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Sample records for berkeley reactor

  1. The Berkeley TRIGA Mark III research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Berkeley Research Reactor went critical on August 10, 1966, and achieved licensed operating power of 1000 kW shortly thereafter. Since then, the reactor has operated, by and large, trouble free on a one-shift basis. The major use of the reactor is in service irradiations, and many scientific programs are accommodated, both on and off campus. The principal off-campus user is the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory at Berkeley. The reactor is also an important instructional tool in the Nuclear Engineering Department reactor experiments laboratory course, and as a source of radioisotopes for two other laboratory courses given by the Department. Finally, the reactor is used in several research programs conducted within the Department, involving studies with neutron beams and in reactor kinetics

  2. Political-social reactor problems at Berkeley

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For better than ten years there was little public notice of the TRIGA reactor at UC-Berkeley. Then: a) A non-student persuaded the Student and Senate to pass a resolution to request Campus Administration to stop operation of the reactor and remove it from campus. b) Presence of the reactor became a campaign-issue in a City Mayoral election. c) Two local residents reported adverse physical reactions before, during, and after a routine tour of the reactor facility. d) The Berkeley City Council began a study of problems associated with radioactive material within the city. e) Friends Of The Earth formally petitioned the NRC to terminate the reactor's license. Campus personnel have expended many man-hours and many pounds of paper in responding to these happenings. Some of the details are of interest, and may be of use to other reactor facilities. (author)

  3. Simulation of the Berkeley research reactor using DSNP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preliminary results have been obtained from a simulation of the TRIGA Mark III Berkeley Research Reactor (BRR) using DSNP. The BRR utilizes fuel that is a mixture of zirconium hydride and uranium hydride, with a hydride-to-metal ratio of 1.65 and a 235U enrichment of 28%. At Berkeley, version 3.4 of DSNP runs on an IBM 3081 Computer. The neutronic modules used to simulate the BRR were CNTRL1, NEUTR4, TPOWR4, CORTR4, and FDBEK4. The hydraulic loop consisted of modules LPLEN4, CORTR4, UPLEN4, PIPEUI, IHMXA1, and PIPEIL. As indicated from their names, several of the modules contained in library 1 were rewritten to incorporate a better model. The problem-description program was written to allow data entry from the console, and thus the FORTRAN program did not have to be recompiled for differing reactivity insertions. The decay heat module, GAMAR1, was not employed, since the ultimate objective of the simulation was to investigate operation of the reactor beyond its licensed limits

  4. Failure of triga fuel cladding at the Berkeley Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On September 16, 1985, following a long maintenance shutdown, unusually high concentrations of radioisotopes were detected in the reactor-room air on a Constant Air Monitor (CAM) after two and a half hours of full power operation. It was thought that the activity could be coming from some contamination in the pool water. Thus the water was cleaned and the water conductivity was reduced fourfold. However, a full-power operation again showed high count rates on the CAM. A third test was conducted with a germanium detector. Following two hours of operation, three fission-product gasses were identified in the reactor-room air; Kr85, Kr37 and Kr88. Once again no unusual activities could be detected on the CAM filter, in the pool water, or in the demineralizer resins. It was concluded that the gasses must be coming from a leaking fuel element. Three old, instrumented elements with defective thermocouples were selected to be the first ones isolated from the core. After removing the elements, the reactor was operated at full-power for two hours with no abnormal activities detected. New standard elements were loaded and the reactor was again operated at full-power to confirm that no leaking element remained in the core. Since then, the reactor has been operated, with no abnormal activities detected. (Nogami, K.)

  5. Bishop Berkeley

    OpenAIRE

    Bindon, Francis (Irish artist, 1690-1765)

    2008-01-01

    'Berkeley was born at his family home, Dysart Castle, near Thomastown, County Kilkenny, Ireland, the eldest son of William Berkeley, a cadet of the noble family of Berkeley. He was educated at Kilkenny College and attended Trinity College, Dublin, completing a Master's degree in 1707. He remained at Trinity College after completion of his degree as a tutor and Greek lecturer.' (en.wikipedia.org)

  6. A preliminary assessment of individual doses in the environs of Berkeley, Gloucestershire, following the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A preliminary assessment has been made of the individual doses to critical group members of the public in the environs of Berkeley arising from fallout resulting from the Chernobyl accident. The assessment was based on measurements of airborne radionuclide concentrations, ground deposition and nuclide concentrations in rainwater, tapwater, grass, milk and green vegetables. The committed effective dose-equivalent was found to be as follows:- Adult - 200 μSv, 1 year old child - 500 μSv, the 10 year old child receiving a dose intermediate between these two values. The estimate accounts only for the nuclides measured and the specific exposure routes considered namely ingestion of milk and vegetables, inhalation and external exposure. However, it is believed that the inclusion of a range of other nuclides of potential significance, which may have been present but not measured, and potential intakes from additional routes is unlikely to increase the above estimates by more than a factor of 2. (author)

  7. El idealismo de Berkeley

    OpenAIRE

    David Sobrevilla

    1995-01-01

    En esta conferencia se examina en qué consiste el idealismo de Berkeley. Para ello se sigue el mismo camino propuesto por G .J. Warnock: se indaga contra qué se opone Berkeley, el materialismo, y cómo lo entiende, y por qué está en contra del mismo. A continuación se reexamina el idealismo berkeleyano, y en la consideración final se juzgan sus virtudes y defectos: algunas de las críticas fundadas que se le han formulado y la visión de la ciencia que se desprende de los escritos de Berkeley. A...

  8. Environmental research at Berkeley

    CERN Multimedia

    1973-01-01

    The information concerning the Energy and Environment Programme at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is based on a talk given at CERN by A.M. Sessler, one of the initiators of the Programme. (Dr. Sessler has been appointed Director of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, in succession to Prof. E. M. McMillan, from 1 November.) Many of the topics mentioned merit an extended story in themselves but the purpose of this article is simply to give a sketch of what is happening.

  9. El idealismo de Berkeley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Sobrevilla

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available En esta conferencia se examina en qué consiste el idealismo de Berkeley. Para ello se sigue el mismo camino propuesto por G .J. Warnock: se indaga contra qué se opone Berkeley, el materialismo, y cómo lo entiende, y por qué está en contra del mismo. A continuación se reexamina el idealismo berkeleyano, y en la consideración final se juzgan sus virtudes y defectos: algunas de las críticas fundadas que se le han formulado y la visión de la ciencia que se desprende de los escritos de Berkeley. A este respecto se pone en conexión las ideas del autor con algunos planteamientos del último Husserl y con una interpretación de Popper sobre la sorprendente modernidad de algunas de las ideas berkeleyanas sobre la ciencia.

  10. Berkeley mini-collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Berkeley Mini-Collider, a heavy-ion collider being planned to provide uranium-uranium collisions at T/sub cm/ less than or equal to 4 GeV/nucleon, is described. The central physics to be studied at these energies and our early ideas for a collider detector are presented

  11. Berkeley Low Background Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Berkeley Low Background Facility (BLBF) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to a wide array of experiments and projects. The analysis of samples takes place within two unique facilities; locally within a carefully-constructed, low background laboratory on the surface at LBNL and at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K) or common cosmogenic/anthropogenic products; active screening via neutron activation analysis for U,Th, and K as well as a variety of stable isotopes; and neutron flux/beam characterization measurements through the use of monitors. A general overview of the facilities, services, and sensitivities will be presented. Recent activities and upgrades will also be described including an overview of the recently installed counting system at SURF (recently relocated from Oroville, CA in 2014), the installation of a second underground counting station at SURF in 2015, and future plans. The BLBF is open to any users for counting services or collaboration on a wide variety of experiments and projects

  12. Berkeley Low Background Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, K. J.; Norman, E. B. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California-Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, CA 94720 (United States); Smith, A. R.; Poon, A. W. P.; Chan, Y. D. [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, CA 94720 (United States); Lesko, K. T. [Physics Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, CA 94720 (United States)

    2015-08-17

    The Berkeley Low Background Facility (BLBF) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to a wide array of experiments and projects. The analysis of samples takes place within two unique facilities; locally within a carefully-constructed, low background laboratory on the surface at LBNL and at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K) or common cosmogenic/anthropogenic products; active screening via neutron activation analysis for U,Th, and K as well as a variety of stable isotopes; and neutron flux/beam characterization measurements through the use of monitors. A general overview of the facilities, services, and sensitivities will be presented. Recent activities and upgrades will also be described including an overview of the recently installed counting system at SURF (recently relocated from Oroville, CA in 2014), the installation of a second underground counting station at SURF in 2015, and future plans. The BLBF is open to any users for counting services or collaboration on a wide variety of experiments and projects.

  13. The decommissioning of Berkeley II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the decommissioning progress at the Magnox site at Berkeley in Gloucestershire.Throughout the work at Berkeley the emphasis has been on conducting decommissioning safely. This has been reflected in the progress of decommissioning starting with removal of the fuel from site and thus much greater than 99% of the radioactive inventory. The major radioactive hazard is the Intermediate Level Waste in the form of fuel element debris (graphite struts and extraneous magnox components removed to increase the packing density of fuel elements in flasks going to Sellafield), miscellaneous activated components, sludges and resins. Approximately 1500 m3 of such material exists and is stored in underground waste vaults on site. Work is underway to recover and encapsulate the waste in cement so rendering it 'passively safe'. All work on site is covered by a nuclear safety case which has a key objective of minimising the radiological exposures that could accrue to workers. Reflecting this an early decision has been taken to leave work on the Reactor Pressure Vessels themselves for several decades. Also important in protection of the workforce has been control of asbestos.Much material has been removed with redundant plant and equipment, but a programme of remediation in line with government legislation has been required to ensure personnel safety throughout the decommissioning period and into Care and Maintenance.In addition to health and safety matters the site approach to environmental issues has been consistent. Formally such standards as ISO 14001 have been adhered to and the appropriate certification maintained. At a working level the principles of reduce, reuse and recycle have been inculcated

  14. Berkeley automated supernova search

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Berkeley automated supernova search employs a computer controlled 36-inch telescope and charge coupled device (CCD) detector to image 2500 galaxies per night. A dedicated minicomputer compares each galaxy image with stored reference data to identify supernovae in real time. The threshold for detection is m/sub v/ = 18.8. We plan to monitor roughly 500 galaxies in Virgo and closer every night, and an additional 6000 galaxies out to 70 Mpc on a three night cycle. This should yield very early detection of several supernovae per year for detailed study, and reliable premaximum detection of roughly 100 supernovae per year for statistical studies. The search should be operational in mid-1982

  15. BERKELEY: ALS ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Everybody at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Center for Beam Physics is pleased with the rapid progress in commissioning LBL's Advanced Light Source (ALS) electron storage ring, the foundation for this third-generation synchrotron radiation facility. Designed for a maximum current of 400 mA, the ALS storage ring reached 407 mA just 24 days after storing the first beam on 16 March. ALS construction as a US Department of Energy (DOE) national user facility to provide high-brightness vacuum ultra-violet and soft x-ray radiation began in October 1987. One technical requirement marking project completion was to accumulate a 50-mA current in the storage ring. The ALS passed this milestone on 24 March, a week ahead of the official deadline. Once injected, the electron beam decays quasi-exponentially primarily because of interactions with residual gas molecules in the storage-ring vacuum chamber. Eventually, when the pressure in the vacuum chamber with beam decreases toward the expected operating level of 1 nano Torr, it will only be necessary to refill the storage ring at intervals of four to eight hours. At present the vacuum is improving rapidly as surfaces are irradiated (scrubbed) by the synchrotron radiation itself. At 100 mA, beam lifetime was about one hour (9 April)

  16. 2009 SCDNR Berkeley County Lidar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Sanborn Map Company completed the original classification of the multiple return LiDAR of Berkeley County, South Carolina in 2009. In 2013, Dewberry was tasked with...

  17. Molecular Foundry, Berkeley, California (Revised)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlisle, N.

    2008-03-01

    This case study provides information on the Molecular Foundry, which incorporates Labs21 principles in its design and construction. The design includes many of the strategies researched at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory for energy efficient cleanroom and data centers. The result is an energy efficient high-performing sustainable laboratory.

  18. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-07-01

    The purpose of this report is to present the preliminary findings made during the Environmental Survey, February 22--29, 1988, at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) in Berkeley, California. The University of California operates the LBL facility for DOE. The LBL Survey is part of the larger DOE-wide Environmental Survey announced by Secretary John S. Herrington on September 18, 1985. The purpose of this effort is to identify, via no fault'' baseline Surveys, existing environmental problems and areas of environmental risk at DOE facilities, and to rank them on a DOE wide basis. This ranking will enable DOE to more effectively establish priorities for addressing environmental problems and allocate the resources necessary to correct them. Because the Survey is no fault'' and is not an audit,'' it is not designed to identify specific isolated incidents of noncompliance or to analyze environmental management practices. Such incidents and/or management practices will, however, be used in the Survey as a means of identifying existing and potential environmental problems. The LBL Survey was conducted by a multidisciplinary team of technical specialists headed and managed by a Team Leader and Assistant Team Leader from DOE's Office of Environmental Audit. A complete list of the LBL Survey participants and their affiliations is provided in Appendix A. 80 refs., 27 figs., 37 tabs.

  19. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this report is to present the preliminary findings made during the Environmental Survey, February 22--29, 1988, at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) in Berkeley, California. The University of California operates the LBL facility for DOE. The LBL Survey is part of the larger DOE-wide Environmental Survey announced by Secretary John S. Herrington on September 18, 1985. The purpose of this effort is to identify, via ''no fault'' baseline Surveys, existing environmental problems and areas of environmental risk at DOE facilities, and to rank them on a DOE wide basis. This ranking will enable DOE to more effectively establish priorities for addressing environmental problems and allocate the resources necessary to correct them. Because the Survey is ''no fault'' and is not an ''audit,'' it is not designed to identify specific isolated incidents of noncompliance or to analyze environmental management practices. Such incidents and/or management practices will, however, be used in the Survey as a means of identifying existing and potential environmental problems. The LBL Survey was conducted by a multidisciplinary team of technical specialists headed and managed by a Team Leader and Assistant Team Leader from DOE's Office of Environmental Audit. A complete list of the LBL Survey participants and their affiliations is provided in Appendix A. 80 refs., 27 figs., 37 tabs

  20. Berkeley High-Resolution Ball

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Criteria for a high-resolution γ-ray system are discussed. Desirable properties are high resolution, good response function, and moderate solid angle so as to achieve not only double- but triple-coincidences with good statistics. The Berkeley High-Resolution Ball involved the first use of bismuth germanate (BGO) for anti-Compton shield for Ge detectors. The resulting compact shield permitted rather close packing of 21 detectors around a target. In addition, a small central BGO ball gives the total γ-ray energy and multiplicity, as well as the angular pattern of the γ rays. The 21-detector array is nearly complete, and the central ball has been designed, but not yet constructed. First results taken with 9 detector modules are shown for the nucleus 156Er. The complex decay scheme indicates a transition from collective rotation (prolate shape) to single- particle states (possibly oblate) near spin 30 h, and has other interesting features

  1. The anticentre old open clusters Berkeley 27, Berkeley 34, and Berkeley 36: new additions to the BOCCE project

    CERN Document Server

    Donati, P; Cignoni, M; Cocozza, G; Tosi, M

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present the investigation of the evolutionary status of three open clusters: Berkeley 27, Berkeley 34, and Berkeley 36, all located in the Galactic anti-centre direction. All of them were observed with SUSI2@NTT using the Bessel B, V, and I filters. The cluster parameters have been obtained using the synthetic colour-magnitude diagram (CMD) method i.e. the direct comparison of the observational CMDs with a library of synthetic CMDs generated with different evolutionary sets (Padova, FRANEC, and FST). This analysis shows that Berkeley 27 has an age between 1.5 and 1.7 Gyr, a reddening E(B-V) in the range 0.40 and 0.50, and a distance modulus (m-M)_0 between 13.1 and 13.3; Berkeley 34 is older with an age in the range 2.1 and 2.5 Gyr, E(B-V) between 0.57 and 0.64, and (m-M)_0 between 14.1 and 14.3; Berkeley 36, with an age between 7.0 and 7.5 Gyr, has a reddening E(B-V)~0.50 and a distance modulus (m-M)_0 between 13.1 and 13.2. For all the clusters our analysis suggests a sub-solar metallicity ...

  2. The Berkeley Digital Seismic Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanowicz, B.; Dreger, D.; Neuhauser, D.; Karavas, W.; Hellweg, M.; Uhrhammer, R.; Lombard, P.; Friday, J.; Lellinger, R.; Gardner, J.; McKenzie, M. R.; Bresloff, C.

    2007-05-01

    Since it began monitoring earthquakes in northern California 120 years ago, the Berkeley Seismological Laboratory (BSL) has been striving to produce the highest quality and most complete seismic data possible in the most modern way. This goal has influenced choices in instrumentation, installation and telemetry, as well as the investment in expertise and manpower. Since the transition to broadband (BB) instrumentation in the mid- 1980s and to a fully digitally telemetered network in the early 1990s, we have continued these efforts. Each of our 25 BB installations includes three component BB seismometers (STS-1s or STS-2) and digital accelerometers to capture the full range of ground motion from distant teleseisms to large, nearby earthquakes (almost 250 dB). The ground motion is recorded on-site by 24 bit dataloggers. Additional environmental parameters, such as temperature and pressure, are also monitored continuously. Many stations record also C-GPS data that is transmitted continuously to the BSL via shared real-time telemetry. The BDSN's first stations were installed in abandoned mines. In the last 15 years, we developed installations using buried shipping containers to reduce environmental noise and provide security and easy access to the equipment. Data are transmitted in real-time at several sampling rates to one or more processing centers, using frame relay, radio, microwave, and/or satellite. Each site has 7-30 days of onsite data storage to guard against data loss during telemetry outages. Each station is supplied with backup batteries to provide power for 3 days. The BDSN real-time data acquisition, earthquake analysis and archiving computers are housed in a building built to "emergency grade" seismic standards, with air conditioning and power backed up by a UPS and a large generator. Data latency and power are monitored by automated processes that alert staff via pager and email. Data completeness and timing quality are automatically assessed on a daily

  3. Berkeley Lab Laser Accelerator (BELLA) facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Berkeley Lab Laser Accelerator (BELLA) facility (formerly LOASIS) develops advanced accelerators and radiation sources. High gradient (1-100 GV/m) laser-plasma...

  4. Reorganizing the Biological Sciences at Berkeley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trow, Martin A.

    1983-01-01

    The University of California at Berkeley's substantial reorganization of the biological sciences due to internal and external needs is chronicled, focusing on the coordinated efforts of the institution and the strong, supportive leadership of the chancellor. The story is presented as an unusual case of institutional leadership within a highly…

  5. Berkeley Lab Computing Sciences: Accelerating Scientific Discovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scientists today rely on advances in computer science, mathematics, and computational science, as well as large-scale computing and networking facilities, to increase our understanding of ourselves, our planet, and our universe. Berkeley Lab's Computing Sciences organization researches, develops, and deploys new tools and technologies to meet these needs and to advance research in such areas as global climate change, combustion, fusion energy, nanotechnology, biology, and astrophysics

  6. Berkeley Lab Computing Sciences: Accelerating Scientific Discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Hules, John A

    2009-01-01

    Scientists today rely on advances in computer science, mathematics, and computational science, as well as large-scale computing and networking facilities, to increase our understanding of ourselves, our planet, and our universe. Berkeley Lab's Computing Sciences organization researches, develops, and deploys new tools and technologies to meet these needs and to advance research in such areas as global climate change, combustion, fusion energy, nanotechnology, biology, and astrophysics.

  7. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory 1993 Site Environmental Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-05-01

    This annual Site Environmental Report summarizes Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory`s (LBL`s) environmental activities in calendar year (CY) 1993. The purpose of this report is to characterize site environmental management performance, confirm compliance status with environmental standards and requirements, and highlight significant programs and efforts. Its format and content are consistent with the requirements of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program.

  8. C. Judson King of UC Berkeley

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prausnitz, John

    2005-06-01

    In the middle of the UC Berkeley campus, next to the Main Library, South Hall is the last surviving building from the original campus, founded about 135 years ago. A tiny tree-shaded appendix to this venerated classical building houses Berkeley's Center for Studies in Higher Education, directed by C. Judson King, former Provost and Senior Vice President--Academic Affairs of the ten-campus University of California and long-time Professor of Chemical Engineering at Berkeley. Jud came to Berkeley in 1963 as assistant professor of chemical engineering, following receipt of a doctor's degree from MIT and a subsequent short appointment as director of the MIT chemical engineering practice school station at what was then Esso (now Exxon) in New Jersey. His undergraduate degree is from Yale. Starting with his MIT doctoral dissertation on gas absorption, Jud has devoted much of his professional career to separation processes. His teaching and research activities have been primarily concerned with separation of mixtures with emphasis on liquid-liquid extraction and drying. As a consultant to Procter and Gamble, he contributed to the technology of making instant coffee. His life-long activities in hiking and camping stimulated Jud's interest in the manufacture of freeze-dried foods (e.g. turkey meat) to minimize the weight of his hiking back-pack. Jud is internationally known not only for his many research publications but even more, for his acclaimed textbook ''Separation Processses'' (McGraw-Hill, second edition 1980) that is used in standard chemical engineering courses in the US and abroad.

  9. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory 1994 site environmental report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 1994 Site Environmental Report summarizes environmental activities at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) for the calendar year (CY) 1994. The report strives to present environmental data in a manner that characterizes the performance and compliance status of the Laboratory's environmental management programs when measured against regulatory standards and DOE requirements. The report also discusses significant highlight and planning efforts of these programs. The format and content of the report are consistent with the requirements of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program

  10. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory 1994 site environmental report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    The 1994 Site Environmental Report summarizes environmental activities at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) for the calendar year (CY) 1994. The report strives to present environmental data in a manner that characterizes the performance and compliance status of the Laboratory`s environmental management programs when measured against regulatory standards and DOE requirements. The report also discusses significant highlight and planning efforts of these programs. The format and content of the report are consistent with the requirements of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program.

  11. Berkeley Lab's ALS generates femtosecond synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory team has succeeded in generating 300 fs pulses of synchrotron radiation at the ALS synchrotron radiation machine. Although this proof-of-principle experiment made use of visible light on a borrowed beamline, the laser 'time-slicing' technique at the heart of the demonstration will soon be applied in a new bend-magnet beamline that was designed specially for the production of femtosecond pulses of X-rays to study long-range and local order in condensed matter with ultrafast time resolution. An undulator beamline based on the same technique has been proposed that will dramatically increase the flux and brightness

  12. Three new bricks in the wall: Berkeley 23, Berkeley 31, and King 8

    CERN Document Server

    Cignoni, Michele; Bragaglia, Angela; Tosi, Monica

    2011-01-01

    A comprehensive census of Galactic open cluster properties places unique constraints on the Galactic disc structure and evolution. In this framework we investigate the evolutionary status of three poorly-studied open clusters, Berkeley 31, Berkeley 23 and King 8, all located in the Galactic anti-centre direction. To this aim, we make use of deep LBT observations, reaching more than 6 mag below the main sequence Turn- Off. To determine the cluster parameters, namely age, metallicity, distance, reddening and binary fraction, we compare the observational colour-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) with a library of synthetic CMDs generated with different evolutionary sets (Padova, FRANEC and FST) and metallicities. We find that Berkeley 31 is relatively old, with an age between 2.3 and 2.9 Gyr, and rather high above the Galactic plane, at about 700 pc. Berkeley 23 and King 8 are younger, with best fitting ages in the range 1.1-1.3 Gyr and 0.8-1.3 Gyr, respectively. The position above the Galactic plane is about 500- 600 pc...

  13. Berkeley Lab's ALS generates femtosecond synchrotron radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Robinson, A L

    2000-01-01

    A team at Berkeley's Advanced Light Source has shown how a laser time-slicing technique provides a path to experiments with ultrafast time resolution. A Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory team has succeeded in generating 300 fs pulses of synchrotron radiation at the ALS synchrotron radiation machine. The team's members come from the Materials Sciences Division (MSD), the Center for Beam Physics in the Accelerator and Fusion Research Division and the Advanced Light Source (ALS). Although this proof-of principle experiment made use of visible light on a borrowed beamline, the laser "time-slicing" technique at the heart of the demonstration will soon be applied in a new bend magnet beamline that was designed specially for the production of femtosecond pulses of X-rays to study long-range and local order in condensed matter with ultrafast time resolution. An undulator beamline based on the same technique has been proposed that will dramatically increase the flux and brightness. The use of X-rays to study the c...

  14. Careers in Data Science: A Berkeley Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koy, K.

    2015-12-01

    Last year, I took on an amazing opportunity to serve as the Executive Director of the new Berkeley Institute for Data Science (BIDS). After a 15-year career working with geospatial data to advance our understanding of the environment, I have been presented with a unique opportunity through BIDS to work with talented researchers from a wide variety of backgrounds. Founded in 2013, BIDS is a central hub of research and education at UC Berkeley designed to facilitate and nurture data-intensive science. We are building a community centered on a cohort of talented data science fellows and senior fellows who are representative of the world-class researchers from across our campus and are leading the data science revolution within their disciplines. Our initiatives are designed to bring together broad constituents of the data science community, including domain experts from the life, social, and physical sciences and methodological experts from computer science, statistics, and applied mathematics. While many of these individuals rarely cross professional paths, BIDS actively seeks new and creative ways to engage and foster collaboration across these different research fields. In this presentation, I will share my own story, along with some insights into how BIDS is supporting the careers of data scientists, including graduate students, postdocs, faculty, and research staff. I will also describe how these individuals we are helping support are working to address a number of data science-related challenges in scientific research.

  15. Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To provide a spray cooling structure wherein the steam phase in a bwr reactor vessel can sufficiently be cooled and the upper cap and flanges in the vessel can be cooled rapidly which kept from direct contaction with cold water. Constitution: An apertured shielding is provided in parallel spaced apart from the inner wall surface at the upper portion of a reactor vessel equipped with a spray nozzle, and the lower end of the shielding and the inner wall of the vessel are closed to each other so as to store the cooling water. Upon spray cooling, cooling water jetting out from the nozzle cools the vapor phase in the vessel and then hits against the shielding. Then the cooling water mostly falls as it is, while partially enters through the apertures to the back of the shielding plate, abuts against stoppers and falls down. The stoppers are formed in an inverted L shape so that the spray water may not in direct contaction with the inner wall of the vessel. (Horiuchi, T.)

  16. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Affirmative Action Program. Revised

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory`s Affirmative Action Program (AAP) serves as a working document that describes current policies, practices, and results in the area of affirmative action. It represents the Laboratory`s framework for an affirmative approach to increasing the representation of people of color and women in segments of our work force where they have been underrepresented and taking action to increase the employment of persons with disabilities and special disabled and Vietnam era veterans. The AAP describes the hierarchy of responsibility for Laboratory affirmative action, the mechanisms that exist for full Laboratory participation in the AAP, the policies and procedures governing recruitment at all levels, the Laboratory`s plan for monitoring, reporting, and evaluating affirmative action progress, and a description of special affirmative action programs and plans the Laboratory has used and will use in its efforts to increase the representation and retention of groups historically underrepresented in our work force.

  17. What Made Berkeley Great? The Sources of Berkeley's Sustained Academic Excellence. Research & Occasional Paper Series CSHE.3.11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breslauer, George W.

    2011-01-01

    University of California (UC) Berkeley's chief academic officer explores the historical sources of Berkeley' academic excellence. He identifies five key factors: (1) wealth from many sources; (2) supportive and skilled governors; (3) leadership from key UC presidents; (4) the pioneering ethos within the State of California; and (5) a process of…

  18. Life sciences: Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-07-01

    Life Sciences Research at LBL has both a long history and a new visibility. The physics technologies pioneered in the days of Ernest O. Lawrence found almost immediate application in the medical research conducted by Ernest's brother, John Lawrence. And the tradition of nuclear medicine continues today, largely uninterrupted for more than 50 years. Until recently, though, life sciences research has been a secondary force at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). Today, a true multi-program laboratory has emerged, in which the life sciences participate as a full partner. The LBL Human Genome Center is a contribution to the growing international effort to map the human genome. Its achievements represent LBL divisions, including Engineering, Materials and Chemical Sciences, and Information and Computing Sciences, along with Cell and Molecular Biology and Chemical Biodynamics. The Advanced Light Source Life Sciences Center will comprise not only beamlines and experimental end stations, but also supporting laboratories and office space for scientists from across the US. This effort reflects a confluence of scientific disciplines --- this time represented by individuals from the life sciences divisions and by engineers and physicists associated with the Advanced Light Source project. And finally, this report itself, the first summarizing the efforts of all four life sciences divisions, suggests a new spirit of cooperation. 30 figs.

  19. ORFEUS focal plane instrumentation: The Berkeley spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Mark; Bowyer, Stuart

    1988-01-01

    A spectrograph for the ORFEUS mission that incorporates four varied line-space, spherically figured diffraction gratings was designed. The ORFEUS, a 1-m normal incidence telescope is equipped with 2 focal plane spectrographs. The Berkeley spectrograph was developed with an optimizing raytracing computer code. Each grating accepts the light from 20 percent of the aperture of the telescope primary mirror and has a unique set of characteristics to cover a sub-bandpass within the 390 to 1200 A spectral range. Two photon-counting detectors incorporating a time delay readout system are used to record the spectra from all four gratings simultaneously. The nominal design achieves a spectral resolution (FWHM) in excess of 5500 at all wavelengths within the bandpass. The resolution is limited primarily by the detector spatial resolution. The 1 sigma astigmatism of this design varies between 13 and 150 micrometer on the same focal surface. An independent, direct imaging system tracks the drift of the target within the spectrometer aperture and allows measurement of the misalignment between the telescope optical axis and that of the external star tracker. The resolution and astigmatism achievable with this design are superior to those of a standard Rowland spectrograph designed with the same constraints.

  20. Life sciences: Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Life Sciences Research at LBL has both a long history and a new visibility. The physics technologies pioneered in the days of Ernest O. Lawrence found almost immediate application in the medical research conducted by Ernest's brother, John Lawrence. And the tradition of nuclear medicine continues today, largely uninterrupted for more than 50 years. Until recently, though, life sciences research has been a secondary force at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). Today, a true multi-program laboratory has emerged, in which the life sciences participate as a full partner. The LBL Human Genome Center is a contribution to the growing international effort to map the human genome. Its achievements represent LBL divisions, including Engineering, Materials and Chemical Sciences, and Information and Computing Sciences, along with Cell and Molecular Biology and Chemical Biodynamics. The Advanced Light Source Life Sciences Center will comprise not only beamlines and experimental end stations, but also supporting laboratories and office space for scientists from across the US. This effort reflects a confluence of scientific disciplines --- this time represented by individuals from the life sciences divisions and by engineers and physicists associated with the Advanced Light Source project. And finally, this report itself, the first summarizing the efforts of all four life sciences divisions, suggests a new spirit of cooperation. 30 figs

  1. Annual environmental monitoring report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schleimer, G.E. (ed.)

    1981-04-01

    The Environmental Monitoring Program of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is described. Data on air and water sampling and continuous radiation monitoring for 1980 are presented, and general trends are discussed.

  2. Annual environmental monitoring report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Environmental Monitoring Program of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is described. Data on air and water sampling and continuous radiation monitoring for 1980 are presented, and general trends are discussed

  3. Annual environmental monitoring report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schleimer, G.E.; Pauer, R.O. (eds.)

    1990-08-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is a multiprogram national laboratory managed by the University of California (UC) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). LBL's major role is to conduct basic and applied science research that is appropriate for an energy research laboratory. The Environmental Monitoring Program of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is described. Data for 1989 are presented, and general trends are discussed. 17 refs., 12 figs., 23 tabs.

  4. BERKELEY: Farewell to the Bevatron/Bevalac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Nearly a hundred current and former Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory employees gathered at the Bevatron accelerator on 21 February to watch Ed Lofgren turn off the beam for the last time. Lofgren, in charge of the venerable machine from its completion in 1954 until his retirement in 1979, pushed a button that someone long ago labeled ''atom smasher offer'', bringing to an end four decades of accomplishment in high energy and heavy ion physics. Owen Chamberlain, who shared the 1959 physics Nobel with Emilio Segré for the discovery of the antiproton at the Bevatron, was among those present at the closing ceremony. The shutdown came 39 years to the week after Bevatron beam first circulated, and a touching moment came just after Lofgren shut the machine down when the poignant strains of the ''Taps'' salute wafted out over the PA system. The Bevatron - or Bevalac, as it was called after being linked to the Super HILAC linear accelerator in the 1970s - made major contributions in four distinct areas of research: high energy physics, heavy ion physics, medical research and therapy, and space-related studies of radiation damage and heavy particles in space. As well as the discovery of the antiproton, the early years of the Bevatron saw classic studies of the kaon, leading to a deeper understanding of both strong and weak interaction physics. With Luis Alvarez' development of Donald Glaser's original bubble chamber idea into a prolific physics technique, the Bevatron was a major focus of the heady days of resonance hunting in the late 1950s and early 1960s. Most recently the Bevalac (Bevatron-SuperHILAC combination) pioneered relativistic heavy ion physics. The central focus of this research programme was the production and study of extreme conditions in nuclear matter. Highlights include the first definitive evidence of collective flow of nuclear matter at high temperatures and densities, studies of the nuclear

  5. Transactinide studies at U.C. Berkeley and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical studies of the heaviest elements have a long-standing history at Berkeley. The Heavy Element Nuclear and Radiochemistry Group at LBNL conducts heavy element nuclear physics as well as transactinide chemistry studies. The new capabilities of the Berkeley Gas-filled Separator (BGS) have added to a further vitalization of the heavy element studies at LBNL. This talk gives an overview of the recent collaborative first ever chemical studies of elements 107, bohrium, and 108, hassium. A recoil transfer chamber (RTC) connected to the back end of the BGS was constructed and tested. With the RTC, compound nucleus evaporation residues (EVR) pass through a thin Mylar window at the BGS focal plane and are stopped in a gas, for gas-jet transport to remote chemical experiments; the transport gas has a substantially higher pressure than the gas in the BGS. The efficiency of the transport was tested with various EVR's and different chemical detection systems, such as the SISAK centrifugal aqueous/organic phase extraction system and the novel Cryogenic Thermo-chromatographic Separator (CTS) were used. The CTS is based on the high volatility at near-ambient temperature of the heavy metal oxides such as Osmium tetroxide, OsO4, the homologue of hassium tetroxide. The CTS consists of an assembly of two rows of silicon PIN-diodes arranged opposite to each other, thus forming a narrow rectangular channel through which the reaction gas flows. A decreasing thermal gradient ranging from room temperature to about minus 120 deg C is applied to the PIN-diode assembly. This results in the deposition of the heavy metal oxide on one of the detectors, where it is identified by alpha counting. Separation factor of 107 - 109 for actinides from the combined BGS-CTS system can be achieved. The successful combination of the BGS with chemical separation systems is a true breakthrough. It opens a new possibility to study more effectively the chemical behaviour of the heaviest elements by

  6. UC-Berkeley-area citizens decry waste transfer from lab.

    CERN Multimedia

    Nakasato, L

    2002-01-01

    Residents are working to stop the transfer of potentially hazardous and radioactive material from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The lab has begun to dismantle the Bevatron which has been shut down since 1993 and says eight trucks per day will move material offsite (1 page).

  7. Annual environmental monitoring report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schleimer, G.E. (ed.)

    1987-04-01

    The Environmental Monitoring Program of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is described. Data for 1986 are presented and general trends are discussed. Topics include radiation monitoring, wastewater discharge monitoring, dose distribution estimates, and ground water monitoring. 9 refs., 8 figs., 20 tabs.

  8. Pass-Fail Grading at Berkeley: Facts and Opinions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suslow, Sidney

    The facts and opinions regarding pass/no pass grading at Berkeley discussed in this report are based on three sources of information. These sources include a survey of faculty conducted in the spring quarter 1970, a survey of undergraduate students in the winter quarter 1971, and the records routinely generated in the Registrar's Office for the…

  9. Annual environmental monitoring report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Environmental Monitoring Program of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is described. Data for 1986 are presented and general trends are discussed. Topics include radiation monitoring, wastewater discharge monitoring, dose distribution estimates, and ground water monitoring. 9 refs., 8 figs., 20 tabs

  10. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Institutional Plan FY 1995--2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-01

    This report presents the details of the mission and strategic plan for Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory during the fiscal years of 1995--2000. It presents summaries of current programs and potential changes; critical success factors such as human resources; management practices; budgetary allowances; and technical and administrative initiatives.

  11. Hydrogeology and tritium transport in Chicken Creek Canyon,Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, Preston D.; Javandel, Iraj

    2007-10-31

    This study of the hydrogeology of Chicken Creek Canyon wasconducted by the Environmental Restoration Program (ERP) at LawrenceBerkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). This canyon extends downhill fromBuilding 31 at LBNL to Centennial Road below. The leading edge of agroundwater tritium plume at LBNL is located at the top of the canyon.Tritium activities measured in this portion of the plume during thisstudy were approximately 3,000 picocuries/liter (pCi/L), which issignificantly less than the maximum contaminant level (MCL) for drinkingwaterof 20,000 pCi/L established by the Environmental ProtectionAgency.There are three main pathways for tritium migration beyond theLaboratory s boundary: air, surface water and groundwater flow. Thepurpose of this report is to evaluate the groundwater pathway.Hydrogeologic investigation commenced with review of historicalgeotechnical reports including 35 bore logs and 27 test pit/trench logsas well as existing ERP information from 9 bore logs. This was followedby field mapping of bedrock outcrops along Chicken Creek as well asbedrock exposures in road cuts on the north and east walls of the canyon.Water levels and tritium activities from 6 wells were also considered.Electrical-resistivity profiles and cone penetration test (CPT) data werecollected to investigate the extent of an interpreted alluvial sandencountered in one of the wells drilled in this area. Subsequent loggingof 7 additional borings indicated that this sand was actually anunusually well-sorted and typically deeply weathered sandstone of theOrinda Formation. Wells were installed in 6 of the new borings to allowwater level measurement and analysis of groundwater tritium activity. Aslug test and pumping tests were also performed in the wellfield.

  12. Nuclear Medicine at Berkeley Lab: From Pioneering Beginnings to Today (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summer Lecture Series 2006: Thomas Budinger, head of Berkeley Lab's Center for Functional Imaging, discusses Berkeley Lab's rich history pioneering the field of nuclear medicine, from radioisotopes to medical imaging.

  13. Results of a monitoring programme in the environs of Berkeley aimed at collecting Chernobyl data for foodchain model validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of a fallout measurement programme which was carried out in the environs of Berkeley Nuclear Laboratory in the United Kingdom following the Chernobyl reactor accident in April 1986 are presented in this report. The programme was aimed at establishing a time-dependent data base of concentrations of Chernobyl fallout radionuclides in selected agricultural products. Results were obtained for milk, grass, silage, soil and wheat over an eighteen month period from May 1986. It is intended to use the data to validate the CEGB's dynamic foodchain model, which is incorporated in the FOODWEB module of the NECTAR environmental code. (author)

  14. Calibration of the Berkeley EUV Airglow Rocket Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, Daniel M.; Chakrabarti, Supriya; Siegmund, Oswald

    1989-01-01

    The Berkeley Extreme-ultraviolet Airglow Rocket Spectrometer (BEARS), a multiinstrument sounding rocket payload, made comprehensive measurements of the earth's dayglow. The primary instruments consisted of two near-normal Rowland mount spectrometers: one channel to measure several atomic oxygen features at high spectral resolution (about 1.5 A) in the band passes 980-1040 and 1300-1360 A, and the other to measure EUV dayglow and the solar EUV simultaneously in a much broader bandpass (250-1150 A) at moderate resolution (about 10 A). The payload also included a hydrogen Lyman-alpha photometer to monitor the solar irradiance and goecoronal emissions. The instrument was calibrated at the EUV calibration facility at the University of California at Berkeley, and was subsequently launched successfully on September 30, 1988 aboard a four-stage experimental sounding rocket, Black Brant XII flight 12.041 WT. The calibration procedure and resulting data are presented.

  15. Annual site environmental report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Environmental Monitoring Program of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is described. Data for 1990 are presented, and general trends are discussed. The report is organized under the following topics: Environmental Program Overview; Environmental Permits; Environmental Assessments; Environmental Activities; Penetrating Radiation; Airborne Radionuclides; Waterborne Radionuclides; Public Doses Resulting from LBL Operations; Trends -- LBL Environmental Impact; Waterborne Pollutants; Airborne Pollutants; Groundwater Protection; and Quality Assurance. 20 refs., 26 figs., 23 tabs

  16. Annual site environmental report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schleimer, G.E.; Pauer, R.O. (eds.)

    1991-05-01

    The Environmental Monitoring Program of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is described. Data for 1990 are presented, and general trends are discussed. The report is organized under the following topics: Environmental Program Overview; Environmental Permits; Environmental Assessments; Environmental Activities; Penetrating Radiation; Airborne Radionuclides; Waterborne Radionuclides; Public Doses Resulting from LBL Operations; Trends -- LBL Environmental Impact; Waterborne Pollutants; Airborne Pollutants; Groundwater Protection; and Quality Assurance. 20 refs., 26 figs., 23 tabs.

  17. Berkeley Lab Sheds Light on Improving Solar Cell Efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Typical manufacturing methods produce solar cells with an efficiency of 12-15%; and 14% efficiency is the bare minimum for achieving a profit. In work performed at the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley, CA, 5 10-486-577 1)--a US Department of Energy national laboratory that conducts unclassified scientific research and is managed by the University of California--scientist Scott McHugo has obtained keen insights into the impaired performance of solar cells manufactured from polycrystalline silicon. The solar cell market is potentially vast, according to Berkeley Lab. Lightweight solar panels are highly beneficial for providing electrical power to remote locations in developing nations, since there is no need to build transmission lines or truck-in generator fuel. Moreover, industrial nations confronted with diminishing resources have active programs aimed at producing improved, less expensive solar cells. 'In a solar cell, there is a junction between p-type silicon and an n-type layer, such as diffused-in phosphorous', explained McHugo, who is now with Berkeley Lab's Accelerator and Fusion Research Division. 'When sunlight is absorbed, it frees electrons, which start migrating in a random-walk fashion toward that junction. If the electrons make it to the junction; they contribute to the cell's output of electric current. Often, however, before they reach the junction, they recombine at specific sites in the crystal' (and, therefore, cannot contribute to current output). McHugo scrutinized a map of a silicon wafer in which sites of high recombination appeared as dark regions. Previously, researchers had shown that such phenomena occurred not primarily at grain boundaries in the polycrystalline material, as might be expected, but more often at dislocations in the crystal. However, the dislocations themselves were not the problem. Using a unique heat treatment technique, McHugo performed electrical measurements to investigate the material

  18. Catalog of research projects at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Catalog has been created to aid in the transfer of technology from the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to potential users in industry, government, universities, and the public. The projects are listed for the following LBL groups: Accelerator and Fusion Research Division, Applied Science Division, Biology and Medicine Division, Center for Advanced Materials, Chemical Biodynamics Division, Computing Division, Earth Sciences Division, Engineering and Technical Services Division, Materials and Molecular Research Division, Nuclear Science Division, and Physics Division

  19. Catalog of research projects at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-01-01

    This Catalog has been created to aid in the transfer of technology from the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to potential users in industry, government, universities, and the public. The projects are listed for the following LBL groups: Accelerator and Fusion Research Division, Applied Science Division, Biology and Medicine Division, Center for Advanced Materials, Chemical Biodynamics Division, Computing Division, Earth Sciences Division, Engineering and Technical Services Division, Materials and Molecular Research Division, Nuclear Science Division, and Physics Division.

  20. Community Relations Plan for Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-07-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) has applied to the California Environmental Protection Agency, Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC), for renewal of its Hazardous Waste Handling Facility Permit. A permit is required under Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations. The permit will allow LBL to continue using its current hazardous waste handling facility, upgrade the existing facility, and construct a replacement facility. The new facility is scheduled for completion in 1995. The existing facility will be closed under RCRA guidelines by 1996. As part of the permitting process, LBL is required to investigate areas of soil and groundwater contamination at its main site in the Berkeley Hills. The investigations are being conducted by LBL`s Environmental Restoration Program and are overseen by a number of regulatory agencies. The regulatory agencies working with LBL include the California Environmental Protection Agency`s Department of Toxic Substances Control, the California Regional Water Quality Control Board, the Bay Area Air Quality Management District, the East Bay Municipal Utilities District, and the Berkeley Department of Environmental Health. RCRA requires that the public be informed of LBL`s investigations and site cleanup, and that opportunities be available for the public to participate in making decisions about how LBL will address contamination issues. LBL has prepared this Community Relations Plan (CRP) to describe activities that LBL will use to keep the community informed of environmental restoration progress and to provide for an open dialogue with the public on issues of importance. The CRP documents the community`s current concerns about LBL`s Environmental Restoration Program. Interviews conducted between February and April 1993 with elected officials, agency staff, environmental organizations, businesses, site neighbors, and LBL employees form the basis for the information contained in this document.

