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Sample records for berkeley drosophila transcription

  1. Detecting novel low-abundant transcripts in Drosophila

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Sanggyu; Bao, Jingyue; Zhou, Guolin

    2005-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that low-abundant transcripts may play fundamental roles in biological processes. In an attempt to estimate the prevalence of low-abundant transcripts in eukaryotic genomes, we performed a transcriptome analysis in Drosophila using the SAGE technique. We collected 244......,313 SAGE tags from transcripts expressed in Drosophila embryonic, larval, pupae, adult, and testicular tissue. From these SAGE tags, we identified 40,823 unique SAGE tags. Our analysis showed that 55% of the 40,823 unique SAGE tags are novel without matches in currently known Drosophila transcripts...... in the Drosophila genome. Our study reveals the presence of a significant number of novel low-abundant transcripts in Drosophila, and highlights the need to isolate these novel low-abundant transcripts for further biological studies. Udgivelsesdato: 2005-Jun...

  2. Transcriptional regulation of Drosophila gonad formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathy, Ratna; Kunwar, Prabhat S; Sano, Hiroko; Renault, Andrew D

    2014-08-15

    The formation of the Drosophila embryonic gonad, involving the fusion of clusters of somatic gonadal precursor cells (SGPs) and their ensheathment of germ cells, provides a simple and genetically tractable model for the interplay between cells during organ formation. In a screen for mutants affecting gonad formation we identified a SGP cell autonomous role for Midline (Mid) and Longitudinals lacking (Lola). These transcriptional factors are required for multiple aspects of SGP behaviour including SGP cluster fusion, germ cell ensheathment and gonad compaction. The lola locus encodes more than 25 differentially spliced isoforms and we have identified an isoform specific requirement for lola in the gonad which is distinct from that in nervous system development. Mid and Lola work in parallel in gonad formation and surprisingly Mid overexpression in a lola background leads to additional SGPs at the expense of fat body cells. Our findings support the idea that although the transcription factors required by SGPs can ostensibly be assigned to those being required for either SGP specification or behaviour, they can also interact to impinge on both processes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The Drosophila Helicase MLE Targets Hairpin Structures in Genomic Transcripts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Cugusi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available RNA hairpins are a common type of secondary structures that play a role in every aspect of RNA biochemistry including RNA editing, mRNA stability, localization and translation of transcripts, and in the activation of the RNA interference (RNAi and microRNA (miRNA pathways. Participation in these functions often requires restructuring the RNA molecules by the association of single-strand (ss RNA-binding proteins or by the action of helicases. The Drosophila MLE helicase has long been identified as a member of the MSL complex responsible for dosage compensation. The complex includes one of two long non-coding RNAs and MLE was shown to remodel the roX RNA hairpin structures in order to initiate assembly of the complex. Here we report that this function of MLE may apply to the hairpins present in the primary RNA transcripts that generate the small molecules responsible for RNA interference. Using stocks from the Transgenic RNAi Project and the Vienna Drosophila Research Center, we show that MLE specifically targets hairpin RNAs at their site of transcription. The association of MLE at these sites is independent of sequence and chromosome location. We use two functional assays to test the biological relevance of this association and determine that MLE participates in the RNAi pathway.

  4. X chromosome dosage compensation via enhanced transcriptional elongation in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larschan, Erica; Bishop, Eric P; Kharchenko, Peter V; Core, Leighton J; Lis, John T; Park, Peter J; Kuroda, Mitzi I

    2011-03-03

    The evolution of sex chromosomes has resulted in numerous species in which females inherit two X chromosomes but males have a single X, thus requiring dosage compensation. MSL (Male-specific lethal) complex increases transcription on the single X chromosome of Drosophila males to equalize expression of X-linked genes between the sexes. The biochemical mechanisms used for dosage compensation must function over a wide dynamic range of transcription levels and differential expression patterns. It has been proposed that the MSL complex regulates transcriptional elongation to control dosage compensation, a model subsequently supported by mapping of the MSL complex and MSL-dependent histone 4 lysine 16 acetylation to the bodies of X-linked genes in males, with a bias towards 3' ends. However, experimental analysis of MSL function at the mechanistic level has been challenging owing to the small magnitude of the chromosome-wide effect and the lack of an in vitro system for biochemical analysis. Here we use global run-on sequencing (GRO-seq) to examine the specific effect of the MSL complex on RNA Polymerase II (RNAP II) on a genome-wide level. Results indicate that the MSL complex enhances transcription by facilitating the progression of RNAP II across the bodies of active X-linked genes. Improving transcriptional output downstream of typical gene-specific controls may explain how dosage compensation can be imposed on the diverse set of genes along an entire chromosome.

  5. Transcriptional control in the segmentation gene network of Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark D Schroeder

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The segmentation gene network of Drosophila consists of maternal and zygotic factors that generate, by transcriptional (cross- regulation, expression patterns of increasing complexity along the anterior-posterior axis of the embryo. Using known binding site information for maternal and zygotic gap transcription factors, the computer algorithm Ahab recovers known segmentation control elements (modules with excellent success and predicts many novel modules within the network and genome-wide. We show that novel module predictions are highly enriched in the network and typically clustered proximal to the promoter, not only upstream, but also in intronic space and downstream. When placed upstream of a reporter gene, they consistently drive patterned blastoderm expression, in most cases faithfully producing one or more pattern elements of the endogenous gene. Moreover, we demonstrate for the entire set of known and newly validated modules that Ahab's prediction of binding sites correlates well with the expression patterns produced by the modules, revealing basic rules governing their composition. Specifically, we show that maternal factors consistently act as activators and that gap factors act as repressors, except for the bimodal factor Hunchback. Our data suggest a simple context-dependent rule for its switch from repressive to activating function. Overall, the composition of modules appears well fitted to the spatiotemporal distribution of their positive and negative input factors. Finally, by comparing Ahab predictions with different categories of transcription factor input, we confirm the global regulatory structure of the segmentation gene network, but find odd skipped behaving like a primary pair-rule gene. The study expands our knowledge of the segmentation gene network by increasing the number of experimentally tested modules by 50%. For the first time, the entire set of validated modules is analyzed for binding site composition under a

  6. Single molecule transcription factor dynamics in the syncytial Drosophila embryo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darzacq, Xavier

    During early development in the Drosophila embryo, cell fates are determined over the course of just 2 hours with exquisite spatio-temoral precision. One of the key regulators of this process is the transcription factor Bicoid which forms a concentration gradient across the long axis of the embryo. Although Bicoids' primary role is activation at the anterior, where concentrations are highest, it is also known to play a role in the posterior where there are only 100s of molecules per nucleus. Understanding how Bicoid can find its target at such low concentrations has remained intractable, largely due to the inability to perform single molecule imaging in the context of the developing embryo. Here we use lattice light sheet microscopy to overcome the technical barriers of sample thickness and auto-fluorescence to characterize the single molecule dynamics of Bicoid. We find that off-rates do not vary across the embryo and that instead the on-rates are modulated through the formation of clusters that enrich local concentration. This data is contrary to the current concentration dependent model of Bicoid function since local concentration within the nucleus is now a regulated parameter and suggests a previously unknown mechanism for regulation at extremely low concentrations.

  7. clockwork orange encodes a transcriptional repressor important for circadian clock amplitude in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Chunghun; Chung, Brian Y.; Pitman, Jena L.; McGill, Jermaine J.; Pradhan, Suraj; Lee, Jongbin; Keegan, Kevin P.; Choe, Joonho; Allada, Ravi

    2007-01-01

    Gene transcription is a central timekeeping process in animal clocks. In Drosophila, the basic helix-loop helix (bHLH)-PAS transcription factor heterodimer, CLOCK (CLK)/CYCLE(CYC) transcriptionally activates the clock components period (per), timeless (tim), Par domain protein 1 (Pdp1), and vrille (vri) that feedback and regulate distinct features of CLK/CYC function [1]. Microarray studies have identified numerous rhythmically expressed transcripts [2-7], some of which are potential direct C...

  8. Mood stabilizing drugs regulate transcription of immune, neuronal and metabolic pathway genes in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herteleer, L; Zwarts, L; Hens, K; Forero, D; Del-Favero, J; Callaerts, P

    2016-05-01

    Lithium and valproate (VPA) are drugs used in the management of bipolar disorder. Even though they reportedly act on various pathways, the transcriptional targets relevant for disease mechanism and therapeutic effect remain unclear. Furthermore, multiple studies used lymphoblasts of bipolar patients as a cellular proxy, but it remains unclear whether peripheral cells provide a good readout for the effects of these drugs in the brain. We used Drosophila culture cells and adult flies to analyze the transcriptional effects of lithium and VPA and define mechanistic pathways. Transcriptional profiles were determined for Drosophila S2-cells and adult fly heads following lithium or VPA treatment. Gene ontology categories were identified using the DAVID functional annotation tool with a cut-off of p neuronal development, neuronal function, and metabolism. (i) Transcriptional effects of lithium and VPA in Drosophila S2 cells and heads show significant overlap. (ii) The overlap between transcriptional alterations in peripheral versus neuronal cells at the single gene level is negligible, but at the gene ontology and pathway level considerable overlap can be found. (iii) Lithium and VPA act on evolutionarily conserved pathways in Drosophila and mammalian models.

  9. Berkeley Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1986-10-15

    To a regular observer at annual international meetings, progress in particle physics from one year to the next sometimes might seem ponderously slow. But shift the timescale and the result is startling. Opening his summary of the 1986 International Conference on High Energy Physics, held in Berkeley, California, from 16-23 July, Steve Weinberg first recalled the 1966 Conference, also held in Berkeley. Then the preoccupations were current algebra, hadron resonances and the interpretation of scattering in terms of Regge poles, and the theory of weak interactions. Physics certainly has moved.

  10. Berkeley Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    To a regular observer at annual international meetings, progress in particle physics from one year to the next sometimes might seem ponderously slow. But shift the timescale and the result is startling. Opening his summary of the 1986 International Conference on High Energy Physics, held in Berkeley, California, from 16-23 July, Steve Weinberg first recalled the 1966 Conference, also held in Berkeley. Then the preoccupations were current algebra, hadron resonances and the interpretation of scattering in terms of Regge poles, and the theory of weak interactions. Physics certainly has moved

  11. Transcripts of mobile element MDG1 during ontogenesis of Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuvakina, A.I.; Nurminskii, D.I.; Kogan, G.L.; Gvozdev, V.A.

    1989-01-01

    It has been demonstrated by Northern hybridization using a single-stranded labeled probes that the number of MDG1 transcripts as well as their size change during ontogenesis of Drosophila. The transcripts of MDG1 were not found in unfertilized eggs. The full-length transcript of MDG1 (about 7 kb long) appears in the embryonic and larval cells, and its quantity sharply increases in pupae and adults. A transcript of about 5 kb length is also found in the pupae and adults. Another, about 2 kb long transcript forms in the embryos, pupae and adults, which is absent in larvae. The main transcript in the larval cells, complementary to the inner part of the body of MDG1, is about 1 kb long. The transcription level of MDG1 and the mobile element copia do not change under heat shock at adult stage

  12. Temporal regulation of Drosophila salivary gland degeneration by the Broad-Complex transcription factors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kuchárová-Mahmood, S.; Raška, Ivan; Mechler, B. M.; Farkaš, R.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 140, - (2002), s. 67-78 ISSN 1047-8477 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA304/02/0342 Grant - others:GA-(SK) VEGA:2/7194/20 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5039906; CEZ:MSM 111100003 Keywords : programmed cell death * BR-C transcription factors * drosophila Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 4.194, year: 2002

  13. Stochastic model for gene transcription on Drosophila melanogaster embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prata, Guilherme N.; Hornos, José Eduardo M.; Ramos, Alexandre F.

    2016-02-01

    We examine immunostaining experimental data for the formation of stripe 2 of even-skipped (eve) transcripts on D. melanogaster embryos. An estimate of the factor converting immunofluorescence intensity units into molecular numbers is given. The analysis of the eve dynamics at the region of stripe 2 suggests that the promoter site of the gene has two distinct regimes: an earlier phase when it is predominantly activated until a critical time when it becomes mainly repressed. That suggests proposing a stochastic binary model for gene transcription on D. melanogaster embryos. Our model has two random variables: the transcripts number and the state of the source of mRNAs given as active or repressed. We are able to reproduce available experimental data for the average number of transcripts. An analysis of the random fluctuations on the number of eves and their consequences on the spatial precision of stripe 2 is presented. We show that the position of the anterior or posterior borders fluctuate around their average position by ˜1 % of the embryo length, which is similar to what is found experimentally. The fitting of data by such a simple model suggests that it can be useful to understand the functions of randomness during developmental processes.

  14. Gene structure of Drosophila diaphorase-1: diversity of transcripts in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The transcripts are represented at very low level in the cells of different organs and at different ..... R primers; lane 14, cDNA, prepared from deep pupae with. DIA.F4-5 and DIA. .... Published on the Web: 25 July 2008. 146. Journal of Genetics ...

  15. Developmental and transcriptional consequences of mutations in Drosophila TAF(II)60.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyagi, N; Wassarman, D A

    2001-10-01

    In vitro, the TAF(II)60 component of the TFIID complex contributes to RNA polymerase II transcription initiation by serving as a coactivator that interacts with specific activator proteins and possibly as a promoter selectivity factor that interacts with the downstream promoter element. In vivo roles for TAF(II)60 in metazoan transcription are not as clear. Here we have investigated the developmental and transcriptional requirements for TAF(II)60 by analyzing four independent Drosophila melanogaster TAF(II)60 mutants. Loss-of-function mutations in Drosophila TAF(II)60 result in lethality, indicating that TAF(II)60 provides a nonredundant function in vivo. Molecular analysis of TAF(II)60 alleles revealed that essential TAF(II)60 functions are provided by two evolutionarily conserved regions located in the N-terminal half of the protein. TAF(II)60 is required at all stages of Drosophila development, in both germ cells and somatic cells. Expression of TAF(II)60 from a transgene rescued the lethality of TAF(II)60 mutants and exposed requirements for TAF(II)60 during imaginal development, spermatogenesis, and oogenesis. Phenotypes of rescued TAF(II)60 mutant flies implicate TAF(II)60 in transcriptional mechanisms that regulate cell growth and cell fate specification and suggest that TAF(II)60 is a limiting component of the machinery that regulates the transcription of dosage-sensitive genes. Finally, TAF(II)60 plays roles in developmental regulation of gene expression that are distinct from those of other TAF(II) proteins.

  16. A regulatory transcriptional loop controls proliferation and differentiation in Drosophila neural stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuo Yasugi

    Full Text Available Neurogenesis is initiated by a set of basic Helix-Loop-Helix (bHLH transcription factors that specify neural progenitors and allow them to generate neurons in multiple rounds of asymmetric cell division. The Drosophila Daughterless (Da protein and its mammalian counterparts (E12/E47 act as heterodimerization factors for proneural genes and are therefore critically required for neurogenesis. Here, we demonstrate that Da can also be an inhibitor of the neural progenitor fate whose absence leads to stem cell overproliferation and tumor formation. We explain this paradox by demonstrating that Da induces the differentiation factor Prospero (Pros whose asymmetric segregation is essential for differentiation in one of the two daughter cells. Da co-operates with the bHLH transcription factor Asense, whereas the other proneural genes are dispensible. After mitosis, Pros terminates Asense expression in one of the two daughter cells. In da mutants, pros is not expressed, leading to the formation of lethal transplantable brain tumors. Our results define a transcriptional feedback loop that regulates the balance between self-renewal and differentiation in Drosophila optic lobe neuroblasts. They indicate that initiation of a neural differentiation program in stem cells is essential to prevent tumorigenesis.

  17. The transcriptional diversity of 25 Drosophila cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherbas, Lucy [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Willingham, Aarron [Affymetrix Inc., Santa Clara, CA (United States); Zhang, Dayu [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Yang, Li [University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, Connecticut (United States); Zou, Yi [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Eads, Brian D. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Carlson, Joseph W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Landolin, Jane M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Kapranov, Philipp [Affymetrix Inc., Santa Clara, CA (United States); Dumais, Jacqueline [Affymetrix Inc., Santa Clara, CA (United States); Samsonova, Anastasia [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Choi, Jeong-Hyeon [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Roberts, Johnny [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Davis, Carrie A. [Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, New York (United States); Tang, Haixu [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); van Baren, Marijke J. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States); Ghosh, Srinka [Affymetrix Inc., Santa Clara, CA (United States); Dobin, Alexander [Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, New York (United States); Bell, Kim [Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, New York (United States); Lin, Wei [Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, New York (United States); Langton, Laura [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States); Duff, Michael O. [University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, Connecticut (United States); Tenney, Aaron E. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States); Zaleski, Chris [Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, New York (United States); Brent, Michael R. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States); Hoskins, Roger A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Kaufman, Thomas C. [Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana (United States); Andrews, Justen [Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana (United States); Graveley, Brenton R. [University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, Connecticut (United States); Perrimon, Norbert [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Celniker, Susan E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Gingeras, Thomas R. [Affymetrix Inc., Santa Clara, CA (United States); Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, New York (United States); Cherbas, Peter [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States)

    2010-12-22

    Drosophila melanogaster cell lines are important resources for cell biologists. In this article, we catalog the expression of exons, genes, and unannotated transcriptional signals for 25 lines. Unannotated transcription is substantial (typically 19% of euchromatic signal). Conservatively, we identify 1405 novel transcribed regions; 684 of these appear to be new exons of neighboring, often distant, genes. Sixty-four percent of genes are expressed detectably in at least one line, but only 21% are detected in all lines. Each cell line expresses, on average, 5885 genes, including a common set of 3109. Expression levels vary over several orders of magnitude. Major signaling pathways are well represented: most differentiation pathways are ‘‘off’’ and survival/growth pathways ‘‘on.’’ Roughly 50% of the genes expressed by each line are not part of the common set, and these show considerable individuality. Thirty-one percent are expressed at a higher level in at least one cell line than in any single developmental stage, suggesting that each line is enriched for genes characteristic of small sets of cells. Most remarkable is that imaginal disc-derived lines can generally be assigned, on the basis of expression, to small territories within developing discs. These mappings reveal unexpected stability of even fine-grained spatial determination. No two cell lines show identical transcription factor expression. We conclude that each line has retained features of an individual founder cell superimposed on a common ‘‘cell line‘‘ gene expression pattern. We report the transcriptional profiles of 25 Drosophila melanogaster cell lines, principally by whole-genome tiling microarray analysis of total RNA, carried out as part of the modENCODE project. The data produced in this study add to our knowledge of the cell lines and of the Drosophila transcriptome in several ways. We summarize the expression of previously annotated genes in each of the 25

  18. The Brakeless co-regulator can directly activate and repress transcription in early Drosophila embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crona, Filip; Holmqvist, Per-Henrik; Tang, Min; Singla, Bhumica; Vakifahmetoglu-Norberg, Helin; Fantur, Katrin; Mannervik, Mattias

    2015-11-01

    The Brakeless protein performs many important functions during Drosophila development, but how it controls gene expression is poorly understood. We previously showed that Brakeless can function as a transcriptional co-repressor. In this work, we perform transcriptional profiling of brakeless mutant embryos. Unexpectedly, the majority of affected genes are down-regulated in brakeless mutants. We demonstrate that genomic regions in close proximity to some of these genes are occupied by Brakeless, that over-expression of Brakeless causes a reciprocal effect on expression of these genes, and that Brakeless remains an activator of the genes upon fusion to an activation domain. Together, our results show that Brakeless can both repress and activate gene expression. A yeast two-hybrid screen identified the Mediator complex subunit Med19 as interacting with an evolutionarily conserved part of Brakeless. Both down- and up-regulated Brakeless target genes are also affected in Med19-depleted embryos, but only down-regulated targets are influenced in embryos depleted of both Brakeless and Med19. Our data provide support for a Brakeless activator function that regulates transcription by interacting with Med19. We conclude that the transcriptional co-regulator Brakeless can either activate or repress transcription depending on context. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Transcription of Gypsy Elements in a Y-Chromosome Male Fertility Gene of Drosophila Hydei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochstenbach, R.; Harhangi, H.; Schouren, K.; Bindels, P.; Suijkerbuijk, R.; Hennig, W.

    1996-01-01

    We have found that defective gypsy retrotransposons are a major constituent of the lampbrush loop pair Nooses in the short arm of the Y chromosome of Drosophila hydei. The loop pair is formed by male fertility gene Q during the primary spermatocyte stage of spermatogenesis, each loop being a single transcription unit with an estimated length of 260 kb. Using fluorescent in situ hybridization, we show that throughout the loop transcripts gypsy elements are interspersed with blocks of a tandemly repetitive Y-specific DNA sequence, ay1. Nooses transcripts containing both sequence types show a wide size range on Northern blots, do not migrate to the cytoplasm, and are degraded just before the first meiotic division. Only one strand of ay1 and only the coding strand of gypsy can be detected in the loop transcripts. However, as cloned genomic DNA fragments also display opposite orientations of ay1 and gypsy, such DNA sections cannot be part of the Nooses. Hence, they are most likely derived from the flanking heterochromatin. The direction of transcription of ay1 and gypsy thus appears to be of a functional significance. PMID:8852843

  20. RNA-Interference Components Are Dispensable for Transcriptional Silencing of the Drosophila Bithorax-Complex

    KAUST Repository

    Cernilogar, Filippo M.

    2013-06-13

    Background:Beyond their role in post-transcriptional gene silencing, Dicer and Argonaute, two components of the RNA interference (RNAi) machinery, were shown to be involved in epigenetic regulation of centromeric heterochromatin and transcriptional gene silencing. In particular, RNAi mechanisms appear to play a role in repeat induced silencing and some aspects of Polycomb-mediated gene silencing. However, the functional interplay of RNAi mechanisms and Polycomb group (PcG) pathways at endogenous loci remains to be elucidated.Principal Findings:Here we show that the endogenous Dicer-2/Argonaute-2 RNAi pathway is dispensable for the PcG mediated silencing of the homeotic Bithorax Complex (BX-C). Although Dicer-2 depletion triggers mild transcriptional activation at Polycomb Response Elements (PREs), this does not induce transcriptional changes at PcG-repressed genes. Moreover, Dicer-2 is not needed to maintain global levels of methylation of lysine 27 of histone H3 and does not affect PRE-mediated higher order chromatin structures within the BX-C. Finally bioinformatic analysis, comparing published data sets of PcG targets with Argonaute-2-bound small RNAs reveals no enrichment of these small RNAs at promoter regions associated with PcG proteins.Conclusions:We conclude that the Dicer-2/Argonaute-2 RNAi pathway, despite its role in pairing sensitive gene silencing of transgenes, does not have a role in PcG dependent silencing of major homeotic gene cluster loci in Drosophila. © 2013 Cernilogar et al.

  1. Mondo/ChREBP-Mlx-Regulated Transcriptional Network Is Essential for Dietary Sugar Tolerance in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havula, Essi; Teesalu, Mari; Hyötyläinen, Tuulia; Seppälä, Heini; Hasygar, Kiran; Auvinen, Petri; Orešič, Matej; Sandmann, Thomas; Hietakangas, Ville

    2013-01-01

    Sugars are important nutrients for many animals, but are also proposed to contribute to overnutrition-derived metabolic diseases in humans. Understanding the genetic factors governing dietary sugar tolerance therefore has profound biological and medical significance. Paralogous Mondo transcription factors ChREBP and MondoA, with their common binding partner Mlx, are key sensors of intracellular glucose flux in mammals. Here we report analysis of the in vivo function of Drosophila melanogaster Mlx and its binding partner Mondo (ChREBP) in respect to tolerance to dietary sugars. Larvae lacking mlx or having reduced mondo expression show strikingly reduced survival on a diet with moderate or high levels of sucrose, glucose, and fructose. mlx null mutants display widespread changes in lipid and phospholipid profiles, signs of amino acid catabolism, as well as strongly elevated circulating glucose levels. Systematic loss-of-function analysis of Mlx target genes reveals that circulating glucose levels and dietary sugar tolerance can be genetically uncoupled: Krüppel-like transcription factor Cabut and carbonyl detoxifying enzyme Aldehyde dehydrogenase type III are essential for dietary sugar tolerance, but display no influence on circulating glucose levels. On the other hand, Phosphofructokinase 2, a regulator of the glycolysis pathway, is needed for both dietary sugar tolerance and maintenance of circulating glucose homeostasis. Furthermore, we show evidence that fatty acid synthesis, which is a highly conserved Mondo-Mlx-regulated process, does not promote dietary sugar tolerance. In contrast, survival of larvae with reduced fatty acid synthase expression is sugar-dependent. Our data demonstrate that the transcriptional network regulated by Mondo-Mlx is a critical determinant of the healthful dietary spectrum allowing Drosophila to exploit sugar-rich nutrient sources. PMID:23593032

  2. A Drosophila genetic model of nephrolithiasis: transcriptional changes in response to diet induced stone formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Vera Y; Turney, Benjamin W

    2017-11-28

    Urolithiasis is a significant healthcare issue but the pathophysiology of stone disease remains poorly understood. Drosophila Malpighian tubules were known to share similar physiological function to human renal tubules. We have used Drosophila as a genetic model to study the transcriptional response to stone formation secondary to dietary manipulation. Wild-type male flies were raised on standard medium supplemented with lithogenic agents: control, sodium oxalate (NaOx) and ethylene glycol (EG). At 2 weeks, Malpighian tubules were dissected under polarized microscope to visualize crystals. The parallel group was dissected for RNA extraction and subsequent next-generation RNA sequencing. Crystal formation was visualized in 20%(±2.2) of flies on control diet, 73%(±3.6) on NaOx diet and 84%(±2.2) on EG diet. Differentially expressed genes were identified in flies fed with NaOx and EG diet comparing with the control group. Fifty-eight genes were differentially expressed (FDR <0.05, p < 0.05) in NaOx diet and 20 genes in EG diet. The molecular function of differentially expressed genes were assessed. Among these, Nervana 3, Eaat1 (Excitatory amino acid transporter 1), CG7912, CG5404, CG3036 worked as ion transmembrane transporters, which were possibly involved in stone pathogenesis. We have shown that by dietary modification, stone formation can be manipulated and visualized in Drosophila Malpighian tubules. This genetic model could be potentially used to identify the candidate genes that influence stone risk hence providing more insight to the pathogenesis of human stone disease.

  3. Reduced Neuronal Transcription of Escargot, the Drosophila Gene Encoding a Snail-Type Transcription Factor, Promotes Longevity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symonenko, Alexander V.; Roshina, Natalia V.; Krementsova, Anna V.; Pasyukova, Elena G.

    2018-01-01

    In recent years, several genes involved in complex neuron specification networks have been shown to control life span. However, information on these genes is scattered, and studies to discover new neuronal genes and gene cascades contributing to life span control are needed, especially because of the recognized role of the nervous system in governing homeostasis, aging, and longevity. Previously, we demonstrated that several genes that encode RNA polymerase II transcription factors and that are involved in the development of the nervous system affect life span in Drosophila melanogaster. Among other genes, escargot (esg) was demonstrated to be causally associated with an increase in the life span of male flies. Here, we present new data on the role of esg in life span control. We show that esg affects the life spans of both mated and unmated males and females to varying degrees. By analyzing the survival and locomotion of the esg mutants, we demonstrate that esg is involved in the control of aging. We show that increased longevity is caused by decreased esg transcription. In particular, we demonstrate that esg knockdown in the nervous system increased life span, directly establishing the involvement of the neuronal esg function in life span control. Our data invite attention to the mechanisms regulating the esg transcription rate, which is changed by insertions of DNA fragments of different sizes downstream of the structural part of the gene, indicating the direction of further research. Our data agree with the previously made suggestion that alterations in gene expression during development might affect adult lifespan, due to epigenetic patterns inherited in cell lineages or predetermined during the development of the structural and functional properties of the nervous system. PMID:29760717

  4. Berkeley's Philosophy of Mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Jesseph, Douglas M

    1993-01-01

    In this first modern, critical assessment of the place of mathematics in Berkeley's philosophy and Berkeley's place in the history of mathematics, Douglas M. Jesseph provides a bold reinterpretation of Berkeley's work. Jesseph challenges the prevailing view that Berkeley's mathematical writings are peripheral to his philosophy and argues that mathematics is in fact central to his thought, developing out of his critique of abstraction. Jesseph's argument situates Berkeley's ideas within the larger historical and intellectual context of the Scientific Revolution. Jesseph begins with Berkeley's r

  5. Basic leucine zipper protein Cnc-C is a substrate and transcriptional regulator of the Drosophila 26S proteasome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimberg, Kristian Björk; Beskow, Anne; Lundin, Daniel; Davis, Monica M; Young, Patrick

    2011-02-01

    While the 26S proteasome is a key proteolytic complex, little is known about how proteasome levels are maintained in higher eukaryotic cells. Here we describe an RNA interference (RNAi) screen of Drosophila melanogaster that was used to identify transcription factors that may play a role in maintaining levels of the 26S proteasome. We used an RNAi library against 993 Drosophila transcription factor genes to identify genes whose suppression in Schneider 2 cells stabilized a ubiquitin-green fluorescent protein reporter protein. This screen identified Cnc (cap 'n' collar [CNC]; basic region leucine zipper) as a candidate transcriptional regulator of proteasome component expression. In fact, 20S proteasome activity was reduced in cells depleted of cnc. Immunoblot assays against proteasome components revealed a general decline in both 19S regulatory complex and 20S proteasome subunits after RNAi depletion of this transcription factor. Transcript-specific silencing revealed that the longest of the seven transcripts for the cnc gene, cnc-C, was needed for proteasome and p97 ATPase production. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR confirmed the role of Cnc-C in activation of transcription of genes encoding proteasome components. Expression of a V5-His-tagged form of Cnc-C revealed that the transcription factor is itself a proteasome substrate that is stabilized when the proteasome is inhibited. We propose that this single cnc gene in Drosophila resembles the ancestral gene family of mammalian nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-related transcription factors, which are essential in regulating oxidative stress and proteolysis.

  6. Transcription factor expression uniquely identifies most postembryonic neuronal lineages in the Drosophila thoracic central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacin, Haluk; Zhu, Yi; Wilson, Beth A; Skeath, James B

    2014-03-01

    Most neurons of the adult Drosophila ventral nerve cord arise from a burst of neurogenesis during the third larval instar stage. Most of this growth occurs in thoracic neuromeres, which contain 25 individually identifiable postembryonic neuronal lineages. Initially, each lineage consists of two hemilineages--'A' (Notch(On)) and 'B' (Notch(Off))--that exhibit distinct axonal trajectories or fates. No reliable method presently exists to identify these lineages or hemilineages unambiguously other than labor-intensive lineage-tracing methods. By combining mosaic analysis with a repressible cell marker (MARCM) analysis with gene expression studies, we constructed a gene expression map that enables the rapid, unambiguous identification of 23 of the 25 postembryonic lineages based on the expression of 15 transcription factors. Pilot genetic studies reveal that these transcription factors regulate the specification and differentiation of postembryonic neurons: for example, Nkx6 is necessary and sufficient to direct axonal pathway selection in lineage 3. The gene expression map thus provides a descriptive foundation for the genetic and molecular dissection of adult-specific neurogenesis and identifies many transcription factors that are likely to regulate the development and differentiation of discrete subsets of postembryonic neurons.

  7. The transcriptional corepressor SMRTER influences both Notch and ecdysone signaling during Drosophila development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan W. Heck

    2011-12-01

    SMRTER (SMRT-related and ecdysone receptor interacting factor is the Drosophila homologue of the vertebrate proteins SMRT and N-CoR, and forms with them a well-conserved family of transcriptional corepressors. Molecular characterization of SMRT-family proteins in cultured cells has implicated them in a wide range of transcriptional regulatory pathways. However, little is currently known about how this conserved class of transcriptional corepressors regulates the development of particular tissues via specific pathways. In this study, through our characterization of multiple Smrter (Smr mutant lines, mosaic analysis of a loss-of-function Smr allele, and studies of two independent Smr RNAi fly lines, we report that SMRTER is required for the development of both ovarian follicle cells and the wing. In these two tissues, SMRTER inhibits not only the ecdysone pathway, but also the Notch pathway. We differentiate SMRTER's influence on these two signaling pathways by showing that SMRTER inhibits the Notch pathway, but not the ecdysone pathway, in a spatiotemporally restricted manner. We further confirm the likely involvement of SMRTER in the Notch pathway by demonstrating a direct interaction between SMRTER and Suppressor of Hairless [Su(H], a DNA-binding transcription factor pivotal in the Notch pathway, and the colocalization of both proteins at many chromosomal regions in salivary glands. Based on our results, we propose that SMRTER regulates the Notch pathway through its association with Su(H, and that overcoming a SMRTER-mediated transcriptional repression barrier may represent a key mechanism used by the Notch pathway to control the precise timing of events and the formation of sharp boundaries between cells in multiple tissues during development.

  8. Transcription profiling of Drosophila exposed to a levitation magnet for different lengths of time

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Drosophila samples were exposed to the levitation magnet inside a 25mm diameter tubes with 3 ml of yeast-based Drosophila food in the bottom and a chamber of only 5...

  9. Transcription Factors Bind Thousands of Active and InactiveRegions in the Drosophila Blastoderm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiao-Yong; MacArthur, Stewart; Bourgon, Richard; Nix, David; Pollard, Daniel A.; Iyer, Venky N.; Hechmer, Aaron; Simirenko, Lisa; Stapleton, Mark; Luengo Hendriks, Cris L.; Chu, Hou Cheng; Ogawa, Nobuo; Inwood, William; Sementchenko, Victor; Beaton, Amy; Weiszmann, Richard; Celniker, Susan E.; Knowles, David W.; Gingeras, Tom; Speed, Terence P.; Eisen, Michael B.; Biggin, Mark D.

    2008-01-10

    Identifying the genomic regions bound by sequence-specific regulatory factors is central both to deciphering the complex DNA cis-regulatory code that controls transcription in metazoans and to determining the range of genes that shape animal morphogenesis. Here, we use whole-genome tiling arrays to map sequences bound in Drosophila melanogaster embryos by the six maternal and gap transcription factors that initiate anterior-posterior patterning. We find that these sequence-specific DNA binding proteins bind with quantitatively different specificities to highly overlapping sets of several thousand genomic regions in blastoderm embryos. Specific high- and moderate-affinity in vitro recognition sequences for each factor are enriched in bound regions. This enrichment, however, is not sufficient to explain the pattern of binding in vivo and varies in a context-dependent manner, demonstrating that higher-order rules must govern targeting of transcription factors. The more highly bound regions include all of the over forty well-characterized enhancers known to respond to these factors as well as several hundred putative new cis-regulatory modules clustered near developmental regulators and other genes with patterned expression at this stage of embryogenesis. The new targets include most of the microRNAs (miRNAs) transcribed in the blastoderm, as well as all major zygotically transcribed dorsal-ventral patterning genes, whose expression we show to be quantitatively modulated by anterior-posterior factors. In addition to these highly bound regions, there are several thousand regions that are reproducibly bound at lower levels. However, these poorly bound regions are, collectively, far more distant from genes transcribed in the blastoderm than highly bound regions; are preferentially found in protein-coding sequences; and are less conserved than highly bound regions. Together these observations suggest that many of these poorly-bound regions are not involved in early

  10. An Org-1-Tup transcriptional cascade reveals different types of alary muscles connecting internal organs in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukhatmi, Hadi; Schaub, Christoph; Bataillé, Laetitia; Reim, Ingolf; Frendo, Jean-Louis; Frasch, Manfred; Vincent, Alain

    2014-10-01

    The T-box transcription factor Tbx1 and the LIM-homeodomain transcription factor Islet1 are key components in regulatory circuits that generate myogenic and cardiogenic lineage diversity in chordates. We show here that Org-1 and Tup, the Drosophila orthologs of Tbx1 and Islet1, are co-expressed and required for formation of the heart-associated alary muscles (AMs) in the abdomen. The same holds true for lineage-related muscles in the thorax that have not been described previously, which we name thoracic alary-related muscles (TARMs). Lineage analyses identified the progenitor cell for each AM and TARM. Three-dimensional high-resolution analyses indicate that AMs and TARMs connect the exoskeleton to the aorta/heart and to different regions of the midgut, respectively, and surround-specific tracheal branches, pointing to an architectural role in the internal anatomy of the larva. Org-1 controls tup expression in the AM/TARM lineage by direct binding to two regulatory sites within an AM/TARM-specific cis-regulatory module, tupAME. The contributions of Org-1 and Tup to the specification of Drosophila AMs and TARMs provide new insights into the transcriptional control of Drosophila larval muscle diversification and highlight new parallels with gene regulatory networks involved in the specification of cardiopharyngeal mesodermal derivatives in chordates. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  11. Identification of the Drosophila Mes4 gene as a novel target of the transcription factor DREF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suyari, Osamu; Ida, Hiroyuki [Department of Applied Biology, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Insect Biomedical Research Center, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Yoshioka, Yasuhide; Kato, Yasuko; Hashimoto, Reina [Department of Applied Biology, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Insect Biomedical Research Center, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Venture Laboratory, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Yamaguchi, Masamitsu, E-mail: myamaguc@kit.ac.jp [Department of Applied Biology, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Insect Biomedical Research Center, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan)

    2009-05-01

    The Mes4 gene has been identified as one of the maternal Dorsal target genes in Drosophila. In the present study, we found a DNA replication-related element (DRE, 5'-TATCGATA) in the Mes4 promoter recognized by the DRE-binding factor (DREF). Luciferase transient expression assays in S2 cells using Mes4 promoter-luciferase fusion plasmids revealed that the DRE sequence is essential for Mes4 promoter activity. Requirement of DRE for Mes4 promoter activity was further confirmed by anti-{beta}-galactosidase antibody-staining of various tissues from transgenic flies carrying Mes4 promoter-lacZ fusion genes. Furthermore, wild type Mes4 promoter activity was decreased by 40% in DREF-depleted S2 cells. These results indicate that DREF positively regulates Mes4 gene expression. Band mobility shift analyses using Kc cell nuclear extracts further indicated that the DRE sequence in the Mes4 promoter is especially important for binding to DREF. Moreover, specific binding of DREF to the involved genomic region could be demonstrated by chromatin immunoprecipitation assays using anti-DREF antibodies. These results, taken together, indicate that the DRE/DREF system activates transcription of the Mes4 gene. In addition, knockdown of the Mes4 gene in wing imaginal discs using the GAL4-UAS system caused an atrophied wing phenotype, suggesting that Mes4 is required for wing morphogenesis.

  12. Identification of the Drosophila Mes4 gene as a novel target of the transcription factor DREF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suyari, Osamu; Ida, Hiroyuki; Yoshioka, Yasuhide; Kato, Yasuko; Hashimoto, Reina; Yamaguchi, Masamitsu

    2009-01-01

    The Mes4 gene has been identified as one of the maternal Dorsal target genes in Drosophila. In the present study, we found a DNA replication-related element (DRE, 5'-TATCGATA) in the Mes4 promoter recognized by the DRE-binding factor (DREF). Luciferase transient expression assays in S2 cells using Mes4 promoter-luciferase fusion plasmids revealed that the DRE sequence is essential for Mes4 promoter activity. Requirement of DRE for Mes4 promoter activity was further confirmed by anti-β-galactosidase antibody-staining of various tissues from transgenic flies carrying Mes4 promoter-lacZ fusion genes. Furthermore, wild type Mes4 promoter activity was decreased by 40% in DREF-depleted S2 cells. These results indicate that DREF positively regulates Mes4 gene expression. Band mobility shift analyses using Kc cell nuclear extracts further indicated that the DRE sequence in the Mes4 promoter is especially important for binding to DREF. Moreover, specific binding of DREF to the involved genomic region could be demonstrated by chromatin immunoprecipitation assays using anti-DREF antibodies. These results, taken together, indicate that the DRE/DREF system activates transcription of the Mes4 gene. In addition, knockdown of the Mes4 gene in wing imaginal discs using the GAL4-UAS system caused an atrophied wing phenotype, suggesting that Mes4 is required for wing morphogenesis.

  13. Spatial profiling of nuclear receptor transcription patterns over the course of Drosophila development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilk, Ronit; Hu, Jack; Krause, Henry M

    2013-07-08

    Previous work has shown that many of the 18 family members of Drosophila nuclear receptor transcription factors function in a temporal hierarchy to coordinate developmental progression and growth with the rate limiting process of metabolism. To gain further insight into these interactions and processes, we have undertaken a whole-family analysis of nuclear receptor mRNA spatial expression patterns over the entire process of embryogenesis, as well as the 3rd instar wandering larva stage, by using high-resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization. Overall, the patterns of expression are remarkably consistent with previously mapped spatial activity profiles documented during the same time points, with similar hot spots and temporal profiles in endocrine and metabolically important tissues. Among the more remarkable of the findings is that the majority of mRNA expression patterns observed show striking subcellular distributions, indicating potentially critical roles in the control of protein synthesis and subsequent subcellular distributions. These patterns will serve as a useful reference for future studies on the tissue-specific roles and interactions of nuclear receptor proteins, partners, cofactors and ligands.

  14. Predictive regulatory models in Drosophila melanogaster by integrative inference of transcriptional networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marbach, Daniel; Roy, Sushmita; Ay, Ferhat; Meyer, Patrick E.; Candeias, Rogerio; Kahveci, Tamer; Bristow, Christopher A.; Kellis, Manolis

    2012-01-01

    Gaining insights on gene regulation from large-scale functional data sets is a grand challenge in systems biology. In this article, we develop and apply methods for transcriptional regulatory network inference from diverse functional genomics data sets and demonstrate their value for gene function and gene expression prediction. We formulate the network inference problem in a machine-learning framework and use both supervised and unsupervised methods to predict regulatory edges by integrating transcription factor (TF) binding, evolutionarily conserved sequence motifs, gene expression, and chromatin modification data sets as input features. Applying these methods to Drosophila melanogaster, we predict ∼300,000 regulatory edges in a network of ∼600 TFs and 12,000 target genes. We validate our predictions using known regulatory interactions, gene functional annotations, tissue-specific expression, protein–protein interactions, and three-dimensional maps of chromosome conformation. We use the inferred network to identify putative functions for hundreds of previously uncharacterized genes, including many in nervous system development, which are independently confirmed based on their tissue-specific expression patterns. Last, we use the regulatory network to predict target gene expression levels as a function of TF expression, and find significantly higher predictive power for integrative networks than for motif or ChIP-based networks. Our work reveals the complementarity between physical evidence of regulatory interactions (TF binding, motif conservation) and functional evidence (coordinated expression or chromatin patterns) and demonstrates the power of data integration for network inference and studies of gene regulation at the systems level. PMID:22456606

  15. Dendritic Cytoskeletal Architecture Is Modulated by Combinatorial Transcriptional Regulation in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Ravi; Bhattacharjee, Shatabdi; Patel, Atit A; Harris, Jenna M; Bhattacharya, Surajit; Letcher, Jamin M; Clark, Sarah G; Nanda, Sumit; Iyer, Eswar Prasad R; Ascoli, Giorgio A; Cox, Daniel N

    2017-12-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) have emerged as essential cell autonomous mediators of subtype specific dendritogenesis; however, the downstream effectors of these TFs remain largely unknown, as are the cellular events that TFs control to direct morphological change. As dendritic morphology is largely dictated by the organization of the actin and microtubule (MT) cytoskeletons, elucidating TF-mediated cytoskeletal regulatory programs is key to understanding molecular control of diverse dendritic morphologies. Previous studies in Drosophila melanogaster have demonstrated that the conserved TFs Cut and Knot exert combinatorial control over aspects of dendritic cytoskeleton development, promoting actin and MT-based arbor morphology, respectively. To investigate transcriptional targets of Cut and/or Knot regulation, we conducted systematic neurogenomic studies, coupled with in vivo genetic screens utilizing multi-fluor cytoskeletal and membrane marker reporters. These analyses identified a host of putative Cut and/or Knot effector molecules, and a subset of these putative TF targets converge on modulating dendritic cytoskeletal architecture, which are grouped into three major phenotypic categories, based upon neuromorphometric analyses: complexity enhancer, complexity shifter, and complexity suppressor. Complexity enhancer genes normally function to promote higher order dendritic growth and branching with variable effects on MT stabilization and F-actin organization, whereas complexity shifter and complexity suppressor genes normally function in regulating proximal-distal branching distribution or in restricting higher order branching complexity, respectively, with spatially restricted impacts on the dendritic cytoskeleton. Collectively, we implicate novel genes and cellular programs by which TFs distinctly and combinatorially govern dendritogenesis via cytoskeletal modulation. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  16. Nucleotide Interdependency in Transcription Factor Binding Sites in the Drosophila Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dresch, Jacqueline M; Zellers, Rowan G; Bork, Daniel K; Drewell, Robert A

    2016-01-01

    A long-standing objective in modern biology is to characterize the molecular components that drive the development of an organism. At the heart of eukaryotic development lies gene regulation. On the molecular level, much of the research in this field has focused on the binding of transcription factors (TFs) to regulatory regions in the genome known as cis-regulatory modules (CRMs). However, relatively little is known about the sequence-specific binding preferences of many TFs, especially with respect to the possible interdependencies between the nucleotides that make up binding sites. A particular limitation of many existing algorithms that aim to predict binding site sequences is that they do not allow for dependencies between nonadjacent nucleotides. In this study, we use a recently developed computational algorithm, MARZ, to compare binding site sequences using 32 distinct models in a systematic and unbiased approach to explore nucleotide dependencies within binding sites for 15 distinct TFs known to be critical to Drosophila development. Our results indicate that many of these proteins have varying levels of nucleotide interdependencies within their DNA recognition sequences, and that, in some cases, models that account for these dependencies greatly outperform traditional models that are used to predict binding sites. We also directly compare the ability of different models to identify the known KRUPPEL TF binding sites in CRMs and demonstrate that a more complex model that accounts for nucleotide interdependencies performs better when compared with simple models. This ability to identify TFs with critical nucleotide interdependencies in their binding sites will lead to a deeper understanding of how these molecular characteristics contribute to the architecture of CRMs and the precise regulation of transcription during organismal development.

  17. Predictive regulatory models in Drosophila melanogaster by integrative inference of transcriptional networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marbach, Daniel; Roy, Sushmita; Ay, Ferhat; Meyer, Patrick E; Candeias, Rogerio; Kahveci, Tamer; Bristow, Christopher A; Kellis, Manolis

    2012-07-01

    Gaining insights on gene regulation from large-scale functional data sets is a grand challenge in systems biology. In this article, we develop and apply methods for transcriptional regulatory network inference from diverse functional genomics data sets and demonstrate their value for gene function and gene expression prediction. We formulate the network inference problem in a machine-learning framework and use both supervised and unsupervised methods to predict regulatory edges by integrating transcription factor (TF) binding, evolutionarily conserved sequence motifs, gene expression, and chromatin modification data sets as input features. Applying these methods to Drosophila melanogaster, we predict ∼300,000 regulatory edges in a network of ∼600 TFs and 12,000 target genes. We validate our predictions using known regulatory interactions, gene functional annotations, tissue-specific expression, protein-protein interactions, and three-dimensional maps of chromosome conformation. We use the inferred network to identify putative functions for hundreds of previously uncharacterized genes, including many in nervous system development, which are independently confirmed based on their tissue-specific expression patterns. Last, we use the regulatory network to predict target gene expression levels as a function of TF expression, and find significantly higher predictive power for integrative networks than for motif or ChIP-based networks. Our work reveals the complementarity between physical evidence of regulatory interactions (TF binding, motif conservation) and functional evidence (coordinated expression or chromatin patterns) and demonstrates the power of data integration for network inference and studies of gene regulation at the systems level.

  18. “Jump Start and Gain” Model for Dosage Compensation in Drosophila Based on Direct Sequencing of Nascent Transcripts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Ferrari

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Dosage compensation in Drosophila is mediated by the MSL complex, which increases male X-linked gene expression approximately 2-fold. The MSL complex preferentially binds the bodies of active genes on the male X, depositing H4K16ac with a 3′ bias. Two models have been proposed for the influence of the MSL complex on transcription: one based on promoter recruitment of RNA polymerase II (Pol II, and a second featuring enhanced transcriptional elongation. Here, we utilize nascent RNA sequencing to document dosage compensation during transcriptional elongation. We also compare X and autosomes from published data on paused and elongating polymerase in order to assess the role of Pol II recruitment. Our results support a model for differentially regulated elongation, starting with release from 5′ pausing and increasing through X-linked gene bodies. Our results highlight facilitated transcriptional elongation as a key mechanism for the coordinated regulation of a diverse set of genes.

  19. Identification of the Drosophila skpA gene as a novel target of the transcription factor DREF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dang Thi Phuong Thao; Ida, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Hideki; Yamaguchi, Masamitsu

    2006-01-01

    SKPa is component of a Drosophila SCF complex that functions in combination with the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme UbcD1. skpA null mutation results in centrosome overduplication, unusual chromatin condensation, defective endoreduplication and cell-cycle progression. While the molecular mechanisms that regulate expression of the skpA gene are poorly understood, the DNA replication-related element (DRE) and the DRE-binding factor (DREF) play important roles in regulating proliferation-related genes in Drosophila and DRE (5'-TATCGATA) and DRE-like (5'-CATCGATT) sequences were here found to be involved in skpA promoter activity. Thus both luciferase transient expression assays in cultured Drosophila S2 cells using skpA promoter-luciferase fusion plasmids and anti-lacZ immunostaining of various tissues from transgenic third instar larvae carrying the skpA promoter-lacZ fusion genes provided supportive evidence. Furthermore, anti-SKPa immunostaining of eye imaginal discs from flies overexpressing DREF showed ectopic expression of protein in the region posterior to the morphogenetic furrow where DREF is overexpressed. Knockdown of DREF in some tissues where SKPa distribution is well known almost completely abrogated the skpA gene expression. These findings, taken together, indicate that the Drosophila skpA gene is a novel target of the transcription factor DREF

  20. Analysis of temporal transcription expression profiles reveal links between protein function and developmental stages of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Cen; Lees, Jonathan G; Minneci, Federico; Orengo, Christine A; Jones, David T

    2017-10-01

    Accurate gene or protein function prediction is a key challenge in the post-genome era. Most current methods perform well on molecular function prediction, but struggle to provide useful annotations relating to biological process functions due to the limited power of sequence-based features in that functional domain. In this work, we systematically evaluate the predictive power of temporal transcription expression profiles for protein function prediction in Drosophila melanogaster. Our results show significantly better performance on predicting protein function when transcription expression profile-based features are integrated with sequence-derived features, compared with the sequence-derived features alone. We also observe that the combination of expression-based and sequence-based features leads to further improvement of accuracy on predicting all three domains of gene function. Based on the optimal feature combinations, we then propose a novel multi-classifier-based function prediction method for Drosophila melanogaster proteins, FFPred-fly+. Interpreting our machine learning models also allows us to identify some of the underlying links between biological processes and developmental stages of Drosophila melanogaster.

  1. Analysis of temporal transcription expression profiles reveal links between protein function and developmental stages of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cen Wan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Accurate gene or protein function prediction is a key challenge in the post-genome era. Most current methods perform well on molecular function prediction, but struggle to provide useful annotations relating to biological process functions due to the limited power of sequence-based features in that functional domain. In this work, we systematically evaluate the predictive power of temporal transcription expression profiles for protein function prediction in Drosophila melanogaster. Our results show significantly better performance on predicting protein function when transcription expression profile-based features are integrated with sequence-derived features, compared with the sequence-derived features alone. We also observe that the combination of expression-based and sequence-based features leads to further improvement of accuracy on predicting all three domains of gene function. Based on the optimal feature combinations, we then propose a novel multi-classifier-based function prediction method for Drosophila melanogaster proteins, FFPred-fly+. Interpreting our machine learning models also allows us to identify some of the underlying links between biological processes and developmental stages of Drosophila melanogaster.

  2. Differential transcription of cytochrome P450s and glutathione S transferases in DDT-susceptible and resistant Drosophila melanogaster strains in response to DDT and oxidative stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metabolic DDT resistance in Drosophila melanogaster has previously been associated with constitutive over-transcription of cytochrome P450s. Increased P450 activity has also been associated with increased oxidative stress. In contrast, over-transcription of glutathione S transferases (GSTs) has been...

  3. Computational identification of developmental enhancers:conservation and function of transcription factor binding-site clustersin drosophila melanogaster and drosophila psedoobscura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berman, Benjamin P.; Pfeiffer, Barret D.; Laverty, Todd R.; Salzberg, Steven L.; Rubin, Gerald M.; Eisen, Michael B.; Celniker, SusanE.

    2004-08-06

    The identification of sequences that control transcription in metazoans is a major goal of genome analysis. In a previous study, we demonstrated that searching for clusters of predicted transcription factor binding sites could discover active regulatory sequences, and identified 37 regions of the Drosophila melanogaster genome with high densities of predicted binding sites for five transcription factors involved in anterior-posterior embryonic patterning. Nine of these clusters overlapped known enhancers. Here, we report the results of in vivo functional analysis of 27 remaining clusters. We generated transgenic flies carrying each cluster attached to a basal promoter and reporter gene, and assayed embryos for reporter gene expression. Six clusters are enhancers of adjacent genes: giant, fushi tarazu, odd-skipped, nubbin, squeeze and pdm2; three drive expression in patterns unrelated to those of neighboring genes; the remaining 18 do not appear to have enhancer activity. We used the Drosophila pseudoobscura genome to compare patterns of evolution in and around the 15 positive and 18 false-positive predictions. Although conservation of primary sequence cannot distinguish true from false positives, conservation of binding-site clustering accurately discriminates functional binding-site clusters from those with no function. We incorporated conservation of binding-site clustering into a new genome-wide enhancer screen, and predict several hundred new regulatory sequences, including 85 adjacent to genes with embryonic patterns. Measuring conservation of sequence features closely linked to function--such as binding-site clustering--makes better use of comparative sequence data than commonly used methods that examine only sequence identity.

  4. Aging and Intermittent Fasting Impact on Transcriptional Regulation and Physiological Responses of Adult Drosophila Neuronal and Muscle Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Sharon; Ratliff, Eric P; Molina, Brandon; El-Mecharrafie, Nadja; Mastroianni, Jessica; Kotzebue, Roxanne W; Achal, Madhulika; Mauntz, Ruth E; Gonzalez, Arysa; Barekat, Ayeh; Bray, William A; Macias, Andrew M; Daugherty, Daniel; Harris, Greg L; Edwards, Robert A; Finley, Kim D

    2018-04-10

    The progressive decline of the nervous system, including protein aggregate formation, reflects the subtle dysregulation of multiple functional pathways. Our previous work has shown intermittent fasting (IF) enhances longevity, maintains adult behaviors and reduces aggregates, in part, by promoting autophagic function in the aging Drosophila brain. To clarify the impact that IF-treatment has upon aging, we used high throughput RNA-sequencing technology to examine the changing transcriptome in adult Drosophila tissues. Principle component analysis (PCA) and other analyses showed ~1200 age-related transcriptional differences in head and muscle tissues, with few genes having matching expression patterns. Pathway components showing age-dependent expression differences were involved with stress response, metabolic, neural and chromatin remodeling functions. Middle-aged tissues also showed a significant increase in transcriptional drift-variance (TD), which in the CNS included multiple proteolytic pathway components. Overall, IF-treatment had a demonstrably positive impact on aged transcriptomes, partly ameliorating both fold and variance changes. Consistent with these findings, aged IF-treated flies displayed more youthful metabolic, behavioral and basal proteolytic profiles that closely correlated with transcriptional alterations to key components. These results indicate that even modest dietary changes can have therapeutic consequences, slowing the progressive decline of multiple cellular systems, including proteostasis in the aging nervous system.

  5. Aging and Intermittent Fasting Impact on Transcriptional Regulation and Physiological Responses of Adult Drosophila Neuronal and Muscle Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon Zhang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The progressive decline of the nervous system, including protein aggregate formation, reflects the subtle dysregulation of multiple functional pathways. Our previous work has shown intermittent fasting (IF enhances longevity, maintains adult behaviors and reduces aggregates, in part, by promoting autophagic function in the aging Drosophila brain. To clarify the impact that IF-treatment has upon aging, we used high throughput RNA-sequencing technology to examine the changing transcriptome in adult Drosophila tissues. Principle component analysis (PCA and other analyses showed ~1200 age-related transcriptional differences in head and muscle tissues, with few genes having matching expression patterns. Pathway components showing age-dependent expression differences were involved with stress response, metabolic, neural and chromatin remodeling functions. Middle-aged tissues also showed a significant increase in transcriptional drift-variance (TD, which in the CNS included multiple proteolytic pathway components. Overall, IF-treatment had a demonstrably positive impact on aged transcriptomes, partly ameliorating both fold and variance changes. Consistent with these findings, aged IF-treated flies displayed more youthful metabolic, behavioral and basal proteolytic profiles that closely correlated with transcriptional alterations to key components. These results indicate that even modest dietary changes can have therapeutic consequences, slowing the progressive decline of multiple cellular systems, including proteostasis in the aging nervous system.

  6. Does positive selection drive transcription factor binding site turnover? A test with Drosophila cis-regulatory modules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Z He

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Transcription factor binding site(s (TFBS gain and loss (i.e., turnover is a well-documented feature of cis-regulatory module (CRM evolution, yet little attention has been paid to the evolutionary force(s driving this turnover process. The predominant view, motivated by its widespread occurrence, emphasizes the importance of compensatory mutation and genetic drift. Positive selection, in contrast, although it has been invoked in specific instances of adaptive gene expression evolution, has not been considered as a general alternative to neutral compensatory evolution. In this study we evaluate the two hypotheses by analyzing patterns of single nucleotide polymorphism in the TFBS of well-characterized CRM in two closely related Drosophila species, Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila simulans. An important feature of the analysis is classification of TFBS mutations according to the direction of their predicted effect on binding affinity, which allows gains and losses to be evaluated independently along the two phylogenetic lineages. The observed patterns of polymorphism and divergence are not compatible with neutral evolution for either class of mutations. Instead, multiple lines of evidence are consistent with contributions of positive selection to TFBS gain and loss as well as purifying selection in its maintenance. In discussion, we propose a model to reconcile the finding of selection driving TFBS turnover with constrained CRM function over long evolutionary time.

  7. Environmental research at Berkeley

    CERN Multimedia

    1973-01-01

    The information concerning the Energy and Environment Programme at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is based on a talk given at CERN by A.M. Sessler, one of the initiators of the Programme. (Dr. Sessler has been appointed Director of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, in succession to Prof. E. M. McMillan, from 1 November.) Many of the topics mentioned merit an extended story in themselves but the purpose of this article is simply to give a sketch of what is happening.

  8. nalyot, a mutation of the Drosophila myb-related Adf1 transcription factor, disrupts synapse formation and olfactory memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeZazzo, J; Sandstrom, D; de Belle, S; Velinzon, K; Smith, P; Grady, L; DelVecchio, M; Ramaswami, M; Tully, T

    2000-07-01

    nalyot (nal) is a novel olfactory memory mutant of Drosophila, encoding Adf1, a myb-related transcription factor. Following extended training sessions, Adf1 mutants show normal early memory but defective longterm memory. Adf1 shows widespread spatiotemporal expression, yet mutant alleles reveal no discernible disruptions in gross morphology of the nervous system. Studies at the larval neuromuscular junction, however, reveal a role for Adf1 in the modulation of synaptic growth-in contrast to the role established for dCREB2 in the control of synaptic function (Davis et al., 1996). These findings suggest that Adf1 and dCREB2 regulate distinct transcriptional cascades involved in terminal stages of synapse maturation. More generally, Adf1 provides a novel link between molecular mechanisms of developmental and behavioral plasticity.

  9. Genome-wide mapping of boundary element-associated factor (BEAF) binding sites in Drosophila melanogaster links BEAF to transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Nan; Emberly, Eldon; Cuvier, Olivier; Hart, Craig M

    2009-07-01

    Insulator elements play a role in gene regulation that is potentially linked to nuclear organization. Boundary element-associated factors (BEAFs) 32A and 32B associate with hundreds of sites on Drosophila polytene chromosomes. We hybridized DNA isolated by chromatin immunoprecipitation to genome tiling microarrays to construct a genome-wide map of BEAF binding locations. A distinct difference in the association of 32A and 32B with chromatin was noted. We identified 1,820 BEAF peaks and found that more than 85% were less than 300 bp from transcription start sites. Half are between head-to-head gene pairs. BEAF-associated genes are transcriptionally active as judged by the presence of RNA polymerase II, dimethylated histone H3 K4, and the alternative histone H3.3. Forty percent of these genes are also associated with the polymerase negative elongation factor NELF. Like NELF-associated genes, most BEAF-associated genes are highly expressed. Using quantitative reverse transcription-PCR, we found that the expression levels of most BEAF-associated genes decrease in embryos and cultured cells lacking BEAF. These results provide an unexpected link between BEAF and transcription, suggesting that BEAF plays a role in maintaining most associated promoter regions in an environment that facilitates high transcription levels.

  10. Drosophila brakeless interacts with atrophin and is required for tailless-mediated transcriptional repression in early embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haecker, Achim; Qi, Dai; Lilja, Tobias; Moussian, Bernard; Andrioli, Luiz Paulo; Luschnig, Stefan; Mannervik, Mattias

    2007-06-01

    Complex gene expression patterns in animal development are generated by the interplay of transcriptional activators and repressors at cis-regulatory DNA modules (CRMs). How repressors work is not well understood, but often involves interactions with co-repressors. We isolated mutations in the brakeless gene in a screen for maternal factors affecting segmentation of the Drosophila embryo. Brakeless, also known as Scribbler, or Master of thickveins, is a nuclear protein of unknown function. In brakeless embryos, we noted an expanded expression pattern of the Krüppel (Kr) and knirps (kni) genes. We found that Tailless-mediated repression of kni expression is impaired in brakeless mutants. Tailless and Brakeless bind each other in vitro and interact genetically. Brakeless is recruited to the Kr and kni CRMs, and represses transcription when tethered to DNA. This suggests that Brakeless is a novel co-repressor. Orphan nuclear receptors of the Tailless type also interact with Atrophin co-repressors. We show that both Drosophila and human Brakeless and Atrophin interact in vitro, and propose that they act together as a co-repressor complex in many developmental contexts. We discuss the possibility that human Brakeless homologs may influence the toxicity of polyglutamine-expanded Atrophin-1, which causes the human neurodegenerative disease dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA).

  11. Genome-wide DNA binding pattern of the homeodomain transcription factor Sine oculis (So in the developing eye of Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Jusiak

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The eye of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster provides a highly tractable genetic model system for the study of animal development, and many genes that regulate Drosophila eye formation have homologs implicated in human development and disease. Among these is the homeobox gene sine oculis (so, which encodes a homeodomain transcription factor (TF that is both necessary for eye development and sufficient to reprogram a subset of cells outside the normal eye field toward an eye fate. We have performed a genome-wide analysis of So binding to DNA prepared from developing Drosophila eye tissue in order to identify candidate direct targets of So-mediated transcriptional regulation, as described in our recent article [20]. The data are available from NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO with the accession number GSE52943. Here we describe the methods, data analysis, and quality control of our So ChIP-seq dataset.

  12. RNA-Interference Components Are Dispensable for Transcriptional Silencing of the Drosophila Bithorax-Complex

    KAUST Repository

    Cernilogar, Filippo M.; Burroughs, A. Maxwell; Lanzuolo, Chiara; Breiling, Achim; Imhof, Axel; Orlando, Valerio

    2013-01-01

    .Conclusions:We conclude that the Dicer-2/Argonaute-2 RNAi pathway, despite its role in pairing sensitive gene silencing of transgenes, does not have a role in PcG dependent silencing of major homeotic gene cluster loci in Drosophila. © 2013 Cernilogar et al.

  13. Transcriptional Signatures in Response to Wheat Germ Agglutinin and Starvation in Drosophila melanogaster Larval Midgut

    Science.gov (United States)

    One function of plant lectins such as wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) is to serve as defenses against herbivorous insects. The midgut is one critical site affected by dietary lectins. We observed marked cellular, structural, and gene expression changes in the midguts of Drosophila melanogaster third-i...

  14. The Drosophila melanogaster DmCK2beta transcription unit encodes for functionally non-redundant protein isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauch, Eike; Wecklein, Heike; Stark, Felix; Jauch, Mandy; Raabe, Thomas

    2006-06-07

    Genes encoding for the two evolutionary highly conserved subunits of a heterotetrameric protein kinase CK2 holoenzyme are present in all examined eukaryotic genomes. Depending on the organism, multiple transcription units encoding for a catalytically active CK2alpha subunit and/or a regulatory CK2beta subunit may exist. The phosphotransferase activity of members of the protein kinase CK2alpha family is thought to be independent of second messengers but is modulated by interaction with CK2beta-like proteins. In the genome of Drosophila melanogaster, one gene encoding for a CK2alpha subunit and three genes encoding for CK2beta-like proteins are present. The X-linked DmCK2beta transcription unit encodes for several CK2beta protein isoforms due to alternative splicing of its primary transcript. We addressed the question whether CK2beta-like proteins are redundant in function. Our in vivo experiments show that variations of the very C-terminal tail of CK2beta isoforms encoded by the X-linked DmCK2beta transcription unit influence their functional properties. In addition, we find that CK2beta-like proteins encoded by the autosomal D. melanogaster genes CK2betates and CK2beta' cannot fully substitute for a loss of CK2beta isoforms encoded by DmCK2beta.

