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Sample records for beryllium moderated reactors

  1. Reflector drums as control mechanism for craft thermionic reactors with constant emitter heating containing U-233 as fuel and beryllium as moderator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahin, S.; Selvi, S.

    1980-01-01

    The suitability of borated reflector drums has been investigated and shown as a control mechanism for space craft thermionic reactors with constant emitter heating using U-233 as fuel and beryllium to be moderator, mainly due to their extremce compactness and their very soft neutron sepctrum. The achievable change in ksub(eff) allows long-term control operation with success. The use of reflector drums keeps the cone diameter and the mass of the radiation shield on minimum. The distortion of the emitter heating field remains under acceptable tolerances, mainly due to the enhanced neutron production at the outer core region and the remaining reflector part between the boron layer and the core. All neutron physics calculations have been carried out using the multigroup Ssub(N) methods. Three data groups for r-theta-calculations in S 4 -P 1 approximation (16 space angles) have been evaluated from a 123-energy-groups data library using transport theoretical methods. (orig.) [de

  2. Moderator for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milgram, M.S.; Dunn, J.T.; Hart, R.S.

    1995-01-01

    This invention relates to a moderator for a nuclear reactor and more specifically, to a composite moderator. A moderator is designed to slow down, or thermalize, neutrons which are released during nuclear reactions in the reactor fuel. Pure or almost pure materials like light water, heavy water, beryllium or graphite are used singly as moderators at present. All these materials, are used widely. Graphite has a good mechanical strength at high temperatures encountered in the nuclear core and therefore is used as both the moderator and core structural material. It also exhibits a low neutron-capture cross section and high neutron scattering cross section. However, graphite is susceptible to attach by carbon dioxide and/or oxygen where applicable, and releases stress energy under certain circumstances, although under normal operating conditions these reactions can be controlled. (author). 1 tab

  3. Benchmarking the new JENDL-4.0 library on criticality experiments of a research reactor with oxide LEU (20 w/o) fuel, light water moderator and beryllium reflectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liem, Peng Hong; Sembiring, Tagor Malem

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Benchmark calculations of the new JENDL-4.0 library. ► Thermal research reactor with oxide LEU fuel, H 2 O moderator and Be reflector. ► JENDL-4.0 library shows better C/E values for criticality evaluations. - Abstract: Benchmark calculations of the new JENDL-4.0 library on the criticality experiments of a thermal research reactor with oxide low enriched uranium (LEU, 20 w/o) fuel, light water moderator and beryllium reflector (RSG GAS) have been conducted using a continuous energy Monte Carlo code, MVP-II. The JENDL-4.0 library shows better C/E values compared to the former library JENDL-3.3 and other world-widely used latest libraries (ENDF/B-VII.0 and JEFF-3.1).

  4. Ageing Management of Beryllium and Graphite Blocks in Research Reactor MARIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golab, A. [National Centre for Nuclear Research, Warsaw (Poland)

    2013-07-01

    In the paper the phenomenon of beryllium moderator poisoning by thermal neutron absorption and the method and results of this phenomenon control is presented. Also the phenomenon of graphite blocks damage due to fast neutrons accumulation and the methods and results of this process supervising is described. These methods refer especially to: visual inspection of their state and radiography of graphite blocks. Special attention is paid to permanent estimate of fast neutron fluency accumulated in blocks and methods of their shuffling in the reactor core. The shuffling makes possible to increase the lifetime of beryllium and graphite blocks and decrease the cost of reactor operation.

  5. The influence of the (n, 2n) and (n, {alpha}) reactions of beryllium on the neutron balance in a BeO or Be moderated reactor and its consequences on the long term reactivity changes; Influence des reactions (n, 2n) et (n, {alpha}) du beryllium sur le bilan neutronique d'un reacteur modere a l'oxyde de beryllium ou au beryllium. Consequences sur l'evolution a long terme de la reactivite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahai, K; Benoist, P; Horowitz, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1958-07-01

    The reaction probabilities in an infinite and homogeneous medium of BeO or Be have been calculated from neutron cross-section curves, for a neutron produced with an energy distribution similar to a fission spectrum; the calculation shows that, after several elastic collisions, the neutron has yet an appreciable probability to undergo a reaction, in spite of the energy degradation in the spectrum due to each collision. This degradation has been calculated, taking into account of anisotropy of the collisions. The gain of the reactivity in a reactor has been obtained after correcting these probabilities for the attenuation of the flux of fission neutrons due to the inelastic scattering in the uranium. Finally, the calculation shows that in a power reactor, this gain of reactivity is in practice destroyed in a few years by the accumulation of poisonous nuclei such as Li{sup 6} and He{sup 3} following (n, {alpha}) reaction. (author) [French] Les probabilites de reaction en milieu infini et homogene de glucine (BeO) ou de beryllium ont ete calculees a partir des courbes de section efficace pour un neutron naissant suivant un spectre de fission; le calcul montre qu'apres plusieurs diffusions elastiques le neutron a encore une probabilite appreciable de subir une reaction, malgre la degradation du spectre a chaque diffusion; cette degradation a ete calculee en tenant compte de l'anisotropie du choc. Le gain de reactivite dans un reacteur a ensuite ete obtenu en corrigeant les probabilites en milieu homogene de l'effet l'attenuation du flux des neutrons de fission par les chocs inelastiques dans les barres d'uranium. Enfin, le calcul montre que, dans un reacteur de puissance, ce gain de reactivite est pratiquement detruit en peu d'annees par l'accumulation de noyaux poisons Li{sup 6} et He{sup 3} consecutive a la reaction (n, {alpha}). (auteur)

  6. Microstructure Analysis on Beryllium Reflector Blocks of Research Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Suk Hoon; Jang, Jin Sung; Jeong, Yong Hwan; Han, Chang Hee; Jung, Yang Il; Kim, Tae Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Yong Seok; Oh, Kyu Hwan [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    A pure beryllium has a very low mass absorption coefficient: it has been used as the reflector element material in research reactors. The lifetime of beryllium reflector elements usually determined by the swelling: the swelling leads to dimensional change in the reflector frame, which results in bending or cracking of the parts. The mechanical interference in between parts should be avoided; the anisotropy of beryllium also needs to be considered. A beryllium has hexagonal close-pack (HCP) crystal structure, which is inherently anisotropic. It has virtually no ductility in one direction. There are two main aspects in the manufacturing of beryllium which will affect its isotropy, and those are the powder morphology and the consolidation process. Powder metallurgy permits the material to be produced in isotropic and fine-grained form, which overcomes the crystal structure problem by distributing loads in low ductility oriented grains to high ductility oriented grains. There are three representative consolidating methods to make beryllium reflector blocks. Traditionally, most powder-derived grades of beryllium have been consolidated by vacuum hot-pressing (VHP). A column of loose beryllium powder is compacted under vacuum by the pressure of the opposed upper and lower punches, bringing the billet to final density. The VHP process is directional in nature: it contributes to the anisotropy of the material properties. Another consolidating method for beryllium powder is hot isostatic pressing (HIPing), which will enhance its isotropy. During HIPing, The argon gas exerts pressure uniformly in all directions on the can containing the beryllium powder. The HIP process is effective to improve the isotropy of the resulting material as well as refinement of grain sizes. The last consolidating method is hot extrusion (HE). A roughly close packed beryllium is subjected to severe plastic defomation, the grains are refined and the tensile strength is enhanced. Since the material

  7. The Effect Of Beryllium Interaction With Fast Neutrons On the Reactivity Of ETRR-2 Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aziz, M.; El Messiry, A.M.

    2000-01-01

    The effect of beryllium interactions with fast neutrons is studied for Etrr 2 research reactors. Isotope build up inside beryllium blocks is calculated under different irradiation times. a new model for the Etrr 2 research reactor is designed using MCNP code to calculate the reactivity and flux change of the reactor due to beryllium poison

  8. Experimental studies of some of the physical features of beryllium-moderated intermediate reactors; Etude experimentale de quelques particularites physiques des reacteurs a neutrons intermediaires, ralentis au beryllium; Ehksperimental'ny e issledovaniya nekotorykh fizicheskikh osobennostej promezhutochnykh reaktorov s berillievym zamedlitelem; Estudios experimentales de algunas caracteristicas fisicas de los reactores intermedios moderados con berilio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lejpunskij, A I; Kuznetsov, V A; Artyukhov, G Ya; Mogil' ner, A I; Prokhorov, Yu A; Steklovski, V M; Chernov, L A [Akademiya Nauk, Moskva, Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (Russian Federation)

    1962-03-15

    This paper is devoted to a review of the results obtained from a number of experiments carried out on the PF-4 critical assembly (intermediate-physical assembly), which is designed for detailed studies of the physical characteristics of intermediate reactors. The cores and reflectors of the various critical assemblies were comprised of compact units of steel or aluminium tubes, in which discs of various materials were placed. By combining 90%-enriched uranium discs with moderating materials in various proportions, and also by introducing moderating layers of different thicknesses into the reflector, it was possible to alter the spectrum of the fission-inducing neutrons within a very broad range. This paper describes the PF-4 critical assembly and its various subassemblies. The relative efficiency of internal and external moderation is analysed for reactors with a very low ratio of moderator nuclei to uranium nuclei in the core. The experiments show that even when thick moderating reflectors are used, this low ratio (the ratio of beryllium nuclei to uranium-235 nuclei being {partial_derivative}Be/{partial_derivative}U{sup 235}{approx_equal}1) leads to an increase of the critical mass. A considerable part of the paper is devoted to an analysis of heterogeneous effects in intermediate reactors. It is shown that for reactors with {partial_derivative}Be/{partial_derivative}U{sup 235}=30-40 various thicknesses of highly enriched uranium, ranging from 0.023 g/cm{sup 2} to 32 g/cm{sup 2}, have an identical effect on the reactivity of the system. The causes underlying compensation of the neutron-flux screening effect by thick layers of uranium are analysed. The interesting fact that the efficiency of uranium increases in the neighbourhood of the absorbing rods, which was experimentally revealed in an assembly with {partial_derivative}Be/{partial_derivative}U{sup 235}{approx_equal}200, is discussed in the paper. This fact is explained by the sharp decline in the importance

  9. 75 FR 80734 - Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-23

    ... are used in nuclear weapons as nuclear reactor moderators or reflectors and as nuclear reactor fuel...), grinding, and machine tooling of parts. Inhalation of beryllium particles may cause chronic beryllium...

  10. Beryllium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Nora K.; Jaskula, Brian W.; Piatak, Nadine M.; Schulte, Ruth F.; Schulz, Klaus J.; DeYoung,, John H.; Seal, Robert R.; Bradley, Dwight C.

    2017-12-19

    Beryllium is a mineral commodity that is used in a variety of industries to make products that are essential for the smooth functioning of a modern society. Two minerals, bertrandite (which is supplied domestically) and beryl (which is currently supplied solely by imports), are necessary to ensure a stable supply of high-purity beryllium metal, alloys, and metal-matrix composites and beryllium oxide ceramics. Although bertrandite is the source mineral for more than 90 percent of the beryllium produced globally, industrial beryl is critical for the production of the very high purity beryllium metal needed for some strategic applications. The current sole domestic source of beryllium is bertrandite ore from the Spor Mountain deposit in Utah; beryl is imported mainly from Brazil, China, Madagascar, Mozambique, and Portugal. High-purity beryllium metal is classified as a strategic and critical material by the Strategic Materials Protection Board of the U.S. Department of Defense because it is used in products that are vital to national security. Beryllium is maintained in the U.S. stockpile of strategic materials in the form of hot-pressed beryllium metal powder.Because of its unique chemical properties, beryllium is indispensable for many important industrial products used in the aerospace, computer, defense, medical, nuclear, and telecommunications industries. For example, high-performance alloys of beryllium are used in many specialized, high-technology electronics applications, as they are energy efficient and can be used to fabricate miniaturized components. Beryllium-copper alloys are used as contacts and connectors, switches, relays, and shielding for everything from cell phones to thermostats, and beryllium-nickel alloys excel in producing wear-resistant and shape-retaining high-temperature springs. Beryllium metal composites, which combine the fabrication ability of aluminum with the thermal conductivity and highly elastic modulus of beryllium, are ideal for

  11. Beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    In this data sheet the occurrence, ore processing, chemical and physical properties and the uses of beryllium and its alloys is presented. The hazards involved in the use of beryllium and its compounds in the laboratory are discussed with particular reference to its toxicity, carcinogenicity, handling, storage, disposal, fire prevention and the principal health hazards. Further reading is suggested. (UK)

  12. Beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, N.B.

    1980-01-01

    A method for determination of beryllium in minerals and rocks is described. The method comprises microanalysis and trace analysis. Because of the toxidity of beryllium the method is designed for determination of a hitherto unknown small amount, 1-10 nanogram Be. With the optimal amount for determination, 3 ng Be, the relative error of the method is 10%. The description includes an inventory of chemicals and apparatus, also an example of application of the method on the mineral epididymite. In brief, the sample is melted with sodium carbonate and sodium tetra borate; when required the sample in advance is fumed with hydrogen fluoride and sulphuric acid to evaporate silica. The residuum is dissolved in water and hydrogen chloride, upon which the solution is made to volume. In the Ring oven interfering compounds are masked with EDTA. Beryllium is settled with chrome azurol and ammonia. Beryllium is identified and evaluated in comparison with previously produced standards. (author)

  13. Beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, N.B.

    1979-01-01

    A method for determination of beryllium in minerals and rocks is described. The method comprises microanalysis and trace analysis. Because of the toxidity of beryllium the method is designed for determination of a hitherto unknown small amount, 1-10 nanogram Be. With the optimal amount for determination, 3 ng Be, the relative error of the method is 10%. The description includes an inventory of chemicals and apparatus, also an example of application of the method on the mineral epididymite. In brief, the sample is melted with sodium carbonate and sodium tetra borate; when required the sample in advance is fumed with hydrogen fluoride and sulphuric acid to evaporate silica. The residuum is dissolved in water and hydrogen chloride, upon which the solution is made to volume. In the Ring oven interfering compounds are masked with EDTA. Beryllium is settled with chrome azurol and ammonia. Beryllium is identified and evaluated in comparison with previously produced standards. (author)

  14. Neutron induced displacement damage in beryllium in the blanket of a (d,t)-fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermanutz, D.

    1995-09-01

    Beryllium is a favoured candidate for a neutron multiplier in solid breeder blankets of fusion reactors. This is mainly due to its low (n, 2n)-reaction threshold and because of its good thermal and mechanical properties. Its behaviour under intense neutron irradiation, however, is a crucial issue for its use in future fusion reactors. Displacement damage in beryllium so far has been calculated both with data related and methodological deficiencies. First of all, there is a need to have accurate cross-section data in order to obtain reliable spectra of primary knock-on atoms (PKA's). Furthermore, there are principal restrictions of the NRT-model in general used to calculate secondary displacements initiated by PKA's. The underlying theory of damage-energy (part of kinetic energy of PKA transferred elastically to matrix atoms) according to Lindhard is strictly valid only for medium and heavy mass ions with moderate energies in targets of the same element. In this work improved damage cross-sections and displacement rates (dpa/s) in beryllium have been calculated based on cross-section data from ENDF/B-VI (with a significantly improved (n, 2n)-evaluation) and on an appropriate treatment of damage-energy that is suitable for fusion relevant damage of light mass materials. ''This work has been performed in the framework of the Nuclear Fusion Project of the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe and is supported by the European Communities within the European Fusion Technology Program''. (orig.)

  15. FLUID MODERATED REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigner, E.P.; Ohlinger, L.A.; Young, G.J.; Weinberg, A.M.

    1957-10-22

    A reactor which utilizes fissionable fuel elements in rod form immersed in a moderator or heavy water and a means of circulating the heavy water so that it may also function as a coolant to remove the heat generated by the fission of the fuel are described. In this design, the clad fuel elements are held in vertical tubes immersed in heavy water in a tank. The water is circulated in a closed system by entering near the tops of the tubes, passing downward through the tubes over the fuel elements and out into the tank, where it is drawn off at the bottom, passed through heat exchangers to give up its heat and then returned to the tops of the tubes for recirculation.

  16. The development of beryllium plasma spray technology for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, R.G.; Elliott, K.E.; Hollis, K.J.; Watson, R.D.

    1999-01-01

    Over the past five years, four international parties, which include the European Communities, Japan, the Russian Federation and the United States, have been collaborating on the design and development of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), the next generation magnetic fusion energy device. During the ITER Engineering Design Activity (EDA), beryllium plasma spray technology was investigated by Los Alamos National Laboratory as a method for fabricating and repairing and the beryllium first wall surface of the ITER tokamak. Significant progress has been made in developing beryllium plasma spraying technology for this application. Information will be presented on the research performed to improve the thermal properties of plasma sprayed beryllium coatings and a method that was developed for cleaning and preparing the surface of beryllium prior to depositing plasma sprayed beryllium coatings. Results of high heat flux testing of the beryllium coatings using electron beam simulated ITER conditions will also be presented

  17. Experience of beryllium blocks operation in the SM and MIR nuclear reactors useful for fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakin, V.P.; Melder, R.R.; Belozerov, S.V.

    2004-01-01

    The results are presented concerning the examinations of state of beryllium blocks after the completion of their operation in the SM and MIR reactors. Both cracks and more significant mechanical damages are revealed in the irradiated beryllium blocks. Under neutron irradiation of beryllium radiation degradation of its physical and mechanical properties occurs. It shows itself in embrittlement, decrease of brittle strength level as well in worsening of thermal conductivity that leads to increase of thermal stresses into beryllium block. Under irradiation it takes place damage of beryllium microstructure, in particular, formation of radiation defects occurs in the form of dislocation loops and great amount of helium atoms. Optimization of beryllium radioactive waste storage is related to their preliminary surface and volumetric decontamination. (author)

  18. SAFARI-1 research reactor beryllium reflector element replacement, management and relocation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kock, Marisa De; Vlok, Jwh; Steynberg, B J [South Africa Atomic Energy Corporation (Necsa) (South Africa)

    2012-03-15

    The beryllium (Be) reflector elements of the SAFARI-1 Research Reactor were replaced in October 2011 as part of the Ageing Management Programme of the reactor. After more than three million MWh of operation over a period of 47 years, core reloading became more difficult due to the geometric deformation of the beryllium reflector elements. During the replacement of the reflector elements, criticality and reactivity worth experiments were performed and found to compare favorably with calculated values. A Beryllium Management Programme was established at SAFARI-1 to identify and apply effective and appropriate actions and practices for managing the ageing of the new beryllium reflector elements. This will provide timely detection and mitigation of ageing mechanisms relevant to beryllium reflector elements, supporting the life extension of these elements. These actions and practices include monitoring of the tritium levels in the primary water, calculating and measuring the fluxes within the beryllium reflector positions, measuring the straightness of the elements to track geometric deformation and visually inspecting the reflector elements for crack formation. Acceptance criteria indicating the end of life of the elements were established. These criteria take into account the smallest gap that could exist between elements, sudden changes in the tritium levels and formation of cracks. All the data obtained through the Beryllium Management Programme are recorded in a database. Additional benefits gained through a Beryllium Management Programme are the availability of a complete irradiation history of the beryllium reflector elements at any point in time and the establishment of a knowledge base to assists in the understanding of the behavior of the beryllium reflector elements in an irradiation environment. Straightness baseline measurements of the new beryllium reflector elements were performed with a beryllium straightness measurement tool, designed at SAFARI-1. The

  19. SAFARI-1 research reactor beryllium reflector element replacement, management and relocation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kock, Marisa De; Vlok, Jwh; Steynberg, B.J.

    2012-01-01

    The beryllium (Be) reflector elements of the SAFARI-1 Research Reactor were replaced in October 2011 as part of the Ageing Management Programme of the reactor. After more than three million MWh of operation over a period of 47 years, core reloading became more difficult due to the geometric deformation of the beryllium reflector elements. During the replacement of the reflector elements, criticality and reactivity worth experiments were performed and found to compare favorably with calculated values. A Beryllium Management Programme was established at SAFARI-1 to identify and apply effective and appropriate actions and practices for managing the ageing of the new beryllium reflector elements. This will provide timely detection and mitigation of ageing mechanisms relevant to beryllium reflector elements, supporting the life extension of these elements. These actions and practices include monitoring of the tritium levels in the primary water, calculating and measuring the fluxes within the beryllium reflector positions, measuring the straightness of the elements to track geometric deformation and visually inspecting the reflector elements for crack formation. Acceptance criteria indicating the end of life of the elements were established. These criteria take into account the smallest gap that could exist between elements, sudden changes in the tritium levels and formation of cracks. All the data obtained through the Beryllium Management Programme are recorded in a database. Additional benefits gained through a Beryllium Management Programme are the availability of a complete irradiation history of the beryllium reflector elements at any point in time and the establishment of a knowledge base to assists in the understanding of the behavior of the beryllium reflector elements in an irradiation environment. Straightness baseline measurements of the new beryllium reflector elements were performed with a beryllium straightness measurement tool, designed at SAFARI-1. The

  20. On use of beryllium in fusion reactors: Resources, impurities and necessity of detritiation after irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolbasov, B.N., E-mail: b.kolbasov@yandex.ru; Khripunov, V.I., E-mail: Khripunov_VI@nrcki.ru; Biryukov, A.Yu.

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Potential needs in Be for fusion power engineering may exceed Be resources. • Be recycling after its operation in a fusion power plant (FPP) seems inevitable. • U impurity in Be seriously impairs environmental properties of fusion power plants. • Upon burial of irradiated Be the main problems are caused by U and {sup 3}H impurities. • Clearance of Be extracted from a FPP is impossible due to U impurity. - Abstract: Worldwide identified resources of beryllium somewhat exceed 80 000 t. Beryllium production in all the countries of the world in 2012 was about 230 t. At the same time, some conceptual designs of fusion power reactors envisage utilization of several hundred tons of this metal. Therefore return of beryllium into the production cycle (recycling) will be necessary. The beryllium ore from some main deposits has uranium content inadmissible for fusion reactors. This fact raises a question on the need to develop and apply an economically acceptable technology for beryllium purification from the uranium. Practically any technological procedure with beryllium used in fusion reactors requires its detritiation. A study of tritium and helium release from irradiated beryllium at different temperatures and rates of temperature increase was performed at Kurchatov Institute.

  1. Beryllium reflectors for research reactors. Review and preliminary finite element analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bejarano, Pablo S; Cocco, Roxana G., E-mail: rcocco@invap.com.ar [INVAP S.E., Rio Negro (Argentina)

    2012-03-15

    Beryllium is used in numerous research reactors to moderate neutron energy and to reflect neutrons back into the core, thus intensifying the thermal neutron flux. However, beryllium is degraded by radiation damage, as a result of both displacement and transmutation. Displacement damage leads to point defect clustering, irradiation hardening and embrittlement. Transmutation produces helium, which results in high levels of gas and swelling, even at low temperatures. A brief state-of-the-art review on the use of reflector assemblies reveals that each user has adopted a different method for overcoming problems related to swelling: strengthening, cracking and distortion. In the present work a preliminary study about the geometry influence on the reflector assembly behavior was performed by a Finite Element Analysis (FEA). A simplified study was made varying its geometry in height, thickness and width. The results showed that the most influencing parameter in avoiding distortion due to swelling is firstly the reflector's assembly height, H; secondly its thickness, L, and lastly its angle/width, {theta}. These results contribute to the understanding of distortion behavior and the stresses generated in a simple geometry Be bar subjected to radiation, which can be a useful tool for mechanical design of more complex components. (author)

  2. Beryllium and lithium resource requirements for solid blanket designs for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, J.R.

    1975-01-01

    The lithium and beryllium requirements are analyzed for an economy of 10 6 MW(e) CTR 3 capacity using solid blanket fusion reactors. The total lithium inventory in fusion reactors is only approximately 0.2 percent of projected U. S. resources. The lithium inventory in the fusion reactors is almost entirely 6 Li, which must be extracted from natural lithium. Approximately 5 percent of natural lithium can be extracted as 6 Li. Thus the total feed of natural lithium required is approximately 20 times that actually used in fusion reactors, or approximately 4 percent of U. S. resources. Almost all of this feed is returned to the U. S. resource base after 6 Li is extracted, however. The beryllium requirements are on the order of 10 percent of projected U. S. resources. Further, the present cost of lithium and the cost of beryllium extraction could both be increased tenfold with only minor effects on CTR capital cost. Such an increase should substantially multiply the economically recoverable resources of lithium and beryllium. It is concluded that there are no lithium or beryllium resource limitations preventing large-scale implementation of solid blanket fusion reactors. (U.S.)

  3. Reactivity effect of poisoned beryllium block shuffling in the MARIA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrzejewski, K.; Kulikowska, T.

    2000-01-01

    The paper is a continuation of the analysis of beryllium blocks poisoning by Li-6 and He-3 in the MARIA reactor, presented at the 22 RERTR Meeting in Budapest. A new computational tool, the REBUS-3 code, has been used for predicting the amount of poison. The code has been put into operation on a HP computer and the beryllium transmutation chains have been activated with assistance of the ANL RERTR staff. The horizontal and vertical poison distribution within beryllium blocks has been studied. A simple shuffling of beryllium blocks has been simulated to check the effect of exchanging a block with high poison concentration, adjacent to fuel elements, with a peripheral one with a low poison concentration

  4. Chronology of the beryllium replacement shutdown at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohring, M.W.

    1984-04-01

    In addition to the permanent beryllium reflector, several other components were replaced. The outer shroud and lower tracks were replaced. The new control rod access plugs and the upper tracks were installed. Replacement of collimator tubes for HB-1 and -2 are tentatively slated for the next permanent beryllium changeout. Inspection of the reactor vessel, the vessel-to-nozzle welds, core support structure, and vessel internal cladding showed them to be in acceptable condition. The highest, accumulative radiation doses received by Reactor Operations personnel during the shutdown, in mrem, were 665, 606, and 560; the highest for P and E personnel were 520, 505, and 475

  5. LIGHT WATER MODERATED NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christy, R.F.; Weinberg, A.M.

    1957-09-17

    A uranium fuel reactor designed to utilize light water as a moderator is described. The reactor core is in a tank at the bottom of a substantially cylindrical cross-section pit, the core being supported by an apertured grid member and comprised of hexagonal tubes each containing a pluralily of fuel rods held in a geometrical arrangement between end caps of the tubes. The end caps are apertured to permit passage of the coolant water through the tubes and the fuel elements are aluminum clad to prevent corrosion. The tubes are hexagonally arranged in the center of the tank providing an amulus between the core and tank wall which is filled with water to serve as a reflector. In use, the entire pit and tank are filled with water in which is circulated during operation by coming in at the bottom of the tank, passing upwardly through the grid member and fuel tubes and carried off near the top of the pit, thereby picking up the heat generated by the fuel elements during the fission thereof. With this particular design the light water coolant can also be used as the moderator when the uranium is enriched by fissionable isotope to an abundance of U/sup 235/ between 0.78% and 2%.

  6. The influence of the (n, 2n) and (n, α) reactions of beryllium on the neutron balance in a BeO or Be moderated reactor and its consequences on the long term reactivity changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahai, K.; Benoist, P.; Horowitz, J.

    1958-01-01

    The reaction probabilities in an infinite and homogeneous medium of BeO or Be have been calculated from neutron cross-section curves, for a neutron produced with an energy distribution similar to a fission spectrum; the calculation shows that, after several elastic collisions, the neutron has yet an appreciable probability to undergo a reaction, in spite of the energy degradation in the spectrum due to each collision. This degradation has been calculated, taking into account of anisotropy of the collisions. The gain of the reactivity in a reactor has been obtained after correcting these probabilities for the attenuation of the flux of fission neutrons due to the inelastic scattering in the uranium. Finally, the calculation shows that in a power reactor, this gain of reactivity is in practice destroyed in a few years by the accumulation of poisonous nuclei such as Li 6 and He 3 following (n, α) reaction. (author) [fr

  7. MODERATOR ELEMENTS FOR UNIFORM POWER NUCLEAR REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balent, R.

    1963-03-12

    This patent describes a method of obtaining a flatter flux and more uniform power generation across the core of a nuclear reactor. The method comprises using moderator elements having differing moderating strength. The elements have an increasing amount of the better moderating material as a function of radial and/or axial distance from the reactor core center. (AEC)

  8. Overview moderator material for nuclear reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mairing Manutu Pongtuluran; Hendra Prihatnadi

    2009-01-01

    In order for a reactor design is considered acceptable absolute technical requirement is fulfilled because the most important part of a reactor design. Safety considerations emphasis on the handling of radioactive substances emitted during the operation of a reactor and radioactive waste handling. Moderator material is a layer that interacts directly with neutrons split the nuclear fuel that will lead to changes in physical properties, nuclear properties, mechanical properties and chemical properties. Reviews moderator of this time is of the types of moderator is often used to meet the requirements as nuclear material. (author)

  9. Moderator circulation in CANDU reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fath, H.E.S.; Hussein, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    A two-dimensional computer code that is capable of predicting the moderator flow and temperature distribution inside CANDU calandria is presented. The code uses a new approach to simulate the calandria tube matrix by blocking the cells containing the tubes in the finite difference mesh. A jet momentum-dominant flow pattern is predicted in the nonisothermal case, and the effect of the buoyancy force, resulting from nuclear heating, is found to enhance the speed of circulation. Hot spots are located in low-velocity areas at the top of the calandria and below the inlet jet level between the fuel channels. A parametric study is carried out to investigate the effect of moderator inlet velocity,moderator inlet nozzle location, and geometric scaling. The results indicate that decreasing the moderator inlet velocity has no significant influence on the general features of the flow pattern (i.e., momentum dominant); however, too many high-temperature hot spots appear within the fuel channels

  10. Method of operating heavy water moderated reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuda, Hiroyuki.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To enable stabilized reactor control, and improve the working rate and the safety of the reactor by removing liquid poison in heavy water while maintaining the power level constant to thereby render the void coefficient of the coolants negative in the low power operation. Method: The operation device for a heavy water moderated reactor comprises a power detector for the reactor, a void coefficient calculator for coolants, control rods inserted into the reactor, a poison regulator for dissolving poisons into or removing them out of heavy water and a device for removing the poisons by the poison regulator device while maintaining the predetermined power level or inserting the control rods by the signals from the power detector and the void coefficient calculator in the high temperature stand-by conditions of the reactor. Then, the heavy water moderated reactor is operated so that liquid poisons in the heavy water are eliminated in the high temperature stand-by condition prior to the start for the power up while maintaining the power level constant and the plurality of control rods are inserted into the reactor core and the void coefficient of the coolants is rendered negative in the low power operation. (Seki, T.)

  11. Analysis of influence of fast neutron fluence irradiated to Beryllium element of The RSG-GAS reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sri Kuntjoro

    2010-01-01

    Analysis of influence fast neutron fluence irradiated to the RSG-GAS beryllium reflector have been done. Methods of analysis was carried out by measuring fluxes neutron in beryllium element and block position that function as reflector.The calculation done for determination it is there any influence of neutron as long as beryllium in the core. Besides that, visualization done to make sure it there is any deformation at beryllium as effect of irradiation. Fluxes and fluences of beryllium element measurement result in 200 kW reactor power are 2.30E+07 n/cm 2 .sec and 4.19E+17 n/cm 2 in position E-2, 3.70E+07 n/cm 2 s and 6.74E+17 n/cm 2 in position J-8, 2.19E+12 n/cm 2 s and 3.99E+22 n/cm 2 in position. Measurement results in the position B-3 are 2.12E+12 n/cm 2 s and 3.86E+22 n/cm 2 in position G-10 respectively. Other result are fluxes and fluence in beryllium block, those are 5,02E+07 n/cm 2 s and 9,15E+17 n/cm 2 in position (5-6), and 2,32E+07 n/cm 2 s and 4,23E+17 n/cm 2 in position (C-D). Deformation (L/L) results for beryllium element are 1,12E-08 in position E-2, 1,84E-08 in position J-8, 1,60E-03 in position B-3, and 1,55E-03 in position G-10. In beryllium block deformation results are 2,52E-08 in position (5-6) and 1,13E-08 in position (C-D). Those results are shown unseen deformation in beryllium element and beryllium block and demonstrably by visual observation in reactor hot cell. (author)

  12. Moderator heat recovery of CANDU reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fath, H.E.S.; Ahmed, S.T.

    1986-01-01

    A moderator heat recovery scheme is proposed for CANDU reactors. The proposed circuit utilizes all the moderator heat to the first stages of the plant feedwater heating system. CANDU-600 reactors are considered with moderator heat load varying from 120 to 160 MWsub(th), and moderator outlet temperature (from calandria) varying from 80 to 100 0 C. The steam saved from the turbine extraction system was found to produce an additional electric power ranging from 5 to 11 MW. This additional power represents a 0.7-1.7% increase in the plant electric output power and a 0.2-0.7% increase in the plant thermal efficiency. The outstanding features and advantages of the proposed scheme are presented. (author)

  13. Beryllium data base for in-pile mockup test on blanket of fusion reactor, (1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamura, Hiroshi; Ishitsuka, Etsuo (Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment); Sakamoto, Naoki; Kato, Masakazu; Takatsu, Hideyuki.

    1992-11-01

    Beryllium has been used in the fusion blanket designs with ceramic breeder as a neutron multiplier to increase the net tritium breeding ratio (TBR). The properties of beryllium, that is physical properties, chemical properties, thermal properties, mechanical properties, nuclear properties, radiation effects, etc. are necessary for the fusion blanket design. However, the properties of beryllium have not been arranged for the fusion blanket design. Therefore, it is indispensable to check and examine the material data of beryllium reported previously. This paper is the first one of the series of papers on beryllium data base, which summarizes the reported material data of beryllium. (author).

  14. Heavy water moderated gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailly du Bois, B.; Bernard, J.L.; Naudet, R.; Roche, R.

    1964-01-01

    France has based its main effort for the production of nuclear energy on natural Uranium Graphite-moderated gas-cooled reactors, and has a long term programme for fast reactors, but this country is also engaged in the development of heavy water moderated gas-cooled reactors which appear to present the best middle term prospects. The economy of these reactors, as in the case of Graphite, arises from the use of natural or very slightly enriched Uranium; heavy water can take the best advantages of this fuel cycle and moreover offers considerable development potential because of better reactor performances. A prototype plant EL 4 (70 MW) is under construction and is described in detail in another paper. The present one deals with the programme devoted to the development of this reactor type in France. Reasons for selecting this reactor type are given in the first part: advantages and difficulties are underlined. After reviewing the main technological problems and the Research and Development carried out, results already obtained and points still to be confirmed are reported. The construction of EL 4 is an important step of this programme: it will be a significant demonstration of reactor performances and will afford many experimentation opportunities. Now the design of large power reactors is to be considered. Extension and improvements of the mechanical structures used for EL 4 are under study, as well as alternative concepts. The paper gives some data for a large reactor in the present state of technology, as a result from optimization studies. Technical improvements, especially in the field of materials could lead to even more interesting performances. Some prospects are mentioned for the long run. Investment costs and fuel cycles are discussed in the last part. (authors) [fr

  15. Heavy water moderated tubular type nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oohashi, Masahisa.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To enable to effectively change the volume of heavy water per unit fuel lattice in heavy water moderated pressure tube type nuclear reactors. Constitution: In a nuclear reactor in which fuels are charged within pressure tubes and coolants are caused to flow between the pressure tubes and the fuels, heavy water tubes for recycling heavy water are disposed to a gas region formed to the outside of the pressure tubes. Then, the pressure tube diameter at the central portion of the reactor core is made smaller than that at the periphery of the reactor core. Further, injection means for gas such as helium is disposed to the upper portion for each of the heavy water tubes so that the level of the heavy water can easily be adjusted by the control for the gas pressure. Furthermore, heavy water reflection tubes are disposed around the reactor core. In this constitution, since the pitch for the pressure tubes can be increased, the construction and the maintenance for the nuclear reactor can be facilitated. Also, since the liquid surface of the heavy water in the heavy water tubes can be varied, nuclear properties is improved and the conversion ratio is improved. (Ikeda, J.)

  16. Investigation of reactivity variations of the Isfahan MNSR reactor due to variations in the thickness of the core top beryllium layer using WIMSD and MCNP codes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Shirani

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the Isfahan Miniature Neutron Source Reactor (MNSR is first simulated using the WIMSD code, and its fuel burn-up after 7 years of operation ( when the reactor was revived by adding a 1.5 mm thick beryllium shim plate to the top of its core and also after 14 years of operation (total operation time of the reactor is calculated. The reactor is then simulated using the MCNP code, and its reactivity variation due to adding a 1.5 mm thick beryllium shim plate to the top of the reactor core, after 7 years of operation, is calculated. The results show good agreement with the available data collected at the revival time. Exess reactivity of the reactor at present time (after 14 years of operation and after 7 years of the the reactor revival time is also determined both experimentally and by calculation, which show good agreement, and indicate that at the present time there is no need to add any further beryllium shim plate to the top of the reactor core. Furthermore, by adding more beryllium layers with various thicknesses to the top of the reactor core, in the input program of the MCNP program, reactivity value of these layers is calculated. From these results, one can predict the necessary beryllium thickness needed to reach a desired reactivity in the MNSR reactor.

  17. High conversion heavy water moderated reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyawaki, Yoshio; Wakabayashi, Toshio.

    1989-01-01

    In the present invention, fuel rods using uranium-plutonium oxide mixture fuels are arranged in a square lattice at the same pitch as that in light water cooled reactor and heavy water moderators are used. Accordingly, the volume ratio (Vm/Vf) between the moderator and the fuel can be, for example, of about 2. When heavy water is used for the moderator (coolant), since the moderating effect of heavy water is lower than that of light water, a high conversion ratio of not less than 0.8 can be obtained even if the fuel rod arrangement is equal to that of PWR (Vm/Vf about 2). Accordingly, it is possible to avoid problems caused by dense arrangement of fuel rods as in high conversion rate light water cooled reactors. That is, there are no more troubles in view of thermal hydrodynamic characteristics, re-flooding upon loss of coolant accident, etc., as well as the fuel production cost is not increased. (K.M.)

  18. Beryllium technology workshop, Clearwater Beach, Florida, November 20, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longhurst, G.R.

    1991-12-01

    This report discusses the following topics: beryllium in the ITER blanket; mechanical testing of irradiated beryllium; tritium release measurements on irradiated beryllium; beryllium needs for plasma-facing components; thermal conductivity of plasma sprayed beryllium; beryllium research at the INEL; Japanese beryllium research activities for in-pile mockup tests on ITER; a study of beryllium bonding of copper alloy; new production technologies; thermophysical properties of a new ingot metallurgy beryllium product line; implications of beryllium:steam interactions in fusion reactors; and a test program for irradiation embrittlement of beryllium at JET

  19. Beryllium technology workshop, Clearwater Beach, Florida, November 20, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longhurst, G.R.

    1991-12-01

    This report discusses the following topics: beryllium in the ITER blanket; mechanical testing of irradiated beryllium; tritium release measurements on irradiated beryllium; beryllium needs for plasma-facing components; thermal conductivity of plasma sprayed beryllium; beryllium research at the INEL; Japanese beryllium research activities for in-pile mockup tests on ITER; a study of beryllium bonding of copper alloy; new production technologies; thermophysical properties of a new ingot metallurgy beryllium product line; implications of beryllium:steam interactions in fusion reactors; and a test program for irradiation embrittlement of beryllium at JET.

  20. Heavy water moderated reactors advances and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meneley, D.A.; Olmstead, R.A.; Yu, A.M.; Dastur, A.R.; Yu, S.K.W.

    1994-01-01

    Nuclear energy is now considered a key contributor to world electricity production, with total installed capacity nearly equal to that of hydraulic power. Nevertheless, many important challenges lie ahead. Paramount among these is gaining public acceptance: this paper makes the basic assumption that public acceptance will improve if, and only if, nuclear power plants are operated safely and economically over an extended period of time. The first task, therefore, is to ensure that these prerequisites to public acceptance are met. Other issues relate to the many aspects of economics associated with nuclear power, include capital cost, operation cost, plant performance and the risk to the owner's investment. Financing is a further challenge to the expansion of nuclear power. While the ability to finance a project is strongly dependent on meeting public acceptance and economic challenges, substantial localisation of design and manufacture is often essential to acceptance by the purchaser. The neutron efficient heavy water moderated CANDU with its unique tube reactor is considered to be particularly well qualified to respond to these market challenges. Enhanced safety can be achieved through simplification of safety systems, design of the moderator and shield water systems to mitigate severe accident events, and the increased use of passive systems. Economics are improved through reduction in both capital and operating costs, achieved through the application of state-of-the-art technologies and economy of scale. Modular features of the design enhance the potential for local manufacture. Advanced fuel cycles offer reduction in both capital costs and fuelling costs. These cycles, including slightly enriched uranium and low grade fuels from reprocessing plants can serve to increase reactor output, reduce fuelling cost and reduce waste production, while extending resource utilisation. 1 ref., 1 tab

  1. Investigation of high purity beryllium for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), Task 002. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vagin, S.P.

    1995-05-01

    The report includes a description of experimental abilities of Solid Structure Research Laboratory of IAE NNC RK, a results of microstructural characterization of A-4 grade polycrystal Beryllium produced at the Ulba metal plant and a technical project-for irradiation experiments. Technical project contains a detailed description of five proposed experiments, clearing behavior of Beryllium materials under the influence of irradiation, temperature, helium and hydrogen accumulation. Complex irradiation jobs, microstructural investigations and mechanical tests are planned in the framework of these experiments

  2. Greek research reactor performance characteristics after addition of beryllium reflector and LEU fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deen, J.R.; Snelgrove, J.L.; Papastergiou, C.

    1992-01-01

    The GRR-1 is a 5-MW pool-type, light-water-moderated and-cooled reactor fueled with MTR-type fuel elements. Recently received Be reflector blocks will soon be added to the core to add additional reactivity until fresh LEU fuel arrives. REBUS-3 xy fuel cycle analyses, using burnup dependent cross sections, were performed to assist in fuel management decisions for the water- and Be-reflected HEU nonequilibrium cores. Cross sections generated by EPRI-CELL have been benchmarked to identical VIM Monte Carlo models. The size of the Be-reflected LEU core has been reduced to 30 elements compared to 35 for the HEU water-reflected core, and an equilibrium cycle calculation has been performed

  3. Inhalation hazards from machining beryllium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoover, M.D.; Finch, G.L.; Mewhinney, J.A.; Eidson, A.F.

    1987-01-01

    Beryllium metal has special nuclear and structural properties that make it useful for applications in fission and fusion reactor designs. Unfortunately, concerns for its toxicity have made designers wary of using beryllium metal. The work being reported here was undertaken to characterize the aerosols produced by two very common operations performed during preparation or modification of components for use in reactor systems: sawing and milling of beryllium metal. The study also covered beryllium metal alloys to allow comparison. Information from this study is to enable better assessments of the risk of using beryllium metal in reactor designs

  4. ZPPR-20 phase D : a cylindrical assembly of polyethylene moderated U metal reflected by beryllium oxide and polyethylene.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lell, R.; Grimm, K.; McKnight, R.; Shaefer, R.; Nuclear Engineering Division; INL

    2006-09-30

    The Zero Power Physics Reactor (ZPPR) fast critical facility was built at the Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) site in Idaho in 1969 to obtain neutron physics information necessary for the design of fast breeder reactors. The ZPPR-20D Benchmark Assembly was part of a series of cores built in Assembly 20 (References 1 through 3) of the ZPPR facility to provide data for developing a nuclear power source for space applications (SP-100). The assemblies were beryllium oxide reflected and had core fuel compositions containing enriched uranium fuel, niobium and rhenium. ZPPR-20 Phase C (HEU-MET-FAST-075) was built as the reference flight configuration. Two other configurations, Phases D and E, simulated accident scenarios. Phase D modeled the water immersion scenario during a launch accident, and Phase E (SUB-HEU-MET-FAST-001) modeled the earth burial scenario during a launch accident. Two configurations were recorded for the simulated water immersion accident scenario (Phase D); the critical configuration, documented here, and the subcritical configuration (SUB-HEU-MET-MIXED-001). Experiments in Assembly 20 Phases 20A through 20F were performed in 1988. The reference water immersion configuration for the ZPPR-20D assembly was obtained as reactor loading 129 on October 7, 1988 with a fissile mass of 167.477 kg and a reactivity of -4.626 {+-} 0.044{cents} (k {approx} 0.9997). The SP-100 core was to be constructed of highly enriched uranium nitride, niobium, rhenium and depleted lithium. The core design called for two enrichment zones with niobium-1% zirconium alloy fuel cladding and core structure. Rhenium was to be used as a fuel pin liner to provide shut down in the event of water immersion and flooding. The core coolant was to be depleted lithium metal ({sup 7}Li). The core was to be surrounded radially with a niobium reactor vessel and bypass which would carry the lithium coolant to the forward inlet plenum. Immediately inside the reactor vessel was a rhenium

  5. Corrosion of beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, J.J.; Adolphson, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of beryllium in aqueous and elevated-temperature oxidizing environments has been extensively studied for early-intended use of beryllium in nuclear reactors and in jet and rocket propulsion systems. Since that time, beryllium has been used as a structural material in les corrosive environments. Its primary applications include gyro systems, mirror and reentry vehicle structures, and aircraft brakes. Only a small amount of information has been published that is directly related to the evaluation of beryllium for service in the less severe or normal atmospheric environments associated with these applications. Despite the lack of published data on the corrosion of beryllium in atmospheric environments, much can be deduced about its corrosion behavior from studies of aqueous corrosion and the experiences of fabricators and users in applying, handling, processing, storing, and shipping beryllium components. The methods of corrosion protection implemented to resist water and high-temperature gaseous environments provide useful information on methods that can be applied to protect beryllium for service in future long-term structural applications

  6. Graphite moderated reactor for thermoelectric generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akazawa, Issei; Yamada, Akira; Mizogami, Yorikata

    1998-01-01

    Fuel rods filled with cladded fuel particles distributed and filled are buried each at a predetermined distance in graphite blocks situated in a reactor core. Perforation channels for helium gas as coolants are formed to the periphery thereof passing through vertically. An alkali metal thermoelectric power generation module is disposed to the upper lid of a reactor container while being supported by a securing receptacle. Helium gas in the coolant channels in the graphite blocks in the reactor core absorbs nuclear reaction heat, to be heated to a high temperature, rises upwardly by the reduction of the specific gravity, and then flows into an upper space above the laminated graphite block layer. Then the gas collides against a ceiling and turns, and flows down in a circular gap around the circumference of the alkali metal thermoelectric generation module. In this case, it transfers heat to the alkali metal thermoelectric generation module. (I.N.)

  7. Solid methane cold moderator for the IBR-2 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beliakov, A. A.; Tretiakov, I. T.; Shabalin, E. P.; Golikov, V. V.; Luschivkov, V I.

    1997-09-01

    The paper describes the research and design work carried out since 1986 at the Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in Dubna to create a cryogenic moderator for the IBR-22 reactor using solid methane as a moderating substance.

  8. Beryllium production using beryllium fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubler, Carlos Henrique

    1993-01-01

    This work presents the beryllium production by thermal decomposition of the ammonium beryllium fluoride, followed by magnesium reduction, obtained in the small pilot plant of the Brazilian National Nuclear Energy Commission - Nuclear Engineering Institute

  9. Moderator behaviour and reactor internals integrity at Atucha I NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berra, S.; Guala, M.; Herzovich, P.; Chocron, M.; Lorenzo, A.; Raffo Calderon, Ma. C. del; Urrutia, G.

    1996-01-01

    Atucha I is a Pressure Vessel Heavy Water Cooled Heavy Water Moderator Reactor. In this kind of reactor the moderator tank is physically connected to the primary coolant. Since neutron economy requires the moderator to be as cold as possible, it is necessary that even when physically connected, it should have a separated cooling system, which in this case is also used as a feed-water preheater, and also heat mass transfer with primary coolant should be minimized. This condition requires that some reactor internals are designed in principle to last the whole life of the plant. However, in 1988 the failure of one internal produced a 16 month shut down. This incident could have been prevented but the idea that reactor internals would not have failures due to aging was dominant at that time avoiding the early detection of the failure. However, the analysis of the records after the incident showed that some process variables had changed previously to the incident, i.e., power exchanged at the moderator heat exchanger had increased. Since the station restart up some changes in the moderator process variables and a flow rate reduction of about 10% through the primary side of one moderator cooler were observed. In order to understand the flow reduction and the overall behaviour of moderators parameters, two models were developed that predict moderator and moderator cooler behavior under the new conditions. The present paper refers to these models, which together with the improvement of process variables measurements mentioned in another paper presented at this meeting permits to understand current moderator behaviour and helps to early diagnostic of an eventual reactor internal failure. (author). 2 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  10. Moderator behaviour and reactor internals integrity at Atucha I NPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berra, S; Guala, M; Herzovich, P [Central Nuclear Atucha I, Nucleoelectrica Argentina, Lima, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Chocron, M; Lorenzo, A; Raffo Calderon, Ma. C. del; Urrutia, G [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Buenos Aires (Argentina). Centro Atomico Constituyentes

    1997-12-31

    Atucha I is a Pressure Vessel Heavy Water Cooled Heavy Water Moderator Reactor. In this kind of reactor the moderator tank is physically connected to the primary coolant. Since neutron economy requires the moderator to be as cold as possible, it is necessary that even when physically connected, it should have a separated cooling system, which in this case is also used as a feed-water preheater, and also heat mass transfer with primary coolant should be minimized. This condition requires that some reactor internals are designed in principle to last the whole life of the plant. However, in 1988 the failure of one internal produced a 16 month shut down. This incident could have been prevented but the idea that reactor internals would not have failures due to aging was dominant at that time avoiding the early detection of the failure. However, the analysis of the records after the incident showed that some process variables had changed previously to the incident, i.e., power exchanged at the moderator heat exchanger had increased. Since the station restart up some changes in the moderator process variables and a flow rate reduction of about 10% through the primary side of one moderator cooler were observed. In order to understand the flow reduction and the overall behaviour of moderators parameters, two models were developed that predict moderator and moderator cooler behavior under the new conditions. The present paper refers to these models, which together with the improvement of process variables measurements mentioned in another paper presented at this meeting permits to understand current moderator behaviour and helps to early diagnostic of an eventual reactor internal failure. (author). 2 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab.

  11. The high moderating ratio reactor using 100% MOX reloads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbrault, P.

    1994-06-01

    This report presents the concept of a High Moderating ratio Reactor, which should accept 100% MOX reloads. This reactor aims to be the plutonium version of the European Pressurized Reactor (EPR), which is developed jointly by French and German companies. A moderating ration of 2.5 (instead of the standard value of 2.0) is obtained by replacing several fuel rods by water holes. The core would contain 241 Fuel Assemblies. We present some advantages of over-moderation for plutonium fuel, a description of the core and assemblies, calculations of fuel reload schemes and Reactivity Shutdown Margins, and the behavior of the core during two occidental transients. (author). 2 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs

  12. Measuring device for the temperature coefficient of reactor moderators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Yuzo.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To rapidly determine by automatic calculation the temperature coefficient for moderators which has been determined so far by a log of manual processings. Constitution: Each of signals from a control rod position indicator, a reactor reactivity, instrument and moderator temperature meter are inputted, and each of the signals and designed valued for the doppler temperature coefficients are stored. Recurling calculation is conducted based on the reactivity and the moderator temperature at an interval where the temperature changes of the moderators are equalized at an identical control rod position, to determine isothermic coefficient. Then, the temperature coefficient for moderator are calculated from the isothermic coefficient and the doppler temperature coefficient. The relationship between the reactivity and the moderator temperature is plotted on a X-Y recorder. The stored signals and the calculated temperature coefficient for moderators are sequentially displayed and the results are printed out when the measurement is completed. According to the present device, since the real time processing is conducted, the processing time can be shortened remarkably. Accordingly, it is possible to save the man power for the test of the nuclear reactor and improve the reactor operation performance. (Kamimura, M.)

  13. UK methods for studying fuel management in water moderated reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayers, F.J.

    1970-10-01

    Current UK methods for studying fuel management and for predicting the reactor physics performance for both light and heavy water moderated power reactors are reviewed. Brief descriptions are given of the less costly computer codes used for initial assessment studies, and also the more elaborate programs associated with detailed evaluation are discussed. Some of the considerations influencing the accuracy of predictions are included with examples of various types of experimental confirmation. (author)

  14. First experience with the new solid methane moderator at the IBR-2 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beliakov, A.A.; Shabalin, E.P.; Tretyakov, I.T.

    2001-01-01

    In the 1999 Fall the solid methane moderator (CM) has been installed and tested at full power at the IBR-2 pulsed reactor. Its main features are a beryllium reflector and a light water premoderator. Radiation load on the methane was three times as much as that of IPNS facility, namely, 0.1 W/g. Effects of temperature, operation time, concentration of a hydrogen scavenger, and annealing procedure on both neutron and service performances were studied. Maximum operation time of a newly loaded portion of methane was 4 days. In this time around 30% of methane is transformed into hydrogen, ethane, and high molecular hydrocarbons, and yet no deterioration in cold neutron intensity was detected. Among new knowledge, the most important are two facts observed: two-fold decrease in hydrogen formation rate when methane is poisoned with 2.5% to 5% of ethylene, and low formation rate of solid, inremovable products of radiolysis - (1.5/3)10 -7 g/J, which means that after 10 years of operation the methane chamber will be filled with only 100 g of residue. Gain of factor 20 in cold neutron flux was obtained as compared to the routine grooved light water moderator. Presently, it is the highest among the intense pulsed neutron sources. (author)

  15. Kinetics of Pressurized Water Reactors with Hot or Cold Moderators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norinder, O

    1960-11-15

    The set of neutron kinetic equations developed in this report permits the use of long integration steps during stepwise integration. Thermal relations which describe the transfer of heat from fuel to coolant are derived. The influence upon the kinetic behavior of the reactor of a number of parameters is studied. A comparison of the kinetic properties of the hot and cold moderators is given.

  16. Proton irradiation effects on beryllium – A macroscopic assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simos, Nikolaos, E-mail: simos@bnl.gov [Nuclear Sciences & Technology Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY, 11973 (United States); Elbakhshwan, Mohamed [Nuclear Sciences & Technology Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY, 11973 (United States); Zhong, Zhong [Photon Sciences, NSLS II, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY, 11973 (United States); Camino, Fernando [Center for Functional Nanomaterials, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY, 11973 (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Beryllium, due to its excellent neutron multiplication and moderation properties, in conjunction with its good thermal properties, is under consideration for use as plasma facing material in fusion reactors and as a very effective neutron reflector in fission reactors. While it is characterized by unique combination of structural, chemical, atomic number, and neutron absorption cross section it suffers, however, from irradiation generated transmutation gases such as helium and tritium which exhibit low solubility leading to supersaturation of the Be matrix and tend to precipitate into bubbles that coalesce and induce swelling and embrittlement thus degrading the metal and limiting its lifetime. Utilization of beryllium as a pion production low-Z target in high power proton accelerators has been sought both for its low Z and good thermal properties in an effort to mitigate thermos-mechanical shock that is expected to be induced under the multi-MW power demand. To assess irradiation-induced changes in the thermal and mechanical properties of Beryllium, a study focusing on proton irradiation damage effects has been undertaken using 200 MeV protons from the Brookhaven National Laboratory Linac and followed by a multi-faceted post-irradiation analysis that included the thermal and volumetric stability of irradiated beryllium, the stress-strain behavior and its ductility loss as a function of proton fluence and the effects of proton irradiation on the microstructure using synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The mimicking of high temperature irradiation of Beryllium via high temperature annealing schemes has been conducted as part of the post-irradiation study. This paper focuses on the thermal stability and mechanical property changes of the proton irradiated beryllium and presents results of the macroscopic property changes of Beryllium deduced from thermal and mechanical tests.

  17. Beryllium allergy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenherr, S.; Pevny, I.

    1989-12-01

    Beryllium is not only a high potent allergen, but also a fotoallergen and can provoke contact allergic reactions, fotoallergic reactions, granulomatous skin reactions, pulmonary granulomatous diseases and sometimes even systemic diseases. The authors present 9 own cases of a patch test positive beryllium allergy, 7 patients with relevant allergy and 5 patients with an allergic contact stomatitis. (author)

  18. Reactivity margins in heavy water moderated production reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benton, F.D.

    1981-11-01

    The design of the reactor core and components of the heavy water moderated reactors at the Savannah River Plant (SFP) can be varied to produce a number of isotopes. For the past decade, the predominant reactor core design has been the enriched-depleted lattice. In this lattice, fuel assemblies of highly enriched uranium and target assemblies of depleted uranium, which produce plutonium, occupy alternate lattice positions. This heterogeneous lattice arrangement and a nonuniform control rod distribution result in a reactor core that requires sophisticated calculational methods for accurate reactivity margin and power distribution predictions. For maximum accuracy, techniques must exist to provide a base of observed data for the calculations. Frequent enriched-depleted lattice design changes are required as product demands vary. These changes provided incentive for the development of techniques to combine the results of calculations and observed reactivity data to accurately and conveniently monitor reactivity margins during operation

  19. Research of flaw assessment methods for beryllium reflector elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Akira; Ito, Masayasu; Takemoto, Noriyuki; Tanimoto, Masataka; Tsuchiya, Kunihiko; Nakatsuka, Masafumi; Ohara, Hiroshi; Kodama, Mitsuhiro

    2012-02-01

    Reflector elements made from metal beryllium is widely used as neutron reflectors to increase neutron flux in test reactors. When beryllium reflector elements are irradiated by neutron, bending of reflector elements caused by swelling occurs, and beryllium reflector elements must be replaced in several years. In this report, literature search and investigation for non-destructive inspection of Beryllium and experiments for Preliminary inspection to establish post irradiation examination method for research of characteristics of metal beryllium under neutron irradiation were reported. (author)

  20. Effects of moderation level on core reactivity and. neutron fluxes in natural uranium fueled and heavy water moderated reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.J.; Aslam; Ahmad, N.; Ahmed, R.; Ahmad, S.I.

    2005-01-01

    The neutron moderation level in a nuclear reactor has a strong influence on core multiplication, reactivity control, fuel burnup, neutron fluxes etc. In the study presented in this article, the effects of neutron moderation level on core reactivity and neutron fluxes in a typical heavy water moderated nuclear research reactor is explored and the results are discussed. (author)

  1. Physical particularities of nuclear reactors using heavy moderators of neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulikov, G. G.; Shmelev, A. N.

    2016-01-01

    In nuclear reactors, thermal neutron spectra are formed using moderators with small atomic weights. For fast reactors, inserting such moderators in the core may create problems since they efficiently decelerate the neutrons. In order to form an intermediate neutron spectrum, it is preferable to employ neutron moderators with sufficiently large atomic weights, using "2"3"3U as a fissile nuclide and "2"3"2Th and "2"3"1Pa as fertile ones. The aim of the work is to investigate the properties of heavy neutron moderators and to assess their advantages. The analysis employs the JENDL-4.0 nuclear data library and the SCALE program package for simulating the variation of fuel composition caused by irradiation in the reactor. The following main results are obtained. By using heavy moderators with small neutron moderation steps, one is able to (1) increase the rate of resonance capture, so that the amount of fertile material in the fuel may be reduced while maintaining the breeding factor of the core; (2) use the vacant space for improving the fuel-element properties by adding inert, strong, and thermally conductive materials and by implementing dispersive fuel elements in which the fissile material is self-replenished and neutron multiplication remains stable during the process of fuel burnup; and (3) employ mixtures of different fertile materials with resonance capture cross sections in order to increase the resonance-lattice density and the probability of resonance neutron capture leading to formation of fissile material. The general conclusion is that, by forming an intermediate neutron spectrum with heavy neutron moderators, one can use the fuel more efficiently and improve nuclear safety.

  2. Physical particularities of nuclear reactors using heavy moderators of neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulikov, G. G., E-mail: ggkulikov@mephi.ru; Shmelev, A. N. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute) (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    In nuclear reactors, thermal neutron spectra are formed using moderators with small atomic weights. For fast reactors, inserting such moderators in the core may create problems since they efficiently decelerate the neutrons. In order to form an intermediate neutron spectrum, it is preferable to employ neutron moderators with sufficiently large atomic weights, using {sup 233}U as a fissile nuclide and {sup 232}Th and {sup 231}Pa as fertile ones. The aim of the work is to investigate the properties of heavy neutron moderators and to assess their advantages. The analysis employs the JENDL-4.0 nuclear data library and the SCALE program package for simulating the variation of fuel composition caused by irradiation in the reactor. The following main results are obtained. By using heavy moderators with small neutron moderation steps, one is able to (1) increase the rate of resonance capture, so that the amount of fertile material in the fuel may be reduced while maintaining the breeding factor of the core; (2) use the vacant space for improving the fuel-element properties by adding inert, strong, and thermally conductive materials and by implementing dispersive fuel elements in which the fissile material is self-replenished and neutron multiplication remains stable during the process of fuel burnup; and (3) employ mixtures of different fertile materials with resonance capture cross sections in order to increase the resonance-lattice density and the probability of resonance neutron capture leading to formation of fissile material. The general conclusion is that, by forming an intermediate neutron spectrum with heavy neutron moderators, one can use the fuel more efficiently and improve nuclear safety.

  3. Fluid moderator control system reactor internals distribution system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fensterer, H.F.; Klassen, W.E.; Veronesi, L.; Boyle, D.E.; Salton, R.B.

    1987-01-01

    This patent describes a spectral shift pressurized water nuclear reactor employing a low neutron moderating fluid for the spectral shift including a reactor pressure vessel, a core comprising a plurality of fuel assemblies, a core support plate, apparatus comprising means for penetrating the reactor vessel for introducing the moderating fluid into the reactor vessel. Means associated with the core support plate for directly distributing the moderating fluid to and from the fuel assemblies comprises at least one inlet flow channel in the core plate; branch inlet feed lines connect to the inlet flow channel in the core plate; vertical inlet flow lines flow connected to the branch inlet feed lines; each vertical flow line communicates with a fuel assembly; the distribution means further comprise lines serving as return flow lines, each of which is connected to one of the fuel assemblies; branch exit flow lines in the core plate flow connected to the return flow lines of the fuel assembly; and at least one outlet flow channel flow connected to the branch exit flow lines; and a flow port interposed between the penetration means and the distribution means for flow connecting the penetration means with the distribution means

  4. Fissile fuel assembly for a sub-moderated nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millot, J.P.; Dejeux, Pol.; Alibran, Patrice.

    1983-01-01

    Each of the core assemblies is composed of a prismatic case made of a neutron absorbing material, inside which very long rods containing the fissile material are arranged parallel to the height of the case and according to a regular network in the straight sections of the case. At least one piece in a fertile material exposed to the neutrons emitted by the fissile material of the assembly is arranged on each one of the side faces of the case. The invention applies in particular to sub-moderated reactors, cooled and moderated by pressurized water [fr

  5. Nuclear calculation methods for light water moderated reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hicks, D.

