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Sample records for beryllium disease susceptibility

  1. Chronic Beryllium Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Science Education & Training Home Conditions Chronic Beryllium Disease Chronic Beryllium Disease Make an Appointment Find a Doctor ... MD, MSPH, FCCP (February 01, 2016) What is chronic beryllium disease (CBD)? Chronic beryllium disease (CBD) is ...

  2. Analysis of HLA-DP association with beryllium disease susceptibility in pooled exposed populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cesare Saltini, Massimo Amicosante

    2009-12-19

    Berylliosis or Chronic Beryllium Disease is a chronic granulomatous disorder primarily involving the lung associated with the exposition to low doses of Beryllium (Be) in the workplace. Berylliosis risk has been associated with the presence of a glutamate at position 69 of the HLA-DP beta chain (HLA-DPbetaGlu69) that is expressed in about 97% of disease cases and in 27% of the unaffected Be-exposed controls (p<0.0001) (Richeldi et al. Science 1993; 262: 242-244.12). Since this first observation of an immunogenetic association between berylliosis and HLA-DPbetaGlu69 a number of studies have confirmed the role of this marker as the primary gene of susceptibility of berylliosis (Richeldi et al Am J Ind Med. 1997; 32:337-40; Wang et al J. Immunol. 1999; 163: 1647-53; Saltini et al Eur Respir J. 2001 18:677-84; Rossman et al Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2002 165:788-94). Moreover, a structure/function interaction between HLA-DP molecules carrying Glu69 and beryllium in driving and developing the immune response against beryllium itself has been observed as: (1) Be-specific T-cells clones obtained from berylliosis patients recognize beryllium as antigen only when presented in the context of the HLA-DP{beta}Glu69 molecules but not in the context of HLA-DP allelic variants carrying Lys69 (Lombardi G et al. J Immunol 2001; 166: 3549-3555), and (2) beryllium presents an affinity for the HLA-DP2, carrying the berylliosis marker of susceptibility HLA-DPGlu69, from 40 to 100 times higher that the HLA-DP molecule carrying Lys69 (Amicosante M. et al Hum. Immunol. 2001; 62: 686-93). However, although the immunogenetic studies performed have been addressed a number of different questions about the genetic association between berylliosis and/or beryllium sensitization, exposure levels to beryllium and HLA markers, a number of questions are still open in the field mainly due to the limitation imposed by the low number of subjects carrying berylliosis or beryllium sensitization enrolled

  3. Advances in identifying beryllium sensitization and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Dan; Kowalski, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Beryllium is a lightweight metal with unique qualities related to stiffness, corrosion resistance, and conductivity. While there are many useful applications, researchers in the 1930s and 1940s linked beryllium exposure to a progressive occupational lung disease. Acute beryllium disease is a pulmonary irritant response to high exposure levels, whereas chronic beryllium disease (CBD) typically results from a hypersensitivity response to lower exposure levels. A blood test, the beryllium lymphocyte proliferation test (BeLPT), was an important advance in identifying individuals who are sensitized to beryllium (BeS) and thus at risk for developing CBD. While there is no true "gold standard" for BeS, basic epidemiologic concepts have been used to advance our understanding of the different screening algorithms.

  4. Beryllium Lymphocyte Proliferation Test Surveillance Identifies Clinically Significant Beryllium Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mroz, Margaret M.; Maier, Lisa A.; Strand, Matthew; Silviera, Lori; Newman, Lee S.

    2011-01-01

    Background Workplace surveillance identifies chronic beryllium disease (CBD) but it remains unknown over what time frame mild CBD will progress to a more severe form. Methods We examined physiology and treatment in 229 beryllium sensitization (BeS) and 171 CBD surveillance-identified cases diagnosed from 1982 to 2002. Never smoking CBD cases (81) were compared to never smoking BeS patients (83) to assess disease progression. We compared CBD machinists to non-machinists to examine effects of exposure. Results At baseline, CBD and BeS cases did not differ significantly in exposure time or physiology. CBD patients were more likely to have machined beryllium. Of CBD cases, 19.3% went on to require oral immunosuppressive therapy. At 30 years from first exposure, measures of gas exchange were significantly worse and total lung capacity was lower for CBD subjects. Machinists had faster disease progression as measured by pulmonary function testing and gas exchange. Conclusions Medical surveillance for CBD identifies individuals at significant risk of disease progression and impairment with sufficient time since first exposure. PMID:19681064

  5. Beryllium-Induced Hypersensitivity: Genetic Susceptibility and Neoantigen Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontenot, Andrew P; Falta, Michael T; Kappler, John W; Dai, Shaodong; McKee, Amy S

    2016-01-01

    Chronic beryllium (Be) disease is a granulomatous lung disorder that results from Be exposure in a genetically susceptible host. The disease is characterized by the accumulation of Be-responsive CD4(+) T cells in the lung, and genetic susceptibility is primarily linked to HLA-DPB1 alleles possessing a glutamic acid at position 69 of the β-chain. Recent structural analysis of a Be-specific TCR interacting with a Be-loaded HLA-DP2-peptide complex revealed that Be is coordinated by amino acid residues derived from the HLA-DP2 β-chain and peptide and showed that the TCR does not directly interact with the Be(2+) cation. Rather, the TCR recognizes a modified HLA-DP2-peptide complex with charge and conformational changes. Collectively, these findings provide a structural basis for the development of this occupational lung disease through the ability of Be to induce posttranslational modifications in preexisting HLA-DP2-peptide complexes, resulting in the creation of neoantigens.

  6. Development of Biomarkers for Chronic Beryllium Disease in Mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, Terry

    2013-01-25

    Beryllium is a strategic metal, indispensable for national defense programs in aerospace, telecommunications, electronics, and weaponry. Exposure to beryllium is an extensively documented occupational hazard that causes irreversible, debilitating granulomatous lung disease in as much as 3 - 5% of exposed workers. Mechanistic research on beryllium exposure-disease relationships has been severely limited by a general lack of a sufficient CBD animal model. We have now developed and tested an animal model which can be used for dissecting dose-response relationships and pathogenic mechanisms and for testing new diagnostic and treatment paradigms. We have created 3 strains of transgenic mice in which the human antigen-presenting moiety, HLA-DP, was inserted into the mouse genome. Each mouse strain contains HLA-DPB1 alleles that confer different magnitude of risk for chronic beryllium disease (CBD): HLA-DPB1*0401 (odds ratio = 0.2), HLA-DPB1*0201 (odds ratio = 15), HLA-DPB1*1701 (odds ratio = 240). Our preliminary work has demonstrated that the *1701 allele, as predicted by human studies, results in the greatest degree of sensitization in a mouse ear swelling test. We have also completed dose-response experiments examining beryllium-induced lung granulomas and identified susceptible and resistant inbred strains of mice (without the human transgenes) as well as quantitative trait loci that may contain gene(s) that modify the immune response to beryllium. In this grant application, we propose to use the transgenic and normal inbred strains of mice to identify biomarkers for the progression of beryllium sensitization and CBD. To achieve this goal, we propose to compare the sensitivity and accuracy of the lymphocyte proliferation test (blood and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid) with the ELISPOT test in the three HLA-DP transgenic mice strains throughout a 6 month treatment with beryllium particles. Because of the availability of high-throughput proteomics, we will also identify

  7. Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S

    2012-03-29

    This document describes how Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) meets the requirements and management practices of federal regulation 10 CFR 850, 'Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program (CBDPP).' This revision of the LLNL CBDPP incorporates clarification and editorial changes based on lessons learned from employee discussions, observations and reviews of Department of Energy (DOE) Complex and commercial industry beryllium (Be) safety programs. The information is used to strengthen beryllium safety practices at LLNL, particularly in the areas of: (1) Management of small parts and components; and (2) Communication of program status to employees. Future changes to LLNL beryllium activities and on-going operating experience will be incorporated into the program as described in Section S, 'Performance Feedback.'

  8. Beryllium particulate exposure and disease relations in a beryllium machining plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelleher, P C; Martyny, J W; Mroz, M M; Maier, L A; Ruttenber, A J; Young, D A; Newman, L S

    2001-03-01

    We examined the relationship between exposure to beryllium and the presence of beryllium sensitization (BeS) and chronic beryllium disease (CBD) in a cohort of workers in a beryllium precision machining facility. Twenty workers with BeS or CBD (cases) were compared with 206 worker-controls in a case-control study. Exposure for each job title was measured using cascade impactors placed in the workers' breathing zone to measure total beryllium exposure and exposure to particles 0.20. In conclusion, increased cumulative and LTW exposure to total and respirable beryllium was observed in workers with CBD or BeS compared with the controls. These results support efforts to control beryllium exposure in the workplace.

  9. Efficacy of serial medical surveillance for chronic beryllium disease in a beryllium machining plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, L S; Mroz, M M; Maier, L A; Daniloff, E M; Balkissoon, R

    2001-03-01

    There is limited information on the use of the blood beryllium lymphocyte proliferation test (BeLPT) at regular intervals in medical surveillance. Employees of a beryllium machining plant were screened with the BeLPT biennially, and new employees were screened within 3 months of hire. Of 235 employees screened from 1995 to 1997, a total of 15 (6.4%) had confirmed abnormal BeLPT results indicating beryllium sensitization; nine of these employees were diagnosed with chronic beryllium disease. Four of the 15 cases were diagnosed within 3 months of first exposure. When 187 of the 235 employees participated in biennial screening in 1997 to 1999, seven more had developed beryllium sensitization or chronic beryllium disease, increasing the overall rate to 9.4% (22 of 235). The blood BeLPT should be used serially in beryllium disease surveillance to capture new or missed cases of sensitization and disease. Beryllium sensitization and chronic beryllium disease can occur within 50 days of first exposure in modern industry.

  10. Exposure-response analysis for beryllium sensitization and chronic beryllium disease among workers in a beryllium metal machining plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madl, Amy K; Unice, Ken; Brown, Jay L; Kolanz, Marc E; Kent, Michael S

    2007-06-01

    The current occupational exposure limit (OEL) for beryllium has been in place for more than 50 years and was believed to be protective against chronic beryllium disease (CBD) until studies in the 1990s identified beryllium sensitization (BeS) and subclinical CBD in the absence of physical symptoms. Inconsistent sampling and exposure assessment methodologies have often prevented the characterization of a clear exposure-response relationship for BeS and CBD. Industrial hygiene (3831 personal lapel and 616 general area samples) and health surveillance data from a beryllium machining facility provided an opportunity to reconstruct worker exposures prior to the ascertainment of BeS or the diagnosis of CBD. Airborne beryllium concentrations for different job titles were evaluated, historical trends of beryllium levels were compared for pre- and postengineering control measures, and mean and upper bound exposure estimates were developed for workers identified as beryllium sensitized or diagnosed with subclinical or clinical CBD. Five approaches were used to reconstruct historical exposures of each worker: industrial hygiene data were pooled by year, job title, era of engineering controls, and the complete work history (lifetime weighted average) prior to diagnosis. Results showed that exposure metrics based on shorter averaging times (i.e., year vs. complete work history) better represented the upper bound worker exposures that could have contributed to the development of BeS or CBD. Results showed that beryllium-sensitized and CBD workers were exposed to beryllium concentrations greater than 0.2 microg/m3 (95th percentile), and 90% were exposed to concentrations greater than 0.4 microg/m3 (95th percentile) within a given year of their work history. Based on this analysis, BeS and CBD generally occurred as a result of exposures greater than 0.4 microg/m3 and maintaining exposures below 0.2 microg/m3 95% of the time may prevent BeS and CBD in the workplace.

  11. The bioinorganic chemistry and associated immunology of chronic beryllium disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Brian L; McCleskey, T Mark; Chaudhary, Anu; Hong-Geller, Elizabeth; Gnanakaran, S

    2008-07-07

    Chronic beryllium disease (CBD) is a debilitating, incurable, and often fatal disease that is caused by the inhalation of beryllium particulates. The growing use of beryllium in the modern world, in products ranging from computers to dental prosthetics (390 tons of beryllium in the US in the year 2000) necessitates a molecular based understanding of the disease in order to prevent and cure CBD. We have investigated the molecular basis of CBD at Los Alamos National Laboratory during the past six years, employing a multidisciplinary approach of bioinorganic chemistry and immunology. The results of this work, including speciation, inhalation and dissolution, and immunology will be discussed.

  12. An official American Thoracic Society statement: diagnosis and management of beryllium sensitivity and chronic beryllium disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmes, John R; Abraham, Jerrold L; Dweik, Raed A; Fireman, Elizabeth; Fontenot, Andrew P; Maier, Lisa A; Muller-Quernheim, Joachim; Ostiguy, Gaston; Pepper, Lewis D; Saltini, Cesare; Schuler, Christine R; Takaro, Tim K; Wambach, Paul F

    2014-11-15

    Beryllium continues to have a wide range of industrial applications. Exposure to beryllium can lead to sensitization (BeS) and chronic beryllium disease (CBD). The purpose of this statement is to increase awareness and knowledge about beryllium exposure, BeS, and CBD. Evidence was identified by a search of MEDLINE. The committee then summarized the evidence, drew conclusions, and described their approach to diagnosis and management. The beryllium lymphocyte proliferation test is the cornerstone of both medical surveillance and the diagnosis of BeS and CBD. A confirmed abnormal beryllium lymphocyte proliferation test without evidence of lung disease is diagnostic of BeS. BeS with evidence of a granulomatous inflammatory response in the lung is diagnostic of CBD. The determinants of progression from BeS to CBD are uncertain, but higher exposures and the presence of a genetic variant in the HLA-DP β chain appear to increase the risk. Periodic evaluation of affected individuals can detect disease progression (from BeS to CBD, or from mild CBD to more severe CBD). Corticosteroid therapy is typically administered when a patient with CBD exhibits evidence of significant lung function abnormality or decline. Medical surveillance in workplaces that use beryllium-containing materials can identify individuals with BeS and at-risk groups of workers, which can help prioritize efforts to reduce inhalational and dermal exposures.

  13. Sarcoidosis and chronic beryllium disease: similarities and differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Annyce S; Hamzeh, Nabeel; Maier, Lisa A

    2014-06-01

    Chronic beryllium disease (CBD) is a granulomatous lung disease that may be pathologically and clinically indistinguishable from pulmonary sarcoidosis, except through use of immunologic testing, such as the beryllium lymphocyte proliferation test (BeLPT). Similar to sarcoidosis, the pulmonary manifestations of CBD are variable and overlap with other respiratory diseases. Definitive diagnosis of CBD is established by evidence of immune sensitization to beryllium and diagnostic bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage and transbronchial biopsy. However, the diagnosis of CBD can also be established on a medically probable basis in beryllium-exposed patients with consistent radiographic imaging and clinical course. Beryllium workers exposed too much higher levels of beryllium in the past demonstrated a much more fulminant disease than is usually seen today. Some extrapulmonary manifestations similar to sarcoidosis were noted in these historic cohorts, although with a narrower spectrum. Extrapulmonary manifestations of CBD are rare today. Since lung-predominant sarcoidosis can very closely resemble CBD, CBD is still misdiagnosed as sarcoidosis when current or past exposure to beryllium is not recognized and no BeLPT is obtained. This article describes the similarities and differences between CBD and sarcoidosis, including clinical and diagnostic features that can help physicians consider CBD in patients with apparent lung-predominant sarcoidosis.

  14. Angiotensin-1 converting enzyme polymorphisms in chronic beryllium disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, L A; Raynolds, M V; Young, D A; Barker, E A; Newman, L S

    1999-04-01

    To test the hypothesis that the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) genotype is associated with chronic beryllium disease (CBD) and disease severity, we studied 50 cases of CBD and compared their ACE genotype to that of two different control groups, consisting of: (1) 50 participants from a beryllium machining facility; and (2) 50 participants from a non-beryllium-associated workplace. We found no statistically significant difference in the frequency of the I or D allele or of the DD genotype among cases of CBD and either control group. The odds ratio (OR) for the CBD DD genotype as compared with the non-DD genotype was 1.58 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.68 to 3.66, p = 0.12) for the beryllium-exposed control group, and 1.09 (95% CI: 0.48 to 2.46, p = 0.56) for the non-beryllium-exposed controls. We found an association between serum ACE activity and the ACE genotype, with DD cases having the highest median serum ACE activity (p = 0.005). We evaluated the beryllium lymphocyte proliferation test (BeLPT), bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cell components, chest radiography, pulmonary function test results, and exercise physiology in our CBD cases. No statistically significant associations with these disease markers were found for the CBD cases with the DD genotype. Although the difference was not statistically significant, the DD cases had a shorter median duration of exposure to beryllium before diagnosis of CBD, and tended to have a weaker response in their blood and BAL BeLPT than did the non-DD cases. These findings may indicate that the ACE genotype is important in the immune response to beryllium and in progression to beryllium disease.

  15. 10 CFR Appendix A to Part 850 - Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program Informed Consent Form

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program Informed Consent Form A Appendix A to Part 850 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Pt. 850, App. A Appendix A to Part 850—Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program...

  16. Measurement of Beryllium in Biological Samples by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry: Applications for Studying Chronic Beryllium Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiarappa-Zucca, M L; Finkel, R C; Martinelli, R E; McAninch, J E; Nelson, D O; Turtletaub, K W

    2004-04-15

    A method using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) has been developed for quantifying attomoles of beryllium (Be) in biological samples. This method provides the sensitivity to trace Be in biological samples at very low doses with the purpose of identifying the molecular targets involved in chronic beryllium disease. Proof of the method was tested by administering 0.001, 0.05, 0.5 and 5.0 {micro}g {sup 9}Be and {sup 10}Be by intraperitoneal injection to male mice and removing spleen, liver, femurs, blood, lung, and kidneys after 24 h exposure. These samples were prepared for AMS analysis by tissue digestion in nitric acid, followed by further organic oxidation with hydrogen peroxide and ammonium persulfate and lastly, precipitation of Be with ammonium hydroxide, and conversion to beryllium oxide at 800 C. The {sup 10}Be/{sup 9}Be ratio of the extracted beryllium oxide was measured by AMS and Be in the original sample was calculated. Results indicate that Be levels were dose-dependent in all tissues and the highest levels were measured in the spleen and liver. The measured {sup 10}Be/{sup 9}Be ratios spanned 4 orders of magnitude, from 10{sup -10} to 10{sup -14}, with a detection limit of 3.0 x 10{sup -14}, which is equivalent to 0.8 attomoles of {sup 10}Be. These results show that routine quantification of nanogram levels of Be in tissues is possible and that AMS is a sensitive method that can be used in biological studies to understand the molecular dosimetry of Be and mechanisms of toxicity.

  17. T cell recognition of beryllium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Shaodong; Falta, Michael T; Bowerman, Natalie A; McKee, Amy S; Fontenot, Andrew P

    2013-12-01

    Chronic beryllium disease (CBD) is a granulomatous lung disorder caused by a hypersensitivity to beryllium and characterized by the accumulation of beryllium-specific CD4(+) T cells in the lung. Genetic susceptibility to beryllium-induced disease is strongly associated with HLA-DP alleles possessing a glutamic acid at the 69th position of the β-chain (βGlu69). The structure of HLA-DP2, the most prevalent βGlu69-containing molecule, revealed a unique solvent-exposed acidic pocket that includes βGlu69 and represents the putative beryllium-binding site. The delineation of mimotopes and endogenous self-peptides that complete the αβTCR ligand for beryllium-specific CD4(+) T cells suggests a unique role of these peptides in metal ion coordination and the generation of altered self-peptides, blurring the distinction between hypersensitivity and autoimmunity.

  18. Identification of beryllium-dependent peptides recognized by CD4+ T cells in chronic beryllium disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falta, Michael T; Pinilla, Clemencia; Mack, Douglas G; Tinega, Alex N; Crawford, Frances; Giulianotti, Marc; Santos, Radleigh; Clayton, Gina M; Wang, Yuxiao; Zhang, Xuewu; Maier, Lisa A; Marrack, Philippa; Kappler, John W; Fontenot, Andrew P

    2013-07-01

    Chronic beryllium disease (CBD) is a granulomatous disorder characterized by an influx of beryllium (Be)-specific CD4⁺ T cells into the lung. The vast majority of these T cells recognize Be in an HLA-DP–restricted manner, and peptide is required for T cell recognition. However, the peptides that stimulate Be-specific T cells are unknown. Using positional scanning libraries and fibroblasts expressing HLA-DP2, the most prevalent HLA-DP molecule linked to disease, we identified mimotopes and endogenous self-peptides that bind to MHCII and Be, forming a complex recognized by pathogenic CD4⁺ T cells in CBD. These peptides possess aspartic and glutamic acid residues at p4 and p7, respectively, that surround the putative Be-binding site and cooperate with HLA-DP2 in Be coordination. Endogenous plexin A peptides and proteins, which share the core motif and are expressed in lung, also stimulate these TCRs. Be-loaded HLA-DP2–mimotope and HLA-DP2–plexin A4 tetramers detected high frequencies of CD4⁺ T cells specific for these ligands in all HLADP2+ CBD patients tested. Thus, our findings identify the first ligand for a CD4⁺ T cell involved in metal-induced hypersensitivity and suggest a unique role of these peptides in metal ion coordination and the generation of a common antigen specificity in CBD.

  19. 20 CFR 30.207 - How does a claimant prove a diagnosis of a beryllium disease covered under Part B?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... beryllium disease covered under Part B? 30.207 Section 30.207 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS... Beryllium Illness Under Part B of Eeoicpa § 30.207 How does a claimant prove a diagnosis of a beryllium... employee developed a covered beryllium illness. Proof that the employee developed a covered...

  20. Chest wall shrapnel-induced beryllium-sensitization and associated pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fireman, E; Shai, A Bar; Lerman, Y; Topilsky, M; Blanc, P D; Maier, L; Li, L; Chandra, S; Abraham, J M; Fomin, I; Aviram, G; Abraham, J L

    2012-10-01

    Chronic beryllium disease (CBD) is an exposure-related granulomatous disease mimicking sarcoidosis. Beryllium exposure-associated disease occurs mainly via inhalation, but skin may also be a source of sensitization. A 65-year-old male with a history of war-related shrapnel wounds was initially diagnosed with pulmonary sarcoidosis. Twenty years later, the possibility of a metal-related etiology for the lung disease was raised. A beryllium lymphocyte proliferation test, elemental analysis of removed shrapnel, and genetic studies were consistent with a diagnosis of CBD. This case demonstrates that retained beryllium-containing foreign bodies can be linked to a pathophysiologic response in the lung consistent with CBD.

  1. Introduction to beryllium: uses, regulatory history, and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolanz, M E

    2001-05-01

    Beryllium is an ubiquitous element in the environment, and it has many commercial applications. Because of its strength, electrical and thermal conductivity, corrosion resistance, and nuclear properties, beryllium products are used in the aerospace, automotive, energy, medical, and electronics industries. What eventually came to be known as chronic beryllium disease (CBD) was first identified in the 1940s, when a cluster of cases was observed in workers from the fluorescent light industry. The U.S. Atomic Energy Commission recommended the first 8-hour occupational exposure limit (OEL) for beryllium of 2.0 microg/m3 in 1949, which was later reviewed and accepted by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH), the American Industrial Hygiene Association (AIHA), the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), and the vast majority of countries and standard-setting bodies worldwide. The 2.0 microg/m3 standard has been in use by the beryllium industry for more than 50 years and has been considered adequate to protect workers against clinical CBD. Recently, improved diagnostic techniques, including immunological testing and safer bronchoscopy, have enhanced our ability to identify subclinical CBD cases that would have formerly remained unidentified. Some recent epidemiological studies have suggested that some workers may develop CBD at exposures less than 2.0 microg/m3. ACGIH is currently reevaluating the adequacy of the current 2.0 microg/m3 guideline, and a plethora of research initiatives are under way to provide a better understanding of the cause of CBD. The research is focusing on the risk factors and exposure metrics that could be associated with CBD, as well as on efforts to better characterize the natural history of CBD. There is growing evidence that particle size and chemical form may be important factors that influence the risk of developing CBD. These research efforts are

  2. Regulatory T cells modulate granulomatous inflammation in an HLA-DP2 transgenic murine model of beryllium-induced disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, Douglas G; Falta, Michael T; McKee, Amy S; Martin, Allison K; Simonian, Philip L; Crawford, Frances; Gordon, Terry; Mercer, Robert R; Hoover, Mark D; Marrack, Philippa; Kappler, John W; Tuder, Rubin M; Fontenot, Andrew P

    2014-06-10

    Susceptibility to chronic beryllium disease (CBD) is linked to certain HLA-DP molecules, including HLA-DP2. To elucidate the molecular basis of this association, we exposed mice transgenic (Tg) for HLA-DP2 to beryllium oxide (BeO) via oropharyngeal aspiration. As opposed to WT mice, BeO-exposed HLA-DP2 Tg mice developed mononuclear infiltrates in a peribronchovascular distribution that were composed of CD4(+) T cells and included regulatory T (Treg) cells. Beryllium-responsive, HLA-DP2-restricted CD4(+) T cells expressing IFN-γ and IL-2 were present in BeO-exposed HLA-DP2 Tg mice and not in WT mice. Using Be-loaded HLA-DP2-peptide tetramers, we identified Be-specific CD4(+) T cells in the mouse lung that recognize identical ligands as CD4(+) T cells derived from the human lung. Importantly, a subset of HLA-DP2 tetramer-binding CD4(+) T cells expressed forkhead box P3, consistent with the expansion of antigen-specific Treg cells. Depletion of Treg cells in BeO-exposed HLA-DP2 Tg mice exacerbated lung inflammation and enhanced granuloma formation. These findings document, for the first time to our knowledge, the development of a Be-specific adaptive immune response in mice expressing HLA-DP2 and the ability of Treg cells to modulate the beryllium-induced granulomatous immune response.

  3. Target organ localization of memory CD4(+) T cells in patients with chronic beryllium disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontenot, Andrew P; Canavera, Scott J; Gharavi, Laia; Newman, Lee S; Kotzin, Brian L

    2002-11-01

    Chronic beryllium disease (CBD) is caused by exposure to beryllium in the workplace, and it remains an important public health concern. Evidence suggests that CD4(+) T cells play a critical role in the development of this disease. Using intracellular cytokine staining, we found that the frequency of beryllium-specific CD4(+) T cells in the lungs (bronchoalveolar lavage) of 12 CBD patients ranged from 1.4% to 29% (mean 17.8%), and these T cells expressed a Th1-type phenotype in response to beryllium sulfate (BeSO(4)). Few, if any, beryllium-specific CD8(+) T cells were identified. In contrast, the frequency of beryllium-responsive CD4(+) T cells in the blood of these subjects ranged from undetectable to 1 in 500. No correlation was observed between the frequency of beryllium-responsive bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) CD4(+) T cells as detected by intracellular staining and lymphocyte proliferation in culture after BeSO(4) exposure. Staining for surface marker expression showed that nearly all BAL T cells exhibit an effector memory cell phenotype. These results demonstrate a dramatically high frequency and compartmentalization of antigen-specific effector memory CD4(+) cells in the lungs of CBD patients. These studies provide insight into the phenotypic and functional characteristics of antigen-specific T cells invading other inaccessible target organs in human disease.

  4. Machining risk of beryllium disease and sensitization with median exposures below 2 micrograms/m3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreiss, K; Mroz, M M; Newman, L S; Martyny, J; Zhen, B

    1996-07-01

    We examined the prevalence of beryllium sensitization in relation to work process and beryllium exposure measurements in a beryllia ceramics plant that had operated since 1980. We interviewed 136 employees (97.8% of the workforce), ascertained beryllium sensitization with the beryllium lymphocyte proliferation blood test, and reviewed historical industrial hygiene measurements. Of eight beryllium-sensitized employees (5.9%), six (4.4% of participating employees) had granulomatous disease on transbronchial lung biopsy. Machinists had a sensitization rate of 14.3% compared to a rate of 1.2% among other employees. Machining had significantly higher general area and breathing zone measurements than did other processes in the time period in which most beryllium-sensitized cases had started machining work. Daily weighted average (DWA) estimates of exposure for matching processes also exceeded estimates for other work processes in that time period, with a median DWA of 0.9 microgram/m3. Machining process DWAs accounted for the majority of DWAs exceeding the 2.0 micrograms/m3 OSHA standard, with 8.1% of machining DWAs above the standard. We conclude that lowering machining process-related exposures may be important to lowering risk of beryllium disease.

  5. Defense programs beryllium good practice guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herr, M.

    1997-07-01

    Within the DOE, it has recently become apparent that some contractor employees who have worked (or are currently working) with and around beryllium have developed chronic beryllium disease (CBD), an occupational granulomatous lung disorder. Respiratory exposure to aerosolized beryllium, in susceptible individuals, causes an immunological reaction that can result in granulomatous scarring of the lung parenchyma, shortness of breath, cough, fatigue, weight loss, and, ultimately, respiratory failure. Beryllium disease was originally identified in the 1940s, largely in the fluorescent light industry. In 1950, the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) introduced strict exposure standards that generally curtailed both the acute and chronic forms of the disease. Beginning in 1984, with the identification of a CBD case in a DOE contractor worker, there was increased scrutiny of both industrial hygiene practices and individuals in this workforce. To date, over 100 additional cases of beryllium-specific sensitization and/or CBD have been identified. Thus, a disease previously thought to be largely eliminated by the adoption of permissible exposure standards 45 years ago is still a health risk in certain workforces. This good practice guide forms the basis of an acceptable program for controlling workplace exposure to beryllium. It provides (1) Guidance for minimizing worker exposure to beryllium in Defense Programs facilities during all phases of beryllium-related work, including the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of facilities. (2) Recommended controls to be applied to the handling of metallic beryllium and beryllium alloys, beryllium oxide, and other beryllium compounds. (3) Recommendations for medical monitoring and surveillance of workers exposed (or potentially exposed) to beryllium, based on the best current understanding of beryllium disease and medical diagnostic tests available. (4) Site-specific safety procedures for all processes of beryllium that is likely to

  6. 75 FR 80734 - Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-23

    ... a person's immune system becomes highly responsive (allergic) to the presence of beryllium in the.... Hardcopies (2 copies) sent by regular mailing should be addressed to: Jacqueline D. Rogers, Office of Worker... to jackie.rogers@hq.doe.gov . If you have additional information, such as studies or journal articles...

  7. Genetic diversity and disease susceptibility.

    OpenAIRE

    Bodmer, W F

    1997-01-01

    The range of genetic diversity within human populations is enormous. Genetic susceptibility to common chronic disease is a significant part of this genetic diversity, which also includes a variety of rare clear-cut inherited diseases. Modern DNA-based genomic analysis can now routinely lead to the identification of genes involved in disease susceptibility, provides the basis for genetic counselling in affected families, and more widely for a genetically targeted approach to disease prevention...

  8. Search for chronic beryllium disease among sarcoidosis patients in Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Marcos; Fritscher, Leandro G; Al-Musaed, Ahmed M; Balter, Meyer S; Hoffstein, Victor; Mazer, Bruce D; Maier, Lisa A; Liss, Gary M; Tarlo, Susan M

    2011-06-01

    Chronic beryllium disease (CBD) is clinically similar to other granulomatous diseases such as sarcoidosis. It is often misdiagnosed if a thorough occupational history is not taken. When appropriate, a beryllium lymphocyte proliferation tests (BeLPT) need to be performed. We aimed to search for CBD among currently diagnosed pulmonary sarcoidosis patients and to identify the occupations and exposures in Ontario leading to CBD. Questionnaire items included work history and details of possible exposure to beryllium. Participants who provided a history of previous work with metals underwent BeLPTs and an ELISPOT on the basis of having a higher pretest probability of CBD. Among 121 sarcoid patients enrolled, 87 (72%) reported no known previous metal dust or fume exposure, while 34 (28%) had metal exposure, including 17 (14%) with beryllium exposure at work or home. However, none of these 34 who underwent testing had positive test results. Self-reported exposure to beryllium or metals was relatively common in these patients with clinical sarcoidosis, but CBD was not confirmed using blood assays in this population.

  9. A role for cell adhesion in beryllium-mediated lung disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong-geller, Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Chronic beryllium disease (CBD) is a debilitating lung disorder in which exposure to the lightweight metal beryllium (Be) causes the accumulation of beryllium-specific CD4+ T cells in the lung and formation of noncaseating pulmonary granulomas. Treatment for CBD patients who exhibit progressive pulmonary decline is limited to systemic corticosteroids, which suppress the severe host inflammatory response. Studies in the past several years have begun to highlight cell-cell adhesion interactions in the development of Be hypersensitivity and CBD. In particular, the high binding affinity between intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (I-CAM1) on lung epithelial cells and the {beta}{sub 2} integrin LFA-1 on migrating lymphocytes and macrophages regulates the concerted rolling of immune cells to sites of inflammation in the lung. In this review, we discuss the evidence that implicates cell adhesion processes in onset of Be disease and the potential of cell adhesion as an intervention point for development of novel therapies.

  10. Heck's disease: diagnosis and susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Lindsey K; Hinshaw, Molly

    2009-01-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia, or Heck's disease, is an uncommon proliferation of oral mucosa that presents primarily in Native Central and South American populations. It presents as asymptomatic papules or nodules on the oral mucosa, gingiva, tongue, and lips. In the majority of cases, human papilloma virus 13 or 32 is detected. Factors that determine disease susceptibility are unclear, but genetics, and having the human lymphocytic antigen-DR4 (DRB1*0404) allele in particular, are thought to play a major role in disease vulnerability. We report another case of focal epithelial hyperplasia, hypothesize on disease susceptibility, and review the current understanding of this uncommon disorder.

  11. Beryllium increases the CD14(dim)CD16+ subset in the lung of chronic beryllium disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Hamzeh, Nabeel; Gillespie, May; Elliott, Jill; Wang, Jieru; Gottschall, Eva Brigitte; Mroz, Peggy M; Maier, Lisa A

    2015-01-01

    CD14dimCD16+ and CD14brightCD16+ cells, which compose a minor population of monocytes in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), have been implicated in several inflammatory diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate whether this phenotype was present as a subset of lung infiltrative alveolar macrophages (AMs) in the granulomatous lung disease, chronic beryllium disease (CBD). The monocytes subsets was determined from PBMC cells and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells from CBD, beryllium sensitized Non-smoker (BeS-NS) and healthy subjects (HS) using flow cytometry. The impact of smoking on the AMs cell phenotype was determined by using BAL cells from BeS smokers (BeS-S). In comparison with the other monocyte subpopulations, CD14dimCD16+ cells were at decreased frequency in PBMCs of both BeS-NS and CBD and showed higher HLA-DR expression, compared to HS. The AMs from CBD and BeS-NS demonstrated a CD14dimCD16+phenotype, while CD14brightCD16+ cells were found at increased frequency in AMs of BeS, compared to HS. Fresh AMs from BeS-NS and CBD demonstrated significantly greater CD16, CD40, CD86 and HLA-DR than HS and BeS-S. The expression of CD16 on AMs from both CBD and BeS-NS was downregulated significantly after 10μM BeSO4 stimulation. The phagocytic activity of AMs decreased after 10μM BeSO4 treatment in both BeS-NS and CBD, although was altered or reduced in HS and BeS-S. These results suggest that Be increases the CD14dimCD16+ subsets in the lung of CBD subjects. We speculate that Be-stimulates the compartmentalization of a more mature CD16+ macrophage phenotype and that in turn these macrophages are a source of Th1 cytokines and chemokines that perpetuate the Be immune response in CBD. The protective effect of cigarette smoking in BeS-S may be due to the low expression of co-stimulatory markers on AMs from smokers as well as the decreased phagocytic function.

  12. Beryllium increases the CD14(dimCD16+ subset in the lung of chronic beryllium disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Li

    Full Text Available CD14dimCD16+ and CD14brightCD16+ cells, which compose a minor population of monocytes in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC, have been implicated in several inflammatory diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate whether this phenotype was present as a subset of lung infiltrative alveolar macrophages (AMs in the granulomatous lung disease, chronic beryllium disease (CBD. The monocytes subsets was determined from PBMC cells and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL cells from CBD, beryllium sensitized Non-smoker (BeS-NS and healthy subjects (HS using flow cytometry. The impact of smoking on the AMs cell phenotype was determined by using BAL cells from BeS smokers (BeS-S. In comparison with the other monocyte subpopulations, CD14dimCD16+ cells were at decreased frequency in PBMCs of both BeS-NS and CBD and showed higher HLA-DR expression, compared to HS. The AMs from CBD and BeS-NS demonstrated a CD14dimCD16+phenotype, while CD14brightCD16+ cells were found at increased frequency in AMs of BeS, compared to HS. Fresh AMs from BeS-NS and CBD demonstrated significantly greater CD16, CD40, CD86 and HLA-DR than HS and BeS-S. The expression of CD16 on AMs from both CBD and BeS-NS was downregulated significantly after 10μM BeSO4 stimulation. The phagocytic activity of AMs decreased after 10μM BeSO4 treatment in both BeS-NS and CBD, although was altered or reduced in HS and BeS-S. These results suggest that Be increases the CD14dimCD16+ subsets in the lung of CBD subjects. We speculate that Be-stimulates the compartmentalization of a more mature CD16+ macrophage phenotype and that in turn these macrophages are a source of Th1 cytokines and chemokines that perpetuate the Be immune response in CBD. The protective effect of cigarette smoking in BeS-S may be due to the low expression of co-stimulatory markers on AMs from smokers as well as the decreased phagocytic function.

  13. An industrial risk: Beryllium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emrah Çaylak

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Beryllium is a vocational disease factor and berylliumexposure can potentially lead to Chronic Beryllium Disease(CBD in 2-6 % of workers. While acute lymphocyticpneumonia occurred in individuals who were exposedto high doses of beryllium, low dose exposure to berylliumfollowed by a long subclinical period can cause CBDcharacterized with chronic granulomatosis. It has beenobserved that varying amounts of beryllium exposureare necessary to produce symptoms of CBD or berylliumsensitization (BeS. Genetic differences between patientsmay be the underlying cause of these dose-effects andfurther study of the differences in patients exposed to berylliummay lead to earlier diagnosis and the identificationof biomarkers of CBD. In this review, it is summarizedthe general properties of beryllium exposure, the immunopathogenesisand genetic differences of beryllium-induceddiseases, genotoxicity and the carcinogenic effectsof beryllium. J Clin Exp Invest 2012; 3(1: 141-148

  14. Chronic Beryllium Disease: revealing the role of beryllium ion and small peptides binding to HLA-DP2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petukh, Marharyta; Wu, Bohua; Stefl, Shannon; Smith, Nick; Hyde-Volpe, David; Wang, Li; Alexov, Emil

    2014-01-01

    Chronic Beryllium (Be) Disease (CBD) is a granulomatous disorder that predominantly affects the lung. The CBD is caused by Be exposure of individuals carrying the HLA-DP2 protein of the major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII). While the involvement of Be in the development of CBD is obvious and the binding site and the sequence of Be and peptide binding were recently experimentally revealed [1], the interplay between induced conformational changes and the changes of the peptide binding affinity in presence of Be were not investigated. Here we carry out in silico modeling and predict the Be binding to be within the acidic pocket (Glu26, Glu68 and Glu69) present on the HLA-DP2 protein in accordance with the experimental work [1]. In addition, the modeling indicates that the Be ion binds to the HLA-DP2 before the corresponding peptide is able to bind to it. Further analysis of the MD generated trajectories reveals that in the presence of the Be ion in the binding pocket of HLA-DP2, all the different types of peptides induce very similar conformational changes, but their binding affinities are quite different. Since these conformational changes are distinctly different from the changes caused by peptides normally found in the cell in the absence of Be, it can be speculated that CBD can be caused by any peptide in presence of Be ion. However, the affinities of peptides for Be loaded HLA-DP2 were found to depend of their amino acid composition and the peptides carrying acidic group at positions 4 and 7 are among the strongest binders. Thus, it is proposed that CBD is caused by the exposure of Be of an individual carrying the HLA-DP2*0201 allele and that the binding of Be to HLA-DP2 protein alters the conformational and ionization properties of HLA-DP2 such that the binding of a peptide triggers a wrong signaling cascade.

  15. Low Prevalence of Chronic Beryllium Disease among Workers at a Nuclear Weapons Research and Development Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arjomandi, M; Seward, J P; Gotway, M B; Nishimura, S; Fulton, G P; Thundiyil, J; King, T E; Harber, P; Balmes, J R

    2010-01-11

    To study the prevalence of beryllium sensitization (BeS) and chronic beryllium disease (CBD) in a cohort of workers from a nuclear weapons research and development facility. We evaluated 50 workers with BeS with medical and occupational histories, physical examination, chest imaging with HRCT (N=49), and pulmonary function testing. Forty of these workers also underwent bronchoscopy for bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and transbronchial biopsies. The mean duration of employment at the facility was 18 yrs and the mean latency (from first possible exposure) to time of evaluation was 32 yrs. Five of the workers had CBD at the time of evaluation (based on histology or HRCT); three others had evidence of probable CBD. These workers with BeS, characterized by a long duration of potential Be exposure and a long latency, had a low prevalence of CBD.

  16. Low Prevalence of Chronic Beryllium Disease Among Workers at aNuclearWeaponsResearchandDevelopmentFacility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjomandi, Mehrdad; Seward, James; Gotway, Michael B.; Nishimura, Stephen; Fulton, George P.; Thundiyil, Josef; King, Talmadge E.; Harber, Philip; Balmes, John R.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To study the prevalence of beryllium sensitization (BeS) and chronic beryllium disease (CBD) in a cohort of workers from a nuclear weapons research and development facility. Methods We evaluated 50 workers with BeS with medical and occupational histories, physical examination, chest imaging with high-resolution computed tomography (N = 49), and pulmonary function testing. Forty of these workers also underwent bronchoscopy for bronchoalveolar lavage and transbronchial biopsies. Results The mean duration of employment at the facility was 18 years and the mean latency (from first possible exposure) to time of evaluation was 32 years. Five of the workers had CBD at the time of evaluation (based on histology or high-resolution computed tomography); three others had evidence of probable CBD. Conclusions These workers with BeS, characterized by a long duration of potential Be exposure and a long latency, had a low prevalence of CBD. PMID:20523233

  17. Structural basis of chronic beryllium disease: linking allergic hypersensitivity and autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Gina M; Wang, Yang; Crawford, Frances; Novikov, Andrey; Wimberly, Brian T; Kieft, Jeffrey S; Falta, Michael T; Bowerman, Natalie A; Marrack, Philippa; Fontenot, Andrew P; Dai, Shaodong; Kappler, John W

    2014-07-03

    T-cell-mediated hypersensitivity to metal cations is common in humans. How the T cell antigen receptor (TCR) recognizes these cations bound to a major histocompatibility complex (MHC) protein and self-peptide is unknown. Individuals carrying the MHCII allele, HLA-DP2, are at risk for chronic beryllium disease (CBD), a debilitating inflammatory lung condition caused by the reaction of CD4 T cells to inhaled beryllium. Here, we show that the T cell ligand is created when a Be(2+) cation becomes buried in an HLA-DP2/peptide complex, where it is coordinated by both MHC and peptide acidic amino acids. Surprisingly, the TCR does not interact with the Be(2+) itself, but rather with surface changes induced by the firmly bound Be(2+) and an accompanying Na(+) cation. Thus, CBD, by creating a new antigen by indirectly modifying the structure of preexisting self MHC-peptide complex, lies on the border between allergic hypersensitivity and autoimmunity.

  18. Technical Basis for PNNL Beryllium Inventory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Michelle Lynn

    2014-07-09

    The Department of Energy (DOE) issued Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 850, “Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program” (the Beryllium Rule) in 1999 and required full compliance by no later than January 7, 2002. The Beryllium Rule requires the development of a baseline beryllium inventory of the locations of beryllium operations and other locations of potential beryllium contamination at DOE facilities. The baseline beryllium inventory is also required to identify workers exposed or potentially exposed to beryllium at those locations. Prior to DOE issuing 10 CFR 850, Pacific Northwest Nuclear Laboratory (PNNL) had documented the beryllium characterization and worker exposure potential for multiple facilities in compliance with DOE’s 1997 Notice 440.1, “Interim Chronic Beryllium Disease.” After DOE’s issuance of 10 CFR 850, PNNL developed an implementation plan to be compliant by 2002. In 2014, an internal self-assessment (ITS #E-00748) of PNNL’s Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program (CBDPP) identified several deficiencies. One deficiency is that the technical basis for establishing the baseline beryllium inventory when the Beryllium Rule was implemented was either not documented or not retrievable. In addition, the beryllium inventory itself had not been adequately documented and maintained since PNNL established its own CBDPP, separate from Hanford Site’s program. This document reconstructs PNNL’s baseline beryllium inventory as it would have existed when it achieved compliance with the Beryllium Rule in 2001 and provides the technical basis for the baseline beryllium inventory.

  19. Chronic beryllium disease, HLA-DPB1, and the DP peptide binding groove.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Lori J; McCanlies, Erin C; Fingerlin, Tasha E; Van Dyke, Michael V; Mroz, Margaret M; Strand, Matthew; Fontenot, Andrew P; Bowerman, Natalie; Dabelea, Dana M; Schuler, Christine R; Weston, Ainsley; Maier, Lisa A

    2012-10-15

    Multiple epidemiologic studies demonstrate associations between chronic beryllium disease (CBD), beryllium sensitization (BeS), and HLA-DPB1 alleles with a glutamic acid residue at position 69 (E69). Results suggest that the less-frequent E69 variants (non-*0201/*0202 alleles) might be associated with greater risk of CBD. In this study, we sought to define specific E69-carrying alleles and their amino acid sequences in the DP peptide binding groove, as well as their relationship to CBD and BeS risk, using the largest case control study to date. We enrolled 502 BeS/CBD subjects and 653 beryllium-exposed controls from three beryllium industries who gave informed consent for participation. Non-Hispanic white cases and controls were frequency-matched by industry. HLA-DPB1 genotypes were determined using sequence-specific primer PCR. The E69 alleles were tested for association with disease individually and grouped by amino acid structure using logistic regression. The results show that CBD cases were more likely than controls to carry a non-*02 E69 allele than an *02 E69, with odds ratios (95% confidence interval) ranging from 3.1 (2.1-4.5) to 3.9 (2.6-5.9) (p < 0.0001). Polymorphic amino acids at positions 84 and 11 were associated with CBD: DD versus GG, 2.8 (1.8-4.6), p < 0.0001; GD versus GG, 2.1 (1.5-2.8), p < 0.0001; LL versus GG, 3.2 (1.8-5.6), p < 0.0001; GL versus GG, 2.8 (2.1-3.8), p < 0.0001. Similar results were found within the BeS group and CBD/BeS combined group. We conclude that the less frequent E69 alleles confer more risk for CBD than does *0201. Recent studies examining how the composition and structure of the binding pockets influence peptide binding in MHC genes, as well of studies showing the topology of the TCR to likely bind DPB1 preferentially, give plausible biological rationale for these findings.

  20. Beryllium alters lipopolysaccharide-mediated intracellular phosphorylation and cytokine release in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Shannon; Ganguly, Kumkum; Fresquez, Theresa M; Gupta, Goutam; McCleskey, T Mark; Chaudhary, Anu

    2009-12-01

    Beryllium exposure in susceptible individuals leads to the development of chronic beryllium disease, a lung disorder marked by release of inflammatory cytokine and granuloma formation. We have previously reported that beryllium induces an immune response even in blood mononuclear cells from healthy individuals. In this study, we investigate the effects of beryllium on lipopolysaccharide-mediated cytokine release in blood mononuclear and dendritic cells from healthy individuals. We found that in vitro treatment of beryllium sulfate inhibits the secretion of lipopolysaccharide-mediated interleukin 10, while the release of interleukin 1beta is enhanced. In addition, not all lipopolysaccharide-mediated responses are altered, as interleukin 6 release in unaffected upon beryllium treatment. Beryllium sulfate-treated cells show altered phosphotyrosine levels upon lipopolysaccharide stimulation. Significantly, beryllium inhibits the phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transducer 3, induced by lipopolysaccharide. Finally, inhibitors of phosphoinositide-3 kinase mimic the effects of beryllium in inhibition of interleukin 10 release, while they have no effect on interleukin 1beta secretion. This study strongly suggests that prior exposures to beryllium could alter host immune responses to bacterial infections in healthy individuals, by altering intracellular signaling.

  1. Beryllium 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-01

    The Roskill report on beryllium gives information on the occurrence and reserves, production technology, geographic distribution, consumption and end-uses, stocks, prices and beryllium and health. There is an appendix on international trade statistics. (author).

  2. Statistical methods for the analysis of a screening test for chronic beryllium disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frome, E.L.; Neubert, R.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Mathematical Sciences Section; Smith, M.H.; Littlefield, L.G.; Colyer, S.P. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States). Medical Sciences Div.

    1994-10-01

    The lymphocyte proliferation test (LPT) is a noninvasive screening procedure used to identify persons who may have chronic beryllium disease. A practical problem in the analysis of LPT well counts is the occurrence of outlying data values (approximately 7% of the time). A log-linear regression model is used to describe the expected well counts for each set of test conditions. The variance of the well counts is proportional to the square of the expected counts, and two resistant regression methods are used to estimate the parameters of interest. The first approach uses least absolute values (LAV) on the log of the well counts to estimate beryllium stimulation indices (SIs) and the coefficient of variation. The second approach uses a resistant regression version of maximum quasi-likelihood estimation. A major advantage of the resistant regression methods is that it is not necessary to identify and delete outliers. These two new methods for the statistical analysis of the LPT data and the outlier rejection method that is currently being used are applied to 173 LPT assays. The authors strongly recommend the LAV method for routine analysis of the LPT.

  3. Beryllium Manufacturing Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldberg, A

    2006-06-30

    This report is one of a number of reports that will be combined into a handbook on beryllium. Each report covers a specific topic. To-date, the following reports have been published: (1) Consolidation and Grades of Beryllium; (2) Mechanical Properties of Beryllium and the Factors Affecting these Properties; (3) Corrosion and Corrosion Protection of Beryllium; (4) Joining of Beryllium; (5) Atomic, Crystal, Elastic, Thermal, Nuclear, and other Properties of Beryllium; and (6) Beryllium Coating (Deposition) Processes and the Influence of Processing Parameters on Properties and Microstructure. The conventional method of using ingot-cast material is unsuitable for manufacturing a beryllium product. Beryllium is a highly reactive metal with a high melting point, making it susceptible to react with mold-wall materials forming beryllium compounds (BeO, etc.) that become entrapped in the solidified metal. In addition, the grain size is excessively large, being 50 to 100 {micro}m in diameter, while grain sizes of 15 {micro}m or less are required to meet acceptable strength and ductility requirements. Attempts at refining the as-cast-grain size have been unsuccessful. Because of the large grain size and limited slip systems, the casting will invariably crack during a hot-working step, which is an important step in the microstructural-refining process. The high reactivity of beryllium together with its high viscosity (even with substantial superheat) also makes it an unsuitable candidate for precision casting. In order to overcome these problems, alternative methods have been developed for the manufacturing of beryllium. The vast majority of these methods involve the use of beryllium powders. The powders are consolidated under pressure in vacuum at an elevated temperature to produce vacuum hot-pressed (VHP) blocks and vacuum hot-isostatic-pressed (HIP) forms and billets. The blocks (typically cylindrical), which are produced over a wide range of sizes (up to 183 cm dia. by 61

  4. Aerosols generated during beryllium machining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martyny, J W; Hoover, M D; Mroz, M M; Ellis, K; Maier, L A; Sheff, K L; Newman, L S

    2000-01-01

    Some beryllium processes, especially machining, are associated with an increased risk of beryllium sensitization and disease. Little is known about exposure characteristics contributing to risk, such as particle size. This study examined the characteristics of beryllium machining exposures under actual working conditions. Stationary samples, using eight-stage Lovelace Multijet Cascade Impactors, were taken at the process point of operation and at the closest point that the worker would routinely approach. Paired samples were collected at the operator's breathing zone by using a Marple Personal Cascade Impactor and a 35-mm closed-faced cassette. More than 50% of the beryllium machining particles in the breathing zone were less than 10 microns in aerodynamic diameter. This small particle size may result in beryllium deposition into the deepest portion of the lung and may explain elevated rates of sensitization among beryllium machinists.

  5. 10 CFR 850.33 - Beryllium emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Beryllium emergencies. 850.33 Section 850.33 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements § 850.33 Beryllium emergencies. (a) The responsible employer must comply with 29 CFR 1910.120(l) for...

  6. Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping in Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiler, Stephan; Deistung, Andreas; Schweser, Ferdinand; Franthal, Sebastian; Homayoon, Nina; Katschnig-Winter, Petra; Koegl-Wallner, Mariella; Pendl, Tamara; Stoegerer, Eva Maria; Wenzel, Karoline; Fazekas, Franz; Ropele, Stefan; Reichenbach, Jürgen Rainer; Schmidt, Reinhold; Schwingenschuh, Petra

    2016-01-01

    Background Quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) and R2* relaxation rate mapping have demonstrated increased iron deposition in the substantia nigra of patients with idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (PD). However, the findings in other subcortical deep gray matter nuclei are converse and the sensitivity of QSM and R2* for morphological changes and their relation to clinical measures of disease severity has so far been investigated only sparsely. Methods The local ethics committee approved this study and all subjects gave written informed consent. 66 patients with idiopathic Parkinson’s disease and 58 control subjects underwent quantitative MRI at 3T. Susceptibility and R2* maps were reconstructed from a spoiled multi-echo 3D gradient echo sequence. Mean susceptibilities and R2* rates were measured in subcortical deep gray matter nuclei and compared between patients with PD and controls as well as related to clinical variables. Results Compared to control subjects, patients with PD had increased R2* values in the substantia nigra. QSM also showed higher susceptibilities in patients with PD in substantia nigra, in the nucleus ruber, thalamus, and globus pallidus. Magnetic susceptibility of several of these structures was correlated with the levodopa-equivalent daily dose (LEDD) and clinical markers of motor and non-motor disease severity (total MDS-UPDRS, MDS-UPDRS-I and II). Disease severity as assessed by the Hoehn & Yahr scale was correlated with magnetic susceptibility in the substantia nigra. Conclusion The established finding of higher R2* rates in the substantia nigra was extended by QSM showing superior sensitivity for PD-related tissue changes in nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathways. QSM additionally reflected the levodopa-dosage and disease severity. These results suggest a more widespread pathologic involvement and QSM as a novel means for its investigation, more sensitive than current MRI techniques. PMID:27598250

  7. Beryllium Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... aerospace, aircraft manufacture and maintenance, computer, dental laboratories, telecommunications, and foundries and metal reclamation. How Can I ... if exposure stops. Beryllium usually affects the respiratory system, although it can affect other parts of the ...

  8. Novel susceptibility genes in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Colin Noble; Elaine Nimmo; Daniel Gaya; Richard K Russell; Jack Satsangi

    2006-01-01

    The inflammatory bowel disease, Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, are polygenic disorders with important environmental interactions. To date, the most widely adopted approach to identifying susceptibility genes in complex diseases has involved genome wide linkage studies followed by studies of positional candidate genes in loci of interest. This review encompasses data from studies into novel candidate genes implicated in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease. Novel techniques to identify candidate genes-genome wide association studies, yeast-two hybrid screening, microarray gene expression studies and proteomic profiling,are also reviewed and their potential role in unravelling the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease are discussed.

  9. Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals and Disease Susceptibility

    OpenAIRE

    Schug, Thaddeus T; Janesick, Amanda; Blumberg, Bruce; Heindel, Jerrold J.

    2011-01-01

    Environmental chemicals have significant impacts on biological systems. Chemical exposures during early stages of development can disrupt normal patterns of development and thus dramatically alter disease susceptibility later in life. Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) interfere with the body's endocrine system and produce adverse developmental, reproductive, neurological, cardiovascular, metabolic and immune effects in humans. A wide range of substances, both natural and man-made, are tho...

  10. Susceptibility-weighted Imaging in Neurovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyn, Chris; Alcaide-Leon, Paula; Bharatha, Aditya; Sussman, Marshall S; Kucharczyk, Walter; Mandell, Daniel M

    2016-04-01

    Susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) has become an important imaging sequence in the evaluation of patients with neurovascular disease. In this review, we provide a general overview of the physics of SWI and describe how image contrast is produced with this technique. We provide a general approach and differential diagnosis for 2 commonly encountered radiographic patterns seen with SWI in neurovascular disease. Finally, we discuss specific neurovascular applications of SWI, including its application in acute stroke, vascular malformations, venous thrombosis, and evaluation of cerebral microbleeds.

  11. Characterization of Shocked Beryllium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cady, Carl M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Adams, Chris D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hull, Lawrence M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gray III, George T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Prime, Michael B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Addessio, Francis L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wynn, Thomas A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brown, Eric N [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-24

    Beryllium metal has many excellent structural properties in addition to its unique radiation characteristics, including: high elastic modulus, low Poisson's ratio, low density, and high melting point. However, it suffers from several major mechanical drawbacks: 1) high anisotropy - due to its hexagonal lattice structure and its susceptibility to crystallographic texturing; 2) susceptibility to impurity-induced fracture - due to grain boundary segregation; and 3) low intrinsic ductility at ambient temperatures thereby limiting fabricability. While large ductility results from deformation under the conditions of compression, the material can exhibit a brittle behavior under tension. Furthermore, there is a brittle to ductile transition at approximately 200 C under tensile conditions. While numerous studies have investigated the low-strain-rate constitutive response of beryllium, the combined influence of high strain rate and temperature on the mechanical behavior and microstructure of beryllium has received limited attention over the last 40 years. Prior studies have focused on tensile loading behavior, or limited conditions of dynamic strain rate and/or temperature. The beryllium used in this study was Grade S200-F (Brush Wellman, Inc., Elmore, OH) material. The work focused on high strain rate deformation and examine the validity of constitutive models in deformation rate regimes, including shock, the experiments were modeled using a Lagrangian hydrocode. Two constitutive strength (plasticity) models, the Preston-Tonks-Wallace (PTW) and Mechanical Threshold Stress (MTS) models, were calibrated using the same set of quasi-static and Hopkinson bar data taken at temperatures from 77K to 873K and strain rates from 0.001/sec to 4300/sec. In spite of being calibrated on the same data, the two models give noticeably different results when compared with the measured wave profiles. These high strain rate tests were conducted using both explosive drive and a gas gun to

  12. OVERVIEW OF BERYLLIUM SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brisson, M

    2009-04-01

    Because of its unique properties as a lightweight metal with high tensile strength, beryllium is widely used in applications including cell phones, golf clubs, aerospace, and nuclear weapons. Beryllium is also encountered in industries such as aluminium manufacturing, and in environmental remediation projects. Workplace exposure to beryllium particulates is a growing concern, as exposure to minute quantities of anthropogenic forms of beryllium may lead to sensitization and to chronic beryllium disease, which can be fatal and for which no cure is currently known. Furthermore, there is no known exposure-response relationship with which to establish a 'safe' maximum level of beryllium exposure. As a result, the current trend is toward ever lower occupational exposure limits, which in turn make exposure assessment, both in terms of sampling and analysis, more challenging. The problems are exacerbated by difficulties in sample preparation for refractory forms of beryllium, such as beryllium oxide, and by indications that some beryllium forms may be more toxic than others. This chapter provides an overview of sources and uses of beryllium, health risks, and occupational exposure limits. It also provides a general overview of sampling, analysis, and data evaluation issues that will be explored in greater depth in the remaining chapters. The goal of this book is to provide a comprehensive resource to aid personnel in a wide variety of disciplines in selecting sampling and analysis methods that will facilitate informed decision-making in workplace and environmental settings.

  13. Susceptibility to Infectious Diseases Based on Antimicrobial Peptide Production▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas-Santiago, Bruno; Serrano, Carmen J.; Enciso-Moreno, J. Antonio

    2009-01-01

    In the last few years, the great impact of antimicrobial peptides on infectious disease susceptibility and natural resistance has been reported. In some cases, susceptibility to diseases is related to antimicrobial peptide polymorphisms and gene copy numbers, but for the vast majority of infectious diseases, these phenomena need to be elucidated. This review is focused on the current knowledge about susceptibility and resistance conferred by genetic variations in antimicrobial peptide expression in infectious diseases. PMID:19703980

  14. Susceptibility to infectious diseases based on antimicrobial peptide production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas-Santiago, Bruno; Serrano, Carmen J; Enciso-Moreno, J Antonio

    2009-11-01

    In the last few years, the great impact of antimicrobial peptides on infectious disease susceptibility and natural resistance has been reported. In some cases, susceptibility to diseases is related to antimicrobial peptide polymorphisms and gene copy numbers, but for the vast majority of infectious diseases, these phenomena need to be elucidated. This review is focused on the current knowledge about susceptibility and resistance conferred by genetic variations in antimicrobial peptide expression in infectious diseases.

  15. Joining of Beryllium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldberg, A

    2006-02-01

    A handbook dealing with the many aspects of beryllium that would be important for the users of this metal is currently being prepared. With an introduction on the applications, advantages and limitations in the use of this metal the following topics will be discussed in this handbook: physical, thermal, and nuclear properties; extraction from the ores; purification and casting of ingots; production and types of beryllium powders; consolidation methods, grades, and properties; mechanical properties with emphasis on the various factors affecting these properties; forming and mechanical working; welding, brazing, bonding, and fastening; machining; powder deposition; corrosion; health aspects; and examples of production of components. This report consists of ''Section X--Joining'' from the handbook. The prefix X is maintained here for the figures, tables and references. In this section the different methods used for joining beryllium and the advantages, disadvantages and limitations of each are presented. The methods discussed are fusion welding, brazing, solid state bonding (diffusion bonding and deformation bonding), soldering, and mechanical fastening. Since beryllium has a high affinity for oxygen and nitrogen with the formation of oxides and nitrides, considerable care must be taken on heating the metal, to protect it from the ambient atmosphere. In addition, mating surfaces must be cleaned and joints must be designed to minimize residual stresses as well as locations for stress concentration (notch effects). In joining any two metals the danger exists of having galvanic corrosion if the part is subjected to moisture or to any type of corroding environment. This becomes a problem if the less noble (anodic) metal has a significantly smaller area than the more noble (cathodic) metal since the ions (positive charges) from the anodic (corroding) metal must correspond to the number of electrons (negative charges) involved at the cathode. Beryllium

  16. Endocrine disrupting chemicals and disease susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schug, Thaddeus T; Janesick, Amanda; Blumberg, Bruce; Heindel, Jerrold J

    2011-11-01

    Environmental chemicals have significant impacts on biological systems. Chemical exposures during early stages of development can disrupt normal patterns of development and thus dramatically alter disease susceptibility later in life. Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) interfere with the body's endocrine system and produce adverse developmental, reproductive, neurological, cardiovascular, metabolic and immune effects in humans. A wide range of substances, both natural and man-made, are thought to cause endocrine disruption, including pharmaceuticals, dioxin and dioxin-like compounds, polychlorinated biphenyls, DDT and other pesticides, and components of plastics such as bisphenol A (BPA) and phthalates. EDCs are found in many everyday products--including plastic bottles, metal food cans, detergents, flame retardants, food additives, toys, cosmetics, and pesticides. EDCs interfere with the synthesis, secretion, transport, activity, or elimination of natural hormones. This interference can block or mimic hormone action, causing a wide range of effects. This review focuses on the mechanisms and modes of action by which EDCs alter hormone signaling. It also includes brief overviews of select disease endpoints associated with endocrine disruption.

  17. Prioritization of Disease Susceptibility Genes Using LSM/SVD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Lejun; Yang, Ronggen; Yan, Qin; Sun, Xiao

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the role of genetics in diseases is one of the most important tasks in the postgenome era. It is generally too expensive and time consuming to perform experimental validation for all candidate genes related to disease. Computational methods play important roles for prioritizing these candidates. Herein, we propose an approach to prioritize disease genes using latent semantic mapping based on singular value decomposition. Our hypothesis is that similar functional genes are likely to cause similar diseases. Measuring the functional similarity between known disease susceptibility genes and unknown genes is to predict new disease susceptibility genes. Taking autism as an instance, the analysis results of the top ten genes prioritized demonstrate they might be autism susceptibility genes, which also indicates our approach could discover new disease susceptibility genes. The novel approach of disease gene prioritization could discover new disease susceptibility genes, and latent disease-gene relations. The prioritized results could also support the interpretive diversity and experimental views as computational evidence for disease researchers.

  18. Beryllium chemistry and processing

    CERN Document Server

    Walsh, Kenneth A

    2009-01-01

    This book introduces beryllium; its history, its chemical, mechanical, and physical properties including nuclear properties. The 29 chapters include the mineralogy of beryllium and the preferred global sources of ore bodies. The identification and specifics of the industrial metallurgical processes used to form oxide from the ore and then metal from the oxide are thoroughly described. The special features of beryllium chemistry are introduced, including analytical chemical practices. Beryllium compounds of industrial interest are identified and discussed. Alloying, casting, powder processing, forming, metal removal, joining and other manufacturing processes are covered. The effect of composition and process on the mechanical and physical properties of beryllium alloys assists the reader in material selection. The physical metallurgy chapter brings conformity between chemical and physical metallurgical processing of beryllium, metal, alloys, and compounds. The environmental degradation of beryllium and its all...

  19. The bioinorganic chemistry and associated immunology of chronic beryllium disease†

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCleskey, T. Mark; Chaudhary, Anu; Hong-Geller, Elizabeth; Gnanakaran, S.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic beryllium disease (CBD) is a debilitating, incurable, and often fatal disease that is caused by the inhalation of beryllium particulates. The growing use of beryllium in the modern world, in products ranging from computers to dental prosthetics (390 tons of beryllium in the US in the year 2000) necessitates a molecular based understanding of the disease in order to prevent and cure CBD. We have investigated the molecular basis of CBD at Los Alamos National Laboratory during the past six years, employing a multidisciplinary approach of bioinorganic chemistry and immunology. The results of this work, including speciation, inhalation and dissolution, and immunology will be discussed. PMID:18566702

  20. Novel disease susceptibility factors for fungal necrotrophic pathogens in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albor Dobón

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Host cells use an intricate signaling system to respond to invasions by pathogenic microorganisms. Although several signaling components of disease resistance against necrotrophic fungal pathogens have been identified, our understanding for how molecular components and host processes contribute to plant disease susceptibility is rather sparse. Here, we identified four transcription factors (TFs from Arabidopsis that limit pathogen spread. Arabidopsis mutants defective in any of these TFs displayed increased disease susceptibility to Botrytis cinerea and Plectosphaerella cucumerina, and a general activation of non-immune host processes that contribute to plant disease susceptibility. Transcriptome analyses revealed that the mutants share a common transcriptional signature of 77 up-regulated genes. We characterized several of the up-regulated genes that encode peptides with a secretion signal, which we named PROVIR (for provirulence factors. Forward and reverse genetic analyses revealed that many of the PROVIRs are important for disease susceptibility of the host to fungal necrotrophs. The TFs and PROVIRs identified in our work thus represent novel genetic determinants for plant disease susceptibility to necrotrophic fungal pathogens.

  1. (Beryllium). Internal Report No. 137, Jan. 15, 1958; Le beryllium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mouret, P.; Rigaud, A

    1959-07-01

    After a brief summary of the physical and chemical properties of beryllium, the various chemical treatments which can be applied to beryllium minerals either directly or after a physical enrichment are discussed. These various treatments give either the hydroxide or beryllium salts, from which either beryllium oxide or metallic beryllium can easily be obtained. The purification, analysis and uses of beryllium are also briefly discussed. (author)

  2. In vivo quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM in Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Acosta-Cabronero

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: This study explores the magnetostatic properties of the Alzheimer's disease brain using a recently proposed, magnetic resonance imaging, postprocessed contrast mechanism. Quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM has the potential to monitor in vivo iron levels by reconstructing magnetic susceptibility sources from field perturbations. However, with phase data acquired at a single head orientation, the technique relies on several theoretical approximations and requires fast-evolving regularisation strategies. METHODS: In this context, the present study describes a complete methodological framework for magnetic susceptibility measurements with a review of its theoretical foundations. FINDINGS AND SIGNIFICANCE: The regional and whole-brain cross-sectional comparisons between Alzheimer's disease subjects and matched controls indicate that there may be significant magnetic susceptibility differences for deep brain nuclei--particularly the putamen--as well as for posterior grey and white matter regions. The methodology and findings described suggest that the QSM method is ready for larger-scale clinical studies.

  3. Nutrition and genetic susceptibility to common diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motulsky, A G

    1992-06-01

    Genetic factors play a role in chronic disease and conditions such as coronary heart disease, hypertension, and obesity. Individual responses to nutritional factors involved in such conditions vary depending upon a person's genetic make-up. The role of individual genes is best understood for the hyperlipidemias that predispose to coronary heart disease. Until more and better information on gene-nutritional interactions is available, general population-wide recommendations regarding a prudent diet appear reasonable. At the same time, high risk screening for certain conditions such as the hyperlipidemias is appropriate.

  4. Life style factors and acquired susceptibility to environmental disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, W W

    2001-10-01

    Multifactorial risk factors are responsible for many diseases. They can be broadly categorized as environmental, genetic and life style factors. Much attention has been focused on the first two categories, e.g. the identification of environmental toxicants/carcinogens and the elucidation of genetic susceptibility to disease. Life style risk factors such as aging, poor nutrition, infection and exposure to toxicants can also increase susceptibility to illnesses. These life style factors can therefore be considered to cause acquired susceptibility for increased risk for environmental disease. Among Egyptians, infection with the parasite, Schistosoma, is the primary risk factor for bladder cancer and the risk is enhanced by exposure to mutagenic chemicals. We have shown that inheritance of susceptible metabolizing genes that can increase body burden of mutagenic chemicals enhances the risk. We have also hypothesized that chronic exposure to mutagenic chemicals causes cellular abnormalities that can reduce the capacity of cells to repair DNA damage and thus increase the risk for environmental disease. We have used a challenge assay to show that cells from cigarette smokers and from populations exposed to uranium, butadiene and pesticides have abnormal DNA repair responses compared to matched controls. On the other hand, the response is normal in workers exposed to very low concentrations of butadiene and benzene, and in mothers who had children with birth defects. This suggests that exposure to high enough concentrations of certain mutagens can cause acquired susceptibility in human populations. The acquired susceptibility is expected to interact with environmental factors and with genetic susceptibility to increase risk for environmental disease.

  5. Beryllium: genotoxicity and carcinogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Terry; Bowser, Darlene

    2003-12-10

    Beryllium (Be) has physical-chemical properties, including low density and high tensile strength, which make it useful in the manufacture of products ranging from space shuttles to golf clubs. Despite its utility, a number of standard setting agencies have determined that beryllium is a carcinogen. Only a limited number of studies, however, have addressed the underlying mechanisms of the carcinogenicity and mutagenicity of beryllium. Importantly, mutation and chromosomal aberration assays have yielded somewhat contradictory results for beryllium compounds and whereas bacterial tests were largely negative, mammalian test systems showed evidence of beryllium-induced mutations, chromosomal aberrations, and cell transformation. Although inter-laboratory differences may play a role in the variability observed in genotoxicity assays, it is more likely that the different chemical forms of beryllium have a significant effect on mutagenicity and carcinogenicity. Because workers are predominantly exposed to airborne particles which are generated during the machining of beryllium metal, ceramics, or alloys, testing of the mechanisms of the mutagenic and carcinogenic activity of beryllium should be performed with relevant chemical forms of beryllium.

  6. Mitochondrial genetics and obesity: evolutionary adaptation and contemporary disease susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham-Snary, Kimberly J; Ballinger, Scott W

    2013-12-01

    Obesity is a leading risk factor for a variety of metabolic diseases including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and cancer. Although in its simplest terms, obesity may be thought of as a consequence of excessive caloric intake and sedentary lifestyle, it is also evident that individual propensity for weight gain can vary. The etiology of individual susceptibility to obesity seems to be complex-involving a combination of environmental-genetic interactions. Herein, we suggest that the mitochondrion plays a major role in influencing individual susceptibility to this disease via mitochondrial-nuclear interaction processes and that environmentally influenced selection events for mitochondrial function that conveyed increased reproductive and survival success during the global establishment of human populations during prehistoric times can influence individual susceptibility to weight gain and obesity. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Beryllium Desorption from Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boschi, V.; Willenbring, J. K.

    2015-12-01

    Beryllium isotopes have provided a useful tool in the field of geochronology and geomorphology over the last 25 years. The amount of cosmogenic meteoric 10Be and native 9Be absorbed to soils often scales with the residence time and chemical weathering of sediments in a landscape, respectively. Thus, the concentrations in river sediment may be used to quantify the denudation of specific watersheds. When deposited in ocean sediment, these concentrations are thought to record the history of denudation on Earth over the last ~10 Ma. The use of both isotopes often relies on the premise of beryllium retention to sediment surfaces in order to preserve a landscape's erosion and weathering signature. Changes in setting, en route from the soil to fluvial system to the ocean, can cause beryllium desorption and may preclude some applications of the 10Be/9Be system. Four mechanisms were tested to determine the desorption potential of beryllium including a reduction in pH, an increase in ionic strength and complexation with soluble organic and inorganic species. These processes have the potential to mobilize beryllium into solution. For example, by both reducing the pH and increasing the ionic strength, competition for adsorption sites increases, potentially liberating beryllium from the sediment surface. In addition, organic and inorganic ligands can complex beryllium causing it to become mobilized. To determine which of these alterations influence beryllium desorption and to quantify the effect, we prepared separate solutions of beryllium bound to minerals and organic compounds and measured beryllium concentrations in solution before and after adjusting the pH, ionic strength, and changing inorganic and organic ligand concentrations. We conclude from our observations that overall, beryllium sorbed to organic compounds was more resistant to desorption relative to mineral-associated beryllium. Among the methods tested, a reduction in pH resulted in the greatest amount of

  8. Occupational Exposure to Beryllium. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-09

    The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is amending its existing standards for occupational exposure to beryllium and beryllium compounds. OSHA has determined that employees exposed to beryllium at the previous permissible exposure limits face a significant risk of material impairment to their health. The evidence in the record for this rulemaking indicates that workers exposed to beryllium are at increased risk of developing chronic beryllium disease and lung cancer. This final rule establishes new permissible exposure limits of 0.2 micrograms of beryllium per cubic meter of air (0.2 [mu]g/m\\3\\) as an 8-hour time-weighted average and 2.0 [mu]g/m\\3\\ as a short-term exposure limit determined over a sampling period of 15 minutes. It also includes other provisions to protect employees, such as requirements for exposure assessment, methods for controlling exposure, respiratory protection, personal protective clothing and equipment, housekeeping, medical surveillance, hazard communication, and recordkeeping. OSHA is issuing three separate standards--for general industry, for shipyards, and for construction--in order to tailor requirements to the circumstances found in these sectors.

