WorldWideScience

Sample records for berkelium sulfides

  1. Interstellar hydrogen sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaddeus, P.; Kutner, M. L.; Penzias, A. A.; Wilson, R. W.; Jefferts, K. B.

    1972-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide has been detected in seven Galactic sources by observation of a single line corresponding to the rotational transition from the 1(sub 10) to the 1(sub 01) levels at 168.7 GHz. The observations show that hydrogen sulfide is only a moderately common interstellar molecule comparable in abundance to H2CO and CS, but somewhat less abundant than HCN and much less abundant than CO.

  2. Sulfide oxidation in a biofilter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Claus Lunde; Dezhao, Liu; Hansen, Michael Jørgen;

    Observed hydrogen sulfide uptake rates in a biofilter treating waste air from a pig farm were too high to be explained within conventional limits of sulfide solubility, diffusion in a biofilm and bacterial metabolism. Clone libraries of 16S and 18S rRNA genes from the biofilter found no sulfide o...... higher hydrogen sulfide uptake followed by oxidation catalyzed by iron-containing enzymes such as cytochrome c oxidase in a process uncoupled from energy conservation....

  3. Sulfide oxidation in a biofilter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Claus Lunde; Liu, Dezhao; Hansen, Michael Jørgen;

    2012-01-01

    Observed hydrogen sulfide uptake rates in a biofilter treating waste air from a pig farm were too high to be explained within conventional limits of sulfide solubility, diffusion in a biofilm and bacterial metabolism. Clone libraries of 16S and 18S rRNA genes from the biofilter found no sulfide o...... higher hydrogen sulfide uptake followed by oxidation catalyzed by iron-containing enzymes such as cytochrome c oxidase in a process uncoupled from energy conservation....

  4. Sulfide detoxification in plant mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birke, Hannah; Hildebrandt, Tatjana M; Wirtz, Markus; Hell, Rüdiger

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to animals, which release the signal molecule sulfide in small amounts from cysteine and its derivates, phototrophic eukaryotes generate sulfide as an essential intermediate of the sulfur assimilation pathway. Additionally, iron-sulfur cluster turnover and cyanide detoxification might contribute to the release of sulfide in mitochondria. However, sulfide is a potent inhibitor of cytochrome c oxidase in mitochondria. Thus, efficient sulfide detoxification mechanisms are required in mitochondria to ensure adequate energy production and consequently survival of the plant cell. Two enzymes have been recently described to catalyze sulfide detoxification in mitochondria of Arabidopsis thaliana, O-acetylserine(thiol)lyase C (OAS-TL C), and the sulfur dioxygenase (SDO) ethylmalonic encephalopathy protein 1 (ETHE1). Biochemical characterization of sulfide producing and consuming enzymes in mitochondria of plants is fundamental to understand the regulatory network that enables mitochondrial sulfide homeostasis under nonstressed and stressed conditions. In this chapter, we provide established protocols to determine the activity of the sulfide releasing enzyme β-cyanoalanine synthase as well as sulfide-consuming enzymes OAS-TL and SDO. Additionally, we describe a reliable and efficient method to purify OAS-TL proteins from plant material.

  5. Sulfide intrusion and detoxification in Zostera marina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasler-Sheetal, Harald; Holmer, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    indicating a possible role of sulfide in the sulfur nutrition beside the detoxification function. Our results suggest different adaptations of Z. marina to reduced sediments and sulfide intrusion ranging from bacterial and chemical reoxidation of sulfide to sulfate to incorporation of sulfide into organic...

  6. A novel method for improving cerussite sulfidization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi-cheng Feng; Shu-ming Wen; Wen-juan Zhao; Qin-bo Cao; Chao L

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of flotation behavior, solution measurements, and surface analyses were performed to investigate the effects of chloride ion addition on the sulfidization of cerussite in this study. Micro-flotation tests indicate that the addition of chloride ions prior to sulfidization can significantly increase the flotation recovery of cerussite, which is attributed to the formation of more lead sulfide species on the mineral surface. Solution measurement results suggest that the addition of chloride ions prior to sulfidization induces the transformation of more sul-fide ions from pulp solution onto the mineral surface by the formation of more lead sulfide species. X-ray diffraction and energy-dispersive spectroscopy indicate that more lead sulfide species form on the mineral surface when chloride ions are added prior to sulfidization. These results demonstrate that the addition of chloride ions prior to sulfidization can significantly improve the sulfidization of cerussite, thereby enhancing the flotation performance.

  7. Prevention of sulfide oxidation in sulfide-rich waste rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyström, Elsa; Alakangas, Lena

    2015-04-01

    The ability to reduce sulfide oxidation in waste rock after mine closure is a widely researched area, but to reduce and/or inhibit the oxidation during operation is less common. Sulfide-rich (ca 30 % sulfur) waste rock, partially oxidized, was leached during unsaturated laboratory condition. Trace elements such as As and Sb were relatively high in the waste rock while other sulfide-associated elements such as Cu, Pb and Zn were low compared to common sulfide-rich waste rock. Leaching of unsaturated waste rock lowered the pH, from around six down to two, resulting in continuously increasing element concentrations during the leaching period of 272 days. The concentrations of As (65 mg/L), Cu (6.9 mg/L), Sb (1.2 mg/L), Zn (149 mg/L) and S (43 g/L) were strongly elevated at the end of the leaching period. Different alkaline industrial residues such as slag, lime kiln dust and cement kiln dust were added as solid or as liquid to the waste rock in an attempt to inhibit sulfide oxidation through neo-formed phases on sulfide surfaces in order to decrease the mobility of metals and metalloids over longer time scale. This will result in a lower cost and efforts of measures after mine closure. Results from the experiments will be presented.

  8. Hydrogen sulfide in signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olas, Beata

    2015-01-15

    For a long time hydrogen sulfide (H₂S) was considered a toxic compound, but recently H₂S (at low concentrations) has been found to play an important function in physiological processes. Hydrogen sulfide, like other well-known compounds - nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO) is a gaseous intracellular signal transducer. It regulates the cell cycle, apoptosis and the oxidative stress. Moreover, its functions include neuromodulation, regulation of cardiovascular system and inflammation. In this review, I focus on the metabolism of hydrogen sulfide (including enzymatic pathways of H₂S synthesis from l- and d-cysteine) and its signaling pathways in the cardiovascular system and the nervous system. I also describe how hydrogen sulfide may be used as therapeutic agent, i.e. in the cardiovascular diseases.

  9. Mechanochemical reduction of copper sulfide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balaz, P.; Takacs, L.; Jiang, Jianzhong

    2002-01-01

    The mechanochemical reduction of copper sulfide with iron was induced in a Fritsch P-6 planetary mill, using WC vial filled with argon and WC balls. Samples milled for specific intervals were analyzed by XRD and Mossbauer spectroscopy. Most of the reaction takes place during the first 10 min...... of milling and only FeS and Cu are found after 60 min. The main chemical process is accompanied by phase transformations of the sulfide phases as a result of milling. Djurleite partially transformed to chalcocite and a tetragonal copper sulfide phase before reduction. The cubic modification of FeS was formed...... first, transforming to hexagonal during the later stages of the process. The formation of off-stoichiometric phases and the release of some elemental sulfur by copper sulfide are also probable....

  10. Synthesis of furan from allenic sulfide derivatives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we report the synthesis of furan derivatives from allenic sulfides. By the reaction with NaH, β-Hydroxyl allenic sulfides were found to generate furan products in excellent yields with the removal of phenylthio group. β-Aldehyde allenic sulfides were found to give similar furan products with one more substituent when treated with additional nucleophilic reagents. β-ketone allenic sulfides can also cyclize to give furan derivatives with the promotion of P2O5.

  11. Synthesis of furan from allenic sulfide derivatives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG LingLing; ZHANG Xiu; MA Jie; ZHONG ZhenZhen; ZHANG Zhe; ZHANG Yan; WANG JianBo

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we report the synthesis of furan derivatives from allenic sulfides. By the reaction with NaH.,β-Hydroxyl allenic sulfides were found to generate furan products in excellent yields with the removal of phenylthio group.β-Aldehyde allenic sulfides were found to give similar furan products with one more substituent when treated with additional nucleophilic reagents. β-ketone allenic sulfides can also cyclize to give furan derivatives with the promotion of P2O5.

  12. Nanostructured metal sulfides for energy storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui, Xianhong; Tan, Huiteng; Yan, Qingyu

    2014-09-07

    Advanced electrodes with a high energy density at high power are urgently needed for high-performance energy storage devices, including lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) and supercapacitors (SCs), to fulfil the requirements of future electrochemical power sources for applications such as in hybrid electric/plug-in-hybrid (HEV/PHEV) vehicles. Metal sulfides with unique physical and chemical properties, as well as high specific capacity/capacitance, which are typically multiple times higher than that of the carbon/graphite-based materials, are currently studied as promising electrode materials. However, the implementation of these sulfide electrodes in practical applications is hindered by their inferior rate performance and cycling stability. Nanostructures offering the advantages of high surface-to-volume ratios, favourable transport properties, and high freedom for the volume change upon ion insertion/extraction and other reactions, present an opportunity to build next-generation LIBs and SCs. Thus, the development of novel concepts in material research to achieve new nanostructures paves the way for improved electrochemical performance. Herein, we summarize recent advances in nanostructured metal sulfides, such as iron sulfides, copper sulfides, cobalt sulfides, nickel sulfides, manganese sulfides, molybdenum sulfides, tin sulfides, with zero-, one-, two-, and three-dimensional morphologies for LIB and SC applications. In addition, the recently emerged concept of incorporating conductive matrices, especially graphene, with metal sulfide nanomaterials will also be highlighted. Finally, some remarks are made on the challenges and perspectives for the future development of metal sulfide-based LIB and SC devices.

  13. 30 CFR 250.604 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.604 Section 250.604... OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Well-Workover Operations § 250.604 Hydrogen sulfide. When a well-workover operation is conducted in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or...

  14. 30 CFR 250.504 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.504 Section 250.504... OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Well-Completion Operations § 250.504 Hydrogen sulfide. When a well-completion operation is conducted in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or...

  15. 30 CFR 250.808 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.808 Section 250.808... OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Production Safety Systems § 250.808 Hydrogen sulfide. Production operations in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in zones where the presence of...

  16. STUDY OF HYDROGEN SULFIDE REMOVAL FROM GROUNDWATER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Lupascu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The process of the hydrogen sulfide removal from the underground water of the Hancesti town has been investigated. By oxygen bubbling through the water containing hydrogen sulfide, from the Hancesti well tube, sulfur is deposited in the porous structure of studied catalysts, which decreases their catalytic activity. Concomitantly, the process of adsorption / oxidation of hydrogen sulfide to sulfate take place. The kinetic research of the hydrogen sulfide removal from the Hancesti underground water, after its treatment by hydrogen peroxide, proves greater efficiency than in the case of modified carbonic adsorbents. As a result of used treatment, hydrogen sulfide is completely oxidized to sulfates

  17. Hydrogen sulfide and translational medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Wei; Cheng, Ze-yu; Zhu, Yi-Zhun

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) along with carbon monoxide and nitric oxide is an important signaling molecule that has undergone large numbers of fundamental investigations. H2S is involved in various physiological activities associated with the regulation of homeostasis, vascular contractility, pro- and anti-inflammatory activities, as well as pro- and anti-apoptotic activities etc. However, the actions of H2S are influenced by its concentration, reaction time, and cell/disease types. Therefore, H2S...

  18. Redox Biochemistry of Hydrogen Sulfide*

    OpenAIRE

    Kabil, Omer; Banerjee, Ruma

    2010-01-01

    H2S, the most recently discovered gasotransmitter, might in fact be the evolutionary matriarch of this family, being both ancient and highly reduced. Disruption of γ-cystathionase in mice leads to cardiovascular dysfunction and marked hypertension, suggesting a key role for this enzyme in H2S production in the vasculature. However, patients with inherited deficiency in γ-cystathionase apparently do not present vascular pathology. A mitochondrial pathway disposes sulfide and couples it to oxid...

  19. Sulfide intrusion and detoxification in seagrasses ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasler-Sheetal, Harald; Holmer, Marianne

    Sulfide intrusion in seagrasses represents a global threat to seagrasses and thereby an important parameter in resilience of seagrass ecosystems. In contrast seegrasses colonize and grow in hostile sediments, where they are constantly exposed to invasion of toxic gaseous sulfide. Remarkably little...... strategies of seagrasses to sustain sulfide intrusion. Using stable isotope tracing, scanning electron microscopy with x-ray analysis, tracing sulfur compounds combined with ecosystem parameters we found different spatial, intraspecific and interspecific strategies to cope with sulfidic sediments. 1...... not present in terrestrial plants at that level. Sulfide is not necessarily toxic but used as sulfur nutrition, presupposing healthy seagrass ecosystems that can support detoxification mechanisms. Presence or absence of those mechanisms determines susceptibility of seagrass ecosystems to sediment sulfide...

  20. Hydrogen sulfide and vascular relaxation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Yan; TANG Chao-shu; DU Jun-bao; JIN Hong-fang

    2011-01-01

    Objective To review the vasorelaxant effects of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in arterial rings in the cardiovascular system under both physiological and pathophysiological conditions and the possible mechanisms involved.Data sources The data in this review were obtained from Medline and Pubmed sources from 1997 to 2011 using the search terms "hydrogen sulfide" and ""vascular relaxation".Study selection Articles describing the role of hydrogen sulfide in the regulation of vascular activity and its vasorelaxant effects were selected.Results H2S plays an important role in the regulation of cardiovascular tone.The vasomodulatory effects of H2S depend on factors including concentration,species and tissue type.The H2S donor,sodium hydrosulfide (NarS),causes vasorelaxation of rat isolated aortic rings in a dose-dependent manner.This effect was more pronounced than that observed in pulmonary arterial rings.The expression of KATP channel proteins and mRNA in the aortic rings was increased compared with pulmonary artery rings.H2S is involved in the pathogenesis of a variety of cardiovascular diseases.Downregulation of the endogenous H2S pathway is an important factor in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases.The vasorelaxant effects of H2S have been shown to be mediated by activation of KATP channels in vascular smooth muscle cells and via the induction of acidification due to activation of the CI/HCO3 exchanger.It is speculated that the mechanisms underlying the vasoconstrictive function of H2S in the aortic rings involves decreased NO production and inhibition of cAMP accumulation.Conclusion H2S is an important endogenous gasotransmitter in the cardiovascular system and acts as a modulator of vascular tone in the homeostatic regulation of blood pressure.

  1. Medical Functions of Hydrogen Sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olas, Beata

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) is a gasomediator synthesized from L- and D-cysteine in various tissues. It is involved in a number of physiological and pathological processes. H(2)S exhibits antiatherosclerotic, vasodilator, and proangiogenic properties, and protects the kidney and heart from damage following ischemia/reperfusion injury. H(2)S donors may be natural or synthetic, and may be used for the safe treatment of a wide range of diseases. This review article summarizes the current state of knowledge of the therapeutic function of H(2)S.

  2. Molybdenum sulfide/carbide catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Gabriel; Chianelli, Russell R.; Fuentes, Sergio; Torres, Brenda

    2007-05-29

    The present invention provides methods of synthesizing molybdenum disulfide (MoS.sub.2) and carbon-containing molybdenum disulfide (MoS.sub.2-xC.sub.x) catalysts that exhibit improved catalytic activity for hydrotreating reactions involving hydrodesulfurization, hydrodenitrogenation, and hydrogenation. The present invention also concerns the resulting catalysts. Furthermore, the invention concerns the promotion of these catalysts with Co, Ni, Fe, and/or Ru sulfides to create catalysts with greater activity, for hydrotreating reactions, than conventional catalysts such as cobalt molybdate on alumina support.

  3. Ammonia and hydrogen sulfide removal using biochar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reducing ammonia and hydrogen sulfide emissions from livestock facilities is an important issue for many communities and livestock producers. Ammonia has been regarded as odorous, precursor for particulate matter (PM), and contributed to livestock mortality. Hydrogen sulfide is highly toxic at elev...

  4. Sulfide toxicity kinetics of a uasb reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. R. Paula Jr.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of sulfide toxicity on kinetic parameters of anaerobic organic matter removal in a UASB (up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor is presented. Two lab-scale UASB reactors (10.5 L were operated continuously during 12 months. The reactors were fed with synthetic wastes prepared daily using glucose, ammonium acetate, methanol and nutrient solution. One of the reactors also received increasing concentrations of sodium sulfide. For both reactors, the flow rate of 16 L.d-1 was held constant throughout the experiment, corresponding to a hydraulic retention time of 15.6 hours. The classic model for non-competitive sulfide inhibition was applied to the experimental data for determining the overall kinetic parameter of specific substrate utilization (q and the sulfide inhibition coefficient (Ki. The application of the kinetic parameters determined allows prediction of methanogenesis inhibition and thus the adoption of operating parameters to minimize sulfide toxicity in UASB reactors.

  5. Sulfide oxidation as a process for the formation of copper-rich magmatic sulfides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlgemuth-Ueberwasser, Cora C.; Fonseca, Raúl O. C.; Ballhaus, Chris; Berndt, Jasper

    2013-01-01

    Typical magmatic sulfides are dominated by pyrrhotite and pentlandite with minor chalcopyrite, and the bulk atomic Cu/Fe ratio of these sulfides is typically less than unity. However, there are rare magmatic sulfide occurrences that are dominated by Cu-rich sulfides (e.g., bornite, digenite, and chalcopyrite, sometimes coexisting with metallic Cu) with atomic Cu/Fe as high as 5. Typically, these types of sulfide assemblages occur in the upper parts of moderately to highly fractionated layered mafic-ultramafic intrusions, a well-known example being the Pd/Au reef in the Upper Middle Zone of the Skaergaard intrusion. Processes proposed to explain why these sulfides are so unusually rich in Cu include fractional crystallization of Fe/(Ni) monosulfide and infiltration of postmagmatic Cu-rich fluids. In this contribution, we explore and experimentally evaluate a third possibility: that Cu-rich magmatic sulfides may be the result of magmatic oxidation. FeS-dominated Ni/Cu-bearing sulfides were equilibrated at variable oxygen fugacities in both open and closed system. Our results show that the Cu/Fe ratio of the sulfide melt increases as a function of oxygen fugacity due to the preferential conversion of FeS into FeO and FeO1.5, and the resistance of Cu2S to being converted into an oxide component even at oxygen fugacities characteristic of the sulfide/sulfate transition (above FMQ + 1). This phenomenon will lead to an increase in the metal/S ratio of a sulfide liquid and will also depress its liquidus temperature. As such, any modeling of the sulfide liquid line of descent in magmatic sulfide complexes needs to address this issue.

  6. 21 CFR 177.2490 - Polyphenylene sulfide resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Polyphenylene sulfide resins. 177.2490 Section 177... Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2490 Polyphenylene sulfide resins. Polyphenylene sulfide resins (poly(1,4-phenylene sulfide) resins) may be safely used as coatings or components...

  7. Adequate hydrogen sulfide, healthy circulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Jun-bao; CHEN Stella; JIN Hong-fang; TANG Chao-shu

    2011-01-01

    Previously,hydrogen sulfide (H2S) was considered to be a toxic gas.However,recently it was discovered that it could be produced in mammals and even in plants,throughtheproductionandmetabolismof sulfur-containing amino acids.In mammals,H2S is mainly catalyzed by cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE),cystathionin-β-lyase (CBS) and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (MPST) with the substrate of L-cysteine.Endogenous H2S exerts many important physiological and pathophysiological functions,including hypotensive action,vasorelaxation,myocardial dilation,inhibition of smooth muscle cell proliferation,and antioxidatve actions.Importantly,it plays a very important role in the pathogenesis of systemic hypertension,pulmonary hypertension,atherosclerosis,myocardialinjury,angiogenesis,hyperhomocysteinemi aandshock.Therefore,H2S is now being considered to be a novel gasotransmitter after nitric oxide and carbon monoxide in the regulation of circulatory system.

  8. Redox biochemistry of hydrogen sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabil, Omer; Banerjee, Ruma

    2010-07-16

    H(2)S, the most recently discovered gasotransmitter, might in fact be the evolutionary matriarch of this family, being both ancient and highly reduced. Disruption of gamma-cystathionase in mice leads to cardiovascular dysfunction and marked hypertension, suggesting a key role for this enzyme in H(2)S production in the vasculature. However, patients with inherited deficiency in gamma-cystathionase apparently do not present vascular pathology. A mitochondrial pathway disposes sulfide and couples it to oxidative phosphorylation while also exposing cytochrome c oxidase to this metabolic poison. This report focuses on the biochemistry of H(2)S biogenesis and clearance, on the molecular mechanisms of its action, and on its varied biological effects.

  9. Microbial control of hydrogen sulfide production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montgomery, A.D.; Bhupathiraju, V.K.; Wofford, N.; McInerney, M.J. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Tulsa, OK (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    A sulfide-resistant strain of Thiobacillus denitrificans, strain F, prevented the accumulation of sulfide by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans when both organisms were grown in liquid medium. The wild-type strain of T. denitrificans did not prevent the accumulation of sulfide produced by D. desulfuricans. Strain F also prevented the accumulation of sulfide by a mixed population of sulfate-reducing bacteria enriched from an oil field brine. Fermentation balances showed that strain F stoichiometrically oxidized the sulfide produced by D. desulfuricans and the oil field brine enrichment to sulfate. The ability of a strain F to control sulfide production in an experimental system of cores and formation water from the Redfield, Iowa, natural gas storage facility was also investigated. A stable, sulfide-producing biofilm was established in two separate core systems, one of which was inoculated with strain F while the other core system (control) was treated in an identical manner, but was not inoculated with strain F. When formation water with 10 mM acetate and 5 mM nitrate was injected into both core systems, the effluent sulfide concentrations in the control core system ranged from 200 to 460 {mu}M. In the test core system inoculated with strain F, the effluent sulfide concentrations were lower, ranging from 70 to 110 {mu}M. In order to determine whether strain F could control sulfide production under optimal conditions for sulfate-reducing bacteria, the electron donor was changed to lactate and inorganic nutrients (nitrogen and phosphate sources) were added to the formation water. When nutrient-supplemented formation water with 3.1 mM lactate and 10 mM nitrate was used, the effluent sulfide concentrations of the control core system initially increased to about 3,800 {mu}M, and then decreased to about 1,100 {mu}M after 5 weeks. However, in the test core system inoculated with strain F, the effluent sulfide concentrations were much lower, 160 to 330 {mu}M.

  10. Removal of methanethiol, dimethyl sulfide, dimethyl disulfide, and hydrogen sulfide from contaminated air by Thiobacillus thioparus TK-m.

    OpenAIRE

    Kanagawa, T; Mikami, E.

    1989-01-01

    Methanethiol, dimethyl sulfide, dimethyl disulfide, and hydrogen sulfide were efficiently removed from contaminated air by Thiobacillus thioparus TK-m and oxidized to sulfate stoichiometrically. More than 99.99% of dimethyl sulfide was removed when the load was less than 4.0 g of dimethyl sulfide per g (dry cell weight) per day.

  11. Hydrogen Sulfide Induces Oxidative Damage to RNA and DNA in a Sulfide-Tolerant Marine Invertebrate

    OpenAIRE

    Joyner-Matos, Joanna; Predmore, Benjamin L.; Stein, Jenny R.; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan; Julian, David

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide acts as an environmental toxin across a range of concentrations and as a cellular signaling molecule at very low concentrations. Despite its toxicity, many animals, including the mudflat polychaete Glycera dibranchiata, are periodically or continuously exposed to sulfide in their environment. We tested the hypothesis that a broad range of ecologically relevant sulfide concentrations induces oxidative stress and oxidative damage to RNA and DNA in G. dibranchiata. Coelomocytes ...

  12. Nitrate-reducing, sulfide-oxidizing bacteria as microbial oxidants for rapid biological sulfide removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Gusseme, Bart; De Schryver, Peter; De Cooman, Michaël; Verbeken, Kim; Boeckx, Pascal; Verstraete, Willy; Boon, Nico

    2009-01-01

    The emission of hydrogen sulfide into the atmosphere of sewer systems induces the biological production of sulfuric acid, causing severe concrete corrosion. As a possible preventive solution, a microbial consortium of nitrate-reducing, sulfide-oxidizing bacteria (NR-SOB) was enriched in a continuously stirred tank reactor in order to develop a biological technique for the removal of dissolved sulfide. The consortium, dominated by Arcobacter sp., was capable of removing 99% of sulfide. Stable isotope fractioning of the sulfide indicated that the oxidation was a biological process. The capacity of the NR-SOB consortium for rapid removal of sulfide was demonstrated by using it as an inoculum in synthetic and real sewage. Removal rates up to 52 mg sulfide-S g VSS(-1) h(-1) were achieved, to our knowledge the highest removal rate reported so far for freshwater species in the absence of molecular oxygen. Further long-term incubation experiments revealed the capacity of the bacteria to oxidize sulfide without the presence of nitrate, suggesting that an oxidized redox reserve is present in the culture.

  13. Hydrogen sulfide in hemostasis: friend or foe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olas, Beata

    2014-06-25

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a well known toxic gas that is synthesized from the amino acids: cysteine (Cys) and homocysteine (Hcy) by three enzymes: cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS), cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE) and mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (3-MST). Hydrogen sulfide, like carbon monoxide (CO) or nitric oxide (NO) is a signaling molecule in different biological systems, including the cardiovascular system. Moreover, hydrogen sulfide plays a role in the pathogenesis of various cardiovascular diseases. It modulates different elements of hemostasis (activation of blood platelet, and coagulation process) as well as proliferation and apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells. However, the biological role and the therapeutic potential of H2S is not clear. This review summarizes the different functions of hydrogen sulfide in hemostasis.

  14. [Fatal outcome of an hydrogen sulfide poisoning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Querellou, E; Jaffrelot, M; Savary, D; Savry, C; Perfus, J-P

    2005-10-01

    We report a case of fatal outcome poisoning by massive exposure to hydrogen sulfide of a sewer worker. This rare event was associated with a moderate intoxication of two members of the rescue team. The death was due to asystole and massive lung oedema. Autopsy analysis showed diffuse necrotic lesions in lungs. Hydrogen sulfide is a direct and systemic poison, produced by organic matter decomposition. The direct toxicity mechanism is still unclear. The systemic toxicity is due to an acute toxicity by oxygen depletion at cellular level. It is highly diffusable and potentially very dangerous. At low concentration, rotten egg smell must trigger hydrogen sulfide suspicion since at higher concentration it is undetectable, making intoxication possible. In case of acute intoxication, there is an almost instantaneous cardiovascular failure and a rapid death. Hydrogen sulfide exposure requires prevention measures and more specifically the use of respiratory equipment for members of the rescue team.

  15. Mechanism of mechanical activation for sulfide ores

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Hui-ping; CHEN Qi-yuan; YIN Zhou-lan; HE Yue-hui; HUANG Bai-yun

    2007-01-01

    Structural changes for mechanically activated pyrite, sphalerite, galena and molybdenite with or without the exposure to ambient air, were systematically investigated using X-ray diffraction analysis(XRD), particle size analysis, gravimetrical method, X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy(XPS) and scanning electron microscopy(SEM), respectively. Based on the above structural changes for mechanically activated sulfide ores and related reports by other researchers, several qualitative rules of the mechanisms and the effects of mechanical activation for sulfide ores are obtained. For brittle sulfide ores with thermal instability, and incomplete cleavage plane or extremely incomplete cleavage plane, the mechanism of mechanical activation is that a great amount of surface reactive sites are formed during their mechanical activation. The effects of mechanical activation are apparent. For brittle sulfide ores with thermal instability, and complete cleavage plane, the mechanism of mechanical activation is that a great amount of surface reactive sites are formed, and lattice deformation happens during their mechanical activation. The effects of mechanical activation are apparent. For brittle sulfide ores with excellent thermal stability, and complete cleavage plane, the mechanism of mechanical activation is that lattice deformation happens during their mechanical activation. The effects of mechanical activation are apparent. For sulfide ores with high toughness, good thermal stability and very excellent complete cleavage plane, the mechanism of mechanical activation is that lattice deformation happens during their mechanical activation, but the lattice deformation ratio is very small. The effects of mechanical activation are worst.

  16. Hydrogen sulfide can inhibit and enhance oxygenic photosynthesis in a cyanobacterium from sulfidic springs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klatt, Judith M.; Haas, Sebastian; Yilmaz, Pelin; de Beer, Dirk; Polerecky, Lubos

    2015-01-01

    We used microsensors to investigate the combinatory effect of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and light on oxygenic photosynthesis in biofilms formed by a cyanobacterium from sulfidic springs. We found that photosynthesis was both positively and negatively affected by H2S: (i) H2S accelerated the recovery of

  17. Sulfide response analysis for sulfide control using a pS electrode in sulfate reducing bioreactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Villa Gomez, D.K.; Cassidy, J.; Keesman, K.J.; Sampaio, R.M.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2014-01-01

    Step changes in the organic loading rate (OLR) through variations in the influent chemical oxygen demand (CODin) concentration or in the hydraulic retention time (HRT) at constant COD/SO4 2- ratio (0.67) were applied to create sulfide responses for the design of a sulfide control in sulfate reducing

  18. NEAR-CONTINUOUS MEASUREMENT OF HYDROGEN SULFIDE AND CARBONYL SULFIDE BY AN AUTOMATIC GAS CHROMATOGRAPH

    Science.gov (United States)

    An automatic gas chromatograph with a flame photometric detector that samples and analyzes hydrogen sulfide and carbonyl sulfide at 30-s intervals is described. Temperature programming was used to elute trace amounts of carbon disulfide present in each injection from a Supelpak-S...

  19. Hydrogen sulfide induces oxidative damage to RNA and DNA in a sulfide-tolerant marine invertebrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyner-Matos, Joanna; Predmore, Benjamin L; Stein, Jenny R; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan; Julian, David

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide acts as an environmental toxin across a range of concentrations and as a cellular signaling molecule at very low concentrations. Despite its toxicity, many animals, including the mudflat polychaete Glycera dibranchiata, are periodically or continuously exposed to sulfide in their environment. We tested the hypothesis that a broad range of ecologically relevant sulfide concentrations induces oxidative stress and oxidative damage to RNA and DNA in G. dibranchiata. Coelomocytes exposed in vitro to sulfide (0-3 mmol L(-1) for 1 h) showed dose-dependent increases in oxidative stress (as 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein fluorescence) and superoxide production (as dihydroethidine fluorescence). Coelomocytes exposed in vitro to sulfide (up to 0.73 mmol L(-1) for 2 h) also acquired increased oxidative damage to RNA (detected as 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanosine) and DNA (detected as 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine). Worms exposed in vivo to sulfide (0-10 mmol L(-1) for 24 h) acquired elevated oxidative damage to RNA and DNA in both coelomocytes and body wall tissue. While the consequences of RNA and DNA oxidative damage are poorly understood, oxidatively damaged deoxyguanosine bases preferentially bind thymine, causing G-T transversions and potentially causing heritable point mutations. This suggests that sulfide can be an environmental mutagen in sulfide-tolerant invertebrates.

  20. Indium sulfide buffer/CIGSSe interface engineering: Improved cell performance by the addition of zinc sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allsop, N.A. [Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin, Department SE2, Glienicker Str. 100, D-14109 Berlin (Germany)]. E-mail: allsop@hmi.de; Camus, C. [Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin, Department SE2, Glienicker Str. 100, D-14109 Berlin (Germany); Haensel, A. [Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin, Department SE2, Glienicker Str. 100, D-14109 Berlin (Germany); Gledhill, S.E. [Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin, Department SE2, Glienicker Str. 100, D-14109 Berlin (Germany); Lauermann, I. [Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin, Department SE2, Glienicker Str. 100, D-14109 Berlin (Germany); Lux-Steiner, M.C. [Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin, Department SE2, Glienicker Str. 100, D-14109 Berlin (Germany); Fischer, Ch.-H. [Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin, Department SE2, Glienicker Str. 100, D-14109 Berlin (Germany)

    2007-05-31

    Indium sulfide buffer layers deposited by the spray-ion layer gas reaction (Spray-ILGAR) technique are a viable alternative to the traditional cadmium sulfide buffer layer in thin film solar cells. In the present work we report on the results of manipulating the absorber/buffer interface between the chalcopyrite Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se){sub 2} absorber (CIGSSe) and the indium sulfide buffer. It is shown that the deposition of a small amount of zinc sulfide at the absorber/buffer interface can be used to increase the open circuit voltage. A small but significant increase of 20 mV (up to 580 mV), as compared to the pure indium sulfide buffered cells is possible leading to an increase in the overall efficiency.

  1. A study of the stability of cadmium sulfide/copper sulfide and cadmium sulfide copper-indium-diselenide solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel, G.; Richard, N.; Gaines, G.

    1984-08-01

    Groups of high efficiency cadmium sulfide/copper sulfide solar cells were exposed to combinations of stresses designed to isolate and accelerate intrinsic degradation mechanisms. Stresses included elevated temperature, illumination intensity, and cell loading conditions. All stress exposures and tests were conducted in a benign (high purity argon) atmosphere. Two primary intrinsic modes of degradation were identified: degradation of the open circuit voltage under continuous illumination and nonzero loading was found to be self recovering upon interruption of illumination or upon shorting or reverse biasing the cells. It was attributed to traps in the depletion region. Recovery from decay of light generated current was not spontaneous but could be partially accomplished by annealing in a reducing (hydrogen) environment. It was attributed to changes in the stoichiometry of the copper sulfide under the influence of electric fields and currents.

  2. Sulfide capacities of fayalite-base slags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeonov, S. R.; Sridhar, R.; Toguri, J. M.

    1995-04-01

    The sulfide capacities of fayalite-base slags were measured by a gas-slag equilibration technique under controlled oxygen and sulfur potentials similar to those encountered in the pyrometallurgical processing of nonferrous metals. The oxygen pressure range was from 10-9.5 to 10-11 MPa and the sulfur pressure range from 10-3 to 10-4.5 MPa, over a temperature range of 1473 to 1623 K. The slags studied were FeO-SiO2 at silica saturation and those with addition of CaO, MgO, and Al2O3 to determine their effect on sulfide capacities. For these slags, the sulfide capacities were found to vary from 10-3.3 to 10-5. The sulfide capacities increased with increasing temperature from 1473 to 1623 K. A comparison of the reported plant data on sulfur content of industrial slags shows good agreement with the present experimental results. The present data will be useful in estimating metal losses in slag due to metal sulfide entrainment in nonferrous smelters.

  3. Solar thermal extraction of copper from sulfides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winkel, L.; Guesdon, C.; Sturzenegger, M.

    2003-03-01

    With the aim to develop a solar-driven process for the extraction of copper from sulfide concentrates re-search on the decomposition of copper sulfides under inert atmospheres has been initiated. Thermogravimetric measurements on chalcocite (Cu{sub 2}S) revealed that copper is formed already at 1823 K. Chalcopyrite (CuFeS{sub 2}) also disintegrates at this temperature, although at a lower rate. Copper and iron have been identified in the solid residue. The results confirm the feasibility of copper extraction by direct decomposition of sulfides under atmospheric pressure. The decomposition under inert atmosphere prevents generation of SO{sub 2}, and is beneficial to the removal of volatile impurities. Chemical equilibrium calculations for CuFeS{sub 2} contaminated with enargite (Cu{sub 3}AsS{sub 4}) have shown that the absence of an oxidic slag allows for a complete evaporation of arsenic and subsequent separation. (author)

  4. Sulfide and methane production in sewer sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yiwen; Ni, Bing-Jie; Ganigué, Ramon; Werner, Ursula; Sharma, Keshab R; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2015-03-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated significant sulfide and methane production by sewer biofilms, particularly in rising mains. Sewer sediments in gravity sewers are also biologically active; however, their contribution to biological transformations in sewers is poorly understood at present. In this study, sediments collected from a gravity sewer were cultivated in a laboratory reactor fed with real wastewater for more than one year to obtain intact sediments. Batch test results show significant sulfide production with an average rate of 9.20 ± 0.39 g S/m(2)·d from the sediments, which is significantly higher than the areal rate of sewer biofilms. In contrast, the average methane production rate is 1.56 ± 0.14 g CH4/m(2)·d at 20 °C, which is comparable to the areal rate of sewer biofilms. These results clearly show that the contributions of sewer sediments to sulfide and methane production cannot be ignored when evaluating sewer emissions. Microsensor and pore water measurements of sulfide, sulfate and methane in the sediments, microbial profiling along the depth of the sediments and mathematical modelling reveal that sulfide production takes place near the sediment surface due to the limited penetration of sulfate. In comparison, methane production occurs in a much deeper zone below the surface likely due to the better penetration of soluble organic carbon. Modelling results illustrate the dependency of sulfide and methane productions on the bulk sulfate and soluble organic carbon concentrations can be well described with half-order kinetics.

  5. Membrane for hydrogen recovery from streams containing hydrogen sulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Pradeep K.

    2007-01-16

    A membrane for hydrogen recovery from streams containing hydrogen sulfide is provided. The membrane comprises a substrate, a hydrogen permeable first membrane layer deposited on the substrate, and a second membrane layer deposited on the first layer. The second layer contains sulfides of transition metals and positioned on the on a feed side of the hydrogen sulfide stream. The present invention also includes a method for the direct decomposition of hydrogen sulfide to hydrogen and sulfur.

  6. Acute inhalation toxicity of carbonyl sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, J.M.; Hahn, F.F.; Barr, E.B. [and others

    1995-12-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS), a colorless gas, is a side product of industrial procedures sure as coal hydrogenation and gasification. It is structurally related to and is a metabolite of carbon disulfide. COS is metabolized in the body by carbonic anhydrase to hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), which is thought to be responsible for COS toxicity. No threshold limit value for COS has been established. Results of these studies indicate COS (with an LC{sub 50} of 590 ppm) is slightly less acutely toxic than H{sub 2}S (LC{sub 50} of 440 ppm).

  7. Modeling of Sulfide Microenvironments on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenzer, S. P.; Bridges, J. C.; McAdam, A.; Steer, E. D.; Conrad, P. G.; Kelley, S. P.; Wiens, R. C.; Mangold, N.; Grotzinger, J.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Franz, H. B.; Sutter, B.

    2016-01-01

    Yellowknife Bay (YKB; sol 124-198) is the second site that the Mars Science Laboratory Rover Curiosity investigated in detail on its mission in Gale Crater. YKB represents lake bed sediments from an overall neutral pH, low salinity environment, with a mineralogical composition which includes Ca-sulfates, Fe oxide/hydroxides, Fe-sulfides, amorphous material, and trioctahedral phyllosilicates. We investigate whether sulfide alteration could be associated with ancient habitable microenvironments in the Gale mudstones. Some textural evidence for such alteration may be pre-sent in the nodules present in the mudstone.

  8. Iron-sulfide crystals in probe deposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Karin; Frandsen, Flemming

    1998-01-01

    Iron-sulfides were observed in deposits collected on a probe inserted at the top of the furnace of a coal-fired power station in Denmark. The chemical composition of the iron-sulfides is equivalent to pyrrhotite (FeS). The pyrrhotites are present as crystals and, based on the shape of the crystals......, it was deduced that they were not deposited but instead grew within the deposit. The presence of unburned char particles within the deposits supports the concept that a reducing environment existed in the deposits. Two processes are proposed for explaining the existence of pyrrhotite crystals within a deposit...

  9. Use of biogenic sulfide for ZnS precipitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esposito, G.; Veeken, A.; Weijma, J.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2006-01-01

    A 600 ml continuously stirred tank reactor was used to assess the performance of a zinc sulfide precipitation process using a biogenic sulfide solution (the effluent of a sulfate-reducing bioreactor) as sulfide source. In all experiments, a proportional-integral (PI) control algorithm was used to co

  10. A physiologically based kinetic model for bacterial sulfide oxidation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klok, J.B.; Graaff, M. de; Bosch, P.L. van den; Boelee, N.C.; Keesman, K.J.; Janssen, A.J.W.M.

    2013-01-01

    In the biotechnological process for hydrogen sulfide removal from gas streams, a variety of oxidation products can be formed. Under natron-alkaline conditions, sulfide is oxidized by haloalkaliphilic sulfide oxidizing bacteria via flavocytochrome c oxidoreductase. From previous studies, it was concl

  11. Measurement and biological significance of the volatile sulfur compounds hydrogen sulfide, methanethiol and dimethyl sulfide in various biological matrices.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tangerman, A.

    2009-01-01

    This review deals with the measurement of the volatile sulfur compounds hydrogen sulfide, methanethiol and dimethyl sulfide in various biological matrices of rats and humans (blood, serum, tissues, urine, breath, feces and flatus). Hydrogen sulfide and methanethiol both contain the active thiol (-SH

  12. Measurement and biological significance of the volatile sulfur compounds hydrogen sulfide, methanethiol and dimethyl sulfide in various biological matrices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tangerman, Albert

    2009-01-01

    This review deals with the measurement of the volatile Sulfur compounds hydrogen sulfide, methanethiol and dimethyl sulfide in various biological matrices of rats and humans (blood, serum, tissues, urine, breath, feces and flatus). Hydrogen sulfide and methanethiol both contain the active thiol (-SH

  13. Modeling Sulfides, pH and Hydrogen Sulfide Gas in the Sewers of San Francisco

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vollertsen, Jes; Revilla, Nohemy; Hvitved-Jacobsen, Thorkild;

    2015-01-01

    An extensive measuring campaign targeted on sewer odor problems was undertaken in San Francisco. It was assessed whether a conceptual sewer process model could reproduce the measured concentrations of total sulfide in the wastewater and H2S gas in the sewer atmosphere, and to which degree...... such simulations have potential for further improving odor and sulfide management. The campaign covered measurement of wastewater sulfide by grab sampling and diurnal sampling, and H2S gas in the sewer atmosphere was logged. The tested model was based on the Wastewater Aerobic/Anaerobic Transformations in Sewers...... (WATS) sewer process concept, which never had been calibrated to such an extensive dataset. The study showed that the model was capable of reproducing the general levels of wastewater sulfide, wastewater pH, and sewer H2S gas. It could also reproduce the general variability of these parameters, albeit...

  14. Comparison of Hydrogen Sulfide Analysis Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bethea, Robert M.

    1973-01-01

    A summary and critique of common methods of hydrogen sulfide analysis is presented. Procedures described are: reflectance from silver plates and lead acetate-coated tiles, lead acetate and mercuric chloride paper tapes, sodium nitroprusside and methylene blue wet chemical methods, infrared spectrophotometry, and gas chromatography. (BL)

  15. Microbial Fuel Cells for Sulfide Removal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rabaey, K.; Sompel, van de S.; Maignien, L.; Boon, N.; Aelterman, P.; Clauwaert, P.; Schamphelaire, de L.; The Pham, H.; Vermeulen, J.; Verhaege, M.; Lens, P.N.L.; Verstraete, W.

    2006-01-01

    Thus far, microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have been used to convert carbon-based substrates to electricity. However, sulfur compounds are ubiquitously present in organic waste and wastewater. In this study, a MFC with a hexacyanoferrate cathodic electrolyte was used to convert dissolved sulfide to eleme

  16. 30 CFR 250.490 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... been confirmed. Well-control fluid means drilling mud and completion or workover fluid as appropriate... OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Drilling Operations Hydrogen Sulfide § 250.490 Hydrogen... section when conducting drilling, well-completion/well-workover, and production operations in zones...

  17. Hydrogen Sulfide in Preeclampsia : Potential Therapeutic Implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holwerda, Kim

    2015-01-01

    The thesis provide insights into the production and possible therapeutic effect of the gaseous molecule hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in preeclampsia (PE). H2S is an important molecule in the (human) body. It is among others involved in blood pressure regulation, stimulation of vascular growth and modulati

  18. Nucleation of mercury sulfide by dealkylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enescu, Mironel; Nagy, Kathryn L.; Manceau, Alain

    2016-12-01

    Metal sulfide minerals are assumed to form naturally at ambient conditions via reaction of a metallic element with (poly)sulfide ions, usually produced by microbes in oxygen-depleted environments. Recently, the formation of mercury sulfide (β-HgS) directly from linear Hg(II)-thiolate complexes (Hg(SR)2) in natural organic matter and in cysteine solutions was demonstrated under aerated conditions. Here, a detailed description of this non-sulfidic reaction is provided by computations at a high level of molecular-orbital theory. The HgS stoichiometry is obtained through the cleavage of the S-C bond in one thiolate, transfer of the resulting alkyl group (R’) to another thiolate, and subsequent elimination of a sulfur atom from the second thiolate as a thioether (RSR’). Repetition of this mechanism leads to the formation of RS-(HgS)n-R chains which may self-assemble in parallel arrays to form cinnabar (α-HgS), or more commonly, quickly condense to four-coordinate metacinnabar (β-HgS). The mechanistic pathway is thermodynamically favorable and its predicted kinetics agrees with experiment. The results provide robust theoretical support for the abiotic natural formation of nanoparticulate HgS under oxic conditions and in the absence of a catalyst, and suggest a new route for the (bio)synthesis of HgS nanoparticles with improved technological properties.

  19. Platinum metals in magmatic sulfide ores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naldrett, A.J.; Duke, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    Platinum-group elements (PGE) are mined predominantly from deposits that have formed by the segregation of molten iron-nickel-copper sulfides from silicate magmas. The absolute concentrations of PGE in sulfides from different deposits vary over a range of five orders of magnitude, whereas those of other chalcophile elements vary by factors of only 2 to 100. However, the relative proportions of the different PGE in a given deposit are systematically related to the nature of the parent magma. The absolute and relative concentrations of PGE in magmatic sulfides are explained in terms of the degree of partial melting of mantle peridotite required to produce the parent magma and the processes of batch equilibration and fractional segregation of sulfides. The Republic of South Africa and the U.S.S.R. together possess more than 97 percent of the world PGE reserves, but significant undeveloped resources occur in North America. The Stillwater complex in Montana is perhaps the most important example. Copyright ?? 1980 AAAS.

  20. Monitoring sulfide and sulfate-reducing bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanner, R.S.

    1995-12-31

    Simple yet precise and accurate methods for monitoring sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and sulfide remain useful for the study of bacterial souring and corrosion. Test kits are available to measure sulfide in field samples. A more precise methylene blue sulfide assay for both field and laboratory studies is described here. Improved media, compared to that in API RP-38, for enumeration of SRB have been formulated. One of these, API-RST, contained cysteine (1.1 mM) as a reducing agent, which may be a confounding source of sulfide. While cysteine was required for rapid enumeration of SRB from environmental samples, the concentration of cysteine in medium could be reduced to 0.4 mM. It was also determined that elevated levels of yeast extract (>1 g/liter) could interfere with enumeration of SRB from environmental samples. The API-RST medium was modified to a RST-11 medium. Other changes in medium composition, in addition to reduction of cysteine, included reduction of the concentration of phosphate from 3.4 mM to 2.2 mM, reduction of the concentration of ferrous iron from 0.8 mM to 0.5 mM and preparation of a stock mineral solution to ease medium preparation. SRB from environmental samples could be enumerated in a week in this medium.

  1. Sulfide Intrusion and Detoxification in the Seagrass Zostera marina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasler-Sheetal, Harald; Holmer, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    Gaseous sulfide intrusion into seagrasses growing in sulfidic sediments causes little or no harm to the plant, indicating the presence of an unknown sulfide tolerance or detoxification mechanism. We assessed such mechanism in the seagrass Zostera marina in the laboratory and in the field with sca......Gaseous sulfide intrusion into seagrasses growing in sulfidic sediments causes little or no harm to the plant, indicating the presence of an unknown sulfide tolerance or detoxification mechanism. We assessed such mechanism in the seagrass Zostera marina in the laboratory and in the field...... with scanning electron microscopy coupled to energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, chromatographic and spectrophotometric methods, and stable isotope tracing coupled with a mass balance of sulfur compounds. We found that Z. marina detoxified gaseous sediment-derived sulfide through incorporation and that most...

  2. Sulfide removal by moderate oxygenation of anaerobic sludge environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Zee, F.P.; Villaverde, S.; Polanco, F. [Valladolid Univ., Valladolid (Spain). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Garcia, P.A.

    2004-07-01

    Treating wastewater through anaerobic bioreactors results in the formation of hydrogen sulfide. The sulfide can be removed from the biogas by introducing air directly into the anaerobic bioreactor system. This study presents the results of batch experiments that provided a better insight into the fate of sulfur compounds and oxygen during microaerobic sulfide oxidation in granular sludge. It was shown that sulfide could be removed rapidly upon introduction of low amounts of oxygen to the sulfide-amended batch vials with granular sludge treating vinasse. Initially, the sulfide was oxidized to elemental sulfur, thiosulfate and polysulfide. Significant production of sulfate did not occur. The introduction of oxygen, however, could result in the growth of aerobic organic-chemical oxygen demand-oxidizing bacteria that compete with sulfide oxidation for oxygen. 6 refs., 1 tab., 1 fig.

  3. Sulfide, the first inorganic substrate for human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goubern, Marc; Andriamihaja, Mireille; Nübel, Tobias; Blachier, François; Bouillaud, Frédéric

    2007-06-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is produced inside the intestine and is known as a poison that inhibits cellular respiration at the level of cytochrome oxidase. However, sulfide is used as an energetic substrate by many photo- and chemoautotrophic bacteria and by animals such as the lugworm Arenicola marina. The concentrations of sulfide present in their habitats are comparable with those present in the human colon. Using permeabilized colonic cells to which sulfide was added by an infusion pump we show that the maximal respiratory rate of colonocyte mitochondria in presence of sulfide compares with that obtained with succinate or L-alpha-glycerophosphate. This oxidation is accompanied by mitochondrial energization. In contrast, other cell types not naturally exposed to high concentration of sulfide showed much lower oxidation rates. Mitochondria showed a very high affinity for sulfide that permits its use as an energetic substrate at low micromolar concentrations, hence, below the toxic level. However, if the supply of sulfide exceeds the oxidation rate, poisoning renders mitochondria inefficient and our data suggest that an anaerobic mechanism involving partial reversion of Krebs cycle already known in invertebrates takes place. In conclusion, this work provides additional and compelling evidence that sulfide is not only a toxic compound. According to our study, sulfide appears to be the first inorganic substrate for mammalian cells characterized thus far.

  4. The Evolution of Sulfide Tolerance in the Cyanobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Scott R.; Bebout, Brad M.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Understanding how the function of extant microorganisms has recorded both their evolutionary histories and their past interactions with the environment is a stated goal of astrobiology. We are taking a multidisciplinary approach to investigate the diversification of sulfide tolerance mechanisms in the cyanobacteria, which vary both in their degree of exposure to sulfide and in their capacity to tolerate this inhibitor of photosynthetic electron transport. Since conditions were very reducing during the first part of Earth's history and detrital sulfides have been found in Archean sediments, mechanisms conferring sulfide tolerance may have been important for the evolutionary success of the ancestors of extant cyanobacteria. Two tolerance mechanisms have been identified in this group: (1) resistance of photosystem II, the principal target of sulfide toxicity; and (2) maintenance of the ability to fix carbon despite photosystem II inhibition by utilizing sulfide as an electron donor in photosystem I - dependent, anoxygenic photosynthesis. We are presently collecting comparative data on aspects of sulfide physiology for laboratory clones isolated from a variety of habitats. These data will be analyzed within a phylogenetic framework inferred from molecular sequence data collected for these clones to test how frequently different mechanisms of tolerance have evolved and which tolerance mechanism evolved first. In addition, by analyzing these physiological data together with environmental sulfide data collected from our research sites using microelectrodes, we can also test whether the breadth of an organism's sulfide tolerance can be predicted from the magnitude of variation in environmental sulfide concentration it has experienced in its recent evolutionary past and whether greater average sulfide concentration and/or temporal variability in sulfide favors the evolution of a particular mechanism of sulfide tolerance.

  5. Speciation of arsenic in sulfidic waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ford Robert G

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Formation constants for thioarsenite species have been determined in dilute solutions at 25°C, ΣH2S from 10-7.5 to 10-3.0 M, ΣAs from 10-5.6 to 10-4.8 M, and pH 7 and 10. The principal inorganic arsenic species in anoxic aquatic systems are arsenite, As(OH30, and a mononuclear thioarsenite with an S/As ratio of 3:1. Thioarsenic species with S/As ratios of 1 : 1,2 : 1, and 4 : 1 are lesser components in sulfidic solutions that might be encountered in natural aquatic environments. Thioarsenites dominate arsenic speciation at sulfide concentrations > 10-4.3 M at neutral pH. Conversion from neutral As(OH30 to anionic thioarsenite species may regulate the transport and fate of arsenic in sulfate-reducing environments by governing sorption and mineral precipitation reactions.

  6. Iron-sulfide redox flow batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Guanguang; Yang, Zhenguo; Li, Liyu; Kim, Soowhan; Liu, Jun; Graff, Gordon L

    2016-06-14

    Iron-sulfide redox flow battery (RFB) systems can be advantageous for energy storage, particularly when the electrolytes have pH values greater than 6. Such systems can exhibit excellent energy conversion efficiency and stability and can utilize low-cost materials that are relatively safer and more environmentally friendly. One example of an iron-sulfide RFB is characterized by a positive electrolyte that comprises Fe(III) and/or Fe(II) in a positive electrolyte supporting solution, a negative electrolyte that comprises S.sup.2- and/or S in a negative electrolyte supporting solution, and a membrane, or a separator, that separates the positive electrolyte and electrode from the negative electrolyte and electrode.

  7. Oxidation of Reduced Sulfur Species: Carbonyl Sulfide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glarborg, Peter; Marshall, Paul

    2013-01-01

    A detailed chemical kinetic model for oxidation of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) has been developed, based on a critical evaluation of data from the literature. The mechanism has been validated against experimental results from batch reactors, flow reactors, and shock tubes. The model predicts satisfact......A detailed chemical kinetic model for oxidation of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) has been developed, based on a critical evaluation of data from the literature. The mechanism has been validated against experimental results from batch reactors, flow reactors, and shock tubes. The model predicts...... by the competition between chain‐branching and ‐propagating steps; modeling predictions are particularly sensitive to the branching fraction for the OCS + O reaction to form CO + SO or CO2 + S....

  8. Iron-sulfide redox flow batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Guan-Guang; Yang, Zhenguo; Li, Liyu; Kim, Soowhan; Liu, Jun; Graff, Gordon L

    2013-12-17

    Iron-sulfide redox flow battery (RFB) systems can be advantageous for energy storage, particularly when the electrolytes have pH values greater than 6. Such systems can exhibit excellent energy conversion efficiency and stability and can utilize low-cost materials that are relatively safer and more environmentally friendly. One example of an iron-sulfide RFB is characterized by a positive electrolyte that comprises Fe(III) and/or Fe(II) in a positive electrolyte supporting solution, a negative electrolyte that comprises S.sup.2- and/or S in a negative electrolyte supporting solution, and a membrane, or a separator, that separates the positive electrolyte and electrode from the negative electrolyte and electrode.

  9. Subsurface heaters with low sulfidation rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John, Randy Carl; Vinegar, Harold J

    2013-12-10

    A system for heating a hydrocarbon containing formation includes a heater having an elongated ferromagnetic metal heater section. The heater is located in an opening in a formation. The heater section is configured to heat the hydrocarbon containing formation. The exposed ferromagnetic metal has a sulfidation rate that goes down with increasing temperature of the heater, when the heater is in a selected temperature range.

  10. Hydrogen sulfide prodrugs—a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yueqin Zheng

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide (H2S is recognized as one of three gasotransmitters together with nitric oxide (NO and carbon monoxide (CO. As a signaling molecule, H2S plays an important role in physiology and shows great potential in pharmaceutical applications. Along this line, there is a need for the development of H2S prodrugs for various reasons. In this review, we summarize different H2S prodrugs, their chemical properties, and some of their potential therapeutic applications.

  11. Hydrogen sulfide prodrugs—a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yueqin; Ji, Xingyue; Ji, Kaili; Wang, Binghe

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is recognized as one of three gasotransmitters together with nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO). As a signaling molecule, H2S plays an important role in physiology and shows great potential in pharmaceutical applications. Along this line, there is a need for the development of H2S prodrugs for various reasons. In this review, we summarize different H2S prodrugs, their chemical properties, and some of their potential therapeutic applications. PMID:26579468

  12. Redetermination of piperidinium hydrogen sulfide structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andras, Maria T.; Hepp, Aloysius F.; Fanwick, Phillip E.; Duraj, Stan A.; Gordon, Edward M.

    1994-01-01

    The presence of adventitious water in a reaction between dicyclopentamethylene thiuram-disulfide (C5H10NCS2)(sub 2) and a picoline solution of tricyclopentadienyl indium(III) (C5H5)(sub 3). It resulted in the formation of piperidinium hydrogen sulfide (C5H13NS). The piperidinium hydrogen sulfide produced in this way was unambiguously characterized by X-ray crystallography. The structure determination showed that the piperidinium hydrogen sulfide crystal (MW = 119.23 g/mol) has an orthorhombic (Pbcm) unit cell whose parameters are: a = 9.818(2), b = 7.3720(1), c = 9.754(1) A, V = 706.0(3) A(exp 3), Z=4. D(sub chi) = 1.122 g cm(exp -3), Mo K(alpha) (lamda = 0.71073), mu= 3.36 cm(exp -1), F(000) = 264.0, T =293 K, R = 0.036 for 343 reflections with F(sub O)(sup 2) greater than 3 sigma (F(sub O)(sup 2)) and 65 variables. The compound consists of (C5H10NH2)(+) cations and (SH)(-) anions with both species residing on crystallographic mirror planes. N-H -- S hydrogen bonding contributes to the interconnection of neighboring piperidinium components of the compound.

  13. Air-water transfer of hydrogen sulfide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yongsiri, C.; Vollertsen, J.; Rasmussen, M. R.;

    2004-01-01

    experiments. By means of the overall mass–transfer coefficient (KLa), the transfer coefficient of hydrogen sulfide (KLaH2S), referring to total sulfide, was correlated to that of oxygen (KLaO2) (i.e., the reaeration coefficient). Results demonstrate that both turbulence and pH in the water phase play...... a significant role for KLaH2S. An exponential expression is a suitable representation for the relationship between KLaH2S and the Froude number at all pH values studied (4.5 to 8.0). Because of the dissociation of hydrogen sulfide, KLaH2S increased with decreasing pH at a constant turbulence level. Relative...... differences in KLaH2S at pH values between 4.5 and 8.0 became larger as the turbulence level increased, whereas those at pH between 4.5 and 7.0 did not statistically show any change. At constant pH, KLaH2S/KLaO2 was observed not to be dependent on the turbulence range studied. KLaH2S/KLaO2 ratio was 0...

  14. Sulfide scaling in low enthalpy geothermal environments; A survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Criaud, A.; Fouillac, C. (Bureau de Recherches Geologiques et Minieres (BRGM), 45 - Orleans (France))

    1989-01-01

    A review of the sulfide scaling phenomena in low-temperature environments is presented. While high-temperature fluids tend to deposit metal sulfides because of their high concentrations of dissolved metals and variations of temperature, pressure and fluid chemistry, low temperature media are characterized by very low metal content but much higher dissolved sulfide. In the case of the goethermal wells of the Paris Basin, detailed studies demonstrate that the relatively large concentrations of chloride and dissolved sulfide are responsible for corrosion and consequent formation of iron sulfide scale composed of mackinawite, pyrite and pyrrhotite. The effects of the exploitation schemes are far less important than the corrosion of the casings. The low-enthalpy fluids that do not originate from sedimentary aquifers (such as in Iceland and Bulgaria), have a limited corrosion potential, and the thin sulfide film that appears may prevent the progress of corrosion.

  15. Oxidation and Precipitation of Sulfide in Sewer Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, A. H.

    calibrated and validated against field data. In the extension to the WATS model, sulfur transformations were described by six processes: 1. Sulfide production taking place in the biofilm and sediments covering the permanently wetted sewer walls; 2. Biological sulfide oxidation in the permanently wetted...... on oxidation and precipitation of sulfide, which are considered important processes in the sulfur cycle in wastewater and biofilms of sewer networks. Based on experimental studies, it was the objective to establish kinetics and stoichiometry of oxidation and precipitation of sulfide and to integrate...... the processes in an already existing sewer process model, thereby improving its capabilities for prediction of sulfide buildup in wastewater and atmosphere of sewer networks. Accordingly, efforts were made to develop experimental procedures for estimation of model parameters. Sulfide oxidation in both...

  16. Organization of the human mitochondrial hydrogen sulfide oxidation pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libiad, Marouane; Yadav, Pramod Kumar; Vitvitsky, Victor; Martinov, Michael; Banerjee, Ruma

    2014-11-07

    Sulfide oxidation is expected to play an important role in cellular switching between low steady-state intracellular hydrogen sulfide levels and the higher concentrations where the physiological effects are elicited. Yet despite its significance, fundamental questions regarding how the sulfide oxidation pathway is wired remain unanswered, and competing proposals exist that diverge at the very first step catalyzed by sulfide quinone oxidoreductase (SQR). We demonstrate that, in addition to sulfite, glutathione functions as a persulfide acceptor for human SQR and that rhodanese preferentially synthesizes rather than utilizes thiosulfate. The kinetic behavior of these enzymes provides compelling evidence for the flow of sulfide via SQR to glutathione persulfide, which is then partitioned to thiosulfate or sulfite. Kinetic simulations at physiologically relevant metabolite concentrations provide additional support for the organizational logic of the sulfide oxidation pathway in which glutathione persulfide is the first intermediate formed.

  17. Measurement of plasma hydrogen sulfide in vivo and in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Xinggui; Pattillo, Christopher B.; Pardue, Sibile; Bir, Shyamal C.; Wang, Rui; Kevil, Christopher G.

    2011-01-01

    The gasotransmitter hydrogen sulfide is known to regulate multiple cellular functions during normal and pathophysiological states. However, a paucity of concise information exists regarding quantitative amounts of hydrogen sulfide involved in physiological and pathological responses. This is primarily due to disagreement among various methods employed to measure free hydrogen sulfide. In this article, we describe a very sensitive method of measuring the presence of H2S in plasma down to nanom...

  18. INVESTIGATION OF THIN FILM CADMIUM SULFIDE SOLAR CELLS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SOLAR CELLS , *CADMIUM COMPOUNDS, FILMS, SULFIDES, VAPOR PLATING, VACUUM APPARATUS, SINGLE CRYSTALS, TITANIUM, COPPER COMPOUNDS, CHLORIDES, INDIUM, MOLYBDENUM, SILICON COMPOUNDS, MONOXIDES, SURFACE PROPERTIES, ENERGY CONVERSION.

  19. Hydrogen sulfide inhibits the renal fibrosis of obstructive nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kai; Wang, Fen; Li, Qian; Shi, Yong-Bing; Zheng, Hui-Fen; Peng, Hanjing; Shen, Hua-Ying; Liu, Chun-Feng; Hu, Li-Fang

    2014-06-01

    Hydrogen sulfide has recently been found decreased in chronic kidney disease. Here we determined the effect and underlying mechanisms of hydrogen sulfide on a rat model of unilateral ureteral obstruction. Compared with normal rats, obstructive injury decreased the plasma hydrogen sulfide level. Cystathionine-β-synthase, a hydrogen sulfide-producing enzyme, was dramatically reduced in the ureteral obstructed kidney, but another enzyme cystathionine-γ-lyase was increased. A hydrogen sulfide donor (sodium hydrogen sulfide) inhibited renal fibrosis by attenuating the production of collagen, extracellular matrix, and the expression of α-smooth muscle actin. Meanwhile, the infiltration of macrophages and the expression of inflammatory cytokines including interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in the kidney were also decreased. In cultured kidney fibroblasts, a hydrogen sulfide donor inhibited the cell proliferation by reducing DNA synthesis and downregulating the expressions of proliferation-related proteins including proliferating cell nuclear antigen and c-Myc. Further, the hydrogen sulfide donor blocked the differentiation of quiescent renal fibroblasts to myofibroblasts by inhibiting the transforming growth factor-β1-Smad and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways. Thus, low doses of hydrogen sulfide or its releasing compounds may have therapeutic potentials in treating chronic kidney disease.

  20. Limitation of Sulfide Capacity Concept for Molten Slags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, In-Ho; Moosavi-Khoonsari, Elmira

    2016-04-01

    The sulfide capacity concept has been widely used in pyrometallurgy to define sulfur removal capacities of slags. Typically, the sulfide capacity is considered to be a unique slag property depending only on temperature regardless of partial pressures of oxygen and sulfur. In the present study, it is demonstrated that sulfide capacities of slags in particular those of Na2O-containing slags can vary with partial pressures of oxygen and sulfur due to large solubility of sulfide in Na2O-containing slag systems.

  1. Influence of iron on sulfide inhibition in dark biohydrogen fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Bipro Ranjan; Elbeshbishy, Elsayed; Nakhla, George

    2012-12-01

    Sulfide impact on biohydrogen production using dark fermentation of glucose at 37 °C was investigated. Dissolved sulfide (S(2-)) at a low concentration (25mg/L) increased biohydrogen production by 54% relative to the control (without iron addition). Whereas on initial dissolved S(2-) concentration of 500 mg/L significantly inhibited the biohydrogen production with total cumulative biohydrogen decreasing by 90% compared to the control (without iron addition). At sulfide concentrations of 500 mg S(2-)/L, addition of Fe(2+) at 3-4 times the theoretical requirement to precipitate 100% of the dissolved S(2-) entirely eliminated the inhibitory effect of sulfide.

  2. MEASURING METAL SULFIDE COMPLEXES IN OXIC RIVER WATERS WITH SQUARE WAVE VOLTAMMETRY. (R825395)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A sulfide identification protocol was developed to quantify specific metal sulfides that could exist in river water. Using a series of acid additions, nitrogen purges, and voltammetric analyses, metal sulfides were identified and semiquantified in three specific gr...

  3. Toxicological analysis of 17 autopsy cases of hydrogen sulfide poisoning resulting from the inhalation of intentionally generated hydrogen sulfide gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maebashi, Kyoko; Iwadate, Kimiharu; Sakai, Kentaro; Takatsu, Akihiro; Fukui, Kenji; Aoyagi, Miwako; Ochiai, Eriko; Nagai, Tomonori

    2011-04-15

    Although many cases of fatal hydrogen sulfide poisoning have been reported, in most of these cases, it resulted from the accidental inhalation of hydrogen sulfide gas. In recent years, we experienced 17 autopsy cases of fatal hydrogen sulfide poisoning due to the inhalation of intentionally generated hydrogen sulfide gas. In this study, the concentrations of sulfide and thiosulfate in blood, urine, cerebrospinal fluid and pleural effusion were examined using GC/MS. The sulfide concentrations were blood: 0.11-31.84, urine: 0.01-1.28, cerebrospinal fluid: 0.02-1.59 and pleural effusion: 2.00-8.59 (μg/ml), while the thiosulfate concentrations were blood: 0-0.648, urine: 0-2.669, cerebrospinal fluid: 0.004-0.314 and pleural effusion: 0.019-0.140 (μmol/ml). In previous reports, the blood concentration of thiosulfate was said to be higher than that of sulfide in hydrogen sulfide poisoning cases, although the latter was higher than the former in 8 of the 14 cases examined in this study. These results are believed to be strongly influenced by the atmospheric concentration of hydrogen sulfide the victims were exposed to and the time interval between exposure and death.

