WorldWideScience

Sample records for berkelium sulfides

  1. New berkelium isotope: 242Bk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new isotope of berkelium, 242Bk, was produced with a cross section of approx. 10 μb in reactions of boron on uranium and nitrogen on thorium. It decays by electron capture with a half-life of 7 +- 1.3 minutes. The branching ratio for this isotope for alpha decay is less than 1% and that for spontaneous fission is less than 0.03%. 2 figures, 2 tables

  2. Characterization of berkelium(III) dipicolinate and borate compounds in solution and the solid state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Mark A; Cary, Samantha K; Johnson, Jason A; Baumbach, Ryan E; Arico, Alexandra A; Luckey, Morgan; Urban, Matthew; Wang, Jamie C; Polinski, Matthew J; Chemey, Alexander; Liu, Guokui; Chen, Kuan-Wen; Van Cleve, Shelley M; Marsh, Matthew L; Eaton, Teresa M; van de Burgt, Lambertus J; Gray, Ashley L; Hobart, David E; Hanson, Kenneth; Maron, Laurent; Gendron, Frédéric; Autschbach, Jochen; Speldrich, Manfred; Kögerler, Paul; Yang, Ping; Braley, Jenifer; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E

    2016-08-26

    Berkelium is positioned at a crucial location in the actinide series between the inherently stable half-filled 5f(7) configuration of curium and the abrupt transition in chemical behavior created by the onset of a metastable divalent state that starts at californium. However, the mere 320-day half-life of berkelium's only available isotope, (249)Bk, has hindered in-depth studies of the element's coordination chemistry. Herein, we report the synthesis and detailed solid-state and solution-phase characterization of a berkelium coordination complex, Bk(III)tris(dipicolinate), as well as a chemically distinct Bk(III) borate material for comparison. We demonstrate that berkelium's complexation is analogous to that of californium. However, from a range of spectroscopic techniques and quantum mechanical calculations, it is clear that spin-orbit coupling contributes significantly to berkelium's multiconfigurational ground state. PMID:27563098

  3. Extraction of tetravalent berkelium and cerium by aliquate-336-S-NO3 quaternary ammonium salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extraction of tetravalent berkelium and cerium by aliquate-336-S-NO3 quaternary ammonium salt from nitric acid solutions is investigated. The effect of concentrations of nitric acid and extracting agent, nature of an oxidant (potassium bromate, potassium bichromate, mixture of AgNO3 and (NH4)2S2O8) and solvent on the distribution coefficient of berkelium(4) and cerium(4) is studied. It is established that solutions of aliquate-336-S-NO3 in carbon tetrachloride and dichloroethane extract quantitatively tetravalent berkelium from 10-12 M nitric acid solutions and cerium - from 1-10 M nitric acid solutions containing potassium bichromate as an oxidant. It is shown that the value of distribution coefficient for berkelium and cerium depends on the nature of an oxidant and extracting agent concentration. It is established that in the case of extraction by quaternary ammonium salt with one berkelium(4) mole four aliquate-336-SNO3 moles are associated and 1.5-1.6 mole of extracting agent are associated with one cerium(4) mole. It permits to make a conclusion that stoichiometry of extraction reactions by quaternary ammonium salt is not the same for tetravalent berkelium and cerium. It is shown that trivalent transplutonium and rare earth elements are not practically extracted by aliquate-336-S-NO3 from nitric acid solutions

  4. Mesostructured metal germanium sulfides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacLachlan, M.J.; Coombs, N.; Bedard, R.L.; White, S.; Thompson, L.K.; Ozin, G.A.

    1999-12-29

    A new class of mesostructured metal germanium sulfide materials has been prepared and characterized. The synthesis, via supramolecular assembly of well-defined germanium sulfide anionic cluster precursors and transition-metal cations in formamide, represents a new strategy for the formation of this class of solids. A variety of techniques were employed to examine the structure and composition of the materials. Structurally, the material is best described as a periodic mesostructured metal sulfide-based coordination framework akin to periodic hexagonal mesoporous silica, MCM-41. At the molecular scale, the materials strongly resemble microstructured metal germanium sulfides, in which the structure of the [Ge{sub 4}S{sub 10}]{sup 4{minus}} cluster building-blocks are intact and linked via {mu}-S-M-S bonds. Evidence for a metal-metal bond in mesostructured Cu/Ge{sub 4}S{sub 10} is also provided.

  5. SULFIDE METHOD PLUTONIUM SEPARATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffield, R.B.

    1958-08-12

    A process is described for the recovery of plutonium from neutron irradiated uranium solutions. Such a solution is first treated with a soluble sullide, causing precipitation of the plutoniunn and uraniunn values present, along with those impurities which form insoluble sulfides. The precipitate is then treated with a solution of carbonate ions, which will dissolve the uranium and plutonium present while the fission product sulfides remain unaffected. After separation from the residue, this solution may then be treated by any of the usual methods, such as formation of a lanthanum fluoride precipitate, to effect separation of plutoniunn from uranium.

  6. Titanocene sulfide chemistry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horáček, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 314, MAY 2016 (2016), s. 83-102. ISSN 0010-8545 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP207/12/2368 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : titanocene sulfide chemistry * photolysis * titanocene hydrosulfides Ti-(SH)n Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 12.239, year: 2014

  7. Sulfide oxidation in a biofilter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Claus Lunde; Dezhao, Liu; Hansen, Michael Jørgen;

    oxidizing bacteria but several fungal families including Trichocomaceae. A positive correlation was found between the presence of mold and sulfide uptake. However there have been no reports on fungi metabolizing hydrogen sulfide. We hypothesize that the mold increases the air exposed surface, enabling...... higher hydrogen sulfide uptake followed by oxidation catalyzed by iron-containing enzymes such as cytochrome c oxidase in a process uncoupled from energy conservation....

  8. Sulfide oxidation in a biofilter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Claus Lunde; Liu, Dezhao; Hansen, Michael Jørgen;

    2012-01-01

    oxidizing bacteria but several fungal families including Trichocomaceae. A positive correlation was found between the presence of mold and sulfide uptake. However there have been no reports on fungi metabolizing hydrogen sulfide. We hypothesize that the mold increases the air exposed surface, enabling...... higher hydrogen sulfide uptake followed by oxidation catalyzed by iron-containing enzymes such as cytochrome c oxidase in a process uncoupled from energy conservation....

  9. Field method for sulfide determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, B L; Schwarser, R R; Chukwuenye, C O

    1982-01-01

    A simple and rapid method was developed for determining the total sulfide concentration in water in the field. Direct measurements were made using a silver/sulfide ion selective electrode in conjunction with a double junction reference electrode connected to an Orion Model 407A/F Specific Ion Meter. The method also made use of a sulfide anti-oxidant buffer (SAOB II) which consists of ascorbic acid, sodium hydroxide, and disodium EDTA. Preweighed sodium sulfide crystals were sealed in air tight plastic volumetric flasks which were used in standardization process in the field. Field standards were prepared by adding SAOB II to the flask containing the sulfide crystals and diluting it to the mark with deionized deaerated water. Serial dilutions of the standards were used to prepare standards of lower concentrations. Concentrations as low as 6 ppB were obtained on lake samples with a reproducibility better than +- 10%.

  10. A novel method for improving cerussite sulfidization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Qi-cheng; Wen, Shu-ming; Zhao, Wen-juan; Cao, Qin-bo; Lü, Chao

    2016-06-01

    Evaluation of flotation behavior, solution measurements, and surface analyses were performed to investigate the effects of chloride ion addition on the sulfidization of cerussite in this study. Micro-flotation tests indicate that the addition of chloride ions prior to sulfidization can significantly increase the flotation recovery of cerussite, which is attributed to the formation of more lead sulfide species on the mineral surface. Solution measurement results suggest that the addition of chloride ions prior to sulfidization induces the transformation of more sulfide ions from pulp solution onto the mineral surface by the formation of more lead sulfide species. X-ray diffraction and energy-dispersive spectroscopy indicate that more lead sulfide species form on the mineral surface when chloride ions are added prior to sulfidization. These results demonstrate that the addition of chloride ions prior to sulfidization can significantly improve the sulfidization of cerussite, thereby enhancing the flotation performance.

  11. Pyrophoric nature of iron sulfides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, R. [Univ. of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Steele, A.D.; Morgan, D.T.B. [Shell Research Centre Ltd., Chester (United Kingdom). Thornton Research Centre

    1996-05-01

    Hydrogen sulfide, often present in crude oil tankers, can react with rust to form various sulfides including mackinawite (FeS), greigite (Fe{sub 3}S{sub 4}), and pyrite (FeS{sub 2}). The tendency for these compounds to react with oxygen in air to form potentially explosive mixtures depends upon their morphology and the environmental conditions. The experimentally determined heat of oxidation of finely divided mackinawite was {minus}7.45 kJ/g. For samples with a larger particle size and smaller surface area the values measured were lower due to incomplete oxidation of the sulfide. All the sulfides produced, whether from magnetite or acicular, prismatic or spherical geothite, were approximately spherical in form. The heat of oxidation of greigite was found to be approximately {minus}2100 kJ/mol, and the heat of formation of greigite is approximately {minus}320 kJ/mol.

  12. Mechanochemical reduction of copper sulfide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balaz, P.; Takacs, L.; Jiang, Jianzhong; Soika, V.; Luxova, M.

    The mechanochemical reduction of copper sulfide with iron was induced in a Fritsch P-6 planetary mill, using WC vial filled with argon and WC balls. Samples milled for specific intervals were analyzed by XRD and Mossbauer spectroscopy. Most of the reaction takes place during the first 10 min of...... milling and only FeS and Cu are found after 60 min. The main chemical process is accompanied by phase transformations of the sulfide phases as a result of milling. Djurleite partially transformed to chalcocite and a tetragonal copper sulfide phase before reduction. The cubic modification of FeS was formed...... first, transforming to hexagonal during the later stages of the process. The formation of off-stoichiometric phases and the release of some elemental sulfur by copper sulfide are also probable....

  13. Synthesis of furan from allenic sulfide derivatives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we report the synthesis of furan derivatives from allenic sulfides. By the reaction with NaH, β-Hydroxyl allenic sulfides were found to generate furan products in excellent yields with the removal of phenylthio group. β-Aldehyde allenic sulfides were found to give similar furan products with one more substituent when treated with additional nucleophilic reagents. β-ketone allenic sulfides can also cyclize to give furan derivatives with the promotion of P2O5.

  14. Synthesis of furan from allenic sulfide derivatives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG LingLing; ZHANG Xiu; MA Jie; ZHONG ZhenZhen; ZHANG Zhe; ZHANG Yan; WANG JianBo

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we report the synthesis of furan derivatives from allenic sulfides. By the reaction with NaH.,β-Hydroxyl allenic sulfides were found to generate furan products in excellent yields with the removal of phenylthio group.β-Aldehyde allenic sulfides were found to give similar furan products with one more substituent when treated with additional nucleophilic reagents. β-ketone allenic sulfides can also cyclize to give furan derivatives with the promotion of P2O5.

  15. 30 CFR 250.808 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.808 Section 250.808... OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Production Safety Systems § 250.808 Hydrogen sulfide. Production operations in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in zones where the presence of...

  16. 30 CFR 250.490 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.490 Section 250.490... OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Drilling Operations Hydrogen Sulfide § 250.490 Hydrogen... black lettering as follows: Letter height Wording 12 inches Danger. Poisonous Gas. Hydrogen Sulfide....

  17. 30 CFR 250.604 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.604 Section 250.604... OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Well-Workover Operations § 250.604 Hydrogen sulfide. When a well-workover operation is conducted in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or...

  18. 30 CFR 250.504 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.504 Section 250.504... OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Well-Completion Operations § 250.504 Hydrogen sulfide. When a well-completion operation is conducted in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or...

  19. STUDY OF HYDROGEN SULFIDE REMOVAL FROM GROUNDWATER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Lupascu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The process of the hydrogen sulfide removal from the underground water of the Hancesti town has been investigated. By oxygen bubbling through the water containing hydrogen sulfide, from the Hancesti well tube, sulfur is deposited in the porous structure of studied catalysts, which decreases their catalytic activity. Concomitantly, the process of adsorption / oxidation of hydrogen sulfide to sulfate take place. The kinetic research of the hydrogen sulfide removal from the Hancesti underground water, after its treatment by hydrogen peroxide, proves greater efficiency than in the case of modified carbonic adsorbents. As a result of used treatment, hydrogen sulfide is completely oxidized to sulfates

  20. Sulfide intrusion and detoxification in seagrasses ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasler-Sheetal, Harald; Holmer, Marianne

    Sulfide intrusion in seagrasses represents a global threat to seagrasses and thereby an important parameter in resilience of seagrass ecosystems. In contrast seegrasses colonize and grow in hostile sediments, where they are constantly exposed to invasion of toxic gaseous sulfide. Remarkably little...... is known about the strategies of seagrasses to survive sulfide intrusion, their potential detoxification mechanisms and sulfur nutrition in general. By a global review of sulfide intrusion, coupled with a series of field studies and in situ experiments we elucidate sulfide intrusion and different...... strategies of seagrasses to sustain sulfide intrusion. Using stable isotope tracing, scanning electron microscopy with x-ray analysis, tracing sulfur compounds combined with ecosystem parameters we found different spatial, intraspecific and interspecific strategies to cope with sulfidic sediments. 1...

  1. Redox Biochemistry of Hydrogen Sulfide*

    OpenAIRE

    Kabil, Omer; Banerjee, Ruma

    2010-01-01

    H2S, the most recently discovered gasotransmitter, might in fact be the evolutionary matriarch of this family, being both ancient and highly reduced. Disruption of γ-cystathionase in mice leads to cardiovascular dysfunction and marked hypertension, suggesting a key role for this enzyme in H2S production in the vasculature. However, patients with inherited deficiency in γ-cystathionase apparently do not present vascular pathology. A mitochondrial pathway disposes sulfide and couples it to oxid...

  2. Kinetic Studies of Sulfide Mineral Oxidation and Xanthate Adsorption

    OpenAIRE

    Mendiratta, Neeraj K.

    2000-01-01

    Sulfide minerals are a major source of metals; however, certain sulfide minerals, such as pyrite and pyrrhotite, are less desirable. Froth flotation is a commonly used separation technique, which requires the use of several reagents to float and depress different sulfide minerals. Xanthate, a thiol collector, has gained immense usage in sulfide minerals flotation. However, some sulfides are naturally hydrophobic and may float without a collector. Iron sulfides, such as pyrite and pyrrho...

  3. Hydrogen sulfide and vascular relaxation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Yan; TANG Chao-shu; DU Jun-bao; JIN Hong-fang

    2011-01-01

    Objective To review the vasorelaxant effects of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in arterial rings in the cardiovascular system under both physiological and pathophysiological conditions and the possible mechanisms involved.Data sources The data in this review were obtained from Medline and Pubmed sources from 1997 to 2011 using the search terms "hydrogen sulfide" and ""vascular relaxation".Study selection Articles describing the role of hydrogen sulfide in the regulation of vascular activity and its vasorelaxant effects were selected.Results H2S plays an important role in the regulation of cardiovascular tone.The vasomodulatory effects of H2S depend on factors including concentration,species and tissue type.The H2S donor,sodium hydrosulfide (NarS),causes vasorelaxation of rat isolated aortic rings in a dose-dependent manner.This effect was more pronounced than that observed in pulmonary arterial rings.The expression of KATP channel proteins and mRNA in the aortic rings was increased compared with pulmonary artery rings.H2S is involved in the pathogenesis of a variety of cardiovascular diseases.Downregulation of the endogenous H2S pathway is an important factor in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases.The vasorelaxant effects of H2S have been shown to be mediated by activation of KATP channels in vascular smooth muscle cells and via the induction of acidification due to activation of the CI/HCO3 exchanger.It is speculated that the mechanisms underlying the vasoconstrictive function of H2S in the aortic rings involves decreased NO production and inhibition of cAMP accumulation.Conclusion H2S is an important endogenous gasotransmitter in the cardiovascular system and acts as a modulator of vascular tone in the homeostatic regulation of blood pressure.

  4. Variation in sulfide tolerance of photosystem II in phylogenetically diverse cyanobacteria from sulfidic habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Scott R.; Bebout, Brad M.

    2004-01-01

    Physiological and molecular phylogenetic approaches were used to investigate variation among 12 cyanobacterial strains in their tolerance of sulfide, an inhibitor of oxygenic photosynthesis. Cyanobacteria from sulfidic habitats were found to be phylogenetically diverse and exhibited an approximately 50-fold variation in photosystem II performance in the presence of sulfide. Whereas the degree of tolerance was positively correlated with sulfide levels in the environment, a strain's phenotype could not be predicted from the tolerance of its closest relatives. These observations suggest that sulfide tolerance is a dynamic trait primarily shaped by environmental variation. Despite differences in absolute tolerance, similarities among strains in the effects of sulfide on chlorophyll fluorescence induction indicated a common mode of toxicity. Based on similarities with treatments known to disrupt the oxygen-evolving complex, it was concluded that sulfide toxicity resulted from inhibition of the donor side of photosystem II.

  5. New biologically active hydrogen sulfide donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger, Thomas; Raynaud, Francoise; Bouillaud, Frédéric; Ransy, Céline; Simonet, Serge; Crespo, Christine; Bourguignon, Marie-Pierre; Villeneuve, Nicole; Vilaine, Jean-Paul; Artaud, Isabelle; Galardon, Erwan

    2013-11-25

    Generous donors: The dithioperoxyanhydrides (CH3 COS)2 , (PhCOS)2 , CH3 COSSCO2 Me and PhCOSSCO2 Me act as thiol-activated hydrogen sulfide donors in aqueous buffer solution. The most efficient donor (CH3 COS)2 can induce a biological response in cells, and advantageously replace hydrogen sulfide in ex vivo vascular studies. PMID:24115650

  6. Sulfide stress cracking of pipeline steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem of the sulfide stress corrosion cracking of pipeline steels and their welded joints have been presented for pipeline steels. Results of hydrogen sulfide stress cracking inhibitors and corrosion inhibitors of three types protective actions on pipeline steels of two grades petroleum range of products are given. (author)

  7. Ammonia and hydrogen sulfide removal using biochar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reducing ammonia and hydrogen sulfide emissions from livestock facilities is an important issue for many communities and livestock producers. Ammonia has been regarded as odorous, precursor for particulate matter (PM), and contributed to livestock mortality. Hydrogen sulfide is highly toxic at elev...

  8. Weathering of sulfides on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Roger G.; Fisher, Duncan S.

    1987-01-01

    Pyrrhotite-pentlandite assemblages in mafic and ultramafic igneous rocks may have contributed significantly to the chemical weathering reactions that produce degradation products in the Martian regolith. By analogy and terrestrial processes, a model is proposed whereby supergene alteration of these primary Fe-Ni sulfides on Mars has generated secondary sulfides (e.g., pyrite) below the water table and produced acidic groundwater containing high concentrations of dissolved Fe, Ni, and sulfate ions. The low pH solutions also initiated weathering reactions of igneous feldspars and ferromagnesian silicates to form clay silicate and ferric oxyhydroxide phases. Near-surface oxidation and hydrolysis of ferric sulfato-and hydroxo-complex ions and sols formed gossan above the water table consisting of poorly crystalline hydrated ferric sulfates (e.g., jarosite), oxides (ferrihydrite, goethite), and silica (opal). Underlying groundwater, now permafrost contains hydroxo sulfato complexes of Fe, Al, Mg, Ni, which may be stabilized in frozen acidic solutions beneath the surface of Mars. Sublimation of permafrost may replenish colloidal ferric oxides, sulfates, and phyllosilicates during dust storms on Mars.

  9. Measurement of dissolved sulfide in geothermal condensate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, D.P.Y.; Corsi, R.L.; McNeece, C.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a reliable method for determining the concentration of sulfide ions in laboratory solutions and in field samples containing geothermal condensate. A method based upon a sulfide selective ion electrode has been tested successfully on both. The method is straightforward to apply, involving collection of filtered samples into a sulfide anti-oxidant buffer (SAOB), subsequent measurement by electrodes and comparison with a calibration curve prepared from solutions containing known concentrations of sulfide ions. The importance of filtering the samples was demonstrated by a marked reduction of electrode potential after sample filtration. For replicate solutions of known composition containing greater than 1 x 10/sup -6/ M (0.032 ppm) of dissolved sulfide the estimated accuracy of the method was about 5%. For geothermal condensate of unknown composition, the mean of replicate samples was estimated to be within about 20% of the true value.

  10. Primordial Xenon in Allende Sulfides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J. T.; Manuel, O. K.

    1995-09-01

    The Allende C3V carbonaceous chondrite incorporated isotopically anomalous components of several medium-heavy elements (Z=36-62) from nucleosynthesis [1]. Isotopically distinct Xe (Z=54) has been found in grains ranging from several _ to a few mm in size. Diamond [2] is the host of Xe that is enriched in isotopes produced by the very rapid p- and r-processes in a supernova explosion [3]. Silicon carbide [4] is the host of Xe that is enriched in the middle isotopes, 128-132Xe, produced by slow neutron capture [3] before a star reaches the supernova stage. The present study was undertaken to identify the isotopic composition of primitive Xe initially trapped in sulfides of the Allende meteorite. Two FeS mineral separates were analyzed by stepwise heating. One sample was first irradiated in a neutron flux to generate a tracer isotope, 131*Xe, by the 130Te(n, gamma beta-)131*Xe reaction. The release pattern of this tracer isotope, 131*Xe, closely paralleled the release of primordial 132Xe up to 950 degrees C, when the sulfide melted and released the bulk of its trapped Xe (Figure 1). The Xe released from both samples at 950 deg C was terrestrial in isotopic composition, except for enrichments from spallogenic and radiogenic components (Figure 2). From the results of this and earlier analyses of Xe in meteoritic FeS [5, 6, 7], we conclude that terrestrial-type Xe was dominant in the central region of the protoplanetary nebula, and it remains a major component in the FeS of diverse meteorites and in the terrestrial planets that are rich in Fe, S [8]. References: [1] Begemann F. (1993) Origin and Evolution of the Elements (N. Prantzos et al., eds.), 518-527, Cambridge Univ. [2] Lewis R. S. and Anders E. (1988) LPS XIX, 679-680. [3] Burbidge et al. (1957) Rev. Modern Phys., 29, 547-650. [4] Tang M. and Anders E. (1988) GCA, 52, 1235-1244. [5] Niemeyer S. (1979) GCA, 43, 843-860. [6] Lewis et al. (1979) GCA, 43, 1743-1752. [7] Hwaung G. and Manuel O. K. (1982) Nature, 299

  11. Pelletizing of sulfide molybdenite concentrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palant, A. A.

    2007-04-01

    The results of a pelletizing investigation using various binding components (water, syrup, sulfite-alcohol distillery grains, and bentonite) of the flotation sulfide molybdenite concentrate (˜84% MoS2) from the Mongolian deposit are discussed. The use of syrup provides rather high-strength pellets (>3 N/pellet or >300 g/pellet) of the required size (2 3 mm) for the consumption of 1 kg binder per 100 kg concentrate. The main advantage of the use of syrup instead of bentonite is that the molybdenum cinder produced by oxidizing roasting of raw ore materials is not impoverished due to complete burning out of the syrup. This fact exerts a positive effect on the subsequent hydrometallurgical process, decreasing molybdenum losses related to dump cakes.

  12. Adequate hydrogen sulfide, healthy circulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Jun-bao; CHEN Stella; JIN Hong-fang; TANG Chao-shu

    2011-01-01

    Previously,hydrogen sulfide (H2S) was considered to be a toxic gas.However,recently it was discovered that it could be produced in mammals and even in plants,throughtheproductionandmetabolismof sulfur-containing amino acids.In mammals,H2S is mainly catalyzed by cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE),cystathionin-β-lyase (CBS) and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (MPST) with the substrate of L-cysteine.Endogenous H2S exerts many important physiological and pathophysiological functions,including hypotensive action,vasorelaxation,myocardial dilation,inhibition of smooth muscle cell proliferation,and antioxidatve actions.Importantly,it plays a very important role in the pathogenesis of systemic hypertension,pulmonary hypertension,atherosclerosis,myocardialinjury,angiogenesis,hyperhomocysteinemi aandshock.Therefore,H2S is now being considered to be a novel gasotransmitter after nitric oxide and carbon monoxide in the regulation of circulatory system.

  13. How selection offsets sulfide corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steels in Girdler heavy water plants are generally required to withstand wet hydrogen sulfide or its aqueous solution. The reasons for selecting various grades for various locations are explained. Information on welding methods is given, and the codes applicable are listed. Carbon steel can be used only where fluid velocity is low. Sections which fail completely if pitted are made of AISI 316 stainless steel. Diaphragms and other very thin parts located in the stagnant fluid are made of Inconel 625. Where solution-annealing of stainless steels at 1000 deg C after welding is not feasible, low-carbon grades (304L, 316L) are used. Some failures are depicted. All castings are completely radiographically examined. (N.D.H.)

  14. Structural studies in limestone sulfidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fenouil, L.A.; Lynn, S.

    1993-05-01

    This study investigates the sulfidation of limestone at high temperatures (700--900{degree}C) as the first step in the design of a High-Temperature Coal-Gas Clean-Up system using millimeter-size limestone particles. Several workers have found that the rate of this reaction significantly decreases after an initial 10 to 15% conversion of CaCO{sub 3} to CaS. The present work attempts to explain this feature. It is first established that millimeter-size limestone particles do not sinter at temperatures up to the CaCO{sub 3} calcination point (899{degree}C at 1.03 bar CO{sub 2} partial pressure). It is then shown that CaS sinters rapidly at 750 to 900{degree}C if CO{sub 2} is present in the gas phase. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) photographs and Electron Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) data reveal that the CaS product layer sinters and forms a quasi-impermeable coating around the CaCO{sub 3} grains that greatly hinders more H{sub 2}S from reaching the still unreacted parts of the stone. Moreover, most of the pores initially present within the limestone structure begin to disappear or, at least, are significantly reduced in size. From then on, subsequent conversion is limited by diffusion of H{sub 2}S through the CaS layer, possibly by S{sup 2{minus}} ionic diffusion. The kinetics is then adequately described by a shrinking-core model, in which a sharp front of completely converted limestone is assumed to progress toward the center of the pellet. Finally, experimental evidence and computer simulations using simple sintering models suggest that the CaS sintering, responsible for the sharp decrease in the sulfidation rate, is surface-diffusion controlled.

  15. Microbial control of hydrogen sulfide production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montgomery, A.D.; Bhupathiraju, V.K.; Wofford, N.; McInerney, M.J. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Tulsa, OK (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    A sulfide-resistant strain of Thiobacillus denitrificans, strain F, prevented the accumulation of sulfide by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans when both organisms were grown in liquid medium. The wild-type strain of T. denitrificans did not prevent the accumulation of sulfide produced by D. desulfuricans. Strain F also prevented the accumulation of sulfide by a mixed population of sulfate-reducing bacteria enriched from an oil field brine. Fermentation balances showed that strain F stoichiometrically oxidized the sulfide produced by D. desulfuricans and the oil field brine enrichment to sulfate. The ability of a strain F to control sulfide production in an experimental system of cores and formation water from the Redfield, Iowa, natural gas storage facility was also investigated. A stable, sulfide-producing biofilm was established in two separate core systems, one of which was inoculated with strain F while the other core system (control) was treated in an identical manner, but was not inoculated with strain F. When formation water with 10 mM acetate and 5 mM nitrate was injected into both core systems, the effluent sulfide concentrations in the control core system ranged from 200 to 460 {mu}M. In the test core system inoculated with strain F, the effluent sulfide concentrations were lower, ranging from 70 to 110 {mu}M. In order to determine whether strain F could control sulfide production under optimal conditions for sulfate-reducing bacteria, the electron donor was changed to lactate and inorganic nutrients (nitrogen and phosphate sources) were added to the formation water. When nutrient-supplemented formation water with 3.1 mM lactate and 10 mM nitrate was used, the effluent sulfide concentrations of the control core system initially increased to about 3,800 {mu}M, and then decreased to about 1,100 {mu}M after 5 weeks. However, in the test core system inoculated with strain F, the effluent sulfide concentrations were much lower, 160 to 330 {mu}M.

  16. Phase Engineering of 2D Tin Sulfides.

    OpenAIRE

    Mutlu, Z; Wu, RJ; Wickramaratne, D.; Shahrezaei, S; Liu, C; Temiz, S; Patalano, A; M Ozkan; Lake, RK; Mkhoyan, KA; Ozkan, CS

    2016-01-01

    Tin sulfides can exist in a variety of phases and polytypes due to the different oxidation states of Sn. A subset of these phases and polytypes take the form of layered 2D structures that give rise to a wide host of electronic and optical properties. Hence, achieving control over the phase, polytype, and thickness of tin sulfides is necessary to utilize this wide range of properties exhibited by the compound. This study reports on phase-selective growth of both hexagonal tin (IV) sulfide SnS2...

  17. The sulfide oxidation in an electrolytic sulfide oxidizing bioreactor using graphite anode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of the present research was the direct conversion of sulfide (an important contaminant in various industrial wastewaters) to sulfate, whose discharge limits are much less stringent than those for sulfide. The electrolysis of sodium sulfide was investigated under different conditions such as: ph, current density and working area etc. along with cyclic voltammetry. By the use of a graphite anode, we achieved near-quantitative electrochemical conversion of sulfide ions to sulfate with current efficiency of 88%. Kinetically, the reaction is first order in current density. The experimental results revealed that the sulfide removal rate of more than 88% could be achieved under the conditions T=30 deg. C, ph = 7, current density of 1 mA/cm/sup 2/ at anode area of 225 cm/sup 2/.The process can be practically coupled with bioreactor for an effective sulfide removal. (author)

  18. Formation of Copper Sulfide Artifacts During Electrolytic Dissolution of Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jia; Pistorius, P. Chris

    2013-06-01

    Based on equilibrium considerations, copper sulfide is not expected to form in manganese-containing steel, yet previous workers reported finding copper sulfide in transmission electron microscope samples which had been prepared by electropolishing. It is proposed that copper sulfide can form during electrolytic dissolution because of the much greater stability of copper sulfide relative to manganese sulfide in contact with an electrolyte containing copper and manganese cations. This mechanism has been demonstrated with aluminum-killed steel samples.

  19. High temperature sulfide corrosion and transport properties of transition metal sulfides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overview is presented of the role of the defect and transport properties of transition metal sulfides on the kinetics and mechanism of high-temperature sulfide corrosion of metals and alloys. It has been shown that due to the very high concentration of defects in common metal sulfides, not only pure metals but also conventional high-temperature alloys (chromia and alumina formers) undergo very rapid degradation in highly sulfidizing environments. Refractory metals (Mo, Nb), on the other hands, are highly resistant to sulfide corrosion, their sulfidation rates being comparable with the oxidation rate of chromium. Also, alloying of common metals by niobium and molybdenum improve considerably corrosion resistance with respect to highly sulfidizing atmospheres. It has demonstrated that Al.-Mo and Al.-Mo-Si alloys shown excellent resistant to sulfidizing environments, these materials being also simultaneously oxidation resistant. Thus, new prospects have been created for the development of a new generation of coating materials, resistant to multicomponent sulfidizing-oxidizing atmospheres, often encountered in many branches of modern technology. (author)

  20. Managing hydrogen sulfide the natural way

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beasley, T.; Abry, R.G.F. [New Paradigm Gas Processing Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    This paper explores the benefits and costs associated with acid gas injection versus flaring and venting. It provides an update of Shell Paques biological gas desulfurization technology and the world's first high pressure application of the technology at the EnCana Bantry Project. The process is particularly well suited to treat sour (acid) natural gases that are currently being flared. It can also be used as an alternative to acid gas injection. Complete removal of hydrogen sulfide can be achieved by selective biotechnological conversion of hydrogen sulfide to elemental sulfur. Compared to conventional processes, this breakthrough technology achieves greater savings in terms of capital and operational costs. The Shell-Paque process produces up to 50 tonnes of sulfur per day with virtually complete conversion of hydrogen sulfide to elemental sulfur, resulting in no hydrogen sulfide based airborne emissions. 2 refs., 2 tabs., 35 figs.

  1. Inorganic sorbents for concentration of hydrogen sulfide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Present work is devoted to application of inorganic sorbents for concentration of hydrogen sulfide. The elaboration of method is conducted under controlled concentrations of hydrogen sulphide from 1.00 til 0.01 mg/l.

  2. The Search for Interstellar Sulfide Grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Lindsay P.; Messenger, Scott

    2010-01-01

    The lifecycle of sulfur in the galaxy is poorly understood. Fe-sulfide grains are abundant in early solar system materials (e.g. meteorites and comets) and S is highly depleted from the gas phase in cold, dense molecular cloud environments. In stark contrast, sulfur is essentially undepleted from the gas phase in the diffuse interstellar medium, indicating that little sulfur is incorporated into solid grains in this environment. It is widely believed that sulfur is not a component of interstellar dust grains. This is a rather puzzling observation unless Fe-sulfides are not produced in significant quantities in stellar outflows, or their lifetime in the ISM is very short due to rapid destruction. Fe sulfide grains are ubiquitous in cometary samples where they are the dominant host of sulfur. The Fe-sulfides (primarily pyrrhotite; Fe(1-x)S) are common, both as discrete 0.5-10 micron-sized grains and as fine (5-10 nm) nanophase inclusions within amorphous silicate grains. Cometary dust particles contain high abundances of well-preserved presolar silicates and organic matter and we have suggested that they should contain presolar sulfides as well. This hypothesis is supported by the observation of abundant Fe-sulfides grains in dust around pre- and post-main sequence stars inferred from astronomical spectra showing a broad 23 micron IR feature due to FeS. Fe-sulfide grains also occur as inclusions in bona fide circumstellar amorphous silicate grains and as inclusions within deuterium-rich organic matter in cometary dust samples. Our irradiation experiments show that FeS is far more resistant to radiation damage than silicates. Consequently, we expect that Fe sulfide stardust should be as abundant as silicate stardust in solar system materials.

  3. Mechanism of mechanical activation for sulfide ores

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Hui-ping; CHEN Qi-yuan; YIN Zhou-lan; HE Yue-hui; HUANG Bai-yun

    2007-01-01

    Structural changes for mechanically activated pyrite, sphalerite, galena and molybdenite with or without the exposure to ambient air, were systematically investigated using X-ray diffraction analysis(XRD), particle size analysis, gravimetrical method, X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy(XPS) and scanning electron microscopy(SEM), respectively. Based on the above structural changes for mechanically activated sulfide ores and related reports by other researchers, several qualitative rules of the mechanisms and the effects of mechanical activation for sulfide ores are obtained. For brittle sulfide ores with thermal instability, and incomplete cleavage plane or extremely incomplete cleavage plane, the mechanism of mechanical activation is that a great amount of surface reactive sites are formed during their mechanical activation. The effects of mechanical activation are apparent. For brittle sulfide ores with thermal instability, and complete cleavage plane, the mechanism of mechanical activation is that a great amount of surface reactive sites are formed, and lattice deformation happens during their mechanical activation. The effects of mechanical activation are apparent. For brittle sulfide ores with excellent thermal stability, and complete cleavage plane, the mechanism of mechanical activation is that lattice deformation happens during their mechanical activation. The effects of mechanical activation are apparent. For sulfide ores with high toughness, good thermal stability and very excellent complete cleavage plane, the mechanism of mechanical activation is that lattice deformation happens during their mechanical activation, but the lattice deformation ratio is very small. The effects of mechanical activation are worst.

  4. Air-water transfer of hydrogen sulfide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yongsiri, C.; Vollertsen, J.; Rasmussen, M. R.;

    2004-01-01

    The emissions process of hydrogen sulfide was studied to quantify air–water transfer of hydrogen sulfide in sewer networks. Hydrogen sulfide transfer across the air–water interface was investigated at different turbulence levels (expressed in terms of the Froude number) and pH using batch...... experiments. By means of the overall mass–transfer coefficient (KLa), the transfer coefficient of hydrogen sulfide (KLaH2S), referring to total sulfide, was correlated to that of oxygen (KLaO2) (i.e., the reaeration coefficient). Results demonstrate that both turbulence and pH in the water phase play...... a significant role for KLaH2S. An exponential expression is a suitable representation for the relationship between KLaH2S and the Froude number at all pH values studied (4.5 to 8.0). Because of the dissociation of hydrogen sulfide, KLaH2S increased with decreasing pH at a constant turbulence level. Relative...

  5. Sulfide response analysis for sulfide control using a pS electrode in sulfate reducing bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa-Gomez, D K; Cassidy, J; Keesman, K J; Sampaio, R; Lens, P N L

    2014-03-01

    Step changes in the organic loading rate (OLR) through variations in the influent chemical oxygen demand (CODin) concentration or in the hydraulic retention time (HRT) at constant COD/SO4(2-) ratio (0.67) were applied to create sulfide responses for the design of a sulfide control in sulfate reducing bioreactors. The sulfide was measured using a sulfide ion selective electrode (pS) and the values obtained were used to calculate proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller parameters. The experiments were performed in an inverse fluidized bed bioreactor with automated operation using the LabVIEW software version 2009(®). A rapid response and high sulfide increment was obtained through a stepwise increase in the CODin concentration, while a stepwise decrease to the HRT exhibited a slower response with smaller sulfide increment. Irrespective of the way the OLR was decreased, the pS response showed a time-varying behavior due to sulfide accumulation (HRT change) or utilization of substrate sources that were not accounted for (CODin change). The pS electrode response, however, showed to be informative for applications in sulfate reducing bioreactors. Nevertheless, the recorded pS values need to be corrected for pH variations and high sulfide concentrations (>200 mg/L). PMID:24361702

  6. Stratospheric carbonyl sulfide (OCS) burden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloss, Corinna; Walker, Kaley A.; Deshler, Terry; von Hobe, Marc

    2015-04-01

    An estimation of the global stratospheric burden of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) calculated using satellite based measurements from the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment - Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS) will be presented. OCS is the most abundant sulfur containing gas in the atmosphere in the absence of volcanic eruptions. With a long lifetime of 2-6 years it reaches the stratosphere where it is photolyzed and the sulfur oxidized and condensed to aerosols, contributing to the stratospheric aerosol layer. The aerosol layer is the one factor of the middle-atmosphere with a direct impact on the Earth's climate by scattering incoming solar radiation back to space. Therefore it is crucial to understand and estimate the different processes and abundances of the species contributing to the aerosol layer. However, the exact amount of OCS in the stratosphere has not been quantified yet. A study on the OCS mixing ratio distribution based on ACE-FTS data has already been made by Barkley et al. (2008), also giving an estimation for the total atmospheric OCS mass. ACE-FTS is an infrared solar occultation spectrometer providing high- resolution profile observations since 2004. In the scope of this work the focus lies on the stratospheric OCS burden, calculated by integrating the ACE profiles. A global overview on the stratospheric OCS amount in the past and present based on the ACE data as well as a look at regional and seasonal variability will be given. Furthermore, the results of this work will be useful for further studies on OCS fluxes and lifetimes, and in quantifying the contribution of OCS to the global stratospheric sulfur burden. Barkley et al., 2008, Geophys. Res. Lett., 35, L14810.

  7. Hydrogen Sulfide and Urogenital Tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Villa Bianca, Roberta d'Emmanuele; Cirino, Giuseppe; Sorrentino, Raffaella

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter the role played by H2S in the physiopathology of urogenital tract revising animal and human data available in the current relevant literature is discussed. H2S pathway has been demonstrated to be involved in the mechanism underlying penile erection in human and experimental animal. Both cystathionine-β synthase (CBS) and cystathionine-γ lyase (CSE) are expressed in the human corpus cavernosum and exogenous H2S relaxes isolated human corpus cavernosum strips in an endothelium-independent manner. Hydrogen sulfide pathway also accounts for the direct vasodilatory effect operated by testosterone on isolated vessels. Convincing evidence suggests that H2S can influence the cGMP pathway by inhibiting the phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE-5) activity. All these findings taken together suggest an important role for the H2S pathway in human corpus cavernosum homeostasis. However, H2S effect is not confined to human corpus cavernosum but also plays an important role in human bladder. Human bladder expresses mainly CBS and generates in vitro detectable amount of H2S. In addition the bladder relaxant effect of the PDE-5 inhibitor sildenafil involves H2S as mediator. In conclusion the H2S pathway is not only involved in penile erection but also plays a role in bladder homeostasis. In addition the finding that it involved in the mechanism of action of PDE-5 inhibitors strongly suggests that modulation of this pathway can represent a therapeutic target for the treatment of erectile dysfunction and bladder diseases. PMID:26162831

  8. Terahertz spectroscopy of hydrogen sulfide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pure rotational transitions of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in its ground and first excited vibrational states have been recorded at room temperature. The spectrum comprises an average of 1020 scans at 0.005 cm−1 resolution recorded in the region 45–360 cm−1 (1.4 to 10.5 THz) with a globar continuum source using a Fourier transform spectrometer located at the AILES beamline of the SOLEIL synchrotron. Over 2400 rotational lines have been detected belonging to ground vibrational state transitions of the four isotopologues H232S, H233S, H234S, and H236S observed in natural abundance. 65% of these lines are recorded and assigned for the first time, sampling levels as high as J=26 and Ka=17 for H232S. 320 pure rotational transitions of H232S in its first excited bending vibrational state are recorded and analysed for the first time and 86 transitions for H234S, where some of these transitions belong to new experimental energy levels. Rotational constants have been fitted for all the isotopologues in both vibrational states using a standard effective Hamiltonian approach. Comprehensive comparisons are made with previously available data as well as the data available in HITRAN, CDMS, and JPL databases. The 91 transitions assigned to H236S give the first proper characterization of its pure rotational spectrum. -- Highlights: • Over 2400 lines are measured and assigned in the 45–360 cm−1 region. • New rotational transitions are assigned for four isotopologues of H2S. • Rotational transitions within the first excited state of H2S are assigned for the first time. • An improved rotational line list is presented

  9. Phase Engineering of 2D Tin Sulfides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutlu, Zafer; Wu, Ryan J; Wickramaratne, Darshana; Shahrezaei, Sina; Liu, Chueh; Temiz, Selcuk; Patalano, Andrew; Ozkan, Mihrimah; Lake, Roger K; Mkhoyan, K A; Ozkan, Cengiz S

    2016-06-01

    Tin sulfides can exist in a variety of phases and polytypes due to the different oxidation states of Sn. A subset of these phases and polytypes take the form of layered 2D structures that give rise to a wide host of electronic and optical properties. Hence, achieving control over the phase, polytype, and thickness of tin sulfides is necessary to utilize this wide range of properties exhibited by the compound. This study reports on phase-selective growth of both hexagonal tin (IV) sulfide SnS2 and orthorhombic tin (II) sulfide SnS crystals with diameters of over tens of microns on SiO2 substrates through atmospheric pressure vapor-phase method in a conventional horizontal quartz tube furnace with SnO2 and S powders as the source materials. Detailed characterization of each phase of tin sulfide crystals is performed using various microscopy and spectroscopy methods, and the results are corroborated by ab initio density functional theory calculations. PMID:27099950

  10. Functional consortium for denitrifying sulfide removal process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chuan [Harbin Inst. of Technology (CN). State Key Lab. of Water Resource and Environment (SKLWRE); Harbin Inst. of Technology (China). School of Municipal and Environmental Engineering; Ren, Nanqi; Wang, Aijie [Harbin Inst. of Technology (CN). State Key Lab. of Water Resource and Environment (SKLWRE); Liu, Lihong [Harbin Inst. of Technology (China). School of Municipal and Environmental Engineering; Lee, Duu-Jong [Harbin Inst. of Technology (CN). State Key Lab. of Water Resource and Environment (SKLWRE); National Taiwan Univ., Taipei (China). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2010-03-15

    Denitrifying sulfide removal (DSR) process simultaneously converts sulfide, nitrate, and chemical oxygen demand from industrial wastewaters to elemental sulfur, nitrogen gas, and carbon dioxide, respectively. This investigation utilizes a dilution-to-extinction approach at 10{sup -2} to 10{sup -6} dilutions to elucidate the correlation between the composition of the microbial community and the DSR performance. In the original suspension and in 10{sup -2} dilution, the strains Stenotrophomonas sp., Thauera sp., and Azoarcus sp. are the heterotrophic denitrifiers and the strains Paracoccus sp. and Pseudomonas sp. are the sulfide-oxidizing denitrifers. The 10{sup -4} dilution is identified as the functional consortium for the present DSR system, which comprises two functional strains, Stenotrophomonas sp. strain Paracoccus sp. At 10{sup -6} dilution, all DSR performance was lost. The functions of the constituent cells in the DSR granules were discussed based on data obtained using the dilution-to-extinction approach. (orig.)

  11. Transition Metal Catalyzed Synthesis of Aryl Sulfides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad C. Eichman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of aryl sulfides in biologically active compounds has resulted in the development of new methods to form carbon-sulfur bonds. The synthesis of aryl sulfides via metal catalysis has significantly increased in recent years. Historically, thiolates and sulfides have been thought to plague catalyst activity in the presence of transition metals. Indeed, strong coordination of thiolates and thioethers to transition metals can often hinder catalytic activity; however, various catalysts are able to withstand catalyst deactivation and form aryl carbon-sulfur bonds in high-yielding transformations. This review discusses the metal-catalyzed arylation of thiols and the use of disulfides as metal-thiolate precursors for the formation of C-S bonds.

  12. Solar thermal extraction of copper from sulfides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winkel, L.; Guesdon, C.; Sturzenegger, M.

    2003-03-01

    With the aim to develop a solar-driven process for the extraction of copper from sulfide concentrates re-search on the decomposition of copper sulfides under inert atmospheres has been initiated. Thermogravimetric measurements on chalcocite (Cu{sub 2}S) revealed that copper is formed already at 1823 K. Chalcopyrite (CuFeS{sub 2}) also disintegrates at this temperature, although at a lower rate. Copper and iron have been identified in the solid residue. The results confirm the feasibility of copper extraction by direct decomposition of sulfides under atmospheric pressure. The decomposition under inert atmosphere prevents generation of SO{sub 2}, and is beneficial to the removal of volatile impurities. Chemical equilibrium calculations for CuFeS{sub 2} contaminated with enargite (Cu{sub 3}AsS{sub 4}) have shown that the absence of an oxidic slag allows for a complete evaporation of arsenic and subsequent separation. (author)

  13. Iron-sulfide crystals in probe deposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Karin; Frandsen, Flemming

    1998-01-01

    Iron-sulfides were observed in deposits collected on a probe inserted at the top of the furnace of a coal-fired power station in Denmark. The chemical composition of the iron-sulfides is equivalent to pyrrhotite (FeS). The pyrrhotites are present as crystals and, based on the shape of the crystals......, it was deduced that they were not deposited but instead grew within the deposit. The presence of unburned char particles within the deposits supports the concept that a reducing environment existed in the deposits. Two processes are proposed for explaining the existence of pyrrhotite crystals within...... a deposit: (1) impact of low viscous droplets of iron sulfide; and (2) sulfur diffusion. Previous research on the influence of pyrite on slagging focused on the decomposition of pyrite into pyrrhotite and especially on the oxidation stage of this product during impact on the heat transfer surfaces...

  14. Modeling of Sulfide Microenvironments on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenzer, S. P.; Bridges, J. C.; McAdam, A.; Steer, E. D.; Conrad, P. G.; Kelley, S. P.; Wiens, R. C.; Mangold, N.; Grotzinger, J.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Franz, H. B.; Sutter, B.

    2016-01-01

    Yellowknife Bay (YKB; sol 124-198) is the second site that the Mars Science Laboratory Rover Curiosity investigated in detail on its mission in Gale Crater. YKB represents lake bed sediments from an overall neutral pH, low salinity environment, with a mineralogical composition which includes Ca-sulfates, Fe oxide/hydroxides, Fe-sulfides, amorphous material, and trioctahedral phyllosilicates. We investigate whether sulfide alteration could be associated with ancient habitable microenvironments in the Gale mudstones. Some textural evidence for such alteration may be pre-sent in the nodules present in the mudstone.

  15. Sol-gel processing of metal sulfides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanic, Vesha

    Metal sulfides were synthesised via a sol-gel process using various metal alkoxides and hydrogen sulfide in toluene. Colloidal gels were prepared from germanium ethoxide, germanium isopropoxide, zinc tert-butoxide and tungsten (VI) ethoxide, whereas colloidal powder was produced from tungsten (V) dichloride ethoxide. Special precautions were necessary to protect the reaction mixture from water contamination which produced metal oxides. Results indicated that the main source of water is the hydrogen sulfide gas. In addition, synthesis of metal sulfides from a mixture of metal oxide and sulfide was demonstrated by the example of monoclinic germanium disulfide. It was produced by reaction of the sol-gel product with sulfur. Heat treatment of the sol-gel product and sulfur yielded single phase GeSsb2. The sol-gel prepared materials and their heat treated products were characterized by various methods. A chemical kinetics study of the functional groups -OR, -SH and Ssp{2-} was carried out for the sol-gel processing of GeSsb2 from of hydrogen sulfide and two different alkoxides, germanium ethoxide and germanium isopropoxide. The study was performed for different concentrations of precursors at different molar ratios and temperatures. The results indicate that the proposed reaction mechanism was simplified under appropriate reaction conditions. Experimentally determined rate constants of thiolysis and condensations demonstrate that thiolysis is slow and that condensations are fast steps, regardless of the studied reaction conditions. A study of the temperature effect on the reaction rate constant shows that it increases with temperature in accord with both Arrhenius law and transition-state theory. Activation energies, Esba, and activation parameters DeltaSsp{ddagger}, DeltaHsp{ddagger} and DeltaGsp{ddagger}, were determined for thiolysis and condensation reactions. The potentiometric tiration method was used for quantitative determination of germanium sulfide and

  16. Acute inhalation toxicity of carbonyl sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, J.M.; Hahn, F.F.; Barr, E.B. [and others

    1995-12-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS), a colorless gas, is a side product of industrial procedures sure as coal hydrogenation and gasification. It is structurally related to and is a metabolite of carbon disulfide. COS is metabolized in the body by carbonic anhydrase to hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), which is thought to be responsible for COS toxicity. No threshold limit value for COS has been established. Results of these studies indicate COS (with an LC{sub 50} of 590 ppm) is slightly less acutely toxic than H{sub 2}S (LC{sub 50} of 440 ppm).

  17. Membrane for hydrogen recovery from streams containing hydrogen sulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Pradeep K.

    2007-01-16

    A membrane for hydrogen recovery from streams containing hydrogen sulfide is provided. The membrane comprises a substrate, a hydrogen permeable first membrane layer deposited on the substrate, and a second membrane layer deposited on the first layer. The second layer contains sulfides of transition metals and positioned on the on a feed side of the hydrogen sulfide stream. The present invention also includes a method for the direct decomposition of hydrogen sulfide to hydrogen and sulfur.

  18. The effect of sulfide inhibition on the ANAMMOX process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Ren-Cun; Yang, Guang-Feng; Zhang, Qian-Qian; Ma, Chun; Yu, Jin-Jin; Xing, Bao-Shan

    2013-03-01

    The feasibility of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (ANAMMOX) process to treat wastewaters containing sulfide was studied in this work. Serum bottles were used as experimental containers in batch tests to analyze the short-term response of the ANAMMOX process under sulfide stress. The IC(50) of sulfide-S for ANAMMOX biomass was substrates-dependent and was calculated to be 264 mg L(-1) at an initial total nitrogen level of 200 mg L(-1) (molar ratio of ammonium and nitrite was 1:1). The long-term effects and the performance recovery under sulfide stress were continuously monitored and evaluated in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor. The performance of the ANAMMOX system was halved at an sulfide-S level of 32 mg L(-1) within 13 days; however, the nitrogen removal rate (NRR) decreased by only 17.2% within 18 days at an sulfide-S concentration of 40 mg L(-1) after long-time acclimatization of sludge in the presence of sulfide. The ANAMMOX performance recovered under sulfide-S level of 8 mg L(-1) with a steady NRR increasing speed, linear relationship between the NRR and operation time. The synchronic reduce in the specific ANAMMOX activity and the biomass extended the apparent doubling time of the nitrogen removal capacity and decreased biomass growth rate. PMID:23273856

  19. T.O.C.S. : Hydrogen Sulfide Remission System

    OpenAIRE

    ECT Team, Purdue

    2007-01-01

    BioEnviroTech, Inc., (BET) developed Toxicity Odor Corrosion Sulfides (T.O.C.S.) Remission System for hydrogen sulfide reduction in municipal and industrial wastewater sewer, lift stations and force mains. This safe and cost effective biotreatment technology uses safe and natural bacteria to interrupt sulfide generation.

  20. Measurement and biological significance of the volatile sulfur compounds hydrogen sulfide, methanethiol and dimethyl sulfide in various biological matrices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tangerman, Albert

    2009-01-01

    This review deals with the measurement of the volatile Sulfur compounds hydrogen sulfide, methanethiol and dimethyl sulfide in various biological matrices of rats and humans (blood, serum, tissues, urine, breath, feces and flatus). Hydrogen sulfide and methanethiol both contain the active thiol (-SH

  1. The diagenesis of carbohydrates by hydrogen sulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mango, Frank D.

    1983-08-01

    Carbohydrates react with hydrogen sulfide under low temperature (100° to 200°C) yielding a variety of organosulfur compounds including thiophenes, thiols, sulfides and sulfones. A polymer is also produced, whose elemental composition is within the range of natural coals. When reductive dehydration is carried out in the presence of hydrocarbon, organosulfur compounds are formed in the carbon number range of the hydrocarbon used. In these processes, an active hydrogen transfer catalyst is produced which facilitates the passage of hydrogen between normal paraffins and saccharide units, distributing sulfur between these two families primarily in the form of thiophene rings. The simplicity of these systems - H 2S, carbohydrates, H 2O, hydrocarbon - and the facility of the chemistry would suggest that the carbohydrates and hydrogen sulfide may be important agents in the diagenetic processes leading to petroleum and coal. Carbohydrate reduction by hydrogen sulfide may constitute an important route through which certain organosulfur compounds found in petroleum and coal entered these materials in early diagenesis.

  2. Support Effect in Hydrodesulfurization over Ruthenium Sulfide

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gulková, Daniela; Kaluža, Luděk; Vít, Zdeněk; Zdražil, Miroslav

    Prague : JHI, 2008, s. 58-s. 59. [Symposium on Catalysis /40./. Prague (CZ), 03.11.2008-05.11.2008] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/06/0705 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : ruthenium sulfide * hydrodesulfurization * support Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  3. Support Effect in Hydrodesulfurization over Ruthenium Sulfide

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gulková, Daniela; Kaluža, Luděk; Vít, Zdeněk; Zdražil, Miroslav

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 2 (2009), s. 146-149. ISSN 1337-7027 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/06/0705 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : ruthenium sulfide * hydrodesulfurization * support effect Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  4. Monitoring sulfide and sulfate-reducing bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanner, R.S.

    1995-12-31

    Simple yet precise and accurate methods for monitoring sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and sulfide remain useful for the study of bacterial souring and corrosion. Test kits are available to measure sulfide in field samples. A more precise methylene blue sulfide assay for both field and laboratory studies is described here. Improved media, compared to that in API RP-38, for enumeration of SRB have been formulated. One of these, API-RST, contained cysteine (1.1 mM) as a reducing agent, which may be a confounding source of sulfide. While cysteine was required for rapid enumeration of SRB from environmental samples, the concentration of cysteine in medium could be reduced to 0.4 mM. It was also determined that elevated levels of yeast extract (>1 g/liter) could interfere with enumeration of SRB from environmental samples. The API-RST medium was modified to a RST-11 medium. Other changes in medium composition, in addition to reduction of cysteine, included reduction of the concentration of phosphate from 3.4 mM to 2.2 mM, reduction of the concentration of ferrous iron from 0.8 mM to 0.5 mM and preparation of a stock mineral solution to ease medium preparation. SRB from environmental samples could be enumerated in a week in this medium.

  5. Reaction between Hydrogen Sulfide and Limestone Calcines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hartman, Miloslav; Svoboda, Karel; Trnka, Otakar; Čermák, Jiří

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 10 (2002), s. 2392-2398. ISSN 0888-5885 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4072711; GA AV ČR IAA4072801 Keywords : hydrogen sulfide * limestone calcines * desulfurization Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.247, year: 2002

  6. Microbial oxidation of mixtures of methylmercaptan and hydrogen sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniyan, A; Kolhatkar, R; Sublette, K L; Beitle, R

    1998-01-01

    Refinery spent-sulfidic caustic, containing only inorganic sulfides, has previously been shown to be amenable to biotreatment with Thiobacillus denitrificans strain F with complete oxidation of sulfides to sulfate. However, many spent caustics contain mercaptans that cannot be metabolized by this strict autotroph. An aerobic enrichment culture was developed from mixed Thiobacilli and activated sludge that was capable of simultaneous oxidation of inorganic sulfide and mercaptans using hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and methylmercaptan (MeSH) gas feeds used to simulate the inorganic and organic sulfur of a spent-sulfidic caustic. The enrichment culture was also capable of biotreatment of an actual mercaptan-containing, spent-sulfidic caustic but at lower rates than predicted by operation on MeSH and H2S fed to the culture in the gas phase, indicating that the caustic contained other inhibitory components. PMID:18576062

  7. Sulfide Intrusion and Detoxification in the Seagrass Zostera marina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harald Hasler-Sheetal

    Full Text Available Gaseous sulfide intrusion into seagrasses growing in sulfidic sediments causes little or no harm to the plant, indicating the presence of an unknown sulfide tolerance or detoxification mechanism. We assessed such mechanism in the seagrass Zostera marina in the laboratory and in the field with scanning electron microscopy coupled to energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, chromatographic and spectrophotometric methods, and stable isotope tracing coupled with a mass balance of sulfur compounds. We found that Z. marina detoxified gaseous sediment-derived sulfide through incorporation and that most of the detoxification occurred in underground tissues, where sulfide intrusion was greatest. Elemental sulfur was a major detoxification compound, precipitating on the inner wall of the aerenchyma of underground tissues. Sulfide was metabolized into thiols and entered the plant sulfur metabolism as well as being stored as sulfate throughout the plant. We conclude that avoidance of sulfide exposure by reoxidation of sulfide in the rhizosphere or aerenchyma and tolerance of sulfide intrusion by incorporation of sulfur in the plant are likely major survival strategies of seagrasses in sulfidic sediments.

  8. The Evolution of Sulfide Tolerance in the Cyanobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Scott R.; Bebout, Brad M.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Understanding how the function of extant microorganisms has recorded both their evolutionary histories and their past interactions with the environment is a stated goal of astrobiology. We are taking a multidisciplinary approach to investigate the diversification of sulfide tolerance mechanisms in the cyanobacteria, which vary both in their degree of exposure to sulfide and in their capacity to tolerate this inhibitor of photosynthetic electron transport. Since conditions were very reducing during the first part of Earth's history and detrital sulfides have been found in Archean sediments, mechanisms conferring sulfide tolerance may have been important for the evolutionary success of the ancestors of extant cyanobacteria. Two tolerance mechanisms have been identified in this group: (1) resistance of photosystem II, the principal target of sulfide toxicity; and (2) maintenance of the ability to fix carbon despite photosystem II inhibition by utilizing sulfide as an electron donor in photosystem I - dependent, anoxygenic photosynthesis. We are presently collecting comparative data on aspects of sulfide physiology for laboratory clones isolated from a variety of habitats. These data will be analyzed within a phylogenetic framework inferred from molecular sequence data collected for these clones to test how frequently different mechanisms of tolerance have evolved and which tolerance mechanism evolved first. In addition, by analyzing these physiological data together with environmental sulfide data collected from our research sites using microelectrodes, we can also test whether the breadth of an organism's sulfide tolerance can be predicted from the magnitude of variation in environmental sulfide concentration it has experienced in its recent evolutionary past and whether greater average sulfide concentration and/or temporal variability in sulfide favors the evolution of a particular mechanism of sulfide tolerance.

  9. Iron-sulfide redox flow batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Guan-Guang; Yang, Zhenguo; Li, Liyu; Kim, Soowhan; Liu, Jun; Graff, Gordon L

    2013-12-17

    Iron-sulfide redox flow battery (RFB) systems can be advantageous for energy storage, particularly when the electrolytes have pH values greater than 6. Such systems can exhibit excellent energy conversion efficiency and stability and can utilize low-cost materials that are relatively safer and more environmentally friendly. One example of an iron-sulfide RFB is characterized by a positive electrolyte that comprises Fe(III) and/or Fe(II) in a positive electrolyte supporting solution, a negative electrolyte that comprises S.sup.2- and/or S in a negative electrolyte supporting solution, and a membrane, or a separator, that separates the positive electrolyte and electrode from the negative electrolyte and electrode.

  10. Iron-sulfide redox flow batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Guanguang; Yang, Zhenguo; Li, Liyu; Kim, Soowhan; Liu, Jun; Graff, Gordon L

    2016-06-14

    Iron-sulfide redox flow battery (RFB) systems can be advantageous for energy storage, particularly when the electrolytes have pH values greater than 6. Such systems can exhibit excellent energy conversion efficiency and stability and can utilize low-cost materials that are relatively safer and more environmentally friendly. One example of an iron-sulfide RFB is characterized by a positive electrolyte that comprises Fe(III) and/or Fe(II) in a positive electrolyte supporting solution, a negative electrolyte that comprises S.sup.2- and/or S in a negative electrolyte supporting solution, and a membrane, or a separator, that separates the positive electrolyte and electrode from the negative electrolyte and electrode.

  11. Oxidation of Reduced Sulfur Species: Carbonyl Sulfide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glarborg, Peter; Marshall, Paul

    2013-01-01

    A detailed chemical kinetic model for oxidation of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) has been developed, based on a critical evaluation of data from the literature. The mechanism has been validated against experimental results from batch reactors, flow reactors, and shock tubes. The model predicts satisfact......A detailed chemical kinetic model for oxidation of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) has been developed, based on a critical evaluation of data from the literature. The mechanism has been validated against experimental results from batch reactors, flow reactors, and shock tubes. The model predicts...... satisfactorily oxidation of OCS over a wide range of stoichiometric air–fuel ratios (0.5 ≤λ≤7.3), temperatures (450–1700 K), and pressures (0.02–3.0 atm) under dry conditions. The governing reaction mechanisms are outlined based on calculations with the kinetic model. The oxidation rate of OCS is controlled...

  12. Subsurface heaters with low sulfidation rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John, Randy Carl; Vinegar, Harold J

    2013-12-10

    A system for heating a hydrocarbon containing formation includes a heater having an elongated ferromagnetic metal heater section. The heater is located in an opening in a formation. The heater section is configured to heat the hydrocarbon containing formation. The exposed ferromagnetic metal has a sulfidation rate that goes down with increasing temperature of the heater, when the heater is in a selected temperature range.