  15. Transcription elongation rate has a tissue-specific impact on alternative cleavage and polyadenylation in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaochuan; Freitas, Jaime; Zheng, Dinghai; Oliveira, Marta S; Hoque, Mainul; Martins, Torcato; Henriques, Telmo; Tian, Bin; Moreira, Alexandra

    2017-12-01

    Alternative polyadenylation (APA) is a mechanism that generates multiple mRNA isoforms with different 3'UTRs and/or coding sequences from a single gene. Here, using 3' region extraction and deep sequencing (3'READS), we have systematically mapped cleavage and polyadenylation sites (PASs) in Drosophila melanogaster , expanding the total repertoire of PASs previously identified for the species, especially those located in A-rich genomic sequences. Cis -element analysis revealed distinct sequence motifs around fly PASs when compared to mammalian ones, including the greater enrichment of upstream UAUA elements and the less prominent presence of downstream UGUG elements. We found that over 75% of mRNA genes in Drosophila melanogaster undergo APA. The head tissue tends to use distal PASs when compared to the body, leading to preferential expression of APA isoforms with long 3'UTRs as well as with distal terminal exons. The distance between the APA sites and intron location of PAS are important parameters for APA difference between body and head, suggesting distinct PAS selection contexts. APA analysis of the RpII215 C4 mutant strain, which harbors a mutant RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) with a slower elongation rate, revealed that a 50% decrease in transcriptional elongation rate leads to a mild trend of more usage of proximal, weaker PASs, both in 3'UTRs and in introns, consistent with the "first come, first served" model of APA regulation. However, this trend was not observed in the head, suggesting a different regulatory context in neuronal cells. Together, our data expand the PAS collection for Drosophila melanogaster and reveal a tissue-specific effect of APA regulation by RNAPII elongation rate. © 2017 Liu et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  16. Berkeley mini-collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, L.S.

    1984-06-01

    The Berkeley Mini-Collider, a heavy-ion collider being planned to provide uranium-uranium collisions at T/sub cm/ less than or equal to 4 GeV/nucleon, is described. The central physics to be studied at these energies and our early ideas for a collider detector are presented

  17. How gut transcriptional function of Drosophila melanogaster varies with the presence and composition of the gut microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bost, Alyssa; Franzenburg, Soeren; Adair, Karen L; Martinson, Vincent G; Loeb, Greg; Douglas, Angela E

    2018-04-01

    Despite evidence from laboratory experiments that perturbation of the gut microbiota affects many traits of the animal host, our understanding of the effect of variation in microbiota composition on animals in natural populations is very limited. The core purpose of this study on the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster was to identify the impact of natural variation in the taxonomic composition of gut bacterial communities on host traits, with the gut transcriptome as a molecular index of microbiota-responsive host traits. Use of the gut transcriptome was validated by demonstrating significant transcriptional differences between the guts of laboratory flies colonized with bacteria and maintained under axenic conditions. Wild Drosophila from six field collections made over two years had gut bacterial communities of diverse composition, dominated to varying extents by Acetobacteraceae and Enterobacteriaceae. The gut transcriptomes also varied among collections and differed markedly from those of laboratory flies. However, no overall relationship between variation in the wild fly transcriptome and taxonomic composition of the gut microbiota was evident at all taxonomic scales of bacteria tested for both individual fly genes and functional categories in Gene Ontology. We conclude that the interaction between microbiota composition and host functional traits may be confounded by uncontrolled variation in both ecological circumstance and host traits (e.g., genotype, age physiological condition) under natural conditions, and that microbiota effects on host traits identified in the laboratory should, therefore, be extrapolated to field population with great caution. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. The transcriptional response of Drosophila melanogaster to infection with the sigma virus (Rhabdoviridae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Carpenter

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial and fungal infections induce a potent immune response in Drosophila melanogaster, but it is unclear whether viral infections induce an antiviral immune response. Using microarrays, we examined the changes in gene expression in Drosophila that occur in response to infection with the sigma virus, a negative-stranded RNA virus (Rhabdoviridae that occurs in wild populations of D. melanogaster.We detected many changes in gene expression in infected flies, but found no evidence for the activation of the Toll, IMD or Jak-STAT pathways, which control immune responses against bacteria and fungi. We identified a number of functional categories of genes, including serine proteases, ribosomal proteins and chorion proteins that were overrepresented among the differentially expressed genes. We also found that the sigma virus alters the expression of many more genes in males than in females.These data suggest that either Drosophila do not mount an immune response against the sigma virus, or that the immune response is not controlled by known immune pathways. If the latter is true, the genes that we identified as differentially expressed after infection are promising candidates for controlling the host's response to the sigma virus.

  19. The transcriptional response of Drosophila melanogaster to infection with the sigma virus (Rhabdoviridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Jennifer; Hutter, Stephan; Baines, John F; Roller, Julia; Saminadin-Peter, Sarah S; Parsch, John; Jiggins, Francis M

    2009-08-31

    Bacterial and fungal infections induce a potent immune response in Drosophila melanogaster, but it is unclear whether viral infections induce an antiviral immune response. Using microarrays, we examined the changes in gene expression in Drosophila that occur in response to infection with the sigma virus, a negative-stranded RNA virus (Rhabdoviridae) that occurs in wild populations of D. melanogaster. We detected many changes in gene expression in infected flies, but found no evidence for the activation of the Toll, IMD or Jak-STAT pathways, which control immune responses against bacteria and fungi. We identified a number of functional categories of genes, including serine proteases, ribosomal proteins and chorion proteins that were overrepresented among the differentially expressed genes. We also found that the sigma virus alters the expression of many more genes in males than in females. These data suggest that either Drosophila do not mount an immune response against the sigma virus, or that the immune response is not controlled by known immune pathways. If the latter is true, the genes that we identified as differentially expressed after infection are promising candidates for controlling the host's response to the sigma virus.

  20. The Transcriptional Response of Drosophila melanogaster to Infection with the Sigma Virus (Rhabdoviridae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baines, John F.; Roller, Julia; Saminadin-Peter, Sarah S.; Parsch, John; Jiggins, Francis M.

    2009-01-01

    Background Bacterial and fungal infections induce a potent immune response in Drosophila melanogaster, but it is unclear whether viral infections induce an antiviral immune response. Using microarrays, we examined the changes in gene expression in Drosophila that occur in response to infection with the sigma virus, a negative-stranded RNA virus (Rhabdoviridae) that occurs in wild populations of D. melanogaster. Principal Findings We detected many changes in gene expression in infected flies, but found no evidence for the activation of the Toll, IMD or Jak-STAT pathways, which control immune responses against bacteria and fungi. We identified a number of functional categories of genes, including serine proteases, ribosomal proteins and chorion proteins that were overrepresented among the differentially expressed genes. We also found that the sigma virus alters the expression of many more genes in males than in females. Conclusions These data suggest that either Drosophila do not mount an immune response against the sigma virus, or that the immune response is not controlled by known immune pathways. If the latter is true, the genes that we identified as differentially expressed after infection are promising candidates for controlling the host's response to the sigma virus. PMID:19718442

  1. Comparative analysis of behavioral and transcriptional variation underlying CO2 sensory neuron function and development in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jia Wern; McLaughlin, Joi; Yang, Haining; Leo, Charles; Rambarat, Paula; Okuwa, Sumie; Monroy-Eklund, Anaïs; Clark, Sabrina; Jones, Corbin D; Volkan, Pelin Cayirlioglu

    2017-10-02

    Carbon dioxide is an important environmental cue for many insects, regulating many behaviors including some that have direct human impacts. To further improve our understanding of how this system varies among closely related insect species, we examined both the behavioral response to CO 2 as well as the transcriptional profile of key developmental regulators of CO 2 sensory neurons in the olfactory system across the Drosophila genus. We found that CO 2 generally evokes repulsive behavior across most of the Drosophilids we examined, but this behavior has been lost or reduced in several lineages. Comparisons of transcriptional profiles from the developing and adult antennae for subset these species suggest that behavioral differences in some species may be due to differences in the expression of the CO 2 co-receptor Gr63a. Furthermore, these differences in Gr63a expression are correlated with changes in the expression of a few genes known to be involved in the development of the CO 2 circuit, namely dac, an important regulator of sensilla fate for sensilla that house CO 2 ORNs, and mip120, a member of the MMB/dREAM epigenetic regulatory complex that regulates CO 2 receptor expression. In contrast, most of the other known structural, molecular, and developmental components of the peripheral Drosophila CO 2 olfactory system seem to be well-conserved across all examined lineages. These findings suggest that certain components of CO 2 sensory ORN development may be more evolutionarily labile, and may contribute to differences in CO 2 -evoked behavioral responses across species.

  2. Identification of unannotated exons of low abundance transcripts in Drosophila melanogaster and cloning of a new serine protease gene upregulated upon injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monesi Nadia

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The sequencing of the D.melanogaster genome revealed an unexpected small number of genes (~ 14,000 indicating that mechanisms acting on generation of transcript diversity must have played a major role in the evolution of complex metazoans. Among the most extensively used mechanisms that accounts for this diversity is alternative splicing. It is estimated that over 40% of Drosophila protein-coding genes contain one or more alternative exons. A recent transcription map of the Drosophila embryogenesis indicates that 30% of the transcribed regions are unannotated, and that 1/3 of this is estimated as missed or alternative exons of previously characterized protein-coding genes. Therefore, the identification of the variety of expressed transcripts depends on experimental data for its final validation and is continuously being performed using different approaches. We applied the Open Reading Frame Expressed Sequence Tags (ORESTES methodology, which is capable of generating cDNA data from the central portion of rare transcripts, in order to investigate the presence of hitherto unnanotated regions of Drosophila transcriptome. Results Bioinformatic analysis of 1,303 Drosophila ORESTES clusters identified 68 sequences derived from unannotated regions in the current Drosophila genome version (4.3. Of these, a set of 38 was analysed by polyA+ northern blot hybridization, validating 17 (50% new exons of low abundance transcripts. For one of these ESTs, we obtained the cDNA encompassing the complete coding sequence of a new serine protease, named SP212. The SP212 gene is part of a serine protease gene cluster located in the chromosome region 88A12-B1. This cluster includes the predicted genes CG9631, CG9649 and CG31326, which were previously identified as up-regulated after immune challenges in genomic-scale microarray analysis. In agreement with the proposal that this locus is co-regulated in response to microorganisms infection, we show

  3. Berkeley Low Background Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, K. J.; Norman, E. B.; Smith, A. R.; Poon, A. W. P.; Chan, Y. D.; Lesko, K. T.

    2015-01-01

    The Berkeley Low Background Facility (BLBF) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to a wide array of experiments and projects. The analysis of samples takes place within two unique facilities; locally within a carefully-constructed, low background laboratory on the surface at LBNL and at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K) or common cosmogenic/anthropogenic products; active screening via neutron activation analysis for U,Th, and K as well as a variety of stable isotopes; and neutron flux/beam characterization measurements through the use of monitors. A general overview of the facilities, services, and sensitivities will be presented. Recent activities and upgrades will also be described including an overview of the recently installed counting system at SURF (recently relocated from Oroville, CA in 2014), the installation of a second underground counting station at SURF in 2015, and future plans. The BLBF is open to any users for counting services or collaboration on a wide variety of experiments and projects

  4. Copper Sensing Function of Drosophila Metal-Responsive Transcription Factor-1 Is Mediated By a Tetranuclear Cu(I) Cluster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, X.; Hua, H.; Balamurugan, K.; Kong, X.; Zhang, L.; George, G.N.; Georgiev, O.; Schaffner, W.; Giedroc, D.P.

    2009-05-12

    Drosophila melanogaster MTF-1 (dMTF-1) is a copper-responsive transcriptional activator that mediates resistance to Cu, as well as Zn and Cd. Here, we characterize a novel cysteine-rich domain which is crucial for sensing excess intracellular copper by dMTF-1. Transgenic flies expressing mutant dMTF-1 containing alanine substitutions of two, four or six cysteine residues within the sequence {sup 547}CNCTNCKCDQTKSCHGGDC{sup 565} are significantly or completely impaired in their ability to protect flies from copper toxicity and fail to up-regulate MtnA (metallothionein) expression in response to excess Cu. In contrast, these flies exhibit wild-type survival in response to copper deprivation thus revealing that the cysteine cluster domain is required only for sensing Cu load by dMTF-1. Parallel studies show that the isolated cysteine cluster domain is required to protect a copper-sensitive S. cerevisiae ace1 strain from copper toxicity. Cu(I) ligation by a Cys-rich domain peptide fragment drives the cooperative assembly of a polydentate [Cu{sub 4}-S{sub 6}] cage structure, characterized by a core of trigonally S{sub 3} coordinated Cu(I) ions bound by bridging thiolate ligands. While reminiscent of Cu{sub 4}-L{sub 6} (L = ligand) tetranuclear clusters in copper regulatory transcription factors of yeast, the absence of significant sequence homology is consistent with convergent evolution of a sensing strategy particularly well suited for Cu(I).

  5. Hierarchical axon targeting of Drosophila olfactory receptor neurons specified by the proneural transcription factors Atonal and Amos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Misako; Kato, Tomoko; Miura, Masayuki; Chihara, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    Sensory information is spatially represented in the brain to form a neural map. It has been suggested that axon-axon interactions are important for neural map formation; however, the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. We used the Drosophila antennal lobe, the first olfactory center in the brain, as a model for studying neural map formation. Olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) expressing the same odorant receptor target their axons to a single glomerulus out of approximately 50 glomeruli in the antennal lobe. Previous studies have showed that the axons of Atonal ORNs, specified by Atonal, a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor, pioneer antennal lobe formation; however, the details remain to be elucidated. Here, we show that genetic ablation of Atonal ORNs affects antennal lobe structure and axon targeting of Amos ORNs, another type of ORN specified by the bHLH transcription factor Amos. During development, Atonal ORNs reach the antennal lobe and form the axon commissure before Amos ORNs. We also found that N-cadherin knockdown specifically in Atonal ORNs disrupts the glomerular boundary in the whole antennal lobe. Our results suggest that Atonal ORNs function as pioneer axons. Thus, correct axon targeting of Atonal ORNs is essential for formation of the whole antennal lobe. © 2015 The Molecular Biology Society of Japan and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  6. Phenotypic Plasticity through Transcriptional Regulation of the Evolutionary Hotspot Gene tan in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Michel Gibert

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Phenotypic plasticity is the ability of a given genotype to produce different phenotypes in response to distinct environmental conditions. Phenotypic plasticity can be adaptive. Furthermore, it is thought to facilitate evolution. Although phenotypic plasticity is a widespread phenomenon, its molecular mechanisms are only beginning to be unravelled. Environmental conditions can affect gene expression through modification of chromatin structure, mainly via histone modifications, nucleosome remodelling or DNA methylation, suggesting that phenotypic plasticity might partly be due to chromatin plasticity. As a model of phenotypic plasticity, we study abdominal pigmentation of Drosophila melanogaster females, which is temperature sensitive. Abdominal pigmentation is indeed darker in females grown at 18°C than at 29°C. This phenomenon is thought to be adaptive as the dark pigmentation produced at lower temperature increases body temperature. We show here that temperature modulates the expression of tan (t, a pigmentation gene involved in melanin production. t is expressed 7 times more at 18°C than at 29°C in female abdominal epidermis. Genetic experiments show that modulation of t expression by temperature is essential for female abdominal pigmentation plasticity. Temperature modulates the activity of an enhancer of t without modifying compaction of its chromatin or level of the active histone mark H3K27ac. By contrast, the active mark H3K4me3 on the t promoter is strongly modulated by temperature. The H3K4 methyl-transferase involved in this process is likely Trithorax, as we show that it regulates t expression and the H3K4me3 level on the t promoter and also participates in female pigmentation and its plasticity. Interestingly, t was previously shown to be involved in inter-individual variation of female abdominal pigmentation in Drosophila melanogaster, and in abdominal pigmentation divergence between Drosophila species. Sensitivity of t

  7. BERKELEY: Light Source anniversary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    The staff of the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory has been too busy to celebrate the first anniversary of the facility's transition from a US Department of Energy construction project to operating third-generation synchrotron radiation source. Based on a 1.5-GeV, low-emittance electron storage ring that accommodates up to ten insertion-device radiation sources optimized primarily for the soft X-ray and vacuum ultra-violet regions of the spectrum, the ALS has completed

  8. BERKELEY: Light Source anniversary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1994-10-15

    The staff of the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory has been too busy to celebrate the first anniversary of the facility's transition from a US Department of Energy construction project to operating third-generation synchrotron radiation source. Based on a 1.5-GeV, low-emittance electron storage ring that accommodates up to ten insertion-device radiation sources optimized primarily for the soft X-ray and vacuum ultra-violet regions of the spectrum, the ALS has completed.

  9. Interplay among Drosophila transcription factors Ets21c, Fos and Ftz-F1 drives JNK-mediated tumor malignancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Külshammer

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cancer initiation and maintenance of the transformed cell state depend on altered cellular signaling and aberrant activities of transcription factors (TFs that drive pathological gene expression in response to cooperating genetic lesions. Deciphering the roles of interacting TFs is therefore central to understanding carcinogenesis and for designing cancer therapies. Here, we use an unbiased genomic approach to define a TF network that triggers an abnormal gene expression program promoting malignancy of clonal tumors, generated in Drosophila imaginal disc epithelium by gain of oncogenic Ras (RasV12 and loss of the tumor suppressor Scribble (scrib1. We show that malignant transformation of the rasV12scrib1 tumors requires TFs of distinct families, namely the bZIP protein Fos, the ETS-domain factor Ets21c and the nuclear receptor Ftz-F1, all acting downstream of Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK. Depleting any of the three TFs improves viability of tumor-bearing larvae, and this positive effect can be enhanced further by their combined removal. Although both Fos and Ftz-F1 synergistically contribute to rasV12scrib1 tumor invasiveness, only Fos is required for JNK-induced differentiation defects and Matrix metalloprotease (MMP1 upregulation. In contrast, the Fos-dimerizing partner Jun is dispensable for JNK to exert its effects in rasV12scrib1 tumors. Interestingly, Ets21c and Ftz-F1 are transcriptionally induced in these tumors in a JNK- and Fos-dependent manner, thereby demonstrating a hierarchy within the tripartite TF network, with Fos acting as the most upstream JNK effector. Of the three TFs, only Ets21c can efficiently substitute for loss of polarity and cooperate with RasV12 in inducing malignant clones that, like rasV12scrib1 tumors, invade other tissues and overexpress MMP1 and the Drosophila insulin-like peptide 8 (Dilp8. While rasV12ets21c tumors require JNK for invasiveness, the JNK activity is dispensable for their growth. In conclusion, our

  10. A Sox Transcription Factor Is a Critical Regulator of Adult Stem Cell Proliferation in the Drosophila Intestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanju W. Meng

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Adult organs and their resident stem cells are constantly facing the challenge of adapting cell proliferation to tissue demand, particularly in response to environmental stresses. Whereas most stress-signaling pathways are conserved between progenitors and differentiated cells, stem cells have the specific ability to respond by increasing their proliferative rate, using largely unknown mechanisms. Here, we show that a member of the Sox family of transcription factors in Drosophila, Sox21a, is expressed in intestinal stem cells (ISCs in the adult gut. Sox21a is essential for the proliferation of these cells during both normal epithelium turnover and repair. Its expression is induced in response to tissue damage, downstream of the Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK pathways, to promote ISC proliferation. Although short-lived, Sox21a mutant flies show no developmental defects, supporting the notion that this factor is a specific regulator of adult stem cell proliferation.

  11. Duox, Flotillin-2, and Src42A are required to activate or delimit the spread of the transcriptional response to epidermal wounds in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle T Juarez

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The epidermis is the largest organ of the body for most animals, and the first line of defense against invading pathogens. A breach in the epidermal cell layer triggers a variety of localized responses that in favorable circumstances result in the repair of the wound. Many cellular and genetic responses must be limited to epidermal cells that are close to wounds, but how this is regulated is still poorly understood. The order and hierarchy of epidermal wound signaling factors are also still obscure. The Drosophila embryonic epidermis provides an excellent system to study genes that regulate wound healing processes. We have developed a variety of fluorescent reporters that provide a visible readout of wound-dependent transcriptional activation near epidermal wound sites. A large screen for mutants that alter the activity of these wound reporters has identified seven new genes required to activate or delimit wound-induced transcriptional responses to a narrow zone of cells surrounding wound sites. Among the genes required to delimit the spread of wound responses are Drosophila Flotillin-2 and Src42A, both of which are transcriptionally activated around wound sites. Flotillin-2 and constitutively active Src42A are also sufficient, when overexpressed at high levels, to inhibit wound-induced transcription in epidermal cells. One gene required to activate epidermal wound reporters encodes Dual oxidase, an enzyme that produces hydrogen peroxide. We also find that four biochemical treatments (a serine protease, a Src kinase inhibitor, methyl-ß-cyclodextrin, and hydrogen peroxide are sufficient to globally activate epidermal wound response genes in Drosophila embryos. We explore the epistatic relationships among the factors that induce or delimit the spread of epidermal wound signals. Our results define new genetic functions that interact to instruct only a limited number of cells around puncture wounds to mount a transcriptional response, mediating

  12. Berkeley automated supernova search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kare, J.T.; Pennypacker, C.R.; Muller, R.A.; Mast, T.S.; Crawford, F.S.; Burns, M.S.

    1981-01-01

    The Berkeley automated supernova search employs a computer controlled 36-inch telescope and charge coupled device (CCD) detector to image 2500 galaxies per night. A dedicated minicomputer compares each galaxy image with stored reference data to identify supernovae in real time. The threshold for detection is m/sub v/ = 18.8. We plan to monitor roughly 500 galaxies in Virgo and closer every night, and an additional 6000 galaxies out to 70 Mpc on a three night cycle. This should yield very early detection of several supernovae per year for detailed study, and reliable premaximum detection of roughly 100 supernovae per year for statistical studies. The search should be operational in mid-1982.

  13. Berkeley automated supernova search

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kare, J.T.; Pennypacker, C.R.; Muller, R.A.; Mast, T.S.

    1981-01-01

    The Berkeley automated supernova search employs a computer controlled 36-inch telescope and charge coupled device (CCD) detector to image 2500 galaxies per night. A dedicated minicomputer compares each galaxy image with stored reference data to identify supernovae in real time. The threshold for detection is m/sub v/ = 18.8. We plan to monitor roughly 500 galaxies in Virgo and closer every night, and an additional 6000 galaxies out to 70 Mpc on a three night cycle. This should yield very early detection of several supernovae per year for detailed study, and reliable premaximum detection of roughly 100 supernovae per year for statistical studies. The search should be operational in mid-1982

  14. Analysis of the dosage compensation of a specific transcript in Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breen, T.R.

    1985-01-01

    The basic tenet of dosage compensation is that males, which normally have one X-chromosome that contains half the amount of DNA as the two X-chromosomes in females, produce a relatively equivalent amount of X-encoded gene products compared to females. Quantitative analyses were performed to ascertain the amount of transcripts synthesized from the X-linked salivary gland secretion protein gene, Sgs-4, in larval third instar males and females which had a variety of genetic backgrounds. Two types of analyses were performed. In one, RNA from male and female late third instar salivary glands was isolated and quantitatively blotted to replica nitrocellulose filters. The replicas were hybridized with 32 P-labeled probes specific for either Sgs-4 or Sgs-3 RNA. The radioactive hybrids were quantitated by scintillation counting. In the other, male and female third instar salivary glands were incubated for 12.5 minutes with 3 H-uridine. The labelled, nascent RNAs were hybridized to dot blots of Sgs-4 and Sgs-3 DNA, and were scintillation counted. 3 H-uridine incorporation analysis showed that male Sgs-4 genes were transcribed at twice the rate of the female genes. These findings indicated that steady-state Sgs-4 RNA levels directly reflect the rate of their transcription. These results are important in that they demonstrate that dosage compensation operates at the level of the rate of transcription of a specific gene. They also dissolve ambiguities associated with results obtained in past dosage compensation experiments

  15. BERKELEY: ALS ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1993-06-15

    Everybody at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Center for Beam Physics is pleased with the rapid progress in commissioning LBL's Advanced Light Source (ALS) electron storage ring, the foundation for this third-generation synchrotron radiation facility. Designed for a maximum current of 400 mA, the ALS storage ring reached 407 mA just 24 days after storing the first beam on 16 March. ALS construction as a US Department of Energy (DOE) national user facility to provide high-brightness vacuum ultra-violet and soft x-ray radiation began in October 1987. One technical requirement marking project completion was to accumulate a 50-mA current in the storage ring. The ALS passed this milestone on 24 March, a week ahead of the official deadline. Once injected, the electron beam decays quasi-exponentially primarily because of interactions with residual gas molecules in the storage-ring vacuum chamber. Eventually, when the pressure in the vacuum chamber with beam decreases toward the expected operating level of 1 nano Torr, it will only be necessary to refill the storage ring at intervals of four to eight hours. At present the vacuum is improving rapidly as surfaces are irradiated (scrubbed) by the synchrotron radiation itself. At 100 mA, beam lifetime was about one hour (9 April)

  16. BERKELEY: ALS ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    Everybody at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Center for Beam Physics is pleased with the rapid progress in commissioning LBL's Advanced Light Source (ALS) electron storage ring, the foundation for this third-generation synchrotron radiation facility. Designed for a maximum current of 400 mA, the ALS storage ring reached 407 mA just 24 days after storing the first beam on 16 March. ALS construction as a US Department of Energy (DOE) national user facility to provide high-brightness vacuum ultra-violet and soft x-ray radiation began in October 1987. One technical requirement marking project completion was to accumulate a 50-mA current in the storage ring. The ALS passed this milestone on 24 March, a week ahead of the official deadline. Once injected, the electron beam decays quasi-exponentially primarily because of interactions with residual gas molecules in the storage-ring vacuum chamber. Eventually, when the pressure in the vacuum chamber with beam decreases toward the expected operating level of 1 nano Torr, it will only be necessary to refill the storage ring at intervals of four to eight hours. At present the vacuum is improving rapidly as surfaces are irradiated (scrubbed) by the synchrotron radiation itself. At 100 mA, beam lifetime was about one hour (9 April)

  17. Drosophila C-terminal binding protein, dCtBP is required for sensory organ prepattern and sharpens proneural transcriptional activity of the GATA factor Pnr.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biryukova, Inna; Heitzler, Pascal

    2008-11-01

    The peripheral nervous system is required for animals to detect and to relay environmental stimuli to central nervous system for the information processing. In Drosophila, the precise spatial and temporal expression of two proneural genes achaete (ac) and scute (sc), is necessary for development of the sensory organs. Here we present an evidence that the transcription co-repressor, dCtBP acts as a negative regulator of sensory organ prepattern. Loss of dCtBP function mutant exhibits ectopic sensory organs, while overexpression of dCtBP results in a dramatic loss of sensory organs. These phenotypes are correlated with mis-emerging of sensory organ precursors and perturbated expression of proneural transcription activator Ac. Mammalian CtBP-1 was identified via interaction with the consensus motif PXDLSX(K/R) of adenovirus E1A oncoprotein. We demonstrated that dCtBP binds directly to PLDLS motif of Drosophila Friend of GATA-1 protein, U-shaped and sharpens the adult sensory organ development. Moreover, we found that dCtBP mediates multivalent interaction with the GATA transcriptional activator Pannier and acts as a direct co-repressor of the Pannier-mediated activation of proneural genes. We demonstrated that Pannier genetically interacts with dCtBP-interacting protein HDAC1, suggesting that the dCtBP-dependent regulation of Pannier activity could utilize a repressive mechanism involving alteration of local chromatine structure.

  18. The Drosophila Translational Control Element (TCE) is required for high-level transcription of many genes that are specifically expressed in testes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzenberger, Rebeccah J; Rach, Elizabeth A; Anderson, Ashley K; Ohler, Uwe; Wassarman, David A

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the importance of core promoter elements for tissue-specific transcription of RNA polymerase II genes, we examined testis-specific transcription in Drosophila melanogaster. Bioinformatic analyses of core promoter sequences from 190 genes that are specifically expressed in testes identified a 10 bp A/T-rich motif that is identical to the translational control element (TCE). The TCE functions in the 5' untranslated region of Mst(3)CGP mRNAs to repress translation, and it also functions in a heterologous gene to regulate transcription. We found that among genes with focused initiation patterns, the TCE is significantly enriched in core promoters of genes that are specifically expressed in testes but not in core promoters of genes that are specifically expressed in other tissues. The TCE is variably located in core promoters and is conserved in melanogaster subgroup species, but conservation dramatically drops in more distant species. In transgenic flies, short (300-400 bp) genomic regions containing a TCE directed testis-specific transcription of a reporter gene. Mutation of the TCE significantly reduced but did not abolish reporter gene transcription indicating that the TCE is important but not essential for transcription activation. Finally, mutation of testis-specific TFIID (tTFIID) subunits significantly reduced the transcription of a subset of endogenous TCE-containing but not TCE-lacking genes, suggesting that tTFIID activity is limited to TCE-containing genes but that tTFIID is not an obligatory regulator of TCE-containing genes. Thus, the TCE is a core promoter element in a subset of genes that are specifically expressed in testes. Furthermore, the TCE regulates transcription in the context of short genomic regions, from variable locations in the core promoter, and both dependently and independently of tTFIID. These findings set the stage for determining the mechanism by which the TCE regulates testis-specific transcription and understanding the

  19. A large-scale, in vivo transcription factor screen defines bivalent chromatin as a key property of regulatory factors mediating Drosophila wing development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schertel, Claus; Albarca, Monica; Rockel-Bauer, Claudia; Kelley, Nicholas W; Bischof, Johannes; Hens, Korneel; van Nimwegen, Erik; Basler, Konrad; Deplancke, Bart

    2015-04-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) are key regulators of cell fate. The estimated 755 genes that encode DNA binding domain-containing proteins comprise ∼ 5% of all Drosophila genes. However, the majority has remained uncharacterized so far due to the lack of proper genetic tools. We generated 594 site-directed transgenic Drosophila lines that contain integrations of individual UAS-TF constructs to facilitate spatiotemporally controlled misexpression in vivo. All transgenes were expressed in the developing wing, and two-thirds induced specific phenotypic defects. In vivo knockdown of the same genes yielded a phenotype for 50%, with both methods indicating a great potential for misexpression to characterize novel functions in wing growth, patterning, and development. Thus, our UAS-TF library provides an important addition to the genetic toolbox of Drosophila research, enabling the identification of several novel wing development-related TFs. In parallel, we established the chromatin landscape of wing imaginal discs by ChIP-seq analyses of five chromatin marks and RNA Pol II. Subsequent clustering revealed six distinct chromatin states, with two clusters showing enrichment for both active and repressive marks. TFs that carry such "bivalent" chromatin are highly enriched for causing misexpression phenotypes in the wing, and analysis of existing expression data shows that these TFs tend to be differentially expressed across the wing disc. Thus, bivalently marked chromatin can be used as a marker for spatially regulated TFs that are functionally relevant in a developing tissue. © 2015 Schertel et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  20. 76 FR 37650 - Safety Zone; 4th of July Festival Berkeley Marina Fireworks Display Berkeley, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-28

    ...-AA00 Safety Zone; 4th of July Festival Berkeley Marina Fireworks Display Berkeley, CA AGENCY: Coast... the 4th of July Festival Berkeley Marina Fireworks Display. Unauthorized persons or vessels are... display. Background and Purpose The City of Berkeley Marina will sponsor the 4th of July Festival Berkeley...

  1. Insulin/IGF-regulated size scaling of neuroendocrine cells expressing the bHLH transcription factor Dimmed in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiangnan Luo

    Full Text Available Neurons and other cells display a large variation in size in an organism. Thus, a fundamental question is how growth of individual cells and their organelles is regulated. Is size scaling of individual neurons regulated post-mitotically, independent of growth of the entire CNS? Although the role of insulin/IGF-signaling (IIS in growth of tissues and whole organisms is well established, it is not known whether it regulates the size of individual neurons. We therefore studied the role of IIS in the size scaling of neurons in the Drosophila CNS. By targeted genetic manipulations of insulin receptor (dInR expression in a variety of neuron types we demonstrate that the cell size is affected only in neuroendocrine cells specified by the bHLH transcription factor DIMMED (DIMM. Several populations of DIMM-positive neurons tested displayed enlarged cell bodies after overexpression of the dInR, as well as PI3 kinase and Akt1 (protein kinase B, whereas DIMM-negative neurons did not respond to dInR manipulations. Knockdown of these components produce the opposite phenotype. Increased growth can also be induced by targeted overexpression of nutrient-dependent TOR (target of rapamycin signaling components, such as Rheb (small GTPase, TOR and S6K (S6 kinase. After Dimm-knockdown in neuroendocrine cells manipulations of dInR expression have significantly less effects on cell size. We also show that dInR expression in neuroendocrine cells can be altered by up or down-regulation of Dimm. This novel dInR-regulated size scaling is seen during postembryonic development, continues in the aging adult and is diet dependent. The increase in cell size includes cell body, axon terminations, nucleus and Golgi apparatus. We suggest that the dInR-mediated scaling of neuroendocrine cells is part of a plasticity that adapts the secretory capacity to changing physiological conditions and nutrient-dependent organismal growth.

  2. Transcriptional analysis of the HeT-A retrotransposon in mutant and wild type stocks reveals high sequence variability at Drosophila telomeres and other unusual features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piñeyro David

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Telomere replication in Drosophila depends on the transposition of a domesticated retroelement, the HeT-A retrotransposon. The sequence of the HeT-A retrotransposon changes rapidly resulting in differentiated subfamilies. This pattern of sequence change contrasts with the essential function with which the HeT-A is entrusted and brings about questions concerning the extent of sequence variability, the telomere contribution of different subfamilies, and whether wild type and mutant Drosophila stocks show different HeT-A scenarios. Results A detailed study on the variability of HeT-A reveals that both the level of variability and the number of subfamilies are higher than previously reported. Comparisons between GIII, a strain with longer telomeres, and its parental strain Oregon-R indicate that both strains have the same set of HeT-A subfamilies. Finally, the presence of a highly conserved splicing pattern only in its antisense transcripts indicates a putative regulatory, functional or structural role for the HeT-A RNA. Interestingly, our results also suggest that most HeT-A copies are actively expressed regardless of which telomere and where in the telomere they are located. Conclusions Our study demonstrates how the HeT-A sequence changes much faster than previously reported resulting in at least nine different subfamilies most of which could actively contribute to telomere extension in Drosophila. Interestingly, the only significant difference observed between Oregon-R and GIII resides in the nature and proportion of the antisense transcripts, suggesting a possible mechanism that would in part explain the longer telomeres of the GIII stock.

  3. Hindsight regulates photoreceptor axon targeting through transcriptional control of jitterbug/Filamin and multiple genes involved in axon guidance in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva, Carlos; Molina-Fernandez, Claudia; Maureira, Miguel; Candia, Noemi; López, Estefanía; Hassan, Bassem; Aerts, Stein; Cánovas, José; Olguín, Patricio; Sierralta, Jimena

    2015-09-01

    During axon targeting, a stereotyped pattern of connectivity is achieved by the integration of intrinsic genetic programs and the response to extrinsic long and short-range directional cues. How this coordination occurs is the subject of intense study. Transcription factors play a central role due to their ability to regulate the expression of multiple genes required to sense and respond to these cues during development. Here we show that the transcription factor HNT regulates layer-specific photoreceptor axon targeting in Drosophila through transcriptional control of jbug/Filamin and multiple genes involved in axon guidance and cytoskeleton organization.Using a microarray analysis we identified 235 genes whose expression levels were changed by HNT overexpression in the eye primordia. We analyzed nine candidate genes involved in cytoskeleton regulation and axon guidance, six of which displayed significantly altered gene expression levels in hnt mutant retinas. Functional analysis confirmed the role of OTK/PTK7 in photoreceptor axon targeting and uncovered Tiggrin, an integrin ligand, and Jbug/Filamin, a conserved actin- binding protein, as new factors that participate of photoreceptor axon targeting. Moreover, we provided in silico and molecular evidence that supports jbug/Filamin as a direct transcriptional target of HNT and that HNT acts partially through Jbug/Filamin in vivo to regulate axon guidance. Our work broadens the understanding of how HNT regulates the coordinated expression of a group of genes to achieve the correct connectivity pattern in the Drosophila visual system. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 75: 1018-1032, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Hippo, TGF-β, and Src-MAPK pathways regulate transcription of the upd3 cytokine in Drosophila enterocytes upon bacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houtz, Philip; Bonfini, Alessandro; Liu, Xi; Revah, Jonathan; Guillou, Aurélien; Poidevin, Mickael; Hens, Korneel; Huang, Hsin-Yi; Deplancke, Bart; Tsai, Yu-Chen; Buchon, Nicolas

    2017-11-01

    Cytokine signaling is responsible for coordinating conserved epithelial regeneration and immune responses in the digestive tract. In the Drosophila midgut, Upd3 is a major cytokine, which is induced in enterocytes (EC) and enteroblasts (EB) upon oral infection, and initiates intestinal stem cell (ISC) dependent tissue repair. To date, the genetic network directing upd3 transcription remains largely uncharacterized. Here, we have identified the key infection-responsive enhancers of the upd3 gene and show that distinct enhancers respond to various stresses. Furthermore, through functional genetic screening, bioinformatic analyses and yeast one-hybrid screening, we determined that the transcription factors Scalloped (Sd), Mothers against dpp (Mad), and D-Fos are principal regulators of upd3 expression. Our study demonstrates that upd3 transcription in the gut is regulated by the activation of multiple pathways, including the Hippo, TGF-β/Dpp, and Src, as well as p38-dependent MAPK pathways. Thus, these essential pathways, which are known to control ISC proliferation cell-autonomously, are also activated in ECs to promote tissue turnover the regulation of upd3 transcription.

  5. The Drosophila Translational Control Element (TCE is required for high-level transcription of many genes that are specifically expressed in testes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebeccah J Katzenberger

    Full Text Available To investigate the importance of core promoter elements for tissue-specific transcription of RNA polymerase II genes, we examined testis-specific transcription in Drosophila melanogaster. Bioinformatic analyses of core promoter sequences from 190 genes that are specifically expressed in testes identified a 10 bp A/T-rich motif that is identical to the translational control element (TCE. The TCE functions in the 5' untranslated region of Mst(3CGP mRNAs to repress translation, and it also functions in a heterologous gene to regulate transcription. We found that among genes with focused initiation patterns, the TCE is significantly enriched in core promoters of genes that are specifically expressed in testes but not in core promoters of genes that are specifically expressed in other tissues. The TCE is variably located in core promoters and is conserved in melanogaster subgroup species, but conservation dramatically drops in more distant species. In transgenic flies, short (300-400 bp genomic regions containing a TCE directed testis-specific transcription of a reporter gene. Mutation of the TCE significantly reduced but did not abolish reporter gene transcription indicating that the TCE is important but not essential for transcription activation. Finally, mutation of testis-specific TFIID (tTFIID subunits significantly reduced the transcription of a subset of endogenous TCE-containing but not TCE-lacking genes, suggesting that tTFIID activity is limited to TCE-containing genes but that tTFIID is not an obligatory regulator of TCE-containing genes. Thus, the TCE is a core promoter element in a subset of genes that are specifically expressed in testes. Furthermore, the TCE regulates transcription in the context of short genomic regions, from variable locations in the core promoter, and both dependently and independently of tTFIID. These findings set the stage for determining the mechanism by which the TCE regulates testis-specific transcription and

  6. Juvenile hormone counteracts the bHLH-PAS transcription factors MET and GCE to prevent caspase-dependent programmed cell death in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Sheng, Zhentao; Liu, Hanhan; Wen, Di; He, Qianyu; Wang, Sheng; Shao, Wei; Jiang, Rong-Jing; An, Shiheng; Sun, Yaning; Bendena, William G; Wang, Jian; Gilbert, Lawrence I; Wilson, Thomas G; Song, Qisheng; Li, Sheng

    2009-06-01

    Juvenile hormone (JH) regulates many developmental and physiological events in insects, but its molecular mechanism remains conjectural. Here we report that genetic ablation of the corpus allatum cells of the Drosophila ring gland (the JH source) resulted in JH deficiency, pupal lethality and precocious and enhanced programmed cell death (PCD) of the larval fat body. In the fat body of the JH-deficient animals, Dronc and Drice, two caspase genes that are crucial for PCD induced by the molting hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E), were significantly upregulated. These results demonstrated that JH antagonizes 20E-induced PCD by restricting the mRNA levels of Dronc and Drice. The antagonizing effect of JH on 20E-induced PCD in the fat body was further confirmed in the JH-deficient animals by 20E treatment and RNA interference of the 20E receptor EcR. Moreover, MET and GCE, the bHLH-PAS transcription factors involved in JH action, were shown to induce PCD by upregulating Dronc and Drice. In the Met- and gce-deficient animals, Dronc and Drice were downregulated, whereas in the Met-overexpression fat body, Dronc and Drice were significantly upregulated leading to precocious and enhanced PCD, and this upregulation could be suppressed by application of the JH agonist methoprene. For the first time, we demonstrate that JH counteracts MET and GCE to prevent caspase-dependent PCD in controlling fat body remodeling and larval-pupal metamorphosis in Drosophila.

  7. 77 FR 37604 - Safety Zone; Fourth of July Fireworks, Berkeley Marina, Berkeley, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-22

    ...: The Coast Guard will enforce a 1,000 foot safety zone around the Berkeley Pier in position 37[deg]51... Zone; Fourth of July Fireworks, Berkeley Marina, Berkeley, CA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of enforcement of regulation. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard will enforce the safety zone for the Berkeley...

  8. 78 FR 29022 - Safety Zone; Fourth of July Fireworks, Berkeley Marina, Berkeley, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-17

    ... Guard will enforce a 1,000 foot safety zone around the Berkeley Pier in approximate position 37[deg]51... Zone; Fourth of July Fireworks, Berkeley Marina, Berkeley, CA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of enforcement of regulation. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard will enforce the safety zone for the Berkeley...

  9. Identification of the Drosophila eIF4A gene as a target of the DREF transcription factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ida, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Hideki; Nakamura, Kumi; Yamaguchi, Masamitsu

    2007-01-01

    The DNA replication-related element-binding factor (DREF) regulates cell proliferation-related gene expression in Drosophila. We have carried out a genetic screening, taking advantage of the rough eye phenotype of transgenic flies that express full-length DREF in the eye imaginal discs and identified the eukaryotic initiation factor 4A (eIF4A) gene as a dominant suppressor of the DREF-induced rough eye phenotype. The eIF4A gene was here found to carry three DRE sequences, DRE1 (- 40 to - 47), DRE2 (- 48 to - 55), and DRE3 (- 267 to - 274) in its promoter region, these all being important for the eIF4A gene promoter activity in cultured Drosophila Kc cells and in living flies. Knockdown of DREF in Drosophila S2 cells decreased the eIF4A mRNA level and the eIF4A gene promoter activity. Furthermore, specific binding of DREF to genomic regions containing DRE sequences was demonstrated by chromatin immunoprecipitation assays using anti-DREF antibodies. Band mobility shift assays using Kc cell nuclear extracts revealed that DREF could bind to DRE1 and DRE3 sequences in the eIF4A gene promoter in vitro, but not to the DRE2 sequence. The results suggest that the eIF4A gene is under the control of the DREF pathway and DREF is therefore involved in the regulation of protein synthesis

  10. Developmental roles of 21 Drosophila transcription factors are determined by quantitative differences in binding to an overlapping set of thousands of genomic regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacArthur, Stewart; Li, Xiao-Yong; Li, Jingyi; Brown, James B.; Chu, Hou Cheng; Zeng, Lucy; Grondona, Brandi P.; Hechmer, Aaron; Simirenko, Lisa; Keranen, Soile V.E.; Knowles, David W.; Stapleton, Mark; Bickel, Peter; Biggin, Mark D.; Eisen, Michael B.

    2009-05-15

    BACKGROUND: We previously established that six sequence-specific transcription factors that initiate anterior/posterior patterning in Drosophila bind to overlapping sets of thousands of genomic regions in blastoderm embryos. While regions bound at high levels include known and probable functional targets, more poorly bound regions are preferentially associated with housekeeping genes and/or genes not transcribed in the blastoderm, and are frequently found in protein coding sequences or in less conserved non-coding DNA, suggesting that many are likely non-functional. RESULTS: Here we show that an additional 15 transcription factors that regulate other aspects of embryo patterning show a similar quantitative continuum of function and binding to thousands of genomic regions in vivo. Collectively, the 21 regulators show a surprisingly high overlap in the regions they bind given that they belong to 11 DNA binding domain families, specify distinct developmental fates, and can act via different cis-regulatory modules. We demonstrate, however, that quantitative differences in relative levels of binding to shared targets correlate with the known biological and transcriptional regulatory specificities of these factors. CONCLUSIONS: It is likely that the overlap in binding of biochemically and functionally unrelated transcription factors arises from the high concentrations of these proteins in nuclei, which, coupled with their broad DNA binding specificities, directs them to regions of open chromatin. We suggest that most animal transcription factors will be found to show a similar broad overlapping pattern of binding in vivo, with specificity achieved by modulating the amount, rather than the identity, of bound factor.

  11. Chronic low-dose pro-oxidant treatment stimulates transcriptional activity of telomeric retroelements and incerases telomere lenght in Drosophila

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Korandová, Michala; Krůček, Tomáš; Szakosová, Klára; Kodrík, Dalibor; Kühnlein, R. P.; Tomášková, Jindřiška; Čapková Frydrychová, Radmila

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 104, JAN 10 (2018), s. 1-8 ISSN 0022-1910 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA17-03253S EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 316304 - MODBIOLIN Grant - others:GA JU(CZ) 052/2013/P; GA JU(CZ) 038/2014/P Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Drosophila * oxidative stress * telomeres Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Genetics and heredity (medical genetics to be 3) Impact factor: 2.227, year: 2016 https://www. science direct.com/ science /article/pii/S0022191017303098?via%3Dihub

  12. Transcriptional Adaptor ADA3 of Drosophila melanogaster Is Required for Histone Modification, Position Effect Variegation, and Transcription▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Grau, Benjamin; Popescu, Cristina; Torroja, Laura; Ortuño-Sahagún, Daniel; Boros, Imre; Ferrús, Alberto

    2007-01-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster gene diskette (also known as dik or dAda3) encodes a protein 29% identical to human ADA3, a subunit of GCN5-containing histone acetyltransferase (HAT) complexes. The fly dADA3 is a major contributor to oogenesis, and it is also required for somatic cell viability. dADA3 localizes to chromosomes, and it is significantly reduced in dGcn5 and dAda2a, but not in dAda2b, mutant backgrounds. In dAda3 mutants, acetylation at histone H3 K9 and K14, but not K18, and at hist...

  13. A Member of the p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Family Is Responsible for Transcriptional Induction of Dopa decarboxylase in the Epidermis of Drosophila melanogaster during the Innate Immune Response▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Monica M.; Primrose, David A.; Hodgetts, Ross B.

    2008-01-01

    Drosophila innate immunity is controlled primarily by the activation of IMD (immune deficiency) or Toll signaling leading to the production of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). IMD signaling also activates the JUN N-terminal kinase (JNK) cascade, which is responsible for immune induction of non-antimicrobial peptide immune gene transcription though the transcription factor AP-1. Transcription of the Dopa decarboxylase (Ddc) gene is induced in response to gram-negative and gram-positive septic injury, but not aseptic wounding. Transcription is induced throughout the epidermis and not specifically at the site of infection. Ddc transcripts are detectible within 2 h and remain high for several hours following infection with either gram-negative or gram-positive bacteria. Using Ddc-green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene constructs, we show that a conserved consensus AP-1 binding site upstream of the Ddc transcription start site is required for induction. However, neither the Toll, IMD, nor JNK pathway is involved. Rather, Ddc transcription depends on a previously uncharacterized member of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase family, p38c. We propose that the involvement of DDC in a new pathway involved in Drosophila immunity increases the levels of dopamine, which is metabolized to produce reactive quinones that exert an antimicrobial effect on invading bacteria. PMID:18519585

  14. Survival Rate and Transcriptional Response upon Infection with the Generalist Parasite Beauveria bassiana in a World-Wide Sample of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Paparazzo

    Full Text Available The ability to cope with infection by a parasite is one of the major challenges for any host species and is a major driver of evolution. Parasite pressure differs between habitats. It is thought to be higher in tropical regions compared to temporal ones. We infected Drosophila melanogaster from two tropical (Malaysia and Zimbabwe and two temperate populations (the Netherlands and North Carolina with the generalist entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana to examine if adaptation to local parasite pressures led to differences in resistance. Contrary to previous findings we observed increased survival in temperate populations. This, however, is not due to increased resistance to infection per se, but rather the consequence of a higher general vigor of the temperate populations. We also assessed transcriptional response to infection within these flies eight and 24 hours after infection. Only few genes were induced at the earlier time point, most of which are involved in detoxification. In contrast, we identified more than 4,000 genes that changed their expression state after 24 hours. This response was generally conserved over all populations with only few genes being uniquely regulated in the temperate populations. We furthermore found that the American population was transcriptionally highly diverged from all other populations concerning basal levels of gene expression. This was particularly true for stress and immune response genes, which might be the genetic basis for their elevated vigor.

  15. Survival Rate and Transcriptional Response upon Infection with the Generalist Parasite Beauveria bassiana in a World-Wide Sample of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paparazzo, Francesco; Tellier, Aurélien; Stephan, Wolfgang; Hutter, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    The ability to cope with infection by a parasite is one of the major challenges for any host species and is a major driver of evolution. Parasite pressure differs between habitats. It is thought to be higher in tropical regions compared to temporal ones. We infected Drosophila melanogaster from two tropical (Malaysia and Zimbabwe) and two temperate populations (the Netherlands and North Carolina) with the generalist entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana to examine if adaptation to local parasite pressures led to differences in resistance. Contrary to previous findings we observed increased survival in temperate populations. This, however, is not due to increased resistance to infection per se, but rather the consequence of a higher general vigor of the temperate populations. We also assessed transcriptional response to infection within these flies eight and 24 hours after infection. Only few genes were induced at the earlier time point, most of which are involved in detoxification. In contrast, we identified more than 4,000 genes that changed their expression state after 24 hours. This response was generally conserved over all populations with only few genes being uniquely regulated in the temperate populations. We furthermore found that the American population was transcriptionally highly diverged from all other populations concerning basal levels of gene expression. This was particularly true for stress and immune response genes, which might be the genetic basis for their elevated vigor.

  16. Survival Rate and Transcriptional Response upon Infection with the Generalist Parasite Beauveria bassiana in a World-Wide Sample of Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paparazzo, Francesco; Tellier, Aurélien; Stephan, Wolfgang; Hutter, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    The ability to cope with infection by a parasite is one of the major challenges for any host species and is a major driver of evolution. Parasite pressure differs between habitats. It is thought to be higher in tropical regions compared to temporal ones. We infected Drosophila melanogaster from two tropical (Malaysia and Zimbabwe) and two temperate populations (the Netherlands and North Carolina) with the generalist entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana to examine if adaptation to local parasite pressures led to differences in resistance. Contrary to previous findings we observed increased survival in temperate populations. This, however, is not due to increased resistance to infection per se, but rather the consequence of a higher general vigor of the temperate populations. We also assessed transcriptional response to infection within these flies eight and 24 hours after infection. Only few genes were induced at the earlier time point, most of which are involved in detoxification. In contrast, we identified more than 4,000 genes that changed their expression state after 24 hours. This response was generally conserved over all populations with only few genes being uniquely regulated in the temperate populations. We furthermore found that the American population was transcriptionally highly diverged from all other populations concerning basal levels of gene expression. This was particularly true for stress and immune response genes, which might be the genetic basis for their elevated vigor. PMID:26154519

  17. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-07-01

    The purpose of this report is to present the preliminary findings made during the Environmental Survey, February 22--29, 1988, at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) in Berkeley, California. The University of California operates the LBL facility for DOE. The LBL Survey is part of the larger DOE-wide Environmental Survey announced by Secretary John S. Herrington on September 18, 1985. The purpose of this effort is to identify, via ''no fault'' baseline Surveys, existing environmental problems and areas of environmental risk at DOE facilities, and to rank them on a DOE wide basis. This ranking will enable DOE to more effectively establish priorities for addressing environmental problems and allocate the resources necessary to correct them. Because the Survey is ''no fault'' and is not an ''audit,'' it is not designed to identify specific isolated incidents of noncompliance or to analyze environmental management practices. Such incidents and/or management practices will, however, be used in the Survey as a means of identifying existing and potential environmental problems. The LBL Survey was conducted by a multidisciplinary team of technical specialists headed and managed by a Team Leader and Assistant Team Leader from DOE's Office of Environmental Audit. A complete list of the LBL Survey participants and their affiliations is provided in Appendix A. 80 refs., 27 figs., 37 tabs

  18. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-07-01

    The purpose of this report is to present the preliminary findings made during the Environmental Survey, February 22--29, 1988, at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) in Berkeley, California. The University of California operates the LBL facility for DOE. The LBL Survey is part of the larger DOE-wide Environmental Survey announced by Secretary John S. Herrington on September 18, 1985. The purpose of this effort is to identify, via no fault'' baseline Surveys, existing environmental problems and areas of environmental risk at DOE facilities, and to rank them on a DOE wide basis. This ranking will enable DOE to more effectively establish priorities for addressing environmental problems and allocate the resources necessary to correct them. Because the Survey is no fault'' and is not an audit,'' it is not designed to identify specific isolated incidents of noncompliance or to analyze environmental management practices. Such incidents and/or management practices will, however, be used in the Survey as a means of identifying existing and potential environmental problems. The LBL Survey was conducted by a multidisciplinary team of technical specialists headed and managed by a Team Leader and Assistant Team Leader from DOE's Office of Environmental Audit. A complete list of the LBL Survey participants and their affiliations is provided in Appendix A. 80 refs., 27 figs., 37 tabs.

  19. Drosophila S2 cells are non-permissive for vaccinia virus DNA replication following entry via low pH-dependent endocytosis and early transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zain Bengali

    Full Text Available Vaccinia virus (VACV, a member of the chordopox subfamily of the Poxviridae, abortively infects insect cells. We have investigated VACV infection of Drosophila S2 cells, which are useful for protein expression and genome-wide RNAi screening. Biochemical and electron microscopic analyses indicated that VACV entry into Drosophila S2 cells depended on the VACV multiprotein entry-fusion complex but appeared to occur exclusively by a low pH-dependent endocytic mechanism, in contrast to both neutral and low pH entry pathways used in mammalian cells. Deep RNA sequencing revealed that the entire VACV early transcriptome, comprising 118 open reading frames, was robustly expressed but neither intermediate nor late mRNAs were made. Nor was viral late protein synthesis or inhibition of host protein synthesis detected by pulse-labeling with radioactive amino acids. Some reduction in viral early proteins was noted by Western blotting. Nevertheless, synthesis of the multitude of early proteins needed for intermediate gene expression was demonstrated by transfection of a plasmid containing a reporter gene regulated by an intermediate promoter. In addition, expression of a reporter gene with a late promoter was achieved by cotransfection of intermediate genes encoding the late transcription factors. The requirement for transfection of DNA templates for intermediate and late gene expression indicated a defect in viral genome replication in VACV-infected S2 cells, which was confirmed by direct analysis. Furthermore, VACV-infected S2 cells did not support the replication of a transfected plasmid, which occurs in mammalian cells and is dependent on all known viral replication proteins, indicating a primary restriction of DNA synthesis.

  20. A functional screen reveals an extensive layer of transcriptional and splicing control underlying RAS/MAPK signaling in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dariel Ashton-Beaucage

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The small GTPase RAS is among the most prevalent oncogenes. The evolutionarily conserved RAF-MEK-MAPK module that lies downstream of RAS is one of the main conduits through which RAS transmits proliferative signals in normal and cancer cells. Genetic and biochemical studies conducted over the last two decades uncovered a small set of factors regulating RAS/MAPK signaling. Interestingly, most of these were found to control RAF activation, thus suggesting a central regulatory role for this event. Whether additional factors are required at this level or further downstream remains an open question. To obtain a comprehensive view of the elements functionally linked to the RAS/MAPK cascade, we used a quantitative assay in Drosophila S2 cells to conduct a genome-wide RNAi screen for factors impacting RAS-mediated MAPK activation. The screen led to the identification of 101 validated hits, including most of the previously known factors associated to this pathway. Epistasis experiments were then carried out on individual candidates to determine their position relative to core pathway components. While this revealed several new factors acting at different steps along the pathway--including a new protein complex modulating RAF activation--we found that most hits unexpectedly work downstream of MEK and specifically influence MAPK expression. These hits mainly consist of constitutive splicing factors and thereby suggest that splicing plays a specific role in establishing MAPK levels. We further characterized two representative members of this group and surprisingly found that they act by regulating mapk alternative splicing. This study provides an unprecedented assessment of the factors modulating RAS/MAPK signaling in Drosophila. In addition, it suggests that pathway output does not solely rely on classical signaling events, such as those controlling RAF activation, but also on the regulation of MAPK levels. Finally, it indicates that core splicing

  1. Evidence for a hierarchical transcriptional circuit in Drosophila male germline involving testis-specific TAF and two gene-specific transcription factors, Mod and Acj6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Mei; Gao, Zhengliang; Wang, Jian; Nurminsky, Dmitry I

    2018-01-01

    To analyze transcription factors involved in gene regulation by testis-specific TAF (tTAF), tTAF-dependent promoters were mapped and analyzed in silico. Core promoters show decreased AT content, paucity of classical promoter motifs, and enrichment with translation control element CAAAATTY. Scanning of putative regulatory regions for known position frequency matrices identified 19 transcription regulators possibly contributing to tTAF-driven gene expression. Decreased male fertility associated with mutation in one of the regulators, Acj6, indicates its involvement in male reproduction. Transcriptome study of testes from male mutants for tTAF, Acj6, and previously characterized tTAF-interacting factor Modulo implies the existence of a regulatory hierarchy of tTAF, Modulo and Acj6, in which Modulo and/or Acj6 regulate one-third of tTAF-dependent genes. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  2. Berkeley High-Resolution Ball

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond, R.M.

    1984-10-01

    Criteria for a high-resolution γ-ray system are discussed. Desirable properties are high resolution, good response function, and moderate solid angle so as to achieve not only double- but triple-coincidences with good statistics. The Berkeley High-Resolution Ball involved the first use of bismuth germanate (BGO) for anti-Compton shield for Ge detectors. The resulting compact shield permitted rather close packing of 21 detectors around a target. In addition, a small central BGO ball gives the total γ-ray energy and multiplicity, as well as the angular pattern of the γ rays. The 21-detector array is nearly complete, and the central ball has been designed, but not yet constructed. First results taken with 9 detector modules are shown for the nucleus 156 Er. The complex decay scheme indicates a transition from collective rotation (prolate shape) to single- particle states (possibly oblate) near spin 30 h, and has other interesting features

  3. Role of Flightless-I (Drosophila) homolog in the transcription activation of type I collagen gene mediated by transforming growth factor beta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Mi-Sun; Jeong, Kwang Won, E-mail: kwjeong@gachon.ac.kr

    2014-11-21

    Highlights: • FLII activates TGFβ-mediated expression of COL1A2 gene. • TGFβ induces the association of FLII with SMAD3 and BRG1 in A549 cells. • FLII is required for the recruitment of SWI/SNF complex and chromatin accessibility to COL1A2 promoter. - Abstract: Flightless-I (Drosophila) homolog (FLII) is a nuclear receptor coactivator that is known to interact with other transcriptional regulators such as the SWI/SNF complex, an ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complex, at the promoter or enhancer region of estrogen receptor (ER)-α target genes. However, little is known about the role of FLII during transcription initiation in the transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ)/SMAD-dependent signaling pathway. Here, we demonstrate that FLII functions as a coactivator in the expression of type I collagen gene induced by TGFβ in A549 cells. FLII activates the reporter gene driven by COL1A2 promoter in a dose-dependent manner. Co-expression of GRIP1, CARM1, or p300 did not show any synergistic activation of transcription. Furthermore, the level of COL1A2 expression correlated with the endogenous level of FLII mRNA level. Depletion of FLII resulted in a reduction of TGFβ-induced expression of COL1A2 gene. In contrast, over-expression of FLII caused an increase in the endogenous expression of COL1A2. We also showed that FLII is associated with Brahma-related gene 1 (BRG1) as well as SMAD in A549 cells. Notably, the recruitment of BRG1 to the COL1A2 promoter region was decreased in FLII-depleted A549 cells, suggesting that FLII is required for TGFβ-induced chromatin remodeling, which is carried out by the SWI/SNF complex. Furthermore, formaldehyde-assisted isolation of regulatory elements (FAIRE)-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) experiments revealed that depletion of FLII caused a reduction in chromatin accessibility at the COL1A2 promoter. These results suggest that FLII plays a critical role in TGFβ/SMAD-mediated transcription of the COL1A2 gene

  4. Diversity, Equity, & Inclusion at Berkeley Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkeley Lab A-Z Index Directory Search Diversity, Equity, & Inclusion at Berkeley Lab Home Diversity & Inclusion Council Women Scientists & Engineers Council Employee Resource Groups -and culture of inclusion are key to attracting and engaging the brightest minds and furthering our

  5. The decommissioning of Berkeley II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannan, A.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the decommissioning progress at the Magnox site at Berkeley in Gloucestershire.Throughout the work at Berkeley the emphasis has been on conducting decommissioning safely. This has been reflected in the progress of decommissioning starting with removal of the fuel from site and thus much greater than 99% of the radioactive inventory. The major radioactive hazard is the Intermediate Level Waste in the form of fuel element debris (graphite struts and extraneous magnox components removed to increase the packing density of fuel elements in flasks going to Sellafield), miscellaneous activated components, sludges and resins. Approximately 1500 m 3 of such material exists and is stored in underground waste vaults on site. Work is underway to recover and encapsulate the waste in cement so rendering it 'passively safe'. All work on site is covered by a nuclear safety case which has a key objective of minimising the radiological exposures that could accrue to workers. Reflecting this an early decision has been taken to leave work on the Reactor Pressure Vessels themselves for several decades. Also important in protection of the workforce has been control of asbestos.Much material has been removed with redundant plant and equipment, but a programme of remediation in line with government legislation has been required to ensure personnel safety throughout the decommissioning period and into Care and Maintenance.In addition to health and safety matters the site approach to environmental issues has been consistent. Formally such standards as ISO 14001 have been adhered to and the appropriate certification maintained. At a working level the principles of reduce, reuse and recycle have been inculcated

  6. The Effect of Common Inversion Polymorphisms In(2L)t and In(3R)Mo on Patterns of Transcriptional Variation in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavington, Erik; Kern, Andrew D

    2017-11-06

    Chromosomal inversions are a ubiquitous feature of genetic variation. Theoretical models describe several mechanisms by which inversions can drive adaptation and be maintained as polymorphisms. While inversions have been shown previously to be under selection, or contain genetic variation under selection, the specific phenotypic consequences of inversions leading to their maintenance remain unclear. Here we use genomic sequence and expression data from the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel (DGRP) to explore the effects of two cosmopolitan inversions, In ( 2L ) t and In ( 3R ) Mo , on patterns of transcriptional variation. We demonstrate that each inversion has a significant effect on transcript abundance for hundreds of genes across the genome. Inversion-affected loci (IAL) appear both within inversions as well as on unlinked chromosomes. Importantly, IAL do not appear to be influenced by the previously reported genome-wide expression correlation structure. We found that five genes involved with sterol uptake, four of which are Niemann-Pick Type 2 orthologs, are upregulated in flies with In ( 3R ) Mo but do not have SNPs in linkage disequilibrium (LD) with the inversion. We speculate that this upregulation is driven by genetic variation in mod ( mdg4 ) that is in LD with In ( 3R ) Mo We find that there is little evidence for a regional or position effect of inversions on gene expression at the chromosomal level, but do find evidence for the distal breakpoint of In ( 3R ) Mo interrupting one gene and possibly disassociating the two flanking genes from regulatory elements. Copyright © 2017 Lavington and Kern.

  7. The Drosophila melanogaster Eip74EF-PA transcription factor directly binds the sciarid BhC4-1 promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Henrique Oliveira; Sanchez, Danilo Garcia; de Freitas Oliveira, Lucas; Kobarg, Jörg; Monesi, Nadia

    2017-11-01

    The DNA puff BhC4-1 gene of Bradysia hygida (Diptera, Sciaridae) is amplified and expressed in the salivary glands at the end of the last larval instar. Even though there are no BhC4-1 orthologs in Drosophila melanogaster, the mechanisms that regulate BhC4-1 gene expression in B. hygida are for the most part conserved in D. melanogaster. The BhC4-1 promoter contains a 129bp (-186/-58) cis-regulatory module (CRM) that drives developmentally regulated expression in transgenic salivary glands at the onset of metamorphosis. Both in the sciarid and in transgenic D. melanogaster, BhC4-1 gene expression is induced by the increase in ecdysone titers that triggers metamorphosis. Genetic interaction experiments revealed that in the absence of the Eip74EF-PA early gene isoform BhC4-1-lacZ levels of expression in the salivary gland are severely reduced. Here we show that the overexpression of the Eip74EF-PA transcription factor is sufficient to anticipate BhC4-1-lacZ expression in transgenic D. melanogaster. Through yeast one-hybrid assays we confirm that the Eip74EF-PA transcription factor directly binds to the 129 bp sciarid CRM. Together, these results contribute to the characterization of an insect CRM and indicate that the ecdysone gene regulatory network that promotes metamorphosis is conserved between D. melanogaster and the sciarid B. hygida. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Structure of long terminal repeats of transcriptionally active and inactive copies of Drosophila mobile dispersed genetic elements mdg3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzhumagaliev, E.B.; Mazo, A.N.; Baev, A.A. Jr.; Gorelova, T.V.; Arkhipova, I.R.; Shuppe, N.G.; Il'in, Yu.V.

