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Sample records for best1 gene causing

  1. Ocular Phenotype Analysis of a Family With Biallelic Mutations in the BEST1 Gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharon, Dror; Al-Hamdani, Sermed; Engelsberg, Karl;

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the genetic cause and perform a comprehensive clinical analysis of a Danish family with autosomal recessive bestrophinopathy; to investigate whether Bestrophin may be expressed in normal human retina. DESIGN: Retrospective clinical and molecular genetic analysis and immuno...... function, autosomal recessive bestrophinopathy may be a suitable first candidate, among the BEST1-related ocular conditions, for gene replacement therapy....

  2. Hereditary retinal disease : clinical and genetic studies on the role of the peripherin/RDS gene , the BEST1 gene, and the CFH gene

    OpenAIRE

    Boon, C.J.F.

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in the peripherin/RDS gene, the BEST1 gene, and the CFH gene appear to be relatively frequent causes of hereditary retinal diseases that principally affect the macula. Intriguingly, a single mutation may be associated with a broad range of retinal phenotypes. Even in a single family, one mutation may show a striking phenotypic variability. Best vitelliform macular dystrophy, caused by mutations in the BEST1 gene, and retinal dystrophies caused by peripherin/RDS gene mutations, are g...

  3. Functional and clinical data of Best vitelliform macular dystrophy patients with mutations in the BEST1 gene

    OpenAIRE

    Querques, Giuseppe; Zerbib, Jennyfer; Santacroce, Rossana; Margaglione, Maurizio; Delphin, Nathalie; Rozet, Jean-Michel; Kaplan, Josseline; Martinelli, Domenico; Delle Noci, Nicola; Soubrane, Gisèle; Souied, Eric H

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To analyze functional and clinical data of Best vitelliform macular dystrophy (VMD) patients with mutations in the BEST1 gene. Methods Best VMD patients with BEST1 mutations were evaluated prospectively regarding age, age of onset, best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), fundus autofluorescence, fluorescein angiography, optical coherence tomography, and electro-oculography. Mutations in BEST1 were established by direct sequencing. Results Forty-six eyes of 23 patients (10 male, 13 female...

  4. NEW BEST1 MUTATIONS IN AUTOSOMAL RECESSIVE BESTROPHINOPATHY

    Science.gov (United States)

    FUNG, ADRIAN T.; YZER, SUZANNE; GOLDBERG, NAOMI; WANG, HAO; NISSEN, MICHAEL; GIOVANNINI, ALFONSO; MERRIAM, JOANNA E.; BUKANOVA, ELENA N.; CAI, CAROLYN; YANNUZZI, LAWRENCE A.; TSANG, STEPHEN H.; ALLIKMETS, RANDO

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To report the ocular phenotype in patients with autosomal recessive bestrophinopathy and carriers, and to describe novel BEST1 mutations. Methods Patients with clinically suspected and subsequently genetically proven autosomal recessive bestrophinopathy underwent full ophthalmic examination and investigation with fundus autofluorescence imaging, spectral domain optical coherence tomography, electroretinography, and electrooculography. Mutation analysis of the BEST1 gene was performed through direct Sanger sequencing. Results Five affected patients from four families were identified. Mean age was 16 years (range, 6–42 years). All affected patients presented with reduced visual acuity and bilateral, hyperautofluorescent subretinal yellowish deposits within the posterior pole. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography demonstrated submacular fluid and subretinal vitelliform material in all patients. A cystoid maculopathy was seen in all but one patient. In 1 patient, the location of the vitelliform material was seen to change over a follow-up period of 3 years despite relatively stable vision. Visual acuity and fundus changes were unresponsive to topical and systemic carbonic anhydrase inhibitors and systemic steroids. Carriers had normal ocular examinations including normal fundus autofluorescence. Three novel mutations were detected. Conclusion Three novel BEST1 mutations are described, suggesting that many deleterious variants in BEST1 resulting in haploinsufficiency are still unknown. Mutations causing autosomal recessive bestrophinopathy are mostly located outside of the exons that usually harbor vitelliform macular dystrophy–associated dominant mutations. PMID:25545482

  5. Genes Causing Male Infertility in Humans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lawrence C. Layman

    2002-01-01

    There are an accumulating number of identified gene mutations that cause infertility in humans. Most of the known gene mutations impair normal puberty and subsequently cause infertility by either hypothalamic /pituitary deficiency of important tropic factors to the gonad or by gonadal genes.

  6. Contemporary Approaches for Identifying Rare Bone Disease Causing Genes

    OpenAIRE

    Farber, Charles R; Clemens, Thomas L.

    2013-01-01

    Recent improvements in the speed and accuracy of DNA sequencing, together with increasingly sophisticated mathematical approaches for annotating gene networks, have revolutionized the field of human genetics and made these once time consuming approaches assessable to most investigators. In the field of bone research, a particularly active area of gene discovery has occurred in patients with rare bone disorders such as osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) that are caused by mutations in single genes. ...

  7. Single Gene and Syndromic Causes of Obesity: Illustrative Examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Merlin G

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a significant health problem in westernized societies, particularly in the United States where it has reached epidemic proportions in both adults and children. The prevalence of childhood obesity has doubled in the past 30 years. The causation is complex with multiple sources, including an obesity promoting environment with plentiful highly dense food sources and overall decreased physical activity noted for much of the general population, but genetic factors clearly play a role. Advances in genetic technology using candidate gene approaches, genome-wide association studies, structural and expression microarrays, and next generation sequencing have led to the discovery of hundreds of genes recognized as contributing to obesity. Polygenic and monogenic causes of obesity are now recognized including dozens of examples of syndromic obesity with Prader-Willi syndrome, as a classical example and recognized as the most common known cause of life-threatening obesity. Genetic factors playing a role in the causation of obesity will be discussed along with the growing evidence of single genes and the continuum between monogenic and polygenic obesity. The clinical and genetic aspects of four classical but rare obesity-related syndromes (ie, Prader-Willi, Alström, fragile X, and Albright hereditary osteodystrophy) will be described and illustrated in this review of single gene and syndromic causes of obesity. PMID:27288824

  8. Gene Tree Discordance Causes Apparent Substitution Rate Variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Fábio K; Hahn, Matthew W

    2016-07-01

    Substitution rates are known to be variable among genes, chromosomes, species, and lineages due to multifarious biological processes. Here, we consider another source of substitution rate variation due to a technical bias associated with gene tree discordance. Discordance has been found to be rampant in genome-wide data sets, often due to incomplete lineage sorting (ILS). This apparent substitution rate variation is caused when substitutions that occur on discordant gene trees are analyzed in the context of a single, fixed species tree. Such substitutions have to be resolved by proposing multiple substitutions on the species tree, and we therefore refer to this phenomenon as Substitutions Produced by ILS (SPILS). We use simulations to demonstrate that SPILS has a larger effect with increasing levels of ILS, and on trees with larger numbers of taxa. Specific branches of the species trees are consistently, but erroneously, inferred to be longer or shorter, and we show that these branches can be predicted based on discordant tree topologies. Moreover, we observe that fixing a species tree topology when performing tests of positive selection increases the false positive rate, particularly for genes whose discordant topologies are most affected by SPILS. Finally, we use data from multiple Drosophila species to show that SPILS can be detected in nature. Although the effects of SPILS are modest per gene, it has the potential to affect substitution rate variation whenever high levels of ILS are present, particularly in rapid radiations. The problems outlined here have implications for character mapping of any type of trait, and for any biological process that causes discordance. We discuss possible solutions to these problems, and areas in which they are likely to have caused faulty inferences of convergence and accelerated evolution. PMID:26927960

  9. A novel mutation of the fibrillin gene causing Ectopia lentis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loennqvist, L.; Kainulainen, K.; Puhakka, L.; Peltonen, L. (National Public Health Institute, Helsinki (Finland)); Child, A. (St. George' s Hospital Medical School, London (United Kingdom)); Peltonen, L. (Duncan Guthrie Institute, Glasgow, Scotland (United Kingdom))

    1994-02-01

    Ectopia lentis (EL), a dominantly inherited connective tissue disorder, has been genetically linked to the fibrillin gene on chromosome 15 (FBN1) in earlier studies. Here, the authors report the first EL mutation in the FBN1 gene confirming that EL is caused by mutations of this gene. So far, several mutations in the FBN1 gene have been reported in patients with Marfan syndrome (MFS). EL and MFS are clinically related but distinct conditions with typical manifestations in the ocular and skeletal systems, the fundamental difference between them being the absence of cardiovascular involvement in EL. They report a point mutation, cosegregating with the disease in the described family, that displays EL over four generations. The mutation changes a conserved glutamic acid residue in an EGF-like motif, which is the major structural component of the fibrillin and is repeated throughout the polypeptide. In vitro mutagenetic studies have demonstrated the necessity of an analogous glutamic acid residue for calcium binding in an EGF-like repeat of human factor IX. This provides a possible explanation for the role of this mutation in the disease pathogenesis. 32 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Familial Dysautonomia Is Caused by Mutations of the IKAP Gene

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Sylvia L.; Coli, Rocco; Daly, Ira W.; Kichula, Elizabeth A.; Rork, Matthew J.; Volpi, Sabrina A.; Ekstein, Josef; Rubin, Berish Y.

    2001-01-01

    The defective gene DYS, which is responsible for familial dysautonomia (FD) and has been mapped to a 0.5-cM region on chromosome 9q31, has eluded identification. We identified and characterized the RNAs encoded by this region of chromosome 9 in cell lines derived from individuals homozygous for the major FD haplotype, and we observed that the RNA encoding the IκB kinase complex–associated protein (IKAP) lacks exon 20 and, as a result of a frameshift, encodes a truncated protein. Sequence anal...

  11. Gene expression analysis characterizes antemortem stress and has implications for establishing cause of death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornel, Leanne; Emond, Mary

    2011-01-01

    Within the field of forensic pathology, determination of the cause of death depends upon identifying physical changes in the corpse or finding diagnostic laboratory abnormalities. When such perturbations are absent, definitive assignment of a cause of death may be difficult or impossible. An example of such a problem is sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), a common cause of neonatal mortality that does not produce physical findings or laboratory abnormalities. Although respiratory failure as a cause of SIDS represents the most widely held hypothesis, sudden cardiac death and hyperthermia have also been advanced as possible causes. We hypothesize that each of these physiological stresses would produce a different pattern of premortem gene expression and that these patterns of gene expression would remain evident in tissues collected postmortem. If these patterns were sufficiently distinctive, they could be used to identify the cause of death. Using an infant mouse model, we compared gene expression patterns in liver tissue after sudden death, lethal hyperthermia, and lethal hypoxia. Each of these conditions produced readily distinguishable differences in gene expression patterns. With the K-nearest neighbor classification algorithm, only 10 genes are necessary to correctly classify samples. If the liver tissue was not harvested immediately after death, additional alteration in gene expression patterns resulted; however, these alterations did not affect the group of genes used to classify the samples. Our findings suggest that gene expression analysis from tissues collected postmortem may provide useful clues about certain physiologic stresses that may precede death. PMID:21693618

  12. Osteogenesis imperfecta without features of type V caused by a mutation in the IFITM5 gene

    OpenAIRE

    Grover, Monica; Campeau, Philippe M.; Lietman, Caressa Dee; Lu, James T.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Schlesinger, Alan E.; Lee, Brendan H.

    2013-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is typically caused by mutations in type 1 collagen genes, but in recent years new recessive and dominant forms caused by mutations in a plethora of different genes have been characterized. OI type V is a dominant form caused by the recurrent (c.-14C>T) mutation in the 5′UTR of the IFITM5 gene. The mutation adds 5 residues to the N-terminus of the IFITM5 but the pathophysiology of the disease still remains to be elucidated. Typical clinical features present in the...

  13. Genetic syndromes caused by mutations in epigenetic genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdasco, María; Esteller, Manel

    2013-04-01

    The orchestrated organization of epigenetic factors that control chromatin dynamism, including DNA methylation, histone marks, non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) and chromatin-remodeling proteins, is essential for the proper function of tissue homeostasis, cell identity and development. Indeed, deregulation of epigenetic profiles has been described in several human pathologies, including complex diseases (such as cancer, cardiovascular and neurological diseases), metabolic pathologies (type 2 diabetes and obesity) and imprinting disorders. Over the last decade it has become increasingly clear that mutations of genes involved in epigenetic mechanism, such as DNA methyltransferases, methyl-binding domain proteins, histone deacetylases, histone methylases and members of the SWI/SNF family of chromatin remodelers are linked to human disorders, including Immunodeficiency Centromeric instability Facial syndrome 1, Rett syndrome, Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome, Sotos syndrome or alpha-thalassemia/mental retardation X-linked syndrome, among others. As new members of the epigenetic machinery are described, the number of human syndromes associated with epigenetic alterations increases. As recent examples, mutations of histone demethylases and members of the non-coding RNA machinery have recently been associated with Kabuki syndrome, Claes-Jensen X-linked mental retardation syndrome and Goiter syndrome. In this review, we describe the variety of germline mutations of epigenetic modifiers that are known to be associated with human disorders, and discuss the therapeutic potential of epigenetic drugs as palliative care strategies in the treatment of such disorders. PMID:23370504

  14. Identification of sequence variants in genetic disease-causing genes using targeted next-generation sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoming Wei

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Identification of gene variants plays an important role in research on and diagnosis of genetic diseases. A combination of enrichment of targeted genes and next-generation sequencing (targeted DNA-HiSeq results in both high efficiency and low cost for targeted sequencing of genes of interest. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To identify mutations associated with genetic diseases, we designed an array-based gene chip to capture all of the exons of 193 genes involved in 103 genetic diseases. To evaluate this technology, we selected 7 samples from seven patients with six different genetic diseases resulting from six disease-causing genes and 100 samples from normal human adults as controls. The data obtained showed that on average, 99.14% of 3,382 exons with more than 30-fold coverage were successfully detected using Targeted DNA-HiSeq technology, and we found six known variants in four disease-causing genes and two novel mutations in two other disease-causing genes (the STS gene for XLI and the FBN1 gene for MFS as well as one exon deletion mutation in the DMD gene. These results were confirmed in their entirety using either the Sanger sequencing method or real-time PCR. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Targeted DNA-HiSeq combines next-generation sequencing with the capture of sequences from a relevant subset of high-interest genes. This method was tested by capturing sequences from a DNA library through hybridization to oligonucleotide probes specific for genetic disorder-related genes and was found to show high selectivity, improve the detection of mutations, enabling the discovery of novel variants, and provide additional indel data. Thus, targeted DNA-HiSeq can be used to analyze the gene variant profiles of monogenic diseases with high sensitivity, fidelity, throughput and speed.

  15. Gene Therapy to Rescue Retinal Degeneration Caused by Mutations in Rhodopsin

    OpenAIRE

    Rossmiller, Brian P.; Ryals, Renee C.; Lewin, Alfred S.

    2015-01-01

    Retinal gene therapy has proven safe and at least partially successful in clinical trials and in numerous animal models. Gene therapy requires characterization of the progression of the disease and understanding of its genetic cause. Testing gene therapies usually requires an animal model that recapitulates the key features of the human disease, though photoreceptors and cells of the retinal pigment epithelium produced from patient-derived stem cells may provide an alternative test system for...

  16. Retinal dystrophies caused by mutations in the ABCA4 gene : an evaluation of the clinical spectrum

    OpenAIRE

    Klevering, Bert Jeroen

    2004-01-01

    In the past seven years, the ABCA4 gene has emerged as the most prominent gene in inherited retinal disease. Pathogenic ABCA4 mutations are the cause of all cases of Stargardt disease, and a portion of the cases of autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa and cone-rod dystrophy. Moreover, specific heterozygous alterations in this gene have been associated with age-related macular degeneration, although this role has been disputed by others. The papers in this thesis, joined in the six appendi...

  17. Identification of candidate cancer-causing genes in mouse brain tumors by retroviral tagging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Fredrik K; Brodd, Josefin; Eklöf, Charlotta; Ferletta, Maria; Hesselager, Göran; Tiger, Carl-Fredrik; Uhrbom, Lene; Westermark, Bengt

    2004-08-01

    Murine retroviruses may cause malignant tumors in mice by insertional mutagenesis of host genes. The use of retroviral tagging as a means of identifying cancer-causing genes has, however, almost entirely been restricted to hematopoietic tumors. The aim of this study was to develop a system allowing for the retroviral tagging of candidate genes in malignant brain tumors. Mouse gliomas were induced by a recombinant Moloney murine leukemia virus encoding platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) B-chain. The underlying idea was that tumors evolve through a combination of PDGF-mediated autocrine growth stimulation and insertional mutagenesis of genes that cooperate with PDGF in gliomagenesis. Common insertion sites (loci that were tagged in more than one tumor) were identified by cloning and sequencing retroviral flanking segments, followed by blast searches of mouse genome databases. A number of candidate brain tumor loci (Btls) were identified. Several of these Btls correspond to known tumor-causing genes; these findings strongly support the underlying idea of our experimental approach. Other Btls harbor genes with a hitherto unproven role in transformation or oncogenesis. Our findings indicate that retroviral tagging with a growth factor-encoding virus may be a powerful means of identifying candidate tumor-causing genes in nonhematopoietic tumors. PMID:15273287

  18. Identification of Genetic Causes of Inherited Peripheral Neuropathies by Targeted Gene Panel Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Soo Hyun; Hong, Young Bin; Hyun, Young Se; Nam, Da Eun; Kwak, Geon; Hwang, Sun Hee; Choi, Byung-Ok; Chung, Ki Wha

    2016-05-31

    Inherited peripheral neuropathies (IPN), which are a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous peripheral nerve disorders including Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), exhibit progressive degeneration of muscles in the extremities and loss of sensory function. Over 70 genes have been reported as genetic causatives and the number is still growing. We prepared a targeted gene panel for IPN diagnosis based on next generation sequencing (NGS). The gene panel was designed to detect mutations in 73 genes reported to be genetic causes of IPN or related peripheral neuropathies, and to detect duplication of the chromosome 17p12 region, the major genetic cause of CMT1A. We applied the gene panel to 115 samples from 63 non-CMT1A families, and isolated 15 pathogenic or likely-pathogenic mutations in eight genes from 25 patients (17 families). Of them, eight mutations were unreported variants. Of particular interest, this study revealed several very rare mutations in the SPTLC2, DCTN1, and MARS genes. In addition, the effectiveness of the detection of CMT1A was confirmed by comparing five 17p12-nonduplicated controls and 15 CMT1A cases. In conclusion, we developed a gene panel for one step genetic diagnosis of IPN. It seems that its time- and cost-effectiveness are superior to previous tiered-genetic diagnosis algorithms, and it could be applied as a genetic diagnostic system for inherited peripheral neuropathies. PMID:27025386

  19. Identification of Genetic Causes of Inherited Peripheral Neuropathies by Targeted Gene Panel Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Soo Hyun; Hong, Young Bin; Hyun, Young Se; Nam, Da Eun; Kwak, Geon; Hwang, Sun Hee; Choi, Byung-Ok; Chung, Ki Wha

    2016-01-01

    Inherited peripheral neuropathies (IPN), which are a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous peripheral nerve disorders including Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), exhibit progressive degeneration of muscles in the extremities and loss of sensory function. Over 70 genes have been reported as genetic causatives and the number is still growing. We prepared a targeted gene panel for IPN diagnosis based on next generation sequencing (NGS). The gene panel was designed to detect mutations in 73 genes reported to be genetic causes of IPN or related peripheral neuropathies, and to detect duplication of the chromosome 17p12 region, the major genetic cause of CMT1A. We applied the gene panel to 115 samples from 63 non-CMT1A families, and isolated 15 pathogenic or likely-pathogenic mutations in eight genes from 25 patients (17 families). Of them, eight mutations were unreported variants. Of particular interest, this study revealed several very rare mutations in the SPTLC2, DCTN1, and MARS genes. In addition, the effectiveness of the detection of CMT1A was confirmed by comparing five 17p12-nonduplicated controls and 15 CMT1A cases. In conclusion, we developed a gene panel for one step genetic diagnosis of IPN. It seems that its time- and cost-effectiveness are superior to previous tiered-genetic diagnosis algorithms, and it could be applied as a genetic diagnostic system for inherited peripheral neuropathies. PMID:27025386

  20. Have gene knockouts caused evolutionary reversals in the mammalian first arch?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, K K; Schneider, R A

    1998-03-01

    Many recent gene knockout experiments cause anatomical changes to the jaw region of mice that several investigators claim are evolutionary reversals. Here we evaluate these mutant phenotypes and the assertions of atavism. We argue that following the knockout of Hoxa-2, Dlx-2, MHox, Otx2, and RAR genes, ectopic cartilages arise as secondary consequences of disruptions in normal processes of cell specification, migration, or differentiation. These disruptions cause an excess of mesenchyme to accumulate in a region through which skeletal progenitor cells usually migrate, and at a site of condensation that is normally present in mammals but that is too small to chondrify. We find little evidence that these genes, when disrupted, cause a reversion to any primitive condition and although changes in their expression may have played a role in the evolution of the mammalian jaw, their function during morphogenesis is not sufficiently understood to confirm such hypotheses. PMID:9631652

  1. Human Genetic Disorders Caused by Mutations in Genes Encoding Biosynthetic Enzymes for Sulfated Glycosaminoglycans*

    OpenAIRE

    Mizumoto, Shuji; Ikegawa, Shiro; Sugahara, Kazuyuki

    2013-01-01

    A number of genetic disorders are caused by mutations in the genes encoding glycosyltransferases and sulfotransferases, enzymes responsible for the synthesis of sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) side chains of proteoglycans, including chondroitin sulfate, dermatan sulfate, and heparan sulfate. The phenotypes of these genetic disorders reflect disturbances in crucial biological functions of GAGs in human. Recent studies have revealed that mutations in genes encoding chondroitin sulfate and derm...

  2. Congenital Hypothyroidism Caused by a PAX8 Gene Mutation Manifested as Sodium/Iodide Symporter Gene Defect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wakako Jo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Loss-of-function mutations of the PAX8 gene are considered to mainly cause congenital hypothyroidism (CH due to thyroid hypoplasia. However, some patients with PAX8 mutation have demonstrated a normal-sized thyroid gland. Here we report a CH patient caused by a PAX8 mutation, which manifested as iodide transport defect (ITD. Hypothyroidism was detected by neonatal screening and L-thyroxine replacement was started immediately. Although 123I scintigraphy at 5 years of age showed that the thyroid gland was in the normal position and of small size, his iodide trapping was low. The ratio of the saliva/plasma radioactive iodide was low. He did not have goiter; however laboratory findings suggested that he had partial ITD. Gene analyses showed that the sodium/iodide symporter (NIS gene was normal; instead, a mutation in the PAX8 gene causing R31H substitution was identified. The present report demonstrates that individuals with defective PAX8 can have partial ITD, and thus genetic analysis is useful for differential diagnosis.

  3. A new mutation of the fukutin gene causing late-onset limb girdle muscular dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisager, Maria; Duno, M; Hansen, Flemming Juul;

    2013-01-01

    Defects in glycosylations of α-dystroglycan are associated with mutations in several genes, including the fukutin gene (FKTN). Hypoglycosylation of α-dystroglycan results in several forms of muscular dystrophy with variable phenotype. Outside Japan, the prevalence of muscular dystrophies related to...... episodes of tachycardia caused by Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. On examination, she had rigid spine syndrome, a typical limb girdle dystrophy pattern of muscle weakness, cardiomyopathy, and serum CK levels >2000 IU/L (normal G; p.Y306C mutation in the FKTN gene was found. The case confirms FKTN mutations...

  4. A duplicated PLP gene causing Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease detected by comparative multiplex PCR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, K.; Sugiyama, N.; Kawanishi, C. [Yokohama City Univ., Yokohama (Japan)] [and others

    1996-07-01

    Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD) is an X-linked dysmyelinating disorder caused by abnormalities in the proteolipid protein (PLP) gene, which is essential for oligodendrocyte differentiation and CNS myelin formation. Although linkage analysis has shown the homogeneity at the PLP locus in patients with PMD, exonic mutations in the PLP gene have been identified in only 10% - 25% of all cases, which suggests the presence of other genetic aberrations, including gene duplication. In this study, we examined five families with PMD not carrying exonic mutations in PLP gene, using comparative multiplex PCR (CM-PCR) as a semiquantitative assay of gene dosage. PLP gene duplications were identified in four families by CM-PCR and confirmed in three families by densitometric RFLP analysis. Because a homologous myelin protein gene, PMP22, is duplicated in the majority of patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth 1A, PLP gene overdosage may be an important genetic abnormality in PMD and affect myelin formation. 38 ref., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Gene amplification as a cause of inherited thyroxine-binding globulin excess in two Japanese families

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, Yuichi; Miura, Yoshitaka; Saito, Hidehiko [Toyota Memorial Hospital (Japan)] [and others

    1995-12-01

    T{sub 4}-binding globulin (TBG) is the major thyroid hormone transport protein in man. Inherited abnormalities in the level of serum TBG have been classified as partial deficiency, complete deficiency, and excess. Sequencing analysis of the TBG gene, located on Xq21-22, has uncovered the molecular defects causing partial and complete deficiency. However, the mechanism leading to inherited TBG excess remains unknown. In this study, two Japanese families, F-A and F-T, with inherited TBG excess were analyzed. Serum TBG levels in hemizygous males were 58 and 44 {mu}g/mL, 3- and 2-fold the normal value, respectively. The molecule had normal properties in terms of heat stability and isoelectric focussing pattern. The sequence of the coding region and the promoter activity of the TBG gene were also indistinguishable between hemizygotes and normal subjects. The gene dosage of TBG relative to that of {beta}-globin, which is located on chromosome 11, and Duchenne muscular dystropy, which is located on Xp, was evaluated by coamplification of these target genes using polymerase chain reaction and subsequent quantitation by HPLC. The TBG/{beta}-globin ratios of the affected male and female of F-A were 3.13 and 4.13 times, respectively, that in the normal males. The TBG/Duchenne muscular dystrophy ratios were 2.92 and 2.09 times the normal value, respectively. These results are compatible with three copies of TBG gene on the affected X-chromosome. Similarly, a 2-fold increase in gene dosage was demonstrated in the affected hemizygote of F-T. A 3-fold tandem amplification of the TBG gene was shown by in situ hybridization of prometaphase and interphase chromosomes from the affected male with a biotinylated genomic TBG probe, confirming the gene dosage results. Gene amplification of TBG is the cause of inherited TBG excess in these two families. 35 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Prevalence of coagulase gene polymorphism in Staphylococcus aureus isolates causing bovine mastitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Dangler, C. A.; Sordillo, L. M.

    1995-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate polymorphism of the coagulase gene of Staphylococcus aureus causing bovine mastitis. One hundred eighty-seven strains of S. aureus were isolated from bovine mastitic milk samples obtained from 187 different Danish dairy farms. The isolates were characterised...

  7. Mining tissue specificity, gene connectivity and disease association to reveal a set of genes that modify the action of disease causing genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reverter Antonio

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The tissue specificity of gene expression has been linked to a number of significant outcomes including level of expression, and differential rates of polymorphism, evolution and disease association. Recent studies have also shown the importance of exploring differential gene connectivity and sequence conservation in the identification of disease-associated genes. However, no study relates gene interactions with tissue specificity and disease association. Methods We adopted an a priori approach making as few assumptions as possible to analyse the interplay among gene-gene interactions with tissue specificity and its subsequent likelihood of association with disease. We mined three large datasets comprising expression data drawn from massively parallel signature sequencing across 32 tissues, describing a set of 55,606 true positive interactions for 7,197 genes, and microarray expression results generated during the profiling of systemic inflammation, from which 126,543 interactions among 7,090 genes were reported. Results Amongst the myriad of complex relationships identified between expression, disease, connectivity and tissue specificity, some interesting patterns emerged. These include elevated rates of expression and network connectivity in housekeeping and disease-associated tissue-specific genes. We found that disease-associated genes are more likely to show tissue specific expression and most frequently interact with other disease genes. Using the thresholds defined in these observations, we develop a guilt-by-association algorithm and discover a group of 112 non-disease annotated genes that predominantly interact with disease-associated genes, impacting on disease outcomes. Conclusion We conclude that parameters such as tissue specificity and network connectivity can be used in combination to identify a group of genes, not previously confirmed as disease causing, that are involved in interactions with disease causing

  8. No muscle involvement in myoclonus-dystonia caused by epsilon-sarcoglycan gene mutations1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjermind, L.E.; Vissing, J.; Asmus, F.;

    2008-01-01

    homologous and may substitute for one-another in different tissues. We therefore investigated whether mutations in SGCE also cause abnormalities of skeletal and myocardial muscle. Six patients with clinically and genetically verified M-D and no signs of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy were included. Skeletal......Mutations in the epsilon-sarcoglycan gene (SGCE) can cause autosomal dominant inherited myoclonus-dystonia (M-D). Defects in other sarcoglycans; alpha-, beta-, gamma-, and delta can cause autosomal recessive inherited limb girdle muscular dystrophies. epsilon- and alpha-sarcoglycans are very...

  9. Identification of a gene causing human cytochrome c oxidase deficiency by integrative genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mootha, Vamsi K; Lepage, Pierre; Miller, Kathleen;

    2003-01-01

    Identifying the genes responsible for human diseases requires combining information about gene position with clues about biological function. The recent availability of whole-genome data sets of RNA and protein expression provides powerful new sources of functional insight. Here we illustrate how...... such data sets can expedite disease-gene discovery, by using them to identify the gene causing Leigh syndrome, French-Canadian type (LSFC, Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man no. 220111), a human cytochrome c oxidase deficiency that maps to chromosome 2p16-21. Using four public RNA expression data sets...... involved with mtDNA transcript processing, suggesting an additional mechanism of mitochondrial pathophysiology. Similar strategies to integrate diverse genomic information can be applied likewise to other disease pathways and will become increasingly powerful with the growing wealth of diverse, functional...

  10. An exonic insertion within Tex14 gene causes spermatogenic arrest in pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sironen Anu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Male infertility is an increasing problem in all domestic species including man. Localization and identification of genes involved in defects causing male infertility provide valuable information of specific events in sperm development. Sperm development is a complex process, where diploid spermatogonia develop into haploid, highly specialized spermatozoa. Correct expression and function of various genes and their protein products are required for production of fertile sperm. We have identified an infertility defect in Finnish Yorkshire boars caused by spermatogenic arrest. The aim of this study was to locate the disease associated region using genome wide screen with the PorcineSNP60 Beadchip and identify the causal mutation by candidate gene approach. Results In the Finnish Yorkshire pig population the spermatogenic arrest (SA defect appears to be of genetic origin and causes severe degeneration of germ cells and total absence of spermatozoa. Genome wide scan with the PorcineSNP60 Beadchip localized the SA defect to porcine chromosome 12 in a 2 Mbp region. Sequencing of a candidate gene Tex14 revealed a 51 bp insertion within exon 27, which caused differential splicing of the exon and created a premature translation stop codon. The expression of Tex14 was markedly down regulated in the testis of a SA affected boar compared to control boars and no protein product was identified by Western blotting. The SA insertion sequence was also found within intron 27 in all analyzed animals, thus the insertion appears to be a possible duplication event. Conclusion In this study we report the identification of a causal mutation for infertility caused by spermatogenic arrest at an early meiotic phase. Our results highlight the role of TEX14 specifically in spermatogenesis and the importance of specific genomic remodeling events as causes for inherited defects.

  11. Schizophrenia: A Pathogenetic Autoimmune Disease Caused by Viruses and Pathogens and Dependent on Genes

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    C. J. Carter

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Many genes have been implicated in schizophrenia as have viral prenatal or adult infections and toxoplasmosis or Lyme disease. Several autoantigens also target key pathology-related proteins. These factors are interrelated. Susceptibility genes encode for proteins homologous to those of the pathogens while the autoantigens are homologous to pathogens' proteins, suggesting that the risk-promoting effects of genes and risk factors are conditional upon each other, and dependent upon protein matching between pathogen and susceptibility gene products. Pathogens' proteins may act as dummy ligands, decoy receptors, or via interactome interference. Many such proteins are immunogenic suggesting that antibody mediated knockdown of multiple schizophrenia gene products could contribute to the disease, explaining the immune activation in the brain and lymphocytes in schizophrenia, and the preponderance of immune-related gene variants in the schizophrenia genome. Schizophrenia may thus be a “pathogenetic” autoimmune disorder, caused by pathogens, genes, and the immune system acting together, and perhaps preventable by pathogen elimination, or curable by the removal of culpable antibodies and antigens.

  12. Alpharetroviral Vectors: From a Cancer-Causing Agent to a Useful Tool for Human Gene Therapy

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    Julia D. Suerth

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy using integrating retroviral vectors has proven its effectiveness in several clinical trials for the treatment of inherited diseases and cancer. However, vector-mediated adverse events related to insertional mutagenesis were also observed, emphasizing the need for safer therapeutic vectors. Paradoxically, alpharetroviruses, originally discovered as cancer-causing agents, have a more random and potentially safer integration pattern compared to gammaretro- and lentiviruses. In this review, we provide a short overview of the history of alpharetroviruses and explain how they can be converted into state-of-the-art gene delivery tools with improved safety features. We discuss development of alpharetroviral vectors in compliance with regulatory requirements for clinical translation, and provide an outlook on possible future gene therapy applications. Taken together, this review is a broad overview of alpharetroviral vectors spanning the bridge from their parental virus discovery to their potential applicability in clinical settings.

  13. Clinical study of DMD gene point mutation causing Becker muscular dystrophy

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    Ji-qing CAO

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background  DMD gene point mutation, mainly nonsense mutation, always cause the most severe Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD. However, we also observed some cases of Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD carrying DMD point mutation. This paper aims to explore the mechanism of DMD point mutation causing BMD, in order to enhance the understanding of mutation types of BMD.  Methods  Sequence analysis was performed in 11 cases of BMD confirmed by typical clinical manifestations and muscle biopsy. The exon of DMD gene was detected non-deletion or duplication by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA.  Results  Eleven patients carried 10 mutation types without mutational hotspot. Six patients carried nonsense mutations [c.5002G>T, p.(Glu1668X; c.1615C > T, p.(Arg539X; c.7105G > T, p.(Glu2369X; c.5287C > T, p.(Arg1763X; c.9284T > G, p.(Leu3095X]. One patient carried missense mutation [c.5234G > A, p.(Arg1745His]. Two patients carried frameshift mutations (c.10231dupT, c.10491delC. Two patients carried splicing site mutations (c.4518 + 3A > T, c.649 + 2T > C.  Conclusions  DMD gene point mutation may result in BMD with mild clinical symptoms. When clinical manifestations suggest the possibility of BMD and MLPA reveals non?deletion or duplication mutation of DMD gene, BMD should be considered. Study on the mechanism of DMD point mutation causing BMD is very important for gene therapy of DMD. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.06.005

  14. Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus infection causes modulation of inflammatory and immune response genes in mouse brain

    OpenAIRE

    Puri Raj K; Bhattacharya Bhaskar; Sharma Anuj; Maheshwari Radha K

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Neurovirulent Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) causes lethal encephalitis in equines and is transmitted to humans by mosquitoes. VEEV is highly infectious when transmitted by aerosol and has been developed as a bio-warfare agent, making it an important pathogen to study from a military and civilian standpoint. Molecular mechanisms of VEE pathogenesis are poorly understood. To study these, the gene expression profile of VEEV infected mouse brains was investigated...

  15. Transcriptome changes in Fusarium verticillioides caused by mutation in the transporter-like gene FST1

    OpenAIRE

    Niu, Chenxing; Payne, Gary A.; Woloshuk, Charles P

    2015-01-01

    Background Fusarium verticillioides causes an important seed disease on maize and produces the fumonisin group of mycotoxins, which are toxic to humans and livestock. A previous study discovered that a gene (FST1) in the pathogen affects fumonisin production and virulence. Although the predicted amino acid sequence of FST1 is similar to hexose transporters, previous experimental evidence failed to prove function. Results Three new phenotypes were identified that are associated with the FST1 m...

  16. Alpharetroviral Vectors: From a Cancer-Causing Agent to a Useful Tool for Human Gene Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Suerth, Julia D.; Verena Labenski; Axel Schambach

    2014-01-01

    Gene therapy using integrating retroviral vectors has proven its effectiveness in several clinical trials for the treatment of inherited diseases and cancer. However, vector-mediated adverse events related to insertional mutagenesis were also observed, emphasizing the need for safer therapeutic vectors. Paradoxically, alpharetroviruses, originally discovered as cancer-causing agents, have a more random and potentially safer integration pattern compared to gammaretro- and lentiviruses. In thi...

  17. Absence of functional TolC protein causes increased stress response gene expression in Sinorhizobium meliloti

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    Moreira Leonilde M

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The TolC protein from Sinorhizobium meliloti has previously been demonstrated to be required for establishing successful biological nitrogen fixation symbiosis with Medicago sativa. It is also needed in protein and exopolysaccharide secretion and for protection against osmotic and oxidative stresses. Here, the transcriptional profile of free-living S. meliloti 1021 tolC mutant is described as a step toward understanding its role in the physiology of the cell. Results Comparison of tolC mutant and wild-type strains transcriptomes showed 1177 genes with significantly increased expression while 325 had significantly decreased expression levels. The genes with an increased expression suggest the activation of a cytoplasmic and extracytoplasmic stress responses possibly mediated by the sigma factor RpoH1 and protein homologues of the CpxRA two-component regulatory system of Enterobacteria, respectively. Stress conditions are probably caused by perturbation of the cell envelope. Consistent with gene expression data, biochemical analysis indicates that the tolC mutant suffers from oxidative stress. This is illustrated by the elevated enzyme activity levels detected for catalase, superoxide dismutase and glutathione reductase. The observed increase in the expression of genes encoding products involved in central metabolism and transporters for nutrient uptake suggests a higher metabolic rate of the tolC mutant. We also demonstrated increased swarming motility in the tolC mutant strain. Absence of functional TolC caused decreased expression mainly of genes encoding products involved in nitrogen metabolism and transport. Conclusion This work shows how a mutation in the outer membrane protein TolC, common to many bacterial transport systems, affects expression of a large number of genes that act in concert to restore cell homeostasis. This finding further underlines the fundamental role of this protein in Sinorhizobium meliloti biology.

  18. Enhancing the prioritization of disease-causing genes through tissue specific protein interaction networks.

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    Oded Magger

    Full Text Available The prioritization of candidate disease-causing genes is a fundamental challenge in the post-genomic era. Current state of the art methods exploit a protein-protein interaction (PPI network for this task. They are based on the observation that genes causing phenotypically-similar diseases tend to lie close to one another in a PPI network. However, to date, these methods have used a static picture of human PPIs, while diseases impact specific tissues in which the PPI networks may be dramatically different. Here, for the first time, we perform a large-scale assessment of the contribution of tissue-specific information to gene prioritization. By integrating tissue-specific gene expression data with PPI information, we construct tissue-specific PPI networks for 60 tissues and investigate their prioritization power. We find that tissue-specific PPI networks considerably improve the prioritization results compared to those obtained using a generic PPI network. Furthermore, they allow predicting novel disease-tissue associations, pointing to sub-clinical tissue effects that may escape early detection.

  19. Imatinib causes epigenetic alterations of PTEN gene via upregulation of DNA methyltransferases and polycomb group proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have recently reported the possible imatinib-resistant mechanism; long-term exposure of leukemia cells to imatinib downregulated levels of phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) via hypermethylation of its promoter region (Leukemia 2010; 24: 1631). The present study explored the molecular mechanisms by which imatinib caused methylation on the promoter region of this tumor suppressor gene in leukemia cells. Real-time reverse transcription PCR found that long-term exposure of chronic eosinophilic leukemia EOL-1 cells expressing FIP1L1/platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α to imatinib induced expression of DNA methyltransferase 3A (DNMT3A) and histone-methyltransferase enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2), a family of polycomb group, thereby increasing methylation of the gene. Immunoprecipitation assay found the increased complex formation of DNMT3A and EZH2 proteins in these cells. Moreover, chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that amounts of both DNMT3A and EZH2 proteins bound around the promoter region of PTEN gene were increased in EOL-1 cells after exposure to imatinib. Furthermore, we found that levels of DNMT3A and EZH2 were strikingly increased in leukemia cells isolated from individuals with chronic myelogenous leukemia (n=1) and Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (n=2), who relapsed after treatment with imatinib compared with those isolated at their initial presentation. Taken together, imatinib could cause drug-resistance via recruitment of polycomb gene complex to the promoter region of the PTEN and downregulation of this gene's transcripts in leukemia patients

  20. Familial Dilated Cardiomyopathy Caused by a Novel Frameshift in the BAG3 Gene.

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    Rocio Toro

    Full Text Available Dilated cardiomyopathy, a major cause of chronic heart failure and cardiac transplantation, is characterized by left ventricular or biventricular heart dilatation. In nearly 50% of cases the pathology is inherited, and more than 60 genes have been reported as disease-causing. However, in 30% of familial cases the mutation remains unidentified even after comprehensive genetic analysis. This study clinically and genetically assessed a large Spanish family affected by dilated cardiomyopathy to search for novel variations.Our study included a total of 100 family members. Clinical assessment was performed in alive, and genetic analysis was also performed in alive and 1 deceased relative. Genetic screening included resequencing of 55 genes associated with sudden cardiac death, and Sanger sequencing of main disease-associated genes. Genetic analysis identified a frame-shift variation in BAG3 (p.H243Tfr*64 in 32 patients. Genotype-phenotype correlation identified substantial heterogeneity in disease expression. Of 32 genetic carriers (one deceased, 21 relatives were clinically affected, and 10 were asymptomatic. Seventeen of the symptomatic genetic carriers exhibited proto-diastolic septal knock by echocardiographic assessment.We report p.H243Tfr*64_BAG3 as a novel pathogenic variation responsible for familial dilated cardiomyopathy. This variation correlates with a more severe phenotype of the disease, mainly in younger individuals. Genetic analysis in families, even asymptomatic individuals, enables early identification of individuals at risk and allows implementation of preventive measures.

  1. Molecular pathology of familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy caused by mutations in the cardiac myosin binding protein C gene.

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, B.; French, J. A.; Carrier, L.; Jeremy, R W; McTaggart, D R; Nicholson, M R; Hambly, B; Semsarian, C; Richmond, D R; Schwartz, K.; Trent, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    DNA studies in familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC) have shown that it is caused by mutations in genes coding for proteins which make up the muscle sarcomere. The majority of mutations in the FHC genes result from missense changes, although one of the most recent genes to be identified (cardiac myosin binding protein C gene, MYBPC3) has predominantly DNA mutations which produce truncated proteins. Both dominant negative and haploinsufficiency models have been proposed to explain the mol...

  2. Mucopolysaccharidosis VI (Maroteaux-Lamy Syndrome): Six unique arylsulfatase B gene alleles causing variable disease phenotypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isbrandt, D.; Arlt, G.; Figura, K. von; Peters, C.; Brooks, D.A.; Hopwood, J.J.

    1994-03-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type VI, or Maroteaux-Lamy syndrome, is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by a deficiency of the enzyme arylsulfatase B (ASB), also known as N-acetylgalactosamine-4-sulfatase. Multiple clinical phenotypes of this autosomal recessively inherited disease have been described. Recent isolation and characterization of the human ASB gene facilitated the analysis of molecular defects underlying the different phenotypes. Conditions for PCR amplification of the entire open reading frame from genomic DNA and for subsequent direct automated DNA sequencing of the resulting DNA fragments were established. Besides two polymorphisms described elsewhere that cause methionine-for-valine substitutions in the arylsulfatase B gene, six new mutations in six patients were detected: four point mutations resulting in amino acid substitutions, a 1-bp deletion, and a 1-bp insertion. The point mutations were two G-to-A and two T-to-C transitions. The G-to-A transitions cause an arginine-for-glycine substitution at residue 144 in a homoallelic patient with a severe disease phenotype and a tyrosine-for-cysteine substitution at residue 521 in a potentially heteroallelic patient with the severe form of the disease. The T-to-C transitions cause an arginine-for-cysteine substitution at amino acid residue 192 in a homoallelic patient with mild symptoms and a proline-for-leucine substitution at amino acid 321 in a homoallelic patient with the intermediate form. The insertion between nucleotides T1284 and G1285 resulted in a loss of the 100 C-terminal amino acids of the wild-type protein and in the deletion of nucleotide C1577 in a 39-amino-acid C-terminal extension of the ASB polypeptide. Both mutations were detected in homoallelic patients with the severe form of the disease. Expression of mutant cDNAs encoding the four amino acid substitutions and the deletion resulted in reduction of both ASB protein levels and arylsulfatase enzyme activity. 25 refs., 4 figs.

  3. Hypomorphic mutation in mouse Nppc gene causes retarded bone growth due to impaired endochondral ossification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long bone abnormality (lbab/lbab) is a spontaneous mutant mouse characterized by dwarfism with shorter long bones. A missense mutation was reported in the Nppc gene, which encodes C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP), but it has not been confirmed whether this mutation is responsible for the dwarf phenotype. To verify that the mutation causes the dwarfism of lbab/lbab mice, we first investigated the effect of CNP in lbab/lbab mice. By transgenic rescue with chondrocyte-specific expression of CNP, the dwarf phenotype in lbab/lbab mice was completely compensated. Next, we revealed that CNP derived from the lbab allele retained only slight activity to induce cGMP production through its receptor. Histological analysis showed that both proliferative and hypertrophic zones of chondrocytes in the growth plate of lbab/lbab mice were markedly reduced. Our results demonstrate that lbab/lbab mice have a hypomorphic mutation in the Nppc gene that is responsible for dwarfism caused by impaired endochondral ossification

  4. c.376G>A mutation in WFS1 gene causes Wolfram syndrome without deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safarpour Lima, Behnam; Ghaedi, Hamid; Daftarian, Narsis; Ahmadieh, Hamid; Jamshidi, Javad; Khorrami, Mehdi; Noroozi, Rezvan; Sohrabifar, Nasim; Assarzadegan, Farhad; Hesami, Omid; Taghavi, Shaghayegh; Ahmadifard, Azadeh; Atakhorrami, Minoo; Rahimi-Aliabadi, Simin; Shahmohammadibeni, Neda; Alehabib, Elham; Andarva, Monavvar; Darvish, Hossein; Emamalizadeh, Babak

    2016-02-01

    Wolfram syndrome is one of the rare autosomal recessive, progressive, neurodegenerative disorders, characterized by diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy. Several other features are observed in patients including deafness, ataxia, and peripheral neuropathy. A gene called WFS1 is identified on chromosome 4p, responsible for Wolfram syndrome. We investigated a family consisted of parents and 8 children, which 5 of them have been diagnosed for Wolfram syndrome. WFS1 gene in all family members was sequenced for causative mutations. A mutation (c.376G>A, p.A126T) was found in all affected members in homozygous state and in both parents in heterozygous state. The bioinformatics analysis showed the deleterious effects of this nucleotide change on the structure and function of the protein product. As all of the patients in the family showed the homozygote mutation, and parents were both heterozygote, this mutation is probably the cause of the disease. We identified this mutation in homozygous state for the first time as Wolfram syndrome causation. We also showed that this mutation probably doesn't cause deafness in affected individuals. PMID:26773575

  5. Conditional ablation of the choroideremia gene causes age-related changes in mouse retinal pigment epithelium.

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    Silène T Wavre-Shapton

    Full Text Available The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE is a pigmented monolayer of cells lying between the photoreceptors and a layer of fenestrated capillaries, the choriocapillaris. Choroideremia (CHM is an X-linked progressive degeneration of these three layers caused by the loss of function of Rab Escort protein-1 (REP1. REP1 is involved in the prenylation of Rab proteins, key regulators of membrane trafficking. To study the pathological consequences of chronic disruption of membrane traffic in the RPE we used a cell type-specific knock-out mouse model of the disease, where the Chm/Rep1 gene is deleted only in pigmented cells (Chm(Flox, Tyr-Cre+. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM was used to quantitate the melanosome distribution in the RPE and immunofluorescent staining of rhodopsin was used to quantitate phagocytosed rod outer segments in retinal sections. The ultrastructure of the RPE and Bruch's membrane at different ages was characterised by TEM to analyse age-related changes occurring as a result of defects in membrane traffic pathways. Chm/Rep1 gene knockout in RPE cells resulted in reduced numbers of melanosomes in the apical processes and delayed phagosome degradation. In addition, the RPE accumulated pathological changes at 5-6 months of age similar to those observed in 2-year old controls. These included the intracellular accumulation of lipofuscin-containing deposits, disorganised basal infoldings and the extracellular accumulation of basal laminar and basal linear deposits. The phenotype of the Chm(Flox, Tyr-Cre+ mice suggests that loss of the Chm/Rep1 gene causes premature accumulation of features of aging in the RPE. Furthermore, the striking similarities between the present observations and some of the phenotypes reported in age-related macular degeneration (AMD suggest that membrane traffic defects may contribute to the pathogenesis of AMD.

  6. A partial gene deletion of SLC45A2 causes oculocutaneous albinism in Doberman pinscher dogs.

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    Paige A Winkler

    Full Text Available The first white Doberman pinscher (WDP dog was registered by the American Kennel Club in 1976. The novelty of the white coat color resulted in extensive line breeding of this dog and her offspring. The WDP phenotype closely resembles human oculocutaneous albinism (OCA and clinicians noticed a seemingly high prevalence of pigmented masses on these dogs. This study had three specific aims: (1 produce a detailed description of the ocular phenotype of WDPs, (2 objectively determine if an increased prevalence of ocular and cutaneous melanocytic tumors was present in WDPs, and (3 determine if a genetic mutation in any of the genes known to cause human OCA is causal for the WDP phenotype. WDPs have a consistent ocular phenotype of photophobia, hypopigmented adnexal structures, blue irides with a tan periphery and hypopigmented retinal pigment epithelium and choroid. WDPs have a higher prevalence of cutaneous melanocytic neoplasms compared with control standard color Doberman pinschers (SDPs; cutaneous tumors were noted in 12/20 WDP (5 years of age: 8/8 and 1/20 SDPs (p<0.00001. Using exclusion analysis, four OCA causative genes were investigated for their association with WDP phenotype; TYR, OCA2, TYRP1 and SLC45A2. SLC45A2 was found to be linked to the phenotype and gene sequencing revealed a 4,081 base pair deletion resulting in loss of the terminus of exon seven of SLC45A2 (chr4∶77,062,968-77,067,051. This mutation is highly likely to be the cause of the WDP phenotype and is supported by a lack of detectable SLC45A2 transcript levels by reverse transcriptase PCR. The WDP provides a valuable model for studying OCA4 visual disturbances and melanocytic neoplasms in a large animal model.

  7. Correlating gene expression with deformities caused by aryl hydrocarbon receptor agonists in zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bugiak, B.; Weber, L. [Saskatchewan Univ., Saskatoon, SK (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    Exposure to aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonists in fish causes lethal disturbances in fish development, but the effects of acute AhR agonist exposure on the cardiovascular system and deformities remain unclear. This study addressed this issue by performing a series of experiments on zebrafish (Danio rerio). The authors hypothesized that genes needed for cardiovascular regulation (PTGS) would exhibit a stronger link to deformities than detoxification enzymes (CYPs). Zebrafish eggs were exposed aqueously until 4 days post-fertilization (dpf) to the AhR agonists benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) or 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzop-dioxin (TCDD) alone and in combination with the putative AhR antagonists resveratrol or alpha-naphthoflavone (ANF). Gene expression was measured using real-time, reverse transcriptase PCR in zebrafish at 5 and 10 dpf. Although the mortalities did not differ considerably among groups at 10 dpf, the deformities increased significantly after BaP-ANF at 5 dpf and after BaP at 10 dpf, but not after TCDD treatment. CYP and PTGS isozymes exhibited small, but statistically significant changes at 5 dpf. By 10 dpf, the expression returned to control values. In general, CYP1A and PTGS-1 expression at 5 dpf were positively correlated with deformities, while all other genes were negatively correlated with deformities. It was concluded that changes in CYP1A, CYP1C2, and PTGS-1 gene expression at 5 dpf are associated with developmental deformities, but additional work is needed to determine which has the most important mechanistic link.

  8. Genetic interactions between planar cell polarity genes cause diverse neural tube defects in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdoch, Jennifer N; Damrau, Christine; Paudyal, Anju; Bogani, Debora; Wells, Sara; Greene, Nicholas D E; Stanier, Philip; Copp, Andrew J

    2014-10-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are among the commonest and most severe forms of developmental defect, characterized by disruption of the early embryonic events of central nervous system formation. NTDs have long been known to exhibit a strong genetic dependence, yet the identity of the genetic determinants remains largely undiscovered. Initiation of neural tube closure is disrupted in mice homozygous for mutations in planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway genes, providing a strong link between NTDs and PCP signaling. Recently, missense gene variants have been identified in PCP genes in humans with NTDs, although the range of phenotypes is greater than in the mouse mutants. In addition, the sequence variants detected in affected humans are heterozygous, and can often be detected in unaffected individuals. It has been suggested that interactions between multiple heterozygous gene mutations cause the NTDs in humans. To determine the phenotypes produced in double heterozygotes, we bred mice with all three pairwise combinations of Vangl2(Lp), Scrib(Crc) and Celsr1(Crsh) mutations, the most intensively studied PCP mutants. The majority of double-mutant embryos had open NTDs, with the range of phenotypes including anencephaly and spina bifida, therefore reflecting the defects observed in humans. Strikingly, even on a uniform genetic background, variability in the penetrance and severity of the mutant phenotypes was observed between the different double-heterozygote combinations. Phenotypically, Celsr1(Crsh);Vangl2(Lp);Scrib(Crc) triply heterozygous mutants were no more severe than doubly heterozygous or singly homozygous mutants. We propose that some of the variation between double-mutant phenotypes could be attributed to the nature of the protein disruption in each allele: whereas Scrib(Crc) is a null mutant and produces no Scrib protein, Celsr1(Crsh) and Vangl2(Lp) homozygotes both express mutant proteins, consistent with dominant effects. The variable outcomes of these genetic

  9. Attenuation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by Disruption of a mas-Like Gene or a Chalcone Synthase-Like Gene, Which Causes Deficiency in Dimycocerosyl Phthiocerol Synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Sirakova, Tatiana D.; Dubey, Vinod S.; Cynamon, Michael H.; Kolattukudy, Pappachan E.

    2003-01-01

    Tuberculosis is one of the leading preventable causes of death. Emergence of drug-resistant tuberculosis makes the discovery of new targets for antimycobacterial drugs critical. The unique mycobacterial cell wall lipids are known to play an important role in pathogenesis, and therefore the genes responsible for their biosynthesis offer potential new targets. To assess the possible role of some of the genes potentially involved in cell wall lipid synthesis, we disrupted a mas-like gene, msl7, ...

  10. The Arabidopsis thaliana homeobox gene ATHB12 is involved in symptom development caused by geminivirus infection.

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    Jungan Park

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Geminiviruses are single-stranded DNA viruses that infect a number of monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous plants. Arabidopsis is susceptible to infection with the Curtovirus, Beet severe curly top virus (BSCTV. Infection of Arabidopsis with BSCTV causes severe symptoms characterized by stunting, leaf curling, and the development of abnormal inflorescence and root structures. BSCTV-induced symptom development requires the virus-encoded C4 protein which is thought to interact with specific plant-host proteins and disrupt signaling pathways important for controlling cell division and development. Very little is known about the specific plant regulatory factors that participate in BSCTV-induced symptom development. This study was conducted to identify specific transcription factors that are induced by BSCTV infection. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Arabidopsis plants were inoculated with BSCTV and the induction of specific transcription factors was monitored using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assays. We found that the ATHB12 and ATHB7 genes, members of the homeodomain-leucine zipper family of transcription factors previously shown to be induced by abscisic acid and water stress, are induced in symptomatic tissues of Arabidopsis inoculated with BSCTV. ATHB12 expression is correlated with an array of morphological abnormalities including leaf curling, stunting, and callus-like structures in infected Arabidopsis. Inoculation of plants with a BSCTV mutant with a defective c4 gene failed to induce ATHB12. Transgenic plants expressing the BSCTV C4 gene exhibited increased ATHB12 expression whereas BSCTV-infected ATHB12 knock-down plants developed milder symptoms and had lower ATHB12 expression compared to the wild-type plants. Reporter gene studies demonstrated that the ATHB12 promoter was responsive to BSCTV infection and the highest expression levels were observed in symptomatic tissues where cell cycle genes also were

  11. Partial Gene Deletions of PMP22 Causing Hereditary Neuropathy with Liability to Pressure Palsies

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    Sun-Mi Cho

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP is an autosomal neuropathy that is commonly caused by a reciprocal 1.5 Mb deletion on chromosome 17p11.2, at the site of the peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22 gene. Other patients with similar phenotypes have been shown to harbor point mutations or small deletions, although there is some clinical variation across these patients. In this report, we describe a case of HNPP with copy number changes in exon or promoter regions of PMP22. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe analysis revealed an exon 1b deletion in the patient, who had been diagnosed with HNPP in the first decade of life using molecular analysis.

  12. Improving palm oil quality through identification and mapping of the lipase gene causing oil deterioration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morcillo, F; Cros, D; Billotte, N; Ngando-Ebongue, G-F; Domonhédo, H; Pizot, M; Cuéllar, T; Espéout, S; Dhouib, R; Bourgis, F; Claverol, S; Tranbarger, T J; Nouy, B; Arondel, V

    2013-01-01

    The oil palm fruit mesocarp contains high lipase activity that increases free fatty acids and necessitates post-harvest inactivation by heat treatment of fruit bunches. Even before heat treatment the mesocarp lipase activity causes consequential oil losses and requires costly measures to limit free fatty acids quantities. Here we demonstrate that elite low-lipase lines yield oil with substantially less free fatty acids than standard genotypes, allowing more flexibility for post-harvest fruit processing and extended ripening for increased yields. We identify the lipase and its gene cosegregates with the low-/high-lipase trait, providing breeders a marker to rapidly identify potent elite genitors and introgress the trait into major cultivars. Overall, economic gains brought by wide adoption of this material could represent up to one billion dollars per year. Expected benefits concern all planters but are likely to be highest for African smallholders who would be more able to produce oil that meets international quality standards. PMID:23857501

  13. Familial glucocorticoid resistance caused by a splice site deletion in the human glucocorticoid receptor gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karl, M.; Lamberts, S.W.J.; Detera-Wadleigh, S.D.; Encio, I.J.; Stratakis, C.A.; Hurley, D.M.; Accili, D.; Chrousos, G.P. (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States) Erasmus Univ. of Rotterdam (Netherlands))

    1993-03-01

    The clinical syndrome of generalized, compensated glucocorticoid resistance is characterized by increased cortisol secretion without clinical evidence of hyper- or hypocortisolism, and manifestations of androgen and/or mineralocorticoid excess. This condition results from partial failure of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) to modulate transcription of its target genes. The authors studied the molecular mechanisms of this syndrome in a Dutch kindred, whose affected members had hypercortisolism and approximately half of normal GRs, and whose proband was a young woman with manifestations of hyperandrogenism. Using the polymerase chain reaction to amplify and sequence each of the nine exons of the GR gene [alpha], along with their 5[prime]- and 3[prime]-flanking regions, the authors identified a 4-base deletion at the 3[prime]-boundary of exon 6 in one GR allele ([Delta][sub 4]), which removed a donor splice site in all three affected members studied. In contrast, the sequence of exon 6 in the two unaffected siblings was normal. A single nucleotide substitution causing an amino acid substitution in the amino terminal domain of the GR (asparagine to serine, codon 363) was also discovered in exon 2 of the other allele (G[sub 1220]) in the proband, in one of her affected brothers and in her unaffected sister. This deletion in the glucocorticoid receptor gene was associated with the expression of only one allele and a decrease of GR protein by 50% in affected members of this glucocorticoid resistant family. The mutation identified in exon 2 did not segregate with the disease and appears to be of no functional significance. The presence of the null allele was apparently compensated for by increased cortisol production at the expense of concurrent hyperandrogenism. 40 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Disruption of Slc52a3 gene causes neonatal lethality with riboflavin deficiency in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimatsu, Hiroki; Yonezawa, Atsushi; Yamanishi, Kaori; Yao, Yoshiaki; Sugano, Kumiko; Nakagawa, Shunsaku; Imai, Satoshi; Omura, Tomohiro; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Yano, Ikuko; Masuda, Satohiro; Inui, Ken-Ichi; Matsubara, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Homeostasis of riboflavin should be maintained by transporters. Previous in vitro studies have elucidated basic information about riboflavin transporter RFVT3 encoded by SLC52A3 gene. However, the contribution of RFVT3 to the maintenance of riboflavin homeostasis and the significance in vivo remain unclear. Here, we investigated the physiological role of RFVT3 using Slc52a3 knockout (Slc52a3-/-) mice. Most Slc52a3-/- mice died with hyperlipidemia and hypoglycemia within 48 hr after birth. The plasma and tissue riboflavin concentrations in Slc52a3-/- mice at postnatal day 0 were dramatically lower than those in wild-type (WT) littermates. Slc52a3-/- fetuses showed a lower capacity of placental riboflavin transport compared with WT fetuses. Riboflavin supplement during pregnancy and after birth reduced neonatal death and metabolic disorders. To our knowledge, this is the first report to indicate that Rfvt3 contributes to placental riboflavin transport, and that disruption of Slc52a3 gene caused neonatal mortality with hyperlipidemia and hypoglycemia owing to riboflavin deficiency. PMID:27272163

  15. Disruption of Slc52a3 gene causes neonatal lethality with riboflavin deficiency in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimatsu, Hiroki; Yonezawa, Atsushi; Yamanishi, Kaori; Yao, Yoshiaki; Sugano, Kumiko; Nakagawa, Shunsaku; Imai, Satoshi; Omura, Tomohiro; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Yano, Ikuko; Masuda, Satohiro; Inui, Ken-ichi; Matsubara, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Homeostasis of riboflavin should be maintained by transporters. Previous in vitro studies have elucidated basic information about riboflavin transporter RFVT3 encoded by SLC52A3 gene. However, the contribution of RFVT3 to the maintenance of riboflavin homeostasis and the significance in vivo remain unclear. Here, we investigated the physiological role of RFVT3 using Slc52a3 knockout (Slc52a3−/−) mice. Most Slc52a3−/− mice died with hyperlipidemia and hypoglycemia within 48 hr after birth. The plasma and tissue riboflavin concentrations in Slc52a3−/− mice at postnatal day 0 were dramatically lower than those in wild-type (WT) littermates. Slc52a3−/− fetuses showed a lower capacity of placental riboflavin transport compared with WT fetuses. Riboflavin supplement during pregnancy and after birth reduced neonatal death and metabolic disorders. To our knowledge, this is the first report to indicate that Rfvt3 contributes to placental riboflavin transport, and that disruption of Slc52a3 gene caused neonatal mortality with hyperlipidemia and hypoglycemia owing to riboflavin deficiency. PMID:27272163

  16. A functional alternative splicing mutation in AIRE gene causes autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junyu Zhang

    Full Text Available Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 (APS-1 is a rare autosomal recessive disease defined by the presence of two of the three conditions: mucocutaneous candidiasis, hypoparathyroidism, and Addison's disease. Loss-of-function mutations of the autoimmune regulator (AIRE gene have been linked to APS-1. Here we report mutational analysis and functional characterization of an AIRE mutation in a consanguineous Chinese family with APS-1. All exons of the AIRE gene and adjacent exon-intron sequences were amplified by PCR and subsequently sequenced. We identified a homozygous missense AIRE mutation c.463G>A (p.Gly155Ser in two siblings with different clinical features of APS-1. In silico splice-site prediction and minigene analysis were carried out to study the potential pathological consequence. Minigene splicing analysis and subsequent cDNA sequencing revealed that the AIRE mutation potentially compromised the recognition of the splice donor of intron 3, causing alternative pre-mRNA splicing by intron 3 retention. Furthermore, the aberrant AIRE transcript was identified in a heterozygous carrier of the c.463G>A mutation. The aberrant intron 3-retaining transcript generated a truncated protein (p.G155fsX203 containing the first 154 AIRE amino acids and followed by 48 aberrant amino acids. Therefore, our study represents the first functional characterization of the alternatively spliced AIRE mutation that may explain the pathogenetic role in APS-1.

  17. Differences in acidity of apples are probably mainly caused by a malic acid transporter gene on LG16

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khan, S.A.; Beekwilder, J.; Schaart, J.G.; Mumm, R.; Soriano, J.M.; Jacobsen, E.; Schouten, H.J.

    2013-01-01

    Acidity has profound effects on the taste of apples (Malus × domestica). Malic acid is the predominant organic acid in apples. Differences in malic acid content are caused by differences in accumulation of malic acid in the vacuole. This accumulation may be caused by a gene that is responsible for t

  18. Recurring dominant-negative mutations in the AVP-NPII gene cause neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Repaske, D.R. [Children`s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Phillips, J.A.; Krishnamani, M.R.S. [Vanderbilt Univ. School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Autosomal dominant neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus (ADNDI) is a familial form of arginine vasopressin (or antidiuretic hormone) deficiency that is usually manifest in early childhood with polyuria, polydipsia and an antidiuretic response to exogenous vasopressin or its analogs. The phenotype is postulated to arise from gliosis and depletion of the magnocellular neurons that produce vasopressin in the supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus. ADNDI is caused by heterozygosity for a variety of mutations in the AVP-NPII gene which encodes vasopressin, its carrier protein (NPII) and a glycoprotein (copeptin) of unknown function. These mutations include: (1) Ala 19{r_arrow}Thr (G279A) in AVP`s signal peptide, (2) Gly 17{r_arrow}Val (G1740T), (3) Pro 24{r_arrow}Leu (C1761T), (4) Gly 57{r_arrow}Ser (G1859A) and (5) del Glu 47({delta}AGG 1824-26), all of which occur in NPII. In characterizing the AVP-NPII mutations in five non-related ADNDI kindreds, we have detected two kindreds having mutation 1 (G279A), two having mutation 3 (C1761T) and one having mutation 4 (G1859A) without any other allelic changes being detected. Two of these recurring mutations (G279A and G1859A) are transitions that occur at CpG dinucleotides while the third (C1761T) does not. Interestingly, families with the same mutations differed in their ethnicity or in their affected AVP-NPII allele`s associated haplotype of closely linked DNA polymorphisms. Our data indicated that at least three of five known AVP-NPII mutations causing ADNDI tend to recur but the mechanisms by which these dominant-negative mutations cause variable or progressive expression of the ADNDI phenotype remain unclear.

  19. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in obesity-related genes and all-cause and cause-specific mortality: a prospective cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Ruczinski Ingo; Strickland Paul; Huang Han; Thuita Lucy; Christo Dana K; Chang Howard H; Gallicchio Lisa; Clipp Sandra; Helzlsouer Kathy J

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background The aim of this study was to examine the associations between 16 specific single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 8 obesity-related genes and overall and cause-specific mortality. We also examined the associations between the SNPs and body mass index (BMI) and change in BMI over time. Methods Data were analyzed from 9,919 individuals who participated in two large community-based cohort studies conducted in Washington County, Maryland in 1974 (CLUE I) and 1989 (CLUE II). ...

  20. A single point-mutation within the melanophilin gene causes the lavender plumage colour dilution phenotype in the chicken

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tixier-Boichard Michèle

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The lavender phenotype in the chicken causes the dilution of both black (eumelanin and red/brown (phaeomelanin pigments. Defects in three genes involved in intracellular melanosomal transport, previously described in mammals, give rise to similar diluted pigmentation phenotypes as those seen in lavender chickens. Results We have used a candidate-gene approach based on an expectation of homology with mammals to isolate a gene involved in pigmentation in chicken. Comparative sequence analysis of candidate genes in the chicken identified a strong association between a mutation in the MLPH gene and the diluted pigmentation phenotype. This mutation results in the amino acid change R35W, at a site also associated with similar phenotypes in mice, humans and cats. Conclusion This is the first time that an avian species with a mutation in the MLPH gene has been reported.