  13. Hydrogen sulfide prodrugs-a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yueqin; Ji, Xingyue; Ji, Kaili; Wang, Binghe

    2015-09-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is recognized as one of three gasotransmitters together with nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO). As a signaling molecule, H2S plays an important role in physiology and shows great potential in pharmaceutical applications. Along this line, there is a need for the development of H2S prodrugs for various reasons. In this review, we summarize different H2S prodrugs, their chemical properties, and some of their potential therapeutic applications. PMID:26579468

  14. Hydrogen sulfide prodrugs—a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yueqin Zheng

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide (H2S is recognized as one of three gasotransmitters together with nitric oxide (NO and carbon monoxide (CO. As a signaling molecule, H2S plays an important role in physiology and shows great potential in pharmaceutical applications. Along this line, there is a need for the development of H2S prodrugs for various reasons. In this review, we summarize different H2S prodrugs, their chemical properties, and some of their potential therapeutic applications.

  15. Efficiently Dispersing Carbon Nanotubes in Polyphenylene Sulfide

    OpenAIRE

    Sommer, Kevin M; Pipes, R. Byron

    2013-01-01

    Thermal plastics are replacing conventional metals in the aerospace, sporting, electronics, and other industries. Thermal plastics are able to withstand relatively high temperatures, have good fatigue properties, and are lighter than metals. Unfortunately, they are not very electrically conductive. However, adding carbon nanotubes to thermal plastics such as polyphenylene sulfide (PPS) can drastically increase the plastic's conductivity at a low weight percent of nanotubes called the percolat...

  16. Microaeration for hydrogen sulfide removal in UASB reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krayzelova, Lucie; Bartacek, Jan; Kolesarova, Nina; Jenicek, Pavel

    2014-11-01

    The removal of hydrogen sulfide from biogas by microaeration was studied in Up-flow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket (UASB) reactors treating synthetic brewery wastewater. A fully anaerobic UASB reactor served as a control while air was dosed into a microaerobic UASB reactor (UMSB). After a year of operation, sulfur balance was described in both reactors. In UASB, sulfur was mainly presented in the effluent as sulfide (49%) and in biogas as hydrogen sulfide (34%). In UMSB, 74% of sulfur was detected in the effluent (41% being sulfide and 33% being elemental sulfur), 10% accumulated in headspace as elemental sulfur and 9% escaped in biogas as hydrogen sulfide. The efficiency of hydrogen sulfide removal in UMSB was on average 73%. Microaeration did not cause any decrease in COD removal or methanogenic activity in UMSB and the elemental sulfur produced by microaeration did not accumulate in granular sludge. PMID:25270045

  17. Simultaneous removal of sulfide, nitrate and acetate: Kinetic modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biological removal of sulfide, nitrate and chemical oxygen demand (COD) simultaneously from industrial wastewaters to elementary sulfur (S0), N2, and CO2, or named the denitrifying sulfide (DSR) process, is a cost effective and environmentally friendly treatment process for high strength sulfide and nitrate laden organic wastewater. Kinetic model for the DSR process was established for the first time on the basis of Activated Sludge Model No. 1 (ASM1). The DSR experiments were conducted at influent sulfide concentrations of 200-800 mg/L, whose results calibrate the model parameters. The model correlates well with the DSR process dynamics. By introducing the switch function and the inhibition function, the competition between autotrophic and heterotrophic denitrifiers is quantitatively described and the degree of inhibition of sulfide on heterotrophic denitrifiers is realized. The model output indicates that the DSR reactor can work well at 0.5 1000 mg/L influent sulfide, however, the DSR system will break down.

  18. Study on the sulfidation behavior of smithsonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Dandan; Wen, Shuming, E-mail: shmwen@126.com; Deng, Jiushuai, E-mail: dengshuai689@163.com; Liu, Jian; Mao, Yingbo

    2015-02-28

    Highlights: • Zeta potential showed that the pH{sub IEP} of smithsonite decreased from 7.7 to 6. • ICP test showed the gradual reduction of C{sub S} in the solution. • SEM showed that the mineral surface was partially changed to ZnS film. • XPS indicated that the presence of a characteristic signal peak of sulfur ions. - Abstract: Zinc extraction from low-grade mineral resources of oxidized zinc has recently become a focus of study. Sulfidation is an important process in oxidized ore flotation. In this study, the influence of sulfur ion adsorption on smithsonite surface was investigated with the use of zeta potential, inductively coupled plasma (ICP), scanning electron microscope (SEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic studies. Zeta potential measurements of sodium sulfide showed that sulfur ions were adsorbed onto the surface of pure smithsonite, as evidenced by the increased negative charge and the decrease in the pH{sub IEP} of smithsonite from 7.7 to 6 after sodium sulfide treatment. The ICP test revealed the gradual reduction in sulfur ion adsorption onto the surface of smithsonite in pulp sulfur. After 30 min of absorption, C{sub S} in the solution declined from 1000 × 10{sup −6} mol/L to 1.4 × 10{sup −6} mol/L. SEM results showed that the mineral surface was partially changed to ZnS film after sodium sulfide treatment, whereas EDS analysis results showed that 2% S is contained on the smithsonite surface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results indicated the presence of a characteristic signal peak of sulfur ions after sulfidation. Sulfur concentration increased to 11.89%, whereas oxygen concentration decreased from 42.31% to 13.74%. Sulfur ions were not only present during chemical adsorption, but were also incorporated into the crystal lattices of minerals by the exchange reaction between S{sup 2−} and CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} ions.

  19. Effects of dispersed sulfides in bronze under line contact conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiro Sato

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A sintered bronze system is applied to plane bearings with some lubricants. A bronze-based, sulfide-dispersed Cu alloy was developed via sintering. Sulfides had some functions, reduction of friction resistance, preventing scoring and seizure. Effects of the developed sulfide-containing bronze were investigated using a journal-type testing apparatus in wet conditions; results indicate that the developed bronze may have some anti-scoring properties.

  20. Extraction of Nanosized Cobalt Sulfide from Spent Hydrocracking Catalyst

    OpenAIRE

    Samia A. Kosa; Hegazy, Eman Z.

    2013-01-01

    The processes used for the extraction of metals (Co, Mo, and Al) from spent hydrotreating catalysts were investigated in this study. A detailed mechanism of the metal extraction process is described. Additionally, a simulation study was performed to understand the sulfidizing mechanism. The suggested separation procedure was effective and achieved an extraction of approximately 80–90%. In addition, the sulfidization mechanism was identified. This sulfidizing process for Co was found to involv...

  1. Investigation into leaching of indium-containing sulfide cake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data are given of laboratory investigations into indium leaching from commercial-grade sulfide cake. Two indium extraction methods are studied: exchange sulfide decomposition by blue vitriol treatment, sulfide destruction by means of an oxidizer where manganese ore containing manganese dioxide and zinc cake containing zinc ferrite have been used. The influence of the reagent consumption temperature, duration of leaching on the indium extraction is estimated as well as into on the Copper and arsenic transport into the solution. Optimal conditions for the indium extraction from sulfide cake under salt leaching and oxidizing treatment are established

  2. Limitation of Sulfide Capacity Concept for Molten Slags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, In-Ho; Moosavi-Khoonsari, Elmira

    2016-04-01

    The sulfide capacity concept has been widely used in pyrometallurgy to define sulfur removal capacities of slags. Typically, the sulfide capacity is considered to be a unique slag property depending only on temperature regardless of partial pressures of oxygen and sulfur. In the present study, it is demonstrated that sulfide capacities of slags in particular those of Na2O-containing slags can vary with partial pressures of oxygen and sulfur due to large solubility of sulfide in Na2O-containing slag systems.

  3. Recent findings on sinks for sulfide in gravity sewer networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Asbjørn Haaning; Hvitved-Jacobsen, Thorkild; Vollertsen, Jes

    2006-01-01

    Sulfide buildup in sewer networks is associated with several problems, including health impacts, corrosion of sewer structures and odor nuisance. In recent years, significant advances in the knowledge of the major processes governing sulfide buildup in sewer networks have been made. This paper...... summarizes this newly obtained knowledge and emphasizes important implications of the findings. Model simulations of the in-sewer processes important for the sulfur cycle showed that sulfide oxidation in the wetted biofilm is typically the most important sink for dissolved sulfide in gravity sewers. However...

  4. Carbon steel protection in G.S. (Girlder sulfide) plants. Iron sulfide scales formation conditions. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An ASTM A 516 degree 60 carbon steel superficial protection technique submitted to a hydrogen-water sulfide corrosive medium at 2 MPa of pressure and 40-125 deg C forming on itself an iron sulfide layer was tested. Studies on pH influence, temperature, passivating mean characteristics and exposure time as well as the mechanical resistance of sulfide layers to erosion are included. (Author)

  5. MEASURING METAL SULFIDE COMPLEXES IN OXIC RIVER WATERS WITH SQUARE WAVE VOLTAMMETRY. (R825395)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A sulfide identification protocol was developed to quantify specific metal sulfides that could exist in river water. Using a series of acid additions, nitrogen purges, and voltammetric analyses, metal sulfides were identified and semiquantified in three specific gr...

  6. Normal State of the Metallic Hydrogen Sulfide

    OpenAIRE

    Kudryashov, Nikolay A.; Kutukov, Alexander A.; Mazur, Evgeny A.

    2016-01-01

    Generalized theory of the normal properties of the metal in the case of the electron-phonon (EP) systems with not constant density of electronic states is used to examine the normal state of the SH3 and SH2 phase of the hydrogen sulfide at different pressures. The frequency dependence of the real and imaginary part of the self-energy part (SP) of the electron Green's function, the real and imaginary part of the complex renormalization of the electron mass, the real and imaginary part of the c...

  7. Solubility of hydrogen sulfide in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The solubility of hydrogen sulfide in water, which is of importance in the design and analysis of the dual temperature process for the production of heavy water, has been measured in the temperature range 100 - 1800C at pressures up to 6670 kPa or the hydrate/H2S-rich liquid locus, whichever is lower at the particular temperature. Limited vapor phase data at 900, 1200, and 1500C were also obtained. Henry's coefficients have been determined from the experimental data. (orig./HK)

  8. 21 CFR 73.2995 - Luminescent zinc sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... coloring externally applied facial makeup preparations and nail polish included under § 720.4(c)(7)(ix) and... zinc sulfide in facial makeup preparations shall not exceed 10 percent by weight of the final product. (2) Facial makeup preparations containing luminescent zinc sulfide are intended for use only...

  9. Effect of Soluble Sulfide on the Activity of Luminescent Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Wang

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Sulfide is an important water pollutant widely found in industrial waste water that has attracted much attention. S2−, as a weak acidic anion, is easy hydrolyzed to HS and H2S in aqueous solution. In this study, biological tests were performed to establish the toxicity of sulfide solutions on luminescent bacteria. Considering the sulfide solution was contained three substances—S2−, HS and H2S—the toxicity test was performed at different pH values to investigate which form of sulfide increased light emission and which reduced light emission. It was shown that the EC50 values were close at pH 7.4, 8.0 and 9.0 which were higher than pH 5 and 10. The light emission and sulfide concentrations displayed an inverse exponential dose-response relationship within a certain concentration range at pH 5, 6.5 and 10. The same phenomenon occurred for the high concentration of sulfide at pH 7.4, 8 and 9, in which the concentration of sulfide was HS >> H2S > S2−. An opposite hormesis-effect appeared at the low concentrations of sulfide.

  10. 40 CFR 425.03 - Sulfide analytical methods and applicability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sulfide analytical methods and applicability. 425.03 Section 425.03 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... § 425.03 Sulfide analytical methods and applicability. (a) The potassium ferricyanide titration...

  11. First detection of doubly deuterated hydrogen sulfide

    CERN Document Server

    Vastel, C; Ceccarelli, C; Pearson, J

    2003-01-01

    This work was carried out with using the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory and presents the observational study of HDS and D2S towards a sample of Class 0 sources, and dense cores. We report the first detection of doubly deuterated hydrogen sulfide (D2S) in two dense cores and analyze the chemistry of these molecules aiming to help understand the deuteration processes in the interstellar medium. The observed values of the D2S/HDS ratio, and upper limits, require an atomic D/H ratio in the accreting gas of 0.1-1. The study presented in this Letter supports the hypothesis that formaldehyde, methanol and hydrogen sulfide are formed on the grain surfaces, during the cold pre-stellar core phase, where the CO depleted gas has large atomic D/H ratios. The high values for the D/H ratios are consistent with the predictions of a recent gas-phase chemical model that includes H3+ and its deuterated isotopomers, H2D+, D2H+ and D3+ (Roberts et al. 2003).

  12. Hydrogen Sulfide and Polysulfides as Biological Mediators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideo Kimura

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide (H2S is recognized as a biological mediator with various roles such as neuromodulation, regulation of the vascular tone, cytoprotection, anti-inflammation, oxygen sensing, angiogenesis, and generation of mitochondrial energy. It is produced by cystathionine β-synthase (CBS, cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE, and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (3MST. The activity of CBS is enhanced by S-adenosyl methionine (SAM and glutathionylation, while it is inhibited by nitric oxide (NO and carbon monoxide (CO. The activity of CSE and cysteine aminotransferase (CAT, which produces the 3MST substrate 3-mercaptopyruvate (3MP, is regulated by Ca2+. H2S is oxidized to thiosulfate in mitochondria through the sequential action of sulfide quinone oxidoreductase (SQR, sulfur dioxygenase, and rhodanese. The rates of the production and clearance of H2S determine its cellular concentration. Polysulfides (H2Sn have been found to occur in the brain and activate transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1 channels, facilitate the translocation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2 to the nucleus, and suppress the activity of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN by sulfurating (sulfhydrating the target cysteine residues. A cross talk between H2S and NO also plays an important role in cardioprotection as well as regulation of the vascular tone. H2S, polysulfides, and their cross talk with NO may mediate various physiological and pathophysiological responses.

  13. Hierarchical Architecturing for Layered Thermoelectric Sulfides and Chalcogenides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Jood

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Sulfides are promising candidates for environment-friendly and cost-effective thermoelectric materials. In this article, we review the recent progress in all-length-scale hierarchical architecturing for sulfides and chalcogenides, highlighting the key strategies used to enhance their thermoelectric performance. We primarily focus on TiS2-based layered sulfides, misfit layered sulfides, homologous chalcogenides, accordion-like layered Sn chalcogenides, and thermoelectric minerals. CS2 sulfurization is an appropriate method for preparing sulfide thermoelectric materials. At the atomic scale, the intercalation of guest atoms/layers into host crystal layers, crystal-structural evolution enabled by the homologous series, and low-energy atomic vibration effectively scatter phonons, resulting in a reduced lattice thermal conductivity. At the nanoscale, stacking faults further reduce the lattice thermal conductivity. At the microscale, the highly oriented microtexture allows high carrier mobility in the in-plane direction, leading to a high thermoelectric power factor.

  14. Physical and microstructural aspects of iron sulfide degradation in concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The microstructural aspects of iron sulfide degradation in dam concrete were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) in both dam concrete samples and laboratory concrete. The results show that iron sulfide inclusions with a diameter of a few micrometers in the aggregates are reactive and appear to generate expansion first in the aggregates and consequently in the cement paste. The expansion from the iron sulfides is a consequence of the increase in volume of the reaction products formed. The types of iron sulfide present in the aggregate, mainly pyrrhotite (FeS) and pyrite (FeS2), show similar reaction behavior in the aggregates. The released sulfate can lead to a secondary ettringite formation in the concrete matrix, but the degradation associated with this appears to be minor. The reaction of the iron sulfides was found to be very slow even when laboratory samples were exposed to elevated temperatures.

  15. Influence of Water Salinity on Air Purification from Hydrogen Sulfide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leybovych L.I.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Mathematical modeling of «sliding» water drop motion in the air flow was performed in software package FlowVision. The result of mathematical modeling of water motion in a droplet with diameter 100 microns at the «sliding» velocity of 15 m/s is shown. It is established that hydrogen sulfide oxidation occurs at the surface of phases contact. The schematic diagram of the experimental setup for studying air purification from hydrogen sulfide is shown. The results of the experimental research of hydrogen sulfide oxidation by tap and distilled water are presented. The dependence determining the share of hydrogen sulfide oxidized at the surface of phases contact from the dimensionless initial concentration of hydrogen sulfide in the air has been obtained.

  16. The Hydrolysis of Carbonyl Sulfide at Low Temperature: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shunzheng; Yi, Honghong; Tang, Xiaolong; Jiang, Shanxue; Gao, Fengyu; Zhang, Bowen; Zuo, Yanran; Wang, Zhixiang

    2013-01-01

    Catalytic hydrolysis technology of carbonyl sulfide (COS) at low temperature was reviewed, including the development of catalysts, reaction kinetics, and reaction mechanism of COS hydrolysis. It was indicated that the catalysts are mainly involved metal oxide and activated carbon. The active ingredients which can load on COS hydrolysis catalyst include alkali metal, alkaline earth metal, transition metal oxides, rare earth metal oxides, mixed metal oxides, and nanometal oxides. The catalytic hydrolysis of COS is a first-order reaction with respect to carbonyl sulfide, while the reaction order of water changes as the reaction conditions change. The controlling steps are also different because the reaction conditions such as concentration of carbonyl sulfide, reaction temperature, water-air ratio, and reaction atmosphere are different. The hydrolysis of carbonyl sulfide is base-catalyzed reaction, and the force of the base site has an important effect on the hydrolysis of carbonyl sulfide. PMID:23956697

  17. Sulindac Sulfide, but Not Sulindac Sulfone, Inhibits Colorectal Cancer Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher S. Williams

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Sulindac sulfide, a metabolite of the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID sulindac sulfoxide, is effective at reducing tumor burden in both familial adenomatous polyposis patients and in animals with colorectal cancer. Another sulindac sulfoxide metabolite, sulindac sulfone, has been reported to have antitumor properties without inhibiting cyclooxygenase activity. Here we report the effect of sulindac sulfone treatment on the growth of colorectal carcinoma cells. We observed that sulindac sulfide or sulfone treatment of HCA-7 cells led to inhibition of prostaglandin E2 production. Both sulindac sulfide and sulfone inhibited HCA-7 and HCT-116 cell growth in vitro. Sulindac sulfone had no effect on the growth of either HCA-7 or HCT-116 xenografts, whereas the sulfide derivative inhibited HCA-7 growth in vivo. Both sulindac sulfide and sulfone inhibited colon carcinoma cell growth and prostaglandin production in vitro, but sulindac sulfone had no effect on the growth of colon cancer cell xenografts in nude mice.

  18. DISSOLUTION OF PLUTONIUM CONTAINING CARRIER PRECIPITATE BY CARBONATE METATHESIS AND SEPARATION OF SULFIDE IMPURITIES THEREFROM BY SULFIDE PRECIPITATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffield, R.B.

    1959-07-14

    A process is described for recovering plutonium from foreign products wherein a carrier precipitate of lanthanum fluoride containing plutonium is obtained and includes the steps of dissolving the carrier precipitate in an alkali metal carbonate solution, adding a soluble sulfide, separating the sulfide precipitate, adding an alkali metal hydroxide, separating the resulting precipitate, washing, and dissolving in a strong acid.

  19. Carbon steel protection in G.S. (Girlder sulfide) plants. Pressure influence on iron sulfide scales formation. Pt. 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to protect carbon steel towers and piping of Girlder sulfide (G.S.) experimental heavy water plants against corrosion produced by the action of aqueous solutions of hydrogen sulfide, a method, previously published, was developed. Carbon steel, exposed to saturated aqueous solutions of hydrogen sulfide, forms iron sulfide scales. In oxygen free solutions evolution of corrosion follows the sequence: mackinawite → cubic ferrous sulfide → troilite → pyrrotite → pyrite. Scales formed by pyrrotite-pyrite or pyrite are the most protective layers (these are obtained at 130 deg C, 2MPa, for periods of 14 days). Experiments, at 125 deg C and periods of 10-25 days, were performed in two different ways: 1- constant pressure operations at 0.5 and 1.1 MPa. 2- variable pressure operation between 0.3-1 MPa. In all cases pyrrotite-pyrite scales were obtained. (Author)

  20. Atomic layer deposition of aluminum sulfide thin films using trimethylaluminum and hydrogen sulfide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sequential exposures of trimethylaluminum and hydrogen sulfide are used to deposit aluminum sulfide thin films by atomic layer deposition (ALD) in the temperature ranging from 100 to 200 °C. Growth rate of 1.3 Å per ALD cycle is achieved by in-situ quartz crystal microbalance measurements. It is found that the growth rate per ALD cycle is highly dependent on the purging time between the two precursors. Increased purge time results in higher growth rate. Surface limited chemistry during each ALD half cycle is studied by in-situ Fourier transformed infrared vibration spectroscopy. Time of flight secondary ion-mass spectroscopy measurement is used to confirm elemental composition of the deposited films

  1. Banded sulfide-magnetite ores of Mauk copper massive sulfide deposit, Central Urals: Composition and genesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safina, N. P.; Maslennikov, V. V.; Maslennikova, S. P.; Kotlyarov, V. A.; Danyushevsky, L. V.; Large, R. R.; Blinov, I. A.

    2015-05-01

    The results of investigation of metamorphosed sulfide-magnetite ores from the Mauk deposit located within the Main Ural Fault at the junction of Tagil and Magnitogorsk massive sulfide zones are discussed. The ore-hosting sequence comprises metamorphic rocks formed from basalt, carbonaceous and carbonaceous-cherty siltstone, and lenticular serpentinized ultramafic bodies. The ores of the deposit are represented by banded varieties and less frequent breccia. The clastic origin of the banded ore is indicated by load casts at the bottom of sulfide beds, alternation of sulfide and barren beds, and the truncation of the growth zones of pyrite crystals. Pyrite, pyrrhotite, chalcopyrite, sphalerite, and magnetite are the major minerals of the banded ores. The internal structure of the listed minerals testifies to the deep metamorphic recrystallization of primary hydrothermal-sedimentary ores accompanied with deformation. Cubanite, pyrrhotite, mackinawite, greigite, and gold are enclosed in metacrysts of pyrite, magnetite, and chalcopyrite. The accessory minerals of the Pb-Bi-Te, Bi-Te, and Ag-Te systems as well as uraninite have been found at the Mauk deposit for the first time. Magnetite predominantly replaces pyrite and less frequently chalcopyrite, pyrrhotite, and gangue minerals. It was established that the major carriers of As and Co are crystals of metamorphic pyrite. Chalcopyrite is the major carrier of Zn, Sn, Te, Pb, Bi, and Ag. Admixture of Fe and Cu is typical of sphalerite, and Se and Ni are characteristic of pyrrhotite. Ti, V, Mn, Sb, As, Ba, and U are concentrated in magnetite. The banded ores of the Mauk deposit are suggested as having been transformed in several stages: diagenesis, anadiagenesis, epidiagenesis ( t 500°C).

  2. Azo dye decolorization assisted by chemical and biogenic sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prato-Garcia, Dorian [Laboratory for Research on Advanced Processes for Water Treatment, Unidad Académica Juriquilla, Instituto de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Blvd. Juriquilla 3001, Querétaro 76230 (Mexico); Cervantes, Francisco J. [División de Ciencias Ambientales, Instituto Potosino de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica, Camino a la Presa de San José 2055, San Luis Potosí 78216 (Mexico); Buitrón, Germán, E-mail: gbuitronm@ii.unam.mx [Laboratory for Research on Advanced Processes for Water Treatment, Unidad Académica Juriquilla, Instituto de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Blvd. Juriquilla 3001, Querétaro 76230 (Mexico)

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ► Azo dyes were reduced efficiently by chemical and biogenic sulfide. ► Biogenic sulfide was more efficient than chemical sulfide. ► There was no competition between dyes and sulfate for reducing equivalents. ► Aromatic amines barely affected the sulfate-reducing process. -- Abstract: The effectiveness of chemical and biogenic sulfide in decolorizing three sulfonated azo dyes and the robustness of a sulfate-reducing process for simultaneous decolorization and sulfate removal were evaluated. The results demonstrated that decolorization of azo dyes assisted by chemical sulfide and anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) was effective. In the absence of AQDS, biogenic sulfide was more efficient than chemical sulfide for decolorizing the azo dyes. The performance of sulfate-reducing bacteria in attached-growth sequencing batch reactors suggested the absence of competition between the studied azo dyes and the sulfate-reducing process for the reducing equivalents. Additionally, the presence of chemical reduction by-products had an almost negligible effect on the sulfate removal rate, which was nearly constant (94%) after azo dye injection.

  3. Azo dye decolorization assisted by chemical and biogenic sulfide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Azo dyes were reduced efficiently by chemical and biogenic sulfide. ► Biogenic sulfide was more efficient than chemical sulfide. ► There was no competition between dyes and sulfate for reducing equivalents. ► Aromatic amines barely affected the sulfate-reducing process. -- Abstract: The effectiveness of chemical and biogenic sulfide in decolorizing three sulfonated azo dyes and the robustness of a sulfate-reducing process for simultaneous decolorization and sulfate removal were evaluated. The results demonstrated that decolorization of azo dyes assisted by chemical sulfide and anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) was effective. In the absence of AQDS, biogenic sulfide was more efficient than chemical sulfide for decolorizing the azo dyes. The performance of sulfate-reducing bacteria in attached-growth sequencing batch reactors suggested the absence of competition between the studied azo dyes and the sulfate-reducing process for the reducing equivalents. Additionally, the presence of chemical reduction by-products had an almost negligible effect on the sulfate removal rate, which was nearly constant (94%) after azo dye injection

  4. Sulfide elimination by intermittent nitrate dosing in sewer sediments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanchen Liu; Chen Wu; Xiaohong Zhou; David Z.Zhu; Hanchang Shi

    2015-01-01

    The formation of hydrogen sulfide in biofilms and sediments in sewer systems can cause severe pipe corrosions and health hazards,and requires expensive programs for its prevention.The aim of this study is to propose a new control strategy and the optimal condition for sulfide elimination by intermittent nitrate dosing in sewer sediments.The study was carried out based on lab-scale experiments and batch tests using real sewer sediments.The intermittent nitrate dosing mode and the optimal control condition were investigated.The results indicated that the sulfide-intermittent-elimination strategy by nitrate dosing is advantageous for controlling sulfide accumulation in sewer sediment.The oxidation-reduction potential is a sensitive indicator parameter that can reflect the control effect and the minimum N/S (nitrate/sulfide)ratio with slight excess nitrate is necessary for optimal conditions ofefficient sulfide control with lower carbon source loss.The opth-nal control condition is feasible for the sulfide elimination in sewer systems.

  5. On the pelletizing of sulfide molybdenite concentrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Investigation results are discussed on the process of pelletizing with the use of various binders (water, syrup, sulfite-alcoholic residue and bentonite) for flotation sulfide molybdenite concentrate (∼84 % MoS2) of the Mongolian deposit. It is established that with the use of syrup rather strong pellets (>300 g/p) of desired size (2-3 mm) can be obtained at a binder flowrate of 1 kg per 100 kg of concentrate. The main advantage of using syrup instead of bentonite lies in the fact that in this instance no depletion of a molybdenum calcine obtained by oxidizing roasting of raw ore takes place due to syrup complete burning out. This affects positively subsequent hydrometallurgical conversion because of decreasing molybdenum losses with waste cakes

  6. Role of iron sulfides in uranium deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of iron mono- and disulfides in uranium infiltrated orogenesis is considered on the basis of the results of experimental and mineral-geochemical investigations. it is shown that pyrrhotite decomposing in a weak-acid medium with hydrogen sulfide and hydrogen emission precipitates actively uranium from oxygen-containing waters. Pyrrhotite in oxygen-free medium - when hydrogoethite is absent (probably due to partial proportionalization of Fe2+, SO42- and H2S and electron release causes Eh decrease at the mineral solution boundary up to values - 250 mV and correspondingly recovery uranium deposition. Regions of near-the fracture and over-the-break rock pyritization are of great importance when forecasting and prospecting infiltrated uranium deposits

  7. Chemical foundations of hydrogen sulfide biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qian; Lancaster, Jack R

    2013-11-30

    Following nitric oxide (nitrogen monoxide) and carbon monoxide, hydrogen sulfide (or its newer systematic name sulfane, H2S) became the third small molecule that can be both toxic and beneficial depending on the concentration. In spite of its impressive therapeutic potential, the underlying mechanisms for its beneficial effects remain unclear. Any novel mechanism has to obey fundamental chemical principles. H2S chemistry was studied long before its biological relevance was discovered, however, with a few exceptions, these past works have received relatively little attention in the path of exploring the mechanistic conundrum of H2S biological functions. This review calls attention to the basic physical and chemical properties of H2S, focuses on the chemistry between H2S and its three potential biological targets: oxidants, metals and thiol derivatives, discusses the applications of these basics into H2S biology and methodology, and introduces the standard terminology to this youthful field. PMID:23850631

  8. Responsive lanthanide coordination polymer for hydrogen sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Baoxia; Chen, Yang

    2013-11-19

    Metal organic coordination polymers have received great attention because of their flexible compositions and architecture. Here, we report the design and synthesis of a responsive lanthanide coordination polymer (LCP) for hydrogen sulfide (H2S), utilizing self-assembling of biomolecule nucleotide with luminescent terbium ion (Tb(3+)) and sensitizing silver ion (Ag(+)) in aqueous solution. LCP is highly fluorescent due to the inclusion of Ag(+) ions, which sensitized the fluorescence of Tb(3+) ions. H2S can strongly quench the fluorescence of LCP through its high affinity for Ag(+) ions. Such configurated LCP material from initial building blocks showed high sensitivity and selectivity for H2S and was applied to the determination of H2S in human serum. LCP with Tb(3+) ions also has a long fluorescence lifetime, which allows for time-resolved fluorescence assays, possessing particular advantages to probing H2S in biological systems with autofluorescence. PMID:24191713

  9. Modulation of hydrogen sulfide by vascular hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osmond JM

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Jessica M Osmond, Nancy L KanagyVascular Physiology Group, Department of Cell Biology and Physiology, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Albuquerque, NM, USAAbstract: Hydrogen sulfide (H2S has emerged as a key regulator of cardiovascular function. This gasotransmitter is produced in the vasculature and is involved in numerous processes that promote vascular homeostasis, including vasodilation and endothelial cell proliferation. Although H2S plays a role under physiological conditions, it has become clear in recent years that hypoxia modulates the production and action of H2S. Furthermore, there is growing evidence that H2S is cytoprotective in the face of hypoxic insults. This review focuses on the synthesis and signaling of H2S in hypoxic conditions in the vasculature, and highlights recent studies providing evidence that H2S is a potential therapy for preventing tissue damage in hypoxic conditions.Keywords: H2S, cystathionine γ-lyase, vascular smooth muscle, endothelium

  10. Hydrogen sulfide production from subgingival plaque samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basic, A; Dahlén, G

    2015-10-01

    Periodontitis is a polymicrobial anaerobe infection. Little is known about the dysbiotic microbiota and the role of bacterial metabolites in the disease process. It is suggested that the production of certain waste products in the proteolytic metabolism may work as markers for disease severity. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a gas produced by degradation of proteins in the subgingival pocket. It is highly toxic and believed to have pro-inflammatory properties. We aimed to study H2S production from subgingival plaque samples in relation to disease severity in subjects with natural development of the disease, using a colorimetric method based on bismuth precipitation. In remote areas of northern Thailand, adults with poor oral hygiene habits and a natural development of periodontal disease were examined for their oral health status. H2S production was measured with the bismuth method and subgingival plaque samples were analyzed for the presence of 20 bacterial species with the checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization technique. In total, 43 subjects were examined (age 40-60 years, mean PI 95 ± 6.6%). Fifty-six percent had moderate periodontal breakdown (CAL > 3  7 mm) on at least one site. Parvimonas micra, Filifactor alocis, Porphyromonas endodontalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum were frequently detected. H2S production could not be correlated to periodontal disease severity (PPD or CAL at sampled sites) or to a specific bacterial composition. Site 21 had statistically lower production of H2S (p = 0.02) compared to 16 and 46. Betel nut chewers had statistically significant lower H2S production (p = 0.01) than non-chewers. Rapid detection and estimation of subgingival H2S production capacity was easily and reliably tested by the colorimetric bismuth sulfide precipitation method. H2S may be a valuable clinical marker for degradation of proteins in the subgingival pocket. PMID:25280920

  11. The electrochemical behavior of sulfide ions in molten cryolite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electrochemical behavior of sulfide ions in molten cryolite (Na3A1F6) has been studied by cyclic voltammetry using graphite electrodes at 1323 K. The oxidation of sulfide ions is found to proceed via a quasi-reversible mechanism, i.e., one in which the current is controlled by both diffusion and charge transfer kinetics. The transfer coefficient BETA and the standard rate constant k /SUB s/ are estimated to be 0.5 and 0.0042 cm/sec, respectively. The apparent diffusion coefficient for sulfide ions in cryolite at 1323 K is about 3.93 x 10-5 cm2/sec

  12. Effect of Soluble Sulfide on the Activity of Luminescent Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Feng Wang; Ling-Ling Wu; Hong-Wen Gao; Ying Shao

    2012-01-01

    Sulfide is an important water pollutant widely found in industrial waste water that has attracted much attention. S2−, as a weak acidic anion, is easy hydrolyzed to HS and H2S in aqueous solution. In this study, biological tests were performed to establish the toxicity of sulfide solutions on luminescent bacteria. Considering the sulfide solution was contained three substances—S2−, HS

  13. Optimization of the superconducting phase of hydrogen sulfide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electron and phonon spectra, as well as the densities of electron and phonon states of the SH3 phase and the stable orthorhombic structure of hydrogen sulfide SH2, are calculated for the pressure interval 100–225 GPa. It is found that the I4/mmm phase can be responsible for the superconducting properties of metallic hydrogen sulfide along with the SH3 phase. Sequential stages for obtaining and conservation of the SH2 phase are proposed. The properties of two (SH2 and SH3) superconducting phases of hydrogen sulfide are compared

  14. Optimization of the superconducting phase of hydrogen sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degtyarenko, N. N.; Masur, E. A., E-mail: eugen-mazur@mail.ru [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    The electron and phonon spectra, as well as the densities of electron and phonon states of the SH{sub 3} phase and the stable orthorhombic structure of hydrogen sulfide SH{sub 2}, are calculated for the pressure interval 100–225 GPa. It is found that the I4/mmm phase can be responsible for the superconducting properties of metallic hydrogen sulfide along with the SH{sub 3} phase. Sequential stages for obtaining and conservation of the SH{sub 2} phase are proposed. The properties of two (SH{sub 2} and SH{sub 3}) superconducting phases of hydrogen sulfide are compared.

  15. Adsorbate thermodynamics as a determinant of reaction mechanism: Pentamethylene sulfide on Mo(110)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiegand, B.C.; Friend, C.M.; Roberts, J.T. (Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (USA))

    The reactions of the totally unstrained, six-membered cyclic sulfide pentamethylene sulfide on Mo(110) have been investigated by using temperature-programmed reaction spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy in an effort to identify the roles of ring size and strain in dictating reaction selectivity. Four gases products are detected in the temperature-programmed reaction of pentamethylene sulfide: dihydrogen at 380 and 590 K, pentane at 350 K, pentene at 345 K, and pentamethylene sulfide at 190 and 280 K. The kinetics for hydrocarbon production from pentamethylene sulfide are qualitatively different than for the four- and five-membered cyclic sulfides, trimethylene sulfide and tetrahydrothiophene.

  16. Sulfide Intrusion and Detoxification in the Seagrass Zostera marina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasler-Sheetal, Harald; Holmer, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    Gaseous sulfide intrusion into seagrasses growing in sulfidic sediments causes little or no harm to the plant, indicating the presence of an unknown sulfide tolerance or detoxification mechanism. We assessed such mechanism in the seagrass Zostera marina in the laboratory and in the field with...... well as being stored as sulfate throughout the plant. We conclude that avoidance of sulfide exposure by reoxidation of sulfide in the rhizosphere or aerenchyma and tolerance of sulfide intrusion by incorporation of sulfur in the plant are likely major survival strategies of seagrasses in sulfidic...

  17. Sulfide mineralization in ultramafic rocks of the Faryab ophiolite complex, southern Kerman

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Ali Rajabzadeh; Fatemeh Al Sadi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Worldwide, Ni-Cu and PGE magmatic sulfide deposits are confined to the lower parts of stratiform mafic and ultramafic complexes. However, ophiolite mafic and ultramafic complexes have been rarely explored for sulfide deposits despite the fact that they have been extensively explored and exploited for chromite. Sulfide saturation during magmatic evolution is necessary for sulfide mineralization, in which sulfide melts scavenge chalcophile metals from the parent magma and conc...

  18. Sulfide oxidizing activity as a survival strategy in mangrove clam Polymesoda erosa (Solander, 1786)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Clemente, S.; Ingole, B.S.; Sumati, M.; Goltekar, R.

    strategies of sulfide detoxification appear to be common in animals in normoxia. First, sulfide can be bound to blood proteins (Bagarinao and Vetter 1992). Second, sulfide is frequently oxidized to less toxic or nontoxic sulfur compounds, either... with the help of bacterial symbionts (Wilmot and Vetter 1990) or in the animal tissue (Vetter et al. 1987). As a group, thiotrophic (sulfide-utilizing) bacteria employ various enzymatic pathways for conversion of sulfide into energy, including the oxidation...

  19. Functional Analysis of Three Sulfide:Quinone Oxidoreductase Homologs in Chlorobaculum tepidum▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, Leong-Keat; Morgan-Kiss, Rachael M; Hanson, Thomas E.

    2008-01-01

    Sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase (SQR) catalyzes sulfide oxidation during sulfide-dependent chemo- and phototrophic growth in bacteria. The green sulfur bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum (formerly Chlorobium tepidum) can grow on sulfide as the sole electron donor and sulfur source. C. tepidum contains genes encoding three SQR homologs: CT0117, CT0876, and CT1087. This study examined which, if any, of the SQR homologs possess sulfide-dependent ubiquinone reduction activity and are required for gro...

  20. Co-settling of Chromite and Sulfide Melt Droplets and Trace Element Partitioning between Sulfide and Silicate Melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoochehri, S.; Schmidt, M. W.; Guenther, D.

    2013-12-01

    Gravitational settling of immiscible, dense sulfide melt droplets together with other cumulate phases such as chromite, combined with downward percolation of these droplets through a cumulate pile, is thought to be one of the possible processes leading to the formation of PGE rich sulfide deposits in layered mafic intrusions. Furthermore some chromitite seams in the Merensky Reef (Bushveld Complex) are considered to be acting as a filter or barrier for further downward percolation of sulfide melts into footwall layers. To investigate the feasibility of such mechanical processes and to study the partitioning behavior of 50 elements including transition metals and REEs (but not PGEs) between a silicate and a sulfide melt, two separate series of high temperature (1250-1380 °C) centrifuge-assisted experiments at 1000 g, 0.4-0.6 GPa were conducted. A synthetic silicate glass with a composition representative of the parental magma of the Bushveld Complex (~ 55 wt% SiO2) was mixed with pure FeS powder. For the first series of experiments, 15 or 25 wt% natural chromite with average grain sizes of ~ 5 or 31 μm were added to a mixture of silicate glass and FeS (10 wt%) adding 1 wt% water. For the second series, a mixture of the same glass and FeS was doped with 50 trace elements. These mixtures were first statically equilibrated and then centrifuged. In the first experimental series, sulfide melt droplets settled together with, but did not segregate from chromite grains even after centrifugation at 1000 g for 12 hours. A change in initial chromite grain size and proportions didn't have any effect on segregation. Without chromite, the starting mixture resulted in the formation of large sulfide melt pools together with finer droplets still disseminated through the silicate glass and both at the bottom of the capsule. The incomplete segregation of sulfide melt is interpreted as being due to high interfacial energies between sulfide and silicate melts/crystals which hinder

  1. Preliminary air pollution survey of hydrogen sulfide: a literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miner, S.

    1969-10-01

    This is a preliminary literature review representing present knowledge of hydrogen sulfide and its effects on humans, animals, plants and materials. Hydrogen sulfide is a colorless gas that has an obnoxious odor at low concentrations. The odor threshold is in the g/cu m range. In higher concentrations, the gas is toxic to humans and animals and corrosive to many metals. It will tarnish silver and react with heavy metals in points to discolor the paint. In humans, it will cause headache, conjunctivitis, sleeplessness, pain in the eyes, and similar symptoms at low air concentrations and death at high air concentrations. However, the majority of the complaints arising from hydrogen sulfide air pollution are due to its obnoxious odor in extremely low air concentrations. Air pollution by hydrogen sulfide is not a widespread urban problem but is generally localized in the vicinity of an emitter such as kraft paper mills, industrial waste disposal ponds, sewage plants, refineries, and coke oven plants.

  2. [Activity of hydrogen sulfide production enzymes in kidneys of rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mel'nyk, A V; Pentiuk, O O

    2009-01-01

    An experimental research of activity and kinetic descriptions of enzymes participating in formation of hydrogen sulfide in the kidney of rats has been carried out. It was established that cystein, homocystein and thiosulphate are the basic substrates for hydrogen sulfide synthesis. The higest activity for hydrogen sulfide production belongs to thiosulfate-dithiolsulfurtransferase and cysteine aminotransferase, less activity is characteristic of cystathionine beta-synthase and cystathio-nine gamma-lyase. The highest affinity to substrate is registered for thiosulfate-dithiolsulfurtransferase and cystathionine gamma-lyase. It is discovered that the substrate inhibition is typical of all hydrogen sulfide formation enzymes, although this characteristic is the most expressed thiosulfat-dithiolsulfurtransferase. PMID:20387629

  3. Micro-PIXE Analysis of Trace Elements in Sulfides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micro-scale Proton-induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) of trace elements (TE) in sulfides provides insights into geologic processes including magmatic system evolution, ore forming events, and fluid-flow processes. The Los Alamos nuclear microprobe was used to determine TE concentrations and ratios in sulfides from diverse geologic environments including hydrothermal ore deposits, coal seams, and metamorphic rocks. Pyrrhotite (Po) from silicic volcanics contains high Cu and Ni; Po from the Clear Lake volcanic field has higher Mo than does Po from other volcanic fields. Coal pyrites contain high Cu, As, Se, Mo and Pb, and show high As/Se and Mo/Se in marine influenced sulfides from the Lower Kittanning coal, but not in other marine-influenced coals. Sulfides are amenable to micro-PIXE studies because of the difficulties in obtaining the homogeneous standards required for many other TE microanalytical techniques

  4. Hydrogen Sulfide Micro-Sensor for Biomass Fouling Detection Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Hydrogen Sulfide (H2S)is the leading chemical agent causing human fatalities following inhalation exposures. The overall aim of this project is to develop and...

  5. The hydrogen sulfide metabolite trimethylsulfonium is found in human urine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lajin, Bassam; Francesconi, Kevin A.

    2016-06-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is the third and most recently discovered gaseous signaling molecule following nitric oxide and carbon monoxide, playing important roles both in normal physiological conditions and disease progression. The trimethylsulfonium ion (TMS) can result from successive methylation reactions of hydrogen sulfide. No report exists so far about the presence or quantities of TMS in human urine. We developed a method for determining TMS in urine using liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-QQQ), and applied the method to establish the urinary levels of TMS in a group of human volunteers. The measured urinary levels of TMS were in the nanomolar range, which is commensurate with the steady-state tissue concentrations of hydrogen sulfide previously reported in the literature. The developed method can be used in future studies for the quantification of urinary TMS as a potential biomarker for hydrogen sulfide body pools.

  6. Oxidation and Precipitation of Sulfide in Sewer Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, A. H.

    are integrated at a more detailed level in the extended WATS model. This allows effects of pH, temperature and hydraulic conditions on the individual processes to be accounted for. For several of the processes, model parameters were found to be highly site specific. A sound and reliable use of complex models....... The effect of temperature on oxidation kinetics was described by the widely used Arrhenius equation. Rates of chemical and biological sulfide oxidation in the wastewater were found to double with temperature increases of 10 and 7C, respectively. The biofilm experiments indicated a smaller dependency...... on temperature in that the biofilm sulfide oxidation rate was found to double with a temperature increase of approximately 23C. The pH dependency of chemical sulfide oxidation in wastewater represented the dissociation of sulfide, with the hydrosulfide ion being more rapidly oxidized than molecular hydrogen...

  7. A new mechanism for the aerobic catabolism of dimethyl sulfide.

    OpenAIRE

    Visscher, P T; Taylor, B F

    1993-01-01

    Aerobic degradation of dimethyl sulfide (DMS), previously described for thiobacilli and hyphomicrobia, involves catabolism to sulfide via methanethiol (CH3SH). Methyl groups are sequentially eliminated as HCHO by incorporation of O2 catalyzed by DMS monooxygenase and methanethiol oxidase. H2O2 formed during CH3SH oxidation is destroyed by catalase. We recently isolated Thiobacillus strain ASN-1, which grows either aerobically or anaerobically with denitrification on DMS. Comparative experimen...

  8. DLC coatings in high temperature hydrogen sulfide environment

    OpenAIRE

    Liskiewicz, T; Al-Borno, A; A. Neville; Zhao, H

    2015-01-01

    Surface protection in high temperature hydrogen sulfide environment remains a significant challenge with limited number of materials providing adequate protection. Diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin films are recognized across different sectors as a promising way of controlling wear and the corrosion performance of components. The aim of this paper is to test the hypothesis that thin DLC coatings may act as an efficient corrosion barrier for steel components in high temperature hydrogen sulfide e...

  9. Biogeographic congruency among bacterial communities from terrestrial sulfidic springs

    OpenAIRE

    BrendanHeadd

    2014-01-01

    Terrestrial sulfidic springs support diverse microbial communities by serving as stable conduits for geochemically diverse and nutrient-rich subsurface waters. Microorganisms that colonize terrestrial springs likely originate from groundwater, but may also be sourced from the surface. As such, the biogeographic distribution of microbial communities inhabiting sulfidic springs should be controlled by a combination of spring geochemistry and surface and subsurface transport mechanisms, and not ...

  10. Alternating current electroluminescent properties of zinc sulfide powders

    OpenAIRE

    Salimian, Alireza

    2012-01-01

    In order to investigate the alternating current electroluminescent properties of zinc sulfide powders the following experiments were conducted: synthesis of zinc sulfide phosphors (comprised of zinc, sulfur and copper dopant); thermal shocking of phosphor materials (sudden cooling, using liquid nitrogen, of phosphor particles heated up to 500oC) and analysis of their alternating current electroluminescent properties as well as studies of particle crystal structures by synchrotron and conventi...

  11. No facilitator required for membrane transport of hydrogen sulfide

    OpenAIRE

    Mathai, John C.; Missner, Andreas; Kügler, Philipp; Saparov, Sapar M.; Zeidel, Mark L.; Lee, John K.; Pohl, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has emerged as a new and important member in the group of gaseous signaling molecules. However, the molecular transport mechanism has not yet been identified. Because of structural similarities with H2O, it was hypothesized that aquaporins may facilitate H2S transport across cell membranes. We tested this hypothesis by reconstituting the archeal aquaporin AfAQP from sulfide reducing bacteria Archaeoglobus fulgidus into planar membranes and by monitoring the resulting fa...

  12. INVESTIGATIONS ON BIOCHEMICAL PURIFICATION OF GROUND WATER FROM HYDROGEN SULFIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. P. Sedlukho

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers problems and features of biochemical removal of hydrogen sulfide from ground water. The analysis of existing methods for purification of ground water from hydrogen sulfide has been given in the paper. The paper has established shortcomings of physical and chemical purification of ground water. While using aeration methods for removal of hydrogen sulfide formation of colloidal sulfur that gives muddiness and opalescence to water occurs due to partial chemical air oxidation. In addition to this violation of sulfide-carbonate equilibrium taking place in the process of aeration due to desorption of H2S and CO2, often leads to clogging of degasifier nozzles with formed CaCO3 that causes serious operational problems. Chemical methods require relatively large flow of complex reagent facilities, storage facilities and transportation costs.In terms of hydrogen sulfide ground water purification the greatest interest is given to the biochemical method. Factors deterring widespread application of the biochemical method is its insufficient previous investigation and necessity to execute special research in order to determine optimal process parameters while purifying groundwater of a particular water supply source. Biochemical methods for oxidation of sulfur compounds are based on natural biological processes that ensure natural sulfur cycle. S. Vinogradsky has established a two-stage mechanism for oxidation of hydrogen sulfide with sulfur bacteria (Beggiatoa. The first stage presupposes oxidation of hydrogen sulphide to elemental sulfur which is accumulating in the cytoplasm in the form of globules. During the second stage sulfur bacteria begin to oxidize intracellular sulfur to sulfuric acid due to shortage of hydrogen sulfide.The paper provides the results of technological tests of large-scale pilot plants for biochemical purification of groundwater from hydrogen sulfide in semi-industrial conditions. Dependences of water quality

  13. An eco-friendly oxidation of sulfide compounds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    RAVINDRA B WAGH; SITARAM H GUND; JAYASHREE M NAGARKAR

    2016-08-01

    An improved green route has been developed for the oxidation of sulfide compounds. Albendazole is converted to ricobendazole or albendazole sulfone using H₂O₂ as an oxidant and H₂O as the solvent. High yields of the corresponding products were obtained by carrying out the reaction at room temperature. This synthetic method is environmentally clean and safe, operationally simple for the oxidation of other benzimidazole anthelmintics and various sulfide compounds.

  14. The hydrogen sulfide metabolite trimethylsulfonium is found in human urine

    OpenAIRE

    Bassam Lajin; Francesconi, Kevin A

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is the third and most recently discovered gaseous signaling molecule following nitric oxide and carbon monoxide, playing important roles both in normal physiological conditions and disease progression. The trimethylsulfonium ion (TMS) can result from successive methylation reactions of hydrogen sulfide. No report exists so far about the presence or quantities of TMS in human urine. We developed a method for determining TMS in urine using liquid chromatography-electrospray ion...

  15. Lithium-aluminum/iron sulfide batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, G. L.; Vissers, D. R.

    Lithium-alloy/metal sulfide batteries have been under development at Argonne National Laboratory since 1972. ANL's technology employs a two-phase Li alloy negative electrode, low-melting point LiCl-rich LiCl-LiBr-KBr molten salt electrolyte, and either an FeS or an upper-plateau (UP) FeS 2 positive electrode. These components are assembled in an 'electrolyte-starved' bipolar cell configuration. Use of the multi-phase Li alloy ((α+β)-Li-Al and Li 5Al 5Fe 2) negative electrode provides in situ overcharge tolerance that renders the bipolar design viable. Employing LiCl-rich LiCl-LiBr-KBr electrolyte is 'electrolyte-starved" cells achieves low-burdened cells that possess low area-specific impedance, comparable with that of flooded cells using LiCl-LiBr-KBr eutectic electrolyte. The combination of dense UP FeS 2 electrodes and low-melting electrolyte produces a stable and reversible couple, achieving over 1000 cycles in flooded cells, with high power capabilities. In addition, a new class of stable chalcogenide ceramic/sealant materials was developed. These materials produce high-strength bonds between a variety of metals and ceramics, which make fabrication of lithium/iron sulfide bipolar stacks practical. Bipolar Li-Al/FeS and Li-Al/FeS 2 cells and four-cell stacks using these seals have been built and tested for electric vehicle (EV) applications. When cell performance characteristics are used to model full-scale EV ad hybrid vehicle (HV) batteries, they are projected to meet or exceed the performance requirements for a large variety of EV and HV applications. In 1992, the US Advanced Battery Consortium awarded contracts to ANL and SAFT America to continue the development of the bipolar Li-Al/FeS 2 battery to meet their long-term criteria. Both ANL and sAFT are working together to refine this technology for EV applications and scale it up to larger stacks and fully integrated battery modules.

  16. Anisotropic Optical Properties of Layered Germanium Sulfide

    CERN Document Server

    Tan, Dezhi; Wang, Feijiu; Mohamed, Nur Baizura; Mouri, Shinichiro; Sandhaya, Koirala; Zhang, Wenjing; Miyauchi, Yuhei; Ohfuchi, Mari; Matsuda, Kazunari

    2016-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) layered materials, transition metal dichalcogenides and black phosphorus, have attracted much interest from the viewpoints of fundamental physics and device applications. The establishment of new functionalities in anisotropic layered 2D materials is a challenging but rewarding frontier, owing to their remarkable optical properties and prospects for new devices. Here, we report the anisotropic optical properties of layered 2D monochalcogenide of germanium sulfide (GeS). Three Raman scattering peaks corresponding to the B3g, A1g, and A2g modes with strong polarization dependence are demonstrated in the GeS flakes, which validates polarized Raman spectroscopy as an effective method for identifying the crystal orientation of anisotropic layered GeS. Photoluminescence (PL) is observed with a peak at around 1.66 eV that originates from the direct optical transition in GeS at room temperature. Moreover, determination of the polarization dependent characteristics of the PL and absorption reveals...

  17. Hydrogen Sulfide and Endothelium-Dependent Vasorelaxation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Bełtowski

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In addition to nitric oxide and carbon monoxide, hydrogen sulfide (H2S, synthesized enzymatically from l-cysteine or l-homocysteine, is the third gasotransmitter in mammals. Endogenous H2S is involved in the regulation of many physiological processes, including vascular tone. Although initially it was suggested that in the vascular wall H2S is synthesized only by smooth muscle cells and relaxes them by activating ATP-sensitive potassium channels, more recent studies indicate that H2S is synthesized in endothelial cells as well. Endothelial H2S production is stimulated by many factors, including acetylcholine, shear stress, adipose tissue hormone leptin, estrogens and plant flavonoids. In some vascular preparations H2S plays a role of endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor by activating small and intermediate-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels. Endothelial H2S signaling is up-regulated in some pathologies, such as obesity and cerebral ischemia-reperfusion. In addition, H2S activates endothelial NO synthase and inhibits cGMP degradation by phosphodiesterase 5 thus potentiating the effect of NO-cGMP pathway. Moreover, H2S-derived polysulfides directly activate protein kinase G. Finally, H2S interacts with NO to form nitroxyl (HNO—a potent vasorelaxant. H2S appears to play an important and multidimensional role in endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation.

  18. Atmospheric measurements of carbonyl sulfide, dimethyl sulfide, and carbon disulfide using the electron capture sulfur detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, James E.; Bates, Timothy S.

    1993-01-01

    Measurements of atmospheric dimethyl sulfide (DMS), carbonyl sulfide (COS), and carbon disulfide (CS2) were conducted over the Atlantic Ocean on board the NASA Electra aircraft during the Chemical Instrumentation Test and Evaluation (CITE 3) project using the electron capture sulfur detector (ECD-S). The system employed cryogenic preconcentration of air samples, gas chromatographic separation, catalytic fluorination, and electron capture detection. Samples collected for DMS analysis were scrubbed of oxidants with NaOH impregnated glass fiber filters to preconcentration. The detection limits (DL) of the system for COS, DMS, and CS2 were 5, 5, and 2 ppt, respectively. COS concentrations ranged from 404 to 603 ppt with a mean of 489 ppt for measurements over the North Atlantic Ocean (31 deg N to 41 deg N), and from 395 to 437 ppt with a mean of 419 ppt for measurements over the Tropical Atlantic Ocean (11 deg S to 2 deg N). DMS concentrations in the lower marine boundary layer, below 600-m altitude, ranged from below DL to 150 ppt from flights over the North Atlantic, and from 9 to 104 ppt over the Tropical Atlantic. CS2 concentrations ranged from below DL to 29 ppt over the North Atlantic. Almost all CS2 measurements over the Tropical Atlantic were below DL.

  19. Selenium content of sulfide ores related to ophiolites of Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Economou-Eliopoulos, M; Eliopoulos, D G

    1998-01-01

    Several deposits of sulfide mineralization have been described in the ophiolites of Greece. Based on their mineralogical and chemical composition and the host rocks, two types can be distinguished: (1) the Fe-Cu-Ni-Co type consisting of pyrrhotite, chalcopyrite, Co-pentlandite, pyrite, magnetite + arsenides, +/- chromite, hosted in serpentinites, gabbros or diabases, which have variable geochemical characteristics, and (2) sulfide mineralization of the Cyprus type containing variable proportions of pyrite, chalcopyrite, bornite, and sphalerite. The spatial association with shear zones and fault systems, which is a common feature in both types of mineralization, provided the necessary permeability for the circulation of the responsible mineralized hydrothermal fluids. The selenium (Se) content in representative samples of both types of mineralization from the ophiolites of Pindos (Kondro, Perivoli, and Neropriona), Othrys (Eretria and A. Theodoroi), Veria (Trilofon), and Argolis (Ermioni) shows a wide variation. The highest values of Se (130 to 1900 ppm) were found in massive Fe-Cu sulfide ores from Kondro, in particular the Cu-rich portions (average 1300 ppm Se). The average values of Se for the Othrys sulfides are low (< 40 ppm Se). The Se content in a diabase breccia pipe (50 x 200 m) with disseminated pyrite mineralization (Neropriona) ranges from < 1 to 35 ppm Se. The highest values were noted in strongly altered samples that also exhibited a significant enrichment in platinum (1 ppm Pt). Sulfide mineralization (irregular to lens-like masses and stringers) associated with magnetite, hosted in gabbros exposed in the Perivoli area (Tsouma hill), shows a content ranging from 40 to 350 ppm Se. The distribution of Se in the studied type of the sulfide mineralization may be of genetic significance, indicating that the Se level, which often is much higher than in typical magmatic sulfides related to mafic-ultramafic rocks (average 90-100 ppm Se), may positively affect

  20. Hydrogen sulfide and nervous system regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Cheng-fang; TANG Xiao-qing

    2011-01-01

    Objective This review discusses the current status and progress in studies on the roles of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in regulation of neurotoxicity,neuroprotection,and neuromodulator,as well as its therapeutic potential for neurodegenerative disorders.Data sources The data used in this review were mainly from Medline and PubMed published in English from 2001 to August 2011.The search terms were “hydrogen sulfide”,“neuron”,and “neurodegenerative disorders”.Study selection Articles regarding the regulation of neuronal function,the protection against neuronal damage and neurological diseases,and their possible cellular and molecular mechanisms associated with H2S were selected.Results The inhibited generation of endogenous H2S is implicated in 1-methy-4-phenylpyridinium ion,6-OHDA,and homocysteine-triggered neurotoxicity.H2S elicits neuroprotection in Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease models as well as protecting neurons against oxidative stress,ischemia,and hypoxia-induced neuronal death.H2S offers anti-oxidant,anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic effects,as well as activates ATP-sensitive potassium channels and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator Cl- channels.H2S regulates the long-term potentiation (LTP) and GABAB receptors in the hippocampus,as well as intracellular calcium and pH homeostasis in neurons and glia cells.Conclusions These articles suggest that endogenous H2S may regulate the toxicity of neurotoxin.H2S not only acts as a neuroprotectant but also serves as a novel neuromodulator.

  1. Electrochemical Behavior Of Copper Electrode In Potassium Sulfide Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Zaafarany

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The electro chemical behavior of copper electrode in 2M potassium sulfide solution was studied using cyclic voltammograms and potentiostatic polarization techniques. The morphology studies were applied using scanning electron microscope (SEM and energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (EDAX and X-ray powder diffraction. Three anodic peaks were observed in the anodic scan of cyclic voltammograms. SEM and EDAX analysis show the formation of an anodic copper sulfide layer on the surface of copper. Chemical sulfidization of the copper shown to be an important layer growth pathway. The sulfide layers do not passivate copper and the formation of passivating oxide layer is suppressed. The sulfide layer on copper has a Cu2S stoichiometry with roxybyite and digenite structure and it grows by a nucleation. A small patches were consistent with a CuS composition. The formation of KCu7S4 or any other ternary compound could not be observed. Only a presumable polysulfide phase very similar to KCuS4 could be detected.

  2. Simultaneous removal of sulfide, nitrate and acetate under denitrifying sulfide removal condition: Modeling and experimental validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Xijun; Chen, Chuan; Wang, Aijie; Guo, Wanqian; Zhou, Xu [State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China); Lee, Duu-Jong, E-mail: djlee@ntu.edu.tw [State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China); Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Ren, Nanqi, E-mail: rnq@hit.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China); Chang, Jo-Shu [Research Center for Energy Technology and Strategy, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China)

    2014-01-15

    Graphical abstract: Model evaluation applied to case study 1: (A-G) S{sup 2−}, NO{sub 3}{sup −}-N, NO{sub 2}{sup −}-N, and Ac{sup −}-C profiles under initial sulfide concentrations of 156.2 (A), 539 (B), 964 (C), 1490 (D), 342.7 (E), 718 (F), and 1140.7 (G) mg L{sup −1}. The solid line represents simulated result and scatter represents experimental result. -- Highlights: • This work developed a mathematical model for DSR process. • Kinetics of sulfur–nitrogen–carbon and interactions between denitrifiers were studied. • Kinetic parameters of the model were estimated via data fitting. • The model described kinetic behaviors of DSR processes over wide parametric range. -- Abstract: Simultaneous removal of sulfide (S{sup 2−}), nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup −}) and acetate (Ac{sup −}) under denitrifying sulfide removal process (DSR) is a novel biological wastewater treatment process. This work developed a mathematical model to describe the kinetic behavior of sulfur–nitrogen–carbon and interactions between autotrophic denitrifiers and heterotrophic denitrifiers. The kinetic parameters of the model were estimated via data fitting considering the effects of initial S{sup 2−} concentration, S{sup 2−}/NO{sub 3}{sup −}-N ratio and Ac{sup −}-C/NO{sub 3}{sup −}-N ratio. Simulation supported that the heterotrophic denitratation step (NO{sub 3}{sup −} reduction to NO{sub 2}{sup −}) was inhibited by S{sup 2−} compared with the denitritation step (NO{sub 2}{sup −} reduction to N{sub 2}). Also, the S{sup 2−} oxidation by autotrophic denitrifiers was shown two times lower in rate with NO{sub 2}{sup −} as electron acceptor than that with NO{sub 3}{sup −} as electron acceptor. NO{sub 3}{sup −} reduction by autotrophic denitrifiers occurs 3–10 times slower when S{sup 0} participates as final electron donor compared to the S{sup 2−}-driven pathway. Model simulation on continuous-flow DSR reactor suggested that the adjustment of

  3. Re-Os geochronology on sulfides from the Tudun Cu-Ni sulfide deposit, Eastern Tianshan, and its geological significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Minfang; Wang, Wei; Gutzmer, Jens; Liu, Kun; Li, Chao; Michałak, Przemysław P.; Xia, Qinlin; Guo, Xiaonan

    2015-11-01

    The Tudun deposit is a medium-sized Cu-Ni sulfide deposit, located at the westernmost edge of the Huangshan-Jing'erquan Belt in the northern part of Eastern Tianshan, NW China. Sulfide separates including pentlandite, pyrrhotite and chalcopyrite from the Tudun deposit, contain Re, common Os and 187Os ranging from 40.46 to 201.2, 0.8048 to 6.246 and 0.1709 to 0.9977 ppb, respectively. They have very low 187Os/188Os ratios of 1.224-2.352. The sulfides yield a Re-Os isochron age of 270.0 ± 7.5 Ma (MSWD = 1.3), consistent within uncertainty with the SHRIMP zircon U-Pb age for the Tudun mafic intrusion (gabbro) of 280.0 ± 3.0 Ma. The calculated initial 187Os/188Os ratio is 0.533 ± 0.022, and γOs values range from 283 to 307, with a mean of 297, indicating significant crustal contamination of the parent melt prior to sulfide saturation. The Tudun deposit shares the same age and Re-Os isotopic compositions with other orthomagmatic Cu-Ni sulfide deposits in Huangshan-Jing'erquan Belt, suggesting that they have formed in Early Permian.