  1. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1995 site environmental report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 1995 Site Environmental Report summarizes environmental activities at the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for the 1995 calendar year. The report strives to present environmental data in a manner that characterizes the performance and compliance status of the environmental management programs. The report also discusses significant highlights and plans of these programs. Topics discussed include: environmental monitoring, environmental compliance programs, air quality, water quality, ground water protection, sanitary sewer monitoring, soil and sediment quality, vegetation and foodstuffs monitoring, and special studies which include preoperational monitoring of building 85 and 1995 sampling results, radiological dose assessment, and quality assessment

  2. Annual environmental monitoring report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schleimer, G.E. (ed.)

    1989-06-01

    The Environmental Monitoring Program of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is described. Data for 1988 are presented and general trends are discussed. In order to establish whether LBL research activities produced any impact on the population surrounding the laboratory, a program of environmental air and water sampling and continuous radiation monitoring was carried on throughout the year. For 1988, as in the previous several years, dose equivalents attributable to LBL radiological operations were a small fraction of both the relevant radiation protection guidelines (RPG) and of the natural radiation background. 16 refs., 7 figs., 21 tabs.

  3. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1995 site environmental report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balgobin, D.; Javandel, I.; Lackner, G.; Smith, C.; Thorson, P.; Tran, H.

    1996-07-01

    The 1995 Site Environmental Report summarizes environmental activities at the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for the 1995 calendar year. The report strives to present environmental data in a manner that characterizes the performance and compliance status of the environmental management programs. The report also discusses significant highlights and plans of these programs. Topics discussed include: environmental monitoring, environmental compliance programs, air quality, water quality, ground water protection, sanitary sewer monitoring, soil and sediment quality, vegetation and foodstuffs monitoring, and special studies which include preoperational monitoring of building 85 and 1995 sampling results, radiological dose assessment, and quality assessment.

  4. Assembly Manual for the Berkeley Lab Cosmic Ray Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Collier, M

    2002-01-01

    The Berkeley Lab Cosmic Ray Detector consists of 3 main components that must be prepared separately before they can be assembled. These components are the scintillator, circuit board, and casing. They are described in the main sections of this report, which may be completed in any order. Preparing the scintillator paddles involves several steps--cutting the scintillator material to the appropriate size and shape, preparing and attaching Lucite cookies (optional), polishing the edges, gluing the end to the photomultiplier tube (optional), and wrapping the scintillator. Since the detector has 2 paddles, each of the sections needs to be repeated for the other paddle.

  5. High speed optical links between LLNL and Berkeley

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lennon, W.J.; Thombley, R.L.

    1994-08-08

    The Advanced Telecommunications Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, in collaboration with Pacific Bell, is developing an experimental high speed, four wavelength, protocol independent optical link for evaluating wide area networking interconnection schemes and the use of fiber amplifiers. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, as a super-user, supercomputer, and super-application site, is anticipating the future bandwidth and protocol requirements to connect to other such sites as well as to connect to remote sited control centers and experiments. In this paper we discuss our vision of the future of Wide Area Networking and describe the plans for the wavelength division multiplexed link between Livermore and the University of California at Berkeley.

  6. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory upgrading approaches to existing facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Plant Engineering Department instituted a seismic risk investigation and seismic upgrade program in 1970. This paper covers the upgrade of two buildings with dissimilar framing systems; Building No. 10, a World War II vintage heavy timber frame building, and Building No. 80, a steel frame structure constructed in 1954. The seismic upgrade task for both structures required that the buildings be kept in service during rehabilitation with a minimum of disruption to occupants. Rehabilitations were phased over two and three year periods with construction management and supervision performed by LBL Plant Engineering staff

  7. Lipoprotein subclasses in genetic studies: The Berkeley Data Set

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krauss, R.M.; Williams, P.T.; Blanche, P.J.; Cavanaugh, A.; Holl, L.G. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Austin, M.A. [Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States). Dept. of Epidemiology

    1992-10-01

    Data from the Berkeley Data Set was used to investigate familial correlations of HDL-subclasses. Analysis of the sibling intraclass correlation coefficient by HDL particle diameter showed that sibling HDL levels were significantly correlated for HDL{sub 2b}, HDL{sub 3a} and HDL{sub 3b} subclasses. The percentage of the offsprings` variance explained by their two parents. Our finding that parents and offspring-have the highest correlation for HDL{sub 2b} is consistent with published reports that show higher heritability estimates for HDL{sub 2} compared with HDL{sub 3}{minus} cholesterol.

  8. Annual environmental monitoring report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Environmental Monitoring Program of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is described. Data for 1988 are presented and general trends are discussed. In order to establish whether LBL research activities produced any impact on the population surrounding the laboratory, a program of environmental air and water sampling and continuous radiation monitoring was carried on throughout the year. For 1988, as in the previous several years, dose equivalents attributable to LBL radiological operations were a small fraction of both the relevant radiation protection guidelines (RPG) and of the natural radiation background. 16 refs., 7 figs., 21 tabs

  9. Assembly Manual for the Berkeley Lab Cosmic Ray Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Berkeley Lab Cosmic Ray Detector consists of 3 main components that must be prepared separately before they can be assembled. These components are the scintillator, circuit board, and casing. They are described in the main sections of this report, which may be completed in any order. Preparing the scintillator paddles involves several steps--cutting the scintillator material to the appropriate size and shape, preparing and attaching Lucite cookies (optional), polishing the edges, gluing the end to the photomultiplier tube (optional), and wrapping the scintillator. Since the detector has 2 paddles, each of the sections needs to be repeated for the other paddle

  10. Assembly Manual for the Berkeley Lab Cosmic Ray Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collier, Michael

    2002-12-17

    The Berkeley Lab Cosmic Ray Detector consists of 3 main components that must be prepared separately before they can be assembled. These components are the scintillator, circuit board, and casing. They are described in the main sections of this report, which may be completed in any order. Preparing the scintillator paddles involves several steps--cutting the scintillator material to the appropriate size and shape, preparing and attaching Lucite cookies (optional), polishing the edges, gluing the end to the photomultiplier tube (optional), and wrapping the scintillator. Since the detector has 2 paddles, each of the sections needs to be repeated for the other paddle.

  11. USING DOE-2.1 AT LAWRENCE BERKELEY LABORATORY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Building Energy Analysis Group.; Authors, Various

    1980-09-01

    The purpose of this manual is to assist the DOE-2 user to run DOE-2 and its utility programs at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). It is organized to reflect the facts that every DOE-2 job run at LBL requires certain steps, and that there are options related to DOE-2 job runs available to any DOE-2 user. The standard steps for running a DOE-2 job are as follows: 1. Prepare a job deck 2. Process a job deck 3. Obtain standard output reports.

  12. Environmental assessment for construction and operation of a Human Genome Laboratory at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-01

    Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) proposes to construct and operate a new laboratory for consolidation of current and future activities of the Human Genome Center (HGC). This document addresses the potential direct, indirect, and cumulative environmental and human-health effects from the proposed facility construction and operation. This document was prepared in accordance the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (United States Codes 42 USC 4321-4347) (NEPA) and the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Final Rule for NEPA Implementing Procedures [Code of Federal Regulations 10CFR 1021].

  13. Berkeley extreme-ultraviolet airglow rocket spectrometer: BEARS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, D M; Chakrabarti, S

    1992-09-20

    We describe the Berkeley extreme-UV airglow rocket spectrometer, which is a payload designed to test several thermospheric remote-sensing concepts by measuring the terrestrial O I far-UV and extreme-UV dayglow and the solar extreme-UV spectrum simultaneously. The instrument consisted of two near-normal Rowland mount spectrometers and a Lyman-alpha photometer. The dayglow spectrometer covered two spectral regions from 980 to 1040 A and from 1300 to 1360 A with 1.5-A resolution. The solar spectrometer had a bandpass of 250-1150 A with an ~ 10-A resolution. All three spectra were accumulated by using a icrochannel-plate-intensified, two-dimensional imaging detector with three separate wedge-and strip anode readouts. The hydrogen Lyman-alpha photometer was included to monitor the solar Lyman-alpha irradiance and geocoronal Lyman-alpha emissions. The instrument was designed, fabricated, and calibrated at the University of California, Berkeley and was successfully launched on 30 September 1988 aboard the first test flight of a four-stage sounding rocket, Black Brant XII. PMID:20733778

  14. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1997 Site Environmental Report Vol. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Each year, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory prepares an integrated report on its environmental programs to satisfy the requirements of U.S. Department of Energy Order 231.1. The Site Environmental Report for 1997 is intended to summarize Berkeley Lab's compliance with environmental standards and requirements, characterize environmental management efforts through surveillance and monitoring activities, and highlight significant programs and efforts for calendar year 1997. This report is structured into three basic areas that cover a general overview of the Laboratory, the status of environmental programs, and the results of the surveillance and monitoring activities, including air quality, surface water, groundwater, sanitary sewer, soil and sediment, vegetation and foodstuffs, radiation dose assessment, and quality assurance. The report is separated into two volumes. Volume I contains the body of the report, a list of references, a list of acronyms and abbreviations, a glossary, Appendix A (NESHAPS annual report), and Appendix B (distribution list for volume I). Volume II contains Appendix C, the individual data results from monitoring programs. Each chapter in volume I begins with an outline of the sections that follow

  15. Seismic Protection of Laboratory Contents: The UC Berkeley Science Building Case Study

    OpenAIRE

    Comerio, Mary C.

    2003-01-01

    The research described in this report is a part of the Disaster Resistant University (DRU) initiative funded by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and the University of California, Berkeley. The first phase of the Disaster Resistant University initiative produced a study of potential earthquake losses at UC Berkeley together with an analysis of the economic impacts. In that report, Comerio (2000) found that despite the extraordinary building retrofit program, the UC Berkeley cam...

  16. Environmental Assessment for the proposed Induction Linac System Experiments in Building 51B at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), (DOE/EA-1087) evaluating the proposed action to modify existing Building 51B at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to install and conduct experiments on a new Induction Linear Accelerator System. LBNL is located in Berkeley, California and operated by the University of California (UC). The project consists of placing a pre-fabricated building inside Building 51B to house a new 10 MeV heavy ion linear accelerator. A control room and other support areas would be provided within and directly adjacent to Building 51B. The accelerator system would be used to conduct tests, at reduced scale and cost, many features of a heavy-ion accelerator driver for the Department of Energy's inertial fusion energy program. Based upon information and analyses in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969. Therefore, an Environmental Impact Statement is not required. This report contains the Environmental Assessment, as well as the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI)

  17. Early History of Heavy Isotope Research at Berkeley

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glenn T. Seaborg

    1976-06-01

    I have had the idea for some time that it would be interesting and worthwhile to put together an account of the early work on heavy isotopes at Berkeley. Of a special interest is the discovery of plutonium (atomic number 94) and the isotope U{sup 233}, and the demonstration of their fission with slow neutrons. This work served as a prelude to the subsequent Plutonium Project (Metallurgical Project) centered at the University of Chicago, in connection with which I have also had the idea of putting together a history of the work of my chemistry group. I have decided that it would be an interesting challenge to write this account on a day-to-day basis in a style that would be consistent with the entries having been written at the end of each day. The aim would be to make this history as accurate as possible by going back to the original records and using them with meticulous care.

  18. Development of an accelerator-based BNCT facility at the Berkeley Lab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An accelerator-based BNCT facility is under construction at the Berkeley Lab. An electrostatic-quadrupole (ESQ) accelerator is under development for the production of neutrons via the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction at proton energies between 2.3 and 2.5 MeV. A novel type of power supply, an air-core coupled transformer power supply, is being built for the acceleration of beam currents exceeding 50 mA. A metallic lithium target has been developed for handling such high beam currents. Moderator, reflector and neutron beam delimiter have extensively been modeled and designs have been identified which produce epithermal neutron spectra sharply peaked between 10 and 20 keV. These. neutron beams are predicted to deliver significantly higher doses to deep seated brain tumors, up to 50% more near the midline of the brain than is possible with currently available reactor beams. The accelerator neutron source will be suitable for future installation at hospitals

  19. Nuclear Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogerton, John

    1964-01-01

    This pamphlet describes how reactors work; discusses reactor design; describes research, teaching, and materials testing reactors; production reactors; reactors for electric power generation; reactors for supply heat; reactors for propulsion; reactors for space; reactor safety; and reactors of tomorrow. The appendix discusses characteristics of U.S. civilian power reactor concepts and lists some of the U.S. reactor power projects, with location, type, capacity, owner, and startup date.

  20. Berkeley lab checkpoint/restart (BLCR) for Linux clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargrove, Paul H.; Duell, Jason C.

    2006-09-01

    This article describes the motivation, design and implementation of Berkeley Lab Checkpoint/Restart (BLCR), a system-level checkpoint/restart implementation for Linux clusters that targets the space of typical High Performance Computing applications, including MPI. Application-level solutions, including both checkpointing and fault-tolerant algorithms, are recognized as more time and space efficient than system-level checkpoints, which cannot make use of any application-specific knowledge. However, system-level checkpointing allows for preemption, making it suitable for responding to ''fault precursors'' (for instance, elevated error rates from ECC memory or network CRCs, or elevated temperature from sensors). Preemption can also increase the efficiency of batch scheduling; for instance reducing idle cycles (by allowing for shutdown without any queue draining period or reallocation of resources to eliminate idle nodes when better fitting jobs are queued), and reducing the average queued time (by limiting large jobs to running during off-peak hours, without the need to limit the length of such jobs). Each of these potential uses makes BLCR a valuable tool for efficient resource management in Linux clusters.

  1. Annual environmental monitoring report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephens, L.D. (ed.)

    1978-03-01

    The data obtained from the Environmental Monitoring Program of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory for the Calendar year 1977 are described and general trends are discussed. The general trend of decreasing radiation levels at our site boundary due to accelerator operation during past years has leveled off during 1977 and in some areas shows a slight but not statistically significant increase as predicted in last year's summary. There were changes in both ion beams as well as current which have resulted in shifts in maxima at the monitoring stations. The gamma levels are once again reported as zero. There is only one period of detectable gamma radiation due to accelerator operation. The annual dose equivalent are reported from the environmental monitoring stations since they have been established. Radiation levels at the Olympus Gate Station have shown a steady decline since 1959 when estimates were first made. The Olympus Gate Station is in direct view of the Bevatron and most directly influenced by that accelerator. Over the past several years the atmospheric sampling program has, with the exception of occasional known releases, yielded data which are within the range of normal background. The surface water program always yields results within the range of normal background. As no substantial changes in the quantities of radionuclides used are anticipated, no changes are expected in these observations.

  2. Berkeley lab checkpoint/restart (BLCR) for Linux clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article describes the motivation, design and implementation of Berkeley Lab Checkpoint/Restart (BLCR), a system-level checkpoint/restart implementation for Linux clusters that targets the space of typical High Performance Computing applications, including MPI. Application-level solutions, including both checkpointing and fault-tolerant algorithms, are recognized as more time and space efficient than system-level checkpoints, which cannot make use of any application-specific knowledge. However, system-level checkpointing allows for preemption, making it suitable for responding to ''fault precursors'' (for instance, elevated error rates from ECC memory or network CRCs, or elevated temperature from sensors). Preemption can also increase the efficiency of batch scheduling; for instance reducing idle cycles (by allowing for shutdown without any queue draining period or reallocation of resources to eliminate idle nodes when better fitting jobs are queued), and reducing the average queued time (by limiting large jobs to running during off-peak hours, without the need to limit the length of such jobs). Each of these potential uses makes BLCR a valuable tool for efficient resource management in Linux clusters

  3. Status of the UC-Berkeley SETI Efforts

    CERN Document Server

    Korpela, Eric J; Bankay, Robert; Cobb, Jeff; Howard, Andrew; Lebofsky, Matt; Siemion, Andrew P V; von Korff, Joshua; Werthimer, Dan

    2011-01-01

    We summarize radio and optical SETI programs based at the University of California, Berkeley. The SEVENDIP optical pulse search looks for ns time scale pulses at visible wavelengths using an automated 30 inch telescope. The ongoing SERENDIP V.v sky survey searches for radio signals at the 300 meter Arecibo Observatory. The currently installed configuration supports 128 million channels over a 200 MHz bandwidth with ~1.6 Hz spectral resolution. SETI@home uses the desktop computers of volunteers to analyze over 160 TB of data at taken at Arecibo looking for two types of continuous wave signals and two types of pulsed signals. A version to be released this summer adds autocorrelation analysis to look for complex wave forms that have been repeated (and overlayed) after a short delay. SETI@home will soon be processing data of Kepler exoplanet systems collected at the GBT. The Astropulse project is the first SETI search for $\\mu$s time scale dispersed pulses in the radio spectrum. We recently reobserved 114 sky loc...

  4. Tiger Team assessment of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Washington, DC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report documents the results of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Tiger Team Assessment of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) conducted from January 14 through February 15, 1991. The purpose of the assessment was to provide the Secretary of Energy with the status of environment, safety, and health (ES ampersand H) programs at LBL. The Tiger Team concluded that curtailment of cessation of any operations at LBL is not warranted. However, the number and breadth of findings and concerns from this assessment reflect a serious condition at this site. In spite of its late start, LBL has recently made progress in increasing ES ampersand H awareness at all staff levels and in identifying ES ampersand H deficiencies. Corrective action plans are inadequate, however, many compensatory actions are underway. Also, LBL does not have the technical expertise or training programs nor the tracking and followup to effectively direct and control sitewide guidance and oversight by DOE of ES ampersand H activities at LBL. As a result of these deficiencies, the Tiger Team has reservations about LBL's ability to implement effective actions in a timely manner and, thereby, achieve excellence in their ES ampersand H program. 4 figs., 24 tabs

  5. Tiger Team assessment of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Washington, DC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-02-01

    This report documents the results of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Tiger Team Assessment of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) conducted from January 14 through February 15, 1991. The purpose of the assessment was to provide the Secretary of Energy with the status of environment, safety, and health (ES H) programs at LBL. The Tiger Team concluded that curtailment of cessation of any operations at LBL is not warranted. However, the number and breadth of findings and concerns from this assessment reflect a serious condition at this site. In spite of its late start, LBL has recently made progress in increasing ES H awareness at all staff levels and in identifying ES H deficiencies. Corrective action plans are inadequate, however, many compensatory actions are underway. Also, LBL does not have the technical expertise or training programs nor the tracking and followup to effectively direct and control sitewide guidance and oversight by DOE of ES H activities at LBL. As a result of these deficiencies, the Tiger Team has reservations about LBL's ability to implement effective actions in a timely manner and, thereby, achieve excellence in their ES H program. 4 figs., 24 tabs.

  6. Guidelines for the segregation characterization management of dry waste at Berkeley Lab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Managing and disposing of dry low level radioactive waste at Berkeley Lab. is problematic. The Waste Management Group must assure off site treatment, storage, and disposal facilities that dry waste from Berkeley Lab. is free of liquids and regulated metals (such as lead and mercury). RTR (Real Time Radioagraphy) used for waste to be rejected. This pamphlet helps to clarify dry waste management requirements that will ensure that Berkeley Lab. dry waste will be accepted for off site shipment. These issues are critical if we are to have an off site disposal option for your dry radioactive waste

  7. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Institutional Plan, FY 1993--1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-10-01

    The FY 1993--1998 Institutional Plan provides an overview of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory mission, strategic plan, scientific initiatives, research programs, environment and safety program plans, educational and technology transfer efforts, human resources, and facilities needs. The Strategic Plan section identifies long-range conditions that can influence the Laboratory, potential research trends, and several management implications. The Initiatives section identifies potential new research programs that represent major long-term opportunities for the Laboratory and the resources required for their implementation. The Scientific and Technical Programs section summarizes current programs and potential changes in research program activity. The Environment, Safety, and Health section describes the management systems and programs underway at the Laboratory to protect the environment, the public, and the employees. The Technology Transfer and Education programs section describes current and planned programs to enhance the nation's scientific literacy and human infrastructure and to improve economic competitiveness. The Human Resources section identifies LBL staff composition and development programs. The section on Site and Facilities discusses resources required to sustain and improve the physical plant and its equipment. The Resource Projections are estimates of required budgetary authority for the Laboratory's ongoing research programs. The plan is an institutional management report for integration with the Department of Energy's strategic planning activities that is developed through an annual planning process. The plan identifies technical and administrative directions in the context of the National Energy Strategy and the Department of Energy's program planning initiatives. Preparation of the plan is coordinated by the Office for Planning and Development from information contributed by the Laboratory's scientific and support divisions.

  8. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Institutional Plan, FY 1993--1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chew, Joseph T.; Stroh, Suzanne C.; Maio, Linda R.; Olson, Karl R.; Grether, Donald F.; Clary, Mary M.; Smith, Brian M.; Stevens, David F.; Ross, Loren; Alper, Mark D.; Dairiki, Janis M.; Fong, Pauline L.; Bartholomew, James C.

    1992-10-01

    The FY 1993--1998 Institutional Plan provides an overview of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory mission, strategic plan, scientific initiatives, research programs, environment and safety program plans, educational and technology transfer efforts, human resources, and facilities needs. The Strategic Plan section identifies long-range conditions that can influence the Laboratory, potential research trends, and several management implications. The Initiatives section identifies potential new research programs that represent major long-term opportunities for the Laboratory and the resources required for their implementation. The Scientific and Technical Programs section summarizes current programs and potential changes in research program activity. The Environment, Safety, and Health section describes the management systems and programs underway at the Laboratory to protect the environment, the public, and the employees. The Technology Transfer and Education programs section describes current and planned programs to enhance the nation`s scientific literacy and human infrastructure and to improve economic competitiveness. The Human Resources section identifies LBL staff composition and development programs. The section on Site and Facilities discusses resources required to sustain and improve the physical plant and its equipment. The Resource Projections are estimates of required budgetary authority for the Laboratory`s ongoing research programs. The plan is an institutional management report for integration with the Department of Energy`s strategic planning activities that is developed through an annual planning process. The plan identifies technical and administrative directions in the context of the National Energy Strategy and the Department of Energy`s program planning initiatives. Preparation of the plan is coordinated by the Office for Planning and Development from information contributed by the Laboratory`s scientific and support divisions.

  9. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Institutional Plan FY 1994--1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    The Institutional Plan provides an overview of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory mission, strategic plan, scientific initiatives, research programs, environment and safety program plans, educational and technology transfer efforts, human resources, and facilities needs. For FY 1994-1999 the Institutional Plan reflects significant revisions based on the Laboratory`s strategic planning process. The Strategic Plan section identifies long-range conditions that will influence the Laboratory, as well as potential research trends and management implications. The Initiatives section identifies potential new research programs that represent major long-term opportunities for the Laboratory, and the resources required for their implementation. The Scientific and Technical Programs section summarizes current programs and potential changes in research program activity. The Environment, Safety, and Health section describes the management systems and programs underway at the Laboratory to protect the environment, the public, and the employees. The Technology Transfer and Education programs section describes current and planned programs to enhance the nation`s scientific literacy and human infrastructure and to improve economic competitiveness. The Human Resources section identifies LBL staff diversity and development program. The section on Site and Facilities discusses resources required to sustain and improve the physical plant and its equipment. The new section on Information Resources reflects the importance of computing and communication resources to the Laboratory. The Resource Projections are estimates of required budgetary authority for the Laboratory`s ongoing research programs. The Institutional Plan is a management report for integration with the Department of Energy`s strategic planning activities, developed through an annual planning process.

  10. Proposed University of California Berkeley fast pulsar search machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the discovery of 1937+21 by Backer et al. (1982) there is much renewed interest in an all sky survey for fast pulsars. University of California Berkeley has designed and is in the process of building an innovative and powerful, stand-alone, real-time, digital signal-processor to conduct an all sky survey for pulsars with rotation rates as high as 2000 Hz and dispersion measures less than 120 cm-3 pc at 800 MHz. The machine is anticipated to be completed in the Fall of 1985. The search technique consists of obtaining a 2-dimensional Fourier transform of the microwave signal. The transform is effected in two stages: a 64-channel, 3-level digital autocorrelator provides the radio frequency to delay transform and a fast 128K-point array processor effects the time to intensity fluctuation frequency transform. The use of a digital correlator allows flexibility in the choice of the observing radio frequency. Besides, the bandwidth is not fixed as in a multi-channel filter bank. In the machine, bandwidths can range from less than a MHz to 40 MHz. In the transform plane, the signature of a pulsar consists of harmonically related peaks which lie on a straight line which passes through the origin. The increased computational demand of a fast pulsar survey will be met by a combination of multi-CPU processing and pipeline design which involves a fast array processor and five commercial 68,000-based micro-processors. 6 references, 3 figures

  11. Laboratories for the 21st Century: Case Studies, Molecular Foundry, Berkeley, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-11-01

    This case study provides information on the Molecular Foundry, which incorporates Labs21 principles in its design and construction. The design includes many of the strategies researched at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory for energy efficient cleanroom and data centers.

  12. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Institutional Plan FY 1987-1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Various

    1986-12-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy, provides national scientific leadership and supports technological innovation through its mission to: (1) Perform leading multidisciplinary research in general sciences and energy sciences; (2) Develop and operate unique national experimental facilities for use by qualified investigators; (3) Educate and train future generations of scientists and engineers; and (4) Foster productive relationships between LBL research programs and industry. The following areas of research excellence implement this mission and provide current focus for achieving DOE goals. GENERAL SCIENCES--(1) Accelerator and Fusion Research--accelerator design and operation, advanced accelerator technology development, accelerator and ion source research for heavy-ion fusion and magnetic fusion, and x-ray optics; (2) Nuclear Science--relativistic heavy-ion physics, medium- and low-energy nuclear physics, nuclear theory, nuclear astrophysics, nuclear chemistry, transuranium elements studies, nuclear data evaluation, and detector development; (3) Physics--experimental and theoretical particle physics, detector development, astrophysics, and applied mathematics. ENERGY SCIENCES--(1) Applied Science--building energy efficiency, solar for building systems, fossil energy conversion, energy storage, and atmospheric effects of combustion; (2) Biology and Medicine--molecular and cellular biology, diagnostic imaging, radiation biophysics, therapy and radiosurgery, mutagenesis and carcinogenesis, lipoproteins, cardiovascular disease, and hemopoiesis research; (3) Center for Advanced Materials--catalysts, electronic materials, ceramic and metal interfaces, polymer research, instrumentation, and metallic alloys; (4) Chemical Biodynamics--molecular biology of nucleic acids and proteins, genetics of photosynthesis, and photochemistry; (5) Earth Sciences--continental lithosphere properties, structures and

  13. Berkeley e o papel das hipóteses na filosofia natural Berkeley and the role of hypothesis in natural philosophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvio Seno Chibeni

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A questão do estatuto epistemológico das hipóteses que postulam entes e mecanismos inobserváveis tornou-se proeminente com o advento da ciência moderna, no século XVII. Uma das razões para isso é que, por um lado, as novas teorias científicas passaram a empregá-las amplamente na explicação dos fenômenos naturais, enquanto que, por outro lado, a epistemologia empirista, geralmente adotada desde então para a análise da ciência, parecia proscrever seu uso. Neste artigo analisam-se as soluções propostas por George Berkeley para essa tensão. Mostra-se que nos Princípios do conhecimento humano ele introduz uma nova noção de explicação científica, segundo a qual a ciência poderia prescindir de hipóteses sobre inobserváveis, quaisquer que sejam. Depois, para acomodar epistemologicamente a mecânica newtoniana, ele propõe, no De motu, a interpretação instrumentalista das hipóteses sobre forças, que são centrais nessa teoria, considerada por ele "a melhor chave para a ciência natural". Finalmente, em sua obra tardia, Siris, Berkeley envolve-se, de forma aparentemente realista, na discussão e defesa de uma série de hipóteses sobre fluidos inobserváveis. Examina-se brevemente, no final do artigo, a possibilidade de conciliar essa posição com os princípios fundamentais da epistemologia e metafísica de Berkeley.The issue of the epistemological status of hypotheses postulating unobservable entities became prominent with the advent of modern science, in the 17th century. The basic reason is that such entities were widely employed by the new scientific theories in the explanation and prediction of natural phenomena, whereas empiricist epistemology, which at that time became very popular among philosophers and scientists, formed a clearly inhospitable background for unobservable elements in general. This paper examines the stands adopted, and the proposals made on this topic by George Berkeley, one of the most important

  14. A community of scientists: cultivating scientific identity among undergraduates within the Berkeley Compass Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aceves, Ana V.; Berkeley Compass Project

    2015-01-01

    The Berkeley Compass Project is a self-formed group of graduate and undergraduate students in the physical sciences at UC Berkeley. Our goals are to improve undergraduate physics education, provide opportunities for professional development, and increase retention of students from populations typically underrepresented in the physical sciences. For students who enter as freshmen, the core Compass experience consists of a summer program and several seminar courses. These programs are designed to foster a diverse, collaborative student community in which students engage in authentic research practices and regular self-reflection. Compass encourages undergraduates to develop an identity as a scientist from the beginning of their university experience.

  15. The Indirect Perception of Distance: Interpretive Complexities in Berkeley's Theory of Vision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael James Braund

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The problem of whether perception is direct or if it depends on additional, cognitive contributions made by the perceiving subject, is posed with particular force in an Essay towards a New Theory of Vision (NTV. It is evident from the recurrent treatment it receives therein that Berkeley considers it to be one of the central issues concerning perception. Fittingly, the NTV devotes the most attention to it. In this essay, I deal exclusively with Berkeley's treatment of the problem of indirect distance perception, as it is presented in the context of that work.

  16. 77 FR 75448 - Welded Tube-Berkeley Including On-Site Leased Workers From Snelling, Aerotek and Express...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-20

    ... Employment and Training Administration Welded Tube--Berkeley Including On-Site Leased Workers From Snelling... Worker Adjustment Assistance on October 10, 2012, applicable to workers of Welded Tube--Berkeley... Register on October 29, 2012 (77 FR 65583). At the request of South Carolina State, the Department...

  17. Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Institutional Plan FY 2000-2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chartock, Mike (ed.); Hansen, Todd (ed.)

    1999-08-01

    The FY 2000-2004 Institutional Plan provides an overview of the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab, the Laboratory) mission, strategic plan, initiatives, and the resources required to fulfill its role in support of national needs in fundamental science and technology, energy resources, and environmental quality. To advance the Department of Energy's ongoing efforts to define the Integrated Laboratory System, the Berkeley Lab Institutional Plan reflects the strategic elements of our planning efforts. The Institutional Plan is a management report that supports the Department of Energy's mission and programs and is an element of the Department of Energy's strategic management planning activities, developed through an annual planning process. The Plan supports the Government Performance and Results Act of 1993 and complements the performance-based contract between the Department of Energy and the Regents of the University of California. It identifies technical and administrative directions in the context of the national energy policy and research needs and the Department of Energy's program planning initiatives. Preparation of the plan is coordinated by the Office of Planning and Communications from information contributed by Berkeley Lab's scientific and support divisions.

  18. Berkeley Foundation for Opportunities in Information Technology: A Decade of Broadening Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crutchfield, Orpheus S. L.; Harrison, Christopher D.; Haas, Guy; Garcia, Daniel D.; Humphreys, Sheila M.; Lewis, Colleen M.; Khooshabeh, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The Berkeley Foundation for Opportunities in Information Technology is a decade-old endeavor to expose pre-college young women and underrepresented racial and ethnic minorities to the fields of computer science and engineering, and prepare them for rigorous, university-level study. We have served more than 150 students, and graduated more than 65…

  19. The principle of phase stability and the accelerator program at Berkeley, 1945--1954

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The discovery of the Principle of Phase Stability by Vladimir Veksler and Edwin McMillian and the end of the war released a surge of accelerator activity at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (then The University of California Radiation Laboratory). Six accelerators incorporating the Principle of Phase Stability were built in the period 1945--1954

  20. The Berkeley Puppet Interview: A Screening Instrument for Measuring Psychopathology in Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Lisanne L.; van Daal, Carlijn; van der Maten, Marloes; Engels, Rutger C. M. E.; Janssens, Jan M. A. M.; Otten, Roy

    2014-01-01

    Background: While child self-reports of psychopathology are increasingly accepted, little standardized instruments are utilized for these practices. The Berkeley Puppet Interview (BPI) is an age-appropriate instrument for self-reports of problem behavior by young children. Objective: Psychometric properties of the Dutch version of the BPI will be…

  1. An Evaluation of the New Curriculum at the University of California, Berkeley, School of Optometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Michael G.; Kashani, Sandy; Saroj, Namrata

    2001-01-01

    Evaluated the new curriculum at the University of California, Berkeley, School of Optometry by comparing the content of the new curriculum to the old curriculum and by surveying faculty and students regarding their opinion of the new curriculum. Findings indicated that the curriculum is successful in implementing desired changes, including reduced…

  2. Cyclist safety on bicycle boulevards and parallel arterial routes in Berkeley, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minikel, Eric

    2012-03-01

    This study compares the safety of bicyclists riding on bicycle boulevards to those riding on parallel arterial routes in Berkeley, California. Literature on the impact of motor vehicle traffic characteristics on cyclist safety shows that high motor vehicle speeds and volumes and the presence of heavy vehicles are all detrimental to cyclist safety. This suggests that cyclists may be safer on side streets than on busy arterials. Bicycle boulevards-traffic-calmed side streets signed and improved for cyclist use-purport to offer cyclists a safer alternative to riding on arterials. Police-reported bicycle collision data and manually collected cyclist count data from bicycle boulevards and parallel arterial routes in Berkeley, California from 2003 to 2010 are used to test the hypothesis that Berkeley's bicycle boulevards have lower cyclist collision rates and a lower proportion of bicycle collisions resulting in severe injury. While no significant difference is found in the proportion of collisions that are severe, results show that collision rates on Berkeley's bicycle boulevards are two to eight times lower than those on parallel, adjacent arterial routes. The difference in collision rate is highly statistically significant, unlikely to be caused by any bias in the collision and count data, and cannot be easily explained away by self-selection or safety in numbers. Though the used dataset is limited and the study design is correlational, this study provides some evidence that Berkeley's bicycle boulevards are safer for cyclists than its parallel arterial routes. The results may be suggestive that, more generally, properly implemented bicycle boulevards can provide cyclists with a safer alternative to riding on arterials. PMID:22269506

  3. N Reactor

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The last of Hanfordqaodmasdkwaspemas7ajkqlsmdqpakldnzsdflss nine plutonium production reactors to be built was the N Reactor.This reactor was called a dual purpose...

  4. Leibniz's Infinitesimals: Their Fictionality, Their Modern Implementations, And Their Foes From Berkeley To Russell And Beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Katz, Mikhail G; 10.1007/s10670-012-9370-y

    2012-01-01

    Many historians of the calculus deny significant continuity between infinitesimal calculus of the 17th century and 20th century developments such as Robinson's theory. Robinson's hyperreals, while providing a consistent theory of infinitesimals, require the resources of modern logic; thus many commentators are comfortable denying a historical continuity. A notable exception is Robinson himself, whose identification with the Leibnizian tradition inspired Lakatos, Laugwitz, and others to consider the history of the infinitesimal in a more favorable light. Inspite of his Leibnizian sympathies, Robinson regards Berkeley's criticisms of the infinitesimal calculus as aptly demonstrating the inconsistency of reasoning with historical infinitesimal magnitudes. We argue that Robinson, among others, overestimates the force of Berkeley's criticisms, by underestimating the mathematical and philosophical resources available to Leibniz. Leibniz's infinitesimals are fictions, not logical fictions, as Ishiguro proposed, but ...

  5. A Community of Scientists and Educators: The Compass Project at UC Berkeley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Nathaniel; Schwab, Josiah

    2016-01-01

    The Berkeley Compass Project is a self-formed group of graduate and undergraduate students in the physical sciences at the University of California, Berkeley. Its goals are to improve undergraduate physics education, provide opportunities for professional development, and increase retention of students from populations underrepresented in the physical sciences. For undergraduate students, the core Compass experience consists of a summer program and several seminar courses. These programs are designed to foster a diverse, collaborative student community in which students engage in authentic research practices and regular self-reflection. Graduate students, together with upper-level undergraduates, design and run all Compass programs. Compass strives to incorporate best practices from the science education literature. Experiences in Compass leave participants poised to be successful students researchers, teachers, and mentors.

  6. Clinical results of stereotactic hellium-ion radiosurgery of the pituitary gland at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first therapeutic clinical trial using accelerated heavy-charged particles in humans was performed at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) for the treatment of various endocrine and metabolic disorders of the pituitary gland, and as suppressive therapy for adenohypophyseal hormone-responsive carcinomas and diabetic retinopathy. In acromegaly, Cushing's disease, Nelson's syndrome and prolactin-secreting tumors, the therapeutic goal in the 433 patients treated has been to destroy or inhibit the growth of the pituitary tumor and control hormonal hypersecretion, while preserving a functional rim of tissue with normal hormone-secreting capacity, and minimizing neurologic injury. An additional group of 34 patients was treated for nonsecreting chromophobe adenomas. This paper discusses the methods and results of stereotactic helium-ion radiosurgery of the pituitary gland at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. 11 refs

  7. Tibet in the 1930s: Theos Bernard's Legacy at UC Berkeley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia M. White

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This essay accompanies an online photo essay titled, "Tibet in the 1930s: The Legacy of Theos Bernard at UC Berkeley" (https://cross-currents.berkeley.edu/e-journal/photo-essay/810?page=0. In 1936–1937, Theos Casimir Bernard made an extraordinary pilgrimage to Tibet in search of adventure and spiritual enlightenment. Bernard was already an ardent practitioner of hatha yoga but was eager to gain knowledge of the esoteric teachings within yoga. His journey was well documented in photographs and moving images, as well as by his own descriptions, which he published in 1939 in the book Penthouse of the Gods: A Pilgrimage into the Heart of Tibet and the Sacred City of Lhasa. During his journey, he collected manuscripts, paintings, prints, and sculptures that he intended to be used in teaching esoteric Buddhist studies in America....

  8. Clinical results of stereotactic hellium-ion radiosurgery of the pituitary gland at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, R.P.; Fabrikant, J.I.; Lyman, J.T.; Frankel, K.A.; Phillips, M.H.; Lawrence, J.H.; Tobias, C.A.

    1989-12-01

    The first therapeutic clinical trial using accelerated heavy-charged particles in humans was performed at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) for the treatment of various endocrine and metabolic disorders of the pituitary gland, and as suppressive therapy for adenohypophyseal hormone-responsive carcinomas and diabetic retinopathy. In acromegaly, Cushing's disease, Nelson's syndrome and prolactin-secreting tumors, the therapeutic goal in the 433 patients treated has been to destroy or inhibit the growth of the pituitary tumor and control hormonal hypersecretion, while preserving a functional rim of tissue with normal hormone-secreting capacity, and minimizing neurologic injury. An additional group of 34 patients was treated for nonsecreting chromophobe adenomas. This paper discusses the methods and results of stereotactic helium-ion radiosurgery of the pituitary gland at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. 11 refs.

  9. Construction and operation of replacement hazardous waste handling facility at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0423, for the construction and operation of a replacement hazardous waste handling facility (HWHF) and decontamination of the existing HWHF at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), Berkeley, California. The proposed facility would replace several older buildings and cargo containers currently being used for waste handling activities and consolidate the LBL's existing waste handling activities in one location. The nature of the waste handling activities and the waste volume and characteristics would not change as a result of construction of the new facility. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action would not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, 42 USC. 4321 et seq. Therefore, an environmental impact statement is not required

  10. Construction and operation of replacement hazardous waste handling facility at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Environmental Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-09-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0423, for the construction and operation of a replacement hazardous waste handling facility (HWHF) and decontamination of the existing HWHF at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), Berkeley, California. The proposed facility would replace several older buildings and cargo containers currently being used for waste handling activities and consolidate the LBL`s existing waste handling activities in one location. The nature of the waste handling activities and the waste volume and characteristics would not change as a result of construction of the new facility. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action would not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, 42 USC. 4321 et seq. Therefore, an environmental impact statement is not required.

  11. Latest results from the SEMATECH Berkeley extreme ultraviolet microfield exposure tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naulleau, Patrick; Anderson, Christopher N.; Chiu, Jerrin; Dean, Kim; Denham, Paul; George, Simi; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Hoef, Brian; Jones, Gideon; Koh, Chawon; La Fontaine, Bruno; Ma, Andy; Montgomery, Warren; Niakoula, Dimitra; Park, Joo-On; Wallow, Tom; Wurm, Stefan

    2008-09-02

    Microfield exposure tools (METs) continue to play a dominant role in the development of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) resists. One of these tools is the 0.3 numerical aperture SEMATECH Berkeley MET operating as a resist and mask test center. Here they present an update on the tool summarizing some of the latest test and characterization results. they provide an update on the long-term aberration stability of the tool and present line-space imaging in chemically amplified photoresist down to the 20-nm half-pitch level. Although resist development has shown substantial progress in the area of resolution, line-edge-roughness (LER) remains a significant concern. Here we present a summary of recent LER performance results and consider the effect of mask contributors to the LER observed from the SEMATECH Berkeley microfield tool.

  12. Progress Report on the Berkeley/Anglo-Australian Observatory High-redshift Supernova Search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldhaber, G.; Perlmutter, S.; Pennypacker, C.; Marvin, H.; Muller, R. A.; Couch, W.; Boyle, B.

    1990-11-01

    There are two main efforts related to supernovae in progress at Berkeley. The first is an automated supernova search for nearby supernovae, which was already discussed by Carl Pennypacker at this conference. The second is a search for distant supernovae, in the z = 0.3 to 0.5 region, aimed at measuring {Omega}. It is the latter that I want to discuss in this paper.

  13. Progress report on the Berkeley/Anglo-Australian Observatory high-redshift supernova search

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are two main efforts related to supernovae in progress at Berkeley. The first is an automated supernova search for nearby supernovae, which was already discussed by Carl Pennypacker at this conference. The second is a search for distant supernovae, in the z = 0.3 to 0.5 region, aimed at measuring Ω. It is the latter that I want to discuss in this paper. 3 refs., 18 figs

  14. Radioactive and mixed waste management plan for the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Hazardous Waste Handling Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Radioactive and Mixed Waste Management Plan for the Hazardous Waste Handling Facility at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is written to meet the requirements for an annual report of radioactive and mixed waste management activities outlined in DOE Order 5820.2A. Radioactive and mixed waste management activities during FY 1994 listed here include principal regulatory and environmental issues and the degree to which planned activities were accomplished

  15. Jornalero: the life and work of Latin American Day Laborers in Berkeley, California

    OpenAIRE

    Ordonez, Juan Thomas

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation is an ethnographic exploration of the everyday life of Latin American day laborers -jornaleros- in Berkeley, California. Based on more than two years of fieldwork consisting of participant observation on the streets and neighborhoods these men inhabit, my research follows the daily experience of marginalization of two-dozen immigrants. Working informally on street hiring sites day laborers actively participate in the US economy while they are marginalized through the very na...

  16. An Introduction to the 2001 Issue of the Berkeley Planning Journa

    OpenAIRE

    Dowall, David

    2001-01-01

    Planners have always been deeply interested in and concerned about the effects of technology on human settlements. There is a rich and var­ ied literature on technics and civilization, to borrow from Mumford's brilliant account ( 193 4). Whether looking at machines, autos, comput­ ers or the Internet, this literature provides a rich treasure-trove of social and historical analysis. This issue of the Berkeley Planningjournal makes a contribution to this topic by examining the effects of techno...

  17. Status of the Berkeley small cyclotron AMS [accelerator mass spectrometry] project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A small, low-energy cyclotron has been designed and built at Berkeley for direct detection dating of 14C. The system combines the use of a negative ion source to reject 14N with the high resolution of a cyclotron to reject other background ions. In order to allow the dating of old and small samples, the present system incorporates a high-current external ion source and injection beamline. The system is expected to be operational by mid-1987

  18. La critique du réalisme leibnizien dans le De Motu de Berkeley.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luc Peterschmitt

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available L’objet de Berkeley dans le De Motu est de marquer l’autonomie de la mécanique (ou dynamique et de la métaphysique, en montrant que le concept de force tel qu’on l’utilise en mécanique ne peut servir à déterminer ce qu’il en est de la nature des choses. Pour établir cette distinction entre ces deux domaines du savoir, Berkeley à la fois s’appuie sur et critique la notion leibnizienne de force : Leibniz assure la réalité de la force dérivative (concept mécanique en la fondant sur la forme substantielle des corps, ou force primitive (concept métaphysique, qui permet d’attribuer aux corps une efficace causale. En récusant la forme substantielle comme inconcevable, Berkeley ruine alors le réalisme leibnizien, en vertu du lien posé par Leibniz lui-même entre sa métaphysique et sa dynamique. Mais du coup, cela permet à Berkeley d’instaurer un nouveau rôle à la métaphysique face à la mécanique : non plus un rôle fondateur comme celui que lui assigne Leibniz, mais un rôle critique, celui d’une instance qui dit les conditions sous lesquelles l’usage des concept est valide en science.

  19. Gilbert Newton Lewis: his influence on physical-organic chemists at Berkeley

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvin, M.

    1982-03-01

    A review is presented of the historical contributions of Gilbert N. Lewis to science and a discussion of the influence of Lewis on the research of the members of the physical-organic staff at Berkeley, including Melvin Calvin, during the twenties, thirties and forties. Some specific examples are discussed. Also, the effect of Lewis, his science and administrative concepts in the creation of excellence in a department of chemistry are reviewed.

  20. Strategic Plan for Loss Reduction and Risk Management: University of California, Berkeley

    OpenAIRE

    Office of the Vice Provost, University of California, Berkeley; Disaster-Resistant University Steering Committee, University of California, Berkeley

    2000-01-01

    In the nearly three years since Chancellor Berdahl announced the creation of the Seismic Action plan for Facilities Enhancement and Renewal (SAFER), the UC Berkeley campus has intensified its attention to seismic safety issues. SAFER Program initiatives have changed the organizational structure, altered the landscape, and increased our understanding of the complex operational needs of the campus. This Strategic Risk Management Plan grows out of the SAFER Program, and advances its twin goals o...

