reduced invasive behaviour of this tumor entity. The enhancement of integrin beta1 subtypes observed in DU-145 cells possibly causes re-differentiation towards a low-invasive phenotype.

  17. Calcium has a permissive role in interleukin-1beta-induced c-jun N-terminal kinase activation in insulin-secreting cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Størling, Joachim; Zaitsev, Sergei V; Kapelioukh, Iouri L

    2005-01-01

    The c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling pathway mediates IL-1beta-induced apoptosis in insulin-secreting cells, a mechanism relevant to the destruction of pancreatic beta-cells in type 1 and 2 diabetes. However, the mechanisms that contribute to IL-1beta activation of JNK in beta-cells are la...

  18. Culture expansion of adipose derived stromal cells. A closed automated Quantum Cell Expansion System compared with manual flask-based culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandana Haack-Sørensen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adipose derived stromal cells (ASCs are a rich and convenient source of cells for clinical regenerative therapeutic approaches. However, applications of ASCs often require cell expansion to reach the needed dose. In this study, cultivation of ASCs from stromal vascular fraction (SVF over two passages in the automated and functionally closed Quantum Cell Expansion System (Quantum system is compared with traditional manual cultivation. Methods Stromal vascular fraction was isolated from abdominal fat, suspended in α-MEM supplemented with 10% Fetal Bovine Serum and seeded into either T75 flasks or a Quantum system that had been coated with cryoprecipitate. The cultivation of ASCs from SVF was performed in 3 ways: flask to flask; flask to Quantum system; and Quantum system to Quantum system. In all cases, quality controls were conducted for sterility, mycoplasmas, and endotoxins, in addition to the assessment of cell counts, viability, immunophenotype, and differentiation potential. Results The viability of ASCs passage 0 (P0 and P1 was above 96%, regardless of cultivation in flasks or Quantum system. Expression of surface markers and differentiation potential was consistent with ISCT/IFATS standards for the ASC phenotype. Sterility, mycoplasma, and endotoxin tests were consistently negative. An average of 8.0 × 107 SVF cells loaded into a Quantum system yielded 8.96 × 107 ASCs P0, while 4.5 × 106 SVF cells seeded per T75 flask yielded an average of 2.37 × 106 ASCs—less than the number of SVF cells seeded. ASCs P1 expanded in the Quantum system demonstrated a population doubling (PD around 2.2 regardless of whether P0 was previously cultured in flasks or Quantum, while ASCs P1 in flasks only reached a PD of 1.0. Conclusion: Manufacturing of ASCs in a Quantum system enhances ASC expansion rate and yield significantly relative to manual processing in T-flasks, while maintaining the purity and quality essential to

  19. Culture expansion of adipose derived stromal cells. A closed automated Quantum Cell Expansion System compared with manual flask-based culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haack-Sørensen, Mandana; Follin, Bjarke; Juhl, Morten; Brorsen, Sonja K; Søndergaard, Rebekka H; Kastrup, Jens; Ekblond, Annette

    2016-11-16

    Adipose derived stromal cells (ASCs) are a rich and convenient source of cells for clinical regenerative therapeutic approaches. However, applications of ASCs often require cell expansion to reach the needed dose. In this study, cultivation of ASCs from stromal vascular fraction (SVF) over two passages in the automated and functionally closed Quantum Cell Expansion System (Quantum system) is compared with traditional manual cultivation. Stromal vascular fraction was isolated from abdominal fat, suspended in α-MEM supplemented with 10% Fetal Bovine Serum and seeded into either T75 flasks or a Quantum system that had been coated with cryoprecipitate. The cultivation of ASCs from SVF was performed in 3 ways: flask to flask; flask to Quantum system; and Quantum system to Quantum system. In all cases, quality controls were conducted for sterility, mycoplasmas, and endotoxins, in addition to the assessment of cell counts, viability, immunophenotype, and differentiation potential. The viability of ASCs passage 0 (P0) and P1 was above 96%, regardless of cultivation in flasks or Quantum system. Expression of surface markers and differentiation potential was consistent with ISCT/IFATS standards for the ASC phenotype. Sterility, mycoplasma, and endotoxin tests were consistently negative. An average of 8.0 × 10 7 SVF cells loaded into a Quantum system yielded 8.96 × 10 7 ASCs P0, while 4.5 × 10 6 SVF cells seeded per T75 flask yielded an average of 2.37 × 10 6 ASCs-less than the number of SVF cells seeded. ASCs P1 expanded in the Quantum system demonstrated a population doubling (PD) around 2.2 regardless of whether P0 was previously cultured in flasks or Quantum, while ASCs P1 in flasks only reached a PD of 1.0. Manufacturing of ASCs in a Quantum system enhances ASC expansion rate and yield significantly relative to manual processing in T-flasks, while maintaining the purity and quality essential to safe and robust cell production. Notably, the use of the Quantum

  20. High fat programming of beta cell compensation, exhaustion, death and dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerf, Marlon E

    2015-03-01

    Programming refers to events during critical developmental windows that shape progeny health outcomes. Fetal programming refers to the effects of intrauterine (in utero) events. Lactational programming refers to the effects of events during suckling (weaning). Developmental programming refers to the effects of events during both fetal and lactational life. Postnatal programming refers to the effects of events either from birth (lactational life) to adolescence or from weaning (end of lactation) to adolescence. Islets are most plastic during the early life course; hence programming during fetal and lactational life is most potent. High fat (HF) programming is the maintenance on a HF diet (HFD) during critical developmental life stages that alters progeny metabolism and physiology. HF programming induces variable diabetogenic phenotypes dependent on the timing and duration of the dietary insult. Maternal obesity reinforces HF programming effects in progeny. HF programming, through acute hyperglycemia, initiates beta cell compensation. However, HF programming eventually leads to chronic hyperglycemia that triggers beta cell exhaustion, death and dysfunction. In HF programming, beta cell dysfunction often co-presents with insulin resistance. Balanced, healthy nutrition during developmental windows is critical for preserving beta cell structure and function. Thus early positive nutritional interventions that coincide with the development of beta cells may reduce the overwhelming burden of diabetes and metabolic disease. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Role of growth factors in control of pancreatic beta cell mass: focus on betatrophin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitsky, Lynne L; Ardestani, Goli; Rhoads, David B

    2014-08-01

    Betatrophin is a newly described hormone, which potently stimulates beta cell replication in mice. This discovery has engendered great hope that it could prove clinically important in the treatment of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Betatrophin, a 198-amino acid protein secreted by liver and adipose tissue, stimulates growth of pancreatic beta cell mass in insulin-resistant mice. Betatrophin has previously been named RIFL, lipasin, and ANGPLT8, and its salutory effects on lipid metabolism have been described in mouse and human studies. Serum betatrophin levels in humans correlate with improved adipose tissue lipid storage and lower serum triglyceride levels in the fed state, but do not correlate with insulin resistance or carbohydrate tolerance in humans. Betatrophin has not yet been shown to have an effect on beta cell replication in human pancreatic islets. Many endocrine and paracrine factors, of which betatrophin is the newest described, increase beta cell mass in murine models. None of these factors, including betatrophin, have displayed the same activity in clinical studies. This may reflect a profound species difference in beta cell regeneration pathways in mice and humans.

  2. Polymorphisms within novel risk loci for type 2 diabetes determine beta-cell function.

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    Harald Staiger

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Type 2 diabetes arises when insulin resistance-induced compensatory insulin secretion exhausts. Insulin resistance and/or beta-cell dysfunction result from the interaction of environmental factors (high-caloric diet and reduced physical activity with a predisposing polygenic background. Very recently, genetic variations within four novel genetic loci (SLC30A8, HHEX, EXT2, and LOC387761 were reported to be more frequent in subjects with type 2 diabetes than in healthy controls. However, associations of these variations with insulin resistance and/or beta-cell dysfunction were not assessed. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By genotyping of 921 metabolically characterized German subjects for the reported candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, we show that the major alleles of the SLC30A8 SNP rs13266634 and the HHEX SNP rs7923837 associate with reduced insulin secretion stimulated by orally or intravenously administered glucose, but not with insulin resistance. In contrast, the other reported type 2 diabetes candidate SNPs within the EXT2 and LOC387761 loci did not associate with insulin resistance or beta-cell dysfunction, respectively. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The HHEX and SLC30A8 genes encode for proteins that were shown to be required for organogenesis of the ventral pancreas and for insulin maturation/storage, respectively. Therefore, the major alleles of type 2 diabetes candidate SNPs within these genetic loci represent crucial alleles for beta-cell dysfunction and, thus, might confer increased susceptibility of beta-cells towards adverse environmental factors.

  3. New Therapeutic Approaches to Prevent or Delay Beta-Cell Failure in Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionica Floriana Elvira

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims: The most recent estimates of International Diabetes Federation indicate that 382 million people have diabetes, and the incidence of this disease is increasing. While in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM beta-cell death is autoimmunemediated, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM results from an interaction between genetic and environmental factors that impair beta-cell function and insulin action. Many people with T2DM remain unaware of their illness for a long time because symptoms may take years to appear or be recognized, while the body is affected by excess blood glucose. These patients are often diagnosed only when diabetes complications have already developed. The aim of this article was to perform a review based on literature data on therapeutic modalities to prevent/delay beta cell function decline. Material and Methods: We searched MEDLINE from 2000 to the present to identify the therapeutic approaches to prevent or delay beta-cell failure in patients with T2DM. Results and conclusions: Several common polymorphisms in genes linked to monogenic forms of diabetes appear to influence the response to T2DM pharmacotherapy. Recent studies report the role of the G protein coupled receptor 40 (GPR40, also known as Free Fatty Acids Receptor 1 (FFAR1 in the regulation of beta-cell function- CNX-011-67 (a GPR40 agonist has the potential to provide good and durable glycemic control in T2DM patients.

  4. GSK-3beta inhibition enhances sorafenib-induced apoptosis in melanoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panka, David J; Cho, Daniel C; Atkins, Michael B; Mier, James W

    2008-01-11

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK-3beta) can participate in the induction of apoptosis or, alternatively, provide a survival signal that minimizes cellular injury. We previously demonstrated that the multikinase inhibitor sorafenib induces apoptosis in melanoma cell lines. In this report, we show that sorafenib activates GSK-3beta in multiple subcellular compartments and that this activation undermines the lethality of the drug. Pharmacologic inhibition and/or down-modulation of the kinase enhances sorafenib-induced apoptosis as determined by propidium iodide staining and by assessing the mitochondrial release of apoptosis-inducing factor and Smac/DIABLO. Conversely, the forced expression of a constitutively active form of the enzyme (GSK-3beta(S9A)) protects the cells from the apoptotic effects of the drug. This protective effect is associated with a marked increase in basal levels of Bcl-2, Bcl-x(L), and survivin and a diminution in the degree to which these anti-apoptotic proteins are down-modulated by sorafenib exposure. Sorafenib down-modulates the pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family member Noxa in cells with high constitutive GSK-3beta activity. Pharmacologic inhibition of GSK-3beta prevents the disappearance of Noxa induced by sorafenib and enhances the down-modulation of Mcl-1. Down-modulation of Noxa largely eliminates the enhancing effect of GSK-3 inhibition on sorafenib-induced apoptosis. These data provide a strong rationale for the use of GSK-3beta inhibitors as adjuncts to sorafenib treatment and suggest that preservation of Noxa may contribute to their efficacy.

  5. Liver X receptor activation inhibits PC-3 prostate cancer cells via the beta-catenin pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youlin, Kuang; Li, Zhang; Weiyang, He; Jian, Kang; Siming, Liang; Xin, Gou

    2017-03-01

    Liver X receptors (LXRs) are nuclear receptors family of ligand-dependent transcription factors that play a crucial role in regulating cholesterol metabolism and inflammation. Recent studies show that LXR agonists exhibit anti-cancer activities in a variety of cancer cell lines including prostate. To further identify the potential mechanisms of LXRα activation on prostate cancer, we investigated the effect of LXR agonist T0901317 on PC3 prostate cancer cell and in which activity of beta-catenin pathway involved. Prostate cancer PC3 cells were transfected with LXR-a siRNA and treated with LXR activator T0901317. qRT-PCR and western blot were used to detect the LXR-a expression. beta-catenin, cyclin D1 and c-MYC were analyzed by western blot. Cell apoptosis was examined by flow cytometry and Cell proliferation was assessed by Cell Counting Kit-8 assay. Cell migration was detected by Transwell chambers. Data showed that T0901317 significantly inhibited PC3 cell proliferation as well as invasion and increased apoptosis in vitro. Furthermore, we found that LXRα activation induced the reduction of beta-catenin expression in PC3 cells, and this inhibitory effect could be totally abolished when cells were treated with LXRα. Meanwhile, the expression of beta-catenin target gene cyclin D1 and c-MYC were also decreased. This study provided additional evidence that LXR activation inhibited PC-3 prostate cancer cells via suppressing beta-catenin pathway. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of ultrasound on Transforming Growth Factor-beta genes in bone cells

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    J Harle

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Therapeutic ultrasound (US is a widely used form of biophysical stimulation that is increasingly applied to promote fracture healing. Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta, which is encoded by three related but different genes, is known to play a major part in bone growth and repair. However, the effects of US on the expression of the TGF-beta genes and the physical acoustic mechanisms involved in initiating changes in gene expression in vitro, are not yet known. The present study demonstrates that US had a differential effect on these TGF-beta isoforms in a human osteoblast cell line, with the highest dose eliciting the most pronounced up-regulation of both TGF-beta1 and TGF-beta3 at 1 hour after treatment and thereafter declining. In contrast, US had no effect on TGF-beta2 expression. Fluid streaming rather than thermal effects or cavitation was found to be the most likely explanation for the gene responses observed in vitro.

  7. Rac1-NADPH oxidase signaling promotes CD36 activation under glucotoxic conditions in pancreatic beta cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elumalai, Suma; Karunakaran, Udayakumar; Lee, In Kyu; Moon, Jun Sung; Won, Kyu Chang

    2017-04-01

    We recently reported that cluster determinant 36 (CD36), a fatty acid transporter, plays a pivotal role in glucotoxicity-induced β-cell dysfunction. However, little is known about how glucotoxicity influences CD36 expression. Emerging evidence suggests that the small GTPase Rac1 is involved in the pathogenesis of beta cell dysfunction in type 2 diabetes (T2D). The primary objective of the current study was to determine the role of Rac1 in CD36 activation and its impact on β-cell dysfunction in diabetes mellitus. To address this question, we subjected INS-1 cells and human beta cells (1.1B4) to high glucose conditions (30mM) in the presence or absence of Rac1 inhibition either by NSC23766 (Rac1 GTPase inhibitor) or small interfering RNA. High glucose exposure in INS-1 and human beta cells (1.1b4) resulted in the activation of Rac1 and induced cell apoptosis. Rac1 activation mediates NADPH oxidase (NOX) activation leading to elevated ROS production in both cells. Activation of the Rac1-NOX complex by high glucose levels enhanced CD36 expression in INS-1 and human 1.1b4 beta cell membrane fractions. The inhibition of Rac1 by NSC23766 inhibited NADPH oxidase activity and ROS generation induced by high glucose concentrations in INS-1 & human 1.1b4 beta cells. Inhibition of Rac1-NOX complex activation by NSC23766 significantly reduced CD36 expression in INS-1 and human 1.1b4 beta cell membrane fractions. In addition, Rac1 inhibition by NSC23766 significantly reduced high glucose-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. Furthermore, NADPH oxidase inhibition by VAS2870 also attenuated high glucose-induced ROS generation and cell apoptosis. These results suggest that Rac1-NADPH oxidase dependent CD36 expression contributes to high glucose-induced beta cell dysfunction and cell death. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Canine tracheal epithelial cells are more sensitive than rat tracheal epithelial cells to transforming growth factor beta induced growth inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubbs, A.F.; Hahn, F.F.; Kelly, G.; Thomassen, D.G.

    1988-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) markedly inhibited growth of canine tracheal epithelial (CTE) cells. Reduced responsiveness to TGFβ-induced growth inhibition accompanied neoplastic progression of these cells from primary to transformed to neoplastic. This was similar to the relationship between neoplastic progression and increased resistance to TGFβ-induced growth inhibition seen for rat tracheal epithelial (RTE) cells. The canine cells were more sensitive than rat cells to TGFβ-induced growth inhibition at all stages in the neoplastic process. (author)

  9. Anti-Proliferative and Apoptotic Effects of Beta-Ionone in Human Leukemia Cell Line K562

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    Zohreh Faezizadeh

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Beta-ionone is an aroma compound found in the Rosaceae family. Some evidence supported that beta-ionone has a great potential for cancer prevention. To date, the anti-proliferative and apoptotic effects of beta-ionone in human leukemia cell line K562 were not studied. Objectives Hence, we investigated whether beta-ionone could inhibit cell growth and induce apoptosis in the K562 cells. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, human leukemia cell line K562 was cultured and anti-proliferation effect of beta-ionone with different doses (25 - 400 µm at different times (24 - 96 hours on treated cells was evaluated by the MTT assay. To determine apoptosis rate, the Hoechst 33342 staining and flow cytometry was performed. Results The MTT assay showed that beta-ionone inhibited proliferation of K562 cells in a dose-dependent manner significantly (P = 0.0008. Moreover, the increased apoptotic rate was found after incubation of K562 cells with 200 µm beta-ionone. The Hoechst staining and flow cytometry analysis indicated that beta-ionone could increase apoptosis of K562 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Conclusions The results demonstrated that beta-ionone has anti-proliferative and apoptotic effects on K562 cells, and in the future may be used in the treatment of some leukemia sub-types.

  10. Chronic antidiabetic sulfonylureas in vivo: reversible effects on mouse pancreatic beta-cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Sara Remedi

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic beta-cell ATP-sensitive potassium (K ATP channels are critical links between nutrient metabolism and insulin secretion. In humans, reduced or absent beta-cell K ATP channel activity resulting from loss-of-function K ATP mutations induces insulin hypersecretion. Mice with reduced K ATP channel activity also demonstrate hyperinsulinism, but mice with complete loss of K ATP channels (K ATP knockout mice show an unexpected insulin undersecretory phenotype. Therefore we have proposed an "inverse U" hypothesis to explain the response to enhanced excitability, in which excessive hyperexcitability drives beta-cells to insulin secretory failure without cell death. Many patients with type 2 diabetes treated with antidiabetic sulfonylureas (which inhibit K ATP activity and thereby enhance insulin secretion show long-term insulin secretory failure, which we further suggest might reflect a similar progression.To test the above hypotheses, and to mechanistically investigate the consequences of prolonged hyperexcitability in vivo, we used a novel approach of implanting mice with slow-release sulfonylurea (glibenclamide pellets, to chronically inhibit beta-cell K ATP channels. Glibenclamide-implanted wild-type mice became progressively and consistently diabetic, with significantly (p < 0.05 reduced insulin secretion in response to glucose. After 1 wk of treatment, these mice were as glucose intolerant as adult K ATP knockout mice, and reduction of secretory capacity in freshly isolated islets from implanted animals was as significant (p < 0.05 as those from K ATP knockout animals. However, secretory capacity was fully restored in islets from sulfonylurea-treated mice within hours of drug washout and in vivo within 1 mo after glibenclamide treatment was terminated. Pancreatic immunostaining showed normal islet size and alpha-/beta-cell distribution within the islet, and TUNEL staining showed no evidence of apoptosis.These results demonstrate that

  11. Feasibility of mesenchymal stem cell culture expansion for a phase I clinical trial in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planchon, Sarah M; Lingas, Karen T; Reese Koç, Jane; Hooper, Brittney M; Maitra, Basabi; Fox, Robert M; Imrey, Peter B; Drake, Kylie M; Aldred, Micheala A; Lazarus, Hillard M; Cohen, Jeffrey A

    2018-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is an inflammatory, neurodegenerative disease of the central nervous system for which therapeutic mesenchymal stem cell transplantation is under study. Published experience of culture-expanding multiple sclerosis patients' mesenchymal stem cells for clinical trials is limited. To determine the feasibility of culture-expanding multiple sclerosis patients' mesenchymal stem cells for clinical use. In a phase I trial, autologous, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells were isolated from 25 trial participants with multiple sclerosis and eight matched controls, and culture-expanded to a target single dose of 1-2 × 10 6 cells/kg. Viability, cell product identity and sterility were assessed prior to infusion. Cytogenetic stability was assessed by single nucleotide polymorphism analysis of mesenchymal stem cells from 18 multiple sclerosis patients and five controls. One patient failed screening. Mesenchymal stem cell culture expansion was successful for 24 of 25 multiple sclerosis patients and six of eight controls. The target dose was achieved in 16-62 days, requiring two to three cell passages. Growth rate and culture success did not correlate with demographic or multiple sclerosis disease characteristics. Cytogenetic studies identified changes on one chromosome of one control (4.3%) after extended time in culture. Culture expansion of mesenchymal stem cells from multiple sclerosis patients as donors is feasible. However, culture time should be minimized for cell products designated for therapeutic administration.

  12. TGF{beta} induces proHB-EGF shedding and EGFR transactivation through ADAM activation in gastric cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebi, Masahide [Department of Gastroenterology and Metabolism, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya (Japan); Kataoka, Hiromi, E-mail: hkataoka@med.nagoya-cu.ac.jp [Department of Gastroenterology and Metabolism, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya (Japan); Shimura, Takaya; Kubota, Eiji; Hirata, Yoshikazu; Mizushima, Takashi; Mizoshita, Tsutomu; Tanaka, Mamoru; Mabuchi, Motoshi; Tsukamoto, Hironobu; Tanida, Satoshi; Kamiya, Takeshi [Department of Gastroenterology and Metabolism, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya (Japan); Higashiyama, Shigeki [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics, Ehime University Graduate School of Medicine, Ehime (Japan); Joh, Takashi [Department of Gastroenterology and Metabolism, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya (Japan)

    2010-11-19

    Research highlights: {yields} TGF{beta} induces EGFR transactivation through proHB-EGF shedding by activated ADAM members in gastric cancer cells. {yields} TGF{beta} induces nuclear translocation of HB-EGF-CTF cleaved by ADAM members. {yields} TGF{beta} enhances cell growth by EGFR transactivation and HB-EGF-CTF nuclear translocation and ADAM inhibitors block these effects. {yields} Silencing of ADAM17 also blocks EGFR transactivation, HB-EGF-CTF nuclear translocation and cancer cell growth by TGF{beta}. {yields} ADAM17 may play a crucial role in this TGF{beta}-HB-EGF signal transduction. -- Abstract: Background and aims: Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF{beta}) is known to potently inhibit cell growth. Loss of responsiveness to TGF{beta} inhibition on cell growth is a hallmark of many types of cancer, yet its mechanism is not fully understood. Membrane-anchored heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (proHB-EGF) ectodomain is cleaved by a disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM) members and is implicated in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) transactivation. Recently, nuclear translocation of the C-terminal fragment (CTF) of pro-HB-EGF was found to induce cell growth. We investigated the association between TGF{beta} and HB-EGF signal transduction via ADAM activation. Materials and methods: The CCK-8 assay in two gastric cancer cell lines was used to determine the effect for cell growth by TGF{beta}. The effect of two ADAM inhibitors was also evaluated. Induction of EGFR phosphorylation by TGF{beta} was analyzed and the effect of the ADAM inhibitors was also examined. Nuclear translocation of HB-EGF-CTF by shedding through ADAM activated by TGF{beta} was also analyzed. EGFR transactivation, HB-EGF-CTF nuclear translocation, and cell growth were examined under the condition of ADAM17 knockdown. Result: TGF{beta}-induced EGFR phosphorylation of which ADAM inhibitors were able to inhibit. TGF{beta} induced shedding of proHB-EGF allowing HB-EGF-CTF to

  13. Nras Overexpression Results in Granulocytosis, T-Cell Expansion and Early Lethality in Mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Louise Berkhoudt; Gonzalez, Borja Ballarin; Schmitz, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    NRAS is a proto-oncogene involved in numerous myeloid malignancies. Here, we report on a mouse line bearing a single retroviral long terminal repeat inserted into Nras. This genetic modification resulted in an increased level of wild type Nras mRNA giving the possibility of studying the function ...... the increment in immature myeloid cells detected in these mice. The short latency period indicates that Nras overexpression alone is sufficient to cause dose-dependent granulocytosis and T-cell expansion....

  14. Initial slope of human tumor cell survival curves: its modification by the oxic cell sensitizer beta-arabinofuranosyladenine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chavaudra, N.; Halimi, M.; Parmentier, C.; Gaillard, N.; Grinfeld, S.; Malaise, E.P.

    1989-01-01

    The initial slope of the survival curve, which is a characteristic of each tumor cell line, varies with the histological group of the tumor. It is one of the factors on which clinical radioresponsiveness depends. The DNA dependant DNA polymerase inhibitor beta-ara A acts as an oxic cell sensitizer. This study was carried out on human tumor cell lines to look for a correlation between the degree of radiosensitization induced by beta-ara A and the radiosensitivity of a given cell line. Six human tumor cell lines with different radiosensitivities were used (the survival rate at 2 Gy and D ranged from 20 to 73% and from 1.2 to 3.2 Gy, respectively). beta-ara A had a major toxic effect on all cell lines but this varied greatly from one cell line to another and was concentration dependant; this toxic effect was taken into account when calculating the surviving fractions. For all cell lines, beta-ara A acted as an oxic radiosensitizer and the radiosensitization was concentration dependant. Analysis of the survival curves of the 6 cell lines using the linear quadratic model showed that concentrations of beta-ara A between 200 and 1000 microM induced an increase in the linear component while the quadratic component underwent no systematic change. The sensitizing enhancement ratio (SER) measured from the Ds ratios, varied greatly from one line to another. For example, at a concentration of 500 microM, the extreme values of Ds ratios were 1.5 and 2.6. The radiosensitization is greater, the higher the radiosensitivity of the cell line studied during exponential growth. The results do not favor the use of beta-ara A in the treatment of intrinsically radioresistant human tumors

  15. Initial slope of human tumor cell survival curves: its modification by the oxic cell sensitizer beta-arabinofuranosyladenine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavaudra, N.; Halimi, M.; Parmentier, C.; Gaillard, N.; Grinfeld, S.; Malaise, E.P.

    1989-05-01

    The initial slope of the survival curve, which is a characteristic of each tumor cell line, varies with the histological group of the tumor. It is one of the factors on which clinical radioresponsiveness depends. The DNA dependant DNA polymerase inhibitor beta-ara A acts as an oxic cell sensitizer. This study was carried out on human tumor cell lines to look for a correlation between the degree of radiosensitization induced by beta-ara A and the radiosensitivity of a given cell line. Six human tumor cell lines with different radiosensitivities were used (the survival rate at 2 Gy and D ranged from 20 to 73% and from 1.2 to 3.2 Gy, respectively). beta-ara A had a major toxic effect on all cell lines but this varied greatly from one cell line to another and was concentration dependant; this toxic effect was taken into account when calculating the surviving fractions. For all cell lines, beta-ara A acted as an oxic radiosensitizer and the radiosensitization was concentration dependant. Analysis of the survival curves of the 6 cell lines using the linear quadratic model showed that concentrations of beta-ara A between 200 and 1000 microM induced an increase in the linear component while the quadratic component underwent no systematic change. The sensitizing enhancement ratio (SER) measured from the Ds ratios, varied greatly from one line to another. For example, at a concentration of 500 microM, the extreme values of Ds ratios were 1.5 and 2.6. The radiosensitization is greater, the higher the radiosensitivity of the cell line studied during exponential growth. The results do not favor the use of beta-ara A in the treatment of intrinsically radioresistant human tumors.

  16. Calculation of absorbed dose of anchorage-dependent cells from internal beta-rays irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jianwei; Huang Gang; Li Shijun

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To elicit the formula of internal dosimetry in anchorage-dependent cells by beta-emitting radionuclides from uniformly distributed volume sources. Methods: By means of the definition of absorbed dose and the MIRD (Medical International Radiation Dose) scheme the formula of internal dosimetry was reasonably deduced. Firstly, studying the systems of suspension culture cells. Then, taking account of the speciality of the systems of the anchorage-dependent cells and the directions of irradiation, the absorbed dose of anchorage -dependent cells was calculated by the accumulated radioactivity, beta-ray energy, and the volume of the cultured systems. Results: The formula of internal dosimetry of suspension culture cells and anchorage-dependent cells were achieved. At the same time, the formula of internal dosimetry of suspension culture cells was compared with that of MIRD and was confirmed accurate. Conclusion: The formula of internal dosimetry is concise, reliable and accurate

  17. Characterization of beta-adrenergic receptors through the replicative life span of IMR-90 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarpace, P.J.

    1987-01-01

    Beta-adrenergic receptor number and receptor affinity for isoproterenol were assessed at various in vitro ages of the human diploid fibroblast cell line IMR-90. From population doubling level (PDL) 33 to 44, there was a positive correlation between beta-adrenergic receptor density and PDL. Beta-adrenergic receptors, assessed by Scatchard analysis of [ 125 I]-iodocyanopindolol (ICYP) binding, increased from 15 fmol/mg protein at PDL 33 to 36 fmol/mg protein at PDL 44. In contrast, from PDL 44 to 59, there was a negative correlation between beta-adrenergic receptor density and PDL. Receptor density declined to 12 fmol/mg protein at PDL 59. When the density of beta-adrenergic receptors was expressed as receptor per cell, the findings were similar. Receptor agonist affinity for isoproterenol was determined from Hill plots of [ 125 I]-ICYP competition with isoproterenol. There was no change in the dissociation constant for isoproterenol with in vitro age. In humans, serum norepinephrine concentrations increase with age. This increase in serum norepinephrine may be partially responsible for the decreased beta-adrenergic receptor-agonist affinity observed with age in human lymphocytes and rat heart and lung. The present findings are consistent with the hypothesis that the decreases in receptor agonist affinity in rat and man with age are secondary to increases in catecholamine concentrations

  18. Impact of fetal and neonatal environment on beta cell function and development of diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens H; Haase, Tobias N; Jaksch, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    on the beta cells in both the mother and the fetus and how various conditions like diabetes, obesity, overnutrition and undernutrition during and after pregnancy may influence the ability of the offspring to adapt to changes in insulin demand later in life. The influence of environmental factors including...... that the intrauterine environment during pregnancy has an impact on the gene expression that may persist until adulthood and cause metabolic diseases like obesity and type 2 diabetes. As the pancreatic beta cells are crucial in the regulation of metabolism this article will describe the influence of normal pregnancy...... nutrients and gut microbiota on appetite regulation, mitochondrial activity and the immune system that may affect beta cell growth and function directly and indirectly is discussed. The possible role of epigenetic changes in the transgenerational transmission of the adverse programming may be the most...

  19. Efficient expansion of mesenchymal stromal cells in a disposable fixed bed culture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizukami, Amanda; Orellana, Maristela D; Caruso, Sâmia R; de Lima Prata, Karen; Covas, Dimas T; Swiech, Kamilla

    2013-01-01

    The need for efficient and reliable technologies for clinical-scale expansion of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) has led to the use of disposable bioreactors and culture systems. Here, we evaluate the expansion of cord blood-derived MSC in a disposable fixed bed culture system. Starting from an initial cell density of 6.0 × 10(7) cells, after 7 days of culture, it was possible to produce of 4.2(±0.8) × 10(8) cells, which represents a fold increase of 7.0 (±1.4). After enzymatic retrieval from Fibra-Cell disks, the cells were able to maintain their potential for differentiation into adipocytes and osteocytes and were positive for many markers common to MSC (CD73, CD90, and CD105). The results obtained in this study demonstrate that MSC can be efficiently expanded in the culture system. This novel approach presents several advantages over the current expansion systems, based on culture flasks or microcarrier-based spinner flasks and represents a key element for MSC cellular therapy according to GMP compliant clinical-scale production system. Copyright © 2013 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  20. Progenitor cells in liver regeneration: molecular responses controlling their activation and expansion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santoni-Rugiu, Eric; Jelnes, Peter; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S

    2005-01-01

    created in the liver by a certain insult. This review will focus on molecular responses controlling activation and expansion of the hepatic progenitor cell niche, emphasizing similarities and differences in the microenvironments orchestrating regeneration by recruitment of progenitor cell populations...... cells, and recruited inflammatory cells as well as the variety of growth-modulating molecules produced and/or harboured by these elements. The cellular and molecular responses to different regenerative stimuli seem to depend on the injury inflicted and consequently on the molecular microenvironment...

  1. Determination of Insulin Resistance and Beta Cell Function in Healthy Obese and Non-obese Individuals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazmi, A.; Sattar, A.; Tariq, K. M.; Najamussahar; Hashim, R.; Almani, M. I.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine insulin resistance and beta cell function in healthy obese and nonobese individuals of the local population. Study Design: Case control study. Place and Duration of Study: AFIP Rawalpindi in collaboration with department of medicine military hospital(MH) Rawalpindi, from Aug 2008 to Mar 2009. Methods: Eighty obese(n=40) and non-obese(n=40) subjects were selected by non-probability convenience sampling. Plasma insulin, glucose, and serum total cholestrol were estimated in fasting state. Insulin resistance was calculated by HOMA-IR and beta cell function by HOMA- equation. Results: Significant differences were observed between obese and non-obese individuals regarding insulin resistance, beta cell function, and BMI and serum total cholesterol. Mean insulin resistance in obese group was found to be 11.1 +- 5.1(range 7.0-16.2) and in non-obese group it was 0.9+-0.4 (range 0.5-1.3). This difference was highly significant (p=0.001). There was a highly significant difference between the two groups in term of beta cell function with mean rank 60.1 for obese group and 20.9 non obese groups (Asym sig. 2 tailed 0.000). Also the correlation (r = 0.064) between insulin resistance and beta cell function in obese group is highly significant (p = 0.000). Mean serum leptin levels were lower (6.3 ng/ml) in non-obese, and high (57.2 ng/ml) in the obese group. Conclusions: Insulin resistance is found higher in obese individuals. Beta cell function is significantly different between obese and non-obese groups. (author)

  2. EDAG promotes the expansion and survival of human CD34+ cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Zhao

    Full Text Available EDAG is multifunctional transcriptional regulator primarily expressed in the linloc-kit+Sca-1+ hematopoietic stem cells (HSC and CD34+ progenitor cells. Previous studies indicate that EDAG is required for maintaining hematopoietic lineage commitment balance. Here using ex vivo culture and HSC transplantation models, we report that EDAG enhances the proliferative potential of human cord blood CD34+ cells, increases survival, prevents cell apoptosis and promotes their repopulating capacity. Moreover, EDAG overexpression induces rapid entry of CD34+ cells into the cell cycle. Gene expression profile analysis indicate that EDAG knockdown leads to down-regulation of various positive cell cycle regulators including cyclin A, B, D, and E. Together these data provides novel insights into EDAG in regulation of expansion and survival of human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells.

  3. Cytomegalovirus-Driven Adaptive-Like Natural Killer Cell Expansions Are Unaffected by Concurrent Chronic Hepatitis Virus Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David F. G. Malone

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Adaptive-like expansions of natural killer (NK cell subsets are known to occur in response to human cytomegalovirus (CMV infection. These expansions are typically made up of NKG2C+ NK cells with particular killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR expression patterns. Such NK cell expansion patterns are also seen in patients with viral hepatitis infection. Yet, it is not known if the viral hepatitis infection promotes the appearance of such expansions or if effects are solely attributed to underlying CMV infection. In sizeable cohorts of CMV seropositive hepatitis B virus (HBV, hepatitis C virus (HCV, and hepatitis delta virus (HDV infected patients, we analyzed NK cells for expression of NKG2A, NKG2C, CD57, and inhibitory KIRs to assess the appearance of NK cell expansions characteristic of what has been seen in CMV seropositive healthy individuals. Adaptive-like NK cell expansions observed in viral hepatitis patients were strongly associated with CMV seropositivity. The number of subjects with these expansions did not differ between CMV seropositive viral hepatitis patients and corresponding healthy controls. Hence, we conclude that adaptive-like NK cell expansions observed in HBV, HCV, and/or HDV infected individuals are not caused by the chronic hepatitis infections per se, but rather are a consequence of underlying CMV infection.

  4. [Expansion of secretory cells in the fallopian tubal epithelium in the early stages of the pathogenesis of ovarian serous carcinomas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asaturova, A V; Ezhova, L S; Faizullina, N M; Adamyan, L V; Khabas, G N; Sannikova, M V

    to investigate the frequency of the types of fallopian tubal secretory cell expansion (SCE) in diseases of the reproductive organs and to determine the immunophenotype and biological role of the cells in the early stages of the pathogenesis of high-grade ovarian serous carcinomas (HGOSC). The investigation enrolled 287 patients with extraovarian diseases and ovarian serous tumors varying in grade, whose fallopian tubes were morphologically and immunohistochemically examined using p53, Ki-67, PAX2, Bcl-2, beta-catenin, and ALDH1 markers. The material was statistically processed applying the Mann-Whitney test and χ2 test. The rate of secretory cell proliferation (SCP) (more than 10 consecutive secretory cells) and that of secretory cell overgrowth (SCO) (more than 30 consecutive secretory cells) increase with age in all investigated reproductive system diseases. The rate of SCP in the corpus fimbriatum of the patients with HGOSC was 5.9 times higher than that in those with extraovarian disease (pepithelium (2.8), in SCP (1.3), in SCO (1.2), in serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma (STIC) (1.0), and in HGOSC (0.9); Bcl-2 was in the intact epithelium (2.2), in SCP (2.1), STIC (0.9), and in HGOSC (0.6), β-catenin was in the intact epithelium (0.5), in SCP (2.85), in SCO (2.95), in STIC (0.6), and in HGOSC (0.5); ALDH1 was in the intact epithelium (0.5), in SCP (2.91), in SCO (2.92), in STIC (1.2), and in HGOSC (0.6). There were statistically significant differences with a 95% confidence interval (pepithelium and pathology (fallopian tube lesions and HGOSC); 2) Bcl-2 between the intact epithelium and SCE (SCP and SCO) and between SCE and HGOSC; 3) beta-catenin between the intact epithelium and SCE (SCP and SCO) and between SCE and HGOSC; 4) ALDH1 between the intact epithelium and SCE, between and SCE and STIC, and between STIC and HGOSC. SCE was shown to be an independent intraepithelial lesion. The incidence of this abnormality increased with age and significantly

  5. An Abbreviated Protocol for In Vitro Generation of Functional Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Beta-Like Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Massumi, Mohammad; Pourasgari, Farzaneh; Nalla, Amarnadh

    2016-01-01

    developed an abbreviated five-stage protocol (25-30 days) to generate human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Beta-like Cells (ES-DBCs). We showed that Geltrex, as an extracellular matrix, could support the generation of ES-DBCs more efficiently than that of the previously described culture systems......The ability to yield glucose-responsive pancreatic beta-cells from human pluripotent stem cells in vitro will facilitate the development of the cell replacement therapies for the treatment of Type 1 Diabetes. Here, through the sequential in vitro targeting of selected signaling pathways, we have...... positive cells, 1% insulin and glucagon positive cells and 30% insulin and NKX6.1 co-expressing cells. Functionally, ES-DBCs were responsive to high glucose in static incubation and perifusion studies, and could secrete insulin in response to successive glucose stimulations. Mitochondrial metabolic flux...