  4. Sulfide Catalysts Supported on Porous Aromatic Frameworks for Naphthalene Hydroprocessing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduard Karakhanov

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the first example of using porous aromatic frameworks as supports for sulfide catalysts for the hydrogenation of aromatic hydrocarbons. The synthesis of bimetallic Ni-W and Ni-Mo sulfides was performed by in situ decomposition of [(n-Bu4N]2[Ni(MeS42] (Me = W, Mo complexes, supported on mesoporous aromatic framework with a diamond-like structure. It is shown that the highest naphthalene conversions were achieved in the case of additional sulfidation with sulfur. After the reaction, catalysts were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The activity of synthesized catalysts has been studied using naphthalene as a model substrate. The materials used in this study were substantially active in hydrogenation and slightly in hydrocracking of naphthalene.

  5. Investigation of chemical suppressants for inactivation of sulfide ores

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In order to investigate the effective control method of spontaneous combustion in the mining of sulfide ore deposits, This paper presents the testing results of several selected chemicals (water glass, calcium chloride, calcium oxide, magnesium oxide and their composites) as oxidation suppressants for sulfide ores. A weight increment scaling method was used to measure suppressant performance, and this method proved to be accurate, simple and convenient. Based on a large number of experiments, the test results show that four types of chemical mixtures demonstrate a good performance in reducing the oxidation rate of seven active sulfide ore samples by up to 27% to 100% during an initial 76 d period. The mixtures of water glass mixed with calcium chloride and magnesium oxide mixed with calcium chloride can also act as fire suppressants when used with fire sprinkling systems.

  6. Diverse sulfur metabolisms from two subterranean sulfidic spring systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossmassler, Karen; Hanson, Thomas E; Campbell, Barbara J

    2016-08-01

    In sulfidic environments, microbes oxidize reduced sulfur compounds via several pathways. We used metagenomics to investigate sulfur metabolic pathways from microbial mat communities in two subterranean sulfidic streams in Lower Kane Cave, WY, USA and from Glenwood Hot Springs, CO, USA. Both unassembled and targeted recA gene assembly analyses revealed that these streams were dominated by Epsilonproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria, including groups related to Sulfurovum, Sulfurospirillum, Thiothrix and an epsilonproteobacterial group with no close cultured relatives. Genes encoding sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase (SQR) were abundant at all sites, but the specific SQR type and the taxonomic affiliation of each type differed between sites. The abundance of thiosulfate oxidation pathway genes (Sox) was not consistent between sites, although overall they were less abundant than SQR genes. Furthermore, the Sox pathway appeared to be incomplete in all samples. This work reveals both variations in sulfur metabolism within and between taxonomic groups found in these systems, and the presence of novel epsilonproteobacterial groups. PMID:27324397

  7. Mechanism of sulfide effect on viscosity of HPAM polymer solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    康万利; 周阳; 王志伟; 孟令伟; 刘述忍; 白宝君

    2008-01-01

    The effect of sulfide on HPAM solution viscosity was studied using BROOKFIELD DV-II viscometer,and the interaction mechanism was discussed.The HPAM solution viscosity was investigated through fully reducing sulfide by the addition of hydrogen peroxide oxidation,and the mechanism of increasing polymer viscosity was investigated.The experimental results also show that there is a critical concentration of 15 mg/L.Below it,the loss rate of HPAM solution viscosity increases more rapidly,but becomes slowly above the critical concentration.A theoretical guidance for oilfields to prepare polymer solution using sewage-water by eliminating sulfide,and it is also importance to prepare polymer solution using sewage-water and save fresh water.

  8. Extraction of Nanosized Cobalt Sulfide from Spent Hydrocracking Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samia A. Kosa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The processes used for the extraction of metals (Co, Mo, and Al from spent hydrotreating catalysts were investigated in this study. A detailed mechanism of the metal extraction process is described. Additionally, a simulation study was performed to understand the sulfidizing mechanism. The suggested separation procedure was effective and achieved an extraction of approximately 80–90%. In addition, the sulfidization mechanism was identified. This sulfidizing process for Co was found to involve an intermediate, the structure of which was proposed. This proposed intermediate was confirmed through simulations. Moreover, the activities of the spent and the regenerated catalyst were examined in the cracking of toluene. The modification of the spent catalyst through the use of different iron oxide loadings improved the catalytic activity.

  9. Laser cleaning of sulfide scale on compressor impeller blade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Q. H.; Zhou, D.; Wang, Y. L.; Liu, G. F.

    2015-11-01

    Sulfide scale on the surface of a compressor impeller blade can considerably reduce the impeller performance and its service life. To prepare for subsequent remanufacturing, such as plasma spraying, it needs to be removed completely. In the corrosion process on an FV(520)B stainless steel, sulfide scale is divided into two layers because of different outward diffusion rates of Cr, Ni and Fe. In this paper, the cleaning threshold values of the upper and inner layers and the damage threshold value of the substrate were investigated using a pulsed fiber laser. To obtain experimental evidence, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and 3D surface profilometry were employed to investigate the two kinds of sulfide layers on specimens before, during, and after laser cleaning.

  10. Mathematical model for microbial oxidation of pure lead sulfide by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargi, F

    1989-08-01

    A shrinking-core mathematical model describing bioleaching of lead sulfide is developed considering the deposition of insoluble bio-oxidation products on metal sulfide particle surfaces. Variations in particle size are considered as it affects diffusion limitations. PMID:18588129

  11. Thermodynamics of Complex Sulfide Inclusion Formation in Ca-Treated Al-Killed Structural Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yin-tao; He, Sheng-ping; Chen, Gu-jun; Wang, Qian

    2016-05-01

    Controlling the morphology of the sulfide inclusion is of vital importance in enhancing the properties of structural steel. Long strip-shaped sulfides in hot-rolled steel can spherize when, instead of the inclusion of pure single-phase MnS, the guest is a complex sulfide, such as an oxide-sulfide duplex and a solid-solution sulfide particle. In this study, the inclusions in a commercial rolled structural steel were investigated. Spherical and elongated oxide-sulfide duplex as well as single-phase (Mn,Ca)S solid solution inclusions were observed in the steel. A thermodynamic equilibrium between the oxide and sulfide inclusions was proposed to understand the oxide-sulfide duplex inclusion formation. Based on the equilibrium solidification principle, thermodynamic discussions on inclusion precipitation during the solidification process were performed for both general and resulfurized structural steel. The predicted results of the present study agreed well with the experimental ones.

  12. Morphology and thermal studies of zinc sulfide and cadmium sulfide nanoparticles in polyvinyl alcohol matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osuntokun, Jejenija; Ajibade, Peter A.

    2016-09-01

    Zn(II) and Cd(II) metal complexes of 1-cyano-1-carboethoxyethylene-2,2-dithiolato-κS,S'-bis(N,N-dimethylthiourea-κS) have been synthesized and characterized with analytical and spectroscopic techniques. The complexes were thermolysed in hexadecylamine at 200 °C to prepare ZnS and CdS nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were characterized with scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), and powder X-ray diffraction (p-XRD). TEM images showed spherically shaped nanoparticles, whose sizes are in the range 4.33-7.21 nm for ZnS and 4.95-7.7 nm CdS respectively and XRD confirmed cubic crystalline phases for the nanoparticles. The optical band gap energy evaluated from the absorption spectra are 2.88 eV (430 nm) and 2.81 eV (440 nm) for the ZnS and CdS nanoparticles respectively. The as-prepared metal sulfide nanoparticles were further incorporated into polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) to give ZnS/PVA and CdS/PVA composites. The polymer nanocomposites were studied to investigate their morphology and thermal properties relative to the pure PVA. XRD diffractions indicated that the crystalline phases of the nanoparticles and the sizes in PVA matrices remained unaltered. Infra-red spectra studies revealed interactions between the PVA and the metal sulfide nanoparticles and TGA studies show that the ZnS/PVA and CdS/PVA nanocomposites exhibit better thermal stability than the pure PVA.

  13. Application of Borehole SIP Technique to Sulfide Mineral Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Changryol; Park, Mi Kyung; Park, Samgyu; Sung, Nak Hoon; Shin, Seung Wook

    2016-04-01

    In the study, SIP (Spectral Induced Polarization) well logging probe system was developed to rapidly locate the metal ore bodies with sulfide minerals in the boreholes. The newly developed SIP logging probe employed the non-polarizable electrodes, consisting of zinc chloride (ZnCl2), sodium chloride (NaCl), gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O), and water (H2O), instead of existing copper electrodes, leading to eliminating the EM coupling effect in the IP surveys as much as possible. In addition, the SIP logging system is designed to make measurements down to maximum 500 meters in depth in the boreholes. The SIP well logging was conducted to examine the applicability of the SIP probe system to the boreholes at the ore mine in Jecheon area, Korea. The boreholes used in the SIP logging are known to have penetrated the metal ore bodies with sulfide minerals from the drilling investigations. The ore mine of the study area is the scarn deposits surrounded by the limestone or lime-silicate rocks in Ordovician period. The results of the SIP well logging have shown that the borehole segments with limestone or lime-silicate rocks yielded the insignificant SIP responses while the borehole segments with sulfide minerals (e.g. pyrite) provided the significant phase shifts of the SIP responses. The borehole segments penetrating the metal ore body, so-called cupola, have shown very high response of the phase shift, due to the high contents of the sulfide mineral pyrite. The phase shifts of the SIP response could be used to estimate the grade of the ore bodies since the higher contents of the sulfide minerals, the higher magnitudes of the phase shifts in the SIP responses. It is, therefore, believed that the borehole SIP technique can be applied to investigate the metal ore bodies with sulfide minerals, and that could be used to estimate the ore grades as a supplementary tool in the future.

  14. Hydrogen evolution from water through metal sulfide reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transition metal sulfides play an important catalytic role in many chemical reactions. In this work, we have conducted a careful computational study of the structures, electronic states, and reactivity of metal sulfide cluster anions M2SX− (M = Mo and W, X = 4–6) using density functional theory. Detailed structural analysis shows that these metal sulfide anions have ground state isomers with two bridging sulfide bonds, notably different in some cases from the corresponding oxides with the same stoichiometry. The chemical reactivity of these metal sulfide anions with water has also been carried out. After a thorough search on the reactive potential energy surface, we propose several competitive, energetically favorable, reaction pathways that lead to the evolution of hydrogen. Selectivity in the initial water addition and subsequent hydrogen migration are found to be the key steps in all the proposed reaction channels. Initial adsorption of water is most favored involving a terminal metal sulfur bond in Mo2S4− isomers whereas the most preferred orientation for water addition involves a bridging metal sulfur bond in the case of W2S4− and M2S5− isomers. In all the lowest energy H2 elimination steps, the interacting hydrogen atoms involve a metal hydride and a metal hydroxide (or thiol) group. We have also observed a higher energy reaction channel where the interacting hydrogen atoms in the H2 elimination step involve a thiol (–SH) and a hydroxyl (–OH) group. For all the reaction pathways, the Mo sulfide reactions involve a higher barrier than the corresponding W analogues. We observe for both metals that reactions of M2S4− and M2S5− clusters with water to liberate H2 are exothermic and involve modest free energy barriers. However, the reaction of water with M2S6− is highly endothermic with a considerable barrier due to saturation of the local bonding environment

  15. Vegetation successfully prevents oxidization of sulfide minerals in mine tailings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Sun, Qingye; Zhan, Jing; Yang, Yang; Wang, Dan

    2016-07-15

    The oxidization of metal sulfide in tailings causes acid mine drainage. However, it remains unclear whether vegetation prevents the oxidization of metal sulfides. The oxidization characteristics and microbial indices of the tailings in the presence of various plant species were investigated to explore the effects of vegetation on the oxidization of sulfide minerals in tailings. The pH, reducing sulfur, free iron oxides (Fed), chemical oxygen consumption (COC) and biological oxygen consumption (BOC) were measured. Key iron- and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (Acidithiobacillus spp., Leptospirillum spp. and Thiobacillus spp.) were quantified using real-time PCR. The results indicate that vegetation growing on tailings can effectively prevent the oxidization of sulfide minerals in tailings. A higher pH and reducing-sulfur content and lower Fed were observed in the 0-30 cm depth interval in the presence of vegetation compared to bare tailings (BT). The COC gradually decreased with depth in all of the soil profiles; specifically, the COC rapidly decreased in the 10-20 cm interval in the presence of vegetation but gradually decreased in the BT profiles. Imperata cylindrica (IC) and Chrysopogon zizanoides (CZ) profiles contained the highest BOC in the 10-20 cm interval. The abundance of key iron- and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in the vegetated tailings were significantly lower than in the BT; in particular, IC was associated with the lowest iron- and sulfur-oxidizing bacterial abundance. In conclusion, vegetation successfully prevented the oxidization of sulfide minerals in the tailings, and Imperata cylindrica is the most effective in reducing the number of iron- and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria and helped to prevent the oxidization of sulfide minerals in the long term. PMID:27093236

  16. Experimental constraints on gold and silver solubility in iron sulfides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pal' yanova, Galina [Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 3, Koptyuga, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Russia, 2, Pirogova, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Mikhlin, Yuri [Institute of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Akademgorodok, 50/24, Krasnoyarsk, 660036 (Russian Federation); Kokh, Konstantin, E-mail: k.a.kokh@gmail.com [Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 3, Koptyuga, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Russia, 2, Pirogova, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Siberian Physical–Technical Institute of Tomsk State University, 1, Novosobornaya, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Karmanov, Nick [Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 3, Koptyuga, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Seryotkin, Yurii [Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 3, Koptyuga, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Russia, 2, Pirogova, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-15

    Experiments were performed to determine crystallization of Fe,S-melts (pyriti≿ and troilitic with molar ratio S/Fe ratios of 2 and 1, respectively) containing traces of gold and silver at (Ag/Au){sub wt} ratios varying from 10 to 0.1. The solid products were studied by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), microprobe analysis, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) in order to reveal the concentration limits of “invisible” gold and silver in magmatic iron sulfides, and to determine the influence of sulfur on forms of precious metals in the Fe–S system with different Ag/Au ratios. Au–Ag phases do not form inclusions but instead concentrate on the grain boundaries in the synthetic pyrrhotite and troilite, while pyrite comprises micro- (1–5 μm) and macroinclusions of Au–Ag alloys and Au–Ag sulfides. In “pyriti≿” systems, the fineness of alloys increases from 650 to 970‰ and the composition of sulfides changes from acanthite (Ag{sub 2}S) to uytenbogaardtite (Ag{sub 3}AuS{sub 2}) and petrovskaite (AgAuS) as the Ag/Au ratio decreases. The concentrations of “invisible” precious metals revealed in troilite were 0.040 ± 0.013 wt.% Au and 0.079 ± 0.016 wt.% Ag. Measured concentrations in pyrite and pyrrhotite were <0.024 wt.% Au and <0.030 wt.% Ag. The surface layers of iron sulfides probed with XPS were enriched in the precious metals, and in silver relative to gold, especially in the systems with Fe/S = 1, probably, due to depletion of the metallic alloy surfaces with gold. Au- and Ag-bearing iron sulfides crystallized primarily from melts may be the source of redeposited phases in hydrothermal and hypergene processes. - Highlights: • The samples of Fe–S–Au–Ag system were synthesized. • Coupled solubility of gold and silver in iron sulfides was specified. • Ag–Au inclusions on surfaces of iron sulfides are likely to be enriched in silver. • Au–Ag sulfides can exist along with

  17. Kinetic studies of cadmium sulfide precipitation from aqueous thiourea solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinetics of cadmium sulfide precipitation by thiourea from aqueous solutions containing ammonia complexes of cadmium(II) under conditions of spontaneous initiation of solid phase within solution volume at temperatures of 298-318 K was studied. It was ascertained that the process activation energy is 77843 J/mol, while the reaction order by initial cadmium complex equals unity. Kinetic equation, which permits control over cadmium sulfide precipitation and preparation of CdS films of desired morphology was derived on the basis of the experimental data

  18. Non-hydrolytic Sol-gel Synthesis of Tin Sulfides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Rajvinder

    The non-hydrolytic sol-gel (NHSG) process is an effective low temperature route well known for preparing homogeneous metal oxides. Thermodynamically as well as kinetically favored products, which cannot be prepared with the traditional solid-state routes, can be produced using NHSG. This project is focused on the exploration of NHSG synthesis of binary tin sulfides. In the past few years, metal sulfides have been the subject of significant interest. Much effort has been devoted to understand these materials because of their potential applications in electronic, optical, and superconductor devices.4 Among these materials, tin sulfides are materials of technological importance, which are being explored as semiconductors, anode materials for Li ion batteries, photoconductors, photocatalysts and absorber layer materials in photovoltaic solar cell devices. All of these applications depend upon features like homogeneity, oxidation state, high surface area and purity of the materials. These properties can be difficult to achieve by employing traditional synthetic routes, which require high temperatures due to slow diffusion, limiting the products to thermodynamically stable phases and prohibiting control over properties like particle size and surface area. A variety of low temperature methods are being explored due to the increased demand for such advanced materials. This project is focused on exploring the NHSG approach to synthesize binary tin sulfides, with the main goal of establishing conditions for the targeted synthesis of different tin sulfide polymorphs with controlled particle size. Being non-oxide materials, tin sulfides can be air sensitive, which requires special attention in handling. All reactions were carried out in absence of oxygen. This project explores the reaction of tin halides with thioethers in a dry solvent medium, leading to the formation of tin sulfides. There are a number of synthetic parameters that can be varied for the NHSG approach. A

  19. Experimental constraints on gold and silver solubility in iron sulfides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments were performed to determine crystallization of Fe,S-melts (pyriti≿ and troilitic with molar ratio S/Fe ratios of 2 and 1, respectively) containing traces of gold and silver at (Ag/Au)wt ratios varying from 10 to 0.1. The solid products were studied by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), microprobe analysis, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) in order to reveal the concentration limits of “invisible” gold and silver in magmatic iron sulfides, and to determine the influence of sulfur on forms of precious metals in the Fe–S system with different Ag/Au ratios. Au–Ag phases do not form inclusions but instead concentrate on the grain boundaries in the synthetic pyrrhotite and troilite, while pyrite comprises micro- (1–5 μm) and macroinclusions of Au–Ag alloys and Au–Ag sulfides. In “pyriti≿” systems, the fineness of alloys increases from 650 to 970‰ and the composition of sulfides changes from acanthite (Ag2S) to uytenbogaardtite (Ag3AuS2) and petrovskaite (AgAuS) as the Ag/Au ratio decreases. The concentrations of “invisible” precious metals revealed in troilite were 0.040 ± 0.013 wt.% Au and 0.079 ± 0.016 wt.% Ag. Measured concentrations in pyrite and pyrrhotite were <0.024 wt.% Au and <0.030 wt.% Ag. The surface layers of iron sulfides probed with XPS were enriched in the precious metals, and in silver relative to gold, especially in the systems with Fe/S = 1, probably, due to depletion of the metallic alloy surfaces with gold. Au- and Ag-bearing iron sulfides crystallized primarily from melts may be the source of redeposited phases in hydrothermal and hypergene processes. - Highlights: • The samples of Fe–S–Au–Ag system were synthesized. • Coupled solubility of gold and silver in iron sulfides was specified. • Ag–Au inclusions on surfaces of iron sulfides are likely to be enriched in silver. • Au–Ag sulfides can exist along with native gold in pyrite

  20. Dithiocarbamate Complexes as Single Source Precursors to Metal Sulfide Nanoparticles for Applications in Catalysis

    OpenAIRE

    Roffey, A. R.

    2014-01-01

    Herein we report the solvothermal decomposition of a range of metal dithiocarbamate complexes for the synthesis of metal sulfide nanoparticles. Metal sulfides exist in a variety of structural phases, some of which are known to be catalytically active towards various processes. The aim of this work was to synthesise a variety of different metal sulfide phases for future catalysis testing, particularly the iron sulfide greigite (Fe3S4, a thiospinel containing Fe2+ and Fe3+) which is to be teste...

  1. The solubility of iron sulfides and their role in mass transport in Girdler-Sulfide heavy water plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The solubilities of several iron sulfides, mackinawite FeSsub((1-x)), troilite FeS, pyrrhotite Fesub((1-x))S (monoclinic and hexagonal), and pyrite FeS2 have been determined in aqueous H2S solution at 0.1 MPa and 1.8 MPa H2S pressures between 25 deg and 125 deg C. The dependence of solubility on the pH of the medium has also been studied. It is concluded that since mackinawite is the most soluble of the iron sulfides, and has the highest dissolution rate and the steepest decline in solubility with temperature, its prolonged formation during plant operation should be avoided to minimize iron transport from lower to higher temperature areas in Girdler-Sulfide (G.S.) heavy water plants. This can be achieved by a preconditioning of carbon steel surfaces to convert mackinawite to pyrrhotite and pyrite

  2. Identifying the Prospective Area of Sulfide Groundwater within the Area of Palvantash Oil and Gas Deposit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Zhurayev

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the methodology of prospecting for sulfide groundwater in the area of Palvantash oil fields. In result of study allowed determining the favorable conditions for the sulfide waters formation, and mapping the areas of different sulfide water concentration. The relatively permeable areas were established and the water borehole positions were recommended.

  3. Sulfide-iron interactions in domestic wastewater from a gravity sewer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nielsen, A.H.; Lens, P.N.L.; Vollertsen, J.; Hvitved-Jacobsen, Th.

    2005-01-01

    Interactions between iron and sulfide in domestic wastewater from a gravity sewer were investigated with particular emphasis on redox cycling of iron and iron sulfide formation. The concentration ranges of iron and total sulfide in the experiments were 0.4-5.4 mg Fe L-1 and 0-5.1 mg S L-1, respectiv

  4. Thermochemical hydrogen production via a cycle using barium and sulfur - Reaction between barium sulfide and water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, K.; Conger, W. L.

    1977-01-01

    The reaction between barium sulfide and water, a reaction found in several sulfur based thermochemical cycles, was investigated kinetically at 653-866 C. Gaseous products were hydrogen and hydrogen sulfide. The rate determining step for hydrogen formation was a surface reaction between barium sulfide and water. An expression was derived for the rate of hydrogen formation.

  5. 76 FR 64022 - Hydrogen Sulfide; Community Right-to-Know Toxic Chemical Release Reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-17

    ... rule (December 1, 1993, 58 FR 63500). Hydrogen sulfide was listed under the criteria of EPCRA section... EPCRA section 313(d)(2)(B) (see 59 FR 61432, 61433, 61440-61442). Hydrogen sulfide has also been... adding hydrogen sulfide to the EPCRA section 313 list of toxic chemicals (58 FR 63500) (effective...

  6. H2S exposure elicits differential expression of candidate genes in fish adapted to sulfidic and non-sulfidic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobler, Michael; Henpita, Chathurika; Bassett, Brandon; Kelley, Joanna L; Shaw, Jennifer H

    2014-09-01

    Disentangling the effects of plasticity, genetic variation, and their interactions on organismal responses to environmental stressors is a key objective in ecological physiology. We quantified the expression of five candidate genes in response to hydrogen sulfide (H2S) exposure in fish (Poecilia mexicana, Poeciliidae) from a naturally sulfide-rich environment as well as an ancestral, non-sulfidic population to test for constitutive and environmentally dependent population differences in gene expression patterns. Common garden raised individuals that had never encountered environmental H2S during their lifetime were subjected to short or long term H2S exposure treatments or respective non-sulfidic controls. The expression of genes involved in responses to H2S toxicity (cytochrome c oxidase, vascular endothelial growth factor, and cytochrome P450-2J6), H2S detoxification (sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase), and endogenous H2S production (cystathionine γ lyase) was determined in both gill and liver tissues by real time PCR. The results indicated complex changes in expression patterns that--depending on the gene--not only differed between organs and populations, but also on the type of H2S exposure. Populations differences, both constitutive and H2S exposure dependent (i.e., plastic), in gene expression were particularly evident for sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase, vascular endothelial growth factor, and to a lesser degree for cytochrome P450-2J6. Our study uncovered putatively adaptive modifications in gene regulation that parallel previously documented adaptive changes in phenotypic traits. PMID:24813672

  7. The structure of Aquifex aeolicus sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase, a basis to understand sulfide detoxification and respiration

    OpenAIRE

    Marcia, Marco; Ermler, Ulrich; Peng, Guohong; Michel, Hartmut

    2009-01-01

    Sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase (SQR) is a flavoprotein with homologues in all domains of life except plants. It plays a physiological role both in sulfide detoxification and in energy transduction. We isolated the protein from native membranes of the hyperthermophilic bacterium Aquifex aeolicus, and we determined its X-ray structure in the “as-purified,” substrate-bound, and inhibitor-bound forms at resolutions of 2.3, 2.0, and 2.9 Å, respectively. The structure is composed of 2 Rossmann doma...

  8. Alloy selection for sulfidation: oxidation resistance in coal gasification environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradshaw, R.W.; Stoltz, R.E.

    1980-01-01

    A series of iron-nickel-chromium and nickel-chromium alloys were studied for their combined sulfidation-oxidation resistance in simulated coal gasification environments. All alloys contained a minimum of 20 w/o chromium, and titanium and aluminum in the range 0 to 4 w/o. Corrosion resistance was evaluated at 1255/sup 0/K (1800/sup 0/F) in both high BTU and low BTU coal gasification atmospheres with 1 v/o H/sub 2/S. Titanium at levels greater than 1 w/o imparted significant sulfidation resistance due to an adherent, solid solution chromium-titanium oxide layer which prevented sulfur penetration. Aluminum was less effective in preventing sulfidation since surface scales were not adherent. Of the commercial alloys tested, Nimomic 81, Pyromet 31, IN801, and IN825 exhibited the best overall corrosion resistance. However, futher alloy development, tailored to produce solid solution chromium-titanium oxide scales, may lead to alloys with greater sulfidation-oxidation resistance than those investigated here.

  9. Adsorption characteristics of thiobacillus ferrooxidans on surface of sulfide minerals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jian-she; XIE Xue-hui; LI Bang-mei; DONG Qing-hai

    2005-01-01

    By using thiobacillus ferrooxidans (T.f) from Qixiashan, Hubei Province, China, the adsorption characteristics of T.f on surface of sulfide mineral were studied. The influences of adsorption time, pH value, temperature, initial inoculated concentration of bacteria, concentration of sulfide mineral powder, and variety of minerals on the adsorption characteristics were firstly investigated by using the ninhydrin colorimetric method, and the changes of contact angles and Zeta potentials of mineral surface during the bacterial adsorption were then determined. The results show that when the leaching experiments are performed for a long time from several days to a month, the maximal quantity of adsorption of T.f on the surface of pyrite is obtained under the following conditions: leaching for 20 d, pH value in range of 1-2 and temperature at 30 ℃, respectively; when the bio-leaching experiments are performed for a shorter leaching time, the maximal quantity of adsorption is obtained under the conditions: bio-leaching for 2 h, at 2.4×10 7 cell/mL of initial inoculated bacteria concentration, and at 10% of mineral powder concentration; and the adsorption quantities are different form one sulfide mineral to another, and the adsorption of T.f on the surface of sulfide minerals includes three phases: increasing phase, stationary phase and decreasing phase.

  10. Synthesis and photovoltaic application of coper (I) sulfide nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Yue; Wadia, Cyrus; Ma, Wanli; Sadtler, Bryce; Alivisatos, A.Paul

    2008-06-24

    We present the rational synthesis of colloidal copper(I) sulfide nanocrystals and demonstrate their application as an active light absorbing component in combination with CdS nanorods to make a solution-processed solar cell with 1.6percent power conversion efficiency on both conventional glass substrates and flexible plastic substrates with stability over a 4 month testing period.

  11. 40 CFR 721.5075 - Mixed methyltin mercaptoester sulfides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... sulfides (PMN P-92-177) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new uses described.... Requirements as specified in § 721.85 (a)(1) and (a)(2) (only in a facility permitted to landfill Resources Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous wastes with the landfill operated in accordance with subtitle...

  12. Solar thermal extraction of copper and zinc from sulfides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guesdon, C.; Sturzenegger, M.

    2002-03-01

    A novel approach for extracting metals from metal sulfides is proposed. Key feature is the use of concentrated solar radiation to directly convert metal sulfides into the metal and sulfur. Such processes have the potential to produce metals with virtually zero emission of SO{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}. The feasibility of such a solar thermal extraction has been evaluated for zinc sulfide (Zn S) and copper(I)sulfide Cu{sub 2}S. Thermodynamic calculations suggest that for both processes heat recovery from the hot product is required to implement a viable process. Decomposition experiments have indicated that the high reactivity of Zn and S is not compatible with the energy requirement of heat recovery and that quenching will likely be needed to collect Zn. As an alternative, the addition of a mixture of O{sub 2} and steam (chemical quenching) is discussed. The extraction of Cu from Cu{sub 2}S appears less critical: Experiments under N{sub 2} revealed the formation of metallic Cu already at 1323 K. Natural separation of gaseous S from liquid Cu successfully prevents recombination of the two products and at least partial heat recovery can be envisaged. (author)

  13. ISE Analysis of Hydrogen Sulfide in Cigarette Smoke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guofeng; Polk, Brian J.; Meazell, Liz A.; Hatchett, David W.

    2000-08-01

    Many advanced undergraduate analytical laboratory courses focus on exposing students to various modern instruments. However, students rarely have the opportunity to construct their own analytical tools for solving practical problems. We designed an experiment in which students are required to build their own analytical module, a potentiometric device composed of a Ag/AgCl reference electrode, a Ag/Ag2S ion selective electrode (ISE), and a pH meter used as voltmeter, to determine the amount of hydrogen sulfide in cigarette smoke. Very simple techniques were developed for constructing these electrodes. Cigarette smoke is collected by a gas washing bottle into a 0.1 M NaOH solution. The amount of sulfide in the cigarette smoke solution is analyzed by standard addition of sulfide solution while monitoring the response of the Ag/Ag2S ISE. The collected data are further evaluated using the Gran plot technique to determine the concentration of sulfide in the cigarette smoke solution. The experiment has been successfully incorporated into the lab course Instrumental Analysis at Georgia Institute of Technology. Students enjoy the idea of constructing an analytical tool themselves and applying their classroom knowledge to solve real-life problems. And while learning electrochemistry they also get a chance to visualize the health hazard imposed by cigarette smoking.

  14. A coumarin-based colorimetric fluorescent probe for hydrogen sulfide

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yanqiu Yang; Yu Liu; Liang Yang; Jun Liu; Kun Li; Shunzhong Luo

    2015-03-01

    A coumarin-based fluorescent probe for selective detection of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is presented. This `off–on’ probe exhibited high selectivity towards H2S in aqueous solution with a detection limit of 30 nM. Notably, because of its dual nucleophilicity, the probe could avoid the interference of thiols and other sulfur containing compounds.

  15. Potential Applications of Hydrogen Sulfide-Induced Suspended Animation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Aslami; M.J. Schultz; N.P. Juffermans

    2009-01-01

    A suspended animation-like state has been induced in rodents with the use of hydrogen sulfide, resulting in hypothermia with a concomitant reduction in metabolic rate. Also oxygen demand was reduced, thereby protecting against hypoxia. Several therapeutic applications of induction of a hibernation-l

  16. Carbon-supported iron and iron-molybdenum sulfide catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objective was to describe the relations between the characteristics (composition and dispersion) of the actual sulfide phase and the catalytic activity. Attention was also paid to the influence of preparational aspects on these characteristics. The catalysts were characterized using in-situ Moessbauer spectroscopy down to 2.0 K. 254 refs.; 47 figs.; 22 tabs

  17. Hydrogen sulfide release from dairy manure storages containing gypsum bedding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recycled gypsum products can provide a cost-effective bedding alternative for dairy producers. Manufacturers report reduced odors, moisture and bacteria in the stall environment when compared to traditional bedding. Gypsum provides a sulfate source that can be converted to hydrogen sulfide under ana...

  18. Luminescence in Sulfides: A Rich History and a Bright Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe F. Smet

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Sulfide-based luminescent materials have attracted a lot of attention for a wide range of photo-, cathodo- and electroluminescent applications. Upon doping with Ce3+ and Eu2+, the luminescence can be varied over the entire visible region by appropriately choosing the composition of the sulfide host. Main application areas are flat panel displays based on thin film electroluminescence, field emission displays and ZnS-based powder electroluminescence for backlights. For these applications, special attention is given to BaAl2S4:Eu, ZnS:Mn and ZnS:Cu. Recently, sulfide materials have regained interest due to their ability (in contrast to oxide materials to provide a broad band, Eu2+-based red emission for use as a color conversion material in white-light emitting diodes (LEDs. The potential application of rare-earth doped binary alkaline-earth sulfides, like CaS and SrS, thiogallates, thioaluminates and thiosilicates as conversion phosphors is discussed. Finally, this review concludes with the size-dependent luminescence in intrinsic colloidal quantum dots like PbS and CdS, and with the luminescence in doped nanoparticles.

  19. 40 CFR 425.04 - Applicability of sulfide pretreatment standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Applicability of sulfide pretreatment standards. 425.04 Section 425.04 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS LEATHER TANNING AND FINISHING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY General Provisions § 425.04 Applicability of...

  20. Estimation of bacterial hydrogen sulfide production in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amina Basic

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Oral bacterial hydrogen sulfide (H2S production was estimated comparing two different colorimetric methods in microtiter plate format. High H2S production was seen for Fusobacterium spp., Treponema denticola, and Prevotella tannerae, associated with periodontal disease. The production differed between the methods indicating that H2S production may follow different pathways.

  1. Support Effect in the Hydrodesulfurization of Thiophene over Rhodium Sulfide

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kaluža, Luděk; Vít, Zdeněk; Zdražil, Miroslav

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 101, č. 1 (2010), s. 63-72. ISSN 1878-5190 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/09/0751 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : hydrodesulfurization * thiophene * rhodium sulfide Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering

  2. Sulfide Oxidation in the Anoxic Black-Sea Chemocline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    JØRGENSEN, BB; FOSSING, H.; WIRSEN, CO; JANNASCH, HW

    1991-01-01

    The depth distributions of O2 and H2S and of the activity of chemical or bacterial sulfide oxidation were studied in the chemocline of the central Black Sea. Relative to measurements from earlier studies, the sulfide zone had moved upwards by 20-50 m and was now (May 1988) situated at a depth of 81...... per day, occurred in anoxic water at the top of the sulfide zone concurrent with the highest rates of dark CO2 assimilation. The main soluble oxidized products of sulfide were thiosulfate (68-82%) and sulfate. Indirect evidence was presented for the formation of elemental sulfur which accumulated to a...... that the measured H2S oxidation rates were 4-fold higher than could be explained by the downward flux of organic carbon and too high to balance the availability of electron acceptors such as oxidized iron or manganese. A nitrate maximum at the lower boundary of the O2 zone did not extend down to the...

  3. New Findings in Hydrogen Sulfide Related Corrosion of Concrete Sewers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Asbjørn Haaning; Jensen, Henriette Stokbro; Hvitved-Jacobsen, Thorkild;

    2009-01-01

    This paper summarizes major findings of a long-term study of hydrogen sulfide gas (H2S) adsorption and oxidation on concrete and plastic sewer pipe surfaces. The processes have been studied using a pilot-scale setup designed to replicate conditions in a gravity sewer located downstream of a force...

  4. Sulfide intrusion in the tropical seagrasses Thalassia testudinum and Syringodium filiforme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmer, Marianne; Pedersen, Ole; Krause-Jensen, Dorte;

    2009-01-01

    sediment-derived sulfides. The sulfide intrusion was negatively correlated to the turnover of sulfides in the sediments regulated by both plant parameters and sediment sulfur pools. Sediment iron content played an indirect role by affecting sulfide turnover rates. Leaf production was negatively correlated...

  5. Blood parameters and metabolites in the teleost fish Colossoma macropomum exposed to sulfide or hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affonso, E G; Polez, V L P; Corrêa, C F; Mazon, A F; Araújo, M R R; Moraes, G; Rantin, F T

    2002-11-01

    Juvenile tambaqui, Colossoma macropomum, were exposed to sulfide and hypoxia for 12, 24, 48 and 96 h. Hemoglobin concentrations, red blood cell counts, and mean cell hemoglobin, were higher at 12 h in fish exposed to hypoxia. However, control fish and those exposed to sulfide and hypoxia had lower red blood cell count, hemoglobin concentration and hematocrit at 96 h. Methemoglobin was higher than in the controls, probably due to the hypoxemia induced by these stressors. Sulfhemoglobin was not detected in significant amounts in the blood of fish exposed to sulfide (in vivo), yet hemoglobin converted into sulfhemoglobin at 1-15 mM sulfide in vitro. Anaerobic metabolism seemed to be an important mechanism for adapting to sulfide exposure and blood pH returned to control values after 24 h of sulfide, preventing acidosis. The high sulfide tolerance in tambaqui is associated with its high tolerance to hypoxia. PMID:12379422

  6. Conversion kinetics for smelt anions: cyanate and sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeMartini, N.

    2004-07-01

    Cyanate and sulfide are two anions found in the molten salts (smelt) from the kraft recovery boiler of the chemical recovery cycle. Their concentrations in smelt are significantly different, as are their origins. The concentration of cyanate in smelt ranges between 0.4 and 2.1 g OCN{sup -}/kg smelt while the concentration of sulfide ranges between 78 and 115 g S{sup 2-}/kg smelt. Cyanate is a by-product of black liquor combustion. It is formed from organic nitrogen compounds in black liquor during the char burning stage. The charge of the cyanate anion is balanced by the alkali metals found in smelt, namely sodium and potassium. It has been found that the nitrogen in cyanate represents about 30% of the nitrogen entering the recovery boiler with the black liquor. This flow is similar in magnitude to the flows of black liquor nitrogen exiting the recovery boiler as the gaseous compounds NO and N{sub 2}. The method for cyanate analysis used in this work is presented in the Methods chapter of this thesis and Paper I. The results from nitrogen balances at three European kraft pulp mills are discussed in this thesis and Papers II and III, with a focus on the fate of cyanate in the recovery boiler and recausticizing process. Cyanate exits the recovery boiler with the smelt and reacts to form ammonia in the recausticizing solutions of the chemical recovery cycle. Papers IV and V of this thesis focus on the rate of ammonia formation from cyanate in model solutions and in kraft green liquors. The experiments were carried out at temperatures of 80 to 95 deg C, which are temperatures similar to those found in the recausticizing process of a kraft pulp mill. The kinetic studies help clarify the catalytic effect of bicarbonate. A rate equation applicable for use in describing ammonia formation from cyanate in highly alkaline solutions such as pulp mill recovery streams is presented. The sulfide anion, on the other hand, is a desired product of black liquor combustion as the

  7. Cadmium sulfide and lead sulfide quantum dots in glass: Processing, growth, and optical absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Pratima Gattu Naga

    Glasses containing cadmium sulfide and lead sulfide particles were prepared, and their properties were studied. These particles exhibit quantum confinement behavior when they are smaller than their Bohr exciton radii. Quantum confinement leads to size dependence in the optical absorption of particles. This size dependence can tune the optical absorption of the material to a particular wavelength or energy and possibly enhances the nonlinear optical absorption of the particles. These properties have potential applications in photonic devices. To control the growth of these semiconductor particles in glass, the glass processing conditions were studied. CdS-doped glasses were initially prepared with CdO and ZnS. The sublimation temperature for ZnS is at 1185°C; whereas, CdO sublimes at 1559°C, and CdS at 980°C. Loss of both cadmium and sulfur was observed in open crucible melts, even when CdO and ZnS were used. Improvements in glass processing were made by use of preheat and a cover during the glass melting, resulting in better retention of both dopants. Direct CdS addition to the glasses was possible with these improvements, thus eliminating complications of zinc incorporation during the growth of the semiconductor particles. These methods were successfully applied to the synthesis of PbS-doped glasses. CdS and PbS particles were grown in alkali borosilicate glasses, and their optical absorption spectra were measured as a function of heat treatment temperature and time. The position of the absorption peak and edge shifted to longer wave-lengths, or lower energies, with longer heat treatments at a constant temperature. Both CdS and PbS particles exhibited quantum confinement. These measurements were used to calculate particle sizes from quantum confinement models. Comparisons with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) demonstrated that the 1-term effective-mass approximation was appropriate for estimating CdS particle sizes. A sophisticated four-band envelope

  8. The removal of hydrogen sulfide from gas streams using an aqueous metal sulfate absorbent : Part II. the regeneration of copper sulfide to copper oxide - An experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ter Maat, H.; Hogendoorn, J. A.; Versteeg, G. F.

    2005-01-01

    Aim of this study was to investigate the possibilities for a selective and efficient method to convert copper(II) sulfide (CuS) into copper(II) oxide (CuO). The oxidation of copper sulfide has been studied experimentally using a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) at temperatures ranging from 450 to 75

  9. Structure and reactivity of zinc sulfide precipitates formed in the presence of sulfate-reducing bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Biogenic zinc sulfides exhibit short-range structural order. → This structural order increases resistance to re-oxidation. → Dissolved Fe and Zn formed distinct sulfide phases. - Abstract: The biologically mediated formation of metal sulfide precipitates in anoxic sediments represents a potentially important mechanism for the sequestration of toxic metals. Current knowledge of the structure and reactivity of these biogenic metal sulfides is scarce, limiting the ability to effectively assess contaminant sequestration in, and remobilization from, these solids. In this study, SO4-reducing bacteria (Desulfovibrio sp.) were grown for 5 days in a high-SO4, minimal metal media amended with Zn at either 30 or 300 micromolar. Zinc speciation in the reactor solids was determined using X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and the results compared to spectra of known metal sulfide mineral phases and freshly formed metal sulfides synthesized through purely chemical processes. Biogenically mediated Zn sulfides showed significantly more short range crystallographic order than the abiotically prepared amorphous precipitates. The presence of dissolved Fe2+ at similar concentrations did not affect the nature of the Zn precipitates formed. The biogenic ZnS solids were also more resistant to re-oxidation than the chemical precipitates but more soluble than sphalerite mineral samples. These results suggest that Zn sulfides formed in anaerobic sediments are likely to be more resistant to re-oxidation than would be expected based on dissolution of Fe sulfides and/or sediment acid volatile sulfides.

  10. Oxygen-free atomic layer deposition of indium sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinson, Alex B.; Hock, Adam S.; McCarthy, Robert; Weimer, Matthew S.

    2016-07-05

    A method for synthesizing an In(III) N,N'-diisopropylacetamidinate precursor including cooling a mixture comprised of diisopropylcarbodiimide and diethyl ether to approximately -30.degree. C., adding methyllithium drop-wise into the mixture, allowing the mixture to warm to room temperature, adding indium(III) chloride as a solid to the mixture to produce a white solid, dissolving the white solid in pentane to form a clear and colorless solution, filtering the mixture over a celite plug, and evaporating the solution under reduced pressure to obtain a solid In(III) N,N'-diisopropylacetamidinate precursor. This precursor has been further used to develop a novel atomic layer deposition technique for indium sulfide by dosing a reactor with the precursor, purging with nitrogen, dosing with dilute hydrogen sulfide, purging again with nitrogen, and repeating these steps to increase growth.

  11. The bioleaching of different sulfide concentrates using thermophilic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, F.; Blázquez, M. L.; González, F.; Ballester, A.; Mier, J. L.

    1995-05-01

    The bioleaching of different mineral sulfide concentrates with thermophilic bacteria (genus Sulfolobus @#@) was studied. Since the use of this type of bacteria in leaching systems involves stirring and the control of temperature, the influence of the type of stirring and the pulp density on dissolution rates was studied in order to ascertain the optimum conditions for metal recovery. At low pulp densities, the dissolution kinetic was favored by pneumatic stirring, but for higher pulp densities, orbital stirring produced the best results. A comparative study of three differential concentrates, one mixed concentrate, and one global concentrate was made. Copper and iron extraction is directly influenced by bacterial activity, while zinc dissolution is basically due to an indirect mechanism that is activated in the presence of copper ions. Galvanic interactions between the different sulfides favors the selective bioleaching of some phases (sphalerite and chalcopyrite) and leads to high metal recovery rates. However, the formation of galvanic couples depends on the type of concentrate.

  12. 'Low-acid' sulfide oxidation using nitrate-enriched groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donn, Michael; Boxall, Naomi; Reid, Nathan; Meakin, Rebecca; Gray, David; Kaksonen, Anna; Robson, Thomas; Shiers, Denis

    2016-04-01

    Acid drainage (AMD/ARD) is undoubtedly one of the largest environmental, legislative and economic challenges facing the mining industry. In Australia alone, at least 60m is spent on AMD related issues annually, and the global cost is estimated to be in the order of tens of billions US. Furthermore, the challenge of safely and economically storing or treating sulfidic wastes will likely intensify because of the trend towards larger mines that process increasingly higher volumes of lower grade ores and the associated sulfidic wastes and lower profit margins. While the challenge of managing potentially acid forming (PAF) wastes will likely intensify, the industrial approaches to preventing acid production or ameliorating the effects has stagnated for decades. Conventionally, PAF waste is segregated and encapsulated in non-PAF tips to limit access to atmospheric oxygen. Two key limitations of the 'cap and cover' approach are: 1) the hazard (PAF) is not actually removed; only the pollutant linkage is severed; and, 2) these engineered structures are susceptible to physical failure in short-to-medium term, potentially re-establishing that pollutant linkage. In an effort to address these concerns, CSIRO is investigating a passive, 'low-acid' oxidation mechanism for sulfide treatment, which can potentially produce one quarter as much acidity compared with pyrite oxidation under atmospheric oxygen. This 'low-acid' mechanism relies on nitrate, rather than oxygen, as the primary electron accepter and the activity of specifically cultured chemolithoautotrophic bacteria and archaea communities. This research was prompted by the observation that, in deeply weathered terrains of Australia, shallow (oxic to sub-oxic) groundwater contacting weathering sulfides are commonly inconsistent with the geochemical conditions produced by ARD. One key characteristic of these aquifers is the natural abundance of nitrate on a regional scale, which becomes depleted around the sulfide bodies, and

  13. L-Cysteine-assisted Synthesis of Copper Gallium Sulfide Microspheres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Xiao-juan; ZHONG Jia-song; CAI Qian; HUANG Hai-yu; LIU Hai-tao; XIANG Wei-dong; SUN Jun-cai

    2012-01-01

    An effective L-cysteine-assisted synthetic route has been successfully developed to prepare copper gallium sulfide(CuGaS2) microspheres under solvothermal conditions with CuCI2-2H2O,GaCl3 and L-cysteine as source materials,in which L-cysteine was used as the sulfide source and eomplexing molecule.The experiments revealed that the synthesized sample was of a typical CuGaS2 tetragonal structure.Moreover,the prepared CuGaS2 crystals consisting of microspheres made up of nanoflakes,and the diameter of the nanoflakes was about 20 nm.Raman spectrum of the obtained CuGaS2 exhibits a high-intensity peak of the A1 mode at 306 cm-1.Meanwhile,a possible growth mechanism was proposed based on the investigations.

  14. Oxygen-free atomic layer deposition of indium sulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinson, Alex B.; Hock, Adam S.; McCarthy, Robert; Weimer, Matthew S.

    2016-07-05

    A method for synthesizing an In(III) N,N'-diisopropylacetamidinate precursor including cooling a mixture comprised of diisopropylcarbodiimide and diethyl ether to approximately -30.degree. C., adding methyllithium drop-wise into the mixture, allowing the mixture to warm to room temperature, adding indium(III) chloride as a solid to the mixture to produce a white solid, dissolving the white solid in pentane to form a clear and colorless solution, filtering the mixture over a celite plug, and evaporating the solution under reduced pressure to obtain a solid In(III) N,N'-diisopropylacetamidinate precursor. This precursor has been further used to develop a novel atomic layer deposition technique for indium sulfide by dosing a reactor with the precursor, purging with nitrogen, dosing with dilute hydrogen sulfide, purging again with nitrogen, and repeating these steps to increase growth.

  15. Potential impact of climate change on marine dimethyl sulfide emissions

    OpenAIRE

    Bopp, Laurent; Aumont, Oliver; Belviso, Sauveur; MONFRAY, PATRICK

    2011-01-01

    Dimethyl sulfide (DMS) is a biogenic compound produced in sea-surface water and outgased to the atmosphere. Once in the atmosphere, DMS is a significant source of cloud condensation nuclei in the unpolluted marine atmosphere. It has been postulated that climate may be partly modulated by variations in DMS production through a DMS-cloud condensation nuclei-albedo feedback. We present here a modelled estimation of the response of DMS sea-water concentrations and DMS fluxes to climate change, fo...

  16. Ocean color and atmospheric dimethyl sulfide: On their mesoscale variability

    OpenAIRE

    Matrai, Patricia A.; Balch, William M; Cooper, David J; Saltzman, Eric S.

    1993-01-01

    The mesoscale variability of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and ocean color is explored to determine the feasibility of a predictive relationship. During NASA's Global Tropospheric Experiment/Chemical Instrumentation Test and Evaluation (GTE/CITE 3), simultaneous shipboard and aircraft studies were carried out in the North Atlantic, followed by aircraft studies in the South Atlantic. Surface concentrations of chlorophyll a were measured with an airborne spectroradiometer, the Ocean Data Acquisition S...

  17. Is Hydrogen Sulfide-Induced Suspended Animation General Anesthesia?

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Rosie Q.; McKinstry, Andrew R.; Moore, Jason T.; Caltagarone, Breanna M.; Eckenhoff, Maryellen F.; Eckenhoff, Roderic G.; Kelz, Max B.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) depresses mitochondrial function and thereby metabolic rates in mice, purportedly resulting in a state of “suspended animation.” Volatile anesthetics also depress mitochondrial function, an effect that may contribute to their anesthetic properties. In this study, we ask whether H2S has general anesthetic properties, and by extension, whether mitochondrial effects underlie the state of anesthesia. We compared loss of righting reflex, electroencephalography, and electromy...

  18. Laboratory SIP signatures associated with oxidation of disseminated metal sulfides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Placencia-Gómez, Edmundo; Slater, Lee; Ntarlagiannis, Dimitrios; Binley, Andrew

    2013-05-01

    Oxidation of metal sulfide minerals is responsible for the generation of acidic waters rich in sulfate and metals. When associated with the oxidation of sulfide ore mine waste deposits the resulting pore water is called acid mine drainage (AMD); AMD is a known environmental problem that affects surface and ground waters. Characterization of oxidation processes in-situ is challenging, particularly at the field scale. Geophysical techniques, spectral induced polarization (SIP) in particular, may provide a means of such investigation. We performed laboratory experiments to assess the sensitivity of the SIP method to the oxidation mechanisms of common sulfide minerals found in mine waste deposits, i.e., pyrite and pyrrhotite, when the primary oxidant agent is dissolved oxygen. We found that SIP parameters, e.g., phase shift, the imaginary component of electrical conductivity and total chargeability, decrease as the time of exposure to oxidation and oxidation degree increase. This observation suggests that dissolution-depletion of the mineral surface reduces the capacitive properties and polarizability of the sulfide minerals. However, small increases in the phase shift and imaginary conductivity do occur during oxidation. These transient increases appear to correlate with increases of soluble oxidizing products, e.g., Fe(2+) and Fe(3+) in solution; precipitation of secondary minerals and the formation of a passivating layer to oxidation coating the mineral surface may also contribute to these increases. In contrast, the real component of electrical conductivity associated with electrolytic, electronic and interfacial conductance is sensitive to changes in the pore fluid chemistry as a result of the soluble oxidation products released (Fe(2+) and Fe(3+)), particularly for the case of pyrrhotite minerals. PMID:23531431

  19. Structural, electronic and optical properties of cadmium sulfide nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Frenzel, Johannes

    2007-01-01

    In this work, the structural, electronic, and optical properties of CdS nanoparticles with sizes up to 4nm have been calculated using density-functional theory (DFT). Inaccuracies in the description of the unoccupied states of the applied density-functional based tight-binding method (DFTB) are overcome by a new SCF-DFTB method. Density-functional-based calculations employing linear-response theory have been performed on cadmium sulfide nanoparticles considering different stoichiometries, und...

  20. Evaluation of methods for monitoring air concentrations of hydrogen sulfide

    OpenAIRE

    Katarzyna Janoszka; Agata Wziątek; Gromiec, Jan P.

    2013-01-01

    The development of different branches of industry and a growing fossil fuels mining results in a considerable emission of by-products. Major air pollutants are: CO, CO₂, SO₂, SO₃, H₂S, nitrogen oxides, as well as compounds of an organic origin. The main aspects of this paper is to review and evaluate methods used for monitoring of hydrogen sulfide in the air. Different instrumental techniques were discussed, electrochemical, chromatographic and spectrophotometric (wet and dry), to select the ...

  1. Endogenous Hydrogen Sulfide Production Is Essential for Dietary Restriction Benefits

    OpenAIRE

    Hine, Christopher; Harputlugil, Eylul; Zhang, Yue; Ruckenstuhl, Christoph; Lee, Byung Cheon; Brace, Lear; Longchamp, Alban; Trevino-Villarreal, Jose H.; Mejia, Pedro; Ozaki, C. Keith; Wang, Rui; Gladyshev, Vadim N.; Madeo, Frank; Mair, William B.; Mitchell, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Dietary restriction (DR) without malnutrition encompasses numerous regimens with overlapping benefits including longevity and stress resistance, but unifying nutritional and molecular mechanisms remain elusive. In a mouse model of DR-mediated stress resistance, we found that sulfur amino acid (SAA) restriction increased expression of the transsulfuration pathway (TSP) enzyme cystathionine γ-lyase (CGL), resulting in increased hydrogen sulfide (H2S) production and protection from hepatic ische...

  2. Method of purifying oil and bed water from hydrogen sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyadechko, V.N.; Kuzovatkin, R.I.; Nesterov, I.N.; Stavitskiy, B.P.

    1982-01-01

    A method is proposed for purifying oil and bed water of hydrogen sulfide by treatment with a chemical reagent. It is distinguished by the fact that in order to prevent the formation of corrosion-aggressive side products and sulfate-reducing bacteria, in the bed water the chemical reagent complex compounds of copper-hexaamine copper (II) hydroxide or tetraamine copper (II) hydroxide are used in the form of 0.05% aqueous solution.

  3. Brassica juncea Produces a Phytochelatin-Cadmium-Sulfide Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speiser, D M; Abrahamson, S L; Banuelos, G; Ow, D W

    1992-07-01

    Phytochelatins (PCs) are enzymically synthesized peptides produced in higher plants and some fungi upon exposure to heavy metals. We have examined PC production in the Se-tolerant wild mustard Brassica juncea and found that it produces two types of PC-Cd complexes with the same characteristics as those from fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, including a high molecular weight PC-Cd-sulfide form. PMID:16669006

  4. Brassica juncea Produces a Phytochelatin-Cadmium-Sulfide Complex 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speiser, David M.; Abrahamson, Susan L.; Banuelos, Gary; Ow, David W.

    1992-01-01

    Phytochelatins (PCs) are enzymically synthesized peptides produced in higher plants and some fungi upon exposure to heavy metals. We have examined PC production in the Se-tolerant wild mustard Brassica juncea and found that it produces two types of PC-Cd complexes with the same characteristics as those from fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, including a high molecular weight PC-Cd-sulfide form. PMID:16669006

  5. Formation of iron sulfide nodules during anaerobic oxidation

    OpenAIRE

    van Dongen, B. E.; Organic Geochemistry Unit, Bristol Biogeochemistry Research Centre, School of Chemistry, Cantock’s Close, Bristol University, Bristol BS8 1TS, United Kingdom; Roberts, A. P.; National Oceanography Centre, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK.; Schouten, S.; Department of Marine Biogeochemistry, Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research, P.O. Box 59, 1790 AB Den Burg, Texel, The Netherlands; Jiang, W-T; Department of Earth Sciences, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan, PR China; Florindo, F.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Roma2, Roma, Italia; Pancost, R. D.; Organic Geochemistry Unit, Bristol Biogeochemistry Research Centre, School of Chemistry, Cantock’s Close, Bristol University, Bristol BS8 1TS, United Kingdom

    2007-01-01

    The biomarker compositions of iron sulfide nodules (ISNs; upper Pliocene Valle Ricca section near Rome, Italy) that contain the ferrimagnetic mineral greigite (Fe3S4) were examined. In addition to the presence of specific terrestrial and marine biomarkers, consistent with formation in coastal marine sediments, these ISNs contain compounds thought to originate from sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB). These compounds include a variety of low-molecular-weight and branched alkanols and seve...

  6. Discrimination among iron sulfide species formed in microbial cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popa, R; Kinkle, B K

    2000-10-01

    A quantitative method for the study of iron sulfides precipitated in liquid cultures of bacteria is described. This method can be used to quantify and discriminate among amorphous iron sulfide (FeS(amorph)), iron monosulfide minerals such as mackinawite or greigite (FeS(min)), and iron disulfide minerals such as pyrite or marcasite (FeS(2min)) formed in liquid cultures. Degradation of iron sulfides is performed using a modified Cr(2+) reduction method with reflux distillation. The basic steps of the method are: first, separation of FeS(amorph); second, elimination of interfering species of S such as colloidal sulfur (S(c) degrees ), thiosulphate (S(2)O(3)(2-)) and polysulfides (S(x)(2-)); third, separation of FeS(min); and fourth, separation of FeS(2min). The final product is H(2)S which is determined after trapping. The efficiency of recovery is 96-99% for FeS(amorph), 76-88% for FeS(min), and >97% for FeS(2min). This method has a high reproducibility if the experimental conditions are rigorously applied and only glass conduits are used. A well ventilated fume hood must be used because of the toxicity and volatility of several reagents and products. The advantage relative to previously described methods are better resolution for iron sulfide species and use of the same bottles for both incubation of cultures and acid degradation. The method can also be used for Fe/S stoichiometry with sub-sampling and Fe analysis. PMID:11018273

  7. Fabrication and applications of copper sulfide (CuS) nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamraiz, Umair; Hussain, Raja Azadar; Badshah, Amin

    2016-06-01

    This review article presents different fabrication procedures (under the headlines of solvothermal routes, aerosol methods, solution methods and thermolysis), and applications (photocatalytic degradation, ablation of cancer cells, electrode material in lithium ion batteries and in gas sensing, organic solar cells, field emission properties, super capacitor applications, photoelectrochemical performance of QDSCs, photocatalytic reduction of organic pollutants, electrochemical bio sensing, enhanced PEC characteristics of pre-annealed CuS film electrodes) of copper sulfide (Covellite).

  8. Spurious hydrogen sulfide production by Providencia and Escherichia coli species.

    OpenAIRE

    Treleaven, B E; Diallo, A. A.; Renshaw, E C

    1980-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide production was noted in two Escherichia coli strands and one Provaidenica alcalifaciens (Proteus inconstans A) strain isolated from clinical stool specimens durin the summer of 1979. An investigation into this phenomenon revealed the predence of Eubacterium lentum, an anaerobe, growing in synergism with the Enterobacteriaceae and producing H2s. The implications of this association are discssed with reference to clinical microbiology laboratory practice.

  9. Support Effect in Hydrodesulfurization of Thiophene over Rhodium Sulfide

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kaluža, Luděk; Vít, Zdeněk; Zdražil, Miroslav

    Prague: J. Heyrovský Institute of Physical Chemistry of the ASCR, v.v.i, 2009, s. 74-75. ISBN 978-80-87351-04-8. [Symposium on Catalysis /41./. Prague (CZ), 02.11.2009-03.11.2009] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/09/0751 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : hydrodesulfurization * rhodium sulfide * support effect Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  10. Productivity-Diversity Relationships from Chemolithoautotrophically Based Sulfidic Karst Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Porter Megan L.; Summers Engel Annette; Kane Thomas C.; Kinkle Brian K.

    2009-01-01

    Although ecosystems thriving in the absence of photosynthetic processes are no longer considered unique phenomena, we haveyet to understand how these ecosystems are energetically sustained via chemosynthesis. Ecosystem energetics were measuredin microbial mats from active sulfidic caves (Movile Cave, Romania; Frasassi Caves, Italy; Lower Kane Cave, Wyoming, USA; andCesspool Cave, Virginia, USA) using radiotracer techniques. We also estimated bacterial diversity using 16S rRNA sequences torela...

  11. Study of crystallization behavior of poly(phenylene sulfide)

    OpenAIRE

    Liliana B. Nohara; Evandro L. Nohara; Andreza Moura; Joseane M. R. P. Gonçalves; Michelle L. Costa; Mirabel C. Rezende

    2006-01-01

    Poly(phenylene sulfide) (PPS) is an engineering thermoplastic polymer that presents high temperature resistance (glass transition temperature around 85 ºC and melting point at 285 ºC). These properties combined with its mechanical properties and its high chemical resistance allows its use in technological applications such as molding resins and as matrix for structural thermoplastic composites. During the manufacture of thermoplastic composites, the polymer is exposed to repeated melting, que...

