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Sample records for berberis mentorensis

  1. Berberis vulgaris: specifications and traditional uses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi-Madiseh, Mohammad; Lorigoini, Zahra; Zamani-gharaghoshi, Hajar; Rafieian-kopaei, Mahmoud

    2017-01-01

    The medicinal plants from genus Berberis are particularly important in traditional medicine and the food basket of Iranians. Given various plants from genus Berberis and their economic, nutritional, and medicinal status in Iran, this study seeks to investigate the findings of recent studies on the phytochemical characteristics, specifications, and uses of Berberis vulgaris. In this review article, 350 articles were initially retrieved from reliable scientific databases using relevant search terms. Then, 230 articles were selected and 120 were excluded after a primary analysis. Finally, 98 articles related to the subject under study were meticulously examined and the required data were extracted and classified according to the research purposes. The findings were divided into eight separate sections: Introducing Berberidaceae family, different species of Berberis, pharmaceutical organs, B. vulgaris nutrition facts and minerals, the antioxidants and alkaloids compounds in fruit and other organs, action mechanisms of preventing and treating diseases, traditional uses of B. vulgaris, and its properties reported by recent studies. The results briefly indicate that B. vulgaris contains a large number of phytochemical materials including ascorbic acid, vitamin K, several triterpenoids, more than 10 phenolic compounds and more than 30 alkaloids. Therefore B. vulgaris may have anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antidiabetic, antibacterial, analgesic and anti-nociceptive and hepato-protective effects. Regarding the use of different organs of B. vulgaris in traditional medicine and their confirmed effects in the recent studies, it is possible to use different organs of B. vulgaris, especially fruit, to develop new drugs. PMID:28656092

  2. Phytochemistry and Pharmacology of Berberis Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhber-Dezfuli, Najmeh; Saeidnia, Soodabeh; Gohari, Ahmad Reza; Kurepaz-Mahmoodabadi, Mahdieh

    2014-01-01

    The genus Berberis (Berberidaceae) includes about 500 species worldwide, some of which are widely cultivated in the north-eastern regions of Iran. This genus consists of spiny deciduous evergreen shrubs, characterized by yellow wood and flowers. The cultivation of seedless barberry in South Khorasan goes back to two hundred years ago. Medicinal properties for all parts of these plants have been reported, including: Antimicrobial, antiemetic, antipyretic, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-arrhythmic, sedative, anti-cholinergic, cholagogic, anti-leishmaniasis, and anti-malaria. The main compounds found in various species of Berberis, are berberine and berbamine. Phytochemical analysis of various species of this genus revealed the presence of alkaloids, tannins, phenolic compounds, sterols and triterpenes. Although there are some review articles on Berberis vulgaris (as the most applied species), there is no review on the phytochemical and pharmacological activities of other well-known species of the genus Berberis. For this reason, the present review mainly focused on the diverse secondary metabolites of various species of this genus and the considerable pharmacological and biological activities together with a concise story of the botany and cultivation. PMID:24600191

  3. Berberis vulgaris: specifications and traditional uses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Rahimi-Madiseh

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The medicinal plants from genus Berberis are particularly important in traditional medicine and the food basket of Iranians. Given various plants from genus Berberis and their economic, nutritional, and medicinal status in Iran, this study seeks to investigate the findings of recent studies on the phytochemical characteristics, specifications, and uses of Berberis vulgaris. In this review article, 350 articles were initially retrieved from reliable scientific databases using relevant search terms. Then, 230 articles were selected and 120 were excluded after a primary analysis. Finally, 98 articles related to the subject under study were meticulously examined and the required data were extracted and classified according to the research purposes. The findings were divided into eight separate sections: Introducing Berberidaceae family, different species of Berberis, pharmaceutical organs, B. vulgaris nutrition facts and minerals, the antioxidants and alkaloids compounds in fruit and other organs, action mechanisms of preventing and treating diseases, traditional uses of B. vulgaris, and its properties reported by recent studies. The results briefly indicate that B. vulgaris contains a large number of phytochemical materials including ascorbic acid, vitamin K, several triterpenoids, more than 10 phenolic compounds and more than 30 alkaloids. Therefore B. vulgaris may have anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antidiabetic, antibacterial, analgesic and anti-nociceptive and hepato-protective effects. Regarding the use of different organs of B. vulgaris in traditional medicine and their confirmed effects in the recent studies, it is possible to use different organs of B. vulgaris, especially fruit, to develop new drugs.

  4. Hypoglycemic effect of Berberis microphylla G Forst root extract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hypoglycemic effect of Berberis microphylla G Forst root extract. María C. Furrianca, Marysol Alvear, Tomás Zambrano, Víctor Fajardo, Luis A. Salazar. Abstract. Purpose: To evaluate the effect of the root extract of Berberis microphylla on glucose uptake and AMPK-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity in non-resistant ...

  5. Alkaloids from Mongolian species Berberis sibirica Pall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Istatkova, R.; Philipov, S.; Tuleva, P.; Amgalan, A.; Samdan, J.; Dangaa, S.

    2007-01-01

    From the aerial parts of Berberis sibirica Pall. 6 isoquinoline alkaloids of protoberberine, protopine, benzphenanthridine and proaporphine type were isolated. The known alkaloids (-)-tetrahydropseudocoptisine, pseudoprotopine, (+)-chelidonine and (+)-glaziovine are new for the family Berberidaceae. From the roots of B. sibirica 10 isoquinoline alkaloids of protoberberine, benzylisoquinoline, bisbenzylisoquinoline, aporphine-benzylisoquinoline and proaporphine-benzylisoquinoline type were isolated. 1,10-Di-O-methylpakistanine has been reported for the first time as a natural alkaloid. The known alkaloids (-)-isothalidezine and (+)-armepavine have been found for the first time in the family Berberidaceae. All structures were determined by physical and spectral data. (authors)

  6. Taxonomic and phytogeographic implications from ITS phylogeny in Berberis (Berberidaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Dong; Kim, Sung-Hee; Landrum, Leslie R

    2004-06-01

    A phylogeny based on the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences from 79 taxa representing much of the diversity of Berberis L. (four major groups and 22 sections) was constructed for the first time. The phylogeny was basically congruent with the previous classification schemes at higher taxonomic levels, such as groups and subgroups. A notable exception is the non-monophyly of the group Occidentales of compound-leaved Berberis (previously separated as Mahonia). At lower levels, however, most of previous sections and subsections were not evident especially in simple-leaved Berberis. Possible relationship between section Horridae (group Occidentales) and the simple-leaved Berberis clade implies paraphyly of the compound-leaved Berberis. A well-known South America-Old World (mainly Asia) disjunctive distribution pattern of the simple-leaved Berberis is explained by a vicariance event occurring in the Cretaceous period. The ITS phylogeny also suggests that a possible connection between the Asian and South American groups through the North American species ( Berberis canadensis or B. fendleri) is highly unlikely.