  1. Gilbert Newton Lewis: his influence on physical-organic chemists at Berkeley

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review is presented of the historical contributions of Gilbert N. Lewis to science and a discussion of the influence of Lewis on the research of the members of the physical-organic staff at Berkeley, including Melvin Calvin, during the twenties, thirties and forties. Some specific examples are discussed. Also, the effect of Lewis, his science and administrative concepts in the creation of excellence in a department of chemistry are reviewed

  2. The design and implementation of Berkeley Lab's linuxcheckpoint/restart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duell, Jason

    2005-04-30

    This paper describes Berkeley Linux Checkpoint/Restart (BLCR), a linux kernel module that allows system-level checkpoints on a variety of Linux systems. BLCR can be used either as a stand alone system for checkpointing applications on a single machine, or as a component by a scheduling system or parallel communication library for checkpointing and restoring parallel jobs running on multiple machines. Integration with Message Passing Interface (MPI) and other parallel systems is described.

  3. Remote operation of DOE-1 on the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory CDC 7600, 6600, and 6400 computers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-03-01

    How to run the DOE-1 building energy analysis program on the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory CDC computers is described. An overview of the LBL operating system and how to run a job on the 7600 are presented. The DOE-1 program, a control card sequence for running the program, and how to store input, output, and intermediate files are discussed. A detailed description is given of the DOE-1 Weather Package.

  4. Ernest Orlando Berkeley National Laboratory - Fundamental and applied research on lean premixed combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ernest Orland Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) is the oldest of America's national laboratories and has been a leader in science and engineering technology for more than 65 years, serving as a powerful resource to meet Us national needs. As a multi-program Department of Energy laboratory, Berkeley Lab is dedicated to performing leading edge research in the biological, physical, materials, chemical, energy, environmental and computing sciences. Ernest Orlando Lawrence, the Lab's founder and the first of its nine Nobel prize winners, invented the cyclotron, which led to a Golden Age of particle physics and revolutionary discoveries about the nature of the universe. To this day, the Lab remains a world center for accelerator and detector innovation and design. The Lab is the birthplace of nuclear medicine and the cradle of invention for medical imaging. In the field of heart disease, Lab researchers were the first to isolate lipoproteins and the first to determine that the ratio of high density to low density lipoproteins is a strong indicator of heart disease risk. The demise of the dinosaurs--the revelation that they had been killed off by a massive comet or asteroid that had slammed into the Earth--was a theory developed here. The invention of the chemical laser, the unlocking of the secrets of photosynthesis--this is a short preview of the legacy of this Laboratory

  5. Ernest Orlando Berkeley National Laboratory - Fundamental and applied research on lean premixed combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Robert K.

    1999-07-07

    Ernest Orland Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) is the oldest of America's national laboratories and has been a leader in science and engineering technology for more than 65 years, serving as a powerful resource to meet Us national needs. As a multi-program Department of Energy laboratory, Berkeley Lab is dedicated to performing leading edge research in the biological, physical, materials, chemical, energy, environmental and computing sciences. Ernest Orlando Lawrence, the Lab's founder and the first of its nine Nobel prize winners, invented the cyclotron, which led to a Golden Age of particle physics and revolutionary discoveries about the nature of the universe. To this day, the Lab remains a world center for accelerator and detector innovation and design. The Lab is the birthplace of nuclear medicine and the cradle of invention for medical imaging. In the field of heart disease, Lab researchers were the first to isolate lipoproteins and the first to determine that the ratio of high density to low density lipoproteins is a strong indicator of heart disease risk. The demise of the dinosaurs--the revelation that they had been killed off by a massive comet or asteroid that had slammed into the Earth--was a theory developed here. The invention of the chemical laser, the unlocking of the secrets of photosynthesis--this is a short preview of the legacy of this Laboratory.

  6. Berkeley Lab's Saul Perlmutter wins E.O. Lawrence Award; scientist's work on supernovae reveals accelerating Universe

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Saul Perlmutter, from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Physics Division and leader of the Supernova Cosmology Project based there, has won the DOE's 2002 E.O. Lawrence Award in the physics category (2 pages).

  7. Hayward Fault rate constraints at Berkeley: Evaluation of the 335-meter Strawberry Creek offset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, P. L.

    2007-12-01

    At UC Berkeley the active channel of Strawberry Creek is offset 335 meters by the Hayward fault and two abandoned channels of Strawberry Creek are laterally offset 580 and 730 meters. These relationships record the displacement of the northern Hayward fault at Berkeley over a period of tens of millennia. The Strawberry Creek site has a similar geometry to the central San Andreas fault's Wallace Creek site, which arguably provides the best geological evidence of "millennial" fault kinematics in California (Sieh and Jahns, 1984). Slip rate determinations are an essential component of overall hazard evaluation for the Hayward fault, and this site is ripe to disclose a long-term form of this parameter, to contrast with geodetic and other geological rate evidence. Large offsets at the site may lower uncertainty in the rate equation relative to younger sites, as the affect of stream abandonment age, generally the greatest source of rate uncertainty, is greatly reduced. This is helpful here because it more-than-offsets uncertainties resulting from piercing projections to the fault. Strawberry Creek and its ancestral channels suggest west-side-up vertical deformation across the Hayward fault at this location. The development of the vertical deformation parameter will complement ongoing geodetic measurements, particularly InSAR, and motivate testing of other geological constraints. Up-to-the-west motion across the Hayward fault at Berkeley has important implications for the partitioning of strain and kinematics of the northern Hayward fault, and may explain anomalous up-on-the-west landforms elsewhere along the fault. For example, geological features of the western Berkeley Hills are consistent with rapid and recent uplift to the west of the fault. On the basis of a preliminary analysis of the offset channels of Strawberry Creek, up-to-the-west uplift is about 0.5mm/yr across the Hayward fault at Berkeley. If this is in fact the long-term rate, the 150 m height of the Hills

  8. Reactor Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Department of SCK-CEN offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutronics calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation, reactor safety and control and non-destructive analysis of reactor fuel. This expertise is applied in the Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments by means of neutron and gamma calculations. The activities of the Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Technologies in Nuclear Science programme cover several domains outside the department. Progress and achievements in these topical areas in 2000 are summarised

  9. Reactor Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SCK-CEN's Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Department offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutron and gamma calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation and control, reactor code benchmarking and reactor safety calculations. This expertise is applied in the Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 materials testing reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments by means of neutron and gamma calculations. The activities of the Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Technologies in Nuclear Science programme cover several domains outside the department. Progress and achievements in these topical areas in 2001 are summarised

  10. Reactor Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ait Abderrahim, A

    2001-04-01

    The Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Department of SCK-CEN offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutronics calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation, reactor safety and control and non-destructive analysis of reactor fuel. This expertise is applied in the Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments by means of neutron and gamma calculations. The activities of the Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Technologies in Nuclear Science programme cover several domains outside the department. Progress and achievements in these topical areas in 2000 are summarised.

  11. How Many Democrats per Republican at UC-Berkeley and Stanford? Voter Registration Data Across 23 Academic Departments

    OpenAIRE

    Klein, Daniel B.; Western, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    Using the records of the seven San Francisco Bay Area counties that surround University of California, Berkeley and Stanford University, we conducted a systematic and thorough study of the party registration of the Berkeley and Stanford faculty in 23 academic departments. The departments span the social sciences, humanities, hard sciences, math, law, journalism, engineering, medicine, and the business school. Of the total of 1497 individual names on the cumulative list, we obtained readings o...

  12. Costs, Culture, and Complexity: An Analysis of Technology Enhancements in a Large Lecture Course at UC Berkeley

    OpenAIRE

    Harley, Diane; Henke, Jonathan; Lawrence, Shannon; McMartin, Flora; Maher, Michael; Gawlik, Marytza; Muller, Parisa

    2003-01-01

    As colleges and universities nationwide anticipate enrolling more than two million new students over the next decade, UC Berkeley is exploring options for serving more students, more cost effectively, in large lecture courses. This research project analyzes economic and pedagogical questions related to the use of on-line lecture and laboratory material in a large introductory chemistry course at UC Berkeley. We undertook a quasi-experimental two-year study to determine if the utilization of o...

  13. Reactor operation

    CERN Document Server

    Shaw, J

    2013-01-01

    Reactor Operation covers the theoretical aspects and design information of nuclear reactors. This book is composed of nine chapters that also consider their control, calibration, and experimentation.The opening chapters present the general problems of reactor operation and the principles of reactor control and operation. The succeeding chapters deal with the instrumentation, start-up, pre-commissioning, and physical experiments of nuclear reactors. The remaining chapters are devoted to the control rod calibrations and temperature coefficient measurements in the reactor. These chapters also exp

  14. Reactor safeguards

    CERN Document Server

    Russell, Charles R

    2013-01-01

    Reactor Safeguards provides information for all who are interested in the subject of reactor safeguards. Much of the material is descriptive although some sections are written for the engineer or physicist directly concerned with hazards analysis or site selection problems. The book opens with an introductory chapter on radiation hazards, the construction of nuclear reactors, safety issues, and the operation of nuclear reactors. This is followed by separate chapters that discuss radioactive materials, reactor kinetics, control and safety systems, containment, safety features for water reactor

  15. Research Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martens, Frederick H. [Argonne National Laboratory; Jacobson, Norman H.

    1968-09-01

    This booklet discusses research reactors - reactors designed to provide a source of neutrons and/or gamma radiation for research, or to aid in the investigation of the effects of radiation on any type of material.

  16. Research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article proposes an overview of research reactors, i.e. nuclear reactors of less than 100 MW. Generally, these reactors are used as neutron generators for basic research in matter sciences and for technological research as a support to power reactors. The author proposes an overview of the general design of research reactors in terms of core size, of number of fissions, of neutron flow, of neutron space distribution. He outlines that this design is a compromise between a compact enough core, a sufficient experiment volume, and high enough power densities without affecting neutron performance or its experimental use. The author evokes the safety framework (same regulations as for power reactors, more constraining measures after Fukushima, international bodies). He presents the main characteristics and operation of the two families which represent almost all research reactors; firstly, heavy water reactors (photos, drawings and figures illustrate different examples); and secondly light water moderated and cooled reactors with a distinction between open core pool reactors like Melusine and Triton, pool reactors with containment, experimental fast breeder reactors (Rapsodie, the Russian BOR 60, the Chinese CEFR). The author describes the main uses of research reactors: basic research, applied and technological research, safety tests, production of radio-isotopes for medicine and industry, analysis of elements present under the form of traces at very low concentrations, non destructive testing, doping of silicon mono-crystalline ingots. The author then discusses the relationship between research reactors and non proliferation, and finally evokes perspectives (decrease of the number of research reactors in the world, the Jules Horowitz project)

  17. Reactor physics and reactor computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathematical methods and computer calculations for nuclear and thermonuclear reactor kinetics, reactor physics, neutron transport theory, core lattice parameters, waste treatment by transmutation, breeding, nuclear and thermonuclear fuels are the main interests of the conference

  18. Exploratory Research and Development Fund, FY 1990. Report on Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-05-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Exploratory R&D Fund FY 1990 report is compiled from annual reports submitted by principal investigators following the close of the fiscal year. This report describes the projects supported and summarizes their accomplishments. It constitutes a part of an Exploratory R&D Fund (ERF) planning and documentation process that includes an annual planning cycle, projection selection, implementation, and review. The research areas covered in this report are: Accelerator and fusion research; applied science; cell and molecular biology; chemical biodynamics; chemical sciences; earth sciences; engineering; information and computing sciences; materials sciences; nuclear science; physics and research medicine and radiation biophysics.

  19. High energy nucleus--nucleus studies at the Berkeley Bevalac. [Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, L.S.

    1976-09-01

    A survey of high-energy nucleus--nucleus experiments performed at the Berkeley Bevalac Facility is presented. Experimental results are divided into the general areas of peripheral and central collisions. Results on projectile and target fragmentation, total cross-section measurements, pion and photon production, and charged-particle multiplicities are stressed. Recently, there have been theoretical predictions concerning the possibility of observing new phenomena such as shock waves, pion condensates, or collapsed nuclear matter. Existing data relevant to some of these speculations are discussed. A brief discussion of future developments with high-energy nuclear beams is also presented. 27 figures, 1 table.

  20. Mixed waste certification plan for the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Hazardous Waste Handling Facility. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this plan is to describe the organization and methodology for the certification of mixed waste handled in the Hazardous Waste Handling Facility (HWHF) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). This plan is composed to meet the requirements found in the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) Solid Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) and follows the suggested outline provided by WHC in the letter of April 26, 1990, to Dr. R.H. Thomas, Occupational Health Division, LBL. Mixed waste is to be transferred to the WHC Hanford Site Central Waste Complex and Burial Grounds in Hanford, Washington

  1. Research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are currently 284 research reactors in operation, and 12 under construction around the world. Of the operating reactors, nearly two-thirds are used exclusively for research, and the rest for a variety of purposes, including training, testing, and critical assembly. For more than 50 years, research reactor programs have contributed greatly to the scientific and educational communities. Today, six of the world's research reactors are being shut down, three of which are in the USA. With government budget constraints and the growing proliferation concerns surrounding the use of highly enriched uranium in some of these reactors, the future of nuclear research could be impacted

  2. Reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Object: To provide a jet and missile protective wall of a configuration being inflated toward the center of a reactor container on the inside of a body of the reactor container disposed within a biological shield wall to thereby increase safety of the reactor container. Structure: A jet and missile protective wall comprised of curved surfaces internally formed with a plurality of arch inflations filled with concrete between inner and outer iron plates and shape steel beam is provided between a reactor container surrounded by a biological shield wall and a thermal shield wall surrounding the reactor pressure vessel, and an adiabatic heat insulating material is filled in space therebetween. (Yoshino, Y.)

  3. Environmental health-risk assessment for tritium releases at the National Tritium Labeling Facility at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKone, T.E.; Brand, K.P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Health and Ecological Assessment Div.; Shan, C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div.

    1997-04-01

    This risk assessment calculates the probability of experiencing health effects, including cancer incidence due to tritium exposure for three groups of people: (1) LBNL workers near the LBNL facility--Building 75--that uses tritium; (2) other workers at LBNL and nearby neighbors; and (3) people who use the UC Berkeley campus area, and some Berkeley residents. All of these groups share the same probability of health effects from the background radiation from natural sources in the Berkeley area environment, including an increased risk of developing a cancer of 11,000 chances per million. In calculating risk the authors assumed continuous operation in Building 75 for at least a human lifetime. Under this assumption, LBNL workers located near Building 75 have an additional risk of 60 chances out of one million to suffer a cancer; other workers at LBNL and people who live near LBNL have an additional risk of six chances out of one million over a lifetime of exposure; and users of the UC Berkeley campus area and other residents of Berkeley have an additional risk of less than once chance out of one million over a lifetime.

  4. Environmental health-risk assessment for tritium releases at the National Tritium Labeling Facility at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This risk assessment calculates the probability of experiencing health effects, including cancer incidence due to tritium exposure for three groups of people: (1) LBNL workers near the LBNL facility--Building 75--that uses tritium; (2) other workers at LBNL and nearby neighbors; and (3) people who use the UC Berkeley campus area, and some Berkeley residents. All of these groups share the same probability of health effects from the background radiation from natural sources in the Berkeley area environment, including an increased risk of developing a cancer of 11,000 chances per million. In calculating risk the authors assumed continuous operation in Building 75 for at least a human lifetime. Under this assumption, LBNL workers located near Building 75 have an additional risk of 60 chances out of one million to suffer a cancer; other workers at LBNL and people who live near LBNL have an additional risk of six chances out of one million over a lifetime of exposure; and users of the UC Berkeley campus area and other residents of Berkeley have an additional risk of less than once chance out of one million over a lifetime

  5. Searching for multiple stellar populations in the massive, old open cluster Berkeley 39

    CERN Document Server

    Bragaglia, A; Carretta, E; D'Orazi, V; Sneden, C; Lucatello, S

    2012-01-01

    The most massive star clusters include several generations of stars with a different chemical composition (mainly revealed by an Na-O anti-correlation) while low-mass star clusters appear to be chemically homogeneous. We are investigating the chemical composition of several clusters with masses of a few 10^4 Msun to establish the lower mass limit for the multiple stellar population phenomenon. Using FLAMES@VLT spectra we determine abundances of Fe, O, Na, and several other elements (alpha, Fe-peak, and neutron-capture elements) in the old open cluster Berkeley 39. This is a massive open cluster: M~10^4 Msun, approximately at the border between small globular clusters and large open clusters. Our sample size of about 30 stars is one of the largest studied for abundances in any open cluster to date, and will be useful to determine improved cluster parameters, such as age, distance, and reddening when coupled with precise, well-calibrated photometry. We find that Berkeley 39 is slightly metal-poor, =-0.20, in ag...

  6. NGC 1817, NGC 2141, and Berkeley 81: three BOCCE clusters of intermediate age

    CERN Document Server

    Donati, P; Bragaglia, A; Cignoni, M; Tosi, M

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we analyse the evolutionary status of three open clusters: NGC 1817, NGC 2141, and Berkeley 81. They are all of intermediate age, two are located in the Galactic anti-centre direction while the third one is located in the Galactic centre direction. All of them were observed with LBC@LBT using the Bessel B, V, and I filters. The cluster parameters have been obtained using the synthetic colour-magnitude diagram (CMD) method, i.e. the direct comparison of the observational CMDs with a library of synthetic CMDs generated with different evolutionary sets (Padova, FRANEC, and FST). This analysis shows that NGC 1817 has subsolar metallicity, age between 0.8 and 1.2 Gyr, reddening E(B-V) in the range 0.21 and 0.34, and distance modulus (m-M)_0 of about 10.9; NGC 2141 is older, with age in the range 1.25 and 1.9 Gyr, E(B-V) between 0.36 and 0.45, (m-M)_0 between 11.95 and 12.21, and subsolar metallicity; Berkeley~81 has metallicity about solar, with age between 0.75 and 1.0 Gyr, has reddening E(B-V)~0.90...

  7. A New Center for Science Education at UC Berkeley's Space Sciences Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, I.

    1998-01-01

    The Space Sciences Laboratory at UC Berkeley has established a new Center for Science Education through the Laboratory's Senior Fellow program. The Center has a two-fold mission: (1) science education research through collaborations with UCB Graduate School of Education faculty, and (2) education and outreach projects that bring NASA research to the K-14 and general public communities. The Center is the host of two major education and outreach programs funded by NASA - The Sun-Earth Connection Education Forum (SECEF) and the Science Education Gateway (SEGway) Project. The SECEF - a collaborative between UC Berkeley and NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center - is one of four Forums that have been funded through the Office of Space Science as part of their Education Ecosystem. SEGway is a partnership between science research centers, science museums, and teachers, for the purpose of developing Internet-based, inquiry activities for the K-12 classroom that tap NASA remote sensing data. We will describe the Center for Science Education's history and vision, as well as summarize our core programs.

  8. Catalog of Research Abstracts, 1993: Partnership opportunities at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    The 1993 edition of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory`s Catalog of Research Abstracts is a comprehensive listing of ongoing research projects in LBL`s ten research divisions. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is a major multi-program national laboratory managed by the University of California for the US Department of Energy (DOE). LBL has more than 3000 employees, including over 1000 scientists and engineers. With an annual budget of approximately $250 million, LBL conducts a wide range of research activities, many that address the long-term needs of American industry and have the potential for a positive impact on US competitiveness. LBL actively seeks to share its expertise with the private sector to increase US competitiveness in world markets. LBL has transferable expertise in conservation and renewable energy, environmental remediation, materials sciences, computing sciences, and biotechnology, which includes fundamental genetic research and nuclear medicine. This catalog gives an excellent overview of LBL`s expertise, and is a good resource for those seeking partnerships with national laboratories. Such partnerships allow private enterprise access to the exceptional scientific and engineering capabilities of the federal laboratory systems. Such arrangements also leverage the research and development resources of the private partner. Most importantly, they are a means of accessing the cutting-edge technologies and innovations being discovered every day in our federal laboratories.

  9. Environmental assessment for the recycling of slightly activated copper coil windings from the 184-Inch Cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-08-02

    The proposed action is to recycle slightly activated copper that is currently stored in a warehouse leased by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) to a scrap metal dealer. Subsequent reutilization of the copper would be unrestricted. This document addresses the potential environmental effects of recycling and reutilizing the activated copper. In addition, the potential environmental effects of possible future uses by the dealer are addressed. Direct environmental effects from the proposed action are assessed, such as air emissions from reprocessing the activated copper, as well as indirect beneficial effects, such as averting air emissions that would result from mining and smelting an equivalent quantity of copper ore. Evaluation of the human health impacts of the proposed action focuses on the pertinent issues of radiological doses and protection of workers and the public. Five alternatives to the proposed action are considered, and their associated potential impacts are addressed. The no-action alternative is the continued storage of the activated copper at the LBL warehouse. Two recycling alternatives are considered: recycling the activated copper at the Scientific Ecology Group (SEG) facility for re-use at a DOE facility and selling or giving the activated copper to a foreign government. In addition, two disposal alternatives evaluate the impacts attributable to disposing of the activated copper either at a local sanitary landfill or at the Hanford Low-Level Waste Burial Site. The proposed project and alternatives include no new construction or development of new industry.

  10. Reactor building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The whole reactor building is accommodated in a shaft and is sealed level with the earth's surface by a building ceiling, which provides protection against penetration due to external effects. The building ceiling is supported on walls of the reactor building, which line the shaft and transfer the vertical components of forces to the foundations. The thickness of the walls is designed to withstand horizontal pressure waves in the floor. The building ceiling has an opening above the reactor, which must be closed by cover plates. Operating equipment for the reactor can be situated above the building ceiling. (orig./HP)

  11. Heterogeneous reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The microscopic study of a cell is meant for the determination of the infinite multiplication factor of the cell, which is given by the four factor formula: K(infinite) = n(epsilon)pf. The analysis of an homogeneous reactor is similar to that of an heterogeneous reactor, but each factor of the four factor formula can not be calculated by the formulas developed in the case of an homogeneous reactor. A great number of methods was developed for the calculation of heterogeneous reactors and some of them are discussed. (Author)

  12. Decommissioning of nuclear reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The decision-making process involving the decommissioning of the British graphite-moderated, gas-cooled Magnox power stations is complex. There are timing, engineering, waste disposal, cost and lost generation capacity factors and the ultimate uptake of radiation dose to consider and, bearing on all of these, the overall decision of when and how to proceed with decommissioning may be heavily weighed by political and public tolerance dimensions. These factors and dimensions are briefly reviewed with reference to the ageing Magnox nuclear power stations, of which Berkeley and Hunterston A are now closed down and undergoing the first stages of decommissioning and Trawsfynydd, although still considered as available capacity, has had both reactors closed down since February 1991 and is awaiting substantiation and acceptance of a revised reactor pressure vessel safety case. Although the other first-generation Magnox power station at Hinkley Point, Bradwell, Dungeness and Sizewell are operational, it is most doubtful that these stations will be able to eke out a generating function for much longer. It is concluded that the British nuclear industry has adopted a policy of deferred decommissioning, that is delaying the process of complete dismantlement of the radioactive components and assemblies for at least one hundred years following close-down of the plant. (Author)

  13. Plasma reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Molina Mansilla, Ricardo; Erra Serrabasa, Pilar; Bertrán Serra, Enric

    2008-01-01

    [EN] A plasma reactor that can operate in a wide pressure range, from vacuum and low pressures to atmospheric pressure and higher pressures. The plasma reactor is also able to regulate other important settings and can be used for processing a wide range of different samples, such as relatively large samples or samples with rough surfaces.

  14. Reactor physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress in research on reactor physics in 1997 at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK/CEN is described. Activities in the following four domains are discussed: core physics, ex-core neutron transport, experiments in Materials Testing Reactors, international benchmarks

  15. Fifty Years of Progress, 1937-1987 [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL, LBNL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budinger, T. F. (ed.)

    1987-01-01

    This booklet was prepared for the 50th anniversary of medical and biological research at the Donner Laboratory and the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory of the University of California. The intent is to present historical facts and to highlight important facets of fifty years of accomplishments in medical and biological sciences. A list of selected scientific publications from 1937 to 1960 is included to demonstrate the character and lasting importance of early pioneering work. The organizational concept is to show the research themes starting with the history, then discoveries of medically important radionuclides, then the use of accelerated charged particles in therapy, next human physiology studies then sequentially studies of biology from tissues to macromolecules; and finally studies of the genetic code.

  16. Photometric study of W UMa type binaries in the old open cluster Berkeley 39

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study of W UMa binary systems gives a wealth of information about their nature as well as their parent bodies (if any), like clusters. In this paper, we present the I passband photometric solutions of four W UMa binaries in the open cluster Berkeley 39 using the latest version of the W-D program. The result shows that two binary systems are W-subtype W UMa binary systems and the other two systems are H-subtype W UMa binary systems. No third body has been found in any of the four systems. We found a correlation between the period and mass-ratio as well as temperature and mass-ratio for the respective variables, which is similar to the relationship between mass ratio and total mass of the contact binaries as shown by van't Veer and Li et al.

  17. Studies, Transport and Treatment Concept for Boilers from Berkeley NPP, England - 13599

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In November 2011 Studsvik was awarded a contract to transport five decommissioned boilers from the Berkeley Nuclear Licensed Site in the UK to the Studsvik Nuclear Site in Sweden for metal treatment and recycling. A key objective of the project was to remove the boilers from the site by 31 March 2012 and this was successfully achieved with all boilers off site by 22 March and delivered to Studsvik on 6 April. Four boilers have been processed and the fifth is planned for completion by end of December 2012.The project had many challenges including a very tight timescale and has been successfully delivered to cost and ahead of the baseline programme. This paper describes the project and the experience gained from treatment of the first four boilers. It is the first UK project to send large components overseas for recycling and provides new insight into the processing of Magnox gas-circuit components. (authors)

  18. U.C. Berkeley Nuclear Engineering curriculum and research enhancement. Final report for award DE-FG03-94ER-76010 and progress report for award DE-FG03-95NE-38105, February 15, 1993 - September 29, 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses the progress achieved during the multi-year program for curriculum and research enhancement for the Department of Nuclear Engineering at the University of California, Berkeley. Due to its declining utility for research, six years ago the department decommissioned the TRIGA research reactor, to make the space available for an accelerator-driven rotating target neutron source for fusion studies. The DOE has traditionally supported these university reactors, in part because they provide a vital educational experience for undergraduate students in reactor operations. Thus in 1993 the department was determined to use its DOE award to replace the undergraduate education that the research reactor formerly provided with an equal or superior educational experience. As this progress report indicates, they can now make a compelling argument that the effort has been successful. Students now have the opportunity to spend a full week at the Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, after spending two weeks full time at Berkeley studying plant operations. The students spend a full day operating the plant using the full-scale simulator, spend a day each individually and in small groups with operations and engineering personnel, and by the end of the week are intimately familiar with the basics of nuclear power plant operations, at a depth that can not be achieved with a university research reactor. A primary mission for nuclear engineering departments will remain the education of the engineers who will be responsible for the safe operation of the nation's existing nuclear power plants. In the past, university research reactors have provided a crucial element in that education. As more research reactors are decommissioned in response to evolving research needs, the program developed may serve as a useful model for other nuclear engineering departments

  19. U.C. Berkeley Nuclear Engineering curriculum and research enhancement. Final report for award DE-FG03-94ER-76010 and progress report for award DE-FG03-95NE-38105, February 15, 1993--September 29, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kastenberg, W.; Peterson, P.F.

    1996-10-24

    This report discusses the progress achieved during the multi-year program for curriculum and research enhancement for the Department of Nuclear Engineering at the University of California, Berkeley. Due to its declining utility for research, six years ago the department decommissioned the TRIGA research reactor, to make the space available for an accelerator-driven rotating target neutron source for fusion studies. The DOE has traditionally supported these university reactors, in part because they provide a vital educational experience for undergraduate students in reactor operations. Thus in 1993 the department was determined to use its DOE award to replace the undergraduate education that the research reactor formerly provided with an equal or superior educational experience. As this progress report indicates, they can now make a compelling argument that the effort has been successful. Students now have the opportunity to spend a full week at the Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, after spending two weeks full time at Berkeley studying plant operations. The students spend a full day operating the plant using the full-scale simulator, spend a day each individually and in small groups with operations and engineering personnel, and by the end of the week are intimately familiar with the basics of nuclear power plant operations, at a depth that can not be achieved with a university research reactor. A primary mission for nuclear engineering departments will remain the education of the engineers who will be responsible for the safe operation of the nation`s existing nuclear power plants. In the past, university research reactors have provided a crucial element in that education. As more research reactors are decommissioned in response to evolving research needs, the program developed may serve as a useful model for other nuclear engineering departments.

  20. UC Berkeley's Adaptations to the Crisis of Public Higher Education in the US: Privatization? Commercialization? or Hybridization? Research & Occasional Paper Series: CSHE.17.13

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breslauer, George W.

    2013-01-01

    The University of California at Berkeley now delivers more to the public of California than it ever has, and it does this on the basis of proportionally less funding by the State government than it has ever received. This claim may come as a surprise, since it is often said that Berkeley is in the process of privatizing, becoming less of a public…

  1. Berkeley Lab's Saul Perlmutter wins E.O. Lawrence Award scientist's work on supernovae reveals accelerating universe

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    "Saul Perlmutter, a member of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's Physics Division and leader of the international Supernova Cosmology Project based there, has won the Department of Energy's 2002 E.O. Lawrence Award in the physics category" (1/2 page).

  2. Compact Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weyl's Gauge Principle of 1929 has been used to establish Weyl's Quantum Principle (WQP) that requires that the Weyl scale factor should be unity. It has been shown that the WQP requires the following: quantum mechanics must be used to determine system states; the electrostatic potential must be non-singular and quantified; interactions between particles with different electric charges (i.e. electron and proton) do not obey Newton's Third Law at sub-nuclear separations, and nuclear particles may be much different than expected using the standard model. The above WQP requirements lead to a potential fusion reactor wherein deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei. Because the deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei at temperatures and energies lower than specified by the standard model there is no harmful radiation as a byproduct of this fusion process. Therefore, a reactor using this reaction does not need any shielding to contain such radiation. The energy released from each reaction and the absence of shielding makes the deuterium-plus-deuterium-to-helium (DDH) reactor very compact when compared to other reactors, both fission and fusion types. Moreover, the potential energy output per reactor weight and the absence of harmful radiation makes the DDH reactor an ideal candidate for space power. The logic is summarized by which the WQP requires the above conditions that make the prediction of DDH possible. The details of the DDH reaction will be presented along with the specifics of why the DDH reactor may be made to cause two deuterium nuclei to preferentially fuse to a helium nucleus. The presentation will also indicate the calculations needed to predict the reactor temperature as a function of fuel loading, reactor size, and desired output and will include the progress achieved to date

  3. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, H.L.

    1960-09-20

    A nuclear reactor is described comprising fissionable material dispersed in graphite blocks, helium filling the voids of the blocks and the spaces therebetween, and means other than the helium in thermal conductive contact with the graphite for removing heat.

  4. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, H.I.; Smith, R.C.

    1958-01-21

    This patent relates to nuclear reactors of the type which use a liquid fuel, such as a solution of uranyl sulfate in ordinary water which acts as the moderator. The reactor is comprised of a spherical vessel having a diameter of about 12 inches substantially surrounded by a reflector of beryllium oxide. Conventionnl control rods and safety rods are operated in slots in the reflector outside the vessel to control the operation of the reactor. An additional means for increasing the safety factor of the reactor by raising the ratio of delayed neutrons to prompt neutrons, is provided and consists of a soluble sulfate salt of beryllium dissolved in the liquid fuel in the proper proportion to obtain the result desired.

  5. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This draft chart contains graphical symbols from which the type of (nuclear) reactor can be seen. They will serve as illustrations for graphical sketches. Important features of the individual reactor types are marked out graphically. The user can combine these symbols to characterize a specific reactor type. The basic graphical symbol is a square with a point in the centre. Functional groups can be depicted for closer specification. If two functional groups are not clearly separated, this is symbolized by a dotted line or a channel. Supply and discharge lines for coolant, moderator and fuel are specified in accordance with DIN 2481 and can be further specified by additional symbols if necessary. The examples in the paper show several different reactor types. (orig./AK)

  6. Multifunctional reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Westerterp, K.R.

    1992-01-01

    Multifunctional reactors are single pieces of equipment in which, besides the reaction, other functions are carried out simultaneously. The other functions can be a heat, mass or momentum transfer operation and even another reaction. Multifunctional reactors are not new, but they have received much emphasis in research in the last decade. A survey is given of modern developments and the first successful applications on a large scale. It is explained why their application in many instances is ...

  7. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, C.R.

    1962-07-24

    A fluidized bed nuclear reactor and a method of operating such a reactor are described. In the design means are provided for flowing a liquid moderator upwardly through the center of a bed of pellets of a nentron-fissionable material at such a rate as to obtain particulate fluidization while constraining the lower pontion of the bed into a conical shape. A smooth circulation of particles rising in the center and falling at the outside of the bed is thereby established. (AEC)

  8. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to reduce neutron embrittlement of the pressue vessel of an LWR, blanked off elements are fitted at the edge of the reactor core, with the same dimensions as the fuel elements. They are parallel to each other, and to the edge of the reactor taking the place of fuel rods, and are plates of neutron-absorbing material (stainless steel, boron steel, borated Al). (HP)

  9. Breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reasons for the development of fast reactors are briefly reviewed (a propitious neutron balance oriented towards a maximum uranium burnup) and its special requirements (cooling, fissile material density and reprocessing) discussed. The three stages in the French program of fast reactor development are outlined with Rapsodie at Cadarache, Phenix at Marcoule, and Super Phenix at Creys-Malville. The more specific features of the program of research and development are emphasized: kinetics and the core, the fuel and the components

  10. Research reactors - an overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, C.D.

    1997-03-01

    A broad overview of different types of research and type reactors is provided in this paper. Reactor designs and operating conditions are briefly described for four reactors. The reactor types described include swimming pool reactors, the High Flux Isotope Reactor, the Mark I TRIGA reactor, and the Advanced Neutron Source reactor. Emphasis in the descriptions is placed on safety-related features of the reactors. 7 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Genotoxicity and antigenotoxicity assessment of shiitake (Lentinula edodes (Berkeley Pegler using the Comet assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CK Miyaji

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The mushroom shiitake (Lentinula edodes (Berkeley Pegler is been widely consumed in many countries, including Brazil, because of its pleasant flavor and reports of its therapeutic properties, although there is little available information on the genotoxicity and/or antigenotoxicity of this mushroom. We used the Comet assay and HEp-2 cells to evaluate the in vitro genotoxic and antigenotoxic activity of aqueous extracts of shiitake prepared in three different concentrations (0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 mg/mL and three different temperatures (4, 22 and 60 °C, using methyl methanesulfonate (MMS as a positive control and untreated cells as a negative control. Two concentrations (1.0 and 1.5 mg/mL of extract prepared at 4 °C and all of the concentrations prepared at 22 ± 2 and 60 °C showed moderate genotoxic activity. To test the protective effect of the three concentrations of the extracts against the genotoxicity induced by methyl methanesulfonate, three protocols were used: pre-treatment, simultaneous-treatment and post-treatment. Treatments were repeated for all combinations of preparation temperature and concentration. Two extracts (22 ± 2 °C 1.0 mg/mL (simultaneous-treatment and 4 °C 0.5 mg/mL (post-treatment showed antigenotoxic activity.

  12. Berkeley Supernova Ia Program II: Initial Analysis of Spectra Obtained Near Maximum Brightness

    CERN Document Server

    Silverman, Jeffrey M; Filippenko, Alexei V

    2012-01-01

    In this second paper in a series we present measurements of spectral features of 432 low-redshift (z < 0.1) optical spectra of 261 Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) within 20 d of maximum brightness. The data were obtained from 1989 through the end of 2008 as part of the Berkeley SN Ia Program (BSNIP) and are presented in BSNIP I (Silverman et al., submitted). We describe in detail our method of automated, robust spectral feature definition and measurement which expands upon similar previous studies. Using this procedure, we attempt to measure expansion velocities, pseudo-equivalent widths (pEW), spectral feature depths, and fluxes at the centre and endpoints of each of nine major spectral feature complexes. A sanity check of the consistency of our measurements is performed using our data (as well as a separate spectral dataset). We investigate how velocity and pEW evolve with time and how they correlate with each other. Various spectral classification schemes are employed and quantitative spectral differences a...

  13. Analysis, Design, and Evaluation of the UC-Berkeley Wave-Energy Extractor

    KAUST Repository

    Yeung, Ronald W.

    2010-01-01

    This paper evaluates the technical feasibility and performance characteristics of an ocean-wave energy to electrical energy conversion device that is based on a moving linear generator. The UC-Berkeley design consists of a cylindrical floater, acting as a rotor, which drives a stator consisting of two banks of wound coils. The performance of such a device in waves depends on the hydrodynamics of the floater, the motion of which is strongly coupled to the electromagnetic properties of the generator. Mathematical models are developed to reveal the critical hurdles that can affect the efficiency of the design. A working physical unit is also constructed. The linear generator is first tested in a dry environment to quantify its performance. The complete physical floater and generator system is then tested in a wave tank with a computer-controlled wavemaker. Measurements are compared with theoretical predictions to allow an assessment of the viability of the design and future directions for improvements. Copyright © 2010 by ASME.

  14. Design, Analysis, and Evaluation of the UC-Berkeley Wave-Energy Extractor

    KAUST Repository

    Yeung, Ronald W.

    2012-01-01

    This paper evaluates the technical feasibility and performance characteristics of an ocean-wave energy to electrical energy conversion device that is based on a moving linear generator. The UC-Berkeley design consists of a cylindrical floater, acting as a rotor, which drives a stator consisting of two banks of wound coils. The performance of such a device in waves depends on the hydrodynamics of the floater, the motion of which is strongly coupled to the electromagnetic properties of the generator. Mathematical models are developed to reveal the critical hurdles that can affect the efficiency of the design. A working physical unit is also constructed. The linear generator is first tested in a dry environment to quantify its performance. The complete physical floater and generator system is then tested in a wave tank with a computer-controlled wavemaker. Measurements are compared with theoretical predictions to allow an assessment of the viability of the design and the future directions for improvements. © 2012 American Society of Mechanical Engineers.

  15. Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory institutional plan, FY 1996--2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    The FY 1996--2001 Institutional Plan provides an overview of the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory mission, strategic plan, core business areas, critical success factors, and the resource requirements to fulfill its mission in support of national needs in fundamental science and technology, energy resources, and environmental quality. The Laboratory Strategic Plan section identifies long-range conditions that will influence the Laboratory, as well as potential research trends and management implications. The Core Business Areas section identifies those initiatives that are potential new research programs representing major long-term opportunities for the Laboratory, and the resources required for their implementation. It also summarizes current programs and potential changes in research program activity, science and technology partnerships, and university and science education. The Critical Success Factors section reviews human resources; work force diversity; environment, safety, and health programs; management practices; site and facility needs; and communications and trust. The Resource Projections are estimates of required budgetary authority for the Laboratory`s ongoing research programs. The Institutional Plan is a management report for integration with the Department of Energy`s strategic planning activities, developed through an annual planning process. The plan identifies technical and administrative directions in the context of the national energy policy and research needs and the Department of Energy`s program planning initiatives. Preparation of the plan is coordinated by the Office of Planning and Communications from information contributed by the Laboratory`s scientific and support divisions.

  16. The Berkeley Low Background Facility and the Black Hills State University Underground Campus at SURF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Keenan; Mount, Brianna; Lesko, Kevin; Norman, Eric; Smith, Alan; Poon, Alan; Chan, Yuen-Dat

    2015-10-01

    The Berkeley Low Background Facility at LBNL provides a variety of low background gamma spectroscopy services to a variety of projects and experiments. It operates HPGe spectrometers in two unique facilities: a surface low background lab at LBNL and underground (4300 m.w.e.) at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, SD. A large component of the measurements performed by the BLBF are for ultralow background experiments concerned with U, Th, K, and other radioisotopes within candidate construction materials to be used to construct sensitive detectors, such as those studying dark matter or neutrinos. The BLBF also makes a variety of environmental measurements in search of other radioisotopes, such as fallout from the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident in 2011 and other radioisotope monitoring activities. A general overview of the services and facilities will be presented. In 2015, the BLBF will be relocating its underground counting stations to a new, dedicated space on the 4850L of SURF. The Black Hills State University Underground Campus will host several low background counting stations and operate in a coordinated manner to provide low background measurements to the scientific community. An overview and description of the BHUC will be presented.

  17. The SEMATECH Berkeley MET pushing EUV development beyond 22-nm half pitch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naulleau, P.; Anderson, C. N.; Backlea-an, L.-M.; Chan, D.; Denham, P.; George, S.; Goldberg, K. A.; Hoef, B.; Jones, G.; Koh, C.; La Fontaine, B.; McClinton, B.; Miyakawa, R.; Montgomery, W.; Rekawa, S.; Wallow, T.

    2010-03-18

    Microfield exposure tools (METs) play a crucial role in the development of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) resists and masks, One of these tools is the SEMATECH Berkeley 0.3 numerical aperture (NA) MET, Using conventional illumination this tool is limited to approximately 22-nm half pitch resolution. However, resolution enhancement techniques have been used to push the patterning capabilities of this tool to half pitches of 18 nm and below, This resolution was achieved in a new imageable hard mask which also supports contact printing down to 22 nm with conventional illumination. Along with resolution, line-edge roughness is another crucial hurdle facing EUV resists, Much of the resist LER, however, can be attributed to the mask. We have shown that intenssionally aggressive mask cleaning on an older generation mask causes correlated LER in photoresist to increase from 3.4 nm to 4,0 nm, We have also shown that new generation EUV masks (100 pm of substrate roughness) can achieve correlated LER values of 1.1 nm, a 3x improvement over the correlated LER of older generation EUV masks (230 pm of substrate roughness), Finally, a 0.5-NA MET has been proposed that will address the needs of EUV development at the 16-nm node and beyond, The tool will support an ultimate resolution of 8 nm half-pitch and generalized printing using conventional illumination down to 12 nm half pitch.

  18. The SEMATECH Berkeley MET: extending EUV learning to 16-nm half pitch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Christopher N.; Baclea-an, Lorie Mae; Denham, Paul E.; George, Simi; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Jones, Michael; Smith, Nathan; Wallow, Thomas; Montgomery, Warren; Naulleau, Patrick P.

    2011-03-18

    Several high-performing resists identified in the past two years have been exposed at the 0.3-numerical-aperture (NA) SEMATECH Berkeley Microfield Exposure Tool (BMET) with an engineered dipole illumination optimized for 18-nm half pitch. Five chemically amplified platforms were found to support 20-nm dense patterning at a film thickness of approximately 45 nm. At 19-nm half pitch, however, scattered bridging kept all of these resists from cleanly resolving larger areas of dense features. At 18-nm half pitch, none of the resists were are able to cleanly resolve a single line within a bulk pattern. With this same illumination a directly imageable metal oxide hardmask showed excellent performance from 22-nm half pitch to 17-nm half pitch, and good performance at 16-nm half pitch, closely following the predicted aerial image contrast. This indicates that observed limitations of the chemically amplified resists are indeed coming from the resist and not from a shortcoming of the exposure tool. The imageable hardmask was also exposed using a Pseudo Phase-Shift-Mask technique and achieved clean printing of 15-nm half pitch lines and modulation all the way down to the theoretical 12.5-nm resolution limit of the 0.3-NA SEMATECH BMET.

  19. Reactor utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1962, the RA reactor was operated almost three times more than in 1961, producing total of 25 555 MWh. Diagram containing comparative data about reactor operation for 1960, 1961, and 1962, percent of fuel used and U-235 burnup shows increase in reactor operation. Number of samples irradiated was 659, number of experiments done was 16. mean powered level was 5.93 MW. Fuel was added into the core twice during the reporting year. In fact the core was increased from 56 to 68 fuel channels and later to 84 fuel channels. Fuel was added to the core when the reactivity worth decreased to the minimum operation level due to burnup. In addition to this 5 central fuel channels were exchanged with fresh fuel in february for the purpose of irradiation in the VISA-2 channel

  20. Reactor Neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Lasserre, T; Lasserre, Thierry; Sobel, Henry W.

    2005-01-01

    We review the status and the results of reactor neutrino experiments, that toe the cutting edge of neutrino research. Short baseline experiments have provided the measurement of the reactor neutrino spectrum, and are still searching for important phenomena such as the neutrino magnetic moment. They could open the door to the measurement of coherent neutrino scattering in a near future. Middle and long baseline oscillation experiments at Chooz and KamLAND have played a relevant role in neutrino oscillation physics in the last years. It is now widely accepted that a new middle baseline disappearance reactor neutrino experiment with multiple detectors could provide a clean measurement of the last undetermined neutrino mixing angle theta13. We conclude by opening on possible use of neutrinos for Society: NonProliferation of Nuclear materials and Geophysics.