  12. Evaluation of methods for monitoring air concentrations of hydrogen sulfide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Janoszka

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The development of different branches of industry and a growing fossil fuels mining results in a considerable emission of by-products. Major air pollutants are: CO, CO₂, SO₂, SO₃, H₂S, nitrogen oxides, as well as compounds of an organic origin. The main aspects of this paper is to review and evaluate methods used for monitoring of hydrogen sulfide in the air. Different instrumental techniques were discussed, electrochemical, chromatographic and spectrophotometric (wet and dry, to select the method most suitable for monitoring low levels of hydrogen sulfide, close to its odor threshold. Based on the literature review the method for H₂S determination in the air, involving absorption in aqueous zinc acetate and reaction with N,N-dimethylo-p-phenylodiamine and FeCl₃, has been selected and preliminary verified. The adopted method allows for routine measurements of low concentration of hydrogen sulfide, close to its odor threshold in workplaces and ambient air. Med Pr 2013;64(3:449–454

  13. Benzothiazole sulfide compatibilized polypropylene/halloysite nanotubes composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mingxian; Guo, Baochun; Lei, Yanda; Du, Mingliang; Jia, Demin

    2009-02-01

    Clay-philic benzothiazole sulfide, capable of donating electrons, is grafted onto polypropylene (PP) backbones when N-cyclohexyl-2-benzothiazole sulfonamide (CBS), a commonly used accelerator in the tire industry, is included in the processing of PP/halloysite nanotubes (HNTs) composites. CBS decomposes at elevated temperature and yields benzothiazole sulfide radicals, which react with the PP polymeric free radicals generated during the processing of the composites. On the other hand, the benzothiazole group of CBS is reactive to HNTs via electron transferring. The compatibilization between HNTs and PP is thus realized via interfacial grafting and electron transferring mechanism. The interfacial interactions in the compatibilized systems were fully characterized. Compared with the control sample, the dispersion of HNTs and the interfacial bonding are enhanced substantially in the compatibilized composites. The significantly improved mechanical properties and thermal properties of benzothiazole sulfide compatibilized PP/HNTs composites are correlated to the enhanced interfacial property. The present work demonstrates a novel interfacial design via interfacial grafting/electron transferring for the compatibilization of PP/clay composites.

  14. Benzothiazole sulfide compatibilized polypropylene/halloysite nanotubes composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clay-philic benzothiazole sulfide, capable of donating electrons, is grafted onto polypropylene (PP) backbones when N-cyclohexyl-2-benzothiazole sulfonamide (CBS), a commonly used accelerator in the tire industry, is included in the processing of PP/halloysite nanotubes (HNTs) composites. CBS decomposes at elevated temperature and yields benzothiazole sulfide radicals, which react with the PP polymeric free radicals generated during the processing of the composites. On the other hand, the benzothiazole group of CBS is reactive to HNTs via electron transferring. The compatibilization between HNTs and PP is thus realized via interfacial grafting and electron transferring mechanism. The interfacial interactions in the compatibilized systems were fully characterized. Compared with the control sample, the dispersion of HNTs and the interfacial bonding are enhanced substantially in the compatibilized composites. The significantly improved mechanical properties and thermal properties of benzothiazole sulfide compatibilized PP/HNTs composites are correlated to the enhanced interfacial property. The present work demonstrates a novel interfacial design via interfacial grafting/electron transferring for the compatibilization of PP/clay composites.

  15. Benzothiazole sulfide compatibilized polypropylene/halloysite nanotubes composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Mingxian [Department of Polymer Materials and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Guo Baochun, E-mail: psbcguo@scut.edu.cn [Department of Polymer Materials and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Lei Yanda; Du Mingliang; Jia Demin [Department of Polymer Materials and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2009-02-15

    Clay-philic benzothiazole sulfide, capable of donating electrons, is grafted onto polypropylene (PP) backbones when N-cyclohexyl-2-benzothiazole sulfonamide (CBS), a commonly used accelerator in the tire industry, is included in the processing of PP/halloysite nanotubes (HNTs) composites. CBS decomposes at elevated temperature and yields benzothiazole sulfide radicals, which react with the PP polymeric free radicals generated during the processing of the composites. On the other hand, the benzothiazole group of CBS is reactive to HNTs via electron transferring. The compatibilization between HNTs and PP is thus realized via interfacial grafting and electron transferring mechanism. The interfacial interactions in the compatibilized systems were fully characterized. Compared with the control sample, the dispersion of HNTs and the interfacial bonding are enhanced substantially in the compatibilized composites. The significantly improved mechanical properties and thermal properties of benzothiazole sulfide compatibilized PP/HNTs composites are correlated to the enhanced interfacial property. The present work demonstrates a novel interfacial design via interfacial grafting/electron transferring for the compatibilization of PP/clay composites.

  16. A kit for preparation of 188Re sulfide suspension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 188Re sulfide suspension could be prepared quickly by a kit. The kit consists of three 10 mL vials. All the procedures were carried out in sterility circumstance. Vial A consisted of 1 mL KReO4 and Na2S2O3 (mole ratio 1:70) solution with excipient. Vial B was 5 mol/L HCl solution. Vial C consisted of 1.5 mL PVP and NaOH solution (mole ratio 1000:1). Vial B was sealed, Vial A and C were freeze-dried. Bacterium check, endotoxin check and security check were qualified. Kits were kept at ambient temperature and the Labelling efficiency of 188Re sulfide suspension was more than 98% with 2 months. The particle sizes were 1-5 μm (60.1 +- 12.7)%; 5-10 μm (30.9 +- 8.1)%; > 10 μm (9.0 +- 4.7)%. The radiochemical purity of 188Re sulfide suspension made by the kit was higher than 98% in 5 days with particle sizes 1-5 μm (49.9 +- 14.4%); 5-10 μm (41.1 +- 5.4)%; > 10μm (9.0 +- 3.3)%

  17. Magnetite-sulfide-metal complexes in the Allende meteorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haggerty, S. E.; Mcmahon, B. M.

    1979-01-01

    A model of liquid immiscibility is presented that seemingly accounts for the sulfide-oxide-metal complexes that are present in olivine-rich chondrules in the Allende meteorite. The four major assemblages that are identified are: (1) magnetite + Ni-Fe metal; (2) magnetite + troilite + Ni-Fe metal; (3) magnetite + troilite + pentlandite + Ni-Fe metal; and (4) troilite + or - pentlandite. Specific attention is focused on oxide-metal associations and experimental data confirm earlier suggestions that magnetite results from the oxidation of an initially high-Fe-content metal alloy. Oxidation decreases the modal abundance of the Fe metal and this is accompanied by substantial increases in Ni contents which reach a maximum of approximately 70 wt % Ni. The proposed oxidation mechanism is entirely consistent with condensation of Fe-metal + olivine (Fa5) that subsequently reequilibrated at lower temperatures. Although the sulfide constituents could also have formed by the reaction of Fe-Ni metal + gaseous H2S, sulfide immiscibility under increased conditions of partial O2 pressure is the preferred process.

  18. A recovery installation for sodium sulfates, thiosulfates and sulfides from waste water resulting from hydrogen sulfide fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An installation for recovery of sodium sulfate and sulfur suspensions from waste water was conceived. It consists from a preheater, vacuum evaporator and a refrigerating system with drum and scraper. This equipment concentration the solution by eliminating in the first stage the water in the vacuum evaporator. The water resulting at this stage is chemically pure and can be discharged in the sewage sludge system. The concentrated solution is then directed to the refrigerating system with drum and scrapper. Here the sodium sulfates, thiosulfates and sulfides get crystallized onto the drum surface. The resulting aqueous solution to be discharged in the sewage sludge system is previously analyzed as in case of the absent of the recovery installation, but the amount of pollutants will be much lower because sulfates, thiosulfates and sulfides were already recovered as scales from the drum. These solid scales can be used in detergent industry

  19. Regulation of bacterial sulfate reduction and hydrogen sulfide fluxes in the central Namibian coastal upwelling zone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruchert, V.; Jørgensen, BB; Neumann, K.;

    2003-01-01

    low capacity to oxidize and trap sulfide. The inner shelf break marks the seaward border of sulfidic bottom waters, and separates two different regimes of bacterial sulfate reduction. In the sulfidic bottom waters on the shelf, up to 55% of sulfide oxidation is mediated by the large nitrate......The coastal upwelling system off central Namibia is one of the most productive regions of the oceans and is characterized by frequently occurring shelf anoxia with severe effects for the benthic life and fisheries. We present data on water column dissolved oxygen, sulfide, nitrate and nitrite, pore...... water profiles for dissolved,sulfide and sulfate, S-35-sulfate reduction rates, as well as bacterial counts of large sulfur bacteria from 20 stations across the continental shelf and slope. The stations covered two transects and included the inner shelf with its anoxic and extremely oxygen...

  20. Microbial control of the production of hydrogen sulfide by sulfate-reducing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, A D; McLnerney, M J; Sublette, K L

    1990-03-01

    A sulfide-resistant ctrain of Thiobacillus denitrificans, strain F, prevented the accumulation of sulfide by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans when both organisms were grown in liquid medium or in Berea sandstone cores. The wild-type strain of T. denitrificans did not prevent the accumulation of sulfide produced by D. desulfuricans. Strain F also prevented the accumulation of sulfide by a mixed population of sulfate-reducing bacteria enriched from an oil field brine. Fermentation balances showed that strain F stoichiometrically oxidized the sulfide produced by D. desulfuricans and the oil field brine enrichment to sulfate. These data suggest that strain F would be effective in controlling sulfide production in oil reservoirs and other environments. PMID:18592547

  1. When can Electrochemical Techniques give Reliable Corrosion Rates on Carbon Steel in Sulfide Media?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel; Hemmingsen, Tor; Nielsen, Lars Vendelbo;

    2005-01-01

    of film formation in sulfide solutions was followed by video. It can be shown that capacitative and diffusional effects due to porous reactive deposits tend to dominate the data resulting in unreliable corrosion rates measured by electrochemical techniques. The effect is strongly increased if biofilm......Effects of film formation on carbon steel in hydrogen sulfide media may corrupt corrosion rate monitoring by electrochemical techniques. Electrochemical data from hydrogen sulfide solutions, biological sulfide media and natural sulfide containing geothermal water have been collected and the process...... in combination with ferrous sulfide corrosion products cover the steel surface. Corrosion rates can be overestimated by a factor of 10 to 100 with electrochemical techniques - both by linear polarization resistance (LPR) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Oxygen entering the system...

  2. Inhibition of Sulfide Mineral Oxidation by Surface Coating Agents: Batch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, J.; Ji, M. K.; Yun, H. S.; Park, Y. T.; Gee, E. D.; Lee, W. R.; Jeon, B.-H.

    2012-04-01

    Mining activities and mineral industries have impacted on rapid oxidation of sulfide minerals such as pyrite (FeS2) which leads to Acid Mine Drainage (AMD) formation. Some of the abandoned mines discharge polluted water without proper environmental remediation treatments, largely because of financial constraints in treating AMD. Magnitude of the problem is considerable, especially in countries with a long history of mining. As metal sulfides become oxidized during mining activities, the aqueous environment becomes acid and rich in many metals, including iron, lead, mercury, arsenic and many others. The toxic heavy metals are responsible for the environmental deterioration of stream, groundwater and soils. Several strategies to remediate AMD contaminated sites have been proposed. Among the source inhibition and prevention technologies, microencapsulation (coating) has been considered as a promising technology. The encapsulation is based on inhibition of O2 diffusion by surface coating agent and is expected to control the oxidation of pyrite for a long time. Potential of several surface coating agents for preventing oxidation of metal sulfide minerals from both Young-Dong coal mine and Il-Gwang gold mine were examined by conducting batch experiments and field tests. Powdered pyrite as a standard sulfide mineral and rock samples from two mine outcrops were mixed with six coating agents (KH2PO4, MgO and KMnO4 as chemical agents, and apatite, cement and manganite as mineral agents) and incubated with oxidizing agents (H2O2 or NaClO). Batch experiments with Young-Dong coal mine samples showed least SO42- production in presence of KMnO4 (16% sulfate production compared to no surface coating agents) or cement (4%) within 8 days. In the case of Il-Gwang mine samples, least SO42- production was observed in presence of KH2PO4 (8%) or cement (2%) within 8 days. Field-scale pilot tests at Il-Gwang site also showed that addition of KH2PO4 decreased sulfate production from 200 to

  3. Leaching of strontium sulfide from produced clinker in conversion furnace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iran is rich in mineral resources one of which is mineral Celestine. Basing on current estimations, the capacity of mineral Celestine is over two million tons, 75-95% of which is strontium sulfate. However; in industries such as Color cathode Ray Tubes, pyrochemical processes, ceramics, paint production, zinc purification processes; strontium sulfate is not a direct feed, rather it is largely consumed in the form of strontium carbonate. Two conventional methods are used to produce strontium carbonate from the sulfate; that is direct reaction and black ash methods. Strontium sulfide, as an intermediate component has a key role in black ash process including strontium sulfate reduction by coke, hence producing and leaching the strontium sulfide by hot water. Finally the reaction of strontium sulfate with sodium carbonate lead to strontium carbonate. In this paper, a system was designed to analyze and optimize the process parameters of strontium sulfide production which is less expensive and available solvent in water. Fundamentally, when strontium sulfide becomes in contact with strontium sulfate; Sr(SH)2, and Sr(OH)2, are produced. The solubility of strontium sulfide depends on water temperature and the maximum solubility achieved at 90degreeC. The results showed that in the experimental scale, at water to SrS ratio of 6; they sediment for 45 minutes at 95degreeC in five operational stages; the separation of 95 and 97.1 percent of imported SrS is possible in effluent of fourth and fifth stages, respectively. Thus; four leaching stages could be recommended for pilot scale plants. Also, the results show that at water to SrS ratio of 8, 40 minutes sedimentation at 85-95degreeC in one operational stage, the separation of 95 percent separation of inputted SrS, is possible. Solvent leaching process is continued till no smell of sulfur components is felt. It could be used as a key role to determine the number of leaching stages in experiments. Finally, the results show

  4. Gibbs free energy of formation of rhodium sulfides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Gibbs energies of formation of RhS0.882, Rh3S4 and Rh2S3 are accurately measured. • Employed a novel solid-state cell based on single crystal CaF2 as an electrolyte. • Auxiliary electrodes of (CaS + CaF2) convert S2 potential into F2 potential. • Measuring electrodes consists of two adjacent phases in the system (Rh + S). • Evaluated S298.15Ko and ΔfH298.15Ko for three rhodium sulfides at T = 298.15 K. -- Abstract: Using a solid-state electrochemical technique, thermodynamic properties of three sulfide phases (RhS0.882, Rh3S4, Rh2S3) in the binary system (Rh + S) are measured as a function of temperature over the range from (925 to 1275) K. Single crystal CaF2 is used as the electrolyte. The auxiliary electrode consisting of (CaS + CaF2) is designed in such a way that the sulfur chemical potential converts into an equivalent fluorine potential at each electrode. The sulfur potentials at the measuring electrodes are established by the mixtures of (Rh + RhS0.882), (RhS0.882 + Rh3S4) and (Rh3S4 + Rh2S3) respectively. A gas mixture (H2 + H2S + Ar) of known composition fixes the sulfur potential at the reference electrode. A novel cell design with physical separation of rhodium sulfides in the measuring electrode from CaS in the auxiliary electrode is used to prevent interaction between the two sulfide phases. They equilibrate only via the gas phase in a hermetically sealed reference enclosure. Standard Gibbs energy changes for the following reactions are calculated from the electromotive force of three cells:2.2667Rh (s) + S2 (g) → 2.2667RhS0.882 (s), ΔrGo±2330/(J·mol-1)=-288690+146.18(T/K), 4.44RhS0.882 (s) + S2 (g) → 1.48Rh3S4 (s), ΔrGo±2245/(J·mol-1)=-245596+164.31(T/K), 4Rh3S4 (s) + S2 (g) → 6Rh2S3 (s), ΔrGo±2490/(J·mol-1)=-230957+160.03(T/K). Standard entropy and enthalpy of formation of rhodium sulfides from elements in their normal standard states at T = 298.15 K are evaluated

  5. Antifoaming materials in G.S. (Girlder sulfide) heavy water plants. Thermical stability. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Girlder sulfide (G.S.) heavy water plants hydrogen sulfide-water systems are inherentely foaming, so the adding of antifoaming materials is of great importance. These may be of high volatility, pyrolizable or chemically unstable in plant operation conditions (water and hydrogen sulfide at 2 MPa, up to 230 deg C). About twenty commercial surfactants were studied from the point of view of their thermical stability. (Author)

  6. Bioconversion of High Concentrations of Hydrogen Sulfide to Elemental Sulfur in Airlift Bioreactor

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed Abdel-Monaem Zytoon; Abdulraheem Ahmad AlZahrani; Madbuli Hamed Noweir; Fadia Ahmed El-Marakby

    2014-01-01

    Several bioreactor systems are used for biological treatment of hydrogen sulfide. Among these, airlift bioreactors are promising for the bioconversion of hydrogen sulfide into elemental sulfur. The performance of airlift bioreactors is not adequately understood, particularly when directly fed with hydrogen sulfide gas. The objective of this paper is to investigate the performance of an airlift bioreactor fed with high concentrations of H2S with special emphasis on the effect of pH in combinat...

  7. Research of the Plasma Sulfide Layer Formed on the Nitrocarburizing Layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xin; MA Shi-ning; HU Chun-hua; QIU Ji; HUANG Yuan-lin

    2004-01-01

    Low-temperature sulfurizing after nitrocarburizing are compared with only low-temperature sulfurizing on the surface of CrMoCu alloyed cast iron, the surface morphologies and microstructures are investigated by SEM and EDS.Results show that under proper treatment parameters, there are sulfide layer on both of the surfaces, and can more easily obtain sulfide layers on the surface of nitrocarburizing. Forming mechanism of sulfides were also studied elementarily.

  8. Marine mineral resources The Global Rare Element Endowment of Seafloor Massive Sulfide Deposits

    OpenAIRE

    Monecke, Thomas; Petersen, Sven; Hannington, Mark D.; Grant, Hannah

    2015-01-01

    Over the past three decades, a large number of seafloor hydrothermal vent sites and associated sulfide deposits have been discovered in the worlds' oceans. Geochemical analysis of samples collected from vent sites worldwide suggests that seafloor sulfide deposits may contain significant base and precious metal concentrations. The present study provides the first estimate of the global rare metal endowment of these deposits. It is shown that seafloor sulfide accumulations can contain elevated ...

  9. Preferential desulfurization of dibenzyl sulfide by an isolated Gordonia sp. IITR100

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad, Abrar; Chauhan, Ashok Kumar; Kushwaha, Hari Narayan; Javed, Saleem; Kumar, Ashwani

    2014-01-01

    Several organosulfur compounds are present in the crude oil, and are required to be removed before its processing into transport fuel. For this reason, biodesulfurization of thiophenic compounds has been studied extensively. However, studies on the sulfide compounds are scarce. In this paper, we describe desulfurization of a model sulfidic compound, dibenzyl sulfide (DBS) by an isolated Gordonia sp. IITR100. The reaction was accompanied with the formation of metabolites dibenzyl sulfoxide, di...

  10. Biological and chemical sulfide oxidation in a Beggiatoa inhabited marine sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preisler, André; de Beer, Dirk; Lichtschlag, Anna;

    2007-01-01

    gradient and corresponding high sulfide flux, a typical characteristic of Beggiatoa habitats, is not needed for their metabolic performance, but rather used as a chemotactic cue by the highly motile filaments to avoid getting lost at depth in the sediment. Indeed sulfide is a repellant for Beggiatoa...... and corresponding high sulfide flux, a typical characteristic of Beggiatoa habitats, is not needed for their metabolic performance, but rather used as a chemotactic cue by the highly motile filaments to avoid getting lost at depth in the sediment. Indeed sulfide is a repellant for Beggiatoa...

  11. Biogenic hydrogen sulfide in the oil gas of Western Siberian fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yershov, V.A.; Chetverkina, V.N.; Nosova, V.S.; Shakirova, A.Kh.

    1984-01-01

    In connection with the discovery of biogenic hydrogen sulfide in the oil gas of Western Siberian fields, the quantity of hydrogen sulfide has been monitored and the dynamics of the development of the sulfate reduction processes and their features are examined. It is noted that in the absence of influences on the bacterial flora, it is necessary to eliminate hydrogen sulfide from natural gas or to use hydrogen sulfide corrosion inhibiters in order to suppress biocenosis in building gas processing plants and gas lift systems, in order to reduce equipment corrosion.

  12. Spectral induced polarization and electrodic potential monitoring of microbially mediated iron sulfide transformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubbard, Susan; Personna, Y.R.; Ntarlagiannis, D.; Slater, L.; Yee, N.; O' Brien, M.; Hubbard, S.

    2008-02-15

    Stimulated sulfate-reduction is a bioremediation technique utilized for the sequestration of heavy metals in the subsurface.We performed laboratory column experiments to investigate the geoelectrical response of iron sulfide transformations by Desulfo vibriovulgaris. Two geoelectrical methods, (1) spectral induced polarization (SIP), and (2) electrodic potential measurements, were investigated. Aqueous geochemistry (sulfate, lactate, sulfide, and acetate), observations of precipitates (identified from electron microscopy as iron sulfide), and electrodic potentials on bisulfide ion (HS) sensitive silver-silver chloride (Ag-AgCl) electrodes (630 mV) were diagnostic of induced transitions between an aerobic iron sulfide forming conditions and aerobic conditions promoting iron sulfide dissolution. The SIP data showed 10m rad anomalies during iron sulfide mineralization accompanying microbial activity under an anaerobic transition. These anomalies disappeared during iron sulfide dissolution under the subsequent aerobic transition. SIP model parameters based on a Cole-Cole relaxation model of the polarization at the mineral-fluid interface were converted to (1) estimated biomineral surface area to pore volume (Sp), and (2) an equivalent polarizable sphere diameter (d) controlling the relaxation time. The temporal variation in these model parameters is consistent with filling and emptying of pores by iron sulfide biofilms, as the system transitions between anaerobic (pore filling) and aerobic (pore emptying) conditions. The results suggest that combined SIP and electrodic potential measurements might be used to monitor spatiotemporal variability in microbial iron sulfide transformations in the field.

  13. Spontaneous electrochemical treatment for sulfur recovery by a sulfide oxidation/vanadium(V) reduction galvanic cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kijjanapanich, Pimluck; Kijjanapanich, Pairoje; Annachhatre, Ajit P; Esposito, Giovanni; Lens, Piet N L

    2015-02-01

    Sulfide is the product of the biological sulfate reduction process which gives toxicity and odor problems. Wastewaters or bioreactor effluents containing sulfide can cause severe environmental impacts. Electrochemical treatment can be an alternative approach for sulfide removal and sulfur recovery from such sulfide rich solutions. This study aims to develop a spontaneous electrochemical sulfide oxidation/vanadium(V) reduction cell with a graphite electrode system to recover sulfide as elemental sulfur. The effects of the internal and external resistance on the sulfide removal efficiency and electrical current produced were investigated at different pH. A high surface area of the graphite electrode is required in order to have as less internal resistance as possible. In this study, graphite powder was added (contact area >633 cm(2)) in order to reduce the internal resistance. A sulfide removal efficiency up to 91% and electrical charge of more than 400 C were achieved when using five graphite rods supplemented with graphite powder as the electrode at an external resistance of 30 Ω and a sulfide concentration of 250 mg L(-1). PMID:25463589

  14. Reliability of Electrochemical Techniques for Determining Corrosion Rates on Carbon Steel in Sulfide Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel; Hemmingsen, T.; Nielsen, Lars Vendelbo; Richter, S.

    2007-01-01

    Effects of film formation on carbon steel in hydrogen sulfide (H2S) media may corrupt corrosion rate monitoring by electrochemical techniques. Electrochemical data from H2S solutions, biological sulfide media, and natural sulfide containing geothermal water have been collected, and the process of...... biofilm in combination with ferrous sulfide corrosion products cover the steel surface. Corrosion rates can be overestimated by a factor of 10 to 100 with electrochemical techniques - both by linear polarization resistance (LPR) and electrochemicel impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Oxygen entering the system...

  15. Phototrophic sulfide oxidation: environmental insights and a method for kinetic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas E Hanson

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Previously, we presented data that indicated microbial sulfide oxidation would out-compete strictly chemical, abiotic sulfide oxidation reactions under nearly all conditions relevant to extant ecosystems (Luther et al., 2011. In particular, we showed how anaerobic microbial sulfide oxidation rates were several orders of magnitude higher than even metal catalyzed aerobic sulfide oxidation processes. The fact that biotic anaerobic sulfide oxidation is kinetically superior to abiotic reactions implies that nearly all anaerobic and sulfidic environments should host microbial populations that oxidize sulfide at appreciable rates. This was likely an important biogeochemical process during long stretches of euxinia in the oceans suggested by the geologic record. In particular, phototrophic sulfide oxidation allows the utilization of carbon dioxide as the electron acceptor suggesting that this process should be particularly widespread rather than relying on the presence of other chemical oxidants. Using the Chesapeake Bay as an example, we argue that phototrophic sulfide oxidation may be more important in many environments than is currently appreciated. Finally, we present methodological considerations to assist other groups that wish to study this process.

  16. Microbial oxidation of soluble sulfide in produced water from the Bakkeen Sands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gevertz, D.; Zimmerman, S. [Agouron Institute, La Jolla, CA (United States); Jenneman, G.E. [Phillips Petroleum Company, Bartlesville, OK (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    The presence of soluble sulfide in produced water results in problems for the petroleum industry due to its toxicity, odor, corrosive nature, and potential for wellbore plugging. Sulfide oxidation by indigenous nitrate-reducing bacteria (NRB) present in brine collected from wells at the Coleville Unit (CVU) in Saskatchewan, Canada, was investigated. Sulfide oxidation took place readily when nitrate and phosphate were added to brine enrichment cultures, resulting in a decrease in sulfide levels of 99-165 ppm to nondetectable levels (< 3.3 ppm). Produced water collected from a number of producing wells was screened to determine the time required for complete sulfide oxidation, in order to select candidate wells for treatment. Three wells were chosen, based on sulfide removal in 48 hours or less. These wells were treated down the backside of the annulus with a solution containing 10 mM KNO{sub 3} and 100 {mu}M NaH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}. Following a 24- to 72-hour shut-in, reductions in pretreatment sulfide levels of greater than 90% were observed for two of the wells, as well as sustained sulfide reductions of 50% for at least two days following startup. NRB populations in the produced brine were observed to increase significantly following treatment, but no significant increases in sulfate-reducing bacteria were observed. These results demonstrate the technical feasibility of stimulating indigenous populations of NRB to remediate and control sulfide in produced brine.

  17. Effect of sulfide concentration on the location of the metal precipitates in inversed fluidized bed reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Sulfide concentration governs the location of metal precipitates in sulfate reducing bioreactors. → High dissolved sulfide induces metal precipitation in the bulk liquid as fines. → Low dissolved sulfide concentrations yield local supersaturation and thus metal precipitation in the biofilm. -- Abstract: The effect of the sulfide concentration on the location of the metal precipitates within sulfate-reducing inversed fluidized bed (IFB) reactors was evaluated. Two mesophilic IFB reactors were operated for over 100 days at the same operational conditions, but with different chemical oxygen demand (COD) to SO42- ratio (5 and 1, respectively). After a start up phase, 10 mg/L of Cu, Pb, Cd and Zn each were added to the influent. The sulfide concentration in one IFB reactor reached 648 mg/L, while it reached only 59 mg/L in the other one. In the high sulfide IFB reactor, the precipitated metals were mainly located in the bulk liquid (as fines), whereas in the low sulfide IFB reactor the metal preciptiates were mainly present in the biofilm. The latter can be explained by local supersaturation due to sulfide production in the biofilm. This paper demonstrates that the sulfide concentration needs to be controlled in sulfate reducing IFB reactors to steer the location of the metal precipitates for recovery.

  18. Enhanced performance of denitrifying sulfide removal process under micro-aerobic condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The denitrifying sulfide removal (DSR) process with bio-granules comprising both heterotrophic and autotrophic denitrifiers can simultaneously convert nitrate, sulfide and acetate into di-nitrogen gas, elementary sulfur and carbon dioxide, respectively, at high loading rates. This study determines the reaction rate of sulfide oxidized into sulfur, as well as the reduction of nitrate to nitrite, would be enhanced under a micro-aerobic condition. The presence of limited oxygen mitigated the inhibition effects of sulfide on denitrifier activities, and enhanced the performance of DSR granules. The advantages and disadvantages of applying the micro-aerobic condition to the DSR process are discussed.

  19. Compositions of Magmatic and Impact Melt Sulfides in Tissint And EETA79001: Precursors of Immiscible Sulfide Melt Blebs in Shergottite Impact Melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, D. K.; Rao, M. N.; Nyquist, L.; Agee, C.; Sutton, S.

    2013-01-01

    Immiscible sulfide melt spherules are locally very abundant in shergottite impact melts. These melts can also contain samples of Martian atmospheric gases [1], and cosmogenic nuclides [2] that are present in impact melt, but not in the host shergottite, indicating some components in the melt resided at the Martian surface. These observations show that some regolith components are, at least locally, present in the impact melts. This view also suggests that one source of the over-abundant sulfur in these impact melts could be sulfates that are major constituents of Martian regolith, and that the sulfates were reduced during shock heating to sulfide. An alternative view is that sulfide spherules in impact melts are produced solely by melting the crystalline sulfide minerals (dominantly pyrrhotite, Fe(1-x)S) that are present in shergottites [3]. In this abstract we report new analyses of the compositions of sulfide immiscible melt spherules and pyrrhotite in the shergottites Tissint, and EETA79001,507, and we use these data to investigate the possible origins of the immiscible sulfide melt spherules. In particular, we use the metal/S ratios determined in these blebs as potential diagnostic criteria for tracking the source material from which the numerous sulfide blebs were generated by shock in these melts.

  20. Sulfide mineralization in ultramafic rocks of the Faryab ophiolite complex, southern Kerman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Rajabzadeh

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Worldwide, Ni-Cu and PGE magmatic sulfide deposits are confined to the lower parts of stratiform mafic and ultramafic complexes. However, ophiolite mafic and ultramafic complexes have been rarely explored for sulfide deposits despite the fact that they have been extensively explored and exploited for chromite. Sulfide saturation during magmatic evolution is necessary for sulfide mineralization, in which sulfide melts scavenge chalcophile metals from the parent magma and concentrate them in specific lithological zones. The lack of exploration for sulfides in this environment suggests that sulfide saturation is rarely attained in ophiolite-related magmas. Some ophiolites, however, contain sulfide deposits, such as at Acoje in Philippines, and Cliffs in Shetland, U.K. (Evans, 2000; Naldrett, 2004. The Faryab ophiolite complex in southern Kerman Province, the most important mining area for chromite deposits in Iran, is located in the southwest part of the Makran Zone. Evidence of sulfide mineralization has been reported there by some authors (e.g. Rajabzadeh and Moosavinasab, 2013. This paper discusses the genesis of sulfides in the Faryab ophiolite using mineral chemistry of the major mineral phases in different rocks of the ophiolite column in order to determine the possible lithological location of sulfide deposits. Materials and methods Seventy three rock samples from cumulate units were collected from surficial occurrences and drill core. The samples were studied using conventional microscopic methods and the mineralogy confirmed by x-ray diffraction. Electron microprobe analysis was carried out on different mineral phases in order to determine the chemistry of the minerals used in the interpretation of magma evolution in the Faryab ophiolite. Lithologically, the Faryab ophiolite complex is divided into two major parts: the northern part includes magmatic rocks and the southern part is comprised of rocks residual after partial

  1. Respirometric characterization of aerobic sulfide, thiosulfate and elemental sulfur oxidation by S-oxidizing biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Mabel; López, Luis R; Lafuente, Javier; Pérez, Julio; Kleerebezem, Robbert; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Gamisans, Xavier; Gabriel, David

    2016-02-01

    Respirometry was used to reveal the mechanisms involved in aerobic biological sulfide oxidation and to characterize the kinetics and stoichiometry of a microbial culture obtained from a desulfurizing biotrickling filter. Physical-chemical processes such as stripping and chemical oxidation of hydrogen sulfide were characterized since they contributed significantly to the conversions observed in respirometric tests. Mass transfer coefficient for hydrogen sulfide and the kinetic parameters for chemical oxidation of sulfide with oxygen were estimated. The stoichiometry of the process was determined and the different steps in the sulfide oxidation process were identified. The conversion scheme proposed includes intermediate production of elemental sulfur and thiosulfate and the subsequent oxidation of both compounds to sulfate. A kinetic model describing each of the reactions observed during sulfide oxidation was calibrated and validated. The product selectivity was found to be independent of the dissolved oxygen to hydrogen sulfide concentration ratio in the medium at sulfide concentrations ranging from 3 to 30 mg S L(-1). Sulfide was preferentially consumed (SOURmax = 49.2 mg DO g(-1) VSS min(-1)) and oxidized to elemental sulfur at dissolved oxygen concentrations above 0.8 mg DO L(-1). Substrate inhibition of sulfide oxidation was observed (K(i,S(2-))= 42.4 mg S L(-1)). Intracellular sulfur accumulation also affected negatively the sulfide oxidation rate. The maximum fraction of elemental sulfur accumulated inside cells was estimated (25.6% w/w) and a shrinking particle equation was included in the kinetic model to describe elemental sulfur oxidation. The microbial diversity obtained through pyrosequencing analysis revealed that Thiothrix sp. was the main species present in the culture (>95%). PMID:26704759

  2. New cadmium sulfide nanomaterial for heterogeneous organic photovoltaic cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rohovec, Jan; Toušková, J.; Toušek, J.; Schauer, F.; Kuřitka, I.

    Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, Linköpings universitet, 2011 - (Moshfegh, B.), s. 2815-2822. (Linköping Electronic Conference Proceedings). ISBN 978-91-7393-070-3. ISSN 1650-3740. [World renewable energy congress. Linköping (SE), 08.05.2011-13.05.2011] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/09/1206 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : nanocrysaline cadmium sulfide * preparation * photovoltaic cells * photovoltaic solar cells * triethanolamine Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry http://www.ep.liu.se/ecp/057/Complete%20Proceeding.pdf

  3. Conspicuous veils formed by vibrioid bacteria on sulfidic marine sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thar, Roland Matthias; Kühl, Michael

    2002-01-01

    inclusions of poly-ß-hydroxybutyric acid. The cells have bipolar polytrichous flagella and exhibit a unique swimming pattern, rotating and translating along their short axis. Free-swimming cells showed aerotaxis and aggregated at ca. 2 µM oxygen within opposing oxygen-sulfide gradients, where they were able...... from the oxic water region toward the veil, whereby the oxygen uptake rate could be enhanced up to six times, as shown by model calculations. The veils showed a pronounced succession pattern. New veils were generated de novo within 24 h and had a homogeneous whitish translucent appearance. Bacterial...

  4. Experience of reprocessing of cadmium sulfide-containing waste materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technique of cadmium extraction from sulfide-containing wastes using the method of oxidizing leaching was developed and subjected to industrial testing. Reagents containing manganese dioxide - manganese ore or manganese slime of electrolytic shop usually used in zinc production - are advisable to be used as oxidizers. Factors of cadmium extraction into solution appeared to be close to ones, obtained during laboratory investigation. If the yield of leaching residual equals ∼38% and the content of cadmium, being in insoluble form, equals ∼0.40%, metal losses with this residual are equal to 0.37%

  5. Hydrogen evolution on nano-particulate transition metal sulfides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Jacob Lindner; Moses, Poul Georg; Jaramillo, Thomas F.;

    2008-01-01

    The hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) on carbon supported MoS2 nanoparticles is investigated and compared to findings with previously published work on Au(111) supported MoS2. An investigation into MoS2 oxidation is presented and used to quantify the surface concentration of MoS2. Other metal...... sulfides with morphologies similar to MoS2 such as WS2, cobalt- promoted WS2, and cobalt-promoted MoS2 were also investigated in the search for improved HER activity. Experimental findings are compared to density functional theory (DFT) calculated values for the hydrogen binding energies (Delta G(H)) on...

  6. Hydrogen sulfide at high pressure: change in stoichiometry

    OpenAIRE

    Goncharov, Alexander F.; Lobanov, Sergey; Kruglov, Ivan; Zhao, Xiao-Miao; Chen, Xiao-Jia; Oganov, Artem R.; Konôpková, Zuzana; Prakapenka, Vitali

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen-sulfide (H2S) was studied by x-ray synchrotron diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy up to 150 GPa at 180-295 K and by quantum-mechanical variable-composition evolutionary simulations. The experiments show that H2S becomes unstable with respect to formation of new compounds with different structure and composition, including Cccm and a body-centered-cubic (bcc) like (R3m or Im-3m) H3S, the latter one predicted previously to show a record-high superconducting transition temperature...

  7. Dynamic corrosion of copper-nickel sulfide by Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TONG Lin-lin; JIANG Mao-fa; YANG Hong-ying; YU Juan; FAN You-jing; ZHANG Yao

    2009-01-01

    The dynamic corrosion process of bio-oxidation of copper-nickel sulfide from Karatungk in northern Xinjiang Province of China was studied. The polished wafer of the copper-nickel sulphide was used to carry on a series of oxidation corrosion experiment by Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. The changes of superficial corrosion appearance and the mineral dynamic corrosion process were discovered by microscope observation. Then, the galvanic cell model was established, and the bio-oxidation activation order of typical copper-nickel sulphide minerals was ascertained as pyrrhotite>pentlandite>chalocopyrite.

  8. Iron (III) sulfide particles produced by a polyol method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iron(III) sulfide Fe2S3 particles were produced using a polyol method. Although pyrrhotite Fe1−xS appeared together with Fe2S3, the relative yield of Fe2S3 changed when the concentration of reagents in the oleylamine changed. Mössbauer spectra of the particles showed superparamagnetic doublets due to Fe2S3 at 293 K, along with a hyperfine magnetic splitting of H = 24.7 T at 6 K. XRD patterns of the Fe2S3 suggested a structure similar to that of greigite Fe3S4

  9. Surface-treatment of Alkaline Earth Sulfides Based Phosphor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Chong-feng; CHU Ben-li; XU Jian; SU Qiang

    2004-01-01

    A series of alkaline earth sulfides based phosphors Ca0.8Sr0.2S∶Eu2+, Tm3+ were covered with a layer of protective coating with alkaline earth fluorides by heating the mixture of phosphor and NH4HF2 at elevated temperatures. The coatings were characterized by means of XRD and SEM. The optical properties of the coated phosphors and the influences of the coating on their properties have been discussed extensively. The stabilities of the coated and uncoated phosphors have been compared.

  10. Iron (III) sulfide particles produced by a polyol method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Ryo; Kubono, Ippei; Kobayashi, Yoshio; Yamada, Yasuhiro

    2015-04-01

    Iron(III) sulfide Fe2S3 particles were produced using a polyol method. Although pyrrhotite Fe1-xS appeared together with Fe2S3, the relative yield of Fe2S3 changed when the concentration of reagents in the oleylamine changed. Mössbauer spectra of the particles showed superparamagnetic doublets due to Fe2S3 at 293 K, along with a hyperfine magnetic splitting of H = 24.7 T at 6 K. XRD patterns of the Fe2S3 suggested a structure similar to that of greigite Fe3S4.

  11. Zinc sulfide in intestinal cell granules of Ancylostoma caninum adults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gianotti, A.J.; Clark, D.T.; Dash, J. (Portland State Univ., OR (USA))

    1991-04-01

    A source of confusion has existed since the turn of the century about the reddish brown, weakly birefringent 'sphaerocrystals' located in the intestines of strongyle nematodes, Strongylus and Ancylostoma. X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive spectrometric analyses were used for accurate determination of the crystalline order and elemental composition of the granules in the canine hookworm Ancylostoma caninum. The composition of the intestinal pigmented granules was identified unequivocally as zinc sulfide. It seems most probable that the granules serve to detoxify high levels of metallic ions (specifically zinc) present due to the large intake of host blood.

  12. Nonlinear optical properties of lead sulfide nanocrystals in polymeric coatings

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Songwei; Sohling, Ulrich; Mennig, Martin; Schmidt, Helmut K.

    2002-01-01

    Lead sulfide (PbS) nanocrystals with a particle size of 3.3 +/- 0.7 nm have been synthesized in a poly vinyl alcohol (PVA) coating on fused silica glass substrates. The coating was dip-coated from a PVA aqueous solution, in which PbS nanocrystals were precipitated and stabilized in the polymer matrix. Third-order nonlinear optical susceptibility of PbS nanocrystals is dependent on the wavelength with its maximum located near the first excitonic absorption peak resulting from the quantum confi...

  13. Luminescence of high-doped calcium sulfide crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calcium sulfide crystals grown by high-temperatur mineralization tecnique have been studied. Bands peaked at 2.12 and 2.5-2.7 eV are considered the most invariable features of cathodoluminescence and photoluminescence spectra. It has been found that the 2.12 eV band is conditioned by optical electronic transitions in Mn2+ ions substituted for Ca2+ ions in the host lattice. The exciton mechanism of energy transfer to centers, that are responsible for the high-energy luminescence band, is discussed

  14. HYDROGEN SULFIDE ADSORPTION BY ALKALINE IMPREGNATED COCONUT SHELL ACTIVATED CARBON

    OpenAIRE

    HUI SUN CHOO; LEE CHUNG LAU; ABDUL RAHMAN MOHAMED; KEAT TEONG LEE

    2013-01-01

    Biogas is one type of renewable energy which can be burnt to produce heat and electricity. However, it cannot be burnt directly due to the presence of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) which is highly corrosive to gas engine. In this study, coconut shell activated carbon (CSAC) was applied as a porous adsorbent for H2S removal. The effect of amount of activated carbon and flow rate of gas stream toward adsorption capacity were investigated. Then, the activated carbons were impregnated by three types of ...

  15. Isolation and characterization of deodorizing bacteria for organic sulfide malodor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG An-xi; LIU Bo; ZHAO Yang-guo; LI Zheng; BAI Yu; CHENG Yang-xue

    2004-01-01

    Strain Jll screened out from different odor origins can efficiently degrade methyl mercaptan and ethanethiol whereas has no ability to remove dimethyl sulfide. The results indicated that the strain Jll breaks only the C-SH bond. The optimum temperature and pH of Jll are 20-30℃ and 6.0-8.3 respectively. A systematic identification method-16S rDNA gene sequence comparison, for deodorizing bacteria was carried out. The 16S rDNA gene sequence analysis of strain Jll showed the highest level of 97% homology to Rape rhizosphere.

  16. The summer of hydrogen sulfide: highlights from two international conferences

    OpenAIRE

    Calvert, John W

    2013-01-01

    A great deal of interest has been paid recently to the hydrogen sulfide, the newest member of the gasotransmitter family. With the growing interest in the biology of H2S, the need for meetings and conferences dedicated solely to the field of H2S has also grown. In 2009, scientist from around the world met in Shanghai, China for the first time to discuss the physiological relevance of H2S. In 2012, two conferences were organized to bring scientists, clinicians, and industry representatives tog...

  17. Therapeutic application of hydrogen sulfide donors: the potential and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dan; Hu, Qingxun; Zhu, Yizhun

    2016-03-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a colorless gas smelling of rotten egg, has long been considered a toxic gas and environment hazard. However, evidences show that H2S plays a great role in many physiological and pathological activities, and it exhibits different effects when applied at various doses. In this review, we summarize the chemistry and biomedical applications of H2S-releasing compounds, including inorganic salts, phosphorodithioate derivatives, derivatives of Allium sativum extracts, derivatives of thioaminoacids, and derivatives of antiinflammatory drugs. PMID:26597301

  18. Rice: Sulfide-induced Barriers to Root Radial Oxygen Loss, Fe2+ and Water Uptake, and Lateral Root Emergence

    OpenAIRE

    ARMSTRONG, JEAN; Armstrong, William (Canadian painter, civil engineer, photographer, 1822-1914)

    2005-01-01

    • Background and Aims Akagare and Akiochi are diseases of rice associated with sulfide toxicity. This study investigates the possibility that rice reacts to sulfide by producing impermeable barriers in roots.

  19. 30 CFR 250.215 - What hydrogen sulfide (H2S) information must accompany the EP?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... methodologies outlined in 40 CFR part 68. ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What hydrogen sulfide (H2S) information must... Contents of Exploration Plans (ep) § 250.215 What hydrogen sulfide (H2S) information must accompany the...

  20. Effects of Methylated, Organic, and Inorganic Substrates on Microbial Consumption of Dimethyl Sulfide in Estuarine Waters

    OpenAIRE

    Wolfe, Gordon V.; Kiene, Ronald P.

    1993-01-01

    We examined the effects of a variety of amendments on the consumption of [U-14C]dimethyl sulfide in a Georgia salt marsh. Methylated compounds, particularly those with dimethyl groups, significantly inhibited dimethyl sulfide consumption, while nonmethylated substrates had little effect. Dimethyl disulfide and dimethyl ether were the most effective inhibitors tested.

  1. Spin-polarized quasiparticle transport in exchange-split superconducting aluminum on europium sulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, M. J.; Sürgers, C.; Fischer, G.; Beckmann, D.

    2014-10-01

    We report on nonlocal spin transport in mesoscopic superconducting aluminum wires in contact with the ferromagnetic insulator europium sulfide. We find spin injection and long-range spin transport in the regime of the exchange splitting induced by europium sulfide. Our results demonstrate that spin transport in superconductors can be manipulated by ferromagnetic insulators, and opens a path to control spin currents in superconductors.

  2. Sulfide oxidation at halo-alkaline conditions in a fed-batch bioreactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, van den P.L.F.; Beusekom, van O.C.; Buisman, C.J.N.; Janssen, A.J.H.

    2007-01-01

    A biotechnological process is described to remove hydrogen sulfide (H2S) from high-pressure natural gas and sour gases produced in the petrochemical industry. The process operates at halo-alkaline conditions and combines an aerobic sulfide-oxidizing reactor with an anaerobic sulfate (SO) and thiosul

  3. Inhibition of a biological sulfide oxidation under haloalkaline conditions by thiols and diorgano polysulfanes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roman, Pawel; Lipińska, Joanna; Bijmans, Martijn F.M.; Sorokin, Dimitry Y.; Keesman, Karel J.; Janssen, Albert J.H.

    2016-01-01

    A novel approach has been developed for the simultaneous description of reaction kinetics to describe the formation of polysulfide and sulfate anions from the biological oxidation of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) using a quick, sulfide-dependent respiration test. Next to H2S, thiol

  4. A STUDY TO EVALUATE CARBON MONOXIDE AND HYDROGEN SULFIDE CONTINUOUS EMISSION MONITORS AT AN OIL REFINERY

    Science.gov (United States)

    An eleven month field evaluation was done on five hydrogen sulfide and four carbon monoxide monitors located at an oil refinery. The hydrogen sulfide monitors sampled a fuel gas feed line and the carbon monoxide monitors sampled the emissions from a fluid cat cracker (FCC). Two o...

  5. VAPOR PHASE MERCURY SORPTION BY ORGANIC SULFIDE MODIFIED BIMETALLIC IRON-COPPER NANOPARTICLE AGGREGATES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novel organic sulfide modified bimetallic iron-copper nanoparticle aggregate sorbent materials have been synthesized for removing elemental mercury from vapor streams at elevated temperatures (120-140 °C). Silane based (disulfide silane and tetrasulfide silane) and alkyl sulfide ...

  6. The sampling of hydrogen sulfide in air with impregnated filter paper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huygen, C.

    1964-01-01

    A method is proposed for the quantitative collection of hydrogen sulfide in air on impregnated filter paper. An aqueous solution of potassium hydroxide, potassium zincate and glycerol is used as impregnating fluid. The stability of the collected sulfide and the efficiency of collection at different

  7. Evaluation of long-term sulfide oxidation processes within pyrrhotite-rich tailings, Lynn Lake, Manitoba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunsinger, M R; Ptacek, C J; Blowes, D W; Jambor, J L

    2006-02-10

    Oxidation reactions have depleted sulfide minerals in the shallow tailings and have generated sulfate- and metal-rich pore water throughout the East Tailings Management Area (ETMA) at Lynn Lake, Manitoba, Canada. Information concerning the tailings geochemistry and mineralogy suggest the sulfide oxidation processes have reached an advanced stage in the area proximal to the point of tailings discharge. In contrast, the distal tailings, or slimes area, have a higher moisture content close to the impoundment surface, thereby impeding the ingress of oxygen and limiting sulfide oxidation. Numerical modelling of sulfide oxidation indicates the maximum rate of release for sulfate, Fe, and Ni occurred shortly after tailings deposition ceased. Although the sulfide minerals have been depleted in the very shallow tailings, the modelling suggests that sulfide oxidation will continue for hundreds and possibly thousands of years. The combination of sulfide minerals, principally pyrrhotite, that is susceptible to weathering processes and the relatively dry, coarse-grained nature of the tailings have resulted in the formation of a massive-hardpan layer in the proximal area of the ETMA. Because extensive accumulations of secondary oxyhydroxides of ferric iron are already present, remediation strategies for the ETMA should focus on mitigating the release of sulfide oxidation products rather than on preventing further oxidation. PMID:16406605

  8. Synthetic Fabrication of Nanoscale MoS2-Based Transition Metal Sulfides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jikang Yuan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Transition metal sulfides are scientifically and technologically important materials. This review summarizes recent progress on the synthetic fabrication of transition metal sulfides nanocrystals with controlled shape, size, and surface functionality. Special attention is paid to the case of MoS2 nanoparticles, where organic (surfactant, polymer, inorganic (support, promoter, doping compounds and intercalation chemistry are applied.

  9. Isolation of Ochrobactrum sp.QZ2 from sulfide and nitrite treatment system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Qaisar; Hu, Baolan; Cai, Jing; Zheng, Ping; Azim, Muhammad Rashid; Jilani, Ghulam; Islam, Ejazul

    2009-06-15

    A bacterial strain QZ2 was isolated from sludge of anoxic sulfide-oxidizing (ASO) reactor. Based on 16S rDNA sequence analysis and morphology, the isolate was identified as Ochrobactrum sp. QZ2. The strain was facultative chemolithotroph, able of using sulfide to reduce nitrite anaerobically. It produced either elemental sulfur or sulfate as the product of sulfide oxidation, depending on the initial sulfide and nitrite concentrations. The optimum growth pH and temperature for Ochrobactrum sp. QZ2 were found as 6.5-7.0 and 30 degrees C, respectively. The specific growth rate (micro) was found as 0.06 h(-1) with a doubling time of 19.75h; the growth seemed more sensitive to highly alkaline pH. Ochrobactrum sp. QZ2 catalyzed sulfide oxidation to sulfate was more sensitive to sulfide compared with nitrite as indicated by IC(50) values for sulfide and nitrite utilization implying that isolate was relatively more tolerant to nitrite. The comparison of physiology of Ochrobactrum sp. QZ2 with those of other known sulfide-oxidizing bacteria suggested that the present isolate resembled to Ochrobactrum anthropi in its denitrification ability. PMID:19010594

  10. Isolation of Ochrobactrum sp.QZ2 from sulfide and nitrite treatment system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmood, Qaisar, E-mail: mahmoodzju@gmail.com [Department of Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University Hangzhou 310029 (China); Department of Environmental Sciences, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology Abbottabad (Pakistan); Hu Baolan; Cai Jing [Department of Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University Hangzhou 310029 (China); Zheng Ping, E-mail: pzheng@zju.edu.cn [Department of Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University Hangzhou 310029 (China); Azim, Muhammad Rashid [Department of Botany, Federal Government Post Graduate College H-8 Islamabad (Pakistan); Jilani, Ghulam [Department of Soil Science and Soil and Water Conservation, PMAS Arid Agriculture University, Rawalpindi (Pakistan); Islam, Ejazul [Department of Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University Hangzhou 310029 (China)

    2009-06-15

    A bacterial strain QZ2 was isolated from sludge of anoxic sulfide-oxidizing (ASO) reactor. Based on 16S rDNA sequence analysis and morphology, the isolate was identified as Ochrobactrum sp. QZ2. The strain was facultative chemolithotroph, able of using sulfide to reduce nitrite anaerobically. It produced either elemental sulfur or sulfate as the product of sulfide oxidation, depending on the initial sulfide and nitrite concentrations. The optimum growth pH and temperature for Ochrobactrum sp. QZ2 were found as 6.5-7.0 and 30 deg. C, respectively. The specific growth rate ({mu}) was found as 0.06 h{sup -1} with a doubling time of 19.75 h; the growth seemed more sensitive to highly alkaline pH. Ochrobactrum sp. QZ2 catalyzed sulfide oxidation to sulfate was more sensitive to sulfide compared with nitrite as indicated by IC{sub 50} values for sulfide and nitrite utilization implying that isolate was relatively more tolerant to nitrite. The comparison of physiology of Ochrobactrum sp. QZ2 with those of other known sulfide-oxidizing bacteria suggested that the present isolate resembled to Ochrobactrum anthropi in its denitrification ability.

  11. Growth kinetics of hydrogen sulfide oxidizing bacteria in corroded concrete from sewers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen sulfide oxidation by microbes present on concrete surfaces of sewer pipes is a key process in sewer corrosion. The growth of aerobic sulfur oxidizing bacteria from corroded concrete surfaces was studied in a batch reactor. Samples of corrosion products, containing sulfur oxidizing bacteria, were suspended in aqueous solution at pH similar to that of corroded concrete. Hydrogen sulfide was supplied to the reactor to provide the source of reduced sulfur. The removal of hydrogen sulfide and oxygen was monitored. The utilization rates of both hydrogen sulfide and oxygen suggested exponential bacterial growth with median growth rates of 1.25 d-1 and 1.33 d-1 as determined from the utilization rates of hydrogen sulfide and oxygen, respectively. Elemental sulfur was found to be the immediate product of the hydrogen sulfide oxidation. When exponential growth had been achieved, the addition of hydrogen sulfide was terminated leading to elemental sulfur oxidation. The ratio of consumed sulfur to consumed oxygen suggested that sulfuric acid was the ultimate oxidation product. To the knowledge of the authors, this is the first study to determine the growth rate of bacteria involved in concrete corrosion with hydrogen sulfide as source of reduced sulfur.

  12. Why does the Conductivity of a Nickel Catalyst Increase during Sulfidation? An Exemplary Study Using an In Operando Sensor Device

    OpenAIRE

    Peter Fremerey; Andreas Jess; Ralf Moos

    2015-01-01

    In order to study the sulfidation of a catalyst fixed bed, an in operando single pellet sensor was designed. A catalyst pellet from the fixed bed was electrically contacted and its electrical response was correlated with the catalyst behavior. For the sulfidation tests, a nickel catalyst was used and was sulfidized with H2S. This catalyst had a very low conductivity in the reduced state. During sulfidation, the conductivity of the catalyst increased by decades. A reaction from nickel to nicke...

  13. Accelerating column leaching trial on copper sulfide ore

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hongjiang; WU Aixiang; ZHOU Xun; WANG Shaoyong; ZHANG Jie

    2008-01-01

    The main measures to accelerate leaching sulfide ore are large spraying intensity,manual oxygen supply,temperature control and acclimated bacteria.The indoor experiment accelerating sulfide ore leaching detected the temperature during leaching process,dissolvability of oxygen,bacterial concentration,Cu concentration and slag grade.At the same time,this paper also analyzed the effect of four factors,which are bacterial diversity cultivation stage,spraying intensity,air supply,and whether to control temperature,on the leaching efficiency of copper.The results indicate that the oxygen content of leach solution has a close relationship with temperature but it is rarely affected by air supply.The bacterial concentration preserves from 106 to 107 mL-1,and temperature has a great effect on the bacterial activity under the condition of proper temperature and oxygen supply,and the lack of nutrition prevents the bacterial concentration from rising in the late stage.The relationships of the copper leaching efficiency to temperature,air feed,and spraying intensity are directly proportional.The leaching efficiencies of the cultivated bacteria and acclimation bacteria are 1.2 and 1.4 times as large as that of the original bacteria.

  14. Hydrogen attack - Influence of hydrogen sulfide. [on carbon steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliezer, D.; Nelson, H. G.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental study is conducted on 12.5-mm-thick SAE 1020 steel (plain carbon steel) plate to assess hydrogen attack at room temperature after specimen exposure at 525 C to hydrogen and a blend of hydrogen sulfide and hydrogen at a pressure of 3.5 MN/sq m for exposure times up to 240 hr. The results are discussed in terms of tensile properties, fissure formation, and surface scales. It is shown that hydrogen attack from a high-purity hydrogen environment is severe, with the formation of numerous methane fissures and bubbles along with a significant reduction in the room-temperature tensile yield and ultimate strengths. However, no hydrogen attack is observed in the hydrogen/hydrogen sulfide blend environment, i.e. no fissure or bubble formation occurred and the room-temperature tensile properties remained unchanged. It is suggested that the observed porous discontinuous scale of FeS acts as a barrier to hydrogen entry, thus reducing its effective equilibrium solubility in the iron lattice. Therefore, hydrogen attack should not occur in pressure-vessel steels used in many coal gasification processes.

  15. Biological conversion of hydrogen sulfide into elemental sulfur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basu, R.; Clausen, E.C.; Gaddy, J.L. [Bioengineering Resources, Inc., Fayetteville, AR (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Currently, hydrogen sulfide is removed from process gas streams by a series of reactions at high temperature to produce elemental sulfur in Claus, Stretford or other processes. These physicochemical processes have high intrinsic capital and operating costs, often are restricted by contaminants, and do not effectively remove all the H{sub 2}S. As an alternative, the anaerobic, photosynthetic bacterium, Chlorobium thiosulfatophilum, has been demonstrated to convert hydrogen sulfide to elemental sulfur in a single step at atmospheric conditions. The autotrophic bacterium uses CO{sub 2} as the carbon source. Energy for cell metabolism is provided by incandescent light and the oxidation of H{sub 2}S. A bench scale study has been performed in a CSTR equipped with a sulfur separator. Optimum process conditions have been achieved to maximize cell growth and elemental sulfur production. Near total conversion of H{sub 2}S is achieved in a retention time of a few minutes. High concentrations of H{sub 2}S or organics do not affect the culture. Sulfur recovery by settling is very efficient and near theoretical yields of sulfur are achieved. Economic projections indicate that sour gas can be desulfurized for $0.08-0.12/MSCF. 13 refs.

  16. Clues to the origin of sulfide minerals in CI chondrites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dominant sulfide in Ci carbonaceous chondrites is an Fe-deficient pyrrhotite containing about 1% Ni. Alais, Ivuna and Orgueil also contain minor cubanite, CuFe2S3, and Alais minor pentlandite, (Fe, Ni)9S8. All pyrrhotites contain 39.4 +- 0.1% S; Ni contents range from 0.7 to 1.3%. The phase diagrams reveal no temperature at which the observed pentlandite-pyrrhotite assemblage is at equilibrium. Similarly, the pyrrhotite compositions alone are inconsistent with equilibrium formation from a gas of solar composition. In Xe from high-purity submilligram Orgueil pyrrhotite separates, the ratios 129Xe/132Xe are not significantly larger than those in trapped meteoritic Xe. The lack of positive evidence for extinct 129I in pyrrhotite does not permit any inferences regarding cooling rates in the early solar nebula. Tt is concluded that sulfides in CI chondrites cannot be nebular condensates formed under equilibrium conditions. Argon isotopic abundances reveal the presence of significant spallation and trapped gas components in Orgueil pyrrhotite. The Orgueil exposure age is calculated to be > approximately 10 m.y. (Auth.)

  17. Clues to the origin of sulfide minerals in CI chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerridge, J. F.; Macdougall, J. D.; Marti, K.

    1979-01-01

    The dominant sulfide in CI carbonaceous chondrites is an Fe-deficient pyrrhotite containing about 1% Ni, Alais, Ivuna, and Orgueil also contain minor cubanite, CuFe2S3, and Alais minor pentlandite, (Fe,Ni)9S8. All pyrrhotites contain 39.4 + or - 0.1% S; Ni contents range from 0.7 to 1.3%. The phase diagrams reveal no temperature at which the observed pentlandite-pyrrhotite assemblage is at equilibrium. Similarly, the pyrrhotite composition alone are inconsistent with equilibrium formation from a gas of solar composition. In Xe from high-purity submilligram Orgueil pyrrhotite separates, the ratios Xe-129/Xe-132 are not significantly larger than those in trapped meteoritic Xe. The lack of positive evidence for extinct I-129 in pyrrhotite does not permit any inferences regarding cooling rates in the early solar nebula. It is concluded that sulfides in CI chondrites cannot be nebular condensates formed under equilibrium conditions. Argon isotopic abundances reveal the presence of significant spallation and trapped gas components in Orgueil pyrrhotite. The Orgueil exposure age is calculated to be at least about 10 m.y.

  18. Sulfide mineralization: Its role in chemical weathering of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Roger G.

    1988-01-01

    Pyrrhotite-pentlandite assemblages in mafic and ultramafic igneous rocks may have contributed significantly to the chemical weathering reactions that produced degradation products in the Martian regolith. By analogy with terrestrial processes, a model is proposed whereby supergene alteration of these primary Fe-Ni sulfides on Mars has generated secondary sulfides (e.g., pyrite) below the water table and produced acidic groundwater containing high concentrations of dissolved Fe, Ni and sulfate ions. The low pH solutions also initiated weathering reactions of igneous feldspars and ferromagnesian silicates to form clay silicate and ferric oxyhydroxide phases. Near-surface oxidation and hydrolysis of ferric sulfato- and hydroxo-complex ions and sols formed gossans above the water table consisting of poorly crystalline hydrated ferric sulfates (e.g., jarosite), oxides (ferrihydrite, goethite) and silica (opal). Underlying groundwater, now permafrost, contains hydroxo sulfato complexes of Fe, Al, Mg, Ni, etc., which may be stabilized in frozen acidic solutions beneath the surface of Mars. Sublimation of permafrost may replenish colloidal ferric oxides, sulfates and phyllosilicates during dust storms on Mars.

  19. Control of microbially generated hydrogen sulfide in produced waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burger, E.D.; Vance, I.; Gammack, G.F.; Duncan, S.E.

    1995-12-31

    Production of hydrogen sulfide in produced waters due to the activity of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) is a potentially serious problem. The hydrogen sulfide is not only a safety and environmental concern, it also contributes to corrosion, solids formation, a reduction in produced oil and gas values, and limitations on water discharge. Waters produced from seawater-flooded reservoirs typically contain all of the nutrients required to support SRB metabolism. Surface processing facilities provide a favorable environment in which SRB flourish, converting water-borne nutrients into biomass and H{sub 2}S. This paper will present results from a field trial in which a new technology for the biochemical control of SRB metabolism was successfully applied. A slip stream of water downstream of separators on a produced water handling facility was routed through a bioreactor in a side-steam device where microbial growth was allowed to develop fully. This slip stream was then treated with slug doses of two forms of a proprietary, nonbiocidal metabolic modifier. Results indicated that H{sub 2}S production was halted almost immediately and that the residual effect of the treatment lasted for well over one week.