  4. Modeling Sulfides, pH and Hydrogen Sulfide Gas in the Sewers of San Francisco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollertsen, Jes; Revilla, Nohemy; Hvitved-Jacobsen, Thorkild; Nielsen, Asbjørn Haaning

    2015-11-01

    An extensive measuring campaign targeted on sewer odor problems was undertaken in San Francisco. It was assessed whether a conceptual sewer process model could reproduce the measured concentrations of total sulfide in the wastewater and H2S gas in the sewer atmosphere, and to which degree such simulations have potential for further improving odor and sulfide management. The campaign covered measurement of wastewater sulfide by grab sampling and diurnal sampling, and H2S gas in the sewer atmosphere was logged. The tested model was based on the Wastewater Aerobic/Anaerobic Transformations in Sewers (WATS) sewer process concept, which never had been calibrated to such an extensive dataset. The study showed that the model was capable of reproducing the general levels of wastewater sulfide, wastewater pH, and sewer H2S gas. It could also reproduce the general variability of these parameters, albeit with some uncertainty. It was concluded that the model could be applied for the purpose in mind.

  5. Mercury Sulfide Dimorphism in Thioarsenate Glasses

    OpenAIRE

    KASSEM, Mohammad; Sokolov, Anton; Cuisset, Arnaud,; Usuki, Takeshi; Khaoulani, Sohayb; Masselin, Pascal; Le Coq, David,; Feygenson, M.; Benmore, C. J.; Hannon, Alex,; Neuefeind, J. C.; Bychkov, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    International audience; Crystalline mercury sulfide exists in two drastically different polymorphic forms in different domains of the P,T-diagram: red chain-like insulator α-HgS, stable below 344 °C, and black tetrahedral narrow-band semiconductor β-HgS, stable at higher temperatures. Using pulsed neutron and high-energy X-ray diffraction, we show that these two mercury bonding pattern are present simultaneously in mercury thioarsenate glasses HgS-As2S3. The population and interconnectivity o...

  6. Diurnal changes in pore water sulfide concentrations in the seagrass Thalassia testudinum beds: the effects of seagrasses on sulfide dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee; Dunton

    2000-12-20

    The dynamics of the seagrass-sulfide interaction were examined in relation to diel changes in sediment pore water sulfide concentrations in Thalassia testudinum beds and adjacent bare areas in Corpus Christi Bay and lower Laguna Madre, Texas, USA, during July 1996. Pore water sulfide concentrations in seagrass beds were significantly higher than in adjacent bare areas and showed strong diurnal variations; levels significantly decreased during mid-day at shallow sediment depths (0-10 cm) containing high below-ground tissue biomass and surface area. In contrast, diurnal variations in sediment sulfide concentrations were absent in adjacent bare patches, and at deeper (>10 cm) sediment depths characterized by low below-ground plant biomass or when the grasses were experimentally shaded. These observations suggest that the mid-day depressions in sulfide levels are linked to the transport of photosynthetically produced oxygen to seagrass below-ground tissues that fuels sediment sulfide oxidation. Lower sulfide concentrations in bare areas are likely a result of low sulfate reduction rates due to low organic matter available for remineralization. Further, high reoxidation rates due to rapid exchange between anoxic pore water and oxic overlying water are probably stimulated in bare areas by higher current velocity on the sediment surface than in seagrass beds. The dynamics of pore water sulfides in seagrass beds suggest no toxic sulfide intrusion into below-ground tissues during photosynthetic periods and demonstrate that the sediment chemical environment is considerably modified by seagrasses. The reduced sediment sulfide levels in seagrass beds during photosynthetic periods will enhance seagrass production through reduced sulfide toxicity to seagrasses and sediment microorganisms related to the nutrient cycling.

  7. Recent findings on sinks for sulfide in gravity sewer networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Asbjørn Haaning; Hvitved-Jacobsen, Thorkild; Vollertsen, Jes

    2006-01-01

    summarizes this newly obtained knowledge and emphasizes important implications of the findings. Model simulations of the in-sewer processes important for the sulfur cycle showed that sulfide oxidation in the wetted biofilm is typically the most important sink for dissolved sulfide in gravity sewers. However...

  8. Hydrogen sulfide: physiological properties and therapeutic potential in ischaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, Eelke M; van Goor, Harry; Joles, Jaap A; Whiteman, Matthew; Leuvenink, Henri G D

    2015-03-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2 S) has become a molecule of high interest in recent years, and it is now recognized as the third gasotransmitter in addition to nitric oxide and carbon monoxide. In this review, we discuss the recent literature on the physiology of endogenous and exogenous H2 S, focusing upon the protective effects of hydrogen sulfide in models of hypoxia and ischaemia.

  9. Influence of Water Salinity on Air Purification from Hydrogen Sulfide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leybovych L.I.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Mathematical modeling of «sliding» water drop motion in the air flow was performed in software package FlowVision. The result of mathematical modeling of water motion in a droplet with diameter 100 microns at the «sliding» velocity of 15 m/s is shown. It is established that hydrogen sulfide oxidation occurs at the surface of phases contact. The schematic diagram of the experimental setup for studying air purification from hydrogen sulfide is shown. The results of the experimental research of hydrogen sulfide oxidation by tap and distilled water are presented. The dependence determining the share of hydrogen sulfide oxidized at the surface of phases contact from the dimensionless initial concentration of hydrogen sulfide in the air has been obtained.

  10. Mechanical properties of gutta-percha sulfide modified asphalt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, X. Y.; Gu, X. Y.; Wang, X. W.

    2017-01-01

    Gutta-percha is the isomer of caoutchouc and can be used to enhance the performance of asphalt. In this paper, the produce proceedings of gutta-percha sulfide and gutta-percha sulfide modified asphalt are introduced. The performance indices of gutta-percha sulfide modified asphalt samples with different proportions are examined based on laboratory tests and the optimum ratio of gutta-percha and sulfur is decided.The micromechanism, temperature sensitivity, high and low temperature properties and viscoelasticity of the polymer modified asphalt are analyzed to discuss the modified mechanism and to decide the optimal polymer content. Low temperature bending tests are carried out to verify the low temperature performance of gutta-percha sulfide modified asphalt mixture. Research results showed that gutta-percha sulfide modified asphalt has good low temperature performance and a promising application prospect in the cold regions.

  11. Sulindac Sulfide, but Not Sulindac Sulfone, Inhibits Colorectal Cancer Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher S. Williams

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Sulindac sulfide, a metabolite of the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID sulindac sulfoxide, is effective at reducing tumor burden in both familial adenomatous polyposis patients and in animals with colorectal cancer. Another sulindac sulfoxide metabolite, sulindac sulfone, has been reported to have antitumor properties without inhibiting cyclooxygenase activity. Here we report the effect of sulindac sulfone treatment on the growth of colorectal carcinoma cells. We observed that sulindac sulfide or sulfone treatment of HCA-7 cells led to inhibition of prostaglandin E2 production. Both sulindac sulfide and sulfone inhibited HCA-7 and HCT-116 cell growth in vitro. Sulindac sulfone had no effect on the growth of either HCA-7 or HCT-116 xenografts, whereas the sulfide derivative inhibited HCA-7 growth in vivo. Both sulindac sulfide and sulfone inhibited colon carcinoma cell growth and prostaglandin production in vitro, but sulindac sulfone had no effect on the growth of colon cancer cell xenografts in nude mice.

  12. Hierarchical Architecturing for Layered Thermoelectric Sulfides and Chalcogenides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Jood

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Sulfides are promising candidates for environment-friendly and cost-effective thermoelectric materials. In this article, we review the recent progress in all-length-scale hierarchical architecturing for sulfides and chalcogenides, highlighting the key strategies used to enhance their thermoelectric performance. We primarily focus on TiS2-based layered sulfides, misfit layered sulfides, homologous chalcogenides, accordion-like layered Sn chalcogenides, and thermoelectric minerals. CS2 sulfurization is an appropriate method for preparing sulfide thermoelectric materials. At the atomic scale, the intercalation of guest atoms/layers into host crystal layers, crystal-structural evolution enabled by the homologous series, and low-energy atomic vibration effectively scatter phonons, resulting in a reduced lattice thermal conductivity. At the nanoscale, stacking faults further reduce the lattice thermal conductivity. At the microscale, the highly oriented microtexture allows high carrier mobility in the in-plane direction, leading to a high thermoelectric power factor.

  13. Effect of palladium on sulfide tarnishing of noble metal alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suoninen, E; Herø, H; Minni, E

    1985-10-01

    Electron spectroscopic studies of Au-Ag-Cu alloys of the type used for dental castings show that small additions (less than or equal to 3 wt%) of palladium reduce essentially the thickness of the sulfide layer formed on surfaces of samples treated in aqueous Na2S solutions. Relative to silver, palladium does not enrich in the sulfide, but statistically significant enrichment is found immediately below the sulfide layer. This enrichment probably takes place during the exposure of the substrate surface to atmosphere before the sulfiding treatment. The mechanism of the impeding effect of palladium on sulfiding is assumed to be a decrease in diffusion from the bulk alloy to the surface due to the enriched layer. The effect cannot be explained by changes in the electronic structure of the alloy due to palladium alloying.

  14. Regulation of bacterial sulfate reduction and hydrogen sulfide fluxes in the central Namibian coastal upwelling zone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruchert, V.; Jørgensen, BB; Neumann, K.;

    2003-01-01

    and the low capacity to oxidize and trap sulfide. The inner shelf break marks the seaward border of sulfidic bottom waters, and separates two different regimes of bacterial sulfate reduction. In the sulfidic bottom waters on the shelf, up to 55% of sulfide oxidation is mediated by the large nitrate...... to the sediment-water interface and reduce the hydrogen sulfide flux to the water column. Modeling of pore water sulfide concentration profiles indicates that sulfide produced by bacterial sulfate reduction in the uppermost 16 cm of sediment is sufficient to account for the total flux of hydrogen sulfide...... to the water column. However, the total pool of hydrogen sulfide in the water column is too large to be explained by steady state diffusion across the sediment-water interface. Episodic advection of hydrogen sulfide, possibly triggered by methane eruptions, may contribute to hydrogen sulfide in the water...

  15. Carbonyl sulfide: No remedy for global warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taubman, Steven J.; Kasting, James F.

    1995-04-01

    The enhancement of the stratospheric aerosol layer caused by the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo (June 15, 1991), and the subsequent cooling of the earth's lower atmosphere [Dutton and Christy, 1992; Minnis et al., 1993] shows that stratospheric aerosols can have a strong effect on the earth's climate. This supports the notion that the intentional enhancement of the stratospheric aerosol layer through increased carbonyl sulfide (OCS) emissions might be an effective means for counteracting global warming. Through the use of a one-dimensional photochemical model, we investigate what effect such a program might have on global average stratospheric ozone. In addition, we consider the impact of enhanced OCS emissions on rainwater acidity and on the overall health of both plants and animals. We find that while the warming produced by a single CO2 doubling (1 to 4°C) might be offset with ozone losses of less than 5%, any attempt to use carbonyl sulfide as a permanent solution to global warming could result in depletion of global average ozone by 30% or more. We estimate that in order to achieve cooling of 4°C rainwater pH would fall to between 3.5 and 3.8. Finally, a 4°C cooling at the surface will require that ambient near ground OCS levels rise to above 10 ppmv which is probably greater than the safe exposure limit for humans. Thus, enhanced OCS emissions do not provide an environmentally acceptable solution to the problem of global warming.

  16. Hydrogen Sulfide and Polysulfides as Biological Mediators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideo Kimura

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide (H2S is recognized as a biological mediator with various roles such as neuromodulation, regulation of the vascular tone, cytoprotection, anti-inflammation, oxygen sensing, angiogenesis, and generation of mitochondrial energy. It is produced by cystathionine β-synthase (CBS, cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE, and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (3MST. The activity of CBS is enhanced by S-adenosyl methionine (SAM and glutathionylation, while it is inhibited by nitric oxide (NO and carbon monoxide (CO. The activity of CSE and cysteine aminotransferase (CAT, which produces the 3MST substrate 3-mercaptopyruvate (3MP, is regulated by Ca2+. H2S is oxidized to thiosulfate in mitochondria through the sequential action of sulfide quinone oxidoreductase (SQR, sulfur dioxygenase, and rhodanese. The rates of the production and clearance of H2S determine its cellular concentration. Polysulfides (H2Sn have been found to occur in the brain and activate transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1 channels, facilitate the translocation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2 to the nucleus, and suppress the activity of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN by sulfurating (sulfhydrating the target cysteine residues. A cross talk between H2S and NO also plays an important role in cardioprotection as well as regulation of the vascular tone. H2S, polysulfides, and their cross talk with NO may mediate various physiological and pathophysiological responses.

  17. Normal state of metallic hydrogen sulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryashov, N. A.; Kutukov, A. A.; Mazur, E. A.

    2017-02-01

    A generalized theory of the normal properties of metals in the case of electron-phonon (EP) systems with a nonconstant density of electron states has been used to study the normal state of the SH3 and SH2 phases of hydrogen sulfide at different pressures. The frequency dependence of the real Re Σ (ω) and imaginary ImΣ (ω) parts of the self-energy Σ (ω) part (SEP) of the Green's function of the electron Σ (ω), real part Re Z (ω), and imaginary part Im Z (ω) of the complex renormalization of the mass of the electron; the real part Re χ (ω) and the imaginary part Imχ (ω) of the complex renormalization of the chemical potential; and the density of electron states N (ɛ) renormalized by strong electron-phonon interaction have been calculated. Calculations have been carried out for the stable orthorhombic structure (space group Im3¯ m) of the hydrogen sulfide SH3 for three values of the pressure P = 170, 180, and 225 GPa; and for an SH2 structure with a symmetry of I4/ mmm ( D4 h1¯7) for three values of pressure P = 150, 180, and 225 GP at temperature T = 200 K.

  18. Hydrogen sulfide and polysulfides as biological mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Hideo

    2014-10-09

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is recognized as a biological mediator with various roles such as neuromodulation, regulation of the vascular tone, cytoprotection, anti-inflammation, oxygen sensing, angiogenesis, and generation of mitochondrial energy. It is produced by cystathionine β-synthase (CBS), cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE), and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (3MST). The activity of CBS is enhanced by S-adenosyl methionine (SAM) and glutathionylation, while it is inhibited by nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO). The activity of CSE and cysteine aminotransferase (CAT), which produces the 3MST substrate 3-mercaptopyruvate (3MP), is regulated by Ca2+. H2S is oxidized to thiosulfate in mitochondria through the sequential action of sulfide quinone oxidoreductase (SQR), sulfur dioxygenase, and rhodanese. The rates of the production and clearance of H2S determine its cellular concentration. Polysulfides (H2Sn) have been found to occur in the brain and activate transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) channels, facilitate the translocation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) to the nucleus, and suppress the activity of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) by sulfurating (sulfhydrating) the target cysteine residues. A cross talk between H2S and NO also plays an important role in cardioprotection as well as regulation of the vascular tone. H2S, polysulfides, and their cross talk with NO may mediate various physiological and pathophysiological responses.

  19. First detection of doubly deuterated hydrogen sulfide

    CERN Document Server

    Vastel, C; Ceccarelli, C; Pearson, J

    2003-01-01

    This work was carried out with using the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory and presents the observational study of HDS and D2S towards a sample of Class 0 sources, and dense cores. We report the first detection of doubly deuterated hydrogen sulfide (D2S) in two dense cores and analyze the chemistry of these molecules aiming to help understand the deuteration processes in the interstellar medium. The observed values of the D2S/HDS ratio, and upper limits, require an atomic D/H ratio in the accreting gas of 0.1-1. The study presented in this Letter supports the hypothesis that formaldehyde, methanol and hydrogen sulfide are formed on the grain surfaces, during the cold pre-stellar core phase, where the CO depleted gas has large atomic D/H ratios. The high values for the D/H ratios are consistent with the predictions of a recent gas-phase chemical model that includes H3+ and its deuterated isotopomers, H2D+, D2H+ and D3+ (Roberts et al. 2003).

  20. Calculation of sulfide capacities of multicomponent slags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelton, Arthur D.; Eriksson, Gunnar; Romero-Serrano, Antonio

    1993-10-01

    The Reddy-Blander model for the sulfide capacities of slags has been modified for the case of acid slags and to include A12O3 and TiO2 as components. The model has been extended to calculate a priori sulfide capacities of multicomponent slags, from a knowledge of the thermodynamic activities of the component oxides, with no adjustable parameters. Agreement with measurements is obtained within experimental uncertainty for binary, ternary, and quinary slags involving the components SiO2-Al2O3-TiO2-CaO-MgO-FeO-MnO over wide ranges of composition. The oxide activities used in the computations are calculated from a database of model parameters obtained by optimizing thermodynamic and phase equilibrium data for oxide systems. Sulfur has now been included in this database. A computing system with automatic access to this and other databases has been developed to permit the calculation of the sulfur content of slags in multicomponent slag/metal/gas/solid equilibria.

  1. CALCULATION OF CONDITIONAL EQUILIBRIUM IN SERIAL MULTIPLE PRECIPITATION OF METAL SULFIDES WITH HYDROGEN SULFIDE STREAM GENERATED FROM SODIUM SULFIDE: A DIDACTIC TOOL FOR CHEMISTRY TEACHING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Bellová

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide is presented in textbooks as toxic, environmentally unacceptable species, however some positive effects in human metabolism were discovered in the last decades. It is important to offer students also some new information about this compound. As didactic tool in this case may serve serial precipitation of Cd2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, Mn2+ and Pb2+ ions forming various colored sulfides in bubblers with chemically generated hydrogen sulfide stream. This experiment has strong and diverse color effect for enhancing the visual perception to motivate students to understand more abstract and complex information about hydrogen sulfide. It also may be helpful in analytical chemistry courses for conditional precipitation equilibrium teaching and calculations.

  2. Synthesis of Diaryl Ethers, Diaryl Sulfides, Heteroaryl Ethers and Heteroaryl Sulfides under Microwave Heating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI,Feng; ZOU,Jiong; WANG,Quan-Rui; TAO,Feng-Gang

    2004-01-01

    @@ Diaryl ether moiety is found in a pool of naturally occurring and medicinally important compounds.[1] As a consequent, considerable efforts have been devoted to the assembly of this framework.[2] Recently, we have developed a microwave heating version of the synthesis of diaryl ethers as well as aryl sulfides. Under our conditions, even the extremely electron-poor 4-nitrophenol works well and its reaction with 1-halo-4-nitrobenzenes produces 4-(nitrophenoxy)-benzonitriles in satisfactory yield. The scope of the present protocol has been expanded to hydroxylated six-membered heterocycles as well as 2-pyrimidinethiol with mildly activated aryl halides, affording heteroaryl ethers and respectively sulfides. The advantages of the present method include the wide substrate scope, no use of any metal catalysts, the ease of product isolation and high yields.

  3. Measurement of plasma hydrogen sulfide in vivo and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xinggui; Pattillo, Christopher B; Pardue, Sibile; Bir, Shyamal C; Wang, Rui; Kevil, Christopher G

    2011-05-01

    The gasotransmitter hydrogen sulfide is known to regulate multiple cellular functions during normal and pathophysiological states. However, a paucity of concise information exists regarding quantitative amounts of hydrogen sulfide involved in physiological and pathological responses. This is primarily due to disagreement among various methods employed to measure free hydrogen sulfide. In this article, we describe a very sensitive method of measuring the presence of H₂S in plasma down to nanomolar levels, using monobromobimane (MBB). The current standard assay using methylene blue provides erroneous results that do not actually measure H₂S. The method presented herein involves derivatization of sulfide with excess MBB in 100 mM Tris-HCl buffer (pH 9.5, 0.1 mM DTPA) for 30 min in 1% oxygen at room temperature. The fluorescent product sulfide-dibimane (SDB) is analyzed by RP-HPLC using an eclipse XDB-C18 (4.6 × 250 mm) column with gradient elution by 0.1% (v/v) trifluoroacetic acid in acetonitrile. The limit of detection for sulfide-dibimane is 2 nM and the SDB product is very stable over time, allowing batch storage and analysis. In summary, our MBB method is suitable for sensitive quantitative measurement of free hydrogen sulfide in multiple biological samples such as plasma, tissue and cell culture lysates, or media.

  4. Sulfide elimination by intermittent nitrate dosing in sewer sediments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanchen Liu; Chen Wu; Xiaohong Zhou; David Z.Zhu; Hanchang Shi

    2015-01-01

    The formation of hydrogen sulfide in biofilms and sediments in sewer systems can cause severe pipe corrosions and health hazards,and requires expensive programs for its prevention.The aim of this study is to propose a new control strategy and the optimal condition for sulfide elimination by intermittent nitrate dosing in sewer sediments.The study was carried out based on lab-scale experiments and batch tests using real sewer sediments.The intermittent nitrate dosing mode and the optimal control condition were investigated.The results indicated that the sulfide-intermittent-elimination strategy by nitrate dosing is advantageous for controlling sulfide accumulation in sewer sediment.The oxidation-reduction potential is a sensitive indicator parameter that can reflect the control effect and the minimum N/S (nitrate/sulfide)ratio with slight excess nitrate is necessary for optimal conditions ofefficient sulfide control with lower carbon source loss.The opth-nal control condition is feasible for the sulfide elimination in sewer systems.

  5. Azo dye decolorization assisted by chemical and biogenic sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prato-Garcia, Dorian [Laboratory for Research on Advanced Processes for Water Treatment, Unidad Académica Juriquilla, Instituto de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Blvd. Juriquilla 3001, Querétaro 76230 (Mexico); Cervantes, Francisco J. [División de Ciencias Ambientales, Instituto Potosino de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica, Camino a la Presa de San José 2055, San Luis Potosí 78216 (Mexico); Buitrón, Germán, E-mail: gbuitronm@ii.unam.mx [Laboratory for Research on Advanced Processes for Water Treatment, Unidad Académica Juriquilla, Instituto de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Blvd. Juriquilla 3001, Querétaro 76230 (Mexico)

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ► Azo dyes were reduced efficiently by chemical and biogenic sulfide. ► Biogenic sulfide was more efficient than chemical sulfide. ► There was no competition between dyes and sulfate for reducing equivalents. ► Aromatic amines barely affected the sulfate-reducing process. -- Abstract: The effectiveness of chemical and biogenic sulfide in decolorizing three sulfonated azo dyes and the robustness of a sulfate-reducing process for simultaneous decolorization and sulfate removal were evaluated. The results demonstrated that decolorization of azo dyes assisted by chemical sulfide and anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) was effective. In the absence of AQDS, biogenic sulfide was more efficient than chemical sulfide for decolorizing the azo dyes. The performance of sulfate-reducing bacteria in attached-growth sequencing batch reactors suggested the absence of competition between the studied azo dyes and the sulfate-reducing process for the reducing equivalents. Additionally, the presence of chemical reduction by-products had an almost negligible effect on the sulfate removal rate, which was nearly constant (94%) after azo dye injection.

  6. Gallium sulfide and indium sulfide nanoparticles from complex precursors: Synthesis and characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, D.P. [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)]. E-mail: duttadimple@yahoo.co.in; Sharma, G. [Materials Science Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Tyagi, A.K. [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Kulshreshtha, S.K. [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2007-03-15

    Nanocrystalline gallium sulfide (Ga{sub 2}S{sub 3}) and indium sulfide (In{sub 2}S{sub 3}) have been prepared by a two-step process. The first step involves metathesis reaction of trimethyl gallium/indium ether adduct (Me{sub 3}Ga/In.OEt{sub 2}) with 1,2-ethanedithiol (HSCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}SH) resulting in the formation of a polymeric precursor. The precursor complex has been characterized using Ga/In analysis, IR, proton NMR and mass spectroscopy. The thermal behavior of both complexes has been studied using thermogravimetric (TG) analysis. In the second step, these precursor complexes have been pyrolysed in furnace under flowing nitrogen atmosphere whereupon they undergo thermodestruction to yield nanometer-sized particles of gallium/indium sulfide. The nanoparticles obtained were characterized using powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The average size of the nanoparticles ranged from 10 to 12 nm for Ga{sub 2}S{sub 3} and 20 to 22 nm for In{sub 2}S{sub 3}, respectively. This is the first report on use of a binary single source precursor to synthesize {beta}-Ga{sub 2}S{sub 3} nanoparticles.

  7. Signaling of hydrogen sulfide and polysulfides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Hideo

    2015-02-10

    It has been almost two decades since the first demonstration of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) as a physiological mediator of cognitive function and vascular tone. H2S is physiologically important because it protects various organs from ischemia-reperfusion injury besides regulating inflammation, oxygen sensing, cell growth, and senescence. The production, metabolism, and regulation of H2S have been studied extensively. H2S modulates target proteins through sulfhydration (or sulfuration) or by the reduction of cysteine disulfide bonds. A large number of novel H2S-donating compounds are being developed owing to the therapeutic potential of H2S. Recently, polysulfides, rather than H2S, have been identified as molecules that sulfhydrate (or sulfurate) their target proteins.

  8. Structure of 4-methylpyridinium Hydrogen Sulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andras, Maria T.; Hepp, Aloysius F.; Fanwick, Phillip E.; Martuch, Robert A.; Duraj, Stan A.; Gordon, Edward M.

    1994-01-01

    4-Methylpyridinium hydrogen sulfide, (C6H7NH)HS, M(sub r) = 127.21, consists of C6H7NH(+) cations and HS(-) anions. Z = 2 for the crystal with monoclinic space group Cm (#8), dimensions of a = 8.679(2) A, b = 7.964(1) A, and c = 4.860(2) A, an angle beta of 101.10(2) degrees, and a volume of V = 329.6(3) A(exp 3). R = 0.039 and R(sub w) = 0.048 for 385 reflections with F(sub o)(exp 2) greater than 3 sigma(F(sub o)(exp 2)) and 59 variables. Both the C6H7NH(+) cation and the HS(-) anion lie on crystallographic mirror planes with the N,S, two carbon atoms, and two hydrogen atoms positioned in the planes. The hydrogen atom of the HS(-) anion was not located.

  9. Hydrogen sulfide in a circumstellar envelope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukita, N.; Morris, M.

    1983-01-01

    A search for hydrogen sulfide in the cool circumstellar envelopes of 25 stars was made using the 1(10)-1(01) rotational line at 1.8 mm. It was detected in the bipolar nebula/OH maser OH231.8+4.2, an object having a high rate of mass loss. An approximate analysis indicates that 1/60 of the sulfur in this outflowing envelope is in the form of H2S, a fraction which may be similar to that in the atmosphere of the central star. In addition, the shape of the observed line profile is discussed in terms of a possible variation of the outflow velocity with latitude above the system's equatorial plane.

  10. Hydrogen sulfide in gastrointestinal and liver physiopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipriani, Sabrina; Mencarelli, Andrea

    2011-04-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) is a gas that can be formed by the action of two enzymes, cystathionine gamma lyase (CSE) and cystathionine beta synthase (CBS). H(2)S has been known for hundreds of years for its poisoning effect, however the idea that H(2)S is not only a poison, but can exert a physiological role in mammalian organisms, originates from the evidence that this gaseous mediator is produced endogenously. In addition to H(2)S synthesis by gastrointestinal tissue, the intestinal mucosa, particularly in the large intestine, is regularly exposed to high concentrations of H(2)S that are generated by some species of bacteria and through the reduction of unabsorbed intestinal inorganic sulphate. This review reports on the effects of H(2)S in the gastrointestinal tract and liver and provides information on the therapeutic applications of H(2)S-donating drugs.

  11. Nanomaterials for the Selective Detection of Hydrogen Sulfide in Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llobet, Eduard; Brunet, Jérôme; Pauly, Alain; Ndiaye, Amadou; Varenne, Christelle

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a focused review on the nanomaterials and associated transduction schemes that have been developed for the selective detection of hydrogen sulfide. It presents a quite comprehensive overview of the latest developments, briefly discusses the hydrogen sulfide detection mechanisms, identifying the reasons for the selectivity (or lack of) observed experimentally. It critically reviews performance, shortcomings, and identifies missing or overlooked important aspects. It identifies the most mature/promising materials and approaches for achieving inexpensive hydrogen sulfide sensors that could be employed in widespread, miniaturized, and inexpensive detectors and, suggests what research should be undertaken for ensuring that requirements are met. PMID:28218674

  12. Effect of radiation on wettability and floatability of sulfide minerals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The feasibility for modifying the wettability and floatability of sulfide minerals by electron beam irradiation has been studied experimentally. The wettability of crystalline pyrite and floatability of some sulfide as pyrite, arsenopyrite, chalcopyrite and marmatite after irradiation were examined by flotation in a modified Hallimond tube. Experimental results show that the hydrophobicity of crystalline pyrite enhances with the increase of irradiation dose in a low dose range. And the flotation responses of sulfide minerals on irradiation dosevary with the mineral species and particle size. The floatability of minerals can be regulated by altering irradiation dose. An explanationfor the mechanism has been suggested based on the principle of radiation chemistry.

  13. Sulfide capacities of MnO-SiO2 slags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Ramana G.; Blander, Milton

    1989-04-01

    Sulfide capacities of binary MnO-SiO2 slags at 1773 and 1923 K were calculated thermodynamically. Only known data, such as the standard free energy of formation of MnO and MnS and activities of MnO in the melt, are used in making calculations based on fundamental concepts. Excellent agreement is found between our calculations and published experimental data. Correlations of sulfide capacities, based on optical basicity using Pauling electronegativities or empirically deduced optical basicities, differ from the experimental data in both magnitude and concentration dependence. Our method provides useful predictions of sulfide capacities a priori.

  14. Micellar-mediated extractive spectrophotometric determination of hydrogen sulfide/sulfide through Prussian Blue reaction: application to environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandurangappa, Malingappa; Samrat, Devaramani

    2010-01-01

    A sensitive surfactant-mediated extractive spectrophotometric method has been developed, based on the reaction of ferric iron with sulfide to form ferrous iron and its subsequent reaction with ferricyanide to form Prussian Blue, to quantify trace levels of hydrogen sulfide/sulfide in environmental samples. The method obeys Beer's law in the concentration range 2-10 microg of sulfide in 25 mL of aqueous phase with molar absorptivity (epsilon) of 3.92 x 10(4) L mol(-1) cm(-1). The colored species has been extracted into isoamyl acetate in the presence of a cationic surfactant i.e. cetylpyridinium chloride, to enhance the sensitivity of the method with epsilon value 5.2 x 10(4) L mol(-1) cm(-1). The relative standard deviation has been found to be 0.69% for 10 determinations at 4 microg of sulfide and the limit of detection was 0.009 microg mL(-1). The interference from common anions and cations has been studied. The proposed method has been applied to the determination of residual hydrogen sulfide in the laboratory fume hood as well as ambient atmospheric hydrogen sulfide in the vicinity of open sewer lines after fixing the analyte in ionic form using suitable trapping medium.

  15. Micro-aeration for hydrogen sulfide removal from biogas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duangmanee, Thanapong

    The presence of sulfur compounds (e.g. protein, sulfate, thiosulfate, sulfite, etc.) in the feed stream generates highly corrosive and odorous hydrogen sulfide during anaerobic digestion. The high sulfide level in the biogas stream is not only poisonous to many novel metal catalysts employed in thermo-catalytic processes but also reduces the quality of methane to produce renewable energy. This study used an innovative, low-maintenance, low-cost biological sulfide removal technology to remove sulfides simultaneously from both gas and liquid phase. ORP (Oxidation-Reduction-Potential) was used as the controlling parameter to precisely regulate air injection to the sulfide oxidizing unit (SOU). The microaeration technique provided just enough oxygen to partially oxidize sulfides to elemental sulfur without inhibiting methanogenesis. The SOU was equipped with a diffuser at the bottom for the dispersion of sulfide-laden biogas and injected air throughout the column. The SOU can be operated as a standalone unit or coupled with an anaerobic digester to simultaneously remove sulfide from the biogas and effluent. The integrated system was capable of reducing hydrogen sulfide in biogas from 2,450 to less than 2 ppmV with minimal sulfate production at the highest available sulfide loading rate of 0.24 kg/m3-day. More than 98% of sulfide removed was recovered as elemental sulfur. However, the standalone SOU was able to operate at high hydrogen sulfide loading of 1.46 kg/m 3-day at inlet sulfide concentration of 3000 ppmV and reduce the off-gas hydrogen sulfide concentrations to less than 10 ppmV. The experiment also revealed that the ORP controlled aeration was sensitive enough to prevent oxygen overdosing (dampening effect) during unexpected surges of aeration. Using generalized linear regression, a model predicting output H2S concentration based on input H2S concentrations, SOU medium heights, and biogas flow rates, was derived. With 95% confidence, output H2S concentration

  16. Hydrogen Sulfide Micro-Sensor for Biomass Fouling Detection Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Hydrogen Sulfide (H2S)is the leading chemical agent causing human fatalities following inhalation exposures. The overall aim of this project is to develop and...

  17. Nanostructured Metal Oxides and Sulfides for Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xue; Huang, Jia-Qi; Zhang, Qiang; Mai, Liqiang

    2017-02-03

    Lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries with high energy density and long cycle life are considered to be one of the most promising next-generation energy-storage systems beyond routine lithium-ion batteries. Various approaches have been proposed to break down technical barriers in Li-S battery systems. The use of nanostructured metal oxides and sulfides for high sulfur utilization and long life span of Li-S batteries is reviewed here. The relationships between the intrinsic properties of metal oxide/sulfide hosts and electrochemical performances of Li-S batteries are discussed. Nanostructured metal oxides/sulfides hosts used in solid sulfur cathodes, separators/interlayers, lithium-metal-anode protection, and lithium polysulfides batteries are discussed respectively. Prospects for the future developments of Li-S batteries with nanostructured metal oxides/sulfides are also discussed.

  18. Selective adsorption of bacteria on sulfide minerals surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA Chun-yun; WEI De-zhou; LIU Wen-gang; HAN Cong; GAO Shu-ling; WANG Yu-juan

    2008-01-01

    The adsorption of bacteria on sulfide minerals surface was studied, and the selective adsorption mechanism of cells on the sulfide minerals was investigated by means of FTIR, UVS and XPS. The results show that the three strains of bacteria adsorbed more preferentially on pyrite than on other two sulfide minerals surface at neutral and alkaline pH conditions. FTIR and UVS of three strains of bacteria indicate that there are more functional groups on their surface, such as O-H, C=O, N-H, C-O, and the content of saccharide is more than that of protein. The state of every element on sulfide minerals surface was analyzed by XPS. The empty orbital number of electronic shell of metal ions on minerals surface is important in selective adsorption process, and some stable constants of metal coordinates can be used to explain the contribution of some groups in saccharide of cell wall to the selective adsorption.

  19. An Experiment in Autotrophic Fermentation: Microbial Oxidation of Hydrogen Sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sublette, Kerry L.

    1989-01-01

    Described is an experiment which uses an autotrophic bacterium to anaerobically oxidize hydrogen sulfide to sulfate in a batch-stirred tank reactor. Discusses background information, experimental procedure, and sample results of this activity. (CW)

  20. Optimization of biological sulfide removal in a CSTR bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roosta, Aliakbar; Jahanmiri, Abdolhossein; Mowla, Dariush; Niazi, Ali; Sotoodeh, Hamidreza

    2012-08-01

    In this study, biological sulfide removal from natural gas in a continuous bioreactor is investigated for estimation of the optimal operational parameters. According to the carried out reactions, sulfide can be converted to elemental sulfur, sulfate, thiosulfate, and polysulfide, of which elemental sulfur is the desired product. A mathematical model is developed and was used for investigation of the effect of various parameters on elemental sulfur selectivity. The results of the simulation show that elemental sulfur selectivity is a function of dissolved oxygen, sulfide load, pH, and concentration of bacteria. Optimal parameter values are calculated for maximum elemental sulfur selectivity by using genetic algorithm as an adaptive heuristic search. In the optimal conditions, 87.76% of sulfide loaded to the bioreactor is converted to elemental sulfur.

  1. An eco-friendly oxidation of sulfide compounds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    RAVINDRA B WAGH; SITARAM H GUND; JAYASHREE M NAGARKAR

    2016-08-01

    An improved green route has been developed for the oxidation of sulfide compounds. Albendazole is converted to ricobendazole or albendazole sulfone using H₂O₂ as an oxidant and H₂O as the solvent. High yields of the corresponding products were obtained by carrying out the reaction at room temperature. This synthetic method is environmentally clean and safe, operationally simple for the oxidation of other benzimidazole anthelmintics and various sulfide compounds.

  2. LUMINESCENCE OF CADMIUM SULFIDE QUANTUM DOTS IN FLUOROPHOSPHATE GLASSES

    OpenAIRE

    Z. O. Lipatova; E. V. Kolobkova; V. A. Aseev

    2015-01-01

    Cadmium sulfide quantum dots are perspective materials in optics, medicine, biology and optoelectronics. Fluorophosphate glasses, doped with cadmium sulfide quantum dots, were examined in the paper. Heat treatment led to the formation of quantum dots with diameters equal to 2.8 nm, 3.0 nm and 3.8 nm. In view of such changes in the quantum dots size the fundamental absorption edge shift and the luminescence band are being displaced to the long wavelengths. Luminescence lifetime has been fou...

  3. INVESTIGATIONS ON BIOCHEMICAL PURIFICATION OF GROUND WATER FROM HYDROGEN SULFIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. P. Sedlukho

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers problems and features of biochemical removal of hydrogen sulfide from ground water. The analysis of existing methods for purification of ground water from hydrogen sulfide has been given in the paper. The paper has established shortcomings of physical and chemical purification of ground water. While using aeration methods for removal of hydrogen sulfide formation of colloidal sulfur that gives muddiness and opalescence to water occurs due to partial chemical air oxidation. In addition to this violation of sulfide-carbonate equilibrium taking place in the process of aeration due to desorption of H2S and CO2, often leads to clogging of degasifier nozzles with formed CaCO3 that causes serious operational problems. Chemical methods require relatively large flow of complex reagent facilities, storage facilities and transportation costs.In terms of hydrogen sulfide ground water purification the greatest interest is given to the biochemical method. Factors deterring widespread application of the biochemical method is its insufficient previous investigation and necessity to execute special research in order to determine optimal process parameters while purifying groundwater of a particular water supply source. Biochemical methods for oxidation of sulfur compounds are based on natural biological processes that ensure natural sulfur cycle. S. Vinogradsky has established a two-stage mechanism for oxidation of hydrogen sulfide with sulfur bacteria (Beggiatoa. The first stage presupposes oxidation of hydrogen sulphide to elemental sulfur which is accumulating in the cytoplasm in the form of globules. During the second stage sulfur bacteria begin to oxidize intracellular sulfur to sulfuric acid due to shortage of hydrogen sulfide.The paper provides the results of technological tests of large-scale pilot plants for biochemical purification of groundwater from hydrogen sulfide in semi-industrial conditions. Dependences of water quality

  4. Sulfide oxidation in fluidized bed bioreactor using nylon support material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Varsha Midha; M K Jha; Apurba Dey

    2012-01-01

    A continuous fluidized bed bioreactor(FBBR)with nylon support particles was used to treat synthetic sulfide wastewater at different hydraulic retention time of 25,50 and 75 min and upflow velocity of 14,17 and 20 m/hr.The effects of upflow velocity,hydraulic retention time and reactor operation time on sulfide oxidation rate were studied using statistical model.Mixed culture obtained from the activated sludge,taken from tannery effluent treatment plant,was used as a source for microorganisms.The diameter and density of the nylon particles were 2-3 mm and 1140 kg/m3,respectively.Experiments were carried out in the reactor at a temperature of(30± 2)℃,at a fixed bed height of 16 cm after the formation of biofilm on the surface of support particles.Biofilm thickness reached(42±3)μm after 15 days from reactor start-up.The sulfide oxidation,sulfate and sulfur formation is examined at all hydraulic retention times and upflow velocities.The results indicated that almost 90%-92% sulfide oxidation was achieved at all hydraulic retention times.Statistical model could explain 94% of the variability and analysis of variance showed that upflow velocity and hydraulic retention time slightly affected the sulfide oxidation rate.The highest sulfide oxidation of 92% with 70% sulfur was obtained at hydraulic retention time of 75 min and upflow velocity of 14 m/hr.

  5. Sulfide oxidation in fluidized bed bioreactor using nylon support material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midha, Varsha; Jha, M K; Dey, Apurba

    2012-01-01

    A continuous fluidized bed bioreactor (FBBR) with nylon support particles was used to treat synthetic sulfide wastewater at different hydraulic retention time of 25, 50 and 75 min and upflow velocity of 14, 17 and 20 m/hr. The effects of upflow velocity, hydraulic retention time and reactor operation time on sulfide oxidation rate were studied using statistical model. Mixed culture obtained from the activated sludge, taken from tannery effluent treatment plant, was used as a source for microorganisms. The diameter and density of the nylon particles were 2-3 mm and 1140 kg/m3, respectively. Experiments were carried out in the reactor at a temperature of (30 +/- 2) degrees C, at a fixed bed height of 16 cm after the formation of biofilm on the surface of support particles. Biofilm thickness reached (42 +/- 3) microm after 15 days from reactor start-up. The sulfide oxidation, sulfate and sulfur formation is examined at all hydraulic retention times and upflow velocities. The results indicated that almost 90%-92% sulfide oxidation was achieved at all hydraulic retention times. Statistical model could explain 94% of the variability and analysis of variance showed that upflow velocity and hydraulic retention time slightly affected the sulfide oxidation rate. The highest sulfide oxidation of 92% with 70% sulfur was obtained at hydraulic retention time of 75 min and upflow velocity of 14 m/hr.

  6. Sulfide Oxidation in the Anoxic Black-Sea Chemocline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    JØRGENSEN, BB; FOSSING, H.; WIRSEN, CO;

    1991-01-01

    The depth distributions of O2 and H2S and of the activity of chemical or bacterial sulfide oxidation were studied in the chemocline of the central Black Sea. Relative to measurements from earlier studies, the sulfide zone had moved upwards by 20-50 m and was now (May 1988) situated at a depth of 81......-99 m. Oxygen in the water column immediately overlying the sulfide zone was depleted to undetectable levels resulting in a 20-30-m deep intermediate layer of O2- and H2S-free water. Radiotracer studies with S-35-labelled H2S showed that high rates of sulfide oxidation, up to a few micromoles per liter...... to a maximum of 200 nmol l-1 at the top of the sulfide zone. Sulfide oxidation was stimulated by particles suspended at the chemocline, probably by bacteria. Green phototrophic sulfur bacteria were abundant in the chemocline, suggesting that photosynthetic H2S oxidation took place. Flux calculations showed...

  7. Sulfide capacity of high alumina blast furnace slags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Amitabh; Görnerup, Märten; Seetharaman, S.; Lahiri, A. K.

    2006-12-01

    Sulfide capacities of high alumina blast furnace slags were experimentally determined using the gas-slag equilibration technique. Two different slag systems were considered for the current study, namely, CaO-SiO2-MgO-Al2O3 quaternary and CaO-SiO2-MgO-Al2O3-TiO2 quinary system. The liquid slag was equilibrated with the Ar-CO-CO2-SO2 gas mixture. Experiments were conducted in the temperature range of 1773 to 1873 K. The effects of temperature, basicity, and the MgO and TiO2 contents of slags on sulfide capacity were studied. As expected, sulfide capacity was found to increase with the increase in temperature and basicity. At the higher experimental temperature, titania decreases the sulfide capacity of slag. However, at the lower temperature, there was no significant effect of titania on the sulfide capacity of slag. Sulfide capacity increases with the increase in MgO content of slag if the MgO content is more than 5 pct.

  8. Dihydrogen Activation by Titanium Sulfide Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Zachary K.; Polse, Jennifer L.; Bergman*, Robert G.; Andersen*, Richard A.

    2005-01-01

    The titanocene sulfido complex Cp*2Ti(S)py (1, Cp* = pentamethylcyclopentadienyl; py = pyridine) is synthesized by addition of a suspension of S8 to a toluene solution of Cp*2Ti-(CH2CH2) (2) and py. The rate of rotation of the pyridine ligand in solution was determined by 1H NMR spectroscopy, and the structure of 1 was determined by X-ray crystallography. Complex 1 reacts reversibly with dihydrogen to give Cp*2Ti(H)SH (6) and py. Reaction of 1 with HD gives an equilibrium mixture of Cp*2Ti(D)SH and Cp*2Ti(H)SD; H2 and D2 are not formed in this reaction. 1D 1H NMR magnetization transfer spectra and 2D EXSY 1H NMR spectra of 6 in the presence of H2 show that in solution the H2, hydride, and hydrosulfido hydrogen atoms exchange. A four-center mechanism for this exchange is proposed. The EXSY studies show that the Ti–H and S–H hydrogens exchange with each other more rapidly than either of those hydrogens exchanges with external H2. A transient dihydrogen complex intermediate is proposed to explain this observation. The infrared spectrum of 6 shows an absorption assigned to the Ti–H stretching mode at 1591 cm−1 that shifts upon deuteration to 1154 cm−1. Reaction of 1 with trimethylsilane, diethylsilane, or dimethylsilane gives Cp*2-Ti(H)SSiMe3 (7), Cp*2Ti(H)SSiHEt2 (8), or Cp*2Ti(H)SSiHMe2 (9), respectively. The isotope effect for the reaction producing 7 has been measured, and a mechanism is proposed. Treatment of 1 with an additional equivalent of S8 results in the formation of the disulfide Cp*2Ti(S2) (4). Acetylene inserts into the Ti–S bond of 4 to produce the vinyl disulfide complex 5. The structures of 4 and 5 have been determined by X-ray diffraction. Compound 4 reacts with 2 in the presence of py to produce 1. Phosphines react with 4 in the presence of H2 to provide 6 and the corresponding phosphine sulfide. Reaction of hydrogen with 4 gives Cp*2-Ti(SH)2 (3). The reactions of 1 and 4 with dihydrogen provide a model for possible mechanisms of H2

  9. Bio-orthogonal "click-and-release" donation of caged carbonyl sulfide (COS) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiger, Andrea K; Yang, Yang; Royzen, Maksim; Pluth, Michael D

    2017-01-24

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an important biomolecule with high therapeutic potential. Here we leverage the inverse-electron demand Diels-Alder (IEDDA) click reaction between a thiocarbamate-functionalized trans-cyclooctene and a tetrazine to deliver carbonyl sulfide (COS), which is quickly converted to H2S by the uniquitous enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA), thus providing a new strategy for bio-orthogonal COS/H2S donation.

  10. Hydrogen Sulfide--Mechanisms of Toxicity and Development of an Antidote.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jingjing; Chan, Adriano; Ali, Sameh; Saha, Arindam; Haushalter, Kristofer J; Lam, Wai-Ling Macrina; Glasheen, Megan; Parker, James; Brenner, Matthew; Mahon, Sari B; Patel, Hemal H; Ambasudhan, Rajesh; Lipton, Stuart A; Pilz, Renate B; Boss, Gerry R

    2016-02-15

    Hydrogen sulfide is a highly toxic gas-second only to carbon monoxide as a cause of inhalational deaths. Its mechanism of toxicity is only partially known, and no specific therapy exists for sulfide poisoning. We show in several cell types, including human inducible pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)-derived neurons, that sulfide inhibited complex IV of the mitochondrial respiratory chain and induced apoptosis. Sulfide increased hydroxyl radical production in isolated mouse heart mitochondria and F2-isoprostanes in brains and hearts of mice. The vitamin B12 analog cobinamide reversed the cellular toxicity of sulfide, and rescued Drosophila melanogaster and mice from lethal exposures of hydrogen sulfide gas. Cobinamide worked through two distinct mechanisms: direct reversal of complex IV inhibition and neutralization of sulfide-generated reactive oxygen species. We conclude that sulfide produces a high degree of oxidative stress in cells and tissues, and that cobinamide has promise as a first specific treatment for sulfide poisoning.

  11. H2S exposure elicits differential expression of candidate genes in fish adapted to sulfidic and non-sulfidic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobler, Michael; Henpita, Chathurika; Bassett, Brandon; Kelley, Joanna L; Shaw, Jennifer H

    2014-09-01

    Disentangling the effects of plasticity, genetic variation, and their interactions on organismal responses to environmental stressors is a key objective in ecological physiology. We quantified the expression of five candidate genes in response to hydrogen sulfide (H2S) exposure in fish (Poecilia mexicana, Poeciliidae) from a naturally sulfide-rich environment as well as an ancestral, non-sulfidic population to test for constitutive and environmentally dependent population differences in gene expression patterns. Common garden raised individuals that had never encountered environmental H2S during their lifetime were subjected to short or long term H2S exposure treatments or respective non-sulfidic controls. The expression of genes involved in responses to H2S toxicity (cytochrome c oxidase, vascular endothelial growth factor, and cytochrome P450-2J6), H2S detoxification (sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase), and endogenous H2S production (cystathionine γ lyase) was determined in both gill and liver tissues by real time PCR. The results indicated complex changes in expression patterns that--depending on the gene--not only differed between organs and populations, but also on the type of H2S exposure. Populations differences, both constitutive and H2S exposure dependent (i.e., plastic), in gene expression were particularly evident for sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase, vascular endothelial growth factor, and to a lesser degree for cytochrome P450-2J6. Our study uncovered putatively adaptive modifications in gene regulation that parallel previously documented adaptive changes in phenotypic traits.

  12. Mitochondria and sulfide: a very old story of poisoning, feeding, and signaling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouillaud, Frédéric; Blachier, François

    2011-07-15

    Sulfide is a molecule with toxicity comparable to that of cyanide. It inhibits mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase at submicromolar concentrations. However, at even lower concentrations, sulfide is a substrate for the mitochondrial electron transport chain in mammals, and is comparable to succinate. This oxidation involves a sulfide quinone reductase. Sulfide is thus oxidized before reaching a toxic concentration, which explains why free sulfide concentrations are very low in mammals, even though sulfide is constantly released as a result of cellular metabolism. It has been suggested that sulfide has signaling properties in mammals like two other gases, NO and CO, which are also cytochrome oxidase inhibitors. The oxidation of sulfide by mitochondria creates further complexity in the description/use of sulfide signaling in mammals. In fact, in the many studies reported in the literature, the sulfide concentrations that have been used were well within the range that affects mitochondrial activity. This review focuses on the relevance of sulfide bioenergetics to sulfide biology and discusses the case of colonocytes, which are routinely exposed to higher sulfide concentrations. Finally, we offer perspectives for future studies on the relationship between the two opposing aspects of this Janus-type molecule, sulfide.

  13. Anisotropic Optical Properties of Layered Germanium Sulfide

    CERN Document Server

    Tan, Dezhi; Wang, Feijiu; Mohamed, Nur Baizura; Mouri, Shinichiro; Sandhaya, Koirala; Zhang, Wenjing; Miyauchi, Yuhei; Ohfuchi, Mari; Matsuda, Kazunari

    2016-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) layered materials, transition metal dichalcogenides and black phosphorus, have attracted much interest from the viewpoints of fundamental physics and device applications. The establishment of new functionalities in anisotropic layered 2D materials is a challenging but rewarding frontier, owing to their remarkable optical properties and prospects for new devices. Here, we report the anisotropic optical properties of layered 2D monochalcogenide of germanium sulfide (GeS). Three Raman scattering peaks corresponding to the B3g, A1g, and A2g modes with strong polarization dependence are demonstrated in the GeS flakes, which validates polarized Raman spectroscopy as an effective method for identifying the crystal orientation of anisotropic layered GeS. Photoluminescence (PL) is observed with a peak at around 1.66 eV that originates from the direct optical transition in GeS at room temperature. Moreover, determination of the polarization dependent characteristics of the PL and absorption reveals...

  14. Subnanometer Thin β-Indium Sulfide Nanosheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Shinjita; Sarkar, Suresh; Pradhan, Narayan

    2012-12-20

    Nanosheets are a peculiar kind of nanomaterials that are grown two-dimensionally over a micrometer in length and a few nanometers in thickness. Wide varieties of inorganic semiconductor nanosheets are already reported, but controlling the crystal growth and tuning their thickness within few atomic layers have not been yet explored. We investigate here the parameters that determine the thickness and the formation mechanism of subnanometer thin (two atomic layers) cubic indium sulfide (In2S3) nanosheets. Using appropriate reaction condition, the growth kinetics is monitored by controlling the decomposition rate of the single source precursor of In2S3 as a function of nucleation temperature. The variation in the thickness of the nanosheets along the polar [111] direction has been correlated with the rate of evolved H2S gas, which in turn depends on the rate of the precursor decomposition. In addition, it has been observed that the thickness of the In2S3 nanosheets is related to the nucleation temperature.

  15. Detection of thiol modifications by hydrogen sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, E; Pead, S; Whiteman, M; Wood, M E; Wilson, I D; Ladomery, M R; Teklic, T; Lisjak, M; Hancock, J T

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an important gasotransmitter in both animals and plants. Many physiological events, including responses to stress, have been suggested to involve H2S, at least in part. On the other hand, numerous responses have been reported following treatment with H2S, including changes in the levels of antioxidants and the activities of transcription factors. Therefore, it is important to understand and unravel the events that are taking place downstream of H2S in signaling pathways. H2S is known to interact with other reactive signaling molecules such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO). One of the mechanisms by which ROS and NO have effects in a cell is the modification of thiol groups on proteins, by oxidation or S-nitrosylation, respectively. Recently, it has been reported that H2S can also modify thiols. Here we report a method for the determination of thiol modifications on proteins following the treatment with biological samples with H2S donors. Here, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is used as a model system but this method can be used for samples from other animals or plants.

  16. Hydrogen Sulfide and Cellular Redox Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Zhong Xie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular redox imbalance is mainly caused by overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS or weakness of the natural antioxidant defense system. It is involved in the pathophysiology of a wide array of human diseases. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S is now recognized as the third “gasotransmitters” and proved to exert a wide range of physiological and cytoprotective functions in the biological systems. Among these functions, the role of H2S in oxidative stress has been one of the main focuses over years. However, the underlying mechanisms for the antioxidant effect of H2S are still poorly comprehended. This review presents an overview of the current understanding of H2S specially focusing on the new understanding and mechanisms of the antioxidant effects of H2S based on recent reports. Both inhibition of ROS generation and stimulation of antioxidants are discussed. H2S-induced S-sulfhydration of key proteins (e.g., p66Shc and Keap1 is also one of the focuses of this review.

  17. Hydrogen Sulfide and Cellular Redox Homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhi-Zhong; Liu, Yang; Bian, Jin-Song

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular redox imbalance is mainly caused by overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) or weakness of the natural antioxidant defense system. It is involved in the pathophysiology of a wide array of human diseases. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is now recognized as the third “gasotransmitters” and proved to exert a wide range of physiological and cytoprotective functions in the biological systems. Among these functions, the role of H2S in oxidative stress has been one of the main focuses over years. However, the underlying mechanisms for the antioxidant effect of H2S are still poorly comprehended. This review presents an overview of the current understanding of H2S specially focusing on the new understanding and mechanisms of the antioxidant effects of H2S based on recent reports. Both inhibition of ROS generation and stimulation of antioxidants are discussed. H2S-induced S-sulfhydration of key proteins (e.g., p66Shc and Keap1) is also one of the focuses of this review. PMID:26881033

  18. Mercury Sulfide Dimorphism in Thioarsenate Glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassem, M; Sokolov, A; Cuisset, A; Usuki, T; Khaoulani, S; Masselin, P; Le Coq, D; Neuefeind, J C; Feygenson, M; Hannon, A C; Benmore, C J; Bychkov, E

    2016-06-16

    Crystalline mercury sulfide exists in two drastically different polymorphic forms in different domains of the P,T-diagram: red chain-like insulator α-HgS, stable below 344 °C, and black tetrahedral narrow-band semiconductor β-HgS, stable at higher temperatures. Using pulsed neutron and high-energy X-ray diffraction, we show that these two mercury bonding patterns are present simultaneously in mercury thioarsenate glasses HgS-As2S3. The population and interconnectivity of chain-like and tetrahedral dimorphous forms determine both the structural features and fundamental glass properties (thermal, electronic, etc.). DFT simulations of mercury species and RMC modeling of high-resolution diffraction data provide additional details on local Hg environment and connectivity implying the (HgS2/2)m oligomeric chains (1 ≤ m ≤ 6) are acting as a network former while the HgS4/4-related mixed agglomerated units behave as a modifier.

  19. The effects of varying humidity on copper sulfide film formation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, Thomas Michael; Missert, Nancy A.; Barbour, John Charles; Sullivan, John Patrick; Copeland, Robert Guild; Campin, Michael J. (International Sematech, Austin, TX)

    2004-02-01

    Detailed experiments involving extensive high resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed significant microstructural differences between Cu sulfides formed at low and high relative humidity (RH). It was known from prior experiments that the sulfide grows linearly with time at low RH up to a sulfide thickness approaching or exceeding one micron, while the sulfide initially grows linearly with time at high RH then becomes sub-linear at a sulfide thickness less than about 0.2 microns, with the sulfidation rate eventually approaching zero. TEM measurements of the Cu2S morphology revealed that the Cu2S formed at low RH has large sized grains (75 to greater than 150 nm) that are columnar in structure with sharp, abrupt grain boundaries. In contrast, the Cu2S formed at high RH has small equiaxed grains of 20 to 50 nm in size. Importantly, the small grains formed at high RH have highly disordered grain boundaries with a high concentration of nano-voids. Two-dimensional diffusion modeling was performed to determine whether the existence of localized source terms at the Cu/Cu2S interface could be responsible for the suppression of Cu sulfidation at long times at high RH. The models indicated that the existence of static localized source terms would not predict the complete suppression of growth that was observed. Instead, the models suggest that the diffusion of Cu through Cu2S becomes restricted during Cu2S formation at high RH. The leading speculation is that the extensive voiding that exists at grain boundaries in this material greatly reduces the flux of Cu between grains, leading to a reduction in the rate of sulfide film formation. These experiments provide an approach for adding microstructural information to Cu sulfidation rate computer models. In addition to the microstructural studies, new micro-patterned test structures were developed in this LDRD to offer insight into the point defect structure of Cu2S and to permit measurement of surface reaction

  20. Atmospheric measurements of carbonyl sulfide, dimethyl sulfide, and carbon disulfide using the electron capture sulfur detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, James E.; Bates, Timothy S.

    1993-01-01

    Measurements of atmospheric dimethyl sulfide (DMS), carbonyl sulfide (COS), and carbon disulfide (CS2) were conducted over the Atlantic Ocean on board the NASA Electra aircraft during the Chemical Instrumentation Test and Evaluation (CITE 3) project using the electron capture sulfur detector (ECD-S). The system employed cryogenic preconcentration of air samples, gas chromatographic separation, catalytic fluorination, and electron capture detection. Samples collected for DMS analysis were scrubbed of oxidants with NaOH impregnated glass fiber filters to preconcentration. The detection limits (DL) of the system for COS, DMS, and CS2 were 5, 5, and 2 ppt, respectively. COS concentrations ranged from 404 to 603 ppt with a mean of 489 ppt for measurements over the North Atlantic Ocean (31 deg N to 41 deg N), and from 395 to 437 ppt with a mean of 419 ppt for measurements over the Tropical Atlantic Ocean (11 deg S to 2 deg N). DMS concentrations in the lower marine boundary layer, below 600-m altitude, ranged from below DL to 150 ppt from flights over the North Atlantic, and from 9 to 104 ppt over the Tropical Atlantic. CS2 concentrations ranged from below DL to 29 ppt over the North Atlantic. Almost all CS2 measurements over the Tropical Atlantic were below DL.

  1. Carbonyl sulfide and dimethyl sulfide exchange between lawn and the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Chunmei; Mu, Yujing

    2004-06-01

    The exchange of carbonyl sulfide (COS) between lawn and the atmosphere was investigated by using a static enclosure under natural field conditions. The results indicated that the lawn acted as a sink for atmospheric COS and a source of dimethyl sulfide (DMS). The exchange fluxes of COS and DMS ranged between -3.24 pmol m-2 s-1 and -94.52 pmol m-2 s-1, and between 0 and 3.14 pmol m-2 s-1, respectively. The lawn was capable of continuously absorbing COS in nighttime as well as in daytime. The COS fluxes depended strongly on the ambient COS mixing ratios. The dependency of DMS emission fluxes on temperature was observed in November 2002. Soil also acted as a sink for COS during our study. However, the COS exchange fluxes of the lawn were much higher than that of the soil. The average COS and DMS fluxes were much higher in spring than in autumn and in summer. The daytime vertical profiles of COS also indicated that the lawn acted as a net sink for COS.

  2. Microbial control of hydrogen sulfide production in a porous medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McInerney, M.J.; Wofford, N.Q. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Sublette, K.L. [Univ. of Tulsa, OK (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The ability of a sulfide- and glutaraldehyde-tolerant strain of Thiobacillus denitrificans (strain F) to control sulfide production in an experimental system of cores and formation water from the Redfield, Iowa natural gas storage facility was investigated. A stable, sulfide-producing biofilm was established in two separate core systems, one of which was inoculated with strain F, and the other core system (control) was treated in an identical manner, but was not inoculated with strain F. When formation water with 10 mM acetate and 5mM nitrate was injected into both core systems, the effluent sulfide concentrations in the control core system ranged from 200-460 {mu}M. In the test core system inoculated with strain F, the effluent sulfide concentrations were lower, ranging from 70-110 {mu}M. In order to determine whether strain F could control sulfide production under optimal conditions for sulfate-reducing bacteria, the electron donor was changed to lactate, and inorganic nutrients (nitrogen and phosphate sources) were added to the formation water. When nutrient-supplemented formation water with 3.1 mM lactate and 10 mM nitrate was used, the effluent sulfide concentrations of the control core system initially increased to about 3800 pM, and then decreased to about 1100 {mu}M after 5 wk. However, in the test core system inoculated with strain F, the effluent sulfide concentrations were much lower, 160-330 {mu}M. Nitrate consumption (5 mM) and high concentrations (101-1011 cells/mL) of strain F were detected in the test core system. An accumulation of biomass occurred in the influent lines during 2 mo of continuous operation, but only a small increase in injection pressure was observed. These studies showed that inoculation with strain F was needed for effective control of sulfide production, and that significant plugging or loss of injectivity owing to microbial inoculation did not occur. 7 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Species-specific enzymatic tolerance of sulfide toxicity in plant roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Nicole M; Maricle, Brian R

    2015-03-01

    Toxic effects of sulfide come from a poisoning of a number of enzymes, especially cytochrome c oxidase, which catalyzes the terminal step in mitochondrial aerobic respiration. Despite this, some estuarine plants live in sulfide-rich sediments. We hypothesized estuarine and flooding-tolerant species might be more tolerant of sulfide compared to upland species, and this was tested by measures of root cytochrome c oxidase and alcohol dehydrogenase activities in extracts exposed to sulfide. Enzyme activities were measured in 0, 5, 10, 15, and 20 μM sodium sulfide, and compared among 17 species of plants. Activities of alcohol dehydrogenase and cytochrome c oxidase were both reduced by increasing sulfide concentration, but cytochrome c oxidase was more sensitive to sulfide compared to alcohol dehydrogenase. Activities of cytochrome c oxidase were reduced to near zero at 5-10 μM sulfide whereas alcohol dehydrogenase activities were only reduced by about 50% at 10 μM sulfide. All species were sensitive to increasing sulfide, but to different degrees. Cytochrome c oxidase in flooding-sensitive species was decreased to near zero activity at 5 μM sulfide, whereas activities in some flooding-tolerant species were still detectable until 15 μM sulfide. Cytochrome c oxidase activities in some estuarine species were low even in the absence of sulfide, perhaps an adaptation to avoid sulfide vulnerability in their native, sulfide-rich habitat. This illustrates the potent metabolic effects of sulfide, and this is the first demonstration of varying sensitivities of cytochrome c oxidase to sulfide across organisms, making these data of novel importance.

  4. Influence of dissolved organic matter on the complexation of mercury under sulfidic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Carrie L; Mason, Robert P; Gilmour, Cynthia C; Heyes, Andrew

    2007-04-01

    The complexation of Hg under sulfidic conditions influences its bioavailability for microbial methylation. Neutral dissolved Hg-sulfide complexes are readily available to Hg-methylating bacteria in culture, and thermodynamic models predict that inorganic Hg-sulfide complexes dominate dissolved Hg speciation under natural sulfidic conditions. However, these models have not been validated in the field. To examine the complexation of Hg in natural sulfidic waters, octanol/water partitioning methods were modified for use under environmentally relevant conditions, and a centrifuge ultrafiltration technique was developed. These techniques demonstrated much lower concentrations of dissolved Hg-sulfide complexes than predicted. Furthermore, the study revealed an interaction between Hg, dissolved organic matter (DOM), and sulfide that is not captured by current thermodynamic models. Whereas Hg forms strong complexes with DOM under oxic conditions, these complexes had not been expected to form in the presence of sulfide because of the stronger affinity of Hg for sulfide relative to its affinity for DOM. The observed interaction between Hg and DOM in the presence of sulfide likely involves the formation of a DOM-Hg-sulfide complex or results from the hydrophobic partitioning of neutral Hg-sulfide complexes into the higher-molecular-weight DOM. An understanding of the mechanism of this interaction and determination of complexation coefficients for the Hg-sulfide-DOM complex are needed to adequately assess how our new finding affects Hg bioavailability, sorption, and flux.