  6. With respect to coefficient of linear thermal expansion, bacterial vegetative cells and spores resemble plastics and metals, respectively.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Koichi; Kogure, Akinori; Fujii, Takenao; Kokawa, Ryohei; Deuchi, Keiji; Kuwana, Ritsuko; Takamatsu, Hiromu

    2013-10-09

    If a fixed stress is applied to the three-dimensional z-axis of a solid material, followed by heating, the amount of thermal expansion increases according to a fixed coefficient of thermal expansion. When expansion is plotted against temperature, the transition temperature at which the physical properties of the material change is at the apex of the curve. The composition of a microbial cell depends on the species and condition of the cell; consequently, the rate of thermal expansion and the transition temperature also depend on the species and condition of the cell. We have developed a method for measuring the coefficient of thermal expansion and the transition temperature of cells using a nano thermal analysis system in order to study the physical nature of the cells. The tendency was seen that among vegetative cells, the Gram-negative Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa have higher coefficients of linear expansion and lower transition temperatures than the Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis. On the other hand, spores, which have low water content, overall showed lower coefficients of linear expansion and higher transition temperatures than vegetative cells. Comparing these trends to non-microbial materials, vegetative cells showed phenomenon similar to plastics and spores showed behaviour similar to metals with regards to the coefficient of liner thermal expansion. We show that vegetative cells occur phenomenon of similar to plastics and spores to metals with regard to the coefficient of liner thermal expansion. Cells may be characterized by the coefficient of linear expansion as a physical index; the coefficient of linear expansion may also characterize cells structurally since it relates to volumetric changes, surface area changes, the degree of expansion of water contained within the cell, and the intensity of the internal stress on the cellular membrane. The coefficient of linear expansion holds promise as a new index for

  7. Successful application of preimplantation genetic diagnosis for beta-thalassaemia and sickle cell anaemia in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamayou, S; Alecci, C; Ragolia, C; Giambona, A; Siciliano, S; Maggio, A; Fichera, M; Guglielmino, A

    2002-05-01

    In Italy, the autosomal recessive diseases beta-thalassaemia and sickle cell anaemia are so widespread that in some regions they can be defined as 'social diseases'. In this study, nine clinical applications of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) were performed for beta-thalassaemia and sickle cell anaemia on seven Sicilian couples and carriers of beta-globin gene mutations. The studied mutations were: Cd39, HbS, IVS1 nt1, IVS1 nt6 and IVS1 nt110. ICSI was performed with partner's sperm on 131 out of 147 retrieved oocytes, and this resulted in 72 zygotes; 32 embryos were successfully biopsied on day 3. The biopsied blastomeres were lysed and the beta-globin alleles amplified by nested PCR. The mutation diagnosis was performed by restriction enzyme digestion and reverse dot-blot. The amplification efficacy was 97.2%. The genotype study of non-transferred and surplus embryos showed that the allele drop-out rate was 8.6%. Seventeen embryos were transferred in utero on day 4. All couples received an embryo transfer; of the four pregnancies obtained, three resulted in live births and one miscarried at 11 weeks. Prenatal diagnosis at the 11th week and miscarriage material analysis confirmed the PGD results. These studies represent the first successful application of PGD for beta-thalassaemia and sickle cell anaemia in Italy.

  8. Dynamics of gas cell coalescence during baking expansion of leavened dough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miś, Antoni; Nawrocka, Agnieszka; Lamorski, Krzysztof; Dziki, Dariusz

    2018-01-01

    The investigation of the dynamics of gas cell coalescence, i.e. a phenomenon that deteriorates the homogeneity of the cellular structure of bread crumb, was carried out performing simultaneously measurements of the dough volume, pressure, and viscosity. It was demonstrated that, during the baking expansion of chemically leavened wheat flour dough, the maximum growth rate of the gas cell radius determined from the ratio of pressure exerted by the expanded dough to its viscosity was on average four-fold lower than that calculated from volume changes in the gas phase of the dough. Such a high discrepancy was interpreted as a result of the course of coalescence, and a formula for determination of its rate was developed. The coalescence rate in the initial baking expansion phase had negative values, indicating nucleation of newly formed gas cells, which increased the number of gas cells even by 8%. In the next baking expansion phase, the coalescence rate started to exhibit positive values, reflecting dominance of the coalescence phenomenon over nucleation. The maximum coalescence rates indicate that, during the period of the most intensive dough expansion, the number of gas cells decreased by 2-3% within one second. At the end of the formation of bread crumb, the number of the gas cells declined by 55-67% in comparison with the initial value. The correctness of the results was positively verified using X-ray micro-computed tomography. The developed method can be a useful tool for more profound exploration of the coalescence phenomenon at various stages of evolution of the cellular structure and its determinants, which may contribute to future development of more effective methods for improving the texture and sensory quality of bread crumb. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A chemically defined substrate for the expansion and neuronal differentiation of human pluripotent stem cell-derived neural progenitor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yihuan Tsai

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Due to the limitation of current pharmacological therapeutic strategies, stem cell therapies have emerged as a viable option for treating many incurable neurological disorders. Specifically, human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC-derived neural progenitor cells (hNPCs, a multipotent cell population that is capable of near indefinite expansion and subsequent differentiation into the various cell types that comprise the central nervous system (CNS, could provide an unlimited source of cells for such cell-based therapies. However the clinical application of these cells will require (i defined, xeno-free conditions for their expansion and neuronal differentiation and (ii scalable culture systems that enable their expansion and neuronal differentiation in numbers sufficient for regenerative medicine and drug screening purposes. Current extracellular matrix protein (ECMP-based substrates for the culture of hNPCs are expensive, difficult to isolate, subject to batch-to-batch variations, and, therefore, unsuitable for clinical application of hNPCs. Using a high-throughput array-based screening approach, we identified a synthetic polymer, poly(4-vinyl phenol (P4VP, that supported the long-term proliferation and self-renewal of hNPCs. The hNPCs cultured on P4VP maintained their characteristic morphology, expressed high levels of markers of multipotency, and retained their ability to differentiate into neurons. Such chemically defined substrates will eliminate critical roadblocks for the utilization of hNPCs for human neural regenerative repair, disease modeling, and drug discovery.

  10. Endothelial Cells Promote Expansion of Long-Term Engrafting Marrow Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells in Primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gori, Jennifer L; Butler, Jason M; Kunar, Balvir; Poulos, Michael G; Ginsberg, Michael; Nolan, Daniel J; Norgaard, Zachary K; Adair, Jennifer E; Rafii, Shahin; Kiem, Hans-Peter

    2017-03-01

    Successful expansion of bone marrow (BM) hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) would benefit many HSPC transplantation and gene therapy/editing applications. However, current expansion technologies have been limited by a loss of multipotency and self-renewal properties ex vivo. We hypothesized that an ex vivo vascular niche would provide prohematopoietic signals to expand HSPCs while maintaining multipotency and self-renewal. To test this hypothesis, BM autologous CD34 + cells were expanded in endothelial cell (EC) coculture and transplanted in nonhuman primates. CD34 + C38 - HSPCs cocultured with ECs expanded up to 17-fold, with a significant increase in hematopoietic colony-forming activity compared with cells cultured with cytokines alone (colony-forming unit-granulocyte-erythroid-macrophage-monocyte; p < .005). BM CD34 + cells that were transduced with green fluorescent protein lentivirus vector and expanded on ECs engrafted long term with multilineage polyclonal reconstitution. Gene marking was observed in granulocytes, lymphocytes, platelets, and erythrocytes. Whole transcriptome analysis indicated that EC coculture altered the expression profile of 75 genes in the BM CD34 + cells without impeding the long-term engraftment potential. These findings show that an ex vivo vascular niche is an effective platform for expansion of adult BM HSPCs. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:864-876. © 2016 The Authors Stem Cells Translational Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AlphaMed Press.

  11. The Tec kinase ITK regulates thymic expansion, emigration, and maturation of γδ NKT cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Catherine C; Cho, Ok Hyun; Sylvia, Katelyn E; Narayan, Kavitha; Prince, Amanda L; Evans, John W; Kang, Joonsoo; Berg, Leslie J

    2013-03-15

    The Tec family tyrosine kinase, Itk, regulates signaling downstream of the TCR. The absence of Itk in CD4(+) T cells results in impaired Th2 responses along with defects in maturation, cytokine production, and survival of iNKT cells. Paradoxically, Itk(-/-) mice have spontaneously elevated serum IgE levels, resulting from an expansion of the Vγ1.1(+)Vδ6.3(+) subset of γδ T cells, known as γδ NKT cells. Comparisons between γδ NKT cells and αβ iNKT cells showed convergence in the pattern of cell surface marker expression, cytokine profiles, and gene expression, suggesting that these two subsets of NKT cells undergo similar differentiation programs. Hepatic γδ NKT cells have an invariant TCR and are derived predominantly from fetal progenitors that expand in the thymus during the first weeks of life. The adult thymus contains these invariant γδ NKT cells plus a heterogeneous population of Vγ1.1(+)Vδ6.3(+) T cells with diverse CDR3 sequences. This latter population, normally excluded from the liver, escapes the thymus and homes to the liver when Itk is absent. In addition, Itk(-/-) γδ NKT cells persistently express high levels of Zbtb16 (PLZF) and Il4, genes that are normally downregulated in the most mature subsets of NKT cells. These data indicate that Itk signaling is required to prevent the expansion of γδ NKT cells in the adult thymus, to block their emigration, and to promote terminal NKT cell maturation.

  12. Rapid expansion of T cells: Effects of culture and cryopreservation and importance of short-term cell recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Arian; Ullenhag, Gustav; Wagenius, Gunnar; Tötterman, Thomas H; Eriksson, Fredrik

    2013-06-01

    Successful cell therapy relies on the identification and mass expansion of functional cells for infusion. Cryopreservation of cells is an inevitable step in most cell therapies which also entails consequences for the frozen cells. This study assessed the impact of cryopreservation and the widely used protocol for rapid expansion of T lymphocytes. The effects on cell viability, immunocompetence and the impact on apoptotic and immunosuppressive marker expression were analyzed using validated assays. Cryopreservation of lymphocytes during the rapid expansion protocol did not affect cell viability. Lymphocytes that underwent mass expansion or culture in high dose IL-2 were unable to respond to PHA stimulation by intracellular ATP production immediately after thawing (ATP = 16 ± 11 ng/ml). However, their reactivity to PHA was regained within 48 hours of recovery (ATP = 356 ± 61 ng/ml). Analysis of mRNA levels revealed downregulation of TGF-β and IL-10 at all time points. Culture in high dose IL-2 led to upregulation of p73 and BCL-2 mRNA levels while FoxP3 expression was elevated after culture in IL-2 and artificial TCR stimuli. FoxP3 levels decreased after short-term recovery without IL-2 or stimulation. Antigen specificity, as determined by IFNγ secretion, was unaffected by cryopreservation but was completely lost after addition of high dose IL-2 and artificial TCR stimuli. In conclusion, allowing short-time recovery of mass expanded and cryopreserved cells before reinfusion could enhance the outcome of adoptive cell therapy as the cells regain immune competence and specificity.

  13. Culture expansion of adipose derived stromal cells. A closed automated Quantum Cell Expansion System compared with manual flask-based culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haack-Sørensen, Mandana; Follin, Bjarke; Juhl, Morten

    2016-01-01

    ) over two passages in the automated and functionally closed Quantum Cell Expansion System (Quantum system) is compared with traditional manual cultivation. Methods: Stromal vascular fraction was isolated from abdominal fat, suspended in α-MEM supplemented with 10% Fetal Bovine Serum and seeded...... into either T75 flasks or a Quantum system that had been coated with cryoprecipitate. The cultivation of ASCs from SVF was performed in 3 ways: flask to flask; flask to Quantum system; and Quantum system to Quantum system. In all cases, quality controls were conducted for sterility, mycoplasmas......, and endotoxins, in addition to the assessment of cell counts, viability, immunophenotype, and differentiation potential. Results: The viability of ASCs passage 0 (P0) and P1 was above 96%, regardless of cultivation in flasks or Quantum system. Expression of surface markers and differentiation potential...

  14. Applied Developmental Biology: Making Human Pancreatic Beta Cells for Diabetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melton, Douglas A

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the genes and signaling pathways that determine the differentiation and fate of a cell is a central goal of developmental biology. Using that information to gain mastery over the fates of cells presents new approaches to cell transplantation and drug discovery for human diseases including diabetes. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Good manufacturing practice-compliant expansion of marrow-derived stem and progenitor cells for cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastens, Martin H; Goltry, Kristin; Prohaska, Wolfgang; Tschöpe, Diethelm; Stratmann, Bernd; Lammers, Dirk; Kirana, Stanley; Götting, Christian; Kleesiek, Knut

    2007-01-01

    Ex vivo expansion is being used to increase the number of stem and progenitor cells for autologous cell therapy. Initiation of pivotal clinical trials testing the efficacy of these cells for tissue repair has been hampered by the challenge of assuring safe and high-quality cell production. A strategy is described here for clinical-scale expansion of bone marrow (BM)-derived stem cells within a mixed cell population in a completely closed process from cell collection through postculture processing using sterile connectable devices. Human BM mononuclear cells (BMMNC) were isolated, cultured for 12 days, and washed postharvest using either standard open procedures in laminar flow hoods or using automated closed systems. Conditions for these studies were similar to long-term BM cultures in which hematopoietic and stromal components are cultured together. Expansion of marrow-derived stem and progenitor cells was then assessed. Cell yield, number of colony forming units (CFU), phenotype, stability, and multilineage differentiation capacity were compared from the single pass perfusion bioreactor and standard flask cultures. Purification of BMMNC using a closed Ficoll gradient process led to depletion of 98% erythrocytes and 87% granulocytes, compared to 100% and 70%, respectively, for manual processing. After closed system culture, mesenchymal progenitors, measured as CD105+CD166+CD14-CD45- and fibroblastic CFU, expanded 317- and 364-fold, respectively, while CD34+ hematopoietic progenitors were depleted 10-fold compared to starting BMMNC. Cultured cells exhibited multilineage differentiation by displaying adipogenic, osteogenic, and endothelial characteristics in vitro. No significant difference was observed between manual and bioreactor cultures. Automated culture and washing of the cell product resulted in 181 x 10(6) total cells that were viable and contained fibroblastic CFU for at least 24 h of storage. A combination of closed, automated technologies enabled

  16. Dual role of proapoptotic BAD in insulin secretion and beta cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danial, Nika N; Walensky, Loren D; Zhang, Chen-Yu; Choi, Cheol Soo; Fisher, Jill K; Molina, Anthony J A; Datta, Sandeep Robert; Pitter, Kenneth L; Bird, Gregory H; Wikstrom, Jakob D; Deeney, Jude T; Robertson, Kirsten; Morash, Joel; Kulkarni, Ameya; Neschen, Susanne; Kim, Sheene; Greenberg, Michael E; Corkey, Barbara E; Shirihai, Orian S; Shulman, Gerald I; Lowell, Bradford B; Korsmeyer, Stanley J

    2008-02-01

    The proapoptotic BCL-2 family member BAD resides in a glucokinase-containing complex that regulates glucose-driven mitochondrial respiration. Here, we present genetic evidence of a physiologic role for BAD in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion by beta cells. This novel function of BAD is specifically dependent upon the phosphorylation of its BH3 sequence, previously defined as an essential death domain. We highlight the pharmacologic relevance of phosphorylated BAD BH3 by using cell-permeable, hydrocarbon-stapled BAD BH3 helices that target glucokinase, restore glucose-driven mitochondrial respiration and correct the insulin secretory response in Bad-deficient islets. Our studies uncover an alternative target and function for the BAD BH3 domain and emphasize the therapeutic potential of phosphorylated BAD BH3 mimetics in selectively restoring beta cell function. Furthermore, we show that BAD regulates the physiologic adaptation of beta cell mass during high-fat feeding. Our findings provide genetic proof of the bifunctional activities of BAD in both beta cell survival and insulin secretion.

  17. Oxidative Metabolism Genes Are Not Responsive to Oxidative Stress in Rodent Beta Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faer Morrison

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Altered expression of oxidative metabolism genes has been described in the skeletal muscle of individuals with type 2 diabetes. Pancreatic beta cells contain low levels of antioxidant enzymes and are particularly susceptible to oxidative stress. In this study, we explored the effect of hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress on a panel of oxidative metabolism genes in a rodent beta cell line. We exposed INS-1 rodent beta cells to low (5.6 mmol/L, ambient (11 mmol/L, and high (28 mmol/L glucose conditions for 48 hours. Increases in oxidative stress were measured using the fluorescent probe dihydrorhodamine 123. We then measured the expression levels of a panel of 90 oxidative metabolism genes by real-time PCR. Elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS production was evident in INS-1 cells after 48 hours (P<0.05. TLDA analysis revealed a significant (P<0.05 upregulation of 16 of the 90 genes under hyperglycemic conditions, although these expression differences did not reflect differences in ROS. We conclude that although altered glycemia may influence the expression of some oxidative metabolism genes, this effect is probably not mediated by increased ROS production. The alterations to the expression of oxidative metabolism genes previously observed in human diabetic skeletal muscle do not appear to be mirrored in rodent pancreatic beta cells.

  18. Use of antibodies against the variable regions of the T-cell receptor alpha/beta heterodimer for the study of cutaneous T-cell lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralfkiaer, E; Wollf-Sneedorff, A; Vejlsgaard, G L

    1991-11-01

    Recent studies have suggested that antibodies against the variable (V) regions of the T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) may be used as markers for clonality and malignancy in T-cell infiltrates. We have investigated this by examining biopsy samples from 45 patients with cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCL) for reactivity with seven antibodies against different V-gene families on the TCR alpha/beta heterodimer, i.e. ICI (V beta 5a), W112 (V beta 5b), OT145 (V beta 6a), 16G8 (V beta 8a), S511 (V beta 12a), F1 (V alpha 2a) and LC4 (alpha beta Va). Serial biopsies were available in 13 patients and a total of 62 samples were studied. The neoplastic cells in five cases were positive for either V beta 5 (one case), V beta 6 (one case), V beta 8 (two cases) or V beta 12 (one case). In the remaining 40 cases, no staining was seen of the neoplastic cells. These findings indicate that while antibodies against the TCR V-regions may be used as clonotypic markers for certain T-cell neoplasms, there is as yet not a sufficient number of anti-TCR V-region antibodies available for the routine diagnosis of these conditions.

  19. ERK Regulates Renal Cell Proliferation and Renal Cyst Expansion in inv Mutant Mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okumura, Yasuko; Sugiyama, Noriyuki; Tanimura, Susumu; Nishida, Masashi; Hamaoka, Kenji; Kohno, Michiaki; Yokoyama, Takahiko

    2009-01-01

    Nephronophthisis (NPHP) is the most frequent genetic cause of end-stage kidney disease in children and young adults. Inv mice are a model for human nephronophthisis type 2 (NPHP2) and characterized by multiple renal cysts and situs inversus. Renal epithelial cells in inv cystic kidneys show increased cell proliferation. We studied the ERK pathway to understand the mechanisms that induce cell proliferation and renal cyst progression in inv kidneys. We studied the effects of ERK suppression by administering PD184352, an oral mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) inhibitor on renal cyst expansion, extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) activity, bromo-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation and expression of cell-cycle regulators in invΔC kidneys. Phosphorylated ERK (p-ERK) level increased along with renal cyst enlargement. Cell-cycle regulators showed a high level of expression in invΔC kidneys. PD184352 successfully decreased p-ERK level and inhibited renal cyst enlargement. The inhibitor also decreased expression of cell-cycle regulators and BrdU incorporation in renal epithelial cells. The present results showed that ERK regulated renal cell proliferation and cyst expansion in inv mutants

  20. Beta cell 5'-shifted isomiRs are candidate regulatory hubs in type 2 diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanette Baran-Gale

    Full Text Available Next-generation deep sequencing of small RNAs has unveiled the complexity of the microRNA (miRNA transcriptome, which is in large part due to the diversity of miRNA sequence variants ("isomiRs". Changes to a miRNA's seed sequence (nucleotides 2-8, including shifted start positions, can redirect targeting to a dramatically different set of RNAs and alter biological function. We performed deep sequencing of small RNA from mouse insulinoma (MIN6 cells (widely used as a surrogate for the study of pancreatic beta cells and developed a bioinformatic analysis pipeline to profile isomiR diversity. Additionally, we applied the pipeline to recently published small RNA-seq data from primary human beta cells and whole islets and compared the miRNA profiles with that of MIN6. We found that: (1 the miRNA expression profile in MIN6 cells is highly correlated with those of primary human beta cells and whole islets; (2 miRNA loci can generate multiple highly expressed isomiRs with different 5'-start positions (5'-isomiRs; (3 isomiRs with shifted start positions (5'-shifted isomiRs are highly expressed, and can be as abundant as their unshifted counterparts (5'-reference miRNAs. Finally, we identified 10 beta cell miRNA families as candidate regulatory hubs in a type 2 diabetes (T2D gene network. The most significant candidate hub was miR-29, which we demonstrated regulates the mRNA levels of several genes critical to beta cell function and implicated in T2D. Three of the candidate miRNA hubs were novel 5'-shifted isomiRs: miR-375+1, miR-375-1 and miR-183-5p+1. We showed by in silico target prediction and in vitro transfection studies that both miR-375+1 and miR-375-1 are likely to target an overlapping, but distinct suite of beta cell genes compared to canonical miR-375. In summary, this study characterizes the isomiR profile in beta cells for the first time, and also highlights the potential functional relevance of 5'-shifted isomiRs to T2D.

  1. Hypoglycemic and beta cell protective effects of andrographolide analogue for diabetes treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larrick James W

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While all anti-diabetic agents can decrease blood glucose level directly or indirectly, few are able to protect and preserve both pancreatic beta cell mass and their insulin-secreting functions. Thus, there is an urgent need to find an agent or combination of agents that can lower blood glucose and preserve pancreatic beta cells at the same time. Herein, we report a dual-functional andrographolide-lipoic acid conjugate (AL-1. The anti-diabetic and beta cell protective activities of this novel andrographolide-lipoic acid conjugate were investigated. Methods In alloxan-treated mice (a model of type 1 diabetes, drugs were administered orally once daily for 6 days post-alloxan treatment. Fasting blood glucose and serum insulin were determined. Pathologic and immunohistochemical analysis of pancreatic islets were performed. Translocation of glucose transporter subtype 4 in soleus muscle was detected by western blot. In RIN-m cells in vitro, the effect of AL-1 on H2O2-induced damage and reactive oxidative species production stimulated by high glucose and glibenclamide were measured. Inhibition of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB activation induced by IL-1β and IFN-γ was investigated. Results In alloxan-induced diabetic mouse model, AL-1 lowered blood glucose, increased insulin and prevented loss of beta cells and their dysfunction, stimulated glucose transport protein subtype 4 (GLUT4 membrane translocation in soleus muscles. Pretreatment of RIN-m cells with AL-1 prevented H2O2-induced cellular damage, quenched glucose and glibenclamide-stimulated reactive oxidative species production, and inhibited cytokine-stimulated NF-κB activation. Conclusion We have demonstrated that AL-1 had both hypoglycemic and beta cell protective effects which translated into antioxidant and NF-κB inhibitory activity. AL-1 is a potential new anti-diabetic agent.

  2. TIS21/(BTG2) negatively regulates estradiol-stimulated expansion of hematopoietic stem cells by derepressing Akt phosphorylation and inhibiting mTOR signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bong Cho; Ryu, Min Sook; Oh, S Paul; Lim, In Kyoung

    2008-09-01

    It has been known that 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate-inducible sequence 21 (TIS21), ortholog of human B-cell translocation gene 2, regulates expansions of stage-specific thymocytes and hematopoietic progenitors. In the present study, lineage-negative (Lin(-))/stem cell antigen-1-positive (Sca-1+)/c-Kit+ (LSK) cell content was significantly elevated in bone marrow (BM) of TIS21-knockout (TIS21(-/-)) female mice, suggesting 17beta-estradiol (E(2))-regulated progenitor expansion. E(2) induced DNA synthesis and cell proliferation of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) isolated from TIS21(-/-) mice, but not wild type (WT). In contrast to WT, E(2) failed to activate protein kinase B (Akt) in the TIS21(-/-) MEFs, independent of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (Erk1/2) activation. Despite attenuation of Akt activation, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) was constitutively activated in the TIS21(-/-) MEFs. Furthermore, mitogen-activated protein kinase 1/2 inhibitor or knockdown of Erk1 could restore activation of Akt and downregulate mTOR. Immunoprecipitation showed Akt preferentially bound to phosphorylated Erk1/2 (p-Erk1/2) in TIS21(-/-) cells, but reconstitution of TIS21 inhibited their interaction. E(2)-injected TIS21(-/-) male mice also increased LSK cells in BM. Taken together, expansion of hematopoietic progenitors in TIS21(-/-) female mice might be through inhibition of Akt activation, and constitutive activation of mTOR via preferential binding of TIS21 to E(2)-induced p-Erk1/2, compared with that of Akt. Our results suggest that TIS21 plays a pivotal role in maintaining the hematopoietic stem cell compartment and hematopoiesis.

  3. POLYGALACTURONASE INVOLVED IN EXPANSION1 functions in cell elongation and flower development in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Chaowen; Somerville, Chris; Anderson, Charles T

    2014-03-01

    Pectins are acidic carbohydrates that comprise a significant fraction of the primary walls of eudicotyledonous plant cells. They influence wall porosity and extensibility, thus controlling cell and organ growth during plant development. The regulated degradation of pectins is required for many cell separation events in plants, but the role of pectin degradation in cell expansion is poorly defined. Using an activation tag screen designed to isolate genes involved in wall expansion, we identified a gene encoding a putative polygalacturonase that, when overexpressed, resulted in enhanced hypocotyl elongation in etiolated Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings. We named this gene POLYGALACTURONASE INVOLVED IN EXPANSION1 (PGX1). Plants lacking PGX1 display reduced hypocotyl elongation that is complemented by transgenic PGX1 expression. PGX1 is expressed in expanding tissues throughout development, including seedlings, roots, leaves, and flowers. PGX1-GFP (green fluorescent protein) localizes to the apoplast, and heterologously expressed PGX1 displays in vitro polygalacturonase activity, supporting a function for this protein in apoplastic pectin degradation. Plants either overexpressing or lacking PGX1 display alterations in total polygalacturonase activity, pectin molecular mass, and wall composition and also display higher proportions of flowers with extra petals, suggesting PGX1's involvement in floral organ patterning. These results reveal new roles for polygalacturonases in plant development.

  4. Endothelial Cells Promote Expansion of Long‐Term Engrafting Marrow Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells in Primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gori, Jennifer L.; Butler, Jason M.; Kunar, Balvir; Poulos, Michael G.; Ginsberg, Michael; Nolan, Daniel J.; Norgaard, Zachary K.; Adair, Jennifer E.; Rafii, Shahin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Successful expansion of bone marrow (BM) hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) would benefit many HSPC transplantation and gene therapy/editing applications. However, current expansion technologies have been limited by a loss of multipotency and self‐renewal properties ex vivo. We hypothesized that an ex vivo vascular niche would provide prohematopoietic signals to expand HSPCs while maintaining multipotency and self‐renewal. To test this hypothesis, BM autologous CD34+ cells were expanded in endothelial cell (EC) coculture and transplanted in nonhuman primates. CD34+C38− HSPCs cocultured with ECs expanded up to 17‐fold, with a significant increase in hematopoietic colony‐forming activity compared with cells cultured with cytokines alone (colony‐forming unit‐granulocyte‐erythroid‐macrophage‐monocyte; p < .005). BM CD34+ cells that were transduced with green fluorescent protein lentivirus vector and expanded on ECs engrafted long term with multilineage polyclonal reconstitution. Gene marking was observed in granulocytes, lymphocytes, platelets, and erythrocytes. Whole transcriptome analysis indicated that EC coculture altered the expression profile of 75 genes in the BM CD34+ cells without impeding the long‐term engraftment potential. These findings show that an ex vivo vascular niche is an effective platform for expansion of adult BM HSPCs. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:864–876 PMID:28297579

  5. Clinical grade purification and expansion of NK cell products for an optimized manufacturing protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike eKoehl

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Allogeneic Natural Killer (NK cells are used for adoptive immunotherapy after stem cell transplantation. In order to overcome technical limitations in NK cell purification and activation, the following study investigates the impact of different variables on NK cell recovery, cytotoxicity and T cell depletion during GMP-grade NK cell selection. 40 NK cell products were derived from 54 unstimulated donor leukaphereses using immunomagnetic CD3 T-cell depletion, followed by a CD56 cell enrichment step. For T cell depletion, either the depletion 2.1 program in single or double procedure (D2.1 1depl, n=18; D2.1 2depl, n=13 or the faster depletion 3.1 (D3.1, n=9 was used on the CliniMACS instrument. 17 purified NK cell products were activated in vitro by IL-2 for 12 days. The whole process resulted in a median number of 7.59x10e8 CD56+CD3- cells with both purity and viability of 94%, respectively. The T-cell depletion was significantly better using D2.1 1depl/2depl compared to D3.1 (log 4.6/log 4.9 vs. log 3.7; p<0.01 and double procedure in two stages led always to residual T cells below 0.1%. In contrast D3.1 was superior to D2.1 1depl/2depl with regard to recovery of CD56+CD3- NK cells (68% vs 41%/38%. Concomitant monocytes and especially IL-2 activation led to increased NK cell activity against malignant target cells compared to unstimulated NK cells, which correlated with both up-regulation of natural cytotoxicity receptors and intracellular signaling. Overall, wide variations in the NK cell expansion rate and the distribution of NK cell subpopulations were found. In conclusion, our results indicate that GMP-grade purification of NK cells might be improved by a sequential processing of T cell depletion program D2.1 and D3.1. In addition NK cell expansion protocols need to be further optimized.

  6. [The effect of bFGF and sucralfate on cell proliferation during continuous tissue expansion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ya-lan; Guo, Shu-zhong; Lu, Kai-hua

    2003-05-01

    To investigate the effect of local application of bFGF combined with sucralfate on the cell proliferation during continuous tissue expansion (CTE). Nine white pigs were selected to undergo the continuous tissue expansion in this study and treated with bFGF and sucralfate, respectively as the following groups: group 1 with both bFGF and sucralfate, group 2 only with bFGF, group 3 with only sucralfate, and group 4 with saline as control. Fifteen samples were taken in each pig for immunohistochemistry analysis 1-14 days and 6 weeks after the operation. In the group with both bFGF and sucralfate, the epidermic basal cells proliferated significantly after the operation and reached top level in 3 days, which was statistical higher than the control group, but the multiplication of basal cell was the lowest 14 days after the operation, still more than the control group. In dermal layer, proliferation of fibroblasts, vessel endothelial cells, hair follicles epidermic cells and sweat gland epicytes was also significant higher in the group with both bFGF and sucralfate than that the control group and reached top level 7 day after the operation, but the proliferation of cells decreased obviously 14 days after the operation, still higher than the control group. The mitotic activity of cells returned to the basal level in 42 days. There were no significant differences among the group 2, group 3 and group 4. Local application of both bFGF and sucralfate could be more effect to induce cells multiplication during early skin expansion to facilitate the growth of neoformed skin soft tissue.

  7. Expansion and differentiation of germline-derived pluripotent stem cells on biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoss, Mareike; Šarić, Tomo; Denecke, Bernd; Peinkofer, Gabriel; Bovi, Manfred; Groll, Jürgen; Ko, Kinarm; Salber, Jochen; Halbach, Marcel; Schöler, Hans R; Zenke, Martin; Neuss, Sabine

    2013-05-01

    Stem cells with broad differentiation potential, such as the recently described germline-derived pluripotent stem cells (gPS cells), are an appealing source for tissue engineering strategies. Biomaterials can inhibit, support, or induce proliferation and differentiation of stem cells. Here we identified (1) polymers that maintain self-renewal and differentiation potential of gPS cells for feeder-free expansion and (2) polymers supporting the cardiomyogenic fate of gPS cells by analyzing a panel of polymers of an established biomaterial bank previously used to assess growth of diverse stem cell types. Identification of cytocompatible gPS cell/biomaterial combinations required analysis of several parameters, including morphology, viability, cytotoxicity, apoptosis, proliferation, and differentiation potential. Pluripotency of gPS cells was visualized by the endogenous Oct4-promoter-driven GFP and by Sox2 and Nanog immunofluorescence. Viability assay, proliferation assay, and flow cytometry showed that gPS cells efficiently adhere and are viable on synthetic polymers, such as Resomer(®) LR704 (poly(L-lactic-D,L-lactic acid), poly(tetrafluor ethylene) (PTFE), poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF), and on gelatine-coated tissue culture polystyrene. Expansion experiments showed that Resomer LR704 is an alternative substrate for feeder-free gPS cell maintenance. Resomer LR704, PTFE, and PVDF were found to be suitable for gPS cell differentiation. Spontaneous beating in embryoid bodies cultured on Resomer LR704 occurred already on day 8 of differentiation, much earlier compared to the other surfaces. This indicates that Resomer LR704 supports spontaneous cardiomyogenic differentiation of gPS cells, which was also confirmed on molecular, protein and functional level.

  8. Lack of beta1 integrins in enteric neural crest cells leads to a Hirschsprung-like phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breau, Marie A; Pietri, Thomas; Eder, Olivier

    2006-01-01

    The enteric nervous system arises mainly from vagal and sacral neural crest cells that colonise the gut between 9.5 and 14 days of development in mice. Using the Cre-LoxP system, we removed beta1 integrins in the neural crest cells when they emerge from the neural tube. beta1-null enteric neural...

  9. Intermittent fasting preserves beta-cell mass in obesity-induced diabetes via the autophagy-lysosome pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haiyan; Javaheri, Ali; Godar, Rebecca J; Murphy, John; Ma, Xiucui; Rohatgi, Nidhi; Mahadevan, Jana; Hyrc, Krzysztof; Saftig, Paul; Marshall, Connie; McDaniel, Michael L; Remedi, Maria S; Razani, Babak; Urano, Fumihiko; Diwan, Abhinav

    2017-01-01

    Obesity-induced diabetes is characterized by hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, and progressive beta cell failure. In islets of mice with obesity-induced diabetes, we observe increased beta cell death and impaired autophagic flux. We hypothesized that intermittent fasting, a clinically sustainable therapeutic strategy, stimulates autophagic flux to ameliorate obesity-induced diabetes. Our data show that despite continued high-fat intake, intermittent fasting restores autophagic flux in islets and improves glucose tolerance by enhancing glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, beta cell survival, and nuclear expression of NEUROG3, a marker of pancreatic regeneration. In contrast, intermittent fasting does not rescue beta-cell death or induce NEUROG3 expression in obese mice with lysosomal dysfunction secondary to deficiency of the lysosomal membrane protein, LAMP2 or haplo-insufficiency of BECN1/Beclin 1, a protein critical for autophagosome formation. Moreover, intermittent fasting is sufficient to provoke beta cell death in nonobese lamp2 null mice, attesting to a critical role for lysosome function in beta cell homeostasis under fasting conditions. Beta cells in intermittently-fasted LAMP2- or BECN1-deficient mice exhibit markers of autophagic failure with accumulation of damaged mitochondria and upregulation of oxidative stress. Thus, intermittent fasting preserves organelle quality via the autophagy-lysosome pathway to enhance beta cell survival and stimulates markers of regeneration in obesity-induced diabetes.

  10. A standardized method for in vivo mouse pancreas imaging and semiquantitative beta cell mass measurement by dual isotope SPECT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mathijs, I.; Xavier, C.; Peleman, C.; Caveliers, V.; Brom, M.; Gotthardt, M.; Herrera, P.L.; Lahoutte, T.; Bouwens, L.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: In order to evaluate future beta cell tracers in vivo, we aimed to develop a standardized in vivo method allowing semiquantitative measurement of a prospective beta cell tracer within the pancreas. PROCEDURES: 2-[(123)I]Iodo-L-phenylalanine ([(123)I]IPA) and

  11. Cell cycle phase dependent role of DNA polymerase beta in DNA repair and survival after ionizing radiation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, C.; Verwijs-Janssen, M.; Begg, A.C.; Vens, C.

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of the present study was to determine the role of DNA polymerase beta in repair and response after ionizing radiation in different phases of the cell cycle. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Synchronized cells deficient and proficient in DNA polymerase beta were irradiated in different

  12. Apc bridges Wnt/{beta}-catenin and BMP signaling during osteoblast differentiation of KS483 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miclea, Razvan L., E-mail: R.L.Miclea@lumc.nl [Department of Pediatrics, Leiden University Medical Centre (LUMC), Leiden (Netherlands); Horst, Geertje van der, E-mail: G.van_der_Horst@lumc.nl [Department of Urology, LUMC, Leiden (Netherlands); Robanus-Maandag, Els C., E-mail: E.C.Robanus@lumc.nl [Department of Human Genetics, LUMC, Leiden (Netherlands); Loewik, Clemens W.G.M., E-mail: C.W.G.M.Lowik@lumc.nl [Department of Endocrinology and Metabolic Diseases, LUMC, Leiden (Netherlands); Oostdijk, Wilma, E-mail: W.Oostdijk@lumc.nl [Department of Pediatrics, Leiden University Medical Centre (LUMC), Leiden (Netherlands); Wit, Jan M., E-mail: J.M.Wit@lumc.nl [Department of Pediatrics, Leiden University Medical Centre (LUMC), Leiden (Netherlands); Karperien, Marcel, E-mail: H.B.J.Karperien@tnw.utwente.nl [MIRA Institute for Biomedical Technology and Technical Medicine, Department of Tissue Regeneration, University of Twente, Zuidhorst Room ZH 144, Drienerlolaan 5, 7522 NB Enschede (Netherlands)

    2011-06-10

    The canonical Wnt signaling pathway influences the differentiation of mesenchymal cell lineages in a quantitative and qualitative fashion depending on the dose of {beta}-catenin signaling. Adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc) is the critical intracellular regulator of {beta}-catenin turnover. To better understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the role of Apc in regulating the differentiation capacity of skeletal progenitor cells, we have knocked down Apc in the murine mesenchymal stem cell-like KS483 cells by stable expression of Apc-specific small interfering RNA. In routine culture, KSFrt-Apc{sub si} cells displayed a mesenchymal-like spindle shape morphology, exhibited markedly decreased proliferation and increased apoptosis. Apc knockdown resulted in upregulation of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin and the BMP/Smad signaling pathways, but osteogenic differentiation was completely inhibited. This effect could be rescued by adding high concentrations of BMP-7 to the differentiation medium. Furthermore, KSFrt-Apc{sub si} cells showed no potential to differentiate into chondrocytes or adipocytes. These results demonstrate that Apc is essential for the proliferation, survival and differentiation of KS483 cells. Apc knockdown blocks the osteogenic differentiation of skeletal progenitor cells, a process that can be overruled by high BMP signaling.