  7. Phytopharmacological and ethnomedicinal uses of the Genus Berberis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Plants belonging to Berberis are reported in several folklore medicinal ... Their antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, anti-diabetic, and anti-tumor activities as well as ... The present review focuses on recent advances in phytopharmacological and ...

  8. Hypoglycemic effect of Berberis microphylla G Forst root extract

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In insulin-resistant HepG2 cells, glucose uptake varied from 68 to 95 % of available ... Keywords: Calafate, Diabetes, Antihyperglycemic effect, Phytomedicine, Berberis, Insulin resistance ..... homeostasis through the coordination of adaptive.

  9. Antihypertensive Activity of Aqueous-Methanol Extract of Berberis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HP

    Median lethal dose (LD50) and sub-chronic toxicity of the extract were also determined ... possible mode(s) of action, side effects, toxicity ... medicinal uses. Berberis ... evaluate the possible antihypertensive effect of this plant. EXPERIMENTAL.

  10. Phytochemical and biological screening of Berberis aristata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Berberis aristata occupies significant position as a medicinal plant. Given its clinical applications and the grave concern of weed based crop damage in Pakistan, the plant was investigated for its antimicrobial and allelopathic activities. Methods: Fresh Berberis aristata plant was obtained from Rawalakot and Hajeera (District Poonch Azad Kashmir. Methanolic extract preparation and phytochemical analysis was done using standard procedures. Antibacterial and antifungal activities of the root, stem and leaf extracts of the plant were assayed against the bacterial strains E. coli, S. typhi, S. aureus, Shigella, Citrobacter, P. vulgaris, Enterobacter, S. pyrogenes, V. cholera and Klebsiella spp. and fungal strains A. niger, Cladosporium, Rhizoctonia, Alternaria, Trichoderma, Penicillium, Curvularia, Paecilomyces and Rhizopus using disc diffusion method. Also, the phytoxicity of the extracts was evaluated against Lemna minor and the data was recorded after seven days. Results: Phytochemical screening of the three extracts identified the presence of alkaloids, reducing sugars, steroids, flavonoids, terpenoids, glycosides and saponins while tannins were found to be absent. The leaf extract also showed negative tests for alkaloids and steroids. The extracts significantly inhibited the growth of the employed microbial isolates. The leaf extract, however, was not active against A. niger, Curvularia, Paecilomyces and Rhizopus. For most of the tested strains, the effectiveness of the extracts was much higher than that of Amoxicillin and Fluconazole; the positive controls used for bacterial and fungal cultures, respectively. All the extracts demonstrated 100% phytotoxicity against Lemna minor at 1000 μg/mL while low activity (10-20% was observed at 10 μg/mL and 100 μg/mL, respectively. Conclusion: The results strongly support the profound ethnobotanical applications of this plant and also demonstrate its potential for use in weed control

  11. Identification and characterization of microsatellites from calafate (Berberis microphylla, Berberidaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varas, Benjamín; Castro, María H; Rodriguez, Roberto; von Baer, Dietrich; Mardones, Claudia; Hinrichsen, Patricio

    2013-07-01

    Southern barberry or calafate (Berberis microphylla) is a shrub species endemic to the Patagonian region of South America that is used for human consumption. The fruit is very rich in vitamin C and anthocyanins and has a very high antioxidant capacity. There have been only a few genetic studies of this and other closely related species. • Here we present the first 18 microsatellite markers of B. microphylla that were characterized using 66 accessions of calafate from Patagonia. On average, they had 7.6 alleles per marker, with an expected heterozygosity of 0.688. The informativeness of these markers was also evaluated in another 15 Berberis species, including most of the native and endemic Chilean species. • The results confirm that these new simple sequence repeat markers are very polymorphic and potentially useful in genetic studies in any species of the genus Berberis.

  12. Identification and Characterization of Microsatellites from Calafate (Berberis microphylla, Berberidaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamín Varas

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: Southern barberry or calafate (Berberis microphylla is a shrub species endemic to the Patagonian region of South America that is used for human consumption. The fruit is very rich in vitamin C and anthocyanins and has a very high antioxidant capacity. There have been only a few genetic studies of this and other closely related species. Methods and Results: Here we present the first 18 microsatellite markers of B. microphylla that were characterized using 66 accessions of calafate from Patagonia. On average, they had 7.6 alleles per marker, with an expected heterozygosity of 0.688. The informativeness of these markers was also evaluated in another 15 Berberis species, including most of the native and endemic Chilean species. Conclusions: The results confirm that these new simple sequence repeat markers are very polymorphic and potentially useful in genetic studies in any species of the genus Berberis.

  13. Phytochemical study on Berberis sibirica Pall.

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    A Solongo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available From the aerial parts (700g of berberis sibirica pall. 6 isoquinoline alkaloids of protoberberine, protopine, benzophenantridine and proaporphine type were isolated. The known alkaloids (--tetrahydropseudocoptisine, pseudoprotopine, (+-chelidonine and (+-glaziovine are new for the family berberidaceae. from the aerial part ii (3.9 kg 14 isoquinoline alkaloids of aporphine, proaporphine, protoberberine, protopine, benzylisoquinoline, bisbenzylisoquinoline,proaporphine-benzylisoquinoline and simple isoquinolin type were isolated and identified. The aporphine alkaloid 1-o-methylisotebaidine and simple isoquinoline dehydrocorypalline have been found for the first time in the family of berberidaceae. From the roots of b. sibirica 10 isoquinoline alkaloids of protoberberine, benzylisoquinoline, bisbenzylisoquinoline, aporphine-benzylisoquinoline and proaporphine-benzylisoquinoline type were isolated. 1,10-di-omethylpakistanine has been reported for the first time as a natural alkaloid. The known alkaloids (- -isothalidezine and (+-armepavine have been found for the first time in the family berberidaceae. All structures were determined by physical and spectral data.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5564/mjc.v12i0.185 Mongolian Journal of Chemistry Vol.12 2011: 117-122