  5. Interaction of hydrogen sulfide with ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Guanghua; Wu, Lingyun; Wang, Rui

    2010-07-01

    1. Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) is a signalling gasotransmitter. It targets different ion channels and receptors, and fulfils its various roles in modulating the functions of different systems. However, the interaction of H(2)S with different types of ion channels and underlying molecular mechanisms has not been reviewed systematically. 2. H(2)S is the first identified endogenous gaseous opener of ATP-sensitive K(+) channels in vascular smooth muscle cells. Through the activation of ATP-sensitive K(+) channels, H(2)S lowers blood pressure, protects the heart from ischemia and reperfusion injury, inhibits insulin secretion in pancreatic beta cells, and exerts anti-inflammatory, anti-nociceptive and anti-apoptotic effects. 3. H(2)S inhibited L-type Ca(2+) channels in cardiomyocytes but stimulated the same channels in neurons, thus regulating intracellular Ca(2+) levels. H(2)S activated small and medium conductance K(Ca) channels but its effect on BK(Ca) channels has not been consistent. 4. H(2)S-induced hyperalgesia and pro-nociception seems to be related to the sensitization of both T-type Ca(2+) channels and TRPV(1) channels. The activation of TRPV(1) and TRPA(1) by H(2)S is believed to result in contraction of nonvascular smooth muscles and increased colonic mucosal Cl(-) secretion. 5. The activation of Cl(-) channel by H(2)S has been shown as a protective mechanism for neurons from oxytosis. H(2)S also potentiates N-methyl-d-aspartic acid receptor-mediated currents that are involved in regulating synaptic plasticity for learning and memory. 6. Given the important modulatory effects of H(2)S on different ion channels, many cellular functions and disease conditions related to homeostatic control of ion fluxes across cell membrane should be re-evaluated.

  6. Hydrogen sulfide and nervous system regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Cheng-fang; TANG Xiao-qing

    2011-01-01

    Objective This review discusses the current status and progress in studies on the roles of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in regulation of neurotoxicity,neuroprotection,and neuromodulator,as well as its therapeutic potential for neurodegenerative disorders.Data sources The data used in this review were mainly from Medline and PubMed published in English from 2001 to August 2011.The search terms were “hydrogen sulfide”,“neuron”,and “neurodegenerative disorders”.Study selection Articles regarding the regulation of neuronal function,the protection against neuronal damage and neurological diseases,and their possible cellular and molecular mechanisms associated with H2S were selected.Results The inhibited generation of endogenous H2S is implicated in 1-methy-4-phenylpyridinium ion,6-OHDA,and homocysteine-triggered neurotoxicity.H2S elicits neuroprotection in Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease models as well as protecting neurons against oxidative stress,ischemia,and hypoxia-induced neuronal death.H2S offers anti-oxidant,anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic effects,as well as activates ATP-sensitive potassium channels and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator Cl- channels.H2S regulates the long-term potentiation (LTP) and GABAB receptors in the hippocampus,as well as intracellular calcium and pH homeostasis in neurons and glia cells.Conclusions These articles suggest that endogenous H2S may regulate the toxicity of neurotoxin.H2S not only acts as a neuroprotectant but also serves as a novel neuromodulator.

  7. Electrical properties of seafloor massive sulfides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spagnoli, Giovanni; Hannington, Mark; Bairlein, Katharina; Hördt, Andreas; Jegen, Marion; Petersen, Sven; Laurila, Tea

    2016-06-01

    Seafloor massive sulfide (SMS) deposits are increasingly seen as important marine metal resources for the future. A growing number of industrialized nations are involved in the surveying and sampling of such deposits by drilling. Drill ships are expensive and their availability can be limited; seabed drill rigs are a cost-effective alternative and more suitable for obtaining cores for resource evaluation. In order to achieve the objectives of resource evaluations, details are required of the geological, mineralogical, and physical properties of the polymetallic deposits and their host rocks. Electrical properties of the deposits and their ore minerals are distinct from their unmineralized host rocks. Therefore, the use of electrical methods to detect SMS while drilling and recovering drill cores could decrease the costs and accelerate offshore operations by limiting the amount of drilling in unmineralized material. This paper presents new data regarding the electrical properties of SMS cores that can be used in that assessment. Frequency-dependent complex electrical resistivity in the frequency range between 0.002 and 100 Hz was examined in order to potentially discriminate between different types of fresh rocks, alteration and mineralization. Forty mini-cores of SMS and unmineralized host rocks were tested in the laboratory, originating from different tectonic settings such as the intermediate-spreading ridges of the Galapagos and Axial Seamount, and the Pacmanus back-arc basin. The results indicate that there is a clear potential to distinguish between mineralized and non-mineralized samples, with some evidence that even different types of mineralization can be discriminated. This could be achieved using resistivity magnitude alone with appropriate rig-mounted electrical sensors. Exploiting the frequency-dependent behavior of resistivity might amplify the differences and further improve the rock characterization.

  8. Chemical dosing for sulfide control in Australia: An industry survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganigue, Ramon; Gutierrez, Oriol; Rootsey, Ray; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2011-12-01

    Controlling sulfide (H(2)S) production and emission in sewer systems is critical due to the corrosion and malodour problems that sulfide causes. Chemical dosing is one of the most commonly used measures to mitigate these problems. Many chemicals have been reported to be effective for sulfide control, but the extent of success varies between chemicals and is also dependent on how they are applied. This industry survey aims to summarise the current practice in Australia with the view to assist the water industry to further improve their practices and to identify new research questions. Results showed that dosing is mainly undertaken in pressure mains. Magnesium hydroxide, sodium hydroxide and nitrate are the most commonly used chemicals for sewers with low flows. In comparison, iron salts are preferentially used for sulfide control in large systems. The use of oxygen injection has declined dramatically in the past few years. Chemical dosing is mainly conducted at wet wells and pumping stations, except for oxygen, which is injected into the pipe. The dosing rates are normally linked to the control mechanisms of the chemicals and the dosing locations, with constant or profiled dosing rates usually applied. Finally, key opportunities for improvement are the use of mathematical models for the selection of chemicals and dosing locations, on-line dynamic control of the dosing rates and the development of more cost-effective chemicals for sulfide control.

  9. Do garlic-derived allyl sulfides scavenge peroxyl radicals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorati, Riccardo; Pedulli, Gian Franco

    2008-03-21

    The chain-breaking antioxidant activities of two garlic-derived allyl sulfides, i.e. diallyl disulfide (1), the main component of steam-distilled garlic oil, and allyl methyl sulfide (3) were evaluated by studying the thermally initiated autoxidation of cumene or styrene in their presence. Although the rate of cumene oxidation was reduced by addition of both 1 and 3, the dependence on the concentration of the two sulfides could not be explained on the basis of the classic antioxidant mechanism as with phenolic antioxidants. The rate of oxidation of styrene, on the other hand, did not show significant changes upon addition of either 1 or 3. This unusual behaviour was explained in terms of the co-oxidant effect, consisting in the decrease of the autoxidation rate of a substrate forming tertiary peroxyl radicals (i.e. cumene) upon addition of little amounts of a second oxidizable substrate giving rise instead to secondary peroxyl radicals. The relevant rate constants for the reaction of ROO(.) with 1 and 3 were measured as 1.6 and 1.0 M(-1) s(-1), respectively, fully consistent with the H-atom abstraction from substituted sulfides. It is therefore concluded that sulfides 1 and 3 do not scavenge peroxyl radicals and therefore cannot be considered chain-breaking antioxidants.

  10. Solubility and permeation of hydrogen sulfide in lipid membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Cuevasanta

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide (H(2S is mainly known for its toxicity but has recently been shown to be produced endogenously in mammalian tissues and to be associated with physiological regulatory functions. To better understand the role of biomembranes in modulating its biological distribution and effects; we measured the partition coefficient of H(2S in models of biological membranes. The partition coefficients were found to be 2.1±0.2, 1.9±0.5 and 2.0±0.6 in n-octanol, hexane and dilauroylphosphatidylcholine liposome membranes relative to water, respectively (25°C. This two-fold higher concentration of H(2S in the membrane translates into a rapid membrane permeability, P(m = 3 cm s(-1. We used a mathematical model in three dimensions to gain insight into the diffusion of total sulfide in tissues. This model shows that the sphere of action of sulfide produced by a single cell expands to involve more than 200 neighboring cells, and that the resistance imposed by lipid membranes has a significant effect on the diffusional spread of sulfide at pH 7.4, increasing local concentrations. These results support the role of hydrogen sulfide as a paracrine signaling molecule and reveal advantageous pharmacokinetic properties for its therapeutic applications.

  11. Solubility and permeation of hydrogen sulfide in lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevasanta, Ernesto; Denicola, Ana; Alvarez, Beatriz; Möller, Matías N

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) is mainly known for its toxicity but has recently been shown to be produced endogenously in mammalian tissues and to be associated with physiological regulatory functions. To better understand the role of biomembranes in modulating its biological distribution and effects; we measured the partition coefficient of H(2)S in models of biological membranes. The partition coefficients were found to be 2.1±0.2, 1.9±0.5 and 2.0±0.6 in n-octanol, hexane and dilauroylphosphatidylcholine liposome membranes relative to water, respectively (25°C). This two-fold higher concentration of H(2)S in the membrane translates into a rapid membrane permeability, P(m) = 3 cm s(-1). We used a mathematical model in three dimensions to gain insight into the diffusion of total sulfide in tissues. This model shows that the sphere of action of sulfide produced by a single cell expands to involve more than 200 neighboring cells, and that the resistance imposed by lipid membranes has a significant effect on the diffusional spread of sulfide at pH 7.4, increasing local concentrations. These results support the role of hydrogen sulfide as a paracrine signaling molecule and reveal advantageous pharmacokinetic properties for its therapeutic applications.

  12. Simultaneous removal of sulfide, nitrate and acetate under denitrifying sulfide removal condition: Modeling and experimental validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Xijun; Chen, Chuan; Wang, Aijie; Guo, Wanqian; Zhou, Xu [State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China); Lee, Duu-Jong, E-mail: djlee@ntu.edu.tw [State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China); Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Ren, Nanqi, E-mail: rnq@hit.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China); Chang, Jo-Shu [Research Center for Energy Technology and Strategy, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China)

    2014-01-15

    Graphical abstract: Model evaluation applied to case study 1: (A-G) S{sup 2−}, NO{sub 3}{sup −}-N, NO{sub 2}{sup −}-N, and Ac{sup −}-C profiles under initial sulfide concentrations of 156.2 (A), 539 (B), 964 (C), 1490 (D), 342.7 (E), 718 (F), and 1140.7 (G) mg L{sup −1}. The solid line represents simulated result and scatter represents experimental result. -- Highlights: • This work developed a mathematical model for DSR process. • Kinetics of sulfur–nitrogen–carbon and interactions between denitrifiers were studied. • Kinetic parameters of the model were estimated via data fitting. • The model described kinetic behaviors of DSR processes over wide parametric range. -- Abstract: Simultaneous removal of sulfide (S{sup 2−}), nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup −}) and acetate (Ac{sup −}) under denitrifying sulfide removal process (DSR) is a novel biological wastewater treatment process. This work developed a mathematical model to describe the kinetic behavior of sulfur–nitrogen–carbon and interactions between autotrophic denitrifiers and heterotrophic denitrifiers. The kinetic parameters of the model were estimated via data fitting considering the effects of initial S{sup 2−} concentration, S{sup 2−}/NO{sub 3}{sup −}-N ratio and Ac{sup −}-C/NO{sub 3}{sup −}-N ratio. Simulation supported that the heterotrophic denitratation step (NO{sub 3}{sup −} reduction to NO{sub 2}{sup −}) was inhibited by S{sup 2−} compared with the denitritation step (NO{sub 2}{sup −} reduction to N{sub 2}). Also, the S{sup 2−} oxidation by autotrophic denitrifiers was shown two times lower in rate with NO{sub 2}{sup −} as electron acceptor than that with NO{sub 3}{sup −} as electron acceptor. NO{sub 3}{sup −} reduction by autotrophic denitrifiers occurs 3–10 times slower when S{sup 0} participates as final electron donor compared to the S{sup 2−}-driven pathway. Model simulation on continuous-flow DSR reactor suggested that the adjustment of

  13. Thermodynamics of Complex Sulfide Inclusion Formation in Ca-Treated Al-Killed Structural Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yin-tao; He, Sheng-ping; Chen, Gu-jun; Wang, Qian

    2016-08-01

    Controlling the morphology of the sulfide inclusion is of vital importance in enhancing the properties of structural steel. Long strip-shaped sulfides in hot-rolled steel can spherize when, instead of the inclusion of pure single-phase MnS, the guest is a complex sulfide, such as an oxide-sulfide duplex and a solid-solution sulfide particle. In this study, the inclusions in a commercial rolled structural steel were investigated. Spherical and elongated oxide-sulfide duplex as well as single-phase (Mn,Ca)S solid solution inclusions were observed in the steel. A thermodynamic equilibrium between the oxide and sulfide inclusions was proposed to understand the oxide-sulfide duplex inclusion formation. Based on the equilibrium solidification principle, thermodynamic discussions on inclusion precipitation during the solidification process were performed for both general and resulfurized structural steel. The predicted results of the present study agreed well with the experimental ones.

  14. Investigation of chemical suppressants for inactivation of sulfide ores

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In order to investigate the effective control method of spontaneous combustion in the mining of sulfide ore deposits, This paper presents the testing results of several selected chemicals (water glass, calcium chloride, calcium oxide, magnesium oxide and their composites) as oxidation suppressants for sulfide ores. A weight increment scaling method was used to measure suppressant performance, and this method proved to be accurate, simple and convenient. Based on a large number of experiments, the test results show that four types of chemical mixtures demonstrate a good performance in reducing the oxidation rate of seven active sulfide ore samples by up to 27% to 100% during an initial 76 d period. The mixtures of water glass mixed with calcium chloride and magnesium oxide mixed with calcium chloride can also act as fire suppressants when used with fire sprinkling systems.

  15. Altered Sulfide (H2S) Metabolism in Ethylmalonic Encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiranti, Valeria; Zeviani, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (sulfide, H2S) is a colorless, water-soluble gas with a typical smell of rotten eggs. In the past, it has been investigated for its role as a potent toxic gas emanating from sewers and swamps or as a by-product of industrial processes. At high concentrations, H2S is a powerful inhibitor of cytochrome c oxidase; in trace amounts, it is an important signaling molecule, like nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO), together termed “gasotransmitters.” This review will cover the physiological role and the pathogenic effects of H2S, focusing on ethylmalonic encephalopathy, a human mitochondrial disorder caused by genetic abnormalities of sulfide metabolism. We will also discuss the options that are now conceivable for preventing genetically driven chronic H2S toxicity, taking into account that a complete understanding of the physiopathology of H2S has still to be achieved. PMID:23284046

  16. Altered sulfide (H(2)S) metabolism in ethylmalonic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiranti, Valeria; Zeviani, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (sulfide, H(2)S) is a colorless, water-soluble gas with a typical smell of rotten eggs. In the past, it has been investigated for its role as a potent toxic gas emanating from sewers and swamps or as a by-product of industrial processes. At high concentrations, H(2)S is a powerful inhibitor of cytochrome c oxidase; in trace amounts, it is an important signaling molecule, like nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO), together termed "gasotransmitters." This review will cover the physiological role and the pathogenic effects of H(2)S, focusing on ethylmalonic encephalopathy, a human mitochondrial disorder caused by genetic abnormalities of sulfide metabolism. We will also discuss the options that are now conceivable for preventing genetically driven chronic H(2)S toxicity, taking into account that a complete understanding of the physiopathology of H(2)S has still to be achieved.

  17. Metal sulfide electrodes and energy storage devices thereof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiang, Yet-Ming; Woodford, William Henry; Li, Zheng; Carter, W. Craig

    2017-02-28

    The present invention generally relates to energy storage devices, and to metal sulfide energy storage devices in particular. Some aspects of the invention relate to energy storage devices comprising at least one flowable electrode, wherein the flowable electrode comprises an electroactive metal sulfide material suspended and/or dissolved in a carrier fluid. In some embodiments, the flowable electrode further comprises a plurality of electronically conductive particles suspended and/or dissolved in the carrier fluid, wherein the electronically conductive particles form a percolating conductive network. An energy storage device comprising a flowable electrode comprising a metal sulfide electroactive material and a percolating conductive network may advantageously exhibit, upon reversible cycling, higher energy densities and specific capacities than conventional energy storage devices.

  18. Conspicuous veils formed by vibrioid bacteria on sulfidic marine sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thar, Roland Matthias; Kühl, Michael

    2002-01-01

    We describe the morphology and behavior of a hitherto unknown bacterial species that forms conspicuous veils (typical dimensions, 30 by 30 mm) on sulfidic marine sediment. The new bacteria were enriched on complex sulfidic medium within a benthic gradient chamber in oxygen-sulfide countergradients......, but the bacteria have so far not been isolated in pure culture, and a detailed characterization of their metabolism is still lacking. The bacteria are colorless, gram-negative, and vibrioid-shaped (1.3- to 2.5- by 4- to 10-µm) cells that multiply by binary division and contain several spherical inclusions of poly......, forming a cohesive whitish veil at the oxic-anoxic interface. Bacteria attached to the veil kept rotating and adapted their stalk lengths dynamically to changing oxygen concentrations. The joint action of rotating bacteria on the veil induced a homogeneous water flow from the oxic water region toward...

  19. Extraction of Nanosized Cobalt Sulfide from Spent Hydrocracking Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samia A. Kosa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The processes used for the extraction of metals (Co, Mo, and Al from spent hydrotreating catalysts were investigated in this study. A detailed mechanism of the metal extraction process is described. Additionally, a simulation study was performed to understand the sulfidizing mechanism. The suggested separation procedure was effective and achieved an extraction of approximately 80–90%. In addition, the sulfidization mechanism was identified. This sulfidizing process for Co was found to involve an intermediate, the structure of which was proposed. This proposed intermediate was confirmed through simulations. Moreover, the activities of the spent and the regenerated catalyst were examined in the cracking of toluene. The modification of the spent catalyst through the use of different iron oxide loadings improved the catalytic activity.

  20. Mechanism of sulfide effect on viscosity of HPAM polymer solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    康万利; 周阳; 王志伟; 孟令伟; 刘述忍; 白宝君

    2008-01-01

    The effect of sulfide on HPAM solution viscosity was studied using BROOKFIELD DV-II viscometer,and the interaction mechanism was discussed.The HPAM solution viscosity was investigated through fully reducing sulfide by the addition of hydrogen peroxide oxidation,and the mechanism of increasing polymer viscosity was investigated.The experimental results also show that there is a critical concentration of 15 mg/L.Below it,the loss rate of HPAM solution viscosity increases more rapidly,but becomes slowly above the critical concentration.A theoretical guidance for oilfields to prepare polymer solution using sewage-water by eliminating sulfide,and it is also importance to prepare polymer solution using sewage-water and save fresh water.

  1. Morphology and thermal studies of zinc sulfide and cadmium sulfide nanoparticles in polyvinyl alcohol matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osuntokun, Jejenija; Ajibade, Peter A., E-mail: pajibade@ufh.ac.za

    2016-09-01

    Zn(II) and Cd(II) metal complexes of 1-cyano-1-carboethoxyethylene-2,2-dithiolato–κS,S’–bis (N,N-dimethylthiourea–κS) have been synthesized and characterized with analytical and spectroscopic techniques. The complexes were thermolysed in hexadecylamine at 200 °C to prepare ZnS and CdS nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were characterized with scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), and powder X-ray diffraction (p-XRD). TEM images showed spherically shaped nanoparticles, whose sizes are in the range 4.33–7.21 nm for ZnS and 4.95–7.7 nm CdS respectively and XRD confirmed cubic crystalline phases for the nanoparticles. The optical band gap energy evaluated from the absorption spectra are 2.88 eV (430 nm) and 2.81 eV (440 nm) for the ZnS and CdS nanoparticles respectively. The as-prepared metal sulfide nanoparticles were further incorporated into polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) to give ZnS/PVA and CdS/PVA composites. The polymer nanocomposites were studied to investigate their morphology and thermal properties relative to the pure PVA. XRD diffractions indicated that the crystalline phases of the nanoparticles and the sizes in PVA matrices remained unaltered. Infra-red spectra studies revealed interactions between the PVA and the metal sulfide nanoparticles and TGA studies show that the ZnS/PVA and CdS/PVA nanocomposites exhibit better thermal stability than the pure PVA.

  2. Morphology and thermal studies of zinc sulfide and cadmium sulfide nanoparticles in polyvinyl alcohol matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osuntokun, Jejenija; Ajibade, Peter A.

    2016-09-01

    Zn(II) and Cd(II) metal complexes of 1-cyano-1-carboethoxyethylene-2,2-dithiolato-κS,S'-bis(N,N-dimethylthiourea-κS) have been synthesized and characterized with analytical and spectroscopic techniques. The complexes were thermolysed in hexadecylamine at 200 °C to prepare ZnS and CdS nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were characterized with scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), and powder X-ray diffraction (p-XRD). TEM images showed spherically shaped nanoparticles, whose sizes are in the range 4.33-7.21 nm for ZnS and 4.95-7.7 nm CdS respectively and XRD confirmed cubic crystalline phases for the nanoparticles. The optical band gap energy evaluated from the absorption spectra are 2.88 eV (430 nm) and 2.81 eV (440 nm) for the ZnS and CdS nanoparticles respectively. The as-prepared metal sulfide nanoparticles were further incorporated into polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) to give ZnS/PVA and CdS/PVA composites. The polymer nanocomposites were studied to investigate their morphology and thermal properties relative to the pure PVA. XRD diffractions indicated that the crystalline phases of the nanoparticles and the sizes in PVA matrices remained unaltered. Infra-red spectra studies revealed interactions between the PVA and the metal sulfide nanoparticles and TGA studies show that the ZnS/PVA and CdS/PVA nanocomposites exhibit better thermal stability than the pure PVA.

  3. Carbonyl Sulfides as Possible Intermediates in the Photolysis of Oxathiiranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Lars; Snyder, J. P.; Holm, A.

    1981-01-01

    of sulfine to ketone via the oxathiirane and the subsequent blue intermediate implies the absence of triplet and biradical singlet transients. The unknown carbonyl sulfide functionality, R2C&z.dbnd;O&z.dbnd;S, thereby emerges as a strong candidate for producing the visible absorption. Comparison of the wave...... functions for CH2&z.dbnd;S&z.dbnd;O and CH2&z.dbnd;O&z.dbnd;S arising from MNDO limited CI geometry optimizations leads to the conclusion that the carbonyl sulfide structure is best described as a zwitterion rather than as a singlet biradical. The failure to observe cycloaddition products between the blue...

  4. High conducting oxide--sulfide composite lithium superionic conductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Chengdu; Rangasamy, Ezhiylmurugan; Dudney, Nancy J.; Keum, Jong Kahk; Rondinone, Adam Justin

    2017-01-17

    A solid electrolyte for a lithium-sulfur battery includes particles of a lithium ion conducting oxide composition embedded within a lithium ion conducting sulfide composition. The lithium ion conducting oxide composition can be Li.sub.7La.sub.3Zr.sub.2O.sub.12 (LLZO). The lithium ion conducting sulfide composition can be .beta.-Li.sub.3PS.sub.4 (LPS). A lithium ion battery and a method of making a solid electrolyte for a lithium ion battery are also disclosed.

  5. Altered Sulfide (H2S) Metabolism in Ethylmalonic Encephalopathy

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (sulfide, H2S) is a colorless, water-soluble gas with a typical smell of rotten eggs. In the past, it has been investigated for its role as a potent toxic gas emanating from sewers and swamps or as a by-product of industrial processes. At high concentrations, H2S is a powerful inhibitor of cytochrome c oxidase; in trace amounts, it is an important signaling molecule, like nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO), together termed “gasotransmitters.” This review will cover th...

  6. Experimental constraints on gold and silver solubility in iron sulfides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pal' yanova, Galina [Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 3, Koptyuga, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Russia, 2, Pirogova, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Mikhlin, Yuri [Institute of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Akademgorodok, 50/24, Krasnoyarsk, 660036 (Russian Federation); Kokh, Konstantin, E-mail: k.a.kokh@gmail.com [Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 3, Koptyuga, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Russia, 2, Pirogova, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Siberian Physical–Technical Institute of Tomsk State University, 1, Novosobornaya, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Karmanov, Nick [Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 3, Koptyuga, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Seryotkin, Yurii [Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 3, Koptyuga, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Russia, 2, Pirogova, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-15

    Experiments were performed to determine crystallization of Fe,S-melts (pyriti≿ and troilitic with molar ratio S/Fe ratios of 2 and 1, respectively) containing traces of gold and silver at (Ag/Au){sub wt} ratios varying from 10 to 0.1. The solid products were studied by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), microprobe analysis, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) in order to reveal the concentration limits of “invisible” gold and silver in magmatic iron sulfides, and to determine the influence of sulfur on forms of precious metals in the Fe–S system with different Ag/Au ratios. Au–Ag phases do not form inclusions but instead concentrate on the grain boundaries in the synthetic pyrrhotite and troilite, while pyrite comprises micro- (1–5 μm) and macroinclusions of Au–Ag alloys and Au–Ag sulfides. In “pyriti≿” systems, the fineness of alloys increases from 650 to 970‰ and the composition of sulfides changes from acanthite (Ag{sub 2}S) to uytenbogaardtite (Ag{sub 3}AuS{sub 2}) and petrovskaite (AgAuS) as the Ag/Au ratio decreases. The concentrations of “invisible” precious metals revealed in troilite were 0.040 ± 0.013 wt.% Au and 0.079 ± 0.016 wt.% Ag. Measured concentrations in pyrite and pyrrhotite were <0.024 wt.% Au and <0.030 wt.% Ag. The surface layers of iron sulfides probed with XPS were enriched in the precious metals, and in silver relative to gold, especially in the systems with Fe/S = 1, probably, due to depletion of the metallic alloy surfaces with gold. Au- and Ag-bearing iron sulfides crystallized primarily from melts may be the source of redeposited phases in hydrothermal and hypergene processes. - Highlights: • The samples of Fe–S–Au–Ag system were synthesized. • Coupled solubility of gold and silver in iron sulfides was specified. • Ag–Au inclusions on surfaces of iron sulfides are likely to be enriched in silver. • Au–Ag sulfides can exist along with

  7. The Sulfide Capacity of Iron Oxide-Rich Slags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motlagh, M.

    1988-03-01

    The relationship between the sulfide capacity of slags rich in iron oxide and the sulfur partition ratio between the metal and slag is strongly related to the slag's iron oxide concentration. For slags containing little or no lime, this relationship is linear for a constant concentration of iron oxide in the slag. The effect of silica on changes in the sulfide capacity of slags rich in iron oxide is similar to that of basic steel-making slags, particularly at low activity of silica in slag.

  8. Thermochemical hydrogen production via a cycle using barium and sulfur - Reaction between barium sulfide and water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, K.; Conger, W. L.

    1977-01-01

    The reaction between barium sulfide and water, a reaction found in several sulfur based thermochemical cycles, was investigated kinetically at 653-866 C. Gaseous products were hydrogen and hydrogen sulfide. The rate determining step for hydrogen formation was a surface reaction between barium sulfide and water. An expression was derived for the rate of hydrogen formation.

  9. The Sulfidation of gamma-Alumina and Titania Supported (Cobalt) Molybdenum Oxide Catalysts Monitored by EXAFS.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koningsberger, D.C.; Leliveld, R.G.; Dillen, A.J. van; Geus, John W.

    1997-01-01

    The sulfidation of @c-alumina- and titania-supported(cobalt)molybdenum oxide catalysts has been studied with X-rayabsorption spectroscopy and temperature programmed sulfidation (TPS).The catalysts were stepwise sulfided at temperatures between 298 and673 K and their structure was determined with EXA

  10. Selective precipitation of heavy metals as controlled by a sulfide-selective electrode

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veeken, A.H.M.; Vries, S.; Mark, van der A.

    2003-01-01

    Sulfide precipitation is superior to hydroxide precipitation for removal of heavy metals from wastewaters as it results in lower effluent concentrations and less interference from chelating agents. However, sulfide precipitation is not widely applied in practice because the dosing of sulfide cannot

  11. 76 FR 69136 - Hydrogen Sulfide; Community Right-to-Know Toxic Chemical Release Reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-08

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 372 RIN 2025-AA27 Hydrogen Sulfide; Community Right-to-Know Toxic Chemical Release... hydrogen sulfide and methyl mercaptan found at 40 CFR 372.65. The document published in the Federal... requirements for only hydrogen sulfide. The Office of the Federal Register mistakenly lifted the stay of...

  12. Sulfide-iron interactions in domestic wastewater from a gravity sewer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nielsen, A.H.; Lens, P.N.L.; Vollertsen, J.; Hvitved-Jacobsen, Th.

    2005-01-01

    Interactions between iron and sulfide in domestic wastewater from a gravity sewer were investigated with particular emphasis on redox cycling of iron and iron sulfide formation. The concentration ranges of iron and total sulfide in the experiments were 0.4-5.4 mg Fe L-1 and 0-5.1 mg S L-1, respectiv

  13. SULFIDE OXIDATION UNDER OXYGEN LIMITATION BY A THIOBACILLUS-THIOPARUS ISOLATED FROM A MARINE MICROBIAL MAT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDENENDE, FP; VANGEMERDEN, H

    1993-01-01

    The colorless sulfur bacterium Thiobacillus thioparus T5, isolated from a marine microbial mat, was grown in continuous culture under conditions ranging from sulfide limitation to oxygen limitation. Under sulfide-limiting conditions, sulfide was virtually completely oxidized to sulfate. Under oxygen

  14. Identifying the Prospective Area of Sulfide Groundwater within the Area of Palvantash Oil and Gas Deposit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Zhurayev

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the methodology of prospecting for sulfide groundwater in the area of Palvantash oil fields. In result of study allowed determining the favorable conditions for the sulfide waters formation, and mapping the areas of different sulfide water concentration. The relatively permeable areas were established and the water borehole positions were recommended.

  15. S/Se In Sulfide Inclusion In Diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomassot, E.; Couffignal, F.; Lorand, J.; Bureau, H.; Cartigny, P.; Harris, J. W.

    2009-05-01

    Sulfides are among the most common minerals found as inclusions in diamonds. Being protected from any alteration after diamond formation, they likely represent the most pristine sulfide sample of mantle rocks. Their chemical composition in major and minor elements (mainly Ni, Cu and Cr), as determined using Electron Probe Micro Analyse (EPMA), is commonly used to determine the rock type in which the diamond formed. Here we propose to apply the same technique to the trace element abundance determination. We performed selenium (Se) on sulfide inclusion in diamonds. The S/Se value could help understanding whether the diamond formed in an eclogitic or peridotitic environment and may also constrain on the magmatic differentiation of diamonds host rock as well as provide a potential surface (hydrothermal) signature in diamond inclusions. A trace element measurement scheme has been developed by EPMA at the CAMPARIS centre (Paris). Se-abundance was obtained using a 30 kV accelerating voltage and 100nA probe current. Total counting time was 800s for peak (1.1 Å ) and 400s for background on both side of peak. Analyses were duplicated by μPIXE using the LPS nuclear microprobe facility (SIS2M CEA Saclay, France). Maps from 30x30 μm2 to 70x70 μm2 were obtained by scanning a 4x4 μm2 proton beam of 3MeV, 600 pA, (0.4 to 2 μC). The two techniques show good agreement and we conclude that EPMA is well suited for accurate and precise Se measurements. We analysed five samples; two monosulfide solid solution (MSS) (Ni>22wt%) typical of the peridotitic paragenesis (P-type), and three Ni-poor sulfides (Ni<7wt%) typical of the eclogitic paragenesis (E-type). In P-type sulfides, Se-content (260 ppm) is significantly higher than previously reported in sulfides from mantle-derived lherzolites (40-160 ppm), pyroxenites (25-45 ppm) or harzburgite. The value of S/Se in MSS is low (˜1400) compared to those of the primitive mantle reservoir (3,300; McDounough et al., 1995 Chemical Geology

  16. A coumarin-based colorimetric fluorescent probe for hydrogen sulfide

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yanqiu Yang; Yu Liu; Liang Yang; Jun Liu; Kun Li; Shunzhong Luo

    2015-03-01

    A coumarin-based fluorescent probe for selective detection of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is presented. This `off–on’ probe exhibited high selectivity towards H2S in aqueous solution with a detection limit of 30 nM. Notably, because of its dual nucleophilicity, the probe could avoid the interference of thiols and other sulfur containing compounds.

  17. Hydrogen sulfide : physiological properties and therapeutic potential in ischaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, Eelke M.; van Goor, Harry; Joles, Jaap A.; Whiteman, Matthew; Leuvenink, Henri G. D.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has become a molecule of high interest in recent years, and it is now recognized as the third gasotransmitter in addition to nitric oxide and carbon monoxide. In this review, we discuss the recent literature on the physiology of endogenous and exogenous H2S, focusing upon the

  18. Sulfide Formation And Its Impacts On A Developing Country

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matias, Natércia; Mutuvúie, Raúl; Vollertsen, Jes;

    2014-01-01

    is expected in the near future, with the associated longer wastewater travel times and increasing problems of septicity and hydrogen sulfide gas impacts. In order to better understand the in-sewer processes under local conditions, evaluate risks and exemplify how to support general drainage systems planning...

  19. Hydrogen sulfide : role in vascular physiology and pathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holwerda, Kim M.; Karumanchi, S. Ananth; Lely, A. Titia

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of reviewHydrogen sulfide (H2S), a colorless gas that is endogenously generated in mammals from cysteine, has important biological functions. Within the vasculature it regulates vessel tone and outgrowth of new vessels. This review summarizes recent literature on H2S signaling in the vascula

  20. Bio-reduction of sulfide minerals to recover invisible gold

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hol, A.

    2011-01-01

      Sulfide minerals, like pyrite and arsenopyrite, are of economical interest due to the presence of invisible gold locked inside these minerals. As fine grinding is often not sufficient to liberate the gold from these minerals, additional destruction techniques, based on chemical and biologica

  1. Potential Applications of Hydrogen Sulfide-Induced Suspended Animation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Aslami; M.J. Schultz; N.P. Juffermans

    2009-01-01

    A suspended animation-like state has been induced in rodents with the use of hydrogen sulfide, resulting in hypothermia with a concomitant reduction in metabolic rate. Also oxygen demand was reduced, thereby protecting against hypoxia. Several therapeutic applications of induction of a hibernation-l

  2. Micelle Mediated Trace Level Sulfide Quantification through Cloud Point Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samrat Devaramani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple cloud point extraction protocol has been proposed for the quantification of sulfide at trace level. The method is based on the reduction of iron (III to iron (II by the sulfide and the subsequent complexation of metal ion with nitroso-R salt in alkaline medium. The resulting green-colored complex was extracted through cloud point formation using cationic surfactant, that is, cetylpyridinium chloride, and the obtained surfactant phase was homogenized by ethanol before its absorbance measurement at 710 nm. The reaction variables like metal ion, ligand, surfactant concentration, and medium pH on the cloud point extraction of the metal-ligand complex have been optimized. The interference effect of the common anions and cations was studied. The proposed method has been successfully applied to quantify the trace level sulfide in the leachate samples of the landfill and water samples from bore wells and ponds. The validity of the proposed method has been studied by spiking the samples with known quantities of sulfide as well as comparing with the results obtained by the standard method.

  3. Luminescence in Sulfides: A Rich History and a Bright Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe F. Smet

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Sulfide-based luminescent materials have attracted a lot of attention for a wide range of photo-, cathodo- and electroluminescent applications. Upon doping with Ce3+ and Eu2+, the luminescence can be varied over the entire visible region by appropriately choosing the composition of the sulfide host. Main application areas are flat panel displays based on thin film electroluminescence, field emission displays and ZnS-based powder electroluminescence for backlights. For these applications, special attention is given to BaAl2S4:Eu, ZnS:Mn and ZnS:Cu. Recently, sulfide materials have regained interest due to their ability (in contrast to oxide materials to provide a broad band, Eu2+-based red emission for use as a color conversion material in white-light emitting diodes (LEDs. The potential application of rare-earth doped binary alkaline-earth sulfides, like CaS and SrS, thiogallates, thioaluminates and thiosilicates as conversion phosphors is discussed. Finally, this review concludes with the size-dependent luminescence in intrinsic colloidal quantum dots like PbS and CdS, and with the luminescence in doped nanoparticles.

  4. Magmatic sulfides in the porphyritic chondrules of EH enstatite chondrites

    CERN Document Server

    Piani, Laurette; Libourel, Guy; Tissandier, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    The nature and distribution of sulfides within 17 porphyritic chondrules of the Sahara 97096 EH3 enstatite chondrite have been studied by backscattered electron microscopy and electron microprobe in order to investigate the role of gas-melt interactions in the chondrule sulfide formation. Troilite (FeS) is systematically present and is the most abundant sulfide within the EH3 chondrite chondrules. It is found either poikilitically enclosed in low-Ca pyroxenes or scattered within the glassy mesostasis. Oldhamite (CaS) and niningerite [(Mg,Fe,Mn)S] are present in about 60% of the chondrules studied. While oldhamite is preferentially present in the mesostasis, niningerite associated with silica is generally observed in contact with troilite and low-Ca pyroxene. The chondrule mesostases contain high abundances of alkali and volatile elements as well as silica. Our data suggest that most of the sulfides found in EH3 chondrite chondrules are magmatic minerals that formed after the dissolution of S from a volatile-r...

  5. 21 CFR 872.1870 - Sulfide detection device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sulfide detection device. 872.1870 Section 872.1870 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... periodontal pocket probing depths, detect the presence or absence of bleeding on probing, and detect...

  6. Hydrogen sulfide release from dairy manure storages containing gypsum bedding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recycled gypsum products can provide a cost-effective bedding alternative for dairy producers. Manufacturers report reduced odors, moisture and bacteria in the stall environment when compared to traditional bedding. Gypsum provides a sulfate source that can be converted to hydrogen sulfide under ana...

  7. Electrogenerative leaching of nickel sulfide concentrate with ferric chloride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王少芬; 方正; 王云燕; 陈阳国

    2004-01-01

    In order to utilize the chemical energy in hydrometallurgical process of sulfide minerals reasonably and to simplify the purifying process, the electrogenerative process was applied and a dual cell system was introduced to investigate FeCl3 leaching of nickel sulfide concentrate. Some factors influencing the electrogenerative leaching, such as electrode structure, temperature and solution concentration were studied. The results show that a certain quantity of electrical energy accompanied with the leached products can be acquired in the electrogenerative leaching process.The output current and power increase with the addition of acetylene black to the electrode. Varying the components of electrode just affects the polarization degree of anode. Increasing FeCl3 concentration results in a sharp increase in the output of the leaching cell when c(FeCl3) is less than 0.1 mol/L. The optimum value of NaCl concentration for electrogenerative leaching nickel sulfide concentrate with FeCl3 is 3.0 mol/L. Temperature influences electrogenerative leaching by affecting anodic and cathodic polarization simultaneously. The apparent activation energy is determined to be 34.63 kJ/mol in the range of 298 K to 322 K. The leaching rate of Ni2+ is 29.3% after FeCl3 electrogenerative leaching of nickel sulfide concentrate for 620 min with a filter bag electrode.

  8. Selective Sulfidation of Lead Smelter Slag with Sulfur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Junwei; Liu, Wei; Wang, Dawei; Jiao, Fen; Qin, Wenqing

    2016-02-01

    The selective sulfidation of lead smelter slag with sulfur was studied. The effects of temperature, sulfur dosage, carbon, and Na salts additions were investigated based on thermodynamic calculation. The results indicated that more than 96 pct of zinc in the slag could be converted into sulfides. Increasing temperature, sulfur dosage, or Na salts dosage was conducive to the sulfidation of the zinc oxides in the slag. High temperature and excess Na salts would result in the more consumption of carbon and sulfur. Carbon addition not only promoted the selective sulfidation but reduced the sulfur dosage and eliminated the generation of SO2. Iron oxides had a buffering role on the sulfur efficient utilization. The transformation of sphalerite to wurtzite was feasible under reducing condition at high temperature, especially above 1273 K (1000 °C). The growth of ZnS particles largely depended upon the roasting temperature. They were significantly increased when the temperature was above 1273 K (1000 °C), which was attributed to the formation of a liquid phase.

  9. Synthesis and photovoltaic application of coper (I) sulfide nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Yue; Wadia, Cyrus; Ma, Wanli; Sadtler, Bryce; Alivisatos, A.Paul

    2008-06-24

    We present the rational synthesis of colloidal copper(I) sulfide nanocrystals and demonstrate their application as an active light absorbing component in combination with CdS nanorods to make a solution-processed solar cell with 1.6percent power conversion efficiency on both conventional glass substrates and flexible plastic substrates with stability over a 4 month testing period.

  10. Adsorption of hydrogen sulfide on montmorillonites modified with iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen-Thanh, Danh; Block, Karin; Bandosz, Teresa J

    2005-04-01

    Sodium-rich montmorillonite was modified with iron in order to introduce active centers for hydrogen sulfide adsorption. In the first modification, interlayer sodium cations were exchanged with iron. In another modification, iron oxocations were introduced to the clay surface. The most elaborated modification was based on doping of iron within the interlayer space of aluminum-pillared clay. The modified clay samples were tested as hydrogen sulfide adsorbents. Iron-doped samples showed a significant improvement in the capacity for H2S removal, despite of a noticeable decrease in microporosity compared to the initial pillared clay. The smallest capacity was obtained for the clay modified with iron oxocations. Variations in adsorption capacity are likely due to differences in the chemistry of iron species, degree of their dispersion on the surface, and accessibility of small pores for H2S molecule. The results suggest that on the surface of iron-modified clay hydrogen sulfide reacts with Fe(+3) forming sulfides or it is catalytically oxidized to SO2 on iron (hydro)oxides. Subsequent oxidation may lead to sulfate formation.

  11. Estimation of bacterial hydrogen sulfide production in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amina Basic

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Oral bacterial hydrogen sulfide (H2S production was estimated comparing two different colorimetric methods in microtiter plate format. High H2S production was seen for Fusobacterium spp., Treponema denticola, and Prevotella tannerae, associated with periodontal disease. The production differed between the methods indicating that H2S production may follow different pathways.

  12. Improvements in the manufacture of sulfur from hydrogen sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azoulay, A.

    1968-12-23

    In this process for the manufacture of sulfur from hydrogen sulfide and sulfur dioxide, the sulfur is separated from the gas after reaction by direct contact by cooling with a cooling liquid. The sulfur is carried away by the cooling liquid.

  13. Lanthanide complexes as luminogenic probes to measure sulfide levels in industrial samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorson, Megan K; Ung, Phuc; Leaver, Franklin M; Corbin, Teresa S; Tuck, Kellie L; Graham, Bim; Barrios, Amy M

    2015-10-08

    A series of lanthanide-based, azide-appended complexes were investigated as hydrogen sulfide-sensitive probes. Europium complex 1 and Tb complex 3 both displayed a sulfide-dependent increase in luminescence, while Tb complex 2 displayed a decrease in luminescence upon exposure to NaHS. The utility of the complexes for monitoring sulfide levels in industrial oil and water samples was investigated. Complex 3 provided a sensitive measure of sulfide levels in petrochemical water samples (detection limit ∼ 250 nM), while complex 1 was capable of monitoring μM levels of sulfide in partially refined crude oil.

  14. Thermochemical hydrogen production via a cycle using barium and sulfur: reaction between barium sulfide and water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ota, K.; Conger, W.L.

    1977-01-01

    The reaction between barium sulfide and water, a reaction found in several sulfur based thermochemical cycles, was investigated kinetically at 653 to 866/sup 0/C. Gaseous products were hydrogen and hydrogen sulfide. The rate determining step for hydrogen formation was a surface reaction between barium sulfide and water. The rate of formation of hydrogen can be expressed as: RH2 = 1.07 x 10/sup -2/ exp (-3180/RT) (mol H/sub 2//mol BaS s). Hydrogen sulfide was produced during the initial period of reaction and the quantity of hydrogen sulfide formed during this period decreased as the temperature of reaction was increased.

  15. Volcanogenic massive sulfide occurrence model: Chapter C in Mineral deposit models for resource assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanks, W.C. Pat; Koski, Randolph A.; Mosier, Dan L.; Schulz, Klaus J.; Morgan, Lisa A.; Slack, John F.; Ridley, W. Ian; Dusel-Bacon, Cynthia; Seal, Robert R., II; Piatak, Nadine M.; Shanks, W.C. Pat; Thurston, Roland

    2012-01-01

    Volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits, also known as volcanic-hosted massive sulfide, volcanic-associated massive sulfide, or seafloor massive sulfide deposits, are important sources of copper, zinc, lead, gold, and silver (Cu, Zn, Pb, Au, and Ag). These deposits form at or near the seafloor where circulating hydrothermal fluids driven by magmatic heat are quenched through mixing with bottom waters or porewaters in near-seafloor lithologies. Massive sulfide lenses vary widely in shape and size and may be podlike or sheetlike. They are generally stratiform and may occur as multiple lenses.

  16. Formation of nanocolloidal metacinnabar in mercury-DOM-sulfide systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerbig, Chase A.; Kim, Christopher S.; Stegemeier, John P.; Ryan, Joseph N.; Aiken, George R.

    2011-01-01

    Direct determination of mercury (Hg) speciation in sulfide-containing environments is confounded by low mercury concentrations and poor analytical sensitivity. Here we report the results of experiments designed to assess mercury speciation at environmentally relevant ratios of mercury to dissolved organic matter (DOM) (i.e., -1) by combining solid phase extraction using C18 resin with extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. Aqueous Hg(II) and a DOM isolate were equilibrated in the presence and absence of 100 μM total sulfide. In the absence of sulfide, mercury adsorption to the resin increased as the Hg:DOM ratio decreased and as the strength of Hg-DOM binding increased. EXAFS analysis indicated that in the absence of sulfide, mercury bonds with an average of 2.4 ± 0.2 sulfur atoms with a bond length typical of mercury-organic thiol ligands (2.35 Å). In the presence of sulfide, mercury showed greater affinity for the C18 resin, and its chromatographic behavior was independent of Hg:DOM ratio. EXAFS analysis showed mercury–sulfur bonds with a longer interatomic distance (2.51–2.53 Å) similar to the mercury–sulfur bond distance in metacinnabar (2.53 Å) regardless of the Hg:DOM ratio. For all samples containing sulfide, the sulfur coordination number was below the ideal four-coordinate structure of metacinnabar. At a low Hg:DOM ratio where strong binding DOM sites may control mercury speciation (1.9 nmol mg-1) mercury was coordinated by 2.3 ± 0.2 sulfur atoms, and the coordination number rose with increasing Hg:DOM ratio. The less-than-ideal coordination numbers indicate metacinnabar-like species on the nanometer scale, and the positive correlation between Hg:DOM ratio and sulfur coordination number suggests progressively increasing particle size or crystalline order with increasing abundance of mercury with respect to DOM. In DOM-containing sulfidic systems nanocolloidal metacinnabar-like species may form, and these species need to

  17. Magmatic sulfides in the porphyritic chondrules of EH enstatite chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piani, Laurette; Marrocchi, Yves; Libourel, Guy; Tissandier, Laurent

    2016-12-01

    The nature and distribution of sulfides within 17 porphyritic chondrules of the Sahara 97096 EH3 enstatite chondrite have been studied by backscattered electron microscopy and electron microprobe in order to investigate the role of gas-melt interactions in the chondrule sulfide formation. Troilite (FeS) is systematically present and is the most abundant sulfide within the EH3 chondrite chondrules. It is found either poikilitically enclosed in low-Ca pyroxenes or scattered within the glassy mesostasis. Oldhamite (CaS) and niningerite [(Mg,Fe,Mn)S] are present in ≈60% of the chondrules studied. While oldhamite is preferentially present in the mesostasis, niningerite associated with silica is generally observed in contact with troilite and low-Ca pyroxene. The Sahara 97096 chondrule mesostases contain high abundances of alkali and volatile elements (average Na2O = 8.7 wt.%, K2O = 0.8 wt.%, Cl = 7100 ppm and S = 3700 ppm) as well as silica (average SiO2 = 62.8 wt.%). Our data suggest that most of the sulfides found in EH3 chondrite chondrules are magmatic minerals that formed after the dissolution of S from a volatile-rich gaseous environment into the molten chondrules. Troilite formation occurred via sulfur solubility within Fe-poor chondrule melts followed by sulfide saturation, which causes an immiscible iron sulfide liquid to separate from the silicate melt. The FeS saturation started at the same time as or prior to the crystallization of low-Ca pyroxene during the high temperature chondrule forming event(s). Protracted gas-melt interactions under high partial pressures of S and SiO led to the formation of niningerite-silica associations via destabilization of the previously formed FeS and low-Ca pyroxene. We also propose that formation of the oldhamite occurred via the sulfide saturation of Fe-poor chondrule melts at moderate S concentration due to the high degree of polymerization and the high Na-content of the chondrule melts, which allowed the activity of Ca

  18. Direct rapid determination of traces of sulfide in environment samples

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭方遒; 黄兰芳; 梁逸曾

    2002-01-01

    An improved ethylene blue method for determination of sulfide is developed. It has been adapted to a direct determination of sulfide by both common spectrophotometric method and total differential spectrophotometric method. In common spectrophotometric method, the calibration curve is A=1.69ρ+0.006 and the correlation coefficient is 0.9994.The apparent molar absorptivity is 5.42×104 L*mol-1*cm-1 and calibration curve is liner when ρ is in the range of 0-0.9 mg*L-1. In total differential spectrophotometric method, the calibration curve is A=9.25ρ+0.004 and the correlation coefficient is 0.9996. The apparent molar absorptivity is 2.96×105 L*mol-1*cm-1and calibration curve is liner when ρ is in the range of 0-0.10 mg*L-1. The sensitivity of this method is increased significantly compared with the former ethylene blue method. The speed of reaction is also faster than the former one. The limit of detection is found to be 1.0 ng*mL-1 by both common spectrophotometric method and total differential spectrophotometric method. Ten replicate analyses of a sample solution containing 100 ng*mL-1sulfide give a relative standard deviation of 1.8%. The effects of various cations and anions on the determination of sulfide are studied and procedures for removal of interference is described. The method is used for the determination of sulfide in environment samples with satisfactory results.

  19. Biogeographic Congruency among Bacterial Communities from Terrestrial Sulfidic Springs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brendan eHeadd

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Terrestrial sulfidic springs support diverse microbial communities by serving as stable conduits for geochemically diverse and nutrient-rich subsurface waters. Microorganisms that colonize terrestrial springs likely originate from groundwater, but may also be sourced from the surface. As such, the biogeographic distribution of microbial communities inhabiting sulfidic springs should be controlled by a combination of spring geochemistry and surface and subsurface transport mechanisms, and not necessarily geographic proximity to other springs. We examined the bacterial diversity of seven springs to test the hypothesis that occurrence of taxonomically similar microbes, important to the sulfur cycle, at each spring is controlled by geochemistry. Complementary Sanger sequencing and 454 pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes retrieved five proteobacterial classes, and Bacteroidetes, Chlorobi, Chloroflexi, and Firmicutes phyla from all springs, which suggested the potential for a core sulfidic spring microbiome. Among the putative sulfide-oxidizing groups (Epsilonproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria, up to 83% of the sequences from geochemically similar springs clustered together. Abundant populations of Hydrogenimonas-like or Sulfurovum-like spp. (Epsilonproteobacteria occurred with abundant Thiothrix and Thiofaba spp. (Gammaproteobacteria, but Arcobacter-like and Sulfurimonas spp. (Epsilonproteobacteria occurred with less abundant gammaproteobacterial populations. These distribution patterns confirmed that geochemistry rather than biogeography regulates bacterial dominance at each spring. Potential biogeographic controls were related to paleogeologic sedimentation patterns that could control long-term microbial transport mechanisms that link surface and subsurface environments. Knowing the composition of a core sulfidic spring microbial community could provide a way to monitor diversity changes if a system is threatened by anthropogenic processes or

  20. Simulation of sulfide buildup in wastewater and atmosphere of sewer networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, A H; Yongsiri, C; Hvitved-Jacobsen, T; Vollertsen, J

    2005-01-01

    A model concept for prediction of sulfide buildup in sewer networks is presented. The model concept is an extension to--and a further development of--the WATS model (Wastewater Aerobic-anaerobic Transformations in Sewers), which has been developed by Hvitved-Jacobsen and co-workers at Aalborg University. In addition to the sulfur cycle, the WATS model simulates changes in dissolved oxygen and carbon fractions of different biodegradability. The sulfur cycle was introduced via six processes: 1. sulfide production taking place in the biofilm covering the permanently wetted sewer walls; 2. biological sulfide oxidation in the permanently wetted biofilm; 3. chemical and biological sulfide oxidation in the water phase; 4. sulfide precipitation with metals present in the wastewater; 5. emission of hydrogen sulfide to the sewer atmosphere and 6. adsorption and oxidation of hydrogen sulfide on the moist sewer walls where concrete corrosion may take place.

  1. Hydrogen sulfide and resolution of acute inflammation: A comparative study utilizing a novel fluorescent probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufton, Neil; Natividad, Jane; Verdu, Elena F; Wallace, John L

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is an essential gasotransmitter associated with numerous pathologies. We assert that hydrogen sulfide plays an important role in regulating macrophage function in response to subsequent inflammatory stimuli, promoting clearance of leukocyte infiltrate and reducing TNF-α levels in vivo following zymosan-challenge. We describe two distinct methods of measuring leukocyte hydrogen sulfide synthesis; methylene blue formation following zinc acetate capture and a novel fluorescent sulfidefluor probe. Comparison of these methods, using pharmacological tools, revealed they were complimentary in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrate the application of sulfidefluor probe to spectrofluorimetry, flow cytometry and whole animal imaging, to monitor the regulation of hydrogen sulfide synthesis in vivo during dynamic inflammatory processes. Both methodologies revealed that granulocyte infiltration negatively affects hydrogen sulfide synthesis. Our report offers an insight into the profile of hydrogen sulfide synthesis during inflammation and highlight opportunities raised by the development of novel fluorescent hydrogen sulfide probes.

  2. Blood Components Prevent Sulfide Poisoning of Respiration of the Hydrothermal Vent Tube Worm Riftia pachyptila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Mar A.; Somero, George N.

    1983-01-01

    Respiration of plume tissue of the hydrothermal vent tube worm Riftia pachyptila is insensitive to sulfide poisoning in contrast to tissues of animals that do not inhabit vents. Permeability barriers may not be responsible for this insensitivity since plume homogenates are also resistant to sulfide poisoning. Cytochrome c oxidase of plume, however, is strongly inhibited by sulfide at concentrations less than 10 μ M. Factors present in blood, but not in cytosol, prevent sulfide from inhibiting cytochrome c oxidase. Avoidance of sulfide poisoning of respiration in Riftia pachyptila thus appears to involve a blood-borne factor having a higher sulfide affinity than that of cytochrome c oxidase, with the result that appreciable amounts of free sulfide are prevented from accumulating in the blood and entering the intracellular compartment.

  3. Galvanic coupling and its effect on origin potential flotation system of sulfide minerals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾帼华; 戴晶平; 王晖; 邱冠周

    2004-01-01

    The galvanic coupling formed in origin potential flotation systems of sulfide minerals can be divided into three types: sulfide mineral-sulfide mineral-water system; sulfide mineral-steel ball-water system; and sulfide mineral-sulfide mineral-collector system. In this paper, taking lead, zinc, iron sulfide mineral systems for examples,several models of galvanic coupling were proposed and the effects of galvanic coupling on flotation were discussed. A galvanic contact between galena (or sphalerite) and pyrite contributes to decreasing the content of zinc in lead concentrate, and enhances remarkably the absorption of collector on the galena surface. During grinding, due to galvanic interactions between minerals and steel medium, Fe(OH)3 formed covers on the cathodic mineral surface, affecting its floatability.

  4. Electrochemical Behavior of Sulfide at the Silver Rotating Disc Electrode. I. Polarization Behavior of Silver Sulfide Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-05-01

    from Reporf) C IS. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES Prepared for publication in The Journal of Electroanalytical Chemistry 19. KEY WORDS (Continue on reverse aide it...SULFIDE FILMS by KUNIO SHIMIZU, KOICH AOKI AND ROBERT A. OSFERYOUNG Accepted for Publication in The Journal of Electroanalytical Chemistry Department

  5. Pyrite formation and mineral transformation pathways upon sulfidation of ferric hydroxides depend on mineral type and sulfide concentration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peiffer, Stefan; Behrends, Thilo; Hellige, Katrin; Larese-Casanova, Philip; Wan, Moli; Pollok, Kilian

    2015-01-01

    The reaction of ferric (hydr)oxides with dissolved sulfide does not lead to the instantaneous production of thermodynamically stable products but can induce a variety of mineral transformations including the formation of metastable intermediates. The importance of the various transformation pathways

  6. Properties of iron sulfide, hydrosulfide, and mixed sulfide/hydrosulfide cluster anions through photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Shi; Bernstein, Elliot R.

    2016-10-01

    A new magnetic-bottle time-of-flight photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) apparatus is constructed in our laboratory. The PES spectra of iron sulfide, hydrosulfide, and mixed sulfide/hydrosulfide [FeSm(SH)n-; m, n = 0-3, 0 theory. The most probable structures and ground state spin multiplicity for these cluster anions are tentatively assigned by comparing their theoretical first vertical detachment energies (VDEs) with their respective experiment values. The behavior of S and (SH) as ligands in these iron sulfide, hydrosulfide, and mixed sulfide/hydrosulfide cluster anions is investigated and compared. The experimental first VDEs for Fe(SH)1-3- cluster anions are lower than those found for their respective FeS1-3- cluster anions. The experimental first VDEs for FeS1-3- clusters are observed to increase for the first two S atoms bound to Fe-; however, due to the formation of an S-S bond for the FeS3- cluster, its first VDE is found to be ˜0.41 eV lower than the first VDE for the FeS2- cluster. The first VDEs of Fe(SH)1-3- cluster anions are observed to increase with the increasing numbers of SH groups. The calculated partial charges of the Fe atom for ground state FeS1-3- and Fe(SH)1-3- clusters are apparently related to and correlated with their determined first VDEs. The higher first VDE is correlated with a higher, more positive partial charge for the Fe atom of these cluster anions. Iron sulfide/hydrosulfide mixed cluster anions are also explored in this work: the first VDE for FeS(SH)- is lower than that for FeS2-, but higher than that for Fe(SH)2-; the first VDEs for FeS2(SH)- and FeS(SH)2- are close to that for FeS3-, but higher than that for Fe(SH)3-. The first VDEs of general iron sulfide, hydrosulfide, and mixed sulfide/hydrosulfide clusters [FeSm(SH)n-; m, n = 0-3, 0 < (m + n) ≤ 3] are dependent on three properties of these anions: 1. the partial charge on the Fe atom, 2. disulfide bond formation (S-S) in the cluster, and 3. the number of hydrosulfide

  7. Extreme enrichment of Se, Te, PGE and Au in Cu sulfide microdroplets: evidence from LA-ICP-MS analysis of sulfides in the Skaergaard Intrusion, east Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holwell, David A.; Keays, Reid R.; McDonald, Iain; Williams, Megan R.

    2015-12-01

    The Platinova Reef, in the Skaergaard Intrusion, east Greenland, is an example of a magmatic Cu-PGE-Au sulfide deposit formed in the latter stages of magmatic differentiation. As is characteristic with such deposits, it contains a low volume of sulfide, displays peak metal offsets and is Cu rich but Ni poor. However, even for such deposits, the Platinova Reef contains extremely low volumes of sulfide and the highest Pd and Au tenor sulfides of any magmatic ore deposit. Here, we present the first LA-ICP-MS analyses of sulfide microdroplets from the Platinova Reef, which show that they have the highest Se concentrations (up to 1200 ppm) and lowest S/Se ratios (190-700) of any known magmatic sulfide deposit and have significant Te enrichment. In addition, where sulfide volume increases, there is a change from high Pd-tenor microdroplets trapped in situ to larger, low tenor sulfides. The transition between these two sulfide regimes is marked by sharp peaks in Au, and then Te concentration, followed by a wider peak in Se, which gradually decreases with height. Mineralogical evidence implies that there is no significant post-magmatic hydrothermal S loss and that the metal profiles are essentially a function of magmatic processes. We propose that to generate these extreme precious and semimetal contents, the sulfides must have formed from an anomalously metal-rich package of magma, possibly formed via the dissolution of a previously PGE-enriched sulfide. Other processes such as kinetic diffusion may have also occurred alongside this to produce the ultra-high tenors. The characteristic metal offset pattern observed is largely controlled by partitioning effects, producing offset peaks in the order Pt+Pd>Au>Te>Se>Cu that are entirely consistent with published D values. This study confirms that extreme enrichment in sulfide droplets can occur in closed-system layered intrusions in situ, but this will characteristically form ore deposits that are so low in sulfide that they do

  8. Trace elements in sulfide inclusions from Yakutian diamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulanova, G. P.; Griffin, W. L.; Ryan, C. G.; Shestakova, O. Y.; Barnes, S.-J.

    1996-07-01

    Sulfide inclusions in diamonds may provide the only pristine samples of mantle sulfides, and they carry important information on the distribution and abundances of chalcophile elements in the deep lithosphere. Trace-element abundances were measured by proton microprobe in >50 sulfide inclusions (SDI) from Yakutian diamonds; about half of these were measured in situ in polished plates of diamonds, providing information on the spatial distribution of compositional variations. Many of the diamonds were identified as peridotitic or eclogitic from the nature of coexisting silicate or oxide inclusions. Known peridotitic diamonds contain SDIs with Ni contents of 22 36%, consistent with equilibration between olivine, monosulfide solid solution (MSS) and sulfide melt, whereas SDIs in eclogitic diamonds contain 0 12% Ni. A group of diamonds without silicate or oxide inclusions has SDIs with 11 18% Ni, and may be derived from pyroxenitic parageneses. Eclogitic SDIs have lower Ni, Cu and Te than peridotitic SDIs; the ranges of the two parageneses overlap for Se, As and Mo. The Mo and Se contents range up to 700 and 300 ppm, respectively; the highest levels are found in peridotitic diamonds. Among the in-situ SDIs, significant Zn and Pb levels are found in those connected by cracks to diamond surfaces, and these elements reflect interaction with kimberlitic melt. Significant levels of Ru (30 1300 ppm) and Rh (10 170 ppm) are found in many peridotitic SDIs; SDIs in one diamond with wustite and olivine inclusions and complex internal structures have high levels of other platinum-group elements (PGEs) as well, and high chondrite-normalized Ir/Pd. Comparison with experimental data on element partitioning between crystals of monosulfide solid solution (MSS) and sulfide melts suggests that most of the inclusions in both parageneses were trapped as MSS, while some high-Cu SDIs with high Pd±Rh may represent fractionated sulfide melts. Spatial variations of SDI composition within

  9. Hydrogen sulfide inhalation ameliorates allergen induced airway hypereactivity by modulating mast cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roviezzo, Fiorentina; Bertolino, Antonio; Sorrentino, Rosalinda; Terlizzi, Michela; Matteis, Maria; Calderone, Vincenzo; Mattera, Valentina; Martelli, Alma; Spaziano, Giuseppe; Pinto, Aldo; D'Agostino, Bruno; Cirino, Giuseppe

    2015-10-01

    Compelling evidence suggests that hydrogen sulfide represents an important gaseous transmitter in the mammalian respiratory system. In the present study, we have evaluated the role of mast cells in hydrogen sulfide-induced effects on airways in a mouse model of asthma. Mice were sensitized to ovalbumin and received aerosol of a hydrogen sulfide donor (NaHS; 100 ppm) starting at day 7 after ovalbumin challenge. Exposure to hydrogen sulfide abrogated ovalbumin-induced bronchial hypereactivity as well as the increase in lung resistance. Concomitantly, hydrogen sulfide prevented mast cell activity as well as FGF-2 and IL-13 upregulation. Conversely, pulmonary inflammation and the increase in plasmatic IgE levels were not affected by hydrogen sulfide. A lack of hydrogen sulfide effects in mast cell deficient mice occurred. Primary fibroblasts harvested from ovalbumin-sensitized mice showed an increased proliferation rate that was inhibited by hydrogen sulfide aerosol. Furthermore, ovalbumin-induced transdifferentiation of pulmonary fibroblasts into myofibroblasts was reversed. Finally, hydrogen sulfide did abrogate in vitro the degranulation of the mast cell-like RBL-2H3 cell line. Similarly to the in vivo experiments the inhibitory effect was present only when the cells were activated by antigen exposure. In conclusion, inhaled hydrogen sulfide improves lung function and inhibits bronchial hyper-reactivity by modulating mast cells and in turn fibroblast activation.

  10. Influence of pipe material and surfaces on sulfide related odor and corrosion in sewers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Asbjørn Haaning; Vollertsen, Jes; Jensen, Henriette Stokbro; Wium-Andersen, Tove; Hvitved-Jacobsen, Thorkild

    2008-09-01

    Hydrogen sulfide oxidation on sewer pipe surfaces was investigated in a pilot scale experimental setup. The experiments were aimed at replicating conditions in a gravity sewer located immediately downstream of a force main where sulfide related concrete corrosion and odor is often observed. During the experiments, hydrogen sulfide gas was injected intermittently into the headspace of partially filled concrete and plastic (PVC and HDPE) sewer pipes in concentrations of approximately 1,000 ppm(v). Between each injection, the hydrogen sulfide concentration was monitored while it decreased because of adsorption and subsequent oxidation on the pipe surfaces. The experiments showed that the rate of hydrogen sulfide oxidation was approximately two orders of magnitude faster on the concrete pipe surfaces than on the plastic pipe surfaces. Removal of the layer of reaction (corrosion) products from the concrete pipes was found to reduce the rate of hydrogen sulfide oxidation significantly. However, the rate of sulfide oxidation was restored to its background level within 10-20 days. A similar treatment had no observable effect on hydrogen sulfide removal in the plastic pipe reactors. The experimental results were used to model hydrogen sulfide oxidation under field conditions. This showed that the gas-phase hydrogen sulfide concentration in concrete sewers would typically amount to a few percent of the equilibrium concentration calculated from Henry's law. In the plastic pipe sewers, significantly higher concentrations were predicted because of the slower adsorption and oxidation kinetics on such surfaces.

  11. Influence of sulfide concentration on the corrosion behavior of titanium in a simulated oral environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Rino; Takemoto, Shinji; Kinoshita, Hideaki; Yoshinari, Masao; Kawada, Eiji

    2016-05-01

    This study assessed the corrosion behavior of titanium in response to sulfide by determining the effects of sulfide concentration and pH over immersion period. Corrosion was evaluated through changes in color, glossiness, surface characterization, and titanium release. Sulfide solutions were prepared in 3 different concentrations with Na2S, each in pH unadjusted (sulfide-alkaline) and pH adjusted to 7.5 (sulfide-neutral). Titanium discoloration increased and glossiness decreased as sulfide concentration and immersion period increased in sulfide-alkaline solutions. Coral-like complexes were observed on the surface of these specimens, which became more pronounced as concentration increased. Small amounts of titanium release were detected in sulfide-alkaline solutions; however, this was not affected by immersion periods. Corrosion was indicated through considerable surface oxidation suggesting the formation of a thick oxide layer. No significant changes in color and glossiness, or titanium release were indicated for titanium specimens immersed in sulfide-neutral solutions indicating that pH had a significant effect on corrosion. Our findings suggest that a thick oxide layer on the titanium surface was formed in sulfide-alkaline solutions due to excessive oxidation.