  13. Characteristics of the Na/beta-alumina/Na cell as a sodium vapor pressure sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takikawa, O.; Imai, A.; Harata, M.

    1982-01-01

    The EMF and voltage-current characteristics for a galvanic cell with the configuration Na vapor (P 1 )/sodium beta-alumina/Na vapor (P 2 ) were studied. It was verified that the EMF followed the Nernst relation over a wide pressure range. For example, when P 1 = 2 x 10 -2 mm Hg and beta-alumina temperature = 340 0 C, the measured EMF agreed with the calculated value in P 2 range from 10 -5 to 10 -2 mm Hg. At lower pressure range, the measured EMF showed a negative deviation. Coexisting argon gas did not influence the cell EMF characteristic. In an atmosphere containing oxygen, the measured EMF was very high at first. Then it decreased and finally approached a value which agreed with the Nernst equation after several hours. At low beta-alumina temperatures, current saturation was observed in the voltage versus current relation with the anode on the P 2 side. Although the sodium pressure could be determined from saturating current measurement, the measurable pressure range was narrower than that for EMF measurement. At high beta-alumina temperature, current saturation was not clear. Values of 6 x 10 -6 (Ω cm) -1 for the electron conductivity and 6 x 10 -10 (Ω cm) -1 for the hole conductivity at 340 0 C were obtained for beta-alumina from the voltage-current characteristics at low sodium pressure. (Auth.)

  14. Ex-vivo expansion of nonhuman primate CD34+ cells by stem cell factor Sall4B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Shen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hematopoietic CD34+ stem cells are widely used in the clinical therapy of complicated blood diseases. Stem cell factor Sall4B is a zinc finger transcription factor that plays a vital role in hematopoietic stem cell expansion. The purpose of our current study is to further evaluate how Sall4B might affect the expansion of CD34+ cells derived from nonhuman primates. Methods Sall4B was overexpressed in nonhuman primate bone marrow-derived CD34+ cells via a lentiviral transduction system. The granulocyte–erythrocyte–macrophage–megakaryocyte colony-forming unit (CFU assay evaluated the differentiation potential of primate CD34+ cells that were expanded with Sall4B. Furthermore, an in-vivo murine system was employed to evaluate the hematopoietic potential of primate Sall4B-expanded CD34+ cells. Results Overexpression of Sall4B promoted ex-vivo nonhuman primate CD34+ cell expansion by 9.21 ± 1.94-fold on day 9, whereas lentiviral transduction without Sall4B expanded cells by only 2.95 ± 0.77-fold. Sall4B maintained a significant percentage of CD34+ cells as well. The CFU assay showed that the Sall4B-expanded CD34+ cells still possessed multilineage differentiation potential. A study using nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID mice in vivo revealed that Sall4B led to an increase in the number of repopulating cells and the 9-day-old Sall4B-transduced CD34+ cells still possess self-renewal and multilineage differentiation capacity in vivo, which are similar stemness characteristics to those in freshly isolated primate bone marrow-derived CD34+ cells. Conclusions We investigated the expansion of nonhuman primate bone marrow-derived CD34+ cells using the Sall4B lentiviral overexpression approach; our findings provide a new perspective on mechanisms of rapid stem cell proliferation. The utilization of Sall4B to expand CD34+ cells on a large scale through use of suitable model systems would prove

  15. Characterization and Application of a Disposable Rotating Bed Bioreactor for Mesenchymal Stem Cell Expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Neumann

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Recruitment of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC into the field of tissue engineering is a promising development since these cells can be expanded vivo to clinically relevant numbers and, after expansion, retain their ability to differentiate into various cell lineages. Safety requirements and the necessity to obtain high cell numbers without frequent subcultivation of cells raised the question of the possibility of expanding MSC in one-way (single-use disposable bioreactors. In this study, umbilical cord-derived MSC (UC-MSC were expanded in a disposable Z 2000 H bioreactor under dynamic conditions. Z was characterized regarding residence time and mixing in order to evaluate the optimal bioreactor settings, enabling optimal mass transfer in the absence of shear stress, allowing an reproducible expansion of MSC, while maintaining their stemness properties. Culture of the UC-MSC in disposable Z 2000 H bioreactor resulted in a reproducible 8-fold increase of cell numbers after 5 days. Cells were shown to maintain specific MSC surface marker expression as well as trilineage differentiation potential and lack stress-induced premature senescence.

  16. Characterization and Application of a Disposable Rotating Bed Bioreactor for Mesenchymal Stem Cell Expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Anne; Lavrentieva, Antonina; Heilkenbrinker, Alexandra; Loenne, Maren; Kasper, Cornelia

    2014-11-27

    Recruitment of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) into the field of tissue engineering is a promising development since these cells can be expanded vivo to clinically relevant numbers and, after expansion, retain their ability to differentiate into various cell lineages. Safety requirements and the necessity to obtain high cell numbers without frequent subcultivation of cells raised the question of the possibility of expanding MSC in one-way (single-use) disposable bioreactors. In this study, umbilical cord-derived MSC (UC-MSC) were expanded in a disposable Z 2000 H bioreactor under dynamic conditions. Z was characterized regarding residence time and mixing in order to evaluate the optimal bioreactor settings, enabling optimal mass transfer in the absence of shear stress, allowing an reproducible expansion of MSC, while maintaining their stemness properties. Culture of the UC-MSC in disposable Z 2000 H bioreactor resulted in a reproducible 8-fold increase of cell numbers after 5 days. Cells were shown to maintain specific MSC surface marker expression as well as trilineage differentiation potential and lack stress-induced premature senescence.

  17. Rev-erb beta regulates the Srebp-1c promoter and mRNA expression in skeletal muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramakrishnan, Sathiya N.; Lau, Patrick; Crowther, Lisa M. [The University of Queensland, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, St. Lucia, Qld 4072 (Australia); Cleasby, Mark E. [Diabetes and Obesity Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, St. Vincent' s Hospital, 384 Victoria Street, Darlinghurst, Sydney, NSW 2010 (Australia); Millard, Susan; Leong, Gary M. [The University of Queensland, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, St. Lucia, Qld 4072 (Australia); Cooney, Gregory J. [Diabetes and Obesity Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, St. Vincent' s Hospital, 384 Victoria Street, Darlinghurst, Sydney, NSW 2010 (Australia); Muscat, George E.O., E-mail: g.muscat@imb.uq.edu.au [The University of Queensland, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, St. Lucia, Qld 4072 (Australia)

    2009-10-30

    The nuclear hormone receptor, Rev-erb beta operates as a transcriptional silencer. We previously demonstrated that exogenous expression of Rev-erb{beta}{Delta}E in skeletal muscle cells increased Srebp-1c mRNA expression. We validated these in vitro observations by injection of an expression vector driving Rev-erb{beta}{Delta}E expression into mouse tibialis muscle that resulted in increased Srebp-1c mRNA expression. Paradoxically, Rev-erb{beta} siRNA expression in skeletal muscle cells repressed Srebp-1c expression, and indicated that Rev-erb{beta} expression was necessary for Srebp-1c expression. ChIP analysis demonstrated that Rev-erb{beta} was recruited to the Srebp-1c promoter. Moreover, Rev-erb{beta} trans-activated the Srebp-1c promoter, in contrast, Rev-erb{beta} efficiently repressed the Rev-erb{alpha} promoter, a previously characterized target gene. Finally, treatment with the Rev-erb agonist (hemin) (i) increased the trans-activation of the Srebp-1c promoter by Rev-erb{beta}; and (ii) increased Rev-erb{beta} and Srebp-1c mRNA expression. These data suggest that Rev-erb{beta} has the potential to activate gene expression, and is a positive regulator of Srebp-1c, a regulator of lipogenesis.

  18. Timing of Ca2+ response in pancreatic beta-cells is related to mitochondrial mass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustavsson, N; Abedi, G; Larsson-Nyrén, G

    2006-01-01

    timing are disturbed in beta-cells from hyperglycemic mice and one of the causes is likely to be an altered mitochondrial metabolism. Mitochondria play a key role in the control of nutrient-induced insulin secretion. Here, we used confocal microscopy with the fluorescent probe MitoTracker Red CMXRos...

  19. Beta cell imaging - a key tool in optimized diabetes prevention and treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gotthardt, M.; Eizirik, D.L.; Cnop, M.; Brom, M.

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of diabetes is 382 million worldwide, and is expected to rise to 592 million in 2035 (http://www.idf.org/diabetesatlas); 2.5-15\\% of national annual healthcare budgets are related to diabetes care, potentially increasing to 40\\% in high-prevalence countries. Beta cell dysfunction and

  20. MicroRNAs as regulators of beta-cell function and dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osmai, Mirwais; Osmai, Yama; Bang-Berthelsen, Claus Heiner

    2016-01-01

    , recent studies have demonstrated that miRNAs are important regulators of the islet transcriptome, controlling apoptosis, differentiation and proliferation, as well as regulating unique islet and beta-cell functions and pathways such as insulin expression, processing and secretion. Furthermore, a large...

  1. Effect of iron on pancreatic beta cell function and insulin resistance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Increase in total body iron store has been reported in the aetiology and development of diabetes mellitus. The effect of iron supplementation in female with respect to the incidence of diabetes mellitus was investigated on the pancreatic beta cell function and insulin resistance in normal female rats. Methods: ...

  2. Growth hormone is a growth factor for the differentiated pancreatic beta-cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linde, S; Welinder, B S; Billestrup, N

    1989-01-01

    The regulation of the growth of the pancreatic beta-cell is poorly understood. There are previous indications of a role of GH in the growth and insulin production of the pancreatic islets. In the present study we present evidence for a direct long-term effect of GH on proliferation and insulin...

  3. Visualizing pancreatic {beta}-cell mass with [{sup 11}C]DTBZ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, Norman Ray [Department of Radiology, Columbia University Medical School, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Souza, Fabiola [Department of Surgery, Columbia University Medical School, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Witkowski, Piotr [Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical School, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Maffei, Antonella [Institute of Genetics and Biophysics ' Adriano Buzzati-Traverso' , CNR, Naples 80131 (Italy); Raffo, Anthony [Department of Surgery, Columbia University Medical School, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Herron, Alan [Center for Comparative Medicine and The Department of Pathology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Kilbourn, Michael [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-0638 (United States); Jurewicz, Agata [Department of Radiology, Columbia University Medical School, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Herold, Kevan [Department of Surgery, Columbia University Medical School, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Liu, Eric [Diabetes Branch, NIDDK, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20854 (United States); Hardy, Mark Adam [Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical School, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Van Heertum, Ronald [Department of Radiology, Columbia University Medical School, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Harris, Paul Emerson [Department of Surgery, Columbia University Medical School, New York, NY 10032 (United States)]. E-mail: peh1@columbia.edu

    2006-10-15

    {beta}-Cell mass (BCM) influences the total amount of insulin secreted, varies by individual and by the degree of insulin resistance, and is affected by physiologic and pathologic conditions. The islets of Langerhans, however, appear to have a reserve capacity of insulin secretion and, overall, assessments of insulin and blood glucose levels remain poor measures of BCM, {beta}-cell function and progression of diabetes. Thus, novel noninvasive determinations of BCM are needed to provide a quantitative endpoint for novel therapies of diabetes, islet regeneration and transplantation. Built on previous gene expression studies, we tested the hypothesis that the targeting of vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2), which is expressed by {beta} cells, with [{sup 11}C]dihydrotetrabenazine ([{sup 11}C]DTBZ), a radioligand specific for VMAT2, and the use of positron emission tomography (PET) can provide a measure of BCM. In this report, we demonstrate decreased radioligand uptake within the pancreas of Lewis rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes relative to their euglycemic historical controls. These studies suggest that quantitation of VMAT2 expression in {beta} cells with the use of [{sup 11}C]DTBZ and PET represents a method for noninvasive longitudinal estimates of changes in BCM that may be useful in the study and treatment of diabetes.

  4. Cytokines and beta-cell biology: from concept to clinical translation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donath, M.Y.; Storling, J.; Berchtold, L.A.

    2007-01-01

    The tale of cytokines and the beta-cell is a long story, starting with in vitro discovery in 1984, evolving via descriptive and phenomenological studies to detailed mapping of the signalling pathways, gene- and protein expression patterns, molecular and biochemical effector mechanisms to in vivo...

  5. Imaging of beta-Cell Mass and Insulitis in Insulin-Dependent (Type 1) Diabetes Mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Gialleonardo, Valentina; de Vries, Erik F. J.; Di Girolamo, Marco; Quintero, Ana M.; Dierckx, Rudi A. J. O.; Signore, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Insulin-dependent (type 1) diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disease with a complex multifactorial etiology and a poorly understood pathogenesis. Genetic and environmental factors cause an autoimmune reaction against pancreatic beta-cells, called insulitis, confirmed in pancreatic samples obtained at

  6. Genetic models rule out a major role of beta cell glycogen in the control of glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir-Coll, Joan; Duran, Jordi; Slebe, Felipe; García-Rocha, Mar; Gomis, Ramon; Gasa, Rosa; Guinovart, Joan J

    2016-05-01

    Glycogen accumulation occurs in beta cells of diabetic patients and has been proposed to partly mediate glucotoxicity-induced beta cell dysfunction. However, the role of glycogen metabolism in beta cell function and its contribution to diabetes pathophysiology remain poorly understood. We investigated the function of beta cell glycogen by studying glucose homeostasis in mice with (1) defective glycogen synthesis in the pancreas; and (2) excessive glycogen accumulation in beta cells. Conditional deletion of the Gys1 gene and overexpression of protein targeting to glycogen (PTG) was accomplished by Cre-lox recombination using pancreas-specific Cre lines. Glucose homeostasis was assessed by determining fasting glycaemia, insulinaemia and glucose tolerance. Beta cell mass was determined by morphometry. Glycogen was detected histologically by periodic acid-Schiff's reagent staining. Isolated islets were used for the determination of glycogen and insulin content, insulin secretion, immunoblots and gene expression assays. Gys1 knockout (Gys1 (KO)) mice did not exhibit differences in glucose tolerance or basal glycaemia and insulinaemia relative to controls. Insulin secretion and gene expression in isolated islets was also indistinguishable between Gys1 (KO) and controls. Conversely, despite effective glycogen overaccumulation in islets, mice with PTG overexpression (PTG(OE)) presented similar glucose tolerance to controls. However, under fasting conditions they exhibited lower glycaemia and higher insulinaemia. Importantly, neither young nor aged PTG(OE) mice showed differences in beta cell mass relative to age-matched controls. Finally, a high-fat diet did not reveal a beta cell-autonomous phenotype in either model. Glycogen metabolism is not required for the maintenance of beta cell function. Glycogen accumulation in beta cells alone is not sufficient to trigger the dysfunction or loss of these cells, or progression to diabetes.

  7. Beta thalassaemia traits in Nigerian patients with sickle cell anaemia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of Medicine and Biomedical Research ... These three patients (1.2%) were found to have positive co-inheritance of thalassaemia trait and sickle cell anaemia. The erythrocyte indices were all reduced in these selected families except for one family whose mean cell haemoglobin concentration was within normal ...

  8. Pathogen-free, plasma-poor platelet lysate and expansion of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iudicone, Paola; Fioravanti, Daniela; Bonanno, Giuseppina; Miceli, Michelina; Lavorino, Claudio; Totta, Pierangela; Frati, Luigi; Nuti, Marianna; Pierelli, Luca

    2014-01-27

    Supplements to support clinical-grade cultures of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are required to promote growth and expansion of these cells. Platelet lysate (PL) is a human blood component which may replace animal serum in MSC cultures being rich in various growth factors. Here, we describe a plasma poor pathogen-free platelet lysate obtained by pooling 12 platelet (PLT) units, to produce a standardized and safe supplement for clinical-grade expansion of MSC. PL lots were obtained by combining 2 6-unit PLT pools in additive solution (AS) following a transfusional-based procedure including pathogen inactivation (PI) by Intercept technology and 3 cycles of freezing/thawing, followed by membrane removal. Three PI-PL and 3 control PL lots were produced to compare their ability to sustain bone marrow derived MSC selection and expansion. Moreover, two further PL, subjected to PI or not, were also produced starting from the same initial PLT pools to evaluate the impact of PI on growth factor concentration and capacity to sustain cell growth. Additional PI-PL lots were used for comparison with fetal bovine serum (FBS) on MSC expansion. Immunoregulatory properties of PI-PL-generated MSC were documented in vitro by mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) mitogen induced proliferation. PI-PL and PL control lots had similar concentrations of 4 well-described growth factors endowed with MSC stimulating ability. Initial growth and MSC expansion by PI-PL and PL controls were comparable either using different MSC populations or in head to head experiments. Moreover, PI-PL and PL control sustained similar MSC growth of frozen/thawed MSC. Multilineage differentiation of PI-derived and PI-PL-derived MSC were maintained in any MSC cultures as well as their immunoregulatory properties. Finally, no direct impact of PI on growth factor concentration and MSC growth support was observed, whereas the capacity of FBS to sustain MSC expansion in basic

  9. Infusion of Autologous Retrodifferentiated Stem Cells into Patients with Beta-Thalassemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilham Saleh Abuljadayel

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Beta-thalassemia is a genetic, red blood cell disorder affecting the beta-globin chain of the adult hemoglobin gene. This results in excess accumulation of unpaired alpha-chain gene products leading to reduced red blood cell life span and the development of severe anemia. Current treatment of this disease involves regular blood transfusion and adjunct chelation therapy to lower blood transfusion–induced iron overload. Fetal hemoglobin switching agents have been proposed to treat genetic blood disorders, such as sickle cell anemia and beta-thalassemia, in an effort to compensate for the dysfunctional form of the beta-globin chain in adult hemoglobin. The rationale behind this approach is to pair the excess normal alpha-globin chain with the alternative fetal gamma-chain to promote red blood cell survival and ameliorate the anemia. Reprogramming of differentiation in intact, mature, adult white blood cells in response to inclusion of monoclonal antibody CR3/43 has been described. This form of retrograde development has been termed “retrodifferentiation”, with the ability to re-express a variety of stem cell markers in a heterogeneous population of white blood cells. This form of reprogramming, or reontogeny, to a more pluripotent stem cell state ought to recapitulate early hematopoiesis and facilitate expression of a fetal and/or adult program of hemoglobin synthesis or regeneration on infusion and subsequent redifferentiation. Herein, the outcome of infusion of autologous retrodifferentiated stem cells (RSC into 21 patients with beta-thalassemia is described. Over 6 months, Infusion of 3-h autologous RSC subjected to hematopoietic-conducive conditions into patients with beta-thalassemia reduced mean blood transfusion requirement, increased mean fetal hemoglobin synthesis, and significantly lowered mean serum ferritin. This was always accompanied by an increase in mean corpuscular volume (MCV, mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH, and mean

  10. Ethacrynic acid exhibits selective toxicity to chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells by inhibition of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desheng Lu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Aberrant activation of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling promotes the development of several cancers. It has been demonstrated that the Wnt signaling pathway is activated in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL cells, and that uncontrolled Wnt/beta-catenin signaling may contribute to the defect in apoptosis that characterizes this malignancy. Thus, the Wnt signaling pathway is an attractive candidate for developing targeted therapies for CLL. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The diuretic agent ethacrynic acid (EA was identified as a Wnt inhibitor using a cell-based Wnt reporter assay. In vitro assays further confirmed the inhibitory effect of EA on Wnt/beta-catenin signaling. Cell viability assays showed that EA selectively induced cell death in primary CLL cells. Exposure of CLL cells to EA decreased the expression of Wnt/beta-catenin target genes, including LEF-1, cyclin D1 and fibronectin. Immune co-precipitation experiments demonstrated that EA could directly bind to LEF-1 protein and destabilize the LEF-1/beta-catenin complex. N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC, which can react with the alpha, beta-unsaturated ketone in EA, but not other anti-oxidants, prevented the drug's inhibition of Wnt/beta-catenin activation and its ability to induce apoptosis in CLL cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our studies indicate that EA selectively suppresses CLL survival due to inhibition of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling. Antagonizing Wnt signaling in CLL with EA or related drugs may represent an effective treatment of this disease.

  11. LMP1-mediated glycolysis induces myeloid-derived suppressor cell expansion in nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Ting Cai

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs are expanded in tumor microenvironments, including that of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV-associated nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC. The link between MDSC expansion and EBV infection in NPC is unclear. Here, we show that EBV latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1 promotes MDSC expansion in the tumor microenvironment by promoting extra-mitochondrial glycolysis in malignant cells, which is a scenario for immune escape initially suggested by the frequent, concomitant detection of abundant LMP1, glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1 and CD33+ MDSCs in tumor sections. The full process has been reconstituted in vitro. LMP1 promotes the expression of multiple glycolytic genes, including GLUT1. This metabolic reprogramming results in increased expression of the Nod-like receptor family protein 3 (NLRP3 inflammasome, COX-2 and P-p65 and, consequently, increased production of IL-1β, IL-6 and GM-CSF. Finally, these changes in the environment of malignant cells result in enhanced NPC-derived MDSC induction. One key step is the physical interaction of LMP1 with GLUT1 to stabilize the GLUT1 protein by blocking its K48-ubiquitination and p62-dependent autolysosomal degradation. This work indicates that LMP1-mediated glycolysis regulates IL-1β, IL-6 and GM-CSF production through the NLRP3 inflammasome, COX-2 and P-p65 signaling pathways to enhance tumor-associated MDSC expansion, which leads to tumor immunosuppression in NPC.

  12. The zinc transporter ZNT3 co-localizes with insulin in INS-1E pancreatic beta cells and influences cell survival, insulin secretion capacity, and ZNT8 expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smidt, Kamille; Larsen, Agnete; Brønden, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Zinc trafficking in pancreatic beta cells is tightly regulated by zinc transporting (ZNTs) proteins. The role of different ZNTs in the beta cells is currently being clarified. ZNT8 transports zinc into insulin granules and is critical for a correct insulin crystallization and storage in the granu......Zinc trafficking in pancreatic beta cells is tightly regulated by zinc transporting (ZNTs) proteins. The role of different ZNTs in the beta cells is currently being clarified. ZNT8 transports zinc into insulin granules and is critical for a correct insulin crystallization and storage...

  13. BMP signaling inhibits intestinal stem cell self-renewal through suppression of Wnt-beta-catenin signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xi C; Zhang, Jiwang; Tong, Wei-Gang; Tawfik, Ossama; Ross, Jason; Scoville, David H; Tian, Qiang; Zeng, Xin; He, Xi; Wiedemann, Leanne M; Mishina, Yuji; Li, Linheng

    2004-10-01

    In humans, mutations in BMPR1A, SMAD4 and PTEN are responsible for juvenile polyposis syndrome, juvenile intestinal polyposis and Cowden disease, respectively. The development of polyposis is a common feature of these diseases, suggesting that there is an association between BMP and PTEN pathways. The mechanistic link between BMP and PTEN pathways and the related etiology of juvenile polyposis is unresolved. Here we show that conditional inactivation of Bmpr1a in mice disturbs homeostasis of intestinal epithelial regeneration with an expansion of the stem and progenitor cell populations, eventually leading to intestinal polyposis resembling human juvenile polyposis syndrome. We show that BMP signaling suppresses Wnt signaling to ensure a balanced control of stem cell self-renewal. Mechanistically, PTEN, through phosphatidylinosital-3 kinase-Akt, mediates the convergence of the BMP and Wnt pathways on control of beta-catenin. Thus, BMP signaling may control the duplication of intestinal stem cells, thereby preventing crypt fission and the subsequent increase in crypt number.

  14. Research of TGF-beta1 Inducing Lung Adencarcinoma PC9 Cells to Mesenchymal Cells Transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofeng CHEN

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective It has been proven that epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT not only correlated with embryonic development but also could promote tumor invasion and metastasis. Transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF-β1 has been identified as the main inducer of tumor EMT. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of TGF-β1 on EMT and PI3K/AKT signaling pathway in lung adencarcinoma PC9 cells. Methods Cultured PC9 cells were treated with different concentrations of TGF-β1 for 48 h. The morphological changes were observed under phase-contrast microscopy; EMT relative marker protein changes were assessed by Western blot and immunoflurescence staining. In addition, the expression of AKT and P-AKT were also measured by Western blot. Results The data showed that TGF-β1 could induce PC9 morphological alteration from epithelial to mesenchymal and upregulate the expression of mesenchymal maker protein Fibronectin. Obviously, the expression of P-AKT was downregulated by TGF-β1 treatment for 48 h. Conclusion TGF-β1 might induce EMT of PC9 cells , accompanied by the changes of PI3K/AKT signaling pathway.

  15. Sickle Cell Beta-Plus Thalassemia with Subcapsular Hematoma of the Spleen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suyash Dahal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available While splenic complications like hypersplenism, sequestration crisis, and infarction are commonly reported in sickle cell variants like sickle cell beta-plus thalassemia, splenic rupture with hematoma is rare. We present a case of a 32-year-old young male who presented with dull left upper quadrant pain who was found to have multiple subcapsular splenic lacerations and hematoma on abdominal imaging. Hemoglobin electrophoresis confirmed sickle cell beta-plus thalassemia in the patient. There was no history of trauma, and rest of the workup for possible cause of spontaneous rupture of spleen was negative. With the patient refusing splenectomy, he was managed conservatively. Clinicians need to be aware of this rare complication of sickle cell variants.

  16. Intrinsic Plasma Cell Differentiation Defects in B Cell Expansion with NF-κB and T Cell Anergy Patient B Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swadhinya Arjunaraja

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available B cell Expansion with NF-κB and T cell Anergy (BENTA disease is a novel B cell lymphoproliferative disorder caused by germline, gain-of-function mutations in the lymphocyte scaffolding protein CARD11, which drives constitutive NF-κB signaling. Despite dramatic polyclonal expansion of naive and immature B cells, BENTA patients also present with signs of primary immunodeficiency, including markedly reduced percentages of class-switched/memory B cells and poor humoral responses to certain vaccines. Using purified naive B cells from our BENTA patient cohort, here we show that BENTA B cells exhibit intrinsic defects in B cell differentiation. Despite a profound in vitro survival advantage relative to normal donor B cells, BENTA patient B cells were severely impaired in their ability to differentiate into short-lived IgDloCD38hi plasmablasts or CD138+ long-lived plasma cells in response to various stimuli. These defects corresponded with diminished IgG antibody production and correlated with poor induction of specific genes required for plasma cell commitment. These findings provide important mechanistic clues that help explain both B cell lymphocytosis and humoral immunodeficiency in BENTA disease.

  17. Trans fatty acids increase nitric oxide levels and pancreatic beta-cell necrosis in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kusmiyati Tjahjono DK

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background The prevalence of diabetes in Indonesia is increasing due to various factors, including life style changes such as trans fatty acid (TFA intake. High TFA intake is known to be related to blood lipid profile changes resulting in cardiovascular disorders. This study was to identify the effect of TFA on nitric oxide (NO production and on necrosis of pancreatic beta cells. Methods A study of randomized pre-test post–test design with control group. Thirty Sprague Dawley rats were divided into 3 groups, i.e. group K (control, group P1 receiving a diet with 5% TFA, and P2 receiving 10% TFA. The intervention was performed for 8 weeks. NO level and pancreatic beta-cell necrosis were analyzed using Pearson’s chi square test. Results After 4 weeks of treatment there was no change in NO levels in group K, but increased NO in P2 (2.6-3.8 ìM. At 8 weeks after treatment, NO levels in groups P1 and P2 increased to 2.6-3.4 ìM and 4.2-14.3 ìM, respectively, while in group K only 2 rats had increased NO levels of 2.8-2.9 ìM. With Pearson’s chi-square test, there was a signifant difference in the proportions of necrotic pancreatic beta cells after 4 weeks and 8 weeks (p=0.000. No necrosis of beta cells was found in group K, mild necrosis in group P1 (1-25% and moderate necrosis in group P2 (26-50%. Conclusion TFA consumption significantly increases NO levels in Sprague Dawley rats and also results in moderate grades of necrosis of pancreatic beta cells.

  18. Trans fatty acids increase nitric oxide levels and pancreatic beta-cell necrosis in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kusmiyati Tjahjono DK

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The prevalence of diabetes in Indonesia is increasing due to various factors, including life style changes such as trans fatty acid (TFA intake. High TFA intake is known to be related to blood lipid profile changes resulting in cardiovascular disorders. This study was to identify the effect of TFA on nitric oxide (NO production and on necrosis of pancreatic beta cells. METHODS A study of randomized pre-test post–test design with control group. Thirty Sprague Dawley rats were divided into 3 groups, i.e. group K (control, group P1 receiving a diet with 5% TFA, and P2 receiving 10% TFA. The intervention was performed for 8 weeks. NO level and pancreatic beta-cell necrosis were analyzed using Pearson’s chi square test. RESULTS After 4 weeks of treatment there was no change in NO levels in group K, but increased NO in P2 (2.6-3.8 ìM. At 8 weeks after treatment, NO levels in groups P1 and P2 increased to 2.6-3.4 ìM and 4.2-14.3 ìM, respectively, while in group K only 2 rats had increased NO levels of 2.8-2.9 ìM. With Pearson’s chi-square test, there was a signifant difference in the proportions of necrotic pancreatic beta cells after 4 weeks and 8 weeks (p= 0.000. No necrosis of beta cells was found in group K, mild necrosis in group P1 (1-25% and moderate necrosis in group P2 (26-50%. CONCLUSION TFA consumption significantly increases NO levels in Sprague Dawley rats and also results in moderate grades of necrosis of pancreatic beta cells

  19. Mobility of creatine phosphokinase and beta-enolase in cultured muscle cells

    OpenAIRE

    Arrio-Dupont, M.; Foucault, G.; Vacher, M.; Douhou, A.; Cribier, S.

    1997-01-01

    The diffusion of beta-enolase and creatine phosphokinase in muscle cells has been studied by modulated fringe pattern photobleaching. Beta-enolase is mobile in the sarcoplasm. At 20 degrees C, the diffusion coefficient is 13.5 +/- 2.5 microm2 s(-1) in the cytosol and 56 microm2 s(-1) in aqueous media. As in the case of dextrans of the same hydrodynamic radius, its mobility is hindered by both the crowding of the fluid phase of the cytoplasm and the screening effect due to myofilaments. A frac...

  20. Glucocorticoid receptor beta increases migration of human bladder cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBeth, Lucien; Nwaneri, Assumpta C; Grabnar, Maria; Demeter, Jonathan; Nestor-Kalinoski, Andrea; Hinds, Terry D

    2016-05-10

    Bladder cancer is observed worldwide having been associated with a host of environmental and lifestyle risk factors. Recent investigations on anti-inflammatory glucocorticoid signaling point to a pathway that may impact bladder cancer. Here we show an inverse effect on the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) isoform signaling that may lead to bladder cancer. We found similar GRα expression levels in the transitional uroepithelial cancer cell lines T24 and UMUC-3. However, the T24 cells showed a significant (p bladder cancer cells. Therefore, GRβ may have a significant role in bladder cancer, and possibly serve as a therapeutic target for the disease.

  1. Development of biomarker specific of pancreatic beta cells (incretin radiolabelled) for image of beta functional mass in diabetic and obese: study in animal model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Daniele

    2017-01-01

    Increased prevalence of obesity worldwide, has become a vast concern, stimulating investigations focusing prevention and therapy of this condition. The association of type 2 diabetes or insulin resistance aggravates the prognosis of obesity. Even patients successfully submitted to bariatric or metabolic surgery, may not be cured of diabetes, as improvement of circulating values of glucose and insulin not necessarily reflects recovery of pancreatic beta cell mass. There is no consensus about how to estimate beta cell mass in vivo. Available tools suffer from low sensitivity and specificity, often being as well cumbersome and expensive. Radiolabeled incretins, such as glucagon-like-peptide 1 (GLP-1) analogs, seem to be promising options for the measurement of beta cell mass in diabetes and insulinoma. The objective of this study was the development of two conjugates of GLP-1 analog, radiolabeled with 99m Technetium, as a noninvasive imaging method for the estimation of pancreatic beta cell mass, in the presence of obesity. Animal models were selected, including hyperlipidic diet-induced obesity, diet restricted obesity, and as controls, alloxan diabetes. Results indicated that both radiotracers achieved over 97% radiochemical yield. The most successful product was 99m Tc-HYNIC-βAla-Exendin-4. Low beta cell mass uptake occurred in diet-induced obesity. Diet-restricted obesity, with substantial shedding of excess body weight, was followed by remarkable decrease of fasting blood glucose, however beta cell mass uptake was only mildly improved. Future studies are recommended in obesity, type 2 diabetes, and dieting, including bariatric and metabolic operations. (author)

  2. Human platelet lysate in mesenchymal stromal cell expansion according to a GMP grade protocol: a cell factory experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becherucci, Valentina; Piccini, Luisa; Casamassima, Serena; Bisin, Silvia; Gori, Valentina; Gentile, Francesca; Ceccantini, Riccardo; De Rienzo, Elena; Bindi, Barbara; Pavan, Paola; Cunial, Vanessa; Allegro, Elisa; Ermini, Stefano; Brugnolo, Francesca; Astori, Giuseppe; Bambi, Franco

    2018-05-02

    The use of platelet lysate (PL) for the ex-vivo expansion of mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) was initially proposed by Doucet et al. in 2005, as an alternative to animal serum. Moreover, regulatory authorities discourage the use of fetal bovine serum (FBS) or other animal derivatives, to avoid risk of zoonoses and xenogeneic immune reactions. Even if many studies investigated PL composition, there still are some open issues related to its use in ex-vivo MSC expansion, especially according to good manufacturing practice (GMP) grade protocols. As an authorized cell factory, we report our experience using standardized PL produced by Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria Meyer Transfusion Service for MSC expansion according to a GMP grade clinical protocol. As suggested by other authors, we performed an in-vitro test on MSCs versus MSCs cultured with FBS that still represents the best way to test PL batches. We compared 12 MSC batches cultured with DMEM 5% PL with similar batches cultured with DMEM 10% FBS, focusing on the MSC proliferation rate, MSC surface marker expression, MSC immunomodulatory and differentiation potential, and finally MSC relative telomere length. Results confirmed the literature data as PL increases cell proliferation without affecting the MSC immunophenotype, immunomodulatory potential, differentiation potential and relative telomere length. PL can be considered a safe alternative to FBS for ex-vivo expansion of MSC according to a GMP grade protocol. Our experience confirms the literature data: a large number of MSCs for clinical applications can be obtained by expansion with PL, without affecting the MSC main features. Our experience underlines the benefits of a close collaboration between the PL producers (transfusion service) and the end users (cell factory) in a synergy of skills and experiences that can lead to standardized PL production.

  3. Comparative analysis in continuous expansion of bovine and human primary nucleus pulposus cells for tissue repair applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DH Rosenzweig

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Autologous NP cell implantation is a potential therapeutic avenue for intervertebral disc (IVD degeneration. However, monolayer expansion of cells isolated from surgical samples may negatively impact matrix production by way of dedifferentiation. Previously, we have used a continuous expansion culture system to successfully preserve a chondrocyte phenotype. In this work, we hypothesised that continuous expansion culture could also preserve nucleus pulposus (NP phenotype. We confirmed that serial passaging drove NP dedifferentiation by significantly decreasing collagen type II, aggrecan and chondroadherin (CHAD gene expression, compared to freshly isolated cells. Proliferation, gene expression profile and matrix production in both culture conditions were compared using primary bovine NP cells. Both standard culture and continuous culture produced clinically relevant cell populations. However, continuous culture cells maintained significantly higher collagen type II, aggrecan and CHAD transcript expression levels. Also, continuous expansion cells generated greater amounts of proteoglycan, collagen type II and aggrecan protein deposition in pellet cultures. To our surprise, continuous expansion of human intervertebral disc cells – isolated from acute herniation tissue – produced less collagen type II, aggrecan and CHAD genes and proteins, compared to standard culture. Also, continuous culture of cells isolated from young non-degenerate tissue did not preserve gene and protein expression, compared to standard culture. These data indicated that primary bovine and human NP cells responded differently to continuous culture, where the positive effects observed for bovine cells did not translate to human cells. Therefore, caution must be exercised when choosing animal models and cell sources for pre-clinical studies.

  4. Dual role of proapoptotic BAD in insulin secretion and beta cell survival

    OpenAIRE

    Danial, Nika N.; Walensky, Loren D.; Zhang, Chen-Yu; Choi, Cheol Soo; Fisher, Jill K.; Molina, Anthony J. A.; Datta, Sandeep Robert; Pitter, Kenneth L.; Bird, Gregory H.; Wikstrom, Jakob D.; Deeney, Jude T.; Robertson, Kirsten; Morash, Joel; Kulkarni, Ameya; Neschen, Susanne

    2008-01-01

    The proapoptotic BCL-2 family member BAD resides in a glucokinase-containing complex that regulates glucose-driven mitochondrial respiration. Here, we present genetic evidence of a physiologic role for BAD in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion by beta cells. This novel function of BAD is specifically dependent upon the phosphorylation of its BH3 sequence, previously defined as an essential death domain. We highlight the pharmacologic relevance of phosphorylated BAD BH3 by using cell-permeab...

  5. Targeted radiosensitization of cells expressing truncated DNA polymerase {beta}.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neijenhuis, S.; Verwijs-Janssen, M.; Broek, Bart van den; Begg, A.C.; Vens, C.

    2010-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) is an effective anticancer treatment, although failures still occur. To improve radiotherapy, tumor-targeted strategies are needed to increase radiosensitivity of tumor cells, without influencing normal tissue radiosensitivity. Base excision repair (BER) and single-strand

  6. Movement of beta-irradiated epidermal basal cells to the spinous-granular layers in the absence of cell division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Etoh, H.; Taguchi, Y.H.; Tabachnick, J.