  9. Validation of cleaning method for various parts fabricated at a Beryllium facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Cynthia M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-12-15

    This study evaluated and documented a cleaning process that is used to clean parts that are fabricated at a beryllium facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The purpose of evaluating this cleaning process was to validate and approve it for future use to assure beryllium surface levels are below the Department of Energy’s release limits without the need to sample all parts leaving the facility. Inhaling or coming in contact with beryllium can cause an immune response that can result in an individual becoming sensitized to beryllium, which can then lead to a disease of the lungs called chronic beryllium disease, and possibly lung cancer. Thirty aluminum and thirty stainless steel parts were fabricated on a lathe in the beryllium facility, as well as thirty-two beryllium parts, for the purpose of testing a parts cleaning method that involved the use of ultrasonic cleaners. A cleaning method was created, documented, validated, and approved, to reduce beryllium contamination.

  10. Characteristics of beryllium exposure to small particles at a beryllium production facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virji, M Abbas; Stefaniak, Aleksandr B; Day, Gregory A; Stanton, Marcia L; Kent, Michael S; Kreiss, Kathleen; Schuler, Christine R

    2011-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have reported process-specific elevated prevalence of beryllium sensitization (BeS) and chronic beryllium disease (CBD) among workers. However, exposure-response relationships have been inconsistent, possibly due to incomplete characterization of many biologically relevant aspects of exposure, including particle size. In 1999, two surveys were conducted 3-5 months apart at a beryllium metal, oxide, and alloy production facility during which personal impactor samples (n = 198) and personal 37-mm closed-face cassette (CFC) 'total' samples (n = 4026) were collected. Among process areas, median particle mass median aerodynamic diameter ranged from 5 to 14 μm. A large fraction of the beryllium aerosol was in the nonrespirable size range. Respirable beryllium concentrations were among the highest for oxide production [geometric mean (GM) = 2.02 μg m⁻³, geometric standard deviation (GSD) = 1.3] and pebbles plant (GM = 1.05 μg m⁻³, GSD = 2.9), areas historically associated with high risk of BeS and CBD. The relationship between GM 'CFC total' and GM respirable beryllium for jobs varied by process areas; the rank order of the jobs showed high overall consistency (Spearman r = 0.84), but the overall correlation was moderate (Pearson r = 0.43). Total beryllium concentrations varied greatly within and between workers among process areas; within-worker variance was larger than between-worker variance for most processes. A review of exposure characteristics among process areas revealed variation in chemical forms and solubility. Process areas with high risk of BeS and CBD had exposure to both soluble and insoluble forms of beryllium. Consideration of biologically relevant aspects of exposure such as beryllium particle size distribution, chemical form, and solubility will likely improve exposure assessment.

  11. Beryllium sulfate induces p21 CDKN1A expression and a senescence-like cell cycle arrest in susceptible cancer cell types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorjala, Priyatham; Gary, Ronald K

    2010-12-01

    In fibroblasts, beryllium salt causes activation of the p53 transcription factor and induction of a senescence-like state. It is not known whether Be(2+) can affect the proliferation of cancer cells, which are generally unsusceptible to senescence. A172 glioblastoma and RKO colon carcinoma cell lines each have wildtype p53, so these cell types have the potential to be responsive to agents that activate p53. In A172 cells, BeSO(4) produced a G(0)/G(1)-phase cell cycle arrest and increased expression of senescence-associated β-galactosidase, an enzymatic marker of senescence. BeSO(4) caused phosphorylation of serine-15 of p53, accumulation of p53 protein, and expression of p21, the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor that is prominent during senescence. BeSO(4) inhibited A172 growth with an IC(50) = 4.7 μM in a 6-day proliferation assay. In contrast, BeSO(4) had no effect on RKO cells, even though Be(2+) uptake was similar for the two cell types. This differential responsiveness marks BeSO(4) as a reagent capable of activating a separable branch of the p53 signaling network. A172 and RKO cells are known to exhibit p53-dependent upregulation of p21 in response to DNA damage. The RKO cells produced high levels of p21 when exposed to DNA damaging agents, yet failed to express p21 when treated with BeSO(4). Conversely, BeSO(4) did not cause DNA damage in A172 cells, yet it was a potent inducer of p21 expression. These observations indicate that the growth control pathway affected by BeSO(4) is distinct from the DNA damage response pathway, even though both ultimately converge on p53 and p21.

  12. Cooperativity in beryllium bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkorta, Ibon; Elguero, José; Yáñez, Manuel; Mó, Otilia

    2014-03-07

    A theoretical study of the beryllium bonded clusters of the (iminomethyl)beryllium hydride and (iminomethyl)beryllium fluoride [HC(BeX)=NH, X = H, F] molecules has been carried out at the B3LYP/6-311++G(3df,2p) level of theory. Linear and cyclic clusters have been characterized up to the decamer. The geometric, energetic, electronic and NMR properties of the clusters clearly indicate positive cooperativity. The evolution of the molecular properties, as the size of the cluster increases, is similar to those reported in polymers held together by hydrogen bonds.

  13. Possible health risks from low level exposure to beryllium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stange, A W; Hilmas, D E; Furman, F J

    1996-07-17

    The first case of chronic beryllium disease (CBD) at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Rocky Flats) was diagnosed in a machinist in 1984. Rocky Flats, located 16 miles northwest of Denver, Colorado, is part of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear weapons complex. Research and development operations using beryllium began at Rocky Flats in 1953, and beryllium production operations began in 1957. Exposures could have occurred during foundry operations, casting, shearing, rolling, cutting, welding, machining, sanding, polishing, assembly, and chemical analysis operations. The Beryllium Health Surveillance Program (BHSP) was established in June 1991 at Rocky Flats to provide health surveillance for beryllium exposed employees using the Lymphocyte Proliferation Test (LPT) to identify sensitized individuals. Of the 29 cases of CBD and 76 cases of beryllium sensitization identified since 1991, several cases appear to have had only minimal opportunistic exposures to beryllium, since they were employed in administrative functions rather than primary beryllium operations. In conjunction with other health surveillance programs, a questionnaire and interview are administered to obtain detailed work and health histories. These histories, along with other data, are utilized to estimate the extent of an individual's exposure. Additional surveillance is in progress to attempt to characterize the possible risks from intermittent or brief exposures to beryllium in the workplace.

  14. Breed susceptibility for developmental orthopedic diseases in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaFond, Elizabeth; Breur, Gert J; Austin, Connie C

    2002-01-01

    A large-scale epidemiological study was conducted to determine breeds at risk for 12 developmental orthopedic diseases (DODs). Developmental orthopedic diseases investigated included canine hip dysplasia (CHD); craniomandibular osteopathy (CMO); fragmented coronoid process; hypertrophic osteodystrophy; Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease; osteochondrosis of the medial humeral condyle, caudal humeral head, femoral condyles, and talar trochlear ridges; panosteitis; patella luxation; and ununited anconeal process. Dogs that were diagnosed with any one of the diseases of interest at any of 10 veterinary teaching hospitals participating in the Veterinary Medical Database from 1986 to 1995 were included as cases. Odds ratios and corresponding 95% confidence intervals were calculated to determine risk. Frequency of diagnosis during the 10-year period ranged from 35 cases (CMO) to 10,637 cases (CHD). The number of breeds at increased risk for a disease ranged from one (CMO) to 35 (CHD). Breed susceptibility for a DOD may suggest a genetic component in the disease etiology. The results of this study serve to increase veterinarians' awareness of breeds susceptible to DODs and may facilitate the control of such diseases by identifying breeds that might benefit from breeding programs or environmental intervention such as dietary modification.

  15. Common variants in CASP3 confer susceptibility to Kawasaki disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onouchi, Yoshihiro; Ozaki, Kouichi; Buns, Jane C; Shimizu, Chisato; Hamada, Hiromichi; Honda, Takafumi; Terai, Masaru; Honda, Akihito; Takeuchi, Takashi; Shibuta, Shoichi; Suenaga, Tomohiro; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Higashi, Kouji; Yasukawa, Kumi; Suzuki, Yoichi; Sasago, Kumiko; Kemmotsu, Yasushi; Takatsuki, Shinichi; Saji, Tsutomu; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi; Nagai, Toshiro; Hamamoto, Kunihiro; Kishi, Fumio; Ouchi, Kazunobu; Sato, Yoshitake; Newburger, Jane W; Baker, Annette L; Shulman, Stanford T; Rowley, Anne H; Yashiro, Mayumi; Nakamura, Yoshikazu; Wakui, Keiko; Fukushima, Yoshimitsu; Fujino, Akihiro; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Kawasaki, Tomisaku; Hata, Akira; Nakamura, Yusuke; Tanaka, Toshihiro

    2010-07-15

    Kawasaki disease (KD; OMIM 611775) is an acute vasculitis syndrome which predominantly affects small- and medium-sized arteries of infants and children. Epidemiological data suggest that host genetics underlie the disease pathogenesis. Here we report that multiple variants in the caspase-3 gene (CASP3) that are in linkage disequilibrium confer susceptibility to KD in both Japanese and US subjects of European ancestry. We found that a G to A substitution of one commonly associated SNP located in the 5' untranslated region of CASP3 (rs72689236; P = 4.2 x 10(-8) in the Japanese and P = 3.7 x 10(-3) in the European Americans) abolished binding of nuclear factor of activated T cells to the DNA sequence surrounding the SNP. Our findings suggest that altered CASP3 expression in immune effecter cells influences susceptibility to KD.

  16. [Susceptible and resistant factors in neuro-immune disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Shinya; Kira, Jun-ichi

    2013-05-01

    Neuro-immune diseases (NIDs) are caused by a complex interaction between multiple genetic and environmental factors, both of which can have some impacts on susceptibility or resistance to each disease. Remarkable advance in genome technology made possible the effective screening of thousands of single nucleotide polymorphisms in thousands of samples. Additionally, epidemiological science, supported by microbiology, immunology and biochemistry, has revealed many possible environmental factors. Integrating genetic and environmental research data will pave the way to inform and personalize therapeutic decision-making in NIDs. This review aims to discuss susceptible and resistant factors that have attracted the most attention in the recent years, especially focusing on multiple sclerosis, which is one of the most common NIDs.

  17. Beryllium and copper-beryllium alloys; Beryllium und Kupfer-Beryllium-Legierungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagel, Nikolaus [Materion Brush GmbH, Stuttgart (Germany). Operation and Quality/EH and S

    2017-02-15

    The light metal beryllium is a comparatively rare element, which today is primarily derived from bertrandite. It is mainly used as pure metal or in the form of copper-beryllium alloys, e.g., in automotive industry, aerospace, and electrical components. The wide range of applications is mainly attributed to the extremely high rigidity/density ratio. An overview of the history of the metal, its production, and recycling as well as the properties of CuBe alloys are given.

  18. Illness Absences Among Beryllium Sensitized Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Janice P.; Ellis, Elizabeth D.; Girardi, David J.; Cragle, Donna L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. This study examined absence rates among US Department of Energy workers who had beryllium sensitization (BeS) or were diagnosed with chronic beryllium disease (CBD) compared with those of other workers. Methods. We used the lymphocyte proliferation test to determine beryllium sensitivity. In addition, we applied multivariable logistic regression to compare absences from 2002 to 2011 between workers with BeS or CBD to those without, and survival analysis to compare time to first absence by beryllium sensitization status. Finally, we examined beryllium status by occupational group. Results. Fewer than 3% of the 19 305 workers were BeS, and workers with BeS or CBD had more total absences (odds ratio [OR] = 1.31; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.18, 1.46) and respiratory absences (OR = 1.51; 95% CI = 1.24, 1.84) than did other workers. Time to first absence for all causes and for respiratory conditions occurred earlier for workers with BeS or CBD than for other workers. Line operators and crafts personnel were at increased risk for BeS or CBD. Conclusions. Although not considered “diseased,” workers with BeS have higher absenteeism compared with nonsensitized workers. PMID:25211750

  19. Identification of HLA-DRPheβ47 as the susceptibility marker of hypersensitivity to beryllium in individuals lacking the berylliosis-associated supratypic marker HLA-DPGluβ69

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogliani Paola

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Susceptibility to beryllium (Be-hypersensitivity (BH has been associated with HLA-DP alleles carrying a glutamate at position 69 of the HLA-DP β-chain (HLA-DPGlu69 and with several HLA-DP, -DQ and -DR alleles and polymorphisms. However, no genetic associations have been found between BH affected subjects not carrying the HLA-DPGlu69 susceptibility marker. Methods In this report, we re-evaluated an already described patient populations after 7 years of follow-up including new 29 identified BH subjects. An overall population 36 berylliosis patients and 38 Be-sensitization without lung granulomas and 86 Be-exposed controls was analysed to assess the role of the individual HLA-class II polymorphisms associated with BH-susceptibility in HLA-DPGlu69 negative subjects by univariate and multivariate analysis. Results As previously observed in this population the HLA-DPGlu69 markers was present in higher frequency in berylliosis patients (31 out of 36, 86% than in Be-sensitized (21 out of 38, 55%, p = 0.008 vs berylliosis and 41 out of 86 (48%, p However, 22 subjects presenting BH did not carry the HLA-DPGlu69 marker. We thus evaluated the contribution of all the HLA-DR, -DP and -DQ polymorphisms in determining BH susceptibility in this subgroup of HLA-Glu69 subjects. In HLA-DPGlu69-negatives a significant association with BH was found for the HLA-DQLeu26, for the HLA-DRB1 locus residues Ser13, Tyr26, His32, Asn37, Phe47 and Arg74 and for the HLA-DRB3 locus clusterized residues Arg11, Tyr26, Asp28, Leu38, Ser60 and Arg74. HLA-DRPhe47 (OR 2.956, p Conclusion We conclude that HLA-DPGlu69 is the primary marker of Be-hypersensitivity and HLA-DRPhe47 is associated with BH in Glu69-negative subjects, likely playing a role in Be-presentation and sensitization.

  20. Influence of the factor V Leiden mutation on infectious disease susceptibility and outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benfield, Thomas L; Dahl, Mortens; Nordestgaard, Borge G

    2005-01-01

    The effect of the coagulation factor V Leiden mutation on infectious disease susceptibility and outcome is controversial.......The effect of the coagulation factor V Leiden mutation on infectious disease susceptibility and outcome is controversial....

  1. Dissolution of beryllium in artificial lung alveolar macrophage phagolysosomal fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefaniak, Aleksandr B; Virji, M Abbas; Day, Gregory A

    2011-05-01

    Dissolution of a lung burden of poorly soluble beryllium particles is hypothesized to be necessary for development of chronic beryllium lung disease (CBD) in humans. As such, particle dissolution rate must be sufficient to activate the lung immune response and dissolution lifetime sufficient to maintain chronic inflammation for months to years to support development of disease. The purpose of this research was to investigate the hypothesis that poorly soluble beryllium compounds release ions via dissolution in lung fluid. Dissolution kinetics of 17 poorly soluble particulate beryllium materials that span extraction through ceramics machining (ores, hydroxide, metal, copper-beryllium [CuBe] fume, oxides) and three CuBe alloy reference materials (chips, solid block) were measured over 31 d using artificial lung alveolar macrophage phagolysosomal fluid (pH 4.5). Differences in beryllium-containing particle physicochemical properties translated into differences in dissolution rates and lifetimes in artificial phagolysosomal fluid. Among all materials, dissolution rate constant values ranged from 10(-5) to 10(-10)gcm(-2)d(-1) and half-times ranged from tens to thousands of days. The presence of magnesium trisilicate in some beryllium oxide materials may have slowed dissolution rates. Materials associated with elevated prevalence of CBD had faster beryllium dissolution rates [10(-7)-10(-8)gcm(-2)d(-1)] than materials not associated with elevated prevalence (p<0.05).

  2. Prioritisation and network analysis of Crohn's disease susceptibility genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Muraro

    Full Text Available Recent Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS have revealed numerous Crohn's disease susceptibility genes and a key challenge now is in understanding how risk polymorphisms in associated genes might contribute to development of this disease. For a gene to contribute to disease phenotype, its risk variant will likely adversely communicate with a variety of other gene products to result in dysregulation of common signaling pathways. A vital challenge is to elucidate pathways of potentially greatest influence on pathological behaviour, in a manner recognizing how multiple relevant genes may yield integrative effect. In this work we apply mathematical analysis of networks involving the list of recently described Crohn's susceptibility genes, to prioritise pathways in relation to their potential development of this disease. Prioritisation was performed by applying a text mining and a diffusion based method (GRAIL, GPEC. Prospective biological significance of the resulting prioritised list of proteins is highlighted by changes in their gene expression levels in Crohn's patients intestinal tissue in comparison with healthy donors.

  3. Vitamin D receptor gene polymorphism: association with Crohn's disease susceptibility

    OpenAIRE

    Simmons, J.; Mullighan, C; Welsh, K; JEWELL, D

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene represents a strong positional candidate susceptibility gene for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The VDR gene maps to a region on chromosome 12 that has been shown to be linked to IBD by genome screening techniques. It is the cellular receptor for 1,25(OH)2 vitamin D3 (calcitriol) which has a wide range of different regulatory effects on the immune system. IBD is characterised by activation of the mucosal immune system.
AIM—To determine if polymo...

  4. Beryllium Health and Safety Committee Data Reporting Task Force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacQueen, D H

    2007-02-21

    On December 8, 1999, the Department of Energy (DOE) published Title 10 CFR 850 (hereafter referred to as the Rule) to establish a chronic beryllium disease prevention program (CBDPP) to: {sm_bullet} reduce the number of workers currently exposed to beryllium in the course of their work at DOE facilities managed by DOE or its contractors, {sm_bullet} minimize the levels of, and potential for, expos exposure to beryllium, and {sm_bullet} establish medical surveillance requirements to ensure early detection of the disease.

  5. Cardiovascular Disease Susceptibility and Resistance in Circumpolar Inuit Populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvermosegaard, Maria; Dahl-Petersen, Inger K; Nielsen, Nina Odgaard

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major public health issue in indigenous populations in the Arctic. These diseases have emerged concomitantly with profound social changes over the past 60 years. The aim of this study was to summarize the literature on CVD risk among Arctic Inuit. Literature...... CVD risk include aging of the population, genetic susceptibility, and a rapid increase in obesity, diabetes, and hypertension in parallel with decreasing physical activity and deterioration of the lipid profile. In contrast, and of great importance, there has been a decrease in smoking and alcohol...... intake (at least documented in Greenland), and contaminant levels are declining. Although there have been marked socioeconomic and dietary changes, it remains unsolved and to some extent controversial how this may have influenced cardiovascular risk among Arctic Inuit. The increase in life expectancy...

  6. Hydrological - pathological interactions: disease susceptibility, tree decline and ecohydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, S. E.; Levin, S. A.; Rodriguez-Iturbe, I.; Gilligan, C.

    2010-12-01

    Changing frequencies and altered ranges of plant disease are highlighted as a major risk associated with global climate change. The role of changing temperature in driving changes in disease risk has been well highlighted, but the influence of variability in rainfall has received less attention, despite the importance of surface moisture for spread of foliar pathogens, of soil moisture for the increase of root rots, and the role of drought and plant water potential in predisposing plants to stem-disease. Here we present a simple stochastic approach to link ecohydrological predictions of soil- and plant-water potentials to the risk of pathogen disease and resulting plant stress. The approach is applicable both to pathogens which require high soil moisture content to grow within their hosts, and to host plants whose susceptibility to pathogens increases during periods of drought. The results offer a framework to link climatic and edaphic drivers to the risk of disease, and highlight the complexity of interrelationships between climatic and pathogenic drivers of tree decline.

  7. Genetic variants of CD209 associated with Kawasaki disease susceptibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho-Chang Kuo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Kawasaki disease (KD is a systemic vasculitis with unknown etiology mainly affecting children in Asian countries. Dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3 grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN, CD209 in humans was showed to trigger an anti-inflammatory cascade and associated with KD susceptibility. This study was conducted to investigate the association between genetic polymorphisms of CD209 and the risk KD. METHODS: A total of 948 subjects (381 KD and 567 controls were recruited. Nine tagging SNPs (rs8112310, rs4804800, rs11465421, rs1544766, rs4804801, rs2287886, rs735239, rs735240, rs4804804 were selected for TaqMan allelic discrimination assay. Clinical phenotypes, coronary artery lesions (CAL and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG treatment outcomes were collected for analysis. RESULTS: Significant associations were found between CD209 polymorphisms (rs4804800, rs2287886, rs735240 and the risk of KD. Haplotype analysis for CD209 polymorphisms showed that A/A/G haplotype (P = 0.0002, OR = 1.61 and G/A/G haplotype (P = 0.0365, OR = 1.52 had higher risk of KD as compared with G/G/A haplotype in rs2287886/rs735239/rs735240 pairwise allele analysis. There were no significant association in KD with regards to CAL formation and IVIG treatment responses. CONCLUSION: CD209 polymorphisms were responsible for the susceptibility of KD, but not CAL formation and IVIG treatment responsiveness.

  8. Advances in Susceptibility Genetics of Intervertebral Degenerative Disc Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin'gang Zhang, Zhengming Sun, Jiangtao Liu, Xiong Guo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The traditional view that the etiology of lumbar disc herniation is primarily due to age, gender, occupation, smoking and exposure to vehicular vibration dominated much of the last century. Recent research indicates that heredity may be largely responsible for the degeneration as well as herniation of intervertebral discs. Since 1998, genetic influences have been confirmed by the identification of several genes forms associated with disc degeneration. These researches are paving the way for a better understanding of the biologic mechanisms. Now, many researchers unanimously agree that lumbar disc herniation appears to be similar to other complex diseases, whose etiology has both environmental and hereditary influence, each with a part of contribution and relative risk. Then addressing the etiological of lumbar disc herniation, it is important to integrate heredity with the environment factors. For the purpose of this review, we have limited our discussion to several susceptibility genes associated with disc degeneration.

  9. Th17-Related Genes and Celiac Disease Susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medrano, Luz María; García-Magariños, Manuel; Dema, Bárbara; Espino, Laura; Maluenda, Carlos; Polanco, Isabel; Figueredo, M. Ángeles; Fernández-Arquero, Miguel; Núñez, Concepción

    2012-01-01

    Th17 cells are known to be involved in several autoimmune or inflammatory diseases. In celiac disease (CD), recent studies suggest an implication of those cells in disease pathogenesis. We aimed at studying the role of genes relevant for the Th17 immune response in CD susceptibility. A total of 101 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), mainly selected to cover most of the variability present in 16 Th17-related genes (IL23R, RORC, IL6R, IL17A, IL17F, CCR6, IL6, JAK2, TNFSF15, IL23A, IL22, STAT3, TBX21, SOCS3, IL12RB1 and IL17RA), were genotyped in 735 CD patients and 549 ethnically matched healthy controls. Case-control comparisons for each SNP and for the haplotypes resulting from the SNPs studied in each gene were performed using chi-square tests. Gene-gene interactions were also evaluated following different methodological approaches. No significant results emerged after performing the appropriate statistical corrections. Our results seem to discard a relevant role of Th17 cells on CD risk. PMID:22359581

  10. Th17-related genes and celiac disease susceptibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz María Medrano

    Full Text Available Th17 cells are known to be involved in several autoimmune or inflammatory diseases. In celiac disease (CD, recent studies suggest an implication of those cells in disease pathogenesis. We aimed at studying the role of genes relevant for the Th17 immune response in CD susceptibility. A total of 101 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, mainly selected to cover most of the variability present in 16 Th17-related genes (IL23R, RORC, IL6R, IL17A, IL17F, CCR6, IL6, JAK2, TNFSF15, IL23A, IL22, STAT3, TBX21, SOCS3, IL12RB1 and IL17RA, were genotyped in 735 CD patients and 549 ethnically matched healthy controls. Case-control comparisons for each SNP and for the haplotypes resulting from the SNPs studied in each gene were performed using chi-square tests. Gene-gene interactions were also evaluated following different methodological approaches. No significant results emerged after performing the appropriate statistical corrections. Our results seem to discard a relevant role of Th17 cells on CD risk.

  11. IL18 Gene Variants Influence the Susceptibility to Chagas Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon Rodriguez, Daniel A; Carmona, F. David; Echeverría, Luis Eduardo; González, Clara Isabel; Martin, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Chagas disease is a parasitic disorder caused by the infection with the flagellated protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. According to the World Health Organization, more than six million people are currently infected in endemic regions. Genetic factors have been proposed to influence predisposition to infection and development of severe clinical phenotypes like chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC). Interleukin 18 (IL18) encodes a proinflammatory cytokine that has been proposed to be involved in controlling T. cruzi infection. In this study, we analyzed the possible role of six IL18 gene variants (rs5744258, rs360722, rs2043055, rs187238, rs1946518 and rs360719), which cover most of the variation within the locus, in the susceptibility to infection by T. cruzi and/or CCC. In total, 1,171 individuals from a Colombian region endemic for Chagas disease, classified as seronegative (n = 595), seropositive asymptomatic (n = 175) and CCC (n = 401), were genotyped using TaqMan probes. Significant associations with T. cruzi infection were observed when comparing seronegative and seropositive individuals for rs187238 (P = 2.18E-03, OR = 0.77), rs360719 (P = 1.49E-03, OR = 0.76), rs2043055 (P = 2.52E-03, OR = 1.29), and rs1946518 (P = 0.0162, OR = 1.22). However, dependence analyses suggested that the association was mainly driven by the polymorphism rs360719. This variant is located within the promoter region of the IL18 gene, and it has been described that it creates a binding site for the transcription factor OCT-1 affecting IL-18 expression levels. In addition, no evidence of association was observed between any of the analyzed IL18 gene polymorphisms and the development of CCC. In summary, our data suggest that genetic variation within the promoter region of IL18 is directly involved in the susceptibility to infection by T. cruzi, which provides novel insight into disease pathophysiology and adds new perspectives to achieve a more effective disease control. PMID:27027876

  12. Reprocessing technology development for irradiated beryllium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamura, H.; Sakamoto, N. [Oarai Research Establishment, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Tatenuma, K. [KAKEN Co., Ibaraki-ken (Japan)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    At present, beryllium is under consideration as a main candidate material for neutron multiplier and plasma facing material in a fusion reactor. Therefore, it is necessary to develop the beryllium reprocessing technology for effective resource use. And, we have proposed reprocessing technology development on irradiated beryllium used in a fusion reactor. The preliminary reprocessing tests were performed using un-irradiated and irradiated beryllium. At first, we performed beryllium separation tests using un-irradiated beryllium specimens. Un-irradiated beryllium with beryllium oxide which is a main impurity and some other impurities were heat-treated under chlorine gas flow diluted with Ar gas. As the results high purity beryllium chloride was obtained in high yield. And it appeared that beryllium oxide and some other impurities were removed as the unreactive matter, and the other chloride impurities were separated by the difference of sublimation temperature on beryllium chloride. Next, we performed some kinds of beryllium purification tests from beryllium chloride. And, metallic beryllium could be recovered from beryllium chloride by the reduction with dry process. In addition, as the results of separation and purification tests using irradiated beryllium specimens, it appeared that separation efficiency of Co-60 from beryllium was above 96%. It is considered that about 4% Co-60 was carried from irradiated beryllium specimen in the form of cobalt chloride. And removal efficiency of tritium from irradiated beryllium was above 95%.

  13. PTPN22 gene polymorphisms in autoimmune diseases with special reference to systemic lupus erythematosus disease susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradhan V

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a prototype autoimmune disease. SLE is a result of one or more immune mechanisms, like autoantibody production, complement activation, multiple inflammation and immune complex deposition leading to organ tissue damage. SLE affected patients are susceptible to common and opportunistic infections. There are several reports suggesting that Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection precipitates SLE in patients from endemic areas. Genetic factors and environmental factors also play an important role in the overall susceptibility to SLE pathophysiology. Recently, protein tyrosine phosphatase, non-receptor type 22 (PTPN22 gene, has been found to be associated with several autoimmune diseases like SLE, Grave′s disease and Hashimoto thyroiditis. The missense R620W polymorphism, rs 2476601, in PTPN22 gene at the nucleotide 1858 in codon 620 (620Arg > Trp has been associated with autoimmune diseases. The PTPN22 locus is also found to be responsible for development of pulmonary tuberculosis in certain populations. The PTPN22 1858C/T gene locus will be ideal to look for SLE susceptibility to tuberculosis in the Indian population. In this review, we focus on human PTPN22 gene structure and function as well as the association of PTPN22 gene polymorphisms with SLE susceptibility

  14. Reduced immune function predicts disease susceptibility in frogs infected with a deadly fungal pathogen

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Savage, Anna E; Terrell, Kimberly A; Gratwicke, Brian; Mattheus, Nichole M; Augustine, Lauren; Fleischer, Robert C

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between amphibian immune function and disease susceptibility is of primary concern given current worldwide declines linked to the pathogenic fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd...

  15. HLA II class antigens and susceptibility to coeliac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojvodić Svetlana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Coeliac disease (CD is a systemic autoimmune, complex and multifactorial disorder, which is caused by interactions between genetic and environmental factors. The only established genetic risk factors so far are the human leucocyte antigens. The aim of this study was to assess the distribution of II class human leukocyte antigens (HLA in patients with coeliac disease and to investigate the susceptibility to coeliac disease in family members. We typed HLA DR and DQ antigens in 37 patients from Vojvodina with coeliac disease, 23 first-degree relatives, and 210 controls, serologically using standard lymphocytotoxicity technique. HLA DQ5(1, DQ6(1, DR11(5, DQ7(3, DQ2 and DR15(2 were the most common antigens in the control group. Frequency of HLA DQ2, DR3 and DR7 was higher in CD patients than in the control group. The relative risks for HLA DQ2, DR3 and DR7 were 4.846, 6.986 and 2.106, respectively, while positive association was found between HLA DQ2 and DR3 and CD. Frequency of HLA DQ2, DR3 and DR16(2 was higher in first-degree relatives than in the control group while a positive association was found between HLA DQ2 and DR3. A negative association was found between HLA DQ5(1 and DQ6(1 in coeliac patients from Vojvodina and their relatives, in addition to HLA DR11(5 in the group of relatives (RR=0.363,PF=0.232. These findings indicate the impact of the HLA testing for CD in clinical practice in order to rule out the possibility to CD in doubtful cases or in at-risk subjects.

  16. Beryllium detection in human lung tissue using electron probe X-ray microanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butnor, Kelly J; Sporn, Thomas A; Ingram, Peter; Gunasegaram, Sue; Pinto, John F; Roggli, Victor L

    2003-11-01

    Chronic berylliosis is an uncommon disease that is caused by the inhalation of beryllium particles, dust, or fumes. The distinction between chronic berylliosis and sarcoidosis can be difficult both clinically and histologically, as both entities can have similar presentations and exhibit nonnecrotizing granulomatous inflammation of the lungs. The diagnosis of chronic berylliosis relies on a history of exposure to beryllium, roentgenographic evidence of diffuse nodular disease, and demonstration of beryllium hypersensitivity by ancillary studies, such as lymphocyte proliferation testing. Additional support may be gained by the demonstration of beryllium in lung tissue. Unlike other exogenous particulates, such as asbestos, detection of beryllium in human lung tissue is problematic. The low atomic number of beryllium usually makes it unsuitable for conventional microprobe analysis. We describe a case of chronic berylliosis in which beryllium was detected in lung tissue using atmospheric thin-window energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (ATW EDXA). A woman with a history of occupational exposure to beryllium at a nuclear weapons testing facility presented with progressive cough and dyspnea and a nodular pattern on chest roentgenograph. Open lung biopsy showed nonnecrotizing granulomatous inflammation that was histologically indistinguishable from sarcoidosis. Scanning electron microscopy and ATW EDXA demonstrated particulates containing beryllium within the granulomas. This application of EDXA offers significant advantages over existing methods of beryllium detection in that it is nondestructive, more widely available, and can be performed using routine paraffin sections.

  17. Characterization of shocked beryllium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papin P.A.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available While numerous studies have investigated the low-strain-rate constitutive response of beryllium, the combined influence of high strain rate and temperature on the mechanical behavior and microstructure of beryllium has received limited attention over the last 40 years. In the current work, high strain rate tests were conducted using both explosive drive and a gas gun to accelerate the material. Prior studies have focused on tensile loading behavior, or limited conditions of dynamic strain rate and/or temperature. Two constitutive strength (plasticity models, the Preston-Tonks-Wallace (PTW and Mechanical Threshold Stress (MTS models, were calibrated using common quasi-static and Hopkinson bar data. However, simulations with the two models give noticeably different results when compared with the measured experimental wave profiles. The experimental results indicate that, even if fractured by the initial shock loading, the Be remains sufficiently intact to support a shear stress following partial release and subsequent shock re-loading. Additional “arrested” drive shots were designed and tested to minimize the reflected tensile pulse in the sample. These tests were done to both validate the model and to put large shock induced compressive loads into the beryllium sample.

  18. Extraction of beryllium from refractory beryllium oxide with dilute ammonium bifluoride and determination by fluorescence: a multiparameter performance evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldcamp, Michael J; Goldcamp, Diane M; Ashley, Kevin; Fernback, Joseph E; Agrawal, Anoop; Millson, Mark; Marlow, David; Harrison, Kenneth

    2009-12-01

    Beryllium exposure can cause a number of deleterious health effects, including beryllium sensitization and the potentially fatal chronic beryllium disease. Efficient methods for monitoring beryllium contamination in workplaces are valuable to help prevent dangerous exposures to this element. In this work, performance data on the extraction of beryllium from various size fractions of high-fired beryllium oxide (BeO) particles (from Beryllium concentrations were determined by fluorescence using a hydroxybenzoquinoline fluorophore. The effects of ABF concentration and volume, extraction temperature, sample tube types, and presence of filter or wipe media were examined. Three percent ABF extracts beryllium nearly twice as quickly as 1% ABF; extraction solution volume has minimal influence. Elevated temperatures increase the rate of extraction dramatically compared with room temperature extraction. Sample tubes with constricted tips yield poor extraction rates owing to the inability of the extraction medium to access the undissolved particles. The relative rates of extraction of Be from BeO of varying particle sizes were examined. Beryllium from BeO particles in fractions ranging from less than 32 microm up to 212 microm were subjected to various extraction schemes. The smallest BeO particles are extracted more quickly than the largest particles, although at 90 degrees C even the largest BeO particles reach nearly quantitative extraction within 4 hr in 3% ABF. Extraction from mixed cellulosic-ester filters, cellulosic surface-sampling filters, wetted cellulosic dust wipes, and cotton gloves yielded 90% or greater recoveries. Scanning electron microscopy of BeO particles, including partially dissolved particles, shows that dissolution in dilute ABF occurs not just on the exterior surface but also via accessing particles' interiors due to porosity of the BeO material. Comparison of dissolution kinetics data shows that as particle diameter approximately doubles, extraction

  19. A transcriptional network underlies susceptibility to kidney disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laouari, Denise; Burtin, Martine; Phelep, Aurélie; Bienaime, Frank; Noel, Laure-Hélène; Lee, David C; Legendre, Christophe; Friedlander, Gérard; Pontoglio, Marco; Terzi, Fabiola

    2012-08-01

    The molecular networks that control the progression of chronic kidney diseases (CKD) are poorly defined. We have recently shown that the susceptibility to development of renal lesions after nephron reduction is controlled by a locus on mouse chromosome 6 and requires epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation. Here, we identified microphthalmia-associated transcription factor A (MITF-A), a bHLH-Zip transcription factor, as a modifier of CKD progression. Sequence analysis revealed a strain-specific mutation in the 5' UTR that decreases MITF-A protein synthesis in lesion-prone friend virus B NIH (FVB/N) mice. More importantly, we dissected the molecular pathway by which MITF-A modulates CKD progression. MITF-A interacts with histone deacetylases to repress the transcription of TGF-α, a ligand of EGFR, and antagonizes transactivation by its related partner, transcription factor E3 (TFE3). Consistent with the key role of this network in CKD, Tgfa gene inactivation protected FVB/N mice from renal deterioration after nephron reduction. These data are relevant to human CKD, as we found that the TFE3/MITF-A ratio was increased in patients with damaged kidneys. Our study uncovers a novel transcriptional network and unveils novel potential prognostic and therapeutic targets for preventing human CKD progression.

  20. MENDELIAN SUSCEPTIBILITY TO MYCOBACTERIAL DISEASE IN EGYPTIAN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nermeen Galal

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tuberculosis remains a major health problem in developing countries especially with the emergence of multidrug resistant strains. Mendelian Susceptibility to Mycobacterial Disease (MSMD is a rare disorder with impaired immunity against mycobacterial pathogens. Reported MSMD etiologies highlight the crucial role of the Interferon gamma /Interleukin 12 (IFN-g/ IL-12 axis and the phagocyte respiratory burst axis. Purpose: Screen patients with possible presentations for MSMD. Methods: Patients with disseminated BCG infection following vaccination, atypical mycobacterial infections or recurrent tuberculosis infections were recruited from the Primary Immune Deficiency Clinic at Cairo University Specialized Pediatric Hospital, Egypt and immune and genetic laboratory investigations were conducted at Human Genetic of Infectious Diseases laboratory in Necker Medical School, France from 2005-2009. IFN-g level in patient’s plasma as well as mutations in the eight previously identified MSMD-causing genes were explored. Results: Nine cases from eight (unrelated kindreds were evaluated in detail. We detected a high level of IFN-g in plasma in one patient. Through Sanger sequencing, a homozygous mutation in the IFNGR1 gene at position 485 corresponding to an amino acid change from serine to phenylalanine (S485F, was detected in this patient. Conclusion: We report the first identified cases of MSMD among Egyptian patients, including in particular a new IFNGR1 mutation underlying IFN-gR1 deficiency. The eight remaining patients need to be explored further. These findings have implications regarding the compulsory Bacillus Calmette Guerin vaccination policy in Egypt, especially given the high consanguinity rate. Keywords: Interferon gamma axis, mycobacterium tuberculosis, BCG, consanguinity

  1. MENDELIAN SUSCEPTIBILITY TO MYCOBACTERIAL DISEASE IN EGYPTIAN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nermeen Galal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available

    Background: Tuberculosis remains a major health problem in developing countries especially with the emergence of multidrug resistant strains. Mendelian Susceptibility to Mycobacterial Disease (MSMD is a rare disorder with impaired immunity against mycobacterial pathogens. Reported MSMD etiologies highlight the crucial role of the Interferon gamma /Interleukin 12 (IFN-g/ IL-12 axis and the phagocyte respiratory burst axis.

    Purpose: Screen patients with possible presentations for MSMD.

    Methods: Patients with disseminated BCG infection following vaccination, atypical mycobacterial infections or recurrent tuberculosis infections were recruited from the Primary Immune Deficiency Clinic at Cairo University Specialized Pediatric Hospital, Egypt and immune and genetic laboratory investigations were conducted at Human Genetic of Infectious Diseases laboratory in Necker Medical School, France from 2005-2009. IFN-g level in patient’s plasma as well as mutations in the eight previously identified MSMD-causing genes were explored.

    Results: Nine cases from eight (unrelated kindreds were evaluated in detail. We detected a high level of IFN-g in plasma in one patient. Through Sanger sequencing, a homozygous mutation in the IFNGR1 gene at position 485 corresponding to an amino acid change from serine to phenylalanine (S485F, was detected in this patient.

    Conclusion: We report the first identified cases of MSMD among Egyptian patients, including in particular a new IFNGR1 mutation underlying IFN-gR1 deficiency. The eight remaining patients need to be explored further. These findings have implications regarding the compulsory Bacillus Calmette Guerin vaccination policy in Egypt, especially given the high consanguinity rate.

    Keywords: Interferon gamma axis, mycobacterium tuberculosis, BCG, consanguinity

  2. Comparison of protein profiles of beech bark disease-resistant or beech bark disease-susceptible American beech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mary E. Mason; Marek Krasowski; Judy Loo; Jennifer. Koch

    2011-01-01

    Proteomic analysis of beech bark proteins from trees resistant and susceptible to beech bark disease (BBD) was conducted. Sixteen trees from eight geographically isolated stands, 10 resistant (healthy) and 6 susceptible (diseased/infested) trees, were studied. The genetic complexity of the sample unit, the sampling across a wide geographic area, and the complexity of...

  3. Beryllium contamination and exposure monitoring in an inhalation laboratory setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Caroline; Audusseau, Séverine; Salehi, Fariba; Truchon, Ginette; Chevalier, Gaston; Mazer, Bruce; Kennedy, Greg; Zayed, Joseph

    2010-02-01

    Beryllium (Be) is used in several forms: pure metal, beryllium oxide, and as an alloy with copper, aluminum, or nickel. Beryllium oxide, beryllium metal, and beryllium alloys are the main forms present in the workplace, with inhalation being the primary route of exposure. Cases of workers with sensitization or chronic beryllium disease challenge the scientific community for a better understanding of Be toxicity. Therefore, a toxicological inhalation study using a murine model was performed in our laboratory in order to identify the toxic effects related to different particle sizes and chemical forms of Be. This article attempts to provide information regarding the relative effectiveness of the environmental monitoring and exposure protection program that was enacted to protect staff (students and researchers) in this controlled animal beryllium inhalation exposure experiment. This includes specific attention to particle migration control through intensive housekeeping and systematic airborne and surface monitoring. Results show that the protective measures applied during this research have been effective. The highest airborne Be concentration in the laboratory was less than one-tenth of the Quebec OEL (occupational exposure limit) of 0.15 microg/m(3). Considering the protection factor of 10(3) of the powered air-purifying respirator used in this research, the average exposure level would be 0.03 x 10(- 4) microg/m(3), which is extremely low. Moreover, with the exception of one value, all average Be concentrations on surfaces were below the Quebec Standard guideline level of 3 microg/100 cm(2) for Be contamination. Finally, all beryllium lymphocyte proliferation tests for the staff were not higher than controls.

  4. Summary of historical beryllium uses and airborne concentration levels at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefaniak, Aleksandr B; Weaver, Virginia M; Cadorette, Maureen; Puckett, Leslie G; Schwartz, Brian S; Wiggs, Laurie D; Jankowski, Mark D; Breysse, Patrick N

    2003-09-01

    Beryllium operations and accompanying medical surveillance of workers at Los Alamos National Laboratory began in the 1940s. In 1999 a Former Workers Medical Surveillance Program that includes screening for chronic beryllium disease was initiated. As part of this program, historical beryllium exposure conditions were reconstructed from archived paper and electronic industrial hygiene data sources to improve understanding of past beryllium uses and airborne concentration levels. Archived industrial hygiene sampling reports indicated beryllium was principally used in technical areas-01 and -03, primarily being machined. Beryllium was also used at 15 other technical areas in activities that ranged from explosives detonation to the manufacture of X-ray windows. A total of 4528 personal breathing zone and area air samples for beryllium, combined for purposes of calculating summary statistics, were identified during the records review phase. The geometric mean airborne beryllium concentration for the period 1949-1989 for all technical areas was 0.04 microg Be/m(3) with 97 percent of all sample below the 2.0 microg Be/m(3) occupational exposure limit (OEL). Average beryllium concentrations per decade were less than 1 microg Be/m(3) and annual geometric mean concentrations in technical area-03, the largest user of beryllium, were generally below 0.1 microg Be/m(3), indicating exposure was generally well-controlled, that is, below the OEL. Typical of many retrospective exposure assessments, not all archived data could be extracted and summarized. Despite this, we report a reasonable summary of potential beryllium uses and airborne concentration levels a worker may have encountered from 1949-1989. These data can be used to more effectively identify former worker populations at potential risk for chronic beryllium disease and to offer these workers screening as part of the Former Worker Medical Surveillance Program, and in the event that a case is diagnosed, help to understand

  5. Beryllium uptake and related biological effects studied in THP-1 differentiated macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jian; Lin, Lin; Hang, Wei; Yan, Xiaomei

    2009-11-01

    Investigation of cellular uptake of metal compounds is important in understanding metal-related toxicity and diseases. Inhalation of beryllium aerosols can cause chronic beryllium disease, a progressive, granulomatous fibrosis of the lung. Studies in laboratory animals and cultured animal cells indicate that alveolar macrophages take up beryllium compounds and participate in a hypersensitivity immune response to a beryllium-containing antigen. In the present work, human monocyte cell line THP-1 was induced with phorbol myristate acetate to differentiate into a macrophage. This cell with characteristics of human alveolar macrophages was employed to study cellular beryllium uptake and related biological effects. Morphological changes, phagocytosis of fluorescent latex beads, and cell surface CD14 expression were used to verify the successful differentiation of THP-1 monocytes into macrophages. An improved mass spectrometry method for quantitative analysis of intracellular beryllium as opposed to the traditional radioisotopic approach was developed using ICP-MS. The influence of the solubility of beryllium compounds, exposure duration, and beryllium concentration on the incorporation of beryllium was studied. Our data indicated that the uptake of particulate BeO was much more significant than that of soluble BeSO(4), suggesting the major cellular uptake pathway is phagocytosis. Nevertheless, subsequent DAPI nuclear staining and PARP cleavage study indicated that beryllium uptake had a negligible effect on the apoptosis of THP-1 macrophages compared to the unstimulated macrophage control. Meanwhile, no substantial variation of tumour necrosis factor-alpha production was observed for THP-1 macrophages upon beryllium exposure. These data imply alveolar macrophages could have some level of tolerance to beryllium and this may explain why most Be-exposed individuals remain healthy throughout life.

  6. IFNγ Influences Type I Interferon Response and Susceptibility to Theiler's Virus-Induced Demyelinating Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Bowen, Jenna L.; Olson, Julie K.

    2013-01-01

    Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) induces a demyelinating disease in susceptible SJL mice that has similarities to multiple sclerosis in humans. TMEV infection of susceptible mice leads to a persistent virus infection of the central nervous system (CNS), which promotes the development of demyelinating disease associated with an inflammatory immune response in the CNS. TMEV infection of resistant C57BL6 mice results in viral clearance without development of demyelinating disease....

  7. Physicochemical characteristics of aerosol particles generated during the milling of beryllium silicate ores: implications for risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefaniak, Aleksandr B; Chipera, Steve J; Day, Gregory A; Sabey, Phil; Dickerson, Robert M; Sbarra, Deborah C; Duling, Mathew G; Lawrence, Robert B; Stanton, Marcia L; Scripsick, Ronald C

    2008-01-01

    Inhalation of beryllium dusts generated during milling of ores and cutting of beryl-containing gemstones is associated with development of beryllium sensitization and low prevalence of chronic beryllium disease (CBD). Inhalation of beryllium aerosols generated during primary beryllium production and machining of the metal, alloys, and ceramics are associated with sensitization and high rates of CBD, despite similar airborne beryllium mass concentrations among these industries. Understanding the physicochemical properties of exposure aerosols may help to understand the differential immunopathologic mechanisms of sensitization and CBD and lead to more biologically relevant exposure standards. Properties of aerosols generated during the industrial milling of bertrandite and beryl ores were evaluated. Airborne beryllium mass concentrations among work areas ranged from 0.001 microg/m(3) (beryl ore grinding) to 2.1 microg/m(3) (beryl ore crushing). Respirable mass fractions of airborne beryllium-containing particles were 80% in high-energy input areas (beryl melting, beryl grinding). Particle specific surface area decreased with processing from feedstock ores to drumming final product beryllium hydroxide. Among work areas, beryllium was identified in three crystalline forms: beryl, poorly crystalline beryllium oxide, and beryllium hydroxide. In comparison to aerosols generated by high-CBD risk primary production processes, aerosol particles encountered during milling had similar mass concentrations, generally lower number concentrations and surface area, and contained no identifiable highly crystalline beryllium oxide. One possible explanation for the apparent low prevalence of CBD among workers exposed to beryllium mineral dusts may be that characteristics of the exposure material do not contribute to the development of lung burdens sufficient for progression from sensitization to CBD. In comparison to high-CBD risk exposures where the chemical nature of aerosol

  8. Thermal fatigue of beryllium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deksnis, E.; Ciric, D.; Falter, H. [JET Joint undertaking, Abingdon (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    Thermal fatigue life of S65c beryllium castellated to a geometry 6 x 6 x (8-10)mm deep has been tested for steady heat fluxes of 3 MW/m{sup 2} to 5 MW/m{sup 2} and under pulsed heat fluxes (10-20 MW/m{sup 2}) for which the time averaged heat flux is 5 MW/m{sup 2}. These tests were carried out in the JET neutral beam test facility A test sequence with peak surface temperatures {le} 600{degrees}C produced no visible fatigue cracks. In the second series of tests, with T{sub max} {le} 750{degrees}C evidence for fatigue appeared after a minimum of 1350 stress cycles. These fatigue data are discussed in view of the observed lack of thermal fatigue in JET plasma operations with beryllium PFC. JET experience with S65b and S65c is reviewed; recent operations with {Phi} = 25 MW/m{sup 2} and sustained melting/resolidification are also presented. The need for a failure criterion for finite element analyses of Be PFC lifetimes is discussed.

  9. Beryllium in the ITER blanket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billone, M.C.

    1995-01-01

    This paper consists of viewgraphs used in a presentation on the application of beryllium in breeding blankets for ITER and JET. The paper brings together data on the physical, thermal, mechanical, and chemical properties of beryllium and beryllium oxide for this type of application, as well as issues of compatibility with construction materials, and irradiation experience. It includes the results from testing programs carried out to arrive at some of the information, including fabrication work, irradiation experiments, and sample tests performed both in and out of the irradiation piles.

  10. Proteomic analysis of beryllium-induced genotoxicity in an Escherichia coli mutant model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor-McCabe, Kirsten J; Wang, Zaolin; Sauer, Nancy N; Marrone, Babetta L

    2006-03-01

    Beryllium is the second lightest metal, has a high melting point and high strength-to-weight ratio, and is chemically stable. These unique chemical characteristics make beryllium metal an ideal choice as a component material for a wide variety of applications in aerospace, defense, nuclear weapons, and industry. However, inhalation of beryllium dust or fumes induces significant health effects, including chronic beryllium disease and lung cancer. In this study, the mutagenicity of beryllium sulfate (BeSO(4)) and the comutagenicity of beryllium with a known mutagen 1-methyl-3-nitro-1-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) were evaluated using a forward mutant detection system developed in Escherichia coli. In this system, BeSO(4) was shown to be weakly mutagenic alone and significantly enhanced the mutagenicity of MNNG up to 3.5-fold over MNNG alone. Based on these results a proteomic study was conducted to identify the proteins regulated by BeSO(4). Using the techniques of 2-DE and oMALDI-TOF MS, we successfully identified 32 proteins being differentially regulated by beryllium and/or MNNG in the E. coli test system. This is the first study to describe the proteins regulated by beryllium in vitro, and the results suggest several potential pathways for the focus of further research into the mechanisms underlying beryllium-induced genotoxicity.

  11. Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping Suggests Altered Brain Iron in Premanifest Huntington Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bergen, J M G; Hua, J; Unschuld, P G; Lim, I A L; Jones, C K; Margolis, R L; Ross, C A; van Zijl, P C M; Li, X

    2016-05-01

    In patients with premanifest (nonsymptomatic) and advanced Huntington disease, changes in brain iron levels in the basal ganglia have been previously reported, especially in the striatum. Quantitative susceptibility mapping by using MR phase imaging allows in vivo measurements of tissue magnetic susceptibility, which has been shown to correlate well with iron levels in brain gray matter and is believed to be more specific than other imaging-based iron measures. The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of magnetic susceptibility as a biomarker of disease progression. Fifteen subjects with premanifest Huntington disease and 16 age-matched healthy controls were scanned at 7T. Magnetic susceptibility, effective relaxation, and tissue volume in deep gray matter structures were quantified and compared with genetic and clinical measures. Subjects with premanifest Huntington disease showed significantly higher susceptibility values in the caudate nucleus, putamen, and globus pallidus, indicating increased iron levels in these structures. Significant decreases in magnetic susceptibility were found in the substantia nigra and hippocampus. In addition, significant volume loss (atrophy) and an increase effective relaxation were observed in the caudate nucleus and putamen. Susceptibility values in the caudate nucleus and putamen were found to be inversely correlated with structure volumes and directly correlated with the genetic burdens, represented by cytosine-adenine-guanine repeat age-product-scaled scores. The significant magnetic susceptibility differences between subjects with premanifest Huntington disease and controls and their correlation with genetic burden scores indicate the potential use of magnetic susceptibility as a biomarker of disease progression in premanifest Huntington disease. © 2016 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  12. SUSCEPTIBILITY TO OZONE-INDUCED INJURY AND ANTIOXIDANT COMPENSATION IN RAT MODELS OF CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Increased oxidative stress and compromised antioxidant status are common pathologic factors of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). It is hypothesized that individuals with chronic CVD are more susceptible to environmental exposures due to underlying oxidative stress. To determine the ...

  13. SNPs in the SCGB3A2 promoter are associated with susceptibility to Graves’ disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁军

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the association of single nucleotide polymorphisms(SNPs) in the SCGB3A2(secretoglobin family 3A member 2) gene promoter with susceptibility of Graves’ disease. Methods One-hundred and seventy-nine SNPs within

  14. Degree of host susceptibility in the initial disease outbreak influences subsequent epidemic spread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severns, Paul M; Estep, Laura K; Sackett, Kathryn E; Mundt, Christopher C

    2014-12-01

    Disease epidemics typically begin as an outbreak of a relatively small, spatially explicit population of infected individuals (focus), in which disease prevalence increases and rapidly spreads into the uninfected, at-risk population. Studies of epidemic spread typically address factors influencing disease spread through the at-risk population, but the initial outbreak may strongly influence spread of the subsequent epidemic.We initiated wheat stripe rust Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici epidemics to assess the influence of the focus on final disease prevalence when the degree of disease susceptibility differed between the at-risk and focus populations.When the focus/at-risk plantings consisted of partially genetic resistant and susceptible cultivars, final disease prevalence was statistically indistinguishable from epidemics produced by the focus cultivar in monoculture. In these experimental epidemics, disease prevalence was not influenced by the transition into an at-risk population that differed in disease susceptibility. Instead, the focus appeared to exert a dominant influence on the subsequent epidemic.Final disease prevalence was not consistently attributable to either the focus or the at-risk population when focus/at-risk populations were planted in a factorial set-up with a mixture (~28% susceptible and 72% resistant) and susceptible individuals. In these experimental epidemics, spatial heterogeneity in disease susceptibility within the at-risk population appeared to counter the dominant influence of the focus.Cessation of spore production from the focus (through fungicide/glyphosate application) after 1.3 generations of stripe rust spread did not reduce final disease prevalence, indicating that the focus influence on disease spread is established early in the epidemic.Synthesis and applications. Our experiments indicated that outbreak conditions can be highly influential on epidemic spread, even when disease resistance in the at-risk population is

  15. Identification of multiple independent susceptibility loci in the HLA region in Behcet's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hughes, Travis; Coit, Patrick; Adler, Adam; Yilmaz, Vuslat; Aksu, Kenan; Duzgun, Nursen; Keser, Gokhan; Cefle, Ayse; Yazici, Ayten; Ergen, Andac; Alpsoy, Erkan; Salvarani, Carlo; Casali, Bruno; Koetter, Ina; Gutierrez-Achury, Javier; Wijmenga, Cisca; Direskeneli, Haner; Saruhan-Direskeneli, Guher; Sawalha, Amr H.

    2013-01-01

    Behcet's disease is an inflammatory disease characterized by recurrent oral and genital ulcers and significant organ involvement. Localizing the genetic association between HLA-B*51 and Behcet's disease and exploring additional susceptibility loci in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region are comp

  16. Genetic determinants of sensitivity to beryllium in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarantino-Hutchison, Lauren M; Sorrentino, Claudio; Nadas, Arthur; Zhu, Yiwen; Rubin, Edward M; Tinkle, Sally S; Weston, Ainsley; Gordon, Terry

    2009-06-01

    Chronic beryllium disease (CBD), an irreversible, debilitating granulomatous lung disease is caused by exposure to beryllium. This occupational hazard occurs in primary production and machining of Be-metal, BeO, beryllium - containing alloys, and other beryllium products. CBD begins as an MHC Class II-restricted, T(H)1 hypersensitivity, and the Human Leukocyte Antigen, HLA-DPB1E(69), is associated with risk of developing CBD. Because inbred strains of mice have not provided good models of CBD to date, three strains of HLA-DPB1 transgenic mice in an FVB/N background were developed; each contains a single allele of HLA-DPB1 that confers a different magnitude of risk for chronic beryllium disease: HLA-DPB1*0401 (OR approximately 0.2), HLA-DPB1*0201 (OR approximately 3), and HLA-DPB1*1701 (OR approximately 46). The mouse ear swelling test (MEST) was employed to determine if these different alleles would support a hypersensitivity response to beryllium. Mice were first sensitized on the back and subsequently challenged on the ear. In separate experiments, mice were placed into one of three groups (sensitization/challenge): C/C, C/Be, and Be/Be. In the HLA-DPB1*1701 mice, the strain with the highest risk transgene, the Be/Be group was the only group that displayed significant maximum increased ear thickness of 19.6% +/- 3.0% over the baseline measurement (p beryllium in seven inbred strains were investigated through use of the MEST, these included: FVB/N, AKR, Balb/c, C3H/HeJ, C57/BL6, DBA/2, and SJL/J. The FVB/N strain was least responsive, while the SJL/J and C57/BL6 strains were the highest responders. Our results suggest that the HLA-DPB1*1701 transgene product is an important risk factor for induction of the beryllium-sensitive phenotype. This model should be a useful tool for investigating beryllium sensitization.

  17. Susceptibility, likelihood to be diagnosed, worry and fear for contracting Lyme disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Joshua; Chawla, Gurasees S

    Risk perception and psychological concerns are relevant for understanding how people view Lyme disease. This study investigates the four separate outcomes of susceptibility, likelihood to be diagnosed, worry, and fear for contracting Lyme disease. University students (n=713) were surveyed about demographics, perceived health, Lyme disease knowledge, Lyme disease preventive behaviors, Lyme disease history, and Lyme disease miscellaneous variables. We found that women were associated with increased susceptibility and fear. Asian/Asian-American race/ethnicity was associated with increased worry and fear. Perceived good health was associated with increased likelihood to be diagnosed, worry, and fear. Correct knowledge was associated with increased susceptibility and likelihood to be diagnosed. Those who typically spend a lot of time outdoors were associated with increased susceptibility, likelihood to be diagnosed, worry, and fear. In conclusion, healthcare providers and public health campaigns should address susceptibility, likelihood to be diagnosed, worry, and fear about Lyme disease, and should particularly target women and Asians/Asian-Americans to address any possible misconceptions and/or offer effective coping strategies. Copyright © 2016 King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Susceptibility to Allitridi of Helicobacter Pylori with Different Genotypes in Gastric Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ying; LIU Bo; GONG Yue-hua; YUAN Yuan

    2008-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the difference in susceptibilities to allitridi of Helicobacter pylori(H.pylori)strains in different gastric diseases and the associations with different genotypes. Methods:H.pylori strains were isolated from gastric antral biopsy specimens and identified.DNA was isolated from H.pylori strains.Different genotypes were determined by polymerase chain reaction(PCR),and the allitridi MICs were determined by agar dilution methods.MIC50 was calculated. Results:The susceptibilities of H.pylori strains varied among different gastric diseases.H.pylori strains in superficial gastritis were significantly more susceptible to allitridi than those in atrophic gastritis(relative median potency was 0.49,95% confidence interval was from 0.24 to 0.80),strains in superficial gastritis were significantly more susceptible than those in gastric cancer(relative median potency was 0.32,95% confidence interval was from 0.06 to 0.68)and strains in atrophic gastritis were significantly more susceptible than those in gastric cancer(relative median potency was 0.16,95% confidence interval was from 0.02 to 0.40).The susceptibilities of H.pylori strains with different genotypes varied among different gastric diseases.In atrophic gastritis,strains with vacAs1+ were significantly more susceptible to allitridi than those with vacAs1-(relative median potency was 0.21,95% confidence interval was from 0.04 to 0.73).In gastric cancer,strains with vacAm1b+ were significantly more susceptible than those with vacAm1b-(relative median potency was 0.07,95% confidence interval was from 0.03 to 0.49). Conclusion:The vacA genotypes play an important role in the susceptibility to allitridi in different gastric diseases.

  19. Release of beryllium from mineral ores in artificial lung and skin surface fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duling, Matthew G; Stefaniak, Aleksandr B; Lawrence, Robert B; Chipera, Steve J; Virji, M Abbas

    2012-06-01

    Exposure to some manufactured beryllium compounds via skin contact or inhalation can cause sensitization. A portion of sensitized persons who inhale beryllium may develop chronic beryllium disease (CBD). Little is understood about exposures to naturally occurring beryllium minerals. The purpose of this study was to assess the bioaccessibility of beryllium from bertrandite ore. Dissolution of bertrandite from two mine pits (Monitor and Blue Chalk) was evaluated for both the dermal and inhalation exposure pathways by determining bioaccessibility in artificial sweat (pH 5.3 and pH 6.5), airway lining fluid (SUF, pH 7.3), and alveolar macrophage phagolysosomal fluid (PSF, pH 4.5). Significantly more beryllium was released from Monitor pit ore than Blue Chalk pit ore in artificial sweat buffered to pH 5.3 (0.88 ± 0.01% vs. 0.36 ± 0.00%) and pH 6.5 (0.09 ± 0.00% vs. 0.03 ± 0.01%). Rates of beryllium released from the ores in artificial sweat were faster than previously measured for manufactured forms of beryllium (e.g., beryllium oxide), known to induce sensitization in mice. In SUF, levels of beryllium were below the analytical limit of detection. In PSF, beryllium dissolution was biphasic (initial rapid diffusion followed by latter slower surface reactions). During the latter phase, dissolution half-times were 1,400 to 2,000 days, and rate constants were ~7 × 10(-10) g/(cm(2)·day), indicating that bertrandite is persistent in the lung. These data indicate that it is prudent to control skin and inhalation exposures to bertrandite dusts.

  20. Lateral organ boundaries 1 is a disease susceptibility gene for citrus bacterial canker disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yang; Zhang, Junli; Jia, Hongge; Sosso, Davide; Li, Ting; Frommer, Wolf B; Yang, Bing; White, Frank F; Wang, Nian; Jones, Jeffrey B

    2014-01-28

    Citrus bacterial canker (CBC) disease occurs worldwide and incurs considerable costs both from control measures and yield losses. Bacteria that cause CBC require one of six known type III transcription activator-like (TAL) effector genes for the characteristic pustule formation at the site of infection. Here, we show that Xanthomonas citri subspecies citri strain Xcc306, with the type III TAL effector gene pthA4 or with the distinct yet biologically equivalent gene pthAw from strain XccA(w), induces two host genes, CsLOB1 and CsSWEET1, in a TAL effector-dependent manner. CsLOB1 is a member of the Lateral Organ Boundaries (LOB) gene family of transcription factors, and CsSWEET1 is a homolog of the SWEET sugar transporter and rice disease susceptibility gene. Both TAL effectors drive expression of CsLOB1 and CsSWEET1 promoter reporter gene fusions when coexpressed in citrus or Nicotiana benthamiana. Artificially designed TAL effectors directed to sequences in the CsLOB1 promoter region, but not the CsSWEET1 promoter, promoted pustule formation and higher bacterial leaf populations. Three additional distinct TAL effector genes, pthA*, pthB, and pthC, also direct pustule formation and expression of CsLOB1. Unlike pthA4 and pthAw, pthB and pthC do not promote the expression of CsSWEET1. CsLOB1 expression was associated with the expression of genes associated with cell expansion. The results indicate that CBC-inciting species of Xanthomonas exploit a single host disease susceptibility gene by altering the expression of an otherwise developmentally regulated gene using any one of a diverse set of TAL effector genes in the pathogen populations.

  1. Development of radiation resistant grades of beryllium for nuclear and fusion facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kupriyanov, I.B.; Gorokhov, V.A.; Nikolaev, G.N. [Russia Research Institute of Inorganic Materials, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-09-01

    R&D results on beryllium with high radiation resistance obtained recently are described in this report. The data are presented on nine different grades of isotropic beryllium manufactured by VNIINM and distinguished by both initial powder characteristics and properties of billets, made of these powders. The average grain size of the investigated beryllium grades varied from 8 to 26 {mu}m, the content of beryllium oxide was 0.9 - 3.9 wt.%, the dispersity of beryllium oxide - 0.04 - 0.5 {mu}m, tensile strength -- 250 - 650 MPa. All materials were irradiated in SM - 2 reactor over the temperature range 550 - 780{degrees}C. The results of the investigation showed, that HIP beryllium grades are less susceptible to swelling at higher temperatures in comparison with hot pressed and extruded grades. Beryllium samples, having the smallest grain size, demonstrated minimal swelling, which was less than 0.8 % at 750{degrees}C and Fs = 3.7 {center_dot}10{sup 21} cm{sup -2} (E>0.1 MeV). The mechanical properties, creep and microstructure parameters, measured before and after irradiation, are presented.

  2. Ontology driven modeling for the knowledge of genetic susceptibility to disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu; Sakamoto, Norihiro

    2009-05-12

    For the machine helped exploring the relationships between genetic factors and complex diseases, a well-structured conceptual framework of the background knowledge is needed. However, because of the complexity of determining a genetic susceptibility factor, there is no formalization for the knowledge of genetic susceptibility to disease, which makes the interoperability between systems impossible. Thus, the ontology modeling language OWL was used for formalization in this paper. After introducing the Semantic Web and OWL language propagated by W3C, we applied text mining technology combined with competency questions to specify the classes of the ontology. Then, an N-ary pattern was adopted to describe the relationships among these defined classes. Based on the former work of OGSF-DM (Ontology of Genetic Susceptibility Factors to Diabetes Mellitus), we formalized the definition of "Genetic Susceptibility", "Genetic Susceptibility Factor" and other classes by using OWL-DL modeling language; and a reasoner automatically performed the classification of the class "Genetic Susceptibility Factor". The ontology driven modeling is used for formalization the knowledge of genetic susceptibility to complex diseases. More importantly, when a class has been completely formalized in an ontology, the OWL reasoning can automatically compute the classification of the class, in our case, the class of "Genetic Susceptibility Factors". With more types of genetic susceptibility factors obtained from the laboratory research, our ontologies always needs to be refined, and many new classes must be taken into account to harmonize with the ontologies. Using the ontologies to develop the semantic web needs to be applied in the future.

  3. Beryllium Related Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaylord, R F

    2008-12-23

    In recent months, LLNL has identified, commenced, and implemented a series of interim controls, compensatory measures, and initiatives to ensure worker safety, and improve safety processes with regards to potential worker exposure to beryllium. Many of these actions have been undertaken in response to the NNSA Independent Review (COR-TS-5/15/2008-8550) received by LLNL in November of 2008. Others are the result of recent discoveries, events or incidents, and lessons learned, or were scheduled corrective actions from earlier commitments. Many of these actions are very recent in nature, or are still in progress, and vary in the formality of implementation. Actions are being reviewed for effectiveness as they progress. The documentation of implementation, and review of effectiveness, when appropriate, of these actions will be addressed as part of the formal Corrective Action Plan addressing the Independent Review. The mitigating actions taken fall into the following categories: (1) Responses to specific events/concerns; (2) Development of interim controls; (3) Review of ongoing activities; and (4) Performance improvement measures.

  4. rs10865331 associated with susceptibility and disease severity of ankylosing spondylitis in a Taiwanese population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Feng Wen

    Full Text Available Ankylosing spondylitis (AS is a highly familial rheumatic disorder and is considered as a chronic inflammatory disease. Genetic factors are involved in the pathogenesis of AS. To identify genes which render people susceptible to AS in a Taiwanese population, we selected six single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs from previous genome-wide association studies (GWASs which were associated with AS in European descendants and Han Chinese. To assess whether the six SNPs contributed to AS susceptibility and severity in Taiwanese population, 475 AS patients fulfilling the modified New York Criteria and 527 healthy subjects were recruited. We found that rs10865331 was significantly associated with AS susceptibility and with Bath AS Function Index (BASFI. The AA and AG genotypes of rs10865331 were also significantly associated with a higher erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Our findings provided evidence that rs10865331 is associated AS susceptibility and with disease activity (BASFI in a Taiwanese population.

  5. Mineral resource of the month: beryllium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2013-01-01

    The article discusses information about Beryllium. It notes that Beryllium is a light metal that has a gray color. The metal is used in the production of parts and devices including bearings, computer-chip heat sinks, and output windows of X-ray tubes. The article mentions Beryllium's discovery in 1798 by French chemist, Louis-Nicolas Vanquelin. It cites that bertrandite and beryl are the principal mineral components for the commercial production of beryllium.

  6. Natural selection on genes that underlie human disease susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blekhman, Ran; Man, Orna; Herrmann, Leslie; Boyko, Adam R.; Indap, Amit; Kosiol, Carolin; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Teshima, Kosuke M.; Przeworski, Molly

    2008-01-01

    What evolutionary forces shape genes that contribute to the risk of human disease? Do similar selective pressures act on alleles that underlie simple vs. complex disorders? [1-3]. Answers to these questions will shed light on the origin of human disorders (e.g., [4]), and help to predict the population frequencies of alleles that contribute to disease risk, with important implications for the efficient design of mapping studies [5-7]. As a first step towards addressing them, we created a hand-curated version of the Mendelian Inheritance in Man database (OMIM). We then examined selective pressures on Mendelian disease genes, genes that contribute to complex disease risk and genes known to be essential in mouse, by analyzing patterns of human polymorphism and of divergence between human and rhesus macaque. We find that Mendelian disease genes appear to be under widespread purifying selection, especially when the disease mutations are dominant (rather than recessive). In contrast, the class of genes that influence complex disease risk shows little signs of evolutionary conservation, possibly because this category includes both targets of purifying and positive selection. PMID:18571414

  7. ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY 1 and SALICYLIC ACID act redundantly to regulate resistance gene-mediated signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resistance (R) protein–associated pathways are well known to participate in defense against a variety of microbial pathogens. Salicylic acid (SA) and its associated proteinaceous signaling components, including enhanced disease susceptibility 1 (EDS1), non–race-specific disease resistance 1 (NDR1), ...

  8. Gene-Wide Analysis Detects Two New Susceptibility Genes for Alzheimer's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Escott-Price, Valentina; Bellenguez, Céline; Wang, Li-San; Choi, Seung-Hoan; Harold, Denise; Jones, Lesley; Holmans, Peter Alan; Gerrish, Amy; Vedernikov, Alexey; Richards, Alexander; DeStefano, Anita L.; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Ibrahim-Verbaas, Carla A.; Naj, Adam C; Sims, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    PUBLISHED BACKGROUND: Alzheimer's disease is a common debilitating dementia with known heritability, for which 20 late onset susceptibility loci have been identified, but more remain to be discovered. This study sought to identify new susceptibility genes, using an alternative gene-wide analytical approach which tests for patterns of association within genes, in the powerful genome-wide association dataset of the International Genomics of Alzheimer's Project Consortium, comprising over...

  9. Bipolar disorder: idioms of susceptibility and disease and the role of 'genes' in illness explanations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baart, Ingrid; Widdershoven, Guy

    2013-11-01

    This qualitative study explores (1) how members of the Dutch Association for People with Bipolar Disorder explain the affliction of bipolar disorder; (2) the relationship between genetic, environmental and personal factors in these explanations and (3) the relationship between illness explanations, self-management and identity. A total of 40 participants took part in seven different focus group discussions. The results demonstrate that there are two different explanatory idioms, each one centred around an opposing concept, that is, susceptibility and disease. Individuals who construct explanations around the concept of 'disease' attach more importance to 'genes and chemicals' than to environmental components in the onset of the disorder, whereas individuals adhering to the central concept of 'susceptibility' tend to do this much less. Compared with individuals using the 'susceptibility' idiom, those who use a 'disease' idiom tend to observe fewer possibilities for self-management and are less inclined to construct normalcy through a quest for personal growth. Stories of suffering seem more integral to the 'disease' idiom than to the 'susceptibility' idiom. The 'disease' idiom seems less integrated in a contemporary surveillance psychiatric discourse than the 'susceptibility' idiom; however, both vocabularies can offer normative constraints.

