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Sample records for berylliosis

  1. Pulmonary berylliosis. Experimental induction. Early detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andre, Stephane

    1984-01-01

    This research thesis reports the study of the biological reactivity of industrial and environmental aerosols, notably beryllium powder aerosols. In order to study beryllium toxicity under its metal form, and the dose-effect relationship and the suspected carcinogen effect, a pulmonary berylliosis has been experimentally induced in rat and monkey. In order to develop means of rapid detection of exposure and sensitisation to beryllium, the author studied early pathological cellular mechanisms occurring during a pulmonary granulomatosis. Quantitative and qualitative modifications have been searched for, more particularly at the level of endo-alveolar cellular populations of macrophages and lymphocytes. The study has also been extended to the sensitisation of lymphocytes with respect to beryllium. After some generalities about beryllium (properties, sources, uses, exposure sources), and an overview of its toxicity (epidemiology, pathologies, experiments, biological mechanisms, detoxification), the author reports the introduction of a chronic pulmonary berylliosis into animals, discusses the various noticed pathologies and their analysis, and reports in situ and in vitro studies [fr

  2. Immunogenetic basis of environmental lung disease: Lessons from the berylliosis model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saltini, C.; Richeldi, L.; Amicosante, M.; Franchi, A.; Lombardi, G.

    1998-01-01

    The role of genetic factors has been hypothesized in the pathogenesis of a number of chronic inflammatory lung diseases. The genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) locus on human chromosome 6 have been identified as important determinants in diseases caused both by inorganic and organic compounds such as beryllium, gold, acid anhydrides, isocyanates and grass pollens. Since many environmental factors are the determinants of the immunopathogenesis of asthma, pulmonary granulomatous disorders, hypersensitivity pneumonitis and fibrotic lung disorders, an understanding of the interaction between environmental factors is crucial to epidemiology, prevention and treatment of these disorders. Berylliosis is an environmental chronic inflammatory disorder of the lung caused by inhalation of beryllium dusts. A human leukocyte antigen class II marker (HLA-DP Glu69) has been found to be strongly associated with the disease. In in vitro studies, the gene has been shown to play a direct role in the immunopathogenesis of the disease. In human studies, the gene has been shown to confer increased susceptibility to beryllium in exposed workers, thus suggesting that HLA gene markers may be used as epidemiological probes to identify population groups at higher risk of environmental lung diseases, to identify environmental levels of lung immunotoxicants that would be safe for the entire population and the prevent disease risk associated with occupation, manufactured products and the environment. Studies on the associations between human leukocyte antigens and chronic inflammatory lung disorders are reviewed in the context of the berylliosis model. (au)

  3. Diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension and pulmonary heart at Berylliosis and plutonium pneumosclerosis (Clinical-functional investigation)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metlyaeva, N. A.

    2004-01-01

    The subject of the research was 54 workers with Beryllium and Plutonium incorporation from 33 to 60 old, all of them had 41- Berylliosis and 13- Plutonium pneumosclerosis. Patient were investigated with ECG, pulmonary, kinetocordiography, echocardiography. Hypertension in the pulmonary artery developed due to a combination of anatomical and functional disturbances and also with increasing of a stroke and minutely volumes at a definite stage of the disease with Beryllium and Plutonium pneumosclerosis. Two type of hypertension were discovered with pulmonary reography in the Beryllium and the Plutonium pneumosclerosis patients: hyper volume and hypertension type. Hyper volume type of pulmonary circulation (31.7% and 53.8%) consist ed of a high amplitude systolic wave. It was revealed in patients at the early stage of disease, when the pulmonary vessels stretching and right ventricle function kept still at a good condition. Hypertensive type of pulmonary circulation (68.3% and 46.2%) had a low amplitude systolic wave. The low amplitude systolic wave caused by increasing resistance of the pulmonary vessels, decreasing in the flow of blood in arterial system and the injection fraction and a low circulatory volume. (Author) 17 refs