    1975-01-01

    Guinea-pig epidermis was irradiated with 3000 rad of beta rays 1 hr after two injections of [ 3 H]thymidine 5 hr apart (labeled cells in S phase and G 2 phase) or 18 hr after injection (labeled early G 1 cells). In nonirradiated epidermis labeled basal cells divided within 24 hr with daughter cells remaining in the basal layer, and approximately 50 percent of the labeled cells moved into the spinal layer by the 3rd day. Cell division in nonirradiated epidermis diluted the number of silver grains/nucleus, and lightly labeled cells were found in the granular layer by day 7. Beta irradiation inhibited cell division but it did not slow the rate of transit (ca 8 days) of irradiated labeled cells from basal to granular layer, some of these remaining heavily labeled. Although cell division may play some role in upward movement of basal cells in normal epidermis detachment of a basal cell from the basement membrane and its transit to the granular layer is unimpaired in the absence of cell division. These findings suggest that some radioresistant metabolic function(s), not cell division, is responsible for upward movement of basal cells. (auth)

  7. In vitro expansion of the mammary stem/progenitor cell population by xanthosine treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choudhary Ratan K

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mammary stem cells are critical for growth and maintenance of the mammary gland and therefore are of considerable interest for improving productivity and efficiency of dairy animals. Xanthosine treatment has been demonstrated to promote expansion of putative mammary stem cells in vivo, and hepatic and hair follicle stem cells in vitro. In the latter, xanthosine promoted the symmetrical division of hepatic and hair follicle stem cells. The objective of this study was to determine if treating primary cultures of bovine mammary epithelial cells (MEC with xanthosine increases the stem/progenitor cell population by promoting symmetrical division of mammary stem cells. Results In vitro treatment with xanthosine increased the population of MEC during the exponential phase of cell growth, reducing the doubling time from 86 h in control cultures to 60 h in xanthosine-treated cultures. The bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU labeling index and the proportion of MEC in S-phase both were increased by xanthosine treatment, indicating that increased cell accretion was due to increased cell proliferation. Analysis of daughter-pairs indicated that xanthosine promoted a shift from asymmetric to symmetric cell division. Moreover, the 30 % increase in symmetric cell division was concomitant with an increase in the proportion of MEC that were positive for a putative stem cell marker (FNDC3B and a trend toward increased telomerase activity. These results suggest that xanthosine treatment in vitro can increase cell proliferation, promote symmetric cell division and enhance stem/progenitor cell activity. Conclusions Xanthosine treatment increased the proliferation rate of bovine MEC in vitro. This was likely to be mediated by an increase in the proportion of stem/progenitor cells in the MEC population due to promotion of symmetrical stem cell division by xanthosine.

  8. Expression of a constitutively activated plasma membrane H+-ATPase in Nicotiana tabacum BY-2 cells results in cell expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niczyj, Marta; Champagne, Antoine; Alam, Iftekhar; Nader, Joseph; Boutry, Marc

    2016-11-01

    Increased acidification of the external medium by an activated H + -ATPase results in cell expansion, in the absence of upstream activating signaling. The plasma membrane H + -ATPase couples ATP hydrolysis with proton transport outside the cell, and thus creates an electrochemical gradient, which energizes secondary transporters. According to the acid growth theory, this enzyme is also proposed to play a major role in cell expansion, by acidifying the external medium and so activating enzymes that are involved in cell wall-loosening. However, this theory is still debated. To challenge it, we made use of a plasma membrane H + -ATPase isoform from Nicotiana plumbaginifolia truncated from its C-terminal auto-inhibitory domain (ΔCPMA4), and thus constitutively activated. This protein was expressed in Nicotiana tabacum BY-2 suspension cells using a heat shock inducible promoter. The characterization of several independent transgenic lines showed that the expression of activated ΔCPMA4 resulted in a reduced external pH by 0.3-1.2 units, as well as in an increased H + -ATPase activity by 77-155 % (ATP hydrolysis), or 70-306 % (proton pumping) of isolated plasma membranes. In addition, ΔCPMA4-expressing cells were 17-57 % larger than the wild-type cells and displayed abnormal shapes. A proteomic comparison of plasma membranes isolated from ΔCPMA4-expressing and wild-type cells revealed the altered abundance of several proteins involved in cell wall synthesis, transport, and signal transduction. In conclusion, the data obtained in this work showed that H + -ATPase activation is sufficient to induce cell expansion and identified possible actors which intervene in this process.

  9. Progenitor potential of nkx6.1-expressing cells throughout zebrafish life and during beta cell regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaye, Aurélie P; Bergemann, David; Tarifeño-Saldivia, Estefania; Flasse, Lydie C; Von Berg, Virginie; Peers, Bernard; Voz, Marianne L; Manfroid, Isabelle

    2015-09-02

    In contrast to mammals, the zebrafish has the remarkable capacity to regenerate its pancreatic beta cells very efficiently. Understanding the mechanisms of regeneration in the zebrafish and the differences with mammals will be fundamental to discovering molecules able to stimulate the regeneration process in mammals. To identify the pancreatic cells able to give rise to new beta cells in the zebrafish, we generated new transgenic lines allowing the tracing of multipotent pancreatic progenitors and endocrine precursors. Using novel bacterial artificial chromosome transgenic nkx6.1 and ascl1b reporter lines, we established that nkx6.1-positive cells give rise to all the pancreatic cell types and ascl1b-positive cells give rise to all the endocrine cell types in the zebrafish embryo. These two genes are initially co-expressed in the pancreatic primordium and their domains segregate, not as a result of mutual repression, but through the opposite effects of Notch signaling, maintaining nkx6.1 expression while repressing ascl1b in progenitors. In the adult zebrafish, nkx6.1 expression persists exclusively in the ductal tree at the tip of which its expression coincides with Notch active signaling in centroacinar/terminal end duct cells. Tracing these cells reveals that they are able to differentiate into other ductal cells and into insulin-expressing cells in normal (non-diabetic) animals. This capacity of ductal cells to generate endocrine cells is supported by the detection of ascl1b in the nkx6.1:GFP ductal cell transcriptome. This transcriptome also reveals, besides actors of the Notch and Wnt pathways, several novel markers such as id2a. Finally, we show that beta cell ablation in the adult zebrafish triggers proliferation of ductal cells and their differentiation into insulin-expressing cells. We have shown that, in the zebrafish embryo, nkx6.1+ cells are bona fide multipotent pancreatic progenitors, while ascl1b+ cells represent committed endocrine precursors. In

  10. The Beta Cell in Its Cluster: Stochastic Graphs of Beta Cell Connectivity in the Islets of Langerhans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah A Striegel

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic islets of Langerhans consist of endocrine cells, primarily α, β and δ cells, which secrete glucagon, insulin, and somatostatin, respectively, to regulate plasma glucose. β cells form irregular locally connected clusters within islets that act in concert to secrete insulin upon glucose stimulation. Due to the central functional significance of this local connectivity in the placement of β cells in an islet, it is important to characterize it quantitatively. However, quantification of the seemingly stochastic cytoarchitecture of β cells in an islet requires mathematical methods that can capture topological connectivity in the entire β-cell population in an islet. Graph theory provides such a framework. Using large-scale imaging data for thousands of islets containing hundreds of thousands of cells in human organ donor pancreata, we show that quantitative graph characteristics differ between control and type 2 diabetic islets. Further insight into the processes that shape and maintain this architecture is obtained by formulating a stochastic theory of β-cell rearrangement in whole islets, just as the normal equilibrium distribution of the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process can be viewed as the result of the interplay between a random walk and a linear restoring force. Requiring that rearrangements maintain the observed quantitative topological graph characteristics strongly constrained possible processes. Our results suggest that β-cell rearrangement is dependent on its connectivity in order to maintain an optimal cluster size in both normal and T2D islets.

  11. The Beta Cell in Its Cluster: Stochastic Graphs of Beta Cell Connectivity in the Islets of Langerhans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striegel, Deborah A; Hara, Manami; Periwal, Vipul

    2015-08-01

    Pancreatic islets of Langerhans consist of endocrine cells, primarily α, β and δ cells, which secrete glucagon, insulin, and somatostatin, respectively, to regulate plasma glucose. β cells form irregular locally connected clusters within islets that act in concert to secrete insulin upon glucose stimulation. Due to the central functional significance of this local connectivity in the placement of β cells in an islet, it is important to characterize it quantitatively. However, quantification of the seemingly stochastic cytoarchitecture of β cells in an islet requires mathematical methods that can capture topological connectivity in the entire β-cell population in an islet. Graph theory provides such a framework. Using large-scale imaging data for thousands of islets containing hundreds of thousands of cells in human organ donor pancreata, we show that quantitative graph characteristics differ between control and type 2 diabetic islets. Further insight into the processes that shape and maintain this architecture is obtained by formulating a stochastic theory of β-cell rearrangement in whole islets, just as the normal equilibrium distribution of the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process can be viewed as the result of the interplay between a random walk and a linear restoring force. Requiring that rearrangements maintain the observed quantitative topological graph characteristics strongly constrained possible processes. Our results suggest that β-cell rearrangement is dependent on its connectivity in order to maintain an optimal cluster size in both normal and T2D islets.

  12. Hypothyroidism in utero stimulates pancreatic beta cell proliferation and hyperinsulinaemia in the ovine fetus during late gestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Shelley E; De Blasio, Miles J; Davis, Melissa A; Kelly, Amy C; Davenport, Hailey M; Wooding, F B Peter; Blache, Dominique; Meredith, David; Anderson, Miranda; Fowden, Abigail L; Limesand, Sean W; Forhead, Alison J

    2017-06-01

    Thyroid hormones are important regulators of growth and maturation before birth, although the extent to which their actions are mediated by insulin and the development of pancreatic beta cell mass is unknown. Hypothyroidism in fetal sheep induced by removal of the thyroid gland caused asymmetric organ growth, increased pancreatic beta cell mass and proliferation, and was associated with increased circulating concentrations of insulin and leptin. In isolated fetal sheep islets studied in vitro, thyroid hormones inhibited beta cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner, while high concentrations of insulin and leptin stimulated proliferation. The developing pancreatic beta cell is therefore sensitive to thyroid hormone, insulin and leptin before birth, with possible consequences for pancreatic function in fetal and later life. The findings of this study highlight the importance of thyroid hormones during pregnancy for normal development of the fetal pancreas. Development of pancreatic beta cell mass before birth is essential for normal growth of the fetus and for long-term control of carbohydrate metabolism in postnatal life. Thyroid hormones are also important regulators of fetal growth, and the present study tested the hypotheses that thyroid hormones promote beta cell proliferation in the fetal ovine pancreatic islets, and that growth retardation in hypothyroid fetal sheep is associated with reductions in pancreatic beta cell mass and circulating insulin concentration in utero. Organ growth and pancreatic islet cell proliferation and mass were examined in sheep fetuses following removal of the thyroid gland in utero. The effects of triiodothyronine (T 3 ), insulin and leptin on beta cell proliferation rates were determined in isolated fetal ovine pancreatic islets in vitro. Hypothyroidism in the sheep fetus resulted in an asymmetric pattern of organ growth, pancreatic beta cell hyperplasia, and elevated plasma insulin and leptin concentrations. In pancreatic

  13. Ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic stem cell by fusion protein TAT-Zfx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Chong; Zhang Yanbing; Jiang Hua

    2009-01-01

    The relative inability of hemopoietic stem cells (HSCs) to reproduce themselves (self-renew) ex vivo imposes substantial limitations on the current use of HSC transplantation. Recently, the transcription factor Zfx has been demonstrated that played an important in controlling the self-renewal of hematopoietic stem cells. Here, we reported that Zfx could enable high-level expansion of HSCs in vitro, by combination of protein transduction domain, TAT. Furthermore, we also demonstrated that expanded HSCs population retains their normal in vivo potential of pluripotency. It is thus that TAT-Zfx has the potential to expand HSCs significantly in vitro, and will have enormous clinical potentials.

  14. Arachidonic Acid-Induced Expression of the Organic Solute and Steroid Transporter-beta (Ost-beta) in a Cartilaginous Fish Cell Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jae-Ho; Parton, Angela; Czechanski, Anne; Ballatori, Nazzareno; Barnes, David

    2008-01-01

    The organic solute and steroid transporter (OST/Ost) is a unique membrane transport protein heterodimer composed of subunits designated alpha and beta, that transports conjugated steroids and prostaglandin E2 across the plasma membrane. Ost was first identified in the liver of the cartilaginous fish Leucoraja erinacea, the little skate, and subsequently was found in many other species, including humans and rodents. The present study describes the isolation of a new cell line, LEE-1, derived from an early embryo of L. erinacea, and characterizes the expression of Ost in these cells. The mRNA size and amino acid sequence of Ost-beta in LEE-1 was identical to that previously reported for Ost-beta from skate liver, and the primary structure was identical to that of the spiny dogfish shark (Squalus acanthias) with the exception of a single amino acid. Ost-beta was found both on the plasma membrane and intracellularly in LEE-1 cells, consistent with its localization in other cell types. Interestingly, arachidonic acid, the precursor to eiconsanoids, strongly induced Ost-beta expression in LEE-1 cells and a lipid mixture containing arachidonic acid also induced Ost-alpha. Overall, the present study describes the isolation of a novel marine cell line, and shows that this cell line expresses relatively high levels of Ost when cultured in the presence of arachidonic acid. Although the function of this transport protein in embryo-derived cells is unknown, it may play a role in the disposition of eicosanoids or steroid-derived molecules. PMID:18407792

  15. Beneficial Effect of Jojoba Seed Extracts on Hyperglycemia-Induced Oxidative Stress in RINm5f Beta Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belhadj, Sahla; Hentati, Olfa; Hamdaoui, Ghaith; Fakhreddine, Khaskhoussi; Maillard, Elisa; Dal, Stéphanie; Sigrist, Séverine

    2018-03-20

    Hyperglycemia occurs during diabetes and insulin resistance. It causes oxidative stress by increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, leading to cellular damage. Polyphenols play a central role in defense against oxidative stress. In our study, we investigated the antioxidant properties of simmondsin, a pure molecule present in jojoba seeds, and of the aqueous extract of jojoba seeds on fructose-induced oxidative stress in RINm5f beta cells. The exposure of RINm5f beta cells to fructose triggered the loss of cell viability (-48%, p jojoba seed extract makes jojoba a powerful agent to prevent the destruction of RINm5f beta cells induced by hyperglycemia.

  16. Wnt3a nanodisks promote ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lalefar, Nahal R.; Witkowski, Andrzej; Simonsen, Jens Bæk

    2016-01-01

    Background : Wnt proteins modulate development, stem cell fate and cancer through interactions with cell surface receptors. Wnts are cysteine-rich, glycosylated, lipid modified, two domain proteins that are prone to aggregation. The culprit responsible for this behavior is a covalently bound palm...... to Lin- Sca-1+ c-Kit+ cell expansion, an effect that was not mediated through β-catenin. Conclusions : The data indicate Wnt3a ND constitute a water-soluble transport vehicle capable of promoting ex vivo expansion of HSPC.......Background : Wnt proteins modulate development, stem cell fate and cancer through interactions with cell surface receptors. Wnts are cysteine-rich, glycosylated, lipid modified, two domain proteins that are prone to aggregation. The culprit responsible for this behavior is a covalently bound...... palmitoleoyl moiety in the N-terminal domain. Results : By combining murine Wnt3a with phospholipid and apolipoprotein A-I, ternary complexes termed nanodisks (ND) were generated. ND-associated Wnt3a is soluble in the absence of detergent micelles and gel filtration chromatography revealed that Wnt3a co...

  17. Methods of ex vivo expansion of human cord blood cells: challenges, successes and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Frédéric; Ruggeri, Annalisa; Nagler, Arnon

    2016-03-01

    More than 40,000 unrelated cord blood transplantations (UCBT) have been performed worldwide as treatment for patients with malignant or non-malignant life threatening hematologic disorders. However, low absolute numbers of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) within a single cord blood unit has remained a limiting factor for this transplantation modality, particularly in adult recipients. Further, because UCB contains low numbers of mostly naïve T cells, immune recovery after UCBT is slow, predisposing patients to severe infections. Other causes of UCBT failure has included graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and relapse of the underlying disease. In this article, we first review the current landscape of cord blood engineering aimed at improving engraftment. This includes approaches of UCB-HSPCs expansion and methods aimed at improving UCB-HSCPs homing. We then discuss recent approaches of cord blood engineering developed to prevent infection [generation of multivirus-specific cytotoxic T cells (VSTs) from UCB], relapse [transduction of UCB-T cells with tumor-specific chimeric receptor antigens (CARs)] and GVHD (expansion of regulatory T cells from UCB). Although many of these techniques of UCB engineering remain currently technically challenging and expensive, they are likely to revolutionize the field of UCBT in the next decades.

  18. In vitro expansion of Lin+ and Lin− mononuclear cells from human peripheral blood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norhaiza, H. Siti; Zarina, Z. A. Intan; Hisham, Z. A. Shahrul; Rohaya, M. A. W.

    2013-01-01

    Haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are used in the therapy of blood disorders due to the ability of these cells to reconstitute haematopoietic lineage cells when transplanted into myeloablative recipients. However, substantial number of cells is required in order for the reconstitution to take place. Since HSCs present in low frequency, larger number of donor is required to accommodate the demand of transplantable HSCs. Therefore, in vitro expansion of HSCs will have profound impact on clinical purposes. The aim of this study was to expand lineage negative (Lin − ) stem cells from human peripheral blood. Total peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs) were fractionated from human blood by density gradient centrifugation. Subsequently, PBMNCs were subjected to magnetic assisted cell sorter (MACS) which depletes lineage positive (Lin + ) mononuclear cells expressing lineage positive markers such as CD2, CD3, CD11b, CD14, CD15, CD16, CD19, CD56, CD123, and CD235a to obtained Lin − cell population. The ability of Lin + and Lin − to survive in vitro was explored by culturing both cell populations in complete medium consisting of Alpha-Minimal Essential Medium (AMEM) +10% (v/v) Newborn Calf Serum (NBCS)+ 2% (v/v) pen/strep. In another experiment, Lin + and Lin − were cultured with complete medium supplemented with 10ng/mL of the following growth factors: stem cell factor (SCF), interleukin (IL)-3, granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), 2IU/mL of Erythropoietin (Epo) and 20ng/mL of IL-6. Three samples were monitored in static culture for 22 days. The expansion potential was assessed by the number of total viable cells, counted by trypan blue exclusion assay. It was found that Lin + mononuclear cells were not able to survive either in normal proliferation medium or proliferation medium supplemented with cytokines. Similarly, Lin − stem cells were not able to survive in proliferation medium however, addition of cytokines into the proliferation

  19. In vitro expansion of Lin+ and Lin- mononuclear cells from human peripheral blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norhaiza, H. Siti; Rohaya, M. A. W.; Zarina, Z. A. Intan; Hisham, Z. A. Shahrul

    2013-11-01

    Haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are used in the therapy of blood disorders due to the ability of these cells to reconstitute haematopoietic lineage cells when transplanted into myeloablative recipients. However, substantial number of cells is required in order for the reconstitution to take place. Since HSCs present in low frequency, larger number of donor is required to accommodate the demand of transplantable HSCs. Therefore, in vitro expansion of HSCs will have profound impact on clinical purposes. The aim of this study was to expand lineage negative (Lin-) stem cells from human peripheral blood. Total peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs) were fractionated from human blood by density gradient centrifugation. Subsequently, PBMNCs were subjected to magnetic assisted cell sorter (MACS) which depletes lineage positive (Lin+) mononuclear cells expressing lineage positive markers such as CD2, CD3, CD11b, CD14, CD15, CD16, CD19, CD56, CD123, and CD235a to obtained Lin- cell population. The ability of Lin+ and Lin- to survive in vitro was explored by culturing both cell populations in complete medium consisting of Alpha-Minimal Essential Medium (AMEM) +10% (v/v) Newborn Calf Serum (NBCS)+ 2% (v/v) pen/strep. In another experiment, Lin+ and Lin- were cultured with complete medium supplemented with 10ng/mL of the following growth factors: stem cell factor (SCF), interleukin (IL)-3, granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), 2IU/mL of Erythropoietin (Epo) and 20ng/mL of IL-6. Three samples were monitored in static culture for 22 days. The expansion potential was assessed by the number of total viable cells, counted by trypan blue exclusion assay. It was found that Lin+ mononuclear cells were not able to survive either in normal proliferation medium or proliferation medium supplemented with cytokines. Similarly, Lin- stem cells were not able to survive in proliferation medium however, addition of cytokines into the proliferation medium support Lin

  20. Differential Recognition of CD1d-[alpha]-Galactosyl Ceramide by the V[beta]8.2 and V[beta]7 Semi-invariant NKT T Cell Receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pellicci, Daniel G.; Patel, Onisha; Kjer-Nielsen, Lars; Pang, Siew Siew; Sullivan, Lucy C.; Kyparissoudis, Konstantinos; Brooks, Andrew G.; Reid, Hugh H.; Gras, Stephanie; Lucet, Isabelle S.; Koh, Ruide; Smyth, Mark J.; Mallevaey, Thierry; Matsuda, Jennifer L.; Gapin, Laurent; McCluskey, James; Godfrey, Dale I.; Rossjohn, Jamie; PMCI-A; Monash; UCHSC; Melbourne

    2009-09-02

    The semi-invariant natural killer T cell receptor (NKT TCR) recognizes CD1d-lipid antigens. Although the TCR{alpha} chain is typically invariant, the {beta} chain expression is more diverse, where three V{beta} chains are commonly expressed in mice. We report the structures of V{alpha}14-V{beta}8.2 and V{alpha}14-V{beta}7 NKT TCRs in complex with CD1d-{alpha}-galactosylceramide ({alpha}-GalCer) and the 2.5 {angstrom} structure of the human NKT TCR-CD1d-{alpha}-GalCer complex. Both V{beta}8.2 and V{beta}7 NKT TCRs and the human NKT TCR ligated CD1d-{alpha}-GalCer in a similar manner, highlighting the evolutionarily conserved interaction. However, differences within the V{beta} domains of the V{beta}8.2 and V{beta}7 NKT TCR-CD1d complexes resulted in altered TCR{beta}-CD1d-mediated contacts and modulated recognition mediated by the invariant {alpha} chain. Mutagenesis studies revealed the differing contributions of V{beta}8.2 and V{beta}7 residues within the CDR2{beta} loop in mediating contacts with CD1d. Collectively we provide a structural basis for the differential NKT TCR V{beta} usage in NKT cells.

  1. COBRA encodes a putative GPI-anchored protein, which is polarly localized and necessary for oriented cell expansion in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindelman, G; Morikami, A; Jung, J; Baskin, T I; Carpita, N C; Derbyshire, P; McCann, M C; Benfey, P N

    2001-05-01

    To control organ shape, plant cells expand differentially. The organization of the cellulose microfibrils in the cell wall is a key determinant of differential expansion. Mutations in the COBRA (COB) gene of Arabidopsis, known to affect the orientation of cell expansion in the root, are reported here to reduce the amount of crystalline cellulose in cell walls in the root growth zone. The COB gene, identified by map-based cloning, contains a sequence motif found in proteins that are anchored to the extracellular surface of the plasma membrane through a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) linkage. In animal cells, this lipid linkage is known to confer polar localization to proteins. The COB protein was detected predominately on the longitudinal sides of root cells in the zone of rapid elongation. Moreover, COB RNA levels are dramatically upregulated in cells entering the zone of rapid elongation. Based on these results, models are proposed for the role of COB as a regulator of oriented cell expansion.

  2. In silico identification of NF-kappaB-regulated genes in pancreatic beta-cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eizirik Decio L

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pancreatic beta-cells are the target of an autoimmune attack in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM. This is mediated in part by cytokines, such as interleukin (IL-1β and interferon (IFN-γ. These cytokines modify the expression of hundreds of genes, leading to beta-cell dysfunction and death by apoptosis. Several of these cytokine-induced genes are potentially regulated by the IL-1β-activated transcription factor (TF nuclear factor (NF-κB, and previous studies by our group have shown that cytokine-induced NF-κB activation is pro-apoptotic in beta-cells. To identify NF-κB-regulated gene networks in beta-cells we presently used a discriminant analysis-based approach to predict NF-κB responding genes on the basis of putative regulatory elements. Results The performance of linear and quadratic discriminant analysis (LDA, QDA in identifying NF-κB-responding genes was examined on a dataset of 240 positive and negative examples of NF-κB regulation, using stratified cross-validation with an internal leave-one-out cross-validation (LOOCV loop for automated feature selection and noise reduction. LDA performed slightly better than QDA, achieving 61% sensitivity, 91% specificity and 87% positive predictive value, and allowing the identification of 231, 251 and 580 NF-κB putative target genes in insulin-producing INS-1E cells, primary rat beta-cells and human pancreatic islets, respectively. Predicted NF-κB targets had a significant enrichment in genes regulated by cytokines (IL-1β or IL-1β + IFN-γ and double stranded RNA (dsRNA, as compared to genes not regulated by these NF-κB-dependent stimuli. We increased the confidence of the predictions by selecting only evolutionary stable genes, i.e. genes with homologs predicted as NF-κB targets in rat, mouse, human and chimpanzee. Conclusion The present in silico analysis allowed us to identify novel regulatory targets of NF-κB using a supervised classification method based on

  3. Sight threatening retinopathy in a child with sickle cell &beta ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sight threatening changes in the retina are a well-recognized complication of sickle cell disease (SCD). However they usually occur in older patients with Haemoglobin SC or Sβ+thal patterns. It is rarely found under the age of 20 years in patients who are Hb SS or Sβ<°thal. This is a report of sight threatening retinopathy in ...

  4. Identification of beta-2 as a key cell adhesion molecule in PCa cell neurotropic behavior: a novel ex vivo and biophysical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansson, Keith H; Castillo, Deborah G; Morris, Joseph W; Boggs, Mary E; Czymmek, Kirk J; Adams, Elizabeth L; Schramm, Lawrence P; Sikes, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is believed to metastasize through the blood/lymphatics systems; however, PCa may utilize the extensive innervation of the prostate for glandular egress. The interaction of PCa and its nerve fibers is observed in 80% of PCa and is termed perineural invasion (PNI). PCa cells have been observed traveling through the endoneurium of nerves, although the underlying mechanisms have not been elucidated. Voltage sensitive sodium channels (VSSC) are multimeric transmembrane protein complexes comprised of a pore-forming α subunit and one or two auxiliary beta (β) subunits with inherent cell adhesion molecule (CAM) functions. The beta-2 isoform (gene SCN2B) interacts with several neural CAMs, while interacting putatively with other prominent neural CAMs. Furthermore, beta-2 exhibits elevated mRNA and protein levels in highly metastatic and castrate-resistant PCa. When overexpressed in weakly aggressive LNCaP cells (2BECFP), beta-2 alters LNCaP cell morphology and enhances LNCaP cell metastasis associated behavior in vitro. We hypothesize that PCa cells use beta-2 as a CAM during PNI and subsequent PCa metastasis. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of beta-2 expression on PCa cell neurotropic metastasis associated behavior. We overexpressed beta-2 as a fusion protein with enhanced cyan fluorescence protein (ECFP) in weakly aggressive LNCaP cells and observed neurotropic effects utilizing our novel ex vivo organotypic spinal cord co-culture model, and performed functional assays with neural matrices and atomic force microscopy. With increased beta-2 expression, PCa cells display a trend of enhanced association with nerve axons. On laminin, a neural CAM, overexpression of beta-2 enhances PCa cell migration, invasion, and growth. 2BECFP cells exhibit marked binding affinity to laminin relative to LNECFP controls, and recombinant beta-2 ectodomain elicits more binding events to laminin than BSA control. Functional overexpression of VSSC

  5. Skin cell isolation and expansion for cell transplantation is limited in patients using tobacco, alcohol, or are exhibiting diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnen, Christa; Hartmann, Bernd; Steffen, Ingo; Bräutigam, Kirsten; Witascheck, Tom; Toman, Nidal; Küntscher, Markus V; Gerlach, Jörg C

    2006-03-01

    The aim of this exploratory study was to investigate the isolation and expansion of keratinocytes and fibroblasts from donors with certain medical histories. Biopsies were taken from donors (N=32) falling into one or more of the following categories: a history of heavy smoking and/or alcohol abuse, drug abuse, diabetes mellitus or steroid treatment. Cells from donors who did not fall into any of the above-mentioned categories were used as controls. Proliferation and growth behaviour of cells were analyzed by measurement of passage duration, absorbance (MTT-assay) and light microscopy. Donors with a specific medical history required larger biopsy areas than the control group for isolating a sufficient number of fibroblasts and keratinocytes. Times to confluence were significantly prolonged and absorbances (MTT) were significantly reduced in several donor groups when compared to control cultures. Biopsies from donors with steroid treatment, drug abuse and combined nicotine and alcohol abuse could not be established beyond passage 0 degrees or 1 degree, respectively. We conclude that isolation and expansion of skin cells from donors with certain medical histories may require larger biopsies, prolonged expansion times or may even result in failure. These findings may therefore be of clinical importance in the field of autologous skin cell transplantation.

  6. Thymosin beta-4 promotes mesenchymal stem cell proliferation via an interleukin-8-dependent mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Byung-Joon; Yang, Yoolhee; Kyung Shim, Su; Yang, Heung-Mo; Cho, Daeho; Ik Bang, Sa

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) hold great promise for the field of tissue regeneration. Because only a limited number of MSCs can be obtained from each donor site, it is important to establish standard methods for MSC expansion using growth and trophic factors. Thymosin β4 (Tβ4) is a novel trophic factor that has antimicrobial effects and the potential to promote tissue repair. Tβ4 is a ubiquitous, naturally-occurring peptide in the wound bed. Therefore, the relationship between Tβ4 and MSCs, especially adjacent adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ASCs), merits consideration. Exogenous Tβ4 treatment enhanced the proliferation of human ASCs, resulting in prominent nuclear localization of PCNA immunoreactivity. In addition, exogenous Tβ4 also increased IL-8 secretion and blocking of IL-8 with neutralizing antibodies decreased Tβ4-induced ASC proliferation, suggesting that IL-8 is a critical mediator of Tβ4-enhanced proliferation. Moreover, Tβ4 activated phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and increased the nuclear translocation of NF-κB. These observation provide that Tβ4 promotes the expansion of human ASCs via an IL-8-dependent mechanism that involves the ERK and NF-κB pathways. Therefore, Tβ4 could be used as a tool for MSC expansion in cell therapeutics. - Highlights: • This is fundamental information required to correlate Tβ4 with MSC expansion. • MSC expansion by Tβ4 is involved in enhancement of IL-8 and ERK/NF-κB pathway. • Tβ4 could be used as a tool for MSC expansion in cell therapeutics

  7. Thymosin beta-4 promotes mesenchymal stem cell proliferation via an interleukin-8-dependent mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Byung-Joon [Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Korea University Medical Center, Gojan 1-dong, Danwon-gu, Ansan-si, Gyeonggi-do 425-707 (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Yoolhee; Kyung Shim, Su [Department of Plastic Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50 Ilwon-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Heung-Mo [Department of Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50 Ilwon-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Daeho, E-mail: cdhkor@sookmyung.ac.kr [Department of Life Science, Sookmyung Women' s University, Hyochangwon-gil 52, Yongsan-gu, Seoul 140-742 (Korea, Republic of); Ik Bang, Sa, E-mail: si55.bang@samsung.com [Department of Plastic Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50 Ilwon-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) hold great promise for the field of tissue regeneration. Because only a limited number of MSCs can be obtained from each donor site, it is important to establish standard methods for MSC expansion using growth and trophic factors. Thymosin β4 (Tβ4) is a novel trophic factor that has antimicrobial effects and the potential to promote tissue repair. Tβ4 is a ubiquitous, naturally-occurring peptide in the wound bed. Therefore, the relationship between Tβ4 and MSCs, especially adjacent adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ASCs), merits consideration. Exogenous Tβ4 treatment enhanced the proliferation of human ASCs, resulting in prominent nuclear localization of PCNA immunoreactivity. In addition, exogenous Tβ4 also increased IL-8 secretion and blocking of IL-8 with neutralizing antibodies decreased Tβ4-induced ASC proliferation, suggesting that IL-8 is a critical mediator of Tβ4-enhanced proliferation. Moreover, Tβ4 activated phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and increased the nuclear translocation of NF-κB. These observation provide that Tβ4 promotes the expansion of human ASCs via an IL-8-dependent mechanism that involves the ERK and NF-κB pathways. Therefore, Tβ4 could be used as a tool for MSC expansion in cell therapeutics. - Highlights: • This is fundamental information required to correlate Tβ4 with MSC expansion. • MSC expansion by Tβ4 is involved in enhancement of IL-8 and ERK/NF-κB pathway. • Tβ4 could be used as a tool for MSC expansion in cell therapeutics.

  8. Plume expansion of a laser-induced plasma studied with the particle-in-cell method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard, O.; Nedelea, T.; Schou, Jørgen

    2002-01-01

    energy as well as electron energy. We have estimated the time constant for energy transfer between the electrons and the ions. The scaling of these processes is given by a single parameter determined by the Debye length obtained from the electron density in the plasma outside the surface. (C) 2002......The initial stage of laser-induced plasma plume expansion from a solid in vacuum and the effect of the Coulomb field have been studied. We have performed a one-dimensional numerical calculation by mapping the charge on a computational grid according to the particle-in-cell (PIC) method of Birdsall...... et al. It is assumed that the particle ablation from a surface with a fixed temperature takes place as a pulse, i.e. within a finite period of time. A number of characteristic quantities for the plasma plume are compared with similar data for expansion of neutrals as well as fluid models: Density...

  9. Calcium Co-regulates Oxidative Metabolism and ATP Synthase-dependent Respiration in Pancreatic Beta Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Marchi, Umberto; Thevenet, Jonathan; Hermant, Aurelie; Dioum, Elhadji; Wiederkehr, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial energy metabolism is essential for glucose-induced calcium signaling and, therefore, insulin granule exocytosis in pancreatic beta cells. Calcium signals are sensed by mitochondria acting in concert with mitochondrial substrates for the full activation of the organelle. Here we have studied glucose-induced calcium signaling and energy metabolism in INS-1E insulinoma cells and human islet beta cells. In insulin secreting cells a surprisingly large fraction of total respiration under resting conditions is ATP synthase-independent. We observe that ATP synthase-dependent respiration is markedly increased after glucose stimulation. Glucose also causes a very rapid elevation of oxidative metabolism as was followed by NAD(P)H autofluorescence. However, neither the rate of the glucose-induced increase nor the new steady-state NAD(P)H levels are significantly affected by calcium. Our findings challenge the current view, which has focused mainly on calcium-sensitive dehydrogenases as the target for the activation of mitochondrial energy metabolism. We propose a model of tight calcium-dependent regulation of oxidative metabolism and ATP synthase-dependent respiration in beta cell mitochondria. Coordinated activation of matrix dehydrogenases and respiratory chain activity by calcium allows the respiratory rate to change severalfold with only small or no alterations of the NAD(P)H/NAD(P)+ ratio. PMID:24554722

  10. Sirt1 regulates insulin secretion by repressing UCP2 in pancreatic beta cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Bordone

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Sir2 and insulin/IGF-1 are the major pathways that impinge upon aging in lower organisms. In Caenorhabditis elegans a possible genetic link between Sir2 and the insulin/IGF-1 pathway has been reported. Here we investigate such a link in mammals. We show that Sirt1 positively regulates insulin secretion in pancreatic beta cells. Sirt1 represses the uncoupling protein (UCP gene UCP2 by binding directly to the UCP2 promoter. In beta cell lines in which Sirt1 is reduced by SiRNA, UCP2 levels are elevated and insulin secretion is blunted. The up-regulation of UCP2 is associated with a failure of cells to increase ATP levels after glucose stimulation. Knockdown of UCP2 restores the ability to secrete insulin in cells with reduced Sirt1, showing that UCP2 causes the defect in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Food deprivation induces UCP2 in mouse pancreas, which may occur via a reduction in NAD (a derivative of niacin levels in the pancreas and down-regulation of Sirt1. Sirt1 knockout mice display constitutively high UCP2 expression. Our findings show that Sirt1 regulates UCP2 in beta cells to affect insulin secretion.

  11. Neurofilament heavy polypeptide regulates the Akt-beta-catenin pathway in human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myoung Sook Kim

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Aerobic glycolysis and mitochondrial dysfunction are common features of aggressive cancer growth. We observed promoter methylation and loss of expression in neurofilament heavy polypeptide (NEFH in a significant proportion of primary esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC samples that were of a high tumor grade and advanced stage. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of NEFH accelerated ESCC cell growth in culture and increased tumorigenicity in vivo, whereas forced expression of NEFH significantly inhibited cell growth and colony formation. Loss of NEFH caused up-regulation of pyruvate kinase-M2 type and down-regulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase, via activation of the Akt/beta-catenin pathway, resulting in enhanced aerobic glycolysis and mitochondrial dysfunction. The acceleration of glycolysis and mitochondrial dysfunction in NEFH-knockdown cells was suppressed in the absence of beta-catenin expression, and was decreased by the treatment of 2-Deoxyglucose, a glycolytic inhibitor, or API-2, an Akt inhibitor. Loss of NEFH activates the Akt/beta-catenin pathway and increases glycolysis and mitochondrial dysfunction. Cancer cells with methylated NEFH can be targeted for destruction with specific inhibitors of deregulated downstream pathways.