  12. The removal of hydrogen sulfide from gas streams using an aqueous metal sulfate absorbent : Part II. the regeneration of copper sulfide to copper oxide - An experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ter Maat, H.; Hogendoorn, J. A.; Versteeg, G. F.

    2005-01-01

    Aim of this study was to investigate the possibilities for a selective and efficient method to convert copper(II) sulfide (CuS) into copper(II) oxide (CuO). The oxidation of copper sulfide has been studied experimentally using a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) at temperatures ranging from 450 to 75

  13. The removal of hydrogen sulfide from gas streams using an aqueous metal sulfate absorbent: Part II. The regeneration of copper sulfide to copper oxide—an experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maat, ter H.; Hogendoorn, J.A.; Versteeg, G.F.

    2005-01-01

    Aim of this study was to investigate the possibilities for a selective and efficient method to convert copper(II) sulfide (CuS) into copper(II) oxide (CuO). The oxidation of copper sulfide has been studied experimentally using a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) at temperatures ranging from 450 to 75

  14. Crustal contamination and sulfide immiscibility history of the Permian Huangshannan magmatic Ni-Cu sulfide deposit, East Tianshan, NW China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Ya-Jing; Qin, Ke-Zhang; Tang, Dong-Mei; Feng, Hong-Ye; Xue, Sheng-Chao

    2016-11-01

    The Huangshannan mafic-ultramafic intrusion is a Permian Ni-Cu sulfide-bearing intrusion in the southern margin of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt. The intrusion consists of an ultramafic unit, which is composed of lherzolite and olivine websterite, and a mafic unit, which is composed of olivine gabbronorite, gabbronorite and leuco-gabbronorite. This intrusion was formed by two separate pulses of magma: a more primitive magma for the early ultramafic unit and a more evolved magma for the late mafic unit. U-Pb isotope geochronology of zircon from the mafic unit yields an age of 278 ± 2 Ma. According to its olivine and Cr-rich spinel compositions, the estimated parental magma of lherzolite for the Huangshannan intrusion has 12.4 wt.% MgO, indicating picritic affinity. Fractional crystallization modeling results and the presence of rounded sulfide inclusions in an olivine crystal (Fo 86.7) indicate that sulfide immiscibility was achieved at the beginning of olivine fractionation. Co-magmatic zircon crystals from gabbronorite have a δ18O value close to 6.5‰, which is 1.2‰ higher than the typical mantle value and suggests significant crustal contamination (∼20%). The positive εHf(t) values of co-magmatic zircon (which vary from +9.2 to +15.3) and positive whole rock εNd(t) values (which vary from +4.7 to +7.8) also indicate that the parental magma was derived from a depleted mantle source and contaminated by 5-20% juvenile arc crust and then by ∼5% upper crustal materials. However, modeling results of sulfur content at sulfide saturation reveal that such a large amount of crustal contamination is not sufficient to trigger sulfide saturation in the parental magma, which strongly suggests that external sulfur addition, probably during contamination, has played a critical role in causing sulfide immiscibility. Furthermore, the arc magmatism geochemical signatures of the Huangshannan intrusion, such as significant Nb and Ta depletion relative to La and low Ca

  15. L-Cysteine-assisted Synthesis of Copper Gallium Sulfide Microspheres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Xiao-juan; ZHONG Jia-song; CAI Qian; HUANG Hai-yu; LIU Hai-tao; XIANG Wei-dong; SUN Jun-cai

    2012-01-01

    An effective L-cysteine-assisted synthetic route has been successfully developed to prepare copper gallium sulfide(CuGaS2) microspheres under solvothermal conditions with CuCI2-2H2O,GaCl3 and L-cysteine as source materials,in which L-cysteine was used as the sulfide source and eomplexing molecule.The experiments revealed that the synthesized sample was of a typical CuGaS2 tetragonal structure.Moreover,the prepared CuGaS2 crystals consisting of microspheres made up of nanoflakes,and the diameter of the nanoflakes was about 20 nm.Raman spectrum of the obtained CuGaS2 exhibits a high-intensity peak of the A1 mode at 306 cm-1.Meanwhile,a possible growth mechanism was proposed based on the investigations.

  16. Oxygen-free atomic layer deposition of indium sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinson, Alex B.; Hock, Adam S.; McCarthy, Robert; Weimer, Matthew S.

    2016-07-05

    A method for synthesizing an In(III) N,N'-diisopropylacetamidinate precursor including cooling a mixture comprised of diisopropylcarbodiimide and diethyl ether to approximately -30.degree. C., adding methyllithium drop-wise into the mixture, allowing the mixture to warm to room temperature, adding indium(III) chloride as a solid to the mixture to produce a white solid, dissolving the white solid in pentane to form a clear and colorless solution, filtering the mixture over a celite plug, and evaporating the solution under reduced pressure to obtain a solid In(III) N,N'-diisopropylacetamidinate precursor. This precursor has been further used to develop a novel atomic layer deposition technique for indium sulfide by dosing a reactor with the precursor, purging with nitrogen, dosing with dilute hydrogen sulfide, purging again with nitrogen, and repeating these steps to increase growth.

  17. LUMINESCENCE OF CADMIUM SULFIDE QUANTUM DOTS IN FLUOROPHOSPHATE GLASSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. O. Lipatova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cadmium sulfide quantum dots are perspective materials in optics, medicine, biology and optoelectronics. Fluorophosphate glasses, doped with cadmium sulfide quantum dots, were examined in the paper. Heat treatment led to the formation of quantum dots with diameters equal to 2.8 nm, 3.0 nm and 3.8 nm. In view of such changes in the quantum dots size the fundamental absorption edge shift and the luminescence band are being displaced to the long wavelengths. Luminescence lifetime has been found to be dependent on the registration wavelength in the range from 450 to 700 nm. Obtained fluorophosphate glasses with CdS quantum dots can find their application as fluorescent materials with intensive luminescence band and long excited-state natural lifetime.

  18. Water purification by sulfide-containing activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeste, F D; Haas, R; Kaminski, L

    2000-03-01

    We investigated a new kind of activated carbon named gaiasafe-Formstoff as an agent for powerful heavy metal reduction. This activated carbon contains highly dispersed sulfide compounds. Our investigations with lead containing wastewaters showed an outstanding metal sulfide precipitation power of the new agent. The lead reduction rates are independent of wastewater parameters like lead concentration and complexing agent concentration. Contacted as powder or as a fixed bed with wastewater gaiasafe-Formstoff showed the best cleaning capacity in comparison to all other agents tested. Investigations with gaiasafe-Formstoff about its ability to reduce the contents of further heavy metals in wastewater are under way. The gaiasafe-Formstoff reaction products with wastewater represent an energy-rich and raw material-rich resource when fed to metallurgical processes.

  19. Effect of hydrogen sulfide emissions on cement mortar specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Idriss, A. F. [Alberta Environment, Science and Technology Branch, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Negi, S. C.; Jofriet, J. C.; Haywoard, G. L. [Guelph Univ., Guelph, ON (Canada)

    2001-07-01

    Six different cement mortar specimens used in animal buildings, where they were exposed to hydrogen sulfide generated from anaerobic fermentation of manure during a period of one year, were investigated. Primary interest was on comparing the corrosion resistance of different cement mortar specimens under long term exposure to hydrogen sulfide. The impressed voltage technique was used to test the specimens in the laboratory. Results revealed that test specimens made with eight per cent silica fume cement replacement performed best and similar Portland cement mortar specimens with a water-cement ratio of 0.55 (PC55) the poorest. All other treatments, (Portland cement with a water to cement ratio of 045, Portland cement Type 50, Portland cement with fibre mesh and Portland cement Type 10 coated with linseed oil) all with water-cement ratios of 0.45, were less effective in preventing corrosion than silica fume replacement.

  20. Fractal characteristics of nanocrystalline indium and gallium sulfide particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sastry, P.U., E-mail: psastry@barc.gov.i [Solid State Physics Division, Mumbai 400085 (India); Dutta, Dimple P. [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2009-11-13

    The structure of nano-sized powders of indium sulfide (In{sub 2}S{sub 3}) and gallium sulfide (Ga{sub 2}S{sub 3}), prepared by single source precursor route has been investigated by small angle X-ray scattering technique. The particle morphology shows interesting fractal nature. For In{sub 2}S{sub 3}, the nanoparticle aggregates show a mass fractal with fractal dimension 2.0 that increases with longer time of thermal treatment. Below the length scale of about 20 nm, the particles have a rough surface with a surface fractal dimension of 2.8. Unlike In{sub 2}S{sub 3}, structure of Ga{sub 2}S{sub 3} exhibits a single surface fractal over whole q-range of study. The estimated particle sizes are in range of 5-15 nm and the results are supported by transmission electron microscope.

  1. Hydrogen sulfide determines HNO-induced stimulation of trigeminal afferents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Vanessa; Messlinger, Karl; Fischer, Michael J M

    2015-08-18

    Endogenous NO and hydrogen sulfide form HNO, which causes CGRP release via TRPA1 channel activation in sensory nerves. In the present study, stimulation of intact trigeminal afferent neuron preparations with NO donors, Na2S or both was analyzed by measuring CGRP release as an index of mass activation. Combined stimulation was able to activate all parts of the trigeminal system and acted synergistic compared to stimulation with both substances alone. To investigate the contribution of both substances, we varied their ratio and tracked intracellular calcium in isolated neurons. Our results demonstrate that hydrogen sulfide is the rate-limiting factor for HNO formation. CGRP has a key role in migraine pathophysiology and HNO formation at all sites of the trigeminal system should be considered for this novel means of activation.

  2. 'Low-acid' sulfide oxidation using nitrate-enriched groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donn, Michael; Boxall, Naomi; Reid, Nathan; Meakin, Rebecca; Gray, David; Kaksonen, Anna; Robson, Thomas; Shiers, Denis

    2016-04-01

    Acid drainage (AMD/ARD) is undoubtedly one of the largest environmental, legislative and economic challenges facing the mining industry. In Australia alone, at least 60m is spent on AMD related issues annually, and the global cost is estimated to be in the order of tens of billions US. Furthermore, the challenge of safely and economically storing or treating sulfidic wastes will likely intensify because of the trend towards larger mines that process increasingly higher volumes of lower grade ores and the associated sulfidic wastes and lower profit margins. While the challenge of managing potentially acid forming (PAF) wastes will likely intensify, the industrial approaches to preventing acid production or ameliorating the effects has stagnated for decades. Conventionally, PAF waste is segregated and encapsulated in non-PAF tips to limit access to atmospheric oxygen. Two key limitations of the 'cap and cover' approach are: 1) the hazard (PAF) is not actually removed; only the pollutant linkage is severed; and, 2) these engineered structures are susceptible to physical failure in short-to-medium term, potentially re-establishing that pollutant linkage. In an effort to address these concerns, CSIRO is investigating a passive, 'low-acid' oxidation mechanism for sulfide treatment, which can potentially produce one quarter as much acidity compared with pyrite oxidation under atmospheric oxygen. This 'low-acid' mechanism relies on nitrate, rather than oxygen, as the primary electron accepter and the activity of specifically cultured chemolithoautotrophic bacteria and archaea communities. This research was prompted by the observation that, in deeply weathered terrains of Australia, shallow (oxic to sub-oxic) groundwater contacting weathering sulfides are commonly inconsistent with the geochemical conditions produced by ARD. One key characteristic of these aquifers is the natural abundance of nitrate on a regional scale, which becomes depleted around the sulfide bodies, and

  3. Synthesis and characterization of cerium sulfide thin film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ιshak Afsin Kariper

    2014-01-01

    Cerium sulfide (CexSy) polycrystalline thin film is coated with chemical bath deposition on substrates (commercial glass). Transmittance, absorption, optical band gap and refractive index are examined by using UV/VIS. Spectrum. The hexagonal form is observed in the structural properties in XRD. The structural and optical properties of cerium sulfide thin films are analyzed at different pH. SEM and EDX analyses are made for surface analysis and elemental ratio in films. It is observed that some properties of films changed with different pH values. In this study, the focus is on the observed changes in the properties of films. The pH values were scanned at 6–10. The optical band gap changed with pH between 3.40 to 3.60 eV. In addition, the film thickness changed with pH at 411 nm to 880 nm.

  4. Fabrication and applications of copper sulfide (CuS) nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamraiz, Umair; Hussain, Raja Azadar; Badshah, Amin

    2016-06-01

    This review article presents different fabrication procedures (under the headlines of solvothermal routes, aerosol methods, solution methods and thermolysis), and applications (photocatalytic degradation, ablation of cancer cells, electrode material in lithium ion batteries and in gas sensing, organic solar cells, field emission properties, super capacitor applications, photoelectrochemical performance of QDSCs, photocatalytic reduction of organic pollutants, electrochemical bio sensing, enhanced PEC characteristics of pre-annealed CuS film electrodes) of copper sulfide (Covellite).

  5. Aromatic and heterocyclic perfluoroalkyl sulfides. Methods of preparation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir N. Boiko

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available This review covers all of the common methods for the syntheses of aromatic and heterocyclic perfluoroalkyl sulfides, a class of compounds which is finding increasing application as starting materials for the preparation of agrochemicals, pharmaceutical products and, more generally, fine chemicals. A systematic approach is taken depending on the mode of incorporation of the SRF groups and also on the type of reagents used.

  6. Laboratory SIP signatures associated with oxidation of disseminated metal sulfides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Placencia-Gómez, Edmundo; Slater, Lee; Ntarlagiannis, Dimitrios; Binley, Andrew

    2013-05-01

    Oxidation of metal sulfide minerals is responsible for the generation of acidic waters rich in sulfate and metals. When associated with the oxidation of sulfide ore mine waste deposits the resulting pore water is called acid mine drainage (AMD); AMD is a known environmental problem that affects surface and ground waters. Characterization of oxidation processes in-situ is challenging, particularly at the field scale. Geophysical techniques, spectral induced polarization (SIP) in particular, may provide a means of such investigation. We performed laboratory experiments to assess the sensitivity of the SIP method to the oxidation mechanisms of common sulfide minerals found in mine waste deposits, i.e., pyrite and pyrrhotite, when the primary oxidant agent is dissolved oxygen. We found that SIP parameters, e.g., phase shift, the imaginary component of electrical conductivity and total chargeability, decrease as the time of exposure to oxidation and oxidation degree increase. This observation suggests that dissolution-depletion of the mineral surface reduces the capacitive properties and polarizability of the sulfide minerals. However, small increases in the phase shift and imaginary conductivity do occur during oxidation. These transient increases appear to correlate with increases of soluble oxidizing products, e.g., Fe2 + and Fe3 + in solution; precipitation of secondary minerals and the formation of a passivating layer to oxidation coating the mineral surface may also contribute to these increases. In contrast, the real component of electrical conductivity associated with electrolytic, electronic and interfacial conductance is sensitive to changes in the pore fluid chemistry as a result of the soluble oxidation products released (Fe2 + and Fe3 +), particularly for the case of pyrrhotite minerals.

  7. Reconstruction of the electron spectrum in a metal hydrogen sulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryashov, N. A.; Kutukov, A. A.; Mazur, E. A.

    2017-01-01

    Generalized Eliashberg theory of the normal properties of a metal electron-phonon system with a non constant electron density of states has been used to study the effect of the conduction band reconstruction. The electron density of states of the metallic phase of the hydrogen sulfide renormalized by the strong electron-phonon coupling at a pressure of P = 225 GPa has been calculated. It has been found that the reconstructed conduction band contains a series of narrow energy pockets.

  8. Hydrogen sulfide metabolism regulates endothelial solute barrier function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Yuan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide (H2S is an important gaseous signaling molecule in the cardiovascular system. In addition to free H2S, H2S can be oxidized to polysulfide which can be biologically active. Since the impact of H2S on endothelial solute barrier function is not known, we sought to determine whether H2S and its various metabolites affect endothelial permeability. In vitro permeability was evaluated using albumin flux and transendothelial electrical resistance. Different H2S donors were used to examine the effects of exogenous H2S. To evaluate the role of endogenous H2S, mouse aortic endothelial cells (MAECs were isolated from wild type mice and mice lacking cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE, a predominant source of H2S in endothelial cells. In vivo permeability was evaluated using the Miles assay. We observed that polysulfide donors induced rapid albumin flux across endothelium. Comparatively, free sulfide donors increased permeability only with higher concentrations and at later time points. Increased solute permeability was associated with disruption of endothelial junction proteins claudin 5 and VE-cadherin, along with enhanced actin stress fiber formation. Importantly, sulfide donors that increase permeability elicited a preferential increase in polysulfide levels within endothelium. Similarly, CSE deficient MAECs showed enhanced solute barrier function along with reduced endogenous bound sulfane sulfur. CSE siRNA knockdown also enhanced endothelial junction structures with increased claudin 5 protein expression. In vivo, CSE genetic deficiency significantly blunted VEGF induced hyperpermeability revealing an important role of the enzyme for barrier function. In summary, endothelial solute permeability is critically regulated via exogenous and endogenous sulfide bioavailability with a prominent role of polysulfides.

  9. Delivering carbide ligands to sulfide-rich clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinholdt, Anders; Herbst, Konrad; Bendix, Jesper

    2016-02-01

    The propensity of the terminal ruthenium carbide Ru(C)Cl2(PCy3)2 (RuC) to form carbide bridges to electron-rich transition metals enables synthetic routes to metal clusters with coexisting carbide and sulfide ligands. Electrochemical experiments show the Ru≡C ligand to exert a relatively large electron-withdrawing effect compared with PPh3, effectively shifting redox potentials.

  10. Mechanism of heterogeneous reaction of carbonyl sulfide on magnesium oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongchun; He, Hong; Xu, Wenqing; Yu, Yunbo

    2007-05-24

    Heterogeneous reaction of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) on magnesium oxide (MgO) under ambient conditions was investigated by in situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS), quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS), and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. It reveals that OCS can be catalytically hydrolyzed by surface hydroxyl on MgO to produce carbon dioxide (CO2) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S), and then H2S can be further catalytically oxidized by surface oxygen or gaseous oxygen on MgO to form sulfite (SO3(2-)) and sulfate (SO4(2-)). Hydrogen thiocarbonate (HSCO2-) was found to be the crucial intermediate. Surface hydrogen sulfide (HS), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and surface sulfite (SO3(2-)) were also found to be intermediates for the formation of sulfate. Furthermore, the surface hydroxyl contributes not only to the formation of HSCO2- but also to HSCO2- decomposition. On the basis of experimental results, the heterogeneous reaction mechanism of OCS on MgO was discussed.

  11. Benzothiazole sulfide compatibilized polypropylene/halloysite nanotubes composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Mingxian [Department of Polymer Materials and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Guo Baochun, E-mail: psbcguo@scut.edu.cn [Department of Polymer Materials and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Lei Yanda; Du Mingliang; Jia Demin [Department of Polymer Materials and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2009-02-15

    Clay-philic benzothiazole sulfide, capable of donating electrons, is grafted onto polypropylene (PP) backbones when N-cyclohexyl-2-benzothiazole sulfonamide (CBS), a commonly used accelerator in the tire industry, is included in the processing of PP/halloysite nanotubes (HNTs) composites. CBS decomposes at elevated temperature and yields benzothiazole sulfide radicals, which react with the PP polymeric free radicals generated during the processing of the composites. On the other hand, the benzothiazole group of CBS is reactive to HNTs via electron transferring. The compatibilization between HNTs and PP is thus realized via interfacial grafting and electron transferring mechanism. The interfacial interactions in the compatibilized systems were fully characterized. Compared with the control sample, the dispersion of HNTs and the interfacial bonding are enhanced substantially in the compatibilized composites. The significantly improved mechanical properties and thermal properties of benzothiazole sulfide compatibilized PP/HNTs composites are correlated to the enhanced interfacial property. The present work demonstrates a novel interfacial design via interfacial grafting/electron transferring for the compatibilization of PP/clay composites.

  12. Chemical Precipitation Synthesis and Thermoelectric Properties of Copper Sulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sixin; Jiang, Jing; Liang, Yinglin; Yang, Ping; Niu, Yi; Chen, Yide; Xia, Junfeng; Wang, Chao

    2017-04-01

    Earth-abundant copper sulfide compounds have been intensively studied as potential thermoelectric materials due to their high dimensionless figure of merit ZT values. They have a unique phonon-liquid electron-crystal model that helps to achieve high thermoelectric performance. Many methods, such as melting and ball-milling, have been adopted to synthesize this copper sulfide compound, but they both use expensive starting materials with high purity. Here, we develop a simple chemical precipitation approach to synthesize copper sulfide materials through low-cost analytically pure compounds as the starting materials. A high ZT value of 0.93 at 800 K was obtained from the samples annealed at 1273 K. Its power factor is around 8.0 μW cm-1 K-2 that is comparable to the highest record reported by traditional methods. But, the synthesis here has been greatly simplified with reduced cost, which will be of great benefit to the potential mass production of thermoelectric devices. Furthermore, this method can be applied to the synthesis of other sulfur compound thermoelectric materials.

  13. Impact electrochemistry: colloidal metal sulfide detection by cathodic particle coulometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Chee Shan; Pumera, Martin

    2015-10-28

    The determination of the size and concentration of colloidal nano and microparticles is of paramount importance to modern nanoscience. Application of the particle collision technique on metal and metal oxide nanoparticles has been intensively explored over the past decade owing to its ability to determine the particle size and concentration via reactions including the inherent oxidation or the reduction of nanoparticles as well as surface reactions catalysed by the nanoparticles. Transition metal dichalcogenide particles were previously quantified using the anodic (oxidative) particle coulometry method. Here we show that cathodic (reductive) particle coulometry can be favorably used for the detection of metal sulfide colloidal particles. The detection of sulfides of cobalt and lead was performed using the particle collision technique in this work. The presence of spikes confirmed the viability of detecting new and larger particles from compounds using reductive (cathodic) potentials. Such an expansion of the impact particle coulometry method will be useful and applicable to the determination of concentration and size of colloidal metal sulfide nanoparticles in general.

  14. Structural studies of copper sulfide films: effect of ambient atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manisha Kundu et al

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined the structural properties of copper sulfide films as a function of the sulfurization time of 70-nm-thick Cu films. Copper sulfide films with various phases such as mixed metallic Cu-chalcocite, chalcocite, roxbyite, and covellite phases were formed with increasing sulfurization time. To evaluate the structural stability of various films, all the films were exposed to the ambient atmosphere for the same amount of time. Although the phase structure and stoichiometry of the films were maintained at a greater depth, the near-surface region of the films was oxidized and covered with overlayers of oxide, hydroxide, and/or sulfate species due to the exposure and reaction with the ambient atmosphere. The oxygen uptake and its reactivity with the copper sulfide film surfaces were enhanced with increasing sulfur content of the films. In addition, the type of divalent state of copper formed on the film surfaces depended on the phase structure, composition, and stoichiometry of the films.

  15. Protective Effects of Hydrogen Sulfide in the Ageing Kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Cui-Lan; Wang, Ming-Jie; Sun, Chen; Huang, Yong; Jin, Sheng; Mu, Xue-Pan; Chen, Ying; Zhu, Yi-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Aims. The study aimed to examine whether hydrogen sulfide (H2S) generation changed in the kidney of the ageing mouse and its relationship with impaired kidney function. Results. H2S levels in the plasma, urine, and kidney decreased significantly in ageing mice. The expression of two known H2S-producing enzymes in kidney, cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE) and cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS), decreased significantly during ageing. Chronic H2S donor (NaHS, 50 μmol/kg/day, 10 weeks) treatment could alleviate oxidative stress levels and renal tubular interstitial collagen deposition. These protective effects may relate to transcription factor Nrf2 activation and antioxidant proteins such as HO-1, SIRT1, SOD1, and SOD2 expression upregulation in the ageing kidney after NaHS treatment. Furthermore, the expression of H2S-producing enzymes changed with exogenous H2S administration and contributed to elevated H2S levels in the ageing kidney. Conclusions. Endogenous hydrogen sulfide production in the ageing kidney is insufficient. Exogenous H2S can partially rescue ageing-related kidney dysfunction by reducing oxidative stress, decreasing collagen deposition, and enhancing Nrf2 nuclear translocation. Recovery of endogenous hydrogen sulfide production may also contribute to the beneficial effects of NaHS treatment.

  16. Sulfide Capacity in Ladle Slag at Steelmaking Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allertz, Carl; Sichen, Du

    2015-12-01

    Sulfide capacity measurements were conducted at 1823 K and 1873 K (1550 °C and 1600 °C) for the quaternary Al2O3-CaO-MgO-SiO2 system, for typical compositions used in the ladle in steelmaking. A copper-slag equilibrium was used under controlled oxygen and sulfur potentials. The sulfide capacity is strongly dependent on the composition and it was found to increase with the basic oxides, while it decreases with increase of the acidic components. It was found that CaO is more effective in holding sulfur in the slag compared to MgO when replacing SiO2. For the present slag compositions, Al2O3 and SiO2 behaved similar with respect to sulfur, and no considerable effect could be recorded when replacing one for the other. The sulfide capacity was also found to be strongly dependent on the temperature, increasing with temperature. The present results were compared with industrial data from the ladle, after vacuum treatment, and they were in good agreement.

  17. Selective Facet Reactivity During Cation Exchange in Cadmium Sulfide Nanorods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadtler, Bryce; Demchenko, Denis; Zheng, Haimei; Hughes, Steven; Merkle, Maxwell; Dahmen, Ulrich; Wang, Lin-Wang; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2008-12-18

    The partial transformation of ionic nanocrystals through cation exchange has been used to synthesize nanocrystal heterostructures. We demonstrate that the selectivity for cation exchange to take place at different facets of the nanocrystal plays an important role in determining the resulting morphology of the binary heterostructure. In the case of copper I (Cu+) cation exchange in cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanorods, the reaction starts preferentially at the ends of the nanorods such that copper sulfide (Cu2S) grows inwards from either end. The resulting morphology is very different from the striped pattern obtained in our previous studies of silver I (Ag+) exchange in CdS nanorods where non-selective nucleation of silver sulfide (Ag2S) occurs. From interface formation energies calculated for several models of epitaxialconnections between CdS and Cu2S or Ag2S, we infer the relative stability of each interface during the nucleation and growth of Cu2S or Ag2S within the CdS nanorods. The epitaxial connections of Cu2S to the end facets of CdS nanorods minimize the formation energy, making these interfaces stable throughout the exchange reaction. However, as the two end facets of wurtzite CdS nanorods are crystallographically nonequivalent, asymmetric heterostructures can be produced.

  18. Influence of sulfide concentration on the corrosion behavior of pure copper in synthetic seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Naoki; Kawasaki, Manabu

    2008-09-01

    Corrosion rate and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of pure copper under anaerobic conditions were studied by immersion tests and slow strain rate tests (SSRT) in synthetic seawater containing Na 2S. The corrosion rate was increased with sulfide concentration both in simple saline solution and in bentnite-sand mixture. The results of SSRT showed that copper was susceptible to intergranular attack; selective dissolution at lower sulfide concentration (less than 0.005 M) and SCC at higher sulfide concentration (0.01 M). It was expected that if the sulfide concentration in groundwater is less than 0.001 M, pure copper is possible to exhibit superior corrosion resistance under anaerobic condition evident by very low corrosion rates and immunity to SCC. In such a low sulfide environment, copper overpack has the potential to achieve super-long lifetimes exceeding several tens of thousands years according to long-term simulations of corrosion based on diffusion of sulfide in buffer material.

  19. Effect of Sulfide Concentration on Copper Corrosion in Anoxic Chloride-Containing Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Decheng; Dong, Chaofang; Xu, Aoni; Man, Cheng; He, Chang; Li, Xiaogang

    2017-02-01

    The structure and property of passive film on copper are strongly dependent on the sulfide concentration; based on this, a series of electrochemical methods were applied to investigate the effect of sulfide concentration on copper corrosion in anaerobic chloride-containing solutions. The cyclic voltammetry and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis demonstrated that the corrosion products formed on copper in anaerobic sulfide solutions comprise Cu2S and CuS. And the corrosion resistance of copper decreased with increasing sulfide concentration and faster sulfide addition, owing to the various structures of the passive films observed by the atomic force microscope and scanning electron microscope. A p-type semiconductor character was obtained under all experimental conditions, and the defect concentration, which had a magnitude of 1022-1023 cm-3, increased with increasing sulfide concentration, resulting in a higher rate of both film growth and dissolution.

  20. Iron sulfides in mudstones within the carbonaceous sequence of Donets Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kizilshtein, L.Y.; Nastavkin, A.V. [Rostov State University, Rostov Na Donu (Russian Federation)

    2003-02-01

    The genesis of local compact segregations of iron sulfide (pyrite) in mudstones at the roof of some coal seams in the Donets Basin (Donbas) is examined. Arguments presented in the work show that sulfides were formed as a result of bacterial sulfate reduction and hydrogen sulfide generation in zones of organic matter concentration. The lack of any signs of influx of alien components testifies to in situ sulfide accumulations at the syngenetic or early diagenetic stage in bottom sediments of the basin. The shape and structure of pyrite segregations suggest that they could be 'sulfide bioherms' occasionally subjected to mechanical deformation in a liquid mud under the influence of gravitational force or external mechanical (possibly seismic) loads. The obtained data can serve as an additional source of information pertaining to the formation conditions of sulfide ore deposits.

  1. When can Electrochemical Techniques give Reliable Corrosion Rates on Carbon Steel in Sulfide Media?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel; Hemmingsen, Tor; Nielsen, Lars Vendelbo

    2005-01-01

    Effects of film formation on carbon steel in hydrogen sulfide media may corrupt corrosion rate monitoring by electrochemical techniques. Electrochemical data from hydrogen sulfide solutions, biological sulfide media and natural sulfide containing geothermal water have been collected and the process...... corrosion rates, but this effect may not be detected if rates are already overestimated. It is concluded that electrochemical techniques can be used for corrosion rate monitoring in som hydrogen sulfide media, but care must be taken when choosing the scan rates, and it is important to realize when direct...... in combination with ferrous sulfide corrosion products cover the steel surface. Corrosion rates can be overestimated by a factor of 10 to 100 with electrochemical techniques - both by linear polarization resistance (LPR) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Oxygen entering the system accelerates...

  2. Modeling of hydrogen sulfide oxidation in concrete corrosion products from sewer pipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Henriette Stokbro; Nielsen, Asbjørn Haaning; Hvitved-Jacobsen, Thorkild; Vollertsen, Jes

    2009-04-01

    Abiotic and biotic oxidation of hydrogen sulfide related to concrete corrosion was studied in corrosion products originating from a sewer manhole. The concrete corrosion products were suspended in an acidic solution, mimicking the conditions in the pore water of corroded concrete. The removal of hydrogen sulfide and dissolved oxygen was measured in parallel in the suspension, upon which the suspension was sterilized and the measurement repeated. The results revealed the biotic oxidation to be fast compared with the abiotic oxidation. The stoichiometry of the hydrogen sulfide oxidation was evaluated using the ratio between oxygen and hydrogen sulfide uptake. The ratio for the biotic oxidation pointed in the direction of elemental sulfur being formed as an intermediate in the oxidation of hydrogen sulfide to sulfuric acid. The experimental results were applied to suggest a hypothesis and a mathematical model describing the hydrogen sulfide oxidation pathway in a matrix of corroded concrete.

  3. Aerobic and anaerobic transformations of sulfide in a sewer system--field study and model simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Asbjørn Haaning; Vollertsen, Jes; Jensen, Henriette Stokbro; Madsen, Heidi Ina; Hvitved-Jacobsen, Thorkild

    2008-01-01

    The formation and fate of sulfide in a force main and a downstream-located gravity sewer were investigated in an extensive field study. Sulfide formation in the force main was significant. However, during 14 minutes of transport in the gravity sewer, the sulfide concentration decreased 30%, on average. An application of a conceptual sewer process model for simulating the formation and fate of sulfide was demonstrated. Overall, the model predicted that approximately 90% of the decrease of the sulfide concentration in the gravity sewer was the result of sulfide oxidation and that only a small fraction entered the sewer atmosphere, causing odor and corrosion. Even so, the model predicted concrete corrosion rates of up to 1.2 mm/y in the gravity sewer section.

  4. Alkaline sulfide pretreatment of an antimonial refractory Au-Ag ore for improved cyanidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alp, Ibrahim; Celep, Oktay; Deveci, Haci

    2010-11-01

    This paper presents the alkaline sulfide pretreatment of an antimonial refractory gold and silver ore. In the ore, gold occurs mainly as gold-silver alloys and as associated with quartz and framboidal pyrite grains, and, to a small extent, as the inclusions within antimonial sulfides. Silver is present extensively as antimonial sulfides such as andorite. Alkaline sulfide pretreatment was shown to allow the decomposition of the antimonial sulfide minerals (up to 98% Sb removal) and to remarkably improve the amenability of gold (e.g., from silver (e.g., from leaching. An increase in reagent concentration (1-4 mol/L Na2S or NaOH) and temperature (20-80°C), and a decrease in particle size seem to produce an enhancing effect on metal extraction. These findings suggest that alkaline sulfide leaching can be suitably used as a chemical pretreatment method prior to the conventional cyanidation for antimonial refractory gold and silver ores.

  5. Biogenesis of reactive sulfur species for signaling by hydrogen sulfide oxidation pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishanina, Tatiana V; Libiad, Marouane; Banerjee, Ruma

    2015-07-01

    The chemical species involved in H2S signaling remain elusive despite the profound and pleiotropic physiological effects elicited by this molecule. The dominant candidate mechanism for sulfide signaling is persulfidation of target proteins. However, the relatively poor reactivity of H2S toward oxidized thiols, such as disulfides, the low concentration of disulfides in the reducing milieu of the cell and the low steady-state concentration of H2S raise questions about the plausibility of persulfide formation via reaction between an oxidized thiol and a sulfide anion or a reduced thiol and oxidized hydrogen disulfide. In contrast, sulfide oxidation pathways, considered to be primarily mechanisms for disposing of excess sulfide, generate a series of reactive sulfur species, including persulfides, polysulfides and thiosulfate, that could modify target proteins. We posit that sulfide oxidation pathways mediate sulfide signaling and that sulfurtransferases ensure target specificity.

  6. Three enzymatic activities catalyze the oxidation of sulfide to thiosulfate in mammalian and invertebrate mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, Tatjana M; Grieshaber, Manfred K

    2008-07-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is a potent toxin of aerobic respiration, but also has physiological functions as a signalling molecule and as a substrate for ATP production. A mitochondrial pathway catalyzing sulfide oxidation to thiosulfate in three consecutive reactions has been identified in rat liver as well as in the body-wall tissue of the lugworm, Arenicola marina. A membrane-bound sulfide : quinone oxidoreductase converts sulfide to persulfides and transfers the electrons to the ubiquinone pool. Subsequently, a putative sulfur dioxygenase in the mitochondrial matrix oxidizes one persulfide molecule to sulfite, consuming molecular oxygen. The final reaction is catalyzed by a sulfur transferase, which adds a second persulfide from the sulfide : quinone oxidoreductase to sulfite, resulting in the final product thiosulfate. This role in sulfide oxidation is an additional physiological function of the mitochondrial sulfur transferase, rhodanese.

  7. Solubility Measurements and Modeling of Zinc, Lead and Iron Sulfides at High Temperatures and High Pressures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carolina Figueroa Murcia, Diana; Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup; Thomsen, Kaj

    Solubility measurements of sulfides in aqueous solutions are necessary to understand the behaviour of these scaling minerals in geothermal and oil reservoirs. The low solubility levels of Zinc Sulfide (ZnS), Lead Sulfide (PbS) and Iron Sulfide (FeS) make the solubility measurements a challenging...... task. Consequently existing data are rare and scattered. The aim of this work is to develop a reliable experimental procedure and to measure solubility of sulfides at high temperature and pressures. Additionally the experimental data are used for estimation of the solid-liquid equilibrium using...... oxygen atmosphere to avoid the risk of oxidation of sulfide minerals. The solution is kept in an equilibrium cell at constant temperature and pressure with continuous stirring. The concentration of Zn2+, Pb2+, Fe2+ and S2- are measured using Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission spectrometry (ICP...

  8. Microbial control of the production of hydrogen sulfide by sulfate-reducing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, A D; McLnerney, M J; Sublette, K L

    1990-03-01

    A sulfide-resistant ctrain of Thiobacillus denitrificans, strain F, prevented the accumulation of sulfide by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans when both organisms were grown in liquid medium or in Berea sandstone cores. The wild-type strain of T. denitrificans did not prevent the accumulation of sulfide produced by D. desulfuricans. Strain F also prevented the accumulation of sulfide by a mixed population of sulfate-reducing bacteria enriched from an oil field brine. Fermentation balances showed that strain F stoichiometrically oxidized the sulfide produced by D. desulfuricans and the oil field brine enrichment to sulfate. These data suggest that strain F would be effective in controlling sulfide production in oil reservoirs and other environments.

  9. Metabolism of S-(2-chloro-1,1,2-trifluoroethyl)-L-cysteine to hydrogen sulfide and the role of hydrogen sulfide in S-(2-chloro-1,1,2-trifluoroethyl)-L-cysteine-induced mitochondrial toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banki, K; Elfarra, A A; Lash, L H; Anders, M W

    1986-07-31

    The nephrotoxic cysteine S-conjugate S-(2-chloro-1,1,2-trifluoroethyl)-L-cysteine (CTFC) is metabolized by kidney homogenates and subcellular fractions to pyruvate and a reactive thiol, which is cytotoxic and partially decomposes to yield hydrogen sulfide and thiosulfate. Although hydrogen sulfide is a potent mitochondrial poison, the mitochondrial toxicity of CTFC is not attributable to hydrogen sulfide formation, as shown by different sites of inhibition of mitochondrial respiration by CTFC and hydrogen sulfide. The efficient mitochondrial oxidation of hydrogen sulfide apparently serves to protect mitochondria against the toxic effects of hydrogen sulfide generated from CTFC.

  10. Inhibition of Sulfide Mineral Oxidation by Surface Coating Agents: Batch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, J.; Ji, M. K.; Yun, H. S.; Park, Y. T.; Gee, E. D.; Lee, W. R.; Jeon, B.-H.

    2012-04-01

    Mining activities and mineral industries have impacted on rapid oxidation of sulfide minerals such as pyrite (FeS2) which leads to Acid Mine Drainage (AMD) formation. Some of the abandoned mines discharge polluted water without proper environmental remediation treatments, largely because of financial constraints in treating AMD. Magnitude of the problem is considerable, especially in countries with a long history of mining. As metal sulfides become oxidized during mining activities, the aqueous environment becomes acid and rich in many metals, including iron, lead, mercury, arsenic and many others. The toxic heavy metals are responsible for the environmental deterioration of stream, groundwater and soils. Several strategies to remediate AMD contaminated sites have been proposed. Among the source inhibition and prevention technologies, microencapsulation (coating) has been considered as a promising technology. The encapsulation is based on inhibition of O2 diffusion by surface coating agent and is expected to control the oxidation of pyrite for a long time. Potential of several surface coating agents for preventing oxidation of metal sulfide minerals from both Young-Dong coal mine and Il-Gwang gold mine were examined by conducting batch experiments and field tests. Powdered pyrite as a standard sulfide mineral and rock samples from two mine outcrops were mixed with six coating agents (KH2PO4, MgO and KMnO4 as chemical agents, and apatite, cement and manganite as mineral agents) and incubated with oxidizing agents (H2O2 or NaClO). Batch experiments with Young-Dong coal mine samples showed least SO42- production in presence of KMnO4 (16% sulfate production compared to no surface coating agents) or cement (4%) within 8 days. In the case of Il-Gwang mine samples, least SO42- production was observed in presence of KH2PO4 (8%) or cement (2%) within 8 days. Field-scale pilot tests at Il-Gwang site also showed that addition of KH2PO4 decreased sulfate production from 200 to

  11. Synthesis, characterization, and reactivity of sulfided hexanuclear molybdenum cluster compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spink, D.

    1990-09-21

    Hexanuclear molybdenum clusters with mixed chloride and sulfide bridging ligands were prepared by reacting {alpha}-MoCl{sub 2} with sodium hydrosulfide in the presence of sodium butoxide. The resulting species, Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub (8-x)}S{sub x}{center dot}npy(x {congruent} 3.6, n {congruent} 4, py = pyridine), was pyrophoric and insoluble. The mixed sulfide chloride cluster species Mo{sub 6}S{sub 4}Cl{sub 4}{center dot}6OPEt{sub 3} and Mo{sub 6}S{sub {approximately}5}Cl{sub {approximately}3}{center dot}6PEt{sub 3} and Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8}{center dot}6PEt{sub 3} were isolated and characterized. Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance, electron paramagnetic resonance, and UV/visible spectra were obtained for each fraction. The completely sulfided cluster, Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8}{center dot}6PEt{sub 3}, was prepared similarly and used in various experiments as a possible precursor to Chevrel phase materials of the type Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8}or M{sub n}Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8}. With the goal of removing all of the triethylphosphine ligands, Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8}{center dot}6PEt{sub 3} was reacted with the transition metal carbonyls molybdenum hexacarbonyl and dicobalt octacarbonyl. Reaction on the molecular sulfide cluster with copper(I) chloride in toluene gave a completely insoluble product. The reaction of Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8}{center dot}6PEt{sub 3} with propylene sulfide gave a product whose infrared spectra showed only very weak peaks associated with coordinated triethylphosphine. The elemental analysis of this product fit the formula Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8}{center dot}5SPEt{sub 3}. Reactivity of the outer ligands of the Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8}{center dot}npy and Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8}{center dot}(6{minus}x)PrNH{sub x} clusters were investigated. Crystalline Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8}{center dot}6THT was recovered from the reaction of the n-propylamine derivative with THT. A crystal structure determination was done. 87 refs., 12 fig., 15 tabs.

  12. Research of the Plasma Sulfide Layer Formed on the Nitrocarburizing Layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xin; MA Shi-ning; HU Chun-hua; QIU Ji; HUANG Yuan-lin

    2004-01-01

    Low-temperature sulfurizing after nitrocarburizing are compared with only low-temperature sulfurizing on the surface of CrMoCu alloyed cast iron, the surface morphologies and microstructures are investigated by SEM and EDS.Results show that under proper treatment parameters, there are sulfide layer on both of the surfaces, and can more easily obtain sulfide layers on the surface of nitrocarburizing. Forming mechanism of sulfides were also studied elementarily.

  13. Self-assembly of biomorphic carbon/sulfur microstructures in sulfidic environments

    OpenAIRE

    Cosmidis, Julie; Templeton, Alexis S.

    2016-01-01

    In natural and laboratory-based environments experiencing sustained counter fluxes of sulfide and oxidants, elemental sulfur (S0)—a key intermediate in the sulfur cycle—can commonly accumulate. S0 is frequently invoked as a biomineralization product generated by enzymatic oxidation of hydrogen sulfide and polysulfides. Here we show the formation of S0 encapsulated in nanometre to micrometre-scale tubular and spherical organic structures that self-assemble in sulfide gradient environments in t...

  14. The impact of electrogenic sulfide oxidation on elemental cycling and solute fluxes in coastal sediment

    OpenAIRE

    Rao, A.M.F.; Malkin, S.Y.; Hidalgo-Martinez, S.; Meysman, Filip

    2016-01-01

    Filamentous sulfide oxidizing cable bacteria are capable of linking the oxidation of free sulfide in deep anoxic layers of marine sediments to the reduction of oxygen or nitrate in surface sediments by conducting electrons over centimeter-scale distances. Previous studies have shown that this newly discovered microbial process, referred to as electrogenic sulfide oxidation (e-SOx), may alter elemental cycling in sediments, but the nature and rates of the resulting biogeochemical transformatio...

  15. High Temperature Corrosion of Fe-C-S Cast Irons in Oxidizing and Sulfidizing Atmospheres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thuan-Dinh NGUYEN; Dong-Bok LEE

    2008-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of spheroidal graphite and flake graphite cast irons was studied in oxidizing and sulfidizing atmospheres between 600 and 800℃ for 50 h. The corrosion rate in the sulfidizing atmosphere was faster than that in air above 700℃, due to the formation of the Feo.975S sulfide. The corrosion rate of the spheroidal graphite cast iron was similar to that of the flake graphite cast iron.

  16. Regarding "Sulfide Capacity in Ladle Slag at Steelmaking Temperatures," C. Allertz, Du Sichen; MMTB 2015 December

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelton, Arthur; Kang, Youn-Bae

    2016-09-01

    Allertz and Sichen measured sulfide contents of slags in equilibrium with Cu-S solutions. Results are in very good agreement with calculations by FactSage whose databases were developed by modeling other sets of data obtained under different conditions. However, when results are reported as sulfide capacities, significant errors may result if these are used to calculate sulfide contents at oxygen and sulfur potentials which differ from those of the experiments and/or are fixed by different means.

  17. Use of hydrochloric acid for determinining solid-phase arsenic partitioning in sulfidic sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkin, Richard T; Ford, Robert G

    2002-11-15

    We examined the use of room-temperature hydrochloric acid (1-6 M) and salt solutions of magnesium chloride, sodium carbonate, and sodium sulfide for the removal of arsenic from synthetic iron monosulfides and contaminated sediments containing acid-volatile sulfides (AVS). Results indicate that acid-soluble arsenic reacts with H2S released from AVS phases and precipitates at low pH as disordered orpiment or alacranite. Arsenic sulfide precipitation is consistent with geochemical modeling in that conditions during acid extraction are predicted to be oversaturated with respect to orpiment, realgar, or both. Binding of arsenic with sulfide at low pH is sufficiently strong that 6 M HCl will not keep spiked arsenic in the dissolved fraction. Over a wide range of AVS concentrations and molar [As]/[AVS] ratios, acid extraction of arsenic from sulfide-bearing sediments will give biased results that overestimate the stability or underestimate the bioavailability of sediment-bound arsenic. Alkaline solutions of sodium sulfide and sodium carbonate are efficient in removing arsenic from arsenic sulfides and mixed iron-arsenic sulfides because of the high solubility of arsenic at alkaline pH, the formation of stable arsenic complexes with sulfide or carbonate, or both.

  18. Spectral induced polarization and electrodic potential monitoring of microbially mediated iron sulfide transformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubbard, Susan; Personna, Y.R.; Ntarlagiannis, D.; Slater, L.; Yee, N.; O' Brien, M.; Hubbard, S.

    2008-02-15

    Stimulated sulfate-reduction is a bioremediation technique utilized for the sequestration of heavy metals in the subsurface.We performed laboratory column experiments to investigate the geoelectrical response of iron sulfide transformations by Desulfo vibriovulgaris. Two geoelectrical methods, (1) spectral induced polarization (SIP), and (2) electrodic potential measurements, were investigated. Aqueous geochemistry (sulfate, lactate, sulfide, and acetate), observations of precipitates (identified from electron microscopy as iron sulfide), and electrodic potentials on bisulfide ion (HS) sensitive silver-silver chloride (Ag-AgCl) electrodes (630 mV) were diagnostic of induced transitions between an aerobic iron sulfide forming conditions and aerobic conditions promoting iron sulfide dissolution. The SIP data showed 10m rad anomalies during iron sulfide mineralization accompanying microbial activity under an anaerobic transition. These anomalies disappeared during iron sulfide dissolution under the subsequent aerobic transition. SIP model parameters based on a Cole-Cole relaxation model of the polarization at the mineral-fluid interface were converted to (1) estimated biomineral surface area to pore volume (Sp), and (2) an equivalent polarizable sphere diameter (d) controlling the relaxation time. The temporal variation in these model parameters is consistent with filling and emptying of pores by iron sulfide biofilms, as the system transitions between anaerobic (pore filling) and aerobic (pore emptying) conditions. The results suggest that combined SIP and electrodic potential measurements might be used to monitor spatiotemporal variability in microbial iron sulfide transformations in the field.

  19. Sulfur speciation and sulfide oxidation in the water column of the Black Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luther, George W., III; Church, Thomas M.; Powell, David

    We have applied sulfur speciation techniques to understand the chemistry and cycling of sulfur in Black Sea waters. The only reduced dissolved inorganic sulfur species detected (above the low minimum detection limits of the voltammetric methods employed) in the water column was hydrogen sulfide. The maximum concentration of sulfide (423 μM) is similar to previous reports. Using a cathodic stripping square wave voltammetry (CSSWV) method for nanomolar levels of sulfide, we determined the precise boundary between the "free" hydrogen sulfide (sulfidic) zone and the upper (oxic/suboxic) water column at the two stations studied. This boundary has apparently moved up by about 50 m in the past 20 years. Our results help demonstrate three chemically distinct zones of water in the central basin of the Black Sea: (1) the oxic [0-65 m], (2) the anoxic/nonsulfidic [65-100 m] and (3) the sulfidic [>100 m]. Sulfide bound to metals ("complexed" sulfide) is observed in both the oxic and anoxic/nonsulfidic zones of the water column. This supports previous studies on metal sulfide forms. From the electrochemical data, it is possible to estimate the strength of the complexation of sulfide to metals (log K = 10 to 11). Thiosulfate and sulfite were below our minimum detectable limit (MDL) of 50 nM using CSSWV. Elemental sulfur (MDL 5 nM) was detected below the onset of the hydrogen sulfide zone (90-100 m) with a maximum of 30-60 nM near 120 m. The sulfur speciation results for the Black Sea are lower by one order of magnitude or more than other marine systems such as the Cariaco Trench and salt marshes. New HPLC techniques were applied to detect thiols at submicromolar levels. The presence of thiols (2-mercaptoethylamine, 2-mercaptoethanol, N-acetylcysteine and glutathione) is correlated with the remineralization of organic matter at the oxic and anoxic/nonsulfidic interface. Water samples collected from the upper 50 m of the sulfidic zone showed significant sulfide oxidation on

  20. Sulfides in diamonds and in xenoliths from kimberlite pipes of Yakutiia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulanova, Galina P.; Spetsius, Zdislav V.; Leskova, Nelli V.

    The characteristics of sulfides from diamonds and xenoliths are compared using literature data on the mineralogy of sulfides in diamonds and in deep-seated xenoliths from kimberlite pipes. Results are presented on the Fe-Ni-Cu-Co-S mineral systems of mantle associations, sulfide inclusions in diamonds and megacrystals of kimberlite rocks, and minerals of the Fe-Ni-Cu-Co-S system in mantle xenoliths from kimberlite pipes. Particular consideration is given to the nature of sulfide mineralization in mantle xenoliths and diamonds.

  1. Corrosion of concrete sewers--the kinetics of hydrogen sulfide oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollertsen, Jes; Nielsen, Asbjørn Haaning; Jensen, Henriette Stokbro; Wium-Andersen, Tove; Hvitved-Jacobsen, Thorkild

    2008-05-01

    Hydrogen sulfide absorption and oxidation by corroding concrete surfaces was quantified in a test rig consisting of 6 concrete pipes operated under sewer conditions. The test rig was placed in an underground sewer monitoring station with access to fresh wastewater. Hydrogen sulfide gas was injected into the pipe every 2nd hour to peak concentrations around 1000 ppm. After some months of operation, the hydrogen sulfide became rapidly oxidized by the corroding concrete surfaces. At hydrogen sulfide concentrations of 1000 ppm, oxidation rates as high as 1 mg S m(-2) s(-1) were observed. The oxidation process followed simple nth order kinetics with a process order of 0.45-0.75. Extrapolating the results to gravity sewer systems showed that hydrogen sulfide oxidation by corroding concrete is a fast process compared to the release of hydrogen sulfide from the bulk water, resulting in low gas concentrations compared with equilibrium. Balancing hydrogen sulfide release with hydrogen sulfide oxidation at steady state conditions demonstrated that significant corrosion rates--several millimeters of concrete per year--can potentially occur at hydrogen sulfide gas phase concentrations well below 5-10 ppm. The results obtained in the study advances the knowledge on prediction of sewer concrete corrosion and the extent of odor problems.

  2. Mapping hydrogen sulfide in rats with a novel azo-based fluorescent probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Cheng, Juan; Gong, Yanling; Yang, Bo; Hu, Yongzhou

    2015-03-15

    We report herein a reaction-based fluorescent switch-on sulfide sensor, azo3, for the quantification of endogenous sulfides in rat tissues. The sensor was exploited based on the novel azo-sulfide chemistry and designed by locking the rhodol fluorophore into its nonfluorescent form with an azo group. However, the azo group would undergo a specific and biocompatible reaction with sulfides, triggering significant fluorescence increasements which were linear to the concentrations of sulfides. Azo3 distinguished by its high sensitivity (148-fold fluorescent switch-on response), good selectivity (22-fold more selective towards sulfides than other bio-thiol species) and low detection limit (500nM). Moreover, the azo3-based assay for biological sulfides displayed the unique advantage of being insusceptible to ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. Azo3 has been successfully applied to the quantification of endogenous sulfides in rat plasma and tissues including heart, brain, liver, spleen, lung and kidney. In addition to providing azo3 as a valuable tool to analyze sulfides in biological samples, we also discussed the influences of the electron effect on the sensitivity of the probes, which would shed some light on the design of future reaction-based probes.

  3. Formation of Iron Sulfide in Water-Body Sediment and Its Influence on Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Lei; SUMI Katsuhiro

    2008-01-01

    Iron sulfide is an important reductive pollutant in aquatic sediment, so that increasing attentions have been paid to it in recent years. In this paper, the formation of iron sulfide in water-body sediment was introduced. Moreover, its adverse influences upon environment were summarized, including direct contribution to deficiency of dissolved oxygen in water, association with eutrophication in water-bodies and impact on geochemical sulfur cycle. Since conventional chemical analysis for iron sulfide has several disadvantages, new technique for rapid determination of iron sulfide on-line was prospected.

  4. Microbial oxidation of soluble sulfide in produced water from the Bakkeen Sands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gevertz, D.; Zimmerman, S. [Agouron Institute, La Jolla, CA (United States); Jenneman, G.E. [Phillips Petroleum Company, Bartlesville, OK (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    The presence of soluble sulfide in produced water results in problems for the petroleum industry due to its toxicity, odor, corrosive nature, and potential for wellbore plugging. Sulfide oxidation by indigenous nitrate-reducing bacteria (NRB) present in brine collected from wells at the Coleville Unit (CVU) in Saskatchewan, Canada, was investigated. Sulfide oxidation took place readily when nitrate and phosphate were added to brine enrichment cultures, resulting in a decrease in sulfide levels of 99-165 ppm to nondetectable levels (< 3.3 ppm). Produced water collected from a number of producing wells was screened to determine the time required for complete sulfide oxidation, in order to select candidate wells for treatment. Three wells were chosen, based on sulfide removal in 48 hours or less. These wells were treated down the backside of the annulus with a solution containing 10 mM KNO{sub 3} and 100 {mu}M NaH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}. Following a 24- to 72-hour shut-in, reductions in pretreatment sulfide levels of greater than 90% were observed for two of the wells, as well as sustained sulfide reductions of 50% for at least two days following startup. NRB populations in the produced brine were observed to increase significantly following treatment, but no significant increases in sulfate-reducing bacteria were observed. These results demonstrate the technical feasibility of stimulating indigenous populations of NRB to remediate and control sulfide in produced brine.

  5. Biological and chemical sulfide oxidation in a Beggiatoa inhabited marine sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preisler, André; de Beer, Dirk; Lichtschlag, Anna;

    2007-01-01

    gradient and corresponding high sulfide flux, a typical characteristic of Beggiatoa habitats, is not needed for their metabolic performance, but rather used as a chemotactic cue by the highly motile filaments to avoid getting lost at depth in the sediment. Indeed sulfide is a repellant for Beggiatoa...... and corresponding high sulfide flux, a typical characteristic of Beggiatoa habitats, is not needed for their metabolic performance, but rather used as a chemotactic cue by the highly motile filaments to avoid getting lost at depth in the sediment. Indeed sulfide is a repellant for Beggiatoa...

  6. Spectral induced polarization and electrodic potential monitoring of microbially mediated iron sulfide transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Personna, Yves Robert; Ntarlagiannis, Dimitrios; Slater, Lee; Yee, Nathan; O'Brien, Michael; Hubbard, Susan

    2008-06-01

    Stimulated sulfate-reduction is a bioremediation technique utilized for the sequestration of heavy metals in the subsurface. We performed laboratory column experiments to investigate the geoelectrical response of iron sulfide transformations by Desulfovibrio vulgaris. Two geoelectrical methods, (1) spectral induced polarization (SIP), and (2) electrodic potential measurements, were investigated. Aqueous geochemistry (sulfate, lactate, sulfide, and acetate), observations of precipitates (identified from electron microscopy as iron sulfide), and electrodic potentials on bisulfide ion (HS-) sensitive silver-silver chloride (Ag-AgCl) electrodes (˜-630 mV) were diagnostic of induced transitions between anaerobic iron sulfide forming conditions and aerobic conditions promoting iron sulfide dissolution. The SIP data showed ˜10 mrad anomalies during iron sulfide mineralization accompanying microbial activity under an anaerobic transition. These anomalies disappeared during iron sulfide dissolution under the subsequent aerobic transition. SIP model parameters based on a Cole-Cole relaxation model of the polarization at the mineral-fluid interface were converted to (1) estimated biomineral surface area to pore volume (Sp), and (2) an equivalent polarizable sphere diameter (d) controlling the relaxation time. The temporal variation in these model parameters is consistent with filling and emptying of pores by iron sulfide biofilms, as the system transitions between anaerobic (pore filling) and aerobic (pore emptying) conditions. The results suggest that combined SIP and electrodic potential measurements might be used to monitor spatiotemporal variability in microbial iron sulfide transformations in the field.

  7. XAFS characterization of industrial catalysts: in situ study of phase transformation of nickel sulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J.; Jia, Z.; Wang, Q.; Zhao, S.; Xu, Z.; Yang, W.; Frenkel, A. I.

    2016-05-01

    The online sulfiding process for nickel-contained catalyst often ends up with a nickel sulfide mixture in refinery plant. To elucidate the local environment of nickel and its corresponding sulfur species, a model catalyst (nickel sulfide) and model thermal process were employed to explore the possibilities for characterization of real catalysts in industrial conditions. The present investigation shows effectiveness of in situ XANES and EXAFS measurements for studying the phase stability and phase composition in these systems, which could be used to simulate real sulfiding process in industrial reactions, such as hydrodesulfurizations of oil.

  8. Pd-NHC-Catalyzed Alkynylation of General Aryl Sulfides with Alkynyl Grignard Reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baralle, Alexandre; Yorimitsu, Hideki; Osuka, Atsuhiro

    2016-07-25

    Cross-coupling reactions of unactivated aryl sulfides with alkynylmagnesium chloride have been invented to afford 1-aryl-1-alkynes with the aid of a palladium/N-heterocyclic carbene complex. This reaction has by far the widest scope of all transformations utilizing aryl sulfides and alkynes, while known cross-coupling alkynylations of aryl-sulfur electrophiles require activated azaaryl sulfides, thiolactams, or arenesulfonyl chlorides. The alkynylation of aryl sulfides is compatible with typical protecting functional groups. The alkynylation is applied to the synthesis of benzofuran-based fluorescent molecules by taking advantage of characteristic organosulfur chemistry.

  9. Sulfide intrusion in the tropical seagrasses Thalassia testudinum and Syringodium filiforme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmer, Marianne; Pedersen, Ole; Krause-Jensen, Dorte;

    2009-01-01

    and on proximity to anthropogenic nutrient sources. Meadow characteristics (shoot density, above- and below-ground biomass, nutrient content) were sampled along with sediment biogeochemistry. Sulfide intrusion was high in T. testudinum, as up to 96% of total sulfur in the plant was derived from sediment......-derived sulfides. The sulfide intrusion was negatively correlated to the turnover of sulfides in the sediments regulated by both plant parameters and sediment sulfur pools. Sediment iron content played an indirect role by affecting sulfide turnover rates. Leaf production was negatively correlated with sulfide...

  10. Vesicle-metal-sulfide assemblages from the Chelyabinsk meteorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andronikov, A.; Lauretta, D.; Hill, D.; Andronikova, I.

    2014-07-01

    On February 15, 2013, an ET object entered the Earth's atmosphere over the Russian city of Chelyabinsk. It entered at a preatmospheric velocity of 18.6 km/sec at the angle of 17--20°. The bolide responsible for this event was estimated to be 17-20 m in diameter and had a mass of ˜10 Ktons; the ensuing airburst occurred at an altitude >20 km and released a total energy of ˜440 kT [1,2]. The Chelyabinsk meteorite is an equilibrated LL5 ordinary chondrite, shock stage S4, and weathering grade WG0 similar to other LL5 falls [1,2]. Our studied sample is an impact melt breccia consisting of shock-darkened chondrite clasts (SDC) and vesicular impact melt lithology (IML). The SDC have recrystallized textures and contain barred- and porphyritic-olivine, porphyritic-olivine-pyroxene and radial-pyroxene chondrules in the intrachondrule matrix. A dense network of thin fractures in the SDC is filled up with opaque minerals [cf. 3]. Metals in the SDC are kamacite (4.7--8.5 % Ni), taenite (21.4--33.5 % Ni), and martensite (14.5--18.6 % Ni). The IML consists mostly of tiny (bearing troilite (62.2--64.2 % Fe; 35.2--37.2 % S; 3000--5000 ppm Ni), with rare pentlandite (41.2--48.6 % Fe, 33.2--34.3 % S, 19.4--23.9 % Ni). The presence of abundant vesicles in the IML indicates strong heating and volatilization. Since no other phase except for sulfide-metal assemblages were observed to fill up vesicles, the likely source of volatiles is S vapor formed by vaporization of FeS during impact melting [cf. 4]. Molten metal and sulfide coalesced into droplets of metal-sulfide liquids forming eventually sulfide-metal assemblages. A notable compositional difference is observed between sulfides not containing metals and those with metals. The metal-free sulfides display higher concentrations of such elements as Ni, Co, Ga, Ge, As, Mo, Ru, Pd, Sn, Sb, Te, Au, and Hg, and lower amounts of Cu than their metal-bearing counterparts. The metal-free sulfides may represent loci of former ''parental'' Fe

  11. In Situ Gene Expression Responsible for Sulfide Oxidation and CO2 Fixation of an Uncultured Large Sausage-Shaped Aquificae Bacterium in a Sulfidic Hot Spring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamazawa, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Kyosuke; Takasaki, Kazuto; Mitani, Yasuo; Hanada, Satoshi; Kamagata, Yoichi; Tamaki, Hideyuki

    2016-06-25

    We investigated the in situ gene expression profile of sulfur-turf microbial mats dominated by an uncultured large sausage-shaped Aquificae bacterium, a key metabolic player in sulfur-turfs in sulfidic hot springs. A reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed that the genes responsible for sulfide, sulfite, and thiosulfate oxidation and carbon fixation via the reductive TCA cycle were continuously expressed in sulfur-turf mats taken at different sampling points, seasons, and years. These results suggest that the uncultured large sausage-shaped bacterium has the ability to grow chemolithoautotrophically and plays key roles as a primary producer in the sulfidic hot spring ecosystem in situ.

  12. Multi-dimensional modeling of atmospheric copper-sulfidation corrosion on non-planar substrates.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ken Shuang

    2004-11-01

    This report documents the author's efforts in the deterministic modeling of copper-sulfidation corrosion on non-planar substrates such as diodes and electrical connectors. A new framework based on Goma was developed for multi-dimensional modeling of atmospheric copper-sulfidation corrosion on non-planar substrates. In this framework, the moving sulfidation front is explicitly tracked by treating the finite-element mesh as a pseudo solid with an arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian formulation and repeatedly performing re-meshing using CUBIT and re-mapping using MAPVAR. Three one-dimensional studies were performed for verifying the framework in asymptotic regimes. Limited model validation was also carried out by comparing computed copper-sulfide thickness with experimental data. The framework was first demonstrated in modeling one-dimensional copper sulfidation with charge separation. It was found that both the thickness of the space-charge layers and the electrical potential at the sulfidation surface decrease rapidly as the Cu{sub 2}S layer thickens initially but eventually reach equilibrium values as Cu{sub 2}S layer becomes sufficiently thick; it was also found that electroneutrality is a reasonable approximation and that the electro-migration flux may be estimated by using the equilibrium potential difference between the sulfidation and annihilation surfaces when the Cu{sub 2}S layer is sufficiently thick. The framework was then employed to model copper sulfidation in the solid-state-diffusion controlled regime (i.e. stage II sulfidation) on a prototypical diode until a continuous Cu{sub 2}S film was formed on the diode surface. The framework was also applied to model copper sulfidation on an intermittent electrical contact between a gold-plated copper pin and gold-plated copper pad; the presence of Cu{sub 2}S was found to raise the effective electrical resistance drastically. Lastly, future research needs in modeling atmospheric copper sulfidation are discussed.

  13. Is Lithium Sulfide a MgB2-like Superconductor?

    OpenAIRE

    Isikaku-Ironkwe, O. P.

    2012-01-01

    Lithium Sulfide, Li2S, is an anti-fluorite semiconductor with a band-gap of 3.865 eV. It also has exactly the same valence electron count, Ne, and atomic number, Z, as magnesium diboride, MgB2. Both have almost the same formula weight. This qualifies Li2S as a magnesium-diboride like material. Li2S passes the same computational material specific test for superconductivity as MgB2. Using our recently developed symmetry rules for searching for superconductors, we predict that Li2S, with electro...

  14. Isolation and characterization of deodorizing bacteria for organic sulfide malodor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG An-xi; LIU Bo; ZHAO Yang-guo; LI Zheng; BAI Yu; CHENG Yang-xue

    2004-01-01

    Strain Jll screened out from different odor origins can efficiently degrade methyl mercaptan and ethanethiol whereas has no ability to remove dimethyl sulfide. The results indicated that the strain Jll breaks only the C-SH bond. The optimum temperature and pH of Jll are 20-30℃ and 6.0-8.3 respectively. A systematic identification method-16S rDNA gene sequence comparison, for deodorizing bacteria was carried out. The 16S rDNA gene sequence analysis of strain Jll showed the highest level of 97% homology to Rape rhizosphere.