  4. In vitro responses of canine alveolar lymphocytes to BeSO4 after inhalation exposure to BeO: comparisons with human chronic berylliosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haley, P.J.; Finch, G.L.; Mewhinney, J.A.; Hahn, F.F.; Hoover, M.D.; Bice, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    Alveolar lymphocytes obtained by broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL) and peripheral blood lymphocytes from 20 dogs exposed once by inhalation to achieve low or high initial lung burdens (ILB) of beryllium oxide (BeO) calcined at one of two different temperatures, 500 deg. C or 1000 deg. C, were cultured in vitro with BeSO 4 . Positive BAL lymphocyte responses were observed at 6 and 7 mo after exposure, with peak responses occurring at 7 mo followed by a rapid decline. Peak BAL SI values ranged from a high of 64 at 6 mo to a low of 6 at 7 mo. Positive blood SI were observed at 7, 15, 18, and 22 mo after exposure in some, but not all, dogs with high or low ILBs of 500 deg. C or 1000 deg. C BeO. Lymphocytes from lung and blood of control dogs did not respond in vitro to BeSO 4 . These data indicate that a single exposure of dogs to an aerosol of BeO can result in beryllium-specific immune responses by alveolar lymphocytes. (author)

  5. BOOK REVIEWS BOEKRESENSIES

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Berylliosis, and Leprosy. 12. The. Treponematoses and Nonspirocbetal Venerial Diseases. ... later section on inborn errors of metabolism. Unusual, too, is ... Within the last 5 years, however, the introduction of canine rabies across the Limpopo ...

  6. Pulmonary imaging techniques in the diagnosis of occupational interstitial lung disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonard, J.F.; Templeton, P.A.

    1992-01-01

    The chest radiograph is extensively used in evaluating workers at risk for developing occupational lung disease. Other pulmonary imaging techniques used in conjunction with the initial chest radiograph include conventional computed tomography, high resolution computed tomography, and gallium scintigraphy. This chapter evaluates the use of these techniques and their appropriate applications in the pneumoconioses, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, berylliosis, and hard metal diseases.65 references

  7. Bronchoalveolar lavage: role in the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management of interstitial lung disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniele, R.P.; Elias, J.A.; Epstein, P.E.; Rossman, M.D.

    1985-01-01

    Bronchoalveolar lavage has emerged as a useful technique for the study of pulmonary interstitial disorders. Several types of information are provided by the evaluation of lavage fluid. First, the identification of cellular constituents helps to separate inflammatory processes in which lymphocytes predominate (for example, sarcoidosis, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, and berylliosis) from those in which neutrophils or macrophages predominate (for example, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and histiocytosis X). Second, the cells removed during lavage can be studied for their immune properties and function; tested with specific antigens, in diseases such as berylliosis and hypersensitivity pneumonitis; and examined for the presence of unique surface antigens with monoclonal antibodies (for example, histiocytosis X). Third, in conjunction with scanning electron microscopy and electron probe analysis, lavage makes possible the identification of inorganic particles in alveolar macrophages of patients with pneumoconiotic lung disease. Finally, although lavage is still an investigative procedure for most pulmonary disorders, it has an established role in the diagnosis of opportunistic infections in the immunocompromised patient

  8. The immunotoxicity of beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reeves, A.L.

    1983-01-01

    In the disease berylliosis, granulomatous hypersensitivity is the specific immune response to tissue contact with a poorly soluble particle of beryllium compound, mediated through the accumulation and proliferation of reticuloendothelial cells. A review is given of the work accomplished since the 1950's and particularly since the 1970's to elucidate the nature and consequences of this response to beryllium and its compounds. (U.K.)