  12. Low interleukin-2 concentration favors generation of early memory T cells over effector phenotypes during chimeric antigen receptor T-cell expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaartinen, Tanja; Luostarinen, Annu; Maliniemi, Pilvi; Keto, Joni; Arvas, Mikko; Belt, Heini; Koponen, Jonna; Loskog, Angelica; Mustjoki, Satu; Porkka, Kimmo; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo; Korhonen, Matti

    2017-06-01

    Adoptive T-cell therapy offers new options for cancer treatment. Clinical results suggest that T-cell persistence, depending on T-cell memory, improves efficacy. The use of interleukin (IL)-2 for in vitro T-cell expansion is not straightforward because it drives effector T-cell differentiation but does not promote the formation of T-cell memory. We have developed a cost-effective expansion protocol for chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells with an early memory phenotype. Lymphocytes were transduced with third-generation lentiviral vectors and expanded using CD3/CD28 microbeads. The effects of altering the IL-2 supplementation (0-300 IU/mL) and length of expansion (10-20 days) on the phenotype of the T-cell products were analyzed. High IL-2 levels led to a decrease in overall generation of early memory T cells by both decreasing central memory T cells and augmenting effectors. T memory stem cells (T SCM , CD95 + CD45RO - CD45RA + CD27 + ) were present variably during T-cell expansion. However, their presence was not IL-2 dependent but was linked to expansion kinetics. CD19-CAR T cells generated in these conditions displayed in vitro antileukemic activity. In summary, production of CAR T cells without any cytokine supplementation yielded the highest proportion of early memory T cells, provided a 10-fold cell expansion and the cells were functionally potent. The number of early memory T cells in a T-cell preparation can be increased by simply reducing the amount of IL-2 and limiting the length of T-cell expansion, providing cells with potentially higher in vivo performance. These findings are significant for robust and cost-effective T-cell manufacturing. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. An Abbreviated Protocol for In Vitro Generation of Functional Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Beta-Like Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Massumi

    Full Text Available The ability to yield glucose-responsive pancreatic beta-cells from human pluripotent stem cells in vitro will facilitate the development of the cell replacement therapies for the treatment of Type 1 Diabetes. Here, through the sequential in vitro targeting of selected signaling pathways, we have developed an abbreviated five-stage protocol (25-30 days to generate human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Beta-like Cells (ES-DBCs. We showed that Geltrex, as an extracellular matrix, could support the generation of ES-DBCs more efficiently than that of the previously described culture systems. The activation of FGF and Retinoic Acid along with the inhibition of BMP, SHH and TGF-beta led to the generation of 75% NKX6.1+/NGN3+ Endocrine Progenitors. The inhibition of Notch and tyrosine kinase receptor AXL, and the treatment with Exendin-4 and T3 in the final stage resulted in 35% mono-hormonal insulin positive cells, 1% insulin and glucagon positive cells and 30% insulin and NKX6.1 co-expressing cells. Functionally, ES-DBCs were responsive to high glucose in static incubation and perifusion studies, and could secrete insulin in response to successive glucose stimulations. Mitochondrial metabolic flux analyses using Seahorse demonstrated that the ES-DBCs could efficiently metabolize glucose and generate intracellular signals to trigger insulin secretion. In conclusion, targeting selected signaling pathways for 25-30 days was sufficient to generate ES-DBCs in vitro. The ability of ES-DBCs to secrete insulin in response to glucose renders them a promising model for the in vitro screening of drugs, small molecules or genes that may have potential to influence beta-cell function.

  14. A chemically defined substrate for the expansion and neuronal differentiation of human pluripotent stem cell-derived neural progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yihuan; Cutts, Josh; Kimura, Azuma; Varun, Divya; Brafman, David A

    2015-07-01

    Due to the limitation of current pharmacological therapeutic strategies, stem cell therapies have emerged as a viable option for treating many incurable neurological disorders. Specifically, human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC)-derived neural progenitor cells (hNPCs), a multipotent cell population that is capable of near indefinite expansion and subsequent differentiation into the various cell types that comprise the central nervous system (CNS), could provide an unlimited source of cells for such cell-based therapies. However the clinical application of these cells will require (i) defined, xeno-free conditions for their expansion and neuronal differentiation and (ii) scalable culture systems that enable their expansion and neuronal differentiation in numbers sufficient for regenerative medicine and drug screening purposes. Current extracellular matrix protein (ECMP)-based substrates for the culture of hNPCs are expensive, difficult to isolate, subject to batch-to-batch variations, and, therefore, unsuitable for clinical application of hNPCs. Using a high-throughput array-based screening approach, we identified a synthetic polymer, poly(4-vinyl phenol) (P4VP), that supported the long-term proliferation and self-renewal of hNPCs. The hNPCs cultured on P4VP maintained their characteristic morphology, expressed high levels of markers of multipotency, and retained their ability to differentiate into neurons. Such chemically defined substrates will eliminate critical roadblocks for the utilization of hNPCs for human neural regenerative repair, disease modeling, and drug discovery. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Nutrient regulation by continuous feeding removes limitations on cell yield in the large-scale expansion of Mammalian cell spheroids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley P Weegman

    Full Text Available Cellular therapies are emerging as a standard approach for the treatment of several diseases. However, realizing the promise of cellular therapies across the full range of treatable disorders will require large-scale, controlled, reproducible culture methods. Bioreactor systems offer the scale-up and monitoring needed, but standard stirred bioreactor cultures do not allow for the real-time regulation of key nutrients in the medium. In this study, β-TC6 insulinoma cells were aggregated and cultured for 3 weeks as a model of manufacturing a mammalian cell product. Cell expansion rates and medium nutrient levels were compared in static, stirred suspension bioreactors (SSB, and continuously fed (CF SSB. While SSB cultures facilitated increased culture volumes, no increase in cell yields were observed, partly due to limitations in key nutrients, which were consumed by the cultures between feedings, such as glucose. Even when glucose levels were increased to prevent depletion between feedings, dramatic fluctuations in glucose levels were observed. Continuous feeding eliminated fluctuations and improved cell expansion when compared with both static and SSB culture methods. Further improvements in growth rates were observed after adjusting the feed rate based on calculated nutrient depletion, which maintained physiological glucose levels for the duration of the expansion. Adjusting the feed rate in a continuous medium replacement system can maintain the consistent nutrient levels required for the large-scale application of many cell products. Continuously fed bioreactor systems combined with nutrient regulation can be used to improve the yield and reproducibility of mammalian cells for biological products and cellular therapies and will facilitate the translation of cell culture from the research lab to clinical applications.

  16. Nutrient Regulation by Continuous Feeding Removes Limitations on Cell Yield in the Large-Scale Expansion of Mammalian Cell Spheroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weegman, Bradley P.; Nash, Peter; Carlson, Alexandra L.; Voltzke, Kristin J.; Geng, Zhaohui; Jahani, Marjan; Becker, Benjamin B.; Papas, Klearchos K.; Firpo, Meri T.

    2013-01-01

    Cellular therapies are emerging as a standard approach for the treatment of several diseases. However, realizing the promise of cellular therapies across the full range of treatable disorders will require large-scale, controlled, reproducible culture methods. Bioreactor systems offer the scale-up and monitoring needed, but standard stirred bioreactor cultures do not allow for the real-time regulation of key nutrients in the medium. In this study, β-TC6 insulinoma cells were aggregated and cultured for 3 weeks as a model of manufacturing a mammalian cell product. Cell expansion rates and medium nutrient levels were compared in static, stirred suspension bioreactors (SSB), and continuously fed (CF) SSB. While SSB cultures facilitated increased culture volumes, no increase in cell yields were observed, partly due to limitations in key nutrients, which were consumed by the cultures between feedings, such as glucose. Even when glucose levels were increased to prevent depletion between feedings, dramatic fluctuations in glucose levels were observed. Continuous feeding eliminated fluctuations and improved cell expansion when compared with both static and SSB culture methods. Further improvements in growth rates were observed after adjusting the feed rate based on calculated nutrient depletion, which maintained physiological glucose levels for the duration of the expansion. Adjusting the feed rate in a continuous medium replacement system can maintain the consistent nutrient levels required for the large-scale application of many cell products. Continuously fed bioreactor systems combined with nutrient regulation can be used to improve the yield and reproducibility of mammalian cells for biological products and cellular therapies and will facilitate the translation of cell culture from the research lab to clinical applications. PMID:24204645

  17. Glucocorticoids Inhibit Basal and Hormone-Induced Serotonin Synthesis in Pancreatic Beta Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moina Hasni Ebou

    Full Text Available Diabetes is a major complication of chronic Glucocorticoids (GCs treatment. GCs induce insulin resistance and also inhibit insulin secretion from pancreatic beta cells. Yet, a full understanding of this negative regulation remains to be deciphered. In the present study, we investigated whether GCs could inhibit serotonin synthesis in beta cell since this neurotransmitter has been shown to be involved in the regulation of insulin secretion. To this aim, serotonin synthesis was evaluated in vitro after treatment with GCs of either islets from CD1 mice or MIN6 cells, a beta-cell line. We also explored the effect of GCs on the stimulation of serotonin synthesis by several hormones such as prolactin and GLP 1. We finally studied this regulation in islet in two in vivo models: mice treated with GCs and with liraglutide, a GLP1 analog, and mice deleted for the glucocorticoid receptor in the pancreas. We showed in isolated islets and MIN6 cells that GCs decreased expression and activity of the two key enzymes of serotonin synthesis, Tryptophan Hydroxylase 1 (Tph1 and 2 (Tph2, leading to reduced serotonin contents. GCs also blocked the induction of serotonin synthesis by prolactin or by a previously unknown serotonin activator, the GLP-1 analog exendin-4. In vivo, activation of the Glucagon-like-Peptide-1 receptor with liraglutide during 4 weeks increased islet serotonin contents and GCs treatment prevented this increase. Finally, islets from mice deleted for the GR in the pancreas displayed an increased expression of Tph1 and Tph2 and a strong increased serotonin content per islet. In conclusion, our results demonstrate an original inhibition of serotonin synthesis by GCs, both in basal condition and after stimulation by prolactin or activators of the GLP-1 receptor. This regulation may contribute to the deleterious effects of GCs on beta cells.

  18. Functional labeling of insulin receptor subunits in live cells. Alpha 2 beta 2 species is the major autophosphorylated form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Marchand-Brustel, Y.; Ballotti, R.; Gremeaux, T.; Tanti, J.F.; Brandenburg, D.; Van Obberghen, E.

    1989-01-01

    Both receptor subunits were functionally labeled in order to provide methods allowing, in live cells and in broken cell systems, concomitant evaluation of the insulin receptor dual function, hormone binding, and kinase activity. In cell-free systems, insulin receptors were labeled on their alpha-subunit with 125I-photoreactive insulin, and on their beta-subunit by autophosphorylation. Thereafter, phosphorylated receptors were separated from the complete set of receptors by means of anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies. Using this approach, a subpopulation of receptors was found which had bound insulin, but which were not phosphorylated. Under nonreducing conditions, receptors appeared in three oligomeric species identified as alpha 2 beta 2, alpha 2 beta, and alpha 2. Mainly the alpha 2 beta 2 receptor species was found to be phosphorylated while insulin was bound to alpha 2 beta 2, alpha 2 beta, and alpha 2 forms. In live cells, biosynthetic labeling of insulin receptors was used. Receptors were first labeled with [35S]methionine. Subsequently, the addition of insulin led to receptor autophosphorylation by virtue of the endogenous ATP pool. The total amount of [35S]methionine-labeled receptors was precipitated with antireceptor antibodies, whereas with anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies, only the phosphorylated receptors were isolated. Using this approach we made the two following key findings: (1) Both receptor species, alpha 2 beta 2 and alpha 2 beta, are present in live cells and in comparable amounts. This indicates that the alpha 2 beta form is not a degradation product of the alpha 2 beta 2 form artificially generated during receptor preparation. (2) The alpha 2 beta 2 species is the prevalently autophosphorylated form

  19. Ionizing radiation predisposes non-malignant human mammaryepithelial cells to undergo TGF beta-induced epithelial to mesenchymaltransition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andarawewa, Kumari L.; Erickson, Anna C.; Chou, William S.; Costes, Sylvain; Gascard, Philippe; Mott, Joni D.; Bissell, Mina J.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen

    2007-04-06

    Transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF{beta}) is a tumor suppressor during the initial stage of tumorigenesis, but it can switch to a tumor promoter during neoplastic progression. Ionizing radiation (IR), both a carcinogen and a therapeutic agent, induces TGF{beta}, activation in vivo. We now show that IR sensitizes human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) to undergo TGF{beta}-mediated epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). Non-malignant HMEC (MCF10A, HMT3522 S1 and 184v) were irradiated with 2 Gy shortly after attachment in monolayer culture, or treated with a low concentration of TGF{beta} (0.4 ng/ml), or double-treated. All double-treated (IR+TGF{beta}) HMEC underwent a morphological shift from cuboidal to spindle-shaped. This phenotype was accompanied by decreased expression of epithelial markers E-cadherin, {beta}-catenin and ZO-1, remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton, and increased expression of mesenchymal markers N-cadherin, fibronectin and vimentin. Furthermore, double-treatment increased cell motility, promoted invasion and disrupted acinar morphogenesis of cells subsequently plated in Matrigel{trademark}. Neither radiation nor TGF{beta} alone elicited EMT, even though IR increased chronic TGF{beta} signaling and activity. Gene expression profiling revealed that double treated cells exhibit a specific 10-gene signature associated with Erk/MAPK signaling. We hypothesized that IR-induced MAPK activation primes non-malignant HMEC to undergo TGF{beta}-mediated EMT. Consistent with this, Erk phosphorylation were transiently induced by irradiation, persisted in irradiated cells treated with TGF{beta}, and treatment with U0126, a Mek inhibitor, blocked the EMT phenotype. Together, these data demonstrate that the interactions between radiation-induced signaling pathways elicit heritable phenotypes that could contribute to neoplastic progression.

  20. Isoreserpine promotes {beta}-catenin degradation via Siah-1 up-regulation in HCT116 colon cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gwak, Jungsug; Song, Taeyun [PharmacoGenomics Research Center, Inje University, Busan 614-735 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Jie-Young; Yun, Yeon-Sook [Laboratory of Radiation Cancer Science, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Il-Whan [Department of Microbiology, Center for Viral Disease Research, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan 614-735 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Yongsu [Department of Genetic Engineering, and Graduate School of Biotechnology, Kyung Hee University, Yongin 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Jae-Gook [PharmacoGenomics Research Center, Inje University, Busan 614-735 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Inje University Busan Paik Hospital, Busan 614-735 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Sangtaek, E-mail: ohsa@inje.ac.kr [PharmacoGenomics Research Center, Inje University, Busan 614-735 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-09-25

    Aberrant accumulation of intracellular {beta}-catenin in intestinal epithelial cells is a frequent early event during the development of colon cancer. To identify small molecules that decrease the level of intracellular {beta}-catenin, we performed cell-based chemical screening using genetically engineered HEK293 reporter cells to detect compounds that inhibit TOPFlash reporter activity, which was stimulated by Wnt3a-conditioned medium. We found that isoreserpine promoted the degradation of intracellular {beta}-catenin by up-regulation of Siah-1 in HEK293 and HCT116 colon cancer cells. Moreover, isoreserpine repressed the expression of {beta}-catenin/T-cell factor (TCF)-dependent genes, such as cyclin D1 and c-myc, resulting in the suppression of HCT116 cell proliferation. Our findings suggest that isoreserpine can potentially be used as a chemotherapeutic agent against colon cancer.

  1. Evaluating Clonal Expansion of HIV-Infected Cells: Optimization of PCR Strategies to Predict Clonality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskey, Sarah B.; Pohlmeyer, Christopher W.; Bruner, Katherine M.; Siliciano, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    In HIV-infected individuals receiving suppressive antiretroviral therapy, the virus persists indefinitely in a reservoir of latently infected cells. The proliferation of these cells may contribute to the stability of the reservoir and thus to the lifelong persistence of HIV-1 in infected individuals. Because the HIV-1 replication process is highly error-prone, the detection of identical viral genomes in distinct host cells provides evidence for the clonal expansion of infected cells. We evaluated alignments of unique, near-full-length HIV-1 sequences to determine the relationship between clonality in a short region and clonality in the full genome. Although it is common to amplify and sequence short, subgenomic regions of the viral genome for phylogenetic analysis, we show that sequence identity of these amplicons does not guarantee clonality across the full viral genome. We show that although longer amplicons capture more diversity, no subgenomic region can recapitulate the diversity of full viral genomes. Consequently, some identical subgenomic amplicons should be expected even from the analysis of completely unique viral genomes, and the presence of identical amplicons alone is not proof of clonally expanded HIV-1. We present a method for evaluating evidence of clonal expansion in the context of these findings. PMID:27494508

  2. Evaluating Clonal Expansion of HIV-Infected Cells: Optimization of PCR Strategies to Predict Clonality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah B Laskey

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In HIV-infected individuals receiving suppressive antiretroviral therapy, the virus persists indefinitely in a reservoir of latently infected cells. The proliferation of these cells may contribute to the stability of the reservoir and thus to the lifelong persistence of HIV-1 in infected individuals. Because the HIV-1 replication process is highly error-prone, the detection of identical viral genomes in distinct host cells provides evidence for the clonal expansion of infected cells. We evaluated alignments of unique, near-full-length HIV-1 sequences to determine the relationship between clonality in a short region and clonality in the full genome. Although it is common to amplify and sequence short, subgenomic regions of the viral genome for phylogenetic analysis, we show that sequence identity of these amplicons does not guarantee clonality across the full viral genome. We show that although longer amplicons capture more diversity, no subgenomic region can recapitulate the diversity of full viral genomes. Consequently, some identical subgenomic amplicons should be expected even from the analysis of completely unique viral genomes, and the presence of identical amplicons alone is not proof of clonally expanded HIV-1. We present a method for evaluating evidence of clonal expansion in the context of these findings.

  3. Measuring phospholipase D activity in insulin-secreting pancreatic beta-cells and insulin-responsive muscle cells and adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazzolli, Rosanna; Huang, Ping; Teng, Shuzhi; Hughes, William E

    2009-01-01

    Phospholipase D (PLD) is an enzyme producing phosphatidic acid and choline through hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine. The enzyme has been identified as a member of a variety of signal transduction cascades and as a key regulator of numerous intracellular vesicle trafficking processes. A role for PLD in regulating glucose homeostasis is emerging as the enzyme has recently been identified in events regulating exocytosis of insulin from pancreatic beta-cells and also in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake through controlling GLUT4 vesicle exocytosis in muscle and adipose tissue. We present methodologies for assessing cellular PLD activity in secretagogue-stimulated insulin-secreting pancreatic beta-cells and also insulin-stimulated adipocyte and muscle cells, two of the principal insulin-responsive cell types controlling blood glucose levels.

  4. Limit-dilution assay and clonal expansion of all T cells capable of proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, W.-F.; Wilson, A.; Scollay, R.; Shortman, K.

    1982-01-01

    A limit-dilution microculture system is presented in which almost all mature T cells, cultured at a level of about 1 cell/well, grow and expand to clones averaging 60,000 cells over an 8-9 day period. Cloning efficiency is 70-100%, so the set of expanded clones is representative of the starting T-cell population. T cells of all Lyt phenotypes form clones of progeny cells. The system involves culture in flat-bottom microtitre trays, in the presence of concanavalin A as the initiating stimulus, together with appropriately irradiated spleen filler cells and a supplementary source of soluble T cell growth factors. The resultant clones may be screened for cytolytic function, as described in the accompanying paper. The system may be used to assay the level of T cells capable of expansion or precursor function (PTL-p) by using [ 3 H]TdR uptake as a readout for the presence or absence of proliferating clones. Analysis of the frequency of positive cultures shows a good fit to the expected Poisson distribution, with no evidence of complicating suppressor or helper effects. (Auth.)

  5. Limit-dilution assay and clonal expansion of all T cells capable of proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, W.F.; Wilson, A.; Scollay, R.; Shortman, K. (Walter and Eliza Hall Inst. of Medical Research, Parkville (Australia))

    1982-08-13

    A limit-dilution microculture system is presented in which almost all mature T cells, cultured at a level of about 1 cell/well, grow and expand to clones averaging 60,000 cells over an 8-9 day period. Cloning efficiency is 70-100%, so the set of expanded clones is representative of the starting T-cell population. T cells of all Lyt phenotypes form clones of progeny cells. The system involves culture in flat-bottom microtitre trays, in the presence of concanavalin A as the initiating stimulus, together with appropriately irradiated spleen filler cells and a supplementary source of soluble T cell growth factors. The resultant clones may be screened for cytolytic function, as described in the accompanying paper. The system may be used to assay the level of T cells capable of expansion or precursor function (PTL-p) by using (/sup 3/H)TdR uptake as a readout for the presence or absence of proliferating clones. Analysis of the frequency of positive cultures shows a good fit to the expected Poisson distribution, with no evidence of complicating suppressor or helper effects.

  6. Human beta-cell precursors mature into functional insulin-producing cells in an immunoisolation device: implications for diabetes cell therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Hee; Hao, Ergeng; Savinov, Alexei Y; Geron, Ifat; Strongin, Alex Y; Itkin-Ansari, Pamela

    2009-04-15

    Islet transplantation is limited by the need for chronic immunosuppression and the paucity of donor tissue. As new sources of human beta-cells are developed (e.g., stem cell-derived tissue), transplanting them in a durable device could obviate the need for immunosuppression, while also protecting the patient from any risk of tumorigenicity. Here, we studied (1) the survival and function of encapsulated human beta-cells and their progenitors and (2) the engraftment of encapsulated murine beta-cells in allo- and autoimmune settings. Human islets and human fetal pancreatic islet-like cell clusters were encapsulated in polytetrafluorethylene devices (TheraCyte) and transplanted into immunodeficient mice. Graft survival and function was measured by immunohistochemistry, circulating human C-peptide levels, and blood glucose levels. Bioluminescent imaging was used to monitor encapsulated neonatal murine islets. Encapsulated human islet-like cell clusters survived, replicated, and acquired a level of glucose responsive insulin secretion sufficient to ameliorate hyperglycemia in diabetic mice. Bioluminescent imaging of encapsulated murine neonatal islets revealed a dynamic process of cell death followed by regrowth, resulting in robust long-term allograft survival. Further, in the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model of type I diabetes, encapsulated primary beta-cells ameliorated diabetes without stimulating a detectable T-cell response. We demonstrate for the first time that human beta-cells function is compatible with encapsulation in a durable, immunoprotective device. Moreover, our study suggests that encapsulation of beta-cells before terminal differentiation will be a successful approach for new cell-based therapies for diabetes, such as those derived from stem cells.

  7. Influence of patient related factors on number of mesenchymal stromal cells reached after in vitro culture expansion for clinical treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qayyum, Abbas Ali; Kaur, Kamal Preet; Mathiasen, Anders Bruun

    2017-01-01

    of autologous stromal cells reached after in vitro culture expansion for clinical therapy. METHODS: Culture expansion data from 111 patients with IHD treated with autologous stromal cells in three clinical trials were used. We correlated the final cell count after two passages of cultivation with different...... correlation between left ventricular ejection fraction and number of MSCs was found (r = -0.287, p = .017). CONCLUSIONS: Patient related factors such as BMI, hypertension and gender may influence the number of MSCs reached after in vitro culture expansion....... patient factors. RESULTS: There was a significant relation between body mass index (BMI) and the number of adipose derived stromal cells (ASCs) reached after culture expansion and for all patients included into the three studies (r = 0.375, p = .019 and r = 0.200, p = .036, respectively). Moreover...

  8. Bioreactor systems for tissue engineering II. Strategies for the expansion and directed differentiation of stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasper, Cornelia [Hannover Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Technische Chemie; Griensven, Martijn van [Ludwig Boltzmann Institut fuer Klinische und Experimentelle Traumatologie, Wien (Austria); Poertner, Ralf (eds.) [Technische Univ. Hamburg-Harburg (Germany). Inst. Biotechnologie und Verfahrenstechnik

    2010-07-01

    Alternative Sources of Adult Stem Cells: Human Amniotic Membrane, by S. Wolbank, M. van Griensven, R. Grillari-Voglauer, and A. Peterbauer-Scherb; - Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Derived from Human Umbilical Cord Tissues: Primitive Cells with Potential for Clinical and Tissue Engineering Applications, by P. Moretti, T. Hatlapatka, D. Marten, A. Lavrentieva, I. Majore, R. Hass and C. Kasper; - Isolation, Characterization, Differentiation, and Application of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells, by J. W. Kuhbier, B. Weyand, C. Radtke, P. M. Vogt, C. Kasper and K. Reimers; - Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells: Characteristics and Perspectives, by T. Cantz and U. Martin; - Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Technology in Regenerative Medicine and Biology, by D. Pei, J. Xu, Q. Zhuang, H.-F. Tse and M. A. Esteban; - Production Process for Stem Cell Based Therapeutic Implants: Expansion of the Production Cell Line and Cultivation of Encapsulated Cells, by C. Weber, S. Pohl, R. Poertner, P. Pino-Grace, D. Freimark, C. Wallrapp, P. Geigle and P. Czermak; - Cartilage Engineering from Mesenchymal Stem Cells, by C. Goepfert, A. Slobodianski, A.F. Schilling, P. Adamietz and R. Poertner; - Outgrowth Endothelial Cells: Sources, Characteristics and Potential Applications in Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, by S. Fuchs, E. Dohle, M. Kolbe, C. J. Kirkpatrick; - Basic Science and Clinical Application of Stem Cells in Veterinary Medicine, by I. Ribitsch, J. Burk, U. Delling, C. Geissler, C. Gittel, H. Juelke, W. Brehm; - Bone Marrow Stem Cells in Clinical Application: Harnessing Paracrine Roles and Niche Mechanisms, by R. M. El Backly, R. Cancedda; - Clinical Application of Stem Cells in the Cardiovascular System, C. Stamm, K. Klose, Y.-H. Choi. (orig.)

  9. TGF-beta1 signaling plays a dominant role in the crosstalk between TGF-beta1 and the aryl hydrocarbon receptor ligand in prostate epithelial cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Staršíchová, Andrea; Hrubá, E.; Slabáková, Eva; Pernicová, Zuzana; Procházková, Jiřina; Pěnčíková, K.; Šeda, Václav; Kabátková, Markéta; Vondráček, Jan; Kozubík, Alois; Machala, M.; Souček, Karel

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 8 (2012), s. 1665-1676 ISSN 0898-6568 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA310/07/0961 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : transforming growth factor-beta * aryl hydrocarbon receptor ligand * prostate epithelial cells Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 4.304, year: 2012

  10. Effect of intraovarian factors on porcine follicular cells: cumulus expansion, granulosa and cumulus cell progesterone production

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ježová, M.; Scsuková, S.; Nagyová, Eva; Vranová, J.; Procházka, Radek; Kolena, J.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 65, - (2001), s. 115-126 ISSN 0378-4320 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA524/98/0231; GA AV ČR KSK5052113 Keywords : pig-ovary * cumulus expansion * luteinization stimulator Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.196, year: 2001

  11. Matrix expansion and syncytial aggregation of syndecan-1+ cells underpin villous atrophy in coeliac disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilla Salvestrini

    Full Text Available We studied the expression of sulphated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs in coeliac disease (CD mucosa, as they are critical determinants of tissue volume, which increases in active disease. We also examined mucosal expression of IL-6, which stimulates excess GAG synthesis in disorders such as Grave's ophthalmopathy.We stained archival jejunal biopsies from 5 children with CD at diagnosis, on gluten-free diet and challenge for sulphated GAGs. We then examined duodenal biopsies from 9 children with CD compared to 9 histological normal controls, staining for sulphated GAGs, heparan sulphate proteoglycans (HSPG, short-chain HSPG (Δ-HSPG and the proteoglycan syndecan-1 (CD138, which is expressed on epithelium and plasma cells. We confirmed findings with a second monoclonal in another 12 coeliac children. We determined mucosal IL-6 expression by immunohistochemistry and PCR in 9 further cases and controls, and used quantitative real time PCR for other Th17 pathway cytokines in an additional 10 cases and controls.In CD, HSPG expression was lost in the epithelial compartment but contrastingly maintained within an expanded lamina propria. Within the upper lamina propria, clusters of syndecan-1(+ plasma cells formed extensive syncytial sheets, comprising adherent plasma cells, lysed cells with punctate cytoplasmic staining and shed syndecan ectodomains. A dense infiltrate of IL-6(+ mononuclear cells was detected in active coeliac disease, also localised to the upper lamina propria, with significantly increased mRNA expression of IL-6 and IL-17A but not IL-23 p19.Matrix expansion, through syndecan-1(+ cell recruitment and lamina propria GAG increase, underpins villous atrophy in coeliac disease. The syndecan-1(+ cell syncytia and excess GAG production recapitulate elements of the invertebrate encapsulation reaction, itself dependent on insect transglutaminase and glutaminated early response proteins. As in other matrix expansion disorders, IL-6 is upregulated and

  12. Matrix Expansion and Syncytial Aggregation of Syndecan-1+ Cells Underpin Villous Atrophy in Coeliac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvestrini, Camilla; Lucas, Mark; Lionetti, Paolo; Torrente, Franco; James, Sean; Phillips, Alan D.; Murch, Simon H.

    2014-01-01

    Background We studied the expression of sulphated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in coeliac disease (CD) mucosa, as they are critical determinants of tissue volume, which increases in active disease. We also examined mucosal expression of IL-6, which stimulates excess GAG synthesis in disorders such as Grave's ophthalmopathy. Methods We stained archival jejunal biopsies from 5 children with CD at diagnosis, on gluten-free diet and challenge for sulphated GAGs. We then examined duodenal biopsies from 9 children with CD compared to 9 histological normal controls, staining for sulphated GAGs, heparan sulphate proteoglycans (HSPG), short-chain HSPG (Δ-HSPG) and the proteoglycan syndecan-1 (CD138), which is expressed on epithelium and plasma cells. We confirmed findings with a second monoclonal in another 12 coeliac children. We determined mucosal IL-6 expression by immunohistochemistry and PCR in 9 further cases and controls, and used quantitative real time PCR for other Th17 pathway cytokines in an additional 10 cases and controls. Results In CD, HSPG expression was lost in the epithelial compartment but contrastingly maintained within an expanded lamina propria. Within the upper lamina propria, clusters of syndecan-1+ plasma cells formed extensive syncytial sheets, comprising adherent plasma cells, lysed cells with punctate cytoplasmic staining and shed syndecan ectodomains. A dense infiltrate of IL-6+ mononuclear cells was detected in active coeliac disease, also localised to the upper lamina propria, with significantly increased mRNA expression of IL-6 and IL-17A but not IL-23 p19. Conclusions Matrix expansion, through syndecan-1+ cell recruitment and lamina propria GAG increase, underpins villous atrophy in coeliac disease. The syndecan-1+ cell syncytia and excess GAG production recapitulate elements of the invertebrate encapsulation reaction, itself dependent on insect transglutaminase and glutaminated early response proteins. As in other matrix expansion disorders

  13. Creatine kinase BB and beta-2-microglobulin as markers of CNS metastases in patients with small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, A G; Bach, F W; Nissen, Mogens Holst

    1985-01-01

    Creatine kinase (CK) and its BB isoenzyme (CK-BB) were measured in CSF in 65 evaluable patients suspected of CNS metastases secondary to small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). In addition, CSF and plasma levels of beta-2-microglobulin (beta-2-m) were measured in a group of 73 evaluable patients. Of the 65...

  14. Imatinib prevents beta cell death in vitro but does not improve islet transplantation outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Aileen J F; Griffiths, Lisa A; Persaud, Shanta J; Jones, Peter M; Howell, Simon L; Welsh, Nils

    2016-05-01

    Introduction Improving islet transplantation outcome could not only bring benefits to individual patients but also widen the patient pool to which this life-changing treatment is available. Imatinib has previously been shown to protect beta cells from apoptosis in a variety of in vitro and in vivo models. The aim of this study was to investigate whether imatinib could be used to improve islet transplantation outcome. Methods Islets were isolated from C57Bl/6 mice and pre-cultured with imatinib prior to exposure to streptozotocin and cytokines in vitro. Cell viability and glucose-induced insulin secretion were measured. For transplantation experiments, islets were pre-cultured with imatinib for either 72 h or 24 h prior to transplantation into streptozotocin-diabetic C57Bl/6 mice. In one experimental series mice were also administered imatinib after islet transplantation. Results Imatinib partially protected islets from beta cell death in vitro. However, pre-culturing islets in imatinib or administering the drug to the mice in the days following islet transplantation did not improve blood glucose concentrations more than control-cultured islets. Conclusion Although imatinib protected against beta cell death from cytokines and streptozotocin in vitro, it did not significantly improve syngeneic islet transplantation outcome.

  15. Distinct roles for dystroglycan, beta1 integrin and perlecan in cell surface laminin organization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henry, M D; Satz, J S; Brakebusch, C

    2001-01-01

    Dystroglycan (DG) is a cell surface receptor for several extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules including laminins, agrin and perlecan. Recent data indicate that DG function is required for the formation of basement membranes in early development and the organization of laminin on the cell surface...... integrin-deficient ES cells, laminin-1 binds to the cell surface, but fails to organize into more morphologically complex structures. This result indicates that beta1 integrin function is required after DG function in the cell surface-mediated laminin assembly process. In perlecan-deficient ES cells......, the formation of complex laminin-1 structures is defective, implicating perlecan in the laminin matrix assembly process. Moreover, laminin and perlecan reciprocally modulate the organization of the other on the cell surface. Taken together, the data support a model whereby DG serves as a receptor essential...

  16. Dibenzocyclooctadiene lignans, gomisins J and N inhibit the Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway in HCT116 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Kyungsu; Lee, Kyung-Mi; Yoo, Ji-Hye; Lee, Hee Ju [Functional Food Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Gangneung 210-340 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chul Young [Functional Food Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Gangneung 210-340 (Korea, Republic of); College of Pharmacy, Hanyang University, Ansan 426-791 (Korea, Republic of); Nho, Chu Won, E-mail: cwnho@kist.re.kr [Functional Food Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Gangneung 210-340 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-16

    Graphical abstract: Schematic diagram of the possible molecular mechanism underlying the inhibition of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway and the induction of G0/G1-phase arrest by gomisins J and N, derived from the fruits of S. chinensis, in HCT116 human colon cancer cells. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gomisins J and N inhibited Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway in HCT116 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gomisins J and N disrupted the binding of {beta}-catenin to specific DNA sequences, TBE. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gomisins J and N inhibited the HCT116 cell proliferation through G0/G1 phase arrest. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gomisins J and N inhibited the expression of Cyc D1, a Wnt/{beta}-catenin target gene. -- Abstract: Here, we report that gomisin J and gomisin N, dibenzocyclooctadiene type lignans isolated from Schisandra chinensis, inhibit Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling in HCT116 cells. Gomisins J and N appear to inhibit Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling by disrupting the interaction between {beta}-catenin and its specific target DNA sequences (TCF binding elements, TBE) rather than by altering the expression of the {beta}-catenin protein. Gomisins J and N inhibit HCT116 cell proliferation by arresting the cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase. The G0/G1 phase arrest induced by gomisins J and N appears to be caused by a decrease in the expression of Cyclin D1, a representative target gene of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway, as well as Cdk2, Cdk4, and E2F-1. Therefore, gomisins J and N, the novel Wnt/{beta}-catenin inhibitors discovered in this study, may serve as potential agents for the prevention and treatment of human colorectal cancers.

  17. Targeting dysfunctional beta-cell signaling for the potential treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenske, Rachel J; Kimple, Michelle E

    2018-03-01

    Since its discovery and purification by Frederick Banting in 1921, exogenous insulin has remained almost the sole therapy for type 1 diabetes mellitus. While insulin alleviates the primary dysfunction of the disease, many other aspects of the pathophysiology of type 1 diabetes mellitus are unaffected. Research aimed towards the discovery of novel type 1 diabetes mellitus therapeutics targeting different cell signaling pathways is gaining momentum. The focus of these efforts has been almost entirely on the impact of immunomodulatory drugs, particularly those that have already received FDA-approval for other autoimmune diseases. However, these drugs can often have severe side effects, while also putting already immunocompromised individuals at an increased risk for other infections. Potential therapeutic targets in the insulin-producing beta-cell have been largely ignored by the type 1 diabetes mellitus field, save the glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor. While there is preliminary evidence to support the clinical exploration of glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor-based drugs as type 1 diabetes mellitus adjuvant therapeutics, there is a vast space for other putative therapeutic targets to be explored. The alpha subunit of the heterotrimeric G z protein (Gα z ) has been shown to promote beta-cell inflammation, dysfunction, death, and failure to replicate in the context of diabetes in a number of mouse models. Genetic loss of Gα z or inhibition of the Gα z signaling pathway through dietary interventions is protective against the development of insulitis and hyperglycemia. The multifaceted effects of Gα z in regards to beta-cell health in the context of diabetes make it an ideal therapeutic target for further study. It is our belief that a low-risk, effective therapy for type 1 diabetes mellitus will involve a multidimensional approach targeting a number of regulatory systems, not the least of which is the insulin-producing beta-cell. Impact statement The expanding

  18. Fetal and adult hematopoietic stem cells require beta1 integrin function for colonizing fetal liver, spleen, and bone marrow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Potocnik, A J; Brakebusch, C; Fässler, R

    2000-01-01

    hematolymphoid differentiation potential in vitro and in fetal organ cultures but were unable to seed fetal and adult hematopoietic tissues. Adult beta1 integrin null HSCs isolated from mice carrying loxP-tagged beta1 integrin alleles and ablated for beta1 integrin expression by retroviral cre transduction......Homing of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) into hematopoietic organs is a prerequisite for the establishment of hematopoiesis during embryogenesis and after bone marrow transplantation. We show that beta1 integrin-deficient HSCs from the para-aortic splanchnopleura and the fetal blood had...

  19. Coronin-1A links cytoskeleton dynamics to TCR alpha beta-induced cell signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bénédicte Mugnier

    Full Text Available Actin polymerization plays a critical role in activated T lymphocytes both in regulating T cell receptor (TCR-induced immunological synapse (IS formation and signaling. Using gene targeting, we demonstrate that the hematopoietic specific, actin- and Arp2/3 complex-binding protein coronin-1A contributes to both processes. Coronin-1A-deficient mice specifically showed alterations in terminal development and the survival of alpha beta T cells, together with defects in cell activation and cytokine production following TCR triggering. The mutant T cells further displayed excessive accumulation yet reduced dynamics of F-actin and the WASP-Arp2/3 machinery at the IS, correlating with extended cell-cell contact. Cell signaling was also affected with the basal activation of the stress kinases sAPK/JNK1/2; and deficits in TCR-induced Ca2+ influx and phosphorylation and degradation of the inhibitor of NF-kappaB (I kappa B. Coronin-1A therefore links cytoskeleton plasticity with the functioning of discrete TCR signaling components. This function may be required to adjust TCR responses to selecting ligands accounting in part for the homeostasis defect that impacts alpha beta T cells in coronin-1A deficient mice, with the exclusion of other lympho/hematopoietic lineages.

  20. Atypical PKC-iota Controls Stem Cell Expansion via Regulation of the Notch Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In Kyoung Mah

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The number of stem/progenitor cells available can profoundly impact tissue homeostasis and the response to injury or disease. Here, we propose that an atypical PKC, Prkci, is a key player in regulating the switch from an expansion to a differentiation/maintenance phase via regulation of Notch, thus linking the polarity pathway with the control of stem cell self-renewal. Prkci is known to influence symmetric cell division in invertebrates; however a definitive role in mammals has not yet emerged. Using a genetic approach, we find that loss of Prkci results in a marked increase in the number of various stem/progenitor cells. The mechanism used likely involves inactivation and symmetric localization of NUMB, leading to the activation of NOTCH1 and its downstream effectors. Inhibition of atypical PKCs may be useful for boosting the production of pluripotent stem cells, multipotent stem cells, or possibly even primordial germ cells by promoting the stem cell/progenitor fate.