  14. A review on biological and chemical diversity in Berberis (Berberidaceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Sharad; Srivastava, Manjoosha; Misra, Ankita; Pandey, Garima; Rawat, AKS

    2015-01-01

    Berberis is an important genus and well known in the Indian as well as European systems of traditional medicine. It is used since ancient times for curing eye disease, fever, jaundice, rheumatism, vomiting during pregnancy, kidney and gall balder stones and various other ailments due to the presence of biologically active alkaloid berberine. Action of the root extracts of few species are believed to be as powerful as quinine in the treatment of malarial fever. A plethora of literature pertaining to the taxonomy, biology, chemistry, traditional and ethnic uses of Berberis in different countries and indigenous cultures was collected by both offline (library, journals, textbooks etc.) and online mode (electronic search of available databases). In addition to this, books on traditional medicine and ethno pharmacological knowledge were also referred to extract ancient uses of Berberis in different traditional medicine systems. Most of the folklore, traditional and ethno botanical claims about Berberis species were validated by broad spectrum in vitro and vivo pharmacological studies. The present article summarizes its usage in eye and liver disorder, fever, kidney and gall stones along with anticancer activity. This comprehensive review will not only help researchers for further evaluation but also provide substantial information for future exploitation of species to develop novel herbal formulations. PMID:26535033

  15. Treating Japanese barberry (Berberis thunbergii) during the dormant season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey S. Ward; Scott C. Williams

    2013-01-01

    Japanese barberry (Berberis thunbergii) is an invasive shrub that can suppress forest regeneration and increase the risk of exposure to Lyme disease. In 2008, we began a study in central Connecticut to examine the efficacy of treating barberry infestations during the dormant season (October-March). Techniques included basal spray (triclopyr in oil)...

  16. A review on biological and chemical diversity in Berberis (Berberidaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Sharad; Srivastava, Manjoosha; Misra, Ankita; Pandey, Garima; Rawat, Aks

    2015-01-01

    Berberis is an important genus and well known in the Indian as well as European systems of traditional medicine. It is used since ancient times for curing eye disease, fever, jaundice, rheumatism, vomiting during pregnancy, kidney and gall balder stones and various other ailments due to the presence of biologically active alkaloid berberine. Action of the root extracts of few species are believed to be as powerful as quinine in the treatment of malarial fever. A plethora of literature pertaining to the taxonomy, biology, chemistry, traditional and ethnic uses of Berberis in different countries and indigenous cultures was collected by both offline (library, journals, textbooks etc.) and online mode (electronic search of available databases). In addition to this, books on traditional medicine and ethno pharmacological knowledge were also referred to extract ancient uses of Berberis in different traditional medicine systems. Most of the folklore, traditional and ethno botanical claims about Berberis species were validated by broad spectrum in vitro and vivo pharmacological studies. The present article summarizes its usage in eye and liver disorder, fever, kidney and gall stones along with anticancer activity. This comprehensive review will not only help researchers for further evaluation but also provide substantial information for future exploitation of species to develop novel herbal formulations.

  17. Ethnobotanical studies on Berberis aristata DC. root extracts ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aqueous and alcoholic extract of fresh Berberis aristata DC roots, as well as aqueous extract of dried roots were compared for their antibacterial and antifungal activities by the disc diffusion method. All three extracts showed wide antibacterial activity against Gram-positive bacteria. Among the Gramnegative bacteria ...

  18. The Effect of Moisture Content on Physical Properties of Berberis

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    E Velayati

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to enhance the mechanization level of harvest and post-harvest operations of Berberis fruit, as one of the major and local crops of south Khorasan province, some of its physical properties were investigated. Different dimensions, geometrical mean diameter, sphericity, surface area, mass of thousand fruit, true density, bulk density, porosity, static coefficient of friction and the repose angles were determined. The properties and the effect of moisture content on them were studied by the completely randomized designs statistical method. Analysis of data indicated that the change of moisture content caused significant difference (P

  19. Detecting the influence of ornamental Berberis thunbergii var. atropurpurea in invasive populations of Berberis thunbergii (Berberidaceae) using AFLP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubell, Jessica D; Brand, Mark H; Lehrer, Jonathan M; Holsinger, Kent E

    2008-06-01

    Japanese barberry (Berberis thunbergii DC.) is a widespread invasive plant that remains an important landscape shrub represented by ornamental, purple-leaved forms of the botanical variety atropurpurea. These forms differ greatly in appearance from feral plants, bringing into question whether they contribute to invasive populations or whether the invasions represent self-sustaining populations derived from the initial introduction of the species in the late 19th century. In this study we used amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers to determine whether genetic contributions from B. t. var. atropurpurea are found within naturalized Japanese barberry populations in southern New England. Bayesian clustering of AFLP genotypes and principal coordinate analysis distinguished B. t. var. atropurpurea genotypes from 85 plants representing five invasive populations. While a single feral plant resembled B. t. var. atropurpurea phenotypically and fell within the same genetic cluster, all other naturalized plants sampled were genetically distinct from the purple-leaved genotypes. Seven plants from two different sites possessed morphology consistent with Berberis vulgaris (common barberry) or B. ×ottawensis (B. thunbergii × B. vulgaris). Genetic analysis placed these plants in two clusters separate from B. thunbergii. Although the Bayesian analysis indicated some introgression of B. t. var. atropurpurea and B. vulgaris, these genotypes have had limited influence on extant feral populations of B. thunbergii.

  20. Study of propagation of Berberis thunbergii L. by cuttings, with using less-known methods of stimulation

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    Martin Říha

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The different type of own produce stimulators were tested at Berberis thunbergii L. 'Green Carpet', Berberis thunbergii 'Red Shift' and Berberis thunbergii 'Aureum'. We used the combination of growing inhibitors and quick-dip method, single quick-dip metod in solution of acetone and stimulant in form of gel. Groving inhibitors is including paclobutrazol and CCC in test. We used IBK, NAA, IAA and nicotin acid as auxins in quick-dip method. Medium was aceton solution.