    1986-01-01

    The authors have determined the nucleotide sequences of long terminal repeats (LTRS) and adjacent regions in the transcribed and nontranscribed variants of the mobile dispersed gene mdg3. In its main characteristics the mdg3 is similar to other mdg. Its integration into chromosomal DNA brings about duplication of the 4 bp of the host DNA, no specificity of the mdg integration at the nucleotide level being detected. The mdg3 is flanked by a 5 bp inverted repeat. The variations in the length of the LTR in different mdg copies is mainly due to duplication of certain sequences in the U3 and R regions. mdg3 copies with a LTR length of 267 bp are the most abundant and are completely conservative in their primary structure. They are transcribed in the cells of the 67J25D culture, but not transcribed in the K/sub c/ line, where another mdg3 variant with a LTR length of 293 bp is transcriptionally active. The SI mapping of transcription initiation and termination sites has shown that in both mdg3 variants they are localized in the same LTR regions, and that the LTR itself has a characteristic U3-R-U5 structure-like retroviral LTRs. The possible factors involved in the regulation of mdg transcription are discussed

  9. Microgravity simulation by diamagnetic levitation: effects of a strong gradient magnetic field on the transcriptional profile of Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herranz Raul

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many biological systems respond to the presence or absence of gravity. Since experiments performed in space are expensive and can only be undertaken infrequently, Earth-based simulation techniques are used to investigate the biological response to weightlessness. A high gradient magnetic field can be used to levitate a biological organism so that its net weight is zero. Results We have used a superconducting magnet to assess the effect of diamagnetic levitation on the fruit fly D. melanogaster in levitation experiments that proceeded for up to 22 consecutive days. We have compared the results with those of similar experiments performed in another paradigm for microgravity simulation, the Random Positioning Machine (RPM. We observed a delay in the development of the fruit flies from embryo to adult. Microarray analysis indicated changes in overall gene expression of imagoes that developed from larvae under diamagnetic levitation, and also under simulated hypergravity conditions. Significant changes were observed in the expression of immune-, stress-, and temperature-response genes. For example, several heat shock proteins were affected. We also found that a strong magnetic field, of 16.5 Tesla, had a significant effect on the expression of these genes, independent of the effects associated with magnetically-induced levitation and hypergravity. Conclusions Diamagnetic levitation can be used to simulate an altered effective gravity environment in which gene expression is tuned differentially in diverse Drosophila melanogaster populations including those of different age and gender. Exposure to the magnetic field per se induced similar, but weaker, changes in gene expression.

  10. Heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1a positively regulates euchromatic gene expression through RNA transcript association and interaction with hnRNPs in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Piacentini

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Heterochromatin Protein 1 (HP1a is a well-known conserved protein involved in heterochromatin formation and gene silencing in different species including humans. A general model has been proposed for heterochromatin formation and epigenetic gene silencing in different species that implies an essential role for HP1a. According to the model, histone methyltransferase enzymes (HMTases methylate the histone H3 at lysine 9 (H3K9me, creating selective binding sites for itself and the chromodomain of HP1a. This complex is thought to form a higher order chromatin state that represses gene activity. It has also been found that HP1a plays a role in telomere capping. Surprisingly, recent studies have shown that HP1a is present at many euchromatic sites along polytene chromosomes of Drosophila melanogaster, including the developmental and heat-shock-induced puffs, and that this protein can be removed from these sites by in vivo RNase treatment, thus suggesting an association of HP1a with the transcripts of many active genes. To test this suggestion, we performed an extensive screening by RIP-chip assay (RNA-immunoprecipitation on microarrays, and we found that HP1a is associated with transcripts of more than one hundred euchromatic genes. An expression analysis in HP1a mutants shows that HP1a is required for positive regulation of these genes. Cytogenetic and molecular assays show that HP1a also interacts with the well known proteins DDP1, HRB87F, and PEP, which belong to different classes of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs involved in RNA processing. Surprisingly, we found that all these hnRNP proteins also bind heterochromatin and are dominant suppressors of position effect variegation. Together, our data show novel and unexpected functions for HP1a and hnRNPs proteins. All these proteins are in fact involved both in RNA transcript processing and in heterochromatin formation. This suggests that, in general, similar epigenetic mechanisms

  11. Berkeley Lab Laser Accelerator (BELLA) facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Berkeley Lab Laser Accelerator (BELLA) facility (formerly LOASIS) develops advanced accelerators and radiation sources. High gradient (1-100 GV/m) laser-plasma...

  12. Dumpy-30 family members as determinants of male fertility and interaction partners of metal-responsive transcription factor 1 (MTF-1 in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renkawitz-Pohl Renate

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metal-responsive transcription factor 1 (MTF-1, which binds to metal response elements (MREs, plays a central role in transition metal detoxification and homeostasis. A Drosophila interactome analysis revealed two candidate dMTF-1 interactors, both of which are related to the small regulatory protein Dumpy-30 (Dpy-30 of the worm C. elegans. Dpy-30 is the founding member of a protein family involved in chromatin modifications, notably histone methylation. Mutants affect mating type in yeast and male mating in C. elegans. Results Constitutive expression of the stronger interactor, Dpy-30L1 (CG6444, in transgenic flies inhibits MTF-1 activity and results in elevated sensitivity to Cd(II and Zn(II, an effect that could be rescued by co-overexpression of dMTF-1. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA suggest that Dpy-30L1 interferes with the binding of MTF-1 to its cognate MRE binding site. Dpy-30L1 is expressed in the larval brain, gonads, imaginal discs, salivary glands and in the brain, testes, ovaries and salivary glands of adult flies. Expression of the second interactor, Dpy-30L2 (CG11591, is restricted to larval male gonads, and to the testes of adult males. Consistent with these findings, dpy-30-like transcripts are also prominently expressed in mouse testes. Targeted gene disruption by homologous recombination revealed that dpy-30L1 knockout flies are viable and show no overt disruption of metal homeostasis. In contrast, the knockout of the male-specific dpy-30L2 gene results in male sterility, as does the double knockout of dpy-30L1 and dpy-30L2. A closer inspection showed that Dpy-30L2 is expressed in elongated spermatids but not in early or mature sperm. Mutant sperm had impaired motility and failed to accumulate in sperm storage organs of females. Conclusion Our studies help to elucidate the physiological roles of the Dumpy-30 proteins, which are conserved from yeast to humans and typically act in concert with

  13. Transcriptional control of steroid biosynthesis genes in the Drosophila prothoracic gland by Ventral veins lacking and Knirps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Erik Thomas; Møller, Morten Erik; Dorry, Elad

    2014-01-01

    Specialized endocrine cells produce and release steroid hormones that govern development, metabolism and reproduction. In order to synthesize steroids, all the genes in the biosynthetic pathway must be coordinately turned on in steroidogenic cells. In Drosophila, the steroid producing endocrine...

  14. Behavioral Teratogenesis in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Monalisa; Barik, Bedanta Kumar

    2018-01-01

    Developmental biology is a fascinating branch of science which helps us to understand the mechanism of development, thus the findings are used in various therapeutic approach. Drosophila melanogaster served as a model to find the key molecules that initiate and regulate the mechanism of development. Various genes, transcription factors, and signaling pathways helping in development are identified in Drosophila. Many toxic compounds, which can affect the development, are also recognized using Drosophila model. These compounds, which can affect the development, are named as a teratogen. Many teratogens identified using Drosophila may also act as a teratogen for a human being since 75% of conservation exist between the disease genes present in Drosophila and human. There are certain teratogens, which do not cause developmental defect if exposed during pregnancy, however; behavioral defect appears in later part of development. Such compounds are named as a behavioral teratogen. Thus, it is worthy to identify the potential behavioral teratogen using Drosophila model. Drosophila behavior is well studied in various developmental stages. This chapter describes various methods which can be employed to test behavioral teratogenesis in Drosophila.

  15. STAR FORMATION NEAR BERKELEY 59: EMBEDDED PROTOSTARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosvick, J. M. [Department of Physical Sciences, Thompson Rivers University, 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, BC V2C 0C8 (Canada); Majaess, D. [Department of Astronomy and Physics, Saint Mary' s University, Halifax, NS B3H 3C3 (Canada)

    2013-12-01

    A group of suspected protostars in a dark cloud northwest of the young (∼2 Myr) cluster Berkeley 59 and two sources in a pillar south of the cluster have been studied in order to determine their evolutionary stages and ascertain whether their formation was triggered by Berkeley 59. Narrowband near-infrared observations from the Observatoire du Mont Mégantic, {sup 12}CO (J = 3-2) and SCUBA-2 (450 and 850 μm) observations from the JCMT, 2MASS, and WISE images, and data extracted from the IPHAS survey catalog were used. Of 12 sources studied, two are Class I objects, while three others are flat/Class II, one of which is a T Tauri candidate. A weak CO outflow and two potential starless cores are present in the cloud, while the pillar possesses substructure at different velocities, with no outflows present. The CO spectra of both regions show peaks in the range v {sub LSR} = –15 to –17 km s{sup –1}, which agrees with the velocity adopted for Berkeley 59 (–15.7 km s{sup –1}), while spectral energy distribution models yield an average interstellar extinction A{sub V} and distance of 15 ± 2 mag and 830 ± 120 pc, respectively, for the cloud, and 6.9 mag and 912 pc for the pillar, indicating that the regions are in the same vicinity as Berkeley 59. The formation of the pillar source appears to have been triggered by Berkeley 59. It is unclear whether Berkeley 59 triggered the association's formation.

  16. BERKELEY/STANFORD: B factory plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    For the past several years, accelerator physicists at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) and the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) have been involved in the design of an Asymmetric B Factory to be sited in the tunnel of the PEP electron-positron collider at SLAC

  17. Berkeley Experiments on Superfluid Macroscopic Quantum Effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Packard, Richard

    2006-01-01

    This paper provides a brief history of the evolution of the Berkeley experiments on macroscopic quantum effects in superfluid helium. The narrative follows the evolution of the experiments proceeding from the detection of single vortex lines to vortex photography to quantized circulation in 3He to Josephson effects and superfluid gyroscopes in both 4He and 3He

  18. Electron Microscope Center Opens at Berkeley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Arthur L.

    1981-01-01

    A 1.5-MeV High Voltage Electron Microscope has been installed at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory which will help materials scientists and biologists study samples in more true-to-life situations. A 1-MeV Atomic Resolution Microscope will be installed at the same location in two years which will allow scientists to distinguish atoms. (DS)

  19. Superbends expand the scope of Berkeley's ALS

    CERN Document Server

    Robin, D S; Tamura, L S

    2002-01-01

    The first-ever retrofit of superconducting bend magnets into the storage ring of an operating synchrotron radiation source extends the spectrum of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's Advanced Light Source into the hard-X-ray region without compromising soft X-ray availability, or performance. (4 refs).

  20. Transcriptional profiling of human breast cancer cells cultured under microgravity conditions revealed the key role of genetic gravity sensors previously detected in Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdivia-Silva, Julio E.; Lavan, David; Diego Orihuela-Tacuri, M.; Sanabria, Gabriela

    2016-07-01

    Currently, studies in Drosophila melanogaster has shown emerging evidence that microgravity stimuli can be detected at the genetic level. Analysis of the transcriptome in the pupal stage of the fruit flies under microgravity conditions versus ground controls has suggested the presence of a few candidate genes as "gravity sensors" which are experimentally validated. Additionally, several studies have shown that microgravity causes inhibitory effects in different types of cancer cells, although the genes involved and responsible for these effects are still unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the genes suggested as the sensors of gravitational waves in Drosophila melanogaster and their human counterpart (orthologous genes) are highly involved in carcinogenesis, proliferation, anti-apoptotic signals, invasiveness, and metastatic potential of breast cancer cell tumors. The transcriptome analyses suggested that the observed inhibitory effect in cancer cells could be due to changes in the genetic expression of these candidates. These results encourage the possibility of new therapeutic targets managed together and not in isolation.

  1. THE YOUNG OPEN CLUSTER BERKELEY 55

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Negueruela, Ignacio; Marco, Amparo, E-mail: ignacio.negueruela@ua.es, E-mail: amparo.marco@ua.es [Departamento de Fisica, Ingenieria de Sistemas y Teoria de la Senal, Universidad de Alicante, Apdo. 99, E-03080 Alicante (Spain)

    2012-02-15

    We present UBV photometry of the highly reddened and poorly studied open cluster Berkeley 55, revealing an important population of B-type stars and several evolved stars of high luminosity. Intermediate-resolution far-red spectra of several candidate members confirm the presence of one F-type supergiant and six late supergiants or bright giants. The brightest blue stars are mid-B giants. Spectroscopic and photometric analyses indicate an age 50 {+-} 10 Myr. The cluster is located at a distance d Almost-Equal-To 4 kpc, consistent with other tracers of the Perseus Arm in this direction. Berkeley 55 is thus a moderately young open cluster with a sizable population of candidate red (super)giant members, which can provide valuable information about the evolution of intermediate-mass stars.

  2. Political-social reactor problems at Berkeley

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, G.A.

    1980-01-01

    For better than ten years there was little public notice of the TRIGA reactor at UC-Berkeley. Then: a) A non-student persuaded the Student and Senate to pass a resolution to request Campus Administration to stop operation of the reactor and remove it from campus. b) Presence of the reactor became a campaign-issue in a City Mayoral election. c) Two local residents reported adverse physical reactions before, during, and after a routine tour of the reactor facility. d) The Berkeley City Council began a study of problems associated with radioactive material within the city. e) Friends Of The Earth formally petitioned the NRC to terminate the reactor's license. Campus personnel have expended many man-hours and many pounds of paper in responding to these happenings. Some of the details are of interest, and may be of use to other reactor facilities. (author)

  3. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory 1993 Site Environmental Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-05-01

    This annual Site Environmental Report summarizes Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory`s (LBL`s) environmental activities in calendar year (CY) 1993. The purpose of this report is to characterize site environmental management performance, confirm compliance status with environmental standards and requirements, and highlight significant programs and efforts. Its format and content are consistent with the requirements of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program.

  4. Berkeley Lab Computing Sciences: Accelerating Scientific Discovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hules, John A.

    2008-01-01

    Scientists today rely on advances in computer science, mathematics, and computational science, as well as large-scale computing and networking facilities, to increase our understanding of ourselves, our planet, and our universe. Berkeley Lab's Computing Sciences organization researches, develops, and deploys new tools and technologies to meet these needs and to advance research in such areas as global climate change, combustion, fusion energy, nanotechnology, biology, and astrophysics

  5. C. Judson King of UC Berkeley

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prausnitz, John

    2005-06-01

    In the middle of the UC Berkeley campus, next to the Main Library, South Hall is the last surviving building from the original campus, founded about 135 years ago. A tiny tree-shaded appendix to this venerated classical building houses Berkeley's Center for Studies in Higher Education, directed by C. Judson King, former Provost and Senior Vice President--Academic Affairs of the ten-campus University of California and long-time Professor of Chemical Engineering at Berkeley. Jud came to Berkeley in 1963 as assistant professor of chemical engineering, following receipt of a doctor's degree from MIT and a subsequent short appointment as director of the MIT chemical engineering practice school station at what was then Esso (now Exxon) in New Jersey. His undergraduate degree is from Yale. Starting with his MIT doctoral dissertation on gas absorption, Jud has devoted much of his professional career to separation processes. His teaching and research activities have been primarily concerned with separation of mixtures with emphasis on liquid-liquid extraction and drying. As a consultant to Procter and Gamble, he contributed to the technology of making instant coffee. His life-long activities in hiking and camping stimulated Jud's interest in the manufacture of freeze-dried foods (e.g. turkey meat) to minimize the weight of his hiking back-pack. Jud is internationally known not only for his many research publications but even more, for his acclaimed textbook ''Separation Processses'' (McGraw-Hill, second edition 1980) that is used in standard chemical engineering courses in the US and abroad.

  6. Gene disruptions using P transposable elements: an integral component of the Drosophila genome project.

    OpenAIRE

    Spradling, A C; Stern, D M; Kiss, I; Roote, J; Laverty, T; Rubin, G M

    1995-01-01

    Biologists require genetic as well as molecular tools to decipher genomic information and ultimately to understand gene function. The Berkeley Drosophila Genome Project is addressing these needs with a massive gene disruption project that uses individual, genetically engineered P transposable elements to target open reading frames throughout the Drosophila genome. DNA flanking the insertions is sequenced, thereby placing an extensive series of genetic markers on the physical genomic map and a...

  7. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory 1994 site environmental report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-05-01

    The 1994 Site Environmental Report summarizes environmental activities at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) for the calendar year (CY) 1994. The report strives to present environmental data in a manner that characterizes the performance and compliance status of the Laboratory's environmental management programs when measured against regulatory standards and DOE requirements. The report also discusses significant highlight and planning efforts of these programs. The format and content of the report are consistent with the requirements of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program

  8. New nuclear physics at Berkeley Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    One of the highlights of the summer was the International Conference on Nuclear Physics, held at Berkeley in August. These big meetings provide a periodic focus for the nuclear physics community. Overall, the Conference paid a lot of attention to topics and phenomna which only a few years ago would have been considered exotic. With many novel ideas being put forward and with new projects afoot, a lot of fresh ground could have been covered by the time of the next meeting, scheduled to be held in Florence in a few years

  9. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory 1994 site environmental report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    The 1994 Site Environmental Report summarizes environmental activities at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) for the calendar year (CY) 1994. The report strives to present environmental data in a manner that characterizes the performance and compliance status of the Laboratory`s environmental management programs when measured against regulatory standards and DOE requirements. The report also discusses significant highlight and planning efforts of these programs. The format and content of the report are consistent with the requirements of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program.

  10. The radioactive inventory of a Berkeley heat exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hancock, R.

    1988-10-01

    The Central Electricity Generating Board has announced a date for the final shutdown of the first of the Magnox power stations at Berkeley (March 1989), and is in the process of preparing Pre-Decommissioning Safety Reports (PDSR) for the decommissioning of Berkeley and Bradwell. This report supports these PDSR studies and reports work carried out within the Research Division at Berkeley Nuclear Laboratories on the radioactive inventories of the heat exchangers at Berkeley Power Station. At Berkeley, the heat exchangers will be included in stage two decommissioning to which they will contribute the largest mass of contaminated material. The purpose of this report is to bring together all of the available data on the contamination in the heat exchangers at Berkeley Power Station, and to recommend a database from which the options for disposal of the heat exchangers may be formulated. (author)

  11. Berkeley Lab's ALS generates femtosecond synchrotron radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Robinson, A L

    2000-01-01

    A team at Berkeley's Advanced Light Source has shown how a laser time-slicing technique provides a path to experiments with ultrafast time resolution. A Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory team has succeeded in generating 300 fs pulses of synchrotron radiation at the ALS synchrotron radiation machine. The team's members come from the Materials Sciences Division (MSD), the Center for Beam Physics in the Accelerator and Fusion Research Division and the Advanced Light Source (ALS). Although this proof-of principle experiment made use of visible light on a borrowed beamline, the laser "time-slicing" technique at the heart of the demonstration will soon be applied in a new bend magnet beamline that was designed specially for the production of femtosecond pulses of X-rays to study long-range and local order in condensed matter with ultrafast time resolution. An undulator beamline based on the same technique has been proposed that will dramatically increase the flux and brightness. The use of X-rays to study the c...

  12. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Affirmative Action Program. Revised

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory`s Affirmative Action Program (AAP) serves as a working document that describes current policies, practices, and results in the area of affirmative action. It represents the Laboratory`s framework for an affirmative approach to increasing the representation of people of color and women in segments of our work force where they have been underrepresented and taking action to increase the employment of persons with disabilities and special disabled and Vietnam era veterans. The AAP describes the hierarchy of responsibility for Laboratory affirmative action, the mechanisms that exist for full Laboratory participation in the AAP, the policies and procedures governing recruitment at all levels, the Laboratory`s plan for monitoring, reporting, and evaluating affirmative action progress, and a description of special affirmative action programs and plans the Laboratory has used and will use in its efforts to increase the representation and retention of groups historically underrepresented in our work force.

  13. City of Berkeley, California Municipal Tree Resource Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    S.E. Maco; E.G. McPherson; J.R. Simpson; P.J. Peper; Q. Xiao

    2005-01-01

    Vibrant, renowned for its livability and cultural wealth, the city of Berkeley maintains trees as an integral component of the urban infrastructure. Research indicates that healthy trees can mitigate impacts associated with the built environment by reducing stormwater runoff, energy consumption, and air pollutants. Put simply, trees improve urban life, making Berkeley...

  14. The RNA helicase Rm62 cooperates with SU(VAR3-9 to re-silence active transcription in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joern Boeke

    Full Text Available Gene expression is highly dynamic and many genes show a wide range in expression over several orders of magnitude. This regulation is often mediated by sequence specific transcription factors. In addition, the tight packaging of DNA into chromatin can provide an additional layer of control resulting in a dynamic range of gene expression covering several orders of magnitude. During transcriptional activation, chromatin barriers have to be eliminated to allow an efficient progression of the RNA polymerase. This repressive chromatin structure has to be re-established quickly after it has been activated in order to tightly regulate gene activity. We show that the DExD/H box containing RNA helicase Rm62 is targeted to a site of rapid induction of transcription where it is responsible for an increased degree of methylation at H3K9 at the heat shock locus after removal of the heat shock stimulus. The RNA helicase interacts with the well-characterized histone methyltransferase SU(VAR3-9 via its N-terminus, which provides a potential mechanism for the targeting of H3K9 methylation to highly regulated genes. The recruitment of SU(VAR3-9 through interaction with a RNA helicase to a site of active transcription might be a general mechanism that allows an efficient silencing of highly regulated genes thereby enabling a cell to fine tune its gene activity over a wide range.

  15. Treatment of Berkeley boilers in Studsvik. Project description and experiences - Berkeley Boilers Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saul, Dave; Davidson, Gavin; Wirendal, Bo

    2014-01-01

    In November 2011 Studsvik was awarded a contract to transport five decommissioned boilers from the Berkeley Nuclear Licensed Site in the UK to the Studsvik Nuclear Site in Sweden for metal treatment and recycling. A key objective of the project was to remove the boilers from the site by 31 March 2012 and this was successfully achieved with all boilers off site by 22 March and delivered to Studsvik on 6 April. In November 2012 Studsvik was awarded a further contract for the remaining ten Berkeley Boilers with the requirement to remove all boilers from the Berkeley site by 31 March 2013. Again this was successfully achieved ahead of programme with all boilers in Sweden by 1 April 2013. A total of nine boilers have now been processed and all remaining boilers will be completed by end of September 2014. The projects have had many challenges including a very tight timescale and both have been successfully delivered to cost and ahead of the baseline programme. This paper describes the project and the experience gained from treatment of the boilers to date. (authors)

  16. What Made Berkeley Great? The Sources of Berkeley's Sustained Academic Excellence. Research & Occasional Paper Series CSHE.3.11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breslauer, George W.

    2011-01-01

    University of California (UC) Berkeley's chief academic officer explores the historical sources of Berkeley' academic excellence. He identifies five key factors: (1) wealth from many sources; (2) supportive and skilled governors; (3) leadership from key UC presidents; (4) the pioneering ethos within the State of California; and (5) a process of…

  17. REDfly: a Regulatory Element Database for Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Steven M; Li, Long; Hu, Zihua; Halfon, Marc S

    2006-02-01

    Bioinformatics studies of transcriptional regulation in the metazoa are significantly hindered by the absence of readily available data on large numbers of transcriptional cis-regulatory modules (CRMs). Even the richly annotated Drosophila melanogaster genome lacks extensive CRM information. We therefore present here a database of Drosophila CRMs curated from the literature complete with both DNA sequence and a searchable description of the gene expression pattern regulated by each CRM. This resource should greatly facilitate the development of computational approaches to CRM discovery as well as bioinformatics analyses of regulatory sequence properties and evolution.

  18. Life sciences: Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-07-01

    Life Sciences Research at LBL has both a long history and a new visibility. The physics technologies pioneered in the days of Ernest O. Lawrence found almost immediate application in the medical research conducted by Ernest's brother, John Lawrence. And the tradition of nuclear medicine continues today, largely uninterrupted for more than 50 years. Until recently, though, life sciences research has been a secondary force at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). Today, a true multi-program laboratory has emerged, in which the life sciences participate as a full partner. The LBL Human Genome Center is a contribution to the growing international effort to map the human genome. Its achievements represent LBL divisions, including Engineering, Materials and Chemical Sciences, and Information and Computing Sciences, along with Cell and Molecular Biology and Chemical Biodynamics. The Advanced Light Source Life Sciences Center will comprise not only beamlines and experimental end stations, but also supporting laboratories and office space for scientists from across the US. This effort reflects a confluence of scientific disciplines --- this time represented by individuals from the life sciences divisions and by engineers and physicists associated with the Advanced Light Source project. And finally, this report itself, the first summarizing the efforts of all four life sciences divisions, suggests a new spirit of cooperation. 30 figs.

  19. Life sciences: Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-07-01

    Life Sciences Research at LBL has both a long history and a new visibility. The physics technologies pioneered in the days of Ernest O. Lawrence found almost immediate application in the medical research conducted by Ernest's brother, John Lawrence. And the tradition of nuclear medicine continues today, largely uninterrupted for more than 50 years. Until recently, though, life sciences research has been a secondary force at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). Today, a true multi-program laboratory has emerged, in which the life sciences participate as a full partner. The LBL Human Genome Center is a contribution to the growing international effort to map the human genome. Its achievements represent LBL divisions, including Engineering, Materials and Chemical Sciences, and Information and Computing Sciences, along with Cell and Molecular Biology and Chemical Biodynamics. The Advanced Light Source Life Sciences Center will comprise not only beamlines and experimental end stations, but also supporting laboratories and office space for scientists from across the US. This effort reflects a confluence of scientific disciplines --- this time represented by individuals from the life sciences divisions and by engineers and physicists associated with the Advanced Light Source project. And finally, this report itself, the first summarizing the efforts of all four life sciences divisions, suggests a new spirit of cooperation. 30 figs

  20. Environmental and simulation facility conditions can modulate a behavioral-driven altered gravity response of Drosophila imagoes transcriptome

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Genome-wide transcriptional profiling shows that reducing gravity levels in the International Space Station (ISS) causes important alterations in Drosophila gene...

  1. Annual environmental monitoring report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schleimer, G.E.

    1981-04-01

    The Environmental Monitoring Program of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is described. Data on air and water sampling and continuous radiation monitoring for 1980 are presented, and general trends are discussed

  2. UC Berkeley's Celebration of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, B. E.; Croft, S.; Silverman, J. M.; Klein, C.; Modjaz, M.

    2010-08-01

    We present the astronomy outreach efforts undertaken for the International Year of Astronomy 2009 at the University of California, Berkeley. Our department-wide endeavors included a monthly public lecture series by UC Berkeley astronomers and a major astronomy outreach event during a campus-wide university "open house," which included solar observing and a Starlab Planetarium. In addition to sharing our outreach techniques and outcomes, we discuss some of our unique strategies for advertising our events to the local community.

  3. BERKELEY: Collaboration on PEP-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    Since the announcement by President Clinton in October 1993 that the US Department of Energy would going ahead the PEPII Asymmetric B Factory project (a joint proposal of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center - SLAC, the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory - LBNL, and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory - LLNL), LBNL has continued its strong support of the project (for a review, see October, page 9). LBNL accelerator physicists have been active in the design of PEP-II since 1988 - shortly after the original concept was suggested by LBNL Deputy Director Pier Oddone. Indeed, the original feasibility study for such a machine was a joint LBNLSLAC- Caltech effort led by Swapan Chattopadhyay, now head of LBNL's Center for Beam Physics (CBP) in the Accelerator & Fusion Research Division (AFRD). The effort grew to include about seven full-time LBNL accelerator physicists (along with about 15 SLAC and LLNL physicists) during the formal design phase, which began in late 1989. This effort encompassed three editions of the Conceptual Design Report, along with innumerable reviews, as is typical of today's accelerator projects. Taking advantage of an experienced engineering staff, fresh from the successful completion of the Advanced Light Source (ALS), LBNL has been assigned lead responsibility for the challenging Low Energy Ring (LER) of the PEP-II project, an entirely new storage ring to be added to the PEP tunnel. The LBNL design team is headed by CBP accelerator physicist Michael Zisman and senior engineers Ron Yourd (who served as the Project Manager for the ALS) and Hank Hsieh (a recent addition to the LBNL staff who was Project Engineer for the NSLS storage rings at BNL and most recently served as Project Engineer for the DAFNE project at Frascati). LBNL is also represented in the overall management of the PEP-II project by Tom Elioff, who serves as Deputy to the Project Director Jonathan Dorfan at SLAC. (Elioff served in the same role for the original

  4. New Cepheid variables in the young open clusters Berkeley 51 and Berkeley 55

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohr, M. E.; Negueruela, I.; Tabernero, H. M.; Clark, J. S.; Lewis, F.; Roche, P.

    2018-05-01

    As part of a wider investigation of evolved massive stars in Galactic open clusters, we have spectroscopically identified three candidate classical Cepheids in the little-studied clusters Berkeley 51, Berkeley 55 and NGC 6603. Using new multi-epoch photometry, we confirm that Be 51 #162 and Be 55 #107 are bona fide Cepheids, with pulsation periods of 9.83±0.01 d and 5.850±0.005 d respectively, while NGC 6603 star W2249 does not show significant photometric variability. Using the period-luminosity relationship for Cepheid variables, we determine a distance to Be 51 of 5.3^{+1.0}_{-0.8} kpc and an age of 44^{+9}_{-8} Myr, placing it in a sparsely-attested region of the Perseus arm. For Be 55, we find a distance of 2.2±0.3 kpc and age of 63^{+12}_{-11} Myr, locating the cluster in the Local arm. Taken together with our recent discovery of a long-period Cepheid in the starburst cluster VdBH222, these represent an important increase in the number of young, massive Cepheids known in Galactic open clusters. We also consider new Gaia (data release 2) parallaxes and proper motions for members of Be 51 and Be 55; the uncertainties on the parallaxes do not allow us to refine our distance estimates to these clusters, but the well-constrained proper motion measurements furnish further confirmation of cluster membership. However, future final Gaia parallaxes for such objects should provide valuable independent distance measurements, improving the calibration of the period-luminosity relationship, with implications for the distance ladder out to cosmological scales.

  5. BERKELEY: Farewell to the Bevatron/Bevalac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    Full text: Nearly a hundred current and former Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory employees gathered at the Bevatron accelerator on 21 February to watch Ed Lofgren turn off the beam for the last time. Lofgren, in charge of the venerable machine from its completion in 1954 until his retirement in 1979, pushed a button that someone long ago labeled ''atom smasher offer'', bringing to an end four decades of accomplishment in high energy and heavy ion physics. Owen Chamberlain, who shared the 1959 physics Nobel with Emilio Segré for the discovery of the antiproton at the Bevatron, was among those present at the closing ceremony. The shutdown came 39 years to the week after Bevatron beam first circulated, and a touching moment came just after Lofgren shut the machine down when the poignant strains of the ''Taps'' salute wafted out over the PA system. The Bevatron - or Bevalac, as it was called after being linked to the Super HILAC linear accelerator in the 1970s - made major contributions in four distinct areas of research: high energy physics, heavy ion physics, medical research and therapy, and space-related studies of radiation damage and heavy particles in space. As well as the discovery of the antiproton, the early years of the Bevatron saw classic studies of the kaon, leading to a deeper understanding of both strong and weak interaction physics. With Luis Alvarez' development of Donald Glaser's original bubble chamber idea into a prolific physics technique, the Bevatron was a major focus of the heady days of resonance hunting in the late 1950s and early 1960s. Most recently the Bevalac (Bevatron-SuperHILAC combination) pioneered relativistic heavy ion physics. The central focus of this research programme was the production and study of extreme conditions in nuclear matter. Highlights include the first definitive evidence of collective flow of nuclear matter at high temperatures and densities, studies of the nuclear

  6. Drosophila Studies on Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yao Tian; Zi Chao Zhang; Junhai Han

    2017-01-01

    In the past decade,numerous genes associated with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) have been identified.These genes encode key regulators of synaptogenesis,synaptic function,and synaptic plasticity.Drosophila is a prominent model system for ASD studies to define novel genes linked to ASDs and decipher their molecular roles in synaptogenesis,synaptic function,synaptic plasticity,and neural circuit assembly and consolidation.Here,we review Drosophila studies on ASD genes that regulate synaptogenesis,synaptic function,and synaptic plasticity through modulating chromatin remodeling,transcription,protein synthesis and degradation,cytoskeleton dynamics,and synaptic scaffolding.

  7. Molecular Cloning, Genomic Organization and Developmental Regulation of a Novel Receptor from Drosophila melanogaster Structurally Related to Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Receptors from Vertebrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauser, Frank; Søndergaard, Leif; Grimmelikhuijzen, Cornelis J.P.

    1998-01-01

    After screening the data base of the BerkeleyDrosophilaGenome Project with a sequence coding for the transmembrane region of a G protein-coupled receptor, we found thatDrosophilamight contain a gene coding for a receptor that is structurally related to the Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone (GnRH) re...

  8. UC-Berkeley-area citizens decry waste transfer from lab.

    CERN Multimedia

    Nakasato, L

    2002-01-01

    Residents are working to stop the transfer of potentially hazardous and radioactive material from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The lab has begun to dismantle the Bevatron which has been shut down since 1993 and says eight trucks per day will move material offsite (1 page).

  9. Berkeley extreme-ultraviolet airglow rocket spectrometer - BEARS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, D. M.; Chakrabarti, S.

    1992-01-01

    The Berkeley EUV airglow rocket spectrometer (BEARS) instrument is described. The instrument was designed in particular to measure the dominant lines of atomic oxygen in the FUV and EUV dayglow at 1356, 1304, 1027, and 989 A, which is the ultimate source of airglow emissions. The optical and mechanical design of the instrument, the detector, electronics, calibration, flight operations, and results are examined.

  10. Annual environmental monitoring report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schleimer, G.E.

    1987-04-01

    The Environmental Monitoring Program of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is described. Data for 1986 are presented and general trends are discussed. Topics include radiation monitoring, wastewater discharge monitoring, dose distribution estimates, and ground water monitoring. 9 refs., 8 figs., 20 tabs

  11. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Institutional Plan FY 1995--2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-01

    This report presents the details of the mission and strategic plan for Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory during the fiscal years of 1995--2000. It presents summaries of current programs and potential changes; critical success factors such as human resources; management practices; budgetary allowances; and technical and administrative initiatives.

  12. Nuclear Medicine at Berkeley Lab: From Pioneering Beginnings to Today (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budinger, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Summer Lecture Series 2006: Thomas Budinger, head of Berkeley Lab's Center for Functional Imaging, discusses Berkeley Lab's rich history pioneering the field of nuclear medicine, from radioisotopes to medical imaging.

  13. Disintegration of the Aged Open Cluster Berkeley 17

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharya, Souradeep; Vaidya, Kaushar [Department of Physics, Birla Institute of Technology and Science, Pilani 333031, Rajasthan (India); Mishra, Ishan [Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati 781039, Assam (India); Chen, W. P., E-mail: f2012553@pilani.bits-pilani.ac.in [Graduate Institute of Astronomy, National Central University, 300 Jhongda Road, Jhongli 32001, Taiwan (China)

    2017-10-01

    We present the analysis of the morphological shape of Berkeley 17, the oldest known open cluster (∼10 Gyr), using the probabilistic star counting of Pan-STARRS point sources, and confirm its core-tail shape, plus an antitail, previously detected with the 2MASS data. The stellar population, as diagnosed by the color–magnitude diagram and theoretical isochrones, shows many massive members in the clusters core, whereas there is a paucity of such members in both of the tails. This manifests mass segregation in this aged star cluster with the low-mass members being stripped away from the system. It has been claimed that Berkeley 17 is associated with an excessive number of blue straggler candidates. A comparison of nearby reference fields indicates that about half of these may be field contamination.

  14. Berkeley Lab Sheds Light on Improving Solar Cell Efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    2007-01-01

    Typical manufacturing methods produce solar cells with an efficiency of 12-15%; and 14% efficiency is the bare minimum for achieving a profit. In work performed at the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley, CA, 5 10-486-577 1)--a US Department of Energy national laboratory that conducts unclassified scientific research and is managed by the University of California--scientist Scott McHugo has obtained keen insights into the impaired performance of solar cells manufactured from polycrystalline silicon. The solar cell market is potentially vast, according to Berkeley Lab. Lightweight solar panels are highly beneficial for providing electrical power to remote locations in developing nations, since there is no need to build transmission lines or truck-in generator fuel. Moreover, industrial nations confronted with diminishing resources have active programs aimed at producing improved, less expensive solar cells. 'In a solar cell, there is a junction between p-type silicon and an n-type layer, such as diffused-in phosphorous', explained McHugo, who is now with Berkeley Lab's Accelerator and Fusion Research Division. 'When sunlight is absorbed, it frees electrons, which start migrating in a random-walk fashion toward that junction. If the electrons make it to the junction; they contribute to the cell's output of electric current. Often, however, before they reach the junction, they recombine at specific sites in the crystal' (and, therefore, cannot contribute to current output). McHugo scrutinized a map of a silicon wafer in which sites of high recombination appeared as dark regions. Previously, researchers had shown that such phenomena occurred not primarily at grain boundaries in the polycrystalline material, as might be expected, but more often at dislocations in the crystal. However, the dislocations themselves were not the problem. Using a unique heat treatment technique, McHugo performed electrical measurements to investigate the material

  15. Annual site environmental report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schleimer, G.E.; Pauer, R.O.

    1991-05-01

    The Environmental Monitoring Program of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is described. Data for 1990 are presented, and general trends are discussed. The report is organized under the following topics: Environmental Program Overview; Environmental Permits; Environmental Assessments; Environmental Activities; Penetrating Radiation; Airborne Radionuclides; Waterborne Radionuclides; Public Doses Resulting from LBL Operations; Trends -- LBL Environmental Impact; Waterborne Pollutants; Airborne Pollutants; Groundwater Protection; and Quality Assurance. 20 refs., 26 figs., 23 tabs

  16. Catalog of research projects at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    This Catalog has been created to aid in the transfer of technology from the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to potential users in industry, government, universities, and the public. The projects are listed for the following LBL groups: Accelerator and Fusion Research Division, Applied Science Division, Biology and Medicine Division, Center for Advanced Materials, Chemical Biodynamics Division, Computing Division, Earth Sciences Division, Engineering and Technical Services Division, Materials and Molecular Research Division, Nuclear Science Division, and Physics Division

  17. Guide to user facilities at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-04-01

    Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories' user facilities are described. Specific facilities include: the National Center for Electron Microscopy; the Bevalac; the SuperHILAC; the Neutral Beam Engineering Test Facility; the National Tritium Labeling Facility; the 88 inch Cyclotron; the Heavy Charged-Particle Treatment Facility; the 2.5 MeV Van de Graaff; the Sky Simulator; the Center for Computational Seismology; and the Low Background Counting Facility

  18. Catalog of research projects at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-01-01

    This Catalog has been created to aid in the transfer of technology from the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to potential users in industry, government, universities, and the public. The projects are listed for the following LBL groups: Accelerator and Fusion Research Division, Applied Science Division, Biology and Medicine Division, Center for Advanced Materials, Chemical Biodynamics Division, Computing Division, Earth Sciences Division, Engineering and Technical Services Division, Materials and Molecular Research Division, Nuclear Science Division, and Physics Division.

  19. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 2015 Annual Financial Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Kim, P

    2017-08-11

    FY2015 financial results reflect a year of significant scientific, operational and financial achievement for Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Complementing many scientific accomplishments, Berkeley Lab completed construction of four new research facilities: the General Purpose Laboratory, Chu Hall, Wang Hall and the Flexlab Building Efficiency Testbed. These state-of-the-art facilities allow for program growth and enhanced collaboration, in part by enabling programs to return to the Lab’s Hill Campus from offsite locations. Detailed planning began for the new Integrative Genomics Building (IGB) that will house another major program currently located offsite. Existing site infrastructure was another key focus area. The Lab prioritized and increased investments in deferred maintenance in alignment with the Berkeley Lab Infrastructure Plan, which was developed under the leadership of the DOE Office of Science. With the expiration of American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funds, we completed the close-out of all of our 134 ARRA projects, recording total costs of $331M over the FY2009-2015 period. Download the report to read more.

  20. Power Management Controls, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Power Management Controls, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westerberg, Emil [Dalarna Univ., Borlaenge (Sweden). Graphic Art Technology

    2002-12-01

    This report describes the work that is being conducted on power management controls at Berkeley National Laboratory. We can see a significant increasing amount of electronic equipment in our work places and in our every day life. Today's modern society depends on a constant energy flow. The future's increasing need of energy will burden our economy as well as our environment. The project group at Berkeley National Laboratory is working with leading manufacturers of office equipment. The goal is to agree on how interfaces for power management should be presented on office equipment. User friendliness and a more consistent power management interface is the project focus. The project group's role is to analyze data that is relevant to power management, as well as to coordinate communication and discussions among the involved parties.

  1. Organization and evolution of Drosophila terminin: similarities and differences between Drosophila and human telomeres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grazia Daniela Raffa

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila lacks telomerase and fly telomeres are elongated by occasional transposition of three specialized retroelements. Drosophila telomeres do not terminate with GC-rich repeats and are assembled independently of the sequence of chromosome ends. Recent work has shown that Drosophila telomeres are capped by the terminin complex, which includes the fast-evolving proteins HOAP, HipHop, Moi and Ver. These proteins are not conserves outside Drosophilidae and localize and function exclusively at telomeres, protecting them from fusion events. Other proteins required to prevent end-to-end fusion in flies include HP1, Eff/UbcD1, ATM, the components of the Mre11-Rad50-Nbs (MRN complex, and the Woc transcription factor. These proteins do not share the terminin properties; they are evolutionarily conserved non-fast-evolving proteins that do not accumulate only telomeres and do not serve telomere-specific functions. We propose that following telomerase loss, Drosophila rapidly evolved terminin to bind chromosome ends in a sequence-independent manner. This hypothesis suggests that terminin is the functional analog of the shelterin complex that protects human telomeres. The non-terminin proteins are instead likely to correspond to ancestral telomere-associated proteins that did not evolve as rapidly as terminin because of the functional constraints imposed by their involvement in diverse cellular processes. Thus, it appears that the main difference between Drosophila and human telomeres is in the protective complexes that specifically associate with the DNA termini. We believe that Drosophila telomeres offer excellent opportunities for investigations on human telomere biology. The identification of additional Drosophila genes encoding non-terminin proteins involved in telomere protection might lead to the discovery of novel components of human telomeres.

  2. A Drosophila gene encoding a protein resembling the human β-amyloid protein precursor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, D.R.; Martin-Morris, L.; Luo, L.; White, K.

    1989-01-01

    The authors have isolated genomic and cDNA clones for a Drosophila gene resembling the human β-amyloid precursor protein (APP). This gene produces a nervous system-enriched 6.5-kilobase transcript. Sequencing of cDNAs derived from the 6.5-kilobase transcript predicts an 886-amino acid polypeptide. This polypeptide contains a putative transmembrane domain and exhibits strong sequence similarity to cytoplasmic and extracellular regions of the human β-amyloid precursor protein. There is a high probability that this Drosophila gene corresponds to the essential Drosophila locus vnd, a gene required for embryonic nervous system development

  3. Evaluating the Impact of Open Access at Berkeley: Results from the 2015 Survey of Berkeley Research Impact Initiative (BRII) Funding Recipients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teplitzky, Samantha; Phillips, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    The Berkeley Research Impact Initiative (BRII) was one of the first campus-based open access (OA) funds to be established in North America and one of the most active, distributing more than $244,000 to support University of California (UC) Berkeley authors. In April 2015, we conducted a qualitative study of 138 individuals who had received BRII…

  4. Journal of Genetics | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gene structure of Drosophila diaphorase-1: diversity of transcripts in adult males and ... Q9W529) from Berkeley Drosophila Genome Project (BDGP) was found ... Sofia University St Kliment Ohridski, Faculty of Biology, Department of Genetics, ...

  5. RNA editing in Drosophila melanogaster: new targets and functionalconsequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stapleton, Mark; Carlson, Joseph W.; Celniker, Susan E.

    2006-09-05

    Adenosine deaminases that act on RNA (ADARs) catalyze the site-specific conversion of adenosine to inosine in primary mRNA transcripts. These re-coding events affect coding potential, splice-sites, and stability of mature mRNAs. ADAR is an essential gene and studies in mouse, C. elegans, and Drosophila suggest its primary function is to modify adult behavior by altering signaling components in the nervous system. By comparing the sequence of isogenic cDNAs to genomic DNA, we have identified and experimentally verified 27 new targets of Drosophila ADAR. Our analyses lead us to identify new classes of genes whose transcripts are targets of ADAR including components of the actin cytoskeleton, and genes involved in ion homeostasis and signal transduction. Our results indicate that editing in Drosophila increases the diversity of the proteome, and does so in a manner that has direct functional consequences on protein function.

  6. Community Relations Plan for Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-07-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) has applied to the California Environmental Protection Agency, Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC), for renewal of its Hazardous Waste Handling Facility Permit. A permit is required under Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations. The permit will allow LBL to continue using its current hazardous waste handling facility, upgrade the existing facility, and construct a replacement facility. The new facility is scheduled for completion in 1995. The existing facility will be closed under RCRA guidelines by 1996. As part of the permitting process, LBL is required to investigate areas of soil and groundwater contamination at its main site in the Berkeley Hills. The investigations are being conducted by LBL`s Environmental Restoration Program and are overseen by a number of regulatory agencies. The regulatory agencies working with LBL include the California Environmental Protection Agency`s Department of Toxic Substances Control, the California Regional Water Quality Control Board, the Bay Area Air Quality Management District, the East Bay Municipal Utilities District, and the Berkeley Department of Environmental Health. RCRA requires that the public be informed of LBL`s investigations and site cleanup, and that opportunities be available for the public to participate in making decisions about how LBL will address contamination issues. LBL has prepared this Community Relations Plan (CRP) to describe activities that LBL will use to keep the community informed of environmental restoration progress and to provide for an open dialogue with the public on issues of importance. The CRP documents the community`s current concerns about LBL`s Environmental Restoration Program. Interviews conducted between February and April 1993 with elected officials, agency staff, environmental organizations, businesses, site neighbors, and LBL employees form the basis for the information contained in this document.

  7. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1995 site environmental report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balgobin, D.; Javandel, I.; Lackner, G.; Smith, C.; Thorson, P.; Tran, H.

    1996-07-01

    The 1995 Site Environmental Report summarizes environmental activities at the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for the 1995 calendar year. The report strives to present environmental data in a manner that characterizes the performance and compliance status of the environmental management programs. The report also discusses significant highlights and plans of these programs. Topics discussed include: environmental monitoring, environmental compliance programs, air quality, water quality, ground water protection, sanitary sewer monitoring, soil and sediment quality, vegetation and foodstuffs monitoring, and special studies which include preoperational monitoring of building 85 and 1995 sampling results, radiological dose assessment, and quality assessment.

  8. Annual environmental monitoring report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schleimer, G.E.

    1989-06-01

    The Environmental Monitoring Program of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is described. Data for 1988 are presented and general trends are discussed. In order to establish whether LBL research activities produced any impact on the population surrounding the laboratory, a program of environmental air and water sampling and continuous radiation monitoring was carried on throughout the year. For 1988, as in the previous several years, dose equivalents attributable to LBL radiological operations were a small fraction of both the relevant radiation protection guidelines (RPG) and of the natural radiation background. 16 refs., 7 figs., 21 tabs

  9. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1995 site environmental report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balgobin, D.; Javandel, I.; Lackner, G.; Smith, C.; Thorson, P.; Tran, H.

    1996-07-01

    The 1995 Site Environmental Report summarizes environmental activities at the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for the 1995 calendar year. The report strives to present environmental data in a manner that characterizes the performance and compliance status of the environmental management programs. The report also discusses significant highlights and plans of these programs. Topics discussed include: environmental monitoring, environmental compliance programs, air quality, water quality, ground water protection, sanitary sewer monitoring, soil and sediment quality, vegetation and foodstuffs monitoring, and special studies which include preoperational monitoring of building 85 and 1995 sampling results, radiological dose assessment, and quality assessment

  10. Popular Berkeley Lab X-ray Data Booklet reissued

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, Art

    2001-01-01

    X-ray scientists and synchrotron-radiation users who have been patiently waiting for an updated version of the popular X-Ray Data Booklet last published in 1986 by the Center for X-Ray Optics at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory can breathe a sigh of relief. The venerable ''little orange book'' has now been reissued under the auspices of CXRO and the Advanced Light Source (ALS) with an April printing of 10,000 paper copies and the posting of a Web edition at http://xdb.lbl.gov

  11. Annual environmental monitoring report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schleimer, G.E. (ed.)

    1989-06-01

    The Environmental Monitoring Program of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is described. Data for 1988 are presented and general trends are discussed. In order to establish whether LBL research activities produced any impact on the population surrounding the laboratory, a program of environmental air and water sampling and continuous radiation monitoring was carried on throughout the year. For 1988, as in the previous several years, dose equivalents attributable to LBL radiological operations were a small fraction of both the relevant radiation protection guidelines (RPG) and of the natural radiation background. 16 refs., 7 figs., 21 tabs.

  12. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory upgrading approaches to existing facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engle, H.M. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Plant Engineering Department instituted a seismic risk investigation and seismic upgrade program in 1970. This paper covers the upgrade of two buildings with dissimilar framing systems; Building No. 10, a World War II vintage heavy timber frame building, and Building No. 80, a steel frame structure constructed in 1954. The seismic upgrade task for both structures required that the buildings be kept in service during rehabilitation with a minimum of disruption to occupants. Rehabilitations were phased over two and three year periods with construction management and supervision performed by LBL Plant Engineering staff

  13. Assembly Manual for the Berkeley Lab Cosmic Ray Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collier, Michael

    2002-01-01

    The Berkeley Lab Cosmic Ray Detector consists of 3 main components that must be prepared separately before they can be assembled. These components are the scintillator, circuit board, and casing. They are described in the main sections of this report, which may be completed in any order. Preparing the scintillator paddles involves several steps--cutting the scintillator material to the appropriate size and shape, preparing and attaching Lucite cookies (optional), polishing the edges, gluing the end to the photomultiplier tube (optional), and wrapping the scintillator. Since the detector has 2 paddles, each of the sections needs to be repeated for the other paddle

  14. Metabolomic Studies in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, James E; Thummel, Carl S; Tennessen, Jason M

    2017-07-01

    Metabolomic analysis provides a powerful new tool for studies of Drosophila physiology. This approach allows investigators to detect thousands of chemical compounds in a single sample, representing the combined contributions of gene expression, enzyme activity, and environmental context. Metabolomics has been used for a wide range of studies in Drosophila , often providing new insights into gene function and metabolic state that could not be obtained using any other approach. In this review, we survey the uses of metabolomic analysis since its entry into the field. We also cover the major methods used for metabolomic studies in Drosophila and highlight new directions for future research. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  15. Environmental assessment for construction and operation of a Human Genome Laboratory at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-01

    Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) proposes to construct and operate a new laboratory for consolidation of current and future activities of the Human Genome Center (HGC). This document addresses the potential direct, indirect, and cumulative environmental and human-health effects from the proposed facility construction and operation. This document was prepared in accordance the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (United States Codes 42 USC 4321-4347) (NEPA) and the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Final Rule for NEPA Implementing Procedures [Code of Federal Regulations 10CFR 1021].

  16. Preparations for decommissioning the TRIGA Mark III Berkeley Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denton, Michael M.; Lim, Tek. H.

    1988-01-01

    On December 20, 1986 the chancellor of UC Berkeley announced his decision to decommission the 20 year old Berkeley Research Reactor citing as principal reasons a decline in use and a need to erect a new computer science building over the reactor's site. In order to meet the University's construction timetable for the new building, the reactor staff together with other units of the campus administration have initiated a program to remove the reactor structure and clear the room for unlicensed use as expediently as possible. Due to the sequence of events which must occur in a limited amount of time, the University adopted a policy to contract out as much of the work as possible, including generation of the defueling and decommissioning plans.The first physical step in the decommissioning project is the removal of the irradiated fuel. This task is largely contracted out to a commercial firm with experience in the transport of radioactive materials and reactor fuel. As suggested by the NRC, the reactor will be defueled under the current operating license. This requires that all fuel must be off-site before the DP can be approved. Therefore any delay in defueling in-turn delays the decommissioning. The NRC has given no commitment or date for completion of their review. Informal discussion with NRC project managers and the experience from other facilities indicate that the review process will take between six and nine months

  17. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1997 Site Environmental Report Vol. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorson, Patrick

    1998-01-01

    Each year, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory prepares an integrated report on its environmental programs to satisfy the requirements of U.S. Department of Energy Order 231.1. The Site Environmental Report for 1997 is intended to summarize Berkeley Lab's compliance with environmental standards and requirements, characterize environmental management efforts through surveillance and monitoring activities, and highlight significant programs and efforts for calendar year 1997. This report is structured into three basic areas that cover a general overview of the Laboratory, the status of environmental programs, and the results of the surveillance and monitoring activities, including air quality, surface water, groundwater, sanitary sewer, soil and sediment, vegetation and foodstuffs, radiation dose assessment, and quality assurance. The report is separated into two volumes. Volume I contains the body of the report, a list of references, a list of acronyms and abbreviations, a glossary, Appendix A (NESHAPS annual report), and Appendix B (distribution list for volume I). Volume II contains Appendix C, the individual data results from monitoring programs. Each chapter in volume I begins with an outline of the sections that follow

  18. The developmental transcriptome of Drosophila melanogaster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    University of Connecticut; Graveley, Brenton R.; Brooks, Angela N.; Carlson, Joseph W.; Duff, Michael O.; Landolin, Jane M.; Yang, Li; Artieri, Carlo G.; van Baren, Marijke J.; Boley, Nathan; Booth, Benjamin W.; Brown, James B.; Cherbas, Lucy; Davis, Carrie A.; Dobin, Alex; Li, Renhua; Lin, Wei; Malone, John H.; Mattiuzzo, Nicolas R.; Miller, David; Sturgill, David; Tuch, Brian B.; Zaleski, Chris; Zhang, Dayu; Blanchette, Marco; Dudoit, Sandrine; Eads, Brian; Green, Richard E.; Hammonds, Ann; Jiang, Lichun; Kapranov, Phil; Langton, Laura; Perrimon, Norbert; Sandler, Jeremy E.; Wan, Kenneth H.; Willingham, Aarron; Zhang, Yu; Zou, Yi; Andrews, Justen; Bicke, Peter J.; Brenner, Steven E.; Brent, Michael R.; Cherbas, Peter; Gingeras, Thomas R.; Hoskins, Roger A.; Kaufman, Thomas C.; Oliver, Brian; Celniker, Susan E.

    2010-12-02

    Drosophila melanogaster is one of the most well studied genetic model organisms; nonetheless, its genome still contains unannotated coding and non-coding genes, transcripts, exons and RNA editing sites. Full discovery and annotation are pre-requisites for understanding how the regulation of transcription, splicing and RNA editing directs the development of this complex organism. Here we used RNA-Seq, tiling microarrays and cDNA sequencing to explore the transcriptome in 30 distinct developmental stages. We identified 111,195 new elements, including thousands of genes, coding and non-coding transcripts, exons, splicing and editing events, and inferred protein isoforms that previously eluded discovery using established experimental, prediction and conservation-based approaches. These data substantially expand the number of known transcribed elements in the Drosophila genome and provide a high-resolution view of transcriptome dynamics throughout development. Drosophila melanogaster is an important non-mammalian model system that has had a critical role in basic biological discoveries, such as identifying chromosomes as the carriers of genetic information and uncovering the role of genes in development. Because it shares a substantial genic content with humans, Drosophila is increasingly used as a translational model for human development, homeostasis and disease. High-quality maps are needed for all functional genomic elements. Previous studies demonstrated that a rich collection of genes is deployed during the life cycle of the fly. Although expression profiling using microarrays has revealed the expression of, 13,000 annotated genes, it is difficult to map splice junctions and individual base modifications generated by RNA editing using such approaches. Single-base resolution is essential to define precisely the elements that comprise the Drosophila transcriptome. Estimates of the number of transcript isoforms are less accurate than estimates of the number of genes

  19. Environmental Assessment for the proposed Induction Linac System Experiments in Building 51B at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-08-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), (DOE/EA-1087) evaluating the proposed action to modify existing Building 51B at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to install and conduct experiments on a new Induction Linear Accelerator System. LBNL is located in Berkeley, California and operated by the University of California (UC). The project consists of placing a pre-fabricated building inside Building 51B to house a new 10 MeV heavy ion linear accelerator. A control room and other support areas would be provided within and directly adjacent to Building 51B. The accelerator system would be used to conduct tests, at reduced scale and cost, many features of a heavy-ion accelerator driver for the Department of Energy's inertial fusion energy program. Based upon information and analyses in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969. Therefore, an Environmental Impact Statement is not required. This report contains the Environmental Assessment, as well as the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI)

  20. The BDGP gene disruption project: Single transposon insertions associated with 40 percent of Drosophila genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellen, Hugo J.; Levis, Robert W.; Liao, Guochun; He, Yuchun; Carlson, Joseph W.; Tsang, Garson; Evans-Holm, Martha; Hiesinger, P. Robin; Schulze, Karen L.; Rubin, Gerald M.; Hoskins, Roger A.; Spradling, Allan C.

    2004-01-13

    The Berkeley Drosophila Genome Project (BDGP) strives to disrupt each Drosophila gene by the insertion of a single transposable element. As part of this effort, transposons in more than 30,000 fly strains were localized and analyzed relative to predicted Drosophila gene structures. Approximately 6,300 lines that maximize genomic coverage were selected to be sent to the Bloomington Stock Center for public distribution, bringing the size of the BDGP gene disruption collection to 7,140 lines. It now includes individual lines predicted to disrupt 5,362 of the 13,666 currently annotated Drosophila genes (39 percent). Other lines contain an insertion at least 2 kb from others in the collection and likely mutate additional incompletely annotated or uncharacterized genes and chromosomal regulatory elements. The remaining strains contain insertions likely to disrupt alternative gene promoters or to allow gene mis-expression. The expanded BDGP gene disruption collection provides a public resource that will facilitate the application of Drosophila genetics to diverse biological problems. Finally, the project reveals new insight into how transposons interact with a eukaryotic genome and helps define optimal strategies for using insertional mutagenesis as a genomic tool.

  1. Linking Core Promoter Classes to Circadian Transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pål O Westermark

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms in transcription are generated by rhythmic abundances and DNA binding activities of transcription factors. Propagation of rhythms to transcriptional initiation involves the core promoter, its chromatin state, and the basal transcription machinery. Here, I characterize core promoters and chromatin states of genes transcribed in a circadian manner in mouse liver and in Drosophila. It is shown that the core promoter is a critical determinant of circadian mRNA expression in both species. A distinct core promoter class, strong circadian promoters (SCPs, is identified in mouse liver but not Drosophila. SCPs are defined by specific core promoter features, and are shown to drive circadian transcriptional activities with both high averages and high amplitudes. Data analysis and mathematical modeling further provided evidence for rhythmic regulation of both polymerase II recruitment and pause release at SCPs. The analysis provides a comprehensive and systematic view of core promoters and their link to circadian mRNA expression in mouse and Drosophila, and thus reveals a crucial role for the core promoter in regulated, dynamic transcription.

  2. The Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, A.L.; Perera, R.C.C.; Schlachter, A.S.

    1991-10-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), scheduled to be operational in the spring of 1993 as a US Department of Energy national user facility, will be a next- generation source of soft x-ray and ultraviolet (XUV) synchrotron radiation. Undulators will provide the world's brightest synchrotron radiation at photon energies from below 10 eV to above 2 keV; wiggler and bend-magnet radiation will extend the spectral coverage with high fluxes above 10 keV. These capabilities will support an extensive research program in a broad spectrum of scientific and technological areas in which XUV radiation is used to study and manipulate matter in all its varied gaseous, liquid, and solid forms. The ALS will also serve those interested in developing the fabrication technology for micro- and nanostructures, as well as characterizing them

  3. LAUE lens development at UC Berkeley: status and prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrière, Nicolas M.; Tomsick, John A.; Ackermann, Marcelo D.; Bastie, Pierre; Boggs, Steven E.; Hanlon, Lorraine; Jentschel, Michael; Lowell, Alexander; Roudil, Gilles; von Ballmoos, Peter; Wade, Colin

    2013-09-01

    We report on the status of the Laue lens development effort led by UC Berkeley, where a dedicated X-ray beamline and a Laue lens assembly station were built. This allowed the realization of a first lens prototype in June 2012. Based on this achievement, and thanks to a new NASA APRA grant, we are moving forward to enable Laue lenses. Several parallel activities are in progress. Firstly, we are refining the method to glue quickly and accurately crystals on a lens substrate. Secondly, we are conducting a study of high-Z crystals to diffract energies up to 900 keV efficiently. And thirdly, we are exploring new concepts of Si-based lenses that could further improve the focusing capabilities, and thus the sensitivity of Laue lenses.

  4. Radioactive waste management research at CEGB Berkeley nuclear laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradbury, D.

    1988-01-01

    The CEGB is the major electric utility in the United Kingdom. This paper discusses how, at the research laboratories at Berkeley (BNL), several programs of work are currently taking place in the radioactive waste management area. The theme running through all this work is the safe isolation of radionuclides from the environment. Normally this means disposal of waste in solid form, but it may also be desirable to segregate and release nonradioactive material from the waste to reduce volume or improve the solid waste characteristics (e.g., the release of liquid or gaseous effluents after treatment to convert the radioactivity to solid form). The fuel cycle and radioactive waste section at BNL has a research program into these aspects for wastes arising from the operation or decommissioning of power stations. The work is done both in-house and on contract, with primarily the UKAEA

  5. Environmental surveillance program of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, R.H.

    1976-04-01

    The major radiological environmental impact of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is due to the operation of four particle accelerators. Potential sources of population exposure at the Laboratory are discussed. The major source of population exposure due to accelerator operation arises from the prompt radiation field which consists principally of neutrons and photons. Release of small quantities of radionuclides is also a potential source of population exposure but is usually an order of magnitude less significant. Accelerator produced radiation levels at the Laboratory boundary are comparable with the magnitudes of the fluctuations found in the natural background radiation. Environmental monitoring of accelerator-produced radiation and of radionuclides is carried on throughout the Laboratory, at the Laboratory perimeter, and in the regions surrounding the Laboratory. The techniques used are described. The models used to calculate population exposure are described and discussed

  6. Early History of Heavy Isotope Research at Berkeley

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glenn T. Seaborg

    1976-06-01

    I have had the idea for some time that it would be interesting and worthwhile to put together an account of the early work on heavy isotopes at Berkeley. Of a special interest is the discovery of plutonium (atomic number 94) and the isotope U{sup 233}, and the demonstration of their fission with slow neutrons. This work served as a prelude to the subsequent Plutonium Project (Metallurgical Project) centered at the University of Chicago, in connection with which I have also had the idea of putting together a history of the work of my chemistry group. I have decided that it would be an interesting challenge to write this account on a day-to-day basis in a style that would be consistent with the entries having been written at the end of each day. The aim would be to make this history as accurate as possible by going back to the original records and using them with meticulous care.

  7. Decommissioning of fuel PIE caves at Berkeley Nuclear Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brant, A.W.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the first major contract awarded to private industry to carry out decommissioning of a facility with significant radiation levels. The work required operatives to work in pressurised suits, entry times were significantly affected by sources of radiation in the Caves, being as low as thirty minutes per day initially. The Caves at Berkeley Nuclear Laboratories carry out post irradiation examination of fuel elements support units and reactor core components from CEGB power stations. The decommissioning work is part of an overall refurbishment of the facility to allow the receipt of AGR Fuel Stringer Component direct from power stations. The paper describes the decommissioning and decontamination of the facility from the remote removal and clean up work carried out by the client to the hands-on work. It includes reference to entry times, work patterns, interfaces with the client and the operations of the laboratory. Details of a specially adapted size reduction method are given. (Author)

  8. Young Cluster Berkeley 59: Properties, Evolution, and Star Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panwar, Neelam; Pandey, A. K.; Samal, Manash R.; Battinelli, Paolo; Ogura, K.; Ojha, D. K.; Chen, W. P.; Singh, H. P.