  1. Compte rendu de : Luc Peterschmitt, Berkeley et la chimie. Une philosophie pour la chimie au XVIIIe siècle

    OpenAIRE

    François Pépin

    2012-01-01

    Ce livre, issu d’une thèse de doctorat sur Berkeley et les sciences, constitue la première étude systématique des rapports entre Berkeley et la chimie. C’est aussi une tentative originale pour examiner la cohérence et la pertinence d’un des derniers textes de Berkeley, la Siris, souvent considérée comme un ouvrage mineur, voire comme une erreur de vieillesse. Ces deux projets novateurs se croisent, puisque c’est par la philosophie de la chimie que Luc Peterschmitt cherche à montrer l’intérêt ...

  2. Compte rendu de : Luc Peterschmitt, Berkeley et la chimie. Une philosophie pour la chimie au XVIIIe siècle

    OpenAIRE

    Pépin, François

    2014-01-01

    Ce livre, issu d’une thèse de doctorat sur Berkeley et les sciences, constitue la première étude systématique des rapports entre Berkeley et la chimie. C’est aussi une tentative originale pour examiner la cohérence et la pertinence d’un des derniers textes de Berkeley, la Siris, souvent considérée comme un ouvrage mineur, voire comme une erreur de vieillesse. Ces deux projets novateurs se croisent, puisque c’est par la philosophie de la chimie que Luc Peterschmitt cherche à montrer l’intérêt ...

  3. Guidelines for generators to meet HWHF acceptance requirements for hazardous, radioactive, and mixed wastes at Berkeley Lab. Revision 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert, R.

    1996-06-01

    This document provides performance standards that one, as a generator of hazardous chemical, radioactive, or mixed wastes at the Berkeley Lab, must meet to manage their waste to protect Berkeley Lab staff and the environment, comply with waste regulations and ensure the continued safe operation of the workplace, have the waste transferred to the correct Waste Handling Facility, and enable the Environment, Health and Safety (EH and S) Division to properly pick up, manage, and ultimately send the waste off site for recycling, treatment, or disposal. If one uses and generates any of these wastes, one must establish a Satellite Accumulation Area and follow the guidelines in the appropriate section of this document. Topics include minimization of wastes, characterization of the wastes, containers, segregation, labeling, empty containers, and spill cleanup and reporting.

  4. Control system for the 2nd generation Berkeley automounters (BAM2) at GM/CA-CAT macromolecular crystallography beamlines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GM/CA-CAT at Sector 23 of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) is an NIH funded facility for crystallographic structure determination of biological macromolecules by X-ray diffraction. A second-generation Berkeley automounter is being integrated into the beamline control system at the 23BM experimental station. This new device replaces the previous all-pneumatic gripper motions with a combination of pneumatics and XYZ motorized linear stages. The latter adds a higher degree of flexibility to the robot including auto-alignment capability, accommodation of a larger capacity sample Dewar of arbitrary shape, and support for advanced operations such as crystal washing, while preserving the overall simplicity and efficiency of the Berkeley automounter design.

  5. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nuclear reactor has a large prompt negative temperature coefficient of reactivity. A reactor core assembly of a plurality of fluid-tight fuel elements is located within a water-filled tank. Each fuel element contains a solid homogeneous mixture of 50-79 w/o zirconium hydride, 20-50 w/o uranium and 0.5-1.5 W erbium. The uranium is not more than 20 percent enriched, and the ratio of hydrogen atoms to zirconium atoms is between 1.5:1 and 7:1. The core has a long lifetime, E.G., at least about 1200 days

  6. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a liquid cooled nuclear reactor, the combination is described for a single-walled vessel containing liquid coolant in which the reactor core is submerged, and a containment structure, primarily of material for shielding against radioactivity, surrounding at least the liquid-containing part of the vessel with clearance therebetween and having that surface thereof which faces the vessel make compatible with the liquid, thereby providing a leak jacket for the vessel. The structure is preferably a metal-lined concrete vault, and cooling means are provided for protecting the concrete against reaching a temperature at which damage would occur. (U.S.)

  7. Transportation Periodicals And Newsletters Currently Received At The Institute Of Transportation Studies Library, University Of California At Berkeley

    OpenAIRE

    Hernandez, Paul A.

    2000-01-01

    This publication is intended to serve as a convenient reference to selected transportation periodicals and newsletters currently (2000) received by UC Berkeley's Harmer E. Davis Transportation Li-brary. This latest version of Transportation Periodicals and Newsletters represents a thourough revision of earlier editions (1989, 1993, and 1995) published under the same (or similar) title. The subject content of this listing reflects the subject strengths of the H.E. Davis Transportation Library:...

  8. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In an improved reactor core for a high conversion BWR reactor, Pu-breeding type BWR type reactor, Pu-breeding type BWR type rector, FEBR type reactor, etc., two types of fuel assemblies are loaded such that fuel assemblies using a channel box of a smaller irradiation deformation ratio are loaded in a high conversion region, while other fuel assemblies are loaded in a burner region. This enables to suppress the irradiation deformation within an allowable limit in the high conversion region where the fast neutron flux is high and the load weight from the inside of the channel box due to the pressure loss is large. At the same time, the irradiation deformation can be restricted within an allowable limit without deteriorating the neutron economy in the burner region in which fast neutron flux is low and the load weight from the inside of the channel box is small since a channel box with smaller neutron absorption cross section or reduced wall thickness is charged. As a result, it is possible to prevent structural deformations such as swelling of the channel box, bending of the entire assemblies, bending of fuel rods, etc. (K.M.)

  9. A simple grid implementation with Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing using BLAST as a model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinthong, Watthanai; Muangruen, Panya; Suriyaphol, Prapat; Mairiang, Dumrong

    2016-01-01

    Development of high-throughput technologies, such as Next-generation sequencing, allows thousands of experiments to be performed simultaneously while reducing resource requirement. Consequently, a massive amount of experiment data is now rapidly generated. Nevertheless, the data are not readily usable or meaningful until they are further analysed and interpreted. Due to the size of the data, a high performance computer (HPC) is required for the analysis and interpretation. However, the HPC is expensive and difficult to access. Other means were developed to allow researchers to acquire the power of HPC without a need to purchase and maintain one such as cloud computing services and grid computing system. In this study, we implemented grid computing in a computer training center environment using Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing (BOINC) as a job distributor and data manager combining all desktop computers to virtualize the HPC. Fifty desktop computers were used for setting up a grid system during the off-hours. In order to test the performance of the grid system, we adapted the Basic Local Alignment Search Tools (BLAST) to the BOINC system. Sequencing results from Illumina platform were aligned to the human genome database by BLAST on the grid system. The result and processing time were compared to those from a single desktop computer and HPC. The estimated durations of BLAST analysis for 4 million sequence reads on a desktop PC, HPC and the grid system were 568, 24 and 5 days, respectively. Thus, the grid implementation of BLAST by BOINC is an efficient alternative to the HPC for sequence alignment. The grid implementation by BOINC also helped tap unused computing resources during the off-hours and could be easily modified for other available bioinformatics software. PMID:27547555

  10. Brief History of Herpetology in the Museum of Vertebrate Zoology, University of California, Berkeley, with a List of Type Specimens of Recent Amphibians and Reptiles

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez-Robles, Javier A; Good, David A; Wake, David B

    2003-01-01

    An overview of the herpetological program of the Museum of Vertebrate Zoology (MVZ), University of California, Berkeley, is presented. The history of herpetological activities in the MVZ and more generally at Berkeley is summarized. Although the MVZ has existed since 1908, until 1945 there was no formal curator for the collection of amphibians and nonavian reptiles. Since that time Robert C. Stebbins, David B. Wake, Harry W. Greene, Javier A. Rodríguez-Robles (in an interim capacity), and Cra...

  11. Reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A reactor container has a suppression chamber partitioned by concrete side walls, a reactor pedestal and a diaphragm floor. A plurality of partitioning walls are disposed in circumferential direction each at an interval inside the suppression chamber, so that independent chambers in a state being divided into plurality are formed inside the suppression chamber. The partition walls are formed from the bottom portion of the suppression chamber up to the diaphragm floor to isolate pool water in a divided state. Operation platforms are formed above the suppression chamber and connected to an access port. Upon conducting maintenance, inspection or repairing, a pump is disposed in the independent chamber to transfer pool water therein to one or a plurality of other independent chambers to make it vacant. (I.N.)

  12. Reactor building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present invention concerns a structure of ABWR-type reactor buildings, which can increase the capacity of a spent fuel storage area at a low cost and improved earthquake proofness. In the reactor building, the floor of a spent fuel pool is made flat, and a depth of the pool water satisfying requirement for shielding is ensured. In addition, a depth of pool water is also maintained for a equipment provisionally storing pool for storing spent fuels, and a capacity for a spent fuel storage area is increased by utilizing surplus space of the equipment provisionally storing pool. Since the flattened floor of the spent fuel pool is flushed with the floor of the equipment provisionally storing pool, transfer of horizontal loads applied to the building upon occurrence of earthquakes is made smooth, to improve earthquake proofness of the building. (T.M.)

  13. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disclosed is a nuclear reactor cooled by a freezable liquid has a vessel for containing said liquid and comprising a structure shaped as a container, and cooling means in the region of the surface of said structure for effecting freezing of said liquid coolant at and for a finite distance from said surface for providing a layer of frozen coolant on and supported by said surface for containing said liquid coolant. In a specific example, where the reactor is sodium-cooled, the said structure is a metal-lined concrete vault, cooling is effected by closed cooling loops containing NaK, the loops extending over the lined surface of the concrete vault with outward and reverse pipe runs of each loop separated by thermal insulation, and air is flowed through cooling pipes embedded in the concrete behind the metal lining. 7 claims, 3 figures

  14. NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, J.B.

    1960-01-01

    A reactor is described which comprises a tank, a plurality of coaxial steel sleeves in the tank, a mass of water in the tank, and wire grids in abutting relationship within a plurality of elongated parallel channels within the steel sleeves, the wire being provided with a plurality of bends in the same plane forming adjacent parallel sections between bends, and the sections of adjacent grids being normally disposed relative to each other.

  15. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The liquid metal (sodium) cooled fast breeder reactor has got fuel subassemblies which are bundled and enclosed by a common can. In order to reduce bending of the sides of the can because of the load caused by the coolant pressure the can has got a dodecagon-shaped crosssection. The surfaces of the can may be of equal width. One out of two surfaces may also be convex towards the center. (RW)

  16. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detector having high sensitivity to fast neutrons and having low sensitivity to thermal neutrons is disposed for reducing influences of neutron detector signals on detection values of neutron fluxes when the upper end of control rod pass in the vicinity of the neutron flux detector. Namely, the change of the neutron fluxes is greater in the thermal neutron energy region while it is smaller in the fast neutron energy region. This is because the neutron absorbing cross section of B-10 used as neutron absorbers of control rods is greater in the thermal neutron region and it is smaller in the fast neutron region. As a result, increase of the neutron detection signals along with the local neutron flux change can be reduced, and detection signals corresponding to the reactor power can be obtained. Even when gang withdrawal of operating a plurality of control rods at the same time is performed, the reactor operation cycle can be measured accurately, thereby enabling to shorten the reactor startup time. (N.H.)

  17. Target Selection and Deselection at the Berkeley StructuralGenomics Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandonia, John-Marc; Kim, Sung-Hou; Brenner, Steven E.

    2005-03-22

    At the Berkeley Structural Genomics Center (BSGC), our goalis to obtain a near-complete structural complement of proteins in theminimal organisms Mycoplasma genitalium and M. pneumoniae, two closelyrelated pathogens. Current targets for structure determination have beenselected in six major stages, starting with those predicted to be mosttractable to high throughput study and likely to yield new structuralinformation. We report on the process used to select these proteins, aswell as our target deselection procedure. Target deselection reducesexperimental effort by eliminating targets similar to those recentlysolved by the structural biology community or other centers. We measurethe impact of the 69 structures solved at the BSGC as of July 2004 onstructure prediction coverage of the M. pneumoniae and M. genitaliumproteomes. The number of Mycoplasma proteins for which thefold couldfirst be reliably assigned based on structures solved at the BSGC (24 M.pneumoniae and 21 M. genitalium) is approximately 25 percent of the totalresulting from work at all structural genomics centers and the worldwidestructural biology community (94 M. pneumoniae and 86M. genitalium)during the same period. As the number of structures contributed by theBSGC during that period is less than 1 percent of the total worldwideoutput, the benefits of a focused target selection strategy are apparent.If the structures of all current targets were solved, the percentage ofM. pneumoniae proteins for which folds could be reliably assigned wouldincrease from approximately 57 percent (391 of 687) at present to around80 percent (550 of 687), and the percentage of the proteome that could beaccurately modeled would increase from around 37 percent (254 of 687) toabout 64 percent (438 of 687). In M. genitalium, the percentage of theproteome that could be structurally annotated based on structures of ourremaining targets would rise from 72 percent (348 of 486) to around 76percent (371 of 486), with the

  18. Analysis of background distributions of metals in the soil at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diamond, David; Baskin, David; Brown, Dennis; Lund, Loren; Najita, Julie; Javandel, Iraj

    2009-03-15

    As part of its Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Corrective Action Program (CAP), the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Environmental Restoration Program conducted an evaluation of naturally occurring metals in soils at the facility. The purpose of the evaluation was to provide a basis for determining if soils at specific locations contained elevated concentrations of metals relative to ambient conditions. Ambient conditions (sometimes referred to as 'local background') are defined as concentrations of metals in the vicinity of a site, but which are unaffected by site-related activities (Cal-EPA 1997). Local background concentrations of 17 metals were initially estimated by LBNL using data from 498 soil samples collected from borings made during the construction of 71 groundwater monitoring wells (LBNL 1995). These concentration values were estimated using the United States Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA's) guidance that was available at that time (USEPA 1989). Since that time, many more soil samples were collected and analyzed for metals by the Environmental Restoration Program. In addition, the California Environmental Protection Agency (Cal-EPA) subsequently published a recommended approach for calculating background concentrations of metals at hazardous waste sites and permitted facilities (Cal-EPA 1997). This more recent approach differs from that recommended by the USEPA and used initially by LBNL (LBNL 2002). The purpose of the 2002 report was to apply the recommended Cal-EPA procedure to the expanded data set for metals that was available at LBNL. This revision to the 2002 report has been updated to include more rigorous tests of normality, revisions to the statistical methods used for some metals based on the results of the normality tests, and consideration of the depth-dependence of some sample results. As a result of these modifications, estimated background concentrations for some metals have been

  19. Heavy ion facilities and heavy ion research at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1973-10-01

    Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory has been heavily involved since 1956 in the construction and adaptation of particle accelerators for the acceleration of heavy ions. At the present time it has the most extensive group of accelerators with heavy-ion capability in the United States: The SuperHILAC, the 88-Inch Cyclotron, and the Bevatron/Bevalac. An extensive heavy-ion program in nuclear and particle physics, in nuclear chemistry, and in the study of biological effects of heavy-ion irradiations has been supported in the past; and the Laboratory has a strong interest in expanding both its capabilities for heavy-ion acceleration and its participation in heavy-ion science. The first heavy-ion accelerator at LBL was the HILAC, which began operation in 1957. A vigorous program of research with ion beams of masses 4 through 40 began at that time and continued until the machine was shut down for modifications in February 1971. At that time, a grant of $3 M had been received from the AEC for a total reconstruction of the HILAC, to turn it into an upgraded accelerator, the SuperHILAC. This new machine is designed for the acceleration of all ions through uranium to an energy of 8.5 MeV/u. The SuperHILAC is equipped with two injectors. The lower energy injector, a 750-kV Cockcroft-Walton machine, was put into service in late 1972 for acceleration of ions up through {sup 40}Ar. By spring of 1973, operation of the SuperHILAC with this injector exceeded the performance of the original HILAC. The second injector, a 2.5-MV Dynamitron, was originally designed for the Omnitron project and built with $1 M of Omnitron R and D funds. Commissioning of this injector began in 1973 and proceeded to the point where nanoampere beams of krypton were available for a series of research studies in May and June. The first publishable new results with beams heavier than {sup 40}Ar were obtained at that time. Debugging and injector improvement projects will continue in FY 74.

  20. Reactor core of nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a BWR type nuclear reactor, the number of first fuel assemblies (uranium) loaded in a reactor core is smaller than that of second fuel assemblies (mixed oxide), the average burnup degree upon take-out of the first fuel assemblies is reduced to less than that of the second fuel assemblies, and the number of the kinds of the fuel rods constituting the first fuel assemblies is made smaller than that of the fuel rods constituting the second fuel assemblies. As a result, the variety of the plutonium enrichment degree is reduced to make the distribution of the axial enrichment degree uniform, thereby enabling to simplify the distribution of the enrichment degree. Then the number of molding fabrication steps for MOX fuel assemblies can be reduced, thereby enabling to reduce the cost for molding and fabrication. (N.H.)

  1. Validity and Reliability of Preschool, First and Second Grade Versions of Berkeley Parenting Self-Efficacy Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrbanoo Tajeri

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available "nObjective: The purpose of this study is to examine the factor structure, internal consistency, and construct validity of preschool, first and second grade versions of Berkeley Parenting self-efficacy scale. "nMethod:  The subjects were 317 mothers: (102 mothers of preschool children, 111 mothers of first grade children and 104 mothers of second grade children who were randomly selected from schools in Tehran. They completed Berkeley parenting self-efficacy and Rotter `s locus of control scales. Factor analysis using the principle component method was used to identify the factor structure of parenting self-efficacy scale. Cronbach`s alpha coefficient was used to identify the reliability of parenting self efficacy scale. "nResults: Results of this study indicated that the cronbach`s alpha coefficient was 0.84, 0.87, 0.64 for preschool, first grade and second grade versions respectively. Based on the scree test ,,factor analysis produced two factors of maternal strategy and child outcome, and it also produced the highest level of total variance explained by these 2 factors. The Parenting self-efficacy scale was negatively associated with measure of locus of control(r=-0.54 for the preschool version, -0.64 for the first grade version and -0.54 for the second grade version. "nConclusion: Due to relatively high reliability and validity of preschool, first and second grade versions of Berkeley Parenting Self-Efficacy scale, this scale could be used as a reliable and valid scale in other research areas

  2. Types of Nuclear Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presentation is based on the following areas: Types of Nuclear Reactors, coolant, moderator, neutron spectrum, fuel type, pressurized water reactor (PWR), boiling water reactor (BWR) reactor pressurized heavy water (PHWR), gas-cooled reactor, RBMK , Nuclear Electricity Generation,Challenges in Nuclear Technology Deployment,EPR, APR1400, A P 1000, A PWR, ATMEA 1, VVER-1000, A PWR, VVER 1200, Boiling Water Reactor, A BWR, A BWR -II, ESBUR, Ke ren, AREVA, Heavy Water Reactor, Candu 6, Acr-1000, HWR, Bw, Iris, CAREM NuCcale, Smart, KLT-HOS, Westinghouse small modular Reactor, Gas Cooled Reactors, PBMR.

  3. Low-level waste certification plan for the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Hazardous Waste Handling Facility. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this plan is to describe the organization and methodology for the certification of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) handled in the Hazardous Waste Handling Facility (HWHF) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). This plan is composed to meet the requirements found in the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) Solid Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) and follows the suggested outline provided by WHC in the letter of April 26, 1990, to Dr. R.H. Thomas, Occupational Health Division, LBL. LLW is to be transferred to the WHC Hanford Site Central Waste Complex and Burial Grounds in Hanford, Washington

  4. Berkeley Supernova Ia Program I: Observations, Data Reduction, and Spectroscopic Sample of 582 Low-Redshift Type Ia Supernovae

    OpenAIRE

    Silverman, Jeffrey M.; Foley, Ryan J.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Ganeshalingam, Mohan; Barth, Aaron J.; Chornock, Ryan; Griffith, Christopher V.; Kong, Jason J.; Lee, Nicholas; Leonard, Douglas C.; Matheson, Thomas; Miller, Emily G.; Steele, Thea N.; Barris, Brian J.; Bloom, Joshua S.

    2012-01-01

    In this first paper in a series we present 1298 low-redshift (z\\leq0.2) optical spectra of 582 Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) observed from 1989 through 2008 as part of the Berkeley SN Ia Program (BSNIP). 584 spectra of 199 SNe Ia have well-calibrated light curves with measured distance moduli, and many of the spectra have been corrected for host-galaxy contamination. Most of the data were obtained using the Kast double spectrograph mounted on the Shane 3 m telescope at Lick Observatory and have...

  5. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nuclear reactor is described in which the core components, including fuel-rod assemblies, control-rod assemblies, fertile rod-assemblies, and removable shielding assemblies, are supported by a plurality of separate inlet modular units. These units are referred to as inlet module units to distinguish them from the modules of the upper internals of the reactor. The modular units are supported, each removable independently of the others, in liners in the supporting structure for the lower internals of the reactor. The core assemblies are removably supported in integral receptacles or sockets of the modular units. The liners, units, sockets and assemblies have inlet openings for entry of the fluid. The modular units are each removably mounted in the liners with fluid seals interposed between the opening in the liner and inlet module into which the fluid enters in the upper and lower portion of the liner. Each assembly is similarly mounted in a corresponding receptacle with fluid seals interposed between the openings where the fluid enters in the lower portion of the receptacle or fitting closely in these regions. As fluid flows along each core assembly a pressure drop is produced along the fluid so that the fluid which emerges from each core assembly is at a lower pressure than the fluid which enters the core assembly. However because of the seals interposed in the mountings of the units and assemblies the pressures above and below the units and assemblies are balanced and the units are held in the liners and the assemblies are held in the receptacles by their weights as they have a higher specific gravity than the fluid. The low-pressure spaces between each module and its liner and between each core assembly and its module is vented to the low-pressure regions of the vessel to assure that fluid which leaks through the seals does not accumulate and destroy the hydraulic balance

  6. Nuclear research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It's presented data about nuclear research reactors in the world, retrieved from the Sien (Nuclear and Energetic Information System) data bank. The information are organized in table forms as follows: research reactors by countries; research reactors by type; research reactors by fuel and research reactors by purpose. (E.G.)

  7. Nuclear reactor physics course for reactor operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The education and training of nuclear reactor operators is important to guarantee the safe operation of present and future nuclear reactors. Therefore, a course on basic 'Nuclear reactor physics' in the initial and continuous training of reactor operators has proven to be indispensable. In most countries, such training also results from the direct request from the safety authorities to assure the high level of competence of the staff in nuclear reactors. The aim of the basic course on 'Nuclear Reactor Physics for reactor operators' is to provide the reactor operators with a basic understanding of the main concepts relevant to nuclear reactors. Seen the education level of the participants, mathematical derivations are simplified and reduced to a minimum, but not completely eliminated

  8. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cover gas spaces for primary coolant vessel, such as a reactor container, a pump vessel and an intermediate heat exchanger vessel are in communication with each other by an inverted U-shaped pressure conduit. A transmitter and a receiver are disposed to the pressure conduit at appropriate positions. If vibration frequencies (pressure vibration) from low frequency to high frequency are generated continuously from the transmitter to the inside of the communication pipe, a resonance phenomenon (air-column resonance oscillation) is caused by the inherent frequency or the like of the communication pipe. The frequency of the air-column resonance oscillation is changed by the inner diameter and the clogged state of the pipelines. Accordingly, by detecting the change of the air-column oscillation characteristics by the receiver, the clogged state of the flow channels in the pipelines can be detected even during the reactor operation. With such procedures, steams of coolants flowing entrained by the cover gases can be prevented from condensation and coagulation at a low temperature portion of the pipelines, otherwise it would lead clogging in the pipelines. (I.N.)

  9. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsotsis, Theodore T. (Inventor); Sahimi, Muhammad (Inventor); Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak (Inventor); Harale, Aadesh (Inventor); Park, Byoung-Gi (Inventor); Liu, Paul K. T. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  10. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsotsis, Theodore T.; Sahimi, Muhammad; Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak; Harale, Aadesh; Park, Byoung-Gi; Liu, Paul K. T.

    2011-03-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  11. Reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To prevent shocks exerted on a vent head due to pool-swell caused within a pressure suppression chamber (disposed in a torus configuration around the dry well) upon loss of coolant accident in BWR type reactors. Constitution: The following relationship is established between the volume V (m3) of a dry well and the ruptured opening area A (m2) at the boundary expected upon loss of coolant accident: V >= 30340 (m) x A Then, the volume of the dry well is made larger than the ruptured open area, that is, the steam flow rate of leaking coolants upon loss of coolant accident to decrease the pressure rise in the dry well at the initial state where loss of coolant accident is resulted. Accordingly, the pressure of non-compressive gases jetted out from the lower end of the downcomer to the pool water is decreased to suppress the pool-swell. (Ikeda, J.)

  12. Survey of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A survey of reasearch reactors based on the IAEA Nuclear Research Reactor Data Base (RRDB) was done. This database includes information on 273 operating research reactors ranging in power from zero to several hundred MW. From these 273 operating research reactors 205 reactors have a power level below 5 MW, the remaining 68 reactors range from 5 MW up to several 100 MW thermal power. The major reactor types with common design are: Siemens Unterrichtsreaktors, 1.2 Argonaut reactors, Slowpoke reactors, the miniature neutron source reactors, TRIGA reactors, material testing reactors and high flux reactors. Technical data such as: power, fuel material, fuel type, enrichment, maximum neutron flux density and experimental facilities for each reactor type as well as a description of their utilization in physics and chemistry, medicine and biology, academic research and teaching, training purposes (students and physicists, operating personnel), industrial application (neutron radiography, silicon neutron transmutation doping facilities) are provided. The geographically distribution of these reactors is also shown. As conclusions the author discussed the advantages (low capital cost, low operating cost, low burn up, simple to operate, safe, less restrictive containment and sitting requirements, versatility) and disadvantages (lower sensitivity for NAA, limited radioisotope production, limited use of neutron beams, limited access to the core, licensing) of low power research reactors. 24 figs., refs. 15, Tab. 1 (nevyjel)

  13. Department of reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The activities of the Department of Reactor Technology at Risoe during 1979 are described. The work is presented in five chapters: Reactor Engineering, Reactor Physics and Dynamics, Heat Transfer and Hydraulics, The DR 1 Reactor, and Non-Nuclear Activities. A list of the staff and of publications is included. (author)

  14. RB reactor noise analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Statistical fluctuations of reactivity represent reactor noise. Analysis of reactor noise enables determining a series of reactor kinetic parameters. Fluctuations of power was measured by ionization chamber placed next to the tank of the RB reactor. The signal was digitized by an analog-digital converter. After calculation of the mean power, 3000 data obtained by sampling were analysed

  15. Environmental health-risk assessment for tritium releases from the National Tritium Labeling Facility (NTLF) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is a health risk assessment that addresses continuous releases of tritium to the environment from the National Tritium Labeling Facility (NTLF) at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). The NTLF contributes approximately 95% of all tritium releases from LBL. Transport and transformation models were used to determine the movement of tritium releases from the NRLF to the air, surface water, soils, and plants and to determine the subsequent doses to humans. These models were calibrated against environmental measurements of tritium levels in the vicinity of the NTLF and in the surrounding community. Risk levels were determined for human populations in each of these zones. Risk levels to both individuals and populations were calculated. In this report population risks and individual risks were calculated for three types of diseases--cancer, heritable genetic effects, and developmental and reproductive effects

  16. Structure-based inference of molecular functions of proteins of unknown function from Berkeley Structural Genomics Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung-Hou; Shin, Dong Hae; Hou, Jingtong; Chandonia, John-Marc; Das, Debanu; Choi, In-Geol; Kim, Rosalind; Kim, Sung-Hou

    2007-09-02

    Advances in sequence genomics have resulted in an accumulation of a huge number of protein sequences derived from genome sequences. However, the functions of a large portion of them cannot be inferred based on the current methods of sequence homology detection to proteins of known functions. Three-dimensional structure can have an important impact in providing inference of molecular function (physical and chemical function) of a protein of unknown function. Structural genomics centers worldwide have been determining many 3-D structures of the proteins of unknown functions, and possible molecular functions of them have been inferred based on their structures. Combined with bioinformatics and enzymatic assay tools, the successful acceleration of the process of protein structure determination through high throughput pipelines enables the rapid functional annotation of a large fraction of hypothetical proteins. We present a brief summary of the process we used at the Berkeley Structural Genomics Center to infer molecular functions of proteins of unknown function.

  17. The Advanced Light Source: A new 1.5 GeV synchrotron radiation facility at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS), now under construction at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, is being planned as a national user facility for the production of high-brightness and partially coherent x-ray and ultraviolet synchrotron radiation. The ALS is based on a low-emittance electron storage ring optimized for operation at 1.5 GeV with insertion devices in 11 long straight sections and up to 48 bend-magnet ports. High-brightness photon beams, from less than 10 eV to more than 1 keV, will be produced by undulators, thereby providing many research opportunities in materials and surface science, biology, atomic physics and chemistry. Wigglers and bend magnets will provide high-flux, broad-band radiation at energies to 10 keV. 6 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs

  18. Environmental health-risk assessment for tritium releases from the National Tritium Labeling Facility (NTLF) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKone, T.E.; Brand, K.P.

    1994-12-01

    This report is a health risk assessment that addresses continuous releases of tritium to the environment from the National Tritium Labeling Facility (NTLF) at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). The NTLF contributes approximately 95% of all tritium releases from LBL. Transport and transformation models were used to determine the movement of tritium releases from the NRLF to the air, surface water, soils, and plants and to determine the subsequent doses to humans. These models were calibrated against environmental measurements of tritium levels in the vicinity of the NTLF and in the surrounding community. Risk levels were determined for human populations in each of these zones. Risk levels to both individuals and populations were calculated. In this report population risks and individual risks were calculated for three types of diseases--cancer, heritable genetic effects, and developmental and reproductive effects.

  19. Decontamination and decommissioning of rooms 62-248 and 62-250 at Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garabedian, G.

    1996-05-01

    This document details the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) process of Rooms 248 and 250 of Building 62 at the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The document describes the D&D efforts for the rooms, their contents, and adjacent areas containing ancillary equipment. The rooms and equipment, before being released, were required to meet the unrestricted release criteria and requirements set forth in DOE orders 5400.5 and 5480.11, LBNL`s internal release-criteria procedure (EH&S Procedure 708), and the LBNL Radiological Control Manual. The radioactive material and items not meeting the release criteria were either sent to the Hazardous Waste Handling Facility (HWHF) for disposal or transferred to other locations approved for radioactive material. The D&D was undertaken by the Radiation Protection Group of LBNL`s Environment, Health and Safety (EH&S) Division at the request of the Materials Sciences Division. Current and past use of radioactive material in both Rooms 248 and 250 necessitated the D&D in order to release both rooms for nonradioactive work. (1) Room 248 was designated a {open_quotes}controlled area.{close_quotes} There was contained radioactive material in some of the equipment. The previous occupants of Room 248 had worked with radioactive materials. (2) Room 250 was designated a {open_quotes}Radioactive Materials Management Area{close_quotes} (RMMA) because the current occupants used potentially dispersible radioisotopes. Both laboratories, during the occupancy of U.C. Berkeley Professor Leo Brewer and Ms. Karen Krushwitz, were kept in excellent condition. There was a detailed inventory of all radioactive materials and chemicals. All work and self surveys were documented. The labs were kept extremely orderly, clean, and in compliance. In October 1993 Ms. Krushwitz received an award in recognition of her efforts in Environmental Protection, Health, and Safety at LBNL.

  20. Research Nuclear Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Published in English and in French, this large report first proposes an overview of the use and history of research nuclear reactors. It discusses their definition, and presents the various types of research reactors which can be either related to nuclear power (critical mock-ups, material test reactors, safety test reactors, training reactors, prototypes), or to research (basic research, industry, health), or to specific particle physics phenomena (neutron diffraction, isotope production, neutron activation, neutron radiography, semiconductor doping). It reports the history of the French research reactors by distinguishing the first atomic pile (ZOE), and the activities and achievements during the fifties, the sixties and the seventies. It also addresses the development of instrumentation for research reactors (neutron, thermal, mechanical and fission gas release measurements). The other parts of the report concern the validation of neutronics calculations for different reactors (the EOLE water critical mock-up, the MASURCA air critical mock-up dedicated to fast neutron reactor study, the MINERVE water critical mock-up, the CALIBAN pulsed research reactor), the testing of materials under irradiation (OSIRIS reactor, laboratories associated with research reactors, the Jules Horowitz reactor and its experimental programs and related devices, irradiation of materials with ion beams), the investigation of accident situations (on the CABRI, Phebus, Silene and Jules Horowitz reactors). The last part proposes a worldwide overview of research reactors

  1. Reactor Physics Training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    University courses in nuclear reactor physics at the universities consist of a theoretical description of the physics and technology of nuclear reactors. In order to demonstrate the basic concepts in reactor physics, training exercises in nuclear reactor installations are also desirable. Since the number of reactor facilities is however strongly decreasing in Europe, it becomes difficult to offer to students a means for demonstrating the basic concepts in reactor physics by performing training exercises in nuclear installations. Universities do not generally possess the capabilities for performing training exercises. Therefore, SCK-CEN offers universities the possibility to perform (on a commercial basis) training exercises at its infrastructure consisting of two research reactors (BR1 and VENUS). Besides the organisation of training exercises in the framework of university courses, SCK-CEN also organizes theoretical courses in reactor physics for the education and training of nuclear reactor operators. It is indeed a very important subject to guarantee the safe operation of present and future nuclear reactors. In this framework, an understanding of the fundamental principles of nuclear reactor physics is also necessary for reactor operators. Therefore, the organisation of a basic Nuclear reactor physics course at the level of reactor operators in the initial and continuous training of reactor operators has proven to be indispensable. In most countries, such training also results from the direct request from the safety authorities to assure the high level of competence of the staff in nuclear reactors. The objectives this activity are: (1) to provide training and education activities in reactor physics for university students and (2) to organise courses in nuclear reactor physics for reactor operators

  2. Introduction of Nuclear Reactor Engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book introduces development, status, supply and demand and resource of nuclear reactor. It deals with basic knowledge of nuclear reactor, which are reactor system, heat recovery in reactor core, structural feature in reactor, materials of structure in reactor, shielding of gamma ray, shielding of reactor, safety and environmental problem of nuclear power plant, nuclear fuel and economical efficiency of nuclear energy.

  3. Maternal Factors That Influence Children's Positive Behavior: Demonstration of a Structural Equation Analysis of Selected Data from the Berkeley Growth Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crano, William D.; Mendoza, Jorge L.

    1987-01-01

    An analysis using data drawn from Nancy Bayley's Berkeley Growth Study is performed for didactic purposes to illustrate the use of structural equation modeling on a child development data set. Alternatives to standard latent factor approaches are demonstrated for use in research situations in which the subject-to-variable ratio is less than…

  4. A Tale of Three Campuses: Planning and Design in Response to the Cultural Heritages at Mills College, the University of California, Berkeley, and Stanford University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiene, Karen; Sabbatini, Robert

    2011-01-01

    How do forward-looking institutions with rich landscape and architectural heritages integrate contemporary programming and design? This article explores the evolution of the Mills College campus and compares it with two larger western universities: the University of California, Berkeley (UCB) and Leland Stanford, Jr., University (Stanford…

  5. Safeguarding research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report is organized in four sections, including the introduction. The second section contains a discussion of the characteristics and attributes of research reactors important to safeguards. In this section, research reactors are described according to their power level, if greater than 25 thermal megawatts, or according to each fuel type. This descriptive discussion includes both reactor and reactor fuel information of a generic nature, according to the following categories. 1. Research reactors with more than 25 megawatts thermal power, 2. Plate fuelled reactors, 3. Assembly fuelled reactors. 4. Research reactors fuelled with individual rods. 5. Disk fuelled reactors, and 6. Research reactors fuelled with aqueous homogeneous fuel. The third section consists of a brief discussion of general IAEA safeguards as they apply to research reactors. This section is based on IAEA safeguards implementation documents and technical reports that are used to establish Agency-State agreements and facility attachments. The fourth and last section describes inspection activities at research reactors necessary to meet Agency objectives. The scope of the activities extends to both pre and post inspection as well as the on-site inspection and includes the examination of records and reports relative to reactor operation and to receipts, shipments and certain internal transfers, periodic verification of fresh fuel, spent fuel and core fuel, activities related to containment and surveillance, and other selected activities, depending on the reactor

  6. Research nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the divergence of the first nuclear reactor in 1942, about 600 research or test reactors have been built throughout the world. Today 255 research reactors are operating in 57 countries and about 70% are over 25 years old. Whereas there are very few reactor types for power plants because of rationalization and standardisation, there is a great diversity of research reactors. We can divide them into 2 groups: heavy water cooled reactors and light water moderated reactors. Heavy water cooled reactors are dedicated to the production of high flux of thermal neutrons which are extracted from the core by means of neutronic channels. Light water moderated reactors involved pool reactors and slightly pressurized closed reactors, they are polyvalent but their main purposes are material testing, technological irradiations, radionuclide production and neutron radiography. At the moment 8 research reactors are being built in Canada, Germany, Iran, Japan, Kazakhstan, Morocco, Russia and Slovakia and 8 others are planned in 7 countries (France, Indonesia, Nigeria, Russia, Slovakia, Thailand and Tunisia. Different research reactors are described: Phebus, Masurca, Phenix and Petten HFR. The general principles of nuclear safety applied to test reactors are presented. (A.C.)

  7. Liquid metal cooled reactors and fuel cycles for international security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), the University of California, Berkeley (UCB) and the Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) have conducted several studies on small reactors. These efforts include studies on the Secure, Transportable, Autonomous Reactor (STAR), the Super, Safe, Small and Simple (4S) reactor, the Encapsulated Nuclear Heat Source (ENHS), and the ANL STAR-LM and STAR-H2 studies. Based on these studies, a concept called the Highly Secure Nuclear Fuel Cycle (HSNFC) is being introduced to focus on the fuel cycle and institutional elements of the STAR concept. The HSNFC foresees the development of small nuclear reactors suitable for remote regions and countries with limited or developing energy infrastructures. The HSNFC is intended to reduce the complexity and expense of eliminating concerns about nuclear proliferation and severe nuclear accidents, even when the user is in the initial phase of developing an energy infrastructure. It is the objective of HSNFC to make the environmental, energy security and reliability benefits of nuclear energy available to all at a competitive cost. A fundamental feature of the HSNFC and the STAR concept is that the nuclear fuel is contained within the sealed reactor vessel when shipped to the user; the spent fuel is then returned to the supplier without being removed from the reactor vessel. Small reactors with very long life nuclear cores are key to the HSNFC concept being competitive with alternative sources of energy. Evaluations completed to date have confirmed that a small liquid metal cooled reactor can likely achieve the performance necessary to make the HSNFC competitive. The ENHS and STAR-LM are examples of reactors that could be used in HSNFC and 4S, with some modification, may also be suitable. The application of these reactors in the HSNFC is discussed in this paper. The institutional conditions necessary to implement the HSNFC

  8. Nuclear reactor building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To prevent seismic vibrations of external buildings from transmitting to the side walls of a reactor container in a tank type FBR reactor building. Constitution: The reactor building is structured such that the base mat for a reactor container chamber and a reactor container is separated from the base mat for the walls of building, and gas-tight material such as silicon rubber is filled in the gap therebetween. With such a constitution, even if the crane-supporting wall vibrates violently upon occurrence of earthqualkes, the seismic vibrations do not transmit toward the reactor container chamber. (Horiuchi, T.)

  9. Reactor Physics Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Reactor Physics and Department of SCK-CEN offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutronics calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation, reactor safety and control and non-destructive analysis on reactor fuel. This expertise is applied within the Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Research Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments. Progress and achievements in 1999 in the following areas are reported on: (1) investigations on the use of military plutonium in commercial power reactors; (2) neutron and gamma calculations performed for BR-2 and for other reactors; (3) the updating of neutron and gamma cross-section libraries; (4) the implementation of reactor codes; (6) the management of the UNIX workstations; and (6) fuel cycle studies

  10. Ship propulsion reactors technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper takes the state of the art on ship propulsion reactors technology. The french research programs with the corresponding technological stakes, the reactors specifications and advantages are detailed. (A.L.B.)

  11. Undergraduate reactor control experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sequence of reactor and related experiments has been a central element of a senior-level laboratory course at Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) for more than 20 yr. A new experiment has been developed where the students program and operate a computer controller that manipulates the speed of a secondary control rod to regulate TRIGA reactor power. Elementary feedback control theory is introduced to explain the experiment, which emphasizes the nonlinear aspect of reactor control where power level changes are equivalent to a change in control loop gain. Digital control of nuclear reactors has become more visible at Penn State with the replacement of the original analog-based TRIGA reactor control console with a modern computer-based digital control console. Several TRIGA reactor dynamics experiments, which comprise half of the three-credit laboratory course, lead to the control experiment finale: (a) digital simulation, (b) control rod calibration, (c) reactor pulsing, (d) reactivity oscillator, and (e) reactor noise

  12. Process heat reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The consumption of heat, for industrial and domestic needs, takes up half of the national energy supply; direct utilization of the heat produced by nuclear reactors could therefore contribute to reduce the deficit in the energetic results. The restraints proper to heat consumption (dispersal and variety of consumers, irregular demand) involve the development of the heat transport system structures and adequate nuclear reactors. With this in view, the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique and Technicatome are developing the CAS reactor series, pressurized water reactors (PWR), (CAS 3G reactor with a power of 420 MW.th.), and the Thermos reactor (100 MW.th.), directly conceived to produce heat at 1200C and whose technology derives from the experimental pool reactors type. In order to prove the value of the Thermos design, an experimental reactor should soon be constructed in the Saclay nuclear research centre

  13. Reactor System Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SMART NPP(Nuclear Power Plant) has been developed for duel purpose, electricity generation and energy supply for seawater desalination. The objective of this project IS to design the reactor system of SMART pilot plant(SMART-P) which will be built and operated for the integrated technology verification of SMART. SMART-P is an integral reactor in which primary components of reactor coolant system are enclosed in single pressure vessel without connecting pipes. The major components installed within a vessel includes a core, twelve steam generator cassettes, a low-temperature self pressurizer, twelve control rod drives, and two main coolant pumps. SMART-P reactor system design was categorized to the reactor coe design, fluid system design, reactor mechanical design, major component design and MMIS design. Reactor safety -analysis and performance analysis were performed for developed SMART=P reactor system. Also, the preparation of safety analysis report, and the technical support for licensing acquisition are performed

  14. Nuclear Reactor RA Safety Report, Vol. 11, Reactor operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume includes the following chapters describing: Organisation of reactor operation (including operational safety, fuel management, and regulatory rules for RA reactor operation); Control and maintenance of reactor components (reactor core, nuclear fuel, heavy water and cover gas systems, mechanical structures, electric power supply system, reactor instrumentation); Quality assurance and Training of the reactor personnel

  15. The Chernobylsk reactor accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The construction, the safety philosophy, the major reactor physical parameters of RBMK-1000 type reactor units and the detailed description of the Chernobylsk-4 reactor accident, its causes and conclusions, the efforts to reduce the consequences on the reactor site and in the surroundings are discussed based on different types of Soviet documents including the report presented to the IAEA by the Soviet Atomic Energy Agency in August 1986. (V.N.)

  16. Zero energy reactor 'RB'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1958 the zero energy reactor RB was built with the purpose of enabling critical experiments with various reactor systems to be carried out. The first core assembly built in this reactor consists of heavy water as moderator and natural uranium metal as fuel. In order to be able to obtain very accurate results when measuring the main characteristics of the assembly the reactor was built as a completely bare system. (author)

  17. High solids fermentation reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyman, Charles E.; Grohmann, Karel; Himmel, Michael E.; Richard, Christopher J.

    1993-01-01

    A fermentation reactor and method for fermentation of materials having greater than about 10% solids. The reactor includes a rotatable shaft along the central axis, the shaft including rods extending outwardly to mix the materials. The reactor and method are useful for anaerobic digestion of municipal solid wastes to produce methane, for production of commodity chemicals from organic materials, and for microbial fermentation processes.

  18. Fossil nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurette, M.

    1976-01-01

    The discussion of fossil nuclear reactors (the Oklo phenomenon) covers the earth science background, neutron-induced isotopes and reactor operating conditions, radiation-damage studies, and reactor modeling. In conclusion possible future studies are suggested and the significance of the data obtained in past studies is summarized. (JSR)

  19. Fusion reactor studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review is given of fusion reactor systems studies, the objectives of these studies are outlined and some recent conceptual reactor designs are described. The need for further studies in greater depth is indicated so that progress towards a commercial fusion reactor may be consolidated. (U.K.)

  20. Reactor power measuring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present invention provides a self-powered long detector having a sensitivity over the entire length of a reactor core as an entire control rod withdrawal range of a BWR type reactor, and a reactor power measuring device using a gamma ray thermometer which scarcely causes sensitivity degradation. That is, a hollow protection pipe is disposed passing through the reactor core from the outside of a reactor pressure vessel. The self-powered long detectors and the gamma ray thermometers are inserted and installed in the protection pipe. An average reactor power in an axial direction of the reactor relative to a certain position in the horizontal cross section of the reactor core is determined based on the power of the self-powered long detector over the entire length of the reactor core. Since the response of the self-powered detector relative to a local power change is rapid, the output is used as an input signal to a safety protection device of the reactor core. Further, a gamma ray thermometer secured in the reactor and having scarce sensitivity degradation is used instead of an incore travelling neutron monitor used for relative calibration of an existent neutron monitor secured in the reactor. (I.S.)