  20. Methodology for assessing thioarsenic formation potential in sulfidic landfill environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianye; Kim, Hwidong; Townsend, Timothy

    2014-07-01

    Arsenic leaching and speciation in landfills, especially those with arsenic bearing waste and drywall disposal (such as construction and demolition (C&D) debris landfills), may be affected by high levels of sulfide through the formation of thioarsenic anions. A methodology using ion chromatography (IC) with a conductivity detector was developed for the assessment of thioarsenic formation potential in sulfidic landfill environments. Monothioarsenate (H2AsSO3(-)) and dithioarsenate (H2AsS2O2(-)) were confirmed in the IC fractions of thioarsenate synthesis mixture, consistent with previous literature results. However, the observation of AsSx(-) (x=5-8) in the supposed trithioarsenate (H2AsS3O(-)) and tetrathioarsenate (H2AsS4(-)) IC fractions suggested the presence of new arsenic polysulfide complexes. All thioarsenate anions, particularly trithioarsenate and tetrathioarsenate, were unstable upon air exposure. The method developed for thioarsenate analysis was validated and successfully used to analyze several landfill leachate samples. Thioarsenate anions were detected in the leachate of all of the C&D debris landfills tested, which accounted for approximately 8.5% of the total aqueous As in the leachate. Compared to arsenite or arsenate, thioarsenates have been reported in literature to have lower adsorption on iron oxide minerals. The presence of thioarsenates in C&D debris landfill leachate poses new concerns when evaluating the impact of arsenic mobilization in such environments. PMID:24508155

  1. Hydrogen sulfide intervention in focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-juan Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to explore the mechanism underlying the protective effects of hydrogen sulfide against neuronal damage caused by cerebral ischemia/reperfusion. We established the middle cerebral artery occlusion model in rats via the suture method. Ten minutes after middle cerebral artery occlusion, the animals were intraperitoneally injected with hydrogen sulfide donor compound sodium hydrosulfide. Immunofluorescence revealed that the immunoreactivity of P2X 7 in the cerebral cortex and hippocampal CA1 region in rats with cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury decreased with hydrogen sulfide treatment. Furthermore, treatment of these rats with hydrogen sulfide significantly lowered mortality, the Longa neurological deficit scores, and infarct volume. These results indicate that hydrogen sulfide may be protective in rats with local cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury by down-regulating the expression of P2X 7 receptors.

  2. Nano Transition Metal Sulfide Catalyst for Solvolysis Liquefaction of Soda Lignin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solvolysis liquefaction of soda lignin in the presence of various transition metal sulfide catalysts was studied to investigate the catalyst effects on the oil and gas yields, conversion rate and higher heating value (HHV) of oil. Nano sized copper sulfide, iron sulfide and molybdenum sulfide were successfully synthesized via a simple hydrothermal method under reaction temperature 200 degree Celsius for 90 min. The addition of transition metal sulfide based catalysts (CuS, MoS2 and FeS2) enhanced both production of the oils and gas and the higher heating value (HHV) of oil products. A high oil and gas yields of 82.1 % and 2890 cm3 was obtained with MoS2 at 250 degree Celsius for 60 min. Elemental analyses for the oils revealed that the liquid products have much higher heating values than the crude soda lignin powder. (author)

  3. Influence of sulfides on the tribological properties of composites produced by pulse electric current sintering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Seung Ho Kim

    2014-01-01

    Self-lubricating Al2O3-15wt%ZrO2 composites with sulfides, such as molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) and tungsten disulfide (WS2) serving as solid lubricants, were fabricated by using the pulse electric current sintering (PECS) technique. The coefficient of friction (COF) of the Al2O3-15wt%ZrO2 composite without/with sulfides was in the range of 0.37-0.48 and 0.27-0.49, respectively. As the amount of sul-fides increased, the COF and the wear rate decreased. The reduction in COF and wear rate of the sulfide-containing composite is caused by a reduction in shear stresses between the specimen and the tribological medium due to the formation of a lubricating film resulting from the lamellar structure of sulfides located on the worn surface.

  4. What do we really know about the role of microorganisms in iron sulfide mineral formation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, Aude; Gartman, Amy; Girguis, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Iron sulfide mineralization in low-temperature systems is a result of biotic and abiotic processes, though the delineation between these two modes of formation is not always straightforward. Here we review the role of microorganisms in the precipitation of extracellular iron sulfide minerals. We summarize the evidence that links sulfur-metabolizing microorganisms and sulfide minerals in nature and we present a critical overview of laboratory-based studies of the nucleation and growth of iron sulfide minerals in microbial cultures. We discuss whether biologically derived minerals are distinguishable from abiotic minerals, possessing attributes that are uniquely diagnostic of biomineralization. These inquiries have revealed the need for additional thorough, mechanistic and high-resolution studies to understand microbially mediated formation of a variety of sulfide minerals across a range of natural environments.

  5. Influence of sulfides on the tribological properties of composites produced by pulse electric current sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seung Ho

    2014-01-01

    Self-lubricating Al2O3-15wt% ZrO2 composites with sulfides, such as molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) and tungsten disulfide (WS2) serving as solid lubricants, were fabricated by using the pulse electric current sintering (PECS) technique. The coefficient of friction (COF) of the Al2O3-15wt% ZrO2 composite without/with sulfides was in the range of 0.37-0.48 and 0.27-0.49, respectively. As the amount of sulfides increased, the COF and the wear rate decreased. The reduction in COF and wear rate of the sulfide-containing composite is caused by a reduction in shear stresses between the specimen and the tribological medium due to the formation of a lubricating film resulting from the lamellar structure of sulfides located on the worn surface.

  6. Synthesis of rare earth sulfides and their UV-vis absorption spectra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Haibin; ZHANG Jianhui; YU Ruijin; SU Qiang

    2009-01-01

    Rare earth sulfides were systematically synthesized via the sulfurization of their commercial oxide powders using CS2 gas to shorten sulfurization time, and their UV-vis absorption spectra were investigated. The appropriate sulfurization conditions were studied. For the rare earth sulfides with the same crystal structure, the sulfurization temperature showed increasing tendency with the decrease of rare earth element atomic radii. The UV-vis absorption spectra of rare earth sulfides did not depend on the crystal structure of rare earth sulfides, but on the 4f electronic structure of rare earth element. The data showed that the optical band gaps of rare earth sulfides were irregular, and the values ranged from 1.65 to 3.75 eV.

  7. Utilising copper screen-printed electrodes (CuSPE) for the electroanalytical sensing of sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Bhawana; Bernalte, Elena; Smith, Jamie P; Foster, Christopher W; Linton, Patricia E; Sawant, Shilpa N; Banks, Craig E

    2016-02-01

    A mediatorless sulfide electrochemical sensing platform utilising a novel nanocopper-oxide screen-printed electrodes (CuSPE) is reported for the first time. The state-of-the-art screen-printed electrochemical sensors demonstrate their capability to quantify sulfide within both the presence and absence of an array of interferents with good levels of sensitivity and repeatability. The direct sensing (using linear sweep voltammetry) of sulfide utilising the CuSPEs provides a mediatorless approach for the detection of sulfide, yielding useful analytical signatures that can be successfully quantified. The proposed novel protocol using the CuSPEs is successfully applied to the sensing of sulfide within drinking water exhibiting a high level of recovery. PMID:26815001

  8. Sulfide intrusion in seagrasses assessed by stable sulfur isotopes—a synthesis of current results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmer, Marianne; Hasler-Sheetal, Harald

    2014-01-01

    Sulfide intrusion in seagrasses, as assessed by stable sulfur isotope signals, is widespread in all climate zones, where seagrasses are growing. Seagrasses can incorporate substantial amounts of 34S-depleted sulfide into their tissues with up to 87% of the total sulfur in leaves derived from...... sedimentary sulfide. Correlations between δ34S in leaves, rhizomes, and roots show that sedimentary sulfide is entering through the roots, either in the form of sulfide or sulfate, and translocated to the rhizomes and the leaves. The total sulfur content of the seagrasses increases as the proportion of...... sulfur in the tissue, and other sulfur containing compounds such as thiols, organic sulfur, and sulfate contribute to the accumulated sulfur pool. Experimental studies with seagrasses exposed to environmental and biological stressors show decreasing δ34S in the tissues along with reduction in growth...

  9. Reliability of Electrochemical Techniques for Determining Corrosion Rates on Carbon Steel in Sulfide Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel; Hemmingsen, T.; Nielsen, Lars Vendelbo;

    2007-01-01

    film formation in sulfide solutins was followed by video. It can be shown that capacitative and diffusional effects due to porous reactive deposits tend to dominate the data, resulting in unreliable corrosion rates measured using electrochemical techniques. The effect is strongly increased if the......Effects of film formation on carbon steel in hydrogen sulfide (H2S) media may corrupt corrosion rate monitoring by electrochemical techniques. Electrochemical data from H2S solutions, biological sulfide media, and natural sulfide containing geothermal water have been collected, and the process of...... biofilm in combination with ferrous sulfide corrosion products cover the steel surface. Corrosion rates can be overestimated by a factor of 10 to 100 with electrochemical techniques - both by linear polarization resistance (LPR) and electrochemicel impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Oxygen entering the system...

  10. Development of novel and sensitive methods for the determination of sulfide in aqueous samples by hydrogen sulfide generation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two new, simple and accurate methods for the determination of sulfide (S2-) at low levels (μg L-1) in aqueous samples were developed. The generation of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) took place in a coil where sulfide reacted with hydrochloric acid. The resulting H2S was then introduced as a vapor into an inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometer (ICP-AES) and sulfur emission intensity was measured at 180.669 nm. In comparison to when aqueous sulfide was introduced, the introduction of sulfur as H2S enhanced the sulfur signal emission. By setting a gas separator at the end of the reaction coil, reduced sulfur species in the form of H2S were removed from the water matrix, thus, interferences could be avoided. Alternatively, the gas separator was replaced by a nebulizer/spray chamber combination to introduce the sample matrix and reagents into the plasma. This methodology allowed the determination of both sulfide and sulfate in aqueous samples. For both methods the linear response was found to range from 5 μg L-1 to 25 mg L-1 of sulfide. Detection limits of 5 μg L-1 and 6 μg L-1 were obtained with and without the gas separator, respectively. These new methods were evaluated by comparison to the standard potentiometric method and were successfully applied to the analysis of reduced sulfur species in environmental waters

  11. Synthesis of Nanoporous Metals, Oxides, Carbides, and Sulfides: Beyond Nanocasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luc, Wesley; Jiao, Feng

    2016-07-19

    metal oxides with bimodal pore size distributions can be obtained. Combining nanocasting with chemical etching, a cobalt oxide with a hierarchical porous structure was synthesized, which possessed a surface area up to 250 m(2) g(-1), representing the highest surface area reported to date for nanoporous cobalt oxides. Lastly, this Account also covers the syntheses of nanoporous metal carbides and sulfides. The combination of in situ carburization and nanocasting enabled the syntheses of two ordered nanoporous metal carbides, Mo2C and W2C. For nanoporous metal sulfides, an "oxide-to-sulfide" synthetic strategy was proposed to address the large volume change issue of converting metal nitrate precursors to metal sulfide products in nanocasting. The successful syntheses of ordered nanoporous FeS2, CoS2, and NiS2 demonstrated the feasibility of the "oxide-to-sulfide" method. Concluding remarks include a summary of recent advances in the syntheses of nanoporous metal-based solids and a brief discussion of future opportunities in the hope of stimulating new interests and ideas. PMID:27294847

  12. Nitrosopersulfide (SSNO− accounts for sustained NO bioactivity of S-nitrosothiols following reaction with sulfide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam M. Cortese-Krott

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sulfide salts are known to promote the release of nitric oxide (NO from S-nitrosothiols and potentiate their vasorelaxant activity, but much of the cross-talk between hydrogen sulfide and NO is believed to occur via functional interactions of cell regulatory elements such as phosphodiesterases. Using RFL-6 cells as an NO reporter system we sought to investigate whether sulfide can also modulate nitrosothiol-mediated soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC activation following direct chemical interaction. We find a U-shaped dose response relationship where low sulfide concentrations attenuate sGC stimulation by S-nitrosopenicillamine (SNAP and cyclic GMP levels are restored at equimolar ratios. Similar results are observed when intracellular sulfide levels are raised by pre-incubation with the sulfide donor, GYY4137. The outcome of direct sulfide/nitrosothiol interactions also critically depends on molar reactant ratios and is accompanied by oxygen consumption. With sulfide in excess, a ‘yellow compound’ accumulates that is indistinguishable from the product of solid-phase transnitrosation of either hydrosulfide or hydrodisulfide and assigned to be nitrosopersulfide (perthionitrite, SSNO−; λmax 412 nm in aqueous buffers, pH 7.4; 448 nm in DMF. Time-resolved chemiluminescence and UV–visible spectroscopy analyses suggest that its generation is preceded by formation of the short-lived NO-donor, thionitrite (SNO−. In contrast to the latter, SSNO− is rather stable at physiological pH and generates both NO and polysulfides on decomposition, resulting in sustained potentiation of SNAP-induced sGC stimulation. Thus, sulfide reacts with nitrosothiols to form multiple bioactive products; SSNO− rather than SNO− may account for some of the longer-lived effects of nitrosothiols and contribute to sulfide and NO signaling.

  13. Sulindac sulfide selectively increases sensitivity of ABCC1 expressing tumor cells to doxorubicin and glutathione depletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitt, Jason D.; Keeton, Adam B.; Gary, Bernard D.; Sklar, Larry A.; Sodani, Kamlesh; Chen, Zhe-Sheng; Piazza, Gary A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transpo rters ABCC1 (MRP1), ABCB1 (P-gp), and ABCG2 (BCRP) contribute to chemotherapy failure. The primary goals of this study were to characterize the efficacy and mechanism of the non­steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), sulindac sulfide, to reverse ABCC1 mediated resistance to chemother­apeutic drugs and to determine if sulindac sulfide can influence sensitivity to chemotherapeutic drugs independently of drug efflux. Cytotoxicity assays were performed to measure resistance of ABC-expressing cell lines to doxoru­bicin and other chemotherapeutic drugs. NSAIDs were tested for the ability to restore sensitivity to resistance selected tumor cell lines, as well as a large panel of standard tumor cell lines. Other experiments characterized the mechanism by which sulindac sulfide inhibits ABCC1 substrate and co-substrate (GSH) transport in isolated membrane vesicles and intact cells. Selective reversal of multi-drug resistance (MDR), decreased efflux of doxor­ubicin, and fluorescent substrates were demonstrated by sulindac sulfide and a related NSAID, indomethacin, in resistance selected and engineered cell lines expressing ABCC1, but not ABCB1 or ABCG2. Sulindac sulfide also inhibited transport of leukotriene C4 into membrane vesicles. Sulindac sulfide enhanced the sensitivity to doxoru­bicin in 24 of 47 tumor cell lines, including all melanoma lines tested (7-7). Sulindac sulfide also decreased intra­cellular GSH in ABCC1 expressing cells, while the glutathione synthesis inhibitor, BSO, selectively increased sensitivity to sulindac sulfide induced cytotoxicity. Sulindac sulfide potently and selectively reverses ABCC1-mediated MDR at clinically achievable concentrations. ABCC1 expressing tumors may be highly sensitive to the direct cytotoxicity of sulindac sulfide, and in combination with chemotherapeutic drugs that induce oxidative stress.

  14. Structural effects of naphthalimide-based fluorescent sensor for hydrogen sulfide and imaging in live zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seon-Ae; Park, Chul Soon; Kwon, Oh Seok; Giong, Hoi-Khoanh; Lee, Jeong-Soo; Ha, Tai Hwan; Lee, Chang-Soo

    2016-05-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an important biological messenger, but few biologically-compatible methods are available for its detection in aqueous solution. Herein, we report a highly water-soluble naphthalimide-based fluorescent probe (L1), which is a highly versatile building unit that absorbs and emits at long wavelengths and is selective for hydrogen sulfide over cysteine, glutathione, and other reactive sulfur, nitrogen, and oxygen species in aqueous solution. We describe turn-on fluorescent probes based on azide group reduction on the fluorogenic ‘naphthalene’ moiety to fluorescent amines and intracellular hydrogen sulfide detection without the use of an organic solvent. L1 and L2 were synthetically modified to functional groups with comparable solubility on the N-imide site, showing a marked change in turn-on fluorescent intensity in response to hydrogen sulfide in both PBS buffer and living cells. The probes were readily employed to assess intracellular hydrogen sulfide level changes by imaging endogenous hydrogen sulfide signal in RAW264.7 cells incubated with L1 and L2. Expanding the use of L1 to complex and heterogeneous biological settings, we successfully visualized hydrogen sulfide detection in the yolk, brain and spinal cord of living zebrafish embryos, thereby providing a powerful approach for live imaging for investigating chemical signaling in complex multicellular systems.

  15. Effects of Sulfidation on ZnO Nanoparticle Dissolution and Aggregation in Sulfate-Containing Suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasool, Kashif; Lee, Dae Sung

    2015-09-01

    Industrial metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs) have recently attracted considerable attention because of their potentially hazardous impacts on ecosystems and microbial colonies in biological wastewater treatment plants. NPs dissolution and aggregation greatly determine the fate of such NPs in the environment and are relevant to their potential toxicities. Hence, we investigated the effects of sulfate on the dissolution and aggregation of ZnO nanoparticles (ZnO-NPs). In addition, ZnO-NPs were sulfidized at different sulfide concentrations in an anaerobic abiotic environment to investigate the effects of sulfidation on ZnO-NPs aggregation and solubility. Increasing the sulfate concentration from 0 to 200 mg/L significantly increased ZnO-NPs dissolution from 3.99 to 6.18 mg Zn(2+)/L, whereas ZnO-NPs sulfidation reduced the Zn(2+) dissolution rate from 1.82 mg Zn(2+)/L for pristine ZnO-NPs to 0.59 mg Zn2+/L for sulfidized ones. Increasing the sulfate concentration and the sulfidation of the ZnO-NPs induced aggregation by suppressing electrostatic repulsion. The results indicate that the sulfidation of ZnO-NPs prevents the particle dissolution and is an attractive method of reducing their antimicrobial activity. PMID:26716331

  16. Enrichment and immobilization of sulfide removal microbiota applied for environmental biological remediation of aquaculture area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yang-Guo; Zheng, Yu; Tian, Weijun; Bai, Jie; Feng, Gong; Guo, Liang; Gao, Mengchun

    2016-07-01

    To remove sulfide in the deteriorating aquaculture sediment and water, sulfide-oxidizing microbiota was enriched from Jiaozhou Bay, China, by using sulfide-rich medium. Composition and structure of microbial communities in the enrichments were investigated by 16S rDNA molecular biotechniques. Results showed that microbial community structure continuously shifted and the abundance of sulfate reducing bacteria, i.e., Desulfobacterium, Desulfococcus and Desulfobacca apparently declined. Several halophile genera, Vibrio, Marinobacter, Pseudomonas, Prochlorococcus, Pediococcus and Thiobacillus predominated finally in the microbiota. The enriched microbiota was capable of removing a maximum of 1000 mg/L sulfide within 12 h with 10% inoculum at pH 7.0, 20-30 °C. After immobilized, the microbiota presented excellent resistance to impact and could completely remove 600 mg/L sulfide in 12 h. Moreover, the immobilized microbiota recovered well even recycled for five times. In conclusion, the immobilized sulfide-removing microbiota showed a quite promising application for biological restoring of sulfide-rich aquaculture environment. PMID:27105167

  17. Structural effects of naphthalimide-based fluorescent sensor for hydrogen sulfide and imaging in live zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seon-Ae; Park, Chul Soon; Kwon, Oh Seok; Giong, Hoi-Khoanh; Lee, Jeong-Soo; Ha, Tai Hwan; Lee, Chang-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an important biological messenger, but few biologically-compatible methods are available for its detection in aqueous solution. Herein, we report a highly water-soluble naphthalimide-based fluorescent probe (L1), which is a highly versatile building unit that absorbs and emits at long wavelengths and is selective for hydrogen sulfide over cysteine, glutathione, and other reactive sulfur, nitrogen, and oxygen species in aqueous solution. We describe turn-on fluorescent probes based on azide group reduction on the fluorogenic 'naphthalene' moiety to fluorescent amines and intracellular hydrogen sulfide detection without the use of an organic solvent. L1 and L2 were synthetically modified to functional groups with comparable solubility on the N-imide site, showing a marked change in turn-on fluorescent intensity in response to hydrogen sulfide in both PBS buffer and living cells. The probes were readily employed to assess intracellular hydrogen sulfide level changes by imaging endogenous hydrogen sulfide signal in RAW264.7 cells incubated with L1 and L2. Expanding the use of L1 to complex and heterogeneous biological settings, we successfully visualized hydrogen sulfide detection in the yolk, brain and spinal cord of living zebrafish embryos, thereby providing a powerful approach for live imaging for investigating chemical signaling in complex multicellular systems. PMID:27188400

  18. Separate recovery of copper and zinc from acid mine drainage using biogenic sulfide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Precipitation of metals from acid mine drainage (AMD) using sulfide gives the possibility of selective recovery due to different solubility product of each metal. Using sulfate reducing bacteria to produce sulfide for that purpose is advantageous due to in situ and on-demand sulfide production. In this study, separate precipitation of Cu and Zn was studied using sulfide produced in anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR). ABR fed with ethanol (1340 mg/L chemical oxygen demand (COD)) and sulfate (2000 mg/L) gave a stable performance with 65% sulfate reduction, 85% COD removal and around 320 mg/L sulfide production. Cu was separately precipitated at low pH (pH 2 gas. Cu precipitation was complete within 45-60 min and Zn did not precipitate during Cu removal. The Cu precipitation rate increased with initial Cu concentration. After selective Cu precipitation, Zn recovery was studied using ABR effluent containing sulfide and alkalinity. Depending on initial sulfide/Zn ratio, removal efficiency varied between 84 and 98%. The low pH of Zn bearing AMD was also increased to neutral values using alkalinity produced by sulfate reducing bacteria in ABR. The mode of particle size distribution of ZnS and CuS precipitates was around 17 and 46 μm, respectively.

  19. Changes in Dimethyl Sulfide Oceanic Distribution due to Climate Change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cameron-Smith, P; Elliott, S; Maltrud, M; Erickson, D; Wingenter, O

    2011-02-16

    Dimethyl sulfide (DMS) is one of the major precursors for aerosols and cloud condensation nuclei in the marine boundary layer over much of the remote ocean. Here they report on coupled climate simulations with a state-of-the-art global ocean biogeochemical model for DMS distribution and fluxes using present-day and future atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations. They find changes in zonal averaged DMS flux to the atmosphere of over 150% in the Southern Ocean. This is due to concurrent sea ice changes and ocean ecosystem composition shifts caused by changes in temperature, mixing, nutrient, and light regimes. The largest changes occur in a region already sensitive to climate change, so any resultant local CLAW/Gaia feedback of DMS on clouds, and thus radiative forcing, will be particularly important. A comparison of these results to prior studies shows that increasing model complexity is associted with reduced DMS emissions at the equator and increased emissions at high latitudes.

  20. Electrodeposited cobalt sulfide hole collecting layer for polymer solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In polymer solar cells based on the blend of regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester, the hole collecting layer has to be endowed with its ionization potential close to or greater than that of P3HT (∼5 eV). Conductive polymer blends such as poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) and metal oxides such as vanadium pentoxide (V2O5) and molybdenum trioxide (MoO3) satisfy this requirement and have been the most common materials used so far in bulk heterojunction structures. We report here cobalt sulfide (CoS) to be a promising hole collecting material deposited by convenient and room temperature electrodeposition. By simply tuning the CoS electrodeposition parameters, power conversion efficiencies similar (within 15%) to a reference structure with PEDOT:PSS were obtained

  1. Chrysanthemum-like bismuth sulfide microcrystals: Synthesis, characterization, and properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jinghui; Gao, Guanhua; Yu, Runnan; Qiu, Guanzhou; Liu, Xiaohe

    2011-02-01

    Uniform chrysanthemum-like bismuth sulfide (Bi 2S 3) microcrystals assembled from nanosheet building blocks were successfully synthesized via a convenient hydrothermal synthetic route under mild conditions in which hydrated bismuth nitrate and L-cysteine were employed to supply Bi and S source and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid disodium salt (EDTA-Na 2) was employed as chelating agent. The influences of reaction temperatures and time on the morphologies of final products were investigated. The phase structures, morphologies, and properties of as-prepared products were investigated by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscope, and photoluminescence spectra. The possible growth mechanism for the formation of chrysanthemum-like Bi 2S 3 microcrystals was discussed on the basis of the experimental results.

  2. Observation of superconductivity in hydrogen sulfide from nuclear resonant scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troyan, Ivan; Gavriliuk, Alexander; Rüffer, Rudolf; Chumakov, Alexander; Mironovich, Anna; Lyubutin, Igor; Perekalin, Dmitry; Drozdov, Alexander P; Eremets, Mikhail I

    2016-03-18

    High-temperature superconductivity remains a focus of experimental and theoretical research. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been reported to be superconducting at high pressures and with a high transition temperature. We report on the direct observation of the expulsion of the magnetic field in H2S compressed to 153 gigapascals. A thin (119)Sn film placed inside the H2S sample was used as a sensor of the magnetic field. The magnetic field on the (119)Sn sensor was monitored by nuclear resonance scattering of synchrotron radiation. Our results demonstrate that an external static magnetic field of about 0.7 tesla is expelled from the volume of (119)Sn foil as a result of the shielding by the H2S sample at temperatures between 4.7 K and approximately 140 K, revealing a superconducting state of H2S. PMID:26989248

  3. Cadmium sulfide nanotubes thin films: Characterization and photoelectrochemical behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Chenhuan, E-mail: rinbiad2006@yahoo.com.cn [College of Chemical Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Yang Suolong, E-mail: yangsuolong@yahoo.com.cn [China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Zheng Baozhan, E-mail: zhengbaozhan@scu.edu.cn [Key laboratory of Green Chemistry and Technology, Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Zhou Ting, E-mail: z-t-zhouting@163.com [Key laboratory of Green Chemistry and Technology, Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry , Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Yuan Hongyan, E-mail: yuan_hy@scu.edu.cn [College of Chemical Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Xiao Dan, E-mail: xiaodan@scu.edu.cn [College of Chemical Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Key laboratory of Green Chemistry and Technology, Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry , Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China)

    2012-01-31

    Monodisperse cadmium sulfide nanotubes (CdS NTs) with a diameter of 100 nm were synthesized on indium-doped tin oxide glass substrates using chemical bath deposition and self-sacrificial template technique. This CdS thin film was characterized by transmission electron microscope, scanning electron microscope, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and UV-vis spectrophotometer. This film gave a short circuit photocurrent of 4.4 mA/cm{sup 2}, an open circuit photovoltage of 0.75 V, a fill factor of 0.49, and an overall conversion efficiency of 1.29% under a simulated solar illumination of 100 mW/cm{sup 2}. All these photoelectrochemical properties of the films were dependent on the microstructure of the nanotubes and the thickness of the film. A facile and efficient way to prepare CdS-based photoelectrodes for photoelectrochemical cells was provided in this report.

  4. Lithium sulfide compositions for battery electrolyte and battery electrode coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Chengdu; Liu, Zengcai; Fu, Wunjun; Lin, Zhan; Dudney, Nancy J; Howe, Jane Y; Rondinone, Adam J

    2013-12-03

    Methods of forming lithium-containing electrolytes are provided using wet chemical synthesis. In some examples, the lithium containing electroytes are composed of .beta.-Li.sub.3PS.sub.4 or Li.sub.4P.sub.2S.sub.7. The solid electrolyte may be a core shell material. In one embodiment, the core shell material includes a core of lithium sulfide (Li.sub.2S), a first shell of .beta.-Li.sub.3PS.sub.4 or Li.sub.4P.sub.2S.sub.7, and a second shell including one or .beta.-Li.sub.3PS.sub.4 or Li.sub.4P.sub.2S.sub.7 and carbon. The lithium containing electrolytes may be incorporated into wet cell batteries or solid state batteries.

  5. Hydrogen Production from Hydrogen Sulfide in IGCC Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elias Stefanakos; Burton Krakow; Jonathan Mbah

    2007-07-31

    IGCC power plants are the cleanest coal-based power generation facilities in the world. Technical improvements are needed to help make them cost competitive. Sulfur recovery is one procedure in which improvement is possible. This project has developed and demonstrated an electrochemical process that could provide such an improvement. IGCC power plants now in operation extract the sulfur from the synthesis gas as hydrogen sulfide. In this project H{sub 2}S has been electrolyzed to yield sulfur and hydrogen (instead of sulfur and water as is the present practice). The value of the byproduct hydrogen makes this process more cost effective. The electrolysis has exploited some recent developments in solid state electrolytes. The proof of principal for the project concept has been accomplished.

  6. Hydrogen Sulfide, Oxidative Stress and Periodontal Diseases: A Concise Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greabu, Maria; Totan, Alexandra; Miricescu, Daniela; Radulescu, Radu; Virlan, Justina; Calenic, Bogdan

    2016-01-01

    In the past years, biomedical research has recognized hydrogen sulfide (H₂S) not only as an environmental pollutant but also, along with nitric oxide and carbon monoxide, as an important biological gastransmitter with paramount roles in health and disease. Current research focuses on several aspects of H₂S biology such as the biochemical pathways that generate the compound and its functions in human pathology or drug synthesis that block or stimulate its biosynthesis. The present work addresses the knowledge we have to date on H₂S production and its biological roles in the general human environment with a special focus on the oral cavity and its involvement in the initiation and development of periodontal diseases. PMID:26805896

  7. Hydrogen Sulfide, Oxidative Stress and Periodontal Diseases: A Concise Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Greabu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the past years, biomedical research has recognized hydrogen sulfide (H2S not only as an environmental pollutant but also, along with nitric oxide and carbon monoxide, as an important biological gastransmitter with paramount roles in health and disease. Current research focuses on several aspects of H2S biology such as the biochemical pathways that generate the compound and its functions in human pathology or drug synthesis that block or stimulate its biosynthesis. The present work addresses the knowledge we have to date on H2S production and its biological roles in the general human environment with a special focus on the oral cavity and its involvement in the initiation and development of periodontal diseases.

  8. Iron (III) sulfide particles produced by a polyol method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Ryo; Kubono, Ippei [Tokyo University of Science (Japan); Kobayashi, Yoshio [The University of Electro-Communications (Japan); Yamada, Yasuhiro, E-mail: yyasu@rs.kagu.tus.ac.jp [Tokyo University of Science (Japan)

    2015-04-15

    Iron(III) sulfide Fe{sub 2}S{sub 3} particles were produced using a polyol method. Although pyrrhotite Fe{sub 1−x}S appeared together with Fe{sub 2}S{sub 3}, the relative yield of Fe{sub 2}S{sub 3} changed when the concentration of reagents in the oleylamine changed. Mössbauer spectra of the particles showed superparamagnetic doublets due to Fe{sub 2}S{sub 3} at 293 K, along with a hyperfine magnetic splitting of H = 24.7 T at 6 K. XRD patterns of the Fe{sub 2}S{sub 3} suggested a structure similar to that of greigite Fe{sub 3}S{sub 4}.

  9. RHEOLOGICAL BEHAVIOR OF POLYPHENYLENE SULFIDE/POLYAMIDE-66 BLENDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Canshu; LI Jihong; WANG Yinghan; CHEN Yongrong; WANG Ling

    1996-01-01

    Blends of polyphenylene sulfide (PPS) containing trace amounts of branching and/or cross-linking in chain and Polyamide-66 (PA-66) have been prepared by melt blending. The rheological behavior of PPS/PA-66 blends has been studied by means of capillary rheometer, and compared with PPS. The effects of shear rate, shear stress and temperature on the flow of PPS/PA-66 blends and PPS are discussed. The non-Newtonian indexes and the activation energies of viscous flow are obtained. The results show that the apparent viscosity of PPS/PA-66 blends is not sensitive to shear rate and stress, but decreases with the elevation of temperature. On the contrary, the apparent viscosity of the PPS decreases obviously with the increasing of shear rate and shear stress, but it is increased by the elevation of temperatue.

  10. Cadmium sulfide nanotubes thin films: Characterization and photoelectrochemical behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monodisperse cadmium sulfide nanotubes (CdS NTs) with a diameter of 100 nm were synthesized on indium-doped tin oxide glass substrates using chemical bath deposition and self-sacrificial template technique. This CdS thin film was characterized by transmission electron microscope, scanning electron microscope, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and UV–vis spectrophotometer. This film gave a short circuit photocurrent of 4.4 mA/cm2, an open circuit photovoltage of 0.75 V, a fill factor of 0.49, and an overall conversion efficiency of 1.29% under a simulated solar illumination of 100 mW/cm2. All these photoelectrochemical properties of the films were dependent on the microstructure of the nanotubes and the thickness of the film. A facile and efficient way to prepare CdS-based photoelectrodes for photoelectrochemical cells was provided in this report.

  11. Kinetics of the conversion of copper sulfide to blister copper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrillo, F.

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available The desulfurization of copper sulfide by air and oxygen has been studied in two laboratory reactors where the gas is blown onto the melt surface. Rates of oxidation in a vertical resistance furnace may be explained by the mass transfer control in the gas phase. However, results for a horizontal tube suggest that the chemical resistance is controlling.

    La desulfuración del sulfuro cuproso con aire y oxígeno se ha estudiado en dos reactores de laboratorio, en los cuales el gas se sopla sobre la superficie del fundido. La velocidad de reacción en un horno de resistencias verticales se puede explicar considerando como controlante la resistencia a la transferencia de materia de la fase gas. Sin embargo, los resultados del horno horizontal indican que la resistencia química es la controlante.

  12. Endogenous hydrogen sulfide is involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic, complex, and progressive pathological process in large and medium sized arteries. The exact mechanism of this process remains unclear. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a novel gasotransmitter, was confirmed as playing a major role in the pathogenesis of many cardiovascular diseases. It plays a role in vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation and apoptosis, participates in the progress of hyperhomocysteinemia (HHCY), inhibits atherogenic modification of LDL, interferes with vascular calcification, intervenes with platelet function, and there are interactions between H2S and inflammatory processes. The role of H2S in atherosclerotic pathogenesis highlights the mysteries of atherosclerosis and inspires the search for innovative therapeutic strategies. Here, we review the studies to date that have considered the role of H2S in atherosclerosis.

  13. Feasibility of sulfide control in sewers by reuse of iron rich drinking water treatment sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jing; Pikaar, Ilje; Sharma, Keshab Raj; Keller, Jürg; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2015-03-15

    Dosage of iron salt is the most commonly used method for sulfide control in sewer networks but incurs high chemical costs. In this study, we experimentally investigate the feasibility of using iron rich drinking water treatment sludge for sulfide control in sewers. A lab-scale rising main sewer biofilm reactor was used. The sulfide concentration in the effluent decreased from 15.5 to 19.8 mgS/L (without dosing) to below 0.7-2.3 mgS/L at a sludge dosing rate achieving an iron to total dissolved inorganic sulfur molar ratio (Fe:S) of 1:1, with further removal of sulfide possible by prolonging the reaction time. In fact, batch tests revealed an Fe consumption to sulfide removal ratio of 0.5 ± 0.02 (mole:mole), suggesting the possible occurrence of other reactions involving the removal of sulfide. Modelling revealed that the reaction between iron in sludge and sulfide has reaction orders of 0.65 ± 0.01 and 0.77 ± 0.02 with respect to the Fe and sulfide concentrations, respectively. The addition of sludge slightly increased the total chemical oxidation demand (tCOD) concentration (by approximately 12%) as expected, but decreased the soluble chemical oxidation demand (sCOD) concentration and methane formation by 7% and 20%, respectively. Some phosphate removal (13%) was also observed at the sludge dosing rate of 1:1 (Fe:S), which is beneficial to nutrient removal from the wastewater. Overall, this study suggests that dosing iron-rich drinking water sludge to sewers could be an effective strategy for sulfide removal in sewer systems, which would also reduce the sludge disposal costs for drinking water treatment works. However, its potential side-effects on sewer sedimentation and on the wastewater treatment plant effluent remain to be investigated. PMID:25616115

  14. Reducing role of sulfides and diamond formation in the Earth's mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palyanov, Yu. N.; Borzdov, Yu. M.; Bataleva, Yu. V.; Sokol, A. G.; Palyanova, G. A.; Kupriyanov, I. N.

    2007-08-01

    Sulfides are abundant inclusions in diamond, but their role in the diamond genesis is still debatable. To address this issue, experimental modeling of natural diamond-forming processes with the participation of sulfides has been performed with the MgCO 3-SiO 2-Al 2O 3-FeS system at 6.3 GPa in the temperature range of 1250-1800 °C, using a multi-anvil high pressure apparatus of the "split-sphere" type. As a result of redox reactions involving carbonate, oxides and sulfide, diamond and/or graphite are produced in association with garnet, orthopyroxene, coesite and sulfides (pyrite, pyrrhotite). Diamond crystals, formed from the carbon of initial carbonate, are found to contain nitrogen impurity with total concentration of approximately 1500 ppm, and defects related to hydrogen impurity. Based on the experimental data and thermodynamic calculations, the processes of the carbonate-oxide-sulfide interaction are reconstructed, revealing the role of sulfides as a reducing agent for CO 2-fluid. It is established that pyrrhotite acts as the reducing agent irrespective of its aggregate state (solid or melt). At temperatures below melting, pyrrhotite is enriched with sulfur and depleted with iron from FeS to Fe 0.85S. At higher temperatures, sulfide melt is enriched with sulfur and crystallizes as pyrite and pyrrhotite during quenching. The medium in which diamond and/or graphite crystallize is a CO 2-dominated fluid containing dissolved carbon, silicates, oxides and sulfides. The investigated processes and mechanisms of diamond crystallization can be considered as a possible model of the diamond formation in sulfide-bearing paragenesis in mantle metasomatism or UHP metamorphism of crustal material.

  15. Sulfide isotopic compositions in shergottites and ALH84001, and possible implications for life on Mars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The shergottite and ALH84001 meteorites hold keys for understanding geologic and possibly biologic processes on Mars. Recently, it has been proposed that carbonates in ALH84001, and the Fe-sulfides they contain, are products of extraterrestrial biogenic activity. Here we report ion microprobe analyses of sulfides in shergottites and ALH84001. The sulfur isotope ratios of igneous pyrrhotites in shergottites (mean δ34SCDT: Shergotty = -0.4 per-thousand, Zagami = +2.7 per-thousand, EETA79001A = 1.9 per-thousand, EETA79001B = -1.7 per-thousand, LEW88516 = -1.9 per-thousand, QUE94201 = +0.8 per-thousand) are similar to those of terrestrial ocean-floor basalts, suggesting that the sulfur isotopic composition of the Martian mantle may be similar to that of the mantle of the Earth. The sulfur isotopic systematics of ALH84001 sulfides are distinct from the shergottites. Measured sulfur isotope ratios of eight pyrite grains (δ34SCDT = +2.0 to +7.3 per-thousand) in crushed zones confirm previously reported analyses of isotopically heavy sulfides and are indistinguishable from an Fe-sulfide zone within a carbonate globule (δ34SCDT = +6.0 per-thousand). Analyses of synthesized, fine-grained mixtures of sulfide, carbonate, and magnetite indicate than the measured sulfur isotope ratio is independent of the presence of carbonate and magnetite in the sputtered volume, confirming the accuracy of the analysis of the fine-grained sulfide in the carbonate globule. Terrestrial biogenic sulfate reduction typically results in light isotopic enrichments. The similarity of δ34S values of the sulfides in ALH84001 imply that the Fe-sulfide zones within ALH84001 carbonates are probably not the result of bacterial reduction of sulfate. 38 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  16. Controlled synthesis and morphology evolution of nickel sulfide micro/nanostructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → A facile hydrothermal method has been developed for synthesis of nickel sulfide micro/nanostructure using Ni(NO3)2.6H2O as nickel source, S=C(NH2)2 as sulfur source and 1, 2-ethylenediamin/sodium dodecyl sulfate as surfactant. → Different morphologies such as petal-, urchin- and sphere-like nickel sulfide structures have been synthesized by tuning the reaction time, reaction temperature, and the surfactant. → The relationship of the fluorescence properties with their morphology and phase was studied, and the possible growth mechanism of nickel sulfide structure was proposed based on the morphology evolution of nickel sulfide. → A hydrothermal method to prepare the nickel sulfide, and the phases can be controlled to adjust the photoluminescence intensities in ultraviolet light band. - Abstract: A facile hydrothermal method has been developed for synthesis of nickel sulfide micro/nanostructure using Ni(NO3)2.6H2O as nickel source, S=C(NH2)2 as sulfur source and 1,2-ethylenediamin/sodium dodecyl sulfate as surfactant. Different morphologies such as petal-, urchin- and sphere-like nickel sulfide structures have been synthesized by tuning the reaction time, reaction temperature, and the surfactant. The as-prepared products were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Field-emission scanning electron microscope, and Photoluminescence spectra. The relationship of the fluorescence properties with their morphology and phase was studied, and the possible growth mechanism of nickel sulfide structure was proposed based on the morphology evolution of nickel sulfide.

  17. Can Hydrogen Sulfide Gas Be a Biosignature in a Habitable Exoplanet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Renyu; Seager, S.; Bains, W.

    2011-05-01

    A group of microorganisms can disproportionate sulfite and elemental sulfur into sulfide and sulfate to obtain energy for a living. We explore if the sulfide produced by microorganisms can alter the atmospheric composition to manifest in the spectrum of a habitable exoplanet. We consider a dry (i.e., limited ocean cover) habitable planet of Earth size and mass, orbiting a Sun-like star. As on Earth, volcanoes release sulfur as sulfur dioxide and hydrogen sulfide, but the volcanic production of hydrogen sulfide is limited by the scarcity of water. In the meantime, in our scenario, microbes can flourish in the ocean and effectively make use of the energy gained from the sulfur disproportion and release sulfide as the metabolic byproduct. The metabolic sulfur disproportion can enhance the overall outgassing rate of hydrogen sulfide by nearly one order of magnitude over the non-biological emission. To study the atmospheric response to this enhancement, we build a one-dimensional chemical transport model that treats all O, H and S bearing species and the relevant photochemical and chemical reactions. The vertical transport is approximated with the eddy diffusion. We also consider the formation and the sedimentation of elemental sulfur aerosols and sulfate aerosols in the atmosphere and explore the effect of aerosol particle size on the chemistry and the radiative transfer. To establish hydrogen sulfide as a biosignature, we need to understand the atmospheric response to the sulfide outgassing, the spectral features of hydrogen sulfide and its photochemical products, and the volcanic release of H2S. The current work will address the first two problems, and the main uncertainty will remain at the possible false positives due to the volcanism.

  18. Effect of Sodium Sulfide on Ni-Containing Carbon Monoxide Dehydrogenases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jian Feng; Paul A. Lindahl

    2004-07-28

    OAK-B135 The structure of the active-site C-cluster in CO dehydrogenase from Carboxythermus hydrogenoformans includes a {mu}{sup 2}-sulfide ion bridged to the Ni and unique Fe, while the same cluster in enzymes from Rhodospirillum rubrum (CODH{sub Rr}) and Moorella thermoacetica (CODH{sub Mt}) lack this ion. This difference was investigated by exploring the effects of sodium sulfide on activity and spectral properties. Sulfide partially inhibited the CO oxidation activity of CODH{sub Rr} and generated a lag prior to steady-state. CODH{sub Mt} was inhibited similarly but without a lag. Adding sulfide to CODH{sub Mt} in the C{sub red1} state caused the g{sub av} = 1.82 EPR signal to decline and new features to appear, including one with g = 1.95, 1.85 and (1.70 or 1.62). Removing sulfide caused the g{sub av} = 1.82 signal to reappear and activity to recover. Sulfide did not affect the g{sub av} = 1.86 signal from the C{sub red2} state. A model was developed in which sulfide binds reversibly to C{sub red1}, inhibiting catalysis. Reducing this adduct causes sulfide to dissociate, C{sub red2} to develop, and activity to recover. Using this model, apparent K{sub I} values are 40 {+-} 10 nM for CODH{sub Rr} and 60 {+-} 30 {micro}M for CODH{sub Mt}. Effects of sulfide are analogous to those of other anions, including the substrate hydroxyl group, suggesting that these ions also bridge the Ni and unique Fe. This proposed arrangement raises the possibility that CO binding labilizes the bridging hydroxyl and increases its nucleophilic tendency towards attacking Ni-bound carbonyl.

  19. Influence of sulfide on the distribution of higher plants in salt marshes. [Salicornia europaea; Puccinellia maritima; Atriplex patula; Festuca rubra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ingold, A.; Havill, D.C.

    1984-11-01

    Soluble sulfide in surface (0-5 cm) salt marsh sediments was detectable only on the lower marsh, salt pans and creek beds. On the lower-marsh only Salicornia europaea amongst the vascular plant species present was rooted in sulfide-containing sediments. No significant correlation was observed between soluble sulfide concentration and redox potential in soil samples from the lower-marsh. When eight salt marshes from around the coast of Britain were compared, six had a detectable sulfide concentration in the lower-marsh sediments. Divisive information analysis of the vegetation data from these sites indicated that in all cases the most significant association was between Salicornia europaea and otherwise bare ground. In two marshes where no soluble sulfide could be measured, S. europaea was associated with other plant species rather than bare ground. Monthly observations of plant cover and sulfide concentration in sixteen permanent quadrats on the lower marsh revealed a significant positive correlation between the cover of Salicornia europaea and soil sulfide. In contrast, Puccinellia maritima showed a significant negative correlation with sulfide concentration. In liquid media, the growth of Atriplex patula, Festuca rubra and Puccinellia maritima, was significantly inhibited by sulfide whereas there was no marked effect on that of Salicornia europaea. The results suggest that S. europaea is relatively tolerant of sulfide and is able to establish on areas of the lower marsh from which other species are excluded by the presence of sulfide.

  20. Radon loss from barite in submarine hydrothermal sulfide deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, A.; Toyoda, S.; Ishibashi, J.

    2012-12-01

    Determining the ages of the hydrothermal deposit will greatly contribute the studies of temporal change of submarine hydrothermal activities, as they are essential factors for ore formation and for the biological systems sustained by the chemical species arising from hydrothermal activities. The dating methods available for this purpose includes disequilibrium among 238U, 234U, and 230Th in sufide minerals, between 226Ra and 210Pb, and 228Ra and 228Th in barite (BaSO4) contained in the deposits, and ESR (electron spin resonance) using SO3- radical in barite. In applying these dating methods, a closed system is assumed, where radioactive nuclei decay following the law of physics but are not mobile out of the mineral. However, White and Rood (2001) reported that 3 to 20% of 222Rn is lost from barite crystal, which are used for casing of mining on the land. As 222Rn loss in barite greatly affects the dating results of 226}Ra-{210Pb method and ESR dating method in which radioactive equilibrium is assumed to calculate the dose rate, in the present paper, we investigated {222}Rn loss from the barite crystals contained in hydrothermal sulfide deposits. The radioactive nuclei, 210Pb and 214Bi were measured by the low background pure germanium gamma ray spectrometer at Okayama University of Science. A Pitchblend Uraninite (UO2) mixed with NaCl was used as the equilibrated standard. The barite crystals extracted from hydrothermal sulfide deposits taken in South Mariana Trough are also crused and mixed with NaCl. The mixed powder was packed in a thin stainless container which prevent from Rn loss, before the measurements. The measurements for 24 hours were repeated every day for 20 days. As results, it was found that the peak intensities of 210Pb and 214Bi did not change with time, meaning no Rn loss.

  1. Productivity-Diversity Relationships from Chemolithoautotrophically Based Sulfidic Karst Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Porter Megan L.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Although ecosystems thriving in the absence of photosynthetic processes are no longer considered unique phenomena, we haveyet to understand how these ecosystems are energetically sustained via chemosynthesis. Ecosystem energetics were measuredin microbial mats from active sulfidic caves (Movile Cave, Romania; Frasassi Caves, Italy; Lower Kane Cave, Wyoming, USA; andCesspool Cave, Virginia, USA using radiotracer techniques. We also estimated bacterial diversity using 16S rRNA sequences torelate the productivity measurements to the composition of the microbial communities. All of the microbial communities investigatedwere dominated by chemolithoautotrophic productivity, with the highest rates from Movile Cave at 281 g C/m2/yr. Heterotrophicproductivities were at least one order of magnitude less than autotrophy from all of the caves. We generated 414 new 16S rRNAgene sequences that represented 173 operational taxonomic units (OTUs with 99% sequence similarity. Although 13% of theseOTUs were found in more than one cave, the compositions of each community were significantly different from each other (P≤0.001.Autotrophic productivity was positively correlated with overall species richness and with the number of bacterial OTUs affiliated withthe Epsilonproteobacteria, a group known for sulfur cycling and chemolithoautotrophy. Higher rates of autotrophy were also stronglypositively correlated to available metabolic energy sources, and specifically to dissolved sulfide concentrations. The relationship ofautotrophic productivity and heterotrophic cycling rates to bacterial species richness can significantly impact the diversity of highertrophic levels in chemolithoautotrophically-based cave ecosystems, with the systems possessing the highest productivity supportingabundant and diverse macro-invertebrate communities.

  2. [Investigation of nitrobenzene removal by iron sulfide (FeS)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xia-Lin; Li, Rui-Hua

    2012-12-01

    The nitrobenzene removal performance by iron sulfide was investigated in batch experiments. The effects of different factors were studied. The results showed that the removal efficiency of nitrobenzene was 90% as initial nitrobenzene concentration was 0.96 mmol x L(-1), dosage of FeS was 1.2 g and the reaction time was 180 minutes. Initial nitrobenzene concentration, dosage of FeS, temperature and reused times of FeS had a significant influence on the removal efficiency of nitrobenzene. As the initial nitrobenzene concentration was in range of 0.74 to 1.74 mmol x L(-1), the removal efficiency of nitrobenzene decreased by 4.7% with every 0.1 mmol x L(-1) increasing of initial nitrobenzene concentration. As the dosage of FeS was in the range of 0.3 to 1.5 g, the removal efficiency of nitrobenzene increased by 20% with every 0.3 g increasing of FeS. As the dosage of FeS was 1.8 g, the removal efficiency of nitrobenzene was 100%. In the temperature range of 10 to 25 degrees C, the removal efficiency of nitrobenzene increased by 1.6% with 1 degrees C increasing. As the temperature was 30 degrees C, the removal efficiency of nitrobenzene was 100%. The removal efficiency of nitrobenzene decreased as the reused times of FeS increased. Rotational speed hardly had any influence on the removal efficiency of nitrobenzene. As the rotational speed was in the range of 10 to 80 r x min(-1), the removal efficiency of nitrobenzene was around 75%. The nitrobenzene removal performance by iron sulfide was satisfied in the treatment of simulated chemical industrial wastewater, and after 60 min, the removal efficiency of nitrobenzene was 100%. PMID:23379163

  3. Impact of iron sulfide transformation on trichloroethylene degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Y. Thomas; Wilson, John T.; Wilkin, Richard T. (EPA)

    2010-05-04

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is one of the most common and persistent groundwater contaminants encountered at hazardous waste sites around the world. A growing body of evidence indicates that iron sulfides play an important role in degrading TCE in natural environments and in engineered systems designed for groundwater cleanup. In this study, we investigate transformation processes of iron sulfides and consequent impacts on TCE degradation using batch experimental techniques, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Our results show that mackinawite is highly reactive toward TCE and no detectable mineralogical changes were detected during the course of reaction. However, freeze-dried FeS transformed to a mixture of mackinawite and greigite during the freeze drying process, with further mineralogical changes during reaction with TCE to lepidocrocite, goethite and pyrite. Newly formed lepidocrocite is a transient phase, with conversion to goethite over time. TCE transformation kinetics show that freeze-dried FeS is 20-50 times less reactive in degrading TCE than non-freeze-dried FeS, and the TCE degradation rate increases with pH (from 5.4 to 8.3), possibly due to an increase of surface deprotonation or electron transfer at higher pH. Results suggest that freeze drying could cause FeS particle aggregation, decreased surface area and availability of reactive sites; it also could change FeS mineralogy and accelerate mineral transformation. These aspects could contribute to the lower reactivity of freeze-dried FeS toward TCE degradation. Modeling results show that FeS transformation in natural environments depends on specific biogeochemical conditions, and natural FeS transformation may affect mineral reactivity in a similar way as compared to the freeze drying process. Rapid transformation of FeS to FeS{sub 2} could significantly slow down TCE degradation in both natural and engineered systems.

  4. Analysis of a microbial community oxidizing inorganic sulfide and mercaptans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, K E; Sublette, K L; Rider, P A; Stepp, A; Beitle, R R; Conner, J A; Kolhatkar, R

    2001-01-01

    Successful treatment of refinery spent-sulfidic caustic (which results from the addition of sodium hydroxide solutions to petroleum refinery waste streams) was achieved in a bioreactor containing an enrichment culture immobilized in organic polymer beads with embedded powdered activated carbon (Bio-Sep). The aerobic enrichment culture had previously been selected using a gas mixture of hydrogen sulfide and methyl mercaptan (MeSH) as the sole carbon and energy sources. The starting cultures for the enrichment consisted of several different Thiobacilli spp. (T. thioparus, T. denitrificans, T. thiooxidans, and T. neopolitanus), as well as activated sludge from a refinery aerobic wastewater treatment system and sludge from an industrial anaerobic digester. Microscopic examination (light and SEM) of the beads and of microbial growth on the walls of the bioreactor revealed a great diversity of microorganisms. Further characterization was undertaken starting with culturable aerobic heterotrophic microorganisms (sequencing of PCR-amplified DNA coding for 16S rRNA, Gram staining) and by PCR amplification of DNA coding for 16S rRNA extracted directly from the cell mass, followed by the separation of the PCR products by DGGE (denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis). Eight prominent bands from the DGGE gel were sequenced and found to be closest to sequences of uncultured Cytophagales (3 bands), Gram-positive cocci (Micrococcineae), alpha proteobacteria (3 bands), and an unidentified beta proteobacterium. Culturable microbes included several genera of fungi as well as various Gram-positive and Gram-negative heterotrophic bacteria not seen in techniques using direct DNA extraction. PMID:11485441

  5. Role of toluene in hydrogen sulfide combustion under Claus condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Examined the role of toluene addition in hydrogen sulfide combustion. • Effect of 0%, 0.5%, 1% and 5% of toluene in H2S gas stream was examined. • Toluene addition triggers production of H2 which provides oxidation competition to H2S. • Increased amount of toluene in H2S gas reduced SO2 and increased asymptotic value of H2S. • Toluene addition enhanced the formation of CO and COS. - Abstract: Experimental investigations on the effect of different amounts of toluene addition to H2S combustion in oxygen under Claus condition (Φ = 3) are presented. Three toluene concentrations of 0.5%, 1% and 5% in H2S are presented and compared with the baseline case of 100% H2S oxygen combustion. Temperature data showed that addition of toluene to H2S gas stream increases the flame temperature because of large heating value associated with toluene. Addition of toluene resulted in the production of H2, which increased with increase in the amounts of toluene addition. Furthermore, increased addition of toluene concentration increased the asymptotic minimum value of hydrogen sulfide due to oxidation competition between the formed H2 and H2S. The results also showed that the presence of CO triggers the formation of COS with toluene addition due to reaction of CO with SO2. The results showed that SO2 mole fraction increased to a maximum value then decayed with distance along the reactor. Addition of toluene increased the rate of SO2 decay. These results have direct impact on sulfur capture in the Claus reactor and its performance

  6. Magnetite-sulfide chondrules and nodules in CK carbonaceous chondrites - Implications for the timing of CK oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Alan E.

    1993-01-01

    CK carbonaceous chondrites contain rare (about 0.1 vol pct) magnetite-sulfide chondrules that range from about 240 to 500 microns in apparent diameter and have ellipsoidal to spheroidal morphologies, granular textures, and concentric layering. They resemble the magnetite-sulfide nodules occurring inside mafic silicate chondrules in CK chondrites. It seems likely that the magnetite-sulfide chondrules constitute the subset of magnetite-sulfide nodules that escaped as immiscible droplets from their molten silicate chondrule hosts during chondrule formation. The intactness of the magnetite-sulfide chondrules and nodules implies that oxidation of CK metal occurred before agglomeration. Hence, the pervasive silicate darkening of CK chondrites was caused by the shock mobilization of magnetite and sulfide, not metallic Fe-Ni and sulfide as in shock-darkened ordinary chondrites.

  7. Fossils of hydrothermal vent worms from Cretaceous sulfide ores of the Samail ophiolite, Oman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haymon, R.M.; Koski, R.A.; Sinclair, C.

    1984-01-01

    Fossil worm tubes of Cretaceous age preserved in the Bayda massive sulfide deposit of the Samail ophiolite, Oman, are apparently the first documented examples of fossils embedded in massive sulfide deposits from the geologic record. The geologic setting of the Bayda deposit and the distinctive mineralogic and textural features of the fossiliferous samples suggest that the Bayda sulfide deposit and fossil fauna are remnants of a Cretaceous sea-floor hydrothermal vent similar to modern hot springs on the East Pacific Rise and the Juan de Fuca Ridge.

  8. Kinetics of Indigenous Nitrate Reducing Sulfide Oxidizing Activity in Microaerophilic Wastewater Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villahermosa, Desirée; Corzo, Alfonso; Garcia-Robledo, Emilio; González, Juan M.; Papaspyrou, Sokratis

    2016-01-01

    Nitrate decreases sulfide release in wastewater treatment plants (WWTP), but little is known on how it affects the microzonation and kinetics of related microbial processes within the biofilm. The effect of nitrate addition on these properties for sulfate reduction, sulfide oxidation, and oxygen respiration were studied with the use of microelectrodes in microaerophilic wastewater biofilms. Mass balance calaculations and community composition analysis were also performed. At basal WWTP conditions, the biofilm presented a double-layer system. The upper microaerophilic layer (~300 μm) showed low sulfide production (0.31 μmol cm-3 h-1) and oxygen consumption rates (0.01 μmol cm-3 h-1). The anoxic lower layer showed high sulfide production (2.7 μmol cm-3 h-1). Nitrate addition decreased net sulfide production rates, caused by an increase in sulfide oxidation rates (SOR) in the upper layer, rather than an inhibition of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB). This suggests that the indigenous nitrate reducing-sulfide oxidizing bacteria (NR-SOB) were immediately activated by nitrate. The functional vertical structure of the biofilm changed to a triple-layer system, where the previously upper sulfide-producing layer in the absence of nitrate split into two new layers: 1) an upper sulfide-consuming layer, whose thickness is probably determined by the nitrate penetration depth within the biofilm, and 2) a middle layer producing sulfide at an even higher rate than in the absence of nitrate in some cases. Below these layers, the lower net sulfide-producing layer remained unaffected. Net SOR varied from 0.05 to 0.72 μmol cm-3 h-1 depending on nitrate and sulfate availability. Addition of low nitrate concentrations likely increased sulfate availability within the biofilm and resulted in an increase of both net sulfate reduction and net sulfide oxidation by overcoming sulfate diffusional limitation from the water phase and the strong coupling between SRB and NR-SOB syntrophic

  9. Indium sulfide precipitation from hydrochloric acid solutions of calcium and sodium chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of precipitation duration, acid concentration, indium complexing with chloride ions on the process of indium sulfide chemical precipitation in hydrochloric acid solutions, precipitate composition and dispersity are studied. It is established that indium sulfide solubility increases in solutions with acid concentration exceeding 0.40-0.45 mol/l. Calcium and indium chloride addition to diluted hydrochloric solutions greatly increases the solubility of indium sulfide. The effect of calcium chloride on In2S3 solubility is higher than that of sodium chloride

  10. Using a portable sulfide monitor as a motivational tool: A clinical study

    OpenAIRE

    Ranjit Singh Uppal; Ranjan Malhotra; Vishakha Grover; Deepak Grover

    2012-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: Bad breath has a significant impact on daily life of those who suffer from it. Oral malodor may rank only behind dental caries and periodontal disease as the cause of patient′s visit to dentist. An aim of this study was to use a portable sulfide monitor as a motivational tool for encouraging the patients towards the better oral hygiene by correlating the plaque scores with sulfide monitor scores, and comparing the sulfide monitor scores before and after complete prophylax...

  11. Effect of Sulfide on Nitrogen Fixation in a Stream Sediment-Water System

    OpenAIRE

    Tam, Tat-Yee; Mayfield, Colin I.; Inniss, William E.; Knowles, Roger

    1982-01-01

    Nitrogen fixation (C2H2 reduction) in a sediment-water system was studied under anaerobic incubation conditions. Sodium sulfide at low concentrations stimulated activity, with a twofold increase in C2H4 production occurring in the presence of 8 μmol of S2− per ml of stream water. Sodium sulfide at concentrations of 16 μmol of S2− per ml or greater inhibited nitrogen fixation, with 64 μmol of S2− per ml being completely inhibitory. Sulfide at levels of 16 μmol/ml or above inhibited CO2 product...

  12. Ni-sulfide particles in NaY-zeolite for combined hydrodesulfurization and hydrocracking purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bont, P. W.; Vissenberg, M. J.; Boellaard, E.; de Beer, V. H. J.; van Veen, J. A. R.; van Santen, R. A.; van der Kraan, A. M.

    1998-12-01

    The influence of physisorbed water on the formation of nickel-sulfide species in a 57Co doped ion exchange type 57Co:NiNaY catalyst is studied by Mössbauer Emission Spectroscopy. The absence or presence of physisorbed water during sulfidation seems to have no influence on the local nickel environment of the formed Ni-sulfide species. This result is confirmed by EXAFS measurements. In spite of the resemblance found in MES and EXAFS a large difference is found for the initial HDS activities, which is explained by the different particle sizes (HREM) found at the outer surface of the zeolite.

  13. Transition-Metal-Free Highly Efficient Aerobic Oxidation of Sulfides to Sulfoxides under Mild Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Hua Zhang; Chunyu Chen; Renhua Liu; Qiang Xu; Weiqie Zhao

    2009-01-01

    A highly efficient transition-metal-free catalytic system Br2/NaNO2/H2O has been developed for a robust and economic acid-free aerobic oxidation of sulfides. It is noteworthy that the sulfide function reacts under mild conditions without over-oxidation to sulfone. The role of NaNO2as an efficient NO equivalent for the activation of molecular oxygen was identified. Under the optimal conditions, a broad range of sulfide substrates were converted into their corresponding sulfoxides in high yield...

  14. Anaerobic sulfide-oxidation in marine colorless sulfur-oxidizing bacteria

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    LokaBharathi, P.A.; Nair, S.; Chandramohan, D.

    to the concentration in milligrams per liter of sulfide sulfur. Percentage oxidation was calculated by comparing the experimental values with the respective uninoculated controls at the end of incubation period using the formula (C f 2 E f /C f ) 3 100, where C f... is the final sulfide content in the control, and E f is the final sulfide content in the experiment. Effect of iron (FeCl 3 ) Positive controls at ambient conditions [room temperature (RT) 30 6 28C and atmospheric pressure] were always included to verify normal...