  10. Beryllium--important for national defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, M.A.

    2012-01-01

    Beryllium is one of the lightest and stiffest metals, but there was little industrial demand for it until the 1930s and 1940s when the aerospace, defense, and nuclear sectors began using beryllium and its compounds. Beryllium is now classified by the U.S. Department of Defense as a strategic and critical material because it is used in products that are vital to national security. The oxide form of beryllium was identified in 1797, and scientists first isolated metallic beryllium in 1828. The United States is the world's leading source of beryllium. A single mine at Spor Mountain, Utah, produced more than 85 percent of the beryllium mined worldwide in 2010. China produced most of the remainder, and less than 2 percent came from Mozambique and other countries. National stockpiles also provide significant amounts of beryllium for processing. To help predict where future beryllium supplies might be located, U.S.Geological Survey (USGS) scientists study how and where beryllium resources are concentrated in Earth's crust and use that knowledge to assess the likelihood that undiscovered beryllium resources may exist. Techniques to assess mineral resources have been developed by the USGS to support the stewardship of Federal lands and to better evaluate mineral resource availability in a global context. The USGS also compiles statistics and information on the worldwide supply of, demand for, and flow of beryllium. These data are used to inform U.S. national policymaking.

  11. Genetics of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: From susceptibility and nutrient interactions to management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vishnubhotla; Venkata; Ravi; Kanth; Mitnala; Sasikala; Mithun; Sharma; Padaki; Nagaraja; Rao; Duvvuru; Nageshwar; Reddy

    2016-01-01

    Genetics plays an important role in determining the susceptibility of an individual to develop a disease. Complex, multi factorial diseases of modern day(diabetes, cardiovascular disease, hypertension and obesity) are a result of disparity between the type of food consumed and genes, suggesting that food which does not match the host genes is probably one of the major reasons for developing life style diseases. Non-alcoholic fatty liver is becoming a global epidemic leading to substantial morbidity. While various genotyping approaches such as whole exome sequencing using next generation sequencers and genome wide association studies have identified susceptibility loci for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease(NAFLD) including variants in patatin-like phospholipase domain containing 3 and transmembrane 6 superfamily member 2 genes apart from others; nutrient based studies emphasized on a combination of vitamin D, E and omega-3 fatty acids to manage fatty liver disease. However majority of the studies were conducted independent of each other and very few studies explored the interactions between the genetic susceptibility and nutrient interactions. Identifying such interactions will aid in optimizing the nutrition tailor made to an individual’s genetic makeup, thereby aiding in delaying the onset of the disease and its progression. The present topic focuses on studies that identified the genetic susceptibility for NAFLD, nutritional recommendations, and their interactions for better management of NAFLD.

  12. Neutron irradiation of beryllium pebbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelles, D.S.; Ermi, R.M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Tsai, H. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1998-03-01

    Seven subcapsules from the FFTF/MOTA 2B irradiation experiment containing 97 or 100% dense sintered beryllium cylindrical specimens in depleted lithium have been opened and the specimens retrieved for postirradiation examination. Irradiation conditions included 370 C to 1.6 {times} 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2}, 425 C to 4.8 {times} 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2}, and 550 C to 5.0 {times} 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2}. TEM specimens contained in these capsules were also retrieved, but many were broken. Density measurements of the cylindrical specimens showed as much as 1.59% swelling following irradiation at 500 C in 100% dense beryllium. Beryllium at 97% density generally gave slightly lower swelling values.

  13. Beryllium strain under dynamic loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pushkov Victor

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There are some data (not much on dynamic characteristics of beryllium that are important, for example, when estimating construction performance at NPP emergencies. A number of data on stress-strain curves, spall strength, shear strength, fracture and structure responses of shock loaded beryllium have obtained in US and Russian laboratories. For today the model description of this complex metal behavior does not have a reasonable agreement with the experimental data, thus a wider spectrum of experimental data is required. This work presents data on dynamic compression-test diagrams of Russian beryllium. Experiments are performed using Hopkinson bar method (SHPB. Strain rates were ε ∼ 103 s−1.

  14. Susceptibility of dogs with heartworm disease to hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawlings, C A; Losonsky, J M; Lewis, R E

    1977-09-01

    Dogs with Dirofilaria immitis microfilariae and early radiographic pulmonary artery changes, but without pulmonary hypertension or clinical signs of heartworm disease, were studied. An exaggerated pulmonary hypertensive response was found in these dogs if subjected to 10% inspired oxygen. The mean pulmonary artery pressure of control dogs was increased from base line (prehypoxia control) of 15.8 +/- 2.3 (SEM) mm of Hg to 20.2 +/- 2.3 during hypoxia, and the mean pulmonary pressure of dogs with heartworm disease increased from base line of 16.4 +/- 2.4 to 26.4 +/- 1.6 during hypoxia. Pulmonary blood flow was not affected by hypoxia indicating that the increased pulmonary artery pressure was the result of increased pulmonary vascular resistance. There was an individual variation of this pulmonary hypertensive response of dogs with heartworm disease that did not appear related to the severity of the pulmonary arterial lesions, as evaluated by pulmonary arteriography.

  15. Susceptibility to exacerbation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hurst, John R; Vestbo, Jørgen; Anzueto, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    of follow-up were 0.85 per person for patients with stage 2 COPD (with stage defined in accordance with Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease [GOLD] stages), 1.34 for patients with stage 3, and 2.00 for patients with stage 4. Overall, 22% of patients with stage 2 disease, 33% with stage 3......, and 47% with stage 4 had frequent exacerbations (two or more in the first year of follow-up). The single best predictor of exacerbations, across all GOLD stages, was a history of exacerbations. The frequent-exacerbation phenotype appeared to be relatively stable over a period of 3 years and could...

  16. Genetic variation in Toll-like receptors and disease susceptibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Netea, Mihai G.; Wijmenga, Cisca; O'Neill, Luke A. J.

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are key initiators of the innate immune response and promote adaptive immunity. Much has been learned about the role of TLRs in human immunity from studies linking TLR genetic variation with disease. First, monogenic disorders associated with complete deficiency in certain

  17. The SPINK gene family and celiac disease susceptibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wapenaar, Martin C.; Monsuur, Alienke J.; Poell, Jos; Slot, Ruben Van 't; Meijer, Jos W. R.; Meijer, Gerrit A.; Mulder, Chris J.; Mearin, Maria Luisa; Wijmenga, Cisca

    The gene family of serine protease inhibitors of the Kazal type (SPINK) are functional and positional candidate genes for celiac disease (CD). Our aim was to assess the gut mucosal gene expression and genetic association of SPINK1, -2, -4, and -5 in the Dutch CD population. Gene expression was

  18. Susceptibility to exacerbation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hurst, John R; Vestbo, Jørgen; Anzueto, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although we know that exacerbations are key events in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), our understanding of their frequency, determinants, and effects is incomplete. In a large observational cohort, we tested the hypothesis that there is a frequent-exacerbation phenotype ...

  19. Identification of susceptibility genes and genetic modifiers of human diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Kenneth; Kammerer, Stefan; Hoyal, Carolyn; Reneland, Rikard; Marnellos, George; Nelson, Matthew R.; Braun, Andreas

    2005-03-01

    The completion of the human genome sequence enables the discovery of genes involved in common human disorders. The successful identification of these genes is dependent on the availability of informative sample sets, validated marker panels, a high-throughput scoring technology, and a strategy for combining these resources. We have developed a universal platform technology based on mass spectrometry (MassARRAY) for analyzing nucleic acids with high precision and accuracy. To fuel this technology, we generated more than 100,000 validated assays for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) covering virtually all known and predicted human genes. We also established a large DNA sample bank comprised of more than 50,000 consented healthy and diseased individuals. This combination of reagents and technology allows the execution of large-scale genome-wide association studies. Taking advantage of MassARRAY"s capability for quantitative analysis of nucleic acids, allele frequencies are estimated in sample pools containing large numbers of individual DNAs. To compare pools as a first-pass "filtering" step is a tremendous advantage in throughput and cost over individual genotyping. We employed this approach in numerous genome-wide, hypothesis-free searches to identify genes associated with common complex diseases, such as breast cancer, osteoporosis, and osteoarthritis, and genes involved in quantitative traits like high density lipoproteins cholesterol (HDL-c) levels and central fat. Access to additional well-characterized patient samples through collaborations allows us to conduct replication studies that validate true disease genes. These discoveries will expand our understanding of genetic disease predisposition, and our ability for early diagnosis and determination of specific disease subtype or progression stage.

  20. Modern approaches to understanding stress and disease susceptibility: A review with special emphasis on respiratory disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palok Aich

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Palok Aich, Andrew A Potter, Philip J GriebelVaccine and Infectious Disease Organization, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, CanadaAbstract: Studies in animals and humans link both physical and psychological stress with an increased incidence and severity of respiratory infections. For this manuscript we define stress as the physiological responses an individual undergoes while adjusting to a continually changing environment. It is known that stressors of various types (psychological/physical can alter the physiological levels of certain hormones, chemokines and cytokines. These alterations send information to the central nervous system to take necessary action which then sends messages to appropriate organs/tissues/cells to respond. These messages can either activate or suppress the immune system as needed and failure to compensate for this by the body can lead to serious health-related problems. Little is known how stress affects disease susceptibility, yet understanding this mechanism is important for developing effective treatments, and for improving health and food quality. The current review focuses on (a the effects of psychological stressors in humans and animals, (b various methodologies employed to understand stress responses and their outcomes, and (c the current status of the attempts to correlate stress and disease with respiratory disease as model system. The methodologies included in this review span traditional epidemiological, behavioral and immunological studies to current high throughput genomic, proteomic, metabolomic/metabonomic approaches. With the advent of various newer omics and bioinformatics methodologies we postulate that it will become feasible to understand the mechanisms through which stress can influence disease onset. Although the literature in this area is limited because of the infancy of this research area, the objective of this review is to illustrate the power of new approaches to address complex

  1. Glucocorticoid-related genetic susceptibility for Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Quervain, Dominique J-F; Poirier, Raphael; Wollmer, M Axel; Grimaldi, Luigi M E; Tsolaki, Magdalini; Streffer, Johannes R; Hock, Christoph; Nitsch, Roger M; Mohajeri, M Hasan; Papassotiropoulos, Andreas

    2004-01-01

    Because glucocorticoid excess increases neuronal vulnerability, genetic variations in the glucocorticoid system may be related to the risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD). We analyzed single-nucleotide polymorphisms in 10 glucocorticoid-related genes in a population of 814 AD patients and unrelated control subjects. Set-association analysis revealed that a rare haplotype in the 5' regulatory region of the gene encoding 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (HSD11B1) was associated with a 6-fold increased risk for sporadic AD. Results of a reporter-gene assay indicated that the rare risk-associated haplotype altered HSD11B1 transcription. HSD11B1 controls tissue levels of biologically active glucocorticoids and thereby influences neuronal vulnerability. Our results indicate that a functional variation in the glucocorticoid system increases the risk for AD, which may have important implications for the diagnosis and treatment of this disease.

  2. Increased Abundance of M Cells in the Gut Epithelium Dramatically Enhances Oral Prion Disease Susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, David S; Sehgal, Anuj; Rios, Daniel; Williams, Ifor R; Mabbott, Neil A

    2016-12-01

    Many natural prion diseases of humans and animals are considered to be acquired through oral consumption of contaminated food or pasture. Determining the route by which prions establish host infection will identify the important factors that influence oral prion disease susceptibility and to which intervention strategies can be developed. After exposure, the early accumulation and replication of prions within small intestinal Peyer's patches is essential for the efficient spread of disease to the brain. To replicate within Peyer's patches, the prions must first cross the gut epithelium. M cells are specialised epithelial cells within the epithelia covering Peyer's patches that transcytose particulate antigens and microorganisms. M cell-development is dependent upon RANKL-RANK-signalling, and mice in which RANK is deleted only in the gut epithelium completely lack M cells. In the specific absence of M cells in these mice, the accumulation of prions within Peyer's patches and the spread of disease to the brain was blocked, demonstrating a critical role for M cells in the initial transfer of prions across the gut epithelium in order to establish host infection. Since pathogens, inflammatory stimuli and aging can modify M cell-density in the gut, these factors may also influence oral prion disease susceptibility. Mice were therefore treated with RANKL to enhance M cell density in the gut. We show that prion uptake from the gut lumen was enhanced in RANKL-treated mice, resulting in shortened survival times and increased disease susceptibility, equivalent to a 10-fold higher infectious titre of prions. Together these data demonstrate that M cells are the critical gatekeepers of oral prion infection, whose density in the gut epithelium directly limits or enhances disease susceptibility. Our data suggest that factors which alter M cell-density in the gut epithelium may be important risk factors which influence host susceptibility to orally acquired prion diseases.

  3. Chemokine regulation in response to beryllium exposure in human peripheral blood mononuclear and dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong-Geller, Elizabeth; Pardington, Paige E; Cary, Robert B; Sauer, Nancy N; Gupta, Goutam

    2006-02-01

    Exposure to beryllium (Be) induces a delayed-type hypersensitivity immune reaction in the lungs of susceptible individuals, which leads to the onset of Be sensitivity and Chronic Beryllium Disease (CBD). Although some mechanistic aspects of CBD have begun to be characterized, very little is known about the molecular mechanisms by which Be activates the host immune response. To gain insight into the cellular response to Be exposure, we have performed global microarray analysis using a mixture of peripheral blood mononuclear and dendritic cells (PBMC/DCs) from a non-CBD source to identify genes that are specifically upregulated in response to BeSO(4) stimulation, compared to a control metal salt, Al(2)(SO(4))(3). We identified a number of upregulated immunomodulatory genes, including several chemokines in the MIP-1 and GRO families. Using PBMC/DCs from three different donors, we demonstrate that BeSO(4) stimulation generally exhibits an increased rate of both chemokine mRNA transcription and release compared to Al(2)(SO(4))(3) exposure, although variations among the individual donors do exist. We show that MIP-1 alpha and MIP-1 beta neutralizing antibodies can partially inhibit the ability of BeSO(4) to stimulate cell migration of PBMC/DCs in vitro. Finally, incubation of PBMC/DCs with BeSO(4) altered the binding of the transcription factor RUNX to the MIP-1 alpha promoter consensus sequence, indicating that Be can regulate chemokine gene activation. Taken together, these results suggest a model in which Be stimulation of PBMC/DCs can modulate the expression and release of different chemokines, leading to the migration of lymphocytes to the lung and the formation of a localized environment for development of Be disease in susceptible individuals.

  4. Reactivity test between beryllium and copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamura, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Kato, M. [NGK Insulators, Ltd., Aichi-ken (Japan)

    1995-09-01

    Beryllium has been expected for using as plasma facing material on ITER. And, copper alloy has been proposed as heat sink material behind plasma facing components. Therefore, both materials must be joined. However, the elementary process of reaction between beryllium and copper alloy does not clear in detail. For example, other authors reported that beryllium reacted with copper at high temperature, but it was not obvious about the generation of reaction products and increasing of the reaction layer. In the present work, from this point, for clarifying the elementary process of reaction between beryllium and copper, the out-of-pile compatibility tests were conducted with diffusion couples of beryllium and copper which were inserted in the capsule filled with high purity helium gas (6N). Annealing temperatures were 300, 400, 500, 600 and 700{degrees}C, and annealing periods were 100, 300 and 1000h. Beryllium specimens were hot pressed beryllium, and copper specimens were OFC (Oxygen Free Copper).

  5. Increased susceptibility to fungal disease accompanies adaptation to drought in Brassica rapa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, Niamh B; Rest, Joshua S; Franks, Steven J

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated adaptive evolutionary responses to climate change, but little is known about how these responses may influence ecological interactions with other organisms, including natural enemies. We used a resurrection experiment in the greenhouse to examine the effect of evolutionary responses to drought on the susceptibility of Brassica rapa plants to a fungal pathogen, Alternaria brassicae. In agreement with previous studies in this population, we found an evolutionary shift to earlier flowering postdrought, which was previously shown to be adaptive. Here, we report the novel finding that postdrought descendant plants were also more susceptible to disease, indicating a rapid evolutionary shift to increased susceptibility. This was accompanied by an evolutionary shift to increased specific leaf area (thinner leaves) following drought. We found that flowering time and disease susceptibility displayed plastic responses to experimental drought treatments, but that this plasticity did not match the direction of evolution, indicating that plastic and evolutionary responses to changes in climate can be opposed. The observed evolutionary shift to increased disease susceptibility accompanying adaptation to drought provides evidence that even if populations can rapidly adapt in response to climate change, evolution in other traits may have ecological effects that could make species more vulnerable.

  6. Worker Environment Beryllium Characterization Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Environment, Safety, Health & Quality

    2009-12-28

    This report summarizes the conclusion of regular monitoring of occupied buildings at the Nevada Test Site and North Las Vegas facility to determine the extent of beryllium (Be) contamination in accordance with Judgment of Needs 6 of the August 14, 2003, “Minnema Report.”

  7. Overlap of disease susceptibility loci for rheumatoid arthritis and juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinks, Anne; Eyre, Steve; Ke, Xiayi; Barton, Anne; Martin, Paul; Flynn, Edward; Packham, Jon; Worthington, Jane; Thomson, Wendy

    2010-01-01

    Background Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been extremely successful in the search for susceptibility risk factors for complex genetic autoimmune diseases. As more studies are published, evidence is emerging of considerable overlap of loci between these diseases. In juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), another complex genetic autoimmune disease, the strategy of using information from autoimmune disease GWAS or candidate gene studies to help in the search for novel JIA susceptibility loci has been successful, with confirmed association with two genes, PTPN22 and IL2RA. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease that shares similar clinical and pathological features with JIA and, therefore, recently identified confirmed RA susceptibility loci are also excellent JIA candidate loci. Objective To determine the overlap of disease susceptibility loci for RA and JIA. Methods Fifteen single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at nine RA-associated loci were genotyped in Caucasian patients with JIA (n=1054) and controls (n=3531) and tested for association with JIA. Allele and genotype frequencies were compared between cases and controls using the genetic analysis software, PLINK. Results Two JIA susceptibility loci were identified, one of which was a novel JIA association (STAT4) and the second confirmed previously published associations of the TRAF1/C5 locus with JIA. Weak evidence of association of JIA with three additional loci (Chr6q23, KIF5A and PRKCQ) was also obtained, which warrants further investigation. Conclusion All these loci are good candidates in view of the known pathogenesis of JIA, as genes within these regions (TRAF1, STAT4, TNFAIP3, PRKCQ) are known to be involved in T-cell receptor signalling or activation pathways. PMID:19674979

  8. TGF-b2 induction regulates invasiveness of Theileria-transformed leukocytes and disease susceptibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Chaussepied

    Full Text Available Theileria parasites invade and transform bovine leukocytes causing either East Coast fever (T. parva, or tropical theileriosis (T. annulata. Susceptible animals usually die within weeks of infection, but indigenous infected cattle show markedly reduced pathology, suggesting that host genetic factors may cause disease susceptibility. Attenuated live vaccines are widely used to control tropical theileriosis and attenuation is associated with reduced invasiveness of infected macrophages in vitro. Disease pathogenesis is therefore linked to aggressive invasiveness, rather than uncontrolled proliferation of Theileria-infected leukocytes. We show that the invasive potential of Theileria-transformed leukocytes involves TGF-b signalling. Attenuated live vaccine lines express reduced TGF-b2 and their invasiveness can be rescued with exogenous TGF-b. Importantly, infected macrophages from disease susceptible Holstein-Friesian (HF cows express more TGF-b2 and traverse Matrigel with great efficiency compared to those from disease-resistant Sahiwal cattle. Thus, TGF-b2 levels correlate with disease susceptibility. Using fluorescence and time-lapse video microscopy we show that Theileria-infected, disease-susceptible HF macrophages exhibit increased actin dynamics in their lamellipodia and podosomal adhesion structures and develop more membrane blebs. TGF-b2-associated invasiveness in HF macrophages has a transcription-independent element that relies on cytoskeleton remodelling via activation of Rho kinase (ROCK. We propose that a TGF-b autocrine loop confers an amoeboid-like motility on Theileria-infected leukocytes, which combines with MMP-dependent motility to drive invasiveness and virulence.

  9. Impact of Maternal Exercise during Pregnancy on Offspring Chronic Disease Susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaize, A Nicole; Pearson, Kevin J; Newcomer, Sean C

    2015-10-01

    Maternal behaviors during pregnancy have been reported to impact offspring health in adulthood. In this article we explore the novel hypothesis that exercise during pregnancy can protect against chronic disease susceptibility in the offspring. To date, research has demonstrated that improvements in metabolic outcomes, cardiovascular risk, and cancer can occur in response to maternal exercise during pregnancy.

  10. A genome-wide association study identifies novel and functionally related susceptibility loci for Kawasaki Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgner, D.; Davila, S.; Breunis, W.B.; Ng, S.B.; Li, Y.; Bonnard, C.; Ling, L.; Wright, V.J.; Thalamuthu, A.; Odam, M.; Shimizu, C.; Burns, J.C.; Levin, M.; Kuijpers, T.W.; Hibberd, M.L.

    2009-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is a pediatric vasculitis that damages the coronary arteries in 25% of untreated and approximately 5% of treated children. Epidemiologic data suggest that KD is triggered by unidentified infection(s) in genetically susceptible children. To investigate genetic determinants of KD

  11. HLA genes and other candidate genes involved in susceptibility for (pre)neoplastic cervical disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zoodsma, M; Nolte, IM; Meerman, GJT; De Vries, EGE; Van Der Zee, AGJ

    2005-01-01

    This review focuses on common and genetic risk factors such as HLA and other genes that may be involved in susceptibility for (pre)neoplastic cervical disease. The goal of this review is the evaluation of polymorphisms that are either associated with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and/or c

  12. ALTERED HEPATIC GENE EXPRESSION IN MORBIDLY OBESE WOMEN AND ITS IMPLICATIONS FOR SUSCEPTIBILITY TO OTHER DISEASES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to determine the molecular bases of disordered hepatic function and disease susceptibility in obesity. We compared global gene expression in liver biopsies from morbidly obese (MO) women undergoing gastric bypass (GBP) surgery with that of women un...

  13. ALTERED HEPATIC GENE EXPRESSION IN MORBIDLY OBESE WOMEN AND ITS IMPLICATIONS FOR SUSCEPTIBILITY TO OTHER DISEASES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to determine the molecular bases of disordered hepatic function and disease susceptibility in obesity. We compared global gene expression in liver biopsies from morbidly obese (MO) women undergoing gastric bypass (GBP) surgery with that of women un...

  14. Levels of immunity parameters underpin bleaching and disease susceptibility of reef corals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Caroline V; Bythell, John C; Willis, Bette L

    2010-06-01

    Immunity is a key life history trait that may explain hierarchies in the susceptibility of corals to disease and thermal bleaching, two of the greatest current threats to coral health and the persistence of tropical reefs. Despite their ongoing and rapid global decline, there have been few investigations into the immunity mechanisms of reef-building corals. Variables commonly associated with invertebrate immunity, including the presence of melanin, size of melanin-containing granular cells, and phenoloxidase (PO) activity, as well as concentrations of fluorescent proteins (FPs), were investigated in hard (Scleractinia) and soft (Alcyonacea) corals spanning 10 families from the Great Barrier Reef. Detectable levels of these indicators were present in all corals investigated, although relative investment differed among coral taxa. Overall levels of investment were inversely correlated to thermal bleaching and disease susceptibility. In addition, PO activity, melanin-containing granular cell size, and FP concentration were each found to be significant predictors of susceptibility and thus may play key roles in coral immunity. Correlative evidence that taxonomic (family-level) variation in the levels of these constituent immunity parameters underpins susceptibility to both thermal bleaching and disease indicates that baseline immunity underlies the vulnerability of corals to these two threats. This reinforces the necessity of a holistic approach to understanding bleaching and disease in order to accurately determine the resilience of coral reefs.

  15. HLA genes and other candidate genes involved in susceptibility for (pre)neoplastic cervical disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zoodsma, M; Nolte, IM; Meerman, GJT; De Vries, EGE; Van Der Zee, AGJ

    2005-01-01

    This review focuses on common and genetic risk factors such as HLA and other genes that may be involved in susceptibility for (pre)neoplastic cervical disease. The goal of this review is the evaluation of polymorphisms that are either associated with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and/or c

  16. Survey of marbofloxacin susceptibility of bacteria isolated from cattle with respiratory disease and mastitis in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroemer, S; Galland, D; Guérin-Faublée, V; Giboin, H; Woehrlé-Fontaine, F

    2012-01-01

    A monitoring programme conducted in Europe since 1994 to survey the marbofloxacin susceptibility of bacterial pathogens isolated from cattle has established the susceptibility of bacterial strains isolated before any antibiotic treatment from bovine mastitis and bovine respiratory disease (BRD) cases between 2002 and 2008. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined by a standardised microdilution technique. For respiratory pathogens, Pasteurella multocida and Mannheimia haemolytica isolates (751 and 514 strains, respectively) were highly susceptible to marbofloxacin (MIC≤0.03 µg/ml for 77.39 per cent of the strains) and only 1.75 per cent of M haemolytica strains were resistant (MIC≥4 µg/ml). Histophilus somni isolates (73 strains) were highly susceptible to marbofloxacin (0.008 to 0.06 µg/ml). Mycoplasma bovis MIC (171 strains) ranged from 0.5 to 4 µg/ml. For mastitis pathogens, the majority of Escherichia coli isolates were highly susceptible to marbofloxacin (95.8 per cent of 617 strains). Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci (568 and 280 strains) had a homogenous population with MIC centred on 0.25 µg/ml. Streptococcus uberis and Streptococcus dysgalactiae (660 and 217 strains) were moderately susceptible with MIC centred on 1 µg/ml. Marbofloxacin MIC for these various pathogens appeared stable over the seven years of the monitoring programme and was similar to previously published MIC results.

  17. Differential effect of caffeine intake in subjects with genetic susceptibility to Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Prakash M; Paing, Swe Swe Thet; Li, HuiHua; Pavanni, R; Yuen, Y; Zhao, Y; Tan, Eng King

    2015-11-02

    We examined if caffeine intake has a differential effect in subjects with high and low genetic susceptibility to Parkinson's disease (PD), a common neurodegenerative disorder. A case control study involving 812 subjects consisting of PD and healthy controls were conducted. Caffeine intake assessed by a validated questionnaire and genotyping of PD gene risk variant (LRRK2 R1628P) was carried out. Compared to caffeine takers with the wild-type genotype (low genetic susceptibility), non-caffeine takers with R1628P variant (high genetic susceptibility) had a 15 times increased risk of developing PD (OR = 15.4, 95% CI = (1.94, 122), P = 0.01), whereas caffeine takers with R1628P (intermediate susceptibility) had a 3 times risk (OR = 3.07, 95% CI = (2.02, 4.66), P Caffeine intake would significantly reduce the risk of PD much more in those with high genetic susceptibility compared to those with low genetic susceptibility.

  18. Considerations for the development of health-based surface dust cleanup criteria for beryllium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shay, Erin; De Gandiaga, Elise; Madl, Amy K

    2013-03-01

    The exposure-response patterns with beryllium sensitization (BeS), chronic beryllium disease (CBD) and lung cancer are influenced by a number of biological and physicochemical factors. Recent studies have suggested dermal exposure as a pathway for BeS. In light of the current non-health-based DOE Beryllium Rule surface criteria, the feasibility of deriving a human health-based surface dust cleanup criteria (SDCC) for beryllium was assessed based on toxicology and health risk factors via all potential routes of exposure. Beryllium-specific and general exposure factors were evaluated, including (1) beryllium physicochemical characteristics, bioavailability and influence on disease prevalence, and (2) chemical dissipation, resuspension and transfer. SDCC for non-cancer (SDCC) and cancer (SDCC) endpoints were derived from a combination of modern methods applied for occupational, residential and building reentry surface dust criteria. The most conservative SDCC estimates were derived for dermal exposure (5-379 μg/100 cm for 0.1-1% damaged skin and 17-3337 μg/100 cm for intact skin), whereas the SDCC for inhalation exposure ranged from 51 to 485 μg/100 cm. Considering this analysis, the lowest DOE surface criterion of 0.2 μg/100 cm is conservative for minimizing exposure and potential risks associated with beryllium-contaminated surfaces released for non-beryllium industrial or public sector use. Although methodological challenges exist with sampling and analysis procedures, data variability and interpretation of surface dust information in relation to anthropogenic and natural background concentrations, this evaluation should provide useful guidance with regard to cleanup of manufacturing equipment or remediation of property for transfer to the general public or non-beryllium industrial facilities.

  19. Spread of Ebola disease with susceptible exposed infected isolated recovered (SEIIhR) model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizah, Afina; Widyaningsih, Purnami; Retno Sari Saputro, Dewi

    2017-06-01

    Ebola is a deadly infectious disease and has caused an epidemic on several countries in West Africa. Mathematical modeling to study the spread of Ebola disease has been developed, including through models susceptible infected removed (SIR) and susceptible exposed infected removed (SEIR). Furthermore, susceptible exposed infected isolated recovered (SEIIhR) model has been derived. The aims of this research are to derive SEIIhR model for Ebola disease, to determine the patterns of its spread, to determine the equilibrium point and stability of the equilibrium point using phase plane analysis, and also to apply the SEIIhR model on Ebola epidemic in Sierra Leone in 2014. The SEIIhR model is a differential equation system. Pattern of ebola disease spread with SEIIhR model is solution of the differential equation system. The equilibrium point of SEIIhR model is unique and it is a disease-free equilibrium point that stable. Application of the model is based on the data Ebola epidemic in Sierra Leone. The free-disease equilibrium point (Se; Ee; Ie; Ihe; Re )=(5743865, 0, 0, 0, 0) is stable.

  20. TRAF3IP2 gene and systemic lupus erythematosus: association with disease susceptibility and pericarditis development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perricone, Carlo; Ciccacci, Cinzia; Ceccarelli, Fulvia; Di Fusco, Davide; Spinelli, Francesca Romana; Cipriano, Enrica; Novelli, Giuseppe; Valesini, Guido; Conti, Fabrizio; Borgiani, Paola

    2013-10-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multifactorial autoimmune disease. Although genetic factors confer susceptibility to the disease, only 15 % of the genetic contribution has been identified. TRAF3IP2 gene, associated with susceptibility to psoriatic arthritis and psoriasis, encodes for Act1, a negative regulator of adaptive immunity and a positive signaling adaptor in IL-17-mediated immune responses. The aim of this study was to assess the role of TRAF3IP2 gene variability in SLE susceptibility and disease phenotype in an Italian population. Two hundred thirty-nine consecutive SLE patients were enrolled. Study protocol included complete physical examination; the clinical and laboratory data were collected. Two hundred seventy-eight age- and ethnicity-matched healthy subjects served as controls. TRAF3IP2 polymorphisms (rs33980500, rs13190932, and rs13193677) were analyzed in both cases and controls. Genotype analysis was performed by allelic discrimination assays. A case-control association study and a genotype-phenotype correlation were performed. The rs33980500 and rs13193677 resulted significantly associated with SLE susceptibility (P = 0.021, odds ratio (OR) = 1.71, and P = 0.046, OR = 1.73, respectively). All three TRAF3IP2 single nucleotide polymorphisms resulted associated with the development of pericarditis; in particular, rs33980500 showed the strongest association (P = 0.002, OR 2.59). This association was further highlighted by binary logistic regression analysis. In conclusion, our data show for the first time the contribution of TRAF3IP2 genetic variability in SLE susceptibility, providing further suggestions that common variation in genes that function in the adaptive and innate arms of the immune system are important in establishing SLE risk. Our study also shows that this gene may affect disease phenotype and, particularly, the occurrence of pericarditis.

  1. Mutagenicity, carcinogenicity and teratogenicity of beryllium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léonard, A; Lauwerys, R

    1987-07-01

    The carcinogenicity of a number of beryllium compounds has been confirmed in experiments on laboratory animals and this metal has to be treated as a possible carcinogenic threat to man. These carcinogenic properties are associated with mutagenic activity as shown by the results of short-term tests performed in vitro with beryllium chloride and beryllium sulfate. These soluble beryllium compounds can produce some infidelity of in vitro synthesis, forward gene mutations in microorganisms and in mammalian cells. They are also able to induce cell transformation. In addition to the positive results obtained in several short-term assays beryllium compounds have been found to bind to nucleoproteins, to inhibit certain enzymes needed for DNA synthesis, to bind nucleic acids to cell membranes and to inhibit microtubule polymerization. The teratogenicity of beryllium salts is relatively unknown and needs additional investigation.

  2. Beryllium Exposure Control Program at the Cardiff Atomic Weapons Establishment in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, J S; Foote, K; McClean, M; Cogbill, G

    2001-05-01

    experienced only one unique a case of clinical chronic beryllium disease (CBD) ascertained by traditional medical monitoring procedures. The treating physician determined that this lung disease was likely caused by a systems reaction resulting from a mound contaminated with beryllium. However, he could not rule out the potential for inhalation exposure. Over the 17 years of measurement data analyzed, on occasion, airborne beryllium concentrations have exceeded 2.0 microg/m3; however, the Cardiff experience demonstrates that strict and consistent adherence to exposure control measures that emphasized airborne and surface levels and appropriate engineering controls, work practices, and use of personal protective equipment appears to have successfully prevented the incidence of clinical CBD with the exception of one unique case.

  3. Heterozygote loss of ACE2 is sufficient to increase the susceptibility to heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wang; Patel, Vaibhav B; Parajuli, Nirmal; Fan, Dong; Basu, Ratnadeep; Wang, Zuocheng; Ramprasath, Tharmarajan; Kassiri, Zamaneh; Penninger, Josef M; Oudit, Gavin Y

    2014-08-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) metabolizes Ang II into Ang 1-7 thereby negatively regulating the renin-angiotensin system. However, heart disease in humans and in animal models is associated with only a partial loss of ACE2. ACE2 is an X-linked gene; and as such, we tested the clinical relevance of a partial loss of ACE2 by using female ACE2(+/+) (wildtype) and ACE2(+/-) (heterozygote) mice. Pressure overload in ACE2(+/-) mice resulted in greater LV dilation and worsening systolic and diastolic dysfunction. These changes were associated with increased myocardial fibrosis, hypertrophy, and upregulation of pathological gene expression. In response to Ang II infusion, there was increased NADPH oxidase activity and myocardial fibrosis resulting in the worsening of Ang II-induced diastolic dysfunction with a preserved systolic function. Ang II-mediated cellular effects in cultured adult ACE2(+/-) cardiomyocytes and cardiofibroblasts were exacerbated. Ang II-mediated pathological signaling worsened in ACE2(+/-) hearts characterized by an increase in the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and JNK1/2 and STAT-3 pathways. The ACE2(+/-) mice showed an exacerbated pressor response with increased vascular fibrosis and stiffness. Vascular superoxide and nitrotyrosine levels were increased in ACE2(+/-) vessels consistent with increased vascular oxidative stress. These changes occurred with increased renal fibrosis and superoxide production. Partial heterozygote loss of ACE2 is sufficient to increase the susceptibility to heart disease secondary to pressure overload and Ang II infusion. Heart disease in humans with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy is associated with a partial loss of ACE2. Heterozygote female ACE2 mutant mice showed enhanced susceptibility to pressure overload-induced heart disease. Heterozygote female ACE2 mutant mice showed enhanced susceptibility to Ang II-induced heart and vascular diseases. Partial loss of ACE2 is sufficient to enhance the susceptibility to

  4. MEASUREMENTS OF THE PROPERTIES OF BERYLLIUM FOIL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ZHAO,Y.; WANG,H.

    2000-03-31

    The electrical conductivity of beryllium at radio frequency (800 MHz) and liquid nitrogen temperature were investigated and measured. This summary addresses a collection of beryllium properties in the literature, an analysis of the anomalous skin effect, the test model, the experimental setup and improvements, MAFIA simulations, the measurement results and data analyses. The final results show that the conductivity of beryllium is not as good as indicated by the handbook, yet very close to copper at liquid nitrogen temperature.

  5. Inhibited solid propellant composition containing beryllium hydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, W. W. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An object of this invention is to provide a composition of beryllium hydride and carboxy-terminated polybutadiene which is stable. Another object of this invention is to provide a method for inhibiting the reactivity of beryllium hydride toward carboxy-terminated polybutadiene. It was found that a small amount of lecithin inhibits the reaction of beryllium hydride with the acid groups in carboxy terminated polybutadiene.

  6. High-temperature beryllium embrittlement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokrovsky, A.S. [Scientific Research Inst. of Atomic Reactors, Dimitrovgrad (Russian Federation); Fabritsiev, S.A. [D.V. Efremov Scientific Research Institute, 189631 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Bagautdinov, R.M. [Scientific Research Inst. of Atomic Reactors, Dimitrovgrad (Russian Federation); Goncharenko, Yu.D. [Scientific Research Inst. of Atomic Reactors, Dimitrovgrad (Russian Federation)

    1996-10-01

    The neutron irradiation effect on the mechanical properties, swelling and fracture surface structure of various beryllium grades was studied in the BOR-60 reactor at 340 to 350 C up to a fluence of 7.2 x 10{sup 21} n/cm{sup 2}. At a mechanical testing temperature of 400 C there was observed a strong anisotropy of plastic beryllium deformation depending on the direction of sample cutting relative to the pressing direction. An increase of the testing temperature up to 700 C resulted in an abrupt embrittlement of all irradiated samples. In the most part of the surface structure the intercrystallite fracture along the grain boundaries was covered entirely with large pores, 1 to 4 {mu}m in size. It was suggested that the increased rate of pore formation along the grain boundaries resulted from a high-temperature embrittlement under irradiation. (orig.).

  7. Beryllium thin films for resistor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiet, O.

    1972-01-01

    Beryllium thin films have a protective oxidation resistant property at high temperature and high recrystallization temperature. However, the experimental film has very low temperature coefficient of resistance.

  8. Discrete-time dynamic network model for the spread of susceptible-infective-recovered diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Sanjeev Kumar

    2017-07-01

    We propose a discrete-time dynamic network model describing the spread of susceptible-infective-recovered diseases in a population. We consider the case in which the nodes in the network change their links due to social mixing dynamics as well as in response to the disease. The model shows the behavior that, as we increase social mixing, disease spread is inhibited in certain cases, while in other cases it is enhanced. We also extend this dynamic network model to take into account the case of hidden infection. Here we find that, as expected, the disease spreads more readily if there is a time period after contracting the disease during which an individual is infective but is not known to have the disease.

  9. Personal view: food for thought--western lifestyle and susceptibility to Crohn's disease. The FODMAP hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, P R; Shepherd, S J

    2005-06-15

    Susceptibility to the development of Crohn's disease involves a combination of genetic and environmental factors. The association of Crohn's disease with westernization has implicated lifestyle factors in pathogenesis. While diet is a likely candidate, evidence for specific changes in dietary habits and/or intake has been lacking. A new hypothesis is proposed, by which excessive delivery of highly fermentable but poorly absorbed short-chain carbohydrates and polyols (designated FODMAPs--Fermentable Oligo-, Di- and Mono-saccharides And Polyols) to the distal small intestinal and colonic lumen is a dietary factor underlying susceptibility to Crohn's disease. The subsequent rapid fermentation of FODMAPs in the distal small and proximal large intestine induces conditions in the bowel that lead to increased intestinal permeability, a predisposing factor to the development of Crohn's disease. Evidence supporting this hypothesis includes the increasing intake of FODMAPs in western societies, the association of increased intake of sugars in the development of Crohn's disease, and the previously documented effects of the ingestion of excessive FODMAPs on the bowel. This hypothesis provides potential for the design of preventive strategies and raises concern about current enthusiasm for putative health-promoting effects of FODMAPs. One of the greatest challenges in defining the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease is to identify predisposing environmental factors. Such an achievement might lead to the development of preventive strategies for, and the definition of, possible target for changing the natural history of this serious disease. The present paper describes a new hypothesis for one such environmental factor.

  10. Unsuspected exposure to beryllium: potential implications for sarcoidosis diagnoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laczniak, Andrew N; Gross, Nathan A; Fuortes, Laurence J; Field, R William

    2014-07-21

    Exposure to Beryllium (Be) can cause sensitization (BeS) and chronic beryllium disease (CBD) in some individuals.  Even relatively low exposures may be sufficient to generate an asymptomatic, or in some cases a symptomatic, immune response. Since the clinical presentation of CBD is similar to that of sarcoidosis, it is helpful to have information on exposure to beryllium in order to reduce misdiagnosis. The purpose of this pilot study is to explore the occurrence of Be surface deposits at worksites with little or no previous reported use of commercially available Be products.  The workplaces chosen for this study represent a convenience sample of businesses in eastern Iowa. One hundred thirty-six surface dust samples were collected from 27 businesses for analysis of Be. The results were then divided into categories by the amount of detected Be according to U.S. Department of Energy guidelines as described in 10 CFR 850.30 and 10 CFR 850.31. Overall, at least one of the samples at 78% of the work sites tested contained deposited Be above the analytical limit of quantitation (0.035 µg beryllium per sample).  Beryllium was detected in 46% of the samples collected. Twelve percent of the samples exceeded 0.2 µg/100 cm² and 4% of the samples exceeded a Be concentration of 3 µg/100 cm². The findings from this study suggest that there may be a wider range and greater number of work environments that have the potential for Be exposure than has been documented previously.  These findings could have implications for the accurate diagnosis of sarcoidosis.

  11. Rotenone Susceptibility Phenotype in Olfactory Derived Patient Cells as a Model of Idiopathic Parkinson's Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Murtaza

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease is a complex age-related neurodegenerative disorder. Approximately 90% of Parkinson's disease cases are idiopathic, of unknown origin. The aetiology of Parkinson's disease is not fully understood but increasing evidence implies a failure in fundamental cellular processes including mitochondrial dysfunction and increased oxidative stress. To dissect the cellular events underlying idiopathic Parkinson's disease, we use primary cell lines established from the olfactory mucosa of Parkinson's disease patients. Previous metabolic and transcriptomic analyses identified deficiencies in stress response pathways in patient-derived cell lines. The aim of this study was to investigate whether these deficiencies manifested as increased susceptibility, as measured by cell viability, to a range of extrinsic stressors. We identified that patient-derived cells are more sensitive to mitochondrial complex I inhibition and hydrogen peroxide induced oxidative stress, than controls. Exposure to low levels (50 nM of rotenone led to increased apoptosis in patient-derived cells. We identified an endogenous deficit in mitochondrial complex I in patient-derived cells, but this did not directly correlate with rotenone-sensitivity. We further characterized the sensitivity to rotenone and identified that it was partly associated with heat shock protein 27 levels. Finally, transcriptomic analysis following rotenone exposure revealed that patient-derived cells express a diminished response to rotenone-induced stress compared with cells from healthy controls. Our cellular model of idiopathic Parkinson's disease displays a clear susceptibility phenotype to mitochondrial stress. The determination of molecular mechanisms underpinning this susceptibility may lead to the identification of biomarkers for either disease onset or progression.

  12. Gene-Wide Analysis Detects Two New Susceptibility Genes for Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harold, Denise; Jones, Lesley; Holmans, Peter; Gerrish, Amy; Vedernikov, Alexey; Richards, Alexander; DeStefano, Anita L.; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Ibrahim-Verbaas, Carla A.; Naj, Adam C.; Sims, Rebecca; Jun, Gyungah; Bis, Joshua C.; Beecham, Gary W.; Grenier-Boley, Benjamin; Russo, Giancarlo; Thornton-Wells, Tricia A.; Denning, Nicola; Smith, Albert V.; Chouraki, Vincent; Thomas, Charlene; Ikram, M. Arfan; Zelenika, Diana; Vardarajan, Badri N.; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Lin, Chiao-Feng; Schmidt, Helena; Kunkle, Brian; Dunstan, Melanie L.; Vronskaya, Maria; Johnson, Andrew D.; Ruiz, Agustin; Bihoreau, Marie-Thérèse; Reitz, Christiane; Pasquier, Florence; Hollingworth, Paul; Hanon, Olivier; Fitzpatrick, Annette L.; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Campion, Dominique; Crane, Paul K.; Baldwin, Clinton; Becker, Tim; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Cruchaga, Carlos; Craig, David; Amin, Najaf; Berr, Claudine; Lopez, Oscar L.; De Jager, Philip L.; Deramecourt, Vincent; Johnston, Janet A.; Evans, Denis; Lovestone, Simon; Letenneur, Luc; Hernández, Isabel; Rubinsztein, David C.; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Sleegers, Kristel; Goate, Alison M.; Fiévet, Nathalie; Huentelman, Matthew J.; Gill, Michael; Brown, Kristelle; Kamboh, M. Ilyas; Keller, Lina; Barberger-Gateau, Pascale; McGuinness, Bernadette; Larson, Eric B.; Myers, Amanda J.; Dufouil, Carole; Todd, Stephen; Wallon, David; Love, Seth; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; Gallacher, John; George-Hyslop, Peter St; Clarimon, Jordi; Lleo, Alberto; Bayer, Anthony; Tsuang, Debby W.; Yu, Lei; Tsolaki, Magda; Bossù, Paola; Spalletta, Gianfranco; Proitsi, Petra; Collinge, John; Sorbi, Sandro; Garcia, Florentino Sanchez; Fox, Nick C.; Hardy, John; Naranjo, Maria Candida Deniz; Bosco, Paolo; Clarke, Robert; Brayne, Carol; Galimberti, Daniela; Scarpini, Elio; Bonuccelli, Ubaldo; Mancuso, Michelangelo; Siciliano, Gabriele; Moebus, Susanne; Mecocci, Patrizia; Zompo, Maria Del; Maier, Wolfgang; Hampel, Harald; Pilotto, Alberto; Frank-García, Ana; Panza, Francesco; Solfrizzi, Vincenzo; Caffarra, Paolo; Nacmias, Benedetta; Perry, William; Mayhaus, Manuel; Lannfelt, Lars; Hakonarson, Hakon; Pichler, Sabrina; Carrasquillo, Minerva M.; Ingelsson, Martin; Beekly, Duane; Alvarez, Victoria; Zou, Fanggeng; Valladares, Otto; Younkin, Steven G.; Coto, Eliecer; Hamilton-Nelson, Kara L.; Gu, Wei; Razquin, Cristina; Pastor, Pau; Mateo, Ignacio; Owen, Michael J.; Faber, Kelley M.; Jonsson, Palmi V.; Combarros, Onofre; O'Donovan, Michael C.; Cantwell, Laura B.; Soininen, Hilkka; Blacker, Deborah; Mead, Simon; Mosley, Thomas H.; Bennett, David A.; Harris, Tamara B.; Fratiglioni, Laura; Holmes, Clive; de Bruijn, Renee F. A. G.; Passmore, Peter; Montine, Thomas J.; Bettens, Karolien; Rotter, Jerome I.; Brice, Alexis; Morgan, Kevin; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Kukull, Walter A.; Hannequin, Didier; Powell, John F.; Nalls, Michael A.; Ritchie, Karen; Lunetta, Kathryn L.; Kauwe, John S. K.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Riemenschneider, Matthias; Boada, Mercè; Hiltunen, Mikko; Martin, Eden R.; Schmidt, Reinhold; Rujescu, Dan; Dartigues, Jean-François; Mayeux, Richard; Tzourio, Christophe; Hofman, Albert; Nöthen, Markus M.; Graff, Caroline; Psaty, Bruce M.; Haines, Jonathan L.; Lathrop, Mark; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Launer, Lenore J.; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Farrer, Lindsay A.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Ramirez, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Background Alzheimer's disease is a common debilitating dementia with known heritability, for which 20 late onset susceptibility loci have been identified, but more remain to be discovered. This study sought to identify new susceptibility genes, using an alternative gene-wide analytical approach which tests for patterns of association within genes, in the powerful genome-wide association dataset of the International Genomics of Alzheimer's Project Consortium, comprising over 7 m genotypes from 25,580 Alzheimer's cases and 48,466 controls. Principal Findings In addition to earlier reported genes, we detected genome-wide significant loci on chromosomes 8 (TP53INP1, p = 1.4×10−6) and 14 (IGHV1-67 p = 7.9×10−8) which indexed novel susceptibility loci. Significance The additional genes identified in this study, have an array of functions previously implicated in Alzheimer's disease, including aspects of energy metabolism, protein degradation and the immune system and add further weight to these pathways as potential therapeutic targets in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:24922517

  13. Gene-wide analysis detects two new susceptibility genes for Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Escott-Price

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease is a common debilitating dementia with known heritability, for which 20 late onset susceptibility loci have been identified, but more remain to be discovered. This study sought to identify new susceptibility genes, using an alternative gene-wide analytical approach which tests for patterns of association within genes, in the powerful genome-wide association dataset of the International Genomics of Alzheimer's Project Consortium, comprising over 7 m genotypes from 25,580 Alzheimer's cases and 48,466 controls.In addition to earlier reported genes, we detected genome-wide significant loci on chromosomes 8 (TP53INP1, p = 1.4×10-6 and 14 (IGHV1-67 p = 7.9×10-8 which indexed novel susceptibility loci.The additional genes identified in this study, have an array of functions previously implicated in Alzheimer's disease, including aspects of energy metabolism, protein degradation and the immune system and add further weight to these pathways as potential therapeutic targets in Alzheimer's disease.

  14. Comparisons of protein profiles of beech bark disease resistant and susceptible American beech (Fagus grandifolia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mason Mary E

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Beech bark disease is an insect-fungus complex that damages and often kills American beech trees and has major ecological and economic impacts on forests of the northeastern United States and southeastern Canadian forests. The disease begins when exotic beech scale insects feed on the bark of trees, and is followed by infection of damaged bark tissues by one of the Neonectria species of fungi. Proteomic analysis was conducted of beech bark proteins from diseased trees and healthy trees in areas heavily infested with beech bark disease. All of the diseased trees had signs of Neonectria infection such as cankers or fruiting bodies. In previous tests reported elsewhere, all of the diseased trees were demonstrated to be susceptible to the scale insect and all of the healthy trees were demonstrated to be resistant to the scale insect. Sixteen trees were sampled from eight geographically isolated stands, the sample consisting of 10 healthy (scale-resistant and 6 diseased/infested (scale-susceptible trees. Results Proteins were extracted from each tree and analysed in triplicate by isoelectric focusing followed by denaturing gel electrophoresis. Gels were stained and protein spots identified and intensity quantified, then a statistical model was fit to identify significant differences between trees. A subset of BBD differential proteins were analysed by mass spectrometry and matched to known protein sequences for identification. Identified proteins had homology to stress, insect, and pathogen related proteins in other plant systems. Protein spots significantly different in diseased and healthy trees having no stand or disease-by-stand interaction effects were identified. Conclusions Further study of these proteins should help to understand processes critical to resistance to beech bark disease and to develop biomarkers for use in tree breeding programs and for the selection of resistant trees prior to or in early stages of BBD

  15. Investigation of beryllium/steam interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chekhonadskikh, A.M.; Vurim, A.D.; Vasilyev, Yu.S.; Pivovarov, O.S. [Inst. of Atomic Energy National Nuclear Center of the Republic of Kazakstan Semipalatinsk (Kazakhstan); Shestakov, V.P.; Tazhibayeva, I.L.

    1998-01-01

    In this report program on investigations of beryllium emissivity and transient processes on overheated beryllium surface attacked by water steam to be carried out in IAE NNC RK within Task S81 TT 2096-07-16 FR. The experimental facility design is elaborated in this Report. (author)

  16. Modeling of hydrogen interactions with beryllium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longhurst, G.R. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, improved mathematical models are developed for hydrogen interactions with beryllium. This includes the saturation effect observed for high-flux implantation of ions from plasmas and retention of tritium produced from neutronic transmutations in beryllium. Use of the models developed is justified by showing how they can replicated experimental data using the TMAP4 tritium transport code. (author)

  17. Benchmark Experiment for Beryllium Slab Samples

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NIE; Yang-bo; BAO; Jie; HAN; Rui; RUAN; Xi-chao; REN; Jie; HUANG; Han-xiong; ZHOU; Zu-ying

    2015-01-01

    In order to validate the evaluated nuclear data on beryllium,a benchmark experiment has been performed at China Institution of Atomic Energy(CIAE).Neutron leakage spectra from pure beryllium slab samples(10cm×10cm×11cm)were measured at 61°and 121°using timeof-

  18. Diffusion-bonded beryllium aluminum optical structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grapes, Thomas F.

    2003-12-01

    Beryllium aluminum material can present significant advantages for optical support structures. A likely advantage of beryllium aluminum compared to aluminum or titanium for such structures is its higher specific stiffness. However, beryllium aluminum material is significantly more expensive than most competing materials. The cost problem with beryllium aluminum is exacerbated if fabrication methods that result in near net shape parts are not used. Near net shape methods result in the least amount of material "thrown away" in the fabrication process. Casting is a primary example of near net shape manufacturing that is appropriate for some optical support structures. Casting aluminum, and other materials as well, is common. Casting of beryllium aluminum is very difficult, however, and has not had significant success. Diffusion bonding - a different approach for achieving near net shape beryllium aluminum optical support structures, was pursued and accomplished. Diffusion bonding is a term used to describe the joining of solid metal pieces under high temperature and pressure, but without melting. Three different optical support structures were designed and built of beryllium aluminum using diffusion bonding. Relatively small solid beryllium aluminum pieces were arranged together and then joined under hot isostatic pressure conditions. The resulting relatively large pressure bonded part was then machined to achieve the final product. Significant cost savings as compared to machining the part from a solid block were realized. Difficulties achieving diffusion bonds in complex joints were experienced and addressed.

  19. OAS1: a multiple sclerosis susceptibility gene that influences disease severity.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Brien, M

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Type 1 interferons upregulate oligoadenylate synthetase 1 (OAS1). A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in exon 7 of OAS1 results in differential RNAseL enzyme activity, the A allele coding for a truncated form with low activity and the G conferring high activity. We hypothesized that OAS1 genotypes would influence both susceptibility to multiple sclerosis (MS) and disease activity with the AA genotype being overrepresented and the GG genotype underrepresented in relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) with increased disease activity. METHODS: We examined OAS1 genotype distribution in 401 patients with MS, 394 healthy controls, and 178 patients with RRMS receiving interferon-beta (IFNbeta) assessed as 1) having no or minimal disease activity on IFNbeta, 2) having disease activity despite IFNbeta, and 3) 65 patients with RRMS with highly active disease. RESULTS: The OAS1 genotype distribution differed between patients with MS and controls (p = 0.000003), with lower frequency of GG homozygotes in patients with MS (6%) compared with controls (17%). In relation to disease severity, 34 (32%) patients with no or minimal disease activity on IFNbeta had the AA and 8 (8%) the GG genotype; of patients with disease activity despite IFNbeta, 27 (51%) were AA, while only 1 (2%) was GG (p = 0.03). Median time to first relapse on IFNbeta was 24 months in patients with RRMS with AA genotype and 33 months with AG or GG genotype (p = 0.04). The GG genotype was absent in 65 patients with highly active RRMS (p = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS: A functional OAS1 SNP, AA genotype, confers susceptibility to MS and the GG genotype may protect against increased disease activity.

  20. Identification of a shared genetic susceptibility locus for coronary heart disease and periodontitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arne S Schaefer

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies indicate a mutual epidemiological relationship between coronary heart disease (CHD and periodontitis. Both diseases are associated with similar risk factors and are characterized by a chronic inflammatory process. In a candidate-gene association study, we identify an association of a genetic susceptibility locus shared by both diseases. We confirm the known association of two neighboring linkage disequilibrium regions on human chromosome 9p21.3 with CHD and show the additional strong association of these loci with the risk of aggressive periodontitis. For the lead SNP of the main associated linkage disequilibrium region, rs1333048, the odds ratio of the autosomal-recessive mode of inheritance is 1.99 (95% confidence interval 1.33-2.94; P = 6.9 x 10(-4 for generalized aggressive periodontitis, and 1.72 (1.06-2.76; P = 2.6 x 10(-2 for localized aggressive periodontitis. The two associated linkage disequilibrium regions map to the sequence of the large antisense noncoding RNA ANRIL, which partly overlaps regulatory and coding sequences of CDKN2A/CDKN2B. A closely located diabetes-associated variant was independent of the CHD and periodontitis risk haplotypes. Our study demonstrates that CHD and periodontitis are genetically related by at least one susceptibility locus, which is possibly involved in ANRIL activity and independent of diabetes associated risk variants within this region. Elucidation of the interplay of ANRIL transcript variants and their involvement in increased susceptibility to the interactive diseases CHD and periodontitis promises new insight into the underlying shared pathogenic mechanisms of these complex common diseases.

  1. Identification of a shared genetic susceptibility locus for coronary heart disease and periodontitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arne S Schaefer

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies indicate a mutual epidemiological relationship between coronary heart disease (CHD and periodontitis. Both diseases are associated with similar risk factors and are characterized by a chronic inflammatory process. In a candidate-gene association study, we identify an association of a genetic susceptibility locus shared by both diseases. We confirm the known association of two neighboring linkage disequilibrium regions on human chromosome 9p21.3 with CHD and show the additional strong association of these loci with the risk of aggressive periodontitis. For the lead SNP of the main associated linkage disequilibrium region, rs1333048, the odds ratio of the autosomal-recessive mode of inheritance is 1.99 (95% confidence interval 1.33-2.94; P = 6.9 x 10(-4 for generalized aggressive periodontitis, and 1.72 (1.06-2.76; P = 2.6 x 10(-2 for localized aggressive periodontitis. The two associated linkage disequilibrium regions map to the sequence of the large antisense noncoding RNA ANRIL, which partly overlaps regulatory and coding sequences of CDKN2A/CDKN2B. A closely located diabetes-associated variant was independent of the CHD and periodontitis risk haplotypes. Our study demonstrates that CHD and periodontitis are genetically related by at least one susceptibility locus, which is possibly involved in ANRIL activity and independent of diabetes associated risk variants within this region. Elucidation of the interplay of ANRIL transcript variants and their involvement in increased susceptibility to the interactive diseases CHD and periodontitis promises new insight into the underlying shared pathogenic mechanisms of these complex common diseases.

  2. Temporal transcriptome changes induced by MDV in marek's disease-resistant and -susceptible inbred chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Ying

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Marek's disease (MD is a lymphoproliferative disease in chickens caused by Marek's disease virus (MDV and characterized by T cell lymphoma and infiltration of lymphoid cells into various organs such as liver, spleen, peripheral nerves and muscle. Resistance to MD and disease risk have long been thought to be influenced both by genetic and environmental factors, the combination of which contributes to the observed outcome in an individual. We hypothesize that after MDV infection, genes related to MD-resistance or -susceptibility may exhibit different trends in transcriptional activity in chicken lines having a varying degree of resistance to MD. Results In order to study the mechanisms of resistance and susceptibility to MD, we performed genome-wide temporal expression analysis in spleen tissues from MD-resistant line 63, susceptible line 72 and recombinant congenic strain M (RCS-M that has a phenotype intermediate between lines 63 and 72 after MDV infection. Three time points of the MDV life cycle in chicken were selected for study: 5 days post infection (dpi, 10dpi and 21dpi, representing the early cytolytic, latent and late cytolytic stages, respectively. We observed similar gene expression profiles at the three time points in line 63 and RCS-M chickens that are both different from line 72. Pathway analysis using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA showed that MDV can broadly influence the chickens irrespective of whether they are resistant or susceptible to MD. However, some pathways like cardiac arrhythmia and cardiovascular disease were found to be affected only in line 72; while some networks related to cell-mediated immune response and antigen presentation were enriched only in line 63 and RCS-M. We identified 78 and 30 candidate genes associated with MD resistance, at 10 and 21dpi respectively, by considering genes having the same trend of expression change after MDV infection in lines 63 and RCS-M. On the other hand, by

  3. MHC Expression on Spleen Lymphocyte Subsets in Genetically Resistant and Susceptible Chickens Infected with Marek's Disease Virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, Tina; Bøving, Mette K.; Handberg, Kurt

    2009-01-01

    Resistance and susceptibility to Marek's disease (MD) are strongly influenced by the chicken major histocompatibility complex (MHC). In this study, splenic lymphocytes from MD-resistant and MD-susceptible chickens of three MHC genotypes (B21/B21, B19/B21, and B19/B19) were analyzed by flow...

  4. BERYLLIUM MEASUREMENT IN COMMERCIALLY AVAILABLE WET WIPES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youmans-Mcdonald, L.

    2011-02-18

    Analysis for beryllium by fluorescence is now an established method which is used in many government-run laboratories and commercial facilities. This study investigates the use of this technique using commercially available wet wipes. The fluorescence method is widely documented and has been approved as a standard test method by ASTM International and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). The procedure involves dissolution of samples in aqueous ammonium bifluoride solution and then adding a small aliquot to a basic hydroxybenzoquinoline sulfonate fluorescent dye (Berylliant{trademark} Inc. Detection Solution Part No. CH-2) , and measuring the fluorescence. This method is specific to beryllium. This work explores the use of three different commercial wipes spiked with beryllium, as beryllium acetate or as beryllium oxide and subsequent analysis by optical fluorescence. The effect of possible interfering metals such as Fe, Ti and Pu in the wipe medium is also examined.

  5. Some characteristics of fine beryllium particle combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davydov, D. A.; Kholopova, O. V.; Kolbasov, B. N.

    2007-08-01

    Beryllium dust will be produced under plasma interaction with beryllium armor of the first wall in ITER. Exothermal reaction of this dust with water steam or air, which can leak into the reactor vacuum chamber in some accidents, gives concern in respect to reactor safety. Results of studies devoted to combustion of fine beryllium particles are reviewed in the paper. A chemically active medium and elevated temperature are prerequisite to the combustion of beryllium particles. Their ignition is hampered by oxide films, which form a diffusion barrier on the particle surface as a result of pre-flame oxidation. The temperature to initiate combustion of particles depends on flame temperature, particle size, composition of combustible mixture, heating rate and other factors. In mixtures enriched with combustible, the flame temperature necessary to ignite individual particles approaches the beryllium boiling temperature.

  6. ITPKC functional polymorphism associated with Kawasaki disease susceptibility and formation of coronary artery aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onouchi, Yoshihiro; Gunji, Tomohiko; Burns, Jane C; Shimizu, Chisato; Newburger, Jane W; Yashiro, Mayumi; Nakamura, Yoshikazu; Yanagawa, Hiroshi; Wakui, Keiko; Fukushima, Yoshimitsu; Kishi, Fumio; Hamamoto, Kunihiro; Terai, Masaru; Sato, Yoshitake; Ouchi, Kazunobu; Saji, Tsutomu; Nariai, Akiyoshi; Kaburagi, Yoichi; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi; Suzuki, Kyoko; Tanaka, Takeo; Nagai, Toshiro; Cho, Hideo; Fujino, Akihiro; Sekine, Akihiro; Nakamichi, Reiichiro; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Kawasaki, Tomisaku; Nakamura, Yusuke; Hata, Akira

    2008-01-01

    Kawasaki disease is a pediatric systemic vasculitis of unknown etiology for which a genetic influence is suspected. We identified a functional SNP (itpkc_3) in the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate 3-kinase C (ITPKC) gene on chromosome 19q13.2 that is significantly associated with Kawasaki disease susceptibility and also with an increased risk of coronary artery lesions in both Japanese and US children. Transfection experiments showed that the C allele of itpkc_3 reduces splicing efficiency of the ITPKC mRNA. ITPKC acts as a negative regulator of T-cell activation through the Ca2+/NFAT signaling pathway, and the C allele may contribute to immune hyper-reactivity in Kawasaki disease. This finding provides new insights into the mechanisms of immune activation in Kawasaki disease and emphasizes the importance of activated T cells in the pathogenesis of this vasculitis.

  7. Alzheimer disease susceptibility loci: evidence for a protein network under natural selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Towfique; Shulman, Joshua M; Keenan, Brendan T; Chibnik, Lori B; Evans, Denis A; Bennett, David A; Stranger, Barbara E; De Jager, Philip L

    2012-04-06

    Recent genome-wide association studies have identified a number of susceptibility loci for Alzheimer disease (AD). To understand the functional consequences and potential interactions of the associated loci, we explored large-scale data sets interrogating the human genome for evidence of positive natural selection. Our findings provide significant evidence for signatures of recent positive selection acting on several haplotypes carrying AD susceptibility alleles; interestingly, the genes found in these selected haplotypes can be assembled, independently, into a molecular complex via a protein-protein interaction (PPI) network approach. These results suggest a possible coevolution of genes encoding physically-interacting proteins that underlie AD susceptibility and are coexpressed in different tissues. In particular, PICALM, BIN1, CD2AP, and EPHA1 are interconnected through multiple interacting proteins and appear to have coordinated evidence of selection in the same human population, suggesting that they may be involved in the execution of a shared molecular function. This observation may be AD-specific, as the 12 loci associated with Parkinson disease do not demonstrate excess evidence of natural selection. The context for selection is probably unrelated to AD itself; it is likely that these genes interact in another context, such as in immune cells, where we observe cis-regulatory effects at several of the selected AD loci. Copyright © 2012 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The thermal mismatch hypothesis explains host susceptibility to an emerging infectious disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Jeremy M; Venesky, Matthew D; Sauer, Erin L; Civitello, David J; McMahon, Taegan A; Roznik, Elizabeth A; Rohr, Jason R

    2017-02-01

    Parasites typically have broader thermal limits than hosts, so large performance gaps between pathogens and their cold- and warm-adapted hosts should occur at relatively warm and cold temperatures, respectively. We tested this thermal mismatch hypothesis by quantifying the temperature-dependent susceptibility of cold- and warm-adapted amphibian species to the fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) using laboratory experiments and field prevalence estimates from 15 410 individuals in 598 populations. In both the laboratory and field, we found that the greatest susceptibility of cold- and warm-adapted hosts occurred at relatively warm and cool temperatures, respectively, providing support for the thermal mismatch hypothesis. Our results suggest that as climate change shifts hosts away from their optimal temperatures, the probability of increased host susceptibility to infectious disease might increase, but the effect will depend on the host species and the direction of the climate shift. Our findings help explain the tremendous variation in species responses to Bd across climates and spatial, temporal and species-level variation in disease outbreaks associated with extreme weather events that are becoming more common with climate change.

  9. Beryllium coating on Inconel tiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailescu, V.; Burcea, G.; Lungu, C.P.; Mustata, I.; Lungu, A.M. [Association EURATOM-MEC Romania, National Institute of Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Bucharest (Romania); Rubel, M. [Alfven Laboratory, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Coad, J.P. [Culham Science Centre, EURATOM-UKAEA Fusion Association, Abingdon, OX, Oxon (United Kingdom); Matthews, G.; Pedrick, L.; Handley, R. [UKAEA Fusion, Association Euratom-UKAEA, Culham Science and Engineering Centre, OX 3DB ABINGDON, Oxon (United Kingdom)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: The Joint European Torus (JET) is a large experimental nuclear fusion device. Its aim is to confine and study the behaviour of plasma in conditions and dimensions approaching those required for a fusion reactor. The plasma is created in the toroidal shaped vacuum vessel of the machine in which it is confined by magnetic fields. In preparation for ITER a new ITER-like Wall (ILW) will be installed on Joint European Torus (JET), a wall not having any carbon facing the plasma [1]. In places Inconel tiles are to be installed, these tiles shall be coated with Beryllium. MEdC represented by the National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Magurele, Bucharest and in direct cooperation with Nuclear Fuel Plant Pitesti started to coat Inconel tiles with 8 {mu}m of Beryllium in accordance with the requirements of technical specification and fit for installation in the JET machine. This contribution provides an overview of the principles of manufacturing processes using thermal evaporation method in vacuum and the properties of the prepared coatings. The optimization of the manufacturing process (layer thickness, structure and purity) has been carried out on Inconel substrates (polished and sand blasted) The results of the optimization process and analysis (SEM, TEM, XRD, Auger, RBS, AFM) of the coatings will be presented. Reference [1] Takeshi Hirai, H. Maier, M. Rubel, Ph. Mertens, R. Neu, O. Neubauer, E. Gauthier, J. Likonen, C. Lungu, G. Maddaluno, G. F. Matthews, R. Mitteau, G. Piazza, V. Philipps, B. Riccardi, C. Ruset, I. Uytdenhouwen, R and D on full tungsten divertor and beryllium wall for JET TIER-like Wall Project, 24. Symposium on Fusion Technology - 11-15 September 2006 -Warsaw, Poland. (authors)

  10. 40 CFR 421.150 - Applicability: Description of the primary beryllium subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... primary beryllium subcategory. 421.150 Section 421.150 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... CATEGORY Primary Beryllium Subcategory § 421.150 Applicability: Description of the primary beryllium... beryllium by primary beryllium facilities processing beryllium ore concentrates or beryllium hydroxide...

  11. Postirradiation examination of beryllium pebbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1998-03-01

    Postirradiation examinations of COBRA-1A beryllium pebbles irradiated in the EBR-II fast reactor at neutron fluences which generated 2700--3700 appm helium have been performed. Measurements included density change, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The major change in microstructure is development of unusually shaped helium bubbles forming as highly non-equiaxed thin platelet-like cavities on the basal plane. Measurement of the swelling due to cavity formation was in good agreement with density change measurements.

  12. Characterization of phagolysosomal simulant fluid for study of beryllium aerosol particle dissolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefaniak, A B; Guilmette, R A; Day, G A; Hoover, M D; Breysse, P N; Scripsick, R C

    2005-02-01

    A simulant of phagolysosomal fluid is needed for beryllium particle dissolution research because intraphagolysosomal dissolution is believed to be a necessary step in the cellular immune response associated with development of chronic beryllium disease. Thus, we refined and characterized a potassium hydrogen phthalate (KHP) buffered solution with pH 4.55, termed phagolysosomal simulant fluid (PSF), for use in a static dissolution technique. To characterize the simulant, beryllium dissolution in PSF was compared to dissolution in the J774A.1 murine cell line. The effects of ionic composition, buffer strength, and the presence of the antifungal agent alkylbenzyldimethylammonium chloride (ABDC) on beryllium dissolution in PSF were evaluated. Beryllium dissolution in PSF was not different from dissolution in the J774A.1 murine cell line (p = 0.78) or from dissolution in another simulant having the same pH but different ionic composition (p = 0.73). A buffer concentration of 0.01-M KHP did not appear adequate to maintain pH under all conditions. There was no difference between dissolution in PSF with 0.01-M KHP and 0.02-M KHP (p = 0.12). At 0.04-M KHP, beryllium dissolution was increased relative to 0.02-M KHP (p = 0.02). Use of a 0.02-M KHP buffer concentration in the standard formulation for PSF provided stability in pH without alteration of the dissolution rate. The presence of ABDC did not influence beryllium dissolution in PSF (p = 0.35). PSF appears to be a useful and appropriate model of in vitro beryllium dissolution when using a static dissolution technique. In addition, the critical approach used to evaluate and adjust the composition of PSF may serve as a framework for characterizing PSF to study dissolution of other metal and oxide particles.

  13. Technical issues for beryllium use in fusion blanket applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarville, T.J.; Berwald, D.H.; Wolfer, W.; Fulton, F.J.; Lee, J.D.; Maninger, R.C.; Moir, R.W.; Beeston, J.M.; Miller, L.G.

    1985-01-01

    Beryllium is an excellent non-fissioning neutron multiplier for fusion breeder and fusion electric blanket applications. This report is a compilation of information related to the use of beryllium with primary emphasis on the fusion breeder application. Beryllium resources, production, fabrication, properties, radiation damage and activation are discussed. A new theoretical model for beryllium swelling is presented.

  14. Meningococcal disease: History, epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, antimicrobial susceptibility and prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manchanda V

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Meningoccocal disease has repeatedly caused outbreaks worldwide. There has been sudden surge of cases of meningococcemia and meningococcal meningitis in early 2005 in Delhi, India and neighboring states of Uttar Pradesh and Haryana. As of June 17, 2005, 429 probable cases of meningococcal disease have been reported in Delhi out of which 128 cases have revealed microbiological evidence of Neisseria meningitidis . It is possible that the number of cases was in excess of the numbers notified. During this episode drug susceptibility testing by MIC method (E-test using break points recently recommended by NCCLS/CLSI, revealed that all isolates were sensitive to penicillin, ampicillin, rifampicin and ceftriaxone. As regards to ciprofloxacin, about two third of the isolates tested were found to be ′non-susceptible′ (MIC =0.03µg/mL- 0.190µg/mL. All the isolates were found resistant to cotrimoxazole (MIC> 16µg/mL. Repeated outbreaks, decreased susceptibility to ciprofloxacin, which is commonly used for chemoprophylaxis of meningococcal disease, highlights the need for a constant surveillance system. Present review deals with various aspects of Neisseria meningitidis and meningococcal disease in view of recent episode.

  15. The Impact of PPARγ Genetic Variants on IBD Susceptibility and IBD Disease Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Mwinyi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available PPARγ is a nuclear receptor that regulates numerous pathways including cytokine expression and immune responses and plays an important role in controlling colon inflammation. We aimed at determining the occurring PPARγ SNPs, at predicting the haplotypes, and at determining the frequency outcome in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD patients in comparison with healthy controls. We determined genetic variants in the coding exons and flanking intronic sequences of the NR1C3 gene in 284 IBD patients and 194 controls and predicted NR1C3 haplotypes via bioinformatic analysis. We investigated whether certain NR1C3 variants are associated with susceptibility to IBD or its disease course. None of the detected 22 NR1C3 variants were associated with IBD. Two variants with allelic frequencies over 1% were included in haplotype/diplotype analyses. None of the NR3C1 haplotypes showed association with IBD development or disease course. We conclude that NR1C3 haplotypes are not related to IBD susceptibility or IBD disease activity.