  1. Berkeley Supernova Ia Program I: Observations, Data Reduction, and Spectroscopic Sample of 582 Low-Redshift Type Ia Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Silverman, Jeffrey M; Filippenko, Alexei V; Ganeshalingam, Mohan; Barth, Aaron J; Chornock, Ryan; Griffith, Christopher V; Kong, Jason J; Lee, Nicholas; Leonard, Douglas C; Matheson, Thomas; Miller, Emily G; Steele, Thea N; Barris, Brian J; Bloom, Joshua S; Cobb, Bethany E; Coil, Alison L; Desroches, Louis-Benoit; Gates, Elinor L; Ho, Luis C; Jha, Saurabh W; Kandrashoff, Michael T; Li, Weidong; Mandel, Kaisey S; Modjaz, Maryam; Moore, Matthew R; Mostardi, Robin E; Papenkova, Marina S; Park, Sung; Perley, Daniel A; Poznanski, Dovi; Reuter, Cassie A; Scala, James; Serduke, Franklin J D; Shields, Joseph C; Swift, Brandon J; Tonry, John L; Van Dyk, Schuyler D; Wang, Xiaofeng; Wong, Diane S

    2012-01-01

    In this first paper in a series we present 1298 low-redshift (z < 0.2) optical spectra of 582 Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) observed from 1989 through 2008 as part of the Berkeley SN Ia Program (BSNIP). 584 spectra of 199 SNe Ia have well-calibrated light curves with measured distance moduli, and many of the spectra have been corrected for host-galaxy contamination. Most of the data were obtained using the Kast double spectrograph mounted on the Shane 3 m telescope at Lick Observatory and have a typical wavelength range of 3300-10,400 Ang., roughly twice as wide as spectra from most previously published datasets. We present our observing and reduction procedures, and we describe the resulting SN Database (SNDB), which will be an online, public, searchable database containing all of our fully reduced spectra and companion photometry. In addition, we discuss our spectral classification scheme (using the SuperNova IDentification code, SNID; Blondin & Tonry 2007), utilizing our newly constructed set of SNID ...

  2. Influence of copper recovery on the water quality of the acidic Berkeley Pit lake, Montana, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucci, Nicholas J; Gammons, Christopher H

    2015-04-01

    The Berkeley Pit lake in Butte, Montana, formed by flooding of an open-pit copper mine, is one of the world's largest accumulations of acidic, metal-rich water. Between 2003 and 2012, approximately 2 × 10(11) L of pit water, representing 1.3 lake volumes, were pumped from the bottom of the lake to a copper recovery plant, where dissolved Cu(2+) was precipitated on scrap iron, releasing Fe(2+) back to solution and thence back to the pit. Artificial mixing caused by this continuous pumping changed the lake from a meromictic to holomictic state, induced oxidation of dissolved Fe(2+), and caused subsequent precipitation of more than 2 × 10(8) kg of secondary ferric compounds, mainly schwertmannite and jarosite, which settled to the bottom of the lake. A large mass of As, P, and sulfate was also lost from solution. These unforeseen changes in chemistry resulted in a roughly 25-30% reduction in the lake's calculated and measured total acidity, which represents a significant potential savings in the cost of lime treatment, which is not expected to commence until 2023. Future monitoring is needed to verify that schwertmannite and jarosite in the pit sediment do not convert to goethite, a process which would release stored acidity back to the water column. PMID:25723275

  3. Light water reactor safety

    CERN Document Server

    Pershagen, B

    2013-01-01

    This book describes the principles and practices of reactor safety as applied to the design, regulation and operation of light water reactors, combining a historical approach with an up-to-date account of the safety, technology and operating experience of both pressurized water reactors and boiling water reactors. The introductory chapters set out the basic facts upon which the safety of light water reactors depend. The central section is devoted to the methods and results of safety analysis. The accidents at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl are reviewed and their implications for light wate

  4. Nuclear reactor repairing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To enable free repairing of an arbitrary position in an LMFBR reactor. Constitution: A laser light emitted from a laser oscillator installed out of a nuclear reactor is guided into a portion to be repaired in the reactor by using a reflecting mirror, thereby welding or cutting it. The guidance of the laser out of the reactor into the reactor is performed by an extension tube depending into a through hole of a rotary plug, and the guidance of the laser light into a portion to be repaired is performed by the transmitting and condensing action of the reflecting mirror. (Kamimura, M.)

  5. Fundamentals of reactor chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the Nuclear Engineering School of JAERI, many courses are presented for the people working in and around the nuclear reactors. The curricula of the courses contain also the subject material of chemistry. With reference to the foreign curricula, a plan of educational subject material of chemistry in the Nuclear Engineering School of JAERI was considered, and the fundamental part of reactor chemistry was reviewed in this report. Since the students of the Nuclear Engineering School are not chemists, the knowledge necessary in and around the nuclear reactors was emphasized in order to familiarize the students with the reactor chemistry. The teaching experience of the fundamentals of reactor chemistry is also given. (author)

  6. Nuclear reactor physics

    CERN Document Server

    Stacey, Weston M

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear reactor physics is the core discipline of nuclear engineering. Nuclear reactors now account for a significant portion of the electrical power generated worldwide, and new power reactors with improved fuel cycles are being developed. At the same time, the past few decades have seen an ever-increasing number of industrial, medical, military, and research applications for nuclear reactors. The second edition of this successful comprehensive textbook and reference on basic and advanced nuclear reactor physics has been completely updated, revised and enlarged to include the latest developme

  7. Generation III+ Reactor Portfolio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While the power generation needs of utilities are unique and diverse, they are all faced with the double challenge of meeting growing electricity needs while curbing CO2 emissions. To answer these diverse needs and help tackle this challenge, AREVA has developed several reactor models which are briefly described in this document: The EPRTM Reactor: designed on the basis of the Konvoi (Germany) and N4 (France) reactors, the EPRTM reactor is an evolutionary model designed to achieve best-in-class safety and operational performance levels. The ATMEA1TM reactor: jointly designed by Mitsubishi Heavy Industries and AREVA through ATMEA, their common company. This reactor design benefits from the competencies and expertise of the two mother companies, which have commissioned close to 130 reactor units. The KERENATM reactor: Designed on the basis of the most recent German BWR reactors (Gundremmingen) the KERENATM reactor relies on proven technology while also including innovative, yet thoroughly tested, features. The optimal combination of active and passive safety systems for a boiling water reactor achieves a very low probability of severe accident

  8. The Maple reactor project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MDS Nordion supplies the majority of the world's reactor-produced medical isotopes. These isotopes are currently produced in the NRU reactor at AECL's Chalk River Laboratories (CRL). Medical isotopes and related technology are relied upon around the world to prevent, diagnose and treat disease. The NRU reactor, which has played a key role in supplying medical isotopes to date, has been in operation for over 40 years. Replacing this aging reactor has been a priority for MDS Nordion to assure the global nuclear medicine community that Canada will continue to be a dependable supplier of medical isotopes. MDS Nordion contracted AECL to construct two MAPLE reactors dedicated to the production of medical isotopes. The MDS Nordion Medical Isotope Reactor (MMIR) project started in September 1996. This paper describes the MAPLE reactors that AECL has built at its CRL site, and will operate for MDS Nordion. (author)

  9. High temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the advent of high temperature reactors, nuclear energy, in addition to producing electricity, has shown enormous potential for the production of alternate transport energy carrier such as hydrogen. High efficiency hydrogen production processes need process heat at temperatures around 1173-1223 K. Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), is currently developing concepts of high temperature reactors capable of supplying process heat around 1273 K. These reactors would provide energy to facilitate combined production of hydrogen, electricity, and drinking water. Compact high temperature reactor is being developed as a technology demonstrator for associated technologies. Design has been also initiated for a 600 MWth innovative high temperature reactor. High temperature reactor development programme has opened new avenues for research in areas like advanced nuclear fuels, high temperature and corrosion resistant materials and protective coatings, heavy liquid metal coolant technologies, etc. The paper highlights design of these reactors and their material related requirements

  10. Spinning fluids reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jan D; Hupka, Jan; Aranowski, Robert

    2012-11-20

    A spinning fluids reactor, includes a reactor body (24) having a circular cross-section and a fluid contactor screen (26) within the reactor body (24). The fluid contactor screen (26) having a plurality of apertures and a circular cross-section concentric with the reactor body (24) for a length thus forming an inner volume (28) bound by the fluid contactor screen (26) and an outer volume (30) bound by the reactor body (24) and the fluid contactor screen (26). A primary inlet (20) can be operatively connected to the reactor body (24) and can be configured to produce flow-through first spinning flow of a first fluid within the inner volume (28). A secondary inlet (22) can similarly be operatively connected to the reactor body (24) and can be configured to produce a second flow of a second fluid within the outer volume (30) which is optionally spinning.

  11. Reactor Safety: Introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The programme of the Reactor Safety Division focuses on the development of expertise on materials behaviour under irradiation for fission and fusion oriented applications. Furthermore, as nuclear energy needs international public acceptance with respect to safety and efficient management of natural resources and wants to reduce the burden of nuclear waste, the Reactor Safety Division enhanced its efforts to develop the MYRRHA project. MYRRHA, an accelerator driven sub-critical system, might have the potential to cope in Europe with the above mentioned constraints on acceptability and might serve as a technological platform for GEN IV reactor development, in particular the Liquid Metal Fast Reactor.The Reactor Safety Division gathers three research entities that are internationally recognised: the Reactor Materials Research department, the Reactor Physics and MYRRHA department and the Instrumentation department.The objectives of Reactor Materials Research are: to evaluate the integrity and behaviour of structural materials and nuclear fuels used in present and future nuclear power industry; to perform research to unravel and understand the parameters that determine the material and fuel behaviour under or after irradiation; to contribute to the interpretation and modelling of the materials and fuels behaviour in order to develop and assess strategies for optimum life management of nuclear power plant components. The programmes within the Reactor Materials Research department concentrate on four distinct disciplines: Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel embrittlement Stress corrosion cracking in reactor coolant environment, including Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking; Nuclear Fuel characterisation and development of new fuel types for commercial and test reactors. Development of materials for Fusion and advanced nuclear fission reactors. The safe operation of present nuclear power plants relies primarily on the integrity of the reactor pressure vessel

  12. DISCURSO E VERDADE: SEIS CONFERÊNCIAS DADAS POR MICHEL FOUCAULT, EM BERKELEY, ENTRE OUTUBRO E NOVEMBRO DE 1983, SOBRE A PARRHESIA - APRESENTAÇÃO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Os Editores da Prometeus

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho é a tradução, produzida pela equipe de tradutores daPrometeus, de O Discurso e a Verdade: a problematização da parrhesia, seisconferências de Michel Foucault proferidas em inglês na Universidade daCalifórnia, em Berkeley, entre outubro e novembro de 1983. A transcrição que nosserviu de base para a tradução foi editada em inglês em 1985 por Joseph Pearson ecompilada a partir das gravações das conferências, disponíveis para download no sítiodo Media Resources Center da Moffitt Library (UC Berkeley1. Essa transcrição foireeditada em 1999 por www.repb.net.

  13. Fluoride-Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactor (FHR) for Power and Process Heat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsberg, Charles [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Hu, Lin-wen [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Peterson, Per [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Sridharan, Kumar [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-01-21

    In 2011 the U.S. Department of Energy through its Nuclear Energy University Program (NEUP) awarded a 3- year integrated research project (IRP) to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and its partners at the University of California at Berkeley (UCB) and the University of Wisconsin at Madison (UW). The IRP included Westinghouse Electric Company and an advisory panel chaired by Regis Matzie that provided advice as the project progressed. The first sentence of the proposal stated the goals: The objective of this Integrated Research Project (IRP) is to develop a path forward to a commercially viable salt-cooled solid-fuel high-temperature reactor with superior economic, safety, waste, nonproliferation, and physical security characteristics compared to light-water reactors. This report summarizes major results of this research.

  14. Renewal of safety circuitry on a zero-energy research reactor using microprocessor units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conventional hard-wired safety-circuitry of the zero-energy research reactor at the Central Electricity Generating Board's Berkeley Nuclear Laboratories is being replaced by microprocessor-based units. The Paper describes how levels of reliability that are necessary for safety circuitry have been achieved by the use of two entirely different guard line systems based on a Motorola 6800 microprocessor and an Intel 8085A microprocessor. The two systems operate in parallel and either will trip the reactor. Each has been programmed by a different programmer using different philosophies. The two units and the test programme involving over 106 simulated guard line trips are described. An overall reliability of better than 10-6 per annum is claimed. (author)

  15. Fluoride-Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactor (FHR) for Power and Process Heat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 2011 the U.S. Department of Energy through its Nuclear Energy University Program (NEUP) awarded a 3- year integrated research project (IRP) to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and its partners at the University of California at Berkeley (UCB) and the University of Wisconsin at Madison (UW). The IRP included Westinghouse Electric Company and an advisory panel chaired by Regis Matzie that provided advice as the project progressed. The first sentence of the proposal stated the goals: The objective of this Integrated Research Project (IRP) is to develop a path forward to a commercially viable salt-cooled solid-fuel high-temperature reactor with superior economic, safety, waste, nonproliferation, and physical security characteristics compared to light-water reactors. This report summarizes major results of this research.

  16. Design, fabrication, and calibration of curved integral coils for measuring transfer function, uniformity, and effective length of LBL ALS [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Advanced Light Source] Booster Dipole Magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A matched pair of curved integral coils has been designed, fabricated and calibrated at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory for measuring Advanced Light Source (ALS) Booster Dipole Magnets. Distinctive fabrication and calibration techniques are described. The use of multifilar magnet wire in fabrication integral search coils is described. Procedures used and results of AC and DC measurements of transfer function, effective length and uniformity of the prototype booster dipole magnet are presented in companion papers. 8 refs

  17. Research reactors in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argentine Nuclear Development started in early fifties. In 1957, it was decided to built the first a research reactor. RA-1 reactor (120 kw, today licensed to work at 40 kW) started operation in January 1958. Originally RA-1 was an Argonaut (American design) reactor. In early sixties, the RA-1 core was changed. Fuel rods (20% enrichment) was introduced instead the old Argonaut core design. For that reason, a critical facility named RA-0 was built. After that, the RA-3 project started, to build a multipurpose 5 MW nuclear reactor MTR pool type, to produce radioisotopes and research. For that reason and to define the characteristics of the RA-3 core, another critical facility was built, RA-2. Initially RA-3 was a 90 % enriched fuel reactor, and started operation in 1967. When Atucha I NPP project started, a German design Power Reactor, a small homogeneous reactor was donated by the German Government to Argentina (1969). This was RA-4 reactor (20% enrichment, 1W). In 1982, RA-6 pool reactor achieved criticality. This is a 500 kW reactor with 90% enriched MTR fuel elements. In 1990, RA-3 started to operate fueled by 20% enriched fuel. In 1997, the RA-8 (multipurpose critical facility located at Pilcaniyeu) started to operate. RA-3 reactor is the most important CNEA reactor for Argentine Research Reactors development. It is the first in a succession of Argentine MTR reactors built by CNEA (and INVAP SE ) in Argentina and other countries: RA-6 (500 kW, Bariloche-Argentina), RP-10 (10MW, Peru), NUR (500 kW, Algeria), MPR (22 MW, Egypt). The experience of Argentinian industry permits to compete with foreign developed countries as supplier of research reactors. Today, CNEA has six research reactors whose activities have a range from education and promotion of nuclear activity, to radioisotope production. For more than forty years, Argentine Research Reactors are working. The experience of Argentine is important, and argentine firms are able to compete in the design and

  18. Thai research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Office of Atomic Energy for Peace (OAEP) was established in 1962, as a reactor center, by the virtue of the Atomic Energy for Peace Act, under operational policy and authority of the Thai Atomic Energy for Peace Commission (TAEPC); and under administration of Ministry of Science, Technology and Energy. It owns and operates the only Thai Research Reactor (TRR-1/M1). The TRR-1/M1 is a mixed reactor system constituting of the old MTR type swimming pool, irradiation facilities and cooling system; and TRIGA Mark III core and control instrumentation. The general performance of TRR-1/M1 is summarized in Table I. The safe operation of TRR-1/M1 is regulated by Reactor Safety Committee (RSC), established under TAEPC, and Health Physics Group of OAEP. The RCS has responsibility and duty to review of and make recommendations on Reactor Standing Orders, Reactor Operation Procedures, Reactor Core Loading and Requests for Reactor Experiments. In addition,there also exist of Emergency Procedures which is administered by OAEP. The Reactor Operation Procedures constitute of reactor operating procedures, system operating procedures and reactor maintenance procedures. At the level of reactor routine operating procedures, there is a set of Specifications on Safety and Operation Limits and Code of Practice from which reactor shift supervisor and operators must follow in order to assure the safe operation of TRR-1/M1. Table II is the summary of such specifications. The OAEP is now upgrading certain major components of the TRR-1/M1 such as the cooling system, the ventilation system and monitoring equipment to ensure their adequately safe and reliable performance under normal and emergency conditions. Furthermore, the International Atomic Energy Agency has been providing assistance in areas of operation and maintenance and safety analysis. (author)

  19. Nuclear Reactor Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, Weston M.

    2001-02-01

    An authoritative textbook and up-to-date professional's guide to basic and advanced principles and practices Nuclear reactors now account for a significant portion of the electrical power generated worldwide. At the same time, the past few decades have seen an ever-increasing number of industrial, medical, military, and research applications for nuclear reactors. Nuclear reactor physics is the core discipline of nuclear engineering, and as the first comprehensive textbook and reference on basic and advanced nuclear reactor physics to appear in a quarter century, this book fills a large gap in the professional literature. Nuclear Reactor Physics is a textbook for students new to the subject, for others who need a basic understanding of how nuclear reactors work, as well as for those who are, or wish to become, specialists in nuclear reactor physics and reactor physics computations. It is also a valuable resource for engineers responsible for the operation of nuclear reactors. Dr. Weston Stacey begins with clear presentations of the basic physical principles, nuclear data, and computational methodology needed to understand both the static and dynamic behaviors of nuclear reactors. This is followed by in-depth discussions of advanced concepts, including extensive treatment of neutron transport computational methods. As an aid to comprehension and quick mastery of computational skills, he provides numerous examples illustrating step-by-step procedures for performing the calculations described and chapter-end problems. Nuclear Reactor Physics is a useful textbook and working reference. It is an excellent self-teaching guide for research scientists, engineers, and technicians involved in industrial, research, and military applications of nuclear reactors, as well as government regulators who wish to increase their understanding of nuclear reactors.

  20. ERDA summer study of heavy ions for inertial fusion, Oakland/Berkeley, California, July 19--30, 1976. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technical summaries are given for the following areas: (1) target and reactor design, (2) ion sources, (3) low-velocity acceleration, (4) atomic and molecular physics, (5) accelerator parameters, (6) beam manipulations, (7) induction linac, (8) final focusing and transmission to the target, (9) systems and cost studies, and (10) alternatives. Several groups of appendices are given that relate to these technical summaries

  1. ERDA summer study of heavy ions for inertial fusion, Oakland/Berkeley, California, July 19--30, 1976. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bangerter, R.O.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.; Judd, D.L.; Smith, L.

    1976-12-01

    Technical summaries are given for the following areas: (1) target and reactor design, (2) ion sources, (3) low-velocity acceleration, (4) atomic and molecular physics, (5) accelerator parameters, (6) beam manipulations, (7) induction linac, (8) final focusing and transmission to the target, (9) systems and cost studies, and (10) alternatives. Several groups of appendices are given that relate to these technical summaries. (MOW)

  2. Reactor containment and reactor safety in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reactor safety systems of two reactors are studied aiming at the reactor containment integrity. The first is a BWR type reactor and is called Peachbottom 2, and the second is a PWR type reactor, and is called surry. (E.G.)

  3. Investigation of Beam Instability Under the Effects of Long-Range Transverse Wake Fields in the Berkeley Future Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An ultra-relativistic charged particle bunch moving through a resonator cavity leaves behind a wake field that will affect subsequent bunches (if the bunch is not ultra-relativistic, the wake field will not be exclusively behind it). If the initial bunch enters the cavity off-axis, it will produce a transverse wake field that can then kick later bunches off the axis. Thus, even bunches that were initially traveling on axis could be displaced and, in turn, produce their own transverse wake fields, affecting following bunches. The offsets obtained by bunches could increase along the bunch train, leading to the so-called multi-bunch beam break-up instability [1]. The purpose of our investigation is to see whether such instability will occur in the superconducting, 1.3 GHz, 2.5GeV linac (see Table 1) planned for the Berkeley future light source (BFLS). We assume an initial steady-state situation established for machine operation; i.e. a continuous process where every bunch follows the same trajectory through the linac, with only small deviations from the axis of the rf structures. We will look at a possible instability arising from a bunch having a small deviation from the established trajectory. Such a deviation would produce a wake field that is slightly different from the one produced by the bunches following the established trajectory. This could lead to subsequent bunches deviating further from the established trajectory. We will assume the deviations are small (at first) and so the difference in the wake field caused by a bunch not traveling along the established trajectory is well approximated by a long-range transverse dipole wake. We are concerned only with deviations from the established trajectory; thus, in our models, a transverse position of zero corresponds to the bunch traveling along the established trajectory. Under this assumption, only the additional long-range transverse dipole wake remains in our models

  4. The Advanced Light Source: A new 1.5 GeV synchrotron radiation facility at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS), presently under construction at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, will be the world's brightest synchrotron-radiation source of ultraviolet and soft x-ray photons when it opens its doors to users in April 1993. The ALS is a third-generation source that is based on a low-emittance electron storage ring, optimized for operation at 1.5 GeV, with long straight sections for insertion devices. Its naturally short pulses are ideal for time-resolved measurements. Undulators will produce high-brightness beams from below 10 eV to above 2 keV; wigglers will produce high fluxes of harder x-rays to energies above 10 keV. The ALS will support an extensive research program in a broad spectrum of scientific and technological areas. The high brightness will open new areas of research in the materials sciences, such as spatially resolved spectroscopy (spectromicroscopy). Biological applications will include x-ray microscopy with element-specific sensitivity in the water window of the spectrum where water is much more transparent than protein. The ALS will be an excellent research tool for atomic physics and chemistry because the high flux will allow measurements to be made with tenuous gas-phase targets. Undulator radiation can excite the K shell of elements up to silicon and the L shell of elements up to krypton, and wiggler radiation can excite the L shell of nearly every element. The ALS will operate as a national user facility; interested scientists are encouraged to contact the ALS Scientific Program Coordinator to explore their scientific and technological research interests

  5. The Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory: A high-brightness soft x-ray synchrotron-radiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Light Source, a third-generation national synchrotron-radiation facility now under construction at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, is scheduled to begin serving qualified users across a broad spectrum of research areas in the spring of 1993. Based on a low-emittance electron storage ring optimized to operate at 1.5 GeV, the ALS will have 10 long straight sections available for insertion devices (undulators and wigglers) and 24 high-quality bend-magnet ports. The short pulse width (30--50 ns) will be ideal for time-resolved measurements. Undulators will generate high-brightness soft x-ray and ultraviolet (XUV) radiation from below 20 eV to above 2 keV. Wigglers and bend magnets will extend the spectrum by generating high fluxes of hard x-rays to photon energies above 10 keV. The ALS will support an extensive research program in which XUV radiation is used to study matter in all its varied gaseous, liquid, and solid forms. The high brightness will open new areas of research in the materials sciences, such as spatially resolved spectroscopy (spectromicroscopy). Biological applications will include x-ray microscopy with element-specific sensitivity in the water window of the spectrum where water is much more transparent than protein. The ALS will be an excellent research tool for atomic physics and chemistry because the high flux will allow measurements to be made with tenuous gas-phase targets. 8 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs

  6. Out-of-band exposure characterization with the SEMATECH Berkeley 0.3-NA microfield exposure tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, Simi A.; Nauleau, Patrick; Rekawa, Senajith; Gullikson, Eric; Kemp, Charles D.

    2009-02-23

    For the commercialization of extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL), discharge or laser produced, pulsed plasma light sources are being considered. These sources are known to emit into a broad range of wavelengths that are collectively referred to as the out-of-band (OOB) radiation by lithographers. Multilayer EUV optics reflect OOB radiation emitted by the EUV sources onto the wafer plane resulting in unwanted background exposure of the resist (flare) and reduced image contrast. The reflectivity of multilayer optics at the target wavelength of 13.5 nm is comparable to that of their reflectivity in the deep ultraviolet (DUV) and UV regions from 100-350 nm. The aromatic molecular backbones of many of the resists used for EUV are equally absorptive at specific DUV wavelengths as well. In order to study the effect of these wavelengths on imaging performance in a real system, we are in the process of integrating a DUV source into the SEMATECH Berkeley 0.3-NA Microfield Exposure Tool (MET). The MET plays an active role in advanced research in resist and mask development for EUVL and as such, we will utilize this system to systematically evaluate the imaging impact of DUV wavelengths in a EUV system. In this paper, we present the optical design for the new DUV component and the simulation-based imaging results predicting the potential impact of OOB based on known resist, mask, and multilayer conditions. It should be noted that because the projection optics work equally well as imaging optics at DUV wavelengths, the OOB radiation cannot be treated simply as uniform background or DC flare.

  7. TRIGA reactor main systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This module describes the main systems of low power (<2 MW) and higher power (≥2 MW) TRIGA reactors. The most significant difference between the two is that forced reactor cooling and an emergency core cooling system are generally required for the higher power TRIGA reactors. However, those TRIGA reactors that are designed to be operated above 3 MW also use a TRIGA fuel that is specifically designed for those higher power outputs (3 to 14 MW). Typical values are given for the respective systems although each TRIGA facility will have unique characteristics that may only be determined by the experienced facility operators. Due to the inherent wide scope of these research reactor facilities construction and missions, this training module covers those systems found at most operating TRIGA reactor facilities but may also discuss non-standard equipment that was found to be operationally useful although not necessarily required. (author)

  8. Evaluation of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present status of research reactors with highly enriched (93%) uranium fuel at JAERI, JRR-2 and JMTR is described. JRR-2 is a heterogeneous type of reactor, using heavy water as moderator and coolant. It uses both MTR type and cylindrical type of fuel elements. The maximum thermal power and the thermal neutron flux are 10 MW and 2x1014 n/cm2 see respectively. The reactor has been used for various experiments such as solid state physics, material irradiation, reactor fuel irradiation and radioisotope production. The JMTR is a multi-purpose tank type material testing reactor, and light water moderator and coolant, operated at 50 MW. The evaluation of lower enriched fuel and its consequences for both reactors is considered more especially

  9. Multipurpose research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The international symposium on the utilization of multipurpose research reactors and related international co-operation was organized by the IAEA to provide for information exchange on current uses of research reactors and international co-operative projects. The symposium was attended by about 140 participants from 36 countries and two international organizations. There were 49 oral presentations of papers and 24 poster presentations. The presentations were divided into 7 sessions devoted to the following topics: neutron beam research and applications of neutron scattering (6 papers and 1 poster), reactor engineering (6 papers and 5 posters), irradiation testing of fuel and material for fission and fusion reactors (6 papers and 10 posters), research reactor utilization programmes (13 papers and 4 posters), neutron capture therapy (4 papers), neutron activation analysis (3 papers and 4 posters), application of small reactors in research and training (11 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  10. The nuclear soliton reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basic reactor physics of a completely novel nuclear fission reactor design - the soliton-reactor - is presented on the basis of a simple model. In such a reactor, the neutrons in the critical region convert either fertile material in the adjacent layers into fissile material or reduce the poisoning of fissile material in such a manner that successively new critical regions emerge. The result is an autocatalytically driven burn-up wave which propagates throughout the reactor. Thereby, the relevant characteristic spatial distributions (neutron flux, specific power density and the associated particle densities) are solitons - wave phenomena resulting from non-linear partial differential equations which do not change their shape during propagation. A qualitativley new kind of harnessing nuclear fission energy may become possible with fuel residence times comparable with the useful lifetime of the reactor system. In the long run, fast breeder systems which exploit the natural uranium and thorium resources, without any reprocessing capacity are imaginable. (orig.)

  11. Fast Spectrum Reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Todd, Donald; Tsvetkov, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    Fast Spectrum Reactors presents a detailed overview of world-wide technology contributing to the development of fast spectrum reactors. With a unique focus on the capabilities of fast spectrum reactors to address nuclear waste transmutation issues, in addition to the well-known capabilities of breeding new fuel, this volume describes how fast spectrum reactors contribute to the wide application of nuclear power systems to serve the global nuclear renaissance while minimizing nuclear proliferation concerns. Readers will find an introduction to the sustainable development of nuclear energy and the role of fast reactors, in addition to an economic analysis of nuclear reactors. A section devoted to neutronics offers the current trends in nuclear design, such as performance parameters and the optimization of advanced power systems. The latest findings on fuel management, partitioning and transmutation include the physics, efficiency and strategies of transmutation, homogeneous and heterogeneous recycling, in addit...

  12. Fusion reactor research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work covers four separate areas: (1) development of technology for processing liquid lithium from blankets, (2) investigation of hydrogen isotope permeation in candidate structural metals and alloys for near-term fusion reactors, (3) analytical studies encompassing fusion reactor thermal hydraulics, tritium facility design, and fusion reactor safety, and (4) studies involving dosimetry and damage analysis. Recent accomplishments in each of these areas are summarized

  13. The Integral Fast Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an innovative liquid metal reactor concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory. It seeks to specifically exploit the inherent properties of liquid metal cooling and metallic fuel in a way that leads to substantial improvements in the characteristics of the complete reactor system. This paper describes the key features and potential advantages of the IFR concept, with emphasis on its safety characteristics. 3 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  14. The replacement research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a consequences of the government decision in September 1997. ANSTO established a replacement research reactor project to manage the procurement of the replacement reactor through the necessary approval, tendering and contract management stages This paper provides an update of the status of the project including the completion of the Environmental Impact Statement. Prequalification and Public Works Committee processes. The aims of the project, management organisation, reactor type and expected capabilities are also described

  15. PFBR reactor protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Design philosophy adopted for Prototype Fast breeder Reactor (PFBR) is a classical one and has the following features: triplicated sensors for measuring important safety parameters; two independent reactor protection Logic Systems based on solid state devices; reactivity control achieved by control rods; gas equipped modules at the core blanket interface providing negative reactivity. Design verification of these features showed that safety of the reactor can be achieved by a traditional approach since the inherent features of LMFBR make this easy

  16. Reactor BR2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The BR2 reactor is still SCK-CEN's most important nuclear facility. After an extensive refurbishment to compensate for the ageing of the installation, the reactor was restarted in April 1997. Various aspects concerning the operation of the BR2 Reactor, the utilisation of the CALLISTO loop and the irradiation programme, the BR2 R and D programme and the production of isotopes and of NTD-silicon are discussed. Progress and achievements in 1999 are reported

  17. TRIGA reactor characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This module describes the general design, characteristics and parameters of TRIGA reactors and fuels. It is recommended that most of this information should be incorporated into any reactor operator training program and, in many cases, the facility Safety Analysis Report. It is oriented to teach the basics of the physics and mechanical design of the TRIGA fuel as well as its unique operational characteristics and the differences between TRIGA fuels and others more traditional reactor fuels. (nevyjel)

  18. Reactor Safety Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of SCK-CEN's programme on reactor safety is to develop expertise in probabilistic and deterministic reactor safety analysis. The research programme consists of four main activities, in particular the development of software for reliability analysis of large systems and participation in the international PHEBUS-FP programme for severe accidents, the development of an expert system for the aid to diagnosis; the development and application of a probabilistic reactor dynamics method. Main achievements in 1999 are reported

  19. Reactor Engineering Department annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research and development activities in the Department of Reactor Engineering in fiscal 1984 are described. The work of the Department is closely related to development of multipurpose Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor and Fusion Reactor, and development of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor carried out by Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. Contents of the report are achievements in fields such as nuclear data and group constants, theoretical method and code development, reactor physics experiment and analysis, fusion neutronics, shielding, reactor and nuclear instrumentation, reactor control and diagnosis, safeguards technology, and activities of the Committee on Reactor Physics. (author)

  20. Reactor Engineering Division annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research and development activities in the Division of Reactor Engineering in fiscal 1981 are described. The work of the Division is closely related to development of multipurpose Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor and fusion reactor, and development of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor carried out by Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. Contents of the report are achievements in fields such as nuclear data and group constants, theoretical method and code development, integral experiment and analysis, shielding, reactor and nuclear instrumentation, reactor control and diagnosis, and fusion reactor technology, and activities of the Committee on Reactor Physics. (author)

  1. Reactor Engineering Division annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research activities in the Division of Reactor Engineering in fiscal 1979 are described. The work of the Division is closely related to development of multi-purpose Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor and fusion reactor, and development of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor carried out by Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. Contents of the report are achievements in fields such as nuclear data and group constants, theoretical method and code development, integral experiment and analysis, shielding, reactor and nuclear instrumentation, reactor control and diagnosis, and fusion reactor technology, and activities of the Committees on Reactor Physics and on Decomissioning of Nuclear Facilities. (author)

  2. New reactor concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The document gives a summary of new nuclear reactor concepts from a technological point of view. Belgium supports the development of the European Pressurized-Water Reactor, which is an evolutionary concept based on the European experience in Pressurized-Water Reactors. A reorientation of the Belgian choice for this evolutionary concept may be required in case that a decision is taken to burn plutonium, when the need for flexible nuclear power plants arises or when new reactor concepts can demonstrate proved benefits in terms of safety and cost

  3. Reactor construction steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basic functions of light water reactor components are shown on the example of a pressurized water reactor and the requirements resulting therefrom for steel, the basic structural material, are derived. A detailed analysis of three main groups of reactor steels is presented and the applications are indicated of low-alloyed steels, high-alloyed austenitic steels, and steels with a high content of Ni and of alloying additions for steam generator pipes. An outline is given of prospective fast breeder reactor steels. (J.K.)

  4. Commercialization of fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comparative analysis has been performed of capital and fuel cycle costs for fast BN-type and pressurized light water VVER-type reactors. As a result of materials demand and components costs comparison of NPPs with VVER-1000 and BN-600 reactors, respectively, conclusion was made, that under equal conditions of the comparison, NPP with fast reactor had surpassed the specific capital cost of NPP with VVER by about 30 - 40 %. Ways were determined for further decrease of this difference, as well as for the fuel cycle cost reduction, because at present it is higher than that of VVER-type reactors. (author)

  5. Mirror fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conceptual design studies were made of fusion reactors based on the three current mirror-confinement concepts: the standard mirror, the tandem mirror, and the field-reversed mirror. Recent studies of the standard mirror have emphasized its potential as a fusion-fission hybrid reactor, designed to produce fuel for fission reactors. We have designed a large commercial hybrid and a small pilot-plant hybrid based on standard mirror confinement. Tandem mirror designs include a commercial 1000-MWe fusion power plant and a nearer term tandem mirror hybrid. Field-reversed mirror designs include a multicell commercial reactor producing 75 MWe and a single-cell pilot plant

  6. Natural convection type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a natural convection type nuclear reactor, a reactor core is disposed such that the top of the reactor core is always situated in a flooded position even if pipelines connected to the pressure vessel are ruptured and the level at the inside of the reactor vessel is reduced due to flashing. Further, a lower dry well situated below the pressure vessel is disposed such that it is in communication with a through hole to a pressure suppression chamber situated therearound and the reactor core is situated at the level lower than that of the through hole. If pipelines connected to the pressure vessel are ruptured to cause loss of water, although the water level is lowered after the end of the flashing, the reactor core is always flooded till the operation of a pressure accummulation water injection system to prevent the top of the reactor core even from temporary exposure. Further, injected water is discharged to the outside of the pressure vessel, transferred to the lower dry well, and flows through the through hole to the pressure control chamber and cools the surface of the reactor pressure vessel from the outside. Accordingly, the reactor core is cooled to surely and efficiently remove the after-heat. (N.H.)

  7. INVAP's Research Reactor Designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    INVAP, an Argentine company founded more than three decades ago, is today recognized as one of the leaders within the research reactor industry. INVAP has participated in several projects covering a wide range of facilities, designed in accordance with the requirements of our different clients. For complying with these requirements, INVAP developed special skills and capabilities to deal with different fuel assemblies, different core cooling systems, and different reactor layouts. This paper summarizes the general features and utilization of several INVAP research reactor designs, from subcritical and critical assemblies to high-power reactors IAEA safety

  8. Reactor power control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present invention provides a control device which can conduct scram and avoid lowering of the power of a nuclear power plant upon occurrence of earthquakes. Namely, the device of the present invention comprises, in addition to an existent power control device, (1) an earthquake detector for detecting occurrence and annihilation of earthquakes and (2) a reactor control device for outputting control rod operation signals and reactor core flow rate control signals depending on the earthquake detection signals from the detector, and reactor and plant information. With such a constitution, although the reactor is vibrated by earthquakes, the detector detects slight oscillations of the reactor by initial fine vibration waves as premonitory symptoms of serious earthquakes. The earthquake occurrence signals are outputted to the reactor control device. The reactor control device, receiving the signals, changes the position of control rods by way of control rod driving mechanisms to make the axial power distribution in the reactor core to a top peak type. As a result, even if the void amount in the reactor core is reduced by the subsequent actual earthquakes, since the void amount is moved, effects on the increase of neutron fluxes by the actual earthquakes is small. (I.S.)

  9. Nuclear reactor internals arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nuclear reactor internals arrangement is disclosed which facilitates reactor refueling. A reactor vessel and a nuclear core is utilized in conjunction with an upper core support arrangement having means for storing withdrawn control rods therein. The upper core support is mounted to the underside of the reactor vessel closure head so that upon withdrawal of the control rods into the upper core support, the closure head, the upper core support and the control rods are removed as a single unit thereby directly exposing the core for purposes of refueling

  10. Fusion Reactor Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of SCK-CEN's programme on fusion reactor materials is to contribute to the knowledge on the radiation-induced behaviour of fusion reactor materials and components as well as to help the international community in building the scientific and technical basis needed for the construction of the future reactor. Ongoing projects include: the study of the mechanical and chemical (corrosion) behaviour of structural materials under neutron irradiation and water coolant environment; the investigation of the characteristics of irradiated first wall material such as beryllium; investigations on the management of materials resulting from the dismantling of fusion reactors including waste disposal. Progress and achievements in these areas in 2001 are discussed

  11. The research reactors their contribution to the reactors physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 19 october 2000, the french society of nuclear energy organized a day on the research reactors. This associated report of the technical session, reactors physics, is presented in two parts. The first part deals with the annual meeting and groups general papers on the pressurized water reactors, the fast neutrons reactors and the fusion reactors industry. The second part presents more technical papers about the research programs, critical models, irradiation reactors (OSIRIS and Jules Horowitz) and computing tools. (A.L.B.)

  12. Modelling containment passive safety systems in advanced water cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most designs of advanced passive reactors incorporate Passive Containment Cooling Systems (PCCS) relying on steam condensation to cope with possible pressure increase that would result in the case of a postulated accident. As a consequence, experimental and analytical research programmes have been launched worldwide to investigate new configurations and conditions involved in these new scenarios. This paper summarises the major outcomes of the joint research of CIEMAT, UPV, and UW in developing predictive models to address anticipated conditions in the Simplified Boiling Water Reactors (CIEMAT-UPV) and in the AP600 (CIEMAT-UW). Even though both models share some of their fundamental characteristics (such as being mass/heat transfer analogy based), samples of their validation against independent databases illustrate their intrinsic differences in formulation according to the scenarios addressed by each one. Relative importance of condensate film or gas mixture velocity are discussed, and the effect of key factors such as noncondensable gas presence and pressure are stated. Experimental data from University of Berkeley (UCB) and from University of Wisconsin - Madison (UW) will be used to support comparisons and discussions held in the paper. In short, this work demonstrates that heat/mass transfer analogy-based models, particularly those relying on diffusion film modelling to account for noncondensable gas presence, are extremely useful in test interpretation and result in good agreement with reliable databases. (author)

  13. An Economic Analysis of Generation IV Small Modular Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, J S; Lamont, A D; Rothwell, G S; Smith, C F; Greenspan, E; Brown, N; Barak, A

    2002-03-01

    This report examines some conditions necessary for Generation IV Small Modular Reactors (SMRs) to be competitive in the world energy market. The key areas that make nuclear reactors an attractive choice for investors are reviewed, and a cost model based on the ideal conditions is developed. Recommendations are then made based on the output of the cost model and on conditions and tactics that have proven successful in other industries. The Encapsulated Nuclear Heat Source (ENHS), a specific SMR design concept, is used to develop the cost model and complete the analysis because information about the ENHS design is readily available from the University of California at Berkeley Nuclear Engineering Department. However, the cost model can be used to analyze any of the current SMR designs being considered. On the basis of our analysis, we determined that the nuclear power industry can benefit from and SMRs can become competitive in the world energy market if a combination of standardization and simplification of orders, configuration, and production are implemented. This would require wholesale changes in the way SMRs are produced, manufactured and regulated, but nothing that other industries have not implemented and proven successful.

  14. Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Demonstration Reactor Point Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fluoride salt-cooled high-temperature reactor (FHR) demonstration reactor (DR) is a concept for a salt-cooled reactor with 100 megawatts of thermal output (MWt). It would use tristructural-isotropic (TRISO) particle fuel within prismatic graphite blocks. FLiBe (2 LiF-BeF2) is the reference primary coolant. The FHR DR is designed to be small, simple, and affordable. Development of the FHR DR is a necessary intermediate step to enable near-term commercial FHRs. Lower risk technologies are purposely included in the initial FHR DR design to ensure that the reactor can be built, licensed, and operated within an acceptable budget and schedule. These technologies include TRISO particle fuel, replaceable core structural material, the use of that same material for the primary and intermediate loops, and tube-and-shell primary-to-intermediate heat exchangers. Several preconceptual and conceptual design efforts that have been conducted on FHR concepts bear a significant influence on the FHR DR design. Specific designs include the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) advanced high-temperature reactor (AHTR) with 3400/1500 MWt/megawatts of electric output (MWe), as well as a 125 MWt small modular AHTR (SmAHTR) from ORNL. Other important examples are the Mk1 pebble bed FHR (PB-FHR) concept from the University of California, Berkeley (UCB), and an FHR test reactor design developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). The MIT FHR test reactor is based on a prismatic fuel platform and is directly relevant to the present FHR DR design effort. These FHR concepts are based on reasonable assumptions for credible commercial prototypes. The FHR DR concept also directly benefits from the operating experience of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE), as well as the detailed design efforts for a large molten salt reactor concept and its breeder variant, the Molten Salt Breeder Reactor. The FHR DR technology is most representative of the 3400 MWt AHTR concept, and it

  15. One piece reactor removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Japan Research Reactor No.3 (JRR-3) was the first reactor consisting of 'Japanese-made' components alone except for fuel and heavy water. After reaching its initial critical state in September 1962, JRR-3 had been in operation for 21 years until March 1983. It was decided that the reactor be removed en-bloc in view of the work schedule, cost and management of the reactor following the removal. In the special method developed jointly by the Japanese Atomic Energy Research Institute and Shimizu Construction Co., Ltd., the reactor main unit was cut off from the building by continuous core boring, with its major components bound in the block with biological shield material (heavy concrete), and then conveyed and stored in a large waste store building constructed near the reactor building. Major work processes described in this report include the cutting off, lifting, horizontal conveyance and lowering of the reactor main unit. The removal of the JRR-3 reactor main unit was successfully carried out safely and quickly by the en-block removal method with radiation exposure dose of the workers being kept at a minimum. Thus the high performance of the en-bloc removal method was demonstrated and, in addition, valuable knowhow and other data were obtained from the work. (Nogami, K.)

  16. Reactor Materials Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The activities of the Reactor Materials Research Department of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN in 2000 are summarised. The programmes within the department are focussed on studies concerning (1) fusion, in particular mechanical testing; (2) Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC); (3) nuclear fuel; and (4) Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel (RPVS)

  17. The fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basic principles of the fusion reactor are outlined. Plasma heating and confinement schemes are described. These confinement systems include the linear Z pinch, magnetic mirrors and Tokamaks. A fusion reactor is described and a discussion is given of its environmental impact and its fuel situation. (R.L.)

  18. Polymerization Reactor Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaates, J. Michael

    1987-01-01

    Describes a polymerization reactor engineering course offered at Michigan Technological University which focuses on the design and operation of industrial polymerization reactors to achieve a desired degree of polymerization and molecular weight distribution. Provides a list of the course topics and assigned readings. (TW)

  19. Reactor Materials Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Walle, E

    2001-04-01

    The activities of the Reactor Materials Research Department of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN in 2000 are summarised. The programmes within the department are focussed on studies concerning (1) fusion, in particular mechanical testing; (2) Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC); (3) nuclear fuel; and (4) Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel (RPVS)

  20. Gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study is the second part of a general survey of Gas Cooled Reactors (GCRs). In this part, the course of development, overall performance and present development status of High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors (HTCRs) and advances of HTGR systems are reviewed. (author)

  1. Light water reactor program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franks, S.M.

    1994-12-31

    The US Department of Energy`s Light Water Reactor Program is outlined. The scope of the program consists of: design certification of evolutionary plants; design, development, and design certification of simplified passive plants; first-of-a-kind engineering to achieve commercial standardization; plant lifetime improvement; and advanced reactor severe accident program. These program activities of the Office of Nuclear Energy are discussed.