    1961-02-01

    This report is intended as an introductory review. After a brief discussion of problems encountered in the nuclear design of water moderated reactors a comprehensive scheme of calculations is described. This scheme is based largely on theoretical methods and computer codes developed in the U.S.A. but some previously unreported developments made in this country are also described. It is shown that the effective reproduction factor of simple water moderated lattices may be estimated to an accuracy of approximately 1%. Methods for treating water gap flux peaking and control absorbers are presented in some detail, together with a brief discussion of temperature coefficients, void coefficients and burn-up problems. (author)

  6. Specific features of reactor or cyclotron {alpha}-particles irradiated beryllium microstructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khomutov, A M [A.A.Bochvar All-Russia Research Inst. of Inorganic Materials (VNIINM), Moscow (Russian Federation); Gromov, B F; Karabanov, V N [and others

    1998-01-01

    Studies were carried out into microstructure changes accompanying helium swelling of Be reactor neutron irradiated at 450degC or {alpha}-particles implanted in cyclotron to reach the same volume accumulation of He (6-8 ncm{sup 3} He/cm{sup 3} Be). The microstructures of reactor irradiated and implanted samples were compared after vacuum anneal at 600-800degC up to 50h. The irradiated samples revealed the etchability along the grain boundaries in zones formed by adequately large equilibrium helium pores. The width of the zones increased with the annealing time and after 50h reached 30{mu}. Depleted areas 2-3{mu} dia were observed in some regions of near grain boundary zones. The roles of grain boundaries and manufacturing pores as vacancies` sources and helium sinks are considered. (author)

  7. Study on core design for reduced-moderation water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okubo, Tsutomu

    2002-01-01

    The Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR) is a water-cooled reactor with the harder neutron spectrum comparing with the LWR, resulting from low neutron moderation due to reduced water volume fraction. Based on the difference from the spectrum from the LWR, the conversion from U-238 to Pu-239 is promoted and the new cores preferable to effective utilization of uranium resource can be possible Design study of the RMWR core started in 1997 and new four core concepts (three BWR cores and one PWR core) are recently evaluated in terms of control rod worths, plutonium multiple recycle, high burnup and void coefficient. Comparative evaluations show needed incorporation of control rod programming and simplified PUREX process as well as development of new fuel cans for high burnup of 100 GW-d/t. Final choice of design specifications will be made at the next step aiming at realization of the RMWR. (T. Tanaka)

  8. Study on core design for reduced-moderation water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okubo, Tsutomu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2002-12-01

    The Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR) is a water-cooled reactor with the harder neutron spectrum comparing with the LWR, resulting from low neutron moderation due to reduced water volume fraction. Based on the difference from the spectrum from the LWR, the conversion from U-238 to Pu-239 is promoted and the new cores preferable to effective utilization of uranium resource can be possible Design study of the RMWR core started in 1997 and new four core concepts (three BWR cores and one PWR core) are recently evaluated in terms of control rod worths, plutonium multiple recycle, high burnup and void coefficient. Comparative evaluations show needed incorporation of control rod programming and simplified PUREX process as well as development of new fuel cans for high burnup of 100 GW-d/t. Final choice of design specifications will be made at the next step aiming at realization of the RMWR. (T. Tanaka)

  9. The liquid hydrogen moderator at the NIST research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, Robert E.; Rowe, J. Michael; Kopetka, Paul

    1997-09-01

    In 1995, the NIST research reactor was shut down for a number of modifications, including the replacement of the D 2 O cold neutron source with a liquid hydrogen moderator. When the liquid hydrogen source began operating, the flux of cold neutrons increased by a factor of six over the D 2 O source. The design and operation of the hydrogen source are described, and measurements of its performance are compared with the Monte Carlo simulations used in the design. (auth)

  10. Graphite-moderated and heavy water-moderated spectral shift controlled reactors; Reactores de moderador solido controlados por desplazamiento espectral

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcala Ruiz, F

    1984-07-01

    It has been studied the physical mechanisms related with the spectral shift control method and their general positive effects on economical and non-proliferant aspects (extension of the fuel cycle length and low proliferation index). This methods has been extended to non-hydrogenous fuel cells of high moderator/fuel ratio: heavy water cells have been con- trolled by graphite rods graphite-moderated and gas-cooled cells have been controlled by berylium rods and graphite-moderated and water-cooled cells have been controlled by a changing mixture of heavy and light water. It has been carried out neutron and thermal analysis on a pre design of these types of fuel cells. We have studied its neutron optimization and their fuel cycles, temperature coefficients and proliferation indices. Finally, we have carried out a comparative analysis of the fuel cycles of conventionally controlled PWRs and graphite-moderated, water-cooled and spectral shift controlled reactors. (Author) 71 refs.

  11. Vacuum hot-pressed beryllium and TiC dispersion strengthened tungsten alloy developments for ITER and future fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiang, E-mail: xliu@swip.ac.cn [Southwestern Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 432, Chengdu 610041, Sichuan (China); Chen, Jiming; Lian, Youyun; Wu, Jihong; Xu, Zengyu; Zhang, Nianman; Wang, Quanming; Duan, Xuro [Southwestern Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 432, Chengdu 610041, Sichuan (China); Wang, Zhanhong; Zhong, Jinming [Northwest Rare Metal Material Research Institute, CNMC, Ningxia Orient Group Co. Ltd.,No.119 Yejin Road, Shizuishan City, Ningxia,753000 (China)

    2013-11-15

    Beryllium and tungsten have been selected as the plasma facing materials of the ITER first wall (FW) and divertor chamber, respectively. China, as a participant in ITER, will share the manufacturing tasks of ITER first-wall mockups with the European Union and Russia. Therefore ITER-grade beryllium has been developed in China and a kind of vacuum hot-pressed (VHP) beryllium, CN-G01, was characterized for both physical, and thermo-mechanical properties and high heat flux performance, which indicated an equivalent performance to U.S. grade S-65C beryllium, a reference grade beryllium of ITER. Consequently CN-G01 beryllium has been accepted as the armor material of ITER-FW blankets. In addition, a modification of tungsten by TiC dispersion strengthening was investigated and a W–TiC alloy with TiC content of 0.1 wt.% has been developed. Both surface hardness and recrystallization measurements indicate its re-crystallization temperature approximately at 1773 K. Deuterium retention and thermal desorption behaviors of pure tungsten and the TiC alloy were also measured by deuterium ion irradiation of 1.7 keV energy to the fluence of 0.5–5 × 10{sup 18} D/cm{sup 2}; a main desorption peak at around 573 K was found and no significant difference was observed between pure tungsten and the tungsten alloy. Further characterization of the tungsten alloy is in progress.

  12. Fuel enrichment reduction for heavy water moderated research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCulloch, D.B.

    1984-01-01

    Twelve heavy-water-moderated research reactors of significant power level (5 MW to 125 MW) currently operate in a number of countries, and use highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel. Most of these reactors could in principle be converted to use uranium of lower enrichment, subject in some cases to the successful development and demonstration of new fuel materials and/or fuel element designs. It is, however, generally accepted as desirable that existing fuel element geometry be retained unaltered to minimise the capital costs and licensing difficulties associated with enrichment conversion. The high flux Australian reactor, HIFAR, at Lucas Heights, Sydney is one of 5 Dido-class reactors in the above group. It operates at 10 MW using 80% 235 U HEU fuel. Theoretical studies of neutronic, thermohydraulic and operational aspects of converting HIFAR to use fuels of reduced enrichment have been made over a period. It is concluded that with no change of fuel element geometry and no penalty in the present HEU fuel cycle burn-up performance, conversion to MEU (nominally 45% 235 U) would be feasible within the limits of current fully qualified U-Al fuel materials technology. There would be no significant, adverse effects on safety-related parameters (e.g. reactivity coefficients) and only small penalties in reactor flux. Conversion to LEU (nominally 20% 235 U) a similar basis would require that fuel materials of about 2.3 g U cm -3 be fully qualified, and would depress the in-core thermal neutron flux by about 15 per cent relative to HEU fuelling. In qualitative terms, similar conclusions would be expected to hold for a majority of the above heavy water moderated reactors. (author)

  13. Radiogenic lead with dominant content of {sup 208}Pb: New coolant and neutron moderator for innovative nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shmelev, A. N.; Kulikov, G. G.; Kryuchkov, E. F.; Apse, V. A.; Kulikov, E. G. [National Research Nuclear Univ. MEPhI, Kashirskoe shosse, 31, 115409, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2012-07-01

    The advantages of radiogenic lead with dominant content of {sup 208}Pb as a reactor coolant with respect to natural lead are caused by unique nuclear properties of {sup 208}Pb which is a double-magic nucleus with closed proton and neutron shells. This results in significantly lower micro cross section and resonance integral of radiative neutron capture by {sup 208}Pb than those for numerous light neutron moderators. The extremely weak ability of {sup 208}Pb to absorb neutrons results in the following effects. Firstly, neutron moderating factor (ratio of scattering to capture cross sections) is larger than that for graphite and light water. Secondly, age and diffusion length of thermal neutrons are larger than those for graphite, light and heavy water. Thirdly, neutron lifetime in {sup 208}Pb is comparable with that for graphite, beryllium and heavy water what could be important for safe reactor operation. The paper presents some results obtained in neutronics and thermal-hydraulics evaluations of the benefits from the use of radiogenic lead with dominant content of {sup 208}Pb instead of natural lead as a coolant of fast breeder reactors. The paper demonstrates that substitution of radiogenic lead for natural lead can offer the following benefits for operation of fast breeder reactors. Firstly, improvement of the reactor safety thanks to the better values of coolant temperature reactivity coefficient and, secondly, improvement of some thermal-hydraulic reactor parameters. Radiogenic lead can be extracted from thorium sludge without isotope separation as {sup 208}Pb is a final isotope in the decay chain of {sup 232}Th. (authors)

  14. Graphite-moderated and heavy water-moderated spectral shift controlled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcala Ruiz, F.

    1984-01-01

    It has been studied the physical mechanisms related with the spectral shift control method and their general positive effects on economical and non-proliferant aspects (extension of the fuel cycle length and low proliferation index). This methods has been extended to non-hydrogenous fuel cells of high moderator/fuel ratio: heavy water cells have been con- trolled by graphite rods graphite-moderated and gas-cooled cells have been controlled by berylium rods and graphite-moderated and water-cooled cells have been controlled by a changing mixture of heavy and light water. It has been carried out neutron and thermal analysis on a pre design of these types of fuel cells. We have studied its neutron optimization and their fuel cycles, temperature coefficients and proliferation indices. Finally, we have carried out a comparative analysis of the fuel cycles of conventionally controlled PWRs and graphite-moderated, water-cooled and spectral shift controlled reactors. (Author) 71 refs

  15. Structure optimization of CFB reactor for moderate temperature FGD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yuan; Zhang, Jie; Zheng, Kai; You, Changfu [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China). Dept. of Thermal Engineering; Ministry of Education, Beijing (China). Key Lab. for Thermal Science and Power Engineering

    2013-07-01

    The gas velocity distribution, sorbent particle concentration distribution and particle residence time in circulating fluidized bed (CFB) reactors for moderate temperature flue gas desulfurization (FGD) have significant influence on the desulfurization efficiency and the sorbent calcium conversion ratio for sulfur reaction. Experimental and numerical methods were used to investigate the influence of the key reactor structures, including the reactor outlet structure, internal structure, feed port and circulating port, on the gas velocity distribution, sorbent particle concentration distribution and particle residence time. Experimental results showed that the desulfurization efficiency increased 5-10% when the internal structure was added in the CFB reactor. Numerical analysis results showed that the particle residence time of the feed particles with the average diameter of 89 and 9 {mu}m increased 40% and 17% respectively, and the particle residence time of the circulating particles with the average diameter of 116 {mu}m increased 28% after reactor structure optimization. The particle concentration distribution also improved significantly, which was good for improving the contact efficiency between the sorbent particles and SO{sub 2}. In addition, the optimization guidelines were proposed to further increase the desulfurization efficiency and the sorbent calcium conversion ratio.

  16. Optimization of beryllium for fusion blanket applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billone, M.C.

    1993-01-01

    The primary function of beryllium in a fusion reactor blanket is neutron multiplication to enhance tritium breeding. However, because heat, tritium and helium will be generated in and/or transported through beryllium and because the beryllium is in contact with other blanket materials, the thermal, mechanical, tritium/helium and compatibility properties of beryllium are important in blanket design. In particular, tritium retention during normal operation and release during overheating events are safety concerns. Accommodating beryllium thermal expansion and helium-induced swelling are important issues in ensuring adequate lifetime of the structural components adjacent to the beryllium. Likewise, chemical/metallurgical interactions between beryllium and structural components need to be considered in lifetime analysis. Under accident conditions the chemical interaction between beryllium and coolant and breeding materials may also become important. The performance of beryllium in fusion blanket applications depends on fabrication variables and operational parameters. First the properties database is reviewed to determine the state of knowledge of beryllium performance as a function of these variables. Several design calculations are then performed to indicate ranges of fabrication and operation variables that lead to optimum beryllium performance. Finally, areas for database expansion and improvement are highlighted based on the properties survey and the design sensitivity studies

  17. Activation and clearance of vanadium alloys and beryllium multipliers in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartenev, S.; Romanovskij, V.; Ciampichetti, A.; Zucchetti, M.; Forrest, R.; Kolbasov, B.; Romanov, P.

    2006-01-01

    Design of fusion reactors includes the development of low-activation materials. V-Cr-Ti alloys are among the candidate structural materials for the first wall and blanket, with the scarce and costly V as the main component. It is worth considering its regeneration and refabrication as well as to avoid its disposal as radioactive waste. However, to do so, it is necessary to bring its radioactivity down to sufficiently low levels. We have two possible goals: · Recycling (within the nuclear industry) for first wall and front blanket components. In that case, contact dose rate must be sufficiently low. · Clearance (release from nuclear regulatory control) for back blanket and backplate components. In that case, the clearance index must be below unity. In fact, for components less exposed to neutron activation, clearance may be reachable, after a conceivable period of decay. Maximum radionuclide concentrations in the alloys allowing their clearance were determined, using new IAEA Clearance Limits. For this purpose, also for less neutron-exposed structures, such as the back part of the blanket and the backplate, clearance is possible only if certain activation products are separated. As for recycling within the nuclear industry of first wall components, also for clearance it turns out that the development of isotope chemical separation techniques is interesting and necessary for our purposes. A suitable method for achieving the required substantial radioactivity reduction of activated V-Cr-Ti alloys is radiochemical extraction reprocessing, Such a technology, permitting to remove metallic activation products from spent materials, was developed and tested experimentally in Russia. Concerning clearance of less activated components, based on the estimated element distribution factors in the extraction and re-extraction processes, and computations, it was shown that the alloy components may be purified from the activation products, using this technology, down to an

  18. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, H.I.; Smith, R.C.

    1958-01-21

    This patent relates to nuclear reactors of the type which use a liquid fuel, such as a solution of uranyl sulfate in ordinary water which acts as the moderator. The reactor is comprised of a spherical vessel having a diameter of about 12 inches substantially surrounded by a reflector of beryllium oxide. Conventionnl control rods and safety rods are operated in slots in the reflector outside the vessel to control the operation of the reactor. An additional means for increasing the safety factor of the reactor by raising the ratio of delayed neutrons to prompt neutrons, is provided and consists of a soluble sulfate salt of beryllium dissolved in the liquid fuel in the proper proportion to obtain the result desired.

  19. Research of beryllium safety issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longhurst, G.R.; Anderl, R.A.; Dolan, T.J.; Hankins, M.R.; Pawelko, R.J.

    1993-01-01

    Beryllium has been identified as a leading contender for the plasma-facing material in ITER. Its use has some obvious advantages, but there are also a number of safety concerns associated with it. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has undertaken a number of studies to help resolve some of these issues. One issue is the response of beryllium to neutron irradiation. We have tested samples irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and are currently preparing to make measurements of the change in mechanical properties of beryllium samples irradiated at elevated temperatures in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) and the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) at the INEL. Mechanical tests will be conducted at the irradiation temperatures of 375-550 C. Other experiments address permeation and retention of implanted tritium in plasma-sprayed beryllium. In one test the porosity of the material allowed 0.12% of implanted ions and 0.17% of atoms from background gas pressure to pass through the foil with essentially no delay. For comparison, similar tests on fully dense hot-rolled, vacuum melted or sintered powder foils of high purity beryllium showed only 0.001% of implanting ions to pass through the foil, and then only after a delay of several hours. None of the molecular gas appeared to permeate these latter targets. An implication is that plasma-sprayed beryllium may substantially enhance recycling of tritium to the plasma provided it is affixed to a relatively impermeable substrate. (orig.)

  20. Beryllium for fusion application - recent results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khomutov, A.; Barabash, V.; Chakin, V.; Chernov, V.; Davydov, D.; Gorokhov, V.; Kawamura, H.; Kolbasov, B.; Kupriyanov, I.; Longhurst, G.; Scaffidi-Argentina, F.; Shestakov, V.

    2002-01-01

    The main issues for the application of beryllium in fusion reactors are analyzed taking into account the latest results since the ICFRM-9 (Colorado, USA, October 1999) and presented at 5th IEA Be Workshop (10-12 October 2001, Moscow Russia). Considerable progress has been made recently in understanding the problems connected with the selection of the beryllium grades for different applications, characterization of the beryllium at relevant operational conditions (irradiation effects, thermal fatigue, etc.), and development of required manufacturing technologies. The key remaining problems related to the application of beryllium as an armour in near-term fusion reactors (e.g. ITER) are discussed. The features of the application of beryllium and beryllides as a neutron multiplier in the breeder blanket for power reactors (e.g. DEMO) in pebble-bed form are described

  1. Beryllium for fusion application - recent results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khomutov, A.; Barabash, V.; Chakin, V.; Chernov, V.; Davydov, D.; Gorokhov, V.; Kawamura, H.; Kolbasov, B.; Kupriyanov, I.; Longhurst, G.; Scaffidi-Argentina, F.; Shestakov, V.

    2002-12-01

    The main issues for the application of beryllium in fusion reactors are analyzed taking into account the latest results since the ICFRM-9 (Colorado, USA, October 1999) and presented at 5th IEA Be Workshop (10-12 October 2001, Moscow Russia). Considerable progress has been made recently in understanding the problems connected with the selection of the beryllium grades for different applications, characterization of the beryllium at relevant operational conditions (irradiation effects, thermal fatigue, etc.), and development of required manufacturing technologies. The key remaining problems related to the application of beryllium as an armour in near-term fusion reactors (e.g. ITER) are discussed. The features of the application of beryllium and beryllides as a neutron multiplier in the breeder blanket for power reactors (e.g. DEMO) in pebble-bed form are described.

  2. The thorium fuel cycle in water-moderated reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Critoph, E.

    1977-01-01

    Current interest in the thorium cycle, as an alternative to the uranium cycle, for water-moderated reactors is based on two attractive aspects of its use - the extension of uranium resources, and the related lower sensitivity of energy costs to uranium price. While most of the scientific basis required is already available, some engineering demonstrations are needed to provide better economic data for rational decisions. Thorium and uranium cycles are compared with regard to reactor characteristics and technology, fuel-cycle technology, economic parameters, fuel-cycle costs, and system characteristics. There appear to be no major feasibility problems associated with the use of thorium, although development is required in the areas of fuel testing and fuel management. The use of thorium cycles implies recycling the fuel, and the major uncertainties are in the associated costs. Experience in the design and operation of fuel reprocessing and active-fabrication facilities is required to estimate costs to the accuracy needed for adequately defining the range of conditions economically favourable to thorium cycles. In heavy-water reactors (HWRs) thorium cycles having uranium requirements at equilibrium ranging from zero to a quarter of those for the natural-uranium once-through cycle appear feasible. An ''inventory'' of uranium of between 1 and 2Mg/MW(e) is required for the transition to equilibrium. The cycles with the lowest uranium requirements compete with the others only at high uranium prices. Using thorium in light-water reactors, uranium requirements can be reduced by a factor of between two and three from the once-through uranium cycle. The light-water breeder reactor, promising zero uranium requirements at equilibrium, is being developed. Larger uranium inventories are required than for the HWRs. The lead time, from a decision to use thorium to significant impact on uranium utilization (compared to uranium cycle, recycling plutonium), is some two decades

  3. The Dragon reactor experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    The concept on which the Dragon Reactor Experiment was based was evolved at the Atomic Energy Research Establishment at Harwell in 1956, and in February of that year a High Temperature Gas- cooled Reactor Project Group was set up to study the feasibility of a helium-cooled reactor with a graphite or beryllium moderator, and with the emphasis on the thorium fuel cycle [af

  4. Power control device for heavy water moderated reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsushima, Hidesuke; Masuda, Hiroyuki.

    1978-01-01

    Purpose: To improve self controllability of a nuclear power plant, as well as enable continuous power level control by a controlled flow of moderators in void pipes provided in a reactor core. Constitution: Hollow void pipes are provided in a reactor core to which a heavy water recycle loop for power control, a heavy water recycle pump for power control, a heavy water temperature regulator and a heavy water flow rate control valve for power control are connected in series to constitute a heavy water recycle loop for flowing heavy water moderators. The void ratio in each of the void pipes are calculated by a process computer to determine the flow rate and the temperature for the recycled heavy water. Based on the above calculation result, the heavy water temperature regulator is actuated by way of a temperature setter at the heavy water inlet and the heavy water flow rate is controlled by the actuation of the heavy water flow rate control valve. (Kawakami, Y.)

  5. THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY BERYLLIUM TECHNOLOGY UPDATE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glen R. Longhurst

    2007-01-01

    A Beryllium Technology Update meeting was held at the Idaho National Laboratory on July 18, 2007. Participants came from the U.S., Japan, and Russia. There were two main objectives of this meeting. One was a discussion of current technologies for beryllium in fission reactors, particularly the Advanced Test Reactor and the Japan Materials Test Reactor, and prospects for material availability in the coming years. The second objective of the meeting was a discussion of a project of the International Science and Technology Center regarding treatment of irradiated beryllium for disposal. This paper highlights discussions held during that meeting and major conclusions reached

  6. Mechanisms of hydrogen retention in metallic beryllium and beryllium oxide and properties of ion-induced beryllium nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberkofler, Martin

    2011-01-01

    In the framework of this thesis laboratory experiments on atomically clean beryllium surfaces were performed. They aim at a basic understanding of the mechanisms occurring upon interaction of a fusion plasma with a beryllium first wall. The retention and the temperature dependent release of implanted deuterium ions are investigated. An atomistic description is developed through simulations and through the comparison with calculations based on density functional theory. The results of these investigations are compared to the behaviour of hydrogen upon implantation into thermally grown beryllium oxide layers. Furthermore, beryllium nitride is produced by implantation of nitrogen into metallic beryllium and its properties are investigated. The results are interpreted with regard to the use of beryllium in a fusion reactor. (orig.)

  7. Beryllium poisonings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alibert, S.

    1959-03-01

    This note reports a bibliographical study of beryllium toxicity. Thus, this bibliographical review addresses and outlines aspects and issues like aetiology, cases of acute poisoning (cutaneous manifestations, pulmonary manifestations), chronic poisoning (cutaneous, pulmonary and bone manifestations), excretion and localisation, and prognosis

  8. Progress in design study on reduced-moderation water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okubo, Tsutomu; Kugo, Teruhiko; Shimada, Shoichiro; Shirakawa, Toshihisa; Iwamura, Takamichi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Takeda, Renzo [Hitachi Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Yokoyama, Tsugio [Toshiba Corp., Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan); Hibi, Koki [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Wada, Shigeyuki [Japan Atomic Power Co., Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-06-01

    The Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR) is a next generation water-cooled reactor which aims at effective utilization of uranium resource, high burn-up and long operation cycle, and plutonium multi-recycle. These characteristics can be achieved by the high conversion ratio from {sup 238}U to {sup 239}Pu resulted from the higher neutron energy spectrum in comparison to conventional light water reactors. Considering the extension of LWR utilization, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) started the research on it in 1997 and then started a collaboration in the conceptual design study with the Japan Atomic Power Company (JAPC) in 1998, under technical cooperation with three Japanese reactor vendors. In the core design study of the RMWR, negative void reactivity coefficient is required from a viewpoint of safety as well as establishing hard neutron spectrum. In order to achieve the above trade-off characteristics simultaneously, several basic core design ideas should be combined, such as a tight-lattice fuel assembly, a flat core, a blanket effect, a streaming effect and so on. Up to now, five core concepts have been created for the RMWR as follows: a high conversion BWR type core with high void fraction and super-flat core, a long operation cycle BWR type core using void tube assembly, a high conversion BWR type core without blankets, a high conversion PWR type core using heavy water as a coolant, and a PWR type core for plutonium multi-recycle using seed-blanket type fuel assemblies. Detailed feasibility studies for the RMWR have been continued on core design study. The present report summarizes the recent progress in the design study for the RMWR. (author)

  9. Core design study on reduced-moderation water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiroshi, Akie; Yoshihiro, Nakano; Toshihisa, Shirakawa; Tsutomu, Okubo; Takamichi, Iwamura

    2002-01-01

    The conceptual core design study of reduced-moderation water reactors (RMWRs) with tight-pitched MOX-fuelled lattice has been carried out at JAERI. Several different RMWR core concepts based on both BWR and PWR have been proposed. All the core concepts meet with the aim to achieve both a conversion ratio of 1.0 or larger and negative void reactivity coefficient. As one of these RMWR concepts, the ABWR compatible core is also proposed. Although the conversion ratio of this core is 1.0 and the void coefficient is negative, the discharge burn-up of the fuel was about 25 GWd/t. By adopting a triangular fuel pin lattice for the reduction of moderator volume fraction and modifying axial Pu enrichment distribution, it was aimed to extend the discharge burn-up of ABWR compatible type RMWR. By using a triangular fuel lattice of smaller moderator volume fraction, discharge burn-up of 40 GWd/t seems achievable, keeping the high conversion ratio and the negative void coefficient. (authors)

  10. Some aspects of beryllium disposal in Kazakhstan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shestakov, V.; Chikhray, Y.; Shakhvorostov, Yr.

    2004-01-01

    Historically in Kazakhstan all disposals of used beryllium and beryllium wasted materials were stored and recycled at JSC ''Ulba Metallurgical Plant''. Since Ulba Metallurgical Plant (beside beryllium and tantalum production) is one of the world largest complex producers of fuel for nuclear power plants as well it has possibilities, technologies and experience in processing toxic and radioactive wastes related with those productions. At present time only one operating Kazakhstan research reactors (EWG1M in Kurchatov) contains beryllium made core. The results of current examination of that core allow using it without replacement long time yet (at least for next five-ten years). Nevertheless the problem how to utilize such irradiated beryllium becomes actual issue for Kazakhstan even today. Since Kazakhstan is the member of ITER/DEMO Reactors Projects and is permanently considered as possible provider of huge amount of beryllium for those reactors so that is the reason for starting studies of possibilities of large scale processing/recycling of such disposed irradiated beryllium. It is clear that the Ulba Metallurgical Plant is considered as the best site for it in Kazakhstan. The draft plan how to organize experimental studies of irradiated beryllium disposals in Kazakhstan involving National Nuclear Center, National University (Almaty), JSC ''Ulba Metallurgical Plant'' (Ust-Kamenogorsk) would be presented in this paper as well as proposals to arrange international collaboration in that field through ISTC (International Science Technology Center, Moscow). (author)

  11. Plutonium multi-recycling in increased moderating ratio reactors (IMR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbrault, P.; Larderet, P.

    1998-01-01

    The large core of the future jointly defined European PWR (EPR), would be compatible with an increased Moderating Ratio (MR) enabling better plutonium burnout. The purpose of current work on the subject is to assess plutonium multi-recycling possibilities in IMR reactors. What additional operating constraints would be involved under normal and accidental conditions and are they acceptable? The conclusion is that Plutonium multi-recycling in a PWR of the type envisaged for the EPR raises no major problems under the following conditions: use of an IMR MOX core, enhancing both plutonium burnout and absorber efficiency; use of enriched boron in both the primary coolant soluble boron and the B4C boron carbide in the control rods. Deeper investigation should be performed concerning the partial or total core drain-out, in view of the high total Pu concentrations involved (13%) and the types of core considered (100% MOX). (author)

  12. The status of beryllium technology for fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scaffidi-Argentina, F.; Longhurst, G.R. E-mail: gx1@inel.gov; Shestakov, V.; Kawamura, H

    2000-12-01

    Beryllium was used for a number of years in the Joint European Torus (JET), and it is planned to be used extensively on the lower heat-flux surfaces of the reduced technical objective/reduced cost international thermonuclear experimental reactor (RTO/RC ITER). It has been included in various forms in a number of tritium breeding blanket designs. There are technical advantages but also a number of safety issues associated with the use of beryllium. Research in a variety of technical areas in recent years has revealed interesting issues concerning the use of beryllium in fusion. Progress in this research has been presented at a series of International Workshops on Beryllium Technology for Fusion. The most recent workshop was held in Karlsruhe, Germany on 15-17 September 1999. In this paper, a summary of findings presented there and their implications for the use of beryllium in the development of fusion reactors are presented.

  13. The status of beryllium technology for fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scaffidi-Argentina, F.; Longhurst, G.R.; Shestakov, V.; Kawamura, H.

    2000-01-01

    Beryllium was used for a number of years in the Joint European Torus (JET), and it is planned to be used extensively on the lower heat-flux surfaces of the reduced technical objective/reduced cost international thermonuclear experimental reactor (RTO/RC ITER). It has been included in various forms in a number of tritium breeding blanket designs. There are technical advantages but also a number of safety issues associated with the use of beryllium. Research in a variety of technical areas in recent years has revealed interesting issues concerning the use of beryllium in fusion. Progress in this research has been presented at a series of International Workshops on Beryllium Technology for Fusion. The most recent workshop was held in Karlsruhe, Germany on 15-17 September 1999. In this paper, a summary of findings presented there and their implications for the use of beryllium in the development of fusion reactors are presented

  14. Research on Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwamura, Takamichi; Okubo, Tsutomu; Shimada, Shoichiro

    1999-11-01

    The Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR) is a next generation water-cooled reactor which aims at effective utilization of uranium resource, high burn-up and long operation cycle, and plutonium multi-recycle. These characteristics can be achieved by the high conversion ratio from 238 U to 239 Pu resulted from the higher neutron energy spectrum in comparison to conventional light water reactors. Considering the extension of LWR utilization, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) started the research on it in 1997 and then started a collaboration in the conceptual design study with the Japan Atomic Power Company (JAPCO) in 1998. In the core design study of the RMWR, negative void reactivity coefficient is required from a viewpoint of safety as well as establishing hard neutron spectrum. In order to achieve the above trade-off characteristics simultaneously, several basic core design ideas should be combined, such as a tight lattice fuel assembly, a flat core, a blanket effect, a streaming effect and so on. Up to now, five core concepts have been created for the RMWR as follows: a high conversion BWR with high void fraction and super-flat core, a long operation cycle BWR using void channels, a high conversion BWR without blankets, a high conversion PWR using heavy water as a coolant, and a PWR for plutonium multi-recycle using seed-blanket type fuel assemblies. The present report summarizes the objectives, domestic and international trends, principles and characteristics, core conceptual designs and future R and D plans of the RMWR. (J.P.N.)

  15. Research on Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwamura, Takamichi; Okubo, Tsutomu; Shimada, Shoichiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment] [and others

    1999-11-01

    The Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR) is a next generation water-cooled reactor which aims at effective utilization of uranium resource, high burn-up and long operation cycle, and plutonium multi-recycle. These characteristics can be achieved by the high conversion ratio from {sup 238}U to {sup 239}Pu resulted from the higher neutron energy spectrum in comparison to conventional light water reactors. Considering the extension of LWR utilization, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) started the research on it in 1997 and then started a collaboration in the conceptual design study with the Japan Atomic Power Company (JAPCO) in 1998. In the core design study of the RMWR, negative void reactivity coefficient is required from a viewpoint of safety as well as establishing hard neutron spectrum. In order to achieve the above trade-off characteristics simultaneously, several basic core design ideas should be combined, such as a tight lattice fuel assembly, a flat core, a blanket effect, a streaming effect and so on. Up to now, five core concepts have been created for the RMWR as follows: a high conversion BWR with high void fraction and super-flat core, a long operation cycle BWR using void channels, a high conversion BWR without blankets, a high conversion PWR using heavy water as a coolant, and a PWR for plutonium multi-recycle using seed-blanket type fuel assemblies. The present report summarizes the objectives, domestic and international trends, principles and characteristics, core conceptual designs and future R and D plans of the RMWR. (J.P.N.)

  16. Beryllium and zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salesse, Marc

    1959-01-01

    Pure beryllium and zirconium, both isolated at about the same date but more than a century ago remained practically unused for eighty years. Fifteen years ago they were released from this state of inactivity by atomic energy, which made them into current metal a with an annual production which runs into tens of tons for the one and thousands for the other. The reasons for this promotion promise well for the future of the two metals, which moreover will probably find additional uses in other branches of industry. The attraction of beryllium and zirconium for atomic energy is easily explained. The curve of figure 1 gives the price per gram of uranium-235 as a function of enrichment: this price increases by about a factor of 3 on passing from natural uranium (0, 7 percent 235 U) to almost pure uranium-235. Because of their tow capture cross-section beryllium and zirconium make it possible, or at least easier, to use natural uranium and they thus enjoy an advantage the extent of which must be calculated for each reactor or fuel element project, but which is generally considerable. It will be seen later that this advantage should be based on figures which are even more favourable that would appear from the simple ratio 3 of the price of pure uranium- 235 contained in natural uranium. Reprint of a paper published in 'Industries Atomiques' - n. 1-2, 1959

  17. Method for welding beryllium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, R.D.; Smith, F.M.; O`Leary, R.F.

    1997-04-01

    A method is provided for joining beryllium pieces which comprises: depositing aluminum alloy on at least one beryllium surface; contacting that beryllium surface with at least one other beryllium surface; and welding the aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces together. The aluminum alloy may be deposited on the beryllium using gas metal arc welding. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be subjected to elevated temperatures and pressures to reduce porosity before welding the pieces together. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be machined into a desired welding joint configuration before welding. The beryllium may be an alloy of beryllium or a beryllium compound. The aluminum alloy may comprise aluminum and silicon. 9 figs.

  18. Method for welding beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, R.D.; Smith, F.M.; O'Leary, R.F.

    1997-01-01

    A method is provided for joining beryllium pieces which comprises: depositing aluminum alloy on at least one beryllium surface; contacting that beryllium surface with at least one other beryllium surface; and welding the aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces together. The aluminum alloy may be deposited on the beryllium using gas metal arc welding. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be subjected to elevated temperatures and pressures to reduce porosity before welding the pieces together. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be machined into a desired welding joint configuration before welding. The beryllium may be an alloy of beryllium or a beryllium compound. The aluminum alloy may comprise aluminum and silicon. 9 figs

  19. Status and perspective of development of cold moderators at the IBR-2 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulikov, S; Shabalin, E

    2012-01-01

    The modernized IBR-2M reactor will start its operation with three water grooved moderators in 2011. Afterwards, they will be exchanged by a new complex of moderators. The complex consists of three so-called kombi-moderators, each of them containing a pre-moderator, a cold moderator, grooved ambient water moderators and post-moderators. They are mounted onto three moveable trolleys that serve to deliver and install moderators near the reactor core. The project is divided in three stages. In 2012 the first stage of development of complex of moderators will be finished. The water grooved moderator will be replaced with the new kombi-moderator for beams nos. 7, 8, 10, 11. Main parameters of moderators for this direction will be studied then. The next stages will be done for beams nos. 2-3 and for beams nos. 1, 9, 4-6, consequently. Cold moderator chambers at the modernized IBR-2 reactor are filled with thousands of beads (∼3.5 - 4 mm in diameter) of moderating material. The cold helium gas flow delivers beads from the charging device to the moderator during the fulfillment process and cools down them during the reactor cycle. The mixture of aromatic hydrocarbons (mesithylen and m-xylen) has been chosen as moderating material. The explanation of the choice of material for novel cold neutron moderators, configuration of moderator complex for the modernized IBR-2 reactor and the main results of optimization of moderator complex for the third stage of moderator development are discussed in the article.

  20. Status and perspective of development of cold moderators at the IBR-2 reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulikov, S.; Shabalin, E.

    2012-03-01

    The modernized IBR-2M reactor will start its operation with three water grooved moderators in 2011. Afterwards, they will be exchanged by a new complex of moderators. The complex consists of three so-called kombi-moderators, each of them containing a pre-moderator, a cold moderator, grooved ambient water moderators and post-moderators. They are mounted onto three moveable trolleys that serve to deliver and install moderators near the reactor core. The project is divided in three stages. In 2012 the first stage of development of complex of moderators will be finished. The water grooved moderator will be replaced with the new kombi-moderator for beams #7, 8, 10, 11. Main parameters of moderators for this direction will be studied then. The next stages will be done for beams #2-3 and for beams #1, 9, 4-6, consequently. Cold moderator chambers at the modernized IBR-2 reactor are filled with thousands of beads (~3.5 - 4 mm in diameter) of moderating material. The cold helium gas flow delivers beads from the charging device to the moderator during the fulfillment process and cools down them during the reactor cycle. The mixture of aromatic hydrocarbons (mesithylen and m-xylen) has been chosen as moderating material. The explanation of the choice of material for novel cold neutron moderators, configuration of moderator complex for the modernized IBR-2 reactor and the main results of optimization of moderator complex for the third stage of moderator development are discussed in the article.

  1. Compact power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wetch, J.R.; Dieckamp, H.M.; Wilson, L.A.

    1978-01-01

    There is disclosed a small compact nuclear reactor operating in the epithermal neutron energy range for supplying power at remote locations, as for a satellite. The core contains fuel moderator elements of Zr hydride with 7 w/o of 93% enriched uranium alloy. The core has a radial beryllium reflector and is cooled by liquid metal coolant such as NaK. The reactor is controlled and shut down by moving portions of the reflector

  2. Hydrogen transport behavior of beryllium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderl, R.A.; Hankins, M.R.; Longhurst, G.R.; Pawelko, R.J. (Idaho National Engineering Lab., EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Macaulay-Newcombe, R.G. (Dept. of Engineering Physics, Univ. Hamilton, ON (Canada))

    1992-12-01

    Beryllium is being evaluated for use as a plasma-facing material in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). One concern in the evaluation is the retention and permeation of tritium implanted into the plasma-facing surface. We performed laboratory-scale studies to investigate mechanisms that influence hydrogen transport and retention in beryllium foil specimens of rolled powder metallurgy product and rolled ingot cast beryllium. Specimen characterization was accomplished using scanning electron microscopy. Auger electron spectroscopy, and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) techniques. Hydrogen transport was investigated using ion-beam permeation experiments and nuclear reaction analysis (NRA). Results indicate that trapping plays a significant role in permeation, re-emission, and retention, and that surface processes at both upstream and downstream surfaces are also important. (orig.).

  3. Calculations on heavy-water moderated and cooled natural uranium fuelled power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinedo V, J.L.

    1979-01-01

    One of the codes that the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (Mexico) has for the nuclear reactors design calculations is the LEOPARD code. This work studies the reliability of this code in reactors design calculations which component materials are the same of the heavy water moderated and cooled, natural uranium fuelled power reactors. (author)

  4. Status of material development for lifetime expansion of beryllium reflector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorn, C [Materion Brush Beryllium and Composites, California (United States); Tsuchiya, Kunihiko; Kawamura, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Oarai Research and Development Center, Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan); Hatano, Y [Univ. of Toyama, Toyama (Japan); Chakrov, P [INP-KNNC, Almaty (Kazakhstan); Kodama, M [Nippon Nuclear Fuel Development Co., Ltd., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2012-03-15

    Beryllium has been used as the reflector element material in the reactor, specifically S-200F structural grade beryllium manufactured by Materion Brush Beryllium and Composites (former, Brush Wellman Inc.). As a part of the reactor upgrade, the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) also has carried out the cooperation experiments to extend the operating lifetime of the beryllium reflector elements. It will first be necessary to determine which of the material's physical, mechanical and chemical properties will be the most influential on that choice. The irradiation testing plans to evaluate the various beryllium grades are also briefly considered and prepared. In this paper, material selection, irradiation test plan and PEI development for lifetime expansion of beryllium are described for material testing reactors. (author)

  5. Studies on gadolinium precipitation in moderator system of nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, Akhilesh C.; Rajesh, Puspalata; Rufus, A.L.; Velmurugan, S.

    2015-01-01

    Gadolinium is used in the moderator system of many Pressurised Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs) for start-up, shut-down and reactivity control during operation. It is very much essential to maintain gadolinium concentration in the system as desired. It has been reported that gadolinium gets precipitated in as oxalate in carbonated water under the influence of γ-radiation. Hence, studies were carried out to investigate the effect of dose, presence of other metal ions and metal surfaces on the precipitation of gadolinium. The results showed that the amount of carboxylic acids viz., formic acid and oxalic acid, formed due to radiolysis is dependent on the dose and that the curve passes though a maxima. Gadolinium is added in higher concentration in Advanced Heavy Water Reactor. So, experiments with high concentration of gadolinium were also carried out. Ultra pure water saturated with high purity CO 2 containing gadolinium and desired ion/surface was irradiated with γ-radiation from 60 Co source at 25°C to doses ranging from 2.5-16.6 Mrad. At lower doses, formation of carboxylic acids takes place but as the dose increases, decomposition of these acids starts and hence the concentration Vs dose passes through a maximum. It was found that precipitation of gadolinium as oxalate occurred at lower doses. At higher doses, it was seen that pH of the solution decreases and hence solubility of gadolinium oxalate increases. It was also observed that the amount of gadolinium precipitated varied linearly with the initial concentration of gadolinium varying from 2 ppm to 20 ppm. While for gadolinium concentration from 20 ppm to 400 ppm, gadolinium in particulate form was observed. The amount of carboxylic acids formed depends on the nature of cations present in solution. It was found that the amount of oxalic acid formed in the case of gadolinium was more than that formed in the case of sodium. Presence of metal oxides such as ZrO 2 formed over zircoloy surfaces was found to

  6. The structure and thermal properties of plasma-sprayed beryllium for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, R.G.; Bartlett, A.; Elliott, K.E.; Hollis, K.J.

    1996-01-01

    Plasma spraying is being studied for in situ repair of damaged Be and W plasma facing surfaces for ITER, the next generation magnetic fusion energy device, and is also being considered for fabricating Be and W plasma-facing components for the first wall of ITER. Investigators at LANL's Beryllium Atomization and Thermal Spray Facility have concentrated on investigating the structure-property relation between as-deposited microstructures of plasma sprayed Be coatings and resulting thermal properties. In this study, the effect of initial substrate temperature on resulting thermal diffusivity of Be coatings and the thermal diffusivity at the coating/Be substrate interface (interface thermal resistance) was investigated. Results show that initial Be substrate temperatures above 600 C can improve the thermal diffusivity of the Be coatings and minimize any thermal resistance at the interface between the Be coating and Be substrate

  7. Beryllium processing technology review for applications in plasma-facing components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, R.G.; Jacobson, L.A.; Stanek, P.W.

    1993-07-01

    Materials research and development activities for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), i.e., the next generation fusion reactor, are investigating beryllium as the first-wall containment material for the reactor. Important in the selection of beryllium is the ability to process, fabricate and repair beryllium first-wall components using existing technologies. Two issues that will need to be addressed during the engineering design activity will be the bonding of beryllium tiles in high-heat-flux areas of the reactor, and the in situ repair of damaged beryllium tiles. The following review summarizes the current technology associated with welding and joining of beryllium to itself and other materials, and the state-of-the-art in plasma-spray technology as an in situ repair technique for damaged beryllium tiles. In addition, a review of the current status of beryllium technology in the former Soviet Union is also included

  8. Beryllium processing technology review for applications in plasma-facing components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, R.G.; Jacobson, L.A.; Stanek, P.W.

    1993-07-01

    Materials research and development activities for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), i.e., the next generation fusion reactor, are investigating beryllium as the first-wall containment material for the reactor. Important in the selection of beryllium is the ability to process, fabricate and repair beryllium first-wall components using existing technologies. Two issues that will need to be addressed during the engineering design activity will be the bonding of beryllium tiles in high-heat-flux areas of the reactor, and the in situ repair of damaged beryllium tiles. The following review summarizes the current technology associated with welding and joining of beryllium to itself and other materials, and the state-of-the-art in plasma-spray technology as an in situ repair technique for damaged beryllium tiles. In addition, a review of the current status of beryllium technology in the former Soviet Union is also included.

  9. Experiments on tritium behavior in beryllium, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishitsuka, Etsuo; Kawamura, Hiroshi; Nakata, Hirokatsu; Sugai, Hiroyuki; Tanase, Masakazu.

    1990-02-01

    Beryllium has been used as the neutron reflector of material testing reactor and as the neutron multiplier for the fusion reactor lately. To study the tritium behavior in beryllium, we conducted the experiments, i.e., tritium release by recoil or diffusion by using the hot-pressed beryllium which had been produced both tritium and helium by neutron irradiation. From our experiments, we found that (1) amount of tritium production per one cycle irradiation (lasting 22 days) of JMTR is 10 mCi/g, (2) amount of tritium per surface area of hot-pressed beryllium released by recoil is 4 μCi/cm 2 , (3) diffusion coefficient of tritium in a temperature range of 800 ∼1180degC can be expressed with the following equation; D = 8.7 x 10 4 exp(-2.9x10 5 /R/T) cm 2 /s. (author)

  10. Power spectral density measurements with 252Cf for a light water moderated research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, W.T.; Mihalczo, J.T.

    1979-01-01

    A method of determining the reactivity of far subcritical systems from neutron noise power spectral density measurements with 252 Cf has previously been tested in fast reactor critical assemblies: a mockup of the Fast Flux Test Facility reactor and a uranium metal sphere. Calculations indicated that this measurement was feasible for a pressurized water reactor (PWR). In order to evaluate the ability to perform these measurements with moderated reactors which have long prompt neutron lifetimes, measurements were performed with a small plate-type research reactor whose neutron lifetime (57 microseconds) was about a factor of three longer than that of a PWR and approx. 50% longer than that of a boiling water reactor. The results of the first measurements of power spectral densities with 252 Cf for a water moderated reactor are presented

  11. Concept of safe tank-type water cooled and moderated reactor with HTGR microparticle fuel compacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gol'tsev, A.O.; Kukharkin, N.E.; Mosevitskij, I.S.; Ponomarev-Stepnoj, N.N.; Popov, S.V.; Udyanskij, Yu.N.; Tsibul'skij, V.F.

    1993-01-01

    Concept of safe tank-type water-cooled and moderated reactor on the basis of HTGR fuel microparticles which enable to avoid environment contamination with radioactive products under severe accidents, is proposed. Results of neutron-physical and thermal-physical studies of water cooled and moderated reactor with HTGR microparticle compacts are presented. Characteristics of two reactors with thermal power of 500 and 1500 MW are indicated within the concept frames. The reactor behaviour under severe accident connected with complete loss of water coolant is considered. It is shown that under such an accident the fission products release from fuel microparticles does not occur

  12. Comparison of CFD Simulations of Moderator Circulation Phenomena for a CANDU-6 Reactor and MCT Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyoung Tae; Cha, Jae Eun Cha; Seo, Han

    2013-01-01

    The Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute is constructing a Moderator Circulation Test (MCT) facility to simulate thermal-hydraulic phenomena in a 1/4 scale-down moderator tank similar to that in a prototype power plant during steady state operation and accident conditions. In the present study, two numerical CFD simulations for the prototype and scaled-down moderator tanks were carried out to check whether the moderator flow and temperature patterns of both the prototype reactor and scaled-down facility are identical. Two different sets of simulations of the moderator circulation phenomena were performed for a CANDU-6 reactor and MCT facility. The results of both simulations were compared to study the effects of scaling on the moderator flow and temperature patterns. There is no significant difference in the results between the prototype and scaled-down model. It was concluded that the present scaling method is properly employed to model the real reactor in the MCT facility

  13. Comparison of CFD Simulations of Moderator Circulation Phenomena for a CANDU-6 Reactor and MCT Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyoung Tae; Cha, Jae Eun Cha; Seo, Han [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    The Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute is constructing a Moderator Circulation Test (MCT) facility to simulate thermal-hydraulic phenomena in a 1/4 scale-down moderator tank similar to that in a prototype power plant during steady state operation and accident conditions. In the present study, two numerical CFD simulations for the prototype and scaled-down moderator tanks were carried out to check whether the moderator flow and temperature patterns of both the prototype reactor and scaled-down facility are identical. Two different sets of simulations of the moderator circulation phenomena were performed for a CANDU-6 reactor and MCT facility. The results of both simulations were compared to study the effects of scaling on the moderator flow and temperature patterns. There is no significant difference in the results between the prototype and scaled-down model. It was concluded that the present scaling method is properly employed to model the real reactor in the MCT facility.

  14. Beryllium R and D for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scaffidi-Argentina, F.; Longhurst, G.R.; Shestakov, V.; Kawamura, H.

    2000-01-01

    Beryllium is one of the primary candidates as both plasma-facing material (PFM) and neutron multiplier in the next-step fusion reactors. Both sintered-product blocks and pebbles are considered in fusion reactor designs. Beryllium evaporated on carbon tiles has also been used in Joint European Torus (JET) and may be considered for other designs. Future efforts are directed toward the pebble form of beryllium. Research and evaluations of data are underway to determine the most attractive material processing approaches in terms of fabrication cost and quality; technical issues associated with heat transfer; thermal, mechanical and irradiation stability; safety and tritium release. Beryllium plasma-facing components will require periodic repair or replacement, therefore disposal or recycling of activated and tritiated beryllium will also be a concern. Beryllium as a component of the molten salt, Flibe is also being considered in novel approaches to the plasma-structure interface. This paper deals with the main issues related to the use of Be in a fusion reactor as both neutron multiplier and first wall material. These issues include potential reactions with steam during accidents and the health and environmental aspects of its use, reprocessing and reuse, or disposal

  15. Beryllium R and D for fusion applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scaffidi-Argentina, F. E-mail: francesco.scaffidi@iket.fzk.de; Longhurst, G.R.; Shestakov, V.; Kawamura, H

    2000-11-01

    Beryllium is one of the primary candidates as both plasma-facing material (PFM) and neutron multiplier in the next-step fusion reactors. Both sintered-product blocks and pebbles are considered in fusion reactor designs. Beryllium evaporated on carbon tiles has also been used in Joint European Torus (JET) and may be considered for other designs. Future efforts are directed toward the pebble form of beryllium. Research and evaluations of data are underway to determine the most attractive material processing approaches in terms of fabrication cost and quality; technical issues associated with heat transfer; thermal, mechanical and irradiation stability; safety and tritium release. Beryllium plasma-facing components will require periodic repair or replacement, therefore disposal or recycling of activated and tritiated beryllium will also be a concern. Beryllium as a component of the molten salt, Flibe is also being considered in novel approaches to the plasma-structure interface. This paper deals with the main issues related to the use of Be in a fusion reactor as both neutron multiplier and first wall material. These issues include potential reactions with steam during accidents and the health and environmental aspects of its use, reprocessing and reuse, or disposal.

  16. Mechanical properties of irradiated beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beeston, J.M.; Longhurst, G.R.; Wallace, R.S.

    1992-01-01

    Beryllium is planned for use as a neutron multiplier in the tritium breeding blanket of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). After fabricating samples of beryllium at densities varying from 80 to 100% of the theoretical density, we conducted a series of experiments to measure the effect of neutron irradiation on mechanical properties, especially strength and ductility. Samples were irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to a neutron fluence of 2.6 x 10 25 n/m 2 (E > MeV) at an irradiation temperature of 75deg C. These samples were subsequently compression-tested at room temperature, and the results were compared with similar tests on unirradiated specimens. We found that the irradiation increased the strength by approximately four times and reduced the ductility to approximately one fourth. Failure was generally ductile, but the 80% dense irradiated samples failed in brittle fracture with significant generation of fine particles and release of small quantities of tritium. (orig.)

  17. Mechanical properties of irradiated beryllium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeston, J. M.; Longhurst, G. R.; Wallace, R. S.; Abeln, S. P.

    1992-10-01

    Beryllium is planned for use as a neutron multiplier in the tritium breeding blanket of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). After fabricating samples of beryllium at densities varying from 80 to 100% of the theoretical density, we conducted a series of experiments to measure the effect of neutron irradiation on mechanical properties, especially strength and ductility. Samples were irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to a neutron fluence of 2.6 × 10 25 n/m 2 ( E > 1 MeV) at an irradiation temperature of 75°C. These samples were subsequently compression-tested at room temperature, and the results were compared with similar tests on unirradiated specimens. We found that the irradiation increased the strength by approximately four times and reduced the ductility to approximately one fourth. Failure was generally ductile, but the 80% dense irradiated samples failed in brittle fracture with significant generation of fine particles and release of small quantities of tritium.

  18. Safety handling of beryllium for fusion technology R and D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Hiroshi; Okamoto, Makoto; Terai, Takayuki; Odawara, Osamu; Ashibe, Kusuo; Ohara, Atsushi.

    1992-07-01

    Feasibility of beryllium use as a blanket neutron multiplier, first wall and plasma facing material has been studied for the D-T burning experiment reactors such as ITER. Various experimental work of beryllium and its compounds will be performed under the conditions of high temperature and high energy particle exposure simulating fusion reactor conditions. Beryllium is known as a hazardous substance and its handling has been carefully controlled by various health and safe guidances and/or regulations in many countries. Japanese regulations for hazardous substance provide various guidelines on beryllium for the protection of industrial workers and environment. This report was prepared for the safe handling of beryllium in a laboratory scale experiments for fusion technology R and D such as blanket development. Major items in this report are; (1) Brief review of guidances and regulations in USA, UK and Japan. (2) Safe handling and administration manuals at beryllium facilities in INEL, LANL and JET. (3) Conceptual design study of beryllium handling facility for small to mid-scale blanket R and D. (4) Data on beryllium toxicity, example of clinical diagnosis of beryllium disease, and environmental occurence of beryllium. (5) Personnel protection tools of Japanese Industrial Standard for hazardous substance. (author) 61 refs

  19. Interaction of hydrogen and its isotopes with irradiated beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tazhibaeva, I.L.; Shestakov, V.P.; Klepikov, A.Kh.; Pomanenko, O.G.; Chikhraj, E.V.; Kenzhin, E.A.; Zverev, V.V.; Kolbanenkov, A.N.

    2000-01-01

    In the article the results of experiments on hydrogen and its isotopes accumulation and gas-release from irradiated beryllium are presented. The irradiation was conducted at different media and temperatures in the RA and IVG.1M reactors. The measurements were carried out by thermal desorption method. Hydrogen release from beryllium samples saturated at different conditions were calculated. Dependence of hydrogen confinement character in beryllium from grain orientation in the sample, temperature and irradiation rate was revealed

  20. Natural uranium fueled light water moderated breeding hybrid power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenspan, E.; Schneider, A.; Misolovin, A.; Gilai, D.; Levin, P.

    The feasibility of fission-fusion hybrid reactors based on breeding light water thermal fission systems is investigated. The emphasis is on fuel-self-sufficient (FSS) hybrid power reactors that are fueled with natural uranium. Other LWHRs considered include FSS-LWHRs that are fueled with spent fuel from LWRs, and LWHRs which are to supplement LWRs to provide a tandem LWR-LWHR power economy that is fuel-self-sufficient

  1. Conceptual design of a pressure tube light water reactor with variable moderator control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rachamin, R.; Fridman, E.; Galperin, A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the development of innovative pressure tube light water reactor with variable moderator control. The core layout is derived from a CANDU line of reactors in general, and advanced ACR-1000 design in particular. It should be stressed however, that while some of the ACR-1000 mechanical design features are adopted, the core design basics of the reactor proposed here are completely different. First, the inter fuel channels spacing, surrounded by the calandria tank, contains a low pressure gas instead of heavy water moderator. Second, the fuel channel design features an additional/external tube (designated as moderator tube) connected to a separate moderator management system. The moderator management system is design to vary the moderator tube content from 'dry' (gas) to 'flooded' (light water filled). The dynamic variation of the moderator is a unique and very important feature of the proposed design. The moderator variation allows an implementation of the 'breed and burn' mode of operation. The 'breed and burn' mode of operation is implemented by keeping the moderator tube empty ('dry' filled with gas) during the breed part of the fuel depletion and subsequently introducing the moderator by 'flooding' the moderator tube for the 'burn' part. This paper assesses the conceptual feasibility of the proposed concept from a neutronics point of view. (authors)

  2. Study on the effect of moderator density reactivity for Kartini reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budi Rohman; Widarto

    2009-01-01

    One of important characteristics of water-cooled reactors is the change of reactivity due to change in the density of coolant or moderator. This parameter generally has negative value and it has significant role in preventing the excursion of power during operation. Many thermal-hydraulic codes for nuclear reactors require this parameter as the input to account for reactivity feedback due to increase in moderator voids and the subsequent decrease in moderator density during operation. Kartini reactor is cooled and moderated by water, therefore, it is essential to study the effect of the change in moderator density as well as to determine the value of void or moderator density reactivity coefficient in order to characterize its behavior resulting from the presence of vapor or change of moderator density during operation. Analysis by MCNP code shows that the reactivity of core is decreasing with the decrease in moderator density. The analysis estimates the void or moderator density reactivity coefficient for Kartini Reactor to be -2.17×10-4 Δρ/ % void . (author)

  3. Calculation of fuel and moderator temperature coefficients in APR1400 nuclear reactor by MVP code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pham Tuan Nam; Le Thi Thu; Nguyen Huu Tiep; Tran Viet Phu

    2014-01-01

    In this project, these fuel and moderator temperature coefficients were calculated in APR1400 nuclear reactor by MVP code. APR1400 is an advanced water pressurized reactor, that was researched and developed by Korea Experts, its electric power is 1400 MW. The neutronics calculations of full core is very important to analysis and assess a reactor. Results of these calculation is input data for thermal-hydraulics calculations, such as fuel and moderator temperature coefficients. These factors describe the self-safety characteristics of nuclear reactor. After obtaining these reactivity parameters, they were used to re-run the thermal hydraulics calculations in LOCA and RIA accidents. These thermal-hydraulics results were used to analysis effects of reactor physics parameters to thermal hydraulics situation in nuclear reactors. (author)

  4. Chronic Beryllium Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... who are exposed to beryllium will not experience health effects. Studies have shown that on average, 1 – 6 percent of exposed workers develop beryllium sensitization, although the rates can be ...

  5. Moderator configuration options for a low-enriched uranium fueled Kilowatt-class Space Nuclear Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, Jeffrey C.; Mencarini, Leonardo de Holanda; Guimaraes, Lamartine N. F.

    2015-01-01

    The Brazilian Air Force, through its Institute for Advanced Studies (Instituto de Estudos Avancados, IEAv/DCTA), and the Colorado School of Mines (CSM) are studying the feasibility of a space nuclear reactor with a power of 1-5 kW e and fueled with Low-Enriched Uranium (LEU). This type of nuclear reactor would be attractive to signatory countries of the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) or commercial interests. A LEU-fueled space reactor would avoid the security concerns inherent with Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel. As an initial step, the HEU-fueled Kilowatt Reactor Using Stirling Technology (KRUSTY) designed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory serves as a basis for a similar reactor fueled with LEU fuel. Using the computational code MCNP6 to predict the reactor neutronics performance, the size of the resulting reactor fueled with 19.75 wt% enriched uranium-10 wt% molybdenum alloy fuel is adjusted to match the excess reactivity of KRUSTY. Then, zirconium hydride moderator is added to the core to reduce the size of the reactor. This work presents the preliminary results of the computational modeling, with special emphasis on the comparison between homogeneous and heterogeneous moderator systems, in terms of the core diameter required to meet a specific multiplication factor (k eff = 1.035). This comparison illustrates the impact of moderator configuration on the size and performance of a LEU-fueled kilowatt-class space nuclear reactor. (author)

  6. Moderator configuration options for a low-enriched uranium fueled Kilowatt-class Space Nuclear Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Jeffrey C., E-mail: kingjc@mines.edu [Nuclear Science and Engineering Program, Colorado School of Mines (CSM), Golden, CO (United States); Mencarini, Leonardo de Holanda; Guimaraes, Lamartine N. F., E-mail: guimaraes@ieav.cta.br, E-mail: mencarini@ieav.cta.br [Instituto de Estudos Avancados (IEAV), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Divisao de Energia Nuclear

    2015-07-01

    The Brazilian Air Force, through its Institute for Advanced Studies (Instituto de Estudos Avancados, IEAv/DCTA), and the Colorado School of Mines (CSM) are studying the feasibility of a space nuclear reactor with a power of 1-5 kW{sub e} and fueled with Low-Enriched Uranium (LEU). This type of nuclear reactor would be attractive to signatory countries of the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) or commercial interests. A LEU-fueled space reactor would avoid the security concerns inherent with Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel. As an initial step, the HEU-fueled Kilowatt Reactor Using Stirling Technology (KRUSTY) designed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory serves as a basis for a similar reactor fueled with LEU fuel. Using the computational code MCNP6 to predict the reactor neutronics performance, the size of the resulting reactor fueled with 19.75 wt% enriched uranium-10 wt% molybdenum alloy fuel is adjusted to match the excess reactivity of KRUSTY. Then, zirconium hydride moderator is added to the core to reduce the size of the reactor. This work presents the preliminary results of the computational modeling, with special emphasis on the comparison between homogeneous and heterogeneous moderator systems, in terms of the core diameter required to meet a specific multiplication factor (k{sub eff} = 1.035). This comparison illustrates the impact of moderator configuration on the size and performance of a LEU-fueled kilowatt-class space nuclear reactor. (author)

  7. Long-term scenarios of power reactors and fuel cycle development and the role of reduced moderation water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Osamu; Tatematsu, Kenji; Tanaka, Yoji

    2000-01-01

    Reduced moderation spectrum reactor is one of water cooled type reactors in future, which is based on the advanced technology of conventional nuclear power plants. The reduced moderation water reactor (RMWR) has various advantages, such as effective utilization of uranium resources, high conversion ratio, high burn-up, long-term cycle operation, and multiple recycle of plutonium. The RMWR is expected to be a substitute of fast breeder reactor (FBR) of which the development encounters with some technical and financial difficulties, and discontinues in many countries. The role of the RMWR on long-term scenarios of power reactor and fuel cycle development in Japan is investigated from the point of view of uranium resource needed. The consumption of natural uranium needed up to the year 2200 is calculated on various assumptions for the following three cases: (1) no breeder reactor; plutonium-thermal cycle in conventional light water reactor, (2) introduction of the FBR, and (3) introduction of the RMWR. The amounts of natural uranium consumption depends largely on the conversion ratio and plutonium quantity needed of a reactor type. The RMWR has a possibility as a substitute technology of the FBR with the improvement of conversion ratio and high burn-up. (Suetake, M.)