  9. Some results of medical researches at Ulba Metallurgical Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artemieva, G.I.; Novikov, V.G.; Savchuk, V.V. [Ulba Metallurgical Plant, Ust-Kamenogorsk (Kazakhstan)

    1998-01-01

    The results of 45-years medical researches at beryllium production of Ulba Metallurgical Plant are summarized in this report. Statistic data on different kinds of occupational diseases, related to beryllium production and the dynamics of changing occupational diseases with the development of beryllium production, are given there. Data on average duration of life of occupational disease patients are presented in the report. It includes the description of problems, related to berylliosis diagnosis. Issues, connected to beryllium production effect on health of man, located nearby beryllium production are also discussed there as well. (author)

  10. Pneumoconiosis: comparison of imaging and pathologic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semin Chong; Kyung Soo Lee; Myung Jin Chung; Joungho Han; O. Jung Kwon; d Tae Sung Kim [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Republic of Korea). Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science

    2006-01-15

    Pneumoconiosis may be classified as either fibrotic or nonfibrotic, according to the presence or absence of fibrosis. Silicosis, coal worker pneumoconiosis, asbestosis, berylliosis, and talcosis are examples of fibrotic pneumoconiosis. Siderosis, stannosis, and baritosis are nonfibrotic forms of pneumoconiosis that result from inhalation of iron oxide, tin oxide, and barium sulfate particles, respectively. In an individual who has a history of exposure to silica or coal dust, a finding of nodular or reticulonodular lesions at chest radiography or small nodules with a perilymphatic distribution at thin-section computed tomography (CT), with or without eggshell calcifications, is suggestive of silicosis or coal worker pneumoconiosis. Magnetic resonance imaging is helpful for distinguishing between progressive massive fibrosis and lung cancer. CT and histopathologic findings in asbestosis are similar to those in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, but the presence of asbestos bodies in histopathologic specimens is specific for the diagnosis of asbestosis. Giant cell interstitial pneumonia due to exposure to hard metals is classified as a fibrotic form of pneumoconiosis and appears on CT images as mixed ground-glass opacities and reticulation. Berylliosis simulates pulmonary sarcoidosis on CT images. CT findings in talcosis include small centrilobular and subpleural nodules or heterogeneous conglomerate masses that contain foci of high attenuation indicating talc deposition. Siderosis is nonfibrotic and is indicated by a CT finding of poorly defined centrilobular nodules or ground-glass opacities.

  11. Pneumoconiosis: Comparison of imaging and pathologic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chong, S.; Lee, K.S.; Chung, M.J.; Han, J.H.; Kwon, O.J.; Kim, T.S. [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Republic of Korea). Samsung Medical Center

    2006-01-15

    Pneumoconiosis may be classified as either fibrotic or nonfibrotic, according to the presence or absence of fibrosis. Silicosis, coal worker pneumoconiosis, asbestosis, berylliosis, and talcosis are examples of fibrotic pneumoconiosis. Siderosis, stannosis, and baritosis are nonfibrotic forms of pneumoconiosis that result from inhalation of iron oxide, tin oxide, and barium sulfate particles, respectively. In an individual who has a history of exposure to silica or coal dust, a finding of nodular or reticulonodular lesions at chest radiography or small nodules with a perilymphatic distribution at thin-section computed tomography (CT), with or without eggshell calcifications, is suggestive of silicosis or coal worker pneumoconiosis. Magnetic resonance imaging is helpful for distinguishing between progressive massive fibrosis and lung cancer. CT and histopathologic findings in asbestosis are similar to those in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, but the presence of asbestos bodies in histopathologic specimens is specific for the diagnosis of asbestosis. Giant cell interstitial pneumonia due to exposure to hard metals is classified as a fibrotic form of pneumoconiosis and appears on CT images as mixed ground-glass opacities and reticulation. Berylliosis simulates pulmonary sarcoidosis on CT images. CT findings in talcosis include small centrilobular and subpleural nodules or heterogeneous conglomerate masses that contain foci of high attenuation indicating talc deposition. Siderosis is nonfibrotic and is indicated by a CT finding of poorly defined centrilobular nodules or ground-glass opacities.