  15. Preparation of tin sulfide-graphene composites with enhanced lithium storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Junsheng; Wang, Dianlong; Liu, Tiefeng

    2013-10-01

    Tin sulfide-graphene nanocomposites have been synthesized through a facile one-pot solvothermal route. The as-prepared composites are characterized using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller analysis and elemental analysis. The results indicate that tin sulfide nanoparticles are homogeneously anchored on the surface of graphene. The electrochemical performance of tin sulfide-graphene composites is evaluated by galvanostatic charge-discharge tests and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Results show that the composites exhibit enhanced reversible lithium storage properties with high reversible capacity and good cyclic performance. The method presented in this work may provide a facile and economic strategy for the preparation of metal sulfide-graphene composites.

  16. Personal Review: Sources of sulfide in waste streams and current biotechnologies for its removal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAHMOOD Qaisar; ZHENG Ping; CAI Jing; HAYAT Yousaf; HASSAN Muhammad Jaffar; WU Dong-lei; HU Bao-lan

    2007-01-01

    Sulfide-containing waste streams are generated by a number of industries. It is emitted into the environment as dissolved sulfide (S2- and HS-) in wastewaters and as H2S in waste gases. Due to its corrosive nature, biological hydrogen sulfide removal processes are being investigated to overcome the chemical and disposal costs associated with existing chemically based removal processes. The nitrogen and sulfur metabolism interacts at various levels of the wastewater treatment process. Hence, the sulfur cycle offers possibilities to integrate nitrogen removal in the treatment process, which needs to be further optimized by appropriate design of the reactor configuration, optimization of performance parameters, retention of biomass and optimization of biomass growth. The present paper reviews the biotechnological advances to remove sulfides from various environments.

  17. Interaction of sulfur and bimetallic surfaces: Fe-promoted sulfidation of Mo(110)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iron promotes the interaction between S2 and Mo(110). The exposure of Mo(110) to large amounts of S2 produces only a chemisorbed layer of sulfur, without forming molybdenum sulfides. The sulfidation of Mo occurs after exposing Fe/Mo(110) surfaces to S2 gas. Fe promotes the rate of formation of molybdenum sulfides by transferring charge to Mo (favoring in this way an electrophilic attack of S on Mo) and by changing the structure of the surface (making the penetration of S into the bulk of the sample easier). The thermal stabilities of the MoSx/Mo(110) and FeSy/MoSx/Mo(110) systems are comparable, with the bimetallic sulfide showing a somewhat lower decomposition temperature (∼1200 K). The behavior of FeMoS catalysts in hydrodesulfurization processes is discussed in light of these results. copyright 1996 American Vacuum Society

  18. Molecular Simulation Study on Interaction of Thiophene Sulfides with Transition Metals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Yujian; Long Jun; Zhou Han; Zhu Yuxia; Da Zhijian

    2003-01-01

    The computer molecular simulation technique was applied to study the chemisorption of thiophene and tetramethylthiophene as the model sulfides on the simple oxides and complex oxides of some transition metals as the catalytic materials. The study disclosed that the thiophene sulfides could enter into chemisorption with metal oxides such as VO, ZnO, NiO and Zn-Al-spinel. This interaction could lead to thiophene molecular structure deformation to be in an activated adsorption state, which could help to promote the conversion of thiophene sulfides in the course of catalytic cracking. The VO with a valence of 2 could provide relatively strong selective adsorption sites for the conversion of thiophene sulfides to apparently transform the molecular structures and electron cloud states of such heterocyclic sulfur compounds such as thiophene and tetramethylthiophene into an activated adsorption state. The effect of this interaction was more pronounced with respect to tetramethylthiophene.

  19. The Synthesis and Characterization of High Molecular Weight Poly(phenylene sulfide/ether)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ai Qun GU; Mei Ju XIE; Zi Li YU

    2006-01-01

    Poly(phenylene sulfide/ether) (PPSE) was synthesized from 4,4'-dihydroxydiphenyl sulfide and 4,4'-dichlorodiphenyl sulfide in solution by nucleophilic substitution reaction. The resulting polymer was characterized by viscosity measurement, elemental analysis, FT-IR, 1H NMR, X-ray diffraction and thermal analysis. The results showed that the viscosities of the resulting polymer were above 0.68 dL/g, and the linear chain structure of product was confirmed.PPSE had the same reflex indices as poly(p-phenylene sulfide), an orthorhombic crystalline with unit cell a=0.853, b=0.562, c=1.026nm. The melting temperature, glass transition temperature and initial decomposition temperature were found to be 228℃, 85℃ and 325℃, respectively.The product was soluble in common organic solvents such as NMP, N, N'-dimethylformamide,N, N'-dimethylacetamide and 1,2-dichloroethane.

  20. Effect of cathode electron acceptors on simultaneous anaerobic sulfide and nitrate removal in microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jing; Zheng, Ping; Mahmood, Qaisar

    2016-01-01

    The current investigation reports the effect of cathode electron acceptors on simultaneous sulfide and nitrate removal in two-chamber microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Potassium permanganate and potassium ferricyanide were common cathode electron acceptors and evaluated for substrate removal and electricity generation. The abiotic MFCs produced electricity through spontaneous electrochemical oxidation of sulfide. In comparison with abiotic MFC, the biotic MFC showed better ability for simultaneous nitrate and sulfide removal along with electricity generation. Keeping external resistance of 1,000 Ω, both MFCs showed good capacities for substrate removal where nitrogen and sulfate were the main end products. The steady voltage with potassium permanganate electrodes was nearly twice that of with potassium ferricyanide. Cyclic voltammetry curves confirmed that the potassium permanganate had higher catalytic activity than potassium ferricyanide. The potassium permanganate may be a suitable choice as cathode electron acceptor for enhanced electricity generation during simultaneous treatment of sulfide and nitrate in MFCs. PMID:26901739

  1. Test of oxidation behavior of sulfide ores at ambient temperature for fire control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Chao; LI Zi-jun; LI Ming; WU Guo-min

    2007-01-01

    The coincidence of relevant factors, e.g. oxygen absorption quantity, weight increment, water soluble iron ions and sulfate ion of sulfide ore samples in the oxidation process, was tested through experiment. Based on a large number of tests for a group sample of sulfide ores from a mine, some important conclusions were obtained. The results obtained by the investigation indicate that there is no general interpretation relative to the oxygen absorption and the formation products of sulfate ion and water soluble iron ions during the oxidation process of sulfide ores at ambient temperature. However, the weight increment of the sulfide ore samples in the oxidation process at ambient temperature has a linear relationship with the quantity of oxygen absorption.

  2. EMERSION IN THE MANGROVE FOREST FISH 'RIVULUS MARMORATUS': A UNIQUE RESPONSE TO HYDROGEN SULFIDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The mangrove forest fish Rivulus marmoratus (Cyprinodontidae) has frequently been observed out of water, a phenomenon generally attributed to habitat drying. The authors tested the hypothesis that hydrogen sulfide, a substance characteristically found in their environment, can se...

  3. SIP response for volume content of sulfide mineral in artificial specimen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Mi Kyung; Park, Samgyu; Jong Yi, Myeong; Kim, Jung Ho

    2014-05-01

    Spectral Induced Polarization (SIP) method has recently been introduced to enhance mineral resource exploration techniques in metal ore deposit, South Korea. Because the valuable mineral ore contains various sulfide minerals such as pyrite (FeS), chalcopyrite (CuFeS2), and galena (PbS), which show IP (Induced Polarization) effect. The conventional IP method was not adequate to find these various sulfide minerals because of certain restrictions, including limited frequency. In order to solve this problem, the SIP (Spectral Induced Polarization) method was introduced, which measures responses like as amplitude (or resistivity) and phase for a wide frequency band. The application of the SIP method has been increasing as an exploration technology for mineral resources, because it can be used to acquire and analyze high quality IP data according to the spectral frequency. SIP responses are strong in the presence of the sulfide minerals; however, sufficient study on the characteristics of the SIP response for the various sulfide minerals is not available so far. In this study, in order to identify the SIP response characteristics of sulfide minerals, the SIP method was used in the laboratory; on artificial specimens filled with glass beads and sulfide minerals. The experiment was controlled by the changing volume content, and grain size, of three kinds of sulfide minerals (i.e., chalcopyrite, pyrite, and galena). The grain sizes of the sulfide minerals were varied in five steps: under 0.5 mm, 0.5 - 1.0 mm, 1.0 - 2.0 mm, 2.0 - 2.85 mm, and 2.85 - 4.0 mm, while the grain size of the glass beads was in the range of 0.75 - 1.0 mm. Variation of the volume content of the sulfide mineral was divided into eight grades. The sulfide minerals occupied 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 10, and 20 percent of the total volume 250 ml specimens. The volume content was converted from the weight using the density of a standard volume of 100 ml for each grain size. The results show that phase response

  4. Sulfide-driven autotrophic denitrification significantly reduces N2O emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Weiming; Zhao, Qing; Lu, Hui; Ding, Zhi; Meng, Liao; Chen, Guang-Hao

    2016-03-01

    The Sulfate reduction-Autotrophic denitrification-Nitrification Integrated (SANI) process build on anaerobic carbon conversion through biological sulfate reduction and autotrophic denitrification by using the sulfide byproduct from the previous reaction. This study confirmed extra decreases in N2O emissions from the sulfide-driven autotrophic denitrification by investigating N2O reduction, accumulation, and emission in the presence of different sulfide/nitrate (S/N) mass ratios at pH 7 in a long-term laboratory-scale granular sludge autotrophic denitrification reactor. The N2O reduction rate was linearly proportional to the sulfide concentration, which confirmed that no sulfide inhibition of N2O reductase occurred. At S/N = 5.0 g-S/g-N, this rate resulted by sulfide-driven autotrophic denitrifying granular sludge (average granule size = 701 μm) was 27.7 mg-N/g-VSS/h (i.e., 2 and 4 times greater than those at 2.5 and 0.8 g-S/g-N, respectively). Sulfide actually stimulates rather than inhibits N2O reduction no matter what granule size of sulfide-driven autotrophic denitrifying sludge engaged. The accumulations of N2O, nitrite and free nitrous acid (FNA) with average granule size 701 μm of sulfide-driven autotrophic denitrifying granular sludge engaged at S/N = 5.0 g-S/g-N were 4.7%, 11.4% and 4.2% relative to those at 3.0 g-S/g-N, respectively. The accumulation of FNA can inhibit N2O reduction and increase N2O accumulation during sulfide-driven autotrophic denitrification. In addition, the N2O gas emission level from the reactor significantly increased from 14.1 ± 0.5 ppmv (0.002% of the N load) to 3707.4 ± 36.7 ppmv (0.405% of the N load) as the S/N mass ratio in the influent decreased from 2.1 to 1.4 g-S/g-N over the course of the 120-day continuous monitoring period. Sulfide-driven autotrophic denitrification may significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions from biological nutrient removal when sulfur conversion processes are applied. PMID

  5. Development of novel and sensitive methods for the determination of sulfide in aqueous samples by hydrogen sulfide generation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colon, M. [Department of Chemistry, University of Girona, Campus Montilivi, 17071 Girona (Spain); Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, University of Alicante, 03080 Alicante (Spain); Todoli, J.L. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, University of Alicante, 03080 Alicante (Spain); Hidalgo, M. [Department of Chemistry, University of Girona, Campus Montilivi, 17071 Girona (Spain); Iglesias, M. [Department of Chemistry, University of Girona, Campus Montilivi, 17071 Girona (Spain)], E-mail: monica.iglesias@udg.es

    2008-02-25

    Two new, simple and accurate methods for the determination of sulfide (S{sup 2-}) at low levels ({mu}g L{sup -1}) in aqueous samples were developed. The generation of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) took place in a coil where sulfide reacted with hydrochloric acid. The resulting H{sub 2}S was then introduced as a vapor into an inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometer (ICP-AES) and sulfur emission intensity was measured at 180.669 nm. In comparison to when aqueous sulfide was introduced, the introduction of sulfur as H{sub 2}S enhanced the sulfur signal emission. By setting a gas separator at the end of the reaction coil, reduced sulfur species in the form of H{sub 2}S were removed from the water matrix, thus, interferences could be avoided. Alternatively, the gas separator was replaced by a nebulizer/spray chamber combination to introduce the sample matrix and reagents into the plasma. This methodology allowed the determination of both sulfide and sulfate in aqueous samples. For both methods the linear response was found to range from 5 {mu}g L{sup -1} to 25 mg L{sup -1} of sulfide. Detection limits of 5 {mu}g L{sup -1} and 6 {mu}g L{sup -1} were obtained with and without the gas separator, respectively. These new methods were evaluated by comparison to the standard potentiometric method and were successfully applied to the analysis of reduced sulfur species in environmental waters.

  6. Global Neoproterozoic (Sturtian) post-glacial sulfide-sulfur isotope anomaly recognised in Namibia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorjan, Paul; Walter, Malcolm R.; Swart, Roger

    2003-02-01

    The Neoproterozoic Earth experienced at least two, probably global, glaciations. Each glaciation was superceded by deposition of a layer of carbonate ('cap-carbonate') that has a distinctive lithology and depletion in 13C ( δ13C carbonate ˜ -5‰). The ˜700 Ma Sturtian glaciation is followed by deposition of a cap-carbonate and post-glacial succession which contain bacterially produced sulfides extremely enriched in 34S (average δ34S sulfide ˜ +30‰) with maximum values up to +60‰. This level of 34S enrichment in sulfides is unique to the Sturtian post-glacial succession and recognised in Australia, Canada, and China. In the Neoproterozoic of the Nama Basin, Namibia, the Gobabis Member is the basal unit of the Court Formation, which overlies the glacial Blaubeker Formation. δ13C carbonate analyses from the Gobabis Member range from -5.2 to -2.2‰ (average = -3.7‰; n = 10). δ34S sulfide ranges from +16.1 to +61.1‰ (average = +37.6‰; n = 8). These results are consistent with a Sturtian age for the Blaubeker Formation and overlying Gobabis Member, which have previously been interpreted as Sturtian. The sulfur isotopic results are comparable with δ34S sulfide in Sturtian post-glacial units of Australia, Canada and China. This adds to the evidence for correlation of the Blaubeker Formation with Sturtian glaciations on other continents. The cause of such elevated δ34S sulfide is enigmatic. Geochemical evidence suggests the sulfide was not formed from low sulfate waters nor in euxinic conditions, which discounts any known modern analogue. 34S enrichment in sulfides is therefore postulated to be caused by enrichment of 34S in contemporaneous seawater ( δ34S sulfate up to +60‰?). The rise in seawater δ34S sulfate is considered to be the result of intense bacterial sulfate reduction in an anoxic ocean during the Sturtian glaciation.

  7. Coupling of Alcohols over Alkali-Promoted Cobalt-Molybdenum Sulfide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jakob Munkholt; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Schiødt, N.C.;

    2010-01-01

    Double or nothing: Higher alcohols are produced by the hydrogenation of CO with a K-promoted Co-MoS2/C catalyst. Ethanol, which is passed over the sulfide catalyst along with CO and H2, is mainly converted into 1-butanol, which indicates that alcohol condensation contributes to the build-up of...... higher alcohols over the sulfide catalyst. In a nitrogen atmosphere, ethanol is also in part converted into 1-butanol, although ethyl acetate is the major product....

  8. Biological removal of air loaded with a hydrogen sulfide and ammonia mixture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Ying-xu; YIN Jun; FANG Shi

    2004-01-01

    The nuisance impact of air pollutant emissions from wastewater pumping stations is a major issue of concern to China. Hydrogen sulfide and ammonia are commonly the primary odor and are important targets for removal. An alternative control technology, biofiltration, was studied. The aim of this study is to investigate the potential of unit systems packed with compost in terms of ammonia and hydrogen sulfide emissions treatment, and to establish optimal operating conditions for a full-scale conceptual design. The laboratory scale biofilter packed with compost was continuously supplied with hydrogen sulfide and ammonia gas mixtures. A volumetric load of less than 150 gH2S/(m3· d) and 230 gNH3/(m3· d) was applied for about fifteen weeks. Hydrogen sulfide and ammonia elimination occurred in the biofilter simultaneously. The removal efficiency, removal capacity and removal kinetics in the biofilter were studied. The hydrogen sulfide removal efficiency reached was very high above 99%, and ammonia removal efficiency was about 80%. Hydrogen sulfide was oxidized into sulphate. The ammonia oxidation products were nitrite and nitrate. Ammonia in the biofilter was mainly removed by adsorption onto the carrier material and by absorption into the water fraction of the carrier material. High percentages of hydrogen sulfide or ammonia were oxidized in the first section of the column. Through kinetics analysis, the presence of amrronia did not hinder the hydrogen sulfide removal. According to the relationship between pressure drop and gas velocity for the biofilter and Reynolds number, non-Darcy flow can be assumed to represent the flow in the medium.

  9. Ab Initio Investigation of Methanthiol and Dimethyl Sulfide Adsorption on Zeolite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lü Renqing

    2006-01-01

    The Hartree-Fock and cluster model methods have been employed to investigate interactions of methanthiol or dimethyl sulfide on zeolites. Molecular complexes formed by adsorption of methanthiol on silanol H3SiOSi(OH)2OSiH3 with five coordination forms and dimethyl sulfide on silanol H3SiOSi(OH)2OSiH3 with four coordination forms, and Br(o)nsted acid sites of bridging hydroxyl H3Si(OH)Al(OH)2OSiH3 entering into interactions with methanthiol or dimethyl sulfide have been investigated. Full optimization and frequency analysis of all cluster models have been carried out using the Hartree-Fock method at 6-31 +G** basis set level for hydrogen, silicon, aluminum, oxygen, carbon, and sulfur atoms. The structures and energy changes of different coordination forms derived from methanthiol and H3Si(OH)Al(OH)2OSiH3, dimethyl sulfide and H3Si(OH)Al(OH)2OSiH3, methanthiol and H3SiOSi(OH)2OSiH3, dimethyl sulfide and H3SiOSi(OH)2OSiH3 complexes have been comparatively studied. The calculated results showed that the nature of interactions leading to the formation of the bridging hydroxyl-methanthiol, silanol-methanthiol,bridging hydroxyl-dimethyl sulfide, silanol-dimethyl sulfide complexes was governed by the Van der Waals force as confirmed by a small change in geometric structures and properties. Methanthiol and dimethyl sulfide molecules were adsorbed on bridging hydroxyl group prior to silanol group as evidenced by the heat of adsorption, and the protonization of methanthiol adsorption on bridging hydroxyl model, which was supposed in the literature, was not found.

  10. Core-Shell Nanopillar Array Solar Cells using Cadmium Sulfide Coating on Indium Phosphide Nanopillars

    OpenAIRE

    Tu, Bor-An Clayton

    2013-01-01

    This thesis presents a new strategy to fabricate nanostructured indium phosphide and cadmium sulfide photovoltaics. The cells are formed by chemical bath deposition (electroless deposition) of cadmium sulfide onto indium phosphide nanopillar arrays grown by selective-area metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. Characterizations through electrical and optical measurements show that the devices consisting of p-InP core and CdS shell have a conversion efficiency, open circuit voltage, short cir...

  11. Enantiomeric oxidation of organic sulfides by the filamentous fungi Botrytis cinerea, Eutypa lata and Trichoderma viride

    OpenAIRE

    Pinedo Rivilla, Cristina; Aleu Casatejada, Josefina; González Collado, Isidro

    2007-01-01

    The biotransformations of a series of substituted sulfides were carried out with the filamentous fungi Botrytis cinerea, Eutypa lata and Trichoderma viride. Several products underwent microbial oxidation of sulfide to sulfoxide with medium to high enantiomeric purity. With regard to sulfoxide enantioselectivity, the (R)-enantiomer was favoured in biotransformations by T. viride and E. lata while the (S)-enantiomer was favoured in those by B. cinerea. A minor amount of sulfone product...

  12. Metal sulfide and rare-earth phosphate nanostructures and methods of making same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Stanislaus; Zhang, Fen

    2014-05-13

    The present invention provides a method of producing a crystalline metal sulfide nanostructure. The metal is a transitional metal or a Group IV metal. In the method, a porous membrane is placed between a metal precursor solution and a sulfur precursor solution. The metal cations of the metal precursor solution and sulfur ions of the sulfur precursor solution react, thereby producing a crystalline metal sulfide nanostructure.

  13. Genesis of new gas oil HDS catalysts. Study of their liquid phase sulfidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frizi, Naima; Blanchard, Pascal; Payen, Edmond; Baranek, Pascale; Lancelot, C. [Unite de Catalyse et de Chimie du Solide, UMR CNRS 8181, Universite des Sciences et Technologies, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Rebeilleau, Michael; Dupuy, Carole; Dath, Jean Pierre [Total Petrochemicals Research, Zone industrielle CB-7181, Feluy (Belgium)

    2008-01-15

    The performance of gas oil hydrodesulfurization catalysts was successfully improved through the modification of oxidic precursors with thioglycolic acid. XPS study indicates that addition of this chelating agent affects the sulfidation of the supported metals. The higher catalytic performance was attributed to an optimization of the nature and morphology of the active phase due to the use of this chelating agent which enables a simultaneous sulfidation of both Co and Mo atoms. (author)

  14. Why does the Conductivity of a Nickel Catalyst Increase during Sulfidation? An Exemplary Study Using an In Operando Sensor Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Fremerey

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the sulfidation of a catalyst fixed bed, an in operando single pellet sensor was designed. A catalyst pellet from the fixed bed was electrically contacted and its electrical response was correlated with the catalyst behavior. For the sulfidation tests, a nickel catalyst was used and was sulfidized with H2S. This catalyst had a very low conductivity in the reduced state. During sulfidation, the conductivity of the catalyst increased by decades. A reaction from nickel to nickel sulfide occurred. This conductivity increase by decades during sulfidation had not been expected since both nickel and nickel sulfides behave metallic. Only by assuming a percolation phenomenon that originates from a volume increase of the nickel contacts when reacting to nickel sulfides, this effect can be explained. This assumption was supported by sulfidation tests with differently nickel loaded catalysts and it was quantitatively estimated by a general effective media theory. The single pellet sensor device for in operando investigation of sulfidation can be considered as a valuable tool to get further insights into catalysts under reaction conditions.

  15. Why does the Conductivity of a Nickel Catalyst Increase during Sulfidation? An Exemplary Study Using an In Operando Sensor Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fremerey, Peter; Jess, Andreas; Moos, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    In order to study the sulfidation of a catalyst fixed bed, an in operando single pellet sensor was designed. A catalyst pellet from the fixed bed was electrically contacted and its electrical response was correlated with the catalyst behavior. For the sulfidation tests, a nickel catalyst was used and was sulfidized with H₂S. This catalyst had a very low conductivity in the reduced state. During sulfidation, the conductivity of the catalyst increased by decades. A reaction from nickel to nickel sulfide occurred. This conductivity increase by decades during sulfidation had not been expected since both nickel and nickel sulfides behave metallic. Only by assuming a percolation phenomenon that originates from a volume increase of the nickel contacts when reacting to nickel sulfides, this effect can be explained. This assumption was supported by sulfidation tests with differently nickel loaded catalysts and it was quantitatively estimated by a general effective media theory. The single pellet sensor device for in operando investigation of sulfidation can be considered as a valuable tool to get further insights into catalysts under reaction conditions. PMID:26512669

  16. Microbial communities and arsenic biogeochemistry at the outflow of an alkaline sulfide-rich hot spring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhou; Li, Ping; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Zhang, Ping; Zhou, Jizhong; Wang, Yanhong; Dai, Xinyue; Zhang, Rui; Jiang, Dawei; Wang, Yanxin

    2016-01-01

    Alkaline sulfide-rich hot springs provide a unique environment for microbial community and arsenic (As) biogeochemistry. In this study, a representative alkaline sulfide-rich hot spring, Zimeiquan in the Tengchong geothermal area, was chosen to study arsenic geochemistry and microbial community using Illumina MiSeq sequencing. Over 0.26 million 16S rRNA sequence reads were obtained from 5-paired parallel water and sediment samples along the hot spring’s outflow channel. High ratios of As(V)/AsSum (total combined arsenate and arsenite concentrations) (0.59–0.78), coupled with high sulfide (up to 5.87 mg/L), were present in the hot spring’s pools, which suggested As(III) oxidation occurred. Along the outflow channel, AsSum increased from 5.45 to 13.86 μmol/L, and the combined sulfide and sulfate concentrations increased from 292.02 to 364.28 μmol/L. These increases were primarily attributed to thioarsenic transformation. Temperature, sulfide, As and dissolved oxygen significantly shaped the microbial communities between not only the pools and downstream samples, but also water and sediment samples. Results implied that the upstream Thermocrinis was responsible for the transformation of thioarsenic to As(III) and the downstream Thermus contributed to derived As(III) oxidation. This study improves our understanding of microbially-mediated As transformation in alkaline sulfide-rich hot springs. PMID:27126380

  17. Correlations among factors of sulfide ores in oxidation process at ambient temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴超; 李孜军; 周勃

    2004-01-01

    Spontaneous combustion is one of the serious problems in the mining of sulfide ore deposits. The relevant factors, e. G. Oxygen absorption quantity, mass increase, contents of water soluble iron ions and sulfate ion of sulfide ore samples in the oxidation process were investigated both in theory and experiment. The results from the investigation show that there is no general interpretation relation among the oxygen absorption quantity, the contents of sulfate ion and water soluble iron ions during the oxidation process of sulfide ores at ambient temperature.However, there is a linear relationship between the mass increase of the sulfide ore samples in the oxidation process at ambient temperature and the quantity of oxygen absorption. Therefore, the simple and cheap mass scaling method is suitable for predicting the oxygen absorption performance of sulfide ores at ambient temperature in place of the expensive and complicated chemical method used hitherto. Furthermore, combined with other items of breeding-fire test, the mass increase potential can also be used to predict the spontaneous combustion tendency of sulfide ores.

  18. Activity Variation of Phanerochaete chrysosporium under Nanosilver Exposure by Controlling of Different Sulfide Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhi; Chen, Guiqiu; Liu, Lingzhi; Zeng, Guangming; Huang, Zhenzhen; Chen, Anwei; Hu, Liang

    2016-02-01

    Due to the particular activation and inhibition behavior of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) on microbes at various concentrations, it’s crucial to exploit the special concentration effect in environment. Here, we studied the viability variation of Phanerochaete chrysosporium (P. chrysosporium) under exposure to citrate-coated AgNPs (Citrate-AgNPs) in the presence of different sulfide sources (an inorganic sulfide, NaHS and an organic sulfide, thioacetamide (TAA)). The results indicated that both NaHS and TAA can promote activation of P. chrysosporium by Citrate-AgNPs at a higher concentration, which was initial at toxic level. Treatment with various concentrations of Citrate-AgNPs (0-9 mg/L) demonstrated a maximum activation concentration (MAC) at 3 mg/L. With the increase in sulfide concentration, MAC transferred to higher concentration significantly, indicating the obvious “toxicity to activation” transformation at a higher concentration. Ag+ testing exhibited that variations in sulfide-induced Ag+ concentration (3-7 μg/L Ag+) accounted for the “toxicity to activation” transformation. In addition, the similar results were observed on antibacterial application using Escherichia coli as the model species. Based on the research results, the application of this transformation in improving antibacterial activity was proposed. Therefore, the antibacterial activity of AgNPs can be controlled, even at concentration, via adjusting for the sulfide concentration.

  19. Startup of a biological scrubber for hydrogen sulfide removal from anaerobic digester biogas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierkiel, A.; Lanting, J. [Biothane Corp., Camden, NJ (United States)

    2004-07-01

    Methane can be produced from the anaerobic digestion of waste. The methane can then be used to generate electricity or heat. However, anaerobic digester biogas contains hydrogen sulfide which can damage furnaces and other equipment. Several chemical and biological treatments have been developed to remove hydrogen sulfide from biogas. The physico-chemical processes include caustic scrubbing and adsorption, but both require large quantities of costly chemicals. This paper described the biological scrubber process which removes hydrogen sulfide from biogas produced by anaerobic digestion systems. Bacteria is used instead of chemicals to remove hydrogen sulfide. The biochemical reaction that occurs by sulfur-oxidizing microorganisms was described along with the methodology used in a full-scale biological scrubber installation at a paper mill's wastewater treatment facility. The main operating parameters for startup were biogas flow rate, hydrogen sulfide load, and pH. The biological scrubbers performed above the warranty standard of 97 per cent hydrogen sulfide removal. 1 tab.

  20. Microbial communities and arsenic biogeochemistry at the outflow of an alkaline sulfide-rich hot spring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhou; Li, Ping; van Nostrand, Joy D.; Zhang, Ping; Zhou, Jizhong; Wang, Yanhong; Dai, Xinyue; Zhang, Rui; Jiang, Dawei; Wang, Yanxin

    2016-04-01

    Alkaline sulfide-rich hot springs provide a unique environment for microbial community and arsenic (As) biogeochemistry. In this study, a representative alkaline sulfide-rich hot spring, Zimeiquan in the Tengchong geothermal area, was chosen to study arsenic geochemistry and microbial community using Illumina MiSeq sequencing. Over 0.26 million 16S rRNA sequence reads were obtained from 5-paired parallel water and sediment samples along the hot spring’s outflow channel. High ratios of As(V)/AsSum (total combined arsenate and arsenite concentrations) (0.59–0.78), coupled with high sulfide (up to 5.87 mg/L), were present in the hot spring’s pools, which suggested As(III) oxidation occurred. Along the outflow channel, AsSum increased from 5.45 to 13.86 μmol/L, and the combined sulfide and sulfate concentrations increased from 292.02 to 364.28 μmol/L. These increases were primarily attributed to thioarsenic transformation. Temperature, sulfide, As and dissolved oxygen significantly shaped the microbial communities between not only the pools and downstream samples, but also water and sediment samples. Results implied that the upstream Thermocrinis was responsible for the transformation of thioarsenic to As(III) and the downstream Thermus contributed to derived As(III) oxidation. This study improves our understanding of microbially-mediated As transformation in alkaline sulfide-rich hot springs.

  1. Mitochondrial Sulfide Detoxification Requires a Functional Isoform O-Acetylserine(thiol)lyase C in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Consolación (A)lvarez; Irene García; Luis C.Romero; Cecilia Gotor

    2012-01-01

    In non-cyanogenic species,the main source of cyanide derives from ethylene and camalexin biosyntheses.In mitochondria,cyanide is a potent inhibitor of the cytochrome c oxidase and is metabolized bythe β-cyanoalanine synthase CYS-C1,catalyzing the conversion of cysteine and cyanide to hydrogen sulfide and β-cyanoalanine.The hydrogen sulfide released also inhibits the cytochrome c oxidase and needs to be detoxified by the O-acetylserine(thiol)lyase mitochondrial isoform,OAS-C,which catalyzes the incorporation of sulfide to O-acetylserine to produce cysteine,thus generating a cyclic pathway in the mitochondria.The loss of functional OAS-C isoforms causes phenotypic characteristics very similar to the loss of the CYS-C1 enzyme,showing defects in root hair formation.Genetic complementation with the OAS-C gene rescues the impairment of root hair elongation,restoring the wild-type phenotype.The mitochondria compromise their capacity to properly detoxify cyanide and the resulting sulfide because the latter cannot re-assimilate into cysteine in the oas-c null mutant.Consequently,we observe an accumulation of sulfide and cyanide and of the alternative oxidase,which is unable to prevent the production of reactive oxygen species probably due to the accumulation of both toxic molecules.Our results allow us to suggest that the significance of OAS-C is related to its role in the proper sulfide and cyanide detoxification in mitochondria.

  2. Microbial communities and arsenic biogeochemistry at the outflow of an alkaline sulfide-rich hot spring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhou; Li, Ping; Van Nostrand, Joy D; Zhang, Ping; Zhou, Jizhong; Wang, Yanhong; Dai, Xinyue; Zhang, Rui; Jiang, Dawei; Wang, Yanxin

    2016-01-01

    Alkaline sulfide-rich hot springs provide a unique environment for microbial community and arsenic (As) biogeochemistry. In this study, a representative alkaline sulfide-rich hot spring, Zimeiquan in the Tengchong geothermal area, was chosen to study arsenic geochemistry and microbial community using Illumina MiSeq sequencing. Over 0.26 million 16S rRNA sequence reads were obtained from 5-paired parallel water and sediment samples along the hot spring's outflow channel. High ratios of As(V)/AsSum (total combined arsenate and arsenite concentrations) (0.59-0.78), coupled with high sulfide (up to 5.87 mg/L), were present in the hot spring's pools, which suggested As(III) oxidation occurred. Along the outflow channel, AsSum increased from 5.45 to 13.86 μmol/L, and the combined sulfide and sulfate concentrations increased from 292.02 to 364.28 μmol/L. These increases were primarily attributed to thioarsenic transformation. Temperature, sulfide, As and dissolved oxygen significantly shaped the microbial communities between not only the pools and downstream samples, but also water and sediment samples. Results implied that the upstream Thermocrinis was responsible for the transformation of thioarsenic to As(III) and the downstream Thermus contributed to derived As(III) oxidation. This study improves our understanding of microbially-mediated As transformation in alkaline sulfide-rich hot springs. PMID:27126380

  3. Kinetics and correlation analysis of reactivity in the oxidation of organic sulfides by butyltriphenylphosphonium dichromate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K M Dilsha; Seema Kothari

    2009-03-01

    The oxidation of a number of monosubstituted aryl methyl, alkyl phenyl, dialkyl, and diphenyl sulfides by butyltriphenylphosphonium dichromate (BTPPD), to the corresponding sulfoxides, is first order with respect to BTPPD and is second order with respect to sulfide. The reaction is catalysed by hydrogen ions and the dependence is of second order. The oxidation of meta- and para-substituted aryl methyl sulfides correlated best in terms of Hammett equation, the reactions exhibited negative polar reaction constant. The ortho-substituted compounds correlated best in terms of Charton’s triparametric equation with negative polar constant and a small degree of steric hindrance. The oxidation of alkyl phenyl sulfides exhibited a good correlation in terms of Pavelich-Taft equation confirming that the electron-donating power of the alkyl group increases the rate, however, the reactivity is not markedly controlled by the bulkiness of the alkyl group. The rates of oxidation of sulfides were determined in nineteen organic solvents. An analysis of the solvent effect by multi-parametric equations indicated the relatively greater importance of the cation-solvating power of the solvents. A mechanism involving a single-step electrophilic oxygen transfer from BTPPD to the sulfide leading to polar transition state has been proposed.

  4. High Temperature Sulfidation Behavior of Laser Alloying with Al Flame Sprayed Coating on Mild Steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A mild steel substrate was coated with Al wire by flame spraying and irradiated with CO2 laser to produce surface modification layer. The isothermal sulfidation behavior on CO2 laser surface alloyed layers were investigated at high temperature(1123k) in sulfidation environment (Ps2= 10-3 Pa) for 48 hours. Generally, surface alloyed layers were uniformed and their porosities were little. These structures were α Fe-Al, since Al concentration was analyzed from 36.3 to 48.5 percentages. The sulfidation kinetics of surface alloyed layers were shown to follow parabolic rate law during isothermal sulfidation, however the sulfidation rate of FA13(13 mm/min, 36% Al) specimen was approximately decreased from one-fifth lower than FA25(25 mm/min, 39% Al) and FA50(50 mm/min, 48% Al) specimen. Interface of FA50 surface alloyed layer was existed to the Al2S3 sulfide and Al2O3 oxide. By calculating partial pressure of impurity oxygen contained in H2S/H2 gas, the Al2O3 oxide formation could be explained using Fe-Al-S-O thermodynamical stability diagram

  5. Characterization of lacustrine iron sulfide particles with proton-induced X-ray emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black particles, collected by filtration (1.2-μ pore size) from the anoxic waters of a soft-water lake, were examined by a scanning proton microprobe which permitted quantitative elemental analysis by proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and Rutherford backscattering (RBS). There was a uniform distribution of sulfur across the filter, but Fe, and to a lesser extent, Mn, was localized in ∼5-μm diameter clusters. Elemental analysis with 1-μm-diameter beams revealed that the Fe clusters were mainly comprised of iron oxides. Iron sulfide material not in the Fe clusters had stoichiometric proportions of Fe1.0S0.60P0.60Ca0.24K0.14. Although a purely biogenic origin for P, Ca, and K cannot be ruled out, the composition is consistent with the particles originating as authigenic iron oxides which react with sulfide as they sink through the water column. The iron sulfide particles are richer in Cu (4,000 ppm) and Zn (6,000 ppm) than the iron oxides, suggesting that these elements are also concentrated as their insoluble sulfides. The coexistence of iron oxides and sulfides indicates that either the supply of sulfide is limiting or that some iron oxide particles are unreactive. 20 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  6. Interfacial tension studies between Fe-Cu-Ni sulfide and halo-norilsk basalt slag system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU; Shangguo

    2005-01-01

    The interfacial tension of the matte/halo-Norilsk basalt slag systems of FeS-Cu2S-Ni3S2 and FeO-FeS were investigated using the sessile drop technique. The results indicate that interfacial tension decreases with increasing copper and nickel contents in the matte of FeS-Cu2S-Ni3S2 system while it increases with increasing oxygen content in the matte of FeO-FeS system. It is inferred from these results that two conditions are critical for the formation of giant Cu-Ni sulfide deposits. One is that mafic-ultramafic parent magma of sulfide deposits should be rich in copper and nickel where due to the low interfacial tension, it is difficult to form sulfide droplet in the early stage of magma evolution. In other words, sulfide liquid conglomeration occurs more difficultly. The other condition is that the magma emplacement should be shallow; and a lot of faults occur in the magma emplacement field. Since oxygen content is high in the environment, interfacial tension is high, which helps sulfide liquid conglomeration and consequently Cu-Ni sulfide deposits form.

  7. Investigation of the Electrocatalytic Activity of Rhodium Sulfide for Hydrogen Evolution and Hydrogen Oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the synthesis of unsupported and carbon-supported, mixed phase, rhodium sulfide, using both a hydrogen sulfide source and a solid sulfur source. Samples with several different distributions of rhodium sulfide phases (Rh2S3, Rh17S15, RhS2 and metallic Rh) were obtained by varying the temperature and exposure time to H2S or sulfur to rhodium ratio when using solid sulfur. Samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), and the unsupported rhodium sulfide compounds studied using Raman spectroscopy to link Raman spectra to catalyst phases. The electrocatalytic activity of the rhodium sulfide compounds for hydrogen evolution and oxidation was measured using rotating disk electrode measurements in acidic conditions to simulate use in a flow cell. The most active phases for hydrogen evolution were found to be Rh3S4 and Rh17S15 (−0.34 V vs. Ag/AgCl required for 20 mA/cm2), while Rh2S3 and RhS2 phases were relatively inactive (−0.46 V vs. Ag/AgCl required for 20 mA/cm2 using RhS2/C). The hydrogen oxidation activity of all rhodium sulfide phases is significantly lower than the hydrogen evolution activity and is not associated with conductivity limitations

  8. Reduced ternary molybdenum and tungsten sulfides and hydroprocessing catalysis therewith

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilsenbeck, Shane J.; McCarley, Robert E.; Schrader, Glenn L.; Xie, Xiaobing

    1999-02-16

    New amorphous molybdenum/tungsten sulfides with the general formula M.sup.n+.sub.2x/n (L.sub.6 S.sub.8)S.sub.x, where L is molybdenum or tungsten and M is a ternary metal, has been developed. Characterization of these amorphous materials by chemical and spectroscopic methods (IR, Raman, PES) shows that the (M.sub.6 S.sub.8).sup.0 cluster units are present. Vacuum thermolysis of the amorphous Na.sub.2x (Mo.sub.6 S.sub.8)S.sub.x .multidot.yMeOH first produces poorly crystalline NaMo.sub.6 S.sub.8 by disproportionation at 800.degree. C. and well-crystallized NaMo.sub.6 S.sub.8 at .gtoreq. 900.degree. C. Ion-exchange of the sodium material in methanol with soluble M.sup.2+ and M.sup.3+ salts (M=Sn, Co, Ni, Pb, La, Ho) produces the M.sup.n+.sub.2x/n (Mo.sub.6 S.sub.8)S.sub.x .multidot.yMeOH compounds. Additionally, the new reduced ternary molybdenum sulfides with the general formula M.sup.n+.sub.2x/n Mo.sub.6 S.sub.8+x (MeOH).sub.y ›MMOS! (M=Sn, Co, Ni) is an effective hydrodesulfurization (HDS) catalyst both as-prepared and after a variety of pretreatment conditions. Under specified pretreatment conditions with flowing hydrogen gas, the SnMoS type catalyst can be stabilized, and while still amorphous, can be considered as "Chevrel phase-like" in that both contain Mo.sub.6 S.sub.8 cluster units. Furthermore, the small cation NiMoS and CoMoS type pretreated catalyst showed to be very active HDS catalysts with rates that exceeded the model unpromoted and cobalt-promoted MoS.sub.2 catalysts.

  9. A phyllosilicate-sulfide vein in Kaidun. [Abstract only

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, A. V.; Zolensky, M. E.; Brandstatter, F.; Kurat, G.; Kononkova, N. N.

    1994-01-01

    A fragment of a carbonaceous chondrite (#53.12, maximal dimension about 2 mm) containing a phyllosilicate-sulfide vein was found during an inspection of small pieces of the Kaidun meteorite. Phyllosilicate veins are apparently rare in carbonaceous chondrites and have so far only been reported from the Y82162 CI chondrite. In hand sample the vein was visible on two perpendicular faces. The polished section prepared from one side displays a complex structure. A single vein, 150 microns in width, bifurcates, and each branch narrows toward a large rounded object (RO). The section contains abundant ROs, most of them less than or equal to 100 microns in diameter. The vein has sharp contacts to the surrounding matrix, whereas the RO contacts are diffuse. The phyllosilicate in the main vein has a massive texture along the contact, which becomes platy toward the vein center where the crystals protrude into an open space. The texture of the largest RO resembles that of a barred olivine (BO) chondrule. Some of the smaller ROs also texturally resemble chondrules. The BO chondrule contains rounded sulfide-silicate objects and small metal grains covered by oxides. Phyllosilicates of the main vein consist mainly of serpentine. The phyllosilicate near the contact with the matrix has low contents of minor elements and a high Mg/Fe ratio. The composition changes in a regular manner toward the center: Al, Na, Ca, Ni, and S increase, indicating increasing amounts of sulfates admixed. The phyllosilicate vein could only have formed after a substantial rock was formed. Mechanical stress probably opened a crack that was subsequently filled by phyllosilicate, pyrrhotite, and finally by a (Fe,Mg)-sulfate. The source of the matter mobilized to form the vein could have been within the rock itself or outside. No compositional or mineralogical zoning is apparent at the vein-rock contacts. The nature of the transporting agent (liquid H2O or vapor) must also remain an enigma. M. Zolensky has

  10. Thioethers as markers of hydrogen sulfide production in homocystinurias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kožich, Viktor; Krijt, Jakub; Sokolová, Jitka; Melenovská, Petra; Ješina, Pavel; Vozdek, Roman; Majtán, Tomáš; Kraus, Jan P

    2016-07-01

    Two enzymes in the transsulfuration pathway of homocysteine -cystathionine beta-synthase (CBS) and gamma-cystathionase (CTH)-use cysteine and/or homocysteine to produce the important signaling molecule hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and simultaneously the thioethers lanthionine, cystathionine or homolanthionine. In this study we explored whether impaired flux of substrates for H2S synthesis and/or deficient enzyme activities alter production of hydrogen sulfide in patients with homocystinurias. As an indirect measure of H2S synthesis we determined by LC-MS/MS concentrations of thioethers in plasma samples from 33 patients with different types of homocystinurias, in 8 patient derived fibroblast cell lines, and as reaction products of seven purified mutant CBS enzymes. Since chaperoned recombinant mutant CBS enzymes retained capacity of H2S synthesis in vitro it can be stipulated that deficient CBS activity in vivo may impair H2S production. Indeed, in patients with classical homocystinuria we observed significantly decreased cystathionine and lanthionine concentrations in plasma (46% and 74% of median control levels, respectively) and significantly lower cystathionine in fibroblasts (8% of median control concentrations) indicating that H2S production from cysteine and homocysteine may be also impaired. In contrast, the grossly elevated plasma levels of homolanthionine in CBS deficient patients (32-times elevation compared to median of controls) clearly demonstrates a simultaneous overproduction of H2S from homocysteine by CTH. In the remethylation defects the accumulation of homocysteine and the increased flux of metabolites through the transsulfuration pathway resulted in elevation of cystathionine and homolanthionine (857% and 400% of median control values, respectively) indicating a possibility of an increased biosynthesis of H2S by both CBS and CTH. This study shows clearly disturbed thioether concentrations in homocystinurias, and modeling using these data indicates

  11. Epithelial Electrolyte Transport Physiology and the Gasotransmitter Hydrogen Sulfide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ervice Pouokam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide (H2S is a well-known environmental chemical threat with an unpleasant smell of rotten eggs. Aside from the established toxic effects of high-dose H2S, research over the past decade revealed that cells endogenously produce small amounts of H2S with physiological functions. H2S has therefore been classified as a “gasotransmitter.” A major challenge for cells and tissues is the maintenance of low physiological concentrations of H2S in order to prevent potential toxicity. Epithelia of the respiratory and gastrointestinal tract are especially faced with this problem, since these barriers are predominantly exposed to exogenous H2S from environmental sources or sulfur-metabolising microbiota. In this paper, we review the cellular mechanisms by which epithelial cells maintain physiological, endogenous H2S concentrations. Furthermore, we suggest a concept by which epithelia use their electrolyte and liquid transport machinery as defence mechanisms in order to eliminate exogenous sources for potentially harmful H2S concentrations.

  12. Co-sprayed manganese doped zinc sulfide films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manganese doped zinc sulfide thin films were deposited on glass substrates using co-spray method. Different characterization techniques such as XRD, FESEM, AFM, UV–vis and PL have been used in order to investigate the structural, morphological and optical properties of these films. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis indicated that pure and Mn-doped films showed only hexagonal polycrystalline wurtzite structure with [0 0 1] vertical preferential direction. SEM images revealed that manganese inclusion has a significant effect on the morphological structure; films have nano-sized grains with a size of approximately 100 nm. All films have high transmittance of about 82% in the visible region. Manganese inclusion has been shown to decrease overall optical gap from 3.69 to 3.63 eV. The photoluminescence intensity was found to reach a maximum and decline at higher manganese content, assisting to the well-known concentration quenching effect. The critical doping level of Mn ions has been determined to be 2%. - Highlights: • Manganese doped ZnS films were deposited at 380 °C by co-spray method. • Effect of Mn doping on structural and optical properties of ZnS films were investigated. • XRD data show that pure and doped films exhibited hexagonal wurtzite structure. • 2% is the appropriate amount of Mn exhibiting the highest photoluminescence intensity

  13. Carbonyl Sulfide for Tracing Carbon Fluxes Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, J. Elliott [Univ. of California, Merced, CA (United States); Berry, Joseph A. [Carnegie Inst. of Science, Stanford, CA (United States); Billesbach, Dave [Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States); Torn, Margaret S [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Zahniser, Mark [Aerodyne Research, Inc., Billerica, MA (United States); Seibt, Ulrike [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Maseyk, Kadmiel [Pierre and Marie Curie Univ., Paris (France)

    2016-04-01

    The April-June 2012 campaign was located at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility Southern Great Plains (SGP) site Central Facility and had three purposes. One goal was to demonstrate the ability of current instrumentation to correctly measure fluxes of atmospheric carbonyl sulfide (COS). The approach has been describe previously as a critical approach to advancing carbon cycle science1,2, but requires further investigation at the canopy scale to resolve ecosystem processes. Previous canopy-scale efforts were limited to data rates of 1Hz. While 1 Hz measurements may work in a few ecosystems, it is widely accepted that data rates of 10 to 20 Hz are needed to fully capture the exchange of traces gases between the atmosphere and vegetative canopy. A second goal of this campaign was to determine if canopy observations could provide information to help interpret the seasonal double peak in airborne observations at SGP of CO2 and COS mixing ratios. A third goal was to detect potential sources and sinks of COS that must be resolved before using COS as a tracer of gross primary productivity (GPP).

  14. Preparation of zinc sulfide nanocrystallites from single-molecule precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palve, Anil M.; Garje, Shivram S.

    2011-07-01

    Zinc sulfide nanocrystallites were prepared using Zinc(II) thiosemicarbazone complexes of the types Zn(L) 2 and ZnCl 2(LH) 2 (where, LH=thiosemicarbazones of cinnamaldehyde, 4-chlorobenzaldehyde, indol-3-carboxaldehyde and thiophene-2-carboxaldehyde) as single source precursors by solvothermal decomposition in ethylene glycol and ethylene diamine in few cases. The materials were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected area electron diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray analysis and UV-vis and IR spectroscopy. Solvothermal decomposition in ethylene glycol resulted in the formation of hexagonal ZnS (JCPDS: 36-1450) as evident from the XRD patterns. However, XRD shows formation of hybrid material, ZnS 0.5EN in case of solvothermal decomposition in ethylenediamine. Infrared spectra authenticate the capping of ethylene glycol and ethylenediamine on ZnS and ZnS 0.5EN, respectively. TEM images showed formation of spherical nanoparticles for the materials obtained from ethylene glycol, whereas plate-like morphology is observed in case of materials obtained from ethylene diamine. The blue shift of absorption bands compared to bands of bulk materials in the UV-vis spectra supports the formation of smaller particles.

  15. Hydrogen Sulfide Donor GYY4137 Protects against Myocardial Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoliang Meng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide (H2S is a gasotransmitter which regulates multiple cardiovascular functions. However, the precise roles of H2S in modulating myocardial fibrosis in vivo and cardiac fibroblast proliferation in vitro remain unclear. We investigated the effect of GYY4137, a slow-releasing H2S donor, on myocardial fibrosis. Spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR were administrated with GYY4137 by intraperitoneal injection daily for 4 weeks. GYY4137 decreased systolic blood pressure and inhibited myocardial fibrosis in SHR as evidenced by improved cardiac collagen volume fraction (CVF in the left ventricle (LV, ratio of perivascular collagen area (PVCA to lumen area (LA in perivascular regions, reduced hydroxyproline concentration, collagen I and III mRNA expression, and cross-linked collagen. GYY4137 also inhibited angiotensin II- (Ang II- induced neonatal rat cardiac fibroblast proliferation, reduced the number of fibroblasts in S phase, decreased collagen I and III mRNA expression and protein synthesis, attenuated oxidative stress, and suppressed α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA, transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1 expression as well as Smad2 phosphorylation. These results indicate that GYY4137 improves myocardial fibrosis perhaps by a mechanism involving inhibition of oxidative stress, blockade of the TGF-β1/Smad2 signaling pathway, and decrease in α-SMA expression in cardiac fibroblasts.

  16. Physiological Importance of Hydrogen Sulfide: Emerging Potent Neuroprotector and Neuromodulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hyung-Joo

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an emerging neuromodulator that is considered to be a gasotransmitter similar to nitrogen oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO). H2S exerts universal cytoprotective effects and acts as a defense mechanism in organisms ranging from bacteria to mammals. It is produced by the enzymes cystathionine β-synthase (CBS), cystathionine ϒ-lyase (CSE), 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (MST), and D-amino acid oxidase (DAO), which are also involved in tissue-specific biochemical pathways for H2S production in the human body. H2S exerts a wide range of pathological and physiological functions in the human body, from endocrine system and cellular longevity to hepatic protection and kidney function. Previous studies have shown that H2S plays important roles in peripheral nerve regeneration and degeneration and has significant value during Schwann cell dedifferentiation and proliferation but it is also associated with axonal degradation and the remyelination of Schwann cells. To date, physiological and toxic levels of H2S in the human body remain unclear and most of the mechanisms of action underlying the effects of H2S have yet to be fully elucidated. The primary purpose of this review was to provide an overview of the role of H2S in the human body and to describe its beneficial effects. PMID:27413423

  17. Synthesis of actinide nitrides, phosphides, sulfides and oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Der Sluys, William G.; Burns, Carol J.; Smith, David C.

    1992-01-01

    A process of preparing an actinide compound of the formula An.sub.x Z.sub.y wherein An is an actinide metal atom selected from the group consisting of thorium, uranium, plutonium, neptunium, and americium, x is selected from the group consisting of one, two or three, Z is a main group element atom selected from the group consisting of nitrogen, phosphorus, oxygen and sulfur and y is selected from the group consisting of one, two, three or four, by admixing an actinide organometallic precursor wherein said actinide is selected from the group consisting of thorium, uranium, plutonium, neptunium, and americium, a suitable solvent and a protic Lewis base selected from the group consisting of ammonia, phosphine, hydrogen sulfide and water, at temperatures and for time sufficient to form an intermediate actinide complex, heating said intermediate actinide complex at temperatures and for time sufficient to form the actinide compound, and a process of depositing a thin film of such an actinide compound, e.g., uranium mononitride, by subliming an actinide organometallic precursor, e.g., a uranium amide precursor, in the presence of an effectgive amount of a protic Lewis base, e.g., ammonia, within a reactor at temperatures and for time sufficient to form a thin film of the actinide compound, are disclosed.

  18. The metallization and superconductivity of dense hydrogen sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yinwei, E-mail: yinwei-li@jsnu.edu.cn; Hao, Jian; Li, Yanling [School of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Jiangsu Normal University, Xuzhou 221116 (China); Liu, Hanyu [Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatchewan S7N 5E2 (Canada); Ma, Yanming, E-mail: mym@jlu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Superhard Materials, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)

    2014-05-07

    Hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) is a prototype molecular system and a sister molecule of water (H{sub 2}O). The phase diagram of solid H{sub 2}S at high pressures remains largely unexplored arising from the challenges in dealing with the pressure-induced weakening of S–H bond and larger atomic core difference between H and S. Metallization is yet achieved for H{sub 2}O, but it was observed for H{sub 2}S above 96 GPa. However, the metallic structure of H{sub 2}S remains elusive, greatly impeding the understanding of its metallicity and the potential superconductivity. We have performed an extensive structural study on solid H{sub 2}S at pressure ranges of 10–200 GPa through an unbiased structure prediction method based on particle swarm optimization algorithm. Besides the findings of candidate structures for nonmetallic phases IV and V, we are able to establish stable metallic structures violating an earlier proposal of elemental decomposition into sulfur and hydrogen [R. Rousseau, M. Boero, M. Bernasconi, M. Parrinello, and K. Terakura, Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 1254 (2000)]. Our study unravels a superconductive potential of metallic H{sub 2}S with an estimated maximal transition temperature of ∼80 K at 160 GPa, higher than those predicted for most archetypal hydrogen-containing compounds (e.g., SiH{sub 4}, GeH{sub 4}, etc.)

  19. Kinetics and mechanisms of hydrogen sulfide adsorption by biochars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Guofeng; Shen, Guoqing; Liu, Liang; Chen, Qin; Xu, Zhiwei

    2013-04-01

    Three different biochars as cost-effective substitutes for activated carbon (AC) were tested for their hydrogen sulfide (H2S) adsorption ability. The biochars were produced from camphor (SC), bamboo (SB), and rice hull (SR) at 400°C by oxygen-limited pyrolysis. The surface area (SA), pH, and Fourier transform infrared spectras of the biochars and AC were compared. The maximum removal rates and the saturation constants were obtained using the Michaelis-Menten-type equation. The three biochars were found to be alkaline, and the SAs of the biochars were much smaller than that of the AC. The H2S breakthrough capacity was related to the local pH within the pore system of the biochar. The order observed in terms of both biochar and AC adsorption capacity was SR>SB>SC>AC. SR efficiently removed H2S within the inlet concentration range of 10-50 μL/L. Biochars derived from agricultural/forestry wastes are a promising H2S adsorbent with distinctive properties. PMID:23455220

  20. Characterization of aura tropospheric emissions spectrometer carbonyl sulfide retrievals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Kuai

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We present a description of the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES carbonyl sulfide (OCS retrieval algorithm, along with evaluation of the biases and uncertainties against aircraft profiles from the HIPPO campaign and data from the NOAA Mauna Loa site. In general, the OCS retrievals (1 have less than 1.0 degree of freedom for signals (DOFs, (2 are sensitive in the mid-troposphere with a peak sensitivity typically between 300 to 500 hPa, (3 but have much smaller systematic errors from temperature, CO2 and H2O calibrations relative to random errors from measurement noise. Here we estimate the monthly means from TES measurements averaged over multiple years so that random errors are reduced and useful information about OCS seasonal and latitudinal variability can be derived. With this averaging, TES OCS data are found to be consistent (within the calculated uncertainties with NOAA ground observations and HIPPO aircraft measurements. TES OCS data also captures the seasonal and latitudinal variations observed by these in situ data.

  1. Potentiation of lymphocyte proliferative responses by nickel sulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo, A.; Sonnenfeld, G.

    1992-01-01

    Crystalline nickel sulfide (NiS) induced a spleen cell proliferation that resembles a mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR). It depended on cell-cell interaction, induced high levels of interleukin-1 (IL-1) and interleukin-2 (IL-2) and the responding cell subpopulation was composed of CD4+ T lymphocytes. Furthermore, the proliferation was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by magnesium. Crystalline NiS also increased significantly the spleen cell proliferative response to concanavalin A (Con A) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) with magnesium potentiating the combined effects of crystalline NiS and mitogens. Interestingly, crystalline NiS did not show any effect on the induction of IL-2 by Con A. The results described herein suggest that crystalline NiS can potentiate both antigenic (MLR) and mitogenic (Con A and LPS) proliferative responses in vitro. Crystalline NiS appears to potentiate these responses by acting in the form of ionic nickel on several intracellular targets for which magnesium ions have different noncompetitive interactions. The effects of magnesium on the potentiating action of crystalline NiS are different depending upon the type of primary stimulatory signal for proliferation (mitogenic or antigenic).

  2. The Significance of Hydrogen Sulfide for Arabidopsis Seed Germination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudouin, Emmanuel; Poilevey, Aurélie; Hewage, Nishodi Indiketi; Cochet, Françoise; Puyaubert, Juliette; Bailly, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) recently emerged as an important gaseous signaling molecule in plants. In this study, we investigated the possible functions of H2S in regulating Arabidopsis seed germination. NaHS treatments delayed seed germination in a dose-dependent manner and were ineffective in releasing seed dormancy. Interestingly, endogenous H2S content was enhanced in germinating seeds. This increase was correlated with higher activity of three enzymes (L-cysteine desulfhydrase, D-cysteine desulfhydrase, and β-cyanoalanine synthase) known as sources of H2S in plants. The H2S scavenger hypotaurine and the D/L cysteine desulfhydrase inhibitor propargylglycine significantly delayed seed germination. We analyzed the germinative capacity of des1 seeds mutated in Arabidopsis cytosolic L-cysteine desulfhydrase. Although the mutant seeds do not exhibit germination-evoked H2S formation, they retained similar germination capacity as the wild-type seeds. In addition, des1 seeds responded similarly to temperature and were as sensitive to ABA as wild type seeds. Taken together, these data suggest that, although its metabolism is stimulated upon seed imbibition, H2S plays, if any, a marginal role in regulating Arabidopsis seed germination under standard conditions.

  3. Hydrogen sulfide facilitates carotid sinus baroreflex in anesthetized rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin XIAO; Yu-ming WU; Hao ZHANG; Yi-xian LIU; Rui-rong HE

    2006-01-01

    Aim:To study effects of hydrogen sulfide (H2S)on the carotid sinus baroreflex (CSB).Methods:The functional curve of the carotid sinus baroreflex was measured by recording changes in arterial pressure in anesthetized male rats with perfused carotid sinus.Results:H2S(derived from sodium hydrosulfide)at concentrations of 25,50,and 100 μmol/L facilitated the CSB,shifting the functional curve of the baroreflex downward and to the left.There was a marked increase in peak slope(PS)and reflex decrease in blood pressure(RD).Effects were concentration-dependent.Pretreatment with glibenclamide(20 μmol/L),a KATP channel blocker,abolished the above effects of H2S on CSB.Pretreatment with Bay K8644 (an agonist of calcium channels;500 nmol/L)eliminated the effect of H2S on CSB.An inhibitor of cystathionine γ-lyase(CSE),DL-propargylglycine(PPG;200 μmol/L),inhibited CSB in male rats and shifted the functional curve of the baroreflex upward and to the right.Conclusion:These data suggest that exogenous H2S exerts a facilitatory role on isolated CSB through opening KATP channels and further closing the calcium channels in vascular smooth muscle.Endogenous H2S may activate the activity of the CSB in vivo.

  4. Heterogeneous oxidation of carbonyl sulfide on mineral oxides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU YongChun; LIU JunFeng; HE Hong; YU YunBo; XUE Li

    2007-01-01

    Heterogeneous oxidation of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) on mineral oxides including SiO2, Fe2O3, CaO, MgO, ZnO and TiO2, which are the main components of atmospheric particles, were investigated using in situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (in situ DRIFTS), ion chromatography (IC), temperature-programmed desorption (TPD), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) methods. The main products and intermediates of the heterogeneous oxidation of OCS on these oxides were identified with in situ DRIFTS and IC. The reaction mechanism and kinetics were also discussed. It is found that the reaction mechanism on these mineral oxides is the same as that on Al2O3 for the same final products and the intermediates at room temperature. Namely, OCS can be catalytically oxidized to produce surface SO42- species and gaseous CO2 through the surface hydrogen thiocarbonate (HSCO2-) and HSO3- species. The activity series for heterogeneous oxidation of OCS follows: Al2O3 ≈ CaO>MgO>TiO2 ≈ ZnO>Fe2O3>SiO2. The specific area, basic hydroxyl and surface basicity of these oxides have effect on the reactivity. This study suggests that heterogeneous reactions of OCS on mineral dust may be an unneglectable sink of OCS.