  1. Robust generation and expansion of skeletal muscle progenitors and myocytes from human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Michael; Kocharyan, Avetik; Liu, Jun; Skerjanc, Ilona S; Stanford, William L

    2016-05-15

    Human pluripotent stem cells provide a developmental model to study early embryonic and tissue development, tease apart human disease processes, perform drug screens to identify potential molecular effectors of in situ regeneration, and provide a source for cell and tissue based transplantation. Highly efficient differentiation protocols have been established for many cell types and tissues; however, until very recently robust differentiation into skeletal muscle cells had not been possible unless driven by transgenic expression of master regulators of myogenesis. Nevertheless, several breakthrough protocols have been published in the past two years that efficiently generate cells of the skeletal muscle lineage from pluripotent stem cells. Here, we present an updated version of our recently described 50-day protocol in detail, whereby chemically defined media are used to drive and support muscle lineage development from initial CHIR99021-induced mesoderm through to PAX7-expressing skeletal muscle progenitors and mature skeletal myocytes. Furthermore, we report an optional method to passage and expand differentiating skeletal muscle progenitors approximately 3-fold every 2weeks using Collagenase IV and continued FGF2 supplementation. Both protocols have been optimized using a variety of human pluripotent stem cell lines including patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells. Taken together, our differentiation and expansion protocols provide sufficient quantities of skeletal muscle progenitors and myocytes that could be used for a variety of studies. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Evaluation of the expansion of umbilical cord blood derived from CD133+ cells on biocompatible microwells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina Soufizomorrod

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT is a therapeutic approach for treatment of hematological malignancies and incompatibility of Bone marrow. Umbilical cord blood (UCB has known as an alternative for hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HPSC in allogeneic transplantation. The low volume of collected samples is the main hindrance in application of HPSC derived from umbilical cord blood. So, ex vivo expansion of HPSCs is the useful approach to overcome this restriction. The goal of using this system is to produce appropriate amount of hematopoietic stem cells, which have the ability of transplantation and long term haematopoiesis. Material & Methods: In current study CD133+ cells were isolated from cord blood (CB. Isolated cells were seeded on microwells. Then expanded cells proliferation rate and ability in colony formation were assessed and finally were compared with 2 Dimensional (2D culture systems. Results: Our findings demonstrated that CD133+ cells derived from UCB which were cultivated on microwells had significantly higher rate of proliferation in compared with routine cell culture systems. Conclusion: In Current study, it was shown that CD133+ cells’ proliferations which were seeded on PDMS microwells coated with collagen significantly increased. We hope that 3 dimensional (3D microenvironment which mimics the 3D structure of bone marrow can solve the problem of using UCB as an alternative source of bone marrow.

  3. Effects of the hypoglycaemic drugs repaglinide and glibenclamide on ATP-sensitive potassium-channels and cytosolic calcium levels in beta TC3 cells and rat pancreatic beta cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gromada, J; Dissing, S; Kofod, Hans

    1995-01-01

    The present study demonstrates the action of the hypoglycaemic drugs repaglinide and glibenclamide in cultured newborn rat islet cells and mouse beta TC3 cells. In cell-attached membrane patches of newborn rat islet cells repaglinide (10 nmol/l) and glibenclamide (20 nmol/l) decrease the open pro...

  4. Orphan nuclear receptor TLX activates Wnt/beta-catenin signalling to stimulate neural stem cell proliferation and self-renewal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Qiuhao; Sun, Guoqiang; Li, Wenwu; Yang, Su; Ye, Peng; Zhao, Chunnian; Yu, Ruth T; Gage, Fred H; Evans, Ronald M; Shi, Yanhong

    2010-01-01

    The nuclear receptor TLX (also known as NR2E1) is essential for adult neural stem cell self-renewal; however, the molecular mechanisms involved remain elusive. Here we show that TLX activates the canonical Wnt/beta-catenin pathway in adult mouse neural stem cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Wnt/beta-catenin signalling is important in the proliferation and self-renewal of adult neural stem cells in the presence of epidermal growth factor and fibroblast growth factor. Wnt7a and active beta-catenin promote neural stem cell self-renewal, whereas the deletion of Wnt7a or the lentiviral transduction of axin, a beta-catenin inhibitor, led to decreased cell proliferation in adult neurogenic areas. Lentiviral transduction of active beta-catenin led to increased numbers of type B neural stem cells in the subventricular zone of adult brains, whereas deletion of Wnt7a or TLX resulted in decreased numbers of neural stem cells retaining bromodeoxyuridine label in the adult brain. Both Wnt7a and active beta-catenin significantly rescued a TLX (also known as Nr2e1) short interfering RNA-induced deficiency in neural stem cell proliferation. Lentiviral transduction of an active beta-catenin increased cell proliferation in neurogenic areas of TLX-null adult brains markedly. These results strongly support the hypothesis that TLX acts through the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway to regulate neural stem cell proliferation and self-renewal. Moreover, this study suggests that neural stem cells can promote their own self-renewal by secreting signalling molecules that act in an autocrine/paracrine mode.

  5. Automated Expansion of Primary Human T Cells in Scalable and Cell-Friendly Hydrogel Microtubes for Adoptive Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Haishuang; Li, Qiang; Wang, Ou; Rauch, Jack; Harm, Braden; Viljoen, Hendrik J; Zhang, Chi; Van Wyk, Erika; Zhang, Chi; Lei, Yuguo

    2018-05-11

    Adoptive immunotherapy is a highly effective strategy for treating many human cancers, such as melanoma, cervical cancer, lymphoma, and leukemia. Here, a novel cell culture technology is reported for expanding primary human T cells for adoptive immunotherapy. T cells are suspended and cultured in microscale alginate hydrogel tubes (AlgTubes) that are suspended in the cell culture medium in a culture vessel. The hydrogel tubes protect cells from hydrodynamic stresses and confine the cell mass less than 400 µm (in radial diameter) to ensure efficient mass transport, creating a cell-friendly microenvironment for growing T cells. This system is simple, scalable, highly efficient, defined, cost-effective, and compatible with current good manufacturing practices. Under optimized culture conditions, the AlgTubes enable culturing T cells with high cell viability, low DNA damage, high growth rate (≈320-fold expansion over 14 days), high purity (≈98% CD3+), and high yield (≈3.2 × 10 8 cells mL -1 hydrogel). All offer considerable advantages compared to current T cell culturing approaches. This new culture technology can significantly reduce the culture volume, time, and cost, while increasing the production. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Beta1 integrins activate a MAPK signalling pathway in neural stem cells that contributes to their maintenance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campos, Lia S; Leone, Dino P; Relvas, Joao B

    2004-01-01

    , signalling is required for neural stem cell maintenance, as assessed by neurosphere formation, and inhibition or genetic ablation of beta1 integrin using cre/lox technology reduces the level of MAPK activity. We conclude that integrins are therefore an important part of the signalling mechanisms that control......The emerging evidence that stem cells develop in specialised niches highlights the potential role of environmental factors in their regulation. Here we examine the role of beta1 integrin/extracellular matrix interactions in neural stem cells. We find high levels of beta1 integrin expression...... in the stem-cell containing regions of the embryonic CNS, with associated expression of the laminin alpha2 chain. Expression levels of laminin alpha2 are reduced in the postnatal CNS, but a population of cells expressing high levels of beta1 remains. Using neurospheres - aggregate cultures, derived from...

  7. Suitability of macrophage inflammatory protein-1beta production by THP-1 cells in differentiating skin sensitizers from irritant chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Yeon-Mi; Moon, Seong-Joon; An, Su-Sun; Lee, Soo-Jin; Kim, Seo-Young; Chang, Ih-Seop; Park, Kui-Lea; Kim, Hyoung-Ah; Heo, Yong

    2008-04-01

    Worldwide restrictions in animal use for research have driven efforts to develop alternative methods. The study aimed to test the efficacy of the macrophage inflammatory protein-1beta (MIP-1beta) assay for testing chemicals' skin-sensitizing capacity. The assay was performed using 9 chemicals judged to be sensitizing and 7 non-sensitizing by the standard in vivo assays. THP-1 cells were cultured in the presence or absence of 4 doses, 0.01x, 0.1x, 0.5x, or 1x IC(50) (50% inhibitory concentration for THP-1 cell proliferation) of these chemicals for 24 hr, and the MIP-1beta level in the supernatants was determined. Skin sensitization by the test chemicals was determined by MIP-1beta production rates. The MIP-1beta production rate was expressed as the relative increase in MIP-1beta production in response to chemical treatment compared with vehicle treatment. When the threshold MIP-1beta production rate used was 100% or 105% of dimethyl sulfoxide, all the sensitizing chemicals tested (dinitrochlorobenzene, hexyl cinnamic aldehyde, eugenol, hydroquinone, dinitrofluorobenzene, benzocaine, nickel, chromium, and 5-chloro-2-methyl-4-isothiazolin-3-one) were positive, and all the non-sensitizing chemicals (methyl salicylate, benzalkonium chloride, lactic acid, isopropanol, and salicylic acid), with the exception of sodium lauryl sulfate, were negative for MIP-1beta production. These results indicate that MIP-1beta could be a biomarker for classification of chemicals as sensitizers or non-sensitizers.

  8. Characterization of GLP-1 effects on beta-cell function after meal ingestion in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahrén, Bo; Holst, Jens Juul; Mari, Andrea

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) is an incretin that augments insulin secretion after meal intake and is developed for treatment of type 2 diabetes. As a novel therapeutic agent, characteristics of its beta-cell effects are important to establish. Previously, beta-cell effects of GLP-1...... have been characterized in humans during graded intravenous infusions of glucose, whereas its effects after more physiological stimuli, like meal intake, are not known. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Eight women (aged 69 years, fasting glucose 3.7-10.3 mmol/l, BMI 22.4-43.9 kg/m(2)) who had fasted...... meal augments insulin secretion in humans by a dose...

  9. Glucose-induced lipogenesis in pancreatic beta-cells is dependent on SREBP-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandberg, Maria B; Fridriksson, Jakob; Madsen, Lise

    2005-01-01

    High concentrations of glucose induce de novo fatty acid synthesis in pancreatic beta-cells and chronic exposure of elevated glucose and fatty acids synergize to induce accumulation of triglycerides, a phenomenon termed glucolipotoxicity. Here we investigate the role of sterol-regulatory element......, de novo fatty acid synthesis and lipid accumulation are induced primarily through sterol-regulatory elements (SREs) and not E-Boxes. Adenoviral expression of a dominant negative SREBP compromises glucose induction of some lipogenic genes and significantly reduces glucose-induction of de novo fatty...... acid synthesis. Thus, we demonstrate for the first time that SREBP activity is necessary for full glucose induction of de novo fatty acid synthesis in pancreatic beta-cells....

  10. CAG Expansions Are Genetically Stable and Form Nontoxic Aggregates in Cells Lacking Endogenous Polyglutamine Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley A. Zurawel

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Proteins containing polyglutamine (polyQ regions are found in almost all eukaryotes, albeit with various frequencies. In humans, proteins such as huntingtin (Htt with abnormally expanded polyQ regions cause neurodegenerative diseases such as Huntington’s disease (HD. To study how the presence of endogenous polyQ aggregation modulates polyQ aggregation and toxicity, we expressed polyQ expanded Htt fragments (polyQ Htt in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. In stark contrast to other unicellular fungi, such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, S. pombe is uniquely devoid of proteins with more than 10 Q repeats. We found that polyQ Htt forms aggregates within S. pombe cells only with exceedingly long polyQ expansions. Surprisingly, despite the presence of polyQ Htt aggregates in both the cytoplasm and nucleus, no significant growth defect was observed in S. pombe cells. Further, PCR analysis showed that the repetitive polyQ-encoding DNA region remained constant following transformation and after multiple divisions in S. pombe, in contrast to the genetic instability of polyQ DNA sequences in other organisms. These results demonstrate that cells with a low content of polyQ or other aggregation-prone proteins can show a striking resilience with respect to polyQ toxicity and that genetic instability of repetitive DNA sequences may have played an important role in the evolutionary emergence and exclusion of polyQ expansion proteins in different organisms.

  11. Failure of anti-T-cell receptor V beta antibodies to consistently identify a malignant T-cell clone in Sézary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigler, R D; Boselli, C M; Foley, B; Vonderheid, E C

    1996-11-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) reacting with the human T cell receptor (TCR) V beta or V alpha region have been shown to be almost as specific as a private idiotypic MAb in identifying T cell clones. When available, V beta-specific MAbs offer the ease of immunofluorescence analysis to identify and quantitate expanded malignant or nonmalignant T cell populations without requiring polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technology to evaluate expression of V beta gene families. The V beta expression of peripheral blood lymphocytes from twenty-three consecutive patients with Sézary syndrome has been analyzed by reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR. Ten patients had malignant T cell clones that expressed a TCR V beta corresponding to a commercially available anti-V beta antibody. Immunofluorescence staining with anti-V beta MAbs showed a direct correlation with RT-PCR results in seven of ten patients. No false positive reactivity was noted on immunofluorescence staining with any MAb. Cells from three patients, however, did not react with the corresponding anti-V beta MAb. These three cases expressed a TCR V beta from gene families containing a single member, ie, V beta 14, V beta 18, and V beta 20, yet MAbs reported to be specific for these regions failed to react with the T cell clone from these patients. Sequencing of the PCR product in these cases confirmed the RT-PCR results. Cells from two patients expressed a TCR using V beta 5.1-D beta 1.1 genes with different J-C segments. One patient's cells reacted with an anti-V beta 5.1 MAb (LC4) whereas the other patient's cells bound one-tenth the amount of this same MAb. These results indicate that currently available anti-TCR V region MAbs may not react consistently with T cell clones expressing the corresponding V region or may react with a low affinity making detection difficult. Differences in the J-C junction or in CDR3 may influence the binding of these MAbs. Until the false negative rate is reduced and the fine specificity and

  12. Gelatin–PMVE/MA composite scaffold promotes expansion of embryonic stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chhabra, Hemlata; Gupta, Priyanka; Verma, Paul J.; Jadhav, Sameer; Bellare, Jayesh R.

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a new composite scaffold of gelatin and polymethyl vinyl ether-alt-maleic anhydride (PMVE/MA) for expansion of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) in an in vitro environment. To optimize the scaffold, we prepared a gelatin scaffold (G) and three composite scaffolds namely GP-1, GP-2, and GP-3 with varying PMVE/MA concentrations (0.2–1%) and characterized them by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), swelling study, compression testing and FTIR. SEM micrographs revealed interconnected porous structure in all the scaffolds. The permissible hemolysis ratio and activation of platelets by scaffolds confirmed the hemocompatibility of scaffolds. Initial biocompatibility assessment of scaffolds was conducted using hepatocarcinoma (Hep G2) cells and adhesion, proliferation and infiltration of Hep G2 cells in depth of scaffolds were observed, proving the scaffold's biocompatibility. Further Oct4B2 mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs), which harbor a green fluorescence protein transgene under regulatory control of the Oct4 promotor, were examined for expansion on scaffolds with MTT assay. The GP-2 scaffold demonstrated the best cell proliferation and was further explored for ESC adherence and infiltration in depth (SEM and confocal), and pluripotent state of mESCs was assessed with the expression of Oct4-GFP and stage-specific embryonic antigen-1 (SSEA-1). This study reports the first demonstration of biocompatibility of gelatin–PMVE/MA composite scaffold and presents this scaffold as a promising candidate for embryonic stem cell based tissue engineering. - Highlights: • Composite scaffolds of gelatin and PMVE/MA were prepared by freeze-drying method. • SEM micrographs showed porous structure in all scaffolds of varying pore dimension. • GP-2 composite exhibited better cellular response in comparison to other scaffolds. • mESCs proliferated and expressed Oct-4 and SSEA-1, when cultured on GP-2 scaffold

  13. Gelatin–PMVE/MA composite scaffold promotes expansion of embryonic stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chhabra, Hemlata [Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai (India); Gupta, Priyanka [Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai (India); IITB-Monash Research Academy, Mumbai (India); Department of Chemical Engineering, Monash University, Melbourne (Australia); Verma, Paul J. [Turretfield Research Centre, South Australian Research and Development Institute, Rosedale, South Australia (Australia); Jadhav, Sameer; Bellare, Jayesh R. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai (India)

    2014-04-01

    We introduce a new composite scaffold of gelatin and polymethyl vinyl ether-alt-maleic anhydride (PMVE/MA) for expansion of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) in an in vitro environment. To optimize the scaffold, we prepared a gelatin scaffold (G) and three composite scaffolds namely GP-1, GP-2, and GP-3 with varying PMVE/MA concentrations (0.2–1%) and characterized them by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), swelling study, compression testing and FTIR. SEM micrographs revealed interconnected porous structure in all the scaffolds. The permissible hemolysis ratio and activation of platelets by scaffolds confirmed the hemocompatibility of scaffolds. Initial biocompatibility assessment of scaffolds was conducted using hepatocarcinoma (Hep G2) cells and adhesion, proliferation and infiltration of Hep G2 cells in depth of scaffolds were observed, proving the scaffold's biocompatibility. Further Oct4B2 mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs), which harbor a green fluorescence protein transgene under regulatory control of the Oct4 promotor, were examined for expansion on scaffolds with MTT assay. The GP-2 scaffold demonstrated the best cell proliferation and was further explored for ESC adherence and infiltration in depth (SEM and confocal), and pluripotent state of mESCs was assessed with the expression of Oct4-GFP and stage-specific embryonic antigen-1 (SSEA-1). This study reports the first demonstration of biocompatibility of gelatin–PMVE/MA composite scaffold and presents this scaffold as a promising candidate for embryonic stem cell based tissue engineering. - Highlights: • Composite scaffolds of gelatin and PMVE/MA were prepared by freeze-drying method. • SEM micrographs showed porous structure in all scaffolds of varying pore dimension. • GP-2 composite exhibited better cellular response in comparison to other scaffolds. • mESCs proliferated and expressed Oct-4 and SSEA-1, when cultured on GP-2 scaffold.

  14. Tumor associated macrophages protect colon cancer cells from TRAIL-induced apoptosis through IL-1beta-dependent stabilization of Snail in tumor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawan Kaler

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available We recently reported that colon tumor cells stimulate macrophages to release IL-1beta, which in turn inactivates GSK3beta and enhances Wnt signaling in colon cancer cells, generating a self-amplifying loop that promotes the growth of tumor cells.Here we describe that macrophages protect HCT116 and Hke-3 colon cancer cells from TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Inactivation of IL-1beta by neutralizing IL-1beta antibody, or silencing of IL-1beta in macrophages inhibited their ability to counter TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Accordingly, IL-1beta was sufficient to inhibit TRAIL-induced apoptosis. TRAIL-induced collapse of the mitochondrial membrane potential (Delta psi and activation of caspases were prevented by macrophages or by recombinant IL-1beta. Pharmacological inhibition of IL-1beta release from macrophages by vitamin D(3, a potent chemopreventive agent for colorectal cancer, restored the ability of TRAIL to induce apoptosis of tumor cells cultured with macrophages. Macrophages and IL-1beta failed to inhibit TRAIL-induced apoptosis in HCT116 cells expressing dnIkappaB, dnAKT or dnTCF4, confirming that they oppose TRAIL-induced cell death through induction of Wnt signaling in tumor cells. We showed that macrophages and IL-1beta stabilized Snail in tumor cells in an NF-kappaB/Wnt dependent manner and that Snail deficient tumor cells were not protected from TRAIL-induced apoptosis by macrophages or by IL-1beta, demonstrating a crucial role of Snail in the resistance of tumor cells to TRAIL.We have identified a positive feedback loop between tumor cells and macrophages that propagates the growth and promotes the survival of colon cancer cells: tumor cells stimulate macrophages to secrete IL-1beta, which in turn, promotes Wnt signaling and stabilizes Snail in tumor cells, conferring resistance to TRAIL. Vitamin D(3 halts this amplifying loop by interfering with the release of IL-1beta from macrophages. Accordingly, vitamin D(3 sensitizes tumor cells to TRAIL

  15. Reference intervals for glucose, beta-cell polypeptides and counterregulatory factors during prolonged fasting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlund, Kurt; Wildner-Christensen, M; Eshøj, O

    2001-01-01

    To establish reference intervals for the pancreatic beta-cell response and the counterregulatory hormone response to prolonged fasting, we studied 33 healthy subjects (16 males, 17 females) during a 72-h fast. Glucose, insulin, C-peptide, and proinsulin levels decreased (P ... of counterregulatory factors increased during the fast [P fasting (P ... decreased from the second to third day of fasting (P = 0.03). Males had higher glucose and glucagon levels and lower FFA levels during the fast (P

  16. Intracellular serotonin modulates insulin secretion from pancreatic beta-cells by protein serotonylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils Paulmann

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available While serotonin (5-HT co-localization with insulin in granules of pancreatic beta-cells was demonstrated more than three decades ago, its physiological role in the etiology of diabetes is still unclear. We combined biochemical and electrophysiological analyses of mice selectively deficient in peripheral tryptophan hydroxylase (Tph1-/- and 5-HT to show that intracellular 5-HT regulates insulin secretion. We found that these mice are diabetic and have an impaired insulin secretion due to the lack of 5-HT in the pancreas. The pharmacological restoration of peripheral 5-HT levels rescued the impaired insulin secretion in vivo. These findings were further evidenced by patch clamp experiments with isolated Tph1-/- beta-cells, which clearly showed that the secretory defect is downstream of Ca(2+-signaling and can be rescued by direct intracellular application of 5-HT via the clamp pipette. In elucidating the underlying mechanism further, we demonstrate the covalent coupling of 5-HT by transglutaminases during insulin exocytosis to two key players in insulin secretion, the small GTPases Rab3a and Rab27a. This renders them constitutively active in a receptor-independent signaling mechanism we have recently termed serotonylation. Concordantly, an inhibition of such activating serotonylation in beta-cells abates insulin secretion. We also observed inactivation of serotonylated Rab3a by enhanced proteasomal degradation, which is in line with the inactivation of other serotonylated GTPases. Our results demonstrate that 5-HT regulates insulin secretion by serotonylation of GTPases within pancreatic beta-cells and suggest that intracellular 5-HT functions in various microenvironments via this mechanism in concert with the known receptor-mediated signaling.

  17. The putative imidazoline receptor agonist, harmane, promotes intracellular calcium mobilisation in pancreatic beta-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squires, Paul E; Hills, Claire E; Rogers, Gareth J; Garland, Patrick; Farley, Sophia R; Morgan, Noel G

    2004-10-06

    beta-Carbolines (including harmane and pinoline) stimulate insulin secretion by a mechanism that may involve interaction with imidazoline I(3)-receptors but which also appears to be mediated by actions that are additional to imidazoline receptor agonism. Using the MIN6 beta-cell line, we now show that both the imidazoline I(3)-receptor agonist, efaroxan, and the beta-carboline, harmane, directly elevate cytosolic Ca(2+) and increase insulin secretion but that these responses display different characteristics. In the case of efaroxan, the increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) was readily reversible, whereas, with harmane, the effect persisted beyond removal of the agonist and resulted in the development of a repetitive train of Ca(2+)-oscillations whose frequency, but not amplitude, was concentration-dependent. Initiation of the Ca(2+)-oscillations by harmane was independent of extracellular calcium but was sensitive to both dantrolene and high levels (20 mM) of caffeine, suggesting the involvement of ryanodine receptor-gated Ca(2+)-release. The expression of ryanodine receptor-1 and ryanodine receptor-2 mRNA in MIN6 cells was confirmed using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and, since low concentrations of caffeine (1 mM) or thimerosal (10 microM) stimulated increases in [Ca(2+)](i), we conclude that ryanodine receptors are functional in these cells. Furthermore, the increase in insulin secretion induced by harmane was attenuated by dantrolene, consistent with the involvement of ryanodine receptors in mediating this response. By contrast, the smaller insulin secretory response to efaroxan was unaffected by dantrolene. Harmane-evoked changes in cytosolic Ca(2+) were maintained by nifedipine-sensitive Ca(2+)-influx, suggesting the involvement of L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+)-channels. Taken together, these data imply that harmane may interact with ryanodine receptors to generate sustained Ca(2+)-oscillations in pancreatic beta-cells and that this effect

  18. CTLA-4 blockade during dendritic cell based booster vaccination influences dendritic cell survival and CTL expansion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders E; Ronchese, Franca

    2007-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are potent antigen-presenting cells and critical for the priming of CD8+ T cells. Therefore the use of these cells as adjuvant cells has been tested in a large number of experimental and clinical vaccination studies, in particular cancer vaccine studies. A number of protocols...

  19. Nanoscale organization of {beta}{sub 2}-adrenergic receptor-Venus fusion protein domains on the surface of mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vobornik, Dusan; Rouleau, Yanouchka; Haley, Jennifer [Steacie Institute for Molecular Sciences, National Research Council Canada, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1A 0R6 (Canada); Bani-Yaghoub, Mahmud [Institute for Biological Sciences, National Research Council Canada, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1A 0R6 (Canada); Taylor, Rod [Steacie Institute for Molecular Sciences, National Research Council Canada, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1A 0R6 (Canada); Johnston, Linda J., E-mail: Linda.Johnston@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca [Steacie Institute for Molecular Sciences, National Research Council Canada, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1A 0R6 (Canada); Pezacki, John Paul, E-mail: John.Pezacki@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca [Steacie Institute for Molecular Sciences, National Research Council Canada, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1A 0R6 (Canada)

    2009-04-24

    Adrenergic receptors are a key component of nanoscale multiprotein complexes that are responsible for controlling the beat rate in a mammalian heart. We demonstrate the ability of near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) to visualize {beta}{sub 2}-adrenergic receptors ({beta}{sub 2}AR) fused to the GFP analogue Venus at the nanoscale on HEK293 cells. The expression of the {beta}{sub 2}AR-Venus fusion protein was tightly controlled using a tetracycline-induced promoter. Both the size and density of the observed nanoscale domains are dependent on the level of induction and thus the level of protein expression. At concentrations between 100 and 700 ng/ml of inducer doxycycline, the size of domains containing the {beta}{sub 2}AR-Venus fusion protein appears to remain roughly constant, but the number of domains per cell increase. At 700 ng/ml doxycycline the functional receptors are organized into domains with an average diameter of 150 nm with a density similar to that observed for the native protein on primary murine cells. By contrast, larger micron-sized domains of {beta}{sub 2}AR are observed in the membrane of the HEK293 cells that stably overexpress {beta}{sub 2}AR-GFP and {beta}{sub 2}AR-eYFP. We conclude that precise chemical control of gene expression is highly advantageous for the use {beta}{sub 2}AR-Venus fusion proteins as models for {beta}{sub 2}AR function. These observations are critical for designing future cell models and assays based on {beta}{sub 2}AR, since the receptor biology is consistent with a relatively low density of nanoscale receptor domains.

  20. Beta-endorphin cell therapy for cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Changqing; Murugan, Sengottuvelan; Boyadjieva, Nadka; Jabbar, Shaima; Shrivastava, Pallavi; Sarkar, Dipak K

    2015-01-01

    β-Endorphin (BEP)-producing neuron in the hypothalamus plays a key role in bringing the stress axis to a state of homeostasis and maintaining body immune defense system. Long-term delivery of BEP to obtain beneficial effect on chemoprevention is challenging, as the peptides rapidly develop tolerance. Using rats as animal models, we show here that transplantation of BEP neurons into the hypothalamus suppressed carcinogens- and hormone-induced cancers in various tissues and prevented growth and metastasis of established tumors via activation of innate immune functions. In addition, we show that intracerebroventricular administration of nanosphere-attached dibutyryl cyclic adenosine monophosphate (dbcAMP) increased the number of BEP neurons in the hypothalamus, reduced the stress response, enhanced the innate immune function, and prevented tumor cell growth, progression, and metastasis. BEP neuronal supplementation did not produce any deleterious effects on general health but was beneficial in suppressing age-induced alterations in physical activity, metabolic, and immune functions. We conclude that the neuroimmune system has significant control over cancer growth and progression, and that activation of the neuroimmune system via BEP neuronal supplementation/induction may have therapeutic value for cancer prevention and improvement of general health. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  1. Suppression of IL-7-dependent Effector T-cell Expansion by Multipotent Adult Progenitor Cells and PGE2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reading, James L; Vaes, Bart; Hull, Caroline; Sabbah, Shereen; Hayday, Thomas; Wang, Nancy S; DiPiero, Anthony; Lehman, Nicholas A; Taggart, Jen M; Carty, Fiona; English, Karen; Pinxteren, Jef; Deans, Robert; Ting, Anthony E; Tree, Timothy I M

    2015-01-01

    T-cell depletion therapy is used to prevent acute allograft rejection, treat autoimmunity and create space for bone marrow or hematopoietic cell transplantation. The evolved response to T-cell loss is a transient increase in IL-7 that drives compensatory homeostatic proliferation (HP) of mature T cells. Paradoxically, the exaggerated form of this process that occurs following lymphodepletion expands effector T-cells, often causing loss of immunological tolerance that results in rapid graft rejection, autoimmunity, and exacerbated graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). While standard immune suppression is unable to treat these pathologies, growing evidence suggests that manipulating the incipient process of HP increases allograft survival, prevents autoimmunity, and markedly reduces GVHD. Multipotent adult progenitor cells (MAPC) are a clinical grade immunomodulatory cell therapy known to alter γ-chain cytokine responses in T-cells. Herein, we demonstrate that MAPC regulate HP of human T-cells, prevent the expansion of Th1, Th17, and Th22 effectors, and block the development of pathogenic allograft responses. This occurs via IL-1β-primed secretion of PGE2 and activates T-cell intrinsic regulatory mechanisms (SOCS2, GADD45A). These data provide proof-of-principle that HP of human T-cells can be targeted by cellular and molecular therapies and lays a basis for the development of novel strategies to prevent immunopathology in lymphodepleted patients. PMID:26216515

  2. SIRT6-mediated transcriptional suppression of Txnip is critical for pancreatic beta cell function and survival in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Kunhua; Zhang, Ning; Zhang, Zhao; Nipper, Michael; Zhu, Zhenxin; Leighton, Jake; Xu, Kexin; Musi, Nicolas; Wang, Pei

    2018-04-01

    Better understanding of how genetic and epigenetic components control beta cell differentiation and function is key to the discovery of novel therapeutic approaches to prevent beta cell dysfunction and failure in the progression of type 2 diabetes. Our goal was to elucidate the role of histone deacetylase sirtuin 6 (SIRT6) in beta cell development and homeostasis. Sirt6 endocrine progenitor cell conditional knockout and beta cell-specific knockout mice were generated using the Cre-loxP system. Mice were assayed for islet morphology, glucose tolerance, glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and susceptibility to streptozotocin. Transcriptional regulatory functions of SIRT6 in primary islets were evaluated by RNA-Seq analysis. Reverse transcription-quantitative (RT-q)PCR and immunoblot were used to verify and investigate the gene expression changes. Chromatin occupancies of SIRT6, H3K9Ac, H3K56Ac and active RNA polymerase II were evaluated by chromatin immunoprecipitation. Deletion of Sirt6 in pancreatic endocrine progenitor cells did not affect endocrine morphology, beta cell mass or insulin production but did result in glucose intolerance and defective glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in mice. Conditional deletion of Sirt6 in adult beta cells reproduced the insulin secretion defect. Loss of Sirt6 resulted in aberrant upregulation of thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) in beta cells. SIRT6 deficiency led to increased acetylation of histone H3 lysine residue at 9 (H3K9Ac), acetylation of histone H3 lysine residue at 56 (H3K56Ac) and active RNA polymerase II at the promoter region of Txnip. SIRT6-deficient beta cells exhibited a time-dependent increase in H3K9Ac, H3K56Ac and TXNIP levels. Finally, beta cell-specific SIRT6-deficient mice showed increased sensitivity to streptozotocin. Our results reveal that SIRT6 suppresses Txnip expression in beta cells via deacetylation of histone H3 and plays a critical role in maintaining beta cell function and viability

  3. Proteome analysis of human Wharton's jelly cells during in vitro expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulpizio Marilisa

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human umbilical cord contains mucoid connective tissue and fibroblast-like cells. These cells named Wharton's jelly cells, (WJCs display properties similar to mesenchymal stem cells therefore representing a rich source of primitive cells to be potentially used in regenerative medicine. Results To better understand their self-renewal and potential in vitro expansion capacity, a reference 2D map was constructed as a proteomic data set. 158 unique proteins were identified. More than 30% of these proteins belong to cytoskeleton compartment. We also found that several proteins including Shootin1, Adenylate kinase 5 isoenzyme and Plasminogen activator-inhibitor 2 are no longer expressed after the 2nd passage of in vitro replication. This indicates that the proliferative potency of these cells is reduced after the initial stage of in vitro growing. At the end of cellular culturing, new synthesized proteins, including, ERO1-like protein alpha, Aspartyl-tRNA synthetase and Prolyl-4-hydroxylase were identified. It is suggested that these new synthesized proteins are involved in the impairment of cellular surviving during replication and differentiation time. Conclusions Our work represents an essential step towards gaining knowledge of the molecular properties of WJCs so as to better understand their possible use in the field of cell therapy and regenerative medicine.

  4. TET proteins regulate the lineage specification and TCR-mediated expansion of iNKT cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsagaratou, Ageliki; González-Avalos, Edahí; Rautio, Sini; Scott-Browne, James P; Togher, Susan; Pastor, William A; Rothenberg, Ellen V; Chavez, Lukas; Lähdesmäki, Harri; Rao, Anjana

    2017-01-01

    TET proteins oxidize 5-methylcytosine in DNA to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine and other oxidation products. We found that simultaneous deletion of Tet2 and Tet3 in mouse CD4 + CD8 + double-positive thymocytes resulted in dysregulated development and proliferation of invariant natural killer T cells (iNKT cells). Tet2-Tet3 double-knockout (DKO) iNKT cells displayed pronounced skewing toward the NKT17 lineage, with increased DNA methylation and impaired expression of genes encoding the key lineage-specifying factors T-bet and ThPOK. Transfer of purified Tet2-Tet3 DKO iNKT cells into immunocompetent recipient mice resulted in an uncontrolled expansion that was dependent on the nonclassical major histocompatibility complex (MHC) protein CD1d, which presents lipid antigens to iNKT cells. Our data indicate that TET proteins regulate iNKT cell fate by ensuring their proper development and maturation and by suppressing aberrant proliferation mediated by the T cell antigen receptor (TCR).

  5. A protein-based hydrogel for in vitro expansion of mesenchymal stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingyu Wang

    Full Text Available Hydrogels are widely used as scaffolds in tissue engineering because they can provide excellent environments for bioactive components including growth factors and cells. We reported in this study on a physical hydrogel formed by a specific protein-peptide interaction, which could be used for the three dimensional (3D cell culture of murine mesenchymal stem cells (mMSC. The mMSC kept dividing during the 7-day culture period and the metabolic-active cell number at day 7 was 359% more than that at day 1. This kind of physical hydrogel could be converted to a homogeneous solution by firstly adding an equal volume of culture medium and then pipeting for several times. Therefore, mMSC post culture could be easily separated from cell-gel constructs. We believed that the protein-based hydrogel system in this study could be developed into a promising scaffold for in vitro expansion of stem cells and cell therapy. This work would be in the general interests of researchers in the fields of biomaterials and supramolecular chemistry.

  6. Expression of a TGF-{beta} regulated cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor in normal and immortalized airway epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tierney, L.A.; Bloomfield, C.; Johnson, N.F. [and others

    1995-12-01

    Tumors arising from epithelial cells, including lung cancers are frequently resistant to factors that regulate growth and differentiation in normal in normal cells. Once such factor is transforming growth factor-{Beta} (TGF-{Beta}). Escape from the growth-inhibitory effects of TGF-{Beta} is thought to be a key step in the transformation of airway epithelial cells. most lung cancer cell lines require serum for growth. In contrast, normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells are exquisitely sensitive to growth-inhibitory and differentiating effects of TGF-{Beta}. The recent identification of a novel cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, p15{sup INK4B}, which is regulated by TGF-{Beta}, suggests a mechanism by which TGF-{Beta} mediates growth arrest in NHBE cells. The purpose of this study was two-fold: (1) to determine if p15{sup INK4B} is induced by TGF-{Beta} in NHBE cells or immortalized bronchial epithelial (R.1) cells and if that induction corresponds to a G1/S cell-cycle arrest; (2) to determine the temporal relationship between p15{sup INK4B} induction, cell-cycle arrest, and the phosphorylation state of the pRB because it is thought that p15{sup INK4B} acts indirectly by preventing phosphorylation of the RB gene product. In this study, expression of p15{sup INK4B} was examined in NHBE cells and R.1 cells at different time intervals following TGF-{Beta} treatment. The expression of this kinase inhibitor and its relationship to the cell and the pRb phosphorylation state were examined in cells that were both sensitive (NHBE) and resistant (R.1) to the effects of TGF-{Beta}. These results suggest that the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, p15{sup INK4B}, is involved in airway epithelial cell differentiation and that loss or reduction of expression plays a role in the resistance of transformed or neoplastic cells to the growth-inhibitory effects of TGF-{Beta}.

  7. Early-Life Origins of Type 2 Diabetes: Fetal Programming of the Beta-Cell Mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard Portha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A substantial body of evidence suggests that an abnormal intrauterine milieu elicited by maternal metabolic disturbances as diverse as undernutrition, placental insufficiency, diabetes or obesity, may program susceptibility in the fetus to later develop chronic degenerative diseases, such as obesity, hypertension, cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. This paper examines the developmental programming of glucose intolerance/diabetes by disturbed intrauterine metabolic condition experimentally obtained in various rodent models of maternal protein restriction, caloric restriction, overnutrition or diabetes, with a focus on the alteration of the developing beta-cell mass. In most of the cases, whatever the type of initial maternal metabolic stress, the beta-cell adaptive growth which normally occurs during gestation, does not take place in the pregnant offspring and this results in the development of gestational diabetes. Therefore gestational diabetes turns to be the ultimate insult targeting the offspring beta-cell mass and propagates diabetes risk to the next generation again. The aetiology and the transmission of spontaneous diabetes as encountered in the GK/Par rat model of type 2 diabetes, are discussed in such a perspective. This review also discusses the non-genomic mechanisms involved in the installation of the programmed effect as well as in its intergenerational transmission.

  8. Vanadyl Sulfate Treatment Stimulates Proliferation and Regeneration of Beta Cells in Pancreatic Islets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira Missaoui

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined the effects of vanadium sulfate (VOSO4 treatment at 5 and 10 mg/kg for 30 days on endocrine pancreas activity and histology in nondiabetic and STZ-induced diabetic rats. In diabetic group, blood glucose levels significantly increased while insulinemia level markedly decreased. At the end of treatment, VOSO4 at a dose of 10 mg/Kg normalized blood glucose level in diabetic group, restored insulinemia, and significantly improved insulin sensitivity. VOSO4 also increased in a dose-dependent manner the number of insulin immunopositive beta cells in pancreatic islets of nondiabetic rats. Furthermore, in the STZ-diabetic group, the decrease in the number of insulin immunopositive beta cells was corrected to reach the control level mainly with the higher dose of vanadium. Therefore, VOSO4 treatment normalized plasma glucose and insulin levels and improved insulin sensitivity in STZ-experimental diabetes and induced beta cells proliferation and/or regeneration in normal or diabetic rats.