  1. Mutation in the Monocarboxylate Transporter 12 Gene Affects Guanidinoacetate Excretion but Does Not Cause Glucosuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhayat, Nasser; Simonin, Alexandre; Anderegg, Manuel; Pathare, Ganesh; Lüscher, Benjamin P; Deisl, Christine; Albano, Giuseppe; Mordasini, David; Hediger, Matthias A; Surbek, Daniel V; Vogt, Bruno; Sass, Jörn Oliver; Kloeckener-Gruissem, Barbara; Fuster, Daniel G

    2016-05-01

    A heterozygous mutation (c.643C>A; p.Q215X) in the monocarboxylate transporter 12-encoding gene MCT12 (also known as SLC16A12) that mediates creatine transport was recently identified as the cause of a syndrome with juvenile cataracts, microcornea, and glucosuria in a single family. Whereas the MCT12 mutation cosegregated with the eye phenotype, poor correlation with the glucosuria phenotype did not support a pathogenic role of the mutation in the kidney. Here, we examined MCT12 in the kidney and found that it resides on basolateral membranes of proximal tubules. Patients with MCT12 mutation exhibited reduced plasma levels and increased fractional excretion of guanidinoacetate, but normal creatine levels, suggesting that MCT12 may function as a guanidinoacetate transporter in vivo However, functional studies in Xenopus oocytes revealed that MCT12 transports creatine but not its precursor, guanidinoacetate. Genetic analysis revealed a separate, undescribed heterozygous mutation (c.265G>A; p.A89T) in the sodium/glucose cotransporter 2-encoding gene SGLT2 (also known as SLC5A2) in the family that segregated with the renal glucosuria phenotype. When overexpressed in HEK293 cells, the mutant SGLT2 transporter did not efficiently translocate to the plasma membrane, and displayed greatly reduced transport activity. In summary, our data indicate that MCT12 functions as a basolateral exit pathway for creatine in the proximal tubule. Heterozygous mutation of MCT12 affects systemic levels and renal handling of guanidinoacetate, possibly through an indirect mechanism. Furthermore, our data reveal a digenic syndrome in the index family, with simultaneous MCT12 and SGLT2 mutation. Thus, glucosuria is not part of the MCT12 mutation syndrome. PMID:26376857

  2. Adaptation of respiratory chain biogenesis to cytochrome c oxidase deficiency caused by SURF1 gene mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovářová, Nikola; Cížková Vrbacká, Alena; Pecina, Petr; Stránecký, Viktor; Pronicka, Ewa; Kmoch, Stanislav; Houštěk, Josef

    2012-07-01

    The loss of Surf1 protein leads to a severe COX deficiency manifested as a fatal neurodegenerative disorder, the Leigh syndrome (LS(COX)). Surf1 appears to be involved in the early step of COX assembly but its function remains unknown. The aim of the study was to find out how SURF1 gene mutations influence expression of OXPHOS and other pro-mitochondrial genes and to further characterize the altered COX assembly. Analysis of fibroblast cell lines from 9 patients with SURF1 mutations revealed a 70% decrease of the COX complex content to be associated with 32-54% upregulation of respiratory chain complexes I, III and V and accumulation of Cox5a subunit. Whole genome expression profiling showed a general decrease of transcriptional activity in LS(COX) cells and indicated that the adaptive changes in OXPHOS complexes are due to a posttranscriptional compensatory mechanism. Electrophoretic and WB analysis showed that in mitochondria of LS(COX) cells compared to controls, the assembled COX is present entirely in a supercomplex form, as I-III₂-IV supercomplex but not as larger supercomplexes. The lack of COX also caused an accumulation of I-III₂ supercomplex. The accumulated Cox5a was mainly present as a free subunit. We have found out that the major COX assembly subcomplexes accumulated due to SURF1 mutations range in size between approximately 85-140kDa. In addition to the originally proposed S2 intermediate they might also represent Cox1-containing complexes lacking other COX subunits. Unlike the assembled COX, subcomplexes are unable to associate with complexes I and III. PMID:22465034

  3. Idiopathic neonatal necrotising fasciitis caused by community-acquired MSSA encoding Panton Valentine Leukocidin genes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dunlop, Rebecca L E

    2012-02-01

    Neonatal necrotising fasciitis is very rare in comparison to the adult presentation of the disease and a Plastic Surgeon may only encounter one such case during his or her career. Often this is initially misdiagnosed and managed as simple cellulitis. It generally affects previously healthy babies, the site is often the lower back area and a history of minor skin trauma may be elicited. The causative organism is usually Streptococcus or polymicrobial, as is the case in the adult population. We present the case of a previously healthy 11-day-old infant with idiopathic, rapidly progressive necrotising fasciitis of the back, cause by Methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) infection. The strain was isolated and found to encode the Panton-Valentine Leukocidin genes, which have been associated with particularly severe necrotising infections in other sites, with high mortality. These strains are the subject of specific treatment and eradication guidance in the UK but awareness of this and the importance of obtaining detailed culture typing is likely to be low amongst Plastic Surgeons.

  4. Screening and analysis of genes expressed upon infection of broad bean with Clover yellow vein virus causing lethal necrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki Yuji; Choi Sun; Atsumi Go; Kitazawa Hiroaki; Nakahara Kenji S; Uyeda Ichiro

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Clover yellow vein virus (ClYVV) causes lethal systemic necrosis in legumes, including broad bean (Vicia faba) and pea (Pisum sativum). To identify host genes involved in necrotic symptom expression after ClYVV infection, we screened cDNA fragments in which expression was changed in advance of necrotic symptom expression in broad bean (V. faba cv. Wase) using the differential display technique and secondarily with Northern blot analysis. Expression changes were confirmed in 20 genes,...

  5. Horizontally Acquired Genes for Purine Salvage in Borrelia spp. Causing Relapsing Fever

    OpenAIRE

    Barbour, Alan G.; Putteet-Driver, Adrienne D.; Bunikis, Jonas

    2005-01-01

    Unlike Borrelia burgdorferi, the relapsing fever agent Borrelia hermsii and the related Borrelia miyamotoi had purA and purB genes of the purine salvage pathway. These were located among the rRNA genes. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that these genes had a different evolutionary history than those of orthologs in other spirochetes.

  6. Evidence that Natural Selection is the Primary Cause of the Guanine-cytosine Content Variation in Rice Genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoli Shi; Xiyin Wang; Zhe Li; Qihui Zhu; Ji Yang; Song Ge; Jingchu Luo

    2007-01-01

    Cereal genes are classified into two distinct classes according to the guanine-cytosine (GC) content at the third codon sites (GC3). Natural selection and mutation bias have been proposed to affect the GC content. However, there has been controversy about the cause of GC variation. Here, we characterized the GC content of 1 092 paralogs and other single-copy genes in the duplicated chromosomal regions of the rice genome (ssp. indica) and classified the paralogs into GC3-rich and GC3-poor groups. By referring to out-group sequences from Arabidopsis and maize, we confirmed that the average synonymous substitution rate of the GC3-rich genes is significantly lower than that of the GC3-poor genes. Furthermore,we explored the other possible factors corresponding to the GC variation including the length of coding sequences, the number of exons in each gene, the number of genes in each family, the location of genes on chromosomes and the protein functions. Consequently, we propose that natural selection rather than mutation bias was the primary cause of the GC variation.

  7. Application of biclustering of gene expression data and gene set enrichment analysis methods to identify potentially disease causing nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Williams

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The presence of diverse types of nanomaterials (NMs in commerce is growing at an exponential pace. As a result, human exposure to these materials in the environment is inevitable, necessitating the need for rapid and reliable toxicity testing methods to accurately assess the potential hazards associated with NMs. In this study, we applied biclustering and gene set enrichment analysis methods to derive essential features of altered lung transcriptome following exposure to NMs that are associated with lung-specific diseases. Several datasets from public microarray repositories describing pulmonary diseases in mouse models following exposure to a variety of substances were examined and functionally related biclusters of genes showing similar expression profiles were identified. The identified biclusters were then used to conduct a gene set enrichment analysis on pulmonary gene expression profiles derived from mice exposed to nano-titanium dioxide (nano-TiO2, carbon black (CB or carbon nanotubes (CNTs to determine the disease significance of these data-driven gene sets.Results: Biclusters representing inflammation (chemokine activity, DNA binding, cell cycle, apoptosis, reactive oxygen species (ROS and fibrosis processes were identified. All of the NM studies were significant with respect to the bicluster related to chemokine activity (DAVID; FDR p-value = 0.032. The bicluster related to pulmonary fibrosis was enriched in studies where toxicity induced by CNT and CB studies was investigated, suggesting the potential for these materials to induce lung fibrosis. The pro-fibrogenic potential of CNTs is well established. Although CB has not been shown to induce fibrosis, it induces stronger inflammatory, oxidative stress and DNA damage responses than nano-TiO2 particles.Conclusion: The results of the analysis correctly identified all NMs to be inflammogenic and only CB and CNTs as potentially fibrogenic. In addition to identifying several

  8. Mutations in the glucose-6-phosphatase gene that cause glycogen storage disease type 1a

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, J.Y.; Lei, K.J.; Shelly, L.L. [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Glycogen storage disease (GSD) type la (von Gierke disease) is caused by the deficiency of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase), the key enzyme in glucose homeostasis. The disease presents with clinical manifestations of severe hypoglycemia, hepatomegaly, growth retardation, lactic acidemia, hyperlipidemia, and hyperuricemia. We have succeeded in isolating a murine G6Pase cDNA from a normal mouse liver cDNA library by differentially screening method. We then isolated the human G6Pase cDNA and gene. To date, we have characterized the G6Pase genes of twelve GSD type la patients and uncovered a total of six different mutations. The mutations are comprised of R83C (an Arg at codon 83 to a Cys), Q347X (a Gly at codon 347 to a stop codon), 459insTA (a two basepair insertion at nucleotide 459 yielding a truncated G6Pase of 129 residues), R295C (an Arg at codon 295 to a Cys), G222R (a Gly at codon 222 to an Arg) and {delta}F327 (a codon deletion for Phe-327 at nucleotides 1058 to 1060). The relative incidences of these mutations are 37.5% (R83C), 33.3% (Q347X), 16.6% (459insTA), 4.2% (G222R), 4.2% (R295C) and 4.2% ({delta}F327). Site-directed mutagenesis and transient expression assays demonstrated that the R83C, Q347X, R295C, and {delta}F327 mutations abolished whereas the G222R mutation greatly reduced G6Pase activity. We further characterized the structure-function requirements of amino acids 83, 222, and 295 in G6Pase catalysis. The identification of mutations in GSD type la patients has unequivocally established the molecular basis of the type la disorder. Knowledge of the mutations may be applied to prenatal diagnosis and opens the way for developing and evaluating new therapeutic approaches.

  9. Genetic heterogeneity in Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome: mutations in both the CBP and EP300 genes cause disease

    OpenAIRE

    Roelfsema, J H; White, S J; Ariyürek, Y.; Bartholdi, D; Niedrist, D.; Papadia, F.; Bacino, C.A.; Dunnen, den, J.T.; Ommen, van, G.J.B; Breuning, M H; Hennekam, R C M; Peters, D.J.M.

    2005-01-01

    CREB-binding protein and p300 function as transcriptional coactivators in the regulation of gene expression through various signal-transduction pathways. Both are potent histone acetyl transferases. A certain level of CREB-binding protein is essential for normal development, since inactivation of one allele causes Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RSTS). There is a direct link between loss of acetyl transferase activity and RSTS, which indicates that the disorder is caused by aberrant chromatin regu...

  10. Developmental Deltamethrin Exposure Causes Persistent Changes in Dopaminergic Gene Expression, Neurochemistry, and Locomotor Activity in Zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung, Tiffany S; Richardson, Jason R; Cooper, Keith R; White, Lori A

    2015-08-01

    Pyrethroids are commonly used insecticides that are considered to pose little risk to human health. However, there is an increasing concern that children are more susceptible to the adverse effects of pesticides. We used the zebrafish model to test the hypothesis that developmental exposure to low doses of the pyrethroid deltamethrin results in persistent alterations in dopaminergic gene expression, neurochemistry, and locomotor activity. Zebrafish embryos were treated with deltamethrin (0.25-0.50 μg/l), at concentrations below the LOAEL, during the embryonic period [3-72 h postfertilization (hpf)], after which transferred to fresh water until the larval stage (2-weeks postfertilization). Deltamethrin exposure resulted in decreased transcript levels of the D1 dopamine (DA) receptor (drd1) and increased levels of tyrosine hydroxylase at 72 hpf. The reduction in drd1 transcripts persisted to the larval stage and was associated with decreased D2 dopamine receptor transcripts. Larval fish, exposed developmentally to deltamethrin, had increased levels of homovanillic acid, a DA metabolite. Since the DA system is involved in locomotor activity, we measured the swim activity of larval fish following a transition to darkness. Developmental exposure to deltamethrin significantly increased larval swim activity which was attenuated by concomitant knockdown of the DA transporter. Acute exposure to methylphenidate, a DA transporter inhibitor, increased swim activity in control larva, while reducing swim activity in larva developmentally exposed to deltamethrin. Developmental exposure to deltamethrin causes locomotor deficits in larval zebrafish, which is likely mediated by dopaminergic dysfunction. This highlights the need to understand the persistent effects of low-dose neurotoxicant exposure during development. PMID:25912032

  11. Gene expression patterns in transgenic mouse models of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy caused by mutations in myosin regulatory light chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wenrui; Kazmierczak, Katarzyna; Zhou, Zhiqun; Aguiar-Pulido, Vanessa; Narasimhan, Giri; Szczesna-Cordary, Danuta

    2016-07-01

    Using microarray and bioinformatics, we examined the gene expression profiles in transgenic mouse hearts expressing mutations in the myosin regulatory light chain shown to cause hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). We focused on two malignant RLC-mutations, Arginine 58→Glutamine (R58Q) and Aspartic Acid 166 → Valine (D166V), and one benign, Lysine 104 → Glutamic Acid (K104E)-mutation. Datasets of differentially expressed genes for each of three mutants were compared to those observed in wild-type (WT) hearts. The changes in the mutant vs. WT samples were shown as fold-change (FC), with stringency FC ≥ 2. Based on the gene profiles, we have identified the major signaling pathways that underlie the R58Q-, D166V- and K104E-HCM phenotypes. The correlations between different genotypes were also studied using network-based algorithms. Genes with strong correlations were clustered into one group and the central gene networks were identified for each HCM mutant. The overall gene expression patterns in all mutants were distinct from the WT profiles. Both malignant mutations shared certain classes of genes that were up or downregulated, but most similarities were noted between D166V and K104E mice, with R58Q hearts showing a distinct gene expression pattern. Our data suggest that all three HCM mice lead to cardiomyopathy in a mutation-specific manner and thus develop HCM through diverse mechanisms. PMID:26906074

  12. Polyhydramnios and cerebellar atrophy: a prenatal presentation of mitochondrial encephalomyopathy caused by mutations in the FBXL4 gene

    OpenAIRE

    Van Rij, Maartje C; Jansen, Fenna A. R.; Hellebrekers, Debby M. E. I.; Onkenhout, W.; Smeets, Hubert J M; Hendrickx, Alexandra T.; Gottschalk, Ralph W. H.; Steggerda, Sylke J; Peeters‐Scholte, Cacha M. P. C. D.; Haak, Monique C.; Hilhorst‐Hofstee, Yvonne

    2016-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Severe recessive mitochondrial myopathy caused by FBXL4 gene mutations may present prenatally with polyhydramnios and cerebellar hypoplasia. Characteristic dysmorphic features are: high and arched eyebrows, triangular face, a slight upslant of palpebral fissures, and a prominent pointed chin. Metabolic investigations invariably show increased serum lactate and pyruvate levels.

  13. Polyhydramnios and cerebellar atrophy: a prenatal presentation of mitochondrial encephalomyopathy caused by mutations in the FBXL4 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rij, Maartje C; Jansen, Fenna A R; Hellebrekers, Debby M E I; Onkenhout, W; Smeets, Hubert J M; Hendrickx, Alexandra T; Gottschalk, Ralph W H; Steggerda, Sylke J; Peeters-Scholte, Cacha M P C D; Haak, Monique C; Hilhorst-Hofstee, Yvonne

    2016-04-01

    Severe recessive mitochondrial myopathy caused by FBXL4 gene mutations may present prenatally with polyhydramnios and cerebellar hypoplasia. Characteristic dysmorphic features are: high and arched eyebrows, triangular face, a slight upslant of palpebral fissures, and a prominent pointed chin. Metabolic investigations invariably show increased serum lactate and pyruvate levels. PMID:27099744

  14. Not All SCID Pigs Are Created Equally: Two Independent Mutations in the Artemis Gene Cause SCID in Pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waide, Emily H; Dekkers, Jack C M; Ross, Jason W; Rowland, Raymond R R; Wyatt, Carol R; Ewen, Catherine L; Evans, Alyssa B; Thekkoot, Dinesh M; Boddicker, Nicholas J; Serão, Nick V L; Ellinwood, N Matthew; Tuggle, Christopher K

    2015-10-01

    Mutations in >30 genes are known to result in impairment of the adaptive immune system, causing a group of disorders collectively known as SCID. SCID disorders are split into groups based on their presence and/or functionality of B, T, and NK cells. Piglets from a line of Yorkshire pigs at Iowa State University were shown to be affected by T(-)B(-)NK(+) SCID, representing, to our knowledge, the first example of naturally occurring SCID in pigs. In this study, we present evidence for two spontaneous mutations as the molecular basis for this SCID phenotype. Flow cytometry analysis of thymocytes showed an increased frequency of immature T cells in SCID pigs. Fibroblasts from these pigs were more sensitive to ionizing radiation than non-SCID piglets, eliminating the RAG1 and RAG2 genes. Genetic and molecular analyses showed that two mutations were present in the Artemis gene, which in the homozygous or compound heterozygous state cause the immunodeficient phenotype. Rescue of SCID fibroblast radiosensitivity by human Artemis protein demonstrated that the identified Artemis mutations are the direct cause of this cellular phenotype. The work presented in the present study reveals two mutations in the Artemis gene that cause T(-)B(-)NK(+) SCID in pigs. The SCID pig can be an important biomedical model, but these mutations would be undesirable in commercial pig populations. The identified mutations and associated genetic tests can be used to address both of these issues. PMID:26320255

  15. Screening of a substance able to reduce gene damages caused by radiation. 1. Detection of gene damages caused by γ-ray by means of Ames test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study aimed to assess the mutagenicity of γ-ray by means of Ames test using Salmonella typhimurium. Production of revertant by γ-ray radiation was investigated with TA98 and TA100, ordinary indicator bacteria. Colony forming ability was determined to estimate the sensitivity to γ-ray. The sensitivity of either of the two strains showed complete linearity to the radiation dose, LD1 was 100 Gy for TA98 and 350 Gy for TA100. Although the mean number of revertant without radiation was 35 for TA98 and 63 for TA100, both of which were within the background range designated by the guideline for Ames test, it was indicated that TA98 produced revertants 2.5-3 times more than the background level at a dose ranging 10-84 Gy, whereas for TA100, the number of revertant was hardly increased by γ-radiation. Therefore, TA98 was thought to be available for screening a substance which reduces gene damages by γ-ray radiation. (M.N.)

  16. New splicing mutation in the choline kinase beta (CHKB) gene causing a muscular dystrophy detected by whole-exome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Jorge; Negrão, Luís; Fineza, Isabel; Taipa, Ricardo; Melo-Pires, Manuel; Fortuna, Ana Maria; Gonçalves, Ana Rita; Froufe, Hugo; Egas, Conceição; Santos, Rosário; Sousa, Mário

    2015-06-01

    Muscular dystrophies (MDs) are a group of hereditary muscle disorders that include two particularly heterogeneous subgroups: limb-girdle MD and congenital MD, linked to 52 different genes (seven common to both subgroups). Massive parallel sequencing technology may avoid the usual stepwise gene-by-gene analysis. We report the whole-exome sequencing (WES) analysis of a patient with childhood-onset progressive MD, also presenting mental retardation and dilated cardiomyopathy. Conventional sequencing had excluded eight candidate genes. WES of the trio (patient and parents) was performed using the ion proton sequencing system. Data analysis resorted to filtering steps using the GEMINI software revealed a novel silent variant in the choline kinase beta (CHKB) gene. Inspection of sequence alignments ultimately identified the causal variant (CHKB:c.1031+3G>C). This splice site mutation was confirmed using Sanger sequencing and its effect was further evaluated with gene expression analysis. On reassessment of the muscle biopsy, typical abnormal mitochondrial oxidative changes were observed. Mutations in CHKB have been shown to cause phosphatidylcholine deficiency in myofibers, causing a rare form of CMD (only 21 patients reported). Notwithstanding interpretative difficulties that need to be overcome before the integration of WES in the diagnostic workflow, this work corroborates its utility in solving cases from highly heterogeneous groups of diseases, in which conventional diagnostic approaches fail to provide a definitive diagnosis. PMID:25740612

  17. Digital gene expression analysis of corky split vein caused by boron deficiency in 'Newhall' Navel Orange (Citrus sinensis Osbeck for selecting differentially expressed genes related to vascular hypertrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Quan Yang

    Full Text Available Corky split vein caused by boron (B deficiency in 'Newhall' Navel Orange was studied in the present research. The boron-deficient citrus exhibited a symptom of corky split vein in mature leaves. Morphologic and anatomical surveys at four representative phases of corky split veins showed that the symptom was the result of vascular hypertrophy. Digital gene expression (DGE analysis was performed based on the Illumina HiSeq™ 2000 platform, which was applied to analyze the gene expression profilings of corky split veins at four morphologic phases. Over 5.3 million clean reads per library were successfully mapped to the reference database and more than 22897 mapped genes per library were simultaneously obtained. Analysis of the differentially expressed genes (DEGs revealed that the expressions of genes associated with cytokinin signal transduction, cell division, vascular development, lignin biosynthesis and photosynthesis in corky split veins were all affected. The expressions of WOL and ARR12 involved in the cytokinin signal transduction pathway were up-regulated at 1(st phase of corky split vein development. Furthermore, the expressions of some cell cycle genes, CYCs and CDKB, and vascular development genes, WOX4 and VND7, were up-regulated at the following 2(nd and 3(rd phases. These findings indicated that the cytokinin signal transduction pathway may play a role in initiating symptom observed in our study.

  18. Screening for mutations in the androgen receptor gene (AR) causing infertility in Syrian men using real-time PCR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    14 known point mutations in the androgen receptor gene (AR) causing male infertility were screened by real time PCR and by DNA sequencing, in order to identify point mutations in the AR gene causing infertility in azoospermic men. We screened 110 Syrian patients suffering from non-obstructive azoospermia with no chromosomal aberrations or AZF micro deletions. We discovered a new AR mutation, del 57Leu, described for the first time as a possible cause of male infertility. Furthermore, we found two patients with the Ala474Val mutation and one patient bearing the Pro390Ser mutation. Our results indicate that these mutations are significant markers for idiopathic male infertility in the Syrian society and in Mediterranean populations in general. (author)

  19. Application of biclustering of gene expression data and gene set enrichment analysis methods to identify potentially disease causing nanomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew Williams; Sabina Halappanavar

    2015-01-01

    Background: The presence of diverse types of nanomaterials (NMs) in commerce is growing at an exponential pace. As a result, human exposure to these materials in the environment is inevitable, necessitating the need for rapid and reliable toxicity testing methods to accurately assess the potential hazards associated with NMs. In this study, we applied biclustering and gene set enrichment analysis methods to derive essential features of altered lung transcriptome following exposure to NMs that...

  20. Evaluation of the gene encoding the enzyme βHPMEH for the bacterial wilt inhibition caused by Ralstonia solanacearum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Fernandez

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Ralstonia solanacearum is the causal agent of the devastating bacterial wilt disease that attacks important agricultural crops such as potato, tomato, banana, among others, causing serious yield losses. Control of R. solanacearum is difficult because of its wide range of alternate hosts, its long survival in soil, its biological and genetic variation, the lack of natural resistance sources and the insufficiency of the appropriate chemical control measures. Quorum sensing is the term that describes the phenomenon whereby the accumulation of molecules allows bacteria to know the number of bacteria found in the environment (population density. R. solanacearum has a quorum sensing system for the regulation of the expression of virulence genes; the molecule 3-OH-PAME is the self-regulatory signal. The molecule ΒHPMEH hydrolyzes 3-OH-PAME nullifying the signal of virulence, and thus, the quorum sensing communication in R. solanacearum. In order to evaluate the βhpmeh gene we designed two vectors that express this gene under the control of two different promoters. Both vectors were verified by restriction analysis and sequencing. Agroinfiltration assays were used to analyze gene expression and the effect against R. solanacearum in potato (Solanum tuberosum leaves. The results of the transient expression experiments showed that the expression of gene βhpmeh caused a delay in the appearance of symptoms of bacterial wilt and thus is a good candidate for whole genetic plant transformation.

  1. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in obesity-related genes and all-cause and cause-specific mortality: a prospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruczinski Ingo

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to examine the associations between 16 specific single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in 8 obesity-related genes and overall and cause-specific mortality. We also examined the associations between the SNPs and body mass index (BMI and change in BMI over time. Methods Data were analyzed from 9,919 individuals who participated in two large community-based cohort studies conducted in Washington County, Maryland in 1974 (CLUE I and 1989 (CLUE II. DNA from blood collected in 1989 was genotyped for 16 SNPs in 8 obesity-related genes: monoamine oxidase A (MAOA, lipoprotein lipase (LPL, paraoxonase 1 and 2 (PON1 and PON2, leptin receptor (LEPR, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα, and peroxisome proliferative activated receptor-γ and -δ (PPARG and PPARD. Data on height and weight in 1989 (CLUE II baseline and at age 21 were collected from participants at the time of blood collection. All participants were followed from 1989 to the date of death or the end of follow-up in 2005. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to obtain the relative risk (RR estimates and 95% confidence intervals (CI for each SNP and mortality outcomes. Results The results showed no patterns of association for the selected SNPs and the all-cause and cause-specific mortality outcomes, although statistically significant associations (p PPARG rs4684847 and all-cause mortality (CC: reference; CT: RR 0.99, 95% CI 0.89, 1.11; TT: RR 0.60, 95% CI 0.39, 0.93 and cancer-related mortality (CC: reference; CT: RR 1.01, 95% CI 0.82, 1.25; TT: RR 0.22, 95% CI 0.06, 0.90 and TNFα rs1799964 and cancer-related mortality (TT: reference; CT: RR 1.23, 95% CI 1.03, 1.47; CC: RR 0.83, 95% CI 0.54, 1.28. Additional analyses showed significant associations between SNPs in LEPR with BMI (rs1137101 and change in BMI over time (rs1045895 and rs1137101. Conclusion Findings from this cohort study suggest that the selected SNPs are not associated with overall

  2. A mutation in the MATP gene causes the cream coat colour in the horse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guérin Gérard

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In horses, basic colours such as bay or chestnut may be partially diluted to buckskin and palomino, or extremely diluted to cream, a nearly white colour with pink skin and blue eyes. This dilution is expected to be controlled by one gene and we used both candidate gene and positional cloning strategies to identify the "cream mutation". A horse panel including reference colours was established and typed for different markers within or in the neighbourhood of two candidate genes. Our data suggest that the causal mutation, a G to A transition, is localised in exon 2 of the MATP gene leading to an aspartic acid to asparagine substitution in the encoded protein. This conserved mutation was also described in mice and humans, but not in medaka.

  3. Deletion of the Aconitase Gene in Corynebacterium glutamicum Causes Strong Selection Pressure for Secondary Mutations Inactivating Citrate Synthase▿†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgart, Meike; Mustafi, Nurije; Krug, Andreas; Bott, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The aconitase gene acn of Corynebacterium glutamicum is regulated by four transcriptional regulators, indicating that the synthesis of this enzyme is carefully controlled. To understand the causes for this elaborate regulation, the properties of the Δacn-1 deletion mutant were analyzed in detail. The mutant was glutamate auxotrophic in glucose minimal medium, showed a strong growth defect, and secreted large amounts of acetate. None of these phenotypes could be complemented by plasmid-encoded aconitase, suggesting the presence of a secondary mutation. In fact, a point mutation within the gltA gene encoding citrate synthase was identified that caused the instability of the protein and an almost complete lack of its enzymatic activity. Subsequently, 27 further, independent Δacn clones were isolated, and 15 of them were found to contain distinct mutations in gltA, causing the loss of citrate synthase activity. A similar result was observed for mutants lacking the isocitrate dehydrogenase gene icd. In this case, 8 of 24 Δicd clones contained additional mutations in gltA. Indirect evidence was obtained that elevated intracellular citrate concentrations could be the cause of this selection pressure. Accordingly, the careful control of aconitase synthesis might have evolved due to the necessity to avoid inhibitory cytoplasmic citrate levels on the one hand and to prevent the excessive synthesis of an oxygen-sensitive protein requiring both iron and sulfur on the other hand. PMID:21984793

  4. Adaptation of respiratory chain biogenesis to cytochrome c oxidase deficiency caused by SURF1 gene mutations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kovářová, Nikola; Vrbacká-Čížková, Alena; Pecina, Petr; Stránecký, V.; Pronicka, E.; Kmoch, S.; Houštěk, Josef

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 1822, č. 7 (2012), s. 1114-1124. ISSN 0925-4439 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NS9759; GA MZd(CZ) NT12370; GA ČR(CZ) GD305/08/H037 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : mitochondrial disorder * SURF1 gene * Leigh syndrome * gene expression * oxidative phosphorylation * cytochrome c oxidase Subject RIV: FG - Pediatrics Impact factor: 4.910, year: 2012

  5. An atypical Dent's disease phenotype caused by co-inheritance of mutations at CLCN5 and OCRL genes

    OpenAIRE

    Addis, Maria; Meloni, Cristiana; Tosetto, Enrica; Ceol, Monica; Cristofaro, Rosalba; Melis, Maria Antonietta; Vercelloni, Paolo; Del Prete, Dorella; Marra, Giuseppina; Anglani, Franca

    2012-01-01

    Dent's disease is an X-linked renal tubulopathy caused by mutations mainly affecting the CLCN5 gene. Defects in the OCRL gene, which is usually mutated in patients with Lowe syndrome, have been shown to lead to a Dent-like phenotype called Dent disease 2. However, about 20% of patients with Dent's disease carry no CLCN5/OCRL mutations. The disease's genetic heterogeneity is accompanied by interfamilial and intrafamilial phenotypic heterogeneity. We report on a case of Dent's disease with a ve...

  6. A case of familial central precocious puberty caused by a novel mutation in the makorin RING finger protein 3 gene

    OpenAIRE

    Grandone, Anna; Cantelmi, Grazia; Cirillo, Grazia; Marzuillo, Pierluigi; Luongo, Caterina; Miraglia del Giudice, Emanuele; Perrone, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Background Central precocious puberty (CPP) is often familial but its genetic cause is largely unknown. Very recently, the makorin RING finger protein 3 (MKRN3) gene, located on chromosome 15 in the Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS)-associated region (15q11-q13), has been found mutated in 5 families with familial precocious puberty. The MKRN3 is a maternal imprinted gene and the phenotype is expressed only when the MKRN3 mutations are localized on the allele inherited from the father. The function ...

  7. Identification of two rare and novel large deletions in ITGB4 gene causing epidermolysis bullosa with pyloric atresia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mencía, Ángeles; García, Marta; García, Eva; Llames, Sara; Charlesworth, Alexandra; de Lucas, Raúl; Vicente, Asunción; Trujillo-Tiebas, María José; Coto, Pablo; Costa, Marta; Vera, Ángel; López-Pestaña, Arantxa; Murillas, Rodolfo; Meneguzzi, Guerrino; Jorcano, José Luis; Conti, Claudio J; Escámez Toledano, María José; Del Río Nechaevsky, Marcela

    2016-04-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa with pyloric atresia (EB-PA) is a rare autosomal recessive hereditary disease with a variable prognosis from lethal to very mild. EB-PA is classified into Simplex form (EBS-PA: OMIM #612138) and Junctional form (JEB-PA: OMIM #226730), and it is caused by mutations in ITGA6, ITGB4 and PLEC genes. We report the analysis of six patients with EB-PA, including two dizygotic twins. Skin immunofluorescence epitope mapping was performed followed by PCR and direct sequencing of the ITGB4 gene. Two of the patients presented with non-lethal EB-PA associated with missense ITGB4 gene mutations. For the other four, early postnatal demise was associated with complete lack of β4 integrin due to a variety of ITGB4 novel mutations (2 large deletions, 1 splice-site mutation and 3 missense mutations). One of the deletions spanned 278 bp, being one of the largest reported to date for this gene. Remarkably, we also found for the first time a founder effect for one novel mutation in the ITGB4 gene. We have identified 6 novel mutations in the ITGB4 gene to be added to the mutation database. Our results reveal genotype-phenotype correlations that contribute to the molecular understanding of this heterogeneous disease, a pivotal issue for prognosis and for the development of novel evidence-based therapeutic options for EB management. PMID:26739954

  8. Transcriptional regulation of PRPF31 gene expression by MSR1 repeat elements causes incomplete penetrance in retinitis pigmentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Anna M; Shah, Amna Z; Venturini, Giulia; Krishna, Abhay; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Rivolta, Carlo; Bhattacharya, Shomi S

    2016-01-01

    PRPF31-associated retinitis pigmentosa presents a fascinating enigma: some mutation carriers are blind, while others are asymptomatic. We identify the major molecular cause of this incomplete penetrance through three cardinal features: (1) there is population variation in the number (3 or 4) of a minisatellite repeat element (MSR1) adjacent to the PRPF31 core promoter; (2) in vitro, 3-copies of the MSR1 element can repress gene transcription by 50 to 115-fold; (3) the higher-expressing 4-copy allele is not observed among symptomatic PRPF31 mutation carriers and correlates with the rate of asymptomatic carriers in different populations. Thus, a linked transcriptional modifier decreases PRPF31 gene expression that leads to haploinsufficiency. This result, taken with other identified risk alleles, allows precise genetic counseling for the first time. We also demonstrate that across the human genome, the presence of MSR1 repeats in the promoters or first introns of genes is associated with greater population variability in gene expression indicating that copy number variation of MSR1s is a generic controller of gene expression and promises to provide new insights into our understanding of gene expression regulation. PMID:26781568

  9. Mutations in MODY Genes Are not Common Cause of Early-Onset Type 2 Diabetes in Mexican Families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bravo-Ríos LE

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY is a monogenic form of diabetes mellitus characterized by autosomal dominant inheritance, early age of onset and a primary insulin secretion defect. Certain MODY gene sequence variants may be involved in polygenic forms of type 2 diabetes. OBJECTIVE: We assessed the contribution of MODY genes to the etiology of type 2 early-onset diabetes in 23 Mexican families, including five with apparently autosomal dominant inheritance. PATIENTS: Twenty-three unrelated Mexican families with early-onset type 2 diabetes previously screened for the presence of glucokinase mutations, were studied. DESIGN: We screened MODY genes for sequence variants by PCR-SSCP analysis and automated sequencing. We performed a functional analysis of the HNF-1alpha P379H recombinant protein in vitro in both HeLa and RINm5f beta-cell lines. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: MODY gene mutation screening and P379H mutant protein transactivation assay. RESULTS: No mutations were detected in the HNF-4alpha, IPF-1, NEUROD1 or HNF-1beta genes in any of the families studied. A new mutation (P379H of the HNF-1alpha gene was identified in one MODY family. RINm5f and HeLa cell transfection assays revealed decreased transactivation activity of the mutant protein on the human insulin promoter. CONCLUSIONS: All known MODY genes were screened for abnormalities in this cohort of early-onset diabetes families which included 5 MODY pedigrees. We identified a new HNF-1alpha MODY mutation (P379H and demonstrated that it reduces the transactivation potential of the mutant protein on the human insulin promoter. No other mutation was identified in this cohort indicating that abnormalities in MODY genes are generally not a common cause of early-onset diabetes and this includes MODY families in Mexico.

  10. Familial Dysalbuminemic Hyperthyroxinemia in a Japanese Man Caused by a Point Albumin Gene Mutation (R218P)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osaki, Yoshinori; Hayashi, Yoshitaka; Nakagawa, Yoshinori; Yoshida, Katsumi; Ozaki, Hiroshi; Fukazawa, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Familial dysalbuminemic hyperthyroxinemia (FDH) is a familial autosomal dominant disease caused by mutation in the albumin gene that produces a condition of euthyroid hyperthyroxinemia. In patients with FDH, serum-free thyroxine (FT4) and free triiodothyronine (FT3) concentrations as measured by several commercial methods are often falsely increased with normal thyrotropin (TSH). Therefore, several diagnostic steps are needed to differentiate TSH-secreting tumor or generalized resistance to thyroid hormone from FDH. We herein report a case of a Japanese man born in Aomori prefecture, with FDH caused by a mutant albumin gene (R218P). We found that a large number of FDH patients reported in Japan to date might have been born in Aomori prefecture and have shown the R218P mutation. In conclusion, FDH needs to be considered among the differential diagnoses in Japanese patients born in Aomori prefecture and showing normal TSH levels and elevated FT4 levels. PMID:27081329

  11. Changes of a continuous character caused by gene flow. A Monte Carlo study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sznajd-Weron, Katarzyna; Pȩkalski, Andrzej

    We introduce a model of a large, sexual, population in which partners for reproduction are chosen randomly, without any bias. This large population is composed of two groups of local populations living in different environments and being in contact. We propose a dynamic equation describing, like the existing one for the allele frequency, the temporal changes of a continuous character due to gene flow, i.e. the transfer of the allels resulting from migration of individuals between the populations, and natural selection. We show that the gene flow can be described by the linear term in the proposed equation and the natural selection by the nonlinear term. Additional killing rule introduces a random factor into our model. We discuss the role of both factors (gene flow and selection) on the structure of the population, i.e. spatial distribution of the considered character and the resulting from it existence of hybrid zones. We use the standard Monte Carlo simulations.

  12. An atypical Dent's disease phenotype caused by co-inheritance of mutations at CLCN5 and OCRL genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addis, Maria; Meloni, Cristiana; Tosetto, Enrica; Ceol, Monica; Cristofaro, Rosalba; Melis, Maria Antonietta; Vercelloni, Paolo; Del Prete, Dorella; Marra, Giuseppina; Anglani, Franca

    2013-06-01

    Dent's disease is an X-linked renal tubulopathy caused by mutations mainly affecting the CLCN5 gene. Defects in the OCRL gene, which is usually mutated in patients with Lowe syndrome, have been shown to lead to a Dent-like phenotype called Dent disease 2. However, about 20% of patients with Dent's disease carry no CLCN5/OCRL mutations. The disease's genetic heterogeneity is accompanied by interfamilial and intrafamilial phenotypic heterogeneity. We report on a case of Dent's disease with a very unusual phenotype (dysmorphic features, ocular abnormalities, growth delay, rickets, mild mental retardation) in which a digenic inheritance was discovered. Two different, novel disease-causing mutations were detected, both inherited from the patient's healthy mother, that is a truncating mutation in the CLCN5 gene (A249fs*20) and a donor splice-site alteration in the OCRL gene (c.388+3A>G). The mRNA analysis of the patient's leukocytes revealed an aberrantly spliced OCRL mRNA caused by in-frame exon 6 skipping, leading to a shorter protein, but keeping intact the central inositol 5-phosphatase domain and the C-terminal side of the ASH-RhoGAP domain. Only wild-type mRNA was observed in the mother's leukocytes due to a completely skewed X inactivation. Our results are the first to reveal the effect of an epistatic second modifier in Dent's disease too, which can modulate its expressivity. We surmise that the severe Dent disease 2 phenotype of our patient might be due to an addictive interaction of the mutations at two different genes. PMID:23047739

  13. Modulation of gene expression in a human cell line caused by poliovirus, vaccinia virus and interferon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoddevik Gunnar

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The project was initiated to describe the response of a human embryonic fibroblast cell line to the replication of two different viruses, and, more specifically, to look for candidate genes involved in viral defense. For this purpose, the cells were synchronously infected with poliovirus in the absence or presence of interferon-alpha, or with vaccinia virus, a virus that is not inhibited by interferon. By comparing the changes in transcriptosome due to these different challenges, it should be possible to suggest genes that might be involved in defense. Results The viral titers were sufficient to yield productive infection in a majority of the cells. The cells were harvested in triplicate at various time-points, and the transcriptosome compared with mock infected cells using oligo-based, global 35 k microarrays. While there was very limited similarities in the response to the different viruses, a large proportion of the genes up-regulated by interferon-alpha were also up-regulated by poliovirus. Interferon-alpha inhibited poliovirus replication, but there were no signs of any interferons being induced by poliovirus. The observations suggest that the cells do launch an antiviral response to poliovirus in the absence of interferon. Analyses of the data led to a list of candidate antiviral genes. Functional information was limited, or absent, for most of the candidate genes. Conclusion The data are relevant for our understanding of how the cells respond to poliovirus and vaccinia virus infection. More annotations, and more microarray studies with related viruses, are required in order to narrow the list of putative defence-related genes.

  14. Mutations of SCN4A gene cause different diseases: 2 case reports and literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Xiao-Li; Huang, Xiao-Jun; LUAN Xing-hua; Zhou, Hai-Yan; Wang, Tian; Wang, Jing-yi; Chen, Sheng-Di; Tang, Hui-Dong; Cao, Li

    2015-01-01

    SCN4A encodes the Nav1.4 channel and mutations in SCN4A lead to different ionic channelopathies. In this study, one sporadic individual of periodic paralysis, one paramyotonia family and 200 normal healthy controls are enrolled. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood leukocytes, followed by polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing of candidate genes, including SCN4A and CACNA1S. As a result, heterozygous mutations c.2024G>A (R675Q) and c.1333G>A (V445M) of gene SCN4A were identif...

  15. Mutations in C10orf11, a Melanocyte-Differentiation Gene, Cause Autosomal-Recessive Albinism

    OpenAIRE

    Grønskov, Karen; Dooley, Christopher M.; Østergaard, Elsebet; Kelsh, Robert N.; Hansen, Lars; Levesque, Mitchell P.; Vilhelmsen, Kaj; Møllgård, Kjeld; Stemple, Derek L.; Rosenberg, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Autosomal-recessive albinism is a hypopigmentation disorder with a broad phenotypic range. A substantial fraction of individuals with albinism remain genetically unresolved, and it has been hypothesized that more genes are to be identified. By using homozygosity mapping of an inbred Faroese family, we identified a 3.5 Mb homozygous region (10q22.2–q22.3) on chromosome 10. The region contains five protein-coding genes, and sequencing of one of these, C10orf11, revealed a nonsense mutation that...

  16. Novel mutations in the SCNN1A gene causing Pseudohypoaldosteronism type 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Wang

    Full Text Available Pseudohypoaldosteronism type 1 (PHA1 is a rare inherited disease characterized by resistance to the actions of aldosterone. Mutations in the subunit genes (SCNN1A, SCNN1B, SCNN1G of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC and the NR3C2 gene encoding the mineralocorticoid receptor, result in systemic PHA1 and renal PHA1 respectively. Common clinical manifestations of PHA1 include salt wasting, hyperkalaemia, metabolic acidosis and elevated plasma aldosterone levels in the neonatal period. In this study, we describe the clinical and biochemical manifestations in two Chinese patients with systemic PHA1. Sequence analysis of the SCNN1A gene revealed a compound heterozygous mutation (c.1311delG and c.1439+1G>C in one patient and a homozygous mutation (c.814_815insG in another patient, all three variants are novel. Further analysis of the splicing pattern in a minigene construct showed that the c.1439+1G>C mutation can lead to the retainment of intron 9 as the 5'-donor splice site disappears during post-transcriptional processing of mRNA. In conclusion, our study identified three novel SCNN1A gene mutations in two Chinese patients with systemic PHA1.

  17. Whispering dysphonia (DYT4 dystonia) is caused by a mutation in the TUBB4 gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lohmann, Katja; Wilcox, Robert A.; Winkler, Susen; Ramirez, Alfredo; Rakovic, Aleksandar; Park, Jin-Sung; Arns, Bjoern; Lohnau, Thora; Kasten, Meike; Brueggemann, Norbert; Hagenah, Johann; Schmidt, Alexander; Kaiser, Frank J.; Kumar, Kishore R.; Zschiedrich, Katja; Alvarez-Fischer, Daniel; Altenmueller, Eckart; Ferbert, Andreas; Lang, Anthony E.; Muenchau, Alexander; Kostic, Vladimir; Simonyan, Kristina; Agzarian, Marc; Ozelius, Laurie J.; Langeveld, Antonius P. M.; Sue, Carolyn M.; Tijssen, Marina A. J.; Klein, Christine; Groen, Justus

    2013-01-01

    Objective A study was undertaken to identify the gene underlying DYT4 dystonia, a dominantly inherited form of spasmodic dysphonia combined with other focal or generalized dystonia and a characteristic facies and body habitus, in an Australian family. Methods Genome-wide linkage analysis was carried

  18. Murine muscular dystrophy caused by a mutation in the laminin alpha 2 (Lama2) gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, H; Wu, X R; Wewer, U M;

    1994-01-01

    The classic murine muscular dystrophy strain, dy, was first described almost 40 years ago. We have identified the molecular basis of an allele of dy, called dy2J, by detecting a mutation in the laminin alpha 2 chain gene--the first identified mutation in laminin-2. The G to A mutation in a splice...

  19. Mutations in the polyglutamine binding protein 1 gene cause X-linked mental retardation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalscheuer, VM; Freude, K; Musante, L; Jensen, LR; Yntema, HG; Gecz, J; Sefiani, A; Hoffmann, K; Moser, B; Haas, S; Gurok, U; Haesler, S; Aranda, B; Nshedjan, A; Tzschach, A; Hartmann, N; Roloff, TC; Shoichet, S; Hagens, O; Tao, J; van Bokhoven, H; Turner, G; Chelly, J; Moraine, C; Fryns, JP; Nuber, U; Hoeltzenbein, M; Scharff, C; Scherthan, H; Lenzner, S; Hamel, BCJ; Schweiger, S; Ropers, HH

    2003-01-01

    We found mutations in the gene PQBP1 in 5 of 29 families with nonsyndromic (MRX) and syndromic (MRXS) forms of X-linked mental retardation (XLMR). Clinical features in affected males include mental retardation, microcephaly, short stature, spastic paraplegia and midline defects. PQBP1 has previously

  20. A mutation in the rice chalcone isomerase gene causes the golden hull and internode 1 phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Lilan; Qian, Qian; Tang, Ding; Wang, Kejian; Li, Ming; Cheng, Zhukuan

    2012-07-01

    The biosynthesis of flavonoids, important secondary plant metabolites, has been investigated extensively, but few mutants of genes in this pathway have been identified in rice (Oryza sativa). The rice gold hull and internode (gh) mutants exhibit a reddish-brown pigmentation in the hull and internode and their phenotype has long been used as a morphological marker trait for breeding and genetic study. Here, we characterized that the gh1 mutant was a mutant of the rice chalcone isomerase gene (OsCHI). The result showed that gh1 had a Dasheng retrotransposon inserted in the 5′ UTR of the OsCHI gene, which resulted in the complete loss of OsCHI expression. gh1 exhibited golden pigmentation in hulls and internodes once the panicles were exposed to light. The total flavonoid content in gh1 hulls was increased threefold compared to wild type. Consistent with the gh1 phenotype, OsCHI transcripts were expressed in most tissues of rice and most abundantly in internodes. It was also expressed at high levels in panicles before heading, distributed mainly in lemmas and paleae, but its expression decreased substantially after the panicles emerged from the sheath. OsCHI encodes a protein functionally and structurally conserved to chalcone isomerases in other species. Our findings demonstrated that the OsCHI gene was indispensable for flux of the flavonoid pathway in rice. PMID:22286805

  1. Mutations in the polyglutamine binding protein 1 gene cause X-linked mental retardation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalscheuer, Vera M; Freude, Kristine; Musante, Luciana;

    2003-01-01

    We found mutations in the gene PQBP1 in 5 of 29 families with nonsyndromic (MRX) and syndromic (MRXS) forms of X-linked mental retardation (XLMR). Clinical features in affected males include mental retardation, microcephaly, short stature, spastic paraplegia and midline defects. PQBP1 has...

  2. Environmental and chemotherapeutic agents induce breakage at genes involved in leukemia-causing gene rearrangements in human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thys, Ryan G., E-mail: rthys@wakehealth.edu [Department of Cancer Biology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Medical Center Boulevard, Winston-Salem, NC 27157-1016 (United States); Lehman, Christine E., E-mail: clehman@wakehealth.edu [Department of Cancer Biology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Medical Center Boulevard, Winston-Salem, NC 27157-1016 (United States); Pierce, Levi C.T., E-mail: Levipierce@gmail.com [Human Longevity, Inc., San Diego, California 92121 (United States); Wang, Yuh-Hwa, E-mail: yw4b@virginia.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics, University of Virginia, 1340 Jefferson Park Avenue, Charlottesville, VA 22908-0733 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Environmental/chemotherapeutic agents cause DNA breakage in MLL and CBFB in HSPCs. • Diethylnitrosamine-induced DNA breakage at MLL and CBFB shown for the first time. • Chemical-induced DNA breakage occurs at topoisomerase II cleavage sites. • Chemical-induced DNA breaks display a pattern similar to those in leukemia patients. • Long-term exposures suggested to generate DNA breakage at leukemia-related genes. - Abstract: Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) give rise to all of the cells that make up the hematopoietic system in the human body, making their stability and resilience especially important. Damage to these cells can severely impact cell development and has the potential to cause diseases, such as leukemia. Leukemia-causing chromosomal rearrangements have largely been studied in the context of radiation exposure and are formed by a multi-step process, including an initial DNA breakage and fusion of the free DNA ends. However, the mechanism for DNA breakage in patients without previous radiation exposure is unclear. Here, we investigate the role of non-cytotoxic levels of environmental factors, benzene, and diethylnitrosamine (DEN), and chemotherapeutic agents, etoposide, and doxorubicin, in generating DNA breakage at the patient breakpoint hotspots of the MLL and CBFB genes in human HSPCs. These conditions represent exposure to chemicals encountered daily or residual doses from chemotherapeutic drugs. Exposure of HSPCs to non-cytotoxic levels of environmental chemicals or chemotherapeutic agents causes DNA breakage at preferential sites in the human genome, including the leukemia-related genes MLL and CBFB. Though benzene, etoposide, and doxorubicin have previously been linked to leukemia formation, this is the first study to demonstrate a role for DEN in the generation of DNA breakage at leukemia-specific sites. These chemical-induced DNA breakpoints coincide with sites of predicted topoisomerase II cleavage. The

  3. Environmental and chemotherapeutic agents induce breakage at genes involved in leukemia-causing gene rearrangements in human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Environmental/chemotherapeutic agents cause DNA breakage in MLL and CBFB in HSPCs. • Diethylnitrosamine-induced DNA breakage at MLL and CBFB shown for the first time. • Chemical-induced DNA breakage occurs at topoisomerase II cleavage sites. • Chemical-induced DNA breaks display a pattern similar to those in leukemia patients. • Long-term exposures suggested to generate DNA breakage at leukemia-related genes. - Abstract: Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) give rise to all of the cells that make up the hematopoietic system in the human body, making their stability and resilience especially important. Damage to these cells can severely impact cell development and has the potential to cause diseases, such as leukemia. Leukemia-causing chromosomal rearrangements have largely been studied in the context of radiation exposure and are formed by a multi-step process, including an initial DNA breakage and fusion of the free DNA ends. However, the mechanism for DNA breakage in patients without previous radiation exposure is unclear. Here, we investigate the role of non-cytotoxic levels of environmental factors, benzene, and diethylnitrosamine (DEN), and chemotherapeutic agents, etoposide, and doxorubicin, in generating DNA breakage at the patient breakpoint hotspots of the MLL and CBFB genes in human HSPCs. These conditions represent exposure to chemicals encountered daily or residual doses from chemotherapeutic drugs. Exposure of HSPCs to non-cytotoxic levels of environmental chemicals or chemotherapeutic agents causes DNA breakage at preferential sites in the human genome, including the leukemia-related genes MLL and CBFB. Though benzene, etoposide, and doxorubicin have previously been linked to leukemia formation, this is the first study to demonstrate a role for DEN in the generation of DNA breakage at leukemia-specific sites. These chemical-induced DNA breakpoints coincide with sites of predicted topoisomerase II cleavage. The

  4. Analysis of disease-causing GATA1 mutations in murine gene complementation systems

    OpenAIRE

    Campbell, Amy E.; Wilkinson-White, Lorna; Mackay, Joel P.; Matthews, Jacqueline M.; Blobel, Gerd A.

    2013-01-01

    Disease-causing mutations in GATA1 impair binding to the cofactors FOG1 or TAL1 but not DNA.Different substitutions at the same residue selectively disrupt FOG1 or TAL1 binding leading to distinct disease phenotypes.

  5. A stop-gain in the laminin, alpha 3 gene causes recessive junctional epidermolysis bullosa in Belgian Blue cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartelet, Arnaud; Harland, Chad; Tamma, Nico; Karim, Latifa; Bayrou, Calixte; Li, Wanbo; Ahariz, Naima; Coppieters, Wouter; Georges, Michel; Charlier, Carole

    2015-10-01

    Four newborn purebred Belgian Blue calves presenting a severe form of epidermolysis bullosa were recently referred to our heredo-surveillance platform. SNP array genotyping followed by autozygosity mapping located the causative gene in a 8.3-Mb interval on bovine chromosome 24. Combining information from (i) whole-genome sequencing of an affected calf, (ii) transcriptomic data from a panel of tissues and (iii) a list of functionally ranked positional candidates pinpointed a private G to A nucleotide substitution in the LAMA3 gene that creates a premature stop codon (p.Arg2609*) in exon 60, truncating 22% of the corresponding protein. The LAMA3 gene encodes the alpha 3 subunit of the heterotrimeric laminin-332, a key constituent of the lamina lucida that is part of the skin basement membrane connecting epidermis and dermis layers. Homozygous loss-of-function mutations in this gene are known to cause severe junctional epidermolysis bullosa in human, mice, horse, sheep and dog. Overall, our data strongly support the causality of the identified gene and mutation. PMID:26370913

  6. Screening and analysis of genes expressed upon infection of broad bean with Clover yellow vein virus causing lethal necrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzuki Yuji

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Clover yellow vein virus (ClYVV causes lethal systemic necrosis in legumes, including broad bean (Vicia faba and pea (Pisum sativum. To identify host genes involved in necrotic symptom expression after ClYVV infection, we screened cDNA fragments in which expression was changed in advance of necrotic symptom expression in broad bean (V. faba cv. Wase using the differential display technique and secondarily with Northern blot analysis. Expression changes were confirmed in 20 genes, and the six that exhibited the most change were analyzed further. These six genes included a gene that encodes a putative nitrate-induced NOI protein (VfNOI, and another was homologous to an Arabidopsis gene that encodes a glycine- and proline-rich protein GPRP (VfGPRP. We recently reported that necrotic symptom development in ClYVV-infected pea is associated with expression of salicylic acid (SA-dependent pathogenesis-related (PR proteins and requires SA-dependent host responses. Interestingly, VfNOI and VfGPRP expression was correlated with that of the putative SA-dependent PR proteins in ClYVV-infected broad bean. However, broad bean infected with a recombinant ClYVV expressing the VfGPRP protein showed weaker symptoms and less viral multiplication than that infected with ClYVV expressing the GFP protein. These results imply that VfGPRP plays a role in defense against ClYVV rather than in necrotic symptom expression.

  7. Screening and analysis of genes expressed upon infection of broad bean with Clover yellow vein virus causing lethal necrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahara, Kenji S; Kitazawa, Hiroaki; Atsumi, Go; Choi, Sun Hee; Suzuki, Yuji; Uyeda, Ichiro

    2011-01-01

    Clover yellow vein virus (ClYVV) causes lethal systemic necrosis in legumes, including broad bean (Vicia faba) and pea (Pisum sativum). To identify host genes involved in necrotic symptom expression after ClYVV infection, we screened cDNA fragments in which expression was changed in advance of necrotic symptom expression in broad bean (V. faba cv. Wase) using the differential display technique and secondarily with Northern blot analysis. Expression changes were confirmed in 20 genes, and the six that exhibited the most change were analyzed further. These six genes included a gene that encodes a putative nitrate-induced NOI protein (VfNOI), and another was homologous to an Arabidopsis gene that encodes a glycine- and proline-rich protein GPRP (VfGPRP). We recently reported that necrotic symptom development in ClYVV-infected pea is associated with expression of salicylic acid (SA)-dependent pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins and requires SA-dependent host responses. Interestingly, VfNOI and VfGPRP expression was correlated with that of the putative SA-dependent PR proteins in ClYVV-infected broad bean. However, broad bean infected with a recombinant ClYVV expressing the VfGPRP protein showed weaker symptoms and less viral multiplication than that infected with ClYVV expressing the GFP protein. These results imply that VfGPRP plays a role in defense against ClYVV rather than in necrotic symptom expression. PMID:21767375

  8. Permanent Neonatal Diabetes Caused by Creation of an Ectopic Splice Site within the INS Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastaldo, Elena; Harries, Lorna W.; Rubio-Cabezas, Oscar; Castaño, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to characterize the genetic etiology in a patient who presented with permanent neonatal diabetes at 2 months of age. Methodology/Principal Findings Regulatory elements and coding exons 2 and 3 of the INS gene were amplified and sequenced from genomic and complementary DNA samples. A novel heterozygous INS mutation within the terminal intron of the gene was identified in the proband and her affected father. This mutation introduces an ectopic splice site leading to the insertion of 29 nucleotides from the intronic sequence into the mature mRNA, which results in a longer and abnormal transcript. Conclusions/Significance This study highlights the importance of routinely sequencing the exon-intron boundaries and the need to carry out additional studies to confirm the pathogenicity of any identified intronic genetic variants. PMID:22235272

  9. Mutations in c10orf11, a melanocyte-differentiation gene, cause autosomal-recessive albinism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønskov, Karen; Dooley, Christopher M; Østergaard, Elsebet;

    2013-01-01

    Autosomal-recessive albinism is a hypopigmentation disorder with a broad phenotypic range. A substantial fraction of individuals with albinism remain genetically unresolved, and it has been hypothesized that more genes are to be identified. By using homozygosity mapping of an inbred Faroese family......, we identified a 3.5 Mb homozygous region (10q22.2-q22.3) on chromosome 10. The region contains five protein-coding genes, and sequencing of one of these, C10orf11, revealed a nonsense mutation that segregated with the disease and showed a recessive inheritance pattern. Investigation of additional...... individual originating from Lithuania. Immunohistochemistry showed localization of C10orf11 in melanoblasts and melanocytes in human fetal tissue, but no localization was seen in retinal pigment epithelial cells. Knockdown of the zebrafish (Danio rerio) homolog with the use of morpholinos resulted in...

  10. A Hybrid CFHR3-1 Gene Causes Familial C3 Glomerulopathy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Malik, Talat H

    2012-07-01

    Controlled activation of the complement system, a key component of innate immunity, enables destruction of pathogens with minimal damage to host tissue. Complement factor H (CFH), which inhibits complement activation, and five CFH-related proteins (CFHR1-5) compose a family of structurally related molecules. Combined deletion of CFHR3 and CFHR1 is common and confers a protective effect in IgA nephropathy. Here, we report an autosomal dominant complement-mediated GN associated with abnormal increases in copy number across the CFHR3 and CFHR1 loci. In addition to normal copies of these genes, affected individuals carry a unique hybrid CFHR3-1 gene. In addition to identifying an association between these genetic observations and complement-mediated kidney disease, these results provide insight into the protective role of the combined deletion of CFHR3 and CFHR1 in IgA nephropathy.

  11. Mutation of the Erwinia amylovora argD gene causes arginine auxotrophy, nonpathogenicity in apples, and reduced virulence in pears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Laura S; Lehman, Brian L; Peter, Kari A; McNellis, Timothy W

    2014-11-01

    Fire blight is caused by Erwinia amylovora and is the most destructive bacterial disease of apples and pears worldwide. In this study, we found that E. amylovora argD(1000)::Tn5, an argD Tn5 transposon mutant that has the Tn5 transposon inserted after nucleotide 999 in the argD gene-coding region, was an arginine auxotroph that did not cause fire blight in apple and had reduced virulence in immature pear fruits. The E. amylovora argD gene encodes a predicted N-acetylornithine aminotransferase enzyme, which is involved in the production of the amino acid arginine. A plasmid-borne copy of the wild-type argD gene complemented both the nonpathogenic and the arginine auxotrophic phenotypes of the argD(1000)::Tn5 mutant. However, even when mixed with virulent E. amylovora cells and inoculated onto immature apple fruit, the argD(1000)::Tn5 mutant still failed to grow, while the virulent strain grew and caused disease. Furthermore, the pCR2.1-argD complementation plasmid was stably maintained in the argD(1000)::Tn5 mutant growing in host tissues without any antibiotic selection. Therefore, the pCR2.1-argD complementation plasmid could be useful for the expression of genes, markers, and reporters in E. amylovora growing in planta, without concern about losing the plasmid over time. The ArgD protein cannot be considered an E. amylovora virulence factor because the argD(1000)::Tn5 mutant was auxotrophic and had a primary metabolism defect. Nevertheless, these results are informative about the parasitic nature of the fire blight disease interaction, since they indicate that E. amylovora cannot obtain sufficient arginine from apple and pear fruit tissues or from apple vegetative tissues, either at the beginning of the infection process or after the infection has progressed to an advanced state. PMID:25172854

  12. Sudden death caused by Staphylococcus aureus carrying Panton–Valentine leukocidin gene in a young girl

    OpenAIRE

    Trieu, Thanh-Van; Gaudelus, Joel; Lefevre, Sophie; Teychene, Anne Marie; Poilane, Isabelle; Colignon, Anne; Etienne, Jerome; de Pontual, Loïc

    2009-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus carrying the Panton–Valentine leukocidin (PVL) gene could be the source of both recurrent furunculosis or abscesses and severe infections, mainly necrotising pneumonia. We present the case of a young girl from consanguineous parents who died suddenly. The postmortem examination revealed necrotising pneumonia due to a PVL producing Staphylococcus aureus strain, raising the question of the role of the host’s immune status in this infection.

  13. Expression of the Reverse Tetracycline-Transactivator Gene Causes Emphysema-Like Changes in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Sisson, Thomas H.; Hansen, Jean M.; Shah, Mitali; Hanson, Kerstin E.; Du, Ming; Ling, Tony; Simon, Richard H.; Christensen, Paul J.

    2006-01-01

    The doxycycline-inducible, gene regulatory system allows tight control of transgene expression for the study of organ development and disease pathogenesis. Multiple recent reports have employed this model to investigate various lung diseases including emphysema. For our study, we used this transgenic system to test whether prolonged, lung-specific, overexpression of the serine protease urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) would result in alveolar wall destruction. Double transgenic mice were...

  14. Combination of Thrombophilic Gene Polymorphisms as a Cause of Increased the Risk of Recurrent Pregnancy Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Torabi, Raheleh; ZAREI, Saeed; Zeraati, Hojjat; Zarnani, Amir Hassan; Akhondi, Mohammad mehdi; Hadavi, Reza; Shiraz, Elham Savadi; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood

    2012-01-01

    Background Recurrent pregnancy loss is (RPL) a heterogeneous condition. While the role of acquired thrombophilia has been accepted as an etiology for RPL, the contribution of specific inherited thrombophilic gene polymorphisms to the disorder has been remained controversial. Methods One hundred women with a history of two or more consecutive abortions and 100 women with at least two live births and no miscarriages were included in the study and evaluated for the presence of 11 thrombophilic g...

  15. Mutations in DDR2 gene cause SMED with short limbs and abnormal calcifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargal, Ruth; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; Ben-Neriah, Ziva; Le Merrer, Martine; Sosna, Jacob; Melki, Judith; Zangen, David H; Smithson, Sarah F; Borochowitz, Zvi; Belostotsky, Ruth; Raas-Rothschild, Annick

    2009-01-01

    The spondylo-meta-epiphyseal dysplasia [SMED] short limb-hand type [SMED-SL] is a rare autosomal-recessive disease, first reported by Borochowitz et al. in 1993.(1) Since then, 14 affected patients have been reported.(2-5) We diagnosed 6 patients from 5 different consanguineous Arab Muslim families from the Jerusalem area with SMED-SL. Additionally, we studied two patients from Algerian and Pakistani ancestry and the parents of the first Jewish patients reported.(1) Using a homozygosity mapping strategy, we located a candidate region on chromosome 1q23 spanning 2.4 Mb. The position of the Discoidin Domain Receptor 2 (DDR2) gene within the candidate region and the similarity of the ddr2 knockout mouse to the SMED patients' phenotype prompted us to study this gene(6). We identified three missense mutations c.2254 C > T [R752C], c. 2177 T > G [I726R], c.2138C > T [T713I] and one splice site mutation [IVS17+1g > a] in the conserved sequence encoding the tyrosine kinase domain of the DDR2 gene. The results of this study will permit an accurate early prenatal diagnosis and carrier screening for families at risk. PMID:19110212

  16. Deletion of Indian hedgehog gene causes dominant semi-lethal Creeper trait in chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Sihua; Zhu, Feng; Wang, Yanyun; Yi, Guoqiang; Li, Junying; Lian, Ling; Zheng, Jiangxia; Xu, Guiyun; Jiao, Rengang; Gong, Yu; Hou, Zhuocheng; Yang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    The Creeper trait, a classical monogenic phenotype of chicken, is controlled by a dominant semi-lethal gene. This trait has been widely cited in the genetics and molecular biology textbooks for illustrating autosomal dominant semi-lethal inheritance over decades. However, the genetic basis of the Creeper trait remains unknown. Here we have utilized ultra-deep sequencing and extensive analysis for targeting causative mutation controlling the Creeper trait. Our results indicated that the deletion of Indian hedgehog (IHH) gene was only found in the whole-genome sequencing data of lethal embryos and Creeper chickens. Large scale segregation analysis demonstrated that the deletion of IHH was fully linked with early embryonic death and the Creeper trait. Expression analysis showed a much lower expression of IHH in Creeper than wild-type chickens. We therefore suggest the deletion of IHH to be the causative mutation for the Creeper trait in chicken. Our findings unravel the genetic basis of the longstanding Creeper phenotype mystery in chicken as the same gene also underlies bone dysplasia in human and mouse, and thus highlight the significance of IHH in animal development and human haploinsufficiency disorders. PMID:27439785

  17. Mfsd14a (Hiat1) gene disruption causes globozoospermia and infertility in male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doran, Joanne; Walters, Cara; Kyle, Victoria; Wooding, Peter; Hammett-Burke, Rebecca; Colledge, William Henry

    2016-07-01

    The Mfsd14a gene, previously called Hiat1, encodes a transmembrane protein of unknown function with homology to the solute carrier protein family. To study the function of the MFSD14A protein, mutant mice (Mus musculus, strain 129S6Sv/Ev) were generated with the Mfsd14a gene disrupted with a LacZ reporter gene. Homozygous mutant mice are viable and healthy, but males are sterile due to a 100-fold reduction in the number of spermatozoa in the vas deferens. Male mice have adequate levels of testosterone and show normal copulatory behaviour. The few spermatozoa that are formed show rounded head defects similar to those found in humans with globozoospermia. Spermatogenesis proceeds normally up to the round spermatid stage, but the subsequent structural changes associated with spermiogenesis are severely disrupted with failure of acrosome formation, sperm head condensation and mitochondrial localization to the mid-piece of the sperm. Staining for β-galactosidase activity as a surrogate for Mfsd14a expression indicates expression in Sertoli cells, suggesting that MFSD14A may transport a solute from the bloodstream that is required for spermiogenesis. PMID:27107036

  18. Becker Muscular Dystrophy (BMD) caused by duplication of exons 3-6 of the dystrophin gene presenting as dilated cardiomyopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, A.C.; Allingham-Hawkins, D.J.; Becker, L. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy (XLCM) is a progressive myocardial disease presenting with congestive heart failure in teenage males without clinical signs of skeletal myopathy. Tight linkage of XLCM to the DMD locus has been demonstrated; it has been suggested that, at least in some families, XLCM is a {open_quotes}dystrophinopathy.{close_quotes} We report a 14-year-old boy who presented with acute heart failure due to dilated cardiomyopathy. He had no history of muscle weakness, but physical examination revealed pseudohypertrophy of the calf muscles. He subsequently received a heart transplantation. Family history was negative. Serum CK level at the time of diagnosis was 10,416. Myocardial biopsy showed no evidence of carditis. Dystrophin staining of cardiac and skeletal muscle with anti-sera to COOH and NH{sub 2}termini showed a patchy distribution of positivity suggestive of Becker muscular dystrophy. Analysis of 18 of the 79 dystrophin exons detected a duplication that included exons 3-6. The proband`s mother has an elevated serum CK and was confirmed to be a carrier of the same duplication. A mutation in the muscle promotor region of the dystrophin gene has been implicated in the etiology of SLCM. However, Towbin et al. (1991) argued that other 5{prime} mutations in the dystrophin gene could cause selective cardiomyopathy. The findings in our patient support the latter hypothesis. This suggests that there are multiple regions in the dystrophin gene which, when disrupted, can cause isolated dilated cardiomyopathy.