  5. Endogenous hydrogen sulfide production is essential for dietary restriction benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hine, Christopher; Harputlugil, Eylul; Zhang, Yue; Ruckenstuhl, Christoph; Lee, Byung Cheon; Brace, Lear; Longchamp, Alban; Treviño-Villarreal, Jose H; Mejia, Pedro; Ozaki, C Keith; Wang, Rui; Gladyshev, Vadim N; Madeo, Frank; Mair, William B; Mitchell, James R

    2015-01-15

    Dietary restriction (DR) without malnutrition encompasses numerous regimens with overlapping benefits including longevity and stress resistance, but unifying nutritional and molecular mechanisms remain elusive. In a mouse model of DR-mediated stress resistance, we found that sulfur amino acid (SAA) restriction increased expression of the transsulfuration pathway (TSP) enzyme cystathionine γ-lyase (CGL), resulting in increased hydrogen sulfide (H2S) production and protection from hepatic ischemia reperfusion injury. SAA supplementation, mTORC1 activation, or chemical/genetic CGL inhibition reduced H2S production and blocked DR-mediated stress resistance. In vitro, the mitochondrial protein SQR was required for H2S-mediated protection during nutrient/oxygen deprivation. Finally, TSP-dependent H2S production was observed in yeast, worm, fruit fly, and rodent models of DR-mediated longevity. Together, these data are consistent with evolutionary conservation of TSP-mediated H2S as a mediator of DR benefits with broad implications for clinical translation. PAPERFLICK: PMID:25542313

  6. Removal of Hydrogen Sulfide Gas using Biofiltration - a Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheerawit RATTANAPAN

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide (H2S is extremely toxic to living organisms and plants. H2S gas contamination may be treated by both chemical and physical methods but they have high capital costs, demand large energy inputs and result in the generation of secondary hazardous wastes. Biofiltration, a biological technique, has significant economic advantages over other air pollution control technologies. Biofiltration is a process by which contaminated gases pass through the biofilter and pollutants are transported into the biofilm where they are utilized by microbes as a carbon source, an energy source. Thiobacillus sp. is the most frequently used microbial species in H2S biofiltration and can degrade H2S for energy and produce sulfate or sulfuric acid. Moreover, media selection for biofiltration (combing both natural and synthetic media is an important step towards the development of a successful biofiltration operation. In addition, the optimization parameters of a biofiltration operation are found. First, optimal moisture content may vary from 20 to 60 wt%. Second, most microbial growths occur near neutral pH and wide deviation from these levels will impact the efficiency of the biofiltration. Third, the optimum temperature of biofiltration is near the optimum temperature for microbial inoculation based on removal efficiency. Finally, because nutrient supply is less critical as H2S removal requires few nutrients, commercial fertilizer or secondary effluent from wastewater treatment plants can be used for humid and nutrient supply. Many biofiltrations are designed for H2S control.Graphical abstract

  7. Dimethyl sulfide as a source of cloud condensation nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, S. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) are predominantly sulfate particles, and over the oceans the major source of sulfur for these particles appears to be dimethyl sulfide, a gas produced by marine biota. The reflection of sunlight by marine stratiform clouds is a major feature of the Earth`s radiation budget, and these clouds will reflect more sunlight if their liquid water is distributed among more CCN, thus forming more (and smaller) droplets. These facts form the basis of a proposal that marine biogenic sulfur may be an important factor in determining the Earth`s climate. Key implications of this proposal are (1) the possibility of a biota-climate feedback loop if the production of biogenic sulfur is sensitive to changes in climate, (2) the possibility that anthropogenic sulfur emissions may be altering the global climate through this cloud-mediated mechanism, and (3) the possibility that anthropogenic pollution could alter climate by perturbing the sulfur-producing marine organisms. 3 refs., 1 fig.

  8. Photoluminescence of indium-rich copper indium sulfide quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The enhanced photoluminescence (PL) for In-rich copper indium sulfide quantum dots (CIS QDs) was observed. The conduction electron-Cu vacancy recombination and the donor–acceptor pair (DAP) defect recombination were considered to exist in CIS QDs at the same time. The temperature-dependent PL study showed that the emission of these QDs might be mainly originated from the recombination between electrons in the quantized conduction band and holes in the copper vacancy acceptor when x was 0.500 (CuxIn1−xS). However, the temperature coefficient of PL peak position decreased when x was 0.237. That meant the DAP recombination increased in the In-rich CIS QDs. - Highlights: • The enhanced photoluminescence (PL) for In-rich CuInS2 QDs with [Cu]/[In] molar ratios of 0.31. • The conduction electron-Cu vacancy recombination and DAP were considered to exist and the temperature-independent DAP recombination was enhanced in the In-rich CuInS2 QDs

  9. The oceanic cycle and global atmospheric budget of carbonyl sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, P.S.

    1994-12-31

    A significant portion of stratospheric air chemistry is influenced by the existence of carbonyl sulfide (COS). This ubiquitous sulfur gas represents a major source of sulfur to the stratosphere where it is converted to sulfuric acid aerosol particles. Stratospheric aerosols are climatically important because they scatter incoming solar radiation back to space and are able to increase the catalytic destruction of ozone through gas phase reactions on particle surfaces. COS is primarily formed at the surface of the earth, in both marine and terrestrial environments, and is strongly linked to natural biological processes. However, many gaps in the understanding of the global COS cycle still exist, which has led to a global atmospheric budget that is out of balance by a factor of two or more, and a lack of understanding of how human activity has affected the cycling of this gas. The goal of this study was to focus on COS in the marine environment by investigating production/destruction mechanisms and recalculating the ocean-atmosphere flux.

  10. Tropical sources and sinks of carbonyl sulfide observed from space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glatthor, N.; Höpfner, M.; Baker, I. T.; Berry, J.; Campbell, J. E.; Kawa, S. R.; Krysztofiak, G.; Leyser, A.; Sinnhuber, B.-M.; Stiller, G. P.; Stinecipher, J.; Clarmann, T.

    2015-11-01

    According to current budget estimations the seasonal variation of carbonyl sulfide (COS) is governed by oceanic release and vegetation uptake. Its assimilation by plants is assumed to be similar to the photosynthetic uptake of CO2 but, contrary to the latter process, to be irreversible. Therefore, COS has been suggested as cotracer of the carbon cycle. Observations of COS, however, are sparse, especially in tropical regions. We use the comprehensive data set of spaceborne measurements of the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding to analyze its global distribution. Two major features are observed in the tropical upper troposphere around 250 hPa: enhanced amounts over the western Pacific and the Maritime Continent, peaking around 550 parts per trillion by volume (pptv) in boreal summer, and a seasonally varying depletion of COS extending from tropical South America to Africa. The large-scale COS depletion, which in austral summer amounts up to -40 pptv as compared to the rest of the respective latitude band, has not been observed before and reveals the seasonality of COS uptake through tropical vegetation. The observations can only be reproduced by global models, when a large vegetation uptake and a corresponding increase in oceanic emissions as proposed in several recent publications are assumed.

  11. Hydrogen sulfide and endothelial dysfunction: relationship with nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altaany, Zaid; Moccia, Francesco; Munaron, Luca; Mancardi, Daniele; Wang, Rui

    2014-01-01

    The endothelium is a cellular monolayer that lines the inner surface of blood vessels and plays a central role in the maintenance of cardiovascular homeostasis by controlling platelet aggregation, vascular tone, blood fluidity and fibrinolysis, adhesion and transmigration of inflammatory cells, and angiogenesis. Endothelial dysfunctions are associated with various cardiovascular diseases, including atherosclerosis, hypertension, myocardial infarction, and cardiovascular complications of diabetes. Numerous studies have established the anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, and anti-oxidant effects of hydrogen sulfide (H2S), the latest member to join the gasotransmitter family along with nitric oxide and carbon monoxide, on vascular endothelium. In addition, H2S may prime endothelial cells (ECs) toward angiogenesis and contribute to wound healing, besides to its well-known ability to relax vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), and thereby reducing blood pressure. Finally, H2S may inhibit VSMC proliferation and platelet aggregation. Consistently, a deficit in H2S homeostasis is involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and of hyperglycaemic endothelial injury. Therefore, the application of H2S-releasing drugs or using gene therapy to increase endogenous H2S level may help restore endothelial function and antagonize the progression of cardiovascular diseases. The present article reviews recent studies on the role of H2S in endothelial homeostasis, under both physiological and pathological conditions, and its putative therapeutic applications. PMID:25005182

  12. Biochemistry and therapeutic potential of hydrogen sulfide - reality or fantasy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodek, Paulina; Olas, Beata

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a signaling gasotransmitter, involved in different physiological and pathological processes. H2S regulates apoptosis, the cell cycle and oxidative stress. H2S exerts powerful effects on smooth muscle cells, endothelial cells, inflammatory cells, endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria and nuclear transcription factors. H2S is known to be produced from L-cysteine, D-cysteine and L-homocysteine in the body. Four enzymes - cystathionine-b synthase (CBS), mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (3-MST), cystathionine-γ lyase (CSE) and cysteine aminotransferase (CAT) - are involved in H2S synthesis. The biosynthetic pathway for the production of H2S from D-cysteine involves 3-MST and D-amino acid oxidase (DAO). The therapeutic potential of H2S is not clear. However, recently results have demonstrated that H2S has protective action for ischemic heart disease or hypertension, and protects against ischemia of the brain. This review summarizes the negative and the positive roles of H2S in various biological systems, for example the cardiovascular system and nervous system. We also discuss the function of classical, therapeutic and natural (for example garlic) donors of H2S in pre-clinical and clinical studies. PMID:27516569

  13. Physiological Importance of Hydrogen Sulfide: Emerging Potent Neuroprotector and Neuromodulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panthi, Sandesh; Chung, Hyung-Joo; Jung, Junyang; Jeong, Na Young

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an emerging neuromodulator that is considered to be a gasotransmitter similar to nitrogen oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO). H2S exerts universal cytoprotective effects and acts as a defense mechanism in organisms ranging from bacteria to mammals. It is produced by the enzymes cystathionine β-synthase (CBS), cystathionine ϒ-lyase (CSE), 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (MST), and D-amino acid oxidase (DAO), which are also involved in tissue-specific biochemical pathways for H2S production in the human body. H2S exerts a wide range of pathological and physiological functions in the human body, from endocrine system and cellular longevity to hepatic protection and kidney function. Previous studies have shown that H2S plays important roles in peripheral nerve regeneration and degeneration and has significant value during Schwann cell dedifferentiation and proliferation but it is also associated with axonal degradation and the remyelination of Schwann cells. To date, physiological and toxic levels of H2S in the human body remain unclear and most of the mechanisms of action underlying the effects of H2S have yet to be fully elucidated. The primary purpose of this review was to provide an overview of the role of H2S in the human body and to describe its beneficial effects. PMID:27413423

  14. Electrochemical characterization on cobalt sulfide for electrochemical supercapacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, Feng; Zhao, Yong-Qing; Zhang, Guo-Qing [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Li, Hu-Lin [College of Material Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautisc, Nanjing 210013 (China); College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2007-06-15

    High capacitance at a high charge-discharge current density of 50 mA/cm{sup 2} for a new type of electrochemical supercapacitor cobalt sulfide (CoS{sub x}) have been studied for the first time. The CoS{sub x} was prepared by a very simply chemical precipitation method. The electrochemical capacitance performance of this compound was investigated by cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and galvanostatic charge-discharge tests with a three-electrode system. The results show that CoS{sub x} has excellent electrochemical capacitive characteristic with potential range -0.3 {proportional_to} 0.35 V (versus SCE) in 6 M KOH solution. Charge-discharge behaviors have been observed with the highest specific capacitance values of 475 F/g at the current density of 5 mA/cm{sup 2}, even at the high current density of 50 mA/cm{sup 2}, CoS{sub x} also shows the high specific capacitance values of 369 F/g. (author)

  15. Photoluminescence of indium-rich copper indium sulfide quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Wenyan [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Zhang, Yu, E-mail: yuzhang@jlu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); State Key Laboratory of Superhard Materials, College of Physics, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Zhao, Jia [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Feng, Yi; Wang, Dan; Zhang, Tieqiang; Gao, Wenzhu [State Key Laboratory of Superhard Materials, College of Physics, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Chu, Hairong [Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130025 (China); Yin, Jingzhi; Wang, Yiding [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Zhao, Jun [Department of Chemistry and Physics, Louisiana State University, Shreveport, LA 71115 (United States); College of Material Science and Engineering, Qingdao University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266042 (China); Yu, William W., E-mail: wyu6000@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Department of Chemistry and Physics, Louisiana State University, Shreveport, LA 71115 (United States); College of Material Science and Engineering, Qingdao University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266042 (China)

    2015-06-15

    The enhanced photoluminescence (PL) for In-rich copper indium sulfide quantum dots (CIS QDs) was observed. The conduction electron-Cu vacancy recombination and the donor–acceptor pair (DAP) defect recombination were considered to exist in CIS QDs at the same time. The temperature-dependent PL study showed that the emission of these QDs might be mainly originated from the recombination between electrons in the quantized conduction band and holes in the copper vacancy acceptor when x was 0.500 (Cu{sub x}In{sub 1−x}S). However, the temperature coefficient of PL peak position decreased when x was 0.237. That meant the DAP recombination increased in the In-rich CIS QDs. - Highlights: • The enhanced photoluminescence (PL) for In-rich CuInS{sub 2} QDs with [Cu]/[In] molar ratios of 0.31. • The conduction electron-Cu vacancy recombination and DAP were considered to exist and the temperature-independent DAP recombination was enhanced in the In-rich CuInS{sub 2} QDs.

  16. Seasonal fluxes of carbonyl sulfide in a midlatitude forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commane, Róisín; Meredith, Laura K.; Baker, Ian T.; Berry, Joseph A.; Munger, J. William; Montzka, Stephen A.; Templer, Pamela H.; Juice, Stephanie M.; Zahniser, Mark S.; Wofsy, Steven C.

    2015-11-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (OCS), the most abundant sulfur gas in the atmosphere, has a summer minimum associated with uptake by vegetation and soils, closely correlated with CO2. We report the first direct measurements to our knowledge of the ecosystem flux of OCS throughout an annual cycle, at a mixed temperate forest. The forest took up OCS during most of the growing season with an overall uptake of 1.36 ± 0.01 mol OCS per ha (43.5 ± 0.5 g S per ha, 95% confidence intervals) for the year. Daytime fluxes accounted for 72% of total uptake. Both soils and incompletely closed stomata in the canopy contributed to nighttime fluxes. Unexpected net OCS emission occurred during the warmest weeks in summer. Many requirements necessary to use fluxes of OCS as a simple estimate of photosynthesis were not met because OCS fluxes did not have a constant relationship with photosynthesis throughout an entire day or over the entire year. However, OCS fluxes provide a direct measure of ecosystem-scale stomatal conductance and mesophyll function, without relying on measures of soil evaporation or leaf temperature, and reveal previously unseen heterogeneity of forest canopy processes. Observations of OCS flux provide powerful, independent means to test and refine land surface and carbon cycle models at the ecosystem scale.

  17. Hydrogen Sulfide in Physiology and Diseases of the Digestive Tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudha B. Singh

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide (H2S is a Janus-faced molecule. On one hand, several toxic functions have been attributed to H2S and exposure to high levels of this gas is extremely hazardous to health. On the other hand, H2S delivery based clinical therapies are being developed to combat inflammation, visceral pain, oxidative stress related tissue injury, thrombosis and cancer. Since its discovery, H2S has been found to have pleiotropic effects on physiology and health. H2S is a gasotransmitter that exerts its effect on different systems, such as gastrointestinal, neuronal, cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, and hepatic systems. In the gastrointestinal tract, in addition to H2S production by mammalian cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS, cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE, H2S is also generated by the metabolic activity of resident gut microbes, mainly by colonic Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria (SRB via a dissimilatory sulfate reduction (DSR pathway. In the gut, H2S regulates functions such as inflammation, ischemia/ reperfusion injury and motility. H2S derived from gut microbes has been found to be associated with gastrointestinal disorders such as ulcerative colitis, Crohn’s disease and irritable bowel syndrome. This underscores the importance of gut microbes and their production of H2S on host physiology and pathophysiology.

  18. Trichosporon jirovecii-mediated synthesis of cadmium sulfide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Baz, Ashraf Farag; Sorour, Noha Mohamed; Shetaia, Youssria Mohamed

    2016-05-01

    Cadmium sulphide is one of the most promising materials for solar cells and of great interest due to its useful applications in photonics and electronics, thus the development of bio-mediated synthesis of cadmium sulphide nanoparticles (CdS NPs) is one of the essential areas in nanoparticles. The present study demonstrates for the first time the eco-friendly biosynthesis of CdS NPs using the yeast Trichosporon jirovecii. The biosynthesis of CdS NPs were confirmed by UV-Vis spectrum and characterized by X-ray diffraction assay and electron microscopy. Scanning and transmission electron microscope analyses shows the formation of spherical CdS NPs with a size range of about 6-15 nm with a mean Cd:S molar ratio of 1.0:0.98. T. jirovecii produced hydrogen sulfide on cysteine containing medium confirmed by positive cysteine-desulfhydrase activity and the colony color turned yellow on 0.1 mM cadmium containing medium. T. jirovecii tolerance to cadmium was increased by the UV treatment and three 0.6 mM cadmium tolerant mutants were generated upon the UV radiation treatment. The overall results indicated that T. jirovecii could tolerate cadmium toxicity by its conversion into CdS NPs on cysteine containing medium using cysteine-desulfhydrase as a defense response mechanism. PMID:26467054

  19. The metallization and superconductivity of dense hydrogen sulfide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a prototype molecular system and a sister molecule of water (H2O). The phase diagram of solid H2S at high pressures remains largely unexplored arising from the challenges in dealing with the pressure-induced weakening of S–H bond and larger atomic core difference between H and S. Metallization is yet achieved for H2O, but it was observed for H2S above 96 GPa. However, the metallic structure of H2S remains elusive, greatly impeding the understanding of its metallicity and the potential superconductivity. We have performed an extensive structural study on solid H2S at pressure ranges of 10–200 GPa through an unbiased structure prediction method based on particle swarm optimization algorithm. Besides the findings of candidate structures for nonmetallic phases IV and V, we are able to establish stable metallic structures violating an earlier proposal of elemental decomposition into sulfur and hydrogen [R. Rousseau, M. Boero, M. Bernasconi, M. Parrinello, and K. Terakura, Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 1254 (2000)]. Our study unravels a superconductive potential of metallic H2S with an estimated maximal transition temperature of ∼80 K at 160 GPa, higher than those predicted for most archetypal hydrogen-containing compounds (e.g., SiH4, GeH4, etc.)

  20. Study of crystallization behavior of poly(phenylene sulfide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana B. Nohara

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Poly(phenylene sulfide (PPS is an engineering thermoplastic polymer that presents high temperature resistance (glass transition temperature around 85 ºC and melting point at 285 ºC. These properties combined with its mechanical properties and its high chemical resistance allows its use in technological applications such as molding resins and as matrix for structural thermoplastic composites. During the manufacture of thermoplastic composites, the polymer is exposed to repeated melting, quenching and crystallization processes. The properties of semicrystalline polymers, such as PPS, depend on its crystallization behavior. This work deals with the PPS crystallization kinetics under different thermal cycles. This study was performed under isothermal conditions in a differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, coupled to Perkin Elmer crystallization software referred to as Pyris Kinetics - Crystallization. The results were correlated with microscopic analyses carried out in a polarized light microscope, equipped with a controlled heating and cooling accessory. In this case, the experimental conditions were the same adopted for the DSC analyses. From the results, parameters could be established to be used in the composite manufacture.

  1. Iron-Nickel Sulfide Compositional Ranges in CM Chondrites: No Simple Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolensky, Michael; Le, Loan

    2003-01-01

    Iron-nickel sulfides are found in most or all solar system environments, and are probably the only minerals found in all extraterrestrial materials on hand. Despite this ubiquity, they have only just begun the attention they deserve. The most common Fe-Ni sulfides in chondrites are troilite (FeS), pyrrhotite (Fe(1-x)S) and pentlandite (Fe,Ni)9S8. Troilite is believed to have resulted from sulfidation of metal (Fe-Ni) grains in an H2S-containing environment. Pyrrhotite is produced when friable troilite grains, which are exfoliated from the metal nucleus, are submitted to continued sulfidation. Some asteroids are known to have experienced aqueous alteration, forming products including new generations of sulfides (pyrrhotite and pentlandite). Pentlandite in particular is known to form during such alteration. However, experimental work by Lauretta has indicated that pentlandite may also have been formed during the initial sulfidation process, due to the faster diffusion rate of nickel into the forming sulfide, as compared to iron. Finally, there is considerable evidence for a family of phases intermediate between pyrrhotite and pentlandite, following the trend of the high temperature monosulfide solid solution, something not encountered in terrestrial rocks. Each sulfide has its own particular stability conditions, which have been determined for most phases. The long-term objective of our research is to characterize sulfides in chondritic materials in order to better establish the conditions under which they formed, and the subsequent processes they experienced. Ultimately, it will be possible to infer whether the sulfides in the chondrites were formed in the solar nebula or on asteroids, and if formed on the asteroids, deduce how much alteration has occurred there. Here we explore the relationships between the finest grain size portions of carbonaceous chondrites, these being matrix and chondrule rims; fine-grained materials are the most sensitive to their environment

  2. Hydrothermal sulfide accumulation along the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamieson, J. W.; Clague, D. A.; Hannington, M. D.

    2014-06-01

    Hydrothermal sulfide deposits that form on the seafloor are often located by the detection of hydrothermal plumes in the water column, followed by exploration with deep-towed cameras, side-scan sonar imaging, and finally by visual surveys using remotely-operated vehicle or occupied submersible. Hydrothermal plume detection, however, is ineffective for finding hydrothermally-inactive sulfide deposits, which may represent a significant amount of the total sulfide accumulation on the seafloor, even in hydrothermally active settings. Here, we present results from recent high-resolution, autonomous underwater vehicle-based mapping of the hydrothermally-active Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, in the Northeast Pacific Ocean. Analysis of the ridge bathymetry resulted in the location of 581 individual sulfide deposits along 24 km of ridge length. Hydrothermal deposits were distinguished from volcanic and tectonic features based on the characteristics of their surface morphology, such as shape and slope angles. Volume calculations for each deposit results in a total volume of 372,500 m3 of hydrothermal sulfide-sulfate-silica material, for an equivalent mass of ∼1.2 Mt of hydrothermal material on the seafloor within the ridge's axial valley, assuming a density of 3.1 g/cm3. Much of this total volume is from previously undocumented inactive deposits outside the main active vent fields. Based on minimum ages of sulfide deposition, the deposits accumulated at a maximum rate of ∼400 t/yr, with a depositional efficiency (proportion of hydrothermal material that accumulates on the seafloor to the total amount hydrothermally mobilized and transported to the seafloor) of ∼5%. The calculated sulfide tonnage represents a four-fold increase over previous sulfide estimates for the Endeavour Segment that were based largely on accumulations from within the active fields. These results suggest that recent global seafloor sulfide resource estimates, which were based mostly

  3. New Measurements of the Densities of Copper, Nickel, and Iron Sulfide Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mioduszewski, L.; Kress, V. C.

    2005-12-01

    Density measurements of sulfide liquids in the Fe-Ni-Cu-S-O system were performed from 1150°C-1250°C under controlled oxygen and sulfur fugacities. Measurements were made using the modified single bob (MSB) Archimedean method using zirconia ceramic bobs and crucibles. A 0.005mm resolution micrometer was attached to an elevator, which raised the crucible and melt relative to the free-hanging, stationary bob. A 0.001 g resolution analytical balance connected to a laptop computer continuously recorded the buoyancy as a function of crucible elevation. Densities were calculated by converting elevation to immersed volume and regressing the slope of buoyancy versus volume immersed. log(fO2) in the experiments ranged from -7.8 to -12.6 and log(fS2) ranged from -0.9 to -3.3. 38 successful sulfide liquid density measurements were performed, with values ranging from 3.8 g/cc to 6.6 g/cc. Regression of the resulting data suggests that a simple linear volume mixing model is adequate to represent the compositional dependence of density in copper- and nickel-sulfide liquids. A moderate positive excess mixing volume appears to be justified in iron-sulfide liquids. This result, along with high derived partial molar volumes for oxygen and sulfur components, are qualitatively consistent with the suggestion that increasing pressure will partition oxygen and sulfur out of the sulfide liquid during planetary accretion. The MSB density measurement also provides information on the relative magnitude of gas-zirconia and sulfide-zirconia surface energies. Assuming most of the observed variation results from sulfide chemistry it appears that oxidizing conditions significantly decrease sulfide-zirconia surface energies (increase wetting). If we can extrapolate this result to silicate minerals, this would suggest that oxidizing conditions will decrease wetting angle and thus increase the potential for sulfide segregation during planetary formation. We hope to test this hypothesis soon. Our

  4. Antifoaming materials studies in G.S. (Girlder sulfide) heavy water plants. Chemical and thermical stability. Pt. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Girlder sulfide (G.S.) heavy water plants hydrogen sulfide-water systems are inherentely foaming, so the adding of antifoaming materials is of great importance. These may be of high volatility, pyrolizable or chemically unstable in plant operation conditions (water and hydrogen sulfide at 2 MPa, up to 230 deg C). Five commercial surfactants were studied from the point of view of their chemical and thermical stability in order to select the most suitable. (Author)

  5. Studies on silicone based antifoaming agents to be used in G.S. (Girlder sulfide) heavy water plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Girlder sulfide (G.S.) heavy water plants hydrogen sulfide-water systems are inherentely foaming, so the adding of antifoaming materials is of great importance. These may be of high volatility, pyrolizable or chemically unstable in plant operation conditions (water and hydrogen sulfide at 2MPa, up to 230 deg C). Six commercial silicone based antifoaming agents were studied from the point of view of their chemical and thermical stability in order to select the most suitable. (Author)

  6. Density Functional Investigation of Methanethiol and Dimethyl Sulfide Adsorption on Zeolite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Renqing Lü; Guangmin Qiu; Chenguang Liu

    2006-01-01

    The density functional theory and cluster model methods have been employed to investigate the interactions between methanethiol, dimethyl sulfide and zeolites. The molecular complexes formed by adsorption of methanethiol or dimethyl sulfide on silanol H3SiOSi(OH)2OSiH3 with five coordination forms or four coordination forms, and complexes formed by interactions of Br(o)nsted acid sites of bridging hydroxyl H3Si(OH)Al(OH)2OSiH3 with methanethiol or dimethyl sulfide have been investigated. Full optimization and frequency analysis of all cluster models have been carried out using the B3LYP hybrid method at 6-31+G (d,p) basis set level for hydrogen, silicon, aluminum, oxygen,carbon, and sulfur atoms. The structures and energy changes of different coordination forms between methanethiol and H3Si(OH)Al(OH)2OSiH3, dimethyl sulfide and H3Si(OH)Al(OH)2OSiH3, methanethiol and H3SiOSi(OH)2OSiH3, dimethyl sulfide and H3SiOSi(OH)2OSiH3 complexes have been comparatively studied. The calculated results showed the nature of interactions that led to the formation of all complexes was van der Waals force confirmed by an insignificant change of geometric structures and properties. The conclusions that methanethiol and dimethyl sulfide molecules were adsorbed on bridging hydroxyl group prior to silanol group were obtained on the basis of adsorption heat, the most stable adsorption models of a 6 ring structure for interaction between bridging hydroxyl and methanethiol, and a 7 ring structure for interaction between bridging hydroxyl and dimethyl sulfide.

  7. Transformation of iron sulfide to greigite by nitrite produced by oil field bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shiping; Krause, Federico; Voordouw, Gerrit

    2009-05-01

    Nitrate, injected into oil fields, can oxidize sulfide formed by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) through the action of nitrate-reducing sulfide-oxidizing bacteria (NR-SOB). When reservoir rock contains siderite (FeCO(3)), the sulfide formed is immobilized as iron sulfide minerals, e.g. mackinawite (FeS). The aim of our study was to determine the extent to which oil field NR-SOB can oxidize or transform FeS. Because no NR-SOB capable of growth with FeS were isolated, the well-characterized oil field isolate Sulfurimonas sp. strain CVO was used. When strain CVO was presented with a mixture of chemically formed FeS and dissolved sulfide (HS(-)), it only oxidized the HS(-). The FeS remained acid soluble and non-magnetic indicating that it was not transformed. In contrast, when the FeS was formed by adding FeCl(2) to a culture of SRB which gradually produced sulfide, precipitating FeS, and to which strain CVO and nitrate were subsequently added, transformation of the FeS to a magnetic, less acid-soluble form was observed. X-ray diffraction and energy-dispersive spectrometry indicated the transformed mineral to be greigite (Fe(3)S(4)). Addition of nitrite to cultures of SRB, containing microbially formed FeS, was similarly effective. Nitrite reacts chemically with HS(-) to form polysulfide and sulfur (S(0)), which then transforms SRB-formed FeS to greigite, possibly via a sulfur addition pathway (3FeS + S(0) --> Fe(3)S(4)). Further chemical transformation to pyrite (FeS(2)) is expected at higher temperatures (>60 degrees C). Hence, nitrate injection into oil fields may lead to NR-SOB-mediated and chemical mineral transformations, increasing the sulfide-binding capacity of reservoir rock. Because of mineral volume decreases, these transformations may also increase reservoir injectivity. PMID:19290520

  8. Long-term field test of an electrochemical method for sulfide removal from sewage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikaar, Ilje; Li, Eugena; Rozendal, René A; Yuan, Zhiguo; Keller, Jürg; Rabaey, Korneel

    2012-06-01

    Corrosion caused by hydrogen sulfide leads to significant costs for the rehabilitation or replacement of corroded sewer pipes. Conventional methods to prevent sewer corrosion normally involve the dosing of significant amounts of chemicals with the associated transport and storage costs as well as considerable maintenance and control requirement. Recently, a novel chemical free method for sulfide abatement based on electrochemical sulfide oxidation was shown to be highly effective for the removal of sulfide from synthetic and real sewage. Here, we report on the electrochemical removal of sulfide using Ta/Ir and Pt/Ir coated titanium electrodes under simulated sewer conditions during field trials. The results showed that sulfide can successfully be removed to levels below the normal target value at the end of a simulated rising main (i.e. Scaling of the electrode and the membrane was observed in the cathode compartment and as a result the cell potentials increased over time. The cathode potentials returned to their original potential after switching the polarity every two days, but a more frequent switching would be needed to reduce the energy requirements of the system. Accelerated lifetime experiments indicated that a lifetime of 6.0 ± 1.9 years can be expected under polarity switching conditions at a pH of 14 and significantly longer at lower pH values. As operating the system without switching simplifies construction as well as operation, the choice whether to switch or not will in practice depend on operational cost (higher/lower energy) versus capital cost (reactor and peripherals). Irrespective of the approach, our study demonstrates that electrochemical sulfide control in sewer systems may be an attractive new option. PMID:22483834

  9. Adsorption of dimethyl sulfide from aqueous solution by a cost-effective bamboo charcoal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ming; Huang, Zheng-Hong; Liu, Guangjia; Kang, Feiyu

    2011-06-15

    The adsorption of dimethyl sulfide from an aqueous solution by a cost-effective bamboo charcoal from Dendrocalamus was studied in comparison with other carbon adsorbents. The bamboo charcoal exhibited superior adsorption on dimethyl sulfide compared with powdered activated carbons at different adsorbent dosages. The adsorption characteristics of dimethyl sulfide onto bamboo charcoal were investigated under varying experimental conditions such as particle size, contact time, initial concentration and adsorbent dosage. The dimethyl sulfide removal was enhanced from 31 to 63% as the particle size was decreased from 24-40 to >300 mesh for the bamboo charcoal. The removal efficiency increased with increasing the adsorbent dosage from 0.5 to 10mg, and reached 70% removal efficiency at 10mg adsorbed. The adsorption capacity (μg/g) increased with increasing concentration of dimethyl sulfide while the removal efficiency decreased. The adsorption process conforms well to a pseudo-second-order kinetics model. The adsorption of dimethyl sulfide is more appropriately described by the Freundlich isotherm (R(2), 0.9926) than by the Langmuir isotherm (R(2), 0.8685). Bamboo charcoal was characterized by various analytical methods to understand the adsorption mechanism. Bamboo charcoal is abundant in acidic and alcohol functional groups normally not observed in PAC. A distinct difference is that the superior mineral composition of Fe (0.4 wt%) and Mn (0.6 wt%) was detected in bamboo charcoal-elements not found in PAC. Acidic functional group and specific adsorption sites would be responsible for the strong adsorption of dimethyl sulfide onto bamboo charcoal of Dendrocalamus origin. PMID:21549503

  10. Photolytic Decomposition Of Hydrogen Sulfide In The Gas Mixtures And Formation Of Molecular Hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text : The chemical conversions of organic fuels during the refining processes complex gas mixtures containing hydrogen sulfide generate as a by-product. In accordance with the environmental safety requirements these gas mixtures have to be purified from hydrogen sulfide before use or environmental discharge. As it is known because of combustion gases containing hydrogen-sulfide oxides of sulfide emit into the atmosphere and they combine with water vapors in the air and this process consequently results in pH change of H2SO3 precipitations and acid rains. The processes of purification of gas mixtures being the product of oil refining processes and mainly containing hydrocarbons from hydrogen sulfide by a photochemical method and molecular hydrogen generation have been under this investigation.The model gas mixture under investigation has been prepared at a vacuum plant in the laboratory. During the researches the partial pressure of H2S capable of completely absorbing the given wave-length of the radiation has been first specified. It has been established that temperature and irradiation time have their influence on the progress rate of the processes.At this wave-length hydrocarbons undergo no photochemical conversions. This is manifested with the absence of excitation levels causing dissociation due to radiation absorption at the wave-length used in hydrocarbon gases . The fact that these levels belong to hydrogen sulfide contained in gas mixtures has been experimentally proved.The role of hot hydrogen atoms and the mechanism of the processes under progress within the process of molecular hydrogen generation due to the photolytic decomposition of hydrogen sulfide have been discussed.

  11. Zinc sulfide and terbium-doped zinc sulfide films grown by traveling wave reactor atomic layer epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinc sulfide (ZnS) and terbium-doped ZnS (ZnS:Tb) thin films were grown by traveling wave reactor atomic layer epitaxy (ALE). In the present work, ZnCl2, H2S, and tris (2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-3,5-heptandionato) terbium (Tb(tmhd)3) were used as the precursors. The dependence of crystallinity and Cl content of ZnS films was investigated on the growth temperature. ZnS and ZnS:Tb films grown at temperatures ranging from 400 to 500 .deg. C showed a hexagonal-2H crystalline structure. The crystallinity of ZnS film was greatly enhanced as the temperature increased. At growth temperatures higher than 450.deg.C, the films showed preferred orientation with mainly (002) diffraction peak. The Cl content decreased from approximately 9 to 1 at.% with the increase in growth temperature from 400 to 500 .deg. C. The segregation of Cl near the surface region and the incorporation of O from Tb(tmhd)3 during ALE process were also observed using Auger electron spectroscopy. The ALE-grown ZnS and ZnS:Tb films revealed very uniform thickness and smooth surface morphology in the observation using atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy

  12. Zinc sulfide and terbium-doped zinc sulfide films grown by traveling wave reactor atomic layer epitaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Yun, S J; Nam, K S

    1998-01-01

    Zinc sulfide (ZnS) and terbium-doped ZnS (ZnS:Tb) thin films were grown by traveling wave reactor atomic layer epitaxy (ALE). In the present work, ZnCl sub 2 , H sub 2 S, and tris (2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-3,5-heptandionato) terbium (Tb(tmhd) sub 3) were used as the precursors. The dependence of crystallinity and Cl content of ZnS films was investigated on the growth temperature. ZnS and ZnS:Tb films grown at temperatures ranging from 400 to 500 .deg. C showed a hexagonal-2H crystalline structure. The crystallinity of ZnS film was greatly enhanced as the temperature increased. At growth temperatures higher than 450.deg.C, the films showed preferred orientation with mainly (002) diffraction peak. The Cl content decreased from approximately 9 to 1 at.% with the increase in growth temperature from 400 to 500 .deg. C. The segregation of Cl near the surface region and the incorporation of O from Tb(tmhd) sub 3 during ALE process were also observed using Auger electron spectroscopy. The ALE-grown ZnS and ZnS:Tb films re...

  13. The changes of three components in coelomic fluid of Urechis unicinctus exposed to different concentrations of sulfide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Zhuojun; BAO Zhenmin; KANG Kyoung-Ho; YU Li; ZHANG Zhifeng

    2005-01-01

    The changes in heme (associated with hemoglobin), hemoglobin and hematin in the coelomic fluid of marine worm, Urechis unicinctus, exposed to different concentrations of sulfide, were investigated using biochemical techniques. When exposed to different sulfide concentrations for up to 96 h, the relative amounts of the three components changed in a regular pattern suggesting that the coelomocytes play an important role in the worm's tolerance to sulfide. The possible roles of heme compounds in sulfide tolerance of this species are discussed on the basis of our experimental data.

  14. Desulfurization of ethylene sulfide on Mo(100). The roles of ring size and strain in adsorbate reaction selectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Jeffrey T.; Friend, C. M.

    1988-08-01

    The reactions, under ultrahigh vacuum, of ethylene sulfide ( c-C 2H 4S) on Mo(110) have been examined, by isothermal reaction spectroscopy, temperature programmed reaction spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, and low energy electron diffraction. The dominant reaction channel (~ 85%) is intramolecular elimination of ethylene sulfide to gaseous ethylene. Approximately 70% of the ethylene formation occurs upon ethylene sulfide adsorption for all crystal temperatures examined (100, 120, and 140 K). At high coverages, small amounts of ethylene are formed at ~ 200 K, produced during the decomposition of chemisorbed ethylene sulfide. A minor reaction channel (~15%) for ethylene sulfide on Mo(110) is complete decomposition to surface carbon, surface sulfur, and gaseous dihydrogen. For high ethylene sulfide coverages, the dihydrogen produced during decomposition evolves at 375, 460, and 575 K. Ethylene sulfide desulfurization results in the deposition of 0.35 monolayer of atomic sulfur at reaction saturation for adsorption temperatures of <140 K, as measured by Auger electron and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies. The high ring strain in ethylene sulfide is proposed to account for the low reaction barrier leading to ethylene. The ethylene product does not trap on the surface even for temperatures of 100 K, attributed to formation of ethylene via a concerted transition state with a large component of momentum perpendicular to the surface. A scheme for the reaction is proposed, and the reaction is compared to those of other cyclic Sulfides on Mo(110).

  15. Use of ferric sulfate: acid media for the desulfurization of model compounds of coal. [Dibenzothiophene, diphenyl sulfide, di-n-butyl sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clary, L.R.; Vermeulen, T.; Lynn, S.

    1980-12-01

    The objective of this work has been to investigate the ability of ferric sulfate-acid leach systems to oxidize the sulfur in model compounds of coal. Ferric iron-acid leach systems have been shown to be quite effective at removal of inorganic sulfur in coal. In this study, the oxidative effect of ferric iron in acid-leach systems was studied using dibenzothiophene, diphenyl sulfide, and di-n-butyl sulfide as models of organic sulfur groups in coal. Nitrogen and oxygen, as well as various transition metal catalysts and oxidants, were utilized in this investigation. Dibenzothiophene was found to be quite refractory to oxidation, except in the case where metavanadate was added, where it appears that 40% oxidation to sulfone could have occurred per hour at 150/sup 0/C and mild oxygen pressure. Diphenyl sulfide was selectively oxidized to sulfoxide and sulfone in an iron and oxygen system. Approximately 15% conversion to sulfone occurred per hour under these conditions. Some of the di-n-butyl sulfide was cracked to 1-butene and 1-butanethiol under similar conditions. Zinc chloride and ferric iron were used at 200/sup 0/C in an attempt to desulfonate dibenzothiophene sulfone, diphenyl sulfone, and di-n-butyl sulfone. Di-n-butyl sulfone was completely desulfurized on one hour and fragmented to oxidized parafins, while dibenzothiophene sulfone and diphenyl sulfone were unaffected. These results suggest that an iron-acid leach process could only selectively oxidize aryl sulfides under mild conditions, representing only 20% of the organic sulfur in coal (8% of the total sulfur). Removal through desulfonation once selective sulfur oxidation had occurred was only demonstrated for alkyl sulfones, with severe oxidation of the fragmented paraffins also occurring in one hour.

  16. Stability and bioavailability of mercury sulfide in Oak Ridge Soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the 1950's and 1960's, a large amount of elemental mercury escaped confinement and is still present in the buildings and grounds of the U.S. Department of Energy's Y-12 National Security Facility and in the Y-12 Watershed in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA. Because of the adverse effects of elemental mercury and mercury compounds upon human health, the Oak Ridge Site is engaged in an on-going effort to monitor and remediate the area. In order to more cost effectively implement those extensive remediation efforts, it is necessary now to obtain an improved understanding of the role that mercury and mercury compounds play in the Oak Ridge ecosystem. Specifically, the long-term bioavailability, stability, and mobility of mercury species in contaminated terrestrial and aquatic environments of the Oak Ridge ecosystem under a range of biogeochemical conditions are not well understood. Mercury can be expected to be present in various forms. These species can be transformed from one form into another thus bioavailability, toxicity, and mobility can change as a function of the biogeochemical conditions. The kinetics of these transformations is currently unknown. We have conducted pilot scale experiments to study the bioavailability of mercury sulfide (HgS) in Oak Ridge soils. The effects of plants and incubation time on chemical stability and bioavailability of HgS under simulated conditions of the Oak Ridge ecosystem have been examined, as has the dynamics of the dissolution of HgS by various extractants. The results show that HgS in contaminated Oak Ridge soils was still to some extent bioavailable to plants. (authors)

  17. Electrophysiological effects of hydrogen sulfide on human atrial fibers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Meng; WU Yu-ming; LI Qian; LIU Su; HE Rui-rong

    2011-01-01

    Background It has been reported that endogenous or exogenous hydrogen sulfide (H2S) exerts physiological effects in the vertebrate cardiovascular system.We have also demonstrated that H2S acts as an important regulator of electrophysiological properties in guinea pig papillary muscles and on pacemaker cells in sinoatrial nodes of rabbits.This study was to observe the electrophysiological effects of H2S on human atrial fibers.Methods Human atrial samples were collected during cardiac surgery.Parameters of action potential in human atrial specialized fibers were recorded using a standard intracellular microelectrode technique.Results NaHS (H2S donor) (50,100 and 200 μmol/L) decreased the amplitude of action potential (APA),maximal rate of depolarization (Vmax),velocity of diastolic (phase 4) depolarization (VDD) and rate of pacemaker firing (RPF),and shortened the duration of 90% repolarization (APD90) in a concentration-dependent manner.ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP)channel blocker glibenclamide (Gli,20 μmol/L) partially blocked the effects of NaHS (100 μmol/L) on human atrial fiber cells.The L-type Ca2+ channel agonist Bay K8644 (0.5 μmol/L) also partially blocked the effects of NaHS (100 μmol/L).An inhibitor of cystathionine y-lyase (CSE),DL-propargylglycine (PPG,200 μmol/L),increased APA,Vmax,VDD and RPF,and prolonged APD90.Conclusions H2S exerts a negative chronotropic action and accelerates the repolarization of human atrial specialized fibers,possibly as a result of increases in potassium efflux through the opening of KATP channels and a concomitant decrease in calcium influx.Endogenous H2S may be generated by CSE and act as an important regulator of electrophysiological properties in human atrial fibers.

  18. Targeting hydrogen sulfide as a promising therapeutic strategy for atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Suowen; Liu, Zhiping; Liu, Peiqing

    2014-03-15

    Physiological concentrations of nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO) have multiple protective effects in the cardiovascular system. Recent studies have implicated hydrogen sulfide (H2S) as a new member of vasculoprotective gasotransmitter family, behaving similarly to NO and CO. H2S has been demonstrated to inhibit multiple key aspects of atherosclerosis, including atherogenic modification of LDL, monocytes adhesion to the endothelial cells, macrophage-derived foam cell formation and inflammation, smooth muscle cell proliferation, neointimal hyperplasia, vascular calcification, and thrombogenesis. H2S also decreases plasma homocysteine levels in experimental animal models. In the human body, H2S production is predominantly catalyzed by cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS) and cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE). CSE is the primary H2S-producing enzyme in the vasculature. Growing evidence suggests that atherosclerosis is associated with vascular CSE/H2S deficiency and that H2S supplementation by exogenous H2S donors (such as NaHS and GYY4137) attenuates, and H2S synthesis suppression by inhibitors (such as D, L-propargylglycine) aggravates the development of atherosclerotic plaques. However, it remains elusive whether CSE deficiency plays a causative role in atherosclerosis. A recent study (Circulation. 2013; 127: 2523-2534) demonstrates that decreased endogenous H2S production by CSE genetic deletion accelerates atherosclerosis in athero-prone ApoE-/- mice, pinpointing that endogenously produced H2S by CSE activation may be of benefit in the prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis. This study will facilitate the development of H2S-based pharmaceuticals with therapeutic applications in atherosclerosis-related cardiovascular diseases. PMID:24491853

  19. Decontamination of 2-Chloroethyl Ethyl Sulfide by Pulsed Corona Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decontamination of 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (2-CEES, CH3CH2SCH2CH2Cl) by pulsed corona plasma was investigated. The results show that 212.6 mg/m3 of 2-CEES, with the gas flow rate of 2 m3/h, can be decontaminated to 0.09 mg/m3. According to the variation of the inlet and outlet concentration of 2-CEES vapor with retention time, it is found that the reaction of 2-CEES in a pulsed corona plasma system follows the first order reaction, with the reaction rate constant of 0.463 s−1. The decontamination mechanism is discussed based on an analysis of the dissociation energy of chemical bonds and decontamination products. The C–S bond adjacent to the Cl atom will be destroyed firstly to form CH3CH2S· and ·CH2CH2Cl radicals. CH3CH2S· can be decomposed to ·C2H5 and ·S. ·S can be oxidized to SO2, while ·C2H5 can be finally oxidized to CO2 and H2O. The C–Cl bond in the ·CH2CH2Cl radical can be destroyed to form ·CH2CH2. and ·Cl, which can be mineralized to CO2, H2O and HCl. The H atom in the ·CH2CH2Cl radical can also be substituted by ·Cl to form CHCl2–CHCl2. (plasma technology)

  20. HYDROGEN SULFIDE ADSORPTION BY ALKALINE IMPREGNATED COCONUT SHELL ACTIVATED CARBON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HUI SUN CHOO

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Biogas is one type of renewable energy which can be burnt to produce heat and electricity. However, it cannot be burnt directly due to the presence of hydrogen sulfide (H2S which is highly corrosive to gas engine. In this study, coconut shell activated carbon (CSAC was applied as a porous adsorbent for H2S removal. The effect of amount of activated carbon and flow rate of gas stream toward adsorption capacity were investigated. Then, the activated carbons were impregnated by three types of alkaline (NaOH, KOH and K2CO3 with various ratios. The effects of various types of alkaline and their impregnation ratio towards adsorption capacity were analysed. In addition, H2S influent concentration and the reaction temperature on H2S adsorption were also investigated. The result indicated that adsorption capacity increases with the amount of activated carbon and decreases with flow rate of gas stream. Alkaline impregnated activated carbons had better performance than unimpregnated activated carbon. Among all impregnated activated carbons, activated carbon impregnated by K2CO3 with ratio 2.0 gave the highest adsorption capacity. Its adsorption capacity was 25 times higher than unimpregnated activated carbon. The result also indicated that the adsorption capacity of impregnated activated carbon decreased with the increment of H2S influent concentration. Optimum temperature for H2S adsorption was found to be 50˚C. In this study, the adsorption of H2S on K2CO3 impregnated activated carbon was fitted to the Langmuir isotherm. The fresh and spent K2CO3 impregnated activated carbon were characterized to study the adsorption process.

  1. Arsenic Sulfide Nanowire Formation on Fused Quartz Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olmstead, J.; Riley, B.J.; Johnson, B.R.; Sundaram, S.K.

    2005-01-01

    Arsenic sulfide (AsxSy) nanowires were synthesized by an evaporation-condensation process in evacuated fused quartz ampoules. During the deposition process, a thin, colored film of AsxSy was deposited along the upper, cooler portion of the ampoule. The ampoule was sectioned and the deposited film analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to characterize and semi-quantitatively evaluate the microstructural features of the deposited film. A variety of microstructures were observed that ranged from a continuous thin film (warmer portion of the ampoule), to isolated micron- and nano-scale droplets (in the intermediate portion), as well as nanowires (colder portion of the ampoule). Experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of ampoule cleaning methods (e.g. modify surface chemistry) and quantity of source material on nanowire formation. The evolution of these microstructures in the thin film was determined to be a function of initial pressure, substrate temperature, substrate surface treatment, and initial volume of As2S3 glass. In a set of two experiments where the initial pressure, substrate thermal gradient, and surface treatment were the same, the initial quantity of As2S3 glass per internal ampoule volume was doubled from one test to the other. The results showed that AsxSy nanowires were only formed in the test with the greater initial quantity of As2S3 per internal ampoule volume. The growth data for variation in diameter (e.g. nanowire or droplet) as a function of substrate temperature was fit to an exponential trendline with the form y = Aekx, where y is the structure diameter, A = 1.25×10-3, k = 3.96×10-2, and x is the temperature with correlation coefficient, R2 = 0.979, indicating a thermally-activated process.

  2. Automatic mechanism generation for pyrolysis of di-tert-butyl sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Class, Caleb A; Liu, Mengjie; Vandeputte, Aäron G; Green, William H

    2016-08-01

    The automated Reaction Mechanism Generator (RMG), using rate parameters derived from ab initio CCSD(T) calculations, is used to build reaction networks for the thermal decomposition of di-tert-butyl sulfide. Simulation results were compared with data from pyrolysis experiments with and without the addition of a cyclohexene inhibitor. Purely free-radical chemistry did not properly explain the reactivity of di-tert-butyl sulfide, as the previous experimental work showed that the sulfide decomposed via first-order kinetics in the presence and absence of the radical inhibitor. The concerted unimolecular decomposition of di-tert-butyl sulfide to form isobutene and tert-butyl thiol was found to be a key reaction in both cases, as it explained the first-order sulfide decomposition. The computer-generated kinetic model predictions quantitatively match most of the experimental data, but the model is apparently missing pathways for radical-induced decomposition of thiols to form elemental sulfur. Cyclohexene has a significant effect on the composition of the radical pool, and this led to dramatic changes in the resulting product distribution. PMID:27431650

  3. The Role of Water for Photodecomposition of Aqueous Hydrogen Sulfide Using Stratified Photocatalyst--Experimental Part

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Splitting of hydrogen sulfide using sunlight is a useful reaction to produce hydrogen. Alkaline sulfide solution, which is prepared by dissolving hydrogen sulfide into alkaline water, is selected as the reaction medium of photocatalytic hydrogen generation reaction. In this system, the photocatalytic reaction is assumed to occur as follows: 2H2O + 2e- → H2 + 2OH- (1) 2S2- + 2h+ → S22- (2) However, as the reaction progresses white solids precipitate in the reaction medium. Furthermore, the HPLC analysis suggested that the ratio between the consumption of sulfide ion and the amount of hydrogen generation was about 3:2, which is not stoichiometric. Thus, in this paper, we characterized the white solid precipitate and tried to optimize the solution condition to prevent the precipitation of the same. From our study, the white solid precipitate was confirmed as sulfur derived from the oxidation of the disulfide ion. It was confirmed that the addition of sulfite ions prevented the oxidation of disulfide ions, which causes the precipitation. In the absence of sulfite ions and for sufide ion concentration less than 0.1M, the precipitation of sulfur occurs in a very short reaction time. On the other hand the hydrogen evolution rate retarded when the sulfide ion concentration is higher than 0.1M. This was due to the degradation of the stratified CdS particles. Thus, the optimal concentration of Na2S solution was determined to be around 0.1M

  4. Formation of Fe-sulfides in cultures of sulfate-reducing bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to synthesize Fe-sulfides produced with sulfate-reducing bacteria under experimental laboratory conditions. Fe-sulfides were precipitated with biologically produced sulfide in cultures growing at 22, 45, and 60 deg. C for up to 16 weeks. Abiotic controls were prepared by reacting liquid media with Na2S solutions. Precipitates were collected anaerobically, freeze-dried and analyzed by X-ray diffraction. Additional analyses included total Fe and S content, magnetic susceptibility, specific surface area, and scanning electron microscopy. Mackinawite (FeS) and greigite (Fe3S4) were the dominant iron sulfide phases formed in sulfate-reducing bacterial cultures. An increase in the incubation temperature from 22 to 60 deg. C enhanced the crystallinity of the Fe-sulfides. Generally, greigite was more prevalent in abiotic samples and mackinawite in biogenic materials. Pyrite (FeS2) was also found in abiotic precipitates. Abiotic samples had a higher magnetic susceptibility because of the greigite and displayed improved crystallinity compared to biotic materials.

  5. The partitioning of hydrogen sulfide in the condensers of Geysers Unit 15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weres, O.

    1982-09-01

    Geysers Unit 15 was the first of the geothermal units equipped with surface condensers to go on line at The Geysers power plant of the Pacific Gas and Electric Company. Units 1 through 12 have contact condensers. The switch to surface condensers was motivated by considerations of hydrogen sulfide mission abatement. In the contact condensers, there is a large liquid-to-vapor ratio, and about 75% of the hydrogen sulfide that is present in the geothermal steam supply ends up dissolved in the cooling water. Once in the cooling water, it is emitted to the atmosphere from the cooling towers unless further, tertiary abatement is employed. It was reasoned that, because the liquid-to-vapor ratio in a surface condenser would be smaller by a factor of about twenty-five than in a contact condenser, most of the hydrogen sulfide would remain in the vapor phase and leave with the gas vented from the condenser rather than by dissolving in the condensate. Unit 15 is equipped with a Stretford Unit, which removes the hydrogen sulfide from the vent gas and converts it to elemental sulfur by reaction with air. Therefore, the fraction of the hydrogen sulfide that leaves the condenser with the vent gas is not emitted to the atmosphere.

  6. THE SULFIDATION/OXIDATION RESISTANCE OF TWO Ni-Cr-Al-Y ALLOYS AT 700℃

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y.X.Lu; W.X.Chen; R.Eadie

    2004-01-01

    The high temperature corrosion resistance of Ni-25.gCr-13.5Al-1.2Y-0.6Si and Ni-10.2Co-12.4 Cr-16.0A l-0.5 Y-0.2Hf alloys was assessed in sulfidation/oxidation environments.In the environment with a sulfur partial pressure of 1Pa.and an oxygen partial pressure of 10-19Pa,both these alloys exhibited three distinct stages in the weight gain-time curve when tested at 700℃.In the initial stage,selective sulfidation of Cr suppressed the formation of the other metal sulfides,resulting in lower weight gains.In the transient stage,breakdown and cracking of Cr sulfides and insufficient concentration of Cr at the outer zone led to the rapid formation of Ni sulfides and a rapid increase in weight.In the steady-state stage,corrosion was controlled by the diffusion of anions and/or cations,which led to a parabolic rate law.

  7. Selective Sulfidation of Lead Smelter Slag with Pyrite and Flotation Behavior of Synthetic ZnS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Junwei; Liu, Wei; Wang, Dawei; Jiao, Fen; Zhang, Tianfu; Qin, Wenqing

    2016-05-01

    The selective sulfidation of lead smelter slag with pyrite in the presence of carbon and Na salts, and the flotation behavior of synthetic ZnS were studied. The effects of temperature, time, pyrite dosage, Na salts, and carbon additions were investigated based on thermodynamic calculation, and correspondingly, the growth mechanism of ZnS particles was studied at high temperatures. The results indicated that the zinc in lead smelter slag was selectively converted into zinc sulfides by sulfidation roasting. The sulfidation degree of zinc was increased until the temperature, time, pyrite, and carbon dosages reached their optimum values, under which it was more than 95 pct. The growth of ZnS particles largely depended upon roasting temperature, and the ZnS grains were significantly increased above 1373 K (1100 °C) due to the formation of a liquid phase. After the roasting, the zinc sulfides generated had a good floatability, and 88.34 pct of zinc was recovered by conventional flotation.

  8. Formation of Fe-sulfides in cultures of sulfate-reducing bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gramp, Jonathan P. [Department of Microbiology, Ohio State University, 484 W. 12th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Bigham, Jerry M.; Jones, F. Sandy [School of Environment and Natural Resources, 2021 Coffey Road, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Tuovinen, Olli H., E-mail: tuovinen.1@osu.edu [Department of Microbiology, Ohio State University, 484 W. 12th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States) and Department of Chemistry and Bioengineering, Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 541, FI 33101 Tampere (Finland)

    2010-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to synthesize Fe-sulfides produced with sulfate-reducing bacteria under experimental laboratory conditions. Fe-sulfides were precipitated with biologically produced sulfide in cultures growing at 22, 45, and 60 deg. C for up to 16 weeks. Abiotic controls were prepared by reacting liquid media with Na{sub 2}S solutions. Precipitates were collected anaerobically, freeze-dried and analyzed by X-ray diffraction. Additional analyses included total Fe and S content, magnetic susceptibility, specific surface area, and scanning electron microscopy. Mackinawite (FeS) and greigite (Fe{sub 3}S{sub 4}) were the dominant iron sulfide phases formed in sulfate-reducing bacterial cultures. An increase in the incubation temperature from 22 to 60 deg. C enhanced the crystallinity of the Fe-sulfides. Generally, greigite was more prevalent in abiotic samples and mackinawite in biogenic materials. Pyrite (FeS{sub 2}) was also found in abiotic precipitates. Abiotic samples had a higher magnetic susceptibility because of the greigite and displayed improved crystallinity compared to biotic materials.

  9. Formation of Fe-sulfides in cultures of sulfate-reducing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramp, Jonathan P; Bigham, Jerry M; Jones, F Sandy; Tuovinen, Olli H

    2010-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to synthesize Fe-sulfides produced with sulfate-reducing bacteria under experimental laboratory conditions. Fe-sulfides were precipitated with biologically produced sulfide in cultures growing at 22, 45, and 60 degrees C for up to 16 weeks. Abiotic controls were prepared by reacting liquid media with Na(2)S solutions. Precipitates were collected anaerobically, freeze-dried and analyzed by X-ray diffraction. Additional analyses included total Fe and S content, magnetic susceptibility, specific surface area, and scanning electron microscopy. Mackinawite (FeS) and greigite (Fe(3)S(4)) were the dominant iron sulfide phases formed in sulfate-reducing bacterial cultures. An increase in the incubation temperature from 22 to 60 degrees C enhanced the crystallinity of the Fe-sulfides. Generally, greigite was more prevalent in abiotic samples and mackinawite in biogenic materials. Pyrite (FeS(2)) was also found in abiotic precipitates. Abiotic samples had a higher magnetic susceptibility because of the greigite and displayed improved crystallinity compared to biotic materials. PMID:19962824

  10. Acidic Microenvironments in Waste Rock Characterized by Neutral Drainage: Bacteria–Mineral Interactions at Sulfide Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John W. Dockrey

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Microbial populations and microbe-mineral interactions were examined in waste rock characterized by neutral rock drainage (NRD. Samples of three primary sulfide-bearing waste rock types (i.e., marble-hornfels, intrusive, exoskarn were collected from field-scale experiments at the Antamina Cu–Zn–Mo mine, Peru. Microbial communities within all samples were dominated by neutrophilic thiosulfate oxidizing bacteria. However, acidophilic iron and sulfur oxidizers were present within intrusive waste rock characterized by bulk circumneutral pH drainage. The extensive development of microbially colonized porous Fe(III (oxyhydroxide and Fe(III (oxyhydroxysulfate precipitates was observed at sulfide-mineral surfaces during examination by field emission-scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (FE-SEM-EDS. Linear combination fitting of bulk extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS spectra for these precipitates indicated they were composed of schwertmannite [Fe8O8(OH6–4.5(SO41–1.75], lepidocrocite [γ-FeO(OH] and K-jarosite [KFe3(OH6(SO42]. The presence of schwertmannite and K-jarosite is indicative of the development of localized acidic microenvironments at sulfide-mineral surfaces. Extensive bacterial colonization of this porous layer and pitting of underlying sulfide-mineral surfaces suggests that acidic microenvironments can play an important role in sulfide-mineral oxidation under bulk circumneutral pH conditions. These findings have important implications for water quality management in NRD settings.

  11. Highly selective fluorescence turn-on sensor for hydrogen sulfide and imaging in living cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A displacement method of detecting hydrogen sulfide in aqueous media based on complex L–Cu ensemble is developed. Once combined with Cu2+, complex L–Cu displayed high specificity for sulfide anion. Among the various anions, only sulfide anion induce the revival of fluoresecence of compound L, which is quenched by Cu2+, resulting in turn-on type sensing sulfide anion. Complex L–Cu exhibits a highly sensitive fluorescent response toward S2− by releasing compound L to give a remarkable change with 20-fold fluorescence intensity enhancement under 2 equivalent of S2− added in Tris–HCl/ DMF (20 mM, 6/4, v/v), and also exhibits a dynamic response range for S2− from 5×10−7 to 5×10−6 M, with a detection limit of 0.18 μM. In addition, the turn-on fluorescent change upon the addition of S2− is also applied in cell imaging. -- Highlights: ► We have developed a displacement method with sensing hydrogen sulfide based on a complex L–Cu. ► It exhibits high selectivity, high sensitivity with a 20-fold fluorescence enhancement. ► It exhibited a low detection limit of 0.18 μM. ► It is applied in vitro imaging of S2− in the living cells

  12. Modeling the Effect of Dissolved Hydrogen Sulfide on Mg2+-water Complex on Dolomite {104} Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, Zhizhang; Brown, Philip E; Szlufarska, Izabela; Xu, Huifang

    2016-01-01

    The key kinetic barrier to dolomite formation is related to the surface Mg2+-H2O complex, which hinders binding of surface Mg2+ ions to the CO3 2- ions in solution. It has been proposed that this reaction can be catalyzed by dissolved hydrogen sulfide. To characterize the role of dissolved hydrogen sulfide in the dehydration of surface Mg 2+ ions, ab initio simulations based on density functional theory (DFT) were carried out to study the thermodynamics of competitive adsorption of hydrogen sulfide and water on dolomite (104) surfaces from solution. We find that water is thermodynamically more stable on the surface with the difference in adsorption energy of -13.6 kJ/mol (in vacuum) and -12.8 kJ/mol (in aqueous solution). However, aqueous hydrogen sulfide adsorbed on the surface increases the Mg2+-H2O distances on surrounding surface sites. Two possible mechanisms were proposed for the catalytic effects of adsorbed hydrogen sulfide on the anhydrous Ca-Mg-carbonate crystallization at low temperature.