    2018-01-01

    Berkeley 59 is a nearby (∼1 kpc) young cluster associated with the Sh2-171 H II region. We present deep optical observations of the central ∼2.5 × 2.5 pc2 area of the cluster, obtained with the 3.58 m Telescopio Nazionale Galileo. The V/(V–I) color–magnitude diagram manifests a clear pre-main-sequence (PMS) population down to ∼0.2 M ⊙. Using the near-infrared and optical colors of the low-mass PMS members, we derive a global extinction of A V = 4 mag and a mean age of ∼1.8 Myr, respectively, for the cluster. We constructed the initial mass function and found that its global slopes in the mass ranges of 0.2–28 M ⊙ and 0.2–1.5 M ⊙ are ‑1.33 and ‑1.23, respectively, in good agreement with the Salpeter value in the solar neighborhood. We looked for the radial variation of the mass function and found that the slope is flatter in the inner region than in the outer region, indicating mass segregation. The dynamical status of the cluster suggests that the mass segregation is likely primordial. The age distribution of the PMS sources reveals that the younger sources appear to concentrate close to the inner region compared to the outer region of the cluster, a phenomenon possibly linked to the time evolution of star-forming clouds. Within the observed area, we derive a total mass of ∼103 M ⊙ for the cluster. Comparing the properties of Berkeley 59 with other young clusters, we suggest it resembles more closely the Trapezium cluster.

  9. Berkeley 51 Kümesinin Temel ve Astrofiziksel Parametrelerinin Belirlenmesi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İnci Akkaya Oralhan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Galaksimizin birinci çeyreğinde bulunan ve daha önce çok az çalışılmış açık yıldız kümelerinden biri olan Berkeley 51 kümesinin temel astrofiziksel ve yapısal parametreleri CCD UBV(RIC ve 2MASS JHKS verileri kullanılarak elde edilmiştir. Kümeye ait CCD UBV(RIC verileri Meksika’da bulunan San Pedro Martir Ulusal Gözlemevi’nden 84cm’lik teleskop ile alınmıştır. Küme üyeliklerinin belirlenmesinde ise PPMXL kataloğundaki öz hareket verileri kullanılmıştır. Buna küre bu küme için elde edilen limit yarıçap Rlim=2.5 yay dakikası, kızarma E(B-V=0.85±0.05 kadir, E(J-H=0.28±0.02 kadir, uzaklık modülü DM=(m-M0=10.66±0.04 pc, uzaklığı d=1355±27 pc ve logaritmik yaş log(A=9.54±0.03 Myıl olarak bulunmuştur. Küme için ilk kez bulunan metal ve ağır element bolluğu ise sırasıyla [Fe/H]=-0.38 ve Z=0.006 olarak elde edilmiştir.Anahtar kelimeler: Açık yıldız kümeleri-Berkeley 51

  10. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 2016 Annual Financial Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Kim, P.; Williams, Kim, P.

    2017-06-27

    FY2016 was a year of significant change and progress at Berkeley Lab. In March, Laboratory Director Michael Witherell assumed his new role when former Lab Director Paul Alivisatos became Vice Chancellor for Research at UC Berkeley. Dr. Witherell has solidified the Lab’s strategy, with a focus on long term science and technology priorities. Large-scale science efforts continued to expand at the Lab, including the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument now heading towards construction, and the LUX-ZEPLIN dark matter detector to be built underground in South Dakota. Another proposed project, the Advanced Light Source-Upgrade, was given preliminary approval and will be the Lab’s largest scientific investment in years. Construction of the Integrative Genomics Building began, and will bring together researchers from the Lab’s Joint Genome Institute, now based in Walnut Creek, and the Systems Biology Knowledgebase (K-Base) under one roof. Investment in the Lab’s infrastructure also continues, informed by the Lab’s Infrastructure Strategic Plan. Another important focus is on developing the next generation of scientists with the talent and diversity needed to sustain Berkeley Lab’s scientific leadership and mission contributions to DOE and the Nation. Berkeley Lab received $897.5M in new FY2016 funding, a 12.5% increase over FY2015, for both programmatic and infrastructure activities. While the Laboratory experienced a substantial increase in funding, it was accompanied by only a modest increase in spending, as areas of growth were partially offset by the completion of several major efforts in FY2015. FY2016 costs were $826.9M, an increase of 1.9% over FY2015. Similar to the prior year, the indirect-funded Operations units worked with generally flat budgets to yield more funding for strategic needs. A key challenge for Berkeley Lab continues to be achieving the best balance to fund essential investments, deliver highly effective operational mission support and

  11. Hearing regulates Drosophila aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versteven, Marijke; Vanden Broeck, Lies; Geurten, Bart; Zwarts, Liesbeth; Decraecker, Lisse; Beelen, Melissa; Göpfert, Martin C; Heinrich, Ralf; Callaerts, Patrick

    2017-02-21

    Aggression is a universal social behavior important for the acquisition of food, mates, territory, and social status. Aggression in Drosophila is context-dependent and can thus be expected to involve inputs from multiple sensory modalities. Here, we use mechanical disruption and genetic approaches in Drosophila melanogaster to identify hearing as an important sensory modality in the context of intermale aggressive behavior. We demonstrate that neuronal silencing and targeted knockdown of hearing genes in the fly's auditory organ elicit abnormal aggression. Further, we show that exposure to courtship or aggression song has opposite effects on aggression. Our data define the importance of hearing in the control of Drosophila intermale aggression and open perspectives to decipher how hearing and other sensory modalities are integrated at the neural circuit level.

  12. Guidelines for the segregation characterization management of dry waste at Berkeley Lab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-05-01

    Managing and disposing of dry low level radioactive waste at Berkeley Lab. is problematic. The Waste Management Group must assure off site treatment, storage, and disposal facilities that dry waste from Berkeley Lab. is free of liquids and regulated metals (such as lead and mercury). RTR (Real Time Radioagraphy) used for waste to be rejected. This pamphlet helps to clarify dry waste management requirements that will ensure that Berkeley Lab. dry waste will be accepted for off site shipment. These issues are critical if we are to have an off site disposal option for your dry radioactive waste

  13. Tiger Team assessment of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Washington, DC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-02-01

    This report documents the results of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Tiger Team Assessment of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) conducted from January 14 through February 15, 1991. The purpose of the assessment was to provide the Secretary of Energy with the status of environment, safety, and health (ES H) programs at LBL. The Tiger Team concluded that curtailment of cessation of any operations at LBL is not warranted. However, the number and breadth of findings and concerns from this assessment reflect a serious condition at this site. In spite of its late start, LBL has recently made progress in increasing ES H awareness at all staff levels and in identifying ES H deficiencies. Corrective action plans are inadequate, however, many compensatory actions are underway. Also, LBL does not have the technical expertise or training programs nor the tracking and followup to effectively direct and control sitewide guidance and oversight by DOE of ES H activities at LBL. As a result of these deficiencies, the Tiger Team has reservations about LBL's ability to implement effective actions in a timely manner and, thereby, achieve excellence in their ES H program. 4 figs., 24 tabs.

  14. Modernizing Natural History: Berkeley's Museum of Vertebrate Zoology in Transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunderland, Mary E

    2013-01-01

    Throughout the twentieth century calls to modernize natural history motivated a range of responses. It was unclear how research in natural history museums would participate in the significant technological and conceptual changes that were occurring in the life sciences. By the 1960s, the Museum of Vertebrate Zoology at the University of California, Berkeley, was among the few university-based natural history museums that were able to maintain their specimen collections and support active research. The MVZ therefore provides a window to the modernization of natural history. This paper concentrates on the directorial transitions that occurred at the MVZ between 1965 and 1971. During this period, the MVZ had four directors: Alden H. Miller (Director 1940-1965), an ornithologist; Aldo Starker Leopold (Acting Director 1965-1966), a conservationist and wildlife biologist; Oliver P. Pearson (Director 1966-1971), a physiologist and mammalogist; and David B. Wake (Director 1971-1998), a morphologist, developmental biologist, and herpetologist. The paper explores how a diversity of overlapping modernization strategies, including hiring new faculty, building infrastructure to study live animals, establishing new kinds of collections, and building modern laboratories combined to maintain collections at the MVZ's core. The paper examines the tensions between the different modernization strategies to inform an analysis of how and why some changes were institutionalized while others were short-lived. By exploring the modernization of collections-based research, this paper emphasizes the importance of collections in the transformation of the life sciences.

  15. Berkeley lab checkpoint/restart (BLCR) for Linux clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hargrove, Paul H; Duell, Jason C

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the motivation, design and implementation of Berkeley Lab Checkpoint/Restart (BLCR), a system-level checkpoint/restart implementation for Linux clusters that targets the space of typical High Performance Computing applications, including MPI. Application-level solutions, including both checkpointing and fault-tolerant algorithms, are recognized as more time and space efficient than system-level checkpoints, which cannot make use of any application-specific knowledge. However, system-level checkpointing allows for preemption, making it suitable for responding to ''fault precursors'' (for instance, elevated error rates from ECC memory or network CRCs, or elevated temperature from sensors). Preemption can also increase the efficiency of batch scheduling; for instance reducing idle cycles (by allowing for shutdown without any queue draining period or reallocation of resources to eliminate idle nodes when better fitting jobs are queued), and reducing the average queued time (by limiting large jobs to running during off-peak hours, without the need to limit the length of such jobs). Each of these potential uses makes BLCR a valuable tool for efficient resource management in Linux clusters

  16. Tiger Team assessment of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Washington, DC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-02-01

    This report documents the results of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Tiger Team Assessment of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) conducted from January 14 through February 15, 1991. The purpose of the assessment was to provide the Secretary of Energy with the status of environment, safety, and health (ES ampersand H) programs at LBL. The Tiger Team concluded that curtailment of cessation of any operations at LBL is not warranted. However, the number and breadth of findings and concerns from this assessment reflect a serious condition at this site. In spite of its late start, LBL has recently made progress in increasing ES ampersand H awareness at all staff levels and in identifying ES ampersand H deficiencies. Corrective action plans are inadequate, however, many compensatory actions are underway. Also, LBL does not have the technical expertise or training programs nor the tracking and followup to effectively direct and control sitewide guidance and oversight by DOE of ES ampersand H activities at LBL. As a result of these deficiencies, the Tiger Team has reservations about LBL's ability to implement effective actions in a timely manner and, thereby, achieve excellence in their ES ampersand H program. 4 figs., 24 tabs

  17. Spin-Off Successes of SETI Research at Berkeley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, K. A.; Anderson, D. P.; Bankay, R.; Chen, H.; Cobb, J.; Korpela, E. J.; Lebofsky, M.; Parsons, A.; von Korff, J.; Werthimer, D.

    2009-12-01

    Our group contributes to the Search for Extra-Terrestrial Intelligence (SETI) by developing and using world-class signal processing computers to analyze data collected on the Arecibo telescope. Although no patterned signal of extra-terrestrial origin has yet been detected, and the immediate prospects for making such a detection are highly uncertain, the SETI@home project has nonetheless proven the value of pursuing such research through its impact on the fields of distributed computing, real-time signal processing, and radio astronomy. The SETI@home project has spun off the Center for Astronomy Signal Processing and Electronics Research (CASPER) and the Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Networked Computing (BOINC), both of which are responsible for catalyzing a smorgasbord of new research in scientific disciplines in countries around the world. Futhermore, the data collected and archived for the SETI@home project is proving valuable in data-mining experiments for mapping neutral galatic hydrogen and for detecting black-hole evaporation.

  18. Annual environmental monitoring report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephens, L.D.

    1978-03-01

    The data obtained from the Environmental Monitoring Program of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory for the Calendar year 1977 are described and general trends are discussed. The general trend of decreasing radiation levels at our site boundary due to accelerator operation during past years has leveled off during 1977 and in some areas shows a slight but not statistically significant increase as predicted in last year's summary. There were changes in both ion beams as well as current which have resulted in shifts in maxima at the monitoring stations. The gamma levels are once again reported as zero. There is only one period of detectable gamma radiation due to accelerator operation. The annual dose equivalent are reported from the environmental monitoring stations since they have been established. Radiation levels at the Olympus Gate Station have shown a steady decline since 1959 when estimates were first made. The Olympus Gate Station is in direct view of the Bevatron and most directly influenced by that accelerator. Over the past several years the atmospheric sampling program has, with the exception of occasional known releases, yielded data which are within the range of normal background. The surface water program always yields results within the range of normal background. As no substantial changes in the quantities of radionuclides used are anticipated, no changes are expected in these observations

  19. Berkeley SuperNova Ia Program (BSNIP): Initial Spectral Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Jeffrey; Kong, J.; Ganeshalingam, M.; Li, W.; Filippenko, A. V.

    2011-01-01

    The Berkeley SuperNova Ia Program (BSNIP) has been observing nearby (z analysis of this dataset consists of accurately and robustly measuring the strength and position of various spectral features near maximum brightness. We determine the endpoints, pseudo-continuum, expansion velocity, equivalent width, and depth of each major feature observed in our wavelength range. For objects with multiple spectra near maximum brightness we investigate how these values change with time. From these measurements we also calculate velocity gradients and various flux ratios within a given spectrum which will allow us to explore correlations between spectral and photometric observables. Some possible correlations have been studied previously, but our dataset is unique in how self-consistent the data reduction and spectral feature measurements have been, and it is a factor of a few larger than most earlier studies. We will briefly summarize the contents of the full dataset as an introduction to our initial analysis. Some of our measurements of SN Ia spectral features, along with a few initial results from those measurements, will be presented. Finally, we will comment on our current progress and planned future work. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support of NSF grant AST-0908886, the TABASGO Foundation, and the Marc J. Staley Graduate Fellowship in Astronomy.

  20. BMAA neurotoxicity in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xianchong; Escala, Wilfredo; Papapetropoulos, Spyridon; Bradley, Walter G; Zhai, R Grace

    2009-01-01

    We report the establishment of an in vivo model using the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster to investigate the toxic effects of L-BMAA. We found that dietary intake of BMAA reduced the lifespan as well as the neurological functions of flies. Furthermore, we have developed an HPLC method to reliably detect both free and protein-bound BMAA in fly tissue extracts.

  1. Cancer in Drosophila

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herranz, Héctor; Eichenlaub, Teresa; Cohen, Stephen M

    2016-01-01

    Cancer genomics has greatly increased our understanding of the complexity of the genetic and epigenetic changes found in human tumors. Understanding the functional relationships among these elements calls for the use of flexible genetic models. We discuss the use of Drosophila models to study...

  2. Modeling Human Cancers in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonoshita, M; Cagan, R L

    2017-01-01

    Cancer is a complex disease that affects multiple organs. Whole-body animal models provide important insights into oncology that can lead to clinical impact. Here, we review novel concepts that Drosophila studies have established for cancer biology, drug discovery, and patient therapy. Genetic studies using Drosophila have explored the roles of oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes that when dysregulated promote cancer formation, making Drosophila a useful model to study multiple aspects of transformation. Not limited to mechanism analyses, Drosophila has recently been showing its value in facilitating drug development. Flies offer rapid, efficient platforms by which novel classes of drugs can be identified as candidate anticancer leads. Further, we discuss the use of Drosophila as a platform to develop therapies for individual patients by modeling the tumor's genetic complexity. Drosophila provides both a classical and a novel tool to identify new therapeutics, complementing other more traditional cancer tools. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Laboratories for the 21st Century: Case Studies, Molecular Foundry, Berkeley, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-11-01

    This case study provides information on the Molecular Foundry, which incorporates Labs21 principles in its design and construction. The design includes many of the strategies researched at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory for energy efficient cleanroom and data centers.

  4. Environmental Justice Screening Method (EJSM) Score, San Joaquin Valley CA, 2013, Occidental College and UC Berkeley

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Cumulative Impacts (CI) screening method is jointly being developed by Manuel Pastor, Jim Sadd (Occidental College), and Rachel Morello-Frosch (UC Berkeley) ....

  5. Proposed University of California Berkeley fast pulsar search machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulkarni, S.R.; Backer, D.C.; Werthimer, D.; Heiles, C.

    1984-01-01

    With the discovery of 1937+21 by Backer et al. (1982) there is much renewed interest in an all sky survey for fast pulsars. University of California Berkeley has designed and is in the process of building an innovative and powerful, stand-alone, real-time, digital signal-processor to conduct an all sky survey for pulsars with rotation rates as high as 2000 Hz and dispersion measures less than 120 cm -3 pc at 800 MHz. The machine is anticipated to be completed in the Fall of 1985. The search technique consists of obtaining a 2-dimensional Fourier transform of the microwave signal. The transform is effected in two stages: a 64-channel, 3-level digital autocorrelator provides the radio frequency to delay transform and a fast 128K-point array processor effects the time to intensity fluctuation frequency transform. The use of a digital correlator allows flexibility in the choice of the observing radio frequency. Besides, the bandwidth is not fixed as in a multi-channel filter bank. In the machine, bandwidths can range from less than a MHz to 40 MHz. In the transform plane, the signature of a pulsar consists of harmonically related peaks which lie on a straight line which passes through the origin. The increased computational demand of a fast pulsar survey will be met by a combination of multi-CPU processing and pipeline design which involves a fast array processor and five commercial 68,000-based micro-processors. 6 references, 3 figures

  6. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Institutional Plan, FY 1993--1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-10-01

    The FY 1993--1998 Institutional Plan provides an overview of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory mission, strategic plan, scientific initiatives, research programs, environment and safety program plans, educational and technology transfer efforts, human resources, and facilities needs. The Strategic Plan section identifies long-range conditions that can influence the Laboratory, potential research trends, and several management implications. The Initiatives section identifies potential new research programs that represent major long-term opportunities for the Laboratory and the resources required for their implementation. The Scientific and Technical Programs section summarizes current programs and potential changes in research program activity. The Environment, Safety, and Health section describes the management systems and programs underway at the Laboratory to protect the environment, the public, and the employees. The Technology Transfer and Education programs section describes current and planned programs to enhance the nation's scientific literacy and human infrastructure and to improve economic competitiveness. The Human Resources section identifies LBL staff composition and development programs. The section on Site and Facilities discusses resources required to sustain and improve the physical plant and its equipment. The Resource Projections are estimates of required budgetary authority for the Laboratory's ongoing research programs. The plan is an institutional management report for integration with the Department of Energy's strategic planning activities that is developed through an annual planning process. The plan identifies technical and administrative directions in the context of the National Energy Strategy and the Department of Energy's program planning initiatives. Preparation of the plan is coordinated by the Office for Planning and Development from information contributed by the Laboratory's scientific and support divisions.

  7. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Institutional Plan, FY 1993--1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chew, Joseph T.; Stroh, Suzanne C.; Maio, Linda R.; Olson, Karl R.; Grether, Donald F.; Clary, Mary M.; Smith, Brian M.; Stevens, David F.; Ross, Loren; Alper, Mark D.; Dairiki, Janis M.; Fong, Pauline L.; Bartholomew, James C.

    1992-10-01

    The FY 1993--1998 Institutional Plan provides an overview of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory mission, strategic plan, scientific initiatives, research programs, environment and safety program plans, educational and technology transfer efforts, human resources, and facilities needs. The Strategic Plan section identifies long-range conditions that can influence the Laboratory, potential research trends, and several management implications. The Initiatives section identifies potential new research programs that represent major long-term opportunities for the Laboratory and the resources required for their implementation. The Scientific and Technical Programs section summarizes current programs and potential changes in research program activity. The Environment, Safety, and Health section describes the management systems and programs underway at the Laboratory to protect the environment, the public, and the employees. The Technology Transfer and Education programs section describes current and planned programs to enhance the nation`s scientific literacy and human infrastructure and to improve economic competitiveness. The Human Resources section identifies LBL staff composition and development programs. The section on Site and Facilities discusses resources required to sustain and improve the physical plant and its equipment. The Resource Projections are estimates of required budgetary authority for the Laboratory`s ongoing research programs. The plan is an institutional management report for integration with the Department of Energy`s strategic planning activities that is developed through an annual planning process. The plan identifies technical and administrative directions in the context of the National Energy Strategy and the Department of Energy`s program planning initiatives. Preparation of the plan is coordinated by the Office for Planning and Development from information contributed by the Laboratory`s scientific and support divisions.

  8. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Institutional Plan FY 1994--1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    The Institutional Plan provides an overview of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory mission, strategic plan, scientific initiatives, research programs, environment and safety program plans, educational and technology transfer efforts, human resources, and facilities needs. For FY 1994-1999 the Institutional Plan reflects significant revisions based on the Laboratory`s strategic planning process. The Strategic Plan section identifies long-range conditions that will influence the Laboratory, as well as potential research trends and management implications. The Initiatives section identifies potential new research programs that represent major long-term opportunities for the Laboratory, and the resources required for their implementation. The Scientific and Technical Programs section summarizes current programs and potential changes in research program activity. The Environment, Safety, and Health section describes the management systems and programs underway at the Laboratory to protect the environment, the public, and the employees. The Technology Transfer and Education programs section describes current and planned programs to enhance the nation`s scientific literacy and human infrastructure and to improve economic competitiveness. The Human Resources section identifies LBL staff diversity and development program. The section on Site and Facilities discusses resources required to sustain and improve the physical plant and its equipment. The new section on Information Resources reflects the importance of computing and communication resources to the Laboratory. The Resource Projections are estimates of required budgetary authority for the Laboratory`s ongoing research programs. The Institutional Plan is a management report for integration with the Department of Energy`s strategic planning activities, developed through an annual planning process.

  9. Tolerance in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Atkinson, Nigel S.

    2009-01-01

    The set of genes that underlie ethanol tolerance (inducible resistance) are likely to overlap with the set of genes responsible for ethanol addiction. Whereas addiction is difficult to recognize in simple model systems, behavioral tolerance is readily identifiable and can be induced in large populations of animals. Thus, tolerance lends itself to analysis in model systems with powerful genetics. Drosophila melanogaster has been used by a variety of laboratories for the identification of genes...

  10. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Institutional Plan FY 1987-1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Various

    1986-12-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy, provides national scientific leadership and supports technological innovation through its mission to: (1) Perform leading multidisciplinary research in general sciences and energy sciences; (2) Develop and operate unique national experimental facilities for use by qualified investigators; (3) Educate and train future generations of scientists and engineers; and (4) Foster productive relationships between LBL research programs and industry. The following areas of research excellence implement this mission and provide current focus for achieving DOE goals. GENERAL SCIENCES--(1) Accelerator and Fusion Research--accelerator design and operation, advanced accelerator technology development, accelerator and ion source research for heavy-ion fusion and magnetic fusion, and x-ray optics; (2) Nuclear Science--relativistic heavy-ion physics, medium- and low-energy nuclear physics, nuclear theory, nuclear astrophysics, nuclear chemistry, transuranium elements studies, nuclear data evaluation, and detector development; (3) Physics--experimental and theoretical particle physics, detector development, astrophysics, and applied mathematics. ENERGY SCIENCES--(1) Applied Science--building energy efficiency, solar for building systems, fossil energy conversion, energy storage, and atmospheric effects of combustion; (2) Biology and Medicine--molecular and cellular biology, diagnostic imaging, radiation biophysics, therapy and radiosurgery, mutagenesis and carcinogenesis, lipoproteins, cardiovascular disease, and hemopoiesis research; (3) Center for Advanced Materials--catalysts, electronic materials, ceramic and metal interfaces, polymer research, instrumentation, and metallic alloys; (4) Chemical Biodynamics--molecular biology of nucleic acids and proteins, genetics of photosynthesis, and photochemistry; (5) Earth Sciences--continental lithosphere properties, structures and

  11. The Drosophila T-box transcription factor Midline functions within the Notch–Delta signaling pathway to specify sensory organ precursor cell fates and regulates cell survival within the eye imaginal disc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sudeshna; Chen, Q. Brent; Saucier, Joseph D.; Drescher, Brandon; Zong, Yan; Morgan, Sarah; Forstall, John; Meriwether, Andrew; Toranzo, Randy; Leal, Sandra M.

    2014-01-01

    We report that the T-box transcription factor Midline (Mid), an evolutionary conserved homolog of the vertebrate Tbx20 protein, functions within the Notch–Delta signaling pathway essential for specifying the fates of sensory organ precursor cells. This complements an established history of research showing that Mid regulates the cell-fate specification of diverse cell types within the developing heart, epidermis and central nervous system. Tbx20 has been detected in diverse neuronal and epithelial cells of embryonic eye tissues in both mice and humans. However, the mechanisms by which either Mid or Tbx20 function to regulate cell-fate specification or other critical aspects of eye development including cell survival have not yet been elucidated. We have also gathered preliminary evidence suggesting that Mid may play an indirect, but vital role in selecting SOP cells within the third-instar larval eye disc by regulating the expression of the proneural gene atonal. During subsequent pupal stages, Mid specifies SOP cell fates as a member of the Notch–Delta signaling hierarchy and is essential for maintaining cell viability within by inhibiting apoptotic pathways. We present several new hypotheses that seek to understand the role of Mid in regulating developmental processes downstream of the Notch receptor that are critical for specifying unique cell fates, patterning the adult eye and maintaining cellular homeostasis during eye disc morphogenesis. PMID:23962751

  12. The Drosophila T-box transcription factor Midline functions within the Notch-Delta signaling pathway to specify sensory organ precursor cell fates and regulates cell survival within the eye imaginal disc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sudeshna; Chen, Q Brent; Saucier, Joseph D; Drescher, Brandon; Zong, Yan; Morgan, Sarah; Forstall, John; Meriwether, Andrew; Toranzo, Randy; Leal, Sandra M

    2013-01-01

    We report that the T-box transcription factor Midline (Mid), an evolutionary conserved homolog of the vertebrate Tbx20 protein, functions within the Notch-Delta signaling pathway essential for specifying the fates of sensory organ precursor (SOP) cells. These findings complement an established history of research showing that Mid regulates the cell-fate specification of diverse cell types within the developing heart, epidermis and central nervous system. Tbx20 has been detected in unique neuronal and epithelial cells of embryonic eye tissues in both mice and humans. However, the mechanisms by which either Mid or Tbx20 function to regulate cell-fate specification or other critical aspects of eye development including cell survival have not yet been elucidated. We have also gathered preliminary evidence suggesting that Mid may play an indirect, but vital role in selecting SOP cells within the third-instar larval eye disc by regulating the expression of the proneural gene atonal. During subsequent pupal stages, Mid specifies SOP cell fates as a member of the Notch-Delta signaling hierarchy and is essential for maintaining cell viability by inhibiting apoptotic pathways. We present several new hypotheses that seek to understand the role of Mid in regulating developmental processes downstream of the Notch receptor that are critical for specifying unique cell fates, patterning the adult eye and maintaining cellular homeostasis during eye disc morphogenesis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Molecular cloning, genomic organization, developmental regulation, and a knock-out mutant of a novel leu-rich repeats-containing G protein-coupled receptor (DLGR-2) from Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Kathrine Krageskov; Hauser, Frank; Schiøtt, Morten

    2000-01-01

    After screening the Berkeley Drosophila Genome Project database with sequences from a recently characterized Leu-rich repeats-containing G protein-coupled receptor (LGR) fromDrosophila (DLGR-1), we identified a second gene for a different LGR (DLGR-2) and cloned its cDNA. DLGR-2 is 1360 amino aci...... knock-out mutants, where the DLGR-2 gene is interrupted by a P element insertion, die around the time of hatching. This finding, together with the expression data, strongly suggests that DLGR-2 is exclusively involved in development....

  14. Berkeley Lab Pilot on External Regulation of DOE National Laboratories by the U.S. NRC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeman, Gary H.

    1999-01-01

    The US Department of Energy and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission entered into an agreement in November 1997 to pursue external regulation of radiation safety at DOE national laboratories through a Pilot Program of simulated regulation at 6-10 sites over a 2 year period. The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab), the oldest of the DOE national laboratories, volunteered and was selected as the first Pilot site. Based on the similarities and linkages between Berkeley Lab and nearby university research laboratories, Berkeley Lab seemed a good candidate for external regulation and a good first step in familiarizing NRC with the technical and institutional issues involved in regulating laboratories in the DOE complex. NRC and DOE team members visited Berkeley Lab on four occasions between October 1997 and January 1998 to carry out the Pilot. The first step was to develop a detailed Work Plan, then to carry out both a technical review of the radiation safety program and an examination of policy and regulatory issues. The Pilot included a public meeting held in Oakland, CA in December 1997. The Pilot concluded with NRC's assessment that Berkeley Lab has a radiation protection program adequate to protect workers, the public and the environment, and that it is ready to be licensed by the NRC with minor programmatic exceptions. A draft final report of the Pilot was prepared and circulated for comment as a NUREG document (dated May 7, 1998). The report's recommendations include extending NRC regulatory authority to cover all ionizing radiation sources (including accelerators, x-ray units, NARM) at Berkeley Lab. Questions remaining to be resolved include: who should be the licensee (DOE, the Lab, or both)?; dealing with legacy issues and NRC D and D requirements; minimizing dual oversight; quantifying value added in terms of cost savings, enhanced safety, and improved public perception; extrapolating results to other national laboratories; and

  15. The Drosophila melanogaster host model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igboin, Christina O.; Griffen, Ann L.; Leys, Eugene J.

    2012-01-01

    The deleterious and sometimes fatal outcomes of bacterial infectious diseases are the net result of the interactions between the pathogen and the host, and the genetically tractable fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, has emerged as a valuable tool for modeling the pathogen–host interactions of a wide variety of bacteria. These studies have revealed that there is a remarkable conservation of bacterial pathogenesis and host defence mechanisms between higher host organisms and Drosophila. This review presents an in-depth discussion of the Drosophila immune response, the Drosophila killing model, and the use of the model to examine bacterial–host interactions. The recent introduction of the Drosophila model into the oral microbiology field is discussed, specifically the use of the model to examine Porphyromonas gingivalis–host interactions, and finally the potential uses of this powerful model system to further elucidate oral bacterial-host interactions are addressed. PMID:22368770

  16. The Drosophila melanogaster host model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina O. Igboin

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The deleterious and sometimes fatal outcomes of bacterial infectious diseases are the net result of the interactions between the pathogen and the host, and the genetically tractable fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, has emerged as a valuable tool for modeling the pathogen–host interactions of a wide variety of bacteria. These studies have revealed that there is a remarkable conservation of bacterial pathogenesis and host defence mechanisms between higher host organisms and Drosophila. This review presents an in-depth discussion of the Drosophila immune response, the Drosophila killing model, and the use of the model to examine bacterial–host interactions. The recent introduction of the Drosophila model into the oral microbiology field is discussed, specifically the use of the model to examine Porphyromonas gingivalis–host interactions, and finally the potential uses of this powerful model system to further elucidate oral bacterial-host interactions are addressed.

  17. The Drosophila melanogaster host model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igboin, Christina O; Griffen, Ann L; Leys, Eugene J

    2012-01-01

    The deleterious and sometimes fatal outcomes of bacterial infectious diseases are the net result of the interactions between the pathogen and the host, and the genetically tractable fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, has emerged as a valuable tool for modeling the pathogen-host interactions of a wide variety of bacteria. These studies have revealed that there is a remarkable conservation of bacterial pathogenesis and host defence mechanisms between higher host organisms and Drosophila. This review presents an in-depth discussion of the Drosophila immune response, the Drosophila killing model, and the use of the model to examine bacterial-host interactions. The recent introduction of the Drosophila model into the oral microbiology field is discussed, specifically the use of the model to examine Porphyromonas gingivalis-host interactions, and finally the potential uses of this powerful model system to further elucidate oral bacterial-host interactions are addressed.

  18. A pupal transcriptomic screen identifies Ral as a target of store-operated calcium entry in Drosophila neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Richhariya, Shlesha; Jayakumar, Siddharth; Abruzzi, Katharine; Rosbash, Michael; Hasan, Gaiti

    2017-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation by Store-operated Calcium Entry (SOCE) is well studied in non-excitable cells. However, the role of SOCE has been poorly documented in neuronal cells with more complicated calcium dynamics. Previous reports demonstrated a requirement for SOCE in neurons that regulate Drosophila flight bouts. We refine this requirement temporally to the early pupal stage and use RNA-sequencing to identify SOCE mediated gene expression changes in the developing Drosophila pupal nervou...

  19. Dynamical Analysis of bantam-Regulated Drosophila Circadian Rhythm Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Liu, Zengrong

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) interact with 3‧untranslated region (UTR) elements of target genes to regulate mRNA stability or translation, and play a crucial role in regulating many different biological processes. bantam, a conserved miRNA, is involved in several functions, such as regulating Drosophila growth and circadian rhythm. Recently, it has been discovered that bantam plays a crucial role in the core circadian pacemaker. In this paper, based on experimental observations, a detailed dynamical model of bantam-regulated circadian clock system is developed to show the post-transcriptional behaviors in the modulation of Drosophila circadian rhythm, in which the regulation of bantam is incorporated into a classical model. The dynamical behaviors of the model are consistent with the experimental observations, which shows that bantam is an important regulator of Drosophila circadian rhythm. The sensitivity analysis of parameters demonstrates that with the regulation of bantam the system is more sensitive to perturbations, indicating that bantam regulation makes it easier for the organism to modulate its period against the environmental perturbations. The effectiveness in rescuing locomotor activity rhythms of mutated flies shows that bantam is necessary for strong and sustained rhythms. In addition, the biological mechanisms of bantam regulation are analyzed, which may help us more clearly understand Drosophila circadian rhythm regulated by other miRNAs.

  20. George Berkeley e a tradição platônica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costica Bradatan

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Existe já uma grande quantidade de literatura dedicada à presença na filosofia inicial de Berkeley de alguns assuntos tipicamente platônicos (arquétipos, o problema da mente de Deus, a relação entre ideias e coisas, etc.. Baseados em alguns desses escritos, nas próprias palavras de Berkeley, assim como no exame de alguns elementos da tradição platônica num amplo sentido, sugiro que, longe de serem apenas tópicos isolados, livremente espalhados nos primeiros escritos de Berkeley, eles formam uma perfeita rede de aspectos, atitudes e modos de pensar platônicos, e que, por mais alusivos ou ambíguos que esses elementos platônicos possam parecer, eles constituem um todo coerente e complexo, desempenhando um papel importante na formação da própria essência do pensamento de Berkeley. Em outras palavras, sugiro que, dadas algumas das ideias apresentadas em suas primeiras obras, foi de certo modo inevitável para George Berkeley, em virtude da lógica interna do desenvolvimento de seu pensamento, chegar a uma obra tão abertamente platônica e especulativa como Siris (1744.

  1. Identification of functional elements and regulatory circuits by Drosophila modENCODE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Sushmita; Ernst, Jason; Kharchenko, Peter V; Kheradpour, Pouya; Negre, Nicolas; Eaton, Matthew L; Landolin, Jane M; Bristow, Christopher A; Ma, Lijia; Lin, Michael F; Washietl, Stefan; Arshinoff, Bradley I; Ay, Ferhat; Meyer, Patrick E; Robine, Nicolas; Washington, Nicole L; Di Stefano, Luisa; Berezikov, Eugene; Brown, Christopher D; Candeias, Rogerio; Carlson, Joseph W; Carr, Adrian; Jungreis, Irwin; Marbach, Daniel; Sealfon, Rachel; Tolstorukov, Michael Y; Will, Sebastian; Alekseyenko, Artyom A; Artieri, Carlo; Booth, Benjamin W; Brooks, Angela N; Dai, Qi; Davis, Carrie A; Duff, Michael O; Feng, Xin; Gorchakov, Andrey A; Gu, Tingting; Henikoff, Jorja G; Kapranov, Philipp; Li, Renhua; MacAlpine, Heather K; Malone, John; Minoda, Aki; Nordman, Jared; Okamura, Katsutomo; Perry, Marc; Powell, Sara K; Riddle, Nicole C; Sakai, Akiko; Samsonova, Anastasia; Sandler, Jeremy E; Schwartz, Yuri B; Sher, Noa; Spokony, Rebecca; Sturgill, David; van Baren, Marijke; Wan, Kenneth H; Yang, Li; Yu, Charles; Feingold, Elise; Good, Peter; Guyer, Mark; Lowdon, Rebecca; Ahmad, Kami; Andrews, Justen; Berger, Bonnie; Brenner, Steven E; Brent, Michael R; Cherbas, Lucy; Elgin, Sarah C R; Gingeras, Thomas R; Grossman, Robert; Hoskins, Roger A; Kaufman, Thomas C; Kent, William; Kuroda, Mitzi I; Orr-Weaver, Terry; Perrimon, Norbert; Pirrotta, Vincenzo; Posakony, James W; Ren, Bing; Russell, Steven; Cherbas, Peter; Graveley, Brenton R; Lewis, Suzanna; Micklem, Gos; Oliver, Brian; Park, Peter J; Celniker, Susan E; Henikoff, Steven; Karpen, Gary H; Lai, Eric C; MacAlpine, David M; Stein, Lincoln D; White, Kevin P; Kellis, Manolis

    2010-12-24

    To gain insight into how genomic information is translated into cellular and developmental programs, the Drosophila model organism Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (modENCODE) project is comprehensively mapping transcripts, histone modifications, chromosomal proteins, transcription factors, replication proteins and intermediates, and nucleosome properties across a developmental time course and in multiple cell lines. We have generated more than 700 data sets and discovered protein-coding, noncoding, RNA regulatory, replication, and chromatin elements, more than tripling the annotated portion of the Drosophila genome. Correlated activity patterns of these elements reveal a functional regulatory network, which predicts putative new functions for genes, reveals stage- and tissue-specific regulators, and enables gene-expression prediction. Our results provide a foundation for directed experimental and computational studies in Drosophila and related species and also a model for systematic data integration toward comprehensive genomic and functional annotation.

  2. The Drosophila homolog of the mammalian imprint regulator, CTCF, maintains the maternal genomic imprint in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasheva Vanya

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CTCF is a versatile zinc finger DNA-binding protein that functions as a highly conserved epigenetic transcriptional regulator. CTCF is known to act as a chromosomal insulator, bind promoter regions, and facilitate long-range chromatin interactions. In mammals, CTCF is active in the regulatory regions of some genes that exhibit genomic imprinting, acting as insulator on only one parental allele to facilitate parent-specific expression. In Drosophila, CTCF acts as a chromatin insulator and is thought to be actively involved in the global organization of the genome. Results To determine whether CTCF regulates imprinting in Drosophila, we generated CTCF mutant alleles and assayed gene expression from the imprinted Dp(1;fLJ9 mini-X chromosome in the presence of reduced CTCF expression. We observed disruption of the maternal imprint when CTCF levels were reduced, but no effect was observed on the paternal imprint. The effect was restricted to maintenance of the imprint and was specific for the Dp(1;fLJ9 mini-X chromosome. Conclusions CTCF in Drosophila functions in maintaining parent-specific expression from an imprinted domain as it does in mammals. We propose that Drosophila CTCF maintains an insulator boundary on the maternal X chromosome, shielding genes from the imprint-induced silencing that occurs on the paternally inherited X chromosome. See commentary: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7007/8/104

  3. Cooperativity, Specificity, and Evolutionary Stability of Polycomb Targeting in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernd Schuettengruber

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Metazoan genomes are partitioned into modular chromosomal domains containing active or repressive chromatin. In flies, Polycomb group (PcG response elements (PREs recruit PHO and other DNA-binding factors and act as nucleation sites for the formation of Polycomb repressive domains. The sequence specificity of PREs is not well understood. Here, we use comparative epigenomics and transgenic assays to show that Drosophila domain organization and PRE specification are evolutionarily conserved despite significant cis-element divergence within Polycomb domains, whereas cis-element evolution is strongly correlated with transcription factor binding divergence outside of Polycomb domains. Cooperative interactions of PcG complexes and their recruiting factor PHO stabilize PHO recruitment to low-specificity sequences. Consistently, PHO recruitment to sites within Polycomb domains is stabilized by PRC1. These data suggest that cooperative rather than hierarchical interactions among low-affinity sequences, DNA-binding factors, and the Polycomb machinery are giving rise to specific and strongly conserved 3D structures in Drosophila. : Schuettengruber et al. present an extensive comparative epigenomics data set, providing new insights into cis-driven versus buffered evolution of Polycomb recruitment and Polycomb domain specificity. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing and transgenic assays, they demonstrate an extremely high conservation of Polycomb repressive domains in five Drosophila species. Using Hi-C and knockout experiments, they challenge the standard hierarchical Polycomb recruitment model and demonstrate that cooperative rather than hierarchical interactions among DNA motifs, transcription factors, and Polycomb group complexes define Polycomb domains.

  4. Spaceflight-related suboptimal conditions can accentuate the altered gravity response of Drosophila transcriptome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herranz, R.; Benguría, A.; Laván, D.A.; López-Vidriero, I.; Gasset, G.; Javier Medina, F.; van Loon, J.J.W.A.; Marco, R.

    2010-01-01

    Genome-wide transcriptional profiling shows that reducing gravity levels during Drosophila metamorphosis in the International Space Station (ISS) causes important alterations in gene expression: a large set of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) are observed compared to 1g controls. However, the

  5. DNA damage-responsive Drosophila melanogaster gene is also induced by heat shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vivino, A.A.; Smith, M.D.; Minton, K.W.

    1986-01-01

    A gene isolated by screening Drosophila melanogaster tissue culture cells for DNA damage regulation was also found to be regulated by heat shock. After UV irradiation or heat shock, induction is at the transcriptional level and results in the accumulation of a 1.0-kilobase polyadenylated transcript. The restriction map of the clone bears no resemblance to the known heat shock genes, which are shown to be uninduced by UV irradiation

  6. CREB Binding Protein Functions During Successive Stages of Eye Development in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Justin P.; Jamal, Tazeen; Doetsch, Alex; Turner, F. Rudolf; Duffy, Joseph B.

    2004-01-01

    During the development of the compound eye of Drosophila several signaling pathways exert both positive and inhibitory influences upon an array of nuclear transcription factors to produce a near-perfect lattice of unit eyes or ommatidia. Individual cells within the eye are exposed to many extracellular signals, express multiple surface receptors, and make use of a large complement of cell-subtype-specific DNA-binding transcription factors. Despite this enormous complexity, each cell will make...

  7. Drosophila PAF1 Modulates PIWI/piRNA Silencing Capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Josef P; Rahman, Reazur; Yang, Nachen; Yang, Linda H; Lau, Nelson C

    2017-09-11

    To test the directness of factors in initiating PIWI-directed gene silencing, we employed a Piwi-interacting RNA (piRNA)-targeted reporter assay in Drosophila ovary somatic sheet (OSS) cells [1]. This assay confirmed direct silencing roles for piRNA biogenesis factors and PIWI-associated factors [2-12] but suggested that chromatin-modifying proteins may act downstream of the initial silencing event. Our data also revealed that RNA-polymerase-II-associated proteins like PAF1 and RTF1 antagonize PIWI-directed silencing. PAF1 knockdown enhances PIWI silencing of reporters when piRNAs target the transcript region proximal to the promoter. Loss of PAF1 suppresses endogenous transposable element (TE) transcript maturation, whereas a subset of gene transcripts and long-non-coding RNAs adjacent to TE insertions are affected by PAF1 knockdown in a similar fashion to piRNA-targeted reporters. Additionally, transcription activation at specific TEs and TE-adjacent loci during PIWI knockdown is suppressed when PIWI and PAF1 levels are both reduced. Our study suggests a mechanistic conservation between fission yeast PAF1 repressing AGO1/small interfering RNA (siRNA)-directed silencing [13, 14] and Drosophila PAF1 opposing PIWI/piRNA-directed silencing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The Indirect Perception of Distance: Interpretive Complexities in Berkeley's Theory of Vision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael James Braund

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The problem of whether perception is direct or if it depends on additional, cognitive contributions made by the perceiving subject, is posed with particular force in an Essay towards a New Theory of Vision (NTV. It is evident from the recurrent treatment it receives therein that Berkeley considers it to be one of the central issues concerning perception. Fittingly, the NTV devotes the most attention to it. In this essay, I deal exclusively with Berkeley's treatment of the problem of indirect distance perception, as it is presented in the context of that work.

  9. A community of scientists: cultivating scientific identity among undergraduates within the Berkeley Compass Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aceves, Ana V.; Berkeley Compass Project

    2015-01-01

    The Berkeley Compass Project is a self-formed group of graduate and undergraduate students in the physical sciences at UC Berkeley. Our goals are to improve undergraduate physics education, provide opportunities for professional development, and increase retention of students from populations typically underrepresented in the physical sciences. For students who enter as freshmen, the core Compass experience consists of a summer program and several seminar courses. These programs are designed to foster a diverse, collaborative student community in which students engage in authentic research practices and regular self-reflection. Compass encourages undergraduates to develop an identity as a scientist from the beginning of their university experience.

  10. Observations of Local ISM Emission with the Berkeley EUV/FUV Shuttle Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, C.; Bowyer, S.

    1984-01-01

    The Berkeley extreme ultraviolet/far ultraviolet shuttle telescope (BEST) will be launched on the Space Shuttle as part of the NASA UVX project. The Berkeley spectrometer will make observations of the cosmic diffuse background in the 600 to 1900 A band, with a spectral resolution of 10 A. The sensitivity and spectral resolution of the instrument make it ideal for the study of components of the interstellar medium in the 10 to the 4th power to 10 to the 6th power K range.

  11. Myoblast fusion in Drosophila

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haralalka, Shruti [Stowers Institute for Medical Research, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Abmayr, Susan M., E-mail: sma@stowers.org [Stowers Institute for Medical Research, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, MO 66160 (United States)

    2010-11-01

    The body wall musculature of a Drosophila larva is composed of an intricate pattern of 30 segmentally repeated muscle fibers in each abdominal hemisegment. Each muscle fiber has unique spatial and behavioral characteristics that include its location, orientation, epidermal attachment, size and pattern of innervation. Many, if not all, of these properties are dictated by founder cells, which determine the muscle pattern and seed the fusion process. Myofibers are then derived from fusion between a specific founder cell and several fusion competent myoblasts (FCMs) fusing with as few as 3-5 FCMs in the small muscles on the most ventral side of the embryo and as many as 30 FCMs in the larger muscles on the dorsal side of the embryo. The focus of the present review is the formation of the larval muscles in the developing embryo, summarizing the major issues and players in this process. We have attempted to emphasize experimentally-validated details of the mechanism of myoblast fusion and distinguish these from the theoretically possible details that have not yet been confirmed experimentally. We also direct the interested reader to other recent reviews that discuss myoblast fusion in Drosophila, each with their own perspective on the process . With apologies, we use gene nomenclature as specified by Flybase (http://flybase.org) but provide Table 1 with alternative names and references.

  12. Myoblast fusion in Drosophila

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haralalka, Shruti; Abmayr, Susan M.

    2010-01-01

    The body wall musculature of a Drosophila larva is composed of an intricate pattern of 30 segmentally repeated muscle fibers in each abdominal hemisegment. Each muscle fiber has unique spatial and behavioral characteristics that include its location, orientation, epidermal attachment, size and pattern of innervation. Many, if not all, of these properties are dictated by founder cells, which determine the muscle pattern and seed the fusion process. Myofibers are then derived from fusion between a specific founder cell and several fusion competent myoblasts (FCMs) fusing with as few as 3-5 FCMs in the small muscles on the most ventral side of the embryo and as many as 30 FCMs in the larger muscles on the dorsal side of the embryo. The focus of the present review is the formation of the larval muscles in the developing embryo, summarizing the major issues and players in this process. We have attempted to emphasize experimentally-validated details of the mechanism of myoblast fusion and distinguish these from the theoretically possible details that have not yet been confirmed experimentally. We also direct the interested reader to other recent reviews that discuss myoblast fusion in Drosophila, each with their own perspective on the process . With apologies, we use gene nomenclature as specified by Flybase (http://flybase.org) but provide Table 1 with alternative names and references.

  13. SUMOylation in Drosophila Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert J. Courey

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO, an ~90 amino acid ubiquitin-like protein, is highly conserved throughout the eukaryotic domain. Like ubiquitin, SUMO is covalently attached to lysine side chains in a large number of target proteins. In contrast to ubiquitin, SUMO does not have a direct role in targeting proteins for proteasomal degradation. However, like ubiquitin, SUMO does modulate protein function in a variety of other ways. This includes effects on protein conformation, subcellular localization, and protein–protein interactions. Significant insight into the in vivo role of SUMOylation has been provided by studies in Drosophila that combine genetic manipulation, proteomic, and biochemical analysis. Such studies have revealed that the SUMO conjugation pathway regulates a wide variety of critical cellular and developmental processes, including chromatin/chromosome function, eggshell patterning, embryonic pattern formation, metamorphosis, larval and pupal development, neurogenesis, development of the innate immune system, and apoptosis. This review discusses our current understanding of the diverse roles for SUMO in Drosophila development.

  14. Gene expression profiling of brakeless mutant Drosophila embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crona, Filip; Singla, Bhumica; Mannervik, Mattias

    2015-12-01

    The transcriptional co-regulator Brakeless performs many important functions during Drosophila development, but few target genes have been identified. Here we use Affymetrix microarrays to identify Brakeless-regulated genes in 2-4 h old Drosophila embryos. Robust multi-array analysis (RMA) and statistical tests revealed 240 genes that changed their expression more than 1.5 fold. We find that up- and down-regulated genes fall into distinct gene ontology categories. In our associated study [2] we demonstrate that both up- and down-regulated genes can be direct Brakeless targets. Our results indicate that the co-repressor and co-activator activities of Brakeless may result in distinct biological responses. The microarray data complies with MIAME guidelines and is deposited in GEO under accession number GSE60048.

  15. Conserved family of glycerol kinase loci in Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez Agosto, Julian A.; McCabe, Edward R.B.

    2009-01-01

    Glycerol kinase (GK) is an enzyme that catalyzes the formation of glycerol 3-phosphate from ATP and glycerol, the rate-limiting step in glycerol utilization. We analyzed the genome of the model organism Drosophila melanogaster and identified five GK orthologs, including two loci with sequence homology to the mammalian Xp21 GK protein. Using a combination of sequence analysis and evolutionary comparisons of orthologs between species, we characterized functional domains in the protein required for GK activity. Our findings include additional conserved domains that suggest novel nuclear and mitochondrial functions for glycerol kinase in apoptosis and transcriptional regulation. Investigation of GK function in Drosophila will inform us about the role of this enzyme in development and will provide us with a tool to examine genetic modifiers of human metabolic disorders. PMID:16545593

  16. Effects of hypo-O-GlcNAcylation on Drosophila development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariappa, Daniel; Ferenbach, Andrew T; van Aalten, Daan M F

    2018-05-11

    Post-translational modification of serine/threonine residues in nucleocytoplasmic proteins with GlcNAc ( O -GlcNAcylation) is an essential regulatory mechanism in many cellular processes. In Drosophila , null mutants of the Polycomb gene O -GlcNAc transferase ( OGT ; also known as super sex combs ( sxc )) display homeotic phenotypes. To dissect the requirement for O -GlcNAc signaling in Drosophila development, we used CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing to generate rationally designed sxc catalytically hypomorphic or null point mutants. Of the fertile males derived from embryos injected with the CRISPR/Cas9 reagents, 25% produced progeny carrying precise point mutations with no detectable off-target effects. One of these mutants, the catalytically inactive sxc K872M , was recessive lethal, whereas a second mutant, the hypomorphic sxc H537A , was homozygous viable. We observed that reduced total protein O -GlcNAcylation in the sxc H537A mutant is associated with a wing vein phenotype and temperature-dependent lethality. Genetic interaction between sxc H537A and a null allele of Drosophila host cell factor ( dHcf ), encoding an extensively O -GlcNAcylated transcriptional coactivator, resulted in abnormal scutellar bristle numbers. A similar phenotype was also observed in sxc H537A flies lacking a copy of skuld ( skd ), a Mediator complex gene known to affect scutellar bristle formation. Interestingly, this phenotype was independent of OGT Polycomb function or dHcf downstream targets. In conclusion, the generation of the endogenous OGT hypomorphic mutant sxc H537A enabled us to identify pleiotropic effects of globally reduced protein O -GlcNAc during Drosophila development. The mutants generated and phenotypes observed in this study provide a platform for discovery of OGT substrates that are critical for Drosophila development. © 2018 Mariappa et al.

  17. Evolutionary genetics: the Drosophila model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Evolutionary genetics straddles the two fundamental processes of life, ... of the genus Drosophila have been used extensively as model systems in experimental ... issue will prove interesting, informative and thought-provoking for both estab-.

  18. Drosophila melanogaster Mounts a Unique Immune Response to the Rhabdovirus Sigma virus▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, C. W.; McGraw, E. A.; Ammar, E.-D.; Dietzgen, R. G.; Hogenhout, S. A.

    2008-01-01

    Rhabdoviruses are important pathogens of humans, livestock, and plants that are often vectored by insects. Rhabdovirus particles have a characteristic bullet shape with a lipid envelope and surface-exposed transmembrane glycoproteins. Sigma virus (SIGMAV) is a member of the Rhabdoviridae and is a naturally occurring disease agent of Drosophila melanogaster. The infection is maintained in Drosophila populations through vertical transmission via germ cells. We report here the nature of the Drosophila innate immune response to SIGMAV infection as revealed by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR analysis of differentially expressed genes identified by microarray analysis. We have also compared and contrasted the immune response of the host with respect to two nonenveloped viruses, Drosophila C virus (DCV) and Drosophila X virus (DXV). We determined that SIGMAV infection upregulates expression of the peptidoglycan receptor protein genes PGRP-SB1 and PGRP-SD and the antimicrobial peptide (AMP) genes Diptericin-A, Attacin-A, Attacin-B, Cecropin-A1, and Drosocin. SIGMAV infection did not induce PGRP-SA and the AMP genes Drosomycin-B, Metchnikowin, and Defensin that are upregulated in DCV and/or DXV infections. Expression levels of the Toll and Imd signaling cascade genes are not significantly altered by SIGMAV infection. These results highlight shared and unique aspects of the Drosophila immune response to the three viruses and may shed light on the nature of the interaction with the host and the evolution of these associations. PMID:18378641

  19. An Evaluation of the New Curriculum at the University of California, Berkeley, School of Optometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Michael G.; Kashani, Sandy; Saroj, Namrata

    2001-01-01

    Evaluated the new curriculum at the University of California, Berkeley, School of Optometry by comparing the content of the new curriculum to the old curriculum and by surveying faculty and students regarding their opinion of the new curriculum. Findings indicated that the curriculum is successful in implementing desired changes, including reduced…

  20. Long-life cathode for the Berkeley-type ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, J.H.; Biagi, L.A.

    1977-01-01

    Preliminary experiments indicate that a hollow cathode, made from impregnated tungsten emitters, can be adapted for the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL)/Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) ion source. Such cathodes could be the basis of a long life, continuously operated positive-ion source

  1. "A Woman's World": The University of California, Berkeley, during the Second World War

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorn, Charles

    2008-01-01

    During World War II, female students at the University of California, Berkeley--then the most populous undergraduate campus in American higher education--made significant advances in collegiate life. In growing numbers, women enrolled in male-dominated academic programs, including mathematics, chemistry, and engineering, as they prepared for…

  2. Dilepton (e+e-) production recent pp and pd studies with DLS at Berkeley

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, L.S.

    1991-09-01

    The use of dileptons as probes of hot, dense hadronic matter is described. Preliminary results on dileptons produced in p-p and p-d interactions at the Bevalac are presented along with potential ramifications for existing model calculations of dileptons at these energies. Future directions of the dilepton program at Berkeley are outlined. 14 refs., 3 figs

  3. The principle of phase stability and the accelerator program at Berkeley, 1945--1954

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lofgren, E.J.

    1994-07-01

    The discovery of the Principle of Phase Stability by Vladimir Veksler and Edwin McMillian and the end of the war released a surge of accelerator activity at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (then The University of California Radiation Laboratory). Six accelerators incorporating the Principle of Phase Stability were built in the period 1945--1954

  4. Berkeley Foundation for Opportunities in Information Technology: A Decade of Broadening Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crutchfield, Orpheus S. L.; Harrison, Christopher D.; Haas, Guy; Garcia, Daniel D.; Humphreys, Sheila M.; Lewis, Colleen M.; Khooshabeh, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The Berkeley Foundation for Opportunities in Information Technology is a decade-old endeavor to expose pre-college young women and underrepresented racial and ethnic minorities to the fields of computer science and engineering, and prepare them for rigorous, university-level study. We have served more than 150 students, and graduated more than 65…

  5. Fermilab and Berkeley Lab Collaborate with Meyer Tool on Key Component for European Particle Accelerator

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Officials of the U.S. Department of Energy's Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory announced yesterday the completion of a key component of the U.S. contribution to the Large Hadron Collider, a particle accelerator under construction at CERN, in Geneva, Switzerland

  6. Follow the Money: Engineering at Stanford and UC Berkeley during the Rise of Silicon Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Stephen B.

    2009-01-01

    A comparison of the engineering schools at UC Berkeley and Stanford during the 1940s and 1950s shows that having an excellent academic program is necessary but not sufficient to make a university entrepreneurial (an engine of economic development). Key factors that made Stanford more entrepreneurial than Cal during this period were superior…

  7. Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Institutional Plan FY 2000-2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chartock, Mike (ed.); Hansen, Todd (ed.)

    1999-08-01

    The FY 2000-2004 Institutional Plan provides an overview of the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab, the Laboratory) mission, strategic plan, initiatives, and the resources required to fulfill its role in support of national needs in fundamental science and technology, energy resources, and environmental quality. To advance the Department of Energy's ongoing efforts to define the Integrated Laboratory System, the Berkeley Lab Institutional Plan reflects the strategic elements of our planning efforts. The Institutional Plan is a management report that supports the Department of Energy's mission and programs and is an element of the Department of Energy's strategic management planning activities, developed through an annual planning process. The Plan supports the Government Performance and Results Act of 1993 and complements the performance-based contract between the Department of Energy and the Regents of the University of California. It identifies technical and administrative directions in the context of the national energy policy and research needs and the Department of Energy's program planning initiatives. Preparation of the plan is coordinated by the Office of Planning and Communications from information contributed by Berkeley Lab's scientific and support divisions.

  8. Control of Drosophila Type I and Type II central brain neuroblast proliferation by bantam microRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weng, Ruifen; Cohen, Stephen M

    2015-01-01

    Post-transcriptional regulation of stem cell self-renewal by microRNAs is emerging as an important mechanism controlling tissue homeostasis. Here, we provide evidence that bantam microRNA controls neuroblast number and proliferation in the Drosophila central brain. Bantam also supports proliferat......Post-transcriptional regulation of stem cell self-renewal by microRNAs is emerging as an important mechanism controlling tissue homeostasis. Here, we provide evidence that bantam microRNA controls neuroblast number and proliferation in the Drosophila central brain. Bantam also supports...

  9. Multiple Landslide-Hazard Scenarios Modeled for the Oakland-Berkeley Area, Northern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, Richard J.; Graymer, Russell W.

    2008-01-01

    With the exception of Los Angeles, perhaps no urban area in the United States is more at risk from landsliding, triggered by either precipitation or earthquake, than the San Francisco Bay region of northern California. By January each year, seasonal winter storms usually bring moisture levels of San Francisco Bay region hillsides to the point of saturation, after which additional heavy rainfall may induce landslides of various types and levels of severity. In addition, movement at any time along one of several active faults in the area may generate an earthquake large enough to trigger landslides. The danger to life and property rises each year as local populations continue to expand and more hillsides are graded for development of residential housing and its supporting infrastructure. The chapters in the text consist of: *Introduction by Russell W. Graymer *Chapter 1 Rainfall Thresholds for Landslide Activity, San Francisco Bay Region, Northern California by Raymond C. Wilson *Chapter 2 Susceptibility to Deep-Seated Landsliding Modeled for the Oakland-Berkeley Area, Northern California by Richard J. Pike and Steven Sobieszczyk *Chapter 3 Susceptibility to Shallow Landsliding Modeled for the Oakland-Berkeley Area, Northern California by Kevin M. Schmidt and Steven Sobieszczyk *Chapter 4 Landslide Hazard Modeled for the Cities of Oakland, Piedmont, and Berkeley, Northern California, from a M=7.1 Scenario Earthquake on the Hayward Fault Zone by Scott B. Miles and David K. Keefer *Chapter 5 Synthesis of Landslide-Hazard Scenarios Modeled for the Oakland-Berkeley Area, Northern California by Richard J. Pike The plates consist of: *Plate 1 Susceptibility to Deep-Seated Landsliding Modeled for the Oakland-Berkeley Area, Northern California by Richard J. Pike, Russell W. Graymer, Sebastian Roberts, Naomi B. Kalman, and Steven Sobieszczyk *Plate 2 Susceptibility to Shallow Landsliding Modeled for the Oakland-Berkeley Area, Northern California by Kevin M. Schmidt and Steven

  10. Humidity Sensing in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enjin, Anders; Zaharieva, Emanuela E; Frank, Dominic D; Mansourian, Suzan; Suh, Greg S B; Gallio, Marco; Stensmyr, Marcus C

    2016-05-23

    Environmental humidity influences the fitness and geographic distribution of all animals [1]. Insects in particular use humidity cues to navigate the environment, and previous work suggests the existence of specific sensory mechanisms to detect favorable humidity ranges [2-5]. Yet, the molecular and cellular basis of humidity sensing (hygrosensation) remains poorly understood. Here we describe genes and neurons necessary for hygrosensation in the vinegar fly Drosophila melanogaster. We find that members of the Drosophila genus display species-specific humidity preferences related to conditions in their native habitats. Using a simple behavioral assay, we find that the ionotropic receptors IR40a, IR93a, and IR25a are all required for humidity preference in D. melanogaster. Yet, whereas IR40a is selectively required for hygrosensory responses, IR93a and IR25a mediate both humidity and temperature preference. Consistent with this, the expression of IR93a and IR25a includes thermosensory neurons of the arista. In contrast, IR40a is excluded from the arista but is expressed (and required) in specialized neurons innervating pore-less sensilla of the sacculus, a unique invagination of the third antennal segment. Indeed, calcium imaging showed that IR40a neurons directly respond to changes in humidity, and IR40a knockdown or IR93a mutation reduced their responses to stimuli. Taken together, our results suggest that the preference for a specific humidity range depends on specialized sacculus neurons, and that the processing of environmental humidity can happen largely in parallel to that of temperature. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Hermann Muller and Mutations in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    dropdown arrow Site Map A-Z Index Menu Synopsis Hermann Muller and Mutations in Drosophila Resources with University of Texas. In Austin his experiments on fruit flies (Drosophila) first showed that exposure to September to spend a year at the only Drosophila laboratory in Europe which was doing parallel work

  12. Use of Drosophila to study DNA repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, J.B.; Harris, P.V.; Sakaguchi, K.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses Drosophila, the premier metazoan organism for analyzing many fundamental features of eukaryotic gene regulation. The authors present adaptations of several approaches for studying DNA repair to an analysis of repair-defective mutants in Drosophila. A current understanding of Drosophila DNA repair is described

  13. miRNA-dependent translational repression in the Drosophila ovary.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Reich

    Full Text Available The Drosophila ovary is a tissue rich in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. Many of the regulatory factors are proteins identified via genetic screens. The more recent discovery of microRNAs, which in other animals and tissues appear to regulate translation of a large fraction of all mRNAs, raised the possibility that they too might act during oogenesis. However, there has been no direct demonstration of microRNA-dependent translational repression in the ovary.Here, quantitative analyses of transcript and protein levels of transgenes with or without synthetic miR-312 binding sites show that the binding sites do confer translational repression. This effect is dependent on the ability of the cells to produce microRNAs. By comparison with microRNA-dependent translational repression in other cell types, the regulated mRNAs and the protein factors that mediate repression were expected to be enriched in sponge bodies, subcellular structures with extensive similarities to the P bodies found in other cells. However, no such enrichment was observed.Our results reveal the variety of post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms that operate in the Drosophila ovary, and have implications for the mechanisms of miRNA-dependent translational control used in the ovary.

  14. Small RNA-Seq analysis reveals microRNA-regulation of the Imd pathway during Escherichia coli infection in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shengjie; Shen, Li; Sun, Lianjie; Xu, Jiao; Jin, Ping; Chen, Liming; Ma, Fei

    2017-05-01

    Drosophila have served as a model for research on innate immunity for decades. However, knowledge of the post-transcriptional regulation of immune gene expression by microRNAs (miRNAs) remains rudimentary. In the present study, using small RNA-seq and bioinformatics analysis, we identified 67 differentially expressed miRNAs in Drosophila infected with Escherichia coli compared to injured flies at three time-points. Furthermore, we found that 21 of these miRNAs were potentially involved in the regulation of Imd pathway-related genes. Strikingly, based on UAS-miRNAs line screening and Dual-luciferase assay, we identified that miR-9a and miR-981 could both negatively regulate Drosophila antibacterial defenses and decrease the level of the antibacterial peptide, Diptericin. Taken together, these data support the involvement of miRNAs in the regulation of the Drosophila Imd pathway. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Activating transcription factor 3 regulates immune and metabolic homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rynes, Jan; Donohoe, Colin D; Frommolt, Peter; Brodesser, Susanne; Jindra, Marek; Uhlirova, Mirka

    2012-10-01

    Integration of metabolic and immune responses during animal development ensures energy balance, permitting both growth and defense. Disturbed homeostasis causes organ failure, growth retardation, and metabolic disorders. Here, we show that the Drosophila melanogaster activating transcription factor 3 (Atf3) safeguards metabolic and immune system homeostasis. Loss of Atf3 results in chronic inflammation and starvation responses mounted primarily by the larval gut epithelium, while the fat body suffers lipid overload, causing energy imbalance and death. Hyperactive proinflammatory and stress signaling through NF-κB/Relish, Jun N-terminal kinase, and FOXO in atf3 mutants deregulates genes important for immune defense, digestion, and lipid metabolism. Reducing the dose of either FOXO or Relish normalizes both lipid metabolism and gene expression in atf3 mutants. The function of Atf3 is conserved, as human ATF3 averts some of the Drosophila mutant phenotypes, improving their survival. The single Drosophila Atf3 may incorporate the diversified roles of two related mammalian proteins.