  19. Hypotrichosis and juvenile macular dystrophy caused by CDH3 mutation: A candidate disease for retinal gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mandeep S; Broadgate, Suzanne; Mathur, Ranjana; Holt, Richard; Halford, Stephanie; MacLaren, Robert E

    2016-01-01

    Hypotrichosis with juvenile macular dystrophy (HJMD) is an autosomal recessive disorder that causes childhood visual impairment. HJMD is caused by mutations in CDH3 which encodes cadherin-3, a protein expressed in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells that may have a key role in intercellular adhesion. We present a case of HJMD and analyse its phenotypic and molecular characteristics to assess the potential for retinal gene therapy as a means of preventing severe visual loss in this condition. Longitudinal in vivo imaging of the retina showed the relative anatomical preservation of the macula, which suggested the presence of a therapeutic window for gene augmentation therapy to preserve visual acuity. The coding sequence of CDH3 fits within the packaging limit of recombinant adeno-associated virus vectors that have been shown to be safe in clinical trials and can efficiently target RPE cells. This report expands the number of reported cases of HJMD and highlights the phenotypic characteristics to consider when selecting candidates for retinal gene therapy. PMID:27157923

  20. Disordered Cell Integrity Signaling Caused by Disruption of the kexB Gene in Aspergillus oryzae†

    OpenAIRE

    Mizutani, Osamu; Nojima, Akira; Yamamoto, Morimasa; Furukawa, Kentaro; Fujioka, Tomonori; Yamagata, Youhei; Abe, Keietsu; Nakajima, Tasuku

    2004-01-01

    We isolated the kexB gene, which encodes a subtilisin-like processing enzyme, from a filamentous fungus, Aspergillus oryzae. To examine the physiological role of kexB in A. oryzae, we constructed a kexB disruptant (ΔkexB), which formed shrunken colonies with poor generation of conidia on Czapek-Dox (CD) agar plates and hyperbranched mycelia in CD liquid medium. The phenotypes of the ΔkexB strain were restored under high osmolarity in both solid and liquid culture conditions. We found that tra...

  1. Aberrant splicing and missense mutations cause steroid 21-hydroxylase [P-450(C21)] deficiency in humans: Possible gene conversion products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four steroid 21-hydroxylase B [P-450(C21)B] genes (designated P.7, P.10-1, P.10-2, and P.3) from three P-450(C21)-deficient patients were isolated to analyze their structures and functions. Several base changes were observed in the sequences of the four P-450(C21)B genes as compared to that of the functional B gene. Many of these base changes were identical to those of the P-450(C21)A pseudogene. The three DNAs (P.10-1, P.10.2, and P.3) produced no P-450(C21) activity in a functional assay for P-450(C21) by the COS cell expression system, while the P.7 DNA expressed the activity. The P.10-1 and P.10-2 DNAs were shown to have a point mutation in the second intron, causing aberrant splicing. The P.3 DNA carried three clustered missense mutations in the sixty exon, which impaired P-450(C21) activity. All these critical mutations could be seen in the corresponding site of the P-450(C21)A pseudogene. These data strongly suggest the involvement of gene conversion in this genetic disease

  2. Incomplete erythropoietic protoporphyria caused by a splice site modulator homozygous IVS3-48C polymorphism in the ferrochelatase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizawa, M; Makino, T; Nakano, H; Sawamura, D; Shimizu, T

    2016-01-01

    Erythropoietic protoporphyria (EPP) is an inherited cutaneous porphyria caused by both the partial deficiency of ferrochelatase (FECH) and the existence of cytosine at IVS3-48 in trans to a mutated FECH allele. However, physicians occasionally encounter patients with EPP with a mild phenotype associated with a slight increase in the erythrocyte-free protoporphyrin concentration and no FECH gene mutations. In this study, genetic analyses were performed on three patients with a mild phenotype of EPP, with photosensitivity, slightly increased erythrocyte-free protoporphyrin concentrations and only a few fluorocytes in the peripheral blood. After obtaining the patients' and their parents' informed consent, a direct sequence analysis of the FECH gene and a restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis were performed on samples from the patients. The FECH gene mutation was not detected in the direct sequence analyses in any of the patients. However, all three patients had the homozygous IVS3-48C polymorphism. These findings suggest that homozygous IVS3-48C polymorphism of the FECH gene is associated with a slight elevation of the protoporphyrin level in erythrocytes, resulting in a mild EPP phenotype. PMID:26280465

  3. The A395T mutation in ERG11 gene confers fluconazole resistance in Candida tropicalis causing candidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jingwen; Zhang, Jinqing; Chen, Wei; Sun, Yi; Wan, Zhe; Li, Ruoyu; Liu, Wei

    2015-04-01

    The mechanism of fluconazole resistance in Candida tropicalis is still unclear. Recently, we isolated a fluconazole-resistant strain of C. tropicalis from the blood specimen of a patient with candidemia in China. In vitro antifungal susceptibility of the isolate was determined by using CLSI M27-A3 and E-test methods. The sequence of ERG11 gene was then analyzed, and the three-dimensional model of Erg11p encoded by ERG11 gene was also investigated. The sequencing of ERG11 gene revealed the mutation of A395T in this fluconazole-resistant isolate of C. tropicalis, resulting in the Y132F substitution in Erg11p. Sequence alignment and three-dimensional model comparison of Erg11ps showed high similarity between fluconazole-susceptible isolates of C. tropicalis and Candida albicans. The comparison of the three-dimensional models of Erg11ps demonstrated that the position of the Y132F substitution in this isolate of C. tropicalis is identical to the isolate of C. albicans with fluconazole resistance resulting from Y132F substitution in Erg11p. Hence, we ascertain that the Y132F substitution of Erg11p caused by A395T mutation in ERG11 gene confers the fluconazole resistance in C. tropicalis. PMID:25398256

  4. An unbalanced translocation unmasks a recessive mutation in the follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) gene and causes FSH resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuechler, Amla; Hauffa, Berthold P; Köninger, Angela; Kleinau, Gunnar; Albrecht, Beate; Horsthemke, Bernhard; Gromoll, Jörg

    2010-01-01

    Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) mediated by its receptor (FSHR) is pivotal for normal gametogenesis. Inactivating FSHR mutations are known to cause hypergonadotropic hypogonadism with disturbed follicular maturation in females. So far, only very few recessive point mutations have been described. We report on a 17-year-old female with primary amenorrhea, hypergonadotropic hypogonadism and disturbed folliculogenesis. Chromosome analysis detected a seemingly balanced translocation 46,XX,t(2;8)(p16.3or21;p23.1)mat. FSHR sequence analysis revealed a novel non-synonymous point mutation in exon 10 (c.1760C>A, p.Pro587His), but no wild-type allele. The mutation was also found in the father, but not in the mother. Furthermore, molecular-cytogenetic analyses of the breakpoint region on chromosome 2 showed the translocation to be unbalanced, containing a deletion with one breakpoint within the FSHR gene. The deletion size was narrowed down by array analysis to approximately 163 kb, involving exons 9 and 10 of the FSHR gene. Functional studies of the mutation revealed the complete lack of signal transduction presumably caused by a changed conformational structure of transmembrane helix 6. To our knowledge, this is the first description of a compound heterozygosity of an inactivating FSHR point mutation unmasked by a partial deletion. This coincidence of two rare changes caused clinical signs consistent with FSH resistance. PMID:20087398

  5. Mutations of SCN4A gene cause different diseases: 2 case reports and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-li; Huang, Xiao-jun; Luan, Xing-hua; Zhou, Hai-yan; Wang, Tian; Wang, Jing-yi; Chen, Sheng-di; Tang, Hui-dong; Cao, Li

    2015-01-01

    SCN4A encodes the Nav1.4 channel and mutations in SCN4A lead to different ionic channelopathies. In this study, one sporadic individual of periodic paralysis, one paramyotonia family and 200 normal healthy controls are enrolled. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood leukocytes, followed by polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing of candidate genes, including SCN4A and CACNA1S. As a result, heterozygous mutations c.2024G>A (R675Q) and c.1333G>A (V445M) of gene SCN4A were identified in the hypokalemic periodic paralysis patient and the paramyotonia congenita family respectively. Both mutations were not detected in healthy controls. Compared with reported cases, patients with mutation R675Q usually do not present hypokalemic periodic paralysis but hyperkalemic or normokalemic periodic paralysis. The mutation V445M was first reported in Chinese patients with nondystrophic myotonias. In addition, we carried out literature review by summarizing clinical features of the 2 mutations and establish the genotype-phenotype correlations to provide guidance for diagnosis. PMID:25839108

  6. A novel deleterious mutation in the COMP gene that causes pseudoachondroplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Huaichao; Yu, Sisi; Lin, Ying; Guo, Qi; Ma, Rongchuan; Ye, Zimeng; Di, Yanan; Li, Ning; Miao, Yuanying; Zhou, Yu; Li, Yuanfeng; Yang, Jiyun; Yang, Zhenglin

    2016-01-01

    Pseudoachondroplasia (PSACH) is a rare and severe genetic disease; therefore, an accurate molecular diagnosis is essential for appropriate disease treatment and family planning. Currently, the diagnosis of PSACH is based mainly on family history, physical examination and radiographic evaluation. Genetic studies of patients with PSACH in Chinese populations have been very limited. With the application of next-generation sequencing (NGS), a comprehensive molecular diagnosis of PSACH is now possible. The purpose of this study was to perform comprehensive NGS-based molecular diagnoses for patients with PSACH in China. We investigated the molecular genetics of one suspected PSACH family in this study. The DNA sample from the proband was sequenced using a custom capture panel that included 249 bone disease genes. Variant calls were filtered and annotated using an in-house automated pipeline. Then, we confirmed the variants by Sanger sequencing in three family members. After co-segregation analysis, the variant, c.1160_1162del of the COMP gene, was identified as a novel mutation responsible for this spontaneous form of PSACH. PMID:27330822

  7. Novel mutations and the emergence of a common mutation in the SDHD gene causing familial paraganglioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milunsky, J M; Maher, T A; Michels, V V; Milunsky, A

    2001-05-15

    Familial paragangliomas (PGL) are slow-growing, highly vascular, generally benign neoplasms, usually of the head and neck, that arise from neural crest cells. This rare autosomal dominant disorder is highly penetrant and influenced by genomic imprinting through paternal transmission. Timely detection of these tumors may afford the affected individual the opportunity to avoid the potential serious morbidity associated with surgical removal and the mortality that may accompany local and distant metastases. Linkage to two distinct chromosomal loci, 11q13.1 and 11q23, has been previously reported. Recently, germline mutations in SDHD, a mitochondrial complex II gene on chromosome 11q23, have been demonstrated. We evaluated members of seven families with PGL, five previously studied and shown to have linkage to chromosome 11q23. The entire coding region of the SDHD gene was sequenced and yielded four novel mutations and one mutation shared in three of our unrelated families. Novel mutations found included a truncating mutation in exon 2, as well as a missense mutation, a deletion, and an insertion in exon 4. Three of our families had a common mutation in exon 3 (P81L) that has been reported and thought to be a founder mutation. A restriction enzyme assay was developed for initial screening of this mutation. Molecular analysis is now available and recommended for presymptomatic diagnosis in those at-risk individuals and for confirmatory diagnosis in those having PGL. PMID:11343322

  8. Acute intermittent porphyria caused by novel mutation in HMBS gene, misdiagnosed as cholecystitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfadhel M

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Majid Alfadhel,1,3 Neam Saleh,2 Helal Alenazi,2 Henry Baffoe-Bonnie21Division of Genetics, Department of Pediatrics, 2Division of General Medicine, Department of Medicine, King Abdulaziz Medical City, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; 3College of Medicine, King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi ArabiaBackground: Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP is an autosomal dominant neurovisceral inherited disorder due to a defect in the heme biosynthesis pathway. Misdiagnosis of the porphyrias is not uncommon.Case report: We present a case of a 26-year-old female with suspected acute cholecystitis, mental status changes, and seizures. Biochemical and molecular investigations confirmed the diagnosis of AIP by findings of elevated urinary porphobilinogen, 5-aminolevulinic acid, and total porphyrins. DNA molecular testing showed a novel heterozygous mutation (c. 760delC p.L254X in the exon11 of the HMBS gene. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a misdiagnosis of AIP presenting with acute cholecystitis.Conclusion: Clinicians are alerted to consider the possibility of AIP in an adult presenting with an acute abdomen, features of cholecystitis, and neuropsychiatric manifestations.Keywords: porphyria, cholecystitis, acute abdomen, acute intermittent porphyria, HMBS gene, hydroxymethylbilane synthase

  9. A novel nonsense mutation in the NOG gene causes familial NOG-related symphalangism spectrum disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Kenichi; Ogasawara, Noriko; Matsunaga, Tatsuo; Mutai, Hideki; Sakurai, Akihiro; Ishikawa, Aki; Himi, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    The human noggin (NOG) gene is responsible for a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations of NOG-related symphalangism spectrum disorder (NOG-SSD), which include proximal symphalangism, multiple synostoses, stapes ankylosis with broad thumbs (SABTT), tarsal–carpal coalition syndrome, and brachydactyly type B2. Some of these disorders exhibit phenotypes associated with congenital stapes ankylosis. In the present study, we describe a Japanese pedigree with dactylosymphysis and conductive hearing loss due to congenital stapes ankylosis. The range of motion in her elbow joint was also restricted. The family showed multiple clinical features and was diagnosed with SABTT. Sanger sequencing analysis of the NOG gene in the family members revealed a novel heterozygous nonsense mutation (c.397A>T; p.K133*). In the family, the prevalence of dactylosymphysis and hyperopia was 100% while that of stapes ankylosis was less than 100%. Stapes surgery using a CO2 laser led to a significant improvement of the conductive hearing loss. This novel mutation expands our understanding of NOG-SSD from clinical and genetic perspectives.

  10. Gene disruption of dematin causes precipitous loss of erythrocyte membrane stability and severe hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yunzhe; Hanada, Toshihiko; Fujiwara, Yuko; Nwankwo, Jennifer O; Wieschhaus, Adam J; Hartwig, John; Huang, Sha; Han, Jongyoon; Chishti, Athar H

    2016-07-01

    Dematin is a relatively low abundance actin binding and bundling protein associated with the spectrin-actin junctions of mature erythrocytes. Primary structure of dematin includes a loosely folded core domain and a compact headpiece domain that was originally identified in villin. Dematin's actin binding properties are regulated by phosphorylation of its headpiece domain by cyclic adenosine monophosphate-dependent protein kinase. Here, we used a novel gene disruption strategy to generate the whole body dematin gene knockout mouse model (FLKO). FLKO mice, while born at a normal Mendelian ratio, developed severe anemia and exhibited profound aberrations of erythrocyte morphology and membrane stability. Having no apparent effect on primitive erythropoiesis, FLKO mice show significant enhancement of erythroblast enucleation during definitive erythropoiesis. Using membrane protein analysis, domain mapping, electron microscopy, and dynamic deformability measurements, we investigated the mechanism of membrane instability in FLKO erythrocytes. Although many membrane and cytoskeletal proteins remained at their normal levels, the major peripheral membrane proteins spectrin, adducin, and actin were greatly reduced in FLKO erythrocytes. Our results demonstrate that dematin plays a critical role in maintaining the fundamental properties of the membrane cytoskeleton complex. PMID:27073223

  11. Upregulation of proinflammatory genes in skin lesions may be the cause of keloid formation (Review)

    OpenAIRE

    DONG, XIANGLIN; MAO, SHAOLIN; Wen, Hao

    2013-01-01

    It was previously demonstrated that the main cause behind keloid formation may be keloid fibroblast abnormalities, which are closely associated with the microenvironment of the keloid lesion. The post-traumatic and chronic inflammation of the keloid lesion area suggest that inflammatory mediators play an important role in the keloid microenvironment and are crucial for keloid fibroblast abnormalities. In this study, we hypothesized that the mechanism underlying keloid formation may involve th...

  12. Improving palm oil quality through identification and mapping of the lipase gene causing oil deterioration

    OpenAIRE

    Morcillo, F.; Cros, D.; Billotte, N; Ngando-Ebongue, G.-F.; Domonhédo, H.; Pizot, M.; Cuéllar, T.; Espéout, S.; Dhouib, R.; Bourgis, F.; Claverol, S.; Tranbarger, T. J.; Nouy, B.; Arondel, V.

    2013-01-01

    The oil palm fruit mesocarp contains high lipase activity that increases free fatty acids and necessitates post-harvest inactivation by heat treatment of fruit bunches. Even before heat treatment the mesocarp lipase activity causes consequential oil losses and requires costly measures to limit free fatty acids quantities. Here we demonstrate that elite low-lipase lines yield oil with substantially less free fatty acids than standard genotypes, allowing more flexibility for post-harvest fruit ...

  13. Natural disease course and genotype-phenotype correlations in Complex I deficiency caused by nuclear gene defects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koene, S; Rodenburg, R J; van der Knaap, M S; Willemsen, M A A P; Sperl, W; Laugel, V; Ostergaard, E; Tarnopolsky, M; Martin, M A; Nesbitt, V; Fletcher, J; Edvardson, S; Procaccio, V; Slama, A; van den Heuvel, L P W J; Smeitink, J A M

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial complex I is the largest multi-protein enzyme complex of the oxidative phosphorylation system. Seven subunits of this complex are encoded by the mitochondrial and the remainder by the nuclear genome. We review the natural disease course and signs and symptoms of 130 patients (four new...... cases and 126 from literature) with mutations in nuclear genes encoding structural complex I proteins or those involved in its assembly. Complex I deficiency caused by a nuclear gene defect is usually a non-dysmorphic syndrome, characterized by severe multi-system organ involvement and a poor prognosis....... Age at presentation may vary, but is generally within the first year of life. The most prevalent symptoms include hypotonia, nystagmus, respiratory abnormalities, pyramidal signs, dystonia, psychomotor retardation or regression, failure to thrive, and feeding problems. Characteristic symptoms include...

  14. Homeobox gene Sax2 deficiency causes an imbalance in energy homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Ruth; Lufkin, Thomas; Bergemann, Andrew D

    2007-10-01

    The brain, in particular the hypothalamus and the brainstem, plays a critical role in the regulation of energy homeostasis by incorporating signals from the periphery and translating them into feeding behavior. Here we show that the homeobox gene Sax2, which is expressed predominantly in the brainstem, in the vicinity of serotonergic neurons, contributes to this physiological balance. Sax2 deficiency results in a decrease of fat and glycogen storage, reduced blood glucose levels, and raised serotonin levels in the hindbrain. Surprisingly, in the brainstem the expression levels of pro-opiomelanocortin and neuropeptide Y were indicative of a fasting condition, opposed to the observed high serotonin levels implying satiation. Furthermore, Sax2-directed lacZ expression reveals a dramatic change of the distribution of Sax2-expressing cells in the null mutant occurring during perinatal development. These data strongly suggest that Sax2 is required for the coordinated crosstalk of factors involved in the maintenance of energy homeostasis. PMID:17879320

  15. Mutations in the Gene PRRT2 Cause Paroxysmal Kinesigenic Dyskinesia with Infantile Convulsions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsien-Yang Lee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia with infantile convulsions (PKD/IC is an episodic movement disorder with autosomal-dominant inheritance and high penetrance, but the causative genetic mutation is unknown. We have now identified four truncating mutations involving the gene PRRT2 in the vast majority (24/25 of well-characterized families with PKD/IC. PRRT2 truncating mutations were also detected in 28 of 78 additional families. PRRT2 encodes a proline-rich transmembrane protein of unknown function that has been reported to interact with the t-SNARE, SNAP25. PRRT2 localizes to axons but not to dendritic processes in primary neuronal culture, and mutants associated with PKD/IC lead to dramatically reduced PRRT2 levels, leading ultimately to neuronal hyperexcitability that manifests in vivo as PKD/IC.

  16. The Tourette International Collaborative Genetics (TIC Genetics) study, finding the genes causing Tourette syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrich, Andrea; Fernandez, Thomas V; King, Robert A;

    2015-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by recurrent motor and vocal tics, often accompanied by obsessive-compulsive disorder and/or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. While the evidence for a genetic contribution is strong, its exact nature has yet to be...... is clear that large patient cohorts and open-access repositories will be essential to further advance the field. To that end, the large multicenter Tourette International Collaborative Genetics (TIC Genetics) study was established. The goal of the TIC Genetics study is to undertake a comprehensive...... gene discovery effort, focusing both on familial genetic variants with large effects within multiply affected pedigrees and on de novo mutations ascertained through the analysis of apparently simplex parent-child trios with non-familial tics. The clinical data and biomaterials (DNA, transformed cell...

  17. DNA microarray analysis of Staphylococcus aureus causing bloodstream infection: bacterial genes associated with mortality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomfeldt, A; Aamot, H V; Eskesen, A N; Monecke, S; White, R A; Leegaard, T M; Bjørnholt, J V

    2016-08-01

    Providing evidence for microbial genetic determinants' impact on outcome in Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infections (SABSI) is challenging due to the complex and dynamic microbe-host interaction. Our recent population-based prospective study reported an association between the S. aureus clonal complex (CC) 30 genotype and mortality in SABSI patients. This follow-up investigation aimed to examine the genetic profiles of the SABSI isolates and test the hypothesis that specific genetic characteristics in S. aureus are associated with mortality. SABSI isolates (n = 305) and S. aureus CC30 isolates from asymptomatic nasal carriers (n = 38) were characterised by DNA microarray analysis and spa typing. Fisher's exact test, least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) and elastic net regressions were performed to discern within four groups defined by patient outcome and characteristics. No specific S. aureus genetic determinants were found to be associated with mortality in SABSI patients. By applying LASSO and elastic net regressions, we found evidence suggesting that agrIII and cna were positively and setC (=selX) and seh were negatively associated with S. aureus CC30 versus non-CC30 isolates. The genes chp and sak, encoding immune evasion molecules, were found in higher frequencies in CC30 SABSI isolates compared to CC30 carrier isolates, indicating a higher virulence potential. In conclusion, no specific S. aureus genes were found to be associated with mortality by DNA microarray analysis and state-of-the-art statistical analyses. The next natural step is to test the hypothesis in larger samples with higher resolution methods, like whole genome sequencing. PMID:27177754

  18. The T788G Mutation in the cyp51C Gene Confers Voriconazole Resistance in Aspergillus flavus Causing Aspergillosis

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Wei; Sun, Yi; Chen, Wei; Liu, Weixia; Wan, Zhe; Bu, Dingfang; Li, Ruoyu

    2012-01-01

    With voriconazole (VRC) being approved as the first choice in treating invasive aspergillosis (IA) and its increasing use in treatment, a VRC-resistant strain of Aspergillus flavus, the second leading cause of IA after Aspergillus fumigatus, has emerged. The VRC-resistant strain of A. flavus was isolated for the first time from the surgical lung specimen of an IA patient with no response to VRC therapy. In order to ascertain the mechanism of VRC resistance, the azole target enzyme genes in th...

  19. RAB39B gene mutations are not a common cause of Parkinson's disease or dementia with Lewy bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Kyndall; Brewer, Sheridan S; Labbé, Catherine; Soto-Ortolaza, Alexandra I; Walton, Ronald L; Strongosky, Audrey J; Uitti, Ryan J; van Gerpen, Jay A; Ertekin-Taner, Nilüfer; Kantarci, Kejal; Lowe, Val J; Parisi, Joseph E; Savica, Rodolfo; Graff-Radford, Jonathan; Jones, David T; Knopman, David S; Petersen, Ronald C; Murray, Melissa E; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Ferman, Tanis J; Dickson, Dennis W; Wszolek, Zbigniew K; Boeve, Bradley F; Ross, Owen A; Lorenzo-Betancor, Oswaldo

    2016-09-01

    Mutations in Ras-related protein Rab-39B (RAB39B) gene have been linked to X-linked early-onset Parkinsonism with intellectual disabilities. The aim of this study was to address the genetic contribution of RAB39B to Parkinson's disease (PD), dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), and pathologically confirmed Lewy body dementia (pLBD) cases. A cohort of 884 PD, 399 DLB, and 379 pLBD patients were screened for RAB39B mutations, but no coding variants were found, suggesting RAB39B mutations are not a common cause of PD, DLB, or pLBD in Caucasian population. PMID:27459931

  20. Congenital thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura caused by new compound heterozygous mutations of the ADAMTS13 gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rank, Cecilie Utke; Kremer Hovinga, Johanna; Taleghani, Magnus Mansouri;

    2014-01-01

    , causing intravascular platelet clumping and thrombotic microangiopathy. Our patient, a 26-year-old man, had attacks of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) with thrombocytopenia and a urine dipstick positive for hemoglobin (4+), often as the only sign of hemolytic activity. He had ADAMTS13 activity...... of A) leading to p.R1123H. This case report confirms the importance of the analysis of the ADAMTS13 activity and its inhibitor in patients who have episodes of TTP, with a very low platelet count and sometimes without the classic biochemical signs of hemolysis....

  1. Riboflavin-responsive oxidative phosphorylation complex I deficiency caused by defective ACAD9: new function for an old gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerards, Mike; van den Bosch, Bianca J C; Danhauser, Katharina; Serre, Valérie; van Weeghel, Michel; Wanders, Ronald J A; Nicolaes, Gerry A F; Sluiter, Wim; Schoonderwoerd, Kees; Scholte, Hans R; Prokisch, Holger; Rötig, Agnès; de Coo, Irenaeus F M; Smeets, Hubert J M

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial complex I deficiency is the most common oxidative phosphorylation defect. Mutations have been detected in mitochondrial and nuclear genes, but the genetics of many patients remain unresolved and new genes are probably involved. In a consanguineous family, patients presented easy fatigability, exercise intolerance and lactic acidosis in blood from early childhood. In muscle, subsarcolemmal mitochondrial proliferation and a severe complex I deficiency were observed. Exercise intolerance and complex I activity was improved by a supplement of riboflavin at high dosage. Homozygosity mapping revealed a candidate region on chromosome three containing six mitochondria-related genes. Four genes were screened for mutations and a homozygous substitution was identified in ACAD9 (c.1594 C>T), changing the highly conserved arginine-532 into tryptophan. This mutation was absent in 188 ethnically matched controls. Protein modelling suggested a functional effect due to the loss of a stabilizing hydrogen bond in an α-helix and a local flexibility change. To test whether the ACAD9 mutation caused the complex I deficiency, we transduced fibroblasts of patients with wild-type and mutant ACAD9. Wild-type, but not mutant, ACAD9 restored complex I activity. An unrelated patient with the same phenotype was compound heterozygous for c.380 G>A and c.1405 C>T, changing arginine-127 into glutamine and arginine-469 into tryptophan, respectively. These amino acids were highly conserved and the substitutions were not present in controls, making them very probably pathogenic. Our data support a new function for ACAD9 in complex I function, making this gene an important new candidate for patients with complex I deficiency, which could be improved by riboflavin treatment. PMID:20929961

  2. A novel mitofusin 2 gene mutation causing Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2A disease in a Chinese family

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEING Chor Kwan; LAU Kwok Kwong; YU Kwok Wai; CHAN Yan Wo Albert; MAK Miu Chloe

    2010-01-01

    @@ Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), also known as hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies, comprises a genetically heterogeneous group of inherited peripheral neuropathies. Clinically it is characterized by progressive distal weakness, muscle atrophy, distal sensory loss and loss of deep tendon reflexes. Following electrophysiological criteria, CMT is divided into two main forms: the primarily demyelinating neuropathy CMT1 with severely decreased nerve conduction velocity (NCV) (38 m/s) but decreased amplitudes.1 CMT2A, an autosomal dominant disease caused by mitofusin 2 gene (MFN2) mutations, is the most common type of CMT2, accounting for up to 33% of familial CMT2 cases.2 We reported a patient with clinical diagnosis of CMT2 caused by a novel MFN2 mutation. To our knowledge, this is a relatively early report of genetically confirmed CMT2A in Chinese.

  3. Structural Basis for a Human Glycosylation Disorder Caused by Mutation of the COG4 Gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richardson, B.; Smith, R; Ungar, D; Nakamura, A; Jeffrey, P; Lupashin, V; Hughson, F

    2009-01-01

    The proper glycosylation of proteins trafficking through the Golgi apparatus depends upon the conserved oligomeric Golgi (COG) complex. Defects in COG can cause fatal congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDGs) in humans. The recent discovery of a form of CDG, caused in part by a COG4 missense mutation changing Arg 729 to Trp, prompted us to determine the 1.9 A crystal structure of a Cog4 C-terminal fragment. Arg 729 is found to occupy a key position at the center of a salt bridge network, thereby stabilizing Cog4's small C-terminal domain. Studies in HeLa cells reveal that this C-terminal domain, while not needed for the incorporation of Cog4 into COG complexes, is essential for the proper glycosylation of cell surface proteins. We also find that Cog4 bears a strong structural resemblance to exocyst and Dsl1p complex subunits. These complexes and others have been proposed to function by mediating the initial tethering between transport vesicles and their membrane targets; the emerging structural similarities provide strong evidence of a common evolutionary origin and may reflect shared mechanisms of action.

  4. Early embryonic lethality caused by targeted disruption of the TRAF-interacting protein (TRIP) gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR)-associated factors (TRAFs) are key adaptor molecules in the TNFR-signaling complexes that promote a wide variety of signaling cascades including cell proliferation, activation, differentiation, and apoptosis. TRAF-interacting protein (TRIP) is required for the inhibitory regulation of TNF-induced NF-κB signaling via the TNFR/TRAF-signaling complexes in vitro. TRIP also directly interacts with the familial cylindromatosis tumor suppressor gene (CYLD) and negatively regulates NF-κB activation in vitro. However, although there appears to be a relationship between TRIP, the TRAFs and also CYLD as modulators of NF-κB signaling in vitro, the functional role of TRIP in vivo is still unclear. To identify the role of TRIP in vivo, we have generated TRIP-deficient mice. Homozygous mouse embryos were found to die shortly after implantation due to proliferation defects and excessive cell death. These results indicate that TRIP is an essential factor during early mouse embryonic development in vivo

  5. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra gene MRA_1916 causes growth defects upon down-regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kumar Sachin; Singh, Sudheer Kumar

    2015-01-01

    D-amino acid oxidases play an important role in converting D-amino acids to their corresponding α-keto acids. MRA_1916 of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra (Mtb-Ra) is annotated to be a D-amino acid oxidase (DAO). However, not much information is available about its physiological role during Mtb-Ra growth and survival. The present study was taken-up to understand the role of DAO during different stages of growth and effect of its down-regulation on growth. Recombinant Mtb-Ra strains with DAO and GlcB (malate synthase: MRA_1848) gene knockdown were developed and their growth was studied using Microtiter Alamar Blue Assay (MABA) with glycerol, acetate and glycine as a carbon source. Ethyl bromopyruvate (BrP) was used as an inhibitor of GlcB. MABA study showed inhibition of wild-type (WT) and knockdowns in the presence of BrP (2.5mM). However, growth inhibition of WT was less noticeable at lower concentrations of BrP. Mtb-Ra with DAO knockdown showed poor utilization of glycine in the presence of BrP. The DAO localization study showed its prominent distribution in cytosolic fraction and to some extent in cell wall and membrane fractions. Growth profile of WT under oxygen and nutritional stress showed changes in expression of DAO, GlcB, PckA (phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase: MRA_0219) and GlyA1 (serine hydroxymethyltransferase: MRA_1104). PMID:26531045

  6. [Syndrome Leigh caused by mutations in the SURF1 gene: clinical and molecular-genetic characteristics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsygankova, P G; Mikhaĭlova, S V; Zakharova, E Iu; Pichkur, N A; Il'ina, E S; Nikolaeva, E A; Rudenskaia, G E; Dadali, E L; Kolpakchi, L M; Fedoniuk, I D; Matiushchenko, G N

    2010-01-01

    Syndrome Leigh (SL) or subacute necrotizing encephalomyelopathy - is a rare hereditary genetically heterogeneous disease from the group of mitochondrial encephalomyopathies. Twenty-seven children with SL were examined using clinical, laboratory (measuring lactate levels), MRI and molecular-genetic (polymerase chain reaction genotyping of 9 exons of the SURF1 gene) studies. The mean age of manifestation was 11,6 months. The main manifestations of SL were: delay of psychomotor development, diffuse muscle hypertonic, cerebellar syndrome, ophthalmoparesis, hypertrichosis. The disease had a progressive course with the loss of acquired skills. The blood lactate concentration was increased on average up to 3,1 mM/ml (from 1,9 to 5,1 mM/ml) compared to normal values (1,8 mM/ml). Brain MRI revealed the subcortical and cortical atrophy (80% of cases), symmetrical distinctly delineated hyperintense lesions on T2-weighted images (demyelization) in the basal ganglia and the brain stem (50%), as well as in the cerebellum (25%). Genotyping identified 7 different mutations. The most frequent (64,8%) was the deletion of 2 nucleotides (845delCT) in exon 8 that was in line with early data of Polish researchers thus indicating the Slavic origin of this mutation. Other mutations (574-575insCTGT, 311-321del10insAT and IVS8-1G>) were also frequent in the Russian population. PMID:20436434

  7. Duplication of the TGFBR1 gene causes features of Loeys-Dietz syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breckpot, Jeroen; Budts, Werner; De Zegher, Francis; Vermeesch, Joris R; Devriendt, Koenraad

    2010-01-01

    Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS; OMIM:609192) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by hypertelorism, bifid uvula or cleft palate, and arterial tortuosity with widespread vascular aneurysms and a high risk of aortic dissection at an early age. LDS results from mutations in the transforming growth factor beta-receptor I and II (TGFBR1 and TGFBR2) genes, altering the transmission of the subcellular TGF-β signal, mediated by increased activation of Smad2. We report on a 17-year-old boy with pubertas tarda, a bifid uvula, camptodactyly and facial dysmorphic features, suggestive of LDS. Mutation analysis of TGFBR1 and TGFBR2 was normal. By means of molecular karyotyping two previously unreported chromosomal imbalances were detected: a 120 kb deletion on chromosome 22q13.31q13.32, inherited from an unaffected parent, and a de novo 14.6 Mb duplication on chromosome 9q22.32q31.3, comprising TGFBR1. We hypothesize that copy number gain of TGFBR1 contributes to the phenotype. PMID:20813212

  8. A connective tissue disorder caused by mutations of the lysyl hydroxylase 3 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salo, Antti M; Cox, Helen; Farndon, Peter; Moss, Celia; Grindulis, Helen; Risteli, Maija; Robins, Simon P; Myllylä, Raili

    2008-10-01

    Lysyl hydroxylase 3 (LH3, encoded by PLOD3) is a multifunctional enzyme capable of catalyzing hydroxylation of lysyl residues and O-glycosylation of hydroxylysyl residues producing either monosaccharide (Gal) or disaccharide (Glc-Gal) derivatives, reactions that form part of the many posttranslational modifications required during collagen biosynthesis. Animal studies have confirmed the importance of LH3, particularly in biosynthesis of the highly glycosylated type IV and VI collagens, but to date, the functional significance in vivo of this enzyme in man is predominantly unknown. We report here a human disorder of LH3 presenting as a compound heterozygote with recessive inheritance. One mutation dramatically reduced the sugar-transfer activity of LH3, whereas another abrogated lysyl hydroxylase activity; these changes were accompanied by reduced LH3 protein levels in cells. The disorder has a unique phenotype causing severe morbidity as a result of features that overlap with a number of known collagen disorders. PMID:18834968

  9. KCNJ10 gene mutations causing EAST syndrome (epilepsy, ataxia, sensorineural deafness, and tubulopathy) disrupt channel function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichold, Markus; Zdebik, Anselm A.; Lieberer, Evelyn; Rapedius, Markus; Schmidt, Katharina; Bandulik, Sascha; Sterner, Christina; Tegtmeier, Ines; Penton, David; Baukrowitz, Thomas; Hulton, Sally-Anne; Witzgall, Ralph; Ben-Zeev, Bruria; Howie, Alexander J.; Kleta, Robert; Bockenhauer, Detlef; Warth, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Mutations of the KCNJ10 (Kir4.1) K+ channel underlie autosomal recessive epilepsy, ataxia, sensorineural deafness, and (a salt-wasting) renal tubulopathy (EAST) syndrome. We investigated the localization of KCNJ10 and the homologous KCNJ16 in kidney and the functional consequences of KCNJ10 mutations found in our patients with EAST syndrome. Kcnj10 and Kcnj16 were found in the basolateral membrane of mouse distal convoluted tubules, connecting tubules, and cortical collecting ducts. In the human kidney, KCNJ10 staining was additionally observed in the basolateral membrane of the cortical thick ascending limb of Henle's loop. EM of distal tubular cells of a patient with EAST syndrome showed reduced basal infoldings in this nephron segment, which likely reflects the morphological consequences of the impaired salt reabsorption capacity. When expressed in CHO and HEK293 cells, the KCNJ10 mutations R65P, G77R, and R175Q caused a marked impairment of channel function. R199X showed complete loss of function. Single-channel analysis revealed a strongly reduced mean open time. Qualitatively similar results were obtained with coexpression of KCNJ10/KCNJ16, suggesting a dominance of KCNJ10 function in native renal KCNJ10/KCNJ16 heteromers. The decrease in the current of R65P and R175Q was mainly caused by a remarkable shift of pH sensitivity to the alkaline range. In summary, EAST mutations of KCNJ10 lead to impaired channel function and structural changes in distal convoluted tubules. Intriguingly, the metabolic alkalosis present in patients carrying the R65P mutation possibly improves residual function of KCNJ10, which shows higher activity at alkaline pH. PMID:20651251

  10. A nonsense mutation in the acid α-glucosidase gene causes Pompe disease in Finnish and Swedish Lapphunds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eija H Seppälä

    Full Text Available Pompe disease is a recessively inherited and often fatal disorder caused by the deficiency of acid α-glucosidase, an enzyme encoded by the GAA gene and needed to break down glycogen in lysosomes. This glycogen storage disease type II has been reported also in Swedish Lapphund dogs. Here we describe the genetic defect in canine Pompe disease and show that three related breeds from Scandinavia carry the same mutation. The affected dogs are homozygous for the GAA c.2237G>A mutation leading to a premature stop codon at amino acid position 746. The corresponding mutation has previously been reported in humans and causes infantile Pompe disease in combination with a second fully deleterious mutation. The affected dogs from both the Finnish as well as the Swedish breed mimic infantile-onset Pompe disease genetically, but also clinico-pathologically. Therefore this canine model provides a valuable tool for preclinical studies aimed at the development of gene therapy in Pompe disease.

  11. Genotype-phenotype characteristics and baseline natural history of heritable neuropathies caused by mutations in the MPZ gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanmaneechai, Oranee; Feely, Shawna; Scherer, Steven S; Herrmann, David N; Burns, Joshua; Muntoni, Francesco; Li, Jun; Siskind, Carly E; Day, John W; Laura, Matilde; Sumner, Charlotte J; Lloyd, Thomas E; Ramchandren, Sindhu; Shy, Rosemary R; Grider, Tiffany; Bacon, Chelsea; Finkel, Richard S; Yum, Sabrina W; Moroni, Isabella; Piscosquito, Giuseppe; Pareyson, Davide; Reilly, Mary M; Shy, Michael E

    2015-11-01

    We aimed to characterize genotype-phenotype correlations and establish baseline clinical data for peripheral neuropathies caused by mutations in the myelin protein zero (MPZ) gene. MPZ mutations are the second leading cause of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1. Recent research makes clinical trials for patients with MPZ mutations a realistic possibility. However, the clinical severity varies with different mutations and natural history data on progression is sparse. We present cross-sectional data to begin to define the phenotypic spectrum and clinical baseline of patients with these mutations. A cohort of patients with MPZ gene mutations was identified in 13 centres of the Inherited Neuropathies Consortium - Rare Disease Clinical Research Consortium (INC-RDCRC) between 2009 and 2012 and at Wayne State University between 1996 and 2009. Patient phenotypes were quantified by the Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease neuropathy score version 1 or 2 and the Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease paediatric scale outcome instruments. Genetic testing was performed in all patients and/or in first- or second-degree relatives to document mutation in MPZ gene indicating diagnosis of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1B. There were 103 patients from 71 families with 47 different MPZ mutations with a mean age of 40 years (range 3-84 years). Patients and mutations were separated into infantile, childhood and adult-onset groups. The infantile onset group had higher Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease neuropathy score version 1 or 2 and slower nerve conductions than the other groups, and severity increased with age. Twenty-three patients had no family history of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. Sixty-one patients wore foot/ankle orthoses, 19 required walking assistance or support, and 10 required wheelchairs. There was hearing loss in 21 and scoliosis in 17. Forty-two patients did not begin walking until after 15 months of age. Half of the infantile onset patients then required ambulation aids or wheelchairs for

  12. Steroidal and Nonsteroidal Mineralocorticoid Receptor Antagonists Cause Differential Cardiac Gene Expression in Pressure Overload-induced Cardiac Hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grune, Jana; Benz, Verena; Brix, Sarah; Salatzki, Janek; Blumrich, Annelie; Höft, Beata; Klopfleisch, Robert; Foryst-Ludwig, Anna; Kolkhof, Peter; Kintscher, Ulrich

    2016-05-01

    Pharmacological blockade of mineralocorticoid receptors (MR) is known as an efficacious therapy in chronic heart failure. Therapy with steroidal MR antagonists such as spironolactone or eplerenone (EPL) is often limited because of side effects. Recently, a new highly selective and potent, nonsteroidal MR antagonist, finerenone (FIN), has been developed. To investigate the effects of FIN on pressure-induced cardiac hypertrophy, the transverse aortic constriction (TAC) model was used in C57BL/6 mice treated with FIN (10 mg·kg·d), EPL (200 mg·kg·d) or vehicle (VEH). First, we analyzed cardiac gene expression 4 weeks after TAC using a pathway-focused quantitative polymerase chain reaction array. FIN caused a distinct cardiac gene expression profile compared to VEH and EPL, including differential expression of BNP (brain natriuretic peptide) and Tnnt2 (troponin T type 2). FIN treatment led to a significant reduction of TAC-induced left ventricular (LV) wall thickening assessed by echocardiography. In accordance, FIN-treated mice showed a significant lower increase of calculated left ventricular mass compared with VEH- and EPL-treated mice (FIN: 28.4 ± 3.7 mg; EPL: 38.4 ± 4.3 mg; VEH: 39.3 ± 3.1 mg; P < 0.05). These data show beneficial effects of nonsteroidal MR antagonism by FIN on left ventricular mass development in pressure overload associated with a distinct cardiac gene expression profile. PMID:26859196

  13. Identification of the first intragenic deletion of the PITX2 gene causing an Axenfeld-Rieger Syndrome: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dufier Jean-Louis

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome (ARS is characterized by bilateral congenital abnormalities of the anterior segment of the eye associated with abnormalities of the teeth, midface, and umbilicus. Most cases of ARS are caused by mutations in the genes encoding PITX2 or FOXC1. Here we describe a family affected by a severe form of ARS. Case presentation Two members of this family (father and daughter presented with typical ARS and developed severe glaucoma. The ocular phenotype was much more severe in the daughter than in the father. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI detected an aggressive form of meningioma in the father. There was no mutation in the PITX2 gene, determined by exon screening. We identified an intragenic deletion by quantitative genomic PCR analysis and characterized this deletion in detail. Conclusion Our findings implicate the first intragenic deletion of the PITX2 gene in the pathogenesis of a severe form of ARS in an affected family. This study stresses the importance of a systematic search for intragenic deletions in families affected by ARS and in sporadic cases for which no mutations in the exons or introns of PITX2 have been found. The molecular genetics of some ARS pedigrees should be re-examined with enzymes that can amplify medium and large genomic fragments.

  14. A missense mutation (p.G274R) in gene ASPA causes Canavan disease in a Pakistani family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Rashida; Daud, Shakeela; Kakar, Naseebullah; Ahmad, Adeel; Baloch, Abdul Hameed; Tareen, Abdul Malik; Kakar, Muhammad Azam; Ahmad, Jamil

    2012-05-01

    Canavan disease (OMIM 271900) is an autosomal recessive lethal neurodegenerative disorder characterized by spongy degeneration of the brain. A highly consanguineous Pakistani family with Canavan disease was enrolled on the basis of diagnosis. All the affected individuals have mental retardation, megalocephaly and degradation of motor skills, poor head control, partial vision loss, weakness of the muscles and raised urinary concentration of N-acetyl aspartic acid in the urine. Blood samples were collected from affected as well as normal siblings and processed for DNA purification. Linkage analysis was performed by typing three short tandem repeat markers D17S1583 (7.19 cM), D17S1828 (10.02 cM) and D17S919 (14.69 cM) for an already-reported gene/locus ASPA at chromosome 17p13.2 causing Canavan disease. During linkage analysis, all the affected individuals were homozygous for short tandem repeat markers while the normal siblings were heterozygous showing co-segregation of the disease. Gene ASPA (NM_000049) was undertaken to sequence for mutation analysis. As a result of sequence analysis, we found missense substitution 740A→G (p.G274R) in exon 6 of gene ASPA. To our knowledge, this is the first report about Canavan disease on a Pakistani family. PMID:22219087

  15. Mutations in the lysosomal [beta]-galactosidase gene that cause the adult form of GMI gangliosidosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, S.; Rafi, M.A.; Wenger, D.A. (Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States))

    1994-06-01

    Three adult patients with acid-galactosidase deficiency/GM1 gangliosidosis who were from two unrelated families of Scandinavian descent were found to share a common point mutation in the coding region of the corresponding gene. The patients share common clinical features, including early dysarthria, mild ataxia, and bone abnormalities. When cDNA from the two patients in family 1 was PCR amplified and sequenced, most (39/41) of the clones showed a C-to-T transition (C[yields]T) at nucleotide 245 (counting from the initiation codon). This mutation changes the codon for the Thr(ACG) to Met(ATG). Mutant and normal sequences were also found in that position in genomic DNA, indicating the presence of another mutant allele. Genomic DNA from the patient in family 2 revealed the same point mutation in one allele. It was determined that in each family only the father carried the C[yields]T mutation. Expression studies showed that this mutation produced 3%-4% of [beta]-galactosidase activity, confirming its deleterious effects. The cDNA clones from the patients in family 1 that did not contain the C[yields]T revealed a 20-bp insertion of intronic sequence between nucleotides 75 and 76, the location of the first intron. Further analysis showed the insertion of a T near the 5[prime] splice donor site which led to the use of a cryptic splice site. It appears that the C[yields]T mutation results in enough functional enzyme to produce a mild adult form of the disease, even in the presence of a second mutation that likely produces nonfunctional enzyme. 31 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Host-specificity of Staphylococcus aureus causing intramammary infections in dairy animals assessed by genotyping and virulence genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Gal, G Kahila; Blum, S E; Hadas, L; Ehricht, R; Monecke, S; Leitner, G

    2015-03-23

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most relevant pathogens causing clinical and subclinical, chronic mastitis in dairy animals. Routinely, mastitis pathogens are isolated and classified to genus or species level, and regarded as single entities. However, S. aureus includes a broad range of genotypes with distinct pathogenic and epidemiologic characteristics. The objective of the present study was to assess the host-specificity of S. aureus causing mastitis in dairy animals, based on phylogenetic and genotypic characterization as well as the presence of virulence and antimicrobial resistance genes in the pathogen genome. S. aureus isolates from mastitis in cows, sheep and goats in Israel, and from cows in Germany, the USA and Italy, were compared by the following methods: a. Bayesian phylogenetic comparison of sequences of genes nuc, coa, lukF and clfA, b. genotyping by spa and agr typing, and assignment to MLST Clonal Complexes (MLST CC), and c. the presence of a broad array of virulence and antimicrobial resistance genes. Overall, phylogenetic, virulence and genotyping approaches agreed with each other. Cow isolates could be differentiated from sheep and goat isolates with all three methods, with different resolution. In two phylogenetic clusters, segregation was found also between cow isolates from Israel and abroad. Sheep and goats' isolates showed less variability than isolates from cows in all methods used. In conclusion, different S. aureus lineages are associated to cows in contrast to goats and sheep, suggesting co-evolution between pathogen and host species. Modern diagnostics approaches should aim to explore molecular data for a better understanding and cost-effective management of mastitis. PMID:25631254

  17. Lyme disease caused by Borrelia burgdorferi with two homeologous 16S rRNA genes: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee SH

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Sin Hang Lee,1,21Pathology Department, Milford Hospital, Milford, CT, USA; 2Milford Molecular Diagnostics, Milford, CT, USA Abstract: Lyme disease (LD, the most common tick-borne disease in North America, is believed to be caused exclusively by Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto and is usually diagnosed by clinical evaluation and serologic assays. As reported previously in a peer-reviewed article, a 13-year-old boy living in the Northeast of the USA was initially diagnosed with LD based on evaluation of his clinical presentations and on serologic test results. The patient was treated with a course of oral doxycycline for 28 days, and the symptoms resolved. A year later, the boy developed a series of unusual symptoms and did not attend school for 1 year. A LD specialist reviewed the case and found the serologic test band patterns nondiagnostic of LD. The boy was admitted to a psychiatric hospital. After discharge from the psychiatric hospital, a polymerase chain reaction test performed in a winter month when the boy was 16 years old showed a low density of B. burgdorferi sensu lato in the blood of the patient, confirmed by partial 16S rRNA (ribosomal RNA gene sequencing. Subsequent DNA sequencing analysis presented in this report demonstrated that the spirochete isolate was a novel strain of B. burgdorferi with two homeologous 16S rRNA genes, which has never been reported in the world literature. This case report shows that direct DNA sequencing is a valuable tool for reliable molecular diagnosis of Lyme and related borrelioses, as well as for studies of the diversity of the causative agents of LD because LD patients infected by a rare or novel borrelial variant may produce an antibody pattern that can be different from the pattern characteristic of an infection caused by a typical B. burgdorferi sensu stricto strain. Keywords: Lyme disease, Borrelia burgdorferi, homeologous 16S rRNA genes, DNA sequencing

  18. A nonsense mutation in the tyrosinase gene causes albinism in water buffalo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damé Maria Cecília

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA is an autosomal recessive hereditary pigmentation disorder affecting humans and several other animal species. Oculocutaneous albinism was studied in a herd of Murrah buffalo to determine the clinical presentation and genetic basis of albinism in this species. Results Clinical examinations and pedigree analysis were performed in an affected herd, and wild-type and OCA tyrosinase mRNA sequences were obtained. The main clinical findings were photophobia and a lack of pigmentation of the hair, skin, horns, hooves, mucosa, and iris. The results of segregation analysis suggest that this disease is acquired through recessive inheritance. In the OCA buffalo, a single-base substitution was detected at nucleotide 1,431 (G to A, which leads to the conversion of tryptophan into a stop codon at residue 477. Conclusion This premature stop codon produces an inactive protein, which is responsible for the OCA buffalo phenotype. These findings will be useful for future studies of albinism in buffalo and as a possible model to study diseases caused by a premature stop codon.

  19. Assessment of canine BEST1 variations identifies new mutations and establishes an independent bestrophinopathy model (cmr3)

    OpenAIRE

    Zangerl, Barbara; Wickström, Kaisa; Slavik, Julianna; Lindauer, Sarah J.; Ahonen, Saija; Schelling, Claude; Lohi, Hannes; Guziewicz, Karina E.; Aguirre, Gustavo D.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Mutations in bestrophin 1 (BEST1) are associated with a group of retinal disorders known as bestrophinopathies in man and canine multifocal retinopathies (cmr) in the dog. To date, the dog is the only large animal model suitable for the complex characterization and in-depth studies of Best-related disorders. In the first report of cmr, the disease was described in a group of mastiff-related breeds (cmr1) and the Coton de Tulear (cmr2). Additional breeds, e.g., the Lapponian herder (LH...

  20. Identification of novel mutation in cathepsin C gene causing Papillon-Lefèvre Syndrome in Mexican patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romero-Quintana José G

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Papillon-Lefèvre Syndrome (PLS is a type IV genodermatosis caused by mutations in cathepsin C (CTSC, with a worldwide prevalence of 1–4 cases per million in the general population. In México, the prevalence of this syndrome is unknown, and there are few case reports. The diagnosis of twenty patients in the state of Sinaloa highlights the need to characterize this syndrome in Mexicans. Methods To understand the basis of PLS in Mexicans, the gene expression, enzymatic activity and mutational analysis of CTSC were assayed in nine PLS patients and their relatives. Frequencies of CTSC gene polymorphisms and HLA alleles were determined in these patients, their relatives, and the population. Results Patients showed normal CTSC gene expression, but a deep reduction (up to 85% in enzymatic activity in comparison to unrelated healthy individuals. A novel loss-of-function mutation, c.203 T >; G (p.Leu68Arg, was found in all patients, and some carried the polymorphism c.458C >; T (p.Thr153Ile. Allelic frequencies in patients, relatives and controls were 88.89%, 38.24% and 0.25% for G (c.203 T >; G; and 11.11%, 8.82% and 9.00% for T (c.458C >; T. HLA-DRB1*11 was found significantly more frequent (P = 0.0071 in patients than controls (33.33% vs. 7.32%, with an estimated relative risk of 6.33. Conclusions The novel loss-of function mutation of CTSC gene (c.203 T >; G found in patients correlated with their diminished enzymatic activity, and HLA-DRB1*11 was found to be associated with PLS. The study of more PLS patients may give more insights into the etiology of the disease as well as its prevalence in México.

  1. A Novel Mutation in Thyroid Peroxidase Gene Causing Congenital Goitrous Hypothyroidism in a German-Thai Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriphrapradang, Chutintorn; Thewjitcharoen, Yotsapon; Chanprasertyothin, Suwannee; Nakasatien, Soontaree; Himathongkam, Thep; Trachoo, Objoon

    2016-06-01

    Thyroid dyshormonogenesis is responsible for 10-15% of all cases of congenital hypothyroidism and is usually inherited. We report a 26-year-old German-Thai male with congenital hypothyroidism caused by a compound heterozygous mutation in the thyroid peroxidase (TPO) gene. He was diagnosed with congenital goitrous hypothyroidism at 4 months of age and had been treated with levothyroxine replacement therapy. His goiter size had increased due to poor compliance to treatment. Ultrasonography of the thyroid gland showed a pattern suspicious for malignancy. The patient later underwent near-total thyroidectomy. Pathologic examination results were consistent with a multinodular goiter and no malignancy. Genetic analyses by direct sequencing of the entire exons and flanking regions of the TPO gene were performed in the index case and family members. The analyses revealed a compound heterozygote of novel TPO mutation of c.1727C>T in exon 10 resulting in amino acid substitution (p.Ala576Val) and c.2268_2269insT in exon 13 causing a frameshift mutation which introduced a stop codon after the insertion site. The latter has been reported in Chinese subjects. However, there is no previous report of c.1727C>T mutation in the literature. We found the allele contained a novel exon 10 mutation inherited from the patient's German mother and an exon 13 mutation from his Thai father. Analysis using two bioinformatic software programs indicated that this variant was likely to cause damage in the resulting protein molecule. The present report emphasizes the importance of regular follow-up and patient compliance to levothyroxine replacement in patients with goitrous congenital hypothyroidism to avoid prolonged stimulation of thyroid tissue by thyroid-stimulating hormone. PMID:26761947

  2. Epilepsy caused by an abnormal alternative splicing with dosage effect of the SV2A gene in a chicken model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douaud, Marine; Feve, Katia; Pituello, Fabienne; Gourichon, David; Boitard, Simon; Leguern, Eric; Coquerelle, Gérard; Vieaud, Agathe; Batini, Cesira; Naquet, Robert; Vignal, Alain; Tixier-Boichard, Michèle; Pitel, Frédérique

    2011-01-01

    Photosensitive reflex epilepsy is caused by the combination of an individual's enhanced sensitivity with relevant light stimuli, such as stroboscopic lights or video games. This is the most common reflex epilepsy in humans; it is characterized by the photoparoxysmal response, which is an abnormal electroencephalographic reaction, and seizures triggered by intermittent light stimulation. Here, by using genetic mapping, sequencing and functional analyses, we report that a mutation in the acceptor site of the second intron of SV2A (the gene encoding synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2A) is causing photosensitive reflex epilepsy in a unique vertebrate model, the Fepi chicken strain, a spontaneous model where the neurological disorder is inherited as an autosomal recessive mutation. This mutation causes an aberrant splicing event and significantly reduces the level of SV2A mRNA in homozygous carriers. Levetiracetam, a second generation antiepileptic drug, is known to bind SV2A, and SV2A knock-out mice develop seizures soon after birth and usually die within three weeks. The Fepi chicken survives to adulthood and responds to levetiracetam, suggesting that the low-level expression of SV2A in these animals is sufficient to allow survival, but does not protect against seizures. Thus, the Fepi chicken model shows that the role of the SV2A pathway in the brain is conserved between birds and mammals, in spite of a large phylogenetic distance. The Fepi model appears particularly useful for further studies of physiopathology of reflex epilepsy, in comparison with induced models of epilepsy in rodents. Consequently, SV2A is a very attractive candidate gene for analysis in the context of both mono- and polygenic generalized epilepsies in humans. PMID:22046416

  3. Epilepsy caused by an abnormal alternative splicing with dosage effect of the SV2A gene in a chicken model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marine Douaud

    Full Text Available Photosensitive reflex epilepsy is caused by the combination of an individual's enhanced sensitivity with relevant light stimuli, such as stroboscopic lights or video games. This is the most common reflex epilepsy in humans; it is characterized by the photoparoxysmal response, which is an abnormal electroencephalographic reaction, and seizures triggered by intermittent light stimulation. Here, by using genetic mapping, sequencing and functional analyses, we report that a mutation in the acceptor site of the second intron of SV2A (the gene encoding synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2A is causing photosensitive reflex epilepsy in a unique vertebrate model, the Fepi chicken strain, a spontaneous model where the neurological disorder is inherited as an autosomal recessive mutation. This mutation causes an aberrant splicing event and significantly reduces the level of SV2A mRNA in homozygous carriers. Levetiracetam, a second generation antiepileptic drug, is known to bind SV2A, and SV2A knock-out mice develop seizures soon after birth and usually die within three weeks. The Fepi chicken survives to adulthood and responds to levetiracetam, suggesting that the low-level expression of SV2A in these animals is sufficient to allow survival, but does not protect against seizures. Thus, the Fepi chicken model shows that the role of the SV2A pathway in the brain is conserved between birds and mammals, in spite of a large phylogenetic distance. The Fepi model appears particularly useful for further studies of physiopathology of reflex epilepsy, in comparison with induced models of epilepsy in rodents. Consequently, SV2A is a very attractive candidate gene for analysis in the context of both mono- and polygenic generalized epilepsies in humans.

  4. YBR/EiJ mice: a new model of glaucoma caused by genes on chromosomes 4 and 17

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, K. Saidas; Cosma, Mihai; Raghupathy, Narayanan; Sellarole, Michael A.; Tolman, Nicholas G.; de Vries, Wilhelmine; Smith, Richard S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A variety of inherited animal models with different genetic causes and distinct genetic backgrounds are needed to help dissect the complex genetic etiology of glaucoma. The scarcity of such animal models has hampered progress in glaucoma research. Here, we introduce a new inherited glaucoma model: the inbred mouse strain YBR/EiJ (YBR). YBR mice develop a form of pigmentary glaucoma. They exhibit a progressive age-related pigment-dispersing iris disease characterized by iris stromal atrophy. Subsequently, these mice develop elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) and glaucoma. Genetic mapping studies utilizing YBR as a glaucoma-susceptible strain and C57BL/6J as a glaucoma-resistant strain were performed to identify genetic loci responsible for the iris disease and high IOP. A recessive locus linked to Tyrp1b on chromosome 4 contributes to iris stromal atrophy and high IOP. However, this is not the only important locus. A recessive locus on YBR chromosome 17 causes high IOP independent of the iris stromal atrophy. In specific eyes with high IOP caused by YBR chromosome 17, the drainage angle (through which ocular fluid leaves the eye) is largely open. The YBR alleles of genes on chromosomes 4 and 17 underlie the development of high IOP and glaucoma but do so through independent mechanisms. Together, these two loci act in an additive manner to increase the susceptibility of YBR mice to the development of high IOP. The chromosome 17 locus is important not only because it causes IOP elevation in mice with largely open drainage angles but also because it exacerbates IOP elevation and glaucoma induced by pigment dispersion. Therefore, YBR mice are a valuable resource for studying the genetic etiology of IOP elevation and glaucoma, as well as for testing new treatments. PMID:27483353

  5. YBR/EiJ mice: a new model of glaucoma caused by genes on chromosomes 4 and 17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, K Saidas; Cosma, Mihai; Raghupathy, Narayanan; Sellarole, Michael A; Tolman, Nicholas G; de Vries, Wilhelmine; Smith, Richard S; John, Simon W M

    2016-08-01

    A variety of inherited animal models with different genetic causes and distinct genetic backgrounds are needed to help dissect the complex genetic etiology of glaucoma. The scarcity of such animal models has hampered progress in glaucoma research. Here, we introduce a new inherited glaucoma model: the inbred mouse strain YBR/EiJ (YBR). YBR mice develop a form of pigmentary glaucoma. They exhibit a progressive age-related pigment-dispersing iris disease characterized by iris stromal atrophy. Subsequently, these mice develop elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) and glaucoma. Genetic mapping studies utilizing YBR as a glaucoma-susceptible strain and C57BL/6J as a glaucoma-resistant strain were performed to identify genetic loci responsible for the iris disease and high IOP. A recessive locus linked to Tyrp1(b) on chromosome 4 contributes to iris stromal atrophy and high IOP. However, this is not the only important locus. A recessive locus on YBR chromosome 17 causes high IOP independent of the iris stromal atrophy. In specific eyes with high IOP caused by YBR chromosome 17, the drainage angle (through which ocular fluid leaves the eye) is largely open. The YBR alleles of genes on chromosomes 4 and 17 underlie the development of high IOP and glaucoma but do so through independent mechanisms. Together, these two loci act in an additive manner to increase the susceptibility of YBR mice to the development of high IOP. The chromosome 17 locus is important not only because it causes IOP elevation in mice with largely open drainage angles but also because it exacerbates IOP elevation and glaucoma induced by pigment dispersion. Therefore, YBR mice are a valuable resource for studying the genetic etiology of IOP elevation and glaucoma, as well as for testing new treatments. PMID:27483353

  6. Congenital bovine spinal dysmyelination is caused by a missense mutation in the SPAST gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Bo; Nissen, Peter H.; Agerholm, Jørgen S; Bendixen, Christian

    2010-01-01

     Bovine spinal dysmyelination (BSD) is a recessive congenital neurodegenerative disease in cattle (Bos taurus) characterized by pathological changes of the myelin sheaths in the spinal cord. The occurrence of BSD is a longstanding problem in the American Brown Swiss (ABS) breed and in several...... insects to mammals. Interestingly, three different mutations in human SPAST gene at the equivalent position are known to cause HSP. To explore this observation further, we genotyped more than 3,100 animals of various cattle breeds and found that the glutamine allele exclusively occurred in breeds upgraded...... with ABS. Furthermore, all confirmed BSD carriers were heterozygous, while all affected calves were homozygous for the glutamine allele consistent with recessive transmission of the underlying mutation and complete penetrance in the homozygous state. Subsequent analysis of recombinant Spastin in vitro...

  7. Lyme disease caused by Borrelia burgdorferi with two homeologous 16S rRNA genes: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sin Hang

    2016-01-01

    Lyme disease (LD), the most common tick-borne disease in North America, is believed to be caused exclusively by Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto and is usually diagnosed by clinical evaluation and serologic assays. As reported previously in a peer-reviewed article, a 13-year-old boy living in the Northeast of the USA was initially diagnosed with LD based on evaluation of his clinical presentations and on serologic test results. The patient was treated with a course of oral doxycycline for 28 days, and the symptoms resolved. A year later, the boy developed a series of unusual symptoms and did not attend school for 1 year. A LD specialist reviewed the case and found the serologic test band patterns nondiagnostic of LD. The boy was admitted to a psychiatric hospital. After discharge from the psychiatric hospital, a polymerase chain reaction test performed in a winter month when the boy was 16 years old showed a low density of B. burgdorferi sensu lato in the blood of the patient, confirmed by partial 16S rRNA (ribosomal RNA) gene sequencing. Subsequent DNA sequencing analysis presented in this report demonstrated that the spirochete isolate was a novel strain of B. burgdorferi with two homeologous 16S rRNA genes, which has never been reported in the world literature. This case report shows that direct DNA sequencing is a valuable tool for reliable molecular diagnosis of Lyme and related borrelioses, as well as for studies of the diversity of the causative agents of LD because LD patients infected by a rare or novel borrelial variant may produce an antibody pattern that can be different from the pattern characteristic of an infection caused by a typical B. burgdorferi sensu stricto strain. PMID:27186082

  8. Lyme disease caused by Borrelia burgdorferi with two homeologous 16S rRNA genes: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sin Hang

    2016-01-01

    Lyme disease (LD), the most common tick-borne disease in North America, is believed to be caused exclusively by Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto and is usually diagnosed by clinical evaluation and serologic assays. As reported previously in a peer-reviewed article, a 13-year-old boy living in the Northeast of the USA was initially diagnosed with LD based on evaluation of his clinical presentations and on serologic test results. The patient was treated with a course of oral doxycycline for 28 days, and the symptoms resolved. A year later, the boy developed a series of unusual symptoms and did not attend school for 1 year. A LD specialist reviewed the case and found the serologic test band patterns nondiagnostic of LD. The boy was admitted to a psychiatric hospital. After discharge from the psychiatric hospital, a polymerase chain reaction test performed in a winter month when the boy was 16 years old showed a low density of B. burgdorferi sensu lato in the blood of the patient, confirmed by partial 16S rRNA (ribosomal RNA) gene sequencing. Subsequent DNA sequencing analysis presented in this report demonstrated that the spirochete isolate was a novel strain of B. burgdorferi with two homeologous 16S rRNA genes, which has never been reported in the world literature. This case report shows that direct DNA sequencing is a valuable tool for reliable molecular diagnosis of Lyme and related borrelioses, as well as for studies of the diversity of the causative agents of LD because LD patients infected by a rare or novel borrelial variant may produce an antibody pattern that can be different from the pattern characteristic of an infection caused by a typical B. burgdorferi sensu stricto strain. PMID:27186082

  9. Disruption of the novel gene fad104 causes rapid postnatal death and attenuation of cell proliferation, adhesion, spreading and migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The molecular mechanisms at the beginning of adipogenesis remain unknown. Previously, we identified a novel gene, fad104 (factor for adipocyte differentiation 104), transiently expressed at the early stage of adipocyte differentiation. Since the knockdown of the expression of fad104 dramatically repressed adipogenesis, it is clear that fad104 plays important roles in adipocyte differentiation. However, the physiological roles of fad104 are still unknown. In this study, we generated fad104-deficient mice by gene targeting. Although the mice were born in the expected Mendelian ratios, all died within 1 day of birth, suggesting fad104 to be crucial for survival after birth. Furthermore, analyses of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) prepared from fad104-deficient mice provided new insights into the functions of fad104. Disruption of fad104 inhibited adipocyte differentiation and cell proliferation. In addition, cell adhesion and wound healing assays using fad104-deficient MEFs revealed that loss of fad104 expression caused a reduction in stress fiber formation, and notably delayed cell adhesion, spreading and migration. These results indicate that fad104 is essential for the survival of newborns just after birth and important for cell proliferation, adhesion, spreading and migration

  10. Sepsis in preterm infants causes alterations in mucosal gene expression and microbiota profiles compared to non-septic twins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cernada, María; Bäuerl, Christine; Serna, Eva; Collado, Maria Carmen; Martínez, Gaspar Pérez; Vento, Máximo

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis is a life-threatening condition in preterm infants. Neonatal microbiota plays a pivotal role in the immune system maturation. Changes in gut microbiota have been associated to inflammatory disorders; however, a link with sepsis in the neonatal period has not yet been established. We aimed to analyze gut microbiota and mucosal gene expression using non-invasively obtained samples to provide with an integrative perspective of host-microbe interactions in neonatal sepsis. For this purpose, a prospective observational case-control study was conducted in septic preterm dizygotic twins and their non-septic twin controls. Fecal samples were used for both microbiota analysis and host genome-wide expression using exfoliated intestinal cells. Gene expression of exfoliated intestinal cells in septic preterm showed an induction of inflammatory and oxidative stress pathways in the gut and pro-oxidant profile that caused dysbiosis in the gut microbiota with predominance of Enterobacteria and reduction of Bacteroides and Bifidobacterium spp.in fecal samples, leading to a global reduction of beneficial anaerobic bacteria. Sepsis in preterm infants induced low-grade inflammation and oxidative stress in the gut mucosa, and also changes in the gut microbiota. This study highlights the role of inflammation and oxidative stress in neonatal sepsis on gut microbial profiles. PMID:27180802

  11. Sepsis in preterm infants causes alterations in mucosal gene expression and microbiota profiles compared to non-septic twins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cernada, María; Bäuerl, Christine; Serna, Eva; Collado, Maria Carmen; Martínez, Gaspar Pérez; Vento, Máximo

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis is a life-threatening condition in preterm infants. Neonatal microbiota plays a pivotal role in the immune system maturation. Changes in gut microbiota have been associated to inflammatory disorders; however, a link with sepsis in the neonatal period has not yet been established. We aimed to analyze gut microbiota and mucosal gene expression using non-invasively obtained samples to provide with an integrative perspective of host-microbe interactions in neonatal sepsis. For this purpose, a prospective observational case-control study was conducted in septic preterm dizygotic twins and their non-septic twin controls. Fecal samples were used for both microbiota analysis and host genome-wide expression using exfoliated intestinal cells. Gene expression of exfoliated intestinal cells in septic preterm showed an induction of inflammatory and oxidative stress pathways in the gut and pro-oxidant profile that caused dysbiosis in the gut microbiota with predominance of Enterobacteria and reduction of Bacteroides and Bifidobacterium spp.in fecal samples, leading to a global reduction of beneficial anaerobic bacteria. Sepsis in preterm infants induced low-grade inflammation and oxidative stress in the gut mucosa, and also changes in the gut microbiota. This study highlights the role of inflammation and oxidative stress in neonatal sepsis on gut microbial profiles. PMID:27180802

  12. Evaluation of adherence, hemagglutination, and presence of genes codifying for virulence factors of Acinetobacter baumannii causing urinary tract infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graziela Braun

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumannii is a strictly aerobic bacterium which causes severe infections, however its pathogenic characteristics are not well defined. Thirteen A. baumannii strains isolated from urine of hospitalized and nonhospitalized patients with different ages were investigated for the presence of virulence factors. The isolates belonged to biotypes 2, 6, and 9 and were sensitive to imipenem. The majority of them showed resistance to amikacin, ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, norfloxacin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. None of A. baumannii strains presented genes codifying for 17 different virulence factors previously described in uropathogenic Escherichia coli, when tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Nine isolates agglutinated human group AB erythrocytes, in presence of mannose, but none of them agglutinated group O erythrocytes. Adherence to polystyrene was observed in 7 isolates, and this result did not correlate with that obtained in hemagglutination assay. All the isolates were able to grow in iron-limiting conditions, showing that A. baumannii produces some type of siderophore. However, the genes iutA and fyuA, from iron uptake system of E. coli and Yersinia sp., respectively, were not present in the isolates, suggesting the presence of a different type of siderophore. The fimbriae of A. baumannii strains that mediates the adherence are possibly mannose-resistant, eventhough the mechanism of adherence to human epithelial cells still remains to be elucidated.