  9. Neoplastic progression of rat tracheal epithelial cells involves resistance to transforming growth factor beta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubbs, A.F.; Hahn, F.F.; Thomassen, D.G.

    1988-01-01

    Primary, transformed, and tumor-derived rat tracheal epithelial (RTE) cells were grown in serum-free medium containing 0 to 300 pg/mL transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) markedly inhibited the growth of primary RTE cells with a 50% drop in the efficiency of colony formation seen at TGFβ concentrations between 10 and 30 pg/ mL. The effect of TGFβ on preneoplastic RTE cells was similar to the effect on normal primary RTE cells. Cell lines established from tumors produced by inoculation of transformed RTE cells into nude mice were relatively resistant to -TGFβ-induced growth inhibition. Resistance to TGFβ-induced growth inhibition, therefore, appears to be a late event in the development of neoplasia. (author)

  10. Snail/beta-catenin signaling protects breast cancer cells from hypoxia attack

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scherbakov, Alexander M., E-mail: alex.scherbakov@gmail.com [Laboratory of Clinical Biochemistry, Institute of Clinical Oncology, N.N. Blokhin Cancer Research Centre, Kashirskoye sh. 24, Moscow 115478 (Russian Federation); Stefanova, Lidia B.; Sorokin, Danila V.; Semina, Svetlana E. [Laboratory of Molecular Endocrinology, Institute of Carcinogenesis, N.N. Blokhin Cancer Research Centre, Kashirskoye sh. 24, Moscow 115478 (Russian Federation); Berstein, Lev M. [Laboratory of Oncoendocrinology, N.N. Petrov Research Institute of Oncology, St. Petersburg 197758 (Russian Federation); Krasil’nikov, Mikhail A. [Laboratory of Molecular Endocrinology, Institute of Carcinogenesis, N.N. Blokhin Cancer Research Centre, Kashirskoye sh. 24, Moscow 115478 (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-10

    The tolerance of cancer cells to hypoxia depends on the combination of different factors – from increase of glycolysis (Warburg Effect) to activation of intracellular growth/apoptotic pathways. Less is known about the influence of epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) and EMT-associated pathways on the cell sensitivity to hypoxia. The aim of this study was to explore the role of Snail signaling, one of the key EMT pathways, in the mediating of hypoxia response and regulation of cell sensitivity to hypoxia, using as a model in vitro cultured breast cancer cells. Earlier we have shown that estrogen-independent HBL-100 breast cancer cells differ from estrogen-dependent MCF-7 cells with increased expression of Snail1, and demonstrated Snail1 involvement into formation of hormone-resistant phenotype. Because Snail1 belongs to hypoxia-activated proteins, here we studied the influence of Snail1 signaling on the cell tolerance to hypoxia. We found that Snail1-enriched HBL-100 cells were less sensitive to hypoxia-induced growth suppression if compared with MCF-7 line (31% MCF-7 vs. 71% HBL-100 cell viability after 1% O{sub 2} atmosphere for 3 days). Snail1 knock-down enhanced the hypoxia-induced inhibition of cell proliferation giving the direct evidence of Snail1 involvement into cell protection from hypoxia attack. The protective effect of Snail1 was shown to be mediated, at least in a part, via beta-catenin which positively regulated expression of HIF-1-dependent genes. Finally, we found that cell tolerance to hypoxia was accompanied with the failure in the phosphorylation of AMPK – the key energy sensor, and demonstrated an inverse relationship between AMPK and Snail/beta-catenin signaling. Totally, our data show that Snail1 and beta-catenin, besides association with loss of hormone dependence, protect cancer cells from hypoxia and may serve as an important target in the treatment of breast cancer. Moreover, we suggest that the level of these proteins as well

  11. Expansion on stromal cells preserves the undifferentiated state of human hematopoietic stem cells despite compromised reconstitution ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnusson, Mattias; Sierra, Maria I; Sasidharan, Rajkumar; Prashad, Sacha L; Romero, Melissa; Saarikoski, Pamela; Van Handel, Ben; Huang, Andy; Li, Xinmin; Mikkola, Hanna K A

    2013-01-01

    Lack of HLA-matched hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) limits the number of patients with life-threatening blood disorders that can be treated by HSC transplantation. So far, insufficient understanding of the regulatory mechanisms governing human HSC has precluded the development of effective protocols for culturing HSC for therapeutic use and molecular studies. We defined a culture system using OP9M2 mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) stroma that protects human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPC) from differentiation and apoptosis. In addition, it facilitates a dramatic expansion of multipotent progenitors that retain the immunophenotype (CD34+CD38-CD90+) characteristic of human HSPC and proliferative potential over several weeks in culture. In contrast, transplantable HSC could be maintained, but not significantly expanded, during 2-week culture. Temporal analysis of the transcriptome of the ex vivo expanded CD34+CD38-CD90+ cells documented remarkable stability of most transcriptional regulators known to govern the undifferentiated HSC state. Nevertheless, it revealed dynamic fluctuations in transcriptional programs that associate with HSC behavior and may compromise HSC function, such as dysregulation of PBX1 regulated genetic networks. This culture system serves now as a platform for modeling human multilineage hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell hierarchy and studying the complex regulation of HSC identity and function required for successful ex vivo expansion of transplantable HSC.

  12. Expansion on stromal cells preserves the undifferentiated state of human hematopoietic stem cells despite compromised reconstitution ability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattias Magnusson

    Full Text Available Lack of HLA-matched hematopoietic stem cells (HSC limits the number of patients with life-threatening blood disorders that can be treated by HSC transplantation. So far, insufficient understanding of the regulatory mechanisms governing human HSC has precluded the development of effective protocols for culturing HSC for therapeutic use and molecular studies. We defined a culture system using OP9M2 mesenchymal stem cell (MSC stroma that protects human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPC from differentiation and apoptosis. In addition, it facilitates a dramatic expansion of multipotent progenitors that retain the immunophenotype (CD34+CD38-CD90+ characteristic of human HSPC and proliferative potential over several weeks in culture. In contrast, transplantable HSC could be maintained, but not significantly expanded, during 2-week culture. Temporal analysis of the transcriptome of the ex vivo expanded CD34+CD38-CD90+ cells documented remarkable stability of most transcriptional regulators known to govern the undifferentiated HSC state. Nevertheless, it revealed dynamic fluctuations in transcriptional programs that associate with HSC behavior and may compromise HSC function, such as dysregulation of PBX1 regulated genetic networks. This culture system serves now as a platform for modeling human multilineage hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell hierarchy and studying the complex regulation of HSC identity and function required for successful ex vivo expansion of transplantable HSC.

  13. Cell expansion of human articular chondrocytes on macroporous gelatine scaffolds-impact of microcarrier selection on cell proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pettersson, Sofia; Kratz, Gunnar [Laboratory for Reconstructive Plastic Surgery, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linkoeping University, SE-581 85 Linkoeping (Sweden); Wetteroe, Jonas [Rheumatology/AIR, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linkoeping University, SE-581 85 Linkoeping (Sweden); Tengvall, Pentti, E-mail: sofia.pettersson@liu.se [Institute of Clinical Sciences, Department of Biomaterials, The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, SE-405 30 Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2011-12-15

    This study investigates human chondrocyte expansion on four macroporous gelatine microcarriers (CultiSpher) differing with respect to two manufacturing processes-the amount of emulsifier used during initial preparation and the gelatine cross-linking medium. Monolayer-expanded articular chondrocytes from three donors were seeded onto the microcarriers and cultured in spinner flask systems for a total of 15 days. Samples were extracted every other day to monitor cell viability and establish cell counts, which were analysed using analysis of variance and piecewise linear regression. Chondrocyte densities increased according to a linear pattern for all microcarriers, indicating an ongoing, though limited, cell proliferation. A strong chondrocyte donor effect was seen during the initial expansion phase. The final cell yield differed significantly between the microcarriers and our results indicate that manufacturing differences affected chondrocyte densities at this point. Remaining cells stained positive for chondrogenic markers SOX-9 and S-100 but extracellular matrix formation was modest to undetectable. In conclusion, the four gelatine microcarriers supported chondrocyte adhesion and proliferation over a two week period. The best yield was observed for microcarriers produced with low emulsifier content and cross-linked in water and acetone. These results add to the identification of optimal biomaterial parameters for specific cellular processes and populations.

  14. Brain and muscle Arnt-like 1 promotes skeletal muscle regeneration through satellite cell expansion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatterjee, Somik [Center for Diabetes Research, Department of Medicine, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Yin, Hongshan [Center for Diabetes Research, Department of Medicine, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Third Affiliated Hospital, Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang 050051, Hebei (China); Nam, Deokhwa [Center for Diabetes Research, Department of Medicine, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Li, Yong [Department of Pediatric Surgery, Center for Stem Cell Research and Regenerative Medicine, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Ma, Ke, E-mail: kma@houstonmethodist.org [Center for Diabetes Research, Department of Medicine, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Circadian clock is an evolutionarily conserved timing mechanism governing diverse biological processes and the skeletal muscle possesses intrinsic functional clocks. Interestingly, although the essential clock transcription activator, Brain and muscle Arnt-like 1 (Bmal1), participates in maintenance of muscle mass, little is known regarding its role in muscle growth and repair. In this report, we investigate the in vivo function of Bmal1 in skeletal muscle regeneration using two muscle injury models. Bmal1 is highly up-regulated by cardiotoxin injury, and its genetic ablation significantly impairs regeneration with markedly suppressed new myofiber formation and attenuated myogenic induction. A similarly defective regenerative response is observed in Bmal1-null mice as compared to wild-type controls upon freeze injury. Lack of satellite cell expansion accounts for the regeneration defect, as Bmal1{sup −/−} mice display significantly lower satellite cell number with nearly abolished induction of the satellite cell marker, Pax7. Furthermore, satellite cell-derived primary myoblasts devoid of Bmal1 display reduced growth and proliferation ex vivo. Collectively, our results demonstrate, for the first time, that Bmal1 is an integral component of the pro-myogenic response that is required for muscle repair. This mechanism may underlie its role in preserving adult muscle mass and could be targeted therapeutically to prevent muscle-wasting diseases. - Highlights: • Bmal1 is highly inducible by muscle injury and myogenic stimuli. • Genetic ablation of Bmal1 significantly impairs muscle regeneration. • Bmal1 promotes satellite cell expansion during muscle regeneration. • Bmal1-deficient primary myoblasts display attenuated growth and proliferation.

  15. Brain and muscle Arnt-like 1 promotes skeletal muscle regeneration through satellite cell expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatterjee, Somik; Yin, Hongshan; Nam, Deokhwa; Li, Yong; Ma, Ke

    2015-01-01

    Circadian clock is an evolutionarily conserved timing mechanism governing diverse biological processes and the skeletal muscle possesses intrinsic functional clocks. Interestingly, although the essential clock transcription activator, Brain and muscle Arnt-like 1 (Bmal1), participates in maintenance of muscle mass, little is known regarding its role in muscle growth and repair. In this report, we investigate the in vivo function of Bmal1 in skeletal muscle regeneration using two muscle injury models. Bmal1 is highly up-regulated by cardiotoxin injury, and its genetic ablation significantly impairs regeneration with markedly suppressed new myofiber formation and attenuated myogenic induction. A similarly defective regenerative response is observed in Bmal1-null mice as compared to wild-type controls upon freeze injury. Lack of satellite cell expansion accounts for the regeneration defect, as Bmal1 −/− mice display significantly lower satellite cell number with nearly abolished induction of the satellite cell marker, Pax7. Furthermore, satellite cell-derived primary myoblasts devoid of Bmal1 display reduced growth and proliferation ex vivo. Collectively, our results demonstrate, for the first time, that Bmal1 is an integral component of the pro-myogenic response that is required for muscle repair. This mechanism may underlie its role in preserving adult muscle mass and could be targeted therapeutically to prevent muscle-wasting diseases. - Highlights: • Bmal1 is highly inducible by muscle injury and myogenic stimuli. • Genetic ablation of Bmal1 significantly impairs muscle regeneration. • Bmal1 promotes satellite cell expansion during muscle regeneration. • Bmal1-deficient primary myoblasts display attenuated growth and proliferation

  16. Xanthophylls are preferentially taken up compared with beta-carotene by retinal cells via a SRBI-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    During, Alexandrine; Doraiswamy, Sundari; Harrison, Earl H

    2008-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanisms by which carotenoids [xanthophylls vs. beta-carotene(beta-C)] are taken up by retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. The human RPE cell line, ARPE-19, was used. When ARPE-19 cells were fully differentiated (7-9 weeks), the xanthophylls lutein (LUT) and zeaxanthin (ZEA) were taken up by cells to an extent 2-fold higher than beta-C (P xanthophylls versus the carotene by a process that appears to be entirely SR-BI-dependent for ZEA and partly so for beta-C. This mechanism may explain, in part, the preferential accumulation of xanthophylls in the macula of the retina.

  17. Trichostatin A inhibits beta-casein expression in mammary epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pujuguet, Philippe; Radisky, Derek; Levy, Dinah; Lacza, Charlemagne; Bissell, Mina J.

    2002-01-01

    Many aspects of cellular behavior are affected by information derived from association of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and with cell membrane receptors. When cultured in the presence of laminin-containing ECM and prolactin (Prl), normal mammary epithelial cells express the milk protein beta-casein. Previously, we defined the minimal ECM- and Prl-responsive enhancer element BCE-1 from the upstream region of the beta-casein gene. We also found that BCE-1 was only active when stably integrated into chromatin, and that trichostatin A (TSA), a reagent that leads to alterations in chromatin structure, was able to activate the integrated enhancer element. We now show that endogenous b-casein gene, which is controlled by a genetic assembly that is highly similar to that of BCE-1 and which is also activated by incubation in ECM and Prl, is instead inhibited by TSA. We provide evidence that the differing response of b-casein and BCE-1 to TSA is neither due to an unusual effect of TSA on mammary epithelial cells, nor to secondary consequences from the expression of a separate gene, nor to a particular property of the BCE-1 construct. As a component of this investigation, we also showed that ECM could mediate rapid histone deacetylation in mammary epithelial cells. These results are discussed in combination with previous work showing that TSA mediates the differentiation of many types of cancer cells but inhibits differentiation of some nonmalignant cell types

  18. The double bromodomain protein Brd2 promotes B cell expansion and mitogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkina, Anna C; Blanton, Wanda P; Nikolajczyk, Barbara S; Denis, Gerald V

    2014-03-01

    Bromodomain-containing transcriptional regulators represent new epigenetic targets in different hematologic malignancies. However, bromodomain-mediated mechanisms that couple histone acetylation to transcription in lymphopoiesis and govern mature lymphocyte mitogenesis are poorly understood. Brd2, a transcriptional coregulator that contains dual bromodomains and an extraterminal domain (the BET family), couples chromatin to cell-cycle progression. We reported previously the first functional characterization of a BET protein as an effector of mammalian mitogenic signal transduction: Eμ-Brd2 Tg mice develop "activated B cell" diffuse large B cell lymphoma. No other animal models exist for genetic or lentiviral expression of BET proteins, hampering testing of novel anti-BET anticancer drugs, such as JQ1. We transduced HSCs with Brd2 lentivirus and reconstituted recipient mice to test the hypothesis that Brd2 regulates hematopoiesis in BM and mitogenesis in the periphery. Forced expression of Brd2 provides an expansion advantage to the donor-derived B cell compartment in BM and increases mature B cell mitogenic responsiveness in vitro. Brd2 binds the cyclin A promoter in B cells, shown by ChIP, and increases cyclin A mRNA and protein levels, and S-phase progression in vitro in mitogen-stimulated primary B cells, but not T cells, reinforcing results from Eμ-Brd2 mice. The small molecule BET inhibitor JQ1 reduces B cell mitogenesis, consistent with the interpretation that BET inhibitors are antiproliferative. Brd2-specific knockdown experiments show that Brd2 is also required for hematopoiesis. We conclude that Brd2 plays a critical, independent role in regulation of mitogenic response genes, particularly cyclin A, in B cells.

  19. Elucidating the phenomenon of HESC-derived RPE: anatomy of cell genesis, expansion and retinal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vugler, Anthony; Carr, Amanda-Jayne; Lawrence, Jean; Chen, Li Li; Burrell, Kelly; Wright, Andrew; Lundh, Peter; Semo, Ma'ayan; Ahmado, Ahmad; Gias, Carlos; da Cruz, Lyndon; Moore, Harry; Andrews, Peter; Walsh, James; Coffey, Peter

    2008-12-01

    Healthy Retinal Pigment Epithelium (RPE) cells are required for proper visual function and the phenomenon of RPE derivation from Human Embryonic Stem Cells (HESC) holds great potential for the treatment of retinal diseases. However, little is known about formation, expansion and expression profile of RPE-like cells derived from HESC (HESC-RPE). By studying the genesis of pigmented foci we identified OTX1/2-positive cell types as potential HESC-RPE precursors. When pigmented foci were excised from culture, HESC-RPE expanded to form extensive monolayers, with pigmented cells at the leading edge assuming a precursor role: de-pigmenting, proliferating, expressing keratin 8 and subsequently re-differentiating. As they expanded and differentiated in vitro, HESC-RPE expressed markers of both developing and mature RPE cells which included OTX1/2, Pax6, PMEL17 and at low levels, RPE65. In vitro, without signals from a developing retinal environment, HESC-RPE could produce regular, polarised monolayers with developmentally important apical and basal features. Following transplantation of HESC-RPE into the degenerating retinal environment of Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) dystrophic rats, the cells survived in the subretinal space, where they maintained low levels of RPE65 expression and remained out of the cell cycle. The HESC-RPE cells responded to the in vivo environment by downregulating Pax6, while maintaining expression of other markers. The presence of rhodopsin-positive material within grafted HESC-RPE indicates that in the future, homogenous transplants of this cell type may be capable of supporting visual function following retinal dystrophy.

  20. Maternal Rat Diabetes Mellitus Deleteriously Affects Insulin Sensitivity and Beta-Cell Function in the Offspring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel-Baset M. Aref

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to assess the effect of maternal diabetes in rats on serum glucose and insulin concentrations, insulin resistance, histological architecture of pancreas and glycogen content in liver of offspring. The pregnant rat females were allocated into two main groups: normal control group and streptozotocin-induced diabetic group. After birth, the surviving offspring were subjected to biochemical and histological examination immediately after delivery and at the end of the 1st and 2nd postnatal weeks. In comparison with the offspring of normal control dams, the fasting serum glucose level of offspring of diabetic mothers was significantly increased at the end of the 1st and 2nd postnatal weeks. Serum insulin level of offspring of diabetic dams was significantly higher at birth and decreased significantly during the following 2 postnatal weeks, while in normal rat offspring, it was significantly increased with progress of time. HOMA Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR was significantly increased in the offspring of diabetic dams at birth and after 1 week than in normal rat offspring, while HOMA insulin sensitivity (HOMA-IS was significantly decreased. HOMA beta-cell function was significantly decreased at all-time intervals in offspring of diabetic dams. At birth, islets of Langerhans as well as beta cells in offspring of diabetic dams were hypertrophied. The cells constituting islets seemed to have a high division rate. However, beta-cells were degenerated during the following 2 post-natal weeks and smaller insulin secreting cells predominated. Vacuolation and necrosis of the islets of Langerhans were also observed throughout the experimental period. The carbohydrate content in liver of offspring of diabetic dams was at all-time intervals lower than that in control. The granule distribution was more random. Overall, the preexisting maternal diabetes leads to glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, and impaired insulin sensitivity and β-cell

  1. Chaperones ameliorate beta cell dysfunction associated with human islet amyloid polypeptide overexpression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Cadavez

    Full Text Available In type 2 diabetes, beta-cell dysfunction is thought to be due to several causes, one being the formation of toxic protein aggregates called islet amyloid, formed by accumulations of misfolded human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP. The process of hIAPP misfolding and aggregation is one of the factors that may activate the unfolded protein response (UPR, perturbing endoplasmic reticulum (ER homeostasis. Molecular chaperones have been described to be important in regulating ER response to ER stress. In the present work, we evaluate the role of chaperones in a stressed cellular model of hIAPP overexpression. A rat pancreatic beta-cell line expressing hIAPP exposed to thapsigargin or treated with high glucose and palmitic acid, both of which are known ER stress inducers, showed an increase in ER stress genes when compared to INS1E cells expressing rat IAPP or INS1E control cells. Treatment with molecular chaperone glucose-regulated protein 78 kDa (GRP78, also known as BiP or protein disulfite isomerase (PDI, and chemical chaperones taurine-conjugated ursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA or 4-phenylbutyrate (PBA, alleviated ER stress and increased insulin secretion in hIAPP-expressing cells. Our results suggest that the overexpression of hIAPP induces a stronger response of ER stress markers. Moreover, endogenous and chemical chaperones are able to ameliorate induced ER stress and increase insulin secretion, suggesting that improving chaperone capacity can play an important role in improving beta-cell function in type 2 diabetes.

  2. Modeling of thermal expansion coefficient of perovskite oxide for solid oxide fuel cell cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydari, F.; Maghsoudipour, A.; Alizadeh, M.; Khakpour, Z.; Javaheri, M.

    2015-09-01

    Artificial intelligence models have the capacity to eliminate the need for expensive experimental investigation in various areas of manufacturing processes, including the material science. This study investigates the applicability of adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) approach for modeling the performance parameters of thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) of perovskite oxide for solid oxide fuel cell cathode. Oxides (Ln = La, Nd, Sm and M = Fe, Ni, Mn) have been prepared and characterized to study the influence of the different cations on TEC. Experimental results have shown TEC decreases favorably with substitution of Nd3+ and Mn3+ ions in the lattice. Structural parameters of compounds have been determined by X-ray diffraction, and field emission scanning electron microscopy has been used for the morphological study. Comparison results indicated that the ANFIS technique could be employed successfully in modeling thermal expansion coefficient of perovskite oxide for solid oxide fuel cell cathode, and considerable savings in terms of cost and time could be obtained by using ANFIS technique.

  3. Making the switch: alternatives to foetal bovine serum for adipose-derived stromal cell expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Dessels

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs are being used extensively in clinical trials. These trials require that ASCs are prepared using good manufacturing procedures (GMPs and are safe for use in humans. The majority of clinical trials in which ASCs are expanded make use of fetal bovine serum (FBS. While FBS is used traditionally in the research setting for in vitro expansion, it does carry the risk of xenoimmunization and zoonotic transmission when used for expanding cells destined for therapeutic purposes. In order to ensure a GMP quality product for cellular therapy, in vitro expansion of ASCs has been undertaken using xeno-free (XF, chemically-defined, and human blood-derived alternatives. These investigations usually include the criteria proposed by the International Society of Cellular Therapy (ISCT and International Fat Applied Technology Society (IFATS. The majority of studies use these criteria to compare plastic-adherence, morphology, the immunophenotype and the trilineage differentiation of ASCs under the different medium supplemented conditions. Based on these studies, all of the alternatives to FBS seem to be suitable replacements; however, each has its own advantages and drawbacks. Very few studies have investigated the effects of the supplements on the immunomodulation of ASCs; the transcriptome, proteome and secretome; and the ultimate effects in appropriate animal models. The selection of medium supplementation will depend on the downstream application of the ASCs and their efficacy and safety in preclinical studies.

  4. CISH has no non-redundant functions in glucose homeostasis or beta cell proliferation during pregnancy in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Yang; Rieck, Sebastian; Le Lay, John; Kaestner, Klaus H

    2013-11-01

    Increased beta cell proliferation during pregnancy is mediated by the Janus kinase 2/signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (JAK2/STAT5) signalling pathway in response to increased lactogen levels. Activation of the pathway leads to transcriptional upregulation of Cish (encoding cytokine-inducible SH2 domain-containing protein), a member of the suppressor of cytokine signalling (SOCS) family of genes, forming a negative-feedback loop. Here, we examined whether conditional gene ablation of Cish in the pancreas improves beta cell proliferation and beta cell function during pregnancy in mice. We derived mice with a novel, conditional loxP allele for Cish. Pancreas-specific ablation of Cish was achieved by crossing Cish (loxP/loxP) mice with Pdx1-Cre (Early) mice. Beta cell proliferation was quantified by BrdU labelling. Glucose homeostasis was examined with glucose tolerance tests and determination of plasma insulin levels. The expression of other Socs genes and target genes of p-STAT5 related to beta cell function and beta cell proliferation was determined by quantitative PCR. There was no difference in beta cell proliferation or glucose homeostasis between the Cish mutant group and the control group. The p-STAT5 protein level was the same in Cish mutant and control mice. Socs2 gene expression was higher in Cish mutant than control mice at pregnancy day 9.5. The expression of other Socs genes was the same between control and mutant mice. Our results show that CISH has no non-redundant functions in beta cell proliferation or glucose homeostasis during pregnancy in mice. Socs2 might compensate for the loss of Cish during pregnancy.

  5. Islet autoantibodies and residual beta cell function in type 1 diabetes children followed for 3-6 years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jesper Sand; Vaziri-Sani, Fariba; Maziarz, M

    2012-01-01

    To test if islet autoantibodies at diagnosis of type 1 diabetes (T1DM) and after 3-6 years with T1D predict residual beta-cell function (RBF) after 3-6 years with T1D.......To test if islet autoantibodies at diagnosis of type 1 diabetes (T1DM) and after 3-6 years with T1D predict residual beta-cell function (RBF) after 3-6 years with T1D....

  6. Gut-homing CD4+ T cell receptor alpha beta+ T cells in the pathogenesis of murine inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudolphi, A; Boll, G; Poulsen, S S

    1994-01-01

    reconstituted a CD3+ T cell receptor alpha beta+ CD4+ T cell subset. CD4+ cells of this subset expressed the surface phenotype of mucosa-seeking, memory T cells. In the immunodeficient scid host, this gut-derived CD4+ T cell subset was found in spleen, peritoneal cavity, mesenteric lymph nodes (LN), epithelial...... compartments with CD4+ T cells from normal GALT plays an essential role in the pathogenesis of IBD in an immunodeficient host.......We studied which T cell subsets from the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) can migrate out of the gut mucosa and repopulate GALT compartments of an immunodeficient (semi)syngeneic host. Many distinct lymphocyte subsets were found in GALT of immunocompetent H-2d (BALB/c, BALB/cdm2, C.B-17...

  7. Autocrine production of beta-chemokines protects CMV-Specific CD4 T cells from HIV infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph P Casazza

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Induction of a functional subset of HIV-specific CD4+ T cells that is resistant to HIV infection could enhance immune protection and decrease the rate of HIV disease progression. CMV-specific CD4+ T cells, which are less frequently infected than HIV-specific CD4+ T cells, are a model for such an effect. To determine the mechanism of this protection, we compared the functional response of HIV gag-specific and CMV pp65-specific CD4+ T cells in individuals co-infected with CMV and HIV. We found that CMV-specific CD4+ T cells rapidly up-regulated production of MIP-1alpha and MIP-1beta mRNA, resulting in a rapid increase in production of MIP-1alpha and MIP-1beta after cognate antigen stimulation. Production of beta-chemokines was associated with maturational phenotype and was rarely seen in HIV-specific CD4+ T cells. To test whether production of beta-chemokines by CD4+ T cells lowers their susceptibility to HIV infection, we measured cell-associated Gag DNA to assess the in vivo infection history of CMV-specific CD4+ T cells. We found that CMV-specific CD4+ T cells which produced MIP-1beta contained 10 times less Gag DNA than did those which failed to produce MIP-1beta. These data suggest that CD4+ T cells which produce MIP-1alpha and MIP-1beta bind these chemokines in an autocrine fashion which decreases the risk of in vivo HIV infection.

  8. Biotin uptake by mouse and human pancreatic beta cells/islets: a regulated, lipopolysaccharide-sensitive carrier-mediated process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosal, Abhisek; Sekar, Thillai V.

    2014-01-01

    Biotin is essential for the normal function of pancreatic beta cells. These cells obtain biotin from their surroundings via transport across their cell membrane. Little is known about the uptake mechanism involved, how it is regulated, and how it is affected by internal and external factors. We addressed these issues using the mouse-derived pancreatic beta-TC-6 cells and freshly isolated mouse and human primary pancreatic beta cells as models. The results showed biotin uptake by pancreatic beta-TC-6 cells occurs via a Na+-dependent, carrier-mediated process, that is sensitive to desthiobiotin, as well as to pantothenic acid and lipoate; the process is also saturable as a function of concentration (apparent Km = 22.24 ± 5.5 μM). These cells express the sodium-dependent multivitamin transporter (SMVT), whose knockdown (with doxycycline-inducible shRNA) led to a sever inhibition in biotin uptake. Similarly, uptake of biotin by mouse and human primary pancreatic islets is Na+-dependent and carrier-mediated, and both cell types express SMVT. Biotin uptake by pancreatic beta-TC-6 cells is also adaptively regulated (via transcriptional mechanism) by extracellular substrate level. Chronic treatment of pancreatic beta-TC-6 cells with bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) leads to inhibition in biotin uptake. This inhibition is mediated via a Toll-Like receptor 4-mediated process and involves a decrease in membrane expression of SMVT. These findings show, for the first time, that pancreatic beta cells/islets take up biotin via a specific and regulated carrier-mediated process, and that the process is sensitive to the effect of LPS. PMID:24904078

  9. Antioxidant and regulatory role of mitochondrial uncoupling protein UCP2 in pancreatic beta-cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ježek, Petr; Olejár, Tomáš; Smolková, Katarína; Ježek, Jan; Dlasková, Andrea; Plecitá-Hlavatá, Lydie; Zelenka, Jaroslav; Špaček, Tomáš; Engstová, Hana; Reguera Pajuelo, David; Jabůrek, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 63, Suppl.1 (2014), S73-S91 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/10/0346; GA ČR(CZ) GAP305/12/1247; GA ČR(CZ) GPP304/10/P204; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0025 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : mitochondria * uncoupling protein UCP2 * pancreatic beta-cells * reactive oxygen species * glucose-stimulated insulin secretion Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 1.293, year: 2014

  10. The grand partition function Z ({alpha},{beta}) of a quantum system is studied, using diagrammatic representations of the perturbation expansion; La grande fonction de partition Z ({alpha},{beta}) d'un systeme quantique est etudies en utilisant des representations diagrammatiques du developpement en serie des perturbations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dominicis, C. de [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1961-07-01

    The grand partition function Z ({alpha},{beta}) of a quantum system is studied, using diagrammatic representations of the perturbation expansion. For a fermions system, it is possible to show, by proper resummation, without approximations but under some 'regularity hypothesis', that Log Z ({alpha},{beta}) takes a form where, besides trivial dependences, {alpha} and {beta} only appear through a statistical factor F{sub k}{sup -} = [1 + e{sup -{alpha}}{sup +{beta}}{sup {epsilon}{sub k}{sup 0}}{sup -{beta}}{sup W{sub k}}]{sup -1}. W{sub k} is a (real) self-consistent potential, generalized to all orders and can be defined by a stationary condition on Log Z ({alpha},{beta}) under variations of F{sub k}{sup -}. The thermodynamical quantities take a form analogous to the expressions Landau introduced for the Fermi liquids. The zero temperature limit (for isotropic systems) gives back Goldstone expressions for the ground state of a system. (author) [French] La grande fonction de partition Z ({alpha},{beta}) d'un systeme quantique est etudiee en utilisant des representations diagrammatiques du developpement en serie des perturbations. Pour un systeme de fermions on peut, par des resommations adequates, sans approximations mais sous reserve d'une 'hypothese de regularite', mettre Log Z ({alpha},{beta}) sous une forme ou, en dehors de dependances triviales, {alpha} et {beta} n'interviennent que par l'intermediaire d'un facteur statistique F{sub k}{sup -} = [1 + e{sup -{alpha}}{sup +{beta}}{sup {epsilon}{sub k}{sup 0}}{sup -{beta}}{sup W{sub k}}]{sup -1}. W{sub k} est ici un potentiel self-consistant (reel) generalise a tous les ordres et peut etre defini par une condition de stationnarite de Log Z ({alpha},{beta}) pour des variations de F{sub k}{sup -}. Les grandeurs thermodynamiques prennent une forme analogue aux expressions que LANDAU a introduites pour les liquides de FERMI. A la limite de la temperature nulle (et pour un

  11. The grand partition function Z ({alpha},{beta}) of a quantum system is studied, using diagrammatic representations of the perturbation expansion; La grande fonction de partition Z ({alpha},{beta}) d'un systeme quantique est etudies en utilisant des representations diagrammatiques du developpement en serie des perturbations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dominicis, C de [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1961-07-01

    The grand partition function Z ({alpha},{beta}) of a quantum system is studied, using diagrammatic representations of the perturbation expansion. For a fermions system, it is possible to show, by proper resummation, without approximations but under some 'regularity hypothesis', that Log Z ({alpha},{beta}) takes a form where, besides trivial dependences, {alpha} and {beta} only appear through a statistical factor F{sub k}{sup -} = [1 + e{sup -{alpha}}{sup +{beta}}{sup {epsilon}{sub k}{sup 0}}{sup -{beta}}{sup W{sub k}}]{sup -1}. W{sub k} is a (real) self-consistent potential, generalized to all orders and can be defined by a stationary condition on Log Z ({alpha},{beta}) under variations of F{sub k}{sup -}. The thermodynamical quantities take a form analogous to the expressions Landau introduced for the Fermi liquids. The zero temperature limit (for isotropic systems) gives back Goldstone expressions for the ground state of a system. (author) [French] La grande fonction de partition Z ({alpha},{beta}) d'un systeme quantique est etudiee en utilisant des representations diagrammatiques du developpement en serie des perturbations. Pour un systeme de fermions on peut, par des resommations adequates, sans approximations mais sous reserve d'une 'hypothese de regularite', mettre Log Z ({alpha},{beta}) sous une forme ou, en dehors de dependances triviales, {alpha} et {beta} n'interviennent que par l'intermediaire d'un facteur statistique F{sub k}{sup -} = [1 + e{sup -{alpha}}{sup +{beta}}{sup {epsilon}{sub k}{sup 0}}{sup -{beta}}{sup W{sub k}}]{sup -1}. W{sub k} est ici un potentiel self-consistant (reel) generalise a tous les ordres et peut etre defini par une condition de stationnarite de Log Z ({alpha},{beta}) pour des variations de F{sub k}{sup -}. Les grandeurs thermodynamiques prennent une forme analogue aux expressions que LANDAU a introduites pour les liquides de FERMI. A la limite de la temperature nulle (et pour un systeme isotrope) on retrouve terme a terme les

  12. Whole transcriptome analysis for T cell receptor-affinity and IRF4-regulated clonal expansion of T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Shi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Clonal population expansion of T cells during an immune response is dependent on the affinity of the T cell receptor (TCR for its antigen [1]. However, there is little understanding of how this process is controlled transcriptionally. We found that the transcription factor IRF4 was induced in a manner dependent on TCR-affinity and was critical for the clonal expansion and maintenance of effector function of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells. We performed a genome-wide expression profiling experiment using RNA sequencing technology (RNA-seq to interrogate global expression changes when IRF4 was deleted in CD8+ T cells activated with either a low or high affinity peptide ligand. This allowed us not only to determine IRF4-dependent transcriptional changes but also to identify transcripts dependent on TCR-affinity [2]. Here we describe in detail the analyses of the RNA-seq data, including quality control, read mapping, quantification, normalization and assessment of differential gene expression. The RNA-seq data can be accessed from Gene Expression Omnibus database (accession number GSE49929.

  13. Long-term changes in cell population kinetics of skin tissue after local beta-irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, T [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    1975-06-01

    Using /sup 3/H-thymidine autoradiography, long-term alterations in cell kinetics were studied in guinea pig skin after ..beta..irradiation with 3000 rads. After complete depopulation, epidermal basal cells at the radiation margin became proliferative 10 days postirradiation and spread over the depopulated area. When epithelization (20 days) was complete the cell cycle time of the basal cells reverted to normal, but the differentiation rate was much slower than that in unirradiated skin. This appeared to be a cause of the persistent (acanthotic) hyperplasia. Similar but slower changes were found in dermal tissue. Reparative proliferation of fibroblasts and capillary endothelial cells began at 20 and 30 days, respectively. Active fibroblastic proliferation was found as late as 110 days. This, along with the abortive nature of the reparative angiogenesis, seemed to be a cause of the later fibrosis (150 to 400 days).

  14. Expansion of highly activated invariant natural killer T cells with altered phenotype in acute dengue infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamaladasa, A.; Wickramasinghe, N.; Adikari, T. N.; Gomes, L.; Shyamali, N. L. A.; Salio, M.; Cerundolo, V.; Ogg, G. S.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are capable of rapid activation and production of cytokines upon recognition of antigenic lipids presented by CD1d molecules. They have been shown to play a significant role in many viral infections and were observed to be highly activated in patients with acute dengue infection. In order to characterize further their role in dengue infection, we investigated the proportion of iNKT cells and their phenotype in adult patients with acute dengue infection. The functionality of iNKT cells in patients was investigated by both interferon (IFN)‐γ and interleukin (IL)−4 ex‐vivo enzyme‐linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assays following stimulation with alpha‐galactosyl‐ceramide (αGalCer). We found that circulating iNKT cell proportions were significantly higher (P = 0·03) in patients with acute dengue when compared to healthy individuals and were predominantly of the CD4+ subset. iNKT cells of patients with acute dengue had reduced proportions expressing CD8α and CD161 when compared to healthy individuals. The iNKT cells of patients were highly activated and iNKT activation correlated significantly with dengue virus‐specific immunoglobulin (Ig)G antibody levels. iNKT cells expressing Bcl‐6 (P = 0·0003) and both Bcl‐6 and inducible T cell co‐stimulator (ICOS) (P = 0·006) were increased significantly in patients when compared to healthy individuals. Therefore, our data suggest that in acute dengue infection there is an expansion of highly activated CD4+ iNKT cells, with reduced expression of CD161 markers. PMID:26874822

  15. Early incorporation of cell-derived cholesterol into pre-beta-migrating high-density lipoprotein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, G.R.; Fielding, C.J.