  1. Development and characterization of microsatellite markers for Berberis thunbergii (Berberidaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Jenica M; Obae, Samuel G; Brand, Mark H; Silander, John A; Jones, Kenneth L; Nunziata, Schyler O; Lance, Stacey L

    2012-05-01

    Microsatellite markers were isolated and characterized in Berberis thunbergii, an invasive and ornamental shrub in the eastern United States, to assess genetic diversity among populations and potentially identify horticultural cultivars. A total of 12 loci were identified for the species. Eight of the loci were polymorphic and were screened in 24 individuals from two native (Tochigi and Ibaraki prefectures, Japan) and one invasive (Connecticut, USA) population and 21 horticultural cultivars. The number of alleles per locus ranged from three to seven, and observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.048 to 0.636. These new markers will provide tools for examining genetic relatedness of B. thunbergii plants in the native and invasive range, including phylogeographic studies and assessment of rapid evolution in the invasive range. These markers may also provide tools for examining hybridization with other related species in the invasive range.

  2. Identification and characterization of microsatellites from calafate (Berberis microphylla, Berberidaceae)1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varas, Benjamín; Castro, María H.; Rodriguez, Roberto; von Baer, Dietrich; Mardones, Claudia; Hinrichsen, Patricio

    2013-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Southern barberry or calafate (Berberis microphylla) is a shrub species endemic to the Patagonian region of South America that is used for human consumption. The fruit is very rich in vitamin C and anthocyanins and has a very high antioxidant capacity. There have been only a few genetic studies of this and other closely related species. • Methods and Results: Here we present the first 18 microsatellite markers of B. microphylla that were characterized using 66 accessions of calafate from Patagonia. On average, they had 7.6 alleles per marker, with an expected heterozygosity of 0.688. The informativeness of these markers was also evaluated in another 15 Berberis species, including most of the native and endemic Chilean species. • Conclusions: The results confirm that these new simple sequence repeat markers are very polymorphic and potentially useful in genetic studies in any species of the genus Berberis. PMID:25202561

  3. Berberis vulgaris for cardiovascular disorders: a scoping literature review

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    Abdelrahman Abushouk

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disorders are the leading cause of mortality worldwide. Berberis vulgaris (B. vulgaris is a commonly used plant in traditional medicine. In recent studies, B. vulgaris showed antiarrhythmic, antihypertensive, anticholinergic, and cardioprotective effects. We reviewed the literature to explore the possible prophylactic and therapeutic roles of B. vulgaris in cardiovascular medicine. A computer literature search was conducted to identify all relevant studies that have investigated the role of B. vulgaris in prevention or treatment of cardiovascular diseases.We also searched the citations of the retrieved articles. Using a systematic approach, we conducted a scoping review that included a total of 37 articles. Twelve studies examined the antihypertensive effects of B. vulgaris, seven studies investigated its antiarrhythmic effects, while its inotropic and cardioprotective effects were evaluated in four and eight studies, respectively. B. vulgaris showed a beneficial effect in reducing blood pressure, enhancing cardiac contractility, and protection from reperfusion injury. However, the mechanisms of these effects are still under investigation. Moreover, it could modify major risk factors for cardiovascular disorders, such as oxidative stress, hyperglycemia, and hyperlipidemia. Further studies are needed to translate these findings into effective cardiovascular medications.

  4. Berberis karnaliensis Bh. Adhikari (Berberidaceae: a new addition to the Flora of India

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    Tiwari Umeshkumar L.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Berberis karnaliensis Bh. Adhikari, a recently described species was recorded for the first time from the Indian territory. Hence, it is being reported herewith as an addition to the Flora of India. The species differs from its closely related taxon viz. Berberis jaeschkeana Schneid. var. usteriana Schneid. in having coriaceous leaves and 5-6 primary veins on each side of the midrib. Detailed information on taxonomy, morphology, habitat, ecology and distribution of B. karnaliensis as well as photographs and illustrations are provided here for the species identification.

  5. La presencia en Argentina de Berberis laurina Billb. (Berberidaceae), una especie de uso múltiple

    OpenAIRE

    Keller, Héctor A.

    2010-01-01

    Berberis laurina (Berberidaceae) es mencionada por primera vez para la flora Argentina. Se presenta una descripción de la especie y se la ilustra mediante fotografías; además se brinda información acerca de su distribución, nombres vernaculares, usos y observaciones ecológicas. Berberis laurina (Berberidaceae) is registred for the first time in Argentina. A description of the species are presented; the specimens are illustrated by mean photographs; moreover, information about distribution ...

  6. Detailed pharmacognostical studies on Berberis aristata DC plant

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    Bhawana Rathi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Berberis aristata DC (Berberidaceae commonly known in Hindi as "Dāruhaldi" and "Citra," is an important medicinal herb native to Northern Himalaya region. The plant is used traditionally in Indian system of medicine as an antibacterial, antiperiodic, antidiarrheal and anticancer and it is also used in the treatment of ophthalmic infections. Its root, stem and leaves also find their use in treatment of various ailments and hence is used extensively in Ayurveda. Materials and Methods: Samples of the whole plants of B. aristata were collected and identified. Hand and microtome sections were taken, stained and mounted and the cell content and cell wall structure were studied according to the method described by Kay and Johansen. Representative sketches were made with the help of camera Lucida. Methods for determining the quantitative values were the same as described elsewhere. For fluorescence analysis, the powder of the root, stem and leaf were examined under ultraviolet light. Total ash, acid insoluble ash and water-soluble ash values and water- and alcohol-soluble extractives were determined. Results: The detailed investigations carried on the pharmacognosy of the root; stem and leaf of B. aristata have brought out some salient diagnostic features, which allow one to differentiate it from other substitutes and or adulterants. The determination of quantitative values, fluorescence analysis and the use of lycopodium spore analysis has specifically contributed to this differentiation. Conclusion: From the foregoing observation on the pharmacognosy of root, stem and leaf of B. aristata DC, the salient diagnostic characters of three parts have been presented, which can allow one to differentiate it from other substitutes and or adulterants.