  13. Complete androgen insensitivity syndrome caused by a deep intronic pseudoexon-activating mutation in the androgen receptor gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Känsäkoski, Johanna; Jääskeläinen, Jarmo; Jääskeläinen, Tiina; Tommiska, Johanna; Saarinen, Lilli; Lehtonen, Rainer; Hautaniemi, Sampsa; Frilander, Mikko J.; Palvimo, Jorma J.; Toppari, Jorma; Raivio, Taneli

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the X-linked androgen receptor (AR) gene underlie complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS), the most common cause of 46,XY sex reversal. Molecular genetic diagnosis of CAIS, however, remains uncertain in patients who show normal coding region of AR. Here, we describe a novel mechanism of AR disruption leading to CAIS in two 46,XY sisters. We analyzed whole-genome sequencing data of the patients for pathogenic variants outside the AR coding region. Patient fibroblasts from the genital area were used for AR cDNA analysis and protein quantification. Analysis of the cDNA revealed aberrant splicing of the mRNA caused by a deep intronic mutation (c.2450-118A>G) in the intron 6 of AR. The mutation creates a de novo 5′ splice site and a putative exonic splicing enhancer motif, which leads to the preferential formation of two aberrantly spliced mRNAs (predicted to include a premature stop codon). Patient fibroblasts contained no detectable AR protein. Our results show that patients with CAIS and normal AR coding region need to be examined for deep intronic mutations that can lead to pseudoexon activation. PMID:27609317

  14. Identification of Two Disease-causing Genes TJP2 and GJB2 in a Chinese Family with Unconditional Autosomal Dominant Nonsyndromic Hereditary Hearing Impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Yang Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There are more than 300 genetic loci that have been found to be related to hereditary hearing impairment (HHI, including 92 causative genes for nonsyndromic hearing loss, among which 34 genes are related to autosomal dominant nonsyndromic HHI (ADNSHHI. Traditional linkage analysis and candidate gene sequencing are not effective at detecting the ADNSHHI, especially for the unconditional families that may have more than one pathogenic cause. This study identified two disease-causing genes TJP2 and GJB2 in a Chinese family with unconditional ADNSHHI. Methods: To decipher the genetic code of a Chinese family (family 686 with ADNSHHI, different gene screening techniques have been performed, including linkage analysis, candidate genes screening, high-throughput sequencing and Sanger sequencing. These techniques were done on samples obtained from this family over a period of 10 years. Results: We identified a pathogenic missense mutation, c. 2081G>A (p.G694E, in TJP2, a gene that plays a crucial role in apoptosis and age-related hearing loss (ARHL. The mutation was co-segregated in this pedigree in all, but not in the two patients who presented with different phenotypes from the other affected family members. In one of the two patients, we confirmed that the compound heterozygosity for p.Y136FNx01 and p.G45E in the GJB2 gene may account for the phenotype shown in this patient. Conclusions: We identified the co-occurrence of two genetic causes in family 686. The possible disease-causing missense mutation of TJP2 in family 686 presents an opportunity for further investigation into ARHL. It is necessary to combine various genes screening methods, especially for some unconventional cases.

  15. Mutations in a novel, cryptic exon of the luteinizing hormone/chorionic gonadotropin receptor gene cause male pseudohermaphroditism.

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    Nina Kossack

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Male pseudohermaphroditism, or Leydig cell hypoplasia (LCH, is an autosomal recessive disorder in individuals with a 46,XY karyotype, characterized by a predominantly female phenotype, a blind-ending vagina, absence of breast development, primary amenorrhea, and the presence of testicular structures. It is caused by mutations in the luteinizing hormone/chorionic gonadotropin receptor gene (LHCGR, which impair either LH/CG binding or signal transduction. However, molecular analysis has revealed that the LHCGR is apparently normal in about 50% of patients with the full clinical phenotype of LCH. We therefore searched the LHCGR for novel genomic elements causative for LCH. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In the present study we have identified a novel, primate-specific bona fide exon (exon 6A within the LHCGR gene. It displays composite characteristics of an internal/terminal exon and possesses stop codons triggering nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD in LHCGR. Transcripts including exon 6A are physiologically highly expressed in human testes and granulosa cells, and result in an intracellular, truncated LHCGR protein of 209 amino acids. We sequenced exon 6A in 16 patients with unexplained LCH and detected mutations in three patients. Functional studies revealed a dramatic increase in the expression of the mutated internal exon 6A transcripts, indicating aberrant NMD. These altered ratios of LHCGR transcripts result in the generation of predominantly nonfunctional LHCGR isoforms, thereby preventing proper expression and functioning. CONCLUSIONS: The identification and characterization of this novel exon not only identifies a new regulatory element within the genomic organization of LHCGR, but also points toward a complex network of receptor regulation, including events at the transcriptional level. These findings add to the molecular diagnostic tools for LCH and extend our understanding of the endocrine regulation of sexual differentiation.

  16. Isolated and Syndromic Retinal Dystrophy Caused by Biallelic Mutations in RCBTB1, a Gene Implicated in Ubiquitination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppieters, Frauke; Ascari, Giulia; Dannhausen, Katharina; Nikopoulos, Konstantinos; Peelman, Frank; Karlstetter, Marcus; Xu, Mingchu; Brachet, Cécile; Meunier, Isabelle; Tsilimbaris, Miltiadis K; Tsika, Chrysanthi; Blazaki, Styliani V; Vergult, Sarah; Farinelli, Pietro; Van Laethem, Thalia; Bauwens, Miriam; De Bruyne, Marieke; Chen, Rui; Langmann, Thomas; Sui, Ruifang; Meire, Françoise; Rivolta, Carlo; Hamel, Christian P; Leroy, Bart P; De Baere, Elfride

    2016-08-01

    Inherited retinal dystrophies (iRDs) are a group of genetically and clinically heterogeneous conditions resulting from mutations in over 250 genes. Here, homozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing (WES) in a consanguineous family revealed a homozygous missense mutation, c.973C>T (p.His325Tyr), in RCBTB1. In affected individuals, it was found to segregate with retinitis pigmentosa (RP), goiter, primary ovarian insufficiency, and mild intellectual disability. Subsequent analysis of WES data in different cohorts uncovered four additional homozygous missense mutations in five unrelated families in whom iRD segregates with or without syndromic features. Ocular phenotypes ranged from typical RP starting in the second decade to chorioretinal dystrophy with a later age of onset. The five missense mutations affect highly conserved residues either in the sixth repeat of the RCC1 domain or in the BTB1 domain. A founder haplotype was identified for mutation c.919G>A (p.Val307Met), occurring in two families of Mediterranean origin. We showed ubiquitous mRNA expression of RCBTB1 and demonstrated predominant RCBTB1 localization in human inner retina. RCBTB1 was very recently shown to be involved in ubiquitination, more specifically as a CUL3 substrate adaptor. Therefore, the effect on different components of the CUL3 and NFE2L2 (NRF2) pathway was assessed in affected individuals' lymphocytes, revealing decreased mRNA expression of NFE2L2 and several NFE2L2 target genes. In conclusion, our study puts forward mutations in RCBTB1 as a cause of autosomal-recessive non-syndromic and syndromic iRD. Finally, our data support a role for impaired ubiquitination in the pathogenetic mechanism of RCBTB1 mutations. PMID:27486781

  17. Molecular evolution of the human SRPX2 gene that causes brain disorders of the Rolandic and Sylvian speech areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levasseur Anthony

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The X-linked SRPX2 gene encodes a Sushi Repeat-containing Protein of unknown function and is mutated in two disorders of the Rolandic/Sylvian speech areas. Since it is linked to defects in the functioning and the development of brain areas for speech production, SRPX2 may thus have participated in the adaptive organization of such brain regions. To address this issue, we have examined the recent molecular evolution of the SRPX2 gene. Results The complete coding region was sequenced in 24 human X chromosomes from worldwide populations and in six representative nonhuman primate species. One single, fixed amino acid change (R75K has been specifically incorporated in human SRPX2 since the human-chimpanzee split. The R75K substitution occurred in the first sushi domain of SRPX2, only three amino acid residues away from a previously reported disease-causing mutation (Y72S. Three-dimensional structural modeling of the first sushi domain revealed that Y72 and K75 are both situated in the hypervariable loop that is usually implicated in protein-protein interactions. The side-chain of residue 75 is exposed, and is located within an unusual and SRPX-specific protruding extension to the hypervariable loop. The analysis of non-synonymous/synonymous substitution rate (Ka/Ks ratio in primates was performed in order to test for positive selection during recent evolution. Using the branch models, the Ka/Ks ratio for the human branch was significantly different (p = 0.027 from that of the other branches. In contrast, the branch-site tests did not reach significance. Genetic analysis was also performed by sequencing 9,908 kilobases (kb of intronic SRPX2 sequences. Despite low nucleotide diversity, neither the HKA (Hudson-Kreitman-Aguadé test nor the Tajima's D test reached significance. Conclusion The R75K human-specific variation occurred in an important functional loop of the first sushi domain of SRPX2, indicating that this evolutionary

  18. Cis-by-Trans regulatory divergence causes the asymmetric lethal effects of an ancestral hybrid incompatibility gene.

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    Shamoni Maheshwari

    Full Text Available The Dobzhansky and Muller (D-M model explains the evolution of hybrid incompatibility (HI through the interaction between lineage-specific derived alleles at two or more loci. In agreement with the expectation that HI results from functional divergence, many protein-coding genes that contribute to incompatibilities between species show signatures of adaptive evolution, including Lhr, which encodes a heterochromatin protein whose amino acid sequence has diverged extensively between Drosophila melanogaster and D. simulans by natural selection. The lethality of D. melanogaster/D. simulans F1 hybrid sons is rescued by removing D. simulans Lhr, but not D. melanogaster Lhr, suggesting that the lethal effect results from adaptive evolution in the D. simulans lineage. It has been proposed that adaptive protein divergence in Lhr reflects antagonistic coevolution with species-specific heterochromatin sequences and that defects in LHR protein localization cause hybrid lethality. Here we present surprising results that are inconsistent with this coding-sequence-based model. Using Lhr transgenes expressed under native conditions, we find no evidence that LHR localization differs between D. melanogaster and D. simulans, nor do we find evidence that it mislocalizes in their interspecific hybrids. Rather, we demonstrate that Lhr orthologs are differentially expressed in the hybrid background, with the levels of D. simulans Lhr double that of D. melanogaster Lhr. We further show that this asymmetric expression is caused by cis-by-trans regulatory divergence of Lhr. Therefore, the non-equivalent hybrid lethal effects of Lhr orthologs can be explained by asymmetric expression of a molecular function that is shared by both orthologs and thus was presumably inherited from the ancestral allele of Lhr. We present a model whereby hybrid lethality occurs by the interaction between evolutionarily ancestral and derived alleles.

  19. Subinhibitory concentrations of antibiotics affect stress and virulence gene expression in Listeria monocytogenes and cause enhanced stress sensitivity but do not affect Caco‐2 cell invasion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Gitte Maegaard; Holch, Anne; Gram, Lone

    2012-01-01

    Antibiotics can act as signal molecules and affect bacterial gene expression, physiology and virulence. The purpose of this study was to determine whether subinhibitory antibiotic concentrations alter gene expression and physiology of Listeria monocytogenes. Using an agar‐based screening assay with...... promoter fusions, 14 of 16 antibiotics induced or repressed expression of one or more stress and/or virulence genes. Despite ampicillin‐induced up‐regulation of PinlA‐lacZ expression, Caco‐2 cell invasion was not affected. Subinhibitory concentrations of ampicillin and tetracycline caused up‐ and down......‐regulation of stress response genes, respectively, but both antibiotics caused increased sensitivity to acid stress. Six combinations of gene‐antibiotic were quantified in broth cultures and five of the six resulted in the same expression pattern as the agar‐based assay. Antibiotics affect virulence and...

  20. A novel mutation in the thyroglobulin gene that causes goiter and dwarfism in Wistar Hannover GALAS rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Akira; Abe, Kuniya; Yuzuriha, Misako; Fujii, Sakiko; Takahashi, Naofumi; Hojo, Hitoshi; Teramoto, Shoji; Aoyama, Hiroaki

    2014-04-01

    Outbred stocks of rats have been used extensively in biomedical, pharmaceutical and/or toxicological studies as a model of genetically heterogeneous human populations. One of such stocks is the Wistar Hannover GALAS rat. However, the colony of Wistar Hannover GALAS rat has been suspected of keeping a problematic mutation that manifests two distinct spontaneous abnormalities, goiter and dwarfism, which often confuses study results. We have successfully identified the responsible mutation, a guanine to thymine transversion at the acceptor site (3' end) of intron 6 in the thyroglobulin (Tg) gene (Tgc.749-1G>T), that induces a complete missing of exon 7 from the whole Tg transcript by mating experiments and subsequent molecular analyses. The following observations confirmed that Tgc.749-1G>T/Tgc.749-1G>T homozygotes manifested both dwarfism and goiter, while Tgc.749-1G>T/+ heterozygotes had only a goiter with normal appearance, suggesting that the mutant phenotypes inherit as an autosomal semi-dominant trait. The mutant phenotypes, goiter and dwarfism, mimicked those caused by typical endocrine disrupters attacking the thyroid. Hence a simple and reliable diagnostic methodology has been developed for genomic DNA-based genotyping of animals. The diagnostic methodology reported here would allow users of Wistar Hannover GALAS rats to evaluate their study results precisely by carefully interpreting the data obtained from Tgc.749-1G>T/+ heterozygotes having externally undetectable thyroidal lesions. PMID:24582622

  1. Is the adiposity-associated FTO gene variant related to all-cause mortality independent of adiposity?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zimmermann, E; Ängquist, L H; Mirza, S S;

    2015-01-01

    Previously, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs9939609, in the FTO gene showed a much stronger association with all-cause mortality than expected from its association with body mass index (BMI), body fat mass index (FMI) and waist circumference (WC). This finding implies that the SNP has......-up. Linear regression showed that the minor allele of the FTO SNP was associated with greater BMI (n = 169,551; 0.32 kg m(-2) ; 95% CI 0.28-0.32, P < 1 × 10(-32) ), WC (n = 152,631; 0.76 cm; 0.68-0.84, P < 1 × 10(-32) ) and FMI (n = 48,192; 0.17 kg m(-2) ; 0.13-0.22, P = 1.0 × 10(-13) ). Cox proportional...... hazard regression analyses for mortality showed that the hazards ratio (HR) for the minor allele of the FTO SNPs was 1.02 (1.00-1.04, P = 0.097), but the apparent excess risk was eliminated after adjustment for BMI and WC (HR: 1.00; 0.98-1.03, P = 0.662) and for FMI (HR: 1.00; 0.96-1.04, P = 0.932). In...

  2. Tobacco streak virus (strain dahlia) suppresses post-transcriptional gene silencing of flavone synthase II in black dahlia cultivars and causes a drastic flower color change.

    OpenAIRE

    Deguchi, Ayumi; Tatsuzawa, Fumi; Hosokawa, Munetaka; Doi, Motoaki; Ohno, Sho

    2015-01-01

    Tobacco streak virus suppressed post-transcriptional gene silencing and caused a flower color change in black dahlias, which supported the role of cyanidin-based anthocyanins for black flower appearance. Black flower color of dahlia (Dahlia variabilis) has been attributed, in part, to the high accumulation of cyanidin-based anthocyanins that occurs when flavone synthesis is reduced because of post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) of flavone synthase II (DvFNS). There are also purple-flow...

  3. Constitutive expression of the neuron-restrictive silencer factor (NRSF)/REST in differentiating neurons disrupts neuronal gene expression and causes axon pathfinding errors in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Paquette, Alice J.; Perez, Sharon E.; Anderson, David J.

    2000-01-01

    The neuron-restrictive silencer factor (NRSF; also known as REST for repressor element-1 silencing transcription factor) is a transcriptional repressor of multiple neuronal genes, but little is known about its function in vivo. NRSF is normally down-regulated upon neuronal differentiation. Constitutive expression of NRSF in the developing spinal cord of chicken embryos caused repression of two endogenous target genes, N-tubulin and Ng-CAM, but did not prevent overt...

  4. A novel point mutation within the EDA gene causes an exon dropping in mature RNA in Holstein Friesian cattle breed affected by X-linked anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pariset Lorraine

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background X-linked anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia is a disorder characterized by abnormal development of tissues and organs of ectodermal origin caused by mutations in the EDA gene. The bovine EDA gene encodes the ectodysplasin A, a membrane protein expressed in keratinocytes, hair follicles and sweat glands, which is involved in the interactions between cell and cell and/or cell and matrix. Four mutations causing ectodermal dysplasia in cattle have been described so far. Results We identified a new single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP at the 9th base of exon 8 in the EDA gene in two calves of Holstein Friesian cattle breed affected by ectodermal dysplasia. This SNP is located in the exonic splicing enhancer (ESEs recognized by SRp40 protein. As a consequence, the spliceosome machinery is no longer able to recognize the sequence as exonic and causes exon skipping. The mutation determines the deletion of the entire exon (131 bp in the RNA processing, causing a severe alteration of the protein structure and thus the disease. Conclusion We identified a mutation, never described before, that changes the regulation of alternative splicing in the EDA gene and causes ectodermal dysplasia in cattle. The analysis of the SNP allows the identification of carriers that can transmit the disease to the offspring. This mutation can thus be exploited for a rational and efficient selection of unequivocally healthy cows for breeding.

  5. Acromesomelic dysplasia, type maroteaux caused by novel loss-of-function mutations of the NPR2 gene: Three case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Song, Mi Hyun; Miura, Kohji; Fujiwara, Makoto; Nawa, Nobutoshi; Ohata, Yasuhisa; Kitaoka, Taichi; Kubota, Takuo; Namba, Noriyuki; Jin, Dong Kyu; Kim, Ok Hwa; Ozono, Keiichi; Cho, Tae-Joon

    2016-02-01

    The C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP)-natriuretic peptide receptor 2 (NPR2) signaling pathway plays an important role in chondrocyte development. Homozygous loss-of-function mutations of the NPR2 gene cause acromesomelic dysplasia, type Maroteaux (AMDM). The aim of this study was to identify and characterize NPR2 loss-of-function mutations in patients with AMDM. The NPR2 gene was sequenced in three Korean patients with AMDM and functional analysis of the mutated proteins was performed in vitro. Five novel NPR2 mutations were found in the three patients: two compound heterozygous mutations [c.1231T>C (Tyr411His) and c.2761C>T (Arg921X) in Patient 1 and c.1663A>T (Lys555X) and c.1711-1G>C (M571VfsX12) in Patient 3] and a homozygous mutation [c.2762G>A (Arg921Gln) in Patient 2]. Serum NT-proCNP concentration was significantly increased in each patient compared to control subjects. Cells transfected with the expression vector of each mutant except those found in Patient 3 showed a negligible or a markedly low cGMP response after treatment with CNP. HA-tagged wild-type (wt) and HA-mutant NPR2 were expressed at comparable levels: there were two bands of ∼130 and ∼120 kDa in wt and Arg921Gln, a single ∼120 kDa band in Tyr411His, and a single ∼110 kDa in the nonsense mutant. With respect to subcellular localization, Arg921Gln as well as wt-NPR2 reached the cell surface, whereas Tyr411His and Arg921X mutants did not. The Tyr411His and Arg921X NPR2 proteins were co-localized with an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) marker and failed to traffic from the ER to the Golgi apparatus. These results are consistent with deglycosylation experiments. Tyr411His and Arg921X NPR2 are complete loss-of-function mutations, whereas Arg921Gln behaves as a receptor for CNP with limited function. PMID:26567084

  6. Pol II-expressed shRNA knocks down Sod2 gene expression and causes phenotypes of the gene knockout in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available RNA interference (RNAi has been used increasingly for reverse genetics in invertebrates and mammalian cells, and has the potential to become an alternative to gene knockout technology in mammals. Thus far, only RNA polymerase III (Pol III-expressed short hairpin RNA (shRNA has been used to make shRNA-expressing transgenic mice. However, widespread knockdown and induction of phenotypes of gene knockout in postnatal mice have not been demonstrated. Previous studies have shown that Pol II synthesizes micro RNAs (miRNAs-the endogenous shRNAs that carry out gene silencing function. To achieve efficient gene knockdown in mammals and to generate phenotypes of gene knockout, we designed a construct in which a Pol II (ubiquitin C promoter drove the expression of an shRNA with a structure that mimics human miRNA miR-30a. Two transgenic lines showed widespread and sustained shRNA expression, and efficient knockdown of the target gene Sod2. These mice were viable but with phenotypes of SOD2 deficiency. Bigenic heterozygous mice generated by crossing these two lines showed nearly undetectable target gene expression and phenotypes consistent with the target gene knockout, including slow growth, fatty liver, dilated cardiomyopathy, and premature death. This approach opens the door of RNAi to a wide array of well-established Pol II transgenic strategies and offers a technically simpler, cheaper, and quicker alternative to gene knockout by homologous recombination for reverse genetics in mice and other mammalian species.

  7. What Causes Polycythemia Vera?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Polycythemia Vera? Primary Polycythemia Polycythemia vera (PV) also ... in the body's JAK2 gene is the main cause of PV. The JAK2 gene makes a protein ...

  8. Repression of c-Myc responsive genes in cycling cells causes G1 arrest through reduction of cyclin E/CDK2 kinase activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berns, K.; Hijmans, E.M.; Bernards, R.A.

    1997-01-01

    The c-myc gene encodes a sequence-specific DNA binding protein involved in proliferation and oncogenesis. Activation of c-myc expression in quiescent cells is sufficient to mediate cell cycle entry, whereas inhibition of c-myc expression causes cycling cells to withdraw from the cell cycle. To searc

  9. A new Frameshift mutation on the α2-globin gene causing α⁺-thalassemia: codon 43 (TTC>-TC or TTC>T-C).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joly, Philippe; Lacan, Philippe; Garcia, Caroline; Barro, Claire; Francina, Alain

    2012-01-01

    We report a new mutation on the α2-globin gene causing α(+)-thalassemia (α(+)-thal) with a deletion of a single nucleotide (T) at amino acid residue 43 [HBA2:c.130delT or HBA2:c.131delT]. This frameshift deletion gives rise to a premature termination codon at codon 47. PMID:22738776

  10. Novel mutation in the AVPR2 gene in a Danish male with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus caused by ER retention and subsequent lysosomal degradation of the mutant receptor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nejsum, L.N.; Christensen, T.M.; Robben, J.H.; Milligan, G.; Deen, P.M.T.; Bichet, D.G.; Levin, K.

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the arginine vasopressin receptor 2 (AVPR2) gene can cause X-linked nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) characterized by the production of large amounts of urine and an inability to concentrate urine in response to the antidiuretic hormone vasopressin. We have identified a novel mutati

  11. Mutations in ZMYND10, a gene essential for proper axonemal assembly of inner and outer dynein arms in humans and flies, cause primary ciliary dyskinesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, Daniel J; Onoufriadis, Alexandros; Shoemark, Amelia;

    2013-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a ciliopathy characterized by airway disease, infertility, and laterality defects, often caused by dual loss of the inner dynein arms (IDAs) and outer dynein arms (ODAs), which power cilia and flagella beating. Using whole-exome and candidate-gene Sanger resequ...

  12. Causes of Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Donate to the National Ataxia Foundation Causes of Ataxia The hereditary ataxias are genetic, which means they ... the disease is inherited as a recessive gene. Ataxia Gene Identified in 1993 The first ataxia gene ...

  13. Deletion of a gene encoding an amino acid transporter in the midgut membrane causes resistance to a Bombyx parvo-like virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Katsuhiko; Kidokoro, Kurako; Sezutsu, Hideki; Nohata, Junko; Yamamoto, Kimiko; Kobayashi, Isao; Uchino, Keiro; Kalyebi, Andrew; Eguchi, Ryokitsu; Hara, Wajiro; Tamura, Toshiki; Katsuma, Susumu; Shimada, Toru; Mita, Kazuei; Kadono-Okuda, Keiko

    2008-05-27

    Bombyx mori densovirus type 2 (BmDNV-2), a parvo-like virus, replicates only in midgut columnar cells and causes fatal disease. The resistance expressed in some silkworm strains against the virus is determined by a single gene, nsd-2, which is characterized as nonsusceptibility irrespective of the viral dose. However, the responsible gene has been unknown. We isolated the nsd-2 gene by positional cloning. The virus resistance is caused by a 6-kb deletion in the ORF of a gene encoding a 12-pass transmembrane protein, a member of an amino acid transporter family, and expressed only in midgut. Germ-line transformation with a wild-type transgene expressed in the midgut restores susceptibility, showing that the defective membrane protein is responsible for resistance. Cumulatively, our data show that the membrane protein is a functional receptor for BmDNV-2. This is a previously undescribed report of positional cloning of a mutant gene in Bombyx and isolation of an absolute virus resistance gene in insects. PMID:18495929

  14. Digital Gene Expression Analysis of Corky Split Vein Caused by Boron Deficiency in ‘Newhall’ Navel Orange (Citrus sinensis Osbeck) for Selecting Differentially Expressed Genes Related to Vascular Hypertrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Cheng-Quan; Liu, Yong-Zhong; An, Ji-Cui; Li, Shuang; Jin, Long-Fei; Zhou, Gao-Feng; Wei, Qing-Jiang; Yan, Hui-Qing; Wang, Nan-Nan; Fu, Li-Na; Liu, Xiao; Hu, Xiao-Mei; Yan, Ting-Shuai; Peng, Shu-Ang

    2013-01-01

    Corky split vein caused by boron (B) deficiency in ‘Newhall’ Navel Orange was studied in the present research. The boron-deficient citrus exhibited a symptom of corky split vein in mature leaves. Morphologic and anatomical surveys at four representative phases of corky split veins showed that the symptom was the result of vascular hypertrophy. Digital gene expression (DGE) analysis was performed based on the Illumina HiSeq™ 2000 platform, which was applied to analyze the gene expression profi...

  15. Riboflavin-responsive oxidative phosphorylation complex I deficiency caused by defective ACAD9: new function for an old gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Gerards; B.J.C. van den Bosch; K. Danhauser; V. Serre; M. van Weeghel; R.J.A. Wanders; G.A.F. Nicolaes; W. Sluiter; K. Schoonderwoerd; H.R. Scholte; H. Prokisch; A. Rötig; I.F.M. de Coo; H.J.M. Smeets

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial complex I deficiency is the most common oxidative phosphorylation defect. Mutations have been detected in mitochondrial and nuclear genes, but the genetics of many patients remain unresolved and new genes are probably involved. In a consanguineous family, patients presented easy fatiga

  16. A novel mutation (4040-4045 nt. delA in exon 14 of the factor VIII gene causing severe hemophilia A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habib Onsori

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemophilia A is an X-linked congenital bleeding disorder caused by Factor VIII deficiency. Different mutations including point mutations, deletions, insertions and inversions have been reported in the FVIII gene, which cause hemophilia A. In the current study, with the use of conformational sensitive gel electrophoresis (CSGE analysis, we report a novel 1-nt deletion in the A6 sequence at codons 1328-1330 (4040-4045 nt delA occurring in exon 14 of the FVIII gene in a seven-year-old Iranian boy with severe hemophilia A. This mutation that causes frameshift and premature stop-codon at 1331 has not previously been reported in the F8 Hemophilia A Mutation, Structure, Test and Resource Site (HAMSTeRS database.

  17. The einkorn wheat (Triticum monococcum) mutant, maintained vegetative phase, is caused by a deletion in the VRN1 gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The einkorn wheat (Triticum monococcum) mutant, maintained vegetative phase (mvp), was induced by nitrogen ion-beam treatment and was identified by its inability to transit from the vegetative to reproductive phase. In our previous study, we showed that WAP1 (wheat APETALA1) is a key gene in the regulatory pathway that controls phase transition from vegetative to reproductive growth in common wheat. WAP1 is an ortholog of the VRN1 gene that is responsible for vernalization insensitivity in einkorn wheat. The mvp mutation resulted from deletion of the VRN1 coding and promoter regions, demonstrating that WAP1/VRN1 is an indispensable gene for phase transition in wheat. Expression analysis of flowering-related genes in mvp plants indicated that wheat GIGANTIA (GI), CONSTANS (CO) and SUPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CONSTANS 1 (SOC1) genes either act upstream of or in a different pathway to WAP1/VRN1

  18. Intronic L1 retrotransposons and nested genes cause transcriptional interference by inducing intron retention, exonization and cryptic polyadenylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristel Kaer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Transcriptional interference has been recently recognized as an unexpectedly complex and mostly negative regulation of genes. Despite a relatively few studies that emerged in recent years, it has been demonstrated that a readthrough transcription derived from one gene can influence the transcription of another overlapping or nested gene. However, the molecular effects resulting from this interaction are largely unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using in silico chromosome walking, we searched for prematurely terminated transcripts bearing signatures of intron retention or exonization of intronic sequence at their 3' ends upstream to human L1 retrotransposons, protein-coding and noncoding nested genes. We demonstrate that transcriptional interference induced by intronic L1s (or other repeated DNAs and nested genes could be characterized by intron retention, forced exonization and cryptic polyadenylation. These molecular effects were revealed from the analysis of endogenous transcripts derived from different cell lines and tissues and confirmed by the expression of three minigenes in cell culture. While intron retention and exonization were comparably observed in introns upstream to L1s, forced exonization was preferentially detected in nested genes. Transcriptional interference induced by L1 or nested genes was dependent on the presence or absence of cryptic splice sites, affected the inclusion or exclusion of the upstream exon and the use of cryptic polyadenylation signals. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest that transcriptional interference induced by intronic L1s and nested genes could influence the transcription of the large number of genes in normal as well as in tumor tissues. Therefore, this type of interference could have a major impact on the regulation of the host gene expression.

  19. Evidence that an evolutionary transition from dehiscent to indehiscent fruits in Lepidium (Brassicaceae) was caused by a change in the control of valve margin identity genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mühlhausen, Andreas; Lenser, Teresa; Mummenhoff, Klaus; Theißen, Günter

    2013-03-01

    In the Brassicaceae, indehiscent fruits evolved from dehiscent fruits several times independently. Here we use closely related wild species of the genus Lepidium as a model system to analyse the underlying developmental genetic mechanisms in a candidate gene approach. ALCATRAZ (ALC), INDEHISCENT (IND), SHATTERPROOF1 (SHP1) and SHATTERPROOF2 (SHP2) are known fruit developmental genes of Arabidopsis thaliana that are expressed in the fruit valve margin governing dehiscence zone formation. Comparative expression analysis by quantitative RT-PCR, Northern blot and in situ hybridization show that their orthologues from Lepidium campestre (dehiscent fruits) are similarly expressed at valve margins. In sharp contrast, expression of the respective orthologues is abolished in the corresponding tissue of indehiscent Lepidium appelianum fruits, indicating that changes in the genetic pathway identified in A. thaliana caused the transition from dehiscent to indehiscent fruits in the investigated species. As parallel mutations in different genes are quite unlikely, we conclude that the changes in gene expression patterns are probably caused by changes in upstream regulators of ALC, IND and SHP1/2, possible candidates from A. thaliana being FRUITFULL (FUL), REPLUMLESS (RPL) and APETALA2 (AP2). However, neither expression analyses nor functional tests in transgenic plants provided any evidence that the FUL or RPL orthologues of Lepidium were involved in evolution of fruit indehiscence in Lepidium. In contrast, stronger expression of AP2 in indehiscent compared to dehiscent fruits identifies AP2 as a candidate gene that deserves further investigation. PMID:23173897

  20. Autosomal recessive woolly hair with hypotrichosis caused by a novel homozygous mutation in the P2RY5 gene

    OpenAIRE

    Shimomura, Yutaka; Garzon, Maria C.; Christiano, Angela M.

    2008-01-01

    During the last decade, several causative genes for hereditary hair diseases have been identified, which have disclosed the molecular mechanisms involved in hair follicle morphogenesis and cycling. We and others recently reported that mutations in the P2RY5 gene, encoding an orphan G protein-coupled receptor, underlie autosomal recessive woolly hair and/or hypotrichosis. Although these findings clearly reveal the involvement of P2RY5 mutations in hereditary hair diseases, the clinical manifes...

  1. P-Body Formation Is a Consequence, Not the Cause, of RNA-Mediated Gene Silencing▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Eulalio, Ana; Behm-Ansmant, Isabelle; Schweizer, Daniel; Izaurralde, Elisa

    2007-01-01

    P bodies are cytoplasmic domains that contain proteins involved in diverse posttranscriptional processes, such as mRNA degradation, nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD), translational repression, and RNA-mediated gene silencing. The localization of these proteins and their targets in P bodies raises the question of whether their spatial concentration in discrete cytoplasmic domains is required for posttranscriptional gene regulation. We show that processes such as mRNA decay, NMD, and RNA-media...

  2. Mutations in the PFN1 gene are not a common cause in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal lobar degeneration in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattante, Serena; Le Ber, Isabelle; Camuzat, Agnès; Brice, Alexis; Kabashi, Edor

    2013-06-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) are 2 adult onset neurological disorders with overlapping symptoms and clinical characteristics. It is well established that they share a common pathologic and genetic background. Recently, mutations in profilin 1 gene (PFN1) have been identified in patients with familial ALS, suggesting a role for this gene in the pathogenesis of the disease. Based on this, we hypothesized that mutations in PFN1 might also contribute to FTLD disease. We studied a French cohort of 165 ALS/FTLD patients, without finding any variant. We conclude that mutations in PFN1 are not a common cause for ALS/FTLD in France. PMID:23182804

  3. Cord blood gene expression supports that prenatal exposure to perfluoroalkyl substances causes depressed immune functionality in early childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennings, Jeroen L A; Jennen, Danyel G J; Nygaard, Unni C; Namork, Ellen; Haug, Line S; van Loveren, Henk; Granum, Berit

    2016-01-01

    Perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are a class of synthetic compounds that have widespread use in consumer and industrial applications. PFAS are considered environmental pollutants that have various toxic properties, including effects on the immune system. Recent human studies indicate that prenatal exposure to PFAS leads to suppressed immune responses in early childhood. In this study, data from the Norwegian BraMat cohort was used to investigate transcriptomics profiles in neonatal cord blood and their association with maternal PFAS exposure, anti-rubella antibody levels at 3 years of age and the number of common cold episodes until 3 years. Genes associated with PFAS exposure showed enrichment for immunological and developmental functions. The analyses identified a toxicogenomics profile of 52 PFAS exposure-associated genes that were in common with genes associated with rubella titers and/or common cold episodes. This gene set contains several immunomodulatory genes (CYTL1, IL27) as well as other immune-associated genes (e.g. EMR4P, SHC4, ADORA2A). In addition, this study identified PPARD as a PFAS toxicogenomics marker. These markers can serve as the basis for further mechanistic or epidemiological studies. This study provides a transcriptomics connection between prenatal PFAS exposure and impaired immune function in early childhood and supports current views on PPAR- and NF-κB-mediated modes of action. The findings add to the available evidence that PFAS exposure is immunotoxic in humans and support regulatory policies to phase out these substances. PMID:25812627

  4. Resistance to rice blast(Pyricularia oryzae) caused by the expression of trichosanthin gene in transgenic rice plants transferred through agrobacterium method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The gene of trichosanthin has been transferred into rice plants through agrobacterium method.The single copy insertion and the expression of foreign gene have been proved in regenerated plants.In antifungal assay the degrees of rice blast (Pyricularia oryzae) infection of the transgenic plants expressing trichosanthin and expressing GUS gene as control have been evaluated.The differences such as the time of disease symptom observed,the number of infected plants and damaged leaves,the growth of infected plants of the two transgenic plants after being inoculated by rice blast (Pyricularia oryzae) are significant.The transgenic plants with trichosanthin gene grew faster than the plants with GUS gene,even when humidity environment was removed.The results show that the transgenic plants that expressed trichosanthin are able to delay the infection of rice blast compared with the plants as control.In addition,no damage caused by the expression of trichosanthin gene in transgenic plants has been observed.

  5. Inherited amplification of an active gene in the cytochrome P450 CYP2D locus as a cause of ultrarapid metabolism of debrisoquine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, I.; Lundqvist, E.; Ingelman-Sundberg, M. (Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden)); Bertilsson, L.; Dahl, M.L.; Sjoeqvist, F. (Huddinge Univ. Hospital, Huddinge (Sweden))

    1993-11-15

    Deficient hydroxylation of debrisoquine is an autosomal recessive trait that affects [approx]7% of the Caucasian population. These individuals (poor metabolizers) carry deficient:CYP2D6 gene variants and have an impaired metabolism of several commonly used drugs. The opposite phenomenon also exists, and certain individuals metabolize the drugs very rapidly, resulting in subtherapeutic plasma concentrations at normal doses. In the present study, the authors have investigated the molecular genetic basis for ultrarapid metabolism of debrisoquine. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the CYP2D locus in two families with very rapid metabolism of debrisoquine [metabolic ratio (MR) for debrisoquine = 0.01-0.1] revealed the variant CYP2D6 gene CYP2D6L. EcoRI RFLP and Xba I pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analyses showed that this gene had been amplified 12-fold in three members (father and his two children) of one of the families, and two copies were present among members of the other family. The CYP2D6L gene had an open reading frame and carried two mutations causing amino acid substitutions: one in exon 6, yielding an Arg-296[yields]Cys exchange and one in exon 9 causing Ser-486[yields]Thr. The MR of subjects carrying one copy of the CYP2D6L gene did not significantly differ from that of those with the wild-type gene, indicating that the structural alterations were not of importance for the catalytic properties of the gene product. Examination of the MR among subjects carrying wild-type CYP2D6, CYP2D6L, or deficient alleles revealed a relationship between the number of active genes and MR. The data show the principle of inherited amplification of an active gene. Furthermore, the finding of a specific haplotype with two or more active CYP2D6 genes allows genotyping for ultrarapid drug metabolizers. This genotyping could be of predictive value for individualized and more efficient drug therapy.

  6. A novel mutation in the GAN gene causes an intermediate form of giant axonal neuropathy in an Arab-Israeli family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Rashid, M; Mahajnah, M; Jaber, L; Kornreich, L; Bar-On, E; Basel-Vanagaite, L; Soffer, D; Koenig, M; Straussberg, R

    2013-05-01

    Giant axonal neuropathy is a severe autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder of childhood that affects both the peripheral and central nervous systems. It is caused by mutations in the GAN gene linked to chromosome 16q24.1 At least 45 distinct disease-causing mutations have been identified throughout the gene in families of various ethnic origins, with different symptomatologies and different clinical courses. To date, no characteristic mutation or phenotype-genotype correlation has been established. We describe a novel missense mutation in four siblings born to consanguineous parents of Arab original with clinical and molecular features compatible with giant axonal neuropathy. The phenotype was characterized by a predominant motor and sensory peripheral neuropathies and severe skeletal deformities. PMID:23332420

  7. Mutations in the latent TGF-beta binding protein 3 (LTBP3) gene cause brachyolmia with amelogenesis imperfecta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huckert, Mathilde; Stoetzel, Corinne; Morkmued, Supawich; Laugel-Haushalter, Virginie; Geoffroy, Véronique; Muller, Jean; Clauss, François; Prasad, Megana K.; Obry, Frédéric; Raymond, Jean Louis; Switala, Marzena; Alembik, Yves; Soskin, Sylvie; Mathieu, Eric; Hemmerlé, Joseph; Weickert, Jean-Luc; Dabovic, Branka Brukner; Rifkin, Daniel B.; Dheedene, Annelies; Boudin, Eveline; Caluseriu, Oana; Cholette, Marie-Claude; Mcleod, Ross; Antequera, Reynaldo; Gellé, Marie-Paule; Coeuriot, Jean-Louis; Jacquelin, Louis-Frédéric; Bailleul-Forestier, Isabelle; Manière, Marie-Cécile; Van Hul, Wim; Bertola, Debora; Dollé, Pascal; Verloes, Alain; Mortier, Geert; Dollfus, Hélène; Bloch-Zupan, Agnès

    2015-01-01

    Inherited dental malformations constitute a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders. Here, we report on four families, three of them consanguineous, with an identical phenotype, characterized by significant short stature with brachyolmia and hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) with almost absent enamel. This phenotype was first described in 1996 by Verloes et al. as an autosomal recessive form of brachyolmia associated with AI. Whole-exome sequencing resulted in the identification of recessive hypomorphic mutations including deletion, nonsense and splice mutations, in the LTBP3 gene, which is involved in the TGF-beta signaling pathway. We further investigated gene expression during mouse development and tooth formation. Differentiated ameloblasts synthesizing enamel matrix proteins and odontoblasts expressed the gene. Study of an available knockout mouse model showed that the mutant mice displayed very thin to absent enamel in both incisors and molars, hereby recapitulating the AI phenotype in the human disorder. PMID:25669657

  8. Clofibrate causes an upregulation of PPAR-{alpha} target genes but does not alter expression of SREBP target genes in liver and adipose tissue of pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luci, Sebastian; Giemsa, Beatrice; Kluge, Holger; Eder, Klaus

    2007-07-01

    This study investigated the effect of clofibrate treatment on expression of target genes of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-alpha and various genes of the lipid metabolism in liver and adipose tissue of pigs. An experiment with 18 pigs was performed in which pigs were fed either a control diet or the same diet supplemented with 5 g clofibrate/kg for 28 days. Pigs treated with clofibrate had heavier livers, moderately increased mRNA concentrations of various PPAR-alpha target genes in liver and adipose tissue, a higher concentration of 3-hydroxybutyrate, and markedly lower concentrations of triglycerides and cholesterol in plasma and lipoproteins than control pigs (P liver and adipose tissue and mRNA concentrations of apolipoproteins A-I, A-II, and C-III in the liver were not different between both groups of pigs. In conclusion, this study shows that clofibrate treatment activates PPAR-alpha in liver and adipose tissue and has a strong hypotriglyceridemic and hypocholesterolemic effect in pigs. The finding that mRNA concentrations of some proteins responsible for the hypolipidemic action of fibrates in humans were not altered suggests that there were certain differences in the mode of action compared with humans. It is also shown that PPAR-alpha activation by clofibrate does not affect hepatic expression of SREBP target genes involved in synthesis of triglycerides and cholesterol homeostasis in liver and adipose tissue of pigs. PMID:17363680

  9. Prenatal diagnosis by FISH in a family with Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease caused by duplication of PLP gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, K; Palmer, R; Rao, K; Malcolm, S

    1999-03-01

    A diagnosis of Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (MIM 312080) was made in a young boy. No mutation in the coding region of the proteolipid protein (PLP) gene had been found. The boy's maternal aunt came for prenatal diagnosis when 16+ weeks pregnant and carrying a male fetus. Samples were tested for duplication of the PLP gene, by interphase FISH, in lymphocyte preparations from the proband, his aunt and an amniotic fluid cell preparation from the fetus. The proband was found to carry the duplication, thus confirming the diagnosis of Pelizaeus Merzbacher disease, but neither the aunt nor the fetus carried a duplication. PMID:10210128

  10. Analysis of Large Phenotypic Variability of EEC and SHFM4 Syndromes Caused by K193E Mutation of the TP63 Gene

    OpenAIRE

    Jianhua Wei; Yang Xue; Lian Wu; Jie Ma; Xiuli Yi; Junrui Zhang; Bin Lu; Chunying Li; Dashuang Shi; Songtao Shi; Xinghua Feng; Tao Cai

    2012-01-01

    EEC (ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, clefting; OMIM 604292) is an autosomal dominant developmental disorder resulting mainly from pathogenic mutations of the DNA-binding domain (DBD) of the TP63 gene. In this study, we showed that K193E mutation in nine affected individuals of a four-generation kindred with a large degree of phenotypic variability causes four different syndromes or TP63-related disorders: EEC, Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia (EE), isolated ectodermal dysplasia, and isol...

  11. Brd2 gene disruption causes ‘metabolically healthy’ obesity: Epigenetic and chromatin-based mechanisms that uncouple obesity from Type 2 diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Fangnian; Deeney, Jude T.; Denis, Gerald V.

    2013-01-01

    Disturbed body energy balance can lead to obesity and obesity-driven diseases such as Type 2 diabetes, which have reached an epidemic level. Evidence indicates that obesity induced inflammation is a major cause of insulin resistance and Type 2 diabetes. Environmental factors, such as nutrients, affect body energy balance through epigenetic or chromatin-based mechanisms. As a bromodomain and external domain family transcription regulator, Brd2 regulates expression of many genes through interpr...

  12. Investigating the potential influence of cause of death and cocaine levels on the differential expression of genes associated with cocaine abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannon, Michael J; Savonen, Candace L; Hartley, Zachary J; Johnson, Magen M; Schmidt, Carl J

    2015-01-01

    The development of new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of complex brain disorders such as drug addiction is likely to be advanced by a more complete understanding of the underlying molecular pathophysiology. Although the study of postmortem human brain represents a unique resource in this regard, it can be challenging to disentangle the relative contribution of chronic pathological processes versus perimortem events to the observed changes in gene expression. To begin to unravel this issue, we analyzed by quantitative PCR the midbrain expression of numerous candidate genes previously associated with cocaine abuse. Data obtained from chronic cocaine abusers (and matched control subjects) dying of gunshot wounds were compared with a prior study of subjects with deaths directly attributable to cocaine abuse. Most of the genes studied (i.e., tyrosine hydroxylase, dopamine transporter, forkhead box A2, histone variant H3 family 3B, nuclear factor kappa B inhibitor alpha, growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible beta) were found to be differentially expressed in chronic cocaine abusers irrespective of immediate cause of death or perimortem levels of cocaine, suggesting that these may represent core pathophysiological changes arising with chronic drug abuse. On the other hand, chemokine C-C motif ligand 2 and jun proto-oncogene expression were unaffected in cocaine-abusing subjects dying of gunshot wounds, in contrast to the differential expression previously reported in cocaine-related fatalities. The possible influence of cause of death and other factors on the cocaine-responsiveness of these genes is discussed. PMID:25658879

  13. Gene silencing of BnTT10 family genes causes retarded pigmentation and lignin reduction in the seed coat of Brassica napus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Zhang

    Full Text Available Yellow-seed (i.e., yellow seed coat is one of the most important agronomic traits of Brassica plants, which is correlated with seed oil and meal qualities. Previous studies on the Brassicaceae, including Arabidopsis and Brassica species, proposed that the seed-color trait is correlative to flavonoid and lignin biosynthesis, at the molecular level. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the oxidative polymerization of flavonoid and biosynthesis of lignin has been demonstrated to be catalyzed by laccase 15, a functional enzyme encoded by the AtTT10 gene. In this study, eight Brassica TT10 genes (three from B. napus, three from B. rapa and two from B. oleracea were isolated and their roles in flavonoid oxidation/polymerization and lignin biosynthesis were investigated. Based on our phylogenetic analysis, these genes could be divided into two groups with obvious structural and functional differentiation. Expression studies showed that Brassica TT10 genes are active in developing seeds, but with differential expression patterns in yellow- and black-seeded near-isogenic lines. For functional analyses, three black-seeded B. napus cultivars were chosen for transgenic studies. Transgenic B. napus plants expressing antisense TT10 constructs exhibited retarded pigmentation in the seed coat. Chemical composition analysis revealed increased levels of soluble proanthocyanidins, and decreased extractable lignin in the seed coats of these transgenic plants compared with that of the controls. These findings indicate a role for the Brassica TT10 genes in proanthocyanidin polymerization and lignin biosynthesis, as well as seed coat pigmentation in B. napus.

  14. Gene silencing of BnTT10 family genes causes retarded pigmentation and lignin reduction in the seed coat of Brassica napus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai; Lu, Kun; Qu, Cunmin; Liang, Ying; Wang, Rui; Chai, Yourong; Li, Jiana

    2013-01-01

    Yellow-seed (i.e., yellow seed coat) is one of the most important agronomic traits of Brassica plants, which is correlated with seed oil and meal qualities. Previous studies on the Brassicaceae, including Arabidopsis and Brassica species, proposed that the seed-color trait is correlative to flavonoid and lignin biosynthesis, at the molecular level. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the oxidative polymerization of flavonoid and biosynthesis of lignin has been demonstrated to be catalyzed by laccase 15, a functional enzyme encoded by the AtTT10 gene. In this study, eight Brassica TT10 genes (three from B. napus, three from B. rapa and two from B. oleracea) were isolated and their roles in flavonoid oxidation/polymerization and lignin biosynthesis were investigated. Based on our phylogenetic analysis, these genes could be divided into two groups with obvious structural and functional differentiation. Expression studies showed that Brassica TT10 genes are active in developing seeds, but with differential expression patterns in yellow- and black-seeded near-isogenic lines. For functional analyses, three black-seeded B. napus cultivars were chosen for transgenic studies. Transgenic B. napus plants expressing antisense TT10 constructs exhibited retarded pigmentation in the seed coat. Chemical composition analysis revealed increased levels of soluble proanthocyanidins, and decreased extractable lignin in the seed coats of these transgenic plants compared with that of the controls. These findings indicate a role for the Brassica TT10 genes in proanthocyanidin polymerization and lignin biosynthesis, as well as seed coat pigmentation in B. napus. PMID:23613820

  15. ROAM mutations causing increased expression of yeast genes: their activation by signals directed toward conjugation functions and their formation by insertion of tyl repetitive elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Errede, B.; Cardillo, T.S.; Wever, G.; Sherman, F.

    1980-01-01

    Mechanisms available to eukaryotic organisms for the coordinate regulation of gene expression are being examined by genetic and biochemical characterization of an unusual mutation, CYC7-H2, which causes overproduction of iso-2-cytochrome c in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The CYC7-H2 mutation causes approximately a twenty fold overproduction of iso-2-cytochrome c in haploid strains but only a one to four fold overproduction in MATa/MAT..cap alpha.. diploid strains. This regulation of overproduction has been characterized as a response to signals controlling conjugation in yeast. The CYC7-H2 mutation is closely related to other regulatory mutations occurring at the cargA, cargB and DUR1,2 loci which are the structural genes for arginase, ornithine transaminase and urea amidolyase, respectively. Similar to the CYC7-H2 mutation, the mutations designated cargA/sup +/O/sup h/, cargB/sup +/O/sup h/ and durO/sup h/ cause constitutive production of their respective gene products at much lower levels in MATa/MAT..cap alpha.. diploid strains than in the corresponding haploid strains. Observations characterizing the regulation of overproduction in the CYC7-H2 mutant are presented with the additional and parallel observations for the O/sup h/ mutants.

  16. A Missense Mutation in the Mouse Col2a1 Gene Causes Spondyloepiphyseal Dysplasia Congenita, Hearing Loss, and Retinoschisis

    OpenAIRE

    Donahue, Leah Rae; Chang, Bo; Mohan, Subburaman; MIYAKOSHI, NAO; Wergedal, Jon E.; Baylink, David J.; Hawes, Norman L.; Rosen, Clifford J.; WARD-BAILEY, PATRICIA; Zheng, Qing Y.; Roderick T Bronson; Johnson, Kenneth R.; Davisson, Muriel T.

    2003-01-01

    A missense mutation in the mouse Col2a1 gene has been discovered, resulting in a mouse phenotype with similarities to human spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia (SED) congenita. In addition, SED patients have been identified with a similar molecular mutation in human COL2A1. This mouse model offers a useful tool for molecular and biological studies of bone development and pathology.

  17. Severe myocardial fibrosis caused by a deletion of the 5' end of the lamin A/C gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Tintelen, J. Peter; Tio, Rene A.; Kerstjens-Frederikse, Wilhelmina S.; van Berlo, Jop H.; Boven, Ludolf G.; Suurmeijer, Albert J. H.; White, Stefan J.; den Dunnen, Johan T.; te Meerman, Gerard J.; Vos, Yvonne J.; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; Osinga, Jan; van den Berg, Maarten P.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Buys, Charles H. C. M.; Hofstra, Robert M. W.; Pinto, Yigal M.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives The goal of this study was to identify the underlying gene defect in a family with inherited myocardial fibrosis. Background A large family with an autosomal dominantly inherited form of myocardial fibrosis with a highly malignant clinical outcome has been investigated. Because myocardial

  18. Presence of the KPC carbapenemase gene in Enterobacteriaceae causing bacteremia, and the correlation with in vitro carbapenem susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    During six months, we obtained Enterobacteriaceae isolates from patients with Gram-negative bacteremia at a 1250-bed teaching hospital in St. Louis, Missouri, and compared carbapenem susceptibility with the presence of blaKPC, a transferable carbapenemase gene. Three (1.2%) out of 243 isolates were ...

  19. Mutation in the RPE65 gene causing hereditary retinal dystrophy in the Briard dogs: application of a new detection method

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bechyňová, Renata; Dostál, Jaromír; Stratil, Antonín; Jílek, F.; Horák, Pavel

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 4 (2008), s. 176-179. ISSN 1212-1819 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1QS500450578; GA ČR GD523/03/H076 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : RPE65 gene * CSNB * dog Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 0.735, year: 2008

  20. Binary PAH mixtures cause additive or antagonistic effects on gene expression but synergistic effects on DNA adduct formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staal, Y.C.M.; Hebels, D.G.A.J.; Herwijnen, M.H.M. van; Gottschalk, R.W.H.; Schooten, F.J. van; Delft, J.H.M. van

    2007-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) cover a wide range of structurally related compounds which differ greatly in their carcinogenic potency. PAH exposure usually occurs through mixtures rather than individual compounds. Therefore, we assessed whether the effects of binary PAH mixtures on gene ex

  1. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis caused by deletion of the GM-CSFRα gene in the X chromosome pseudoautosomal region 1

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez-Moczygemba, Margarita; Doan, Minh L.; Elidemir, Okan; Fan, Leland L.; Cheung, Sau Wai; Lei, Jonathan T.; Moore, James P.; Tavana, Ghamartaj; Lewis, Lora R; Zhu, Yiming; Muzny, Donna M.; Gibbs, Richard A; Huston, David P.

    2008-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rare lung disorder in which surfactant-derived lipoproteins accumulate excessively within pulmonary alveoli, causing severe respiratory distress. The importance of granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in the pathogenesis of PAP has been confirmed in humans and mice, wherein GM-CSF signaling is required for pulmonary alveolar macrophage catabolism of surfactant. PAP is caused by disruption of GM-CSF signaling in these cells, and is...

  2. Steroidogenic factor-1 (SF-1 gene mutation as a frequent cause of primary amenorrhea in 46,XY female adolescents with low testosterone concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Servant Nadège

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary amenorrhea due to 46,XY disorders of sex differentiation (DSD is a frequent reason for consultation in endocrine and gynecology clinics. Among the genetic causes of low-testosterone primary amenorrhea due to 46,XY DSD, SRY gene is reported to be frequently involved, but other genes, such as SF1 and WT1, have never been studied for their prevalence. Methods We directly sequenced SRY, SF1 and WT1 genes in 15 adolescent girls with primary amenorrhea, low testosterone concentration, and XY karyotype, to determine the prevalence of mutations. We also analyzed the LH receptor gene in patients with high LH and normal FSH concentrations. Results Among the 15 adolescents with primary amenorrhea and low testosterone concentration, we identified two new SRY mutations, five new SF1 mutations and one new LH receptor gene mutation. Our study confirms the 10-15% prevalence of SRY mutations and shows the high prevalence (33% of SF1 abnormalities in primary amenorrhea due to 46,XY DSD with low plasma testosterone concentration. Conclusions The genetic analysis of low-testosterone primary amenorrhea is complex as several factors may be involved. This work underlines the need to systematically analyze the SF1 sequence in girls with primary amenorrhea due to 46,XY DSD and low testosterone, as well as in newborns with 46,XY DSD.

  3. A Homozygous TPO Gene Duplication (c.1184_1187dup4) Causes Congenital Hypothyroidism in Three Siblings Born to a Consanguineous Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cangul, Hakan; Aydin, Banu K; Bas, Firdevs

    2015-12-01

    Congenital hypothyroidism (CH) is the most common neonatal endocrine disease, and germ-line mutations in the TPO gene cause the inherited form of the disease. Our aim in this study was to determine the genetic basis of congenital hypothyroidism in three affected children coming from a consanguineous Turkish family. Because CH is usually inherited in autosomal recessive manner in consanguineous/multicase families, we adopted a two-stage strategy of genetic linkage studies and targeted sequencing of the candidate genes. First, we investigated the potential genetic linkage of the family to any known CH locus, using microsatellite markers, and then screened for mutations in linked-gene by conventional sequencing. The family showed potential linkage to the TPO gene and we detected a homozygous duplication (c.1184_1187dup4) in all cases. The mutation segregated with disease status in the family. This study confirms the pathogenicity of the c.1184_1187dup4 mutation in the TPO gene and helps establish a genotype/phenotype correlation associated with this mutation. It also highlights the importance of molecular genetic studies in the definitive diagnosis and accurate classification of CH. PMID:27617131

  4. The Tourette International Collaborative Genetics (TIC Genetics) study, finding the genes causing Tourette syndrome: objectives and methods

    OpenAIRE

    Dietrich, Andrea; Fernandez, Thomas V.; King, Robert A.; State, Matthew W.; Tischfield, Jay A.; Pieter J Hoekstra; Heiman, Gary A.; ,

    2014-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by recurrent motor and vocal tics, often accompanied by obsessive–compulsive disorder and/or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. While the evidence for a genetic contribution is strong, its exact nature has yet to be clarified fully. There is now mounting evidence that the genetic risks for TS include both common and rare variants and may involve complex multigenic inheritance or, in rare cases, a single major gene. Bas...

  5. A stop-gain in the laminin, alpha 3 gene causes recessive junctional epidermolysis bullosa in Belgian Blue cattle

    OpenAIRE

    Sartelet, Arnaud; Harland, Chad; Tamma, Nico; Karim, Latifa; Bayrou, Calixte; Li, Wanbo; Ahariz, Naïma; Coppieters, Wouter; Georges, Michel; Charlier, Carole

    2015-01-01

    Four newborn purebred Belgian Blue calves presenting a severe form of epidermolysis bullosa were recently referred to our heredo-surveillance platform. SNP array genotyping followed by autozygosity mapping located the causative gene in a 8.3-Mb interval on bovine chromosome 24. Combining information from (i) whole-genome sequencing of an affected calf, (ii) transcriptomic data from a panel of tissues and (iii) a list of functionally ranked positional candidates pinpointed a private G to A nuc...

  6. An atypical phenotype of hypokalemic periodic paralysis caused by a mutation in the sodium channel gene SCN4A

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Yang Hee; Kim, June Bum

    2010-01-01

    Familial hypokalemic periodic paralysis is an autosomal-dominant channelopathy characterized by episodic muscle weakness with hypokalemia. The respiratory and cardiac muscles typically remain unaffected, but we report an atypical case of a family with hypokalemic periodic paralysis in which the affected members presented with frequent respiratory insufficiency during severe attacks. Molecular analysis revealed a heterozygous c.664 C>T transition in the sodium channel gene SCN4A, leading to an...

  7. Analysis of the CFTR gene in Venezuelan cystic fibrosis patients, identification of six novel cystic fibrosis-causing genetic variants

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez K; de Mendonca E; Matute X; Chaustre I; Villalón M; Takiff H

    2016-01-01

    Karen Sánchez,1 Elizabeth de Mendonca,1 Xiorama Matute,2 Ismenia Chaustre,2 Marlene Villalón,3 Howard Takiff4 1Unit of Genetic and Forensic Studies, Venezuelan Institute for Scientific Research (IVIC), 2Hospital JM de los Ríos, 3Hospital José Ignacio Baldo, Algodonal, National Reference Unit, 4Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, Venezuelan Institute for Scientific Research (IVIC), Caracas, Venezuela. Abstract: The mutations in the CFTR gene found in patients with cy...

  8. Analysis of the CFTR gene in Venezuelan cystic fibrosis patients, identification of six novel cystic fibrosis-causing genetic variants

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Karen Sánchez,1 Elizabeth de Mendonca,1 Xiorama Matute,2 Ismenia Chaustre,2 Marlene Villalón,3 Howard Takiff4 1Unit of Genetic and Forensic Studies, Venezuelan Institute for Scientific Research (IVIC), 2Hospital JM de los Ríos, 3Hospital José Ignacio Baldo, Algodonal, National Reference Unit, 4Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, Venezuelan Institute for Scientific Research (IVIC), Caracas, Venezuela. Abstract: The mutations in the CFTR gene found in ...

  9. Conditional beta1-integrin gene deletion in neural crest cells causes severe developmental alterations of the peripheral nervous system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pietri, Thomas; Eder, Olivier; Breau, Marie Anne;

    2004-01-01

    Integrins are transmembrane receptors that are known to interact with the extracellular matrix and to be required for migration, proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. We have generated mice with a neural crest cell-specific deletion of the beta1-integrin gene to analyse the role of beta1-...... almost complete absence of Schwann cells and sensory axon segregation and defective maturation in neuromuscular synaptogenesis. Thus, beta1-integrins are important for the control of embryonic and postnatal peripheral nervous system development....

  10. Mapping the gene causing hereditary primary hyperparathyroidism in a Portuguese kindred to chromosome 1q22-q31.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, C; Cavaco, B M; Jauch, A; Dixon, P H; Forbes, S; Harding, B; Holtgreve-Grez, H; Schoell, B; Pereira, M C; Font, A P; Loureiro, M M; Sobrinho, L G; Santos, M A; Thakker, R V; Jausch, A

    1999-02-01

    A Portuguese kindred with autosomal dominant isolated primary hyperparathyroidism (HPT) that was associated with parathyroid adenomas and carcinomas was investigated with the aim of determining the chromosomal location of this gene, designated HPTPort. Leukocyte DNA from 9 affected and 16 unaffected members and 7 parathyroid tumors from 4 patients was used in comparative genomic hybridization (CGH), tumor loss of heterozygosity (LOH), and family linkage studies. The CGH studies revealed abnormalities of chromosomes 1 and 13, and the results of LOH studies were consistent with the involvements of tumor suppressor genes from these regions. Family segregation studies mapped HPTPort to chromosome 1q22-q31 by establishing linkage with eight loci (D1S254, D1S222, D1S202, D1S238, D1S428, D1S2877, D1S422, and D1S412) (peak two-point LOD scores = 3. 46-5.14 at 0% recombination), and defined the location of HPT Port to a 21 cM region flanked centromerically by D1S215 and telomerically by D1S306. Thus, HPTPort has been mapped to chromosome 1q22-q31, and a characterization of this gene will help to elucidate further the mechanisms that are involved in the development of parathyroid tumors. PMID:9933477

  11. A missense mutation in the human liver/bone/kidney alkaline phosphatase gene causing a lethal form of hypophosphatasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hypophosphatasia is an inherited disorder characterized by defective bone mineralization and a deficiency of serum and tissue liver/bone/kidney alkaline phosphatase (L/B/K ALP) activity. Clinical severity is variable, ranging from death in utero (due to severe rickets) to pathologic fractures first presenting in adult life. Affected siblings, however, are phenotypically similar. Severe forms of the disease are inherited in an autosomal recessive fashion; heterozygotes often show reduced serum ALP activity. The specific gene defects in hypophosphatasia are unknown but are thought to occur either at the L/B/K ALP locus or within another gene that regulates L/B/K ALP expression. The authors used the polymerase chain reaction to examine L/B/K ALP cDNA from a patient with a perinatal (lethal) form of the disease. They observed a guanine-to-adenine transition in nucleotide 711 of the cDNA that converts alanine-162 of the mature enzyme to threonine. The affected individual, whose parents are second cousins, is homozygous for the mutant allele. Introduction of this mutation into an otherwise normal cDNA by site-directed mutagenesis abolished the expression of active enzyme, demonstrating that a defect in the L/B/K ALP gene results in hypophosphatasia and that the enzyme is, therefore, essential for normal skeletal mineralization

  12. RNA interference gene therapy in dominant retinitis pigmentosa and cone-rod dystrophy mouse models caused by GCAP1 mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Baehr

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available RNA interference (RNAi knockdown is an efficacious therapeutic strategy for silencing genes causative for dominant retinal dystrophies. To test this, we used self-complementary (sc AAV2/8 vector to develop an RNAi-based therapy in two dominant retinal degeneration mouse models. The allele-specific model expresses transgenic bovine GCAP1(Y99C establishing a rapid RP-like phenotype, whereas the nonallele-specific model expresses mouse GCAP1(L151F producing a slowly progressing cone/rod dystrophy (CORD. The late onset GCAP1(L151F-CORD mimics the dystrophy observed in human GCAP1-CORD patients. Subretinal injection of scAAV2/8 carrying shRNA expression cassettes specific for bovine or mouse GCAP1 showed strong expression at one week post-injection. In both allele-specific (GCAP1(Y99C-RP and nonallele-specific (GCAP1(L151F-CORD models of dominant retinal dystrophy, RNAi-mediated gene silencing enhanced photoreceptor survival, delayed onset of degeneration and improved visual function. Such results provide a “proof of concept” toward effective RNAi-based gene therapy mediated by scAAV2/8 for dominant retinal disease based on GCAP1 mutation. Further, nonallele-specific RNAi knockdown of GCAP1 may prove generally applicable toward the rescue of any human GCAP1-based dominant cone-rod dystrophy.