  16. Transcriptomic Response of Drosophila Melanogaster Pupae Developed in Hypergravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosamani, Ravikumar; Hateley, Shannon; Bhardwaj, Shilpa R.; Pachter, Lior; Bhattacharya, Sharmila

    2016-01-01

    The metamorphosis of Drosophila is evolutionarily adapted to Earth's gravity, and is a tightly regulated process. Deviation from 1g to microgravity or hypergravity can influence metamorphosis, and alter associated gene expression. Understanding the relationship between an altered gravity environment and developmental processes is important for NASA's space travel goals. In the present study, 20 female and 20 male synchronized (Canton S, 2 to 3day old) flies were allowed to lay eggs while being maintained in a hypergravity environment (3g). Centrifugation was briefly stopped to discard the parent flies after 24hrs of egg laying, and then immediately continued until the eggs developed into P6-staged pupae (25 - 43 hours after pupation initiation). Post hypergravity exposure, P6-staged pupae were collected, total RNA was extracted using Qiagen RNeasy mini kits. We used RNA-Seq and qRT-PCR techniques to profile global transcriptomic changes in early pupae exposed to chronic hypergravity. During the pupal stage, Drosophila relies upon gravitational cues for proper development. Assessing gene expression changes in the pupa under altered gravity conditions helps highlight gravity dependent genetic pathways. A robust transcriptional response was observed in hypergravity-exposed pupae compared to controls, with 1,513 genes showing a significant (q Drosophila pupae in response to hypergravity.

  17. Pluripotency and a secretion mechanism of Drosophila transglutaminase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Toshio; Kawabata, Shun-Ichiro

    2018-03-01

    Transglutaminase (TG) catalyses the formation of an isopeptide bond between glutamine and lysine residues and amine incorporation into specific glutamine residues. TG is conserved in all metazoans and functions both intracellularly and extracellularly. Here we review the existing knowledge of Drosophila TG with an emphasis on its pluripotency: Drosophila TG (i) plays a key role in cuticular morphogenesis, haemolymph coagulation, and entrapment against invading pathogens, (ii) suppresses the immune deficiency pathway to enable immune tolerance against commensal bacteria through the incorporation of polyamines into the nuclear factor-κB-like transcription factor Relish as well as through the protein-protein cross-linking of Relish, (iii) forms a physical matrix in the gut through cross-linking of chitin-binding proteins and (iv) is involved in the maintenance of homeostasis in microbiota in the gut. Moreover, we review the evidence that TG-A, one of alternative splicing-derived isoforms of Drosophila TG, is secreted through an endoplasmic reticulum/Golgi-independent pathway involving exosomes and fatty acylations.

  18. Drosophila Myc is required for normal DREF gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dang Thi Phuong Thao; Seto, Hirokazu; Yamaguchi, Masamitsu

    2008-01-01

    The Drosophila DNA replication-related element-binding factor (dDREF) is required for the expression of many proliferation-related genes carrying the DRE sequence, 5'-TATCGATA. Finding a canonical E-box, 5'-CACGTG, in the dDREF gene promoter prompted us to explore the possibility that the dDREF gene is a target of Drosophila Myc (dMyc). Luciferase transient expression assays combined with RNA interference in Drosophila S2 cells revealed that knockdown of dmyc reduced dDREF gene promoter activity by 35% to 82%, an effect at least partly mediated by the E-box in the promoter. dm 4 /Y hemizygous mutant larvae demonstrated no maternal dMyc and severe impairment of dDREF mRNA transcription. dMyc loss of function in dm 2 /dm 2 homozygous mutant follicle cell clones also resulted in loss of anti-dDREF immunostaining in nuclei. In contrast, co-expression of dMyc-dMax up-regulated dDREF promoter activity in S2 cells. Furthermore, dMyc over-expressing clones exhibited a high level of dDREF gene expression in wing and eye discs. These results taken together indicate that dMyc is indeed required for dDREF gene expression

  19. FMRFamide signaling promotes stress-induced sleep in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Olivia; Xiong, Jianmei; Nelson, Matthew D; Raizen, David M; Williams, Julie A

    2015-07-01

    Enhanced sleep in response to cellular stress is a conserved adaptive behavior across multiple species, but the mechanism of this process is poorly understood. Drosophila melanogaster increases sleep following exposure to septic or aseptic injury, and Caenorhabditis elegans displays sleep-like quiescence following exposure to high temperatures that stress cells. We show here that, similar to C. elegans, Drosophila responds to heat stress with an increase in sleep. In contrast to Drosophila infection-induced sleep, heat-induced sleep is not sensitive to the time-of-day of the heat pulse. Moreover, the sleep response to heat stress does not require Relish, the NFκB transcription factor that is necessary for infection-induced sleep, indicating that sleep is induced by multiple mechanisms from different stress modalities. We identify a sleep-regulating role for a signaling pathway involving FMRFamide neuropeptides and their receptor FR. Animals mutant for either FMRFamide or for the FMRFamide receptor (FR) have a reduced recovery sleep in response to heat stress. FR mutants, in addition, show reduced sleep responses following infection with Serratia marcescens, and succumb to infection at a faster rate than wild-type controls. Together, these findings support the hypothesis that FMRFamide and its receptor promote an adaptive increase in sleep following stress. Because an FMRFamide-like neuropeptide plays a similar role in C. elegans, we propose that FRMFamide neuropeptide signaling is an ancient regulator of recovery sleep which occurs in response to cellular stress. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Nutritional control of gene expression in Drosophila larvae via TOR, Myc and a novel cis-regulatory element

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grewal Savraj S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nutrient availability is a key determinant of eukaryotic cell growth. In unicellular organisms many signaling and transcriptional networks link nutrient availability to the expression of metabolic genes required for growth. However, less is known about the corresponding mechanisms that operate in metazoans. We used gene expression profiling to explore this issue in developing Drosophila larvae. Results We found that starvation for dietary amino acids (AA's leads to dynamic changes in transcript levels of many metabolic genes. The conserved insulin/PI3K and TOR signaling pathways mediate nutrition-dependent growth in Drosophila and other animals. We found that many AA starvation-responsive transcripts were also altered in TOR mutants. In contrast, although PI3K overexpression induced robust changes in the expression of many metabolic genes, these changes showed limited overlap with the AA starvation expression profile. We did however identify a strong overlap between genes regulated by the transcription factor, Myc, and AA starvation-responsive genes, particularly those involved in ribosome biogenesis, protein synthesis and mitochondrial function. The consensus Myc DNA binding site is enriched in promoters of these AA starvation genes, and we found that Myc overexpression could bypass dietary AA to induce expression of these genes. We also identified another sequence motif (Motif 1 enriched in the promoters of AA starvation-responsive genes. We showed that Motif 1 was both necessary and sufficient to mediate transcriptional responses to dietary AA in larvae. Conclusions Our data suggest that many of the transcriptional effects of amino acids are mediated via signaling through the TOR pathway in Drosophila larvae. We also find that these transcriptional effects are mediated through at least two mechanisms: via the transcription factor Myc, and via the Motif 1 cis-regulatory element. These studies begin to elucidate a nutrient

  1. Phylogeny of the Genus Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Grady, Patrick M.; DeSalle, Rob

    2018-01-01

    Understanding phylogenetic relationships among taxa is key to designing and implementing comparative analyses. The genus Drosophila, which contains over 1600 species, is one of the most important model systems in the biological sciences. For over a century, one species in this group, Drosophila melanogaster, has been key to studies of animal development and genetics, genome organization and evolution, and human disease. As whole-genome sequencing becomes more cost-effective, there is increasing interest in other members of this morphologically, ecologically, and behaviorally diverse genus. Phylogenetic relationships within Drosophila are complicated, and the goal of this paper is to provide a review of the recent taxonomic changes and phylogenetic relationships in this genus to aid in further comparative studies. PMID:29716983

  2. Construction and operation of replacement hazardous waste handling facility at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-09-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0423, for the construction and operation of a replacement hazardous waste handling facility (HWHF) and decontamination of the existing HWHF at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), Berkeley, California. The proposed facility would replace several older buildings and cargo containers currently being used for waste handling activities and consolidate the LBL's existing waste handling activities in one location. The nature of the waste handling activities and the waste volume and characteristics would not change as a result of construction of the new facility. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action would not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, 42 USC. 4321 et seq. Therefore, an environmental impact statement is not required

  3. A Community of Scientists and Educators: The Compass Project at UC Berkeley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Nathaniel; Schwab, Josiah

    2016-01-01

    The Berkeley Compass Project is a self-formed group of graduate and undergraduate students in the physical sciences at the University of California, Berkeley. Its goals are to improve undergraduate physics education, provide opportunities for professional development, and increase retention of students from populations underrepresented in the physical sciences. For undergraduate students, the core Compass experience consists of a summer program and several seminar courses. These programs are designed to foster a diverse, collaborative student community in which students engage in authentic research practices and regular self-reflection. Graduate students, together with upper-level undergraduates, design and run all Compass programs. Compass strives to incorporate best practices from the science education literature. Experiences in Compass leave participants poised to be successful students researchers, teachers, and mentors.

  4. Clinical results of stereotactic hellium-ion radiosurgery of the pituitary gland at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, R.P.; Fabrikant, J.I.; Lyman, J.T.; Frankel, K.A.; Phillips, M.H.; Lawrence, J.H.; Tobias, C.A.

    1989-12-01

    The first therapeutic clinical trial using accelerated heavy-charged particles in humans was performed at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) for the treatment of various endocrine and metabolic disorders of the pituitary gland, and as suppressive therapy for adenohypophyseal hormone-responsive carcinomas and diabetic retinopathy. In acromegaly, Cushing's disease, Nelson's syndrome and prolactin-secreting tumors, the therapeutic goal in the 433 patients treated has been to destroy or inhibit the growth of the pituitary tumor and control hormonal hypersecretion, while preserving a functional rim of tissue with normal hormone-secreting capacity, and minimizing neurologic injury. An additional group of 34 patients was treated for nonsecreting chromophobe adenomas. This paper discusses the methods and results of stereotactic helium-ion radiosurgery of the pituitary gland at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. 11 refs.

  5. Construction and operation of replacement hazardous waste handling facility at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Environmental Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-09-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0423, for the construction and operation of a replacement hazardous waste handling facility (HWHF) and decontamination of the existing HWHF at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), Berkeley, California. The proposed facility would replace several older buildings and cargo containers currently being used for waste handling activities and consolidate the LBL`s existing waste handling activities in one location. The nature of the waste handling activities and the waste volume and characteristics would not change as a result of construction of the new facility. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action would not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, 42 USC. 4321 et seq. Therefore, an environmental impact statement is not required.

  6. Clinical results of stereotactic hellium-ion radiosurgery of the pituitary gland at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, R.P.; Fabrikant, J.I.; Lyman, J.T.; Frankel, K.A.; Phillips, M.H.; Lawrence, J.H.; Tobias, C.A.

    1989-12-01

    The first therapeutic clinical trial using accelerated heavy-charged particles in humans was performed at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) for the treatment of various endocrine and metabolic disorders of the pituitary gland, and as suppressive therapy for adenohypophyseal hormone-responsive carcinomas and diabetic retinopathy. In acromegaly, Cushing's disease, Nelson's syndrome and prolactin-secreting tumors, the therapeutic goal in the 433 patients treated has been to destroy or inhibit the growth of the pituitary tumor and control hormonal hypersecretion, while preserving a functional rim of tissue with normal hormone-secreting capacity, and minimizing neurologic injury. An additional group of 34 patients was treated for nonsecreting chromophobe adenomas. This paper discusses the methods and results of stereotactic helium-ion radiosurgery of the pituitary gland at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. 11 refs

  7. Modelling Cooperative Tumorigenesis in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    The development of human metastatic cancer is a multistep process, involving the acquisition of several genetic mutations, tumour heterogeneity, and interactions with the surrounding microenvironment. Due to the complexity of cancer development in mammals, simpler model organisms, such as the vinegar fly, Drosophila melanogaster, are being utilized to provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms involved. In this review, we highlight recent advances in modelling tumorigenesis using the Drosophila model, focusing on the cooperation of oncogenes or tumour suppressors, and the interaction of mutant cells with the surrounding tissue in epithelial tumour initiation and progression. PMID:29693007

  8. Modelling Cooperative Tumorigenesis in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena E. Richardson

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of human metastatic cancer is a multistep process, involving the acquisition of several genetic mutations, tumour heterogeneity, and interactions with the surrounding microenvironment. Due to the complexity of cancer development in mammals, simpler model organisms, such as the vinegar fly, Drosophila melanogaster, are being utilized to provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms involved. In this review, we highlight recent advances in modelling tumorigenesis using the Drosophila model, focusing on the cooperation of oncogenes or tumour suppressors, and the interaction of mutant cells with the surrounding tissue in epithelial tumour initiation and progression.

  9. Gilbert Newton Lewis: his influence on physical-organic chemists at Berkeley

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvin, M.

    1982-03-01

    A review is presented of the historical contributions of Gilbert N. Lewis to science and a discussion of the influence of Lewis on the research of the members of the physical-organic staff at Berkeley, including Melvin Calvin, during the twenties, thirties and forties. Some specific examples are discussed. Also, the effect of Lewis, his science and administrative concepts in the creation of excellence in a department of chemistry are reviewed

  10. The design and implementation of Berkeley Lab's linuxcheckpoint/restart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duell, Jason

    2005-04-30

    This paper describes Berkeley Linux Checkpoint/Restart (BLCR), a linux kernel module that allows system-level checkpoints on a variety of Linux systems. BLCR can be used either as a stand alone system for checkpointing applications on a single machine, or as a component by a scheduling system or parallel communication library for checkpointing and restoring parallel jobs running on multiple machines. Integration with Message Passing Interface (MPI) and other parallel systems is described.

  11. Gilbert Newton Lewis: his influence on physical-organic chemists at Berkeley

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvin, M.

    1982-03-01

    A review is presented of the historical contributions of Gilbert N. Lewis to science and a discussion of the influence of Lewis on the research of the members of the physical-organic staff at Berkeley, including Melvin Calvin, during the twenties, thirties and forties. Some specific examples are discussed. Also, the effect of Lewis, his science and administrative concepts in the creation of excellence in a department of chemistry are reviewed.

  12. Radioactive and mixed waste management plan for the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Hazardous Waste Handling Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This Radioactive and Mixed Waste Management Plan for the Hazardous Waste Handling Facility at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is written to meet the requirements for an annual report of radioactive and mixed waste management activities outlined in DOE Order 5820.2A. Radioactive and mixed waste management activities during FY 1994 listed here include principal regulatory and environmental issues and the degree to which planned activities were accomplished

  13. Progress report on the Berkeley/Anglo-Australian Observatory high-redshift supernova search

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldhaber, G.; Perlmutter, S.; Pennypacker, C.; Marvin, H.; Muller, R.A.; Couch, W.; Boyle, B.

    1990-11-01

    There are two main efforts related to supernovae in progress at Berkeley. The first is an automated supernova search for nearby supernovae, which was already discussed by Carl Pennypacker at this conference. The second is a search for distant supernovae, in the z = 0.3 to 0.5 region, aimed at measuring Ω. It is the latter that I want to discuss in this paper. 3 refs., 18 figs

  14. Berkeley Nuclear Laboratories Reactor Physics Mk. III Experimental Programme. Description of facility and programme for 1971

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunn, R M; Waterson, R H; Young, J D

    1971-01-15

    Reactor physics experiments have been carried out at Berkeley Nuclear Laboratories during the past few years in support of the Civil Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactors (Mk. II) the Generating Board is building. These experiments are part of an overall programme whose objective is to assess the accuracy of the calculational methods used in the design and operation of these reactors. This report provides a description of the facility for the Mk. III experimental programme and the planned programme for 1971.

  15. Maternal control of the Drosophila dorsal–ventral body axis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, David S.; Stevens, Leslie M.

    2016-01-01

    The pathway that generates the dorsal–ventral (DV) axis of the Drosophila embryo has been the subject of intense investigation over the previous three decades. The initial asymmetric signal originates during oogenesis by the movement of the oocyte nucleus to an anterior corner of the oocyte, which establishes DV polarity within the follicle through signaling between Gurken, the Drosophila Transforming Growth Factor (TGF)-α homologue secreted from the oocyte, and the Drosophila Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) that is expressed by the follicular epithelium cells that envelop the oocyte. Follicle cells that are not exposed to Gurken follow a ventral fate and express Pipe, a sulfotransferase that enzymatically modifies components of the inner vitelline membrane layer of the eggshell, thereby transferring DV spatial information from the follicle to the egg. These ventrally sulfated eggshell proteins comprise a localized cue that directs the ventrally restricted formation of the active Spätzle ligand within the perivitelline space between the eggshell and the embryonic membrane. Spätzle activates Toll, a transmembrane receptor in the embryonic membrane. Transmission of the Toll signal into the embryo leads to the formation of a ventral-to-dorsal gradient of the transcription factor Dorsal within the nuclei of the syncytial blastoderm stage embryo. Dorsal controls the spatially specific expression of a large constellation of zygotic target genes, the Dorsal gene regulatory network, along the embryonic DV circumference. This article reviews classic studies and integrates them with the details of more recent work that has advanced our understanding of the complex pathway that establishes Drosophila embryo DV polarity. PMID:25124754

  16. Hox gene regulation in the central nervous system of Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maheshwar eGummalla

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Hox genes specify the structures that form along the anteroposterior (AP axis of bilateria. Within the genome, they often form clusters where, remarkably enough, their position within the clusters reflects the relative positions of the structures they specify along the AP axis. This correspondence between genomic organization and gene expression pattern has been conserved through evolution and provides a unique opportunity to study how chromosomal context affects gene regulation. In Drosophila, a general rule, often called posterior dominance, states that Hox genes specifying more posterior structures repress the expression of more anterior Hox genes. This rule explains the apparent spatial complementarity of Hox gene expression patterns in Drosophila. Here we review a noticeable exception to this rule where the more-posteriorly expressed Abd-B hox gene fails to repress the more-anterior abd-A gene in cells of the central nervous system (CNS. While Abd-B is required to repress ectopic expression of abd-A in the posterior epidermis, abd-A repression in the posterior CNS is accomplished by a different mechanism that involves a large 92kb long non-coding RNA (lncRNA encoded by the intergenic region separating abd-A and Abd-B (the iab8ncRNA. Dissection of this lncRNA revealed that abd-A is repressed by the lncRNA using two redundant mechanisms. The 1st mechanism is mediated by a microRNA (mir-iab-8 encoded by intronic sequence within the large iab8-ncRNA. Meanwhile, the second mechanism seems to involve transcriptional interference by the long iab-8 ncRNA on the abd-A promoter. Recent work demonstrating CNS-specific regulation of genes by ncRNAs in Drosophila, seem to highlight a potential role for the iab-8-ncRNA in the evolution of the Drosophila hox complexes

  17. Distinct types of glial cells populate the Drosophila antenna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jhaveri Dhanisha

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of nervous systems involves reciprocal interactions between neurons and glia. In the Drosophila olfactory system, peripheral glial cells arise from sensory lineages specified by the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, Atonal. These glia wrap around the developing olfactory axons early during development and pattern the three distinct fascicles as they exit the antenna. In the moth Manduca sexta, an additional set of central glia migrate to the base of the antennal nerve where axons sort to their glomerular targets. In this work, we have investigated whether similar types of cells exist in the Drosophila antenna. Results We have used different P(Gal4 lines to drive Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP in distinct populations of cells within the Drosophila antenna. Mz317::GFP, a marker for cell body and perineural glia, labels the majority of peripheral glia. An additional ~30 glial cells detected by GH146::GFP do not derive from any of the sensory lineages and appear to migrate into the antenna from the brain. Their appearance in the third antennal segment is regulated by normal function of the Epidermal Growth Factor receptor and small GTPases. We denote these distinct populations of cells as Mz317-glia and GH146-glia respectively. In the adult, processes of GH146-glial cells ensheath the olfactory receptor neurons directly, while those of the Mz317-glia form a peripheral layer. Ablation of GH146-glia does not result in any significant effects on the patterning of the olfactory receptor axons. Conclusion We have demonstrated the presence of at least two distinct populations of glial cells within the Drosophila antenna. GH146-glial cells originate in the brain and migrate to the antenna along the newly formed olfactory axons. The number of cells populating the third segment of the antenna is regulated by signaling through the Epidermal Growth Factor receptor. These glia share several features of the sorting

  18. Genome-Wide Approaches to Drosophila Heart Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manfred Frasch

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The development of the dorsal vessel in Drosophila is one of the first systems in which key mechanisms regulating cardiogenesis have been defined in great detail at the genetic and molecular level. Due to evolutionary conservation, these findings have also provided major inputs into studies of cardiogenesis in vertebrates. Many of the major components that control Drosophila cardiogenesis were discovered based on candidate gene approaches and their functions were defined by employing the outstanding genetic tools and molecular techniques available in this system. More recently, approaches have been taken that aim to interrogate the entire genome in order to identify novel components and describe genomic features that are pertinent to the regulation of heart development. Apart from classical forward genetic screens, the availability of the thoroughly annotated Drosophila genome sequence made new genome-wide approaches possible, which include the generation of massive numbers of RNA interference (RNAi reagents that were used in forward genetic screens, as well as studies of the transcriptomes and proteomes of the developing heart under normal and experimentally manipulated conditions. Moreover, genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments have been performed with the aim to define the full set of genomic binding sites of the major cardiogenic transcription factors, their relevant target genes, and a more complete picture of the regulatory network that drives cardiogenesis. This review will give an overview on these genome-wide approaches to Drosophila heart development and on computational analyses of the obtained information that ultimately aim to provide a description of this process at the systems level.

  19. A Radiation Homeland Security Workshop Presented to the City of Berkeley Fire Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matis, Howard

    2005-04-01

    A radiation incident in a community, ranging from a transportation accident to a dirty bomb, is expected to be rare, but still can occur. First responders to such an incident must be prepared. City of Berkeley officials met with members of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory staff and agreed that the laboratory participants would create material and teach it to all of their fire fighting staff. To design such a course, nuclear physicists, biologists and health physicists merged some of their existing teaching material together with previous homeland security efforts to produce a course that lasted one full day. The material was designed to help alleviate the myths and fear of radiation experienced by many first responders. It included basic nuclear physics information, biological effects, and methods that health physicists use to detect and handle radiation. The curriculum included several hands on activities which involved working directly with the meters the Berkeley Fire Department possessed. In addition, I will discuss some observations from teaching this course material plus some unusual problems that we encountered, such as suddenly the whole class responding to a fire.

  20. Ernest Orlando Berkeley National Laboratory - Fundamental and applied research on lean premixed combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Robert K.

    1999-01-01

    Ernest Orland Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) is the oldest of America's national laboratories and has been a leader in science and engineering technology for more than 65 years, serving as a powerful resource to meet Us national needs. As a multi-program Department of Energy laboratory, Berkeley Lab is dedicated to performing leading edge research in the biological, physical, materials, chemical, energy, environmental and computing sciences. Ernest Orlando Lawrence, the Lab's founder and the first of its nine Nobel prize winners, invented the cyclotron, which led to a Golden Age of particle physics and revolutionary discoveries about the nature of the universe. To this day, the Lab remains a world center for accelerator and detector innovation and design. The Lab is the birthplace of nuclear medicine and the cradle of invention for medical imaging. In the field of heart disease, Lab researchers were the first to isolate lipoproteins and the first to determine that the ratio of high density to low density lipoproteins is a strong indicator of heart disease risk. The demise of the dinosaurs--the revelation that they had been killed off by a massive comet or asteroid that had slammed into the Earth--was a theory developed here. The invention of the chemical laser, the unlocking of the secrets of photosynthesis--this is a short preview of the legacy of this Laboratory

  1. Analysis of the interaction between human RITA and Drosophila Suppressor of Hairless.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockmann, Birgit; Mastel, Helena; Oswald, Franz; Maier, Dieter

    2014-12-01

    Notch signalling mediates intercellular communication, which is effected by the transcription factor CSL, an acronym for vertebrate CBF1/RBP-J, Drosophila Suppressor of Hairless [Su(H)] and C. elegans Lag1. Nuclear import of CBF1/RBP-J depends on co-activators and co-repressors, whereas the export relies on RITA. RITA is a tubulin and CBF1/RBP-J binding protein acting as a negative regulator of Notch signalling in vertebrates. RITA protein is highly conserved in eumatazoa, but no Drosophila homologue was yet identified. In this work, the activity of human RITA in the fly was addressed. To this end, we generated transgenic flies that allow a tissue specific induction of human RITA, which was demonstrated by Western blotting and in fly tissues. Unexpectedly, overexpression of RITA during fly development had little phenotypic consequences, even when overexpressed simultaneously with either Su(H) or the Notch antagonist Hairless. We demonstrate the in vivo binding of human RITA to Su(H) and to tubulin by co-immune precipitation. Moreover, RITA and tubulin co-localized to some degree in several Drosophila tissues. Overall our data show that human RITA, albeit binding to Drosophila Su(H) and tubulin, cannot influence the Notch signalling pathway in the fly, suggesting that a nuclear export mechanism of Su(H), if existent in Drosophila, does not depend on RITA. © 2015 The Authors.

  2. Berkeley Lab's Saul Perlmutter wins E.O. Lawrence Award; scientist's work on supernovae reveals accelerating Universe

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Saul Perlmutter, from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Physics Division and leader of the Supernova Cosmology Project based there, has won the DOE's 2002 E.O. Lawrence Award in the physics category (2 pages).

  3. Negative regulation of P element excision by the somatic product and terminal sequences of P in drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    A transient in vivo P element excision assay was used to test the regulatory properties of putative repressor-encoding plasmids in Drosophila melanogaster embryos. The somatic expression of an unmodified transposase transcription unit under the control of a heat shock gene promoter (phsn) effectivel...

  4. Functional evolution of cis-regulatory modules at a homeotic gene in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret C W Ho

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available It is a long-held belief in evolutionary biology that the rate of molecular evolution for a given DNA sequence is inversely related to the level of functional constraint. This belief holds true for the protein-coding homeotic (Hox genes originally discovered in Drosophila melanogaster. Expression of the Hox genes in Drosophila embryos is essential for body patterning and is controlled by an extensive array of cis-regulatory modules (CRMs. How the regulatory modules functionally evolve in different species is not clear. A comparison of the CRMs for the Abdominal-B gene from different Drosophila species reveals relatively low levels of overall sequence conservation. However, embryonic enhancer CRMs from other Drosophila species direct transgenic reporter gene expression in the same spatial and temporal patterns during development as their D. melanogaster orthologs. Bioinformatic analysis reveals the presence of short conserved sequences within defined CRMs, representing gap and pair-rule transcription factor binding sites. One predicted binding site for the gap transcription factor KRUPPEL in the IAB5 CRM was found to be altered in Superabdominal (Sab mutations. In Sab mutant flies, the third abdominal segment is transformed into a copy of the fifth abdominal segment. A model for KRUPPEL-mediated repression at this binding site is presented. These findings challenge our current understanding of the relationship between sequence evolution at the molecular level and functional activity of a CRM. While the overall sequence conservation at Drosophila CRMs is not distinctive from neighboring genomic regions, functionally critical transcription factor binding sites within embryonic enhancer CRMs are highly conserved. These results have implications for understanding mechanisms of gene expression during embryonic development, enhancer function, and the molecular evolution of eukaryotic regulatory modules.

  5. Genome-wide analysis of Polycomb targets in Drosophila

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, Yuri B.; Kahn, Tatyana G.; Nix, David A.; Li,Xiao-Yong; Bourgon, Richard; Biggin, Mark; Pirrotta, Vincenzo

    2006-04-01

    Polycomb Group (PcG) complexes are multiprotein assemblages that bind to chromatin and establish chromatin states leading to epigenetic silencing. PcG proteins regulate homeotic genes in flies and vertebrates but little is known about other PcG targets and the role of the PcG in development, differentiation and disease. We have determined the distribution of the PcG proteins PC, E(Z) and PSC and of histone H3K27 trimethylation in the Drosophila genome. At more than 200 PcG target genes, binding sites for the three PcG proteins colocalize to presumptive Polycomb Response Elements (PREs). In contrast, H3 me3K27 forms broad domains including the entire transcription unit and regulatory regions. PcG targets are highly enriched in genes encoding transcription factors but receptors, signaling proteins, morphogens and regulators representing all major developmental pathways are also included.

  6. Drosophila Wnt and STAT Define Apoptosis-Resistant Epithelial Cells for Tissue Regeneration after Irradiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpi Verghese

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila melanogaster larvae irradiated with doses of ionizing radiation (IR that kill about half of the cells in larval imaginal discs still develop into viable adults. How surviving cells compensate for IR-induced cell death to produce organs of normal size and appearance remains an active area of investigation. We have identified a subpopulation of cells within the continuous epithelium of Drosophila larval wing discs that shows intrinsic resistance to IR- and drug-induced apoptosis. These cells reside in domains of high Wingless (Wg, Drosophila Wnt-1 and STAT92E (sole Drosophila signal transducer and activator of transcription [STAT] homolog activity and would normally form the hinge in the adult fly. Resistance to IR-induced apoptosis requires STAT and Wg and is mediated by transcriptional repression of the pro-apoptotic gene reaper. Lineage tracing experiments show that, following irradiation, apoptosis-resistant cells lose their identity and translocate to areas of the wing disc that suffered abundant cell death. Our findings provide a new paradigm for regeneration in which it is unnecessary to invoke special damage-resistant cell types such as stem cells. Instead, differences in gene expression within a population of genetically identical epithelial cells can create a subpopulation with greater resistance, which, following damage, survive, alter their fate, and help regenerate the tissue.

  7. Nubbin isoform antagonism governs Drosophila intestinal immune homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo G Lindberg

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Gut immunity is regulated by intricate and dynamic mechanisms to ensure homeostasis despite a constantly changing microbial environment. Several regulatory factors have been described to participate in feedback responses to prevent aberrant immune activity. Little is, however, known about how transcriptional programs are directly tuned to efficiently adapt host gut tissues to the current microbiome. Here we show that the POU/Oct gene nubbin (nub encodes two transcription factor isoforms, Nub-PB and Nub-PD, which antagonistically regulate immune gene expression in Drosophila. Global transcriptional profiling of adult flies overexpressing Nub-PB in immunocompetent tissues revealed that this form is a strong transcriptional activator of a large set of immune genes. Further genetic analyses showed that Nub-PB is sufficient to drive expression both independently and in conjunction with nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB, JNK and JAK/STAT pathways. Similar overexpression of Nub-PD did, conversely, repress expression of the same targets. Strikingly, isoform co-overexpression normalized immune gene transcription, suggesting antagonistic activities. RNAi-mediated knockdown of individual nub transcripts in enterocytes confirmed antagonistic regulation by the two isoforms and that both are necessary for normal immune gene transcription in the midgut. Furthermore, enterocyte-specific Nub-PB expression levels had a strong impact on gut bacterial load as well as host lifespan. Overexpression of Nub-PB enhanced bacterial clearance of ingested Erwinia carotovora carotovora 15. Nevertheless, flies quickly succumbed to the infection, suggesting a deleterious immune response. In line with this, prolonged overexpression promoted a proinflammatory signature in the gut with induction of JNK and JAK/STAT pathways, increased apoptosis and stem cell proliferation. These findings highlight a novel regulatory mechanism of host-microbe interactions mediated by antagonistic

  8. Genome-wide analysis of promoter architecture in Drosophila melanogaster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoskins, Roger A.; Landolin, Jane M.; Brown, James B.; Sandler, Jeremy E.; Takahashi, Hazuki; Lassmann, Timo; Yu, Charles; Booth, Benjamin W.; Zhang, Dayu; Wan, Kenneth H.; Yang, Li; Boley, Nathan; Andrews, Justen; Kaufman, Thomas C.; Graveley, Brenton R.; Bickel, Peter J.; Carninci, Piero; Carlson, Joseph W.; Celniker, Susan E.

    2010-10-20

    Core promoters are critical regions for gene regulation in higher eukaryotes. However, the boundaries of promoter regions, the relative rates of initiation at the transcription start sites (TSSs) distributed within them, and the functional significance of promoter architecture remain poorly understood. We produced a high-resolution map of promoters active in the Drosophila melanogaster embryo by integrating data from three independent and complementary methods: 21 million cap analysis of gene expression (CAGE) tags, 1.2 million RNA ligase mediated rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RLMRACE) reads, and 50,000 cap-trapped expressed sequence tags (ESTs). We defined 12,454 promoters of 8037 genes. Our analysis indicates that, due to non-promoter-associated RNA background signal, previous studies have likely overestimated the number of promoter-associated CAGE clusters by fivefold. We show that TSS distributions form a complex continuum of shapes, and that promoters active in the embryo and adult have highly similar shapes in 95% of cases. This suggests that these distributions are generally determined by static elements such as local DNA sequence and are not modulated by dynamic signals such as histone modifications. Transcription factor binding motifs are differentially enriched as a function of promoter shape, and peaked promoter shape is correlated with both temporal and spatial regulation of gene expression. Our results contribute to the emerging view that core promoters are functionally diverse and control patterning of gene expression in Drosophila and mammals.

  9. TALE-mediated modulation of transcriptional enhancers in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocker, Justin; Stern, David L

    2013-08-01

    We tested whether transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) could mediate repression and activation of endogenous enhancers in the Drosophila genome. TALE repressors (TALERs) targeting each of the five even-skipped (eve) stripe enhancers generated repression specifically of the focal stripes. TALE activators (TALEAs) targeting the eve promoter or enhancers caused increased expression primarily in cells normally activated by the promoter or targeted enhancer, respectively. This effect supports the view that repression acts in a dominant fashion on transcriptional activators and that the activity state of an enhancer influences TALE binding or the ability of the VP16 domain to enhance transcription. In these assays, the Hairy repression domain did not exhibit previously described long-range transcriptional repression activity. The phenotypic effects of TALER and TALEA expression in larvae and adults are consistent with the observed modulations of eve expression. TALEs thus provide a novel tool for detection and functional modulation of transcriptional enhancers in their native genomic context.

  10. Environmental assessment for the proposed construction and operation of a Genome Sequencing Facility in Building 64 at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    This document is an Environmental Assessment (EA) for a proposed project to modify 14,900 square feet of an existing building (Building 64) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) to operate as a Genome Sequencing Facility. This EA addresses the potential environmental impacts from the proposed modifications to Building 64 and operation of the Genome Sequencing Facility. The proposed action is to modify Building 64 to provide space and equipment allowing LBL to demonstrate that the Directed DNA Sequencing Strategy can be scaled up from the current level of 750,000 base pairs per year to a facility that produces over 6,000,000 base pairs per year, while still retaining its efficiency.

  11. Drosophila arginine methyltransferase 1 (DART1) is an ecdysone receptor co-repressor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Shuhei; Sawatsubashi, Shun; Ito, Saya; Kouzmenko, Alexander; Suzuki, Eriko; Zhao, Yue; Yamagata, Kaoru; Tanabe, Masahiko; Ueda, Takashi; Fujiyama, Sari; Murata, Takuya; Matsukawa, Hiroyuki; Takeyama, Ken-ichi; Yaegashi, Nobuo

    2008-01-01

    Histone arginine methylation is an epigenetic marker that regulates gene expression by defining the chromatin state. Arginine methyltransferases, therefore, serve as transcriptional co-regulators. However, unlike other transcriptional co-regulators, the physiological roles of arginine methyltransferases are poorly understood. Drosophila arginine methyltransferase 1 (DART1), the mammalian PRMT1 homologue, methylates the arginine residue of histone H4 (H4R3me2). Disruption of DART1 in Drosophila by imprecise P-element excision resulted in low viability during metamorphosis in the pupal stages. In the pupal stage, an ecdysone hormone signal is critical for developmental progression. DART1 interacted with the nuclear ecdysone receptor (EcR) in a ligand-dependent manner, and co-repressed EcR in intact flies. These findings suggest that DART1, a histone arginine methyltransferase, is a co-repressor of EcR that is indispensable for normal pupal development in the intact fly

  12. Effects of high-LET particles (40A) on the brain of Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miquel, J.; Herman, M.M.; Benton, E.V.; Welch, G.

    1976-01-01

    To investigate the effects of galactic heavy particles on nervous tissue, Drosophila melanogaster flies were exposed to 40 A from the Super-HILAC accelerator at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The energy of the particles reaching the Drosophila neurons was 4.8 MeV/nucleon, and the fluence ranged from 6 x 10 4 to 8 x 10 7 particles/cm 2 . Thirty-five days after irradiation at the higher fluences, extensive tissue fragmentation and cysts were found. At fluences as low as one hit/two cell bodies (about 5 x 10 6 ) and one hit/90 cell bodies (about 9 x 10 4 particles/cm 2 or 21 rad average dose) swelling of neuronal cytoplasm and focally fragmented membranes were noted; at fluences ranging from one hit/six to one hit/135 cell bodies, there was frequently a marked increase in glial lamellae around nerve-cell processes, which often had degenerative features. These findings support the view that single hits by heavy particles may injure nervous tissue. (author)

  13. Effects of high-LET particles /A-40/ on the brain of Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miquel, J.; Herman, M. M.; Benton, E. V.; Welch, G.

    1976-01-01

    To investigate the effects of galactic heavy particles on nervous tissue, Drosophila melanogaster flies were exposed to A-40 from the Super-HILAC accelerator at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The energy of the particles reaching the Drosophila neurons was 4.8 MeV/nucleon, and the fluence ranged from 60,000 to 80 million particles/sq cm. Thirty-five days after irradiation at the higher fluences, extensive tissue fragmentation and cysts were found. At fluences as low as one hit/two cell bodies (about 5 million) and one hit/90 cell bodies (about 90,000 particles/sq cm or 21 rad average dose) swelling of neuronal cytoplasm and focally fragmented membranes were noted; at fluences ranging from one hit/six to one hit/135 cell bodies, there was frequently a marked increase in glial lamellae around nerve-cell processes, which often had degenerative features. These findings support the view that single hits by heavy particles may injure nervous tissue.

  14. Tools for neuroanatomy and neurogenetics in Drosophila

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfeiffer, Barret D.; Jenett, Arnim; Hammonds, Ann S.; Ngo, Teri-T B.; Misra, Sima; Murphy, Christine; Scully, Audra; Carlson, Joseph W.; Wan, Kenneth H.; Laverty, Todd R.; Mungall, Chris; Svirskas, Rob; Kadonaga, James T.; Doe, Chris Q.; Eisen, Michael B.; Celniker, Susan E.; Rubin, Gerald M.

    2008-08-11

    We demonstrate the feasibility of generating thousands of transgenic Drosophila melanogaster lines in which the expression of an exogenous gene is reproducibly directed to distinct small subsets of cells in the adult brain. We expect the expression patterns produced by the collection of 5,000 lines that we are currently generating to encompass all neurons in the brain in a variety of intersecting patterns. Overlapping 3-kb DNA fragments from the flanking noncoding and intronic regions of genes thought to have patterned expression in the adult brain were inserted into a defined genomic location by site-specific recombination. These fragments were then assayed for their ability to function as transcriptional enhancers in conjunction with a synthetic core promoter designed to work with a wide variety of enhancer types. An analysis of 44 fragments from four genes found that >80% drive expression patterns in the brain; the observed patterns were, on average, comprised of <100 cells. Our results suggest that the D. melanogaster genome contains >50,000 enhancers and that multiple enhancers drive distinct subsets of expression of a gene in each tissue and developmental stage. We expect that these lines will be valuable tools for neuroanatomy as well as for the elucidation of neuronal circuits and information flow in the fly brain.

  15. Insulin signaling mediates sexual attractiveness in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsung-Han Kuo

    Full Text Available Sexually attractive characteristics are often thought to reflect an individual's condition or reproductive potential, but the underlying molecular mechanisms through which they do so are generally unknown. Insulin/insulin-like growth factor signaling (IIS is known to modulate aging, reproduction, and stress resistance in several species and to contribute to variability of these traits in natural populations. Here we show that IIS determines sexual attractiveness in Drosophila through transcriptional regulation of genes involved in the production of cuticular hydrocarbons (CHC, many of which function as pheromones. Using traditional gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS together with newly introduced laser desorption/ionization orthogonal time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LDI-MS we establish that CHC profiles are significantly affected by genetic manipulations that target IIS. Manipulations that reduce IIS also reduce attractiveness, while females with increased IIS are significantly more attractive than wild-type animals. IIS effects on attractiveness are mediated by changes in CHC profiles. Insulin signaling influences CHC through pathways that are likely independent of dFOXO and that may involve the nutrient-sensing Target of Rapamycin (TOR pathway. These results suggest that the activity of conserved molecular regulators of longevity and reproductive output may manifest in different species as external characteristics that are perceived as honest indicators of fitness potential.

  16. Isolation of two tissue-specific Drosophila paired box genes, Pox meso and Pox neuro.

    OpenAIRE

    Bopp, D; Jamet, E; Baumgartner, S; Burri, M; Noll, M

    1989-01-01

    Two new paired domain genes of Drosophila, Pox meso and Pox neuro, are described. In contrast to the previously isolated paired domain genes, paired and gooseberry, which contain both a paired and a homeo-domain (PHox genes), Pox meso and Pox neuro possess no homeodomain. Evidence suggesting that the new genes encode tissue-specific transcriptional factors and belong to the same regulatory cascade as the other paired domain genes includes (i) tissue-specific expression of Pox meso in the soma...

  17. Synaptic and genomic responses to JNK and AP-1 signaling in Drosophila neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bohmann Dirk

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The transcription factor AP-1 positively controls synaptic plasticity at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction. Although in motor neurons, JNK has been shown to activate AP-1, a positive regulator of growth and strength at the larval NMJ, the consequences of JNK activation are poorly studied. In addition, the downstream transcriptional targets of JNK and AP-1 signaling in the Drosophila nervous system have yet to be identified. Here, we further investigated the role of JNK signaling at this model synapse employing an activated form of JNK-kinase; and using Serial Analysis of Gene Expression and oligonucleotide microarrays, searched for candidate early targets of JNK or AP-1 dependent transcription in neurons. Results Temporally-controlled JNK induction in postembryonic motor neurons triggers synaptic growth at the NMJ indicating a role in developmental plasticity rather than synaptogenesis. An unexpected observation that JNK activation also causes a reduction in transmitter release is inconsistent with JNK functioning solely through AP-1 and suggests an additional, yet-unidentified pathway for JNK signaling in motor neurons. SAGE profiling of mRNA expression helps define the neural transcriptome in Drosophila. Though many putative AP-1 and JNK target genes arose from the genomic screens, few were confirmed in subsequent validation experiments. One potentially important neuronal AP-1 target discovered, CG6044, was previously implicated in olfactory associative memory. In addition, 5 mRNAs regulated by RU486, a steroid used to trigger conditional gene expression were identified. Conclusion This study demonstrates a novel role for JNK signaling at the larval neuromuscular junction and provides a quantitative profile of gene transcription in Drosophila neurons. While identifying potential JNK/AP-1 targets it reveals the limitations of genome-wide analyses using complex tissues like the whole brain.

  18. The Drosophila DHR96 nuclear receptor binds cholesterol and regulates cholesterol homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Horner, Michael A.; Pardee, Keith; Liu, Suya; King-Jones, Kirst; Lajoie, Gilles; Edwards, Aled; Krause, Henry M.; Thummel, Carl S.

    2009-01-01

    Cholesterol homeostasis is required to maintain normal cellular function and avoid the deleterious effects of hypercholesterolemia. Here we show that the Drosophila DHR96 nuclear receptor binds cholesterol and is required for the coordinate transcriptional response of genes that are regulated by cholesterol and involved in cholesterol uptake, trafficking, and storage. DHR96 mutants die when grown on low levels of cholesterol and accumulate excess cholesterol when maintained on a high-choleste...

  19. Semi-automated quantitative Drosophila wings measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Sheng Yang Michael; Ogawa, Yoshitaka; Kawana, Sara; Tamura, Koichiro; Lee, Hwee Kuan

    2017-06-28

    Drosophila melanogaster is an important organism used in many fields of biological research such as genetics and developmental biology. Drosophila wings have been widely used to study the genetics of development, morphometrics and evolution. Therefore there is much interest in quantifying wing structures of Drosophila. Advancement in technology has increased the ease in which images of Drosophila can be acquired. However such studies have been limited by the slow and tedious process of acquiring phenotypic data. We have developed a system that automatically detects and measures key points and vein segments on a Drosophila wing. Key points are detected by performing image transformations and template matching on Drosophila wing images while vein segments are detected using an Active Contour algorithm. The accuracy of our key point detection was compared against key point annotations of users. We also performed key point detection using different training data sets of Drosophila wing images. We compared our software with an existing automated image analysis system for Drosophila wings and showed that our system performs better than the state of the art. Vein segments were manually measured and compared against the measurements obtained from our system. Our system was able to detect specific key points and vein segments from Drosophila wing images with high accuracy.

  20. Access to public drinking water fountains in Berkeley, California: a geospatial analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, Dylan C; Smith, Charlotte D

    2018-01-24

    In January 2015, Berkeley, California became the first city in the Unites States to impose a tax on sugar-sweetened beverages. The tax is intended to discourage purchase of sugary beverages and promote consumption of healthier alternatives such as tap water. The goal of the study was to assess the condition of public drinking water fountains and determine if there is a difference in access to clean, functioning fountains based on race or socio-economic status. A mobile-GIS App was created to locate and collect data on existing drinking water fountains in Berkeley, CA. Demographic variables related to race and socio-economic status (SES) were acquired from the US Census - American Community Survey database. Disparities in access to, or condition of drinking water fountains relative to demographics was explored using spatial analyses. Spatial statistical-analysis was performed to estimate demographic characteristics of communities near the water fountains and logistic regression was used to examine the relationship between household median income or race and condition of fountain. Although most fountains were classified as functioning, some were dirty, clogged, or both dirty and clogged. No spatial relationships between demographic characteristics and fountain conditions were observed. All geo-located data and a series of maps were provided to the City of Berkeley and the public. The geo-database created as an outcome of this study is useful for prioritizing maintenance of existing fountains and planning the locations of future fountains. The methodologies used for this study could be applied to a wide variety of asset inventory and assessment projects such as clinics or pharmaceutical dispensaries, both in developed and developing countries.

  1. Searching for multiple stellar populations in the massive, old open cluster Berkeley 39

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragaglia, A.; Gratton, R. G.; Carretta, E.; D'Orazi, V.; Sneden, C.; Lucatello, S.

    2012-12-01

    The most massive star clusters include several generations of stars with a different chemical composition (mainly revealed by an Na-O anti-correlation) while low-mass star clusters appear to be chemically homogeneous. We are investigating the chemical composition of several clusters with masses of a few 104 M⊙ to establish the lower mass limit for the multiple stellar population phenomenon. Using VLT/FLAMES spectra we determine abundances of Fe, O, Na, and several other elements (α, Fe-peak, and neutron-capture elements) in the old open cluster Berkeley 39. This is a massive open cluster: M ~ 104 M⊙, approximately at the border between small globular clusters and large open clusters. Our sample size of about 30 stars is one of the largest studied for abundances in any open cluster to date, and will be useful to determine improved cluster parameters, such as age, distance, and reddening when coupled with precise, well-calibrated photometry. We find that Berkeley 39 is slightly metal-poor, ⟨[Fe/H]⟩ = -0.20, in agreement with previous studies of this cluster. More importantly, we do not detect any star-to-star variation in the abundances of Fe, O, and Na within quite stringent upper limits. The rms scatter is 0.04, 0.10, and 0.05 dex for Fe, O, and Na, respectively. This small spread can be entirely explained by the noise in the spectra and by uncertainties in the atmospheric parameters. We conclude that Berkeley 39 is a single-population cluster. Based on observations collected at ESO telescopes under programme 386.B-0009.Tables 2 and 3 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  2. Dissecting genetic architecture of startle response in Drosophila melanogaster using multi-omics information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Angli; Wang, Hongcheng; Zhu, Jun

    2017-09-28

    Startle behavior is important for survival, and abnormal startle responses are related to several neurological diseases. Drosophila melanogaster provides a powerful system to investigate the genetic underpinnings of variation in startle behavior. Since mechanically induced, startle responses and environmental conditions can be readily quantified and precisely controlled. The 156 wild-derived fully sequenced lines of the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel (DGRP) were used to identify SNPs and transcripts associated with variation in startle behavior. The results validated highly significant effects of 33 quantitative trait SNPs (QTSs) and 81 quantitative trait transcripts (QTTs) directly associated with phenotypic variation of startle response. We also detected QTT variation controlled by 20 QTSs (tQTSs) and 73 transcripts (tQTTs). Association mapping based on genomic and transcriptomic data enabled us to construct a complex genetic network that underlies variation in startle behavior. Based on principles of evolutionary conservation, human orthologous genes could be superimposed on this network. This study provided both genetic and biological insights into the variation of startle response behavior of Drosophila melanogaster, and highlighted the importance of genetic network to understand the genetic architecture of complex traits.

  3. Mixed waste certification plan for the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Hazardous Waste Handling Facility. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this plan is to describe the organization and methodology for the certification of mixed waste handled in the Hazardous Waste Handling Facility (HWHF) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). This plan is composed to meet the requirements found in the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) Solid Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) and follows the suggested outline provided by WHC in the letter of April 26, 1990, to Dr. R.H. Thomas, Occupational Health Division, LBL. Mixed waste is to be transferred to the WHC Hanford Site Central Waste Complex and Burial Grounds in Hanford, Washington

  4. Exploratory Research and Development Fund, FY 1990. Report on Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-05-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Exploratory R&D Fund FY 1990 report is compiled from annual reports submitted by principal investigators following the close of the fiscal year. This report describes the projects supported and summarizes their accomplishments. It constitutes a part of an Exploratory R&D Fund (ERF) planning and documentation process that includes an annual planning cycle, projection selection, implementation, and review. The research areas covered in this report are: Accelerator and fusion research; applied science; cell and molecular biology; chemical biodynamics; chemical sciences; earth sciences; engineering; information and computing sciences; materials sciences; nuclear science; physics and research medicine and radiation biophysics.

  5. Lawrence Berkeley laboratory neutral-beam engineering test facility power-supply system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutz, I.C.; Arthur, C.A.; deVries, G.J.; Owren, H.M.

    1981-10-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is upgrading the neutral beam source test facility (NBSTF) into a neutral beam engineering test facility (NBETF) with increased capabilities for the development of neutral beam systems. The NBETF will have an accel power supply capable of 170 kV, 70 A, 30 sec pulse length, 10% duty cycle; and the auxiliary power supplies required for the sources. This paper describes the major components, their ratings and capabilities, and the flexibility designed to accomodate the needs of source development

  6. Fun and games in Berkeley: the early years (1956-2013).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinoco, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    Life at Berkeley for the past 57 years involved research on the thermodynamics, kinetics, and spectroscopic properties of RNA to better understand its structures, interactions, and functions. We (myself and all the graduate students and postdocs who shared in the fun) began with dinucleoside phosphates and slowly worked our way up to megadalton-sized RNA molecular motors. We used UV absorption, circular dichroism, circular intensity differential scattering, fluorescence, NMR, and single-molecule methods. We learned a lot and had fun doing it.

  7. The LBL [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory] 1-2 GeV synchrotron radiation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornacchia, M.

    1987-03-01

    A description is presented of the conceptual design of the 1 to 2 GeV Synchrotron Radiation Source proposed for construction at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. This facility is designed to produce ultraviolet and soft x-ray radiation. The accelerator complex consists of an injection system (linac plus booster synchrotron) and a low-emittance storage ring optimized for insertion devices. Eleven straight sections are available for undulators and wigglers, and up to 48 photon beam lines may ultimately emanate from bending magnets. Design features of the radiation source are the high brightness of the photon beams, the very short pulses (tens of picoseconds), and the tunability of the radiation

  8. Public census data on CD-ROM at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merrill, D.W.

    1992-07-02

    In connection with the Comprehensive Epidemiologic Data Resource (CEDR) and Populations at Risk to Environmental Pollution (PAREP) projects, of the Information and Computing Sciences Division (ICSD) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), are using public socioeconomic and geographic data files which are available to CEDR and PAREP collaborators via LBL`s computing network. At this time 67 CD-ROM diskettes (approximately 35 gigabytes) are on line via the Unix file server cedrcd.lbl.gov. Most of the files are from the US Bureau of the Census, and most pertain to the 1990 Census of Population and Housing. This paper contains a list of the CD-ROMs available.

  9. Public census data on CD-ROM at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merrill, D.W.

    1992-07-02

    In connection with the Comprehensive Epidemiologic Data Resource (CEDR) and Populations at Risk to Environmental Pollution (PAREP) projects, of the Information and Computing Sciences Division (ICSD) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), are using public socioeconomic and geographic data files which are available to CEDR and PAREP collaborators via LBL's computing network. At this time 67 CD-ROM diskettes (approximately 35 gigabytes) are on line via the Unix file server cedrcd.lbl.gov. Most of the files are from the US Bureau of the Census, and most pertain to the 1990 Census of Population and Housing. This paper contains a list of the CD-ROMs available.

  10. Particle production in high energy nucleus--nucleus experiments at Berkeley

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, L.S.

    1976-09-01

    A review of high energy nucleus-nucleus experiments performed at the Berkeley Bevalac is presented. Earlier results on projectile and target fragmentation and pion production are briefly summarized. More recent results on Coulomb effects in projectile fragmentation, heavy ion total cross-sections, γ-ray production, and charged particle multiplicities are presented. Also, recent experiments which may shed light on phenomena arising from the central collision of two energetic nuclei, including recent evidence for and against the observation of nuclear shock waves, are reviewed

  11. vasa is expressed in somatic cells of the embryonic gonad in a sex-specific manner in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew D. Renault

    2012-08-01

    Vasa is a DEAD box helicase expressed in the Drosophila germline at all stages of development. vasa homologs are found widely in animals and vasa has become the gene of choice in identifying germ cells. I now show that Drosophila vasa expression is not restricted to the germline but is also expressed in a somatic lineage, the embryonic somatic gonadal precursor cells. This expression is sexually dimorphic, being maintained specifically in males, and is regulated post-transcriptionally. Although somatic Vasa expression is not required for gonad coalescence, these data support the notion that Vasa is not solely a germline factor.

  12. vasa is expressed in somatic cells of the embryonic gonad in a sex-specific manner in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renault, Andrew D

    2012-10-15

    Vasa is a DEAD box helicase expressed in the Drosophila germline at all stages of development. vasa homologs are found widely in animals and vasa has become the gene of choice in identifying germ cells. I now show that Drosophila vasa expression is not restricted to the germline but is also expressed in a somatic lineage, the embryonic somatic gonadal precursor cells. This expression is sexually dimorphic, being maintained specifically in males, and is regulated post-transcriptionally. Although somatic Vasa expression is not required for gonad coalescence, these data support the notion that Vasa is not solely a germline factor.

  13. A Drosophila wing spot test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayaki, Toshikazu; Yoshikawa, Isao; Niikawa, Norio; Hoshi, Masaharu.

    1986-01-01

    A Drosophila wing spot test system was used to investigate the effects of low doses of X-rays, gamma rays, and both 2.3 and 14.1 MeV neutrons on somatic chromosome mutation (SCM) induction. The incidence of SCM was significantly increased with any type of radiation, with evident linear dose-response relationship within the range of 3 to 20 cGy. It was estimated that relative biological effectiveness value for SCM induction of 2.3 MeV neutrons to X-rays and gamma rays is much higher than that of 14.1 MeV neutrons to those photons (2.4 vs 8.0). The Drosophila wing spot test system seems to become a promising in vivo experimental method for higher animals in terms of the lack of necessity for a marvelously large number of materials required in conventional test system. (Namekawa, K.)

  14. Limited taste discrimination in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masek, Pavel; Scott, Kristin

    2010-08-17

    In the gustatory systems of mammals and flies, different populations of sensory cells recognize different taste modalities, such that there are cells that respond selectively to sugars and others to bitter compounds. This organization readily allows animals to distinguish compounds of different modalities but may limit the ability to distinguish compounds within one taste modality. Here, we developed a behavioral paradigm in Drosophila melanogaster to evaluate directly the tastes that a fly distinguishes. These studies reveal that flies do not discriminate among different sugars, or among different bitter compounds, based on chemical identity. Instead, flies show a limited ability to distinguish compounds within a modality based on intensity or palatability. Taste associative learning, similar to olfactory learning, requires the mushroom bodies, suggesting fundamental similarities in brain mechanisms underlying behavioral plasticity. Overall, these studies provide insight into the discriminative capacity of the Drosophila gustatory system and the modulation of taste behavior.

  15. Functions of the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay pathway in Drosophila development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark M Metzstein

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD is a cellular surveillance mechanism that degrades transcripts containing premature translation termination codons, and it also influences expression of certain wild-type transcripts. Although the biochemical mechanisms of NMD have been studied intensively, its developmental functions and importance are less clear. Here, we describe the isolation and characterization of Drosophila "photoshop" mutations, which increase expression of green fluorescent protein and other transgenes. Mapping and molecular analyses show that photoshop mutations are loss-of-function mutations in the Drosophila homologs of NMD genes Upf1, Upf2, and Smg1. We find that Upf1 and Upf2 are broadly active during development, and they are required for NMD as well as for proper expression of dozens of wild-type genes during development and for larval viability. Genetic mosaic analysis shows that Upf1 and Upf2 are required for growth and/or survival of imaginal cell clones, but this defect can be overcome if surrounding wild-type cells are eliminated. By contrast, we find that the PI3K-related kinase Smg1 potentiates but is not required for NMD or for viability, implying that the Upf1 phosphorylation cycle that is required for mammalian and Caenorhabditis elegans NMD has a more limited role during Drosophila development. Finally, we show that the SV40 3' UTR, present in many Drosophila transgenes, targets the transgenes for regulation by the NMD pathway. The results establish that the Drosophila NMD pathway is broadly active and essential for development, and one critical function of the pathway is to endow proliferating imaginal cells with a competitive growth advantage that prevents them from being overtaken by other proliferating cells.

  16. Forkhead-box transcription factors and their role in the immune system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coffer, PJ; Burgering, BMT

    2004-01-01

    It is more than a decade since the discovery of the first forkhead-box (FOX) transcription factor in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. In the intervening time, there has been an explosion in the identification and characterization of members of this family of proteins. Importantly, in the past

  17. Studies on Drosophila radiosensitive strains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varentsova, E.P.; Zakharov, I.A.

    1976-01-01

    45 of radiosensitive strains of Drosophila melanogaster were isolated by Curly/Lobe technique after EMS treatment of Livadia population males. The lethality of non-Curly late larvae after gamma-irradiation (4000r) characterized radiosensitivity strains. Most of them exhibited higher frequency of the spontaneous dominant lethals (up to 69%). The males of 6 strains were semi-sterile. 5 of these strains exhibited higher frequency of X-chromosome non-disjunction

  18. Olfactory memory traces in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Berry, Jacob; Krause, William C.; Davis, Ronald L.

    2008-01-01

    In Drosophila the fruit fly, coincident exposure to an odor and an aversive electric shock can produce robust behavioral memory. This behavioral memory is thought to be regulated by cellular memory traces within the central nervous system of the fly. These molecular, physiological or structural changes in neurons, induced by pairing odor and shock, regulate behavior by altering the neurons’ response to the learned environment. Recently, novel in vivo functional imaging techniques have allowed...

  19. Large-scale discovery of promoter motifs in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas A Down

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A key step in understanding gene regulation is to identify the repertoire of transcription factor binding motifs (TFBMs that form the building blocks of promoters and other regulatory elements. Identifying these experimentally is very laborious, and the number of TFBMs discovered remains relatively small, especially when compared with the hundreds of transcription factor genes predicted in metazoan genomes. We have used a recently developed statistical motif discovery approach, NestedMICA, to detect candidate TFBMs from a large set of Drosophila melanogaster promoter regions. Of the 120 motifs inferred in our initial analysis, 25 were statistically significant matches to previously reported motifs, while 87 appeared to be novel. Analysis of sequence conservation and motif positioning suggested that the great majority of these discovered motifs are predictive of functional elements in the genome. Many motifs showed associations with specific patterns of gene expression in the D. melanogaster embryo, and we were able to obtain confident annotation of expression patterns for 25 of our motifs, including eight of the novel motifs. The motifs are available through Tiffin, a new database of DNA sequence motifs. We have discovered many new motifs that are overrepresented in D. melanogaster promoter regions, and offer several independent lines of evidence that these are novel TFBMs. Our motif dictionary provides a solid foundation for further investigation of regulatory elements in Drosophila, and demonstrates techniques that should be applicable in other species. We suggest that further improvements in computational motif discovery should narrow the gap between the set of known motifs and the total number of transcription factors in metazoan genomes.

  20. JAK/Stat signaling regulates heart precursor diversification in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Aaron N.; Mokalled, Mayssa H.; Haden, Tom N.; Olson, Eric N.

    2011-01-01

    Intercellular signal transduction pathways regulate the NK-2 family of transcription factors in a conserved gene regulatory network that directs cardiogenesis in both flies and mammals. The Drosophila NK-2 protein Tinman (Tin) was recently shown to regulate Stat92E, the Janus kinase (JAK) and Signal transducer and activator of transcription (Stat) pathway effector, in the developing mesoderm. To understand whether the JAK/Stat pathway also regulates cardiogenesis, we performed a systematic characterization of JAK/Stat signaling during mesoderm development. Drosophila embryos with mutations in the JAK/Stat ligand upd or in Stat92E have non-functional hearts with luminal defects and inappropriate cell aggregations. Using strong Stat92E loss-of-function alleles, we show that the JAK/Stat pathway regulates tin expression prior to heart precursor cell diversification. tin expression can be subdivided into four phases and, in Stat92E mutant embryos, the broad phase 2 expression pattern in the dorsal mesoderm does not restrict to the constrained phase 3 pattern. These embryos also have an expanded pericardial cell domain. We show the E(spl)-C gene HLHm5 is expressed in a pattern complementary to tin during phase 3 and that this expression is JAK/Stat dependent. In addition, E(spl)-C mutant embryos phenocopy the cardiac defects of Stat92E embryos. Mechanistically, JAK/Stat signals activate E(spl)-C genes to restrict Tin expression and the subsequent expression of the T-box transcription factor H15 to direct heart precursor diversification. This study is the first to characterize a role for the JAK/Stat pathway during cardiogenesis and identifies an autoregulatory circuit in which tin limits its own expression domain. PMID:21965617

  1. Environmental health-risk assessment for tritium releases at the National Tritium Labeling Facility at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKone, T.E.; Brand, K.P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Health and Ecological Assessment Div.; Shan, C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div.

    1997-04-01

    This risk assessment calculates the probability of experiencing health effects, including cancer incidence due to tritium exposure for three groups of people: (1) LBNL workers near the LBNL facility--Building 75--that uses tritium; (2) other workers at LBNL and nearby neighbors; and (3) people who use the UC Berkeley campus area, and some Berkeley residents. All of these groups share the same probability of health effects from the background radiation from natural sources in the Berkeley area environment, including an increased risk of developing a cancer of 11,000 chances per million. In calculating risk the authors assumed continuous operation in Building 75 for at least a human lifetime. Under this assumption, LBNL workers located near Building 75 have an additional risk of 60 chances out of one million to suffer a cancer; other workers at LBNL and people who live near LBNL have an additional risk of six chances out of one million over a lifetime of exposure; and users of the UC Berkeley campus area and other residents of Berkeley have an additional risk of less than once chance out of one million over a lifetime.

  2. Environmental health-risk assessment for tritium releases at the National Tritium Labeling Facility at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKone, T.E.; Brand, K.P.; Shan, C.

    1997-04-01

    This risk assessment calculates the probability of experiencing health effects, including cancer incidence due to tritium exposure for three groups of people: (1) LBNL workers near the LBNL facility--Building 75--that uses tritium; (2) other workers at LBNL and nearby neighbors; and (3) people who use the UC Berkeley campus area, and some Berkeley residents. All of these groups share the same probability of health effects from the background radiation from natural sources in the Berkeley area environment, including an increased risk of developing a cancer of 11,000 chances per million. In calculating risk the authors assumed continuous operation in Building 75 for at least a human lifetime. Under this assumption, LBNL workers located near Building 75 have an additional risk of 60 chances out of one million to suffer a cancer; other workers at LBNL and people who live near LBNL have an additional risk of six chances out of one million over a lifetime of exposure; and users of the UC Berkeley campus area and other residents of Berkeley have an additional risk of less than once chance out of one million over a lifetime

  3. Drosophila: Retrotransposons Making up Telomeres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casacuberta, Elena

    2017-07-19

    Drosophila and extant species are the best-studied telomerase exception. In this organism, telomere elongation is coupled with targeted retrotransposition of Healing Transposon (HeT-A) and Telomere Associated Retrotransposon (TART) with sporadic additions of Telomere Associated and HeT-A Related (TAHRE), all three specialized non-Long Terminal Repeat (non-LTR) retrotransposons. These three very special retroelements transpose in head to tail arrays, always in the same orientation at the end of the chromosomes but never in interior locations. Apparently, retrotransposon and telomerase telomeres might seem very different, but a detailed view of their mechanisms reveals similarities explaining how the loss of telomerase in a Drosophila ancestor could successfully have been replaced by the telomere retrotransposons. In this review, we will discover that although HeT-A, TART, and TAHRE are still the only examples to date where their targeted transposition is perfectly tamed into the telomere biology of Drosophila, there are other examples of retrotransposons that manage to successfully integrate inside and at the end of telomeres. Because the aim of this special issue is viral integration at telomeres, understanding the base of the telomerase exceptions will help to obtain clues on similar strategies that mobile elements and viruses could have acquired in order to ensure their survival in the host genome.