  2. Reactor Safety Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of SCK-CEN's programme on reactor safety is to develop expertise in probabilistic and deterministic reactor safety analysis. The research programme consists of two main activities, in particular the development of software for reliability analysis of large systems and participation in the international PHEBUS-FP programme for severe accidents. Main achievements in 1999 are reported

  3. Light water type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear reactor of the present invention prevents disruption of a reactor core even in a case of occurrence of entire AC power loss event, and even if a reactor core disruption should occur, it prevents a rupture of the reactor container due to excess heating. That is, a high pressure water injection system and a low pressure water injection system operated by a diesel engine are disposed in the reactor building in addition to an emergency core cooling system. With such a constitution, even if an entire AC power loss event should occur, water can surely be injected to the reactor thereby enabling to prevent the rupture of the reactor core. Even if it should be ruptured, water can be sprayed to the reactor container by the low pressure water injection system. Further, if each of water injection pumps of the high pressure water injection system and the low pressure water injection system can be driven also by motors in addition to the diesel engine, the pump operation can be conducted more certainly and integrally. (I.S.)

  4. Naval propulsion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article deals with the design and exploitation of naval propulsion reactors, mainly of PWR-type. The other existing or conceivable types of reactors are also presented: 1 - specificities of nuclear propulsion (integration in the ship, marine environment, maneuverability, instantaneous availability, conditions of exploitation-isolation, nuclear safety, safety authority); 2 - PWR-type reactor (stable operation, mastered technology, general design, radiation protection); 3 - other reactor types; 4 - compact or integrated loops architecture; 5 - radiation protection; 6 - reactor core; 7 - reactivity control (core lifetime, control means and mechanisms); 8 - core cooling (natural circulation, forced circulation, primary flow-rate program); 9 - primary loop; 10 - pressurizer; 11 - steam generators and water-steam secondary loop; 12 - auxiliary and safety loops; 13 - control instrumentation; 14 - operation; 15 - nuclear wastes and dismantling. (J.S.)

  5. Iris reactor conceptual design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    IRIS (International Reactor Innovative and Secure) is a modular, integral, light water cooled, low-to-medium power (100-350 MWe) reactor which addresses the requirements defined by the US DOE for Generation IV reactors, i.e., proliferation resistance, enhanced safety, improved economics and fuel cycle sustainability. It relies on the proven technology of light water reactors and features innovative engineering, but it does not require new technology development. This paper discusses the current reference IRIS design, which features a 1000 MWt thermal core with proven 5%-enriched uranium oxide fuel and five-year long straight burn fuel cycle, integral reactor vessel housing helical tube steam generators and immersed spool pumps. Other major contributors to the high level of safety and economic attractiveness are the safety by design and optimized maintenance approaches, which allow elimination of some classes of accidents, lower capital cost, long operating cycle, and high capacity factors. (author)

  6. Research reactor DHRUVA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DHRUVA, a 100 MWt research reactor located at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay, attained first criticality during August, 1985. The reactor is fuelled with natural uranium and is cooled, moderated and reflected by heavy water. Maximum thermal neutron flux obtained in the reactor is 1.8 X 1014 n/cm2/sec. Some of the salient design features of the reactor are discussed in this paper. Some important features of the reactor coolant system, regulation and protection systems and experimental facilities are presented. A short account of the engineered safety features is provided. Some of the problems that were faced during commissioning and the initial phase of power operation are also dealt upon

  7. Reactor core monitoring method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, Michitsugu [Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc. (Japan); Kanemoto, Shigeru; Enomoto, Mitsuhiro; Ebata, Shigeo

    1998-05-06

    The present invention provides a method of monitoring the state of coolant flow in a reactor of a BWR power plant. Namely, a plurality of local power region monitors (LPRM) are disposed to the inside of the reactor core for monitoring a power distribution. Signals of at least two optional LPRM detectors situated at positions different in axial or radial positions of the reactor core are obtained. General fluctuation components which nuclear hydrothermally fluctuate in overall reactor core are removed from the components of the signals. Then, correlational functions between these signals are determined. The state of coolant flow in the reactor is monitored based on the correlational function. When the axial flowing rate and radial flow interference are monitored, the accuracy upon monitoring axial and radial local behaviors of coolants can be improved by thus previously removing the general fluctuation components from signals of LPRM detectors and extracting local void information near to LPRM detectors at high accuracy. (I.S.)

  8. Physics of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This manual covers all the aspects of the science of neutron transport in nuclear reactors and can be used with great advantage by students, engineers or even reactor experts. It is composed of 18 chapters: 1) basis of nuclear physics, 2) the interactions of neutrons with matter, 3) the interactions of electromagnetic radiations and charged-particles with matter, 4) neutron slowing-down, 5) resonant absorption, 6) Doppler effect, 7) neutron thermalization, 8) Boltzmann equation, 9) calculation methods in neutron transport theory, 10) neutron scattering, 11) reactor reactivity, 12) theory of the critical homogenous pile, 13) the neutron reflector, 14) the heterogeneous reactor, 15) the equations of the fuel cycle, 16) neutron counter-reactions, 17) reactor kinetics, and 18) calculation methods in neutron scattering

  9. Mirror reactor surface study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general survey is presented of surface-related phenomena associated with the following mirror reactor elements: plasma first wall, ion sources, neutral beams, director converters, vacuum systems, and plasma diagnostics. A discussion of surface phenomena in possible abnormal reactor operation is included. Several studies which appear to merit immediate attention and which are essential to the development of mirror reactors are abstracted from the list of recommended areas for surface work. The appendix contains a discussion of the fundamentals of particle/surface interactions. The interactions surveyed are backscattering, thermal desorption, sputtering, diffusion, particle ranges in solids, and surface spectroscopic methods. A bibliography lists references in a number of categories pertinent to mirror reactors. Several complete published and unpublished reports on surface aspects of current mirror plasma experiments and reactor developments are also included

  10. FBR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A circular neutron reflector is disposed vertically movably so as to surround the outer circumference of a reactor core barrel. A reflector driving device comprises a driving device main body attracted to the outer wall surface of the reactor barrel by electromagnetic attraction force and an inertia body disposed above the driving device main body vertically movably. A reflector is connected below the reactor driving device. At the initial stage, a spontaneous large current is supplied to upper electromagnetic repulsion coils of the reflector driving device, impact electromagnetic repulsion force is caused between the inertia body and the reflector driving device, so that the driving device main body moves downwardly by a predetermined distance and stopped. The reflector driving device can be lowered in a step-like manner to an appropriate position suitable to restart the reactor during stoppage of the reactor core by conducting spontaneous supply of current repeatedly to the upper electromagnetic repulsion coils. (I.N.)

  11. TRIGA research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TRIGA (Training, Research, Isotope production, General-Atomic) has become the most used research reactor in the world with 65 units operating in 24 countries. The original patent for TRIGA reactors was registered in 1958. The success of this reactor is due to its inherent level of safety that results from a prompt negative temperature coefficient. Most of the neutron moderation occurs in the nuclear fuel (UZrH) because of the presence of hydrogen atoms, so in case of an increase of fuel temperature, the neutron spectrum becomes harder and neutrons are less likely to fission uranium nuclei and as a consequence the power released decreases. This inherent level of safety has made this reactor fit for training tool in university laboratories. Some recent versions of TRIGA reactors have been designed for medicine and industrial isotope production, for neutron therapy of cancers and for providing a neutron source. (A.C.)

  12. Status of French reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballagny, A. [Commissariat a l`Energie Atomique, Saclay (France)

    1997-08-01

    The status of French reactors is reviewed. The ORPHEE and RHF reactors can not be operated with a LEU fuel which would be limited to 4.8 g U/cm{sup 3}. The OSIRIS reactor has already been converted to LEU. It will use U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} as soon as its present stock of UO{sub 2} fuel is used up, at the end of 1994. The decision to close down the SILOE reactor in the near future is not propitious for the start of a conversion process. The REX 2000 reactor, which is expected to be commissioned in 2005, will use LEU (except if the fast neutrons core option is selected). Concerning the end of the HEU fuel cycle, the best option is reprocessing followed by conversion of the reprocessed uranium to LEU.

  13. Nuclear reactor design

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This book focuses on core design and methods for design and analysis. It is based on advances made in nuclear power utilization and computational methods over the past 40 years, covering core design of boiling water reactors and pressurized water reactors, as well as fast reactors and high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. The objectives of this book are to help graduate and advanced undergraduate students to understand core design and analysis, and to serve as a background reference for engineers actively working in light water reactors. Methodologies for core design and analysis, together with physical descriptions, are emphasized. The book also covers coupled thermal hydraulic core calculations, plant dynamics, and safety analysis, allowing readers to understand core design in relation to plant control and safety.

  14. Compact torsatron reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low-aspect-ratio torsatron configurations could lead to compact stellarator reactors with R0 = 8--11m, roughly one-half to one-third the size of more conventional stellarator reactor designs. Minimum-size torsatron reactors are found using various assumptions. Their size is relatively insensitive to the choice of the conductor parameters and depends mostly on geometrical constraints. The smallest size is obtained by eliminating the tritium breeding blanket under the helical winding on the inboard side and by reducing the radial depth of the superconducting coil. Engineering design issues and reactor performance are examined for three examples to illustrate the feasibility of this approach for compact reactors and for a medium-size (R0 ≅ 4 m,/bar a/ /approx lt/ 1 m) copper-coil ignition experiment. 26 refs., 11 figs., 7 tabs

  15. Multi-purpose reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Multi-Purpose-Reactor (MPR), is a pool-type reactor with an open water surface and variable core arrangement. Its main feature is plant safety and reliability. Its power is 22MWth, cooled by light water and moderated by beryllium. It has platetype fuel elements (MTR type, approx. 20%. enriched uranium) clad in aluminium. Its cobalt (Co60) production capacity is 50000 Ci/yr, 200Ci/gr. The distribution of the reactor core and associated control and safety systems is essentially based on the following design criteria: - upwards cooling flow, to waive the need for cooling flow inversion in case the reactor is cooled by natural convection if confronted with a loss of pumping power, and in order to establish a superior heat transfer potential (a higher coolant saturation temperature); - easy access to the reactor core from top of pool level with the reactor operating at full power, in order to facilitate actual implementation of experiments. Consequently, mechanisms associated to control and safety rods s,re located underneath the reactor tank; - free access of reactor personnel to top of pool level with the reactor operating at full power. This aids in the training of personnel and the actual carrying out of experiments, hence: - a vast water column was placed over the core to act as radiation shielding; - the core's external area is cooled by a downwards flow which leads to a decay tank beyond the pool (for N16 to decay); - a small downwards flow was directed to stream downwards from above the reactor core in order to drag along any possibly active element; and - a stagnant hot layer system was placed at top of pool level so as to minimize the upwards coolant flow rising towards pool level

  16. The CAREM reactor and present currents in reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    INVAP has been working on the CAREM project since 1983. It concerns a very low power reactor for electrical energy generation. The design of the reactor and the basic criteria used were described in 1984. Since then, a series of designs have been presented for reactors which are similar to CAREM regarding the solutions presented to reduce the chance of major nuclear accidents. These designs have been grouped under different names: Advanced Reactors, Second Generation Reactors, Inherently Safe Reactors, or even, Revolutionary Reactors. Every reactor fabrication firm has, at least, one project which can be placed in this category. Presently, there are two main currents of Reactor Design; Evolutionary and Revolutionary. The present work discusses characteristics of these two types of reactors, some revolutionary designs and common criteria to both types. After, these criteria are compared with CAREM reactor design. (Author)

  17. Reactor Engineering Division annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research activities in the Division of Reactor Engineering in fiscal 1977 are described. Works of the Division are development of multi-purpose Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor, fusion reactor engineering, and development of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor for Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. Contents of the report are nuclear data and group constants, theoretical method and code development, integral experiment and analysis, shielding, heat transfer and fluid dynamics, reactor and nuclear instrumentation, dynamics analysis and control method development, fusion reactor technology, and Committee on Reactor Physics. (Author)

  18. Reactor Engineering Department annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research and development activities in the Department of Reactor Engineering in fiscal 1983 are described. The work of the Department is closely related to development of multipurpose Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor and Fusion Reactor, and development of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor carried out by Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. Contents of the report are achievements in fields such as nuclear data and group constants, theoretical method and code development, integral experiment and analysis, fusion neutronics, shielding, reactor and nuclear instrumentation, reactor control and diagnosis, and safeguards technology, and activities of the Committee on Reactor Physics. (author)

  19. Reactor Engineering Division annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research activities conducted in Reactor Engineering Division in fiscal 1975 are summarized in this report. Works in the division are closely related to the development of multi-purpose High-temperature Gas Cooled Reactor, the development of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor by Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation, and engineering research of thermonuclear fusion reactor. Many achievements are described concerning nuclear data and group constants, theoretical method and code development, integral experiment and analysis, shielding, heat transfer and fluid dynamics, reactor and nuclear instrumentation, dynamics analysis and control method development, fusion reactor technology and activities of the Committee on Reactor Physics. (auth.)

  20. Small modular reactors: Simpler, safer, cheaper?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear energy can play a very significant long-term role for meeting the world’s increasing energy demands, while simultaneously addressing challenges associated with global climate and environmental impact. Many nations of the world, particularly the Asia/Pacific Rim countries, are actively engaged in a major expansion of their nuclear energy complex. The degree to which nuclear energy can address long-term energy needs, either globally or regionally, will be dictated by the pace and adequacy of technical and policy solutions for waste, safety, security, and non-proliferation issues, as well as the capital cost of construction. Small Modular Reactors (SMRs) could successfully address several of these issues. SMRs offer simpler, standardized, and safer modular design by being factory built, requiring smaller initial capital investment, and having shorter construction times. The SMRs could be small enough to be transportable, could be used in isolated locations without advanced infrastructure and without power grid, or could be clustered in a single site to provide a multi-module, large capacity power plant. This paper summarizes some of the basic features of SMRs for early deployment, several advanced SMR concepts, and points out the benefits and challenges in regulatory, economical, safety and security issues. -- Highlights: ► We held a summer forum on SMR technologies at UC Berkeley in July 2010. ► Advantages and disadvantages, technical and economic, of each design were discussed. ► Further literature searches were also done and this paper summarizes prominent designs. ► We conclude SMRs have no large problems preventing their introduction into the nuclear market.

  1. Thermal-hydraulic analysis for the lead-bismuth eutectic cooled reactor. System analysis by MSG-COPD code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The feasibility study for fast breeder reactors (FBRs) including related nuclear fuel cycle systems has been started from the 1999 fiscal year by Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC). Phase 1 studies were finished at the end of March, 2000. Various options of FBRs plant systems was studied and concept of Lead-Bismuth Eutectic (LBE) cooled FBRs have been selected as one of these options. In the United States, the LBE cooled reactor has been examined by Generation IV. Plant dynamics analyses on 2 type of LBE-cooled reactors, forced circulation type which designed by JNC and natural circulation type which was designed by University of California, Berkeley, have been performed to understand the basic thermal-hydraulic characteristics of the reactors. As a result of the analysis on JNC forced circulation reactor, it has been clarified that hot coolant remains in the upper plenum by the thermal stratification in case of a manual trip condition. And the characteristics of pump coast down influences core exit high-temperature in case of a loss of power condition. In addition, as a result of analysis on the natural circulation reactor, the flow-redistribution effect in ductless core channels by the buoyancy force has been evaluated for a candidate duct core channels. (author)

  2. Reactor performance calculations for water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The principles of nuclear, thermal and hydraulic performance calculations for water cooled reactors are discussed. The principles are illustrated by describing their implementation in the UKAEA PATRIARCH scheme of computer codes. This material was originally delivered as a course of lectures at the Technical University of Helsinki in Summer of 1969.

  3. Fourth Generation Reactor Concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concerns over energy resources availability, climate changes and energy supply security suggest an important role for nuclear energy in future energy supplies. So far nuclear energy evolved through three generations and is still evolving into new generation that is now being extensively studied. Nuclear Power Plants are producing 16% of the world's electricity. Today the world is moving towards hydrogen economy. Nuclear technologies can provide energy to dissociate water into oxygen and hydrogen and to production of synthetic fuel from coal gasification. The introduction of breeder reactors would turn nuclear energy from depletable energy supply into an unlimited supply. From the early beginnings of nuclear energy in the 1940s to the present, three generations of nuclear power reactors have been developed: First generation reactors: introduced during the period 1950-1970. Second generation: includes commercial power reactors built during 1970-1990 (PWR, BWR, Candu, Russian RBMK and VVER). Third generation: started being deployed in the 1990s and is composed of Advanced LWR (ALWR), Advanced BWR (ABWR) and Passive AP600 to be deployed in 2010-2030. Future advances of the nuclear technology designs can broaden opportunities for use of nuclear energy. The fourth generation reactors are expected to be deployed by 2030 in time to replace ageing reactors built in the 1970s and 1980s. The new reactors are to be designed with a view of the following objectives: economic competitiveness, enhanced safety, minimal radioactive waste production, proliferation resistance. The Generation IV International Forum (GIF) was established in January 2000 to investigate innovative nuclear energy system concepts. GIF members include Argentina, Brazil, Canada, Euratom, France Japan, South Africa, South Korea, Switzerland, United Kingdom and United States with the IAEA and OECD's NEA as permanent observers. China and Russia are expected to join the GIF initiative. The following six systems

  4. Safety of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The number of research reactors that have been constructed worldwide for civilian applications is about 651. Of the reactors constructed, 284 are currently in operation, 258 are shut down and 109 have been decommissioned. More than half of all operating research reactors worldwide are over thirty years old. During this long period of time national priorities have changed. Facility ageing, if not properly managed, has a natural degrading effect. Many research reactors face concerns with the obsolescence of equipment, lack of experimental programmes, lack of funding for operation and maintenance and loss of expertise through ageing and retirement of the staff. Other reactors of the same vintage maintain effective ageing management programmes, conduct active research programmes, develop and retain high calibre personnel and make important contributions to society. Many countries that operate research reactors neither operate nor plan to operate power reactors. In most of these countries there is a tendency not to create a formal regulatory body. A safety committee, not always independent of the operating organization, may be responsible for regulatory oversight. Even in countries with nuclear power plants, a regulatory regime differing from the one used for the power plants may exist. Concern is therefore focused on one tail of a continuous spectrum of operational performance. The IAEA has been sending missions to review the safety of research reactors in Member States since 1972. Some of the reviews have been conducted pursuant to the IAEA' functions and responsibilities regarding research reactors that are operated within the framework of Project and Supply Agreements between Member States and the IAEA. Other reviews have been conducted upon request. All these reviews are conducted following procedures for Integrated Safety Assessment of Research Reactors (INSARR) missions. The prime objective of these missions has been to conduct a comprehensive operational safety

  5. Reactor Engineering Department annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the research and development activities in the Department of Reactor Engineering during the fiscal year of 1992 (April 1, 1992-March 31, 1993). The major Department's programs promoted in the year are the assessment of the high conversion light water reactor, the design activities of advanced reactor system and development of a high energy proton linear accelerator for the engineering applications including TRU incineration. Other major tasks of the Department are various basic researches on the nuclear data and group constants, the developments of theoretical methods and codes, the reactor physics experiments and their analyses, fusion neutronics, radiation shielding, reactor instrumentation, reactor control/diagnosis, thermohydraulics and technology developments related to the reactor physics facilities. The cooperative works to JAERI's major projects such as the high temperature gas cooled reactor or the fusion reactor and to PNC's fast reactor project were also progressed. The activities of the Research Committee on Reactor Physics are also summarized. (author)

  6. Reactor engineering department annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the research and development activities in the Department of Reactor Engineering during the fiscal year of 1989 (April 1, 1989 - March 31, 1990). One of major Department's programs is the assessment of the high conversion light water reactor and the design activities of advanced reactor system. Development of a high energy proton linear accelerator for the nuclear engineering including is also TRU incineration promoted. Other major tasks of the Department are various basic researches on nuclear data and group constants, theoretical methods and code development, on reactor physics experiments and analyses, fusion neutronics, radiation shielding, reactor instrumentation, reactor control/diagnosis, thermohydraulics, technology assessment of nuclear energy and technology developments related to the reactor physics facilities. The cooperative works to JAERI's major projects such as the high temperature gas cooled reactor or the fusion reactor and to PNC's fast reactor project also progressed. The activities of the Research Committee on Reactor Physics are also summarized. (author)

  7. Slurry reactor design studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, J.M.; Degen, B.D.; Cady, G.; Deslate, F.D.; Summers, R.L. (Bechtel Group, Inc., San Francisco, CA (USA)); Akgerman, A. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (USA)); Smith, J.M. (California Univ., Davis, CA (USA))

    1990-06-01

    The objective of these studies was to perform a realistic evaluation of the relative costs of tublar-fixed-bed and slurry reactors for methanol, mixed alcohols and Fischer-Tropsch syntheses under conditions where they would realistically be expected to operate. The slurry Fischer-Tropsch reactor was, therefore, operated at low H{sub 2}/CO ratio on gas directly from a Shell gasifier. The fixed-bed reactor was operated on 2.0 H{sub 2}/CO ratio gas after adjustment by shift and CO{sub 2} removal. Every attempt was made to give each reactor the benefit of its optimum design condition and correlations were developed to extend the models beyond the range of the experimental pilot plant data. For the methanol design, comparisons were made for a recycle plant with high methanol yield, this being the standard design condition. It is recognized that this is not necessarily the optimum application for the slurry reactor, which is being proposed for a once-through operation, coproducing methanol and power. Consideration is also given to the applicability of the slurry reactor to mixed alcohols, based on conditions provided by Lurgi for an Octamix{trademark} plant using their standard tubular-fixed reactor technology. 7 figs., 26 tabs.

  8. FBR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present invention provides an FBR type reactor in which the combustion of reactor core fuels is controlled by reflectors, and the position of a reflector driving device can be controlled even during shut down of the reactor. Namely, the reflector driving device is attracted to the outer wall surface of a reactor core barrel by electromagnetic attraction force. An inertia body is disposed vertically movably to the upper portion of the reflector driving device. Magnetic repulsive coils generate instantaneous magnetic repulsive force between the inertia body and the reflector driving device. With such a constitution, the reflector driving device can be driven by using magnetic repulsion of the electromagnetic repulsive coils and inertia of the inertia body. As a result, not only the reflectors can be elevated at an ultraslow speed during normal reactor operation, but also fine position adjustment for the reflector driving device, as well as fine position adjustment of the reflectors required upon restart of the reactor can be conducted by lowering the reflector driving device during shut down of the reactor. (I.S.)

  9. Reactor water sampling device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present invention concerns a reactor water sampling device for sampling reactor water in an in-core monitor (neutron measuring tube) housing in a BWR type reactor. The upper end portion of a drain pipe of the reactor water sampling device is attached detachably to an in-core monitor flange. A push-up rod is inserted in the drain pipe vertically movably. A sampling vessel and a vacuum pump are connected to the lower end of the drain pipe. A vacuum pump is operated to depressurize the inside of the device and move the push-up rod upwardly. Reactor water in the in-core monitor housing flows between the drain pipe and the push-up rod and flows into the sampling vessel. With such a constitution, reactor water in the in-core monitor housing can be sampled rapidly with neither opening the lid of the reactor pressure vessel nor being in contact with air. Accordingly, operator's exposure dose can be reduced. (I.N.)

  10. Test reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Reactor Development Program created a need for engineering testing of fuels and materials. The Engineering Test Reactors were developed around the world in response to this demand. The design of the test reactors proved to be different from that of power reactors, carrying the fuel elements closer to the threshold of failure, requiring more responsive instrumentation, more rapid control element action, and inherent self-limiting behavior under accident conditions. The design of the experimental facilities to exploit these reactors evolved a new, specialized, branch of engineering, requiring a very high-lvel scientific and engineering team, established a meticulous concern with reliability, the provision for recovery from their own failures, and detailed attention to possible interactions with the test reactors. This paper presents this technology commencing with the Materials Testing Reactor (MTR) through the Fast Flux Test Facility, some of the unique experimental facilities developed to exploit them, but discusses only cursorily the experiments performed, since sample preparation and sample analyses were, and to some extent still are, either classified or proprietary. The Nuclear Engineering literature is filled with this information

  11. Advanced reactor licensing issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In July 1986 the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission issued a Policy Statement on the Regulation of Advanced Nuclear Power Plants. As part of this policy advanced reactor designers were encouraged to interact with NRC early in the design process to obtain feedback regarding licensing requirements for advanced reactors. Accordingly, the staff has been interacting with the Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors on the review of three advanced reactor conceptual designs: one modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) and two Liquid Metal Reactors (LMRs). As a result of these interactions certain safety issues associated with these advanced reactor designs have been identified as key to the licensability of the designs as proposed by DOE. The major issues in this regard are: (1) selection and treatment of accident scenarios; (2) selection of siting source term; (3) performance and reliability of reactor shutdown and decay heat removal systems; (4) need for conventional containment; (5) need for conventional emergency evacuation; (6) role of the operator; (7) treatment of balance of plant; and (8) modular approach. This paper provides a status of the NRC review effort, describes the above issues in more detail and provides the current status and approach to the development of licensing guidance on each

  12. Nuclear reactor power monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The device of the present invention monitors phenomena occurred in a nuclear reactor more accurately than usual case. that is, the device monitors a reactor power by signals sent from a great number of neutron monitors disposed in the reactor. The device has a means for estimating a phenomenon occurred in the reactor based on the relationship of a difference of signals between each of the great number of neutron monitors to the positions of the neutron monitors disposed in the reactor. The estimation of the phenomena is conducted by, for example, conversion of signals sent from the neutron monitors to a code train. Then, a phenomenon is estimated rapidly by matching the code train described above with a code train contained in a data base. Further. signals sent from the neutron monitors are processed statistically to estimate long term and periodical phenomena. As a result, phenomena occurred in the reactor are monitored more accurately than usual case, thereby enabling to improve reactor safety and operationability. (I.S.)

  13. Reactor Sharing Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Support utilization of the RINSC reactor for student and faculty instructions and research. The Department of Energy award has provided financial assistance during the period 9/29/1995 to 5/31/2001 to support the utilization of the Rhode Island Nuclear Science Center (RINSC) reactor for student and faculty instruction and research by non-reactor owning educational institutions within approximately 300 miles of Narragansett, Rhode Island. Through the reactor sharing program, the RINSC (including the reactor and analytical laboratories) provided reactor services and laboratory space that were not available to the other universities and colleges in the region. As an example of services provided to the users: Counting equipment, laboratory space, pneumatic and in-pool irradiations, demonstrations of sample counting and analysis, reactor tours and lectures. Funding from the Reactor Sharing Program has provided the RINSC to expand student tours and demonstration programs that emphasized our long history of providing these types of services to the universities and colleges in the area. The funding have also helped defray the cost of the technical assistance that the staff has routinely provided to schools, individuals and researchers who have called on the RINSC for resolution of problems relating to nuclear science. The reactor has been featured in a Public Broadcasting System documentary on Pollution in the Arctic and how a University of Rhode Island Professor used Neutron Activation Analysis conducted at the RINSC to discover the sources of the ''Arctic Haze''. The RINSC was also featured by local television on Earth Day for its role in environmental monitoring

  14. Determination of research reactor safety parameters by reactor calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Main research reactor safety parameters such as power density peaking factors, shutdown margin and temperature reactivity coefficients are treated. Reactor physics explanation of the parameters is given together with their application in safety evaluation performed as part of research reactor operation. Reactor calculations are presented as a method for their determination assuming use of widely available computer codes. (author)

  15. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Partnerships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frances M. Marshall; Todd R. Allen; Jeff B. Benson; James I. Cole; Mary Catherine Thelen

    2012-03-01

    Wisconsin-Madison; (8) Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT) Materials Research Collaborative Access Team (MRCAT) beamline at Argonne National Laboratory's Advanced Photon Source; and (9) Nanoindenter in the University of California at Berkeley (UCB) Nuclear Engineering laboratory Materials have been analyzed for ATR NSUF users at the Advanced Photon Source at the MRCAT beam, the NIST Center for Neutron Research in Gaithersburg, MD, the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, and the SHaRE user facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Additionally, ORNL has been accepted as a partner facility to enable ATR NSUF users to access the facilities at the High Flux Isotope Reactor and related facilities.

  16. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Partnerships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    -Madison; (8) Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT) Materials Research Collaborative Access Team (MRCAT) beamline at Argonne National Laboratory's Advanced Photon Source; and (9) Nanoindenter in the University of California at Berkeley (UCB) Nuclear Engineering laboratory Materials have been analyzed for ATR NSUF users at the Advanced Photon Source at the MRCAT beam, the NIST Center for Neutron Research in Gaithersburg, MD, the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, and the SHaRE user facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Additionally, ORNL has been accepted as a partner facility to enable ATR NSUF users to access the facilities at the High Flux Isotope Reactor and related facilities.

  17. Reactor de plasma

    OpenAIRE

    Erra Serrabasa, Pilar; Molina Mansilla, Ricardo; Beltrán Serra, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Reactor de plasma. Se trata de un reactor de plasma que puede trabajar en un amplio rango de presión, desde el vacío y presiones reducidas hasta la presión atmosférica y presiones superiores. Adicionalmente el reactor de plasma tiene la capacidad de regular otros parámetros importantes y permite su uso para el tratamiento de muestras de tipología muy diversa, como por ejemplo las de tamaño relativamente grande o de superficie rugosa.

  18. Integral nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The invention deals with an inprovement of the design of an integral pressurized water nuclear reactor. A typical embodyment of the invention includes a generally cylindrical pressure vessel that is assembled from three segments which are bolted together at transverse joints to form a pressure tight unit that encloses the steam generator and the reactor. The new construction permits primary to secondary coolant heat exchange and improved control rod drive mecanisms which can be exposed for full service access during reactor core refueling, maintenance and inspection

  19. Microfluidic electrochemical reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuzzo, Ralph G.; Mitrovski, Svetlana M.

    2011-03-22

    A microfluidic electrochemical reactor includes an electrode and one or more microfluidic channels on the electrode, where the microfluidic channels are covered with a membrane containing a gas permeable polymer. The distance between the electrode and the membrane is less than 500 micrometers. The microfluidic electrochemical reactor can provide for increased reaction rates in electrochemical reactions using a gaseous reactant, as compared to conventional electrochemical cells. Microfluidic electrochemical reactors can be incorporated into devices for applications such as fuel cells, electrochemical analysis, microfluidic actuation, pH gradient formation.

  20. Licensed operating reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Operating Units Status Report --- Licensed Operating Reactors provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Information Resources Management from the Headquarters staff on NRC's Office of Enforcement (OE), from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. The three sections of the report are: monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC's Regional Offices, OE Headquarters and the utilities; and an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor-years of experience and non- power reactors in the US

  1. First Algerian research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1985, both the Algerian Commissariat of New Energies and the Argentine National Atomic Energy Commission plus the firm INVAP S.E., started a series of mutual visits aimed at defining the mechanisms for cooperation in the nuclear field. Within this framework, a commercial contract was undersigned covering the supply of a low-power reactor (RUN), designed for basic and applied research in the fields of reactor physics and nuclear engineering. The reactor may also be used for performing experiences with neutron beams, for the irradiation of several materials and for the training of technicians, scientists and operators

  2. Course on reactor physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Germany only few students graduate in nuclear technology, therefore the NPP operating companies are forced to develop their own education and training concepts. AREVA NP has started together with the Technical University of Dresden a one-week course ''reactor physics'' that includes the know-how of the nuclear power plant construction company. The Technical University of Dresden has the training reactor AKR-2 that is retrofitted by modern digital instrumentation and control technology that allows the practical training of reactor control.

  3. Fast Breeder Reactor studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is a compilation of Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR) resource documents prepared to provide the technical basis for the US contribution to the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation. The eight separate parts deal with the alternative fast breeder reactor fuel cycles in terms of energy demand, resource base, technical potential and current status, safety, proliferation resistance, deployment, and nuclear safeguards. An Annex compares the cost of decommissioning light-water and fast breeder reactors. Separate abstracts are included for each of the parts

  4. Nuclear reactor theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This textbook is composed of two parts. Part 1 'Elements of Nuclear Reactor Theory' is composed of only elements but the main resource for the lecture of nuclear reactor theory, and should be studied as common knowledge. Much space is therefore devoted to the history of nuclear energy production and to nuclear physics, and the material focuses on the principles of energy production in nuclear reactors. However, considering the heavy workload of students, these subjects are presented concisely, allowing students to read quickly through this textbook. (J.P.N.)

  5. PWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From a PWR with a primary circuit, consisting of a reactor pressure vessel, a steam generator and a reactor coolant pump, hot coolant is removed by means of an auxiliary system containing h.p. pumps for feeding water into the primary circuit and being connected with a pipe, originating at the upper part, which has got at least one isolating value. This is done by opening an outlet in a part of the auxiliary system that has got a lower pressure than the reactor vessel. Preferably a water jet pump is used for mixing with the water of the auxiliary system. (orig.)

  6. Fusion Reactor Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of SCK-CEN's programme on fusion reactor materials is to contribute to the knowledge on the behaviour of fusion reactor materials and components during and after irradiation. Ongoing projects include: the study of the mechanical behaviour of structural materials under neutron irradiation; the investigation of the characteristics of irradiated first wall material such as beryllium; the detection of abrupt electrical degradation of insulating ceramics under high temperature and neutron irradiation; and the study of dismantling and waste disposal strategy for fusion reactors. Progress and achievements in these areas in 2000 are discussed

  7. International tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1978, the US, the European Communities, Japan, and the Soviet Union have collaborated on the definition, conceptual design, data base assessment, and analysis of critical technical issues for a tokamak engineering test reactor, called the International Tokamak Reactor (INTOR). During 1985-1986, this activity has been expanded in scope to include evaluation of concept innovations that could significantly improve the tokamak as a commercial reactor. The purposes of this paper are to summarize the present INTOR design concept and to summarize the work on concept innovations

  8. Joyo experimental reactor tour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JAEA cooperation in remote monitoring focuses on the Joyo Experimental Reactor at the O'arai Research and Development Center. Joyo performs irradiation of test fuels to support development of the fast reactor cycle in Japan, both in international cooperation and in support of the Monju fast reactor, which is now undergoing reconstruction. The tour included an introduction at the model, a visit to the control room, entry into the containment vessel, and viewing of remote monitoring equipment in the Fresh Fuel Storage and at one of the Spent Fuel Ponds. (author)

  9. Fast Breeder Reactor studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Till, C.E.; Chang, Y.I.; Kittel, J.H.; Fauske, H.K.; Lineberry, M.J.; Stevenson, M.G.; Amundson, P.I.; Dance, K.D.

    1980-07-01

    This report is a compilation of Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR) resource documents prepared to provide the technical basis for the US contribution to the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation. The eight separate parts deal with the alternative fast breeder reactor fuel cycles in terms of energy demand, resource base, technical potential and current status, safety, proliferation resistance, deployment, and nuclear safeguards. An Annex compares the cost of decommissioning light-water and fast breeder reactors. Separate abstracts are included for each of the parts.

  10. nuclear reactor design calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work , the sensitivity of different reactor calculation methods, and the effect of different assumptions and/or approximation are evaluated . A new concept named error map is developed to determine the relative importance of different factors affecting the accuracy of calculations. To achieve this goal a generalized, multigroup, multi dimension code UAR-DEPLETION is developed to calculate the spatial distribution of neutron flux, effective multiplication factor and the spatial composition of a reactor core for a period of time and for specified reactor operating conditions. The code also investigates the fuel management strategies and policies for the entire fuel cycle to meet the constraints of material and operating limitations

  11. Nuclear reactor internal structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The upper internal structures of the reactor are connected to the closing head so as to be readily removed with the latter and a skirt connected to the lower portion of said upper structures so as to surround the latter, extends under the control rods when they are removed from the reactor core. Through such an arrangement the skirt protects the control rods and supports the vessel closing-head and the core upper structures, whenever the head is severed from the vessel and put beside the latter in order to discharge the reactor

  12. Reactor monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present invention concerns a device for monitoring the inside of an FBR type reactor which can not be monitored by a usual optical camera. An ultrasonic camera having an excellent propagating property in a liquid metal sodium is scanned, and reflected waves of the ultrasonic waves are received as signals. The signals are processed by using a virtual realistic feeling (VR) technique such as a head mounting type image display (HMD) and a three dimensional pointing device. With such procedures, the inside of the FBR type reactor can be observed with such a realistic feeling that the inside of the FBR type reactor were seen directly. (I.S.)

  13. Research reactor support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research reactors (RRs) have been used in a wide range of applications including nuclear power development, basic physics research, education and training, medical isotope production, geology, industry and other fields. However, many research reactors are fuelled with High Enriched Uranium (HEU), are underutilized and aging, and have significant quantities of spent fuel. HEU inventories (fresh and spent) pose security risks Unavailability of a high-density-reprocessable fuel hinders conversion and limits back-end options and represents a survival dilemma for many RRs. Improvement of interim spent fuel storage is required at some RRs. Many RRs are under-utilized and/or inadequately funded and need to find users for their services, or permanently shut down and eventually decommission. Reluctance to decommission affect both cost and safety (loss of experienced staff ) and many shut down but not decommissioned RR with fresh and/or spent fuel at the sites invoke serious concern. The IAEA's research reactor support helps to ensure that research reactors can be operated efficiently with fuels and targets of lower proliferation and security concern and that operators have appropriate technology and options to manage RR fuel cycle issues, especially on long term interim storage of spent research reactor fuel. Availability of a high-density-reprocessable fuel would expand and improve back end options. The International Atomic Energy Agency provides assistance to Member States to convert research reactors from High Enriched Uranium fuel and targets (for medical isotope production) to qualified Low Enriched Uranium fuel and targets while maintaining reactor performance levels. The assistance includes provision of handbooks and training in the performance of core conversion studies, advice for the procurement of LEU fuel, and expert services for LEU fuel acceptance. The IAEA further provides technical and administrative support for countries considering repatriation of its

  14. Study of power reactor dynamics by stochastic reactor oscillator method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stochastic reactor oscillator and cross correlation method were used for determining reactor dynamics characteristics. Experimental equipment, fast reactor oscillator (BOR-1) was activated by random pulses from the GBS-16 generator. Tape recorder AMPEX-SF-300 and data acquisition tool registered reactor response to perturbations having different frequencies. Reactor response and activation signals were cross correlated by digital computer for different positions of stochastic oscillator and ionization chamber

  15. Jane Eyre de Michael Berkeley et de David Malouf : La transposition opératique d’un grand classique de la littérature anglaise Jane Eyre by Michael Berkeley and David Malouf: The Operatic Rewriting of a Great Classic English Novel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Philippe Héberlé

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses Michael Berkeley’s opera Jane Eyre. Premiered on June 30, 2000 by Music Theatre Wales at the Cheltenham International Festival of Music, this opera is based on the novel by Charlotte Brontë and the libretto is written by the Australian poet, novelist, playwright and librettist, David Malouf. It was risky and daring to try to adapt this famous and long novel for the stage. We will particularly focus on the similarities and differences between the novel and the opera as well as on the strategies used both by David Malouf and Michael Berkeley to adapt it. Through the analysis of the similarities we will see how Michael Berkeley set to music some of the great themes and elements of the novel: passion, a sense of entrapment, the “Gothic” atmosphere. On the other hand, the analysis of the discrepancies between the novel and the opera as they appear in both the libretto and the music will lead us to a modern apprehension of the characterization of madness as well as of the metafictional dimension of the rewriting of Jane Eyre by David Malouf and Michael Berkeley.  

  16. Nuclear reactor fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An improved nuclear power reactor fuel element is described which consists of fuel rods, rod guide tubes and an end plate. The system allows direct access to an end of each fuel rod for inspection purposes. (U.K.)

  17. Reactor power control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present invention concerns a method of controlling reactor power to shift it into a partial power operation upon occurrence of recycling pump tripping or loss of generator load. Operation state of a reactor is classified into a plurality of operation states based on values of the reactor core flow rate and the reactor power. Different insertion patterns for selected control rods are determined on every classified operation states. Then, an insertion pattern corresponding to the operation state upon occurrence of recycling pump tripping or loss of power generator load is carried out to shift into partial power operation. The operation is shifted to a load operation solely in the station while avoiding risks such as TPM scram. Then neutron fluxes are suppressed upon transient to increase margin of fuel integrity. Selected control rod pattern of the optimum reactivity is set to each of operation regions, thereby enabling to conduct flexible countermeasure so as to attain optimum operationability. (N.H.)

  18. Reactor pressure boundary materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With a long-term operation of nuclear power plants, the component materials are degraded under severe reactor conditions such as neutron irradiation, high temperature, high pressure and corrosive environment. It is necessary to establish the reliable and practical technologies for improving and developing the component materials and for evaluating the mechanical properties. Especially, it is very important to investigate the technologies for reactor pressure boundary materials such as reactor vessel and pipings in accordance with their critical roles. Therefore, this study was focused on developing and advancing the microstructural/micro-mechanical evaluation technologies, and on evaluating the neutron irradiation characteristics and radiation effects analysis technology of the reactor pressure boundary materials, and also on establishing a basis of nuclear material property database

  19. Reactor BR2. Introduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gubel, P

    2001-04-01

    The BR2 is a materials testing reactor and is still one of SCK-CEN's important nuclear facilities. After an extensive refurbishment to compensate for the ageing of the installation, the reactor was restarted in April 1997. During the last three years, the availability of the installation was maintained at an average level of 97.6 percent. In the year 2000, the reactor was operated for a total of 104 days at a mean power of 56 MW. In 2000, most irradiation experiments were performed in the CALLISTO PWR loop. The report describes irradiations achieved or under preparation in 2000, including the development of advanced facilities and concept studies for new programmes. An overview of the scientific irradiation programmes as well as of the R and D programme of the BR2 reactor in 2000 is given.

  20. Reactor BR2. Introduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gubel, P

    2002-04-01

    The BR2 materials testing reactor is one of SCK-CEN's most important nuclear facilities. After an extensive refurbishment to compensate for the ageing of the installation, the reactor was restarted in April 1997. In 2001, the reactor was operated for a total of 123 days at a mean power of 59 MW in order to satisfy the irradiation conditions of the internal and external programmes using mainly the CALLISTO PWR loop. The mean consumption of fresh fuel elements was 5.26 per 1000 MWd. Main achievements in 2001 included the development of a three-dimensional full-scale model of the BR2 reactor for simulation and prediction of irradiation conditions for various experiments; the construction of the FUTURE-MT device designed for the irradiation of fuel plates under representative conditions of geometry, neutron spectrum, heat flux and thermal-hydraulic conditions and the development of in-pile instrumentation and a data acquisition system.

  1. Reactor parameter simulation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A reactor parameter simulation system (RPSS) has been built with the capability of analyzing any reactor signals, decomposing those signals into their deterministic and stochastic components, then reconstructing new, simulated signals that possess the same statistical and correlation structure as the original plant variables. Important uses of the RPSS are for integration with reactor simulation software to provide tools for plant control strategy development, and for safety-study investigations of scenarios that can arise involving signal faults generated from degraded sensors. A third use of the RPSS is for frequency-domain filtering of reactor process variables contaminated with serially correlated noise, which is important for our ongoing development of expert systems for sensor-operability surveillance. 5 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  2. Fusion Reactor Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decreton, M

    2002-04-01

    The objective of SCK-CEN's programme on fusion reactor materials is to contribute to the knowledge on the radiation-induced behaviour of fusion reactor materials and components as well as to help the international community in building the scientific and technical basis needed for the construction of the future reactor. Ongoing projects include: the study of the mechanical and chemical (corrosion) behaviour of structural materials under neutron irradiation and water coolant environment; the investigation of the characteristics of irradiated first wall material such as beryllium; investigations on the management of materials resulting from the dismantling of fusion reactors including waste disposal. Progress and achievements in these areas in 2001 are discussed.

  3. New reactor type proposed

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "Russian scientists at the Research Institute of Nuclear Power Engineering in Moscow are hoping to develop a new reactor that will use lead and bismuth as fuel instead of uranium and plutonium" (1/2 page).

  4. Nuclear reactor fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fuel assembly construction for liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactors is described in which the sub-assemblies carry a smaller proportion of parasitic material than do conventional sub-assemblies. (U.K.)

  5. Ageing of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Historically, many of the research institutions were centred on a research reactor facility as main technological asset and major source of neutrons for research. Important achievements were made in time in these research institutions for development of nuclear materials technology and nuclear safety for nuclear energy. At present, ageing of nuclear research facilities among these research reactors and ageing of staff are considerable factors of reduction of competence in research centres. The safe way of mitigation of this trend deals with ageing management by so called, for power reactors, Plant Life Management and new investments in staff as investments in research, or in future resources of competence. A programmatic approach of ageing of research reactors in correlation with their actual and future utilisation, will be used as a basis for safety evaluation and future spending. (author)

  6. Experience with Kamini reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamini is a 233U fuelled, 30 kW(th) research reactor. It is one of the best neutron source facility with a core average flux of 1012 n/cm2/s in IGCAR used for neutron radiography of active and nonradioactive objects, activation analysis and radiation physics research. The core consists of nine plate type fuel elements with a total fuel inventory of 590 g of 233U. Two safety control plates made of cadmium are used for start up and shutdown of the reactor. Three beam tubes, two-thimble irradiation site outside reflector and one irradiation site nearer to the core constitute the testing facilities of Kamini. Kamini attained first criticality on 29th October 96 and nominal power of 30 kW in September 1997. This paper covers the design features of the reactor, irradiation facilities and their utilities and operating experience of the reactor. (author)

  7. Dossier: research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research reactors are used at the CEA (the French atomic energy commission) since many years. Their number has been reduced but they remain unique tools that CEA valorize continuously. The results of the programs involving such reactors are of prime importance for the operation of Electricite de France (EdF) park of existing power plants but also for the design of future nuclear power plants and future research reactors. This dossier presents three examples of research reactors in use at the CEA: Osiris and Orphee (CEA-Saclay), devoted to nuclear energy and fundamental research, respectively, and the critical mockups Eole, Minerve and Masurca (CEA-Cadarache) devoted to nuclear data libraries and neutronic calculation. (J.S.)