  13. Acute abdomen due to group A streptococcus bacteremia caused by an isolate with a mutation in the csrS gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Masahiko; Maruta, Masaki; Shikata, Hisaharu; Hanayama, Masakazu; Ikebe, Tadayoshi

    2015-11-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus) is an aerobic gram-positive coccus that causes infections ranging from non-invasive pharyngitis to severely invasive necrotizing fasciitis. Mutations in csrS/csrR and rgg, negative regulator genes of group A streptococcus, are crucial factors in the pathogenesis of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome, which is a severe, invasive infection characterized by sudden onset of shock and multiorgan failure, resulting in a high mortality rate. Here we present a case of group A streptococcal bacteremia in a 28-year-old Japanese woman with no relevant previous medical history. The patient developed progressive abdominal symptoms that may have been due to spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, followed by a state of shock, which did not fulfill the proposed criteria for streptococcal toxic shock. The isolate was found to harbor a mutation in the negative regulator csrS gene, whereas the csrR and rgg genes were intact. It was noteworthy that this strain carrying a csrS mutation had caused group A streptococcal bacteremia characterized by acute abdomen as the presenting symptom in a young individual who had been previously healthy. This case indicates that group A streptococcus with csrS mutations has potential virulence factors that are associated with the onset of group A streptococcal bacteremia that does not meet the diagnostic criteria for streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. PMID:26231317

  14. Hypothyroidism caused by the combination of two heterozygous mutations: one in the TSH receptor gene the other in the DUOX2 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Mari; Aso, Keiko; Ogikubo, Sayaka; Yoshizawa-Ogasawara, Atsuko; Saji, Tsutomu

    2015-05-01

    Subjects who are heterozygous for thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) gene mutations present various phenotypes that range from euthyroid to hyperthyrotropinemia. Similarly, heterozygous dual oxidase 2 (DUOX2) gene mutations result in variable phenotypes, such as transient congenital hypothyroidism, subclinical hyperthyrotropinemia, and euthyroid in children. Here, we describe an 8-year-old boy who had normal newborn screening results, but who developed nonautoimmune hypothyroidism at the age of 1 year and 8 months of age. He was heterozygous for previously reported R450H-TSHR mutation and heterozygous for a novel double mutant allele A1323T-DUOX2 and L1343F-DUOX2. He needed levothyroxine (l-T4) replacement therapy to keep serum TSH levels within normal limits; l-T4 dose of 2.01-2.65 μg/kg/day corresponded to the dose taken by children homozygous for R450H-TSHR and by children with permanent congenital hypothyroidism. Therefore, the coexistence of a heterozygous TSHR mutation and a heterozygous DUOX2 mutation may have affected the severity of his hypothyroid condition. PMID:25928756

  15. Limited divergence among populations of rice striped stem borer in southeast China caused by gene flow: Implications for resistance management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao YANG; Xiao YANG; Qiang FU; Kai XU; Bao-Rong LU

    2012-01-01

    Rice striped stem borer (RSSB,Chilo suppressalis) is a serious lepidopteron pest occurring in rice ecosystems of Asia and Europe.Genetically modified (GM) insect-resistant Bt rice has been developed to deter lepidopteron pests including RSSB.The concern of resistance evolution to the Bt toxin by the pests under commercial cultivation of GM Bt rice and the need of effective management of the resistance encourage the studies of genetic variation and divergence,as well as gene flow of RSSB populations.We analyzed 13 RSSB populations fed on water-oats or rice plants,respectively,from southeast China applying the fluorescent amplified fragment length polymorphism fingerprints.A generally moderate level of genetic variation was detected in the populations,as estimated by Nei's genetic diversity (0.27) and Shannon's index (0.42).The FsT- and AMOVA values indicated a low level (~ 12%) of genetic divergence among the RSSB populations.A relatively frequent gene flow (an average Nm =2.62) was detected among the 12 RSSB populations,which may explain the limited genetic divergence among the rice-feeding populations.This explanation gains support by the assignment test of the corresponding populations,suggesting that a considerable proportion of individuals was contributed from non-native populations.Our results revealed that the moderate level of genetic diversity combined with relatively frequent gene flow among RSSB populations across a large geographical range may slow down the resistance evolution of the RSSB populations,given that a proper measure of resistance management is taken.

  16. RNA interference gene therapy in dominant retinitis pigmentosa and cone-rod dystrophy mouse models caused by GCAP1 mutations

    OpenAIRE

    JIANG Li; Frederick, Jeanne M.; Baehr, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) knockdown is an efficacious therapeutic strategy for silencing genes causative for dominant retinal dystrophies. To test this, we used self-complementary (sc) AAV2/8 vector to develop an RNAi-based therapy in two dominant retinal degeneration mouse models. The allele-specific model expresses transgenic bovine GCAP1(Y99C) establishing a rapid RP-like phenotype, whereas the nonallele-specific model expresses mouse GCAP1(L151F) producing a slowly progressing cone-rod dyst...

  17. RNA interference gene therapy in dominant retinitis pigmentosa and cone-rod dystrophy mouse models caused by GCAP1 mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Wolfgang Baehr

    2014-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) knockdown is an efficacious therapeutic strategy for silencing genes causative for dominant retinal dystrophies. To test this, we used self-complementary (sc) AAV2/8 vector to develop an RNAi-based therapy in two dominant retinal degeneration mouse models. The allele-specific model expresses transgenic bovine GCAP1(Y99C) establishing a rapid RP-like phenotype, whereas the nonallele-specific model expresses mouse GCAP1(L151F) producing a slowly progressing cone/rod dyst...

  18. Ectopic expression of the HAM59 gene causes homeotic transformations of reproductive organs in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulga, O A; Neskorodov, Ya B; Shchennikova, A V; Gaponenko, A K; Skryabin, K G

    2015-01-01

    The function of the HAM59 MADS-box gene in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) was studied to clarify homeotic C activity in the Asteraceae plant family. For the first time, transgenic sunflower plants with a modified pattern of HAM59 expression were obtained. It was shown that the HAM59 MADS-box transcription factor did mediate C activity in sunflower. In particular, it participated in termination of the floral meristem, repression of the cadastral function of A-activity, and together with other C-type sunflower protein HAM45-in the specification of the identity of stamens and pistils. PMID:25937227

  19. Novel Hypomorphic Alleles of the Mouse Tyrosinase Gene Induced by CRISPR-Cas9 Nucleases Cause Non-Albino Pigmentation Phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boitet, Evan R.; Turner, Ashley N.; Johnson, Larry W.; Kennedy, Daniel; Downs, Ethan R.; Hymel, Katherine M.; Gross, Alecia K.; Kesterson, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Tyrosinase is a key enzyme in melanin biosynthesis. Mutations in the gene encoding tyrosinase (Tyr) cause oculocutaneous albinism (OCA1) in humans. Alleles of the Tyr gene have been useful in studying pigment biology and coat color formation. Over 100 different Tyr alleles have been reported in mice, of which ≈24% are spontaneous mutations, ≈60% are radiation-induced, and the remaining alleles were obtained by chemical mutagenesis and gene targeting. Therefore, most mutations were random and could not be predicted a priori. Using the CRISPR-Cas9 system, we targeted two distinct regions of exon 1 to induce pigmentation changes and used an in vivo visual phenotype along with heteroduplex mobility assays (HMA) as readouts of CRISPR-Cas9 activity. Most of the mutant alleles result in complete loss of tyrosinase activity leading to an albino phenotype. In this study, we describe two novel in-frame deletion alleles of Tyr, dhoosara (Sanskrit for gray) and chandana (Sanskrit for sandalwood). These alleles are hypomorphic and show lighter pigmentation phenotypes of the body and eyes. This study demonstrates the utility of CRISPR-Cas9 system in generating domain-specific in-frame deletions and helps gain further insights into structure-function of Tyr gene. PMID:27224051

  20. 5q14.3 deletion neurocutaneous syndrome: Contiguous gene syndrome caused by simultaneous deletion of RASA1 and MEF2C: A progressive disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilari, Rita; Agosta, Guillermo; Bacino, Carlos

    2016-03-01

    We report the case of a young girl who was presented with complex clinical symptoms caused by the deletion of contiguous genes: RASA1 and MEF2C, located on chromosome 5q14.3. Specifically, the diagnosis of her skin disorder and vascular malformations involving central nervous system is consistent with a RASopathy. The child's neurological manifestations are observed in most patients suffering from 5q14.3 by deletion or mutation of the MEF2C gene. A review of the literature allowed us to conclude that the contiguous deletion of genes RASA1 and MEF2C fulfills the criteria for the diagnosis of a Neurocutaneous syndrome as proposed by Carr et al. [2011]. We also assessed the penetrance of RASA1 and clinical manifestations of MEF2C according to the type of deletion. This child described presents the complete symptomatology of both deleted genes. We would also like to highlight the progression of the disorder. PMID:26774077

  1. Novel Hypomorphic Alleles of the Mouse Tyrosinase Gene Induced by CRISPR-Cas9 Nucleases Cause Non-Albino Pigmentation Phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challa, Anil K; Boitet, Evan R; Turner, Ashley N; Johnson, Larry W; Kennedy, Daniel; Downs, Ethan R; Hymel, Katherine M; Gross, Alecia K; Kesterson, Robert A

    2016-01-01

    Tyrosinase is a key enzyme in melanin biosynthesis. Mutations in the gene encoding tyrosinase (Tyr) cause oculocutaneous albinism (OCA1) in humans. Alleles of the Tyr gene have been useful in studying pigment biology and coat color formation. Over 100 different Tyr alleles have been reported in mice, of which ≈24% are spontaneous mutations, ≈60% are radiation-induced, and the remaining alleles were obtained by chemical mutagenesis and gene targeting. Therefore, most mutations were random and could not be predicted a priori. Using the CRISPR-Cas9 system, we targeted two distinct regions of exon 1 to induce pigmentation changes and used an in vivo visual phenotype along with heteroduplex mobility assays (HMA) as readouts of CRISPR-Cas9 activity. Most of the mutant alleles result in complete loss of tyrosinase activity leading to an albino phenotype. In this study, we describe two novel in-frame deletion alleles of Tyr, dhoosara (Sanskrit for gray) and chandana (Sanskrit for sandalwood). These alleles are hypomorphic and show lighter pigmentation phenotypes of the body and eyes. This study demonstrates the utility of CRISPR-Cas9 system in generating domain-specific in-frame deletions and helps gain further insights into structure-function of Tyr gene. PMID:27224051

  2. Experimental heart failure causes depression-like behavior together with differential regulation of inflammatory and structural genes in the brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Frey

    2014-10-01

    Methods and Results- In order to assess depression-like behavior, anhedonia was investigated by repeatedly testing sucrose preference for 8 weeks after coronary artery ligation or sham operation. Mice with large MI and increased left ventricular dimensions on echocardiography (termed CHF mice showed reduced preference for sucrose, indicating depression-like behavior. 6 weeks after MI, mice were tested for exploratory activity, anxiety-like behavior and cognitive function using the elevated plus maze (EPM, light-dark box (LDB, open field (OF and object recognition (OR tests. In the EPM and OF, CHF mice exhibited diminished exploratory behavior and motivation despite similar movement capability. In the OR, CHF mice had reduced preference for novelty and impaired short-term memory. On histology, CHF mice had unaltered overall cerebral morphology. However, analysis of gene expression by RNA-sequencing in prefrontal cortical, hippocampal, and left ventricular tissue revealed changes in genes related to inflammation and cofactors of neuronal signal transduction in CHF mice, with Nr4a1 being dysregulated both in prefrontal cortex and myocardium after MI. Conclusions-After induction of ischemic CHF, mice exhibited anhedonic behavior, decreased exploratory activity and interest in novelty, and cognitive impairment. Thus, ischemic CHF leads to distinct behavioral changes in mice analogous to symptoms observed in humans with CHF and comorbid depression.

  3. TMPRSS2-ERG Gene Fusion Causing ERG Overexpression Precedes Chromosome Copy Number Changes in Prostate Carcinomas, Paired HGPIN Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuno Cerveira

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available TMPRSS2-ETS gene fusions have been found recurrently in prostate carcinomas, but not in the presumed precursor lesion, high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN. However, HGPIN lesions may share chromosomal changes with prostate cancer. To determine the relative order of genetic events in prostate carcinogenesis, we have analyzed 34 prostate carcinomas, 19 paired HGPIN lesions, 14 benign prostate hyperplasias, 11 morphologically normal prostatic tissues for TMPRSS2-ERG, TMPRSS2-ETV1 rearrangements, genomic imbalances. TMPRSS2 exon 1 was fused in-frame with ERG exon 4 in 17 of 34 (50% prostate carcinomas, in 4 of 19 (21% HGPIN lesions, but in none of controls. The findings were further validated by sequencing analysis, by the real-time polymerase chain reaction quantification of TMPRSS2-ERG fusion transcript, the ERG exons 5/6:exons 1/2 expression ratio. Chromosome copy number changes were detected by comparative genomic hybridization in 42% of clinically confined carcinomas, in none of the 16 HGPIN lesions analyzed. We demonstrate for the first time that the TMPRSS2-ERG fusion gene can be detected in a proportion of HGPIN lesions, that this molecular rearrangement is an early event that may precede chromosome-level alterations in prostate carcinogenesis.

  4. Common variation in oxidative phosphorylation genes is not a major cause of insulin resistance or type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snogdal, L S; Wod, M; Grarup, N;

    2012-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: There is substantial evidence that mitochondrial dysfunction is linked to insulin resistance and is present in several tissues relevant to the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. Here, we examined whether common variation in genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation (Ox......Phos) contributes to type 2 diabetes susceptibility or influences diabetes-related metabolic traits. METHODS: OxPhos gene variants (n = 10) that had been nominally associated (p < 0.01) with type 2 diabetes in a recent genome-wide meta-analysis (n = 10,108) were selected for follow-up in 3,599 type 2 diabetic and 4......,956 glucose-tolerant Danish individuals. A meta-analysis of these variants was performed in 11,729 type 2 diabetic patients and 43,943 non-diabetic individuals. The impact on OGTT-derived metabolic traits was evaluated in 5,869 treatment-naive individuals from the Danish Inter99 study. RESULTS: The minor...

  5. Splicing Defect in Mitochondrial Seryl-tRNA Synthetase Gene Causes Progressive Spastic Paresis Instead of HUPRA Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnankivi, Tarja; Neupane, Nirajan; Richter, Uwe; Isohanni, Pirjo; Tyynismaa, Henna

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases are an important group of disease genes typically underlying either a disorder affecting an isolated tissue or a distinct syndrome. Missense mutations in the mitochondrial seryl-tRNA synthetase gene, SARS2, have been identified in HUPRA syndrome (hyperuricemia, pulmonary hypertension, renal failure in infancy, and alkalosis). We report here a homozygous splicing mutation in SARS2 in a patient with progressive spastic paresis. We show that the mutation leads to diminished levels of the synthetase in patient's fibroblasts. This has a destabilizing effect on the tRNASer(AGY) isoacceptor, but to a lesser degree than in HUPRA syndrome patients. tRNASer(UCN) is largely unaffected in both phenotypes. In conclusion, the level of tRNASer(AGY) instability may be a factor in determining tissue manifestation in patients with SARS2 mutations. This finding exemplifies the sensitivity of the nervous system to partially reduced aminoacylation, which is sufficient in other tissues to maintain respiratory chain function. PMID:27279129

  6. Gene targeting of the transcription factor Mohawk in rats causes heterotopic ossification of Achilles tendon via failed tenogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Hidetsugu; Ito, Yoshiaki; Shinohara, Masahiro; Yamashita, Satoshi; Ichinose, Shizuko; Kishida, Akio; Oyaizu, Takuya; Kayama, Tomohiro; Nakamichi, Ryo; Koda, Naoki; Yagishita, Kazuyoshi; Lotz, Martin K; Okawa, Atsushi; Asahara, Hiroshi

    2016-07-12

    Cell-based or pharmacological approaches for promoting tendon repair are currently not available because the molecular mechanisms of tendon development and healing are not well understood. Although analysis of knockout mice provides many critical insights, small animals such as mice have some limitations. In particular, precise physiological examination for mechanical load and the ability to obtain a sufficient number of primary tendon cells for molecular biology studies are challenging using mice. Here, we generated Mohawk (Mkx)(-/-) rats by using CRISPR/Cas9, which showed not only systemic hypoplasia of tendons similar to Mkx(-/-) mice, but also earlier heterotopic ossification of the Achilles tendon compared with Mkx(-/-) mice. Analysis of tendon-derived cells (TDCs) revealed that Mkx deficiency accelerated chondrogenic and osteogenic differentiation, whereas Mkx overexpression suppressed chondrogenic, osteogenic, and adipogenic differentiation. Furthermore, mechanical stretch stimulation of Mkx(-/-) TDCs led to chondrogenic differentiation, whereas the same stimulation in Mkx(+/+) TDCs led to formation of tenocytes. ChIP-seq of Mkx overexpressing TDCs revealed significant peaks in tenogenic-related genes, such as collagen type (Col)1a1 and Col3a1, and chondrogenic differentiation-related genes, such as SRY-box (Sox)5, Sox6, and Sox9 Our results demonstrate that Mkx has a dual role, including accelerating tendon differentiation and preventing chondrogenic/osteogenic differentiation. This molecular network of Mkx provides a basis for tendon physiology and tissue engineering. PMID:27370800

  7. Experimental heart failure causes depression-like behavior together with differential regulation of inflammatory and structural genes in the brain

    OpenAIRE

    Frey, Anna; Popp, Sandy; Post, Antonia; Langer, Simon; Lehmann, Marc; Hofmann, Ulrich; Sirén, Anna-Leena; Hommers, Leif; Schmitt, Angelika; Strekalova, Tatyana; Ertl, Georg; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Frantz, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Depression and anxiety are common and independent outcome predictors in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). However, it is unclear whether CHF causes depression. Thus, we investigated whether mice develop anxiety- and depression-like behavior after induction of ischemic CHF by myocardial infarction (MI). Methods and Results: In order to assess depression-like behavior, anhedonia was investigated by repeatedly testing sucrose preference for 8 weeks after coronary artery l...

  8. Study on Environmental Causes and SNPs of MTHFR, MS and CBS Genes Related to Congenital Heart Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Hui; Yang, Shiwei; Liu, Yan; HUANG, PENG; Lin, Ning; Sun, Xiaoru; Yu, Rongbin; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Qin, Yuming; Wang, Lijuan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Congenital heart diseases (CHD) are among the most common birth defects in China. Environmental causes and folate metabolism changes may alter susceptibility to CHD. The aim of this study is to evaluate the relevant risk-factors of children with CHD and their mothers. Methods 138 children with CHD and 207 normal children for controls were recruited. Their mothers were also enlisted in this study and interviewed following a questionnaire about their pregnant history and early pregnancy...

  9. Lon Protease Activity Causes Down-Regulation of Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1 Invasion Gene Expression after Infection of Epithelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Boddicker, Jennifer D.; Jones, Bradley D.

    2004-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium causes self-limiting gastroenteritis in humans and a typhoid-like disease in mice that serves as a model for typhoid infections in humans. A critical step in Salmonella pathogenesis is the invasion of enterocytes and M cells of the small intestine via expression of a type III secretion system, encoded on Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1), that secretes effector proteins into host cells, leading to engulfment of the bacteria within large membrane...

  10. A mutation in the LAMC2 gene causes the Herlitz junctional epidermolysis bullosa (H-JEB in two French draft horse breeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guérin Gérard

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Epidermolysis bullosa (EB is a heterogeneous group of inherited diseases characterised by skin blistering and fragility. In humans, one of the most severe forms of EB known as Herlitz-junctional EB (H-JEB, is caused by mutations in the laminin 5 genes. EB has been described in several species, like cattle, sheep, dogs, cats and horses where the mutation, a cytosine insertion in exon 10 of the LAMC2 gene, was very recently identified in Belgian horses as the mutation responsible for JEB. In this study, the same mutation was found to be totally associated with the JEB phenotype in two French draft horse breeds, Trait Breton and Trait Comtois. This result provides breeders a molecular test to better manage their breeding strategies by genetic counselling.

  11. Emergence of Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Detection of Isolates harboring blaCTX gene causing infections in hospital and determination of their susceptibility to antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z Rabani

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Because of its ubiquitous nature, ability to survive in moist environments, and innate resistance to many antibiotics and antiseptics, P. aeruginosa is a common pathogen in hospitals. The goals of this study were detection of Psudomonas aeruginosa harboring blaCTX gene causing infections in hospitals and determination of their susceptibility to antibiotics and ESBL production. Methods: In the present cross-sectional study, clinical samples from hospitalized patients were collected and culture was done on apropriate media. Final identification was performed using biochemical tests and API 20NE system. According to the protocol CLSI 2014 disc diffusion, combination disk, modified hodge test (MHT and E-test were used for antibiotic susceptibility, ESBL production, carbapenemas production, and MIC values of imipenem respectively. The blaCTX gene was detected in the isolates by PCR molecular method. Results: In the current study, 45 isolates of Pseudomonas aeroginosa were obtained from hospitalized patients, consisting of 19 males (42.2% and 26 females (57.8%. As observed, 57.8% (26 strains of isolates were recovered from sputum. The most effective antibiotics against isolates were amikacin and colistin with 97.8% suseptibility whereas the highest resistance was to cefotaxime (97.8%. As revealed 77.8% of isolates showed response to group 2 carbapenems (imipenem, meropenem. All imipenem resistant strains had the MIC more than 32. Seventeen strains (37.7% were  showed resistant to quinolones (ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin. The results of PCR on blaCTX gene indicated that 15.5% of the isolates possess the gene. Conclusion: Carbapenem group of antibiotic in 22% of infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa were ineffective and indiscriminate prescribing of these drugs will increase the ratet of resistance.

  12. Chromosome anomalies in bone marrow as primary cause of aplastic or hypoplastic conditions and peripheral cytopenia: disorders due to secondary impairment of RUNX1 and MPL genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marletta Cristina

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chromosome changes in the bone marrow (BM of patients with persistent cytopenia are often considered diagnostic for a myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS. Comprehensive cytogenetic evaluations may give evidence of the real pathogenetic role of these changes in cases with cytopenia without morphological signs of MDS. Results Chromosome anomalies were found in the BM of three patients, without any morphological evidence of MDS: 1 an acquired complex rearrangement of chromosome 21 in a boy with severe aplastic anaemia (SAA; the rearrangement caused the loss of exons 2–8 of the RUNX1 gene with subsequent hypoexpression. 2 a constitutional complex rearrangement of chromosome 21 in a girl with congenital thrombocytopenia; the rearrangement led to RUNX1 disruption and hypoexpression. 3 an acquired paracentric inversion of chromosome 1, in which two regions at the breakpoints were shown to be lost, in a boy with aplastic anaemia; the MPL gene, localized in chromosome 1 short arms was not mutated neither disrupted, but its expression was severely reduced: we postulate that the aplastic anaemia was due to position effects acting both in cis and in trans, and causing Congenital Amegakaryocytic Thrombocytopenia (CAMT. Conclusions A clonal anomaly in BM does not imply per se a diagnosis of MDS: a subgroup of BM hypoplastic disorders is directly due to chromosome structural anomalies with effects on specific genes, as was the case of RUNX1 and MPL in the patients here reported with diagnosis of SAA, thrombocytopenia, and CAMT. The anomaly may be either acquired or constitutional, and it may act by deletion/disruption of the gene, or by position effects. Full cytogenetic investigations, including a-CGH, should always be part of the diagnostic evaluation of patients with BM aplasia/hypoplasia and peripheral cytopenias.

  13. Long-term gene therapy causes transgene-specific changes in the morphology of regenerating retinal ganglion cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Rodger

    Full Text Available Recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV vectors can be used to introduce neurotrophic genes into injured CNS neurons, promoting survival and axonal regeneration. Gene therapy holds much promise for the treatment of neurotrauma and neurodegenerative diseases; however, neurotrophic factors are known to alter dendritic architecture, and thus we set out to determine whether such transgenes also change the morphology of transduced neurons. We compared changes in dendritic morphology of regenerating adult rat retinal ganglion cells (RGCs after long-term transduction with rAAV2 encoding: (i green fluorescent protein (GFP, or (ii bi-cistronic vectors encoding GFP and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF or growth-associated protein-43 (GAP43. To enhance regeneration, rats received an autologous peripheral nerve graft onto the cut optic nerve of each rAAV2 injected eye. After 5-8 months, RGCs with regenerated axons were retrogradely labeled with fluorogold (FG. Live retinal wholemounts were prepared and GFP positive (transduced or GFP negative (non-transduced RGCs injected iontophoretically with 2% lucifer yellow. Dendritic morphology was analyzed using Neurolucida software. Significant changes in dendritic architecture were found, in both transduced and non-transduced populations. Multivariate analysis revealed that transgenic BDNF increased dendritic field area whereas GAP43 increased dendritic complexity. CNTF decreased complexity but only in a subset of RGCs. Sholl analysis showed changes in dendritic branching in rAAV2-BDNF-GFP and rAAV2-CNTF-GFP groups and the proportion of FG positive RGCs with aberrant morphology tripled in these groups compared to controls. RGCs in all transgene groups displayed abnormal stratification. Thus in addition to promoting cell survival and axonal regeneration, vector-mediated expression of neurotrophic factors has measurable, gene-specific effects on the morphology of injured

  14. Loss of p24 function in Drosophila melanogaster causes a stress response and increased levels of NF-κB-regulated gene products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carney Ginger E

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Secretory and transmembrane proteins traverse the endoplasmic reticulum (ER and Golgi compartments for final maturation prior to reaching their functional destinations. Members of the p24 protein family, which are transmembrane constituents of ER and Golgi-derived transport vesicles, function in trafficking some secretory proteins in yeast and higher eukaryotes. Yeast p24 mutants have minor secretory defects and induce an ER stress response that likely results from accumulation of proteins in the ER due to disrupted trafficking. We tested the hypothesis that loss of Drosophila melanogaster p24 protein function causes a transcriptional response characteristic of ER stress activation. Results We performed genome-wide profiling experiments on tissues from Drosophila females with a mutation in the p24 gene logjam (loj and identified changes in message levels for 641 genes. We found that loj mutants have expression profiles consistent with activation of stress responses. Of particular note is our observation that approximately 20% of the loci up regulated in loj mutants are Drosophila immune-regulated genes (DIRGs, many of which are transcriptional targets of NF-κB or JNK signaling pathways. Conclusion The loj mutant expression profiling data support the hypothesis that loss of p24 function causes a stress response. Genes involved in ameliorating stress, such as those encoding products involved in proteolysis, metabolism and protein folding, are differentially expressed in loj mutants compared to controls. Nearly 20% of the genes with increased message levels in the loj mutant are transcriptional targets of Drosophila NF-κB proteins. Activation of NF-κB transcription factors is the hallmark of an ER stress response called the ER overload response. Therefore, our data are consistent with the hypothesis that Drosophila p24 mutations induce stress, possibly via activation of ER stress response pathways. Because of the molecular

  15. Role of zebrafish cytochrome P450 CYP1C genes in the reduced mesencephalic vein blood flow caused by activation of AHR2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) causes various signs of toxicity in early life stages of vertebrates through activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR). We previously reported a sensitive and useful endpoint of TCDD developmental toxicity in zebrafish, namely a decrease in blood flow in the dorsal midbrain, but downstream genes involved in the effect are not known. The present study addressed the role of zebrafish cytochrome P450 1C (CYP1C) genes in association with a decrease in mesencephalic vein (MsV) blood flow. The CYP1C subfamily was recently discovered in fish and includes the paralogues CYP1C1 and CYP1C2, both of which are induced via AHR2 in zebrafish embryos. We used morpholino antisense oligonucleotides (MO or morpholino) to block initiation of translation of the target genes. TCDD-induced mRNA expression of CYP1Cs and a decrease in MsV blood flow were both blocked by gene knockdown of AHR2. Gene knockdown of CYP1C1 by two different morpholinos and CYP1C2 by two different morpholinos, but not by their 5 nucleotide-mismatch controls, was effective in blocking reduced MsV blood flow caused by TCDD. The same CYP1C-MOs prevented reduction of blood flow in the MsV caused by β-naphthoflavone (BNF), representing another class of AHR agonists. Whole-mount in situ hybridization revealed that mRNA expression of CYP1C1 and CYP1C2 was induced by TCDD most strongly in branchiogenic primordia and pectoral fin buds. In situ hybridization using head transverse sections showed that TCDD increased the expression of both CYP1Cs in endothelial cells of blood vessels, including the MsV. These results indicate a potential role of CYP1C1 and CYP1C2 in the local circulation failure induced by AHR2 activation in the dorsal midbrain of the zebrafish embryo. - Research Highlights: → We examine the roles of zebrafish CYP1C1 and CYP1C2 in TCDD developmental toxicity. → TCDD induces mRNA expression of both CYP1Cs in the mesencephalic vein. → Knockdown of each

  16. A Mutation in the Golgi Qb-SNARE Gene GOSR2 Causes Progressive Myoclonus Epilepsy with Early Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbett, Mark A.; Schwake, Michael; Bahlo, Melanie; Dibbens, Leanne M.; Lin, Meng; Gandolfo, Luke C.; Vears, Danya F.; O'Sullivan, John D.; Robertson, Thomas; Bayly, Marta A.; Gardner, Alison E.; Vlaar, Annemarie M.; Korenke, G. Christoph; Bloem, Bastiaan R.; de Coo, Irenaeus F.; Verhagen, Judith M.A.; Lehesjoki, Anna-Elina; Gecz, Jozef; Berkovic, Samuel F.

    2011-01-01

    The progressive myoclonus epilepsies (PMEs) are a group of predominantly recessive disorders that present with action myoclonus, tonic-clonic seizures, and progressive neurological decline. Many PMEs have similar clinical presentations yet are genetically heterogeneous, making accurate diagnosis difficult. A locus for PME was mapped in a consanguineous family with a single affected individual to chromosome 17q21. An identical-by-descent, homozygous mutation in GOSR2 (c.430G>T, p.Gly144Trp), a Golgi vesicle transport gene, was identified in this patient and in four apparently unrelated individuals. A comparison of the phenotypes in these patients defined a clinically distinct PME syndrome characterized by early-onset ataxia, action myoclonus by age 6, scoliosis, and mildly elevated serum creatine kinase. This p.Gly144Trp mutation is equivalent to a loss of function and results in failure of GOSR2 protein to localize to the cis-Golgi. PMID:21549339

  17. Recessively inherited L-DOPA-responsive dystonia caused by a point mutation (Q381K) in the tyrosine hydroxylase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knappskog, P M; Flatmark, T; Mallet, J; Lüdecke, B; Bartholomé, K

    1995-07-01

    Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) catalyzes the conversion of L-tyrosine to L-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA), the rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of dopamine. Recently, we described a point mutation in hTH (Q381K) in a family of two siblings suffering from progressive L-DOPA-responsive dystonia (DRD), representing the first reported mutation in this gene. We here describe the cloning, expression and steady-state kinetic properties of the recombinant mutant enzyme. When expressed by a coupled in vitro transcription-translation system and in E. coli, the mutant enzyme represents a kinetic variant form, with a reduced affinity for L-tyrosine. The 'residual activity' of about 15% of the corresponding wild-type hTH (isoform hTH1), at substrate concentrations prevailing in vivo, is compatible with the clinical phenotype of the two Q381K homozygote patients carrying this recessively inherited mutation. PMID:8528210

  18. Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-cleft syndrome (EEC syndrome) with a developmental delay caused by R304W mutation in the tp63 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawrych, Elzbieta; Bińczak-Kuleta, Agnieszka; Janiszewska-Olszowska, Joanna; Ciechanowicz, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-cleft syndrome (EEC) results from a simultaneous developmental abnor-caused by mutations of the tp63 gene. Five mutations: 204, 227, 279, 280, and 304 account for most cases of this syndrome. A case with R304W mutation, characterized by the presence of all major (ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, cleft lip and palate) and two minor (lacrimal duct obstruction, developmental delay) clinical symptoms of the syndrome is presented. This severe case improves the existing knowledge concerning the genotype-phenotype correlations in EEC syndrome. PMID:24734328

  19. A case report of primary ciliary dyskinesia, laterality defects and developmental delay caused by the co-existence of a single gene and chromosome disorder.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Casey, Jillian P

    2015-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterised by abnormal ciliary motion and impaired mucociliary clearance, leading to recurrent respiratory infections, sinusitis, otitis media and male infertility. Some patients also have laterality defects. We recently reported the identification of three disease-causing PCD genes in the Irish Traveller population; RSPH4A, DYX1C1 and CCNO. We have since assessed an additional Irish Traveller family with a complex phenotype involving PCD who did not have any of the previously identified PCD mutations.

  20. A Unique Insertion/Duplication in the VDR Gene that Truncates the VDR Causing Hereditary 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D-Resistant Rickets Without Alopecia

    OpenAIRE

    Malloy, Peter J.; Wang, Jining; Peng, Lihong; Nayak, Sunil; Sisk, Jeanne M.; Thompson, Catherine C.; Feldman, David

    2006-01-01

    Hereditary vitamin D resistant rickets (HVDRR) is caused by mutations in the vitamin D receptor (VDR). Here we describe a patient with HVDRR who also exhibited some hypotrichosis of the scalp but otherwise had normal hair and skin. A 102 bp insertion/duplication was found in the VDR gene that introduced a premature stop (Y401X). The patient's fibroblasts expressed the truncated VDR, but were resistant to 1,25(OH)2D3. The truncated VDR weakly bound [3H]-1,25(OH)2D3 but was able to heterodimeri...

  1. Deletion of a single allele of the Pex11β gene is sufficient to cause oxidative stress, delayed differentiation and neuronal death in mouse brain

    OpenAIRE

    Barbara Ahlemeyer; Magdalena Gottwald; Eveline Baumgart-Vogt

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Impaired neuronal migration and cell death are commonly observed in patients with peroxisomal biogenesis disorders (PBDs), and in mouse models of this diseases. In Pex11β-deficient mice, we observed that the deletion of a single allele of the Pex11β gene (Pex11β+/− heterozygous mice) caused cell death in primary neuronal cultures prepared from the neocortex and cerebellum, although to a lesser extent as compared with the homozygous-null animals (Pex11β−/− mice). In corresponding br...

  2. Delayed-onset enzootic bovine leukosis possibly caused by superinfection with bovine leukemia virus mutated in the pol gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Tadaaki; Inoue, Emi; Mori, Hiroshi; Osawa, Yoshiaki; Okazaki, Katsunori

    2015-08-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is the causative agent of enzootic bovine leucosis (EBL), to which animals are most susceptible at 4-8 years of age. In this study, we examined tumor cells associated with EBL in an 18-year-old cow to reveal that the cells carried at least two different copies of the virus, one of which was predicted to encode a reverse transcriptase (RT) lacking ribonuclease H activity and no integrase. Such a deficient enzyme may exhibit a dominant negative effect on the wild-type RT and cause insufficient viral replication, resulting in delayed tumor development in this cow. PMID:26025155

  3. Gene

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Gene integrates information from a wide range of species. A record may include nomenclature, Reference Sequences (RefSeqs), maps, pathways, variations, phenotypes,...

  4. A novel deletion/insertion caused by a replication error in the β-globin gene locus control region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joly, Philippe; Lacan, Philippe; Garcia, Caroline; Meley, Roland; Pondarré, Corinne; Francina, Alain

    2011-01-01

    Deletions in the β-globin locus control region (β-LCR) lead to (εγδβ)(0)-thalassemia [(εγδβ)(0)-thal]. In patients suffering from these rare deletions, a normal hemoglobin (Hb), phenotype is found, contrasting with a hematological thalassemic phenotype. Multiplex-ligation probe amplification (MLPA) is an efficient tool to detect β-LCR deletions combined with long-range polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA sequencing to pinpoint deletion breakpoints. We present here a novel 11,155 bp β-LCR deletion found in a French Caucasian patient which removes DNase I hypersensitive site 2 (HS2) to HS4 of the β-LCR. Interestingly, a 197 bp insertion of two inverted sequences issued from the HS2-HS3 inter-region is present and suggests a complex rearrangement during replication. Carriers of this type of thalassemia can be misdiagnosed as an α-thal trait. Consequently, a complete α- and β-globin gene cluster analysis is required to prevent a potentially damaging misdiagnosis in genetic counselling. PMID:21797698

  5. Molecular cause and functional impact of altered synaptic lipid signaling due to a prg-1 gene SNP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Johannes; Yang, Jenq-Wei; Mobascher, Arian; Cheng, Jin; Li, Yunbo; Liu, Xingfeng; Baumgart, Jan; Thalman, Carine; Kirischuk, Sergei; Unichenko, Petr; Horta, Guilherme; Radyushkin, Konstantin; Stroh, Albrecht; Richers, Sebastian; Sahragard, Nassim; Distler, Ute; Tenzer, Stefan; Qiao, Lianyong; Lieb, Klaus; Tüscher, Oliver; Binder, Harald; Ferreiros, Nerea; Tegeder, Irmgard; Morris, Andrew J; Gropa, Sergiu; Nürnberg, Peter; Toliat, Mohammad R; Winterer, Georg; Luhmann, Heiko J; Huai, Jisen; Nitsch, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Loss of plasticity-related gene 1 (PRG-1), which regulates synaptic phospholipid signaling, leads to hyperexcitability via increased glutamate release altering excitation/inhibition (E/I) balance in cortical networks. A recently reported SNP in prg-1 (R345T/mutPRG-1) affects ~5 million European and US citizens in a monoallelic variant. Our studies show that this mutation leads to a loss-of-PRG-1 function at the synapse due to its inability to control lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) levels via a cellular uptake mechanism which appears to depend on proper glycosylation altered by this SNP. PRG-1(+/-) mice, which are animal correlates of human PRG-1(+/mut) carriers, showed an altered cortical network function and stress-related behavioral changes indicating altered resilience against psychiatric disorders. These could be reversed by modulation of phospholipid signaling via pharmacological inhibition of the LPA-synthesizing molecule autotaxin. In line, EEG recordings in a human population-based cohort revealed an E/I balance shift in monoallelic mutPRG-1 carriers and an impaired sensory gating, which is regarded as an endophenotype of stress-related mental disorders. Intervention into bioactive lipid signaling is thus a promising strategy to interfere with glutamate-dependent symptoms in psychiatric diseases. PMID:26671989

  6. A Syndromic Intellectual Disability Disorder Caused by Variants in TELO2, a Gene Encoding a Component of the TTT Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Jing; Sobreira, Nara L; Gable, Dustin L; Jurgens, Julie; Grange, Dorothy K; Belnap, Newell; Siniard, Ashley; Szelinger, Szabolcs; Schrauwen, Isabelle; Richholt, Ryan F; Vallee, Stephanie E; Dinulos, Mary Beth P; Valle, David; Armanios, Mary; Hoover-Fong, Julie

    2016-05-01

    The proteins encoded by TELO2, TTI1, and TTI2 interact to form the TTT complex, a co-chaperone for maturation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related protein kinases (PIKKs). Here we report six affected individuals from four families with intellectual disability (ID) and neurological and other congenital abnormalities associated with compound heterozygous variants in TELO2. Although their fibroblasts showed reduced steady-state levels of TELO2 and the other components of the TTT complex, PIKK functions were normal in cellular assays. Our results suggest that these TELO2 missense variants result in loss of function, perturb TTT complex stability, and cause an autosomal-recessive syndromic form of ID. PMID:27132593

  7. Disease-causing mutations in exon 11 of the medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, B S; Jensen, T G; Bross, P;

    1994-01-01

    -dimer interface of the MCAD tetramer. On the basis of the three-dimensional structure of MCAD and the results from the COS-7 expression experiments, we speculate that the primary effect of the M301T and S311R mutations is on correct folding/tetramer assembly, as it has previously been observed for the K304E......), causing a change from lysine to glutamate at position 304 (K304E) in the mature MCAD. Only seven non-G985 mutations, all of which are rare, have been reported. Because the G985 mutation and three of the non-G985 mutations are located in exon 11, it has been suggested that this exon may be a mutational hot...

  8. What Causes Cystic Fibrosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Cystic Fibrosis? A defect in the CFTR gene causes cystic ... in the severity of the disease. How Is Cystic Fibrosis Inherited? Every person inherits two CFTR genes—one ...

  9. Two novel splicing mutations in the SLC45A2 gene cause Oculocutaneous Albinism Type IV by unmasking cryptic splice sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straniero, Letizia; Rimoldi, Valeria; Soldà, Giulia; Mauri, Lucia; Manfredini, Emanuela; Andreucci, Elena; Bargiacchi, Sara; Penco, Silvana; Gesu, Giovanni P; Del Longo, Alessandra; Piozzi, Elena; Asselta, Rosanna; Primignani, Paola

    2015-09-01

    Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) is characterized by hypopigmentation of the skin, hair and eye, and by ophthalmologic abnormalities caused by a deficiency in melanin biosynthesis. OCA type IV (OCA4) is one of the four commonly recognized forms of albinism, and is determined by mutation in the SLC45A2 gene. Here, we investigated the genetic basis of OCA4 in an Italian child. The mutational screening of the SLC45A2 gene identified two novel potentially pathogenic splicing mutations: a synonymous transition (c.888G>A) involving the last nucleotide of exon 3 and a single-nucleotide insertion (c.1156+2dupT) within the consensus sequence of the donor splice site of intron 5. As computer-assisted analysis for mutant splice-site prediction was not conclusive, we investigated the effects on pre-mRNA splicing of these two variants by using an in vitro minigene approach. Production of mutant transcripts in HeLa cells demonstrated that both mutations cause the almost complete abolishment of the physiologic donor splice site, with the concomitant unmasking of cryptic donor splice sites. To our knowledge, this work represents the first in-depth molecular characterization of splicing defects in a OCA4 patient. PMID:26016411

  10. A novel synonymous mutation in the MPZ gene causing an aberrant splicing pattern and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1b.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrado, L; Magri, S; Bagarotti, A; Carecchio, M; Piscosquito, G; Pareyson, D; Varrasi, C; Vecchio, D; Zonta, A; Cantello, R; Taroni, F; D'Alfonso, S

    2016-08-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is an inherited peripheral neuropathy with a heterogeneous genetic background. Here, we describe two CMT1B families with a mild sensory-motor neuropathy and a novel synonymous variant (c.309G > T, p.G103G) in exon 3 of the MPZ gene. Next generation sequencing analysis on a 94 CMT gene panel showed no mutations in other disease genes. In vitro splicing assay and mRNA expression analysis indicated that the c.309T variant enhances a cryptic donor splice site at position c.304 resulting in the markedly increased expression of the r.304_448del alternative transcript in patients' cells. This transcript is predicted to encode a truncated P0 protein (p.V102Cfs11*) lacking the transmembrane domain, thus suggesting a possible haploinsufficiency mechanism for this mutation. This is the third reported synonymous MPZ variant associated with CMT1 and affecting splicing. These data confirm the functional impact of synonymous variants on MPZ splicing and their possible role as disease-causing mutations rather than silent polymorphisms. PMID:27344971

  11. Alteration of gene expression in Pisum sativum tissue cultures caused by the free radical-generating agent 2,2`-azobis (2-amidinipropane) dihydrochloride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henkow, L. [Sveriges Lantbruksuniv., Inst. foer Vaextfoeraedling, Uppsala (Sweden); Strid, Aa.; Rydstroem, J. [Goeteborgs Univ. och Chalmers Tekniska Hoegskola, Inst. foer Biokemi och Biofysik, Goeteborg (Sweden); Berglund, T.; Ohlsson, A.B. [Kungliga Tekniska Hoegskolan, Inst. foer Biokemi och biokemisk Teknologi, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1996-04-01

    Root-differentiated tissue cultures (PS-R) from Pisum sativum (cv. Greenfeast) were exposed to a 5 mM solution of the free radical-generating compound 2,2`-azobis (2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH). The levels of mRNA transcripts for two genes were examined: chs2, encoding a chalcone synthase isozyme, and cab, encoding the chlorophyll a/b-binding protein of the light-harvesting antenna complex. In light-grown PS-R, cab mRNA transcript levels decreased to 14% of controls after 6 h of exposure, whereas chs2 mRNA levels increased 50-fold. In dark-grown PS-R, chs2 mRNA transcripts increased by 40-fold compared with the controls. Glutathione determination inlight-grown PS-R showed no substantial difference in total glutathione (GSH{sub tot}), whereas oxidized glutathione (GSSG) increased by 66% after 12 h of exposure. However, in dark-grown PS-R a decrease in both GSH{sub tot} and GSSG after 6 h was followed by an increase of about 70%, as compared with the controls, after 12 h of exposure. In conclusion AAPH generated oxidative stress, reflected in changed glutathione levels and induced expression of the chs2 gene of the flavonoid biosynthetic pathway and also caused a decreased level of mRNA for the photosynthetic cab gene. (au) 39 refs.

  12. Analyses of loss-of-function mutations of the MITF gene suggest that haploinsufficiency is a cause of Waardenburg syndrome type 2A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nobukuni, Yoshitaka; Watanabe, A.; Takeda, Kazushisa; Skarka, Hana; Tachibana, Masayoshi [National Inst. of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1996-07-01

    Waardenburg syndrome type 2 (WS2) is a dominantly inherited disorder characterized by a pigmentation anomaly and hearing impairment due to lack of melanocyte. Previous work has linked a subset of families with WS2 (WS2A) to the MITF gene that encodes a transcription factor with a basic-helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper (bHLH-Zip) motif and that is involved in melanocyte differentiation. Several splice-site and missense mutations have been reported in individuals affected with WS2A. In this report, we have identified two novel point mutations in the MITF gene in affected individuals from two different families with WS2A. The two mutations (C760{r_arrow}T and C895{r_arrow}T) create stop codons in exons 7 and 8, respectively. Corresponding mutant alleles predict the truncated proteins lacking HLH-Zip or Zip structure. To understand how these mutations cause WS2 in heterozygotes, we generated mutant MITF cDNAs and used them for DNA-binding and luciferase reporter assays. The mutated MITF proteins lose the DNA-binding activity and fail to transactivate the promoter of tyrosinase, a melanocyte-specific enzyme. However, these mutated proteins do not appear to interfere with the activity of wild-type MITF protein in these assays, indicating that they do not show a dominant-negative effect. These findings suggest that the phenotypes of the two families with WS2A in the present study are caused by loss-of-function mutations in one of the two alleles of the MITF gene, resulting in haploinsufficiency of the MITF protein, the protein necessary for normal development of melanocytes. 37 refs., 4 figs.

  13. Mutation in Glycerol-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase 1–Like Gene (GPD1-L) Decreases Cardiac Na+ Current and Causes Inherited Arrhythmias

    Science.gov (United States)

    London, Barry; Michalec, Michael; Mehdi, Haider; Zhu, Xiaodong; Kerchner, Laurie; Sanyal, Shamarendra; Viswanathan, Prakash C.; Pfahnl, Arnold E.; Shang, Lijuan L.; Madhusudanan, Mohan; Baty, Catherine J.; Lagana, Stephen; Aleong, Ryan; Gutmann, Rebecca; Ackerman, Michael J.; McNamara, Dennis M.; Weiss, Raul; Dudley, Samuel C.

    2011-01-01

    Background Brugada syndrome is a rare, autosomal-dominant, male-predominant form of idiopathic ventricular fibrillation characterized by a right bundle-branch block and ST elevation in the right precordial leads of the surface ECG. Mutations in the cardiac Na+ channel SCN5A on chromosome 3p21 cause ≈20% of the cases of Brugada syndrome; most mutations decrease inward Na+ current, some by preventing trafficking of the channels to the surface membrane. We previously used positional cloning to identify a new locus on chromosome 3p24 in a large family with Brugada syndrome and excluded SCN5A as a candidate gene. Methods and Results We used direct sequencing to identify a mutation (A280V) in a conserved amino acid of the glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase 1–like (GPD1-L) gene. The mutation was present in all affected individuals and absent in >500 control subjects. GPD1-L RNA and protein are abundant in the heart. Compared with wild-type GPD1-L, coexpression of A280V GPD1-L with SCN5A in HEK cells reduced inward Na+ currents by ≈50% (P<0.005). Wild-type GPD1-L localized near the cell surface to a greater extent than A280V GPD1-L. Coexpression of A280V GPD1-L with SCN5A reduced SCN5A cell surface expression by 31±5% (P=0.01). Conclusions GPD1-L is a novel gene that may affect trafficking of the cardiac Na+ channel to the cell surface. A GPD1-L mutation decreases SCN5A surface membrane expression, reduces inward Na+ current, and causes Brugada syndrome. PMID:17967977

  14. Ectopic Expression of BraYAB1-702, a Member of YABBY Gene Family in Chinese Cabbage, Causes Leaf Curling, Inhibition of Development of Shoot Apical Meristem and Flowering Stage Delaying in Arabidopsis thaliana

    OpenAIRE

    Lu-Gang Zhang; Jing Zhang; Ze-Ping Yang; Xin-Ling Zhang

    2013-01-01

    YABBY gene family plays an important role in the polarity development of lateral organs. We isolated the BraYAB1-702 gene, a member of the YABBY gene family, from young leaves of Chinese cabbage line 06J45. The full-length gene has a 937 bp CDNA sequence and contains an open reading frame (ORF) of 702 bp. The subcellular localization analysis showed that the expression product of the gene was localized in the nucleus. Ectopic expression of BraYAB1-702 in Arabidopsis thaliana caused leaf curli...

  15. Deletion of exon 20 of the Familial Dysautonomia gene Ikbkap in mice causes developmental delay, cardiovascular defects, and early embryonic lethality.

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    Paula Dietrich

    Full Text Available Familial Dysautonomia (FD is an autosomal recessive disorder that affects 1/3,600 live births in the Ashkenazi Jewish population, and leads to death before the age of 40. The disease is characterized by abnormal development and progressive degeneration of the sensory and autonomic nervous system. A single base pair substitution in intron 20 of the Ikbkap gene accounts for 98% of FD cases, and results in the expression of low levels of the full-length mRNA with simultaneous expression of an aberrantly spliced mRNA in which exon 20 is missing. To date, there is no animal model for the disease, and the essential cellular functions of IKAP--the protein encoded by Ikbkap--remain unknown. To better understand the normal function of IKAP and in an effort to generate a mouse model for FD, we have targeted the mouse Ikbkap gene by homologous recombination. We created two distinct alleles that result in either loss of Ikbkap expression, or expression of an mRNA lacking only exon 20. Homozygosity for either mutation leads to developmental delay, cardiovascular and brain malformations, accompanied with early embryonic lethality. Our analyses indicate that IKAP is essential for expression of specific genes involved in cardiac morphogenesis, and that cardiac failure is the likely cause of abnormal vascular development and embryonic lethality. Our results also indicate that deletion of exon 20 abolishes gene function. This implies that the truncated IKAP protein expressed in FD patients does not retain any significant biological function.

  16. Reduced Euchromatin histone methyltransferase 1 causes developmental delay, hypotonia, and cranial abnormalities associated with increased bone gene expression in Kleefstra syndrome mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balemans, Monique C M; Ansar, Muhammad; Oudakker, Astrid R; van Caam, Arjan P M; Bakker, Brenda; Vitters, Elly L; van der Kraan, Peter M; de Bruijn, Diederik R H; Janssen, Sanne M; Kuipers, Arthur J; Huibers, Manon M H; Maliepaard, Eliza M; Walboomers, X Frank; Benevento, Marco; Nadif Kasri, Nael; Kleefstra, Tjitske; Zhou, Huiqing; Van der Zee, Catharina E E M; van Bokhoven, Hans

    2014-02-15

    Haploinsufficiency of Euchromatin histone methyltransferase 1 (EHMT1), a chromatin modifying enzyme, is the cause of Kleefstra syndrome (KS). KS is an intellectual disability (ID) syndrome, with general developmental delay, hypotonia, and craniofacial dysmorphisms as additional core features. Recent studies have been focused on the role of EHMT1 in learning and memory, linked to the ID phenotype of KS patients. In this study we used the Ehmt1(+/-) mouse model, and investigated whether the core features of KS were mimicked in these mice. When comparing Ehmt1(+/-) mice to wildtype littermates we observed delayed postnatal growth, eye opening, ear opening, and upper incisor eruption, indicating a delayed postnatal development. Furthermore, tests for muscular strength and motor coordination showed features of hypotonia in young Ehmt1(+/-) mice. Lastly, we found that Ehmt1(+/-) mice showed brachycephalic crania, a shorter or bent nose, and hypertelorism, reminiscent of the craniofacial dysmorphisms seen in KS. In addition, gene expression analysis revealed a significant upregulation of the mRNA levels of Runx2 and several other bone tissue related genes in P28 Ehmt1(+/-) mice. Runx2 immunostaining also appeared to be increased. The mRNA upregulation was associated with decreased histone H3 lysine 9 dimethylation (H3K9me2) levels, the epigenetic mark deposited by Ehmt1, in the promoter region of these genes. Together, Ehmt1(+/-) mice indeed recapitulate KS core features and can be used as an animal model for Kleefstra syndrome. The increased expression of bone developmental genes in the Ehmt1(+/-) mice likely contributes to their cranial dysmorphisms and might be explained by diminished Ehmt1-induced H3K9 dimethylation. PMID:24362066

  17. A novel HSF4 gene mutation (p.R405X causing autosomal recessive congenital cataracts in a large consanguineous family from Pakistan

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    Cheema Abdul

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hereditary cataracts are most frequently inherited as autosomal dominant traits, but can also be inherited in an autosomal recessive or X-linked fashion. To date, 12 loci for autosomal recessive cataracts have been mapped including a locus on chromosome 16q22 containing the disease-causing gene HSF4 (Genbank accession number NM_001040667. Here, we describe a family from Pakistan with the first nonsense mutation in HSF4 thus expanding the mutational spectrum of this heat shock transcription factor gene. Methods A large consanguineous Pakistani family with autosomal recessive cataracts was collected from Quetta. Genetic linkage analysis was performed for the common known autosomal recessive cataracts loci and linkage to a locus containing HSF4 (OMIM 602438 was found. All exons and adjacent splice sites of the heat shock transcription factor 4 gene (HSF4 were sequenced. A mutation-specific restriction enzyme digest (HphI was performed for all family members and unrelated controls. Results The disease phenotype perfectly co-segregated with markers flanking the known cataract gene HSF4, whereas other autosomal recessive loci were excluded. A maximum two-point LOD score with a Zmax = 5.6 at θ = 0 was obtained for D16S421. Direct sequencing of HSF4 revealed the nucleotide exchange c.1213C > T in this family predicting an arginine to stop codon exchange (p.R405X. Conclusion We identified the first nonsense mutation (p.R405X in exon 11 of HSF4 in a large consanguineous Pakistani family with autosomal recessive cataract.

  18. A Novel Mutation in the CYP11B1 Gene Causes Steroid 11β-Hydroxylase Deficient Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia with Reversible Cardiomyopathy

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    Mohammad A. Alqahtani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH due to steroid 11β-hydroxylase deficiency is the second most common form of CAH, resulting from a mutation in the CYP11B1 gene. Steroid 11β-hydroxylase deficiency results in excessive mineralcorticoids and androgen production leading to hypertension, precocious puberty with acne, enlarged penis, and hyperpigmentation of scrotum of genetically male infants. In the present study, we reported 3 male cases from a Saudi family who presented with penile enlargement, progressive darkness of skin, hypertension, and cardiomyopathy. The elder patient died due to heart failure and his younger brothers were treated with hydrocortisone and antihypertensive medications. Six months following treatment, cardiomyopathy disappeared with normal blood pressure and improvement in the skin pigmentation. The underlying molecular defect was investigated by PCR-sequencing analysis of all coding exons and intron-exon boundary of the CYP11B1 gene. A novel biallelic mutation c.780 G>A in exon 4 of the CYP11B1 gene was found in the patients. The mutation created a premature stop codon at amino acid 260 (p.W260∗, resulting in a truncated protein devoid of 11β-hydroxylase activity. Interestingly, a somatic mutation at the same codon (c.779 G>A, p.W260∗ was reported in a patient with papillary thyroid cancer (COSMIC database. In conclusion, we have identified a novel nonsense mutation in the CYP11B1 gene that causes classic steroid 11β-hydroxylase deficient CAH. Cardiomyopathy and cardiac failure can be reversed by early diagnosis and treatment.

  19. A Novel Mutation in the CYP11B1 Gene Causes Steroid 11β-Hydroxylase Deficient Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia with Reversible Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqahtani, Mohammad A; Shati, Ayed A; Zou, Minjing; Alsuheel, Ali M; Alhayani, Abdullah A; Al-Qahtani, Saleh M; Gilban, Hessa M; Meyer, Brain F; Shi, Yufei

    2015-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) due to steroid 11β-hydroxylase deficiency is the second most common form of CAH, resulting from a mutation in the CYP11B1 gene. Steroid 11β-hydroxylase deficiency results in excessive mineralcorticoids and androgen production leading to hypertension, precocious puberty with acne, enlarged penis, and hyperpigmentation of scrotum of genetically male infants. In the present study, we reported 3 male cases from a Saudi family who presented with penile enlargement, progressive darkness of skin, hypertension, and cardiomyopathy. The elder patient died due to heart failure and his younger brothers were treated with hydrocortisone and antihypertensive medications. Six months following treatment, cardiomyopathy disappeared with normal blood pressure and improvement in the skin pigmentation. The underlying molecular defect was investigated by PCR-sequencing analysis of all coding exons and intron-exon boundary of the CYP11B1 gene. A novel biallelic mutation c.780 G>A in exon 4 of the CYP11B1 gene was found in the patients. The mutation created a premature stop codon at amino acid 260 (p.W260 (∗) ), resulting in a truncated protein devoid of 11β-hydroxylase activity. Interestingly, a somatic mutation at the same codon (c.779 G>A, p.W260 (∗) ) was reported in a patient with papillary thyroid cancer (COSMIC database). In conclusion, we have identified a novel nonsense mutation in the CYP11B1 gene that causes classic steroid 11β-hydroxylase deficient CAH. Cardiomyopathy and cardiac failure can be reversed by early diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26265915

  20. Persistent Müllerian Duct Syndrome Caused by a Novel Mutation of an Anti-MüIlerian Hormone Receptor Gene: Case Presentation and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias-Assad, Ghadir; Elias, Marwan; Kanety, Hannah; Pressman, Asher; Tenenbaum-Rakover, Yardena

    2016-06-01

    Persistent Müllerian duct syndrome (PMDS) is a rare genetic disorder of male internal sexual development defined as lack of regression of Müllerian derivatives in the 46XY male with normally virilized external genitalia and unilateral or bilateral cryptorchidism. Approximately 85% of all cases are caused by mutations in genes encoding anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) or its receptor (AMHR2) with autosomal recessive transmission. This condition is frequently diagnosed incidentally, during surgical repair of inguinal hernia or cryptorchidism. There is no consensus on surgical approach: malignancy risk in the Müllerian duct remnant or undescended testis encourages early removal of the former and bilateral orchiopexy; however, removal of Müllerian structures can impair testicular and vas deferens blood supply, potentially causing infertility. Herein, we report on a male infant with PMDS caused by a novel homozygous missense mutation in AMHR2 (c.928C>T; p.Q310X), review the literature, and discuss the diverse clinical and surgical approaches to this condition. PMID:27464416

  1. Exclusion of mutations in the PRNP, JPH3, TBP, ATN1, CREBBP, POU3F2 and FTL genes as a cause of disease in Portuguese patients with a Huntington-like phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Costa, Maria do Carmo; Teixeira-Castro, Andreia; Constante, Marco; Magalhães, Marina; Magalhães, Paula; Cerqueira, Joana; Vale, José; Passão, Vitorina; Barbosa, Célia; Robalo, Conceição; Coutinho, Paula; Barros, José; Santos, Manuela M.; Sequeiros, Jorge; Maciel, Patrícia

    2006-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder characterised by chorea, cognitive impairment, dementia and personality changes, caused by the expansion of a CAG repeat in the HD gene. Often, patients with a similar clinical presentation do not carry expansions of the CAG repeat in this gene [Huntington disease-like (HDL) patients]. We report the genetic analysis of 107 Portuguese patients with an HDL phenotype. The HDL genes PRNP and JPH3, encoding the prion prote...

  2. Deletion of a single allele of the Pex11β gene is sufficient to cause oxidative stress, delayed differentiation and neuronal death in mouse brain

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    Barbara Ahlemeyer

    2012-01-01

    Impaired neuronal migration and cell death are commonly observed in patients with peroxisomal biogenesis disorders (PBDs, and in mouse models of this diseases. In Pex11β-deficient mice, we observed that the deletion of a single allele of the Pex11β gene (Pex11β+/− heterozygous mice caused cell death in primary neuronal cultures prepared from the neocortex and cerebellum, although to a lesser extent as compared with the homozygous-null animals (Pex11β−/− mice. In corresponding brain sections, cell death was rare, but differences between the genotypes were similar to those found in vitro. Because PEX11β has been implicated in peroxisomal proliferation, we searched for alterations in peroxisomal abundance in the brain of heterozygous and homozygous Pex11β-null mice compared with wild-type animals. Deletion of one allele of the Pex11β gene slightly increased the abundance of peroxisomes, whereas the deletion of both alleles caused a 30% reduction in peroxisome number. The size of the peroxisomal compartment did not correlate with neuronal death. Similar to cell death, neuronal development was delayed in Pex11β+/− mice, and to a further extent in Pex11β−/− mice, as measured by a reduced mRNA and protein level of synaptophysin and a reduced protein level of the mature isoform of MAP2. Moreover, a gradual increase in oxidative stress was found in brain sections and primary neuronal cultures from wild-type to heterozygous to homozygous Pex11β-deficient mice. SOD2 was upregulated in neurons from Pex11β+/− mice, but not from Pex11β−/− animals, whereas the level of catalase remained unchanged in neurons from Pex11β+/− mice and was reduced in those from Pex11β−/− mice, suggesting a partial compensation of oxidative stress in the heterozygotes, but a failure thereof in the homozygous Pex11β−/− brain. In conclusion, we report the alterations in the brain caused by the deletion of a single allele of the Pex11β gene. Our data might lead

  3. A single base insertion in the putative transmembrane domain of the tyrosinase gene as a cause for tyrosinase-negative oculocutaneous albinism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chintamaneni, C.D.; Kobayashi, Y.; Kwon, B.S. (Indiana Univ. School of Medicine, Indianapolis (United States)); Halaban, R. (Yale Univ. School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States)); Witkop, C.J. Jr. (Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis (United States))

    1991-06-15

    The authors have determined a molecular defect to be the likely basis for inactivity of the tyrosinase from a patient with tyrosinase-negative oculocutaneous albinism. A single base (thymine) was inserted in exon 5 of the tyrosinase gene following codon 471 in the putative transmembrane coding region. This insertion caused a shift in the reading frame of 19 amino acids at the 3{prime} end and introduced a premature termination signal that would be expected to truncate the protein by 21 amino acids at the carboxyl terminus. The albino tyrosinase was not recognized by antibodies directed to the carboxyl terminus of tyrosinase. Furthermore, as shown by gel electrophoresis of the immunoprecipitated protein, the tyrosinase was {approx} 3kDa smaller than normal. Similar immunoprecipitation data were obtained when cloned normal and mutant tyrosinases were expressed in COS-1 cells.

  4. Molecular analysis of four cases of chronic granulomatous disease caused by defects in NCF-2: the gene encoding the p67-phox.

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    Mohsen Badalzadeh

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD, a rare inherited primary immunodeficiency disorder,  is  caused  by  mutation  in  any  one  of  the  genes  encoding  components   of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH-oxidase enzyme. NCF2 gene (encoding P67-phox component is one of them and its mutation is less common to cause CGD (around 5-6%. Here, we assessed mutation analysis of NCF2 in 4 CGD patients with p67-phox defect in Iran.These patients showed classical CGD symptoms. NCF2 sequence analyses revealed two different homozygous mutations including a nonsense mutation in exon 4, c.304C>T (Arg102X in one case and a CA deletion in exon 13 (Leu346fsX380 in one brother and sister;the latter is a new mutation which has not been reported in previous studies.In another patient in whom the attempts to amplify exon 2 individually from genomic DNA  were unsuccessful, PCR amplification of exon 2 revealed no band of this exon on agarose gel. A PCR amplification mix of  exon  2 and exon 7, with an internal control, confirmed the lack of exon 2 in this patient. Although a gross deletion in other exons of NCF2  has been previously reported, a large deletion encompassing exon 2 has been not reported yet. This abstract was also presented in ESID 2012, Florence, Italy.

  5. Mutation G805R in the transmembrane domain of the LDL receptor gene causes familial hypercholesterolemia by inducing ectodomain cleavage of the LDL receptor in the endoplasmic reticulum

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    Thea Bismo Strøm

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available More than 1700 mutations in the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR gene have been found to cause familial hypercholesterolemia (FH. These are commonly divided into five classes based upon their effects on the structure and function of the LDLR. However, little is known about the mechanism by which mutations in the transmembrane domain of the LDLR gene cause FH. We have studied how the transmembrane mutation G805R affects the function of the LDLR. Based upon Western blot analyses of transfected HepG2 cells, mutation G805R reduced the amounts of the 120 kDa precursor LDLR in the endoplasmic reticulum. This led to reduced amounts of the mature 160 kDa LDLR at the cell surface. However, significant amounts of a secreted 140 kDa G805R-LDLR ectodomain fragment was observed in the culture media. Treatment of the cells with the metalloproteinase inhibitor batimastat largely restored the amounts of the 120 and 160 kDa forms in cell lysates, and prevented secretion of the 140 kDa ectodomain fragment. Together, these data indicate that a metalloproteinase cleaved the ectodomain of the 120 kDa precursor G805R-LDLR in the endoplasmic reticulum. It was the presence of the polar Arg805 and not the lack of Gly805 which led to ectodomain cleavage. Arg805 also prevented γ-secretase cleavage within the transmembrane domain. It is conceivable that introducing a charged residue within the hydrophobic membrane lipid bilayer, results in less efficient incorporation of the 120 kDa G805R-LDLR in the endoplasmic reticulum membrane and makes it a substrate for metalloproteinase cleavage.

  6. Genome Sequencing and Transposon Mutagenesis of Burkholderia seminalis TC3.4.2R3 Identify Genes Contributing to Suppression of Orchid Necrosis Caused by B. gladioli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Welington L; Creason, Allison L; Mano, Emy T; Camargo-Neves, Aline A; Minami, Sonia N; Chang, Jeff H; Loper, Joyce E

    2016-06-01

    From a screen of 36 plant-associated strains of Burkholderia spp., we identified 24 strains that suppressed leaf and pseudobulb necrosis of orchid caused by B. gladioli. To gain insights into the mechanisms of disease suppression, we generated a draft genome sequence from one suppressive strain, TC3.4.2R3. The genome is an estimated 7.67 megabases in size, with three replicons, two chromosomes, and the plasmid pC3. Using a combination of multilocus sequence analysis and phylogenomics, we identified TC3.4.2R3 as B. seminalis, a species within the Burkholderia cepacia complex that includes opportunistic human pathogens and environmental strains. We generated and screened a library of 3,840 transposon mutants of strain TC3.4.2R3 on orchid leaves to identify genes contributing to plant disease suppression. Twelve mutants deficient in suppression of leaf necrosis were selected and the transposon insertions were mapped to eight loci. One gene is in a wcb cluster that is related to synthesis of extracellular polysaccharide, a key determinant in bacterial-host interactions in other systems, and the other seven are highly conserved among Burkholderia spp. The fundamental information developed in this study will serve as a resource for future research aiming to identify mechanisms contributing to biological control. PMID:26959838

  7. The dwarf phenotype in GH240B mice, haploinsufficient for the autism candidate gene Neurobeachin, is caused by ectopic expression of recombinant human growth hormone.