  8. Long-term scenarios of power reactors and fuel cycle development and the role of reduced moderation water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Osamu; Tatematsu, Kenji; Tanaka, Yoji [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2000-06-01

    Reduced moderation spectrum reactor is one of water cooled type reactors in future, which is based on the advanced technology of conventional nuclear power plants. The reduced moderation water reactor (RMWR) has various advantages, such as effective utilization of uranium resources, high conversion ratio, high burn-up, long-term cycle operation, and multiple recycle of plutonium. The RMWR is expected to be a substitute of fast breeder reactor (FBR) of which the development encounters with some technical and financial difficulties, and discontinues in many countries. The role of the RMWR on long-term scenarios of power reactor and fuel cycle development in Japan is investigated from the point of view of uranium resource needed. The consumption of natural uranium needed up to the year 2200 is calculated on various assumptions for the following three cases: (1) no breeder reactor; plutonium-thermal cycle in conventional light water reactor, (2) introduction of the FBR, and (3) introduction of the RMWR. The amounts of natural uranium consumption depends largely on the conversion ratio and plutonium quantity needed of a reactor type. The RMWR has a possibility as a substitute technology of the FBR with the improvement of conversion ratio and high burn-up. (Suetake, M.)

  9. Moderator clean-up system in a heavy water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasada, Yasuhiro; Hamamura, Kenji.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To decrease the fluctuation of the poison concentration in heavy water moderator due to a heavy water clean-up system. Constitution: To a calandria tank filled with heavy water as poison-containing moderators, are connected both end of a pipeway through which heavy water flows and to which a clean-up device is provided. Strongly basic resin is filled within the clean-up device and a cooler is disposed to a pipeway at the upstream of the clean-up device. In this structure, the temperature of heavy water at the inlet of the clean-up device at a constant level between the temperature at the exit of the cooler and the lowest temperature for the moderator to thereby decrease the fluctuation in the poison concentration in the heavy water moderator due to the heavy water clean-up device. (Moriyama, K.)

  10. Summary of the 4th workshop on the reduced-moderation water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakatsuka, Toru; Ishikawa, Nobuyuki; Iwamura, Takamichi (eds.) [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-09-01

    The research on Reduced-Moderation Water Reactors (RMWRs) has been performed in JAERI for the development of future innovative reactors. The workshop on the RMWRs has been held every year since fiscal 1997 aimed at information exchange between JAERI and other organizations such as universities, laboratories, utilities and vendors. The 4th workshop was held on March 2, 2001 under the joint auspices of JAERI and North Kanto branch of Atomic Energy Society of Japan. The workshop began with three lectures on recent research activities in JAERI entitled 'Recent Situation of Research on Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor', 'Analysis on Electricity Generation Costs of Reduced Moderation Water Reactors' and 'Reprocessing Technology for Spent Mixed-Oxides Fuel from LWR'. Then five lectures followed: 'Micro Reactor Physics of MOX Fueled LWR' which shows the recent results of reactor physics, Fast Reactor Cooled by Supercritical Light Water' which is another type of reduced-moderation reactor, 'Phase 1 of Feasibility Studies on Commercialized Fast Breeder Reactor Cycle System' mainly conducted by Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC), 'Integral Type Small PWR with Stand-alone Safety' which is intended to suit for the future consumers' needs, and Utilization of Plutonium in Reduced-Moderation Water Reactors' which dictates benefits of plutonium utilization with RMWRs. This report includes the original papers presented at the workshop and summaries of the questions and answers for each lecture, as well as presentation handouts, program and participant list as appendixes. The 8 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  11. Summary of the 4th workshop on the reduced-moderation water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakatsuka, Toru; Ishikawa, Nobuyuki; Iwamura, Takamichi

    2001-09-01

    The research on Reduced-Moderation Water Reactors (RMWRs) has been performed in JAERI for the development of future innovative reactors. The workshop on the RMWRs has been held every year since fiscal 1997 aimed at information exchange between JAERI and other organizations such as universities, laboratories, utilities and vendors. The 4th workshop was held on March 2, 2001 under the joint auspices of JAERI and North Kanto branch of Atomic Energy Society of Japan. The workshop began with three lectures on recent research activities in JAERI entitled 'Recent Situation of Research on Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor', 'Analysis on Electricity Generation Costs of Reduced Moderation Water Reactors' and 'Reprocessing Technology for Spent Mixed-Oxides Fuel from LWR'. Then five lectures followed: 'Micro Reactor Physics of MOX Fueled LWR' which shows the recent results of reactor physics, Fast Reactor Cooled by Supercritical Light Water' which is another type of reduced-moderation reactor, 'Phase 1 of Feasibility Studies on Commercialized Fast Breeder Reactor Cycle System' mainly conducted by Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC), 'Integral Type Small PWR with Stand-alone Safety' which is intended to suit for the future consumers' needs, and Utilization of Plutonium in Reduced-Moderation Water Reactors' which dictates benefits of plutonium utilization with RMWRs. This report includes the original papers presented at the workshop and summaries of the questions and answers for each lecture, as well as presentation handouts, program and participant list as appendixes. The 8 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  12. Calculation of reactivity of control rods in graphite moderated reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakata, H.

    1978-01-01

    A study about the method of calculation for the reactivity of control rods in graphite-moderated critical assemblies, is presented. The result of theoretical calculation, developed by super celles and Nordheim-Scalettar methods are compared with experimental results for the critical Assembly of General Atomic. The two methods are then applicable to reactivity calculation of the control rods of graphite moderated critical assemblies [pt

  13. Effect of 3-D moderator flow configurations on the reactivity of CANDU nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zadeh, Foad Mehdi; Etienne, Stephane; Chambon, Richard; Marleau, Guy; Teyssedou, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • 3-D CFD simulations of CANDU-6 moderator flows are presented. • A thermal-hydraulic code using thermal physical fluid properties is used. • The numerical approach and convergence is validated against available data. • Flow configurations are correlated using Richardson’s number. • The interaction between moderator temperatures with reactivity is determined. - Abstract: The reactivity of nuclear reactors can be affected by thermal conditions prevailing within the moderator. In CANDU reactors, the moderator and the coolant are mechanically separated but not necessarily thermally isolated. Hence, any variation of moderator flow properties may change the reactivity. Until now, nuclear reactor calculations have been performed by assuming uniform moderator flow temperature distribution. However, CFD simulations have predicted large time dependent flow fluctuations taking place inside the calandria, which can bring about local temperature variations that can exceed 50 °C. This paper presents robust CANDU 3-D CFD moderator simulations coupled to neutronic calculations. The proposed methodology makes it possible to study not only different moderator flow configurations but also their effects on the reactor reactivity coefficient.

  14. Neutron absorption profile in a reactor moderated by different mixtures of light and heavy waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagy, Mohamed E.; Aly, Mohamed N.; Gaber, Fatma A.; Dorrah, Mahmoud E.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We studied neutron absorption spectra in a mixed water moderated reactor. • Changing D 2 O% in moderator induced neutron energy spectral shift. • Most of the neutrons absorbed in control rods were epithermal. • Control rods worth changes were not proportional to changes of D 2 O% in moderator. • Control rod arrangement influenced the neutronic behavior of the reactor. - Abstract: A Monte-Carlo parametric study was carried out to investigate the neutron absorption profile in a model of LR-0 reactor when it is moderated by different mixtures of heavy/light waters at molecular ratios ranging from 0% up to 100% D 2 O at increments of 10% in D 2 O. The tallies included; neutron absorption profiles in control rods and moderator, and neutron capture profile in 238 U. The work focused on neutron absorption in control rods entailing; total mass of control rods needed to attain criticality, neutron absorption density and total neutron absorption in control rods at each of the studied mixed water moderators. The aim was to explore whether thermal neutron poisons are the most suitable poisons to be used in control rods of nuclear reactors moderated by mixed heavy/light water moderators

  15. A Graphite Isotope Ratio Method: A Primer on Estimating Plutonium Production in Graphite Moderated Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gesh, Christopher J.

    2004-01-01

    The Graphite Isotope Ratio Method (GIRM) is a technique used to estimate the total plutonium production in a graphite-moderated reactor. The cumulative plutonium production in that reactor can be accurately determined by measuring neutron irradiation induced isotopic ratio changes in certain impurity elements within the graphite moderator. The method does not require detailed knowledge of a reactor's operating history, although that knowledge can decrease the uncertainty of the production estimate. The basic premise of the Graphite Isotope Ratio Method is that the fluence in non-fuel core components is directly related to the cumulative plutonium production in the nuclear fuel

  16. Parametric study of moderator heat exchanger for Candu 6 advanced reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umar, Efrizon; Vecchiarelli, Jack

    2000-01-01

    The passive moderator system for Candu 6 advanced reactor require moderator heat exchanger with the small size and the low resistance coefficient of the shell-side. The study is to determine the required size of moderator heat exchanger, and to calculate the shell side of resistance coefficient have been done. Using computer code CATHENA, it is concluded that the moderator heat exchanger can be used at full power-normal operation condition, especially for the cases with 3600 to 8100 number of tube and 15.90 mm tube diameter. This study show that the proposed moderator heat exchanger have given satisfactory results

  17. The thorium fuel cycle in water-moderated reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Critoph, E.

    1977-05-01

    Thorium and uranium cycles are compared with regard to reactor characteristics and technology, fuel-cycle technology, economic parameters, fuel-cycle costs, and system characteristics. In heavy-water reactors (HWRs) thorium cycles having uranium requirements at equilibrium ranging from zero to a quarter of those for the natural-uranium once-through cycle appear feasible. An 'inventory' of uranium of between 1 and 2 Mg/MW(e) is required for the transition to equilibrium. The cycles with the lowest uranium requirements compete with the others only at high uranium prices. Using thorium in light-water reactors, uranium requirements can be reduced by a factor of between two and three from the once-through uranium cycle. The light-water breeder reactor, promising zero uranium requirements at equilibrium, is being developed. Larger uranium inventories are required than for the HWRs. The lead time, from a decision to use thorium to significant impact on uranium utilization (compared to uranium cycle, recycling plutonium) is some two decades

  18. Recommended design correlations for S-65 beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billone, M.C.

    1995-01-01

    The properties of tritium and helium behavior in irradiated beryllium are reviewed, along with the thermal-mechanical properties needed for ITER design analysis. Correlations are developed to describe the performance of beryllium in a fusion reactor environment. While this paper focuses on the use of beryllium as a plasma-facing component (PFC) material, the correlations presented here can also be used to describe the performance of beryllium as a neutron multiplier for a tritium breeding blanket. The performance properties for beryllium are subdivided into two categories: properties which do not change with irradiation damage to the bulk of the material; and properties which are degraded by neutron irradiation. The irradiation-independent properties described within are: thermal conductivity, specific heat capacity, thermal expansion, and elastic constants. Irradiation-dependent properties include: yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, plastic tangent modulus, uniform and total tensile elongation, thermal and irradiation-induced creep strength, He-induced swelling and tritium retention/release. The approach taken in developing properties correlations is to describe the behavior of dense, pressed S-65 beryllium -- the material chosen for ITER PFC application -- as a function of temperature. As there are essentially no data on the performance of porous and/or irradiated S-65 beryllium, the degradation of properties with as-fabricated porosity and irradiation are determined from the broad data base on S-200F, as well as other types and grades, and applied to S-65 beryllium by scaling factors. The resulting correlations can be used for Be produced by vacuum hot pressing (VHP) and cold-pressing (CP)/sintering(S)/hot-isostatic-pressing (HIP). The performance of plasma-sprayed beryllium is discussed but not quantified

  19. Laser fabrication of beryllium components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanafee, J.E.; Ramos, T.J.

    1995-08-01

    Working with the beryllium industry on commercial applications and using prototype parts, the authors have found that the use of lasers provides a high-speed, low-cost method of cutting beryllium metal, beryllium alloys, and beryllium-beryllium oxide composites. In addition, they have developed laser welding processes for commercial structural grades of beryllium that do not need a filler metal; i.e., autogenous welds were made in commercial structural grades of beryllium by using lasers

  20. Reactivity effects due to beryllium poisoning of BR2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalcheva, S.; Ponsard, B.; Koonen, E.

    2004-01-01

    This paper illustrates the impact of the poisoning of the beryllium reflector on reactivity variations of the Belgian MTR BR2 in SCK.CEN. Detailed calculations by MCNP-4C of reactivity effects caused by strong neutron absorbers 3 He and 6 Li during reactor operation history are presented. The importance of beryllium poisoning for the accuracy of reactivity predictions is discussed. (authors)

  1. The beryllium production at Ulba metallurgical plant (Ust-Kamenogrsk, Kazakhstan)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dvinskykh, E.M.; Savchuk, V.V.; Tuzov, Y.V. [Ulba Metallurgical Plant (Zavod), Ust-Kamenogorsk, Abay prospect 102 (Kazakhstan)

    1998-01-01

    The Report includes data on beryllium production of Ulba metallurgical plant, located in Ust-Kamenogorsk (Kazakhstan). Beryllium production is showed to have extended technological opportunities in manufacturing semi-products (beryllium ingots, master alloys, metallic beryllium powders, beryllium oxide) and in production of structural beryllium and its parts. Ulba metallurgical plant owns a unique technology of beryllium vacuum distillation, which allows to produce reactor grades of beryllium with a low content of metallic impurities. At present Ulba plant does not depend on raw materials suppliers. The quantity of stored raw materials and semi-products will allow to provide a 25-years work of beryllium production at a full capacity. The plant has a satisfactory experience in solving ecological problems, which could be useful in ITER program. (author)

  2. Beryllium chemistry and processing

    CERN Document Server

    Walsh, Kenneth A

    2009-01-01

    This book introduces beryllium; its history, its chemical, mechanical, and physical properties including nuclear properties. The 29 chapters include the mineralogy of beryllium and the preferred global sources of ore bodies. The identification and specifics of the industrial metallurgical processes used to form oxide from the ore and then metal from the oxide are thoroughly described. The special features of beryllium chemistry are introduced, including analytical chemical practices. Beryllium compounds of industrial interest are identified and discussed. Alloying, casting, powder processing, forming, metal removal, joining and other manufacturing processes are covered. The effect of composition and process on the mechanical and physical properties of beryllium alloys assists the reader in material selection. The physical metallurgy chapter brings conformity between chemical and physical metallurgical processing of beryllium, metal, alloys, and compounds. The environmental degradation of beryllium and its all...

  3. Summary of the 3rd workshop on the reduced-moderation water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Nobuyuki; Nakatsuka, Tohru; Iwamura, Takamichi

    2000-06-01

    The research activities of a Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR) are being performed for a development of the next generation water-cooled reactor. A workshop on the RMWR was held on March 3rd 2000 aiming to exchange information between JAERI and other organizations such as universities, laboratories, utilities and vendors. This report summarizes the contents of lectures and discussions on the workshop. The 1st workshop was held on March 1998 focusing on the review of the research activities and future research plan. The succeeding 2nd workshop was held on March 1999 focusing on the topics of the plutonium utilization in water-cooled reactors. The 3rd workshop was held on March 3rd 2000, which was attended by 77 participants. The workshop began with a lecture titled 'Recent Situation Related to Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR)', followed by 'Program on MOX Fuel Utilization in Light Water Reactors' which is the mainstream scenario of plutonium utilization by utilities, and 'Feasibility Studies on Commercialized Fast Breeder Reactor Cycle System' mainly conducted by Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC). Also, following lectures were given as the recent research activities in JAERI: 'Progress in Design Study on Reduced-Moderation Water Reactors', 'Long-Term Scenarios of Power Reactors and Fuel Cycle Development and the Role of Reduced Moderation Water Reactors', 'Experimental and Analytical Study on Thermal Hydraulics' and Reactor Physics Experiment Plan using TCA'. At the end of the workshop, a general discussion was performed about the research and development of the RMWR. This report includes the original papers presented at the workshop and summaries of the questions and answers for each lecture and general discussion, as well as presentation viewgraphs, program and participant list as appendixes. The 7 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  4. Summary of the 3rd workshop on the reduced-moderation water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishikawa, Nobuyuki; Nakatsuka, Tohru; Iwamura, Takamichi [eds.

    2000-06-01

    The research activities of a Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR) are being performed for a development of the next generation water-cooled reactor. A workshop on the RMWR was held on March 3rd 2000 aiming to exchange information between JAERI and other organizations such as universities, laboratories, utilities and vendors. This report summarizes the contents of lectures and discussions on the workshop. The 1st workshop was held on March 1998 focusing on the review of the research activities and future research plan. The succeeding 2nd workshop was held on March 1999 focusing on the topics of the plutonium utilization in water-cooled reactors. The 3rd workshop was held on March 3rd 2000, which was attended by 77 participants. The workshop began with a lecture titled 'Recent Situation Related to Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR)', followed by 'Program on MOX Fuel Utilization in Light Water Reactors' which is the mainstream scenario of plutonium utilization by utilities, and 'Feasibility Studies on Commercialized Fast Breeder Reactor Cycle System' mainly conducted by Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC). Also, following lectures were given as the recent research activities in JAERI: 'Progress in Design Study on Reduced-Moderation Water Reactors', 'Long-Term Scenarios of Power Reactors and Fuel Cycle Development and the Role of Reduced Moderation Water Reactors', 'Experimental and Analytical Study on Thermal Hydraulics' and Reactor Physics Experiment Plan using TCA'. At the end of the workshop, a general discussion was performed about the research and development of the RMWR. This report includes the original papers presented at the workshop and summaries of the questions and answers for each lecture and general discussion, as well as presentation viewgraphs, program and participant list as appendixes. The 7 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  5. Minor actinides incineration by loading moderated targets in fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Hongchun; Sato, Daisuke; Takeda, Toshikazu

    2000-01-01

    The effect of hydrogen concentration and loaded mass of minor actinides (MAs) in the target on the core performance and MAs transmutation rate was analyzed in this paper. An optimum core was proposed which has 96 MAs target assemblies of which MAs fuel pins per assembly is 38 with the composition ratio U/MA/Zr/H of 1/4/10/50. This optimized core offers good core performance and can transmute MAs very effectively, the transmutation rate was about 67% (939 kg) and the incinerate (transmute by fission) rate was about 35% (489 kg) through 3 years of reactor operation. It is about 2-3 times larger than current transmutation method that MAs are loaded homogeneously in the PWR and fast reactor core. (author)

  6. Beryllium. Evaluation of beryllium hydroxide industrial processes. Pt. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lires, O.A.; Delfino, C.A.; Botbol, J.

    1991-01-01

    This work continues the 'Beryllium' series. It is a historical review of different industrial processes of beryllium hydroxide obtention from beryllium ores. Flowsheats and operative parameters of five plants are provided. These plants (Degussa, Brush Beryllium Co., Beryllium Corp., Murex Ltd., SAPPI) were selected as representative samples of diverse commercial processes in different countries. (Author) [es

  7. Mechanisms of hydrogen retention in metallic beryllium and beryllium oxide and properties of ion-induced beryllium nitride; Rueckhaltemechanismen fuer Wasserstoff in metallischem Beryllium und Berylliumoxid sowie Eigenschaften von ioneninduziertem Berylliumnitrid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberkofler, Martin

    2011-09-22

    In the framework of this thesis laboratory experiments on atomically clean beryllium surfaces were performed. They aim at a basic understanding of the mechanisms occurring upon interaction of a fusion plasma with a beryllium first wall. The retention and the temperature dependent release of implanted deuterium ions are investigated. An atomistic description is developed through simulations and through the comparison with calculations based on density functional theory. The results of these investigations are compared to the behaviour of hydrogen upon implantation into thermally grown beryllium oxide layers. Furthermore, beryllium nitride is produced by implantation of nitrogen into metallic beryllium and its properties are investigated. The results are interpreted with regard to the use of beryllium in a fusion reactor. (orig.)

  8. Study on neutron irradiation behavior of beryllium as neutron multiplier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishitsuka, Etsuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    More than 300 tons beryllium is expected to be used as a neutron multiplier in ITER, and study on the neutron irradiation behavior of beryllium as the neutron multiplier with Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR) were performed to get the engineering data for fusion blanket design. This study started as the study on the tritium behavior in beryllium neutron reflector in order to make clear the generation mechanism on tritium of JMTR primary coolant since 1985. These experiences were handed over to beryllium studies for fusion study, and overall studies such as production technology of beryllium pebbles, irradiation behavior evaluation and reprocessing technology have been started since 1990. In this presentation, study on the neutron irradiation behavior of beryllium as the neutron multiplier with JMTR was reviewed from the point of tritium release, thermal properties, mechanical properties and reprocessing technology. (author)

  9. Experiments on tritium behavior in beryllium, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Hiroshi; Ishizuka, Etsuo; Matsumoto, Mikio; Inada, Seiji; Sezaki, Katsuji; Saito, Minoru; Kato, Mineo.

    1989-06-01

    In JMTR, it was observed that the tritium concentration of the primary coolant increases with the reactor operation at 50 MW. As one of the tritium generation sources, we paid attention to a neutron reflector made of beryllium because the tritium generation rate in the beryllium is bigger than other components in the reactor core. On the other hand, the irradiation test of blanket materials (i.e. tritium breeding materials and neutron multipling materials) are planned for development of the fusion reactor in JMTR and the beryllium will be also irradiated as a neutron multiplier with tritium breeding materials. Therefore, as the irradiated specimens, we used a hot-pressed beryllium disk fabricated by the same method as the neutron reflector or the neutron multiplier and conducted the irradiation tests in JMTR. The purpose of these tests are to clarify the tritium behavior in the hot-pressed beryllium. In this paper, from a viewpoint of the fabrication of capsules for neutron irradiation, the specifications of the irradiated specimens and capsules are summarized. Additionally, the results on the puncture test of the container of the irradiation specimens are described. (author)

  10. Methodology used to calculate moderator-system heat load at full power and during reactor transients in CANDU reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aydogdu, K.

    1998-01-01

    Nine components determine the moderator-system heat load during full-power operation and during a reactor power transient in a CANDU reactor. The components that contribute to the total moderator-system heat load at any time consist of the heat generated in the calandria tubes, guide tubes and reactivity mechanisms, moderator and reflector; the heat transferred from calandria shell, the inner tubesheets and the fuel channels; and the heat gained from moderator pumps and heat lost from piping. The contributions from each of these components will vary with time during a reactor transient. The sources of heat that arise from the deposition of nuclear energy can be divided into two categories, viz., a) the neutronic component (which is directly proportional to neutronic power), which includes neutron energy absorption, prompt-fission gamma absorption and capture gamma absorption; and b) the fission-product decay-gamma component, which also varies with time after initiation of the transient. An equation was derived to calculate transient heat loads to the moderator. The equation includes two independent variables that are the neutronic power and fission-product decay-gamma power fractions during the transient and a constant term that represents the heat gained from moderator pumps and heat lost from piping. The calculated heat load in the moderator during steady-state full-power operation for a CANDU 6 reactor was compared with available measurements from the Point Lepreau, Wolsong 1 and Gentilly-2 nuclear generating stations. The calculated and measured values were in reasonably good agreement. (author)

  11. Experimental estimation of moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity of the IPEN/MB-01 research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Rubens C. da; Bitelli, Ulysses D.; Mura, Luiz Ernesto C.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this article is to present the procedure for the experimental estimation of the Moderator Temperature Coefficient of Reactivity of the IPEN/MB-01 Research Reactor, a parameter that has an important role in the physics and the control operations of any reactor facility. At the experiment, the IPEN/MB-01 reactor went critical at the power of 1W (1% of its total power), and whose core configuration was 28 x 26 rectangular array of UO_2 fuel rods, inside a light water (moderator) tank. In addition, there was a heavy water (D_2O) reflector installed in the West side of the core to obtain an adequate neutron reflection along the experiment. The moderator temperature was increased in steps of 4 °C, and the measurement of the mean moderator temperature was acquired using twelve calibrated thermocouples, placed around the reactor core. As a result, the mean value of -4.81 pcm/°C was obtained for such coefficient. The curves of ρ(T) (Reactivity x Temperature) and α"M_T(T)(Moderator Temperature Coefficient of Reactivity x Temperature) were developed using data from an experimental measurement of the integral reactivity curves through the Stable Period and Inverse Kinetics Methods, that was carried out at the reactor with the same core configuration. Such curves were compared and showed a very similar behavior between them. (author)

  12. Experimental estimation of moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity of the IPEN/MB-01 research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Rubens C. da; Bitelli, Ulysses D.; Mura, Luiz Ernesto C., E-mail: rubensrcs@usp.br, E-mail: ubitelli@ipen.br, E-mail: credidiomura@gmail.com [Universidade de Sao Paulo (PNV/POLI/USP), SP (Brazil). Arquitetura Naval e Departamento de Engenharia Oceanica; Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this article is to present the procedure for the experimental estimation of the Moderator Temperature Coefficient of Reactivity of the IPEN/MB-01 Research Reactor, a parameter that has an important role in the physics and the control operations of any reactor facility. At the experiment, the IPEN/MB-01 reactor went critical at the power of 1W (1% of its total power), and whose core configuration was 28 x 26 rectangular array of UO{sub 2} fuel rods, inside a light water (moderator) tank. In addition, there was a heavy water (D{sub 2}O) reflector installed in the West side of the core to obtain an adequate neutron reflection along the experiment. The moderator temperature was increased in steps of 4 °C, and the measurement of the mean moderator temperature was acquired using twelve calibrated thermocouples, placed around the reactor core. As a result, the mean value of -4.81 pcm/°C was obtained for such coefficient. The curves of ρ(T) (Reactivity x Temperature) and α{sup M}{sub T}(T)(Moderator Temperature Coefficient of Reactivity x Temperature) were developed using data from an experimental measurement of the integral reactivity curves through the Stable Period and Inverse Kinetics Methods, that was carried out at the reactor with the same core configuration. Such curves were compared and showed a very similar behavior between them. (author)

  13. Combined BC/MD approach to the evaluation of damage from fast neutrons and its implementation for beryllium irradiation in a fusion reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borodin, V. A.; Vladimirov, P. V.

    2017-12-01

    The determination of primary damage production efficiency in metals irradiated with fast neutrons is a complex problem. Typically, the majority of atoms are displaced from their lattice positions not by neutrons themselves, but by energetic primary recoils, that can produce both single Frenkel pairs and dense localized cascades. Though a number of codes are available for the calculation of displacement damage from fast ions, they commonly use binary collision (BC) approximation, which is unreliable for dense cascades and thus tend to overestimate the number of created displacements. In order to amend the radiation damage predictions, this work suggests a combined approach, where the BC approximation is used for counting single Frenkel pairs only, whereas the secondary recoils able to produce localized dense cascades are stored for later processing, but not followed explicitly. The displacement production in dense cascades is then determined independently from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Combining contributions from different calculations, one gets the total number of displacements created by particular neutron spectrum. The approach is applied here to the case of beryllium irradiation in a fusion reactor. Using a relevant calculated energy spectrum of primary knocked-on atoms (PKAs), it is demonstrated that more than a half of the primary point defects (˜150/PKA) is produced by low-energy recoils in the form of single Frenkel pairs. The contribution to the damage from the dense cascades as predicted using the mixed BC/MD scheme, i.e. ˜110/PKA, is remarkably lower than the value deduced from uncorrected SRIM calculations (˜145/PKA), so that in the studied case SRIM tends to overpredict the total primary damage level.

  14. Pelletized cold moderator of the IBR-2 reactor: current status and future development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ananiev, V; Beliakov, A; Bulavin, M; Verkhogliadov, A; Kulagin, E; Kulikov, S; Mukhin, K; Shabalin, E; Loktaev, K

    2016-01-01

    Current status and future development of the pelletized cold moderator of the IBR-2 reactor in Neutron Physics Laboratory of JINR are represented. Nowadays cold moderator works for physical experiments and allows conducting experiments in the region of wavelengths more than 4 Å up to 10-13 times faster in comparison with the warm water moderator. Future development of the pelletized cold moderator is aimed at increasing the time of its operation for experiments and is based on three components: creation of a system of continuous charging and discharging of beads, supplementation of various additives, and use of new materials, such as triphenylmethane. (paper)

  15. Tritium release from neutron irradiated beryllium pebbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scaffidi-Argentina, F.; Werle, H. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH Technik und Umwelt (Germany). Inst. fuer Neutronenphysik und Reactortechnik

    1998-01-01

    One of the most important open issues related to beryllium for fusion applications refers to the kinetics of the tritium release as a function of neutron fluence and temperature. The EXOTIC-7 as well as the `Beryllium` experiments carried out in the HFR reactor in Petten are considered as the most detailed and significant tests for investigating the beryllium response under neutron irradiation. This paper reviews the present status of beryllium post-irradiation examinations performed at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe with samples from the above mentioned irradiation experiments, trying to elucidate the tritium release controlling processes. In agreement with previous studies it has been found that release starts at about 500-550degC and achieves a maximum at about 700-750degC. The observed release at about 500-550degC is probably due to tritium escaping from chemical traps, while the maximum release at about 700-750degC is due to tritium escaping from physical traps. The consequences of a direct contact between beryllium and ceramics during irradiation, causing tritium implanting in a surface layer of beryllium up to a depth of about 40 mm and leading to an additional inventory which is usually several times larger than the neutron-produced one, are also presented and the effects on the tritium release are discussed. (author)

  16. (Beryllium). Internal Report No. 137, Jan. 15, 1958; Le beryllium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mouret, P; Rigaud, A

    1959-07-01

    After a brief summary of the physical and chemical properties of beryllium, the various chemical treatments which can be applied to beryllium minerals either directly or after a physical enrichment are discussed. These various treatments give either the hydroxide or beryllium salts, from which either beryllium oxide or metallic beryllium can easily be obtained. The purification, analysis and uses of beryllium are also briefly discussed. (author)

  17. Noise analysis method for monitoring the moderator temperature coefficient of pressurized water reactors: Neural network calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, J.R. Jr.; Adams, J.T.

    1994-01-01

    A neural network was trained with data for the frequency response function between in-core neutron noise and core-exit thermocouple noise in a pressurized water reactor, with the moderator temperature coefficient (MTC) as target. The trained network was subsequently used to predict the MTC at other points in the same fuel cycle. Results support use of the method for operating pressurized water reactors provided noise data can be accumulated for several fuel cycles to provide a training base

  18. An optimization study of peak thermal neutron flux in moderators of advanced repetitive pulse reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asaoka, Takumi; Watanabe, N.

    1976-01-01

    In achieving a high peak thermal neutron flux in hydrogenous moderators installed in repetitive pulse reactors, the core-moderator arrangement can play as much an important role as the moderator design itself. However, the effect of the former has not been adequately emphasized to date, while a rather extensive study has been made on the latter. The present study concerns with a core-moderator system parameter optimization for a repetitive accelerator pulsed fast reactor. The results have shown that small differences in the arrangement resulting from the optimizations of various parameters are significant and the effects can be summed up to give an increase in the peak thermal flux by a factor of about two. (auth.)

  19. Extractive metallurgy of the beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, Neusa; Capocchi, Jose Deodoro Trani

    1995-01-01

    A bibliographic review is performed on the beryllium extractive metallurgy. The work describes the main type of ores and processes applied to the metallic beryllium production, beryllium oxide production using fluoride, sulfide and direct chlorination. The thermodynamic consideration are made on beryllium reduction processes, discussing the viability of the beryllium oxide and hallide reduction processes. Under the technological viewpoint, the Cu-Be alloys main production processes are discussed, and the main toxicity problems related with beryllium are mentioned

  20. An automatic regulating control system for a graphite moderated reactor using digital techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho Goncalves Junior, J. de.

    1989-01-01

    The work propose an automatic regulating control system for a graphite moderated reactor using digital techniques. The system uses a microcomputer to monitor the power and the period, to run the control algorithm, and to generate electronic signals to excite the motor, which moves vertically the control rod banks. A nuclear reactor simulator was developed to test the control system. The simulator consists of a software based on the point kinetic equations and implanted in an analogical computer. The results show that this control system has a good performance and versatility. In addition, the simulator is capable of reproducing with accuracy the behavior of a nuclear reactor. (author)

  1. Moderator feedback effects in two-dimensional nodal methods for pressurized water reactor analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downar, T.J.

    1987-01-01

    A method was developed for incorporating moderator feedback effects in two-dimensional nodal codes used for pressurized water reactor (PWR) neutronic analysis. Equations for the assembly average quality and density are developed in terms of the assembly power calculated in two dimensions. The method is validated with a Westinghouse PWR using the Electric Power Research Institute code SIMULATE-E. Results show a several percent improvement is achieved in the two-dimensional power distribution prediction compared to methods without moderator feedback

  2. Measurement of neutron disadvantage factor for fuel and moderator in the square reactor cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosevski, T.; Spiric, V.

    1964-01-01

    Full text: Heterogeneous diffusion treatment for flux distribution was used to define the direction of measurements for obtaining mean neutron flux in the moderator of the reactor cell by single integration. Factor Q for the fuel was determined by using experimental flux distribution in the cell moderator and calculated values for the function X (x;y). Experimental and calculated results are shown as a diagram. All the calculations were done on the ZUSE-Z-23 computer

  3. Reactor-moderated intermediate-energy neutron beams for neutron-capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Less, T.J.

    1987-01-01

    One approach to producing an intermediate energy beam is moderating fission neutrons escaping from a reactor core. The objective of this research is to evaluate materials that might produce an intermediate beam for NCT via moderation of fission neutrons. A second objective is to use the more promising moderator material in a preliminary design of an NCT facility at a research reactor. The evaluations showed that several materials or combinations of materials could produce a moderator source for an intermediate beam for NCT. The best neutron spectrum for use in NCT is produced by Al 2 O 3 , but mixtures of Al metal and D 2 O are also attractive. Using the best moderator materials, results were applied to the design of an NCT moderator at the Georgia Institute of Technology Research Reactor's bio-medical facility. The amount of photon shielding and thermal neutron absorber were optimized with respect to the desired photon dose rate and intermediate neutron flux at the patient position

  4. Effect of scaling on the thermal hydraulics of the moderator of a CANDU reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarchami, Araz; Ashgriz, Nasser; Kwee, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Three dimensional numerical simulations are conducted on the CANDU Moderator Test Facility (MTF) and the actual size CANDU reactor. Moderator test facility is ¼ scale of the actual reactor. The heat input and other operating conditions are scaled down from the real reactor to the MTF using constant Archimedes number (as considered in MTF experiments performed by Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd.). The heat generations inside both tanks are applied through volumetric heating. In this method, heat is added to the fluid throughout the volume as it occurs in real reactor through fission heat generation and gamma rays from radioactive materials. The temperatures in actual reactor simulation are about 10 deg C greater than in MTF simulations. The separation between high and low temperature zones are more visible in real reactor simulation comparing to MTF simulation. The result indicates that the MTF has better mixing and weaker buoyancy forces comparing to real reactor. The velocity distribution in both cases seems similar with impingement point for inlet jets in both cases at the right hand side of the tank. Although the velocities are considerably higher (about 40%) in the case of real reactor, but as we go toward inner core of the tanks, the velocities are similar and very low. Several points inside the tank are monitored for their temperature and velocity with time. The results for these points show fluctuations in both temperature and velocity inside the tank. The fluctuations frequency seems higher in the case of real reactor while the amplitude of fluctuations is smaller in real reactor in most of the points. Here, in this research we have shown that Archimedes number alone cannot be a good scaling parameter (as used in MTF experiments) and it should be used along with Rayleigh number for scaling purposes. (author)

  5. CFD simulations of moderator flow inside Calandria of the Passive Moderator Cooling System of an advanced reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pal, Eshita [Homi Bhabha National Institute, Anushaktinagar, Mumbai 400 094 (India); Kumar, Mukesh [Reactor Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Joshi, Jyeshtharaj B., E-mail: jbjoshi@gmail.com [Homi Bhabha National Institute, Anushaktinagar, Mumbai 400 094 (India); Department of Chemical Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, Matunga, Mumbai 400019 India (India); Nayak, Arun K. [Reactor Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Vijayan, Pallippattu K., E-mail: vijayanp@barc.gov.in [Reactor Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • CFD simulations in the Calandria of an advanced reactor under natural circulation. • Under natural convection, majority of the flow recirculates within the Calandria. • Maximum temperature is located at the top and center of the fuel channel matrix. • During SBO, temperature inside Calandria is stratified. - Abstract: Passive systems are being examined for the future Advanced Nuclear Reactor designs. One of such concepts is the Passive Moderator Cooling System (PMCS), which is designed to remove heat from the moderator in the Calandria vessel passively in case of an extended Station Black Out condition. The heated heavy-water moderator (due to heat transferred from the Main Heat Transport System (MHTS) and thermalization of neutrons and gamma from radioactive decay of fuel) rises upward due to buoyancy, gets cooled down in a heat exchanger and returns back to Calandria, completing a natural circulation loop. The natural circulation should provide sufficient cooling to prevent the increase of moderator temperature and pressure beyond safe limits. In an earlier study, a full-scale 1D transient simulation was performed for the reactor including the MHTS and the PMCS, in the event of a station blackout scenario (Kumar et al., 2013). The results indicate that the systems remain within the safe limits for 7 days. However, the flow inside a geometry like Calandria is quite complex due to its large size and inner complexities of dense fuel channel matrix, which was simplified as a 1D pipe flow in the aforesaid analysis. In the current work, CFD simulations are performed to study the temperature distributions and flow distribution of moderator inside the Calandria vessel using a three-dimensional CFD code, OpenFoam 2.2.0. First, a set of steady state simulation was carried out for a band of inlet mass flow rates, which gives the minimum mass flow rate required for removing the maximum heat load, by virtue of prediction of hot spots inside the Calandria

  6. The structure, properties and performance of plasma-sprayed beryllium for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, R.G.; Stanek, P.W.; Elliott, K.E.

    1995-01-01

    Plasma-spray technology is under investigation as a method for producing high thermal conductivity beryllium coatings for use in magnetic fusion applications. Recent investigations have focused on optimizing the plasma-spray process for depositing beryllium coatings on damaged beryllium surfaces. Of particular interest has been optimizing the processing parameters to maximize the through-thickness thermal conductivity of the beryllium coatings. Experimental results will be reported on the use of secondary H 2 gas additions to improve the melting of the beryllium powder and transferred-arc cleaning to improve the bonding between the beryllium coatings and the underlying surface. Information will also be presented on thermal fatigue tests which were done on beryllium coated ISX-B beryllium limiter tiles using 10 sec cycle times with 60 sec cooldowns and an International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) relevant divertor heat flux slightly in excess of 5 MW/m 2

  7. Analysis of Moderator System Failure Accidents by Using New Method for Wolsong-1 CANDU 6 Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Dongsik; Kim, Jonghyun; Cho, Cheonhwey [Atomic Creative Technology Co., Ltd., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sungmin [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    To reconfirm the safety of moderator system failure accidents, the safety analysis by using the reactor physics code, RFSP-IST, coupled with the thermal hydraulics code, CATHENA is performed additionally. In the present paper, the newly developed analysis method is briefly described and the results obtained from the moderator system failure accident simulations for Wolsong-1 CANDU 6 reactor by using the new method are summarized. The safety analysis of the moderator system failure accidents for Wolsong-1 CANDU 6 reactor was carried out by using the new code system, i. e., CATHENA and RFSP-IST, instead of the non-IST old codes, namely, SMOKIN G-2 and MODSTBOIL. The analysis results by using the new method revealed as same with the results by using the old method that the fuel integrity is warranted because the localized power peak remained well below the limits and, most importantly, the reactor operation enters into the self-shutdown mode due to the substantial loss of moderator D{sub 2}O inventory from the moderator system. In the analysis results obtained by using the old method, it was predicted that the ROP trip conditions occurred for the transient cases which are also studied in the present paper. But, in the new method, it was found that the ROP trip conditions did not occur. Consequently, in the safety analysis performed additionally by using the new method, the safety of moderator system failure accidents was reassured. In the future, the new analysis method by using the IST codes instead of the non-IST old codes for the moderator system failure accidents is strongly recommended.

  8. Calculation of the Thermal State of the Graphite Moderator of the RBMK Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vorobiev Alexander V.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This work is devoted to study the temperature field of the graphite stack of the RBMK reactor. In work was analyzed the influence of contact pressure between the components of the masonry on the temperature of the graphite moderator.

  9. Postirradiation examination of beryllium pebbles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelles, D.S.

    1998-01-01

    Postirradiation examinations of COBRA-1A beryllium pebbles irradiated in the EBR-II fast reactor at neutron fluences which generated 2700--3700 appm helium have been performed. Measurements included density change, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The major change in microstructure is development of unusually shaped helium bubbles forming as highly non-equiaxed thin platelet-like cavities on the basal plane. Measurement of the swelling due to cavity formation was in good agreement with density change measurements

  10. Conceptual designing of reduced-moderation water reactor with heavy water coolant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hibi, Kohki; Shimada, Shoichiro; Okubo, Tsutomu E-mail: okubo@hems.jaeri.go.jp; Iwamura, Takamichi; Wada, Shigeyuki

    2001-12-01

    The conceptual designing of reduced-moderation water reactors, i.e. advanced water-cooled reactors using plutonium mixed-oxide fuel with high conversion ratios more than 1.0 and negative void reactivity coefficients, has been carried out. The core is designed on the concept of a pressurized water reactor with a heavy water coolant and a triangular tight lattice fuel pin arrangement. The seed fuel assembly has an internal blanket region inside the seed fuel region as well as upper and lower blanket regions (i.e. an axial heterogeneous core). The radial blanket fuel assemblies are introduced in a checkerboard pattern among the seed fuel assemblies (i.e. a radial heterogeneous core). The radial blanket region is shorter than the seed fuel region. This study shows that the heavy water moderated core can achieve negative void reactivity coefficients and conversion ratios of 1.06-1.11.

  11. Reducing the cost of S-65C grade beryllium for ITER first wall applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaczynski, D.; Sato, K.; Savchuk, V.V.; Shestakov, V.P.

    2004-01-01

    Beryllium is the current material of choice for plasma-facing components in ITER. The present design is for 10 mm thick beryllium tiles bonded to an actively cooled copper substrate. Brush Wellman grade S65C beryllium is preferred grade off beryllium for these tiles. S65C has the best resistance to low-cycle thermal fatigue than any other beryllium grad in the world. S65C grade beryllium has been successfully deployed in fusion reactors for more than two decades, most recently in the JET reactor. This paper will detail a supply chain to produce the most cost-effective S65C plasma facing components for ITER. This paper will also propose some future work too demonstrate the best technology for bonding beryllium to copper. (author)

  12. METHOD OF BRAZING BERYLLIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanks, G.S.; Keil, R.W.

    1963-05-21

    A process is described for brazing beryllium metal parts by coating the beryllium with silver (65- 75 wt%)-aluminum alloy using a lithium fluoride (50 wt%)-lithium chloride flux, and heating the coated joint to a temperature of about 700 un. Concent 85% C for about 10 minutes. (AEC)

  13. Preparation of beryllium hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, C.B.

    1975-01-01

    A process is described for preparing beryllium hydride by the direct reaction of beryllium borohydride and aluminum hydride trimethylamine adduct. Volatile by-products and unreacted reactants are readily removed from the product mass by sublimation and/or evaporation. (U.S.)

  14. Graphite moderator annealing of the experimental reactor for irradiation (0.5 MW)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira Avila, Carlos Alberto de; Pires, Luis Fernando Goncalves

    1995-01-01

    This work describes an operational procedure for the annealing of the graphite moderator in the 0,5 MW Experimental Reactor for Irradiation. A theoretical methodology has been developed for calculating the temperature field during the annealing process. The equations for mass, momentum, and energy conservation for the coolant as well as for the energy conservation in the moderator are solved numerically. The energy stored in the graphite and released in the annealing is accounted for by the use of a modified source term in the energy conservation equation for the moderator. A good agreement has been found for comparisons of the calculations with annealing data from the BEPO reactor. The major parameters affecting annealing have also been determined. (author). 8 refs, 11 figs

  15. Reaction-diffusion modeling of hydrogen in beryllium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wensing, Mirko; Matveev, Dmitry; Linsmeier, Christian [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Institut fuer Energie- und Klimaforschung - Plasmaphysik (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Beryllium will be used as first-wall material for the future fusion reactor ITER as well as in the breeding blanket of DEMO. In both cases it is important to understand the mechanisms of hydrogen retention in beryllium. In earlier experiments with beryllium low-energy binding states of hydrogen were observed by thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) which are not yet well understood. Two candidates for these states are considered: beryllium-hydride phases within the bulk and surface effects. The retention of deuterium in beryllium is studied by a reaction rate approach using a coupled reaction diffusion system (CRDS)-model relying on ab initio data from density functional theory calculations (DFT). In this contribution we try to assess the influence of surface recombination.

  16. Study on thermal neutron spectra in reactor moderators by time-of-flight method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akino, Fujiyoshi

    1982-12-01

    Prediction of thermal neutron spectra in a reactor core plays very important role in the neutronic design of the reactor for obtaining the accurate thermal group constants. It is well known that the neutron scattering properties of the moderator materials markedly influence the thermal neutron spectra. Therefore, 0 0 angular dependent thermal neutron spectra were measured by the time-of-flight method in the following moderator bulks 1) Graphite bulk poisoned with boron at the temperatures from 20 to 800 0 C, 2) Light water bulk poisoned with Cadmium and/or Indium, 3) Light water-natural uranium heterogeneous bulk. The measured results were compared with calculation utilizing Young-Koppel and Haywood scattering model for graphite and light water respectively. On the other hand, a variety of 20% enriched uranium loaded and graphite moderated cores consisting of the different lattice cell in a wide range of the carbon to uranium atomic ratio have been built at Semi-Homogeneous Critical Experimental Assembly (SHE) to perform the critical experiments related to Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR). The experimental data were for the critical masses in 235 U, reactivity worths of experimental burnable poison rods, thorium rods, natural-uranium rods and experimental control rods and kinetic parameters. It is made clear from comparison between measurement and calculation that the accurate thermal group constants can be obtained by use of the Young-Koppel and Haywood neutron scattering models if heterogeneity of reactor core lattices is taken into account precisely. (author)

  17. Standard Practice for Design of Surveillance Programs for Light-Water Moderated Nuclear Power Reactor Vessels

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers procedures for designing a surveillance program for monitoring the radiation-induced changes in the mechanical properties of ferritic materials in light-water moderated nuclear power reactor vessels. This practice includes the minimum requirements for the design of a surveillance program, selection of vessel material to be included, and the initial schedule for evaluation of materials. 1.2 This practice was developed for all light-water moderated nuclear power reactor vessels for which the predicted maximum fast neutron fluence (E > 1 MeV) at the end of license (EOL) exceeds 1 × 1021 neutrons/m2 (1 × 1017 n/cm2) at the inside surface of the reactor vessel. 1.3 This practice applies only to the planning and design of surveillance programs for reactor vessels designed and built after the effective date of this practice. Previous versions of Practice E185 apply to earlier reactor vessels. 1.4 This practice does not provide specific procedures for monitoring the radiation induced cha...

  18. Mechanical performance of irradiated beryllium pebbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scaffidi-Argentina, F.; Dalle-Donne, M.; Werle, H. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH Technik und Umwelt (Germany). Inst. fuer Neutronenphysik und Reaktortechnik

    1998-01-01

    For the Helium Cooled Pebble Bed (HCPB) Blanket, which is one of the two reference concepts studied within the European Fusion Technology Programme, the neutron multiplier consists of a mixed bed of about 2 and 0.1-0.2 mm diameter beryllium pebbles. Beryllium has no structural function in the blanket, however microstructural and mechanical properties are important, as they might influence the material behavior under neutron irradiation. The EXOTIC-7 as well as the `Beryllium` experiments carried out in the HFR reactor in Petten are considered as the most detailed and significant tests for investigating it. This paper reviews the present status of beryllium post-irradiation examinations performed at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe with samples from these irradiation experiments, emphasizing the effects of irradiation of essential material properties and trying to elucidate the processes controlling the property changes. The microstructure, the porosity distribution, the impurity content, the behavior under compression loads and the compatibility of the beryllium pebbles with lithium orthosilicate (Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}) during the in-pile irradiation are presented and critically discussed. Qualitative information on ductility and creep obtained by hardness-type measurements are also supplied. (author)

  19. Advanced concept of reduced-moderation water reactor (RMWR) for plutonium multiple recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okubo, T.; Iwamura, T.; Takeda, R.; Yamamoto, K.; Okada, H.

    2001-01-01

    An advanced water-cooled reactor concept named the Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR) has been proposed to attain a high conversion ratio more than 1.0 and to achieve the negative void reactivity coefficient. At present, several types of design concepts satisfying both the design targets have been proposed based on the evaluation for the fuel without fission products and minor actinides. In this paper, the feasibility of the RMWR core is investigated for the plutonium multiple recycling under advanced reprocessing schemes with low decontamination factors as proposed for the FBR fuel cycle. (author)

  20. Minor Actinides Burnup Enhancement in the European Sodium Fast Reactor through Moderator Material Addition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos, R.L.; Buiron, L.

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: • ZrH 2 was the best moderator material, followed by MgO and MgAl 2 O 4 ; • When the number of moderator pins is increased: – the percentage of minor actinides consumed increases; – the total mass consumed of minor actinides decreases; – the decay heat generated decreases; – the neutron flux in the reactor varies very little. Perspectives: • For future studies it would be possible to evaluate the use of other materials with resonances in the scattering cross section in the fast range that would improve the results obtained with Mg. • It would be necessary to consider how to add moderator material without changing the initial mass of minor actinides. E.g., adding the moderator at the periphery of the minor actinide elements

  1. The rate of diffusion into advanced gas cooled reactor moderator bricks: an equivalent cylinder model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyte, W.S.

    1980-01-01

    The graphite moderator bricks which make up the moderator of an advanced gas-cooled nuclear reactor (AGR) are of many different and complex shapes. Many physico-chemical processes that occur within these porous bricks include a diffusional step and thus to model these processes it is necessary to solve the diffusion equation (with chemical reaction) in a porous medium of complex shape. A finite element technique is applied to calculating the rate at which nitrogen diffuses into and out of the porous moderator graphite during operation of a shutdown procedure for an AGR. However, the finite element method suffers from several disadvantages that undermine its general usefulness for calculating rates of diffusion in AGR moderator cores. A model which overcomes some of these disadvantages is presented (the equivalent cylinder model) and it is shown that this gives good results for a variety of different boundary and initial conditions

  2. Mechanical properties of irradiated beryllium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beeston, J.M.; Longhurst, G.R.; Wallace, R.S. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering Lab.); Abeln, S.P. (EG and G Rocky Flats, Inc., Golden, CO (United States))

    1992-10-01

    Beryllium is planned for use as a neutron multiplier in the tritium breeding blanket of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). After fabricating samples of beryllium at densities varying from 80 to 100% of the theoretical density, we conducted a series of experiments to measure the effect of neutron irradiation on mechanical properties, especially strength and ductility. Samples were irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to a neutron fluence of 2.6 x 10[sup 25] n/m[sup 2] (E > MeV) at an irradiation temperature of 75deg C. These samples were subsequently compression-tested at room temperature, and the results were compared with similar tests on unirradiated specimens. We found that the irradiation increased the strength by approximately four times and reduced the ductility to approximately one fourth. Failure was generally ductile, but the 80% dense irradiated samples failed in brittle fracture with significant generation of fine particles and release of small quantities of tritium. (orig.).

  3. Measuring device for bending of beryllium reflector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishida, Seiri; Sakamoto, Naoki.

    1994-01-01

    The device of the present invention can measure bending of a beryllium reflector formed in a reactor core of a nuclear reactor by a relatively easy operation. Namely, a sensor portion comprises a long-support that can be inserted to a fuel element-insertion hole disposed in the reactor and a plurality of distance sensors disposed in a longitudinal direction of the support. A supersonic wave sensor which is advantageous in the heat resistance, the size and the accuracy and can conduct measurement in water relatively easily is used as the distance sensors. However, other sensors, instead of the sensor described above, may also be used. The plurality of distance sensors detect the bending amount of the beryllium reflector in the longitudinal direction by such an easy operation of inserting such a sensor portion to the fuel element-insertion hole upon exchange of fuel elements. (I.S.)

  4. Beryllium poisonings; Les intoxications par le beryllium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alibert, S.

    1959-03-15

    This note reports a bibliographical study of beryllium toxicity. Thus, this bibliographical review addresses and outlines aspects and issues like aetiology, cases of acute poisoning (cutaneous manifestations, pulmonary manifestations), chronic poisoning (cutaneous, pulmonary and bone manifestations), excretion and localisation, and prognosis.

  5. Development of a standard for calculation and measurement of the moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity in water-moderated power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosteller, R.D.; Hall, R.A.; Lancaster, D.B.; Young, E.H.; Gavin, P.H.; Robertson, S.T.

    1998-01-01

    The contents of ANS 19.11, the standard for ''Calculation and Measurement of the Moderator Temperature Coefficient of Reactivity in Water-Moderated Power Reactors,'' are described. The standard addresses the calculation of the moderator temperature coefficient (MTC) both at standby conditions and at power. In addition, it describes several methods for the measurement of the at-power MTC and assesses their relative advantages and disadvantages. Finally, it specifies a minimum set of documentation requirements for compliance with the standard

  6. Study beryllium microplastic deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papirov, I.I.; Ivantsov, V.I.; Nikolaenko, A.A.; Shokurov, V.S.; Tuzov, Yu.V.

    2015-01-01

    Microplastic flow characteristics systematically studied for different varieties beryllium. In isostatically pressed beryllium it decreased with increasing particle size of the powder, increasing temperature and increasing the pressing metal purity. High initial values of the limit microelasticity and microflow in some cases are due a high level of internal stresses of thermal origin and over time it can relax slowly. During long-term storage of beryllium materials with high initial resistance values microplastic deformation microflow limit and microflow stress markedly reduced, due mainly to the relaxation of thermal microstrain

  7. Preparation of beryllium hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowrance, B.R.

    1975-01-01

    A process is described for the preparation of beryllium hydride which comprises pyrolyzing, while in solution in a solvent inert under the reaction conditions, with respect to reactants and products and at a temperature in the range of about 100 0 to about 200 0 C, sufficient to result in the formation of beryllium hydride, a di-t-alkyl beryllium etherate wherein each tertiary alkyl radical contains from 4 to 20 carbon atoms. The pyrolysis is carried out under an atmosphere inert under the reaction conditions, with respect to reactants and products. (U.S.)

  8. Structural characteristics of a graphite moderated critical assembly for a Zero Power reactor at IEA (Brazil)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida Ferreira, A.C. de; Hukai, R.Y.

    1975-01-01

    The structural characteristics of a graphite moderated core of a critical assembly to be installed in the Zero Power Reactor of IEA have been defined. These characteristics are the graphite block dimensions, the number and dimensions of the holes in the graphite, the pitch, the dimensions of the sticks of fuel and graphite to be inserted in the holes, and the mechanical reproducibility of the system. The composition of the fuel and moderator sticks were also defined. The main boundary conditions were the range of the relation C/U and C/TH used in commercial HTGR and the neutronics homogeneity

  9. Summary report of the 7th reduced-moderation water reactor workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akie, Hiroshi; Nabeshima, Kunihiko; Uchikawa, Sadao

    2005-08-01

    As a research on the future innovative water reactor, the development of Reduced-Moderation Water Reactors (RMWRs) has been performed in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). The workshop on RMWRs is aiming at information exchange between JAERI and other organizations such as universities, laboratories, utilities and vendors, and has been held every year since 1998. The 7th workshop was held on March 5, 2004 under the joint auspices of JAERI and North Kanto branch of Atomic Energy Society of Japan. The program of the workshop was composed of 5 lectures and an overall discussion time. The workshop started with the lecture by JAERI on the status and future program of PMWR research and development, followed by the two presentations by JAERI and Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute, respectively, on the investigation and evaluation of water cooled reactor in Feasibility Study Program on Commercialized Fast Reactor Systems. The lectures were also made on the Japan's nuclear fuel cycle and scenarios for RMWRs deployment by JAERI, and on the next generation reactor development activity by Hitachi, Ltd. The main subjects of the overall discussion time were Na cooled fast reactor, deployment effects of RMWRs and the future plan of the RMWR research and development. This report includes the original papers presented at the workshop and summaries of the questions and answers for each lecture, as well as of the discussion time. In addition in the Appendices, there are included presentation handouts of each lecture, program of the workshop and the participants list. (author)

  10. A plan of reactor physics experiments for reduced-moderation water reactors with MOX fuel in TCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, Shoichiro; Akie, Hiroshi; Suzaki, Takenori; Okubo, Tutomu; Usui, Shuji; Shirakawa, Toshihisa; Iwamura, Takamiti; Kugo, Teruhiko; Ishikawa, Nobuyuki

    2000-06-01

    The Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR) is one of the next generation water-cooled reactors which aim at effective utilization of uranium resource, high burn-up, long operation cycle, and plutonium multi-recycle. For verification of the feasibility, negative void reactivity coefficient and conversion ratio more than 1.0 must be confirmed. Critical Experiments performed so far in Eualope and Japan were reviewed, and no useful data are available for RMWR development. Critical experiments using TCA (Tank Type Critical Assembly) in JAERI are planned. MOX fuel rods should be prepared for the experiments and some modifications of the equipment are needed for use of MOX fuel rods. This report describes the preliminary plan of physics experiments. The number of MOX fuel rods used in the experiments are obtained by calculations and the modification of the equipment for the experiments are shown. (author)

  11. Multi-physical developments for safety related investigations of low moderated boiling water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlenker, Markus Thomas

    2014-12-19

    The main objective of this dissertation is the development and optimization of a low moderated boiling water reactor (BWR) core with improved fuel utilization to be incorporated in a Gen II BWR nuclear power plant. The assessment of the new core design is done by comparing it with a full MOX BWR core design regarding neutron physical and thermal-hydraulic design and safety criteria (e.g. inherent reactivity coefficients) and different sustainability parameters (e.g. conversion ratio).

  12. Multi-physical Developments for Safety Related Investigations of Low Moderated Boiling Water Reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Schlenker, Markus Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this dissertation is the development and optimization of a low moderated boiling water reactor (BWR) core with improved fuel utilization to be incorporated in a Gen II BWR nuclear power plant. The assessment of the new core design is done by comparing it with a full MOX BWR core design regarding neutron physical and thermal-hydraulic design and safety criteria (e.g. inherent reactivity coefficients) and different sustainability parameters (e.g. conversion ratio).

  13. Standard Guide for In-Service Annealing of Light-Water Moderated Nuclear Reactor Vessels

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2003-01-01

    1.1 This guide covers the general procedures to be considered for conducting an in-service thermal anneal of a light-water moderated nuclear reactor vessel and demonstrating the effectiveness of the procedure. The purpose of this in-service annealing (heat treatment) is to improve the mechanical properties, especially fracture toughness, of the reactor vessel materials previously degraded by neutron embrittlement. The improvement in mechanical properties generally is assessed using Charpy V-notch impact test results, or alternatively, fracture toughness test results or inferred toughness property changes from tensile, hardness, indentation, or other miniature specimen testing (1). 1.2 This guide is designed to accommodate the variable response of reactor-vessel materials in post-irradiation annealing at various temperatures and different time periods. Certain inherent limiting factors must be considered in developing an annealing procedure. These factors include system-design limitations; physical constrain...

  14. New facility for post irradiation examination of neutron irradiated beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishitsuka, Etsuo; Kawamura, Hiroshi

    1995-01-01

    Beryllium is expected as a neutron multiplier and plasma facing materials in the fusion reactor, and the neutron irradiation data on properties of beryllium up to 800 degrees C need for the engineering design. The acquisition of data on the tritium behavior, swelling, thermal and mechanical properties are first priority in ITER design. Facility for the post irradiation examination of neutron irradiated beryllium was constructed in the hot laboratory of Japan Materials Testing Reactor to get the engineering design data mentioned above. This facility consist of the four glove boxes, dry air supplier, tritium monitoring and removal system, storage box of neutron irradiated samples. Beryllium handling are restricted by the amount of tritium;7.4 GBq/day and 60 Co;7.4 MBq/day

  15. Beryllium and copper-beryllium alloys; Beryllium und Kupfer-Beryllium-Legierungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagel, Nikolaus [Materion Brush GmbH, Stuttgart (Germany). Operation and Quality/EH and S

    2017-02-15

    The light metal beryllium is a comparatively rare element, which today is primarily derived from bertrandite. It is mainly used as pure metal or in the form of copper-beryllium alloys, e.g., in automotive industry, aerospace, and electrical components. The wide range of applications is mainly attributed to the extremely high rigidity/density ratio. An overview of the history of the metal, its production, and recycling as well as the properties of CuBe alloys are given.

  16. The immunotoxicity of beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reeves, A.L.

    1983-01-01

    In the disease berylliosis, granulomatous hypersensitivity is the specific immune response to tissue contact with a poorly soluble particle of beryllium compound, mediated through the accumulation and proliferation of reticuloendothelial cells. A review is given of the work accomplished since the 1950's and particularly since the 1970's to elucidate the nature and consequences of this response to beryllium and its compounds. (U.K.)

  17. Preparation of beryllium hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergeron, C.R.; Baker, R.W.

    1975-01-01

    Beryllium hydride of high bulk density, suitable for use as a component of high-energy fuels, is prepared by the pyrolysis, in solution in an inert solvent, of a ditertiary-alkyl beryllium. An agitator introduces mechanical energy into the reaction system, during the pyrolysis, at the rate of 0.002 to 0.30 horsepower per gallon of reaction mixture. (U.S.)

  18. Steady-State Thermal-Hydraulics Analyses for the Conversion of the BR2 Reactor to LEU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Licht, J. R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bergeron, A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Dionne, B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Van den Branden, G. [SCK CEN (Belgium); Kalcheva, S. [SCK CEN (Belgium); Sikik, E. [SCK CEN (Belgium); Koonen, E. [SCK CEN (Belgium)

    2015-12-01

    BR2 is a research reactor used for radioisotope production and materials testing. It’s a tank-in-pool type reactor cooled by light water and moderated by beryllium and light water (Figure 1). The reactor core consists of a beryllium moderator forming a matrix of 79 hexagonal prisms in a hyperboloid configuration; each having a central bore that can contain a variety of different components such as a fuel assembly, a control or regulating rod, an experimental device, or a beryllium or aluminum plug. Based on a series of tests, the BR2 operation is currently limited to a maximum allowable heat flux of 470 W/cm2 to ensure fuel plate integrity during steady-state operation and after a loss-of-flow/loss-of-pressure accident.

  19. A moderation layer to improve the safety behavior of sodium cooled fast reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merk, B.; Weiß, F.P., E-mail: b.merk@fzd.de [Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institut für Sicherheitsforschung, Dresden (germany)

    2011-07-01

    The nature of the sodium void effect in an infinite lattice is discussed and for a reduction of the effect the insertion of moderating material is proposed. The effect of three different moderating layers on the sodium void defect and the feedback effects is investigated. Especially the uranium zirconium hydride UzrH layer causes a strong reduction of the sodium void effect. Additionally, this layer improves the fuel temperature effect and the coolant effect of the system significantly. All changes caused by the insertion of the UZrH layer lead to a significant increase in stability of the fast reactor system against transients. The moderating layers have only a small influence on the breeding effect and on the production of minor actinides. (author)

  20. A moderation layer to improve the safety behavior of sodium cooled fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merk, B.; Weiß, F.P.