  8. Reactor vessel sealing plug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This invention relates to an apparatus and method for sealing the cold leg nozzles of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel from a remote location during maintenance and inspection of associated steam generators and pumps while the pressure vessel and refueling canal are filled with water. The apparatus includes a sealing plug for mechanically sealing the cold leg nozzle from the inside of a reactor pressure vessel. The sealing plugs include a primary and a secondary O-ring. An installation tool is suspended within the reactor vessel and carries the sealing plug. The tool telescopes to insert the sealing plug within the cold leg nozzle, and to subsequently remove the plug. Hydraulic means are used to activate the sealing plug, and support means serve to suspend the installation tool within the reactor vessel during installation and removal of the sealing plug

  9. Future Reactor Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    He, Miao

    2013-01-01

    The measurement of the neutrino mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ opens a gateway for the next generation experiments to measure the neutrino mass hierarchy and the leptonic CP-violating phase. Future reactor experiments will focus on mass hierarchy determination and the precision measurement of mixing parameters. Mass hierarchy can be determined from the disappearance of reactor electron antineutrinos based on the interference effect of two separated oscillation modes. Relative and absolute measurement techniques have been explored. A proposed experiment JUNO, with a 20 kton liquid scintillator detector of $3%/$$\\sqrt{E(MeV)}$ energy resolution, $\\sim$ 53 km far from reactors of $\\sim$ 36 GW total thermal power, can reach to a sensitivity of $\\Delta\\chi^{2}>16$ considering the spread of reactor cores and uncertainties of the detector response. Three of mixing parameters are expected to be measured to better than 1% precision. There are multiple detector options for JUNO under investigation. The technical challenges...

  10. Reactor hot spot analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilim, R.B.

    1985-08-01

    The principle methods for performing reactor hot spot analysis are reviewed and examined for potential use in the Applied Physics Division. The semistatistical horizontal method is recommended for future work and is now available as an option in the SE2-ANL core thermal hydraulic code. The semistatistical horizontal method is applied to a small LMR to illustrate the calculation of cladding midwall and fuel centerline hot spot temperatures. The example includes a listing of uncertainties, estimates for their magnitudes, computation of hot spot subfactor values and calculation of two sigma temperatures. A review of the uncertainties that affect liquid metal fast reactors is also presented. It was found that hot spot subfactor magnitudes are strongly dependent on the reactor design and therefore reactor specific details must be carefully studied. 13 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  11. Reactor BR2. Introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The BR2 is a materials testing reactor and is still one of SCK-CEN's important nuclear facilities. After an extensive refurbishment to compensate for the ageing of the installation, the reactor was restarted in April 1997. During the last three years, the availability of the installation was maintained at an average level of 97.6 percent. In the year 2000, the reactor was operated for a total of 104 days at a mean power of 56 MW. In 2000, most irradiation experiments were performed in the CALLISTO PWR loop. The report describes irradiations achieved or under preparation in 2000, including the development of advanced facilities and concept studies for new programmes. An overview of the scientific irradiation programmes as well as of the R and D programme of the BR2 reactor in 2000 is given

  12. Research Reactor Benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A criticality benchmark experiment performed at the Jozef Stefan Institute TRIGA Mark II research reactor is described. This experiment and its evaluation are given as examples of benchmark experiments at research reactors. For this reason the differences and possible problems compared to other benchmark experiments are particularly emphasized. General guidelines for performing criticality benchmarks in research reactors are given. The criticality benchmark experiment was performed in a normal operating reactor core using commercially available fresh 20% enriched fuel elements containing 12 wt% uranium in uranium-zirconium hydride fuel material. Experimental conditions to minimize experimental errors and to enhance computer modeling accuracy are described. Uncertainties in multiplication factor due to fuel composition and geometry data are analyzed by sensitivity analysis. The simplifications in the benchmark model compared to the actual geometry are evaluated. Sample benchmark calculations with the MCNP and KENO Monte Carlo codes are given

  13. Nuclear reactor (1960)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first French plutonium-making reactors G1, G2 and G3 built at Marcoule research center are linked to a power plant. The G1 electrical output does not offset the energy needed for operating this reactor. On the contrary, reactors G2 and G3 will each generate a net power of 25 to 30 MW, which will go into the EDF grid. This power is relatively small, but the information obtained from operation is great and will be helpful for starting up the power reactor EDF1, EDF2 and EDF3. The paper describes how, previous to any starting-up operation, the tests performed, especially those concerned with the power plant and the pressure vessel, have helped to bring the commissioning date closer. (author)

  14. Reactor Neutrino Spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Hayes, A C

    2016-01-01

    We present a review of the antineutrino spectra emitted from reactors. Knowledge of these and their associated uncertainties are crucial for neutrino oscillation studies. The spectra used to-date have been determined by either conversion of measured electron spectra to antineutrino spectra or by summing over all of the thousands of transitions that makeup the spectra using modern databases as input. The uncertainties in the subdominant corrections to beta-decay plague both methods, and we provide estimates of these uncertainties. Improving on current knowledge of the antineutrino spectra from reactors will require new experiments. Such experiments would also address the so-called reactor neutrino anomaly and the possible origin of the shoulder observed in the antineutrino spectra measured in recent high-statistics reactor neutrino experiments.

  15. Pulsed fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This summer school specialized in examining specific fusion center systems. Papers on scientific feasibility are first presented: confinement of high-beta plasma, liners, plasma focus, compression and heating and the use of high power electron beams for thermonuclear reactors. As for technological feasibility, lectures were on the theta-pinch toroidal reactors, toroidal diffuse pinch, electrical engineering problems in pulsed magnetically confined reactors, neutral gas layer for heat removal, the conceptual design of a series of laser fusion power plants with ''Saturn'', implosion experiments and the problem of the targets, the high brightness lasers for plasma generation, and topping and bottoming cycles. Some problems common to pulsed reactors were examined: energy storage and transfer, thermomechanical and erosion effects in the first wall and blanket, the problems of tritium production, radiation damage and neutron activation in blankets, and the magnetic and inertial confinement

  16. Reactor fueling of BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To enable the pattern exchange for control rods during burning in Control Cell Core type BWR reactors. Constitution: A plurality of control cells are divided into a plurality of groups such that the control cells is aparted from each other by way of at least two fuel assemblies other than the control cells with respect to the vertical and lateral directions of the reactor core cross section, as well as they are in adjacent with control cells of other groups with respect to the orthogonal direction. This enables to perform the pattern exchange for the control rods during burning in the control cell core with ease, and the control blade and the story effect harmful to the mechanical soundness of fuels can thus be suppressed. (Moriyama, K.)

  17. Reactor Engineering Division annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research activities in fiscal 1974 in Reactor Engineering Division of eight laboratories and computing center are described. Works in the division are closely related with the development of a multi-purpose High-temperature Gas Cooled Reactor, the development of a Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor in Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation, and engineering of thermonuclear fusion reactors. They cover nuclear data and group constants, theoretical method and code development, integral experiment and analysis, shielding, heat transfer and fluid dynamics, reactor and nuclear instrumentation, dynamics analysis and control method development, fusion reactor technology and aspects of the computing center. (auth.)

  18. Special lecture on nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book gives a special lecture on nuclear reactor, which is divided into two parts. The first part has explanation on nuclear design of nuclear reactor and analysis of core with theories of integral transports, diffusion Nodal, transports Nodal and Monte Carlo skill parallel computer and nuclear calculation and speciality of transmutation reactor. The second part deals with speciality of nuclear reactor and control with nonlinear stabilization of nuclear reactor, nonlinear control of nuclear reactor, neural network and control of nuclear reactor, control theory of observer and analysis method of Adomian.

  19. The replacement research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The contract for the design, construction and commissioning of the Replacement Research Reactor was signed in July 2000. This was followed by the completion of the detailed design and an application for a construction licence was made in May 2001. This paper will describe the main elements of the design and their relation to the proposed applications of the reactor. The future stages in the project leading to full operation are also described

  20. OECD Halden reactor project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the activities of the OECD Halden Reactor Project for the year 1976. The main items reported on are: a) the process supervision and control which have focused on core monitoring and control, and operator-process communication; b) the fuel performance and safety behavior which have provided data and analytical descriptions of the thermal, mechanical and chemical behavior of fuel under various operating conditions; c) the reactor operations and d) the administration and finance

  1. Nuclear reactor fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nuclear reactor fuel element comprising a column of vibration compacted fuel which is retained in consolidated condition by a thimble shaped plug. The plug is wedged into gripping engagement with the wall of the sheath by a wedge. The wedge material has a lower coefficient of expansion than the sheath material so that at reactor operating temperature the retainer can relax sufficient to accommodate thermal expansion of the column of fuel. (author)

  2. Small reactor return

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current state of the development of present-day small reactors in different countries is performed. Various designs of low and middle power reactors, among which are CAREM (25 MW, PWR), KLT-40 (40 MW, PWR), MRX (30 MW, PWR), IRIS (50 MW, PWR), SMART (1000 MW, PWR), Modular SBWR (50 MW, BWR), PBMR (120 MW, HTGR), GT-HMR (285 MW, HTGR), are discussed

  3. Reactor lattice transport calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present lecture is a continuation of the lecture on Introduction to the Neutron Transport Phenomena. It comprises three aspects of lattice calculations. First the idea of a reactor lattice is introduced. Then the main definitions used in reactor lattice analysis are given, and finally two basic methods applied for solution of the transport equations are defined. Several remarks on secondary results from lattice transport calculations are added. (author)

  4. Thermal or epithermal reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a thermal or epithermal heavy-water reactor of the pressure tube design the reactivity is to be increased by different means: replacement of the moderator by additional rods with heavy metal in the core or in the reflector; separation of the moderator (heavy water) from the coolant (light water) by means of shroud tubes. In light-water reactor types neutron losses are to be influenced by using the heavy elements in different configurations. (orig./PW)

  5. Future reactor experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The non-zero neutrino mixing angle θ13 has been discovered and precisely measured by the current generation short-baseline reactor neutrino experiments. It opens the gate of measuring the leptonic CP-violating phase and enables the neutrino mass ordering. The JUNO and RENO-50 proposals aim at resolving the neutrino mass ordering using reactors. The experiment design, physics sensitivity, technical challenges as well as the progresses of those two proposed experiments are reviewed in this paper

  6. Water cooled nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The description is given of a water cooled nuclear reactor comprising a core, cooling water that rises through the core, vertical guide tubes located inside the core and control rods vertically mobile in the guide tubes. In this reactor the cooling water is divided into a first part introduced at the bottom end of the core and rising through it and a second part introduced at the top end of the guide tubes so as to drop in them

  7. Jet-Stirred Reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Herbinet, Olivier; Guillaume, Dayma

    2013-01-01

    The jet-stirred reactor is a type of ideal continuously stirred-tank reactor which is well suited for gas phase kinetic studies. It is mainly used to study the oxidation and the pyrolysis of hydrocarbon and oxygenated fuels. These studies consist in recording the evolution of the conversion of the reactants and of the mole fractions of reaction products as a function of different parameters such as reaction temperature, residence time, pressure and composition of the inlet gas. Gas chromatogr...

  8. Generation IV reactors: economics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The operating nuclear reactors were built over a short period: no more than 10 years and today their average age rounds 18 years. EDF (French electricity company) plans to renew its reactor park over a far longer period : 30 years from 2020 to 2050. According to EDF this objective implies 3 constraints: 1) a service life of 50 to 60 years for a significant part of the present operating reactors, 2) to be ready to built a generation 3+ unit in 2020 which infers the third constraint: 3) to launch the construction of an EPR (European pressurized reactor) prototype as soon as possible in order to have it operating in 2010. In this scheme, generation 4 reactor will benefit the feedback experience of generation 3 and will take over in 2030. Economic analysis is an important tool that has been used by the generation 4 international forum to select the likely future reactor systems. This analysis is based on 4 independent criteria: the basic construction cost, the construction time, the operation and maintenance costs and the fuel cycle cost. This analysis leads to the evaluation of the global cost of electricity generation and of the total investment required for each of the reactor system. The former defines the economic competitiveness in a de-regulated energy market while the latter is linked to the financial risk taken by the investor. It appears, within the limits of the assumptions and models used, that generation 4 reactors will be characterized by a better competitiveness and an equivalent financial risk when compared with the previous generation. (A.C.)

  9. Future reactor experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Liangjian

    2015-07-01

    The non-zero neutrino mixing angle θ13 has been discovered and precisely measured by the current generation short-baseline reactor neutrino experiments. It opens the gate of measuring the leptonic CP-violating phase and enables the neutrino mass ordering. The JUNO and RENO-50 proposals aim at resolving the neutrino mass ordering using reactors. The experiment design, physics sensitivity, technical challenges as well as the progresses of those two proposed experiments are reviewed in this paper.

  10. Department of Reactor Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risø National Laboratory, Roskilde

    The general development of the Department of Reactor Technology at Risø during 1981 is presented, and the activities within the major subject fields are described in some detail. Lists of staff, publications, and computer programs are included.......The general development of the Department of Reactor Technology at Risø during 1981 is presented, and the activities within the major subject fields are described in some detail. Lists of staff, publications, and computer programs are included....

  11. AVR reactor physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A process for reactivity control was developed and used for fuelling the AVR reactor core, which is largely based on experimentally determined values. By adding fuel elements with different quantities of heavy metals paired with various experimental requirements, great demands were made of reactivity control. Although only a small range of control was available, this was sufficient to operate the reactor and to shut it down safely in the required power and temperature range. (orig.)

  12. Moon base reactor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez, H.; Flores, J.; Nguyen, M.; Carsen, K.

    1989-01-01

    The objective of our reactor design is to supply a lunar-based research facility with 20 MW(e). The fundamental layout of this lunar-based system includes the reactor, power conversion devices, and a radiator. The additional aim of this reactor is a longevity of 12 to 15 years. The reactor is a liquid metal fast breeder that has a breeding ratio very close to 1.0. The geometry of the core is cylindrical. The metallic fuel rods are of beryllium oxide enriched with varying degrees of uranium, with a beryllium core reflector. The liquid metal coolant chosen was natural lithium. After the liquid metal coolant leaves the reactor, it goes directly into the power conversion devices. The power conversion devices are Stirling engines. The heated coolant acts as a hot reservoir to the device. It then enters the radiator to be cooled and reenters the Stirling engine acting as a cold reservoir. The engines' operating fluid is helium, a highly conductive gas. These Stirling engines are hermetically sealed. Although natural lithium produces a lower breeding ratio, it does have a larger temperature range than sodium. It is also corrosive to steel. This is why the container material must be carefully chosen. One option is to use an expensive alloy of cerbium and zirconium. The radiator must be made of a highly conductive material whose melting point temperature is not exceeded in the reactor and whose structural strength can withstand meteor showers.

  13. BWR type nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To simplify the structure of an emergency core cooling system while suppressing the flow out of coolants upon rapture accidents in a coolant recycling device of BWR type reactors. Constitution: Recirculation pumps are located at a position higher than the reactor core in a pressure vessel, and the lower plenum is bisected vertically by a partition plate. Further, a gas-liquid separator is surrounded with a wall and the water level at the outer side of the wall is made higher than the water level in the inside of the wall. In this structure, coolants are introduced from the upper chamber in the lower plenum into the reactor core, and the steams generated in the reactor core are separated in the gas-liquid separator, whereby the separated liquid is introduced as coolants by way of the inner chamber into the lower chamber of the lower plenum and further sent by way of the outer chamber into the reactor core. Consequently, idle rotation of the recycling pumps due to the flow-in of saturated water is prevented and loss of coolants in the reactor core can also be prevented upon raptures in the pipeway and the driving section of the pump connected to the pressure vessel and in the bottom of the pressure vessel. (Horiuchi, T.)

  14. Emergency reactor scram system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present invention provides an emergency reactor scram system capable of shut down a reactor safely upon occurrence of pump trip by improving a passive scram performance for an FBR-type reactor. Namely, a driving motor and an electric generator are connected to a main pump of a primary system. An AC/DC convertor is connected to the electric generator. A shielding plug is disposed to the upper end opening of a reactor container, a control rod drive mechanism is erected on the shielding plug, and an extension pipe is attached to scram magnets of the control rod drive mechanism. The extension pipe is connected to a control rod. The rotation of the shaft of the pump is used as a direct rotator to provide an integrated-type electric generator. The electric generator is electrically connected with the power source of a scram magnet of the emergency scram system. Accordingly, the control rod of the emergency scram system is automatically and rapidly inserted to the reactor core using the power source of the electric generator upon trip of the main pump thereby enabling to scram the reactor safely. (I.S.)

  15. A modular reactor plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a new concept in liquid metal reactors that is being developed by General Electric under contract to the Department of Energy. This concept is called the Modular Reactor Plant. While this effort is not expected to have a near-term impact, it is directed toward three principal issues currently affecting nuclear power in the United States. First, plant costs have escalated to the point where the startup of new plants require large electric rate increases. Second, the cost of new plants coming on-line today vary by as much as a factor of three. And, third, nuclear construction times often exceed the utilities prudent planning cycle. This paper describes how General Electric's Modular Reactor Plant addreses these issues through shop fabrication and assembly, rail shipment to the site for rapid installation of nuclear components and inherent reactor protection. In addition, it is expected the modular reactor plant will reduce the current cost of development and demonstration of liquid metal reactors to an affordable level

  16. New fission reactor designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of critical challenges to the expanded or continued use of nuclear power have developed. These can be categorized as: regulatory restrictions and complications; negative public attitudes; plant complexity; plant life, operations, and maintenance; uncertain load growth, financing; waste management. Solutions to these challenges through advanced reactor design centre around four key technical responses. Passive safety systems are being introduced which use the laws of physics to provide emergency reactor coding, control and shutdown thus eliminating the possibility of human error. Modular construction promises cuts in costs and construction time by shifting the major part of component manufacture from the site to the factory. Standardization also cuts capital costs and in addition operations and repair costs and expedites reactor licensing. Improvements to the fuel cycle include improved fuel types, designs and fabrication, and the reprocessing of and recycling spent fuel back into energy production, thus extending uranium resources and offering a partial solution to the problem of waste disposal. Examples of evolutionary and advanced water-cooled reactors, modular high temperature gas-cooled reactors, and advanced liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactors which are being developed round the world are presented. (author)

  17. OECD Halden reactor project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the nineteenth annual Report on the OECD Halden Reactor Project, describing activities at the Project during 1978, the last year of the 1976-1978 Halden Agreement. Work continued in two main fields: test fuel irradiation and fuel research, and computer-based process supervision and control. Project research on water reactor fuel focusses on various aspects of fuel behavior under normal, and off-normal transient conditions. In 1978, participating organisations continued to submit test fuel for irradiation in the Halden boiling heavy-water reactor, in instrumented test assemblies designed and manufactured by the Project. Work included analysis of the impact of fuel design and reactor operating conditions on fuel cladding behavior. Fuel performance modelling included characterization of thermal and mechanical behavior at high burn-up, of fuel failure modes, and improvement of data qualification procedures to reduce and quantify error bands on in-reactor measurements. Instrument development yielded new or improved designs for measuring rod temperature, internal pressure, axial neutron flux shape determination, and for detecting cladding defects. Work on computer-based methods of reactor supervision and control included continued development of a system for predictive core surveillance, and of special mathematical methods for core power distribution control

  18. Reactor power measuring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The device of the present invention efficiently calibrates a fixed type gamma ray thermometer of a reactor power measuring device of a BWR type reactor. Namely, the device of the present invention calculates peripheral fuel rod power distribution by calibrating the reactor power distribution by heat generation amount, the reactor power distribution being obtained by a calculation based on a reactor model for converting the signals of a plurality of the gamma ray thermometers in the reactor core based on a conversion formula. In this case, the conversion formula is a relational formula between the power of a thermocouple of the gamma ray thermometer, gamma ray heat generation amount, thermocouple zero power sensitivity relative to a temperature coefficient. A conversion efficient calculation means makes a calibration heater to generate heat at a predetermined power, and the thermocouple zero power sensitivity and the temperature coefficient are obtained based on the output of the gamma ray thermometer in this case. The calibration means updates to conversion type thermocouple zero power sensitivity and temperature coefficient. A calibration execution means executes the operations described above successively, and when the thermocouple zero power sensitivity and the temperature coefficient are out of an allowable range, the means informs it and eliminates the corresponding gamma ray thermometer from the measuring meters. (I.S.)

  19. Reactor safety engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concept of the work is such that the basic safety philosophy for nuclear power plants as well as the safety features of both types of light water reactors, pressurized and boiling water reactors, and of the fast breeder reactor are dealt with. With the pressurized and boiling water reactors also variations, due to different supplies are mentioned. The state of development considered is characterized by the results of the American reactor safety study having very much influenced the way of presentation and the validity of the information contained. In the introduction the attentive reader is made familiar with the basic traits of safety engineering, the traditional deterministic way of proceeding being supplemented by a detailed illustration of probabilistic means used in the safety analysis. Added to this are comparative descriptions of the individual safety features, their design and mode of operation. There are, e.g., detailed discussion of the emergency core cooling systems, the power supply systems, the reactor protection system, and the containment. Special chapters are attributed to transients with and without the fast shutdown system working and to loss of coolant. The so-called external events are treated somewhat shortly whereas much space is given to core melting problems. The treatment of important events from the safety point of view, including the section on Harrisburg added for reasons of immediate interest, is limited to phenomenological description. (orig.)

  20. An advanced educational program for nuclear professionals with social scientific literacy. A collaborative initiative by UC Berkeley and Univ. of Tokyo on the Fukushima accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have collaborated for over three years in developing an advanced educational program to cultivate leading engineers who can productively interact with other stakeholders. The program is organized under a partnership between the Nuclear Engineering Department of University of California, Berkeley (UCBNE) and the Global COE Program 'Nuclear Education and Research Initiative' (GoNERI) of the University of Tokyo, and is funded by MEXT (Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology), Japan. We conducted two 'summer schools' in 2009 and 2010 as trial cases of the educational program. This year, in response to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident, we decided to make our third summer school a venue for preliminary, yet multi-dimensional learning from that event. This school was held in Berkeley, CA, in the first week of August, with 12 lecturers and 18 students from various fields and countries. In this paper, we will explain the concept, aim, and design of our program; do a preliminary assessment of its effectiveness; introduce a couple of intriguing discussions held by participants; and discuss the program's implications for the post-Fukushima nuclear context. (author)

  1. Spent fuel working group report on inventory and storage of the Department's spent nuclear fuel and other reactor irradiated nuclear materials and their environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Each Site Team, consisting of M ampersand O contractor and Operations Office personnel, performed data collection and identified ES ampersand H concerns relative to RINM storage by preparing responses to the detailed question set for each storage facility at the site. These responses formed the basis for the Site Team reports. These reports are contained in this volume and are from the following facilities: Hanford Site, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Site, Savannah River Site, Oak Ridge Site, West Valley Demonstration Project Site, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, General Atomics, San Diego, Babcock ampersand Wilcox, Lynchburg Technical Center, Argonne National Laboratory - East, Naval Reactors Facilities, Rocky Flats Critical Mass Laboratory, EG ampersand G Mound Applied Technologies, Ohio, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, and Battelle Columbus Laboratory. This volume also contains information received from the sites that were not visited. These sites include the Naval Reactor Facility at the INEL, EG ampersand G Mound Applied Technologies, The Catholic University of America, Rocky Flats Site, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Stanford Linear Accelerator Laboratory, Energy Technology Engineering Center, and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Information received through the Chicago Operations Office for University Reactors, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Battelle Columbus Laboratory is also included. Materials contained in this volume consist of information, data and site documents. They are unedited

  2. Regulations for RA reactor operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regulations for RA reactor operation are written in accordance with the legal regulations defined by the Law about radiation protection and related legal acts, as well as technical standards according to the IAEA recommendations. The contents of this book include: fundamental data about the reactor; legal regulations for reactor operation; organizational scheme for reactor operation; general and detailed instructions for operation, behaviour in the reactor building, performing experiments; operating rules for operation under steady state and accidental conditions

  3. The reactor Cabri

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has become necessary to construct in France a reactor which would permit the investigation of the conditions of functioning of future installations, the choice, the testing and the development of safety devices to be adopted. A water reactor of a type corresponding to the latest CEA constructions in the field of laboratory or university reactors was decided upon: it appeared important to be able to evaluate the risks entailed and to study the possibilities of increasing the power, always demanded by the users; on the other hand, it is particularly interesting to clarify the phenomena of power oscillation and the risks of burn out. The work programme for CABRI will be associated with the work carried out on the American Sperts of the same type, during its construction, very useful contacts were made with the American specialists who designed the se reactors. A brief description of the reactor is given in the communication as well as the work programme for the first years with respect to the objectives up to now envisaged. Rough description of the reactor. CABRI is an open core swimming-pool reactor without any lateral protection, housed in a reinforced building with controlled leakage, in the Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Cadarache. It lies alone in the middle of an area whose radius is 300 meters long. Control and measurements equipment stand out on the edge of that zone. It consumes MTR fuel elements. The control-safety rods are propelled by compressed air. The maximum flow rate of cooling circuit is 1500 m3/h. Transient measurements are recorded in a RW330 unit. Aims and work programme. CABRI is meant for: - studies on the safety of water reactors - for the definition of the safety margins under working conditions: research of maximum power at which a swimming-pool reactor may operate with respect to a cooling accident, of local boiling effect on the nuclear behaviour of the reactor, performances of the control and safety instruments under exceptional

  4. REACTOR GROUT THERMAL PROPERTIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steimke, J.; Qureshi, Z.; Restivo, M.; Guerrero, H.

    2011-01-28

    Savannah River Site has five dormant nuclear production reactors. Long term disposition will require filling some reactor buildings with grout up to ground level. Portland cement based grout will be used to fill the buildings with the exception of some reactor tanks. Some reactor tanks contain significant quantities of aluminum which could react with Portland cement based grout to form hydrogen. Hydrogen production is a safety concern and gas generation could also compromise the structural integrity of the grout pour. Therefore, it was necessary to develop a non-Portland cement grout to fill reactors that contain significant quantities of aluminum. Grouts generate heat when they set, so the potential exists for large temperature increases in a large pour, which could compromise the integrity of the pour. The primary purpose of the testing reported here was to measure heat of hydration, specific heat, thermal conductivity and density of various reactor grouts under consideration so that these properties could be used to model transient heat transfer for different pouring strategies. A secondary purpose was to make qualitative judgments of grout pourability and hardened strength. Some reactor grout formulations were unacceptable because they generated too much heat, or started setting too fast, or required too long to harden or were too weak. The formulation called 102H had the best combination of characteristics. It is a Calcium Alumino-Sulfate grout that contains Ciment Fondu (calcium aluminate cement), Plaster of Paris (calcium sulfate hemihydrate), sand, Class F fly ash, boric acid and small quantities of additives. This composition afforded about ten hours of working time. Heat release began at 12 hours and was complete by 24 hours. The adiabatic temperature rise was 54 C which was within specification. The final product was hard and displayed no visible segregation. The density and maximum particle size were within specification.

  5. Materials for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The improved performance of present generation nuclear reactors and the realization of advanced reactor concepts, both, require development of better materials. Physical metallurgy/materials science principles which have been exploited in meeting the exacting requirements of nuclear reactor materials (fuels and structural materials), are outlined citing a few specific examples. While the incentive for improvement of traditional fuels (e.g., UO2 fuel) is primarily for increasing the average core burn up, the development of advanced fuels (e.g., MOX, mixed carbide, nitride, silicide and dispersion fuels) are directed towards better utilization of fissile and fertile inventories through adaptation of innovative fuel cycles. As the burn up of UO2 fuel reaches higher levels, a more detailed and quantitative understanding of the phenomena such as fission gas release, fuel restructuring induced by radiation and thermal gradients and pellet-clad interaction is being achieved. Development of zirconium based alloys for both cladding and pressure tube applications is discussed with reference to their physical metallurgy, fabrication techniques and in-reactor degradation mechanisms. The issue of radiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) is covered drawing a comparison between the western and eastern specifications of RPV steels. The search for new materials which can stand higher rates of atomic displacement due to radiation has led to the development of swelling resistant austenitic and ferritic stainless steels for fast reactor applications as exemplified by the development of the D-9 steel for Indian fast breeder reactor. The presentation will conclude by listing various materials related phenomena, which have a strong bearing on the successful development of future nuclear energy systems. (author)

  6. Reactor physics and economic aspects of the CANDU reactor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A history of the development of the CANDU system is given along with a fairly detailed description of the 600 MW(e) CANDU reactor. Reactor physics calculation methods are described, as well as comparisons between calculated reactor physics parameters and those measured in research and power reactors. An examination of the economics of CANDU in the Ontario Hydro system and a comparison between fossil fuelled and light water reactors is presented. Some physics, economics and resources aspects are given for both low enriched uranium and thorium-fuelled CANDU reactors. Finally the RβD program in Advanced Fuel Cycles is briefly described

  7. Reactor Safety Planning for Prometheus Project, for Naval Reactors Information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Delmolino

    2005-05-06

    The purpose of this letter is to submit to Naval Reactors the initial plan for the Prometheus project Reactor Safety work. The Prometheus project is currently developing plans for cold physics experiments and reactor prototype tests. These tests and facilities may require safety analysis and siting support. In addition to the ground facilities, the flight reactor units will require unique analyses to evaluate the risk to the public from normal operations and credible accident conditions. This letter outlines major safety documents that will be submitted with estimated deliverable dates. Included in this planning is the reactor servicing documentation and shipping analysis that will be submitted to Naval Reactors.

  8. Fast breeder reactor research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The meeting was attended by 15 participants from seven countries and two international organizations. The Eighth Annual Meeting of the International Working Group on Fast Reactors (IWGFR) was attended by representatives from France, Fed. Rep. Germany, Italy, Japan, United Kingdom, Union of Soviet Socialist Republics and the United States of America - countries that have made significant progress in developing the technology and physics of sodium cooled fast reactors and have extensive national programmes in this field - as well as by representatives of the Commission of the European Communities and the IAEA. The design of fast-reactor power plants is a more difficult task than developing facilities with thermal reactors. Different reactor kinetics and dynamics, a hard neutron spectrum, larger integral doses of fuel and structural material irradiation, higher core temperatures, the use of an essentially novel coolant, and, as a result of all these factors, the additional reliability and safety requirements that are imposed on the planning and operation of sodium cooled fast reactors - all these factors pose problems that can be solved comprehensively only by countries with a high level of scientific and technical development. The exchange of experience between these countries and their combined efforts in solving the fundamental problems that arise in planning, constructing and operating fast reactors are promoting technical progress and reducing the relative expenditure required for various studies on developing and introducing commercial fast reactors. For this reason, the meeting concentrated on reviewing and discussing national fast reactor programmes. The situation with regard to planning, constructing and operating fast experimental and demonstration reactors in the countries concerned, the experience accumulated in operating them, the difficulties arising during operation and ways of over-coming them, the search for optimal designs for the power

  9. BR2 Reactor: Introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The irradiations in the BR2 reactor are in collaboration with or at the request of third parties such as the European Commission, the IAEA, research centres and utilities, reactor vendors or fuel manufacturers. The reactor also contributes significantly to the production of radioisotopes for medical and industrial applications, to neutron silicon doping for the semiconductor industry and to scientific irradiations for universities. Along the ongoing programmes on fuel and materials development, several new irradiation devices are in use or in design. Amongst others a loop providing enhanced cooling for novel materials testing reactor fuel, a device for high temperature gas cooled fuel as well as a rig for the irradiation of metallurgical samples in a Pb-Bi environment. A full scale 3-D heterogeneous model of BR2 is available. The model describes the real hyperbolic arrangement of the reactor and includes the detailed 3-D space dependent distribution of the isotopic fuel depletion in the fuel elements. The model is validated on the reactivity measurements of several tens of BR2 operation cycles. The accurate calculations of the axial and radial distributions of the poisoning of the beryllium matrix by 3He, 6Li and 3T are verified on the measured reactivity losses used to predict the reactivity behavior for the coming decades. The model calculates the main functionals in reactor physics like: conventional thermal and equivalent fission neutron fluxes, number of displacements per atom, fission rate, thermal power characteristics as heat flux and linear power density, neutron/gamma heating, determination of the fission energy deposited in fuel plates/rods, neutron multiplication factor and fuel burn-up. For each reactor irradiation project, a detailed geometry model of the experimental device and of its neighborhood is developed. Neutron fluxes are predicted within approximately 10 percent in comparison with the dosimetry measurements. Fission rate, heat flux and

  10. Reactor coolant cleanup facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A depressurization device is disposed in pipelines upstream of recycling pumps of a reactor coolant cleanup facility to reduce a pressure between the pressurization device and the recycling pump at the downstream, thereby enabling high pressure coolant injection from other systems by way of the recycling pumps. Upon emergency, the recycling pumps of the coolant cleanup facility can be used in common to an emergency reactor core cooling facility and a reactor shutdown facility. Since existent pumps of the emergency reactor core cooling facility and the reactor shutdown facility which are usually in a stand-by state can be removed, operation confirmation test and maintenance for equipments in both of facilities can be saved, so that maintenance and reliability of the plant are improved and burdens on operators can also be mitigated. Moreover, low pressure design can be adopted for a non-regenerative heat exchanger and recycling coolant pumps, which enables to improve the reliability and economical property due to reduction of possibility of leakage. (N.H.)

  11. HTGR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A reactor core is disposed at the center of a reactor container, a reflector is disposed on the outer side thereof, a steam generator is disposed further outer side thereof coaxially, and they are constituted as an integrated one container. A gas circulator and control rod drives are protruded at the outer side of the lower portion of the integrated container. Heat insulators are disposed on the inner side of the container wall in the upper portion of the reactor container. Helium gas risen in the reactor core and heated to a high temperature descends in a circular steam generator and undergoes heat exchange with water, and is then pressurized in the gas circulator after the lowering of the temperature, and returned to the inlet of the reactor core from the lower central portion of the container. With such procedures, the helium gas as primary coolants circulates only in the container to improve confinement. The device can be reduced in the size and the cost. (I.N.)

  12. Reactor container spray device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To enable decrease in the heat and the concentration of radioactive iodine released from the reactor vessel into the reactor container in the spray device of BWR type reactors. Constitution: A plurality of water receiving trays are disposed below the spray nozzle in the dry well and communicated to a pressure suppression chamber by way of drain pipeways passing through a diaphragm floor. When the recycling system is ruptured and coolants in the reactor vessel and radioactive iodine in the reactor core are released into the dry well, spray water is discharged from the spray nozzle to eliminate the heat and the radioactive iodine in the dry well. In this case, the receiving trays collect the portions of spray water whose absorption power for the heat and radioactive iodine is nearly saturated and falls them into the pool water of the pressure suppression chamber. Consequently, other portions of the spray water that still possess absorption power can be jetted with no hindrance, to increase the efficiency for the removal of the heat and iodine of the spray droplets. (Horiuchi, T.)

  13. PROTEUS research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The PROTEUS zero power reactor at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) in Switzerland achieved first criticality in 1968 and since then has been operated as an experimental tool for reactor physics research on test lattices representative of a wide range of reactor concepts. Reactor design codes and their associated data libraries are validated on the basis of the experimental results obtained. PROTEUS is normally configured as a driven system, in which a subcritical test zone is made critical by the surrounding driver zones. The advantages of driven systems can be summarized as follows: - Smaller amount of test fuel is required; - Large range of test zone conditions (including k∞ < 1 states) can be investigated by changes in the driver loading alone, thus avoiding undesirable perturbations to the test zone which would influence the measurement conditions and thus affect the interpretability of the results; - Necessary reactor control and instrumentation equipment (usually perturbing from the experimental viewpoint) can be located in the outer driver regions, thereby avoiding disturbance of the test lattice

  14. Generalities about nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From Zoe, the first nuclear reactor, till the current EPR, the French nuclear industry has always advanced by profiting from the feedback from dozens of years of experience and operations, in particular by drawing lessons from the most significant events in its history, such as the Fukushima accident. The new generations of reactors must improve safety and economic performance so that the industry maintain its legitimacy and its share in the production of electricity. This article draws the history of nuclear power in France, gives a brief description of the pressurized water reactor design, lists the technical features of the different versions of PWR that operate in France and compares them with other types of reactors. The feedback experience concerning safety, learnt from the major nuclear accidents Three Miles Island (1979), Chernobyl (1986) and Fukushima (2011) is also detailed. Today there are 26 third generation reactors being built in the world: 4 EPR (1 in Finland, 1 in France and 2 in China); 2 VVER-1200 in Russia, 8 AP-1000 (4 in China and 4 in the Usa), 8 APR-1400 (4 in Korea and 4 in UAE), and 4 ABWR (2 in Japan and 2 in Taiwan)

  15. China experimental fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chinese experimental fast reactor (CEFR) is a pool-type sodium-cooled fast reactor whose short term purposes are: -) the validation of computer codes, -) the check of the relevance of standards, and -) the gathering of experimental data on fast reactors. On the long term the expectations will focus on: -) gaining experience in fast reactor operations, -) the testing of nuclear fuels and materials, and -) the study of sodium compounds. The main technical features of CEFR are: -) thermal power output: 65 MW (electrical power output: 20 MW), -) size of the core: height: 45 cm, diameter: 60 cm, -) maximal linear output: 430 W/cm, -) neutron flux: 3.7*1015 n/cm2/s, -) input/output sodium temperature: 360 / 530 Celsius degrees, -) 2 loops for the primary system and 2 loops for the secondary system. The temperature coefficient and the power coefficient are settled to stay negative for any change in the values of the core parameters. The installation of the reactor vessel will be completed by mid 2007. The first criticality of CEFR is expected during the first semester of 2010. (A.C.)

  16. EBT reactor analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the results of a recent ELMO Bumpy Torus (EBT) reactor study that includes ring and core plasma properties with consistent treatment of coupled ring-core stability criteria and power balance requirements. The principal finding is that constraints imposed by these coupling and other physics and technology considerations permit a broad operating window for reactor design optimization. Within this operating window, physics and engineering systems analysis and cost sensitivity studies indicate that reactors with approx. 6 to 10%, P approx. 1200 to 1700 MW(e), wall loading approx. 1.0 to 2.5 MW/m2, and recirculating power fraction (including ring-sustaining power and all other reactors auxiliaries) approx. 10 to 15% are possible. A number of concept improvements are also proposed that are found to offer the potential for further improvement of the reactor size and parameters. These include, but are not limited to, the use of: (1) supplementary coils or noncircular mirror coils to improve magnetic geometry and reduce size, (2) energetic ion rings to improve ring power requirements, (3) positive potential to enhance confinement and reduce size, and (4) profile control to improve stability and overall fusion power density

  17. Modern research reactors in the world and RA research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper covers the following topics: fundamentals of research reactors, thermal neutron flux density, classification of research reactors in the world, properties of research reactors of higher power in the world according to IAEA data for 1995, their application, and trend of development, experimental feasibility and status of RA reactor. Trend of research reactors development in the world (after 1980) is directed towards increasing the neutron production quality factor, i.e. ratio between thermal neutron flux density and reactor power, which is achieved by designing compact reactor cores. With the aim of renewal of RA reactor (without analysis of reactor components and staff aging, possibility of restart and commercialization), according to the analysis in this paper, it can be concluded: there is very few reactors under construction in the world, all the important countries in Europe have research reactors; RA reactor is not very interesting for development of reactor physics; nowadays RA reactor is in the group of reactors which are 30-40 years old; its inventories of fuel and heavy water are enough for about 20 years of operation; it has achieved high quality factor of neutron production with low and highly enriched fuel; core transfer from low highly enriched to low enriched fuel should be carefully studies from operation, experimental and economical point of view; it is necessary to use the advantages of RA reactor (minimum investment): volume of the core and reflector which enables availability of neutron flux for the users (numerous experimental loops), fuel in shape of slugs enabling efficient fuel management and flexible neutron flux distribution in the core in the reflector, reactor operation should be directed towards commercial applications. Bibliography of more than 140 relevant papers used is included in this paper

  18. Sodium-cooled nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book first explains the choice of sodium-cooled reactors by outlining the reasons of the choice of fast neutron reactors (fast neutrons instead of thermal neutrons, recycling opportunity for plutonium, full use of natural uranium, nuclear waste optimization, flexibility of fast neutron reactors in nuclear material management, fast neutron reactors as complements of water-cooled reactors), and by outlining the reasons for the choice of sodium as heat-transfer material. Physical, chemical, and neutron properties of sodium are presented. The second part of the book first presents the main design principles for sodium-cooled fast neutron reactors and their core. The third part proposes an historical overview and an assessment of previously operated sodium-cooled fast neutron reactors (French reactors from Rapsodie to Superphenix, other reactors in the world), and an assessment of the main incidents which occurred in these reactors. It also reports the experience and lessons learned from the dismantling of various sodium-cooled fast breeder reactors in the world. The next chapter addresses safety issues (technical and safety aspects related to the use of sodium) and environmental issues (dosimetry, gaseous and liquid releases, solid wastes, and cooling water). Then, various technological aspects of these reactors are addressed: the energy conversion system, main components, sodium chemistry, sodium-related technology, advances in in-service inspection, materials used in reactors and their behaviour, and fuel system. The next chapter addresses the fuel cycle in these reactors: its integrated specific character, report of the French experience in fast neutron reactor fuel processing, description of the transmutation of minor actinides in these reactors. The last chapter proposes an overview of reactors currently projected or under construction in the world, presents the Astrid project, and gives an assessment of the economy of these reactors. A glossary and an index

  19. Scaleable, High Efficiency Microchannel Sabatier Reactor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A Microchannel Sabatier Reactor System (MSRS) consisting of cross connected arrays of isothermal or graded temperature reactors is proposed. The reactor array...

  20. Methanation assembly using multiple reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahnke, Fred C.; Parab, Sanjay C.

    2007-07-24

    A methanation assembly for use with a water supply and a gas supply containing gas to be methanated in which a reactor assembly has a plurality of methanation reactors each for methanating gas input to the assembly and a gas delivery and cooling assembly adapted to deliver gas from the gas supply to each of said methanation reactors and to combine water from the water supply with the output of each methanation reactor being conveyed to a next methanation reactor and carry the mixture to such next methanation reactor.

  1. Mimic of OSU research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Ohio State University research reactor (OSURR) is undergoing improvements in its research and educational capabilities. A computer-based digital data acquisition system, including a reactor system mimic, will be installed as part of these improvements. The system will monitor the reactor system parameters available to the reactor operator either in digital parameters available to the reactor operator either in digital or analog form. The system includes two computers. All the signals are sent to computer 1, which processes the data and sends the data through a serial port to computer 2 with a video graphics array VGA monitor, which is utilized to display the mimic system of the reactor

  2. MINT research reactor safety program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamad Idris bin Taib [Division of Special Project, Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Technology Research (MINT), Bangi (Malaysia)

    2000-11-01

    Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Technology Research (MINT) Research Reactor Safety Program has been done along with Reactor Power Upgrading Project, Reactor Safety Upgrading Project and Development of Expert System for On-Line Nuclear Process Control Project. From 1993 up to date, Neutronic and Thermal-hydraulics analysis, Probabilistic Safety Assessment as well as installation of New 2 MW Secondary Cooling System were done. Installations of New Reactor Building Ventilation System, Reactor Monitoring System, Updating of Safety Analysis Report and Upgrading Primary Cooling System are in progress. For future activities, Reactor Modeling will be included to add present activities. (author)

  3. RB research reactor Safety Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This RB reactor safety report is a revised and improved version of the Safety report written in 1962. It contains descriptions of: reactor building, reactor hall, control room, laboratories, reactor components, reactor control system, heavy water loop, neutron source, safety system, dosimetry system, alarm system, neutron converter, experimental channels. Safety aspects of the reactor operation include analyses of accident causes, errors during operation, measures for preventing uncontrolled activity changes, analysis of the maximum possible accident in case of different core configurations with natural uranium, slightly and highly enriched fuel; influence of possible seismic events

  4. Fusion reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the fifteenth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following progress reports: Alloy Development for Irradiation Performance; Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies; Special purpose Materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials programs being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. The Fusion Reactor Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of the program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the rest of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide

  5. Chernobyl reactor accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On April 26, 1986, an explosion occurred at the newest of four operating nuclear reactors at the Chernobyl site in the USSR. The accident initiated an international technical exchange of almost unprecedented magnitude; this exchange was climaxed with a meeting at the International Atomic Energy Agency in Vienna during the week of August 25, 1986. The meeting was attended by more than 540 official representatives from 51 countries and 20 international organizations. Information gleaned from that technical exchange is presented in this report. A description of the Chernobyl reactor, which differs significantly from commercial US reactors, is presented, the accident scenario advanced by the Russian delegation is discussed, and observations that have been made concerning fission product release are described

  6. International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An international design team comprised of members from Canada, Europe, Japan, the Soviet Union, and the United States of America, are designing an experimental fusion test reactor. The engineering and testing objectives of this International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) are to validate the design and to demonstrate controlled ignition, extended burn of a deuterium and tritium plasma, and achieve steady state using technology expected to be available by 1990. The concept maximizes flexibility while allowing for a variety of plasma configurations and operating scenarios. During physics phase operation, the machine produces a 22 MA plasma current. In the technology phase, the machine can be reconfigured with a thicker shield and a breeding blanket to operate with an 18 MA plasma current at a major radius of 5.5 meters. Canada's involvement in the areas of safety, facility design, reactor configuration and maintenance builds on our internationally recognized design and operational expertise in developing tritium processes and CANDU related technologies

  7. Licensed operating reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly Licensed Operating Reactors Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Information Resources Management, from the Headquarters Staff of NRC's Office of Inspection and Enforcement, from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the Utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States

  8. Licensed operating reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    THE OPERATING UNITS STATUS REPORT - LICENSED OPERATING REACTORS provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Information Resources Management from the Headquarters staff of NRC's Office of Enforcement (OE), from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. The three sections of the report are: monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC's Regional Offices, OE Headquarters and the utilities; and an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor-years of experience and non-power reactors in the US

  9. Licensed operating reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly LICENSED OPERATING REACTORS Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Information Resources Management, from the Headquarters Staff of NRC's Office of Inspection and Enforcement, from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the Utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States

  10. Colliding Beam Fusion Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostoker, Norman; Qerushi, Artan; Binderbauer, Michl

    2003-06-01

    The recirculating power for virtually all types of fusion reactors has previously been calculated [1] with the Fokker-Planck equation. The reactors involve non-Maxwellian plasmas. The calculations are generic in that they do not relate to specific confinement devices. In all cases except for a Tokamak with D-T fuel the recirculating power was found to exceed the fusion power by a large factor. In this paper we criticize the generality claimed for this calculation. The ratio of circulating power to fusion power is calculated for the Colliding Beam Reactor with fuels D-T, D-He3 and p-B11. The results are respectively, 0.070, 0.141 and 0.493.