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    Kim Nuytens

    Full Text Available Two knockout mouse models for the autism candidate gene Neurobeachin (Nbea have been generated independently. Although both models have similar phenotypes, one striking difference is the dwarf phenotype observed in the heterozygous configuration of the GH240B model that is generated by the serendipitous insertion of a promoterless human growth hormone (hGH genomic fragment in the Nbea gene. In order to elucidate this discrepancy, the dwarfism present in this Nbea mouse model was investigated in detail. The growth deficiency in Nbea+/- mice coincided with an increased percentage of fat mass and a decrease in bone mineral density. Low but detectable levels of hGH were detected in the pituitary and hypothalamus of Nbea+/- mice but not in liver, hippocampus nor in serum. As a consequence, several members of the mouse growth hormone (mGH signaling cascade showed altered mRNA levels, including a reduction in growth hormone-releasing hormone mRNA in the hypothalamus. Moreover, somatotrope cells were less numerous in the pituitary of Nbea+/- mice and both contained and secreted significantly less mGH resulting in reduced levels of circulating insulin-like growth factor 1. These findings demonstrate that the random integration of the hGH transgene in this mouse model has not only inactivated Nbea but has also resulted in the tissue-specific expression of hGH causing a negative feedback loop, mGH hyposecretion and dwarfism.

  8. Mutation of a family 8 glycosyltransferase gene alters cell wall carbohydrate composition and causes a humidity-sensitive semi-sterile dwarf phenotype in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao, Nga T; Long, Debbie; Kiang, Sophie; Coupland, George; Shoue, Douglas A; Carpita, Nicholas C; Kavanagh, Tony A

    2003-11-01

    The genome of Arabidopsis thaliana contains about 400 genes coding for glycosyltransferases, many of which are predicted to be involved in the synthesis and remodelling of cell wall components. We describe the isolation of a transposon-tagged mutant, parvus, which under low humidity conditions exhibits a severely dwarfed growth phenotype and failure of anther dehiscence resulting in semi-sterility. All aspects of the mutant phenotype were partially rescued by growth under high-humidity conditions, but not by the application of growth hormones or jasmonic acid. The mutation is caused by insertion of a maize Dissociation (Ds) element in a gene coding for a putative Golgi-localized glycosyltransferase belonging to family 8. Members of this family, originally identified on the basis of similarity to bacterial lipooligosaccharide glycosyltransferases, include enzymes known to be involved in the synthesis of bacterial and plant cell walls. Cell-wall carbohydrate analyses of the parvus mutant indicated reduced levels of rhamnogalacturonan I branching and alterations in the abundance of some xyloglucan linkages that may, however, be indirect consequences of the mutation. PMID:15010604

  9. A novel TRPS1 gene mutation causing trichorhinophalangeal syndrome with growth hormone responsive short stature: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merjaneh, Lina; Parks, John S; Muir, Andrew B; Fadoju, Doris

    2014-01-01

    The role of growth hormone (GH) and its therapeutic supplementation in the trichorhinophalangeal syndrome type I (TRPS I) is not well delineated. TRPS I is a rare congenital syndrome, characterized by craniofacial and skeletal malformations including short stature, sparse, thin scalp hair and lateral eyebrows, pear-shaped nose, cone shaped epiphyses and hip dysplasia. It is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner and caused by haploinsufficiency of the TRPS1 gene. We report a family (Mother and 3 of her 4 children) with a novel mutation in the TRPS1 gene. The diagnosis was suspected only after meeting all family members and comparing affected and unaffected siblings since the features of this syndrome might be subtle. The eldest sibling, who had neither GH deficiency nor insensitivity, improved his growth velocity and height SDS after 2 years of treatment with exogenous GH. No change in growth velocity was observed in the untreated siblings during this same period. This report emphasizes the importance of examining all family members when suspecting a genetic syndrome. It also demonstrates the therapeutic effect of GH treatment in TRPS I despite normal GH-IGF1 axis. A review of the literature is included to address whether TRPS I is associated with: a) GH deficiency, b) GH resistance, or c) GH-responsive short stature. More studies are needed before recommending GH treatment for TRPS I but a trial should be considered on an individual basis. PMID:25177352

  10. Involvement of Ca2+ in Vacuole Degradation Caused by a Rapid Temperature Decrease in Saintpaulia Palisade Cells: A Case of Gene Expression Analysis in a Specialized Small Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, Miwa; Kadohama, Noriaki; Suzuki, Yoshihiro; Kajiyama, Tomoharu; Shichijo, Chizuko; Ishizaki, Kimitsune; Fukaki, Hidehiro; Iida, Hidetoshi; Kambara, Hideki; Mimura, Tetsuro

    2015-07-01

    Saintpaulia (African violet) leaves are known to be damaged by a rapid temperature decrease when cold water is applied to the leaf surface; the injury is ascribed to the chloroplast damage caused by the cytosolic pH decrease following the degradation of the vacuolar membrane in the palisade cells. In this report, we present evidence for the involvement of Ca(2+) in facilitating the collapse of the vacuolar membrane and in turn in the temperature sensitivity of Saintpaulia leaves. In the presence of a Ca(2+) chelator (EGTA) or certain Ca(2+) channel inhibitors (Gd(3+) or La(3+)) but not others (verapamil or nifedipine), the pH of the vacuole, monitored through BCECF (2',7'-bis(carboxyethyl)-4 or 5-carboxyfluorescein) fluorescence, did not increase in response to a rapid temperature drop. These pharmacological observations are consistent with the involvement of mechanosensitive Ca(2+) channels in the collapse of the vacuolar membrane. The high level of expression of an MCA- (Arabidopsis mechanosensitive Ca(2+) channel) like gene, a likely candidate for a mechanosensitive Ca(2+) channel(s) in plant cells, was confirmed in the palisade tissue in Saintpaulia leaves by using a newly developed method of gene expression analysis for the specialized small tissues. PMID:25941231

  11. Mutations in the gene encoding the Sigma 2 subunit of the adaptor protein 1 complex, AP1S2, cause X-linked mental retardation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarpey, Patrick S; Stevens, Claire; Teague, Jon; Edkins, Sarah; O'Meara, Sarah; Avis, Tim; Barthorpe, Syd; Buck, Gemma; Butler, Adam; Cole, Jennifer; Dicks, Ed; Gray, Kristian; Halliday, Kelly; Harrison, Rachel; Hills, Katy; Hinton, Jonathon; Jones, David; Menzies, Andrew; Mironenko, Tatiana; Perry, Janet; Raine, Keiran; Richardson, David; Shepherd, Rebecca; Small, Alexandra; Tofts, Calli; Varian, Jennifer; West, Sofie; Widaa, Sara; Yates, Andy; Catford, Rachael; Butler, Julia; Mallya, Uma; Moon, Jenny; Luo, Ying; Dorkins, Huw; Thompson, Deborah; Easton, Douglas F; Wooster, Richard; Bobrow, Martin; Carpenter, Nancy; Simensen, Richard J; Schwartz, Charles E; Stevenson, Roger E; Turner, Gillian; Partington, Michael; Gecz, Jozef; Stratton, Michael R; Futreal, P Andrew; Raymond, F Lucy

    2006-12-01

    In a systematic sequencing screen of the coding exons of the X chromosome in 250 families with X-linked mental retardation (XLMR), we identified two nonsense mutations and one consensus splice-site mutation in the AP1S2 gene on Xp22 in three families. Affected individuals in these families showed mild-to-profound mental retardation. Other features included hypotonia early in life and delay in walking. AP1S2 encodes an adaptin protein that constitutes part of the adaptor protein complex found at the cytoplasmic face of coated vesicles located at the Golgi complex. The complex mediates the recruitment of clathrin to the vesicle membrane. Aberrant endocytic processing through disruption of adaptor protein complexes is likely to result from the AP1S2 mutations identified in the three XLMR-affected families, and such defects may plausibly cause abnormal synaptic development and function. AP1S2 is the first reported XLMR gene that encodes a protein directly involved in the assembly of endocytic vesicles. PMID:17186471

  12. Analysis of large phenotypic variability of EEC and SHFM4 syndromes caused by K193E mutation of the TP63 gene.

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    Jianhua Wei

    Full Text Available EEC (ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, clefting; OMIM 604292 is an autosomal dominant developmental disorder resulting mainly from pathogenic mutations of the DNA-binding domain (DBD of the TP63 gene. In this study, we showed that K193E mutation in nine affected individuals of a four-generation kindred with a large degree of phenotypic variability causes four different syndromes or TP63-related disorders: EEC, Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia (EE, isolated ectodermal dysplasia, and isolated Split Hand/Foot Malformation type 4 (SHFM4. Genotype-phenotype and DBD structural modeling analysis showed that the K193-located loop L2-A is associated with R280 through hydrogen bonding interactions, while R280 mutations also often cause large phenotypic variability of EEC and SHFM4. Thus, we speculate that K193 and several other DBD mutation-associated syndromes may share similar pathogenic mechanisms, particularly in the case of the same mutation with different phenotypes. Our study and others also suggest that the phenotypic variability of EEC is attributed, at least partially, to genetic and/or epigenetic modifiers.

  13. Novel mutations in DNAJB6 gene cause a very severe early-onset limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 1D disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmio, Johanna; Jonson, Per Harald; Evilä, Anni; Auranen, Mari; Straub, Volker; Bushby, Kate; Sarkozy, Anna; Kiuru-Enari, Sari; Sandell, Satu; Pihko, Helena; Hackman, Peter; Udd, Bjarne

    2015-11-01

    DNAJB6 is the causative gene for limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 1D (LGMD1D). Four different coding missense mutations, p.F89I, p.F93I, p.F93L, and p.P96R, have been reported in families from Europe, North America and Asia. The previously known mutations cause mainly adult-onset proximal muscle weakness with moderate progression and without respiratory involvement. A Finnish family and a British patient have been studied extensively due to a severe muscular dystrophy. The patients had childhood-onset LGMD, loss of ambulation in early adulthood and respiratory involvement; one patient died of respiratory failure aged 32. Two novel mutations, c.271T > A (p.F91I) and c.271T > C (p.F91L), in DNAJB6 were identified by whole exome sequencing as a cause of this severe form of LGMD1D. The results were confirmed by Sanger sequencing. The anti-aggregation effect of the mutant DNAJB6 was investigated in a filter-trap based system using transient transfection of mammalian cell lines and polyQ-huntingtin as a model for an aggregation-prone protein. Both novel mutant proteins show a significant loss of ability to prevent aggregation. PMID:26338452

  14. First case report of rare congenital adrenal insufficiency caused by mutations in the CYP11A1 gene in the Czech Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomahačová, Renata; Sýkora, Josef; Zamboryová, Jana; Paterová, Petra; Varvařovská, Jana; Šubrt, Ivan; Dort, Jiří; Dortová, Eva

    2016-06-01

    We characterized a case of congenital adrenal insufficiency caused by cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc) deficiency. The patient presented after birth with cardiopulmonary instability, hyponatremia, hyperkalemia, hypoglycemia and metabolic acidosis. We confirmed primary adrenal insufficiency. There were no signs of the external genitalia virilism. The replacement therapy with glucocorticoids and mineralocorticoids led to normal laboratory results. At the age of 12 years, we confirmed hypergonadotropic hypogonadism, which revealed disorder of steroidogenesis in the adrenal glands and in the gonads. The enzymatic block was found at the beginning of steroidogenesis. The mutation was confirmed in the CYP11A1 gene. The patient is compound heterozygote for the novel CYP11A1 missense mutation c.412G>A (p.Gly138Arg) in exon 2 and frameshift mutation c.508_509delCT (p.Leu170Valfs*30) in exon 3. The CYP11A1: c.412G>A (p.Gly138Arg) was predicted as pathogenic by in silico analysis. So far, only 19 patients with CYP11A1 mutations causing P450scc deficiency have been reported worldwide. There are no related reports in the Czech Republic. PMID:27008691

  15. A novel mutation in the nerve-specific 5'UTR of the GJB1 gene causes X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Sinéad M

    2011-03-01

    X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT1X) is the second most common cause of CMT, and is usually caused by mutations in the gap junction protein beta 1 (GJB1) gene which codes for connexin 32 (CX32). CX32 has three tissue-specific promoters, P1 which is specific for liver and pancreas, P1a specific for liver, oocytes and embryonic stem cells, and P2 which is nerve-specific. Over 300 mutations have been described in GJB1, spread throughout the coding region. We describe two families with X-linked inheritance and a phenotype consistent with CMT1X who did not have mutations in the GJB1 coding region. The non-coding region of GJB1 was sequenced and an upstream exon-splicing variant found at approximately - 373G>A which segregated with the disease in both families and was not present in controls. This substitution is located at the last base of the nerve-specific 5\\'UTR and thus may disrupt splicing of the nerve-specific transcript. Online consensus splice-site programs predict a reduced score for the mutant sequence vs. the normal sequence. It is likely that other mutations within the GJB1 non-coding regions account for the CMT1X families who do not have coding region mutations.

  16. Exploring the structural and functional effect of pRB by significant nsSNP in the coding region of RB1 gene causing retinoblastoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rajasekaran; R; Rao; Sethumadhavan

    2010-01-01

    In this study,we identified the most deleterious nsSNP in RB1 gene through structural and functional properties of its protein (pRB) and investigated its binding affinity with E2F-2.Out of 956 SNPs,we investigated 12 nsSNPs in coding region in which three of them (SNPids rs3092895,rs3092903 and rs3092905) are commonly found to be damaged by I-Mutant 2.0,SIFT and PolyPhen programs.With this effort,we modeled the mutant pRB proteins based on these deleterious nsSNPs.From a comparison of total energy,stabilizing residues and RMSD of these three mutant proteins with native pRB protein,we identified that the major mutation is from Glutamic acid to Glycine at the residue position of 746 of pRB.Further,we compared the binding efficiency of both native and mutant pRB (E746G) with E2F-2.We found that mutant pRB has less binding affinity with E2F-2 as compared to native type.This is due to sixteen hydrogen bonding and two salt bridges that exist between native type and E2F-2,whereas mutant type makes only thirteen hydrogen bonds and one salt bridge with E2F-2.Based on our investigation,we propose that the SNP with an id rs3092905 could be the most deleterious nsSNP in RB1 gene causing retinoblastoma.

  17. Autosomal recessive spastic tetraplegia caused by AP4M1 and AP4B1 gene mutation: expansion of the facial and neuroimaging features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tüysüz, Beyhan; Bilguvar, Kaya; Koçer, Naci; Yalçınkaya, Cengiz; Çağlayan, Okay; Gül, Ece; Sahin, Sezgin; Çomu, Sinan; Günel, Murat

    2014-07-01

    Adaptor protein complex-4 (AP4) is a component of intracellular transportation of proteins, which is thought to have a unique role in neurons. Recently, mutations affecting all four subunits of AP4 (AP4M1, AP4E1, AP4S1, and AP4B1) have been found to cause similar autosomal recessive phenotype consisting of tetraplegic cerebral palsy and intellectual disability. The aim of this study was analyzing AP4 genes in three new families with this phenotype, and discussing their clinical findings with an emphasis on neuroimaging and facial features. Using homozygosity mapping followed by whole-exome sequencing, we identified two novel homozygous mutations in AP4M1 and a homozygous deletion in AP4B1 in three pairs of siblings. Spastic tetraplegia, microcephaly, severe intellectual disability, limited speech, and stereotypic laughter were common findings in our patients. All patients also had similar facial features consisting of coarse and hypotonic face, bitemporal narrowing, bulbous nose with broad nasal ridge, and short philtrum which were not described in patients with AP4M1 and AP4B1 mutations previously. The patients presented here and previously with AP4M1, AP4B1, and AP4E1 mutations shared brain abnormalities including asymmetrical ventriculomegaly, thin splenium of the corpus callosum, and reduced white matter volume. The patients also had hippocampal globoid formation and thin hippocampus. In conclusion, disorders due to mutations in AP4 complex have similar neurological, facial, and cranial imaging findings. Thus, these four genes encoding AP4 subunits should be screened in patients with autosomal recessive spastic tetraplegic cerebral palsy, severe intellectual disability, and stereotypic laughter, especially with the described facial and cranial MRI features. PMID:24700674

  18. Acute 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene exposure causes differential concentration-dependent follicle depletion and gene expression in neonatal rat ovaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madden, Jill A. [Department of Animal Science, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Hoyer, Patricia B. [Department of Physiology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85724 (United States); Devine, Patrick J. [INRS—Institut Armand-Frappier Research Centre, University of Quebec, Laval, QC H7V 1B7 (Canada); Keating, Aileen F., E-mail: akeating@iastate.edu [Department of Animal Science, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Department of Physiology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85724 (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Chronic exposure to the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA), generated during combustion of organic matter including cigarette smoke, depletes all ovarian follicle types in the mouse and rat, and in vitro models mimic this effect. To investigate the mechanisms involved in follicular depletion during acute DMBA exposure, two concentrations of DMBA at which follicle depletion has (75 nM) and has not (12.5 nM) been observed were investigated. Postnatal day four F344 rat ovaries were maintained in culture for four days before a single exposure to vehicle control (1% DMSO; CT) or DMBA (12 nM; low-concentration or 75 nM; high-concentration). After four or eight additional days of culture, DMBA-induced follicle depletion was evaluated via follicle enumeration. Relative to control, DMBA did not affect follicle numbers after 4 days of exposure, but induced large primary follicle loss at both concentrations after 8 days; while, the low-concentration DMBA also caused secondary follicle depletion. Neither concentration affected primordial or small primary follicle number. RNA was isolated and quantitative RT-PCR performed prior to follicle loss to measure mRNA levels of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism (Cyp2e1, Gstmu, Gstpi, Ephx1), autophagy (Atg7, Becn1), oxidative stress response (Sod1, Sod2) and the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway (Kitlg, cKit, Akt1) 1, 2 and 4 days after exposure. With the exception of Atg7 and cKit, DMBA increased (P < 0.05) expression of all genes investigated. Also, BECN1 and pAKT{sup Thr308} protein levels were increased while cKIT was decreased by DMBA exposure. Taken together, these results suggest an increase in DMBA bioactivation, add to the mechanistic understanding of DMBA-induced ovotoxicity and raise concern regarding female low concentration DMBA exposures. - Highlights: • Acute DMBA exposures induce large primary and/or secondary follicle loss. • Acute DMBA exposure did not impact

  19. Acute 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene exposure causes differential concentration-dependent follicle depletion and gene expression in neonatal rat ovaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chronic exposure to the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA), generated during combustion of organic matter including cigarette smoke, depletes all ovarian follicle types in the mouse and rat, and in vitro models mimic this effect. To investigate the mechanisms involved in follicular depletion during acute DMBA exposure, two concentrations of DMBA at which follicle depletion has (75 nM) and has not (12.5 nM) been observed were investigated. Postnatal day four F344 rat ovaries were maintained in culture for four days before a single exposure to vehicle control (1% DMSO; CT) or DMBA (12 nM; low-concentration or 75 nM; high-concentration). After four or eight additional days of culture, DMBA-induced follicle depletion was evaluated via follicle enumeration. Relative to control, DMBA did not affect follicle numbers after 4 days of exposure, but induced large primary follicle loss at both concentrations after 8 days; while, the low-concentration DMBA also caused secondary follicle depletion. Neither concentration affected primordial or small primary follicle number. RNA was isolated and quantitative RT-PCR performed prior to follicle loss to measure mRNA levels of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism (Cyp2e1, Gstmu, Gstpi, Ephx1), autophagy (Atg7, Becn1), oxidative stress response (Sod1, Sod2) and the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway (Kitlg, cKit, Akt1) 1, 2 and 4 days after exposure. With the exception of Atg7 and cKit, DMBA increased (P < 0.05) expression of all genes investigated. Also, BECN1 and pAKTThr308 protein levels were increased while cKIT was decreased by DMBA exposure. Taken together, these results suggest an increase in DMBA bioactivation, add to the mechanistic understanding of DMBA-induced ovotoxicity and raise concern regarding female low concentration DMBA exposures. - Highlights: • Acute DMBA exposures induce large primary and/or secondary follicle loss. • Acute DMBA exposure did not impact

  20. Phenotypic, metabolic, and molecular genetic characterization of six patients with congenital adrenal hyperplasia caused by novel mutations in the CYP11B1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Huy-Hoang; Eiden-Plach, Antje; Hannemann, Frank; Malunowicz, Ewa M; Hartmann, Michaela F; Wudy, Stefan A; Bernhardt, Rita

    2016-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder of steroidogenesis. Steroid 11β-hydroxylase deficiency (11β-OHD) due to mutations in the CYP11B1 gene is the second most common form of CAH. In this study, 6 patients suffering from CAH were diagnosed with 11β-OHD using urinary GC-MS steroid metabolomics analysis. The molecular basis of the disorder was investigated by molecular genetic analysis of the CYP11B1 gene, functional characterization of splicing and missense mutations, and analysis of the missense mutations in a computer model of CYP11B1. All patients presented with abnormal clinical signs of hyperandrogenism. Their urinary steroid metabolomes were characterized by excessive excretion rates of metabolites of 11-deoxycortisol as well as metabolites of 11-deoxycorticosterone, and allowed definite diagnosis. Patient 1 carries compound heterozygous mutations consisting of a novel nonsense mutation p.Q102X (c.304C>T) in exon 2 and the known missense mutation p.T318R (c.953C>G) in exon 5. Two siblings (patient 2 and 3) were compound heterozygous carriers of a known splicing mutation c.1200+1G>A in intron 7 and a known missense mutation p.R448H (c.1343G>A) in exon 8. Minigene experiments demonstrated that the c.1200+1G>A mutation caused abnormal pre-mRNA splicing (intron retention). Two further siblings (patient 4 and 5) were compound heterozygous carriers of a novel missense mutation p.R332G (c.994C>G) in exon 6 and the known missense mutation p.R448H (c.1343G>A) in exon 8. A CYP11B1 activity study in COS-1 cells showed that only 11% of the enzyme activity remained in the variant p.R332G. Patient 6 carried a so far not described homozygous deletion g.2470_5320del of 2850 bp corresponding to a loss of the CYP11B1 exons 3-8. The breakpoints of the deletion are embedded into two typical 6 base pair repeats (GCTTCT) upstream and downstream of the gene. Experiments analyzing the influence of mutations on splicing and on enzyme

  1. The effect of ultrasound on the expression of CNTF gene, a possible cause of ultrasound influence on the rate of injured peripheral nerve regeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this article we evaluate the effects of ultrasound radiation and its causes on the rate of injured peripheral nerve regeneration by crushing the sciatic nerve of rats with hemostatic forceps. The rats were divided into three test and one control groups. The test groups were radiated using three different types of ultrasound parameters while the control group just received sham expose. The amount of nerve regeneration was measured via functional test by extracting sciatic functional index from rats paw prints. The results showed that one of the test group parameters had the best functional results compared to other groups. Obtaining this outcome, the investigations continued by 50 rats with crushed sciatic nerve. These rats again divided into two test and control groups while for the test group the best parameters were assigned. In different time intervals compound muscle action potential wave was recorded from five rats of each group. Then their sciatic nerves were extracted to measure the amount of ciliary neurotropic factor gene expression by real time polymerase chain reaction. Crush injury sets the sciatic functional index to about −90 and compound muscle action potential to 6.8 mV in both control and test groups. After the period of treatment with ultrasound, the sciatic functional index reached the value of −25 in control group and −10 in test group and compound muscle action potential value reached 11 in control and 18 in test group. The results of electrophysiological tests confirmed the results of functional tests. At the end of the second, third and fourth weeks, the outcomes of real time polymerase chain reaction showed that the expression of ciliary neurotropic factor gene in test group was higher than control group as well as the amount in test group was approximately 11, 2 and 6 times higher than test group in corresponding weeks. Hence we can conclude that increase in the expression of ciliary neurotropic factor gene, as a nerve growth

  2. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the interferon gamma gene are associated with distinct types of retinochoroidal scar lesions presumably caused by Toxoplasma gondii infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Guerra Peixe

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the interferon (IFN-γ gene ( IFNG with different types of retinal scar lesions presumably caused by toxoplasmosis were investigated in a cross-sectional population-based genetic study. Ten SNPs were investigated and after Bonferroni correction, only the associations between SNPs rs2069718 and rs3181035 with retinal/retinochoroidal scar lesions type A (most severe scar lesions and C (least severe scar lesions, respectively, remained significant. The associations of two different IFNG SNPs with two different types of retinal lesions attributable to toxoplasmosis support the hypothesis that different inflammatory mechanisms underlie the development of these lesions. The in vitro analysis of IFN-γ secretion by peripheral blood mononuclear cells stimulated with Toxoplasma gondii antigens was also investigated. The association between SNP rs2069718 and type A scar lesions revealed that differential IFN-γ levels are correlated with distinct genotypes. However, no correlation was observed with IFN-γ secretion levels and the SNP rs3181035 , which was significantly associated with type C scar lesions. Our findings strongly suggest that immunogenetic studies of individuals with congenital or postnatally acquired infection are needed to better understand the role of IFN-γ and its polymorphisms in the pathogenesis of ocular toxoplasmosis.

  3. A novel missense mutation p.L76P in the GJB2 gene causing nonsyndromic recessive deafness in a Brazilian family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.C. Batissoco

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the GJB2 gene, encoding connexin 26 (Cx26, are a major cause of nonsyndromic recessive hearing loss in many countries. We report here on a novel point mutation in GJB2, p.L76P (c.227C>T, in compound heterozygosity with a c.35delG mutation, in two Brazilian sibs, one presenting mild and the other profound nonsyndromic neurosensorial hearing impairment. Their father, who carried a wild-type allele and a p.L76P mutation, had normal hearing. The mutation leads to the substitution of leucine (L by proline (P at residue 76, an evolutionarily conserved position in Cx26 as well as in other connexins. This mutation is predicted to affect the first extracellular domain (EC1 or the second transmembrane domain (TM2. EC1 is important for connexon-connexon interaction and for the control of channel voltage gating. The segregation of the c.227C>T (p.L76P mutation together with c.35delG in this family indicates a recessive mode of inheritance. The association between the p.L76P mutation and hearing impairment is further supported by its absence in a normal hearing control group of 100 individuals, 50 European-Brazilians and 50 African-Brazilians.

  4. Mutations in the paired domain of the human PAX3 gene cause Klein-Waardenburg syndrome (WS-III) as well as Waardenburg syndrome type I (WS-I).

    OpenAIRE

    Hoth, C F; Milunsky, A; Lipsky, N; Sheffer, R; Clarren, S K; Baldwin, C T

    1993-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome type I (WS-I) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by sensorineural hearing loss, dystopia canthorum, pigmentary disturbances, and other developmental defects. Klein-Waardenburg syndrome (WS-III) is a disorder with many of the same characteristics as WS-I and includes musculoskeletal abnormalities. We have recently reported the identification and characterization of one of the first gene defects, in the human PAX3 gene, which causes WS-I. PAX3 is a DNA-binding ...

  5. Prevalence of Gene Rearrangements in Mexican Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Population Study—Report from the Mexican Interinstitutional Group for the Identification of the Causes of Childhood Leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Vilma Carolina Bekker-Méndez; Enrique Miranda-Peralta; Juan Carlos Núñez-Enríquez; Irma Olarte-Carrillo; Francisco Xavier Guerra-Castillo; Ericka Nelly Pompa-Mera; Alicia Ocaña-Mondragón; Angélica Rangel-López; Roberto Bernáldez-Ríos; Aurora Medina-Sanson; Elva Jiménez-Hernández; Raquel Amador-Sánchez; José Gabriel Peñaloza-González; José de Diego Flores-Chapa; Arturo Fajardo-Gutiérrez

    2014-01-01

    Mexico has one of the highest incidences of childhood leukemia worldwide and significantly higher mortality rates for this disease compared with other countries. One possible cause is the high prevalence of gene rearrangements associated with the etiology or with a poor prognosis of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The aims of this multicenter study were to determine the prevalence of the four most common gene rearrangements [ETV6-RUNX1, TCF3-PBX1, BCR-ABL1, and MLL rearrangement...

  6. Mutations in the paired domain of the human PAX3 gene cause Klein-Waardenburg syndrome (WS-III) as well as Waardenburg syndrome type I (WS-I)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoth, C.F.; Milunsky, A.; Lipsky, N.; Baldwin, C.T. (Boston Univ. School of Medicine, MA (United States)); Sheffer, R. (Hadassah-Hebrew Univ. Medical Center, Jerusalem (Israel)); Clarren, S.K. (Univ. of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle (United States))

    1993-03-01

    Waardenburg syndrome type I (WS-I) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by sensorineural hearing loss, dystopia canthorum, pigmentary disturbances, and other developmental defects. Klein-Waardenburg syndrome (WS-III) is a disorder with many of the same characteristics as WS-I and includes musculoskeletal abnormalities. The authors have recently reported the identification and characterization of one of the first gene defects, in the human PAX3 gene, which causes WS-I. PAX3 is a DNA-binding protein that contains a structural motif known as the paired domain and is believed to regulate the expression of other genes. In this report they describe two new mutations, in the human PAX3 gene, that are associated with WS. One mutation was found in a family with WS-I, while the other mutation was found in a family with WS-III. Both mutations were in the highly conserved paired domain of the human PAX3 gene and are similar to other mutations that cause WS. The results indicate that mutations in the PAX3 gene can cause both WS-I and WS-III. 36 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Evidence for modifier genes that enhance the effect of the Pax-3 mutation, splotch-delayed (Sp{sup d}), on facial morphology: A model for studying the causes of variation of Waardenburg syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, R.W.; Morell, R.; Friedman, T.B. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Waardenburg syndrome type I (WS1) is caused by autosomal dominant mutations of the gene coding for the PAX3 transcription factor. These mutations have variable penetrance and expressivity within and between families where they cause hypopigmentation, deafness and facially dysmorphic features. It has been suspected that changes of penetrance and expressivity in WS1 mutations are caused by familial variation in other loci which interact with or modify the expression of the PAX3 locus. Splotch mutations (Sp, Sp{sup d}, etc.) are the mouse homologs of WS1 mutations. Mutations in Pax-3 were first used to predict the map position and function of WS1 mutations. We now present morphometric evidence for alleles of modifier genes, originating from Mus spretus and segregating in an F{sub 1} backcross with Mus musculus, that modify the effects of Sp{sup d} on the structure of mouse facial bones. Variation caused by these mouse genes are precisely homologous to the familial variation we see in dystopia canthorum, the principal diagnostic feature of Waardenburg syndrome type I. The mouse modifier genes of Pax-3 identified by this analysis are now being mapped as a first step towards positional cloning human PAX3 modifier genes.

  8. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 inhibition and angiotensin II converting inhibition in mice with cardiomyopathy caused by lamin A/C gene mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Both ACE and MEK1/2 inhibition are beneficial on cardiac function in Lmna cardiomyopathy. • MEK1/2 inhibitor has beneficial effects beyond ACE inhibition for Lmna cardiomyopathy. • These results provide further preclinical rationale for a clinical trial of a MEK1/2 inhibitor. - Abstract: Background: Mutations in the LMNA gene encoding A-type nuclear lamins can cause dilated cardiomyopathy with or without skeletal muscular dystrophy. Previous studies have shown abnormally increased extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 activity in hearts of LmnaH222P/H222P mice, a small animal model. Inhibition of this abnormal signaling activity with a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 (MEK1/2) inhibitor has beneficial effects on heart function and survival in these mice. However, such treatment has not been examined relative to any standard of care intervention for dilated cardiomyopathy or heart failure. We therefore examined the effects of an angiotensin II converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor on left ventricular function in LmnaH222P/H222P mice and assessed if adding a MEK1/2 inhibitor would provide added benefit. Methods: Male LmnaH222P/H222P mice were treated with the ACE inhibitor benazepril, the MEK1/2 inhibitor selumetinib or both. Transthoracic echocardiography was used to measure left ventricular diameters and fractional shortening was calculated. Results: Treatment of LmnaH222P/H222P mice with either benazepril or selumetinib started at 8 weeks of age, before the onset of detectable left ventricular dysfunction, lead to statistically significantly increased fractional shortening compared to placebo at 16 weeks of age. There was a trend towards a great value for fractional shortening in the selumetinib-treated mice. When treatment was started at 16 weeks of age, after the onset of left ventricular dysfunction, the addition of selumetinib treatment to benazepril lead to a statistically significant increase in left ventricular fractional

  9. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 inhibition and angiotensin II converting inhibition in mice with cardiomyopathy caused by lamin A/C gene mutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muchir, Antoine, E-mail: a.muchir@institut-myologie.org [Department of Medicine, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States); Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States); Wu, Wei [Department of Medicine, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States); Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States); Sera, Fusako; Homma, Shunichi [Department of Medicine, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States); Worman, Howard J., E-mail: hjw14@columbia.edu [Department of Medicine, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States); Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-10-03

    Highlights: • Both ACE and MEK1/2 inhibition are beneficial on cardiac function in Lmna cardiomyopathy. • MEK1/2 inhibitor has beneficial effects beyond ACE inhibition for Lmna cardiomyopathy. • These results provide further preclinical rationale for a clinical trial of a MEK1/2 inhibitor. - Abstract: Background: Mutations in the LMNA gene encoding A-type nuclear lamins can cause dilated cardiomyopathy with or without skeletal muscular dystrophy. Previous studies have shown abnormally increased extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 activity in hearts of Lmna{sup H222P/H222P} mice, a small animal model. Inhibition of this abnormal signaling activity with a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 (MEK1/2) inhibitor has beneficial effects on heart function and survival in these mice. However, such treatment has not been examined relative to any standard of care intervention for dilated cardiomyopathy or heart failure. We therefore examined the effects of an angiotensin II converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor on left ventricular function in Lmna{sup H222P/H222P} mice and assessed if adding a MEK1/2 inhibitor would provide added benefit. Methods: Male Lmna{sup H222P/H222P} mice were treated with the ACE inhibitor benazepril, the MEK1/2 inhibitor selumetinib or both. Transthoracic echocardiography was used to measure left ventricular diameters and fractional shortening was calculated. Results: Treatment of Lmna{sup H222P/H222P} mice with either benazepril or selumetinib started at 8 weeks of age, before the onset of detectable left ventricular dysfunction, lead to statistically significantly increased fractional shortening compared to placebo at 16 weeks of age. There was a trend towards a great value for fractional shortening in the selumetinib-treated mice. When treatment was started at 16 weeks of age, after the onset of left ventricular dysfunction, the addition of selumetinib treatment to benazepril lead to a statistically significant increase in left

  10. A temperature-sensitive allele of a putative mRNA splicing helicase down-regulates many cell wall genes and causes radial swelling in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howles, Paul A; Gebbie, Leigh K; Collings, David A; Varsani, Arvind; Broad, Ronan C; Ohms, Stephen; Birch, Rosemary J; Cork, Ann H; Arioli, Tony; Williamson, Richard E

    2016-05-01

    The putative RNA helicase encoded by the Arabidopsis gene At1g32490 is a homolog of the yeast splicing RNA helicases Prp2 and Prp22. We isolated a temperature-sensitive allele (rsw12) of the gene in a screen for root radial swelling mutants. Plants containing this allele grown at the restrictive temperature showed weak radial swelling, were stunted with reduced root elongation, and contained reduced levels of cellulose. The role of the protein was further explored by microarray analysis. By using both fold change cutoffs and a weighted gene coexpression network analysis (WGCNA) to investigate coexpression of genes, we found that the radial swelling phenotype was not linked to genes usually associated with primary cell wall biosynthesis. Instead, the mutation has strong effects on expression of secondary cell wall related genes. Many genes potentially associated with secondary walls were present in the most significant WGCNA module, as were genes coding for arabinogalactans and proteins with GPI anchors. The proportion of up-regulated genes that possess introns in rsw12 was above that expected if splicing was unrelated to the activity of the RNA helicase, suggesting that the helicase does indeed play a role in splicing in Arabidopsis. The phenotype may be due to a change in the expression of one or more genes coding for cell wall proteins. PMID:27008640

  11. Altered Pre-mRNA Splicing Caused by a Novel Intronic Mutation c.1443+5G>A in the Dihydropyrimidinase (DPYS Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoko Nakajima

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dihydropyrimidinase (DHP deficiency is an autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in the DPYS gene. Patients present with highly elevated levels of dihydrouracil and dihydrothymine in their urine, blood and cerebrospinal fluid. The analysis of the effect of mutations in DPYS on pre-mRNA splicing is hampered by the fact that DHP is primarily expressed in liver and kidney cells. The minigene approach can detect mRNA splicing aberrations using cells that do not express the endogenous mRNA. We have used a minigene-based approach to analyze the effects of a presumptive pre-mRNA splicing mutation in two newly identified Chinese pediatric patients with DHP deficiency. Mutation analysis of DPYS showed that both patients were compound heterozygous for a novel intronic mutation c.1443+5G>A in intron 8 and a previously described missense mutation c.1001A>G (p.Q334R in exon 6. Wild-type and the mutated minigene constructs, containing exons 7, 8 and 9 of DPYS, yielded different splicing products after expression in HEK293 cells. The c.1443+5G>A mutation resulted in altered pre-mRNA splicing of the DPYS minigene construct with full skipping of exon 8. Analysis of the DHP crystal structure showed that the deletion of exon 8 severely affects folding, stability and homooligomerization of the enzyme as well as disruption of the catalytic site. Thus, the analysis suggests that the c.1443+5G>A mutation results in aberrant splicing of the pre-mRNA encoding DHP, underlying the DHP deficiency in two unrelated Chinese patients.

  12. A novel CYP17A1 deletion causes a functional knockout of the steroid enzyme 17-hydroxylase and 17,20-lyase in a Turkish family and illustrates the precise role of the CYP17A1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camats, Núria; Üstyol, Ala; Atabek, Mehmet Emre; Dick, Bernhard; Flück, Christa E

    2015-10-01

    A novel homozygous long-range deletion of the CYP17A1 gene abolished protein expression and caused the severest form of 17-hydroxylase deficiency in one kindred of a Turkish family. The affected subjects presented with 46,XY sex reversal and 46,XX lack of pubertal development as well as severe hypertension. PMID:26509008

  13. Genes and Psoriasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diet Tips" to find out more! Email * Zipcode Genes and Psoriasis Genes hold the key to understanding ... is responsible for causing psoriatic disease. How do genes work? Genes control everything from height to eye ...

  14. Mutations in the FTSJ1 gene coding for a novel S-adenosylmethionine-binding protein cause nonsyndromic X-linked mental retardation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freude, Kristine; Hoffmann, Kirsten; Jensen, Lars-Riff; Delatycki, Martin B; des Portes, Vincent; Moser, Bettina; Hamel, Ben; van Bokhoven, Hans; Moraine, Claude; Fryns, Jean-Pierre; Chelly, Jamel; Gécz, Jozef; Lenzner, Steffen; Kalscheuer, Vera M; Ropers, Hans-Hilger; Freude, Karla Kristine

    2004-01-01

    Nonsyndromic X-linked mental retardation (NSXLMR) is a very heterogeneous condition, and most of the underlying gene defects are still unknown. Recently, we have shown that approximately 30% of these genes cluster on the proximal Xp, which prompted us to perform systematic mutation screening in b...

  15. Global gene expression profiling of a mouse model of ovarian clear cell carcinoma caused by ARID1A and PIK3CA mutations implicates a role for inflammatory cytokine signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald L. Chandler

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian clear-cell carcinoma (OCCC is an aggressive form of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC. OCCC represents 5–25% of all EOC incidences and is the second leading cause of death from ovarian cancer (Glasspool and McNeish, 2013 [1]. A recent publication by Chandler et al. reported the first mouse model of OCCC that resembles human OCCC both genetically and histologically by inducing a localized deletion of ARID1A and the expression of the PIK3CAH1047R substitution mutation (Chandler et al., 2015 [2]. We utilized Affymetrix Mouse Gene 2.1 ST arrays for the global gene expression profiling of mouse primary OCCC tumor samples and animal-matched normal ovaries to identify cancer-dependent gene expression. We describe the approach used to generate the differentially expressed genes from the publicly available data deposited at the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO database under the accession number GSE57380. These data were used in cross-species comparisons to publically available human OCCC gene expression data and allowed the identification of coordinately regulated genes in both mouse and human OCCC and supportive of a role for inflammatory cytokine signaling in OCCC pathogenesis (Chandler et al., 2015 [2].

  16. What Causes Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... protein in the blood) causes thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). The ADAMTS13 gene controls the enzyme, which is ... enough enzyme activity causes overactive blood clotting. In TTP, blood clots form in small blood vessels throughout ...

  17. A genetic combination of silent beta-thalassaemia, high Hb A2 beta-thalassaemia, and single alpha globin gene deletion causing mild thalassaemia intermedia.

    OpenAIRE

    R. Galanello; Maccioni, L; ROSATELLI, M. C.; Ibba, P; Nurchi, A M; Cao, A

    1984-01-01

    This paper reports a Sardinian patient, who was a compound heterozygote for silent beta-thalassaemia and high Hb A2 beta o-thalassaemia with the clinical phenotype of mild thalassaemia intermedia; alpha globin gene mapping showed a single alpha globin gene deletion. The reduced alpha globin chain output resulted in more balanced globin chain synthesis, which in turn accounted for the mild clinical phenotype.

  18. H3N2 canine influenza virus causes severe morbidity in dogs with induction of genes related to inflammation and apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Young Myong; Kim, Heui Man; Ku, Keun Bon; Park, Eun Hye; Yum, Jung; Seo, Sang Heui

    2013-01-01

    Dogs are companion animals that live in close proximity with humans. Canine H3N2 influenza virus has been isolated from pet dogs that showed severe respiratory signs and other clinical symptoms such as fever, reduced body weight, and interstitial pneumonia. The canine H3N2 influenza virus can be highly transmissible among dogs via aerosols. When we analyzed global gene expression in the lungs of infected dogs, the genes associated with the immune response and cell death were greatly elevated....

  19. Mutations in human lipoyltransferase gene LIPT1 cause a Leigh disease with secondary deficiency for pyruvate and alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase

    OpenAIRE

    Soreze, Yohan; Boutron, Audrey; Habarou, Florence; Barnerias, Christine; Nonnenmacher, Luc; Delpech, Hélène; Mamoune, Asmaa; Chrétien, Dominique; Hubert, Laurence; Bole-Feysot, Christine; Nitschke, Patrick; Correia, Isabelle; Sardet, Claude; Boddaert, Nathalie; Hamel, Yamina

    2013-01-01

    Background Synthesis and apoenzyme attachment of lipoic acid have emerged as a new complex metabolic pathway. Mutations in several genes involved in the lipoic acid de novo pathway have recently been described (i.e., LIAS, NFU1, BOLA3, IBA57), but no mutation was found so far in genes involved in the specific process of attachment of lipoic acid to apoenzymes pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDHc), α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase (α-KGDHc) and branched chain α-keto acid dehydrogenase (BCKDHc) complexes....

  20. Prevalence of Gene Rearrangements in Mexican Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Population Study—Report from the Mexican Interinstitutional Group for the Identification of the Causes of Childhood Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilma Carolina Bekker-Méndez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mexico has one of the highest incidences of childhood leukemia worldwide and significantly higher mortality rates for this disease compared with other countries. One possible cause is the high prevalence of gene rearrangements associated with the etiology or with a poor prognosis of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL. The aims of this multicenter study were to determine the prevalence of the four most common gene rearrangements [ETV6-RUNX1, TCF3-PBX1, BCR-ABL1, and MLL rearrangements] and to explore their relationship with mortality rates during the first year of treatment in ALL children from Mexico City. Patients were recruited from eight public hospitals during 2010–2012. A total of 282 bone marrow samples were obtained at each child’s diagnosis for screening by conventional and multiplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction to determine the gene rearrangements. Gene rearrangements were detected in 50 (17.7% patients. ETV6-RUNX1 was detected in 21 (7.4% patients, TCF3-PBX1 in 20 (7.1% patients, BCR-ABL1 in 5 (1.8% patients, and MLL rearrangements in 4 (1.4% patients. The earliest deaths occurred at months 1, 2, and 3 after diagnosis in patients with MLL, ETV6-RUNX1, and BCR-ABL1 gene rearrangements, respectively. Gene rearrangements could be related to the aggressiveness of leukemia observed in Mexican children.

  1. Prevalence of Gene Rearrangements in Mexican Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Population Study—Report from the Mexican Interinstitutional Group for the Identification of the Causes of Childhood Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekker-Méndez, Vilma Carolina; Miranda-Peralta, Enrique; Núñez-Enríquez, Juan Carlos; Olarte-Carrillo, Irma; Guerra-Castillo, Francisco Xavier; Pompa-Mera, Ericka Nelly; Ocaña-Mondragón, Alicia; Bernáldez-Ríos, Roberto; Medina-Sanson, Aurora; Jiménez-Hernández, Elva; Amador-Sánchez, Raquel; Peñaloza-González, José Gabriel; de Diego Flores-Chapa, José; Fajardo-Gutiérrez, Arturo; Flores-Lujano, Janet; Rodríguez-Zepeda, María del Carmen; Dorantes-Acosta, Elisa María; Bolea-Murga, Victoria; Núñez-Villegas, Nancy; Velázquez-Aviña, Martha Margarita; Torres-Nava, José Refugio; Reyes-Zepeda, Nancy Carolina; González-Bonilla, Cesar; Mejía-Aranguré, Juan Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Mexico has one of the highest incidences of childhood leukemia worldwide and significantly higher mortality rates for this disease compared with other countries. One possible cause is the high prevalence of gene rearrangements associated with the etiology or with a poor prognosis of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The aims of this multicenter study were to determine the prevalence of the four most common gene rearrangements [ETV6-RUNX1, TCF3-PBX1, BCR-ABL1, and MLL rearrangements] and to explore their relationship with mortality rates during the first year of treatment in ALL children from Mexico City. Patients were recruited from eight public hospitals during 2010–2012. A total of 282 bone marrow samples were obtained at each child's diagnosis for screening by conventional and multiplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction to determine the gene rearrangements. Gene rearrangements were detected in 50 (17.7%) patients. ETV6-RUNX1 was detected in 21 (7.4%) patients, TCF3-PBX1 in 20 (7.1%) patients, BCR-ABL1 in 5 (1.8%) patients, and MLL rearrangements in 4 (1.4%) patients. The earliest deaths occurred at months 1, 2, and 3 after diagnosis in patients with MLL, ETV6-RUNX1, and BCR-ABL1 gene rearrangements, respectively. Gene rearrangements could be related to the aggressiveness of leukemia observed in Mexican children. PMID:25692130

  2. Overexpression of a tobacco small G protein gene NtRop1 causes salt sensitivity and hydrogen peroxide production in transgenic plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The small GTPases of Rop/Rho family is central regulators of important cellular processes in plants. Tobacco small G protein gene NtRop1 has been isolated; however, its roles in stress responses were unknown. In the present study, the genomic sequence of NtRop1 was cloned, which has seven exons and six introns, similar to the Rop gene structure from Arabidopsis. The NtRop1 gene was constitutively expressed in the different organs whereas the other six Rop genes from tobacco had differential expression patterns. The expression of the NtRop1 gene was moderately induced by methyl viologen, NaCl, and ACC treatments, but slightly inhibited by ABA treatment, with no significant induction by NAA treatment. The transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing the NtRop1 showed increased salt sensitivity as can be seen from the reduced root growth and elevated relative electrolyte leakage. The hydrogen peroxide production was also promoted in the NtRop1-trangenic plants in comparison with wild type plants. These results imply that the NtRop1 may confer salt sensitivity through activation of H2O2 production during plant response to salt stress.

  3. Overexpression of a tobacco small G protein gene NtRop1 causes salt sensitivity and hydrogen peroxide production in transgenic plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, YangRong; Li, ZhiGang; Chen, Tao; Zhang, ZhiGang; Zhang, JinSong; Chen, ShouYi

    2008-05-01

    The small GTPases of Rop/Rho family is central regulators of important cellular processes in plants. Tobacco small G protein gene NtRop1 has been isolated; however, its roles in stress responses were unknown. In the present study, the genomic sequence of NtRop1 was cloned, which has seven exons and six introns, similar to the Rop gene structure from Arabidopsis. The NtRop1 gene was constitutively expressed in the different organs whereas the other six Rop genes from tobacco had differential expression patterns. The expression of the NtRop1 gene was moderately induced by methyl viologen, NaCl, and ACC treatments, but slightly inhibited by ABA treatment, with no significant induction by NAA treatment. The transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing the NtRop1 showed increased salt sensitivity as can be seen from the reduced root growth and elevated relative electrolyte leakage. The hydrogen peroxide production was also promoted in the NtRop1-trangenic plants in comparison with wild type plants. These results imply that the NtRop1 may confer salt sensitivity through activation of H2O2 production during plant response to salt stress. PMID:18785583

  4. A Novel Mutation in Human Androgen Receptor Gene Causing Partial Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome in a Patient Presenting with Gynecomastia at Puberty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koçyiğit, Cemil; Sarıtaş, Serdar; Çatlı, Gönül; Onay, Hüseyin; Dündar, Bumin Nuri

    2016-06-01

    Partial androgen insensitivity syndrome (PAIS) typically presents with micropenis, perineoscrotal hypospadias, and a bifid scrotum with descending or undescending testes and gynecomastia at puberty. It is an X-linked recessive disorder resulting from mutations in the androgen receptor (AR) gene. However, AR gene mutations are found in less than a third of PAIS cases. A 16-year-old boy was admitted with complaints of gynecomastia and sparse facial hair. Family history revealed male relatives from maternal side with similar clinical phenotype. His external genitalia were phenotypically male with pubic hair Tanner stage IV, penoscrotal hypospadias, and a bifid scrotum with bilateral atrophic testes. He had elevated gonadotropins with a normal testosterone level. Chromosome analysis revealed a 46,XY karyotype. Due to the family history suggesting a disorder of X-linked trait, PAIS was considered and molecular analysis of AR gene was performed. DNA sequence analysis revealed a novel hemizygous mutation p.T576I (c.1727C>T) in the AR gene. The diagnosis of PAIS is based upon clinical phenotype and laboratory findings and can be confirmed by detection of a defect in the AR gene. An accurate approach including a detailed family history suggesting an X-linked trait is an important clue for a quick diagnosis. PMID:27087292

  5. Overexpression of a tobacco small G protein gene NtRop1 causes salt sensitivity and hydrogen peroxide production in transgenic plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO YangRong; LI ZhiGang; CHEN Tao; ZHANG ZhiGang; ZHANG JinSong; CHEN ShouYi

    2008-01-01

    The small GTPases of Rop/Rho family is central regulators of important cellular processes in plants.Tobacco small G protein gene NtRop1 has been isolated; however, its roles in stress responses were unknown. In the present study, the genomic sequence of NtRop1 was cloned, which has seven exons and six introns, similar to the Rop gene structure from Arabidopsis. The NtRopl gene was constitutively expressed in the different organs whereas the other six Rop genes from tobacco had differential expression patterns. The expression of the NtRop1 gene was moderately induced by methyl viologen,NaCl, and ACC treatments, but slightly inhibited by ABA treatment, with no significant induction by NAA treatment. The trsnsgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing the NtRop1 showed increased salt sensitivity as can be seen from the reduced root growth and elevated relative electrolyte leakage. The hydrogen peroxide production was also promoted in the NtRop1-trangenic plants in comparison with wild type plants. These results imply that the NtRopl may confer salt sensitivity through activation of H2O2 production during plant response to salt stress.

  6. A conservative assessment of the major genetic causes of idiopathic chronic pancreatitis: data from a comprehensive analysis of PRSS1, SPINK1, CTRC and CFTR genes in 253 young French patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuelle Masson

    Full Text Available Idiopathic chronic pancreatitis (ICP has traditionally been defined as chronic pancreatitis in the absence of any obvious precipitating factors (e.g. alcohol abuse and family history of the disease. Studies over the past 15 years have revealed that ICP has a highly complex genetic architecture involving multiple gene loci. Here, we have attempted to provide a conservative assessment of the major genetic causes of ICP in a sample of 253 young French ICP patients. For the first time, conventional types of mutation (comprising coding sequence variants and variants at intron/exon boundaries and gross genomic rearrangements were screened for in all four major pancreatitis genes, PRSS1, SPINK1, CTRC and CFTR. For the purposes of the study, synonymous, intronic and 5'- or 3'-untranslated region variants were excluded from the analysis except where there was persuasive evidence of functional consequences. The remaining sequence variants/genotypes were classified into causative, contributory or neutral categories by consideration of (i their allele frequencies in patient and normal control populations, (ii their presumed or experimentally confirmed functional effects, (iii the relative importance of their associated genes in the pathogenesis of chronic pancreatitis and (iv gene-gene interactions wherever applicable. Adoption of this strategy allowed us to assess the pathogenic relevance of specific variants/genotypes to their respective carriers to an unprecedented degree. The genetic cause of ICP could be assigned in 23.7% of individuals in the study group. A strong genetic susceptibility factor was also present in an additional 24.5% of cases. Taken together, up to 48.2% of the studied ICP patients were found to display evidence of a genetic basis for their pancreatitis. Whereas these particular proportions may not be extrapolable to all ICP patients, the approach employed should serve as a useful framework for acquiring a better understanding of the

  7. MAPK signaling pathway alters expression of midgut ALP and ABCC genes and causes resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ac toxin in diamondback moth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaojiang Guo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Insecticidal crystal toxins derived from the soil bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt are widely used as biopesticide sprays or expressed in transgenic crops to control insect pests. However, large-scale use of Bt has led to field-evolved resistance in several lepidopteran pests. Resistance to Bt Cry1Ac toxin in the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L., was previously mapped to a multigenic resistance locus (BtR-1. Here, we assembled the 3.15 Mb BtR-1 locus and found high-level resistance to Cry1Ac and Bt biopesticide in four independent P. xylostella strains were all associated with differential expression of a midgut membrane-bound alkaline phosphatase (ALP outside this locus and a suite of ATP-binding cassette transporter subfamily C (ABCC genes inside this locus. The interplay between these resistance genes is controlled by a previously uncharacterized trans-regulatory mechanism via the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling pathway. Molecular, biochemical, and functional analyses have established ALP as a functional Cry1Ac receptor. Phenotypic association experiments revealed that the recessive Cry1Ac resistance was tightly linked to down-regulation of ALP, ABCC2 and ABCC3, whereas it was not linked to up-regulation of ABCC1. Silencing of ABCC2 and ABCC3 in susceptible larvae reduced their susceptibility to Cry1Ac but did not affect the expression of ALP, whereas suppression of MAP4K4, a constitutively transcriptionally-activated MAPK upstream gene within the BtR-1 locus, led to a transient recovery of gene expression thereby restoring the susceptibility in resistant larvae. These results highlight a crucial role for ALP and ABCC genes in field-evolved resistance to Cry1Ac and reveal a novel trans-regulatory signaling mechanism responsible for modulating the expression of these pivotal genes in P. xylostella.

  8. MAPK signaling pathway alters expression of midgut ALP and ABCC genes and causes resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ac toxin in diamondback moth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhaojiang; Kang, Shi; Chen, Defeng; Wu, Qingjun; Wang, Shaoli; Xie, Wen; Zhu, Xun; Baxter, Simon W; Zhou, Xuguo; Jurat-Fuentes, Juan Luis; Zhang, Youjun

    2015-04-01

    Insecticidal crystal toxins derived from the soil bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are widely used as biopesticide sprays or expressed in transgenic crops to control insect pests. However, large-scale use of Bt has led to field-evolved resistance in several lepidopteran pests. Resistance to Bt Cry1Ac toxin in the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L.), was previously mapped to a multigenic resistance locus (BtR-1). Here, we assembled the 3.15 Mb BtR-1 locus and found high-level resistance to Cry1Ac and Bt biopesticide in four independent P. xylostella strains were all associated with differential expression of a midgut membrane-bound alkaline phosphatase (ALP) outside this locus and a suite of ATP-binding cassette transporter subfamily C (ABCC) genes inside this locus. The interplay between these resistance genes is controlled by a previously uncharacterized trans-regulatory mechanism via the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. Molecular, biochemical, and functional analyses have established ALP as a functional Cry1Ac receptor. Phenotypic association experiments revealed that the recessive Cry1Ac resistance was tightly linked to down-regulation of ALP, ABCC2 and ABCC3, whereas it was not linked to up-regulation of ABCC1. Silencing of ABCC2 and ABCC3 in susceptible larvae reduced their susceptibility to Cry1Ac but did not affect the expression of ALP, whereas suppression of MAP4K4, a constitutively transcriptionally-activated MAPK upstream gene within the BtR-1 locus, led to a transient recovery of gene expression thereby restoring the susceptibility in resistant larvae. These results highlight a crucial role for ALP and ABCC genes in field-evolved resistance to Cry1Ac and reveal a novel trans-regulatory signaling mechanism responsible for modulating the expression of these pivotal genes in P. xylostella. PMID:25875245

  9. Study of Antibiotic Resistance Pattern and Mutation in Genes gyrA and parC of Escherichia Coli Causing Urinary Tract Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Faghri

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Fluoroquinolones are essential antimicrobial agents used to treat UTIs. Clinical experiences have shown a high rate of antibiotic resistance among uropatho-gens. These resistance are usually the consequence of mutations involving genes encoding gyrA and parC. The aim of this study was to determine antimicrobial resistance pattern and the presence of mutations in regions that code for quinolone resistance in the genes gyrA and parC in clinical isolates of E. coli from a hospital in Isfahan, Iran. Materials & Methods: A total of 135 isolates of E.coli (from urine were collected from Sep-tember to February 2013 from Alzahra Hospital (Isfahan, Iran. Bacterial susceptibility to an-timicrobial agents was determined using disk diffusion method. PCR was performed to detect genes gyrA and parC. Then, 13 isolates were randomly chosen for genetic characterization of the quinolone-determining region (QRDR of the parC and gyrA genes. Results: Among 135 E. coli isolates, 61 isolates ( 45 % were resistant to fluoroquinolones. From 13 isolates, 11 isolates showed two mutations (Ser83Leu/ Asp87Asn and 2 isolates showed a single mutation (Ser83Leu in gyrA gene. Also, five different mutations were de-tected in parC gene in the E. coli isolates, encoding Ser80Ile, Ser80Val, Ser80Arg, Glu84Val, Gly78Ser. Conclusion: More research on the molecular basis of FQ resistance is required to develop new therapeutic strategies for FQ-resistant E. coli. To overcome antibiotic resistance antibiotic therapy should be limited and based on the susceptibility patterns of microorganisms. (Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2016; 23 (2:118-125

  10. Genes that encodes NAGT, MIF1 and MIF2 are not virulence factors for kala-azar caused by Leishmania infantum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Guedes Alcoforado Aguiar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Kala-azar is a disease resulting from infection by Leishmania donovani and Leishmania infantum. Most patients with the disease exhibit prolonged fever, wasting, anemia and hepatosplenomegaly without complications. However, some patients develop severe disease with hemorrhagic manifestations, bacterial infections, jaundice, and edema dyspnea, among other symptoms, followed by death. Among the parasite molecules that might influence the disease severity are the macrophage migration inhibitory factor-like proteins (MIF1 and MIF2 and N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphotransferase (NAGT, which act in the first step of protein N-glycosylation. This study aimed to determine whether MIF1, MIF2 and NAGT are virulence factors for severe kala-azar. Methods To determine the parasite genotype in kala-azar patients from Northeastern Brazil, we sequenced the NAGT genes of L. infantum from 68 patients as well as the MIF1 and MIF2 genes from 76 different subjects with diverse clinical manifestations. After polymerase chain reaction (PCR, the fragments were sequenced, followed by polymorphism identification. Results The nucleotide sequencing of the 144 amplicons revealed the absence of genetic variability of the NAGT, MIF1 and MIF2 genes between the isolates. The conservation of these genes suggests that the clinical variability of kala-azar does not depend upon these genes. Additionally, this conservation suggests that these genes may be critical for parasite survival. Conclusions NAGT, MIF1 and MIF2 do not alter the severity of kala-azar. NAGT, MIF1 and MIF2 are highly conserved among different isolates of identical species and exhibit potential for use in phylogenetic inferences or molecular diagnosis.

  11. An intragenic deletion of the P gene is the common mutation causing tyrosinase-positive oculocutaneous albinism in southern African Negroids.

    OpenAIRE

    Stevens, G; van Beukering, J; Jenkins, T; Ramsay, M.

    1995-01-01

    Tyrosinase-positive oculocutaneous albinism (OCA2), an autosomal recessive disorder of the melanin biosynthetic pathway, is the most common recessive disorder occurring in southern African Bantu-speaking Negroids, with an overall prevalence of 1/3,900. The OCA2 gene, P, has been mapped to chromosome 15q11-q13, and recently alterations in the P gene have been identified in OCA2 individuals. An intragenic deletion has been described and proposed to be of African origin because of its occurrence...

  12. Paired Box Gene 8-Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-γ Fusion Protein and Loss of Phosphatase and Tensin Homolog Synergistically Cause Thyroid Hyperplasia in Transgenic Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Diallo-Krou, Ericka; Yu, Jingcheng; Colby, Lesley A.; Inoki, Ken; Wilkinson, John E.; Thomas, Dafydd G.; Giordano, Thomas J.; Koenig, Ronald J.

    2009-01-01

    Approximately 35% of follicular thyroid carcinomas and a small fraction of follicular adenomas are associated with a t(2;3)(q13;p25) chromosomal translocation that fuses paired box gene 8 (PAX8) with the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ gene (PPARG), resulting in expression of a PAX8-PPARγ fusion protein, PPFP. The mechanism by which PPFP contributes to follicular thyroid neoplasia is poorly understood. Therefore, we have created mice with thyroid-specific expression of PPFP. At 1...

  13. A Novel c.554+5C>T Mutation in the DUOXA2 Gene Combined with p.R885Q Mutation in the DUOX2 Gene Causing Congenital Hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiao; Ma, Shao Gang; Qiu, Ya Li; Guo, Man Li; Shao, Xiao Juan

    2016-06-01

    The coexistence of mutations in the dual oxidase maturation factor 2 (DUOXA2) and dual oxidase 2 (DUOX2) genes is rarely identified in congenital hypothyroidism (CH). This study reports a boy with CH due to a novel splice-site mutation in the DUOXA2 gene and a missense mutation in the DUOX2 gene. A four-year-old boy was diagnosed with CH at neonatal screening and was enrolled in this study. The DUOXA2, DUOX2, thyroid peroxidase (TPO), and thyrotropin receptor (TSHR) genes were considered for genetic defects screening. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood leukocytes, and Sanger sequencing was used to screen the mutations in the exon fragments. Family members of the patient and the controls were also enrolled and evaluated. The boy harbored compound heterozygous mutations including a novel splice-site mutation c.554+5C>T in the maternal DUOXA2 allele and c.2654G>A (p.R885Q) in the paternal DUOX2 allele. The germline mutations from his parents were consistent with an autosomal recessive inheritance pattern. No mutations in the TPO and TSHR genes were detected. A novel splice-site mutation c.554+5C>T in the DUOXA2 gene and a mutation p.R885Q in the DUOX2 gene were identified in a 4-year-old patient with goitrous CH. PMID:26758695

  14. The most common mutation causing medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency is strongly associated with a particular haplotype in the region of the gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kølvraa, S; Gregersen, N; Blakemore, A I; Schneidermann, A K; Winter, V; Andresen, B S; Curtis, D; Engel, P C; Pricille, D; Rhead, W

    1991-01-01

    RFLP haplotypes in the region containing the medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) gene on chromosome 1 have been determined in patients with MCAD deficiency. The RFLPs were detected after digestion of patient DNA with the enzymes BanII. PstI and TaqI and with an MCAD cDNA-clone as a probe. Of...

  15. Variant non ketotic hyperglycinemia is caused by mutations in LIAS, BOLA3 and the novel gene GLRX5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Peter R; Friederich, Marisa W; Swanson, Michael A;

    2014-01-01

    Patients with nonketotic hyperglycinemia and deficient glycine cleavage enzyme activity, but without mutations in AMT, GLDC or GCSH, the genes encoding its constituent proteins, constitute a clinical group which we call 'variant nonketotic hyperglycinemia'. We hypothesize that in some patients th...

  16. Association of single nucleotide polymorphic sites in candidate genes with aggressiveness and deoxynivalenol production in Fusarium graminearum causing wheat head blight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talas Firas

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fusarium graminearum sensu stricto (s.s. is an ubiquitous pathogen of cereals. The economic impact of Fusarium head blight (FHB is characterized by crop losses and mycotoxin contamination. Our objective was to associate SNP diversity within candidate genes with phenotypic traits. A total of 77 F. graminearum s.s. isolates was tested for severity of fungal infection (= aggressiveness and deoxynivalenol (DON production in an inoculated field experiment at two locations in each of two years. For seven genes known to control fungal growth (MetAP1, Erf2 or DON production (TRI1, TRI5, TRI6 TRI10 and TRI14 single nucleotides polymorphic sites (SNPs were determined and evaluated for the extent of linkage disequilibrium (LD. Associations of SNPs with both phenotypic traits were tested using linear mixed models. Results Decay of LD was in most instances fast. Two neighboring SNPs in MetAP1 and one SNP in Erf2 were significantly (P pG of 25.6%, 0.5%, and 13.1%, respectively. One SNP in TRI1 was significantly associated with DON production (pG = 4.4. Conclusions We argue that using the published sequence information of Fusarium graminearum as a template to amplify comparative sequence parts of candidate genes is an effective method to detect quantitative trait loci. Our findings underline the potential of candidate gene association mapping approaches to identify functional SNPs underlying aggressiveness and DON production for F. graminearum s.s populations.

  17. Bracteomania, an inflorescence anomaly, is caused by the loss of function of the MADS-box gene squamosa in Antirrhinum majus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huijser, P; Klein, J; Lönnig, W E; Meijer, H; Saedler, H; Sommer, H

    1992-04-01

    Anomalous flowering of the Antirrhinum majus mutant squamosa (squa) is characterized by excessive formation of bracts and the production of relatively few and often malformed or incomplete flowers. To study the function of squamosa in the commitment of an inflorescence lateral meristem to floral development, the gene was cloned and its genomic structure, a well as that of four mutant alleles, was determined. SQUA is a member of a family of transcription factors which contain the MADS-box, a conserved DNA binding domain. In addition, we analysed the temporal and spatial expression pattern of the squa gene. Low transcriptional activity of squa is detectable in bracts and in the leaves immediately below the inflorescence. High squa transcript levels are seen in the inflorescence lateral meristems as soon as they are formed in the axils of bracts. Squa transcriptional activity persists through later stages of floral morphogenesis, with the exception of stamen differentiation. Although necessary for shaping a normal racemose inflorescence, the squa function is not absolutely essential for flower development. We discuss the function of the gene during flowering, its likely functional redundancy and its possible interaction with other genes participating in the genetic control of flower formation in Antirrhinum. PMID:1563342

  18. Structural and functional changes of mitochondrial ATP synthase caused by mtDNA 9205delTA mutation in ATP6 gene

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ješina, Pavel; Tesařová, M.; Fornůsková, D.; Vojtíšková, Alena; Pecina, Petr; Kaplanová, Vilma; Hansíková, H.; Zeman, J.; Houštěk, Josef

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 29, S1 (2006), s. 117-117. ISSN 0141-8955. [International Congress of Inborn Errors of Metabolism /10./. 12.09.2006-16.09.2006, Chiba] R&D Projects: GA MZd NR7790 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : ATP synthase * ATP6 gene * mitochondria Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  19. Silent exonic mutations in the low-density lipoprotein receptor gene that cause familial hypercholesterolemia by affecting mRNA splicing.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Defesche, J.C.; Schuurman, E.J.M.; Klaaijsen, L.N.; Khoo, K.L.; Wiegman, A.; Stalenhoef, A.F.H.

    2008-01-01

    In a large group of patients with the clinical phenotype of familial hypercholesterolemia, such as elevated low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and premature atherosclerosis, but without functional mutations in the genes coding for the LDL receptor and apolipoprotein B, we examined the effect

  20. Detection of gene expression changes in Capsicum annuum L. leaf foliar blight caused by Phytophthora capsici Leon. using qRT-PCR and leaf discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phytophthora capsici is responsible for multiple disease syndromes of Capsicum annuum but the resistance mechanism is still unknown. Evaluating gene expression during foliar blight can be used to identify expression patterns associated with resistance in Capsicum species. This study reports a direct...