  4. Optogenetic pacing in Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alex, Aneesh; Li, Airong; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Zhou, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Electrical stimulation is currently the gold standard for cardiac pacing. However, it is invasive and nonspecific for cardiac tissues. We recently developed a noninvasive cardiac pacing technique using optogenetic tools, which are widely used in neuroscience. Optogenetic pacing of the heart provides high spatial and temporal precisions, is specific for cardiac tissues, avoids artifacts associated with electrical stimulation, and therefore promises to be a powerful tool in basic cardiac research. We demonstrated optogenetic control of heart rhythm in a well-established model organism, Drosophila melanogaster. We developed transgenic flies expressing a light-gated cation channel, channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2), specifically in their hearts and demonstrated successful optogenetic pacing of ChR2-expressing Drosophila at different developmental stages, including the larva, pupa, and adult stages. A high-speed and ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence microscopy imaging system that is capable of providing images at a rate of 130 frames/s with axial and transverse resolutions of 1.5 and 3.9 μm, respectively, was used to noninvasively monitor Drosophila cardiac function and its response to pacing stimulation. The development of a noninvasive integrated optical pacing and imaging system provides a novel platform for performing research studies in developmental cardiology. PMID:26601299

  5. 'Peer pressure' in larval Drosophila?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niewalda, Thomas; Jeske, Ines; Michels, Birgit; Gerber, Bertram

    2014-06-06

    Understanding social behaviour requires a study case that is simple enough to be tractable, yet complex enough to remain interesting. Do larval Drosophila meet these requirements? In a broad sense, this question can refer to effects of the mere presence of other larvae on the behaviour of a target individual. Here we focused in a more strict sense on 'peer pressure', that is on the question of whether the behaviour of a target individual larva is affected by what a surrounding group of larvae is doing. We found that innate olfactory preference of a target individual was neither affected (i) by the level of innate olfactory preference in the surrounding group nor (ii) by the expression of learned olfactory preference in the group. Likewise, learned olfactory preference of a target individual was neither affected (iii) by the level of innate olfactory preference of the surrounding group nor (iv) by the learned olfactory preference the group was expressing. We conclude that larval Drosophila thus do not take note of specifically what surrounding larvae are doing. This implies that in a strict sense, and to the extent tested, there is no social interaction between larvae. These results validate widely used en mass approaches to the behaviour of larval Drosophila. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  6. Quantification of Drosophila Grooming Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barradale, Francesca; Sinha, Kairav; Lebestky, Tim

    2017-07-19

    Drosophila grooming behavior is a complex multi-step locomotor program that requires coordinated movement of both forelegs and hindlegs. Here we present a grooming assay protocol and novel chamber design that is cost-efficient and scalable for either small or large-scale studies of Drosophila grooming. Flies are dusted all over their body with Brilliant Yellow dye and given time to remove the dye from their bodies within the chamber. Flies are then deposited in a set volume of ethanol to solubilize the dye. The relative spectral absorbance of dye-ethanol samples for groomed versus ungroomed animals are measured and recorded. The protocol yields quantitative data of dye accumulation for individual flies, which can be easily averaged and compared across samples. This allows experimental designs to easily evaluate grooming ability for mutant animal studies or circuit manipulations. This efficient procedure is both versatile and scalable. We show work-flow of the protocol and comparative data between WT animals and mutant animals for the Drosophila type I Dopamine Receptor (DopR).

  7. Nuclear materials teaching and research at the University of California, Berkeley

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olander, D.R.; Roberts, J.T.A.

    1985-01-01

    In academic nuclear engineering departments, research and teaching in the specialized subdiscipline of nuclear materials is usually a one-person or at best a two-person operation. These subcritical sizes invariably result in inadequate overall representation of the many topics in nuclear materials in the research program of the department, although broader coverage of the field is possible in course offerings. Even in course-work, the full range of materials problems important in nuclear technology cannot be dealt with in detail because the small number of faculty involved restricts staffing to as little as a single summary course and generally no more than three courses in this specialty. The contents of the two nuclear materials courses taught at the University of California at Berkeley are listed. Materials research in most US nuclear engineering departments focuses on irradiation effects on metals, but at UC Berkeley, the principal interest is in the high-temperature materials chemistry of UO 2 fuel and Zircaloy cladding

  8. Installation and experimental uses of RTNS-I at the University of California, Berkeley

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belian, A.P.; Morse, E.C.; Tobin, M.

    1996-01-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) features optical components with line-of-sight access to the 14 MeV neutrons generated by fusion reactions in the target. Two of these components are a final focusing lens, made of fused silica, and a frequency conversion crystal comprised of two potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystals. The Rotating Target Neutron Source (RTNS-I), which was previously operated at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), has now been re-installed at UC Berkeley and is being used for the studies of neutron irradiation of fused silica and KDP. The machine has been installed so as to re-utilize the concrete structure that once housed the Berkeley Research Reactor, now decommissioned. The RTNS uses a 2 - 5 mA beam of deuterons impinging upon a spinning internally cooled tritiated copper target with a 110 Ci tritium inventory. Maximum beam energy is 399 KeV. The 14 MeV neutron production rate is 1.0x10 12 n/sec. Some new features of the machine include fiber-optic coupled microprocessor control of accelerator parameters, a cryogenic tritium collection system, and a scrubber system for exhaust tritium management. 15 refs., 4 figs

  9. Catalog of Research Abstracts, 1993: Partnership opportunities at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    The 1993 edition of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory`s Catalog of Research Abstracts is a comprehensive listing of ongoing research projects in LBL`s ten research divisions. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is a major multi-program national laboratory managed by the University of California for the US Department of Energy (DOE). LBL has more than 3000 employees, including over 1000 scientists and engineers. With an annual budget of approximately $250 million, LBL conducts a wide range of research activities, many that address the long-term needs of American industry and have the potential for a positive impact on US competitiveness. LBL actively seeks to share its expertise with the private sector to increase US competitiveness in world markets. LBL has transferable expertise in conservation and renewable energy, environmental remediation, materials sciences, computing sciences, and biotechnology, which includes fundamental genetic research and nuclear medicine. This catalog gives an excellent overview of LBL`s expertise, and is a good resource for those seeking partnerships with national laboratories. Such partnerships allow private enterprise access to the exceptional scientific and engineering capabilities of the federal laboratory systems. Such arrangements also leverage the research and development resources of the private partner. Most importantly, they are a means of accessing the cutting-edge technologies and innovations being discovered every day in our federal laboratories.

  10. Cryptocephal, the Drosophila melanogaster ATF4, is a specific coactivator for ecdysone receptor isoform B2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastien A Gauthier

    Full Text Available The ecdysone receptor is a heterodimer of two nuclear receptors, the Ecdysone receptor (EcR and Ultraspiracle (USP. In Drosophila melanogaster, three EcR isoforms share common DNA and ligand-binding domains, but these proteins differ in their most N-terminal regions and, consequently, in the activation domains (AF1s contained therein. The transcriptional coactivators for these domains, which impart unique transcriptional regulatory properties to the EcR isoforms, are unknown. Activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4 is a basic-leucine zipper transcription factor that plays a central role in the stress response of mammals. Here we show that Cryptocephal (CRC, the Drosophila homolog of ATF4, is an ecdysone receptor coactivator that is specific for isoform B2. CRC interacts with EcR-B2 to promote ecdysone-dependent expression of ecdysis-triggering hormone (ETH, an essential regulator of insect molting behavior. We propose that this interaction explains some of the differences in transcriptional properties that are displayed by the EcR isoforms, and similar interactions may underlie the differential activities of other nuclear receptors with distinct AF1-coactivators.

  11. Radioresistance and radiosensitivity in Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reguly, M.L.

    1983-01-01

    Studying the mechanisms controlling radioresistant in Drosophila the sensibility of four strains of Drosophila melanogaster to sex-linked recessive lethal mutations induced by 5kR Cobalt-60 gamma radiation and 0,006 M EMS or 0,25% of caffeine was determined. (M.A.C.) [pt

  12. The Drosophila melanogaster circadian pacemaker circuit

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... Keywords. circadian rhythm; neuronal network; ion channel; behaviour; neurotransmitter; electrophysiology; Drosophila. Abstract. As an experimental model system, the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has been seminal in shaping our understanding of the circadian clockwork. The wealth of genetic tools ...

  13. Environmental assessment for the recycling of slightly activated copper coil windings from the 184-Inch Cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-08-02

    The proposed action is to recycle slightly activated copper that is currently stored in a warehouse leased by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) to a scrap metal dealer. Subsequent reutilization of the copper would be unrestricted. This document addresses the potential environmental effects of recycling and reutilizing the activated copper. In addition, the potential environmental effects of possible future uses by the dealer are addressed. Direct environmental effects from the proposed action are assessed, such as air emissions from reprocessing the activated copper, as well as indirect beneficial effects, such as averting air emissions that would result from mining and smelting an equivalent quantity of copper ore. Evaluation of the human health impacts of the proposed action focuses on the pertinent issues of radiological doses and protection of workers and the public. Five alternatives to the proposed action are considered, and their associated potential impacts are addressed. The no-action alternative is the continued storage of the activated copper at the LBL warehouse. Two recycling alternatives are considered: recycling the activated copper at the Scientific Ecology Group (SEG) facility for re-use at a DOE facility and selling or giving the activated copper to a foreign government. In addition, two disposal alternatives evaluate the impacts attributable to disposing of the activated copper either at a local sanitary landfill or at the Hanford Low-Level Waste Burial Site. The proposed project and alternatives include no new construction or development of new industry.

  14. Comparative genomic analysis of Drosophila melanogaster and vector mosquito developmental genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanta K Behura

    Full Text Available Genome sequencing projects have presented the opportunity for analysis of developmental genes in three vector mosquito species: Aedes aegypti, Culex quinquefasciatus, and Anopheles gambiae. A comparative genomic analysis of developmental genes in Drosophila melanogaster and these three important vectors of human disease was performed in this investigation. While the study was comprehensive, special emphasis centered on genes that 1 are components of developmental signaling pathways, 2 regulate fundamental developmental processes, 3 are critical for the development of tissues of vector importance, 4 function in developmental processes known to have diverged within insects, and 5 encode microRNAs (miRNAs that regulate developmental transcripts in Drosophila. While most fruit fly developmental genes are conserved in the three vector mosquito species, several genes known to be critical for Drosophila development were not identified in one or more mosquito genomes. In other cases, mosquito lineage-specific gene gains with respect to D. melanogaster were noted. Sequence analyses also revealed that numerous repetitive sequences are a common structural feature of Drosophila and mosquito developmental genes. Finally, analysis of predicted miRNA binding sites in fruit fly and mosquito developmental genes suggests that the repertoire of developmental genes targeted by miRNAs is species-specific. The results of this study provide insight into the evolution of developmental genes and processes in dipterans and other arthropods, serve as a resource for those pursuing analysis of mosquito development, and will promote the design and refinement of functional analysis experiments.

  15. Toll-8/Tollo negatively regulates antimicrobial response in the Drosophila respiratory epithelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idir Akhouayri

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Barrier epithelia that are persistently exposed to microbes have evolved potent immune tools to eliminate such pathogens. If mechanisms that control Drosophila systemic responses are well-characterized, the epithelial immune responses remain poorly understood. Here, we performed a genetic dissection of the cascades activated during the immune response of the Drosophila airway epithelium i.e. trachea. We present evidence that bacteria induced-antimicrobial peptide (AMP production in the trachea is controlled by two signalling cascades. AMP gene transcription is activated by the inducible IMD pathway that acts non-cell autonomously in trachea. This IMD-dependent AMP activation is antagonized by a constitutively active signalling module involving the receptor Toll-8/Tollo, the ligand Spätzle2/DNT1 and Ect-4, the Drosophila ortholog of the human Sterile alpha and HEAT/ARMadillo motif (SARM. Our data show that, in addition to Toll-1 whose function is essential during the systemic immune response, Drosophila relies on another Toll family member to control the immune response in the respiratory epithelium.

  16. The gene transformer-2 of Sciara (Diptera, Nematocera) and its effect on Drosophila sexual development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Iker; Ruiz, María F; Sánchez, Lucas

    2011-03-15

    The gene transformer-2, which is involved in sex determination, has been studied in Drosophila, Musca, Ceratitis, Anastrepha and Lucilia. All these members of Diptera belong to the suborder Brachycera. In this work, it is reported the isolation and characterisation of genes transformer-2 of the dipterans Sciara ocellaris and Bradysia coprophila (formerly Sciara coprophila), which belong to the much less extensively analysed Sciaridae Family of the Suborder Nematocera, which is paraphyletic with respect to Suborder Brachycera. The transformer-2 genes of the studied Sciara species were found to be transcribed in both sexes during development and adult life, in both the soma and germ lines. They produced a single primary transcript, which follows the same alternative splicing in both sexes, giving rise to different mRNAs isoforms. In S. ocellaris the most abundant mRNA isoform encoded a full-length protein of 251 amino acids, while that of B. coprophila encoded a protein of 246 amino acids. Both showed the features of the SR protein family. The less significant mRNA isoforms of both species encoded truncated, presumably non-functional Transformer-2 proteins. The comparison of the functional Sciara Transformer-2 proteins among themselves and those of other insects revealed the greatest degree of conservation in the RRM domain and linker region. In contrast, the RS1 and RS2 domains showed extensive variation with respect to their number of amino acids and their arginine-serine (RS) dipeptide content. The expression of S. ocellaris Transformer-2 protein in Drosophila XX pseudomales lacking the endogenous transformer-2 function caused their partial feminisation. The transformer-2 genes of both Sciaridae species encode a single protein in both sexes that shares the characteristics of the Transformer-2 proteins of other insects. These proteins showed conserved sex-determination function in Drosophila; i.e., they were able to form a complex with the endogenous Drosophila

  17. A potential role for Drosophila mucins in development and physiology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulfeqhar A Syed

    Full Text Available Vital vertebrate organs are protected from the external environment by a barrier that to a large extent consists of mucins. These proteins are characterized by poorly conserved repeated sequences that are rich in prolines and potentially glycosylated threonines and serines (PTS. We have now used the characteristics of the PTS repeat domain to identify Drosophila mucins in a simple bioinformatics approach. Searching the predicted protein database for proteins with at least 4 repeats and a high ST content, more than 30 mucin-like proteins were identified, ranging from 300-23000 amino acids in length. We find that Drosophila mucins are present at all stages of the fly life cycle, and that their transcripts localize to selective organs analogous to sites of vertebrate mucin expression. The results could allow for addressing basic questions about human mucin-related diseases in this model system. Additionally, many of the mucins are expressed in selective tissues during embryogenesis, thus revealing new potential functions for mucins as apical matrix components during organ morphogenesis.

  18. Lineage tracing of lamellocytes demonstrates Drosophila macrophage plasticity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Stofanko

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Leukocyte-like cells called hemocytes have key functions in Drosophila innate immunity. Three hemocyte types occur: plasmatocytes, crystal cells, and lamellocytes. In the absence of qimmune challenge, plasmatocytes are the predominant hemocyte type detected, while crystal cells and lamellocytes are rare. However, upon infestation by parasitic wasps, or in melanotic mutant strains, large numbers of lamellocytes differentiate and encapsulate material recognized as "non-self". Current models speculate that lamellocytes, plasmatocytes and crystal cells are distinct lineages that arise from a common prohemocyte progenitor. We show here that over-expression of the CoREST-interacting transcription factor Chn in plasmatocytes induces lamellocyte differentiation, both in circulation and in lymph glands. Lamellocyte increases are accompanied by the extinction of plasmatocyte markers suggesting that plasmatocytes are transformed into lamellocytes. Consistent with this, timed induction of Chn over-expression induces rapid lamellocyte differentiation within 18 hours. We detect double-positive intermediates between plasmatocytes and lamellocytes, and show that isolated plasmatocytes can be triggered to differentiate into lamellocytes in vitro, either in response to Chn over-expression, or following activation of the JAK/STAT pathway. Finally, we have marked plasmatocytes and show by lineage tracing that these differentiate into lamellocytes in response to the Drosophila parasite model Leptopilina boulardi. Taken together, our data suggest that lamellocytes arise from plasmatocytes and that plasmatocytes may be inherently plastic, possessing the ability to differentiate further into lamellocytes upon appropriate challenge.

  19. Obp56h Modulates Mating Behavior in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John R. Shorter

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Social interactions in insects are driven by conspecific chemical signals that are detected via olfactory and gustatory neurons. Odorant binding proteins (Obps transport volatile odorants to chemosensory receptors, but their effects on behaviors remain poorly characterized. Here, we report that RNAi knockdown of Obp56h gene expression in Drosophila melanogaster enhances mating behavior by reducing courtship latency. The change in mating behavior that results from inhibition of Obp56h expression is accompanied by significant alterations in cuticular hydrocarbon (CHC composition, including reduction in 5-tricosene (5-T, an inhibitory sex pheromone produced by males that increases copulation latency during courtship. Whole genome RNA sequencing confirms that expression of Obp56h is virtually abolished in Drosophila heads. Inhibition of Obp56h expression also affects expression of other chemoreception genes, including upregulation of lush in both sexes and Obp83ef in females, and reduction in expression of Obp19b and Or19b in males. In addition, several genes associated with lipid metabolism, which underlies the production of cuticular hydrocarbons, show altered transcript abundances. Our data show that modulation of mating behavior through reduction of Obp56h is accompanied by altered cuticular hydrocarbon profiles and implicate 5-T as a possible ligand for Obp56h.

  20. Two distinct mechanisms silence chinmo in Drosophila neuroblasts and neuroepithelial cells to limit their self-renewal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillard, Caroline; Narbonne-Reveau, Karine; Foppolo, Sophie; Lanet, Elodie; Maurange, Cédric

    2018-01-25

    Whether common principles regulate the self-renewing potential of neural stem cells (NSCs) throughout the developing central nervous system is still unclear. In the Drosophila ventral nerve cord and central brain, asymmetrically dividing NSCs, called neuroblasts (NBs), progress through a series of sequentially expressed transcription factors that limits self-renewal by silencing a genetic module involving the transcription factor Chinmo. Here, we find that Chinmo also promotes neuroepithelium growth in the optic lobe during early larval stages by boosting symmetric self-renewing divisions while preventing differentiation. Neuroepithelium differentiation in late larvae requires the transcriptional silencing of chinmo by ecdysone, the main steroid hormone, therefore allowing coordination of neural stem cell self-renewal with organismal growth. In contrast, chinmo silencing in NBs is post-transcriptional and does not require ecdysone. Thus, during Drosophila development, humoral cues or tissue-intrinsic temporal specification programs respectively limit self-renewal in different types of neural progenitors through the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of the same transcription factor. © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  1. Drosophila CTCF tandemly aligns with other insulator proteins at the borders of H3K27me3 domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bortle, Kevin; Ramos, Edward; Takenaka, Naomi; Yang, Jingping; Wahi, Jessica E; Corces, Victor G

    2012-11-01

    Several multiprotein DNA complexes capable of insulator activity have been identified in Drosophila melanogaster, yet only CTCF, a highly conserved zinc finger protein, and the transcription factor TFIIIC have been shown to function in mammals. CTCF is involved in diverse nuclear activities, and recent studies suggest that the proteins with which it associates and the DNA sequences that it targets may underlie these various roles. Here we show that the Drosophila homolog of CTCF (dCTCF) aligns in the genome with other Drosophila insulator proteins such as Suppressor of Hairy wing [SU(HW)] and Boundary Element Associated Factor of 32 kDa (BEAF-32) at the borders of H3K27me3 domains, which are also enriched for associated insulator proteins and additional cofactors. RNAi depletion of dCTCF and combinatorial knockdown of gene expression for other Drosophila insulator proteins leads to a reduction in H3K27me3 levels within repressed domains, suggesting that insulators are important for the maintenance of appropriate repressive chromatin structure in Polycomb (Pc) domains. These results shed new insights into the roles of insulators in chromatin domain organization and support recent models suggesting that insulators underlie interactions important for Pc-mediated repression. We reveal an important relationship between dCTCF and other Drosophila insulator proteins and speculate that vertebrate CTCF may also align with other nuclear proteins to accomplish similar functions.

  2. Sex chromosome-specific regulation in the Drosophila male germline but little evidence for chromosomal dosage compensation or meiotic inactivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin D Meiklejohn

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of heteromorphic sex chromosomes (e.g., XY in males or ZW in females has repeatedly elicited the evolution of two kinds of chromosome-specific regulation: dosage compensation--the equalization of X chromosome gene expression in males and females--and meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI--the transcriptional silencing and heterochromatinization of the X during meiosis in the male (or Z in the female germline. How the X chromosome is regulated in the Drosophila melanogaster male germline is unclear. Here we report three new findings concerning gene expression from the X in Drosophila testes. First, X chromosome-wide dosage compensation appears to be absent from most of the Drosophila male germline. Second, microarray analysis provides no evidence for X chromosome-specific inactivation during meiosis. Third, we confirm the previous discovery that the expression of transgene reporters driven by autosomal spermatogenesis-specific promoters is strongly reduced when inserted on the X chromosome versus the autosomes; but we show that this chromosomal difference in expression is established in premeiotic cells and persists in meiotic cells. The magnitude of the X-autosome difference in transgene expression cannot be explained by the absence of dosage compensation, suggesting that a previously unrecognized mechanism limits expression from the X during spermatogenesis in Drosophila. These findings help to resolve several previously conflicting reports and have implications for patterns of genome evolution and speciation in Drosophila.

  3. Insulators form gene loops by interacting with promoters in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erokhin, Maksim; Davydova, Anna; Kyrchanova, Olga; Parshikov, Alexander; Georgiev, Pavel; Chetverina, Darya

    2011-09-01

    Chromatin insulators are regulatory elements involved in the modulation of enhancer-promoter communication. The 1A2 and Wari insulators are located immediately downstream of the Drosophila yellow and white genes, respectively. Using an assay based on the yeast GAL4 activator, we have found that both insulators are able to interact with their target promoters in transgenic lines, forming gene loops. The existence of an insulator-promoter loop is confirmed by the fact that insulator proteins could be detected on the promoter only in the presence of an insulator in the transgene. The upstream promoter regions, which are required for long-distance stimulation by enhancers, are not essential for promoter-insulator interactions. Both insulators support basal activity of the yellow and white promoters in eyes. Thus, the ability of insulators to interact with promoters might play an important role in the regulation of basal gene transcription.

  4. HDAC Inhibitors Disrupt Programmed Resistance to Apoptosis During Drosophila Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunsik Kang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We have previously shown that the ability to respond to apoptotic triggers is regulated during Drosophila development, effectively dividing the fly life cycle into stages that are either sensitive or resistant to apoptosis. Here, we show that the developmentally programmed resistance to apoptosis involves transcriptional repression of critical proapoptotic genes by histone deacetylases (HDACs. Administration of HDAC inhibitors (HDACi, like trichostatin A or suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid, increases expression of proapoptotic genes and is sufficient to sensitize otherwise resistant stages. Conversely, reducing levels of proapoptotic genes confers resistance to otherwise sensitive stages. Given that resistance to apoptosis is a hallmark of cancer cells, and that HDACi have been recently added to the repertoire of FDA-approved agents for cancer therapy, our results provide new insights for how HDACi help kill malignant cells and also raise concerns for their potential unintended effects on healthy cells.

  5. Myc-dependent genome instability and lifespan in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Greer

    Full Text Available The Myc family of transcription factors are key regulators of cell growth and proliferation that are dysregulated in a large number of human cancers. When overexpressed, Myc family proteins also cause genomic instability, a hallmark of both transformed and aging cells. Using an in vivo lacZ mutation reporter, we show that overexpression of Myc in Drosophila increases the frequency of large genome rearrangements associated with erroneous repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs. In addition, we find that overexpression of Myc shortens adult lifespan and, conversely, that Myc haploinsufficiency reduces mutation load and extends lifespan. Our data provide the first evidence that Myc may act as a pro-aging factor, possibly through its ability to greatly increase genome instability.

  6. Cloning of a postreplication repair gene in Drosophila

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banga, S.S.; Yamamoto, A.H.; Mason, J.M.; Boyd, J.B.

    1987-01-01

    Mutants at the mei-41 locus in Drosophila are strongly hypersensitive to each of eight tested mutagens. Mutant flies exhibit reduced meiotic recombination and elevated levels of chromosomal aberrations. In analogy with the defect in xeroderma pigmentosum variant cells, mei-41 cells are strongly defective in postreplication repair following UV radiation. In preparation for cloning that gene they have performed complementation studies between chromosomal aberrations and mei-41 mutants. That study has localized the mei-41 gene to polytene chromosome bands 14C4-6. A chromosomal walk conducted in that region has recovered about 65 kb of contiguous DNA sequence. The position of the mei-41 gene within that region has been established with the aid of a mutation in that gene which was generated by the insertion of a transposable element. Transcription mapping is being employed to define the complete coding region of the gene in preparation for investigations of gene function

  7. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1995 site environmental report: Volume 2, Data appendix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-07-01

    Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory presents Volume II, Data Appendix as a reference document to supplement the 1995 Site Environmental Report. Volume II contains the raw environmental monitoring and sampling data used to generate many of the summary results included in the main report. Supplemental data is provided for sitewide activities involving the media of stack and ambient air quality, rainwater, surface water, stormwater, wastewater, and soil and sediment. Volume II also contains supplemental data on the special preoperational monitoring study for the new Hazardous Waste Handling Facility. The Table of Contents provides a cross-reference to the data tables of the main report and this appendix. Data are given in System International (SI) units

  8. An injector for the proposed Berkeley Ultrafast X-Ray Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lidia, Steven; Corlett, John; Pusina, Jan; Staples, John; Zholents, Alexander

    2003-01-01

    Berkeley Lab has proposed to build a recirculating linac based X-ray source for ultra-fast dynamic studies [1]. This machine requires a flat electron beam with a small vertical emittance and large x/y emittance ratio to allow for compression of spontaneous undulator emission of soft and hard x-ray pulses, and a low-emittance, round electron beam for coherent emission of soft x-rays via the FEL process based on cascaded harmonic generation [2]. We propose an injector system consisting of two high gradient high repetition rate photo cathode guns [3] (one for each application), an ∼120 MeV super conducting linear accelerator, a 3rd harmonic cavity for linearization of the longitudinal phase space, and a bunch compressor. We present details of the design and the results of particle tracking studies using several computer codes

  9. Interviews with Michael Baxandall, February 3rd and 4th, 1994, Berkeley, CA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan Langdale

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The following interviews with Michael Baxandall were conducted in Berkeley on February 3rd and 4th of 1994. The content of these interviews include general responses about developments in art history in the years between 1960 and 1985, a period of dramatic modifications in the discipline. Among the issues are the rise of the social history of art and the sources from anthropology that informed Baxandall’s concept of the ‘Period Eye’. Baxandall talks about his own work, his personal intellectual history, and the scholars of past and current generations who influenced him. Other topics include Baxandall’s professional trajectory, the Warburg Library, and aspects of cultural history having to do with Renaissance Humanism. These interviews first appeared as an appendix to the PhD dissertation by Allan Langdale, Art History and Intellectual History: Michael Baxandall’s Work between 1963 and 1985, U. C. Santa Barbara, 1995.

  10. Stability of the Zagreb realization of the Carnegie-Mellon-Berkeley coupled-channels unitary model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osmanović, H.; Ceci, S.; Švarc, A.; Hadžimehmedović, M.; Stahov, J.

    2011-09-01

    In Hadžimehmedović [Phys. Rev. CPRVCAN0556-281310.1103/PhysRevC.84.035204 84, 035204 (2011)] we have used the Zagreb realization of Carnegie-Melon-Berkeley coupled-channel, unitary model as a tool for extracting pole positions from the world collection of partial-wave data, with the aim of eliminating model dependence in pole-search procedures. In order that the method is sensible, we in this paper discuss the stability of the method with respect to the strong variation of different model ingredients. We show that the Zagreb CMB procedure is very stable with strong variation of the model assumptions and that it can reliably predict the pole positions of the fitted partial-wave amplitudes.

  11. Stability of the Zagreb realization of the Carnegie-Mellon-Berkeley coupled-channels unitary model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osmanovic, H.; Hadzimehmedovic, M.; Stahov, J.; Ceci, S.; Svarc, A.

    2011-01-01

    In Hadzimehmedovicet al.[Phys. Rev. C 84, 035204 (2011)] we have used the Zagreb realization of Carnegie-Melon-Berkeley coupled-channel, unitary model as a tool for extracting pole positions from the world collection of partial-wave data, with the aim of eliminating model dependence in pole-search procedures. In order that the method is sensible, we in this paper discuss the stability of the method with respect to the strong variation of different model ingredients. We show that the Zagreb CMB procedure is very stable with strong variation of the model assumptions and that it can reliably predict the pole positions of the fitted partial-wave amplitudes.

  12. Studies, Transport and Treatment Concept for Boilers from Berkeley NPP, England - 13599

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wirendal, Bo; Saul, David; Robinson, Joe; Davidson, Gavin

    2013-01-01

    In November 2011 Studsvik was awarded a contract to transport five decommissioned boilers from the Berkeley Nuclear Licensed Site in the UK to the Studsvik Nuclear Site in Sweden for metal treatment and recycling. A key objective of the project was to remove the boilers from the site by 31 March 2012 and this was successfully achieved with all boilers off site by 22 March and delivered to Studsvik on 6 April. Four boilers have been processed and the fifth is planned for completion by end of December 2012.The project had many challenges including a very tight timescale and has been successfully delivered to cost and ahead of the baseline programme. This paper describes the project and the experience gained from treatment of the first four boilers. It is the first UK project to send large components overseas for recycling and provides new insight into the processing of Magnox gas-circuit components. (authors)

  13. Hazardous Waste Cerification Plan: Hazardous Waste Handling Facility, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-02-01

    The purpose of this plan is to describe the organization and methodology for the certification of hazardous waste (HW) handled in the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) Hazardous Waste Handling Facility (HWHF). The plan also incorporates the applicable elements of waste reduction, which include both up-front minimization and end- product treatment to reduce the volume and toxicity of the waste; segregation of the waste as it applies to certification; and executive summary of the Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) for the HWHF and a list of the current and planned implementing procedures used in waste certification. The plan provides guidance from the HWHF to waste generators, waste handlers, and the Systems Group Manager to enable them to conduct their activities and carry out their responsibilities in a manner that complies with several requirements of the Federal Resource Conservation and Resource Recovery Act (RCRA), the Federal Department of Transportation (DOT), and the State of California, Code of Regulations (CCR), Title 22

  14. The SCF ubiquitin ligase Slimb controls Nerfin-1 turnover in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiaohui; Wang, Feng; Li, Yuanpei; Zhai, Chaojun; Wang, Guiping; Zhang, Xiaoting; Gao, Yang; Yi, Tao; Sun, Dan; Wu, Shian

    2018-01-01

    The C2H2 type zinc-finger transcription factor Nerfin-1 expresses dominantly in Drosophila nervous system and plays an important role in early axon guidance decisions and preventing neurons dedifferentiation. Recently, increasing reports indicated that INSM1 (homologue to nerfin-1 in mammals) is a useful marker for prognosis of neuroendocrine tumors. The dynamic expression of Nerfin-1 is regulated post-transcriptionally by multiple microRNAs; however, its post-translational regulation is still unclear. Here we showed that the protein turnover of Nerfin-1 is regulated by Slimb, the substrate adaptor of SCF Slimb ubiquitin ligase complex. Mechanistically, Slimb associates with Nerfin-1 and promotes it ubiquitination and degradation in Drosophila S2R + cells. Furthermore, we determined that the C-terminal half of Nerfin-1 (Nerfin-1 CT ) is required for its binding to Slimb. Genetic epistasis assays showed that Slimb misexpression antagonizes, while knock-down enhances the activity of Nerfin-1 CT in Drosophila eyes. Our data revealed a new link to understand the underlying mechanism for Nerfin-1 turnover in post-translational level, and provided useful insights in animal development and disease treatment by manipulating the activity of Slimb and Nerfin-1. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Identification of chromatin-associated regulators of MSL complex targeting in Drosophila dosage compensation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica Larschan

    Full Text Available Sex chromosome dosage compensation in Drosophila provides a model for understanding how chromatin organization can modulate coordinate gene regulation. Male Drosophila increase the transcript levels of genes on the single male X approximately two-fold to equal the gene expression in females, which have two X-chromosomes. Dosage compensation is mediated by the Male-Specific Lethal (MSL histone acetyltransferase complex. Five core components of the MSL complex were identified by genetic screens for genes that are specifically required for male viability and are dispensable for females. However, because dosage compensation must interface with the general transcriptional machinery, it is likely that identifying additional regulators that are not strictly male-specific will be key to understanding the process at a mechanistic level. Such regulators would not have been recovered from previous male-specific lethal screening strategies. Therefore, we have performed a cell culture-based, genome-wide RNAi screen to search for factors required for MSL targeting or function. Here we focus on the discovery of proteins that function to promote MSL complex recruitment to "chromatin entry sites," which are proposed to be the initial sites of MSL targeting. We find that components of the NSL (Non-specific lethal complex, and a previously unstudied zinc-finger protein, facilitate MSL targeting and display a striking enrichment at MSL entry sites. Identification of these factors provides new insight into how MSL complex establishes the specialized hyperactive chromatin required for dosage compensation in Drosophila.

  16. Public census data on CD-ROM at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Revision 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merrill, D.W.

    1993-03-12

    The Comprehensive Epidemiologic Data Resource (CEDR) and Populations at Risk to Environmental Pollution (PAREP) projects, of the Information and Computing sciences Division (ICSD) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), are using public socioeconomic and geographic data files which are available to CEDR and PAREP collaborators via LBL`s computing network. At this time 89 CD-ROM diskettes (approximately 45 gigabytes) are on line via the Unix file server cedrcd.lbl.gov. Most of the files are from the US Bureau of the Census, and many of these pertain to the 1990 Census of Population and Housing. All the CD-ROM diskettes contain documentation in the form of ASCII text files. In addition, printed documentation for most files is available for inspection at University of California Data and Technical Assistance (UC DATA), tel. (510) 642-6571, or the UC Documents Library, tel. (510) 642-2569, both located on the UC Berkeley Campus. Many of the CD-ROM diskettes distributed by the Census Bureau contain software for PC compatible computers, for easily accessing the data. Shared access to the data is maintained through a collaboration among the CEDR and PAREP projects at LBL, and UC DATA, and the UC Documents Library. LBL is grateful to UC DATA and the UC Documents Library for the use of their CD-ROM diskettes. Shared access to LBL facilities may be restricted in the future if costs become prohibitive. Via the Sun Network File System (NFS), these data can be exported to Internet computers for direct access by the user`s application program(s). Due to the size of the files, this access method is preferred over File Transfer Protocol (FTP) access.

  17. Public census data on CD-ROM at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Revision 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merrill, D.W.

    1993-01-16

    The Comprehensive Epidemiologic Data Resource (CEDR) and Populations at Risk to Environmental Pollution (PAREP) projects, of the Information and Computing Sciences Division (ICSD) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), are using public socioeconomic and geographic data files which are available to CEDR and PAREP collaborators via LBL`s computing network. At this time 72 CD-ROM diskettes (approximately 37 gigabytes) are on line via the Unix file server ``cedrcd.lbl.gov``. Most of the files are from the US Bureau of the Census, and many of these pertain to the 1990 Census of Population and Housing. All the CD-ROM diskettes contain documentation in the form of ASCII text files. In addition, printed documentation for most files is available for inspection at University of California Data and Technical Assistance (UC DATA), tel. (510) 642-6571, or the UC Documents Library, tel. (510) 642-2569, both located on the UC Berkeley Campus. Many of the CD-ROM diskettes distributed by the Census Bureau contain software for PC compatible computers, for easily accessing the data. Shared access to the data is maintained through a collaboration among the CEDR and PAREP projects at LBL, and UC DATA, and the UC Documents Library. LBL is grateful to UC DATA and the UC Documents Library for the use of their CD-ROM diskettes. Shared access to LBL facilities may be restricted in the future if costs become prohibitive. Via the Sun Network File System (NFS), these data can be exported to Internet computers for direct access by the user`s application program(s). Due to the size of the files, this access method is preferred over File Transfer Protocol (FTP) access. Please contact Deane Merrill (dwmerrill@lbl.gov) if you wish to make use of the data.

  18. Public census data on CD-ROM at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merrill, D.W.

    1993-01-16

    The Comprehensive Epidemiologic Data Resource (CEDR) and Populations at Risk to Environmental Pollution (PAREP) projects, of the Information and Computing Sciences Division (ICSD) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), are using public socioeconomic and geographic data files which are available to CEDR and PAREP collaborators via LBL's computing network. At this time 72 CD-ROM diskettes (approximately 37 gigabytes) are on line via the Unix file server cedrcd.lbl.gov''. Most of the files are from the US Bureau of the Census, and many of these pertain to the 1990 Census of Population and Housing. All the CD-ROM diskettes contain documentation in the form of ASCII text files. In addition, printed documentation for most files is available for inspection at University of California Data and Technical Assistance (UC DATA), tel. (510) 642-6571, or the UC Documents Library, tel. (510) 642-2569, both located on the UC Berkeley Campus. Many of the CD-ROM diskettes distributed by the Census Bureau contain software for PC compatible computers, for easily accessing the data. Shared access to the data is maintained through a collaboration among the CEDR and PAREP projects at LBL, and UC DATA, and the UC Documents Library. LBL is grateful to UC DATA and the UC Documents Library for the use of their CD-ROM diskettes. Shared access to LBL facilities may be restricted in the future if costs become prohibitive. Via the Sun Network File System (NFS), these data can be exported to Internet computers for direct access by the user's application program(s). Due to the size of the files, this access method is preferred over File Transfer Protocol (FTP) access. Please contact Deane Merrill (dwmerrill lbl.gov) if you wish to make use of the data.

  19. Life span extension and neuronal cell protection by Drosophila nicotinamidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balan, Vitaly; Miller, Gregory S; Kaplun, Ludmila; Balan, Karina; Chong, Zhao-Zhong; Li, Faqi; Kaplun, Alexander; VanBerkum, Mark F A; Arking, Robert; Freeman, D Carl; Maiese, Kenneth; Tzivion, Guri

    2008-10-10

    The life span of model organisms can be modulated by environmental conditions that influence cellular metabolism, oxidation, or DNA integrity. The yeast nicotinamidase gene pnc1 was identified as a key transcriptional target and mediator of calorie restriction and stress-induced life span extension. PNC1 is thought to exert its effect on yeast life span by modulating cellular nicotinamide and NAD levels, resulting in increased activity of Sir2 family class III histone deacetylases. In Caenorhabditis elegans, knockdown of a pnc1 homolog was shown recently to shorten the worm life span, whereas its overexpression increased survival under conditions of oxidative stress. The function and regulation of nicotinamidases in higher organisms has not been determined. Here, we report the identification and biochemical characterization of the Drosophila nicotinamidase, D-NAAM, and demonstrate that its overexpression significantly increases median and maximal fly life span. The life span extension was reversed in Sir2 mutant flies, suggesting Sir2 dependence. Testing for physiological effectors of D-NAAM in Drosophila S2 cells, we identified oxidative stress as a primary regulator, both at the transcription level and protein activity. In contrast to the yeast model, stress factors such as high osmolarity and heat shock, calorie restriction, or inhibitors of TOR and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathways do not appear to regulate D-NAAM in S2 cells. Interestingly, the expression of D-NAAM in human neuronal cells conferred protection from oxidative stress-induced cell death in a sirtuin-dependent manner. Together, our findings establish a life span extending the ability of nicotinamidase in flies and offer a role for nicotinamide-modulating genes in oxidative stress regulated pathways influencing longevity and neuronal cell survival.

  20. The NSL Complex Regulates Housekeeping Genes in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, Sunil Jayaramaiah; Holz, Herbert; Luscombe, Nicholas M.; Manke, Thomas; Akhtar, Asifa

    2012-01-01

    MOF is the major histone H4 lysine 16-specific (H4K16) acetyltransferase in mammals and Drosophila. In flies, it is involved in the regulation of X-chromosomal and autosomal genes as part of the MSL and the NSL complexes, respectively. While the function of the MSL complex as a dosage compensation regulator is fairly well understood, the role of the NSL complex in gene regulation is still poorly characterized. Here we report a comprehensive ChIP–seq analysis of four NSL complex members (NSL1, NSL3, MBD-R2, and MCRS2) throughout the Drosophila melanogaster genome. Strikingly, the majority (85.5%) of NSL-bound genes are constitutively expressed across different cell types. We find that an increased abundance of the histone modifications H4K16ac, H3K4me2, H3K4me3, and H3K9ac in gene promoter regions is characteristic of NSL-targeted genes. Furthermore, we show that these genes have a well-defined nucleosome free region and broad transcription initiation patterns. Finally, by performing ChIP–seq analyses of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) in NSL1- and NSL3-depleted cells, we demonstrate that both NSL proteins are required for efficient recruitment of Pol II to NSL target gene promoters. The observed Pol II reduction coincides with compromised binding of TBP and TFIIB to target promoters, indicating that the NSL complex is required for optimal recruitment of the pre-initiation complex on target genes. Moreover, genes that undergo the most dramatic loss of Pol II upon NSL knockdowns tend to be enriched in DNA Replication–related Element (DRE). Taken together, our findings show that the MOF-containing NSL complex acts as a major regulator of housekeeping genes in flies by modulating initiation of Pol II transcription. PMID:22723752

  1. Adaptive genic evolution in the Drosophila genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shapiro, Joshua A; Huang, Wei; Zhang, Chenhui

    2007-01-01

    and stable population. In this study, we sequenced 419 genes from 24 lines of Drosophila melanogaster and its close relatives. Together with data from Drosophila simulans, these data reveal the following. (i) Approximately 10% of the loci in regions of normal recombination are much less polymorphic at silent...... sites than expected, hinting at the action of selective sweeps. (ii) The level of polymorphism is negatively correlated with the rate of nonsynonymous divergence across loci. Thus, even under strict neutrality, the ratio of amino acid to silent nucleotide changes (A:S) between Drosophila species...

  2. Drosophila TRF2 and TAF9 regulate lipid droplet size and phospholipid fatty acid composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Wei; Lam, Sin Man; Xin, Jingxue; Yang, Xiao; Liu, Zhonghua; Liu, Yuan; Wang, Yong; Shui, Guanghou; Huang, Xun

    2017-03-01

    The general transcription factor TBP (TATA-box binding protein) and its associated factors (TAFs) together form the TFIID complex, which directs transcription initiation. Through RNAi and mutant analysis, we identified a specific TBP family protein, TRF2, and a set of TAFs that regulate lipid droplet (LD) size in the Drosophila larval fat body. Among the three Drosophila TBP genes, trf2, tbp and trf1, only loss of function of trf2 results in increased LD size. Moreover, TRF2 and TAF9 regulate fatty acid composition of several classes of phospholipids. Through RNA profiling, we found that TRF2 and TAF9 affects the transcription of a common set of genes, including peroxisomal fatty acid β-oxidation-related genes that affect phospholipid fatty acid composition. We also found that knockdown of several TRF2 and TAF9 target genes results in large LDs, a phenotype which is similar to that of trf2 mutants. Together, these findings provide new insights into the specific role of the general transcription machinery in lipid homeostasis.

  3. Altered gene regulation and synaptic morphology in Drosophila learning and memory mutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Zhuo; Buhl, Lauren K.; Quinn, William G.; Littleton, J. Troy

    2011-01-01

    Genetic studies in Drosophila have revealed two separable long-term memory pathways defined as anesthesia-resistant memory (ARM) and long-lasting long-term memory (LLTM). ARM is disrupted in radish (rsh) mutants, whereas LLTM requires CREB-dependent protein synthesis. Although the downstream effectors of ARM and LLTM are distinct, pathways leading to these forms of memory may share the cAMP cascade critical for associative learning. Dunce, which encodes a cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase, and rutabaga, which encodes an adenylyl cyclase, both disrupt short-term memory. Amnesiac encodes a pituitary adenylyl cyclase-activating peptide homolog and is required for middle-term memory. Here, we demonstrate that the Radish protein localizes to the cytoplasm and nucleus and is a PKA phosphorylation target in vitro. To characterize how these plasticity pathways may manifest at the synaptic level, we assayed synaptic connectivity and performed an expression analysis to detect altered transcriptional networks in rutabaga, dunce, amnesiac, and radish mutants. All four mutants disrupt specific aspects of synaptic connectivity at larval neuromuscular junctions (NMJs). Genome-wide DNA microarray analysis revealed ∼375 transcripts that are altered in these mutants, suggesting defects in multiple neuronal signaling pathways. In particular, the transcriptional target Lapsyn, which encodes a leucine-rich repeat cell adhesion protein, localizes to synapses and regulates synaptic growth. This analysis provides insights into the Radish-dependent ARM pathway and novel transcriptional targets that may contribute to memory processing in Drosophila. PMID:21422168

  4. Nucleosome mediated crosstalk between transcription factors at eukaryotic enhancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teif, Vladimir B; Rippe, Karsten

    2011-01-01

    A recent study of transcription regulation in Drosophila embryonic development revealed a complex non-monotonic dependence of gene expression on the distance between binding sites of repressor and activator proteins at the corresponding enhancer cis-regulatory modules (Fakhouri et al 2010 Mol. Syst. Biol. 6 341). The repressor efficiency was high at small separations, low around 30 bp, reached a maximum at 50–60 bp, and decreased at larger distances to the activator binding sites. Here, we propose a straightforward explanation for the distance dependence of repressor activity by considering the effect of the presence of a nucleosome. Using a method that considers partial unwrapping of nucleosomal DNA from the histone octamer core, we calculated the dependence of activator binding on the repressor–activator distance and found a quantitative agreement with the distance dependence reported for the Drosophila enhancer element. In addition, the proposed model offers explanations for other distance-dependent effects at eukaryotic enhancers. (communication)

  5. Berkeley Lab's Saul Perlmutter wins E.O. Lawrence Award scientist's work on supernovae reveals accelerating universe

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    "Saul Perlmutter, a member of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's Physics Division and leader of the international Supernova Cosmology Project based there, has won the Department of Energy's 2002 E.O. Lawrence Award in the physics category" (1/2 page).

  6. Presentation of the National Center for Research in Vocational Education [Berkeley, California] at the AVA Annual Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Center for Research in Vocational Education, Berkeley, CA.

    This collection contains the following conference presentations about the National Center for Research in Vocational Education at the University of California at Berkeley: "Visions and Principles" (Charles Benson); "How the Center Sees Its Role" (Gordon Swanson); "The Research Agenda" (Sue Berryman); "The Service…

  7. Higher Retail Prices of Sugar-Sweetened Beverages 3 Months After Implementation of an Excise Tax in Berkeley, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falbe, Jennifer; Rojas, Nadia; Grummon, Anna H; Madsen, Kristine A

    2015-11-01

    We assessed the short-term ability to increase retail prices of the first US 1-cent-per-ounce excise tax on the distribution of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs), which was implemented in March 2015 by Berkeley, California. In 2014 and 2015, we examined pre- to posttax price changes of SSBs and non-SSBs in a variety of retailers in Berkeley and in the comparison cities Oakland and San Francisco, California. We examined price changes by beverage, brand, size, and retailer type. For smaller beverages (≤ 33.8 oz), price increases (cents/oz) in Berkeley relative to those in comparison cities were 0.69 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.36, 1.03) for soda, 0.47 (95% CI = 0.08, 0.87) for fruit-flavored beverages, and 0.47 (95% CI = 0.25, 0.69) for SSBs overall. For 2-liter bottles and multipacks of soda, relative price increases were 0.46 (95% CI = 0.03, 0.89) and 0.49 (95% CI = 0.21, 0.77). We observed no relative price increases for nontaxed beverages overall. Approximately 3 months after the tax was implemented, SSB retail prices increased more in Berkeley than in nearby cities, marking a step in the causal pathway between the tax and reduced SSB consumption.

  8. The transcriptional landscape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    The application of new and less biased methods to study the transcriptional output from genomes, such as tiling arrays and deep sequencing, has revealed that most of the genome is transcribed and that there is substantial overlap of transcripts derived from the two strands of DNA. In protein coding...... regions, the map of transcripts is very complex due to small transcripts from the flanking ends of the transcription unit, the use of multiple start and stop sites for the main transcript, production of multiple functional RNA molecules from the same primary transcript, and RNA molecules made...... by independent transcription from within the unit. In genomic regions separating those that encode proteins or highly abundant RNA molecules with known function, transcripts are generally of low abundance and short-lived. In most of these cases, it is unclear to what extent a function is related to transcription...

  9. Studies on Drosophila radiosensitivity strains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varentsova, E.R.; Sharygin, V.I.; Khromykh, Yu.U.

    1985-01-01

    Fertility of radiosensitive mutant drosophila female strain rad (2) 201 61 after irradiation and frequency of dominant lethal mutations (DLM), induced by γ-radiation for 0-5 h and 5-7 days, are investigated. It is shown, that oocytes of the mutant strain are more radiosensitive as compared with cells of mongrel flies as to criterion of DLM appearance over the period of maturing. Early oocytes of stages 2-7 are the most sensitive, i.e. at the stages, corresponding to the manifestation of previously established recombination-defective properties of mutations rad (2) 201 61 . It is also sown, that doses of γ-rays, exceeding 10 Gy produce a strong sterilizing effect on mutant females due to destruction and resorption of egg chambers, irradiated at the stages of previtellogenetic growth of oocytes. In females, carrying mutation of radiosensitivity there is no direct correlation betwen sensitivity of oocytes proper to DLM induction and sensitivity of egg folleicles to resorbing effect of γ-rays. The ways of possible involvement of mutant locus studied into genetic processes in various specialized cells of drosophila

  10. The Drosophila MAPK p38c regulates oxidative stress and lipid homeostasis in the intestine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sveta Chakrabarti

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinase signaling cassette has been implicated in stress and immunity in evolutionarily diverse species. In response to a wide variety of physical, chemical and biological stresses p38 kinases phosphorylate various substrates, transcription factors of the ATF family and other protein kinases, regulating cellular adaptation to stress. The Drosophila genome encodes three p38 kinases named p38a, p38b and p38c. In this study, we have analyzed the role of p38c in the Drosophila intestine. The p38c gene is expressed in the midgut and upregulated upon intestinal infection. We showed that p38c mutant flies are more resistant to infection with the lethal pathogen Pseudomonas entomophila but are more susceptible to the non-pathogenic bacterium Erwinia carotovora 15. This phenotype was linked to a lower production of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS in the gut of p38c mutants, whereby the transcription of the ROS-producing enzyme Duox is reduced in p38c mutant flies. Our genetic analysis shows that p38c functions in a pathway with Mekk1 and Mkk3 to induce the phosphorylation of Atf-2, a transcription factor that controls Duox expression. Interestingly, p38c deficient flies accumulate lipids in the intestine while expressing higher levels of antimicrobial peptide and metabolic genes. The role of p38c in lipid metabolism is mediated by the Atf3 transcription factor. This observation suggests that p38c and Atf3 function in a common pathway in the intestine to regulate lipid metabolism and immune homeostasis. Collectively, our study demonstrates that p38c plays a central role in the intestine of Drosophila. It also reveals that many roles initially attributed to p38a are in fact mediated by p38c.

  11. The Drosophila MAPK p38c regulates oxidative stress and lipid homeostasis in the intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Sveta; Poidevin, Mickaël; Lemaitre, Bruno

    2014-09-01

    The p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase signaling cassette has been implicated in stress and immunity in evolutionarily diverse species. In response to a wide variety of physical, chemical and biological stresses p38 kinases phosphorylate various substrates, transcription factors of the ATF family and other protein kinases, regulating cellular adaptation to stress. The Drosophila genome encodes three p38 kinases named p38a, p38b and p38c. In this study, we have analyzed the role of p38c in the Drosophila intestine. The p38c gene is expressed in the midgut and upregulated upon intestinal infection. We showed that p38c mutant flies are more resistant to infection with the lethal pathogen Pseudomonas entomophila but are more susceptible to the non-pathogenic bacterium Erwinia carotovora 15. This phenotype was linked to a lower production of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) in the gut of p38c mutants, whereby the transcription of the ROS-producing enzyme Duox is reduced in p38c mutant flies. Our genetic analysis shows that p38c functions in a pathway with Mekk1 and Mkk3 to induce the phosphorylation of Atf-2, a transcription factor that controls Duox expression. Interestingly, p38c deficient flies accumulate lipids in the intestine while expressing higher levels of antimicrobial peptide and metabolic genes. The role of p38c in lipid metabolism is mediated by the Atf3 transcription factor. This observation suggests that p38c and Atf3 function in a common pathway in the intestine to regulate lipid metabolism and immune homeostasis. Collectively, our study demonstrates that p38c plays a central role in the intestine of Drosophila. It also reveals that many roles initially attributed to p38a are in fact mediated by p38c.

  12. Metal-metal interaction mediates the iron induction of Drosophila MtnB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiang, Wenjia; Huang, Yunpeng; Wan, Zhihui; Zhou, Bing

    2017-01-01

    Metallothionein (MT) protein families are a class of small and universal proteins rich in cysteine residues. They are synthesized in response to heavy metal stresses to sequester the toxic ions by metal-thiolate bridges. Five MT family members, namely MtnA, MtnB, MtnC, MtnD and MtnE, have been discovered and identified in Drosophila. These five isoforms of MTs are regulated by metal responsive transcription factor dMTF-1 and play differentiated but overlapping roles in detoxification of metal ions. Previous researches have shown that Drosophila MtnB responds to copper (Cu), cadmium (Cd) and zinc (Zn). Interestingly in this study we found that Drosophila MtnB expression also responds to elevated iron levels in the diet. Further investigations revealed that MtnB plays limited roles in iron detoxification, and the direct binding of MtnB to ferrous iron in vitro is also weak. The induction of MtnB by iron turns out to be mediated by iron interference of other metals, because EDTA at even a partial concentration of that of iron can suppress this induction. Indeed, in the presence of iron, zinc homeostasis is altered, as reflected by expression changes of zinc transporters dZIP1 and dZnT1. Thus, iron-mediated MtnB induction appears resulting from interrupted homeostasis of other metals such as zinc, which in turns induced MtnB expression. Metal-metal interaction may more widely exist than we expected. - Highlights: • Metallothionein B expression is regulated by iron in Drosophila melanogaster. • MtnB has limited physiological roles in iron detoxification. • Binding affinity of MtnB to iron is weak in vitro. • Induction of Drosophila MtnB by iron is mediated indirectly through metal-metal interaction.

  13. Functional Analysis of Drosophila NF1

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bernards, Andre

    2005-01-01

    ...) for Ras, yet homozygous loss of a highly conserved Drosophila NF1 ortholog results in several phenotypes that are insensitive to manipulating Ras signal transduction, but rescued by increasing...

  14. The Drosophila bipectinata species complex: phylogenetic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PARUL BANERJEE

    c Indian Academy of Sciences. RESEARCH ARTICLE. The Drosophila bipectinata species complex: phylogenetic relationship among different members based on chromosomal variations. PARUL BANERJEE and BASHISTH N. SINGH. ∗. Genetics Laboratory, Department of Zoology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi ...

  15. Drosophila melanogaster gene expression changes after spaceflight.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Gene expression levels were determined in 3rd instar and adult Drosophila melanogaster reared during spaceflight to elucidate the genetic and molecular mechanisms...

  16. Ecdysteroid receptors in Drosophila melanogaster adult females

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecdysteroid receptors were identified and partially characterized from total cell extracts of whole animals and dissected tissues from Drosophila melanogaster adult females. Binding studies indicated the presence of two ecdysteroid binding components having high affinity and specificity consistent w...

  17. Snipper, an Eri1 homologue, affects histone mRNA abundance and is crucial for normal Drosophila melanogaster development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexiadis, Anastasios; Delidakis, Christos; Kalantidis, Kriton

    2017-07-01

    The conserved 3'-5' RNA exonuclease ERI1 is implicated in RNA interference inhibition, 5.8S rRNA maturation and histone mRNA maturation and turnover. The single ERI1 homologue in Drosophila melanogaster Snipper (Snp) is a 3'-5' exonuclease, but its in vivo function remains elusive. Here, we report Snp requirement for normal Drosophila development, since its perturbation leads to larval arrest and tissue-specific downregulation results in abnormal tissue development. Additionally, Snp directly interacts with histone mRNA, and its depletion results in drastic reduction in histone transcript levels. We propose that Snp protects the 3'-ends of histone mRNAs and upon its absence, histone transcripts are readily degraded. This in turn may lead to cell cycle delay or arrest, causing growth arrest and developmental perturbations. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  18. Regulation of lifespan, metabolism, and stress responses by the Drosophila SH2B protein, Lnk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathy Slack

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila Lnk is the single ancestral orthologue of a highly conserved family of structurally-related intracellular adaptor proteins, the SH2B proteins. As adaptors, they lack catalytic activity but contain several protein-protein interaction domains, thus playing a critical role in signal transduction from receptor tyrosine kinases to form protein networks. Physiological studies of SH2B function in mammals have produced conflicting data. However, a recent study in Drosophila has shown that Lnk is an important regulator of the insulin/insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1 signaling (IIS pathway during growth, functioning in parallel to the insulin receptor substrate, Chico. As this pathway also has an evolutionary conserved role in the determination of organism lifespan, we investigated whether Lnk is required for normal lifespan in Drosophila. Phenotypic analysis of mutants for Lnk revealed that loss of Lnk function results in increased lifespan and improved survival under conditions of oxidative stress and starvation. Starvation resistance was found to be associated with increased metabolic stores of carbohydrates and lipids indicative of impaired metabolism. Biochemical and genetic data suggest that Lnk functions in both the IIS and Ras/Mitogen activated protein Kinase (MapK signaling pathways. Microarray studies support this model, showing transcriptional feedback onto genes in both pathways as well as indicating global changes in both lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. Finally, our data also suggest that Lnk itself may be a direct target of the IIS responsive transcription factor, dFoxo, and that dFoxo may repress Lnk expression. We therefore describe novel functions for a member of the SH2B protein family and provide the first evidence for potential mechanisms of SH2B regulation. Our findings suggest that IIS signaling in Drosophila may require the activity of a second intracellular adaptor, thereby yielding fundamental new insights into the

  19. Evidence for a Complex Class of Nonadenylated mRNA in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, J. Lynn; Fouts, David L.; Manning, Jerry E.

    1980-01-01

    The amount, by mass, of poly(A+) mRNA present in the polyribosomes of third-instar larvae of Drosophila melanogaster, and the relative contribution of the poly(A+) mRNA to the sequence complexity of total polysomal RNA, has been determined. Selective removal of poly(A+) mRNA from total polysomal RNA by use of either oligo-dT-cellulose, or poly(U)-sepharose affinity chromatography, revealed that only 0.15% of the mass of the polysomal RNA was present as poly(A+) mRNA. The present study shows that this RNA hybridized at saturation with 3.3% of the single-copy DNA in the Drosophila genome. After correction for asymmetric transcription and reactability of the DNA, 7.4% of the single-copy DNA in the Drosophila genome is represented in larval poly(A+) mRNA. This corresponds to 6.73 x 106 nucleotides of mRNA coding sequences, or approximately 5,384 diverse RNA sequences of average size 1,250 nucleotides. However, total polysomal RNA hybridizes at saturation to 10.9% of the single-copy DNA sequences. After correcting this value for asymmetric transcription and tracer DNA reactability, 24% of the single-copy DNA in Drosophila is represented in total polysomal RNA. This corresponds to 2.18 x 107 nucleotides of RNA coding sequences or 17,440 diverse RNA molecules of size 1,250 nucleotides. This value is 3.2 times greater than that observed for poly(A+) mRNA, and indicates that ≃69% of the polysomal RNA sequence complexity is contributed by nonadenylated RNA. Furthermore, if the number of different structural genes represented in total polysomal RNA is ≃1.7 x 104, then the number of genes expressed in third-instar larvae exceeds the number of chromomeres in Drosophila by about a factor of three. This numerology indicates that the number of chromomeres observed in polytene chromosomes does not reflect the number of structural gene sequences in the Drosophila genome. PMID:6777246

  20. Mapping of gene mutations in drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Halvorsen, Charlotte Marie

    2004-01-01

    In this experiment, mutant genes of a given unknown mutant strain of Drosophila melanogaster were mapped to specific chromosomes. Drosophila melanogaster, commonly known as the fruit fly, was the appropriate choice for the organism to use in this specific experiment because of its relatively rapid life cycle of 10-14 days and because of the small amount of space and food neccessary for maintaining thousands of flies. The D. Melanogaster unknown strain specifically used in this experiment wa...

  1. Metabolome analysis of Drosophila melanogaster during embryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Phan Nguyen Thuy; Yamaguchi, Masamitsu; Bamba, Takeshi; Fukusaki, Eiichiro

    2014-01-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster embryo has been widely utilized as a model for genetics and developmental biology due to its small size, short generation time, and large brood size. Information on embryonic metabolism during developmental progression is important for further understanding the mechanisms of Drosophila embryogenesis. Therefore, the aim of this study is to assess the changes in embryos' metabolome that occur at different stages of the Drosophila embryonic development. Time course samples of Drosophila embryos were subjected to GC/MS-based metabolome analysis for profiling of low molecular weight hydrophilic metabolites, including sugars, amino acids, and organic acids. The results showed that the metabolic profiles of Drosophila embryo varied during the course of development and there was a strong correlation between the metabolome and different embryonic stages. Using the metabolome information, we were able to establish a prediction model for developmental stages of embryos starting from their high-resolution quantitative metabolite composition. Among the important metabolites revealed from our model, we suggest that different amino acids appear to play distinct roles in different developmental stages and an appropriate balance in trehalose-glucose ratio is crucial to supply the carbohydrate source for the development of Drosophila embryo.

  2. Characterization of Autophagic Responses in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, T; Kumar, S; Denton, D

    2017-01-01

    Drosophila is an excellent model system for studying autophagy during animal development due to the availability of genetic reagents and opportunity for in vivo cell biological analysis. The regulation and mechanism of autophagy are highly evolutionarily conserved and the role of autophagy has been characterized during various stages of Drosophila development as well as following starvation. Studies in Drosophila have revealed novel insights into the role of distinct components of the autophagy machinery. This chapter describes protocols for examining autophagy during Drosophila development. A crucial step in the induction of autophagy is the incorporation of Atg8a into the autophagosome. This can be measured as autophagic puncta using live fluorescent imaging, immunostaining, or immunoblot analysis of LC3/Atg8a processing. The level of autophagy can also be examined using other specific components of the autophagy pathway as markers detected by immunofluorescent imaging. Based on the distinct morphology of autophagy, it can also be examined by transmission electron microscopy. In addition, one of the advantages of using Drosophila as a model is the ability to undertake genetic analysis of individual components of the autophagy machinery. Current approaches that can be used to monitor autophagy, including the overall flux and individual steps in Drosophila melanogaster, will be discussed. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of non-nutritive sugars to decrease the survivorship of spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study, we investigated the effects of non-nutritive sugars and sugar alcohols on the survivorship of spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii, and found erythritol and erythrose as potentially toxic to the fly. In a dose-dependent study, erythritol and erythrose significantly reduced fly ...

  4. New record for the invasive Spotted Wing Drosophila, Drosophila suzukii Matsumura (Diptera: Drosophilidae) in Anillaco, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    The invasive Spotted Wing Drosophila (SWD), Drosophila suzukii Matsumura, is reported for the first time in La Rioja, Argentina. This represents a major range expansion for this species. The natural enemies of SWD, Leptopilina clavipes and Ganaspis hookeri were also collected with the SWD at the s...

  5. Identification of four Drosophila allatostatins as the cognate ligands for the Drosophila orphan receptor DAR-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenz, C; Williamson, M; Hansen, G N

    2001-01-01

    The allatostatins are generally inhibitory insect neuropeptides. The Drosophila orphan receptor DAR-2 is a G-protein-coupled receptor, having 47% amino acid residue identity with another Drosophila receptor, DAR-1 (which is also called dros. GPCR, or DGR) that was previously shown...... to be the receptor for an intrinsic Drosophila A-type (cockroach-type) allatostatin. Here, we have permanently expressed DAR-2 in CHO cells and found that it is the cognate receptor for four Drosophila A-type allatostatins, the drostatins-A1 to -A4. Of all the drostatins, drostatin-A4 (Thr...... weakly in the brain. The Drosophila larval gut also contains about 20-30 endocrine cells, expressing the gene for the drostatins-A1 to -A4. We suggest, therefore, that DAR-2 mediates an allatostatin (drostatin)-induced inhibition of gut motility. This is the first report on the permanent and functional...

  6. Effect of Hawthorn on Drosophila Melanogaster Antioxidant-Related ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: The results indicate that hawthorn extract prolonged the life span of Drosophila, with 50 % survival time of 0.8 ... Drosophila's aging gene is highly similar to humans [4,5]. ..... reduces lipid peroxidation in senescence-accelerated mice .