  16. Investigation of Caucasian rheumatoid arthritis susceptibility loci in African patients with the same disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The largest genetic risk to develop rheumatoid arthritis (RA) arises from a group of alleles of the HLA DRB1 locus ('shared epitope', SE). Over 30 non-HLA single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) predisposing to disease have been identified in Caucasians, but they have never been investigated in West/Central Africa. We previously reported a lower prevalence of the SE in RA patients in Cameroon compared to European patients and aimed in the present study to investigate the contribution of Caucasian non-HLA RA SNPs to disease susceptibility in Black Africans. Methods RA cases and controls from Cameroon were genotyped for Caucasian RA susceptibility SNPs using Sequenom MassArray technology. Genotype data were also available for 5024 UK cases and 4281 UK controls and for 119 Yoruba individuals in Ibadan, Nigeria (YRI, HapMap). A Caucasian aggregate genetic-risk score (GRS) was calculated as the sum of the weighted risk-allele counts. Results After genotyping quality control procedures were performed, data on 28 Caucasian non-HLA susceptibility SNPs were available in 43 Cameroonian RA cases and 44 controls. The minor allele frequencies (MAF) were tightly correlated between Cameroonian controls and YRI individuals (correlation coefficient 93.8%, p = 1.7E-13), and they were pooled together. There was no correlation between MAF of UK and African controls; 13 markers differed by more than 20%. The MAF for markers at PTPN22, IL2RA, FCGR2A and IL2/IL21 was below 2% in Africans. The GRS showed a strong association with RA in the UK. However, the GRS did not predict RA in Africans (OR = 0.71, 95% CI 0.29 - 1.74, p = 0.456). Random sampling from the UK cohort showed that this difference in association is unlikely to be explained by small sample size or chance, but is statistically significant with p<0.001. Conclusions The MAFs of non-HLA Caucasian RA susceptibility SNPs are different between Caucasians and Africans, and several polymorphisms are barely detectable in

  17. Prion protein gene sequence and chronic wasting disease susceptibility in white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Adam L; Kelly, Amy C; Green, Michelle L; Shelton, Paul; Novakofski, Jan; Mateus-Pinilla, Nohra E

    2015-01-01

    The sequence of the prion protein gene (PRNP) affects susceptibility to spongiform encephalopathies, or prion diseases in many species. In white-tailed deer, both coding and non-coding single nucleotide polymorphisms have been identified in this gene that correlate to chronic wasting disease (CWD) susceptibility. Previous studies examined individual nucleotide or amino acid mutations; here we examine all nucleotide polymorphisms and their combined effects on CWD. A 626 bp region of PRNP was examined from 703 free-ranging white-tailed deer. Deer were sampled between 2002 and 2010 by hunter harvest or government culling in Illinois and Wisconsin. Fourteen variable nucleotide positions were identified (4 new and 10 previously reported). We identified 68 diplotypes comprised of 24 predicted haplotypes, with the most common diplotype occurring in 123 individuals. Diplotypes that were found exclusively among positive or negative animals were rare, each occurring in less than 1% of the deer studied. Only one haplotype (C, odds ratio 0.240) and 2 diplotypes (AC and BC, odds ratios of 0.161 and 0.108 respectively) has significant associations with CWD resistance. Each contains mutations (one synonymous nucleotide 555C/T and one nonsynonymous nucleotide 286G/A) at positions reported to be significantly associated with reduced CWD susceptibility. Results suggest that deer populations with higher frequencies of haplotype C or diplotypes AC and BC might have a reduced risk for CWD infection--while populations with lower frequencies may have higher risk for infection. Understanding the genetic basis of CWD has improved our ability to assess herd susceptibility and direct management efforts within CWD infected areas.

  18. Investigation of type 1 diabetes and coeliac disease susceptibility loci for association with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinks, Anne; Martin, Paul; Flynn, Edward; Eyre, Steve; Packham, Jon; Barton, Anne; Worthington, Jane; Thomson, Wendy

    2010-01-01

    Background There is strong evidence suggesting that juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) shares many susceptibility loci with other autoimmune diseases. Objective To investigate variants robustly associated with type 1 diabetes (T1D) or coeliac disease (CD) for association with JIA. Methods Sixteen single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) already identified as susceptibility loci for T1D/CD were selected for genotyping in patients with JIA (n=1054) and healthy controls (n=3129). Genotype and allele frequencies were compared using the Cochrane–Armitage trend test implemented in PLINK. Results One SNP in the LPP gene, rs1464510, showed significant association with JIA (ptrend=0.002, OR=1.18, 95% CI 1.06 to 1.30). A second SNP, rs653178 in ATXN2, also showed nominal evidence for association with JIA (ptrend=0.02, OR=1.13, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.25). The SNP, rs17810546, in IL12A showed subtype-specific association with enthesitis-related arthritis (ERA) subtype (ptrend=0.005, OR=1.88, 95% CI 1.2 to 2.94). Conclusions Evidence for a novel JIA susceptibility locus, LPP, is presented. Association at the SH2B3/ATXN2 locus, previously reported to be associated with JIA in a US series, also supports this region as contributing to JIA susceptibility. In addition, a subtype-specific association of IL12A with ERA is identified. All findings will require validation in independent JIA cohorts. PMID:20647273

  19. Functional single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the SCGB3A2 promoter are associated with susceptibility to Graves’ disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁军

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the association of functional single-nucleotide polymorphisms(SNPs) in the SCGB3A2 promoter with susceptibility to Graves’disease(GD).Methods Functional analysis was carried out in vivo and in

  20. IFNγ influences type I interferon response and susceptibility to Theiler's virus-induced demyelinating disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Jenna L; Olson, Julie K

    2013-08-01

    Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) induces a demyelinating disease in susceptible SJL mice that has similarities to multiple sclerosis in humans. TMEV infection of susceptible mice leads to a persistent virus infection of the central nervous system (CNS), which promotes the development of demyelinating disease associated with an inflammatory immune response in the CNS. TMEV infection of resistant C57BL6 mice results in viral clearance without development of demyelinating disease. Interestingly, TMEV infection of resistant mice deficient in IFNγ leads to a persistent virus infection in the CNS and development of demyelinating disease. We have previously shown that the innate immune response affects development of TMEV- induced demyelinating disease, thus we wanted to determine the role of IFNγ during the innate immune response. TMEV-infected IFNγ-deficient mice had an altered innate immune response, including reduced expression of innate immune cytokines, especially type I interferons. Administration of type I interferons, IFNα and IFNß, to TMEV-infected IFNγ-deficient mice during the innate immune response restored the expression of innate immune cytokines. Most importantly, administration of type I interferons to IFNγ-deficient mice during the innate immune response decreased the virus load in the CNS and decreased development of demyelinating disease. Microglia are the CNS resident immune cells that express innate immune receptors. In TMEV-infected IFNγ-deficient mice, microglia had reduced expression of innate immune cytokines, and administration of type I interferons to these mice restored the innate immune response by microglia. In the absence of IFNγ, microglia from TMEV-infected mice had reduced expression of some innate immune receptors and signaling molecules, especially IRF1. These results suggest that IFNγ plays an important role in the innate immune response to TMEV by enhancing the expression of innate immune cytokines

  1. Fine mapping of susceptibility genes by Lewontin's linkage disequilibrium measure with application to Alzheimer's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Objectives To formulate an equation for fine mapping of disease loci under complex conditions and determine the marker-disease distance in a specific case using this equation. Methods Lewontin's linkage disequilibrium (LD) measure D' was used to formulate an equation for mapping disease genes in the presence of phenocopies, locus heterogeneity, gene-gene and gene-environment interactions, incomplete penetrance, uncertain liability and threshold, incomplete initial LD, natural selection, recurrent mutation, high disease allele frequency and unknown mode of inheritance. This equation was then used to determine the distance between a marker (ε4 within the apolipoprotein E gene, APOE) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) loci using published data.Results An equation was formulated for mapping disease genes under the above conditions. If these conditions are present but ignored, then recombination fraction θ between marker and disease loci will be either overestimated or estimated with little bias. Therefore, an upper limit of θ can be obtained. AD has been found to be associated with the marker allele ε4 in Africans, Asians, and Caucasians. This suggests that the AD-ε4 allelic LD predates the divergence of peoples occurring 100·!000 years ago. With the age of AD-ε4 allelic LD so estimated, the maximal distance was calculated to be 23.2 kb (mean 5.8 kb).Conclusions (1) A method is developed for LD mapping of susceptibility genes. (2) A mutation within the APOE gene itself, among others, is responsible for the susceptibility to AD, which is supported by recent evidence from studies using transgenic mice.

  2. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Genetic Polymorphisms and Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Any Role in Disease Susceptibility?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Dongiovanni

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD defines a wide spectrum of liver diseases that extend from simple steatosis, that is, increased hepatic lipid content, to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH, a condition that may progress to cirrhosis with its associated complications. Nuclear hormone receptors act as intracellular lipid sensors that coordinate genetic networks regulating lipid metabolism and energy utilization. This family of transcription factors, in particular peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs, represents attractive drug targets for the management of NAFLD and NASH, as well as related conditions such as type 2 diabetes and the metabolic syndrome. The impact on the regulation of lipid metabolism observed for PPARs has led to the hypothesis that genetic variants within the human PPARs genes may be associated with human disease such as NAFLD, the metabolic syndrome, and/or coronary heart disease. Here we review the available evidence on the association between PPARs genetic polymorphism and the susceptibility to NAFLD and NASH, and we provide a meta-analysis of the available evidence. The impact of PPAR variants on the susceptibility to NASH in specific subgroup of patients, and in particular on the response to therapies, especially those targeting PPARs, represents promising new areas of investigation.

  3. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Genetic Polymorphisms and Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Any Role in Disease Susceptibility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dongiovanni, Paola; Valenti, Luca

    2013-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) defines a wide spectrum of liver diseases that extend from simple steatosis, that is, increased hepatic lipid content, to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), a condition that may progress to cirrhosis with its associated complications. Nuclear hormone receptors act as intracellular lipid sensors that coordinate genetic networks regulating lipid metabolism and energy utilization. This family of transcription factors, in particular peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), represents attractive drug targets for the management of NAFLD and NASH, as well as related conditions such as type 2 diabetes and the metabolic syndrome. The impact on the regulation of lipid metabolism observed for PPARs has led to the hypothesis that genetic variants within the human PPARs genes may be associated with human disease such as NAFLD, the metabolic syndrome, and/or coronary heart disease. Here we review the available evidence on the association between PPARs genetic polymorphism and the susceptibility to NAFLD and NASH, and we provide a meta-analysis of the available evidence. The impact of PPAR variants on the susceptibility to NASH in specific subgroup of patients, and in particular on the response to therapies, especially those targeting PPARs, represents promising new areas of investigation. PMID:23431284

  4. NFKBIZ polymorphisms and susceptibility to pneumococcal disease in European and African populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Stephen J; Khor, Chiea C; Vannberg, Fredrik O; Rautanen, Anna; Segal, Shelley; Moore, Catrin E; Davies, Robert J O; Day, Nicholas P; Peshu, Norbert; Crook, Derrick W; Berkley, James A; Williams, Thomas N; Scott, J Anthony; Hill, Adrian V S

    2011-01-01

    The proinflammatory transcription factor nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) plays a central role in host defence against pneumococcal disease. Both rare mutations and common polymorphisms in the NFKBIA gene encoding the NF-κB inhibitor IκB-α associate with susceptibility to bacterial disease, but the possible role of polymorphisms within the related IκB-ζ gene NFKBIZ in the development of invasive pneumococcal disease has not previously been reported. To investigate this further, we examined the frequencies of 22 single-nucleotide polymorphisms spanning NFKBIZ in two case-control studies, comprising UK Caucasian (n=1008) and Kenyan (n=723) individuals. Nine polymorphisms within a single UK linkage disequilibrium block and all four polymorphisms within the equivalent, shorter Kenyan linkage disequilibrium block displayed either significant association with invasive pneumococcal disease or a trend towards association. For each polymorphism, heterozygosity was associated with protection from invasive pneumococcal disease when compared to the combined homozygous states (e.g. for rs600718, Mantel-Haenszel 2×2 χ2=7.576, P=0.006, OR=0.67, 95% CI for OR: 0.51-0.88; for rs616597, Mantel-Haenszel 2×2 χ2=8.715, P=0.003, OR=0.65, 95% CI: 0.49-0.86). We conclude that multiple NFKBIZ polymorphisms associate with susceptibility to invasive pneumococcal disease in humans. The study of multiple populations may aid fine-mapping of associations within extensive regions of strong linkage disequilibrium (‘transethnic mapping’). PMID:19798075

  5. Prion protein polymorphisms in white-tailed deer influence susceptibility to chronic wasting disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Chad; Johnson, Jody; Vanderloo, Joshua P; Keane, Delwyn; Aiken, Judd M; McKenzie, Debbie

    2006-07-01

    The primary sequence of the prion protein affects susceptibility to transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, or prion diseases, in mice, sheep and humans. The Prnp gene sequence of free-ranging, Wisconsin white-tailed deer was determined and the Prnp genotypes of chronic wasting disease (CWD)-positive and CWD-negative deer were compared. Six amino acid changes were identified, two of which were located in pseudogenes. Two alleles, a Q-->K polymorphism at codon 226 and a single octapeptide repeat insertion into the pseudogene, have not been reported previously. The predominant alleles--wild-type (Q95, G96 and Q226) and a G96S polymorphism--comprised almost 98% of the Prnp alleles in the Wisconsin white-tailed deer population. Comparison of the allelic frequencies in the CWD-positive and CWD-negative deer suggested that G96S and a Q95H polymorphism were linked to a reduced susceptibility to CWD. The G96S allele did not, however, provide complete resistance, as a CWD-positive G96S/G96S deer was identified. The G96S allele was also linked to slower progression of the disease in CWD-positive deer based on the deposition of PrP(CWD) in the obex region of the medulla oblongata. Although the reduced susceptibility of deer with at least one copy of the Q95H or G96S allele is insufficient to serve as a genetic barrier, the presence of these alleles may modulate the impact of CWD on white-tailed deer populations.

  6. Programmed cell death 1 gene (PDCD1 polymorphism and pemphigus foliaceus (fogo selvagem disease susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Braun-Prado

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Pemphigus foliaceus, also known as fogo selvagem, is an autoimmune disease of the epidermis characterized by superficial blisters and antibodies against desmoglein 1. It is a multifactorial disease and genetic susceptibility is oligogenic or polygenic. Considering the crucial function of the programmed cell death 1 molecule (PD-1 in the immune response, the aim of this study was to verify if variants of the PDCD1 gene influence susceptibility and resistance to pemphigus foliaceus, in a case - control disease association study. We analyzed patients (n = 154 and unaffected control individuals (n = 325 of the Brazilian population, in respect to the PD1.3(G,A PD1.5(C,T and PD1.6(A,G single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and also investigated, for the first time, the exon 5 PDCD1 microsatellite (CTGn. The patient and control samples were divided into strata, according to the predominant ancestry of the individuals (African or European. The PD1.5 genotype distribution in the patients sample was almost indistinguishable from that in the control sample, in both population strata. A possible negative association between pemphigus foliaceus and allele PD1.3A was observed in the total African and European ancestry population sample (odds ratio (OR = 0.55, p = 0.066 and should be investigated in forthcoming studies. The PD1.6A allele was over-represented among the patients of predominantly European ancestry due to an increase of both the G/A and the A/A genotypes (OR = 2.12 and 1.74, respectively; p = 0.035. We conclude that polymorphisms of the PDCD1 gene may influence susceptibility to pemphigus foliaceus, at least in Brazilians of predominantly European ancestry.

  7. Correlation of HDEFB1 polymorphism and susceptibility to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in Chinese Han population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡瑞成; 徐永健; 张珍祥; 倪望; 陈士新

    2004-01-01

    Background Inherited factors are involved in the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This study was designed to investigate the relationship between polymorphisms of HDEFB1 668 C/G and 1654G/A loci and susceptibility to COPD in Chinese Han population.Methods After the process of extracting genomic DNA from peripheral blood of COPD smokers and healthy smokers, the loci of genotypes 668C/G and 1654G/A were determined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism analysis. Results With respect to HDEFB1 668 locus, the occurences of CC, CG, GG genotypes were 72.7%, 25.0%, 2.3% in COPD smokers and 53.2%, 38.3%, 8.5% in healthy smokers (P<0.05, respectively). The allele frequencies of 668 C and 668G were 85.2% and 14.8% in COPD smokers and 72.3% and 27.7% in healthy smokers (P<0.01, respectively, odds ratio was 2.32 with 95% confidence interval 1.37 to 3.72). As to HDEFB1 1654G/A locus, neither genotype distribution difference nor allele distribution difference was found when comparing COPD smokers with healthy smokers. Conclusion The polymorphism of HDEFB1 668C/G is associated with susceptibility to COPD in Chinese Han population; furthermore, the 668G allele represents relatively lower susceptibility to COPD.

  8. Recommended design correlations for S-65 beryllium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billone, M.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The properties of tritium and helium behavior in irradiated beryllium are reviewed, along with the thermal-mechanical properties needed for ITER design analysis. Correlations are developed to describe the performance of beryllium in a fusion reactor environment. While this paper focuses on the use of beryllium as a plasma-facing component (PFC) material, the correlations presented here can also be used to describe the performance of beryllium as a neutron multiplier for a tritium breeding blanket. The performance properties for beryllium are subdivided into two categories: properties which do not change with irradiation damage to the bulk of the material; and properties which are degraded by neutron irradiation. The irradiation-independent properties described within are: thermal conductivity, specific heat capacity, thermal expansion, and elastic constants. Irradiation-dependent properties include: yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, plastic tangent modulus, uniform and total tensile elongation, thermal and irradiation-induced creep strength, He-induced swelling and tritium retention/release. The approach taken in developing properties correlations is to describe the behavior of dense, pressed S-65 beryllium -- the material chosen for ITER PFC application -- as a function of temperature. As there are essentially no data on the performance of porous and/or irradiated S-65 beryllium, the degradation of properties with as-fabricated porosity and irradiation are determined from the broad data base on S-200F, as well as other types and grades, and applied to S-65 beryllium by scaling factors. The resulting correlations can be used for Be produced by vacuum hot pressing (VHP) and cold-pressing (CP)/sintering(S)/hot-isostatic-pressing (HIP). The performance of plasma-sprayed beryllium is discussed but not quantified.

  9. Dissecting the Genetic Susceptibility to Graves' Disease in a Cohort of Patients of Italian Origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Angela; Menconi, Francesca; Greenberg, David; Concepcion, Erlinda; Leo, Marenza; Rocchi, Roberto; Marinó, Michele; Keddache, Mehdi; Tomer, Yaron

    2016-01-01

    Graves' disease (GD) is an autoimmune oligogenic disorder with a strong hereditary component. Several GD susceptibility genes have been identified and confirmed during the last two decades. However, there are very few studies that evaluated susceptibility genes for GD in specific geographic subsets. Previously, we mapped a new locus on chromosome 3q that was unique to GD families of Italian origin. In the present study, we used association analysis of single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) at the 3q locus in a cohort of GD patients of Italian origin in order to prioritize the best candidates among the known genes in this locus to choose the one(s) best supported by the association. DNA samples were genotyped using the Illumina GoldenGate genotyping assay analyzing 690 SNP in the linked 3q locus covering all 124 linkage disequilibrium blocks in this locus. Candidate non-HLA (human-leukocyte-antigen) genes previously reported to be associated with GD and/or other autoimmune disorders were analyzed separately. Three SNPs in the 3q locus showed a nominal association (p < 0.05): rs13097181, rs763313, and rs6792646. Albeit these could not be further validated by multiple comparison correction, we were prioritizing candidate genes at a locus already known to harbor a GD-related gene, not hypothesis testing. Moreover, we found significant associations with the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) gene, the cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4) gene, and the thyroglobulin (TG) gene. In conclusion, we identified three SNPs on chromosome 3q that may map a new GD susceptibility gene in this region which is unique to the Italian population. Furthermore, we confirmed that the TSHR, the CTLA-4, and the TG genes are associated with GD in Italians. Our findings highlight the influence of ethnicity and geographic variations on the genetic susceptibility to GD.

  10. Association of Toll-like receptor 10 and susceptibility to Crohn's disease independent of NOD2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abad, C; González-Escribano, M F; Diaz-Gallo, L M; Lucena-Soto, J M; Márquez, J L; Leo, E; Crivell, C; Gómez-García, M; Martín, J; Núñez-Roldán, A; García-Lozano, J R

    2011-12-01

    Impaired innate inflammatory response has a key role in the Crohn's disease (CD) pathogenesis. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible role of the TLR10-TLR1-TLR6 gene cluster in CD susceptibility. A total of 508 CD patients (284, cohort 1 and 224, cohort 2) and 576 controls were included. TLR10-TLR1-TLR6 cluster single-nucleotide polymorphisms genotyping, NOD2 mutations and TLR10 mRNA quantification were performed using TaqMan assays. Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain containing 2 (NOD2) and Toll-like receptor (TLR) loci interaction was analyzed by logistic regression and multifactor-dimensionality reduction (MDR). Entropy-based analysis was used to interpret combination effects. One TLR10 haplotype (TLR10(GGGG)) was found associated with CD susceptibility in both cohorts, individuals with two copies had approximately twofold more risk of CD susceptibility than individuals having no copies (odds ratio=1.89, P-value=0.0002). No differences in the mRNA levels were observed among the genotypes. The strongest model for predicting CD risk according to the MDR analysis was a two-locus model including NOD2 mutations and TLR10(GGGG) haplotype (P(c)<0.0001). The interaction gain attributed to the combination of both genes was negative (IG=-2.36%), indicating redundancy or independent effects. Our results support association of the TLR10 gene with CD susceptibility. The effect of TLR10 would be independent of NOD2, suggesting different signaling pathways for both genes.

  11. THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY BERYLLIUM TECHNOLOGY UPDATE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glen R. Longhurst

    2007-12-01

    A Beryllium Technology Update meeting was held at the Idaho National Laboratory on July 18, 2007. Participants came from the U.S., Japan, and Russia. There were two main objectives of this meeting. One was a discussion of current technologies for beryllium in fission reactors, particularly the Advanced Test Reactor and the Japan Materials Test Reactor, and prospects for material availability in the coming years. The second objective of the meeting was a discussion of a project of the International Science and Technology Center regarding treatment of irradiated beryllium for disposal. This paper highlights discussions held during that meeting and major conclusions reached

  12. Metallurgical viewpoints on the brittleness of beryllium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagerberg, G.

    1960-02-15

    At present the development and use of beryllium metal for structural applications is severely hampered by its brittleness. Reasons for this lack of ductility are reviewed in discussing the deformation behaviour of beryllium in relation to other hexagonal metals. The ease of fracturing in beryllium is assumed to be a consequence of a limited number of deformation modes in combination with high deformation resistance. Models for the nucleation of fracture are suggested. The relation of ductility to elastic constants as well as to grain size, texture and alloying additions is discussed.

  13. A mortality study of workers exposed to insoluble forms of beryllium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boffetta, Paolo; Fordyce, Tiffani; Mandel, Jack S

    2014-11-01

    This study investigated lung cancer and other diseases related to insoluble beryllium compounds. A cohort of 4950 workers from four US insoluble beryllium manufacturing facilities were followed through 2009. Expected deaths were calculated using local and national rates. On the basis of local rates, all-cause mortality was significantly reduced. Mortality from lung cancer (standardized mortality ratio 96.0; 95% confidence interval 80.0, 114.3) and from nonmalignant respiratory diseases was also reduced. There were no significant trends for either cause of death according to duration of employment or time since first employment. Uterine cancer among women was the only cause of death with a significantly increased standardized mortality ratio. Five of the seven women worked in office jobs. This study confirmed the lack of an increase in mortality from lung cancer and nonmalignant respiratory diseases related to insoluble beryllium compounds.

  14. Genome-wide association study identifies FCGR2A as a susceptibility locus for Kawasaki disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khor, Chiea Chuen; Davila, Sonia; Breunis, Willemijn B; Lee, Yi-Ching; Shimizu, Chisato; Wright, Victoria J; Yeung, Rae S M; Tan, Dennis E K; Sim, Kar Seng; Wang, Jie Jin; Wong, Tien Yin; Pang, Junxiong; Mitchell, Paul; Cimaz, Rolando; Dahdah, Nagib; Cheung, Yiu-Fai; Huang, Guo-Ying; Yang, Wanling; Park, In-Sook; Lee, Jong-Keuk; Wu, Jer-Yuarn; Levin, Michael; Burns, Jane C; Burgner, David; Kuijpers, Taco W; Hibberd, Martin L

    2011-11-13

    Kawasaki disease is a systemic vasculitis of unknown etiology, with clinical observations suggesting a substantial genetic contribution to disease susceptibility. We conducted a genome-wide association study and replication analysis in 2,173 individuals with Kawasaki disease and 9,383 controls from five independent sample collections. Two loci exceeded the formal threshold for genome-wide significance. The first locus is a functional polymorphism in the IgG receptor gene FCGR2A (encoding an H131R substitution) (rs1801274; P = 7.35 × 10(-11), odds ratio (OR) = 1.32), with the A allele (coding for histadine) conferring elevated disease risk. The second locus is at 19q13, (P = 2.51 × 10(-9), OR = 1.42 for the rs2233152 SNP near MIA and RAB4B; P = 1.68 × 10(-12), OR = 1.52 for rs28493229 in ITPKC), which confirms previous findings(1). The involvement of the FCGR2A locus may have implications for understanding immune activation in Kawasaki disease pathogenesis and the mechanism of response to intravenous immunoglobulin, the only proven therapy for this disease.

  15. Genetic and Functional Profiling of Crohn's Disease: Autophagy Mechanism and Susceptibility to Infectious Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Anna Monica; Girardelli, Martina; Tommasini, Alberto; Martelossi, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Crohn's disease is a complex disease in which genome, microbiome, and environment interact to produce the immunological background of the disease. Disease in childhood is more extensive and characterized by a rapid progression, leading to severe repercussions in the course of the disorder. Several genetic variations have been associated with an increased risk of developing the disease and most of these are also implicated in other autoimmune disorders. The gut has many tiers of defense against incursion by luminal microbes, including the epithelial barrier and the innate and adaptive immune responses. Moreover, recent evidence shows that bacterial and viral infections, as well as inflammasome genes and genes involved in the autophagy process, are implicated in Crohn's disease pathogenesis. The aim of this review is to establish how much the diagnostic system can improve, thus increasing the success of Crohn's disease diagnosis. The major expectation for the near future is to be able to anticipate the possible consequences of the disease already in childhood, thus preventing associated complications, and to choose the best treatment for each patient. PMID:23738324

  16. Genetic and functional profiling of Crohn's disease: autophagy mechanism and susceptibility to infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcuzzi, Annalisa; Bianco, Anna Monica; Girardelli, Martina; Tommasini, Alberto; Martelossi, Stefano; Monasta, Lorenzo; Crovella, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    Crohn's disease is a complex disease in which genome, microbiome, and environment interact to produce the immunological background of the disease. Disease in childhood is more extensive and characterized by a rapid progression, leading to severe repercussions in the course of the disorder. Several genetic variations have been associated with an increased risk of developing the disease and most of these are also implicated in other autoimmune disorders. The gut has many tiers of defense against incursion by luminal microbes, including the epithelial barrier and the innate and adaptive immune responses. Moreover, recent evidence shows that bacterial and viral infections, as well as inflammasome genes and genes involved in the autophagy process, are implicated in Crohn's disease pathogenesis. The aim of this review is to establish how much the diagnostic system can improve, thus increasing the success of Crohn's disease diagnosis. The major expectation for the near future is to be able to anticipate the possible consequences of the disease already in childhood, thus preventing associated complications, and to choose the best treatment for each patient.

  17. Genetic and Functional Profiling of Crohn's Disease: Autophagy Mechanism and Susceptibility to Infectious Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalisa Marcuzzi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Crohn's disease is a complex disease in which genome, microbiome, and environment interact to produce the immunological background of the disease. Disease in childhood is more extensive and characterized by a rapid progression, leading to severe repercussions in the course of the disorder. Several genetic variations have been associated with an increased risk of developing the disease and most of these are also implicated in other autoimmune disorders. The gut has many tiers of defense against incursion by luminal microbes, including the epithelial barrier and the innate and adaptive immune responses. Moreover, recent evidence shows that bacterial and viral infections, as well as inflammasome genes and genes involved in the autophagy process, are implicated in Crohn's disease pathogenesis. The aim of this review is to establish how much the diagnostic system can improve, thus increasing the success of Crohn's disease diagnosis. The major expectation for the near future is to be able to anticipate the possible consequences of the disease already in childhood, thus preventing associated complications, and to choose the best treatment for each patient.

  18. Toxoplasmosis and Polygenic Disease Susceptibility Genes: Extensive Toxoplasma gondii Host/Pathogen Interactome Enrichment in Nine Psychiatric or Neurological Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Carter

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Toxoplasma gondii is not only implicated in schizophrenia and related disorders, but also in Alzheimer's or Parkinson's disease, cancer, cardiac myopathies, and autoimmune disorders. During its life cycle, the pathogen interacts with ~3000 host genes or proteins. Susceptibility genes for multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression, childhood obesity, Parkinson's disease, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (multiple sclerosis, and autism (, but not anorexia or chronic fatigue are highly enriched in the human arm of this interactome and 18 (ADHD to 33% (MS of the susceptibility genes relate to it. The signalling pathways involved in the susceptibility gene/interactome overlaps are relatively specific and relevant to each disease suggesting a means whereby susceptibility genes could orient the attentions of a single pathogen towards disruption of the specific pathways that together contribute (positively or negatively to the endophenotypes of different diseases. Conditional protein knockdown, orchestrated by T. gondii proteins or antibodies binding to those of the host (pathogen derived autoimmunity and metabolite exchange, may contribute to this disruption. Susceptibility genes may thus be related to the causes and influencers of disease, rather than (and as well as to the disease itself.

  19. Monitoring beryllium during site cleanup and closure using a real-time analyzer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlager, R.J.; Sappey, A.D.; French, P.D. [ADA Technologies, Inc., Englewood, CO (United States)

    1998-12-31

    Beryllium metal has a number of unique properties that have been exploited for use in commercial and government applications. Airborne beryllium particles can represent a significant human health hazard if deposited in the lungs. These particles can cause immunologically-mediated chronic granulomatous lung disease (chronic beryllium disease). Traditional methods of monitoring airborne beryllium involve collecting samples of air within the work area using a filter. The filter then undergoes chemical analysis to determine the amount of beryllium collected during the sampling period. These methods are time-consuming and results are known only after a potential exposure has occurred. The need for monitoring exposures in real time has prompted government and commercial companies to develop instrumentation that will allow for the real time assessment of short-term exposures so that adequate protection for workers in contaminated environments can be provided. Such an analyzer provides a tool that will allow government and commercial sites to be cleaned up in a more safe and effective manner since exposure assessments can be made instantaneously. This paper describes the development and initial testing of an analyzer for monitoring airborne beryllium using a technique known as Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS). Energy from a focused, pulsed laser is used to vaporize a sample and create an intense plasma. The light emitted from the plasma is analyzed to determine the quantity of beryllium in the sampled air. A commercial prototype analyzer has been fabricated and tested in a program conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, and ADA Technologies, Inc. Design features of the analyzer and preliminary test results are presented.

  20. Variation in clinical disease and species susceptibility to psittacine beak and feather disease in Zimbabwean lovebirds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kock, N D; Hangartner, P U; Lucke, V

    1993-06-01

    While psittacine beak and feather disease has caused 100% mortality in captive flocks of 2 species of native Zimbabwean lovebirds (Agapornis nigrigensis and A. lilianae), other lovebird species in close contact with the sick birds have been only transiently affected or not at all. The clinical course of the disease in affected lovebirds may differ from that reported elsewhere, with recovery in some cases. These differences, along with ultrastructural differences may suggest a different virus or different strain of virus underlying disease in Zimbabwe.

  1. Introgression and susceptibility to disease in a wild population of rainbow trout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currens, K.P.; Hemmingsen, A.R.; French, R.A.; Buchanan, D.V.; Schreck, C.B.; Li, H.W.

    1997-01-01

    We examined susceptibility of wild rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss from the Metolius River, a tributary of the Deschutes River, Oregon, to genetic introgression and ceratomyxosis as a result of stocking nonnative hatchery rainbow trout. Ceratomyxa shasta, an enzootic myxosporean parasite that can be lethal to nonnative hatchery rainbow trout, might have been limiting the interbreeding of hatchery and wild rainbow trout in the river. However, rainbow trout from the Metolius River had allozyme frequencies intermediate between those of wild and hatchery fish at LDH-B2* and sSOD-1*, two diagnostic genetic loci that allow the inland subspecies of rainbow trout to be distinguished from hatchery strains of coastal origin. They also had notable frequencies of ADA-1*85, an allele documented in hatchery rainbow trout but rarely seen in wild populations. We also found that rainbow trout in the Metolius River averaged 138.9 scales in the lateral series, intermediate between the counts for 9 coastal or nonnative hatchery populations, which always had fewer than 140 scales, and 10 inland populations, which always had more than 140 scales. Disease challenges revealed that rainbow trout from the Metolius River had much greater susceptibility to C. shasta than rainbow trout from the Deschutes River, which have genetic resistance to the lethal disease. Based on these data, we concluded that introgression with nonnative hatchery rainbow trout has reduced the abilities of wild rainbow trout in the Metolius River to survive when conditions for ceratomyxosis infection occur.

  2. Fahr disease: use of susceptibility-weighted imaging for diagnostic dilemma with magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Neslin; Solak, Aynur; Genc, Berhan; Kulu, Ugur

    2015-08-01

    Fahr disease (FD) is a well-defined rare neurodegenerative disease that is characterized by idiopathic bilateral symmetric extensive striopallidodentate calcifications. The patients may present with diverse manifestations, most commonly movement disorder, cognitive impairment, and ataxia. Computed tomography (CT) is considered to be critical for accurate diagnosis because it is difficult to reliably identify calcifications by routine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) is a relatively new 3D gradient-echo (GE) MR sequence with special phase and magnitude processing. SWI phase images can recognize calcifications definitively with higher sensitivity compared to other MRI sequences. In this article, we present two cases of FD with different manifestations and neuroimaging in different age groups and genders, which were diagnosed by SWI and confirmed with CT, and we discuss the contribution of SWI in the diagnosis of FD. In conclusion, we suggest integrating SWI with MRI protocol to identify calcifications in suspicion of neurodegenerative disorders.

  3. MAVS is not a Likely Susceptibility Locus for Addison's Disease and Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurawek, Magdalena; Fichna, Marta; Kazimierska, Marta; Fichna, Piotr; Dzikiewicz-Krawczyk, Agnieszka; Przybylski, Grzegorz; Ruchala, Marek; Nowak, Jerzy

    2017-06-01

    Mitochondrial antiviral signaling (MAVS) protein is an intracellular adaptor molecule, downstream of viral sensors, retinoid acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I)-like receptors (RLRs). Impaired antiviral cell signaling might contribute to autoimmunity. Studies have recently shown variations in genes encoding RLRs as risk factors for autoimmune diseases. We investigated whether MAVS coding polymorphisms are associated with Addison's disease (AD) and type 1 diabetes (T1D) in Polish population. We genotyped 140 AD, 532 T1D patients and 600 healthy controls for MAVS rs17857295, rs7262903, rs45437096 and rs7269320. Genotyping was performed by TaqMan assays. Distribution of the MAVS genotypes and alleles did not reveal significant differences between patients and controls (p > 0.05). This analysis did not indicate the association of the MAVS locus with susceptibility to AD and T1D.

  4. Genetic variation in pattern recognition receptors: functional consequences and susceptibility to infectious disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Martin; Stappers, Mark H T; Joosten, Leo A B; Gyssens, Inge C; Netea, Mihai G

    2015-01-01

    Cells of the innate immune system are equipped with surface and cytoplasmic receptors for microorganisms called pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). PRRs recognize specific pathogen-associated molecular patterns and as such are crucial for the activation of the immune system. Currently, five different classes of PRRs have been described: Toll-like receptors, C-type lectin receptors, nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors, retinoic acid-inducible gene I-like receptors and absent in melanoma 2-like receptors. Following their discovery, many sequence variants in PRR genes have been uncovered and shown to be implicated in human infectious diseases. In this review, we will discuss the effect of genetic variation in PRRs and their signaling pathways on susceptibility to infectious diseases in humans.

  5. Diet-induced obesity and kidney disease - In search of a susceptible mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicks, Shawna E; Nguyen, Trang-Tiffany; Breaux, Chelsea; Kruger, Claudia; Stadler, Krisztian

    2016-05-01

    Obesity and metabolic syndrome are independent risk factors for chronic kidney disease, even without diabetes or hyperglycemia. Here, we compare two mouse models that are susceptible to diet-induced obesity: the relatively renal injury resistant C57BL/6J strain and the DBA2/J strain which is more sensitive to renal injury. Our studies focused on characterizing the effects of high fat diet feeding on renal oxidative stress, albuminuria, fibrosis and podocyte loss/insulin resistance. While the C57BL/6J strain does not develop significant pathological changes in the kidney, at least on lard based diets within the time frame investigated, it does show increased renal iNOS and nitrotyrosine levels and elevated mitochondrial respiration which may be indicative of mitochondrial lipid overfueling. Restricting the high fat diet to decrease adiposity decreased the levels of cellular oxidative stress markers, indicating that adiposity-related proinflammatory changes such as increased iNOS levels may trigger similar responses in the kidney. Mitochondrial respiration remained higher, suggesting that eating excess lipids, despite normal adiposity may still lead to renal mitochondrial overfueling. In comparison, DBA/2J mice developed albuminuria on similar diets, signs of fibrosis, oxidative stress, early signs of podocyte loss (evaluated by the markers podocin and WT-1) and podocyte insulin resistance (unable to phosphorylate their glomerular Akt when insulin was given). To summarize, while the C57BL/6J strain is not particularly susceptible to renal disease, changes in its mitochondrial lipid handling combined with the easy availability of transgenic technology may be an advantage to design new knockout models related to mitochondrial lipid metabolism. The DBA/2J model could serve as a basis for studying podocyte insulin resistance and identifying early renal markers in obesity before more severe kidney disease develops. Based on our observations, we encourage further critical

  6. Innate immune markers that distinguish red deer (Cervus elaphus selected for resistant or susceptible genotypes for Johne’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dobson Brooke

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract While many factors contribute to resistance and susceptibility to infectious disease, a major component is the genotype of the host and the way in which it is expressed. Johne’s disease is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease affecting ruminants and is caused by infection with Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP. We have previously identified red deer breeds (Cervus elaphus that are resistant; have a low rate of MAP infection and do not progress to develop Johne’s disease. In contrast, susceptible breeds have a high rate of MAP infection as seen by seroconversion and progress to develop clinical Johne’s disease. The aim of this study was to determine if immunological differences exist between animals of resistant or susceptible breeds. Macrophage cultures were derived from the monocytes of deer genotypically defined as resistant or susceptible to the development of Johne’s disease. Following in vitro infection of the cells with MAP, the expression of candidate genes was assessed by quantitative PCR as well as infection rate and cell death rate. The results indicate that macrophages from susceptible animals show a significantly higher upregulation of inflammatory genes (iNOS, IL-1α, TNF-α and IL-23p19 than the macrophages from resistant animals. Cells from resistant animals had a higher rate of apoptosis at 24 hours post infection (hpi compared to macrophages from susceptible animals. The excessive expression of inflammatory mRNA transcripts in susceptible animals could cause inefficient clearing of the mycobacterial organism and the establishment of disease. Controlled upregulation of inflammatory pathways coupled with programmed cell death in the macrophages of resistant animals may predispose the host to a protective immune response against this mycobacterial pathogen.

  7. Hydrogen release from reactor-irradiated beryllium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klepikov, A.Kh. [Kazakh State Univ., Alma-Ata (Kazakstan); Tazhibaeva, I.L. [Kazakh State Univ., Alma-Ata (Kazakstan); Shestakov, V.P. [Kazakh State Univ., Alma-Ata (Kazakstan); Romanenko, O.G. [Kazakh State Univ., Alma-Ata (Kazakstan); Chikhray, Y.V. [Kazakh State Univ., Alma-Ata (Kazakstan); Kenzhin, E.A. [IAE NNC RK, Semipalatinsk-21 (Russian Federation); Cherepnin, Yu.S. [IAE NNC RK, Semipalatinsk-21 (Russian Federation); Tikhomirov, L.N. [IAE NNC RK, Semipalatinsk-21 (Russian Federation)

    1996-10-01

    Experiments on gas release of reactor-irradiated beryllium samples were carried out and compared to control samples. The simultaneous influence of reactor irradiation and exposure to hydrogen results in more hydrogen retention in beryllium, than if beryllium is initially irradiated and then exposed to hydrogen. Appearance of low temperature peaks at 460 K and 540 K with 0.71 eV/atom and 0.84 eV/atom desorption activation energies, respectively, assessed in a frame of a second order desorption model, is mainly responsible for the increase in hydrogen content. These peaks can be attributed to chemical hydrogen bonds with surface oxide. The simultaneous influence of hydrogen and nuclear reactor irradiation at a temperature of 1150 K was assumed to increase significantly microcrack formation near the surface of beryllium samples, resulting in an increase in low temperature peak intensities. (orig.).

  8. Synthesis and ceramization of polycarbosilane containing beryllium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄小忠; 周珊; 程勇; 杜作娟; 段曦东; 王超英

    2014-01-01

    Polycarbosilane containing beryllium (BPCS) precursors was prepared by the reaction of polycarbosilane (PCS) with beryllium acetylacetone (Be (acac)2). The analysis of structures and components of BPCS demonstrates that their main structures are basically the same as PCS. Ceramization of BPCS precursors shows that BPCS precursors are organic below 600 °C and inorganic at 800 °C. At 1400 °C, BPCS precursors convert into silicon carbide ceramics. The ceramization of different beryllium content precursors were studied, which show that beryllium plays an important role in the inhibition of crystalline grain growth ofβ-SiC at high temperature and it can adjust the dielectric constant of silicon carbide ceramics.

  9. How glyphosate affects plant disease development: it is more than enhanced susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerschmidt, Ray

    2017-01-09

    Glyphosate has been shown to affect the development of plant disease in several ways. Plants utilize phenolic and other shikimic acid pathway-derived compounds as part of their defense against pathogens, and glyphosate inhibits the biosynthesis of these compounds via its mode of action. Several studies have shown a correlation between enhanced disease and suppression of phenolic compound production after glyphosate. Glyphosate-resistant crop plants have also been studied for changes in resistance as a result of carrying the glyphosate resistance trait. The evidence indicates that neither the resistance trait nor application of glyphosate to glyphosate-resistant plants increases susceptibility to disease. The only exceptions to this are cases where glyphosate has been shown to reduce rust diseases on glyphosate-resistant crops, supporting a fungicidal role for this chemical. Finally, glyphosate treatment of weeds or volunteer crops can cause a temporary increase in soil-borne pathogens that may result in disease development if crops are planted too soon after glyphosate application. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  10. Recent human evolution has shaped geographical differences in susceptibility to disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bosch Elena

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Searching for associations between genetic variants and complex diseases has been a very active area of research for over two decades. More than 51,000 potential associations have been studied and published, a figure that keeps increasing, especially with the recent explosion of array-based Genome-Wide Association Studies. Even if the number of true associations described so far is high, many of the putative risk variants detected so far have failed to be consistently replicated and are widely considered false positives. Here, we focus on the world-wide patterns of replicability of published association studies. Results We report three main findings. First, contrary to previous results, genes associated to complex diseases present lower degrees of genetic differentiation among human populations than average genome-wide levels. Second, also contrary to previous results, the differences in replicability of disease associated-loci between Europeans and East Asians are highly correlated with genetic differentiation between these populations. Finally, highly replicated genes present increased levels of high-frequency derived alleles in European and Asian populations when compared to African populations. Conclusions Our findings highlight the heterogeneous nature of the genetic etiology of complex disease, confirm the importance of the recent evolutionary history of our species in current patterns of disease susceptibility and could cast doubts on the status as false positives of some associations that have failed to replicate across populations.

  11. Beryllium concentration in pharyngeal tonsils in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Nogaj

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Power plant dust is believed to be the main source of the increased presence of the element beryllium in the environment which has been detected in the atmospheric air, surface waters, groundwater, soil, food, and cigarette smoke. In humans, beryllium absorption occurs mainly via the respiratory system. The pharyngeal tonsils are located on the roof of the nasopharynx and are in direct contact with dust particles in inhaled air. As a result, the concentration levels of beryllium in the pharyngeal tonsils are likely to be a good indicator of concentration levels in the air. The presented study had two primary aims: to investigate the beryllium concentration in pharyngeal tonsils in children living in southern Poland, and the appropriate reference range for this element in children’s pharyngeal tonsils. Pharyngeal tonsils were extracted from a total of 379 children (age 2–17 years, mean 6.2 ± 2.7 years living in southern Poland. Tonsil samples were mineralized in a closed cycle in a pressure mineralizer PDS 6, using 65% spectrally pure nitric acid. Beryllium concentration was determined using the ICP-AES method with a Perkin Elmer Optima 5300DVTM. The software Statistica v. 9 was used for the statistical analysis. It was found that girls had a significantly greater beryllium concentration in their pharyngeal tonsils than boys. Beryllium concentration varies greatly, mostly according to the place of residence. Based on the study results, the reference value for beryllium in pharyngeal tonsils of children is recommended to be determined at 0.02–0.04 µg/g.

  12. Benchmark Experiment for Beryllium Slab Samples

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NIE; Yang-bo; BAO; Jie; HAN; Rui; RUAN; Xi-chao; REN; Jie; HUANG; Han-xiong; ZHOU; Zu-ying

    2013-01-01

    The neutron leakage spectra were measured at 60°from pure beryllium slab samples(10 cm×10 cm×5 cm and 10 cm×10 cm×11 cm)by TOF method.The experimental results were compared with the calculated ones by MCNP5 simulation,using the evaluated data of beryllium from CENDL3.1,

  13. Beryllium concentration in pharyngeal tonsils in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogaj, Ewa; Kwapulinski, Jerzy; Misiołek, Maciej; Golusiński, Wojciech; Kowol, Jolanta; Wiechuła, Danuta

    2014-01-01

    Power plant dust is believed to be the main source of the increased presence of the element beryllium in the environment which has been detected in the atmospheric air, surface waters, groundwater, soil, food, and cigarette smoke. In humans, beryllium absorption occurs mainly via the respiratory system. The pharyngeal tonsils are located on the roof of the nasopharynx and are in direct contact with dust particles in inhaled air. As a result, the concentration levels of beryllium in the pharyngeal tonsils are likely to be a good indicator of concentration levels in the air. The presented study had two primary aims: to investigate the beryllium concentration in pharyngeal tonsils in children living in southern Poland, and the appropriate reference range for this element in children's pharyngeal tonsils. Pharyngeal tonsils were extracted from a total of 379 children (age 2-17 years, mean 6.2 ± 2.7 years) living in southern Poland. Tonsil samples were mineralized in a closed cycle in a pressure mineralizer PDS 6, using 65% spectrally pure nitric acid. Beryllium concentration was determined using the ICP-AES method with a Perkin Elmer Optima 5300DVTM. The software Statistica v. 9 was used for the statistical analysis. It was found that girls had a significantly greater beryllium concentration in their pharyngeal tonsils than boys. Beryllium concentration varies greatly, mostly according to the place of residence. Based on the study results, the reference value for beryllium in pharyngeal tonsils of children is recommended to be determined at 0.02-0.04 µg/g.

  14. High Incidence of Celiac Disease in a Long-term Study of Adolescents With Susceptibility Genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Edwin; Dong, Fran; Barón, Anna E; Taki, Iman; Norris, Jill M; Frohnert, Brigitte I; Hoffenberg, Edward J; Rewers, Marian

    2017-05-01

    Little is known about the incidence of celiac disease in the general population of children in the United States. We aimed to estimate the cumulative incidence of celiac disease in adolescents born in the Denver metropolitan area. We collected data on HLA-DR, DQ genotypes of 31,766 infants, born from 1993 through 2004 at St. Joseph's Hospital in Denver, from the Diabetes Autoimmunity Study in the Young. Subjects with susceptibility genotypes for celiac disease and type 1 diabetes were followed up for up to 20 years for development of tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies (tTGA). Outcomes were the development of celiac disease autoimmunity (CDA) or celiac disease. CDA was defined as persistence of tTGA for at least 3 months or development of celiac disease. Celiac disease was defined based on detection of Marsh 2 or greater lesions in biopsy specimens or persistent high levels of tTGA. For each genotype, the cumulative incidence of CDA and celiac disease were determined. To estimate the cumulative incidence in the Denver general population, outcomes by each genotype were weighted according to the frequency of each of these genotypes in the general population. Of 1339 subjects followed up, 66 developed CDA and met criteria for celiac disease and 46 developed only CDA. Seropositivity for tTGA resolved spontaneously, without treatment, in 21 of the 46 subjects with only CDA (46%). The estimated cumulative incidence for CDA in the Denver general population at 5, 10, and 15 years of age was 2.4%, 4.3%, and 5.1%, respectively, and incidence values for celiac disease were 1.6%, 2.8%, and 3.1%, respectively. In a 20-year prospective study of 1339 children with genetic risk factors for celiac disease, we found the cumulative incidence of CDA and celiac disease to be high within the first 10 years. Although more than 5% of children may experience a period of CDA, not all children develop celiac disease or require gluten-free diets. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published

  15. Beryllium, an adjuvant that promotes gamma interferon production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J Y; Atochina, O; King, B; Taylor, L; Elloso, M; Scott, P; Rossman, M D

    2000-07-01

    Beryllium is associated with a human pulmonary granulomatosis characterized by an accumulation of CD4(+) T cells in the lungs and a heightened specific lymphocyte proliferative response to beryllium (Be) with gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) release (i.e., a T helper 1 [Th1] response). While an animal model of Be sensitization is not currently available, Be has exhibited adjuvant effects in animals. The effects of Be on BALB/c mice immunized with soluble leishmanial antigens (SLA) were investigated to determine if Be had adjuvant activity for IFN-gamma production, an indicator of the Th1 response. In this strain of Leishmania-susceptible BALB/c mice, a Th2 response is normally observed after in vivo SLA sensitization and in vitro restimulation with SLA. If interleukin-12 (IL-12) is given during in vivo sensitization with SLA, markedly increased IFN-gamma production and decreased IL-4 production are detected. We show here that when beryllium sulfate (BeSO(4)) was added during in vivo sensitization of BALB/c mice with SLA and IL-12, significantly increased IFN-gamma production and decreased IL-4 production from lymph node and spleen cells were detected upon in vitro SLA restimulation. No specific responses were observed to Be alone. Lymph node and spleen cells from all mice proliferated strongly and comparably upon in vitro restimulation with SLA and with SLA plus Be; no differences were noted among groups of mice that received different immunization regimens. In vivo, when Be was added to SLA and IL-12 for sensitization of BALB/c mice, more effective control of Leishmania infection was achieved. This finding has implications for understanding not only the development of granulomatous reactions but also the potential for developing Be as a vaccine adjuvant.

  16. Occupational exposure to beryllium and cancer risk: a review of the epidemiologic evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boffetta, Paolo; Fryzek, Jon P; Mandel, Jack S

    2012-02-01

    There is controversy on whether occupational exposure to beryllium causes lung cancer. We conducted a systematic review of epidemiologic studies on cancer among workers exposed to beryllium, including a study of seven U.S. production plants which has been recently updated, a study of patients with beryllium disease (largely overlapping with the former study) and several smaller studies. A small excess mortality from lung cancer was detected in the large cohort, which was partially explained by confounding by tobacco smoking and urban residence. Other potential confounders have not been addressed. The excess mortality was mainly among workers employed (often for a short duration) in the early phase of the manufacturing industry. There was no relation with duration of employment or cumulative exposure, whereas average and maximum exposure were associated with lung cancer risk. The use of lagged exposure variables resulted in associations with lung cancer risk; however, these associations were due to confounding by year of birth and year of hire. The studies of beryllium disease patients do not provide independent evidence and the results from other studies do not support the hypothesis of an increased risk of lung cancer or any other cancer. Overall, the available evidence does not support a conclusion that a causal association has been established between occupational exposure to beryllium and the risk of cancer.

  17. Tritium release from neutron irradiated beryllium pebbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scaffidi-Argentina, F.; Werle, H. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH Technik und Umwelt (Germany). Inst. fuer Neutronenphysik und Reactortechnik

    1998-01-01

    One of the most important open issues related to beryllium for fusion applications refers to the kinetics of the tritium release as a function of neutron fluence and temperature. The EXOTIC-7 as well as the `Beryllium` experiments carried out in the HFR reactor in Petten are considered as the most detailed and significant tests for investigating the beryllium response under neutron irradiation. This paper reviews the present status of beryllium post-irradiation examinations performed at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe with samples from the above mentioned irradiation experiments, trying to elucidate the tritium release controlling processes. In agreement with previous studies it has been found that release starts at about 500-550degC and achieves a maximum at about 700-750degC. The observed release at about 500-550degC is probably due to tritium escaping from chemical traps, while the maximum release at about 700-750degC is due to tritium escaping from physical traps. The consequences of a direct contact between beryllium and ceramics during irradiation, causing tritium implanting in a surface layer of beryllium up to a depth of about 40 mm and leading to an additional inventory which is usually several times larger than the neutron-produced one, are also presented and the effects on the tritium release are discussed. (author)

  18. Hydrogen release from deposited beryllium layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shestakov, V.P.; Klepikov, A.Kh.; Chikhray, Y.V.; Tazhibaeva, I.L. [NIIETF of Al Farabi Kazakh State Univ., Almaty (Kazakhstan)

    2000-04-01

    The analysis of hydrogen retained in deposited beryllium layers deposited by magnetron sputtering was carried out by means of thermodesorption (TDS) technique. Two hydrogen release peaks were clearly seen on the thermodesorption curves at the temperatures 760-800 K and 920-970 K. Hydrogen concentrations in the deposited beryllium layers were calculated from the gas release curves corresponding to the number of Be atoms in the beryllium layer of 100% theoretical density. Average hydrogen concentration in the beryllium samples loaded in the process of magnetron sputtering was equal to 3800{+-}200 appm. The experiments with beryllium layers, enriched with carbon, revealed the increase of retained hydrogen concentration up to 9600{+-}200 appm. Assuming that gas release can be described within the framework of model of diffusion from layer system BeO-Be-BeO, hydrogen diffusion coefficient in BeO and the trapping and detrapping constants for the traps appearing in beryllium in the process of deposition were evaluated. (orig.)

  19. Characteristics of beryllium bonds; a QTAIM study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskandari, K

    2012-08-01

    The nature of beryllium bonds formed between BeX2 (X is H, F and Cl) and some Lewis bases have been investigated. The distribution of the Laplacian of electron density shows that there is a region of charge depletion around the Be atom, which, according to Laplacian complementary principal, can interact with a region of charge concentration of an atom in the base and form a beryllium bond. The molecular graphs of the investigated complexes indicate that beryllium in BeH2 and BeF2 can form “beryllium bonds” with O, N and P atoms but not with halogens. In addition, eight criteria based on QTAIM properties, including the values of electron density and its Laplacian at the BCP, penetration of beryllium and acceptor atom, charge, energy, volume and first atomic moment of beryllium atom, have been considered and compared with the corresponding ones in conventional hydrogen bonds. These bonds share many common features with very strong hydrogen bonds, however,some differences have also been observed.

  20. ANTIMICROBIAL SUSCEPTIBILITY PROFILE OF MICROBIAL PATHOGENS ISOLATED FROM CALVES WITH RESPIRATORY DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Cosmin Nadas

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Respiratory disease in calves is an actual problem, a major cause of economic losses due to mortality, growth delay and improper development. These conditions are frequent in calves due to the weaning stress, transport and environmental changes. Aims: The aim of this study was the isolation of bacteria from 30 calves with respiratory disorders and their antibiotic susceptibility testing. Materials and methods: Samples were collected from calves with respiratory disorders (nasal discharge aged 6 to 9 weeks in 2 series, using sterile swabs. Samples were initially inoculated on blood agar and MacConkey agar following the characteristics of the colonies and microscopic examination that enabled the identification of bacterial species. Isolated strains were used to flood Mueller-Hinton agar to carry out sensitivity testing. The antibiotics tested were represented by: Amoxicillin with clavulanic acid, Gentamicin, Florfenicol, Enrofloxacin, Marbofloxacin, Penicillin G, Cefquinone, Tulathromycin, Ceftiofur, Tylosin and Cephalotin. Results: Genus Streptococcus have been identified in 23 samples, followed by Staphylococcus identified in 14 samples, and Bacillus spp., in 10 nasal swabs; The most common bacteria associations were represented by Streptococcus-Staphylococcus, Streptococcus-Staphylococcus-Bacillus, and Streptococcus-E.coli. The most efficient antibiotic was Cefquinome (Cobactan, followed by Penicillin G and Amoxicillin with clavulanic acid (Amoxiclav; the least effective antibiotics were Florfenicol and Tulathromycin. Conclusions: The study carried out on nasal discharge samples collected from calves with respiratory disorders and their antimicrobial profile testing led to the following conclusions: 1 Low susceptibility to Florfenicol is caused by previous treatments when this molecule was excessively used and without prior sensitivity testing. 2 Cefquinome may represent an emergency therapeutic antibiotic for respiratory

  1. The association of genome-wide significant spirometric loci with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaldi, Peter J; Cho, Michael H; Litonjua, Augusto A; Bakke, Per; Gulsvik, Amund; Lomas, David A; Anderson, Wayne; Beaty, Terri H; Hokanson, John E; Crapo, James D; Laird, Nan; Silverman, Edwin K

    2011-12-01

    Two recent metaanalyses of genome-wide association studies conducted by the CHARGE and SpiroMeta consortia identified novel loci yielding evidence of association at or near genome-wide significance (GWS) with FEV(1) and FEV(1)/FVC. We hypothesized that a subset of these markers would also be associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) susceptibility. Thirty-two single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in or near 17 genes in 11 previously identified GWS spirometric genomic regions were tested for association with COPD status in four COPD case-control study samples (NETT/NAS, the Norway case-control study, ECLIPSE, and the first 1,000 subjects in COPDGene; total sample size, 3,456 cases and 1,906 controls). In addition to testing the 32 spirometric GWS SNPs, we tested a dense panel of imputed HapMap2 SNP markers from the 17 genes located near the 32 GWS SNPs and in a set of 21 well studied COPD candidate genes. Of the previously identified GWS spirometric genomic regions, three loci harbored SNPs associated with COPD susceptibility at a 5% false discovery rate: the 4q24 locus including FLJ20184/INTS12/GSTCD/NPNT, the 6p21 locus including AGER and PPT2, and the 5q33 locus including ADAM19. In conclusion, markers previously associated at or near GWS with spirometric measures were tested for association with COPD status in data from four COPD case-control studies, and three loci showed evidence of association with COPD susceptibility at a 5% false discovery rate.

  2. Sanitary-hygienic and ecological aspects of beryllium production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dvinskykh, E.M.; Savchuk, V.V.; Sidorov, V.L.; Slobodin, D.B.; Tuzov, Y.V. [Ulba Metallurgical Plant, Ust-Kamenogorsk (Kazakhstan)

    1998-01-01

    The Report describes An organization of sanitary-hygienic and ecological control of beryllium production at Ulba metallurgical plant. It involves: (1) the consideration of main methods for protection of beryllium production personnel from unhealthy effect of beryllium, (2) main kinds of filters, used in gas purification systems at different process areas, (3) data on beryllium monitoring in water, soil, on equipment. This Report also outlines problems connected with designing devices for a rapid analysis of beryllium in air as well as problems of beryllium production on ecological situation in the town. (author)

  3. African origins and chronic kidney disease susceptibility in the human immunodeficiency virus era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasembeli, Alex N; Duarte, Raquel; Ramsay, Michèle; Naicker, Saraladevi

    2015-05-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major public health problem worldwide with the estimated incidence growing by approximately 6% annually. There are striking ethnic differences in the prevalence of CKD such that, in the United States, African Americans have the highest prevalence of CKD, four times the incidence of end stage renal disease when compared to Americans of European ancestry suggestive of genetic predisposition. Diabetes mellitus, hypertension and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection are the major causes of CKD. HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN) is an irreversible form of CKD with considerable morbidity and mortality and is present predominantly in people of African ancestry. The APOL1 G1 and G2 alleles were more strongly associated with the risk for CKD than the previously examined MYH9 E1 risk haplotype in individuals of African ancestry. A strong association was reported in HIVAN, suggesting that 50% of African Americans with two APOL1 risk alleles, if untreated, would develop HIVAN. However these two variants are not enough to cause disease. The prevailing belief is that modifying factors or second hits (including genetic hits) underlie the pathogenesis of kidney disease. This work reviews the history of genetic susceptibility of CKD and outlines current theories regarding the role for APOL1 in CKD in the HIV era.

  4. A mouse model of Alzheimer's disease displays increased susceptibility to kindling and seizure-associated death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Jianxiong; Jones, Nigel C; Bush, Ashley I; O'Brien, Terence J; Kwan, Patrick

    2015-06-01

    People with Alzheimer's disease (AD) are up to 10 times more likely to develop epilepsy than the age-matched general population. However, given that only a proportion of patients with AD develop epilepsy, it is likely that additional factors may be required for the epilepsy to emerge. This study aimed to better understand the relationship between AD pathology and seizure susceptibility. It also aimed to investigate a "two-hit" hypothesis for seizure susceptibility through amygdala kindling of rodent AD models. Aged AD mice (Tg2576 model) and wild-type (WT) mice underwent electrical amygdala kindling. Compared with WT mice, Tg2576 mice had significantly lower afterdischarge threshold. Significantly fewer stimulations were required for the Tg2576 mice to reach the first class V seizure. Higher death rate was observed with Tg2576 mice in the kindling group. Both sham and kindled Tg2576 animals had increased levels of sprouting in the supragranular layer of the dentate gyrus compared with the WT counterparts. These findings support the "two-hit" hypothesis and represent a potentially novel research model to help better understand the relationship between AD pathology and epilepsy.

  5. Immunoendocrine mechanisms associated with resistance or susceptibility to parasitic diseases during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Villavicencio, José Antonio; De León-Nava, Marco A; Morales-Montor, Jorge

    2009-01-01

    During pregnancy, the mammalian endocrine system plays a leading role in maintaining the fetus, characterized by an increase in the level of hormones such as progesterone, oestradiol and some gonadotropic hormones. The immune system participates during pregnancy by self-regulating to prevent fetus rejection. The distinctive type of immunity during gestation is characterized by an increase in levels of Th2 type cytokines IL-4, IL-6 and IL-10, concomitant with a decrease in IL-2, INF-gamma and TNF-alpha levels. Along pregnancy, sex steroids and factors associated with them regulate the immune response. In this way, endocrine and immunologic factors have an impact on the pregnant female's susceptibility or resistance to parasitic diseases. There are three main mechanisms proposed to explain this susceptibility or resistance: (1) sex steroids influence the host's immune system; (2) hormones acting directly on the parasites inhibit or promote their reproduction, or (3) the two effects can occur simultaneously within a network of immuno-endocrine host-parasite interactions, mediated by hormones, cytokines, antibodies and other factors interacting directly and bidirectionally. The present work reviews recent literature concerning the most frequent parasitic infections during pregnancy and discusses the mechanisms implied in the establishment, growth, reproduction or elimination of the parasite.

  6. Mud crab susceptibility to disease from white spot syndrome virus is species-dependent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sritunyalucksana Kallaya

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Based on a report for one species (Scylla serrata, it is widely believed that mud crabs are relatively resistant to disease caused by white spot syndrome virus (WSSV. We tested this hypothesis by determining the degree of susceptibility in two species of mud crabs, Scylla olivacea and Scylla paramamosain, both of which were identified by mitochondrial 16 S ribosomal gene analysis. We compared single-dose and serial-dose WSSV challenges on S. olivacea and S. paramamosain. Findings In a preliminary test using S. olivacea alone, a dose of 1 × 106 WSSV copies/g gave 100% mortality within 7 days. In a subsequent test, 17 S. olivacea and 13 S. paramamosain were divided into test and control groups for challenge with WSSV at 5 incremental, biweekly doses starting from 1 × 104 and ending at 5 × 106 copies/g. For 11 S. olivacea challenged, 3 specimens died at doses between 1 × 105 and 5 × 105 copies/g and none died for 2 weeks after the subsequent dose (1 × 106 copies/g that was lethal within 7 days in the preliminary test. However, after the final challenge on day 56 (5 × 106 copies/g, the remaining 7 of 11 S. olivacea (63.64% died within 2 weeks. There was no mortality in the buffer-injected control crabs. For 9 S. paramamosain challenged in the same way, 5 (55.56% died after challenge doses between 1 × 104 and 5 × 105 copies/g, and none died for 2 weeks after the challenge dose of 1 × 106 copies/g. After the final challenge (5 × 106 copies/g on day 56, no S. paramamosain died during 2 weeks after the challenge, and 2 of 9 WSSV-infected S. paramamosain (22.22% remained alive together with the control crabs until the end of the test on day 106. Viral loads in these survivors were low when compared to those in the moribund crabs. Conclusions S. olivacea and S. paramamosain show wide variation in response to challenge with WSSV. S. olivacea and S. paramamosain are susceptible to white spot disease, and S. olivacea is more

  7. Mutations in GBA are associated with familial Parkinson disease susceptibility and age at onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, W C; Pankratz, N; Marek, D K; Pauciulo, M W; Elsaesser, V E; Halter, C A; Rudolph, A; Wojcieszek, J; Pfeiffer, R F; Foroud, T

    2009-01-27

    To characterize sequence variation within the glucocerebrosidase (GBA) gene in a select subset of our sample of patients with familial Parkinson disease (PD) and then to test in our full sample whether these sequence variants increased the risk for PD and were associated with an earlier onset of disease. We performed a comprehensive study of all GBA exons in one patient with PD from each of 96 PD families, selected based on the family-specific lod scores at the GBA locus. Identified GBA variants were subsequently screened in all 1325 PD cases from 566 multiplex PD families and in 359 controls. Nine different GBA variants, five previously reported, were identified in 21 of the 96 PD cases sequenced. Screening for these variants in the full sample identified 161 variant carriers (12.2%) in 99 different PD families. An unbiased estimate of the frequency of the five previously reported GBA variants in the familial PD sample was 12.6% and in the control sample was 5.3% (odds ratio 2.6; 95% confidence interval 1.5-4.4). Presence of a GBA variant was associated with an earlier age at onset (p = 0.0001). On average, those patients carrying a GBA variant had onset with PD 6.04 years earlier than those without a GBA variant. This study suggests that GBA is a susceptibility gene for familial Parkinson disease (PD) and patients with GBA variants have an earlier age at onset than patients with PD without GBA variants.

  8. Searching for an immunogenetic factor that will illuminate susceptibility to non-tuberculous mycobacterial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affandi, Jacquita S; Hendry, Shona; Waterer, Grant; Thomson, Rachel; Wallace, Hilary; Burrows, Sally; Price, Patricia

    2013-10-01

    The incidence of pulmonary non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) disease in otherwise healthy adults is increasing as the population ages. The organisms are ubiquitous so susceptibility probably reflects a deficiency in a protective immune response. Here we investigate if singlenucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) affecting cytokines, chemokines and their receptors associate with pulmonary NTM disease. Samples from NTM patients (n=79) and healthy controls (n=188) were genotyped using TaqMan probes. Of the 16 SNPs assessed, IL28B-rs8099917*TG (rs8099917; P=0.01, OR=2.2), TNFA-1031*CC (rs1799964; p=0.02, OR=0.48) and IL10-1082*AA (rs1800896; P=0.001, OR=0.33) were significantly associated with NTM disease. IL28B-rs8099917 and IL10-1082 have been associated with perturbations of the Th1/Th2 balance, whilst TNFA-1031*CC associates with sensory neuropathy in HIV patients. IL10-1082 warrants further investigation because we observed high production of IL-10 in blood mononuclear cells from NTM patients.

  9. Identification of Two Additional Susceptibility Loci for Inflammatory Bowel Disease in a Chinese Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiucai Lan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: To investigate the associations between the rs1250569 (zinc finger MIZ-type containing 1, ZMIZ1, rs1042522 (tumour protein p53, TP53, and rs10114470 (tumour necrosis factor-like cytokine 1A, TL1A polymorphisms and the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD in a Chinese (Han population. We analysed the expression of genes that predispose patients to Crohn’s disease (CD and ulcerative colitis (UC. Methods: A total of 381 IBD patients and 517 healthy controls were recruited into our study. Polymorphisms at the three loci were genotyped using polymerase chain reaction-ligation detection reactions (PCR-LDR. Genotype-phenotype correlations were analysed. Blood and gut samples were obtained and analysed using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR, western blot analysis, and immunohistochemistry to investigate the mRNA and protein levels and in situ expression of genes found to predispose patients to IBD. Furthermore, the expression of susceptible genes was further verified using a mouse dextran sulphate sodium (DSS-induced acute colitis model. Results: No significant association was detected between rs1250569 and rs1042522 genotypes and CD or UC susceptibility. However, the frequency of allele A of rs1250569 was much higher in CD patients than that in healthy controls (55.03% vs. 48.48%, respectively; p = 0.044. The mutation rates at rs10114470 were dramatically lower at both the genotype and allele level in patients than those in healthy controls (p = 0.002 at both the genotype and allele level. Additionally, increased ZMIZ1 and TL1A levels were detected in intestinal samples obtained from both IBD patients and DSS-treated mice. Conclusion: rs1250569 (ZMIZ1 and rs10114470 (TL1A are two novel loci that indicate susceptibility to IBD in Han-Chinese patients. Consistent with previous studies, TL1A expression levels were higher in Chinese Han IBD patients and DSS-treated mice. Most importantly, we found that ZMIZ1 expression was

  10. Long-term follow-up of beryllium sensitized workers from a single employer

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    Curtis Anne M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Up to 12% of beryllium-exposed American workers would test positive on beryllium lymphocyte proliferation test (BeLPT screening, but the implications of sensitization remain uncertain. Methods Seventy two current and former employees of a beryllium manufacturer, including 22 with pathologic changes of chronic beryllium disease (CBD, and 50 without, with a confirmed positive test were followed-up for 7.4 +/-3.1 years. Results Beyond predicted effects of aging, flow rates and lung volumes changed little from baseline, while DLCO dropped 17.4% of predicted on average. Despite this group decline, only 8 subjects (11.1% demonstrated physiologic or radiologic abnormalities typical of CBD. Other than baseline status, no clinical or laboratory feature distinguished those who clinically manifested CBD at follow-up from those who did not. Conclusions The clinical outlook remains favorable for beryllium-sensitized individuals over the first 5-12 years. However, declines in DLCO may presage further and more serious clinical manifestations in the future. These conclusions are tempered by the possibility of selection bias and other study limitations.

  11. Geographic differences in allele frequencies of susceptibility SNPs for cardiovascular disease

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    Kullo Iftikhar J

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We hypothesized that the frequencies of risk alleles of SNPs mediating susceptibility to cardiovascular diseases differ among populations of varying geographic origin and that population-specific selection has operated on some of these variants. Methods From the database of genome-wide association studies (GWAS, we selected 36 cardiovascular phenotypes including coronary heart disease, hypertension, and stroke, as well as related quantitative traits (eg, body mass index and plasma lipid levels. We identified 292 SNPs in 270 genes associated with a disease or trait at P -8. As part of the Human Genome-Diversity Project (HGDP, 158 (54.1% of these SNPs have been genotyped in 938 individuals belonging to 52 populations from seven geographic areas. A measure of population differentiation, FST, was calculated to quantify differences in risk allele frequencies (RAFs among populations and geographic areas. Results Large differences in RAFs were noted in populations of Africa, East Asia, America and Oceania, when compared with other geographic regions. The mean global FST (0.1042 for 158 SNPs among the populations was not significantly higher than the mean global FST of 158 autosomal SNPs randomly sampled from the HGDP database. Significantly higher global FST (P FST of 2036 putatively neutral SNPs. For four of these SNPs, additional evidence of selection was noted based on the integrated Haplotype Score. Conclusion Large differences in RAFs for a set of common SNPs that influence risk of cardiovascular disease were noted between the major world populations. Pairwise comparisons revealed RAF differences for at least eight SNPs that might be due to population-specific selection or demographic factors. These findings are relevant to a better understanding of geographic variation in the prevalence of cardiovascular disease.

  12. Genome-wide interaction-based association analysis identified multiple new susceptibility Loci for common diseases.

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    Yang Liu

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide interaction-based association (GWIBA analysis has the potential to identify novel susceptibility loci. These interaction effects could be missed with the prevailing approaches in genome-wide association studies (GWAS. However, no convincing loci have been discovered exclusively from GWIBA methods, and the intensive computation involved is a major barrier for application. Here, we developed a fast, multi-thread/parallel program named "pair-wise interaction-based association mapping" (PIAM for exhaustive two-locus searches. With this program, we performed a complete GWIBA analysis on seven diseases with stringent control for false positives, and we validated the results for three of these diseases. We identified one pair-wise interaction between a previously identified locus, C1orf106, and one new locus, TEC, that was specific for Crohn's disease, with a Bonferroni corrected P < 0.05 (P = 0.039. This interaction was replicated with a pair of proxy linked loci (P = 0.013 on an independent dataset. Five other interactions had corrected P < 0.5. We identified the allelic effect of a locus close to SLC7A13 for coronary artery disease. This was replicated with a linked locus on an independent dataset (P = 1.09 × 10⁻⁷. Through a local validation analysis that evaluated association signals, rather than locus-based associations, we found that several other regions showed association/interaction signals with nominal P < 0.05. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the GWIBA approach was successful for identifying novel loci, and the results provide new insights into the genetic architecture of common diseases. In addition, our PIAM program was capable of handling very large GWAS datasets that are likely to be produced in the future.