  7. Flavonols, alkaloids, and antioxidant capacity of edible wild berberis species from patagonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Antonieta; Zapata, Moises; Sabando, Constanza; Bustamante, Luis; von Baer, Dietrich; Vergara, Carola; Mardones, Claudia

    2014-12-24

    There are 20 species of the Berberidaceae family described in Chile, whose fruits are edible and show high anthocyanin and hydroxycinnamic acid levels. Berberis microphylla G. Forst, commonly known as calafate, is the most extensively distributed. Flavonols and alkaloids in seed, pulp, skin, and whole calafate berry extracts and other Berberis were studied using HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS/MS and HPLC with fluorescence detector. Berry samples from different locations in Chilean Patagonia, including different phenological stages, were systematically addressed. Results were compared with other organs of the plant and with other Berberis species. Total flavonol concentration in calafate (n = 65) was 1.33 ± 0.54 μmol/g. Glycosyl metabolites of quercetin and isorhamnetin were the most abundant. Similar profiles were observed in calafate from distinct locations, but important differences were observed for the other edible Berberis species. Calafate pulp and skin have higher flavonol concentrations than seeds, and the maturation process reduced its levels. TEACCUPRAC and TEACABTS of whole calafate extracts and fractions are also explored. Finally, only berberine was detected in the fruit (0.001%), mainly in seeds. Results contribute to the promotion of this berry as a superfruit from Patagonia.

  8. Berbanine: a new isoquinoline-isoquinolone alkaloid from Berberis vulgaris (Berberidaceae)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hošťálková, A.; Novák, Z.; Pour, M.; Jirošová, Anna; Opletal, L.; Kuneš, J.; Cahlíková, L.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 4 (2013), s. 441-442 ISSN 1934-578X Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : Berberis vulgaris * Berberidaceae * alkaloid * isoquinoline-isoquinolone dimer * berbanine Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 0.924, year: 2013

  9. Rediscovery of Berberis nilghiriensis Ahrendt (Berberidaceae from Nilgiris, Tamil Nadu, Southern India

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    V. S. Ramachandran

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The critically endangered Berberis nilghiriensis Ahrendt, endemic to the Nilgiri hills in South India is rediscovered after 140 years, with three extant populations of ca. 25 individuals in the Nilgiri hills. Taxonomic treatment along with threat status, ecology, and economic uses are provided and urgent conservation is suggested to prevent its local extinction as the species is exposed to continued anthropogenic disturbances.

  10. Universal Plant DNA Barcode Loci May Not Work in Complex Groups: A Case Study with Indian Berberis Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Sribash; Tyagi, Antariksh; Shukla, Virendra; Kumar, Anil; Singh, Uma M.; Chaudhary, Lal Babu; Datt, Bhaskar; Bag, Sumit K.; Singh, Pradhyumna K.; Nair, Narayanan K.; Husain, Tariq; Tuli, Rakesh

    2010-01-01

    Background The concept of DNA barcoding for species identification has gained considerable momentum in animals because of fairly successful species identification using cytochrome oxidase I (COI). In plants, matK and rbcL have been proposed as standard barcodes. However, barcoding in complex genera is a challenging task. Methodology and Principal Findings We investigated the species discriminatory power of four reportedly most promising plant DNA barcoding loci (one from nuclear genome- ITS, and three from plastid genome- trnH-psbA, rbcL and matK) in species of Indian Berberis L. (Berberidaceae) and two other genera, Ficus L. (Moraceae) and Gossypium L. (Malvaceae). Berberis species were delineated using morphological characters. These characters resulted in a well resolved species tree. Applying both nucleotide distance and nucleotide character-based approaches, we found that none of the loci, either singly or in combinations, could discriminate the species of Berberis. ITS resolved all the tested species of Ficus and Gossypium and trnH-psbA resolved 82% of the tested species in Ficus. The highly regarded matK and rbcL could not resolve all the species. Finally, we employed amplified fragment length polymorphism test in species of Berberis to determine their relationships. Using ten primer pair combinations in AFLP, the data demonstrated incomplete species resolution. Further, AFLP analysis showed that there was a tendency of the Berberis accessions to cluster according to their geographic origin rather than species affiliation. Conclusions/Significance We reconfirm the earlier reports that the concept of universal barcode in plants may not work in a number of genera. Our results also suggest that the matK and rbcL, recommended as universal barcode loci for plants, may not work in all the genera of land plants. Morphological, geographical and molecular data analyses of Indian species of Berberis suggest probable reticulate evolution and thus barcode markers may

  11. Universal plant DNA barcode loci may not work in complex groups: a case study with Indian berberis species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sribash Roy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The concept of DNA barcoding for species identification has gained considerable momentum in animals because of fairly successful species identification using cytochrome oxidase I (COI. In plants, matK and rbcL have been proposed as standard barcodes. However, barcoding in complex genera is a challenging task. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We investigated the species discriminatory power of four reportedly most promising plant DNA barcoding loci (one from nuclear genome--ITS, and three from plastid genome--trnH-psbA, rbcL and matK in species of Indian Berberis L. (Berberidaceae and two other genera, Ficus L. (Moraceae and Gossypium L. (Malvaceae. Berberis species were delineated using morphological characters. These characters resulted in a well resolved species tree. Applying both nucleotide distance and nucleotide character-based approaches, we found that none of the loci, either singly or in combinations, could discriminate the species of Berberis. ITS resolved all the tested species of Ficus and Gossypium and trnH-psbA resolved 82% of the tested species in Ficus. The highly regarded matK and rbcL could not resolve all the species. Finally, we employed amplified fragment length polymorphism test in species of Berberis to determine their relationships. Using ten primer pair combinations in AFLP, the data demonstrated incomplete species resolution. Further, AFLP analysis showed that there was a tendency of the Berberis accessions to cluster according to their geographic origin rather than species affiliation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We reconfirm the earlier reports that the concept of universal barcode in plants may not work in a number of genera. Our results also suggest that the matK and rbcL, recommended as universal barcode loci for plants, may not work in all the genera of land plants. Morphological, geographical and molecular data analyses of Indian species of Berberis suggest probable reticulate evolution and thus

  12. NUEVA LOCALIDAD GEOGRAFICA PARA BERBERIS NEGERIANA TISCHLER (BERBERIDACEAE) EN LA PROVINCIA DE ARAUCO, REGION DEL BIO-BIO, CHILE

    OpenAIRE

    Gómez, Persy; Belov, Michail; San Martín, José

    2008-01-01

    This note reports the finding of a population of Berberis negeriana Tischler (Berberidaceae), in the province of Arauco, Bío-Bío Region (37°42'17" S y 73°19'43" W) in the center south of Chile. The population was found between Nothofagus obliqua and species of the Valdiviano Forest.