  15. Analytical Measurement of Discrete Hydrogen Sulfide Pools in Biological Specimens

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Xinggui; Peter, Elvis A.; Bir, Shyamal; Wang, Rui; Kevil, Christopher G.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a ubiquitous gaseous signaling molecule that plays a vital role in numerous cellular functions and has become the focus of many research endeavors including pharmaco-therapeutic manipulation. Amongst the challenges facing the field is the accurate measurement of biologically active H2S. We have recently reported that the typically used methylene blue method and its associated results are invalid and do not measure bonafide H2S. The complexity of analytical H2S measur...

  16. Zinc sulfide in intestinal cell granules of Ancylostoma caninum adults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gianotti, A.J.; Clark, D.T.; Dash, J. (Portland State Univ., OR (USA))

    1991-04-01

    A source of confusion has existed since the turn of the century about the reddish brown, weakly birefringent 'sphaerocrystals' located in the intestines of strongyle nematodes, Strongylus and Ancylostoma. X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive spectrometric analyses were used for accurate determination of the crystalline order and elemental composition of the granules in the canine hookworm Ancylostoma caninum. The composition of the intestinal pigmented granules was identified unequivocally as zinc sulfide. It seems most probable that the granules serve to detoxify high levels of metallic ions (specifically zinc) present due to the large intake of host blood.

  17. Synthesis of Lead Sulfide Nanoparticles by Chemical Precipitation Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chongad, L. S.; Sharma, A.; Banerjee, M.; Jain, A.

    2016-10-01

    Lead sulfide (PbS) nanoparticles were prepared by chemical precipitation method (CPM) with the assistance of H2S gas. The microstructure and morphology of the synthesized nanoparticles have been investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The XRD patterns of the PbS nanoparticles reveal formation of cubic phase. To investigate the quality of prepared nanoparticles, the particles size, lattice constant, strain, dislocation density etc. have been determined using XRD. TEM images reveal formation of cubic nanoparticles and the particle size determined from TEM images agree well with those from XRD.

  18. Oxidation sulfidation resistance of Fe-Cr-Ni alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, Ken (Naperville, IL); Baxter, David J. (Woodridge, IL)

    1984-01-01

    High temperature resistance of Fe-Cr-Ni alloy compositions to oxidative and/or sulfidative conditions is provided by the incorporation of about 1-8 wt. % of Zr or Nb and results in a two-phase composition having an alloy matrix as the first phase and a fine grained intermetallic composition as the second phase. The presence and location of the intermetallic composition between grains of the matrix provides mechanical strength, enhanced surface scale adhesion, and resistance to corrosive attack between grains of the alloy matrix at temperatures of 500.degree.-1000.degree. C.

  19. Handbook of Phase Transition Sulfides, Selenides and Tellurides,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-07-01

    made (as reported in Ref. 5) in 61899 by Mourlot. More recent studies showed that he actually prepared CrSo.9 7 and that pure CrS should have a density ...1n2S 3 Indium Sulfide or Di-Indium Trisulflde In2S3 exists as cubic a-In 2S3 and tetragonal 0-In 2S3. Until recently, no detailed studies on the...Mn+2 is bonded tetrahedrally through sulfur atoms to its nearest Mn neighbors. The crystal lattice parameters have been studied as a function of 0

  20. Formation of Submicron Copper Sulfide Particles Using Spray Pyrolysis Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenggoro, I.; Kang, Yun; Komiya, Takafumi; Okuyama, Kikuo; Tohge, Noboru

    1998-03-01

    The morphology and crystalline phase of submicron copper sulfide particles prepared by spray pyrolysis method have been studied. In a nitrogen gas atmosphere, the covellite phase (CuS) spherical particles could be prepared using the solution with molar ratio of copper nitrate to thiourea and furnace temperatures of 1:2 at 200 300°C, as well as of 1:5 at 200 600°C. The crystalline phase of particles was highly depended on the composition of the precursors and the pyrolysis temperature. The sphericity of particles could be enhanced by increasing the temperature and prolonging the residence time of the droplets or particles in the furnace.

  1. Spectroscopy of titanium-doped gallium lanthanum sulfide glass

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Titanium-doped gallium lanthanum sulfide (Ti:GLS) and gallium lanthanum oxysulfide (Ti:GLSO) glasses have an absorption band at similar to 500-600 nm that cannot be fully resolved because of its proximity to the band edge of the glass. At concentrations >0.5% a shoulder at 980 nm is observed in Ti:GLS but not in Ti :GLSO. The emission spectra of Ti:GLS and T :GLSO both peak at 900 nm with lifetimes of 67 and 97)us, respectively. We propose that the absorption at similar to 600 nm is due to th...

  2. Therapeutic application of hydrogen sulfide donors: the potential and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dan; Hu, Qingxun; Zhu, Yizhun

    2016-03-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a colorless gas smelling of rotten egg, has long been considered a toxic gas and environment hazard. However, evidences show that H2S plays a great role in many physiological and pathological activities, and it exhibits different effects when applied at various doses. In this review, we summarize the chemistry and biomedical applications of H2S-releasing compounds, including inorganic salts, phosphorodithioate derivatives, derivatives of Allium sativum extracts, derivatives of thioaminoacids, and derivatives of antiinflammatory drugs.

  3. Surface-treatment of Alkaline Earth Sulfides Based Phosphor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Chong-feng; CHU Ben-li; XU Jian; SU Qiang

    2004-01-01

    A series of alkaline earth sulfides based phosphors Ca0.8Sr0.2S∶Eu2+, Tm3+ were covered with a layer of protective coating with alkaline earth fluorides by heating the mixture of phosphor and NH4HF2 at elevated temperatures. The coatings were characterized by means of XRD and SEM. The optical properties of the coated phosphors and the influences of the coating on their properties have been discussed extensively. The stabilities of the coated and uncoated phosphors have been compared.

  4. Dynamic corrosion of copper-nickel sulfide by Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TONG Lin-lin; JIANG Mao-fa; YANG Hong-ying; YU Juan; FAN You-jing; ZHANG Yao

    2009-01-01

    The dynamic corrosion process of bio-oxidation of copper-nickel sulfide from Karatungk in northern Xinjiang Province of China was studied. The polished wafer of the copper-nickel sulphide was used to carry on a series of oxidation corrosion experiment by Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. The changes of superficial corrosion appearance and the mineral dynamic corrosion process were discovered by microscope observation. Then, the galvanic cell model was established, and the bio-oxidation activation order of typical copper-nickel sulphide minerals was ascertained as pyrrhotite>pentlandite>chalocopyrite.

  5. Effect of mineral processing wastewater on flotation of sulfide minerals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jian-ming; LIU Run-qing; SUN Wei; QIU Guan-zhou

    2009-01-01

    The effects of mineral processing wastewater on sulfide minerals were investigated by flotation, infrared spectrometry and electrochemistry test. The results show that lead-concentrate water can improve the flotation of galena, while the sulfur-concentrate water has negative effect on flotation of galena compared with distilled water. The flotation behavior of pyrite is contrary to that of galena in three kinds of water. Infrared spectra indicate that the residual collector in the lead-concentrate water is beneficial to the formation of lead xanthate on the surface of galena. Electrochemistry results indicate that electrochemistry reaction on galena surface has apparent change. The anode polarization is improved and cathode polarization is depressed.

  6. Effect of sulfide pollution on the stability of the protective film of benzotriazole on copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al Kharafi, F.M. [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Kuwait University (Kuwait)], E-mail: fayzah@aas.com.kw; Abdullah, A.M.; Ghayad, I.M. [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Kuwait University (Kuwait); Ateya, B.G. [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Kuwait University (Kuwait)], E-mail: bgateya@yahoo.com

    2007-09-15

    Benzotriazole (BTAH) is an excellent inhibitor for the corrosion of copper and many of its alloys in unpolluted media. Protection is attributed to the formation of a film of Cu(I)BTA. Injection of sulfide ions into a benzotriazole inhibited salt water damages the protective Cu(I)BTA film very rapidly, increases the corrosion rate and leads to the formation of copper sulfide. This effect is quite marked at a sulfide concentration as low as 10{sup -5} M (about 0.3 ppm sulfur) in the presence of 10{sup -2} M BTAH, which is 1000-fold greater than that of the sulfide ion. The intensity of sulfide attack increases with its concentration. Prolonged pre-passivation of copper in the BTAH protected medium even at high concentration does not markedly improve the resistance of the protective film to sulfide attack. This finding is contrary to a well-documented phenomenon in unpolluted media where the inhibiting efficiency of BTAH increases with the time of immersion and the concentration of the inhibitor. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) reveals the presence of both sulfide and BTAH on the corroded surface indicating that sulfide attack is localized.

  7. Synthetic Fabrication of Nanoscale MoS2-Based Transition Metal Sulfides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jikang Yuan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Transition metal sulfides are scientifically and technologically important materials. This review summarizes recent progress on the synthetic fabrication of transition metal sulfides nanocrystals with controlled shape, size, and surface functionality. Special attention is paid to the case of MoS2 nanoparticles, where organic (surfactant, polymer, inorganic (support, promoter, doping compounds and intercalation chemistry are applied.

  8. Growth kinetics of hydrogen sulfide oxidizing bacteria in corroded concrete from sewers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Henriette Stokbro; Lens, Piet N L; Nielsen, Jeppe L; Bester, Kai; Nielsen, Asbjørn Haaning; Hvitved-Jacobsen, Thorkild; Vollertsen, Jes

    2011-05-30

    Hydrogen sulfide oxidation by microbes present on concrete surfaces of sewer pipes is a key process in sewer corrosion. The growth of aerobic sulfur oxidizing bacteria from corroded concrete surfaces was studied in a batch reactor. Samples of corrosion products, containing sulfur oxidizing bacteria, were suspended in aqueous solution at pH similar to that of corroded concrete. Hydrogen sulfide was supplied to the reactor to provide the source of reduced sulfur. The removal of hydrogen sulfide and oxygen was monitored. The utilization rates of both hydrogen sulfide and oxygen suggested exponential bacterial growth with median growth rates of 1.25 d(-1) and 1.33 d(-1) as determined from the utilization rates of hydrogen sulfide and oxygen, respectively. Elemental sulfur was found to be the immediate product of the hydrogen sulfide oxidation. When exponential growth had been achieved, the addition of hydrogen sulfide was terminated leading to elemental sulfur oxidation. The ratio of consumed sulfur to consumed oxygen suggested that sulfuric acid was the ultimate oxidation product. To the knowledge of the authors, this is the first study to determine the growth rate of bacteria involved in concrete corrosion with hydrogen sulfide as source of reduced sulfur.

  9. Growth kinetics of hydrogen sulfide oxidizing bacteria in corroded concrete from sewers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Henriette Stokbro, E-mail: h.s.jensen@sheffield.ac.uk [Department of Biotechnology, Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Aalborg University, Sohngaardsholmsvej 57, 9000 Aalborg (Denmark); Lens, Piet N.L. [Sub-department of Environmental Technology, Agricultural University of Wageningen, Bomenweg 2, NL-6700-EV Wageningen (Netherlands); Nielsen, Jeppe L.; Bester, Kai; Nielsen, Asbjorn Haaning; Hvitved-Jacobsen, Thorkild; Vollertsen, Jes [Department of Biotechnology, Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Aalborg University, Sohngaardsholmsvej 57, 9000 Aalborg (Denmark)

    2011-05-30

    Hydrogen sulfide oxidation by microbes present on concrete surfaces of sewer pipes is a key process in sewer corrosion. The growth of aerobic sulfur oxidizing bacteria from corroded concrete surfaces was studied in a batch reactor. Samples of corrosion products, containing sulfur oxidizing bacteria, were suspended in aqueous solution at pH similar to that of corroded concrete. Hydrogen sulfide was supplied to the reactor to provide the source of reduced sulfur. The removal of hydrogen sulfide and oxygen was monitored. The utilization rates of both hydrogen sulfide and oxygen suggested exponential bacterial growth with median growth rates of 1.25 d{sup -1} and 1.33 d{sup -1} as determined from the utilization rates of hydrogen sulfide and oxygen, respectively. Elemental sulfur was found to be the immediate product of the hydrogen sulfide oxidation. When exponential growth had been achieved, the addition of hydrogen sulfide was terminated leading to elemental sulfur oxidation. The ratio of consumed sulfur to consumed oxygen suggested that sulfuric acid was the ultimate oxidation product. To the knowledge of the authors, this is the first study to determine the growth rate of bacteria involved in concrete corrosion with hydrogen sulfide as source of reduced sulfur.

  10. Artificial Corrosion of Cu-Alloys. A Contribution to Understanding Microbial and Nonmicrobial Sulfide Corrosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    therefore, the dominant reduced sulfur species considered in this paper. Conditions of Mineral Formation Figures 14 and 15 show the stability fields...would have been reduced to < 2 ppm in the first week. Although such low sulfide levels are not conducive to Cu-S mineral formation , copper sulfide

  11. The impact of electrogenic sulfide oxidation on elemental cycling and solute fluxes in coastal sediment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rao, A.M.F.; Malkin, S.Y.; Hidalgo-Martinez, S.; Meysman, Filip

    2016-01-01

    Filamentous sulfide oxidizing cable bacteria are capable of linking the oxidation of free sulfide in deep anoxic layers of marine sediments to the reduction of oxygen or nitrate in surface sediments by conducting electrons over centimeter-scale distances. Previous studies have shown that this newly

  12. Amperometric inhibitive biosensor based on horseradish peroxidase-nanoporous gold for sulfide determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Huihui; Liu, Zhuang; Wu, Chao; Xu, Ping; Wang, Xia

    2016-08-01

    As a well-known toxic pollutant, sulfide is harmful to human health. In this study, a simple and sensitive amperometric inhibitive biosensor was developed for the determination of sulfide in the environment. By immobilizing nanoporous gold (NPG) on glassy carbon electrode (GCE), and encapsulating horseradish peroxidase (HRP) onto NPG, a HRP/NPG/GCE bioelectrode for sulfide detection was successfully constructed based on the inhibition of sulfide on HRP activity with o-Phenylenediamine (OPD) as a substrate. The resulted HRP/NPG/GCE bioelectrode achieved a wide linear range of 0.1–40 μM in sulfide detection with a high sensitivity of 1720 μA mM‑1 cm‑2 and a low detection limit of 0.027 μM. Additionally, the inhibition of sulfide on HRP is competitive inhibition with OPD as a substrate by Michaelis-Menten analysis. Notably, the recovery of HRP activity was quickly achieved by washing the HRP/NPG/GCE bioelectrode using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) technique in deaerated PBS (50 mM, pH 7.0) for only 60 s. Furthermore, the real sample analysis of sulfide by the HRP/NPG/GCE bioelectrode was achieved. Based on above results, the HRP/NPG/GCE bioelectrode could be a better choice for the real determination of sulfide compared to inhibitive biosensors previously reported.

  13. Lanthanide complexes as luminogenic probes to measure sulfide levels in industrial samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thorson, Megan K. [Department of Medicinal Chemistry, University of Utah College of Pharmacy, Salt Lake City, UT 84108 (United States); Ung, Phuc [Monash Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Monash University, Victoria 3052 (Australia); Leaver, Franklin M. [Water & Energy Systems Technology, Inc., Kaysville, UT 84037 (United States); Corbin, Teresa S. [Quality Services Laboratory, Tesoro Refining and Marketing, Salt Lake City, UT 84103 (United States); Tuck, Kellie L., E-mail: kellie.tuck@monash.edu [School of Chemistry, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Graham, Bim, E-mail: bim.graham@monash.edu [Monash Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Monash University, Victoria 3052 (Australia); Barrios, Amy M., E-mail: amy.barrios@utah.edu [Department of Medicinal Chemistry, University of Utah College of Pharmacy, Salt Lake City, UT 84108 (United States)

    2015-10-08

    A series of lanthanide-based, azide-appended complexes were investigated as hydrogen sulfide-sensitive probes. Europium complex 1 and Tb complex 3 both displayed a sulfide-dependent increase in luminescence, while Tb complex 2 displayed a decrease in luminescence upon exposure to NaHS. The utility of the complexes for monitoring sulfide levels in industrial oil and water samples was investigated. Complex 3 provided a sensitive measure of sulfide levels in petrochemical water samples (detection limit ∼ 250 nM), while complex 1 was capable of monitoring μM levels of sulfide in partially refined crude oil. - Highlights: • Lanthanide–azide based sulfide sensors were synthesized and characterized. • The probes have excitation and emission profiles compatible with sulfide-contaminated samples from the petrochemical industry. • A terbium-based probe was used to measure the sulfide concentration in oil refinery wastewater. • A europium-based probe had compatibility with partially refined crude oil samples.

  14. The sampling of hydrogen sulfide in air with impregnated filter paper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huygen, C.

    1964-01-01

    A method is proposed for the quantitative collection of hydrogen sulfide in air on impregnated filter paper. An aqueous solution of potassium hydroxide, potassium zincate and glycerol is used as impregnating fluid. The stability of the collected sulfide and the efficiency of collection at different

  15. The Determination of Hydrogen Sulfide in Stack Gases, Iodometric Titration After Sulfite Removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles, E. G.

    The determination of hydrogen sulfide in effluents from coal-fired furnaces and incinerators is complicated by the presence of sulfur oxides (which form acids). Organic compounds also may interfere with or prevent the formation of the cadmium sulfide precipitate or give false positive results because of reaction with iodine. The report presents a…

  16. 30 CFR 250.215 - What hydrogen sulfide (H2S) information must accompany the EP?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What hydrogen sulfide (H2S) information must accompany the EP? 250.215 Section 250.215 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Contents of Exploration Plans (ep) § 250.215 What hydrogen sulfide (H2S) information must accompany the...

  17. Description of a redox-controlled sulfidostat for the growth of sulfide-oxidizing phototrophs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanchez, O; vanGemerden, H; Mas, J

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes a novel type of continuous culture for the growth of phototrophic sulfur oxidizers under constant concentrations of hydrogen sulfide, The culture maintains a constant concentration of sulfide despite possible variations in external factors likely to affect photosynthetic activit

  18. Band offset in zinc oxy-sulfide/cubic-tin sulfide interface from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    K. C., Sanal; Nair, P. K.; Nair, M. T. S.

    2017-02-01

    Zinc oxy-sulfide, ZnOxS1-x, has been found to provide better band alignment in thin film solar cells of tin sulfide of orthorhombic crystalline structure. Here we examine ZnOxS1-x/SnS-CUB interface, in which the ZnOxS1-x thin film was deposited by radio frequency (rf) magnetron sputtering on SnS thin film of cubic (CUB) crystalline structure with a band gap (Eg) of 1.72 eV, obtained via chemical deposition. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy provides the valence band maxima of the materials and hence places the conduction band offset of 0.41 eV for SnS-CUB/ZnO0.27S0.73 and -0.28 eV for SnS-CUB/ZnO0.88S0.12 interfaces. Thin films of ZnOxS1-x with 175-240 nm in thickness were deposited from targets prepared with different ZnO to ZnS molar ratios. With the target of molar ratio of 1:13.4, the thin films are of composition ZnO0.27S0.73 with hexagonal crystalline structure and with that of 1:1.7 ratio, it is ZnO0.88S0.12. The optical band gap of the ZnOxS1-x thin films varies from 2.90 eV to 3.21 eV as the sulfur to zinc ratio in the film increases from 0.12:1 to 0.73:1 as determined from X-ray diffraction patterns. Thus, band offsets sought for absorber materials and zinc oxy-sulfide in solar cells may be achieved through a choice of ZnO:ZnS ratio in the sputtering target.

  19. Vibrational Spectroscopic Studies of Hydrogen, Carbon-Monoxide and Thiophene Adsorption on Ruthenium-Sulfide and Sulfided Ruthenium Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heise, William Herbert

    The "working surface" of ruthenium hydrodesulfurization (HDS) catalysts has been modeled by preadsorption of sulfur, carbon and carbon plus sulfur on Ru(0001). Adsorption and decomposition of thiophene over these surfaces have been investigated using TDS/TPRS, XPS and EELS. Thiophene is proposed to decompose via a three-step mechanism involving: (i) initial thiophene cracking at 120 K yielding surface sulfur and hydrocarbon species, (ii) hydrogen desorption near 230 K providing additional decomposition ensembles and (iii) continued decomposition to form "metallocycle -like" intermediates which retain EELS features similar to thiophene. Preadsorbed carbon or carbon plus sulfur are not as effective for passivation of the surface toward metallocycle formation as preadsorbed sulfur alone. This result is attributed to the fact that carbon deposited from butadiene annealed and decomposed at 700 K forms islands, while sulfur establishes a well-ordered superlattice on the surface. The decrease in metallocycle formation with increasing poison levels appears to explain HDS selectivity and specific activity trends observed in our laboratory from mildly sulfided (10% H_2S/H_2 , 673 K, 2h) ruthenium catalysts retaining submonolayers of sulfur. Incoherent inelastic neutron scattering (IINS) has been used to characterize hydrogen adsorption sites on ruthenium sulfide. Hydrogen resides on sulfur anions to form SH groups, yielding two non-degenerate bending modes at 600 and 710 cm^{-1}. Complementary hydrogen adsorption and H_2/D _2 exchange data suggest that the active sites for hydrogen adsorption may be coordinatively unsaturated S-S anion pairs. Comparison of CO adsorption on sulfided Ru/Al _2O_3 to sulfur precovered Ru(0001) reveals an adsorption site related to edge/corner atoms directly perturbed by sulfur, consistent with previous kinetic studies demonstrating higher specific activity for thiophene HDS over smaller ruthenium crystallites.

  20. Sulfide and mercury species profiles in two Ontario boreal shield lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Jeff M; Hintelmann, Holger

    2014-09-01

    The cycling of sulfur in freshwater environments plays an important role in the cycling of metals. In this study, acid volatile sulfides were measured at nanomolar levels using a purge-and-trap preconcentration, followed by methylene blue derivatization with HPLC separation and UV-Vis detection. The limit of detection using the preconcentration step was 7.5ngL(-1) or 0.23nM sulfide. Profiles of sulfide and methylmercury were generated for two Ontario lakes. Sulfide concentrations were inversely related to dissolved oxygen concentrations and significant levels of anoxia had developed in both lakes. In both Plastic Lake and Lake 658, mercury concentrations also increased below the oxycline. Lake 658 showed a strong positive correlation between sulfide and methylmercury (CMeHg=2×10(-6)⋅Csulfide+0.198; r=0.96, p=1.2×10(-5)), at the time of sampling.

  1. Atomic layer deposition of metal sulfide thin films using non-halogenated precursors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinson, Alex B. F.; Elam, Jeffrey W.; Pellin, Michael J.

    2015-05-26

    A method for preparing a metal sulfide thin film using ALD and structures incorporating the metal sulfide thin film. The method includes providing an ALD reactor, a substrate, a first precursor comprising a metal and a second precursor comprising a sulfur compound. The first and the second precursors are reacted in the ALD precursor to form a metal sulfide thin film on the substrate. In a particular embodiment, the metal compound comprises Bis(N,N'-di-sec-butylacetamidinato)dicopper(I) and the sulfur compound comprises hydrogen sulfide (H.sub.2S) to prepare a Cu.sub.2S film. The resulting metal sulfide thin film may be used in among other devices, photovoltaic devices, including interdigitated photovoltaic devices that may use relatively abundant materials for electrical energy production.

  2. Decreasing sulfide generation in sewage by dosing formaldehyde and its derivatives under anaerobic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L; De Gusseme, B; De Schryver, P; Mendoza, L; Marzorati, M; Verstraete, W

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide emission in sewers is associated with toxicity, corrosion, odour nuisance and high costs. In this study, a new method to inhibit sulfide generation by means of formaldehyde and its derivatives has been evaluated under anaerobic conditions. The possible impact of formaldehyde on an activated sludge system and an appraisal of the economic aspects are presented as well. A dosage of 19 mg L(-1) formaldehyde resulted in a decrease of the sulfide production of 90%. Dosing of 32 mg L(-1) paraformaldehyde and addition of 111 mg L(-1) ureaformaldehyde were not sufficient to inhibit the sulfide generation in sewage to the same extent. The impacts of 19 mg L(-1) formaldehyde on activated sludge, in terms of COD removal, nitrification rate and oxygen uptake rates, were negligible. This suggests that formaldehyde dosage is a feasible technique to abate the sulfide problem in sewers.

  3. Hydrogen sulfide intervention in focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-juan Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to explore the mechanism underlying the protective effects of hydrogen sulfide against neuronal damage caused by cerebral ischemia/reperfusion. We established the middle cerebral artery occlusion model in rats via the suture method. Ten minutes after middle cerebral artery occlusion, the animals were intraperitoneally injected with hydrogen sulfide donor compound sodium hydrosulfide. Immunofluorescence revealed that the immunoreactivity of P2X 7 in the cerebral cortex and hippocampal CA1 region in rats with cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury decreased with hydrogen sulfide treatment. Furthermore, treatment of these rats with hydrogen sulfide significantly lowered mortality, the Longa neurological deficit scores, and infarct volume. These results indicate that hydrogen sulfide may be protective in rats with local cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury by down-regulating the expression of P2X 7 receptors.

  4. Repulsive Interaction of Sulfide Layers on Compressor Impeller Blades Remanufactured Through Plasma Spray Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Y.; Zhou, D.; Wang, Y. L.; Huang, H. H.

    2016-12-01

    This study investigated the repulsive interaction of sulfide layers on compressor impeller blades remanufactured through plasma spray welding (PSW). Sulfide layers on the blades made of FV(520)B steel were prepared through multifarious corrosion experiments, and PSW was utilized to remanufacture blade specimens. The specimens were evaluated through optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, 3D surface topography, x-ray diffraction, ImageJ software analysis, Vicker's micro-hardness test and tensile tests. Results showed a large number of sulfide inclusions in the fusion zone generated by sulfide layers embodied into the molten pool during PSW. These sulfide inclusions seriously degraded the mechanical performance of the blades remanufactured through PSW.

  5. What do we really know about the role of microorganisms in iron sulfide mineral formation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, Aude; Gartman, Amy; Girguis, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Iron sulfide mineralization in low-temperature systems is a result of biotic and abiotic processes, though the delineation between these two modes of formation is not always straightforward. Here we review the role of microorganisms in the precipitation of extracellular iron sulfide minerals. We summarize the evidence that links sulfur-metabolizing microorganisms and sulfide minerals in nature and we present a critical overview of laboratory-based studies of the nucleation and growth of iron sulfide minerals in microbial cultures. We discuss whether biologically derived minerals are distinguishable from abiotic minerals, possessing attributes that are uniquely diagnostic of biomineralization. These inquiries have revealed the need for additional thorough, mechanistic and high-resolution studies to understand microbially mediated formation of a variety of sulfide minerals across a range of natural environments.

  6. What do we really know about the role of microorganisms in iron sulfide mineral formation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, Aude A.; Gartman, Amy; Girguis, Peter R.

    2016-01-01

    Iron sulfide mineralization in low-temperature systems is a result of biotic and abiotic processes, though the delineation between these two modes of formation is not always straightforward. Here we review the role of microorganisms in the precipitation of extracellular iron sulfide minerals. We summarize the evidence that links sulfur-metabolizing microorganisms and sulfide minerals in nature and we present a critical overview of laboratory-based studies of the nucleation and growth of iron sulfide minerals in microbial cultures. We discuss whether biologically derived minerals are distinguishable from abiotic minerals, possessing attributes that are uniquely diagnostic of biomineralization. These inquiries have revealed the need for additional thorough, mechanistic and high-resolution studies to understand microbially mediated formation of a variety of sulfide minerals across a range of natural environments.

  7. QEXAFS study of the sulfidation of NiMo/Al2O3 hydrotreating catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattaneo, R; Shido, T; Prins, R

    2001-03-01

    Quick-scanning extended X-ray absorption fine structure (QEXAFS) spectroscopy was employed to investigate in situ the sulfidation of Mo and Ni in y-AI2O3-supported hydrotreating catalysts modified with chelating ligands. Mo K-edge QEXAFS enabled the detection of an intermediate product in the sulfidation of Mo. The parameters obtained from the fits of the QEXAFS spectra showed that this product consists of compounds similar to Mo2S2-(12) or Mo3S2-(13). QEXAFS also demonstrated that the sulfidation of Ni is strongly influenced by the presence of chelating ligands. Classical EXAFS spectra of the sulfided catalysts showed that Ni forms small sulfided clusters, the size of which is influenced by the presence or absence of the chelating agents.

  8. Synthesis of rare earth sulfides and their UV-vis absorption spectra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Haibin; ZHANG Jianhui; YU Ruijin; SU Qiang

    2009-01-01

    Rare earth sulfides were systematically synthesized via the sulfurization of their commercial oxide powders using CS2 gas to shorten sulfurization time, and their UV-vis absorption spectra were investigated. The appropriate sulfurization conditions were studied. For the rare earth sulfides with the same crystal structure, the sulfurization temperature showed increasing tendency with the decrease of rare earth element atomic radii. The UV-vis absorption spectra of rare earth sulfides did not depend on the crystal structure of rare earth sulfides, but on the 4f electronic structure of rare earth element. The data showed that the optical band gaps of rare earth sulfides were irregular, and the values ranged from 1.65 to 3.75 eV.

  9. Hydrogen sulfide intervention in focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin-Juan; Li, Chao-Kun; Wei, Lin-Yu; Lu, Na; Wang, Guo-Hong; Zhao, Hong-Gang; Li, Dong-Liang

    2015-06-01

    The present study aimed to explore the mechanism underlying the protective effects of hydrogen sulfide against neuronal damage caused by cerebral ischemia/reperfusion. We established the middle cerebral artery occlusion model in rats via the suture method. Ten minutes after middle cerebral artery occlusion, the animals were intraperitoneally injected with hydrogen sulfide donor compound sodium hydrosulfide. Immunofluorescence revealed that the immunoreactivity of P2X7 in the cerebral cortex and hippocampal CA1 region in rats with cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury decreased with hydrogen sulfide treatment. Furthermore, treatment of these rats with hydrogen sulfide significantly lowered mortality, the Longa neurological deficit scores, and infarct volume. These results indicate that hydrogen sulfide may be protective in rats with local cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury by down-regulating the expression of P2X7 receptors.

  10. A NEW BIOGENIC SULFIDE CHEMICAL SENSOR FOR MARINE ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING AND SURVEY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋金明; 赵卫东

    2001-01-01

    A new convenient sulfide electrochemical sensor for marine environmental insitumonitoring and real time survey was developed. The new sensor based on a solid Ag2 S membrane electrode has outstanding chemical sensitivity and stability. It responds to the activity of sulfide ions according to a Nernsfian slope of - 31mV/decade. The sensor can be used to determine the total concentration of sulfides ( CT ) by calibrating the pH value of the solution to a standard pH. The practical measurement range for total sulfide concentration is 0.1 - 10 mg/L in seawater. The sensor has a very low potential drift ( < 4mV) during two months in 0.1 mg/L sulfide seawater. This paper describes the preparation of the sensitive membrane and some main properties of the sensor.

  11. A NEW BIOGENIC SULFIDE CHEMICAL SENSOR FOR MARINE ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING AND SURVEY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A new convenient sulfide electrochemical sensor for marine environmental in-situ monitoring and real time survey was developed. The new sensor based on a solid Ag2S membrane electrode has outstanding chemical sensitivity and stability. It responds to the activity of sulfide ions according to a Nernstian slope of -31mV/decade. The sensor can be used to determine the total concentration of sulfides (CT) by calibrating the pH value of the solution to a standard pH. The practical measurement range for total sulfide concentration is 0.1-10 mg/L in seawater. The sensor has a very low potential drift (<4mV) during two months in 0.1 mg/L sulfide seawater. This paper describes the preparation of the sensitive membrane and some main properties of the sensor.

  12. Influence of sulfides on the tribological properties of composites produced by pulse electric current sintering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Seung Ho Kim

    2014-01-01

    Self-lubricating Al2O3-15wt%ZrO2 composites with sulfides, such as molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) and tungsten disulfide (WS2) serving as solid lubricants, were fabricated by using the pulse electric current sintering (PECS) technique. The coefficient of friction (COF) of the Al2O3-15wt%ZrO2 composite without/with sulfides was in the range of 0.37-0.48 and 0.27-0.49, respectively. As the amount of sul-fides increased, the COF and the wear rate decreased. The reduction in COF and wear rate of the sulfide-containing composite is caused by a reduction in shear stresses between the specimen and the tribological medium due to the formation of a lubricating film resulting from the lamellar structure of sulfides located on the worn surface.

  13. 75 FR 19319 - Hydrogen Sulfide; Community Right-to-Know Toxic Chemical Release Reporting; Extension of Comment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-14

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 372 RIN 2025-AA27 Hydrogen Sulfide; Community Right-to-Know Toxic Chemical Release...) section 313 toxic chemical release reporting requirements for hydrogen sulfide (Chemical Abstracts Service... otherwise use hydrogen sulfide. Potentially affected categories and entities may include, but are...

  14. 40 CFR 60.648 - Optional procedure for measuring hydrogen sulfide in acid gas-Tutwiler Procedure. 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... hydrogen sulfide in acid gas-Tutwiler Procedure. 1 60.648 Section 60.648 Protection of Environment... procedure for measuring hydrogen sulfide in acid gas—Tutwiler Procedure. 1 1 Gas Engineers Handbook, Fuel.... In principle, this method consists of titrating hydrogen sulfide in a gas sample directly with...

  15. The lithiation and acyl transfer reactions of phosphine oxides, sulfides and boranes in the synthesis of cyclopropanes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clarke, Celia; Fox, David J; Pedersen, Daniel Sejer;

    2009-01-01

    Phosphine oxides are lithiated much faster than phosphine sulfides and phosphine boranes. Phosphine sulfides are in turn lithiated much more readily than phosphine boranes. It was possible to trap a phosphine sulfide THF in one case which upon treatment with t-BuOK gave cyclopropane, showing that...

  16. Heavy Metals in a Sulfidic Minespoil: Fractions and Column Leaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Fractions of various heavy metals in a sulfidic minespoil were investigated. Column leaching experimentwas also conducted to simulate "acid mine drainage" (AMD) from the minespoil. The results show thatleaching of heavy metals from the minespoil was extremely significant during the initial water flushing.The amounts of heavy metals leached out dramatically reduced after leaching twice. It is worthwhile tonote that in this study, Zn, Mn, Fe, As and Ni in the first leachate exceeded the total amount of eachcorresponding water-extractable (1:5, soil:water) metal contained in the minespoil sample. This appears tosuggest that 1:5 water extraction did not allow accurate estimation of water-leachable concentrations of theabove heavy metals. This work has implications for the management of sulfidic minespoils. Acid drainageof great environmental concerns is likely to occur only during heavy rainfall events after substantial solubleand readily exchangeable acid and metals are accumulated in the minespoils. The slow-reacting fractionsother than water-soluble and readily exchangeable fractions may pose little environmental hazards. This isparticularly true for Pb, As and Ni.

  17. Oxygen-free atomic layer deposition of indium sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Robert F; Weimer, Matthew S; Emery, Jonathan D; Hock, Adam S; Martinson, Alex B F

    2014-08-13

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of indium sulfide (In2S3) films was achieved using a newly synthesized indium precursor and hydrogen sulfide. We obtain dense and adherent thin films free from halide and oxygen impurities. Self-limiting half-reactions are demonstrated at temperatures up to 225 °C, where oriented crystalline thin films are obtained without further annealing. Low-temperature growth of 0.89 Å/cycle is observed at 150 °C, while higher growth temperatures gradually reduce the per-cycle growth rate. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) together with depth-profiling Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) reveal a S/In ratio of 1.5 with no detectable carbon, nitrogen, halogen, or oxygen impurities. The resistivity of thin films prior to air exposure decreases with increasing deposition temperature, reaching In2S3 via ALD at temperatures up to 225 °C may allow high quality thin films to be leveraged in optoelectronic devices including photovoltaic absorbers, buffer layers, and intermediate band materials.

  18. Accelerating column leaching trial on copper sulfide ore

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hongjiang; WU Aixiang; ZHOU Xun; WANG Shaoyong; ZHANG Jie

    2008-01-01

    The main measures to accelerate leaching sulfide ore are large spraying intensity,manual oxygen supply,temperature control and acclimated bacteria.The indoor experiment accelerating sulfide ore leaching detected the temperature during leaching process,dissolvability of oxygen,bacterial concentration,Cu concentration and slag grade.At the same time,this paper also analyzed the effect of four factors,which are bacterial diversity cultivation stage,spraying intensity,air supply,and whether to control temperature,on the leaching efficiency of copper.The results indicate that the oxygen content of leach solution has a close relationship with temperature but it is rarely affected by air supply.The bacterial concentration preserves from 106 to 107 mL-1,and temperature has a great effect on the bacterial activity under the condition of proper temperature and oxygen supply,and the lack of nutrition prevents the bacterial concentration from rising in the late stage.The relationships of the copper leaching efficiency to temperature,air feed,and spraying intensity are directly proportional.The leaching efficiencies of the cultivated bacteria and acclimation bacteria are 1.2 and 1.4 times as large as that of the original bacteria.

  19. Hydrogen attack - Influence of hydrogen sulfide. [on carbon steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliezer, D.; Nelson, H. G.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental study is conducted on 12.5-mm-thick SAE 1020 steel (plain carbon steel) plate to assess hydrogen attack at room temperature after specimen exposure at 525 C to hydrogen and a blend of hydrogen sulfide and hydrogen at a pressure of 3.5 MN/sq m for exposure times up to 240 hr. The results are discussed in terms of tensile properties, fissure formation, and surface scales. It is shown that hydrogen attack from a high-purity hydrogen environment is severe, with the formation of numerous methane fissures and bubbles along with a significant reduction in the room-temperature tensile yield and ultimate strengths. However, no hydrogen attack is observed in the hydrogen/hydrogen sulfide blend environment, i.e. no fissure or bubble formation occurred and the room-temperature tensile properties remained unchanged. It is suggested that the observed porous discontinuous scale of FeS acts as a barrier to hydrogen entry, thus reducing its effective equilibrium solubility in the iron lattice. Therefore, hydrogen attack should not occur in pressure-vessel steels used in many coal gasification processes.

  20. Critical temperature of metallic hydrogen sulfide at 225-GPa pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryashov, N. A.; Kutukov, A. A.; Mazur, E. A.

    2017-01-01

    The Eliashberg theory generalized for electron—phonon systems with a nonconstant density of electron states and with allowance made for the frequency behavior of the electron mass and chemical potential renormalizations is used to study T c in the SH3 phase of hydrogen sulfide under pressure. The phonon contribution to the anomalous electron Green's function is considered. The pairing within the total width of the electron band and not only in a narrow layer near the Fermi surface is taken into account. The frequency and temperature dependences of the complex mass renormalization Re Z(ω), the density of states N(ɛ) renormalized by the electron—phonon interactions, and the electron—phonon spectral function obtained computationally are used to calculate the anomalous electron Green's function. A generalized Eliashberg equation with a variable density of electron states has been solved. The frequency dependence of the real and imaginary parts of the order parameter in the SH3 phase has been obtained. The value of T c ≈ 177 K in the SH3 phase of hydrogen sulfide at pressure P = 225 GPa has been determined by solving the system of Eliashberg equations.

  1. Bioleaching of low grade nickel sulfide mineral in column reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHEN Shi-jie; QIN Wen-qing; YAN Zhong-qiang; ZHANG Yan-sheng; WANG Jun; REN Liu-yi

    2008-01-01

    Jinchuan low grade nickel (0.4%-0.6% Ni,mass fraction) sulfide mineral ore contains a remarkably high content of magnesia (30%-35% MgO,mass fraction) present in the main gangue minerals.Bioleaching was performed to investigate the feasibility to process the mineral due to its relative simplicity,eco-friendly operation and low capital cost requirements.The mixed mesophiles were enriched from acid mine drainage samples collected from several acid mines in China.Considering that the magnesia is easily extracted by acid solution and the excessive Mg2+ will exceed the tolerance of the mixed mesophiles,three effective means were used to reduce the disadvantage of magnesia during the bioleaching operation.They were adaptation of the mixed mesophiles to improve the tolerance; pre-leaching to remove most leachable magnesia and periodic bleeds of a portion of the pregnant leaching solution to control the level of Mg2+ based on the tolerance of the mixed mesophiles.An extraction of nickel (90.3%) and cobalt (88.6%) was successfully achieved within a 300 d leaching process from the Jinchuan low grade nickel sulfide mineral ore using a column reactor at ambient temperature.

  2. Control of microbially generated hydrogen sulfide in produced waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burger, E.D.; Vance, I.; Gammack, G.F.; Duncan, S.E.

    1995-12-31

    Production of hydrogen sulfide in produced waters due to the activity of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) is a potentially serious problem. The hydrogen sulfide is not only a safety and environmental concern, it also contributes to corrosion, solids formation, a reduction in produced oil and gas values, and limitations on water discharge. Waters produced from seawater-flooded reservoirs typically contain all of the nutrients required to support SRB metabolism. Surface processing facilities provide a favorable environment in which SRB flourish, converting water-borne nutrients into biomass and H{sub 2}S. This paper will present results from a field trial in which a new technology for the biochemical control of SRB metabolism was successfully applied. A slip stream of water downstream of separators on a produced water handling facility was routed through a bioreactor in a side-steam device where microbial growth was allowed to develop fully. This slip stream was then treated with slug doses of two forms of a proprietary, nonbiocidal metabolic modifier. Results indicated that H{sub 2}S production was halted almost immediately and that the residual effect of the treatment lasted for well over one week.

  3. Sulfide mineralization: Its role in chemical weathering of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Roger G.

    1988-01-01

    Pyrrhotite-pentlandite assemblages in mafic and ultramafic igneous rocks may have contributed significantly to the chemical weathering reactions that produced degradation products in the Martian regolith. By analogy with terrestrial processes, a model is proposed whereby supergene alteration of these primary Fe-Ni sulfides on Mars has generated secondary sulfides (e.g., pyrite) below the water table and produced acidic groundwater containing high concentrations of dissolved Fe, Ni and sulfate ions. The low pH solutions also initiated weathering reactions of igneous feldspars and ferromagnesian silicates to form clay silicate and ferric oxyhydroxide phases. Near-surface oxidation and hydrolysis of ferric sulfato- and hydroxo-complex ions and sols formed gossans above the water table consisting of poorly crystalline hydrated ferric sulfates (e.g., jarosite), oxides (ferrihydrite, goethite) and silica (opal). Underlying groundwater, now permafrost, contains hydroxo sulfato complexes of Fe, Al, Mg, Ni, etc., which may be stabilized in frozen acidic solutions beneath the surface of Mars. Sublimation of permafrost may replenish colloidal ferric oxides, sulfates and phyllosilicates during dust storms on Mars.

  4. Nitrosopersulfide (SSNO− accounts for sustained NO bioactivity of S-nitrosothiols following reaction with sulfide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam M. Cortese-Krott

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sulfide salts are known to promote the release of nitric oxide (NO from S-nitrosothiols and potentiate their vasorelaxant activity, but much of the cross-talk between hydrogen sulfide and NO is believed to occur via functional interactions of cell regulatory elements such as phosphodiesterases. Using RFL-6 cells as an NO reporter system we sought to investigate whether sulfide can also modulate nitrosothiol-mediated soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC activation following direct chemical interaction. We find a U-shaped dose response relationship where low sulfide concentrations attenuate sGC stimulation by S-nitrosopenicillamine (SNAP and cyclic GMP levels are restored at equimolar ratios. Similar results are observed when intracellular sulfide levels are raised by pre-incubation with the sulfide donor, GYY4137. The outcome of direct sulfide/nitrosothiol interactions also critically depends on molar reactant ratios and is accompanied by oxygen consumption. With sulfide in excess, a ‘yellow compound’ accumulates that is indistinguishable from the product of solid-phase transnitrosation of either hydrosulfide or hydrodisulfide and assigned to be nitrosopersulfide (perthionitrite, SSNO−; λmax 412 nm in aqueous buffers, pH 7.4; 448 nm in DMF. Time-resolved chemiluminescence and UV–visible spectroscopy analyses suggest that its generation is preceded by formation of the short-lived NO-donor, thionitrite (SNO−. In contrast to the latter, SSNO− is rather stable at physiological pH and generates both NO and polysulfides on decomposition, resulting in sustained potentiation of SNAP-induced sGC stimulation. Thus, sulfide reacts with nitrosothiols to form multiple bioactive products; SSNO− rather than SNO− may account for some of the longer-lived effects of nitrosothiols and contribute to sulfide and NO signaling.

  5. Effects of sulfide treatment on electronic transport of graphene/n-type Si Schottky diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Jian-Jhou; Lin, Yow-Jon, E-mail: rzr2390@yahoo.com.tw

    2014-05-01

    The present work reports the fabrication and detailed electrical properties of graphene/n-type Si Schottky diodes with and without sulfide treatment. The graphene/n-type Si Schottky diode without sulfide treatment shows a poor rectifying behavior with an ideality factor (η) of 4.2 and high leakage. η > 2 implies that the interfacial defects influence the electronic conduction through the device. However, the graphene/n-type Si Schottky diode with sulfide treatment for 5 min shows a good rectifying behavior with η of 1.8 and low leakage. Such an improvement indicates that a good passivation is formed at the interface as a result of the reduction of the defect density. These experimental demonstrations suggest that it may be possible to minimize the adverse effects of the interface states to obtain functional devices using sulfide treatment. In addition, the graphene/n-type Si Schottky diode with sulfide treatment for 10 min shows a poor rectifying behavior with η of 2.5 and high leakage. Note, a suitable sulfide treatment time is an important issue for improving the device performance. - Highlights: • Graphene/Si diodes with sulfide treatment for 5 min show a good rectifying behavior. • Graphene/Si diodes without sulfide treatment show a poor rectifying behavior. • The interfacial defects of Schottky diodes were controlled by sulfide treatment. • Such an improvement indicates that a good passivation is formed at the interface. • A suitable sulfide treatment time is an important issue for improving performances.

  6. Magmatic Cu-Ni sulfide mineralization of the Huangshannan mafic-untramafic intrusion, Eastern Tianshan, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yun; Xue, Chunji; Zhao, Xiaobo; Yang, YongQiang; Ke, Junjun

    2015-06-01

    The Huangshannan Ni-Cu (-PGE) sulfide deposit, a new discovery from geological prospecting in Eastern Tianshan, is in a belt of magmatic Ni-Cu (-PGE) sulfide deposits along the southern margin of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt. The host intrusion of the Huangshannan deposit is composed of a layered ultramafic sequence and a massive gabbro-diorite unit. The major sulfide orebodies occur mainly within websterite and lherzolite in the layered ultramafic sequence. In-situ zircon U-Pb dating analyses yielded a crystallization age of 282.5 ± 1.4 Ma, similar to the ages of the Permian Tarim mantle plume. Samples from the Huangshannan intrusion are characterized by nearly flat rare earth elements patterns, negative Zr, Ti and Nb anomalies, arc-like Th/Yb and Nb/Yb ratios, and significantly lower rare earth element and immobile trace element contents than the Tarim basalts. These characteristics suggest that the Huangshannan intrusion was not generated from the Tarim mantle plume. The primary magma for the Huangshannan intrusion and its associated sulfide mineralization were formed from different pulses of picritic magma with different degrees of crustal contamination. The first pulse underwent an initial removal of 0.016% sulfide in the deep magma chamber. The evolved magma reached sulfide saturation again in the shallow magma chamber and formed sulfide ores in lherzolite. The second pulse of magma reached a level of 0.022% sulfide segregation at staging chamber before ascending up to the shallow magma chamber. In the shallow conduit system, this sulfide-unsaturated magma mixed with the first pulse of magma and with contamination from the country rocks, leading to the formation of sulfide ores in websterite. The third magma pulse from the deep chamber formed the unmineralized massive gabbro-diorite unit of the Huangshannan intrusion.

  7. Synthesis of Nanoporous Metals, Oxides, Carbides, and Sulfides: Beyond Nanocasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luc, Wesley; Jiao, Feng

    2016-07-19

    metal oxides with bimodal pore size distributions can be obtained. Combining nanocasting with chemical etching, a cobalt oxide with a hierarchical porous structure was synthesized, which possessed a surface area up to 250 m(2) g(-1), representing the highest surface area reported to date for nanoporous cobalt oxides. Lastly, this Account also covers the syntheses of nanoporous metal carbides and sulfides. The combination of in situ carburization and nanocasting enabled the syntheses of two ordered nanoporous metal carbides, Mo2C and W2C. For nanoporous metal sulfides, an "oxide-to-sulfide" synthetic strategy was proposed to address the large volume change issue of converting metal nitrate precursors to metal sulfide products in nanocasting. The successful syntheses of ordered nanoporous FeS2, CoS2, and NiS2 demonstrated the feasibility of the "oxide-to-sulfide" method. Concluding remarks include a summary of recent advances in the syntheses of nanoporous metal-based solids and a brief discussion of future opportunities in the hope of stimulating new interests and ideas.

  8. Carbonyl sulfide and dimethyl sulfide fluxes in an urban lawn and adjacent bare soil in Guangzhou, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Zhigang; Wang, Xinming

    2011-01-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS) and dimethyl sulfide (DMS) fluxes from an urban Cynodon dactylon lawn and adjacent bare soil were measured during April-July 2005 in Guangzhou, China. Both the lawn and bare soil acted as sinks for COS and sources for DMS. The mean fluxes of COS and DMS in the lawn (-19.27 and 18.16 pmol/(m2 sec), respectively) were significantly higher than those in the bare soil (-9.89 and 9.35 pmol/(m2 sec), respectively). Fluxes of COS and DMS in mowed lawn were also higher than those in bare soils. Both COS and DMS fluxes showed diurnal variation with detectable but much lower values in the nighttime than in the daytime. COS fluxes were related significantly to temperature and the optimal temperature for COS uptake was 29 degrees C. While positive linear correlations were found between DMS fluxes and temperature. COS fluxes increased linearly with ambient COS mixing ratios, and had a compensation point of 336 ppt.

  9. Effect of rainfall on terrestrial fluxes of global cooling gases: carbonyl sulfide (COS) and its precursor dimethyl sulfide (DMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelan, M.; Rhew, R. C.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric sulfur compounds regulate climate by affecting cloud dynamics and reducing the amount of direct solar radiation that reaches the Earth's surface, and are notable for sometimes resulting in a global cooling effect. Carbonyl sulfide (COS) is the most abundant sulfur-containing gas in the atmosphere. Dimethyl sulfide (DMS), known to be produced by phytoplankton and bacteria, is oxidized in the atmosphere by hydroxl radicals, forming a considerable portion of the total atmospheric COS. Changes in soil moisture are expected to influence the direction of net gas fluxes of both COS and DMS. With the goal of refining existing models of sulfur gas fluxes, this study observes dramatic changes in the rates of production and consumption of COS and DMS when in situ grass-covered soils are initially wetted. Here we report the effect of simulated rainfall on uncultivated marine terrace field sites near Santa Cruz, CA (37.0 °N, 122°W) in the dry season using static flux chambers. Dry plots exhibited fluxes of DMS and COS below method detection limits. Immediately after a simulated rainfall event, DMS fluxes increased, then declined from their post-rainfall maxima by 90 minutes after wetting. Fluxes of COS from wetted plots showed occasional uptake, but were not consistent between sites. These results agree with observations from our lab-based soil incubation experiments.

  10. Carbonyl sulfide and dimethyl sulfide fluxes in an urban lawn and adjacent bare soil in Guangzhou, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhigang Yi; Xinming Wang

    2011-01-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS) and dimethyl sulfide (DMS) fluxes from an urban Cynodon dactylon lawn and adjacent bare soil were measured during April-July 2005 in Guangzhou, China.Both the lawn and bare soil acted as sinks for COS and sources for DMS.The mean fluxes of COS and DMS in the lawn (-19.27 and 18.16 pmol/(m2·sec), respectively) were significantly higher than those in the bare soil (-9.89 and 9.35 pmol/(m2·sec), respectively).Fluxes of COS and DMS in mowed lawn were also higher than those in bare soils.Both COS and DMS fluxes showed diurnal variation with detectable but much lower values in the nighttime than in the daytime.COS fluxes were related significantly to temperature and the optimal temperature for COS uptake was 29℃.While positive linear correlations were found between DMS fluxes and temperature.COS fluxes increased linearly with ambient COS mixing ratios,and had a compensation point of 336 ppt.

  11. Replacive sulfide formation in anhydrite chimneys from the Pacmanus hydrothermal field, Papua New Guinea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Los, Catharina; Bach, Wolfgang; Plümper, Oliver

    2016-04-01

    Hydrothermal flow within the oceanic crust is an important process for the exchange of energy and mass between the lithosphere, hydrosphere and biosphere. Infiltrated seawater heats up and interacts with wall rock, causing mineral replacement reactions. These play a large role in the formation of ore deposits; at the discharge zone, a hot, acidic and metal-rich potential ore fluid exits the crust. It mixes with seawater and forms chimneys, built up of sulfate minerals such as anhydrite (CaSO4), which are subsequently replaced by sulfide minerals. Sulfide formation is related to fluid pathways, defined by cracks and pores in the sulfate chimney. Over time, these systems might develop into massive sulfide deposits. The big question is then: how is sulfate-sulfide replacement related to the evolution of rock porosity? To address this question, sulfide-bearing anhydrite chimneys from the Pacmanus hydrothermal field (Manus Basin, Papua New Guinea) were studied using X-ray tomography, EMPA, FIB-SEM and -TEM. The apparently massive anhydrite turns out highly porous on the micro scale, with sulfide minerals in anhydrite cleavage planes and along grain boundaries. The size of the sulfide grains relates to the pores they grew into, suggesting a tight coupling between dissolution (porosity generation) and growth of replacive minerals. Some of the sulfide grains are hollow and apparently used the dissolving anhydrite as a substrate to start growth in a pore. Another mode of sulfide development is aggregates of euhedral pyrite cores surrounded by colloform chalcopyrite. This occurrence implies that fluid pathways have remained open for some time to allow several stages of precipitation during fluid evolution. To start the replacement and to keep it going, porosity generation is crucial. Our samples show that dissolution of anhydrite occurred along pathways where fluid could enter, such as cleavage planes and grain boundaries. It appears that fluids ascending within the inner

  12. Cu-Ni-PGE fertility of the Yoko-Dovyren layered massif (northern Transbaikalia, Russia): thermodynamic modeling of sulfide compositions in low mineralized dunite based on quantitative sulfide mineralogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariskin, Alexey A.; Kislov, Evgeny V.; Danyushevsky, Leonid V.; Nikolaev, Georgy S.; Fiorentini, Marco L.; Gilbert, Sarah; Goemann, Karsten; Malyshev, Alexey

    2016-12-01

    The geology and major types of sulfide mineralization in the Yoko-Dovyren layered massif (northern Transbaikalia, Russia) are presented. This study focuses on the structure, mineralogy, and geochemistry of poorly mineralized plagiodunite and dunite in the lower part of the intrusion. Assuming these rocks contain key information on the timing of sulfide immiscibility in the original cumulate pile, we apply a novel approach which combines estimates of the average sulfide compositions in each particular rock with thermodynamic modeling of the geochemistry of the original sulfide liquid. To approach the goal, an updated sulfide version of the COMAGMAT-5 model was used. Results of simulations of sulfide immiscibility in initially S-undersaturated olivine cumulates demonstrate a strong effect of the decreasing fraction of the silicate melt, due to crystallization of silicate and oxide minerals, on the composition of the intercumulus sulfide liquid. Comparison of the observed and modeled sulfide compositions indicates that the proposed modeling reproduces well the average concentrations of Cu, Cd, Ag, and Pd in natural sulfides. This suggests the sulfide control on the distribution of these elements in the rocks. Conversely, data for Pt and Au suggest that a significant portion of these elements could present in a native form, thus depleting the intercumulus sulfide melt at an early stage of crystallization.

  13. Nitrogen release from forest soils containing sulfide-bearing sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maileena Nieminen, Tiina; Merilä, Päivi; Ukonmaanaho, Liisa

    2014-05-01

    Soils containing sediments dominated by metal sulfides cause high acidity and release of heavy metals, when excavated or drained, as the aeration of these sediments causes formation of sulfuric acid. Consequent leaching of acidity and heavy metals can kill tree seedlings and animals such as fish, contaminate water, and corrode concrete and steel. These types of soils are called acid sulfate soils. Their metamorphic equivalents, such as sulfide rich black shales, pose a very similar risk of acidity and metal release to the environment. Until today the main focus in treatment of the acid sulfate soils has been to prevent acidification and metal toxicity to agricultural crop plants, and only limited attention has been paid to the environmental threat caused by the release of acidity and heavy metals to the surrounding water courses. Even less attention is paid on release of major nutrients, such as nitrogen, although these sediments are extremely rich in carbon and nitrogen and present a potentially high microbiological activity. In Europe, the largest cover of acid sulfate soils is found in coastal lowlands of Finland. Estimates of acid sulfate soils in agricultural use range from 1 300 to 3 000 km2, but the area in other land use classes, such as managed peatland forests, is presumably larger. In Finland, 49 500 km2 of peatlands have been drained for forestry, and most of these peatland forests will be at the regeneration stage within 10 to 30 years. As ditch network maintenance is often a prerequisite for a successful establishment of the following tree generation, the effects of maintenance operations on the quality of drainage water should be under special control in peatlands underlain by sulfide-bearing sediments. Therefore, identification of risk areas and effective prevention of acidity and metal release during drain maintenance related soil excavating are great challenges for forestry on coastal lowlands of Finland. The organic and inorganic nitrogen

  14. Structural effects of naphthalimide-based fluorescent sensor for hydrogen sulfide and imaging in live zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seon-Ae; Park, Chul Soon; Kwon, Oh Seok; Giong, Hoi-Khoanh; Lee, Jeong-Soo; Ha, Tai Hwan; Lee, Chang-Soo

    2016-05-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an important biological messenger, but few biologically-compatible methods are available for its detection in aqueous solution. Herein, we report a highly water-soluble naphthalimide-based fluorescent probe (L1), which is a highly versatile building unit that absorbs and emits at long wavelengths and is selective for hydrogen sulfide over cysteine, glutathione, and other reactive sulfur, nitrogen, and oxygen species in aqueous solution. We describe turn-on fluorescent probes based on azide group reduction on the fluorogenic ‘naphthalene’ moiety to fluorescent amines and intracellular hydrogen sulfide detection without the use of an organic solvent. L1 and L2 were synthetically modified to functional groups with comparable solubility on the N-imide site, showing a marked change in turn-on fluorescent intensity in response to hydrogen sulfide in both PBS buffer and living cells. The probes were readily employed to assess intracellular hydrogen sulfide level changes by imaging endogenous hydrogen sulfide signal in RAW264.7 cells incubated with L1 and L2. Expanding the use of L1 to complex and heterogeneous biological settings, we successfully visualized hydrogen sulfide detection in the yolk, brain and spinal cord of living zebrafish embryos, thereby providing a powerful approach for live imaging for investigating chemical signaling in complex multicellular systems.

  15. Hydrogen sulfide gas emission under turbulent conditions - an experimental approach for free-fall drops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matias, N M; Matos, J S; Ferreira, F

    2014-01-01

    Odor nuisance and sulfide corrosion in sewers carrying septic wastewater are accelerated at points of turbulence such as drops in manholes, but accurate methods or empirical expressions to evaluate the gas stripping rate at those particular sites are still missing. With the aim of improving the current knowledge on the influence of free-fall drops on the release of hydrogen sulfide gas, an experimental set-up was built allowing different free-fall drops heights and flows. Three types of experiments were carried out: reaeration tests without sulfide; sulfide oxidation tests; and hydrogen sulfide release tests. With the increase of the free-fall drop height or of the flow, a higher rate of air-to-water mass oxygen transfer was observed. Results regarding sulfide oxidation tests with reaeration through the free-fall have shown that the oxidation rate was correlated with flow. In the hydrogen sulfide release tests, the maximum concentration in the atmosphere reached 500 ppm. Results also showed that increasing the flow rate decreased the time at which the maximum concentrations in the atmosphere were observed.

  16. Effects of loading rate and hydraulic residence time on anoxic sulfide biooxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Jing; ZHENG Ping; MAHMOOD Qaisar; ISLAM Ejazul; HU Bao-lan; WU Dong-lei

    2007-01-01

    The optimal operation conditions in an anoxic sulfide oxidizing (ASO) bioreactor were investigated. The maximal loading rates (LRs) observed through decreasing hydraulic retention time (HRT) at fixed substrate concentration are higher than those by increasing substrate concentration at fixed HRT. The sulfide oxidation in ASO reactor was partially producing both sulfate and sulfur; but the amount of sulfate produced was approximately one third that of sulfur. The process was able to tolerate high sulfide concentration, as the sulfide removal percentage always remained near 99% when influent concentration was up to 580 mg/L. It tolerated relatively lower nitrate concentration because the removal percentage dropped to 85% when influent concentration was increased above 110 mg/L. The process can tolerate shorter HRT but careful operation is needed. Nitrate conversion was more sensitive to HRT than sulfide conversion since the process performance deteriorated abruptly when HRT was decreased from 3.12 h to 2.88 h. In order to avoid nitrite accumulation in the reactor, the influent sulfide and nitrate concentrations should be kept at 280 mg/L and 67.5 mg/L respectively. Present biotechnology is useful for removing sulfides from sewers and crude oil.

  17. A paradox resolved: Sulfide acquisition by roots of seep tubeworms sustains net chemoautotrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freytag, John K.; Girguis, Peter R.; Bergquist, Derk C.; Andras, Jason P.; Childress, James J.; Fisher, Charles R.

    2001-01-01

    Vestimentiferan tubeworms, symbiotic with sulfur-oxidizing chemoautotrophic bacteria, dominate many cold-seep sites in the Gulf of Mexico. The most abundant vestimentiferan species at these sites, Lamellibrachia cf. luymesi, grows quite slowly to lengths exceeding 2 meters and lives in excess of 170–250 years. L. cf. luymesi can grow a posterior extension of its tube and tissue, termed a “root,” down into sulfidic sediments below its point of original attachment. This extension can be longer than the anterior portion of the animal. Here we show, using methods optimized for detection of hydrogen sulfide down to 0.1 μM in seawater, that hydrogen sulfide was never detected around the plumes of large cold-seep vestimentiferans and rarely detectable only around the bases of mature aggregations. Respiration experiments, which exposed the root portions of L. cf. luymesi to sulfide concentrations between 51–561 μM, demonstrate that L. cf. luymesi use their roots as a respiratory surface to acquire sulfide at an average rate of 4.1 μmol⋅g−1⋅h−1. Net dissolved inorganic carbon uptake across the plume of the tubeworms was shown to occur in response to exposure of the posterior (root) portion of the worms to sulfide, demonstrating that sulfide acquisition by roots of the seep vestimentiferan L. cf. luymesi can be sufficient to fuel net autotrophic total dissolved inorganic carbon uptake. PMID:11687647

  18. Sulfidation Roasting of Hemimorphite with Pyrite for the Enrichment of Zn and Pb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Xiao-Bo; Xue, Ke; Ke, Yong; Zhou, Bo-Sheng; Li, Yang-Wen-Jun; Wang, Qing-Wei

    2016-09-01

    With the increasing consumption of zinc and the depletion of zinc sulfide ores, the exploitation of low-grade zinc oxide ores may be important for the sustainability of the zinc industry. Hemimorphite, a zinc hydroxyl silicate hydrate, is a significant source of Zn and Pb. It is difficult to obtain Zn and Pb from the hemimorphite using traditional technology. In this work, for the first time, sulfidation roasting of hemimorphite with pyrite was studied for the enrichment of Zn and Pb by a flotation process. Four stages of sulfidation roasting were determined based on x-ray diffraction and thermogravimetry analysis. Then, the effects of sulfidation temperature, pyrite dosage and reaction time on the sulfidation percentages were investigated at the laboratory scale. The experimental results showed that the sulfidation percentages of Pb and Zn were as high as 98.08% and 90.55% under optimum conditions, respectively. Finally, a flotation test was performed to enrich Zn and Pb in the sulfidation product. A flotation concentrate with 8.78% Zn and 9.25% Pb was obtained, and the recovery of Zn and Pb reached 56.14% and 75.94%, respectively.

  19. Enrichment and immobilization of sulfide removal microbiota applied for environmental biological remediation of aquaculture area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yang-Guo; Zheng, Yu; Tian, Weijun; Bai, Jie; Feng, Gong; Guo, Liang; Gao, Mengchun

    2016-07-01

    To remove sulfide in the deteriorating aquaculture sediment and water, sulfide-oxidizing microbiota was enriched from Jiaozhou Bay, China, by using sulfide-rich medium. Composition and structure of microbial communities in the enrichments were investigated by 16S rDNA molecular biotechniques. Results showed that microbial community structure continuously shifted and the abundance of sulfate reducing bacteria, i.e., Desulfobacterium, Desulfococcus and Desulfobacca apparently declined. Several halophile genera, Vibrio, Marinobacter, Pseudomonas, Prochlorococcus, Pediococcus and Thiobacillus predominated finally in the microbiota. The enriched microbiota was capable of removing a maximum of 1000 mg/L sulfide within 12 h with 10% inoculum at pH 7.0, 20-30 °C. After immobilized, the microbiota presented excellent resistance to impact and could completely remove 600 mg/L sulfide in 12 h. Moreover, the immobilized microbiota recovered well even recycled for five times. In conclusion, the immobilized sulfide-removing microbiota showed a quite promising application for biological restoring of sulfide-rich aquaculture environment.

  20. In Vitro Antiparasitic and Apoptotic Effects of Antimony Sulfide Nanoparticles on Leishmania infantum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saied Soflaei

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Visceral leishmaniasis is one of the most important sever diseases in tropical and subtropical countries. In the present study the effects of antimony sulfide nanoparticles on Leishmania infantum in vitro were evaluated. Antimony sulfide NPs (Sb2S5 were synthesized by biological method from Serratia marcescens bacteria. Then the cytotoxicity effects of different concentrations (5, 10, 25, 50, and 100 μg/mL of this nanoparticle were assessed on promastigote and amastigote stages of L. infantum. MTT method was used for verification results of promastigote assay. Finally, the percentages of apoptotic, necrotic, and viable cells were determined by flow cytometry. The results indicated the positive effectiveness of antimony sulfide NPs on proliferation of promastigote form. The IC50 (50% inhibitory concentration of antimony sulfide NPs on promastigotes was calculated 50 μg/mL. The cytotoxicity effect was dose-dependent means by increasing the concentration of antimony sulfide NPs, the cytotoxicity curve was raised and the viability curve of the parasite dropped simultaneously. Moreover, the IC50 of antimony sulfide NPs on amastigote stage was calculated 25 μg/mL. On the other hand, however, antimony sulfide NPs have a low cytotoxicity effect on uninfected macrophages but it can induce apoptosis in promastigote stage at 3 of 4 concentrations.