  13. Foot-and-mouth disease in feral swine: susceptibility and transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, F; Swafford, S; Petrowski, H; Bracht, A; Schmit, B; Fabian, A; Pacheco, J M; Hartwig, E; Berninger, M; Carrillo, C; Mayr, G; Moran, K; Kavanaugh, D; Leibrecht, H; White, W; Metwally, S

    2011-08-01

    Experimental studies of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) in feral swine are limited, and data for clinical manifestations and disease transmissibility are lacking. In this report, feral and domestic swine were experimentally infected with FMDV (A24-Cruzeiro), and susceptibility and virus transmission were studied. Feral swine were proved to be highly susceptible to A-24 Cruzeiro FMD virus by intradermal inoculation and by contact with infected domestic and feral swine. Typical clinical signs in feral swine included transient fever, lameness and vesicular lesions in the coronary bands, heel bulbs, tip of the tongue and snout. Domestic swine exhibited clinical signs of the disease within 24 h after contact with feral swine, whereas feral swine did not show clinical signs of FMD until 48 h after contact with infected domestic and feral swine. Clinical scores of feral and domestic swine were comparable. However, feral swine exhibited a higher tolerance for the disease, and their thicker, darker skin made vesicular lesions difficult to detect. Virus titration of oral swabs showed that both feral and domestic swine shed similar amounts of virus, with levels peaking between 2 to 4 dpi/dpc (days post-inoculation/days post-contact). FMDV RNA was intermittently detectable in the oral swabs by real-time RT-PCR of both feral and domestic swine between 1 and 8 dpi/dpc and in some instances until 14 dpi/12 dpc. Both feral and domestic swine seroconverted 6-8 dpi/dpc as measured by 3ABC antibody ELISA and VIAA assays. FMDV RNA levels in animal room air filters were similar in feral and domestic swine animal rooms, and were last detected at 22 dpi, while none were detectable at 28 or 35 dpi. The FMDV RNA persisted in domestic and feral swine tonsils up to 33-36 dpi/dpc, whereas virus isolation was negative. Results from this study will help understand the role feral swine may play in sustaining an FMD outbreak, and may be utilized in guiding surveillance, epidemiologic and economic

  14. Accelerator mass spectrometry detection of beryllium ions in the antigen processing and presentation pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tooker, Brian C; Brindley, Stephen M; Chiarappa-Zucca, Marina L; Turteltaub, Kenneth W; Newman, Lee S

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to small amounts of beryllium (Be) can result in beryllium sensitization and progression to Chronic Beryllium Disease (CBD). In CBD, beryllium is presented to Be-responsive T-cells by professional antigen-presenting cells (APC). This presentation drives T-cell proliferation and pro-inflammatory cytokine (IL-2, TNFα, and IFNγ) production and leads to granuloma formation. The mechanism by which beryllium enters an APC and is processed to become part of the beryllium antigen complex has not yet been elucidated. Developing techniques for beryllium detection with enough sensitivity has presented a barrier to further investigation. The objective of this study was to demonstrate that Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is sensitive enough to quantify the amount of beryllium presented by APC to stimulate Be-responsive T-cells. To achieve this goal, APC - which may or may not stimulate Be-responsive T-cells - were cultured with Be-ferritin. Then, by utilizing AMS, the amount of beryllium processed for presentation was determined. Further, IFNγ intracellular cytokine assays were performed to demonstrate that Be-ferritin (at levels used in the experiments) could stimulate Be-responsive T-cells when presented by an APC of the correct HLA type (HLA-DP0201). The results indicated that Be-responsive T-cells expressed IFNγ only when APC with the correct HLA type were able to process Be for presentation. Utilizing AMS, it was determined that APC with HLA-DP0201 had membrane fractions containing 0.17-0.59 ng Be and APC with HLA-DP0401 had membrane fractions bearing 0.40-0.45 ng Be. However, HLA-DP0401 APC had 20-times more Be associated with the whole cells (57.68-61.12 ng) than HLA-DP0201 APC (0.90-3.49 ng). As these findings demonstrate, AMS detection of picogram levels of Be processed by APC is possible. Further, regardless of form, Be requires processing by APC to successfully stimulate Be-responsive T-cells to generate IFNγ.

  15. Migration of Beryllium via Multiple Exposure Pathways among Work Processes in Four Different Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Jenna L; Day, Gregory A; Park, Ji Young; Stefaniak, Aleksandr B; Stanton, Marcia L; Deubner, David C; Kent, Michael S; Schuler, Christine R; Virji, M Abbas

    2014-01-01

    Inhalation of beryllium is associated with the development of sensitization; however, dermal exposure may also be important. The primary aim of this study was to elucidate relationships among exposure pathways in four different manufacturing and finishing facilities. Secondary aims were to identify jobs with increased levels of beryllium in air, on skin, and on surfaces; identify potential discrepancies in exposure pathways, and determine if these are related to jobs with previously identified risk. Beryllium was measured in air, on cotton gloves, and on work surfaces. Summary statistics were calculated and correlations among all three measurement types were examined at the facility and job level. Exposure ranking strategies were used to identify jobs with higher exposures. The highest air, glove, and surface measurements were observed in beryllium metal production and beryllium oxide ceramics manufacturing jobs that involved hot processes and handling powders. Two finishing and distribution facilities that handle solid alloy products had lower exposures than the primary production facilities, and there were differences observed among jobs. For all facilities combined, strong correlations were found between air-surface (rp ≥ 0.77), glove-surface (rp ≥ 0.76), and air-glove measurements (rp ≥ 0.69). In jobs where higher risk of beryllium sensitization or disease has been reported, exposure levels for all three measurement types were higher than in jobs with lower risk, though they were not the highest. Some jobs with low air concentrations had higher levels of beryllium on glove and surface wipe samples, suggesting a need to further evaluate the causes of the discrepant levels. Although such correlations provide insight on where beryllium is located throughout the workplace, they cannot identify the direction of the pathways between air, surface, or skin. Ranking strategies helped to identify jobs with the highest combined air, glove, and/or surface exposures

  16. Loss of function in Mlo orthologs reduces susceptibility of pepper and tomato to powdery mildew disease caused by Leveillula taurica.

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    Zheng Zheng

    Full Text Available Powdery mildew disease caused by Leveillula taurica is a serious fungal threat to greenhouse tomato and pepper production. In contrast to most powdery mildew species which are epiphytic, L. taurica is an endophytic fungus colonizing the mesophyll tissues of the leaf. In barley, Arabidopsis, tomato and pea, the correct functioning of specific homologues of the plant Mlo gene family has been found to be required for pathogenesis of epiphytic powdery mildew fungi. The aim of this study was to investigate the involvement of the Mlo genes in susceptibility to the endophytic fungus L. taurica. In tomato (Solanum lycopersicum, a loss-of-function mutation in the SlMlo1 gene results in resistance to powdery mildew disease caused by Oidium neolycopersici. When the tomato Slmlo1 mutant was inoculated with L. taurica in this study, it proved to be less susceptible compared to the control, S. lycopersicum cv. Moneymaker. Further, overexpression of SlMlo1 in the tomato Slmlo1 mutant enhanced susceptibility to L. taurica. In pepper, the CaMlo2 gene was isolated by applying a homology-based cloning approach. Compared to the previously identified CaMlo1 gene, the CaMlo2 gene is more similar to SlMlo1 as shown by phylogenetic analysis, and the expression of CaMlo2 is up-regulated at an earlier time point upon L. taurica infection. However, results of virus-induced gene silencing suggest that both CaMlo1 and CaMlo2 may be involved in the susceptibility of pepper to L. taurica. The fact that overexpression of CaMlo2 restored the susceptibility of the tomato Slmlo1 mutant to O. neolycopersici and increased its susceptibility to L. taurica confirmed the role of CaMlo2 acting as a susceptibility factor to different powdery mildews, though the role of CaMlo1 as a co-factor for susceptibility cannot be excluded.

  17. Mechanical performance of irradiated beryllium pebbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scaffidi-Argentina, F.; Dalle-Donne, M.; Werle, H. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH Technik und Umwelt (Germany). Inst. fuer Neutronenphysik und Reaktortechnik

    1998-01-01

    For the Helium Cooled Pebble Bed (HCPB) Blanket, which is one of the two reference concepts studied within the European Fusion Technology Programme, the neutron multiplier consists of a mixed bed of about 2 and 0.1-0.2 mm diameter beryllium pebbles. Beryllium has no structural function in the blanket, however microstructural and mechanical properties are important, as they might influence the material behavior under neutron irradiation. The EXOTIC-7 as well as the `Beryllium` experiments carried out in the HFR reactor in Petten are considered as the most detailed and significant tests for investigating it. This paper reviews the present status of beryllium post-irradiation examinations performed at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe with samples from these irradiation experiments, emphasizing the effects of irradiation of essential material properties and trying to elucidate the processes controlling the property changes. The microstructure, the porosity distribution, the impurity content, the behavior under compression loads and the compatibility of the beryllium pebbles with lithium orthosilicate (Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}) during the in-pile irradiation are presented and critically discussed. Qualitative information on ductility and creep obtained by hardness-type measurements are also supplied. (author)

  18. Estimating the total number of susceptibility variants underlying complex diseases from genome-wide association studies.

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    Hon-Cheong So

    Full Text Available Recently genome-wide association studies (GWAS have identified numerous susceptibility variants for complex diseases. In this study we proposed several approaches to estimate the total number of variants underlying these diseases. We assume that the variance explained by genetic markers (Vg follow an exponential distribution, which is justified by previous studies on theories of adaptation. Our aim is to fit the observed distribution of Vg from GWAS to its theoretical distribution. The number of variants is obtained by the heritability divided by the estimated mean of the exponential distribution. In practice, due to limited sample sizes, there is insufficient power to detect variants with small effects. Therefore the power was taken into account in fitting. Besides considering the most significant variants, we also tried to relax the significance threshold, allowing more markers to be fitted. The effects of false positive variants were removed by considering the local false discovery rates. In addition, we developed an alternative approach by directly fitting the z-statistics from GWAS to its theoretical distribution. In all cases, the "winner's curse" effect was corrected analytically. Confidence intervals were also derived. Simulations were performed to compare and verify the performance of different estimators (which incorporates various means of winner's curse correction and the coverage of the proposed analytic confidence intervals. Our methodology only requires summary statistics and is able to handle both binary and continuous traits. Finally we applied the methods to a few real disease examples (lipid traits, type 2 diabetes and Crohn's disease and estimated that hundreds to nearly a thousand variants underlie these traits.

  19. CD40: Novel Association with Crohn's Disease and Replication in Multiple Sclerosis Susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcina, Antonio; Teruel, María; Díaz-Gallo, Lina M.; Gómez-García, María; López-Nevot, Miguel A.; Rodrigo, Luis; Nieto, Antonio; Cardeña, Carlos; Alcain, Guillermo; Díaz-Rubio, Manuel; de la Concha, Emilio G.; Fernandez, Oscar; Arroyo, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    Background A functional polymorphism located at −1 from the start codon of the CD40 gene, rs1883832, was previously reported to disrupt a Kozak sequence essential for translation. It has been consistently associated with Graves' disease risk in populations of different ethnicity and genetic proxies of this variant evaluated in genome-wide association studies have shown evidence of an effect in rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis (MS) susceptibility. However, the protective allele associated with Graves' disease or rheumatoid arthritis has shown a risk role in MS, an effect that we aimed to replicate in the present work. We hypothesized that this functional polymorphism might also show an association with other complex autoimmune condition such as inflammatory bowel disease, given the CD40 overexpression previously observed in Crohn's disease (CD) lesions. Methodology Genotyping of rs1883832C>T was performed in 1564 MS, 1102 CD and 969 ulcerative colitis (UC) Spanish patients and in 2948 ethnically matched controls by TaqMan chemistry. Principal Findings The observed effect of the minor allele rs1883832T was replicated in our independent Spanish MS cohort [p = 0.025; OR (95% CI) = 1.12 (1.01–1.23)]. The frequency of the minor allele was also significantly higher in CD patients than in controls [p = 0.002; OR (95% CI) = 1.19 (1.06–1.33)]. This increased predisposition was not detected in UC patients [p = 0.5; OR (95% CI) = 1.04 (0.93–1.17)]. Conclusion The impact of CD40 rs1883832 on MS and CD risk points to a common signaling shared by these autoimmune conditions. PMID:20634952

  20. Genetic predictions of prion disease susceptibility in carnivore species based on variability of the prion gene coding region.

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    Paula Stewart

    Full Text Available Mammalian species vary widely in their apparent susceptibility to prion diseases. For example, several felid species developed prion disease (feline spongiform encephalopathy or FSE during the bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE epidemic in the United Kingdom, whereas no canine BSE cases were detected. Whether either of these or other groups of carnivore species can contract other prion diseases (e.g. chronic wasting disease or CWD remains an open question. Variation in the host-encoded prion protein (PrP(C largely explains observed disease susceptibility patterns within ruminant species, and may explain interspecies differences in susceptibility as well. We sequenced and compared the open reading frame of the PRNP gene encoding PrP(C protein from 609 animal samples comprising 29 species from 22 genera of the Order Carnivora; amongst these samples were 15 FSE cases. Our analysis revealed that FSE cases did not encode an identifiable disease-associated PrP polymorphism. However, all canid PrPs contained aspartic acid or glutamic acid at codon 163 which we propose provides a genetic basis for observed susceptibility differences between canids and felids. Among other carnivores studied, wolverine (Gulo gulo and pine marten (Martes martes were the only non-canid species to also express PrP-Asp163, which may impact on their prion diseases susceptibility. Populations of black bear (Ursus americanus and mountain lion (Puma concolor from Colorado showed little genetic variation in the PrP protein and no variants likely to be highly resistant to prions in general, suggesting that strain differences between BSE and CWD prions also may contribute to the limited apparent host range of the latter.

  1. Occupational and non-occupational allergic contact dermatitis from beryllium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilaplana, J; Romaguera, C; Grimalt, F

    1992-05-01

    There are various references to sensitization to beryllium in the literature. Since introducing a patch testing series for patients with suspected sensitization to metals, we have found 3 cases of sensitization to beryllium. Of these 3 cases, we regard the first 2 as having relevant sensitization. Beryllium chloride (1% pet.) was positive in 3 patients and negative in 150 controls.

  2. 20 CFR 30.508 - What is beryllium sensitivity monitoring?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What is beryllium sensitivity monitoring? 30... and Offsets; Overpayments Payment of Claims and Offset for Certain Payments § 30.508 What is beryllium sensitivity monitoring? Beryllium sensitivity monitoring shall consist of medical examinations to confirm...

  3. LOD score exclusion analyses for candidate disease susceptibility genes using case-parents design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Hongwen; GAO Guimin

    2006-01-01

    The focus of almost all the association studies of candidate genes is to test for their importance. We recently developed a LOD score approach that can be used to test against the importance of candidate genes for complex diseases and quantitative traits in random samples. As a complementary method to regular association analyses, our LOD score approach is powerful but still affected by the population admixture, though it is more conservative. To control the confounding effect of population heterogeneity, we develop here a LOD score exclusion analysis using case-parents design, the basic design of the transmission disequilibrium test (TDT) approach that is immune to population admixture. In the analysis, specific genetic effects and inheritance models at candidate genes can be analyzed and if a LOD score is ≤ - 2.0, the locus can be excluded from having an effect larger than that specified. Simulations show that this approach has reasonable power to exclude a candidate gene having small genetic effects if it is not a disease susceptibility locus (DSL) with sample size often employed in TDT studies. Similar to association analyses with the TDT in nuclear families, our exclusion analyses are generally not affected by population admixture. The exclusion analyses may be implemented to rule out candidate genes with no or minor genetic effects as supplemental analyses for the TDT. The utility of the approach is illustrated with an application to test the importance of vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene underlying the differential risk to osteoporosis.

  4. Possible Implication of Fcγ Receptor-Mediated Trogocytosis in Susceptibility to Systemic Autoimmune Disease

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    Sakiko Masuda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Leukocytes can “gnaw away” the plasma membrane of other cells. This phenomenon, called trogocytosis, occurs subsequent to cell-to-cell adhesion. Currently, two mechanisms of trogocytosis, adhesion molecule-mediated trogocytosis and Fcγ receptor-(FcγR- mediated trogocytosis, have been identified. In our earlier study, we established an in vitro model of FcγR-mediated trogocytosis, namely, CD8 translocation model from T cells to neutrophils. By using this model, we demonstrated that the molecules transferred to neutrophils via FcγR-mediated trogocytosis were taken into the cytoplasm immediately. This result suggests that the chance of molecules transferred via FcγR-mediated trogocytosis to play a role on the cell surface could be time-limited. Thus, we consider the physiological role of FcγR-mediated trogocytosis as a means to remove antibodies (Abs that bind with self-molecules rather than to extract molecules from other cells. This concept means that FcγR-mediated trogocytosis can be a defense mechanism to Ab-mediated autoimmune response. Moreover, the activity of FcγR-mediated trogocytosis was revealed to be parallel to the endocytotic activity of neutrophils, which was critically related to the susceptibility to systemic autoimmune diseases. The collective findings suggest that FcγR-mediated trogocytosis could physiologically play a role in removal of Abs bound to self-antigens and prevent autoimmune diseases.

  5. Enhanced disease susceptibility 1 and salicylic acid act redundantly to regulate resistance gene-mediated signaling.

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    Srivathsa C Venugopal

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Resistance (R protein-associated pathways are well known to participate in defense against a variety of microbial pathogens. Salicylic acid (SA and its associated proteinaceous signaling components, including enhanced disease susceptibility 1 (EDS1, non-race-specific disease resistance 1 (NDR1, phytoalexin deficient 4 (PAD4, senescence associated gene 101 (SAG101, and EDS5, have been identified as components of resistance derived from many R proteins. Here, we show that EDS1 and SA fulfill redundant functions in defense signaling mediated by R proteins, which were thought to function independent of EDS1 and/or SA. Simultaneous mutations in EDS1 and the SA-synthesizing enzyme SID2 compromised hypersensitive response and/or resistance mediated by R proteins that contain coiled coil domains at their N-terminal ends. Furthermore, the expression of R genes and the associated defense signaling induced in response to a reduction in the level of oleic acid were also suppressed by compromising SA biosynthesis in the eds1 mutant background. The functional redundancy with SA was specific to EDS1. Results presented here redefine our understanding of the roles of EDS1 and SA in plant defense.

  6. Enhanced disease susceptibility 1 and salicylic acid act redundantly to regulate resistance gene-mediated signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venugopal, Srivathsa C; Jeong, Rae-Dong; Mandal, Mihir K; Zhu, Shifeng; Chandra-Shekara, A C; Xia, Ye; Hersh, Matthew; Stromberg, Arnold J; Navarre, DuRoy; Kachroo, Aardra; Kachroo, Pradeep

    2009-07-01

    Resistance (R) protein-associated pathways are well known to participate in defense against a variety of microbial pathogens. Salicylic acid (SA) and its associated proteinaceous signaling components, including enhanced disease susceptibility 1 (EDS1), non-race-specific disease resistance 1 (NDR1), phytoalexin deficient 4 (PAD4), senescence associated gene 101 (SAG101), and EDS5, have been identified as components of resistance derived from many R proteins. Here, we show that EDS1 and SA fulfill redundant functions in defense signaling mediated by R proteins, which were thought to function independent of EDS1 and/or SA. Simultaneous mutations in EDS1 and the SA-synthesizing enzyme SID2 compromised hypersensitive response and/or resistance mediated by R proteins that contain coiled coil domains at their N-terminal ends. Furthermore, the expression of R genes and the associated defense signaling induced in response to a reduction in the level of oleic acid were also suppressed by compromising SA biosynthesis in the eds1 mutant background. The functional redundancy with SA was specific to EDS1. Results presented here redefine our understanding of the roles of EDS1 and SA in plant defense.

  7. Genes related to iron metabolism and susceptibility to Alzheimer's disease in Basque population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blázquez, L; De Juan, D; Ruiz-Martínez, J; Emparanza, J I; Sáenz, A; Otaegui, D; Sistiaga, A; Martínez-Lage, P; Lamet, I; Samaranch, L; Buiza, C; Etxeberria, I; Arriola, E; Cuadrado, E; Urdaneta, E; Yanguas, J; López de Munain, A

    2007-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common dementing disorder and presents with a progressive and irreversible cognitive decline of gradual onset. To date, several reports have involved iron in AD physiopathology. In this study, we have analysed TFC2 variant and HFE mutations (H63D and C282Y) in 211 AD patients and 167 controls recruited from an area of the Basque Country. Furthermore, we have studied APOE genotype as it is a well-known risk factor for AD. APOE epsilon 4 allele was associated with an increased risk of AD and an earlier age at onset, whereas no association was found between TFC2 or HFE C282Y mutation and disease susceptibility. The frequency of H63D mutation was higher in control population (29.9%) than in AD patients (18%), suggesting a protective role of this allele on AD either due to the presence of the mutation itself or through the effect of other related genes in the ancestral haplotype in which it is included.

  8. A genome-wide association study identifies potential susceptibility loci for Hirschsprung disease.

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    Jeong-Hyun Kim

    Full Text Available Hirschsprung disease (HSCR is a congenital and heterogeneous disorder characterized by the absence of intramural nervous plexuses along variable lengths of the hindgut. Although RET is a well-established risk factor, a recent genome-wide association study (GWAS of HSCR has identified NRG1 as an additional susceptibility locus. To discover additional risk loci, we performed a GWAS of 123 sporadic HSCR patients and 432 unaffected controls using a large-scale platform with coverage of over 1 million polymorphic markers. The result was that our study replicated the findings of RET-CSGALNACT2-RASGEF1A genomic region (rawP = 5.69×10(-19 before a Bonferroni correction; corrP = 4.31×10(-13 after a Bonferroni correction and NRG1 as susceptibility loci. In addition, this study identified SLC6A20 (adjP = 2.71×10(-6, RORA (adjP = 1.26×10(-5, and ABCC9 (adjP = 1.86×10(-5 as new potential susceptibility loci under adjusting the already known loci on the RET-CSGALNACT2-RASGEF1A and NRG1 regions, although none of the SNPs in these genes passed the Bonferroni correction. In further subgroup analysis, the RET-CSGALNACT2-RASGEF1A genomic region was observed to have different significance levels among subgroups: short-segment (S-HSCR, corrP = 1.71×10(-5, long-segment (L-HSCR, corrP = 6.66×10(-4, and total colonic aganglionosis (TCA, corrP>0.05. This differential pattern in the significance level suggests that other genomic loci or mechanisms may affect the length of aganglionosis in HSCR subgroups during enteric nervous system (ENS development. Although functional evaluations are needed, our findings might facilitate improved understanding of the mechanisms of HSCR pathogenesis.

  9. Examining ERBB2 as a candidate gene for susceptibility to leprosy (Hansen's disease) in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Sérgio Ricardo Fernandes; Jamieson, Sarra Elisabeth; Dupnik, Kathryn Margaret; Monteiro, Glória Regina; Nobre, Maurício Lisboa; Dias, Márcia Sousa; Trindade Neto, Pedro Bezerra; Queiroz, Maria do Carmo Palmeira; Gomes, Carlos Eduardo Maia; Blackwell, Jenefer Mary; Jeronimo, Selma Maria Bezerra

    2014-04-01

    Leprosy remains prevalent in Brazil. ErbB2 is a receptor for leprosy bacilli entering Schwann cells, which mediates Mycobacterium leprae-induced demyelination and the ERBB2 gene lies within a leprosy susceptibility locus on chromosome 17q11-q21. To determine whether polymorphisms at the ERBB2 locus contribute to this linkage peak, three haplotype tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (tag-SNPs) (rs2517956, rs2952156, rs1058808) were genotyped in 72 families (208 cases; 372 individuals) from the state of Pará (PA). All three tag-SNPs were associated with leprosy per se [best SNP rs2517959 odds ratio (OR) = 2.22; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.37-3.59; p = 0.001]. Lepromatous (LL) (OR = 3.25; 95% CI 1.37-7.70; p = 0.007) and tuberculoid (TT) (OR = 1.79; 95% CI 1.04-3.05; p = 0.034) leprosy both contributed to the association, which is consistent with the previous linkage to chromosome 17q11-q21 in the population from PA and supports the functional role of ErbB2 in disease pathogenesis. To attempt to replicate these findings, six SNPs (rs2517955, rs2517956, rs1810132, rs2952156, rs1801200, rs1058808) were genotyped in a population-based sample of 570 leprosy cases and 370 controls from the state of Rio Grande do Norte (RN) and the results were analysed using logistic regression analysis. However, none of the associations were replicated in the RN sample, whether analysed for leprosy per se, LL leprosy, TT leprosy, erythema nodosum leprosum or reversal reaction conditions. The role of polymorphisms at ERBB2 in controlling susceptibility to leprosy in Brazil therefore remains unclear.

  10. Gene-Gene Associations with the Susceptibility of Kawasaki Disease and Coronary Artery Lesions.

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    Ho-Chang Kuo

    Full Text Available Kawasaki disease (KD is a systemic vasculitis primarily affecting children < 5 years old. Genes significantly associated with KD mostly involve cardiovascular, immune, and inflammatory responses. Recent studies have observed stronger associations for KD risk with multiple genes compared to individual genes. Therefore, we investigated whether gene combinations influenced KD susceptibility or coronary artery lesion (CAL formation. We examined 384 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs for 159 immune-related candidate genes in DNA samples from KD patients with CAL (n = 73, KD patients without CAL (n = 153, and cohort controls (n = 575. Individual SNPs were first assessed by univariate analysis (UVA and multivariate analysis (MVA. We used multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR to examine individual SNPs in one-, two-, and three-locus best fit models. UVA identified 53 individual SNPs that were significantly associated with KD risk or CAL formation (p < 0.10, while 35 individual SNPs were significantly associated using MVA (p ≤ 0.05. Significant associations in MDR analysis were only observed for the two-locus models after permutation testing (p ≤ 0.05. In logistic regression, combined possession of PDE2A (rs341058 and CYFIP2 (rs767007 significantly increased KD susceptibility (OR = 3.54; p = 4.14 x 10(-7, while combinations of LOC100133214 (rs2517892 and IL2RA (rs3118470 significantly increased the risk of CAL in KD patients (OR = 5.35; p = 7.46 x 10(-5. Our results suggest varying gene-gene associations respectively predispose individuals to KD risk or its complications of CAL.

  11. Whole-exome sequencing for the identification of susceptibility genes of Kashin-Beck disease.

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    Zhenxing Yang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To identify and investigate the susceptibility genes of Kashin-Beck disease (KBD in Chinese population. METHODS: Whole-exome capturing and sequencing technology was used for the detection of genetic variations in 19 individuals from six families with high incidence of KBD. A total of 44 polymorphisms from 41 genes were genotyped from a total of 144 cases and 144 controls by using MassARRAY under the standard protocol from Sequenom. Association was applied on the data by using PLINK1.07. RESULTS: In the sequencing stage, each sample showed approximately 70-fold coverage, thus covering more than 99% of the target regions. Among the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs used in the transmission disequilibrium test, 108 had a p-value of <0.01, whereas 1056 had a p-value of <0.05. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes(KEGG pathway analysis indicates that these SNPs focus on three major pathways: regulation of actin cytoskeleton, focal adhesion, and metabolic pathways. In the validation stage, single locus effects revealed that two of these polymorphisms (rs7745040 and rs9275295 in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA-DRB1 gene and one polymorphism (rs9473132 in CD2-associated protein (CD2AP gene have a significant statistical association with KBD. CONCLUSIONS: HLA-DRB1 and CD2AP gene were identified to be among the susceptibility genes of KBD, thus supporting the role of the autoimmune response in KBD and the possibility of shared etiology between osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and KBD.

  12. Associations between CD36 gene polymorphisms and susceptibility to coronary artery heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y.; Ling, Z.Y.; Deng, S.B.; Du, H.A.; Yin, Y.H.; Yuan, J.; She, Q.; Chen, Y.Q. [Department of Cardiology, The Second Affiliated Hospital, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China)

    2014-08-08

    Associations between polymorphisms of the CD36 gene and susceptibility to coronary artery heart disease (CHD) are not clear. We assessed allele frequencies and genotype distributions of CD36 gene polymorphisms in 112 CHD patients and 129 control patients using semi-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. Additionally, we detected CD36 mRNA expression by real-time quantitative PCR, and we quantified plasma levels of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). There were no significant differences between the two groups (P>0.05) in allele frequencies of rs1761667 or in genotype distribution and allele frequencies of rs3173798. The genotype distribution of rs1761667 significantly differed between CHD patients and controls (P=0.034), with a significantly higher frequency of the AG genotype in the CHD group compared to the control group (P=0.011). The plasma levels of ox-LDL in patients with the AG genotype were remarkably higher than those with the GG and AA genotypes (P=0.010). In a randomized sample taken from patients in the two groups, the CD36 mRNA expression of the CHD patients was higher than that of the controls. In CHD patients, the CD36 mRNA expression in AG genotype patients was remarkably higher than in those with an AA genotype (P=0.005). After adjusted logistic regression analysis, the AG genotype of rs1761667 was associated with an increased risk of CHD (OR=2.337, 95% CI=1.336-4.087, P=0.003). In conclusion, the rs1761667 polymorphism may be closely associated with developing CHD in the Chongqing Han population of China, and an AG genotype may be a genetic susceptibility factor for CHD.

  13. Molecular cloning and characterization of enhanced disease susceptibility 1 (EDS1) from Gossypium barbadense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xiaofeng; Qi, Xiliang; Cheng, Hongmei

    2014-06-01

    Arabidopsis enhanced disease susceptibility 1 (EDS1) plays an important role in plant defense against biotrophic and necrotrophic pathogens. The necrotrophic pathogen Verticillium dahliae infection of Gossypium barbadense could lead to Verticillium wilt which seriously reduces the cotton production. Here, we cloned and characterized a G. barbadense homolog of EDS1, designated as GbEDS1. The full-length cDNA of the GbEDS1 gene was obtained by the technique of rapid-amplification of cDNA ends. The open reading frame of the GbEDS1 gene was 1,647 bp long and encoded a protein of 548 amino acids residues. Comparison of the cDNA and genomic DNA sequence of GbEDS1 indicated that this gene contained a single intron and two exons. Like other EDS1s, GbEDS1 contained a conserved N-terminal lipase domain and an EDS1-specific KNEDT motif. Subcellular localization assay revealed that GbEDS1-green fluorescence protein fusion protein was localized in both cytosol and nucleus. Interestingly, the transcript levels of GbEDS1 were dramatically increased in response to pathogen V. dahliae infection. To investigate the role of GbEDS1 in plant resistance against V. dahliae, a conserved fragment derived from GbEDS1 was used to knockdown the endogenous EDS1 in Nicotiana benthamiana by heterologous virus-induced gene silencing. Our data showed that silencing of NbEDS1 resulted in increased susceptibility to V. dahliae infection in N. benthamiana, suggesting a possible involvement of the novelly isolated GbEDS1 in the regulation of plant defense against V. dahliae.

  14. Enhanced Disease Susceptibility1 Mediates Pathogen Resistance and Virulence Function of a Bacterial Effector in Soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jialin; Shine, M B; Gao, Qing-Ming; Navarre, Duroy; Jiang, Wei; Liu, Chunyan; Chen, Qingshan; Hu, Guohua; Kachroo, Aardra

    2014-05-28

    Enhanced disease susceptibility1 (EDS1) and phytoalexin deficient4 (PAD4) are well-known regulators of both basal and resistance (R) protein-mediated plant defense. We identified two EDS1-like (GmEDS1a/GmEDS1b) proteins and one PAD4-like (GmPAD4) protein that are required for resistance signaling in soybean (Glycine max). Consistent with their significant structural conservation to Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) counterparts, constitutive expression of GmEDS1 or GmPAD4 complemented the pathogen resistance defects of Arabidopsis eds1 and pad4 mutants, respectively. Interestingly, however, the GmEDS1 and GmPAD4 did not complement pathogen-inducible salicylic acid accumulation in the eds1/pad4 mutants. Furthermore, the GmEDS1a/GmEDS1b proteins were unable to complement the turnip crinkle virus coat protein-mediated activation of the Arabidopsis R protein Hypersensitive reaction to Turnip crinkle virus (HRT), even though both interacted with HRT. Silencing GmEDS1a/GmEDS1b or GmPAD4 reduced basal and pathogen-inducible salicylic acid accumulation and enhanced soybean susceptibility to virulent pathogens. The GmEDS1a/GmEDS1b and GmPAD4 genes were also required for Resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv glycinea2 (Rpg2)-mediated resistance to Pseudomonas syringae. Notably, the GmEDS1a/GmEDS1b proteins interacted with the cognate bacterial effector AvrA1 and were required for its virulence function in rpg2 plants. Together, these results show that despite significant structural similarities, conserved defense signaling components from diverse plants can differ in their functionalities. In addition, we demonstrate a role for GmEDS1 in regulating the virulence function of a bacterial effector.

  15. Interleukin-8 gene polymorphism –251T>A contributes to Alzheimer's disease susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Biyong; Li, Li; Wang, Shanshan; Wu, Jun; Huang, Yulan; Zhou, Ping; Bai, Jiao; Zheng, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Published association studies have investigated the correlation between interleukin-8 (IL-8) gene polymorphism –251T>A and susceptibility to Alzheimer's disease (AD); however, the results are conflicting. Thus, we conducted the meta-analysis to reassess the effect of IL-8 gene –251T>A variant on the risk of AD. Methods: Relevant studies regarding this association were electronically searched and identified from the PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, and the Chinese Biomedicine Database. The odds ratios (ORs) with the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were pooled to calculate the strength of this association. Results: Nine studies with a total of 1406 cases and 2152 controls were included in the meta-analysis. Overall, a significant association of IL-8 gene –251T>A polymorphism with increased risk of AD was observed in several genetic models (allele, A vs T: OR=1.32, 95%CI=1.16-1.50; homozygous, AA vs TT: OR=1.70, 95%CI=1.21–2.21; heterozygous, TA vs TT: OR=1.37, 95%CI=1.12–1.69; recessive, AA vs TA+TT: OR=1.40, 95%CI=1.12–1.75). Similarly, such association was also revealed both in Asian and European populations in the subgroup analysis by ethnicity. Conclusion: The current study suggested that IL-8 gene polymorphism –251T>A may contribute to the susceptibility to AD. PMID:27684880

  16. Pre-existing diseases of patients increase susceptibility to hypoxemia during gastrointestinal endoscopy.

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    Yanhua Long

    Full Text Available Hypoxemia is the most common adverse event that happened during gastrointestinal endoscopy. To estimate risk of hypoxemia prior to endoscopy, American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA classification scores were used as a major predictive factor. But the accuracy of ASA scores for predicting hypoxemia incidence was doubted here, considering that the classification system ignores much information about general health status and fitness of patient that may contribute to hypoxemia. In this retrospective review of clinical data collected prospectively, the data on 4904 procedures were analyzed. The Pearson's chi-square test or the Fisher exact test was employed to analyze variance of categorical factors. Continuous variables were statistically evaluated using t-tests or Analysis of variance (ANOVA. As a result, only 245 (5.0% of the enrolled 4904 patients were found to present hypoxemia during endoscopy. Multivariable logistic regressions revealed that independent risk factors for hypoxemia include high BMI (BMI 30 versus 20, Odd ratio: 1.52, 95% CI: 1.13-2.05; P = 0.0098, hypertension (Odd ratio: 2.28, 95% CI: 1.44-3.60; P = 0.0004, diabetes (Odd ratio: 2.37, 95% CI: 1.30-4.34; P = 0.005, gastrointestinal diseases (Odd ratio: 1.77, 95% CI: 1.21-2.60; P = 0.0033, heart diseases (Odd ratio: 1.97, 95% CI: 1.06-3.68; P = 0.0325 and the procedures that combined esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD and colonoscopy (Odd ratio: 4.84, 95% CI: 1.61-15.51; P = 0.0292; EGD as reference. It is noteworthy that ASA classification scores were not included as an independent predictive factor, and susceptibility of youth to hypoxemia during endoscopy was as high as old subjects. In conclusion, some certain pre-existing diseases of patients were newly identified as independent risk factors for hypoxemia during GI endoscopy. High ASA scores are a confounding predictive factor of pre-existing diseases. We thus recommend that youth (≤18 yrs, obese

  17. [Effects of beryllium chloride on cultured cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, T; Sakaguchi, S; Nakamura, I; Kagami, M

    1984-05-01

    The effects of beryllium on cultured cells were investigated. Three cell-lines (HeLa-S3, Vero, HEL-R66) were used in these experiments and they were cultured in Eagle's MEM plus 5 or 10% FBS (Fetal Bovine Serum) containing beryllium in various concentrations. HeLa cells or Vero cells were able to grow in the medium with 10 micrograms Be/ml (1.1 mM). On the other hand, the growth of HEL cells were strongly inhibited, even when cultured in the medium with 1 microgram Be/ml (1.1 X 10(-1) mM) and the number of living cells showed markedly low level as compared to that of the control samples cultured in the medium without beryllium. The cytotoxic effects of beryllium on these cells, which were cultured for three days in the medium with beryllium, were observed. None of cytotoxic effects were found on HeLa cells cultured with 0.5 micrograms/ml (5.5 X 10(-2) mM) and on Vero cells cultured with 0.05 micrograms Be/ml (5.5 X 10(-3) mM), while HEL cells received cytotoxic effects even when cultured in the medium containing 0.05 micrograms Be/ml (5.5 X 10(-3) mM), and these effects on the cells appeared strong when cultured in the medium without FBS. It was revealed from these experiments that HEL cells are very sensitive in terms of toxic effects of beryllium. Therefore, there cells can be used for the toxicological study on low level concentrations of the metal.

  18. New susceptibility loci associated with kidney disease in type 1 diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niina Sandholm

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic kidney disease, or diabetic nephropathy (DN, is a major complication of diabetes and the leading cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD that requires dialysis treatment or kidney transplantation. In addition to the decrease in the quality of life, DN accounts for a large proportion of the excess mortality associated with type 1 diabetes (T1D. Whereas the degree of glycemia plays a pivotal role in DN, a subset of individuals with poorly controlled T1D do not develop DN. Furthermore, strong familial aggregation supports genetic susceptibility to DN. However, the genes and the molecular mechanisms behind the disease remain poorly understood, and current therapeutic strategies rarely result in reversal of DN. In the GEnetics of Nephropathy: an International Effort (GENIE consortium, we have undertaken a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS of T1D DN comprising ~2.4 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs imputed in 6,691 individuals. After additional genotyping of 41 top ranked SNPs representing 24 independent signals in 5,873 individuals, combined meta-analysis revealed association of two SNPs with ESRD: rs7583877 in the AFF3 gene (P = 1.2 × 10(-8 and an intergenic SNP on chromosome 15q26 between the genes RGMA and MCTP2, rs12437854 (P = 2.0 × 10(-9. Functional data suggest that AFF3 influences renal tubule fibrosis via the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β1 pathway. The strongest association with DN as a primary phenotype was seen for an intronic SNP in the ERBB4 gene (rs7588550, P = 2.1 × 10(-7, a gene with type 2 diabetes DN differential expression and in the same intron as a variant with cis-eQTL expression of ERBB4. All these detected associations represent new signals in the pathogenesis of DN.

  19. New susceptibility loci associated with kidney disease in type 1 diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niina Sandholm

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic kidney disease, or diabetic nephropathy (DN, is a major complication of diabetes and the leading cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD that requires dialysis treatment or kidney transplantation. In addition to the decrease in the quality of life, DN accounts for a large proportion of the excess mortality associated with type 1 diabetes (T1D. Whereas the degree of glycemia plays a pivotal role in DN, a subset of individuals with poorly controlled T1D do not develop DN. Furthermore, strong familial aggregation supports genetic susceptibility to DN. However, the genes and the molecular mechanisms behind the disease remain poorly understood, and current therapeutic strategies rarely result in reversal of DN. In the GEnetics of Nephropathy: an International Effort (GENIE consortium, we have undertaken a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS of T1D DN comprising ~2.4 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs imputed in 6,691 individuals. After additional genotyping of 41 top ranked SNPs representing 24 independent signals in 5,873 individuals, combined meta-analysis revealed association of two SNPs with ESRD: rs7583877 in the AFF3 gene (P = 1.2 × 10(-8 and an intergenic SNP on chromosome 15q26 between the genes RGMA and MCTP2, rs12437854 (P = 2.0 × 10(-9. Functional data suggest that AFF3 influences renal tubule fibrosis via the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β1 pathway. The strongest association with DN as a primary phenotype was seen for an intronic SNP in the ERBB4 gene (rs7588550, P = 2.1 × 10(-7, a gene with type 2 diabetes DN differential expression and in the same intron as a variant with cis-eQTL expression of ERBB4. All these detected associations represent new signals in the pathogenesis of DN.

  20. New Susceptibility Loci Associated with Kidney Disease in Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsblom, Carol; Isakova, Tamara; McKay, Gareth J.; Williams, Winfred W.; Sadlier, Denise M.; Mäkinen, Ville-Petteri; Swan, Elizabeth J.; Palmer, Cameron; Boright, Andrew P.; Ahlqvist, Emma; Deshmukh, Harshal A.; Keller, Benjamin J.; Huang, Huateng; Ahola, Aila J.; Fagerholm, Emma; Gordin, Daniel; Harjutsalo, Valma; He, Bing; Heikkilä, Outi; Hietala, Kustaa; Kytö, Janne; Lahermo, Päivi; Lehto, Markku; Lithovius, Raija; Österholm, Anne-May; Parkkonen, Maija; Pitkäniemi, Janne; Rosengård-Bärlund, Milla; Saraheimo, Markku; Sarti, Cinzia; Söderlund, Jenny; Soro-Paavonen, Aino; Syreeni, Anna; Thorn, Lena M.; Tikkanen, Heikki; Tolonen, Nina; Tryggvason, Karl; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Wadén, Johan; Gill, Geoffrey V.; Prior, Sarah; Guiducci, Candace; Mirel, Daniel B.; Taylor, Andrew; Hosseini, S. Mohsen; Parving, Hans-Henrik; Rossing, Peter; Tarnow, Lise; Ladenvall, Claes; Alhenc-Gelas, François; Lefebvre, Pierre; Rigalleau, Vincent; Roussel, Ronan; Tregouet, David-Alexandre; Maestroni, Anna; Maestroni, Silvia; Falhammar, Henrik; Gu, Tianwei; Möllsten, Anna; Cimponeriu, Danut; Ioana, Mihai; Mota, Maria; Mota, Eugen; Serafinceanu, Cristian; Stavarachi, Monica; Hanson, Robert L.; Nelson, Robert G.; Kretzler, Matthias; Colhoun, Helen M.; Panduru, Nicolae Mircea; Gu, Harvest F.; Brismar, Kerstin; Zerbini, Gianpaolo; Hadjadj, Samy; Marre, Michel; Groop, Leif; Lajer, Maria; Bull, Shelley B.; Waggott, Daryl; Paterson, Andrew D.; Savage, David A.; Bain, Stephen C.; Martin, Finian; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Godson, Catherine; Florez, Jose C.; Groop, Per-Henrik; Maxwell, Alexander P.

    2012-01-01

    Diabetic kidney disease, or diabetic nephropathy (DN), is a major complication of diabetes and the leading cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) that requires dialysis treatment or kidney transplantation. In addition to the decrease in the quality of life, DN accounts for a large proportion of the excess mortality associated with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Whereas the degree of glycemia plays a pivotal role in DN, a subset of individuals with poorly controlled T1D do not develop DN. Furthermore, strong familial aggregation supports genetic susceptibility to DN. However, the genes and the molecular mechanisms behind the disease remain poorly understood, and current therapeutic strategies rarely result in reversal of DN. In the GEnetics of Nephropathy: an International Effort (GENIE) consortium, we have undertaken a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of T1D DN comprising ∼2.4 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) imputed in 6,691 individuals. After additional genotyping of 41 top ranked SNPs representing 24 independent signals in 5,873 individuals, combined meta-analysis revealed association of two SNPs with ESRD: rs7583877 in the AFF3 gene (P = 1.2×10−8) and an intergenic SNP on chromosome 15q26 between the genes RGMA and MCTP2, rs12437854 (P = 2.0×10−9). Functional data suggest that AFF3 influences renal tubule fibrosis via the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β1) pathway. The strongest association with DN as a primary phenotype was seen for an intronic SNP in the ERBB4 gene (rs7588550, P = 2.1×10−7), a gene with type 2 diabetes DN differential expression and in the same intron as a variant with cis-eQTL expression of ERBB4. All these detected associations represent new signals in the pathogenesis of DN. PMID:23028342

  1. Mineral resource of the month: beryllium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shedd, Kim B.

    2006-01-01

    Beryllium metal is lighter than aluminum and stiffer than steel. These and other properties, including its strength, dimensional stability, thermal properties and reflectivity, make it useful for aerospace and defense applications, such as satellite and space-vehicle structural components. Beryllium’s nuclear properties, combined with its low density, make it useful as a neutron reflector and moderator in nuclear reactors. Because it is transparent to most X rays, beryllium is used as X-ray windows in medical, industrial and analytical equipment.

  2. Complex Interplay of Future Climate Levels of CO2, Ozone and Temperature on Susceptibility to Fungal Diseases in Barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Bolette Lind

    Climate change will modify the environmental growth conditions for plants, and consequently also their physiology and susceptibility to diseases. However, there is a lack of experimental studies on the effect of climate change on plant diseases, which include several climatic factors in order....... The underlying mechanisms hereof was examined by studying changes in photosynthesis, accumulation of secondary metabolites and global gene expression after B. graminis attack...

  3. Preliminary results for explosion bonding of beryllium to copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, D.J. [Northwest Technical Industries, Inc., Sequim, WA (United States); Dombrowski, D.E. [Brush Wellman, Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States)

    1995-09-01

    This program was undertaken to determine if explosive bonding is a viable technique for joining beryllium to copper substrates. The effort was a cursory attempt at trying to solve some of the problems associated with explosive bonding beryllium and should not be considered a comprehensive research effort. There are two issues that this program addressed. Can beryllium be explosive bonded to copper substrates and can the bonding take place without shattering the beryllium? Thirteen different explosive bonding iterations were completed using various thicknesses of beryllium that were manufactured with three different techniques.

  4. Beryllium-stimulated apoptosis in macrophage cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, R T; Fadok, V A; Kittle, L A; Maier, L A; Newman, L S

    2000-08-21

    In vitro stimulation of bronchoalveolar lavage cells from patients with chronic beryllium disease (CBD) induces the production of TNF-alpha. We tested the hypothesis that beryllium (Be)-stimulated TNF-alpha might induce apoptosis in mouse and human macrophage cell lines. These cell lines were selected because they produce a range of Be-stimulated TNF-alpha. The mouse macrophage cell line H36.12j produces high levels of Be-stimulated TNF-alpha. The mouse macrophage cell line P388D.1 produces low, constitutive, levels of TNF-alpha and does not up-regulate Be-stimulated TNF-alpha production. The DEOHS-1 human CBD macrophage cell line does not produce constitutive or Be-stimulated TNF-alpha. Apoptosis was determined by microscopic observation of propidium iodide stained fragmented nuclei in unstimulated and BeSO(4)-stimulated macrophage cell lines. BeSO(4) induced apoptosis in all macrophage cell lines tested. Beryllium-stimulated apoptosis was dose-responsive and maximal after 24 h of exposure to 100 microM BeSO(4). In contrast, unstimulated and Al(2)(SO(4))(3)-stimulated macrophage cell lines did not undergo apoptosis. The general caspase inhibitor BD-fmk inhibited Be-stimulated macrophage cell line apoptosis at concentrations above 50 microM. Our data show that Be-stimulated macrophage cell line apoptosis was caspase-dependent and not solely dependent on Be-stimulated TNF-alpha levels. We speculate that the release of Be-antigen from apoptotic macrophages may serve to re-introduce Be material back into the lung microenvironment, make it available for uptake by new macrophages, and thereby amplify Be-stimulated cytokine production, promoting ongoing inflammation and granuloma maintenance in CBD.

  5. Characterizing brain mineral deposition in patients with Wilson disease using susceptibility-weighted imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang-Xue Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of characterizing the brain-mineral deposition in patients with Wilson disease (WD using susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI. Materials and Methods: The study enrolled 30 WD patients and 20 age-matched healthy controls. Neurological symptoms were scored using the modified Young Scale. The hepatic function indices, serum and urinary copper content, and serum iron content were determined. All study objects received the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and SWI test of the brain. The values of corrected phase (CP were calculated on SWI. The relationship between CP values and the clinical status were evaluated. Results: The serum iron content of WD patients was higher than the normal. The CP values of substantia nigra, caudate nucleus, and globus pallidus of WD were lower than the normal values, while the CP value of substantia nigra was the lowest. No correlations were determined between the CP values and the iron and copper parameters. There was negative correlation between the scores of dysarthria and the CP values of the globus pallidus. There was negative correlation between the scores of tremor and the CP values of caudate nucleus. Some regions, which had high signals on T2-weighted image, had low signals on SWI. Conclusions: There might be abnormal iron metabolism in patients with WD. The decreased CP values might reflect a deposition of both copper and iron. SWI may be more sensitive than the ordinary MRI. The mineral deposition may contribute to the neural symptoms.

  6. Susceptibility-Weighted Imaging Manifestations in the Brain of Wilson's Disease Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinjing Yang

    Full Text Available It is well known that patients with Wilson's disease (WD suffer copper metabolism disorder. However, recent studies point to an additional iron metabolism disorder in WD patients. The purpose of our study was to examine susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI manifestations of WD in the brains of WD patients.A total of 33 patients with WD and 18 normal controls underwent conventional MRI (Magnetic resonance imaging and SWI. The phase values were measured on SWI-filtered phase images of the bilateral head of the caudate nuclei, globus pallidus, putamen, thalamus, substantia nigra, and red nucleus. Student's t-tests were used to compare the phase values between WD groups and normal controls.The mean phase values for the bilateral head of the caudate nuclei, globus pallidus, putamen, thalamus, substantia nigra, and red nucleus were significantly lower than those in the control group (P < 0.001, and bilateral putamen was most strongly affected.There is paramagnetic mineralization deposition in brain gray nuclei of WD patients and SWI is an effective method to evaluate these structures.

  7. Relationships of OPG Genetic Polymorphisms with Susceptibility to Cardiovascular Disease: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, De-Hua; Zhou, Peng-Zhen; Xiu, Xiao-Lin; Zhou, Guang-Hui; Sun, Yu-Xia; Song, Chun

    2016-04-12

    BACKGROUND The aim of this meta-analysis was to determine whether genetic polymorphisms in the osteoprotegerin (OPG) gene contribute to increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). MATERIAL AND METHODS Electronic databases were searched carefully without any language restriction. Analyses of data were conducted using STATA software. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) were also calculated. RESULTS Seven clinical case-control studies that enrolled 1170 CVD patients and 1194 healthy subjects were included. The results indicated that OPG gene polymorphism might be closely associated with susceptibility to CVD, especially for rs2073617 T>C and rs2073618 G>C polymorphisms. Ethnicity-stratified analysis indicated that genetic polymorphism in the OPG were closely related with the pathogenesis of CVD among Asians (all P0.05). CONCLUSIONS Our meta-analysis provided quantitative evidence that OPG gene polymorphism may be closely related to an increased risk of CVD, especially for rs2073617 T>C and rs2073618 G>C polymorphisms.

  8. Gene Expression-Genotype Analysis Implicates GSDMA, GSDMB, and LRRC3C as Contributors to Inflammatory Bowel Disease Susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Söderman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the biological foundation of the inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease, susceptibility locus rs2872507, we have investigated the expression of 13 genes using ileal and colonic biopsies from patients with IBD (inflamed and noninflamed mucosa or from individuals without IBD (noninflamed mucosa. The susceptibility allele was consistently associated with reduced expression of GSDMB (P = 4.1 × 10−3–7.2 × 10−10. The susceptibility allele was also associated with the increased expression of GSDMA (P = 1.6 × 10−4 and LRRC3C (P = 7.8 × 10−6 in colon tissue from individuals without IBD and with the reduced expression of PGAP3 (IBD; P = 2.0 × 10−3 and ZPBP2 (Crohn’s disease; P = 7.7 × 10−4 in noninflamed ileum. Inflammation resulted in the reduced colonic expression of ERBB2, GRB7, MIEN1, and PGAP3 (P = 1.0 × 10−4–1.0 × 10−9 and the increased colonic expression of IKZF3 and CSF3 (P = 2.4 × 10−7–3.5 × 10−8. Based on our results and published findings on GSDMA, GSDMB, LRRC3C, and related proteins, we propose that this locus in part affects IBD susceptibility via effects on apoptosis and cell proliferation and believe this hypothesis warrants further experimental investigation.

  9. Contribution of rs11465788 in IL23R gene to Crohn’s disease susceptibility and phenotype in Chinese population

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chen Bin; Zeng Zhirong; Wu Xiaoqin; Chen Minhu; Li Mei; Gao Xiang; Chen Baili; Hu Pinjin

    2009-08-01

    Multiple studies have shown that IL23 cytokine plays an essential role in the development of autoimmune diseases by activating IL17-producing helper T (Th17) cells. Given that the susceptibility loci in IL23R for Crohn’s disease (CD) is present in Western population and not in Asian population; we screened the IL23R gene by DNA sequencing to identify susceptibility loci in a selected CD cohort and confirmed it in all our subjects (134 CD and 131 controls). A novel nonsynonymous SNP (p.Gly149Arg, c.445G>A) and 35 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified. Among them, only rs11465788 was implicated in CD susceptibility (P = 4.9 × 10-4, OR = 0.30). Genotype–phenotypic interaction analysis showed that rs11465788 is associated with nonstricturing and nonpenetrating disease behaviour in CD patients ($P = 0.015$). Our results provide the evidence that rs11465788 may influence the susceptibility and clinical features of CD in Chinese population.

  10. Age-associated sperm DNA methylation alterations: possible implications in offspring disease susceptibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy G Jenkins

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent evidence demonstrates a role for paternal aging on offspring disease susceptibility. It is well established that various neuropsychiatric disorders (schizophrenia, autism, etc., trinucleotide expansion associated diseases (myotonic dystrophy, Huntington's, etc. and even some forms of cancer have increased incidence in the offspring of older fathers. Despite strong epidemiological evidence that these alterations are more common in offspring sired by older fathers, in most cases the mechanisms that drive these processes are unclear. However, it is commonly believed that epigenetics, and specifically DNA methylation alterations, likely play a role. In this study we have investigated the impact of aging on DNA methylation in mature human sperm. Using a methylation array approach we evaluated changes to sperm DNA methylation patterns in 17 fertile donors by comparing the sperm methylome of 2 samples collected from each individual 9-19 years apart. With this design we have identified 139 regions that are significantly and consistently hypomethylated with age and 8 regions that are significantly hypermethylated with age. A representative subset of these alterations have been confirmed in an independent cohort. A total of 117 genes are associated with these regions of methylation alterations (promoter or gene body. Intriguingly, a portion of the age-related changes in sperm DNA methylation are located at genes previously associated with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. While our data does not establish a causative relationship, it does raise the possibility that the age-associated methylation of the candidate genes that we observe in sperm might contribute to the increased incidence of neuropsychiatric and other disorders in the offspring of older males. However, further study is required to determine whether, and to what extent, a causative relationship exists.

  11. Physiological and pathological adaptations in dairy cows that may increase susceptibility to periparturient diseases and disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan J. Loor

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Dairy cows undergo tremendous metabolic and physiological adaptations around parturition to support lactation. The liver  is central to many of these processes, including gluconeogenesis and metabolism of fatty acids mobilized from adipose tis-  sue. Fat accumulation may impair normal functions of the liver and increase ketogenesis, which in turn may predispose cows  to other metabolic abnormalities. Several aspects of dietary management and body condition may alter these adaptations,  affect dry matter intake, and increase or decrease susceptibility to periparturient health problems. Overfeeding energy dur-  ing the dry period is a prominent risk factor. Considerable progress has been made in recent years in describing the adap-  tive changes in the liver and other organs in normal and abnormal states, but this knowledge has not yet identified unequiv-  ocally the key steps that might be compromised during development of metabolic disorders. The potential role of signaling  compounds, such as the inflammatory cytokines released in response to environmental stressors, infectious challenge, and  oxidative stress, in the pathogenesis of periparturient disease is under investigation. New techniques such as functional  genomics, using cDNA or oligonucleotide microarrays, as well as proteomics and metabolomics, provide additional high-  throughput tools to determine the effects of nutrition, management, or stressors on tissue function in development of dis-  ease. Integrative approaches should be fruitful in unraveling the complex interactions of metabolism, immune activation,  stress physiology, and endocrinology that likely underlie development of periparturient disease

  12. Linkage Analysis in Autoimmune Addison's Disease: NFATC1 as a Potential Novel Susceptibility Locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Anna L; Bøe Wolff, Anette; MacArthur, Katie; Weaver, Jolanta U; Vaidya, Bijay; Erichsen, Martina M; Darlay, Rebecca; Husebye, Eystein S; Cordell, Heather J; Pearce, Simon H S

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune Addison's disease (AAD) is a rare, highly heritable autoimmune endocrinopathy. It is possible that there may be some highly penetrant variants which confer disease susceptibility that have yet to be discovered. DNA samples from 23 multiplex AAD pedigrees from the UK and Norway (50 cases, 67 controls) were genotyped on the Affymetrix SNP 6.0 array. Linkage analysis was performed using Merlin. EMMAX was used to carry out a genome-wide association analysis comparing the familial AAD cases to 2706 UK WTCCC controls. To explore some of the linkage findings further, a replication study was performed by genotyping 64 SNPs in two of the four linked regions (chromosomes 7 and 18), on the Sequenom iPlex platform in three European AAD case-control cohorts (1097 cases, 1117 controls). The data were analysed using a meta-analysis approach. In a parametric analysis, applying a rare dominant model, loci on chromosomes 7, 9 and 18 had LOD scores >2.8. In a non-parametric analysis, a locus corresponding to the HLA region on chromosome 6, known to be associated with AAD, had a LOD score >3.0. In the genome-wide association analysis, a SNP cluster on chromosome 2 and a pair of SNPs on chromosome 6 were associated with AAD (P <5x10-7). A meta-analysis of the replication study data demonstrated that three chromosome 18 SNPs were associated with AAD, including a non-synonymous variant in the NFATC1 gene. This linkage study has implicated a number of novel chromosomal regions in the pathogenesis of AAD in multiplex AAD families and adds further support to the role of HLA in AAD. The genome-wide association analysis has also identified a region of interest on chromosome 2. A replication study has demonstrated that the NFATC1 gene is worthy of future investigation, however each of the regions identified require further, systematic analysis.

  13. Linkage Analysis in Autoimmune Addison's Disease: NFATC1 as a Potential Novel Susceptibility Locus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna L Mitchell

    Full Text Available Autoimmune Addison's disease (AAD is a rare, highly heritable autoimmune endocrinopathy. It is possible that there may be some highly penetrant variants which confer disease susceptibility that have yet to be discovered.DNA samples from 23 multiplex AAD pedigrees from the UK and Norway (50 cases, 67 controls were genotyped on the Affymetrix SNP 6.0 array. Linkage analysis was performed using Merlin. EMMAX was used to carry out a genome-wide association analysis comparing the familial AAD cases to 2706 UK WTCCC controls. To explore some of the linkage findings further, a replication study was performed by genotyping 64 SNPs in two of the four linked regions (chromosomes 7 and 18, on the Sequenom iPlex platform in three European AAD case-control cohorts (1097 cases, 1117 controls. The data were analysed using a meta-analysis approach.In a parametric analysis, applying a rare dominant model, loci on chromosomes 7, 9 and 18 had LOD scores >2.8. In a non-parametric analysis, a locus corresponding to the HLA region on chromosome 6, known to be associated with AAD, had a LOD score >3.0. In the genome-wide association analysis, a SNP cluster on chromosome 2 and a pair of SNPs on chromosome 6 were associated with AAD (P <5x10-7. A meta-analysis of the replication study data demonstrated that three chromosome 18 SNPs were associated with AAD, including a non-synonymous variant in the NFATC1 gene.This linkage study has implicated a number of novel chromosomal regions in the pathogenesis of AAD in multiplex AAD families and adds further support to the role of HLA in AAD. The genome-wide association analysis has also identified a region of interest on chromosome 2. A replication study has demonstrated that the NFATC1 gene is worthy of future investigation, however each of the regions identified require further, systematic analysis.

  14. Large scale association analysis identifies three susceptibility loci for coronary artery disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Saade

    Full Text Available Genome wide association studies (GWAS and their replications that have associated DNA variants with myocardial infarction (MI and/or coronary artery disease (CAD are predominantly based on populations of European or Eastern Asian descent. Replication of the most significantly associated polymorphisms in multiple populations with distinctive genetic backgrounds and lifestyles is crucial to the understanding of the pathophysiology of a multifactorial disease like CAD. We have used our Lebanese cohort to perform a replication study of nine previously identified CAD/MI susceptibility loci (LTA, CDKN2A-CDKN2B, CELSR2-PSRC1-SORT1, CXCL12, MTHFD1L, WDR12, PCSK9, SH2B3, and SLC22A3, and 88 genes in related phenotypes. The study was conducted on 2,002 patients with detailed demographic, clinical characteristics, and cardiac catheterization results. One marker, rs6922269, in MTHFD1L was significantly protective against MI (OR=0.68, p=0.0035, while the variant rs4977574 in CDKN2A-CDKN2B was significantly associated with MI (OR=1.33, p=0.0086. Associations were detected after adjustment for family history of CAD, gender, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, and smoking. The parallel study of 88 previously published genes in related phenotypes encompassed 20,225 markers, three quarters of which with imputed genotypes The study was based on our genome-wide genotype data set, with imputation across the whole genome to HapMap II release 22 using HapMap CEU population as a reference. Analysis was conducted on both the genotyped and imputed variants in the 88 regions covering selected genes. This approach replicated HNRNPA3P1-CXCL12 association with CAD and identified new significant associations of CDKAL1, ST6GAL1, and PTPRD with CAD. Our study provides evidence for the importance of the multifactorial aspect of CAD/MI and describes genes predisposing to their etiology.

  15. Haplotype of prostaglandin synthase 2/cyclooxygenase 2 is involved in the susceptibility to inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    David G Cox; J Bart A Crusius; Petra HM Peeters; H Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita; A Salvador Pe(~n)a; Federico Canzian

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Prostaglandin G/H synthase 2 (PTGS2 or COX2) is one of the key factors in the cellular response to inflammation.PTGS2 is expressed in the affected intestinal segments of patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). In IBD patients, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, which have been shown to reduce both the production and activity of PTGS2, may activate IBD and aggravate the symptoms.We aimed at examining genetic variants of PTGS2 that may be risk factors for IBD.METHODS: We genotyped 291 individuals diagnosed with IBD and 367 controls from the Dutch population for the five most frequent polymorphisms of the PTGS2 gene.Clinical data were collected on all patients. DNA was extracted via normal laboratory methods. Genotyping was carried out using multiplex PCR followed by the Invader Assay and the 5' exonuclease assay (TaqMan). New polymorphism screening was performed by pre-screening with denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography,followed by fluorescent sequencing.RESULTS: Allele 5209G was weakly associated with Crohn's disease (odds ratio [OR] 1.63, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.03-2.57), and allele 8473T with ulcerative colitis (OR 1.50, 95%CI 1.00-2.27). The haplotype including both alleles showed a strong association with IBD (OR 13.15, 95%CI 3.17-116.15). This haplotype, while rare (-0.3%) in the general population, is found more frequently in patients (3.5%).CONCLUSION: Our data suggest that this haplotype of PTGS2 contributes to the susceptibility of IBD.

  16. Investigation of multiple susceptibility loci for inflammatory bowel disease in an Italian cohort of patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Latiano

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent GWAs and meta-analyses have outlined about 100 susceptibility genes/loci for inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD. In this study we aimed to investigate the influence of SNPs tagging the genes/loci PTGER4, TNFSF15, NKX2-3, ZNF365, IFNG, PTPN2, PSMG1, and HLA in a large pediatric- and adult-onset IBD Italian cohort. METHODS: Eight SNPs were assessed in 1,070 Crohn's disease (CD, 1,213 ulcerative colitis (UC, 557 of whom being diagnosed at the age of ≤16 years, and 789 healthy controls. Correlations with sub-phenotypes and major variants of NOD2 gene were investigated. RESULTS: The SNPs tagging the TNFSF15, NKX2-3, ZNF365, and PTPN2 genes were associated with CD (P values ranging from 0.037 to 7×10(-6. The SNPs tagging the PTGER4, NKX2-3, ZNF365, IFNG, PSMG1, and HLA area were associated with UC (P values 0.047 to 4×10(-5. In the pediatric cohort the associations of TNFSF15, NKX2-3 with CD, and PTGER4, NKX2-3, ZNF365, IFNG, PSMG1 with UC, were confirmed. Association with TNFSF15 and pediatric UC was also reported. A correlation with NKX2-3 and need for surgery (P  =  0.038, and with HLA and steroid-responsiveness (P  =  0.024 in UC patients was observed. Moreover, significant association in our CD cohort with TNFSF15 SNP and colonic involvement (P  =  0.021, and with ZNF365 and ileal location (P  =  0.024 was demonstrated. CONCLUSIONS: We confirmed in a large Italian cohort the associations with CD and UC of newly identified genes, both in adult and pediatric cohort of patients, with some influence on sub-phenotypes.

  17. Multiple independent variants in 6q21-22 associated with susceptibility to celiac disease in the Dutch, Finnish and Hungarian populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Einarsdottir, Elisabet; Bevova, Marianna R.; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Monsuur, Alienke; Koskinen, Lotta L. E.; van't Slot, Ruben; Mulder, Chris; Mearin, M. Luisa; Korponay-Szabo, Ilma R.; Kaukinen, Katri; Kurppa, Kalle; Kere, Juha; Maki, Markku; Wijmenga, Cisca; Saavalainen, Paivi

    Celiac disease is an inflammatory enteropathy caused by intolerance to gluten. Previous linkage studies in the Dutch, Finnish and Hungarian populations have revealed a locus on chromosome 6q21-22 conferring susceptibility to celiac disease. This locus has previously been implicated in susceptibility

  18. Susceptibility to infection and pathogenicity of White Spot Disease (WSD) in non-model crustacean host taxa from temperate regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, K S; Tew, I; French, C; Hicks, R J; Martin, P; Munro, J; Stentiford, G D

    2012-07-01

    Despite almost two decades since its discovery, White Spot Disease (WSD) caused by White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV) is still considered the most significant known pathogen impacting the sustainability and growth of the global penaeid shrimp farming industry. Although most commonly associated with penaeid shrimp farmed in tropical regions, the virus is also able to infect, cause disease and kill a wide range of other decapod crustacean hosts from temperate regions, including lobsters, crabs, crayfish and shrimp. For this reason, WSSV has recently been listed in European Community Council Directive 2006/88. Using principles laid down by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) we applied an array of diagnostic approaches to provide a definitive statement on the susceptibility to White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV) infection in seven ecologically or economically important crustacean species from Europe. We chose four marine species: Cancer pagurus, Homarus gammarus, Nephrops norvegicus and Carcinus maenas; one estuarine species, Eriocheir sinensis and two freshwater species, Austropotamobius pallipes and Pacifastacus leniusculus. Exposure trials based upon natural (feeding) and artificial (intra-muscular injection) routes of exposure to WSSV revealed universal susceptibility to WSSV infection in these hosts. However, the relative degree of susceptibility (measured by progression of infection to disease, and mortality) varied significantly between host species. In some instances (Type 1 hosts), pathogenesis mimicked that observed in penaeid shrimp hosts whereas in other examples (Types 2 and 3 hosts), infection did not readily progress to disease, even though hosts were considered as infected and susceptible according to accepted principles. Results arising from challenge studies are discussed in relation to the potential risk posed to non-target hosts by the inadvertent introduction of WSSV to European waters via trade. Furthermore, we highlight the potential for

  19. Age-related iron deposition in the basal ganglia of controls and Alzheimer disease patients quantified using susceptibility weighted imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dan; Li, Yan-Ying; Luo, Jian-Hua; Li, Yue-Hua

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate age-related iron deposition changes in healthy subjects and Alzheimer disease patients using susceptibility weighted imaging. The study recruited 182 people, including 143 healthy volunteers and 39 Alzheimer disease patients. All underwent conventional magnetic resonance imaging and susceptibility weighted imaging sequences. The groups were divided according to age. Phase images were used to investigate iron deposition in the bilateral head of the caudate nucleus, globus pallidus and putamen, and the angle radian value was calculated. We hypothesized that age-related iron deposition changes may be different between Alzheimer disease patients and controls of the same age, and that susceptibility weighted imaging would be a more sensitive method of iron deposition quantification. The results revealed that iron deposition in the globus pallidus increased with age, up to 40 years. In the head of the caudate nucleus, iron deposition peaked at 60 years. There was a general increasing trend with age in the putamen, up to 50-70 years old. There was significant difference between the control and Alzheimer disease groups in the bilateral globus pallidus in both the 60-70 and 70-80 year old group comparisons. In conclusion, iron deposition increased with age in the globus pallidus, the head of the caudate nucleus and putamen, reaching a plateau at different ages. Furthermore, comparisons between the control and Alzheimer disease group revealed that iron deposition changes were more easily detected in the globus pallidus. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Historical analysis of airborne beryllium concentrations at a copper beryllium machining facility (1964-2000).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAtee, B L; Donovan, E P; Gaffney, S H; Frede, W; Knutsen, J S; Paustenbach, D J

    2009-06-01

    Copper beryllium alloys are the most commonly used form of beryllium; however, there have been few studies assessing occupational exposure in facilities that worked exclusively with this alloy versus those where pure metal or beryllium oxide may also have been present. In this paper, we evaluated the airborne beryllium concentrations at a machining plant using historical industrial hygiene samples collected between 1964 and 2000. With the exception of a few projects conducted in the 1960s, it is believed that >95% of the operations used copper beryllium alloy exclusively. Long-term (>120 min) and short-term (machining of copper beryllium-containing parts, as well as finishing operations (e.g., deburring and polishing) and decontamination of machinery. A total of 580 beryllium air samples were analyzed (311 personal and 269 area samples). The average concentration based on area samples (1964-2000) was 0.021 microg m(-3) (SD 0.17 microg m(-3); range 0.00012-2.5 microg m(-3)); 68.8% were below the analytical limit of detection (LOD). The average airborne beryllium concentration, based on all personal samples available from 1964 through the end of 2000 (n = 311), was 0.026 microg m(-3) (SD 0.059 microg m(-3); range 0.019-0.8 microg m(-3)); 97.4% were below the LOD. Personal samples collected from machinists (n = 78) had an average airborne concentration of 0.021 microg m(-3) (SD 0.014 microg m(-3); range 0.019-0.14 microg m(-3)); 97.4% were below the LOD. Airborne concentrations were consistently below the Occupational Safety and Health Administration permissible exposure limit for beryllium (2 microg m(-3)). Overall, the data indicate that for machining operations involving copper beryllium, the airborne concentrations for >95% of the samples were below the contemporaneous occupational exposure limits or the 1999 Department of Energy action level of 0.2 microg m(-3) and, in most cases, were below the LOD.

  1. Differential regulation of microRNA transcriptome in chicken lines resistant and susceptible to necrotic enteritis disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yeong Ho; Dinh, Hue; Lillehoj, Hyun S; Song, Ki-Duk; Oh, Jae-Don

    2014-06-01

    Necrotic enteritis (NE) is a re-emerging disease as a result of increased restriction on the use of antibiotics in poultry. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of NE are unclear. Small RNA transcriptome analysis was performed using spleen and intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL) from 2 inbred chicken lines selected for resistance or susceptibility to Marek's disease (MD) in an experimentally induced model of avian NE to investigate whether microRNA (miRNA) control the expression of genes associated with host response to pathogen challenge. Unique miRNA represented only 0.02 to 0.04% of the total number of sequences obtained, of which 544 were unambiguously identified. Hierarchical clustering revealed that most of miRNA in IEL were highly expressed in the MD-susceptible line 7.2 compared with MD-resistant line 6.3. Reduced CXCL14 gene expression was correlated with differential expression of several unique miRNA in MD-resistant chickens, whereas TGFβR2 gene expression was correlated with altered gga-miR-216 miRNA levels in MD-susceptible animals. In conclusion, miRNA profiling and deep sequencing of small RNA in experimental models of infectious diseases may be useful for further understanding of host-pathogen interactions, and for providing insights into genetic markers of disease resistance.