    2011-01-01

    The nature of the sodium void effect in an infinite lattice is discussed and for a reduction of the effect the insertion of moderating material is proposed. The effect of three different moderating layers on the sodium void defect and the feedback effects is investigated. Especially the uranium zirconium hydride UzrH layer causes a strong reduction of the sodium void effect. Additionally, this layer improves the fuel temperature effect and the coolant effect of the system significantly. All changes caused by the insertion of the UZrH layer lead to a significant increase in stability of the fast reactor system against transients. The moderating layers have only a small influence on the breeding effect and on the production of minor actinides. (author)

  1. CFD analysis of moderator flow and temperature fields inside a vertical calandria vessel of nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kansal, Anuj Kumar; Joshi, Jyeshtharaj B.; Maheshwari, Naresh Kumar; Vijayan, Pallippattu Krishnan

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • 3D CFD of vertical calandria vessel. • Spatial distribution of volumetric heat generation. • Effect of Archimedes number. • Non-dimensional analysis. - Abstract: Three dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis has been performed for the moderator flow and temperature fields inside a vertical calandria vessel of nuclear reactor under normal operating condition using OpenFOAM CFD code. OpenFOAM is validated by comparing the predicted results with the experimental data available in literature. CFD model includes the calandria vessel, calandria tubes, inlet header and outlet header. Analysis has been performed for the cases of uniform and spatial distribution of volumetric heat generation. Studies show that the maximum temperature in moderator is lower in the case of spatial distribution of heat generation as compared to that in the uniform heat generation in calandria. In addition, the effect of Archimedes number on maximum and average moderator temperature was investigated

  2. CFD analysis of moderator flow and temperature fields inside a vertical calandria vessel of nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kansal, Anuj Kumar, E-mail: akansal@barc.gov.in [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Joshi, Jyeshtharaj B., E-mail: jbjoshi@gmail.com [Homi Bhabha National Institute, Anushaktinagar, Mumbai 400094 (India); Maheshwari, Naresh Kumar, E-mail: nmahesh@barc.gov.in [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Vijayan, Pallippattu Krishnan, E-mail: vijayanp@barc.gov.in [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • 3D CFD of vertical calandria vessel. • Spatial distribution of volumetric heat generation. • Effect of Archimedes number. • Non-dimensional analysis. - Abstract: Three dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis has been performed for the moderator flow and temperature fields inside a vertical calandria vessel of nuclear reactor under normal operating condition using OpenFOAM CFD code. OpenFOAM is validated by comparing the predicted results with the experimental data available in literature. CFD model includes the calandria vessel, calandria tubes, inlet header and outlet header. Analysis has been performed for the cases of uniform and spatial distribution of volumetric heat generation. Studies show that the maximum temperature in moderator is lower in the case of spatial distribution of heat generation as compared to that in the uniform heat generation in calandria. In addition, the effect of Archimedes number on maximum and average moderator temperature was investigated.

  3. Beryllium coating on Inconel tiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailescu, V.; Burcea, G.; Lungu, C.P.; Mustata, I.; Lungu, A.M.; Rubel, M.; Coad, J.P.; Matthews, G.; Pedrick, L.; Handley, R.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The Joint European Torus (JET) is a large experimental nuclear fusion device. Its aim is to confine and study the behaviour of plasma in conditions and dimensions approaching those required for a fusion reactor. The plasma is created in the toroidal shaped vacuum vessel of the machine in which it is confined by magnetic fields. In preparation for ITER a new ITER-like Wall (ILW) will be installed on Joint European Torus (JET), a wall not having any carbon facing the plasma [1]. In places Inconel tiles are to be installed, these tiles shall be coated with Beryllium. MEdC represented by the National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Magurele, Bucharest and in direct cooperation with Nuclear Fuel Plant Pitesti started to coat Inconel tiles with 8 μm of Beryllium in accordance with the requirements of technical specification and fit for installation in the JET machine. This contribution provides an overview of the principles of manufacturing processes using thermal evaporation method in vacuum and the properties of the prepared coatings. The optimization of the manufacturing process (layer thickness, structure and purity) has been carried out on Inconel substrates (polished and sand blasted) The results of the optimization process and analysis (SEM, TEM, XRD, Auger, RBS, AFM) of the coatings will be presented. Reference [1] Takeshi Hirai, H. Maier, M. Rubel, Ph. Mertens, R. Neu, O. Neubauer, E. Gauthier, J. Likonen, C. Lungu, G. Maddaluno, G. F. Matthews, R. Mitteau, G. Piazza, V. Philipps, B. Riccardi, C. Ruset, I. Uytdenhouwen, R and D on full tungsten divertor and beryllium wall for JET TIER-like Wall Project, 24. Symposium on Fusion Technology - 11-15 September 2006 -Warsaw, Poland. (authors)

  4. Development of a silicon calorimeter for dosimetry applications in a water-moderated reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DePriest, Kendall Russell; King, Donald Bryan; Naranjo, Gerald E.; Luker, Spencer Michael; Keltner, Ned R.; Suo-Anttila, Ahti Jorma; Griffin, Patrick Joseph

    2005-01-01

    High fidelity active dosimetry in the mixed neutron/gamma field of a research reactor is a very complex issue. For passive dosimetry applications, the use of activation foils addresses the neutron environment while the use of low neutron response CaF 2 :Mn thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) addresses the gamma environment. While radiation-hardened diamond photoconducting detectors (PCD) have been developed that provide a very precise fast response (picosecond) dosimeter and can provide a time-dependent profile for the radiation environment, the mixed field response of the PCD is still uncertain and this interferes with the calibration of the PCD response. In order to address the research reactor experimenter's need for a dosimeter that reports silicon dose and dose rate at a test location during a pulsed reactor operation, a silicon calorimeter has been developed. This dosimeter can be used by itself to provide a dose in rad(Si) up to a point in a reactor pulsed operation, or, in conjunction with the diamond PCD, to provide a dose rate. This paper reports on the development, testing, and validation of this silicon calorimeter for applications in water-moderated research reactors.

  5. Development of safety analysis methodology for moderator system failure of CANDU-6 reactor by thermal-hydraulics/physics coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Hyun; Jin, Dong Sik; Chang, Soon Heung

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Developed new safety analysis methodology of moderator system failures for CANDU-6. • The new methodology used the TH-physics coupling concept. • Thermalhydraulic code is CATHENA, physics code is RFSP-IST. • Moderator system failure ends to the subcriticality through self-shutdown. -- Abstract: The new safety analysis methodology for the CANDU-6 nuclear power plant (NPP) moderator system failure has been developed by using the coupling technology with the thermalhydraulic code, CATHENA and reactor core physics code, RFSP-IST. This sophisticated methodology can replace the legacy methodology using the MODSTBOIL and SMOKIN-G2 in the field of the thermalhydraulics and reactor physics, respectively. The CATHENA thermalhydraulic model of the moderator system can simulate the thermalhydraulic behaviors of all the moderator systems such as the calandria tank, head tank, moderator circulating circuit and cover gas circulating circuit and can also predict the thermalhydraulic property of the moderator such as moderator density, temperature and water level in the calandria tank as the moderator system failures go on. And these calculated moderator thermalhydraulic properties are provided to the 3-dimensional neutron kinetics solution module – CERBRRS of RFSP-IST as inputs, which can predict the change of the reactor power and provide the calculated reactor power to the CATHENA. These coupling calculations are performed at every 2 s time steps, which are equivalent to the slow control of CANDU-6 reactor regulating systems (RRS). The safety analysis results using this coupling methodology reveal that the reactor operation enters into the self-shutdown mode without any engineering safety system and/or human interventions for the postulated moderator system failures of the loss of heat sink and moderator inventory, respectively

  6. Ageing management of the BR2 research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verpoortem, J. R.; Van Dyck, S.

    2014-01-01

    At the Belgian nuclear research centre (SCK.CEN) several test reactors are operated. Among these, Belgian Reactor 2 (BR2) is the largest Material Test Reactor (MTR). This water-cooled, beryllium moderated reactor with a maximum thermal power of 100 MW became operational in 1962. Except for two major refurbishment campaigns of one year each, this reactor has been operated continuously over the past 50 years, with a frequency of 5-12 cycles per year. At present, BR2 is used for different research activities, the production of medical isotopes, the production of n-doped silicon and various training and education activities. (Author)

  7. Verification of codes used for the nuclear safety assessment of the small space heterogeneous reactors with zirconium hydride moderator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glushkov, E.S.; Gomin, E.A.; Kompaniets, G.V.

    1994-01-01

    Computer codes used for assessment of nuclear safety for space NPP are compared taking as an example small-sized heterogeneous reactor with zirconium hydride moderator of the Topaz-2 facility. The code verifications are made for five different variants

  8. Carbon-14 in neutron-irradiated graphite for graphite-moderated reactors. Joint research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, Kimio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Matsuo, Hideto [Radioactive Waste Management and Nuclear Facility Decommissioning Technology Center, Tokyo (Japan)

    2002-12-01

    The graphite moderated gas cooled reactor operated by the Japan Atomic Power Company was stopped its commercial operation on March 1998, and the decommissioning process has been started. Graphite material is often used as the moderator and the reflector materials in the core of the gas cooled reactor. During the operation, a long life nuclide of {sup 14}C is generated in the graphite by several transmutation reactions. Separation of {sup 14}C isotope and the development of the separation method have been recognized to be critical issues for the decommissioning of the reactor core. To understand the current methodologies for the carbon isotope separation, literature on the subject was surveyed. Also, those on the physical and chemical behavior of {sup 14}C were surveyed. This is because the larger part of the nuclides in the graphite is produced from {sup 14}N by (n,p) reaction, and the location of them in the material tends to be different from those of the other carbon atoms. This report summarizes the result of survey on the open literature about the behavior of {sup 14}C and the separation methods, including the list of the literature on these subjects. (author)

  9. Nitrogen Removal by Anammox Biofilm Column Reactor at Moderately Low Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuty Emilia Agustina

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox as a new biological approach for nitrogen removal has been considered to be more cost-effective compared with the combination of nitrification and denitrification process. However, the anammox bioreactors are mostly explored at high temperature (>300C in which temperature controlling system is fully required. This research was intended to develop and to apply anammox process for high nitrogen concentration removal at ambient temperature used for treating wastewater in tropical countries. An up-flow biofilm column reactor, which the upper part constructed with a porous polyester non-woven fabric material as a carrier to attach the anammox bacteria was operated without heating system. A maximum nitrogen removal rate (NRR of 1.05 kg-N m3 d-1 was reached in the operation days of 178 with a Total Nitrogen (TN removal efficiency of 74%. This showed the biofilm column anammox reactor was successfully applied to moderate high nitrogen removal from synthetic wastewater at moderately low temperature. Keywords: Anammox, biofilm column reactor, ambient temperature, nitrogen removal

  10. Method of collecting helium cover gas for heavy water moderated reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, Keiji; Ueda, Hiroshi.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the systematic facility cost in a heavy water moderated reactor by contriving the simplification of a helium cover gas collecting intake system. Method: A detachable low pressure metal tank and a neoprene balloon are prepared for a vacuum pump in a permanent vacuum drying facility. When all of the helium cover gas is collected from a heavy water moderated reactor, a large capacity of neoprene balloon capable of temporarily storing it under low pressure is connected to the exhaust of the vacuum pump. On the other hand, while the reactor is operating, a suitable amount of the low pressure tank or neoprene balloon is connected to the exhaust side of the pump, thereby regulating the pressure of the helium cover gas. When refeeding the cover gas, the balloon, with a large capacity for collecting and storing the cover gas is connected to the intake side of the pump. Thus, the pressure regulation, collection of all of the cover gas and refeeding of the cover gas can be conducted without using a high discharge pump and high pressure tank. (Kamimura, M.)

  11. Improvement of Core Performance by Introduction of Moderators in a Blanket Region of Fast Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshio Wakabayashi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An application of deuteride moderator for fast reactor cores is proposed for power flattening that can mitigate thermal spikes and alleviate the decrease in breeding ratio, which sometimes occurs when hydrogen moderator is applied as a moderator. Zirconium deuteride is employed in a form of pin arrays at the inner most rows of radial blanket fuel assemblies, which works as a reflector in order to flatten the radial power distribution in the outer core region of MONJU. The power flattening can be utilized to increase core average burn-up by increasing operational time. The core characteristics have been evaluated with a continuous-energy model Monte Carlo code MVP and the JENDL-3.3 cross-section library. The result indicates that the discharged fuel burn-up can be increased by about 7% relative to that of no moderator in the blanket region due to the power flattening when the number of deuteride moderator pins is 61. The core characteristics and core safety such as void reactivity, Doppler coefficient, and reactivity insertion that occurred at dissolution of deuteron were evaluated. It was clear that the serious drawback did not appear from the viewpoints of the core characteristics and core safety.

  12. Status of research and development on reduced-moderation water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwamura, Takamichi

    2002-01-01

    To improve uranium utilization, a design study of the Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR) has been carried out intensively since 1998 at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). In this reactor, the nuclear fission reaction is designed to be realized mainly by high energy neutrons. To achieve this, the volume of water used to cool the fuel rods is decreased by reducing the gap width between the fuel rods. Conversion ratio greater than 1.0 is expected whether the core i-s cooled by boiling water or pressurized water and whether the core size is small or large. Status of the RMWR design is reviewed and planning of R and D for future deployment of this reactor after 20-20 is presented. To improve economics of this reactor, development of fuel cans for high burnup and low-cost reprocessing technology of mixed oxide spect fuels are highly needed. R and D has been conducted under the cooperation with utilities, industry, research organization and academia. (T. Tanaka)

  13. Status of research and development on reduced-moderation water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwamura, Takamichi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2002-12-01

    To improve uranium utilization, a design study of the Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR) has been carried out intensively since 1998 at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). In this reactor, the nuclear fission reaction is designed to be realized mainly by high energy neutrons. To achieve this, the volume of water used to cool the fuel rods is decreased by reducing the gap width between the fuel rods. Conversion ratio greater than 1.0 is expected whether the core i-s cooled by boiling water or pressurized water and whether the core size is small or large. Status of the RMWR design is reviewed and planning of R and D for future deployment of this reactor after 20-20 is presented. To improve economics of this reactor, development of fuel cans for high burnup and low-cost reprocessing technology of mixed oxide spect fuels are highly needed. R and D has been conducted under the cooperation with utilities, industry, research organization and academia. (T. Tanaka)

  14. Improvements in gas supply systems for heavy-water moderated reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aubert, G.; Hassig, J.M.; Laurent, N.; Thomas, B.

    1964-01-01

    In a heavy-water moderated reactor cooled by pressurized gas, an important problem from the point of view, of the reactor block and its economics is the choice of the gas supply system. In the pressure tube solution, the whole of the reactor block structure is at a relatively low temperature, whereas the gas supply equipment is at that of the gas, which is much higher. These parts, through which passes the heat carrying fluid have to present as low a resistance as possible to it so as to avoid costly extra blowing power. Finally, they may only be placed in the reactor block after it has been built; the time required for putting them in position should therefore not be too long. The work reported here concerns the various problems arising in the case of each channel being supplied individually by a tube at the entry and the exit which is connected to a main circuit made up of large size collectors. This individual tubing is sufficiently flexible to absorb the differential expansion and the movement of its ends without stresses or prohibitive reactions being produced; the tubing is also of relatively short length so as to reduce the pressure head of the pressurized gas outside the channels; the small amount of space taken up by the tubing makes it possible to assemble it in a manner which is satisfactory from the point of view both of the time required and of the technical quality. (authors) [fr

  15. Decontamination and decommissioning of the Organic Moderated Reactor Experiment facility (OMRE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hine, R.E.

    1980-09-01

    This report describes the decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of the Organic Moderated Reactor Experiment (OMRE) facility performed from October 1977 through September 1979. This D and D project included removal of all the facilities and as much contaminated soil and rock as practical. Removal of the reactor pressure vessel was an unusually difficult problem, and an extraordinary, unexpected amount of activated rock and soil was removed. After removal of all significantly contaminated material, the site consisted of a 20-ft deep excavation surrounded by backfill material. Before this excavation was backfilled, it and the backfill material were radiologically surveyed and detailed records made of these surveys. After the excavation was backfilled and graded, the site surface was surveyed again and found to be essentially uncontaminated

  16. Multidimensional space-time kinetics of a heavy water moderated nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winn, W.G.; Baumann, N.P.; Jewell, C.E.

    1980-01-01

    Diffusion theory analysis of a series of multidimensional space-time experiments is appraised in terms of the final experiment of the series. In particular, TRIMHX diffusion calculations were examined for an experiment involving free-fall insertion of a 235 U-bearing rod into a heavy water moderated reactor with a large reflector. The experimental transient flux-tilts were accurately reproduced after cross section adjustments forced agreement between static diffusion calculations and static reactor measurements. The time-dependent features were particularly well modeled, and the bulk of the small discrepancies in space-dependent features should be removable by more refined cross-section adjustments. This experiment concludes a series of space-time experiments that span a wide range of delayed neutron holdback effects. TRIMHX calculations of these experiments demonstrate the accuracy of the modeling employed in the code

  17. Innovative concept for an ultra-small nuclear thermal rocket utilizing a new moderated reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Hyun Nam

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Although the harsh space environment imposes many severe challenges to space pioneers, space exploration is a realistic and profitable goal for long-term humanity survival. One of the viable and promising options to overcome the harsh environment of space is nuclear propulsion. Particularly, the Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR is a leading candidate for near-term human missions to Mars and beyond due to its relatively high thrust and efficiency. Traditional NTR designs use typically high power reactors with fast or epithermal neutron spectrums to simplify core design and to maximize thrust. In parallel there are a series of new NTR designs with lower thrust and higher efficiency, designed to enhance mission versatility and safety through the use of redundant engines (when used in a clustered engine arrangement for future commercialization. This paper proposes a new NTR design of the second design philosophy, Korea Advanced NUclear Thermal Engine Rocket (KANUTER, for future space applications. The KANUTER consists of an Extremely High Temperature Gas cooled Reactor (EHTGR utilizing hydrogen propellant, a propulsion system, and an optional electricity generation system to provide propulsion as well as electricity generation. The innovatively small engine has the characteristics of high efficiency, being compact and lightweight, and bimodal capability. The notable characteristics result from the moderated EHTGR design, uniquely utilizing the integrated fuel element with an ultra heat-resistant carbide fuel, an efficient metal hydride moderator, protectively cooling channels and an individual pressure tube in an all-in-one package. The EHTGR can be bimodally operated in a propulsion mode of 100 MWth and an electricity generation mode of 100 kWth, equipped with a dynamic energy conversion system. To investigate the design features of the new reactor and to estimate referential engine performance, a preliminary design study in terms of neutronics and

  18. Innovative concept for an ultra-small nuclear thermal rocket utilizing a new moderated reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Seung Hyun; Venneri, Paolo; Kim, Yong Hee; Lee, Jeong Ik; Chang, Soon Heung; Jeong, Yong Hoon [Dept. of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Although the harsh space environment imposes many severe challenges to space pioneers, space exploration is a realistic and profitable goal for long-term humanity survival. One of the viable and promising options to overcome the harsh environment of space is nuclear propulsion. Particularly, the Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) is a leading candidate for near-term human missions to Mars and beyond due to its relatively high thrust and efficiency. Traditional NTR designs use typically high power reactors with fast or epithermal neutron spectrums to simplify core design and to maximize thrust. In parallel there are a series of new NTR designs with lower thrust and higher efficiency, designed to enhance mission versatility and safety through the use of redundant engines (when used in a clustered engine arrangement) for future commercialization. This paper proposes a new NTR design of the second design philosophy, Korea Advanced NUclear Thermal Engine Rocket (KANUTER), for future space applications. The KANUTER consists of an Extremely High Temperature Gas cooled Reactor (EHTGR) utilizing hydrogen propellant, a propulsion system, and an optional electricity generation system to provide propulsion as well as electricity generation. The innovatively small engine has the characteristics of high efficiency, being compact and lightweight, and bimodal capability. The notable characteristics result from the moderated EHTGR design, uniquely utilizing the integrated fuel element with an ultra heat-resistant carbide fuel, an efficient metal hydride moderator, protectively cooling channels and an individual pressure tube in an all-in-one package. The EHTGR can be bimodally operated in a propulsion mode of 100 MW{sub th} and an electricity generation mode of 100 kW{sub th}, equipped with a dynamic energy conversion system. To investigate the design features of the new reactor and to estimate referential engine performance, a preliminary design study in terms of neutronics and

  19. Innovative concept for an ultra-small nuclear thermal rocket utilizing a new moderated reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam, Seung Hyun; Venneri, Paolo; Kim, Yong Hee; Lee, Jeong Ik; Chang, Soon Heung; Jeong, Yong Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Although the harsh space environment imposes many severe challenges to space pioneers, space exploration is a realistic and profitable goal for long-term humanity survival. One of the viable and promising options to overcome the harsh environment of space is nuclear propulsion. Particularly, the Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) is a leading candidate for near-term human missions to Mars and beyond due to its relatively high thrust and efficiency. Traditional NTR designs use typically high power reactors with fast or epithermal neutron spectrums to simplify core design and to maximize thrust. In parallel there are a series of new NTR designs with lower thrust and higher efficiency, designed to enhance mission versatility and safety through the use of redundant engines (when used in a clustered engine arrangement) for future commercialization. This paper proposes a new NTR design of the second design philosophy, Korea Advanced NUclear Thermal Engine Rocket (KANUTER), for future space applications. The KANUTER consists of an Extremely High Temperature Gas cooled Reactor (EHTGR) utilizing hydrogen propellant, a propulsion system, and an optional electricity generation system to provide propulsion as well as electricity generation. The innovatively small engine has the characteristics of high efficiency, being compact and lightweight, and bimodal capability. The notable characteristics result from the moderated EHTGR design, uniquely utilizing the integrated fuel element with an ultra heat-resistant carbide fuel, an efficient metal hydride moderator, protectively cooling channels and an individual pressure tube in an all-in-one package. The EHTGR can be bimodally operated in a propulsion mode of 100 MW th and an electricity generation mode of 100 kW th , equipped with a dynamic energy conversion system. To investigate the design features of the new reactor and to estimate referential engine performance, a preliminary design study in terms of neutronics and thermohydraulics

  20. Fine distributed moderating material to the enhance feedback effects in LBE cooled rast reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merk, Bruno [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Reactor Safety Div.

    2013-07-01

    In this work it is demonstrated, that the concept of enhanced feedback coefficients is transferable to LBE cooled fast reactors. The demonstration is based on the fuel assembly design of the CDT project. The effect of the moderating material on the neutron spectrum, on the k{sub inf}, and on the fuel temperature feedback and the coolant feedback is shown, discussed and compared to SFRs. The calculations are performed with the 2D lattice transport code HELIOS and based on the fully detailed fuel assembly geometry representation. (orig.)

  1. Contribution to the use of a solid moderator gas reactor, for naval propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pheline, J.; Gautier, A.

    1960-01-01

    In this contribution, the authors discuss works performed in France for the development of nuclear propulsion in merchant ships, notably for an oil tanker of 50.000 tons with 17 knot speed, i.e. a 20.000 Hp engine with an energy produced by a 60 MW gas reactor with a solid moderator and comprising 400 channels loaded with uranium oxide enriched ay 2.8 per cent and sheathed with a refractory alloy. The authors discuss the possible materials for the moderator, the heat transfer medium, the sheath, the fuel and the structures, and report technological studies (mechanical tests, irradiation tests) performed to investigate material properties and their behaviour in operation conditions. They report tests performed to investigate core structure characteristics with respect to neutrons. They finally briefly present a prototype

  2. Assessment of the feasibility and advantages of beryllium recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Druyts, F.; Braet, J.; Ooms, L.

    2006-01-01

    This paper proposes a generic route for the recycling of beryllium from fusion reactors, based on critical issues associated with beryllium pebbles after their service life in the HCPB breeding blanket. These critical issues are the high tritium inventory, the presence of long-lived radionuclides (among which transuranics due to traces of uranium in the base metal), and the chemical toxicity of beryllium. On the basis of the chemical and radiochemical characteristics of the neutron irradiated beryllium pebbles, we describe a possible recycling route. The first step is the detritiation of the material. This can be achieved by heating the pebbles to 800 o C under an argon flow. The argon gas avoids oxidation of the beryllium, and at the proposed temperature the tritium inventory is readily released from the pebbles. In a second step, the released tritium can be oxidised on a copper oxide bed to produce tritiated water, which is consistent with the current international strategy to convert all kinds of tritiated waste into tritiated water, which can subsequently be treated in a water detritiation plant. Removal of radionuclides from the beryllium pebbles may be achieved by several types of chloride processes. The first step is to pass chlorine gas (in an argon flow) over the pebbles, thus yielding volatile BeCl 2 . This beryllium chloride can then be purified by fractional distillation. As a small fraction of the beryllium chloride contains the long-lived 10 Be isotope, 10BeCl 2 has to be separated from 9BeCl 2 , which could be achieved by centrifugal techniques. The product can then be reduced to obtain high-purity metallic beryllium. Two candidate reduction methods were identified: fused salt electrolysis and thermal decomposition. Both these methods require laboratory parametric studies to maximise the yield and achieve a high purity metal, before either process can be upgraded to a larger scale. The eventual product of the chloride reduction process must be a high

  3. Status of beryllium study for fusion in RF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khomutov, A.M.; Kupriyanov, I.B.; Markushkin, Yu.E.; Gervash, A.; Kolbasov, B.N.

    2004-01-01

    codes have been proposed for determination of the rate of hydrogen generation. The theoretical investigation on the correlation of the plasma disruption with tritium inventory in beryllium components of the first wall of ITER reactor and on the penetration of tritium through first wall material into coolant agents has been performed. Tritium breeding blanket. The investigation on optimization of fabrication processes of porous beryllium with guaranteed predetermined open porosity in the range of 10-30% altogether with properties characterization has been carried out. (author)

  4. Thermogravimetric analysis of the beryllium/steam reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Druyts, Frank E-mail: fdruyts@sckcen.be; Iseghem, Pierre van

    2000-11-01

    In view of the safety assessment of new fusion reactor designs, kinetic data are needed on the beryllium/steam reaction. Therefore, thermogravimetric analysis was used to determine the reactivity of beryllium in steam as a function of temperature, irradiation history and porosity of the samples. To this purpose, reference unirradiated S-200 VHP beryllium samples were compared with specimens irradiated in the BR2 reactor up to fast neutron fluences (E>1 MeV) of respectively 1.6x10{sup 21} n cm{sup -2} (resulting in a helium content of 300 appm He and a theoretical density of 99.9%) and 4x10{sup 22} n cm{sup -2} (21000 appm He, 97.2% theoretical density). Kinetics were parabolic for all tested beryllium types at 600 deg. C. At 700 deg. C, kinetics were parabolic for the unirradiated and irradiated 99.9% dense beryllium, and accelerating/linear for the irradiated 97.2% material. At 800 deg. C, all samples showed accelerating/linear behaviour. There was no influence of porosity on the reaction rate of beryllium in steam within the limited investigated density range, except at 700 deg. C, where the measured reaction rate for the irradiated 97.2% dense samples is an order of magnitude higher than for the irradiated 99.9% dense specimens.

  5. HEINBE; the calculation program for helium production in beryllium under neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimakawa, Satoshi; Ishitsuka, Etsuo; Sato, Minoru

    1992-11-01

    HEINBE is a program on personal computer for calculating helium production in beryllium under neutron irradiation. The program can also calculate the tritium production in beryllium. Considering many nuclear reactions and their multi-step reactions, helium and tritium productions in beryllium materials irradiated at fusion reactor or fission reactor may be calculated with high accuracy. The calculation method, user's manual, calculated examples and comparison with experimental data were described. This report also describes a neutronics simulation method to generate additional data on swelling of beryllium, 3,000-15,000 appm helium range, for end-of-life of the proposed design for fusion blanket of the ITER. The calculation results indicate that helium production for beryllium sample doped lithium by 50 days irradiation in the fission reactor, such as the JMTR, could be achieved to 2,000-8,000 appm. (author)

  6. Three dimensional numerical simulation of a full scale CANDU reactor moderator to study temperature fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarchami, Araz; Ashgriz, Nasser; Kwee, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • 3D model of a Candu reactor is modeled to investigate flow distribution. • The results show the temperature distribution is not symmetrical. • Temperature contours show the hot regions at the top left-hand side of the tank. • Interactions of momentum flows and buoyancy flows create circulation zones. • The results indicate that the moderator tank operates in the buoyancy driven mode. -- Abstract: Three dimensional numerical simulations are conducted on a full scale CANDU Moderator and transient variations of the temperature and velocity distributions inside the tank are determined. The results show that the flow and temperature distributions inside the moderator tank are three dimensional and no symmetry plane can be identified. Competition between the upward moving buoyancy driven flows and the downward moving momentum driven flows in the center region of the tank, results in the formation of circulation zones. The moderator tank operates in the buoyancy driven mode and any small disturbances in the flow or temperature makes the system unstable and asymmetric. Different types of temperature fluctuations are noted inside the tank: (i) large amplitude are at the boundaries between the hot and cold; (ii) low amplitude are in the core of the tank; (iii) high frequency fluctuations are in the regions with high velocities and (iv) low frequency fluctuations are in the regions with lower velocities

  7. Sintering of beryllium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caillat, R.; Pointud, R.

    1955-01-01

    This study had for origin to find a process permitting to manufacture bricks of beryllium oxide of pure nuclear grade, with a density as elevated as possible and with standardized shape. The sintering under load was the technique kept for the manufacture of the bricks. Because of the important toxicity of the beryllium oxide, the general features for the preliminary study of the sintering, have been determined while using alumina. The obtained results will be able to act as general indication for ulterior studies with sintering under load. (M.B.) [fr

  8. Beryllium-copper reactivity in an ITER joining environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odegard, B.C.; Cadden, C.H.; Yang, N.Y.C.

    1998-01-01

    Beryllium-copper reactivity was studied using test parameters being considered for use in the ITER reactor. In this application, beryllium-copper tiles are produced using a low-temperature copper-copper diffusion bonding technique. Beryllium is joined to copper by first plating the beryllium with copper followed by diffusion bonding the electrodeposited (ED) copper to a wrought copper alloy (CuNiBe) at 450 C, 1-3 h using a hot isostatic press (HIP). In this bonded assembly, beryllium is the armor material and the CuNiBe alloy is the heat sink material. Interface temperatures in service are not expected to exceed 350 C. For this study, an ED copper-beryllium interface was subjected to diffusion bonding temperatures and times to study the reaction products. Beryllium-copper assemblies were subjected to 350, 450 and 550 C for times up to 200 h. Both BeCu and Be 2 Cu intermetallic phases were detected using scanning electron microscopy and quantitative microprobe analysis. Growth rates were determined experimentally for each phase and activation energies for formation were calculated. The activation energies were 66 mol and 62 kJ mol -1 for the BeCu and Be 2 Cu, respectively. Tensile bars were produced from assemblies consisting of coated beryllium (both sides) sandwiched between two blocks of Hycon-3. Tensile tests were conducted to evaluate the influence of these intermetallics on the bond strength. Failure occurred at the beryllium-copper interface at fracture strengths greater than 300 MPa for the room-temperature tests. (orig.)

  9. Application of hydrogen water chemistry to moderate corrosive circumstances around the reactor pressure vessel bottom of boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Shunsuke; Ibe, Eishi; Nakata, Kiyatomo; Fuse, Motomasa; Ohsumi, Katsumi; Takashima, Yoshie

    1995-01-01

    Many efforts to preserve the structural integrity of major piping, components, and structures in a boiling water reactor (BWR) primary cooling system have been directed toward avoiding intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). Application of hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) to moderate corrosive circumstances is a promising approach to preserve the structural integrity during extended lifetimes of BWRs. The benefits of HWC application are (a) avoiding the occurrence of IGSCC on structural materials around the bottom of the crack growth rate, even if microcracks are present on the structural materials. Several disadvantage caused by HWC are evaluated to develop suitable countermeasures prior to HWC application. The advantages and disadvantages of HWC are quantitatively evaluated base on both BWR plant data and laboratory data shown in unclassified publications. Their trade-offs are discussed, and suitable applications of HWC are described. It is concluded that an optimal amount of Hydrogen injected into the feedwater can moderate corrosive circumstances, in the region to be preserved, without serious disadvantages. The conclusions have been drawn by combining experimental and theoretical results. Experiments in BWR plants -- e.g., direct measurements of electrochemical corrosion potential and crack growth rate at the RPV bottom -- are planned that would collect data to support the theoretical considerations

  10. Liquid wall boiler and moderator (BAM) for heavy ion-pellet fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, J.R.; Lazareth, O.; Fillo, J.

    1977-11-01

    Thick liquid wall blankets appear to be of great promise for heavy ion pellet fusion reactors. They avoid the severe problems of intense radiation and blast damage that would be encountered with solid blanket structures. The liquid wall material can be chosen so that its vapor pressure at the working temperature of the power cycle is well below the value at which it might interfere with the propagation of the heavy ion beam. The liquid wall can be arranged so that it does not contact any surrounding solid structure when the pellet explosion occurs, including the ends. The ends can be magnetically closed just before the pellet explosion, or a time phased flow can be used, which will leave a clear central zone into which the pellet is injected. Parametric analysis comparing three candidate liquid wall materials were carried out. The three materials were lithium, flibe, and lead (with a low concentration of disolved lithium). Lead appeared to be the best choice for the liquid wall, although any of the three should allow a practical reactor system. The parametric analyses examined the effects of pellet yield (0 to 10 GJ), pellet mass (3 g to 3 kg), liquid wall thickness (10 cm to 80 cm), vapor condensation time (0 to 10 milliseconds), degree of neutron moderation in the pellet (none to 100%), liquid wall chamber size (radius of 1.5 meters to 4 meters), Pb/Li 6 ratio (100 to 5,000), and thickness of graphite moderating zone behind the liquid wall

  11. CFD Simulation on Cooling Down of Beryllium Filters for Neutron Conditioning for Small Angle Neutron Scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azraf Azman; Shahrir Abdullah; Mohd Rizal Mamat

    2011-01-01

    The cryogenic system for cooling Beryllium filter utilizing liquid nitrogen was designed, fabricated, tested and installed at SANS instrument of TRIGA MARK II PUSPATI research reactor. A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling was used to predict the cooling performance of the beryllium for optimization of neutron beam resolution and transmission. This paper presents the transient CFD results of temperature distributions via the thermal link to the beryllium and simulation of heat flux. The simulation data are also compared with the experimental results for the cooling time and distribution to the beryllium. (author)

  12. Study on Doppler coefficient for metallic fuel fast reactor added hydrogeneous moderator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirakawa, Naohiro; Iwasaki, Tomohiko; Tsujimoto, Kazuhumi [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Osugi, Toshitaka; Okajima, Shigeaki; Andoh, Masaki; Nemoto, Tatsuo; Mukaiyama, Takehiko

    1998-01-01

    A series of mock-up experiments for moderator added metallic fast reactor core was carried out at FCA to obtain the experimental verification for improvement of reactivity coefficients. Softened neutron spectrum increases Doppler effect by a factor of 2, and flatter adjoint neutron spectrum decreases Na void effect by a factor of 0.6 when hydrogen to heavy metal atomic number ratio is increased from 0.02 to 0.13. The experimental results are analyzed with SLALOM and CITATION-FBR, which is the standard design code system for a fast reactor at JAERI, and SRAC95 and CITATION-FBR. The present code system gives generally good agreement with the experimental results, especially by the use of the latter, the dependence of the Doppler effect to the hydrogen to fuel element atomic number density ratio is disappeared. Therefore, it looks possible to use the present code system for the conceptual design of a fast reactor system with hydrogeneous materials. (author)

  13. Subchannel analysis of 37-rod tight-lattice bundle experiments for reduced-moderation water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakatsuka, Toru; Tamai, Hidesada; Akimoto, Hajime

    2005-01-01

    R and D project to investigate thermal-hydraulic performance of tight-lattice fuel bundles for Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR) started at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) in collaboration with utilities, reactor vendors and universities from 2002. The RMWR realizes a high conversion ratio larger than 0.1 for sustainable energy supply through plutonium multiple recycling based on the well-experienced LWR technologies. The reactor core comprises tight-lattice fuel assemblies with gap clearance of around 1.0 mm to reduce the water volume ratio to achieve the high conversion ratio. A problem of utmost importance from a thermal-hydraulic point of view is the coolability of the tight-lattice assembly with such a small gap width. JAERI has been carrying out experimental study to investigate the system parameter effects on the thermal-hydraulic performance and to confirm the feasibility of the core. In the present study, the subchannel analysis code NASCA was applied to 37-rod tight-lattice bundle experiments. The NASCA can give good predictions of critical power for the gap width of 1.3 mm while the prediction accuracy decreases for the gap width of 1.0 mm. To improve the prediction accuracy, the code will be modified to take the effect of film thickness distribution around fuel rods on boiling transition. (author)

  14. Workshop on beryllium for fusion applications. Proceedings. IEA Implementing Agreement for a Programme of Research and Development on Fusion Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalle Donne, M.

    1993-12-01

    As shown by recent developments beryllium has become one of the most important materials in the development of fusion reactors. It is practically the only neutron multiplier available for blankets with ceramic breeder materials and can be used with liquid metal breeders as well. It is one of the most likely materials to be used on the surface of the first walls and of the divertor. The neutron irradiation behavior of beryllium in a fusion reactor is not well know. Beryllium was extensively irradiated about 25-40 years ago and has been used since then in material testing reactors as reflector. In the meantime, however, beryllium has been improved quite considerably. Today it is possible to obtain commercially beryllium which is much more isotropic and contains smaller ammounts of oxide. There are already indications that these new kinds of beryllium behave better under irradiation. (orig.)

  15. Behavior of beryllium pebbles under irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalle-Donne, M.; Scaffidi-Argentina, F. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH Technik und Umwelt (Germany). Inst. fuer Neutronenphysik und Reactortechnik; Baldwin, D.L.; Gelles, D.S.; Greenwood, L.R.; Kawamura, H.; Oliver, B.M.

    1998-01-01

    Beryllium pebbles are being considered in fusion reactor blanket designs as neutron multiplier. An example is the European `Helium Cooled Pebble Bed Blanket.` Several forms of beryllium pebbles are commercially available but little is known about these forms in response to fast neutron irradiation. Commercially available beryllium pebbles have been irradiated to approximately 1.3 x 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2} (E>1 MeV) at 390degC. Pebbles 1-mm in diameter manufactured by Brush Wellman, USA and by Nippon Gaishi Company, Japan, and 3-mm pebbles manufactured by Brush Wellman were included. All were irradiated in the below-core area of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II in Idaho Falls, USA, in molybdenum alloy capsules containing helium. Post-irradiation results are presented on density change measurements, tritium release by assay, stepped-temperature anneal, and thermal ramp desorption tests, and helium release by assay and stepped-temperature anneal measurements, for Be pebbles from two manufacturing methods, and with two specimen diameters. The experimental results on density change and tritium and helium release are compared with the predictions of the code ANFIBE. (author)

  16. Optimization of temperature coefficient and breeding ratio for a graphite-moderated molten salt reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, C.Y.; Cai, X.Z.; Jiang, D.Z.; Yu, C.G.; Li, X.X.; Ma, Y.W.; Han, J.L. [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); CAS Center for Excellence in TMSR Energy System, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Key Laboratory of Nuclear Radiation and Nuclear Energy Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Chen, J.G., E-mail: chenjg@sinap.ac.cn [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); CAS Center for Excellence in TMSR Energy System, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Key Laboratory of Nuclear Radiation and Nuclear Energy Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • The temperature feedback coefficient with different moderation ratios for TMSR in thermal neutron region is optimized. • The breeding ratio and doubling time of a thermal TMSR with three different reprocessing schemes are analyzed. • The smaller hexagon size and larger salt fraction with more negative feedback coefficient can better satisfy the safety demands. • A shorter reprocessing time can achieve a better breeding ratio in a thermal TMSR. • The graphite moderator lifespan is compared with other MSRs and discussed. - Abstract: Molten salt reactor (MSR) has fascinating features: inherent safety, no fuel fabrication, online fuel reprocessing, etc. However, the graphite moderated MSR may present positive feedback coefficient which has severe implications for the transient behavior during operation. In this paper, the feedback coefficient and the breeding ratio are optimized based on the fuel-to-graphite ratio variation for a thorium based MSR (TMSR). A certain thermal core with negative feedback coefficient and relative high initial breeding ratio is chosen for the reprocessing scheme analysis. The breeding performances for the TMSR under different online fuel reprocessing efficiencies and frequencies are evaluated and compared with other MSR concepts. The results indicate that the thermal TMSR can get a breeding ratio greater than 1.0 with appropriate reprocessing scheme. The low fissile inventory in thermal TMSR leads to a short doubling time and low transuranic (TRU) inventory. The lifetime of graphite used for the TMSR is also discussed.

  17. A preliminary definition of the parameters of an experimental natural - uranium, graphite - moderated, helium - cooled power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baltazar, O.

    1978-01-01

    A preliminary study of the technical characteristic of an experiment at 32 MWe power with a natural uconium, graphite-moderated, helium cooled reactor is described. The national participation and the use of reactor as an instrument for the technological development of future high temperature gas cooled reactor is considered in the choice of the reactor type. Considerations about nuclear power plants components based in extensive bibliography about similar english GCR reactor is presented. The main thermal, neutronic an static characteristic and in core management of the nuclear fuel is stablished. A simplified scheme of the secondary system and its thermodynamic performance is determined. A scheme of parameters calculation of the reactor type is defined based in the present capacity of calculation developed by Coordenadoria de Engenharia Nuclear and Centro de Processamento de Dados, IEA, Brazil [pt

  18. Status of beryllium R and D in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, H.; Ishida, K.

    2004-01-01

    Recently, several R and D program of beryllium for fusion are being promoted in Japan and community of beryllium study is growing up. In the R and D area of beryllium for solid breeding blanket, major subjects are beryllide application for prototype reactor, lifetime evaluation of neutron multiplier, impurity effect of beryllium and recycling of irradiated beryllium. Especially, the study of beryllide application has significant progress in these two years. The basic properties such as tritium inventory, oxidation behavior, steam interaction for stoichiometric Be 12 Ti fabricated by HIP (Hot Isostatic Pressing) have been studied and some advantages against beryllium were made clear. For manufacturing technology development, phase diagram and ductility improvement have been studied. And, Be 12 Ti pebbles with the improved microstructure were successfully fabricated by Rotating Electrode Process. In order to enhance the R and D activities, the R and D network consisted of industries, universities and laboratories in all Japan have been organized. Many collaboration and information exchange strongly promotes the R and D and some projects for commercial application have been launched form these activities. Also international collaborative project such as IEA and ISTC have been launched or planned. Recent result of R and D in Japan is described on this paper. (author)

  19. Research and development on reduced-moderation light water reactor with passive safety features (Contract research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwamura, Takamichi; Okubo, Tsutomu; Akie, Hiroshi; Kugo, Teruhiko; Yonomoto, Taisuke; Kureta, Masatoshi; Ishikawa, Nobuyuki; Nagaya, Yasunobu; Araya, Fumimasa; Okajima, Shigeaki; Okumura, Keisuke; Suzuki, Motoe; Mineo, Hideaki; Nakatsuka, Toru

    2004-06-01

    The present report contains the achievement of 'Research and Development on Reduced-moderation Light Water Reactor with Passive Safety Features', which was performed by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), Hitachi Ltd., Japan Atomic Power Company and Tokyo Institute of Technology in FY2000-2002 as the innovative and viable nuclear energy technology (IVNET) development project operated by the Institute of Applied Energy (IAE). In the present project, the reduced-moderation water reactor (RMWR) has been developed to ensure sustainable energy supply and to solve the recent problems of nuclear power and nuclear fuel cycle, such as economical competitiveness, effective use of plutonium and reduction of spent fuel storage. The RMWR can attain the favorable characteristics such as high burnup, long operation cycle, multiple recycling of plutonium (Pu) and effective utilization of uranium resources based on accumulated LWR technologies. Our development target is 'Reduced-moderation Light Water Reactor with Passive Safety Features' with innovative technologies to achieve above mentioned requirement. Electric power is selected as 300 MWe considering anticipated size required for future deployment. The reactor core consists of MOX fuel assemblies with tight lattice arrangement to increase the conversion ratio. Design targets of the core specification are conversion ratio more than unity, negative void reactivity feedback coefficient to assure safety, discharged burnup more than 60 GWd/t and operation cycle more than 2 years. As for the reactor system, a small size natural circulation BWR with passive safety systems is adopted to increase safety and reduce construction cost. The results obtained are as follows: As regards core design study, core design was performed to meet the goal. Sequence of startup operation was constructed for the RMWR. As the plant design, plant system was designed to achieve enhanced economy using passive safety system effectively. In

  20. Pressure drop characteristics in tight-lattice bundles for reduced-moderation water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamai, Hidesada; Kureta, Masatoshi; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Akimoto, Hajime

    2004-01-01

    The reduced-moderation water reactor (RMWR) consists of several distinctive structures; a triangular tight-lattice configuration and a double-flat core. In order to design the RMWR core from the point of view of thermal-hydraulics, an evaluation method on pressure drop characteristics in the rod bundles at the tight-lattice configuration is required. In this study, calculated results by the Martinelli-Nelson's and Hancox's correlations were compared with experimental results in 4 x 5 rod bundles and seven-rod bundles. Consequently, the friction loss in two-phase flows becomes smaller at the tight-lattice configuration with the hydraulic diameter less than about 3 mm. This reason is due to the difference of the configuration between the multi-rod bundle and the circular tube and due to the effect of the small hydraulic diameter on the two-phase multiplier. (author)

  1. Design and development of rolled joint for moderator sparger channel of an Indian Pressurised Heavy Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joemon, V.; Sinha, R.K.

    1993-01-01

    Indian Pressurised Heavy Water Reactors are natural uranium fuelled heavy water moderated and cooled reactors. As per the conventional scheme, the moderator enters through one or more inlet nozzles penetrating the calandria shell and flows out through outlet nozzles. Baffles are fixed at the inlet nozzles for proper distribution of moderator in the calandria and to avoid the impact of the jet on the neighbouring calandria tubes. An alternate scheme for moderator inlet has been conceived and engineered in which three lower peripheral lattice locations of the reactor are converted into moderator inlets. This is achieved by moderator sparger channels each containing a 5 m long perforated zircaloy-2 sparger tube rolled to the calandria tube sheets and extended by stainless steel tubular components (inserts) at both ends of a sparger channel. Moderator enters the sparger channel at both ends and flows into the calandria. In the absence of standard codes for design of rolled joints, it was requires to develop these joints based on trials followed by various tests. this paper discusses the details of the rolled joint developed for this purpose, the details of the trials with test results and optimization of rolling parameters for these joints

  2. Optimization of seed-blanket type fuel assembly for reduced-moderation water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shelley, Afroza; Shimada, Shoichiro; Kugo, Teruhiko; Okubo, Tsutomu E-mail: okubo@hems.jaeri.go.jp; Iwamura, Takamichi

    2003-10-01

    Parametric studies have been performed for a PWR-type reduced-moderation water reactor (RMWR) with the seed-blanket type fuel assembles to achieve a high conversion ratio, negative void reactivity coefficient and a high burnup by using MOX fuel. From the viewpoint of reactor safety analysis, the fuel temperature coefficients were also studied. From the result of the burnup calculation, it has been seen that ratio of 40-50% of outer blanket in a seed-blanket assembly gives higher conversion ratio compared to the other combination of seed-blanket assembly. And the recommended number of (seed+blanket) layers is 20, in which the number of seed (S) layers is 15 (S15) and blanket (B) layers is 5 (B5). It was found that the conversion ratio of seed-blanket assembly decreases, when they are arranged looks like a flower shape (Hanagara). By the optimization of different parameters, S15B5 fuel assembly with the height of seed of 1000 mmx2, internal blanket of 150 mm and axial blanket of 400 mmx2 is recommended for a reactor of high conversion ratio. In this assembly, the gap of seed fuel rod is 1.0 mm and blanket fuel rod is 0.4 mm. In S15B5 assembly, the conversion ratio is 1.0 and the burnup is 38.18 GWd/t in (seed+internal blanket+outer blanket) region. However, the burnup is 57.45 GWd/t in (seed+internal blanket) region. The cycle length of the core is 16.46 effective full power in month (EFPM) by six batches and the enrichment of fissile Pu is 14.64 wt.%. The void coefficient is +21.82 pcm/%void, however, it is expected that the void coefficient will be negative if the radial neutron leakage is taken into account in the calculation. It is also possible to use S15B5 fuel assembly as a high burnup reactor 45 GWd/t in (seed+internal blanket+outer blanket) region, however, it is necessary to decrease the height of seed to 500 mmx2 to improve the void coefficient. In this reactor, the conversion ratio is 0.97 and void coefficient is +20.81 pcm/%void. The fuel temperature

  3. Impact of different moderator ratios with light and heavy water cooled reactors in equilibrium states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Permana, Sidik; Takaki, Naoyuki; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2006-01-01

    As an issue of sustainable development in the world, energy sustainability using nuclear energy may be possible using several different ways such as increasing breeding capability of the reactors and optimizing the fuel utilization using spent fuel after reprocessing as well as exploring additional nuclear resources from sea water. In this present study the characteristics of light and heavy water cooled reactors for different moderator ratios in equilibrium states have been investigated. The moderator to fuel ratio (MFR) is varied from 0.1 to 4.0. Four fuel cycle schemes are evaluated in order to investigate the effect of heavy metal (HM) recycling. A calculation method for determining the required uranium enrichment for criticality of the systems has been developed by coupling the equilibrium fuel cycle burn-up calculation and cell calculation of SRAC 2000 code using nuclear data library from the JENDL 3.2. The results show a thermal spectrum peak appears for light water coolant and no thermal peak for heavy water coolant along the MFR (0.1 ≤ MFR ≤ 4.0). The plutonium quality can be reduced effectively by increasing the MFR and number of recycled HM. Considering the effect of increasing number of recycled HM; it is also effective to reduce the uranium utilization and to increase the conversion ratio. trans-Plutonium production such as americium (Am) and curium (Cm) productions are smaller for heavy water coolant than light water coolant. The light water coolant shows the feasibility of breeding when HM is recycled with reducing the MFR. Wider feasible area of breeding has been obtained when light water coolant is replaced by heavy water coolant

  4. Reactor physics measurements with 19-element ThOsub(2)-sup(235)UOsub(2) cluster fuel in heavy water moderator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    French, P.M.

    1985-02-01

    Low power lattice physics measurements have been performed with a single rod of 19-element thorium oxide fuel enriched with 1.45 wt. percent sub(235)UOsub(2) (93 percent enriched) in a simulated heavy water moderated and cooled power reactor core. The experiments were designed to provide data relevant to a power reactor irradiation and to obtain some basic information on the physics of uranium-thorium fuel material. Some theoretical flux calculations are summarized and show reasonable agreement with experiment

  5. Thermal effects on beryllium mirrors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinswig, S.

    1989-01-01

    Beryllium is probably the most frequently used material for spaceborne system scan mirrors. Beryllium's properties include lightweightedness, high Young's modulus, high stiffness value, high resonance value. As an optical surface, beryllium is usually nickel plated in order to produce a higher quality surface. This process leads to the beryllium mirror acting like a bimetallic device. The mirror's deformation due to the bimetallic property can possibly degrade the performance of the associated optical system. As large space borne systems are designed and as temperature considerations become more crucial in the instruments, the concern about temporal deformation of the scan mirrors becomes a prime consideration. Therefore, two sets of tests have been conducted in order to ascertain the thermal effects on nickel plated beryllium mirrors. These tests are categorized. The purpose of this paper is to present the values of the bimetallic effect on typical nickel plated beryllium mirrors

  6. A study of the tritium behavior in coolant and moderator system of heavy water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S. P.; Song, S. S.; Chae, K. S. and others [Chosun Univ., Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-12-15

    The objectives of this report is to present a regulatory policy on the environmental impact and personnel exposure by understanding the generation, accumulation, environmental release and management of tritium in heavy water reactors. By estimating the tritium concentration at Wolsong nuclear plant site by estimating and forecasting the generation and accumulation of tritium in coolant and moderator systems at Wolsong unit 1, we will study the management and release of tritium at Wolsong units 3 and 4 which are ready for construction. The major activities of this study are as follows : tritium generation and accumulation in heavy water reactor, a quantitative assessment of the accumulation and release of tritium at Wolsong nuclear plant site, heavy water management at Wolsong nuclear plants. The tritium concentration and accumulation trends in the systems at Wolsong unit 1 was estimated. A quantitative assessment of the tritium accumulation and release for Wolsong 2, 3 and 4 based on data from Wolsong 1 was performed. The tritium removal schemes and its long-term management plan were made.

  7. Energetics of semi-catalyzed-deuterium, light-water-moderated, fusion-fission toroidal reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jassby, D.L.; Towner, H.H.; Greenspan, E.; Schneider, A.; Misolovin, A.; Gilai, D.

    1978-07-01

    The semi-catalyzed-deuterium Light-Water Hybrid Reactor (LWHR) comprises a lithium-free light-water-moderated blanket with U 3 Si fuel driven by a deuterium-based fusion-neutron source, with complete burn-up of the tritium but almost no burn-up of the helium-3 reaction product. A one-dimensional model for a neutral-beam-driven tokamak plasma is used to determine the operating modes under which the fusion energy multiplication Q/sub p/ can be equal to or greater than 0.5. Thermonuclear, beam-target, and energetic-ion reactions are taken into account. The most feasible operating conditions for Q/sub p/ approximately 0.5 are tau/sub E/ = 2 to 4 x 10 14 cm -3 s, = 10 to 20 keV, and E/sub beam/ = 500 to 1000 keV, with approximately 40% of the fusion energy produced by beam-target reactions. Illustrative parameters of LWHRs are compared with those of an ignited D-T reactor

  8. Natural uranium fueled light water moderated breeding hybrid power reactors: a feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenspan, E.; Schneider, A.; Misolovin, A.; Gilai, D.; Levin, P.

    1978-06-01

    The first part of the study consists of a thorough investigation of the properties of subcritical thermal lattices for hybrid reactor applications. Light water is found to be the best moderator for (fuel-self-sufficient) FSS hybrid reactors for power generation. Several lattice geometries and compositions of particular promise for LWHRs are identified. Using one of these lattices, fueled with natural uranium, the performance of several concepts of LWHR blankets is investigated, and optimal blanket designs are identified. The effect of blanket coverage efficiency and the feasibility of separating the functions of tritium breeding and of power generation to different blankets are investigated. Optimal iron-water shields for LWHRs are also determined. The performance of generic types of LWHRs is evaluated. The evolution of the blanket properties with burnup is evaluated and fuel management schemes are briefly examined. The feasibility of using the lithium system of the blanket to control the blanket power amplitude and shape is also investigated. A parametric study of the energy balance of LWHR power plants is carried out, and performance parameters expected from LWHRs are estimated. Discussions are given of special features of LWHRs and their fuel cycle

  9. Startup of a high-temperature reactor cooled and moderated by supercritical-pressure light water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi, Tin Tin; Ishiwatari, Yuki; Koshizuka, Seiichi; Oka, Yoshiaki

    2003-01-01

    The startup schemes of high-temperature reactors cooled and moderated by supercritical pressure light water (SCLWR-H) with square lattice and descending flow type water rods are studied by thermal-hydraulic analysis. In this study, two kinds of startup systems are investigated. In the constant pressure startup system, the reactor starts at a supercritical pressure. A flash tank and pressure reducing valves are necessary. The flash tank is designed so that the moisture content in the steam is less than 0.1%. In sliding pressure startup system, the reactor starts at a subcritical pressure. A steam-water separator and a drain tank are required for two-phase flow at startup. The separator is designed by referring to the water separator used in supercritical fossil-fired power plants. The maximum cladding surface temperature during the power-raising phase of startup is restricted not to exceed the rated value of 620degC. The minimum feedwater flow rate is 25% for constant pressure startup and 35% for sliding pressure startup system. It is found that both constant pressure startup system and sliding pressure startup system are feasible in SCLWR-H from the thermal hydraulic point of view. The core outlet temperature as high as 500degC can be achieved in the present design of SCLWR-H. Since the feedwater flow rate of SCLWR-H (1190 kg/s) is lower than that of the previous SCR designs the weight of the component required for startup is reduced. The sliding pressure startup system is better than constant pressure startup system in order to reduce the required component weight (and hence material expenditure) and to simplify the startup plant system. (author)

  10. Beryllium. Its minerals. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lires, O.A.; Delfino, C.A.; Botbol, J.

    1990-01-01

    With this work a series of reports begins, under the generic name 'Beryllium', related to several aspects of beryllium technology. The target is to update, with critical sense, current bibliographic material in order to be used in further applications. Some of the most important beryllium ores, the Argentine emplacement of their deposits and world occurrence are described. Argentine and world production, resources and reserves are indicated here as well. (Author) [es

  11. Beryllium Metal Supply Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    Carcinogen Assessment Group (U.S. Environmental Protec- tion Agency, 1987). The National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health is currently examining...Epidemiology of beryllium intox- ication. Arch. Ind. Hyg. Occup . Med. 4:123-151. U. S. Environmental Protection Agency 1987. Health Assessment Document...1957 to 1961. He rejoined the Bureau of Mines in 1961 as the aluminum and bauxite commcdity specialist. In 1973 he became chief of the Division of

  12. Measurement of cold neutron spectra at a model of cryogenic moderator of the IBR-2M reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulikov, S.A.; Chernikov, A.N.; Shabalin, E.P.; Kalinin, I.V.; Morozov, V.M.; Novikov, A.G.; Puchkov, A.V.

    2010-01-01

    The article is dedicated to methods and results of experimental determination of cold neutron spectra from solid mesitylene at neutron moderator temperatures 10-50 K. Experiments were fulfilled at the DIN-2PI spectrometer of the IBR-2 reactor. The main goals of this work were to examine a system of constants for Monte Carlo calculation of cryogenic moderators of the IBR-2M reactor and to determine the temperature dependence of cold neutron intensity from the moderator. A reasonable agreement of experimental and calculation results for mesitylene at 20 K has been obtained. The cold neutron intensity at temperature of moderator 10 K is about 1.8 times higher than at T=50 K

  13. Characterization of shocked beryllium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papin P.A.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available While numerous studies have investigated the low-strain-rate constitutive response of beryllium, the combined influence of high strain rate and temperature on the mechanical behavior and microstructure of beryllium has received limited attention over the last 40 years. In the current work, high strain rate tests were conducted using both explosive drive and a gas gun to accelerate the material. Prior studies have focused on tensile loading behavior, or limited conditions of dynamic strain rate and/or temperature. Two constitutive strength (plasticity models, the Preston-Tonks-Wallace (PTW and Mechanical Threshold Stress (MTS models, were calibrated using common quasi-static and Hopkinson bar data. However, simulations with the two models give noticeably different results when compared with the measured experimental wave profiles. The experimental results indicate that, even if fractured by the initial shock loading, the Be remains sufficiently intact to support a shear stress following partial release and subsequent shock re-loading. Additional “arrested” drive shots were designed and tested to minimize the reflected tensile pulse in the sample. These tests were done to both validate the model and to put large shock induced compressive loads into the beryllium sample.

  14. Heavy water moderated gas-cooled reactors; Filiere eau lourde - gaz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailly du Bois, B; Bernard, J L; Naudet, R; Roche, R [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    France has based its main effort for the production of nuclear energy on natural Uranium Graphite-moderated gas-cooled reactors, and has a long term programme for fast reactors, but this country is also engaged in the development of heavy water moderated gas-cooled reactors which appear to present the best middle term prospects. The economy of these reactors, as in the case of Graphite, arises from the use of natural or very slightly enriched Uranium; heavy water can take the best advantages of this fuel cycle and moreover offers considerable development potential because of better reactor performances. A prototype plant EL 4 (70 MW) is under construction and is described in detail in another paper. The present one deals with the programme devoted to the development of this reactor type in France. Reasons for selecting this reactor type are given in the first part: advantages and difficulties are underlined. After reviewing the main technological problems and the Research and Development carried out, results already obtained and points still to be confirmed are reported. The construction of EL 4 is an important step of this programme: it will be a significant demonstration of reactor performances and will afford many experimentation opportunities. Now the design of large power reactors is to be considered. Extension and improvements of the mechanical structures used for EL 4 are under study, as well as alternative concepts. The paper gives some data for a large reactor in the present state of technology, as a result from optimization studies. Technical improvements, especially in the field of materials could lead to even more interesting performances. Some prospects are mentioned for the long run. Investment costs and fuel cycles are discussed in the last part. (authors) [French] La France, qui a base son effort principal pour la production d'energie nucleaire sur la filiere des reacteurs a uranium naturel et graphite refroidis par gaz, et qui a un programme a plus

  15. High dose neutron irradiation damage in beryllium as blanket material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakin, V.P. E-mail: fae@niiar.ru; Kazakov, V.A.; Teykovtsev, A.A.; Pimenov, V.V.; Shimansky, G.A.; Ostrovsky, Z.E.; Suslov, D.N.; Latypov, R.N.; Belozerov, S.V.; Kupriyanov, I.B. E-mail: vniinm.400@g23.relkom.ru

    2001-11-01

    The paper presents the investigation results of beryllium products that operated in the SM and BOR-60 reactors up to neutron doses of 2.8x10{sup 22} and 8.0x10{sup 22} cm{sup -2} (E>1 MeV), respectively. The calculated and experimental data are given on helium and tritium accumulation, swelling, micro-hardness and thermal conductivity. The microstructural investigation results of irradiated beryllium are also presented. It is shown that the rate of helium and tritium accumulation in beryllium in the SM and BOR-60 reactors is high enough, which is of interest from the viewpoint of modeling the working conditions of the DEMO fusion reactor. Swelling of beryllium at irradiation temperature of 70-150 deg. C and neutron fluence of 2.8x10{sup 22} cm{sup -2} (E>1 MeV) makes up 0.8-1.5%, at 400 deg. C and fluence of 8x10{sup 22} cm{sup -2} (E>1 MeV)-3.2-5.0%. Irradiation hardening and decrease of thermal conductivity strongly depend on the irradiation temperature and are more significant at reduced temperatures. All results presented in the paper were analyzed with due account of the supposed working parameters of the DEMO fusion reactor blanket.

  16. High dose neutron irradiation damage in beryllium as blanket material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakin, V.P.; Kazakov, V.A.; Teykovtsev, A.A.; Pimenov, V.V.; Shimansky, G.A.; Ostrovsky, Z.E.; Suslov, D.N.; Latypov, R.N.; Belozerov, S.V.; Kupriyanov, I.B.