  13. Effect of Moisture Content on Mechanical Properties and Terminal Velocity of Berberis

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    E Velayati

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The study of mechanical properties of Berberis not only is useful for design and optimization of transportation, processing and packaging equipment but also can prevent mechanical injuries and losses. In this study force, deformation, energy and toughness were measured at different moisture content levels including 70-76, 45-50, 25-30 and 7-10 percent (w.b.. The decrease of moisture content caused increasing rupture force from 1.387 to 2.679 N, decreasing shape deformation from 3.387 to 2.413mm, increasing toughness from 4.297 to 8.220 J/cm3 and decreasing rupture energy from 0.921 to 0.661mJ. Effects of loading speed, force orientation and their interaction were investigated on just fresh Berberis fruit. It was indicated that only force orientation was effective on all investigated properties except toughness. The moisture content was identified as an effective parameter on terminal velocity. It decreased from 9 to 4.5 m/s with decrease of moisture content from 76 to 7 percent (w.b..

  14. Standardization of Berberis aristata extract through conventional and modern HPTLC techniques

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    Dinesh K. Patel

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Berberis aristata (Berberidaceae is an important medicinal plant, found in the different region of the world. It has significant medicinal value in the traditional Indian and Chinese system of medicine. The aim of the present investigation includes qualitative and quantitative analysis of Berberis aristata extract. Methods: Present study includes determination of phytochemical analysis, solubility test, heavy metal analysis, antimicrobial study and quantitative analysis by HPTLC method. Results: Preliminary phytochemical analysis showed the presence of carbohydrate, glycoside, alkaloid, protein, amino acid, saponin, tannin and flavonoid. Solubility in water and alcohal were found to be 81.90% in water and 84.52% in 50% in alcohal. Loss on drying was found to be 5.32%. Total phenol and flavonoid content were found to be 0.11% and 2.8%. Level of lead, arsenic, mercury and cadmium complies the standard level. E. coli and salmonella was found to be absent whereas total bacterial count, yeast and moulds contents were found to be under the limit. Content of berberine was found to be 13.47% through HPTLC techniques. Conclusions: The results obtained from the present studies could be used as source of valuable information which can play an important role for the food scientists, researchers and even the consumers for its standards.

  15. Especies nuevas del género Berberis de Colombia, Ecuador y Venezuela

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    Camargo G. Luis A.

    1966-06-01

    Full Text Available EI presente estudio es la primicia de una revisión taxonómica del género Berberis que hice en U. S. National Museum (Department of Botany, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D. C. Una parte de él fue presentado a la Catholic University of America, Washington, D. C., en 1960, como requisito parcial para tesis del grado "Master of Science". Las numerosas colecciones indeterminadas de este género procedentes de Suramérica y existentes en los Herbarios de National Museum, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D. c.; Chicago Natural History Museum; Royal Botanical Gardens, Kew, Great Britain; Museum National d'Histoire Naturelle de Paris, e Instituto de Ciencias Naturales de la Universidad Nacional de Colombia, en Bogotá, me animaron a investigar sobre este género.

  16. An experimental genetic system using Berberis vulgaris confirms sexual recombination in Puccinia striiformis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodriguez Algaba, Julian; Walter, Stephanie; Sørensen, Chris Khadgi

    An effort to develop an experimental genetic system for the stripe (yellow) rust fungus using Berberis vulgaris as an alternate host has been made by INRA Grignon (F) and GRRC (DK). The first attempts to achieve infection using European isolates and B. vulgaris plants from France were unsuccessful...... and to study genotypic diversity. The markers confirmed the parental origin and markers that were heterozygous in the parent generally segregated in the S1 progenies. A largest number of multilocus genotypes observed among the progeny isolates confirmed successful sexual recombination. Segregation...... for avirulence and virulence was investigated using 15 single R-gene wheat lines. The sexual structures and spore forms were documented by microscopic and macroscopic imaging at crucial time points during the life cycle of Pst on the alternate host....

  17. In Vitro Study of Berberis vulgaris, Actinidia deliciosa and Allium cepa L. Antibacterial Effects on Listeria monocytogenes

    OpenAIRE

    Anzabi Younes

    2015-01-01

    Objective: One control method of pathogenic microorganisms is using synthetic chemical preservatives and antibiotics. Because of being generally recognized as safe, antibacterial compounds with organic origin are considered important for health. This study was done in order to investigate the antibacterial effects of methanol extracts of the Berberis vulgaris (Barberry), Actinidia deliciosa (Kiwi) and Allium cepa L. (Onions) on the standard strain (ATCC:19114) of Listeria monocytogenes (L. mo...

  18. Toxicology effects of Berberis vulgaris (barberry and its active constituent, berberine: a review

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    Seyede Zohre Kamrani Rad

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Berberis vulgaris and berberine, its main component, traditionally have been used for treatment of various disorders. The pharmacological properties of them have been investigated using different in vivo and in vitro models. In spite of beneficial effects of B. vulgaris on different cell lines, there are documents have revealed negative impacts of it on animal and human. In this regards, the determination of its toxicity in a scientific view is necessary. In current report, we provide classified information about the toxicity of B. vulgaris and berberine in different conditions consist of acute, sub-acute, sub-chronic and chronic state. Besides, it discusses the cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, mutagenicity, and carcinogenicity of B. vulgaris and berberine as well as developmental toxicity and clinical studies. Data from the present study indicate that their toxicity is depending on the route and duration of administration. According to present study, they could induce GI upset and ulceration, immunotoxicity, phototoxicity, neurotoxicity, cardiotoxicity and jaundice in a dose dependent manner. They should be used with caution in pregnancy, neonatal and G6PD deficiency. Besides, consideration should be taken in co-administration of berberine with drugs that are metabolized with CYP enzymes due their inhibitory effects on these enzymes. Furthermore, they evoke cytotoxicity on both normal and cancer cell line which is time and concentration dependent.