  1. The role of transition metal sulfides in hydrotreatment. 3. Acidity, XPS and catalytic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Agudelo, M.M.; Reyes, L.G.; Do Campo, N.

    1987-05-15

    Although, recently, most of the research on catalysis has been devoted to hydrotreatment, attention has been paid to hydrodesulfurization (HDS) but very little has been done on hydrodemetallization (HDM). This article is part of a systematic study directed towards defining the role of transition metal sulfides in hydrotreatment reactions. Catalysts supported on silica or alumina have been considered. Acidity has been evaluated using pyridine as probe molecule. This property can be attributed to the sulfide phase of the catalysts. The alumina supported catalysts were more acid than the silica supported catalysts. Since the acidity might exclusively be of Lewis type, the pattern observed through the first row transition metal sulfides reflects the trend of the electron-acceptor character of these sulfides. The XPS results indicate that catalysts are partially sulfided (at 400 C). At the same time, the results corroborate a better Me-support interaction on alumina than on silica. The HDM and HDS intrinsic activities, using a desalphalted (DAO) Morichal as feed were evaluated normalizing conversion in terms of the surface metal sites per surface area. The intrinsic activity patterns obtained for the first row transition metal sulfides, were very similar to those mentioned of acidity, reaffirming the importance of the electronic structure of the sulfide phase on its catalytic activity. 21 refs.

  2. Novel one pot stoichiometric synthesis of nickel sulfide nanomaterials as counter electrodes for QDSSCs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mani, A. Daya; Deepa, Melepurath [Department of Chemistry, IIT Hyderabad, Yeddumailaram 502 205 (India); Xanthopoulos, N. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-Lausanne (Switzerland); Subrahmanyam, Ch, E-mail: csubbu@iith.ac.in [Department of Chemistry, IIT Hyderabad, Yeddumailaram 502 205 (India)

    2014-11-14

    Solution combustion synthesis has been used for the first time to synthesize metal sulfide nanomaterials. Selective stoichiometric synthesis of nickel sulfide nanomaterials was achieved in a single step by using combustion synthesis under ambient conditions and the samples were tested as counter electrodes in a typical quantum dot sensitized solar cell (QDSSC). By varying the oxidant/fuel ratio, different stoichiometric nickel sulfide nanomaterials were obtained. Interestingly, a maximum of fourfold increase in efficiency (1.1%) was achieved with nickel sulfide counter electrode when compared to the Pt counter electrode (0.25%). This can be attributed to the less charge transfer resistance offered by nickel sulfide samples compared to Pt, which was confirmed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Among different stoichiometric compositions of nickel sulfide, Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2} was found to exhibit the least charge transfer resistance and superior solar cell efficiency. The present study describes a novel selective stoichiometric synthetic approach and facile fabrication procedure for low cost counter electrode materials in QDSSCs. - Highlights: • Novel and facile phase selective synthesis of nickel sulfide nanomaterials. • A different sensitization approach of TiO{sub 2} with CdS. • A simple paint approach for working and counter electrode fabrication. • Fourfold increase of efficiency with Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2} compared to the conventional Pt.

  3. Myeloid zinc finger 1 mediates sulindac sulfide-induced upregulation of death receptor 5 of human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horinaka, Mano; Yoshida, Tatsushi; Tomosugi, Mitsuhiro; Yasuda, Shusuke; Sowa, Yoshihiro; Sakai, Toshiyuki

    2014-08-08

    A combined therapy of sulindac sulfide and tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a promising strategy for the treatment of cancer. Sulindac sulfide had been shown to induce the expression of death receptor 5 (DR5), a receptor for TRAIL, and sensitize cancer cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis; however, the molecular mechanism underlying the upregulation of DR5 has not yet been elucidated. We demonstrate here that myeloid zinc finger 1 (MZF1) mediates the induction of DR5 by sulindac sulfide. Sulindac sulfide induced the expression of DR5 at the protein and mRNA levels in colon cancer SW480 cells. Furthermore, sulindac sulfide increased DR5 promoter activity. We showed that sulindac sulfide stimulated DR5 promoter activity via the -301 to -253 region. This region contained a putative MZF1-binding site. Site-directed mutations in the site abrogated the enhancement in DR5 promoter activity by sulindac sulfide. MZF1 directly bound to the putative MZF1-binding site of the DR5 promoter and the binding was increased by sulindac sulfide. The expression of MZF1 was also increased by sulindac sulfide, and MZF1 siRNA attenuated the upregulation of DR5 by sulindac sulfide. These results indicate that sulindac sulfide induces the expression of DR5 by up-regulating MZF1.

  4. Regeneration of elemental sulfur in a simultaneous sulfide and nitrate removal reactor under different dissolved oxygen conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaowei; Zhang, Yu; Zhou, Jiti; Zhang, Tingting; Chen, Mingxiang

    2015-04-01

    A continuous reactor in microaerobic conditions was adopted for sulfide-oxidizing, nitrate-reducing and elemental sulfur (S(0)) regenerating, simultaneously. The results showed that appropriate dissolved oxygen (DO) enhanced S(0) regeneration efficiency, sulfide oxidation efficiency, and nitrate reduction efficiency. When the DO concentration was 0.1-0.3 mg L(-1), the microaerobic bioreactor simultaneously converted 8.16 kg-Sm(-3)d(-1) of sulfide to S(0) and 2.48 kg-Nm(-3)d(-1) of nitrate to nitrogen with the sulfide and nitrate removal efficiency of 100% and 90% respectively. Compared with anaerobic sulfide and nitrate removal process previously reported, the loading sulfide was higher and more S(0) was generated during the operation in microaerobic reactor. Analysis using the 16S rDNA gene clone library revealed that Azoarcus, Thauera, Paracoccus, Sulfurospirillum, Arcobacter and Clostridium were the dominant microorganisms in the sulfide and nitrate removal system.

  5. Feasibility of sulfide control in sewers by reuse of iron rich drinking water treatment sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jing; Pikaar, Ilje; Sharma, Keshab Raj; Keller, Jürg; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2015-03-15

    Dosage of iron salt is the most commonly used method for sulfide control in sewer networks but incurs high chemical costs. In this study, we experimentally investigate the feasibility of using iron rich drinking water treatment sludge for sulfide control in sewers. A lab-scale rising main sewer biofilm reactor was used. The sulfide concentration in the effluent decreased from 15.5 to 19.8 mgS/L (without dosing) to below 0.7-2.3 mgS/L at a sludge dosing rate achieving an iron to total dissolved inorganic sulfur molar ratio (Fe:S) of 1:1, with further removal of sulfide possible by prolonging the reaction time. In fact, batch tests revealed an Fe consumption to sulfide removal ratio of 0.5 ± 0.02 (mole:mole), suggesting the possible occurrence of other reactions involving the removal of sulfide. Modelling revealed that the reaction between iron in sludge and sulfide has reaction orders of 0.65 ± 0.01 and 0.77 ± 0.02 with respect to the Fe and sulfide concentrations, respectively. The addition of sludge slightly increased the total chemical oxidation demand (tCOD) concentration (by approximately 12%) as expected, but decreased the soluble chemical oxidation demand (sCOD) concentration and methane formation by 7% and 20%, respectively. Some phosphate removal (13%) was also observed at the sludge dosing rate of 1:1 (Fe:S), which is beneficial to nutrient removal from the wastewater. Overall, this study suggests that dosing iron-rich drinking water sludge to sewers could be an effective strategy for sulfide removal in sewer systems, which would also reduce the sludge disposal costs for drinking water treatment works. However, its potential side-effects on sewer sedimentation and on the wastewater treatment plant effluent remain to be investigated.

  6. Reductive Dechlorination of Trichloroethene by Zero-valent Iron Nanoparticles: Reactivity Enhancement through Sulfidation Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yanlai; Yan, Weile

    2016-12-06

    Zero-valent iron nanoparticles (nZVI) synthesized in the presence of reduced sulfur compounds have been shown to degrade trichloroethene (TCE) at significantly higher rates. However, the applicability of sulfidation as a general means to enhance nZVI reactivity under different particle preparation conditions and the underlying cause for this enhancement effect are not well understood. In this study, the effects of sulfidation reagent, time point of sulfidation, and sulfur loading on the resultant particles were assessed through TCE degradation experiments. Up to 60-fold increase in TCE reaction rates was observed upon sulfidation treatment, with products being fully dechlorinated hydrocarbons. While the reactivity of these sulfur-treated nZVI (S-nZVI) was relatively unaffected by the sulfidation reagent (viz., sodium sulfide, dithionite, or thiosulfate) or the sequence of sulfidation relative to iron reduction, TCE reaction rates were found to depend strongly on sulfur to iron ratio. At a low sulfur loading, TCE degradation was accelerated with increasing sulfur dose. The rate constant reached a limiting value, however, as the sulfur to iron mole ratio was greater than 0.025. Different from previous propositions that iron sulfidation leads to more efficient TCE or tetrachloroethene (PCE) degradation by enabling depassivation of iron surface, affording catalytic pathways, or facilitating electron transfer, we show that the role of sulfur in nZVI lies essentially in its ability to poison hydrogen recombination, which drives surface reactions to favor reduction by atomic hydrogen. This implies that the reactivity of S-nZVI is contaminant-specific and is selective against the background reaction of water reduction. As the effect of sulfur manifests through surface processes, sulfidation represents a broadly applicable surface modification approach to modulate or increase the reactivity of nZVI for treating TCE and other related contaminants.

  7. Assaying the catalytic potential of transition metal sulfides for abiotic carbon fixation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cody, G. D.; Boctor, N. Z.; Brandes, J. A.; Filley, T. R.; Hazen, R. M.; Yoder, H. S.

    2004-05-01

    A suite of nickel, cobalt, iron, copper, and zinc containing sulfides are assayed for the promotion of a model carbon fixation reaction with relevance to local reducing environments of the early Earth. The assay tests the promotion of hydrocarboxylation (the Koch reaction) wherein a carboxylic acid is synthesized via carbonyl insertion at a metal-sulfide-bound alkyl group. The experimental conditions are chosen for optimal assay, i.e., high reactant concentrations and pressures (200 MPa) to enhance chemisorption, and high temperature (250°C) to enhance reaction kinetics. All of the metal sulfides studied, with the exception CuS, promote hydrocarboxylation. Two other significant reactions involve the catalytic reduction of CO to form a surface-bound methyl group, detected after nucleophilic attack by nonane thiol to form methyl nonyl sulfide, and the formation of dinonyl sulfide via a similar reaction. Estimation of the catalytic turnover frequencies for each of the metal sulfides with respect to each of the primary reactions reveals that NiS, Ni 3S 2, and CoS perform comparably to commonly employed industrial catalysts. A positive correlation between the yield of primary product to NiS and Ni 3S 2 surface areas provides strong evidence that the reactions are surface catalytic in these cases. The sulfides FeS and Fe (1-x)S are unique in that they exhibit evidence of extensive dissolution, thus, complicating interpretation regarding heterogeneous vs. homogeneous catalysis. With the exception of CuS, each of the metal sulfides promotes reactions that mimic key intermediate steps manifest in the mechanistic details of an important autotrophic enzyme, acetyl-CoA synthase. The relatively high temperatures chosen for assaying purposes, however, are incompatible with the accumulation of thioesters. The results of this study support the hypothesis that transition metal sulfides may have provided useful catalytic functionality for geochemical carbon fixation in a prebiotic

  8. An array of layers in silicon sulfides: Chainlike and monolayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Lanza, T.; Ayuela, A.; Aguilera-Granja, F.

    2016-12-01

    While much is known about isoelectronic materials related to carbon nanostructures, such as boron-nitride layers and nanotubes, rather less is known about equivalent silicon-based materials. Following the recent discovery of phosphorene, here we discuss isoelectronic silicon-monosulfide monolayers. We describe a set of anisotropic structures that clearly have a high stability with respect to previously reported silicon-monosulfide monolayers. The source of the layer anisotropy is related to the presence of Si-S double chains linked by some Si-Si covalent bonds together with a remarkable spd hybridization on Si. The increased stability is related to silicon forming four bonds, including an additional double-bond-like Si-Si bond. The involvement of d orbitals brings more variety to silicon-sulfide-based nanostructures that are isoelectronic to phosphorene, which could be relevant for future applications, adding extra degrees of freedom.

  9. Hydrogen sulfide at high pressure: Change in stoichiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncharov, Alexander F.; Lobanov, Sergey S.; Kruglov, Ivan; Zhao, Xiao-Miao; Chen, Xiao-Jia; Oganov, Artem R.; Konôpková, Zuzana; Prakapenka, Vitali B.

    2016-05-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S ) was studied by x-ray synchrotron diffraction and Raman spectroscopy up to 150 GPa at 180-295 K and by quantum-mechanical variable-composition evolutionary simulations. The experiments show that H2S becomes unstable with respect to formation of compounds with different structure and composition, including Cccm and a body-centered cubic like (R 3 m or I m -3 m ) H3S , the latter one predicted previously to show a record-high superconducting transition temperature, a Tc of 203 K. These experiments provide experimental ground for understanding of this record-high Tc. The experimental results are supported by theoretical structure searches that suggest the stability of H3S , H4S3 , H5S8 , H3S5 , and H S2 compounds that have not been reported previously at elevated pressures.

  10. New Findings in Hydrogen Sulfide Related Corrosion of Concrete Sewers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Asbjørn Haaning; Jensen, Henriette Stokbro; Hvitved-Jacobsen, Thorkild;

    2009-01-01

    This paper summarizes major findings of a long-term study of hydrogen sulfide gas (H2S) adsorption and oxidation on concrete and plastic sewer pipe surfaces. The processes have been studied using a pilot-scale setup designed to replicate conditions in a gravity sewer located downstream of a force......, the paper demonstrates how the kinetic data can be used for prediction of concrete corrosion in real sewer systems based on H2S measurements from a conventional gas detector....... main. H2S related concrete corrosion and odor is often observed at such locations. The experiments showed that the rate of H2S oxidation was significantly faster on concrete pipe surfaces than on plastic pipe surfaces. Steady state calculations based on the kinetic data demonstrated that the gas phase...

  11. Hydrogen Production from Hydrogen Sulfide in IGCC Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elias Stefanakos; Burton Krakow; Jonathan Mbah

    2007-07-31

    IGCC power plants are the cleanest coal-based power generation facilities in the world. Technical improvements are needed to help make them cost competitive. Sulfur recovery is one procedure in which improvement is possible. This project has developed and demonstrated an electrochemical process that could provide such an improvement. IGCC power plants now in operation extract the sulfur from the synthesis gas as hydrogen sulfide. In this project H{sub 2}S has been electrolyzed to yield sulfur and hydrogen (instead of sulfur and water as is the present practice). The value of the byproduct hydrogen makes this process more cost effective. The electrolysis has exploited some recent developments in solid state electrolytes. The proof of principal for the project concept has been accomplished.

  12. Microbial Oxidation of Iron Sulfides in Anaerobic Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaclavkova, Sarka

    . Under anaerobic conditions FeSx serves as an electron donor in nitrate (NO3-) reduction processes. In this PhD thesis, unknown controls of microbial FeSx oxidation by NO3- (MISON), as a potentially important NO3- reducing process, were investigated. The importance of understanding the NO3- removal...... environments including sandy aquifer, freshwater peatland and moderately brackish muddy marine sediment. An apparent salinity limitation of MISON was shown in heavily brackish sediment, where FeSx oxidation was inhibited while other NO3-reduction processes did not appear to be affected by the salinity levels......Abstract (shortened): Iron sulfides (FeSx), representing 0.04-10 % of Danish dry soil weight, oxidize in a presence of oxygen, releasing sulfuric acid and free iron. Environmental impact of FeSx oxidation is commonly seen on agricultural sites cultivated by drainage as acid sulfate soil formation...

  13. Photoelectricalchemical characteristics of brush plated tin sulfide thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subramanian, B.; Jayachandran, M. [Central Electrochemical Research Inst., Karaikudi (India); Sanjeeviraja, C. [Alagappa Univ., Karaikudi (India). Dept. of Physics

    2003-08-01

    Thin films of tin sulfide find wide applications in optoelectronic devices and window materials for heterojunction solar cells. Thin films of p-SnS were brush plated onto tin oxide coated glass substrates from aqueous solution containing SnCl{sub 2} and Na{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Deposits have been characterized with XRD and SEM for structural analysis. Hot probe method showed invariably p-type nature for all the brush plated SnS films. The variation of space charge capacitance, C{sub sc} with applied potential, V, was recorded for the PEC cell with p-SnS/Fe{sup 3+}, Fe{sup 2+}/Pt system. The spectral response of the PEC cell formed with SnS photoelectrode was studied and reported. (author)

  14. Photoelectrochemical characteristics of brush plated tin sulfide thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subramanian, B.; Jayachandran, M. [Central Electrochemical Research Institute, Karaikudi 630 006 (India); Sanjeeviraja, C. [Department of Physics, Alagappa University, Karaikudi 630 006 (India)

    2003-08-01

    Thin films of tin sulfide find wide applications in optoelectronic devices and window materials for heterojunction solar cells. Thin films of p-SnS were brush plated onto tin oxide coated glass substrates from aqueous solution containing SnCl{sub 2} and Na{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Deposits have been characterized with XRD and SEM for structural analysis. Hot probe method showed invariably p-type nature for all the brush plated SnS films. The variation of space charge capacitance, C{sub sc}, with applied potential, V, was recorded for the PEC cell with p-SnS/Fe{sup 3+}, Fe{sup 2+}/Pt system. The spectral response of the PEC cell formed with SnS photoelectrode was studied and reported.

  15. Morphological variations in cadmium sulfide nanocrystals without phase transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colorado Henry

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A very novel phenomenon of morphological variations of cadmium sulfide (CdS nanorods under the transmission electron microscopy (TEM beam was observed without structural phase transformation. Environmentally stable and highly crystalline CdS nanorods have been obtained via a chemical bath method. The energy of the TEM beam is believed to have a significant influence on CdS nanorods and may melt and transform them into smaller nanowires. Morphological variations without structural phase transformation are confirmed by recording selected area electron diffraction at various stages. The prepared CdS nanorods have been characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, TEM, UV-Vis spectroscopy, and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The importance of this phenomenon is vital for the potential application for CdS such as smart materials.

  16. Hydrogen Sulfide, Oxidative Stress and Periodontal Diseases: A Concise Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greabu, Maria; Totan, Alexandra; Miricescu, Daniela; Radulescu, Radu; Virlan, Justina; Calenic, Bogdan

    2016-01-01

    In the past years, biomedical research has recognized hydrogen sulfide (H2S) not only as an environmental pollutant but also, along with nitric oxide and carbon monoxide, as an important biological gastransmitter with paramount roles in health and disease. Current research focuses on several aspects of H2S biology such as the biochemical pathways that generate the compound and its functions in human pathology or drug synthesis that block or stimulate its biosynthesis. The present work addresses the knowledge we have to date on H2S production and its biological roles in the general human environment with a special focus on the oral cavity and its involvement in the initiation and development of periodontal diseases. PMID:26805896

  17. Kinetics of the conversion of copper sulfide to blister copper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrillo, F.

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available The desulfurization of copper sulfide by air and oxygen has been studied in two laboratory reactors where the gas is blown onto the melt surface. Rates of oxidation in a vertical resistance furnace may be explained by the mass transfer control in the gas phase. However, results for a horizontal tube suggest that the chemical resistance is controlling.

    La desulfuración del sulfuro cuproso con aire y oxígeno se ha estudiado en dos reactores de laboratorio, en los cuales el gas se sopla sobre la superficie del fundido. La velocidad de reacción en un horno de resistencias verticales se puede explicar considerando como controlante la resistencia a la transferencia de materia de la fase gas. Sin embargo, los resultados del horno horizontal indican que la resistencia química es la controlante.

  18. SYNTHESIS AND MORPHOLOGICAL STRUCTURE OF POLY(PHENYLENE SULFIDE AMIDE)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Qixian; CHEN Yongrong; ZHOU Zuowan

    1995-01-01

    Poly(phenylene sulfide amide) (PPSA) has been synthesized by using sulfur as Ssource which reacts with dichlorobenzamide (DCBA) and alkali in polar organic solvent atthe atmospheric pressure. The polymer structures were determined by elemental analysis,FT-IR and 1H-NMR. It is shown that the yielded polymer has linear structure and itsstructure unit is -p-C6H4-CONH -p-C6H4-S-. The polymer morphology was studied byX-ray diffraction and polarized microscopy. The results show that PPSA is a crystallinepolymer and its spherulites are the aggregation of nontwisting lamella or micro-threadstructure. Under shearing force, these crystals are dispersed to form micro-fibrillarstructure. The decomposition kinetics of PPSA was also studied at different heating rates.The decomposition energy of PPSA is higher than that of PPS.

  19. Release and control of hydrogen sulfide during sludge thermal drying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weng, Huanxin; Dai, Zhixin; Ji, Zhongqiang; Gao, Caixia; Liu, Chongxuan

    2015-04-15

    The release of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) during sludge drying is a major environmental problem because of its toxicity to human health. A series of experiments were performed to investigate the mechanisms and factors controlling the H2S release. Results of this study show that: 1) the biomass and activity of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in sludge were the major factors controlling the amount of H2S release, 2) the sludge drying temperature had an important effect on both the extent and the timing of H2S release from the sludge, and 3) decreasing sludge pH increased the H2S release. Based on the findings from this study, a new system that integrates sludge drying and H2S gas treatment was developed to reduce the amount of H2S released from sludge treatments.

  20. Endogenous hydrogen sulfide is involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiao, Wang [Department of Pediatrics, Peking University First Hospital, Beijing 100034 (China); Chaoshu, Tang [Department of Physiology and Pathophysiology, Health Sciences Center, Peking University, Beijing 100034 (China); Key Laboratory of Molecular Cardiovascular Medicine, Ministry of Education (China); Hongfang, Jin, E-mail: jinhongfang51@126.com [Department of Pediatrics, Peking University First Hospital, Beijing 100034 (China); Junbao, Du, E-mail: junbaodu1@126.com [Department of Pediatrics, Peking University First Hospital, Beijing 100034 (China)

    2010-05-28

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic, complex, and progressive pathological process in large and medium sized arteries. The exact mechanism of this process remains unclear. Hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), a novel gasotransmitter, was confirmed as playing a major role in the pathogenesis of many cardiovascular diseases. It plays a role in vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation and apoptosis, participates in the progress of hyperhomocysteinemia (HHCY), inhibits atherogenic modification of LDL, interferes with vascular calcification, intervenes with platelet function, and there are interactions between H{sub 2}S and inflammatory processes. The role of H{sub 2}S in atherosclerotic pathogenesis highlights the mysteries of atherosclerosis and inspires the search for innovative therapeutic strategies. Here, we review the studies to date that have considered the role of H{sub 2}S in atherosclerosis.

  1. Hydrogen sulfide poisoning: an antidotal role for sodium nitrite?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, A H; Rumack, B H

    1997-06-01

    In 2 separate incidents, 6 patients were poisoned with hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in sewer gas. In the first incident, mixing acid- and sodium hydroxide-based drain cleaners in a confined space resulted in 4 poisonings and 2 deaths. Three would-be rescuers were seriously poisoned and 1 died. Two survivors had neurological sequelae. Sodium nitrite appeared to have some clinical efficacy in 1 case. The second incident involved 2 patients working on a pump in a sewage pond. A patient lying on a raft close to the pond surface was seriously poisoned; sodium nitrite was clinically efficacious and this patient survived without developing neurological sequelae. Sodium nitrite deserves further clinical study as a potential H2S antidote.

  2. Observation of superconductivity in hydrogen sulfide from nuclear resonant scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troyan, Ivan; Gavriliuk, Alexander; Rüffer, Rudolf; Chumakov, Alexander; Mironovich, Anna; Lyubutin, Igor; Perekalin, Dmitry; Drozdov, Alexander P; Eremets, Mikhail I

    2016-03-18

    High-temperature superconductivity remains a focus of experimental and theoretical research. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been reported to be superconducting at high pressures and with a high transition temperature. We report on the direct observation of the expulsion of the magnetic field in H2S compressed to 153 gigapascals. A thin (119)Sn film placed inside the H2S sample was used as a sensor of the magnetic field. The magnetic field on the (119)Sn sensor was monitored by nuclear resonance scattering of synchrotron radiation. Our results demonstrate that an external static magnetic field of about 0.7 tesla is expelled from the volume of (119)Sn foil as a result of the shielding by the H2S sample at temperatures between 4.7 K and approximately 140 K, revealing a superconducting state of H2S.

  3. RHEOLOGICAL BEHAVIOR OF POLYPHENYLENE SULFIDE/POLYAMIDE-66 BLENDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Canshu; LI Jihong; WANG Yinghan; CHEN Yongrong; WANG Ling

    1996-01-01

    Blends of polyphenylene sulfide (PPS) containing trace amounts of branching and/or cross-linking in chain and Polyamide-66 (PA-66) have been prepared by melt blending. The rheological behavior of PPS/PA-66 blends has been studied by means of capillary rheometer, and compared with PPS. The effects of shear rate, shear stress and temperature on the flow of PPS/PA-66 blends and PPS are discussed. The non-Newtonian indexes and the activation energies of viscous flow are obtained. The results show that the apparent viscosity of PPS/PA-66 blends is not sensitive to shear rate and stress, but decreases with the elevation of temperature. On the contrary, the apparent viscosity of the PPS decreases obviously with the increasing of shear rate and shear stress, but it is increased by the elevation of temperatue.

  4. Lithium sulfide compositions for battery electrolyte and battery electrode coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Chengdu; Liu, Zengcai; Fu, Wunjun; Lin, Zhan; Dudney, Nancy J; Howe, Jane Y; Rondinone, Adam J

    2013-12-03

    Methods of forming lithium-containing electrolytes are provided using wet chemical synthesis. In some examples, the lithium containing electroytes are composed of .beta.-Li.sub.3PS.sub.4 or Li.sub.4P.sub.2S.sub.7. The solid electrolyte may be a core shell material. In one embodiment, the core shell material includes a core of lithium sulfide (Li.sub.2S), a first shell of .beta.-Li.sub.3PS.sub.4 or Li.sub.4P.sub.2S.sub.7, and a second shell including one or .beta.-Li.sub.3PS.sub.4 or Li.sub.4P.sub.2S.sub.7 and carbon. The lithium containing electrolytes may be incorporated into wet cell batteries or solid state batteries.

  5. Volatilization of hydrogen sulfide from a quiescent surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Cassia Feroni, Rita; Santos, Jane Meri; Reis, Neyval Costa

    2012-01-01

    Air-water mass transfer of hydrogen sulfide from a shallow tank with a quiescent surface under the influence of weak wind stress on the water surface was studied numerically using a two-dimensional model. The flow field in the tank was investigated using a computational code based on a finite volume, which is used to numerically solve momentum, mass and continuity conservation equations. The results show that water phase flow field is strongly dependent on the wind-induced surface velocity and the aspect ratio of the tank. Based on the numerical study, the liquid-side mass transfer coefficient is correlated with Reynolds number (R(e)), tank aspect ratio (AR) and Schmidt number (S(c)). Overall mass transfer coefficient (K(L)) values extend further downstream as the R(e) number increases.

  6. Changes in Dimethyl Sulfide Oceanic Distribution due to Climate Change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cameron-Smith, P; Elliott, S; Maltrud, M; Erickson, D; Wingenter, O

    2011-02-16

    Dimethyl sulfide (DMS) is one of the major precursors for aerosols and cloud condensation nuclei in the marine boundary layer over much of the remote ocean. Here they report on coupled climate simulations with a state-of-the-art global ocean biogeochemical model for DMS distribution and fluxes using present-day and future atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations. They find changes in zonal averaged DMS flux to the atmosphere of over 150% in the Southern Ocean. This is due to concurrent sea ice changes and ocean ecosystem composition shifts caused by changes in temperature, mixing, nutrient, and light regimes. The largest changes occur in a region already sensitive to climate change, so any resultant local CLAW/Gaia feedback of DMS on clouds, and thus radiative forcing, will be particularly important. A comparison of these results to prior studies shows that increasing model complexity is associted with reduced DMS emissions at the equator and increased emissions at high latitudes.

  7. Uptake and conversion of carbonyl sulfide in a lawn soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junfeng; Mu, Yujing; Geng, Chunmei; Yu, Yunbo; He, Hong; Zhang, Yuanhang

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS) exchange fluxes between a lawn soil and the atmosphere as well as influencing factors (temperature and water content of soil) were investigated using a static cuvette. The optimal soil temperature and water content for COS consumption were about 298 K and 12.5%, respectively. The converting products of the consumed COS in the lawn soil were researched using in situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS). The peaks of gas-phase products of CO2 and surface HCO3-, HS-, SO32-, HSO3-, and SO42- species were observed. The possible mechanism of COS conversion in the lawn soil was discussed. The conversion rates of consumed COS into water-soluble sulfate in the lawn soil were studied by ion chromatography (IC). The experimental results show that about 50% sulfur from the soil consumed COS was eventually converted into water-soluble sulfate.

  8. Non-thermal plasma treatment of hydrogen sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frost, L.J.; Hartvigsen, J.; Elangovan, S. [Ceramatec Inc., Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2009-07-01

    This paper described a non-thermal plasma reforming process to treat hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) in heavy hydrocarbons. H{sub 2}S is present in natural gas, petroleum, and various process gases. It is an unwanted compound that is generally removed using an amine extraction process followed by a Claus process. Ceramatec Inc. has developed a GlidArc plasma reformer to recover some of the hydrogen from the H{sub 2}S. Non-thermal plasma reforming breaks hydrogen sulfide into hydrogen and elemental sulphur. Ceramatec has established the catalytic nature of the non-thermal plasma generated by its GlidArc plasma reformer. This treatment process is still in the laboratory stage, but it offers the possibility of a new method to treat acid gas that will provide an opportunity to recover hydrogen that is currently burned to water during the Claus sulphur removal process. Ceramatec, in conjunction with Albin Czernichowski of ECP in France, has demonstrated the ability to reform a variety of hydrocarbons using the non-thermal plasma catalyzed reaction. The plasma reaction can be initiated in either a partial oxidation or steam reforming mode. Multiple hydrocarbons can be processed by the same unit with only control parameters changing to meet the requirements of the individual hydrocarbons being processed. Although a tested unit did not accomplish complete conversion, some additional options will be tested that are expected to increase the conversion under an existing program operated by the United States Department of Energy. 4 refs., 9 figs.

  9. Production of hydrogen by superadiabatic decomposition of hydrogen sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slimane, R.B.; Lau, F.S.; Dihu, R. [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States); Bingue, J.P.; Saveliev, A.V.; Fridman, A.A.; Kennedy, L.A. [Illinois Univ., Chicago, IL (United States)

    2002-07-01

    It is expected that hydrogen will become the fuel of choice for advanced technologies. Hydrogen is currently used as feedstock in the synthesis of ammonia and methanol, in the desulfurization and hydrocracking at oil refineries, and in the upgrading of hydrocarbon resources such as heavy oil and coal. Hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) is regarded as a mineral from which both hydrogen and sulfur can be extracted. Since there are large amounts of H{sub 2}S available worldwide, significant research has gone into the development of converting hydrogen sulfide into hydrogen through thermal decomposition. The high temperature required for the reaction, however, makes the approach impractical. This paper presents results of a study using a new approach to overcome the limitations of thermal decomposition. In this newly developed process, operation at very high temperatures is possible and economical through oxidation of part of the H{sub 2}S to provide the energy needed for the decomposition reaction. Partial oxidation is carried out in the presence of an inert, porous, high-capacity medium and the heat exchange results in flame temperatures that exceed the adiabatic flame temperature of the gas mixture. This process is less stringent than the Claus process because of the required feed gas conditioning. SO{sub 2} emissions inevitably form because part of the H{sub 2}S is oxidized to generate heat. However, SO{sub 2} is not expected to form to a significant degree. It was concluded that the product/byproduct separation schemes need to be examined further to have a better idea regarding the cost of hydrogen production from this process. 6 refs., 5 figs.

  10. Thioethers as markers of hydrogen sulfide production in homocystinurias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kožich, Viktor; Krijt, Jakub; Sokolová, Jitka; Melenovská, Petra; Ješina, Pavel; Vozdek, Roman; Majtán, Tomáš; Kraus, Jan P

    2016-07-01

    Two enzymes in the transsulfuration pathway of homocysteine -cystathionine beta-synthase (CBS) and gamma-cystathionase (CTH)-use cysteine and/or homocysteine to produce the important signaling molecule hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and simultaneously the thioethers lanthionine, cystathionine or homolanthionine. In this study we explored whether impaired flux of substrates for H2S synthesis and/or deficient enzyme activities alter production of hydrogen sulfide in patients with homocystinurias. As an indirect measure of H2S synthesis we determined by LC-MS/MS concentrations of thioethers in plasma samples from 33 patients with different types of homocystinurias, in 8 patient derived fibroblast cell lines, and as reaction products of seven purified mutant CBS enzymes. Since chaperoned recombinant mutant CBS enzymes retained capacity of H2S synthesis in vitro it can be stipulated that deficient CBS activity in vivo may impair H2S production. Indeed, in patients with classical homocystinuria we observed significantly decreased cystathionine and lanthionine concentrations in plasma (46% and 74% of median control levels, respectively) and significantly lower cystathionine in fibroblasts (8% of median control concentrations) indicating that H2S production from cysteine and homocysteine may be also impaired. In contrast, the grossly elevated plasma levels of homolanthionine in CBS deficient patients (32-times elevation compared to median of controls) clearly demonstrates a simultaneous overproduction of H2S from homocysteine by CTH. In the remethylation defects the accumulation of homocysteine and the increased flux of metabolites through the transsulfuration pathway resulted in elevation of cystathionine and homolanthionine (857% and 400% of median control values, respectively) indicating a possibility of an increased biosynthesis of H2S by both CBS and CTH. This study shows clearly disturbed thioether concentrations in homocystinurias, and modeling using these data indicates

  11. Online dissolved methane and total dissolved sulfide measurement in sewers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yiwen; Sharma, Keshab R; Fluggen, Markus; O'Halloran, Kelly; Murthy, Sudhir; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies using short-term manual sampling of sewage followed by off-line laboratory gas chromatography (GC) measurement have shown that a substantial amount of dissolved methane is produced in sewer systems. However, only limited data has been acquired to date due to the low frequency and short span of this method, which cannot capture the dynamic variations of in-sewer dissolved methane concentrations. In this study, a newly developed online measuring device was used to monitor dissolved methane concentrations at the end of a rising main sewer network, over two periods of three weeks each, in summer and early winter, respectively. This device uses an online gas-phase methane sensor to measure methane under equilibrium conditions after being stripped from the sewage. The data are then converted to liquid-phase methane concentrations according to Henry's Law. The detection limit and range are suitable for sewer application and can be adjusted by varying the ratio of liquid-to-gas phase volume settings. The measurement presented good linearity (R² > 0.95) during field application, when compared to off-line measurements. The overall data set showed a wide variation in dissolved methane concentration of 5-15 mg/L in summer and 3.5-12 mg/L in winter, resulting in a significant average daily production of 24.6 and 19.0 kg-CH₄/d, respectively, from the network with a daily average sewage flow of 2840 m³/day. The dissolved methane concentration demonstrated a clear diurnal pattern coinciding with flow and sulfide fluctuation, implying a relationship with the wastewater hydraulic retention time (HRT). The total dissolved sulfide (TDS) concentration in sewers can be determined simultaneously with the same principle.

  12. A kuroko-type polymetallic sulfide deposit in a submarine silicic caldera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iizasa; Fiske; Ishizuka; Yuasa; Hashimoto; Ishibashi; Naka; Horii; Fujiwara; Imai; Koyama

    1999-02-12

    Manned submersible studies have delineated a large and actively growing Kuroko-type volcanogenic massive sulfide deposit 400 kilometers south of Tokyo in Myojin Knoll submarine caldera. The sulfide body is located on the caldera floor at a depth of 1210 to 1360 meters, has an area of 400 by 400 by 30 meters, and is notably rich in gold and silver. The discovery of a large Kuroko-type polymetallic sulfide deposit in this arc-front caldera raises the possibility that the numerous unexplored submarine silicic calderas elsewhere might have similar deposits.

  13. First Application of Novel Sulfiding Agent SZ 54 in Domestic Hydrofining Unit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pan Maohua

    2006-01-01

    A novel environmentally friendly sulfiding agent SZ 54 was for the first time used for presulfidation of the catalyst in the 2 Mt/a hydrofining unit at Zhenhai Refining and Chemical Company. The application results had shown that the sulfiding agent SZ54 had low smell, high flash point, and safe and environmentally friendly features. The lower decomposition temperature and stepwise chemical decomposition characteristics of this reagent can effectively avoid the reduction of metals and improve sulfur adsorption to meet the needs for sulfidizing the hydrofining catalyst,and is a good reagent worthy of extended application.

  14. Kinetics of Indigenous Nitrate Reducing Sulfide Oxidizing Activity in Microaerophilic Wastewater Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villahermosa, Desirée; Corzo, Alfonso; Garcia-Robledo, Emilio; González, Juan M.; Papaspyrou, Sokratis

    2016-01-01

    Nitrate decreases sulfide release in wastewater treatment plants (WWTP), but little is known on how it affects the microzonation and kinetics of related microbial processes within the biofilm. The effect of nitrate addition on these properties for sulfate reduction, sulfide oxidation, and oxygen respiration were studied with the use of microelectrodes in microaerophilic wastewater biofilms. Mass balance calaculations and community composition analysis were also performed. At basal WWTP conditions, the biofilm presented a double-layer system. The upper microaerophilic layer (~300 μm) showed low sulfide production (0.31 μmol cm-3 h-1) and oxygen consumption rates (0.01 μmol cm-3 h-1). The anoxic lower layer showed high sulfide production (2.7 μmol cm-3 h-1). Nitrate addition decreased net sulfide production rates, caused by an increase in sulfide oxidation rates (SOR) in the upper layer, rather than an inhibition of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB). This suggests that the indigenous nitrate reducing-sulfide oxidizing bacteria (NR-SOB) were immediately activated by nitrate. The functional vertical structure of the biofilm changed to a triple-layer system, where the previously upper sulfide-producing layer in the absence of nitrate split into two new layers: 1) an upper sulfide-consuming layer, whose thickness is probably determined by the nitrate penetration depth within the biofilm, and 2) a middle layer producing sulfide at an even higher rate than in the absence of nitrate in some cases. Below these layers, the lower net sulfide-producing layer remained unaffected. Net SOR varied from 0.05 to 0.72 μmol cm-3 h-1 depending on nitrate and sulfate availability. Addition of low nitrate concentrations likely increased sulfate availability within the biofilm and resulted in an increase of both net sulfate reduction and net sulfide oxidation by overcoming sulfate diffusional limitation from the water phase and the strong coupling between SRB and NR-SOB syntrophic

  15. Controls on Highly Siderophile Element Concentrations in Martian Basalt: Sulfide Saturation and Under-Saturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righter, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    Highly siderophile elements (HSE; Re, Au and the platinum group elements) in shergottites exhibit a wide range from very high, similar to the terrestrial mantle, to very low, similar to sulfide saturated mid ocean ridge basalt (e.g., [1]). This large range has been difficult to explain without good constraints on sulfide saturation or under-saturation [2]. A new model for prediction of sulfide saturation places new constraints on this problem [3]. Shergottite data: For primitive shergottites, pressure and temperature estimates are between 1.2-1.5 GPa, and 1350-1470 C [4]. The range of oxygen fugacities is from FMQ-2 to IW, where the amount of Fe2O3 is low and thus does not have a significant effect on the S saturation values. Finally, the bulk compositions of shergottites have been reported in many recent studies (e.g., [5]). All of this information will be used to test whether shergottites are sulfide saturated [3]. Modeling values and results: The database for HSE partition coefficients has been growing with many new data for silicates and oxides [6-8] to complement a large sulfide database [9- 11]. Combining these data with simple batch melting models allows HSE contents of mantle melts to be estimated for sulfide-bearing vs. sulfide-free mantle. Combining such models with fractional crystallization modeling (e.g., [12]) allows HSE contents of more evolved liquids to be modeled. Most primitive shergottites have high HSE contents (and low S contents) that can be explained by sulfide under-saturated melting of the mantle. An exception is Dhofar 019 which has high S contents and very low HSE contents suggesting sulfide saturation. Most evolved basaltic shergottites have lower S contents than saturation, and intermediate HSE contents that can be explained by olivine, pyroxene, and chromite fractionation. An exception is EET A79001 lithology B, which has very low HSE contents and S contents higher than sulfide saturation values . evidence for sulfide saturation

  16. Kinetics of Indigenous Nitrate Reducing Sulfide Oxidizing Activity in Microaerophilic Wastewater Biofilms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desirée Villahermosa

    Full Text Available Nitrate decreases sulfide release in wastewater treatment plants (WWTP, but little is known on how it affects the microzonation and kinetics of related microbial processes within the biofilm. The effect of nitrate addition on these properties for sulfate reduction, sulfide oxidation, and oxygen respiration were studied with the use of microelectrodes in microaerophilic wastewater biofilms. Mass balance calaculations and community composition analysis were also performed. At basal WWTP conditions, the biofilm presented a double-layer system. The upper microaerophilic layer (~300 μm showed low sulfide production (0.31 μmol cm-3 h-1 and oxygen consumption rates (0.01 μmol cm-3 h-1. The anoxic lower layer showed high sulfide production (2.7 μmol cm-3 h-1. Nitrate addition decreased net sulfide production rates, caused by an increase in sulfide oxidation rates (SOR in the upper layer, rather than an inhibition of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB. This suggests that the indigenous nitrate reducing-sulfide oxidizing bacteria (NR-SOB were immediately activated by nitrate. The functional vertical structure of the biofilm changed to a triple-layer system, where the previously upper sulfide-producing layer in the absence of nitrate split into two new layers: 1 an upper sulfide-consuming layer, whose thickness is probably determined by the nitrate penetration depth within the biofilm, and 2 a middle layer producing sulfide at an even higher rate than in the absence of nitrate in some cases. Below these layers, the lower net sulfide-producing layer remained unaffected. Net SOR varied from 0.05 to 0.72 μmol cm-3 h-1 depending on nitrate and sulfate availability. Addition of low nitrate concentrations likely increased sulfate availability within the biofilm and resulted in an increase of both net sulfate reduction and net sulfide oxidation by overcoming sulfate diffusional limitation from the water phase and the strong coupling between SRB and NR

  17. Arsenic mobilization from sulfidic materials from gold mines in Minas Gerais State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Pereira de Andrade

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Acid drainage results from exposition of sulfides to the atmosphere. Arsenopyrite is a sulfide that releases arsenic (As to the environment when oxidized. This work evaluated the As mobility in six sulfidic geomaterials from gold mining areas in Minas Gerais State, Brazil. Grained samples (<2 mm were periodically leached with distilled water, during 70 days. Results suggested As sorption onto (hydroxides formed by oxidation of arsenopyrite. Low pH accelerated the acid generation, dissolving Fe oxihydroxides and releasing As. Presence of carbonates decreased oxidation rates and As release. On the other hand, lime added to a partially oxidized sample increased As mobilization.

  18. Anaerobic sulfide-oxidation in marine colorless sulfur-oxidizing bacteria

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    LokaBharathi, P.A.; Nair, S.; Chandramohan, D.

    could perform under specific variable effect on sulfide oxidation. The viability of the cells environmental conditions such as varying concentrations of and efficiency of oxidation increased in the presence of sulfide, or elevated temperature... that performed better than the others. Simulta- and Kuenen 1992): neously, experiments set up with temperature increasing up to 508C showed that 29 was among those that could with- 5H 2 S 1 8KNO 3 r 4K 2 SO 4 1 H 2 SO 4 1 4N 2 1 4H 2 O stand and oxidize sulfide...

  19. Thermodynamic Modeling of Sulfide Capacity of Na2O-Containing Oxide Melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosavi-Khoonsari, Elmira; Jung, In-Ho

    2016-10-01

    Thermodynamic modeling of the sulfide dissolution in the Na2O-FetO-CaO-MgO-MnO-Al2O3-SiO2 multicomponent slags was performed to investigate the desulfurization of hot metal using Na2O-containing fluxes. The dissolution behavior of sulfur in the melts was modeled using the modified quasi-chemical model in the quadruplet approximation. This model can take into account the short-range ordering and the reciprocal exchange reaction of cations and anions in oxy-sulfide slags. Experimental sulfide capacity data were well predicted from the model with only three model parameters.

  20. Metal-organic frameworks for the storage and delivery of biologically active hydrogen sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allan, Phoebe K; Wheatley, Paul S; Aldous, David; Mohideen, M Infas; Tang, Chiu; Hriljac, Joseph A; Megson, Ian L; Chapman, Karena W; De Weireld, Guy; Vaesen, Sebastian; Morris, Russell E [St Andrews

    2012-04-02

    Hydrogen sulfide is an extremely toxic gas that is also of great interest for biological applications when delivered in the correct amount and at the desired rate. Here we show that the highly porous metal-organic frameworks with the CPO-27 structure can bind the hydrogen sulfide relatively strongly, allowing the storage of the gas for at least several months. Delivered gas is biologically active in preliminary vasodilation studies of porcine arteries, and the structure of the hydrogen sulfide molecules inside the framework has been elucidated using a combination of powder X-ray diffraction and pair distribution function analysis.

  1. Effect of inoculum and sulfide type on simultaneous hydrogen sulfide removal from biogas and nitrogen removal from swine slurry and microbial mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lan; Wei, Benping; Chen, Ziai; Deng, Liangwei; Song, Li; Wang, Shuang; Zheng, Dan; Liu, Yi; Pu, Xiaodong; Zhang, Yunhong

    2015-12-01

    Four reactors were initiated to study the effect of inoculum and sulfide type on the simultaneous hydrogen sulfide removal from biogas and nitrogen removal from swine slurry (Ssu-Nir) process. Anaerobic sludge, aerobic sludge, and water were used as inocula, and Na2S and biogas were used as a sulfide substrate, respectively. Additionally, 454 pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene was used to explore the bacterial diversity. The results showed that sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (Thiobacillus, 42.2-84.4 %) were dominant in Ssu-Nir process and led to the excellent performance. Aerobic sludge was more suitable for inoculation of the Ssu-Nir process because it is better for rapidly enriching dominant sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (Thiobacillus, 54.4 %), denitrifying sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (40.0 %) and denitrifiers (23.9 %). Lower S(2-) removal efficiency (72.6 %) and NO3 (-) removal efficiency (biogas as a sulfide substrate than when Na2S was used. For the Ssu-Nir process with biogas as the sulfide substrate, limiting H2S absorption caused a high relative abundance of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria, Thiobacillus (84.8 %) and Thiobacillus sayanicus (39.6 %), which in turn led to low relative abundance of denitrifiers (1.6 %) and denitrifying sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (24.4 %), low NO3 (-) removal efficiency, and eventually poor performance.

  2. Sulfide mineralization in ultramafic rocks of the Faryab ophiolite complex, southern Kerman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Rajabzadeh

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Worldwide, Ni-Cu and PGE magmatic sulfide deposits are confined to the lower parts of stratiform mafic and ultramafic complexes. However, ophiolite mafic and ultramafic complexes have been rarely explored for sulfide deposits despite the fact that they have been extensively explored and exploited for chromite. Sulfide saturation during magmatic evolution is necessary for sulfide mineralization, in which sulfide melts scavenge chalcophile metals from the parent magma and concentrate them in specific lithological zones. The lack of exploration for sulfides in this environment suggests that sulfide saturation is rarely attained in ophiolite-related magmas. Some ophiolites, however, contain sulfide deposits, such as at Acoje in Philippines, and Cliffs in Shetland, U.K. (Evans, 2000; Naldrett, 2004. The Faryab ophiolite complex in southern Kerman Province, the most important mining area for chromite deposits in Iran, is located in the southwest part of the Makran Zone. Evidence of sulfide mineralization has been reported there by some authors (e.g. Rajabzadeh and Moosavinasab, 2013. This paper discusses the genesis of sulfides in the Faryab ophiolite using mineral chemistry of the major mineral phases in different rocks of the ophiolite column in order to determine the possible lithological location of sulfide deposits. Materials and methods Seventy three rock samples from cumulate units were collected from surficial occurrences and drill core. The samples were studied using conventional microscopic methods and the mineralogy confirmed by x-ray diffraction. Electron microprobe analysis was carried out on different mineral phases in order to determine the chemistry of the minerals used in the interpretation of magma evolution in the Faryab ophiolite. Lithologically, the Faryab ophiolite complex is divided into two major parts: the northern part includes magmatic rocks and the southern part is comprised of rocks residual after partial

  3. Selective oxidation of glycosyl sulfides to sulfoxides using magnesium monoperoxyphthalate and microwave irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming-Yi; Patkar, Laxmikant Narhari; Lin, Chun-Cheng

    2004-04-16

    A protocol that uses moist magnesium monoperoxyphthalate (MMPP) as an oxidant under microwave irradiation rapidly yields a variety of glycosyl sulfoxides from corresponding sulfides in high yields with high selectivity.

  4. Inhibition of sulfide generation by dosing formaldehyde and its derivatives in sewage under anaerobic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L; Mendoza, L; Marzorati, M; Verstraete, W

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide emission in sewers is associated with toxicity, corrosion, odor nuisance and a lot of costs. The possibility to inhibit sulfide generation by formaldehyde and its derivatives (paraformaldehyde and urea formaldehyde) has been evaluated under anaerobic conditions. The impact of formaldehyde on an activated sludge system and an appraisal of the economic aspects are also presented. The optimum dosage to inhibit sulfide generation in sewage was 12-19 mg L(-1) formaldehyde. The dosages of 32 mg L(-1) paraformaldehyde or 100 mg L(-1) urea formaldehyde were not capable of inhibiting sulfide generation in sewage. The impact of 19 mg L(-1) formaldehyde on activated sludge system was negligible in terms of COD removal, nitrification rate and oxygen uptake rate.

  5. Effect of cathode electron acceptors on simultaneous anaerobic sulfide and nitrate removal in microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jing; Zheng, Ping; Mahmood, Qaisar

    2016-01-01

    The current investigation reports the effect of cathode electron acceptors on simultaneous sulfide and nitrate removal in two-chamber microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Potassium permanganate and potassium ferricyanide were common cathode electron acceptors and evaluated for substrate removal and electricity generation. The abiotic MFCs produced electricity through spontaneous electrochemical oxidation of sulfide. In comparison with abiotic MFC, the biotic MFC showed better ability for simultaneous nitrate and sulfide removal along with electricity generation. Keeping external resistance of 1,000 Ω, both MFCs showed good capacities for substrate removal where nitrogen and sulfate were the main end products. The steady voltage with potassium permanganate electrodes was nearly twice that of with potassium ferricyanide. Cyclic voltammetry curves confirmed that the potassium permanganate had higher catalytic activity than potassium ferricyanide. The potassium permanganate may be a suitable choice as cathode electron acceptor for enhanced electricity generation during simultaneous treatment of sulfide and nitrate in MFCs.

  6. Reliability of Electrochemical Techniques for Determining Corrosion Rates on Carbon Steel in Sulfide Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel; Hemmingsen, T.; Nielsen, Lars Vendelbo

    2007-01-01

    Effects of film formation on carbon steel in hydrogen sulfide (H2S) media may corrupt corrosion rate monitoring by electrochemical techniques. Electrochemical data from H2S solutions, biological sulfide media, and natural sulfide containing geothermal water have been collected, and the process...... if the biofilm in combination with ferrous sulfide corrosion products cover the steel surface. Corrosion rates can be overestimated by a factor of 10 to 100 with electrochemical techniques - both by linear polarization resistance (LPR) and electrochemicel impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Oxygen entering the system...... accelerates corrosion rates, but this effect may not be detected if rates are already overestimated. It is concluded that electrochemical techniques can be used for corrosion reate monitoring in some H2S media, but care must be taken in the choice of scan ratre; it is important to realize when direct...

  7. Personal Review: Sources of sulfide in waste streams and current biotechnologies for its removal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAHMOOD Qaisar; ZHENG Ping; CAI Jing; HAYAT Yousaf; HASSAN Muhammad Jaffar; WU Dong-lei; HU Bao-lan

    2007-01-01

    Sulfide-containing waste streams are generated by a number of industries. It is emitted into the environment as dissolved sulfide (S2- and HS-) in wastewaters and as H2S in waste gases. Due to its corrosive nature, biological hydrogen sulfide removal processes are being investigated to overcome the chemical and disposal costs associated with existing chemically based removal processes. The nitrogen and sulfur metabolism interacts at various levels of the wastewater treatment process. Hence, the sulfur cycle offers possibilities to integrate nitrogen removal in the treatment process, which needs to be further optimized by appropriate design of the reactor configuration, optimization of performance parameters, retention of biomass and optimization of biomass growth. The present paper reviews the biotechnological advances to remove sulfides from various environments.

  8. Hydrogen sulfide poisoning in solid oxide fuel cells under accelerated testing conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ting Shuai; Wang, Wei Guo; Chen, Tao; Miao, He; Xu, Cheng

    This study investigates the 0.2% hydrogen sulfide poisoning of Ni/YSZ anode-supported solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The deterioration degrees and recovery extents of the cell current density, cell voltage and operation temperature are monitored. The results of impedance spectroscopy analysis show that hydrogen sulfide poisoning behavior may affect oxygen ion migration and gas diffusion and conversion on the anode side. Microstructural inspection reveals sulfur or sulfide formed on the anode-active area, which accounts for the immediate and severe cell power drop upon the injection of H 2S. The nickel sulfide in the anodic functional layer cannot be completely removed after long-term regeneration and thus may be a key factor in the permanent degradation of the cell.

  9. Occupationally related hydrogen sulfide deaths in the United States from 1984 to 1994.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, D C; Suruda, A J

    2000-09-01

    Alice Hamilton described fatal work injuries from acute hydrogen sulfide poisonings in 1925 in her book Industrial Poisons in the United States. There is no unique code for H2S poisoning in the International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision; therefore, these deaths cannot be identified easily from vital records. We reviewed US Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) investigation records for the period 1984 to 1994 for mention of hazardous substance 1480 (hydrogen sulfide). There were 80 fatalities from hydrogen sulfide in 57 incidents, with 19 fatalities and 36 injuries among coworkers attempting to rescue fallen workers. Only 17% of the deaths were at workplaces covered by collective bargaining agreements. OSHA issued citations for violation of respiratory protection and confined space standards in 60% of the fatalities. The use of hydrogen sulfide detection equipment, air-supplied respirators, and confined space safety training would have prevented most of the fatalities.

  10. The Synthesis and Characterization of High Molecular Weight Poly(phenylene sulfide/ether)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ai Qun GU; Mei Ju XIE; Zi Li YU

    2006-01-01

    Poly(phenylene sulfide/ether) (PPSE) was synthesized from 4,4'-dihydroxydiphenyl sulfide and 4,4'-dichlorodiphenyl sulfide in solution by nucleophilic substitution reaction. The resulting polymer was characterized by viscosity measurement, elemental analysis, FT-IR, 1H NMR, X-ray diffraction and thermal analysis. The results showed that the viscosities of the resulting polymer were above 0.68 dL/g, and the linear chain structure of product was confirmed.PPSE had the same reflex indices as poly(p-phenylene sulfide), an orthorhombic crystalline with unit cell a=0.853, b=0.562, c=1.026nm. The melting temperature, glass transition temperature and initial decomposition temperature were found to be 228℃, 85℃ and 325℃, respectively.The product was soluble in common organic solvents such as NMP, N, N'-dimethylformamide,N, N'-dimethylacetamide and 1,2-dichloroethane.

  11. Sulfide capacities of CaO-CaF2-CaCl2 melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeonov, Simeon; Sakai, Toshihiko; Maeda, Masafumi

    1992-06-01

    The sulfide capacityC_{s^{2 - } } = ({text{pct S}}^{{text{2 - }}} )(p_{{text{O}}_{text{2}} } /p_{{text{S}}_{text{2}} } )^{1/2} ) of CaO-CaF2-CaCl2 slag was determined at temperatures from 1000 °C to 1300 °C by equilibrating molten slag, molten silver, and CO-CO2-Ar gas mixture. The sulfide capacity increases with replacing CaCl2 by CaF2 in slags of constant CaO contents. The sulfide capacity also increases with increasing temperature as well as with increasing CaO content at a constant ratio of CaF2/CaCl2 of unity. A linear relationship between the sulfide capacity and carbonate capacity in literature was observed on a logarithmic scale.

  12. Test of oxidation behavior of sulfide ores at ambient temperature for fire control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Chao; LI Zi-jun; LI Ming; WU Guo-min

    2007-01-01

    The coincidence of relevant factors, e.g. oxygen absorption quantity, weight increment, water soluble iron ions and sulfate ion of sulfide ore samples in the oxidation process, was tested through experiment. Based on a large number of tests for a group sample of sulfide ores from a mine, some important conclusions were obtained. The results obtained by the investigation indicate that there is no general interpretation relative to the oxygen absorption and the formation products of sulfate ion and water soluble iron ions during the oxidation process of sulfide ores at ambient temperature. However, the weight increment of the sulfide ore samples in the oxidation process at ambient temperature has a linear relationship with the quantity of oxygen absorption.

  13. Interpreting HSE Contents of Planetary Basalts: The Importance of Sulfide Saturation and Under-Saturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righter, K.

    2000-01-01

    Highly siderophile elements provide important constraints on planetary differentiation due to their siderophile behavior. Their interpretation in terms of planetary differentiation models has so far overlooked the importance of sulfide saturation and under-saturation.

  14. Harvesting biohydrogen from cellobiose from sulfide or nitrite-containing wastewaters using Clostridium sp. R1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Kuo-Ling; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2011-09-01

    Harvesting biohydrogen from inhibiting wastewaters is of practical interest since the toxicity of compounds in a wastewater stream commonly prevents the bioenergy content being recovered. The isolated Clostridium sp. R1 is utilized to degrade cellobiose in sulfide or nitrite-containing medium for biohydrogen production. The strain can effectively degrade cellobiose free of severe inhibitory effects at up to 200 mgl(-1) sulfide or to 5 mgl(-1) nitrite, yielding hydrogen at >2.0 mol H2 mol(-1) cellobiose. Principal metabolites of cellobiose fermentation are acetate and butyrate, with the concentration of the former increases with increasing sulfide and nitrite concentrations. The isolated strain can yield hydrogen from cellobiose in sulfide-laden wastewaters. However, the present of nitrite significantly limit the efficiency of the biohydrogen harvesting process.

  15. Sulfide Composition and Melt Stability Field in the Earth's Upper Mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z.; Hirschmann, M. M.

    2015-12-01

    In the Earth's upper mantle, sulfur occurs chiefly as (Fe, Ni)xS minerals and melts with near-monosulfide stoichiometries. These could have substantial influence on geochemical and geophysical properties of the Earth's interior. For example, sulfide mineral and melts are the major carriers of chalcophile and platinum group elements (PGEs) and sulfide melts are potentially responsible for mantle geophysical anomalies, as their physical properties (higher density, surface tension, electrical conductivity and lower melting points) differ greatly from those of silicates. Sulfide melts are a potential sink for reduced mantle carbon and perhaps be associated with carbon transport, including diamond precipitation. Sulfides may be molten in large parts of the mantle, but this is determined in part by sulfide composition, which is in turn a product of Fe-Ni exchange with olivine and of the effect of sulfur, oxygen, and carbon fugacities on metal/anion ratios of melts. Melting experiments define the monosulfide (Fe0.35Ni0.12Cu0.01S0.52) solidus from 1-8 GPa at carbon-free and graphite saturated conditions. The resulting carbon-free solidus is below the mantle adiabat to depths of at least 300 km, but does not indicate sulfide melting in continental lithosphere. In contrast, the graphite saturated solidus indicates melting in the lithosphere at 6-7 GPa (~200 km), close to the source conditions typical of diamond formation. To determine the composition of sulfide equilibrated with olivine, we performed experiments on monosulfide-olivine (crushed powders from San Carlos single crystal) under 2 GPa, 1400 ◦C. Our preliminary results suggests that Fe-Ni distribution coefficients KD, defined by (Ni/Fe)sulfide/(Ni/Fe)olivine, have significantly lower values than those determined previously at one atmosphere (Doyle and Naldrett 1987; Fleet and MacRae 1987; Gaetani and Grove 1997). This indicates that sulfide equilibrated with olivine in the mantle is richer in Fe than former

  16. The influence of sulfur pressure on sulfidation behaviour of NiCoCrAl(Y) alloys at high temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godlewska, E. (School of Mining and Metallurgy, Krakow (Poland). Dept. of Solid State Chemistry); Roszczynialska, E. (School of Mining and Metallurgy, Krakow (Poland). Dept. of Solid State Chemistry); Zurek, Z. (Cracow Univ. of Technology (Poland). Inst. of Inorganic Chemistry and Technology)

    1994-06-01

    Sulfidation of alloy having nominal composition Ni-23Co-19Cr-12Al (wt%) with and without the addition of 0.6% yttrium was studied at temperatures 1073-1273 K in sulfur vapor at atmospheric pressure and in H[sub 2]/H[sub 2]S gas mixtures at sulfur pressure of 10[sup -3] and 10[sup -1.5] Pa. Sulfidation runs were followed thermogravimetrically. Phase and chemical composition of sulfide scales and scale morphologies were determined by means of XRD, EDX, EPM and SEM analyses. After certain initial period sulfidation of both materials followed approximately a parabolic rate law. The estimated sulfidation rates for each alloy increased with sulfur pressure and temperature. The sulfide scales on both materials showed complex microstructures and compositions, depending on sulfidation conditions, with several sulfide and sulfospinel phases present, such as (Ni, Co)S, (Ni, Co)[sub 3]S[sub 4], (Ni, Co)Cr[sub 2]S[sub 4], (Cr, Ni, Co)Al[sub 2]S[sub 4] or (Cr, Ni, Co)S and (Cr, Ni, Co)[sub 3]S[sub 4]. There was no evidence of yttrium segregation either to the grain boundary regions in the scale or to the alloy/scale interface. Yttrium dissolved in the sulfide phases and accelerated the sulfidation process. This behaviour was ascribed to the doping effect. (orig.)

  17. The susceptibility of 90Cu-10Ni alloy to stress corrosion cracking in seawater polluted by sulfide ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domiaty, A. El; Alhajji, J. N.

    1997-08-01

    Electrochemical polarization measurements and slow strain rate tests (SSRT) of a 90Cu-10Ni alloy in highly sulfide polluted seawater were conducted to investigate stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior. The severity of the SCC depends on the sulfide concentration in the seawater. The severity increases as the concentration increases. Because the major time in SCC is spent in the initiation process of the propagating crack, the fracture toughness has only a minor effect in the component life failed by SCC. The SCC behavior of CDA706 is strictly linked to sulfide concentration in the range of 100 to 1000 ppm. The general corrosion of Cu-Ni alloys in low (100 ppm) sulfide polluted seawater increases due to the selective copper dissolution. Cyclic polarization measurements confirmed that the corrosion rate decreases slightly as the sulfide concentration increases. Pitting tendency was high in the low concentration range of sulfide and low in the high concentration range. The presence of stresses in SCC removes the protective layer as it increases during testing of the specimen or during the actual service of a component. The authors propose that film rupture occurred, and two proposed SCC mechanisms were operational, namely sulfide stress cracking associated with the anodic dissolution in the low sulfide concentration range and hydrogen embrittlement, which was dominant in the high sulfide concentration range. It was found that a synergism exists between sulfide and stress that enhances the effect of the latter.

  18. Quantitative prediction process and evaluation method for seafloor polymetallic sulfide resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengyi Ren

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Seafloor polymetallic sulfide resources exhibit significant development potential. In 2011, China received the exploration rights for 10,000 km2 of a polymetallic sulfides area in the Southwest Indian Ocean; China will be permitted to retain only 25% of the area in 2021. However, an exploration of seafloor hydrothermal sulfide deposits in China remains in the initial stage. According to the quantitative prediction theory and the exploration status of seafloor sulfides, this paper systematically proposes a quantitative prediction evaluation process of oceanic polymetallic sulfide resources and divides it into three stages: prediction in a large area, prediction in the prospecting region, and the verification and evaluation of targets. The first two stages of the prediction process have been employed in seafloor sulfides prospecting of the Chinese contract area. The results of stage one suggest that the Chinese contract area is located in the high posterior probability area, which indicates good prospecting potential area in the Indian Ocean. In stage two, the Chinese contract area of 48°–52°E has the highest posterior probability value, which can be selected as the reserved region for additional exploration. In stage three, the method of numerical simulation is employed to reproduce the ore-forming process of sulfides to verify the accuracy of the reserved targets obtained from the three-stage prediction. By narrowing the exploration area and gradually improving the exploration accuracy, the prediction will provide a basis for the exploration and exploitation of seafloor polymetallic sulfide resources.

  19. Electrochemistry of Molten Sulfides: Copper Extraction from BaS-Cu[subscript 2]S

    OpenAIRE

    Sokhanvaran, Samira; Lee, Sang-Kwon; Lambotte, Guillaume; Allanore, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    The electrolytic extraction of liquid copper at 1105°C from a molten sulfide electrolyte composed of 57 wt% BaS and 43 wt% Cu[subscript 2]S was investigated. DC cyclic voltammetry, Fourier transformed AC voltammetry, and galvanostatic electrolysis revealed that the electrodeposition of copper is possible in the selected molten sulfide electrolyte. The half wave potential for the reaction on graphite was determined, and liquid copper of high purity was obtained by galvanostatic electrolysis. T...

  20. Diamond growth history from in situ measurement of Pb and S isotopic compositions of sulfide inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudnick, Roberta L.; Eldridge, C. Stewart; Bulanova, Galina P.