  11. The MNSR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This tank-in-pool reactor is based on the same design concept as the Canadian Slowpoke. The core is a right circular cylinder, 24 cm diameter by 25 cm long, containing 411 fuel pin positions. The pins are HEU-Aluminium alloy, 0.5 cm in diameter. Critical mass is about 900 g. The reactor has a single cadmium control rod. The back-up shutdown system is the insertion of a cadmium capsule in a core position. Excess reactivity is limited to 3.5mk. In both the MNSR and Slowpoke, the insertion of the maximum excess reactivity results in a power transient limited by the coolant/moderator temperature to safe values, independent of any operator action. This reactor is used primarily in training and neutron activation analysis. Up to 64 elements have been analyzed in a great variety of different disciplines. (author)

  12. Welding and reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high safety requirements which must be demanded of the quality of the welded joints in reactor technique have so far not been fulfilled in all cases. The errors occuring have caused considerable loss of availability and high material costs. They were not, however, so serious that one need have feared any immediate danger to the personnel or to the environment. The safety devices of reactor plants were only called upon in a few cases and to these they responded perfectly. The intensive efforts to complete and improve the specifications are to contribute to that in future, the reactor plants can be counted even more so as one of the safest technical plants ever. (orig./LH)

  13. Reactor operation experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the TRIGA Users Conference in Helsinki 1970 the TRIGA reactor Vienna was in operation without any larger undesired shutdown. The integrated thermal power production by August 15 1972 accumulated to 110 MWd. The TRIGA reactor is manly used for training of students, for scientific courses and research work. Cooperation with industry increased in the last two years either in form of research or in performing training courses. Close cooperation is also maintained with the IAEA, samples are irradiated and courses on various fields are arranged. Maintenance work was performed on the heat exchanger and to replace the shim rod magnet. With the view on the future power upgrading nine fuel elements type 110 have been ordered recently. Experiments, performed currently on the reactor are presented in details

  14. Nuclear Rocket Engine Reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Lanin, Anatoly

    2013-01-01

    The development of a nuclear rocket engine reactor (NRER ) is presented in this book. The working capacity of an active zone NRER under mechanical and thermal load, intensive neutron fluxes, high energy generation (up to 30 MBT/l) in a working medium (hydrogen) at temperatures up to 3100 K is displayed. Design principles and bearing capacity of reactors area discussed on the basis of simulation experiments and test data of a prototype reactor. Property data of dense constructional, porous thermal insulating and fuel materials like carbide and uranium carbide compounds in the temperatures interval 300 - 3000 K are presented. Technological aspects of strength and thermal strength resistance of materials are considered. The design procedure of possible emergency processes in the NRER is developed and risks for their origination are evaluated. Prospects of the NRER development for pilotless space devices and piloted interplanetary ships are viewed.

  15. Reactor accidents in perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In each of the three major reactor accidents which have led to significant releases to the environment, and discussed in outline in this note, the reactor has been essentially destroyed - certainly Windscale and Chernobyl reactors will never operate and the cleanup operation for Three Mile Island is currently estimated to have cost in excess of US Pound 500 000 000. In each of the accidents there has not been any fatality off site in the short term and any long-term health detriment is unlikely to be seen in comparison with the natural cancer incidence rate. At Chernobyl, early fatalities did occur amongst those concerned with fighting the incident on site and late effects are to be expected. The assumption of a linear non-threshold risk, and hence no level of zero risk is the main problem in communication with the public, and the author calls for simplification of the presentation of the concepts of radiological protection. (U.K.)

  16. Reactor safety equipments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To positively recover radioactive substances discharged in a dry well at the time of failure of a reactor. Constitution: In addition to the emergency gas treating system fitted to a reactor building, a purification system connected through a pipeline to the dry well is arranged in the reactor building. This purification system is connected through pipes fitted to the dry well to forced circulation device, heat exchanger, and purification device. The atmosphere of high pressure steam gases in the dry well is derived to the heat exchanger for cooling, and then radioactive substances which are contained in the gases are removed by filter sets charged with the HEPA filters and the HECA filters. At last, there gases are returned to dry well by circulation pump, repeat this process. (Kamimura, M.)

  17. Licensed operating reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly LICENSED OPERATING REACTORS Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Information Resources Management, from the Headquarters Staff of NRC's Office of Inspection and Enforcement, from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States

  18. Reactor protection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report describes the reactor protection system (RPS-II) designed for use on Babcock and Wilcox 145-, later 177-, and 205-fuel assembly pressurized water reactors. In this system, relays in the trip logic have been replaced by solid state devices. A calculating module for the low DNBR, pump status, and offset trip functions has replaced the overpower trip (based on flow and imbalance), the power/RC pump trip, and the variable low-pressure trip. Included is a description of the changes from the present Oconee-type reactor protection system (RPS-I), a functional and hardware description of the calculating module, a description of the software programmed in the calculating module, and a discussion of the qualification program conducted to ensure that the degree of protection provided by RPS-II is not less than that provided by previously licensed systems supplied by B and W

  19. Backfitting swimming pool reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calculations based on measurements in a critical assembly, and experiments to disclose fuel element surface temperatures in case of accidents like stopping of primary coolant flow during full power operation, have shown that the power of the swimming pool type research reactor FRG-2 (15 MW, operating since 1967) might be raised to 21 MW within the present rules of science and technology, without major alterations of the pool buildings and the cooling systems. A backfitting program is carried through to adjust the reactor control systems of FRG-2 and FRG-1 (5 MW, housed in the same reactor hall) to the present safety rules and recommendations, to ensure FRG-2 operation at 21 MW for the next decade. (author)

  20. MERCHANT MARINE SHIP REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumm, J.F.; North, D.C. Jr.; Rock, H.R.; Geston, D.K.

    1961-05-01

    A nuclear reactor is described for use in a merchant marine ship. The reactor is of pressurized light water cooled and moderated design in which three passes of the water through the core in successive regions of low, intermediate, and high heat generation and downflow in a fuel region are made. The foregoing design makes a compact reactor construction with extended core life. The core has an egg-crate lattice containing the fuel elements confined between a lower flow baffle and upper grid plate, with the latter serving also as part of a turn- around manifold from which the entire coolant is distributed into the outer fuel elements for the second pass through the core. The inner fuel elements are cooled in the third pass.

  1. Safety systems of heavy water reactors and small power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After introductional descriptions of heavy water reactors and natural circulation boiling water reactors the safety philosophy and safety systems like ECCS, residual heat removal, protection systems etc., are described. (RW)

  2. Study of future reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Today, more than 420 large reactors with a gross output of close to 350 GWe supply 20 percent of world electricity needs, accounting for less than 5 percent of primary energy consumption. These figures are not expected to change in the near future, due to suspended reactor construction in many countries. Nevertheless, world energy needs continue to grow: the planet's population already exceeds five billion and is forecast to reach ten billion by the middle of the next century. Most less developed countries have a very low rate of energy consumption and, even though some savings can be made in industrialized countries, it will become increasingly difficult to satisfy needs using fossil fuels only. Furthermore, there has been no recent breakthrough in the energy landscape. The physical feasibility of the other great hope of nuclear energy, fusion, has yet to be proved; once this has been done, it will be necessary to solve technological problems and to assess economic viability. Although it is more ever necessary to pursue fusion programs, there is little likelihood of industrial applications being achieved in the coming decades. Coal and fission are the only ways to produce massive amounts of energy for the next century. Coal must overcome the pollution problems inherent in its use; fission nuclear power has to gain better public acceptance, which is obviously colored by safety and waste concerns. Most existing reactors were commissioned in the 1970s; reactor lifetime is a parameter that has not been clearly established. It will certainly be possible to refurbish some to extend their operation beyond the initial target of 30 or 40 years. But normal advances in technology and safety requirements will make the operation of the oldest reactors increasingly difficult. It becomes necessary to develop new generations of nuclear reactors, both to replace older ones and to revive plant construction in their countries that are not yet equipped or that have halted their

  3. AREVA's nuclear reactors portfolio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A reasonable assumption for the estimated new build market for the next 25 years is over 340 GWe net. The number of prospect countries is growing almost each day. To address this new build market, AREVA is developing a comprehensive portfolio of reactors intended to meet a wide range of power requirements and of technology choices. The EPR reactor is the flagship of the fleet. Intended for large power requirements, the four first EPRs are being built in Finland, France and China. Other countries and customers are in view, citing just two examples: the Usa where the U.S. EPR has been selected as the technology of choice by several U.S utilities; and the United Kingdom where the Generic Design Acceptance process of the EPR design submitted by AREVA and EDF is well under way, and where there is a strong will to have a plant on line in 2017. For medium power ranges, the AREVA portfolio includes a boiling water reactor and a pressurized water reactor which both offer all of the advantages of an advanced plant design, with excellent safety performance and competitive power generation cost: -) KERENA (1250+ MWe), developed in collaboration with several European utilities, and in particular with Eon; -) ATMEA 1 (1100+ MWe), a 3-loop evolutionary PWR which is being developed by AREVA and Mitsubishi. AREVA is also preparing the future and is deeply involved into Gen IV concepts. It has developed the ANTARES modular HTR reactor (pre-conceptual design completed) and is building upon its vast Sodium Fast Reactor experience to take part into the development of the next prototype. (author)

  4. Operating US power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This update, which appears regularly in each issue of Nuclear Safety, surveys the operations of those power reactors in the US which have been issued operating licenses. Table 1 shows the number of such reactors and their net capacities as of Dec. 31, 1986, the end of the three-month period covered in this report. Table 2 lists the unit capacity and forced outage rate for each licensed reactor for each of the three months (October, November, and December 1986) covered in this report and the cumulative values of these parameters since the beginning of commercial operation. They are defined as follows: In addition to the tabular data, this article discusses significant occurrences and developments that affected licensed US power reactors during this reporting period. It includes, but is not limited to, changes in operating status, regulatory actions and decisions, and legal actions involving the status of power reactors. We do not have space here for routine problems of operation and maintenance, but such information is available at the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Public Document Room, 1717 H Street, NW, Washington, DC 20555. Some significant operating events are summarized elsewhere in this section in the article ''Selected Safety-Related Events,'' and a report on activities relating to facilities still in the construction process is given in the article ''Status of Power-Reactor Projects Undergoing Licensing Review'' in the last section of each issue of this journal. The reader's attention is also called to the regular feature ''General Administrative Activities,'' which deals with more general aspects of regulatory and legal matters that are not covered elsewhere in the journal

  5. Oscillatory flow chemical reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavnić Danijela S.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Global market competition, increase in energy and other production costs, demands for high quality products and reduction of waste are forcing pharmaceutical, fine chemicals and biochemical industries, to search for radical solutions. One of the most effective ways to improve the overall production (cost reduction and better control of reactions is a transition from batch to continuous processes. However, the reactions of interests for the mentioned industry sectors are often slow, thus continuous tubular reactors would be impractically long for flow regimes which provide sufficient heat and mass transfer and narrow residence time distribution. The oscillatory flow reactors (OFR are newer type of tube reactors which can offer solution by providing continuous operation with approximately plug flow pattern, low shear stress rates and enhanced mass and heat transfer. These benefits are the result of very good mixing in OFR achieved by vortex generation. OFR consists of cylindrical tube containing equally spaced orifice baffles. Fluid oscillations are superimposed on a net (laminar flow. Eddies are generated when oscillating fluid collides with baffles and passes through orifices. Generation and propagation of vortices create uniform mixing in each reactor cavity (between baffles, providing an overall flow pattern which is close to plug flow. Oscillations can be created by direct action of a piston or a diaphragm on fluid (or alternatively on baffles. This article provides an overview of oscillatory flow reactor technology, its operating principles and basic design and scale - up characteristics. Further, the article reviews the key research findings in heat and mass transfer, shear stress, residence time distribution in OFR, presenting their advantages over the conventional reactors. Finally, relevant process intensification examples from pharmaceutical, polymer and biofuels industries are presented.

  6. Nuclear reactor simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Reactor Simulator was projected to help the basic training in the formation of the Nuclear Power Plants operators. It gives the trainee the opportunity to see the nuclear reactor dynamics. It's specially indicated to be used as the support tool to NPPT (Nuclear Power Preparatory Training) from NUS Corporation. The software was developed to Intel platform (80 x 86, Pentium and compatible ones) working under the Windows operational system from Microsoft. The program language used in development was Object Pascal and the compiler used was Delphi from Borland. During the development, computer algorithms were used, based in numeric methods, to the resolution of the differential equations involved in the process. (author)

  7. Experimental reactor physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutronic experiments in moderators, subcritical assemblies, critical assemblies, and nuclear reactors are described, as well as the techniques of radiation measurements necessary to perform these experiments. Previously dispersed data from government reports, journal articles, and specialized monographs are codified. Original information drawn from the author's experience is included, especially on the pulsed source technique, spectrum measurements, research reactors, and exponential assemblies. The book provides the essential information for carrying out, analyzing, and understanding the experiments. Theory is kept to a minimum. Emphasis is placed on the physics of the situation, and the importance of estimating error as well as the mean value of a measured quantity

  8. Diagnostics for hybrid reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hybrid Reactor(HR) can be considered an attractive actinide-burner or a fusion assisted transmutation for destruction of transuranic(TRU) nuclear waste. The hybrid reactor has two important subsystems: the tokamak neutron source and the blanket which includes a fuel zone where the TRU are placed and a tritium breeding zone. The diagnostic system for a HR must be as simple and robust as possible to monitor and control the plasma scenario, guarantee the protection of the machine and monitor the transmutation.

  9. Perspectives on reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) maintains a technical training center at Chattanooga, Tennessee to provide appropriate training to both new and experienced NRC employees. This document describes a one-week course in reactor, safety concepts. The course consists of five modules: (1) historical perspective; (2) accident sequences; (3) accident progression in the reactor vessel; (4) containment characteristics and design bases; and (5) source terms and offsite consequences. The course text is accompanied by slides and videos during the actual presentation of the course

  10. Clinch River Breeder Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mr. Baron says the administration's effort to terminate the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) project is symptomatic; they have also placed restrictions on fusion, coal, solar, and other areas of energy development in which technological advances are held back in order to force conservation. Because the breeder reactor, unlike solar and fusion energy, is both economically and technically feasible, a demonstration plant is needed. The contentions that the CRBR design is obsolete, that its proposed size is inappropriate, or that plutonium can be diverted for weapons proliferation are argued to be invalid. Failure to complete the CRBR will have both economic and national security repercussions

  11. Netherlands Interuniversity Reactor Institut

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the annual report of the Interuniversity Reactor Institute in the Netherlands for the Academic Year 1977-78. Activities of the general committee, the daily committee and the scientific advice board are presented. Detailed reports of the scientific studies performed are given under five subjects - radiation physics, reactor physics, radiation chemistry, radiochemistry and radiation hygiene and dosimetry. Summarised reports of the various industrial groups are also presented. Training and education, publications and reports, courses, visits and cooperation with other institutes in the area of scientific research are mentioned. (C.F.)

  12. Reactor Materials Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The activities of SCK-CEN's Reactor Materials Research Department for 2001 are summarised. The objectives of the department are: (1) to evaluate the integrity and behaviour of structural materials used in nuclear power industry; (2) to conduct research to unravel and understand the parameters that determine the material behaviour under or after irradiation; (3) to contribute to the interpretation, the modelling of the material behaviour and to develop and assess strategies for optimum life management of nuclear power plant components. The programmes within the department are focussed on studies concerning (1) Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC); (2) nuclear fuel; and (3) Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel

  13. Perspectives on reactor safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haskin, F.E. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering; Camp, A.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-03-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) maintains a technical training center at Chattanooga, Tennessee to provide appropriate training to both new and experienced NRC employees. This document describes a one-week course in reactor, safety concepts. The course consists of five modules: (1) historical perspective; (2) accident sequences; (3) accident progression in the reactor vessel; (4) containment characteristics and design bases; and (5) source terms and offsite consequences. The course text is accompanied by slides and videos during the actual presentation of the course.

  14. Reactor neutron dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analysis of requirements and possibilities for experimental neutron spectrum determination during the reactor pressure vessel surveil lance programme is given. Fast neutron spectrum and neutron dose rate were measured in the Fast neutron irradiation facility of our TRIGA reactor. It was shown that the facility can be used for calibration of neutron dosimeters and for irradiation of samples sensitive to neutron radiation. The investigation of the unfolding algorithm ITER was continued. Based on this investigations are two specialized unfolding program packages ITERAD and ITERGS written this year. They are able to unfold data from activation detectors and NaI(T1) gamma spectrometer respectively

  15. Decay of reactor neutrinos

    OpenAIRE

    Vogel, P.

    1984-01-01

    We consider the decay of massive neutrinos which couple to electrons and are, therefore, produced in nuclear reactors. Lifetime limits for the γ and electron-positron decay modes of these neutrinos are deduced from the experimental limit on the singles count rate in the detector used to study neutrino oscillations at the Gösgen reactor. The dominantly coupled neutrinos are light, and their invariant-lifetime limit tc.m. / mν is 1-3 sec/eV. The subdominantly coupled heavy neutrinos with mass 1...

  16. Small mirror fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basic requirements for the pilot plants are that they produce a net product and that they have a potential for commercial upgrade. We have investigated a small standard mirror fusion-fission hybrid, a two-component tandem mirror hybrid, and two versions of a field-reversed mirror fusion reactor--one a steady state, single cell reactor with a neutral beam-sustained plasma, the other a moving ring field-reversed mirror where the plasma passes through a reaction chamber with no energy addition

  17. Reactor Materials Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Walle, E

    2002-04-01

    The activities of SCK-CEN's Reactor Materials Research Department for 2001 are summarised. The objectives of the department are: (1) to evaluate the integrity and behaviour of structural materials used in nuclear power industry; (2) to conduct research to unravel and understand the parameters that determine the material behaviour under or after irradiation; (3) to contribute to the interpretation, the modelling of the material behaviour and to develop and assess strategies for optimum life management of nuclear power plant components. The programmes within the department are focussed on studies concerning (1) Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC); (2) nuclear fuel; and (3) Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel.

  18. Nuclear reactor constructions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nuclear reactor construction comprising a reactor core submerged in a pool of liquid metal coolant in a primary vessel which is suspended from the roof structure of a containment vault. Control rods supported from the roof structure are insertable in the core which is carried on a support structure from the wall of the primary vessel. To prevent excessive relaxation of the support structure whereby the control rods would be displaced relative to the core, the support structure incorporates a normally inactive secondary structure designed to become effective in bracing the primary structure against further relaxation beyond a predetermined limit. (author)

  19. Reactor PIK construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The construction work at the 100 MW researches reactor PIK in year 2002 was in progress. The main activity was concentrated on mechanical, ventilation and electrical equipment. Some systems and subsystems are under adjustment. Hydraulic driving gear for beam shutters are finished in installation, rinsing, and adjusting. Regulating rods test assembling was done. On the critical assembly the first reactor fueling was tested to evaluate the starting neutron source intensity and a sufficiency of existing control and instrument board. Mainline of the PIK facility design and neutron parameters are presented. (author)

  20. Reactor pressure vessel materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a result of the popularity of the Agencies report 'Neutron Irradiation Embrittlement of Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels' of 1975, it was decided that another report on this broad subject would be of use. In this report, background and contemporary views on specially identified areas of the subject are considered as self-contained chapters, written by experts. Chapter 3 offers a detailed treatment of the selection criteria and properties of reactor pressure vessel materials. The main attention is directed towards steel and ingot making and the subsequent material processing

  1. Reactor gamma spectrometry: status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current work is described for Compton Recoil Gamma-Ray Spectrometry including developments in experimental technique as well as recent reactor spectrometry measurements. The current status of the method is described concerning gamma spectromoetry probe design and response characteristics. Emphasis is given to gamma spectrometry work in US LWR and BR programs. Gamma spectrometry in BR environments are outlined by focussing on start-up plans for the Fast Test Reactor (FTR). Gamma spectrometry results are presented for a LWR pressure vessel mockup in the Poolside Critical Assembly (PCA) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

  2. Fusion Reactor Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SCK-CEN's research and development programme on fusion reactor materials includes: (1) the study of the mechanical behaviour of structural materials under neutron irradiation (including steels, inconel, molybdenum, chromium); (2) the determination and modelling of the characteristics of irradiated first wall materials such as beryllium; (3) the detection of abrupt electrical degradation of insulating ceramics under high temperature and neutron irradiation; (4) the study of the dismantling and waste disposal strategy for fusion reactors.; (5) a feasibility study for the testing of blanket modules under neutron radiation. Main achievements in these topical areas in the year 1999 are summarised

  3. Space-time reactor kinetics for heterogeneous reactor structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An attempt is made to formulate time dependent diffusion equation based on Feinberg-Galanin theory in the from analogue to the classical reactor kinetic equation. Parameters of these equations could be calculated using the existing codes for static reactor calculation based on the heterogeneous reactor theory. The obtained kinetic equation could be analogues in form to the nodal kinetic equation. Space-time distribution of neutron flux in the reactor can be obtained by solving these equations using standard methods

  4. Physics on your feet Berkeley graduate exam questions : or ninety minutes of shame but a PhD for the rest of your life!

    CERN Document Server

    Budker, Dmitry; Demas, Vasiliki

    2015-01-01

    Physics on Your Feet gives a collection of physics problems covering the broad range of topics in classical and modern physics that were, or could have been, asked at oral PhD exams at Berkeley. The questions are easy to formulate, but some of them can only be answered using an out-of-the-box approach. Detailed solutions are provided, from which the reader is guaranteed to learn a lot about the physicists' way of thinking. The book is also packed full of cartoons and dry humour to help take the edge off the stress and anxiety surrounding exams. This is a helpful guide to students preparing for their exams, as well as to University lecturers looking for good instructive problems. No exams are necessary to enjoy the book!

  5. Mechanical design and fabrication of the VHF-gun, the Berkeley normal-conducting continuous-wave high-brightness electron source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, R. P.; Ghiorso, W.; Staples, J.; Huang, T. M.; Sannibale, F.; Kramasz, T. D.

    2016-02-01

    A high repetition rate, MHz-class, high-brightness electron source is a key element in future high-repetition-rate x-ray free electron laser-based light sources. The VHF-gun, a novel low frequency radio-frequency gun, is the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) response to that need. The gun design is based on a normal conducting, single cell cavity resonating at 186 MHz in the VHF band and capable of continuous wave operation while still delivering the high accelerating fields at the cathode required for the high brightness performance. The VHF-gun was fabricated and successfully commissioned in the framework of the Advanced Photo-injector EXperiment, an injector built at LBNL to demonstrate the capability of the gun to deliver the required beam quality. The basis for the selection of the VHF-gun technology, novel design features, and fabrication techniques are described.

  6. Risk prevention during reactor shutdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During reactor shutdown potential risks are issued of a number of maintenance operations. In this text we analyse these operations and give the modifications of technical specifications to ameliorate the reactor safety. 4 figs

  7. New fast-reactor approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design parameters for a 1000 MW LMFBR type reactor are presented. The design requires the multiple primary coolant pumps and heat exchangers to be located around the core within the reactor vessel

  8. Reactor Engineering Department annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research and development activities in the Department of Reactor Engineering in fiscal 1982 are described. The work of the Department is closely related to development of multipurpose Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor and Fusion Reactor, and development of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor carried out by Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. Since fiscal 1982, Systematic research and development work on safeguards technology has been added to the activities of the Department. Contents of the report are achievements in fields such as nuclear data and group constants, theoretical method and code development, integral experiment and analysis, fusion neutronics, shielding, reactor and nuclear instrumentation, reactor control and diagnosis, and safeguards technology, and activities of the Committee on Reactor Physics. (author)

  9. Reactor operation environmental information document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haselow, J.S.; Price, V.; Stephenson, D.E.; Bledsoe, H.W.; Looney, B.B.

    1989-12-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) produces nuclear materials, primarily plutonium and tritium, to meet the requirements of the Department of Defense. These products have been formed in nuclear reactors that were built during 1950--1955 at the SRS. K, L, and P reactors are three of five reactors that have been used in the past to produce the nuclear materials. All three of these reactors discontinued operation in 1988. Currently, intense efforts are being extended to prepare these three reactors for restart in a manner that protects human health and the environment. To document that restarting the reactors will have minimal impacts to human health and the environment, a three-volume Reactor Operations Environmental Impact Document has been prepared. The document focuses on the impacts of restarting the K, L, and P reactors on both the SRS and surrounding areas. This volume discusses the geology, seismology, and subsurface hydrology. 195 refs., 101 figs., 16 tabs.

  10. Operating reactors licensing actions summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Operating Reactors Licensing Actions Summary is designed to provide the management of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with an overview of licensing actions dealing with operating power and nonpower reactors

  11. High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The HFIR at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is a light-water cooled and moderated reactor that is the United States’ highest flux reactor-based neutron source. HFIR...

  12. The IR-8 reactor operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryazantsev, E.P.; Egorenkov, P.M.; Yashin, A.F. [Reactor Technology and Materials Research Inst. of RRC ' KI' , Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1997-07-01

    At the Russian Research Center 'Kurchatov Institute' (RRC 'KI') the IR-8 reactor commissioning was carried out in 1981. The reactor was developed in return for earlier existing at RRC 'KI' of the IRT-M reactor (modernized IRT reactor, constructed in 1957). The IRT-M reactor was used for investigations in nuclear physics, solid state physics, radiation chemistry, biology as well as to produce isotopes. Under developing the IR-8 reactor the IRT biological shielding with beam tubes and its process systems were used. The IR-8 reactor creation was founded on application developed by then new fuel assemblies (FA) of IRT-3M type, having two times as great surface of heat transfer and 1.75 times higher U-235 load than the FA of the IRT-2M type, which were used in IRT-M reactor. (author)

  13. Power calibrations for TRIGA reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this paper is to establish a framework for the calorimetric power calibration of TRIGA reactors so that reliable results can be obtained with a precision better than ± 5%. Careful application of the same procedures has produced power calibration results that have been reproducible to ± 1.5%. The procedures are equally applicable to the Mark I, Mark II and Mark III reactors as well as to reactors having much larger reactor tanks and to TRIGA reactors capable of forced cooling up to 3 MW in some cases and 15 MW in another case. In the case of forced cooled TRIGA reactors, the calorimetric power calibration is applicable in the natural convection mode for these reactors using exactly the same procedures as are discussed below for the smaller TRIGA reactors (< 2 MW)

  14. Reactor operation safety information document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    The report contains a reactor facility description which includes K, P, and L reactor sites, structures, operating systems, engineered safety systems, support systems, and process and effluent monitoring systems; an accident analysis section which includes cooling system anomalies, radioactive materials releases, and anticipated transients without scram; a summary of onsite doses from design basis accidents; severe accident analysis (reactor core disruption); a description of operating contractor organization and emergency planning; and a summary of reactor safety evolution. (MB)

  15. Reactor safety in Eastern Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The papers presented to the GRS colloquium refer to the cooperative activities for reactor accident analysis and modification of the GRS computer codes for their application to reactors of the Russian design types of WWER or RBMK. Another topic is the safety of RBMK reactors in particular, and the current status of investigations and studies addressing the containment of unit 4 of the Chernobyl reactor station. All papers are indexed separately in report GRS--117. (HP)

  16. VVER and RBMK reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The safety of VVER and RBMK reactors has been discussed a lot after Chernobyl accident. Some improvements have been performed since that especially in RBMK-reactors and extensive programmes for backfitting have been planned and are partly underway. There are two different sizes of VVER reactors, 440 MW and 1000 MW. The design bases and designs itself vary inside the family of two size classes depending on the age of the plant. The oldest VVER-440 is called model 230 and the newest model 213. The oldest VVER-1000 units (two units) are prototypes that have some unique, nonfavorable features. The next stage of VVER-1000 developement (three units) is model V-302 and the remaining 15 plants in operation are model V-320, but even within this latest model there are some differences. The design bases and designs vary also inside the family of the RBMK reactors exactly the same way as in VVERs. The most important design bases of nuclear power plants designed in the former Soviet Union is presented in this paper. Also some safety advantages and disadvantages of these NPPs are discussed. (au). (5 figs.)

  17. Thermal Reactor Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-06-01

    Information is presented concerning fire risk and protection; transient thermal-hydraulic analysis and experiments; class 9 accidents and containment; diagnostics and in-service inspection; risk and cost comparison of alternative electric energy sources; fuel behavior and experiments on core cooling in LOCAs; reactor event reporting analysis; equipment qualification; post facts analysis of the TMI-2 accident; and computational methods.

  18. Studies on reactor physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most of the peaceful applications of atomic energy are inherently dependent on advances in the science and technology of nuclear reactors, and aspects of this development are part of a major programme of the International Atomic Energy Agency. The most useful role that the Agency can play is as a co-ordinating body or central forum where the trends can be reviewed and the results assessed. Some of the basic studies are carried out by members of the Agency's own scientific staff. The Agency also convenes groups of experts from different countries to examine a particular problem in detail and make any necessary recommendations. Some of the important subjects are discussed at international scientific meetings held by the Agency. One of the subjects covered by such studies is the physics of nuclear reactors and a specific topic recently discussed was Codes for Reactor Computations, on which a seminar was held in Vienna in April this year. Another The members of the Panel described the development of heavy water reactors, the equipment and methods of research currently used, and plans for further development in their respective countries meeting of Panel of Experts on Heavy Water Lattices was held in Vienna in August 1959

  19. Nuclear power reactor physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this book is to explain the physical working conditions of nuclear reactors for the benefit of non-specialized engineers and engineering students. One of the leading ideas of this course is to distinguish between two fundamentally different concepts: - a science which could be called neutrodynamics (as distinct from neutron physics which covers the knowledge of the neutron considered as an elementary particle and the study of its interactions with nuclei); the aim of this science is to study the interaction of the neutron gas with real material media; the introduction will however be restricted to its simplified expression, the theory and equation of diffusion; - a special application: reactor physics, which is introduced when the diffusing and absorbing material medium is also multiplying. For this reason the chapter on fission is used to introduce this section. In practice the section on reactor physics is much longer than that devoted to neutrodynamics and it is developed in what seemed to be the most relevant direction: nuclear power reactors. Every effort was made to meet the following three requirements: to define the physical bases of neutron interaction with different materials, to give a correct mathematical treatment within the limit of necessary simplifying hypotheses clearly explained; to propose, whenever possible, numerical applications in order to fix orders of magnitude

  20. Nuclear Reactors and Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cason, D.L.; Hicks, S.C. [eds.

    1992-01-01

    This publication Nuclear Reactors and Technology (NRT) announces on a monthly basis the current worldwide information available from the open literature on nuclear reactors and technology, including all aspects of power reactors, components and accessories, fuel elements, control systems, and materials. This publication contains the abstracts of DOE reports, journal articles, conference papers, patents, theses, and monographs added to the Energy Science and Technology Database during the past month. Also included are US information obtained through acquisition programs or interagency agreements and international information obtained through the International Energy Agency`s Energy Technology Data Exchange or government-to-government agreements. The digests in NRT and other citations to information on nuclear reactors back to 1948 are available for online searching and retrieval on the Energy Science and Technology Database and Nuclear Science Abstracts (NSA) database. Current information, added daily to the Energy Science and Technology Database, is available to DOE and its contractors through the DOE Integrated Technical Information System. Customized profiles can be developed to provide current information to meet each user`s needs.

  1. Thermal Reactor Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Information is presented concerning fire risk and protection; transient thermal-hydraulic analysis and experiments; class 9 accidents and containment; diagnostics and in-service inspection; risk and cost comparison of alternative electric energy sources; fuel behavior and experiments on core cooling in LOCAs; reactor event reporting analysis; equipment qualification; post facts analysis of the TMI-2 accident; and computational methods

  2. Nuclear reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a container of a BWR type reactor, spray water is stored in a pedestal cavity. A perforated hole is formed on the side wall of the pedestal, and a stirrer is disposed in the pedestal cavity to stir the stored spray water. During reactor operation, the door on the side wall of the pedestal is closed to prevent discharge of fission products to the dry well when a severe accident should occur. During periodical inspection for the plant, the door is opened to enable an operator to access to the inside of the pedestal. When a molten reactor core should drop to the pedestal cavity, fission products generated from the failed reactor core left in a pressure vessel pass through the spray water in the pedestal cavity. Then, most of the fission products are held in the spray water by a scrubbing effect when they pass through the spray water. In addition, the stored spray water is stirred by the stirrer to enhance the scrubbing effect thereby enabling to further decrease the amount of the fission products discharged to the dry well. (N.H.)

  3. ICF tritium production reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conceptual design of an ICF tritium production reactor is described. The chamber design uses a beryllium multiplier and a liquid lithium breeder to achieve a tritium breeding ratio of 2.08. The annual net tritium production of this 532 MW/sub t/ plant is 16.9 kg, and the estimated cost of tritium is $8100/g

  4. Fusion reactor materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    1989-01-01

    This paper discuses the following topics on fusion reactor materials: irradiation, facilities, test matrices, and experimental methods; dosimetry, damage parameters, and activation calculations; materials engineering and design requirements; fundamental mechanical behavior; radiation effects; development of structural alloys; solid breeding materials; and ceramics.

  5. Nuclear reactor building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Perng-Fei; Townsend, Harold E.; Barbanti, Giancarlo

    1994-01-01

    A reactor building for enclosing a nuclear reactor includes a containment vessel having a wetwell disposed therein. The wetwell includes inner and outer walls, a floor, and a roof defining a wetwell pool and a suppression chamber disposed thereabove. The wetwell and containment vessel define a drywell surrounding the reactor. A plurality of vents are disposed in the wetwell pool in flow communication with the drywell for channeling into the wetwell pool steam released in the drywell from the reactor during a LOCA for example, for condensing the steam. A shell is disposed inside the wetwell and extends into the wetwell pool to define a dry gap devoid of wetwell water and disposed in flow communication with the suppression chamber. In a preferred embodiment, the wetwell roof is in the form of a slab disposed on spaced apart support beams which define therebetween an auxiliary chamber. The dry gap, and additionally the auxiliary chamber, provide increased volume to the suppression chamber for improving pressure margin.

  6. Nuclear reactor constructions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method of constructing a radiation shielding plug for use in the roof of the coolant containment vault of liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactors is described. The construction allows relative movement of that part of service cables and pipes which are carried by the fixed roof and that part which is carried by the rotatable plug. (U.K.)

  7. Fast reactor programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This progress report summarizes the fast reactor research carried out by ECN during the period covering the year 1980. This research is mainly concerned with the cores of sodium-cooled breeders, in particular the SNR-300, and its related safety aspects. It comprises six items: A programme to determine relevant nuclear data of fission- and corrosion-products; A fuel performance programme comprising in-pile cladding failure experiments and a study of the consequences of loss-of-cooling and overpower; Basic research on fuel; Investigation of the changes in the mechanical properties of austenitic stainless steel DIN 1.4948 due to fast neutron doses, this material has been used in the manufacture of the reactor vessel and its internal components; Study of aerosols which could be formed at the time of a fast reactor accident and their progressive behaviour on leaking through cracks in the concrete containment; Studies on heat transfer in a sodium-cooled fast reactor core. As fast breeders operate at high power densities, an accurate knowledge of the heat transfer phenomena under single-phase and two-phase conditions is sought. (Auth.)

  8. Fusion reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN, activities related to fusion focus on environmental tolerance of opto-electronic components. The objective of this program is to contribute to the knowledge on the behaviour, during and after neutron irradiation, of fusion-reactor materials and components. The main scientific activities for 1997 are summarized

  9. Reactors. Nuclear propulsion ships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article has for object the development of nuclear-powered ships and the conception of the nuclear-powered ship. The technology of the naval propulsion P.W.R. type reactor is described in the article B.N.3 141 'Nuclear Boilers ships'. (N.C.)

  10. Cermet fuel reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowan, C.L.; Palmer, R.S.; Van Hoomissen, J.E.; Bhattacharyya, S.K.; Barner, J.O.

    1987-09-01

    Cermet fueled nuclear reactors are attractive candidates for high performance space power systems. The cermet fuel consists of tungsten-urania hexagonal fuel blocks characterized by high strength at elevated temperatures, a high thermal conductivity and resultant high thermal shock resistance. Key features of the cermet fueled reactor design are (1) the ability to achieve very high coolant exit temperatures, and (2) thermal shock resistance during rapid power changes, and (3) two barriers to fission product release - the cermet matrix and the fuel element cladding. Additionally, thre is a potential for achieving a long operating life because of (1) the neutronic insensitivity of the fast-spectrum core to the buildup of fission products and (2) the utilization of a high strength refractory metal matrix and structural materials. These materials also provide resistance against compression forces that potentially might compact and/or reconfigure the core. In addition, the neutronic properties of the refractory materials assure that the reactor remains substantially subcritical under conditions of water immersion. It is concluded that cermet fueled reactors can be utilized to meet the power requirements for a broad range of advanced space applications. 4 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Cermet fuel reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cermet fueled nuclear reactors are attractive candidates for high performance space power systems. The cermet fuel consists of tungsten-urania hexagonal fuel blocks characterized by high strength at elevated temperatures, a high thermal conductivity and resultant high thermal shock resistance. Key features of the cermet fueled reactor design are (1) the ability to achieve very high coolant exit temperatures, and (2) thermal shock resistance during rapid power changes, and (3) two barriers to fission product release - the cermet matrix and the fuel element cladding. Additionally, thre is a potential for achieving a long operating life because of (1) the neutronic insensitivity of the fast-spectrum core to the buildup of fission products and (2) the utilization of a high strength refractory metal matrix and structural materials. These materials also provide resistance against compression forces that potentially might compact and/or reconfigure the core. In addition, the neutronic properties of the refractory materials assure that the reactor remains substantially subcritical under conditions of water immersion. It is concluded that cermet fueled reactors can be utilized to meet the power requirements for a broad range of advanced space applications. 4 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  12. Integral Fast Reactor Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes highlights of the technical progress made in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) Program in FY 1992. Technical accomplishments are presented in the following areas of the IFR technology development activities: (1) metal fuel performance, (2) pyroprocess development, (3) safety experiments and analyses, (4) core design development, (5) fuel cycle demonstration, and (6) LMR technology R ampersand D

  13. Stabilized Spheromak Fusion Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, T

    2007-04-03

    The U.S. fusion energy program is focused on research with the potential for studying plasmas at thermonuclear temperatures, currently epitomized by the tokamak-based International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) but also continuing exploratory work on other plasma confinement concepts. Among the latter is the spheromak pursued on the SSPX facility at LLNL. Experiments in SSPX using electrostatic current drive by coaxial guns have now demonstrated stable spheromaks with good heat confinement, if the plasma is maintained near a Taylor state, but the anticipated high current amplification by gun injection has not yet been achieved. In future experiments and reactors, creating and maintaining a stable spheromak configuration at high magnetic field strength may require auxiliary current drive using neutral beams or RF power. Here we show that neutral beam current drive soon to be explored on SSPX could yield a compact spheromak reactor with current drive efficiency comparable to that of steady state tokamaks. Thus, while more will be learned about electrostatic current drive in coming months, results already achieved in SSPX could point to a productive parallel development path pursuing auxiliary current drive, consistent with plans to install neutral beams on SSPX in the near future. Among possible outcomes, spheromak research could also yield pulsed fusion reactors at lower capital cost than any fusion concept yet proposed.

  14. SRP reactor safety evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Savannah River Plant reactors have operated for over 100 reactor years without an incident of significant consequence to on or off-site personnel. The reactor safety posture incorporates a conservative, failure-tolerant design; extensive administrative controls carried out through detailed operating and emergency written procedures; and multiple engineered safety systems backed by comprehensive safety analyses, adapting through the years as operating experience, changes in reactor operational modes, equipment modernization, and experience in the nuclear power industry suggested. Independent technical reviews and audits as well as a strong organizational structure also contribute to the defense-in-depth safety posture. A complete review of safety history would discuss all of the above contributors and the interplay of roles. This report, however, is limited to evolution of the engineered safety features and some of the supporting analyses. The discussion of safety history is divided into finite periods of operating history for preservation of historical perspective and ease of understanding by the reader. Programs in progress are also included. The accident at Three Mile Island was assessed for its safety implications to SRP operation. Resulting recommendations and their current status are discussed separately at the end of the report. 16 refs., 3 figs

  15. Fusion reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discuses the following topics on fusion reactor materials: irradiation, facilities, test matrices, and experimental methods; dosimetry, damage parameters, and activation calculations; materials engineering and design requirements; fundamental mechanical behavior; radiation effects; development of structural alloys; solid breeding materials; and ceramics

  16. Department of reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The activities of the Department of Reactor Technology at Risoe during 1980 are described. The work is presented in three chapters: General Information on the Department, Summary of the Department's Development during 1980, and Activities of the Department. Lists of staff, publications, computer programs, and test facilities are included. (author)

  17. The AP1000 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design of the AP1000 reactor began 20 years ago when Westinghouse launched the AP600 reactor project. In fact by re-assessing AP600's safety margins Westinghouse realized that the its power output could be raised without putting at risk its safety standard. The AP1000 was born, it yields 1100 MWe. The main AP1000's design features is its passive safety (particularly after the Fukushima accident) and its modularity. The passive safety of the AP1000 implies: -) no humane intervention needed for 72 hours at least after the incident; -) no necessity for redundant complex safety systems. The modularity means that the plant, the reactor and other buildings are constructed from a choice of 300 modular units. These units can be built off-site and fit together on site. The modularity allows more construction activities to be led simultaneously and more chances to cope with the construction schedule. The NRC has approved the operation license for 30 years of the first AP1000 being built in the Usa (Vogtle plant in Georgia). 4 AP1000 are being built in China (Sanmen and Haiyang sites) and 6 others are planned in the Usa. Westinghouse is convinced that the AP1000's passive safety makes it more attractive. Let us not forget that Westinghouse was at the origin of the concept of pressurized water reactors, an idea adopted for half the nuclear power stations in the world and for all the plants now active in France. (A.C.)

  18. Fast reactor programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This progress report summarises the fast reactor research carried out at the Netherlands Energy Research Centre during the year 1981. The neutron and fission product cross sections of various isotopes have been evaluated. In the fuel performance programme, some preliminary results are given and irradiation facilities described. Creep experiments on various stainless steel components are reported

  19. Pressure tube type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heretofore, a pressure tube type reactor has a problem in that the evaluation for the reactor core performance is complicate and no sufficient consideration is made for the economical property, to increase the size of a calandria tank and make the cost expensive. Then, in the present invention, the inner diameter of a pressure tube is set to greater than 50% of the lattice gap in a square lattice like arrangement, and the difference between the inner and the outer diameters of the calandria tube is set smaller than 20% of the lattice gap. Further, the inner diameter of the pressure tube is set to greater than 40% and the difference between the inner and the outer diameters of the calandria tube is set smaller than 30% of the lattice gap in a triangle lattice arrangement. Then, heavy water-to-fuel volume ratio can be determined appropriately and the value for the coolant void coefficient is made more negative side, to improve the self controllability inherent to the reactor. In particular, when 72 to 90 fuel rods are arranged per one pressure tube, the power density per one fuel rod is can be increased by about twice. Accordingly, the number of the pressure tubes can be reduced about to one-half, thereby enabling to remarkably decrease the diameter of the reactor core and to reduce the size of the calandria, which is economical. (N.H.)

  20. TRIGA reactor characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The general design, characteristics and parameters of TRIGA reactors and fuel are described. This is a training module with the learning objectives: to understand the basics of the physics and mechanical design of the TRIGA fuel as well as its unique operational characteristics and realize the differences between TRIGA fuels and other more traditional. 10 figs., 6 tabs. (nevyjel)