  13. Synthesis, Deposition, and Microstructure Development of Thin Films Formed by Sulfidation and Selenization of Copper Zinc Tin Sulfide Nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernomordik, Boris David

    Significant reduction in greenhouse gas emission and pollution associated with the global power demand can be accomplished by supplying tens-of-terawatts of power with solar cell technologies. No one solar cell material currently on the market is poised to meet this challenge due to issues such as manufacturing cost, material shortage, or material toxicity. For this reason, there is increasing interest in efficient light-absorbing materials that are comprised of abundant and non-toxic elements for thin film solar cell. Among these materials are copper zinc tin sulfide (Cu2ZnSnS4, or CZTS), copper zinc tin selenide (Cu2ZnSnSe4, or CZTSe), and copper zinc tin sulfoselenide alloys [Cu2ZnSn(SxSe1-x )4, or CZTSSe]. Laboratory power conversion efficiencies of CZTSSe-based solar cells have risen to almost 13% in less than three decades of research. Meeting the terawatt challenge will also require low cost fabrication. CZTSSe thin films from annealed colloidal nanocrystal coatings is an example of solution-based methods that can reduce manufacturing costs through advantages such as high throughput, high material utilization, and low capital expenses. The film microstructure and grain size affects the solar cell performance. To realize low cost commercial production and high efficiencies of CZTSSe-based solar cells, it is necessary to understand the fundamental factors that affect crystal growth and microstructure evolution during CZTSSe annealing. Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) nanocrystals were synthesized via thermolysis of single-source cation and sulfur precursors copper, zinc and tin diethyldithiocarbamates. The average nanocrystal size could be tuned between 2 nm and 40 nm, by varying the synthesis temperature between 150 °C and 340 °C. The synthesis is rapid and is completed in less than 10 minutes. Characterization by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy confirm that the nanocrystals are nominally

  14. Formation of Zn- and Fe-sulfides near hydrothermal vents at the Eastern Lau Spreading Center: implications for sulfide bioavailability to chemoautotrophs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yucel Mustafa

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The speciation of dissolved sulfide in the water immediately surrounding deep-ocean hydrothermal vents is critical to chemoautotrophic organisms that are the primary producers of these ecosystems. The objective of this research was to identify the role of Zn and Fe for controlling the speciation of sulfide in the hydrothermal vent fields at the Eastern Lau Spreading Center (ELSC in the southern Pacific Ocean. Compared to other well-studied hydrothermal systems in the Pacific, the ELSC is notable for unique ridge characteristics and gradients over short distances along the north-south ridge axis. Results In June 2005, diffuse-flow ( 250°C vent fluids were collected from four field sites along the ELSC ridge axis. Total and filtered Zn and Fe concentrations were quantified in the vent fluid samples using voltammetric and spectrometric analyses. The results indicated north-to-south variability in vent fluid composition. In the high temperature vent fluids, the ratio of total Fe to total Zn varied from 39 at Kilo Moana, the most northern site, to less than 7 at the other three sites. The concentrations of total Zn, Fe, and acid-volatile sulfide indicated that oversaturation and precipitation of sphalerite (ZnS(s and pyrite (FeS2(s were possible during cooling of the vent fluids as they mixed with the surrounding seawater. In contrast, most samples were undersaturated with respect to mackinawite (FeS(s. The reactivity of Zn(II in the filtered samples was tested by adding Cu(II to the samples to induce metal-exchange reactions. In a portion of the samples, the concentration of labile Zn2+ increased after the addition of Cu(II, indicating the presence of strongly-bound Zn(II species such as ZnS clusters and nanoparticles. Conclusion Results of this study suggest that Zn is important to sulfide speciation at ELSC vent habitats, particularly at the southern sites where Zn concentrations increase relative to Fe. As the hydrothermal

  15. Self-assembly of Copper Sulfide Nanoparticles to Solid, Hollow Spherical and Wire-Shaped Structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NAN Zhao-Dong; WEI Cheng-Zhen; WANG Xue-Ying; HAO Hai-Yan

    2008-01-01

    Copper sulfides, such as Cu7S4, Cu1.8S, Cu1.81S and Cu2S, in the wire-like, and solid and hollow ball-like shapes congregated from nano-spherical particles and nanoslices, have been prepared by a solvothermal method using a mixture of water and ethylene glycol as solvent. CuSO4 and thiourea were used as the starting materials without as- sistance of any surfactant or template. The results show that the water content in the solvent affects the morphology of the samples, and the reaction time and temperature affect the crystal structure and morphology. On the basis of the obtained results, the formation processes of different morphologies of copper sulfides can be interpreted by the following mechanism: nanoparticles of copper sulfides initially formed, then the wire-like structures were gradually created, and finally translated to solid and hollow spherical structures under the different experimental conditions.

  16. Molybdenum evidence for expansive sulfidic water masses in ~ 750 Ma oceans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Tais Wittchen; Canfield, Donald Eugene; Rosing, Minik Thorleif;

    2011-01-01

    and isotope composition of ancient seawater. Further, we investigate the ~ 750 Ma Walcott Member of the Chuar Group, Grand Canyon, which accumulated in a rift basin with open connection to the ocean. Iron speciation data from upper Walcott shales indicate that local bottom waters were anoxic and...... equivalents (0.99 ± 0.13‰ versus ~ 2.35‰ today). These signatures are consistent with model predictions where sulfidic waters cover ~ 1–4% of the global continental shelf area, corresponding to a ~ 400–800 fold increase compared to the modern ocean. Therefore, our results suggest globally expansive sulfidic...... water masses in mid-Neoproterozoic oceans, bridging a nearly 700 million-year gap in previous Mo data. We propose that anoxic and sulfidic (euxinic) conditions governed Mo cycling in the oceans even as ferruginous subsurface waters re-appeared 800–750 Ma, and we interpret this anoxic ocean state to...

  17. Improving the sensitivity of the ZnO gas sensor to dimethyl sulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchorska-Woźniak, P.; Nawrot, W.; Rac, O.; Fiedot, M.; Teterycz, H.

    2016-01-01

    This study was focused on how to improve the gas sensing properties of resistive gas sensors based on zinc oxide to dimethyl sulfide (DMS). The aim of this research was to investigate possible ways of improvement detection of dimethyl sulfide, such as volume doping with synthesized gold nanoparticles or applying sepiolite passive filter. The addition of noble metal into the gas sensing layer is a widely known method of increasing gas sensor response. Sepiolite is a clay mineral with highly porous structure consisting of nanotubes few micrometers long and water absorption abilities. In this work thick-film resistive gas sensors based on zinc oxide were made (pure ZnO, modified by gold nanoparticles, with the addition of filter) and tested for low concentration (2 ppm) of dimethyl sulfide. The sensitivities to DMS of developed sensors were compared. Attention was paid to the analysis of the impact of high humidity (90% RH) on the sensor time response.

  18. Sodium sulfide leaching of low-grade jamesonite concentrate in production of sodium pyroantimoniate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Tian-zu; JIANG Ming-xi; LAI Qiong-lin; CHEN Jin-zhong

    2005-01-01

    Sodium sulfide leaching of a low-grade jamesonite concentrate in the production of sodium pyroantimoniate through the air oxidation process and the influencing factors on the leaching rate of antimony were investigated.In order to decrease the consumption of sodium sulfide and increase the concentration of antimony in the leaching solution, two-stage leaching of jamesonite concentrate and combination leaching of high-grade stibnite concentrate and jamesonite concentrate were used. The experimental results showthat the consumptions of sodium sulfide for the two-stage leaching process and the combination leaching process are decreased by 20% and 60% compared to those of one-stage leaching process respectively. The final concentrations of antimony in the leaching solutions of both processes are above 100 g/L.

  19. Denitrifying sulfide removal process on high-salinity wastewaters in the presence of Halomonas sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chunshuang; Zhao, Dongfeng; Ma, Wenjuan; Guo, Yadong; Wang, Aijie; Wang, Qilin; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2016-02-01

    Biological conversion of sulfide, acetate, and nitrate to, respectively, elemental sulfur (S(0)), carbon dioxide, and nitrogen-containing gas (such as N2) at NaCl concentration of 35-70 g/L was achieved in an expanded granular sludge bed (EGSB) reactor. A C/N ratio of 1:1 was noted to achieve high sulfide removal and S(0) conversion rate at high salinity. The extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) quantities were increased with NaCl concentration, being 11.4-mg/g volatile-suspended solids at 70 mg/L NaCl. The denitrifying sulfide removal (DSR) consortium incorporated Thauera sp. and Halomonas sp. as the heterotrophs and Azoarcus sp. being the autotrophs at high salinity condition. Halomonas sp. correlates with the enhanced DSR performance at high salinity. PMID:26454867

  20. Characterization of AISI 1005 corrosion films grown under cyclic voltammetry of low sulfide ion concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •The corrosion of AISI 1005 in sulfide solutions was investigated. •The mechanism of film growth on carbon steel in sulfide solutions was studied. •Film growth was characterized using SEM, EDX, XRD and Mössbauer spectroscopy. •Growth of AISI 1005 corrosion films under cyclic voltammetry. -- Abstract: The mechanism of AISI 1005 corrosion in sulfide ion solutions has been investigated using cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Mössbauer spectroscopy (MS). The proposed mechanism occurs with the initial formation of oxygenated ferrous species followed by adsorption of HS− species, precipitation of iron monosulfides and their partial conversion to bisulfide iron. This mechanism was demonstrated by XRD results that revealed Fe-O and Fe-S phases and by MS results that detected pyrite as the major proportion (94%) of the iron species in the corrosion product

  1. The Effect of Oxygen Potential on the Sulfide Capacity for Slags Containing Multivalent Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allertz, Carl; Selleby, Malin; Sichen, Du

    2016-06-01

    The dependence of sulfide capacity on the oxygen partial pressure for slags containing multivalent species was investigated experimentally using a slag containing vanadium oxide. Copper-slag equilibration experiments were carried out at 1873 K (1600 °C) in the approximate oxygen partial pressure range 10-15.4 to 10-9 atm. The sulfide capacity was found to be strongly dependent on the oxygen potential in this slag system, increasing with the oxygen partial pressure. The sulfide capacity changed by more than two orders of magnitude over the oxygen partial pressure range. The effect of changing oxygen partial pressure was found to be much greater than the effect of changing slag composition at a fixed oxygen partial pressure.

  2. Nanocomposites Based on Metal and Metal Sulfide Clusters Embedded in Polystyrene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianfranco Carotenuto

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Transition-metal alkane-thiolates (i.e., organic salts with formula Me(SRx, where R is a linear aliphatic hydrocarbon group, –CnH2n+1 undergo a thermolysis reaction at moderately low temperatures (close to 200 °C, which produces metal atoms or metal sulfide species and an organic by-product, disulfide (RSSR or thioether (RSR molecules, respectively. Alkane-thiolates are non-polar chemical compounds that dissolve in most techno-polymers and the resulting solid solutions can be annealed to generate polymer-embedded metal or metal sulfide clusters. Here, the preparation of silver and gold clusters embedded into amorphous polystyrene by thermolysis of a dodecyl-thiolate precursor is described in detail. However, this chemical approach is quite universal and a large variety of polymer-embedded metals or metal sulfides could be similarly prepared.

  3. Transition-Metal-Free Highly Efficient Aerobic Oxidation of Sulfides to Sulfoxides under Mild Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Zhang

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A highly efficient transition-metal-free catalytic system Br2/NaNO2/H2O has been developed for a robust and economic acid-free aerobic oxidation of sulfides. It is noteworthy that the sulfide function reacts under mild conditions without over-oxidation to sulfone. The role of NaNO2as an efficient NO equivalent for the activation of molecular oxygen was identified. Under the optimal conditions, a broad range of sulfide substrates were converted into their corresponding sulfoxides in high yields by molecular oxygen. The present catalytic system utilizes cheap and readily available agents as the catalysts, exhibits high selectivity for sulfoxide products and releases only innocuous water as the by-products.

  4. Direct chlorination process for geothermal power plant off-gas - hydrogen sulfide abatement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sims, A.V.

    1983-06-01

    The Direct Chlorination Process removes hydrogen sulfide from geothermal off-gases by reacting hydrogen sulfide with chlorine in the gas phase. Hydrogen chloride and elemental sulfur are formed by this reaction. The Direct Chlorination Process has been successfully demonstrated by an on-site operation of a pilot plant at the 3 M We HPG-A geothermal power plant in the Puna District on the island of Hawaii. Over 99.5 percent hydrogen sulfide removal was achieved in a single reaction state. Chlorine gas did not escape the pilot plant, even when 90 percent excess chlorine gas was used. A preliminary economic evaluation of the Direct Chlorination Process indicates that it is very competitive with the Stretford Process. Compared to the Stretford Process, the Direct Chlorination Process requires about one-third the initial capital investment and about one-fourth the net daily expenditure.

  5. Analytical modeling of localized surface plasmon resonance in heterostructure copper sulfide nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) in semiconductor nanocrystals is a relatively new field of investigation that promises greater tunability of plasmonic properties compared to metal nanoparticles. A novel process by which the LSPR in semiconductor nanocrystals can be altered is through heterostructure formation arising from solution-based cation exchange. Herein, we describe the development of an analytical model of LSPR in heterostructure copper sulfide-zinc sulfide nanocrystals synthesized via a cation exchange reaction between copper sulfide (Cu1.81S) nanocrystals and Zn ions. The cation exchange reaction produces dual-interface, heterostructure nanocrystals in which the geometry of the copper sulfide phase can be tuned from a sphere to a thin disk separating symmetrically-grown sulfide (ZnS) grains. Drude model electronic conduction and Mie-Gans theory are applied to describe how the LSPR wavelength changes during cation exchange, taking into account the morphology evolution and changes to the local permittivity. The results of the modeling indicate that the presence of the ZnS grains has a significant effect on the out-of-plane LSPR mode. By comparing the results of the model to previous studies on solid-solid phase transformations of copper sulfide in these nanocrystals during cation exchange, we show that the carrier concentration is independent of the copper vacancy concentration dictated by its atomic phase. The evolution of the effective carrier concentration calculated from the model suggests that the out-of-plane resonance mode is dominant. The classical model was compared to a simplified quantum mechanical model which suggested that quantum mechanical effects become significant when the characteristic size is less than ∼8 nm. Overall, we find that the analytical models are not accurate for these heterostructured semiconductor nanocrystals, indicating the need for new model development for this emerging field

  6. Coregulated genes link sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase and arsenic metabolism in Synechocystis sp. strain PCC6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Csaba I; Vass, Imre; Rákhely, Gábor; Vass, István Zoltán; Tóth, András; Duzs, Agnes; Peca, Loredana; Kruk, Jerzy; Kós, Péter B

    2014-10-01

    Although the biogeochemistry of the two environmentally hazardous compounds arsenic and sulfide has been extensively investigated, the biological interference of these two toxic but potentially energy-rich compounds has only been hypothesized and indirectly proven. Here we provide direct evidence for the first time that in the photosynthetic model organism Synechocystis sp. strain PCC6803 the two metabolic pathways are linked by coregulated genes that are involved in arsenic transport, sulfide oxidation, and probably in sulfide-based alternative photosynthesis. Although Synechocystis sp. strain PCC6803 is an obligate photoautotrophic cyanobacterium that grows via oxygenic photosynthesis, we discovered that specific genes are activated in the presence of sulfide or arsenite to exploit the energy potentials of these chemicals. These genes form an operon that we termed suoRSCT, located on a transposable element of type IS4 on the plasmid pSYSM of the cyanobacterium. suoS (sll5036) encodes a light-dependent, type I sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase. The suoR (sll5035) gene downstream of suoS encodes a regulatory protein that belongs to the ArsR-type repressors that are normally involved in arsenic resistance. We found that this repressor has dual specificity, resulting in 200-fold induction of the operon upon either arsenite or sulfide exposure. The suoT gene encodes a transmembrane protein similar to chromate transporters but in fact functioning as an arsenite importer at permissive concentrations. We propose that the proteins encoded by the suoRSCT operon might have played an important role under anaerobic, reducing conditions on primordial Earth and that the operon was acquired by the cyanobacterium via horizontal gene transfer. PMID:25022856

  7. 30 CFR 250.245 - What hydrogen sulfide (H2S) information must accompany the DPP or DOCD?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... analysis must be consistent with the EPA's risk management plan methodologies outlined in 40 CFR part 68. ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What hydrogen sulfide (H2S) information must... Documents (docd) § 250.245 What hydrogen sulfide (H2S) information must accompany the DPP or DOCD?...

  8. Estradiol of various saturation and its influence on hydrogen sulfide formation in the myocardium of female rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melnik A.V.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide is signalling molecule that regulates vascular tone and myocardial contractility. Role of estradiol in hydrogen sulfide production in cardiovascular system of rats remains unclear and this becames research objective. Effect of estradiol on hydrogen sulfide level, cystathionine-γ -lyase activity and its kinetic parameters - Michaelis constant (Km and maximum rate (Vmax in rats’ heart was estimated. Experiments were conducted on 45 white nonlinear female rats. Deficit of sex hormones level in females was modulated by castration - ovariectomy and hormone replacement therapy with estradiol. It is shown that the production of hydrogen sulfide in the myocardium is determined by the level of estradiol: castration of females causes a significant decrease in myocardial hydrogen sulfide content, cystathionine-γ-lyase activity, maximum rate of hydrogen sulfide formation from cysteine in participation of cystathionine-γ-lyase, as well as increase in Michaelis constant of this enzyme in comparison with the controls. Hormone replacement therapy with estradiol brings nearer hydrogen sulfide level, cystathionine-γ-lyase activity and kinetic parameters of cysteine desulfuration reaction in the rats’ myocardium to the levels of the control group. Thus, estradiol is involved in regulation of hydrogen sulfide production in cardiovascular system of rats, namely it increases cystathionine-γ-lyase activity and its affinity to cysteine.

  9. Synthesis of zinc sulfide by chemical vapor deposition using an organometallic precursor: Di-tertiary-butyl-disulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasekar, Parag, E-mail: psvasekar@yahoo.com [Center for Autonomous Solar Power, State University of New York at Binghamton, Binghamton, New York 13902 (United States); Dhakal, Tara; Ganta, Lakshmikanth; Vanhart, Daniel [Center for Autonomous Solar Power, State University of New York at Binghamton, Binghamton, New York 13902 (United States); Desu, Seshu [State University of New York at Binghamton, Binghamton, New York 13902 (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Zinc sulfide has gained popularity in the last few years as a cadmium-free heterojunction partner for thin film solar cells and is seen as a good replacement for cadmium sulfide due to better blue photon response and non-toxicity. In this work, zinc sulfide films are prepared using an organic sulfur source. We report a simple and repeatable process for development of zinc sulfide using a cost-effective and less hazardous organic sulfur source. The development of zinc sulfide has been studied on zinc oxide-coated glass where the zinc oxide is converted into zinc sulfide. Zinc oxide grown by atomic layer deposition as well as commercially available zinc oxide-coated glass was used. The zinc sulfide synthesis has been studied and the films are characterized using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and a UV-VIS spectrophotometer. XRD, XPS and optical characterization confirm the zinc sulfide phase formation. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Synthesis of ZnS using a less-hazardous precursor, di-tertiary-butyl-disulfide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZnS process optimized for two types of ZnO films. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Preliminary results for a solar cell show an efficiency of 1.09%.

  10. Effect of pre-oxidation on high temperature sulfidation behavior of FeCr and FeCrAl alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pillis Marina Fuser

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available High temperature corrosion of structural alloys in sulfur bearing environments is many orders of magnitude higher than in oxidizing environments. Efforts to increase sulfidation resistance of these alloys include addition of alloying elements. Aluminum additions to iron-chromium alloys bring about increase in sulfidation resistance. This paper reports the effect of pre-oxidation on the sulfidation behavior of Fe-20Cr and Fe-20Cr-5Al alloys in H2-2% H2S environment at 800 °C. The surfaces of sulfidized specimens were also examined. Pre-oxidation of the two alloys results in an incubation period during subsequent sulfidation. After this incubation period, the Fe-20Cr alloy showed sulfidation behavior similar to that when the alloy was not pre-oxidized. The incubation period during sulfidation of the Fe-20Cr-5Al alloy was significantly longer, over 45 h, compared to 2 h for the Al free alloy. Based on the microscopic and gravimetric data a mechanism for sulfidation of these alloys with pre-oxidation has been proposed.

  11. Anaerobic methane oxidation and a deep H2S sink generate isotopically heavy sulfides in Black Sea sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, BB; Bottcher, ME; Luschen, H.;

    2004-01-01

    deposits, most of the methane-derived H2S is drawn downward to a sulfidization front where it reacts with Fe(III) and with Fe 21 diffusing up from below. The H2S-Fe2+ transition is marked by a black band of amorphous iron sulfide above which distinct horizons of greigite and pyrite formation occur. The...

  12. Synthesis of zinc sulfide by chemical vapor deposition using an organometallic precursor: Di-tertiary-butyl-disulfide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinc sulfide has gained popularity in the last few years as a cadmium-free heterojunction partner for thin film solar cells and is seen as a good replacement for cadmium sulfide due to better blue photon response and non-toxicity. In this work, zinc sulfide films are prepared using an organic sulfur source. We report a simple and repeatable process for development of zinc sulfide using a cost-effective and less hazardous organic sulfur source. The development of zinc sulfide has been studied on zinc oxide-coated glass where the zinc oxide is converted into zinc sulfide. Zinc oxide grown by atomic layer deposition as well as commercially available zinc oxide-coated glass was used. The zinc sulfide synthesis has been studied and the films are characterized using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and a UV–VIS spectrophotometer. XRD, XPS and optical characterization confirm the zinc sulfide phase formation. - Highlights: ► Synthesis of ZnS using a less-hazardous precursor, di-tertiary-butyl-disulfide. ► ZnS process optimized for two types of ZnO films. ► Preliminary results for a solar cell show an efficiency of 1.09%.

  13. Tracking the transformation and transport of arsenic sulfide pigments in paints : synchrotron-based X-ray micro-analyses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keune, Katrien; Mass, Jennifer; Meirer, Florian; Pottasch, Carol; van Loon, Annelies; Hull, Alyssa; Church, Jonathan; Pouyet, Emeline; Cotte, Marine; Mehta, Apurva

    2015-01-01

    Realgar and orpiment, arsenic sulfide pigments used in historic paints, degrade under the influence of light, resulting in transparent, whitish, friable and/or crumbling paints. So far, para-realgar and arsenic trioxide have been identified as the main oxidation products of arsenic sulfide pigments.

  14. Tracking the transformation and transport of arsenic sulfide pigments in paints: synchrotron-based X-ray micro-analyses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Keune; J. Mass; F. Meirer; C. Pottasch; A. van Loon; A. Hull; J. Church; E. Pouyet; M. Cotte; A. Mehta

    2015-01-01

    Realgar and orpiment, arsenic sulfide pigments used in historic paints, degrade under the influence of light, resulting in transparent, whitish, friable and/or crumbling paints. So far, para-realgar and arsenic trioxide have been identified as the main oxidation products of arsenic sulfide pigments.

  15. A TICT-based fluorescent probe for rapid and specific detection of hydrogen sulfide and its bio-imaging applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Mingguang; Deng, Beibei; Kong, Xiuqi; Zhou, Kai; Liu, Keyin; Xu, Gaoping; Lin, Weiying

    2016-05-11

    By blocking the intramolecular twisted internal charge transfer (TICT) process, we designed and sythesized the first TICT-based fluorescent probe for hydrogen sulfide. The new probe exhibits high selectivity, good membrane-permeability and is suitable for visualization of exogenous and endogenous hydrogen sulfide in living cells. PMID:27090853

  16. 75 FR 19319 - Hydrogen Sulfide; Community Right-to-Know Toxic Chemical Release Reporting; Extension of Comment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-14

    ... requirements for hydrogen sulfide (75 FR 8889). B. Why and for How Long Is EPA Extending the Comment Period... Number (CAS No.) 7783-06-4) (75 FR 8889). The purpose of today's action is to inform interested parties... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 372 RIN 2025-AA27 Hydrogen Sulfide; Community Right-to-Know Toxic Chemical...

  17. Materials and mechanisms of high temperature lithium sulfide batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaun, T. D.; Hash, M. C.; Henriksen, G. L.; Jansen, A. N.; Vissers, D. R.

    1994-05-01

    New materials have encouraged development of bipolar Li-Al/FeS2 batteries for electric vehicle (EV) applications. Current technology employs a two-phase Li-alloy negative electrode low-melting, LiCl-rich LiCl-LiBr-KBr molten salt electrolyte, and either an FeS or an upper-plateau (UP) FeS2 positive electrode. These components are assembled in a sealed bipolar battery configuration. Use of the two-phase Li-alloy (alpha + beta Li-Al and Li5Al5Fe2) negative electrode provides in situ overcharge tolerance that renders the bipolar design viable. Employing LiCl-rich LiCl-LiBr-KBr electrolyte in 'electrolyte-starved' cells achieves low-burdened cells that possess low area-specific impedance, comparable to that of flooded cells using LiCl-LiBr-KBr eutectic electrolyte. The combination of dense UP FeS2 electrodes and low-melting electrolyte produces a stable and reversible couple, achieving over 1000 cycle life in flooded cells, with high power capabilities. In addition, a family of stable sulfide ceramic/sealant materials was developed that produce high-strength bonds between a variety of metals and ceramics, which renders lithium/iron suffide bipolar stacks practical. Bipolar Li-Al/FeS2 cells and four-cell stacks using these seals are being built and tested in the 13 cm diameter size for EV applications. To date, Li-Al/FeS2 cells have attained 400 W/kg power at 80% DOD and 180 Wh/kg energy at the 30 W/kg rate. When cell performance characteristics are used to model full-scale EV and hybrid vehicle (HV) batteries, they are projected to meet or exceed the performance requirements for a large variety of EV and HV applications. Efficient production and application of Li-alloys and Li-salt electrolyte are critical to approaching battery cost objectives.

  18. Removal of arsenopyrite from complex sulfide minerals by froth flotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jin-young; Kim, Yang-soo; Kim, Dong-gyu; Han, Oh-hyung; Park, Chul-hyun

    2016-04-01

    Arsenic (As) is one of hazardous materials and a penalty element in metal concentrates and so metal concentrates containing arsenic of over 0.5% has been currently restricted in import and export trade. It also corrodes a smelting furnace as well as shortens its life cycle. In korea, Janggun mine that produces galena (PbS) /sphalerite (ZnS) concentrate containing arsenic of 1.78% charges a penalty of US 2/ton to LS-Nikko smelter. Hence in this work, flotation tests for removal of arsenopyrite (FeAsS) from sulfide mineral concentrates were carried out using lab scale flotation cell, which maintain grade and recovery of PbS and ZnS in comparison to flotation plant. Particularly, this study was focused on investigating the combination of several chemical reagents (depressant, collector, activator and etc.) that affect flotation performance. In the straight differential flotation for PbS, a PbS grade of 75.80% and a recovery of 90.12% could be obtained with FeAsS removal of 84.1% (0.2% As) under the conditions of 20% feed solids concentration, pH 8.5, 50g/t frother (AF65), 40g/t collector (AP242) and 800g/t As depressant (NaHSO3) and 600g/t Zn depressant (ZnSO4). In the ZnS flotation, the maximum separation achievable for ZnS using froth flotation has been shown to be a grade of 72.57% and a recovery of 95.43%. At this time, FeAsS removal of 87.8% (0.16% As) could be successfully accomplished under pH 11, and 800g/t Zn activator (CuSO4), 75g/t frother (AF65), 60g/t collector (AP211) and 600g/t As depressant (NaHSO3). Acknowledgments This work was supported by the Energy and Resources Engineering Program Grant funded by the Ministry of Trade, Industry and Energy, Korea

  19. Biological treatment of sulfidic spent caustics under haloalkaline conditions using soda lake bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Graaff, de, R.J.

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis, the development of a newbiotechnological process for the treatment of undiluted sulfidic spent caustics (SSC’s) using soda lake bacteria is described. SSC’s are waste solutions that are formed in the oil and gas industry due to the caustic (NaOH) scrubbing of hydrocarbon streams for the removal of sulfur compounds.Without treatment, SSC’s may impose serious environmental problems because of their alkalinity (pH>12), salinity (Na+ 5-12 wt%) and high sulfide...

  20. Simulating pH and hydrogen sulfide in a distributed collection system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vollertsen, Jes; Le Guennec, Anne; Nielsen, Asbjørn Haaning;

    2013-01-01

    ventilation. The presented concept includes the major buffer systems, namely carbonate, ammonia, amine groups, hydrogen sulfides, phosphates, acetic acid, and propionic acid. It furthermore includes water-gas mass transfer between phases and ventilation of sewer gas into the urban atmosphere. The model was...... calibrated to the conveyance system of Tangier, Morocco, and was able to simulate the observed variation in pH as well as the observed levels of hydrogen sulfide in the network. For the sewer system of Tangier, the most important buffer system was the carbonate system, followed by ammonia and amino groups...

  1. Pyrolytically grown indium sulfide sensitized zinc oxide nanowires for solar water splitting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires, sensitized with spray pyrolyzed indium sulfide, were obtained by chemical bath deposition. The XRD analysis indicated dominant evolution of hexagonal ZnO phase. Significant gain in photoelectrochemical current using ZnO nanowires is largely accountable to enhancement of the visible light absorption and the formation of heterostructure. The maximum photoconversion efficiency of 2.77% was calculated for the indium sulfide sensitized ZnO nanowire photoelectrodes. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  2. Synthesis and Antiproliferative Activities of Benzimidazole-Based Sulfide and Sulfoxide Derivatives

    OpenAIRE

    Gaballah, Samir T.; El-Nezhawy, Ahmed O. H.; Amer, Hassan; Ali, Mamdouh Moawad; Mahmoud, Abeer Essam El-Din; Hofinger-Horvath, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The design, synthesis, and in vitro antiproliferative activity of a novel series of sulfide (4a–i) and sulfoxide (5a–h) derivatives of benzimidazole, in which different aromatic and heteroaromatic acetamides are linked to benzimidazole via sulfide (4a–i) and sulfoxide (5a–h) linker, are reported and the structure-activity relationship is discussed. The new derivatives were prepared by coupling 2-(mercaptomethyl)benzimidazole with 2-bromo-N-(substituted) acetamides in dry acetone in the presen...

  3. Environmentally Benign Oxidation of Some Organic Sulfides with 34% Hydrogen Peroxide Catalyzed by Simple Heteropolyoxometalates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAYEBEE,Reza; ALIZADEH,Moharnmad Hassan

    2007-01-01

    An environmentally benign oxygenation protocol was developed for selective oxidation of some types of aromatic and aliphatic sulfides in good to excellent yields utilizing 34% hydrogen peroxide catalyzed by simple heteropolyoxometalates in normal drinking water at room temperature. The catalysts could be recovered and reused for at least seven reaction cycles under the described reaction conditions without considerable loss of reactivity. This procedure introduced a new insight into the use of simple heteropolyanions as recoverable catalysts for the oxidation of organic sulfides by an environmentally acceptable protocol.

  4. Inhibition of the Sulfide Induced Pitting of Copper Nickel Alloy using Benzotriazole

    OpenAIRE

    Nageh K. Allam, Hussein S. Hegazy and Elsayed A. Ashour

    2007-01-01

    Benzotriazole (BTAH) affects the localized corrosion of Cu10Ni alloy in 3.4% NaCl salt water containing 2 ppm sulfide ions. BTAH concentrations > 5 x 10-4 M imparted corrosion inhibiting efficiency that increased with its concentration. On the other hand, a concentration of 10-4 M BTAH acted as a promoter of pitting corrosion of the alloy in the above medium. The results of optical and scanning electron microscopy could be rationalized on the basis of competitive adsorption of BTAH and sulfid...

  5. Modeling the Effect of Dissolved Hydrogen Sulfide on Mg2+-water Complex on Dolomite {104} Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Zhizhang; Liu, Yun; Brown, Philip E; Szlufarska, Izabela; Xu, Huifang

    2016-01-01

    The key kinetic barrier to dolomite formation is related to the surface Mg2+-H2O complex, which hinders binding of surface Mg2+ ions to the CO3 2- ions in solution. It has been proposed that this reaction can be catalyzed by dissolved hydrogen sulfide. To characterize the role of dissolved hydrogen sulfide in the dehydration of surface Mg 2+ ions, ab initio simulations based on density functional theory (DFT) were carried out to study the thermodynamics of competitive adsorption of hydrogen s...

  6. Some properties of copper and selected heavy metal sulfides. A limited literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the SKB proposal for a Swedish nuclear waste repository, copper canisters are used for encapsulating the spent fuel. The chemical and physical behavior of Copper in the repository environment will therefore be of critical importance for the repository integrity. The present work concerns a literature review of Copper and selected heavy metal sulfides as they are expected to play an important role in the repository environment. The interest is focused on their properties as described by crystal structure, electrical properties, atom mobility, solubility in water, mechanisms of sulfidation and selected thermodynamical data. 56 refs, 14 figs, 5 tabs

  7. Determination of Sulfides in FCC Gasoline by Using the Potentiometric Titration of Lead Tetraacetate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗立文; 夏道宏

    2004-01-01

    Compared with conventional method of violet spectrum, determination of the content of sulfides in fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) gasoline by using the potentiometric titration of lead tetraacetate has some advantages such as clear potentiometric abrupt change at the stoichiometric point, stable potentiometric value, exact and credible results, and simple operation. The content of sulfides in FCC gasoline of Shenghua refinery is 0.136% by this method. The standard deviation about this method is less than 0.01% and the relative standard deviation is less than 2.42%.

  8. Sulfidization of lacustrine glacial clay upon Holocene marine transgression (Arkona Basin, Baltic Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmkvist, Lars; Kamyshny, Alexey; Brüchert, Volker; Ferdelman, Timothy G.; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    2014-10-01

    Towards the end of the last deglaciation more than 13,500 years ago the southern Baltic Sea was a freshwater lake, the Baltic Ice Lake, for several thousand years during which iron-rich, organic-poor clay was deposited. The modern brackish-marine stage started about 8600 years ago with the deposition of organic-rich mud, which is today characterized by high rates of sulfate reduction and high concentrations of free sulfide. We studied the iron-sulfur diagenesis in gravity cores from the Arkona Basin, SW Baltic Sea, to track the progressing sulfidization front in the buried Ice Lake sediment. The geochemical zonation was unusual as the sulfate concentration dropped steeply by two thirds below which it increased again due to a deep sulfate reservoir. The reservoir had been established during the early Holocene marine period as sulfate and other seawater ions diffused down into the lake sediment for several thousand years. Sulfur isotope analyses confirmed its origin as seawater sulfate, while its oxygen isotope composition indicated a microbially catalyzed equilibration with ambient interstitial water, decoupled from net sulfate reduction. Today, hydrogen sulfide diffuses from the marine mud down into the lake sediment where a black band with high magnetic susceptibility and high iron monosulfide, greigite and elemental sulfur content shows progressing sulfidization of the large pool of solid-phase reactive iron. Dissolved iron from the deep Ice Lake sediment diffuses up to the sulfide front and provides a small supplement to the solid Fe(III) pool as a sulfide sink. Pyrite formation at the sulfidization front may involve surface-bound zero-valent sulfur while, above the front, polysulfides are in equilibrium with the system hydrogen sulfide - polysulfide - rhombic sulfur and may not be important for further pyrite formation. The Holocene iron-sulfur diagenesis observed in the Arkona Basin represents an important transitional state for post-glacial transgressions

  9. Transformation behavior and mechanical properties of an equiatomic Ti-Ni alloy with surface sulfide layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, T.H.; Park, S.M.; Cho, G.B. [Information Technology Research Center for Energy Storage and Conversion, Gyeongsang National Univ., Jinju, Gyeongnam (Korea)

    2005-07-01

    Surface sulfide layers were formed on the surface of Ti-50.0(at%)Ni alloys by isothermal annealing at 873 K for 3.6 ks under the sulfur pressure of 80 kPa, and then transformation behavior and mechanical properties were investigated by means of differential scanning calorimetery(DSC), thermal cycling tests under constant load, and tensile tests. The DSC peaks were broadened and martensitic transformation start temperature(Ms) increased from 281 K to 289 K by sulfurization. An equiatomic Ti-Ni alloy with surface sulfide layers showed good shape memory characteristics and partial superelasticity. (orig.)

  10. Zinc-rich clays in supergene non-sulfide zinc deposits

    OpenAIRE

    Choulet, Flavien; Buatier, M.; Barbanson, Luc; Guégan, Régis; Ennaciri, A.

    2015-01-01

    The nature and the origin of zinc clays are poorly understood. With the example of the Bou Arhous Zn-Pb ore deposit in the Moroccan High Atlas, this study presents new data for the mineralogical and chemical characterization of barren and zinc clays associated with non-sulfide zinc ores. In the field, white to ocher granular clays are associated with willemite (Zn2SiO4), while red clays fill karst-related cavities cutting across the non-sulfide ore bodies. Red clays (kaolinite, chlorite, illi...

  11. Hydrolysis of Carbonyl Sulfide in Binary Mixture of Diethylene Glycol Diethyl Ether and Water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李新学; 刘迎新; 魏雄辉

    2005-01-01

    The solubility and hydrolysis of carbonyl sulfide in binary mixture of diethylene glycol diethyl ether and water are studied as a function of composition. The use of an aqueous solution of diethylene glycol diethyl ether enhances the solubility and hydrolysis rate of carbonyl sulfide compared with that in pure water. The composition of the mixture with maximum hydrolysis rate varies with temperature. The thermophysical properties including density, viscosity, and surface tension as a function of composition at 20℃ under atmospheric pressure as well as liquid-liquid equilibrium (LLE) data over the temperature range from 28℃ to 90℃ are also measured for the binary mixture.

  12. Activity of Transition Metal Sulfides Supported on Al2O3,

    OpenAIRE

    Kaluža, L. (Luděk)

    2015-01-01

    Sulfided conventional transition metals Co, Ni, Mo, and W and noble metals Rh, Pd, Ir, Pt, and Re deposited over conventional support c-Al2O3 (SBET = 262 m2g-1), and unconventional supports TiO2 (anatase, SBET = 140 m2- g-1) and ZrO2 (baddeleyite, SBET = 108 m2g-1) were studied in the parallel hydrodesulfurization of 1-benzothiophene (HDS) and hydrogenation of 1-methylcyclohex- 1-ene (o-HYD) at 360 Cand 1.6 MPa. Mo, W, Co, and Ni sulfided catalysts exhibited relatively low activity in bot...

  13. Ionic liquid-modified metal sulfides/graphene oxide nanocomposites for photoelectric conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Yù; Pei, Qi; Feng, Ting; Mao, Hui; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Shuyao; Liu, Daliang; Wang, Hongyu; Song, Xi-Ming

    2015-08-01

    Ionic liquid-modified metal sulfides/graphene oxide nanocomposites are prepared via a facile electrostatic adsorption. Ionic liquid (IL) is firstly used as surface modifier and structure-directing agent of metal sulfide (MS) crystallization process, obtaining ionic liquid modified-MS (IL-MS) nanoparticles with positive charges on surface. IL-MS/GO is obtained by electrostatic adherence between positively charged IL-MS and negatively charged graphene oxide (GO). The as-prepared sample shows enhanced photocurrent and highly efficient photocatalytic activity under visible light irradiation, indicating IL-MS/GO nanocomposites greatly promoted the separation of photogenerated electron-hole pairs.

  14. Sulfur cycling and methanogenesis primarily drive microbial colonization of the highly sulfidic Urania deep hypersaline basin

    OpenAIRE

    Borin, S.; Brusetti, L; F. Mapelli; D'Auria, G.; Brusa, T; Marzorati, M.; Rizzi, A.; Yakimov, M; Marty, D; de Lange, G.J.; Van der Wielen, P; Bolhuis, H.; McGenity, T.J.; Polymenakou, P. N.; Malinverno, E.

    2009-01-01

    Urania basin in the deep Mediterranean Sea houses a lake that is > 100 m deep, devoid of oxygen, 6 times more saline than seawater, and has very high levels of methane and particularly sulfide (up to 16 mM), making it among the most sulfidic water bodies on Earth. Along the depth profile there are 2 chemoclines, a steep one with the overlying oxic seawater, and another between anoxic brines of different density, where gradients of salinity, electron donors and acceptors occur. To identify and...

  15. Pyrolytically grown indium sulfide sensitized zinc oxide nanowires for solar water splitting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komurcu, Pelin; Can, Emre Kaan; Aydin, Erkan; Semiz, Levent [Micro and Nanotechnology Graduate Program, TOBB University of Economics and Technology, 06560 Ankara (Turkey); Gurol, Alp Eren; Alkan, Fatma Merve [Department of Materials Science and Nanotechnology Engineering, TOBB University of Economics and Technology, 06560 Ankara (Turkey); Sankir, Mehmet; Sankir, Nurdan Demirci [Micro and Nanotechnology Graduate Program, TOBB University of Economics and Technology, 06560 Ankara (Turkey); Department of Materials Science and Nanotechnology Engineering, TOBB University of Economics and Technology, 06560 Ankara (Turkey)

    2015-11-15

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires, sensitized with spray pyrolyzed indium sulfide, were obtained by chemical bath deposition. The XRD analysis indicated dominant evolution of hexagonal ZnO phase. Significant gain in photoelectrochemical current using ZnO nanowires is largely accountable to enhancement of the visible light absorption and the formation of heterostructure. The maximum photoconversion efficiency of 2.77% was calculated for the indium sulfide sensitized ZnO nanowire photoelectrodes. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. Experimental Study of Gas Explosions in Hydrogen Sulfide-Natural Gas-Air Mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Gaathaug, André Vagner; Bjerketvedt, Dag; Vågsæther, Knut; Nilsen, Sandra Hennie

    2014-01-01

    An experimental study of turbulent combustion of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and natural gas was performed to provide reference data for verification of CFD codes and direct comparison. Hydrogen sulfide is present in most crude oil sources, and the explosion behaviour of pure H2S and mixtures with natural gas is important to address. The explosion behaviour was studied in a four-meter-long square pipe.The first two meters of the pipe had obstacles while the rest was smooth. Pressure transducers...

  17. Experimental Study of Gas Explosions in Hydrogen Sulfide-Natural Gas-Air Mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    André Vagner Gaathaug; Dag Bjerketvedt; Knut Vaagsaether; Sandra Hennie Nilsen

    2014-01-01

    An experimental study of turbulent combustion of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and natural gas was performed to provide reference data for verification of CFD codes and direct comparison. Hydrogen sulfide is present in most crude oil sources, and the explosion behaviour of pure H2S and mixtures with natural gas is important to address. The explosion behaviour was studied in a four-meter-long square pipe. The first two meters of the pipe had obstacles while the rest was smooth. Pressure transducers w...

  18. On the inhibition of hydrogen sulfide corrosion of steel with Schiff Bases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The number of the Schiff bases(above 20 compounds) is synthesized. Their impact on the kinetics of electrochemical reactions and steel corrosion behaviour in the two-phase systems electrolyte - hydrocarbon containing H2S, is studied. It is shown, that azomethines, synthesized by the Schiff reaction from aldehydes and aliphatic amines, may serve as water-soluble inhibitors in these systems. The efficiency of steel corrosion protection against hydrogen sulfide corrosion through azomethines depends on their chemical structure and pH media. The effective water-soluble inhibitor of the hydrogen sulfide corrosion - IFKhAN-62 - is developed

  19. The reaction of Grignard reagents with Bunte salts: a thiol-free synthesis of sulfides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Jonathan T; Camara, Kaddy; Han, Zhengxu S; Xu, Yibo; Lee, Heewon; Busacca, Carl A; Senanayake, Chris H

    2014-02-21

    S-Alkyl, S-aryl, and S-vinyl thiosulfate sodium salts (Bunte salts) react with Grignard reagents to give sulfides in good yields. The S-alkyl Bunte salts are prepared from odorless sodium thiosulfate by an SN2 reaction with alkyl halides. A Cu-catalyzed coupling of sodium thiosulfate with aryl and vinyl halides was developed to access S-aryl and S-vinyl Bunte salts. The reaction is amenable to a broad structural array of Bunte salts and Grignard reagents. Importantly, this route to sulfides avoids the use of malodorous thiol starting materials or byproducts. PMID:24512478

  20. The loss of the hemoglobin H2S-binding function in annelids from sulfide-free habitats reveals molecular adaptation driven by Darwinian positive selection

    OpenAIRE

    Bailly, Xavier; Leroy, Riwanon; Carney, Susan; Collin, Olivier; Zal, Franck; Toulmond, André; Jollivet, Didier

    2003-01-01

    The hemoglobin of the deep-sea hydrothermal vent vestimentiferan Riftia pachyptila (annelid) is able to bind toxic hydrogen sulfide (H2S) to free cysteine residues and to transport it to fuel endosymbiotic sulfide-oxidising bacteria. The cysteine residues are conserved key amino acids in annelid globins living in sulfide-rich environments, but are absent in annelid globins from sulfide-free environments. Synonymous and nonsynonymous substitution analysis from two different sets of orthologous...

  1. Sclerite formation in the hydrothermal-vent “scaly-foot” gastropod — possible control of iron sulfide biomineralization by the animal

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Yohey; Kopp, Robert E.; Kogure, Toshihiro; Suga, Akinobu; Takai, Ken; Tsuchida, Shinji; Ozaki, Noriaki; Endo, Kazuyoshi; Hashimoto, Jun; Kato, Yasuhiro; Mizota, Chitoshi; Hirata, Takafumi; CHIBA, Hitoshi; Nealson, Kenneth H; Horikoshi, Koki

    2006-01-01

    A gastropod from a deep-sea hydrothermal field at the Rodriguez triple junction, Indian Ocean, has scale-shaped structures, called sclerites, mineralized with iron sulfides on its foot. No other organisms are known to produce a skeleton consisting of iron sulfides. To investigate whether iron sulfide mineralization is mediated by the gastropod for the function of the sclerites, we performed a detailed physical and chemical characterization. Nanostructural characterization of the iron sulfide ...

  2. Carbon steel protection in G.S. (Girlder sulfide) plants. Iron sulfide scales formation on surfaces covered by fabrication produced films. Pt. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work describes the assays aimed to passivate the steel carbon of the process pipings. This steel is marked by the ASTM A 333 G6 and is chemically similar to those of isotopic exchange towers which corrode in contact with in-water hydrogen sulfide solutions forming iron sulfide protective layers. The differences between both materials lie in the surface characteristics to be passivated. The steel of towers has an internal side covered by paint which shall be removed prior to passivation. The steel's internal side shall be covered by a film formed during the fabrication process and constituted by calcinated wastes and iron oxides (magnetite, hematite and wustite). This film interferes in the formation process of passivating layers of pyrrhotite and pyrite. The possibility to passivate the pipes in their actual state was evaluated since it would result highly laborious and expensive to eliminate the film. (Author)

  3. Reduction of Net Sulfide Production Rate by Nitrate in Wastewater Bioreactors. Kinetics and Changes in the Microbial Community

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villahermosa, Desiree; Corzo, Alfonso; Gonzalez, J M;

    2013-01-01

    Nitrate addition stimulated sulfide oxidation by increasing the activity of nitrate-reducing sulfide-oxidizing bacteria (NR-SOB), decreasing the concentration of dissolved H2S in the water phase and, consequently, its release to the atmosphere of a pilot-scale anaerobic bioreactor. The effect of...... four different concentrations of nitrate (0.12, 0.24, 0.50, and 1.00 mM) was investigated for a period of 3 days in relation to sulfide concentration in two bioreactors set up at Guadalete wastewater treatment plant (Jerez de la Frontera, Spain). Physicochemical variables were measured in water and air...... initial net sulfide production in about 3 h. Addition of nitrate increased the activity of NR-SOB and decreased the activity of sulfate-reducing bacteria. Results confirmed the role of NR-SOB on hydrogen sulfide consumption coupled with nitrate reduction and sulfate recycling, revealing Sulfurimonas...

  4. Biotechnological reduction of sulfide in an industrial primary wastewater treatment system: A sustainable and successful case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajamani, S. [Central Leather Research Institute, Madras (India)

    1996-12-31

    The leather industry is an important export-oriented industry in India, with more than 3,000 tanneries located in different clusters. Sodium sulfide, a toxic chemical, is used in large quantities to remove hair and excess flesh from hides and skins. Most of the sodium sulfide used in the process is discharged as waste in the effluent, which causes serious environmental problems. Reduction of sulfide in the effluent is generally achieved by means of chemicals in the pretreatment system, which involves aerobic mixing using large amounts of chemicals and high energy, and generating large volumes of sludge. A simple biotechnological system that uses the residual biosludge from the secondary settling tank was developed, and the commercial-scale application established that more than 90% of the sulfide could be reduced in the primary treatment system. In addition to the reduction of sulfide, foul smells, BOD and COD are reduced to a considerable level. 3 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of two hydrogen sulfide-producing enzymes from Fusobacterium nucleatum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two homologous hydrogen sulfide-producing enzymes, Fn1220 and Cdl, from F. nucleatum (which actively produces hydrogen sulfide) were overproduced, purified and crystallized. The crystals obtained were characterized by X-ray diffraction. Hydrogen sulfide produced by oral bacteria is responsible for oral malodour. Two homologous hydrogen sulfide-producing enzymes, Fn1220 and Cdl, from Fusobacterium nucleatum (which actively produces hydrogen sulfide) were overproduced, purified and crystallized. X-ray diffraction data were collected from the crystals using a synchrotron-radiation source. The Fn1220 crystal belonged to tetragonal space group P41212 or P43212 (unit-cell parameters a = b = 116.8, c = 99.2 Å) and the Cdl crystal belonged to monoclinic space group P21 (unit-cell parameters a = 84.9, b = 70.9, c = 87.6 Å, β = 90.3°)

  6. Chalcophile element (Ni, Cu, PGE, and Au) variations in the Tamarack magmatic sulfide deposit in the Midcontinent Rift System: implications for dynamic ore-forming processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taranovic, Valentina; Ripley, Edward M.; Li, Chusi; Rossell, Dean

    2016-03-01

    The Tamarack magmatic sulfide deposit is hosted by the Tamarack Intrusive Complex (1105.6 ± 1.2 Ma) in the Midcontinent Rift System. The most important sulfide mineralization in the Complex occurs in the northern part, which consists of two separate intrusive units: an early funnel-shaped layered peridotite body containing relatively fine-grained olivine (referred to as the FGO Intrusion) at the top, and a late gabbro-troctolite-peridotite dike-like body containing relatively coarse-grained olivine (referred to as the CGO Intrusion) at the bottom. Disseminated, net-textured, and massive sulfides occur in the base of the FGO Intrusion as well as in the upper part of the CGO Intrusion. The widest part of the CGO Intrusion also hosts a large semi-massive (net-textured) sulfide ore body locally surrounded by disseminated sulfide mineralization. Small massive sulfide veins occur in the footwall of the FGO Intrusion and in the wall rocks of the CGO dike. The sulfide mineralization is predominantly composed of pyrrhotite, pentlandite, and chalcopyrite, plus minor magnetite. Pyrrhotite containing the highest Ni and Co contents occurs in the FGO disseminated sulfides and in the CGO semi-massive sulfide ores, respectively. The most important platinum-group minerals associated with the base metal sulfides are sperrylite (PtAs2), sudburyite (PdSb), and michenerite (PdBiTe). Nickel shows a strong positive correlation with S in all types of sulfide mineralization, and Cu shows a strong positive correlation with S in the disseminated sulfide mineralization. At a given S content, the concentrations of Pt, Pd, and Au in the CGO disseminated sulfides are significantly higher than those in the FGO disseminated sulfides. The semi-massive sulfide ores are characterized by significantly higher IPGE (Ir, Os, Ru, and Rh) concentrations than most of the massive sulfide ores. With few exceptions, all of the various textural types of sulfide mineralization collectively show a good positive

  7. Effect of inoculum and sulfide type on simultaneous hydrogen sulfide removal from biogas and nitrogen removal from swine slurry and microbial mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lan; Wei, Benping; Chen, Ziai; Deng, Liangwei; Song, Li; Wang, Shuang; Zheng, Dan; Liu, Yi; Pu, Xiaodong; Zhang, Yunhong

    2015-12-01

    Four reactors were initiated to study the effect of inoculum and sulfide type on the simultaneous hydrogen sulfide removal from biogas and nitrogen removal from swine slurry (Ssu-Nir) process. Anaerobic sludge, aerobic sludge, and water were used as inocula, and Na2S and biogas were used as a sulfide substrate, respectively. Additionally, 454 pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene was used to explore the bacterial diversity. The results showed that sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (Thiobacillus, 42.2-84.4 %) were dominant in Ssu-Nir process and led to the excellent performance. Aerobic sludge was more suitable for inoculation of the Ssu-Nir process because it is better for rapidly enriching dominant sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (Thiobacillus, 54.4 %), denitrifying sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (40.0 %) and denitrifiers (23.9 %). Lower S(2-) removal efficiency (72.6 %) and NO3 (-) removal efficiency (bacteria, Thiobacillus (84.8 %) and Thiobacillus sayanicus (39.6 %), which in turn led to low relative abundance of denitrifiers (1.6 %) and denitrifying sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (24.4 %), low NO3 (-) removal efficiency, and eventually poor performance. PMID:26286512

  8. Influence of Gas Components on the Formation of Carbonyl Sulfide over Water-Gas Shift Catalyst B303Q

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Water-gas shift reaction catalyst at lower temperature (200-400 ℃) may improve the conversion of carbon monoxide. But carbonyl sulfide was found to be present over the sulfided cobaltmolybdenum/alumina catalyst for water-gas shift reaction. The influences of temperature, space velocity,and gas components on the formation of carbonyl sulfide over sulfided cobalt-molybdenum/alumina catalyst B303Q at 200-400 ℃ were studied in a tubular fixed-bed quartz-glass reactor under simulated water-gas shift conditions. The experimental results showed that the yield of carbonyl sulfide over B303Q catalyst reached a maximum at 220 ℃ with the increase in temperature, sharply decreased with the increase in space velocity and the content of water vapor, increased with the increase in the content of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide, and its yield increased and then reached a stable value with the increase in the content of hydrogen and hydrogen sulfide. The formation mechanism of carbonyl sulfide over B303Q catalyst at 200-400 ℃ was discussed on the basis of how these factors influence the formation of COS. The yield of carbonyl sulfide over B303Q catalyst at 200-400 ℃ was the combined result of two reactions, that is, COS was first produced by the reaction of carbon monoxide with hydrogen sulfide,and then the as-produced COS was converted to hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide by hydrolysis. The mechanism of COS formation is assumed as follows: sulfur atoms in the Co9Ss-MoS2/Al2O3 crystal lattice were easily removed and formed carbonyl sulfide with CO, and then hydrogen sulfide in the water-gas shift gas reacted with the crystal lattice oxygen atoms in CoO-MoO3/Al2O3 to form Co9Ss-MoS2/Al2O3.This mechanism for the formation of COS over water-gas shift catalyst B303Q is in accordance with the Mars-Van Krevelen's redox mechanism over metal sulfide.

  9. Assessment of Hydrogen Sulfide Minimum Detection Limits of an Open Path Tunable Diode Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    During June 2007, U.S. EPA conducted a feasibility study to determine whether the EPA OTM 10 measurement approach, also known as radial plume mapping (RPM), was feasible. A Boreal open-path tunable diode laser (OP-TDL) to collect path-integrated hydrogen sulfide measurements alon...

  10. Ionic liquid-modified metal sulfides/graphene oxide nanocomposites for photoelectric conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Yù; Pei, Qi; Feng, Ting; Mao, Hui; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Shuyao; Liu, Daliang; Wang, Hongyu; Song, Xi-Ming, E-mail: songlab@lnu.edu.cn

    2015-08-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Metal sulfide (CdS, ZnS, Ag{sub 2}S)/GO nanocomposites were prepared by electrostatic adherence. • Ionic liquid was used to link the metal sulfide and GO in the electrostatic adherence process. • The as-prepared samples showed enhanced photocurrent and highly efficient photocatalytic activity under visible light irradiation. - Abstract: Ionic liquid-modified metal sulfides/graphene oxide nanocomposites are prepared via a facile electrostatic adsorption. Ionic liquid (IL) is firstly used as surface modifier and structure-directing agent of metal sulfide (MS) crystallization process, obtaining ionic liquid modified-MS (IL-MS) nanoparticles with positive charges on surface. IL-MS/GO is obtained by electrostatic adherence between positively charged IL-MS and negatively charged graphene oxide (GO). The as-prepared sample shows enhanced photocurrent and highly efficient photocatalytic activity under visible light irradiation, indicating IL-MS/GO nanocomposites greatly promoted the separation of photogenerated electron–hole pairs.

  11. Antifoaming materials studies in G.S. (Girlder sulfide) heavy water plants. Chemical stability. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As in Girlder sulfide (G.S.) heavy water plants the system is inherently foaming, it is necessary to use antifoaming materials to solve this problem. This work describes the assays and results of some surfactants that can be employed to this purpose, under the corresponding temperature and pressure conditions of the plant. (Author)

  12. Heterogeneous ion-exchange membranes based on sulfonated poly(1,4-phenylene sulfide)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schauer, Jan; Kůdela, Vlastimil; Richau, K.; Mohr, R.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 198, 1-3 (2006), s. 256-264. ISSN 0011-9164 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/05/0080 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : poly(1,4-phenylene sulfide) sulfonated * ion-exchange membrane Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 0.917, year: 2006

  13. Selective production of hydrogen peroxide and oxidation of hydrogen sulfide in an unbiased solar photoelectrochemical cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zong, Xu; Chen, Hongjun; Seger, Brian;

    2014-01-01

    A solar-to-chemical conversion process is demonstrated using a photoelectrochemical cell without external bias for selective oxidation of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) to produce hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and sulfur (S). The process integrates two redox couples anthraquinone/anthrahydroquinone and I−/I3......−, and conceptually illustrates the remediation of a waste product for producing valuable chemicals....

  14. Hydrogen sulfide and nonmethane hydrocarbon emissions from broiler houses in the Southeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and nonmethane hydrocarbon (NMHC) emissions from two mechanically ventilated commercial broiler houses located in the Southeastern United States were continuously monitored over 12 flocks during the one-year period of 2006-2007 as a joint effort between Iowa State University a...

  15. Bioconversion of high concentrations of hydrogen sulfide to elemental sulfur in airlift bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zytoon, Mohamed Abdel-Monaem; AlZahrani, Abdulraheem Ahmad; Noweir, Madbuli Hamed; El-Marakby, Fadia Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Several bioreactor systems are used for biological treatment of hydrogen sulfide. Among these, airlift bioreactors are promising for the bioconversion of hydrogen sulfide into elemental sulfur. The performance of airlift bioreactors is not adequately understood, particularly when directly fed with hydrogen sulfide gas. The objective of this paper is to investigate the performance of an airlift bioreactor fed with high concentrations of H2S with special emphasis on the effect of pH in combination with other factors such as H2S loading rate, oxygen availability, and sulfide accumulation. H2S inlet concentrations between 1,008 ppm and 31,215 ppm were applied and elimination capacities up to 113 g H2S m(-3) h(-1) were achieved in the airlift bioreactor under investigation at a pH range 6.5-8.5. Acidic pH values reduced the elimination capacity. Elemental sulfur recovery up to 95% was achieved under oxygen limited conditions (DO 500 mg/L at pH values 8.0-8.5, and near 100% removal efficiency was achieved. Overall, the resident microorganisms in the studied airlift bioreactor favored pH values in the alkaline range. The bioreactor performance in terms of elimination capacity and sulfur recovery was better at pH range 8-8.5. PMID:25147857

  16. Release of dissolved cadmium and sulfur nanoparticles from oxidizing sulfide minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadmium enrichment (relative to Fe and Zn) in paddy rice grain occurs during the pre-harvest drainage of flooded soil, which causes oxidative dissolution of sulfide minerals present in reduced soil. We investigated this process over a range of environmentally realistic Cdcontain...

  17. Ore lead isotopical composition of lower Proterozoic volcanogenic sulfide ores at Garpenberg, south central Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The isotopic composition of ore lead in galena from the volcanogenic sulfide ores at Garpenberg district is presented. Compared with the average growth curve of Stacey and Kramers, the ore lead at Garpenberg is slightly enriched in radiogenic lead. The influence of metamorphism on the ore lead composition of galena samples is negligible. The observed trend in the standard diagrams may be explained in terms of a mixing line, where the ore lead was derived from two different crustal sources originally enriched in radiogenic lead (e.g. volcanic and sedimentary rocks). Alternatively, it could represent sulfide ores of slightly different ages derived from a common rock source. The composition of the ore lead in the Garpenberg district displays the typical signature of the volcanogenic sulfide ores in Bergslagen, which at a regional scale is relatively homogeneous and is interpreted as derived form an isotopically well mixed orogen-upper crust reservoir. The results are consistent with a common origin for all the sulfide ore types present in the Garpenberg and Garpenberg Norra deposits. However, at a local scale, minor variations in the ore lead composition can be detected within a particular district or single deposit. These differences may be interpreted as due to the influence of the local lithology on the ore lead or differences in mineralization age. (L.E.)

  18. Ore lead isotopical composition of lower Proterozoic volcanogenic sulfide ores at Garpenberg, south central Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gebeyehu, M.; Vivallo, W. (Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Geology and Geochemistry)

    1991-01-01

    The isotopic composition of ore lead in galena from the volcanogenic sulfide ores at Garpenberg district is presented. Compared with the average growth curve of Stacey and Kramers, the ore lead at Garpenberg is slightly enriched in radiogenic lead. The influence of metamorphism on the ore lead composition of galena samples is negligible. The observed trend in the standard diagrams may be explained in terms of a mixing line, where the ore lead was derived from two different crustal sources originally enriched in radiogenic lead (e.g. volcanic and sedimentary rocks). Alternatively, it could represent sulfide ores of slightly different ages derived from a common rock source. The composition of the ore lead in the Garpenberg district displays the typical signature of the volcanogenic sulfide ores in Bergslagen, which at a regional scale is relatively homogeneous and is interpreted as derived form an isotopically well mixed orogen-upper crust reservoir. The results are consistent with a common origin for all the sulfide ore types present in the Garpenberg and Garpenberg Norra deposits. However, at a local scale, minor variations in the ore lead composition can be detected within a particular district or single deposit. These differences may be interpreted as due to the influence of the local lithology on the ore lead or differences in mineralization age. (L.E.).

  19. Biological treatment of sulfidic spent caustics under haloalkaline conditions using soda lake bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaff, de C.M.

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis, the development of a newbiotechnological process for the treatment of undiluted sulfidic spent caustics (SSC’s) using soda lake bacteria is described. SSC’s are waste solutions that are formed in the oil and gas industry due to the caustic (NaOH) scrubbing of hydrocarbon

  20. The elimination of selenium(IV) from aqueous solution by precipitation with sodium sulfide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, the removal/precipitation of selenium with sodium sulfide from initially weakly acidic sulfate solutions containing 300 mg/L of selenium(IV) at 23 oC was studied. The results showed that, below a pH of approximately 7.0, the precipitation reaction was complete at a sulfide to selenium ratio above 1.8 and less than 11 with less than 0.005 mg/L of soluble selenium remaining in solution. When the pH rose between 7.0 and 9.5 the precipitation of selenium was incomplete. Above pH 9.5 the solution turned dark red but no precipitation was apparent. The precipitation reaction started as soon as the sodium sulfide was added in the selenium-bearing solution and was completed in less than 10 min. The orange 'selenium sulfide' precipitates, characterized using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and chemical analysis, were crystalline in the form of aggregated dense particles with their sulfur/selenium molar ratio varying from 1.7 to 2.3. The precipitate was deduced to be a Se-S solid solution consisting of ring molecules of the following SenS8-n formula, where n = 2.5-3. Long term leachability tests (>2 month equilibration) under ambient conditions at pH 7 showed the produced precipitate to be essentially insoluble (<0.005 mg/L).