  2. Association between VEGF -634G/C polymorphism and susceptibility to autoimmune diseases: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haikui; Zhang, Tianyun; Gong, Bolin; Cao, Xiaohong

    2015-03-10

    The role of VEGF -634G/C polymorphism has been involved in the investigations of susceptibility to autoimmune diseases, but the conclusion remains controversial. Here, we have performed a meta-analysis to clarify the relationship between them. All relevant articles updating to August 2013 were searched in PubMed and EMBASE. Crude odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) based on the available articles were calculated. A total of 24 independent studies associated with autoimmune disease were analyzed in our research. The results show that VEGF -634G/C polymorphism was associated with susceptibility to autoimmune disease in Asian population (C vs. G: OR=0.88, 95% CI: 0.80-0.96, P=0.543; CC vs. GG: OR=0.77, 95% CI: 0.63-0.93, P=0.787; CC+GC vs. GG: OR=0.80, 95% CI: 0.67-0.96, P=0.080 by random effects model). Nevertheless, no significant associations were found in total population or in other stratified groups. In the current meta-analysis, we reveal a significant association between VEGF -634G/C polymorphism and susceptibility to autoimmune diseases in Asian population.

  3. [Identification of mutations associated with coronary artery lesion susceptibility in Kawasaki disease by targeted enrichment of genomic region sequencing technique].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, D Y; Song, S R; Xie, L J; Qiu, F; Yang, J; Xiao, T T; Huang, M

    2017-07-02

    Objective: To screen and identify the mutations in Kawasaki disease by targeted enrichment of genomic region sequencing technique and investigate susceptibility genes associated with coronary artery lesion. Method: This was a case-control study.A total of 114 patients diagnosed as Kawasaki disease treated in Shanghai Children's Hospital between December 2015 and November 2016 were studied and another 45 healthy children who were physically examined in outpatient department were enrolled as control group. Patients were divided into two groups based on the results of echocardiogram. Peripheral venous blood was obtained from patients and controls. Genomic DNA was extracted. SeqCap EZ Choice libraries were prepared by targeted enrichment of genomic region technology. Then the libraries were sequenced to identify susceptibility genes associated with coronary artery lesion in patients diagnosed as Kawasaki disease.Susceptible genes were identified by Burden test, Pearson chi-square test or Fisher's exact probability test. Result: There was statistically significant difference in TNFRSF11B(rs2073618)G>C(p.N3K)mutation and GG/GC/CC genotype between Kawasaki disease group and control group(χ(2)=15.52, P=0.00). There was statistically significant difference in TNFRSF13B(rs34562254)C>T(p.P251L)mutation(χ(2)=10.40, P=0.01)and LEFTY1(rs360057)T>G(p.D322A)mutation(χ(2)=8.505, P=0.01)between patients with coronary artery lesions and those without. Conclusion: Targeted enrichment of genomic region sequencing technology can be used to do primary screening for the susceptible genes associated with coronary artery lesions in Chinese Kawasaki patients and may provide theoretical basis for larger sample investigation of risk prediction score standard in Kawasaki disease.

  4. Mendelian Susceptibility to Mycobacterial Disease due to IL-12Rβ1 Deficiency in Three Iranian Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shokouh azam SARRAFZADEH

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial diseases (MSMD is a rare inheritance syndrome, characterized by a disseminated infection with mycobacterium in children following BCG vaccination at birth. Regarding the vaccination program in Iran, it may consider as a public health problem. The pathogenesis of MSMD is dependent on either insufficient production of IFN-gamma (γ or inadequate response to it. Here, we want to introduce three cases including two siblings and one girl from two unrelated families with severe mycobacterial infections referred to Immunology, Asthma and Allergy Research Institute (IAARI, from 2013 to 2015; their MSMD was confirmed by both cytokine assessment and genetic analysis. Regarding the clinical features of the patients, cell proliferation against a mitogen and BCG antigen was ordered in a lymphocyte transformation test (LTT setting. ELISA was performed for the measurement of IL-12p70 and IFN- γ in whole blood samples activated by BCG + recombinant human IFN-γ and BCG + recombinant human IL-12, respectively. In contrast to mitogen, the antigen-dependent proliferation activity of the patients’ leukocytes was significantly lower than that in normal range. We identified a homozygous mutation in IL12RB1 gene for two kindred who had a homozygous mutation affecting an essential splice site. For the third patient, a novel frameshift deletion in IL12RB1 gene was found. The genetic study results confirmed the impaired function of stimulated lymphocytes to release IFN-γ following stimulation with BCG+IL-12 while the response to rhIFN-γ for IL-12p70 production was relatively intact. Our findings show that cellular and molecular assessments are needed for precise identification of immunodeficiency disorders especially those without clear-cut diagnostic criteria. Keywords: Mendelian, IL-12Rβ1 Deficiency, Interfron-gamma, Interleukin 12, Mycobacterium

  5. Longevity of animals under reactive oxygen species stress and disease susceptibility due to global warming

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Biswaranjan Paital; Sumana Kumari Panda; Akshaya Kumar Hati; Bobllina Mohanty; Manoj Kumar Mohapatra; Shyama Kanungo; Gagan Bihari Nityananda Chainy

    2016-01-01

    The world is projected to experience an approximate doubling of atmospheric CO2 concentration in the next decades. Rise in atmospheric CO2 level as one of the most important reasons is expected to contribute to raise the mean global temperature 1.4 ℃-5.8 ℃ by that time. A survey from 128 countries speculates that global warming is primarily due to increase in atmospheric CO2 level that is produced mainly by anthropogenic activities. Exposure of animals to high environmental temperatures is mostly accompanied by unwanted acceleration of certain biochemical pathways in their cells. One of such examples is augmentation in generation of reactive oxygen species(ROS) and subsequent increase in oxidation of lipids, proteins and nucleic acids by ROS. Increase in oxidation of biomolecules leads to a state called as oxidative stress(OS). Finally, the increase in OS condition induces abnormality in physiology of animals under elevated temperature. Exposure of animals to rise in habitat temperature is found to boost the metabolism of animals and a very strong and positive correlation exists between metabolism and levels of ROS and OS. Continuous induction of OS is negatively correlated with survivability and longevity and positively correlated with ageing in animals. Thus, it can be predicted that continuous exposure of animals to acute or gradual rise in habitat temperature due to global warming may induce OS, reduced survivability and longevity in animals in general and poikilotherms in particular. A positive correlation between metabolism and temperature in general and altered O2 consumption at elevated temperature in particular could also increase the risk of experiencing OS in homeotherms. Effects of global warming on longevity of animals through increased risk of protein misfolding and disease susceptibility due to OS as the cause or effects or both also cannot be ignored. Therefore, understanding the physiological impacts of global warming in relation to

  6. Longevity of animals under reactive oxygen species stress and disease susceptibility due to global warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paital, Biswaranjan; Panda, Sumana Kumari; Hati, Akshaya Kumar; Mohanty, Bobllina; Mohapatra, Manoj Kumar; Kanungo, Shyama; Chainy, Gagan Bihari Nityananda

    2016-02-26

    The world is projected to experience an approximate doubling of atmospheric CO2 concentration in the next decades. Rise in atmospheric CO2 level as one of the most important reasons is expected to contribute to raise the mean global temperature 1.4 °C-5.8 °C by that time. A survey from 128 countries speculates that global warming is primarily due to increase in atmospheric CO2 level that is produced mainly by anthropogenic activities. Exposure of animals to high environmental temperatures is mostly accompanied by unwanted acceleration of certain biochemical pathways in their cells. One of such examples is augmentation in generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and subsequent increase in oxidation of lipids, proteins and nucleic acids by ROS. Increase in oxidation of biomolecules leads to a state called as oxidative stress (OS). Finally, the increase in OS condition induces abnormality in physiology of animals under elevated temperature. Exposure of animals to rise in habitat temperature is found to boost the metabolism of animals and a very strong and positive correlation exists between metabolism and levels of ROS and OS. Continuous induction of OS is negatively correlated with survivability and longevity and positively correlated with ageing in animals. Thus, it can be predicted that continuous exposure of animals to acute or gradual rise in habitat temperature due to global warming may induce OS, reduced survivability and longevity in animals in general and poikilotherms in particular. A positive correlation between metabolism and temperature in general and altered O2 consumption at elevated temperature in particular could also increase the risk of experiencing OS in homeotherms. Effects of global warming on longevity of animals through increased risk of protein misfolding and disease susceptibility due to OS as the cause or effects or both also cannot be ignored. Therefore, understanding the physiological impacts of global warming in relation to

  7. Utility of susceptibility-weighted MRI in differentiating Parkinson's disease and atypical parkinsonism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Deepak [Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology (SCTIMST), Department of Neurology, Trivandrum, Kerala (India); Saini, Jitender; Kesavadas, Chandrasekharan [Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology (SCTIMST), Department of Imaging Sciences and Interventional Radiology, Trivandrum, Kerala (India); Sarma, P.S. [Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology (SCTIMST), Achutha Menon Centre for Health Sciences, Trivandrum, Kerala (India); Kishore, Asha [Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology (SCTIMST), Department of Neurology, Trivandrum, Kerala (India); Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology (SCTIMST), Comprehensive Care Centre for Movement Disorders, Trivandrum, Kerala (India)

    2010-12-15

    Neuropathological studies report varying patterns of brain mineralization in Parkinson's diseases (PD), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), and Parkinson variant of multiple system atrophy (MSA-P). Susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) is the ideal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique to detect mineralization of the brain. The purpose of this study was to test if SWI can differentiate PD, PSP, and MSA-P. Eleven patients with PD, 12 with PSP, 12 with MSA-P, and 11 healthy controls underwent SWI of the brain. Hypointensity of putamen, red nucleus, substantia nigra, and dentate nucleus in all groups were measured using an objective grading scale and scored from 0 to 3. In PSP, hypointensity score of red nucleus was higher than that in MSA-P (p = 0.001) and PD (p = 0.001), and a score of {>=}2 differentiated the PSP group from the PD and MSA-P groups. Putaminal hypointensity score was higher in PSP when compared to that in PD (p = 0.003), and a score of {>=}2 differentiated PSP from PD groups. SWI hypointensity scores of red nucleus and putamen had an excellent intrarater and interrater correlation. Substantia nigra hypointensity score of the PSP group was higher than that of the MSA-P (p = 0.004) and PD (p = 0.006) groups, but the scores had only a moderate intrarater and interrater correlation. SWI shows different patterns of brain mineralization in clinically diagnosed groups of PD, PSP, and MSA-P and may be considered as an additional MR protocol to help differentiate these conditions. (orig.)

  8. Role of CYP1A1 haplotypes in modulating susceptibility to coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmi, Sana Venkata Vijaya; Naushad, Shaik Mohammad; Saumya, Kankanala; Rao, Damera Seshagiri; Kutala, Vijay Kumar

    2012-10-01

    To investigate the role of cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) haplotypes in modulating susceptibility to coronary artery disease (CAD), a case-control study was conducted by enrolling 352 CAD cases and 282 healthy controls. PCR-RFLP, multiplex PCR, competitive ELISA techniques were employed for the analysis of CYP1A1 [ml (T-->C), m2 (A-->G) and m4 (C-->A)] haplotypes, glutathione-S-transferase (GST)T1/GSTM1 null variants and plasma 8-oxo-2'deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) respectively. Two CYP1A1 haplotypes, i.e. CAC and TGC showed independent association with CAD risk, while all-wild CYP1A1 haplotype i.e. TAC showed reduced risk for CAD. All the three variants showed mild linkage disequilibrium (D': 0.05 to 0.17). GSTT1 null variant also exerted independent association with CAD risk (OR: 2.53, 95% CI 1.55-4.12). Among the conventional risk factors, smoking showed synergetic interaction with CAC haplotype of CYP1A1 and GSTT1 null genotype in inflating CAD risk. High risk alleles of this pathway showed dose-dependent association with percentage of stenosis and number of vessels affected. Elevated 8-oxodG levels were observed in subjects with CYP1A1 CAC haplotype and GSTT1 null variant. Multiple linear regression model of these xenobiotic variants explained 36% variability in 8-oxodG levels. This study demonstrated the association of CYP1A1 haplotypes and GSTT1 null variant with CAD risk and this association was attributed to increased oxidative DNA damage.

  9. Association of LRRK2 exonic variants with susceptibility to Parkinson's disease: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Owen A; Soto-Ortolaza, Alexandra I; Heckman, Michael G; Aasly, Jan O; Abahuni, Nadine; Annesi, Grazia; Bacon, Justin A; Bardien, Soraya; Bozi, Maria; Brice, Alexis; Brighina, Laura; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Carr, Jonathan; Chartier-Harlin, Marie-Christine; Dardiotis, Efthimios; Dickson, Dennis W; Diehl, Nancy N; Elbaz, Alexis; Ferrarese, Carlo; Ferraris, Alessandro; Fiske, Brian; Gibson, J Mark; Gibson, Rachel; Hadjigeorgiou, Georgios M; Hattori, Nobutaka; Ioannidis, John P A; Jasinska-Myga, Barbara; Jeon, Beom S; Kim, Yun Joong; Klein, Christine; Kruger, Rejko; Kyratzi, Elli; Lesage, Suzanne; Lin, Chin-Hsien; Lynch, Timothy; Maraganore, Demetrius M; Mellick, George D; Mutez, Eugénie; Nilsson, Christer; Opala, Grzegorz; Park, Sung Sup; Puschmann, Andreas; Quattrone, Aldo; Sharma, Manu; Silburn, Peter A; Sohn, Young Ho; Stefanis, Leonidas; Tadic, Vera; Theuns, Jessie; Tomiyama, Hiroyuki; Uitti, Ryan J; Valente, Enza Maria; van de Loo, Simone; Vassilatis, Demetrios K; Vilariño-Güell, Carles; White, Linda R; Wirdefeldt, Karin; Wszolek, Zbigniew K; Wu, Ruey-Meei; Farrer, Matthew J

    2011-10-01

    Background The leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 gene (LRRK2) harbours highly penetrant mutations that are linked to familial parkinsonism. However, the extent of its polymorphic variability in relation to risk of Parkinson's disease (PD) has not been assessed systematically. We therefore assessed the frequency of LRRK2 exonic variants in individuals with and without PD, to investigate the role of the variants in PD susceptibility. LRRK2 was genotyped in patients with PD and controls from three series (white, Asian, and Arab-Berber) from sites participating in the Genetic Epidemiology of Parkinson's Disease Consortium. Genotyping was done for exonic variants of LRRK2 that were identified through searches of literature and the personal communications of consortium members. Associations with PD were assessed by use of logistic regression models. For variants that had a minor allele frequency of 0·5% or greater, single variant associations were assessed, whereas for rarer variants information was collapsed across variants. 121 exonic LRRK2 variants were assessed in 15 540 individuals: 6995 white patients with PD and 5595 controls, 1376 Asian patients and 962 controls, and 240 Arab-Berber patients and 372 controls. After exclusion of carriers of known pathogenic mutations, new independent risk associations were identified for polymorphic variants in white individuals (M1646T, odds ratio 1·43, 95% CI 1·15-1·78; p=0·0012) and Asian individuals (A419V, 2·27, 1·35-3·83; p=0·0011). A protective haplotype (N551K-R1398H-K1423K) was noted at a frequency greater than 5% in the white and Asian series, with a similar finding in the Arab-Berber series (combined odds ratio 0·82, 0·72-0·94; p=0·0043). Of the two previously reported Asian risk variants, G2385R was associated with disease (1·73, 1·20-2·49; p=0·0026), but no association was noted for R1628P (0·62, 0·36-1·07; p=0·087). In the Arab-Berber series, Y2189C showed potential evidence of risk association with

  10. Admixture mapping of end stage kidney disease genetic susceptibility using estimated mutual information ancestry informative markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geiger Dan

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The question of a genetic contribution to the higher prevalence and incidence of end stage kidney disease (ESKD among African Americans (AA remained unresolved, until recent findings using admixture mapping pointed to the association of a genomic locus on chromosome 22 with this disease phenotype. In the current study we utilize this example to demonstrate the utility of applying a multi-step admixture mapping approach. Methods A multi-step case only admixture mapping study, consisted of the following steps was designed: 1 Assembly of the sample dataset (ESKD AA; 2 Design of the estimated mutual information ancestry informative markers (n = 2016 screening panel 3; Genotyping the sample set whose size was determined by a power analysis (n = 576 appropriate for the initial screening panel; 4 Inference of local ancestry for each individual and identification of regions with increased AA ancestry using two different ancestry inference statistical approaches; 5 Enrichment of the initial screening panel; 6 Power analysis of the enriched panel 7 Genotyping of additional samples. 8 Re-analysis of the genotyping results to identify a genetic risk locus. Results The initial screening phase yielded a significant peak using the ADMIXMAP ancestry inference program applying case only statistics. Subgroup analysis of 299 ESKD patients with no history of diabetes yielded peaks using both the ANCESTRYMAP and ADMIXMAP ancestry inference programs. The significant peak was found on chromosome 22. Genotyping of additional ancestry informative markers on chromosome 22 that took into account linkage disequilibrium in the ancestral populations, and the addition of samples increased the statistical significance of the finding. Conclusions A multi-step admixture mapping analysis of AA ESKD patients replicated the finding of a candidate risk locus on chromosome 22, contributing to the heightened susceptibility of African Americans to develop non

  11. Can Genetic Analysis of Putative Blood Alzheimer's Disease Biomarkers Lead to Identification of Susceptibility Loci?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert C Barber

    Full Text Available Although 24 Alzheimer's disease (AD risk loci have been reliably identified, a large portion of the predicted heritability for AD remains unexplained. It is expected that additional loci of small effect will be identified with an increased sample size. However, the cost of a significant increase in Case-Control sample size is prohibitive. The current study tests whether exploring the genetic basis of endophenotypes, in this case based on putative blood biomarkers for AD, can accelerate the identification of susceptibility loci using modest sample sizes. Each endophenotype was used as the outcome variable in an independent GWAS. Endophenotypes were based on circulating concentrations of proteins that contributed significantly to a published blood-based predictive algorithm for AD. Endophenotypes included Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein 1 (MCP1, Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule 1 (VCAM1, Pancreatic Polypeptide (PP, Beta2 Microglobulin (B2M, Factor VII (F7, Adiponectin (ADN and Tenascin C (TN-C. Across the seven endophenotypes, 47 SNPs were associated with outcome with a p-value ≤1x10(-7. Each signal was further characterized with respect to known genetic loci associated with AD. Signals for several endophenotypes were observed in the vicinity of CR1, MS4A6A/MS4A4E, PICALM, CLU, and PTK2B. The strongest signal was observed in association with Factor VII levels and was located within the F7 gene. Additional signals were observed in MAP3K13, ZNF320, ATP9B and TREM1. Conditional regression analyses suggested that the SNPs contributed to variation in protein concentration independent of AD status. The identification of two putatively novel AD loci (in the Factor VII and ATP9B genes, which have not been located in previous studies despite massive sample sizes, highlights the benefits of an endophenotypic approach for resolving the genetic basis for complex diseases. The coincidence of several of the endophenotypic signals with known AD loci may point

  12. Characterization of plasma sprayed beryllium ITER first wall mockups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, R.G.; Vaidya, R.U.; Hollis, K.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Material Science and Technology Div.

    1998-01-01

    ITER first wall beryllium mockups, which were fabricated by vacuum plasma spraying the beryllium armor, have survived 3000 thermal fatigue cycles at 1 MW/m{sup 2} without damage during high heat flux testing at the Plasma Materials Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratory in New Mexico. The thermal and mechanical properties of the plasma sprayed beryllium armor have been characterized. Results are reported on the chemical composition of the beryllium armor in the as-deposited condition, the through thickness and normal to the through thickness thermal conductivity and thermal expansion, the four-point bend flexure strength and edge-notch fracture toughness of the beryllium armor, the bond strength between the beryllium armor and the underlying heat sink material, and ultrasonic C-scans of the Be/heat sink interface. (author)

  13. Mechanisms of hydrogen retention in metallic beryllium and beryllium oxide and properties of ion-induced beryllium nitride; Rueckhaltemechanismen fuer Wasserstoff in metallischem Beryllium und Berylliumoxid sowie Eigenschaften von ioneninduziertem Berylliumnitrid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberkofler, Martin

    2011-09-22

    In the framework of this thesis laboratory experiments on atomically clean beryllium surfaces were performed. They aim at a basic understanding of the mechanisms occurring upon interaction of a fusion plasma with a beryllium first wall. The retention and the temperature dependent release of implanted deuterium ions are investigated. An atomistic description is developed through simulations and through the comparison with calculations based on density functional theory. The results of these investigations are compared to the behaviour of hydrogen upon implantation into thermally grown beryllium oxide layers. Furthermore, beryllium nitride is produced by implantation of nitrogen into metallic beryllium and its properties are investigated. The results are interpreted with regard to the use of beryllium in a fusion reactor. (orig.)

  14. Antagonism between phytohormone signalling underlies the variation in disease susceptibility of tomato plants under elevated CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuai; Li, Xin; Sun, Zenghui; Shao, Shujun; Hu, Lingfei; Ye, Meng; Zhou, Yanhong; Xia, Xiaojian; Yu, Jingquan; Shi, Kai

    2015-04-01

    Increasing CO2 concentrations ([CO2]) have the potential to disrupt plant-pathogen interactions in natural and agricultural ecosystems, but the research in this area has often produced conflicting results. Variations in phytohormone salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) signalling could be associated with variations in the responses of pathogens to plants grown under elevated [CO2]. In this study, interactions between tomato plants and three pathogens with different infection strategies were compared. Elevated [CO2] generally favoured SA biosynthesis and signalling but repressed the JA pathway. The exposure of plants to elevated [CO2] revealed a lower incidence and severity of disease caused by tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and by Pseudomonas syringae, whereas plant susceptibility to necrotrophic Botrytis cinerea increased. The elevated [CO2]-induced and basal resistance to TMV and P. syringae were completely abolished in plants in which the SA signalling pathway nonexpressor of pathogenesis-related genes 1 (NPR1) had been silenced or in transgenic plants defective in SA biosynthesis. In contrast, under both ambient and elevated [CO2], the susceptibility to B. cinerea highly increased in plants in which the JA signalling pathway proteinase inhibitors (PI) gene had been silenced or in a mutant affected in JA biosynthesis. However, plants affected in SA signalling remained less susceptible to this disease. These findings highlight the modulated antagonistic relationship between SA and JA that contributes to the variation in disease susceptibility under elevated [CO2]. This information will be critical for investigating how elevated CO2 may affect plant defence and the dynamics between plants and pathogens in both agricultural and natural ecosystems. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  15. Antagonism between phytohormone signalling underlies the variation in disease susceptibility of tomato plants under elevated CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuai; Li, Xin; Sun, Zenghui; Shao, Shujun; Hu, Lingfei; Ye, Meng; Zhou, Yanhong; Xia, Xiaojian; Yu, Jingquan; Shi, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Increasing CO2 concentrations ([CO2]) have the potential to disrupt plant–pathogen interactions in natural and agricultural ecosystems, but the research in this area has often produced conflicting results. Variations in phytohormone salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) signalling could be associated with variations in the responses of pathogens to plants grown under elevated [CO2]. In this study, interactions between tomato plants and three pathogens with different infection strategies were compared. Elevated [CO2] generally favoured SA biosynthesis and signalling but repressed the JA pathway. The exposure of plants to elevated [CO2] revealed a lower incidence and severity of disease caused by tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and by Pseudomonas syringae, whereas plant susceptibility to necrotrophic Botrytis cinerea increased. The elevated [CO2]-induced and basal resistance to TMV and P. syringae were completely abolished in plants in which the SA signalling pathway nonexpressor of pathogenesis-related genes 1 (NPR1) had been silenced or in transgenic plants defective in SA biosynthesis. In contrast, under both ambient and elevated [CO2], the susceptibility to B. cinerea highly increased in plants in which the JA signalling pathway proteinase inhibitors (PI) gene had been silenced or in a mutant affected in JA biosynthesis. However, plants affected in SA signalling remained less susceptible to this disease. These findings highlight the modulated antagonistic relationship between SA and JA that contributes to the variation in disease susceptibility under elevated [CO2]. This information will be critical for investigating how elevated CO2 may affect plant defence and the dynamics between plants and pathogens in both agricultural and natural ecosystems. PMID:25657213

  16. Quantitative method of determining beryllium or a compound thereof in a sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCleskey, T. Mark; Ehler, Deborah S.; John, Kevin D.; Burrell, Anthony K.; Collis, Gavin E.; Minogue, Edel M.; Warner, Benjamin P.

    2010-08-24

    A method of determining beryllium or a beryllium compound thereof in a sample, includes providing a sample suspected of comprising beryllium or a compound thereof, extracting beryllium or a compound thereof from the sample by dissolving in a solution, adding a fluorescent indicator to the solution to thereby bind any beryllium or a compound thereof to the fluorescent indicator, and determining the presence or amount of any beryllium or a compound thereof in the sample by measuring fluorescence.

  17. Quantitative method of determining beryllium or a compound thereof in a sample

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCleskey, T. Mark (Los Alamos, NM); Ehler, Deborah S. (Los Alamos, NM); John, Kevin D. (Santa Fe, NM); Burrell, Anthony K. (Los Alamos, NM); Collis, Gavin E. (Los Alamos, NM); Minogue, Edel M. (Los Alamos, NM); Warner, Benjamin P. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2010-08-24

    A method of determining beryllium or a beryllium compound thereof in a sample, includes providing a sample suspected of comprising beryllium or a compound thereof, extracting beryllium or a compound thereof from the sample by dissolving in a solution, adding a fluorescent indicator to the solution to thereby bind any beryllium or a compound thereof to the fluorescent indicator, and determining the presence or amount of any beryllium or a compound thereof in the sample by measuring fluorescence.

  18. Quantitative method of determining beryllium or a compound thereof in a sample

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCleskey, T. Mark; Ehler, Deborah S.; John, Kevin D.; Burrell, Anthony K.; Collis, Gavin E.; Minogue, Edel M.; Warner, Benjamin P.

    2006-10-31

    A method of determining beryllium or a beryllium compound thereof in a sample, includes providing a sample suspected of comprising beryllium or a compound thereof, extracting beryllium or a compound thereof from the sample by dissolving in a solution, adding a fluorescent indicator to the solution to thereby bind any beryllium or a compound thereof to the fluorescent indicator, and determining the presence or amount of any beryllium or a compound thereof in the sample by measuring fluorescence.

  19. Characterisation of rapid progressors to type 1 diabetes among children with HLA-conferred disease susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pöllänen, Petra M; Lempainen, Johanna; Laine, Antti-Pekka; Toppari, Jorma; Veijola, Riitta; Vähäsalo, Paula; Ilonen, Jorma; Siljander, Heli; Knip, Mikael

    2017-07-01

    In this study, we aimed to characterise rapid progressors to type 1 diabetes among children recruited from the general population, on the basis of HLA-conferred disease susceptibility. We monitored 7410 HLA-predisposed children participating in the Finnish Type 1 Diabetes Prediction and Prevention (DIPP) study for the development of beta cell autoimmunity and type 1 diabetes from birth over a median follow-up time of 16.2 years (range 0.9-21.1 years). Islet cell antibodies (ICA) and autoantibodies to insulin (IAA), GAD (GADA) and islet antigen 2 (IA-2A) were assessed as markers of beta cell autoimmunity. Rapid progression was defined as progression to clinical type 1 diabetes within 1.5 years of autoantibody seroconversion. We analysed the association between rapid progression and demographic and autoantibody characteristics as well as genetic markers, including 25 non-HLA SNPs predisposing to type 1 diabetes. Altogether, 1550 children (21%) tested positive for at least one diabetes-associated autoantibody in at least two samples, and 248 (16%) of seroconverters progressed to type 1 diabetes by the end of 2015. The median time from seroconversion to diagnosis was 0.51 years in rapid progressors (n = 42, 17%) and 5.4 years in slower progressors. Rapid progression was observed both among young (7 years), resulting in a double-peak distribution of seroconversion age. Compared with slower progressors, rapid progressors had a higher frequency of positivity for multiple (≥2) autoantibodies and had higher titres of ICA, IAA and IA-2A at seroconversion, and there was a higher prevalence of the secretor genotype in the FUT2 gene among those carrying the high-risk HLA genotype. Compared with autoantibody-positive non-progressors, rapid progressors were younger, were more likely to carry the high-risk HLA genotype and a predisposing SNP in the PTPN22 gene, had higher frequency of ICA, IAA, GADA and IA-2A positivity and multipositivity, and had higher titres of all

  20. Electronic bistability in linear beryllium chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helal, Wissam; Monari, Antonio; Evangelisti, Stefano; Leininger, Thierry

    2009-04-30

    A theoretical investigation on the mixed-valence behavior (bistability) of a series of cationic linear chains composed of beryllium atoms, Be(N)(+) (with N = 6,..., 12), is presented. The calculations were performed at CAS-SCF and MR-CI levels by using an ANO basis set containing 6s4p3d2f orbitals for each atom. Our results show a consistent gradual shift between different classes of mixed-valence compounds as the number of beryllium atoms increases, from class III strong coupling toward class II valence trapped. Indeed, in the largest cases (N > 10), the cationic chains were found to be closer to class I, where the coupling vanishes. The intramolecular electron transfer parameters V(ab), E(a), and E(opt) were calculated for each atomic chain. It is shown that the decrease of V(ab) with increasing N follows an exponential pattern.

  1. Plasma cleaning of beryllium coated mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, L.; Marot, L.; Steiner, R.; Newman, M.; Widdowson, A.; Ivanova, D.; Likonen, J.; Petersson, P.; Pintsuk, G.; Rubel, M.; Meyer, E.; Contributors, JET

    2016-02-01

    Cleaning systems of metallic first mirrors are needed in more than 20 optical diagnostic systems from ITER to avoid reflectivity losses. Currently, plasma sputtering is considered as one of the most promising techniques to remove deposits coming from the main wall (mainly beryllium and tungsten). This work presents the results of plasma cleaning of rhodium and molybdenum mirrors exposed in JET-ILW and contaminated with typical tokamak elements (including beryllium and tungsten). Using radio frequency (13.56 MHz) argon or helium plasma, the removal of mixed layers was demonstrated and mirror reflectivity improved towards initial values. The cleaning was evaluated by performing reflectivity measurements, scanning electron microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and ion beam analysis.

  2. PIGE analysis of magnesium and beryllium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, M.; Jesus, A. P.; Luís, H.; Mateus, R.; Cruz, J.; Gasques, L.; Galaviz, D.; Ribeiro, J. P.

    2010-06-01

    In this work, we present an alternative method for PIGE analysis of magnesium and beryllium in thick samples. This method is based on the ERYA - Emitted Radiation Yield Analysis - code, which integrates the nuclear reaction excitation function along the depth of the sample. For this purpose, the excitations functions of the 25Mg(p,p'γ) 25Mg ( Eγ = 585 keV) and 9Be(p,γ) 10B ( Eγ = 718 keV) reactions were employed. Calculated gamma-ray yields were compared, at several proton energy values, with experimental yields for thick samples made of inorganic compounds containing magnesium or beryllium. The agreement is better than 5%. Taking into consideration the experimental uncertainty of the measured yields and the errors related to the stopping power values, this agreement shows that effects as the beam energy straggling, ignored in the calculation, seem to play a minor role.

  3. Dense genotyping of immune-related loci implicates host responses to microbial exposure in Behçet's disease susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Masaki; Mizuki, Nobuhisa; Meguro, Akira; Ombrello, Michael J; Kirino, Yohei; Satorius, Colleen; Le, Julie; Blake, Mary; Erer, Burak; Kawagoe, Tatsukata; Ustek, Duran; Tugal-Tutkun, Ilknur; Seyahi, Emire; Ozyazgan, Yilmaz; Sousa, Inês; Davatchi, Fereydoun; Francisco, Vânia; Shahram, Farhad; Abdollahi, Bahar Sadeghi; Nadji, Abdolhadi; Shafiee, Niloofar Mojarad; Ghaderibarmi, Fahmida; Ohno, Shigeaki; Ueda, Atsuhisa; Ishigatsubo, Yoshiaki; Gadina, Massimo; Oliveira, Sofia A; Gül, Ahmet; Kastner, Daniel L; Remmers, Elaine F

    2017-03-01

    We analyzed 1,900 Turkish Behçet's disease cases and 1,779 controls genotyped with the Immunochip. The most significantly associated SNP was rs1050502, a tag SNP for HLA-B*51. In the Turkish discovery set, we identified three new risk loci, IL1A-IL1B, IRF8, and CEBPB-PTPN1, with genome-wide significance (P < 5 × 10(-8)) by direct genotyping and ADO-EGR2 by imputation. We replicated the ADO-EGR2, IRF8, and CEBPB-PTPN1 loci by genotyping 969 Iranian cases and 826 controls. Imputed data in 608 Japanese cases and 737 controls further replicated ADO-EGR2 and IRF8, and meta-analysis additionally identified RIPK2 and LACC1. The disease-associated allele of rs4402765, the lead marker at IL1A-IL1B, was associated with both decreased IL-1α and increased IL-1β production. ABO non-secretor genotypes for two ancestry-specific FUT2 SNPs showed strong disease association (P = 5.89 × 10(-15)). Our findings extend the list of susceptibility genes shared with Crohn's disease and leprosy and implicate mucosal factors and the innate immune response to microbial exposure in Behçet's disease susceptibility.

  4. Neutron counter based on beryllium activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bienkowska, B.; Prokopowicz, R.; Kaczmarczyk, J.; Paducha, M. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion (IPPLM), Hery 23, 01-497 Warsaw (Poland); Scholz, M.; Igielski, A. [Institute of Nuclear Physics PAS (IFJPAN), Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342 Krakow (Poland); Karpinski, L. [Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Rzeszow University of Technology, Pola 2, 35-959 Rzeszow (Poland); Pytel, K. [National Centre for Nuclear Research (NCBJ), Soltana 7, 05-400 Otwock - Swierk (Poland)

    2014-08-21

    The fusion reaction occurring in DD plasma is followed by emission of 2.45 MeV neutrons, which carry out information about fusion reaction rate and plasma parameters and properties as well. Neutron activation of beryllium has been chosen for detection of DD fusion neutrons. The cross-section for reaction {sup 9}Be(n, α){sup 6}He has a useful threshold near 1 MeV, which means that undesirable multiple-scattered neutrons do not undergo that reaction and therefore are not recorded. The product of the reaction, {sup 6}He, decays with half-life T{sub 1/2} = 0.807 s emitting β{sup −} particles which are easy to detect. Large area gas sealed proportional detector has been chosen as a counter of β–particles leaving activated beryllium plate. The plate with optimized dimensions adjoins the proportional counter entrance window. Such set-up is also equipped with appropriate electronic components and forms beryllium neutron activation counter. The neutron flux density on beryllium plate can be determined from the number of counts. The proper calibration procedure needs to be performed, therefore, to establish such relation. The measurements with the use of known β–source have been done. In order to determine the detector response function such experiment have been modeled by means of MCNP5–the Monte Carlo transport code. It allowed proper application of the results of transport calculations of β{sup −} particles emitted from radioactive {sup 6}He and reaching proportional detector active volume. In order to test the counter system and measuring procedure a number of experiments have been performed on PF devices. The experimental conditions have been simulated by means of MCNP5. The correctness of simulation outcome have been proved by measurements with known radioactive neutron source. The results of the DD fusion neutron measurements have been compared with other neutron diagnostics.

  5. Neutron counter based on beryllium activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienkowska, B.; Prokopowicz, R.; Scholz, M.; Kaczmarczyk, J.; Igielski, A.; Karpinski, L.; Paducha, M.; Pytel, K.

    2014-08-01

    The fusion reaction occurring in DD plasma is followed by emission of 2.45 MeV neutrons, which carry out information about fusion reaction rate and plasma parameters and properties as well. Neutron activation of beryllium has been chosen for detection of DD fusion neutrons. The cross-section for reaction 9Be(n, α)6He has a useful threshold near 1 MeV, which means that undesirable multiple-scattered neutrons do not undergo that reaction and therefore are not recorded. The product of the reaction, 6He, decays with half-life T1/2 = 0.807 s emitting β- particles which are easy to detect. Large area gas sealed proportional detector has been chosen as a counter of β-particles leaving activated beryllium plate. The plate with optimized dimensions adjoins the proportional counter entrance window. Such set-up is also equipped with appropriate electronic components and forms beryllium neutron activation counter. The neutron flux density on beryllium plate can be determined from the number of counts. The proper calibration procedure needs to be performed, therefore, to establish such relation. The measurements with the use of known β-source have been done. In order to determine the detector response function such experiment have been modeled by means of MCNP5-the Monte Carlo transport code. It allowed proper application of the results of transport calculations of β- particles emitted from radioactive 6He and reaching proportional detector active volume. In order to test the counter system and measuring procedure a number of experiments have been performed on PF devices. The experimental conditions have been simulated by means of MCNP5. The correctness of simulation outcome have been proved by measurements with known radioactive neutron source. The results of the DD fusion neutron measurements have been compared with other neutron diagnostics.

  6. Beryllium induces premature senescence in human fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Shannon S A; Lehnert, Bruce E; Sharma, Sunil; Kindell, Susan M; Gary, Ronald K

    2007-07-01

    After cells have completed a sufficient number of cell divisions, they exit the cell cycle and enter replicative senescence. Here, we report that beryllium causes proliferation arrest with premature expression of the principal markers of senescence. After young presenescent human fibroblasts were treated with 3 microM BeSO(4) for 24 h, p21 cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor mRNA increased by >200%. Longer periods of exposure caused mRNA and protein levels to increase for both p21 and p16(Ink4a), a senescence regulator that prevents pRb-mediated cell cycle progression. BeSO(4) also caused dose-dependent induction of senescence-associated beta-galactosidase activity (SA-beta-gal). Untreated cells had 48 relative fluorescence units (RFU)/microg/h of SA-beta-gal, whereas 3 microM BeSO(4) caused activity to increase to 84 RFU/microg/h. In chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments, BeSO(4) caused p53 protein to associate with its DNA binding site in the promoter region of the p21 gene, indicating that p53 transcriptional activity is responsible for the large increase in p21 mRNA elicited by beryllium. Forced expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) rendered HFL-1 cells incapable of normal replicative senescence. However, there was no difference in the responsiveness of normal HFL-1 fibroblasts (IC(50) = 1.9 microM) and hTERT-immortalized cells (IC(50) = 1.7 microM) to BeSO(4) in a 9-day proliferation assay. The effects of beryllium resemble those of histone deacetylase-inhibiting drugs, which also cause large increases in p21. However, beryllium produced no changes in histone acetylation, suggesting that Be(2+) acts as a novel and potent pharmacological inducer of premature senescence.

  7. Computer simulation of electronic excitations in beryllium

    CERN Document Server

    Popov, A V

    2016-01-01

    An effective method for the quantitative description of the electronic excited states of polyatomic systems is developed by using computer technology. The proposed method allows calculating various properties of matter at the atomic level within the uniform scheme. A special attention is paid to the description of beryllium atoms interactions with the external fields, comparable by power to the fields in atoms, molecules and clusters.

  8. Disposal of beryllium and cadmium from research reactors; Entsorgung von Beryllium und Cadmium aus Forschungsreaktoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lierse von Gostomski, C.; Remmert, A.; Stoewer, W. [Inst. fuer Radiochemie, Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Bach, F.W.; Wilk, P.; Kutlu, I. [Inst. fuer Werkstoffkunde, Univ. Hannover, Hannover (Germany); Blenski, H.J.; Berthold, M. [Gesellschaft fuer Nuklear-Service mbH, Essen (Germany); Nerlich, K.D.; Plank, W. [TUeV Sueddeutschland Bau und Betrieb GmbH, Muenchen (Germany)

    2003-07-01

    Beryllium and cadmium mostly occur in metal form as radioactive special materials during the deconstruction of research reactors. Beryllium is usually used in these reactors as a neutron reflector and moderator, while cadmium is used above all as a neutron absorber. Both metals together have a high chemotoxicity as well as an inventory of radionuclides which has not been more closely characterised up to now. A high tritium content is to be expected, particularly in the case of beryllium; this tritium is due to the reaction of the metal with thermal reactor neutrons in particular. However, other nuclides which may be formed by neutron capture from impurities also contribute to the activity inventory. Up to now there is no qualified process for proper treatment, conditioning and intermediate and final repository in Germany. (orig.)

  9. Behavior of beryllium pebbles under irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalle-Donne, M.; Scaffidi-Argentina, F. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH Technik und Umwelt (Germany). Inst. fuer Neutronenphysik und Reactortechnik; Baldwin, D.L.; Gelles, D.S.; Greenwood, L.R.; Kawamura, H.; Oliver, B.M.

    1998-01-01

    Beryllium pebbles are being considered in fusion reactor blanket designs as neutron multiplier. An example is the European `Helium Cooled Pebble Bed Blanket.` Several forms of beryllium pebbles are commercially available but little is known about these forms in response to fast neutron irradiation. Commercially available beryllium pebbles have been irradiated to approximately 1.3 x 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2} (E>1 MeV) at 390degC. Pebbles 1-mm in diameter manufactured by Brush Wellman, USA and by Nippon Gaishi Company, Japan, and 3-mm pebbles manufactured by Brush Wellman were included. All were irradiated in the below-core area of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II in Idaho Falls, USA, in molybdenum alloy capsules containing helium. Post-irradiation results are presented on density change measurements, tritium release by assay, stepped-temperature anneal, and thermal ramp desorption tests, and helium release by assay and stepped-temperature anneal measurements, for Be pebbles from two manufacturing methods, and with two specimen diameters. The experimental results on density change and tritium and helium release are compared with the predictions of the code ANFIBE. (author)

  10. Susceptibility of Marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) to Monkeypox Virus: A Low Dose Prospective Model for Monkeypox and Smallpox Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucker, Eric M; Chapman, Jennifer; Huzella, Louis M; Huggins, John W; Shamblin, Joshua; Robinson, Camenzind G; Hensley, Lisa E

    2015-01-01

    Although current nonhuman primate models of monkeypox and smallpox diseases provide some insight into disease pathogenesis, they require a high titer inoculum, use an unnatural route of infection, and/or do not accurately represent the entire disease course. This is a concern when developing smallpox and/or monkeypox countermeasures or trying to understand host pathogen relationships. In our studies, we altered half of the test system by using a New World nonhuman primate host, the common marmoset. Based on dose finding studies, we found that marmosets are susceptible to monkeypox virus infection, produce a high viremia, and have pathological features consistent with smallpox and monkeypox in humans. The low dose (48 plaque forming units) required to elicit a uniformly lethal disease and the extended incubation (preclinical signs) are unique features among nonhuman primate models utilizing monkeypox virus. The uniform lethality, hemorrhagic rash, high viremia, decrease in platelets, pathology, and abbreviated acute phase are reflective of early-type hemorrhagic smallpox.

  11. Terpene Profile, Leaf Anatomy, and Enzyme Activity of Resistant and Susceptible Cocoa Clonesto Vascular Streak Dieback Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adi Prawoto

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Vascular-streak dieback (VSD, Oncobasidium theobromae is the most prevalent disease of Theobroma cacao L. in Indonesia. This study aims to analyze resistance mechanism to VSD based on terpene profile, leaf anatomy, chitinase, and peroxidase study. Resistant clones of Sulawesi 1 and Sca 6 and susceptible clones of ICS 60 and TSH 858 were used for terpene profile, leaf anatomy analysis, chitinase, peroxides, polyphenol, lignin, and cellulose analysis. Those clones and KEE 2, KKM 22 and ICS 13 were used for peroxides analysis. For trichome study, the resistant clones of Sulawesi 1, Sca 6, KEE 2, and KKM 22, and susceptible clones of ICS 60 and TSH 858 were used. GCMS analysis showed that chromatogram pattern of resistant and susceptible groups were quite similar, but resistant clones contained 22% more components than the susceptible ones. Resistant clones contained groups of pinene, decane, myrcene, and octadecanoic acid, while those substances on usceptible clones were absent. Trichome was thicker on younger leaf, and its density on the basal was higher than that on the middle and tip leaf parts. Trichome density of resistant clone was not always thicker than that of susceptible ones. On resistant clones, stomatal density was lower and width of stomate pits was narrower, while thickness of epidermis layer and pallisade parenchym were higher. Polyphenol content of resistant clones were higher but lignin and cellulose of both groups were similar. Chitinase activity which has a role in hydrolysis of mycelia cell wall was higher on the resistant clones, but peroxides which has a role in polymeration of lignin biosynthesis was similar between both groups. It is concluded that groups of terpene pinene, decane, myrcene, and octadecanoic acid, thickness of leaf epidermis, density and width of stomata pit, and chitinase activity plays important role in cocoa resistance to VSD. Key words: Theobroma cacaoL., clone, vascular-streak dieback, resistance, leaf

  12. High temperature and temperature variation undermine future disease susceptibility in a population of the invasive garden ant Lasius neglectus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamminger, Tobias; Steier, Thomas; Tragust, Simon

    2016-06-01

    Environmental temperature and temperature variation can have strong effects on the outcome of host-parasite interactions. Whilst such effects have been reported for different host systems, long-term consequences of pre-infection temperatures on host susceptibility and immunity remain understudied. Here, we show that experiencing both a biologically relevant increase in temperature and temperature variation undermines future disease susceptibility of the invasive garden ant Lasius neglectus when challenged with a pathogen under a constant temperature regime. In light of the economic and ecological importance of many social insects, our results emphasise the necessity to take the hosts' temperature history into account when studying host-parasite interactions under both natural and laboratory conditions, especially in the face of global change.

  13. Functionally Graded Nanophase Beryllium/Carbon Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Michael K.

    2003-01-01

    Beryllium, beryllium alloys, beryllium carbide, and carbon are the ingredients of a class of nanophase Be/Be2C/C composite materials that can be formulated and functionally graded to suit a variety of applications. In a typical case, such a composite consists of a first layer of either pure beryllium or a beryllium alloy, a second layer of B2C, and a third layer of nanophase sintered carbon derived from fullerenes and nanotubes. The three layers are interconnected through interpenetrating spongelike structures. These Be/Be2C/C composite materials are similar to Co/WC/diamond functionally graded composite materials, except that (1) W and Co are replaced by Be and alloys thereof and (2) diamond is replaced by sintered carbon derived from fullerenes and nanotubes. (Optionally, one could form a Be/Be2C/diamond composite.) Because Be is lighter than W and Co, the present Be/Be2C/C composites weigh less than do the corresponding Co/WC/diamond composites. The nanophase carbon is almost as hard as diamond. WC/Co is the toughest material. It is widely used for drilling, digging, and machining. However, the fact that W is a heavy element (that is, has high atomic mass and mass density) makes W unattractive for applications in which weight is a severe disadvantage. Be is the lightest tough element, but its toughness is less than that of WC/Co alloy. Be strengthened by nanophase carbon is much tougher than pure or alloy Be. The nanophase carbon has an unsurpassed strength-to-weight ratio. The Be/Be2C/C composite materials are especially attractive for terrestrial and aerospace applications in which there are requirements for light weight along with the high strength and toughness of the denser Co/WC/diamond materials. These materials could be incorporated into diverse components, including cutting tools, bearings, rocket nozzles, and shields. Moreover, because Be and C are effective as neutron moderators, Be/Be2C/C composites could be attractive for some nuclear applications.

  14. Histamine H(3 receptor integrates peripheral inflammatory signals in the neurogenic control of immune responses and autoimmune disease susceptibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitry N Krementsov

    Full Text Available Histamine H(3 receptor (Hrh3/H(3R is primarily expressed by neurons in the central nervous system (CNS where it functions as a presynaptic inhibitory autoreceptor and heteroreceptor. Previously, we identified an H(3R-mediated central component in susceptibility to experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE, the principal autoimmune model of multiple sclerosis (MS, related to neurogenic control of blood brain barrier permeability and peripheral T cell effector responses. Furthermore, we identified Hrh3 as a positional candidate for the EAE susceptibility locus Eae8. Here, we characterize Hrh3 polymorphisms between EAE-susceptible and resistant SJL and B10.S mice, respectively, and show that Hrh3 isoform expression in the CNS is differentially regulated by acute peripheral inflammatory stimuli in an allele-specific fashion. Next, we show that Hrh3 is not expressed in any subpopulations of the immune compartment, and that secondary lymphoid tissue is anatomically poised to be regulated by central H(3R signaling. Accordingly, using transcriptome analysis, we show that, inflammatory stimuli elicit unique transcriptional profiles in the lymph nodes of H(3RKO mice compared to WT mice, which is indicative of negative regulation of peripheral immune responses by central H(3R signaling. These results further support a functional link between the neurogenic control of T cell responses and susceptibility to CNS autoimmune disease coincident with acute and/or chronic peripheral inflammation. Pharmacological targeting of H(3R may therefore be useful in preventing the development and formation of new lesions in MS, thereby limiting disease progression.

  15. Six Novel Susceptibility Loci for Early-Onset Androgenetic Alopecia and Their Unexpected Association with Common Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Daniel; Medland, Sarah E.; Dimitriou, Maria; Waterworth, Dawn; Tung, Joyce Y.; Geller, Frank; Heilmann, Stefanie; Hillmer, Axel M.; Bataille, Veronique; Eigelshoven, Sibylle; Hanneken, Sandra; Moebus, Susanne; Herold, Christine; den Heijer, Martin; Montgomery, Grant W.; Deloukas, Panos; Eriksson, Nicholas; Heath, Andrew C.; Becker, Tim; Sulem, Patrick; Mangino, Massimo; Vollenweider, Peter; Spector, Tim D.; Dedoussis, George; Martin, Nicholas G.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Mooser, Vincent; Stefansson, Kari; Hinds, David A.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Richards, J. Brent

    2012-01-01

    Androgenetic alopecia (AGA) is a highly heritable condition and the most common form of hair loss in humans. Susceptibility loci have been described on the X chromosome and chromosome 20, but these loci explain a minority of its heritable variance. We conducted a large-scale meta-analysis of seven genome-wide association studies for early-onset AGA in 12,806 individuals of European ancestry. While replicating the two AGA loci on the X chromosome and chromosome 20, six novel susceptibility loci reached genome-wide significance (p = 2.62×10−9–1.01×10−12). Unexpectedly, we identified a risk allele at 17q21.31 that was recently associated with Parkinson's disease (PD) at a genome-wide significant level. We then tested the association between early-onset AGA and the risk of PD in a cross-sectional analysis of 568 PD cases and 7,664 controls. Early-onset AGA cases had significantly increased odds of subsequent PD (OR = 1.28, 95% confidence interval: 1.06–1.55, p = 8.9×10−3). Further, the AGA susceptibility alleles at the 17q21.31 locus are on the H1 haplotype, which is under negative selection in Europeans and has been linked to decreased fertility. Combining the risk alleles of six novel and two established susceptibility loci, we created a genotype risk score and tested its association with AGA in an additional sample. Individuals in the highest risk quartile of a genotype score had an approximately six-fold increased risk of early-onset AGA [odds ratio (OR) = 5.78, p = 1.4×10−88]. Our results highlight unexpected associations between early-onset AGA, Parkinson's disease, and decreased fertility, providing important insights into the pathophysiology of these conditions. PMID:22693459

  16. Beryllium metal II. a review of the available toxicity data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strupp, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Beryllium metal was classified in Europe collectively with beryllium compounds, e.g. soluble salts. Toxicological equivalence was assumed despite greatly differing physicochemical properties. Following introduction of the Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH) regulation, beryllium metal was classified as individual substance and more investigational efforts to appropriately characterize beryllium metal as a specific substance apart from soluble beryllium compounds was required. A literature search on toxicity of beryllium metal was conducted, and the resulting literature compiled together with the results of a recently performed study package into a comprehensive data set. Testing performed under Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development guidelines and Good Laboratory Practice concluded that beryllium metal was neither a skin irritant, an eye irritant, a skin sensitizer nor evoked any clinical signs of acute oral toxicity; discrepancies between the current legal classification of beryllium metal in the European Union (EU) and the experimental results were identified. Furthermore, genotoxicity and carcinogenicity were discussed in the context of the literature data and the new experimental data. It was concluded that beryllium metal is unlikely to be a classical nonthreshold mutagen. Effects on DNA repair and morphological cell transformation were observed but need further investigation to evaluate their relevance in vivo. Animal carcinogenicity studies deliver evidence of carcinogenicity in the rat; however, lung overload may be a species-specific confounding factor in the existing studies, and studies in other species do not give convincing evidence of carcinogenicity. Epidemiology has been intensively discussed over the last years and has the problem that the studies base on the same US beryllium production population and do not distinguish between metal and soluble compounds. It is noted that the correlation

  17. Association analysis revealed one susceptibility locus for vitiligo with immune-related diseases in the Chinese Han population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shu; Yao, Weiyi; Pan, Qian; Tang, Xianfa; Zhao, Suli; Wang, Wenjun; Zhu, Zhengwei; Gao, Jinping; Sheng, Yujun; Zhou, Fusheng; Zheng, Xiaodong; Zuo, Xianbo; Sun, Liangdan; Zhang, Anping

    2015-07-01

    Generalized vitiligo is an autoimmune disease characterized by melanocyte loss, which results in patchy depigmentation of skin and hair, and is associated with an elevated risk of other immune-related diseases. However, there is no reported study on the associations between immune susceptibility polymorphisms and the risk of vitiligo with immune-related diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential influence of 10 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 18q21.31 (rs10503019), 4p16.1 (rs11940117), 3q28 (rs1464510), 14q12 (rs2273844), 12q13.2 (rs2456973), 16q12.2 (rs3213758), 10q25.3 (rs4353229), 3q13.33 (rs59374417), and 10p15.1 (rs706779 and rs7090530) on vitiligo with immune-related diseases in the Chinese Han population. All SNPs were genotyped in 552 patients with vitiligo-associated immune-related diseases and 1656 controls using the Sequenom MassArray system. Data were analyzed with PLINK 1.07 software. The C allele of rs2456973 at 12q13.2 was observed to be significantly associated with vitiligo-associated immune-related diseases (autoimmune diseases and allergic diseases) (P = 0.0028, odds ratio (OR) = 1.27). In subphenotype analysis, the rs2456973 C allele was also significantly associated with early-onset vitiligo by comparing with controls (P = 0.0001) and in the case-only analysis (P = 0.0114). We confirmed that 12q13.2 was an important candidate locus for vitiligo with immune-related diseases (autoimmune diseases and allergic diseases) and affected disease phenotypes with early onset.

  18. Evidence for a diffusible factor that induces susceptibility in the Colletotrichum-maize disease interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Maria F; Cuadros, Diego F; Vaillancourt, Lisa J

    2014-01-01

    Colletotrichum graminicola, the causal agent of maize anthracnose, is a hemibiotrophic fungus that initially infects living host cells via primary hyphae surrounded by a membrane. A nonpathogenic mutant disrupted in a gene encoding a component of the signal peptidase complex, and believed to be deficient in protein processing and secretion, regained pathogenicity when it was inoculated onto maize leaf sheaths close to the wild-type fungus. Evidence is presented suggesting that the wild-type produces a diffusible factor(s) that induces the localized susceptibility of host cells at the borders of expanding colonies, causing them to become receptive to biotrophic invasion. The induced susceptibility effect is limited to a distance of approximately eight cells from the edge of the wild-type colony, is dosage dependent and is specific to C. graminicola. © 2013 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  19. Quantification and micron-scale imaging of spatial distribution of trace beryllium in shrapnel fragments and metallurgic samples with correlative fluorescence detection method and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, J L; Chandra, S; Agrawal, A

    2014-11-01

    Recently, a report raised the possibility of shrapnel-induced chronic beryllium disease from long-term exposure to the surface of retained aluminum shrapnel fragments in the body. Since the shrapnel fragments contained trace beryllium, methodological developments were needed for beryllium quantification and to study its spatial distribution in relation to other matrix elements, such as aluminum and iron, in metallurgic samples. In this work, we developed methodology for quantification of trace beryllium in samples of shrapnel fragments and other metallurgic sample-types with main matrix of aluminum (aluminum cans from soda, beer, carbonated water and aluminum foil). Sample preparation procedures were developed for dissolving beryllium for its quantification with the fluorescence detection method for homogenized measurements. The spatial distribution of trace beryllium on the sample surface and in 3D was imaged with a dynamic secondary ion mass spectrometry instrument, CAMECA IMS 3f secondary ion mass spectrometry ion microscope. The beryllium content of shrapnel (∼100 ppb) was the same as the trace quantities of beryllium found in aluminum cans. The beryllium content of aluminum foil (∼25 ppb) was significantly lower than cans. SIMS imaging analysis revealed beryllium to be distributed in the form of low micron-sized particles and clusters distributed randomly in X-Y- and Z dimensions, and often in association with iron, in the main aluminum matrix of cans. These observations indicate a plausible formation of Be-Fe or Al-Be alloy in the matrix of cans. Further observations were made on fluids (carbonated water) for understanding if trace beryllium in cans leached out and contaminated the food product. A direct comparison of carbonated water in aluminum cans and plastic bottles revealed that beryllium was below the detection limits of the fluorescence detection method (∼0.01 ppb). These observations indicate that beryllium present in aluminum matrix was either

  20. CD40 Gene Polymorphisms Associated with Susceptibility and Coronary Artery Lesions of Kawasaki Disease in the Taiwanese Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho-Chang Kuo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Kawasaki disease (KD is characterized by systemic vasculitis of unknown etiology. Our previous studies showed expression of CD40 ligand on CD4+ T cells correlated to the coronary artery lesion (CAL and disease progress in KD. Other studies from Japan suggested the role of CD40L in the pathogenesis of CAL, and this might help explain the excessive number of males affected with KD but cannot be reproduced by Taiwanese population. This study was conducted to investigate the CD40 polymorphism in KD and CAL formation. Methods. A total of 950 subjects (381 KD patients and 569 controls were investigated to identify 2 tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (tSNPs of CD40 (rs4810485 and rs1535045 by using the TaqMan allelic discrimination assay. Results. A significant association was noted with regards to CD40 tSNPs (rs1535045 between controls and KD patients (P=0.0405, dominant model. In KD patients, polymorphisms of CD40 (rs4810485 showed significant association with CAL formation (P=0.0436, recessive model. Haplotype analysis did not yield more significant results between polymorphisms of CD40 and susceptibility/disease activity of KD. Conclusions. This study showed for the first time that polymorphisms of CD40 are associated with susceptibility to KD and CAL formation, in the Taiwanese population.

  1. Deuterium/hydrogen isotope exchange on beryllium and beryllium nitride; Deuterium/Wasserstoff-Isotopenaustausch an Beryllium und Berylliumnitrid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dollase, Petra; Eichler, Michael; Koeppen, Martin; Dittmar, Timo; Linsmeier, Christian [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Institut fuer Energie- und Klimaforschung - Plasmaphysik (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    In the fusion experiments JET and ITER, the first wall is made up of beryllium. The use of nitrogen is discussed for radiative cooling in the divertor. This can react with the surface of the first wall to form beryllium nitride (Be{sub 3}N{sub 2}). The hydrogen isotopes deuterium and tritium, which react in the fusion reaction to helium and a neutron, are used as fuel. Since the magnetic confinement of the plasma is not perfect, deuterium and tritium ions are also found on the beryllium wall and can accumulate there. This should be avoided due to the radioactivity of tritium. Therefore the isotope exchange with deuterium is investigated to regenerate the first wall. We investigate the isotopic exchange of deuterium and protium in order to have not to work with radioactive tritium. The ion bombardment is simulated with an ion source. With voltages up to a maximum of 5 kV, deuterium and protic hydrogen ions are implanted in polycrystalline Be and Be{sub 3}N{sub 2}. The samples are then analyzed in situ using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). Subsequently, samples prepared under the same conditions are characterized ex-situ by means of nuclear reaction analysis (NRA). [German] In den Fusionsexperimenten JET und ITER besteht die erste Wand im Hauptraum aus Beryllium (Be). Zur Strahlungskuehlung im Divertor wird der Einsatz von Stickstoff diskutiert. Dieser kann mit der Oberflaeche der ersten Wand zu Berylliumnitrid (Be{sub 3}N{sub 2}) reagieren. Als Brennstoff werden die Wasserstoffisotope Deuterium und Tritium eingesetzt, die in der Fusionsreaktion zu Helium und einem Neutron reagieren. Da der magnetische Einschluss des Plasmas nicht perfekt ist, treffen auch Deuterium- und Tritiumionen auf die Berylliumwand auf und koennen sich dort anreichern. Das soll aufgrund der Radioaktivitaet von Tritium unbedingt vermieden werden. Daher wird zur Regenerierung der ersten Wand der Isotopenaustausch mit Deuterium untersucht. Wir

  2. Is nutrient intake a gender-specific cause for enhanced susceptibility to alcohol-induced liver disease in women?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagnerberger, S.; Schäfer, C.; Schwarz, E.

    2008-01-01

    of ALD in animal experiments, the hypothesis of the present retrospective cross-sectional study was that gender-dependent (micro-) nutrient intake in patients with ALD may cause the higher susceptibility of women to this disease. METHODS: In 210 patients (male: 158, female: 52) with different stages...... of ALD (ALD1: mild stage of liver damage; ALD2: moderately severe changes of the liver with signs of hepatic inflammation; ALD3: severely impaired liver function) and in 336 controls (male: 208, female: 128), nutrient intake was determined by a computer-guided diet history, and related to the severity...

  3. Is nutrient intake a gender-specific cause for enhanced susceptibility to alcohol-induced liver disease in women?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagnerberger, S.; Schafer, C.; Schwarz, E.

    2008-01-01

    of ALD in animal experiments, the hypothesis of the present retrospective cross-sectional study was that gender-dependent (micro-) nutrient intake in patients with ALD may cause the higher susceptibility of women to this disease. Methods: In 210 patients (male: 158, female: 52) with different stages...... of ALD (ALD1: mild stage of liver damage; ALD2: moderately severe changes of the liver with signs of hepatic inflammation; ALD3: severely impaired liver function) and in 336 controls (male: 208, female: 128), nutrient intake was determined by a computer-guided diet history, and related to the severity...

  4. Beryllium toxicity testing in the suspension culture of mouse fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rössner, P; Bencko, V

    1980-01-01

    Suspension culture of mouse fibroblast cell line L-A 115 was used to test beryllium toxicity in the presence of magnesium ions. Beryllium added to the MEM cultivation medium was bound in a complex with sulphosalicylic acid BeSSA complex, because the use of beryllium chloride turned out to yield ineffective beryllium phosphate that formed macroscopically detectable insoluble opacities. The BeSSA complex was used in the concentration range: 10(-3)--10(-9)M, magnesium was used in 3 concentrations: 10(-1)M, 5 x 10(-2)M and 10(-2)M. Growth curve analysis revealed pronounced beryllium toxicity at the concentration of 10(-3)M, magnesium-produced toxic changes were observed only at the concentration of 10(-1)M. No competition between the beryllium and magnesium ions was recorded. It is assumed that the possible beryllium-magnesium competition was significantly modified by the use of BeSSA complex-bound beryllium.

  5. Joining of beryllium by braze welding technique: preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banaim, P.; Abramov, E. [Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Beersheba (Israel); Zalkind, S.; Eden, S.

    1998-01-01

    Within the framework of some applications, there is a need to join beryllium parts to each other. Gas Tungsten Arc Braze Welds were made in beryllium using 0.3 mm commercially Aluminum (1100) shim preplaced at the joint. The welds exhibited a tendency to form microcracks in the Fusion Zone and Heat Affected Zone. All the microcracks were backfilled with Aluminum. (author)

  6. 10 CFR 850.20 - Baseline beryllium inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Baseline beryllium inventory. 850.20 Section 850.20 Energy... Baseline beryllium inventory. (a) The responsible employer must develop a baseline inventory of the... inventory, the responsible employer must: (1) Review current and historical records; (2) Interview...

  7. Ionization energies of beryllium in strong magnetic fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUANXiao-xu; ZHANGYue-xia

    2004-01-01

    We have develop an effective frozen core approximation to calculate energy levels and ionization enegies of the beryllium atom in magnetic field strengths up to 2.35 × 105T. Systematic improvement over the Hartree-Fock results for the beryllium low-lying states has been accomplished.

  8. Ionization energies of beryllium in strong magnetic fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUAN Xiao-xu; ZHANG Yue-xia

    2004-01-01

    We have develop an effective frozen core approximation to calculate energy levels and ionization enegies of the beryllium atom in magnetic field strengths up to 2.35×105T. Systematic improvement over the Hartree-Fock results for the beryllium low-lying states has been accomplished.

  9. IRIS TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW AND SUMMARY DOCUMENTS FOR BERYLLIUM AND COMPOUNDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA's assessment of the noncancer health effects and carcinogenic potential of Beryllium was added to the IRIS database in 1998. The IRIS program is updating the IRIS assessment for Beryllium. This update will incorporate health effects information published since the last assess...

  10. Prenatal ethanol exposure programs an increased susceptibility of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in female adult offspring rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Lang; Liu, Zhongfen; Gong, Jun; Zhang, Li [Department of Pharmacology, Basic Medical School of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Wang, Linlong [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Magdalou, Jacques [UMR 7561 CNRS-Nancy Université, Faculté de Médicine, Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy (France); Chen, Liaobin [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Wang, Hui, E-mail: wanghui19@whu.edu.cn [Department of Pharmacology, Basic Medical School of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Research Center of Food and Drug Evaluation, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China)

    2014-01-15

    Prenatal ethanol exposure (PEE) induces dyslipidemia and hyperglycemia in fetus and adult offspring. However, whether PEE increases the susceptibility to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in offspring and its underlying mechanism remain unknown. This study aimed to demonstrate an increased susceptibility to high-fat diet (HFD)-induced NAFLD and its intrauterine programming mechanisms in female rat offspring with PEE. Rat model of intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) was established by PEE, the female fetus and adult offspring that fed normal diet (ND) or HFD were sacrificed. The results showed that, in PEE + ND group, serum corticosterone (CORT) slightly decreased and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and glucose increased with partial catch-up growth; In PEE + HFD group, serum CORT decreased, while serum IGF-1, glucose and triglyceride (TG) increased, with notable catch-up growth, higher metabolic status and NAFLD formation. Enhanced liver expression of the IGF-1 pathway, gluconeogenesis, and lipid synthesis as well as reduced expression of lipid output were accompanied in PEE + HFD group. In PEE fetus, serum CORT increased while IGF-1 decreased, with low body weight, hyperglycemia, and hepatocyte ultrastructural changes. Hepatic IGF-1 expression as well as lipid output was down-regulated, while lipid synthesis significantly increased. Based on these findings, we propose a “two-programming” hypothesis for an increased susceptibility to HFD-induced NAFLD in female offspring of PEE. That is, the intrauterine programming of liver glucose and lipid metabolic function is “the first programming”, and postnatal adaptive catch-up growth triggered by intrauterine programming of GC-IGF1 axis acts as “the second programming”. - Highlights: • Prenatal ethanol exposure increase the susceptibility of NAFLD in female offspring. • Prenatal ethanol exposure reprograms fetal liver’s glucose and lipid metabolism . • Prenatal ethanol exposure cause

  11. Mutations in CARD15 and smoking confer susceptibility to Crohn's disease in the Danish population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernst, Anja; Jacobsen, Bent Ascanius; Østergaard, Mette

    2007-01-01

    Three CAspase Recruitment Domain (CARD15) mutations have shown to predispose to Crohn's disease in Caucasian populations. The aim of this study was to investigate the mutation frequency in patients with inflammatory bowel disease and in healthy controls in Denmark....

  12. Toxicological effects of beryllium on platelets and vascular endothelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togna, G; Togna, A R; Russo, P; Caprino, L

    1997-06-01

    Although ample research has described the toxic effects of the metal beryllium on the respiratory apparatus, less is known about its effects on the vascular apparatus, including pulmonary blood vessels. We investigated the in vitro effects of beryllium on endothelial vascular adenosine diphosphatase activity and prostacyclin production in bovine aortic endothelium, and on nitric oxide release in isolated rabbit arteries. Rabbit and human platelet responsiveness was also evaluated. Beryllium inhibited vascular endothelial adenosine diphosphatase activity, prostacyclin production, and nitric oxide release, thus inducing functional alterations in vascular endothelial cells. It also induced platelet hyperreactivity to arachidonic acid, as shown by a lowering of the threshold of aggregating concentration and by concurrently increasing thromboxane production. In contrast, beryllium left the response to aggregating and nonaggregating concentrations of ADP and collagen unchanged. These findings show that beryllium may impair some vascular endothelial functions and alter the interaction between platelet and endothelial mediators.

  13. Protection of air in premises and environment against beryllium aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bitkolov, N.Z.; Vishnevsky, E.P.; Krupkin, A.V. [Research Inst. of Industrial and Marine Medicine, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1998-01-01

    First and foremost, the danger of beryllium aerosols concerns a possibility of their inhalation. The situation is aggravated with high biological activity of the beryllium in a human lung. The small allowable beryllium aerosols` concentration in air poses a rather complex and expensive problem of the pollution prevention and clearing up of air. The delivery and transportation of beryllium aerosols from sites of their formation are defined by the circuit of ventilation, that forms aerodynamics of air flows in premises, and aerodynamic links between premises. The causes of aerosols release in air of premises from hoods, isolated and hermetically sealed vessels can be vibrations, as well as pulses of temperature and pressure. Furthermore, it is possible the redispersion of aerosols from dirty surfaces. The effective protection of air against beryllium aerosols at industrial plants is provided by a complex of hygienic measures: from individual means of breath protection up to collective means of the prevention of air pollution. (J.P.N.)

  14. Estimating occupational beryllium exposure from compliance monitoring data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, Michele P; Burstyn, Igor

    2011-01-01

    Occupational exposure to beryllium is widespread and is a health risk. The objectives of this study were to develop plausible models to estimate occupational airborne beryllium exposure. Compliance monitoring data were obtained from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration for 12,148 personal measurements of beryllium exposure from 1979 to 2005. Industry codes were maintained as reported or collapsed based on the number of measurements per cell of a job-exposure matrix (JEM). Probability of exposure was predicted based on year, industry, job, and sampling duration. In these models, probability of exposure decreased over time, was highest in full-shift personal samples, and varied with industry and job. The probability of exposure was calculated using 6 JEMs, each providing similar rankings of the likelihood of non-negligible exposure to beryllium. These statistical models, with expert appraisal, are suitable for the assessment of the probability of elevated occupational exposure to beryllium.

  15. Release of beryllium into artificial airway epithelial lining fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefaniak, Aleksandr B; Virji, M Abbas; Day, Gregory A

    2012-01-01

    Inhaled beryllium particles that deposit in the lung airway lining fluid may dissolve and interact with immune-competent cells resulting in sensitization. As such, solubilization of 17 beryllium-containing materials (ore, hydroxide, metal, oxide, alloys, and process intermediates) was investigated using artificial human airway epithelial lining fluid. The maximum beryllium release in 7 days was 11.78% (from a beryl ore melter dust), although release from most materials was beryllium ions may be released in the respiratory tract via dissolution in airway lining fluid. Beryllium-containing particles that deposit in the respiratory tract dissolve in artificial lung epithelial lining fluid, thereby providing ions for absorption in the lung and interaction with immune-competent cells in the respiratory tract.

  16. Immunogenetic basis of environmental lung disease: Lessons from the berylliosis model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saltini, C.; Richeldi, L. [Univ. di Modena, Dept. di Scienze Mediche, Modena (Italy); Amicosante, M. [Univ. di Roma `Tor Vergata`, Dept. di Biologia, Roma (Italy); Franchi, A. [Univ. de Modena, Dept. Medicina Interna, Modena (Italy); Lombardi, G. [Hammersmith Hospital, Dept. of Immunology, London (United Kingdom)

    1998-12-01

    The role of genetic factors has been hypothesized in the pathogenesis of a number of chronic inflammatory lung diseases. The genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) locus on human chromosome 6 have been identified as important determinants in diseases caused both by inorganic and organic compounds such as beryllium, gold, acid anhydrides, isocyanates and grass pollens. Since many environmental factors are the determinants of the immunopathogenesis of asthma, pulmonary granulomatous disorders, hypersensitivity pneumonitis and fibrotic lung disorders, an understanding of the interaction between environmental factors is crucial to epidemiology, prevention and treatment of these disorders. Berylliosis is an environmental chronic inflammatory disorder of the lung caused by inhalation of beryllium dusts. A human leukocyte antigen class II marker (HLA-DP Glu69) has been found to be strongly associated with the disease. In in vitro studies, the gene has been shown to play a direct role in the immunopathogenesis of the disease. In human studies, the gene has been shown to confer increased susceptibility to beryllium in exposed workers, thus suggesting that HLA gene markers may be used as epidemiological probes to identify population groups at higher risk of environmental lung diseases, to identify environmental levels of lung immunotoxicants that would be safe for the entire population and the prevent disease risk associated with occupation, manufactured products and the environment. Studies on the associations between human leukocyte antigens and chronic inflammatory lung disorders are reviewed in the context of the berylliosis model. (au) 123 refs.

  17. Dietary vitamin K and therapeutic warfarin alter susceptibility to vascular calcification in experimental chronic kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    The leading cause of death in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is cardiovascular disease (CVD), with vascular calcification (VC) being a key modifier of disease progression. A local regulator of vascular calcification is vitamin K. This gamma-glutamyl carboxylase substrate is an essential ...