    2001-01-01

    The paper presents the investigation results of beryllium products that operated in the SM and BOR-60 reactors up to neutron doses of 2.8x10 22 and 8.0x10 22 cm -2 (E>1 MeV), respectively. The calculated and experimental data are given on helium and tritium accumulation, swelling, micro-hardness and thermal conductivity. The microstructural investigation results of irradiated beryllium are also presented. It is shown that the rate of helium and tritium accumulation in beryllium in the SM and BOR-60 reactors is high enough, which is of interest from the viewpoint of modeling the working conditions of the DEMO fusion reactor. Swelling of beryllium at irradiation temperature of 70-150 deg. C and neutron fluence of 2.8x10 22 cm -2 (E>1 MeV) makes up 0.8-1.5%, at 400 deg. C and fluence of 8x10 22 cm -2 (E>1 MeV)-3.2-5.0%. Irradiation hardening and decrease of thermal conductivity strongly depend on the irradiation temperature and are more significant at reduced temperatures. All results presented in the paper were analyzed with due account of the supposed working parameters of the DEMO fusion reactor blanket

  17. Permeation behavior of deuterium implanted into beryllium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Hirofumi; Hayashi, Takumi; O' hira, Shigeru; Nishi, Masataka [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-09-01

    Study on Implantation Driven Permeation (IDP) behavior of deuterium through pure beryllium was investigated as a part of the research to predict the tritium permeation through the first wall components ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor). The permeation experiments were carried out with two beryllium specimens, one was an unannealed specimen and the other was that annealed at 1173 K. The permeation flux was measured as a function of specimen temperature and incident ion flux. Surface analysis of specimen was also carried out after the permeation experiment. Permeation was observed only with the annealed specimen and no significant permeation was observed with unannealed specimen under the present experimental condition (maximum temperature: 685 K, detection limit: 1x10{sup 13} D atoms/m{sup 2}s). It could be attributed that the intrinsic lattice defects, which act as diffusion preventing site, decreased with the specimen annealing. Based on the result of steady and transient permeation behavior and surface analysis, it was estimated that the deuterium permeation implanted into annealed beryllium was controlled by surface recombination due to the oxide layer on the surface of the permeated side. (author)

  18. Beryllium. Beryllium oxide, obtention and properties. Pt.4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lires, O.A.; Delfino, C.A.; Botbol, J.

    1991-01-01

    As a continuation of the 'Beryllium' series this work reviews several methods of high purity beryllia production. Diverse methods of obtention and purification from different beryllium compounds are described. Some chemical, mechanical and electrical properties related with beryllia obtention methods are summarized. (Author) [es

  19. Irradiation effects on aluminium and beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bieth, M.

    1992-01-01

    The High Flux Reactor (HFR) in Petten (The Netherlands) is a 45 MW light water cooled and moderated research reactor. The vessel was replaced in 1984 after more than 20 years of operation because doubts had arisen over the condition of the aluminium alloy construction material. Data on the mechanical properties of the aluminium alloy Al 5154 with and without neutron irradiation are necessary for the safety analysis of the new HFR vessel which is constructed from the same material as the old vessel. Fatigue, fracture mechanics (crack growth and fracture toughness) and tensile properties have been obtained from several experimental testing programmes with materials of the new and the old HFR vessel. 1) Low-cycle fatigue testing has been carried out on non-irradiated specimens from stock material of the new HFR vessel. The number of cycles to failure ranges from 90 to more than 50,000 for applied strain from 3.0% to 0.4%; 2) Fatigue crack growth rate testing has been conducted: - with unirradiated specimens from stock material of the new vessel; - with irradiated specimens from the remnants of the old core box. Irradiation has a minor effect on the sub-critical fatigue crack growth rate. The ultimate increase of the mean crack growth rate amounts to a factor of 2. However crack extension is strongly reduced due to the smaller crack length for crack growth instability (reduction of K IC ). - Irradiated material from the core box walls of the old vessel has been used for fracture toughness testing. The conditional fracture toughness values K IQ ranges from 30.3 down to 16.5 MPa√m. The lowermost meaningful 'K IC ' is 17.7 MPa√m corresponding to the thermal fluence of 7.5 10 26 n/m 2 for the End of Life (EOL) of the old vessel. - Testing carried out on irradiated material from the remnants of the old HFR core box shows an ultimate neutron irradiation hardening of 35 points increase of HSR 15N and an ultimate tensile yield stress of 589 MPa corresponding to the

  20. Fusion Reactor Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moons, F.

    1998-01-01

    SCK-CEN's programme on fusion reactor materials includes studies (1) to investigate fracture mechanics of neutron-irradiated beryllium; (2) to describe the helium behaviour in irradiated beryllium at atomic scale; (3) to define the kinetics of beryllium reacting with air or steam; (3) to perform a feasibility study for the testing of integrated blanket modules under neutron irradiation. Progress and achievements in 1997 are reported

  1. Design of a graphite-moderated {sup 241}Am-Li neutron field to simulate reactor spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsujimura, N., E-mail: tsujimura.norio@jaea.go.j [Nuclear Fuel Cycle Engineering Laboratories, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4-33, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki-ken, 319-1194 (Japan); Yoshida, T. [Nuclear Fuel Cycle Engineering Laboratories, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4-33, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki-ken, 319-1194 (Japan)

    2010-12-15

    A neutron calibration field using {sup 241}Am-Li sources and a moderator was designed to simulate the neutron fields found outside a reactor. The moderating assembly selected for the design calculation consists of a cube of graphite blocks with dimensions of 50 cm by 50 cm by 50 cm, in which the {sup 241}Am-Li sources are placed. Monte Carlo calculations revealed the optimal depth of the source to be 15 cm. This moderated neutron source can be used to provide a test field that has a large number of intermediate energy neutrons with a small portion of MeV component.

  2. Plasma spraying of beryllium and beryllium-aluminum-silver alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, R.G.; Stanek, P.W.; Elliott, K.E.; Jacobson, L.A.

    1994-01-01

    A preliminary investigation on plasma-spraying of beryllium and a beryllium-aluminum-4% silver alloy was done at the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Beryllium Atomization and Thermal Spray Facility (BATSF). Spherical Be and Be-Al-4%Ag powders, which were produced by centrifugal atomization, were used as feedstock material for plasma-spraying. The spherical morphology of the powders allowed for better feeding of fine (<38 μm) powders into the plasma-spray torch. The difference in the as-deposited densities and deposit efficiencies of the two plasma-sprayed powders will be discussed along with the effect of processing parameters on the as-deposited microstructure of the Be-Al-4%Ag. This investigation represents ongoing research to develop and characterize plasma-spraying of beryllium and beryllium-aluminum alloys for magnetic fusion and aerospace applications

  3. Plasma spraying of beryllium and beryllium-aluminum-silver alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, R.G.; Stanek, P.W.; Elliott, K.E.; Jacobson, L.A.

    1993-01-01

    A preliminary investigation on plasma-spraying of beryllium and a beryllium-aluminum 4% silver alloy was done at the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Beryllium Atomization and Thermal Spray Facility (BATSF). Spherical Be and Be-Al-4%Ag powders, which were produced by centrifugal atomization, were used as feedstock material for plasma-spraying. The spherical morphology of the powders allowed for better feeding of fine (<38 μm) powders into the plasma-spray torch. The difference in the as-deposited densities and deposit efficiencies of the two plasma-sprayed powders will be discussed along with the effect of processing parameters on the as-deposited microstructure of the Be-Al-4%Ag. This investigation represents ongoing research to develop and characterize plasma-spraying of beryllium and beryllium-aluminum alloys for magnetic fusion and aerospace applications

  4. Measurements of beryllium sputtering yields at JET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jet-Efda Contributors Stamp, M. F.; Krieger, K.; Brezinsek, S.

    2011-08-01

    The lifetime of the beryllium first wall in ITER will depend on erosion and redeposition processes. The physical sputtering yields for beryllium (both deuterium on beryllium (Be) and Be on Be) are of crucial importance since they drive the erosion process. Literature values of experimental sputtering yields show an order of magnitude variation so predictive modelling of ITER wall lifetimes has large uncertainty. We have reviewed the old beryllium yield experiments on JET and used current beryllium atomic data to produce revised beryllium sputtering yields. These experimental measurements have been compared with a simple physical sputtering model based on TRIM.SP beryllium yield data. Fair agreement is seen for beryllium yields from a clean beryllium limiter. However the yield on a beryllium divertor tile (with C/Be co-deposits) shows poor agreement at low electron temperatures indicating that the effect of the higher sputtering threshold for beryllium carbide is important.

  5. Application of noise analysis technique for monitoring the moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shieh, D.J.; Upadhyaya, B.R.; Sweeney, F.J.

    1987-01-01

    A new technique, based on the noise analysis of neutron detector and core-exit coolant temperature signals, is developed for monitoring the moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). A detailed multinodal model is developed and evaluated for the reactor core subsystem of the loss-of-fluid test (LOFT) reactor. This model is used to study the effect of changing the sign of the moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity on the low-frequency phase angle relationship between the neutron detector and the core-exit temperature noise signals. Results show that the phase angle near zero frequency approaches - 180 deg for negative coefficients and 0 deg for positive coefficients when the perturbation source for the noise signals is core coolant flow, inlet coolant temperature, or random heat transfer

  6. Assessment of the accident response of a light-water-moderated breeder-reactor system: AWBA development program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High, H.M.

    1983-05-01

    The predicted accident response for a light water moderated, thorium/U-233 fueled, seed-blanket reactor concept was assessed. The first part of the assessment compared breeder accident response with that of a current commercial pressurized water reactor design for several different types of transients. Based on these comparisons and a review of the various parameter differences between the breeder and a U-235 fueled plant, the second part of the assessment studied the breeder accident behavior in more detail, particularly in areas of potential concern. Based on the two parts of the assessment, it was concluded that the breeder accident response would be very similar to that of present commercial pressurized water reactor plants. The large Doppler and moderator reactivity coefficients of the breeder would significantly reduce the severity of many of the accidents that must be considered. It is expected that the accident response of the breeder can be shown to meet regulatory criteria

  7. Technical Basis for PNNL Beryllium Inventory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Michelle Lynn

    2014-07-09

    The Department of Energy (DOE) issued Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 850, “Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program” (the Beryllium Rule) in 1999 and required full compliance by no later than January 7, 2002. The Beryllium Rule requires the development of a baseline beryllium inventory of the locations of beryllium operations and other locations of potential beryllium contamination at DOE facilities. The baseline beryllium inventory is also required to identify workers exposed or potentially exposed to beryllium at those locations. Prior to DOE issuing 10 CFR 850, Pacific Northwest Nuclear Laboratory (PNNL) had documented the beryllium characterization and worker exposure potential for multiple facilities in compliance with DOE’s 1997 Notice 440.1, “Interim Chronic Beryllium Disease.” After DOE’s issuance of 10 CFR 850, PNNL developed an implementation plan to be compliant by 2002. In 2014, an internal self-assessment (ITS #E-00748) of PNNL’s Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program (CBDPP) identified several deficiencies. One deficiency is that the technical basis for establishing the baseline beryllium inventory when the Beryllium Rule was implemented was either not documented or not retrievable. In addition, the beryllium inventory itself had not been adequately documented and maintained since PNNL established its own CBDPP, separate from Hanford Site’s program. This document reconstructs PNNL’s baseline beryllium inventory as it would have existed when it achieved compliance with the Beryllium Rule in 2001 and provides the technical basis for the baseline beryllium inventory.

  8. Safety analysis of high temperature reactor cooled and moderated by supercritical light water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiwatari, Yuki; Oka, Yoshiaki; Koshizuka, Seiichi

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes 'Safety' of a high temperature supercritical light water cooled and moderated reactor (SCRLWR-H) with descending flow water rods. The safety system of the SCLWR-H is similar to that of a BWR. It consists of reactor scram, high pressure auxiliary feedwater system (AFS), low pressure core injection system (LPCI), safety relief valves (SRV), automatic depressurization system (ADS), and main steam isolation valves (MSIV). Ten types of transients and five types of accidents are analyzed using a plant transient analysis code SPRAT-DOWN. The sequences are determined referring to LWRs. At the 'Loss of load without turbine bypass' transient, the coolant density and the core power are increased by the over-pressurization, and at the same time the core flow rate is decreased by the closure of the turbine control valves. The peak cladding temperature increases to 727degC. The high temperature at this type of transient is one of the characteristics of the SCLWR-H. Conversely at 'feedwater-loss' events, the core power decrease to some extend by density feedback before the reactor scram. The peak cladding temperatures at the 'Partial loss of feedwater' transient and the 'Total loss of feedwater' accident are only 702degC and 833degC, respectively. The cladding temperature does not increase so much at the transients 'Loss of feedwater heating' and 'CR withdrawal' because of the operation of the plant control system. All the transients and accidents satisfy the satisfy criteria with good margins. The highest cladding temperatures of the transients and the accidents are 727degC and 833degC at the 'Loss of load without turbine bypass' and 'Total loss of feedwater', respectively. The duration of the high cladding temperature is very short at the transients. According to the parametric survey, the peak cladding temperature are sensitive to the parameters such as the pump coast-down time, delay of pump trip, AFS capacity, AFS delay, CR worth, and SRV setpoint

  9. Investigation on spent fuel characteristics of reduced-moderation water reactor (RMWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukaya, Y.; Okubo, T.; Uchikawa, S.

    2008-01-01

    The spent fuel characteristics of the reduced-moderation water reactor (RMWR) have been investigated using the SWAT and ORIGEN codes. RMWR is an advanced LWR concept for plutonium recycling by using the MOX fuel. In the code calculation, the ORIGEN libraries such as one-group cross-section data prepared for RMWR were necessary. Since there were no open libraries for RMWR, they were produced in this study by using the SWAT code. New libraries based on the heterogeneous core modeling in the axial direction and with the variable actinide cross-section (VXSEC) option were produced and selected as the representative ORIGEN libraries for RMWR. In order to investigate the characteristics of the RMWR spent fuel, the decay heat, the radioactivity and the content of each nuclide were evaluated with ORIGEN using these libraries. In this study, the spent fuel characteristics of other types of reactors, such as PWR, BWR, high burn-up PWR, full-MOX-PWR, full-MOX-BWR and FBR, were also evaluated with ORIGEN. It has been found that about a half of the decay heat of the RMWR spent fuel comes from the actinides nuclides. It is the same with the radioactivity. The decay heat and the radioactivity of the RMWR spent fuel are lower than those of full-MOX-LWRs and FBR, and are the same level as those of the high burn-up PWR. The decay heat and the radioactivity from the fission products (FPs) in the spent fuel mainly depend on the burn-up and the burn-up time rather than the reactor type. Therefore, the decay heat and the radioactivity from FPs in the RMWR spent fuel are smaller, reflecting its relatively long burn-up time resulted from its core characteristics with the high conversion ratio. The radioactivity from the actinides in the spent fuel mainly depends on the 241 Pu content in the initial fuel, and the decay heat mainly depends on 238 Pu and 244 Cm. The contribution of 244 Cm is much smaller in RMWR than in MOX-LWRs because of the difference in the spectrum. In addition, from

  10. Experiences in the emptying of waste silos containing solid nuclear waste from graphite- moderated reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wall, S.; Schwarz, T.

    2003-01-01

    Before reactor sites can be handed over for ultimate decommissioning, at some sites silos containing waste from operations need to be emptied. The form and physical condition of the waste demands sophisticated retrieval technologies taking into account the onsite situation in terms of infrastructure and silo geometry. Furthermore, in the case of graphite moderated reactors, this waste usually includes several tonnes of graphite waste requiring special HVAC and dust handling measures. RWE NUKEM Group has already performed several contracts dealing with such emptying tasks. Of particular interest for the upcoming decommissioning projects in France might be the activities at Vandellos, Spain and Trawsfynnyd, UK. Retrieval System for Vandellos NPP is discussed. Following an international competitive tender exercise, RWE NUKEM won the contract to provide a turn-key retrieval system. This involved the design, manufacture and installation of a system built around the modules of a 200 kg capacity version of the ARTISAN manipulator system. The ARTISAN 200 manipulator, with remote slave arm detach facility, was deployed on a telescopic mast inserted into the silos through the roof penetrations. The manipulator deployed a range of tools to gather the waste and load it into a transfer basket, deployed through an adjacent penetration. After commissioning, the system cleared the vaults in less than the scheduled period with no failures. At the Trawsfynnyd Magnox plants two types of intermediate level waste (ILW) accumulated on site; namely Miscellaneous Activated Components (MAC) and Fuel Element Debris (FED). MAC is predominantly components that have been activated by the reactor core and then discharged. FED mainly consists of fuel cladding produced when fuel elements were prepared for dispatch to the reprocessing facility. RWE NUKEM Ltd. was awarded a contract to design, supply, commission and operate equipment to retrieve, pack and immobilize the two waste streams. Major

  11. Investigation on spent fuel characteristics of reduced-moderation water reactor (RMWR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukaya, Y. [Advanced Nuclear System Research and Development Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Oarai-machi, Ibaraki-ken 311-1393 (Japan)], E-mail: fukaya.yuji@jaea.go.jp; Okubo, T.; Uchikawa, S. [Advanced Nuclear System Research and Development Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Oarai-machi, Ibaraki-ken 311-1393 (Japan)

    2008-07-15

    The spent fuel characteristics of the reduced-moderation water reactor (RMWR) have been investigated using the SWAT and ORIGEN codes. RMWR is an advanced LWR concept for plutonium recycling by using the MOX fuel. In the code calculation, the ORIGEN libraries such as one-group cross-section data prepared for RMWR were necessary. Since there were no open libraries for RMWR, they were produced in this study by using the SWAT code. New libraries based on the heterogeneous core modeling in the axial direction and with the variable actinide cross-section (VXSEC) option were produced and selected as the representative ORIGEN libraries for RMWR. In order to investigate the characteristics of the RMWR spent fuel, the decay heat, the radioactivity and the content of each nuclide were evaluated with ORIGEN using these libraries. In this study, the spent fuel characteristics of other types of reactors, such as PWR, BWR, high burn-up PWR, full-MOX-PWR, full-MOX-BWR and FBR, were also evaluated with ORIGEN. It has been found that about a half of the decay heat of the RMWR spent fuel comes from the actinides nuclides. It is the same with the radioactivity. The decay heat and the radioactivity of the RMWR spent fuel are lower than those of full-MOX-LWRs and FBR, and are the same level as those of the high burn-up PWR. The decay heat and the radioactivity from the fission products (FPs) in the spent fuel mainly depend on the burn-up and the burn-up time rather than the reactor type. Therefore, the decay heat and the radioactivity from FPs in the RMWR spent fuel are smaller, reflecting its relatively long burn-up time resulted from its core characteristics with the high conversion ratio. The radioactivity from the actinides in the spent fuel mainly depends on the {sup 241}Pu content in the initial fuel, and the decay heat mainly depends on {sup 238}Pu and {sup 244}Cm. The contribution of {sup 244}Cm is much smaller in RMWR than in MOX-LWRs because of the difference in the spectrum

  12. A Conceptual Supercritical Water Cooled Reactor Design Using a Cruciform Solid Moderator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Hyung Kook; Bae, Kang Mok; Yoo, Jae Woon; Lee, Hyun Chul; Noh, Jae Man; Bae, Yoon Yong

    2006-01-15

    A Super Critical Water-Cooled Reactor(SCWR) concept proposed by Gen-IV has an advantage of a high thermal efficiency. However, there are some difficulties in neutronic core design for a SCWR due to lower moderator density resulting from the high operating temperature over the pseudo-critical temperature. In this report, the design concepts for the fuel assembly and the core for a SCWR were described as a feasibility study on the SCWR core design. HELIOS lattice code which will be used for group constants generation was verified for the application to the low coolant density condition of a SCWR. The TAF module for a thermal hydraulic feedback in MASTER was modified to consider high pressure and temperature of the supercritical coolant with single-phase fluid. A cruciform ZrH{sub 2} solid moderator was proposed for the SCWR fuel assembly design to compensate the lower coolant density. The axial zoning concept with three different enrichments for a fuel rod was used for the axial power shape control. Gadolinia burnable poison rods were used to reduce excess reactivity. Control rod system was grouped into 6 banks to control the excess reactivity of the core during normal operation. An orifice concept for each assembly was applied to control a coolant flow rate individually. As a result of the neutronic analysis for the equilibrium SCWR core, the maximum linear heat generation rete limit was satisfied and the maximum coolant temperature of the core outlet was {approx}590 .deg. C which is lower than 620 .deg. C of the maximum clad temperature limit.

  13. Method for fabricating beryllium structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovis, Jr., Victor M.; Northcutt, Jr., Walter G.

    1977-01-01

    Thin-walled beryllium structures are prepared by plasma spraying a mixture of beryllium powder and about 2500 to 4000 ppm silicon powder onto a suitable substrate, removing the plasma-sprayed body from the substrate and placing it in a sizing die having a coefficient of thermal expansion similar to that of the beryllium, exposing the plasma-sprayed body to a moist atmosphere, outgassing the plasma-sprayed body, and then sintering the plasma-sprayed body in an inert atmosphere to form a dense, low-porosity beryllium structure of the desired thin-wall configuration. The addition of the silicon and the exposure of the plasma-sprayed body to the moist atmosphere greatly facilitate the preparation of the beryllium structure while minimizing the heretofore deleterious problems due to grain growth and grain orientation.

  14. Doped beryllium lanthanate crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    Monocrystals of doped beryllium lanthanate, Be 2 Lasub(2-2x)Zsub(2x)O 5 --where Z may be any rare earth, but preferably neodymium, and x may have values between 0.001 and 0.2, but preferably between 0.007 and 0.015-- are recommended as laser hosts. They are softer and may be grown at a lower temperature than Y 3 A1 5 O 12 :Nd (YAG:Nd). Their chemical composition and preparation are described. An example of an optically pumped laser apparatus with this type of monocrystal as laser host is presented

  15. Particle bed reactor nuclear rocket concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludewig, H.

    1991-01-01

    The particle bed reactor nuclear rocket concept consists of fuel particles (in this case (U,Zr)C with an outer coat of zirconium carbide). These particles are packed in an annular bed surrounded by two frits (porous tubes) forming a fuel element; the outer one being a cold frit, the inner one being a hot frit. The fuel element are cooled by hydrogen passing in through the moderator. These elements are assembled in a reactor assembly in a hexagonal pattern. The reactor can be either reflected or not, depending on the design, and either 19 or 37 elements, are used. Propellant enters in the top, passes through the moderator fuel element and out through the nozzle. Beryllium used for the moderator in this particular design to withstand the high radiation exposure implied by the long run times

  16. A flashing driven moderator cooling system for CANDU reactors: Experimental and computational results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khartabil, H.F.

    2000-01-01

    A flashing-driven passive moderator cooling system is being developed at AECL for CANDU reactors. Preliminary simulations and experiments showed that the concept was feasible at normal operating power. However, flow instabilities were observed at low powers under conditions of variable and constant calandria inlet temperatures. This finding contradicted code predictions that suggested the loop should be stable at all powers if the calandria inlet temperature was constant. This paper discusses a series of separate-effects tests that were used to identify the sources of low-power instabilities in the experiments, and it explores methods to avoid them. It concludes that low-power instabilities can be avoided, thereby eliminating the discrepancy between the experimental and code results. Two factors were found to be important for loop stability: (1) oscillations in the calandria outlet temperature, and (2) flashing superheat requirements, and the presence of nucleation sites. By addressing these factors, we could make the loop operate in a stable manner over the whole power range and we could obtain good agreement between the experimental and code results. (author)

  17. On modeling of beryllium molten depths in simulated plasma disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsotridis, G.; Rother, H.

    1996-01-01

    Plasma-facing components in tokamak-type fusion reactors are subjected to intense heat loads during plasma disruptions. The influence of high heat fluxes on the depth of heat-affected zones of pure beryllium metal and beryllium containing very low levels of surface active impurities is studied by using a two-dimensional transient computer model that solves the equations of motion and energy. Results are presented for a range of energy densities and disruption times. Under certain conditions, impurities, through their effect on surface tension, create convective flows and hence influence the flow intensities and the resulting depths of the beryllium molten layers during plasma disruptions. The calculated depths of the molten layers are also compared with other mathematical models that are based on the assumption that heat is transported through the material by conduction only. 32 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  18. Comparative thermal cyclic test of different beryllium grades previously subjected to simulated disruption loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gervash, A.; Giniyatulin, R.; Mazul, I.

    1999-01-01

    Considering beryllium as plasma facing armour this paper presents recent results obtained in Russia. A special process of joining beryllium to a Cu-alloy material structure is described and recent results of thermal cycling tests of such joints are presented. Summarizing the results, the authors show that a Cu-alloy heat sink structure armoured with beryllium can survive high heat fluxes (≥10 MW/m 2 ) during 1000 heating/cooling cycles without serious damage to the armour material and its joint. The principal feasibility of thermal cycling of beryllium grades and their joints directly in the core of a nuclear reactor is demonstrated and the main results of this test are presented. The paper also describes the thermal cycling of different beryllium grades having cracks initiated by previously applied high heat loads simulating plasma disruptions. (orig.)

  19. Thermal fatigue of beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deksnis, E.; Ciric, D.; Falter, H.

    1995-01-01

    Thermal fatigue life of S65c beryllium castellated to a geometry 6 x 6 x (8-10)mm deep has been tested for steady heat fluxes of 3 MW/m 2 to 5 MW/m 2 and under pulsed heat fluxes (10-20 MW/m 2 ) for which the time averaged heat flux is 5 MW/m 2 . These tests were carried out in the JET neutral beam test facility A test sequence with peak surface temperatures ≤ 600 degrees C produced no visible fatigue cracks. In the second series of tests, with T max ≤ 750 degrees C evidence for fatigue appeared after a minimum of 1350 stress cycles. These fatigue data are discussed in view of the observed lack of thermal fatigue in JET plasma operations with beryllium PFC. JET experience with S65b and S65c is reviewed; recent operations with Φ = 25 MW/m 2 and sustained melting/resolidification are also presented. The need for a failure criterion for finite element analyses of Be PFC lifetimes is discussed

  20. Corrosion of beryllium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elston, J.; Caillat, R.

    1958-01-01

    Data are reported on the volatilization rate of beryllium oxide in moist air depending on temperature and water vapour concentration. They are concerned with powder samples or sintered shapes of various densities. For sintered samples, the volatilization rate is very low under the following conditions: - temperature: 1300 deg. C, - water vapour concentration in moist air: 25 g/m 3 , - flow rate: 12 I/hour corresponding to a speed of 40 m/hour on the surface of the sample. For calcinated powders (1300 deg. C), grain growth has been observed under a stream of moist air at 1100 deg. C. For instance, grain size changes from 0,5 to at least 2 microns after 500 hours of exposure at this temperature. Furthermore, results data are reported on corrosion of sintered beryllium oxide in pressurized water. At 250 deg. C, under a pressure of 40 kg/cm 2 water is very slightly corrosive; however, internal strains are revealed. Finally, some features on the corrosion in liquid sodium are exposed. (author) [fr

  1. Steady-State Thermal-Hydraulics Analyses for the Conversion of the BR2 Reactor to LEU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Licht, J. R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bergeron, A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Dionne, B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Van den Branden, G. [Belgian Nuclear Research Center (SCK-CEN), Mol (Belgium); Kalcheva, S [Belgian Nuclear Research Center (SCK-CEN), Mol (Belgium); Sikik, E [Belgian Nuclear Research Center (SCK-CEN), Mol (Belgium); Koonen, E [Belgian Nuclear Research Center (SCK-CEN), Mol (Belgium)

    2016-09-01

    BR2 is a research reactor used for radioisotope production and materials testing. It’s a tank-in-pool type reactor cooled by light water and moderated by beryllium and light water. The reactor core consists of a beryllium moderator forming a matrix of 79 hexagonal prisms in a hyperboloid configuration; each having a central bore that can contain a variety of different components such as a fuel assembly, a control or regulating rod, an experimental device, or a beryllium or aluminum plug. Based on a series of tests, the BR2 operation is currently limited to a maximum allowable heat flux of 470 W/cm2 to ensure fuel plate integrity during steady-state operation and after a loss-of-flow/loss-of-pressure accident. A feasibility study for the conversion of the BR2 reactor from highly-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel was previously performed to verify it can operate safely at the same maximum nominal steady-state heat flux. An assessment was also performed to quantify the heat fluxes at which the onset of flow instability and critical heat flux occur for each fuel type. This document updates and expands these results for the current representative core configuration (assuming a fresh beryllium matrix) by evaluating the onset of nucleate boiling (ONB), onset of fully developed nucleate boiling (FDNB), onset of flow instability (OFI) and critical heat flux (CHF).

  2. Compatibility of stainless steels and lithiated ceramics with beryllium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flament, T.; Fauvet, P.; Sannier, J.

    1988-07-01

    The introduction of beryllium as a neutron multiplier in ceramic blankets of thermonuclear fusion reactors may give rise to the following compatibility problems: (i) oxidation of Be by ceramics (lithium aluminate and silicates) or by water vapour; (ii) interaction between beryllium and austenitic and martensitic steels. The studies were done in contact tests under vacuum and in tests under wet sweeping helium. The contact tests under vacuum have revealed that the interaction of beryllium with ceramics seems to be low up to 700°C, the interaction of beryllium with steels is significant and is characterized by the formation of a diffusion layer and of a brittle Be-Fe-Ni compound. With type 316 L austenitic steel, this interaction appears quite large at 600°C whereas it is noticeable only at 700°C with martensitic steels. The experiments carried out with sweeping wet helium at 600°C have evidenced a slight oxidation of beryllium due to water vapour which can be enhanced in the front of uncompletely dehydrated ceramics.

  3. Neutron irradiation behavior of ITER candidate beryllium grades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kupriyanov, I.B.; Gorokhov, V.A.; Nikolaev, G.N. [A.A.Bochvar All-Russia Scientific Research Inst. of Inorganic Materials (VNIINM), Moscow (Russian Federation); Melder, R.R.; Ostrovsky, Z.E.

    1998-01-01

    Beryllium is one of the main candidate materials both for the neutron multiplier in a solid breeding blanket and for the plasma facing components. That is why its behaviour under the typical for fusion reactor loading, in particular, under the neutron irradiation is of a great importance. This paper presents mechanical properties, swelling and microstructure of six beryllium grades (DshG-200, TR-30, TshG-56, TRR, TE-30, TIP-30) fabricated by VNIINM, Russia and also one - (S-65) fabricated by Brush Wellman, USA. The average grain size of the beryllium grades varied from 8 to 25 {mu}m, beryllium oxide content was 0.8-3.2 wt. %, initial tensile strength was 250-680 MPa. All the samples were irradiated in active zone of SM-3 reactor up to the fast neutron fluence (5.5-6.2) {center_dot} 10{sup 21} cm{sup -2} (2.7-3.0 dpa, helium content up to 1150 appm), E > 0.1 MeV at two temperature ranges: T{sub 1} = 130-180degC and T{sub 2} = 650-700degC. After irradiation at 130-180degC no changes in samples dimensions were revealed. After irradiation at 650-700degC swelling of the materials was found to be in the range 0.1-2.1 %. Beryllium grades TR-30 and TRR, having the smallest grain size and highest beryllium oxide content, demonstrated minimal swelling, which was no more than 0.1 % at 650-700degC and fluence 5.5 {center_dot} 10{sup 21} cm{sup -2}. Tensile and compression test results and microstructure parameters measured before and after irradiation are also presented. (author)

  4. The moderator's moderator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, G.K.

    1990-01-01

    A brief account is given of the development of graphite moderators for Magnox and advanced gas cooled reactors. The accident at Windscale in 1957 brought to worldwide attention the importance of irradiation damage in graphite and the consequent storage of Wigner energy. In spite of the Windscale setback, preparations for the civil programme of Magnox reactors went ahead apace. Some of the background to the disastrous Dungeness B tender is presented. In spite of all the difficulties and uncertainties, the graphite in UK reactors has performed well. In all cases, as far as the author is aware, the behaviour of the graphite moderators will not prevent design life being achieved. (author)

  5. Condensation nuclear power plants with water-cooled graphite-moderated channel type reactors and advances in their development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boldyrev, V.M.; Mikhaj, V.I.

    1985-01-01

    Consideration is being given to results of technical and economical investigations of advisability of increasing unit power by elevating steam generating capacity as a result of inserting numerous of stereotype sectional structural elements of the reactor with similar thermodynamic parameters. It is concluded that construction of power units of condensation nuclear power plants with water-cooled graphite-moderated channel type reactors of 2400-3200 MWe and higher unit power capacity represents the real method for sharp growth of efficiency and labour productivity in power industry. It can also provide the required increase of the rate of putting electrogenerating powers into operation

  6. CFD Application and OpenFOAM on the 2-D Model for the Moderator System of Heavy-Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Se Myong; Park, A. Y.; Kim, Hyoung Tae

    2011-01-01

    The flow in the complex pipeline system in a calandria tank of CANDU reactor is transported through the distribution of heat sources, which also exerts the pressure drop to the coolant flow. So the phenomena should be considered as multi-physics both in the viewpoints of heat transfer and fluid dynamics. In this study, we have modeled the calandria tank system as two-dimensional simplified one preliminarily that is yet far from the real objects, but to see the essential physics and to test the possibility of the present CFD(computational fluid dynamics) methods for the thermo-hydraulic problem in the moderator system of heavy-water reactors

  7. Thermo-hydraulic test of the moderator cell of liquid hydrogen cold neutron source for the Budapest research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosz, Tamas; Rosta, Laszlo; Hargitai, Tibor; Mityukhlyaev, V.A.; Serebrov, A.P.; Zaharov, A.A.

    1999-01-01

    Thermo-hydraulic experiment was carried out in order to test performance of the direct cooled liquid hydrogen moderator cell to be installed at the research reactor of the Budapest Neutron Center. Two electric hearers up to 300 W each imitated the nuclear heat release in the liquid hydrogen as well as in construction material. The test moderator cell was also equipped with temperature gauges to measure the hydrogen temperature at different positions as well as the inlet and outlet temperature of cooling he gas. The hydrogen pressure in the connected buffer volume was also controlled. At 140 w expected total heat load the moderator cell was filled with liquid hydrogen within 4 hours. The heat load and hydrogen pressure characteristics of the moderator cell are also presented. (author)

  8. The INEL beryllium multiplication experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.R.; King, J.J.

    1991-03-01

    The experiment to measure the multiplication of 14-MeV neutrons in bulk beryllium has been completed. The experiment consists of determining the ratio of 56 Mn activities induced in a large manganese bath by a central 14-MeV neutron source, with and without a beryllium sample surrounding the source. In the manganese bath method a neutron source is placed at the center of a totally-absorbing aqueous solution of MnSo 4 . The capture of neutrons by Mn produces a 56 Mn activity proportional to the emission rate of the source. As applied to the measurement of the multiplication of 14- MeV neutrons in bulk beryllium, the neutron source is a tritium target placed at the end of the drift tube of a small deuteron accelerator. Surrounding the source is a sample chamber. When the sample chamber is empty, the neutrons go directly to the surrounding MnSO 4 solution, and produce a 56 Mn activity proportional to the neutron emission rate. When the chamber contains a beryllium sample, the neutrons first enter the beryllium and multiply through the (n,2n) process. Neutrons escaping from the beryllium enter the bath and produce a 56 Mn activity proportional to the neutron emission rate multiplied by the effective value of the multiplication in bulk beryllium. The ratio of the activities with and without the sample present is proportional to the multiplication value. Detailed calculations of the multiplication and all the systematic effects were made with the Monte Carlo program MCNP, utilizing both the Young and Stewart and the ENDF/B-VI evaluations for beryllium. Both data sets produce multiplication values that are in excellent agreement with the measurements for both raw and corrected values of the multiplication. We conclude that there is not real discrepancy between experimental and calculated values for the multiplication of neutrons in bulk beryllium. 12 figs., 11 tabs., 18 refs

  9. Unique differences in applying safety analyses for a graphite moderated, channel reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moffitt, R.L.

    1993-06-01

    Unlike its predecessors, the N Reactor at the Hanford Site in Washington State was designed to produce electricity for civilian energy use as well as weapons-grade plutonium. This paper describes the major problems associated with applying safety analysis methodologies developed for commercial light water reactors (LWR) to a unique reactor like the N Reactor. The focus of the discussion is on non-applicable LWR safety standards and computer modeling/analytical variances of standards. The approaches used to resolve these problems to develop safety standards and limits for the N Reactor are described

  10. Offshoots from beryllium development programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, B.P.; Sinha, P.K.

    1995-01-01

    The paper briefly presents extraction and processing of beryllium metal as practiced in the beryllium facilities at Turbhe, New Bombay. These facilities have been set up to meet the indigenous requirements of the metal in space and nuclear science programmes. As offshoot of this beryllium development programme has been the development of a number of pyro and powder metallurgical equipment. Indigenous development of these pieces of equipment has been a professionally rewarding experience. Efforts are now on to promote these equipment for industrial use. (author). 6 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  11. The feasibility study of using deuterated gadolinium nitrate for moderator-poisoned shutdown and excess reactivity control in CANDU reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, J.; Everatt, A.

    2006-01-01

    Gadolinium nitrate is used in CANDU stations as moderator poison for reactor shutdowns and excess reactivity control. The use of the light-water hydrate introduces significant quantities of light water into the moderator system, which must be removed from the moderator by periodically upgrading the moderator (isotopic maintenance). The benefit of using a deuterated gadolinium nitrate would be a higher moderator isotopic and/or a lesser isotopic maintenance requirement. This study evaluated the economics of using deuterated gadolinium nitrate, as opposed to the light-water hydrate, for moderator-poisoned shutdowns and excess reactivity control in CANDU-6 reactors. Normal gadolinium nitrate (i.e., the light-water hydrate) is available from suppliers at ∼125 $/kg. Supplier quotes for deuterated gadolinium nitrate ranged from 1900 to 4000 $/kg. To examine the possibility of producing deuterated gadolinium nitrate in-house at a lower cost than commercially available, a three-stage dissolution/evaporation manufacturing process was conceived and costed. Depending on the assumed demand for the product (i.e., the number of reactors adopting the use of the product) and the capital recovery period, the estimated unit cost for the dissolution/evaporation process ranged from 730 to 2500 $/kg. The determination of economic benefit from using deuterated gadolinium nitrate in existing CANDU stations was based on the cost savings resulting from a higher fuel burn-up (i.e., the higher moderator isotopic would give a higher fuel burn-up). The net benefit of using deuterated gadolinium nitrate for most CANDU stations was determined to be marginal (i.e., <20 k$/a). Only for those CANDU stations where the moderator isotopic was relatively low (e.g., 99.85 wt%) was there a potential significant benefit (20-100 k$/a). However, if the reason for the low moderator isotopic is a relatively high moderator light-water ingress rate from sources other than the use of the light-water hydrate

  12. On the use of a moderation layer to improve the safety behavior in sodium cooled fast reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merk, Bruno, E-mail: b.merk@fzd.de [Institute of Safety Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (Germany); Fridman, Emil; Weiss, Frank-Peter [Institute of Safety Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (Germany)

    2011-05-15

    Research highlights: > Using a moderation layer can reduce the sodium void effect in a SFR. > Inserting the moderation layer improves the Doppler effect significantly. > The uniform layer distribution avoids effects on power and burnup distribution. > Hydride containing material like uranium-zirconium hydride is most efficient. - Abstract: This work shows the effect of the use of moderating layers on the sodium void effect in sodium cooled fast breeder reactors. The moderating layers consisting of either boron carbide B{sub 4}C or uranium-zirconium hydride UZrH cause a strong reduction of the sodium void effect. Additionally these layers improve the fuel temperature effect and the coolant effect of the system. The use of the UZrH is significantly more effective for the reduction of the sodium void effect as well as for the improvement of the fuel temperature and the coolant effect. All changes cause by the insertion of the UZrH layer cause a significantly increased stability of the fast reactor system against transients. The moderating layers have only a small influence on the breeding effect and on the production of minor actinides.

  13. Study on neutronics performance of flower shape advanced supercritical water cooled fast reactor with different solid moderators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Tao; Li Zhifeng; Xie Jinsen; Peng Honghua

    2015-01-01

    The supercritical water cooled fast reactors worked at such harsh condition with high temperature and high pressure, huge hydrogen balance pressure and thermal shock can result in a great loss of hydrogen. The released hydrogen would be out of control under accident situations. K_e_f_f, conversion ratio, moderator temperature effect, Doppler effect and void effect of different material such as ZrH_1_._7, Bp, BeO, C and SiC are discussed. BeO and SiC hold better integrated performance among these materials. Besides, moderators have less effect on the Doppler effect of fuel. (authors)

  14. Thermal conductivity of beryllium under low temperature high dose neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakin, V.P.; Latypov, R.N.; Suslov, D.N.; Kupriyanov, I.B.

    2004-01-01

    Thermal conductivity of compact beryllium of several Russian grades such as TE-400, TE-56, TE-30, TIP and DIP differing in the production technology, grain size and impurity content has been investigated. The thermal diffusivity of beryllium was measured on the disks in the initial and irradiated conditions using the pulse method in the range from room temperature to 200degC. The thermal conductivity was calculated using the table values for the beryllium thermal capacity. The specimens and beryllium neutron source fragments were irradiation in the SM reactor at 70degC and 200degC to a neutron fluence of (0.5-11.4)·10 22 cm -2 (E>0.1 MeV) and in the BOR-60 reactor at 400degC to 16·10 22 cm -2 (E>0.1MeV), respectively. The low-temperature irradiation leads to the drop decrease of the beryllium thermal conductivity and the effect depends on the irradiation parameters. The paper analyses the effect of irradiation parameters (temperature, neutron fluence), measurement temperature and structural factors on beryllium conductivity. The experiments have revealed that the short time post-irradiation annealing at high temperature results in partial reduction of the thermal conductivity of irradiated beryllium. (author)

  15. TEM study of impurity segregations in beryllium pebbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klimenkov, M., E-mail: michael.klimenkov@kit.edu [Institute for Applied Materials – Applied Materials Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Chakin, V.; Moeslang, A. [Institute for Applied Materials – Applied Materials Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Rolli, R. [Institute for Applied Materials – Materials and Biomechanics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2014-12-15

    Beryllium is planned to be used as a neutron multiplier in the Helium-cooled Pebble Bed European concept of a breeding blanket of demonstration power reactor DEMO. In order to evaluate the irradiation performance, individual pebbles and constrained pebble beds were neutron-irradiated at temperatures typical of fusion blankets. Beryllium pebbles 1 mm in diameter produced by the rotating electrode method were subjected to a TEM study before and after irradiation at High Flux Reactor, Petten, Netherlands at 861 K. The grain size varied in a wide range from sub-micron size up to several tens of micrometers, which indicated formation bimodal grain size distribution. Based on the application of combined electron energy loss spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy methods, we suggest that impurity precipitates play an important role in controlling the mechanical properties of beryllium. The impurity elements were present in beryllium at a sub-percent concentration form beryllide particles of a complex (Fe/Al/Mn/Cr)B composition. These particles are often ordered along dislocations lines, forming several micron-long chains. It can be suggested that fracture surfaces often extended along these chains in irradiated material.

  16. Investigations of the ternary system beryllium-carbon-tungsten and analyses of beryllium on carbon surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kost, Florian

    2009-01-01

    Beryllium, carbon and tungsten are planned to be used as first wall materials in the future fusion reactor ITER. The aim of this work is a characterization of mixed material formation induced by thermal load. To this end, model systems (layers) were prepared and investigated, which give insight into the basic physical and chemical concepts. Before investigating ternary systems, the first step was to analyze the binary systems Be/C and Be/W (bottom-up approach), where the differences between the substrates PG (pyrolytic graphite) and HOPG (highly oriented pyrolytic graphite) were of special interest. Particularly X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), low energy ion scattering (ISS) and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) were used as analysis methods. Beryllium evaporated on carbon shows an island growth mode, whereas a closed layer can be assumed for layer thicknesses above 0.7 nm. Annealing of the Be/C system induces Be 2 C island formation for T≥770 K. At high temperatures (T≥1170 K), beryllium carbide dissociates, resulting in (metallic) beryllium desorption. For HOPG, carbide formation starts at higher temperatures compared to PG. Activation energies for the diffusion processes were determined by analyzing the decreasing beryllium amount versus annealing time. Surface morphologies were characterized using angle-resolved XPS (ARXPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Experiments were performed to study processes in the Be/W system in the temperature range from 570 to 1270 K. Be 2 W formation starts at 670 K, a complete loss of Be 2 W is observed at 1170 K due to dissociation (and subsequent beryllium desorption). Regarding ternary systems, particularly Be/C/W and C/Be/W were investigated, attaching importance to layer thickness (reservoir) variations. At room temperature, Be 2 C, W 2 C, WC and Be 2 W formation at the respective interfaces was observed. Further Be 2 C is forming with increasing annealing temperatures. Depending on the layer

  17. Effective neutron temperature measurements in well moderated reactor by the reactivity coefficient method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raisic, N.; Klinc, T.

    1968-11-01

    The ratio of the reactivity changes of a nuclear reactor produced by successive introduction of two different neutron absorbers in the reactor core, has been measured and information on effective neutron temperature at a particular point obtained. Boron was used as a l/v absorber and cadmium as an absorber sensiti ve to neutron temperature. Effective neutron temperature distribution has been deduced by moving absorbers across the reactor core and observing the corresponding reactivity changes. (author)

  18. Application of hydrogen water chemistry to moderate corrosive circumstances around the reactor pressure vessel bottom of boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shunsuke Uchida; Eishi Ibe; Katsumi Ohsumi

    1994-01-01

    Application of hydrogen water chemistry to moderate corrosive circumstances is a promising approach to preserve structural integrities of major components and structures in the primary cooling system of BWRs. The benefits of HWC application are usually accompanied by several disadvantages. After evaluating merits and demerits of HWC application, it is concluded that optimal amounts of hydrogen injected into the feed water can moderate corrosive circumstances, in the region to be preserved, without serious disadvantages. (authors). 1 fig., 4 refs

  19. Fracture toughness of irradiated beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beeston, J.M.

    1978-01-01

    The fracture toughness of nuclear grade hot-pressed beryllium upon irradiation to fluences of 3.5 to 5.0 x 10 21 n/cm 2 , E greater than 1 MeV, was determined. Procedures and data relating to a round-robin test contributing to a standard ASTM method for unirradiated beryllium are discussed in connection with the testing of irradiated specimens. A porous grade of beryllium was also irradiated and tested, thereby enabling some discrimination between the models for describing the fracture toughness behavior of porous beryllium. The fracture toughness of unirradiated 2 percent BeO nuclear grade beryllium was 12.0 MPa m/sup 1 / 2 /, which was reduced 60 percent upon irradiation at 339 K and testing at 295 K. The fracture toughness of a porous grade of beryllium was 13.1 MPa m/sup 1 / 2 /, which was reduced 68 percent upon irradiation and testing at the same conditions. Reasons for the reduction in fracture toughness upon irradiation are discussed

  20. Beryllium irradiation embrittlement test programme. Material and specimen specification, manufacture and qualification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harries, D.R.; Dalle Donne, M.

    1996-06-01

    The report presents the specification, manufacture and qualification of the beryllium specimens to be irradiated in the BR2 reactor in Mol to investigate the effect of the neutron irradiation on the embrittlement as a function of temperature and beryllium oxide content. This work was been performed in the framework of the Nuclear Fusion Project of the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe and is supported by the European Union within the European Fusion Technology Program. (orig.)

  1. Analysis of passive moderator cooling system of Candu-6A reactor at emergency condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umar, Efrizon; Subki, M. Hadid; Vecchiarelli, Jack

    2001-01-01

    Analysis of passive moderator cooling system subject to in-core LOCA with no emergency core cooling injection has been done. In this study, the new model of passive moderator system has been tested for emergency conditions and CATHENA code Mod-3.5b/Rev1 is used to calculate some parameters of this passive moderator cooling system. This result of simulation show that the proposed moderator cooling system have given satisfactory result, especially for the case with 0.7 m riser diameter and the number of heat exchanger tubes 8100. For PEWS tank containing 3000 m3 of light water initially at 30 0C and a 3641 m2 moderator heat exchanger, the average long-term heat removed rate balances the moderator heat load and the flow through the passive moderator loop remains stable for over 72 hours with no saturated boiling in the calandria and flow instabilities do not develop during long-term period

  2. Beryllium R and D for blanket application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalle Donne, M.; Scaffidi-Argentina, F. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH Technik und Umwelt (Germany). Inst. fuer Neutronenphysik und Reaktortechnik; Longhurst, G.R. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls (United States); Kawamura, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment

    1998-10-01

    The paper describes the main problems and the R and D for the beryllium to be used as neutron multiplier in blankets. As the four ITER partners propose to use beryllium in the form of pebbles for their DEMO relevant blankets (only the Russians consider the porous beryllium option as an alternative) and the ITER breeding blanket will use beryllium pebbles as well, the paper is mainly based on beryllium pebbles. Also the work on the chemical reactivity of fully dense and porous beryllium in contact with water steam is described, due to the safety importance of this point. (orig.) 29 refs.

  3. Beryllium R and D for blanket application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalle Donne, M.; Scaffidi-Argentina, F.; Kawamura, H.

    1998-01-01

    The paper describes the main problems and the R and D for the beryllium to be used as neutron multiplier in blankets. As the four ITER partners propose to use beryllium in the form of pebbles for their DEMO relevant blankets (only the Russians consider the porous beryllium option as an alternative) and the ITER breeding blanket will use beryllium pebbles as well, the paper is mainly based on beryllium pebbles. Also the work on the chemical reactivity of fully dense and porous beryllium in contact with water steam is described, due to the safety importance of this point. (orig.)

  4. Beryllium R&D for blanket application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donne, M. Dalle; Longhurst, G. R.; Kawamura, H.; Scaffidi-Argentina, F.

    1998-10-01

    The paper describes the main problems and the R&D for the beryllium to be used as neutron multiplier in blankets. As the four ITER partners propose to use beryllium in the form of pebbles for their DEMO relevant blankets (only the Russians consider the porous beryllium option as an alternative) and the ITER breeding blanket will use beryllium pebbles as well, the paper is mainly based on beryllium pebbles. Also the work on the chemical reactivity of fully dense and porous beryllium in contact with water steam is described, due to the safety importance of this point.

  5. Design and fabrication of a dead weight equipment to perform creep measurements on highly irradiated beryllium specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scibetta, M.; Pellettieri, A.; Wouters, P.; Leenaerts, A.; Verpoucke, G.

    2005-01-01

    Beryllium is an important material to be used in the blanket of fusion reactors. It acts as a neutron multiplier that allows tritium production. In order to use this material effectively, some data on creep and swelling behaviour are needed. This paper describes preliminary microstructural investigations and the qualification of a creep set-up that will be used to measure creep of highly irradiated beryllium from the BR2 research reactor matrix. (Author)

  6. Aiming at super long term application of nuclear energy. Scope and subjects on the water cooled breeder reactor, the 'reduced moderation water reactor'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Osamu; Tatematsu, Kenji; Tanaka, Yoji

    2001-01-01

    In order to make possible on nuclear energy application for super long term, development of sodium cooling type fast breeder reactor (FBR) has been carried out before today. However, as it was found that its commercialization was technically and economically difficult beyond expectation, a number of nations withdrew from its development. And, as Japan has continued its development, scope of its actual application is not found yet. Now, a research and development on a water cooling type breeder reactor, the reduced moderation water reactor (RMWR)' using LWR technology has now been progressed under a center of JAERI. This RMWR is a reactor intending a jumping upgrade of conversion ratio by densely arranging fuel bars to shift neutron spectrum to faster region. The RMWR has a potential realizable on full-dress plutonium application at earlier timing through its high conversion ratio, high combustion degree, plutonium multi-recycling, and so on. And, it has also feasibility to solve uranium resource problem by realization of conversion ratio with more than 1.0, to contribute to super long term application of nuclear energy. Here was investigated on an effect of reactor core on RMWR, especially of its conversion ratio and plutonium loading on introduction effect as well as on how RMWR could be contributed to reduction of uranium resource consumption, by drawing some scenario on development of power generation reactor and fuel cycle in Japan under scope of super long term with more than 100 years in future. And, trial calculation on power generation cost of the RMWR was carried out to investigate some subjects at a viewpoint of upgrading on economy. (G.K.)

  7. The JFS libraries and the effect of beryllium on the breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiguro, Y.; Gouveia, A.S. de.

    1981-02-01

    The Japanese group constants libraries for fast reactor analysis JFS-25 and JFS-70 are compared. The effect of beryllium on the breeding characteristics of thorium cycle breeders is examined. The results show that the 25-group set predicts shorter reactor doubling times than the 70-group set and that the effect of Be(n,2n) reactions is negligible. (Author) [pt

  8. Cryostat system for investigation on new neutron moderator materials at reactor TRIGA PUSPATI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dris, Zakaria bin, E-mail: zakariadris@gmail.com [College of Graduate Studies, Universiti Tenaga Nasional (UNITEN), Putrajaya Campus, Jalan IKRAM-UNITEN, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Centre for Nuclear Energy, Universiti Tenaga Nasional (UNITEN), Putrajaya Campus, Jalan IKRAM-UNITEN, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Mohamed, Abdul Aziz bin; Hamid, Nasri A. [Centre for Nuclear Energy, Universiti Tenaga Nasional (UNITEN), Putrajaya Campus, Jalan IKRAM-UNITEN, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Azman, Azraf; Ahmad, Megat Harun Al Rashid Megat; Jamro, Rafhayudi; Yazid, Hafizal [Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2016-01-22

    A simple continuous flow (SCF) cryostat was designed to investigate the neutron moderation of alumina in high temperature co-ceramic (HTCC) and polymeric materials such as Teflon under TRIGA neutron environment using a reflected neutron beam from a monochromator. Cooling of the cryostat will be carried out using liquid nitrogen. The cryostat will be built with an aluminum holder for moderator within stainless steel cylinder pipe. A copper thermocouple will be used as the temperature sensor to monitor the moderator temperature inside the cryostat holder. Initial measurements of neutron spectrum after neutron passing through the moderating materials have been carried out using a neutron spectrometer.

  9. Analyses for MARIA Research Reactor with RELAP/MOD3 code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szczurek, J.; Czerski, P.

    2004-01-01

    This paper deals with the application of the RELAP5/MOD3 code to the transient analyses for MARIA research reactor. Poland's MARIA Research Reactor is water and beryllium moderated, water-cooled reactor of a pool type with pressurized fuel channels containing concentric multi-tube assemblies of highly enriched uranium clad in aluminium. The RELAP5/MOD3 input data model includes the whole primary cooling circuit of the MARIA reactor. The model was qualified against the reactor data at steady state conditions and additionally against the existing reliable experimental data for a transient initiated by the reactor scram. The RELAP transient simulation was performed for loss of forced flow accidents including two scenarios with protected and unprotected (no scram) reactor core. Calculations allow estimating time margin for reactor scram initiation and reactivity feedbacks contribution to the results. (author)

  10. Chapter 10: Calculation of the temperature coefficient of reactivity of a graphite-moderated reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, G.; Richmond, R.; Stace, R.H.W.

    1963-01-01

    The temperature coefficients of reactivity of the BEPO, Windscale and Calder reactors are calculated, using the revised methods given by Lockey et al. (1956) and by Campbell and Symonds (1962). The results are compared with experimental values. (author)

  11. Safe waste management practices in beryllium facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhat, P.N.; Soundararajan, S.; Sharma, D.N.

    2012-01-01

    Beryllium, an element with the atomic symbol Be, atomic number 4, has very high stiffness to weight ratio and low density. It has good electrical conductive properties with low coefficient of thermal expansion. These properties make the metal beryllium very useful in varied technological endeavours, However, beryllium is recognised as one of the most toxic metals. Revelation of toxic effects of beryllium resulted in institution of stringent health and safety practices in beryllium handling facilities. The waste generated in such facilities may contain traces of beryllium. Any such waste should be treated as toxic waste and suitable safe waste management practices should be adopted. By instituting appropriate waste management practice and through a meticulously incorporated safety measures and continuous surveillance exercised in such facilities, total safety can be ensured. This paper broadly discusses health hazards posed by beryllium and safe methods of management of beryllium bearing wastes. (author)

  12. Feasibility study on thermal-hydraulic performance in tight-lattice rod bundles for reduced-moderation water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnuki, A.; Kureta, M.; Liu, W.; Tamai, H.; Akimoto, H.

    2004-01-01

    Research and development project for investigating thermal-hydraulic performance in tight-lattice rod bundles for Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR) started at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) in 2002. The RMWR can attain the favorable characteristics such as effective utilization of uranium resources, multiple recycling of plutonium, high burn-up and long operation cycle, based on matured light-water reactor technologies. MOX fuel assemblies with tight lattice arrangement are used to increase the conversion ratio by reducing the moderation of neutron. Increasing the in-core void fraction also contributes to the reduction of neutron moderation. The confirmation of thermal-hydraulic feasibility is one of the most important issues for the RMWR because of the tight-lattice configuration. The project has mainly consisted of a large-scale thermal-hydraulic test and development of analytical methods named modeling engineering. In the large-scale test, 37-rod bundle experiments can be performed. Steady-state critical power experiments have been achieved in the test facility and the experimental data reveal the feasibility of RMWR

  13. Advances of study on thermal-hydraulic performance in tight-lattice rod bundles for reduced-moderation water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akira Ohnuki; Kazuyuki Takase; Masatoshi Kureta; Hiroyuki Yoshida; Hidesada Tamai; Wei Liu; Toru Nakatsuka; Hajime Akimoto

    2005-01-01

    R and D project to investigate thermal-hydraulic performance in tight-lattice rod bundles for Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR) is started at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute in collaboration with power company, reactor vendors, universities since 2002. The RMWR can attain the favorable characteristics such as effective utilization of uranium resources, multiple recycling of plutonium, high burn-up and long operation cycle, based on matured LWR technologies. MOX fuel assemblies with tight lattice arrangement are used to increase the conversion ratio by reducing the moderation of neutron. Increasing the in-core void fraction also contributes to the reduction of neutron moderation. The confirmation of thermal-hydraulic feasibility is one of the most important R and D items for the RMWR because of the tight-lattice configuration. In this paper, we will show the R and D plan and describe some advances on experimental and analytical studies. The experimental study is performed mainly using large-scale (37-rod bundle) test facility and the analytical one aims to develop a predictable technology for geometry effects such as gap between rods, grid spacer configuration etc. using advanced 3-D two-phase flow simulation methods. Steady-state and transient critical power experiments are conducted with the test facility (Gap width between rods: 1.0 mm) and the experimental data reveal the feasibility of RMWR. (authors)

  14. The nature of beryllium disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, W.J.

    1977-01-01

    The increasing use of beryllium in modern industry poses a continuing health hazard with a real risk of producing incapacitating disease and even death. Beryllium and its salts are very toxic, even in small doses and may produce lesions in any organ. The majority of cases follow inhalation and may cause either acute or chronic lung disease. Acute pulmonary disease is a form of chemical pneumonitis while the chronic disease is characterised by the production of granulomas and fibrosis. The skin may be affected with the finding of dermatitis, acute or chronic ulceration. Other organs commonly involved include the liver and kidneys. The pathology of beryllium disease is not specific and diagnosis depends on satisfying the following criteria - history of exposure, consistent clinical, radiographic and pathological finding, presence of beryllium in tissue/fluid and evidence of hypersensitivity. Recent development of 'in vitro' tests of hypersensitivity may prove of value in both diagnosis and prevention of disease. Beryllium disease responds to steroid therapy but the only sure treatment is avoidance of exposure. (author)

  15. Beryllium-beryllium oxide filter difference spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstone, J.A.; Eckert, J.; Taylor, A.D.; Wood, E.J.

    1982-06-01

    A successful experimental program has been initiated on the filter difference spectrometer. The instrument is most appropriate for energy transfers from about 50 to 600 MeV when moderate energy resolution is sufficient and a high count rate of importance. The difference technique is well enough understood so that peak positions, line widths and integrated intensities can be determined from fairly complex spectra. Several improvements to the instrument are in progress. An important change will be cooling of the sections which is expected to give approximately a factor of two increase in signal. The solid angle subtended by the detector banks will also be increased by a factor of 1.7 without significant degradation in resolution. With these improvements, much smaller samples can be examined in cases where material is unavailable in larger quantities, as well as samples with much small scattering cross sections. The major improvement will come when the proton storage ring becomes operational in 1985. A total increase of approximately 100 in neutrons detected will allow much more difficult experiments to be performed on this instrument with still a fast turnover rate

  16. Design of a mixed recharge with MOX assemblies of greater relation of moderation for a BWR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez S, J.R.; Alonso V, G.; Palacios H, J.

    2004-01-01

    The study of the fuel of mixed oxides of uranium and plutonium (MOX) it has been topic of investigation in many countries of the world and those are even discussed in many places the benefits of reprocessing the spent fuel to extract the plutonium created during the irradiation of the fuel in the nuclear power reactors. At the moment those reactors that have been loaded partially with MOX fuel, are mainly of the type PWR where a mature technology has been achieved in some countries like they are France, Belgium and England, however the experience with reactors of the type BWR is more limited and it is continued studying the best way to introduce this type of fuel in BWRs, one of the main problems to introduce MOX in reactors BWR is the neutronic design of the same one, existing different concepts to introduce the plutonium in the assemblies of fuel and one of them is the one of increasing the relationship of moderation of the assemble. In this work a MOX fuel assemble design is presented and the obtained results so far in the ININ. These results indicate that the investigated concept has some exploitable advantages in the use of the MOX fuel. (Author)

  17. Application of the dose limitation system to the control of carbon-14 releases from heavy-water-moderated reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beninson, D.; Gonzalez, A.J.

    1982-01-01

    Heavy-water-moderated reactors produce substantially more carbon-14 than light-water reactors. Applying the principles of the systems of dose limitation, the paper presents the rationale used for establishing the release limit for effluents containing this nuclide and for the decisions made regarding the effluent treatment in the third nuclear power station in Argentina. Production of carbon-14 in PHWR and the release routes are analysed in the light of the different effluent treatment possibilities. An optimization assessment is presented, taking into account effluent treatment and waste management costs, and the collective effective dose commitment due to the releases. The contribution of present carbon-14 releases to future individual doses is also analysed in the light of an upper bound for the contribution, representing a fraction of the individual dose limits. The paper presents the resulting requirements for the effluent treatment regarding carbon-14 and the corresponding regulatory aspects used in Argentina. (author)

  18. Influence of impurities in Beryllium on tritium breeding ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamauchi, M.; Ochiai, K.; Verzilov, Y.; Ito, M.; Wada, M.; Nishitani, T.