  1. Identification of p.A684V missense mutation in the WFS1 gene as a frequent cause of autosomal dominant optic atrophy and hearing impairment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rendtorff, Nanna D; Lodahl, Marianne; Boulahbel, Houda; Johansen, Ida R; Pandya, Arti; Welch, Katherine O; Norris, Virginia W; Arnos, Kathleen S; Bitner-Glindzicz, Maria; Emery, Sarah B; Mets, Marilyn B; Fagerheim, Toril; Eriksson, Kristina; Hansen, Lars; Bruhn, Helene; Möller, Claes; Lindholm, Sture; Ensgaard, Stefan; Lesperance, Marci M; Tranebjaerg, Lisbeth

    2011-01-01

    Optic atrophy (OA) and sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) are key abnormalities in several syndromes, including the recessively inherited Wolfram syndrome, caused by mutations in WFS1. In contrast, the association of autosomal dominant OA and SNHL without other phenotypic abnormalities is rare, and...... DNA deletions were detected in muscle from one p.A684V patient analyzed. Finally, wolframin p.A684V mutant ectopically expressed in HEK cells showed reduced protein levels compared to wild-type wolframin, strongly indicating that the mutation is disease-causing. Our data support OA and SNHL as a...... phenotype caused by dominant mutations in WFS1 in these additional eight families. Importantly, our data provide the first evidence that a single, recurrent mutation in WFS1, p.A684V, may be a common cause of ADOA and SNHL, similar to the role played by the p.R445H mutation in OPA1. Our findings suggest...

  2. Liver tumor formation by a mutant retinoblastoma protein in the transgenic mice is caused by an upregulation of c-Myc target genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Bo; Hikosaka, Keisuke; Sultana, Nishat; Sharkar, Mohammad Tofael Kabir [Department of Biochemistry, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, 1-20-1 Handa-yama, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu 431-3192 (Japan); Noritake, Hidenao [Department of Biochemistry, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, 1-20-1 Handa-yama, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu 431-3192 (Japan); Department of Internal Medicine, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, 1-20-1 Handa-yama, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu 431-3192 (Japan); Kimura, Wataru; Wu, Yi-Xin [Department of Biochemistry, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, 1-20-1 Handa-yama, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu 431-3192 (Japan); Kobayashi, Yoshimasa [Department of Internal Medicine, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, 1-20-1 Handa-yama, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu 431-3192 (Japan); Uezato, Tadayoshi [Department of Biochemistry, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, 1-20-1 Handa-yama, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu 431-3192 (Japan); Miura, Naoyuki, E-mail: nmiura@hama-med.ac.jp [Department of Biochemistry, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, 1-20-1 Handa-yama, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu 431-3192 (Japan)

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fifty percent of the mutant Rb transgenic mice produced liver tumors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In the tumor, Foxm1, Skp2, Bmi1 and AP-1 mRNAs were up-regulated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer No increase in expression of the Myc-target genes was observed in the non-tumorous liver. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tumor formation depends on up-regulation of the Myc-target genes. -- Abstract: The retinoblastoma (Rb) tumor suppressor encodes a nuclear phosphoprotein that regulates cellular proliferation, apoptosis and differentiation. In order to adapt itself to these biological functions, Rb is subjected to modification cycle, phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. To directly determine the effect of phosphorylation-resistant Rb on liver development and function, we generated transgenic mice expressing phosphorylation-resistant human mutant Rb (mt-Rb) under the control of the rat hepatocyte nuclear factor-1 gene promoter/enhancer. Expression of mt-Rb in the liver resulted in macroscopic neoplastic nodules (adenomas) with {approx}50% incidence within 15 months old. Interestingly, quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR analysis showed that c-Myc was up-regulated in the liver of mt-Rb transgenic mice irrespective of having tumor tissues or no tumor. In tumor tissues, several c-Myc target genes, Foxm1, c-Jun, c-Fos, Bmi1 and Skp2, were also up-regulated dramatically. We determined whether mt-Rb activated the Myc promoter in the HTP9 cells and demonstrated that mt-Rb acted as an inhibitor of wild-type Rb-induced repression on the Myc promoter. Our results suggest that continued upregulation of c-Myc target genes promotes the liver tumor formation after about 1 year of age.

  3. Deregulation of the OsmiR160 Target Gene OsARF18 Causes Growth and Developmental Defects with an Alteration of Auxin Signaling in Rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jian; Li, Zhiyong; Zhao, Dazhong

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) control gene expression as key negative regulators at the post-transcriptional level. MiR160 plays a pivotal role in Arabidopsis growth and development through repressing expression of its target AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR (ARF) genes; however, the function of miR160 in monocots remains elusive. In this study, we found that the mature rice miR160 (OsmiR160) was mainly derived from OsMIR160a and OsMIR160b genes. Among four potential OsmiR160 target OsARF genes, the OsARF18 transcript was cleaved at the OsmiR160 target site. Rice transgenic plants (named mOsARF18) expressing an OsmiR160-resistant version of OsARF18 exhibited pleiotropic defects in growth and development, including dwarf stature, rolled leaves, and small seeds. mOsARF18 leaves were abnormal in bulliform cell differentiation and epidermal cell division. Starch accumulation in mOsARF18 seeds was also reduced. Moreover, auxin induced expression of OsMIR160a, OsMIR160b, and OsARF18, whereas expression of OsMIR160a and OsMIR160b as well as genes involved in auxin signaling was altered in mOsARF18 plants. Our results show that negative regulation of OsARF18 expression by OsmiR160 is critical for rice growth and development via affecting auxin signaling, which will advance future studies on the molecular mechanism by which miR160 fine-tunes auxin signaling in plants. PMID:27444058

  4. Liver tumor formation by a mutant retinoblastoma protein in the transgenic mice is caused by an upregulation of c-Myc target genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Fifty percent of the mutant Rb transgenic mice produced liver tumors. ► In the tumor, Foxm1, Skp2, Bmi1 and AP-1 mRNAs were up-regulated. ► No increase in expression of the Myc-target genes was observed in the non-tumorous liver. ► Tumor formation depends on up-regulation of the Myc-target genes. -- Abstract: The retinoblastoma (Rb) tumor suppressor encodes a nuclear phosphoprotein that regulates cellular proliferation, apoptosis and differentiation. In order to adapt itself to these biological functions, Rb is subjected to modification cycle, phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. To directly determine the effect of phosphorylation-resistant Rb on liver development and function, we generated transgenic mice expressing phosphorylation-resistant human mutant Rb (mt-Rb) under the control of the rat hepatocyte nuclear factor-1 gene promoter/enhancer. Expression of mt-Rb in the liver resulted in macroscopic neoplastic nodules (adenomas) with ∼50% incidence within 15 months old. Interestingly, quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR analysis showed that c-Myc was up-regulated in the liver of mt-Rb transgenic mice irrespective of having tumor tissues or no tumor. In tumor tissues, several c-Myc target genes, Foxm1, c-Jun, c-Fos, Bmi1 and Skp2, were also up-regulated dramatically. We determined whether mt-Rb activated the Myc promoter in the HTP9 cells and demonstrated that mt-Rb acted as an inhibitor of wild-type Rb-induced repression on the Myc promoter. Our results suggest that continued upregulation of c-Myc target genes promotes the liver tumor formation after about 1 year of age.

  5. A Novel Large Deletion Encompassing the Whole of the Galactose-1-Phosphate Uridyltransferase (GALT) Gene and Extending into the Adjacent Interleukin 11 Receptor Alpha (IL11RA) Gene Causes Classic Galactosemia Associated with Additional Phenotypic Abnormalities

    OpenAIRE

    Papachristoforou, Rena; Petrou, Petros P.; Sawyer, Hilary; Williams, Maggie; Drousiotou, Anthi

    2013-01-01

    Objective The characterization of a novel large deletion in the galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT) gene accounting for the majority of disease alleles in Cypriot patients with classic galactosemia.

  6. Splice-site mutations cause Rrp6-mediated nuclear retention of the unspliced RNAs and transcriptional down-regulation of the splicing-defective genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea B Eberle

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Eukaryotic cells have developed surveillance mechanisms to prevent the expression of aberrant transcripts. An early surveillance checkpoint acts at the transcription site and prevents the release of mRNAs that carry processing defects. The exosome subunit Rrp6 is required for this checkpoint in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but it is not known whether Rrp6 also plays a role in mRNA surveillance in higher eukaryotes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have developed an in vivo system to study nuclear mRNA surveillance in Drosophila melanogaster. We have produced S2 cells that express a human beta-globin gene with mutated splice sites in intron 2 (mut beta-globin. The transcripts encoded by the mut beta-globin gene are normally spliced at intron 1 but retain intron 2. The levels of the mut beta-globin transcripts are much lower than those of wild type (wt ss-globin mRNAs transcribed from the same promoter. We have compared the expression of the mut and wt beta-globin genes to investigate the mechanisms that down-regulate the production of defective mRNAs. Both wt and mut beta-globin transcripts are processed at the 3', but the mut beta-globin transcripts are less efficiently cleaved than the wt transcripts. Moreover, the mut beta-globin transcripts are less efficiently released from the transcription site, as shown by FISH, and this defect is restored by depletion of Rrp6 by RNAi. Furthermore, transcription of the mut beta-globin gene is significantly impaired as revealed by ChIP experiments that measure the association of the RNA polymerase II with the transcribed genes. We have also shown that the mut beta-globin gene shows reduced levels of H3K4me3. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results show that there are at least two surveillance responses that operate cotranscriptionally in insect cells and probably in all metazoans. One response requires Rrp6 and results in the inefficient release of defective mRNAs from the transcription site. The

  7. A recurrent homozygous nonsense mutation within the LAMA3 gene as a cause of Herlitz junctional epidermolysis bullosa in patients of Pakistani ancestry: evidence for a founder effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, J A; Kivirikko, S; Ciatti, S; Moss, C; Christiano, A M; Uitto, J

    1996-04-01

    The anchoring filament protein laminin 5 is abnormally expressed in the skin of patients with Herlitz junctional epidermolysis bullosa (H-JEB). In this study, we performed mutational analysis on genomic DNA from a H-JEB child of first-cousin Pakistani parents, and identified a homozygous C-to-T transition in the LAMA3 gene of laminin 5 resulting in a premature termination codon (CGA-TGA) on both alleles. This mutation, R650X, has been previously reported in two other seemingly unrelated H-JEB individuals of Pakistani ancestry. Although this mutation may represent a mutational hotspot within the LAMA3 gene, haplotype analysis based on a silent intragenic polymorphism (GCC/GCG, alanine 429; GenBank no. L34155), and on three flanking microsatellite polymorphism (D18S45, D18S478, and D18S480), suggests that a common ancestral allele may be present in all three cases. PMID:8618022

  8. Disruption of TRPM6/TRPM7 complex formation by a mutation in the TRPM6 gene causes hypomagnesemia with secondary hypocalcemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chubanov, Vladimir; Waldegger, Siegfried; Schnitzler, Michael Mederos y; Vitzthum, Helga; Sassen, Martin C.; Seyberth, Hannsjörg W.; Konrad, Martin; Gudermann, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    Impaired magnesium reabsorption in patients with TRPM6 gene mutations stresses an important role of TRPM6 (melastatin-related TRP cation channel) in epithelial magnesium transport. While attempting to isolate full-length TRPM6, we found that the human TRPM6 gene encodes multiple mRNA isoforms. Full-length TRPM6 variants failed to form functional channel complexes because they were retained intracellularly on heterologous expression in HEK 293 cells and Xenopus oocytes. However, TRPM6 specifically interacted with its closest homolog, the Mg2+-permeable cation channel TRPM7, resulting in the assembly of functional TRPM6/TRPM7 complexes at the cell surface. The naturally occurring S141L TRPM6 missense mutation abrogated the oligomeric assembly of TRPM6, thus providing a cell biological explanation for the human disease. Together, our data suggest an important contribution of TRPM6/TRPM7 heterooligomerization for the biological role of TRPM6 in epithelial magnesium absorption. PMID:14976260

  9. A mutation in the DNA-binding domain of the androgen receptor gene causes complete testicular feminization in a patient with receptor-positive androgen resistance.

    OpenAIRE

    M. Marcelli; Zoppi, S; Grino, P B; Griffin, J E; Wilson, J. D.; McPhaul, M J

    1991-01-01

    Androgen resistance is associated with a wide range of quantitative and qualitative defects in the androgen receptor. However, fibroblast cultures from approximately 10% of patients with the clinical, endocrine, and genetic features characteristic of androgen resistance express normal quantities of apparently normal androgen receptor in cultured genital skin fibroblasts (receptor-positive androgen resistance). We have analyzed the androgen receptor gene of one patient (P321) with receptor-pos...

  10. A "White" Anthocyanin-less Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) Caused by an Insertion in the Coding Region of the Leucoanthocyanidin Dioxygenase (LDOX; ANS) Gene

    OpenAIRE

    Zohar Ben-Simhon; Sylvie Judeinstein; Taly Trainin; Rotem Harel-Beja; Irit Bar-Ya'akov; Hamutal Borochov-Neori; Doron Holland

    2015-01-01

    Color is an important determinant of pomegranate fruit quality and commercial value. To understand the genetic factors controlling color in pomegranate, chemical, molecular and genetic characterization of a "white" pomegranate was performed. This unique accession is lacking the typical pomegranate color rendered by anthocyanins in all tissues of the plant, including flowers, fruit (skin and arils) and leaves. Steady-state gene-expression analysis indicated that none of the analyzed "white" po...

  11. Novel and recurrent mutations in the laminin-5 genes causing lethal junctional epidermolysis bullosa: molecular basis and clinical course of Herlitz disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mühle, Christiane; Jiang, Qiu-Jie; Charlesworth, Alexandra; Bruckner-Tuderman, Leena; Meneguzzi, Guerrino; Schneider, Holm

    2005-01-01

    Herlitz disease (H-JEB), the lethal form of junctional epidermolysis bullosa, is a rare genodermatosis presenting from birth with widespread erosions and blistering of skin and mucosae because of tissue cleavage within the epidermal basement membrane. Mutations in any of the three genes encoding the alpha3, beta3 and gamma2 chains of laminin-5 underlie this recessively inherited disorder. Here, we report the molecular basis and clinical course of H-JEB in 12 patients. Two novel nonsense mutations in the gene LAMA3 (E281X and K1299X) and a novel frame-shift mutation in the gene LAMB3 (1628insG) leading to a premature termination codon were identified by DNA sequencing and confirmed by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. In the four patients affected, neither the resulting truncated polypeptide chains nor assembled laminin-5 protein were detectable by immunofluorescence. Three patients were found to be heterozygous for the known hotspot mutation R635X and the recurrent mutations Q373X or 29insC in the gene LAMB3, whereas five others were homozygous for R635X. Significant variations in the disease progression and survival times between 1 and 30 months in this group of H-JEB patients emphasised the impact of modifying factors and the importance of immunostaining or mRNA assessment as parallel diagnostic methods. Interestingly, the only patients who survived for longer than 6 months were four females carrying the mutation R635X homozygously. In one of them, the clinical course may have been improved by treatment with artificial skin equivalents. These data may stimulate further investigation of genotype-phenotype correlations and facilitate mutation analysis and genetic counselling of affected families. PMID:15538630

  12. Investigating the Potential Influence of Cause of Death and Cocaine Levels on the Differential Expression of Genes Associated with Cocaine Abuse

    OpenAIRE

    Bannon, Michael J.; Savonen, Candace L.; Hartley, Zachary J; Johnson, Magen M.; Schmidt, Carl J.

    2015-01-01

    The development of new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of complex brain disorders such as drug addiction is likely to be advanced by a more complete understanding of the underlying molecular pathophysiology. Although the study of postmortem human brain represents a unique resource in this regard, it can be challenging to disentangle the relative contribution of chronic pathological processes versus perimortem events to the observed changes in gene expression. To begin to unravel this...

  13. Insufficiency of Copper Ion Homeostasis Causes Freeze-Thaw Injury of Yeast Cells as Revealed by Indirect Gene Expression Analysis ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Takahashi, Shunsuke; Ando, Akira; Takagi, Hiroshi; Shima, Jun

    2009-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is exposed to freeze-thaw stress in commercial processes, including frozen dough baking. Cell viability and fermentation activity after a freeze-thaw cycle were dramatically decreased due to freeze-thaw injury. Because this type of injury involves complex phenomena, the injury mechanisms are not fully understood. We examined freeze-thaw injury by indirect gene expression analysis during postthaw incubation after freeze-thaw treatment using DNA microarray profiling. Th...

  14. Bracteomania, an inflorescence anomaly, is caused by the loss of function of the MADS-box gene squamosa in Antirrhinum majus.

    OpenAIRE

    Huijser, P.; Klein, J.; Lönnig, W E; Meijer, H; Saedler, H; H. Sommer

    1992-01-01

    Anomalous flowering of the Antirrhinum majus mutant squamosa (squa) is characterized by excessive formation of bracts and the production of relatively few and often malformed or incomplete flowers. To study the function of squamosa in the commitment of an inflorescence lateral meristem to floral development, the gene was cloned and its genomic structure, a well as that of four mutant alleles, was determined. SQUA is a member of a family of transcription factors which contain the MADS-box, a c...

  15. Expression of wild-type PtrIAA14.1, a poplar Aux/IAA gene causes morphological changes in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanda eLiu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aux/IAA proteins are transcriptional repressors that control auxin signaling by interacting with Auxin Response Factors (ARFs. So far all of the identified Aux/IAA mutants with auxin-related phenotypes in Arabidopsis and rice (Oryza sativa are dominant gain-of-function mutants, with mutantions in Domain II that affected stability of the corresponding Aux/IAA proteins. On the other hand, morphological changes were observed in knock-down mutants of Aux/IAA genes in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum, suggesting that functions of Aux/IAA proteins may be specific for certain plant species. We report here the characterization of PtrIAA14.1, a poplar (Populus trichocarpa homologue of IAA7. Bioinformatics analysis showed that PtrIAA14.1 is a classic Aux/IAA protein. It contains four conserved domains with the repressor motif in Domain I, the degron in Domain II, and the conserved amino acid signatures for protein-protein interactions in Domain III and Domain IV. Protoplast transfection assays showed that PtrIAA14.1 is localized in nucleus. It is unable in the presence of auxin, and it represses auxin response reporter gene expression. Expression of wild type PtrIAA14.1 in Arabidopsis resulted in auxin-related phenotypes including down-curling leaves, semi-draft with increased number of branches, and greatly reduced fertility, but expression of the Arabidopsis Aux/IAA genes tested remain largely unchanged in the transgenic plants. Protein-protein interaction assays in yeast and protoplasts showed that PtrIAA14.1 interacted with ARF5, but not other ARFs. Consistent with this observation, vascular patterning was altered in the transgenic plants, and the expression of AtHB8 (Arabidopsis thaliana Homeobox Gene 8 was reduced in transgenic plants.

  16. A Novel Mutation in the CYP11B1 Gene Causes Steroid 11β-Hydroxylase Deficient Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia with Reversible Cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Alqahtani, Mohammad A.; Ayed A. Shati; Minjing Zou; Alsuheel, Ali M.; Alhayani, Abdullah A.; Al-Qahtani, Saleh M.; Gilban, Hessa M.; Meyer, Brain F.; Yufei Shi

    2015-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) due to steroid 11β-hydroxylase deficiency is the second most common form of CAH, resulting from a mutation in the CYP11B1 gene. Steroid 11β-hydroxylase deficiency results in excessive mineralcorticoids and androgen production leading to hypertension, precocious puberty with acne, enlarged penis, and hyperpigmentation of scrotum of genetically male infants. In the present study, we reported 3 male cases from a Saudi family who presented with penile enlargem...

  17. A family with hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with spheroids caused by a novel c.2442+2T>C mutation in the CSF1R gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Ito; Iseki, Eizo; Kasanuki, Koji; Minegishi, Michiko; Sato, Kiyoshi; Hino, Hiroyuki; Shibuya, Katsuhiko; Fujisawa, Kohshiro; Higashi, Shinji; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Furuta, Akiko; Takanashi, Masashi; Li, Yuanzhe; Hattori, Nobutaka; Mitsuyama, Yoshio; Arai, Heii

    2016-08-15

    Clinical phenotypes of hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with spheroids (HDLS), a familial progressive neurodegenerative disorder affecting the white matter of the brain, are heterogenous and may include behavioral and personality changes, memory impairment, parkinsonism, seizure, and spasticity. Thus, HDLS is frequently unrecognized and misdiagnosed. Heterozygous mutations located within the kinase domain of the gene encoding the colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R), a cell surface receptor with key roles in development and innate immunity, have been shown in HDLS. These different gene mutations may be related to the various clinical phenotypes. We report here a newly identified family with HDLS harboring a mutation in the CSF1R gene. We examined clinical and neuropathological features in three members of this family. These patients presented with affective incontinence, memory impairment, and executive dysfunction at onset, and revealed nonfluent aphasia, parkinsonism, and seizure as the disease progressed. We identified a novel CSF1R splice site mutation (c.2442+2T>C) in intron 18 for two of the patients. MRI of these patients revealed progressive, frontotemporal-predominant, confluent leukoencephalopathy. We also observed severe myelin loss, axonal degeneration, and abundant axonal spheroids, astrocytes, and microglia in the cerebral white matter, consistent with HDLS neuropathological features. Additionally, we identified atypical neuropathological findings for HDLS, including neuronal loss and gliosis with ballooned neurons and central chromatolysis in the frontal cortex and hippocampus. This report provides further evidence for the clinical and neuropathological heterogeneity of HDLS. PMID:27423618

  18. Rapid detection of a point mutation in thyroid-stimulating hormone beta-subunit gene causing congenital isolated thyroid-stimulating hormone deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, R; Sawai, T; Kinoshita, E; Baba, T; Matsumoto, T; Yoshimoto, M; Tsuji, Y; Satake, Y; Sawada, K

    1991-12-01

    Previous study showed that congenital isolated TSH deficiency in Japan is resulted exclusively from a G-A transition at nucleotide 145 in exon 2 of the TSH beta-subunit gene. All reported cases were from the inbred in Shikoku Island. We describe here a 10-year-old boy with hereditary TSH deficiency in the same area. The patient was born with a weight of 3,225 g to non-consanguineous parents. Evaluation at age 2 months revealed typical manifestations of cretinism without goiter. Serum T4, T3, and TSH values were 2.53 micrograms/dl, 107 ng/dl, and 0.5 microU/ml, respectively. A TRH stimulation test showed no increment of serum TSH value. Other anterior pituitary hormone levels were all within the normal range. Two oligonucleotide primers T1a and T1b were synthesized according to the sequence data. Amplified 169 bp nucleotides in exon 2 of the TSH beta gene with this primer set were digested with MaeI. Both the phenotypically normal brother and normal controls showed only the 169 bp fragment, whereas the proband showed 140 and 29 bp fragments and both parents showed three fragments; 169, 140, and 29 bp. These results were consistent with the point mutation of TSH beta gene in Japanese patients with congenital isolated TSH deficiency. Our PCR method with MaeI digestion contributes to the rapid detection of the homozygous patient and the heterozygous carrier. PMID:1811097

  19. Analysis of gene expression changes, caused by exposure to nitrite, in metabolic and antioxidant enzymes in the red claw crayfish, Cherax quadricarinatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Qichen; Zhang, Wenyi; Tan, Hongyue; Pan, Dongmei; Yang, Yuanhao; Ren, Qian; Yang, Jiaxin

    2014-06-01

    We evaluated the effect of acute exposure to nitrite on expression of antioxidant and metabolic enzyme genes in gill tissue of advanced juvenile Cherax quadricarinatus. A 48h nitrite exposure was conducted, using four test concentrations (NO2-N=0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2mg L(-1)) plus a control group. The relative mRNA expression of mitochondrial manganese superoxide dismutase (mMnSOD), cytosolic MnSOD (cMnSOD), extracellular copper/zinc SOD (exCu/ZnSOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione S-transferase (GST), arginine kinase (AK), glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase (mMDH), Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase α-subunit and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) in gill tissue was measured. Significantly increased mRNA expression was observed for all the antioxidant enzymes after 12 and 24h. After 48h, they all decreased at high nitrite concentrations. The gene expression levels of AK, GDH, mMDH and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase α-subunit showed similar trends as the antioxidant enzymes. Significant depression of gene expression levels of PEPCK occurred throughout the experimental time at high nitrite concentrations. The results indicated that nitrite could induce oxidative and metabolic stress in C. quadricarinatus, in a time dependent manner, which suggests they could be helpful in predicting sublethal nitrite toxicity and useful in environmental monitoring studies. PMID:24680578

  20. Mutations in GAS8, a Gene Encoding a Nexin-Dynein Regulatory Complex Subunit, Cause Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia with Axonemal Disorganization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanson, Ludovic; Thomas, Lucie; Copin, Bruno; Coste, André; Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle; Dastot-Le Moal, Florence; Duquesnoy, Philippe; Montantin, Guy; Collot, Nathalie; Tissier, Sylvie; Papon, Jean-François; Clement, Annick; Louis, Bruno; Escudier, Estelle; Amselem, Serge; Legendre, Marie

    2016-08-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by chronic respiratory infections of the upper and lower airways, hypofertility, and, in approximately half of the cases, situs inversus. This complex phenotype results from defects in motile cilia and sperm flagella. Among the numerous genes involved in PCD, very few-including CCDC39 and CCDC40-carry mutations that lead to a disorganization of ciliary axonemes with microtubule misalignment. Focusing on this particular phenotype, we identified bi-allelic loss-of-function mutations in GAS8, a gene that encodes a subunit of the nexin-dynein regulatory complex (N-DRC) orthologous to DRC4 of the flagellated alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Unlike the majority of PCD patients, individuals with GAS8 mutations have motile cilia, which, as documented by high-speed videomicroscopy, display a subtle beating pattern defect characterized by slightly reduced bending amplitude. Immunofluorescence studies performed on patients' respiratory cilia revealed that GAS8 is not required for the proper expression of CCDC39 and CCDC40. Rather, mutations in GAS8 affect the subcellular localization of another N-DRC subunit called DRC3. Overall, this study, which identifies GAS8 as a PCD gene, unveils the key importance of the corresponding protein in N-DRC integrity and in the proper alignment of axonemal microtubules in humans. PMID:27120127

  1. Virus-induced gene silencing of the RPC5-like subunit of RNA polymerase III caused pleiotropic effects in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemchinov, Lev G; Boutanaev, Alexander M; Postnikova, Olga A

    2016-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, RNA polymerase III is highly conserved and transcribes housekeeping genes such as ribosomal 5S rRNA, tRNA and other small RNAs. The RPC5-like subunit is one of the 17 subunits forming RNAPIII and its exact functional roles in the transcription are poorly understood. In this work, we report that virus-induced gene silencing of transcripts encoding a putative RPC5-like subunit of the RNA Polymerase III in a model species Nicotiana benthamiana had pleiotropic effects, including but not limited to severe dwarfing appearance, chlorosis, nearly complete reduction of internodes and abnormal leaf shape. Using transcriptomic analysis, we identified genes and pathways affected by RPC5 silencing and thus presumably related to the cellular roles of the subunit as well as to the downstream cascade of reactions in response to partial loss of RNA Polymerase III function. Our results suggest that silencing of the RPC5L in N. benthamiana disrupted not only functions commonly associated with the core RNA Polymerase III transcripts, but also more diverse cellular processes, including responses to stress. We believe this is the first demonstration that activity of the RPC5 subunit is critical for proper functionality of RNA Polymerase III and normal plant development. PMID:27282827

  2. Nuclear gene causing multiple mtDNA deletions in autosomal dominant ophthalmoplegia maps to a distinct chromosomal region - involvement of both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA in a single disorder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suomalainen, A.; Kaukonen, J.; Timonen, R. [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia (adPEO) is a mitochondrial disease characterized by muscle weakness, most prominent in ocular muscles. The symptoms are caused by accumulation of multiple large deletions of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in the tissues of the patient, especially in those tissues that are most dependent on oxidative metabolism: brain, skeletal muscle and heart. However, the disorder shows autosomal dominant way of transmission, suggesting a primary defect in a nuclear encoded protein, which only secondarily results in mtDNA deletions. The candidate genes could be those actively participating in the mtDNA replication, or those associated with oxidative metabolism and e.g. via overproduction or inefficient elimination of fire oxygen radicals fragmenting mtDNA. We applied random mapping approach to localize the autosomal adPEO gene locus in a large Finnish family. The affected subjects were identified by detection of multiple mtDNA deletions in the Southern blot analysis of DNA extracted from the muscle biopsy specimens. All the family members underwent muscle biopsy. After analysis of 248 highly polymorphic dinucleotide repeat markets dispersed throughout the genome we were able to assign the adPEO gene locus to a distinct chromosomal region with the maximum pairwise lod score of 4.52, recombination fraction 0.0. This is the first evidence that a mutation in a nuclear gene may interfere mtDNA. The pathogenesis of adPEO involves both the genomes: the primary nuclear gene defect leads to secondary mtDNA mutations that cause the symptoms of the patients.

  3. A single nucleotide deletion of 293delT in SEDL gene causing spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia tarda in a four-generation Chinese family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Cuiying; Zhang, Sizhong; Wang, Jun; Qiu, Weimin; Chi, Leiting; Li, Yunqing; Su, Zhiguang

    distinctive radiological signs and the X-linked mode of inheritance make it easy to diagnose. Here a four-generation Chinese SEDT family has been analyzed and the disease-causing mutation has been found. After polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis and DNA...

  4. Genome sequencing and transposon mutagenesis of Burkholderia seminalis TC3.4.2R3 identify genes contributing to suppression of orchid necrosis caused by B. gladioli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirty six strains of Burkholderia spp. isolated from sugarcane were evaluated for biological control of leaf and pseudobulb necrosis of orchid caused by B. gladioli. Twenty nine of the sugarcane strains suppressed the disease in greenhouse assays. We generated a draft genomic sequence of one suppr...

  5. The Phytohormone Ethylene Enhances Cellulose Production, Regulates CRP/FNRKx Transcription and Causes Differential Gene Expression within the Bacterial Cellulose Synthesis Operon of Komagataeibacter (Gluconacetobacter) xylinus ATCC 53582

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augimeri, Richard V.; Strap, Janice L.

    2015-01-01

    Komagataeibacter (formerly Gluconacetobacter) xylinus ATCC 53582 is a plant-associated model organism for bacterial cellulose (BC) biosynthesis. This bacterium inhabits the carposphere where it interacts with fruit through the bi-directional transfer of phytohormones. The majority of research regarding K. xylinus has been focused on identifying and characterizing structural and regulatory factors that control BC biosynthesis, but its ecophysiology has been generally overlooked. Ethylene is a phytohormone that regulates plant development in a variety of ways, but is most commonly known for its positive role on fruit ripening. In this study, we utilized ethephon (2-chloroethylphosphonic acid) to produce in situ ethylene to investigate the effects of this phytohormone on BC production and the expression of genes known to be involved in K. xylinus BC biosynthesis (bcsA, bcsB, bcsC, bcsD, cmcAx, ccpAx and bglAx). Using pellicle assays and reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), we demonstrate that ethephon-derived ethylene enhances BC directly in K. xylinus by up-regulating the expression of bcsA and bcsB, and indirectly though the up-regulation of cmcAx, ccpAx, and bglAx. We confirm that IAA directly decreases BC biosynthesis by showing that IAA down-regulates bcsA expression. Similarly, we confirm that ABA indirectly influences BC biosynthesis by showing it does not affect the expression of bcs operon genes. In addition, we are the first to report the ethylene and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) induced differential expression of genes within the bacterial cellulose synthesis (bcs) operon. Using bioinformatics we have identified a novel phytohormone-regulated CRP/FNRKx transcription factor and provide evidence that it influences BC biosynthesis in K. xylinus. Lastly, utilizing current and previous data, we propose a model for the phytohormone-mediated fruit-bacteria interactions that K. xylinus experiences in nature. PMID:26733991

  6. Wheat Brassinosteroid-Insensitive1 (TaBRI1) Interacts with Members of TaSERK Gene Family and Cause Early Flowering and Seed Yield Enhancement in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Akanksha; Breja, Priyanka; Khurana, Jitendra P; Khurana, Paramjit

    2016-01-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) hormones are important for plant growth, development and immune responses. They are sensed by the transmembrane receptor kinase Brassinosteroid-Insensitive 1 (BRI1) when they bind to its extracellular Leu-rich repeat (LRR) domain. We cloned and characterized the TaBRI1 from T. aestivum and raised overexpression transgenics in Arabidopsis to decipher its functional role. TaBRI1 protein consists of a putative signal peptide followed by 25 leucine rich repeats (LRR), a transmembrane domain and a C-terminal kinase domain. The analysis determined the interaction of TaBRI1 with five members of the wheat Somatic Embryogenesis Receptor Kinase (TaSERKs) gene family (TaSERK1, TaSERK2, TaSERK3, TaSERK4 and TaSERK5), at the plasma membrane. Furthermore, overexpression of TaBRI1 in Arabidopsis leads to the early flowering, increased silique size and seed yield. Root growth analysis of TaBRI1 overexpressing transgenic plants showed hypersensitivity to epi-brassinolide (epi-BL) hormone in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, transgenic Arabidopsis plants show thermotolerance phenotype at the seedling stages as revealed by chlorophyll content, photosystem II activity and membrane stability. The transcriptome profiling on the basis of microarray analysis indicates up-regulation of several genes related to brassinosteroid signaling pathway, abiotic stress response, defense response and transcription factors. These studies predict the possible role of TaBRI1 gene in plant growth and development imparting tolerance to thermal stress. PMID:27322749

  7. The phytohormone ethylene enhances bacterial cellulose production, regulates CRP/FNRKx transcription and causes differential gene expression within the cellulose synthesis operon of Komagataeibacter (Gluconacetobacter xylinus ATCC 53582

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Vincent Augimeri

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Komagataeibacter (formerly Gluconacetobacter xylinus ATCC 53582 is a plant-associated model organism for bacterial cellulose (BC biosynthesis. This bacterium inhabits the carposphere where it interacts with fruit through the bi-directional transfer of phytohormones. The majority of research regarding K. xylinus has been focused on identifying and characterizing structural and regulatory factors that control BC biosynthesis, but its ecophysiology has been generally overlooked. Ethylene is a phytohormone that regulates plant development in a variety of ways, but is most commonly known for its positive role on fruit ripening. In this study, we utilized ethephon (2-chloroethylphosphonic acid to produce in situ ethylene to investigate the effects of this phytohormone on BC production and the expression of genes known to be involved in K. xylinus BC biosynthesis (bcsA, bcsB, bcsC, bcsD, cmcAx, ccpAx and bglAx. Using pellicle assays and reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR, we demonstrate that ethephon-derived ethylene enhances BC directly in K. xylinus by up-regulating the expression of bcsA and bcsB, and indirectly though the up-regulation of cmcAx, ccpAx and bglAx. We confirm that IAA directly decreases BC biosynthesis by showing that IAA down-regulates bcsA expression. Similarly, we confirm that ABA indirectly influences BC biosynthesis by showing it does not affect the expression of bcs operon genes. In addition, we are the first to report the ethylene and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA induced differential expression of genes within the bacterial cellulose synthesis (bcs operon. Using bioinformatics we have identified a novel phytohormone-regulated CRP/FNRKx transcription factor and provide evidence that it influences BC biosynthesis in K. xylinus. Lastly, utilizing current and previous data, we propose a model for the phytohormone-mediated fruit-bacteria interactions that K. xylinus experiences in nature.

  8. The Phytohormone Ethylene Enhances Cellulose Production, Regulates CRP/FNRKx Transcription and Causes Differential Gene Expression within the Bacterial Cellulose Synthesis Operon of Komagataeibacter (Gluconacetobacter) xylinus ATCC 53582.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augimeri, Richard V; Strap, Janice L

    2015-01-01

    Komagataeibacter (formerly Gluconacetobacter) xylinus ATCC 53582 is a plant-associated model organism for bacterial cellulose (BC) biosynthesis. This bacterium inhabits the carposphere where it interacts with fruit through the bi-directional transfer of phytohormones. The majority of research regarding K. xylinus has been focused on identifying and characterizing structural and regulatory factors that control BC biosynthesis, but its ecophysiology has been generally overlooked. Ethylene is a phytohormone that regulates plant development in a variety of ways, but is most commonly known for its positive role on fruit ripening. In this study, we utilized ethephon (2-chloroethylphosphonic acid) to produce in situ ethylene to investigate the effects of this phytohormone on BC production and the expression of genes known to be involved in K. xylinus BC biosynthesis (bcsA, bcsB, bcsC, bcsD, cmcAx, ccpAx and bglAx). Using pellicle assays and reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), we demonstrate that ethephon-derived ethylene enhances BC directly in K. xylinus by up-regulating the expression of bcsA and bcsB, and indirectly though the up-regulation of cmcAx, ccpAx, and bglAx. We confirm that IAA directly decreases BC biosynthesis by showing that IAA down-regulates bcsA expression. Similarly, we confirm that ABA indirectly influences BC biosynthesis by showing it does not affect the expression of bcs operon genes. In addition, we are the first to report the ethylene and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) induced differential expression of genes within the bacterial cellulose synthesis (bcs) operon. Using bioinformatics we have identified a novel phytohormone-regulated CRP/FNRKx transcription factor and provide evidence that it influences BC biosynthesis in K. xylinus. Lastly, utilizing current and previous data, we propose a model for the phytohormone-mediated fruit-bacteria interactions that K. xylinus experiences in nature. PMID:26733991

  9. Wheat Brassinosteroid-Insensitive1 (TaBRI1 Interacts with Members of TaSERK Gene Family and Cause Early Flowering and Seed Yield Enhancement in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akanksha Singh

    Full Text Available Brassinosteroids (BRs hormones are important for plant growth, development and immune responses. They are sensed by the transmembrane receptor kinase Brassinosteroid-Insensitive 1 (BRI1 when they bind to its extracellular Leu-rich repeat (LRR domain. We cloned and characterized the TaBRI1 from T. aestivum and raised overexpression transgenics in Arabidopsis to decipher its functional role. TaBRI1 protein consists of a putative signal peptide followed by 25 leucine rich repeats (LRR, a transmembrane domain and a C-terminal kinase domain. The analysis determined the interaction of TaBRI1 with five members of the wheat Somatic Embryogenesis Receptor Kinase (TaSERKs gene family (TaSERK1, TaSERK2, TaSERK3, TaSERK4 and TaSERK5, at the plasma membrane. Furthermore, overexpression of TaBRI1 in Arabidopsis leads to the early flowering, increased silique size and seed yield. Root growth analysis of TaBRI1 overexpressing transgenic plants showed hypersensitivity to epi-brassinolide (epi-BL hormone in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, transgenic Arabidopsis plants show thermotolerance phenotype at the seedling stages as revealed by chlorophyll content, photosystem II activity and membrane stability. The transcriptome profiling on the basis of microarray analysis indicates up-regulation of several genes related to brassinosteroid signaling pathway, abiotic stress response, defense response and transcription factors. These studies predict the possible role of TaBRI1 gene in plant growth and development imparting tolerance to thermal stress.

  10. A second mutation in the type II procollagen gene (COL2AI) causing stickler syndrome (arthro-ophthalmopathy) is also a premature termination codon.

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad, N N; McDonald-McGinn, D M; Zackai, E H; Knowlton, R G; LaRossa, D; DiMascio, J; Prockop, D J

    1993-01-01

    Genetic linkage analyses suggest that mutations in type II collagen may be responsible for Stickler syndrome, or arthro-ophthalmopathy (AO), in many families. In the present study oligonucleotide primers were developed to amplify and directly sequence eight of the first nine exons of the gene for type II procollagen (COL2A1). Analysis of the eight exons in 10 unrelated probands with AO revealed that one had a single-base mutation in one allele that changed the codon of -CGA- for arginine at a...

  11. Rice husks and their hydrochars cause unexpected stress response in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans: reduced transcription of stress-related genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Shumon; Dicke, Christiane; Kalderis, Dimitrios; Kern, Jürgen

    2015-08-01

    Currently, char substrates gain a lot of interest since soils amended with such substrates are being discussed to increase in fertility and productivity, water retention, and mitigation of greenhouse gases. Char substrates can be produced by carbonization of organic matter. Among different process conditions, temperature is the main factor controlling the occurrence of organic and inorganic contaminants such as phenols and furfurals, which may affect target and non-target organisms. The hydrochar produced at 200 °C contained both furfural and phenol with concentrations of 282 and 324 mg kg(-1) in contrast to the 300 °C hydrochar, which contained only phenol with a concentration of 666 mg kg(-1). By washing with acetone and water, these concentrations were significantly reduced. In this study, the potential toxic effects of hydrochars on the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans were investigated via gene transcription studies using the following four matrices: (i) raw rice husk, (ii) unwashed rice char, (iii) acetone/water washed rice char, and (iv) the wash water of the two rice chars produced at 200 and 300 °C via hydrothermal carbonization (HTC). Furthermore, genetically modified strains, where the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene sequence is linked to a reporter gene central in specific anti-stress regulations, were also exposed to these matrices. Transgenic worms exposed to hydrochars showed very weak, if any, fluorescence, and expression of the associated RNAs related to stress response and biotransformation genes was surprisingly downregulated. Similar patterns were also found for the raw rice husk. It is hypothesized that an unidentified chemical trigger exists in the rice husk, which is not destroyed during the HTC process. Therefore, the use of GFP transgenic nematode strains cannot be recommended as a general rapid monitoring tool for farmers treating their fields with artificial char. However, it is hypothesized that the observed reduced

  12. RNA interference suppression of genes in glycosyl transferase families 43 and 47 in wheat starchy endosperm causes large decreases in arabinoxylan content

    OpenAIRE

    Lovegrove, Alison; Wilkinson, Mark D; Freeman, Jackie; Pellny, Till K.; Tosi, Paola; Saulnier, Luc; Shewry, Peter R.; Mitchell, Rowan A. C.

    2013-01-01

    The cell walls of wheat (Triticum aestivum) starchy endosperm are dominated by arabinoxylan (AX), accounting for 65% to 70% of the polysaccharide content. Genes within two glycosyl transferase (GT) families, GT43 (IRREGULAR XYLEM9 [IRX9] and IRX14) and GT47 (IRX10), have previously been shown to be involved in the synthesis of the xylan backbone in Arabidopsis, and close homologs of these have been implicated in the synthesis of xylan in other species. Here, homologs of IRX10 TaGT47_2 and IRX...

  13. Overexpression of Two PsnAP1 Genes from Populus simonii × P. nigra Causes Early Flowering in Transgenic Tobacco and Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Tangchun; Li, Shuang; Zang, Lina; Dai, Lijuan; Yang, Chuanping; Qu, Guan-Zheng

    2014-01-01

    In Arabidopsis, AP1 is a floral meristem identity gene and plays an important role in floral organ development. In this study, PsnAP1-1 and PsnAP1-2 were isolated from the male reproductive buds of poplar (Populus simonii × P. nigra), which are the orthologs of AP1 in Arabidopsis, by sequence analysis. Northern blot and qRT-PCR analysis showed that PsnAP1-1 and PsnAP1-2 exhibited high expression level in early inflorescence development of poplar. Subcellular localization showed the PsnAP1-1 a...

  14. Mutations in the Gene Encoding the Sigma 2 Subunit of the Adaptor Protein 1 Complex, AP1S2, Cause X-Linked Mental Retardation

    OpenAIRE

    Tarpey, Patrick S. ; Stevens, Claire ; Teague, Jon ; Edkins, Sarah ; O’Meara, Sarah ; Avis, Tim ; Barthorpe, Syd ; Buck, Gemma ; Butler, Adam ; Cole, Jennifer ; Dicks, Ed ; Gray, Kristian ; Halliday, Kelly ; Harrison, Rachel ; Hills, Katy 

    2006-01-01

    In a systematic sequencing screen of the coding exons of the X chromosome in 250 families with X-linked mental retardation (XLMR), we identified two nonsense mutations and one consensus splice-site mutation in the AP1S2 gene on Xp22 in three families. Affected individuals in these families showed mild-to-profound mental retardation. Other features included hypotonia early in life and delay in walking. AP1S2 encodes an adaptin protein that constitutes part of the adaptor protein complex found ...

  15. The t(14,15) in Mouse Strain CBA/CaH-T(14;15)6Ca/J Causes a Break in the ADAMTS12 Gene

    OpenAIRE

    Acar-Perk, Bengi; Bräutigam, Karen; Grunewald, Regina; Schmutzler, Andreas; Schem, Christian; Arnold, Norbert K; Jonat, Walter; Weimer, Jörg

    2010-01-01

    The mouse strain CBA/CaH-T(14;15)6Ca/J carries a homozygous balanced reciprocal translocation between mouse chromosomes 14 and 15, but the break points of this translocation have not previously been examined in detail. Using fluorescent in situ hybridization, we assigned the break point in 14qE3 to a 200-kb region devoid of any known gene. We similarly defined the break point in 15qA1 to a 27-kb region containing involving ADAMTS12. The chromosomal break likely is between exons 2 and 3 of ADA...

  16. Generation of the AML1-EVI-1 fusion gene in the t(3;21)(q26;q22) causes blastic crisis in chronic myelocytic leukemia.

    OpenAIRE

    Mitani, K; Ogawa, S.; Tanaka, T; Miyoshi, H; Kurokawa, M; Mano, H.; Yazaki, Y; Ohki, M; Hirai, H

    1994-01-01

    The t(3;21)(q26;q22) translocation, which is one of the consistent chromosomal abnormalities found in blastic crisis of chronic myelocytic leukemia (CML), is thought to play an important role in the leukemic progression of CML to an acute blastic crisis phase. The AML1 gene, which is located at the translocation breakpoint of the t(8;21)(q22;q22) translocation found in acute myelocytic leukemia, was also rearranged by the t(3;21)(q26;q22) translocation. Screening of a cDNA library of the t(3;...

  17. Cryptic microdeletion of the CREBBP gene from t(1;16) (p36.2;p13.3) as a novel genetic defect causing Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Suk Ran; Kim, Hee-Jin; Kim, Yae-Jean; Kwon, Jeong-Yi; Kim, Jong-Won; Kim, Sun-Hee

    2013-01-01

    Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RTS) is a multiple congenital anomaly syndrome characterized by facial abnormalities, broad thumbs and toes, and mental retardation. RTS is known to be caused by the disruption, either by point mutations or microdeletions, of the human CREB-binding protein (CREBBP) gene on 16p13.3. Gross rearrangements involving 16p13.3, such as translocations or inversions, have rarely been reported in RTS. A 3-month-old boy with a phenotype typical of RTS was referred for genetic diagnosis. Cytogenetic analysis revealed a novel reciprocal translocation: t(1;16)(p36.2;p13.3). Gene dosage analysis for the CREBBP gene was performed using multiple ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) and revealed heterozygous deletion of the whole CREBBP gene. Genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-array confirmed the deletion and also indicated large genomic deletions in both 1p36.2 and 16p13.3. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of characterization of the genomic dosage imbalances in RTS by SNP-array. PMID:24247805

  18. Exposure to the synthetic FXR agonist GW4064 causes alterations in gene expression and sublethal hepatotoxicity in eleutheroembryo medaka (Oryzias latipes)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The small freshwater teleost, medaka (Oryzias latipes), has a history of usage in studies of chronic toxicity of liver and biliary system. Recent progress with this model has focused on defining the medaka hepatobiliary system. Here we investigate critical liver function and toxicity by examining the in vivo role and function of the farnesoid X receptor alpha (FXRα, NR1H4), a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily that plays an essential role in the regulation of bile acid homeostasis. Quantitative mRNA analysis of medaka FXRα demonstrates differential expression of two FXRα isoforms designated Fxrα1 and Fxrα2, in both free swimming medaka embryos with remaining yolk (eleutheroembryos, EEs) and adults. Activation of medaka Fxrα in vivo with GW4064 (a strong FXRα agonist) resulted in modification of gene expression for defined FXRα gene targets including the bile salt export protein, small heterodimer partner, and cytochrome P450 7A1. Histological examination of medaka liver subsequent to GW4064 exposure demonstrated significant lipid accumulation, cellular and organelle alterations in both hepatocytes and biliary epithelial cells of the liver. This report of hepatobiliary injury following GW4064 exposure extends previous investigations of the intrahepatic biliary system in medaka, reveals sensitivity to toxicant exposure, and illustrates the need for added resolution in detection and interpretation of toxic responses in this vertebrate.

  19. The alkylglycerol monooxygenase (AGMO) gene previously involved in autism also causes a novel syndromic form of primary microcephaly in a consanguineous Saudi family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alrayes, Nuha; Mohamoud, Hussein Sheikh Ali; Ahmed, Saleem; Almramhi, Mona Mohammad; Shuaib, Taghreed Mohammad; Wang, Jun; Al-Aama, Jumana Yousuf; Everett, Kate; Nasir, Jamal; Jelani, Musharraf

    2016-04-15

    Autosomal recessive primary microcephaly (MCPH) refers to a genetically heterogeneous group of neurodevelopmental disorders in which patients exhibit a marked decrease in occipitofrontal head circumference at birth and a variable degree of intellectual disability. To date, 18 genes have been reported for MCPH worldwide. We enrolled a consanguineous family from Saudi Arabia presenting with primary microcephaly, developmental delay, short stature and intellectual disability. Whole exome sequencing (WES) with 100× coverage was performed on two affected siblings after defining common regions of homozygosity through genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) microarray genotyping. WES data analysis, confirmed by subsequent Sanger sequence validation, identified a novel homozygous deletion mutation (c.967delA; p.Glu324Lysfs12*) in exon 10 of the alkylglycerol monooxygenase (AGMO) gene on chromosome 7p21.2. Population screening of 178 ethnically matched control chromosomes and consultation of the Exome Aggregation Consortium database, containing 60,706 individuals' exomes worldwide, confirmed that this mutation was not present outside the family. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first evidence of an AGMO mutation underlying primary microcephaly and intellectual disability in humans. Our findings further expand the genetic heterogeneity of MCPH in familial cases. PMID:27000257

  20. An ochre mutation in the vitamin D receptor gene causes hereditary 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3-resistant rickets in three families

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hereditary 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3-resistant rickets is a rare autosomal-recessive disease resulting from target-organ resistance to the action of the active hormonal form of vitamin D. Four affected children from three related families with the classical syndrome of hereditary 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3-resistant rickets and the absence of detectable binding to the vitamin D receptor (VDR) in cultured fibroblasts or lymphoblasts were examined for genetic abnormalities in the VDR gene. Genomic DNA from Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphoblasts of eight family members was isolated and amplified by polymerase chain reaction techniques. Amplified fragments containing the eight structural exons encoding the VDR protein were sequenced. The DNA from all affected children exhibited a single C → A base substitution within exon 7 at nucleotide 970. Although the affected children were all homozygotic for the mutation, the four parents tested all exhibited both wild-type and mutant alleles, indicating a heterozygous state. Recreated mutant receptor exhibited no specific 1,25-[3H]dihydroxyvitamin D3 binding and failed to activate a cotransfected VDR promoter-reporter gene construct. Thus these findings identify an ochre mutation in a human steroid hormone receptor in patients with hereditary 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3-resistant rickets

  1. Cystathionine γ-lyase, a H2S-generating enzyme, is a GPBAR1-regulated gene and contributes to vasodilation caused by secondary bile acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renga, Barbara; Bucci, Mariarosaria; Cipriani, Sabrina; Carino, Adriana; Monti, Maria Chiara; Zampella, Angela; Gargiulo, Antonella; d'Emmanuele di Villa Bianca, Roberta; Distrutti, Eleonora; Fiorucci, Stefano

    2015-07-01

    GPBAR1 is a bile acid-activated receptor (BAR) for secondary bile acids, lithocholic (LCA) and deoxycholic acid (DCA), expressed in the enterohepatic tissues and in the vasculature by endothelial and smooth muscle cells. Despite that bile acids cause vasodilation, it is unclear why these effects involve GPBAR1, and the vascular phenotype of GPBAR1 deficient mice remains poorly defined. Previous studies have suggested a role for nitric oxide (NO) in regulatory activity exerted by GPBAR1 in liver endothelial cells. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a vasodilatory agent generated in endothelial cells by cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE). Here we demonstrate that GPBAR1 null mice had increased levels of primary and secondary bile acids and impaired vasoconstriction to phenylephrine. In aortic ring preparations, vasodilation caused by chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), a weak GPBAR1 ligand and farnesoid-x-receptor agonist (FXR), was iberiotoxin-dependent and GPBAR1-independent. In contrast, vasodilation caused by LCA was GPBAR1 dependent and abrogated by propargyl-glycine, a CSE inhibitor, and by 5β-cholanic acid, a GPBAR1 antagonist, but not by N(5)-(1-iminoethyl)-l-ornithine (l-NIO), an endothelial NO synthase inhibitor, or iberiotoxin, a large-conductance calcium-activated potassium (BKCa) channels antagonist. In venular and aortic endothelial (HUVEC and HAEC) cells GPBAR1 activation increases CSE expression/activity and H2S production. Two cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) sites (CREs) were identified in the CSE promoter. In addition, TLCA stimulates CSE phosphorylation on serine residues. In conclusion we demonstrate that GPBAR1 mediates the vasodilatory activity of LCA and regulates the expression/activity of CSE. Vasodilation caused by CDCA involves BKCa channels. The GPBAR1/CSE pathway might contribute to endothelial dysfunction and hyperdynamic circulation in liver cirrhosis. PMID:25934094

  2. Chronic co-administration of nicotine and methamphetamine causes differential expression of immediate early genes in the dorsal striatum and nucleus accumbens

    OpenAIRE

    Saint-Preux, Fabienne; Bores, Lorena Rodríguez; Tulloch, Ingrid; Ladenheim, Bruce; Kim, Ronald; Thanos, Panayotis K.; Nora D Volkow; Cadet, Jean Lud

    2013-01-01

    Nicotine and methamphetamine (METH) cause addiction by triggering neuroplastic changes in brain reward pathways though they each engage distinct molecular targets (nicotine receptors and dopamine transporters respectively). Addiction to both drugs is very prevalent, with the vast majority of METH users being also smokers of cigarettes. This co-morbid occurrence thus raised questions about potential synergistic rewarding effects of the drugs. However, few studies have investigated the chronic ...

  3. Blue eye color in humans may be caused by a perfectly associated founder mutation in a regulatory element located within the HERC2 gene inhibiting OCA2 expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eiberg, Hans; Troelsen, Jesper; Boyd, Mette;

    2008-01-01

    The human eye color is a quantitative trait displaying multifactorial inheritance. Several studies have shown that the OCA2 locus is the major contributor to the human eye color variation. By linkage analysis of a large Danish family, we finemapped the blue eye color locus to a 166 Kbp region...... within the HERC2 gene. By association analyses, we identified two SNPs within this region that were perfectly associated with the blue and brown eye colors: rs12913832 and rs1129038. Of these, rs12913832 is located 21.152 bp upstream from the OCA2 promoter in a highly conserved sequence in intron 86 of...... HERC2. The brown eye color allele of rs12913832 is highly conserved throughout a number of species. As shown by a Luciferase assays in cell cultures, the element significantly reduces the activity of the OCA2 promoter and electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrate that the two alleles bind...

  4. Familial Polycythemia Caused by a Novel Mutation in the Beta Globin Gene: Essential Role of P50 in Evaluation of Familial Polycythemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeraj Agarwal, Mariluz P. Mojica-Henshaw, Elizabeth. D. Simmons, Dottie Hussey, Ching N. Ou, Josef T. Prchal

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Two polycythemic subjects from a family with multiple polycythemic subjects were evaluated. Estimation of oxygen affinity of Hb from venous blood gas parameters (P50 revealed low P50 suggesting a high affinity Hb variant. Further work up, which included beta globin gene sequencing, revealed a novel mutation changing a codon to the previously reported high affinity Hb - Hb Johnstown (beta109 Val->Leu. Polycythemic subjects with high affinity Hb variant are asymptomatic with normal life expectancy. Their differentiation from polycythemia vera (PV is crucial to avoid therapy which is otherwise reserved for PV patients. We provide an electronic version (in Microsoft excel program of a previously reported mathematical formula for rapid calculation of P50 from venous blood gases. Estimation of P50 is an essential initial step in the evaluation of a subject with personal and family history of polycythemia.

  5. The expanding phenotype of MELAS caused by the m.3291T > C mutation in the MT-TL1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keilland, E; Rupar, C A; Prasad, Asuri N; Tay, K Y; Downie, A; Prasad, C

    2016-03-01

    m.3291T > C mutation in the MT-TL1 gene has been infrequently encountered in association with mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS), however remains poorly characterized from a clinical perspective. In the following report we describe in detail the phenotypic features, long term follow up (> 7 years) and management in a Caucasian family with MELAS due to the m.3291T > C mutation and review the literature on m.3291T > C mutation. The clinical phenotype in the proposita included overlapping features of MELAS, MERRF (Myoclonic epilepsy and ragged-red fiber syndrome), MNGIE (Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalopathy), KSS (Kearns-Sayre Syndrome) and CPEO (Chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia). PMID:27014580

  6. The expanding phenotype of MELAS caused by the m.3291T>C mutation in the MT-TL1 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Keilland

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available m.3291T>C mutation in the MT-TL1 gene has been infrequently encountered in association with mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS, however remains poorly characterized from a clinical perspective. In the following report we describe in detail the phenotypic features, long term follow up (>7 years and management in a Caucasian family with MELAS due to the m.3291T>C mutation and review the literature on m.3291T>C mutation. The clinical phenotype in the proposita included overlapping features of MELAS, MERRF (Myoclonic epilepsy and ragged-red fiber syndrome, MNGIE (Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalopathy, KSS (Kearns-Sayre Syndrome and CPEO (Chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia.

  7. Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease in a family of Portuguese origin caused by a point mutation in exon 5 of the proteolipid protein gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pratt, V.M.; Boyadjiev, S.; Dlouhy, S.R. [Indiana Univ. School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States)] [and others

    1995-02-13

    Single-strand conformational polymorphism analysis of an affected male with Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD) showed a slight change in mobility of amplified exon 5 of the proteolipid protein (PLP) gene. The exon was sequenced and a G{r_arrow}A transition at codon 216 was found. This mutation eliminates a BstNI restriction site and creates a MaeI restriction site. In 1989, Gencic et al. reported a mutation that destroyed the same BstNI site, but resulted in a substitution at codon 15. The mutation we report here is also present in the patient`s mother and her male fetus as determined by polymerase chain reaction analysis of amniocytes. 22 refs., 2 figs.

  8. Two novel mutations in the NR5A1 gene as a cause of disorders of sex development in a Pakistani cohort of 46,XY patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, S; Amar, A; Najeeb, M N; Khaliq, S

    2016-06-01

    NR5A1 plays a central role in gonadal development and regulation by transcriptional regulation of key modulators involved in steroidogenesis. Mutations in human NR5A1 are frequently associated with 46,XY disorders of sex development (DSD). We analysed a Pakistani cohort of patients with 46,XY DSD, presenting with variable degrees of gonadal dysgenesis, for NR5A1 mutations. The study identified three mutations (p.Tyr03X, p.Glu07X and p.Gln299HisfsX386), of which two are novel, in these patients with 46,XY DSD. The mutations, p.Tyr03X and novel p.Glu07X, are located in the coding region of the gene, corresponding to DNA-binding domain of the predicted protein. In silico analysis for the novel homozygous p.Gln299HisfsX386 mutation in ligand-binding domain of NR5A1 revealed subtle changes in overall tertiary conformation which is predicted to affect the normal physiology of this mutant protein. This study reveals two novel mutations with altered NR5A1 protein in twenty patients with 46,XY DSD, highlighting the critical role of NR5A1 protein in gonadal development and differentiation. In conclusion, the current and previous studies suggest that the NR5A1 mutations are present in around 8-15% of patients with 46,XY DSD presenting with gonadal dysgenesis. For the clinical utility of NR5A1 gene mutations, more comprehensive studies with large 46,XY DSD patient series in different populations are suggested. PMID:26260161

  9. What Causes Sudden Cardiac Arrest?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... heart muscle. Eventually, an area of plaque can rupture (break open). This may cause a blood clot ... tendency is inherited, which means it's passed from parents to children through the genes. Members of these ...

  10. Deficiency of the ribosome biogenesis gene Sbds in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells causes neutropenia in mice by attenuating lineage progression in myelocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambetti, Noemi A; Bindels, Eric M J; Van Strien, Paulina M H; Valkhof, Marijke G; Adisty, Maria N; Hoogenboezem, Remco M; Sanders, Mathijs A; Rommens, Johanna M; Touw, Ivo P; Raaijmakers, Marc H G P

    2015-10-01

    Shwachman-Diamond syndrome is a congenital bone marrow failure disorder characterized by debilitating neutropenia. The disease is associated with loss-of-function mutations in the SBDS gene, implicated in ribosome biogenesis, but the cellular and molecular events driving cell specific phenotypes in ribosomopathies remain poorly defined. Here, we established what is to our knowledge the first mammalian model of neutropenia in Shwachman-Diamond syndrome through targeted downregulation of Sbds in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells expressing the myeloid transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer binding protein α (Cebpa). Sbds deficiency in the myeloid lineage specifically affected myelocytes and their downstream progeny while, unexpectedly, it was well tolerated by rapidly cycling hematopoietic progenitor cells. Molecular insights provided by massive parallel sequencing supported cellular observations of impaired cell cycle exit and formation of secondary granules associated with the defect of myeloid lineage progression in myelocytes. Mechanistically, Sbds deficiency activated the p53 tumor suppressor pathway and induced apoptosis in these cells. Collectively, the data reveal a previously unanticipated, selective dependency of myelocytes and downstream progeny, but not rapidly cycling progenitors, on this ubiquitous ribosome biogenesis protein, thus providing a cellular basis for the understanding of myeloid lineage biased defects in Shwachman-Diamond syndrome. PMID:26185170

  11. Over-expression of the PaAP1 gene from sweet cherry (Prunus avium L.) causes early flowering in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Zhang, Xiaoming; Yan, Guohua; Zhou, Yu; Zhang, Kaichun

    2013-02-15

    A homologue of SQUAMOSA/APETALA1, designated PaAP1, was isolated from Prunus avium by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR). The full length of PaAP1 cDNA is 753 bp, and it codes for a polypeptide of 250 amino acid residues. Sequence comparison revealed that PaAP1 belongs to the MADS-box gene family. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that PaAP1 shared the highest identity with SQUA/AP1 homologues from Prunus serrulata. Real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR analysis showed that PaAP1 was expressed at high levels in petal, sepal, style, and flower buds, which was slightly different from the expression pattern of AP1 of Arabidopsis thaliana. To characterize the functions of PaAP1, we assessed Arabidopsis transformed with 35S::PaAP1. A total of 8 transgenic T(1) lines with an early flowering phenotype were obtained, and a 3:1 segregation ratio of flowering time was observed in the T(2) generation of 4 lines. This study provides the first functional analysis of an SQUA/AP1 homolog from P. avium and suggests that PaAP1 is potentially useful for shortening the juvenile period in sweet cherry. PMID:23206932

  12. Deletion of the pluripotency-associated Tex19.1 gene causes activation of endogenous retroviruses and defective spermatogenesis in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ollinger, Rupert; Childs, Andrew J; Burgess, Hannah M;

    2008-01-01

    . During male spermatogenesis, Tex19.1 expression is highest in mitotic spermatogonia and diminishes as these cells differentiate and progress through meiosis. In pluripotent stem cells, Tex19.1 expression is also downregulated upon differentiation. However, it is not clear whether Tex19.1 has an essential...... spermatogenesis. Immunostaining and histological analysis revealed defects in meiotic chromosome synapsis, the persistence of DNA double-strand breaks during meiosis, and a loss of post-meiotic germ cells in the testis. Furthermore, expression of a class of endogenous retroviruses is upregulated during meiosis in...... the Tex19.1(-/-) testes. Increased transposition of endogenous retroviruses in the germline of Tex19.1(-/-) mutant mice, and the concomitant increase in DNA damage, may be sufficient to disrupt the normal processes of recombination and chromosome synapsis during meiosis and cause defects in...

  13. A novel 26 bp deletion [HBB: c.20_45del26bp] in exon 1 of the β-globin gene causing β-thalassemia major.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edison, Eunice S; Venkatesan, Rajkumar S; Govindanattar, Sankari Devi; George, Biju; Shaji, Ramachandran V

    2012-01-01

    Molecular characterization of β-thalassemia (β-thal) is essential in prevention and in understanding the biology of the disease. Deletion mutations are relatively uncommon in β-thal. In this report, we describe a novel 26 bp deletion from codon 6 to codon 14 in the β-globin in a consanguineous family from Tamil Nadu, India. This novel mutation causes a shift in the normal reading frame of the β-globin coding sequence, and consequently, a premature chain termination of translation due to the creation of a stop codon at the position of codon 21. The identification of this novel deletional mutation adds to the repertoire of β-thal mutations in India. PMID:22233277

  14. A recessive syndrome of intellectual disability, moderate overgrowth, and renal dysplasia predisposing to Wilms tumor is caused by a mutation in FIBP gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akawi, Nadia; Ben-Salem, Salma; Lahti, Laura; Partanen, Juha; Ali, Bassam R; Al-Gazali, Lihadh

    2016-08-01

    Clinical classification of overgrowth syndromes represents a challenge since a wide spectrum of disorders result in marked overgrowth. Therefore, there is a continuous effort to identify the genetic basis of these disorders that will eventually facilitate their molecular classification. Here, we have identified the genetic etiology and the pathogenetic mechanism underlying a rare autosomal recessive overgrowth syndrome in three affected siblings. The overgrowth phenotype in the patients was accompanied by developmental delay, learning disabilities, and variable congenital abnormalities. To elucidate the genetic etiology of the disorder, whole-genome genotyping and whole-exome sequencing were used. The disease was mapped to 3p21.1-p14.2 and 11q13.1-q13.4, where an in-frame insertion (c.175_176insTAA) in FIBP gene was revealed. The resulting indel (p.H59LN) was predicted to change the protein conformation with likely deleterious effect on its function as one of the fibroblast growth factor signaling mediators. In vitro cellular proliferation assay and in situ hypridization in vivo were then performed to understand the pathophysiology of the disease. The patients' skin fibroblasts showed an increased proliferation capacity compared to the controls' explaining the observed overgrowth phenotype. In addition, we detected Fibp expression most notably in the brains of mice embryos suggesting a possible effect on cognitive functions early in development. To date, only one patient has been reported with a homozygous nonsense mutation in FIBP exhibiting an overgrowth syndrome with multiple congenital abnormalities. Taken all together, these findings provide convincing evidence implicating FIBP aberrations in the newly recognized overgrowth syndrome and expand the associated phenotypes to include possible Wilms tumor predisposition. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27183861

  15. Mutation of the gene encoding the ribonuclease P RNA in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis causes decreased growth rate and impaired processing of tRNA precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Toshifumi; Ishino, Sonoko; Suematsu, Kotaro; Nakashima, Takashi; Kakuta, Yoshimitsu; Kawarabayasi, Yutaka; Ishino, Yoshizumi; Kimura, Makoto

    2015-12-25

    Ribonuclease P (RNase P) catalyzes the processing of 5' leader sequences of tRNA precursors in all three phylogenetic domains. RNase P also plays an essential role in non-tRNA biogenesis in bacterial and eukaryotic cells. For archaeal RNase Ps, additional functions, however, remain poorly understood. To gain insight into the biological function of archaeal RNase Ps in vivo, we prepared archaeal mutants KUWΔP3, KUWΔP8, and KUWΔP16, in which the gene segments encoding stem-loops containing helices, respectively, P3, P8 and P16 in RNase P RNA (TkopRNA) of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis were deleted. Phenotypic analysis showed that KUWΔP3 and KUWΔP16 grew slowly compared with wild-type T. kodakarensis KUW1, while KUWΔP8 displayed no difference from T. kodakarensis KUW1. RNase P isolated using an affinity-tag from KUWΔP3 had reduced pre-tRNA cleavage activity compared with that from T. kodakarensis KUW1. Moreover, quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) and Northern blots analyses of KUWΔP3 showed greater accumulation of unprocessed transcripts for pre-tRNAs than that of T. kodakarensis KUW1. The current study represents the first attempt to prepare mutant T. kodakarensis with impaired RNase P for functional investigation. Comparative whole-transcriptome analysis of T. kodakarensis KUW1 and KUWΔP3 should allow for the comprehensive identification of RNA substrates for archaeal RNase Ps. PMID:26551464

  16. High-grain feeding causes strong shifts in ruminal epithelial bacterial community and expression of Toll-like receptor genes in goats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junhua eLiu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available High-grain (HG feeding used in intensive goat production can affect the physiology of the rumen wall, but the changes induced in the epimural bacterial community and host Toll-like receptors (TLRs are not well understood. In this study, ten male goats were randomly allocated to two groups and fed either a hay diet (0% grain; n=5 or an HG diet (65% grain; n=5. The changes in the ruminal epithelial bacterial community and expression of TLRs during long-term (seven weeks HG feeding were determined using pyrosequencing and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Principal coordinate analysis and analysis of molecular variance results showed that HG feeding caused a strong shift in bacterial composition and structure. At the genus level, our data revealed that it increased the relative abundance of taxa Butyrivibrio, unclassified Clostridiales, Mogibacterium, unclassified Anaerolineaceae, and Succiniclasticum, and decreased the proportion of unclassified Ruminococcaceae, unclassified Rikenellaceae, unclassified Erysipelotrichaceae, Howardella, and unclassified Neisseriaceae. The HG-fed goats also exhibited upregulation of the relative mRNA expression of TLR2, TLR3, and TLR5 in the rumen epithelium (P<0.05. Correlation analysis revealed that the increase in TLR expression was associated with changes in the relative abundance of ruminal epithelial bacteria. This study provides a first insight into the adaptive response of ruminal epithelial bacterial populations to HG feeding in goats and shows that these changes were associated with alterations in TLR expression. These findings provide new insight into understanding of host–microbial relationships in ruminants.