    1988-01-01

    Cultures of human skin fibroblasts were labeled to high cholesterol specific activity with [ 3 H]cholesterol and incubated briefly (1-3 min) with normal human plasma. The plasma was fractionated by two-dimensional agarose-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and the early appearance of cholesterol label among plasma lipoproteins determined. A major part of the label at 1-min incubation was in a pre-beta-migrating apo A-I lipoprotein fraction with a molecular weight of ca. 70,000. Label was enriched about 30-fold in this fraction relative to its content of apo A-I (1-2% of total apo A-I). The proportion of label in this lipoprotein was strongly correlated with its concentration in plasma. Further incubation (2 min) in the presence of unlabeled cells demonstrated transfer of label from this fraction to a higher molecular weight pre-beta apo A-I species, to low-density lipoprotein, and to the alpha-migrating apo A-I that made up the bulk (96%) of total apo A-I in plasma. The data suggest that a significant part of cell-derived cholesterol is transferred specifically to a pre-beta-migrating lipoprotein A-I species as part of a cholesterol transport transfer sequence in plasma

  16. [Factors causing damage and destruction of beta-cells of the islets of Langerhans in the pancreas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anděl, Michal; Němcová, Vlasta; Pavlíková, Nela; Urbanová, Jana; Cecháková, Marie; Havlová, Andrea; Straková, Radka; Večeřová, Livia; Mandys, Václav; Kovář, Jan; Heneberg, Petr; Trnka, Jan; Polák, Jan

    2014-09-01

    Insulin secretion in patients with manifested diabetes mellitus tends to disappear months to decades after the diagnosis, which is a clear sign of a gradual loss of pancreatic islet beta-cells. In our sample of 30 type 2 diabetic patients, whose disease manifested between 30 and 45 years of age, about a half have retained or even increased insulin secretion 30 years later, while the other half exhibit a much diminished or lost insulin secretion. Factors that can damage or destroy beta-cells can be divided into the following groups: Metabolic factors: hyperglycemia and glucotoxicity, lipotoxicity, hypoxia, reactive oxygen species; Pharmacological factors: antimicrobial medication pentamidine, SSRI antidepressants; Factors related to impaired insulin secretion: MODY type diabetes; Environmental toxic factors: rat poison Vacor, streptozotocin, polychlorinated and polybrominated hydrocarbons; Disorders of the exocrine pancreas: tumor infiltration, fibrous infiltration, chronic pancreatitis, cystic fibrosis; Infections, inflammation, autoimmunity, viral factors: Coxsackie viruses, H1N1 influenza, enteroviruses. We are currently working on finding other factors leading to beta-cell damage, studying their effect on apoptosis and necrosis and looking for possible protective factors to prevent this damage. We our increasing knowledge about the mechanisms of beta-cell damage and destruction we come ever closer to suggest measures for their prevention. In this review we offer a brief and simplified summary of some of the findings related to this area.Key words: pancreatic islet beta-cells of Langerhans - factors damaging or destroying beta-cells - insulin secretion.

  17. Increased androgen levels in rats impair glucose-stimulated insulin secretion through disruption of pancreatic beta cell mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongdong; Wang, Xiaping; Zhu, Yunxia; Chen, Fang; Sun, Yujie; Han, Xiao

    2015-11-01

    Although insulin resistance is recognized to contribute to the reproductive and metabolic phenotypes of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), pancreatic beta cell dysfunction plays an essential role in the progression from PCOS to the development of type 2 diabetes. However, the role of insulin secretory abnormalities in PCOS has received little attention. In addition, the precise changes in beta cells and the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we therefore attempted to elucidate potential mechanisms involved in beta cell alterations in a rat model of PCOS. Glucose-induced insulin secretion was measured in islets isolated from DHT-treated and control rats. Oxygen consumption rate (OCR), ATP production, and mitochondrial copy number were assayed to evaluate mitochondrial function. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion is significantly decreased in islets from DHT-treated rats. On the other hand, significant reductions are observed in the expression levels of several key genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and in mitochondrial OCR and ATP production in DHT-treated rat islets. Meanwhile, we found that androgens can directly impair beta cell function by inducing mitochondrial dysfunction in vitro in an androgen receptor dependent manner. For the first time, our study demonstrates that increased androgens in female rats can impair glucose-stimulated insulin secretion partly through disruption of pancreatic beta cell mitochondrial function. This work has significance for hyperandrogenic women with PCOS: excess activation of the androgen receptor by androgens may provoke beta cell dysfunction via mitochondrial dysfunction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Dystroglycan loss disrupts polarity and beta-casein induction inmammary epithelial cells by perturbing laminin anchoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weir, M. Lynn; Oppizzi, Maria Luisa; Henry, Michael D.; Onishi,Akiko; Campbell, Kevin P.; Bissell, Mina J.; Muschler, John L.

    2006-02-17

    Precise contact between epithelial cells and their underlying basement membrane is critical to the maintenance of tissue architecture and function. To understand the role that the laminin receptor dystroglycan (DG) plays in these processes, we assayed cell responses to laminin-111 following conditional ablation of DG expression in cultured mammary epithelial cells (MECs). Strikingly, DG loss disrupted laminin-111-induced polarity and {beta}-casein production, and abolished laminin assembly at the step of laminin binding to the cell surface. DG re-expression restored these deficiencies. Investigations of mechanism revealed that DG cytoplasmic sequences were not necessary for laminin assembly and signaling, and only when the entire mucin domain of extracellular DG was deleted did laminin assembly not occur. These results demonstrate that DG is essential as a laminin-111 co-receptor in MECs that functions by mediating laminin anchoring to the cell surface, a process that allows laminin polymerization, tissue polarity, and {beta}-casein induction. The observed loss of laminin-111 assembly and signaling in DG-/-MECs provides insights into the signaling changes occurring in breast carcinomas and other cancers, where DG's laminin-binding function is frequently defective.

  19. Functional characterization of the beta-adrenergic receptor subtypes expressed by CA1 pyramidal cells in the rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillman, Kristin L; Doze, Van A; Porter, James E

    2005-08-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that activation of the beta-adrenergic receptor (AR) using the selective beta-AR agonist isoproterenol (ISO) facilitates pyramidal cell long-term potentiation in the cornu ammonis 1 (CA1) region of the rat hippocampus. We have previously analyzed beta-AR genomic expression patterns of 17 CA1 pyramidal cells using single cell reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, demonstrating that all samples expressed the beta2-AR transcript, with four of the 17 cells additionally expressing mRNA for the beta1-AR subtype. However, it has not been determined which beta-AR subtypes are functionally expressed in CA1 for these same pyramidal neurons. Using cell-attached recordings, we tested the ability of ISO to increase pyramidal cell action potential (AP) frequency in the presence of subtype-selective beta-AR antagonists. ICI-118,551 [(+/-)-1-[2,3-(dihydro-7-methyl-1H-inden-4-yl)oxy]-3-[(1-methylethyl)amino]-2-butanol] and butoxamine [alpha-[1-(t-butylamino)ethyl]-2,5-dimethoxybenzyl alcohol) hydrochloride], agents that selectively block the beta2-AR, produced significant parallel rightward shifts in the concentration-response curves for ISO. From these curves, apparent equilibrium dissociation constant (K(b)) values of 0.3 nM for ICI-118,551 and 355 nM for butoxamine were calculated using Schild regression analysis. Conversely, effective concentrations of the selective beta1-AR antagonists CGP 20712A [(+/-)-2-hydroxy-5-[2-([2-hydroxy-3-(4-[1-methyl-4-(trifluoromethyl)-1H-imidazol-2-yl]phenoxy)propyl]amino)ethoxy]-benzamide methanesulfonate] and atenolol [4-[2'-hydroxy-3'-(isopropyl-amino)propoxy]phenylacetamide] did not significantly affect the pyramidal cell response to ISO. However, at higher concentrations, atenolol significantly decreased the potency for ISO-mediated AP frequencies. From these curves, an apparent atenolol K(b) value of 3162 nM was calculated. This pharmacological profile for subtype-selective beta-AR antagonists

  20. Multilayer network representation of membrane potential and cytosolic calcium concentration dynamics in beta cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gosak, Marko; Dolenšek, Jurij; Markovič, Rene; Slak Rupnik, Marjan; Marhl, Marko; Stožer, Andraž

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Physiological processes within and among pancreatic beta cells are very complex. • We analyze the simultaneous recordings of membrane potential and calcium dynamics. • We represent the interaction patterns among beta cells as a multilayer network. • The nature of the intracellular dynamics is found to rely on the network structure. - Abstract: Modern theory of networks has been recognized as a very successful methodological concept for the description and analysis of complex systems. However, some complex systems are more complex than others. For instance, several real-life systems are constituted by interdependent subsystems and their elements are subjected to different types of interactions that can also change with time. Recently, the multilayer network formalism has been proposed as a general theoretical framework for the description and analysis of such multi-dimensional complex systems and is acquiring more and more prominence in terms of a new research direction. In the present study, we use this methodology for the description of functional connectivity patterns and signal propagation between pancreatic beta cells in an islet of Langerhans at the levels of membrane potential (MP) and cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca"2"+]_c) dynamics to study the extent of overlap in the two networks and to clarify whether time lags between the two signals in individual cells are in any way dependent on the role these cells play in the functional networks. The two corresponding network layers are constructed on the basis of signal directions and pairwise correlations, whereas the interlayer connections represent the time lag between both measured signals. Our results confirm our previous finding that both MP and [Ca"2"+]_c change spread across an islet in the form of a depolarization and a [Ca"2"+]_c wave, respectively. Both types of waves follow nearly the same path and the networks in both layers have a similar but not entirely the same structure

  1. HEXIM1 controls satellite cell expansion after injury to regulate skeletal muscle regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Peng; Chen, Kang; Huang, Bihui; Liu, Min; Cui, Miao; Rozenberg, Inna; Chaqour, Brahim; Pan, Xiaoyue; Barton, Elisabeth R.; Jiang, Xian-Cheng; Siddiqui, M.A.Q.

    2012-01-01

    The native capacity of adult skeletal muscles to regenerate is vital to the recovery from physical injuries and dystrophic diseases. Currently, the development of therapeutic interventions has been hindered by the complex regulatory network underlying the process of muscle regeneration. Using a mouse model of skeletal muscle regeneration after injury, we identified hexamethylene bisacetamide inducible 1 (HEXIM1, also referred to as CLP-1), the inhibitory component of the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) complex, as a pivotal regulator of skeletal muscle regeneration. Hexim1-haplodeficient muscles exhibited greater mass and preserved function compared with those of WT muscles after injury, as a result of enhanced expansion of satellite cells. Transplanted Hexim1-haplodeficient satellite cells expanded and improved muscle regeneration more effectively than WT satellite cells. Conversely, HEXIM1 overexpression restrained satellite cell proliferation and impeded muscle regeneration. Mechanistically, dissociation of HEXIM1 from P-TEFb and subsequent activation of P-TEFb are required for satellite cell proliferation and the prevention of early myogenic differentiation. These findings suggest a crucial role for the HEXIM1/P-TEFb pathway in the regulation of satellite cell–mediated muscle regeneration and identify HEXIM1 as a potential therapeutic target for degenerative muscular diseases. PMID:23023707

  2. Beta Blockers Suppress Dextrose-Induced Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress, Oxidative Stress, and Apoptosis in Human Coronary Artery Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Michael J; Kurban, William; Shah, Harshit; Onstead-Haas, Luisa; Mooradian, Arshag D

    Beta blockers are known to have favorable effects on endothelial function partly because of their capacity to reduce oxidative stress. To determine whether beta blockers can also prevent dextrose-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in addition to their antioxidative effects, human coronary artery endothelial cells and hepatocyte-derived HepG2 cells were treated with 27.5 mM dextrose for 24 hours in the presence of carvedilol (a lipophilic beta blockers with alpha blocking activity), propranolol (a lipophilic nonselective beta blockers), and atenolol (a water-soluble selective beta blockers), and ER stress, oxidative, stress and cell death were measured. ER stress was measured using the placental alkaline phosphatase assay and Western blot analysis of glucose regulated protein 78, c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK), phospho-JNK, eukaryotic initiating factor 2α (eIF2α), and phospho-eIF2α and measurement of X-box binding protein 1 (XBP1) mRNA splicing using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Superoxide (SO) generation was measured using the superoxide-reactive probe 2-methyl-6-(4-methoxyphenyl)-3,7-dihydroimidazo[1,2-A]pyrazin-3-one hydrochloride (MCLA) chemiluminescence. Cell viability was measured by propidium iodide staining method. The ER stress, SO production, and cell death induced by 27.5 mM dextrose were inhibited by all 3 beta blockers tested. The antioxidative and ER stress reducing effects of beta blockers were also observed in HepG2 cells. The salutary effects of beta blockers on endothelial cells in reducing both ER stress and oxidative stress may contribute to the cardioprotective effects of these agents.

  3. Beta-Poisson model for single-cell RNA-seq data analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Trung Nghia; Wills, Quin F; Kalari, Krishna R; Niu, Nifang; Wang, Liewei; Rantalainen, Mattias; Pawitan, Yudi

    2016-07-15

    Single-cell RNA-sequencing technology allows detection of gene expression at the single-cell level. One typical feature of the data is a bimodality in the cellular distribution even for highly expressed genes, primarily caused by a proportion of non-expressing cells. The standard and the over-dispersed gamma-Poisson models that are commonly used in bulk-cell RNA-sequencing are not able to capture this property. We introduce a beta-Poisson mixture model that can capture the bimodality of the single-cell gene expression distribution. We further integrate the model into the generalized linear model framework in order to perform differential expression analyses. The whole analytical procedure is called BPSC. The results from several real single-cell RNA-seq datasets indicate that ∼90% of the transcripts are well characterized by the beta-Poisson model; the model-fit from BPSC is better than the fit of the standard gamma-Poisson model in > 80% of the transcripts. Moreover, in differential expression analyses of simulated and real datasets, BPSC performs well against edgeR, a conventional method widely used in bulk-cell RNA-sequencing data, and against scde and MAST, two recent methods specifically designed for single-cell RNA-seq data. An R package BPSC for model fitting and differential expression analyses of single-cell RNA-seq data is available under GPL-3 license at https://github.com/nghiavtr/BPSC CONTACT: yudi.pawitan@ki.se or mattias.rantalainen@ki.se Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. The growth of stem cells within {beta}-TCP scaffolds in a fluid-dynamic environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Shanglong [School of Mechatronics Engineering, University of Electronic Science and Technology, Chengdu (China); State Key Laboratory of Mechanical Manufacture System Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an (China); Li Dichen [State Key Laboratory of Mechanical Manufacture System Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an (China)], E-mail: dcli@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Xie Youzhuan; Lu Jianxi; Dai Kerong [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Ninth People' s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China)

    2008-01-10

    A three-dimensional dynamic perfusion system was developed to provide mass transport and nutrient supply to permit the cell proliferation during the long-term culture inside a {beta}-tricalcium phosphate ({beta}-TCP) scaffold. Also the flow field throughout the scaffold was studied. The porous cylindrical scaffold with a central channel was seeded with the sheep mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Then the cell-seeded scaffolds were continuously perfused with the complete {alpha}-MEM medium by a peristaltic pump for 7, 14 and 28 days, respectively. Histological study showed that the cell proliferation rates were different throughout the whole scaffolds and the different cell coverage was shown in different positions of the scaffold. Unoccupied spaces were found in many macropores. A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling was used to simulate the flow conditions within perfused cell-seeded scaffolds to give an insight into the mechanisms of these cell growth phenomena. Relating the simulation results to perfusion experiments, the even fluid velocity (approximately 0.52 mm/s) and shear stress (approximately 0.0055 Pa) were found to correspond to increased cell proliferation within the cell-scaffold constructs. Flow speeds were between 0.25 and 0.75 mm/s and shear stresses were between 0.003 and 0.008 Pa in approximately 75% of the regions. This method exhibits novel capabilities to compare the results obtained for different perfusion rates or different scaffold microarchitectures. It may allow specific fluid velocities and shear stresses to be determined to optimize the perfusion flow rate, porous scaffold architecture and distribution of in vitro tissue growth.

  5. CDK2 phosphorylation of Smad2 disrupts TGF-beta transcriptional regulation in resistant primary bone marrow myeloma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baughn, Linda B; Di Liberto, Maurizio; Niesvizky, Ruben; Cho, Hearn J; Jayabalan, David; Lane, Joseph; Liu, Fang; Chen-Kiang, Selina

    2009-02-15

    Resistance to growth suppression by TGF-beta1 is common in cancer; however, mutations in this pathway are rare in hematopoietic malignancies. In multiple myeloma, a fatal cancer of plasma cells, malignant cells accumulate in the TGF-beta-rich bone marrow due to loss of both cell cycle and apoptotic controls. Herein we show that TGF-beta activates Smad2 but fails to induce cell cycle arrest or apoptosis in primary bone marrow myeloma and human myeloma cell lines due to its inability to activate G(1) cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors (p15(INK4b), p21(CIP1/WAF1), p27(KIP1), p57(KIP2)) or to repress c-myc and Bcl-2 transcription. Correlating with aberrant activation of CDKs, CDK-dependent phosphorylation of Smad2 on Thr(8) (pT8), a modification linked to impaired Smad activity, is elevated in primary bone marrow myeloma cells, even in asymptomatic monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance. Moreover, CDK2 is the predominant CDK that phosphorylates Smad2 on T8 in myeloma cells, leading to inhibition of Smad2-Smad4 association that precludes transcriptional regulation by Smad2. Our findings provide the first direct evidence that pT8 Smad2 couples dysregulation of CDK2 to TGF-beta resistance in primary cancer cells, and they suggest that disruption of Smad2 function by CDK2 phosphorylation acts as a mechanism for TGF-beta resistance in multiple myeloma.

  6. Ionizing Radiation Promotes Migration and Invasion of Cancer Cells Through Transforming Growth Factor-Beta-Mediated Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou Yongchun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Xijing Hospital Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an (China); Department of Radiation Medicine, College of Preventive Medicine, Xijing Hospital Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an (China); Liu Junye; Li Jing; Zhang Jie [Department of Radiation Medicine, College of Preventive Medicine, Xijing Hospital Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an (China); Xu Yuqiao [Department of Pathology, Xijing Hospital Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an (China); Zhang Huawei; Qiu Lianbo; Ding Guirong [Department of Radiation Medicine, College of Preventive Medicine, Xijing Hospital Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an (China); Su Xiaoming [Department of Radiation Oncology, 306th Hospital of PLA, Beijing (China); Mei Shi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Xijing Hospital Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an (China); Guo Guozhen, E-mail: guozhenguo@hotmail.com [Department of Radiation Medicine, College of Preventive Medicine, Xijing Hospital Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an (China)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To examine whether ionizing radiation enhances the migratory and invasive abilities of cancer cells through transforming growth factor (TGF-{beta})-mediated epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Methods and Materials: Six cancer cell lines originating from different human organs were irradiated by {sup 60}Co {gamma}-ray at a total dose of 2 Gy, and the changes associated with EMT, including morphology, EMT markers, migration and invasion, were observed by microscope, Western blot, immunofluorescence, scratch assay, and transwell chamber assay, respectively. Then the protein levels of TGF-{beta} in these cancer cells were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and the role of TGF-{beta} signaling pathway in the effect of ionizing radiation on EMT was investigate by using the specific inhibitor SB431542. Results: After irradiation with {gamma}-ray at a total dose of 2 Gy, cancer cells presented the mesenchymal phenotype, and compared with the sham-irradiation group the expression of epithelial markers was decreased and of mesenchymal markers was increased, the migratory and invasive capabilities were strengthened, and the protein levels of TGF-{beta} were enhanced. Furthermore, events associated with EMT induced by IR in A549 could be reversed through inhibition of TGF-{beta} signaling. Conclusions: These results suggest that EMT mediated by TGF-{beta} plays a critical role in IR-induced enhancing of migratory and invasive capabilities in cancer cells.

  7. Selective Expansion of Memory CD4+ T cells By Mitogenic Human CD28 Generates Inflammatory Cytokines and Regulatory T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Manisha; Basu, Sreemanti; Camell, Christina; Couturier, Jacob; Nudelman, Rodolfo J.; Medina, Miguel A.; Rodgers, John R.; Lewis, Dorothy E.

    2009-01-01

    Co-stimulatory signals are important for development of effector and regulatory T cells. In this case, CD28 signaling is usually considered inert in the absence of signaling through the TCR. By contrast, mitogenic rat CD28 mAbs reportedly expand regulatory T cells without TCR stimulation. We found that a commercially available human CD28 mAb (ANC28) stimulated PBMCs without TCR co-ligation or cross-linking; ANC28 selectively expanded CD4+CD25+FoxP3−(T effector) and CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ (Treg) cells. ANC28 stimulated the CD45RO+ CD4+ (memory) population whereas CD45RA+CD4+ (naïve) cells did not respond. ANC28 also induced inflammatory cytokines. Treg induced by ANC28 retain the Treg phenotype longer than did co-stimulated Treg. Treg induced by ANC28 suppressed CD25− T cells through a contact-dependent mechanism. Purity influenced the response of CD4+CD25+ cells because bead-purified CD4+CD25+ cells (85–90% pure) responded strongly to ANC28, whereas 98% pure FACS-sorted CD4+CD25 bright (T-reg) did not respond. Purified CD4+CD25int cells responded similarly to the bead-purified CD4+CD25+ cells. Thus, pre-activated CD4+ T cells (CD25int) respond to ANC28 rather than Treg (CD25bright). The ability of ANC28 to expand both effectors producing inflammatory cytokines as well as suppressive regulatory T cells might be useful for ex vivo expansion of therapeutic T cells. PMID:18446791

  8. Analysis of bone marrow stromal cell transferred bacterial {beta}-galactosidase gene by PIXE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumakawa, Toshiro [Tokyo Metropolitan Geriatric Hospital, Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Blood Transfusion and Hematology; Hibino, Hitoshi; Tani, Kenzaburo; Asano, Shigetaka; Futatugawa, Shouji; Sera, Kouichiro

    1997-12-31

    PIXE, Particle Induced X-ray Emission, is a powerful, multi-elemental analysis method which has many distinguishing features and has been used in varies research fields. Recently the method of applying baby cyclotrons for nuclear medicine to PIXE has been developed. This enables us to study biomedical phenomena from the physical point of view. Mouse bone marrow stromal cells were transferred bacterial {beta}-galactosidase gene (LacZ gene) by murine retroviral vectors. Analysis of the bone marrow stromal cells with the LacZ gene by PIXE revealed remarkable changes of intracellular trace elements compared with the normal control cells. These results indicate that gene transfer by retroviral vectors may bring about a dynamic change of intracellular circumstances of the target cell. (author)

  9. Crypt cell population kinetics in mouse jejunum under continuous beta irradiation from tritiated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatia, A.L.; Gupta, M.L.; Saharan, B.R.

    1979-01-01

    The behaviour of crypt cell population in mouse jejunum under continuous beta irradiation from tritiated water (HTO) has been studied. Adult mice were maintained on tritiated drinking water of the activity of 1.25 μCi/ml, after priming injection. The crypts were studied at 1, 5, 7, 15 and 30 days after the initiation of treatment. It is observed that there is a partial recovery in proliferative activity after the first day of the treatment. Again there is a decrease in the crypt cells on the 7th day, after which this population appears to achieve a near-steady-state level at about 8% below normal at the last interval studied. Crypt cell population and mitotic figures showed a simultaneous dip and recovery, while dead cells showed inverse relationship. (orig.) [de

  10. * Tissue-Specific Extracellular Matrix Enhances Skeletal Muscle Precursor Cell Expansion and Differentiation for Potential Application in Cell Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Deying; Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Yi, Hualin; Wang, Zhan; Wu, Rongpei; He, Dawei; Wei, Guanghui; Wei, Shicheng; Hu, Yun; Deng, Junhong; Criswell, Tracy; Yoo, James; Zhou, Yu; Atala, Anthony

    2017-08-01

    Skeletal muscle precursor cells (MPCs) are considered a key candidate for cell therapy in the treatment of skeletal muscle dysfunction due to injury, disease, or age. However, expansion of a sufficient number of functional skeletal muscle cells in vitro from a small tissue biopsy has been challenging due to changes in phenotypic expression of these cells under traditional culture conditions. Thus, the aim of the study was to develop a better culture system for the expansion and myo-differentiation of MPCs that could further be used for therapy. For this purpose, we developed an ideal method of tissue decellularization and compared the ability of different matrices to support MPC growth and differentiation. Porcine-derived skeletal muscle and liver and kidney extracellular matrix (ECM) were generated by decellularization methods consisting of distilled water, 0.2 mg/mL DNase, or 5% fetal bovine serum. Acellular matrices were further homogenized, dissolved, and combined with a hyaluronic acid-based hydrogel decorated with heparin (ECM-HA-HP). The cell proliferation and myogenic differentiation capacity of human MPCs were assessed when grown on gel alone, ECM, or each ECM-HA-HP substrate. Human MPC proliferation was significantly enhanced when cultured on the ECM-HA-HP substrates compared to the other substrates tested, with the greatest proliferation on the muscle ECM-HA-HP (mECM-HA-HP) substrate. The number of differentiated myotubes was significantly increased on the mECM-HA-HP substrate compared to the other gel-ECM substrates, as well as the numbers of MPCs expressing specific myogenic cell markers (i.e., myosin, desmin, myoD, and myf5). In conclusion, skeletal mECM-HA-HP as a culture substrate provided an optimal culture microenvironment potentially due to its similarity to the in vivo environment. These data suggest a potential use of skeletal muscle-derived ECM gel for the expansion and differentiation of human MPCs for cell-based therapy for skeletal muscle

  11. Toll-like receptor triggered dendritic cell maturation and IL-12 secretion are necessary to overcome T-cell inhibition by glioma-associated TGF-beta2.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grauer, O.M.; Poschl, P.; Lohmeier, A.; Adema, G.J.; Bogdahn, U.

    2007-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are able to secrete large amounts of immunosuppressive cytokines like transforming growth factor beta 2 (TGF-beta2) and regularly escape from immune surveillance. Many strategies have been developed to induce potent anti-glioma responses, among those the use of dendritic cells (DC)

  12. Megakaryocytes promote murine osteoblastic HSC niche expansion and stem cell engraftment after radioablative conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Timothy S; Caselli, Anna; Otsuru, Satoru; Hofmann, Ted J; Williams, Richard; Paolucci, Paolo; Dominici, Massimo; Horwitz, Edwin M

    2013-06-27

    Successful hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation requires donor HSC engraftment within specialized bone marrow microenvironments known as HSC niches. We have previously reported a profound remodeling of the endosteal osteoblastic HSC niche after total body irradiation (TBI), defined as relocalization of surviving megakaryocytes to the niche site and marked expansion of endosteal osteoblasts. We now demonstrate that host megakaryocytes function critically in expansion of the endosteal niche after preparative radioablation and in the engraftment of donor HSC. We show that TBI-induced migration of megakaryocytes to the endosteal niche depends on thrombopoietin signaling through the c-MPL receptor on megakaryocytes, as well as CD41 integrin-mediated adhesion. Moreover, niche osteoblast proliferation post-TBI required megakaryocyte-secreted platelet-derived growth factor-BB. Furthermore, blockade of c-MPL-dependent megakaryocyte migration and function after TBI resulted in a significant decrease in donor HSC engraftment in primary and competitive secondary transplantation assays. Finally, we administered thrombopoietin to mice beginning 5 days before marrow radioablation and ending 24 hours before transplant to enhance megakaryocyte function post-TBI, and found that this strategy significantly enhanced donor HSC engraftment, providing a rationale for improving hematopoietic recovery and perhaps overall outcome after clinical HSC transplantation.

  13. Expression of the alpha 6 beta 4 integrin by squamous cell carcinomas and basal cell carcinomas: possible relation to invasive potential?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossen, K; Dahlstrøm, K K; Mercurio, A M

    1994-01-01

    We have studied the expression of alpha 6 beta 4 integrin, a carcinoma laminin receptor in ten squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) and ten basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) of the skin in order to examine whether changes in alpha 6 beta 4 integrin expression may be related to invasive and metastatic...... potential. Monoclonal antibodies specific for each subunit were applied on cryosections, using a three step indirect peroxidase technique. In normal epidermis the basal cells expressed both the alpha 6 and the beta 4 subunits, and the expression was polarized against the basement membrane. In SCCs...

  14. Corneal endothelial expansion promoted by human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell-derived conditioned medium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makiko Nakahara

    Full Text Available Healthy corneal endothelium is essential for maintaining corneal clarity, as the damage of corneal endothelial cells and loss of cell count causes severe visual impairment. Corneal transplantation is currently the only therapy for severe corneal disorders. The greatly limited proliferative ability of human corneal endothelial cells (HCECs, even in vitro, has challenged researchers to establish efficient techniques for the cultivating HCECs, a pivotal issue for clinical applications. The aim of this study was to evaluate conditioned medium (CM obtained from human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs (MSC-CM for use as a consistent expansion protocol of HCECs. When HCECs were maintained in the presence of MSC-CM, cell morphology assumed a hexagonal shape similar to corneal endothelial cells in vivo, as opposed to the irregular cell shape observed in control cultures in the absence of MSC-CM. They also maintained the functional protein phenotypes; ZO-1 and Na(+/K(+-ATPase were localized at the intercellular adherent junctions and pump proteins of corneal endothelium were accordingly expressed. In comparison to the proliferative potential observed in the control cultures, HCECs maintained in MSC-CM were found to have more than twice as many Ki67-positive cells and a greatly increased incorporation of BrdU into DNA. MSC-CM further facilitated the cell migration of HCECs. Lastly, the mechanism of cell proliferation mediated by MSC-CM was investigated, and phosphorylation of Akt and ERK1/2 was observed in HCECs after exposure to MSC-CM. The inhibitor to PI 3-kinase maintained the level of p27(Kip1 for up to 24 hours and greatly blocked the expression of cyclin D1 and D3 during the early G1 phase, leading to the reduction of cell density. These findings indicate that MSC-CM not only stimulates the proliferation of HCECs by regulating the G1 proteins of the cell cycle but also maintains the characteristic differentiated phenotypes necessary

  15. The C. elegans engrailed homolog ceh-16 regulates the self-renewal expansion division of stem cell-like seam cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xinxin; Tian, E; Xu, Yanhua; Zhang, Hong

    2009-09-15

    Stem cells undergo symmetric and asymmetric division to maintain the dynamic equilibrium of the stem cell pool and also to generate a variety of differentiated cells. The homeostatic mechanism controlling the choice between self-renewal and differentiation of stem cells is poorly understood. We show here that ceh-16, encoding the C. elegans ortholog of the transcription factor Engrailed, controls symmetric and asymmetric division of stem cell-like seam cells. Loss of function of ceh-16 causes certain seam cells, which normally undergo symmetric self-renewal expansion division with both daughters adopting the seam cell fate, to divide asymmetrically with only one daughter retaining the seam cell fate. The human engrailed homolog En2 functionally substitutes the role of ceh-16 in promoting self-renewal expansion division of seam cells. Loss of function of apr-1, encoding the C. elegans homolog of the Wnt signaling component APC, results in transformation of self-renewal maintenance seam cell division to self-renewal expansion division, leading to seam cell hyperplasia. The apr-1 mutation suppresses the seam cell division defect in ceh-16 mutants. Our study reveals that ceh-16 interacts with the Wnt signaling pathway to control the choice between self-renewal expansion and maintenance division and also demonstrates an evolutionarily conserved function of engrailed in promoting cell proliferation.

  16. The cysteine-rich domain of human ADAM 12 supports cell adhesion through syndecans and triggers signaling events that lead to beta1 integrin-dependent cell spreading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iba, K; Albrechtsen, R; Gilpin, B

    2000-01-01

    The ADAMs (a disintegrin and metalloprotease) family of proteins is involved in a variety of cellular interactions, including cell adhesion and ecto- domain shedding. Here we show that ADAM 12 binds to cell surface syndecans. Three forms of recombinant ADAM 12 were used in these experiments......-dependent manner attach to ADAM 12 via members of the syndecan family. After binding to syndecans, mesenchymal cells spread and form focal adhesions and actin stress fibers. Integrin beta1 was responsible for cell spreading because function-blocking monoclonal antibodies completely inhibited cell spreading......, and chondroblasts lacking beta1 integrin attached but did not spread. These data suggest that mesenchymal cells use syndecans as the initial receptor for the ADAM 12 cysteine-rich domain-mediated cell adhesion, and then the beta1 integrin to induce cell spreading. Interestingly, carcinoma cells attached but did...

  17. Expression of transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1 and its role in insulin release from rat pancreatic beta cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De-Shou Cao

    Full Text Available Several transient receptor potential (TRP channels are expressed in pancreatic beta cells and have been proposed to be involved in insulin secretion. However, the endogenous ligands for these channels are far from clear. Here, we demonstrate the expression of the transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1 ion channel in the pancreatic beta cells and its role in insulin release. TRPA1 is an attractive candidate for inducing insulin release because it is calcium permeable and is activated by molecules that are produced during oxidative glycolysis.Immunohistochemistry, RT-PCR, and Western blot techniques were used to determine the expression of TRPA1 channel. Ca²⁺ fluorescence imaging and electrophysiology (voltage- and current-clamp techniques were used to study the channel properties. TRPA1-mediated insulin release was determined using ELISA.TRPA1 is abundantly expressed in a rat pancreatic beta cell line and freshly isolated rat pancreatic beta cells, but not in pancreatic alpha cells. Activation of TRPA1 by allyl isothiocyanate (AITC, hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂, 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE, and cyclopentenone prostaglandins (PGJ₂ and a novel agonist methylglyoxal (MG induces membrane current, depolarization, and Ca²⁺ influx leading to generation of action potentials in a pancreatic beta cell line and primary cultured pancreatic beta cells. Activation of TRPA1 by agonists stimulates insulin release in pancreatic beta cells that can be inhibited by TRPA1 antagonists such as HC030031 or AP-18 and by RNA interference. TRPA1-mediated insulin release is also observed in conditions of voltage-gated Na⁺ and Ca²⁺ channel blockade as well as ATP sensitive potassium (K(ATP channel activation.We propose that endogenous and exogenous ligands of TRPA1 cause Ca²⁺ influx and induce basal insulin release and that TRPA1-mediated depolarization acts synergistically with K(ATP channel blockade to facilitate insulin release.

  18. A Rapid Cell Expansion Process for Production of Engineered Autologous CAR-T Cell Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Tangying Lily; Pugach, Omar; Somerville, Robert; Rosenberg, Steven A; Kochenderfer, James N; Better, Marc; Feldman, Steven A

    2016-12-01

    The treatment of B-cell malignancies by adoptive cell transfer (ACT) of anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptor T cells (CD19 CAR-T) has proven to be a highly successful therapeutic modality in several clinical trials. 1-6 The anti-CD19 CAR-T cell production method used to support initial trials relied on numerous manual, open process steps, human serum, and 10 days of cell culture to achieve a clinical dose. 7 This approach limited the ability to support large multicenter clinical trials, as well as scale up for commercial cell production. Therefore, studies were completed to streamline and optimize the original National Cancer Institute production process by removing human serum from the process in order to minimize the risk of viral contamination, moving process steps from an open system to functionally closed system operations in order to minimize the risk of microbial contamination, and standardizing additional process steps in order to maximize process consistency. This study reports a procedure for generating CD19 CAR-T cells in 6 days, using a functionally closed manufacturing process and defined, serum-free medium. This method is able to produce CD19 CAR-T cells that are phenotypically and functionally indistinguishable from cells produced for clinical trials by the previously described production process.

  19. Biologic activities of recombinant human-beta-defensin-4 toward cultured human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerashchenko, O L; Zhuravel, E V; Skachkova, O V; Khranovska, N N; Filonenko, V V; Pogrebnoy, P V; Soldatkina, M A

    2013-06-01

    The aim of the study was in vitro analysis of biological activity of recombinant human beta-defensin-4 (rec-hBD-4). hBD-4 cDNA was cloned into pGEX-2T vector, and recombinant plasmid was transformed into E. coli BL21(DE3) cells. To purify soluble fusion GST-hBD-4 protein, affinity chromatography was applied. Rec-hBD-4 was cleaved from the fusion protein with thrombin, and purified by reverse phase chromatography on Sep-Pack C18. Effects of rec-hBD-4 on proliferation, viability, cell cycle distribution, substrate-independent growth, and mobility of cultured human cancer cells of A431, A549, and TPC-1 lines were analyzed by direct cell counting technique, MTT assay, flow cytofluorometry, colony forming assay in semi-soft medium, and wound healing assay. Rec-hBD-4 was expressed in bacterial cells as GST-hBD-4 fusion protein, and purified by routine 3-step procedure (affine chromatography on glutathione-agarose, cleavage of fusion protein by thrombin, and reverse phase chromatography). Analysis of in vitro activity of rec-hBD-4 toward three human cancer cell lines has demonstrated that the defensin is capable to affect cell behaviour in concentration-dependent manner. In 1-100 nM concentrations rec-hBD-4 significantly stimulates cancer cell proliferation and viability, and promotes cell cycle progression through G2/M checkpoint, greatly enhances colony-forming activity and mobility of the cells. Treatment of the cells with 500 nM of rec-hBD-4 resulted in opposite effects: significant suppression of cell proliferation and viability, blockage of cell cycle in G1/S checkpoint, significant inhibition of cell migration and colony forming activity. Recombinant human beta-defensin-4 is biologically active peptide capable to cause oppositely directed effects toward biologic features of cancer cells in vitro dependent on its concentration.

  20. A fully defined and scalable 3D culture system for human pluripotent stem cell expansion and differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Yuguo; Schaffer, David V.

    2013-12-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), including human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, are promising for numerous biomedical applications, such as cell replacement therapies, tissue and whole-organ engineering, and high-throughput pharmacology and toxicology screening. Each of these applications requires large numbers of cells of high quality; however, the scalable expansion and differentiation of hPSCs, especially for clinical utilization, remains a challenge. We report a simple, defined, efficient, scalable, and good manufacturing practice-compatible 3D culture system for hPSC expansion and differentiation. It employs a thermoresponsive hydrogel that combines easy manipulation and completely defined conditions, free of any human- or animal-derived factors, and entailing only recombinant protein factors. Under an optimized protocol, the 3D system enables long-term, serial expansion of multiple hPSCs lines with a high expansion rate (∼20-fold per 5-d passage, for a 1072-fold expansion over 280 d), yield (∼2.0 × 107 cells per mL of hydrogel), and purity (∼95% Oct4+), even with single-cell inoculation, all of which offer considerable advantages relative to current approaches. Moreover, the system enabled 3D directed differentiation of hPSCs into multiple lineages, including dopaminergic neuron progenitors with a yield of ∼8 × 107 dopaminergic progenitors per mL of hydrogel and ∼80-fold expansion by the end of a 15-d derivation. This versatile system may be useful at numerous scales, from basic biological investigation to clinical development.