  19. Acute hypotensive and diuretic activities of Berberis vulgaris root bark aqueous extract in normal rats

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    Muhammad Ahmed

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The aim of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of intravenous administration of Berberis vulgaris root bark aqueous extract (BRBD on the cardiovascular and renal functions of healthy normotensive rats. The different doses of BRBD 1, 10 and 20 mg/kg were administered intravenously (i.v in normal rats. Blood pressure, diuretic activity and serum renal profile were analyzed. Intravenous injection of BRBD at the different doses of 1, 10 and 20 mg/kg showed a dose-dependent reduction in mean arterial blood pressure (P<0.001. At different doses of 1, 10 and 20 mg/kg, the hypotensive effect remained for more than one hour. Single dose administration of BRBD at doses of 10 and 20 mg/kg caused a significant increase in urine output (P<0.001 as compared to the control rats. Serum renal profile test (albumin, Urea, Uric Acid, creatinine and BUN did not show any significant alteration. The authors conclude that the BRBD is a potent hypotensive and possesses diuretic potential

  20. Optimization, characterization, and biological activity of polysaccharides from Berberis dasystachya Maxim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Lijuan; Suo, Yourui; Yang, Yongjing; Meng, Jing; Hu, Na

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the extraction of water-soluble polysaccharides (BDPs) from Berberis dasystachya Maxim using dynamic microwave-assisted extraction (DMAE) was discussed. A Box-Behnken design combined with response surface methodology has been employed to optimize extraction parameters of DMAE. The BDPs have been analyzed in order to identify a variety of chemical properties. Antioxidant and anti-tumor activities in vitro have been studied by DPPH, ABTS, reducing power assay, and MTT assay, respectively. The results obtained showed that the optimal extraction conditions were as follows: ratio of water to raw material (X1) 25.84 mg/L, extraction power (X2) 433.13W, extraction time (X3) 35.18 min, and the maximum yield of extraction was 6.472 ± 0.384%, which was in good agreement with the predicted value. The physicochemical tests demonstrated that the BDPs mainly consist of rhamnose, arabinose, xylose, mannose, glucose and lactose in a molar ratio of 1:17.3:1.33:7:2.33:1.78; the average molecular weight of the BDPs was estimated to be from 2.95×10(5) and 1.52×10(3)Da, respectively. Furthermore, the BDPs exhibited effective antioxidant and anti-proliferative properties in vitro. Such pharmaceutical activities could prove useful for potential future applications involving the berries of B. dasystachya Maxim. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. A quick overview on some aspects of endocrinological and therapeutic effects of Berberis vulgaris L.

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    Ali Zarei

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Many herbaceous plants contain compounds that have biological effects in addition to their medicinal properties. They have compounds with numerous properties, including hypo lipidemic, hypoglycemic, antioxidant, and hepato protective ones, which have been analyzed at different levels. One of these plants, with the scientific name of Berberis vulgaris, is barberry. The most important compounds identified in this plant are berberine, oxycontin, palmatine, bervulcine, berbamine, columbamine, jatrorrhizine, coptisine, and berbamine. In addition to alkaloids, organic acids such as chelidonic acid, citric acid, malic acid, resin, tannin, pectinic, and mucilagic substances are among the ingredients of barberry. In this paper, it was attempted to determine the role and effect of the extract of barberry on various body organs. The results showed that berberine actually increases insulin sensitivity and is capable of inhibiting alpha glucosidase, adipogenesis, and thus acts as an anti-obesity and hypoglycemic agent. Berberine reduces the density of serum cholesterol and triglycerides and can improve the function of liver enzymes, therefore, it can be suggested as a hypo lipidemic and hepato protective plant extract. The hepato protective effects of this extract are probably due to its antioxidant properties. Studies showed that barberry have numerous health benefits, including anti-inflammatory ones. Moreover, it can be used as a medicinal herb to treat a variety of disorders, such as diabetes, liver disease, gallbladder pain, digestive, urinary tract diseases, and gallstones. However, more studies on this issue and doing more focused and intensive researches in this field are recommended.

  2. The fruit extract of Berberis crataegina DC: exerts potent antioxidant activity and protects DNA integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charehsaz, Mohammad; Sipahi, Hande; Celep, Engin; Üstündağ, Aylin; Cemiloğlu Ülker, Özge; Duydu, Yalçın; Aydın, Ahmet; Yesilada, Erdem

    2015-04-17

    Dried fruits of Berberis crataegina (Berberidaceae) have been frequently consumed as food garniture in Turkish cuisine, while its fruit paste has been used to increase stamina and in particular to prevent from cardiovascular dysfunctions in Northeastern Black Sea region of Turkey. This study investigated this folkloric information in order to explain the claimed healing effects as well as to evaluate possible risks. Total phenolic, flavonoid and proanthocyanidin contents and antioxidant capacity of the methanolic fruit extract were evaluated through several in vitro assays. The cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of B. crataegina fruit extract were also assessed in both cervical cancer cell line (HeLa) and human peripheral blood lymphocytes. The extract showed protective effects against ferric-induced oxidative stress and had a relatively good antioxidant activity. It also ameliorated the H2O2 mediated DNA damage in lymphocytes, suggesting the protective effect against oxidative DNA damage. The methanolic extract of B. crataegina fruits may be a potential antioxidant nutrient and also may exert a protective role against lipid peroxidation as well as oxidative DNA damage.