  17. High-grain feeding causes strong shifts in ruminal epithelial bacterial community and expression of Toll-like receptor genes in goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun-Hua; Bian, Gao-Rui; Zhu, Wei-Yun; Mao, Sheng-Yong

    2015-01-01

    High-grain (HG) feeding used in intensive goat production can affect the physiology of the rumen wall, but the changes induced in the epimural bacterial community and host Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are not well understood. In this study, 10 male goats were randomly allocated to two groups and fed either a hay diet (0% grain; n = 5) or an HG diet (65% grain; n = 5). The changes in the ruminal epithelial bacterial community and expression of TLRs during long-term (7 weeks) HG feeding were determined using pyrosequencing and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Principal coordinate analysis and analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) results showed that HG feeding caused a strong shift in bacterial composition and structure. At the genus level, our data revealed that it increased the relative abundance of taxa Butyrivibrio, unclassified Clostridiales, Mogibacterium, unclassified Anaerolineaceae, and Succiniclasticum, and decreased the proportion of unclassified Ruminococcaceae, unclassified Rikenellaceae, unclassified Erysipelotrichaceae, Howardella, and unclassified Neisseriaceae. The HG-fed goats also exhibited upregulation of the relative mRNA expression of TLR2, TLR3, and TLR5 in the rumen epithelium (P < 0.05). Correlation analysis revealed that the increase in TLR expression was associated with changes in the relative abundance of ruminal epithelial bacteria. This study provides a first insight into the adaptive response of ruminal epithelial bacterial populations to HG feeding in goats and shows that these changes were associated with alterations in TLR expression. These findings provide new insight into understanding of host-microbial relationships in ruminants. PMID:25784904

  18. Base substitution mutations in uridinediphosphate-dependent glycosyltransferase 76G1 gene of Stevia rebaudiana causes the low levels of rebaudioside A: mutations in UGT76G1, a key gene of steviol glycosides synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yong-Heng; Huang, Su-Zhen; Han, Yu-Lin; Yuan, Hai-Yan; Gu, Chun-Sun; Zhao, Yan-Hai

    2014-07-01

    Steviol glycosides, extracted from the leaves of Stevia rebaudiana (Bert) Bertoni, are calorie-free sugar substitute of natural origin with intensely sweet (Boileau et al., 2012). Stevioside and rebaudioside A are the two main kinds of the diterpenic glycosides. We analyzed the concentration of stevioside and rebaudioside A in Stevia leaves of about 500 samples (hybrid progenies) and discovered a mutation plant "Z05" with very low levels of rebaudioside A. Because UGT76G1, a uridinediphosphate-dependent glycosyltransferases, is responsible for the conversion from stevioside to rebaudioside A (Richman et al., 2005), so mutation identification was done by sequencing the candidate gene, UGT76G1. In this study molecular analysis of two strains revealed a heterozygotic nonsense mutation of c.389T > G (p.L121X) in UGT76G1. Meanwhile, we found some amino acid substitutions significant change the protein structure. And the difference of enzyme activity between two strains proved the lack of functionality of UGT76G1 of the mutation "Z05". So the nonsense mutation and amino acid substitution mutation resulted in the low levels of rebaudioside A. PMID:24811677

  19. Transposon mutations in the 5' end of glnD, the gene for a nitrogen regulatory sensor, that suppress the osmosensitive phenotype caused by otsBA lesions in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tøndervik, Anne; Torgersen, Haakon R; Botnmark, Hans K; Strøm, Arne R

    2006-06-01

    GlnD of Escherichia coli is a bifunctional signal-transducing enzyme (102.4 kDa) which uridylylates the allosteric regulatory protein PII and deuridylylates PII-UMP in response to growth with nitrogen excess or limitation, respectively. GlnD catalyzes these reactions in response to high or low levels of cytoplasmic glutamine, respectively, and indirectly directs the expression of nitrogen-regulated genes, e.g., the glnK-amtB operon. We report that chromosomal mini-Tn10 insertions situated after nucleotide number 997 or 1075 of glnD partially suppressed the osmosensitive phenotype of DeltaotsBA or otsA::Tn10 mutations (defective osmoregulatory trehalose synthesis). Strains carrying these glnD::mini-Tn10 mutations either completely repressed the expression of trp::(glnKp-lacZ) or induced this reporter system to nearly 60% of the wild-type glnD level in response to nitrogen availability, an essentially normal response. This was in contrast to the much-studied glnD99::Tn10 mutation, which carries its insertion in the 3' end of the gene, causes a complete repression of glnKp-lacZ expression under all growth conditions, and also confers leaky glutamine auxotrophy. When expressed from the Pm promoter in plasmid constructs, the present glnD mutations produced proteins with an apparent mass of 39 or 42 kDa. These proteins were deduced to comprise 344 or 370 N-terminal residues, respectively, harboring the known nucleotidyltransferase domain of GlnD, plus a common C-terminal addition of 12 residues encoded by IS10. They lacked three other domains of GlnD. Apparently, the transferase domain by itself enabled the cells to catalyze the uridylylation reaction and direct nitrogen-regulated gene expression. Our data indicate that there exists a link between osmotic stress and the nitrogen response. PMID:16740928

  20. What Causes Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency? Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) ... develop. The most common faulty gene that can cause AAT deficiency is called PiZ. If you inherit ...

  1. A novel insA2933 causes premature termination of translation and is accompanied by overexpression of truncated androgen receptor gene in a patient with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turek-Plewa, J; Starzyk, J B; Trzeciak, W H

    2015-11-01

    A patient with a female phenotype, 46,XY karyotype, and a diagnosis of complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS) was examined. Her mother and three 46,XX sisters were also included in the study. Sequence analysis of the androgen receptor gene (AR) revealed a novel A2933 insertion that alters the Tyr codon to a termination codon (Y857X), resulting in a truncated form of the receptor. Computer simulation revealed major conformational changes in the hydrophobic pocket that accommodates the hormone. An insA2933 results in a truncated receptor incapable of binding the ligand and is responsible for the clinical symptoms of CAIS in the patient. The levels of the AR transcript in peripheral blood leukocytes were higher in the patient than in her heterozygous mother and her heterozygous sister, as well as in the two healthy sisters. It is hypothesized that elevated levels of the AR transcript in the patient might be caused by the inability of the truncated receptor to react with IFI-16, which functions in complex with AR to inhibit the expression of the AR gene. PMID:25997614

  2. Autism and Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Institutes of Health, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This document defines and discusses autism and how genes play a role in the condition. Answers to the following questions are covered: (1) What are genes? (2) What is autism? (3) What causes autism? (4) Why study genes to learn about autism? (5) How do researchers look for the genes involved in autism? (screen the whole genome; conduct cytogenetic…

  3. Detection of pathogenic genes in Neisseria spp causing respiratory tract infections%呼吸道感染患者奈瑟菌属致病性相关基因的检测

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗振华; 王和; 易旭; 佘晓玲; 王涛; 王艳; 叶长芸

    2012-01-01

    目的 检测呼吸道感染患者分离奈瑟菌属的致病性相关基因,探讨非淋病奈瑟菌、非脑膜炎奈瑟菌的致病性.方法 采用PCR扩增和序列分析技术,对慢性呼吸道感染患者下呼吸道分离奈瑟菌属致病性相关基因orf1与nspA进行检测.结果 从呼吸道感染患者标本分离的230株奈瑟菌属,orf1基因阳性35株,序列比对与淋病奈瑟菌TCDC-NG08107 orf1序列同源性达95.0%~99.0%;nspA无阳性反应.结论 人体上呼吸道正常菌群奈瑟菌属缺乏nspA基因,少数菌株可具有淋病奈瑟菌及脑膜炎奈瑟菌致病性相关基因orf1,提示该基因并不是人体上呼吸道正常菌群奈瑟菌属致病性和引起呼吸道继发性感染的毒力因素%OBJECTIVE To detect the pathogenic genes of Neisseria spp. isolated from patients with respiratory tract infections and probe the pathogenicity of non-gonococci and non-meningitidis Neisseria species. METHODS The virulence-associated genes or/1 and nspA in Neisseria species isolated from the patients with chronic respiratory tract infections were detected and analyzed by PCR and nucleotide sequencing. RESULTS Of the 230 strains of Neisseria species isolated from patients with chronic respiratory tract infections, totally 35 strains showed or/1 positive, as compared with the sequence of TCDC-NG08107 orfl of N. g9norrhoeae? the sequence homology reaching to 95. 0% - 99. 0% , and there was no positive reaction of nspA. CONCLUSION The species of Neisseria spp. which are the normal flora of upper respiratory tract of human lack nspA, the pathogenic gene or/1 of N. gonorrhoeae and N. meningitides can be found only in few strains, which indicate that the genes are not the important virulence factors for the normal flora Neisseria species living the upper respiratory tract of human that causing the secondary respiratory tract infections.

  4. Single base mutation in the proα2(I) collagen gene that causes efficient splicing of RNA from exon 27 to exon 29 and synthesis of a shortened but in-frame proα2(I) chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous observations demonstrated that a lethal variant of osteogenesis imperfecta had two altered alleles for proα2(I) chains of type I procollagen. One mutation produced a nonfunctioning allele in that there was synthesis of mRNA but no detectable synthesis of proα2(I) chains from the allele. The mutation in the other allele caused synthesis of shortened proα2(I) chains that lacked most or all of the 18 amino acids encoded by exon 28. Subclones of the proα2(I) gene were prepared from the proband's DNA and the DNA sequence was determined for a 582-base-pair (bp) region that extended from the last 30 bp of intervening sequence 26 to the first 26 bp of intervening sequence 29. Data from six independent subclones demonstrated that all had the same sequence as a previously isolated normal clone for the proα2(I) gene except that four subclones had a single base mutation at the 3' end of intervening sequence 27. The mutation was a substitution of guanine for adenine that changed the universal consensus sequence for the 3' splicing site of RNA from -AG- to -GG-. S1 nuclease experiments demonstrated that about half the proα2(I) mRNA in the proband's fibroblasts was abnormally spliced and that the major species of abnormal proα2(I) mRNA was completely spliced from the last codon of exon 27 to the first codon of exon 29. The mutation is apparently unique among RNA splicing mutations of mammalian systems in producing a shortened polypeptide chain that is in-frame in terms of coding sequences, that is used in the subunit assembly of a protein, and that contributes to a lethal phenotype

  5. Genes and Gene Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... correctly, a child can have a genetic disorder. Gene therapy is an experimental technique that uses genes to ... or prevent disease. The most common form of gene therapy involves inserting a normal gene to replace an ...

  6. Ectopic expression of foxtail millet zip-like gene,SiPf40,in transgenic rice plants causes a pleiotropic phenotype affecting tillering,vascular distribution and root development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Plant architecture determines grain production in rice(Oryza sativa) and is affected by important agronomic traits such as tillering,plant height,and panicle morphology.Many key genes involved in controlling the initiation and outgrowth of axillary buds,the elongation of stems,and the architecture of inflorescences have been isolated and analyzed.Previous studies have shown that SiPf40,which was identified from a foxtail millet(Setaria italica) immature seed cDNA library,causes extra branches and tillers in SiPf40-transgenic tobacco and foxtail millet,respectively.To reconfirm its function,we generated transgenic rice plants overexpressing SiPf40 under the control of the ubiquitin promoter.SiPf40-overexpressing transgenic plants have a greater tillering number and a wider tiller angle than wild-type plants.Their root architecture is modified by the promotion of lateral root development,and the distribution of xylem and phloem in the vascular bundle is affected.Analysis of hormone levels showed that the ratios of indole-3-acetic acid/zeatin(IAA/ZR) and IAA/gibberellic acid(IAA/GA) decreased in SiPf40-transgenic plants compared with wild-type plants.These findings strongly suggest that SiPf40 plays an important role in plant architecture.

  7. [Language gene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hiroshi

    2006-11-01

    The human capacity for acquiring speech and language must derive, at least in part, from the genome. Recent advance in the field of molecular genetics finally discovered 'Language Gene'. Disruption of FOXP2 gene, the firstly identified 'language gene' causes severe speech and language disorder. To elucidate the anatomical basis of language processing in the brain, we examined the expression pattern of FOXP2/Foxp2 genes in the monkey and rat brains through development. We found the preferential expression of FOXP2/Foxp2 in the striosomal compartment of the developing striatum. Thus, we suggest the striatum, particularly striosomal system may participate in neural information processing for language and speech. Our suggestion is consistent with the declarative/ procedural model of language proposed by Ullman (1997, 2001), which the procedural memory-dependent mental grammar is rooted in the basal ganglia and the frontal cortex, and the declarative memory-dependent mental lexicon is rooted in the temporal lobe. PMID:17432197

  8. 医院感染金黄色葡萄球菌耐药表型与耐药基因研究%Drug resistance phenotypes and drug resistance genes in Staphylococcus aureus causing nosocomial infections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张志军; 曹海燕; 刘延媛; 刘春来

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To study the drug resistance phenotypes and drug resistance genes in Staphylococcus au‐reus causing nosocomial infections so as to provide guidance for clinical prevention and treatment of the nosocomial infections .METHODS From Jan 2011 to Jan 2013 ,totally 120 strains of S .aureus were isolated from the submitted specimens that were obtained from the patients with nosocomial infections .According to the standard operation procedures of clinical laboratory standard institute ,the drug resistance phenotypes and drug resistance genes in the S .aureus strains were analyzed by using polymerase‐chain‐reaction (PCR) .RESULTS The drug resistance rates of the S .aureus strains to penicillin ,erythromycin ,gentamicin ,clindamycin ,tetracycline ,and ciprofloxacin were 100 .00% ,98 .83% ,80 .00% ,76 .67% ,76 .67% ,and 75 .83% ,respectively ;the strains were highly susceptible to vancomycin and linezolid .Among the different drug resistance phenotypes of S .aureus ,the drug resistance rate of the type Ⅵ S .aureus was the highest (97 .50% ) , followed by the type Ⅴ (67 .50% ) and the type Ⅳ(60 .00% ) .Among the S .aureus strains harboring different drug resistance genes ,the drug resistance rate of the S .aureus strains harboring mecA was the highest (98 .83% ) ,and the drug resistance of the drug resistance genes in the S .aureus strains was in accordance with the drug resistance of the S .aureus strains .CONCLUSION The S .aureus strains causing nosocomial infections are highly resistant to most of the antibiotics and highly susceptible to vancomycin .The type Ⅵ ,type Ⅴ ,and type Ⅳ are the major drug resistance phenotypes;the tetK and mecA are the predominant drug resistance genes .%目的:研究医院感染耐药金黄色葡萄球菌的耐药表型及耐药基因,以期为临床防治医院感染提供参考。方法选取2011年1月-2013年1月医院感染患者送检标本中分离的120株金黄色葡萄球菌,根据美国临床实验

  9. Abnormal dentin structure in two novel gene mutations [COL1A1, Arg134Cys] and [ADAMTS2, Trp795-to-ter] causing rare type I collagen disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Coster, P J; Cornelissen, M; De Paepe, A; Martens, L C; Vral, A

    2007-02-01

    Histological and ultrastructural observations of dentin of two patients affected with rare types of type I collagen disorders are presented. In the first case, a homozygous nonsense mutation in ADAMTS2 (substitution of a codon for tryptophan by a stopcodon) causes type VIIC Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) with multiple tooth agenesis and focal dysplastic dentin defects. In the second case, a missense mutation in COL1A1 (substitution of arginine by cysteine) results in a type I EDS phenotype with clinically normal-appearing dentition. Tooth samples are investigated by using light microscopy (LM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and immunostaining for types I and III collagen, and tenascin. These are compared with samples from patients with types III and IV osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) in association with dentinogenesis imperfecta (DI), showing a consistently abnormal appearance of the dentin in all specimens, with variations being primarily those of degree of change. Similarities in histological changes include the alternating presence of normal and severe pathological areas in primary and secondary dentin, the latter being characterized by large canal-like structures in atubular areas. Ultrastructural evidence of pathological dentinogenesis include abnormal distribution, size and organization of collagen fibers, which may also be found in clinically unaffected teeth. The histological and ultrastructural changes seen can be explained on the basis of odontoblast dysfunction which may be secondary to the collagen defect, interfering with different levels of odontoblast cell function and intercellular communication. These observations on (ultra)structural dentin defects associated with the two novel gene mutations are the first ever reported. PMID:17118335

  10. Cochlear Gene Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Lustig, Lawrence R.; Akil, Omar

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to highlight recent advances in cochlear gene therapy over the past several years. Cochlear gene therapy has undergone tremendous advances over the past decade. Beginning with some groundbreaking work in 2005 documenting hair cell regeneration using virallymediated delivery of the mouse atonal 1 gene, gene therapy is now being explored as a possible treatment for a variety of causes of hearing loss.

  11. Do We Know What Causes Malignant Mesothelioma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Next Topic Can malignant mesothelioma be prevented? Do we know what causes malignant mesothelioma? Researchers have found ... genes – the instructions for how our cells function. We usually look like our parents because they are ...

  12. Do We Know What Causes Kidney Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Next Topic Can kidney cancer be prevented? Do we know what causes kidney cancer? Although many risk ... genes − the instructions for how our cells function. We usually look like our parents because they are ...

  13. Do We Know What Causes Stomach Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Next Topic Can stomach cancer be prevented? Do we know what causes stomach cancer? There are many ... genes — the instructions for how our cells function. We look like our parents because they are the ...

  14. Do We Know What Causes Breast Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Next Topic Can breast cancer be prevented? Do we know what causes breast cancer? Many risk factors ... Genes have instructions for how our cells function. We usually look like our parents because they are ...

  15. Gene therapy in periodontics

    OpenAIRE

    Anirban Chatterjee; Nidhi Singh; Mini Saluja

    2013-01-01

    GENES are made of DNA - the code of life. They are made up of two types of base pair from different number of hydrogen bonds AT, GC which can be turned into instruction. Everyone inherits genes from their parents and passes them on in turn to their children. Every person′s genes are different, and the changes in sequence determine the inherited differences between each of us. Some changes, usually in a single gene, may cause serious diseases. Gene therapy is ′the use of genes as medicine′. It...

  16. Loss of LRPPRC causes ATP synthase deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Mourier, Arnaud; Ruzzenente, Benedetta; Brandt, Tobias; Kühlbrandt, Werner; Larsson, Nils-Göran

    2014-01-01

    Defects of the oxidative phosphorylation system, in particular of cytochrome-c oxidase (COX, respiratory chain complex IV), are common causes of Leigh syndrome (LS), which is a rare neurodegenerative disorder with severe progressive neurological symptoms that usually present during infancy or early childhood. The COX-deficient form of LS is commonly caused by mutations in genes encoding COX assembly factors, e.g. SURF1, SCO1, SCO2 or COX10. However, other mutations affecting genes that encode...

  17. What Causes Angina?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Angina? Underlying Causes Angina usually is a symptom of coronary heart ... and cause angina or a heart attack . Immediate Causes Many factors can trigger angina pain, depending on ...

  18. What Causes Lymphocytopenia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... low lymphocyte counts with no underlying cause. Acquired Causes Many acquired diseases, conditions, and factors can cause ... anemia . Radiation and chemotherapy (treatments for cancer). Inherited Causes Certain inherited diseases and conditions can lead to ...

  19. What Causes Cardiogenic Shock?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Cardiogenic Shock? Immediate Causes Cardiogenic shock occurs if the heart suddenly can' ... reason why emergency treatment is so important. Underlying Causes The underlying causes of cardiogenic shock are conditions ...

  20. Glucose Alters Per2 Rhythmicity Independent of AMPK, Whereas AMPK Inhibitor Compound C Causes Profound Repression of Clock Genes and AgRP in mHypoE-37 Hypothalamic Neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanneke E Oosterman

    Full Text Available Specific neurons in the hypothalamus are regulated by peripheral hormones and nutrients to maintain proper metabolic control. It is unclear if nutrients can directly control clock gene expression. We have therefore utilized the immortalized, hypothalamic cell line mHypoE-37, which exhibits robust circadian rhythms of core clock genes. mHypoE-37 neurons were exposed to 0.5 or 5.5 mM glucose, comparable to physiological levels in the brain. Per2 and Bmal1 mRNAs were assessed every 3 hours over 36 hours. Incubation with 5.5 mM glucose significantly shortened the period and delayed the phase of Per2 mRNA levels, but had no effect on Bmal1. Glucose had no significant effect on phospho-GSK3β, whereas AMPK phosphorylation was altered. Thus, the AMPK inhibitor Compound C was utilized, and mRNA levels of Per2, Bmal1, Cryptochrome1 (Cry1, agouti-related peptide (AgRP, carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1C (Cpt1c, and O-linked N-acetylglucosamine transferase (Ogt were measured. Remarkably, Compound C dramatically reduced transcript levels of Per2, Bmal1, Cry1, and AgRP, but not Cpt1c or Ogt. Because AMPK was not inhibited at the same time or concentrations as the clock genes, we suggest that the effect of Compound C on gene expression occurs through an AMPK-independent mechanism. The consequences of inhibition of the rhythmic expression of clock genes, and in turn downstream metabolic mediators, such as AgRP, could have detrimental effects on overall metabolic processes. Importantly, the effects of the most commonly used AMPK inhibitor Compound C should be interpreted with caution, considering its role in AMPK-independent repression of specific genes, and especially clock gene rhythm dysregulation.

  1. FOXP3 Orchestrates H4K16 Acetylation and H3K4 Tri-Methylation for Activation of Multiple Genes through Recruiting MOF and Causing Displacement of PLU-1

    OpenAIRE

    Katoh, Hiroto; Qin, Zhaohui S.; Liu, Runhua; Wang, Lizhong; Li, Weiquan; Li, Xiangzhi; Wu, Lipeng; Du, Zhanwen; Lyons, Robert; Liu, Chang-Gong; Liu, Xiuping; Dou, Yali; Zheng, Pan; Liu, Yang

    2011-01-01

    Both H4K16 acetylation and H3K4 tri-methylation are required for gene activation. However, it is still largely unclear how these modifications are orchestrated by transcriptional factors. Here we analyzed the mechanism of the transcriptional activation by FOXP3, an X-linked suppressor of autoimmune diseases and cancers. FOXP3 binds near transcriptional start sites of its target genes. By recruiting MOF and displacing histone H3K4 demethylase PLU-1, FOXP3 increases both H4K16 acetylation and H...

  2. The recurrent chromosomal translocation t(12;18) (q14~15;q12~21) causes the fusion gene HMGA2-SETBP1 and HMGA2 expression in lipoma and osteochondrolipoma

    OpenAIRE

    PANAGOPOULOS, IOANNIS; Gorunova, Ludmila; Bjerkehagen, Bodil; LOBMAIER, INGVILD; Heim, Sverre

    2015-01-01

    Lipomas are the most common soft tissue tumors in adults. They often carry chromosome aberrations involving 12q13~15 leading to rearrangements of the HMGA2 gene in 12q14.3, with breakpoints occurring within or outside of the gene. Here, we present eleven lipomas and one osteochondrolipoma with a novel recurrent chromosome aberration, t(12;18) (q14~15;q12~21). Molecular studies on eight of the tumors showed that full-length HMGA2 transcript was expressed in three and a chimeric HMGA2 transcrip...

  3. What Causes Raynaud's?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Raynaud's? There are two main types of Raynaud’s— ... type of Raynaud's is often called Raynaud's phenomenon. Causes of Secondary Raynaud's Many things can cause secondary ...

  4. What Causes Thrombocytopenia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Thrombocytopenia? Many factors can cause thrombocytopenia (a low ... known for sure. Rare and Serious Conditions That Cause Blood Clots Some rare and serious conditions can ...

  5. What Causes Atherosclerosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Atherosclerosis? The exact cause of atherosclerosis isn't known. However, studies show ... blood clots can worsen angina (chest pain) or cause a heart attack or stroke . Researchers continue to ...

  6. What Causes Hemochromatosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Hemochromatosis? The two types of hemochromatosis are primary and secondary. Each type has a different cause. Primary Hemochromatosis Primary hemochromatosis is caused by a ...

  7. What Causes Aplastic Anemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Aplastic Anemia? Damage to the bone marrow's stem ... system attacks its own cells by mistake. Acquired Causes Many diseases, conditions, and factors can cause aplastic ...

  8. Causes of Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Help for Diabetes Care Diabetes Statistics Causes of Diabetes What is diabetes? Diabetes is a complex group of diseases with ... and type 2 diabetes. What causes type 1 diabetes? Type 1 diabetes is caused by a lack ...

  9. What Causes Respiratory Failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Respiratory Failure? Diseases and conditions that impair breathing can cause ... injure your lungs. Normal Lungs and Conditions Causing Respiratory Failure Figure A shows the location of the lungs, ...

  10. About Alzheimer's Disease: Causes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Project Act (NAPA) About ADEAR About Alzheimer's Disease: Causes Age-related changes in the brain Genetics Health, ... for the Causes of AD" NIA Information on Causes Alzheimer’s Disease in People with Down Syndrome Understanding ...

  11. Causes of Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infertility Causes of male infertility Causes of female infertility Infertility is clinically defined as the inability to conceive naturally after one year of frequent, unprotected intercourse. Approximately 7. ...

  12. Determination of resistance spectra of the Pi-ta and Pi-k genes to US races of Magnaporthe oryzae causing rice blast in a recombinant inbred line population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resistance (R) genes to ten common races of Magnaporthe oryzae were mapped using an F10 recombinant inbred line population of a cross of a tropical japonica cultivar Katy with a breeding line RU9101001. Katy was found to confer resistance to all common races IA-45, IB-1, IB-45, IB-49, IB-54, IC-17,...

  13. A gain-of-function mutation in the transcription factor Upc2p causes upregulation of ergosterol biosynthesis genes and increased fluconazole resistance in a clinical Candida albicans isolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunkel, Nico; Liu, Teresa T; Barker, Katherine S; Homayouni, Ramin; Morschhäuser, Joachim; Rogers, P David

    2008-07-01

    In the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans, the zinc cluster transcription factor Upc2p has been shown to regulate the expression of ERG11 and other genes involved in ergosterol biosynthesis upon exposure to azole antifungals. ERG11 encodes lanosterol demethylase, the target enzyme of this antifungal class. Overexpression of UPC2 reduces azole susceptibility, whereas its disruption results in hypersusceptibility to azoles and reduced accumulation of exogenous sterols. Overexpression of ERG11 leads to the increased production of lanosterol demethylase, which contributes to azole resistance in clinical isolates of C. albicans, but the mechanism for this has yet to be determined. Using genome-wide gene expression profiling, we found UPC2 and other genes involved in ergosterol biosynthesis to be coordinately upregulated with ERG11 in a fluconazole-resistant clinical isolate compared with a matched susceptible isolate from the same patient. Sequence analysis of the UPC2 alleles of these isolates revealed that the resistant isolate contained a single-nucleotide substitution in one UPC2 allele that resulted in a G648D exchange in the encoded protein. Introduction of the mutated allele into a drug-susceptible strain resulted in constitutive upregulation of ERG11 and increased resistance to fluconazole. By comparing the gene expression profiles of the fluconazole-resistant isolate and of strains carrying wild-type and mutated UPC2 alleles, we identified target genes that are controlled by Upc2p. Here we show for the first time that a gain-of-function mutation in UPC2 leads to the increased expression of ERG11 and imparts resistance to fluconazole in clinical isolates of C. albicans. PMID:18487346

  14. Human errors - human caused, environment caused

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The importance of human error in the safe operation of Nuclear Plants has been well recognised. The human error could be due to a large number of reasons. Eg. coming from factors like sensing, perceiving, predicting, familiarity, skills, rules, individual performance and environmental factors such as ergonomics, work organisation, procedure, time and duration of work, training, physical environment etc. Two incidents highlighting human caused and environmental caused errors are described. Also a distribution of causes of failure and affected systems of Safety Related Unusual Occurrences is presented on the basis of the reports received by the regulatory body. A system to analyse human errors with respect to human caused and environment caused is being developed. The input data for this analysis is obtained from Safety Related Unusual Occurrence reports received by the regulatory body. The regulatory requirement for submission of these reports include first information report (by telex, telephone etc) within 24 hours of the incident and detailed report within 20 days. The detailed report amongst other information also contains information with respect to the cause of the incident. These reports are discussed at various levels and an attempt is made to identify the root cause. (author). 3 figs, 1 tab

  15. Gene therapy: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudip Indu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy "the use of genes as medicine" involves the transfer of a therapeutic or working copy of a gene into specific cells of an individual in order to repair a faulty gene copy. The technique may be used to replace a faulty gene, or to introduce a new gene whose function is to cure or to favorably modify the clinical course of a condition. The objective of gene therapy is to introduce new genetic material into target cells while causing no damage to the surrounding healthy cells and tissues, hence the treatment related morbidity is decreased. The delivery system includes a vector that delivers a therapeutic gene into the patient′s target cell. Functional proteins are created from the therapeutic gene causing the cell to return to a normal stage. The vectors used in gene therapy can be viral and non-viral. Gene therapy, an emerging field of biomedicine, is still at infancy and much research remains to be done before this approach to the treatment of condition will realize its full potential.

  16. Multi-drug carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae infection carrying the OXA-48 gene and showing variations in outer membrane protein 36 causing an outbreak in a tertiary care hospital in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taher uz Zaman

    2014-11-01

    Conclusions: This is probably the first reported outbreak of multidrug/carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella infection involving the OXA-48 gene from Saudi Arabia. Although the presence of ESBLs such as OXA, CTX-M, TEM, and SHV are predictable reasons for resistance, variations in the Omp-36 gene might also have precipitated this phenomenon. Disruption of the Omp-36 sequence by large insertional elements, the insertion of two amino acids in a very crucial part of this protein, and the presence of a premature stop codon in one isolate might have rendered this protein incomplete and non-functional. The study also demonstrated that more than one type of clone was responsible for this reported apparent outbreak and that ST29, a clone not reported from this region before, was the major clone responsible.

  17. Automated direct sequencing of the iduronate-2 sulfatase gene reveals a vast spectrum of mutations causing Hunter syndrome (mucopolysaccharidosis type II) and a {open_quotes}hot spot{close_quotes} at R468

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitley, C.B; Jonsson, J.J.; Aronovich, E.L. [Univ. of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Hunter syndrome is an X-linked recessive, lethal disease resulting from deficiency of iduronate-2-sulfatase (IDS) catalytic activity. Because of low reproductive fitness, most affected individuals are expected to have new mutations. Most of such defects are anticipated to be single base pair (bp) changes; however, several previous studies utilizing Southern analysis of RT-PCR have identified numerous large gene deletions in patients having the {open_quotes}severe form{close_quotes} with neurologic disease. To investigate the spectrum of IDS mutations, we have developed a method of automated direct sequencing of RT-PCR products representing the entire IDS coding region. Of 19 patients studied by this approach, only 1 had an IDS coding region which did not contain a mutation; 1 had a single bp insertion; 1 had a 2 bp deletion; and 13 had single-base substitutions. Of the 13 having single base substitutions, 2 resulted in aberrant splicing. Only 1 patient had a complete gene deletion; in view of previous reports, there was a surprising lack of major gene deletions. Notably, a CpG dinucleotide at R468 was identified as a {open_quotes}hot spot{close_quotes} for mutation. Five unrelated individuals had substitutions at this site which thus accounted for 28% of all mutations in this series: R468W (3 patients) and R468Q (2 patients). MspI digestion provided a method of rapid diagnosis and determination of heterozygote status for such R468 mutations. Genotype-phenotype correlations in this R468 group are not yet possible because of confounding information, i.e., there are both {open_quotes}mild{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}severe{close_quotes} patients in this group and some have co-existing neurologic diseases. This approach of gene sequencing appears to be necessary, and sufficient, to characterize the vast spectrum of mutations in Hunter syndrome.

  18. Design and Evaluation of a Multiplex PCR Assay for the Simultaneous Identification of Genes for Nine Different Virulence Factors Associated with Escherichia coli that Cause Diarrhea and Edema Disease in Swine

    Science.gov (United States)

    A multiplex PCR assay was developed for detection and characterization of pathogenic E. coli that cause diarrhea and Edema Disease in swine. This PCR assay was designed as a single reaction for detecting five different adhesins (K88, K99, 987P, F41 and F18), three enterotoxins (LT, STaP, STb), and ...

  19. Genetic causes of human heart failure

    OpenAIRE

    Morita, Hiroyuki; Seidman, Jonathan; Seidman, Christine E.

    2005-01-01

    Factors that render patients with cardiovascular disease at high risk for heart failure remain incompletely defined. Recent insights into molecular genetic causes of myocardial diseases have highlighted the importance of single-gene defects in the pathogenesis of heart failure. Through analyses of the mechanisms by which a mutation selectively perturbs one component of cardiac physiology and triggers cell and molecular responses, studies of human gene mutations provide a window into the compl...

  20. Autoinflammatory diseases: a possible cause of thrombosis?

    OpenAIRE

    La Regina, Micaela; Orlandini, Francesco; Manna, Raffaele

    2015-01-01

    Autoinflammatory diseases are a group of disorders due to acquired or hereditary disfunction of innate immune system and characterized by systemic or localized manifestations. The prototype is Familial Mediterranean Fever, a monogenic hereditary disorder, whose causing gene (MeFV gene) was identified in 1997 and opened the way to a new fascinanting chapter of rheumatology. A growing body of monogenic and poligenic autoinflammatory disorders has been described since then. Arterial and venous t...

  1. Accumulation of a nod Gene Inducer, the Flavonoid Naringenin, in the Cytoplasmic Membrane of Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar viciae Is Caused by the pH-Dependent Hydrophobicity of Naringenin

    OpenAIRE

    Recourt, Kees; Brussel, Anton A.N. van; Driessen, Arnold J. M.; Lugtenberg, Ben J. J.

    1989-01-01

    Most Sym plasmid-localized nodulation genes of Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae are only expressed upon activation of the NodD protein by plant flavonoids, e.g., naringenin (S. A. J. Zaat, C. A. Wijffelman, H. P. Spaink, A. A. N. van Brussel, and B. J. J. Lugtenberg, J. Bacteriol, 169:198-204, 1987). As part of a study on the mechanism of NodD protein activation, the mechanism of uptake and the intracellular fate of [3H]naringenin were studied. Naringenin was accumulated by Rhizobium cells ...

  2. Leading Causes of Blindness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issue Past Issues Feature: Vision Leading Causes of Blindness Past Issues / Summer 2008 Table of Contents For ... have cataracts. They are the leading cause of blindness in the world. By age 80, more than ...

  3. What Causes Pulmonary Hypertension?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Pulmonary Hypertension? Pulmonary hypertension (PH) begins with inflammation and changes in the ... different types of PH. Group 1 pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) may have no known cause, or the ...

  4. What Causes Atelectasis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Atelectasis? Atelectasis can occur if the lungs can' ... expand and fill with air. Atelectasis has many causes. Conditions and Factors That Prevent Deep Breathing and ...

  5. Causes of Male Infertility

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cessation Links to Professional Societies and Organizations Home › Causes of Male Infertility Dr. Roger Lobo of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine covers causes of male infertility. "Understanding Infertility - The Basics" is ...

  6. What Causes Hypotension?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Hypotension? Conditions or factors that disrupt the body's ability to control blood pressure cause hypotension. The different types of hypotension have different ...

  7. What Causes Anemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Anemia? The three main causes of anemia are: Blood ... the blood and can lead to anemia. Aplastic Anemia Some infants are born without the ability to ...

  8. Causes of Male Infertility

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to Professional Societies and Organizations Home › Causes of Male Infertility Dr. Roger Lobo of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine covers causes of male infertility. "Understanding Infertility - The Basics" is a series ...

  9. Causes of Male Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Professional Societies and Organizations Home › Causes of Male Infertility Dr. Roger Lobo of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine covers causes of male infertility. "Understanding Infertility - The Basics" is a series ...

  10. What Causes Parkinson's?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... National HelpLine Educational Publications Online Seminars Parkinson's News Parkinson's HelpLine Learn More Educational Materials Do you want ... more. Order Free Materials Today Causes What Causes Parkinson's? To date, despite decades of intensive study, the ...

  11. What Causes Cardiomyopathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Cardiomyopathy? Cardiomyopathy can be acquired or inherited. “Acquired” means ... case when the disease occurs in children. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy usually is inherited. It’s caused by ...

  12. What Causes Lactose Intolerance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications What causes lactose intolerance? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: ... lactase in the body is the cause of lactose intolerance. The names for the three types of lactose ...

  13. What Causes Bronchitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Bronchitis? Acute Bronchitis Infections or lung irritants cause acute bronchitis. The ... fire, also may lead to acute bronchitis. Chronic Bronchitis Repeatedly breathing in fumes that irritate and damage ...

  14. Targeting the Root Cause of Cystic Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trescott, Laura; Holcomb, Joshua; Spellmon, Nicholas; Mcleod, Cathy; Aljehane, Leala; Sun, Fei; Li, Chunying; Yang, Zhe

    2015-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is a serious genetic condition caused by CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) mutation. CF patients have shortened lifespan due to airway obstruction, infection, and end-stage lung failure. However, recent development in CF therapy suggests a brighter future for CF patients. Targeting specific CFTR mutations aims to potentiate the channel gating activity of impaired CFTR and restore protein trafficking to the plasma membrane. Gene therapy introduces correct CFTR gene into the affected airway epithelium leading to the functional expression of CFTR in CF patients. This review will sum up the current status in CF-cause targeting therapy. PMID:25316272

  15. mecA 基因与金黄色葡萄球菌感染患者的耐药性研究%Research of mecA gene and drug resistance of Staphy lococcus aureus causing infections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王欢; 沙栋杰; 邱莲女; 费鲜明; 周永列

    2015-01-01

    目的:检测mecA基因在金黄色葡萄球菌(SAU)中的分布,探讨mecA基因与SAU耐药性的关系。方法用琼脂扩散法检测临床分离的112株SAU对常用抗菌药物的耐药性,采用 PCR方法检测SAU中的 mecA基因,并分析 mecA基因和SAU耐药性的关系。结果耐甲氧西林金黄色葡萄球菌(MRSA)59株占52.68%,甲氧西林敏感金黄色葡萄球菌(MSSA)53株占47.32%;MRSA对青霉素G耐药率为100.00%,对红霉素和四环素耐药率分别为69.49%和47.46%,对万古霉素和替考拉宁敏感;MSSA对青霉素G耐药率最高,为88.68%,其次为红霉素和克林霉素,耐药率分别为60.38%和28.30%,对苯唑西林、利福平、万古霉素和替考拉宁敏感;SAU 耐药株主要从痰液中分离,神经外科分布最多;mecA基因总阳性率为51.79%,其中M RSA 中阳性率为88.14%, MSSA中阳性率为11.32%,mecA 基因阳性的 MSSA 比 mecA 基因阴性有更高的耐药性。结论 MRSA 中mecA基因阳性率极高,在金黄色葡萄球菌的耐药中发挥重要作用。%OBJECTIVE To explore the distribution of mecA gene in Staphylococcus aureus and study the relation‐ship between the mecA gene and the drug resistance of S .aureus .METHODS The drug resistance rates of 112 clini‐cal isolates of S .aureus to commonly used antibiotics were determined by using agar diffusion method ,the mecA gene in the S .aureus strains was detected with the use of PCR ,and the relationship between the mecA gene and the drug resistance of the S .aureus strains was observed .RESULTS The methicillin‐resistant S .aureus (MRSA) accounted for 52 .68% (59 strains) ,and the methicillin‐susceptible S .aureus (MSSA) accounted for 47 .32% (53 strains) .The drug resistance rate of MRSA to penicillin G was 100 .00% ,the drug resistance rates to erythromy‐cin and tetracycline were 69 .49% and 47 .46% ,respectively ,and the MRSA strains

  16. What Causes Heart Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Heart Disease? Research suggests that coronary heart disease (CHD) begins with damage to the lining and ... causing coronary microvascular disease (MVD). Coronary MVD is heart disease that affects the heart's tiny arteries. The cause ...

  17. Do Allergies Cause Asthma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Help a Friend Who Cuts? Do Allergies Cause Asthma? KidsHealth > For Teens > Do Allergies Cause Asthma? Print A A A Text Size en español ¿Las alergias provocan asma? Do allergies cause asthma? The answer to that question is: yes and ...

  18. Modelling prokaryote gene content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Susko

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The patchy distribution of genes across the prokaryotes may be caused by multiple gene losses or lateral transfer. Probabilistic models of gene gain and loss are needed to distinguish between these possibilities. Existing models allow only single genes to be gained and lost, despite the empirical evidence for multi-gene events. We compare birth-death models (currently the only widely-used models, in which only one gene can be gained or lost at a time to blocks models (allowing gain and loss of multiple genes within a family. We analyze two pairs of genomes: two E. coli strains, and the distantly-related Archaeoglobus fulgidus (archaea and Bacillus subtilis (gram positive bacteria. Blocks models describe the data much better than birth-death models. Our models suggest that lateral transfers of multiple genes from the same family are rare (although transfers of single genes are probably common. For both pairs, the estimated median time that a gene will remain in the genome is not much greater than the time separating the common ancestors of the archaea and bacteria. Deep phylogenetic reconstruction from sequence data will therefore depend on choosing genes likely to remain in the genome for a long time. Phylogenies based on the blocks model are more biologically plausible than phylogenies based on the birth-death model.

  19. ClpP deletion causes attenuation of Salmonella Typhimurium virulence through mis-regulation of RpoS and indirect control of CsrA and the SPI genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Gitte Maegaard; Olsen, John E.; Aabo, Søren;

    2013-01-01

    the proteolytic component ClpP, the stationary phase regulator RpoS and the carbon-storage regulator CsrA. However, the mechanism behind the ClpP regulation is not fully understood. To elucidate this we examined differentially expressed genes in a ΔclpP mutant compared with WT using global...... double mutant, suggesting the repression of invasion was directed through RpoS. The expression of the csrA virulence regulator was increased in the ΔclpP mutant and decreased in the rpoS : : amp and ΔclpP/rpoS : : amp mutants, indicating that ClpP affects the csrA expression level as well. Thus, this...... study suggests that ClpP affects SPI1 expression and thereby virulence indirectly through its regulation of both RpoS and CsrA....

  20. 一个多巴反应性肌张力障碍家系的GCH1基因新突变研究%A novel mutation in GCH1 gene causes dopa-responsive dystonia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴维青; 韩春锡; 郝颖; 谢建生; 徐志勇; 耿茜

    2014-01-01

    目的 对1个多巴反应性肌张力障碍(dopa-responsive dystonia,DRD)家系成员的三磷酸鸟苷环化水解酶Ⅰ (guanosine triphosphate cyclohydrolase Ⅰ,GCH1)基因进行分析,以期找到致病基因突变.方法 应用PCR扩增DRD家系成员的GCH1基因6个外显子及侧翼序列,产物直接进行序列测定.检测到的突变以变性高效液相色谱分析方法进行检测,寻找合适的洗脱条件,并且在100个正常人进行筛查,以排除突变为多态位点的可能.结果 家系中所有患者均在GCH1基因第5外显子检测到一个碱基缺失突变c.597delT(p.Ala200LeufsX5),此突变国际上未见报道.突变将导致开放阅读框前移,自200位密码子开始出现移码突变,到第204位密码子即出现终止密码,使得正常为750个氨基酸残基的酶截短为203个氨基酸残基.100名正常人未见如患者类似的洗脱峰.结论 研究明确了导致该DRD家系的基因异常,并且发现了一种新的GCH1基因突变.%Objective To identify potential mutation of the GCH1 gene in a Chinese family affected with dopa-responsive dystonia.Methods Genomic DNA of patients was extracted from peripheral blood samples.The 6 exons of the GCH1 gene and at least 100 bp of flanking intronic sequences were amplified with PCR.Potential mutations were screened by direct sequencing.Identified mutation was verified with denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) in 100 healthy controls.Results All patients were found to be heterozygous for a novel c.597delT (p.Ala200LeufsX5) deletion in the exon 5 of the GCH1 gene.The deletion of T has resulted in formation of a shorter (203 amino acids) truncated non-functional guanosine triphosphate cyclohydrolase I.The same mutation was not found in the 100 controls.Conclusion A novel GCH1 gene frameshifing mutation probably underlies the dopa-responsive dystonia in this Chinese family.

  1. Causes and effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cone, Carol L; Feldman, Mark A; DaSilva, Alison T

    2003-07-01

    Most companies make charitable donations, but few approach their contributions with an eye toward enhancing their brands. Those that do take such an approach commit talent and know-how, not just dollars, to a pressing but carefully chosen social need and then tell the world about the cause and their service to it. Through the association, both the business and the cause benefit in ways they could not otherwise. Organizations such as Avon, ConAgra Foods, and Chevrolet have recognized that a sustained cause-branding program can improve their reputations, boost their employees' morale, strengthen relations with business partners, and drive sales. And the targeted causes receive far more money than they could have from direct corporate gifts alone. The authors examine these best practices and offer four principles for building successful cause-branding programs. First, they say, a company should select a cause that advances its corporate goals. That is, unless the competitive logic for supporting the cause is clear, a company shouldn't even consider putting its finite resources behind it. Second, a business should commit to a cause before picking its charitable partners. Otherwise, a cause-branding program may become too dependent on its partners. Third, a company should put all its assets to work, especially its employees. It should leverage the professional skills of its workers as well as its other assets such as distribution networks. And fourth, a company should promote its philanthropic initiatives through every possible channel. In addition to using the media, it should communicate its efforts through the Web, annual reports, direct mail, and so on. Cause branding is a way to turn the obligations of corporate citizenship into a valuable asset. When the cause is well chosen, the commitment genuine, and the program well executed, the cause helps the company, and the company helps the cause. PMID:12858714

  2. Particles causing lung disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Kilburn, K H

    1984-01-01

    The lung has a limited number of patterns of reaction to inhaled particles. The disease observed depends upon the location: conducting airways, terminal bronchioles and alveoli, and upon the nature of inflammation induced: acute, subacute or chronic. Many different agents cause narrowing of conducting airways (asthma) and some of these cause permanent distortion or obliteration of airways as well. Terminal bronchioles appear to be particularly susceptible to particles which cause goblet cell ...

  3. Overexpression of variant PNPLA3 gene at I148M position causes malignant transformation of hepatocytes via IL-6-JAK2/STAT3 pathway in low dose free fatty acid exposure: a laboratory investigation in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhengtao; Chen, Tianchi; Lu, Xiaoxiao; Xie, Haiyang; Zhou, Lin; Zheng, Shusen

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological survey identified that the variant patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing protein 3 (PNPLA3) gene at I148M position exerts direct effect in promoting hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) under extraneous oxidative stress by interaction with obesity. However, the mechanism is still unknown. HepG2 cells were overexpressed by transinfection of PNPLA3 with wild-type 148I (PNPLA3(WT)) and mutant 148M (PNPLA3(I148M)), respectively. Variation in metabolic indicators, hepatic steatosis, biological behaviors and signaling molecules related to cancer promotion was measured in hepatocytes using low-dose free fatty acid (FFA) exposure. Effect of PNPLA3(I148M) on xenograft biology and its interaction with dietary obesity were also evaluated in animal study. Cells overexpresssing PNPLA3(I148M) in low-dose FFA incubation showed more proliferation, migration, invasion, and less apoptosis (Pdiet accelerated growth of xenografts derived from PNPLA3(I148M) cells incubated in low-dose FFA. In low oxidative stress, PNPLA3(I148M) initiated the hepatocyte malignant transformation through the activation of inflammation-mediated JAK/STAT pathway. Dietary obesity amplified the growth of tumor from PNPLA3(I148M) cells by interaction with local FFA incubation. Anti-inflammation and weight loss might be potential approaches for preventing HCC in high-risk population carrying PNPLA3 variant. PMID:27186262

  4. TAT gene mutation analysis in three Palestinian kindreds with oculocutaneous tyrosinaemia type II; characterization of a silent exonic transversion that causes complete missplicing by exon 11 skipping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maydan, G; Andresen, Brage Storstein; Madsen, Pia Pinholt; Zeigler, M.; Raas-Rothschild, A.; Zlotogorski, A.; Gutman, A.; Korman, S.H.

    2006-01-01

    Deficiency of the hepatic cytosolic enzyme tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) causes marked hypertyrosinaemia leading to painful palmoplantar hyperkeratoses, pseudodendritic keratitis and variable mental retardation (oculocutaneous tyrosinaemia type II or Richner-Hanhart syndrome). Parents may...... therefore seek prenatal diagnosis, but this is not possible by biochemical assays as tyrosine does not accumulate in amniotic fluid and TAT is not expressed in chorionic villi or amniocytes. Molecular analysis is therefore the only possible approach for prenatal diagnosis and carrier detection. To this end....... Homozygosity for a c.1249C > T (R417X) exon 12 nonsense mutation (previously reported in a French patient) was identified in both patients from the third kindred, enabling successful prenatal diagnosis of an unaffected fetus using chorionic villous tissue....

  5. What Causes Bad Breath?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... I Help a Friend Who Cuts? What Causes Bad Breath? KidsHealth > For Teens > What Causes Bad Breath? Print A A A Text Size en español ¿Qué es lo que provoca el mal aliento? Bad breath, or halitosis , can be a major problem, especially ...

  6. Do Allergies Cause Asthma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Smoothie Pregnant? Your Baby's Growth Do Allergies Cause Asthma? KidsHealth > For Parents > Do Allergies Cause Asthma? Print A A A Text Size en español ¿Causan asma las alergias? My daughter has asthma and I'm worried that her younger brother ...

  7. Substitution of Aspartate for glycine 1018 in the Type III procollagen (COL3AI) gene causes type IV Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome: The mutated allele is present in most blood leukocytes of the asymptomatic and mosaic mother

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kontusaari, S.; Tromp, G.; Kuivaniemi, H.; Prockop, D.J. (Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)); Stolle, C. (Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States)); Pope, F.M.

    1992-09-01

    A proband with arterial ruptures and skin changes characteristic of the type IV variant of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome was found to have a single-base mutation in the type III procollagen gene, which converted the codon for glycine at amino position 1018 to a codon for aspartate. (Amino acid positions are numbered by the standard convention in which the first glycine of the triple-helical domain of an [alpha] chain is number 1. The numbers of positions in the [alpha]1(III) chains can be converted to positions in the human pro[alpha](III) chain by adding 167.). Nucleotide sequencing of overlapping PCR products in which the two alleles were distinguished demonstrated that the mutation of glycine 1018 was the only mutation that changed the primary structure of type III procollagen. The glycine substitution markedly decreased the amount of type III procollagen secreted into the medium by cultured skin fibroblasts from the proband. It is surprising that the same mutation was found in about 94% of the peripheral blood leukocytes from the proband's asymptomatic 72-year-old mother. Other tissues from the mother contained the mutated allele; it was present in 0%-100% of different samples of hair cells and in about 40% of cells from the oral epithelium. Therefore, the mother was a mosaic for the mutation. Since the mutated allele was present in cells derived from all three germ layers, the results indicated that the mutation arose by the late blastocyst stage of development. The results also indicate that assays of blood leukocytes do not always reveal mosaicism or predict phenotypic involvement of tissues, such as blood vessels, that are derived from the same embryonic cells as are leukocytes. 66 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Substantial decrease in cell wall α-1,3-glucan caused by disruption of the kexB gene encoding a subtilisin-like processing protease in Aspergillus oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizutani, Osamu; Shiina, Matsuko; Yoshimi, Akira; Sano, Motoaki; Watanabe, Takeshi; Yamagata, Youhei; Nakajima, Tasuku; Gomi, Katsuya; Abe, Keietsu

    2016-09-01

    Disruption of the kexB encoding a subtilisin-like processing protease in Aspergillus oryzae (ΔkexB) leads to substantial morphological defects when the cells are grown on Czapek-Dox agar plates. We previously found that the disruption of kexB causes a constitutive activation of the cell wall integrity pathway. To understand how the disruption of the kexB affects cell wall organization and components, we analyzed the cell wall of ΔkexB grown on the plates. The results revealed that both total N-acetylglucosamine content, which constitutes chitin, and chitin synthase activities were increased. Whereas total glucose content, which constitutes β-1,3-glucan and α-1,3-glucan, was decreased; this decrease was attributed to a remarkable decrease in α-1,3-glucan. Additionally, the β-1,3-glucan in the alkali-insoluble fraction of the ΔkexB showed a high degree of polymerization. These results suggested that the loss of α-1,3-glucan in the ΔkexB was compensated by increases in the chitin content and the average degree of β-1,3-glucan polymerization. PMID:26980104

  9. A rare cause of osteonecrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Agostinis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionHereditary hemochromatosis (HH is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the HFE gene, which increase intestinal iron absorption. The prevalence of C282Y homozygosity, which causes the disorder, is 0.5% in Caucasian populations. The clinical manifestations are related to excess iron in the tissues, especially the liver, heart, pancreas, pituitary, and skin. They include fatigue, loss of libido or impotence in males, liver disease, skin pigmentation, diabetes mellitus, cardiac enlargement—with or without heart failure, and conduction defects. The classic triad of cirrhosis, diabetes mellitus, and skin pigmentation (“bronze diabetes” results from a combination of iron deposits and melanin. It occurs late in the disease, when the total body iron content is more than five times the normal value, about 20 grams. Left untreated, approximately half of all patients with HH eventually develop arthralgia or arthropathy. Chondrocalcinosis, chronic pseudo-osteoarthritis, and osteoporosis are the major rheumatic manifestations of HH. The cause of the arthropathy is still unknown. Iron deposits within joints may trigger a number of pathologic events, such as free radical generation and crystal deposition, which stimulate immune complex formation and inflammation.Materials and methodsWe describe the case of a 48-year-old male suffering from chronic bilateral ankle pain.ResultsThe work-up revealed osteonecrosis of ankle. The patient also presented high plasma ferritin levels and homozygosity for the C282Y mutation. Other than HH, which was confirmed by liver biopsy, the patient had no other risk factors for osteonecrosis.DiscussionHH represents a rare cause of osteonecrosis, and there are no prior reports of aseptic osteonecrosis of the ankle in a patient with this disease. The pathogenetic mechanism remains unknown.

  10. Metastasis Suppressor Genes

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Jinchun; Yang, Qin; Huang, Qihong

    2013-01-01

    Metastasis is a major cause of cancer mortality. Metastasis is a complex process that requires the regulation of both metastasis-promoting and metastasis suppressor genes. The discovery of metastasis suppressor genes contributes significantly to our understanding of metastasis mechanisms and provides prognostic markers and therapeutic targets in clinical cancer management. In this review, we summarize the methods that have been used to identify metastasis suppressors and the potential clinica...

  11. 雄激素受体基因新突变致雄激素不敏感综合征%Study on a novel androgen receptor gene mutation causing androgen insensitivity syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张曼娜; 张惠杰; 杨军; 顾丽群; 刘建民; 王卫庆; 宁光; 李小英

    2009-01-01

    目的 分析2例雄激素不敏感综合征患者及其家系的临床及分子遗传学.方法 收集2例雄激素小敏感综合征患者的临床资料,从患者及其家系成员的外周血单个核细胞抽提基因组DNA,应用PCR扩增雄激素受体基因并直接测序,明确患者及其父母基因有无突变.结果 患者1表现为女性外生殖器、单侧乳房发育、原发性闭经、阴毛腋毛缺如.患者2表现为男性化不全,体毛稀少、双侧乳房发育、尿道下裂.基因检测证实患者1雄激素受体基因第2号外显子第579位密码子点突变(S579N),并证实为一新突变.患者2第5号外显子第747位密码子点突变(V747M).结论 该2例雄激素受体不敏感综合征系分别由雄激素受体基因S579N及V747M所致,其中S579N突变尚未见文献报道.%Objective To investigate the clinical and genetic characteristics in two patients with androgen insensitivity syndrome. Methods Clinical features and laboratory data were collected from the patients and their families. All exons of the androgen receptor gene were amplified by PCR and PCR products were sequenced. Results Patient 1 presented with unambiguous female external genitalia, unilateral gynecomastia and primary amenorrhea. He did not have axillary hairs or pubic hairs. Patient 2 presented with undervirilization including scanty body hairs, gynecomastia and hypospadias. A missense mutation of

  12. Genetic causes of spermatogenic failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Annelien Massart; Willy Lissens; Herman Tournaye; Katrien Stouffs

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 10%-15% of couples are infertile,and a male factor is involved in almost half of these cases.This observation is due in part to defects in spermatogenesis,and the underlying causes,including genetic abnormalities,remain largely unknown.Until recently,the only genetic tests used in the diagnosis of male infertility were aimed at detecting the presence of microdeletions of the long arm of the Y chromosome and/or chromosomal abnormalities.Various other single-gene or polygenic defects have been proposed to be involved in male fertility.However,their causative effects often remain unproven.The recent evolution in the development of whole-genome-based techniques and the large-scale analysis of mouse models might help in this process.Through knockout mouse models,at least 388 genes have been shown to be associated with spermatogenesis in mice.However,problems often arise when translating this information from mice to humans.

  13. How HIV Causes AIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share this: Main Content Area How HIV Causes AIDS HIV destroys CD4 positive (CD4+) T cells, which ... and disease, ultimately resulting in the development of AIDS. Most people who are infected with HIV can ...

  14. Causes of Congenital Malformations

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2002-01-01

    The genetic epidemiology of congenital malformations (CMs) and interaction with environmental causes are reviewed from the Arkansas Center for Birth Defects, Arkansas Children’s Hospital, Little Rock, AS.

  15. What Causes Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this section you can get information on cigarette, cigar, and smokeless tobacco use, and learn how it ... Basics What Causes Cancer? Breast Cancer Colon/Rectum Cancer Lung Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Show All Cancer ...

  16. Causes of Male Infertility

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Smoking Cessation Links to Professional Societies and Organizations Home › Causes of Male Infertility Dr. Roger Lobo of ... Find a Health Care Provider Back to Top Home | About Us | Reproductive Health Topics | News & Publications | Resources ...

  17. What Causes Rett Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications What causes Rett syndrome? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: ... as bad for development as too little. Is Rett syndrome passed from one generation to the next? In ...

  18. What Causes Thyroid Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... TOPICS Document Topics GO » SEE A LIST » Thyroid cancer risk factors What causes thyroid cancer? Can thyroid cancer be prevented? Previous Topic Thyroid cancer risk factors Next Topic Can thyroid cancer be prevented? What ...

  19. Causes of Male Infertility

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Smoking Cessation Links to Professional Societies and Organizations Home › Causes of Male Infertility Dr. Roger Lobo ... Site Terms & Conditions of Use | Web Design and Development by The Berndt Group

  20. Cause of Flu (Influenza)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Skip Content Marketing Share this: Main Content Area Flu (Influenza) Cause About the Flu Virus Influenza, or flu, is a respiratory infection ... the virus. Influenza A virus. Credit: CDC Where Influenza Comes From In nature, the flu virus is ...

  1. What Causes COPD?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes COPD? Long-term exposure to lung irritants that damage ... Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video What is COPD? 05/22/2014 Describes how COPD, or chronic ...

  2. Causes of Male Infertility

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Roger Lobo of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine covers causes of male infertility. "Understanding Infertility - The ... videos produced for the American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Looking for Additional Information? Visit our provider site ...

  3. Causes of Paralysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... progressive neurological disease. > Arteriovenous malformations Defects of the circulatory system that are believed to arise during fetal development. > ... skeletal muscles. > Neurofibromatosis Progressive disorder of the nervous ... Polio is caused by a virus that attacks the nerves which control motor function. > ...

  4. Frontotemporal Disorders: Causes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Referral Center Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center Home About Alzheimer’s Alzheimer's Basics Causes Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment Caregiving Other Dementias Publications FAQs ...

  5. What Causes Menstrual Irregularities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medications. 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 , 5 , 6 Common causes of anovulatory bleeding (absent, infrequent periods, and irregular periods) include 2 : Adolescence Uncontrolled diabetes Eating disorders Hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism Hyperprolactinemia (an abnormally high concentration ...

  6. Vulvovaginitis: causes and management.

    OpenAIRE

    Pierce, A M; Hart, C. A.

    1992-01-01

    Over a period of 33 months in a paediatric accident and emergency department, the clinical pattern and possible causes of vulvovaginitis were studied prospectively in 200 girls presenting with genital discharge, irritation, pain, or redness. The major causes were poor hygiene and threadworms. The suspicion of sexual abuse arose in a few girls but no organisms of sexually transmitted disease were found. Urinary symptoms were common but only 20 patients had a significant bacteriuria and 40 had ...

  7. Do Institutions Cause Growth?

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    We revisit the debate over whether political institutions cause economic growth, or whether, alternatively, growth and human capital accumulation lead to institutional improvement. We find that most indicators of institutional quality used to establish the proposition that institutions cause growth are constructed to be conceptually unsuitable for that purpose. We also find that some of the instrumental variable techniques used in the literature are flawed. Basic OLS results, as well as a var...

  8. An overview of gene therapy in head and neck cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Amit Bali; Deepika Bali; Ashutosh Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Gene therapy is a new treatment modality in which new gene is introduced or existing gene is manipulated to cause cancer cell death or slow the growth of the tumor. In this review, we have discussed the different treatment approaches for cancer gene therapy; gene addition therapy, immunotherapy, gene therapy using oncolytic viruses, antisense ribonucleic acid (RNA) and RNA interference-based gene therapy. Clinical trials to date in head and neck cancer have shown evidence of gene transduction...

  9. Loss of LRPPRC causes ATP synthase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourier, Arnaud; Ruzzenente, Benedetta; Brandt, Tobias; Kühlbrandt, Werner; Larsson, Nils-Göran

    2014-05-15

    Defects of the oxidative phosphorylation system, in particular of cytochrome-c oxidase (COX, respiratory chain complex IV), are common causes of Leigh syndrome (LS), which is a rare neurodegenerative disorder with severe progressive neurological symptoms that usually present during infancy or early childhood. The COX-deficient form of LS is commonly caused by mutations in genes encoding COX assembly factors, e.g. SURF1, SCO1, SCO2 or COX10. However, other mutations affecting genes that encode proteins not directly involved in COX assembly can also cause LS. The leucine-rich pentatricopeptide repeat containing protein (LRPPRC) regulates mRNA stability, polyadenylation and coordinates mitochondrial translation. In humans, mutations in Lrpprc cause the French Canadian type of LS. Despite the finding that LRPPRC deficiency affects the stability of most mitochondrial mRNAs, its pathophysiological effect has mainly been attributed to COX deficiency. Surprisingly, we show here that the impaired mitochondrial respiration and reduced ATP production observed in Lrpprc conditional knockout mouse hearts is caused by an ATP synthase deficiency. Furthermore, the appearance of inactive subassembled ATP synthase complexes causes hyperpolarization and increases mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production. Our findings shed important new light on the bioenergetic consequences of the loss of LRPPRC in cardiac mitochondria. PMID:24399447

  10. Novel genetic causes for cerebral visual impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, Daniëlle Gm; Boonstra, F Nienke; de Leeuw, Nicole; Pfundt, Rolph; Nillesen, Willy M; de Ligt, Joep; Gilissen, Christian; Jhangiani, Shalini; Lupski, James R; Cremers, Frans Pm; de Vries, Bert Ba

    2016-05-01

    Cerebral visual impairment (CVI) is a major cause of low vision in children due to impairment in projection and/or interpretation of the visual input in the brain. Although acquired causes for CVI are well known, genetic causes underlying CVI are largely unidentified. DNAs of 25 patients with CVI and intellectual disability, but without acquired (eg, perinatal) damage, were investigated by whole-exome sequencing. The data were analyzed for de novo, autosomal-recessive, and X-linked variants, and subsequently classified into known, candidate, or unlikely to be associated with CVI. This classification was based on the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man database, literature reports, variant characteristics, and functional relevance of the gene. After classification, variants in four genes known to be associated with CVI (AHDC1, NGLY1, NR2F1, PGAP1) in 5 patients (20%) were identified, establishing a conclusive genetic diagnosis for CVI. In addition, in 11 patients (44%) with CVI, variants in one or more candidate genes were identified (ACP6, AMOT, ARHGEF10L, ATP6V1A, DCAF6, DLG4, GABRB2, GRIN1, GRIN2B, KCNQ3, KCTD19, RERE, SLC1A1, SLC25A16, SLC35A2, SOX5, UFSP2, UHMK1, ZFP30). Our findings show that diverse genetic causes underlie CVI, some of which will provide insight into the biology underlying this disease process. PMID:26350515

  11. What Causes Specific Language Impairment in Children?

    OpenAIRE

    Bishop, Dorothy V. M.

    2006-01-01

    Specific language impairment (SLI) is diagnosed when a child's language development is deficient for no obvious reason. For many years, there was a tendency to assume that SLI was caused by factors such as poor parenting, subtle brain damage around the time of birth, or transient hearing loss. Subsequently it became clear that these factors were far less important than genes in determining risk for SLI. A quest to find “the gene for SLI” was undertaken, but it soon became apparent that no sin...

  12. Do We Know What Causes Acute Myeloid Leukemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Topic Can acute myeloid leukemia be prevented? Do we know what causes acute myeloid leukemia? Some people ... genes – the instructions for how our cells function. We tend to look like our parents because they ...

  13. Do We Know What Causes Breast Cancer in Men?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Can breast cancer in men be prevented? Do we know what causes breast cancer in men? Although ... genes , the instructions for how our cells function. We usually look like our parents because they are ...

  14. Do We Know What Causes Chronic Myeloid Leukemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Topic Can chronic myeloid leukemia be prevented? Do we know what causes chronic myeloid leukemia? Normal human ... genes, the instructions for how our cells function. We look like our parents because they are the ...

  15. Do We Know What Causes Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Topic Can gastrointestinal carcinoid tumors be prevented? Do we know what causes gastrointestinal carcinoid tumors? Researchers have ... our genes, which control how our cells function. We look like our parents because they are the ...

  16. Do We Know What Causes Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Topic Can chronic lymphocytic leukemia be prevented? Do we know what causes chronic lymphocytic leukemia? The exact ... genes -- the instructions for how our cells function. We look like our parents because they are the ...

  17. Meningococcal Disease: Causes and Transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Campaign Podcast: Meningitis Immunization for Adolescents Meningitis Sepsis Causes & Transmission Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Causes Meningococcal disease is caused by the bacterium Neisseria ...

  18. What Causes Cushing's Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the lungs, pancreas (pronounced PAN-kree-uhs ), thyroid, or thymus How Tumors Can Cause Cushing’s Syndrome Normally, the pituitary gland ... cancerous, are mostly found in the lungs, pancreas, thyroid, and thymus. ... are more vulnerable to tumors in one or more glands that influence cortisol ...

  19. [Myopathy caused by hypothyroidism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, C; Mouro, A M; Luís, M L; Fonseca, F; Quina, M

    1991-01-01

    The authors report a case of primary hypothyroidism where the main symptoms were caused by muscular lesions and disappeared after treatment with L-thyroxine. Based on this case study the authors then review both the clinical aspects and the diagnostical methods of hypothyroidism myopathy, noting its frequency, be it in terms of isolated laboratory changes or in terms of functional changes. PMID:1807095

  20. Darwin's Sacred Cause

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    of scholarly specialists and been appropriated by money makers. One could not help thinking about this as, in the autumn of 2008, the publisher began hyping Darwin's Sacred Cause as ‘one of the major contributions to the worldwide Darwin anniversary celebrations in 2009' Udgivelsesdato: February...