    2004-01-01

    Several neutronics experiments simulating fusion blankets have been conducted with 14 MeV neutron source to assess the reliability of nuclear analysis codes. However, the analyses have not always presented good agreements so far between calculated and measured tritium production rates. One of the reasons was considered as impurities in beryllium which has negligibly small neutron absorption cross section in low energy range. Chemical compositions of beryllium were analyzed by Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) method, and a pulsed neutron decay experiment discovered that the macroscopic neutron absorption cross section for beryllium medium may be about 30% larger than the value calculated by the data specified by manufacturing company. The influence of the impurities on the calculations was studied on the basis of the fusion DEMO-reactor blanket design. As a result of the study, it was made clear that the impurities affect the local tritium production rates when the size of beryllium medium is more than 20-30 mean free paths (30-40 cm) in thickness. In case of some blanket designs that meet the above condition, the effect on tritium breeding ratio may become as large as about 4%. (author)

  19. Influence of impurities in Beryllium on tritium breeding ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamauchi, M; Ochiai, K; Verzilov, Y; Ito, M; Wada, M; Nishitani, T [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2004-03-01

    Several neutronics experiments simulating fusion blankets have been conducted with 14 MeV neutron source to assess the reliability of nuclear analysis codes. However, the analyses have not always presented good agreements so far between calculated and measured tritium production rates. One of the reasons was considered as impurities in beryllium which has negligibly small neutron absorption cross section in low energy range. Chemical compositions of beryllium were analyzed by Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) method, and a pulsed neutron decay experiment discovered that the macroscopic neutron absorption cross section for beryllium medium may be about 30% larger than the value calculated by the data specified by manufacturing company. The influence of the impurities on the calculations was studied on the basis of the fusion DEMO-reactor blanket design. As a result of the study, it was made clear that the impurities affect the local tritium production rates when the size of beryllium medium is more than 20-30 mean free paths (30-40 cm) in thickness. In case of some blanket designs that meet the above condition, the effect on tritium breeding ratio may become as large as about 4%. (author)

  20. Transmutation, Burn-Up and Fuel Fabrication Trade-Offs in Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor Thorium Fuel Cycles - 13502

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindley, Benjamin A.; Parks, Geoffrey T.; Franceschini, Fausto

    2013-01-01

    Multiple recycle of long-lived actinides has the potential to greatly reduce the required storage time for spent nuclear fuel or high level nuclear waste. This is generally thought to require fast reactors as most transuranic (TRU) isotopes have low fission probabilities in thermal reactors. Reduced-moderation LWRs are a potential alternative to fast reactors with reduced time to deployment as they are based on commercially mature LWR technology. Thorium (Th) fuel is neutronically advantageous for TRU multiple recycle in LWRs due to a large improvement in the void coefficient. If Th fuel is used in reduced-moderation LWRs, it appears neutronically feasible to achieve full actinide recycle while burning an external supply of TRU, with related potential improvements in waste management and fuel utilization. In this paper, the fuel cycle of TRU-bearing Th fuel is analysed for reduced-moderation PWRs and BWRs (RMPWRs and RBWRs). RMPWRs have the advantage of relatively rapid implementation and intrinsically low conversion ratios. However, it is challenging to simultaneously satisfy operational and fuel cycle constraints. An RBWR may potentially take longer to implement than an RMPWR due to more extensive changes from current BWR technology. However, the harder neutron spectrum can lead to favourable fuel cycle performance. A two-stage fuel cycle, where the first pass is Th-Pu MOX, is a technically reasonable implementation of either concept. The first stage of the fuel cycle can therefore be implemented at relatively low cost as a Pu disposal option, with a further policy option of full recycle in the medium term. (authors)

  1. Transmutation, Burn-Up and Fuel Fabrication Trade-Offs in Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor Thorium Fuel Cycles - 13502

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindley, Benjamin A.; Parks, Geoffrey T. [University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Franceschini, Fausto [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, Cranberry Township, PA (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Multiple recycle of long-lived actinides has the potential to greatly reduce the required storage time for spent nuclear fuel or high level nuclear waste. This is generally thought to require fast reactors as most transuranic (TRU) isotopes have low fission probabilities in thermal reactors. Reduced-moderation LWRs are a potential alternative to fast reactors with reduced time to deployment as they are based on commercially mature LWR technology. Thorium (Th) fuel is neutronically advantageous for TRU multiple recycle in LWRs due to a large improvement in the void coefficient. If Th fuel is used in reduced-moderation LWRs, it appears neutronically feasible to achieve full actinide recycle while burning an external supply of TRU, with related potential improvements in waste management and fuel utilization. In this paper, the fuel cycle of TRU-bearing Th fuel is analysed for reduced-moderation PWRs and BWRs (RMPWRs and RBWRs). RMPWRs have the advantage of relatively rapid implementation and intrinsically low conversion ratios. However, it is challenging to simultaneously satisfy operational and fuel cycle constraints. An RBWR may potentially take longer to implement than an RMPWR due to more extensive changes from current BWR technology. However, the harder neutron spectrum can lead to favourable fuel cycle performance. A two-stage fuel cycle, where the first pass is Th-Pu MOX, is a technically reasonable implementation of either concept. The first stage of the fuel cycle can therefore be implemented at relatively low cost as a Pu disposal option, with a further policy option of full recycle in the medium term. (authors)

  2. METHUSELAH II - A Fortran program and nuclear data library for the physics assessment of liquid-moderated reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brinkworth, M.J.; Griffiths, J.A.

    1966-03-01

    METHUSELAH II is a Fortran program with a nuclear data library, used to calculate cell reactivity and burn-up in liquid-moderated reactors. It has been developed from METHUSELAH I by revising the nuclear data library, and by introducing into the program improvements relating to nuclear data, improvements in efficiency and accuracy, and additional facilities which include a neutron balance edit, specialised outputs, fuel cycling, and fuel costing. These developments are described and information is given on the coding and usage of versions of METHUSELAH II for the IBM 7030 (STRETCH), IBM 7090, and KDF9 computers. (author)

  3. High-strength beryllium block

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto, N.P.; Keith, G.H.

    1977-01-01

    Beryllium billets hot isopressed using fine powder of high purity have exceptionally attractive properties; average tensile ultimate, 0.2% offset yield strength and elongation are 590 MPa, 430 MPa and 4.0% respectively. Properties are attributed to the fine grain size (about 4.0 μm average diameter) and the relatively low levels of BeO present as fine, well-dispersed particles. Dynamic properties, e.g., fracture toughness, are similar to those of standard grade, high-purity beryllium. The modulus of beryllium is retained to very high stress levels, and the microyield stress or precision elastic limit is higher than for other grades, including instrument grades. Limited data for billets made from normal-purity fine powders show similar room temperature properties. (author)

  4. Multi-purpose reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-05-01

    The Multi-Purpose-Reactor (MPR), is a pool-type reactor with an open water surface and variable core arrangement. Its main feature is plant safety and reliability. Its power is 22MW t h, cooled by light water and moderated by beryllium. It has platetype fuel elements (MTR type, approx. 20%. enriched uranium) clad in aluminium. Its cobalt (Co 60 ) production capacity is 50000 Ci/yr, 200 Ci/gr. The distribution of the reactor core and associated control and safety systems is essentially based on the following design criteria: - upwards cooling flow, to waive the need for cooling flow inversion in case the reactor is cooled by natural convection if confronted with a loss of pumping power, and in order to establish a superior heat transfer potential (a higher coolant saturation temperature); - easy access to the reactor core from top of pool level with the reactor operating at full power, in order to facilitate actual implementation of experiments. Consequently, mechanisms associated to control and safety rods s,re located underneath the reactor tank; - free access of reactor personnel to top of pool level with the reactor operating at full power. This aids in the training of personnel and the actual carrying out of experiments, hence: - a vast water column was placed over the core to act as radiation shielding; - the core's external area is cooled by a downwards flow which leads to a decay tank beyond the pool (for N 16 to decay); - a small downwards flow was directed to stream downwards from above the reactor core in order to drag along any possibly active element; and - a stagnant hot layer system was placed at top of pool level so as to minimize the upwards coolant flow rising towards pool level

  5. The Status of Beryllium Research for Fusion in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glen R. Longhurst

    2003-01-01

    Use of beryllium in fusion reactors has been considered for neutron multiplication in breeding blankets and as an oxygen getter for plasma-facing surfaces. Previous beryllium research for fusion in the United States included issues of interest to fission (swelling and changes in mechanical and thermal properties) as well as interactions with plasmas and hydrogen isotopes and methods of fabrication. When the United States formally withdrew its participation in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) program, much of this effort was terminated. The focus in the U.S. has been mainly on toxic effects of beryllium and on industrial hygiene and health-related issues. Work continued at the INEEL and elsewhere on beryllium-containing molten salts. This activity is part of the JUPITER II Agreement. Plasma spray of ITER first wall samples at Los Alamos National Laboratory has been performed under the European Fusion Development Agreement. Effects of irradiation on beryllium structure are being studied at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Numerical and phenomenological models are being developed and applied to better understand important processes and to assist with design. Presently, studies are underway at the University of California Los Angeles to investigate thermo-mechanical characteristics of beryllium pebble beds, similar to research being carried out at Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe and elsewhere. Additional work, not funded by the fusion program, has dealt with issues of disposal, and recycling

  6. The status of beryllium research for fusion in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longhurst, G.R.; Snead, L.L.; Abou-Sena, A.A.

    2004-01-01

    Use of beryllium in fusion reactor has been considered for neutron multiplication in breeding blankets an as an oxygen getter for plasma - facing surface. Previous beryllium research for fusion in the United States included issues of interest to fission (swelling an changes in mechanical and thermal properties) as well as interactions with plasmas and hydrogen isotopes and methods of fabrication. When the United States formally withdrew its participation in the International Experimental Reactor (ITER) program, much of this effort was terminated. The focus in the U.S. has been mainly on toxic effects of beryllium and on industrial hygiene and health-related issues. Work continued at the INEEL (Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory) and elsewhere on beryllium-containing molten salts. This activity is part of the JUPITER II Agreement. Plasma spray of ITER first wall samples at Los Alamos National Laboratory has been performed under the European Fusion Development Agreement. Effects of irradiation on beryllium structure are being studied at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Numerical and phenomenological models are being developed and applied at the University of California Los Angels to investigate thermo-mechanical characteristics of beryllium pebble beds, similar to research being carried out at Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe and elsewhere. Additional work, not funded by the fusion program, has dealt with issues of disposal, and recycling. (author)

  7. European Fusion Programme. ITER task T23: Beryllium characterisation. Progress report. Tensile tests on neutron irradiated and reference beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moons, F.

    1996-02-01

    As part of the European Technology Fusion Programme, the irradiation embrittlement characteristics of the more ductile and isotopic grades of beryllium manufactured by Brush Wellman has been investigated using modern powder production and consolidation techniques . This study was initiated in support of the development and evaluation of beryllium as a neutron multiplier for the solid breeder blanket design concepts proposed for a DEMO fusion power reactor. Four different species of beryllium: S-200 F (vacuum hot pressed, 1.2 wt% BeO), S-200FH (hot isostatic pressed, 0.9 wt% BeO), S-65 (vacuum hot pressed, 0.6 wt% BeO), S-65H (hot isostatic pressed, 0.5 wt% BeO) have been compared. Three batches of the beryllium have been investigated, a neutron batch, a thermal control batch and a reference batch. Neutron irradiation has been performed at temperatures between 175 and 605 degrees Celsius up to a neutron fluence of 2.1 10 25 n.m -2 (E> 1 MeV) or 750 appm He. The results of the tensile tests are summarized

  8. Impact of moderator history on physics parameters in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosteller, R.D.

    1988-01-01

    The magnitude of differential reactivity effects that result from spectral differences in different portions of a pressurized water (PWR) core is studied, and it is shown that these effects can be correlated very well with the local moderator history. The impact of these differences on physics parameters such as axial offset, isothermal moderator temperature coefficient, and differential control rod worth is shown to be significant for two PWRs of considerably different design

  9. Molten fuel-coolant interactions resulting from power transients in aluminium plate/water moderated reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storr, G.J.

    1989-08-01

    The behaviour of two reactors SL1 and SPERT D12, which underwent fast nuclear power transients prior to core destruction by a molten fuel-coolant interaction (MFCI) has been analysed and the results compared with measured data. The calculated spatial melt distribution and the mechanical work done during the events leads to high (∼ 250 kJ/kg) conversion efficiencies for this type of interaction when compared with molten drop experiments. A simple model for the steam explosion, using static thermodynamic properties of high temperature and pressure steam is used to calculate the dynamics of the reactors following the MFCI. 26 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs

  10. Cause of pitting in beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kershaw, R.P.

    1982-01-01

    Light microscopy, bare-film radiography, secondary ion mass spectroscopy, electron microprobe and physical testing were used to examine beryllium specimens exhibiting a stratified, pitted, pattern after chemical milling. The objective was to find the cause of this pattern. Specimens were found to have voids in excess of density specification allowances. These voids are attributed, at least in part, to the sublimation of beryllium fluoride during the vacuum hot pressing operation. The origin of the pattern is attributed to these voids and etching out of fines and associated impurities. Hot isostatic pressing with a subsequent heat treatment close residual porosity and dispersed impurities enough to correct the problem

  11. Bioenvironmental Engineering Guide to Beryllium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-26

    Dermal contact with beryllium can result in dermatitis resembling first- or second-degree burns and skin granulomas [7]. Beryllium dust, fume...minute short-term exposure limit (STEL) of 2.0 µg/m3 [§1910.1024(c)(2) & §1926.1124(c)(2)], and added provisions to prevent skin contact [§1910.1024(b...document you want more information, contact the Environmental, Safety, and Occupational Health (ESOH) Service Center at DSN 798-3764, 1-888-232-ESOH (3764

  12. Reactivity variations associated with the core expansion of the MARIA research reactor after modernisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krzysztoszek, G.

    1997-01-01

    Polish high flux research reactor MARIA is a pool type reactor moderated with beryllium and water and cooled with water. The fuel is 80% enriched uranium, in the shape of multitube fuel elements, each tube made up of UAl x alloy in aluminium cladding. MARIA reactor has been operated in the years of 1977-85 and then it was modernised and again put into operation in December 1992. The modernisation as regarded the reactor core comprises a beryllium matrix expansion from 20-48 blocks. Within the frame of the power start-up and trial operation the reactor has been extended from 12 to 18 fuel channels. On that stage of reactor operation the power of mostly loaded fuel channels was constrained to 1,6 MW. Reactor has been operated within the 100-hrs campaign for an irradiation of target materials and for performing measurements at the horizontal channel outlets. In the previous time it has been noticed substantial differences in reactivity changes of the core in similar campaigns of reactor operation. It concerns the reactivity losses during poisoning period of the reactor within the first 30-40 hrs of operation as well as in the fuel burning up process. An analysis of the reactivity variations during the core extension will made possible the fuel management optimisation in further reactor operation system. (author)

  13. Defense programs beryllium good practice guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herr, M.

    1997-07-01

    Within the DOE, it has recently become apparent that some contractor employees who have worked (or are currently working) with and around beryllium have developed chronic beryllium disease (CBD), an occupational granulomatous lung disorder. Respiratory exposure to aerosolized beryllium, in susceptible individuals, causes an immunological reaction that can result in granulomatous scarring of the lung parenchyma, shortness of breath, cough, fatigue, weight loss, and, ultimately, respiratory failure. Beryllium disease was originally identified in the 1940s, largely in the fluorescent light industry. In 1950, the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) introduced strict exposure standards that generally curtailed both the acute and chronic forms of the disease. Beginning in 1984, with the identification of a CBD case in a DOE contractor worker, there was increased scrutiny of both industrial hygiene practices and individuals in this workforce. To date, over 100 additional cases of beryllium-specific sensitization and/or CBD have been identified. Thus, a disease previously thought to be largely eliminated by the adoption of permissible exposure standards 45 years ago is still a health risk in certain workforces. This good practice guide forms the basis of an acceptable program for controlling workplace exposure to beryllium. It provides (1) Guidance for minimizing worker exposure to beryllium in Defense Programs facilities during all phases of beryllium-related work, including the decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D) of facilities. (2) Recommended controls to be applied to the handling of metallic beryllium and beryllium alloys, beryllium oxide, and other beryllium compounds. (3) Recommendations for medical monitoring and surveillance of workers exposed (or potentially exposed) to beryllium, based on the best current understanding of beryllium disease and medical diagnostic tests available. (4) Site-specific safety procedures for all processes of beryllium that is

  14. SOURCE AND PATHWAY DETERMINATION FOR BERYLLIUM FOUND IN BECHTEL NEVADA NORTH LAS VEGAS FACILITIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BECHTEL NEVADA

    2004-07-01

    In response to the report ''Investigation of Beryllium Exposure Cases Discovered at the North Las Vegas Facility of the National Nuclear Security Administration'', published by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) in August 2003, Bechtel Nevada (BN) President and General Manager Dr. F. A. Tarantino appointed the Beryllium Investigation & Assessment Team (BIAT) to identify both the source and pathway for the beryllium found in the North Las Vegas (NLV) B-Complex. From September 8 to December 18, 2003, the BIAT investigated the pathway for beryllium and determined that a number of locations existed at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) which could have contained sufficient quantities of beryllium to result in contamination if transported. Operations performed in the B-1 Building as a result of characterization activities at the Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (EMAD); Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (RMAD); Test Cells A and C; and the Central Support Facility in Area 25 had the greatest opportunity for transport of beryllium. Investigative monitoring and sampling was performed at these sites with subsequent transport of sample materials, equipment, and personnel from the NTS to the B-1 Building. The timeline established by the BIAT for potential transport of the beryllium contamination into the B-1 Building was from September 1997 through November 2002. Based on results of recently completed swipe sampling, no evidence of transport of beryllium from test areas has been confirmed. Results less than the DOE beryllium action level of 0.2 ???g/100 cm2 were noted for work support facilities located in Area 25. All of the identified sites in Area 25 worked within the B-1 tenant's residency timeline have been remediated. Legacy contaminants have either been disposed of or capped with clean borrow material. As such, no current opportunity exists for release or spread of beryllium

  15. Tests of Neutron Spectrum Calculations with the Help of Foil Measurements in a D{sub 2}O and in an H{sub 2}O-Moderated Reactor and in Reactor Shields of Concrete an Iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, R; Aalto, E

    1964-09-15

    Foil measurements covering the fast, epithermal and thermal neutron energy regions have been made in the centre of the Swedish D{sub 2}O-moderated reactor R1, in the pool reactor R2-0, and in different positions in reactor shields of iron, magnetite concrete and ordinary concrete. Neutron spectra have also been calculated for most of these positions, often with the help of a numerical integration of the Boltzmann equation. The measurements and the calculated spectra are presented.

  16. Refurbishment programme for the BR2-reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koonen, E [Centre d' Etude de l' Energie Nucleaire, Studiecentrum voor Kernenergie, BR2 Department, Boeretang, Mol (Belgium)

    1992-07-01

    BR2 is a high flux engineering test reactor, which differs from comparable material testing reactors by its specific core array (fig. 1). It is a heterogeneous, thermal, tank-in-pool type reactor, moderated by beryllium and light water, which serves also as coolant. The fuel elements consist of cylindrical assemblies loaded in channels materialized by hexagonal beryllium prisms. The central 200 mm channel is vertical, while all others are inclined and form a hyperbolical arrangement around the central one. This feature combines a very compact core with the requirement of sufficient space for individual access to all channels through penetrations in the top cover of the aluminium pressure vessel. Each channel may hold a fuel element, a control rod, an experiment, an irradiation device or a beryllium plug. The refurbishment Program According to the present programme of C.E.N./S.C.K., BR2 will be in operation until 1996. At that time, the beryllium matrix will reach its foreseen end-of-life. In order to continue operation beyond this point, a thorough refurbishment of the reactor is foreseen, in addition to the unavoidable replacement of the matrix, to ensure quality of the installation and compliance with modern standards. Some fundamental options have been taken as a starting point: BR2 will continue to be used as a classical MTR, i.e. fuel and material irradiations and safety experiments with some additional service-activities. The present configuration is optimized for that use and there is no specific experimental requirement to change the basic concepts and performance characteristics. From the customers viewpoint, it is desirable to go ahead with the well-known features of BR2, to maintain a high degree of availability and reliability and to minimize the duration of the long shutdown. It is also important to limit the amount of nuclear liabilities. So the objective of the refurbishment programme is the life extension of BR2 for about 15 years, corresponding to

  17. Refurbishment programme for the BR2-reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koonen, E.

    1992-01-01

    BR2 is a high flux engineering test reactor, which differs from comparable material testing reactors by its specific core array (fig. 1). It is a heterogeneous, thermal, tank-in-pool type reactor, moderated by beryllium and light water, which serves also as coolant. The fuel elements consist of cylindrical assemblies loaded in channels materialized by hexagonal beryllium prisms. The central 200 mm channel is vertical, while all others are inclined and form a hyperbolical arrangement around the central one. This feature combines a very compact core with the requirement of sufficient space for individual access to all channels through penetrations in the top cover of the aluminium pressure vessel. Each channel may hold a fuel element, a control rod, an experiment, an irradiation device or a beryllium plug. The refurbishment Program According to the present programme of C.E.N./S.C.K., BR2 will be in operation until 1996. At that time, the beryllium matrix will reach its foreseen end-of-life. In order to continue operation beyond this point, a thorough refurbishment of the reactor is foreseen, in addition to the unavoidable replacement of the matrix, to ensure quality of the installation and compliance with modern standards. Some fundamental options have been taken as a starting point: BR2 will continue to be used as a classical MTR, i.e. fuel and material irradiations and safety experiments with some additional service-activities. The present configuration is optimized for that use and there is no specific experimental requirement to change the basic concepts and performance characteristics. From the customers viewpoint, it is desirable to go ahead with the well-known features of BR2, to maintain a high degree of availability and reliability and to minimize the duration of the long shutdown. It is also important to limit the amount of nuclear liabilities. So the objective of the refurbishment programme is the life extension of BR2 for about 15 years, corresponding to

  18. Hanford Site Beryllium Program: Past, Present, and Future - 12428

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, Mark [CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States); Garcia, Pete [U.S. Department of Energy - Richland Office, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Goeckner, Julie [U.S. Department of Energy - HQ, EMCBC, Cincinnati, Ohio 45202 (United States); Millikin, Emily [Washington Closure Hanford, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States); Stoner, Mike [Mission Support Alliance, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has a long history of beryllium use because of the element's broad application to many nuclear operations and processes. At the Hanford Site beryllium alloy was used to fabricate parts for reactors, including fuel rods for the N-Reactor during plutonium production. Because of continued confirmed cases of chronic beryllium disease (CBD), and data suggesting CBD occurs at exposures to low-level concentrations, the DOE decided to issue a rule to further protect federal and contractor workers from hazards associated with exposure to beryllium. When the beryllium rule was issued in 1999, each of the Hanford Site contractors developed a Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program (CBDPP) and initial site wide beryllium inventories. A new site-wide CBDPP, applicable to all Hanford contractors, was issued in May, 2009. In the spring of 2010 the DOE Headquarters Office of Health, Safety, and Security (HSS) conducted an independent inspection to evaluate the status of implementation of the Hanford Site Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program (CBDPP). The report identified four Findings and 12 cross-cutting Opportunities for Improvement (OFIs). A corrective action plan (CAP) was developed to address the Findings and crosscutting OFIs. The DOE directed affected site contractors to identify dedicated resources to participate in development of the CAP, along with involving stakeholders. The CAP included general and contractor-specific recommendations. Following initiation of actions to implement the approved CAP, it became apparent that additional definition of product deliverables was necessary to assure that expectations were adequately addressed and CAP actions could be closed. Consequently, a supplement to the original CAP was prepared and transmitted to DOE-HQ for approval. Development of the supplemental CAP was an eight month effort. From the onset a core group of CAP development members were identified to develop a mechanism

  19. Study on characteristics for different moderation ratios of heavy water coolant with different reactor types in equilibrium states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Permana, Sidik; Takaki, Naoyuki; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2005-01-01

    Several characteristics for different moderation ratios of heavy water coolant with different reactor types in equilibrium states have been investigated. Performances of PWR and CANDU reactors are compared. A calculation method for determining the required uranium enrichment for criticality of the systems has been developed by coupling the equilibrium fuel cycle burn-up calculation and cell calculation of PIJ module of SRAC2000 code. In the present study, we have compared the characteristics for different moderator to fuel ratio (MFR, 0.1 to 30), different burn-up for CANDU type and four fuels cycle schemes. Nuclide density of 235 U at MFR=1.9 decreases with increasing number of confined HM, while 235 U at higher MFR has the opposite trend. However, the nuclide density of fissile material at higher MFR is lower except 238 U. CANDU type requires lower uranium enrichment and obtains higher conversion ratio than PWR type. Lowest burn-up requires the lowest uranium enrichment and obtains the highest conversion ratio. The breeding condition can be obtained for plutonium recycle cases at MFR=2.1 of Case 4 and MFR=1.4 of Case 3. The natural uranium can be achieved at MFR=14 of plutonium recycle cases, and it can be used easier by increasing number of confined HM. (author)

  20. Reactivity and reaction rate ratio changes with moderator voidage in a light water high converter reactor lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chawla, R.; Gmuer, K.; Hager, H.; Seiler, R.

    1986-01-01

    Integral reaction rate ratios and other k ∞ related parameters have been measured in the first three cores of the experimental program on light water high converter reactor (LWHCR) test lattices in the PROTEUS reactor. The reference tight-pitch lattice consisted of two rod types, with an average fissile-plutonium enrichment of 6% and a fuel/moderator ratio of 2.0. The moderators were H 2 O, Dowtherm (simulating an H 2 O voidage of 42.5%), and air (100% void). Comparisons of the measured parameters have been made with calculational results based mainly on the use of two separate codes and their associated data libraries, namely, WIMS-D and EPRI-CPM. A reconstruction of individual components of the k-infinity void coefficient has been carried out on the basis of the measured changes with voidage of the various reaction rate ratios, as well as of k-infinity itself. The subsequent more detailed comparisons between experiment and calculation should provide a useful basis for resolving the conflicting calculational results that have been reported in the past for the void coefficient characteristics of LWHCRs. (author)

  1. Reactivity test between beryllium and copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, H.; Kato, M.

    1995-01-01

    Beryllium has been expected for using as plasma facing material on ITER. And, copper alloy has been proposed as heat sink material behind plasma facing components. Therefore, both materials must be joined. However, the elementary process of reaction between beryllium and copper alloy does not clear in detail. For example, other authors reported that beryllium reacted with copper at high temperature, but it was not obvious about the generation of reaction products and increasing of the reaction layer. In the present work, from this point, for clarifying the elementary process of reaction between beryllium and copper, the out-of-pile compatibility tests were conducted with diffusion couples of beryllium and copper which were inserted in the capsule filled with high purity helium gas (6N). Annealing temperatures were 300, 400, 500, 600 and 700 degrees C, and annealing periods were 100, 300 and 1000h. Beryllium specimens were hot pressed beryllium, and copper specimens were OFC (Oxygen Free Copper)

  2. Galvanic corrosion of beryllium welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, M.A.; Butt, D.P.; Lillard, R.S.

    1997-01-01

    Beryllium is difficult to weld because it is highly susceptible to cracking. The most commonly used filler metal in beryllium welds is Al-12 wt.% Si. Beryllium has been successfully welded using Al-Si filler metal with more than 30 wt.% Al. This filler creates an aluminum-rich fusion zone with a low melting point that tends to backfill cracks. Drawbacks to adding a filler metal include a reduction in service temperature, a lowering of the tensile strength of the weld, and the possibility for galvanic corrosion to occur at the weld. To evaluate the degree of interaction between Be and Al-Si in an actual weld, sections from a mock beryllium weldment were exposed to 0.1 M Cl - solution. Results indicate that the galvanic couple between Be and the Al-Si weld material results in the cathodic protection of the weld and of the anodic dissolution of the bulk Be material. While the cathodic protection of Al is generally inefficient, the high anodic dissolution rate of the bulk Be during pitting corrosion combined with the insulating properties of the Be oxide afford some protection of the Al-Si weld material. Although dissolution of the Be precipitate in the weld material does occur, no corrosion of the Al-Si matrix was observed

  3. Worker Environment Beryllium Characterization Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    This report summarizes the conclusion of regular monitoring of occupied buildings at the Nevada Test Site and North Las Vegas facility to determine the extent of beryllium (Be) contamination in accordance with Judgment of Needs 6 of the August 14, 2003, 'Minnema Report.'

  4. Worker Environment Beryllium Characterization Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Environment, Safety, Health & Quality

    2009-12-28

    This report summarizes the conclusion of regular monitoring of occupied buildings at the Nevada Test Site and North Las Vegas facility to determine the extent of beryllium (Be) contamination in accordance with Judgment of Needs 6 of the August 14, 2003, “Minnema Report.”

  5. Problems of two-phase flows in water cooled and moderated reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syu, Yu.

    1984-01-01

    Heat exchange in two-phase flows of coolant in loss of coolant accidents in PWR and BWR reactors has been investigated. Three main stages of accident history are considered: blowdown, reflooding using emergency core cooling system and rewetting. Factors, determining the rate of coolant leakage and the rate of temperature increase in fuel cladding during blowdown, processes of vapour during reflooding and liquid priming by vapour during rewetting, are discussed

  6. Numerical simulation of moderator flow and temperature distributions in a CANDU reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlucci, L.N.

    1982-10-01

    This paper describes numerical predictions of the two-dimensional flow and temperature fields of an internally-heated liquid in a typical CANDU reactor vessel. Turbulence momentum and energy transport are simulated using the k-epsilon model. Both steady-state and transient results are discussed. The finite control volume analogues of the conservation equations are solved using a modified version of the TEACH code

  7. Thermal-hydraulic instabilities in pressure tube graphite - moderated boiling water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsiklauri, G.; Schmitt, B.

    1995-09-01

    Thermally induced two-phase instabilities in non-uniformly heated boiling channels in RBMK-1000 reactor have been analyzed using RELAP5/MOD3 code. The RELAP5 model of a RBMK-1000 reactor was developed to investigate low flow in a distribution group header (DGH) supplying 44 fuel pressure tubes. The model was evaluated against experimental data. The results of the calculations indicate that the period of oscillation for the high power tube varied from 3.1s to 2.6s, over the power range of 2.0 MW to 3.0 MW, respectively. The amplitude of the flow oscillation for the high powered tube varied from +100% to -150% of the tube average flow. Reverse flow did not occur in the lower power tubes. The amplitude of oscillation in the subcooled region at the inlet to the fuel region is higher than in the saturated region at the outlet. In the upper fuel region and outlet connectors the flow oscillations are dissipated. The threshold of flow instability for the high powered tubes of a RBMK reactor is compared to Japanese data and appears to be in good agreement.

  8. Thermal-hydraulic instabilities in pressure tube graphite-moderated boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsiklauri, G.; Schmitt, B.

    1995-09-01

    Thermally induced two-phase instabilities in non-uniformly heated boiling charmers in RBMK-1000 reactor have been analyzed using RELAP5/MOD3 code. The RELAP5 model of a RBMK-1000 reactor was developed to investigate low flow in a distribution group header (DGH) supplying 44 fuel pressure tubes. The model was evaluated against experimental data. The results of the calculations indicate that the period of oscillation for the high power tube varied from 3.1s to 2.6s, over the power range of 2.0 MW to 3.0 MW, respectively. The amplitude of the flow oscillation for the high powered tube varied from +100% to -150% of the tube average flow. Reverse flow did not occur in the lower power tubes. The amplitude of oscillation in the subcooled region at the inlet to the fuel region is higher than in the saturated region at the outlet. In the upper fuel region and outlet connectors the flow oscillations are dissipated. The threshold of flow instability for the high powered tubes of a RBMK reactor is compared to Japanese data and appears to be in good agreement

  9. On the Use of Fine Distributed Moderating Material to Enhance Feedback Coefficients in Fast Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merk, B.

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions and outlook: • Use of moderating material to enhance feedback coefficients in SFR: • Creation of a new degree of freedom for SFR design; • Good opportunities for the compensation of the effects due to transmutation fuels; • No major influence on Am incinieration; • Major problem is the thermal stability; • Stability up to ~1300°C by use of YH

  10. Copper extraction from coarsely ground printed circuit boards using moderate thermophilic bacteria in a rotating-drum reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, Michael L.M., E-mail: mitchel.marques@yahoo.com.br [Bio& Hydrometallurgy Laboratory, Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto, Campus Morro do Cruzeiro, Ouro Preto, MG 35400-000 (Brazil); Leão, Versiane A., E-mail: versiane@demet.em.ufop.br [Bio& Hydrometallurgy Laboratory, Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto, Campus Morro do Cruzeiro, Ouro Preto, MG 35400-000 (Brazil); Gomes, Otavio [Centre for Mineral Technology – CETEM, Av Pedro Calmon, 900, 21941-908 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Lambert, Fanny; Bastin, David; Gaydardzhiev, Stoyan [Mineral Processing and Recycling, University of Liege, SartTilman, 4000 Liege (Belgium)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Copper bioleaching from PCB (20 mm) by moderate thermophiles was demonstrated. • Larger PCB sheets enable a cost reduction due to the elimination of fine grinding. • Crushing generated cracks in PCB increasing the copper extraction. • A pre-treatment step was necessary to remove the lacquer coating. • High copper extractions (85%) were possible with pulp density of up to 25.0 g/L. - Abstract: The current work reports on a new approach for copper bioleaching from Printed Circuit Board (PCB) by moderate thermophiles in a rotating-drum reactor. Initially leaching of PCB was carried out in shake flasks to assess the effects of particle size (−208 μm + 147 μm), ferrous iron concentration (1.25–10.0 g/L) and pH (1.5–2.5) on copper leaching using mesophile and moderate thermophile microorganisms. Only at a relatively low solid content (10.0 g/L) complete copper extraction was achieved from the particle size investigated. Conversely, high copper extractions were possible from coarse-ground PCB (20 mm-long) working with increased solids concentration (up to 25.0 g/L). Because there was as the faster leaching kinetics at 50 °C Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans was selected for experiments in a rotating-drum reactor with the coarser-sized PCB sheets. Under optimal conditions, copper extraction reached 85%, in 8 days and microscopic observations by SEM–EDS of the on non-leached and leached material suggested that metal dissolution from the internal layers was restricted by the fact that metal surface was not entirely available and accessible for the solution in the case of the 20 mm-size sheets.

  11. Copper extraction from coarsely ground printed circuit boards using moderate thermophilic bacteria in a rotating-drum reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, Michael L.M.; Leão, Versiane A.; Gomes, Otavio; Lambert, Fanny; Bastin, David; Gaydardzhiev, Stoyan

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Copper bioleaching from PCB (20 mm) by moderate thermophiles was demonstrated. • Larger PCB sheets enable a cost reduction due to the elimination of fine grinding. • Crushing generated cracks in PCB increasing the copper extraction. • A pre-treatment step was necessary to remove the lacquer coating. • High copper extractions (85%) were possible with pulp density of up to 25.0 g/L. - Abstract: The current work reports on a new approach for copper bioleaching from Printed Circuit Board (PCB) by moderate thermophiles in a rotating-drum reactor. Initially leaching of PCB was carried out in shake flasks to assess the effects of particle size (−208 μm + 147 μm), ferrous iron concentration (1.25–10.0 g/L) and pH (1.5–2.5) on copper leaching using mesophile and moderate thermophile microorganisms. Only at a relatively low solid content (10.0 g/L) complete copper extraction was achieved from the particle size investigated. Conversely, high copper extractions were possible from coarse-ground PCB (20 mm-long) working with increased solids concentration (up to 25.0 g/L). Because there was as the faster leaching kinetics at 50 °C Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans was selected for experiments in a rotating-drum reactor with the coarser-sized PCB sheets. Under optimal conditions, copper extraction reached 85%, in 8 days and microscopic observations by SEM–EDS of the on non-leached and leached material suggested that metal dissolution from the internal layers was restricted by the fact that metal surface was not entirely available and accessible for the solution in the case of the 20 mm-size sheets

  12. Study of burned optimization for minor actinides in European Sodium Fast Reactor (ESFR) by use of moderator materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos, R L; Villanueva, A J; Buiront, L

    2012-01-01

    The minor actinides (MA) burn up optimization in the European Sodium Fast Reactor (ESFR) core was studied by adding different moderating materials in the Minor Actinides Bearing Blanket subassemblies (MABB SA) using the ERANOS neutron code package. These SA are of hexagonal shape and are composed of pellets inside of pins. These pellets contain a mixture of uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) and americium dioxide (AmO 2 ). If some of these pins are replaced by other identical ones containing moderating material instead of minor actinides, a shift in the spectrum towards lower energies is expected, which might enhance the burn up performance. The results of this work demonstrated that the use of compounds of hydrogen and magnesium as moderators produces a shift in the neutron spectrum, improving the porcentual minor actinides consumption. ZrH 2 moderator material was found to exhibit the best performances for this propose, followed by MgO and MgAl 2 O 4 , in that order. The use of SiC, BeO, TiC, LiO 2 and ZrC material produced no effect on the shift of the neutron spectrum. For safety reasons, it seems hardly realistic to use hydrogenous compounds in sodium fast reactors. So, compounds with magnesium are selected to be placed into the pins to improve the porcentual minor actinides consumption. The ESFR core is composed by 817 SA, 453 of them are fuel SA, 247 are reflectors SA, 84 are MABB (Minor Actinides Bearing Blankets) SA and 33 are control and shutdown rods. When about half of the total pins in each MABB were substituted by moderator pins with MgO pellets (135 of 271 pins), the porcentual consumption of minor actinides was of 30.85 %, i.e., 227.22 kg of minor actinides were consumed out of 736.65 kg in the initial configuration. In the case where all the pins of the MABB contained pellets of minor actinides, the porcentual consumption of minor actinides was of 21.26 %, i.e., 312.13 kg of minor actinides were consumed of 1467.87 kg in the initial configuration (author)

  13. Reactivity costs in MARIA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcinkowska, Zuzanna E.; Pytel, Krzysztof M.; Frydrysiak, Andrzej

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The methodology for calculating consumed fuel cost of excess reactivity is proposed. • Correlation between time integral of the core excess reactivity and released energy. • Reactivity price gives number of fuel elements required for given excess reactivity. - Abstract: For the reactor operation at high power level and carrying out experiments and irradiations the major cost of reactor operation is the expense of nuclear fuel. In this paper the methodology for calculating consumed fuel cost-relatedness of excess reactivity is proposed. Reactivity costs have been determined on the basis of operating data. A number of examples of calculating the reactivity costs for processes such as: strong absorbing material irradiation, molybdenium-99 production, beryllium matrix poisoning and increased moderator temperature illustrates proposed method.

  14. In-pile thermocycling testing and post-test analysis of beryllium divertor mockups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giniatulin, R.; Mazul, I. [Efremov Inst., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Melder, R.; Pokrovsky, A.; Sandakov, V.; Shiuchkin, A.

    1998-01-01

    The main damaging factors which impact the ITER divertor components are neutron irradiation, cyclic surface heat loads and hydrogen environment. One of the important questions in divertor mockups development is the reliability of beryllium/copper joints and the beryllium resistance under neutron irradiation and thermal cycling. This work presents the experiment, where neutron irradiation and thermocyclic heat loads were applied simultaneously for two beryllium/copper divertor mockups in a nuclear reactor channel to simulate divertor operational conditions. Two mockups with different beryllium grades were mounted facing each other with the tantalum heater placed between them. This device was installed in the active zone of the nuclear reactor SM-2 (Dimitrovgrad, Russia) and the tantalum block was heated by neutron irradiation up to a high temperature. The main part of the heat flux from the tantalum surface was transported to the beryllium surface through hydrogen, as a result the heat flux loaded two mockups simultaneously. The mockups were cooled by reactor water. The device was lowered to the active zone so as to obtain the heating regime and to provide cooling lifted. This experiment was performed under the following conditions: tantalum heater temperature - 1950degC; hydrogen environment -1000 Pa; surface heat flux density -3.2 MW/m{sup 2}; number of thermal cycles (lowering and lifting) -101; load time in each cycle - 200-5000 s; dwell time (no heat flux, no neutrons) - 300-2000 s; cooling water parameters: v - 1 m/s, Tin - 50degC, Pin - 5 MPa; neutron fluence -2.5 x 10{sup 20} cm{sup -2} ({approx}8 years of ITER divertor operation from the start up). The metallographic analysis was performed after experiment to investigate the beryllium and beryllium/copper joint structures, the results are presented in the paper. (author)

  15. Beryllium Project: developing in CDTN of uranium dioxide fuel pellets with addition of beryllium oxide to increase the thermal conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Ricardo Alberto Neto; Camarano, Denise das Merces; Miranda, Odair; Grossi, Pablo Andrade; Andrade, Antonio Santos; Queiroz, Carolinne Mol; Gonzaga, Mariana de Carvalho Leal

    2013-01-01

    Although the nuclear fuel currently based on pellets of uranium dioxide be very safe and stable, the biggest problem is that this material is not a good conductor of heat. This results in an elevated temperature gradient between the center and its lateral surface, which leads to a premature degradation of the fuel, which restricts the performance of the reactor, being necessary to change the fuel before its full utilization. An increase of only 5 to 10 percent in its thermal conductivity, would be a significant increase. An increase of 50 percent would be a great improvement. A project entitled 'Beryllium Project' was developed in CDTN - Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear, which aimed to develop fuel pellets made from a mixture of uranium dioxide microspheres and beryllium oxide powder to obtain a better heat conductor phase, filling the voids between the microspheres to increase the thermal conductivity of the pellet. Increases in the thermal conductivity in the range of 8.6% to 125%, depending on the level of addition employed in the range of 1% to 14% by weight of beryllium oxide, were obtained. This type of fuel promises to be safer than current fuels, improving the performance of the reactor, in addition to last longer, resulting in great savings. (author)

  16. Lattice cell and full core physics of internally cooled annular fuel in heavy water moderated reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, J.; Hamilton, H.; Hyland, B. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1J0 (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    A program is underway at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) to develop a new fuel bundle concept to enable greater burnups for PT-HWR (pressure tube heavy water reactor) cores. One option that AECL is investigating is an internally cooled annular fuel (ICAF) element concept. ICAF contains annular cylindrical pellets with cladding on the inner and outer diameters. Coolant flows along the outside of the element and through the centre. With such a concept, the maximum fuel temperature as a function of linear element rating is significantly reduced compared to conventional, solid-rod type fuel. The preliminary ICAF bundle concept considered in this study contains 24 half-metre long internally cooled annular fuel elements and one non-fuelled centre pin. The introduction of the non-fuelled centre pin reduces the coolant void reactivity (CVR), which is the increase in reactivity that occurs on voiding the coolant in accident scenarios. Lattice cell and full core physics calculations of the preliminary ICAF fuel bundle concept have been performed for medium burnups of approximately 18 GWd/tU using WIMS-AECL and reactor fuel simulation program (RFSP). The results will be used to assist in concept configuration optimization. The effects of radial and axial core power distributions, linear element power ratings, refuelling rates and operational power ramps have been analyzed. The results suggest that burnups of greater than 18 GWd/tU can be achieved in current reactor designs. At approximately 18 GWd/tU, expected maximum linear element ratings in a PT-HWR with online-refuelling are approximately 90 kW/m. These conditions would be prohibitive for solid-rod fuel, but may be possible in ICAF fuel given the reduced maximum fuel temperature as a function of linear element rating. (authors)

  17. Lattice cell and full core physics of internally cooled annular fuel in heavy water moderated reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, J.; Hamilton, H.; Hyland, B.

    2013-01-01

    A program is underway at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) to develop a new fuel bundle concept to enable greater burnups for PT-HWR (pressure tube heavy water reactor) cores. One option that AECL is investigating is an internally cooled annular fuel (ICAF) element concept. ICAF contains annular cylindrical pellets with cladding on the inner and outer diameters. Coolant flows along the outside of the element and through the centre. With such a concept, the maximum fuel temperature as a function of linear element rating is significantly reduced compared to conventional, solid-rod type fuel. The preliminary ICAF bundle concept considered in this study contains 24 half-metre long internally cooled annular fuel elements and one non-fuelled centre pin. The introduction of the non-fuelled centre pin reduces the coolant void reactivity (CVR), which is the increase in reactivity that occurs on voiding the coolant in accident scenarios. Lattice cell and full core physics calculations of the preliminary ICAF fuel bundle concept have been performed for medium burnups of approximately 18 GWd/tU using WIMS-AECL and reactor fuel simulation program (RFSP). The results will be used to assist in concept configuration optimization. The effects of radial and axial core power distributions, linear element power ratings, refuelling rates and operational power ramps have been analyzed. The results suggest that burnups of greater than 18 GWd/tU can be achieved in current reactor designs. At approximately 18 GWd/tU, expected maximum linear element ratings in a PT-HWR with online-refuelling are approximately 90 kW/m. These conditions would be prohibitive for solid-rod fuel, but may be possible in ICAF fuel given the reduced maximum fuel temperature as a function of linear element rating. (authors)

  18. The Liquid Annular Reactor System (LARS) propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, J.; Ludewig, H.; Horn, F.; Lenard, R.

    1990-01-01

    A concept for very high specific impulse (greater than 2000 seconds) direct nuclear propulsion is described. The concept, termed the liquid annular reactor system (LARS), uses liquid nuclear fuel elements to heat hydrogen propellant to very high temperatures (approximately 6000 K). Operating pressure is moderate (approximately 10 atm), with the result that the outlet hydrogen is virtually 100 percent dissociated to monatomic H. The molten fuel is contained in a solid container of its own material, which is rotated to stabilize the liquid layer by centripetal force. LARS reactor designs are described, together with neutronic and thermal-hydraulic analyses. Power levels are on the order of 200 megawatts. Typically, LARS designs use seven rotating fuel elements, are beryllium moderated, and have critical radii of approximately 100 cm (core L/D approximately equal to 1.5)

  19. Moderators for the design of a cold neutron source for the RA 3 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantargi, F; Sbaffoni, M; Granada, R

    2004-01-01

    The cold neutron production of hydrogenous materials was studied, taking into account their radiation resistance, for the conceptual design of a cold neutron source for the RA-3 reactor.Low spontaneous release of chemical energy was found in mesitylene.Libraries for hidrogen in mesitylene were generated using the NJOY nuclear processing system and the resulting cross sections were compared with experimental data.Good agreement between measurements and calculations was found in those cases where data are available.New calculations using the RA-3 geometry and these validated libraries will be performed [es

  20. OVERVIEW OF BERYLLIUM SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brisson, M

    2009-04-01

    Because of its unique properties as a lightweight metal with high tensile strength, beryllium is widely used in applications including cell phones, golf clubs, aerospace, and nuclear weapons. Beryllium is also encountered in industries such as aluminium manufacturing, and in environmental remediation projects. Workplace exposure to beryllium particulates is a growing concern, as exposure to minute quantities of anthropogenic forms of beryllium may lead to sensitization and to chronic beryllium disease, which can be fatal and for which no cure is currently known. Furthermore, there is no known exposure-response relationship with which to establish a 'safe' maximum level of beryllium exposure. As a result, the current trend is toward ever lower occupational exposure limits, which in turn make exposure assessment, both in terms of sampling and analysis, more challenging. The problems are exacerbated by difficulties in sample preparation for refractory forms of beryllium, such as beryllium oxide, and by indications that some beryllium forms may be more toxic than others. This chapter provides an overview of sources and uses of beryllium, health risks, and occupational exposure limits. It also provides a general overview of sampling, analysis, and data evaluation issues that will be explored in greater depth in the remaining chapters. The goal of this book is to provide a comprehensive resource to aid personnel in a wide variety of disciplines in selecting sampling and analysis methods that will facilitate informed decision-making in workplace and environmental settings.

  1. Design and Analysis of Thorium-fueled Reduced Moderation Boiling Water Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, Phillip Michael

    The Resource-renewable Boiling Water Reactors (RBWRs) are a set of light water reactors (LWRs) proposed by Hitachi which use a triangular lattice and high void fraction to incinerate fuel with an epithermal spectrum, which is highly atypical of LWRs. The RBWRs operate on a closed fuel cycle, which is impossible with a typical thermal spectrum reactor, in order to accomplish missions normally reserved for sodium fast reactors (SFRs)--either fuel self-sufficiency or waste incineration. The RBWRs also axially segregate the fuel into alternating fissile "seed" regions and fertile "blanket" regions in order to enhance breeding and leakage probability upon coolant voiding. This dissertation focuses on thorium design variants of the RBWR: the self-sufficient RBWR-SS and the RBWR-TR, which consumes reprocessed transuranic (TRU) waste from PWR used nuclear fuel. These designs were based off of the Hitachi-designed RBWR-AC and the RBWR-TB2, respectively, which use depleted uranium (DU) as the primary fertile fuel. The DU-fueled RBWRs use a pair of axially segregated seed sections in order to achieve a negative void coefficient; however, several concerns were raised with this multi-seed approach, including difficulty with controlling the reactor and unacceptably high axial power peaking. Since thorium-uranium fuel tends to have much more negative void feedback than uranium-plutonium fuels, the thorium RBWRs were designed to use a single elongated seed to avoid these issues. A series of parametric studies were performed in order to find the design space for the thorium RBWRs, and optimize the designs while meeting the required safety constraints. The RBWR-SS was optimized to maximize the discharge burnup, while the RBWR-TR was optimized to maximize the TRU transmutation rate. These parametric studies were performed on an assembly level model using the MocDown simulator, which calculates an equilibrium fuel composition with a specified reprocessing scheme. A full core model was

  2. Tritium release and retention properties of highly neutron-irradiated beryllium pebbles from HIDOBE-01 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakin, V., E-mail: vladimir.chakin@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Rolli, R.; Moeslang, A.; Klimenkov, M.; Kolb, M.; Vladimirov, P.; Kurinskiy, P.; Schneider, H.-C. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Til, S. van; Magielsen, A.J. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group, Westerduinweg 3, Postbus 25, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Zmitko, M. [The European Joint Undertaking for ITER and the Development of Fusion Energy, c/Josep Pla, no. 2, Torres Diagonal Litoral, Edificio B3, 08019 Barcelona (Spain)

    2013-11-15

    The current helium cooled pebble bed (HCPB) tritium breeding blanket concept for fusion reactors includes a bed of 1 mm diameter beryllium pebbles to act as a neutron multiplier. Beryllium pebbles, fabricated by the rotating electrode method, were neutron irradiated in the HFR in Petten within the HIDOBE-01 experiment. This study presents tritium release and retention properties and data on microstructure evolution of beryllium pebbles irradiated at 630, 740, 873, 948 K up to a damage dose of 18 dpa, corresponding to a helium accumulation of about 3000 appm. The measured cumulative released activity from the beryllium pebbles irradiated at 948 K was found to be significantly lower than the calculated value. After irradiation at 873 and 948 K scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses revealed large pores or bubbles in the bulk and oxide films with a thickness of up to 8 μm at the surface of the beryllium pebbles. The radiation-enhanced diffusion of tritium and the formation of open porosity networks accelerate the tritium release from the beryllium pebbles during the high-flux neutron irradiation.

  3. Defense programs beryllium good practice guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herr, M.

    1997-07-01

    Within the DOE, it has recently become apparent that some contractor employees who have worked (or are currently working) with and around beryllium have developed chronic beryllium disease (CBD), an occupational granulomatous lung disorder. Respiratory exposure to aerosolized beryllium, in susceptible individuals, causes an immunological reaction that can result in granulomatous scarring of the lung parenchyma, shortness of breath, cough, fatigue, weight loss, and, ultimately, respiratory failure. Beryllium disease was originally identified in the 1940s, largely in the fluorescent light industry. In 1950, the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) introduced strict exposure standards that generally curtailed both the acute and chronic forms of the disease. Beginning in 1984, with the identification of a CBD case in a DOE contractor worker, there was increased scrutiny of both industrial hygiene practices and individuals in this workforce. To date, over 100 additional cases of beryllium-specific sensitization and/or CBD have been identified. Thus, a disease previously thought to be largely eliminated by the adoption of permissible exposure standards 45 years ago is still a health risk in certain workforces. This good practice guide forms the basis of an acceptable program for controlling workplace exposure to beryllium. It provides (1) Guidance for minimizing worker exposure to beryllium in Defense Programs facilities during all phases of beryllium-related work, including the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of facilities. (2) Recommended controls to be applied to the handling of metallic beryllium and beryllium alloys, beryllium oxide, and other beryllium compounds. (3) Recommendations for medical monitoring and surveillance of workers exposed (or potentially exposed) to beryllium, based on the best current understanding of beryllium disease and medical diagnostic tests available. (4) Site-specific safety procedures for all processes of beryllium that is likely to

  4. Detailed description of an SSAC at the facility level for light water moderated (off-load refueled) power reactor facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.J.

    1985-03-01

    This report is intended to provide the technical details of an effective State Systems of Accounting for and Control of Nuclear Material (SSAC) which Member States may use, if they wish, to establish and maintain their SSACs. It is expected that systems designed along the lines described would be effective in meeting the objectives of both national and international systems for nuclear material accounting and control. This document accordingly provides a detailed description of a system for the accounting for and control of nuclear material in an off-load refueled light water moderated power reactor facility which can be used by a facility operator to establish his own system to comply with a national system for nuclear material accounting and control and to facilitate application of IAEA safeguards. The scope of this document is limited to descriptions of the following elements: (1) Nuclear Material Measurements; (2) Measurement Quality; (3) Records and Reports; (4) Physical Inventory Taking; (5) Material Balance Closing

  5. Safety analysis of a high temperature supercritical pressure light water cooled and moderated reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiwatari, Y.; Oka, Y.; Koshizuka, S.

    2002-01-01

    A safety analysis code for a high temperature supercritical pressure light water cooled reactor (SCLWR-H) with water rods cooled by descending flow, SPRAT-DOWN, is developed. The hottest channel, a water rod, down comer, upper and lower plenums, feed pumps, etc. are modeled as junction of nodes. Partial of the feed water flows downward from the upper dome of the reactor pressure vessel to the water rods. The accidents analyzed here are total loss of feed water flow, feed water pump seizure, and control rods ejection. All the accidents satisfy the criteria. The accident event at which the maximum cladding temperature is the highest is total loss of feedwater flow. The transients analyzed here are loss of feed water heating, inadvertent start-up of an auxiliary water supply system, partial loss of feed water flow, loss of offsite power, loss of load, and abnormal withdrawal of control rods. All the transients satisfied the criteria. The transient event for which the maximum cladding temperature is the highest is control rod withdrawal at normal operation. The behavior of loss of load transient is different from that of BWR. The power does not increase because loss of flow occurs and the density change is small. The sensitivities of the system behavior to various parameters during transients and accidents are analyzed. The parameters having strong influence are the capacity of the auxiliary water supply system, the coast down time of the main feed water pumps, and the time delay of the main feed water pumps trip. The control rod reactivity also has strong influence. (authors)

  6. Belgian research on fusion beryllium waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Druyts, F.; Mallants, D.; Sillen, X.; Iseghem, P. Van

    2004-01-01

    Future fusion power plants will generate important quantities of neutron irradiated beryllium. Although recycling is the preferred management option for this waste, this may not be technically feasible for all of the beryllium, because of its radiological characteristics. Therefore, at SCK·CEN, we initiated a research programme aimed at studying aspects of the disposal of fusion beryllium, including waste characterisation, waste acceptance criteria, conditioning methods, and performance assessment. One of the main issues to be resolved is the development of fusion-specific waste acceptance criteria for surface or deep geological disposal, in particular with regard to the tritium content. In case disposal is the only solution, critical nuclides can be immobilised by conditioning the waste. As a first approach to immobilising beryllium waste, we investigated the vitrification of beryllium. Corrosion tests were performed on both metallic and vitrified beryllium to provide source data for performance assessment. Finally, a first step in performance assessment was undertaken. (author)

  7. Beryllium minerals - demand strong for miniaturisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffiths, J.

    1985-01-01

    Beryllium is an essential constituent of over 40 minerals of which two are exploited commercially. Beryl is largely produced in the USSR and China and bertrandite in the U.S.A. Phenacite, from Canada, is also under investigation. The largest extraction plant for the recovery of beryllium in the western world is in Utah, U.S.A. and the company also produces beryllium oxide used in the manufacture of ceramics widely used in the electronics industry and for refractory articles. Beryllium-copper alloys in strip, rod and tube form are produced in the U.S.A., Germany and the U.K. Beryllium ceramics are important because of their high thermal conductivity, electrical insulation, strength and rigidity. The alloys, used as electric connectors, microswitch contacts are important for their high suitability for miniaturisation. The future growth potential for the beryllium industry is in the automotive industries in Europe and Japan. (U.K.)

  8. Method for hot pressing beryllium oxide articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Ambrose H.; Godfrey, Jr., Thomas G.; Mowery, Erb H.

    1988-01-01

    The hot pressing of beryllium oxide powder into high density compacts with little or no density gradients is achieved by employing a homogeneous blend of beryllium oxide powder with a lithium oxide sintering agent. The lithium oxide sintering agent is uniformly dispersed throughout the beryllium oxide powder by mixing lithium hydroxide in an aqueous solution with beryllium oxide powder. The lithium hydroxide is converted in situ to lithium carbonate by contacting or flooding the beryllium oxide-lithium hydroxide blend with a stream of carbon dioxide. The lithium carbonate is converted to lithium oxide while remaining fixed to the beryllium oxide particles during the hot pressing step to assure uniform density throughout the compact.

  9. MEASUREMENTS OF THE PROPERTIES OF BERYLLIUM FOIL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ZHAO, Y.; WANG, H.

    2000-01-01

    The electrical conductivity of beryllium at radio frequency (800 MHz) and liquid nitrogen temperature were investigated and measured. This summary addresses a collection of beryllium properties in the literature, an analysis of the anomalous skin effect, the test model, the experimental setup and improvements, MAFIA simulations, the measurement results and data analyses. The final results show that the conductivity of beryllium is not as good as indicated by the handbook, yet very close to copper at liquid nitrogen temperature

  10. New audio applications of beryllium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, M.

    1977-01-01

    The major applications of beryllium metal in the field of audio appliances are for the vibrating cones for the two types of speakers 'TWITTER' for high range sound and 'SQUAWKER' for mid range sound, and also for beryllium cantilever tube assembled in stereo cartridge. These new applications are based on the characteristic property of beryllium having high ratio of modulus of elasticity to specific gravity. The production of these audio parts is described, and the audio response is shown. (author)

  11. Thermal expansion of beryllium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solodukhin, A.V.; Kruzhalov, A.V.; Mazurenko, V.G.; Maslov, V.A.; Medvedev, V.A.; Polupanova, T.I.

    1987-01-01

    Precise measurements of temperature dependence of the coefficient of linear expansion in the 22-320 K temperature range on beryllium oxide monocrystals are conducted. A model of thermal expansion is suggested; the range of temperature dependence minimum of the coefficient of thermal expansion is well described within the frames of this model. The results of the experiment may be used for investigation of thermal stresses in crystals

  12. Tritium behavior in ITER beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longhurst, G.R.

    1990-10-01

    The beryllium neutron multiplier in the ITER breeding blanket will generate tritium through transmutations. That tritium constitutes a safety hazard. Experiments evaluating tritium storage and release mechanisms have shown that most of the tritium comes out in a burst during thermal ramping. A small fraction of retained tritium is released by thermally activated processes. Analysis of recent experimental data shows that most of the tritium resides in helium bubbles. That tritium is released when the bubbles undergo swelling sufficient to develop porosity that connects with the surface. That appears to occur when swelling reaches about 10--15%. Other tritium appears to be stored chemically at oxide inclusions, probably as Be(OT) 2 . That component is released by thermal activation. There is considerable variation in published values for tritium diffusion through the beryllium and solubility in it. Data from experiments using highly irradiated beryllium from the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory showed diffusivity generally in line with the most commonly accepted values for fully dense material. Lower density material, planned for use in the ITER blanket may have very short diffusion times because of the open structure. The beryllium multiplier of the ITER breeding blanket was analyzed for tritium release characteristics using temperature and helium production figures at the midplane generated in support of the ITER Summer Workshop, 1990 in Garching. Ordinary operation, either in Physics or Technology phases, should not result in the release of tritium trapped in the helium bubbles. Temperature excursions above 600 degree C result in large-scale release of that tritium. 29 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs

  13. Intoxication experiments with beryllium sulphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bucurescu, I.; Stan, T.

    1990-01-01

    The changes in the particular number of animals in two groups of 40 rats each subjected to intoxication experiments with beryllium sulphate was investigated. The two investigations had very different characteristics. In the case of chronic intoxication there was a marked lethality over given time intervals. In the case of subacute intoxication the number of animals decreased with time. It was found empirically that this change can be described by an exponential relationship which lends itself to statistical interpretation. (author)

  14. Thermodynamic properties of beryllium hydroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baur, A.; Lecocq, A.

    1964-01-01

    The study of the hydro-thermal decomposition of beryllium hydroxide has made it possible to determine the free energy of formation and the entropy. The results obtained are in good agreement with the theoretical values calculated from the solubility product of this substance. They give furthermore the possibility of acquiring a better understanding of the BeO-H 2 O-Be (OH) 2 system between 20 and 1500 C. (authors) [fr

  15. Radial heat transfer from fuel to moderator during LOCAs for CANDU PHW reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hildebrandt, J.G.; So, C.B.; Gillespie, G.E.; MacLean, G.

    1983-01-01

    In a postulated CANDU-PHW loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) with coincident impaired emergency cooling, the axial transport of heat from the fuel by convection is reduced. This reduction in heat removal causes the fuel to heat up and the radial heat transfer to the moderator to become significant. This paper deals with two codes that predict the thermal response of fuel channels under LOCA conditions. New channel thermal radiation models in both RAMA, a thermalhydraulic code, and CHAN II, a fuel channel thermo-chemical code, are presented and their predictions are compared with the experimental results of an electrically heated bundle of 37 fuel pins. A second experiment, involving a single heated pin in a channel with flowing steam, is presented. The predictions of RAMA and CHAN II are compared with this experiment to verify the codes' thermo-chemical models. There is good agreement between the predictions of both codes and the experimental results

  16. Thermal Properties of Beryllium Metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Tae Won; Baek, Je Kyun; Jeong, Gwan Yoon; Kim, Ji Hyeon; Sohn, Dong Seong

    2013-01-01

    It is known that the presence of as-fabricated porosity largely affect thermal conductivity of beryllium. Therefore, in this paper we will suggest a new thermal conductivity equation which consider volume fraction and discuss how this can be applied to irradiation induced degradation of thermal conductivity later. This study was performed to develop a new correlation of thermal conductivity of Beryllium. Although there are many factors like BeO contents, impurity level, grain size, and porosity, we assumed porosity will be the dominant factor for thermal conductivity. Therefore, a new correlation which consider volume fraction by applying Maxwell-Eucken equation is developed and this is consistent to some degrees. However, increasing impurity level and decreasing grain size will decrease thermal conductivity. Therefore, we need to consider their effects although we assume BeO contents, impurity, and grain size do not make noticeable effects in the future. Furthermore, thermal conductivity degradation by neutron irradiation should be considered afterward. There are two main factors for the thermal conductivity degradation: the one is defects formed by neutron collisions and the other is helium generated by transmutation of Be. It is known that they make a considerable degradation of conductivity. Beryllium is known there are considerable volume increases by helium accumulation. Therefore, we anticipate our suggested model can be applicable if it has been developed furthermore considering irradiation induced swelling

  17. (Beryllium). Internal Report No. 137, Jan. 15, 1958

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mouret, P.; Rigaud, A.