  18. Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) gene polymorphism in vitiligo: protective and predisposing effects of genotypes in disease susceptibility and progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tippisetty, Surekha; Ishaq, Mohammed; Komaravalli, Prasanna Latha; Jahan, Parveen

    2011-01-01

    Vitiligo is a depigmenting skin disorder with profound heterogenity in its aetio-pathophysiology, and is associated with inter-individual variation in progression of disease. Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) is a regulator of renin angiotensin system (RAS) that plays an important role in the physiology of the vasculature, blood pressure, inflammation, adipocyte distribution of various diseases. The present study was carried out in 243 vitiligo patients (132 males and 111 females), aged between 3-62 years with a mean age at onset of 21.6  ±  13.6 yrs, and in 205 healthy controls of south Indian origin. The main objectives of the present study were to evaluate the ACE I/D (insertion/deletion) polymorphism in the patient and control groups. Further, I/D genotypes were compared among the patients with and without the family history of vitiligo as well as the progression of the disease, through polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods.The results revealed a highly significant association of DD genotype with disease susceptibility (p vitiligo (p < 0.05) in terms of early age at onset. Further, the pre-dominance of ID genotype among patients revealed its association with a slow progression of the disease (p < 0.05). The present study is the first report to highlight the protective role of II genotype and the significant association of ID genotype with slow progression of the disease.

  19. ZIRCONIUM-TITANIUM-BERYLLIUM BRAZING ALLOY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliland, R.G.; Patriarca, P.; Slaughter, G.M.; Williams, L.C.

    1962-06-12

    A new and improved ternary alloy is described which is of particular utility in braze-bonding parts made of a refractory metal selected from Group IV, V, and VI of the periodic table and alloys containing said metal as a predominating alloying ingredient. The brazing alloy contains, by weight, 40 to 50 per cent zirconium, 40 to 50 per cent titanium, and the balance beryllium in amounts ranging from 1 to 20 per cent, said alloy having a melting point in the range 950 to 1400 deg C. (AEC)

  20. Plasma transferred arc deposition of beryllium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollis, K.; Bartram, B.; Withers, J.; Storm, R.; Massarello, J.

    2006-12-01

    The exceptional properties of beryllium (Be), including low density and high elastic modulus, make it the material of choice in many defense and aerospace applications. However, health hazards associated with Be material handling limit the applications that are suited for its use. Innovative solutions that enable continued use of Be in critical applications while addressing worker health concerns are highly desirable. Plasma transferred arc solid free-form fabrication is being evaluated as a Be fabrication technique for civilian and military space-based components. Initial experiments producing Be deposits are reported here. Deposit shape, microstructure, and mechanical properties are reported.

  1. Neutron beams from protons on beryllium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bewley, D K; Meulders, J P; Octave-Prignot, M; Page, B C

    1980-09-01

    Measurements of dose rate and penetration in water have been made for neutron beams produced by 30--75 MeV protons on beryllium. The effects of Polythene filters added on the target side of the collimator have also been studied. A neutron beam comparable with a photon beam from a 4--8 MeV linear accelerator can be produced with p/Be neutrons plus 5 cm Polythene filtrations, with protons in the range 50--75 MeV. This is a more economical method than use of the d/Be reaction.

  2. Exome sequencing identifies DLG1 as a novel gene for potential susceptibility to Crohn's disease in a Chinese family study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shufang Xu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Genetic variants make some contributions to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, including Crohn's disease (CD and ulcerative colitis (UC. More than 100 susceptibility loci were identified in Western IBD studies, but susceptibility gene has not been found in Chinese IBD patients till now. Sequencing of individuals with an IBD family history is a powerful approach toward our understanding of the genetics and pathogenesis of IBD. The aim of this study, which focuses on a Han Chinese CD family, is to identify high-risk variants and potentially novel loci using whole exome sequencing technique. METHODS: Exome sequence data from 4 individuals belonging to a same family were analyzed using bioinformatics methods to narrow down the variants associated with CD. The potential risk genes were further analyzed by genotyping and Sanger sequencing in family members, additional 401 healthy controls (HC, 278 sporadic CD patients, 123 UC cases, a pair of monozygotic CD twins and another Chinese CD family. RESULTS: From the CD family in which the father and daughter were affected, we identified a novel single nucleotide variant (SNV c.374T>C (p.I125T in exon 4 of discs large homolog 1 (DLG1, a gene has been reported to play multiple roles in cell proliferation, T cell polarity and T cell receptor signaling. After genotyping among case and controls, a PLINK analysis showed the variant was of significance (PA (p.R278Q in exon 9 of DLG1. CONCLUSIONS: We have discovered novel genetic variants in the coding regions of DLG1 gene, the results support that DLG1 is a novel potential susceptibility gene for CD in Chinese patients.

  3. Genetic Variability in Susceptibility to Occupational Respiratory Sensitization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berran Yucesoy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory sensitization can be caused by a variety of substances at workplaces, and the health and economic burden linked to allergic respiratory diseases continues to increase. Although the main factors that affect the onset of the symptoms are the types and intensity of allergen exposure, there is a wide range of interindividual variation in susceptibility to occupational/environmental sensitizers. A number of gene variants have been reported to be associated with various occupational allergic respiratory diseases. Examples of genes include, but are not limited to, genes involved in immune/inflammatory regulation, antioxidant defenses, and fibrotic processes. Most of these variants act in combination with other genes and environmental factors to modify disease progression, severity, or resolution after exposure to allergens. Therefore, understanding the role of genetic variability and the interaction between genetic and environmental/occupational factors provides new insights into disease etiology and may lead to the development of novel preventive and therapeutic strategies. This paper will focus on the current state of knowledge regarding genetic influences on allergic respiratory diseases, with specific emphasis on diisocyanate-induced asthma and chronic beryllium disease.

  4. 40 CFR 63.11166 - What General Provisions apply to primary beryllium production facilities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... primary beryllium production facilities? 63.11166 Section 63.11166 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Primary Nonferrous Metals Area Sources-Zinc, Cadmium, and Beryllium Primary Beryllium Production Facilities § 63.11166 What General Provisions apply to primary beryllium production facilities? (a) You...

  5. Identification of RNF213 as a susceptibility gene for moyamoya disease and its possible role in vascular development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanyang Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Moyamoya disease is an idiopathic vascular disorder of intracranial arteries. Its susceptibility locus has been mapped to 17q25.3 in Japanese families, but the susceptibility gene is unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Genome-wide linkage analysis in eight three-generation families with moyamoya disease revealed linkage to 17q25.3 (P<10(-4. Fine mapping demonstrated a 1.5-Mb disease locus bounded by D17S1806 and rs2280147. We conducted exome analysis of the eight index cases in these families, with results filtered through Ng criteria. There was a variant of p.N321S in PCMTD1 and p.R4810K in RNF213 in the 1.5-Mb locus of the eight index cases. The p.N321S variant in PCMTD1 could not be confirmed by the Sanger method. Sequencing RNF213 in 42 index cases confirmed p.R4810K and revealed it to be the only unregistered variant. Genotyping 39 SNPs around RNF213 revealed a founder haplotype transmitted in 42 families. Sequencing the 260-kb region covering the founder haplotype in one index case did not show any coding variants except p.R4810K. A case-control study demonstrated strong association of p.R4810K with moyamoya disease in East Asian populations (251 cases and 707 controls with an odds ratio of 111.8 (P = 10(-119. Sequencing of RNF213 in East Asian cases revealed additional novel variants: p.D4863N, p.E4950D, p.A5021V, p.D5160E, and p.E5176G. Among Caucasian cases, variants p.N3962D, p.D4013N, p.R4062Q and p.P4608S were identified. RNF213 encodes a 591-kDa cytosolic protein that possesses two functional domains: a Walker motif and a RING finger domain. These exhibit ATPase and ubiquitin ligase activities. Although the mutant alleles (p.R4810K or p.D4013N in the RING domain did not affect transcription levels or ubiquitination activity, knockdown of RNF213 in zebrafish caused irregular wall formation in trunk arteries and abnormal sprouting vessels. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We provide evidence suggesting, for the first

  6. Identification of HAVCR1 gene haplotypes associated with mRNA expression levels and susceptibility to autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Lozano, José Raúl; Abad, Cristina; Escalera, Ana; Torres, Belén; Fernández, Olga; García, Alicia; Sánchez-Román, Julio; Sabio, José-Mario; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto; Raya-Alvarez, Enrique; Núñez-Roldán, Antonio; Martín, Javier; González-Escribano, María Francisca

    2010-08-01

    Human HAVCR1 gene maps on 5q33.2, a region linked with susceptibility to allergic and autoimmune diseases. The aims of the present study were to define the haplotypes of HAVCR1 gene taking into account both HapMap Project SNP haplotypes and exon 4 variants, to investigate a possible relationship between these haplotypes and mRNA expression levels, and to assess whether HAVCR1 gene is involved in susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Genotyping of three ins/del variants in the exon 4 was performed by fragment length analysis. Five tag SNPs genotypes and mRNA levels were determined using TaqMan assays. We defined four major haplotypes in our population: the two major haplotypes (named haplotypes A and B) bear both the 5383_5397del variant and the two most common SNP sets found in the CEU population. Quantification analysis revealed that genotype B/B had the highest median of mRNA expression levels (vs. BX + XX, p < 0.0001). Additionally, frequency of the genotype BB was significantly higher in RA patients than in controls (12.3 vs. 5.9% in controls, p = 0.0046, p (c) = 0.014, OR = 2.23, 95% CI 1.23-4.10). Our results support a relationship between HAVCR1 haplotypes and mRNA expression levels, and suggest an association of this gene with autoimmune diseases.

  7. Nutrigenomics of high fat diet induced obesity in mice suggests relationships between susceptibility to fatty liver disease and the proteasome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Waller-Evans

    Full Text Available Nutritional factors play important roles in the etiology of obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus and their complications through genotype x environment interactions. We have characterised molecular adaptation to high fat diet (HFD feeding in inbred mouse strains widely used in genetic and physiological studies. We carried out physiological tests, plasma lipid assays, obesity measures, liver histology, hepatic lipid measurements and liver genome-wide gene transcription profiling in C57BL/6J and BALB/c mice fed either a control or a high fat diet. The two strains showed marked susceptibility (C57BL/6J and relative resistance (BALB/c to HFD-induced insulin resistance and non alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD. Global gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA of transcriptome data identified consistent patterns of expression of key genes (Srebf1, Stard4, Pnpla2, Ccnd1 and molecular pathways in the two strains, which may underlie homeostatic adaptations to dietary fat. Differential regulation of pathways, including the proteasome, the ubiquitin mediated proteolysis and PPAR signalling in fat fed C57BL/6J and BALB/c suggests that altered expression of underlying diet-responsive genes may be involved in contrasting nutrigenomic predisposition and resistance to insulin resistance and NAFLD in these models. Collectively, these data, which further demonstrate the impact of gene x environment interactions on gene expression regulations, contribute to improved knowledge of natural and pathogenic adaptive genomic regulations and molecular mechanisms associated with genetically determined susceptibility and resistance to metabolic diseases.

  8. Health communication, genetic determinism, and perceived control: the roles of beliefs about susceptibility and severity versus disease essentialism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrott, Roxanne; Kahl, Mary L; Ndiaye, Khadidiatou; Traeder, Tara

    2012-08-01

    This research examined the lay public's beliefs about genes and health that might be labeled deterministic. The goals of this research were to sort through the divergent and contested meanings of genetic determinism in an effort to suggest directions for public health genomic communication. A survey conducted in community-based settings of 717 participants included 267 who self-reported race as African American and 450 who self-reported race as Caucasian American. The survey results revealed that the structure of genetic determinism included 2 belief sets. One set aligned with perceived threat, encompassing susceptibility and severity beliefs linked to genes and health. The other set represents beliefs about biological essentialism linked to the role of genes for health. These concepts were found to be modestly positively related. Threat beliefs predicted perceived control over genes. Public health efforts to communicate about genes and health should consider effects of these messages for (a) perceived threat relating to susceptibility and severity and (b) perceptions of disease essentialism. Perceived threat may enhance motivation to act in health protective ways, whereas disease essentialist beliefs may contribute to a loss of motivation associated with control over health.

  9. Association of MCP-1-2518A/G polymorphism with susceptibility to autoimmune diseases: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Si; Deng, Chuiwen; Hu, Chaojun; Li, Jing; Wen, Xiaoting; Wu, Ziyan; Li, Yuan; Zhang, Fengchun; Li, Yongzhe

    2016-05-01

    We performed a meta-analysis to estimate whether combined evidence shows the association between the MCP-1-2518A/G polymorphism and susceptibility to autoimmune diseases. Relevant articles dated to July 2014 were acquired from the PubMed, EMBASE, ISI, and CNKI databases. The number of the genotypes and/or alleles for the MCP-1-2518A/G in cases and control subjects was extracted, and statistical analysis was conducted using STATA 11.2 software. Summary odds ratios (ORs) with their 95 % confidence intervals (95 % CIs) were used to calculate the risk of autoimmune diseases with the MCP-1-2518A/G. Significant increased risk of autoimmune diseases could be found for A allele vs. G allele (OR = 1.616, 95 % CI 1.027-2.542, P = 0.038) and AA + AG vs. GG (OR = 1.616, 95 % CI 1.027-2.542, P = 0.038) in Asian patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and for A allele vs. G allele (OR = 1.383, 95 % CI 1.142-1.676, P = 0.022) and AA vs. AG + GG (OR = 1.575, 95 % CI 1.361-1.823, P < 0.001) in European patients with Crohn's disease (CD). In addition, when comparison of European patients with lupus nephritis (LN) and without LN, significant association between patients with LN and without LN also could be found for AA vs. AG + GG (OR = 0.713, 95 % CI 0.545-0.933, P = 0.014). This meta-analysis showed that the MCP-1-2518-A allele confers susceptibility to Asian patients with RA and European patients with CD.

  10. Potassium permanganate elicits a shift of the external fish microbiome and increases host susceptibility to columnaris disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Haitham H; Arias, Covadonga R

    2015-07-15

    The external microbiome of fish is thought to benefit the host by hindering the invasion of opportunistic pathogens and/or stimulating the immune system. Disruption of those microbial communities could increase susceptibility to diseases. Traditional aquaculture practices include the use of potent surface-acting disinfectants such as potassium permanganate (PP, KMnO4) to treat external infections. This study evaluated the effect of PP on the external microbiome of channel catfish and investigated if dysbiosis leads to an increase in disease susceptibility. Columnaris disease, caused by Flavobacterium columnare, was used as disease model. Four treatments were compared in the study: (I) negative control (not treated with PP nor challenged with F. columnare), (II) treated but not challenged, (III) not treated but challenged, and (IV) treated and challenged. Ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (RISA) and pyrosequencing were used to analyze changes in the external microbiome during the experiment. Exposure to PP significantly disturbed the external microbiomes and increased catfish mortality following the experimental challenge. Analysis of similarities of RISA profiles showed statistically significant changes in the skin and gill microbiomes based on treatment and sampling time. Characterization of the microbiomes using 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing confirmed the disruption of the skin microbiome by PP at different phylogenetic levels. Loss of diversity occurred during the study, even in the control group, but was more noticeable in fish subjected to PP than in those challenged with F. columnare. Fish treated with PP and challenged with the pathogen exhibited the least diverse microbiome at the end of the study.

  11. [Effect of beryllium on the morphology and chemical elements of cell membrane of Porphyromonas gingivalis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei-hong; Huang, Rui; Lin, Hua; Li, Qing-yan; Zheng, Xin-ying; Lv, Qiao; Gao, Ning

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the effect of beryllium (Be²⁺) on the morphology and chemical elements on cell membrane of Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis), thus to explore the microbiologic mechanisms of periodontal diseases. P. gingivalis was put into the culture with different Be²⁺ concentrations and anaerobically cultured for 24 hours. The morphologic change of P. gingivalis was observed under microscope and scanning electronic microscope (SEM), and chemical elements of cell membrane were observed by X-ray energy dispersion spectrum (EDS). The data was statistically analyzed with SPSS13.0 software package. The morphology of P.gingivalis altered obviously at the concentration greater than 2.5 mg/L, which was manifested by the sharpness of border and depression on the surface. With the increased concentration of beryllium, the Na and Ca peak descended on the surface of P. gingivalis. Beryllium can interfere with the morphology of P. gingivalis, and lead to the changes of chemical elements on cell membrane of P. gingivalis, which may result in a disturbance in the microecologic balance of subgingival microbes and eventually contribute to periodontal diseases.

  12. Mining susceptibility gene modules and disease risk genes from SNP data by combining network topological properties with support vector regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Lin; Zhou, Ping; Liu, Hong; Li, Lin; Yang, Zheng; Liu, Zhi-cheng

    2011-11-21

    Genome-wide association study is a powerful approach to identify disease risk loci. However, the molecular regulatory mechanisms for most complex diseases are still not well understood. Therefore, further investigating the interplay between genetic factors and biological networks is important for elucidating the molecular mechanisms of complex diseases. Here, we proposed a novel framework to identify susceptibility gene modules and disease risk genes by combining network topological properties with support vector regression from single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) level. We assigned risk SNPs to genes using the University of California at Santa Cruz (UCSC) genome database, and then mapped these genes to protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks. The gene modules implicated by hub genes were extracted using the PPI networks and the topological property was analyzed for these gene modules. For each gene module, risk feature genes were determined by topological property analysis and support vector regression. As a result, five shared risk feature genes, CD80, EGFR, FN1, GSK3B and TRAF6 were found and proven to be associated with rheumatoid arthritis by previous reports. Our approach showed a good performance in comparison with other approaches and can be used for prioritizing candidate genes associated with complex diseases.

  13. Meta-analysis of 74,046 individuals identifies 11 new susceptibility loci for Alzheimer’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Jean-Charles; Ibrahim-Verbaas, Carla A; Harold, Denise; Naj, Adam C; Sims, Rebecca; Bellenguez, Céline; Jun, Gyungah; DeStefano, Anita L; Bis, Joshua C; Beecham, Gary W; Grenier-Boley, Benjamin; Russo, Giancarlo; Thornton-Wells, Tricia A; Jones, Nicola; Smith, Albert V; Chouraki, Vincent; Thomas, Charlene; Ikram, M Arfan; Zelenika, Diana; Vardarajan, Badri N; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Lin, Chiao-Feng; Gerrish, Amy; Schmidt, Helena; Kunkle, Brian; Dunstan, Melanie L; Ruiz, Agustin; Bihoreau, Marie-Thérèse; Choi, Seung-Hoan; Reitz, Christiane; Pasquier, Florence; Hollingworth, Paul; Ramirez, Alfredo; Hanon, Olivier; Fitzpatrick, Annette L; Buxbaum, Joseph D; Campion, Dominique; Crane, Paul K; Baldwin, Clinton; Becker, Tim; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Cruchaga, Carlos; Craig, David; Amin, Najaf; Berr, Claudine; Lopez, Oscar L; De Jager, Philip L; Deramecourt, Vincent; Johnston, Janet A; Evans, Denis; Lovestone, Simon; Letenneur, Luc; Morón, Francisco J; Rubinsztein, David C; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Sleegers, Kristel; Goate, Alison M; Fiévet, Nathalie; Huentelman, Matthew J; Gill, Michael; Brown, Kristelle; Kamboh, M Ilyas; Keller, Lina; Barberger-Gateau, Pascale; McGuinness, Bernadette; Larson, Eric B; Green, Robert; Myers, Amanda J; Dufouil, Carole; Todd, Stephen; Wallon, David; Love, Seth; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; Gallacher, John; St George-Hyslop, Peter; Clarimon, Jordi; Lleo, Alberto; Bayer, Anthony; Tsuang, Debby W; Yu, Lei; Tsolaki, Magda; Bossù, Paola; Spalletta, Gianfranco; Proitsi, Petroula; Collinge, John; Sorbi, Sandro; Sanchez-Garcia, Florentino; Fox, Nick C; Hardy, John; Deniz Naranjo, Maria Candida; Bosco, Paolo; Clarke, Robert; Brayne, Carol; Galimberti, Daniela; Mancuso, Michelangelo; Matthews, Fiona; Moebus, Susanne; Mecocci, Patrizia; Zompo, Maria Del; Maier, Wolfgang; Hampel, Harald; Pilotto, Alberto; Bullido, Maria; Panza, Francesco; Caffarra, Paolo; Nacmias, Benedetta; Gilbert, John R; Mayhaus, Manuel; Lannfelt, Lars; Hakonarson, Hakon; Pichler, Sabrina; Carrasquillo, Minerva M; Ingelsson, Martin; Beekly, Duane; Alvarez, Victoria; Zou, Fanggeng; Valladares, Otto; Younkin, Steven G; Coto, Eliecer; Hamilton-Nelson, Kara L; Gu, Wei; Razquin, Cristina; Pastor, Pau; Mateo, Ignacio; Owen, Michael J; Faber, Kelley M; Jonsson, Palmi V; Combarros, Onofre; O’Donovan, Michael C; Cantwell, Laura B; Soininen, Hilkka; Blacker, Deborah; Mead, Simon; Mosley, Thomas H; Bennett, David A; Harris, Tamara B; Fratiglioni, Laura; Holmes, Clive; de Bruijn, Renee F A G; Passmore, Peter; Montine, Thomas J; Bettens, Karolien; Rotter, Jerome I; Brice, Alexis; Morgan, Kevin; Foroud, Tatiana M; Kukull, Walter A; Hannequin, Didier; Powell, John F; Nalls, Michael A; Ritchie, Karen; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Kauwe, John S K; Boerwinkle, Eric; Riemenschneider, Matthias; Boada, Mercè; Hiltunen, Mikko; Martin, Eden R; Schmidt, Reinhold; Rujescu, Dan; Wang, Li-san; Dartigues, Jean-François; Mayeux, Richard; Tzourio, Christophe; Hofman, Albert; Nöthen, Markus M; Graff, Caroline; Psaty, Bruce M; Jones, Lesley; Haines, Jonathan L; Holmans, Peter A; Lathrop, Mark; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Launer, Lenore J; Farrer, Lindsay A; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Moskvina, Valentina; Seshadri, Sudha; Williams, Julie; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Amouyel, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Eleven susceptibility loci for late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (LOAD) were identified by previous studies; however, a large portion of the genetic risk for this disease remains unexplained. We conducted a large, two-stage meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in individuals of European ancestry. In stage 1, we used genotyped and imputed data (7,055,881 SNPs) to perform meta-analysis on 4 previously published GWAS data sets consisting of 17,008 Alzheimer’s disease cases and 37,154 controls. In stage 2,11,632 SNPs were genotyped and tested for association in an independent set of 8,572 Alzheimer’s disease cases and 11,312 controls. In addition to the APOE locus (encoding apolipoprotein E), 19 loci reached genome-wide significance (P < 5 × 10−8) in the combined stage 1 and stage 2 analysis, of which 11 are newly associated with Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:24162737

  14. Drug susceptibility testing and pharmacokinetics question current treatment regimens in Mycobacterium simiae complex disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingen, J. van; Totten, S.E.; Heifets, L.B.; Boeree, M.J.; Daley, C.L.

    2012-01-01

    The Mycobacterium simiae complex bacteria can cause opportunistic infections in humans. In the case of definite disease, there are no evidence-based treatment regimens and outcomes are very disappointing. To increase the evidence base underpinning treatment regimens for M. simiae complex disease, dr

  15. Comparisons of protein profiles of beech bark disease resistant and susceptible American beech (Fagus grandifolia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mary E. Mason; Jennifer L. Koch; Marek Krasowski; Judy. Loo

    2013-01-01

    Beech bark disease is an insect-fungus complex that damages and often kills American beech trees and has major ecological and economic impacts on forests of the northeastern United States and southeastern Canadian forests. The disease begins when exotic beech scale insects feed on the bark of trees, and is followed by infection of damaged bark tissues by one of the...

  16. Identification of a shared genetic susceptibility locus for coronary heart disease and periodontitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaefer, A.S.; Richter, G.M.; Groessner-Schreiber, B.; Noack, D.; Nothnagel, M.; El Mokhtari, N.E.; Loos, B.G.; Jepsen, S.; Schreiber, S.

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies indicate a mutual epidemiological relationship between coronary heart disease (CHD) and periodontitis. Both diseases are associated with similar risk factors and are characterized by a chronic inflammatory process. In a candidate-gene association study, we identify an association of a

  17. New susceptibility loci associated with kidney disease in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandholm, Niina; Salem, Rany M; McKnight, Amy Jayne

    2012-01-01

    Diabetic kidney disease, or diabetic nephropathy (DN), is a major complication of diabetes and the leading cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) that requires dialysis treatment or kidney transplantation. In addition to the decrease in the quality of life, DN accounts for a large proportion of ...

  18. Susceptibility to development of Mycobacterium ulcerans disease : Review of possible risk factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stienstra, Y; van der Graaf, W T; te Meerman, G J; The, T H; de Leij, L F; van der Werf, T S

    2001-01-01

    Mycobacterium ulcerans disease, also known as Buruli ulcer (BU), is a disease of subcutaneous fat tissue. BU is prevalent in riverine and swamp areas of the tropical zone in Africa, Asia and South America, and a few scattered foci in Australia. The mode of transmission of M. ulcerans has not been fu

  19. Human neurocysticercosis: immunological features involved in the host's susceptibility to become infected and to develop disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciutto, Edda; Cárdenas, Graciela; Adalid-Peralta, Laura; Fragoso, Gladis; Larralde, Carlos; Fleury, Agnes

    2013-06-01

    Human neurocysticercosis (NC) is a clinically and radiologically heterogeneous disease caused by the establishment of Taenia solium larvae in the central nervous system. Herein, the immunological and endocrinological features involved in resistance to infection and severe forms of the disease are reviewed, and their clinical relevance is discussed.

  20. WNT2 Locus Is Involved in Genetic Susceptibility of Peyronie's Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolmans, Guido H.; Werker, Paul M.; de Jong, Igle J.; Nijman, Rien J.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Ophoff, Roel A.

    Introduction. Peyronie's disease (PD) is a fibromatosis of the penis, with a pathology very similar to what is seen in the hand (palmar fascia) in Dupuytren's disease (DD). Recently, we performed a genome-wide association study and identified nine genetic loci containing common variants associated

  1. WNT2 Locus Is Involved in Genetic Susceptibility of Peyronie's Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolmans, Guido H.; Werker, Paul M.; de Jong, Igle J.; Nijman, Rien J.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Ophoff, Roel A.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Peyronie's disease (PD) is a fibromatosis of the penis, with a pathology very similar to what is seen in the hand (palmar fascia) in Dupuytren's disease (DD). Recently, we performed a genome-wide association study and identified nine genetic loci containing common variants associated w

  2. Identification of a shared genetic susceptibility locus for coronary heart disease and periodontitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaefer, A.S.; Richter, G.M.; Groessner-Schreiber, B.; Noack, D.; Nothnagel, M.; El Mokhtari, N.E.; Loos, B.G.; Jepsen, S.; Schreiber, S.

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies indicate a mutual epidemiological relationship between coronary heart disease (CHD) and periodontitis. Both diseases are associated with similar risk factors and are characterized by a chronic inflammatory process. In a candidate-gene association study, we identify an association of a

  3. Six novel susceptibility Loci for early-onset androgenetic alopecia and their unexpected association with common diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Li

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Androgenetic alopecia (AGA is a highly heritable condition and the most common form of hair loss in humans. Susceptibility loci have been described on the X chromosome and chromosome 20, but these loci explain a minority of its heritable variance. We conducted a large-scale meta-analysis of seven genome-wide association studies for early-onset AGA in 12,806 individuals of European ancestry. While replicating the two AGA loci on the X chromosome and chromosome 20, six novel susceptibility loci reached genome-wide significance (p = 2.62×10⁻⁹-1.01×10⁻¹². Unexpectedly, we identified a risk allele at 17q21.31 that was recently associated with Parkinson's disease (PD at a genome-wide significant level. We then tested the association between early-onset AGA and the risk of PD in a cross-sectional analysis of 568 PD cases and 7,664 controls. Early-onset AGA cases had significantly increased odds of subsequent PD (OR = 1.28, 95% confidence interval: 1.06-1.55, p = 8.9×10⁻³. Further, the AGA susceptibility alleles at the 17q21.31 locus are on the H1 haplotype, which is under negative selection in Europeans and has been linked to decreased fertility. Combining the risk alleles of six novel and two established susceptibility loci, we created a genotype risk score and tested its association with AGA in an additional sample. Individuals in the highest risk quartile of a genotype score had an approximately six-fold increased risk of early-onset AGA [odds ratio (OR = 5.78, p = 1.4×10⁻⁸⁸]. Our results highlight unexpected associations between early-onset AGA, Parkinson's disease, and decreased fertility, providing important insights into the pathophysiology of these conditions.

  4. Two HLA DRB 1 alleles confer independent genetic susceptibility to Graves disease: relevance of cross-population studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marga, M; Denisova, A; Sochnev, A; Pirags, V; Farid, N R

    2001-08-01

    Recent studies of Graves disease (GD) employing genome scanning techniques excluded the major histocompatibility complex as a contributor to disease liability. These findings contradict earlier population association studies. Our own earlier studies have also emphasized that genetic variation in human populations may give novel clues to disease liability and manifestations. To this end, we studied HLA class II alleles in 47 Latvian GD patients and 111 matched healthy controls. As expected, we found that DRB1*03 and DQA1*0501 (OR = 3.6, P = 0.029 and OR 2.35, P = 0.0373, respectively) were associated with GD. Unforeseen, DRB1*04 was found to be significantly increased in the patients compared to controls (OR 3.267, corrected P = 0.0319). The two DRB1 alleles conferred two non-overlapping and independent susceptibilities to GD, in that only three patients were positive for both alleles, and the removal of each allele in turn resulted in only the other DRB1 allele showing significant association with the disease. There was no heterogeneity between the two patient groups (DRB1*03 positive and DRB1*04 positive) in clinical characteristics or disease manifestations. The phenotype DRB1*03 and/or DRB1*04 was found in 34/47 patients compared to 27/111 controls yielding an OR of 7.395 (P corrected = 0.000019). We examined the structural basis of DRB1 susceptibility to GD in light of this and previous studies, showing that DRB1*03, 04, and 08 were positively associated with the disease, whereas DRB1*07 was negatively associated. Differences in protein sequences were noted at residues 54, 57, 59, and 66; positions 54, 57, and 66 are on the same face of the alpha helix. The canonical arginine 54 is replaced by glutamine in DRB1*07. At position 66, asparagine in DRB1*03 and tyrosine in DRB1*04 are replaced by phenylalanine in DRB1*07. Residue 59, likely involved in pocket formation in the antigen binding groove, is modified by replacement of tyrosine in DRB1*03, 08, and 04 and

  5. The genetic profile of susceptibility to infectious diseases in Roman-Period populations from Central Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowska, Magda; Jędrychowska-Dańska, Krystyna; Zamerska, Alicja; Płoszaj, Tomasz; Witas, Henryk W

    2017-01-01

    For thousands of years human beings have resisted life-threatening pathogens. This ongoing battle is considered to be the major force shaping our gene pool as every micro-evolutionary process provokes specific shifts in the genome, both that of the host and the pathogen. Past populations were more susceptible to changes in allele frequencies not only due to selection pressure, but also as a result of genetic drift, migration and inbreeding. In the present study we have investigated the frequency of five polymorphisms within innate immune-response genes (SLC11A1 D543N, MBL2 G161A, P2RX7 A1513C, IL10 A-1082G, TLR2 -196 to -174 ins/del) related to susceptibility to infections in humans. The DNA of individuals from two early Roman-Period populations of Linowo and Rogowo was analysed. The distribution of three mutations varied significantly when compared to the modern Polish population. The TAFT analysis suggests that the decreased frequency of SLC11A1 D543N in modern Poles as compared to 2nd century Linowo samples is the result of non-stochastic mechanisms, such as purifying or balancing selection. The disparity in frequency of other mutations is most likely the result of genetic drift, an evolutionary force which is remarkably amplified in low-size groups. Together with the FST analysis, mtDNA haplotypes' distribution and deviation from the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, we suggest that the two populations were not interbreeding (despite the close proximity between them), but rather inbreeding, the results of which are particularly pronounced among Rogowo habitants.

  6. Fluorimetric method for determination of Beryllium; Determinazione fluorimetrica del berillio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sparacino, N.; Sabbioneda, S. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Saluggia, Vercelli (Italy). Dip. Energia

    1996-10-01

    The old fluorimetric method for the determination of Beryllium, based essentially on the fluorescence of the Beryllium-Morine complex in a strongly alkaline solution, is still competitive and stands the comparison with more modern methods or at least three reasons: in the presence of solid or gaseous samples (powders), the times necessary to finalize an analytic determination are comparable since the stage of the process which lasts the longest is the mineralization of the solid particles containing Beryllium, the cost of a good fluorimeter is by far Inferior to the cost, e. g., of an Emission Spectrophotometer provided with ICP torch and magnets for exploiting the Zeeman effect and of an Atomic absorption Spectrophotometer provided with Graphite furnace; it is possible to determine, fluorimetrically, rather small Beryllium levels (about 30 ng of Beryllium/sample), this potentiality is more than sufficient to guarantee the respect of all the work safety and hygiene rules now in force. The study which is the subject of this publication is designed to the analysis procedure which allows one to reach good results in the determination of Beryllium, chiefly through the control and measurement of the interference effect due to the presence of some metals which might accompany the environmental samples of workshops and laboratories where Beryllium is handled, either at the pure state or in its alloys. The results obtained satisfactorily point out the merits and limits of this analytic procedure.

  7. Beryllium nitrate inhibits fibroblast migration to disrupt epimorphic regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Adam B; Seifert, Ashley W

    2016-10-01

    Epimorphic regeneration proceeds with or without formation of a blastema, as observed for the limb and skin, respectively. Inhibition of epimorphic regeneration provides a means to interrogate the cellular and molecular mechanisms that regulate it. In this study, we show that exposing amputated limbs to beryllium nitrate disrupts blastema formation and causes severe patterning defects in limb regeneration. In contrast, exposing full-thickness skin wounds to beryllium only causes a delay in skin regeneration. By transplanting full-thickness skin from ubiquitous GFP-expressing axolotls to wild-type hosts, we demonstrate that beryllium inhibits fibroblast migration during limb and skin regeneration in vivo Moreover, we show that beryllium also inhibits cell migration in vitro using axolotl and human fibroblasts. Interestingly, beryllium did not act as an immunostimulatory agent as it does in Anurans and mammals, nor did it affect keratinocyte migration, proliferation or re-epithelialization, suggesting that the effect of beryllium is cell type-specific. While we did not detect an increase in cell death during regeneration in response to beryllium, it did disrupt cell proliferation in mesenchymal cells. Taken together, our data show that normal blastema organogenesis cannot occur without timely infiltration of local fibroblasts and highlights the importance of positional information to instruct pattern formation during regeneration. In contrast, non-blastemal-based skin regeneration can occur despite early inhibition of fibroblast migration and cell proliferation.

  8. Quantum molecular dynamics simulations of beryllium at high pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjarlais, Michael; Knudson, Marcus

    2008-03-01

    The phase boundaries and high pressure melt properties of beryllium have been the subject of several recent experimental and theoretical studies. The interest is motivated in part by the use of beryllium as an ablator material in inertial confinement fusion capsule designs. In this work, the high pressure melt curve, Hugoniot crossings, sound speeds, and phase boundaries of beryllium are explored with DFT based quantum molecular dynamics calculations. The entropy differences between the various phases of beryllium are extracted in the vicinity of the melt curve and agree favorably with earlier theoretical work on normal melting. High velocity flyer plate experiments with beryllium targets on Sandia's Z machine have generated high quality data for the Hugoniot, bulk sound speeds, and longitudinal sound speeds. This data provides a tight constraint on the pressure for the onset of shock melting of beryllium and intriguing information on the solid phase prior to melt. The results of the QMD calculations and the experimental results will be compared, and implications for the HCP and BCC phase boundaries of beryllium will be presented.

  9. Polymorphisms in the Toll-Like Receptor and the IL-23/IL-17 Pathways Were Associated with Susceptibility to Inflammatory Bowel Disease in a Danish Cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bank, Steffen; Andersen, Paal Skytt; Burisch, Johan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), result from the combined effects of susceptibility genes and environmental factors. Previous studies have shown that polymorphisms in the Toll-like receptor (TLR), the apoptosis, the IL-23/IL-17 a...

  10. Complex Interplay of Future Climate Levels of CO2, Ozone and Temperature on Susceptibility to Fungal Diseases in Barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Bolette Lind

    Climate change will modify the environmental growth conditions for plants, and consequently also their physiology and susceptibility to diseases. However, there is a lack of experimental studies on the effect of climate change on plant diseases, which include several climatic factors in order to ...

  11. Studies on the susceptibility of ostriches (Struthio camelus to the Indonesian velogenic strain of Newcastle disease virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darminto

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available Susceptibility of ostriches (Struthio camelus to the Indonesian velogenic strain of Newcastle disease virus (NDV was evaluated by artificial infection . Twelve - 5 to 6 week old ostriches were divided into 3 groups each containing 4 birds . The first group was inoculated through respiratory system by dropping directly the virus solution into the nostrils, while the second group was inoculated through digestive system by dropping directly the virus solution into the oesophagus, with the dose of infection 106ELDSo (50%-embryo lethal dose per bird . Meanwhile, the third group was treated as uninfected control . All infected birds developed antibody responses, but only two inoculated birds from the first group and two inoculated birds from the second group developed clinical signs of Newcastle disease (ND, with no specific pathological alterations . Infected birds, either sicks or healthy, excreted the challenge viruses through the respiratory system and still be detected up to the end of this experiment, ie . 15 days post-inoculation . The challenge viruses can be re-isolated from the brain, trachea, lungs, heart, liver, spleen, kidneys, small intestine, cecal-tonsil, and proventriculus of the infected birds . This study concludes that: (1 the ostriches are susceptible to the infection of the Indonesian velogenic strain ofNDV; (2 all infected birds developed immune responses, but only half of them develops el jtigi aj i disease ; (3 the infected birds excreted the challenge viruses for a considerable long time which may play role as the Mginiseti.ce ofinfectron the other healthy ostriches ; and (4 the challenge viruses can be re-isolated from various organs of the birds . .

  12. HLA and Celiac Disease Susceptibility: New Genetic Factors Bring Open Questions about the HLA Influence and Gene-Dosage Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medrano, Luz María; Dema, Bárbara; López-Larios, Arturo; Maluenda, Carlos; Bodas, Andrés; López-Palacios, Natalia; Figueredo, M. Ángeles; Fernández-Arquero, Miguel; Núñez, Concepción

    2012-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a chronic inflammatory disorder triggered after gluten ingestion in genetically susceptible individuals. The major genetic determinants are HLA-DQA1*05 and HLA-DQB1*02, which encode the DQ2 heterodimer. These alleles are commonly inherited in cis with DRB1*03∶01, which is associated with numerous immune-related disorders, in some cases contributing with a different amount of risk depending on the haplotype context. We aimed at investigating those possible differences involving DRB1*03∶01-carrying haplotypes in CD susceptibility. A family (274 trios) and a case-control sample (369 CD cases/461 controls) were analyzed. DRB1*03∶01-carrying individuals were classified according to the haplotype present (ancestral haplotype (AH) 8.1, AH 18.2 or non-conserved haplotype) after genotyping of HLA-DRB1, -DQA1, -DQB1, -B8, TNF -308, TNF -376 and the TNFa and TNFb microsatellites. We observe that the AH 8.1 confers higher risk than the remaining DRB1*03∶01-carrying haplotypes, and this effect only involves individuals possessing a single copy of DQB1*02. CD risk for these individuals is similar to the one conferred by inherit DQA1*05 and DQB1*02 in trans. It seems that an additional CD susceptibility factor is present in the AH 8.1 but not in other DRB1*03∶01-carrying haplotypes. This factor could be shared with individuals possessing DQ2.5 trans, according to the similar risk observed in those two groups of individuals. PMID:23119005

  13. Antimicrobial susceptibility monitoring of respiratory tract pathogens isolated from diseased cattle and pigs across Europe: the VetPath study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Anno; Thomas, Valérie; Simjee, Shabbir; Moyaert, Hilde; El Garch, Farid; Maher, Kirsty; Morrissey, Ian; Butty, Pascal; Klein, Ulrich; Marion, Hervé; Rigaut, Delphine; Vallé, Michel

    2014-08-06

    VetPath is an ongoing pan-European antibiotic susceptibility monitoring programme collecting pathogens from diseased antimicrobial non-treated cattle, pigs and poultry. In the current study, 1001 isolates from cattle and pig respiratory tract infections were tested for their antimicrobial susceptibilities. Non-replicate lung samples or nasopharyngeal/nasal swabs were collected from animals with acute clinical signs in 11 countries during 2002-2006. Pasteurella multocida and Mannheimia haemolytica from cattle and P. multocida, Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae and Streptococcus suis from pigs were isolated by standard methods. S. suis was also isolated from meningitis cases. MICs of 16 antibiotics were assessed centrally by broth microdilution following CLSI recommendations. Results were interpreted using CLSI breakpoints where available. P. multocida (231) and M. haemolytica (138) isolates were all susceptible to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, ceftiofur, enrofloxacin and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. Resistance to florfenicol and spectinomycin was 0.4% and 3.5% in P. multocida, respectively, and absent in M. haemolytica isolates. Tetracycline resistance was 5.7% and 14.6% for P. multocida and M. haemolytica. In pigs, 230 P. multocida, 220 A. pleuropneumoniae and 182 S. suis isolates were recovered. Resistance to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, ceftiofur, enrofloxacin, florfenicol, tiamulin and tilmicosin was absent or antibiotics with defined clinical breakpoints, except for tetracycline, was observed among the major respiratory tract pathogens recovered from cattle and pigs. Since for approximately half of the antibiotics in this panel no CLSI-defined breakpoints were available, setting of the missing veterinary breakpoints is important.

  14. Prenatal ethanol exposure programs an increased susceptibility of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in female adult offspring rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Lang; Liu, Zhongfen; Gong, Jun; Zhang, Li; Wang, Linlong; Magdalou, Jacques; Chen, Liaobin; Wang, Hui

    2014-01-15

    Prenatal ethanol exposure (PEE) induces dyslipidemia and hyperglycemia in fetus and adult offspring. However, whether PEE increases the susceptibility to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in offspring and its underlying mechanism remain unknown. This study aimed to demonstrate an increased susceptibility to high-fat diet (HFD)-induced NAFLD and its intrauterine programming mechanisms in female rat offspring with PEE. Rat model of intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) was established by PEE, the female fetus and adult offspring that fed normal diet (ND) or HFD were sacrificed. The results showed that, in PEE+ND group, serum corticosterone (CORT) slightly decreased and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and glucose increased with partial catch-up growth; In PEE+HFD group, serum CORT decreased, while serum IGF-1, glucose and triglyceride (TG) increased, with notable catch-up growth, higher metabolic status and NAFLD formation. Enhanced liver expression of the IGF-1 pathway, gluconeogenesis, and lipid synthesis as well as reduced expression of lipid output were accompanied in PEE+HFD group. In PEE fetus, serum CORT increased while IGF-1 decreased, with low body weight, hyperglycemia, and hepatocyte ultrastructural changes. Hepatic IGF-1 expression as well as lipid output was down-regulated, while lipid synthesis significantly increased. Based on these findings, we propose a "two-programming" hypothesis for an increased susceptibility to HFD-induced NAFLD in female offspring of PEE. That is, the intrauterine programming of liver glucose and lipid metabolic function is "the first programming", and postnatal adaptive catch-up growth triggered by intrauterine programming of GC-IGF1 axis acts as "the second programming".

  15. Susceptibility of Marmosets (Callithrix jacchus to Monkeypox Virus: A Low Dose Prospective Model for Monkeypox and Smallpox Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric M Mucker

    Full Text Available Although current nonhuman primate models of monkeypox and smallpox diseases provide some insight into disease pathogenesis, they require a high titer inoculum, use an unnatural route of infection, and/or do not accurately represent the entire disease course. This is a concern when developing smallpox and/or monkeypox countermeasures or trying to understand host pathogen relationships. In our studies, we altered half of the test system by using a New World nonhuman primate host, the common marmoset. Based on dose finding studies, we found that marmosets are susceptible to monkeypox virus infection, produce a high viremia, and have pathological features consistent with smallpox and monkeypox in humans. The low dose (48 plaque forming units required to elicit a uniformly lethal disease and the extended incubation (preclinical signs are unique features among nonhuman primate models utilizing monkeypox virus. The uniform lethality, hemorrhagic rash, high viremia, decrease in platelets, pathology, and abbreviated acute phase are reflective of early-type hemorrhagic smallpox.

  16. The inflammatory bowel disease (IBD susceptibility genes NOD1 and NOD2 have conserved anti-bacterial roles in zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan H. Oehlers

    2011-11-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, in the form of Crohn’s disease (CD or ulcerative colitis (UC, is a debilitating chronic immune disorder of the intestine. A complex etiology resulting from dysfunctional interactions between the intestinal immune system and its microflora, influenced by host genetic susceptibility, makes disease modeling challenging. Mutations in NOD2 have the highest disease-specific risk association for CD, and a related gene, NOD1, is associated with UC. NOD1 and NOD2 encode intracellular bacterial sensor proteins acting as innate immune triggers, and represent promising therapeutic targets. The zebrafish has the potential to aid in modeling genetic and environmental aspects of IBD pathogenesis. Here, we report the characterization of the Nod signaling components in the zebrafish larval intestine. The nod1 and nod2 genes are expressed in intestinal epithelial cells and neutrophils together with the Nod signaling pathway genes ripk2, a20, aamp, cd147, centaurin b1, erbin and grim-19. Using a zebrafish embryo Salmonella infection model, morpholino-mediated depletion of Nod1 or Nod2 reduced the ability of embryos to control systemic infection. Depletion of Nod1 or Nod2 decreased expression of dual oxidase in the intestinal epithelium and impaired the ability of larvae to reduce intracellular bacterial burden. This work highlights the potential use of zebrafish larvae in the study of components of IBD pathogenesis.

  17. Common variation in ISL1 confers genetic susceptibility for human congenital heart disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen N Stevens

    Full Text Available Congenital heart disease (CHD is the most common birth abnormality and the etiology is unknown in the overwhelming majority of cases. ISLET1 (ISL1 is a transcription factor that marks cardiac progenitor cells and generates diverse multipotent cardiovascular cell lineages. The fundamental role of ISL1 in cardiac morphogenesis makes this an exceptional candidate gene to consider as a cause of complex congenital heart disease. We evaluated whether genetic variation in ISL1 fits the common variant-common disease hypothesis. A 2-stage case-control study examined 27 polymorphisms mapping to the ISL1 locus in 300 patients with complex congenital heart disease and 2,201 healthy pediatric controls. Eight genic and flanking ISL1 SNPs were significantly associated with complex congenital heart disease. A replication study analyzed these candidate SNPs in 1,044 new cases and 3,934 independent controls and confirmed that genetic variation in ISL1 is associated with risk of non-syndromic congenital heart disease. Our results demonstrate that two different ISL1 haplotypes contribute to risk of CHD in white and black/African American populations.

  18. Inhibitory effects of beryllium chloride on rat liver microsomal enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, C F; Yasaka, W J; Silva, L F; Oshiro, T T; Oga, S

    1990-04-30

    A single i.v. dose (0.1 mmol Be2+/kg) of beryllium chloride prolonged the duration of pentobarbital-induced sleep and zoxazolamine-induced paralysis, in rats. The effects are correlated with changes of the pharmacokinetic parameters and with the in vitro inhibition of both aliphatic and aromatic hydroxylation of pentobarbital and zoxazolamine. In vitro N-demethylation of meperidine and aminopyrine was partially inhibited while O-demethylation of quinidine was unaffected by liver microsomes of rats pretreated with beryllium salt. The findings give clues that beryllium chloride inhibits some forms of cytochrome P-450, especially those responsible for hydroxylation of substrates, like pentobarbital and zoxazolamine.

  19. Development of Beryllium Vacuum Chamber Technology for the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Veness, R; Dorn, C

    2011-01-01

    Beryllium is the material of choice for the beam vacuum chambers around collision points in particle colliders due to a combination of transparency to particles, high specific stiffness and compatibility with ultra-high vacuum. New requirements for these chambers in the LHC experiments have driven the development of new methods for the manufacture of beryllium chambers. This paper reviews the requirements for experimental vacuum chambers. It describes the new beryllium technology adopted for the LHC and experience gained in the manufacture and installation.

  20. Selection of I-220H beryllium for NIRCam optical bench

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edinger, Derek J.; Nordt, Alison A.

    2005-08-01

    The Near Infrared Camera (NIRCam) for NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is one of the four science instruments to be installed into the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) on JWST. I-220H beryllium was chosen as the optical bench material for NIRCam based on its high specific stiffness, relatively high thermal conductivity, low CTE at cryogenic temperatures, and overall thermal stability at cryogenic temperatures. Beryllium has cryogenic heritage, but development of a structural bonded joint that could survive cryogenic temperatures was required. This paper will describe the trade studies performed in which bonded, I-220H beryllium was selected.

  1. Pathway analysis of GWAS provides new insights into genetic susceptibility to 3 inflammatory diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hariklia Eleftherohorinou

    Full Text Available Although the introduction of genome-wide association studies (GWAS have greatly increased the number of genes associated with common diseases, only a small proportion of the predicted genetic contribution has so far been elucidated. Studying the cumulative variation of polymorphisms in multiple genes acting in functional pathways may provide a complementary approach to the more common single SNP association approach in understanding genetic determinants of common disease. We developed a novel pathway-based method to assess the combined contribution of multiple genetic variants acting within canonical biological pathways and applied it to data from 14,000 UK individuals with 7 common diseases. We tested inflammatory pathways for association with Crohn's disease (CD, rheumatoid arthritis (RA and type 1 diabetes (T1D with 4 non-inflammatory diseases as controls. Using a variable selection algorithm, we identified variants responsible for the pathway association and evaluated their use for disease prediction using a 10 fold cross-validation framework in order to calculate out-of-sample area under the Receiver Operating Curve (AUC. The generalisability of these predictive models was tested on an independent birth cohort from Northern Finland. Multiple canonical inflammatory pathways showed highly significant associations (p 10(-3-10(-20 with CD, T1D and RA. Variable selection identified on average a set of 205 SNPs (149 genes for T1D, 350 SNPs (189 genes for RA and 493 SNPs (277 genes for CD. The pattern of polymorphisms at these SNPS were found to be highly predictive of T1D (91% AUC and RA (85% AUC, and weakly predictive of CD (60% AUC. The predictive ability of the T1D model (without any parameter refitting had good predictive ability (79% AUC in the Finnish cohort. Our analysis suggests that genetic contribution to common inflammatory diseases operates through multiple genes interacting in functional pathways.

  2. Differences in the susceptibility of dromedary and Bactrian camels to foot-and-mouth disease virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larska, M.; Wernery, U.; Kinne, J.

    2009-01-01

    as positive controls, displayed typical moderate clinical signs of FMD and developed viraemia and high antibody titres. The presence of the virus was also detected in probang and mouth-swab samples for several days after inoculation. In contrast, the inoculated dromedary camels were not susceptible to FMDV...... sheep. Characteristic FMD lesions in the Bactrian camels, accompanied with severe lameness, were only observed on the hind feet. The presence of the virus in the serum samples of both Bactrian camels was detected by real-time RT-PCR in one of the animals on days 3 and 7 p.i. and in the second animal...... from days I to 3 p.i. and subsequently again on day 21 p.i. The Bactrian camels developed high titres of antibodies to the inoculated FMDV which appeared at 7-10 days p.i. and lasted up to 130 days p.i. Only low and transient amounts of FMDV were detected in the mouth-swab and probang samples collected...

  3. High susceptibility to fatty liver disease in two-pore channel 2-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Christian; Holdt, Lesca M; Chen, Cheng-Chang; Hassan, Sami; Müller, Christoph; Jörs, Simone; Cuny, Hartmut; Kissing, Sandra; Schröder, Bernd; Butz, Elisabeth; Northoff, Bernd; Castonguay, Jan; Luber, Christian A; Moser, Markus; Spahn, Saskia; Lüllmann-Rauch, Renate; Fendel, Christina; Klugbauer, Norbert; Griesbeck, Oliver; Haas, Albert; Mann, Matthias; Bracher, Franz; Teupser, Daniel; Saftig, Paul; Biel, Martin; Wahl-Schott, Christian

    2014-08-21

    Endolysosomal organelles play a key role in trafficking, breakdown and receptor-mediated recycling of different macromolecules such as low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol, epithelial growth factor (EGF) or transferrin. Here we examine the role of two-pore channel (TPC) 2, an endolysosomal cation channel, in these processes. Embryonic mouse fibroblasts and hepatocytes lacking TPC2 display a profound impairment of LDL-cholesterol and EGF/EGF-receptor trafficking. Mechanistically, both defects can be attributed to a dysfunction of the endolysosomal degradation pathway most likely on the level of late endosome to lysosome fusion. Importantly, endolysosomal acidification or lysosomal enzyme function are normal in TPC2-deficient cells. TPC2-deficient mice are highly susceptible to hepatic cholesterol overload and liver damage consistent with non-alcoholic fatty liver hepatitis. These findings indicate reduced metabolic reserve of hepatic cholesterol handling. Our results suggest that TPC2 plays a crucial role in trafficking in the endolysosomal degradation pathway and, thus, is potentially involved in the homoeostatic control of many macromolecules and cell metabolites.

  4. Changing trends in serotype distribution and antimicrobial susceptibility of Streptococcus pneumoniae causing invasive diseases in Central Thailand, 2009-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phongsamart, Wanatpreeya; Srifeungfung, Somporn; Chatsuwan, Tanittha; Nunthapisud, Pongpun; Treerauthaweeraphong, Vipa; Rungnobhakhun, Pimpha; Sricharoenchai, Sirintip; Chokephaibulkit, Kulkanya

    2014-01-01

    To describe the trends in serotype distribution and antimicrobial susceptibility of S. pneumoniae causing invasive pneumococcal diseases (IPD) we tested 238 pneumococci isolates from normally sterile sites between 2009 and 2012 and compared these findings with previous data collected within our network. Serotyping was performed for 15 serotypes contained in the 7-,10-, 13-, and experimental 15-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV). The most common serotypes found were 6B (13.9%), 19A (12.6%), 14 (8.0%), 18C (5.9%), and 6A (3.8%); and 39.9% were non-PCV15 serotypes. One of 81 patients with available data had breakthrough infection with vaccine serotype (19F). There was a significant increase of serotype 19A among children ≤5 years (5.6% in 2000-2009 vs 18.3% in 2009-2012, P = 0.003). The all-age serotype coverage was 36.4%, 41.5%, 59.3%, and 59.7% for PCV7, PCV10, PCV13, and PCV 15, respectively. The corresponding coverage in children ≤5 years were 46.4%, 48.8%, 73.2%, and 73.2% respectively. High susceptibilities to penicillin (89.7%), cefotaxime (95.7%), cefditoren (90.2% by Spanish breakpoints), ofloxacin (97.9%), and levofloxacin (100%), but low to cefdinir (50.0%), cefditoren (45.1% by US-FDA breakpoints), macrolides (<50%), clindamycin (67.7%), tetracycline (41.4%), and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (32.4%) were observed. Serotype 19A was less susceptible to penicillin (80.0 vs 91.2%, P = 0.046), cefditoren (66.7 vs 95.5% by Spanish breakpoints, P = 0.004), and tetracycline (9.1 vs 45.5%, P = 0.024) than non-19A isolates. These data emphasize the need for continued surveillance to monitor changes in serotypes as well as antimicrobial susceptibilities in order to guide strategies for prevention and treatment.

  5. Genetic susceptibility and genotype-phenotype association in 588 Danish children with inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, C; Cleynen, I; Andersen, Susanne Pia;

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the association between known inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)-associated genetic variants and development of paediatric IBD, and specific clinical sub-phenotypes. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In this case-control study we included IBD patients ... retrieved and clinical information was extracted. DNA was obtained from Guthrie cards from the Danish National Neonatal Screening Biobank (PKU-biobanken) at Statens Serum Institut and from blood samples. RESULTS: A total of 588 IBD patients (244 Crohn's disease (CD), 318 ulcerative colitis (UC) and 26 IBD...... associated with disease localisation, medical treatment or surgery after correcting for multiple analyses. CONCLUSION: We found an association between CD and three previously published genetic variants and replicated the association with the paediatric specific ZMIZ1 gene. No Bonferroni corrected significant...

  6. Cooler temperatures destabilize RNA interference and increase susceptibility of disease vector mosquitoes to viral infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zach N Adelman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The impact of global climate change on the transmission dynamics of infectious diseases is the subject of extensive debate. The transmission of mosquito-borne viral diseases is particularly complex, with climatic variables directly affecting many parameters associated with the prevalence of disease vectors. While evidence shows that warmer temperatures often decrease the extrinsic incubation period of an arthropod-borne virus (arbovirus, exposure to cooler temperatures often predisposes disease vector mosquitoes to higher infection rates. RNA interference (RNAi pathways are essential to antiviral immunity in the mosquito; however, few experiments have explored the effects of temperature on the RNAi machinery. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We utilized transgenic "sensor" strains of Aedes aegypti to examine the role of temperature on RNA silencing. These "sensor" strains express EGFP only when RNAi is inhibited; for example, after knockdown of the effector proteins Dicer-2 (DCR-2 or Argonaute-2 (AGO-2. We observed an increase in EGFP expression in transgenic sensor mosquitoes reared at 18°C as compared with 28°C. Changes in expression were dependent on the presence of an inverted repeat with homology to a portion of the EGFP sequence, as transgenic strains lacking this sequence, the double stranded RNA (dsRNA trigger for RNAi, showed no change in EGFP expression when reared at 18°C. Sequencing small RNAs in sensor mosquitoes reared at low temperature revealed normal processing of dsRNA substrates, suggesting the observed deficiency in RNAi occurs downstream of DCR-2. Rearing at cooler temperatures also predisposed mosquitoes to higher levels of infection with both chikungunya and yellow fever viruses. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This data suggest that microclimates, such as those present in mosquito breeding sites, as well as more general climactic variables may influence the dynamics of mosquito-borne viral diseases by affecting

  7. Evaluation of shared genetic susceptibility loci between autoimmune diseases and schizophrenia based on genome-wide association studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoeffding, Louise K; Rosengren, Anders; Thygesen, Johan H;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Epidemiological studies have documented higher than expected comorbidity (or, in some cases, inverse comorbidity) between schizophrenia and several autoimmune disorders. It remains unknown whether this comorbidity reflects shared genetic susceptibility loci. AIMS: The present study...... aimed to investigate whether verified genome wide significant variants of autoimmune disorders confer risk of schizophrenia, which could suggest a common genetic basis. METHODS: Seven hundred and fourteen genome wide significant risk variants of 25 autoimmune disorders were extracted from the NHGRI GWAS...... catalogue and examined for association to schizophrenia in the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium schizophrenia GWAS samples (36,989 cases and 113,075 controls). RESULTS: Two independent loci at 4q24 and 6p21.32-33 originally identified from GWAS of autoimmune diseases were found genome wide associated...

  8. Eleven years of malaria surveillance in a Sudanese village highlights unexpected variation in individual disease susceptibility and outbreak severity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Creasey, A; Giha, H; Hamad, A A;

    2004-01-01

    An analysis is presented of continuous data collected over 11 years based on 1,902,600 person/days of observation on the malaria experience of the people of Daraweesh, a village in eastern Sudan. Malaria transmission is hypo-endemic: the acquisition of clinical immunity with age is not as obvious...... as in more holo-endemic areas and malaria remained a problem in all age groups throughout the study. However, this population, who are of Fulani origin, showed a distinctly variable level of disease susceptibility. Thirty-two percent of the village never reported malaria symptoms or required malaria...... an interesting question for malaria modelling in this, and in other low transmission zones, such as the burgeoning urban areas of modern Africa....

  9. Activating KIR and HLA Bw4 ligands are associated to decreased susceptibility to pemphigus foliaceus, an autoimmune blistering skin disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danillo G Augusto

    Full Text Available The KIR genes and their HLA class I ligands have thus far not been investigated in pemphigus foliaceus (PF and related autoimmune diseases, such as pemphigus vulgaris. We genotyped 233 patients and 204 controls for KIR by PCR-SSP. HLA typing was performed by LABType SSO reagent kits. We estimated the odds ratio, 95% confidence interval and performed logistic regression analyses to test the hypothesis that KIR genes and their known ligands influence susceptibility to PF. We found significant negative association between activating genes and PF. The activating KIR genes may have an overlapping effect in the PF susceptibility and the presence of more than three activating genes was protective (OR=0.49, p=0.003. A strong protective association was found for higher ratios activating/inhibitory KIR (OR=0.44, p=0.001. KIR3DS1 and HLA-Bw4 were negatively associated to PF either isolated or combined, but higher significance was found for the presence of both together (OR=0.34, p<10(-3 suggesting that the activating function is the major factor to interfere in the PF pathogenesis. HLA-Bw4 (80I and 80T was decreased in patients. There is evidence that HLA-Bw4(80T may also be important as KIR3DS1 ligand, being the association of this pair (OR=0.07, p=0.001 stronger than KIR3DS1-Bw4(80I (OR=0.31, p=0.002. Higher levels of activating KIR signals appeared protective to PF. The activating KIR genes have been commonly reported to increase the risk for autoimmunity, but particularities of endemic PF, like the well documented influence the environmental exposure in the pathogenesis of this disease, may be the reason why activated NK cells probably protect against pemphigus foliaceus.

  10. Replication of GWAS Coding SNPs Implicates MMEL1 as a Potential Susceptibility Locus among Saudi Arabian Celiac Disease Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar I. Saadah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD, a gluten intolerance disorder, was implicated to have 57 genetic susceptibility loci for Europeans but not for culturally and geographically distinct ethnic populations like Saudi Arabian CD patients. Therefore, we genotyped Saudi CD patients and healthy controls for three polymorphisms, that is, Phe196Ser in IRAK1, Trp262Arg in SH2B3, and Met518Thr in MMEL1 genes. Single locus analysis identified that carriers of the 518 Thr/Thr (MMEL1 genotype conferred a 1.6-fold increased disease risk compared to the noncarriers (OR = 2.6; 95% CI: 1.22–5.54; P<0.01. This significance persisted even under allelic (OR = 1.55; 95% CI: 1.05–2.28; P=0.02 and additive (OR = 0.35; 95% CI: 0.17–0.71; P=0.03 genetic models. However, frequencies for Trp262Arg (SH2B3 and Phe196Ser (IRAK1 polymorphisms were not significantly different between patients and controls. The overall best MDR model included Met518Thr and Trp262Arg polymorphisms, with a maximal testing accuracy of 64.1% and a maximal cross-validation consistency of 10 out of 10 (P=0.0156. Allelic distribution of the 518 Thr/Thr polymorphism in MMEL1 primarily suggests its independent and synergistic contribution towards CD susceptibility among Saudi patients. Lack of significant association of IRAK and SH2B3 gene polymorphisms in Saudi patients but their association in European groups suggests the genetic heterogeneity of CD.

  11. Antimicrobial susceptibility, tetracycline and erythromycin resistance genes, and multilocus sequence typing of Streptococcus suis isolates from diseased pigs in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Song, Yajing; Wei, Zigong; He, Hongkui; Zhang, Anding; Jin, Meilin

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus suis (S. suis) is an emerging zoonotic pathogen causing significant economic losses in the swine industry. Here, we investigated the antimicrobial susceptibility, associated antibiotic-resistant determinants and sequence type (ST) of S. suis isolates from diseased pigs in China from 2008 to 2010. Serotype 2 was the most frequently observed strain (n=95) among the 106 S. suis strains collected, followed by serotypes 3 (n=3), 5 (n=3), 4 (n=2), 7 (n=1), 11 (n=1) and 28 (n=1). Multilocus sequence typing analysis revealed that ST1 (n=21) and ST7 (n=74) were the predominant STs, and serotype 2 was found to be significantly correlated with ST7 (P=0.017, Fisher's exact test) and CC1 (P=0.024, Fisher's exact test). The antimicrobial susceptibility results indicated that the antibiotic resistance rate was highest for tetracycline (99.1%), followed by azithromycin (68.9%), erythromycin (67.9%), clindamycin (67.9%), trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (16%), levofloxacin (2.8%), chloramphenicol (1.9%), cefaclor (0.9%) and ceftriaxone (0.9%). Antibiotic-resistant genes tet(M), tet(O), tet(O/W/32/O), tet(O/32/O), tet(S), tet(W), tet(L), tet(40), erm(B), mef(A/E) and msr(D) could be detected, and several tandem organizations of antibiotic resistance genes were also found in this study. In conclusion, S. suis strains isolated from diseased pigs in China were less diverse and multi-drug resistant.

  12. Investigation of cerebral iron deposition in aged patients with ischemic cerebrovascular disease using susceptibility-weighted imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Y

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Yin Liu, Jun Liu, Huanghui Liu, Yunjie Liao, Lu Cao, Bin Ye, Wei Wang Department of Radiology, The Third Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan, People’s Republic of China Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate focal iron deposition level in the brain in patients with ischemic cerebrovascular disease and its correlation with cerebral small vessel disease imaging markers.Patients and methods: Seventy-four patients with first-ever transient ischemic attack (median age: 69 years; 30 males and 44 females and 77 patients with positive ischemic stroke history (median age: 72 years; 43 males and 34 females were studied retrospectively. On phase image of susceptibility-weighted imaging and regions of interest were manually drawn at the bilateral head of the caudate nucleus, lenticular nucleus (LN, thalamus (TH, frontal white matter, and occipital white matter. The correlation between iron deposition level and the clinical and imaging variables was also investigated.Results: Iron deposition level at LN was significantly higher in patients with previous stroke history. It linearly correlated with the presence and number of cerebral microbleeds (CMBs but not with white matter hyperintensity and lacunar infarct. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that deep structure CMBs were the most relevant in terms of iron deposition at LN.Conclusion: Iron deposition at LN may increase in cases of more severe ischemia in aged patients with transient ischemic attack, and it may be an imaging marker for CMB of ischemic origin. Keywords: cerebral microbleed, ischemia, susceptibility-weighted imaging, iron, lenticular nucleus

  13. ATG16L1: A multifunctional susceptibility factor in Crohn disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Mohammad; Ammitzboell, Mette; Nys, Kris; Seidelin, Jakob Benedict; Nielsen, Ole Haagen

    2015-04-03

    Genetic variations in the autophagic pathway influence genetic predispositions to Crohn disease. Autophagy, the major lysosomal pathway for degrading and recycling cytoplasmic material, constitutes an important homeostatic cellular process. Of interest, single-nucleotide polymorphisms in ATG16L1 (autophagy-related 16-like 1 [S. cerevisiae]), a key component in the autophagic response to invading pathogens, have been associated with an increased risk of developing Crohn disease. The most common and well-studied genetic variant of ATG16L1 (rs2241880; leading to a T300A conversion) exhibits a strong association with risk for developing Crohn disease. The rs2241880 variant plays a crucial role in pathogen clearance, resulting in imbalanced cytokine production, and is linked to other biological processes, such as the endoplasmic reticulum stress/unfolded protein response. In this review, we focus on the importance of ATG16L1 and its genetic variant (T300A) within the elementary biological processes linked to Crohn disease.

  14. Genome-wide linkage and association mapping identify susceptibility alleles in ABCC4 for Kawasaki disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khor, Chiea Chuen; Davila, Sonia; Shimizu, Chisato; Sheng, Stephanie; Matsubara, Tomoyo; Suzuki, Yasuo; Newburger, Jane W.; Baker, Annette; Burgner, David; Breunis, Willemijn; Kuijpers, Taco; Wright, Victoria J.; Levin, Michael; Hibberd, Martin L.; Burns, Jane C.

    Background Kawasaki disease (KD) is a self limited vasculitis in which host genetics plays a prominent role. To further the understanding of the role of host genetics in KD, a three-stage genetic study was conducted that began with a family linkage study and ultimately involved more than 3000

  15. Genome-wide linkage and association mapping identify susceptibility alleles in ABCC4 for Kawasaki disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khor, C.C.; Davila, S.; Shimizu, C.; Sheng, S.; Matsubara, T.; Suzuki, Y.; Newburger, J.W.; Baker, A.; Burgner, D.; Breunis, W.; Kuijpers, T.; Wright, V.J.; Levin, M.; Hibberd, M.L.; Burns, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is a self limited vasculitis in which host genetics plays a prominent role. To further the understanding of the role of host genetics in KD, a three-stage genetic study was conducted that began with a family linkage study and ultimately involved more than 3000 individuals to

  16. Genome-wide linkage and association mapping identify susceptibility alleles in ABCC4 for Kawasaki disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khor, C.C.; Davila, S.; Shimizu, C.; Sheng, S.; Matsubara, T.; Suzuki, Y.; Newburger, J.W.; Baker, A.; Burgner, D.; Breunis, W.; Kuijpers, T.; Wright, V.J.; Levin, M.; Hibberd, M.L.; Burns, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is a self limited vasculitis in which host genetics plays a prominent role. To further the understanding of the role of host genetics in KD, a three-stage genetic study was conducted that began with a family linkage study and ultimately involved more than 3000 individuals to id

  17. Genome-wide linkage and association mapping identify susceptibility alleles in ABCC4 for Kawasaki disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khor, Chiea Chuen; Davila, Sonia; Shimizu, Chisato; Sheng, Stephanie; Matsubara, Tomoyo; Suzuki, Yasuo; Newburger, Jane W.; Baker, Annette; Burgner, David; Breunis, Willemijn; Kuijpers, Taco; Wright, Victoria J.; Levin, Michael; Hibberd, Martin L.; Burns, Jane C.

    2011-01-01

    Background Kawasaki disease (KD) is a self limited vasculitis in which host genetics plays a prominent role. To further the understanding of the role of host genetics in KD, a three-stage genetic study was conducted that began with a family linkage study and ultimately involved more than 3000 indivi

  18. Large-scale association analysis identifies 13 new susceptibility loci for coronary artery disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Schunkert (Heribert); I.R. König (Inke); S. Kathiresan (Sekar); M.P. Reilly (Muredach); T.L. Assimes (Themistocles); H. Holm (Hilma); M. Preuss (Michael); A.F.R. Stewart (Alexandre); M. Barbalic (maja); C. Gieger (Christian); D. Absher (Devin); Z. Aherrahrou (Zouhair); H. Allayee (Hooman); D. Altshuler (David); S.S. Anand (Sonia); K. Andersen (Karl); J.L. Anderson (Jeffrey); D. Ardissino (Diego); S.G. Ball (Stephen); A.J. Balmforth (Anthony); T.A. Barnes (Timothy); D.M. Becker (Diane); K. Berger (Klaus); J.C. Bis (Joshua); S.M. Boekholdt (Matthijs); E.A. Boerwinkle (Eric); P.S. Braund (Peter); M.J. Brown (Morris); M.S. Burnett; I. Buysschaert (Ian); J.F. Carlquist (John); L. Chen (Li); S. Cichon (Sven); V. Codd (Veryan); R.W. Davies (Robert); G.V. Dedoussis (George); A. Dehghan (Abbas); S. Demissie (Serkalem); J. Devaney (Joseph); P. Diemert (Patrick); R. Do (Ron); A. Doering (Angela); S. Eifert (Sandra); N.E.E. Mokhtari; S.G. Ellis (Stephen); R. Elosua (Roberto); J.C. Engert (James); S.E. Epstein (Stephen); U. de Faire (Ulf); M. Fischer (Marcus); A.R. Folsom (Aaron); J. Freyer (Jennifer); B. Gigante (Bruna); D. Girelli (Domenico); S. Gretarsdottir (Solveig); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); J.R. Gulcher (Jeffrey); E. Halperin (Eran); N. Hammond (Naomi); S.L. Hazen (Stanley); A. Hofman (Albert); B.D. Horne (Benjamin); T. Illig (Thomas); C. Iribarren (Carlos); G.T. Jones (Gregory); J.W. Jukema (Jan Wouter); M.A. Kaiser (Michael); R.C. Kaplan (Robert); K-T. Khaw (Kay-Tee); J.W. Knowles (Joshua); G. Kolovou (Genovefa); A. Kong (Augustine); R. Laaksonen (Reijo); D. Lambrechts (Diether); K. Leander (Karin); G. Lettre (Guillaume); X. Li (Xiaohui); W. Lieb (Wolfgang); C. Loley (Christina); A.J. Lotery (Andrew); P.M. Mannucci (Pier); S. Maouche (Seraya); N. Martinelli (Nicola); P.P. McKeown (Pascal); C. Meisinger (Christa); T. Meitinger (Thomas); O. Melander (Olle); P.A. Merlini; V. Mooser (Vincent); T. Morgan (Thomas); T.W. Mühleisen (Thomas); J.B. Muhlestein (Joseph); T. Münzel (Thomas); K. Musunuru (Kiran); J. Nahrstaedt (Janja); C.P. Nelson (Christopher P.); M.M. Nöthen (Markus); O. Olivieri (Oliviero); R.S. Patel (Riyaz); C.C. Patterson (Chris); A. Peters (Annette); F. Peyvandi (Flora); L. Qu (Liming); A.A. Quyyumi (Arshed); D.J. Rader (Daniel); L.S. Rallidis (Loukianos); C. Rice (Catherine); F.R. Rosendaal (Frits); D. Rubin (Diana); V. Salomaa (Veikko); M.L. Sampietro (Maria Lourdes); M.S. Sandhu (Manj); E.E. Schadt (Eric); A. Scḧsignfer (Arne); A. Schillert (Arne); S. Schreiber (Stefan); J. Schrezenmeir (Jürgen); S.M. Schwartz (Stephen); D.S. Siscovick (David); M. Sivananthan (Mohan); S. Sivapalaratnam (Suthesh); A.V. Smith (Albert Vernon); J.D. Snoep (Jaapjan); N. Soranzo (Nicole); J.A. Spertus (John); K. Stark (Klaus); K. Stirrups (Kathy); M. Stoll (Monika); W.H.W. Tang (Wilson); S. Tennstedt (Stephanie); G. Thorgeirsson (Gudmundur); G. Thorleifsson (Gudmar); M. Tomaszewski (Maciej); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); A.M. van Rij (Andre); B.F. Voight (Benjamin); N.J. Wareham (Nick); G.A. Wells (George); H.E. Wichmann (Heinz Erich); P.S. Wild (Philipp); C. Willenborg (Christina); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); B.J. Wright (Benjamin); S. Ye (Shu); T. Zeller (Tanja); A. Ziegler (Andreas); F. Cambien (François); A.H. Goodall (Alison); L.A. Cupples (Adrienne); T. Quertermous (Thomas); W. Mäsignrz (Winfried); C. Hengstenberg (Christian); S. Blankenberg (Stefan); W.H. Ouwehand (Willem); A.S. Hall (Alistair); J.J.P. Kastelein (John); P. Deloukas (Panagiotis); J.R. Thompson (John); K. Stefansson (Kari); R. Roberts (Robert); U. Thorsteinsdottir (Unnur); C.J. O'Donnell (Christopher); R. McPherson (Ruth); J. Erdmann (Jeanette); N.J. Samani (Nilesh)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractWe performed a meta-analysis of 14 genome-wide association studies of coronary artery disease (CAD) comprising 22,233 individuals with CAD (cases) and 64,762 controls of European descent followed by genotyping of top association signals in 56,682 additional individuals. This analysis

  19. Expression of HSV-1 receptors in EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disease determines susceptibility to oncolytic HSV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, P.Y.; Currier, M.A.; Hansford, L.; Kaplan, D.; Chiocca, E.A.; Uchida, H.; Goins, W.F.; Cohen, J.B.; Glorioso, J.C.; Kuppevelt, T.H. van; Mo, X.; Cripe, T.P.