  12. Immunological characterisation of groups of people exposed to beryllium as a result of burning coal with high contents of this toxin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bencko, V.; Vasilieva, E.V.; Tichy, V.; Konopikova, L.; Horecka, J.; Symon, K.

    1990-01-01

    An epidemological study was made of persons occupationally (39) and non-occupationally (34) exposed to relatively low concentrations of beryllium in air as a result of coal combustion. Beryllium concentrations in the workplace were between 30 and 800x10 -5 mg.m -3 , and in the town of Sokolov 1.68-0.39x10 -5 mg.m -3 . Radial immunodiffusion was used to determine main immunoglobulin classes, and the passive haemagglutination reaction used to determine antibodies (lungs, heart, liver, spleen, thyroid) and antibodies to nuclear (ANA) and mitochondrial (AMA) antigens in intact rat lungs and rats with experimental berylliosis. In both exposed groups significant increase in IgG and IgA and autoantibodies was found compared with controls (60). Specific AMA and ANA were found in exposed groups (higher values in women). (UK)

  13. Differential diagnosis of granulomatous lung disease: clues and pitfalls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinichiro Ohshimo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Granulomatous lung diseases are a heterogeneous group of disorders that have a wide spectrum of pathologies with variable clinical manifestations and outcomes. Precise clinical evaluation, laboratory testing, pulmonary function testing, radiological imaging including high-resolution computed tomography and often histopathological assessment contribute to make a confident diagnosis of granulomatous lung diseases. Differential diagnosis is challenging, and includes both infectious (mycobacteria and fungi and noninfectious lung diseases (sarcoidosis, necrotising sarcoid granulomatosis, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, hot tub lung, berylliosis, granulomatosis with polyangiitis, eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis, rheumatoid nodules, talc granulomatosis, Langerhans cell histiocytosis and bronchocentric granulomatosis. Bronchoalveolar lavage, endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration, transbronchial cryobiopsy, positron emission tomography and genetic evaluation are potential candidates to improve the diagnostic accuracy for granulomatous lung diseases. As granuloma alone is a nonspecific histopathological finding, the multidisciplinary approach is important for a confident diagnosis.

  14. Differential diagnosis of granulomatous lung disease: clues and pitfalls: Number 4 in the Series "Pathology for the clinician" Edited by Peter Dorfmüller and Alberto Cavazza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohshimo, Shinichiro; Guzman, Josune; Costabel, Ulrich; Bonella, Francesco

    2017-09-30

    Granulomatous lung diseases are a heterogeneous group of disorders that have a wide spectrum of pathologies with variable clinical manifestations and outcomes. Precise clinical evaluation, laboratory testing, pulmonary function testing, radiological imaging including high-resolution computed tomography and often histopathological assessment contribute to make a confident diagnosis of granulomatous lung diseases. Differential diagnosis is challenging, and includes both infectious (mycobacteria and fungi) and noninfectious lung diseases (sarcoidosis, necrotising sarcoid granulomatosis, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, hot tub lung, berylliosis, granulomatosis with polyangiitis, eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis, rheumatoid nodules, talc granulomatosis, Langerhans cell histiocytosis and bronchocentric granulomatosis). Bronchoalveolar lavage, endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration, transbronchial cryobiopsy, positron emission tomography and genetic evaluation are potential candidates to improve the diagnostic accuracy for granulomatous lung diseases. As granuloma alone is a nonspecific histopathological finding, the multidisciplinary approach is important for a confident diagnosis. Copyright ©ERS 2017.