    1959-01-01

    After a brief summary of the physical and chemical properties of beryllium, the various chemical treatments which can be applied to beryllium minerals either directly or after a physical enrichment are discussed. These various treatments give either the hydroxide or beryllium salts, from which either beryllium oxide or metallic beryllium can easily be obtained. The purification, analysis and uses of beryllium are also briefly discussed. (author)

  18. Fast breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Shin-ichi; Maki, Koichi.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To conserve loaded fuel, aquire controllable surplus reaction degree, increase the breeding index, flatten output and improve sealing of neutrons by inserting a decelerating substance in a blanket section. Structure: A decelerating substance such as beryllium or beryllium oxide is inserted in a blanket section between an outer reactor core and reflector. With this arrangement, neutrons are decelerated to increase the low energy components, which are partly subjected to reflection by the outer reactor core to thereby reduce leakage of neutrons from the reactor core. (Kamimura, M.)

  19. Beryllium dust generation resulting from plasma bombardment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerner, R.; Mays, C.

    1997-01-01

    The beryllium dust resulting from erosion of beryllium samples subjected to plasma bombardment has been measured in PISCES-B. Loose surface dust was found to be uniformly distributed throughout the device and accounts for 3% of the eroded material. A size distribution measurement of the loose surface dust shows an increasing number of particles with decreasing diameter. Beryllium coatings on surfaces with a line of sight view of the target interaction region account for an additional 33% of the eroded beryllium material. Flaking of these surface layers is observed and is thought to play a significant role in dust generation inside the vacuum vessel. (orig.)

  20. Microplasticity in hot-pressed beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plane, D.C.; Bonfield, W.

    1977-01-01

    Closed hysteresis loops measured in the microstrain region of hot pressed, commercially pure, polycrystalline beryllium are correlated with a dislocation - impurity atom, energy dissipating mechanism. (author)

  1. Beryllium thin films for resistor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiet, O.

    1972-01-01

    Beryllium thin films have a protective oxidation resistant property at high temperature and high recrystallization temperature. However, the experimental film has very low temperature coefficient of resistance.

  2. Technologies for tritium control in fission reactors moderated with heavy water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramilo, L.B.; Gomez de Soler, S.M.

    1996-01-01

    This study was done within a program one of whose objectives was to analyze the possible strategies and technologies, to be applied to HWR at Argentine nuclear power plants, for tritium control. The high contribution of tritium to the total dose has given rise to the need by the operators and/or designers to carry out developments and improvements to try to optimize tritium control technologies. Within a tritium control program, only that one which includes the heavy water detritiation will allow to reduce the tritium concentrations at optimum levels for safety and cost-effective power plant operation. The technology chosen to be applied should depend not only on the technical feasibility but also on the analysis of economic and juncture factors such as, among others, the quantity of heavy water to be treated. It is the authors' belief that AECL tendency concerning heavy water treatment in its future reactors would be to employ the CECE technology complemented with immobilization on titanium beds, with the 'on-line' detritiation in each nuclear power plant. This would not be of immediate application since our analysis suggests that AECL would assume that the process is under development and needs to be tested. (author). 21 refs

  3. Effective cross section values for well-moderated thermal reactor spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westcott, C.H

    1970-11-15

    This document replaces the earlier versions (CRRP-680 and CRRP-787) and now employs the {sigma} (E) information contained in Supplement 1 (1960) of the 2nd edition of BNL-325 and other data privately collected to a cut-off date of April 1, 1960. The compilation is also enlarged to include higher temperatures (thus superseding CRRP-862) and for the first time also includes s-factors calculated using the epithermal cut-off functions exhibiting a maximum at just above the cut-off energy, which have recently been indicated by Swedish and U.K. measurements, as well as by analysis of some calculated spectra. As in the earlier compilation, the notation of the author's Geneva Conference (1958) paper is used, the effective cross section {sigma} being given in terms of the 2200 m/sec. value {sigma}{sub o} by the relation {sigma} {sigma}{sub o} (g + rs), where g and s are the factors listed in this compilation and r is a measure of the proportion of epithermal neutrons in the reactor spectrum. (author)

  4. Effective cross section values for well-moderated thermal reactor spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westcott, C H

    1970-11-15

    This document replaces the earlier versions (CRRP-680 and CRRP-787) and now employs the {sigma} (E) information contained in Supplement 1 (1960) of the 2nd edition of BNL-325 and other data privately collected to a cut-off date of April 1, 1960. The compilation is also enlarged to include higher temperatures (thus superseding CRRP-862) and for the first time also includes s-factors calculated using the epithermal cut-off functions exhibiting a maximum at just above the cut-off energy, which have recently been indicated by Swedish and U.K. measurements, as well as by analysis of some calculated spectra. As in the earlier compilation, the notation of the author's Geneva Conference (1958) paper is used, the effective cross section {sigma} being given in terms of the 2200 m/sec. value {sigma}{sub o} by the relation {sigma} {sigma}{sub o} (g + rs), where g and s are the factors listed in this compilation and r is a measure of the proportion of epithermal neutrons in the reactor spectrum. (author)

  5. Effective cross section values for well-moderated thermal reactor spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westcott, C.H.

    1970-11-01

    This document replaces the earlier versions (CRRP-680 and CRRP-787) and now employs the σ (E) information contained in Supplement 1 (1960) of the 2nd edition of BNL-325 and other data privately collected to a cut-off date of April 1, 1960. The compilation is also enlarged to include higher temperatures (thus superseding CRRP-862) and for the first time also includes s-factors calculated using the epithermal cut-off functions exhibiting a maximum at just above the cut-off energy, which have recently been indicated by Swedish and U.K. measurements, as well as by analysis of some calculated spectra. As in the earlier compilation, the notation of the author's Geneva Conference (1958) paper is used, the effective cross section σ being given in terms of the 2200 m/sec. value σ o by the relation σ σ o (g + rs), where g and s are the factors listed in this compilation and r is a measure of the proportion of epithermal neutrons in the reactor spectrum. (author)

  6. Decommissioning the Romanian Water-Cooled Water-Moderated Research Reactor: New Environmental Perspective on the Management of Radioactive Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barariu, G.; Giumanca, R.

    2006-01-01

    Pre-feasibility and feasibility studies were performed for decommissioning of the water-cooled water-moderated research reactor (WWER) located in Bucharest - Magurele, Romania. Using these studies as a starting point, the preferred safe management strategy for radioactive wastes produced by reactor decommissioning is outlined. The strategy must account for reactor decommissioning, as well as for the rehabilitation of the existing Radioactive Waste Treatment Plant and for the upgrade of the Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility at Baita-Bihor. Furthermore, the final rehabilitation of the laboratories and ecological reconstruction of the grounds need to be provided for, in accordance with national and international regulations. In accordance with IAEA recommendations at the time, the pre-feasibility study proposed three stages of decommissioning. However, since then new ideas have surfaced with regard to decommissioning. Thus, taking into account the current IAEA ideology, the feasibility study proposes that decommissioning of the WWER be done in one stage to an unrestricted clearance level of the reactor building in an Immediate Dismantling option. Different options and the corresponding derived preferred option for waste management are discussed taking into account safety measures, but also considering technical, logistical and economic factors. For this purpose, possible types of waste created during each decommissioning stage are reviewed. An approximate inventory of each type of radioactive waste is presented. The proposed waste management strategy is selected in accordance with the recommended international basic safety standards identified in the previous phase of the project. The existing Radioactive Waste Treatment Plant (RWTP) from the Horia Hulubei Institute for Nuclear Physics and Engineering (IFIN-HH), which has been in service with no significant upgrade since 1974, will need refurbishing due to deterioration, as well as upgrading in order to ensure the

  7. Investigations of the ternary system beryllium-carbon-tungsten and analyses of beryllium on carbon surfaces; Untersuchung des ternaeren Systems Beryllium-Kohlenstoff-Wolfram und Betrachtungen von Beryllium auf Kohlenstoffoberflaechen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kost, Florian

    2009-05-25

    Beryllium, carbon and tungsten are planned to be used as first wall materials in the future fusion reactor ITER. The aim of this work is a characterization of mixed material formation induced by thermal load. To this end, model systems (layers) were prepared and investigated, which give insight into the basic physical and chemical concepts. Before investigating ternary systems, the first step was to analyze the binary systems Be/C and Be/W (bottom-up approach), where the differences between the substrates PG (pyrolytic graphite) and HOPG (highly oriented pyrolytic graphite) were of special interest. Particularly X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), low energy ion scattering (ISS) and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) were used as analysis methods. Beryllium evaporated on carbon shows an island growth mode, whereas a closed layer can be assumed for layer thicknesses above 0.7 nm. Annealing of the Be/C system induces Be{sub 2}C island formation for T{>=}770 K. At high temperatures (T{>=}1170 K), beryllium carbide dissociates, resulting in (metallic) beryllium desorption. For HOPG, carbide formation starts at higher temperatures compared to PG. Activation energies for the diffusion processes were determined by analyzing the decreasing beryllium amount versus annealing time. Surface morphologies were characterized using angle-resolved XPS (ARXPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Experiments were performed to study processes in the Be/W system in the temperature range from 570 to 1270 K. Be{sub 2}W formation starts at 670 K, a complete loss of Be{sub 2}W is observed at 1170 K due to dissociation (and subsequent beryllium desorption). Regarding ternary systems, particularly Be/C/W and C/Be/W were investigated, attaching importance to layer thickness (reservoir) variations. At room temperature, Be{sub 2}C, W{sub 2}C, WC and Be{sub 2}W formation at the respective interfaces was observed. Further Be{sub 2}C is forming with increasing annealing temperatures

  8. Pressure loadings of Soviet-designed VVER [Water-Cooled, Water-Moderated Energy Reactor] reactor release mitigation structures from large-break LOCAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sienicki, J.J.; Horak, W.C.

    1989-01-01

    Analyses have been carried out of the pressurization of the accident release mitigation structures of Soviet-designed VVER (Water-Cooled, Water-Moderated Energy Reactor) pressurized water reactors following large-break loss-of-coolant accidents. Specific VVER systems for which calculations were performed are the VVER-440 model V230, VVER-440 model V213, and VVER-1000 model V320. Descriptions of the designs of these and other VVER models are contained in the report DOE/NE-0084. The principal objective of the current analyses is to calculate the time dependent pressure loadings inside the accident localization or containment structures immediately following the double-ended guillotine rupture of a primary coolant pipe. In addition, the pressures are compared with the results of calculations of the response of the structures to overpressure. Primary coolant system thermal hydraulic conditions and the fluid conditions at the break location were calculated with the RETRAN-02 Mod2 computer code (Agee, 1984). Pressures and temperatures inside the building accident release mitigation structures were obtained from the PACER (Pressurization Accompanying Coolant Escape from Ruptures) multicompartment containment analysis code developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The analyses were carried out using best estimate models and conditions rather than conservative, bounding-type assumptions. In particular, condensation upon structure and equipment was calculated using correlations based upon analyses of the HDR, Marviken, and Battelle Frankfurt containment loading experiments. The intercompartment flow rates incorporate an effective discharge coefficient and liquid droplet carryover fraction given by expressions of Schwan determined from analyses of the Battelle Frankfurt and Marviken tests. 5 refs., 4 figs

  9. Safety aspects of long term operation of water moderated reactors. Recommendations on the scope and content of programmes for safe long term operation. Final report of the extrabudgetary programme on safety aspects long term operation of water moderated reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-07-01

    During the last two decades, the number of IAEA Member States giving high priority to continuing the operation of nuclear power plants beyond the time frame originally anticipated is increasing. This is related to the age of nuclear power plants connected to the grid worldwide. The IAEA started to develop guidance on the safety aspects of ageing management in the 1990s. Recognizing the development in a number of its Member States, the IAEA initiated this Extrabudgetary Programme on Safety Aspects of Long Term Operation of Water Moderated Reactors in 2003. The objective of the Programme was to establish recommendations on the scope and content of activities to ensure safe long term operation of water moderated reactors. The term long term operation is used to accommodate various approaches in Member States and is defined as operation beyond an initial time frame set forth in design, standards, licence, and/or regulations, that is justified by safety assessment, considering life limiting processes and features for systems, structures and components. The scope of the Programme included general long term operation framework, mechanical components and materials, electrical components and instrumentation and control, and structural components and structures. The scope of the Programme was limited to physical structures of the NPPs. Four working groups addressed the above indicated technical areas. The Programme steering committee provided coordination and guidance and served as a forum for the exchange of information. The Programme implementation relied on voluntary in kind and financial contributions from the Czech Republic, Hungary, Slovakia, Sweden, the United Kingdom and the USA as well as in kind contributions from Bulgaria, Finland, the Netherlands, the Russian Federation, Spain, the Ukraine, and the European Commission. This report summarizes the main results, conclusions and recommendations of this Programme and provides in the Appendices I-IV detailed

  10. Nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-11-01

    After an introduction and general explanation of nuclear power the following reactor types are described: magnox thermal reactor; advanced gas-cooled reactor (AGR); pressurised water reactor (PWR); fast reactors (sodium cooled); boiling water reactor (BWR); CANDU thermal reactor; steam generating heavy water reactor (SGHWR); high temperature reactor (HTR); Leningrad (RMBK) type water-cooled graphite moderated reactor. (U.K.)

  11. Status of the beryllium replacement project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimayuga, I. [Atomic Energy of Canada, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Corcoran, E. [Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Daniels, T. [Ontario Power Generation, Pickering, Ontario (Canada); Harmsen, J. [Cameco Fuel Manufacturing Inc., Port Hope, Ontario (Canada); Lu, E. [Bruce Power, Tiverton, Ontario (Canada); Onderwater, T.; Palleck, S. [General Electric- Hitachi, Wilmington, North Carolina (United States); Pant, A. [Cameco Fuel Manufacturing Inc., Port Hope, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    Currently, beryllium (Be) is used as the filler metal for brazing appendages on the sheaths of CANDU® fuel elements. Because of its toxicity, occupational exposure limits for Be are being reduced to very low levels, resulting in significant challenges to CANDU® fuel fabricators. The CANDU® Owners Group (COG) initiated a test program to identify a filler material to replace Be and confirm that the brazed joints meet the established technical requirements for CANDU® fuel. Together with eliminating health risks associated with the use of Be, the industry needs to be assured that continuation of fuel supply remains unaffected and that fuel fabrication processes continue to comply with health and safety standards. A literature survey of studies on brazing and joining of Zircaloy identified potential filler materials that can meet or exceed existing design requirements of the brazed joint, including the required mechanical, microstructural, corrosion resistance, and irradiation properties equivalent to those obtained with Be as braze material. Candidate materials were evaluated against several criteria, including manufacturability, melting point, wettability, mechanical properties, corrosion resistance, effect on neutron economy, potential activation products, and interaction with fuel channels and other related disciplines. This exercise resulted in a list of promising candidate materials that were recommended for the first phase of testing. These materials include stainless steel (304 or 316), Al-Si, Ni-P, and Zr-Mn alloys. To allow a CANDU® utility have sufficient confidence in considering implementation of a different braze filler material, a Be Replacement Test Program, involving out-reactor and in-reactor tests, is being undertaken as a collaborative endeavour by the Canadian nuclear industry. The out-reactor tests consist of: a constructability assessment to determine the material’s suitability with current fuel manufacturing methods; evaluation of

  12. Thermal fatigue behavior of US and Russian grades of beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, R.D.; Youchison, D.L.; Dombrowski, D.E.; Guiniatouline, R.N.; Kupriynov, I.B.

    1996-01-01

    A novel technique has been used to test the relative low cycle thermal fatigue resistance of different grades of US and Russian beryllium which is proposed as plasma facing armor for fusion reactor first wall, limiter, and divertor components. The 30 KW electron beam test system at Sandia National Laboratories was used to sweep the beam spot along one direction at 1 Hz. This produces a localized temperature ''spike'' of 750 degrees C for each pass of the beam. Large thermal stress in excess of the yield strength are generated due to very high spot heat flux, 250 MW/m 2 . Cyclic plastic strains on the order of 0.6% produced visible cracking on the heated surface in less than 3000 cycles. An in-vacuo fiber optic borescope was used to visually inspect the beryllium surfaces for crack initiation. Grades of US beryllium tested included: S-65C, S-65H, S-200F, S-300F-H, Sr-200, I-400, extruded high purity. HIP'd sperical powder, porous beryllium (94% and 98% dense), Be/30% BeO, Be/60% BeO, and TiBe 12 . Russian grades included: TGP-56, TShGT, DShG-200, and TShG-56. Both the number of cycles to crack initiation, and the depth of crack propagation, were measured. The most fatigue resistant grades were S-65C, DShG-200, TShGT, and TShG-56. Rolled sheet Be(SR-200) showed excellent crack propagation resistance in the plane of rolling, despite early formation of delamination cracks. Only one sample showed no evidence of surface melting, Extruded (T). Metallographic and chemical analyses are provided. Good agreement was found between the measured depth of cracks and a 2-D elastic-plastic finite element stress analysis

  13. Beryllium and growth. II. The effect of beryllium on plant growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoagland, M B

    1952-01-01

    Experiments were undertaken to determine whether beryllium could replace magnesium in a growing organism. This was stimulated by the several known growth effects of beryllium in animals and by the fact that beryllium apparently competes with magnesium for animal alkaline phosphatases. The following findings are noted: (1) beryllium can reduce the magnesium requirement of plants by some 60% within a certain range of magnesium deficiency. (2) The residual obligatory magnesium requirements is probably accounted for by chlorophyll since beryllium appears to have no primary effect on chlorophyll or chlorophyll production. (3) The pH of the nutrient solution is critical: at acid pH's, beryllium is highly toxic, and growth increase due to beryllium only appears at initial pH's above 11.2, although this initial pH rapidly falls to neutrality during the experimental period. 22 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  14. The benchmark experiment on slab beryllium with D–T neutrons for validation of evaluated nuclear data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nie, Y., E-mail: nieyb@ciae.ac.cn [Science and Technology on Nuclear Data Laboratory, China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing 102413 (China); Ren, J.; Ruan, X.; Bao, J. [Science and Technology on Nuclear Data Laboratory, China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing 102413 (China); Han, R. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Zhang, S. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Inner Mongolia University for the Nationalities, Inner Mongolia, Tongliao 028000 (China); Huang, H.; Li, X. [Science and Technology on Nuclear Data Laboratory, China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing 102413 (China); Ding, Y. [Science and Technology on Nuclear Data Laboratory, China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing 102413 (China); School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Wu, H.; Liu, P.; Zhou, Z. [Science and Technology on Nuclear Data Laboratory, China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing 102413 (China)

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • Evaluated data for beryllium are validated by a high precision benchmark experiment. • Leakage neutron spectra from pure beryllium slab are measured at 61° and 121° using time-of-flight method. • The experimental results are compared with the MCNP-4B calculations with the evaluated data from different libraries. - Abstract: Beryllium is the most favored neutron multiplier candidate for solid breeder blankets of future fusion power reactors. However, beryllium nuclear data are differently presented in modern nuclear data evaluations. In order to validate the evaluated nuclear data on beryllium, in the present study, a benchmark experiment has been performed at China Institution of Atomic Energy (CIAE). Neutron leakage spectra from pure beryllium slab samples were measured at 61° and 121° using time-of-flight method. The experimental results were compared with the calculated ones by MCNP-4B simulation, using the evaluated data of beryllium from the CENDL-3.1, ENDF/B-VII.1 and JENDL-4.0 libraries. From the comparison between the measured and the calculated spectra, it was found that the calculation results based on CENDL-3.1 caused overestimation in the energy range from about 3–12 MeV at 61°, while at 121°, all the libraries led to underestimation below 3 MeV.

  15. The benchmark experiment on slab beryllium with D–T neutrons for validation of evaluated nuclear data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nie, Y.; Ren, J.; Ruan, X.; Bao, J.; Han, R.; Zhang, S.; Huang, H.; Li, X.; Ding, Y.; Wu, H.; Liu, P.; Zhou, Z.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Evaluated data for beryllium are validated by a high precision benchmark experiment. • Leakage neutron spectra from pure beryllium slab are measured at 61° and 121° using time-of-flight method. • The experimental results are compared with the MCNP-4B calculations with the evaluated data from different libraries. - Abstract: Beryllium is the most favored neutron multiplier candidate for solid breeder blankets of future fusion power reactors. However, beryllium nuclear data are differently presented in modern nuclear data evaluations. In order to validate the evaluated nuclear data on beryllium, in the present study, a benchmark experiment has been performed at China Institution of Atomic Energy (CIAE). Neutron leakage spectra from pure beryllium slab samples were measured at 61° and 121° using time-of-flight method. The experimental results were compared with the calculated ones by MCNP-4B simulation, using the evaluated data of beryllium from the CENDL-3.1, ENDF/B-VII.1 and JENDL-4.0 libraries. From the comparison between the measured and the calculated spectra, it was found that the calculation results based on CENDL-3.1 caused overestimation in the energy range from about 3–12 MeV at 61°, while at 121°, all the libraries led to underestimation below 3 MeV.

  16. Neutronic performance of high-density LEU fuels in water-moderated and water-reflected research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bretscher, M.M.; Matos, J.E.

    1996-01-01

    At the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) meeting in September 1994, Durand reported that the maximum uranium loading attainable with U 3 Si 2 fuel is about 6.0 g U/cm 3 . The French Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) plan to perform irradiation tests with 5 plates at this loading. Compagnie pour L'Etude et La Realisation de Combustibles Atomiques (CERCA) has also fabricated a few uranium nitride (UN) plates with a uranium density in the fuel meat of 7.0 g/cm 3 and found that UN is compatible with the aluminum matrix at temperatures below 500 C. High density dispersion fuels proposed for development include U-Zr(4 wt%)-Nb(2 wt%), U-Mo(5 wt%), and U-Mo(9 wt%). The purpose of this note is to examine the relative neutronic behavior of these high density fuels in a typical light water-reflected and water-moderated MTR-type research reactor. The results show that a dispersion of the U-Zr-Nb alloy has the most favorable neutronic properties and offers the potential for uranium densities greater than 8.0 g/cm 3 . On the other hand, UN is the least reactive fuel because of the relatively large 14 N(n,p) cross section. For a fixed value of k eff , the required 235 U loading per fuel element is least for the U-Zr-Nb fuel and steadily increases for the U-Mo(5%), U-Mo(9%), and UN fuels. Because of volume fraction limitations, the UO 2 dispersions are only useful for uranium densities below 5.0 g/cm 3 . In this density range, however, UO 2 is more reactive than U 3 Si 2

  17. Beryllium in aircraft brakes - a summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zenczak, S.

    1977-01-01

    Beryllium has been in use in aircraft brakes for ten years. During the original design phases of the several aircraft programs using beryllium a number of problems requiring solution confronted the designers. In actual service the solution to these problems performed much better than had been anticipated. A summary is presented. (author)

  18. ICT diagnostic method of beryllium welding quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Lingxia; Wei Kentang; Ye Yunchang

    2002-01-01

    To avoid the interference of high density material for the quality assay of beryllium welding line, a slice by slice scanning method was proposed based upon the research results of the Industrial Computerized Tomography (ICT) diagnostics for weld penetration, weld width, off-centered deviation and weld defects of beryllium-ring welding seam with high density material inside

  19. Investigation of beryllium/steam interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chekhonadskikh, A.M.; Vurim, A.D.; Vasilyev, Yu.S.; Pivovarov, O.S. [Inst. of Atomic Energy National Nuclear Center of the Republic of Kazakstan Semipalatinsk (Kazakhstan); Shestakov, V.P.; Tazhibayeva, I.L.

    1998-01-01

    In this report program on investigations of beryllium emissivity and transient processes on overheated beryllium surface attacked by water steam to be carried out in IAE NNC RK within Task S81 TT 2096-07-16 FR. The experimental facility design is elaborated in this Report. (author)

  20. Modeling of hydrogen interactions with beryllium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longhurst, G.R. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, improved mathematical models are developed for hydrogen interactions with beryllium. This includes the saturation effect observed for high-flux implantation of ions from plasmas and retention of tritium produced from neutronic transmutations in beryllium. Use of the models developed is justified by showing how they can replicated experimental data using the TMAP4 tritium transport code. (author)

  1. Managing health effects of beryllium exposure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Committee on Beryllium Alloy Exposures; Committee on Toxicology; National Research Council; Division on Earth and Life Studies; National Research Council

    2008-01-01

    ... to its occurrence in exposed people. Despite reduced workplace exposure, chronic beryllium disease continues to occur. In addition, beryllium has been classified as a likely human carcinogen by several agencies, such as the International Agency for Research on Cancer, the National Toxicology Program, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Thos...

  2. Structure investigations of some beryllium materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faeldt, I; Lagerberg, G

    1960-05-15

    Metallographic structure, microhardness and texture have been studied on various types of beryllium metal including hot pressed powder, a rolled strip and an extruded tube It was found that beryllium exhibits its highest hardness in directions perpendicular to the basal plane. Good ideas of the prevailing textures were obtained with an ordinary X-ray diffractometer.

  3. Structure investigations of some beryllium materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faeldt, I.; Lagerberg, G.

    1960-05-01

    Metallographic structure, microhardness and texture have been studied on various types of beryllium metal including hot pressed powder, a rolled strip and an extruded tube It was found that beryllium exhibits its highest hardness in directions perpendicular to the basal plane. Good ideas of the prevailing textures were obtained with an ordinary X-ray diffractometer

  4. Measurement of neutron yield by 62 MeV proton beam on a thick Beryllium target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alba, R; Cosentino, G; Zoppo, A Del; Pietro, A Di; Figuera, P; Finocchiaro, P; Maiolino, C; Santonocito, D; Schillaci, M; Barbagallo, M; Colonna, N; Boccaccio, P; Esposito, J; Celentano, A; Osipenko, M; Ricco, G; Ripani, M; Viberti, C M; Kostyukov, A

    2013-01-01

    In the framework of research on IVth generation reactors and high intensity neutron sources a low-power prototype neutron amplifier was recently proposed by INFN. It is based on a low-energy, high current proton cyclotron, whose beam, impinging on a thick Beryllium converter, produces a fast neutron spectrum. The world database on the neutron yield from thick Beryllium target in the 70 MeV proton energy domain is rather scarce. The new measurement was performed at LNS, covering a wide angular range from 0 to 150 degrees and an almost complete neutron energy interval. In this contribution the preliminary data are discussed together with the proposed ADS facility.

  5. Measurement of the diffusion length of thermal neutrons in the beryllium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koechlin, J.C.; Martelly, J.; Duggal, V.P.

    1955-01-01

    The diffusion length of thermal neutrons in the beryllium oxide has been obtained while studying the spatial distribution of the neutrons in a massive parallelepiped of this matter placed before the thermal column of the reactor core of Saclay. The mean density of the beryllium oxide (BeO) is 2,95 gr/cm 3 , the mean density of the massif is 2,92 gr/cm 3 . The value of the diffusion length, deducted of the done measures, is: L = 32,7 ± 0,5 cm (likely gap). Some remarks are formulated about the influence of the spectral distribution of the neutrons flux used. (authors) [fr

  6. Effect of horizontal flow on the cooling of the moderator brick in the advanced gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganesan, P.; He, S.; Hamad, F.; Gotts, J.

    2011-01-01

    The paper reports an investigation of the effect of the horizontal cross flow on the temperature of the moderator brick in UK Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor (AGR) using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) with a conjugate heat transfer model for the solid and fluid. The commercial software package of ANSYS Fluent is used for this purpose. The CFD model comprises the full axial length of one-half of a typical fuel channel (assuming symmetry) and part of neighbouring channels on either side. Two sets of simulations have been carried out, namely, one with cross flow and one without cross flow. The effect of cross flow has subsequently been derived by comparing the results from the two groups of simulations. The study shows that a small cross flow can have a significant effect on the cooling of the graphite brick, causing the peak temperature of the brick to reduce significantly. Two mechanisms are identified to be responsible for this. Firstly, the small cross flow causes a significant redistribution of the main axial downward flow and this leads to an enhancement of heat transfer in some of the small clearances, and an impairment in others although overall, the enhancement is dominant leading to a better cooling. Secondly, the cross flow makes effective use of the small clearances between the key/keyway connections which increases the effective heat transfer area, hence increasing the cooling. Under the conditions of no cross flow, these areas remain largely inactive in heat transfer. The study shows that the cooling of the moderator is significantly enhanced by the cross flow perpendicular to the main cooling flow. (author)

  7. BERYLLIUM MEASUREMENT IN COMMERCIALLY AVAILABLE WET WIPES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youmans-Mcdonald, L.

    2011-02-18

    Analysis for beryllium by fluorescence is now an established method which is used in many government-run laboratories and commercial facilities. This study investigates the use of this technique using commercially available wet wipes. The fluorescence method is widely documented and has been approved as a standard test method by ASTM International and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). The procedure involves dissolution of samples in aqueous ammonium bifluoride solution and then adding a small aliquot to a basic hydroxybenzoquinoline sulfonate fluorescent dye (Berylliant{trademark} Inc. Detection Solution Part No. CH-2) , and measuring the fluorescence. This method is specific to beryllium. This work explores the use of three different commercial wipes spiked with beryllium, as beryllium acetate or as beryllium oxide and subsequent analysis by optical fluorescence. The effect of possible interfering metals such as Fe, Ti and Pu in the wipe medium is also examined.

  8. Beryllium Measurement In Commercially Available Wet Wipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youmans-Mcdonald, L.

    2011-01-01

    Analysis for beryllium by fluorescence is now an established method which is used in many government-run laboratories and commercial facilities. This study investigates the use of this technique using commercially available wet wipes. The fluorescence method is widely documented and has been approved as a standard test method by ASTM International and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). The procedure involves dissolution of samples in aqueous ammonium bifluoride solution and then adding a small aliquot to a basic hydroxybenzoquinoline sulfonate fluorescent dye (Berylliant(trademark) Inc. Detection Solution Part No. CH-2) , and measuring the fluorescence. This method is specific to beryllium. This work explores the use of three different commercial wipes spiked with beryllium, as beryllium acetate or as beryllium oxide and subsequent analysis by optical fluorescence. The effect of possible interfering metals such as Fe, Ti and Pu in the wipe medium is also examined.

  9. Assessment of LANL beryllium waste management documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danna, J.G.; Jennrich, E.A.; Lund, D.M.; Davis, K.D.; Hoevemeyer, S.S.

    1991-04-01

    The objective of this report is to determine present status of the preparation and implementation of the various high priority documents required to properly manage the beryllium waste generated at the Laboratory. The documents being assessed are: Waste Acceptance Criteria, Waste Characterization Plan, Waste Certification Plan, Waste Acceptance Procedures, Waste Characterization Procedures, Waste Certification Procedures, Waste Training Procedures and Waste Recordkeeping Procedures. Beryllium is regulated (as a dust) under 40 CFR 261.33 as ''Discarded commercial chemical products, off specification species, container residues and spill residues thereof.'' Beryllium is also identified in the 3rd thirds ruling of June 1, 1990 as being restricted from land disposal (as a dust). The beryllium waste generated at the Laboratory is handled separately because beryllium has been identified as a highly toxic carcinogenic material

  10. Preliminary Thermohydraulic Analysis of a New Moderated Reactor Utilizing an LEU-Fuel for Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam, Seung Hyun; Choi, Jae Young; Venneria, Paolo F.; Jeong, Yong Hoon; Chang, Soon Heung

    2015-01-01

    The Korea Advanced NUclear Thermal Engine Rocket utilizing an LEU fuel (KANUTER-LEU) is a non-proliferative and comparably efficient NTR engine with relatively low thrust levels of 40 - 50 kN for in-space transportation. The small modular engine can expand mission versatility, when flexibly used in a clustered engine arrangement, so that it can perform various scale missions from low-thrust robotic science missions to high-thrust manned missions. In addition, the clustered engine system can enhance engine redundancy and ensuing crew safety as well as the thrust. The propulsion system is an energy conversion system to transform the thermal energy of the reactor into the kinetic energy of the propellant to produce the powers for thrust, propellant feeding and electricity. It is mainly made up of a propellant Feeding System (PFS) comprising a Turbo-Pump Assembly (TPA), a Regenerative Nozzle Assembly (RNA), etc. For this core design study, an expander cycle is assumed to be the propulsion system. The EGS converts the thermal energy of the EHTGR in the idle operation (only 350 kW th power) to electric power during the electric power mode. This paper presents a preliminary thermohydraulic design analysis to explore the design space for the new reactor and to estimate the referential engine performance. The new non-proliferative NTR engine concept, KANUTER-LEU, is under designing to surmount the nuclear proliferation obstacles on allR and Dactivities and eventual commercialization for future generations. To efficiently implement a heavy LEU fuel for the NTR engine, its reactor design innovatively possesses the key characteristics of the high U density fuel with high heating and H 2 corrosion resistances, the thermal neutron spectrum core and also minimizing non-fission neutron loss, and the compact reactor design with protectively cooling capability. To investigate feasible design space for the moderated EHTGR-LEU and resultant engine performance, the preliminary design

  11. Preliminary Thermohydraulic Analysis of a New Moderated Reactor Utilizing an LEU-Fuel for Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Seung Hyun; Choi, Jae Young; Venneria, Paolo F.; Jeong, Yong Hoon; Chang, Soon Heung [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The Korea Advanced NUclear Thermal Engine Rocket utilizing an LEU fuel (KANUTER-LEU) is a non-proliferative and comparably efficient NTR engine with relatively low thrust levels of 40 - 50 kN for in-space transportation. The small modular engine can expand mission versatility, when flexibly used in a clustered engine arrangement, so that it can perform various scale missions from low-thrust robotic science missions to high-thrust manned missions. In addition, the clustered engine system can enhance engine redundancy and ensuing crew safety as well as the thrust. The propulsion system is an energy conversion system to transform the thermal energy of the reactor into the kinetic energy of the propellant to produce the powers for thrust, propellant feeding and electricity. It is mainly made up of a propellant Feeding System (PFS) comprising a Turbo-Pump Assembly (TPA), a Regenerative Nozzle Assembly (RNA), etc. For this core design study, an expander cycle is assumed to be the propulsion system. The EGS converts the thermal energy of the EHTGR in the idle operation (only 350 kW{sub th} power) to electric power during the electric power mode. This paper presents a preliminary thermohydraulic design analysis to explore the design space for the new reactor and to estimate the referential engine performance. The new non-proliferative NTR engine concept, KANUTER-LEU, is under designing to surmount the nuclear proliferation obstacles on allR and Dactivities and eventual commercialization for future generations. To efficiently implement a heavy LEU fuel for the NTR engine, its reactor design innovatively possesses the key characteristics of the high U density fuel with high heating and H{sub 2} corrosion resistances, the thermal neutron spectrum core and also minimizing non-fission neutron loss, and the compact reactor design with protectively cooling capability. To investigate feasible design space for the moderated EHTGR-LEU and resultant engine performance, the

  12. Beryllium application in ITER plasma facing components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raffray, A.R.; Federici, G.; Barabash, V.; Cardella, A.; Jakeman, R.; Ioki, K.; Janeschitz, G.; Parker, R.; Tivey, R.; Pacher, H.D.; Wu, C.H.; Bartels, H.W.

    1997-01-01

    Beryllium is a candidate armour material for the in-vessel components of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), namely the primary first wall, the limiter, the baffle and the divertor. However, a number of issues arising from the performance requirements of the ITER plasma facing components (PFCs) must be addressed to better assess the attractiveness of Be as armour for these different components. These issues include heat loading limits arising from temperature and stress constraints under steady state conditions, armour lifetime including the effects of sputtering erosion as well as vaporisation and loss of melt during disruption events, tritium retention and permeation, and chemical hazards, in particular with respect to potential Be/steam reaction. Other issues such as fabrication and the possibility of in-situ repair are not performance-dependent but have an important impact on the overall assessment of Be as PFC armour. This paper describes the present view on Be application for ITER PFCs. The key issues are discussed including an assessment of the current level of understanding based on analysis and experimental data; and on-going activities as part of the ITER EDA R and D program are highlighted. (orig.)

  13. Tritium release from beryllium pebbles after high temperature irradiation up to 3000 appm He in the HIDOBE-01 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Til, S. van, E-mail: vantil@nrg.eu [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group, Westerduinweg 3, Postbus 25, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Fedorov, A.V.; Stijkel, M.P.; Cobussen, H.L.; Mutnuru, R.K.; Idsert, P. van der [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group, Westerduinweg 3, Postbus 25, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Zmitko, M. [The European Joint Undertaking for ITER and The Development of Fusion Energy, c/ Josep Pla, no. 2, Torres Diagonal Litoral, Edificio B3, 08019 Barcelona (Spain)

    2013-11-15

    In the HIDOBE (HIgh DOse irradiation of BEryllium) irradiation program, various grades of constrained and unconstrained beryllium pebbles, beryllium pellets and titanium-beryllide samples are irradiated in the High Flux Reactor (HFR) in Petten at four different temperatures (between 698 K and 1023 K) for 649 days [1]. The first of two HIDOBE irradiation experiments, HIDOBE-01, was completed after achieving a DEMO relevant helium production level of 3000 appm and the samples are retrieved for postirradiation examination (PIE). This work shows preliminary results of the out-of-pile tritium release analysis performed on different grades of irradiated beryllium pebbles (different in size). Relationships between irradiation temperature, tritium inventory and microstructural evolution have been observed by light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy.

  14. Status of the European R and D on beryllium as multiplier material for breeder blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeslang, A.; Boccaccini, L.V.; Rabaglino, E.; Piazza, G.; Cardella, A.; Sannen, L.; Scibetta, M.; Laan, J. van der; Hegeman, J.B.J.W.

    2004-01-01

    Within the international fusion community a variety of breeding blanket concepts are being considered, ranging from more conservative concepts to higher-risk concepts for fusion power reactors. In Europe, the Helium Cooled Pebble Bed (HCPB) blanket is one of the two reference concepts which will also be tested as Test Blanket Module (TBM) in ITER. In addition to the R and D for structural parts of the HCPB blanket, a considerable effort is devoted to the production and qualification of ceramic breeder and neutron multiplier (beryllium or beryllide) pebble beds. Since in the HCPB blanket pebbles made of lithium ceramics are foreseen, a high volume fraction of beryllium as a neutron multiplier to Li-based ceramic of about 4: l is needed. The typical loading conditions for beryllium are, with a neutron wall load of ∼12.5 MWa/m 2 and in ∼5 years lifetime: T min ∼300degC, T max ∼600-900degC, displacement damage ∼80 dpa, peak 4 He production ∼26000 appm and peak 3 H production ∼700 appm at the End-Of-Life. The behaviour of beryllium under irradiation is considered to be a key issue of the HCPB blanket, because of swelling due to helium bubbles and tritium retention. A large R and D programme on beryllium has been implemented in Europe, aimed at characterising and predicting the material behaviour before and under irradiation. An overview on experimental and modelling activities performed during the past 2 years is given with typical results on non-irradiated and irradiated Beryllium materials and pebble beds and the relevance of major results on future beryllium R and D is addressed. (author)

  15. Effects of core models and neutron energy group structures on xenon oscillation in large graphite-moderated reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamasita, Kiyonobu; Harada, Hiroo; Murata, Isao; Shindo, Ryuichi; Tsuruoka, Takuya.

    1993-01-01

    Xenon oscillations of large graphite-moderated reactors have been analyzed by a multi-group diffusion code with two- and three-dimensional core models to study the effects of the geometric core models and the neutron energy group structures on the evaluation of the Xe oscillation behavior. The study clarified the following. It is important for accurate Xe oscillation simulations to use the neutron energy group structure that describes well the large change in the absorption cross section of Xe in the thermal energy range of 0.1∼0.65 eV, because the energy structure in this energy range has significant influences on the amplitude and the period of oscillations in power distributions. Two-dimensional R-Z models can be used instead of three-dimensional R-θ-Z models for evaluation of the threshold power of Xe oscillation, but two-dimensional R-θ models cannot be used for evaluation of the threshold power. Although the threshold power evaluated with the R-θ-Z models coincides with that of the R-Z models, it does not coincide with that of the R-θ models. (author)

  16. Experimental and thermodynamic studies of beryllium replacement materials for CANDU brazed joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potter, K.N.; Ferrier, G.A.; Corcoran, E.C., E-mail: Kieran.Potter@rmc.ca [Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, ON (Canada)

    2015-07-01

    Currently, appendages are joined to CANDU fuel elements via a brazing process, which uses beryllium as the filler material. A potential reduction in the occupational limit on airborne beryllium particulates has motivated research into alternative brazing materials. To this end, the Canadian nuclear industry has funded an initiative to identify and evaluate the suitability of several candidate materials. This work describes contributions toward the assessment of alternative brazing materials from the Royal Military College of Canada. Thermodynamic modelling was performed to predict the aqueous behaviour of each candidate material in CANDU coolant conditions characteristic of reactor shutdown, and experiments are underway to support modelling predictions. These results will assist in selecting a suitable replacement material for beryllium. (author)

  17. Experimental and thermodynamic assessment of beryllium-replacement materials for CANDU brazed joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potter, K.N.; Ferrier, G.A.; Corcoran, E.C., E-mail: Kieran.Potter@rmc.ca [Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston ON, (Canada); Dimayuga, F.C. [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    2015-07-01

    Currently, appendages are joined to CANDU fuel elements via a brazing process, with beryllium as the filler material. A potential reduction in the occupational limit on airborne beryllium particulates has motivated research into alternative brazing materials. To this end, the Canadian nuclear industry has funded an initiative to identify and evaluate the suitability of several candidate brazing materials. This work describes contributions toward the assessment of alternative brazing materials from the Royal Military College of Canada (RMCC). An impact testing method was developed to evaluate the mechanical strength of candidate braze joints.Thermodynamic modelling was performed to predict the aqueous behaviour of each candidate material in CANDU coolant conditions characteristic of reactor shutdown, and corrosion experiments are underway to support modelling predictions.The results of these activities will assist in selecting a suitable replacement material for beryllium. (author)

  18. Study on Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR) core design. Joint research report (FY1998-1999)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-09-01

    The Reduce-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR) is a next generation water-cooled reactor aiming at effective utilization of uranium resource, high burn-up and long operation cycle, and plutonium multi-recycle. Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) started a joint research program for conceptual design of RMWR core in collaboration with the Japan Atomic Power Company (JAPC) since 1998. The research area includes the RMWR core conceptual designs, development of analysis methods for rector physics and thermal-hydraulics to design the RMWR cores with higher accuracy and preparation of MOX critical experiment to confirm the feasibility from the reactor physics point of view. The present report describes the results of joint research program 'RMWR core design Phase 1' performed by JAERI and JAPC in FY 1998 and 1999. The results obtained from the joint research program are as follows: Conceptual design study on the RMWR core has been performed. A core concept with a conversion ratio more than about 1 is basically feasible to multiple recycling of plutonium. Investigating core characteristics at the equilibrium, some promising core concepts to satisfy above aims have been established. As for BWR-type concepts with negative void reactivity coefficients, three types of design have been obtained as follows; (1) one feasible to attain high conversion ratio about 1.1, (2) one feasible to attain operation cycle of about 2 years and burn-up of about 60 GWd/t with conversion ratio more than 1 or (3) one in simple design based on the ABWR assembly and without blanket attaining conversion ratio more than 1. And as for PWR-type concepts with negative void reactivity coefficients, two types of design have been obtained as follows; (1) one feasible to attain high conversion ratio about 1.05 by using heavy water as a coolant and (2) one feasible to attain conversion ratio about l by using light water. In the study of nuclear calculation method, a reactor analysis code

  19. Technical issues for beryllium use in fusion blanket applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarville, T.J.; Berwald, D.H.; Wolfer, W.; Fulton, F.J.; Lee, J.D.; Maninger, R.C.; Moir, R.W.; Beeston, J.M.; Miller, L.G.

    1985-01-01

    Beryllium is an excellent non-fissioning neutron multiplier for fusion breeder and fusion electric blanket applications. This report is a compilation of information related to the use of beryllium with primary emphasis on the fusion breeder application. Beryllium resources, production, fabrication, properties, radiation damage and activation are discussed. A new theoretical model for beryllium swelling is presented

  20. Production of beryllium oxide of nuclear purity from beryl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copat, A; Sood, S P

    1984-01-01

    Production of beryllium oxide from beryl by the fluoride process was optimized in this study. Optimum results were obtained using a mixture of sodium hexafluorsilicate and sodium hexafluorferrate as flux and calcinating at 740/sup 0/C for 2 hours. The beryllium concentrate produced was further purified by crystallization as beryllium sulfate to obtain nuclear grade beryllium oxide

  1. Production of beryllium oxide of nuclear purity from beryl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copat, A.; Sood, S.P.

    1983-01-01

    Production of beryllium oxide from beryl by the fluoride process was optimized in this study. Optimum results were obtained using a mixture of sodium hexafluorsilicate and sodium hexafluorferrate as flux and calcinating at 740 0 C for 2 hours. The beryllium concentrate produced was further purified by crystallization as beryllium sulfate to obtain nuclear grade beryllium oxide (Author) [pt

  2. Enhancing the moderator effectiveness as a heat sink during loss-of-coolant accidents in CANDU-PHW reactors using glass-peened surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitheanandan, T.; Tiede, R.W.; Sanderson, D.B.; Fong, R.W.L.; Coleman, C.E.

    1998-08-01

    The horizontal fuel channel concept is a distinguishing feature of the CANDU-PHW reactor. Each fuel channel consists of a Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube and a Zircaloy-2 calandria tube, separated by a gas filled annulus. The calandria tube is surrounded by heavy-water moderator that also provides a backup heat sink for the reactor core. This heat sink (about 10 mm away from the hot pressure tube) ensures adequate cooling of fuel in the unlikely event of a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). One of the ways of enhancing the use of the moderator as a heat sink is to improve the heat-transfer characteristics between the calandria tube and the moderator. This enhancement can be achieved through surface modifications to the calandria tube which have been shown to increase the tube's critical heat flux (CHF) value. An increase in CHIF could be used to reduce moderator subcooling requirements for CANDU fuel channels or increase the margin to dryout. A series of experiments was conducted to assess the benefits provided by glass-peening the outside surface of calandria tubes for postulated LOCA conditions. In particular, the ability to increase the tube's CHF, and thereby reduce moderator subcooling requirements was assessed. Results from the experiments confirm that glass-peening the outer surface of a tube increases its CHF value in pool boiling. This increase in CHF could be used to reduce moderator subcooling requirements for CANDU fuel channels by at least 5 degrees C. (author)

  3. Natural-circulation flow pattern during the gamma-heating phase of an LBLOCA in a heavy-water moderated reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, S.B.; Unal, C.; Pasamehmetoglu, K.O.; Motley, F.E.

    1992-01-01

    In a postulated large-break loss-of-coolant accident (LBLOCA), the core of the reactor is uncovered quickly as the liquid that drains out of the tank is replaced by air. During the LBLOCA, the reactor is scrammed. the moderator tank is drained, and fuel and control rod tubes are cooled internally by forced convection via the emergency cooling system (ECS) water. However, the safety rods, reflector assemblies, tank wall, and instrument rods continue to heat up as a result of gamma deposition. These components are primarily cooled by natural/mixed convection and radiation heat transfer. In this paper, the thermal-hydraulic analysis of a reactor moderator tank exposed to air during an LBLOCA is discussed. The analysis was performed using a special version of the Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC). TRAC input and code modifications considered the appropriate modeling of ECS cooling, thermal radiation heat transfer, and natural convection. The major objective of the model was to calculate the limiting component temperature (that establishes the maximum operating power) as a result of gamma heating. In addition, the nature of the moderator tank air-circulation pattern and its effects on the limiting temperature under various conditions were analyzed. None of the components were found to exceed their structural limits when the pre-scram power level was 50% of historical power

  4. Irradiated Beryllium Disposal Workshop, Idaho Falls, ID, May 29-30, 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longhurst, Glen Reed; Anderson, Gail; Mullen, Carlan K; West, William Howard

    2002-07-01

    In 2001, while performing routine radioactive decay heat rate calculations for beryllium reflector blocks for the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), it became evident that there may be sufficient concentrations of transuranic isotopes to require classification of this irradiated beryllium as transuranic waste. Measurements on samples from ATR reflector blocks and further calculations confirmed that for reflector blocks and outer shim control cylinders now in the ATR canal, transuranic activities are about five times the threshold for classification. That situation implies that there is no apparent disposal pathway for this material. The problem is not unique to the ATR. The High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Missouri University Research Reactor at Columbia, Missouri and other reactors abroad must also deal with this issue. A workshop was held in Idaho Falls Idaho on May 29-30, 2002 to acquaint stakeholders with these findings and consider a path forward in resolving the issues attendant to disposition of irradiated material. Among the findings from this workshop were (1) there is a real potential for the US to be dependent on foreign sources for metallic beryllium within about a decade; (2) there is a need for a national policy on beryllium utilization and disposition and for a beryllium coordinating committee to be assembled to provide guidance on that policy; (3) it appears it will be difficult to dispose of this material at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico due to issues of Defense classification, facility radioactivity inventory limits, and transportation to WIPP; (4) there is a need for a funded DOE program to seek resolution of these issues including research on processing techniques that may make this waste acceptable in an existing disposal pathway or allow for its recycle.

  5. Solid state bonding of beryllium-copper for an ITER first wall application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odegard, B.C. Jr.; Cadden, C.H. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Several different joint assemblies were evaluated in support of a manufacturing technology for diffusion bonding a beryllium armor tile to a copper alloy heat sink for fusion reactor applications. Because beryllium reacts with all but a few elements to form intermetallic compounds, this study considered several different surface treatments as a means of both inhibiting these reactions and promoting a good diffusion bond between the two substrates. All diffusion bonded assemblies used aluminum or an aluminum-beryllium composite (AlBeMet-150) as the interfacial material in contact with beryllium. In most cases, explosive bonding was utilized as a technique for joining the copper alloy heat sink to an aluminum or AlBeMet-150 substrate, which was subsequently diffusion bonded to an aluminum coated beryllium tile. In this approach, a 250 {mu}m thick titanium foil was used as a diffusion barrier between the copper and aluminum to prevent the formation of Cu-Al intermetallic phases. In all cases, a hot isostatic pressing (HIP) furnace was used in conjunction with canned assemblies in order to minimize oxidation and apply sufficient pressure on the assembly for excellent metal-to-metal contact and subsequent bonding. Several different processing schedules were evaluated during the course of this study; bonded assemblies were produced that failed outside the bond area indicating a 100% joint efficiency. (author)

  6. Solid state bonding of beryllium-copper for an ITER first wall application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odegard, B.C. Jr.; Cadden, C.H.

    1998-02-01

    Several different joint assemblies were evaluated in support of a manufacturing technology for diffusion bonding a beryllium armor tile to a copper alloy heat sink for fusion reactor applications. Because beryllium reacts with all but a few elements to form intermetallic compounds, this study considered several different surface treatments as a means of both inhibiting these reactions and promoting a good diffusion bond between the two substrates. A diffusion bonded assemblies used aluminum or an aluminum-beryllium composite (AlBeMet-150) as the interfacial material in contact with beryllium. In most cases, explosive bonding was utilized as a technique for joining the copper alloy heat sink to an aluminum or AlBeMet-150 substrate, which was subsequently diffusion bonded to an aluminum coated beryllium tile. In this approach, a 250 microm thick titanium foil was used as a diffusion barrier between the copper and aluminum to prevent the formation of Cu-Al intermetallic phases. In all cases, a hot isostatic pressing (HIP) furnace was used in conjunction with canned assemblies in order to minimize oxidation and apply sufficient pressure on the assembly for excellent metal-to-metal contact and subsequent bonding. Several different processing schedules were evaluated during the course of this study; bonded assemblies were produced that failed outside the bond area indicating a 100% joint efficiency

  7. Fluorimetric method for determination of Beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sparacino, N.; Sabbioneda, S.

    1996-10-01

    The old fluorimetric method for the determination of Beryllium, based essentially on the fluorescence of the Beryllium-Morine complex in a strongly alkaline solution, is still competitive and stands the comparison with more modern methods or at least three reasons: in the presence of solid or gaseous samples (powders), the times necessary to finalize an analytic determination are comparable since the stage of the process which lasts the longest is the mineralization of the solid particles containing Beryllium, the cost of a good fluorimeter is by far Inferior to the cost, e. g., of an Emission Spectrophotometer provided with ICP torch and magnets for exploiting the Zeeman effect and of an Atomic absorption Spectrophotometer provided with Graphite furnace; it is possible to determine, fluorimetrically, rather small Beryllium levels (about 30 ng of Beryllium/sample), this potentiality is more than sufficient to guarantee the respect of all the work safety and hygiene rules now in force. The study which is the subject of this publication is designed to the analysis procedure which allows one to reach good results in the determination of Beryllium, chiefly through the control and measurement of the interference effect due to the presence of some metals which might accompany the environmental samples of workshops and laboratories where Beryllium is handled, either at the pure state or in its alloys. The results obtained satisfactorily point out the merits and limits of this analytic procedure

  8. Preliminary proposal for a beryllium technology program for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-02-01

    The program was designed to provide the answers to the critical issues of beryllium technology needed in fusion blanket designs. The four tasks are as follows: (1) Beryllium property measurements needed for fusion data base. (2) Beryllium stress relaxation and creep measurements for lifetime modelling calculations. (3) Simplified recycle technique development for irradiated beryllium. (4) Beryllium neutron multiplier measurements using manganese bath absolute calibration techniques

  9. Numerical analysis on the calandria tubes in the moderator of a heavy water reactor using OpenFOAM and other codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, S.M.; Kim, H.T.

    2013-01-01

    CANDU, a prototype of heavy water reactor is modeled for the moderator system with porous media buoyancy-effect heat-transfer turbulence model. OpenFOAM, a set of C++ classes and libraries developed under the object-oriented concept, is selected as the tool of numerical analysis. The result from this computational code is compared with experiments and other commercial code data through ANSYS-CFX and COMSOL Multi-physics. The three-dimensional code concerning buoyancy force, turbulence, and heat transfer is tested and shown to be successful for the analysis of thermo-hydraulic system of heavy water reactors. (authors)

  10. Beryllium and growth. III. The effect of beryllium on plant phosphatase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoagland, M B

    1952-01-01

    The purpose of the investigations was to correlate the apparent ability of beryllium to substitute for magnesium in plant growth with a specific biochemical effect of the metal. Through association with earlier work on beryllium inhibition of animal alkaline phosphatase, a study was made of the effect of beryllium and other metals upon the activity of a phosphatase derived from tomato leaves. Although only indirect evidence is available that this enzyme system was magnesium-activated, beryllium was found to inhibit reversibly the splitting of GP and ATP. Other metals were also found to be inhibitory but the ATP-ase inhibition - and especially the ratio of P split from GP to P split from ATP - was higher for beryllium than for any other metal studied. The significance of this finding in relation to energy metabolism, growth, and beryllium toxicity is discussed. 12 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

  11. Spectrographic measurement of beryllium in the atmosphere; Dosage spectrographique du beryllium dans l'atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artaud, J; Cittanova, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Service d' Analyses et Recherches Chimiques Appliquees, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Crehange, G; Frequelin, S [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Dir. des Applications Militaires, Service Chimie, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Baudin, G [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1961-07-01

    We describe here a method for the spectrographic determination of beryllium on filters which is valid for amounts varying between 0,01 and 30 {mu}g of beryllium and which is independent of the nature of the beryllium compound involved. This is a flux method (graphite-lithium carbonate mixture), the excitation being by a direct current arc. (author) [French] Nous decrivons ici, une methode de dosage spectrographique de beryllium sur filtre, valable pour des teneurs comprises entre 0,01 et 30 {mu}g de beryllium et independante de la nature du compose de beryllium a doser. C'est une methode de 'flux' (melange graphite-carbonate de lithium) l'excitation etant un arc a courant continu. (auteur)

  12. Metallurgical viewpoints on the brittleness of beryllium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagerberg, G

    1960-02-15

    At present the development and use of beryllium metal for structural applications is severely hampered by its brittleness. Reasons for this lack of ductility are reviewed in discussing the deformation behaviour of beryllium in relation to other hexagonal metals. The ease of fracturing in beryllium is assumed to be a consequence of a limited number of deformation modes in combination with high deformation resistance. Models for the nucleation of fracture are suggested. The relation of ductility to elastic constants as well as to grain size, texture and alloying additions is discussed.

  13. Metallurgical viewpoints on the brittleness of beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagerberg, G.

    1960-02-01

    At present the development and use of beryllium metal for structural applications is severely hampered by its brittleness. Reasons for this lack of ductility are reviewed in discussing the deformation behaviour of beryllium in relation to other hexagonal metals. The ease of fracturing in beryllium is assumed to be a consequence of a limited number of deformation modes in combination with high deformation resistance. Models for the nucleation of fracture are suggested. The relation of ductility to elastic constants as well as to grain size, texture and alloying additions is discussed

  14. Beryllium health effects in the era of the beryllium lymphocyte proliferation test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, L A

    2001-05-01

    The beryllium lymphocyte proliferation test (BeLPT) has revolutionized our approach to the diagnosis, screening, and surveillance of beryllium health effects. Based on the development of a beryllium-specific cell-mediated immune response, the BeLPT has allowed us to define early health effects of beryllium, including beryllium sensitization (BeS), and chronic beryllium disease (CBD) at a subclinical stage. The use of this test as a screening tool has improved our understanding of these health effects. From a number of studies it is apparent that BeS precedes CBD and develops after as little as 9 weeks of beryllium exposure. CBD occurs within 3 months and up to 30 years after initial beryllium exposure. Exposure-response variables have been associated with BeS/CBD, including work as a machinist, chemical or metallurgical operator, laboratory technician, work in ceramics or beryllium metal production, and years of beryllium exposure. Recent studies have found BeS and CBD in workplaces in which the majority of exposures were below the 2 microg/m3 OSHA time-weighted average (TWA). Ideally, the BeLPT would be used in surveillance aimed at defining other risk-related processes, determining exposure variables which predict BeS and CBD, and defining the exposure level below which beryllium health effects do not occur. Unfortunately, the BeLPT can result in false negative tests and still requires an invasive procedure, a bronchoscopy, for the definitive diagnosis of CBD. Thus, research is needed to establish new tests to be used alone or in conjunction with the BeLPT to improve our ability to detect early beryllium health effects.

  15. A study concerning tritium concentration evolution in the moderator of a CANDU reactor connected on-line to a detritiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bidica, Nicolae; Bornea, Anisia

    2005-01-01

    The present work is a theoretical study on the tritium concentration evolution in the CANDU reactor moderator connected on-line with a detritiation facility. This study is based on a calculation model which takes into account the evolution curve of the tritium concentration in the absence of detritiation process in both the moderator and SPTC of the Unit 1 CANDU reactor at Cernavoda NPP. This study leads to determination of the tritium concentration evolution in the moderator in the presence of the detritiation process for both a range of intake flows and initial concentration. Also, the intake flow change will be analyzed for a detritiation facility as a function of tritium initial concentration existing in the moderator in the case of a survey of the detritiation over a given period of time. The conclusions of this study were the following: - an optimum of the detritiation factor can be determined; - detritiation starts at a lower value for the tritium concentration in moderator which reduces the strain upon the detritiation facility and therefore the costs of its building, maintenance and operation. (authors)

  16. Development of a noise-based method for the determination of the moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity (MTC) in pressurized water reactors (PWRs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demaziere, C.

    2002-01-01

    The Moderator Temperature Coefficient of reactivity (MTC) is an important safety parameter of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). In most countries, the so-called at-power MTC has to be measured a few months before the reactor outage, in order to determine if the MTC will not become too negative. Usually, the at-power MTC is determined by inducing a change in the moderator temperature, which has to be compensated for by other means, such as a change in the boron concentration. An MTC measurement using the boron dilution method is analysed in this thesis. It is demonstrated that the uncertainty of such a measurement technique is so large, that the measured MTC could become more negative than what the Technical Specifications allow. Furthermore, this technique incurs a disturbance of the plant operation. For this reason, another technique relying on noise analysis was proposed a few years ago. In this technique, the MTC is inferred from the neutron noise measured inside the core and the moderator temperature noise measured at the core-exit, in the same or in a neighbouring fuel assembly. This technique does not require any perturbation of the reactor operation, but was nevertheless proven to underestimate the MTC by a factor of 2 to 5. In this thesis, it is shown, both theoretically and experimentally, that the reason of the MTC underestimation by noise analysis is the radially loosely coupled character of the moderator temperature noise throughout the core. A new MTC noise estimator, accounting for this radially non-homogeneous moderator temperature noise is proposed and demonstrated to give the correct MTC value. This new MTC noise estimator relies on the neutron noise measured in a single point of the reactor and the radially averaged moderator temperature noise measured inside the core. In the case of the Ringhals-2 PWR in Sweden, Gamma-Thermometers (GTs) offer such a possibility since in dynamic mode they measure the moderator temperature noise, whereas in static

  17. Theoretical Calculations of the Effect on Lattice Parameters of Emptying the Coolant Channels in a D{sub 2}O- Moderated and Cooled Natural Uranium Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weissglas, P [The Swedish State Power Board, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1960-11-15

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate theoretically the effect of coolant boiling and subsequent void formation in a pressurized D{sub 2}O moderated and cooled reactor. The fuel rods were arranged in a cluster geometry and clad in Zr-2. The coolant was separated from the moderator by a Zr-2 shroud. In this geometry the following problems have been given special attention: l) calculation of the effective resonance integral, 2) thermal disadvantage factors, 3) fast fission effects, 4) leakage effects, 5) changes in epithermal absorption. No account has up to now been taken of the variation of these effects with position in the reactor and burnup. Some comparisons of the theoretical methods and measurements have been attempted. It is concluded that at the present time it is not possible to calculate the void coefficient with any accuracy but it may be possible to give an upper limit from theoretical consideration.

  18. Combined aging of beryllium bronze

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duraev, P.P.; Kaplun, Yu.A.; Pastukhova, Zh.P.; Rakhshtadt, A.G.

    1986-01-01

    This article evaluates the possibility of increasing the resistance of beryllium bronze to small plastic deformations as a result of the application of stepped aging under stress. Low-temperature aging under conditions of bending under a stress of about 100 MPa was applied to alloy BrBNT1, 9Mg at 150, 180, and 210 0 C, high-temperature aging at 300 and 340 0 C under stress and without stress. As a result of applying stepped aging under stress, the elastic limit of the alloy BrBNT1, 9Mg was raised to 900 MPa. Stepped aging under stress has a substantial effect on the relaxation stability of the alloy. The procedure suggested in the article for aging may be used efficiently for treating elastic elements made of other brands of bronze as well

  19. Research Reactors Types and Utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelrazek, I.D.

    2008-01-01

    A nuclear reactor, in gross terms, is a device in which nuclear chain reactions are initiated, controlled, and sustained at a steady rate. The nuclei of fuel heavy atoms (mostly 235 U or 239 Pu), when struck by a slow neutron, may split into two or more smaller nuclei as fission products,releasing energy and neutrons in a process called nuclear fission. These newly-born fast neutrons then undergo several successive collisions with relatively low atomic mass material, the moderator, to become thermalized or slow. Normal water, heavy water, graphite and beryllium are typical moderators. These neutrons then trigger further fissions, and so on. When this nuclear chain reaction is controlled, the energy released can be used to heat water, produce steam and drive a turbine that generates electricity. The fission process, and hence the energy release, are controlled by the insertion (or extraction) of control rods through the reactor. These rods are strongly neutron absorbents, and thus only enough neutrons to sustain the chain reaction are left in the core. The energy released, mostly in the form of heat, should be continuously removed, to protect the core from damage. The most significant use of nuclear reactors is as an energy source for the generation of electrical power and for power in some military ships. This is usually accomplished by methods that involve using heat from the nuclear reaction to power steam turbines. Research reactors are used for radioisotope production and for beam experiments with free neutrons. Historically, the first use of nuclear reactors was the production of weapons grade plutonium for nuclear weapons. Currently all commercial nuclear reactors are based on nuclear fission. Fusion power is an experimental technology based on nuclear fusion instead of fission.