    1993-01-01

    In a continuing effort to understand crust-mantle dynamics, we have determined the S and Pb isotopic compositions of mantle sulfides encapsulated within diamonds from under the Siberian craton and compared these results to those of previously investigated African counterparts. Because diamond inclusions are isolated from exchange with surrounding mantle, they may preserve the history of diamond growth and act as direct tracers of the origins of mantle materials. Study of these inclusions may thus offer the best chance of recognizing global-scale interaction between Earth's crust and mantle. Although δ34S values of the Siberian sulfides do not deviate significantly from the mantle value of 0‰ ± 3‰, Pb isotopic compositions are highly variable. Pb isotopic compositions of sulfides from peridotitic suite diamonds generally plot near the terrestrial Pb growth curve, with model ages ranging between 0 and 2 Ga, whereas sulfides from eclogitic suite diamonds have radiogenic compositions, plotting beyond the growth curve. These results, which are similar to those for sulfides in African diamonds, suggest that the sulfides from eclogitic suite diamonds were derived from a source with an unusually high U/Pb ratio and may indicate a common process (such as subduction of crystal materials into the mantle) operating beneath Africa and Siberia. The absence of extremely radiogenic Pb in sulfides from eclogite xenoliths suggests that the radiogenic material from which eclogitic suite diamonds grew was a transient feature of the mantle, associated with diamond growth. The ultimate origin of this high U/Pb signature, however, remains enigmatic. Large variations in Pb isotopic composition of sulfides from different zones in a single peridotitic suite diamond document (1) crystallization of the diamond's core near 2.0 Ga, (2) growth of its outer zone in an environment with a high U/Pb ratio similar to the growth environment of eclogitic suite diamonds, and (3) growth of the

  1. Sulindac Sulfide Differentially Induces Apoptosis in Smac-Proficient and -Deficient Human Colon Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Jingxue; He, Qin; An, Jie; Sun, Hong; Huang, Ying; Sheikh, M. Saeed

    2009-01-01

    Sulindac, the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug has shown promise in the prevention of colon cancer but the molecular mechanisms by which it mediates such effects remain to be elucidated. Sulindac sulfide is the major active metabolite of sulindac and believed to be responsible for mediating the effects of sulindac. Previously, our group and others have shown that sulindac sulfide induces apoptosis by engaging death receptor and mitochondrial pathways and that a cross-talk exists between t...

  2. Removal of Sulfide and COD from a Crude Oil Wastewater Model by Aluminum and Iron Electrocoagulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. I. Dermentzis

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of petroleum wastewater was studied using the electrocoagulation process with aluminum and iron electrodes aiming to simultaneous removal of sulfide and COD. All affecting parameters, such as solution pH, applied current density, time of electroprocessing, electrode material and addition of surfactant, were investigated. Sulfide was rapidly and effectively removed using iron electrodes. The removal of COD was effectively effectively enhanced by performing the electrocoagulation process after addition of the surfactant polyethylene glycol oleate.

  3. Removal of Sulfide and COD from a Crude Oil Wastewater Model by Aluminum and Iron Electrocoagulation

    OpenAIRE

    K. I. Dermentzis

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of petroleum wastewater was studied using the electrocoagulation process with aluminum and iron electrodes aiming to simultaneous removal of sulfide and COD. All affecting parameters, such as solution pH, applied current density, time of electroprocessing, electrode material and addition of surfactant, were investigated. Sulfide was rapidly and effectively removed using iron electrodes. The removal of COD was effectively effectively enhanced by performing the electrocoagulation ...

  4. Ab Initio Investigation of Methanthiol and Dimethyl Sulfide Adsorption on Zeolite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lü Renqing

    2006-01-01

    The Hartree-Fock and cluster model methods have been employed to investigate interactions of methanthiol or dimethyl sulfide on zeolites. Molecular complexes formed by adsorption of methanthiol on silanol H3SiOSi(OH)2OSiH3 with five coordination forms and dimethyl sulfide on silanol H3SiOSi(OH)2OSiH3 with four coordination forms, and Br(o)nsted acid sites of bridging hydroxyl H3Si(OH)Al(OH)2OSiH3 entering into interactions with methanthiol or dimethyl sulfide have been investigated. Full optimization and frequency analysis of all cluster models have been carried out using the Hartree-Fock method at 6-31 +G** basis set level for hydrogen, silicon, aluminum, oxygen, carbon, and sulfur atoms. The structures and energy changes of different coordination forms derived from methanthiol and H3Si(OH)Al(OH)2OSiH3, dimethyl sulfide and H3Si(OH)Al(OH)2OSiH3, methanthiol and H3SiOSi(OH)2OSiH3, dimethyl sulfide and H3SiOSi(OH)2OSiH3 complexes have been comparatively studied. The calculated results showed that the nature of interactions leading to the formation of the bridging hydroxyl-methanthiol, silanol-methanthiol,bridging hydroxyl-dimethyl sulfide, silanol-dimethyl sulfide complexes was governed by the Van der Waals force as confirmed by a small change in geometric structures and properties. Methanthiol and dimethyl sulfide molecules were adsorbed on bridging hydroxyl group prior to silanol group as evidenced by the heat of adsorption, and the protonization of methanthiol adsorption on bridging hydroxyl model, which was supposed in the literature, was not found.

  5. The cardioprotective actions of hydrogen sulfide in acute myocardial infarction and heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polhemus, David J; Calvert, John W; Butler, Javed; Lefer, David J

    2014-01-01

    It has now become universally accepted that hydrogen sulfide (H2S), previously considered only as a lethal toxin, has robust cytoprotective actions in multiple organ systems. The diverse signaling profile of H2S impacts multiple pathways to exert cytoprotective actions in a number of pathological states. This paper will review the recently described cardioprotective actions of hydrogen sulfide in both myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury and congestive heart failure.

  6. The Cardioprotective Actions of Hydrogen Sulfide in Acute Myocardial Infarction and Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. Polhemus

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It has now become universally accepted that hydrogen sulfide (H2S, previously considered only as a lethal toxin, has robust cytoprotective actions in multiple organ systems. The diverse signaling profile of H2S impacts multiple pathways to exert cytoprotective actions in a number of pathological states. This paper will review the recently described cardioprotective actions of hydrogen sulfide in both myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury and congestive heart failure.

  7. The Cardioprotective Actions of Hydrogen Sulfide in Acute Myocardial Infarction and Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Polhemus, David J.; Calvert, John W.; Javed Butler; Lefer, David J.

    2014-01-01

    It has now become universally accepted that hydrogen sulfide (H2S), previously considered only as a lethal toxin, has robust cytoprotective actions in multiple organ systems. The diverse signaling profile of H2S impacts multiple pathways to exert cytoprotective actions in a number of pathological states. This paper will review the recently described cardioprotective actions of hydrogen sulfide in both myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury and congestive heart failure.

  8. Sulfide capacities of Na2O-SiO2 melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, R. G.; Zhao, W.

    1995-10-01

    Sulfide capacities of Na2O-SiO2 melts at 1473, 1523, 1573, 1623, and 1673 K were calculated a priori using the revised Reddy Blander model. An expression for C S in the composition range of 0≤ X SiO 2sulfide capacities of slags are found to be directly related to two independent quantities: the equilibrium constant K and the activity of the base oxide.

  9. Biological removal of air loaded with a hydrogen sulfide and ammonia mixture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Ying-xu; YIN Jun; FANG Shi

    2004-01-01

    The nuisance impact of air pollutant emissions from wastewater pumping stations is a major issue of concern to China. Hydrogen sulfide and ammonia are commonly the primary odor and are important targets for removal. An alternative control technology, biofiltration, was studied. The aim of this study is to investigate the potential of unit systems packed with compost in terms of ammonia and hydrogen sulfide emissions treatment, and to establish optimal operating conditions for a full-scale conceptual design. The laboratory scale biofilter packed with compost was continuously supplied with hydrogen sulfide and ammonia gas mixtures. A volumetric load of less than 150 gH2S/(m3· d) and 230 gNH3/(m3· d) was applied for about fifteen weeks. Hydrogen sulfide and ammonia elimination occurred in the biofilter simultaneously. The removal efficiency, removal capacity and removal kinetics in the biofilter were studied. The hydrogen sulfide removal efficiency reached was very high above 99%, and ammonia removal efficiency was about 80%. Hydrogen sulfide was oxidized into sulphate. The ammonia oxidation products were nitrite and nitrate. Ammonia in the biofilter was mainly removed by adsorption onto the carrier material and by absorption into the water fraction of the carrier material. High percentages of hydrogen sulfide or ammonia were oxidized in the first section of the column. Through kinetics analysis, the presence of amrronia did not hinder the hydrogen sulfide removal. According to the relationship between pressure drop and gas velocity for the biofilter and Reynolds number, non-Darcy flow can be assumed to represent the flow in the medium.

  10. Nanoscale Zero-Valent Iron for Sulfide Removal from Digested Piggery Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Hsun Chaung

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The removal of dissolved sulfides in water and wastewater by nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI was examined in the study. Both laboratory batch studies and a pilot test in a 50,000-pig farm were conducted. Laboratory studies indicated that the sulfide removal with nZVI was a function of pH where an increase in pH decreased removal rates. The pH effect on the sulfide removal with nZVI is attributed to the formation of FeS through the precipitation of Fe(II and sulfide. The saturated adsorption capacities determined by the Langmuir model were 821.2, 486.3, and 359.7 mg/g at pH values 4, 7, and 12, respectively, for nZVI, largely higher than conventional adsorbents such as activated carbon and impregnated activated carbon. The surface characterization of sulfide-laden nZVI using XPS and TGA indicated the formation of iron sulfide, disulfide, and polysulfide that may account for the high adsorption capacity of nZVI towards sulfide. The pilot study showed the effectiveness of nZVI for sulfide removal; however, the adsorption capacity is almost 50 times less than that determined in the laboratory studies during the testing period of 30 d. The complexity of digested wastewater constituents may limit the effectiveness of nZVI. Microbial analysis suggested that the impact of nZVI on the change of microbial species distribution was relatively noticeable after the addition of nZVI.

  11. Hydrogen evolution at nanoporous gold/tungsten sulfide composite film and its optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Xinxin; Engelbrekt, Christian; Li, Zheshen

    2015-01-01

    Development of efficient and economical electrochemical systems for water splitting is a key part of renewable energy technology. Amorphous films of tungsten sulfide have been deposited by electrochemical reduction of tetrathiotungstate ions (WS42-) on dealloyed nanoporous gold (NPG) for electroc......Development of efficient and economical electrochemical systems for water splitting is a key part of renewable energy technology. Amorphous films of tungsten sulfide have been deposited by electrochemical reduction of tetrathiotungstate ions (WS42-) on dealloyed nanoporous gold (NPG...

  12. Ways to improve the removal of hydrogen sulfide from coke-oven gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznetsov, M.D.; Lyannaya; No. 1, Z.G.; Ignatova, E.P.; Zbykovskii, I.I.; Shukh, Ya.I.; Andreiko, I.M.; Garkushenko, I.Ya.

    1979-01-01

    Our calculations showed that, if the gas temperatures ahead of the scrubbers were reuced to 30/sup 0/C and 300 to 400 liters/h of concentrated ammonia water were added to the circuit, the degree of hydrogen sulfide absorption could be brought to 58 to 65%, i.e., the hydrogen sulfide content in the return gas would be less than 2.5 g/m/sup 3/. All the hydrogen sulfide removed from the gas would enter the concentrated ammonia water, which would be delivered to facilities for production of soda by the ammonia method. The ammonium sulfide formed in the liquor would be a desirable component, acting to inhibit corrosion. This would provide the simplest solution to the problem of utilizing the hydrogen sulfide removed from the gas. Our investigation thus showed that the hydrogen sulfide content of the coke-oven gas can be reduced to a permissible level in the department as it now exists, without substantial remodelling of the scrubber department. Implementation of the proposed measures (installation of an additional gas cooler beyond the blower and introduction of 300 to 400 liters/h of 20% ammonia liquor into the circuit) will make it possible to improve air-pollution conditions in the carbonization department and adjoining areas, reduce the corrosion of the gaslines, utilize that portion of the gas now discharged into the atmosphere, and eliminate the need for construction of an expensive special facility for removal of hydrogen sulfide. Addition of concentrated ammonia liquor into the scrubber-liquor circuit in the amounts indicated above raised the degree of hydrogen sulfide absorption from 31 to 43 to 47%.

  13. Development of novel and sensitive methods for the determination of sulfide in aqueous samples by hydrogen sulfide generation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colon, M. [Department of Chemistry, University of Girona, Campus Montilivi, 17071 Girona (Spain); Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, University of Alicante, 03080 Alicante (Spain); Todoli, J.L. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, University of Alicante, 03080 Alicante (Spain); Hidalgo, M. [Department of Chemistry, University of Girona, Campus Montilivi, 17071 Girona (Spain); Iglesias, M. [Department of Chemistry, University of Girona, Campus Montilivi, 17071 Girona (Spain)], E-mail: monica.iglesias@udg.es

    2008-02-25

    Two new, simple and accurate methods for the determination of sulfide (S{sup 2-}) at low levels ({mu}g L{sup -1}) in aqueous samples were developed. The generation of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) took place in a coil where sulfide reacted with hydrochloric acid. The resulting H{sub 2}S was then introduced as a vapor into an inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometer (ICP-AES) and sulfur emission intensity was measured at 180.669 nm. In comparison to when aqueous sulfide was introduced, the introduction of sulfur as H{sub 2}S enhanced the sulfur signal emission. By setting a gas separator at the end of the reaction coil, reduced sulfur species in the form of H{sub 2}S were removed from the water matrix, thus, interferences could be avoided. Alternatively, the gas separator was replaced by a nebulizer/spray chamber combination to introduce the sample matrix and reagents into the plasma. This methodology allowed the determination of both sulfide and sulfate in aqueous samples. For both methods the linear response was found to range from 5 {mu}g L{sup -1} to 25 mg L{sup -1} of sulfide. Detection limits of 5 {mu}g L{sup -1} and 6 {mu}g L{sup -1} were obtained with and without the gas separator, respectively. These new methods were evaluated by comparison to the standard potentiometric method and were successfully applied to the analysis of reduced sulfur species in environmental waters.

  14. Correlations among factors of sulfide ores in oxidation process at ambient temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴超; 李孜军; 周勃

    2004-01-01

    Spontaneous combustion is one of the serious problems in the mining of sulfide ore deposits. The relevant factors, e. G. Oxygen absorption quantity, mass increase, contents of water soluble iron ions and sulfate ion of sulfide ore samples in the oxidation process were investigated both in theory and experiment. The results from the investigation show that there is no general interpretation relation among the oxygen absorption quantity, the contents of sulfate ion and water soluble iron ions during the oxidation process of sulfide ores at ambient temperature.However, there is a linear relationship between the mass increase of the sulfide ore samples in the oxidation process at ambient temperature and the quantity of oxygen absorption. Therefore, the simple and cheap mass scaling method is suitable for predicting the oxygen absorption performance of sulfide ores at ambient temperature in place of the expensive and complicated chemical method used hitherto. Furthermore, combined with other items of breeding-fire test, the mass increase potential can also be used to predict the spontaneous combustion tendency of sulfide ores.

  15. Kinetics and correlation analysis of reactivity in the oxidation of organic sulfides by butyltriphenylphosphonium dichromate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K M Dilsha; Seema Kothari

    2009-03-01

    The oxidation of a number of monosubstituted aryl methyl, alkyl phenyl, dialkyl, and diphenyl sulfides by butyltriphenylphosphonium dichromate (BTPPD), to the corresponding sulfoxides, is first order with respect to BTPPD and is second order with respect to sulfide. The reaction is catalysed by hydrogen ions and the dependence is of second order. The oxidation of meta- and para-substituted aryl methyl sulfides correlated best in terms of Hammett equation, the reactions exhibited negative polar reaction constant. The ortho-substituted compounds correlated best in terms of Charton’s triparametric equation with negative polar constant and a small degree of steric hindrance. The oxidation of alkyl phenyl sulfides exhibited a good correlation in terms of Pavelich-Taft equation confirming that the electron-donating power of the alkyl group increases the rate, however, the reactivity is not markedly controlled by the bulkiness of the alkyl group. The rates of oxidation of sulfides were determined in nineteen organic solvents. An analysis of the solvent effect by multi-parametric equations indicated the relatively greater importance of the cation-solvating power of the solvents. A mechanism involving a single-step electrophilic oxygen transfer from BTPPD to the sulfide leading to polar transition state has been proposed.

  16. Detecting Naturally-Produced Sulfide Nanoparticles by Adsorptive, Cathodic Stripping Voltammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helz, G. R.; Krznaric, D.; Bura-Nakic, E.; Ciglenecki, I.

    2007-12-01

    Growing evidence implies that metal sulfide nanoparticles of natural origin exist in some aquatic environments. These nanoparticles could play important roles as mediators of trace metal nutrition and toxicity. Thermodynamics suggests that in sulfidic environments (total transition metaltotal sulfide) the most insoluble metal sulfide (usually Hg or Cu) will form the predominant sulfide nanoparticle. New experimental methods for detecting and distinguishing between such nanoparticles are needed. We report that mercury electrodes effectively preconcentrate a number of different metal sulfide nanoparticles, enabling their detection by adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry. Voltammetrically, nanoparticulate analytes differ fundamentally from dissolved analytes; e.g. analyte accumulation is very sensitive to electrolyte composition and concentration in accord with the Schulze-Hardy Rule. EDTA or acid treatment of samples is useful for distinguishing highly insoluble nanoparticles (HgS, CuS) from FeS. Nanoparticulate sulfur potentially interferes. Supersaturated solutions can generate artifactual analyte on Hg electrode surfaces. Despite such potential pitfalls, progress is encouraging. Preliminary, qualitative results from natural waters will be reported.

  17. Fundamental features of copper ion precipitation using sulfide as a precipitant in a wastewater system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jung-Yoon; Kim, Dong-Su; Lim, Joong-Yeon

    2006-01-01

    We have investigated the precipitation features of copper ion using sulfide as a precipitant by varying the mole ratio of sulfide to copper ion, pH, temperature and the kind and concentration of complexing agent. In the precipitation of copper ion by sulfide, sludge is produced as cupric sulfide; thus, there is a possibility for its recycled use in photochemical and ceramic processes. When the ratio of the concentration of copper ion to sulfide was increased to more than 1.0, the extent of precipitation was very high. As the ratio was increased, nucleation time was decreased and crystal growth rate was raised. The higher the pH, the greater the amount of precipitated copper ion due to lowered solubility of cupric sulfide. When temperature changed from 25 degrees C to 55 degrees C, the precipitation of copper ion was increased a little. On the basis of estimated thermodynamic parameters such as Gibbs free energy and enthalpy, the precipitation reaction was spontaneous and endothermic. The precipitation of copper ion was lowered in the presence of complexing agent and it was affected by the stability of the copper complex. The feasibility test for the application of precipitation treatment to actual wastewater containing copper ion showed, although there was a little decrease in the removal of copper, the precipitation extent of copper was higher than 90% compared with that for artificial wastewater.

  18. Docosahexaenoic acid sensitizes colon cancer cells to sulindac sulfide-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Soo-Jeong; Lee, Eunmyong; Lee, Eun-Hye; Kim, Soo-Yeon; Cha, Jun Hyung; Choi, Hwanho; Park, Wanseo; Choi, Hyeon Kyeom; Ko, Seong-Hee; Kim, So Hee

    2012-06-01

    Sulindac analogs represent one of the most efficacious groups of NSAIDs reducing the risk of colon cancer. Recent studies have shown that sulindac sulfide, a sulindac analog effective at lower doses compared to its parent compound, triggers the death receptor (DR)5-dependent extrinsic apoptotic pathway. Induction of apoptosis via activation of the DR-mediated pathway would be an ideal therapeutic strategy to eliminate cancer cells. In this study, we investigated the possibility that colon cancer cells are sensitized to sulindac sulfide-induced apoptosis by docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), via activation of the DR/extrinsic apoptotic pathway. Our data demonstrated that DHA combination sensitized colon cancer cells to sulindac sulfide-induced apoptosis, leading to enhanced growth suppression of human colon cancer xenografts. The combination effect was primarily attributed to increased cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and caspase-8 activation. Moreover, pretreatment with z-IETD-FMK (caspase-8 inhibitor) or stable expression of dominant negative caspase-8 genes blocked DHA/sulindac sulfide cotreatment-induced apoptosis. In view of the finding that DR5 silencing abrogated the combination-stimulated apoptosis, we propose that apoptotic synergy induced by sulindac sulfide plus DHA is mediated via DR5. Our findings collectively support the utility of a combination of sulindac sulfide and DHA in the effective prevention and treatment of colon cancer.

  19. Hydrothermal sulfidation and floatation treatment of heavy-metal-containing sludge for recovery and stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yan-Jie; Chai, Li-Yuan; Min, Xiao-Bo; Tang, Chong-Jian; Zhang, Hai-Jing; Ke, Yong; Xie, Xian-De

    2012-05-30

    This study focuses on the application of hydrothermal sulfidation and floatation to treat the heavy-metal-containing sludge for recovery and stabilization. After the hydrothermal sulfidation, the sulfidation percentage of zinc and lead reach up to 85.0% and 75.4%, respectively. 33.3% of Zn, 58.9% of Pb and 68.8% of Cu can be recovered from the sludge by floatation. The lower recovery of ZnS attributes to its surface and structural characteristics. To compare these characteristics, three types of synthetic metal sulfide (ZnS, PbS and CuS) were prepared and examined with XRD, SEM and TEM. The poor floatability of the finely dispersed, round shape of ZnS can be improved by crystal modification in hydrothermal condition. With increasing the temperature and reaction time, the grain size of the ZnS increased from 7.95 nm to 44.28 nm and the recovery of Zn increased to from 33.3% to 72.8%. The TCLP results indicate that all the leached heavy metal concentrations of floatation tailings are under the allowable limit. No obvious increase of heavy metal concentration was observed in continuous leaching procedure. The presence of alkaline compounds after hydrothermal sulfidation might act as mineralogical scavengers of dissolved heavy metal released by sulfide oxidation to avoid the heavy metal pollution.

  20. Sulphidization flotation for recovery of lead and zinc from oxide-sulfide ores

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FA Keqing; Jan D.Miller; JIANG Tao; LI Guang-hui

    2005-01-01

    A new flowsheet was developed to recover the valuable minerals from oxide or oxide-sulfide ores of lead and zinc. The flowsheet consisted of flotation of sulfide minerals, desliming and sulphidization-flotation of oxide minerals. The corresponding reagent system and techniques to the flowsheet were investigated. Batch and continuous tests show that the dosage of sodium sulfide, temperature, and collector type are main affecting factors on the recovery of smithsonite and cerussite. For the flotation of cerussite, there is an appropriate dosage of sodium sulfide at which the recovery reaches its maximum value. The required sodium sulfide for smithsonite flotation is higher than that for cerussite and the recovery of smithsonite flotation increases with the dosage of sodium sulfide at low level and becomes insensitive at high dosage. The appropriate temperature for smithsonite and cerussite flotation is found to be 25 - 40 ℃. Amines are found to be the effective collectors for the flotation of smithsonite after sulphidization. Investigation also shows that desliming prior to sulphidization-flotation is essential to the effective recovery of smithsonite and cerussite, and the desliming process of two-stage hydrocyclon is well feasible and effective for the treatment of lead-zinc oxide ores. A further treatment on the cerussite flotation concentrate by shaking table is proposed to obtain higher lead grade.

  1. Microbial communities involved in electricity generation from sulfide oxidation in a microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Min; Tong, Zhong-Hua; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Chen, Yong-Zhen; Zhang, Feng; Mu, Zhe-Xuan; Wang, Hua-Lin; Zeng, Raymond J; Liu, Xian-Wei; Yu, Han-Qing; Wei, Li; Ma, Fang

    2010-10-15

    Simultaneous electricity generation and sulfide removal can be achieved in a microbial fuel cell (MFC). In electricity harvesting from sulfide oxidation in such an MFC, various microbial communities are involved. It is essential to elucidate the microbial communities and their roles in the sulfide conversion and electricity generation. In this work, an MFC was constructed to enrich a microbial consortium, which could harvest electricity from sulfide oxidation. Electrochemical analysis demonstrated that microbial catalysis was involved in electricity output in the sulfide-fed MFC. The anode-attached and planktonic communities could perform catalysis independently, and synergistic interactions occurred when the two communities worked together. A 16S rRNA clone library analysis was employed to characterize the microbial communities in the MFC. The anode-attached and planktonic communities shared similar richness and diversity, while the LIBSHUFF analysis revealed that the two community structures were significantly different. The exoelectrogenic, sulfur-oxidizing and sulfate-reducing bacteria were found in the MFC anodic chamber. The discovery of these bacteria was consistent with the community characteristics for electricity generation from sulfide oxidation. The exoelectrogenic bacteria were found both on the anode and in the solution. The sulfur-oxidizing bacteria were present in greater abundance on the anode than in the solution, while the sulfate-reducing bacteria preferably lived in the solution.

  2. Interfacial tension studies between Fe-Cu-Ni sulfide and halo-norilsk basalt slag system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU Shangguo; Jim Mungall; WANG Jian; GENG Ke

    2005-01-01

    The interfacial tension of the matte/halo-Norilsk basalt slag systems of FeS-Cu2S-Ni3S2 and FeO-FeS were investigated using the sessile drop technique. The results indicate that interfacial tension decreases with increasing copper and nickel contents in the matte of FeS-Cu2S-Ni3S2 system while it increases with increasing oxygen content in the matte of FeO-FeS system. It is inferred from these results that two conditions are critical for the formation of giant Cu-Ni sulfide deposits. One is that mafic-ultramafic parent magma of sulfide deposits should be rich in copper and nickel where due to the low interfacial tension, it is difficult to form sulfide droplet in the early stage of magma evolution. In other words, sulfide liquid conglomeration occurs more difficultly. The other condition is that the magma emplacement should be shallow; and a lot of faults occur in the magma emplacement field. Since oxygen content is high in the environment, interfacial tension is high, which helps sulfide liquid conglomeration and consequently Cu-Ni sulfide deposits form.

  3. Antagonism of Acute Sulfide Poisoning in Mice by Nitrite Anion without Methemoglobinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronican, Andrea A; Frawley, Kristin L; Ahmed, Humza; Pearce, Linda L; Peterson, Jim

    2015-07-20

    There are currently no FDA-approved antidotes for H2S/sulfide intoxication. Sodium nitrite, if given prophylactically to Swiss Webster mice, was shown to be highly protective against the acute toxic effects of sodium hydrosulfide (∼LD40 dose) with both agents administered by intraperitoneal injections. However, sodium nitrite administered after the toxicant dose did not detectably ameliorate sulfide toxicity in this fast-delivery, single-shot experimental paradigm. Nitrite anion was shown to rapidly produce NO in the bloodstream, as judged by the appearance of EPR signals attributable to nitrosylhemoglobin and methemoglobin, together amounting to less than 5% of the total hemoglobin present. Sulfide-intoxicated mice were neither helped by the supplemental administration of 100% oxygen nor were there any detrimental effects. Compared to cyanide-intoxicated mice, animals surviving sulfide intoxication exhibited very short knockdown times (if any) and full recovery was extremely fast (∼15 min) irrespective of whether sodium nitrite was administered. Behavioral experiments testing the ability of mice to maintain balance on a rotating cylinder showed no motor impairment up to 24 h post sulfide exposure. It is argued that antagonism of sulfide inhibition of cytochrome c oxidase by NO is the crucial antidotal activity of nitrite rather than formation of methemoglobin.

  4. Sulfide assemblages in granulite xenoliths from Hannuoba Basalt, Hebei Province, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiuhua Xu; Yuling Xie; Xuelei Chu; Jianming Liu; Qian Mao

    2005-01-01

    Granulite xenoliths are important samples for understanding the forming and evolution of the crust. The granulite xenoliths enclosed in Cenozoic basalt of Hannuoba, Hebei Province, China, contain four types of sulfide assemblages: isolate rotundity enclosed sulfides, intergranular sulfides between minerals, secondary sulfide inclusions ranging in linear, and fissure-filling sulfides.Electron microprobe analysis shows that the components of sulfides are Ni-poor pyrrhotite with the molar ratios of (Ni+Co+Cu)/Fe less than 0.2. The molar ratios of (Fe+Cu+Co+Ni)/S are less than 0.875 of normal pyrrhotite, and are less than those of mantle xenoliths, reflecting a sulfur-saturated environment. Pyrrhotite in various occurrences contains some Au and Ag, with the averages of 0.19wt%-0.22wt% Au and 0.01 wt%-0.02wt% Ag, showing the gold mineralization related to the granulitization of low crust. Ni, Co and Cu have a normal correlation with S in pyrrhotite, indicating that heavy metal elements have a same source similar to sulfur because of the degasification of upper mantle.

  5. Mitochondrial Sulfide Detoxification Requires a Functional Isoform O-Acetylserine(thiol)lyase C in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Consolación (A)lvarez; Irene García; Luis C.Romero; Cecilia Gotor

    2012-01-01

    In non-cyanogenic species,the main source of cyanide derives from ethylene and camalexin biosyntheses.In mitochondria,cyanide is a potent inhibitor of the cytochrome c oxidase and is metabolized bythe β-cyanoalanine synthase CYS-C1,catalyzing the conversion of cysteine and cyanide to hydrogen sulfide and β-cyanoalanine.The hydrogen sulfide released also inhibits the cytochrome c oxidase and needs to be detoxified by the O-acetylserine(thiol)lyase mitochondrial isoform,OAS-C,which catalyzes the incorporation of sulfide to O-acetylserine to produce cysteine,thus generating a cyclic pathway in the mitochondria.The loss of functional OAS-C isoforms causes phenotypic characteristics very similar to the loss of the CYS-C1 enzyme,showing defects in root hair formation.Genetic complementation with the OAS-C gene rescues the impairment of root hair elongation,restoring the wild-type phenotype.The mitochondria compromise their capacity to properly detoxify cyanide and the resulting sulfide because the latter cannot re-assimilate into cysteine in the oas-c null mutant.Consequently,we observe an accumulation of sulfide and cyanide and of the alternative oxidase,which is unable to prevent the production of reactive oxygen species probably due to the accumulation of both toxic molecules.Our results allow us to suggest that the significance of OAS-C is related to its role in the proper sulfide and cyanide detoxification in mitochondria.

  6. Microbial communities and arsenic biogeochemistry at the outflow of an alkaline sulfide-rich hot spring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhou; Li, Ping; van Nostrand, Joy D.; Zhang, Ping; Zhou, Jizhong; Wang, Yanhong; Dai, Xinyue; Zhang, Rui; Jiang, Dawei; Wang, Yanxin

    2016-04-01

    Alkaline sulfide-rich hot springs provide a unique environment for microbial community and arsenic (As) biogeochemistry. In this study, a representative alkaline sulfide-rich hot spring, Zimeiquan in the Tengchong geothermal area, was chosen to study arsenic geochemistry and microbial community using Illumina MiSeq sequencing. Over 0.26 million 16S rRNA sequence reads were obtained from 5-paired parallel water and sediment samples along the hot spring’s outflow channel. High ratios of As(V)/AsSum (total combined arsenate and arsenite concentrations) (0.59-0.78), coupled with high sulfide (up to 5.87 mg/L), were present in the hot spring’s pools, which suggested As(III) oxidation occurred. Along the outflow channel, AsSum increased from 5.45 to 13.86 μmol/L, and the combined sulfide and sulfate concentrations increased from 292.02 to 364.28 μmol/L. These increases were primarily attributed to thioarsenic transformation. Temperature, sulfide, As and dissolved oxygen significantly shaped the microbial communities between not only the pools and downstream samples, but also water and sediment samples. Results implied that the upstream Thermocrinis was responsible for the transformation of thioarsenic to As(III) and the downstream Thermus contributed to derived As(III) oxidation. This study improves our understanding of microbially-mediated As transformation in alkaline sulfide-rich hot springs.

  7. Red soil as a regenerable sorbent for high temperature removal of hydrogen sulfide from coal gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Tzu-Hsing; Chu, Hsin; Lin, Hsiao-Ping; Peng, Ching-Yu

    2006-08-25

    In this study, hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) was removed from coal gas by red soil under high temperature in a fixed-bed reactor. Red soil powders were collected from the northern, center and southern of Taiwan. They were characterized by XRPD, porosity analysis and DCB chemical analysis. Results show that the greater sulfur content of LP red soils is attributed to the higher free iron oxides and suitable sulfidation temperature is around 773K. High temperature has a negative effect for use red soil as a desulfurization sorbent due to thermodynamic limitation in a reduction atmosphere. During 10 cycles of regeneration, after the first cycle the red soil remained stable with a breakthrough time between 31 and 36 min. Hydrogen adversely affects sulfidation reaction, whereas CO exhibits a positive effect due to a water-shift reaction. COS was formed during the sulfidation stage and this was attributed to the reaction of H(2)S and CO. Results of XRPD indicated that, hematite is the dominant active species in fresh red soil and iron sulfide (FeS) is a product of the reaction between hematite and hydrogen sulfide in red soils. The spinel phase FeAl(2)O(4) was found during regeneration, moreover, the amount of free iron oxides decreased after regeneration indicating the some of the free iron oxide formed a spinel phase, further reducting the overall desulfurization efficiency.

  8. Effect of Sulfur Content and Sulfide Shape on Fracture Ductility in Case Hardening Steel%Effect of Sulfur Content and Sulfide Shape on Fracture Ductility in Case Hardening Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Guo-hua; DONG Han; WANG Mao-qiu; HUI Wei-jun

    2011-01-01

    The effects of sulfur content and calcium addition on smooth axisymmetric tensile fracture ductility of case hardening steel DIN 18CrNiMo7-6 have been investigated. The quantitative metallographic analysis of sulfide inclusions and the correlations between sulfide inclusions and fracture ductility were examined. Sulfide inclusions were found to have deleterious effect on fracture ductility, whereas the effect can be offset to some extent by calcium-treat- ment due to less easily deforming of sulfides during hot-working. The product (AA·λAW) of sulfide inclusion area fraction (An) and its area-weighted aspect ratio (λAW) can be used as a parameter to describe the effect of sulfide inclusions on fracture true strain.

  9. Reduced ternary molybdenum and tungsten sulfides and hydroprocessing catalysis therewith

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilsenbeck, Shane J.; McCarley, Robert E.; Schrader, Glenn L.; Xie, Xiaobing

    1999-02-16

    New amorphous molybdenum/tungsten sulfides with the general formula M.sup.n+.sub.2x/n (L.sub.6 S.sub.8)S.sub.x, where L is molybdenum or tungsten and M is a ternary metal, has been developed. Characterization of these amorphous materials by chemical and spectroscopic methods (IR, Raman, PES) shows that the (M.sub.6 S.sub.8).sup.0 cluster units are present. Vacuum thermolysis of the amorphous Na.sub.2x (Mo.sub.6 S.sub.8)S.sub.x .multidot.yMeOH first produces poorly crystalline NaMo.sub.6 S.sub.8 by disproportionation at 800.degree. C. and well-crystallized NaMo.sub.6 S.sub.8 at .gtoreq. 900.degree. C. Ion-exchange of the sodium material in methanol with soluble M.sup.2+ and M.sup.3+ salts (M=Sn, Co, Ni, Pb, La, Ho) produces the M.sup.n+.sub.2x/n (Mo.sub.6 S.sub.8)S.sub.x .multidot.yMeOH compounds. Additionally, the new reduced ternary molybdenum sulfides with the general formula M.sup.n+.sub.2x/n Mo.sub.6 S.sub.8+x (MeOH).sub.y ›MMOS! (M=Sn, Co, Ni) is an effective hydrodesulfurization (HDS) catalyst both as-prepared and after a variety of pretreatment conditions. Under specified pretreatment conditions with flowing hydrogen gas, the SnMoS type catalyst can be stabilized, and while still amorphous, can be considered as "Chevrel phase-like" in that both contain Mo.sub.6 S.sub.8 cluster units. Furthermore, the small cation NiMoS and CoMoS type pretreated catalyst showed to be very active HDS catalysts with rates that exceeded the model unpromoted and cobalt-promoted MoS.sub.2 catalysts.

  10. Positive trends in Southern Hemisphere observations of carbonyl sulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremser, Stefanie; Jones, Nicholas; Smale, Dan; Palm, Mathias; Lejeune, Bernard; Wang, Yuting; Deutscher, Nicholas

    2016-04-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (OCS; lifetime of about 5.7 years) is the longest lived reduced sulfur-containing gas in the atmosphere. The primary source of OCS is the ocean, which is both a direct source (through OCS emission) and an indirect source (due to oxidation of carbon disulfide, CS2, and dimethyl sulfide). Other natural sources of OCS include volcanic outgassing and direct fluxes from wetland regions. The removal of OCS from the atmosphere is dominated by soil and vegetation uptake, with minor contributions from reactions with the hydroxyl radical. Small anthropogenic sources of OCS are coal combustion, biomass burning, and aluminum production. A dominant indirect source results from CS2 emissions from the rayon industry. Transport of tropospheric OCS to the stratosphere during volcanically quiescent periods has been suggested to contribute sulfur to the stratospheric aerosol layer which affects atmospheric radiative balance. If, however, production of stratospheric aerosols from OCS oxidation is smaller than typical estimates, this OCS contribution would be overestimated. The magnitude of the OCS flux to the stratosphere is currently not well quantified as is the relative contribution of OCS to background aerosol loading. While earlier model simulations indicate OCS fluxes into the atmosphere exceeding removal, past total column observations of OCS show no significant trend. Analysis of tropospheric OCS columns at Arrival Heights (Antarctica) and Lauder (New Zealand) show strong positive trends from 2001-2008 followed by weaker trends to 2015, with unexpected temporal coherence. Since trends in ocean and land sources/sinks at these two sites, respectively, are unlikely to be similar, the coherence in trend structure likely results from changes in transport of OCS from the tropics to middle and high latitudes. Potential causes for OCS increases are (i) increases in tropical lower stratospheric OCS and/or (ii) strengthening of the large-scale circulation which

  11. The Voisey's Bay Ni-Cu-Co Sulfide Deposit,Labrador,Canada:Emplacement of Silicate and Sulfide-Laden Magmas into Spaces Created within a Structural Corridor%The Voisey's Bay Ni-Cu-Co Sulfide Deposit,Labrador, Canada: Emplacement of Silicate and Sulfide-Laden Magmas into Spaces Created within a Structural Corridor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter C.Lightfoot; Dawn Evans-Lamswood; Robert Wheeler

    2012-01-01

    Abstract:The Voisey's Bay Ni-Cu-Co sulfide deposit is hosted in a 1.34 Ga mafic intrusion that is part of the Nain Plutonic Suite in Labrador,Canada.The Ni-Cu-Co sulfide mineralization is associated with magmatic breccias that are typically contained in weakly mineralized olivine gabbros,troctolites and ferrogabbros,but also occur as veins in adjacent paragneiss.The mineralization is associated with a dyke-like body which is termed the feeder dyke.This dyke connects the shallow differentiated Eastern Deeps chamber in the east to a deeper intrusion in the west termed the Western Deeps Intrusion.Where the conduit is connected to the Eastern Deeps Intrusion,the Eastern Deeps Deposit is developed at the entry line of the dyke along the steep north wall of the Eastern Deeps Intrusion.The Eastern Deeps Deposit is surrounded by a halo of moderately to weakly mineralized Variable-Textured Troctolite (VTT) that reaches a maximum thickness above the ENE-WSW axis of the Eastern Deeps Deposit.At depth to the west,the conduit is adjacent to the south side of the Western Deeps Intrusion,where the dyke and intrusion contain disseminated magmatic sulfide mineralization.The Reid Brook Zone plunges to the east within the dyke,and both the dyke and adjacent paragneiss are mineralized.The Ovoid Deposit comprises a bowl-shaped body of massive sulfide where the dyke widens near to the present-day surface.It is not clear whether this deposit was developed as a widened-zone within the conduit or at the entry point into a chamber that is now lost to erosion.The massive sulfides and breccia sulfides of the Eastern Deeps are petrologically and chemically different when compared to the disseminated sulfides in the VTT; there is a marked break in Ni tenor (Ni content in 100% sulfide,abbreviated to [Ni] 100) and Ni/Co of sulfide between the two.The boundary of the sulfide types is often marked by strong sub-horizontal alignment of heavily digested and metamorphosed paragneiss fragments

  12. Hydrothermal sulfide accumulation along the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamieson, J. W.; Clague, D. A.; Hannington, M. D.

    2014-06-01

    Hydrothermal sulfide deposits that form on the seafloor are often located by the detection of hydrothermal plumes in the water column, followed by exploration with deep-towed cameras, side-scan sonar imaging, and finally by visual surveys using remotely-operated vehicle or occupied submersible. Hydrothermal plume detection, however, is ineffective for finding hydrothermally-inactive sulfide deposits, which may represent a significant amount of the total sulfide accumulation on the seafloor, even in hydrothermally active settings. Here, we present results from recent high-resolution, autonomous underwater vehicle-based mapping of the hydrothermally-active Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, in the Northeast Pacific Ocean. Analysis of the ridge bathymetry resulted in the location of 581 individual sulfide deposits along 24 km of ridge length. Hydrothermal deposits were distinguished from volcanic and tectonic features based on the characteristics of their surface morphology, such as shape and slope angles. Volume calculations for each deposit results in a total volume of 372,500 m3 of hydrothermal sulfide-sulfate-silica material, for an equivalent mass of ∼1.2 Mt of hydrothermal material on the seafloor within the ridge's axial valley, assuming a density of 3.1 g/cm3. Much of this total volume is from previously undocumented inactive deposits outside the main active vent fields. Based on minimum ages of sulfide deposition, the deposits accumulated at a maximum rate of ∼400 t/yr, with a depositional efficiency (proportion of hydrothermal material that accumulates on the seafloor to the total amount hydrothermally mobilized and transported to the seafloor) of ∼5%. The calculated sulfide tonnage represents a four-fold increase over previous sulfide estimates for the Endeavour Segment that were based largely on accumulations from within the active fields. These results suggest that recent global seafloor sulfide resource estimates, which were based mostly

  13. Toxicity of sulfide to early life-stages of wild rice (Zizania palustris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fort, Douglas J; Todhunter, Kevin; Fort, Troy D; Mathis, Michael B; Walker, Rachel; Hansel, Mike; Hall, Scott; Richards, Robin; Anderson, Kurt

    2017-02-07

    Wild rice (Zizania palustris) sensitivity to sulfide is not well understood. Since sulfate in surface waters is reduced to sulfide by anaerobic bacteria in sediments and historical information indicated that 10 mg/L sulfate in Minnesota surface water reduced Z. palustris abundance, the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) established 10 mg/L sulfate as a water quality criterion in 1973. A 21-day daily-renewal hydroponic study was conducted to evaluate sulfide toxicity to wild rice and the potential mitigation of sulfide toxicity by Fe. The hydroponic design used hypoxic test media for seed and root exposure and aerobic headspace for the vegetative portion of the plant. Test concentrations were 0.3, 1.6, 3.1, 7.8, and 12.5 mg/L sulfide in test media with 0.8, 2.8, and 10.8 mg/L total Fe used to evaluate the impact of iron on sulfide toxicity. Visual assessments (i.e., no plants harvested) of seed activation, mesocotyl emergence, seedling survival, and phytoxicity were conducted 10 days following dark-phase exposure. Each treatment was also evaluated for time to 30% emergence (ET30), total plant biomass, root and shoot lengths, and signs of phytotoxicity at study conclusion (21 days). Results from this study indicated that exposure of developing wild rice to sulfide at ≥3.1 mg sulfide/L in the presence of 0.8 mg/L iron reduced mesocotyl emergence. Sulfide toxicity was mitigated by the addition of iron at 2.8 and 10.8 mg /L relative to the control value of 0.8 mg Fe/L, demonstrating the importance of iron in mitigating sulfide toxicity to wild rice. Ultimately, determination of site-specific sulfate criteria that consider factors that alter toxicity, including sediment Fe and organic carbon, are necessary. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. Potentiation of lymphocyte proliferative responses by nickel sulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo, A.; Sonnenfeld, G.

    1992-01-01

    Crystalline nickel sulfide (NiS) induced a spleen cell proliferation that resembles a mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR). It depended on cell-cell interaction, induced high levels of interleukin-1 (IL-1) and interleukin-2 (IL-2) and the responding cell subpopulation was composed of CD4+ T lymphocytes. Furthermore, the proliferation was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by magnesium. Crystalline NiS also increased significantly the spleen cell proliferative response to concanavalin A (Con A) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) with magnesium potentiating the combined effects of crystalline NiS and mitogens. Interestingly, crystalline NiS did not show any effect on the induction of IL-2 by Con A. The results described herein suggest that crystalline NiS can potentiate both antigenic (MLR) and mitogenic (Con A and LPS) proliferative responses in vitro. Crystalline NiS appears to potentiate these responses by acting in the form of ionic nickel on several intracellular targets for which magnesium ions have different noncompetitive interactions. The effects of magnesium on the potentiating action of crystalline NiS are different depending upon the type of primary stimulatory signal for proliferation (mitogenic or antigenic).

  15. Biochemistry and therapeutic potential of hydrogen sulfide - reality or fantasy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodek, Paulina; Olas, Beata

    2016-08-11

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a signaling gasotransmitter, involved in different physiological and pathological processes. H2S regulates apoptosis, the cell cycle and oxidative stress. H2S exerts powerful effects on smooth muscle cells, endothelial cells, inflammatory cells, endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria and nuclear transcription factors. H2S is known to be produced from L-cysteine, D-cysteine and L-homocysteine in the body. Four enzymes - cystathionine-b synthase (CBS), mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (3-MST), cystathionine-γ lyase (CSE) and cysteine aminotransferase (CAT) - are involved in H2S synthesis. The biosynthetic pathway for the production of H2S from D-cysteine involves 3-MST and D-amino acid oxidase (DAO). The therapeutic potential of H2S is not clear. However, recently results have demonstrated that H2S has protective action for ischemic heart disease or hypertension, and protects against ischemia of the brain. This review summarizes the negative and the positive roles of H2S in various biological systems, for example the cardiovascular system and nervous system. We also discuss the function of classical, therapeutic and natural (for example garlic) donors of H2S in pre-clinical and clinical studies.

  16. Preparation of zinc sulfide nanocrystallites from single-molecule precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palve, Anil M.; Garje, Shivram S.

    2011-07-01

    Zinc sulfide nanocrystallites were prepared using Zinc(II) thiosemicarbazone complexes of the types Zn(L) 2 and ZnCl 2(LH) 2 (where, LH=thiosemicarbazones of cinnamaldehyde, 4-chlorobenzaldehyde, indol-3-carboxaldehyde and thiophene-2-carboxaldehyde) as single source precursors by solvothermal decomposition in ethylene glycol and ethylene diamine in few cases. The materials were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected area electron diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray analysis and UV-vis and IR spectroscopy. Solvothermal decomposition in ethylene glycol resulted in the formation of hexagonal ZnS (JCPDS: 36-1450) as evident from the XRD patterns. However, XRD shows formation of hybrid material, ZnS 0.5EN in case of solvothermal decomposition in ethylenediamine. Infrared spectra authenticate the capping of ethylene glycol and ethylenediamine on ZnS and ZnS 0.5EN, respectively. TEM images showed formation of spherical nanoparticles for the materials obtained from ethylene glycol, whereas plate-like morphology is observed in case of materials obtained from ethylene diamine. The blue shift of absorption bands compared to bands of bulk materials in the UV-vis spectra supports the formation of smaller particles.

  17. The metallization and superconductivity of dense hydrogen sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yinwei, E-mail: yinwei-li@jsnu.edu.cn; Hao, Jian; Li, Yanling [School of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Jiangsu Normal University, Xuzhou 221116 (China); Liu, Hanyu [Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatchewan S7N 5E2 (Canada); Ma, Yanming, E-mail: mym@jlu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Superhard Materials, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)

    2014-05-07

    Hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) is a prototype molecular system and a sister molecule of water (H{sub 2}O). The phase diagram of solid H{sub 2}S at high pressures remains largely unexplored arising from the challenges in dealing with the pressure-induced weakening of S–H bond and larger atomic core difference between H and S. Metallization is yet achieved for H{sub 2}O, but it was observed for H{sub 2}S above 96 GPa. However, the metallic structure of H{sub 2}S remains elusive, greatly impeding the understanding of its metallicity and the potential superconductivity. We have performed an extensive structural study on solid H{sub 2}S at pressure ranges of 10–200 GPa through an unbiased structure prediction method based on particle swarm optimization algorithm. Besides the findings of candidate structures for nonmetallic phases IV and V, we are able to establish stable metallic structures violating an earlier proposal of elemental decomposition into sulfur and hydrogen [R. Rousseau, M. Boero, M. Bernasconi, M. Parrinello, and K. Terakura, Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 1254 (2000)]. Our study unravels a superconductive potential of metallic H{sub 2}S with an estimated maximal transition temperature of ∼80 K at 160 GPa, higher than those predicted for most archetypal hydrogen-containing compounds (e.g., SiH{sub 4}, GeH{sub 4}, etc.)

  18. Synthesis and characterisation: Zinc oxide-sulfide nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, Prinsa, E-mail: prinsa.verma@gmail.co [Nanophosphor Application Center, Allahabad University (India); Satish Dhawan Space Center, ISRO (India); Pandey, Avinash C. [Nanophosphor Application Center, Allahabad University (India); Bhargava, R.N. [Nanocrystal Technology, New York (United States)

    2009-11-15

    A novel synthesis method is presented for the preparation of nanosized-semiconductor zinc oxide-sulphide (ZnO/ZnS) core-shell nanocomposites, both formed sequentially from a single-source solid precursor. ZnO nanocrystals were synthesized by a simple co-precipitation method and ZnO/ZnS core-shell nanocomposites were successfully fabricated by sulfidation of ZnO nanocrystals via a facile chemical synthesis at room temperature. The as-obtained samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The results showed that the pure ZnO nanocrystals were hexagonal wurtzite crystal structures and the ZnS nanoparticles were sphalerite structure with the size of about 10 nm grown on the surface of the ZnO nanocrystals. Optical properties measured reveal that ZnO/ZnS core-shell nanocomposites have integrated the photoluminescent effect of ZnO and ZnS. Based on the results of the experiments, a possible formation mechanism of ZnO/ZnS core-shell nanocomposites was also suggested. This treatment is suggested to improve various properties of optoelectronically valuable ZnO/ZnS nanocomposites. These nanosized semiconductor nanocomposites can form a new class of luminescent materials for various applications.

  19. Surface Treatment for Improving Sulfidation Resistance of Fossil Power Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikka, V.K.

    2001-03-09

    The purpose of the cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) between ABB Combustion Engineering, Inc. and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was to develop improved, longer life, and corrosion resistance surfaces for fossil power system components for use primarily in sulfidizing environments. Four surface protection techniques were to be explored. These included diffusion process, weld overlay, hot-isostatic processing, and various spraying methods. The work was to focus on Fe{sub 3} Al-based iron aluminide to increase the component life. The successful completion of the CRADA would have required the achievement of the following four goals: (1) fabrication development, (2) characterization and possibly modification of the alloy to optimize its manufacturability and environmental resistance, (3) testing and evaluation of the specimens, and (4) fabrication and testing of prototype parts. Because of lack of active participation from the participant, this CRADA did not achieve all of its goals and was terminated prematurely. Work carried out at ORNL on the CRADA is described in this report.

  20. Role of Hydrogen Sulfide in the Pathology of Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhav Bhatia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide (H2S is a well-known toxic gas that is synthesized in the human body from the amino acids cystathionine, homocysteine, and cysteine by the action of at least two distinct enzymes: cystathionine-γ-lyase and cystathionine-β-synthase. In the past few years, H2S has emerged as a novel and increasingly important biological mediator. Imbalances in H2S have also been shown to be associated with various disease conditions. However, defining the precise pathophysiology of H2S is proving to be a complex challenge. Recent research in our laboratory has shown H2S as a novel mediator of inflammation and work in several groups worldwide is currently focused on determining the role of H2S in inflammation. H2S has been implicated in different inflammatory conditions, such as acute pancreatitis, sepsis, joint inflammation, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Active research on the role of H2S in inflammation will unravel the pathophysiology of its actions in inflammatory conditions and may help develop novel therapeutic approaches for several, as yet incurable, disease conditions.

  1. Sulindac sulfide suppresses 5-lipoxygenase at clinically relevant concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbrink, Svenja D; Pergola, Carlo; Bühring, Ulrike; George, Sven; Metzner, Julia; Fischer, Astrid S; Häfner, Ann-Kathrin; Wisniewska, Joanna M; Geisslinger, Gerd; Werz, Oliver; Steinhilber, Dieter; Maier, Thorsten J

    2010-03-01

    Sulindac is a non-selective inhibitor of cyclooxygenases (COX) used to treat inflammation and pain. Additionally, non-COX targets may account for the drug's chemo-preventive efficacy against colorectal cancer and reduced gastrointestinal toxicity. Here, we demonstrate that the pharmacologically active metabolite of sulindac, sulindac sulfide (SSi), targets 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO), the key enzyme in the biosynthesis of proinflammatory leukotrienes (LTs). SSi inhibited 5-LO in ionophore A23187- and LPS/fMLP-stimulated human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (IC(50) approximately 8-10 microM). Importantly, SSi efficiently suppressed 5-LO in human whole blood at clinically relevant plasma levels (IC(50) = 18.7 microM). SSi was 5-LO-selective as no inhibition of related lipoxygenases (12-LO, 15-LO) was observed. The sulindac prodrug and the other metabolite, sulindac sulfone (SSo), failed to inhibit 5-LO. Mechanistic analysis demonstrated that SSi directly suppresses 5-LO with an IC(50) of 20 muM. Together, these findings may provide a novel molecular basis to explain the COX-independent pharmacological effects of sulindac under therapy.

  2. Study of crystallization behavior of poly(phenylene sulfide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana B. Nohara

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Poly(phenylene sulfide (PPS is an engineering thermoplastic polymer that presents high temperature resistance (glass transition temperature around 85 ºC and melting point at 285 ºC. These properties combined with its mechanical properties and its high chemical resistance allows its use in technological applications such as molding resins and as matrix for structural thermoplastic composites. During the manufacture of thermoplastic composites, the polymer is exposed to repeated melting, quenching and crystallization processes. The properties of semicrystalline polymers, such as PPS, depend on its crystallization behavior. This work deals with the PPS crystallization kinetics under different thermal cycles. This study was performed under isothermal conditions in a differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, coupled to Perkin Elmer crystallization software referred to as Pyris Kinetics - Crystallization. The results were correlated with microscopic analyses carried out in a polarized light microscope, equipped with a controlled heating and cooling accessory. In this case, the experimental conditions were the same adopted for the DSC analyses. From the results, parameters could be established to be used in the composite manufacture.

  3. Tropical sources and sinks of carbonyl sulfide observed from space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glatthor, Norbert; Höpfner, Michael; Baker, Ian T.; Berry, Joe; Campbell, Elliott; Kawa, Stephan R.; Krysztofiak, Gisele; Sinnhuber, Björn-Martin; Stiller, Gabriele; Stinecipher, Jim; von Clarmann, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    According to current budget estimations the seasonal variation of carbonyl sulfide (COS) is governed by oceanic release and vegetation uptake. Its assimilation by plants is assumed to be similar to the photosynthetic uptake of CO2 but, contrary to the latter process, to be irreversible. Therefore COS has been suggested as co-tracer of the carbon cycle. Observations of COS, however, are sparse, especially in tropical regions. We use the comprehensive data set of spaceborne measurements of the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) to analyze its global distribution. Two major features are observed in the tropical upper troposphere around 250 hPa: enhanced amounts over the western Pacific and the Maritime Continent, peaking around 550 pptv in boreal summer, and a seasonally varying depletion of COS extending from tropical South America to Africa. The large-scale COS depletion, which in austral summer amounts up to -40 pptv as compared to the rest of the respective latitude band, has not been observed before and reveals the seasonality of COS uptake through tropical vegetation. The observations can only be reproduced by global models, when a large vegetation uptake and a corresponding increase in oceanic emissions as proposed in several recent publications is assumed.

  4. [Severe hydrogen sulfide intoxication: a pediatric case of survival].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claudet, I; Marcoux, M-O; Karsenty, C; Rittié, J-L; Honorat, R; Lelong-Tissier, M-C

    2012-03-01

    We report a paediatric case of survival following severe hydrogen sulfide (H2S) gas intoxication. A 13-year-old boy was found submerged to the neck in a manure tank. He was hypothermic, unresponsive with bilateral mydriasis, and had poor oxygen saturation. After intubation, he was transferred to the paediatric intensive care unit of a tertiary care children's hospital. He developed acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) requiring high frequency percussive ventilation. Cardiac evaluation was significant for myocardial infarction and left ventricular function impairment. He completely recovered from the respiratory and cardiac failure. Neurological examinations showed abnormal signals on MRI in the semi-oval center and in the frontal cortex. Follow-up detected partial impairment of axonal fibers of the right external popliteal sciatic nerve. Paediatric cases of survival after H2S intoxication have been rarely reported. Such exposures can evolve to severe ARDS and benefit from high frequency percussive ventilation. Hypothermia and other metabolic abnormalities are now better explained thanks to actual knowledge about endogenous H2S function. Lessons learned from paediatric accidents should result in better information about this threat for farmers and families living in houses with septic tanks, reducing the risk to their own and their children's safety.

  5. Dimethyl sulfide as a source of cloud condensation nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, S. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) are predominantly sulfate particles, and over the oceans the major source of sulfur for these particles appears to be dimethyl sulfide, a gas produced by marine biota. The reflection of sunlight by marine stratiform clouds is a major feature of the Earth`s radiation budget, and these clouds will reflect more sunlight if their liquid water is distributed among more CCN, thus forming more (and smaller) droplets. These facts form the basis of a proposal that marine biogenic sulfur may be an important factor in determining the Earth`s climate. Key implications of this proposal are (1) the possibility of a biota-climate feedback loop if the production of biogenic sulfur is sensitive to changes in climate, (2) the possibility that anthropogenic sulfur emissions may be altering the global climate through this cloud-mediated mechanism, and (3) the possibility that anthropogenic pollution could alter climate by perturbing the sulfur-producing marine organisms. 3 refs., 1 fig.

  6. Hydrogen Sulfide in Physiology and Diseases of the Digestive Tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudha B. Singh

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide (H2S is a Janus-faced molecule. On one hand, several toxic functions have been attributed to H2S and exposure to high levels of this gas is extremely hazardous to health. On the other hand, H2S delivery based clinical therapies are being developed to combat inflammation, visceral pain, oxidative stress related tissue injury, thrombosis and cancer. Since its discovery, H2S has been found to have pleiotropic effects on physiology and health. H2S is a gasotransmitter that exerts its effect on different systems, such as gastrointestinal, neuronal, cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, and hepatic systems. In the gastrointestinal tract, in addition to H2S production by mammalian cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS, cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE, H2S is also generated by the metabolic activity of resident gut microbes, mainly by colonic Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria (SRB via a dissimilatory sulfate reduction (DSR pathway. In the gut, H2S regulates functions such as inflammation, ischemia/ reperfusion injury and motility. H2S derived from gut microbes has been found to be associated with gastrointestinal disorders such as ulcerative colitis, Crohn’s disease and irritable bowel syndrome. This underscores the importance of gut microbes and their production of H2S on host physiology and pathophysiology.

  7. The oceanic cycle and global atmospheric budget of carbonyl sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, P.S.

    1994-12-31

    A significant portion of stratospheric air chemistry is influenced by the existence of carbonyl sulfide (COS). This ubiquitous sulfur gas represents a major source of sulfur to the stratosphere where it is converted to sulfuric acid aerosol particles. Stratospheric aerosols are climatically important because they scatter incoming solar radiation back to space and are able to increase the catalytic destruction of ozone through gas phase reactions on particle surfaces. COS is primarily formed at the surface of the earth, in both marine and terrestrial environments, and is strongly linked to natural biological processes. However, many gaps in the understanding of the global COS cycle still exist, which has led to a global atmospheric budget that is out of balance by a factor of two or more, and a lack of understanding of how human activity has affected the cycling of this gas. The goal of this study was to focus on COS in the marine environment by investigating production/destruction mechanisms and recalculating the ocean-atmosphere flux.

  8. Removal of Hydrogen Sulfide Gas using Biofiltration - a Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheerawit RATTANAPAN

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide (H2S is extremely toxic to living organisms and plants. H2S gas contamination may be treated by both chemical and physical methods but they have high capital costs, demand large energy inputs and result in the generation of secondary hazardous wastes. Biofiltration, a biological technique, has significant economic advantages over other air pollution control technologies. Biofiltration is a process by which contaminated gases pass through the biofilter and pollutants are transported into the biofilm where they are utilized by microbes as a carbon source, an energy source. Thiobacillus sp. is the most frequently used microbial species in H2S biofiltration and can degrade H2S for energy and produce sulfate or sulfuric acid. Moreover, media selection for biofiltration (combing both natural and synthetic media is an important step towards the development of a successful biofiltration operation. In addition, the optimization parameters of a biofiltration operation are found. First, optimal moisture content may vary from 20 to 60 wt%. Second, most microbial growths occur near neutral pH and wide deviation from these levels will impact the efficiency of the biofiltration. Third, the optimum temperature of biofiltration is near the optimum temperature for microbial inoculation based on removal efficiency. Finally, because nutrient supply is less critical as H2S removal requires few nutrients, commercial fertilizer or secondary effluent from wastewater treatment plants can be used for humid and nutrient supply. Many biofiltrations are designed for H2S control.Graphical abstract

  9. Carbonyl Sulfide for Tracing Carbon Fluxes Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, J. Elliott [Univ. of California, Merced, CA (United States); Berry, Joseph A. [Carnegie Inst. of Science, Stanford, CA (United States); Billesbach, Dave [Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States); Torn, Margaret S [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Zahniser, Mark [Aerodyne Research, Inc., Billerica, MA (United States); Seibt, Ulrike [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Maseyk, Kadmiel [Pierre and Marie Curie Univ., Paris (France)

    2016-04-01

    The April-June 2012 campaign was located at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility Southern Great Plains (SGP) site Central Facility and had three purposes. One goal was to demonstrate the ability of current instrumentation to correctly measure fluxes of atmospheric carbonyl sulfide (COS). The approach has been describe previously as a critical approach to advancing carbon cycle science1,2, but requires further investigation at the canopy scale to resolve ecosystem processes. Previous canopy-scale efforts were limited to data rates of 1Hz. While 1 Hz measurements may work in a few ecosystems, it is widely accepted that data rates of 10 to 20 Hz are needed to fully capture the exchange of traces gases between the atmosphere and vegetative canopy. A second goal of this campaign was to determine if canopy observations could provide information to help interpret the seasonal double peak in airborne observations at SGP of CO2 and COS mixing ratios. A third goal was to detect potential sources and sinks of COS that must be resolved before using COS as a tracer of gross primary productivity (GPP).

  10. Regional-Scale Carbon Flux Partitioning Using Atmospheric Carbonyl Sulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Naser, M.; Campbell, J. E.; Berry, J. A.

    2011-12-01

    Simultaneous analysis of atmospheric concentrations of carbonyl sulfide (COS) and carbon dioxide (CO2) has been proposed as an approach to partitioning gross primary production and respiration fluxes at regional and global scales. The basis for this approach was that the observation and regional gradients in atmospheric CO2 are dominated by net ecosystem fluxes while regional gradients in atmospheric COS are dominated by GPP-related plant uptake. Here we investigate the spatial and temporal gradients in airborne COS and CO2 measurements in comparison to flux estimates from ecosystem models and eddy covariance methods over North America. The spatial gradients in the ecosystem relative uptake (ERU), the normalized ratio of COS and CO2 vertical gradients, were consistent with the theoretical relationship to flux estimates from ecosystem models and eddy covariance methods. The seasonality of the gross primary productivity flux estimates was consistent with airborne observations in the midwestern region but had mixed results in the southeastern region. Inter-annual changes in the ERU and regional drought index data suggested a potential relationship between drought stress and low ratios of gross primary production to net ecosystem exchange.

  11. High-temperature study of superconducting hydrogen and deuterium sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durajski, A.P. [Institute of Physics, Czestochowa University of Technology, Ave. Armii Krajowej 19, 42-200 Czestochowa (Poland); Szczesniak, R. [Institute of Physics, Czestochowa University of Technology, Ave. Armii Krajowej 19, 42-200 Czestochowa (Poland); Institute of Physics, Jan Dlugosz University, Ave. Armii Krajowej 13/15, 42-200 Czestochowa (Poland); Pietronero, L. [Sapienza, Universita di Roma, Dip. Fisica, P. le A. Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); Institute of Complex Systems, CNR, Via dei Taurini 19 Roma (Italy); London Institute for Mathematical Sciences, South Street 22, Mayfair London (United Kingdom)

    2016-05-15

    Hydrogen-rich compounds are extensively explored as candidates for a high-temperature superconductors. Currently, the measured critical temperature of 203 K in hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 3}S) is among the highest over all-known superconductors. In present paper, using the strong-coupling Eliashberg theory of superconductivity, we compared in detail the thermodynamic properties of two samples containing different hydrogen isotopes H{sub 3}S and D{sub 3}S at 150 GPa. Our research indicates that it is possible to reproduce the measured values of critical temperature 203 K and 147 K for H{sub 3}S and D{sub 3}S by using a Coulomb pseudopotential of 0.123 and 0.131, respectively. However, we also discuss a scenario in which the isotope effect is independent of pressure and the Coulomb pseudopotential for D{sub 3}S is smaller than for H{sub 3}S. For both scenarios, the energy gap, specific heat, thermodynamic critical field and related dimensionless ratios are calculated and compared with other conventional superconductors. We shown that the existence of the strong-coupling and retardation effects in the systems analysed result in significant differences between values obtained within the framework of the Eliashberg formalism and the prediction of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory. (copyright 2015 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  12. Hydrogen sulfide facilitates carotid sinus baroreflex in anesthetized rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin XIAO; Yu-ming WU; Hao ZHANG; Yi-xian LIU; Rui-rong HE

    2006-01-01

    Aim:To study effects of hydrogen sulfide (H2S)on the carotid sinus baroreflex (CSB).Methods:The functional curve of the carotid sinus baroreflex was measured by recording changes in arterial pressure in anesthetized male rats with perfused carotid sinus.Results:H2S(derived from sodium hydrosulfide)at concentrations of 25,50,and 100 μmol/L facilitated the CSB,shifting the functional curve of the baroreflex downward and to the left.There was a marked increase in peak slope(PS)and reflex decrease in blood pressure(RD).Effects were concentration-dependent.Pretreatment with glibenclamide(20 μmol/L),a KATP channel blocker,abolished the above effects of H2S on CSB.Pretreatment with Bay K8644 (an agonist of calcium channels;500 nmol/L)eliminated the effect of H2S on CSB.An inhibitor of cystathionine γ-lyase(CSE),DL-propargylglycine(PPG;200 μmol/L),inhibited CSB in male rats and shifted the functional curve of the baroreflex upward and to the right.Conclusion:These data suggest that exogenous H2S exerts a facilitatory role on isolated CSB through opening KATP channels and further closing the calcium channels in vascular smooth muscle.Endogenous H2S may activate the activity of the CSB in vivo.