  7. Gustatory Processing in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Kristin

    2018-01-07

    The ability to identify nutrient-rich food and avoid toxic substances is essential for an animal's survival. Although olfaction and vision contribute to food detection, the gustatory system acts as a final checkpoint control for food acceptance or rejection. The vinegar fly Drosophila melanogaster tastes many of the same stimuli as mammals and provides an excellent model system for comparative studies of taste detection. The relative simplicity of the fly brain and behaviors, along with the molecular genetic and functional approaches available in this system, allow the examination of gustatory neural circuits from sensory input to motor output. This review discusses the molecules and cells that detect taste compounds in the periphery and the circuits that process taste information in the brain. These studies are providing insight into how the detection of taste compounds regulates feeding decisions.

  8. Evaluating the Autonomy of the Drosophila Circadian Clock in Dissociated Neuronal Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabado, Virginie; Vienne, Ludovic; Nagoshi, Emi

    2017-01-01

    Circadian behavioral rhythms offer an excellent model to study intricate interactions between the molecular and neuronal mechanisms of behavior. In mammals, pacemaker neurons in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) generate rhythms cell-autonomously, which are synchronized by the network interactions within the circadian circuit to drive behavioral rhythms. However, whether this principle is universal to circadian systems in animals remains unanswered. Here, we examined the autonomy of the Drosophila circadian clock by monitoring transcriptional and post-transcriptional rhythms of individual clock neurons in dispersed culture with time-lapse microscopy. Expression patterns of the transcriptional reporter show that CLOCK/CYCLE (CLK/CYC)-mediated transcription is constantly active in dissociated clock neurons. In contrast, the expression profile of the post-transcriptional reporter indicates that PERIOD (PER) protein levels fluctuate and ~10% of cells display rhythms in PER levels with periods in the circadian range. Nevertheless, PER and TIM are enriched in the cytoplasm and no periodic PER nuclear accumulation was observed. These results suggest that repression of CLK/CYC-mediated transcription by nuclear PER is impaired, and thus the negative feedback loop of the molecular clock is incomplete in isolated clock neurons. We further demonstrate that, by pharmacological assays using the non-amidated form of neuropeptide pigment-dispersing factor (PDF), which could be specifically secreted from larval LNvs and adult s-LNvs, downstream events of the PDF signaling are partly impaired in dissociated larval clock neurons. Although non-amidated PDF is likely to be less active than the amidated one, these results point out the possibility that alteration in PDF downstream signaling may play a role in dampening of molecular rhythms in isolated clock neurons. Taken together, our results suggest that Drosophila clocks are weak oscillators that need to be in the intact circadian

  9. Evaluating the Autonomy of the Drosophila Circadian Clock in Dissociated Neuronal Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginie Sabado

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Circadian behavioral rhythms offer an excellent model to study intricate interactions between the molecular and neuronal mechanisms of behavior. In mammals, pacemaker neurons in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN generate rhythms cell-autonomously, which are synchronized by the network interactions within the circadian circuit to drive behavioral rhythms. However, whether this principle is universal to circadian systems in animals remains unanswered. Here, we examined the autonomy of the Drosophila circadian clock by monitoring transcriptional and post-transcriptional rhythms of individual clock neurons in dispersed culture with time-lapse microscopy. Expression patterns of the transcriptional reporter show that CLOCK/CYCLE (CLK/CYC-mediated transcription is constantly active in dissociated clock neurons. In contrast, the expression profile of the post-transcriptional reporter indicates that PERIOD (PER protein levels fluctuate and ~10% of cells display rhythms in PER levels with periods in the circadian range. Nevertheless, PER and TIM are enriched in the cytoplasm and no periodic PER nuclear accumulation was observed. These results suggest that repression of CLK/CYC-mediated transcription by nuclear PER is impaired, and thus the negative feedback loop of the molecular clock is incomplete in isolated clock neurons. We further demonstrate that, by pharmacological assays using the non-amidated form of neuropeptide pigment-dispersing factor (PDF, which could be specifically secreted from larval LNvs and adult s-LNvs, downstream events of the PDF signaling are partly impaired in dissociated larval clock neurons. Although non-amidated PDF is likely to be less active than the amidated one, these results point out the possibility that alteration in PDF downstream signaling may play a role in dampening of molecular rhythms in isolated clock neurons. Taken together, our results suggest that Drosophila clocks are weak oscillators that need to be in the

  10. Characterization of dFOXO binding sites upstream of the Insulin Receptor P2 promoter across the Drosophila phylogeny.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorcas J Orengo

    Full Text Available The insulin/TOR signal transduction pathway plays a critical role in determining such important traits as body and organ size, metabolic homeostasis and life span. Although this pathway is highly conserved across the animal kingdom, the affected traits can exhibit important differences even between closely related species. Evolutionary studies of regulatory regions require the reliable identification of transcription factor binding sites. Here we have focused on the Insulin Receptor (InR expression from its P2 promoter in the Drosophila genus, which in D. melanogaster is up-regulated by hypophosphorylated Drosophila FOXO (dFOXO. We have finely characterized this transcription factor binding sites in vitro along the 1.3 kb region upstream of the InR P2 promoter in five Drosophila species. Moreover, we have tested the effect of mutations in the characterized dFOXO sites of D. melanogaster in transgenic flies. The number of experimentally established binding sites varies across the 1.3 kb region of any particular species, and their distribution also differs among species. In D. melanogaster, InR expression from P2 is differentially affected by dFOXO binding sites at the proximal and distal halves of the species 1.3 kb fragment. The observed uneven distribution of binding sites across this fragment might underlie their differential contribution to regulate InR transcription.

  11. Inverse regulation of two classic Hippo pathway target genes in Drosophila by the dimerization hub protein Ctp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, Daniel A; Moberg, Kenneth

    2016-03-14

    The LC8 family of small ~8 kD proteins are highly conserved and interact with multiple protein partners in eukaryotic cells. LC8-binding modulates target protein activity, often through induced dimerization via LC8:LC8 homodimers. Although many LC8-interactors have roles in signaling cascades, LC8's role in developing epithelia is poorly understood. Using the Drosophila wing as a developmental model, we find that the LC8 family member Cut up (Ctp) is primarily required to promote epithelial growth, which correlates with effects on the pro-growth factor dMyc and two genes, diap1 and bantam, that are classic targets of the Hippo pathway coactivator Yorkie. Genetic tests confirm that Ctp supports Yorkie-driven tissue overgrowth and indicate that Ctp acts through Yorkie to control bantam (ban) and diap1 transcription. Quite unexpectedly however, Ctp loss has inverse effects on ban and diap1: it elevates ban expression but reduces diap1 expression. In both cases these transcriptional changes map to small segments of these promoters that recruit Yorkie. Although LC8 complexes with Yap1, a Yorkie homolog, in human cells, an orthologous interaction was not detected in Drosophila cells. Collectively these findings reveal that that Drosophila Ctp is a required regulator of Yorkie-target genes in vivo and suggest that Ctp may interact with a Hippo pathway protein(s) to exert inverse transcriptional effects on Yorkie-target genes.

  12. Ras1 interacts with multiple new signaling and cytoskeletal loci in Drosophila eggshell patterning and morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnorr, J D; Holdcraft, R; Chevalier, B; Berg, C A

    2001-10-01

    Little is known about the genes that interact with Ras signaling pathways to regulate morphogenesis. The synthesis of dorsal eggshell structures in Drosophila melanogaster requires multiple rounds of Ras signaling followed by dramatic epithelial sheet movements. We took advantage of this process to identify genes that link patterning and morphogenesis; we screened lethal mutations on the second chromosome for those that could enhance a weak Ras1 eggshell phenotype. Of 1618 lethal P-element mutations tested, 13 showed significant enhancement, resulting in forked and fused dorsal appendages. Our genetic and molecular analyses together with information from the Berkeley Drosophila Genome Project reveal that 11 of these lines carry mutations in previously characterized genes. Three mutations disrupt the known Ras1 cell signaling components Star, Egfr, and Blistered, while one mutation disrupts Sec61beta, implicated in ligand secretion. Seven lines represent cell signaling and cytoskeletal components that are new to the Ras1 pathway; these are Chickadee (Profilin), Tec29, Dreadlocks, POSH, Peanut, Smt3, and MESK2, a suppressor of dominant-negative Ksr. A twelfth insertion disrupts two genes, Nrk, a "neurospecific" receptor tyrosine kinase, and Tpp, which encodes a neuropeptidase. These results suggest that Ras1 signaling during oogenesis involves novel components that may be intimately associated with additional signaling processes and with the reorganization of the cytoskeleton. To determine whether these Ras1 Enhancers function upstream or downstream of the Egf receptor, four mutations were tested for their ability to suppress an activated Egfr construct (lambdatop) expressed in oogenesis exclusively in the follicle cells. Mutations in Star and l(2)43Bb had no significant effect upon the lambdatop eggshell defect whereas smt3 and dock alleles significantly suppressed the lambdatop phenotype.

  13. Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Markers for Genetic Mapping in Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Hoskins, Roger A.; Phan, Alexander C.; Naeemuddin, Mohammed; Mapa, Felipa A.; Ruddy, David A.; Ryan, Jessica J.; Young, Lynn M.; Wells, Trent; Kopczynski, Casey; Ellis, Michael C.

    2001-01-01

    For nearly a century, genetic analysis in Drosophila melanogaster has been a powerful tool for analyzing gene function, yet Drosophila lacks the molecular genetic mapping tools that recently have revolutionized human, mouse, and plant genetics. Here, we describe the systematic characterization of a dense set of molecular markers in Drosophila by using a sequence tagged site-based physical map of the genome. We identify 474 biallelic markers in standard laboratory strains of Drosophila that sp...

  14. Cloning of the cDNA for a human homologue of the Drosophila white gene and mapping to chromosome 21q22.3.

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, H.; Rossier, C.; Lalioti, M. D.; Lynn, A.; Chakravarti, A.; Perrin, G.; Antonarakis, S. E.

    1996-01-01

    In an effort to contribute to the transcript map of human chromosome 21 and the understanding of the pathophysiology of trisomy 21, we have used exon trapping to identify fragments of chromosome 21 genes. Two trapped exons, from pools of chromosome 21-specific cosmids, showed homology to the Drosophila white (w) gene. We subsequently cloned the corresponding cDNA for a human homologue of the Drosophila w gene (hW) from human retina and fetal brain cDNA libraries. The gene belongs to the ATP-b...

  15. Analysis, Design, and Evaluation of the UC-Berkeley Wave-Energy Extractor

    KAUST Repository

    Yeung, Ronald W.; Peiffer, Antoine; Tom, Nathan; Matlak, Tomasz

    2010-01-01

    This paper evaluates the technical feasibility and performance characteristics of an ocean-wave energy to electrical energy conversion device that is based on a moving linear generator. The UC-Berkeley design consists of a cylindrical floater, acting as a rotor, which drives a stator consisting of two banks of wound coils. The performance of such a device in waves depends on the hydrodynamics of the floater, the motion of which is strongly coupled to the electromagnetic properties of the generator. Mathematical models are developed to reveal the critical hurdles that can affect the efficiency of the design. A working physical unit is also constructed. The linear generator is first tested in a dry environment to quantify its performance. The complete physical floater and generator system is then tested in a wave tank with a computer-controlled wavemaker. Measurements are compared with theoretical predictions to allow an assessment of the viability of the design and future directions for improvements. Copyright © 2010 by ASME.

  16. Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory institutional plan, FY 1996--2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    The FY 1996--2001 Institutional Plan provides an overview of the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory mission, strategic plan, core business areas, critical success factors, and the resource requirements to fulfill its mission in support of national needs in fundamental science and technology, energy resources, and environmental quality. The Laboratory Strategic Plan section identifies long-range conditions that will influence the Laboratory, as well as potential research trends and management implications. The Core Business Areas section identifies those initiatives that are potential new research programs representing major long-term opportunities for the Laboratory, and the resources required for their implementation. It also summarizes current programs and potential changes in research program activity, science and technology partnerships, and university and science education. The Critical Success Factors section reviews human resources; work force diversity; environment, safety, and health programs; management practices; site and facility needs; and communications and trust. The Resource Projections are estimates of required budgetary authority for the Laboratory`s ongoing research programs. The Institutional Plan is a management report for integration with the Department of Energy`s strategic planning activities, developed through an annual planning process. The plan identifies technical and administrative directions in the context of the national energy policy and research needs and the Department of Energy`s program planning initiatives. Preparation of the plan is coordinated by the Office of Planning and Communications from information contributed by the Laboratory`s scientific and support divisions.

  17. 1-2 GeV synchrotron radiation facility at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkner, K.H.

    1985-10-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS), a dedicated synchrotron radiation facility optimized to generate soft x-ray and vacuum ultraviole (XUV) light using magnetic insertion devices, was proposed by the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory in 1982. It consists of a 1.3-GeV injection system, an electron storage ring optimized at 1.3 GeV (with the capability of 1.9-GeV operation), and a number of photon beamlines emanating from twelve 6-meter-long straight sections, as shown in Fig. 1. In addition, 24 bending-magnet ports will be avialable for development. The ALS was conceived as a research tool whose range and power would stimulate fundamentally new research in fields from biology to materials science (1-4). The conceptual design and associated cost estimate for the ALS have been completed and reviewed by the US Department of Energy (DOE), but preliminary design activities have not yet begun. The focus in this paper is on the history of the ALS as an example of how a technical construction project was conceived, designed, proposed, and validated within the framwork of a national laboratory funded largely by the DOE

  18. The Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory: a new tool for research in atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlachter, A.S.; Robinson, A.L.

    1991-01-01

    The Advanced Light Source, a third-generation national synchrotron-radiation facility now under construction at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, is scheduled to begin serving qualified users across a broad spectrum of research areas in the spring of 1993. Based on a low-emittance electron storage ring optimized to operate at 1.5 GeV, the ALS will have 10 long straight sections available for insertion devices (undulators and wigglers) and 24 high-quality bend-magnet ports. The short pulse width (30-50 ps) will be ideal for time-resolved measurements. Undulators will generate high-brightness partially coherent soft X-ray and ultraviolet (XUV) radiation from below 10 eV to above 2 keV; this radiation is plane polarized. Wigglers and bend magnets will extend the spectrum by generating high fluxes of X-rays to photon energies above 10 keV. The ALS will have an extensive research program in which XUV radiation is used to study matter in allk its varied gaseous, liquid, and solid forms. The high brightness will open new areas of research in the materials sciences, such as spatially resolved spectroscopy (spectromicroscopy), and in biology, such as X-ray microscopy with element-specific sensitivity; the high flux will allow measurements in atomic physics and chemistry to be made with tenuous gas-phase targets. Technological applications could include lithography and nano-fabrication. (orig.)

  19. Design, Analysis, and Evaluation of the UC-Berkeley Wave-Energy Extractor

    KAUST Repository

    Yeung, Ronald W.; Peiffer, Antoine; Tom, Nathan; Matlak, Tomasz

    2012-01-01

    This paper evaluates the technical feasibility and performance characteristics of an ocean-wave energy to electrical energy conversion device that is based on a moving linear generator. The UC-Berkeley design consists of a cylindrical floater, acting as a rotor, which drives a stator consisting of two banks of wound coils. The performance of such a device in waves depends on the hydrodynamics of the floater, the motion of which is strongly coupled to the electromagnetic properties of the generator. Mathematical models are developed to reveal the critical hurdles that can affect the efficiency of the design. A working physical unit is also constructed. The linear generator is first tested in a dry environment to quantify its performance. The complete physical floater and generator system is then tested in a wave tank with a computer-controlled wavemaker. Measurements are compared with theoretical predictions to allow an assessment of the viability of the design and the future directions for improvements. © 2012 American Society of Mechanical Engineers.

  20. Introduction to the 1975 Berkeley Summer Study. [On efficient use of energy in buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dean, E

    1977-05-01

    The 1975 Berkeley Summer Study on the Efficient Use of Energy in Buildings was held to bring together designers and researchers from the building profession, universities, and government agencies for an intensive examination of the problems of improved efficiencies of energy use for the heating and cooling of buildings. The focus of the Study was the development of an understanding of the maximum potential for the use of natural heat and light in what has become known as the ''passive mode'', as well as of the practical difficulties involved. Consequently much of the work is centered on window systems, daylighting, and ventilation. The motivation for the organization of the Study was the fact that buildings in general are not designed, constructed, or operated well from the point of view of energy use, and that the appropriate strategies for maximum energy efficiency are not well understood. There was, in addition, a certain reluctance to refer to the content of the work of the Study as ''energy conservation'' because of the suggestion that seems to occur to the public and the policymakers that conservation means some form of deprivation of a ''lower standard of living''.

  1. Public census data on CD-ROM at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merrill, D.W.

    1992-10-01

    The Comprehensive Epidemiologic Data Resource (CEDR) and Populations at Risk to Environmental Pollution (PAREP) projects, of the Information and Computing Sciences Division (ICSD) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), are using public socio-economic and geographic data files which are available to CEDR and PAREP collaborators via LBL's computing network. At this time 70 CD-ROM diskettes (approximately 36 gigabytes) are on line via the Unix file server cedrcd. lbl. gov. Most of the files are from the US Bureau of the Census, and most pertain to the 1990 Census of Population and Housing. All the CD-ROM diskettes contain documentation in the form of ASCII text files. Printed documentation for most files is available for inspection at University of California Data and Technical Assistance (UC DATA), or the UC Documents Library. Many of the CD-ROM diskettes distributed by the Census Bureau contain software for PC compatible computers, for easily accessing the data. Shared access to the data is maintained through a collaboration among the CEDR and PAREP projects at LBL, and UC DATA, and the UC Documents Library. Via the Sun Network File System (NFS), these data can be exported to Internet computers for direct access by the user's application program(s).

  2. Public census data on CD-ROM at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merrill, D.W.

    1992-10-01

    The Comprehensive Epidemiologic Data Resource (CEDR) and Populations at Risk to Environmental Pollution (PAREP) projects, of the Information and Computing Sciences Division (ICSD) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), are using public socio-economic and geographic data files which are available to CEDR and PAREP collaborators via LBL`s computing network. At this time 70 CD-ROM diskettes (approximately 36 gigabytes) are on line via the Unix file server cedrcd. lbl. gov. Most of the files are from the US Bureau of the Census, and most pertain to the 1990 Census of Population and Housing. All the CD-ROM diskettes contain documentation in the form of ASCII text files. Printed documentation for most files is available for inspection at University of California Data and Technical Assistance (UC DATA), or the UC Documents Library. Many of the CD-ROM diskettes distributed by the Census Bureau contain software for PC compatible computers, for easily accessing the data. Shared access to the data is maintained through a collaboration among the CEDR and PAREP projects at LBL, and UC DATA, and the UC Documents Library. Via the Sun Network File System (NFS), these data can be exported to Internet computers for direct access by the user`s application program(s).

  3. Photometric search for variable stars in the young open cluster Berkeley 59

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lata, Sneh; Pandey, A. K.; Maheswar, G.; Mondal, Soumen; Kumar, Brijesh

    2011-12-01

    We present the time series photometry of stars located in the extremely young open cluster Berkeley 59. Using the 1.04-m telescope at Aryabhatta Research Institute of Observational Sciences (ARIES), Nainital, we have identified 42 variables in a field of ˜13 × 13 arcmin2 around the cluster. The probable members of the cluster have been identified using a (V, V-I) colour-magnitude diagram and a (J-H, H-K) colour-colour diagram. 31 variables have been found to be pre-main-sequence stars associated with the cluster. The ages and masses of the pre-main-sequence stars have been derived from the colour-magnitude diagram by fitting theoretical models to the observed data points. The ages of the majority of the probable pre-main-sequence variable candidates range from 1 to 5 Myr. The masses of these pre-main-sequence variable stars have been found to be in the range of ˜0.3 to ˜3.5 M⊙, and these could be T Tauri stars. The present statistics reveal that about 90 per cent T Tauri stars have period dispersal of the discs of relatively massive stars.

  4. Development of an accelerator-based BNCT facility at the Berkeley Lab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludewigt, B.A.; Bleuel, D.; Chu, W.T.; Donahue, R.J.; Kwan, J.; Reginato, L.L.; Wells, R.P.

    1998-01-01

    An accelerator-based BNCT facility is under construction at the Berkeley Lab. An electrostatic-quadrupole (ESQ) accelerator is under development for the production of neutrons via the 7 Li(p,n) 7 Be reaction at proton energies between 2.3 and 2.5 MeV. A novel type of power supply, an air-core coupled transformer power supply, is being built for the acceleration of beam currents exceeding 50 mA. A metallic lithium target has been developed for handling such high beam currents. Moderator, reflector and neutron beam delimiter have extensively been modeled and designs have been identified which produce epithermal neutron spectra sharply peaked between 10 and 20 keV. These. neutron beams are predicted to deliver significantly higher doses to deep seated brain tumors, up to 50% more near the midline of the brain than is possible with currently available reactor beams. The accelerator neutron source will be suitable for future installation at hospitals

  5. Genotoxicity and antigenotoxicity assessment of shiitake (Lentinula edodes (Berkeley Pegler using the Comet assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CK Miyaji

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The mushroom shiitake (Lentinula edodes (Berkeley Pegler is been widely consumed in many countries, including Brazil, because of its pleasant flavor and reports of its therapeutic properties, although there is little available information on the genotoxicity and/or antigenotoxicity of this mushroom. We used the Comet assay and HEp-2 cells to evaluate the in vitro genotoxic and antigenotoxic activity of aqueous extracts of shiitake prepared in three different concentrations (0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 mg/mL and three different temperatures (4, 22 and 60 °C, using methyl methanesulfonate (MMS as a positive control and untreated cells as a negative control. Two concentrations (1.0 and 1.5 mg/mL of extract prepared at 4 °C and all of the concentrations prepared at 22 ± 2 and 60 °C showed moderate genotoxic activity. To test the protective effect of the three concentrations of the extracts against the genotoxicity induced by methyl methanesulfonate, three protocols were used: pre-treatment, simultaneous-treatment and post-treatment. Treatments were repeated for all combinations of preparation temperature and concentration. Two extracts (22 ± 2 °C 1.0 mg/mL (simultaneous-treatment and 4 °C 0.5 mg/mL (post-treatment showed antigenotoxic activity.

  6. Functional dissection of the Hox protein Abdominal-B in Drosophila cell culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhai, Zongzhao [Key Laboratory of the Zoological Systematics and Evolution, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beichen West Road, Chaoyang, Beijing 100101 (China); CellNetworks - Cluster of Excellence, Centre for Organismal Studies (COS) Heidelberg, University of Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Yang, Xingke, E-mail: yangxk@ioz.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of the Zoological Systematics and Evolution, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beichen West Road, Chaoyang, Beijing 100101 (China); Lohmann, Ingrid, E-mail: ilohmann@flydev.org [CellNetworks - Cluster of Excellence, Centre for Organismal Studies (COS) Heidelberg, University of Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ct340 CRM was identified to be the posterior spiracle enhancer of gene cut. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ct340 is under the direct transcriptional control of Hox protein Abd-B. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An efficient cloning system was developed to assay protein-DNA interaction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New features of Abd-B dependent target gene regulation were detected. -- Abstract: Hox transcription factors regulate the morphogenesis along the anterior-posterior (A/P) body axis through the interaction with small cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) of their target gene, however so far very few Hox CRMs are known and have been analyzed in detail. In this study we have identified a new Hox CRM, ct340, which guides the expression of the cell type specification gene cut (ct) in the posterior spiracle under the direct control of the Hox protein Abdominal-B (Abd-B). Using the ct340 enhancer activity as readout, an efficient cloning system to generate VP16 activation domain fusion protein was developed to unambiguously test protein-DNA interaction in Drosophila cell culture. By functionally dissecting the Abd-B protein, new features of Abd-B dependent target gene regulation were detected. Due to its easy adaptability, this system can be generally used to map functional domains within sequence-specific transcriptional factors in Drosophila cell culture, and thus provide preliminary knowledge of the protein functional domain structure for further in vivo analysis.

  7. Gene expression disruptions of organism versus organ in Drosophila species hybrids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Catron

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid dysfunctions, such as sterility, may result in part from disruptions in the regulation of gene expression. Studies of hybrids within the Drosophila simulans clade have reported genes expressed above or below the expression observed in their parent species, and such misexpression is associated with male sterility in multigenerational backcross hybrids. However, these studies often examined whole bodies rather than testes or had limited replication using less-sensitive but global techniques. Here, we use a new RNA isolation technique to re-examine hybrid gene expression disruptions in both testes and whole bodies from single Drosophila males by real-time quantitative RT-PCR. We find two early-spermatogenesis transcripts are underexpressed in hybrid whole-bodies but not in assays of testes alone, while two late-spermatogenesis transcripts seem to be underexpressed in both whole-bodies and testes alone. Although the number of transcripts surveyed is limited, these results provide some support for a previous hypothesis that the spermatogenesis pathway in these sterile hybrids may be disrupted sometime after the expression of the early meiotic arrest genes.

  8. Nutritional regimens with periodically recurring phases of dietary restriction extend lifespan in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romey-Glüsing, Renja; Li, Yang; Hoffmann, Julia; von Frieling, Jakob; Knop, Mirjam; Pfefferkorn, Roxana; Bruchhaus, Iris; Fink, Christine; Roeder, Thomas

    2018-04-01

    Nutritional interventions such as caloric and dietary restriction increase lifespan in various animal models. To identify alternative and less demanding nutritional interventions that extend lifespan, we subjected fruit flies ( Drosophila melanogaster) to weekly nutritional regimens that involved alternating a conventional diet with dietary restriction. Short periods of dietary restriction (up to 2 d) followed by longer periods of a conventional diet yielded minimal increases in lifespan. We found that 3 or more days of contiguous dietary restriction (DR) was necessary to yield a lifespan extension similar to that observed with persistent DR. Female flies were more responsive to these interventions than males. Physiologic changes known to be associated with prolonged DR, such as reduced metabolic rates, showed the same time course as lifespan extension. Moreover, concurrent transcriptional changes indicative of reduced insulin signaling were identified with DR. These physiologic and transcriptional changes were sustained, as they were detectable several days after switching to conventional diets. Taken together, diets with longer periods of DR extended lifespan concurrently with physiologic and transcriptional changes that may underlie this increase in lifespan.-Romey-Glüsing, R., Li, Y., Hoffmann, J., von Frieling, J., Knop, M., Pfefferkorn, R., Bruchhaus, I., Fink, C., Roeder, T. Nutritional regimens with periodically recurring phases of dietary restriction extend lifespan in Drosophila.

  9. Functional dissection of the Hox protein Abdominal-B in Drosophila cell culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhai, Zongzhao; Yang, Xingke; Lohmann, Ingrid

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► ct340 CRM was identified to be the posterior spiracle enhancer of gene cut. ► ct340 is under the direct transcriptional control of Hox protein Abd-B. ► An efficient cloning system was developed to assay protein–DNA interaction. ► New features of Abd-B dependent target gene regulation were detected. -- Abstract: Hox transcription factors regulate the morphogenesis along the anterior–posterior (A/P) body axis through the interaction with small cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) of their target gene, however so far very few Hox CRMs are known and have been analyzed in detail. In this study we have identified a new Hox CRM, ct340, which guides the expression of the cell type specification gene cut (ct) in the posterior spiracle under the direct control of the Hox protein Abdominal-B (Abd-B). Using the ct340 enhancer activity as readout, an efficient cloning system to generate VP16 activation domain fusion protein was developed to unambiguously test protein–DNA interaction in Drosophila cell culture. By functionally dissecting the Abd-B protein, new features of Abd-B dependent target gene regulation were detected. Due to its easy adaptability, this system can be generally used to map functional domains within sequence-specific transcriptional factors in Drosophila cell culture, and thus provide preliminary knowledge of the protein functional domain structure for further in vivo analysis.

  10. Toll mediated infection response is altered by gravity and spaceflight in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Taylor

    Full Text Available Space travel presents unlimited opportunities for exploration and discovery, but requires better understanding of the biological consequences of long-term exposure to spaceflight. Immune function in particular is relevant for space travel. Human immune responses are weakened in space, with increased vulnerability to opportunistic infections and immune-related conditions. In addition, microorganisms can become more virulent in space, causing further challenges to health. To understand these issues better and to contribute to design of effective countermeasures, we used the Drosophila model of innate immunity to study immune responses in both hypergravity and spaceflight. Focusing on infections mediated through the conserved Toll and Imd signaling pathways, we found that hypergravity improves resistance to Toll-mediated fungal infections except in a known gravitaxis mutant of the yuri gagarin gene. These results led to the first spaceflight project on Drosophila immunity, in which flies that developed to adulthood in microgravity were assessed for immune responses by transcription profiling on return to Earth. Spaceflight alone altered transcription, producing activation of the heat shock stress system. Space flies subsequently infected by fungus failed to activate the Toll pathway. In contrast, bacterial infection produced normal activation of the Imd pathway. We speculate on possible linkage between functional Toll signaling and the heat shock chaperone system. Our major findings are that hypergravity and spaceflight have opposing effects, and that spaceflight produces stress-related transcriptional responses and results in a specific inability to mount a Toll-mediated infection response.

  11. Signalling pathways involved in adult heart formation revealed by gene expression profiling in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Zeitouni

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila provides a powerful system for defining the complex genetic programs that drive organogenesis. Under control of the steroid hormone ecdysone, the adult heart in Drosophila forms during metamorphosis by a remodelling of the larval cardiac organ. Here, we evaluated the extent to which transcriptional signatures revealed by genomic approaches can provide new insights into the molecular pathways that underlie heart organogenesis. Whole-genome expression profiling at eight successive time-points covering adult heart formation revealed a highly dynamic temporal map of gene expression through 13 transcript clusters with distinct expression kinetics. A functional atlas of the transcriptome profile strikingly points to the genomic transcriptional response of the ecdysone cascade, and a sharp regulation of key components belonging to a few evolutionarily conserved signalling pathways. A reverse genetic analysis provided evidence that these specific signalling pathways are involved in discrete steps of adult heart formation. In particular, the Wnt signalling pathway is shown to participate in inflow tract and cardiomyocyte differentiation, while activation of the PDGF-VEGF pathway is required for cardiac valve formation. Thus, a detailed temporal map of gene expression can reveal signalling pathways responsible for specific developmental programs and provides here substantial grasp into heart formation.

  12. The Him gene reveals a balance of inputs controlling muscle differentiation in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liotta, David; Han, Jun; Elgar, Stuart; Garvey, Clare; Han, Zhe; Taylor, Michael V

    2007-08-21

    Tissue development requires the controlled regulation of cell-differentiation programs. In muscle, the Mef2 transcription factor binds to and activates the expression of many genes and has a major positive role in the orchestration of differentiation. However, little is known about how Mef2 activity is regulated in vivo during development. Here, we characterize a gene, Holes in muscle (Him), which our results indicate is part of this control in Drosophila. Him expression rapidly declines as embryonic muscle differentiates, and consistent with this, Him overexpression inhibits muscle differentiation. This inhibitory effect is suppressed by mef2, implicating Him in the mef2 pathway. We then found that Him downregulates the transcriptional activity of Mef2 in both cell culture and in vivo. Furthermore, Him protein binds Groucho, a conserved, transcriptional corepressor, through a WRPW motif and requires this motif and groucho function to inhibit both muscle differentiation and Mef2 activity during development. Together, our results identify a mechanism that can inhibit muscle differentiation in vivo. We conclude that a balance of positive and negative inputs, including Mef2, Him, and Groucho, controls muscle differentiation during Drosophila development and suggest that one outcome is to hold developing muscle cells in a state with differentiation genes poised to be expressed.

  13. Control system for the 2nd generation Berkeley automounters (BAM2) at GM/CA-CAT macromolecular crystallography beamlines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makarov, O., E-mail: makarov@anl.gov [GM/CA-CAT, Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Hilgart, M.; Ogata, C.; Pothineni, S. [GM/CA-CAT, Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Cork, C. [Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2011-09-01

    GM/CA-CAT at Sector 23 of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) is an NIH funded facility for crystallographic structure determination of biological macromolecules by X-ray diffraction. A second-generation Berkeley automounter is being integrated into the beamline control system at the 23BM experimental station. This new device replaces the previous all-pneumatic gripper motions with a combination of pneumatics and XYZ motorized linear stages. The latter adds a higher degree of flexibility to the robot including auto-alignment capability, accommodation of a larger capacity sample Dewar of arbitrary shape, and support for advanced operations such as crystal washing, while preserving the overall simplicity and efficiency of the Berkeley automounter design.

  14. BErkeley Atmospheric CO2 Network (BEACON) - Bringing Measurements of CO2 Emissions to a School Near You

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teige, V. E.; Havel, E.; Patt, C.; Heber, E.; Cohen, R. C.

    2011-12-01

    The University of California at Berkeley in collaboration with the Chabot Space and Science Center describe a set of educational programs, workshops, and exhibits based on a multi-node greenhouse gas and air quality monitoring network being deployed over Oakland, California. Examining raw numerical data using highly engaging and effective geo-data visualization tools like Google Earth can make the science come alive for students, and provide a hook for drawing them into deeper investigations. The Climate Science Investigations teacher workshop at the Chabot Space and Science Center will make use of Google Earth, Excel, and other geo-data visualization tools to step students through the process from data acquisition to discovery. Using multiple data sources, including output from the BErkeley Atmospheric CO2 Network (BEACON) project, participants will be encouraged to explore a variety of different modes of data display toward producing a unique, and ideally insightful, illumination of the data.

  15. Use of a krypton isotope for rapid ion changeover at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory 88-inch cyclotron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soli, George A.; Nichols, Donald K.

    1989-01-01

    An isotope of krypton, Kr86, has been combined with a mix of Ar, Ne, and N ions at the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) source, at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory cyclotron, to provide rapid ion changeover in Single Event Phenomena (SEP) testing. The new technique has been proved out successfully by a recent Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) test in which it was found that there was no measurable contamination from other isotopes.

  16. Activating Transcription Factor 3 Regulates Immune and Metabolic Homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rynes, Jan; Donohoe, Colin D.; Frommolt, Peter; Brodesser, Susanne; Jindra, Marek

    2012-01-01

    Integration of metabolic and immune responses during animal development ensures energy balance, permitting both growth and defense. Disturbed homeostasis causes organ failure, growth retardation, and metabolic disorders. Here, we show that the Drosophila melanogaster activating transcription factor 3 (Atf3) safeguards metabolic and immune system homeostasis. Loss of Atf3 results in chronic inflammation and starvation responses mounted primarily by the larval gut epithelium, while the fat body suffers lipid overload, causing energy imbalance and death. Hyperactive proinflammatory and stress signaling through NF-κB/Relish, Jun N-terminal kinase, and FOXO in atf3 mutants deregulates genes important for immune defense, digestion, and lipid metabolism. Reducing the dose of either FOXO or Relish normalizes both lipid metabolism and gene expression in atf3 mutants. The function of Atf3 is conserved, as human ATF3 averts some of the Drosophila mutant phenotypes, improving their survival. The single Drosophila Atf3 may incorporate the diversified roles of two related mammalian proteins. PMID:22851689

  17. The genetic basis of natural variation in mushroom body size in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwarts, Liesbeth; Vanden Broeck, Lies; Cappuyns, Elisa; Ayroles, Julien F; Magwire, Michael M; Vulsteke, Veerle; Clements, Jason; Mackay, Trudy F C; Callaerts, Patrick

    2015-12-11

    Genetic variation in brain size may provide the basis for the evolution of the brain and complex behaviours. The genetic substrate and the selective pressures acting on brain size are poorly understood. Here we use the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel to map polymorphic variants affecting natural variation in mushroom body morphology. We identify 139 genes and 39 transcription factors and confirm effects on development and adult plasticity. We show correlations between morphology and aggression, sleep and lifespan. We propose that natural variation in adult brain size is controlled by interaction of the environment with gene networks controlling development and plasticity.

  18. Gut-associated microbes of Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broderick, Nichole; Lemaitre, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    There is growing interest in using Drosophila melanogaster to elucidate mechanisms that underlie the complex relationships between a host and its microbiota. In addition to the many genetic resources and tools Drosophila provides, its associated microbiota is relatively simple (1–30 taxa), in contrast to the complex diversity associated with vertebrates (> 500 taxa). These attributes highlight the potential of this system to dissect the complex cellular and molecular interactions that occur between a host and its microbiota. In this review, we summarize what is known regarding the composition of gut-associated microbes of Drosophila and their impact on host physiology. We also discuss these interactions in the context of their natural history and ecology and describe some recent insights into mechanisms by which Drosophila and its gut microbiota interact. “Workers with Drosophila have been considered fortunate in that they deal with the first multicellular invertebrate to be cultured monoxenically (Delcourt and Guyenot, 1910); the first to be handled axenically on a semisynthetic diet (Guyenot, 1917); and the first to be grown on a defined diet (Schultz et al., 1946). This list of advantages is somewhat embarrassing, since it implies an interest in nutrition that, in reality, was only secondary. The very first studies were concerned with the reduction of variability in genetic experiments (Delcourt and Guyenot, 1910) and standardization of the nutritional environment.” -James Sang, 1959 Ann NY Acad 1 PMID:22572876

  19. Org-1-dependent lineage reprogramming generates the ventral longitudinal musculature of the Drosophila heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaub, Christoph; März, Johannes; Reim, Ingolf; Frasch, Manfred

    2015-02-16

    Only few examples of transdifferentiation, which denotes the conversion of one differentiated cell type to another, are known to occur during normal development, and more often, it is associated with regeneration processes. With respect to muscles, dedifferentiation/redifferentiation processes have been documented during post-traumatic muscle regeneration in blastema of newts as well as during myocardial regeneration. As shown herein, the ventral longitudinal muscles of the adult Drosophila heart arise from specific larval alary muscles in a process that represents the first known example of syncytial muscle transdifferentiation via dedifferentiation into mononucleate myoblasts during normal development. We demonstrate that this unique process depends on the reinitiation of a transcriptional program previously employed for embryonic alary muscle development, in which the factors Org-1 (Drosophila Tbx1) and Tailup (Drosophila Islet1) are key components. During metamorphosis, the action of these factors is combined with cell-autonomous inputs from the ecdysone steroid and the Hox gene Ultrabithorax, which provide temporal and spatial specificity to the transdifferentiation events. Following muscle dedifferentiation, inductive cues, particularly from the remodeling heart tube, are required for the redifferentiation of myoblasts into ventral longitudinal muscles. Our results provide new insights into mechanisms of lineage commitment and cell-fate plasticity during development. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Dynamics of the Drosophila circadian clock: theoretical anti-jitter network and controlled chaos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan M Fathallah-Shaykh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Electronic clocks exhibit undesirable jitter or time variations in periodic signals. The circadian clocks of humans, some animals, and plants consist of oscillating molecular networks with peak-to-peak time of approximately 24 hours. Clockwork orange (CWO is a transcriptional repressor of Drosophila direct target genes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Theory and data from a model of the Drosophila circadian clock support the idea that CWO controls anti-jitter negative circuits that stabilize peak-to-peak time in light-dark cycles (LD. The orbit is confined to chaotic attractors in both LD and dark cycles and is almost periodic in LD; furthermore, CWO diminishes the Euclidean dimension of the chaotic attractor in LD. Light resets the clock each day by restricting each molecular peak to the proximity of a prescribed time. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The theoretical results suggest that chaos plays a central role in the dynamics of the Drosophila circadian clock and that a single molecule, CWO, may sense jitter and repress it by its negative loops.

  1. Gene expression during Drosophila melanogaster egg development before and after reproductive diapause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baker Dean A

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the importance of egg development to the female life cycle in Drosophila, global patterns of gene expression have not been examined in detail, primarily due to the difficulty in isolating synchronised developmental stages in sufficient quantities for gene expression profiling. Entry into vitellogenesis is a key stage of oogenesis and by forcing females into reproductive diapause we are able to arrest oogenesis at the pre-vitellogenic stages. Releasing females from diapause allows collection of relatively synchronous developing egg populations and an investigation of some of the transcriptional dynamics apparent before and after reproductive diapause. Results Focusing on gender-biased transcription, we identified mechanisms of egg development suppressed during reproductive dormancy as well as other molecular changes unique to the diapausing female. A microarray based analysis generated a set of 3565 transcripts with at least 2-fold greater expression in females as compared to control males, 1392 such changes were biased during reproductive dormancy. In addition, we also detect 1922 up-regulated transcriptional changes after entry into vitellogenesis, which were classified into discrete blocks of co-expression. We discuss some of the regulatory aspects apparent after re-initiation of egg development, exploring the underlying functions, maternal contribution and evolutionary conservation of co-expression patterns involved in egg production. Conclusion Although much of the work we present is descriptive, fundamental aspects of egg development and gender-biased transcription can be derived from our time-series experiment. We believe that our dataset will facilitate further exploration of the developmental and evolutionary characteristics of oogenesis as well as the nature of reproductive arrest in Drosophila.

  2. Tyrosine phosphorylation and proteolytic cleavage of Notch are required for non-canonical Notch/Abl signaling in Drosophila axon guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, Ramakrishnan; Cox, Eric; Wang, Lei; Kuzina, Irina; Gu, Qun; Giniger, Edward

    2018-01-17

    Notch signaling is required for the development and physiology of nearly every tissue in metazoans. Much of Notch signaling is mediated by transcriptional regulation of downstream target genes, but Notch controls axon patterning in Drosophila by local modulation of Abl tyrosine kinase signaling, via direct interactions with the Abl co-factors Disabled and Trio. Here, we show that Notch-Abl axonal signaling requires both of the proteolytic cleavage events that initiate canonical Notch signaling. We further show that some Notch protein is tyrosine phosphorylated in Drosophila , that this form of the protein is selectively associated with Disabled and Trio, and that relevant tyrosines are essential for Notch-dependent axon patterning but not for canonical Notch-dependent regulation of cell fate. Based on these data, we propose a model for the molecular mechanism by which Notch controls Abl signaling in Drosophila axons. © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  3. Development of a Methodology for Hydrogeological Characterization of Faults: Progress of the Project in Berkeley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, J.; Moriya, T.; Yoshimura, K.; Tsuchi, H.; Karasaki, K.; Onishi, T.; Ueta, K.; Tanaka, S.; Kiho, K.

    2010-12-01

    The Nuclear Waste Management Organization of Japan (NUMO), in collaboration with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), has carried out a project to develop an efficient and practical methodology to characterize hydrologic property of faults since 2007, exclusively for the early stage of siting a deep underground repository. A preliminary flowchart of the characterization program and a classification scheme of fault hydrology based on the geological feature have been proposed. These have been tested through the field characterization program on the Wildcat Fault in Berkeley, California. The Wildcat Fault is a relatively large non-active strike-slip fault which is believed to be a subsidiary of the active Hayward Fault. Our classification scheme assumes the contrasting hydrologic features between the linear northern part and the split/spread southern part of the Wildcat Fault. The field characterization program to date has been concentrated in and around the LBNL site on the southern part of the fault. Several lines of electrical and reflection seismic surveys, and subsequent trench investigations, have revealed the approximate distribution and near-surface features of the Wildcat Fault (see also Onishi, et al. and Ueta, et al.). Three 150m deep boreholes, WF-1 to WF-3, have been drilled on a line normal to the trace of the fault in the LBNL site. Two vertical holes were placed to characterize the undisturbed Miocene sedimentary formations at the eastern and western sides of the fault (WF-1 and WF-2 respectively). WF-2 on the western side intersected the rock formation, which was expected only in WF-1, and several of various intensities. Therefore, WF-3, originally planned as inclined to penetrate the fault, was replaced by the vertical hole further to the west. It again encountered unexpected rocks and faults. Preliminary results of in-situ hydraulic tests suggested that the transmissivity of WF-1 is ten to one hundred times higher than WF-2. The monitoring

  4. A simple grid implementation with Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing using BLAST as a model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watthanai Pinthong

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Development of high-throughput technologies, such as Next-generation sequencing, allows thousands of experiments to be performed simultaneously while reducing resource requirement. Consequently, a massive amount of experiment data is now rapidly generated. Nevertheless, the data are not readily usable or meaningful until they are further analysed and interpreted. Due to the size of the data, a high performance computer (HPC is required for the analysis and interpretation. However, the HPC is expensive and difficult to access. Other means were developed to allow researchers to acquire the power of HPC without a need to purchase and maintain one such as cloud computing services and grid computing system. In this study, we implemented grid computing in a computer training center environment using Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing (BOINC as a job distributor and data manager combining all desktop computers to virtualize the HPC. Fifty desktop computers were used for setting up a grid system during the off-hours. In order to test the performance of the grid system, we adapted the Basic Local Alignment Search Tools (BLAST to the BOINC system. Sequencing results from Illumina platform were aligned to the human genome database by BLAST on the grid system. The result and processing time were compared to those from a single desktop computer and HPC. The estimated durations of BLAST analysis for 4 million sequence reads on a desktop PC, HPC and the grid system were 568, 24 and 5 days, respectively. Thus, the grid implementation of BLAST by BOINC is an efficient alternative to the HPC for sequence alignment. The grid implementation by BOINC also helped tap unused computing resources during the off-hours and could be easily modified for other available bioinformatics software.

  5. SETI with Help from Five Million Volunteers: The Berkeley SETI Efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korpela, E. J.; Anderson, D. P.; Bankay, R.; Cobb, J.; Foster, G.; Howard, A.; Lebofsky, M.; Marcy, G.; Parsons, A.; Siemion, A.; von Korff, J.; Werthimer, D.; Douglas, K. A.

    2009-12-01

    We summarize radio and optical SETI programs based at the University of California, Berkeley. The ongoing SERENDIP V sky survey searches for radio signals at the 300 meter Arecibo Observatory. The currently installed configuration supports 128 million channels over a 200 MHz bandwidth with 1.6 Hz spectral resolution. Frequency stepping allows the spectrometer to cover the full 300 MHz band of the Arecibo L-band receivers. The final configuration will allow data from all 14 receivers in the Arecibo L-band Focal Array to be monitored simultaneously with over 1.8 billion simultaneous channels. SETI@home uses desktop computers volunteers to analyze over 100 TB of at taken at Arecibo. Over 5 million volunteers have run SETI@home during its 10 year history. The SETI@home sky survey is 10 times more sensitive than SERENDIP V but it covers only a 2.5 MHz band, centered on 1420 MHz. SETI@home searches a much wider parameter space, including 14 octaves of signal bandwidth and 15 octaves of pulse period with Doppler drift corrections from -100 Hz/s to +100 Hz/s. The ASTROPULSE project is the first SETI search for μs time scale pulses in the radio spectrum. Because short pulses are dispersed by the interstellar medium, and amount of dispersion is unknown, ASTROPULSE must search through 30,000 possible dispersions. Substantial computing power is required to conduct this search, so the project will use volunteers and their personal computers to carry out the computation (using distributed computing similar to SETI@home). The SEVENDIP optical pulse search looks for ns time scale pulses at visible wavelengths. It utilizes an automated 30 inch telescope, three ultra fast photo multiplier tubes and a coincidence detector. The target list includes F,G,K and M stars, globular cluster and galaxies.

  6. Viruses and Antiviral Immunity in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jie; Cherry, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Viral pathogens present many challenges to organisms, driving the evolution of a myriad of antiviral strategies to combat infections. A wide variety of viruses infect invertebrates, including both natural pathogens that are insect-restricted, and viruses that are transmitted to vertebrates. Studies using the powerful tools available in the model organism Drosophila have expanded our understanding of antiviral defenses against diverse viruses. In this review, we will cover three major areas. First, we will describe the tools used to study viruses in Drosophila. Second, we will survey the major viruses that have been studied in Drosophila. And lastly, we will discuss the well-characterized mechanisms that are active against these diverse pathogens, focusing on non-RNAi mediated antiviral mechanisms. Antiviral RNAi is discussed in another paper in this issue. PMID:23680639

  7. Receptor Tyrosine Kinases in Drosophila Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopko, Richelle; Perrimon, Norbert

    2013-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation plays a significant role in a wide range of cellular processes. The Drosophila genome encodes more than 20 receptor tyrosine kinases and extensive studies in the past 20 years have illustrated their diverse roles and complex signaling mechanisms. Although some receptor tyrosine kinases have highly specific functions, others strikingly are used in rather ubiquitous manners. Receptor tyrosine kinases regulate a broad expanse of processes, ranging from cell survival and proliferation to differentiation and patterning. Remarkably, different receptor tyrosine kinases share many of the same effectors and their hierarchical organization is retained in disparate biological contexts. In this comprehensive review, we summarize what is known regarding each receptor tyrosine kinase during Drosophila development. Astonishingly, very little is known for approximately half of all Drosophila receptor tyrosine kinases. PMID:23732470

  8. Apoptosis in Drosophila: which role for mitochondria?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavier, Amandine; Rincheval-Arnold, Aurore; Colin, Jessie; Mignotte, Bernard; Guénal, Isabelle

    2016-03-01

    It is now well established that the mitochondrion is a central regulator of mammalian cell apoptosis. However, the importance of this organelle in non-mammalian apoptosis has long been regarded as minor, mainly because of the absence of a crucial role for cytochrome c in caspase activation. Recent results indicate that the control of caspase activation and cell death in Drosophila occurs at the mitochondrial level. Numerous proteins, including RHG proteins and proteins of the Bcl-2 family that are key regulators of Drosophila apoptosis, constitutively or transiently localize in mitochondria. These proteins participate in the cell death process at different levels such as degradation of Diap1, a Drosophila IAP, production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species or stimulation of the mitochondrial fission machinery. Here, we review these mitochondrial events that might have their counterpart in human.

  9. Ubiquitylation of the acetyltransferase MOF in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schunter, Sarah; Villa, Raffaella; Flynn, Victoria; Heidelberger, Jan B; Classen, Anne-Kathrin; Beli, Petra; Becker, Peter B

    2017-01-01

    The nuclear acetyltransferase MOF (KAT8 in mammals) is a subunit of at least two multi-component complexes involved in transcription regulation. In the context of complexes of the 'Non-Specific-Lethal' (NSL) type it controls transcription initiation of many nuclear housekeeping genes and of mitochondrial genes. While this function is conserved in metazoans, MOF has an additional, specific function in Drosophila in the context of dosage compensation. As a subunit of the male-specific-lethal dosage compensation complex (MSL-DCC) it contributes to the doubling of transcription output from the single male X chromosome by acetylating histone H4. Proper dosage compensation requires finely tuned levels of MSL-DCC and an appropriate distribution of MOF between the regulatory complexes. The amounts of DCC formed depends directly on the levels of the male-specific MSL2, which orchestrates the assembly of the DCC, including MOF recruitment. We found earlier that MSL2 is an E3 ligase that ubiquitylates most MSL proteins, including MOF, suggesting that ubiquitylation may contribute to a quality control of MOF's overall levels and folding state as well as its partitioning between the complex entities. We now used mass spectrometry to map the lysines in MOF that are ubiquitylated by MSL2 in vitro and identified in vivo ubiquitylation sites of MOF in male and female cells. MSL2-specific ubiquitylation in vivo could not be traced due to the dominance of other, sex-independent ubiquitylation events and conceivably may be rare or transient. Expressing appropriately mutated MOF derivatives we assessed the importance of the ubiquitylated lysines for dosage compensation by monitoring DCC formation and X chromosome targeting in cultured cells, and by genetic complementation of the male-specific-lethal mof2 allele in flies. Our study provides a comprehensive analysis of MOF ubiquitylation as a reference for future studies.

  10. Ubiquitylation of the acetyltransferase MOF in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Schunter

    Full Text Available The nuclear acetyltransferase MOF (KAT8 in mammals is a subunit of at least two multi-component complexes involved in transcription regulation. In the context of complexes of the 'Non-Specific-Lethal' (NSL type it controls transcription initiation of many nuclear housekeeping genes and of mitochondrial genes. While this function is conserved in metazoans, MOF has an additional, specific function in Drosophila in the context of dosage compensation. As a subunit of the male-specific-lethal dosage compensation complex (MSL-DCC it contributes to the doubling of transcription output from the single male X chromosome by acetylating histone H4. Proper dosage compensation requires finely tuned levels of MSL-DCC and an appropriate distribution of MOF between the regulatory complexes. The amounts of DCC formed depends directly on the levels of the male-specific MSL2, which orchestrates the assembly of the DCC, including MOF recruitment. We found earlier that MSL2 is an E3 ligase that ubiquitylates most MSL proteins, including MOF, suggesting that ubiquitylation may contribute to a quality control of MOF's overall levels and folding state as well as its partitioning between the complex entities. We now used mass spectrometry to map the lysines in MOF that are ubiquitylated by MSL2 in vitro and identified in vivo ubiquitylation sites of MOF in male and female cells. MSL2-specific ubiquitylation in vivo could not be traced due to the dominance of other, sex-independent ubiquitylation events and conceivably may be rare or transient. Expressing appropriately mutated MOF derivatives we assessed the importance of the ubiquitylated lysines for dosage compensation by monitoring DCC formation and X chromosome targeting in cultured cells, and by genetic complementation of the male-specific-lethal mof2 allele in flies. Our study provides a comprehensive analysis of MOF ubiquitylation as a reference for future studies.

  11. Microwave effects in Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dardalhon, M.; Averbeck, D.; Berteaud, A.J.

    1979-01-01

    Experiments were set up to investigate the effects of open space microwave irradiation of the millimeter (73 GHz) and the centimeter (17 GHz) range in Drosophila melanogaster. We used the wild type strain Paris and the strain delta carrying melanitic tumors in the 3rd larval stage, in the pupae and the adults. The power densities were up to 100mW.cm -2 for 73 GHz and about 60 mW.cm -2 for microwaves at 17 GHz. After 2h exposure to microwaves of 17 GHz or 73 GHz the hatching of the irradiated eggs and their development were normal. In a few cases there was a tendency towards a diminution of the survival of eggs treated at different stages, of larvae treated in the stages 1, 2 and 3 and of treated pupae. However, this was not always statistically significant. The microwave treatment did not induce teratological changes in the adults. A statistical analysis brought about slight diminutions in the incidence and multiplicity of tumors in adult flies. When wild type females were exposed to microwaves of 17 GHz for 16 or 21 h and crossed with untreated males we observed a marked increase in fertility as compared to untreated samples. The viability and tumor incidence in the offspring was not affected. Similar results were obtained when microwaves treated males were crossed with untreated females

  12. Olfactory memory traces in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Jacob; Krause, William C; Davis, Ronald L

    2008-01-01

    In Drosophila, the fruit fly, coincident exposure to an odor and an aversive electric shock can produce robust behavioral memory. This behavioral memory is thought to be regulated by cellular memory traces within the central nervous system of the fly. These molecular, physiological, or structural changes in neurons, induced by pairing odor and shock, regulate behavior by altering the neurons' response to the learned environment. Recently, novel in vivo functional imaging techniques have allowed researchers to observe cellular memory traces in intact animals. These investigations have revealed interesting temporal and spatial dynamics of cellular memory traces. First, a short-term cellular memory trace was discovered that exists in the antennal lobe, an early site of olfactory processing. This trace represents the recruitment of new synaptic activity into the odor representation and forms for only a short period of time just after training. Second, an intermediate-term cellular memory trace was found in the dorsal paired medial neuron, a neuron thought to play a role in stabilizing olfactory memories. Finally, a long-term protein synthesis-dependent cellular memory trace was discovered in the mushroom bodies, a structure long implicated in olfactory learning and memory. Therefore, it appears that aversive olfactory associations are encoded by multiple cellular memory traces that occur in different regions of the brain with different temporal domains.

  13. Transcriptional regulation by competing transcription factor modules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rutger Hermsen

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Gene regulatory networks lie at the heart of cellular computation. In these networks, intracellular and extracellular signals are integrated by transcription factors, which control the expression of transcription units by binding to cis-regulatory regions on the DNA. The designs of both eukaryotic and prokaryotic cis-regulatory regions are usually highly complex. They frequently consist of both repetitive and overlapping transcription factor binding sites. To unravel the design principles of these promoter architectures, we have designed in silico prokaryotic transcriptional logic gates with predefined input-output relations using an evolutionary algorithm. The resulting cis-regulatory designs are often composed of modules that consist of tandem arrays of binding sites to which the transcription factors bind cooperatively. Moreover, these modules often overlap with each other, leading to competition between them. Our analysis thus identifies a new signal integration motif that is based upon the interplay between intramodular cooperativity and intermodular competition. We show that this signal integration mechanism drastically enhances the capacity of cis-regulatory domains to integrate signals. Our results provide a possible explanation for the complexity of promoter architectures and could be used for the rational design of synthetic gene circuits.

  14. Targeting Transcription Elongation Machinery for Breast Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Luo CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: University of California, Berkeley Berkeley, CA 94704 REPORT DATE: May 2016 TYPE OF REPORT: Annual PREPARED FOR...ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER University of California, Berkeley BERKELEY, CA 94704 9. SPONSORING...molecules. We have employed the CRISPR /Cas9 genome-editing tool to knock out the gene encoding the SEC component AFF4 or knock in a mutant cyclin T1 (AAG

  15. Longevity and the stress response in Drosophila

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vermeulen, Corneel J.; Loeschcke, Volker

    2007-01-01

    briefly review the state of the art of research on ageing and longevity in the model organism Drosophila, with focus on the role of the general stress response. We will conclude by contemplating some of the implications of the findings in this research and will suggest several directions for future...... research. Keywords: Ageing; Stress response; Hsp; Drosophila; Stress......The concept that lifespan is a function of the capacity to withstand extrinsic stress is very old. In concordance with this, long-lived individuals often have increased resistance against a variety of stresses throughout life. Genes underlying the stress response may therefore have the ability...

  16. BMPs regulate msx gene expression in the dorsal neuroectoderm of Drosophila and vertebrates by distinct mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteves, Francisco F; Springhorn, Alexander; Kague, Erika; Taylor, Erika; Pyrowolakis, George; Fisher, Shannon; Bier, Ethan

    2014-09-01

    In a broad variety of bilaterian species the trunk central nervous system (CNS) derives from three primary rows of neuroblasts. The fates of these neural progenitor cells are determined in part by three conserved transcription factors: vnd/nkx2.2, ind/gsh and msh/msx in Drosophila melanogaster/vertebrates, which are expressed in corresponding non-overlapping patterns along the dorsal-ventral axis. While this conserved suite of "neural identity" gene expression strongly suggests a common ancestral origin for the patterning systems, it is unclear whether the original regulatory mechanisms establishing these patterns have been similarly conserved during evolution. In Drosophila, genetic evidence suggests that Bone Morphogenetic Proteins (BMPs) act in a dosage-dependent fashion to repress expression of neural identity genes. BMPs also play a dose-dependent role in patterning the dorsal and lateral regions of the vertebrate CNS, however, the mechanism by which they achieve such patterning has not yet been clearly established. In this report, we examine the mechanisms by which BMPs act on cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) that control localized expression of the Drosophila msh and zebrafish (Danio rerio) msxB in the dorsal central nervous system (CNS). Our analysis suggests that BMPs act differently in these organisms to regulate similar patterns of gene expression in the neuroectoderm: repressing msh expression in Drosophila, while activating msxB expression in the zebrafish. These findings suggest that the mechanisms by which the BMP gradient patterns the dorsal neuroectoderm have reversed since the divergence of these two ancient lineages.

  17. BMPs regulate msx gene expression in the dorsal neuroectoderm of Drosophila and vertebrates by distinct mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco F Esteves

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In a broad variety of bilaterian species the trunk central nervous system (CNS derives from three primary rows of neuroblasts. The fates of these neural progenitor cells are determined in part by three conserved transcription factors: vnd/nkx2.2, ind/gsh and msh/msx in Drosophila melanogaster/vertebrates, which are expressed in corresponding non-overlapping patterns along the dorsal-ventral axis. While this conserved suite of "neural identity" gene expression strongly suggests a common ancestral origin for the patterning systems, it is unclear whether the original regulatory mechanisms establishing these patterns have been similarly conserved during evolution. In Drosophila, genetic evidence suggests that Bone Morphogenetic Proteins (BMPs act in a dosage-dependent fashion to repress expression of neural identity genes. BMPs also play a dose-dependent role in patterning the dorsal and lateral regions of the vertebrate CNS, however, the mechanism by which they achieve such patterning has not yet been clearly established. In this report, we examine the mechanisms by which BMPs act on cis-regulatory modules (CRMs that control localized expression of the Drosophila msh and zebrafish (Danio rerio msxB in the dorsal central nervous system (CNS. Our analysis suggests that BMPs act differently in these organisms to regulate similar patterns of gene expression in the neuroectoderm: repressing msh expression in Drosophila, while activating msxB expression in the zebrafish. These findings suggest that the mechanisms by which the BMP gradient patterns the dorsal neuroectoderm have reversed since the divergence of these two ancient lineages.

  18. The Drosophila surface glia transcriptome: evolutionary conserved blood-brain barrier processes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael K DeSalvo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available AbstractCentral nervous system (CNS function is dependent on the stringent regulation of metabolites, drugs, cells, and pathogens exposed to the CNS space. Cellular blood-brain barrier (BBB structures are highly specific checkpoints governing entry and exit of all small molecules to and from the brain interstitial space, but the precise mechanisms that regulate the BBB are not well understood. In addition, the BBB has long been a challenging obstacle to the pharmacologic treatment of CNS diseases; thus model systems that can parse the functions of the BBB are highly desirable. In this study, we sought to define the transcriptome of the adult Drosophila melanogaster BBB by isolating the BBB surface glia with FACS and profiling their gene expression with microarrays. By comparing the transcriptome of these surface glia to that of all brain glia, brain neurons, and whole brains, we present a catalog of transcripts that are selectively enriched at the Drosophila BBB. We found that the fly surface glia show high expression of many ABC and SLC transporters, cell adhesion molecules, metabolic enzymes, signaling molecules, and components of xenobiotic metabolism pathways. Using gene sequence-based alignments, we compare the Drosophila and Murine BBB transcriptomes and discover many shared chemoprotective and small molecule control pathways, thus affirming the relevance of invertebrate models for studying evolutionary conserved BBB properties. The Drosophila BBB transcriptome is valuable to vertebrate and insect biologists alike as a resource for studying proteins underlying diffusion barrier development and maintenance, glial biology, and regulation of drug transport at tissue barriers.

  19. The Drosophila surface glia transcriptome: evolutionary conserved blood-brain barrier processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSalvo, Michael K; Hindle, Samantha J; Rusan, Zeid M; Orng, Souvinh; Eddison, Mark; Halliwill, Kyle; Bainton, Roland J

    2014-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) function is dependent on the stringent regulation of metabolites, drugs, cells, and pathogens exposed to the CNS space. Cellular blood-brain barrier (BBB) structures are highly specific checkpoints governing entry and exit of all small molecules to and from the brain interstitial space, but the precise mechanisms that regulate the BBB are not well understood. In addition, the BBB has long been a challenging obstacle to the pharmacologic treatment of CNS diseases; thus model systems that can parse the functions of the BBB are highly desirable. In this study, we sought to define the transcriptome of the adult Drosophila melanogaster BBB by isolating the BBB surface glia with fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) and profiling their gene expression with microarrays. By comparing the transcriptome of these surface glia to that of all brain glia, brain neurons, and whole brains, we present a catalog of transcripts that are selectively enriched at the Drosophila BBB. We found that the fly surface glia show high expression of many ATP-binding cassette (ABC) and solute carrier (SLC) transporters, cell adhesion molecules, metabolic enzymes, signaling molecules, and components of xenobiotic metabolism pathways. Using gene sequence-based alignments, we compare the Drosophila and Murine BBB transcriptomes and discover many shared chemoprotective and small molecule control pathways, thus affirming the relevance of invertebrate models for studying evolutionary conserved BBB properties. The Drosophila BBB transcriptome is valuable to vertebrate and insect biologists alike as a resource for studying proteins underlying diffusion barrier development and maintenance, glial biology, and regulation of drug transport at tissue barriers.