  20. Measurement of the diffusion length of thermal neutrons in the beryllium oxide; Mesure de la longueur de diffusion des neutrons thermiques dans l'oxyde de beryllium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koechlin, J C; Martelly, J; Duggal, V P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1955-07-01

    The diffusion length of thermal neutrons in the beryllium oxide has been obtained while studying the spatial distribution of the neutrons in a massive parallelepiped of this matter placed before the thermal column of the reactor core of Saclay. The mean density of the beryllium oxide (BeO) is 2,95 gr/cm{sup 3}, the mean density of the massif is 2,92 gr/cm{sup 3}. The value of the diffusion length, deducted of the done measures, is: L = 32,7 {+-} 0,5 cm (likely gap). Some remarks are formulated about the influence of the spectral distribution of the neutrons flux used. (authors) [French] La longueur de diffusion des neutrons thermiques dans l'oxyde de beryllium a ete obtenue en etudiant la repartition spatiale des neutrons dans un massif parallelepipedique de cette matiere placee devant la colonne thermique de la Pile de Saclay. La densite moyenne de l'oxyde de beryllium (BeO) est de 2,95 gr/cm{sup 3}, la densite moyenne du massif de 2,92 gr/cm{sup 3}. La valeur de la longueur de diffusion, deduite des mesures effectuees est: L 32,7 {+-} 0,5 cm (ecart probable). Des remarques sont formulees quant a l'influence de la repartition spectrale du flux de neutrons utilise. (auteurs)

  1. The adhesive bonding of beryllium structural components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fullerton-Batten, R.C.

    1977-01-01

    Where service conditions permit, adhesive bonding is a highly recommendable, reliable means of joining beryllium structural parts. Several important programs have successfully used adhesive bonding for joining structural and non-structural beryllium components. Adhesive bonding minimizes stress concentrations associated with other joining techniques and considerably improves fatigue resistance. In addition, no degradation of base metal properties occur. In many instances, structural joints can be fabricated more cheaply by adhesive bonding or in combination with adhesive bonding than by any other method used alone. An evaluation program on structural adhesive bonding of beryllium sheet components is described. A suitable surface pretreatment for beryllium adherends prior to bonding is given. Tensile shear strength and fatigue properties of FM 1000 and FM 123-5 adhesive bonded joints are reviewed and compared with data obtained from riveted joints of similar geometry. (author)

  2. Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S

    2012-03-29

    This document describes how Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) meets the requirements and management practices of federal regulation 10 CFR 850, 'Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program (CBDPP).' This revision of the LLNL CBDPP incorporates clarification and editorial changes based on lessons learned from employee discussions, observations and reviews of Department of Energy (DOE) Complex and commercial industry beryllium (Be) safety programs. The information is used to strengthen beryllium safety practices at LLNL, particularly in the areas of: (1) Management of small parts and components; and (2) Communication of program status to employees. Future changes to LLNL beryllium activities and on-going operating experience will be incorporated into the program as described in Section S, 'Performance Feedback.'

  3. Beryllium-aluminum alloys for investment castings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nachtrab, W.T.; Levoy, N.

    1997-01-01

    Beryllium-aluminum alloys containing greater than 60 wt % beryllium are very favorable materials for applications requiring light weight and high stiffness. However, when produced by traditional powder metallurgical methods, these alloys are expensive and have limited applications. To reduce the cost of making beryllium-aluminum components, Nuclear Metals Inc. (NMI) and Lockheed Martin Electronics and Missiles have recently developed a family of patented beryllium-aluminum alloys that can be investment cast. Designated Beralcast, the alloys can achieve substantial weight savings because of their high specific strength and stiffness. In some cases, weight has been reduced by up to 50% over aluminum investment casting. Beralcast is now being used to make thin wall precision investment castings for several advanced aerospace applications, such as the RAH-66 Comanche helicopter and F-22 jet fighter. This article discusses alloy compositions, properties, casting method, and the effects of cobalt additions on strength

  4. Beryllium concentration in pharyngeal tonsils in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Nogaj

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Power plant dust is believed to be the main source of the increased presence of the element beryllium in the environment which has been detected in the atmospheric air, surface waters, groundwater, soil, food, and cigarette smoke. In humans, beryllium absorption occurs mainly via the respiratory system. The pharyngeal tonsils are located on the roof of the nasopharynx and are in direct contact with dust particles in inhaled air. As a result, the concentration levels of beryllium in the pharyngeal tonsils are likely to be a good indicator of concentration levels in the air. The presented study had two primary aims: to investigate the beryllium concentration in pharyngeal tonsils in children living in southern Poland, and the appropriate reference range for this element in children’s pharyngeal tonsils. Pharyngeal tonsils were extracted from a total of 379 children (age 2–17 years, mean 6.2 ± 2.7 years living in southern Poland. Tonsil samples were mineralized in a closed cycle in a pressure mineralizer PDS 6, using 65% spectrally pure nitric acid. Beryllium concentration was determined using the ICP-AES method with a Perkin Elmer Optima 5300DVTM. The software Statistica v. 9 was used for the statistical analysis. It was found that girls had a significantly greater beryllium concentration in their pharyngeal tonsils than boys. Beryllium concentration varies greatly, mostly according to the place of residence. Based on the study results, the reference value for beryllium in pharyngeal tonsils of children is recommended to be determined at 0.02–0.04 µg/g.

  5. Effect of transient heating loads on beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupriyanov, Igor B.; Porezanov, Nicolay P.; Nikolaev, Georgyi N.; Kurbatova, Liudmila A.; Podkovyrov, Vyacheslav L.; Muzichenko, Anatoliy D.; Zhitlukhin, Anatoliy M.; Khimchenko, Leonid N.; Gervash, Alexander A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We study the effect of transient plasma loads on beryllium erosion and surface microstructure. • Beryllium targets were irradiated by plasma streams with energy of 0.5–1 MJ/m 2 at ∼250 °C. • Under plasma loads 0.5–1 MJ/m 2 cracking of beryllium surface is rather slight. • Under 0.5 MJ/m 2 the mass loss of Be is no more than 0.2 g/m 2 shot and decreasing with shots number. • Under 1 MJ/m 2 maximum mass loss of beryllium was 3.7 g/m 2 shot and decreasing with shots number. - Abstract: Beryllium will be used as a plasma facing material for ITER first wall. It is expected that erosion of beryllium under transient plasma loads such as the edge-localized modes (ELMs) and disruptions will mainly determine a lifetime of ITER first wall. The results of recent experiments with the Russian beryllium of TGP-56FW ITER grade on QSPA-Be plasma gun facility are presented. The Be/CuCrZr mock-ups were exposed to upto 100 shots by deuterium plasma streams with pulse duration of 0.5 ms at ∼250 °C and average heat loads of 0.5 and 1 MJ/m 2 . Experiments were performed at 250 °C. The evolution of surface microstructure and cracks morphology as well as beryllium mass loss are investigated under erosion process

  6. Characteristics of microstructure and tritium release properties of different kinds of beryllium pebbles for application in tritium breeding modules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurinskiy, P., E-mail: petr.kurinskiy@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials – Applied Materials Physics (IAM-AWP), P.O. Box 3640, Karlsruhe 76021 (Germany); Vladimirov, P.; Moeslang, A. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials – Applied Materials Physics (IAM-AWP), P.O. Box 3640, Karlsruhe 76021 (Germany); Rolli, R. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials – Materials and Biomechanics (IAM-WBM), P.O. Box 3640, Karlsruhe 76021 (Germany); Zmitko, M. [The European Joint Undertaking for ITER and the Development of Fusion Energy, c/Josep Pla, no. 2, Torres Diagonal Litoral, Edificio B3, Barcelona 08019 (Spain)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Tritium release properties and characteristics of microstructure of beryllium pebbles having different sizes of grains were studied. • Fine-grained beryllium pebbles showed the best ability to release tritium compared to pebbles from another charges. • Be pebbles with the grain sizes exceeding 100 μm contain a great number of small pores and inclusions presumably referring to the history of material fabrication. • The sizes of grains are one of a key characteristic of microstructure which influences the parameters of tritium release. - Abstract: Beryllium pebbles with diameters of 1 mm are considered to be perspective material for the use as neutron multiplier in tritium breeding modules of fusion reactors. Up to now, the design of helium-cooled breeding blanket in ITER project foresees the use of 1 mm beryllium pebbles fabricated by NGK Insulators Ltd., Japan. It is notable that beryllium pebbles from Russian Federation and USA are also available and the possibility of their large-scale fabrication is under study. Presented work is dedicated to a study of characteristics of microstructure and parameters of tritium release of beryllium pebbles produced by Bochvar Institute, Russian Federation, and Materion Corporation, USA.

  7. Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyama, Masahiro; Kasai, Shigeo.

    1978-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a lmfbr type reactor wherein effusion of coolants through a loop contact portion is reduced even when fuel assemblies float up, and misloading of reactor core constituting elements is prevented thereby improving the reactor safety. Constitution: The reactor core constituents are secured in the reactor by utilizing the differential pressure between the high-pressure cooling chamber and low-pressure cooling chamber. A resistance port is formed at the upper part of a connecting pipe, and which is connect the low-pressure cooling chamber and the lower surface of the reactor core constituent. This resistance part is formed such that the internal sectional area of the connecting pipe is made larger stepwise toward the upper part, and the cylinder is formed larger so that it profiles the inner surface of the connecting pipe. (Aizawa, K.)

  8. Mockup tests of void fraction in moderator cell and two-phase thermosiphon loop of cold neutron source in China Advanced Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Shejiao; Bi Qincheng; Chen Tingkuan; Feng Quanke; Li Xiaoming

    2004-01-01

    Full-scale mockup tests were carried out using freon-113 as a working fluid to verify the design of China Advanced Research Reactor (CARR) Cold neutron Source (CNS), which is a two-phase hydrogen thermosiphon loop consisting of an annular cylindrical moderator cell, two separated hydrogen transfer tubes and a condenser. The circulation characteristics, liquid level and void fraction in the moderator cell against the variation of the heat load were studied. The density ratio and the volumetric evaporating rate of the mockup test are kept the same as those of CARR CNS. The test results show that the mockup loop can establish stable circulation and has a self-regulating characteristic. Within the moderator cell, the inner shell contains only vapor and the outer shell contains the mixture of vapor-liquid with void fraction in a certain range. (authors)

  9. Beryllium electrodeposition on aluminium cathode from chloride melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichkov, I.F.; Novikov, E.A.; Serebryakov, G.A.; Kanashin, Yu.P.; Sardyko, G.N.

    1980-01-01

    Cathodic processes during beryllium deposition on liquid and solid aluminium cathodes are investigated. Mixture of sodium, potassium and beryllium chloride melts served as an lectrolyte. Beryllium ion discharge at the expense of alloy formation takes place at more positive potentials than on an indifferent cathode at low current densities ( in the case of liquid aluminium cathode). Metallographic analysis and measurements of microhardness have shown, that the cathodic product includes two phases: beryllium solid solution in aluminium and metallic beryllium. It is concluded, that aluminium-beryllium alloys with high cathodic yield by current can be obtained by the electrolytic method

  10. Sanitary-hygienic and ecological aspects of beryllium production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dvinskykh, E.M.; Savchuk, V.V.; Sidorov, V.L.; Slobodin, D.B.; Tuzov, Y.V. [Ulba Metallurgical Plant, Ust-Kamenogorsk (Kazakhstan)

    1998-01-01

    The Report describes An organization of sanitary-hygienic and ecological control of beryllium production at Ulba metallurgical plant. It involves: (1) the consideration of main methods for protection of beryllium production personnel from unhealthy effect of beryllium, (2) main kinds of filters, used in gas purification systems at different process areas, (3) data on beryllium monitoring in water, soil, on equipment. This Report also outlines problems connected with designing devices for a rapid analysis of beryllium in air as well as problems of beryllium production on ecological situation in the town. (author)

  11. Beryllium satellite thrust cone design, manufacture and test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneiter, H.; Chandler, D.

    1977-01-01

    Pre-formed beryllium sheet material has been used in the design, manufacturing and test of a satellite thrust cone structure. Adhesive bonding was used for attachment of aluminium flanges and conical segment lap strips. Difficulties in beryllium structure design such as incompatibilities with aluminium and handling problems are discussed. Testing to optimize beryllium-beryllium and beryllium-aluminium adhesive bonds is described. The completed thrust cone assembly has been subjected to static load testing and the results are presented. A summary of the relative merits of the use of beryllium in satellite structures is given with recommendations for future users. (author)

  12. The effect of helium generation and irradiation temperature on tritium release from neutron irradiated beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupriyanov, I.B.; Gorokhov, V.A.; Vlasov, V.V.; Kovalev, A.M.; Chakin, V.P.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of neutron irradiation condition on tritium release from beryllium is described in this paper. Beryllium samples were irradiated in the SM reactor with neutron fluence (E > 0.1 MeV) of (0.37-2.0) x 10 22 cm -2 at 70-100degC and 650-700degC. Mass-spectrometer technique was used in out of tritium release experiments during stepped-temperature anneal within a temperature range from 250 to 1300degC. The total amount of helium accumulated in irradiated beryllium samples varied from 521 appm to 3061 appm. The first signs of tritium release were detected at temperature of 406-553degC. It was shown that irradiation temperature and helium generation level significantly affect the tritium release. A fraction of 44 - 74 % of tritium content in samples irradiated at low temperature (70 - 100degC) is release from beryllium at an annealing temperature below 800degC, whereas for samples after high temperature irradiation (650 - 700 degC) tritium release did not exceed 14 %. Majority of tritium (∼68%) is released within a temperature range from 800 to 920 degC. The increase of helium generation from 521 appm to 3061 appm results in lowering the temperature of maximal tritium release rate and the upper temperature of tritium release from beryllium by 100-130degC and 200-240degC, correspondingly. On the basis of data obtained, the diffusion coefficients of tritium in beryllium were calculated. (author)

  13. Design and safety considerations for the 10 MW(t) multipurpose TRIGA reactor in Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Razvi, J.; Bolin, J.M.; Saurwein, J.J.; Whittemore, W.L.; Proongmuang, S.

    1999-01-01

    General Atomics (GA) is constructing the Ongkharak Nuclear Research Center (ONRC) near Bangkok, Thailand for the Office of Atomic Energy for Peace. The ONRC complex includes the following: A multipurpose 10 MW(t) research reactor; An Isotope Production Facility; Centralized Radioactive Waste Processing and Storage Facilities. The Center is being built 60-km northeast of Bangkok, with a 10 MW(t) TRIGA type research reactor as the centerpiece. Facilities are included for neutron transmutation doping of silicon, neutron capture therapy neutron beam research and for production of a variety of radioisotopes. The facility will also be utilized for applied research and technology development as well as training in reactor operations, conduct of experiments and in reactor physics. The multipurpose, pool-type reactor will be fueled with high-density (45 wt%), low-enriched (19.7 wt%) uranium-erbium-zirconium-hydride (UErZrH) fuel rods, cooled and moderated by light water, and reflected by beryllium and heavy water. The general arrangement of the reactor and auxiliary pool structure allows irradiated targets to be transferred entirely under water from their irradiation locations to the hot cell, then pneumatically transferred to the adjacent Isotope Production Facility for processing. The core configuration includes 4 x 4 array standard TRIGA fuel clusters, modified clusters to serve as fast-neutron irradiation facilities, control rods and an in-core Ir-192 production facility. The active core is reflected on two sides by beryllium and on the other two sides by D 2 O. Additional irradiation facilities are also located in the beryllium reflector blocks and the D 2 O reflector blanket. The fuel provides the fundamental safety feature of the ONRC reactor, and as a result of all the well established accident-mitigating characteristics of the UErZrH fuel itself (large prompt negative temperature coefficient of reactivity, fission product retention and chemical stability), a

  14. A neutronics feasibility study for the LEU conversion of Poland's Maria research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bretscher, M. M.

    1998-01-01

    The MARIA reactor is a high-flux multipurpose research reactor which is water-cooled and moderated with both beryllium and water. Standard HEU (80% 235 U)fuel assemblies consist of six concentric fuel tubes of a U-Al alloy clad in aluminum. Although the inventory of HEU (80%) fuel is nearly exhausted, a supply of highly-loaded 36%-enriched fuel assemblies is available at the reactor site. Neutronic equilibrium studies have been made to determine the relative performance of fuels with enrichments of 80%, 36% and 19.7%. These studies indicate that LEU (19.7%) densities of about 2.5 gU/cm 3 and 3.8 gU/cm 3 are required to match the performance of the MARIA reactor with 80%-enriched and with 36%-enriched fuels, respectively

  15. Cascade ICF power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogan, W.J.; Pitts, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    The double-cone-shaped Cascade reaction chamber rotates at 50 rpm to keep a blanket of ceramic granules in place against the wall as they slide from the poles to the exit slots at the equator. The 1 m-thick blanket consists of layers of carbon, beryllium oxide, and lithium aluminate granules about 1 mm in diameter. The x rays and debris are stopped in the carbon granules; the neutrons are multiplied and moderated in the BeO and breed tritium in the LiAlO 2 . The chamber wall is made up of SiO tiles held in compression by a network of composite SiC/Al tendons. Cascade operates at a 5 Hz pulse rate with 300 MJ in each pulse. The temperature in the blanket reaches 1600 K on the inner surface and 1350 K at the outer edge. The granules are automatically thrown into three separate vacuum heat exchangers where they give up their energy to high pressure helium. The helium is used in a Brayton cycle to obtain a thermal-to-electric conversion efficiency of 55%. Studies have been done on neutron activation, debris recovery, vaporization and recondensation of blanket material, tritium control and recovery, fire safety, and cost. These studies indicate that Cascade appears to be a promising ICF reactor candidate from all standpoints. At the 1000 MWe size, electricity could be made for about the same cost as in a future fission reactor

  16. Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Masaomi; Kashimura, Kazuo; Inoue, Kazuyuki; Nishioka, Kazuya.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To facilitate the construction of a reactor containment building, whereby the inspections of the outer wall of a reactor container after the completion of the construction of the reactor building can be easily carried out. Constitution: In a reactor accommodated in a container encircled by a building wall, a space is provided between the container and the building wall encircling the container, and a metal wall is provided in the space so that it is fitted in the building wall in an attachable or detatchable manner. (Aizawa, K.)

  17. In service inspection of the reactor pressure vessel coolant and moderator nozzles at Atucha 1. 1998/1999 outages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonaccio, Carlos; Conde, Alberto; Fittipaldi, Andres H.; Maniotti, Jorge; Moliterno, Gabriel E.

    2000-01-01

    During the August 1998 and the August 1999 Atucha 1 outages, two areas were inspected on the Reactor Pressure Vessel: the nozzle inner radii and the nozzle shell welds on all 3 moderator nozzles and all 4 main coolant nozzles. The inspections themselves were carried out by Mitsui Babcock Energy Limited from Scotland. The coordination, maintenance assistant and mounting of the manipulator devices over the nozzles were carried out by NASA personnel. Although it was not the first time the nozzle shell welds were inspected, due to the technologies advances in the ultrasonic field and in the inspection manipulators (magnetic ones), it was possible to inspect more volume than in previous inspections. In the other hand, it was the first time NASA was able to inspect the inner radii. In this last case the mayor problems to inspect them were the nozzles geometry and the small space available to install manipulators. The result of the inspections were: 1) There were no reportable indications at any of the inner radii inspected; 2) The inspection of nozzle to shell welds in main-coolant nozzles R3 and R4 detected flaws (one in each nozzle) which were reported as exceeding the dimensions specified as the acceptance level under Table IWB 3512-1, Section XI of the ASME code. Subsequent analysis requested by NASA and performed by Mitsui Babcock, demonstrated that the flaws were over dimensioned and could be explained as due to 'point' flaws. The analysis was based on theoretical mathematic model and experimental trials. Therefore their dimension were under the acceptance level of the ASME XI code. Although the Mitsui Babcock analysis, and at the same time it was in progress, it was assumed that the flaws were as they were originally presented (exceeding the acceptance level). NASA asked SIEMENS/KWU, the designer of the plant, to perform the fracture assessment according to ASME XI App. A. The assessment shows that the expected crack growth is negligibly small and the safety

  18. Beryllium-rich intermediate phases in beryllium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raynor, G.V.

    1977-01-01

    The results of a survey of the factors affecting the formation of phases of stoichiometry MBe 5 , M 2 Be 17 , MBe 12 and MBe 13 are presented. Using published information it is shown that the structures adopted at the higher Be:M ratios involve different characteristics from those adopted at lower Be:M ratios. In the ThMn 12 and NaZn 13 structures adopted in the former case dsub(M-Be) > (rsub(M) + rsub(Be)), (where the atomic radii refer to coordination number 12) and the dsub(Be-Be) distances are contracted. In the CaCu 5 structure adopted at composition MBe 5 , dsub(M-Be) < (rsub(M) + rsub(Be)) and interactions between unlike atoms are significant. The structural characteristics, occurrence, and the stabilities of these phases, and of the others mentioned above, are discussed in terms of atomic radius ratios, the position of the M component in the periodic table, and the value of the univalent ionic radius of the M component, taken as a measure of the extension in space of the hard incompressible ionic core. Though the compound-forming characteristics of beryllium are largely dictated by its small atomic diameter, other factors such as the nature of the bonding which can be exerted by the partner atoms are also significant. In particular, the proportions of the volumes of the atoms which are occupied by the hard incompressible ionic cores assume importance. (author)

  19. Thermomechanical testing of beryllium for the JET/ISX-B beryllium limiter experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, R.D.; Smith, M.F.; Whitley, J.B.; McDonald, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    Materials testing of S-65-B beryllium has been conducted in support of the beryllium limiter experiment on the ISX-B tokamak. The S-65-B grade of hot-pressed beryllium was chosen over S-200-E because of its superior strength and ductility at elevated temperatures. The testing has included measurement of tensile and yield strength, ductility, Young's Modulus, thermal conductivity, and specific heat from 50 0 C to 700 0 C. Thermal fatigue testing of a 2.5 cm beryllium cube was conducted using an electron beam to apply a heat flux of 2.5 kw/cm 2 for 0.3 second pulses for 1500 cycles. Results from the tests are compared to elastic-plastic finite element stress calculations. The testing indicates that the ISX-B beryllium limiter should survive the tokamak environment without serious structural failure, although some surface cracking is expected to occur. (author)

  20. Development of uranium dioxide fuel pellets with addition of beryllium oxide for increasing of thermal conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Queiroz, Carolinne Mol; Ferreira, Ricardo Alberto Neto

    2011-01-01

    The CDTN - Centro de Desenvolvimento de Tecnologia Nuclear presents a project named 'Beryllium Project' viewing to increasing the thermal conductivity of UO 2 fuel pellets, increasing the lifetime of those pellets in the reactor, generating a greater economy. This increase of conductivity is obtained by means of Be O addition to the UO 2 fuel pellets, which is very used for the production of nuclear energy. The UO 2 pellets however present a thermal conductivity relatively low, generating a high temperature gradient between the center and his side surface. The addition of beryllium oxide, with higher thermal conductivity gives pellets which will present lower temperature gradient and, consequently, more durability and better utilization of energy potential of the pellet in the reactor. (author)

  1. Influence of neutron irradiation on the tritium retention in beryllium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rolli, R.; Ruebel, S.; Werle, H. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Inst. fuer Neutronenphysik und Reaktortechnik, Karlsruhe (Germany); Wu, C.H.

    1998-01-01

    Carbon-based materials and beryllium are the candidates for protective layers on the components of fusion reactors facing plasma. In contact with D-T plasma, these materials absorb tritium, and it is anticipated that tritium retention increases with the neutron damage due to neutron-induced traps. Because of the poor data base for beryllium, the work was concentrated on it. Tritium was loaded into the samples from stagnant T{sub 2}/H{sub 2} atmosphere, and afterwards, the quantity of the loaded tritium was determined by purged thermal annealing. The specification of the samples is shown. The samples were analyzed by SEM before and after irradiation. The loading and the annealing equipments are contained in two different glove boxes with N{sub 2} inert atmosphere. The methods of loading and annealing are explained. The separation of neutron-produced and loaded tritium and the determination of loaded tritium in irradiated samples are reported. Also the determination of loaded tritium in unirradiated samples is reported. It is evident that irradiated samples contained much more loaded tritium than unirradiated samples. The main results of this investigation are summarized in the table. (K.I.)

  2. Beryllium research on FFHR molten salt blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terai, T.; Tanaka, S.; Sze, D.-K.

    2000-01-01

    Force-free helical reactor, FFHR, is a demo-relevant heliotron-type D-T fusion reactor based on the great amount of R and D results obtained in the LHD project. Since 1993, collaboration works have made great progress in design studies of FFHR with standing on the major advantage of current-less steady operation with no dangerous plasma disruptions. There are two types of reference designs, FFHR-1 and FFHR-2, where molten Flibe (LiF-BeF2) is utilized as tritium breeder and coolant. In this paper, we present the outline of FFHR blanket design and some related R and D topics focusing on Be utilization. Beryllium is used as a neutron multiplier in the design and Be pebbles are placed in the front part of the tritium breeding zone. In a Flibe blanket, HF (TF) generated due to nuclear transmutation will be a problem because of its corrosive property. Though nickel-based alloys are thought to be intact in such a corrosive environment, FFHR blanket design does not adopt the alloys because of their induced radioactivity. The present candidate materials for the structure are low-activated ferritic steel (JLF-1), V-4Cr-4Ti, etc. They are capable to be corroded by HF in the operation condition, and Be is expected to work as a reducing agent in the system as well. Whether Be pebbles placed in a Flibe flow can work well or not is a very important matter. From this point, Be solubility in Flibe, reaction rate of the Redox reaction with TF in the liquid and on the surface of Be pebbles under irradiation, flowing behavior of Flibe through a Be pebble bed, etc. should be investigated. In 1997, in order to establish more practical and new data bases for advanced design works, we started a collaboration work of R and D on blanket engineering, where the Be research above mentioned is included. Preliminary dipping-test of Be sheets and in-situ tritium release experiment from Flibe with Be sheets have got started. (orig.)

  3. Failure analysis of beryllium tile assembles following high heat flux testing for the ITER program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odegard, B.C. Jr.; Cadden, C. H.; Yang, N. Y. C.

    2000-01-01

    The following document describes the processing, testing and post-test analysis of two Be-Cu assemblies that have successfully met the heat load requirements for the first wall and dome sections for the ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) fusion reactor. Several different joint assemblies were evaluated in support of a manufacturing technology investigation aimed at diffusion bonding or brazing a beryllium armor tile to a copper alloy heat sink for fusion reactor applications. Judicious selection of materials and coatings for these assemblies was essential to eliminate or minimize interactions with the highly reactive beryllium armor material. A thin titanium layer was used as a diffusion barrier to isolate the copper heat sink from the beryllium armor. To reduce residual stresses produced by differences in the expansion coefficients between the beryllium and copper, a compliant layer of aluminum or aluminum-beryllium (AlBeMet-150) was used. Aluminum was chosen because it does not chemically react with, and exhibits limited volubility in, beryllium. Two bonding processes were used to produce the assemblies. The primary process was a diffusion bonding technique. In this case, undesirable metallurgical reactions were minimized by keeping the materials in a solid state throughout the fabrication cycle. The other process employed an aluminum-silicon layer as a brazing filler material. In both cases, a hot isostatic press (HIP) furnace was used in conjunction with vacuum-canned assemblies in order to minimize oxidation and provide sufficient pressure on the assemblies for full metal-to-metal contact and subsequent bonding. The two final assemblies were subjected to a suite of tests including: tensile tests and electron and optical metallography. Finally, high heat flux testing was conducted at the electron beam testing system (EBTS) at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico. Here, test mockups were fabricated and subjected to normal heat loads to

  4. Beryllium. Health hazards and their control. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lires, O.A.; Delfino, C.A.; Botbol, J.

    1991-01-01

    In this work (continuation of 'Beryllium' series) health hazards, toxic effects, limits of permissible atmospheric contamination and safe exposure to beryllium are described. Guidelines to the design, control operations and hygienic precautions of the working facilities are given. (Author) [es

  5. Effect of machining damage on tensile properties of beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanafee, J.E.

    1976-01-01

    It is well established that damage introduced at the surface of beryllium during machining operations can lower its mechanical properties. Tensile tests were conducted to illustrate this on beryllium presently being used for parts in the W79 program and similar to the new powder-processed beryllium specified for production (tentative specification MEL 76-001319). The objective of this study is to quantitatively illuminate the importance of controlling machining damage in this particular grade of powder-processed beryllium

  6. Kinetic characterization for hemicellulose hydrolysis of corn stover in a dilute acid cycle spray flow-through reactor at moderate conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Qiang; Zhang, Hongman; Yan, Lishi; Qu, Liang; Huang, He

    2011-01-01

    The kinetic characterization of hemicellulose hydrolysis of corn stover was investigated using a new reactor of dilute acid cycle spray flow-through (DCF) pretreatment. The primary purpose was to obtain kinetic data for hemicellulose hydrolysis with sulfuric acid concentrations (10-30 kg m -3 ) at relatively low temperatures (90-100 o C). A simplified kinetic model was used to describe its performance at moderate conditions. The results indicate that the rates of xylose formation and degradation are sensitive to flow rate, temperature and acid concentration. Moreover, the kinetic data of hemicellulose hydrolysis fit a first-order reaction model and the experimental data with actual acid concentration after accounting for the neutralization effect of the substrates at different temperatures. Over 90% of the xylose monomer yield and below 5.5% of degradation product (furfural) yield were observed in this reactor. Kinetic constants for hemicellulose hydrolysis models were analyzed by an Arrhenius-type equation, and the activation energy of xylose formation were 111.6 kJ mol -1 , and 95.7 kJ mol -1 for xylose degradation, respectively. -- Highlights: → Investigating a novel pretreatment reactor of dilute acid cycle spray flow-through. → Xylose yield is sensitive to flow rate, temperature and acid concentration. → Obtaining relatively higher xylose monomer yield and lower fermentation inhibitor. → Lumping hemicellulose and xylan oligmers together in the model is a valid way. → The kinetic model as a guide for reactor design, and operation strategy optimization.

  7. CHF experiments of tight pitch lattice rod bundles under PWR pressure condition for development of reduced moderation water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araya, Fumimasa; Nakatsuka, Toru; Yoritsune, Tsutomu

    2002-10-01

    In order to improve plutonium utilization, design studies of reduced moderation water reactors which have hard neutron energy spectrum have been carried out at Division of Energy System Research of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). At present, triangle, tight pitch lattice cores with about 1 mm gap width between fuel rods have been focused in the neutronic core design. Since a degradation of the heat removal from the fuel rods is worried, an evaluation of heat removal capability i.e. critical heat flux becomes one of important evaluation items in the feasibility study. However, any of published data base, which can be applicable to the evaluation on such narrow gap width cores, does not exist. Therefore, in the present study, in order to accumulate applicable data and to confirm applicability of an evaluation methodology of critical heat flux, basic experiments on the critical heat flux were performed using the test sections consisted of 7 heater rods bundles with the gap widths of 1.5, 1.0 and 0.6 mm under the PWR pressure conditions. The present report describes the experimental apparatus, experimental conditions and accumulated data. Analysis results of the data and the applicability of the evaluation methodology used for the design work are also discussed in this report. As the results of the experiment, it was found that the critical heat flux increased as the mass flux and the inlet subcooling increased. In the region of the mass flux less than about 2,000 kg/m 2 /s, the critical heat flux decreased as the gap width decreased. In the larger mass flux region, obvious trend of effects of the gap width on critical heat flux were not observed due to data scatterings. The flow-area-averaged thermal-equilibrium quality at the CHF position was in the higher ranges from 0.3 to 0.8 in the cases of gap widths of 1.0 and 0.6 mm, and 0.1 to 0.3 in the 1.5 mm case. Based on the experimental results such that the CHFs occurred in the higher quality range and

  8. Hydrogen isotope retention in beryllium for tokamak plasma-facing applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderl, R.A.; Longhurst, G.R. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technol. Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho Nat. Eng. and Environ. Lab.; Causey, R.A.; Wampler, W.R.; Wilson, K.L. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)]|[Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Davis, J.W.; Haasz, A.A. [Institute for Aerospace Studies, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Doerner, R.P. [California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States). Center for Magnetic Recording Research; Federici, G. [ITER JWS Garching Co-center, Garching (Germany)

    1999-06-01

    Beryllium has been used as a plasma-facing material to effect substantial improvements in plasma performance in the Joint European Torus (JET), and it is planned as a plasma-facing material for the first wall (FW) and other components of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The interaction of hydrogenic ions, and charge-exchange neutral atoms from plasmas, with beryllium has been studied in recent years with widely varying interpretations of results. In this paper we review experimental data regarding hydrogenic atom inventories in experiments pertinent to tokamak applications and show that with some very plausible assumptions, the experimental data appear to exhibit rather predictable trends. A phenomenon observed in high ion-flux experiments is the saturation of the beryllium surface such that inventories of implanted particles become insensitive to increased flux and to continued implantation fluence. Methods for modeling retention and release of implanted hydrogen in beryllium are reviewed and an adaptation is suggested for modeling the saturation effects. The TMAP4 code used with these modifications has succeeded in simulating experimental data taken under saturation conditions where codes without this feature have not. That implementation also works well under more routine conditions where the conventional recombination-limited release model is applicable. Calculations of tritium inventory and permeation in the ITER FW during the basic performance phase (BPP) using both the conventional recombination model and the saturation effects assumptions, show a difference of several orders of magnitude in both inventory and permeation rate to the coolant. (orig.) 78 refs.

  9. Use of a Paraffin Based Grout to Stabilize Buried Beryllium and Other Wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gretchen Matthern; Duane Hanson; Neal Yancey; Darrell Knudson

    2005-01-01

    The long term durability of WAXFIXi, a paraffin based grout, was evaluated for in situ grouting of activated beryllium wastes in the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA), a radioactive landfill at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex, part of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The evaluation considered radiological and biological mechanisms that could degrade the grout using data from an extensive literature search and previous tests of in situ grouting at the INL. Conservative radioactive doses for WAXFIX were calculated from the ''hottest'' (i.e., highest-activity) Advanced Test Reactor beryllium block in the SDA.. These results indicate that WAXFIX would not experience extensive radiation damage for many hundreds of years. Calculation of radiation induced hydrogen generation in WAXFIX indicated that grout physical performance should not be reduced beyond the effects of radiation dose on the molecular structure. Degradation of a paraffin-based grout by microorganisms in the SDA is possible and perhaps likely, but the rate of degradation will be at a slower rate than found in the literature reviewed. The calculations showed the outer 0.46 m (18 in.) layer of each monolith, which represents the minimum expected distance to the beryllium block, was calculated to require 1,000 to 3,600 years to be consumed. The existing data and estimations of biodegradation and radiolysis rates for WAXFIX/paraffin do not indicate any immediate problems with the use of WAXFIX for grouting beryllium or other wastes in the SDA

  10. Outline of design, manufacturing and installation experience of pressure vessel structure for the prototype heavy water moderated boiling light water cooled reactor 'FUGEN'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibato, Eizo; Oguchi, Isao; Kishi, Toshikazu; Kitagawa, Yuji

    1977-01-01

    After component installation completed in June 1977 and various functional tests to be conducted later, the prototype heavy water moderated, boiling light water cooled reactor ''FUGEN'' is scheduled to reach first criticality in March 1978. Since the pressure vessel of ''FUGEN'' is completely different from that of a light water reactor in structure and materials, through research and development work was carried out prior to fabrication and construction. Based on these studies, installation of the actual pressure vessel was completed. Functional tests are now under way. This article describes examples in which our research and development results are reflected on design, manufacture, and installation of the pressure vessel. Also it introduces noteworthy achievements relevant to production techniques in manufacture and installation. (auth.)

  11. Development of quantitative analytical procedures on two-phase flow in tight-lattice fuel bundles for reduced-moderation light-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnuki, A.; Kureta, M.; Takae, K.; Tamai, H.; Akimoto, H.; Yoshida, H.

    2004-01-01

    The research project to investigate thermal-hydraulic performance in tight-lattice rod bundles for Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR) started at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) in 2002. The RMWR is a light water reactor for which a higher conversion ratio more than one can be expected. In order to attain this higher conversion ratio, triangular tight-lattice fuel bundles whose gap spacing between each fuel rod is around 1 mm are required. As for the thermal design of the RMWR core, conventional analytical methods are no good because the conventional composition equations can not predict the RMWR core with high accuracy. Then, development of new quantitative analytical procedures was carried out. Those analytical procedures are constructed by model experiments and advanced two-phase flow analysis codes. This paper describes the results of the model experiments and analytical results with the developed analysis codes. (authors)

  12. Occupational and non-occupational allergic contact dermatitis from beryllium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilaplana, J; Romaguera, C; Grimalt, F [Allergy Department, Dermatological Service Hospital Clinico, Barcelona (Spain)

    1992-01-01

    There are various references to sensitization to beryllium in the literature. Since introducing a patch testing series for patients with suspected sensitization to metals, we have found 3 cases of sensitization to beryllium. Of these 3 cases, we regard the first 2 as having relevant sensitization. Beryllium chloride (1% pet.) was positive in 3 patients and negative in 150 controls. (au).

  13. Occupational and non-occupational allergic contact dermatitis from beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilaplana, J.; Romaguera, C.; Grimalt, F.

    1992-01-01

    There are various references to sensitization to beryllium in the literature. Since introducing a patch testing series for patients with suspected sensitization to metals, we have found 3 cases of sensitization to beryllium. Of these 3 cases, we regard the first 2 as having relevant sensitization. Beryllium chloride (1% pet.) was positive in 3 patients and negative in 150 controls. (au)

  14. Dosage of boron traces in graphite, uranium and beryllium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coursier, J.; Hure, J.; Platzer, R.

    1955-01-01

    The problem of the dosage of the boron in the materials serving to the construction of nuclear reactors arises of the following way: to determine to about 0,1 ppm close to the quantities of boron of the order of tenth ppm. We have chosen the colorimetric analysis with curcumin as method of dosage. To reach the indicated contents, it is necessary to do a previous separation of the boron and the materials of basis, either by extraction of tetraphenylarsonium fluoborate in the case of the boron dosage in uranium and the beryllium oxide, either by the use of a cations exchanger resin of in the case of graphite. (M.B.) [fr

  15. Tensile and fracture toughness test results of neutron irradiated beryllium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaouadi, R.; Moons, F.; Puzzolante, J.L. [Centre d`Etude de l`Energie Nucleaire, Mol (Belgium)

    1998-01-01

    Tensile and fracture toughness test results of four Beryllium grades are reported here. The flow and fracture properties are investigated by using small size tensile and round compact tension specimens. Irradiation was performed at the BR2 material testing reactor which allows various temperature and irradiation conditions. The fast neutron fluence (>1 MeV) ranges between 0.65 and 2.45 10{sup 21} n/cm{sup 2}. In the meantime, un-irradiated specimens were aged at the irradiation temperatures to separate if any the effect of temperature from irradiation damage. Test results are analyzed and discussed, in particular in terms of the effects of material grade, test temperature, thermal ageing and neutron irradiation. (author)

  16. Beryllium phonon spectrum from cold neutron measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulat, I.A.

    1979-01-01

    The inelastic coherent scattering of neutrons with the initial energy E 0 =4.65 MeV on the spectrometer according to the time of flight is studied in polycrystalline beryllium. The measurements are made for the scattering angles THETA=15, 30, 45, 60, 75 and 90 deg at 293 K. The phonon spectrum of beryllium, i-e. g(w) is reestablished from the experimental data. The data obtained are compared with the data of model calculations. It is pointed out that the phonon spectrum of beryllium has a bit excessive state density in the energy range from 10 to 30 MeV. It is caused by the insufficient statistical accuracy of the experiment at low energy transfer

  17. Spectrographic determination of impurities in beryllium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paula Reino, L.C. de; Lordello, A.R.; Pereira, A.S.A.

    1986-03-01

    A method for the spectrographic determination of Al, B, Cd, Co, Cu, Cr, Fe, Mg, NaNi, Si and Zn in nuclear grade beryllium oxide has been developed. The determination of Co, Al, Na and Zn is besed upon a carrier distillation technique. Better results were obtained with 2% Ga 2 O 3 as carrier in beryllium oxide. For the elements B, Cd, Cu, Fe, Cr, Mg, Ni and Si the sample is loaded in a Scribner-Mullin shallow cup electrode, covered with graphite powder and excited in DC arc. The relative standard deviation values for different elements are in the range of 10 to 20%. The method fulfills requirements of precision and sensitivity for specification analysis of nuclear grade beryllium oxide.(Author) [pt

  18. Development of an automated system of nuclear materials accounting for nuclear power stations with water-cooled, water-moderated reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babaev, N.S.

    1981-06-01

    The results of work carried out under IAEA Contract No. 2336/RB are described (subject: an automated system of nuclear materials accounting for nuclear power stations with water-cooled, water-moderated (VVER) reactors). The basic principles of an accounting system for this type of nuclear power plant are outlined. The general structure and individual units of the information computer program used to achieve automated accounting are described and instructions are given on the use of the program. A detailed example of its application (on a simulated nuclear power plant) is examined

  19. Melting of contaminated steel scrap from the dismantling of the CO2 systems of gas cooled, graphite moderated nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feaugas, J.; Jeanjacques, M.; Peulve, J.

    1994-01-01

    G2 and G3 are the natural Uranium cooled reactors Graphite/Gas. The two reactors were designed for both plutonium and electricity production (45 MWe). The dismantling of the reactors at stage 2 has produced more than 4 000 tonnes of contaminated scrap. Because of their large mass and low residual contamination level, the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) considered various possibilities for the processing of these metallic products in order to reduce the volume of waste going to be stored. After different studies and tests of several processes and the evaluation of their results, the choice to melt the dismantled pipeworks was taken. It was decided to build the Nuclear Steel Melting Facility known as INFANTE, in cooperation with a steelmaker (AHL). The realization time schedule for the INFANTE lasted 20 months. It included studies, construction and the licensing procedure. (authors). 2 tabs., 3 figs

  20. Program of chemical research organic moderators and coolants in regard with the project of the Spanish DON-Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez Cellini, R

    1961-07-01

    In order to select the most suitable mixtures for cooling the Reactor DON, in project, within the group of polyphenyl compounds, which at present time prevails in organic nuclear power reactor philosophy, the following subjects are going to be studied: 1. Static and dynamic experiences of thermal and radiolytic stability of commercial polyphenyl mixtures. 2. Studies on purification of the damaged coolant and search for possible applications of the residual polymers. 3. Analytical control and measurement of the physical constants of the polyphenyl mixtures. (Author)

  1. Program of chemical research on organic moderators and coolants in regard with the project of the Spanish DON-Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez Cellini, R.

    1961-01-01

    In order to select the most suitable mixtures for cooling the Reactor DON, in project, within the group of polyphenyl compounds, which at present time prevails in organic nuclear power reactor philosophy, the following subjects are going to be studied: 1. Static and dynamic experiences of thermal and radiolytic stability of commercial polyphenyl mixtures. 2. Studies on purification of the damaged coolant and search for possible applications of the residual polymers. 3. Analytical control and measurement of the physical constants of the polyphenyl mixtures. (Author)

  2. Modernization and Refurbishment of the RECH-1 Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daie, J. [Nuclear Application Department, Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission (CCHEN), Santiago (Chile)

    2014-08-15

    The Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission (Comisión Chilena de Energía Nuclear, or CCHEN) has operated the RECH-1 research reactor since 1974. This reactor is located at La Reina Nuclear Centre in Santiago, Chile. It is a pool type reactor using LEU MTR fuel assemblies, light water as moderator and coolant, and beryllium as reflector. The reactor has been operated at the nominal power of 5 MW in a continuous shift of 20 hours per week, 48 weeks per year. The main utilizations of the RECH-1 reactor are radioisotope production and neutron activation analysis. Among the most relevant refurbishment and modernization campaigns undertaken at the reactor are: full core conversion to the use of LEU fuel, replacement of the cooling tower, improvement of the containment building by changing the doors and gates and by a better sealant for the penetrations, introduction of an additional source of water by connecting the raw water supply system to the emergency cooling system, improvement of the emergency ventilation system, introduction of a fire detection and alarm system for detection and mitigation to protect the I&C racks, introduction of a radioactive liquid release for those generated at the reactor, introduction of a delay tank degasification system and renewal of the environmental monitoring system. At present we are assessing the possibility of replacing the old analog electronics of control for new digital systems. Detailed descriptions of these diverse activities are presented in the paper. (author)

  3. Design of a mixed recharge with MOX assemblies of greater relation of moderation for a BWR reactor; Diseno de una recarga mixta con ensambles MOX de mayor relacion de moderacion para un reactor BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez S, J.R.; Alonso V, G.; Palacios H, J. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca Km. 36.5, 52045 Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: jrrs@nuclear.inin.mx

    2004-07-01

    The study of the fuel of mixed oxides of uranium and plutonium (MOX) it has been topic of investigation in many countries of the world and those are even discussed in many places the benefits of reprocessing the spent fuel to extract the plutonium created during the irradiation of the fuel in the nuclear power reactors. At the moment those reactors that have been loaded partially with MOX fuel, are mainly of the type PWR where a mature technology has been achieved in some countries like they are France, Belgium and England, however the experience with reactors of the type BWR is more limited and it is continued studying the best way to introduce this type of fuel in BWRs, one of the main problems to introduce MOX in reactors BWR is the neutronic design of the same one, existing different concepts to introduce the plutonium in the assemblies of fuel and one of them is the one of increasing the relationship of moderation of the assemble. In this work a MOX fuel assemble design is presented and the obtained results so far in the ININ. These results indicate that the investigated concept has some exploitable advantages in the use of the MOX fuel. (Author)

  4. Preliminary results for explosion bonding of beryllium to copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, D.J.; Dombrowski, D.E.

    1995-01-01

    This program was undertaken to determine if explosive bonding is a viable technique for joining beryllium to copper substrates. The effort was a cursory attempt at trying to solve some of the problems associated with explosive bonding beryllium and should not be considered a comprehensive research effort. There are two issues that this program addressed. Can beryllium be explosive bonded to copper substrates and can the bonding take place without shattering the beryllium? Thirteen different explosive bonding iterations were completed using various thicknesses of beryllium that were manufactured with three different techniques

  5. Reflector-moderated critical assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paxton, H.C.; Jarvis, G.A.; Byers, C.C.

    1975-07-01

    Experiments with reflector-moderated critical assemblies were part of the Rover Program at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL). These assemblies were characterized by thick D 2 O or beryllium reflectors surrounding large cavities that contained highly enriched uranium at low average densities. Because interest in this type of system has been revived by LASL Plasma Cavity Assembly studies, more detailed descriptions of the early assemblies than had been available in the unclassified literature are provided. (U.S.)

  6. Fusion Reactor Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decreton, M.

    2002-01-01

    The objective of SCK-CEN's programme on fusion reactor materials is to contribute to the knowledge on the radiation-induced behaviour of fusion reactor materials and components as well as to help the international community in building the scientific and technical basis needed for the construction of the future reactor. Ongoing projects include: the study of the mechanical and chemical (corrosion) behaviour of structural materials under neutron irradiation and water coolant environment; the investigation of the characteristics of irradiated first wall material such as beryllium; investigations on the management of materials resulting from the dismantling of fusion reactors including waste disposal. Progress and achievements in these areas in 2001 are discussed

  7. Beryllium and graphite performance in ITER during a disruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassanein, A.; Ehst, D.A.; Gahl, J.

    1993-09-01

    Plasma disruptions are considered one of the most limiting factors for successful operation of magnetic fusion reactors. During a disruption, a sharp, rapid release of energy strikes components such as the divertor or limiter plates. Severe surface erosion and melting of these components may then occur. The amount of material eroded from both ablation and melting is important to the reactor design and component lifetime. The anticipated performance of both beryllium and graphite as plasma-facing materials during such abnormal events is analyzed and compared. Recent experimental data obtained with both plasma guns and electron beams are carefully evaluated and compared to results of analytical modeling, including vapor shielding effect. Initial results from plasma gun experiments indicate that the Be erosion rate is about five times larger than that for a graphite material under the same disruption conditions. Key differences between simulation experiments and reactor disruption on the net erosion rate, and consequently on the lifetime of the divertor plate, are discussed in detail. The advantages and disadvantages of Be over graphite as a divertor plasma-facing material are discussed

  8. Beryllium and graphite performance in ITER during a disruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassanein, A.; Ehst, D.A.; Gahl, J.

    1994-01-01

    Plasma disruptions are considered one of the most limiting factors for successful operation of magnetic fusion reactors. During a disruption, a sharp, rapid release of energy strikes components such as the divertor or limiter plates. Severe surface erosion and melting of these components may then occur. The amount of material eroded from both ablation and melting is important to the reactor design and component lifetime. The anticipated performance of both beryllium and graphite as plasma-facing materials during such abnormal events is analyzed and compared. Recent experimental data obtained with both plasma guns and electron beams are carefully evaluated and compared to results of analytical modeling, including vapor shielding effect. Initial results from plasma gun experiments indicate that the Be erosion rate is about five times larger than that for a graphite material under the same disruption conditions. Key differences between simulation experiments and reactor disruption on the net erosion rate, and consequently on the lifetime of the divertor plate, are discussed in detail. The advantages and disadvantages of Be over graphite as a divertor plasma-facing material are discussed. ((orig.))

  9. Tritium retention in S-65 beryllium after 100 eV plasma exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Causey, R.A. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Longhurst, G.R. [Idaho National Engineering Laboratories, Idaho Falls, 83415 (United States); Harbin, W. [Los Alamos National Laboratories, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    1997-02-01

    The tritium plasma experiment (TPE) has been used to measure the retention of tritium in S-65 beryllium under conditions similar to that expected for the international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER). Beryllium samples 2 mm thick and 50 mm in diameter were exposed to a plasma of tritium and deuterium. The particle flux striking the samples was varied from approximately 1 x 10{sup 17} (D+T)/cm{sup 2} s up to about 3 x 10{sup 18} (D+T)/cm{sup 2} s. The beryllium samples were negatively biased to elevate the energy of the impinging ions to 100 eV. The temperature of the samples was varied from 373 K to 973 K. Exposure times of 1 h were used. Subsequent to the plasma exposure, the samples were outgassed in a separate system where 99% He and 1% H{sub 2} gas was swept over the samples during heating. The sweep gas along with the released tritium was sent through an ionization chamber, through a copper oxide catalyst bed, and into a series of glycol bubblers. The amount of released tritium was determined both by the ionization chamber and by liquid scintillation counting of the glycol. Tritium retention in the beryllium disks varied from a high of 2.4 x 10{sup 17} (D+T)/cm{sup 2} at 373 K to a low of 1 x 10{sup 16} (D+T)/cm{sup 2} at 573 K. For almost every case, the tritium retention in the beryllium was less than that calculated using the C=0 boundary condition at the plasma facing surface. It is believed that this lower than expected retention is due to rapid release of tritium from the large specific surface area created in the implant zone due to the production of voids, bubbles, and blisters. (orig.).

  10. Tritium retention in S-65 beryllium after 100 eV plasma exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Causey, Rion A.; Longhurst, Glen R.; Harbin, Wally

    1997-02-01

    The tritium plasma experiment (TPE) has been used to measure the retention of tritium in S-65 beryllium under conditions similar to that expected for the international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER). Beryllium samples 2 mm thick and 50 mm in diameter were exposed to a plasma of tritium and deuterium. The particle flux striking the samples was varied from approximately 1 × 10 17 ( D + T)/ cm2s up to about 3 × 10 18 ( D + T)/ cm2s. The beryllium samples were negatively biased to elevate the energy of the impinging ions to 100 eV. The temperature of the samples was varied from 373 K to 973 K. Exposure times of 1 h were used. Subsequent to the plasma exposure, the samples were outgassed in a separate system where 99% He and 1% H 2 gas was swept over the samples during heating. The sweep gas along with the released tritium was sent through an ionization chamber, through a copper oxide catalyst bed, and into a series of glycol bubblers. The amount of released tritium was determined both by the ionization chamber and by liquid scintillation counting of the glycol. Tritium retention in the beryllium disks varied from a high of 2.4 × 10 17 ( D + T)/ cm2 at 373 K to a low of 1 × 10 16 ( D + T)/ cm2 at 573 K. For almost every case, the tritium retention in the beryllium was less than that calculated using the C = 0 boundary condition at the plasma facing surface. It is believed that this lower than expected retention is due to rapid release of tritium from the large specific surface area created in the implant zone due to the production of voids, bubbles, and blisters.

  11. Desorption of tritium and helium from high dose neutron irradiated beryllium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupriyanov, I. B.; Nikolaev, G. N.; Vlasov, V. V.; Kovalev, A. M.; Chakin, V. P.

    2007-08-01

    The effect of high dose neutron irradiation on tritium and helium desorption in beryllium is described. Beryllium samples were irradiated in the SM and BOR-60 reactors to a neutron fluences ( E > 0.1 MeV) of (5-16) × 10 22 cm -2 at 70-100 °C and 380-420 °C. A mass-spectrometry technique was used in out of pile tritium release experiments during stepped annealing in the 250-1300 °C temperature range. The total amount of helium accumulated in irradiated beryllium samples varied from 6000 to 7200 appm. The first signs of tritium and helium release were detected at temperature of 312-445 °C and 500-740 °C, respectively. It is shown that most tritium (˜82%) from sample irradiated at 70-100 °C releases in temperature range of 312-700 °C before the beginning of helium release (740 °C). In the case of beryllium sample irradiated at 380-420 °C, tritium release starts at a higher temperature ( Ts > Tann = 445 °C) and most of the tritium (˜99.8%) is released concurrently with helium which could be considered as evidence of co-existence of partial amounts of tritium and helium in common bubbles. Both the Be samples differ little in the upper temperatures of gas release: 745 and 775 °C for tritium; 1140 and 1160 °C for helium. Swelling of beryllium starts to play a key role in accelerating tritium release at Tann > 600 °C and in helium release - at Tann > 750 °C.

  12. Interfacial properties of HIP joint between beryllium and reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirose, T.; Ogiwara, H.; Enoeda, M.; Akiba, M.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: ITER test blanket module is the most important components to validate energy production and fuel breeding process for future demonstration reactor. Reduced activation ferritic / martensitic steel is recognized as a promising structural material for breeding blanket systems. And Beryllium must be used as plasma facing materials for ITER in vessel components. In this work, interfacial properties of beryllium/reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel (RAF/Ms) joint were investigated for a first wall of ITER test blanket module (TBM). The starting materials were ITER grade Beryllium, S65C and a Japanese RAF/M, F82H. The joint was produced by solid state hot isostatic pressing (HIP) method. Chromium layer with the thickness of 1 μm and 10 μm were formed by plasma vapor deposition on the beryllium surface as a diffusion barrier. The HIP was carried out at 1023 K and 1233 K which are determined by standard normalizing and tempering temperature of F82H. The joint made at 1233 K was followed by tempering at 1033 K. The bonding interface was characterized by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). The bonding strength was also investigated by isometric four point bending tests at ambient temperature. EPMA showed chromium layer effectively worked as a diffusion barrier at 1023 K. However, the beryllium rich layer was formed in F82H after HIP at 1233 K followed by tempering. Bending tests revealed that thin chromium layer and low temperature HIP is preferable. The high temperature HIP introduce brittle BeFe inter metallic compounds along bonding interface. On the other hand, joint with thick chromium layer suffer from brittleness of chromium itself. (authors)

  13. Interfacial properties of HIP joint between beryllium and reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirose, T. [Blanket Engineering Group, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka, Ibaraki (Japan); Ogiwara, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naga-gun, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Enoeda, M. [Naka Fusion Research Establishment, J.A.E.R.I., Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Naka-gun, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Akiba, M. [Naka Fusion Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: ITER test blanket module is the most important components to validate energy production and fuel breeding process for future demonstration reactor. Reduced activation ferritic / martensitic steel is recognized as a promising structural material for breeding blanket systems. And Beryllium must be used as plasma facing materials for ITER in vessel components. In this work, interfacial properties of beryllium/reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel (RAF/Ms) joint were investigated for a first wall of ITER test blanket module (TBM). The starting materials were ITER grade Beryllium, S65C and a Japanese RAF/M, F82H. The joint was produced by solid state hot isostatic pressing (HIP) method. Chromium layer with the thickness of 1 {mu}m and 10 {mu}m were formed by plasma vapor deposition on the beryllium surface as a diffusion barrier. The HIP was carried out at 1023 K and 1233 K which are determined by standard normalizing and tempering temperature of F82H. The joint made at 1233 K was followed by tempering at 1033 K. The bonding interface was characterized by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). The bonding strength was also investigated by isometric four point bending tests at ambient temperature. EPMA showed chromium layer effectively worked as a diffusion barrier at 1023 K. However, the beryllium rich layer was formed in F82H after HIP at 1233 K followed by tempering. Bending tests revealed that thin chromium layer and low temperature HIP is preferable. The high temperature HIP introduce brittle BeFe inter metallic compounds along bonding interface. On the other hand, joint with thick chromium layer suffer from brittleness of chromium itself. (authors)

  14. Status of beryllium development for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billone, M.C.; Donne, M.D.; Macaulay-Newcombe, R.G.

    1994-05-01

    Beryllium is a leading candidate material for the neutron multiplier of tritium breeding blankets and the plasma facing component of first wall and divertor systems. Depending on the application, the fabrication methods proposed include hot-pressing, hot-isostatic-pressing, cold isostatic pressing/sintering, rotary electrode processing and plasma spraying. Product forms include blocks, tubes, pebbles, tiles and coatings. While, in general, beryllium is not a leading structural material candidate, its mechanical performance, as well its performance with regard to sputtering, heat transport, tritium retention/release, helium-induced swelling and chemical compatibility, is an important consideration in first-wall/blanket design. Differential expansion within the beryllium causes internal stresses which may result in cracking, thereby affecting the heat transport and barrier performance of the material. Overall deformation can result in loading of neighboring structural material. Thus, in assessing the performance of beryllium for fusion applications, it is important to have a good database in all of these performance areas, as well as a set of properties correlations and models for the purpose of interpolation/extrapolation

  15. Method of beryllium implantation in germanium substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagawa, S.; Baba, Y.; Kaneda, T.; Shirai, T.

    1983-01-01

    A semiconductor device is disclosed, as well as a method for manufacturing it in which ions of beryllium are implanted into a germanium substrate to form a layer containing p-type impurity material. There after the substrate is heated at a temperature in the range of 400 0 C. to 700 0 C. to diffuse the beryllium ions into the substrate so that the concentration of beryllium at the surface of the impurity layer is in the order of 10 17 cm- 3 or more. In one embodiment, a p-type channel stopper is formed locally in a p-type germanium substrate and an n-type active layer is formed in a region surrounded by, and isolated from, the channel stopper region. In another embodiment, a relatively shallow p-type active layer is formed at one part of an n-type germanium substrate and p-type guard ring regions are formed surrounding, and partly overlapping said p-type active layer. In a further embodiment, a p-type island region is formed at one part of an n-type germanium substrate, and an n-type region is formed within said p-type region. In these embodiments, the p-type channel stopper region, p-type guard ring regions and the p-type island region are all formed by implanting ions of beryllium into the germanium substrate

  16. ESR investigations of gamma irradiated beryllium ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryabikin, Yu.A.; Polyakov, A.I.; Petukhov, Yu.V.; Bitenbaev, M.I.; Zashkvara, O.V.

    2000-01-01

    In this report the result of ESR- investigation of kinetics of radiation paramagnetic defects accumulated in beryllium ceramics under gamma irradiation are presented. The data on quantum yield and destruction rate constants of these defects under ionizing irradiation are obtained. (orig.)

  17. ESR investigations of gamma irradiated beryllium ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryabikin, Yu A; Polyakov, A I; Petukhov, Yu V; Bitenbaev, M I; Zashkvara, O V [Physical-Technical Inst., Almaty (Kazakhstan)

    2000-04-01

    In this report the result of ESR- investigation of kinetics of radiation paramagnetic defects accumulated in beryllium ceramics under gamma irradiation are presented. The data on quantum yield and destruction rate constants of these defects under ionizing irradiation are obtained. (orig.)

  18. Beryllium, a material of great promise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Fauconnier, J.P.; Nomine, A.M.

    1992-01-01

    Beryllium is one of the lightest metals. It also owns an outstanding combination of physical, mechanical and nuclear properties which gives it a favorable position, compared to more usual materials, in various fields of applications. Constant technological advancements in the elaboration and working up have induced a significant improvement of its ductility and a reduction of the production costs. (Author). 12 refs., 7 figs

  19. Thermophysical properties of solid and liquid beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boivineau, M.; Arles, L.; Vermeulen, J.M.; Thevenin, Th.

    1993-01-01

    A submillisecond resistive heating technique under high pressure (0.12 GPa) has been used to measure selected thermophysical properties of both solid and liquid beryllium. Data have been obtained between room temperature and 2900 K. Results on enthalpy, volume expansion, electrical resistivity, and sound velocity measurements are presented

  20. Critical parameters controlling irradiation swelling in beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubinko, V.I.

    1995-01-01

    Radiation effects in beryllium can hardly be explained within a framework of the conventional theory based on the bias concept due to elastic interaction difference (EID) between vacancies and self-interstitial atoms (SIAs) since beryllium belongs to hexagonal close-packed metals where diffusion has been shown to be anisotropic. Diffusional anisotropy difference (DAD) between point defects changes the cavity bias for their absorption and leads to dependence of the dislocation bias on the distribution of dislocations over crystallographic directions. On the other hand, the elastic interaction between point defects and cavities gives rise to the size and gas pressure dependencies of the cavity bias, resulting in new critical quantities for bubble-void transition effects at low temperature irradiation. In the present paper, we develop the concept of the critical parameters controlling irradiation swelling with account of both DAD and EID, and take care of thermal effects as well since they are of major importance for beryllium which has an anomalously low self-diffusion activation energy. Experimental data on beryllium swelling are analyzed on the basis of the present theory. (orig.)