    2013-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative disease (LPD) after hematopoietic stem cell or solid organ transplantation remains a life-threatening complication. Expression of the virus-encoded gene product, EBER, has been shown to prevent apoptosis via blockade of PKR activation. A

  20. Differential susceptibility to motor impulsivity among functional subtypes of Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wylie, S.A.; van den Wildenberg, W.P.M.; Ridderinkhof, K.R.; Claassen, D.O.; Wooten, G.F.; Manning, C.A.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Parkinson's disease patients with predominant postural instability and gait difficulties (PIGD) may experience unique cognitive difficulties compared to patients with tremor predominant (TD) symptoms. PIGD patients are also at high risk for falling, and some of the worst f

  1. Visceral adiposity, genetic susceptibility, and risk of complications among individuals with crohn's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Der Sloot, Kimberley W.; Bellavance, Danielle; Gilpin, Katherine; Stewart, Kathleen; Joshi, Amit D.; Garber, John; Giallourakis, Comas; Yajnik, Vijay; Ananthakrishnan, Ashwin N.; Alizadeh, Behrooz; Xavier, Ramnik; Khalili, Hamed

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Adipose tissue in mesenteric fat plays a key role in systemic and luminal inflammation through production of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α (TNF-α) and inhibition of adiponectin, an anti-inflammatory cytokine, in patients with Crohn's disease (CD). However, little is known about the role of

  2. Visceral adiposity, genetic susceptibility, and risk of complications among individuals with crohn's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Der Sloot, Kimberley W.; Bellavance, Danielle; Gilpin, Katherine; Stewart, Kathleen; Joshi, Amit D.; Garber, John; Giallourakis, Comas; Yajnik, Vijay; Ananthakrishnan, Ashwin N.; Alizadeh, Behrooz; Xavier, Ramnik; Khalili, Hamed

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Adipose tissue in mesenteric fat plays a key role in systemic and luminal inflammation through production of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α (TNF-α) and inhibition of adiponectin, an anti-inflammatory cytokine, in patients with Crohn's disease (CD). However, little is known about the role of v

  3. Interleukin and interleukin receptor gene polymorphisms in inflammatory bowel diseases susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magyari, Lili; Kovesdi, Erzsebet; Sarlos, Patricia; Javorhazy, Andras; Sumegi, Katalin; Melegh, Bela

    2014-03-28

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which includes Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), represents a group of chronic inflammatory disorders caused by dysregulated immune responses in genetically predisposed individuals. Genetic markers are associated with disease phenotype and long-term evolution, but their value in everyday clinical practice is limited at the moment. IBD has a clear immunological background and interleukins play key role in the process. Almost 130 original papers were revised including meta-analysis. It is clear these data are very important for understanding the base of the disease, especially in terms of clinical utility and validity, but text often do not available for the doctors use these in the clinical practice nowadays. We conducted a systematic review of the current literature on interleukin and interleukin receptor gene polymorphisms associated with IBD, performing an electronic search of PubMed Database from publications of the last 10 years, and used the following medical subject heading terms and/or text words: IBD, CD, UC, interleukins and polymorphisms.

  4. Large-scale association analysis identifies 13 new susceptibility loci for coronary artery disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Schunkert (Heribert); I.R. König (Inke); S. Kathiresan (Sekar); M.P. Reilly (Muredach); T.L. Assimes (Themistocles); H. Holm (Hilma); M. Preuss (Michael); A.F.R. Stewart (Alexandre); M. Barbalic (maja); C. Gieger (Christian); D. Absher (Devin); Z. Aherrahrou (Zouhair); H. Allayee (Hooman); D. Altshuler (David); S.S. Anand (Sonia); K. Andersen (Karl); J.L. Anderson (Jeffrey); D. Ardissino (Diego); S.G. Ball (Stephen); A.J. Balmforth (Anthony); T.A. Barnes (Timothy); D.M. Becker (Diane); K. Berger (Klaus); J.C. Bis (Joshua); S.M. Boekholdt (Matthijs); E. Boerwinkle (Eric); P.S. Braund (Peter); M.J. Brown (Morris); M.S. Burnett; I. Buysschaert (Ian); J.F. Carlquist (John); L. Chen (Li); S. Cichon (Sven); V. Codd (Veryan); R.W. Davies (Robert); G.V. Dedoussis (George); A. Dehghan (Abbas); S. Demissie (Serkalem); J. Devaney (Joseph); P. Diemert (Patrick); R. Do (Ron); A. Doering (Angela); S. Eifert (Sandra); N.E.E. Mokhtari; S.G. Ellis (Stephen); R. Elosua (Roberto); J.C. Engert (James); S.E. Epstein (Stephen); U. de Faire (Ulf); M. Fischer (Marcus); A.R. Folsom (Aaron); J. Freyer (Jennifer); B. Gigante (Bruna); D. Girelli (Domenico); S. Gretarsdottir (Solveig); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); J.R. Gulcher (Jeffrey); E. Halperin (Eran); N. Hammond (Naomi); S.L. Hazen (Stanley); A. Hofman (Albert); B.D. Horne (Benjamin); T. Illig (Thomas); C. Iribarren (Carlos); G.T. Jones (Gregory); J.W. Jukema (Jan Wouter); M.A. Kaiser (Michael); R.C. Kaplan (Robert); K-T. Khaw (Kay-Tee); J.W. Knowles (Joshua); G. Kolovou (Genovefa); A. Kong (Augustine); R. Laaksonen (Reijo); D. Lambrechts (Diether); K. Leander (Karin); G. Lettre (Guillaume); X. Li (Xiaohui); W. Lieb (Wolfgang); C. Loley (Christina); A.J. Lotery (Andrew); P.M. Mannucci (Pier); S. Maouche (Seraya); N. Martinelli (Nicola); P.P. McKeown (Pascal); C. Meisinger (Christa); T. Meitinger (Thomas); O. Melander (Olle); P.A. Merlini; V. Mooser (Vincent); T. Morgan (Thomas); T.W. Mühleisen (Thomas); J.B. Muhlestein (Joseph); T. Münzel (Thomas); K. Musunuru (Kiran); J. Nahrstaedt (Janja); C.P. Nelson (Christopher P.); M.M. Nöthen (Markus); O. Olivieri (Oliviero); R.S. Patel (Riyaz); C.C. Patterson (Chris); A. Peters (Annette); F. Peyvandi (Flora); L. Qu (Liming); A.A. Quyyumi (Arshed); D.J. Rader (Daniel); L.S. Rallidis (Loukianos); C. Rice (Catherine); F.R. Rosendaal (Frits); D. Rubin (Diana); V. Salomaa (Veikko); M.L. Sampietro (Maria Lourdes); M.S. Sandhu (Manj); E.E. Schadt (Eric); A. Scḧsignfer (Arne); A. Schillert (Arne); S. Schreiber (Stefan); J. Schrezenmeir (Jürgen); S.M. Schwartz (Stephen); D.S. Siscovick (David); M. Sivananthan (Mohan); S. Sivapalaratnam (Suthesh); A.V. Smith (Albert Vernon); J.D. Snoep (Jaapjan); N. Soranzo (Nicole); J.A. Spertus (John); K. Stark (Klaus); K. Stirrups (Kathy); M. Stoll (Monika); W.H.W. Tang (Wilson); S. Tennstedt (Stephanie); G. Thorgeirsson (Gudmundur); G. Thorleifsson (Gudmar); M. Tomaszewski; A.G. Uitterlinden (André); A.M. van Rij (Andre); B.F. Voight (Benjamin); N.J. Wareham (Nick); G.A. Wells (George); H.E. Wichmann (Heinz Erich); P.S. Wild (Philipp); C. Willenborg (Christina); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); B.J. Wright (Benjamin); S. Ye (Shu); T. Zeller (Tanja); A. Ziegler; F. Cambien (François); A.H. Goodall (Alison); L.A. Cupples (Adrienne); T. Quertermous (Thomas); W. Mäsignrz (Winfried); C. Hengstenberg (Christian); S. Blankenberg (Stefan); W.H. Ouwehand (Willem); A.S. Hall (Alistair); J.J.P. Kastelein (John); P. Deloukas (Panagiotis); J.R. Thompson (John); K. Stefansson (Kari); R. Roberts (Robert); U. Thorsteinsdottir (Unnur); C.J. O'Donnell (Christopher); R. McPherson (Ruth); J. Erdmann (Jeanette); N.J. Samani (Nilesh)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractWe performed a meta-analysis of 14 genome-wide association studies of coronary artery disease (CAD) comprising 22,233 individuals with CAD (cases) and 64,762 controls of European descent followed by genotyping of top association signals in 56,682 additional individuals. This analysis ide

  5. Recent human evolution has shaped geographical differences in susceptibility to disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    U.M. Marigorta (Urko); O. Lao Grueso (Oscar); F. Casals (Ferran); F. Calafell (Francesc); C. Morcillo-Suárez (Carlos); R. Faria (Rui); E. Bosch (Elena); F. Serra (François); J. Bertranpetit (Jaume); H. Dopazo (Hernán); A. Navarro (Arcadi)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Searching for associations between genetic variants and complex diseases has been a very active area of research for over two decades. More than 51,000 potential associations have been studied and published, a figure that keeps increasing, especially with the recent explosion

  6. Modulation of microrna in two genetically disparate chicken lines showing different necrotic enteritis disease susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Necrotic enteritis (NE) is a re-emerging disease as a result of an increased restriction on the use of antibiotics in poultry. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathology of NE are unclear. Therefore, we carried out small RNA transcriptome analysis in an experimentally induced NE m...

  7. Demonstration of cerebral perfusion abnormalities in moyamoya disease using susceptibility perfusion- and diffusion-weighted MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, W.M.; Laitt, R.D. [Department of Neuroradiology, Central Manchester Healthcare Trust, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9WL (United Kingdom); Li, K.L.; Jackson, A. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PT (United Kingdom); Sherrington, C.R.; Talbot, P. [Department of Neurology, Central Manchester Healthcare Trust, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9WL (United Kingdom)

    1999-02-01

    We describe the use of diffusion-weighted imaging and perfusion MRI using a contrast-medium bolus in the preoperative investigation for young man presenting with a cerebral ischaemic episode as a manifestation of moyamoya disease. (orig.) With 6 figs., 21 refs.

  8. Chronic wasting disease (CWD) susceptibility of several North American rodents that are sympatric with cervid CWD epidemics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heisey, D.M.; Mickelsen, N.A.; Schneider, J.R.; Johnson, C.J.; Langenberg, J.A.; Bochsler, P.N.; Keane, D.P.; Barr, D.J.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a highly contagious always fatal neurodegenerative disease that is currently known to naturally infect only species of the deer family, Cervidae. CWD epidemics are occurring in free-ranging cervids at several locations in North America, and other wildlife species are certainly being exposed to infectious material. To assess the potential for transmission, we intracerebrally inoculated four species of epidemic-sympatric rodents with CWD. Transmission was efficient in all species; the onset of disease was faster in the two vole species than the two Peromyscus spp. The results for inocula prepared from CWD-positive deer with or without CWD-resistant genotypes were similar. Survival times were substantially shortened upon second passage, demonstrating adaptation. Unlike all other known prion protein sequences for cricetid rodents that possess asparagine at position 170, our red-backed voles expressed serine and refute previous suggestions that a serine in this position substantially reduces susceptibility to CWD. Given the scavenging habits of these rodent species, the apparent persistence of CWD prions in the environment, and the inevitable exposure of these rodents to CWD prions, our intracerebral challenge results indicate that further investigation of the possibility of natural transmission is warranted. Copyright ?? 2010, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Genetic polymorphism of MMP family and coronary disease susceptibility: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Shi, Jingpu; Fu, Lingyu; Wang, Hailong; Zhou, Bo; Wu, Xiaomei

    2012-03-01

    The issue that genetic polymorphism of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family is in association with coronary disease is controversial. So we did a meta-analysis to clarify it clearly. We made a literature search of PubMed, the Web of Science, and Cochrane Collaboration's database to identify eligible reports. The methodological quality of each included studies was assessed. We calculated the pooled ORs with their 95%CI for each genetic polymorphism in STATA 11 software. Separate analysis was performed to address the consistency of results across the subgroup with different continents. A total of 39 studies were included, with a sample of 42269 individuals. This meta-analysis provided evidence that genetic polymorphism of MMP1-1607 1G/2G, MMP3-Gly45lys, MMP3-376 G/C, MMP3-1171 5A/6A, MMP9-1562 C/T and MMP9-R279Q have a small to medium effect on incidence of coronary disease. There was no evidence that MMP1-519 A/G, MMP1-340 T/C and MMP2-1306 C/T polymorphism could increase risk of coronary disease. Results from subgroup analysis supported a relation between MMP3-1711 5A allele, MMP9-1562 C allele and coronary disease especially in Asian population. The results provide moderate association between the six common genetic polymorphism of matrix metalloproteinase family and coronary disease. However, the challenge for researcher is identifying separate effect on different races.

  10. Lactoferrin knockout mice demonstrates greater susceptibility to Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans-induced periodontal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velusamy, S K; Ganeshnarayan, K; Markowitz, K; Schreiner, H; Furgang, D; Fine, D H; Velliyagounder, K

    2013-11-01

    Among the innate defense mechanisms in the oral cavity, lactoferrin (LF) is a vital antimicrobial that can modify the host response against periodontopathogens. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is the main periodontopathogen of localized aggressive periodontitis. The aim of this study is to evaluate the role of LF during A. actinomycetemcomitans-induced periodontitis. Differences in the expression levels of cytokines, chemokines, chemokine receptors, and bone loss markers between wild-type (WT) and LF knockout mice (LFKO(-/-)) were evaluated by real time-PCR. Serum IgG and LF levels were quantified by ELISA. Alveolar bone loss among the groups was estimated by measuring the distance from cemento-enamel junction (CEJ) to the alveolar bone crest (ABC) at 20 molar sites. Oral infection with A. actinomycetemcomitans increased LF levels in periodontal tissue (P = 0.01) and saliva (P = 0.0004) of wild-type infected (WTI) mice compared to wild-type control mice. Pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interferon-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and IL-12 were increased in the infected LF knockout (LFKO(-/-)I) mice compared to the WTI mice, whereas the anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-4 and IL-10 were decreased. Chemokines and chemokine receptors showed different expression patterns between WTI and LFKO(-/-)I mice. The LFKO(-/-)I mice developed increased bone loss (P = 0.002), in conjunction with increased expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand and decrease in osteoprotegerin, compared to WTI mice. These results demonstrate that the infected LFKO(-/-) mice were more susceptible to A. actinomycetemcomitans-induced alveolar bone loss, with different patterns of immune responses compared to those of WTI mice.

  11. Primordial beryllium as a big bang calorimeter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pospelov, Maxim; Pradler, Josef

    2011-03-25

    Many models of new physics including variants of supersymmetry predict metastable long-lived particles that can decay during or after primordial nucleosynthesis, releasing significant amounts of nonthermal energy. The hadronic energy injection in these decays leads to the formation of ⁹Be via the chain of nonequilibrium transformations: Energy(h)→T, ³He→⁶He, ⁶Li→⁹Be. We calculate the efficiency of this transformation and show that if the injection happens at cosmic times of a few hours the release of O(10 MeV) per baryon can be sufficient for obtaining a sizable ⁹Be abundance. The absence of a plateau structure in the ⁹Be/H abundance down to a O(10⁻¹⁴) level allows one to use beryllium as a robust constraint on new physics models with decaying or annihilating particles.

  12. Investigation of the ion beryllium surface interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guseva, M.I.; Birukov, A.Yu.; Gureev, V.M. [RRC Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    The self -sputtering yield of the Be was measured. The energy dependence of the Be self-sputtering yield agrees well with that calculated by W. Eckstein et. al. Below 770 K the self-sputtering yield is temperature independent; at T{sub irr}.> 870 K it increases sharply. Hot-pressed samples at 370 K were implanted with monoenergetic 5 keV hydrogen ions and with a stationary plasma (flux power {approximately} 5 MW/m{sup 2}). The investigation of hydrogen behavior in beryllium shows that at low doses hydrogen is solved, but at doses {ge} 5x10{sup 22} m{sup -2} the bubbles and channels are formed. It results in hydrogen profile shift to the surface and decrease of its concentration. The sputtering results in further concentration decrease at doses > 10{sup 25}m{sup -2}.

  13. Photodesorption from copper, beryllium, and thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foerster, C. L.; Halama, H. J.; Korn, G.

    Ever increasing circulating currents in electron-positron colliders and light sources demand lower and lower photodesportion (PSD) from the surfaces of their vacuum chambers and their photon absorbers. This is particularly important in compact electron storage rings and B meson factories where photon power of several kw cm(exp -1) is deposited on the surfaces. Given the above factors, we have measured PSD from 1 m long bars of solid copper and solid beryllium, and TiN, Au and C thin films deposited on solid copper bars. Each sample was exposed to about 10(exp 23) photons/m with a critical energy of 500 eV at the VUV ring of the NSLS. PSD was recorded for two conditions: after a 200 C bake-out and after an Ar glow discharge cleaning. In addition, we also measured reflected photons, photoelectrons and desorption as functions of normal, 75 mrad, 100 mrad, and 125 mrad incident photons.

  14. Methodological approach for substantiating disease freedom in a heterogeneous small population. Application to ovine scrapie, a disease with a strong genetic susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Marie-José; Durand, Benoit; Calavas, Didier; Ducrot, Christian

    2010-06-01

    Demonstrating disease freedom is becoming important in different fields including animal disease control. Most methods consider sampling only from a homogeneous population in which each animal has the same probability of becoming infected. In this paper, we propose a new methodology to calculate the probability of detecting the disease if it is present in a heterogeneous population of small size with potentially different risk groups, differences in risk being defined using relative risks. To calculate this probability, for each possible arrangement of the infected animals in the different groups, the probability that all the animals tested are test-negative given this arrangement is multiplied by the probability that this arrangement occurs. The probability formula is developed using the assumption of a perfect test and hypergeometric sampling for finite small size populations. The methodology is applied to scrapie, a disease affecting small ruminants and characterized in sheep by a strong genetic susceptibility defining different risk groups. It illustrates that the genotypes of the tested animals influence heavily the confidence level of detecting scrapie. The results present the statistical power for substantiating disease freedom in a small heterogeneous population as a function of the design prevalence, the structure of the sample tested, the structure of the herd and the associated relative risks.

  15. New facility for post irradiation examination of neutron irradiated beryllium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishitsuka, Etsuo; Kawamura, Hiroshi [Oarai Research Establishment, Ibaraki-Ken (Japan)

    1995-09-01

    Beryllium is expected as a neutron multiplier and plasma facing materials in the fusion reactor, and the neutron irradiation data on properties of beryllium up to 800{degrees}C need for the engineering design. The acquisition of data on the tritium behavior, swelling, thermal and mechanical properties are first priority in ITER design. Facility for the post irradiation examination of neutron irradiated beryllium was constructed in the hot laboratory of Japan Materials Testing Reactor to get the engineering design data mentioned above. This facility consist of the four glove boxes, dry air supplier, tritium monitoring and removal system, storage box of neutron irradiated samples. Beryllium handling are restricted by the amount of tritium;7.4 GBq/day and {sup 60}Co;7.4 MBq/day.

  16. The uses and adverse effects of beryllium on health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooper, Ross G.; Harrison, Adrian Paul

    2009-01-01

    Context: This review describes the health effects of beryllium exposure in the workplace and the environment. Aim: To collate information on the consequences of occupational and environmental exposure to beryllium on physiological function and well being. Materials and Methods: The criteria used...... in the current review for selecting articles were adopted from proposed criteria in The International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health. Articles were classified based on acute and chronic exposure and toxicity of beryllium. Results: The proportions of utilized and nonutilized articles were...... published in sources unobtainable through requests at the British Library, and some had no impact factor and were excluded. Conclusion: Beryllium has some useful but undoubtedly harmful effects on health and well-being. Measures needed to be taken to prevent hazardous exposure to this element, making its...

  17. Gene Prospector: An evidence gateway for evaluating potential susceptibility genes and interacting risk factors for human diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khoury Muin J

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Millions of single nucleotide polymorphisms have been identified as a result of the human genome project and the rapid advance of high throughput genotyping technology. Genetic association studies, such as recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS, have provided a springboard for exploring the contribution of inherited genetic variation and gene/environment interactions in relation to disease. Given the capacity of such studies to produce a plethora of information that may then be described in a number of publications, selecting possible disease susceptibility genes and identifying related modifiable risk factors is a major challenge. A Web-based application for finding evidence of such relationships is key to the development of follow-up studies and evidence for translational research. We developed a Web-based application that selects and prioritizes potential disease-related genes by using a highly curated and updated literature database of genetic association studies. The application, called Gene Prospector, also provides a comprehensive set of links to additional data sources. Results We compared Gene Prospector results for the query "Parkinson" with a list of 13 leading candidate genes (Top Results from a curated, specialty database for genetic associations with Parkinson disease (PDGene. Nine of the thirteen leading candidate genes from PDGene were in the top 10th percentile of the ranked list from Gene Prospector. In fact, Gene Prospector included more published genetic association studies for the 13 leading candidate genes than PDGene did. Conclusion Gene Prospector provides an online gateway for searching for evidence about human genes in relation to diseases, other phenotypes, and risk factors, and provides links to published literature and other online data sources. Gene Prospector can be accessed via http://www.hugenavigator.net/HuGENavigator/geneProspectorStartPage.do.

  18. The beryllium production at Ulba metallurgical plant (Ust-Kamenogrsk, Kazakhstan)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dvinskykh, E.M.; Savchuk, V.V.; Tuzov, Y.V. [Ulba Metallurgical Plant (Zavod), Ust-Kamenogorsk, Abay prospect 102 (Kazakhstan)

    1998-01-01

    The Report includes data on beryllium production of Ulba metallurgical plant, located in Ust-Kamenogorsk (Kazakhstan). Beryllium production is showed to have extended technological opportunities in manufacturing semi-products (beryllium ingots, master alloys, metallic beryllium powders, beryllium oxide) and in production of structural beryllium and its parts. Ulba metallurgical plant owns a unique technology of beryllium vacuum distillation, which allows to produce reactor grades of beryllium with a low content of metallic impurities. At present Ulba plant does not depend on raw materials suppliers. The quantity of stored raw materials and semi-products will allow to provide a 25-years work of beryllium production at a full capacity. The plant has a satisfactory experience in solving ecological problems, which could be useful in ITER program. (author)

  19. Quantitative evaluation of DNA methylation patterns for ALVE and TVB genes in a neoplastic disease susceptible and resistant chicken model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Yu

    Full Text Available Chicken endogenous viruses, ALVE (Avian Leukosis Virus subgroup E, are inherited as LTR (long terminal repeat retrotransposons, which are negatively correlated with disease resistance, and any changes in DNA methylation may contribute to the susceptibility to neoplastic disease. The relationship between ALVE methylation status and neoplastic disease in the chicken is undefined. White Leghorn inbred lines 7(2 and 6(3 at the ADOL have been respectively selected for resistance and susceptibility to tumors that are induced by avian viruses. In this study, the DNA methylation patterns of 3 approximately 6 CpG sites of four conserved regions in ALVE, including one unique region in ALVE1, the promoter region in the TVB (tumor virus receptor of ALV subgroup B, D and E locus, were analyzed in the two lines using pyrosequencing methods in four tissues, i.e., liver, spleen, blood and hypothalamus. A significant CpG hypermethylation level was seen in line 7(2 in all four tissues, e.g., 91.86 +/- 1.63% for ALVE region2 in blood, whereas the same region was hemimethylated (46.16 +/- 2.56% in line 6(3. CpG methylation contents of the ALVE regions were significantly lower in line 6(3 than in line 7(2 in all tissues (P < 0.01 except the ALVE region 3/4 in liver. RNA expressions of ALVE regions 2 and 3 (PPT-U3 were significantly higher in line 6(3 than in line 7(2 (P < 0.01. The methylation levels of six recombinant congenic strains (RCSs closely resembled to the background line 6(3 in ALVE-region 2, which imply the methylation pattern of ALVE-region 2 may be a biomarker in resistant disease breeding. The methylation level of the promoter region in the TVB was significantly different in blood (P < 0.05 and hypothalamus (P < 0.0001, respectively. Our data disclosed a hypermethylation pattern of ALVE that may be relevant for resistance against ALV induced tumors in chickens.

  20. Susceptibility to Laurel Wilt and disease incidence in two rare plant species, Pondberry and Pondspice Plant Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen Fraedrich; T Harrington; C Bates; J Johnson; L. Reid; Glenda Susan Best; T Leininger; Tracy Hawkins

    2011-01-01

    Laurel wilt, caused by Raffaelea lauricola, has been responsible for extensive losses of redbay (Persea borbonia) in South Carolina and Georgia since 2003. Symptoms of the disease have been noted in other species of the Lauraceae such as the federally endangered pondberry (Lindera melissifolia) and the threatened pondspice (Litsea aestivalis). Pondberry and pondspice...

  1. Rare Variants in the TREX1 Gene and Susceptibility to Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Barizzone

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available TREX1 (DNase III is an exonuclease involved in response to oxidative stress and apoptosis. Heterozygous mutations in TREX1 were previously observed in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE and Sjögren's syndrome (SS. We performed a mutational analysis of the TREX1 gene on three autoimmune diseases: SLE (210 patients and SS (58 patients, to confirm a TREX1 involvement in the Italian population, and systemic sclerosis (SSc, 150 patients because it shares similarities with SLE (presence of antinuclear antibodies and connective tissue damage. We observed 7 variations; two of these are novel nonsynonymous variants (p.Glu198Lys and p.Met232Val. They were detected in one SS and in one SSc patient, respectively, and in none of the 200 healthy controls typed in this study and of the 1712 published controls. In silico analysis predicts a possibly damaging role on protein function for both variants. The other 5 variations are synonymous and only one of them is novel (p.Pro48Pro. This study contributes to the demonstration that TREX1 is involved in autoimmune diseases and proposes that the spectrum of involved autoimmune diseases can be broader and includes SSc. We do not confirm a role of TREX1 variants in SLE.

  2. Nanostructured Alloys as an Alternative to Copper-Beryllium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-19

    bushing applications;  2) Nanometal/composite for high specific strength/stiffness components; and  3) Nanometal cobalt / copper enabled...performance of Integran’s Nanovate cobalt -based and nickel- cobalt metals is superior to copper beryllium (peak hardness); Mechanical Property Summary...Nanostructured Cobalt Alloy 285 ksi (1967 MPa) 225 ksi (1550 MPa) 290 ksi (2000 MPa) 18855 ksi (130 GPa) Copper Beryllium (C17200-TH04) 142 ksi

  3. Actinide/beryllium neutron sources with reduced dispersion characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Louis D.

    2012-08-14

    Neutron source comprising a composite, said composite comprising crystals comprising BeO and AmBe.sub.13, and an excess of beryllium, wherein the crystals have an average size of less than 2 microns; the size distribution of the crystals is less than 2 microns; and the beryllium is present in a 7-fold to a 75-fold excess by weight of the amount of AmBe.sub.13; and methods of making thereof.

  4. Deletion of PPAR-γ in immune cells enhances susceptibility to antiglomerular basement membrane disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristen Chafin

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Cristen Chafin2, Sarah Muse2, Raquel Hontecillas5, Josep Bassaganya-Riera5, David L Caudell2, Samuel K Shimp III4, M Nichole Rylander4, John Zhang6, Liwu Li3, Christopher M Reilly1,21Virginia College of Osteopathic Medicine, 2Department of Biomedical Sciences and Pathobiology, Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA, USA; 3Department of Biological Sciences, 4Department of Mechanical Engineering, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA, USA; 5Nutritional Immunology and Molecular Medicine Laboratory, Virginia Bioinformatics Institute, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA, USA; 6Medical University of SC, Charleston, SC, USAAbstract: Activation of the nuclear hormone receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ has been shown to be immunoregulatory in autoimmune diseases by inhibiting production of a number of inflammatory mediators. We investigated whether PPAR-γ gene deletion in hematopoietic cells would alter disease pathogenesis in the antiglomerular basement membrane (anti-GBM mouse model. PPAR-γ+/+ and PPAR-γ-/- mice were immunized with rabbit antimouse GBM antibodies and lipopolysaccharide and evaluated for two weeks. Although both the PPAR-γ+/+ and PPAR-γ-/- mice had IgG deposition in the glomerulus and showed proteinuria two weeks after injection, glomerular and tubulointerstitial disease in PPAR-γ-/- mice were significantly more severe compared with the PPAR-γ+/+ animals. We observed that the PPAR-γ-/- mice had decreased CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells and an increased CD8+:CD4+ ratio as compared with the PPAR-γ+/+ mice, suggesting that PPAR-γ has a role in the regulation of T cells. Furthermore, plasma interleukin-6 levels were significantly increased in the PPAR-γ-/- mice at two weeks as compared with the PPAR-γ+/+ animals. Taken together, these studies show that

  5. Impurities effect on the swelling of neutron irradiated beryllium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donne, M.D.; Scaffidi-Argentina, F. [Institut fuer Neutronenphysik und Reaktortechnik, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    1995-09-01

    An important factor controlling the swelling behaviour of fast neutron irradiated beryllium is the impurity content which can strongly affect both the surface tension and the creep strength of this material. Being the volume swelling of the old beryllium (early sixties) systematically higher than that of the more modem one (end of the seventies), a sensitivity analysis with the aid of the computer code ANFIBE (ANalysis of Fusion Irradiated BEryllium) to investigate the effect of these material properties on the swelling behaviour of neutron irradiated beryllium has been performed. Two sets of experimental data have been selected: the first one named Western refers to quite recently produced Western beryllium, whilst the second one, named Russian refers to relatively old (early sixties) Russian beryllium containing a higher impurity rate than the Western one. The results obtained with the ANFIBE Code were assessed by comparison with experimental data and the used material properties were compared with the data available in the literature. Good agreement between calculated and measured values has been found.

  6. Determination of beryllium by using X-ray fluorescence spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawisza, Beata

    2008-03-01

    X-ray fluorescence spectrometry method is subject to certain difficulties and inconveniences for the elements having the atomic number 9 or less. These difficulties become progressively more severe as the atomic number decreases, and are quite serious for beryllium, which is practically indeterminable directly by XRF. Therefore, an indirect determination of beryllium that is based on the evaluation of cobalt in the precipitate is taken into consideration. In the thesis below, there is a description of a new, simple, and precise method by selective precipitation using hexamminecobalt(III) chloride and ammonium carbonate-EDTA solution as a complexing agent for the determining of a trace amount of beryllium using X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. The optimum conditions for [Co(NH(3))(6)][Be(2)(OH)(3)(CO(3))(2)(H(2)O)(2)].(3)H(2)O complex formation were studied. The complex was collected on the membrane filter, and the Co Kalpha line was measured by XRF. The method presents the advantages of the sample preparation and the elimination of the matrix effects due to the thin film obtained. The detection limit of the proposed method is 0.2 mg of beryllium. The method was successfully applied to beryllium determination in copper/ beryllium/cobalt alloys.

  7. Association of Thrombomodulin Gene Polymorphisms with Susceptibility to Atherosclerotic Diseases: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jie; Jin, Jun; Tan, Sheng

    2016-05-01

    Previous studies have proved that the dysfunction of thrombomodulin (TM) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic diseases. In order to reveal their inherent relationship, we conducted a meta-analysis to uncover the association between two polymorphisms -33G/A and Ala455Val (c.1418C>T) in the TM gene and atherosclerotic diseases. We carried out a systematic search in PubMed, Science Direct, BIOSIS Previews, SpringerLink, the Cochrane library, the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, the Chinese Biomedical Database, the Wei Pu database, and the Wanfang Database. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were computed to show the association. We included 22 eligible studies which involved 5472 patients and 7786 controls. There were statistically significant associations between -33G/A polymorphisms in TM and the MI group under the Allele and Recessive models in Asians (G vs. A: OR = 0.67, 95%CI = 0.56-0.78, P < 0.00001; GG vs. GA+AA: OR = 0.66, 95%CI = 0.56-0.78, P < 0.00001). However, these findings of the overall and subgroups showed that Ala455Val polymorphisms did not have any relationship with atherosclerotic diseases. After Bonferroni correction, the above associations remained statistically significant. This meta-analysis provides robust evidence of association between the -33G/A polymorphism in the TM gene and the risk of myocardial infarction in Asians. The A allele may increase the incidence of MI in Asians. However, the Ala455Val variant was not associated with atherosclerotic risk. Further studies with adequate sample size are needed to verify our findings.

  8. Dissection of a Complex Disease Susceptibility Region Using a Bayesian Stochastic Search Approach to Fine Mapping.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Wallace

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Identification of candidate causal variants in regions associated with risk of common diseases is complicated by linkage disequilibrium (LD and multiple association signals. Nonetheless, accurate maps of these variants are needed, both to fully exploit detailed cell specific chromatin annotation data to highlight disease causal mechanisms and cells, and for design of the functional studies that will ultimately be required to confirm causal mechanisms. We adapted a Bayesian evolutionary stochastic search algorithm to the fine mapping problem, and demonstrated its improved performance over conventional stepwise and regularised regression through simulation studies. We then applied it to fine map the established multiple sclerosis (MS and type 1 diabetes (T1D associations in the IL-2RA (CD25 gene region. For T1D, both stepwise and stochastic search approaches identified four T1D association signals, with the major effect tagged by the single nucleotide polymorphism, rs12722496. In contrast, for MS, the stochastic search found two distinct competing models: a single candidate causal variant, tagged by rs2104286 and reported previously using stepwise analysis; and a more complex model with two association signals, one of which was tagged by the major T1D associated rs12722496 and the other by rs56382813. There is low to moderate LD between rs2104286 and both rs12722496 and rs56382813 (r2 ≃ 0:3 and our two SNP model could not be recovered through a forward stepwise search after conditioning on rs2104286. Both signals in the two variant model for MS affect CD25 expression on distinct subpopulations of CD4+ T cells, which are key cells in the autoimmune process. The results support a shared causal variant for T1D and MS. Our study illustrates the benefit of using a purposely designed model search strategy for fine mapping and the advantage of combining disease and protein expression data.

  9. Antimicrobial susceptibility and virulence characteristics of Salmonella enterica Typhimurium isolates from healthy and diseased pigs in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamang, Migma Dorji; Gurung, Mamata; Nam, Hyang-Mi; Moon, Dong Chan; Jang, Geum-Chan; Jung, Suk-Chan; Lim, Suk-Kyung

    2014-09-01

    This study compared the antimicrobial susceptibility and prevalence of virulence genes in Salmonella enterica Typhimurium isolated from healthy and diseased pigs in Korea. A total of 456 Salmonella Typhimurium isolated from healthy (n = 238) and diseased (n = 218) pigs between 1998 and 2011 were investigated. In total, 93.4% of the Salmonella Typhimurium isolates were resistant to at least one antimicrobial agent tested. The isolates were most often resistant to tetracycline (85.7%), followed by streptomycin (83.6%), nalidixic acid (67.3%), ampicillin (49.3%), chloramphenicol (42.8%), and gentamicin (37.1%). Moreover, multidrug resistance phenotype and resistance to ampicillin, florfenicol, gentamicin, nalidixic acid, neomycin, streptomycin, and tetracycline were significantly higher (P invA, spiA, msgA, sipB, prgH, spaN, tolC, lpfC, sifA, sitC, and sopB virulence genes. The prevalence of orgA, pagC, and iroN were 50.2, 74.1, and 91.0%, respectively, whereas isolates carrying cdtB (1.5%), pefA (7.0%), and spvB (14.9%) were identified much less frequently. Furthermore, the prevalence of invA, lpfC, orgA, pagC, and iroN was significantly higher (P < 0.01) among the isolates from the diseased pigs than in isolates from the healthy pigs. Our results demonstrated that, among diseased pigs, there was significantly higher resistance to some antimicrobials and greater prevalence of some virulence genes than in healthy pigs, indicating the role these factors play in pathogenesis. Multidrug-resistant Salmonella isolates that carry virulence-associated genes are potentially more dangerous and constitute a public health concern. Thus, continuous surveillance of antimicrobial resistance and virulence characteristics in Salmonella is essential.

  10. Genome editing of the disease susceptibility gene CsLOB1 in citrus confers resistance to citrus canker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Hongge; Zhang, Yunzeng; Orbović, Vladimir; Xu, Jin; White, Frank F; Jones, Jeffrey B; Wang, Nian

    2017-07-01

    Citrus is a highly valued tree crop worldwide, while, at the same time, citrus production faces many biotic challenges, including bacterial canker and Huanglongbing (HLB). Breeding for disease-resistant varieties is the most efficient and sustainable approach to control plant diseases. Traditional breeding of citrus varieties is challenging due to multiple limitations, including polyploidy, polyembryony, extended juvenility and long crossing cycles. Targeted genome editing technology has the potential to shorten varietal development for some traits, including disease resistance. Here, we used CRISPR/Cas9/sgRNA technology to modify the canker susceptibility gene CsLOB1 in Duncan grapefruit. Six independent lines, DLOB 2, DLOB 3, DLOB 9, DLOB 10, DLOB 11 and DLOB 12, were generated. Targeted next-generation sequencing of the six lines showed the mutation rate was 31.58%, 23.80%, 89.36%, 88.79%, 46.91% and 51.12% for DLOB 2, DLOB 3, DLOB 9, DLOB 10, DLOB 11 and DLOB 12, respectively, of the cells in each line. DLOB 2 and DLOB 3 showed canker symptoms similar to wild-type grapefruit, when inoculated with the pathogen Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (Xcc). No canker symptoms were observed on DLOB 9, DLOB 10, DLOB 11 and DLOB 12 at 4 days postinoculation (DPI) with Xcc. Pustules caused by Xcc were observed on DLOB 9, DLOB 10, DLOB 11 and DLOB 12 in later stages, which were much reduced compared to that on wild-type grapefruit. The pustules on DLOB 9 and DLOB 10 did not develop into typical canker symptoms. No side effects and off-target mutations were detected in the mutated plants. This study indicates that genome editing using CRISPR technology will provide a promising pathway to generate disease-resistant citrus varieties. © 2016 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Low brain ascorbic acid increases susceptibility to seizures in mouse models of decreased brain ascorbic acid transport and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Timothy A; Kang, Jing-Qiong; Kennard, John A; Harrison, Fiona E

    2015-02-01

    Seizures are a known co-occurring symptom of Alzheimer's disease, and they can accelerate cognitive and neuropathological dysfunction. Sub-optimal vitamin C (ascorbic acid) deficiency, that is low levels that do not lead the sufferer to present with clinical signs of scurvy (e.g. lethargy, hemorrhage, hyperkeratosis), are easily obtainable with insufficient dietary intake, and may contribute to the oxidative stress environment of both Alzheimer's disease and epilepsy. The purpose of this study was to test whether mice that have diminished brain ascorbic acid in addition to carrying human Alzheimer's disease mutations in the amyloid precursor protein (APP) and presenilin 1 (PSEN1) genes, had altered electrical activity in the brain (electroencephalography; EEG), and were more susceptible to pharmacologically induced seizures. Brain ascorbic acid was decreased in APP/PSEN1 mice by crossing them with sodium vitamin C transporter 2 (SVCT2) heterozygous knockout mice. These mice have an approximately 30% decrease in brain ascorbic acid due to lower levels of SVCT2 that supplies the brain with ASC. SVCT2+/-APP/PSEN1 mice had decreased ascorbic acid and increased oxidative stress in brain, increased mortality, faster seizure onset latency following treatment with kainic acid (10 mg/kg i.p.), and more ictal events following pentylenetetrazol (50 mg/kg i.p.) treatment. Furthermore, we report the entirely novel phenomenon that ascorbic acid deficiency alone increased the severity of kainic acid- and pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures. These data suggest that avoiding ascorbic acid deficiency may be particularly important in populations at increased risk for epilepsy and seizures, such as Alzheimer's disease.

  12. Large-scale association analyses identifies 13 new susceptibility loci for coronary artery disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schunkert, Heribert; König, Inke R.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Reilly, Muredach P.; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Holm, Hilma; Preuss, Michael; Stewart, Alexandre F. R.; Barbalic, Maja; Gieger, Christian; Absher, Devin; Aherrahrou, Zouhair; Allayee, Hooman; Altshuler, David; Anand, Sonia S.; Andersen, Karl; Anderson, Jeffrey L.; Ardissino, Diego; Ball, Stephen G.; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Barnes, Timothy A.; Becker, Diane M.; Becker, Lewis C.; Berger, Klaus; Bis, Joshua C.; Boekholdt, S. Matthijs; Boerwinkle, Eric; Braund, Peter S.; Brown, Morris J.; Burnett, Mary Susan; Buysschaert, Ian; Carlquist, Cardiogenics, John F.; Chen, Li; Cichon, Sven; Codd, Veryan; Davies, Robert W.; Dedoussis, George; Dehghan, Abbas; Demissie, Serkalem; Devaney, Joseph M.; Do, Ron; Doering, Angela; Eifert, Sandra; El Mokhtari, Nour Eddine; Ellis, Stephen G.; Elosua, Roberto; Engert, James C.; Epstein, Stephen E.; Faire, Ulf de; Fischer, Marcus; Folsom, Aaron R.; Freyer, Jennifer; Gigante, Bruna; Girelli, Domenico; Gretarsdottir, Solveig; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gulcher, Jeffrey R.; Halperin, Eran; Hammond, Naomi; Hazen, Stanley L.; Hofman, Albert; Horne, Benjamin D.; Illig, Thomas; Iribarren, Carlos; Jones, Gregory T.; Jukema, J.Wouter; Kaiser, Michael A.; Kaplan, Lee M.; Kastelein, John J.P.; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Knowles, Joshua W.; Kolovou, Genovefa; Kong, Augustine; Laaksonen, Reijo; Lambrechts, Diether; Leander, Karin; Lettre, Guillaume; Li, Mingyao; Lieb, Wolfgang; Linsel-Nitschke, Patrick; Loley, Christina; Lotery, Andrew J.; Mannucci, Pier M.; Maouche, Seraya; Martinelli, Nicola; McKeown, Pascal P.; Meisinger, Christa; Meitinger, Thomas; Melander, Olle; Merlini, Pier Angelica; Mooser, Vincent; Morgan, Thomas; Mühleisen, Thomas W.; Muhlestein, Joseph B.; Münzel, Thomas; Musunuru, Kiran; Nahrstaedt, Janja; Nelson, Christopher P.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Olivieri, Oliviero; Patel, Riyaz S.; Patterson, Chris C.; Peters, Annette; Peyvandi, Flora; Qu, Liming; Quyyumi, Arshed A.; Rader, Daniel J.; Rallidis, Loukianos S.; Rice, Catherine; Rosendaal, Frits R.; Rubin, Diana; Salomaa, Veikko; Sampietro, M. Lourdes; Sandhu, Manj S.; Schadt, Eric; Schäfer, Arne; Schillert, Arne; Schreiber, Stefan; Schrezenmeir, Jürgen; Schwartz, Stephen M.; Siscovick, David S.; Sivananthan, Mohan; Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh; Smith, Albert; Smith, Tamara B.; Snoep, Jaapjan D.; Soranzo, Nicole; Spertus, John A.; Stark, Klaus; Stirrups, Kathy; Stoll, Monika; Tang, W. H. Wilson; Tennstedt, Stephanie; Thorgeirsson, Gudmundur; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Tomaszewski, Maciej; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; van Rij, Andre M.; Voight, Benjamin F.; Wareham, Nick J.; Wells, George A.; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Wild, Philipp S.; Willenborg, Christina; Witteman, Jaqueline C. M.; Wright, Benjamin J.; Ye, Shu; Zeller, Tanja; Ziegler, Andreas; Cambien, Francois; Goodall, Alison H.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Quertermous, Thomas; März, Winfried; Hengstenberg, Christian; Blankenberg, Stefan; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Hall, Alistair S.; Deloukas, Panos; Thompson, John R.; Stefansson, Kari; Roberts, Robert; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; O’Donnell, Christopher J.; McPherson, Ruth; Erdmann, Jeanette; Samani, Nilesh J.

    2011-01-01

    We performed a meta-analysis of 14 genome-wide association studies of coronary artery disease (CAD) comprising 22,233 cases and 64,762 controls of European descent, followed by genotyping of top association signals in 60,738 additional individuals. This genomic analysis identified 13 novel loci harboring one or more SNPs that were associated with CAD at P<5×10−8 and confirmed the association of 10 of 12 previously reported CAD loci. The 13 novel loci displayed risk allele frequencies ranging from 0.13 to 0.91 and were associated with a 6 to 17 percent increase in the risk of CAD per allele. Notably, only three of the novel loci displayed significant association with traditional CAD risk factors, while the majority lie in gene regions not previously implicated in the pathogenesis of CAD. Finally, five of the novel CAD risk loci appear to have pleiotropic effects, showing strong association with various other human diseases or traits. PMID:21378990

  13. Vascular Permeability Drives Susceptibility to Influenza Infection in a Murine Model of Sickle Cell Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Erik A.; Oguin, Thomas H.; Meliopoulos, Victoria; Iverson, Amy; Broadnax, Alexandria; Yoon, Sun-Woo; Pestina, Tamara; Thomas, Paul; Webby, Richard; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey; Rosch, Jason W.

    2017-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a major global health concern. Patients with SCD experience disproportionately greater morbidity and mortality in response to influenza infection than do others. Viral infection is one contributing factor for the development of Acute Chest Syndrome (ACS), a major cause of morbidity and mortality in SCD patients. We determined whether the heightened sensitivity to influenza infection could be reproduced in the two different SCD murine models to ascertain the underlying mechanisms of increased disease severity. In agreement with clinical observations, we found that both genetic and bone marrow-transplanted SCD mice had greater mortality in response to influenza infection than did wild-type animals. Despite similar initial viral titers and inflammatory responses between wild-type and SCD animals during infection, SCD mice continued to deteriorate and failed to resolve the infection, resulting in increased mortality. Histopathology of the lung tissues revealed extensive pulmonary edema and vascular damage following infection, a finding confirmed by heightened vascular permeability following virus challenge. These findings implicate the development of exacerbated pulmonary permeability following influenza challenge as the primary factor underlying heightened mortality. These studies highlight the need to focus on prevention and control strategies against influenza infection in the SCD population. PMID:28256526

  14. TRPC6 channel as an emerging determinant of the podocyte injury susceptibility in kidney diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilatovskaya, Daria V; Staruschenko, Alexander

    2015-09-01

    Podocytes (terminally differentiated epithelial cells of the glomeruli) play a key role in the maintenance of glomerular structure and permeability and in the incipiency of various renal abnormalities. Injury to podocytes is considered a major contributor to the development of kidney disease as their loss causes proteinuria and progressive glomerulosclerosis. The physiological function of podocytes is critically dependent on proper intracellular calcium handling; excessive calcium influx in these cells may result in the effacement of foot processes, apoptosis, and subsequent glomeruli damage. One of the key proteins responsible for calcium flux in the podocytes is transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily C, member 6 (TRPC6); a gain-of-function mutation in TRPC6 has been associated with the onset of the familial forms of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). Recent data also revealed a critical role of this channel in the onset of diabetic nephropathy. Therefore, major efforts of the research community have been recently dedicated to unraveling the TRPC6-dependent effects in the initiation of podocyte injury. This mini-review focuses on the TRPC6 channel in podocytes and colligates recent data in an attempt to shed some light on the mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of TRPC6-mediated glomeruli damage and its potential role as a therapeutic target for the treatment of chronic kidney diseases.

  15. Prediction of "aggregation-prone" and "aggregation-susceptible" regions in proteins associated with neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawar, Amol P; Dubay, Kateri F; Zurdo, Jesús; Chiti, Fabrizio; Vendruscolo, Michele; Dobson, Christopher M

    2005-07-08

    Increasing evidence indicates that many peptides and proteins can be converted in vitro into highly organised amyloid structures, provided that the appropriate experimental conditions can be found. In this work, we define intrinsic propensities for the aggregation of individual amino acids and develop a method for identifying the regions of the sequence of an unfolded peptide or protein that are most important for promoting amyloid formation. This method is applied to the study of three polypeptides associated with neurodegenerative diseases, Abeta42, alpha-synuclein and tau. In order to validate the approach, we compare the regions of proteins that are predicted to be most important in driving aggregation, either intrinsically or as the result of mutations, with those determined experimentally. The knowledge of the location and the type of the "sensitive regions" for aggregation is important both for rationalising the effects of sequence changes on the aggregation of polypeptide chains and for the development of targeted strategies to combat diseases associated with amyloid formation.

  16. Official American Thoracic Society/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/Infectious Diseases Society of America Clinical Practice Guidelines: Treatment of Drug-Susceptible Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahid, Payam; Dorman, Susan E; Alipanah, Narges; Barry, Pennan M; Brozek, Jan L; Cattamanchi, Adithya; Chaisson, Lelia H; Chaisson, Richard E; Daley, Charles L; Grzemska, Malgosia; Higashi, Julie M; Ho, Christine S; Hopewell, Philip C; Keshavjee, Salmaan A; Lienhardt, Christian; Menzies, Richard; Merrifield, Cynthia; Narita, Masahiro; O'Brien, Rick; Peloquin, Charles A; Raftery, Ann; Saukkonen, Jussi; Schaaf, H Simon; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Starke, Jeffrey R; Migliori, Giovanni Battista; Vernon, Andrew

    2016-10-01

    The American Thoracic Society, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and Infectious Diseases Society of America jointly sponsored the development of this guideline for the treatment of drug-susceptible tuberculosis, which is also endorsed by the European Respiratory Society and the US National Tuberculosis Controllers Association. Representatives from the American Academy of Pediatrics, the Canadian Thoracic Society, the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, and the World Health Organization also participated in the development of the guideline. This guideline provides recommendations on the clinical and public health management of tuberculosis in children and adults in settings in which mycobacterial cultures, molecular and phenotypic drug susceptibility tests, and radiographic studies, among other diagnostic tools, are available on a routine basis. For all recommendations, literature reviews were performed, followed by discussion by an expert committee according to the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation methodology. Given the public health implications of prompt diagnosis and effective management of tuberculosis, empiric multidrug treatment is initiated in almost all situations in which active tuberculosis is suspected. Additional characteristics such as presence of comorbidities, severity of disease, and response to treatment influence management decisions. Specific recommendations on the use of case management strategies (including directly observed therapy), regimen and dosing selection in adults and children (daily vs intermittent), treatment of tuberculosis in the presence of HIV infection (duration of tuberculosis treatment and timing of initiation of antiretroviral therapy), as well as treatment of extrapulmonary disease (central nervous system, pericardial among other sites) are provided. The development of more potent and better-tolerated drug regimens, optimization of drug exposure for the

  17. Executive Summary: Official American Thoracic Society/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/Infectious Diseases Society of America Clinical Practice Guidelines: Treatment of Drug-Susceptible Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahid, Payam; Dorman, Susan E; Alipanah, Narges; Barry, Pennan M; Brozek, Jan L; Cattamanchi, Adithya; Chaisson, Lelia H; Chaisson, Richard E; Daley, Charles L; Grzemska, Malgosia; Higashi, Julie M; Ho, Christine S; Hopewell, Philip C; Keshavjee, Salmaan A; Lienhardt, Christian; Menzies, Richard; Merrifield, Cynthia; Narita, Masahiro; O'Brien, Rick; Peloquin, Charles A; Raftery, Ann; Saukkonen, Jussi; Schaaf, H Simon; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Starke, Jeffrey R; Migliori, Giovanni Battista; Vernon, Andrew

    2016-10-01

    The American Thoracic Society, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and Infectious Diseases Society of America jointly sponsored the development of this guideline for the treatment of drug-susceptible tuberculosis, which is also endorsed by the European Respiratory Society and the US National Tuberculosis Controllers Association. Representatives from the American Academy of Pediatrics, the Canadian Thoracic Society, the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, and the World Health Organization also participated in the development of the guideline. This guideline provides recommendations on the clinical and public health management of tuberculosis in children and adults in settings in which mycobacterial cultures, molecular and phenotypic drug susceptibility tests, and radiographic studies, among other diagnostic tools, are available on a routine basis. For all recommendations, literature reviews were performed, followed by discussion by an expert committee according to the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation methodology. Given the public health implications of prompt diagnosis and effective management of tuberculosis, empiric multidrug treatment is initiated in almost all situations in which active tuberculosis is suspected. Additional characteristics such as presence of comorbidities, severity of disease, and response to treatment influence management decisions. Specific recommendations on the use of case management strategies (including directly observed therapy), regimen and dosing selection in adults and children (daily vs intermittent), treatment of tuberculosis in the presence of HIV infection (duration of tuberculosis treatment and timing of initiation of antiretroviral therapy), as well as treatment of extrapulmonary disease (central nervous system, pericardial among other sites) are provided. The development of more potent and better-tolerated drug regimens, optimization of drug exposure for the

  18. The moyamoya disease susceptibility variant RNF213 R4810K (rs112735431) induces genomic instability by mitotic abnormality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitomi, Toshiaki; Habu, Toshiyuki; Kobayashi, Hatasu; Okuda, Hiroko; Harada, Kouji H; Osafune, Kenji; Taura, Daisuke; Sone, Masakatsu; Asaka, Isao; Ameku, Tomonaga; Watanabe, Akira; Kasahara, Tomoko; Sudo, Tomomi; Shiota, Fumihiko; Hashikata, Hirokuni; Takagi, Yasushi; Morito, Daisuke; Miyamoto, Susumu; Nakao, Kazuwa; Koizumi, Akio

    2013-10-04

    Moyamoya disease (MMD) is a cerebrovascular disease characterized by occlusive lesions in the Circle of Willis. The RNF213 R4810K polymorphism increases susceptibility to MMD. In the present study, we characterized phenotypes caused by overexpression of RNF213 wild type and R4810K variant in the cell cycle to investigate the mechanism of proliferation inhibition. Overexpression of RNF213 R4810K in HeLa cells inhibited cell proliferation and extended the time of mitosis 4-fold. Ablation of spindle checkpoint by depletion of mitotic arrest deficiency 2 (MAD2) did not shorten the time of mitosis. Mitotic morphology in HeLa cells revealed that MAD2 colocalized with RNF213 R4810K. Immunoprecipitation revealed an RNF213/MAD2 complex: R4810K formed a complex with MAD2 more readily than RNF213 wild-type. Desynchronized localization of MAD2 was observed more frequently during mitosis in fibroblasts from patients (n=3, 61.0 ± 8.2%) compared with wild-type subjects (n=6, 13.1 ± 7.7%; pcarrier had a longer time from prometaphase to metaphase than those from controls (pcarrier had significantly increased mitotic failure rates compared with controls (p<0.05). Thus, RNF213 R4810K induced mitotic abnormalities and increased risk of genomic instability. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Untangling the neurobiology of coping styles in rodents: Towards neural mechanisms underlying individual differences in disease susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, Sietse F; Buwalda, Bauke; Koolhaas, Jaap M

    2017-03-01

    Considerable individual differences exist in trait-like patterns of behavioral and physiological responses to salient environmental challenges. This individual variation in stress coping styles has an important functional role in terms of health and fitness. Hence, understanding the neural embedding of coping style variation is fundamental for biobehavioral neurosciences in probing individual disease susceptibility. This review outlines individual differences in trait-aggressiveness as an adaptive component of the natural sociobiology of rats and mice, and highlights that these reflect the general style of coping that varies from proactive (aggressive) to reactive (docile). We propose that this qualitative coping style can be disentangled into multiple quantitative behavioral domains, e.g., flexibility/impulse control, emotional reactivity and harm avoidance/reward processing, that each are encoded into selective neural circuitries. Since functioning of all these brain circuitries rely on fine-tuned serotonin signaling, autoinhibitory control mechanisms of serotonergic neuron (re)activity are crucial in orchestrating general coping style. Untangling the precise neuromolecular mechanisms of different coping styles will provide a roadmap for developing better therapeutic strategies of stress-related diseases.

  20. Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000: a model pathogen for probing disease susceptibility and hormone signaling in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Xiu-Fang; He, Sheng Yang

    2013-01-01

    Since the early 1980s, various strains of the gram-negative bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae have been used as models for understanding plant-bacterial interactions. In 1991, a P. syringae pathovar tomato (Pst) strain, DC3000, was reported to infect not only its natural host tomato but also Arabidopsis in the laboratory, a finding that spurred intensive efforts in the subsequent two decades to characterize the molecular mechanisms by which this strain causes disease in plants. Genomic analysis shows that Pst DC3000 carries a large repertoire of potential virulence factors, including proteinaceous effectors that are secreted through the type III secretion system and a polyketide phytotoxin called coronatine, which structurally mimics the plant hormone jasmonate (JA). Study of Pst DC3000 pathogenesis has not only provided several conceptual advances in understanding how a bacterial pathogen employs type III effectors to suppress plant immune responses and promote disease susceptibility but has also facilitated the discovery of the immune function of stomata and key components of JA signaling in plants. The concepts derived from the study of Pst DC3000 pathogenesis may prove useful in understanding pathogenesis mechanisms of other plant pathogens.

  1. Investigation of cerebral iron deposition in aged patients with ischemic cerebrovascular disease using susceptibility-weighted imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yin; Liu, Jun; Liu, Huanghui; Liao, Yunjie; Cao, Lu; Ye, Bin; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate focal iron deposition level in the brain in patients with ischemic cerebrovascular disease and its correlation with cerebral small vessel disease imaging markers. Patients and methods Seventy-four patients with first-ever transient ischemic attack (median age: 69 years; 30 males and 44 females) and 77 patients with positive ischemic stroke history (median age: 72 years; 43 males and 34 females) were studied retrospectively. On phase image of susceptibility-weighted imaging and regions of interest were manually drawn at the bilateral head of the caudate nucleus, lenticular nucleus (LN), thalamus (TH), frontal white matter, and occipital white matter. The correlation between iron deposition level and the clinical and imaging variables was also investigated. Results Iron deposition level at LN was significantly higher in patients with previous stroke history. It linearly correlated with the presence and number of cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) but not with white matter hyperintensity and lacunar infarct. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that deep structure CMBs were the most relevant in terms of iron deposition at LN. Conclusion Iron deposition at LN may increase in cases of more severe ischemia in aged patients with transient ischemic attack, and it may be an imaging marker for CMB of ischemic origin. PMID:27574434

  2. Endothelin-converting enzyme-1 promoter polymorphisms and susceptibility to sporadic late-onset Alzheimer's disease in a Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Zhao; Luxiang, Chi; Huadong, Zhou; Yanjiang, Wang; Zhiqiang, Xu; Hongyuan, Cao; Lihua, Huang; Xu, Yi

    2009-01-01

    Endothelin converting enzyme (ECE-1) is a candidate Alzheimer disease susceptibility gene. It was previously reported that western individuals homozygous for the C-338A polymorphism (AA) within the ECE1 gene promoter region are at reduced risk of developing late onset Alzheimer disease (LOAD). A further polymorphism, T-839G, is present within the ECE1 promoter region but a potential association with LOAD has not been studied. We therefore studied possible associations between these ECE1 polymorphisms and LOAD in a Chinese population. Subjects comprised 376 Chinese LOAD patients and 376 age- and sex-matched controls; all subjects were typed for the ECE1 C-338A and the T-839G polymorphisms. We report that the frequency of the 338A allele was decreased in LOAD patients compared to controls (adjusted OR =0.73; 95% CI=0.54-0.98; P=0.03). There was no significant association between T-839G genotype and LOAD, however the combined 839T/338A haplotype was significantly associated with decreased risk of LOAD (OR=0.73; 95% CI=0.57-0.93; P=0.01). This study argues that the ECE1 338A allele is protective against LOAD in a Chinese population.

  3. Examining ERBB2 as a candidate gene for susceptibility to leprosy (Hansen’s disease in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Ricardo Fernandes Araújo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Leprosy remains prevalent in Brazil. ErbB2 is a receptor for leprosy bacilli entering Schwann cells, which mediates Mycobacterium leprae-induced demyelination and the ERBB2 gene lies within a leprosy susceptibility locus on chromosome 17q11-q21. To determine whether polymorphisms at the ERBB2 locus contribute to this linkage peak, three haplotype tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (tag-SNPs (rs2517956, rs2952156, rs1058808 were genotyped in 72 families (208 cases; 372 individuals from the state of Pará (PA. All three tag-SNPs were associated with leprosy per se [best SNP rs2517959 odds ratio (OR = 2.22; 95% confidence interval (CI 1.37-3.59; p = 0.001]. Lepromatous (LL (OR = 3.25; 95% CI 1.37-7.70; p = 0.007 and tuberculoid (TT (OR = 1.79; 95% CI 1.04-3.05; p = 0.034 leprosy both contributed to the association, which is consistent with the previous linkage to chromosome 17q11-q21 in the population from PA and supports the functional role of ErbB2 in disease pathogenesis. To attempt to replicate these findings, six SNPs (rs2517955, rs2517956, rs1810132, rs2952156, rs1801200, rs1058808 were genotyped in a population-based sample of 570 leprosy cases and 370 controls from the state of Rio Grande do Norte (RN and the results were analysed using logistic regression analysis. However, none of the associations were replicated in the RN sample, whether analysed for leprosy per se, LL leprosy, TT leprosy, erythema nodosum leprosum or reversal reaction conditions. The role of polymorphisms at ERBB2 in controlling susceptibility to leprosy in Brazil therefore remains unclear.

  4. Genetic basis of differences in myxospore count between whirling disease-resistant and -susceptible strains of rainbow trout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetherman, Eric R.; Winkelman, Dana L.; Schisler, George J.; Antolin, Michael F.

    2012-01-01

    We used a quantitative genetics approach and estimated broad sense heritability (h2b) of myxospore count and the number of genes involved in myxospore formation to gain a better understanding of how resistance to Myxobolus cerebralis, the parasite responsible for whirling disease, is inherited in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss. An M. cerebralis-resistant strain of rainbow trout, the German Rainbow (GR), and a wild, susceptible strain of rainbow trout, the Colorado River Rainbow (CRR), were spawned to create 3 intermediate crossed populations (an F1 cross, F2 intercross, and a B2 backcross between the F1 and the CRR). Within each strain or cross, h2b was estimated from the between-family variance of myxospore counts using full-sibling families. Estimates of h2b and average myxospore counts were lowest in the GR strain, F1 cross, and F2 intercross (h2b = 0.34, 0.42, and 0.34; myxospores fish−1 = 275, 9566, and 45780, respectively), and highest in the B2 backcross and CRR strain (h2b = 0.93 and 0.89; myxospores fish−1 = 97865 and 187595, respectively). Comparison of means and a joint-scaling test suggest that resistance alleles arising from the GR strain are dominant to susceptible alleles from the CRR strain. Resistance was retained in the intermediate crosses but decreased as filial generation number increased (F2) or backcrossing occurred (B2). The estimated number of segregating loci responsible for differences in myxospore count in the parental strains was 9 ± 5. Our results indicate that resistance to M. cerebralis is a heritable trait within these populations and would respond to either artificial selection in hatcheries or natural selection in the wild.

  5. Genetic polymorphism of interleukin 1β -511C/T and susceptibility to sporadic Alzheimer's disease: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Hai; Xia, Qing; Ge, Pingping; Wu, Shaowei

    2013-02-01

    A large number of epidemiological studies have been performed to investigate the association between Alzheimer's disease (AD) risk and interleukin-1β -511C/T genetic polymorphism, however, inconsistent results have been reported. The effect of the IL-1β -511C/T polymorphism on AD susceptibility was evaluated by a meta-analysis. Series of databases were researched. 14 studies involving 2640 AD case and 3493 control subjects were identified. The pooled results showed there were no statistical associations of interleukin-1β -511C/T genetic polymorphism with susceptibility to AD for five analysis models in all subjects. However, obvious heterogeneity among studies was detected. When stratifying for age at onset, ethnicity and geographic distribution of population to explore the original source of heterogeneity, the meta-analysis results based on geographic distribution of population showed the significant difference (CC vs CT, OR 1.26, 95 % CI: 1.03, 1.54, z = 2.25, P = 0.025; CC vs CT+TT, OR 1.24, 95 % CI: 1.03, 1.50, z = 2.24, P = 0.025) only in non-Europe. These findings indicate that the IL-1β -511C/T polymorphism might be associated with AD risk, and individuals with IL-1β -511C/C genotype might be at higher risk of AD in non-Europe. Further larger sample research would be warranted to confirm these conclusions.

  6. [Identifying different susceptibility loci associated with early onset diabetes and cardiovascular disease in Mexican families].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Huertas-Vázquez, Adriana; Riba-Ramírez, Laura; Monroy-Guzmán, Adriana; Domínguez-López, Aarón; Romero-Hidalgo, Sandra; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos; Rodríguez-Torres, Maribel; Ramírez-Jiménez, Salvador; Tusié-Luna, María Teresa

    2005-01-01

    Coronary artery disease and diabetes mellitus are among the primary mortality and morbidity causes in Mexico. Genetic factors play a fundamental role in the development of these entities. In the past few years due to the recognition and study of families with monogenic forms of diabetes and dislipidemias associated with development of atherosclerosis, several genes and loci have been associated with these conditions through genetic linkage studies. These studies have provided evidence of the genetic heterogeneity that exists and the type of genes involved in different ethnic groups. The study of Mexican families with early-onset diabetes and combined familial hyperlipidemia showed the participation of different genetic loci associated with these conditions in the Mexican population. These findings show the value of gene mapping strategies in the identification of the genetic component in these entities in our population.

  7. Glucocorticoid receptor gene polymorphisms and potential association to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease susceptibility and severity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwabe K

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective As chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is known for poor glucocorticoid (GC response, we hypothesized that polymorphic variants of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR gene might predispose for COPD and/or disease severity. Materials and methods Three out of about 50 of the most abundant receptor GR gene polymorphisms were investigated in a case-control study which included 207 patients with chronic bronchitis or COPD (mean FEV1 50.5% predicted, GOLD I-IV and 106 age matched healthy subjects (mean FEV1 101.8% predicted. These were genotyped: a for the N363S (Exon 2; 1220 A > G (I; b the BCLI restriction fragment length polymorphism (Intron 2; 647 C > G (II; and c the ER2223EK (Exon 2; 198, 200 G > A (III, using RT-PCR and PCR-RFLP method on genomic DNA isolated from EDTA blood. Results Genotype distribution between COPD and healthy subjects were alike in all of these three polymorphisms. N363S was found in 0.94% of the healthy and 0% of the COPD subjects. BCLI was detected in 11.3% of the controls and 15.5% of the COPD patients whereas heterozygote frequency was less in the COPD (44.4% group (controls 60.4%. ER2223EK lacks in any of the study subjects. Further, SNPs did not correlate with COPD severity stage (GOLD, exacerbation rates, and clinical course. Conclusion COPD is not linked to gene polymorphisms N363S, BCLI-RFLP, and ER2223EK. Since we analyzed only these 3 receptor gene polymorphisms, this study cannot rule out that other GR gene variants and linkages may be of influence.

  8. Analysis of human chromosome 21 for a locus conferring susceptibility to Hirschsprung Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolk, S.; Duggan, D.J.; Chakravarti, A. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States)

    1994-09-01

    It has been estimated that approximately 5% of patients diagnosed with Hirschsprung disease (HSCR), or aganglionic megacolon, have trisomy 21. Since the incidence of Hirschsprung disease is 1/5000 live births and the incidence of trisomy 21 is approximately 1/1000 live births, the observed occurrence of HSCR in trisomy 21 is fifty times higher than expected. We propose that at least one locus on chromosome 21 predisposes to HSCR. Although at fifty times elevated risk, only 1% of Down Syndrome cases have HSCR. Thus additional genes or genetic events are necessary for HSCR to manifest in patients with trisomy 21. Based on segregation analysis, Badner et al. postulated that recessive genes may be responsible for up to 80% of HSCR. We postulate that at least one such gene is on chromosome 21 and increased homozygosity for common recessive HSCR mutations may be one cause for the elevated risk of HSCR in cases of trisomy 21. To map such a chromosome 21 locus, we are searching for segments of human chromosome 21 which are identical by descent from the parent in whom non-disjunction occurred. These segments will arise either from meiosis I (followed by a crossover between the centromere and the locus) or from meiosis II (followed by no crossovers). Nine nuclear families with a proband diagnosed with HSCR and Down Syndrome have been genotyped for 18 microsatellite markers spanning human chromosome 21q. In all nine cases analyzed thus far, trisomy 21 resulted from maternal non-disjunction at meiosis I. At this point no single IBD region is apparent. Therefore, additional families are being ascertained and additional markers at high density are being genotyped to map the HSCR locus.

  9. Association between rs2294020 in X-linked CCDC22 and susceptibility to autoimmune diseases with focus on systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amico, Fabio; Skarmoutsou, Evangelia; Lo, Lauren J; Granata, Mariagrazia; Trovato, Chiara; Rossi, Giulio A; Bellocchi, Chiara; Marchini, Maurizio; Scorza, Raffaella; Mazzarino, Maria Clorinda; Keinan, Alon

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases often share common susceptibility genes. Most genetic variants associated with susceptibility to systemic lupus erythematosus are also associated with other autoimmune diseases. The X-linked variant rs2294020 is positioned in exon 7 of the CCDC22 gene. The encoded protein functions in the regulation of NF-κB, a master regulator in immune response. The aim of this study is to investigate whether the rs2294020 polymorphism may be a general susceptibility factor for autoimmunity. We evaluated case-control association between the occurrence of rs2294020 and different autoimmune diseases, including new data for systemic lupus erythematosus and previous genome-wide association studies (GWAS) (though most did not analyse the X chromosome) of psoriasis, celiac disease, Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, multiple sclerosis, vitiligo, type-1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis. Cases from patients affected by amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and type-2 diabetes were also included in the study. We detected nominal significant associations of rs2294020 with systemic lupus erythematosus (additive model test: p=0.01), vitiligo (p=0.016), psoriasis (p=0.038), and in only one of two studies of multiple sclerosis (p=0.03). Our results suggest that rs2294020 is associated with the risk of several autoimmune diseases in European populations, specifically with diseases that present themselves, among else, in the skin.

  10. Beryllium-induced immune response in C3H mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, J.M.; Bice, D.E.; Nikula, K.J. [and others

    1995-12-01

    Studies conducted at ITRI over the past several years have investigated whether Beagle dogs, monkeys, and mice are suitable models for human chronic beryllium-induced lung disease (CBD). Recent studies have focused on the histopathological and immunopathological changes occurring in A/J and C3H/HeJ mice acutely exposed by inhalation to Be metal. Lung lesions in both strains of mice included focal lymphocyte aggregates comprised primarily of B lymphocytes and lesser amounts of T-helper lymphocytes and microgranulomas consisting chiefly of macrophages and T-helper lymphocytes. The distribution of proliferating cells within the microgranulomas was similar to the distribution of T-helper cells. These results strongly suggested that A/J and C3H/HeJ mice responded to inhaled Be metal in a fashion similar to humans in terms of pulmonary lesions and the apparent in situ proliferation of T-helper cells. Results of these studies confirm lymphocyte involvement in the pulmonary response to inhaled Be metal.

  11. Dissecting direct and indirect genetic effects on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siedlinski, Mateusz; Tingley, Dustin; Lipman, Peter J; Cho, Michael H; Litonjua, Augusto A; Sparrow, David; Bakke, Per; Gulsvik, Amund; Lomas, David A; Anderson, Wayne; Kong, Xiangyang; Rennard, Stephen I; Beaty, Terri H; Hokanson, John E; Crapo, James D; Lange, Christoph; Silverman, Edwin K

    2013-04-01

    Cigarette smoking is the major environmental risk factor for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Genome-wide association studies have provided compelling associations for three loci with COPD. In this study, we aimed to estimate direct, i.e., independent from smoking, and indirect effects of those loci on COPD development using mediation analysis. We inc