  20. Characterization of the effect of Cr(VI) on humoral innate immunity using Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pragya, P; Shukla, A K; Murthy, R C; Abdin, M Z; Kar Chowdhuri, D

    2015-11-01

    With the advancement of human race, different anthropogenic activities have heaped the environment with chemicals that can cause alteration in the immune system of exposed organism. As a first line of barrier, the evolutionary conserved innate immunity is crucial for the health of an organism. However, there is paucity of information regarding in vivo assessment of the effect of environmental chemicals on innate immunity. Therefore, we examined the effect of a widely used environmental chemical, Cr(VI), on humoral innate immune response using Drosophila melanogaster. The adverse effect of Cr(VI) on host humoral response was characterized by decreased gene expression of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) in the exposed organism. Concurrently, a significantly decreased transcription of humoral pathway receptors (Toll and PGRP) and triglyceride level along with inhibition of antioxidant enzyme activities were observed in exposed organism. This in turn weakened the immune response of exposed organism that was manifested by their reduced resistance against bacterial infection. In addition, overexpression of the components of humoral immunity particularly Diptericin benefits Drosophila from Cr(VI)-induced humoral immune-suppressive effect. To our knowledge, this is the first report regarding negative impact of an environmental chemical on humoral innate immune response of Drosophila along with subsequent protection by AMPs, which may provide novel insight into host-chemical interactions. Also, our data validate the utility and sensitivity of Drosophila as a model that could be used for screening the possible risk of environmental chemicals on innate immunity with minimum ethical concern that can be further extrapolated to higher organisms. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. WRKY transcription factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakshi, Madhunita; Oelmüller, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    WRKY transcription factors are one of the largest families of transcriptional regulators found exclusively in plants. They have diverse biological functions in plant disease resistance, abiotic stress responses, nutrient deprivation, senescence, seed and trichome development, embryogenesis, as well as additional developmental and hormone-controlled processes. WRKYs can act as transcriptional activators or repressors, in various homo- and heterodimer combinations. Here we review recent progress on the function of WRKY transcription factors in Arabidopsis and other plant species such as rice, potato, and parsley, with a special focus on abiotic, developmental, and hormone-regulated processes. PMID:24492469

  2. Identification of functional elements and regulatory circuits by Drosophila modENCODE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Sushmita; Ernst, Jason; Kharchenko, Peter V.; Kheradpour, Pouya; Negre, Nicolas; Eaton, Matthew L.; Landolin, Jane M.; Bristow, Christopher A.; Ma, Lijia; Lin, Michael F.; Washietl, Stefan; Arshinoff, Bradley I.; Ay, Ferhat; Meyer, Patrick E.; Robine, Nicolas; Washington, Nicole L.; Stefano, Luisa Di; Berezikov, Eugene; Brown, Christopher D.; Candeias, Rogerio; Carlson, Joseph W.; Carr, Adrian; Jungreis, Irwin; Marbach, Daniel; Sealfon, Rachel; Tolstorukov, Michael Y.; Will, Sebastian; Alekseyenko, Artyom A.; Artieri, Carlo; Booth, Benjamin W.; Brooks, Angela N.; Dai, Qi; Davis, Carrie A.; Duff, Michael O.; Feng, Xin; Gorchakov, Andrey A.; Gu, Tingting; Henikoff, Jorja G.; Kapranov, Philipp; Li, Renhua; MacAlpine, Heather K.; Malone, John; Minoda, Aki; Nordman, Jared; Okamura, Katsutomo; Perry, Marc; Powell, Sara K.; Riddle, Nicole C.; Sakai, Akiko; Samsonova, Anastasia; Sandler, Jeremy E.; Schwartz, Yuri B.; Sher, Noa; Spokony, Rebecca; Sturgill, David; van Baren, Marijke; Wan, Kenneth H.; Yang, Li; Yu, Charles; Feingold, Elise; Good, Peter; Guyer, Mark; Lowdon, Rebecca; Ahmad, Kami; Andrews, Justen; Berger, Bonnie; Brenner, Steven E.; Brent, Michael R.; Cherbas, Lucy; Elgin, Sarah C. R.; Gingeras, Thomas R.; Grossman, Robert; Hoskins, Roger A.; Kaufman, Thomas C.; Kent, William; Kuroda, Mitzi I.; Orr-Weaver, Terry; Perrimon, Norbert; Pirrotta, Vincenzo; Posakony, James W.; Ren, Bing; Russell, Steven; Cherbas, Peter; Graveley, Brenton R.; Lewis, Suzanna; Micklem, Gos; Oliver, Brian; Park, Peter J.; Celniker, Susan E.; Henikoff, Steven; Karpen, Gary H.; Lai, Eric C.; MacAlpine, David M.; Stein, Lincoln D.; White, Kevin P.; Kellis, Manolis

    2010-12-22

    To gain insight into how genomic information is translated into cellular and developmental programs, the Drosophila model organism Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (modENCODE) project is comprehensively mapping transcripts, histone modifications, chromosomal proteins, transcription factors, replication proteins and intermediates, and nucleosome properties across a developmental time course and in multiple cell lines. We have generated more than 700 data sets and discovered protein-coding, noncoding, RNA regulatory, replication, and chromatin elements, more than tripling the annotated portion of the Drosophila genome. Correlated activity patterns of these elements reveal a functional regulatory network, which predicts putative new functions for genes, reveals stage- and tissue-specific regulators, and enables gene-expression prediction. Our results provide a foundation for directed experimental and computational studies in Drosophila and related species and also a model for systematic data integration toward comprehensive genomic and functional annotation. Several years after the complete genetic sequencing of many species, it is still unclear how to translate genomic information into a functional map of cellular and developmental programs. The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) (1) and model organism ENCODE (modENCODE) (2) projects use diverse genomic assays to comprehensively annotate the Homo sapiens (human), Drosophila melanogaster (fruit fly), and Caenorhabditis elegans (worm) genomes, through systematic generation and computational integration of functional genomic data sets. Previous genomic studies in flies have made seminal contributions to our understanding of basic biological mechanisms and genome functions, facilitated by genetic, experimental, computational, and manual annotation of the euchromatic and heterochromatic genome (3), small genome size, short life cycle, and a deep knowledge of development, gene function, and chromosome biology. The functions

  3. A genetic screen in Drosophila implicates Sex comb on midleg (Scm) in tissue overgrowth and mechanisms of Scm degradation by Wds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jiwei; Jin, Dan

    2015-05-01

    The sex comb on midleg (scm) gene encodes a transcriptional repressor and belongs to the Polycomb group (PcG) of genes, which regulates growth in Drosophila. Scm interacts with Polyhomeotic (a PcG protein) in vitro by recognizing its SPM domain. The homologous human protein, Sex comb on midleg-like 2 (Scml2), has been implicated in malignant brain tumors. Will die slowly (Wds) is another factor that regulates Drosophila development, and its homologous human protein, WD repeat domain 5(Wdr5), is part of the mixed lineage leukemia 1(MLL1) complex that promotes histone H3Lys4 methylation. Like Scml2, Wdr5 has been implicated in certain cancers; this protein plays an important role in leukemogenesis. In this study, we find that loss-of-function mutations in Scm result in non-autonomous tissue overgrowth in Drosophila, and determine that Scm is essential for ommatidium development and important for cell survival in Drosophila. Furthermore, our research suggests a relationship between Wds and Scm; Wds promotes Scm degradation through ubiquitination in vitro in Drosophila. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Expressionof Drosophila FOXO regulates growth and can phenocopy starvation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lockyer Joseph M

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Components of theinsulin signaling pathway are important regulators of growth. TheFOXO (forkhead box, sub-group "O" transcriptionfactors regulate cellular processes under conditions of low levelsof insulin signaling. Studies in mammalian cell culture show thatactivation of FOXO transcription factors causes cell death or cellcycle arrest. The Caenorhabiditis elegans homologue ofFOXO, Daf-16, is required for the formation of dauer larvae in responseto nutritional stress. In addition, FOXO factors have been implicatedin stress resistance and longevity. Results We have identifiedthe Drosophila melanogaster homologue of FOXO (dFOXO,which is conserved in amino acid sequence compared with the mammalianFOXO homologues and Daf-16. Expression of dFOXO during early larvaldevelopment causes inhibition of larval growth and alterations infeeding behavior. Inhibition of larval growth is reversible upondiscontinuation of dFOXO expression. Expression of dFOXO duringthe third larval instar or at low levels during development leadsto the generation of adults that are reduced in size. Analysis ofthe wings and eyes of these small flies indicates that the reductionin size is due to decreases in cell size and cell number. Overexpressionof dFOXO in the developing eye leads to a characteristic phenotypewith reductions in cell size and cell number. This phenotype canbe rescued by co-expression of upstream insulin signaling components,dPI3K and dAkt, however, this rescue is not seen when FOXO is mutatedto a constitutively active form. Conclusions dFOXO is conservedin both sequence and regulatory mechanisms when compared with otherFOXO homologues. The establishment of Drosophila as a model forthe study of FOXO transcription factors should prove beneficialto determining the biological role of these signaling molecules.The alterations in larval development seen upon overexpression ofdFOXO closely mimic the phenotypic effects of starvation, suggestinga

  5. Hormetic efficacy of rutin to promote longevity in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Debarati; Chitnis, Atith; Talekar, Aishwarya; Mulay, Prajakta; Makkar, Manyata; James, Joel; Thirumurugan, Kavitha

    2017-06-01

    Hormetins are compounds that mediate hormesis by being beneficial at low doses but detrimental at high doses. Recent studies have highlighted that many compounds that extended lifespan in model organisms did so by mediating hormesis. Rutin is a glycosylate conjugate of quercetin and rutinose and is abundant in citrus fruits and buckwheat seeds. Rutin possess ROS scavenging, anti-cancer, cardio-protective, skin-regenerative and neuro-protective properties. Drosophila melanogaster is an attractive model organism for longevity studies owing to its homology of organ and cellular-pathways with mammals. In this study, we aimed to understand the effect of rutin on extending longevity in Drosophila melanogaster. Male and female flies were administered with a range of rutin doses (100-800 µM) to analyse whether rutin mediated lifespan-extension by hormesis. Effect of rutin on physiological parameters like food intake, fecundity, climbing activity, development and resistance to various stresses was also studied. Lifespan assays showed that rutin at 200 and 400 µM significantly extended median lifespan in both male and female flies beyond which flies exhibited drastically reduced longevity. Increase in survival at 400 µM was associated with reduced food intake and fecundity. Flies exhibited improved climbing capability with both 200 and 400 µM rutin. Flies fed with 100 and 200 µM rutin exhibited enhanced survival upon exposure to oxidative stress with 400 µM rutin exhibiting no improvement in median lifespan following oxidative stress. Analysis of endogenous peroxide upon treatment with rutin (100-400 µM) with or without 5% H 2 O 2 showed elevated levels of endogenous peroxide with 400 µM rutin whereas no increase in hydrogen peroxide level was observed with rutin at 100 and 200 µM. Finally, gene expression studies in male flies revealed that rutin treatment at 200 and/or 400 µM elevated transcript levels of dFoxO, MnSod, Cat, dTsc1, dTsc2, Thor, dAtg1, d

  6. Neural stem cell-encoded temporal patterning delineates an early window of malignant susceptibility in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narbonne-Reveau, Karine; Lanet, Elodie; Dillard, Caroline; Foppolo, Sophie; Chen, Ching-Huan; Parrinello, Hugues; Rialle, Stéphanie; Sokol, Nicholas S; Maurange, Cédric

    2016-06-14

    Pediatric neural tumors are often initiated during early development and can undergo very rapid transformation. However, the molecular basis of this early malignant susceptibility remains unknown. During Drosophila development, neural stem cells (NSCs) divide asymmetrically and generate intermediate progenitors that rapidly differentiate in neurons. Upon gene inactivation, these progeny can dedifferentiate and generate malignant tumors. Here, we find that intermediate progenitors are prone to malignancy only when born during an early window of development while expressing the transcription factor Chinmo, and the mRNA-binding proteins Imp/IGF2BP and Lin-28. These genes compose an oncogenic module that is coopted upon dedifferentiation of early-born intermediate progenitors to drive unlimited tumor growth. In late larvae, temporal transcription factor progression in NSCs silences the module, thereby limiting mitotic potential and terminating the window of malignant susceptibility. Thus, this study identifies the gene regulatory network that confers malignant potential to neural tumors with early developmental origins.

  7. DISCO interacting protein 2 determines direction of axon projection under the regulation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase in the Drosophila mushroom body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitta, Yohei; Sugie, Atsushi

    2017-01-01

    Precisely controlled axon guidance for complex neuronal wiring is essential for appropriate neuronal function. c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) was found to play a role in axon guidance recently as well as in cell proliferation, protection and apoptosis. In spite of many genetic and molecular studies on these biological processes regulated by JNK, how JNK regulates axon guidance accurately has not been fully explained thus far. To address this question, we use the Drosophila mushroom body (MB) as a model since the α/β axons project in two distinct directions. Here we show that DISCO interacting protein 2 (DIP2) is required for the accurate direction of axonal guidance. DIP2 expression is under the regulation of Basket (Bsk), the Drosophila homologue of JNK. We additionally found that the Bsk/DIP2 pathway is independent from the AP-1 transcriptional factor complex pathway, which is directly activated by Bsk. In conclusion, our findings revealed DIP2 as a novel effector downstream of Bsk modulating the direction of axon projection. - Highlights: • DIP2 is required for accurate direction of axon guidance in Drosophila mushroom body. • DIP2 is a downstream of JNK in the axon guidance of Drosophila mushroom body neuron. • JNK/DIP2 pathway is independent from JNK/AP-1 transcriptional factor complex pathway.

  8. Genetic changeover in Drosophila populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallace, B.

    1986-01-01

    Three populations of Drosophila melanogaster that were daughter populations of two others with histories of high, continuous radiation exposure [population 5 (irradiated, small population size) gave rise to populations 17 (small) and 18 (large); population 6 (irradiated, large population size) gave rise to population 19 (large)] were maintained for 1 year with no radiation exposure. The frequency with which random combinations of second chromosomes taken from population 19 proved to be lethal changed abruptly after about 8 months, thus revealing the origin of a selectively favored element in that population. (This element may or may not have been the cause of the lethality.) A comparison of the loss of lethals in populations 17 and 18 with a loss that occurred concurrently in the still-irradiated population 5 suggests that a second, selectively favored element had arisen in that population just before populations 17 and 18 were split off. This element was on a nonlethal chromosome. The result in population 5 was the elimination of many lethals from that population, followed by a subsequent increase as mutations occurred in the favored nonlethal chromosome. Populations 17 and 18, with no radiation exposure, underwent a loss of lethals with no subsequent increase. The events described here, as well as others to be described elsewhere, suggest that populations may be subject to episodic periods of rapid gene frequency changes that occur under intense selection pressure. In the instances in which the changeover was revealed by the elimination of preexisting lethals, earlier lethal frequencies were reduced by approximately one-half; the selectively favored elements appear, then, to be favored in the heterozygous--not homozygous--condition

  9. Acute Sleep Deprivation Enhances Post-Infection Sleep and Promotes Survival during Bacterial Infection in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Tzu-Hsing; Williams, Julie A.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Sleep is known to increase as an acute response to infection. However, the function of this behavioral response in host defense is not well understood. To address this problem, we evaluated the effect of acute sleep deprivation on post-infection sleep and immune function in Drosophila. Setting: Laboratory. Participants: Drosophila melanogaster. Methods and Results: Flies were subjected to sleep deprivation before (early DEP) or after (late DEP) bacterial infection. Relative to a non-deprived control, flies subjected to early DEP had enhanced sleep after infection as well as increased bacterial clearance and survival outcome. Flies subjected to late DEP experienced enhanced sleep following the deprivation period, and showed a modest improvement in survival outcome. Continuous DEP (early and late DEP) throughout infection also enhanced sleep later during infection and improved survival. However, improved survival in flies subjected to late or continuous DEP did not occur until after flies had experienced sleep. During infection, both early and late DEP enhanced NFκB transcriptional activity as measured by a luciferase reporter (κB-luc) in living flies. Early DEP also increased NFκB activity prior to infection. Flies that were deficient in expression of either the Relish or Dif NFκB transcription factors showed normal responses to early DEP. However, the effect of early DEP on post-infection sleep and survival was abolished in double mutants, which indicates that Relish and Dif have redundant roles in this process. Conclusions: Acute sleep deprivation elevated NFκB-dependent activity, increased post-infection sleep, and improved survival during bacterial infection. Citation: Kuo TH, Williams JA. Acute sleep deprivation enhances post-infection sleep and promotes survival during bacterial infection in Drosophila. SLEEP 2014;37(5):859-869. PMID:24790264

  10. Target Selection and Deselection at the Berkeley StructuralGenomics Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandonia, John-Marc; Kim, Sung-Hou; Brenner, Steven E.

    2005-03-22

    At the Berkeley Structural Genomics Center (BSGC), our goalis to obtain a near-complete structural complement of proteins in theminimal organisms Mycoplasma genitalium and M. pneumoniae, two closelyrelated pathogens. Current targets for structure determination have beenselected in six major stages, starting with those predicted to be mosttractable to high throughput study and likely to yield new structuralinformation. We report on the process used to select these proteins, aswell as our target deselection procedure. Target deselection reducesexperimental effort by eliminating targets similar to those recentlysolved by the structural biology community or other centers. We measurethe impact of the 69 structures solved at the BSGC as of July 2004 onstructure prediction coverage of the M. pneumoniae and M. genitaliumproteomes. The number of Mycoplasma proteins for which thefold couldfirst be reliably assigned based on structures solved at the BSGC (24 M.pneumoniae and 21 M. genitalium) is approximately 25 percent of the totalresulting from work at all structural genomics centers and the worldwidestructural biology community (94 M. pneumoniae and 86M. genitalium)during the same period. As the number of structures contributed by theBSGC during that period is less than 1 percent of the total worldwideoutput, the benefits of a focused target selection strategy are apparent.If the structures of all current targets were solved, the percentage ofM. pneumoniae proteins for which folds could be reliably assigned wouldincrease from approximately 57 percent (391 of 687) at present to around80 percent (550 of 687), and the percentage of the proteome that could beaccurately modeled would increase from around 37 percent (254 of 687) toabout 64 percent (438 of 687). In M. genitalium, the percentage of theproteome that could be structurally annotated based on structures of ourremaining targets would rise from 72 percent (348 of 486) to around 76percent (371 of 486), with the

  11. Identification and characterization of pyrokinin and CAPA peptides, and corresponding GPCRs from spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Man-Yeon; Ahn, Seung-Joon; Kim, A Young; Koh, Youngho

    2017-05-15

    The family of FXPRLamide peptides serves as a major insect hormone. It is characterized by a core active amino acid sequence conserved at the C-terminal ends, and provides various physiological roles across the Insecta. In this study we identified and characterized pyrokinin (PK) and CAPA cDNAs encoding two FXPRLamide peptides, pyrokinin and CAPA-DH (diapause hormone), and two corresponding G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) from spotted wing drosophila (SWD), Drosophila suzukii. Expressions of PK and CAPA mRNAs were differentially observed during all life stages except the embryo, and the detection of CAPA transcription was relatively strong compared with the PK gene in SWD. Both D. suzukii pyrokinin receptor (DrosuPKr) and CAPA-DH receptor (DrosuCAPA-DHr) were functionally expressed and confirmed through binding to PK and DH peptides. Differential expression of two GPCRs occurred during all life stages; a strong transcription of DrosuPKr was observed in the 3rd instar. DrosuCAPA-DHr was clearly expressed from the embryo to the larva, but not detected in the adult. Gene regulation during the life stages was not synchronized between ligand and receptor. For example, SWD CAPA mRNA has been up-regulated in the adult while CAPA-DHr was down-regulated. The difference could be from the CAPA mRNA translating multiple peptides including CAPA-DH and two CAPA-PVK (periviscerokinin) peptides to act on different receptors. Comparing the genes of SWD PK, CAPA, PKr and CAPA-DHr to four corresponding genes of D. melanogaster, SWD CAPA and the receptor are more similar to D. melanogaster than PK and the receptor. These data suggest that the CAPA gene could be evolutionally more conserved to have a common biological role in insects. In addition, the effect of Kozak sequences was investigated by the expression of the GPCRs with or without Kozak sequences in Sf9 insect cells. The Kozak sequenced PK receptor was significantly less active than the original (= no Kozak sequenced

  12. Drosophila melanogaster deoxyribonucleoside kinase activates gemcitabine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knecht, Wolfgang; Mikkelsen, N.E.; Clausen, A.R.

    2009-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster multisubstrate deoxyribonucleoside kinase (Dm-dNK) can additionally sensitize human cancer cell lines towards the anti-cancer drug gemcitabine. We show that this property is based on the Dm-dNK ability to efficiently phosphorylate gemcitabine. The 2.2 angstrom resolution...

  13. Functional Neuroanatomy of "Drosophila" Olfactory Memory Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guven-Ozkan, Tugba; Davis, Ronald L.

    2014-01-01

    New approaches, techniques and tools invented over the last decade and a half have revolutionized the functional dissection of neural circuitry underlying "Drosophila" learning. The new methodologies have been used aggressively by researchers attempting to answer three critical questions about olfactory memories formed with appetitive…

  14. Second-Order Conditioning in "Drosophila"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabone, Christopher J.; de Belle, J. Steven

    2011-01-01

    Associative conditioning in "Drosophila melanogaster" has been well documented for several decades. However, most studies report only simple associations of conditioned stimuli (CS, e.g., odor) with unconditioned stimuli (US, e.g., electric shock) to measure learning or establish memory. Here we describe a straightforward second-order conditioning…

  15. Behavioural reproductive isolation and speciation in Drosophila

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the genus Drosophila, the phenomenon of behavioural reproductive isolation, which is an important type of premating (prezygotic) reproductive isolating mechanisms, has been extensively studied and interesting data have been documented. In many cases incomplete sexual isolation has been observed and the pattern ...

  16. Radiation effects on the drosophila melanogaster genoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arceo-Maldonado, C.

    1989-01-01

    When DNA of living beings has been damaged, the cells show different responses depending on their physiological state. Repair mechanisms can be classified into two groups: constitutive which are always present in the cells and inductible, which must be stimulated to show themselves. It is suggested that a repair mechanism exists in the drosophila ovules which act upon the damage present in mature spermatozoids. Our aim is to verify whether or not a radiation dosis applied to the female drosophila will modify the frequency of individuals which have lost the paternal sex chromosomes. YW/YW virgin females and XEZ males and fbb-/bS Y y + y were mated for two days in order to collect radiation treated spermatozoids. The results were consistent as to the parameters being evaluated and lead one to suppose that the radiation applied to the female drosophila produced some changes in the ovule metabolism which reduced the frequency of individuals with lost chromosomes. It is believed that ionizing radiation interferes with the repair mechanisms that are existent and constitutive, retarding and hindering the restoration of chromosome fragments and this brings about death of the zygote or death of the eggs which lessens the frequencies of individuals carriers of chromosomic aberrations. Ionizing radiations applied to the female drosophila modifies the frequency of loss of patternal chromosomes and comes about when the radiation dose to the female is 700 rad. (Author)

  17. Low-resolution structure of Drosophila translin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vinay; Gupta, Gagan D.

    2012-01-01

    Crystals of native Drosophila melanogaster translin diffracted to 7 Å resolution. Reductive methylation of the protein improved crystal quality. The native and methylated proteins showed similar profiles in size-exclusion chromatography analyses but the methylated protein displayed reduced DNA-binding activity. Crystals of the methylated protein diffracted to 4.2 Å resolution at BM14 of the ESRF synchrotron. Crystals with 49% solvent content belonged to monoclinic space group P21 with eight protomers in the asymmetric unit. Only 2% of low-resolution structures with similar low percentage solvent content were found in the PDB. The crystal structure, solved by molecular replacement method, refined to Rwork (Rfree) of 0.24 (0.29) with excellent stereochemistry. The crystal structure clearly shows that drosophila protein exists as an octamer, and not as a decamer as expected from gel-filtration elution profiles. The similar octameric quaternary fold in translin orthologs and in translin–TRAX complexes suggests an up-down dimer as the basic structural subunit of translin-like proteins. The drosophila oligomer displays asymmetric assembly and increased radius of gyration that accounts for the observed differences between the elution profiles of human and drosophila proteins on gel-filtration columns. This study demonstrates clearly that low-resolution X-ray structure can be useful in understanding complex biological oligomers. PMID:23650579

  18. Biological effects of radon in Drosophila

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pimentel P, A.E.; Tavera D, L.; Cruces M, M.P.; Arceo M, C.; Rosa D, M.E. de la

    1992-04-01

    The main objective of this investigation, is to study the biological effects of the Radon-222 at low dose in 'Drosophila melanogaster'. It is necessary to mention that these effects will analyze from the genetic point of view for: 1) To evaluate in which form the Radon-222 to low dose it influences in some genetic components of the adaptation in Drosophila, such as: fecundity, viability egg-adult and sex proportion. 2) To evaluate which is the genetic effect that induces the Radon to low dose by means of the SMART technique in Drosophila melanogaster, and this way to try of to identify which is the possible mechanism that causes the genetic damage to somatic level. The carried out investigation was divided in three stages: 1. Tests to the vacuum resistance. 2. Test of somatic mutation, and 3. Determination of the presence of radon daughters on the adult of Drosophila. It is necessary to point out that all the experiments were made by triplicate and in each one of them was placed detectors in preset places. Those obtained results are presented inside the 4 charts included in the present work. (Author)

  19. Radioresistance and radiosensitivity in Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reguly, M.L.; Marques, E.K.

    1987-01-01

    The mechanisms of radioresistance in Drosophila are studied. The mutagenic effects of 5KR of 60 Cobalt gamma radiation and of 0,006M dose of ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) on four D. Melanogaster strains (RC 1 , CO 3 , BUE and LEN) are investigated. (M.A.C.) [pt

  20. Drosophila Melanogaster as an Experimental Organism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Gerald M.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the role of the fruit fly in genetics research requiring a multidisciplinary approach. Describes embryological and genetic methods used in the experimental analysis of this organism. Outlines the use of Drosophila in the study of the development and function of the nervous system. (RT)

  1. The Drosophila bipectinata species complex: phylogenetic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    [Banerjee P. and Singh B. N. 2017 The Drosophila bipectinata species complex: phylogenetic relationship among different members based on chromosomal variations. J. Genet. 96, 97–107]. Introduction ..... loops touch the chromocenter and in our microphotograph. (depicting both the arms) too, the involvement of chromo-.

  2. Orthodenticle is required for the development of olfactory projection neurons and local interneurons in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Sen

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The accurate wiring of nervous systems involves precise control over cellular processes like cell division, cell fate specification, and targeting of neurons. The nervous system of Drosophila melanogaster is an excellent model to understand these processes. Drosophila neurons are generated by stem cell like precursors called neuroblasts that are formed and specified in a highly stereotypical manner along the neuroectoderm. This stereotypy has been attributed, in part, to the expression and function of transcription factors that act as intrinsic cell fate determinants in the neuroblasts and their progeny during embryogenesis. Here we focus on the lateral neuroblast lineage, ALl1, of the antennal lobe and show that the transcription factor-encoding cephalic gap gene orthodenticle is required in this lineage during postembryonic brain development. We use immunolabelling to demonstrate that Otd is expressed in the neuroblast of this lineage during postembryonic larval stages. Subsequently, we use MARCM clonal mutational methods to show that the majority of the postembryonic neuronal progeny in the ALl1 lineage undergoes apoptosis in the absence of orthodenticle. Moreover, we demonstrate that the neurons that survive in the orthodenticle loss-of-function condition display severe targeting defects in both the proximal (dendritic and distal (axonal neurites. These findings indicate that the cephalic gap gene orthodenticle acts as an important intrinsic determinant in the ALl1 neuroblast lineage and, hence, could be a member of a putative combinatorial code involved in specifying the fate and identity of cells in this lineage.

  3. Quantitative evaluation of the mitochondrial proteomes of Drosophila melanogaster adapted to extreme oxygen conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songyue Yin

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are the primary organelles that consume oxygen and provide energy for cellular activities. To investigate the mitochondrial mechanisms underlying adaptation to extreme oxygen conditions, we generated Drosophila strains that could survive in low- or high-oxygen environments (LOF or HOF, respectively, examined their mitochondria at the ultrastructural level via transmission electron microscopy, studied the activity of their respiratory chain complexes, and quantitatively analyzed the protein abundance responses of the mitochondrial proteomes using Isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ. A total of 718 proteins were identified with high confidence, and 55 and 75 mitochondrial proteins displayed significant differences in abundance in LOF and HOF, respectively, compared with the control flies. Importantly, these differentially expressed mitochondrial proteins are primarily involved in respiration, calcium regulation, the oxidative response, and mitochondrial protein translation. A correlation analysis of the changes in the levels of the mRNAs corresponding to differentially regulated mitochondrial proteins revealed two sets of proteins with different modes of regulation (transcriptional vs. post-transcriptional in both LOF and HOF. We believe that these findings will not only enhance our understanding of the mechanisms underlying adaptation to extreme oxygen conditions in Drosophila but also provide a clue in studying human disease induced by altered oxygen tension in tissues and cells.

  4. The Effects of Royal Jelly on Fitness Traits and Gene Expression in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John R Shorter

    Full Text Available Royal Jelly (RJ is a product made by honey bee workers and is required for queen differentiation and accompanying changes in queen body size, development time, lifespan and reproductive output relative to workers. Previous studies have reported similar changes in Drosophila melanogaster in response to RJ. Here, we quantified viability, development time, body size, productivity, lifespan and genome wide transcript abundance of D. melanogaster reared on standard culture medium supplemented with increasing concentrations of RJ. We found that lower concentrations of RJ do induce significant differences in body size in both sexes; higher concentrations reduce size, increase mortality, shorten lifespan and reduce productivity. Increased concentrations of RJ also consistently lengthened development time in both sexes. RJ is associated with changes in expression of 1,581 probe sets assessed using Affymetrix Drosophila 2.0 microarrays, which were enriched for genes associated with metabolism and amino acid degradation. The transcriptional changes are consistent with alterations in cellular processes to cope with excess nutrients provided by RJ, including biosynthesis and detoxification, which might contribute to accelerated senescence and reduced lifespan.

  5. EGFR/Ras Signaling Controls Drosophila Intestinal Stem Cell Proliferation via Capicua-Regulated Genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinhua Jin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Epithelial renewal in the Drosophila intestine is orchestrated by Intestinal Stem Cells (ISCs. Following damage or stress the intestinal epithelium produces ligands that activate the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR in ISCs. This promotes their growth and division and, thereby, epithelial regeneration. Here we demonstrate that the HMG-box transcriptional repressor, Capicua (Cic, mediates these functions of EGFR signaling. Depleting Cic in ISCs activated them for division, whereas overexpressed Cic inhibited ISC proliferation and midgut regeneration. Epistasis tests showed that Cic acted as an essential downstream effector of EGFR/Ras signaling, and immunofluorescence showed that Cic's nuclear localization was regulated by EGFR signaling. ISC-specific mRNA expression profiling and DNA binding mapping using DamID indicated that Cic represses cell proliferation via direct targets including string (Cdc25, Cyclin E, and the ETS domain transcription factors Ets21C and Pointed (pnt. pnt was required for ISC over-proliferation following Cic depletion, and ectopic pnt restored ISC proliferation even in the presence of overexpressed dominant-active Cic. These studies identify Cic, Pnt, and Ets21C as critical downstream effectors of EGFR signaling in Drosophila ISCs.

  6. Validity and Reliability of Preschool, First and Second Grade Versions of Berkeley Parenting Self-Efficacy Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrbanoo Tajeri

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available "nObjective: The purpose of this study is to examine the factor structure, internal consistency, and construct validity of preschool, first and second grade versions of Berkeley Parenting self-efficacy scale. "nMethod:  The subjects were 317 mothers: (102 mothers of preschool children, 111 mothers of first grade children and 104 mothers of second grade children who were randomly selected from schools in Tehran. They completed Berkeley parenting self-efficacy and Rotter `s locus of control scales. Factor analysis using the principle component method was used to identify the factor structure of parenting self-efficacy scale. Cronbach`s alpha coefficient was used to identify the reliability of parenting self efficacy scale. "nResults: Results of this study indicated that the cronbach`s alpha coefficient was 0.84, 0.87, 0.64 for preschool, first grade and second grade versions respectively. Based on the scree test ,,factor analysis produced two factors of maternal strategy and child outcome, and it also produced the highest level of total variance explained by these 2 factors. The Parenting self-efficacy scale was negatively associated with measure of locus of control(r=-0.54 for the preschool version, -0.64 for the first grade version and -0.54 for the second grade version. "nConclusion: Due to relatively high reliability and validity of preschool, first and second grade versions of Berkeley Parenting Self-Efficacy scale, this scale could be used as a reliable and valid scale in other research areas

  7. Determination of gene expression patterns using high-throughput RNA in situ hybridizaion to whole-mount Drosophila embryos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiszmann, R.; Hammonds, A.S.; Celniker, S.E.

    2009-04-09

    We describe a high-throughput protocol for RNA in situ hybridization (ISH) to Drosophila embryos in a 96-well format. cDNA or genomic DNA templates are amplified by PCR and then digoxigenin-labeled ribonucleotides are incorporated into antisense RNA probes by in vitro transcription. The quality of each probe is evaluated before ISH using a RNA probe quantification (dot blot) assay. RNA probes are hybridized to fixed, mixed-staged Drosophila embryos in 96-well plates. The resulting stained embryos can be examined and photographed immediately or stored at 4oC for later analysis. Starting with fixed, staged embryos, the protocol takes 6 d from probe template production through hybridization. Preparation of fixed embryos requires a minimum of 2 weeks to collect embryos representing all stages. The method has been used to determine the expression patterns of over 6,000 genes throughout embryogenesis.

  8. A computational model clarifies the roles of positive and negative feedback loops in the Drosophila circadian clock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Junwei; Zhou Tianshou

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies showed that a single negative feedback structure should be sufficient for robust circadian oscillations. It is thus pertinent to ask why current cellular clock models almost universally have interlocked negative feedback loop (NFL) and positive feedback loop (PFL). Here, we propose a molecular model that reflects the essential features of the Drosophila circadian clock to clarify the different roles of negative and positive feedback loops. In agreement with experimental observations, the model can simulate circadian oscillations in constant darkness, entrainment by light-dark cycles, as well as phenotypes of per 01 and clk Jrk mutants. Moreover, sustained oscillations persist when the PFL is removed, implying the crucial role of NFL for rhythm generation. Through parameter sensitivity analysis, it is revealed that incorporation of PFL increases the robustness of the system to regulatory processes in PFL itself. Such reduced models can aid understanding of the design principles of circadian clocks in Drosophila and other organisms with complex transcriptional feedback structures.

  9. Results of a monitoring programme in the environs of Berkeley aimed at collecting Chernobyl data for foodchain model validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nair, S.; Darley, P.J.; Shaer, J.

    1989-03-01

    The results of a fallout measurement programme which was carried out in the environs of Berkeley Nuclear Laboratory in the United Kingdom following the Chernobyl reactor accident in April 1986 are presented in this report. The programme was aimed at establishing a time-dependent data base of concentrations of Chernobyl fallout radionuclides in selected agricultural products. Results were obtained for milk, grass, silage, soil and wheat over an eighteen month period from May 1986. It is intended to use the data to validate the CEGB's dynamic foodchain model, which is incorporated in the FOODWEB module of the NECTAR environmental code. (author)

  10. Low-level waste certification plan for the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Hazardous Waste Handling Facility. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this plan is to describe the organization and methodology for the certification of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) handled in the Hazardous Waste Handling Facility (HWHF) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). This plan is composed to meet the requirements found in the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) Solid Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) and follows the suggested outline provided by WHC in the letter of April 26, 1990, to Dr. R.H. Thomas, Occupational Health Division, LBL. LLW is to be transferred to the WHC Hanford Site Central Waste Complex and Burial Grounds in Hanford, Washington

  11. Low-level waste certification plan for the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Hazardous Waste Handling Facility. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-01-10

    The purpose of this plan is to describe the organization and methodology for the certification of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) handled in the Hazardous Waste Handling Facility (HWHF) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). This plan is composed to meet the requirements found in the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) Solid Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) and follows the suggested outline provided by WHC in the letter of April 26, 1990, to Dr. R.H. Thomas, Occupational Health Division, LBL. LLW is to be transferred to the WHC Hanford Site Central Waste Complex and Burial Grounds in Hanford, Washington.

  12. Drosophila increase exploration after visually detecting predators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel de la Flor

    Full Text Available Novel stimuli elicit behaviors that are collectively known as specific exploration. These behaviors allow the animal to become more familiar with the novel objects within its environment. Specific exploration is frequently suppressed by defensive reactions to predator cues. Herein, we examine if this suppression occurs in Drosophila melanogaster by measuring the response of these flies to wild harvested predators. The flies used in our experiments have been cultured and had not lived under predator threat for multiple decades. In a circular arena with centrally-caged predators, wild type Drosophila actively avoided the pantropical jumping spider, Plexippus paykulli, and the Texas unicorn mantis, Phyllovates chlorophaena, indicating an innate defensive reaction to these predators. Interestingly, wild type Drosophila males also avoided a centrally-caged mock spider, and the avoidance of the mock spider became exaggerated when it was made to move within the cage. Visually impaired Drosophila failed to detect and avoid the Plexippus paykulli and the moving mock spider, while the broadly anosmic orco2 mutants were fully capable of detecting and avoiding Plexippus paykulli, indicating that these flies principally relied upon vison to perceive the predator stimuli. During early exploration of the arena, exploratory activity increased in the presence of Plexippus paykulli and the moving mock spider. The elevated activity induced by Plexippus paykulli disappeared after the fly had finished exploring, suggesting the flies were capable of habituating the predator cues. Taken together, these results indicate that despite being isolated from predators for decades Drosophila will visually detect these predators, retain innate defensive behaviors, respond by increasing exploratory activity in the arena rather than suppressing activity, and may habituate to normal predator cues.

  13. Optogenetic pacing in Drosophila melanogaster (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alex, Aneesh; Li, Airong; Men, Jing; Jerwick, Jason; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Zhou, Chao

    2016-03-01

    A non-invasive, contact-less cardiac pacing technology can be a powerful tool in basic cardiac research and in clinics. Currently, electrical pacing is the gold standard for cardiac pacing. Although highly effective in controlling the cardiac function, the invasive nature, non-specificity to cardiac tissues and possible tissue damage limits its capabilities. Optical pacing of heart is a promising alternative, which is non-invasive and more specific, has high spatial and temporal precision, and avoids shortcomings in electrical stimulation. Optical coherence tomography has been proved to be an effective technique in non-invasive imaging in vivo with ultrahigh resolution and imaging speed. In the last several years, non-invasive specific optical pacing in animal hearts has been reported in quail, zebrafish, and rabbit models. However, Drosophila Melanogaster, which is a significant model with orthologs of 75% of human disease genes, has rarely been studied concerning their optical pacing in heart. Here, we combined optogenetic control of Drosophila heartbeat with optical coherence microscopy (OCM) technique for the first time. The light-gated cation channel, channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) was specifically expressed by transgene as a pacemaker in drosophila heart. By stimulating the pacemaker with 472 nm pulsed laser light at different frequencies, we achieved non-invasive and more specific optical control of the Drosophila heart rhythm, which demonstrates the wide potential of optical pacing for studying cardiac dynamics and development. Imaging capability of our customized OCM system was also involved to observe the pacing effect visually. No tissue damage was found after long exposure to laser pulses, which proved the safety of optogenetic control of Drosophila heart.

  14. Drosophila Longevity Assurance Conferred by Reduced Insulin Receptor Substrate Chico Partially Requires d4eBP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Bai

    Full Text Available Mutations of the insulin/IGF signaling (IIS pathway extend Drosophila lifespan. Based on genetic epistasis analyses, this longevity assurance is attributed to downstream effects of the FOXO transcription factor. However, as reported FOXO accounts for only a portion of the observed longevity benefit, suggesting there are additional outputs of IIS to mediate aging. One candidate is target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1. Reduced TORC1 activity is reported to slow aging, whereas reduced IIS is reported to repress TORC1 activity. The eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E binding protein (4E-BP is repressed by TORC1, and activated 4E-BP is reported to increase Drosophila lifespan. Here we use genetic epistasis analyses to test whether longevity assurance mutants of chico, the Drosophila insulin receptor substrate homolog, require Drosophila d4eBP to slow aging. In chico heterozygotes, which are robustly long-lived, d4eBP is required but not sufficient to slow aging. Remarkably, d4eBP is not required or sufficient for chico homozygotes to extend longevity. Likewise, chico heterozygote females partially require d4eBP to preserve age-dependent locomotion, and both chico genotypes require d4eBP to improve stress-resistance. Reproduction and most measures of growth affected by either chico genotype are always independent of d4eBP. In females, chico heterozygotes paradoxically produce more rather than less phosphorylated 4E-BP (p4E-BP. Altered IRS function within the IIS pathway of Drosophila appears to have partial, conditional capacity to regulate aging through an unconventional interaction with 4E-BP.

  15. Interorgan Communication Pathways in Physiology: Focus on Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Droujinine, Ilia A.; Perrimon, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    Studies in mammals and Drosophila have demonstrated the existence and significance of secreted factors involved in communication between distal organs. In this review, primarily focusing on Drosophila, we examine the known interorgan communication factors and their functions, physiological inducers, and integration in regulating physiology. Moreover, we describe how organ-sensing screens in Drosophila can systematically identify novel conserved interorgan communication factors. Finally, we di...

  16. Early Olfactory Processing in Drosophila: Mechanisms and Principles

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Rachel I.

    2013-01-01

    In the olfactory system of Drosophila melanogaster, it is relatively straightforward to make in vivo measurements of activity in neurons corresponding to targeted processing. This, together with the numerical simplicity of the Drosophila olfactory system, has produced rapid gains in our understanding of Drosophila olfaction. This review summarizes the neurophysiology of the first two layers of this system: the peripheral olfactory receptor neurons and their postsynaptic targets in the antenna...

  17. Neuropeptide Mapping of Dimmed Cells of Adult Drosophila Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diesner, Max; Predel, Reinhard; Neupert, Susanne

    2018-05-01

    Neuropeptides are structurally highly diverse messenger molecules that act as regulators of many physiological processes such as development, metabolism, reproduction or behavior in general. Differentiation of neuropeptidergic cells often corresponds with the presence of the transcription factor DIMMED. In the central nervous system of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, DIMMED commonly occurs in neuroendocrine neurons that release peptides as neurohormones but also in interneurons with complex branching patterns. Fly strains with green fluorescence protein (GFP)-expressing dimmed cells make it possible to systematically analyze the processed neuropeptides in these cells. In this study, we mapped individual GFP-expressing neurons of adult D. melanogaster from the dimmed ( c929)>GFP line. Using single cell mass spectrometry, we analyzed 10 types of dimmed neurons from the brain/gnathal ganglion. These cells included neuroendocrine cells with projection into the retrocerebral complex but also a number of large interneurons. Resulting mass spectra not only provided comprehensive data regarding mature products from 13 neuropeptide precursors but also evidence for the cellular co-localization of neuropeptides from different neuropeptide genes. The results can be implemented in a neuroanatomical map of the D. melanogaster brain. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  18. The genetic makeup of the Drosophila piRNA pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handler, Dominik; Meixner, Katharina; Pizka, Manfred; Lauss, Kathrin; Schmied, Christopher; Gruber, Franz Sebastian; Brennecke, Julius

    2013-06-06

    The piRNA (PIWI-interacting RNA) pathway is a small RNA silencing system that acts in animal gonads and protects the genome against the deleterious influence of transposons. A major bottleneck in the field is the lack of comprehensive knowledge of the factors and molecular processes that constitute this pathway. We conducted an RNAi screen in Drosophila and identified ~50 genes that strongly impact the ovarian somatic piRNA pathway. Many identified genes fall into functional categories that indicate essential roles for mitochondrial metabolism, RNA export, the nuclear pore, transcription elongation, and chromatin regulation in the pathway. Follow-up studies on two factors demonstrate that components acting at distinct hierarchical levels of the pathway were identified. Finally, we define CG2183/Gasz as an essential primary piRNA biogenesis factor in somatic and germline cells. Based on the similarities between insect and vertebrate piRNA pathways, our results have far-reaching implications for the understanding of this conserved genome defense system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. [PIWI protein as a nucleolus visitor in Drosophila melanogaster].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhaleva, E A; Iakushev, E Iu; Stoliarenko, A D; Klenov, M S; Pozovskiĭ, Ia M; Gvozdev, V A

    2015-01-01

    The evolutionarily conserved nuclear Piwi protein of Drosophila melanogaster is a representative of the Argonaute small RNA binding protein family. Guided by small piRNAs, Piwi functions in transposon silencing in somatic and germ cells of the gonad. We found that in ovarian somatic and germ cells, as well as in the established ovarian somatic cell line, Piwi is concentrated predominantly in the nucleolus--the main nuclear compartment, participating not only in rRNA synthesis, but also in various cell stress responses. We demonstrated the colocalization of Piwi with nucleolar marker proteins--fibrillarin and Nopp140. A mutation preventing Piwi transport to the nucleus and disturbing transposon silencing (piwi(Nt)) leads to 6-8-fold upregulation of rRNA genes expression, as evaluated by the level of transcripts of transposon insertions in 28S rRNA genes. RNase treatment of live cultured ovarian somatic cells depletes Piwi from the nucleolus. The same effect is observed upon inhibiting RNA polymerase I which transcribes rRNA, but not RNA polymerase II. In contrast, upon heat shock Piwi is concentrated in the nucleolus and is depleted from the nucleoplasm. These results implicate Piwi in RNA polymerase activity modulation and stress response in the nucleolus. We discuss possible noncanonical Piwi functions along with its canonical role in transposon silencing by piRNAs.

  20. Neuropeptide Mapping of Dimmed Cells of Adult Drosophila Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diesner, Max; Predel, Reinhard; Neupert, Susanne

    2018-01-01

    Neuropeptides are structurally highly diverse messenger molecules that act as regulators of many physiological processes such as development, metabolism, reproduction or behavior in general. Differentiation of neuropeptidergic cells often corresponds with the presence of the transcription factor DIMMED. In the central nervous system of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, DIMMED commonly occurs in neuroendocrine neurons that release peptides as neurohormones but also in interneurons with complex branching patterns. Fly strains with green fluorescence protein (GFP)-expressing dimmed cells make it possible to systematically analyze the processed neuropeptides in these cells. In this study, we mapped individual GFP-expressing neurons of adult D. melanogaster from the dimmed (c929)>GFP line. Using single cell mass spectrometry, we analyzed 10 types of dimmed neurons from the brain/gnathal ganglion. These cells included neuroendocrine cells with projection into the retrocerebral complex but also a number of large interneurons. Resulting mass spectra not only provided comprehensive data regarding mature products from 13 neuropeptide precursors but also evidence for the cellular co-localization of neuropeptides from different neuropeptide genes. The results can be implemented in a neuroanatomical map of the D. melanogaster brain. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  1. Recurring ethanol exposure induces disinhibited courtship in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Gwan Lee

    Full Text Available Alcohol has a strong causal relationship with sexual arousal and disinhibited sexual behavior in humans; however, the physiological support for this notion is largely lacking and thus a suitable animal model to address this issue is instrumental. We investigated the effect of ethanol on sexual behavior in Drosophila. Wild-type males typically court females but not males; however, upon daily administration of ethanol, they exhibited active intermale courtship, which represents a novel type of behavioral disinhibition. The ethanol-treated males also developed behavioral sensitization, a form of plasticity associated with addiction, since their intermale courtship activity was progressively increased with additional ethanol experience. We identified three components crucial for the ethanol-induced courtship disinhibition: the transcription factor regulating male sex behavior Fruitless, the ABC guanine/tryptophan transporter White and the neuromodulator dopamine. fruitless mutant males normally display conspicuous intermale courtship; however, their courtship activity was not enhanced under ethanol. Likewise, white males showed negligible ethanol-induced intermale courtship, which was not only reinstated but also augmented by transgenic White expression. Moreover, inhibition of dopamine neurotransmission during ethanol exposure dramatically decreased ethanol-induced intermale courtship. Chronic ethanol exposure also affected a male's sexual behavior toward females: it enhanced sexual arousal but reduced sexual performance. These findings provide novel insights into the physiological effects of ethanol on sexual behavior and behavioral plasticity.

  2. A new Drosophila octopamine receptor responds to serotonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yi-Xiang; Xu, Gang; Gu, Gui-Xiang; Mao, Fen; Ye, Gong-Yin; Liu, Weiwei; Huang, Jia

    2017-11-01

    As the counterparts of the vertebrate adrenergic transmitters, octopamine and tyramine are important physiological regulators in invertebrates. They control and modulate many physiological and behavioral functions in insects. In this study, we reported the pharmacological properties of a new α2-adrenergic-like octopamine receptor (CG18208) from Drosophila melanogaster, named DmOctα2R. This new receptor gene encodes two transcripts by alternative splicing. The long isoform DmOctα2R-L differs from the short isoform DmOctα2R-S by the presence of an additional 29 amino acids within the third intracellular loop. When heterologously expressed in mammalian cell lines, both receptors were activated by octopamine, tyramine, epinephrine and norepinephrine, resulting in the inhibition of cAMP production in a dose-dependent manner. The long form is more sensitive to the above ligands than the short form. The adrenergic agonists naphazoline, tolazoline and clonidine can stimulate DmOctα2R as full agonists. Surprisingly, serotonin and serotoninergic agonists can also activate DmOctα2R. Several tested adrenergic antagonists and serotonin antagonists blocked the action of octopamine or serotonin on DmOctα2R. The data presented here reported an adrenergic-like G protein-coupled receptor activated by serotonin, suggesting that the neurotransmission and neuromodulation in the nervous system could be more complex than previously thought. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Conservation patterns in different functional sequence categoriesof divergent Drosophila species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papatsenko, Dmitri; Kislyuk, Andrey; Levine, Michael; Dubchak, Inna

    2005-10-01

    We have explored the distributions of fully conservedungapped blocks in genome-wide pairwise alignments of recently completedspecies of Drosophila: D.yakuba, D.ananassae, D.pseudoobscura, D.virilisand D.mojavensis. Based on these distributions we have found that nearlyevery functional sequence category possesses its own distinctiveconservation pattern, sometimes independent of the overall sequenceconservation level. In the coding and regulatory regions, the ungappedblocks were longer than in introns, UTRs and non-functional sequences. Atthe same time, the blocks in the coding regions carried 3N+2 signaturecharacteristic to synonymic substitutions in the 3rd codon positions.Larger block sizes in transcription regulatory regions can be explainedby the presence of conserved arrays of binding sites for transcriptionfactors. We also have shown that the longest ungapped blocks, or'ultraconserved' sequences, are associated with specific gene groups,including those encoding ion channels and components of the cytoskeleton.We discussed how restrained conservation patterns may help in mappingfunctional sequence categories and improving genomeannotation.

  4. Mapping organism expression levels at cellular resolution in developing Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, David W.; Keranen, Soile; Biggin, Mark D.; Sudar, Damir

    2002-05-01

    The development of an animal embryo is orchestrated by a network of genetically determined, temporal and spatial gene expression patterns that determine the animals final form. To understand such networks, we are developing novel quantitative optical imaging techniques to map gene expression levels at cellular and sub-cellular resolution within pregastrula Drosophila. Embryos at different stages of development are labeled for total DNA and specific gene products using different fluorophors and imaged in 3D with confocal microscopy. Innovative steps have been made which allow the DNA-image to be automatically segmented to produce a morphological mask of the individual nuclear boundaries. For each stage of development an average morphology is chosen to which images from different embryo are compared. The morphological mask is then used to quantify gene-product on a per nuclei basis. What results is an atlas of the relative amount of the specific gene product expressed within the nucleus of every cell in the embryo at the various stages of development. We are creating a quantitative database of transcription factor and target gene expression patterns in wild-type and factor mutant embryos with single cell resolution. Our goal is to uncover the rules determining how patterns of gene expression are generated.

  5. High-Resolution Profiling of Drosophila Replication Start Sites Reveals a DNA Shape and Chromatin Signature of Metazoan Origins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Comoglio

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available At every cell cycle, faithful inheritance of metazoan genomes requires the concerted activation of thousands of DNA replication origins. However, the genetic and chromatin features defining metazoan replication start sites remain largely unknown. Here, we delineate the origin repertoire of the Drosophila genome at high resolution. We address the role of origin-proximal G-quadruplexes and suggest that they transiently stall replication forks in vivo. We dissect the chromatin configuration of replication origins and identify a rich spatial organization of chromatin features at initiation sites. DNA shape and chromatin configurations, not strict sequence motifs, mark and predict origins in higher eukaryotes. We further examine the link between transcription and origin firing and reveal that modulation of origin activity across cell types is intimately linked to cell-type-specific transcriptional programs. Our study unravels conserved origin features and provides unique insights into the relationship among DNA topology, chromatin, transcription, and replication initiation across metazoa.

  6. Molecular cloning, functional expression, and gene silencing of two Drosophila receptors for the Drosophila neuropeptide pyrokinin-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Carina; Cazzamali, Giuseppe; Williamson, Michael

    2003-01-01

    The database of the Drosophila Genome Project contains the sequences of two genes, CG8784 and CG8795, predicted to code for two structurally related G protein-coupled receptors. We have cloned these genes and expressed their coding parts in Chinese hamster ovary cells. We found that both receptors...... can be activated by low concentrations of the Drosophila neuropeptide pyrokinin-2 (CG8784, EC(50) for pyrokinin-2, 1x10(-9)M; CG8795, EC(50) for pyrokinin-2, 5 x 10(-10)M). The precise role of Drosophila pyrokinin-2 (SVPFKPRLamide) in Drosophila is unknown, but in other insects, pyrokinins have...... embryos and first instar larvae. In addition to the two Drosophila receptors, we also identified two probable pyrokinin receptors in the genomic database from the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae. The two Drosophila pyrokinin receptors are, to our knowledge, the first invertebrate pyrokinin receptors...

  7. SCR series switch and impulse crowbar at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory for CTR neutral beam source development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franck, J.V.; Arthur, A.A.; Brusse, L.A.; Low, W.

    1977-10-01

    The series switch is designed to operate at 120kV and pass 65A for 0.5 sec every 30 sec on the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory CTR Neutral Beam Source Test Stand IIIB. The series switch consists of 400 individual SCR circuits connected in series and is turned on by a simple system of cascaded pulse transformers with multiple single turn secondaries each driving the individual SCR gates. It is turned off by an SCR impulse crowbar that momentarily shorts the power supply allowing the series switch to recover. The SCR switch has been tested in the impulse crowbar configuration and will reliably commutate up to 90A at 120kV. The series switch and impulse crowbar are now in service in Test Stand IIIB. A series switch and impulse crowbar similar in concept is routinely powering a 10 x 10 cm source at 150kV, 20A, 0.5 sec with a 1% duty cycle on the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory CTR NSB Test Stand IIIA

  8. Mutants dissecting development and behaviour in drosophila

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, Adita; Chandrashekaran, Shanti; Sharma, R.P.

    2005-01-01

    We have traced in this paper the progress in Drosophila genetics research from the 1960s, at the IARI, spearheaded by the visionary insight of M. S. Swaminathan. The work started with the study of indirect effect of radiation and the synergistic interaction of physical and chemical mutagens on chromosomal and genetic changes. This paved the way for the study of single gene mutants in dissecting developmental and behavioural processes. New genes discovered by us have been shown to encode conserved cell signalling molecules controlling developmental and behavioural pathways. With the complete sequencing of the Drosophila genome, in the year 2000, mounting evidence for the homology between Drosophila and human genes controlling genetic disorders became available. This has led to the fly becoming an indispensable tool for studying human diseases as well as a model to test for drugs and pharmaceuticals against human diseases and complex behavioural processes. For example wingless in Drosophila belongs to the conserved Wnt gene family and aberrant WNT signalling is linked to a range of human diseases, most notably cancer. Inhibition as well as activation of WNT signalling form the basis of an effective therapy for some cancers as well as several other clinical conditions. Recent experiments have shown that WNTs might also normally participate in self-renewal, proliferation or differentiation of stem cells and altering WNT signalling might be beneficial to the use of stem cells for therapeutic means. Likewise, the stambhA mutant of Drosophila which was discovered for its temperature-dependent paralytic behaviour is the fly homologue of Phospholipase Cβ. Phospholipase C mediated G protein signalling plays a central role in vital processes controlling epilepsy, vision, taste, and olfaction in animals. Proteins of the G-signalling pathway are of intense research interest since many human diseases involve defects in G-protein signalling pathways. In fact, approximately 50

  9. A software tool to model genetic regulatory networks. Applications to the modeling of threshold phenomena and of spatial patterning in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Dilão

    Full Text Available We present a general methodology in order to build mathematical models of genetic regulatory networks. This approach is based on the mass action law and on the Jacob and Monod operon model. The mathematical models are built symbolically by the Mathematica software package GeneticNetworks. This package accepts as input the interaction graphs of the transcriptional activators and repressors of a biological process and, as output, gives the mathematical model in the form of a system of ordinary differential equations. All the relevant biological parameters are chosen automatically by the software. Within this framework, we show that concentration dependent threshold effects in biology emerge from the catalytic properties of genes and its associated conservation laws. We apply this methodology to the segment patterning in Drosophila early development and we calibrate the genetic transcriptional network responsible for the patterning of the gap gene proteins Hunchback and Knirps, along the antero-posterior axis of the Drosophila embryo. In this approach, the zygotically produced proteins Hunchback and Knirps do not diffuse along the antero-posterior axis of the embryo of Drosophila, developing a spatial pattern due to concentration dependent thresholds. This shows that patterning at the gap genes stage can be explained by the concentration gradients along the embryo of the transcriptional regulators.

  10. Drosophila VAMP7 regulates Wingless intracellular trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Han; He, Fang; Lin, Xinhua; Wu, Yihui

    2017-01-01

    Drosophila Wingless (Wg) is a morphogen that determines cell fate during development. Previous studies have shown that endocytic pathways regulate Wg trafficking and signaling. Here, we showed that loss of vamp7, a gene required for vesicle fusion, dramatically increased Wg levels and decreased Wg signaling. Interestingly, we found that levels of Dally-like (Dlp), a glypican that can interact with Wg to suppress Wg signaling at the dorsoventral boundary of the Drosophila wing, were also increased in vamp7 mutant cells. Moreover, Wg puncta in Rab4-dependent recycling endosomes were Dlp positive. We hypothesize that VAMP7 is required for Wg intracellular trafficking and the accumulation of Wg in Rab4-dependent recycling endosomes might affect Wg signaling.

  11. Exquisite light sensitivity of Drosophila melanogaster cryptochrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooja Vinayak

    Full Text Available Drosophila melanogaster shows exquisite light sensitivity for modulation of circadian functions in vivo, yet the activities of the Drosophila circadian photopigment cryptochrome (CRY have only been observed at high light levels. We studied intensity/duration parameters for light pulse induced circadian phase shifts under dim light conditions in vivo. Flies show far greater light sensitivity than previously appreciated, and show a surprising sensitivity increase with pulse duration, implying a process of photic integration active up to at least 6 hours. The CRY target timeless (TIM shows dim light dependent degradation in circadian pacemaker neurons that parallels phase shift amplitude, indicating that integration occurs at this step, with the strongest effect in a single identified pacemaker neuron. Our findings indicate that CRY compensates for limited light sensitivity in vivo by photon integration over extraordinarily long times, and point to select circadian pacemaker neurons as having important roles.

  12. Evidence for transgenerational metabolic programming in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica L. Buescher

    2013-09-01

    Worldwide epidemiologic studies have repeatedly demonstrated an association between prenatal nutritional environment, birth weight and susceptibility to adult diseases including obesity, cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Despite advances in mammalian model systems, the molecular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are unclear, but might involve programming mechanisms such as epigenetics. Here we describe a new system for evaluating metabolic programming mechanisms using a simple, genetically tractable Drosophila model. We examined the effect of maternal caloric excess on offspring and found that a high-sugar maternal diet alters body composition of larval offspring for at least two generations, augments an obese-like phenotype under suboptimal (high-calorie feeding conditions in adult offspring, and modifies expression of metabolic genes. Our data indicate that nutritional programming mechanisms could be highly conserved and support the use of Drosophila as a model for evaluating the underlying genetic and epigenetic contributions to this phenomenon.

  13. The fabulous destiny of the Drosophila heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medioni, Caroline; Sénatore, Sébastien; Salmand, Pierre-Adrien; Lalevée, Nathalie; Perrin, Laurent; Sémériva, Michel

    2009-10-01

    For the last 15 years the fly cardiovascular system has attracted developmental geneticists for its potential as a model system of organogenesis. Heart development in Drosophila indeed provides a remarkable system for elucidating the basic molecular and cellular mechanisms of morphogenesis and, more recently, for understanding the genetic control of cardiac physiology. The success of these studies can in part be attributed to multidisciplinary approaches, the multiplicity of existing genetic tools, and a detailed knowledge of the system. Striking similarities with vertebrate cardiogenesis have long been stressed, in particular concerning the conservation of key molecular regulators of cardiogenesis and the new data presented here confirm Drosophila cardiogenesis as a model not only for organogenesis but also for the study of molecular mechanisms of human cardiac disease.

  14. Remembering components of food in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav eDas

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Remembering features of past feeding experience can refine foraging and food choice. Insects can learn to associate sensory cues with components of food, such as sugars, amino acids, water, salt, alcohol, toxins and pathogens. In the fruit fly Drosophila some food components activate unique subsets of dopaminergic neurons that innervate distinct functional zones on the mushroom bodies. This architecture suggests that the overall dopaminergic neuron population could provide a potential cellular substrate through which the fly might learn to value a variety of food components. In addition, such an arrangement predicts that individual component memories reside in unique locations. Dopaminergic neurons are also critical for food memory consolidation and deprivation-state dependent motivational control of the expression of food-relevant memories. Here we review our current knowledge of how nutrient-specific memories are formed, consolidated and specifically retrieved in insects, with a particular emphasis on Drosophila.

  15. Imaging cell competition in Drosophila imaginal discs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohsawa, Shizue; Sugimura, Kaoru; Takino, Kyoko; Igaki, Tatsushi

    2012-01-01

    Cell competition is a process in which cells with higher fitness ("winners") survive and proliferate at the expense of less fit neighbors ("losers"). It has been suggested that cell competition is involved in a variety of biological processes such as organ size control, tissue homeostasis, cancer progression, and the maintenance of stem cell population. By advent of a genetic mosaic technique, which enables to generate fluorescently marked somatic clones in Drosophila imaginal discs, recent studies have presented some aspects of molecular mechanisms underlying cell competition. Now, with a live-imaging technique using ex vivo-cultured imaginal discs, we can dissect the spatiotemporal nature of competitive cell behaviors within multicellular communities. Here, we describe procedures and tips for live imaging of cell competition in Drosophila imaginal discs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Plasticity in the Drosophila larval visual System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abud J Farca-Luna

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The remarkable ability of the nervous system to modify its structure and function is mostly experience and activity modulated. The molecular basis of neuronal plasticity has been studied in higher behavioral processes, such as learning and memory formation. However, neuronal plasticity is not restricted to higher brain functions, but may provide a basic feature of adaptation of all neural circuits. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster provides a powerful genetic model to gain insight into the molecular basis of nervous system development and function. The nervous system of the larvae is again a magnitude simpler than its adult counter part, allowing the genetic assessment of a number of individual genetically identifiable neurons. We review here recent progress on the genetic basis of neuronal plasticity in developing and functioning neural circuits focusing on the simple visual system of the Drosophila larva.

  17. Overview of Drosophila immunity: a historical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imler, Jean-Luc

    2014-01-01

    The functional analysis of genes from the model organism Drosophila melanogaster has provided invaluable information for many cellular and developmental or physiological processes, including immunity. The best-understood aspect of Drosophila immunity is the inducible humoral response, first recognized in 1972. This pioneering work led to a remarkable series of findings over the next 30 years, ranging from the identification and characterization of the antimicrobial peptides produced, to the deciphering of the signalling pathways activating the genes that encode them and, ultimately, to the discovery of the receptors sensing infection. These studies on an insect model coincided with a revival of the field of innate immunity, and had an unanticipated impact on the biomedical field. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Some Aspects of Transmutation Studies in Drosophila

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oftedal, P.; Kaplan, W. D. [Norsk Hydro Institute for Cancer Research, Oslo (Norway); City of Hope Medical Research Center, Duarte, CA (United States)

    1968-06-15

    The experimental data pertaining to the mutagenic efficiency of {sup 32}P in Drosophila are discussed. It is estimated that the efficiency of the transmutation phenomena is of the order of 10{sup -9} to 10{sup -3} for the induction of recessive lethals. It is thus orders of magnitude lower than that found in bacteria and fungi. The efficiency would be lower - in comparison with the radiation effects - in organisms of greater dimensions than Drosophila, where a smaller fraction of dose is lost through the escape from the organism of high-energy {beta}-particles. Data are also reported on the genetic effects of {sup 3}H-thymidine, {sup 3}H-lysine and {sup 3}H-arginine. It appears that in all probability the effects may be interpreted as caused by radiation alone, if due regard is given to variations in radiation sensitivity and cellular dimensions during spermiogenesis. (author)

  19. Neuromodulation of Innate Behaviors in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Susy M; Su, Chih-Ying; Wang, Jing W

    2017-07-25

    Animals are born with a rich repertoire of robust behaviors that are critical for their survival. However, innate behaviors are also highly adaptable to an animal's internal state and external environment. Neuromodulators, including biogenic amines, neuropeptides, and hormones, are released to signal changes in animals' circumstances and serve to reconfigure neural circuits. This circuit flexibility allows animals to modify their behavioral responses according to environmental cues, metabolic demands, and physiological states. Aided by powerful genetic tools, researchers have made remarkable progress in Drosophila melanogaster to address how a myriad of contextual information influences the input-output relationship of hardwired circuits that support a complex behavioral repertoire. Here we highlight recent advances in understanding neuromodulation of Drosophila innate behaviors, with a special focus on feeding, courtship, aggression, and postmating behaviors.

  20. The translation factors of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marygold, Steven J; Attrill, Helen; Lasko, Paul

    2017-01-02

    Synthesis of polypeptides from mRNA (translation) is a fundamental cellular process that is coordinated and catalyzed by a set of canonical 'translation factors'. Surprisingly, the translation factors of Drosophila melanogaster have not yet been systematically identified, leading to inconsistencies in their nomenclature and shortcomings in functional (Gene Ontology, GO) annotations. Here, we describe the complete set of translation factors in D. melanogaster, applying nomenclature already in widespread use in other species, and revising their functional annotation. The collection comprises 43 initiation factors, 12 elongation factors, 3 release factors and 6 recycling factors, totaling 64 of which 55 are cytoplasmic and 9 are mitochondrial. We also provide an overview of notable findings and particular insights derived from Drosophila about these factors. This catalog, together with the incorporation of the improved nomenclature and GO annotation into FlyBase, will greatly facilitate access to information about the functional roles of these important proteins.