  13. Alleviation of chromium toxicity by hydrogen sulfide in barley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Shafaqat; Farooq, Muhammad Ahsan; Hussain, Sabir; Yasmeen, Tahira; Abbasi, G H; Zhang, Guoping

    2013-10-01

    A hydroponic experiment was carried out to examine the effect of hydrogen sulfide (H2 S) in alleviating chromium (Cr) stress in barley. A 2-factorial design with 6 replications was selected, including 3 levels of NaHS (0 μM, 100 μM, and 200 μM) and 2 levels of Cr (0 μM and 100 μM) as treatments. The results showed that NaHS addition enhances plant growth and photosynthesis slightly compared with the control. Moreover, NaHS alleviated the inhibition in plant growth and photosynthesis by Cr stress. Higher levels of NaHS exhibited more pronounced effects in reducing Cr concentrations in roots, shoots, and leaves. Ultrastructural examination of plant cells supported the facts by indication of visible alleviation of cell disorders in both root and leaf with exogenous application of NaHS. An increased number of plastoglobuli, disintegration, and disappearance of thylakoid membranes and starch granules were visualized inside the chloroplast of Cr-stressed plants. Starch accumulation in the chloroplasts was also noticed in the Cr-treated cells, with the effect being much less in Cr + NaHS-treated plants. Hence, it is concluded that H2 S produced from NaHS can improve plant tolerance under Cr stress.

  14. Carbamoylation abrogates the antioxidant potential of hydrogen sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praschberger, Monika; Hermann, Marcela; Laggner, Christian; Jirovetz, Leopold; Exner, Markus; Kapiotis, Stylianos; Gmeiner, Bernhard M K; Laggner, Hilde

    2013-11-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been identified as the third gasotransmitter. Beside its role as signaling molecule in the cardiovascular and nervous system the antioxidant and cyto-protective properties of H2S have gained much attention. In the present study we show that cyanate, an uremic toxin which is found in abundant concentration in sera of patients suffering from chronic kidney disease (CKD), can abrogate the antioxidant and cytoprotective activity of H2S via S-carbamoylation reaction, a reaction that previously has only been shown to have a physiological effect on cysteine groups, but not on H2S. Carbamoylation strongly inhibited the free radical scavenging (ABTS(+·) and alkylperoxyl ROO(·)) properties of H2S. The extent of intracellular ROS formation induced by ROO(·) was diminished by H2S whereas carbamoylation counteracted the protective effect. Reagent HOCl was rapidly inactivated by H2S in contrast to the carbamoylated compound. Protein modification by HOCl was inhibited by H2S but carbamoylation significantly reduced the effect. Thus, S-carbamoylation of low molecular weight thiols by abrogating their antioxidant potential may contribute to the higher oxidative stress observed in CKD.

  15. Hydrogen sulfide induced disruption of Na+ homeostasis in the cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Dongman; He, Xiaozhou; Yang, Yilin; Balboni, Gianfranco; Salvadori, Severo; Kim, Dong H; Xia, Ying

    2012-07-01

    Maintenance of ionic balance is essential for neuronal functioning. Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S), a known toxic environmental gaseous pollutant, has been recently recognized as a gasotransmitter involved in numerous biological processes and is believed to play an important role in the neural activities under both physiological and pathological conditions. However, it is unclear if it plays any role in maintenance of ionic homeostasis in the brain under physiological/pathophysiological conditions. Here, we report by directly measuring Na(+) activity using Na(+) selective electrodes in mouse cortical slices that H(2)S donor sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) increased Na(+) influx in a concentration-dependent manner. This effect could be partially blocked by either Na(+) channel blocker or N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) blocker alone or almost completely abolished by coapplication of both blockers but not by non-NMDAR blocker. These data suggest that increased H(2)S in pathophysiological conditions, e.g., hypoxia/ischemia, potentially causes a disruption of ionic homeostasis by massive Na(+) influx through Na(+) channels and NMDARs, thus injuring neural functions. Activation of delta-opioid receptors (DOR), which reduces Na(+) currents/influx in normoxia, had no effect on H(2)S-induced Na(+) influx, suggesting that H(2)S-induced disruption of Na(+) homeostasis is resistant to DOR regulation and may play a major role in neuronal injury in pathophysiological conditions, e.g., hypoxia/ischemia.

  16. Depolarizing actions of hydrogen sulfide on hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Sahara Khademullah

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide (H2S is a novel neurotransmitter that has been shown to influence cardiovascular functions as well and corticotrophin hormone (CRH secretion. Since the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN is a central relay center for autonomic and endocrine functions, we sought to investigate the effects of H2S on the neuronal population of the PVN. Whole cell current clamp recordings were acquired from the PVN neurons and sodium hydrosulfide hydrate (NaHS was bath applied at various concentrations (0.1, 1, 10, and 50 mM. NaHS (1, 10, and 50 mM elicited a concentration-response relationship from the majority of recorded neurons, with almost exclusively depolarizing effects following administration. Cells responded and recovered from NaHS administration quickly and the effects were repeatable. Input differences from baseline and during the NaHS-induced depolarization uncovered a biphasic response, implicating both a potassium and non-selective cation conductance. The results from the neuronal population of the PVN shed light on the possible physiological role that H2S has in autonomic and endocrine function.

  17. Heterogeneous oxidation of carbonyl sulfide on mineral oxides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU YongChun; LIU JunFeng; HE Hong; YU YunBo; XUE Li

    2007-01-01

    Heterogeneous oxidation of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) on mineral oxides including SiO2, Fe2O3, CaO, MgO, ZnO and TiO2, which are the main components of atmospheric particles, were investigated using in situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (in situ DRIFTS), ion chromatography (IC), temperature-programmed desorption (TPD), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) methods. The main products and intermediates of the heterogeneous oxidation of OCS on these oxides were identified with in situ DRIFTS and IC. The reaction mechanism and kinetics were also discussed. It is found that the reaction mechanism on these mineral oxides is the same as that on Al2O3 for the same final products and the intermediates at room temperature. Namely, OCS can be catalytically oxidized to produce surface SO42- species and gaseous CO2 through the surface hydrogen thiocarbonate (HSCO2-) and HSO3- species. The activity series for heterogeneous oxidation of OCS follows: Al2O3 ≈ CaO>MgO>TiO2 ≈ ZnO>Fe2O3>SiO2. The specific area, basic hydroxyl and surface basicity of these oxides have effect on the reactivity. This study suggests that heterogeneous reactions of OCS on mineral dust may be an unneglectable sink of OCS.

  18. Epithelial Electrolyte Transport Physiology and the Gasotransmitter Hydrogen Sulfide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ervice Pouokam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide (H2S is a well-known environmental chemical threat with an unpleasant smell of rotten eggs. Aside from the established toxic effects of high-dose H2S, research over the past decade revealed that cells endogenously produce small amounts of H2S with physiological functions. H2S has therefore been classified as a “gasotransmitter.” A major challenge for cells and tissues is the maintenance of low physiological concentrations of H2S in order to prevent potential toxicity. Epithelia of the respiratory and gastrointestinal tract are especially faced with this problem, since these barriers are predominantly exposed to exogenous H2S from environmental sources or sulfur-metabolising microbiota. In this paper, we review the cellular mechanisms by which epithelial cells maintain physiological, endogenous H2S concentrations. Furthermore, we suggest a concept by which epithelia use their electrolyte and liquid transport machinery as defence mechanisms in order to eliminate exogenous sources for potentially harmful H2S concentrations.

  19. Epithelial Electrolyte Transport Physiology and the Gasotransmitter Hydrogen Sulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouokam, Ervice; Althaus, Mike

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a well-known environmental chemical threat with an unpleasant smell of rotten eggs. Aside from the established toxic effects of high-dose H2S, research over the past decade revealed that cells endogenously produce small amounts of H2S with physiological functions. H2S has therefore been classified as a “gasotransmitter.” A major challenge for cells and tissues is the maintenance of low physiological concentrations of H2S in order to prevent potential toxicity. Epithelia of the respiratory and gastrointestinal tract are especially faced with this problem, since these barriers are predominantly exposed to exogenous H2S from environmental sources or sulfur-metabolising microbiota. In this paper, we review the cellular mechanisms by which epithelial cells maintain physiological, endogenous H2S concentrations. Furthermore, we suggest a concept by which epithelia use their electrolyte and liquid transport machinery as defence mechanisms in order to eliminate exogenous sources for potentially harmful H2S concentrations. PMID:26904165

  20. Physiological Importance of Hydrogen Sulfide: Emerging Potent Neuroprotector and Neuromodulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hyung-Joo

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an emerging neuromodulator that is considered to be a gasotransmitter similar to nitrogen oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO). H2S exerts universal cytoprotective effects and acts as a defense mechanism in organisms ranging from bacteria to mammals. It is produced by the enzymes cystathionine β-synthase (CBS), cystathionine ϒ-lyase (CSE), 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (MST), and D-amino acid oxidase (DAO), which are also involved in tissue-specific biochemical pathways for H2S production in the human body. H2S exerts a wide range of pathological and physiological functions in the human body, from endocrine system and cellular longevity to hepatic protection and kidney function. Previous studies have shown that H2S plays important roles in peripheral nerve regeneration and degeneration and has significant value during Schwann cell dedifferentiation and proliferation but it is also associated with axonal degradation and the remyelination of Schwann cells. To date, physiological and toxic levels of H2S in the human body remain unclear and most of the mechanisms of action underlying the effects of H2S have yet to be fully elucidated. The primary purpose of this review was to provide an overview of the role of H2S in the human body and to describe its beneficial effects. PMID:27413423

  1. Discoveries of hydrogen sulfide as a novel cardiovascular therapeutic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Larry A; Calvert, John W

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an endogenously produced gaseous signaling molecule that elicits a number of cytoprotective effects in mammalian species. H2S was originally considered toxic at elevated levels, but 15 years ago the labile molecule was discovered in mammalian tissue and termed a gasotransmitter, thus opening the door for research aimed towards understanding its physiologic nature. Since then, novel findings have depicted the beneficial aspects of H2S therapy, such as vasodilation, antioxidant upregulation, inflammation inhibition, and activation of anti-apoptotic pathways. These cytoprotective alterations effectively treat multiple forms of cardiac injury at the preclinical level of research. The field has progressed towards instituting novel H2S donors that prove more effective at activating the subsequent cardioprotective enhancements over longer time periods. As more findings explore the efficacy of H2S, research focused on detection of sulfhydrated targets is on the rise. Understanding the molecular mechanisms that stem from H2S treatment may lead the field towards powerful therapeutics in the clinical setting. This review will discuss the cytoprotective and cardioprotective effects of H2S therapy, provide analysis on the molecular alterations that lead to these enhancements, and explore recently developed therapeutics that may bring this gasotransmitter into the clinic in the near future.

  2. Synthesis of actinide nitrides, phosphides, sulfides and oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Der Sluys, William G.; Burns, Carol J.; Smith, David C.

    1992-01-01

    A process of preparing an actinide compound of the formula An.sub.x Z.sub.y wherein An is an actinide metal atom selected from the group consisting of thorium, uranium, plutonium, neptunium, and americium, x is selected from the group consisting of one, two or three, Z is a main group element atom selected from the group consisting of nitrogen, phosphorus, oxygen and sulfur and y is selected from the group consisting of one, two, three or four, by admixing an actinide organometallic precursor wherein said actinide is selected from the group consisting of thorium, uranium, plutonium, neptunium, and americium, a suitable solvent and a protic Lewis base selected from the group consisting of ammonia, phosphine, hydrogen sulfide and water, at temperatures and for time sufficient to form an intermediate actinide complex, heating said intermediate actinide complex at temperatures and for time sufficient to form the actinide compound, and a process of depositing a thin film of such an actinide compound, e.g., uranium mononitride, by subliming an actinide organometallic precursor, e.g., a uranium amide precursor, in the presence of an effectgive amount of a protic Lewis base, e.g., ammonia, within a reactor at temperatures and for time sufficient to form a thin film of the actinide compound, are disclosed.

  3. Carbonyl sulfide uptake and chloroform emissions from an Arctic site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkins, J. W.; Dutton, G. S.; Montzka, S. A.; Nance, J. D.; Hall, B. D.; Thoning, K. W.; Miller, J. B.; White, J.; Vaugh, B.; Manning, A.

    2008-12-01

    The Arctic Region is most sensitive to future climate change. Quantifying emissions and sinks of many important biogenic trace gases there may become important indicators of potential climate feedback. Once snowmelt at Pt. Barrow, Alaska (77o N) occurs, ground cover is exposed by sunlight and higher temperatures, then photosynthesis starts up. Peaks of chloroform (CHCl3) appear throughout the summer from southerly-based air masses based over northern Alaska and northwest Canada. Carbonyl sulfide (COS) undergoes uptake throughout the summer season through the same enzymes that uptake carbon dioxide (CO2). We will calculate the footprint of emissions of CHCl3 and uptake of COS using high frequency in situ observations, and the NAME and FLEXPART models. Previous studies show a large source of CHCl3 (8% of the total budget) may be coming from soils in high latitude pine forests. We will examine emissions of CHCl3 to see whether or not they are coming from the tundra just south of Pt. Barrow. We will identify the regions for uptake of COS and CO2 from the footprint generated from the models.

  4. Degradation of ambient carbonyl sulfide by Mycobacterium spp. in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Hiromi; Saito, Masahiko; Nagahata, Yoshiko; Katayama, Yoko

    2008-01-01

    The ability to degrade carbonyl sulfide (COS) was confirmed in seven bacterial strains that were isolated from soil, without the addition of COS. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that these isolates belonged to the genera Mycobacterium, Williamsia and Cupriavidus. For example, Mycobacterium sp. strain THI401, grown on PYG agar medium, was able to degrade an initial level of 30 parts per million by volume COS within 1 h, while 60 % of the initial COS was decreased by abiotic conversion in 30 h. Considering natural COS flux between soil and the atmosphere, COS degradation by these bacteria was confirmed at an ambient level of 500 parts per trillion by volume (p.p.t.v.), using sterilized soil to cultivate the bacterium. Autoclave sterilization of soil resulted in a small amount of COS emission, while Mycobacterium spp. degraded COS at a faster rate than it was emitted from the soil, and reduced the COS mixing ratio to a level that was lower than the ambient level: THI401 degraded COS from an initial level of 530 p.p.t.v. to a level of 330 p.p.t.v. in 30 h. These results provide experimental evidence of microbial activity in soil as a sink for atmospheric COS.

  5. Hydrogen Sulfide Donor GYY4137 Protects against Myocardial Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoliang Meng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide (H2S is a gasotransmitter which regulates multiple cardiovascular functions. However, the precise roles of H2S in modulating myocardial fibrosis in vivo and cardiac fibroblast proliferation in vitro remain unclear. We investigated the effect of GYY4137, a slow-releasing H2S donor, on myocardial fibrosis. Spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR were administrated with GYY4137 by intraperitoneal injection daily for 4 weeks. GYY4137 decreased systolic blood pressure and inhibited myocardial fibrosis in SHR as evidenced by improved cardiac collagen volume fraction (CVF in the left ventricle (LV, ratio of perivascular collagen area (PVCA to lumen area (LA in perivascular regions, reduced hydroxyproline concentration, collagen I and III mRNA expression, and cross-linked collagen. GYY4137 also inhibited angiotensin II- (Ang II- induced neonatal rat cardiac fibroblast proliferation, reduced the number of fibroblasts in S phase, decreased collagen I and III mRNA expression and protein synthesis, attenuated oxidative stress, and suppressed α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA, transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1 expression as well as Smad2 phosphorylation. These results indicate that GYY4137 improves myocardial fibrosis perhaps by a mechanism involving inhibition of oxidative stress, blockade of the TGF-β1/Smad2 signaling pathway, and decrease in α-SMA expression in cardiac fibroblasts.

  6. New nitric oxide or hydrogen sulfide releasing aspirins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzarato, Loretta; Chegaev, Konstantin; Marini, Elisabetta; Rolando, Barbara; Borretto, Emily; Guglielmo, Stefano; Joseph, Sony; Di Stilo, Antonella; Fruttero, Roberta; Gasco, Alberto

    2011-08-11

    A new series of (((R-oxy)carbonyl)oxy)methyl esters of aspirin (ASA), bearing nitric oxide (NO) or hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) releasing groups, was synthesized, and the compounds were evaluated as new ASA co-drugs. All the products were quite stable in buffered solution at pH 1 and 7.4. Conversely, they were all rapidly metabolized, producing ASA and the NO/H(2)S releasing moiety used for their preparation. Consequent on ASA release, the compounds were capable of inhibiting collagen-induced platelet aggregation of human platelet-rich plasma (PRP). The simple NO/H(2)S donor substructures were able to relax contracted rat aorta strips, with a NO- and H(2)S-dependent mechanism, respectively, but they either did not trigger antiaggregatory activity or displayed antiplatelet potency markedly below that of the related co-drug. The new products might provide a safer and improved alternative to the use of ASA principally in its anti-inflammatory and antithrombotic applications.

  7. Simultaneous sulfide removal, nitrification, and electricity generation in a microbial fuel cell equipped with an oxic cathode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Renbing; Zhang, Shaohui; Zhao, Li; Zhong, Liuxiang

    2017-02-01

    With sulfide as an anodic electron donor and ammonium as a cathodic substrate, the feasibility of simultaneous sulfide removal, nitrification, and electricity generation was investigated in a microbial fuel cell (MFC) equipped with an oxic cathode. Successful simultaneous sulfide removal, nitrification, and electricity generation in this MFC were achieved in 35 days, with the sulfide and ammonium removal percent of 92.7 ± 1.4 and 96.4 ± 0.3%, respectively. The maximum power density increased, but the internal resistance decreased with the increase of feeding sulfide concentration from 62.9 ± 0.3 to 238.5 ± 0.2 mg S/L. Stable ammonium removal with complete nitrification, preparing for future denitrification, was obtained throughout the current study. Sulfide removal loading significantly increased with the increase of feeding sulfide concentration at each external resistance, but no significant correlation between sulfide removal loading and external resistance was found at each feeding sulfide concentration. The charge recovery and anodic coulombic efficiency (CE) significantly decreased with the increase of external resistance. High feeding sulfide concentration led to low anodic CE. Granular sulfur deposition was found on the anode graphite fiber. The appropriate feeding sulfide concentration for sulfide removal and sulfur deposition was deemed to be 178.0 ± 1.7 mg S/L, achieving a sulfur deposition percent of 69.7 ± 0.6%.

  8. The effect of sulfide dissolved in silicate melts on enhancing the solubility of the Highly Siderophile Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, H. S.

    2015-12-01

    There are large inconsistencies among experimental studies of Highly Siderophile Element (HSE) partitioning relations between silicates and metal or sulfide phases, which has usually been attributed to "micronuggets", a general term for sub-optical (approximately HSE sulfide-melt/silicate-melt partition coefficients, where results range over several orders of magnitude. Moreover, nearly all the reported results of directly determined sulfide-melt/silicate-melt partition coefficients are considerably lower than values calculated by combining metal/silicate-melt with metal/sulfide-melt partition coefficients. This discrepancy has been attributed to large effects of S dissolved as sulfide in the silicate melts on HSE solubilities. As such large effects are not expected from the thermodynamic modeling of sulfide solubilities in silicate melts, it has been proposed that HSEs dissolve in sulfide-containing silicate melts by forming HSE-S complexes. This idea has been tested by experiments that compare the solubilities of Ir, Re and Ru in a high-TiO2 silicate melt both with and without dissolved sulfide at 1400 to 1600ºC at atmospheric pressure. The high TiO2 suppresses micronuggets. Experiments were analysed by LA-ICP-MS, with detection limits approaching 2 ppb. For Ir, the results show that at fO2 low enough to enable measurable sulfide in the melt, the presence of the sulfide just raises the level of dissolved Ir above detection limits. These results suggest a fairly large influence of the sulfide, but are not quantitative. By contrast, the experiments on Ru and Re clearly show only a modest effect of dissolved sulfide.

  9. The rediscovery of a long described species reveals additional complexity in speciation patterns of poeciliid fishes in sulfide springs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, Maura; Arias-Rodriguez, Lenin; Plath, Martin; Eifert, Constanze; Lerp, Hannes; Lamboj, Anton; Voelker, Gary; Tobler, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The process of ecological speciation drives the evolution of locally adapted and reproductively isolated populations in response to divergent natural selection. In Southern Mexico, several lineages of the freshwater fish species of the genus Poecilia have independently colonized toxic, hydrogen sulfide-rich springs. Even though ecological speciation processes are increasingly well understood in this system, aligning the taxonomy of these fish with evolutionary processes has lagged behind. While some sulfide spring populations are classified as ecotypes of Poecilia mexicana, others, like P. sulphuraria, have been described as highly endemic species. Our study particularly focused on elucidating the taxonomy of the long described sulfide spring endemic, Poecilia thermalis Steindachner 1863, and investigates if similar evolutionary patterns of phenotypic trait divergence and reproductive isolation are present as observed in other sulfidic species of Poecilia. We applied a geometric morphometric approach to assess body shape similarity to other sulfidic and non-sulfidic fish of the genus Poecilia. We also conducted phylogenetic and population genetic analyses to establish the phylogenetic relationships of P. thermalis and used a population genetic approach to determine levels of gene flow among Poecilia from sulfidic and non-sulfidic sites. Our results indicate that P. thermalis' body shape has evolved in convergence with other sulfide spring populations in the genus. Phylogenetic analyses placed P. thermalis as most closely related to one population of P. sulphuraria, and population genetic analyses demonstrated that P. thermalis is genetically isolated from both P. mexicana ecotypes and P. sulphuraria. Based on these findings, we make taxonomic recommendations for P. thermalis. Overall, our study verifies the role of hydrogen sulfide as a main factor shaping convergent, phenotypic evolution and the emergence of reproductive isolation between Poecilia populations

  10. The removal of hydrogen sulfide from gas streams using an aqueous metal sulfate absorbent : Part I. the absorption of hydrogen sulfide in metal sulfate solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ter Maat, H.; Hogendoorn, J. A.; Versteeg, G. F.

    2005-01-01

    The desulfurization of gas streams using aqueous iron(II)sulfate (Fe(II)SO4), zinc sulfate (ZnSO4) and copper sulfate (CuSO4) solutions as washing liquor is studied theoretically and experimentally. The desulfurization is accomplished by a precipitation reaction that occurs when sulfide ions and met

  11. Sulfidation as a natural antidote to metallic nanoparticles is overestimated: CuO sulfidation yields CuS nanoparticles with increased toxicity in medaka (Oryzias latipes) embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lingxiangyu; Hu, Ligang; Zhou, Qunfang; Huang, Chunhua; Wang, Yawei; Sun, Cheng; Jiang, Guibin

    2015-02-17

    Sulfidation is considered as a natural antidote to toxicity of metallic nanoparticles (NPs). The detoxification contribution from sulfidation, however, may vary depending on sulfidation mechanisms. Here we present the dissolution-precipitation instead of direct solid-state-shell mechanism to illustrate the process of CuO-NPs conversion to CuS-NPs in aqueous solutions. Accordingly, the CuS-NPs at environmentally relevant concentrations showed much stronger interference on Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) embryo hatching than CuO-NPs, which was probably due to elevated free copper ions released from CuS-NPs, leading to significant increase in oxidative stress and causing toxicity in embryos. The larval length was significantly reduced by CuS-NPs, however, no other obviously abnormal morphological features were identified in the hatched larvae. Co-introduction of a metal ion chelator [ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA)] could abolish the hatching inhibition induced by CuS-NPs, indicating free copper ions released from CuS-NPs play an important role in hatching interference. This work documents for the first time that sulfidation as a natural antidote to metallic NPs is being overestimated, which has far reaching implications for risk assessment of metallic NPs in aquatic environment.

  12. The mechanism of the catalytic oxidation of hydrogen sulfide *1: III. An electron spin resonance study of the sulfur catalyzed oxidation of hydrogen sulfide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steijns, M.; Koopman, P.; Nieuwenhuijse, B.; Mars, P.

    1976-01-01

    ESR experiments on the oxidation of hydrogen sulfide were performed in the temperature range 20–150 °C. Alumina, active carbon and molecular sieve zeolite 13X were investigated as catalysts. For zeolite 13X it was demonstrated that the reaction is autocatalytic and that sulfur radicals are the activ

  13. Bacterial leaching of metal sulfides proceeds by two indirect mechanisms via thiosulfate or via polysulfides and sulfur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schippers, A.; Sand, W. [Univ. Hamburg (Germany). Inst. fuer Allgemeine Botanik

    1999-01-01

    Bacterial leaching, the biooxidation of metal sulfides to soluble metal sulfates and sulfuric acid, is effected by specialized bacteria. The acid-insoluble metal sulfides FeS{sub 2}, MoS{sub 2}, and WS{sub 2} are chemically attacked by iron(III) hexahydrate ions, generating thiosulfate, which is oxidized to sulfuric acid. Other metal sulfides are attacked by iron(III) ions and by protons, resulting in the formation of elemental sulfur via intermediary polysulfides. Sulfur is biooxidized to sulfuric acid. This explains leaching of metal sulfides by Thiobacillus thiooxidans.

  14. Variable mineralization processes during the formation of the Permian Hulu Ni-Cu sulfide deposit, Xinjiang, Northwestern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yun; Xue, Chunji; Zhao, Xiaobo; Yang, Yongqiang; Ke, Junjun; Zu, Bo

    2016-08-01

    The Permian Hulu Ni-Cu sulfide deposit is located at the southern margin of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB) in Northern Xinjiang, Northwestern China. The host intrusion of the Hulu deposit is composed of a layered mafic-ultramafic sequence and a dike-like unit. The layered sequence is composed of harzburgite, lherzolite, pyroxenite, gabbro, gabbrodiorite and diorite. The dike-like body comprises lherzolite and gabbro. Sulfide orebodies occur mainly within the harzburgite, pyroxenite and lherzolite at the base of the layered sequence and within the lherzolite in the dike-like body. Sulfide mineralization from the Hulu deposit shows significant depletion of PGE relative to Cu and Ni. These elements show good positive correlations with S in the sulfide mineralization from the dike-like unit but relatively weak correlations in the sulfide mineralization from the layered sequence. The sulfide mineralization from the layered unit shows excellent positive correlations between Ir and Os, Ru or Rh, and poor relationships between Ir and Pt or Pd. On the contrary, sulfide mineralization from the dike-like unit shows good correlations in the diagrams of Os, Ru, Rh, Pt and Pd against Ir. Both high Cu/Pd ratios (8855-481,398) and our modeling indicate that PGE depletion resulted from sulfide removal in a deep staging magma chamber. The evolved PGE-depleted magmas then ascended to the shallower magma chamber and became sulfide saturation due to crustal contamination. Both low Se/S ratios (33.5 × 10-6-487.5 × 10-6) and a negative correlation between Se/S and Cu/Pd ratios are consistent with the addition of crustal S. A large number of sulfide liquids segregated with minor crystallization of monosulfide solid solution (MSS) in the shallower magma chamber. When new magma pulses with unfractionated sulfide droplets entered the shallower magma chamber, the sulfide slurry containing crystallized MSS may be disrupted and mixed with the unfractionated sulfide droplets. The

  15. The changes of three components in coelomic fluid of Urechis unicinctus exposed to different concentrations of sulfide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Zhuojun; BAO Zhenmin; KANG Kyoung-Ho; YU Li; ZHANG Zhifeng

    2005-01-01

    The changes in heme (associated with hemoglobin), hemoglobin and hematin in the coelomic fluid of marine worm, Urechis unicinctus, exposed to different concentrations of sulfide, were investigated using biochemical techniques. When exposed to different sulfide concentrations for up to 96 h, the relative amounts of the three components changed in a regular pattern suggesting that the coelomocytes play an important role in the worm's tolerance to sulfide. The possible roles of heme compounds in sulfide tolerance of this species are discussed on the basis of our experimental data.

  16. Catalysis of Dissolved and Adsorbed Iron in Soil Suspension for Chromium(Ⅵ) Reduction by Sulfide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LAN Ye-Qing; YANG Jun-Xiang; B. DENG

    2006-01-01

    The kinetics of Cr(Ⅵ) reduction by sulfide in soil suspensions with various pHs, soil compositions, and Fe(Ⅱ) concentrations was examined using batch anaerobic experimental systems at constant temperature. The results showed that the reaction rate of Cr(Ⅵ) reduction was in the order of red soil < yellow-brown soil < chernozem and was proportional to the concentration of HCl-extractable iron in the soils. Dissolved and adsorbed iron in soil suspensions played an important role in accelerating Cr(Ⅵ) reduction. The reaction involved in the Cr(Ⅵ) reduction by Fe(Ⅱ) to produce Fe(Ⅲ), which was reduced to Fe(Ⅱ) again by sulfide, could represent the catalytic pathway until about 70% of the initially present Cr(Ⅵ)was reduced. The catalysis occurred because the one-step reduction of Cr(Ⅵ) by sulfide was slower than the two-step process consisting of rapid Cr(Ⅵ) reduction by Fe(Ⅱ) followed by Fe(Ⅲ) reduction by sulfide. In essence, Fe(Ⅱ)/Fe(Ⅲ)species shuttle electrons from sulfide to Cr(Ⅵ), facilitating the reaction. The effect of iron, however, could be completely blocked by adding a strong Fe(Ⅱ)-complexing ligand, 1,10-phenanthroline, to the soil suspensions. In all the experiments,initial sulfide concentration was much higher than initial Cr(Ⅵ) concentration. The plots of ln c[Cr(Ⅵ)] versus reaction time were linear up to approximately 70% of Cr(Ⅵ) reduction, suggesting a first-order reaction kinetics with respect to Cr(Ⅵ). Elemental sulfur, the product of sulfide oxidation, was found to accelerate Cr(Ⅵ) reduction at a later stage of the reaction, resulting in deviation from linearity for the ln c[Cr(Ⅵ)] versus time plots.

  17. Long-term field test of an electrochemical method for sulfide removal from sewage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikaar, Ilje; Li, Eugena; Rozendal, René A; Yuan, Zhiguo; Keller, Jürg; Rabaey, Korneel

    2012-06-01

    Corrosion caused by hydrogen sulfide leads to significant costs for the rehabilitation or replacement of corroded sewer pipes. Conventional methods to prevent sewer corrosion normally involve the dosing of significant amounts of chemicals with the associated transport and storage costs as well as considerable maintenance and control requirement. Recently, a novel chemical free method for sulfide abatement based on electrochemical sulfide oxidation was shown to be highly effective for the removal of sulfide from synthetic and real sewage. Here, we report on the electrochemical removal of sulfide using Ta/Ir and Pt/Ir coated titanium electrodes under simulated sewer conditions during field trials. The results showed that sulfide can successfully be removed to levels below the normal target value at the end of a simulated rising main (i.e. Scaling of the electrode and the membrane was observed in the cathode compartment and as a result the cell potentials increased over time. The cathode potentials returned to their original potential after switching the polarity every two days, but a more frequent switching would be needed to reduce the energy requirements of the system. Accelerated lifetime experiments indicated that a lifetime of 6.0 ± 1.9 years can be expected under polarity switching conditions at a pH of 14 and significantly longer at lower pH values. As operating the system without switching simplifies construction as well as operation, the choice whether to switch or not will in practice depend on operational cost (higher/lower energy) versus capital cost (reactor and peripherals). Irrespective of the approach, our study demonstrates that electrochemical sulfide control in sewer systems may be an attractive new option.

  18. Hydrogen sulfide in plants: from dissipation of excess sulfur to signaling molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderwood, Alexander; Kopriva, Stanislav

    2014-09-15

    Sulfur is essential in all organisms for the synthesis of amino acids cysteine and methionine and as an active component of numerous co-factors and prosthetic groups. However, only plants, algae, fungi, and some prokaryotes are capable of using the abundant inorganic source of sulfur, sulfate. Plants take sulfate up, reduce it, and assimilate into organic compounds with cysteine being the first product of the pathway and a donor of reduced sulfur for synthesis of other S-containing compounds. Cysteine is formed in a reaction between sulfide, derived from reduction of sulfite and an activated amino acid acceptor, O-acetylserine. Sulfide is thus an important intermediate in sulfur metabolism, but numerous other functions in plants has been revealed. Hydrogen sulfide can serve as an alternative source of sulfur for plants, which may be significant in anaerobic conditions of waterlogged soils. On the other hand, emissions of hydrogen sulfide have been detected from many plant species. Since the amount of H2S discharged correlated with sulfate supply to the plants, the emissions were considered a mechanism for dissipation of excess sulfur. Significant hydrogen sulfide emissions were also observed in plants infected with pathogens, particularly with fungi. H2S thus seems to be part of the widely discussed sulfur-induced-resistance/sulfur-enhanced-defense. Recently, however, more evidence has emerged for a role for H2S in regulation and signaling. Sulfide stabilizes the cysteine synthase complex, increasing so the synthesis of its acceptor O-acetylserine. H2S has been implicating in regulation of plant stress response, particularly draught stress. There are more and more examples of processes regulated by H2S in plants being discovered, and hydrogen sulfide is emerging as an important signaling molecule, similar to its role in the animal and human world. How similar the functions, and homeostasis of H2S are in these diverse organisms, however, remains to be elucidated.

  19. Density Functional Investigation of Methanethiol and Dimethyl Sulfide Adsorption on Zeolite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Renqing Lü; Guangmin Qiu; Chenguang Liu

    2006-01-01

    The density functional theory and cluster model methods have been employed to investigate the interactions between methanethiol, dimethyl sulfide and zeolites. The molecular complexes formed by adsorption of methanethiol or dimethyl sulfide on silanol H3SiOSi(OH)2OSiH3 with five coordination forms or four coordination forms, and complexes formed by interactions of Br(o)nsted acid sites of bridging hydroxyl H3Si(OH)Al(OH)2OSiH3 with methanethiol or dimethyl sulfide have been investigated. Full optimization and frequency analysis of all cluster models have been carried out using the B3LYP hybrid method at 6-31+G (d,p) basis set level for hydrogen, silicon, aluminum, oxygen,carbon, and sulfur atoms. The structures and energy changes of different coordination forms between methanethiol and H3Si(OH)Al(OH)2OSiH3, dimethyl sulfide and H3Si(OH)Al(OH)2OSiH3, methanethiol and H3SiOSi(OH)2OSiH3, dimethyl sulfide and H3SiOSi(OH)2OSiH3 complexes have been comparatively studied. The calculated results showed the nature of interactions that led to the formation of all complexes was van der Waals force confirmed by an insignificant change of geometric structures and properties. The conclusions that methanethiol and dimethyl sulfide molecules were adsorbed on bridging hydroxyl group prior to silanol group were obtained on the basis of adsorption heat, the most stable adsorption models of a 6 ring structure for interaction between bridging hydroxyl and methanethiol, and a 7 ring structure for interaction between bridging hydroxyl and dimethyl sulfide.

  20. Adsorption of dimethyl sulfide from aqueous solution by a cost-effective bamboo charcoal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ming; Huang, Zheng-Hong; Liu, Guangjia; Kang, Feiyu

    2011-06-15

    The adsorption of dimethyl sulfide from an aqueous solution by a cost-effective bamboo charcoal from Dendrocalamus was studied in comparison with other carbon adsorbents. The bamboo charcoal exhibited superior adsorption on dimethyl sulfide compared with powdered activated carbons at different adsorbent dosages. The adsorption characteristics of dimethyl sulfide onto bamboo charcoal were investigated under varying experimental conditions such as particle size, contact time, initial concentration and adsorbent dosage. The dimethyl sulfide removal was enhanced from 31 to 63% as the particle size was decreased from 24-40 to >300 mesh for the bamboo charcoal. The removal efficiency increased with increasing the adsorbent dosage from 0.5 to 10mg, and reached 70% removal efficiency at 10mg adsorbed. The adsorption capacity (μg/g) increased with increasing concentration of dimethyl sulfide while the removal efficiency decreased. The adsorption process conforms well to a pseudo-second-order kinetics model. The adsorption of dimethyl sulfide is more appropriately described by the Freundlich isotherm (R(2), 0.9926) than by the Langmuir isotherm (R(2), 0.8685). Bamboo charcoal was characterized by various analytical methods to understand the adsorption mechanism. Bamboo charcoal is abundant in acidic and alcohol functional groups normally not observed in PAC. A distinct difference is that the superior mineral composition of Fe (0.4 wt%) and Mn (0.6 wt%) was detected in bamboo charcoal-elements not found in PAC. Acidic functional group and specific adsorption sites would be responsible for the strong adsorption of dimethyl sulfide onto bamboo charcoal of Dendrocalamus origin.

  1. Tellurium-bearing minerals in zoned sulfide chimneys from Cu-Zn massive sulfide deposits of the Urals, Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslennikov, V. V.; Maslennikova, S. P.; Large, R. R.; Danyushevsky, L. V.; Herrington, R. J.; Stanley, C. J.

    2013-02-01

    Tellurium-bearing minerals are generally rare in chimney material from mafic and bimodal felsic volcanic hosted massive sulfide (VMS) deposits, but are abundant in chimneys of the Urals VMS deposits located within Silurian and Devonian bimodal mafic sequences. High physicochemical gradients during chimney growth result in a wide range of telluride and sulfoarsenide assemblages including a variety of Cu-Ag-Te-S and Ag-Pb-Bi-Te solid solution series and tellurium sulfosalts. A change in chimney types from Fe-Cu to Cu-Zn-Fe to Zn-Cu is accompanied by gradual replacement of abundant Fe-, Co, Bi-, and Pb- tellurides by Hg, Ag, Au-Ag telluride and galena-fahlore with native gold assemblages. Decreasing amounts of pyrite, both colloform and pseudomorphic after pyrrhotite, isocubanite ISS and chalcopyrite in the chimneys is coupled with increasing amounts of sphalerite, quatz, barite or talc contents. This trend represents a transition from low- to high sulphidation conditions, and it is observed across a range of the Urals deposits from bimodal mafic- to bimodal felsic-hosted types: Yaman-Kasy → Molodezhnoye → Uzelga → Valentorskoye → Oktyabrskoye → Alexandrinskoye → Tash-Tau → Jusa.

  2. Zinc sulfide and terbium-doped zinc sulfide films grown by traveling wave reactor atomic layer epitaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Yun, S J; Nam, K S

    1998-01-01

    Zinc sulfide (ZnS) and terbium-doped ZnS (ZnS:Tb) thin films were grown by traveling wave reactor atomic layer epitaxy (ALE). In the present work, ZnCl sub 2 , H sub 2 S, and tris (2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-3,5-heptandionato) terbium (Tb(tmhd) sub 3) were used as the precursors. The dependence of crystallinity and Cl content of ZnS films was investigated on the growth temperature. ZnS and ZnS:Tb films grown at temperatures ranging from 400 to 500 .deg. C showed a hexagonal-2H crystalline structure. The crystallinity of ZnS film was greatly enhanced as the temperature increased. At growth temperatures higher than 450.deg.C, the films showed preferred orientation with mainly (002) diffraction peak. The Cl content decreased from approximately 9 to 1 at.% with the increase in growth temperature from 400 to 500 .deg. C. The segregation of Cl near the surface region and the incorporation of O from Tb(tmhd) sub 3 during ALE process were also observed using Auger electron spectroscopy. The ALE-grown ZnS and ZnS:Tb films re...

  3. Oxygen and sulfur isotope fractionation during sulfide oxidation by anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brabec, Michelle Y.; Lyons, Timothy W.; Mandernack, Kevin W.

    2012-04-01

    Sulfide-mediated anoxygenic photosynthesis (SMAP) carried out by anaerobic phototrophic bacteria may have played an important role in sulfur cycling, formation of sulfate, and, perhaps, primary production in the Earth’s early oceans. Determination of ε34SSO4-Sulfide- and ε18OSO4-H2O values for bacterial sulfide oxidation will permit more refined interpretation of the δ34S and δ18OSO4 values measured in modern anoxic environments, such as meromictic lakes where sulfide commonly extends into the photic zone, and in the ancient rock record, particularly during periods of the Precambrian when anoxic and sulfidic (euxinic) conditions were believed to be more pervasive than today. Laboratory experiments with anaerobic purple and green sulfur phototrophs, Allochromatium vinosum and Chlorobaculum tepidum, respectively, were conducted to determine the sulfur and oxygen isotope fractionation during the oxidation of sulfide to sulfate. Replicate experiments were conducted at 25 °C for A. vinosum and 45 °C for C. tepidum, and in duplicate at three different starting oxygen isotope values for water to determine sulfate-water oxygen isotope fractionations accurately (ε18OSO4-H2O). ε18OSO4-H2O values of 5.6 ± 0.2‰ and 5.4 ± 0.1‰ were obtained for A. vinosum and C. tepidum, respectively. Temperature had no apparent effect on the ε18OSO4-H2O values. By combining all data from both cultures, an average ε18OSO4-H2O value of 5.6 ± 0.3‰ was obtained for SMAP. This value falls between those previously reported for bacterial oxidation of sphalerite and elemental sulfur (7-9‰) and abiotic and biotic oxidation of pyrite and chalcopyrite (2-4‰). Sulfur isotope fractionation between sulfide and sulfate formed by A.vinosum was negligible (0.1 ± 0.2‰) during all experiments. For C. tepidum an apparent fractionation of -2.3 ± 0.5‰ was observed during the earlier stages of oxidation based on bulk δ34S measurements of sulfate and sulfide and became smaller (-0.7

  4. Hollow glass waveguides with multilayer polystyrene and metal sulfide thin film coatings for improved infrared transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Valencia S.

    2007-12-01

    The overall goal of this project was to improve transmission of infrared radiation in hollow waveguides. First, polystyrene was studied as a new dielectric material for silver-coated hollow glass waveguides. The deposition and performance of polystyrene, as a single dielectric layer, were investigated. The potential of polystyrene as the low index of refraction material in a multilayer coating was also demonstrated. Cadmium sulfide and lead sulfide were each considered as the high index material in the multilayer stack. Multilayer silver coated hollow glass waveguides can be formed using polystyrene and either cadmium sulfide or lead sulfide. These material pairs are interesting because they form a multilayer structure with high index contrast, which can significantly lower the loss of a waveguide. The deposition of lead sulfide was also optimized in this project. Lead sulfide, as a single layer dielectric coating, is an attractive material for transmission of longer wavelength radiation, especially 10.6 mum. It is also of interest for emerging applications such as metals processing by lasers because hollow waveguides with silver and lead sulfide can make a low loss waveguide. Losses as low as 0.1dB/m were achieved. The deposition of zinc sulfide and zinc selenide was also investigated in this project. They are of interest because of their small extinction coefficients at longer wavelengths and potential for use in waveguides used for materials processing. The numerous simultaneous chemical reactions occurring during deposition of these materials makes obtaining pure films difficult. Gold was evaluated as a replacement for silver as the highly reflecting metallic layer. It was considered an attractive alternative because it has greater resistance to degradation in high temperature and corrosive environments. All samples were made using an electroless process. Characterization of the samples was performed using the optical techniques of FTIR and UV

  5. Electrophysiological effects of hydrogen sulfide on human atrial fibers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Meng; WU Yu-ming; LI Qian; LIU Su; HE Rui-rong

    2011-01-01

    Background It has been reported that endogenous or exogenous hydrogen sulfide (H2S) exerts physiological effects in the vertebrate cardiovascular system.We have also demonstrated that H2S acts as an important regulator of electrophysiological properties in guinea pig papillary muscles and on pacemaker cells in sinoatrial nodes of rabbits.This study was to observe the electrophysiological effects of H2S on human atrial fibers.Methods Human atrial samples were collected during cardiac surgery.Parameters of action potential in human atrial specialized fibers were recorded using a standard intracellular microelectrode technique.Results NaHS (H2S donor) (50,100 and 200 μmol/L) decreased the amplitude of action potential (APA),maximal rate of depolarization (Vmax),velocity of diastolic (phase 4) depolarization (VDD) and rate of pacemaker firing (RPF),and shortened the duration of 90% repolarization (APD90) in a concentration-dependent manner.ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP)channel blocker glibenclamide (Gli,20 μmol/L) partially blocked the effects of NaHS (100 μmol/L) on human atrial fiber cells.The L-type Ca2+ channel agonist Bay K8644 (0.5 μmol/L) also partially blocked the effects of NaHS (100 μmol/L).An inhibitor of cystathionine y-lyase (CSE),DL-propargylglycine (PPG,200 μmol/L),increased APA,Vmax,VDD and RPF,and prolonged APD90.Conclusions H2S exerts a negative chronotropic action and accelerates the repolarization of human atrial specialized fibers,possibly as a result of increases in potassium efflux through the opening of KATP channels and a concomitant decrease in calcium influx.Endogenous H2S may be generated by CSE and act as an important regulator of electrophysiological properties in human atrial fibers.

  6. Magmatic Sulfide Ni-Cu Deposits in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Deep-seated magmatic liquation-injection deposits form a major type of magmatic sulfide deposit in China. The reserves of nickel and copper in this type of deposit may attain several hundred thousand tons (e.g.Hongqi 7 and Karatunggu) to nearly ten million tons (e.g.Jinchuan). Those deposits can be classified as large or superlarge deposits. The ore grade is relatively high, commonly with w(Ni)>1 %.The mineralized intrusions are small in size, generally only 0.0n km2 to 0.n km2, with the largest one not exceeding a few km2. Before intruding, the primary magmas have undergone liquation and partial crystallization at depth; as a result, the magmas have partitioned into barren magma, ore-bearing magma, ore-rich magma and ore magma, which then ascended and injected into the present locations once or multiple times, to form ore deposits. The above-mentioned mineralizing process is known as deep-seated magmatic liquation-injection mineralization. The volume of the barren magma is generally much larger than those of the ore-bearing magma, ore-rich magma and ore magma. In the ascending process, most of the barren magma intruded into different locations or outpoured onto the ground surface, forming intrusions or lava flows. The rest barren magma, ore-bearing magma, ore-rich magmaand ore magma may either multiple times inject into the same place in which rocks and ores are formed or separately inject into different spaces to form rocks and ores. Such deep-seated magmatic liquation-injection deposits have a much smaller volume, greater ore potential and higher ore grade than those of in-situ magmatic liquation deposits. Consequently, this mineralizing process leads to the formation of large deposits in small intrusions.

  7. Arsenic Sulfide Nanowire Formation on Fused Quartz Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olmstead, J.; Riley, B.J.; Johnson, B.R.; Sundaram, S.K.

    2005-01-01

    Arsenic sulfide (AsxSy) nanowires were synthesized by an evaporation-condensation process in evacuated fused quartz ampoules. During the deposition process, a thin, colored film of AsxSy was deposited along the upper, cooler portion of the ampoule. The ampoule was sectioned and the deposited film analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to characterize and semi-quantitatively evaluate the microstructural features of the deposited film. A variety of microstructures were observed that ranged from a continuous thin film (warmer portion of the ampoule), to isolated micron- and nano-scale droplets (in the intermediate portion), as well as nanowires (colder portion of the ampoule). Experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of ampoule cleaning methods (e.g. modify surface chemistry) and quantity of source material on nanowire formation. The evolution of these microstructures in the thin film was determined to be a function of initial pressure, substrate temperature, substrate surface treatment, and initial volume of As2S3 glass. In a set of two experiments where the initial pressure, substrate thermal gradient, and surface treatment were the same, the initial quantity of As2S3 glass per internal ampoule volume was doubled from one test to the other. The results showed that AsxSy nanowires were only formed in the test with the greater initial quantity of As2S3 per internal ampoule volume. The growth data for variation in diameter (e.g. nanowire or droplet) as a function of substrate temperature was fit to an exponential trendline with the form y = Aekx, where y is the structure diameter, A = 1.25×10-3, k = 3.96×10-2, and x is the temperature with correlation coefficient, R2 = 0.979, indicating a thermally-activated process.

  8. Fast retrievals of tropospheric carbonyl sulfide with IASI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, R. Anthony; Dudhia, Anu

    2017-02-01

    Iterative retrievals of trace gases, such as carbonyl sulfide (OCS), from satellites can be exceedingly slow. The algorithm may even fail to keep pace with data acquisition such that analysis is limited to local events of special interest and short time spans. With this in mind, a linear retrieval scheme was developed to estimate total column amounts of OCS at a rate roughly 104 times faster than a typical iterative retrieval. This scheme incorporates two concepts not utilized in previously published linear estimates. First, all physical parameters affecting the signal are included in the state vector and accounted for jointly, rather than treated as effective noise. Second, the initialization point is determined from an ensemble of atmospheres based on comparing the model spectra to the observations, thus improving the linearity of the problem. All of the 2014 data from the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI), instruments A and B, were analysed and showed spatial features of OCS total columns, including depletions over tropical rainforests, seasonal enhancements over the oceans, and distinct OCS features over land. Error due to assuming linearity was found to be on the order of 11 % globally for OCS. However, systematic errors from effects such as varying surface emissivity and extinction due to aerosols have yet to be robustly characterized. Comparisons to surface volume mixing ratio in situ samples taken by NOAA show seasonal correlations greater than 0.7 for five out of seven sites across the globe. Furthermore, this linear scheme was applied to OCS, but may also be used as a rapid estimator of any detectable trace gas using IASI or similar nadir-viewing instruments.

  9. The global transcriptional response of fission yeast to hydrogen sulfide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Jia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hydrogen sulfide (H(2S is a newly identified member of the small family of gasotransmitters that are endogenous gaseous signaling molecules that have a fundamental role in human biology and disease. Although it is a relatively recent discovery and the mechanism of H(2S activity is not completely understood, it is known to be involved in a number of cellular processes; H(2S can affect ion channels, transcription factors and protein kinases in mammals. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this paper, we have used fission yeast as a model organism to study the global gene expression profile in response to H(2S by microarray. We initially measured the genome-wide transcriptional response of fission yeast to H(2S. Through the functional classification of genes whose expression profile changed in response to H(2S, we found that H(2S mainly influences genes that encode putative or known stress proteins, membrane transporters, cell cycle/meiotic proteins, transcription factors and respiration protein in the mitochondrion. Our analysis showed that there was a significant overlap between the genes affected by H(2S and the stress response. We identified that the target genes of the MAPK pathway respond to H(2S; we also identified that a number of transporters respond to H(2S, these include sugar/carbohydrate transporters, ion transporters, and amino acid transporters. We found many mitochondrial genes to be down regulated upon H(2S treatment and that H(2S can reduce mitochondrial oxygen consumption. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This study identifies potential molecular targets of the signaling molecule H(2S in fission yeast and provides clues about the identity of homologues human proteins and will further the understanding of the cellular role of H(2S in human diseases.

  10. Eukaryotic and prokaryotic contributions to colonic hydrogen sulfide synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flannigan, Kyle L; McCoy, Kathy D; Wallace, John L

    2011-07-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) is an important modulator of many aspects of digestive function, both in health and disease. Colonic tissue H(2)S synthesis increases markedly during injury and inflammation and appears to contribute to resolution. Some of the bacteria residing in the colon can also produce H(2)S. The extent to which bacterial H(2)S synthesis contributes to what is measured as colonic H(2)S synthesis is not clear. Using conventional and germ-free mice, we have delineated the eukaryotic vs. prokaryotic contributions to colonic H(2)S synthesis, both in healthy and colitic mice. Colonic tissue H(2)S production is entirely dependent on the presence of the cofactor pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (vitamin B(6)), while bacterial H(2)S synthesis appears to occur independent of this cofactor. As expected, approximately one-half of the H(2)S produced by feces is derived from eukaryotic cells. While colonic H(2)S synthesis is markedly increased when the tissue is inflamed, and, in proportion to the extent of inflammation, fecal H(2)S synthesis does not change and tissue granulocytes do not appear to be the source of the elevated H(2)S production. Rats fed a B vitamin-deficient diet for 6 wk exhibited significantly diminished colonic H(2)S synthesis, but fecal H(2)S synthesis was not different from that of rats on the control diet. Our results demonstrate that H(2)S production by colonic bacteria does not contribute significantly to what is measured as colonic tissue H(2)S production, using the acetate trapping assay system employed in this study.

  11. The role of hydrogen sulfide in renal system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Cao

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide (H2S has gained recognition as the third gaseous signaling molecule after nitric oxide (NO and carbon monoxide (CO. This review surveys the emerging role of H2S in mammalian renal system, with emphasis on both renal physiology and diseases. H2S is produced redundantly by four pathways in kidney, indicating the abundance of this gaseous molecule in the organ. In physiological conditions, H2S was found to regulate the excretory function of the kidney possibly by the inhibitory effect on sodium transporters on renal tubular cells. Likewise, it also influences the release of renin from juxtaglomerular (JG cells and thereby modulates blood pressure. A possible role of H2S as an oxygen sensor has also been discussed, especially at renal medulla. Alternation of H2S level has been implicated in various pathological conditions such as renal ischemia/reperfusion, obstructive nephropathy, diabetic nephropathy and hypertensive nephropathy. Moreover, H2S donors exhibit broad beneficial effects in renal diseases although a few conflicts need to be resolved. Further research reveals that multiple mechanisms are underlying the protective effects of H2S, including anti-inflammation, anti-oxidation and anti-apoptosis. In the review, several research directions are also proposed including the role of mitochondrial H2S in renal diseases, H2S delivery to kidney by targeting D-amino acid oxidase/3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (DAO/3-MST pathway, effect of drug-like H2S donors in kidney diseases and understanding the molecular mechanism of H2S. The completion of the studies in these directions will not only improves our understanding of renal H2S functions but may also be critical to translate H2S to be a new therapy for renal diseases.

  12. Hydrogen sulfide promotes calcium uptake in larval zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwong, Raymond W M; Perry, Steve F

    2015-07-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) can act as a signaling molecule for various ion channels and/or transporters; however, little is known about its potential involvement in Ca(2+) balance. Using developing zebrafish (Danio rerio) as an in vivo model system, the present study demonstrated that acute exposure to H2S donors increased Ca(2+) influx at 4 days postfertilization, while chronic (3-day) exposure caused a rise in whole body Ca(2+) levels. The mRNA expression of Ca(2+)-transport-related genes was unaffected by H2S exposure, suggesting that posttranscriptional modifications were responsible for the altered rates of Ca(2+) uptake. Indeed, treatment of fish with the protein kinase A inhibitor H-89 abolished the H2S-mediated stimulation of Ca(2+) influx, suggesting that H2S increased Ca(2+) influx by activating cAMP-protein kinase A pathways. Cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) and cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE) are two key enzymes in the endogenous synthesis of H2S. Using an antisense morpholino knockdown approach, we demonstrated that Ca(2+) influx was reduced in CBS isoform b (CBSb)- but not in CSE-deficient fish. Interestingly, the reduction in Ca(2+) influx in CBSb-deficient fish was observed only in fish that were acclimated to low-Ca(2+) water (i.e., 25 μM Ca(2+); control: 250 μM Ca(2+)). Similarly, mRNA expression of cbsb but not cse was increased in fish acclimated to low-Ca(2+) water. Results from whole-mount immunohistochemistry further revealed that CBSb was expressed in Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase-rich cells, which are implicated in Ca(2+) uptake in zebrafish larvae. Collectively, the present study suggests a novel role for H2S in promoting Ca(2+) influx, particularly in a low-Ca(2+) environment.

  13. Hydrogen sulfide improves neural function in rats following cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    LIN, JI-YAN; ZHANG, MIN-WEI; WANG, JIN-GAO; LI, HUI; WEI, HONG-YAN; LIU, RONG; DAI, GANG; LIAO, XIAO-XING

    2016-01-01

    The alleviation of brain injury is a key issue following cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is hypothesized to be involved in the pathophysiological process of ischemia-reperfusion injury, and exerts a protective effect on neurons. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of H2S on neural functions following cardiac arrest (CA) in rats. A total of 60 rats were allocated at random into three groups. CA was induced to establish the model and CPR was performed after 6 min. Subsequently, sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), hydroxylamine or saline was administered to the rats. Serum levels of H2S, neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and S100β were determined following CPR. In addition, neurological deficit scoring (NDS), the beam walking test (BWT), prehensile traction test and Morris water maze experiment were conducted. Neuronal apoptosis rates were detected in the hippocampal region following sacrifice. After CPR, as the H2S levels increased or decreased, the serum NSE and S100β concentrations decreased or increased, respectively (P<0.0w. The NDS results of the NaHS group were improved compared with those of the hydroxylamine group at 24 h after CPR (P<0.05). In the Morris water maze experiment, BWT and prehensile traction test the animals in the NaHS group performed best and rats in the hydroxylamine group performed worst. At day 7, the apoptotic index and the expression of caspase-3 were reduced in the hippocampal CA1 region, while the expression of Bcl-2 increased in the NaHS group; and results of the hydroxylamine group were in contrast. Therefore, the results of the present study indicate that H2S is able to improve neural function in rats following CPR. PMID:26893650

  14. The Role of Hydrogen Sulfide in Renal System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xu; Bian, Jin-Song

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide has gained recognition as the third gaseous signaling molecule after nitric oxide and carbon monoxide. This review surveys the emerging role of H2S in mammalian renal system, with emphasis on both renal physiology and diseases. H2S is produced redundantly by four pathways in kidney, indicating the abundance of this gaseous molecule in the organ. In physiological conditions, H2S was found to regulate the excretory function of the kidney possibly by the inhibitory effect on sodium transporters on renal tubular cells. Likewise, it also influences the release of renin from juxtaglomerular cells and thereby modulates blood pressure. A possible role of H2S as an oxygen sensor has also been discussed, especially at renal medulla. Alternation of H2S level has been implicated in various pathological conditions such as renal ischemia/reperfusion, obstructive nephropathy, diabetic nephropathy, and hypertensive nephropathy. Moreover, H2S donors exhibit broad beneficial effects in renal diseases although a few conflicts need to be resolved. Further research reveals that multiple mechanisms are underlying the protective effects of H2S, including anti-inflammation, anti-oxidation, and anti-apoptosis. In the review, several research directions are also proposed including the role of mitochondrial H2S in renal diseases, H2S delivery to kidney by targeting D-amino acid oxidase/3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (DAO/3-MST) pathway, effect of drug-like H2S donors in kidney diseases and understanding the molecular mechanism of H2S. The completion of the studies in these directions will not only improves our understanding of renal H2S functions but may also be critical to translate H2S to be a new therapy for renal diseases.

  15. Soil fluxes of carbonyl sulfide (COS) across four distinct ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, W.; Maseyk, K. S.; Lett, C.; Juarez, S.; Kooijmans, L.; Mammarella, I.; Vesala, T.; Chen, H.; Seibt, U.

    2015-12-01

    Soils are additional but poorly resolved sinks of carbonyl sulfide (COS) in terrestrial ecosystems. COS has been proposed as a tracer for quantifying gross photosynthesis based on the coupled stomatal uptake of COS and CO2. But applying this tracer requires the soil COS flux to be subtracted from the ecosystem flux to obtain the actual plant flux. To simulate soil COS fluxes, we have built a 1-D diffusion-reaction model accounting for vertical transport in the soil, microbial sinks and sources, and a litter layer. Uptake and production of COS in the soil column are linked with soil temperature and moisture through empirical functions adapted from enzyme kinetics and lab incubations. We have measured soil COS fluxes and the related soil variables in four distinct ecosystems: a wheat field (Southern Great Plains, OK, USA), an oak woodland (Santa Monica Mountains, CA, USA), a tropical rainforest (La Selva Biological Station, Costa Rica) and a boreal pine forest (Hyytiälä, Finland). Across all sites, a lower soil temperature and a humid climate are generally favorable to soil COS uptake. Strong COS emissions were observed in the wheat field at high soil temperatures after harvesting but were absent in other ecosystems, indicating that COS exchange may behave differently in agricultural soils. We simulated the soil fluxes in all ecosystems using the diffusion-reaction model, and optimized the source/sink strength parameters with field data. The optimized model provides insights that are not attainable from data analysis alone: For example, the wheat field soil must have continued uptake activity even when it showed net emissions, and leaf litter contributed dominantly to the COS sink after rain in the oak woodland. We expect the new model to be useful for simulating global soil COS fluxes as field data on soil fluxes from a broader range of ecosystems become available.

  16. Modeling the Effect of Dissolved Hydrogen Sulfide on Mg2+-water Complex on Dolomite {104} Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, Zhizhang; Brown, Philip E; Szlufarska, Izabela; Xu, Huifang

    2016-01-01

    The key kinetic barrier to dolomite formation is related to the surface Mg2+-H2O complex, which hinders binding of surface Mg2+ ions to the CO3 2- ions in solution. It has been proposed that this reaction can be catalyzed by dissolved hydrogen sulfide. To characterize the role of dissolved hydrogen sulfide in the dehydration of surface Mg 2+ ions, ab initio simulations based on density functional theory (DFT) were carried out to study the thermodynamics of competitive adsorption of hydrogen sulfide and water on dolomite (104) surfaces from solution. We find that water is thermodynamically more stable on the surface with the difference in adsorption energy of -13.6 kJ/mol (in vacuum) and -12.8 kJ/mol (in aqueous solution). However, aqueous hydrogen sulfide adsorbed on the surface increases the Mg2+-H2O distances on surrounding surface sites. Two possible mechanisms were proposed for the catalytic effects of adsorbed hydrogen sulfide on the anhydrous Ca-Mg-carbonate crystallization at low temperature.

  17. Pathways of sulfide oxidation by haloalkaliphilic bacteria in limited-oxygen gas lift bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klok, Johannes B M; van den Bosch, Pim L F; Buisman, Cees J N; Stams, Alfons J M; Keesman, Karel J; Janssen, Albert J H

    2012-07-17

    Physicochemical processes, such as the Lo-cat and Amine-Claus process, are commonly used to remove hydrogen sulfide from hydrocarbon gas streams such as landfill gas, natural gas, and synthesis gas. Biodesulfurization offers environmental advantages, but still requires optimization and more insight in the reaction pathways and kinetics. We carried out experiments with gas lift bioreactors inoculated with haloalkaliphilic sulfide-oxidizing bacteria. At oxygen-limiting levels, that is, below an O(2)/H(2)S mole ratio of 1, sulfide was oxidized to elemental sulfur and sulfate. We propose that the bacteria reduce NAD(+) without direct transfer of electrons to oxygen and that this is most likely the main route for oxidizing sulfide to elemental sulfur which is subsequently oxidized to sulfate in oxygen-limited bioreactors. We call this pathway the limited oxygen route (LOR). Biomass growth under these conditions is significantly lower than at higher oxygen levels. These findings emphasize the importance of accurate process control. This work also identifies a need for studies exploring similar pathways in other sulfide oxidizers such as Thiobacillus bacteria.

  18. Nitrate stimulation of indigenous nitrate-reducing, sulfide-oxidising bacterial community in wastewater anaerobic biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-de-Lomas, Juan; Corzo, Alfonso; Carmen Portillo, M; Gonzalez, Juan M; Andrades, Jose A; Saiz-Jimenez, Cesáreo; Garcia-Robledo, Emilio

    2007-07-01

    The role of the nitrate-reducing, sulfide-oxidising bacteria (NR-SOB) in the nitrate-mediated inhibition of sulfide net production by anaerobic wastewater biofilms was analyzed in two experimental bioreactors, continuously fed with the primary effluent of a wastewater treatment plant, one used as control (BRC) and the other one supplemented with nitrate (BRN). This study integrated information from H(2)S and pH microelectrodes, RNA-based molecular techniques, and the time course of biofilm growth and bioreactors water phase. Biofilms were a net source of sulfide for the water phase (2.01 micromol S(2-)(tot)m(-2)s(-1)) in the absence of nitrate dosing. Nitrate addition effectively led to the cessation of sulfide release from biofilms despite which a low rate of net sulfate reduction activity (0.26 micromol S(2-)(tot)m(-2)s(-1)) persisted at a deep layer within the biofilm. Indigenous NR-SOB including Thiomicrospira denitrificans, Arcobacter sp., and Thiobacillus denitrificans were stimulated by nitrate addition resulting in the elimination of most sulfide from the biofilms. Active sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) represented comparable fractions of total metabolically active bacteria in the libraries obtained from BRN and BRC. However, we detected changes in the taxonomic composition of the SRB community suggesting its adaptation to a higher level of NR-SOB activity in the presence of nitrate.

  19. Bioconversion of high concentrations of hydrogen sulfide to elemental sulfur in airlift bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zytoon, Mohamed Abdel-Monaem; AlZahrani, Abdulraheem Ahmad; Noweir, Madbuli Hamed; El-Marakby, Fadia Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Several bioreactor systems are used for biological treatment of hydrogen sulfide. Among these, airlift bioreactors are promising for the bioconversion of hydrogen sulfide into elemental sulfur. The performance of airlift bioreactors is not adequately understood, particularly when directly fed with hydrogen sulfide gas. The objective of this paper is to investigate the performance of an airlift bioreactor fed with high concentrations of H2S with special emphasis on the effect of pH in combination with other factors such as H2S loading rate, oxygen availability, and sulfide accumulation. H2S inlet concentrations between 1,008 ppm and 31,215 ppm were applied and elimination capacities up to 113 g H2S m(-3) h(-1) were achieved in the airlift bioreactor under investigation at a pH range 6.5-8.5. Acidic pH values reduced the elimination capacity. Elemental sulfur recovery up to 95% was achieved under oxygen limited conditions (DO bioreactor tolerated accumulated dissolved sulfide concentrations >500 mg/L at pH values 8.0-8.5, and near 100% removal efficiency was achieved. Overall, the resident microorganisms in the studied airlift bioreactor favored pH values in the alkaline range. The bioreactor performance in terms of elimination capacity and sulfur recovery was better at pH range 8-8.5.

  20. Geology of the Brick Flat massive sulfide body, Iron Mountain cluster, West Shasta district, California ( USA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, J.P.

    1985-01-01

    The Brick Flat massive sulfide body is one of a group of 8 individual bodies that constitute the Iron Mountain cluster in the S part of the West Shasta district. Before they were separated by postmineral faulting, 5 of the 8 sulfide bodies formed a single large deposit about 1375 m long with a mass of some 23 million metric tons. The pyritic Brick Flat sulfide body is one of the 5 faulted segements of this deposit. The Brick Flat massive sulfide lies within medium phenocryst rhyolite that is characteristic of the ore-bearing middle unit of the Balaklala Rhyolite. It is interpreted to be downfaulted a vertical distance of 75 to 85 m from the Old Mine sulfide-gossan orebody along the N-dipping Camden South fault. It is bounded in turn on its N side by another parallel fault, the Camden North, which drops the orebody down another 75 m to the level of the Richmond orebody. -from Author