  15. Medical Surveillance for Former Workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tim Takaro

    2009-05-29

    The Former Hanford Worker Medical Monitoring Program, directed by the Occupational and Environmental Medicine Program at the University of Washington, served former production and other non-construction workers who were potentially exposed to workplace hazards while working for the USDOE or its contractors at Hanford. The USDOE Former Workers Program arose from Congressional action in the Defense Authorization of 1993 (Public Law 102). Section 3162 stated that, “The Secretary shall establish and carry out a program for the identification and ongoing medical evaluation of current and former Department of Energy employees who are subject to significant health risks as a result of exposure of such employees to hazardous or radioactive substances during such employment.” (This also covers former employees of USDOE contractors and subcontractors.) The key objective has been to provide these former workers with medical evaluations in order to determine whether workers have experienced significant risk due to workplace exposure to hazards. Exposures to asbestos, beryllium, and noise can produce specific medical conditions: asbestosis, berylliosis, and noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). Each of these conditions can be identified by specific, non-invasive screening tests, which are widely available. Treatments are also available for individuals affected by these conditions. This project involved two phases. Phase I involved a needs and risk assessment, characterizing the nature and extent of workplace health hazards which may have increased the risk for long-term health effects. We categorized jobs and tasks by likelihood of exposures to specific workplace health hazards; and located and established contact with former Hanford workers. Phase II involved implementation of medical monitoring programs for former workers whose individual work history indicated significant risk for adverse health effects. We identified 118,000 former workers, employed from 1943 to 1997

  16. Feasibility study for the in vivo measurement of silicon and beryllium by nuclear techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ettinger, K.V.; Morgan, W.D.; Miola, U.; Vartsky, D.; Ellis, K.J.; Wielopolski, L.; Cohn, S.H.

    1980-01-01

    Experiments were performed to assess the feasibility of measuring silicon in vivo by means of the prompt neutron inelastic scattering reaction 28 Si(n,n'γ) 28 Si. The optimum neutron energy in terms of counts per dose delivered to a liquid tissue-equivalent phantom was found to be in the range 5 to 8 MeV. By pulsing the neutron beam and counting only in the on period it was possible to substantially reduce the background both from thermal neutron interactions in the phantom and also from the fast interfering reaction 31 P(n,α) 28 Al. In final measurements with a realistic chest phantom no interferences from other prompt inelastic scattering reactions were observed. With one Ge(Li) detector of 19% relative efficiency, a detection limit of 0.6g silicon per rem was obtained. A system comprising six 25% efficient detectors would be capable of measuring normal lung silicon contents of about 0.1g. Berylliosis, a granulomatous lung disease, has been observed in persons with lung contents ranging from micrograms to tens of milligrams (a normal value is 1-2 μg).. For gamma photons between 1.665 MeV and 2.225 MeV (the beryllium and deuterium photonuclear thresholds respectively), the production of neutrons is a unique property of beryllium which might be exploited for analysis in vivo. Experiments with a Pb-filtered 124 Sb source and an enriched 10 BF 3 counter provided data from which it was projected that a 72-detector array might yield a detection limit of 3.4 mg Be for a lung dose of 2.5 rads. Possible methods for improving this result are discussed

  17. Point of view concerning new trends in the assessment and management of risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masse, R.

    1993-01-01

    Because they result in the most severe constraints for exposure limitation, carcinogenicity mutagenicity and toxicity for human reproduction (CMT) make up the greatest concern for toxicants in general and this remains true for heavy metals. New guidelines have recently been proposed by EEC for including compounds in CMT categories. Categorization of substances toxic to reproduction has been the most widely reassessed including all the aspects from troubles of the libido to neonatal behaviour. Although epidemiology allows to evidence some carcinogenic potency of combined exposure to different metals, lifestyle confounding factors are multiple and do not permit in general to derive risk coefficient for exposure limitation. Thus the role of animal experiments remains crucial for that purpose. Identifying a carcinogenic hazard in animals is usually easy, however risk evaluation and extrapolation of risk coefficients to man is highly debatable owing to different toxicokinetics, to the use of non relevant ways or to the use of near MTD concentrations. This is especially true when lung carcinogens have to be dealt with. Overloading the lung can result from very little amount deposited in the exchange airways resulting in irritation which may turn to cell proliferation and tumor. Cadmium and beryllium are extremely potent carcinogens after low doses deposited in the airways of the rat. There is no evidence that this phenomenon relate to human situation since most occupationally exposed workers did not develop significant excess of tumors although they developed berylliosis and kidney disease. It is therefore suggested that the limitation system be based on specific human pathology and not on carcinogenic risks since elements cannot be banned from the environment. (author). 10 refs., 1 tab

  18. Targeting of macrophages for the scintigraphic evaluation of inflammatory lesions in a model of radio-induced inflammation in pigs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffschir, D.; Daburon, F.; Normier, G.; Binz, H.; Le Pape, A.

    1991-01-01

    For a new scintigraphic strategy based on the targeting of macrophages recruited by inflammatory lesions, a specific ligand able to interact with these cells both in vitro and in vivo has been developed. J001 is a 34 KDa acylated peptidopoly 1-3 galactoside isolated from proteoglycans of a non pathogenic strain of klebsiella. When labelled with 99mTc then administrated by aerosol, this agent has been demonstrated to be a potent tool for the scintigraphic imaging of inflammatory lymph nodes in experimental berylliosis and in patients with sarcoidosis, lung tumors and ganglionic metastases. An experimental model was developed in pigs using an acute and localized muscular γ irradiation in the limb and skin resection to prevent ulceration. Dynamic imaging was performed during two hours after intravenous injection of 1 mg J001 labelled with 370 MBq 99mTc in the presence of 0.125 mg stannous fluoride. The perfusion of the lesions was evaluated from scintigraphic data obtained both 15 min after IV injection of J001 or 99mTc 04-. The intensity of the fixation of J001 was quantified 2 hours after injection and expressed as a scintigraphic ratio: R2h = cpm in lesion / cpm in a defined healthy area in the same limb. After induction of irradiation, scintigraphic ratios exhibited a progressive increase to reach a maximum (R2h = 3.6) after 3 months. Then, they decreased to recover a normal value about 6 months after irradiation. At that time, histological controls and clinical observations exhibited a significant decrease in inflammatory reaction, macrophages recruitment and apparition of fibrosis. J001 fixation was very sensitive to corticosteroids that resulted in a complete clearing of the scintigraphic images 12 to 24 hours after treatment. Two weeks were then required for a complete recovery of the inflammatory reaction and J001 fixation. So, targeting of macrophages with J001 should offer a sensitive and specific tool for the scintigraphic assessment of inflammation and

  19. Intellectual Freedom and the National Laboratories : 2000 Sigma Xi Forum New Ethical Challenges in Science and Technology, November 9-10, 2000, Albuquerque, New Mexico"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Browne, John C.

    2001-01-01

    scientific realm. It really does not permit them the freedom to roam at will outside of their areas of technical expertise into the realm of policy without clearly stating that their remarks are those of a private citizen and must be handled, therefore, outside of the laboratory business. This is a major issue within our laboratories, and I think one that we try to nurture very carefully, because without it, we think that there would be a closing up of laboratories because of the type of classified work that we do. The issues that I hope we might explore in this session include, (1) how do you give technical advice to a policymaker? Where do you draw the line with respect to your judgment, your advice versus your opinion, which can change how government attacks very significant societal problems: (2) The issue of security and classification. How does that affect the intellectual freedom of our staff? (3) Dealing with the public on matters of risk. I am going to add to that, also, dealing with our employees on matters of risk, because one of the things that we're finding as we get better with our detection technology and our screening technologies, we now find out about how employees might be susceptible to illnesses, such as berylliosis, problems with beryllium sensitivity. What ethical issues arise when you now have the ability to learn more about impacts on, not only the public, but your employees as well? We share similar types of problems that Bob Dynes mentioned: conflict of interest, intellectual property questions. And we also have the conflict of interest as an institution. And I'll just mention one--perhaps it could come up in the discussion-is in the past year we had an issue with respect to how the Congress and the Administration handled the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty. What kind of eihical issues arise in testing on our technical judgment regarding the CTBT versus institutional conflict of interest? Questions were raised. Were the laboratory directors