  3. Influence of drying conditions on the effective moisture diffusivity, energy of activation and energy consumption during the thin-layer drying of berberis fruit (Berberidaceae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aghbashlo, Mortaza; Kianmehr, Mohammad H.; Samimi-Akhijahani, Hadi [Department of Agriculture Machinery, University of Tehran, Aboreyhan Campus (Iran)

    2008-10-15

    Berberis is known as a medicinal and ornamental plant in the world. Berberis fruit is used in medicine to cure liver, neck and stomach cancer, blood purification and mouth scent. Dried berberis fruit using new technology was preserved for relatively long time. Thin-layer drying simulation was used to obtain experiment data, using laboratory scale hot-air dryer of the static tray. Fick's second law was used as a major equation to calculate the moisture diffusivity with some simplification. The calculated value of moisture diffusivity varied from a minimum of 3.320 x 10{sup -10} to a maximum of 9 x 10{sup -9} m{sup 2}/s and the value of energy activation from a minimum of 110.837 to a maximum of 130.61 kJ/mol of from 50 C to 70 C with drying air velocities of 0.5-2 m/s. The high value of the energy of activation for berberis fruit probably related to the tissue of berberis fruit and high moisture content (about 74.28%w.b), and intensive changes in D{sub eff} values for a different air temperature at constant air velocity. The input energy values and specific energy requirement for thin-drying of berberis fruit were found to be in the range of 0.643348-35.20032 (kWh) and 20.9355-1110.0700 (kWh/kg) from 50 C to 70 C with drying air velocities of 0.5-2 m/s, respectively. (author)

  4. Influence of drying conditions on the effective moisture diffusivity, energy of activation and energy consumption during the thin-layer drying of berberis fruit (Berberidaceae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aghbashlo, Mortaza; Kianmehr, Mohammad H.; Samimi-Akhijahani, Hadi

    2008-01-01

    Berberis is known as a medicinal and ornamental plant in the world. Berberis fruit is used in medicine to cure liver, neck and stomach cancer, blood purification and mouth scent. Dried berberis fruit using new technology was preserved for relatively long time. Thin-layer drying simulation was used to obtain experiment data, using laboratory scale hot-air dryer of the static tray. Fick's second law was used as a major equation to calculate the moisture diffusivity with some simplification. The calculated value of moisture diffusivity varied from a minimum of 3.320 x 10 -10 to a maximum of 9 x 10 -9 m 2 /s and the value of energy activation from a minimum of 110.837 to a maximum of 130.61 kJ/mol of from 50 deg. C to 70 deg. C with drying air velocities of 0.5-2 m/s. The high value of the energy of activation for berberis fruit probably related to the tissue of berberis fruit and high moisture content (about 74.28%w.b), and intensive changes in D eff values for a different air temperature at constant air velocity. The input energy values and specific energy requirement for thin-drying of berberis fruit were found to be in the range of 0.643348-35.20032 (kWh) and 20.9355-1110.0700 (kWh/kg) from 50 deg. C to 70 deg. C with drying air velocities of 0.5-2 m/s, respectively

  5. Effects of Berberis vulgaris fractions on PTZ Induced seizure in male rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Berberis vulgaris L (Berberidaceae is a medicinal plant that is distributed in different parts of Iran; it is grown as a wild or cultivated plant. It has different pharmacological activities such as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-arrhythmic, sedative and anti-malaria effects. In this study, the anti-seizure activity of different fractions of this plant was evaluated. Methods: Seventy two rats were randomly divided in to nine groups (n=8 in each group. (1: negative control group (normal saline 10mL/kg, (2: positive control group (sodium valproate 1 mg/kg, (3, 4, 5: hydroalcoholic extract-treated groups (100, 200, 400 mg/kg, (6, 7: methanol fraction-treated groups (100 and 200 mg/kg and (8, 9: chloroform fraction-treated group (100 and 200 mg/kg. Thirty minute after peritoneal injection of different doses of extract, fractions, saline and gavage of sodium valproate, PTZ (45 mg/kg was injected and they were immediately transferred to a special cage, and the seizure parameters were evaluated for 30 min. Result: The injection of different doses of hydroalcoholic extract and different fractions had a dose-dependent effect on prolongation of latency to the onset of seizures. The effective dose was 400 mg/kg of hydroalcoholic extract and 200 mg/kg of methanol fraction. They decreased the rate of mortality and the number of suddenly seizures jumping significantly. Conclusion: The present study demonstrated that the hydroalcoholic extract and methanol fraction of B. vulgaris showed anticonvulsant activity in PTZ-induced seizures in mice. Therefore, this plant may be more useful in petit mal epilepsy.

  6. Protoscolecidal Effect of Berberis vulgaris Root Extract and Its Main Compound, Berberine in Cystic Echinococcosis.

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    Hossein Mahmoudvand

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Cystic echinococcosis (CE, a zoonotic parasitic infection caused by the metacestode (larvae stage of dog tapeworm Echinococcus granulosus and recognized as a major economic and public health concern in the world. This study aimed to investigate the in vitro scolicidal effect of methanolic extract of Berberis vulgaris L. roots and its main compound, berberine against protoscoleces of hydatid cysts.For this purpose, protoscoleces were aseptically aspirated from sheep livers having hydatid cysts. Various concentrations of the methanolic extract (0.25-2 mg/ml and berberine (0.062- 0.5 mg/ml were used for 5 to 30 min. Viability of protoscoleces was confirmed by eosin exclusive test.In the present study, all of the various concentrations of the B. vulgaris methanolic extract (0.25, 0.5, 1 and 2 mg/ml and berberine (0.062, 0.125, 0.25 and 0.5 mg/ml revealed significant (P<0.05 scolicidal effects against protoscoleces of E. granulosus in a dose-dependent manner. Both berberine and methanolic extract exhibited 100% inhibition against protoscoleces of E. granulosus at the concentration of 2.0 and 0.5 mg/ml after 10 min incubation, respectively.According to the results, both B. vulgaris methanolic extract and berberine alone demonstrated high scolicidal activities against protoscoleces of hydatid cysts in low concentration and short exposure time on in vitro model. However, in vivo efficacy of B. vulgaris and berberine also requires to be evaluated using an animal model with hydatid infection.

  7. Optimization extraction conditions for improving phenolic content and antioxidant activity in Berberis asiatica fruits using response surface methodology (RSM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belwal, Tarun; Dhyani, Praveen; Bhatt, Indra D; Rawal, Ranbeer Singh; Pande, Veena

    2016-09-15

    This study for the first time designed to optimize the extraction of phenolic compounds and antioxidant potential of Berberis asiatica fruits using response surface methodology (RSM). Solvent selection was done based on the preliminary experiments and a five-factors-three-level, Central Composite Design (CCD). Extraction temperature (X1), sample to solvent ratio (X3) and solvent concentration (X5) significantly affect response variables. The quadratic model well fitted for all the responses. Under optimal extraction conditions, the dried fruit sample mixed with 80% methanol having 3.0 pH in a ratio of 1:50 and the mixture was heated at 80 °C for 30 min; the measured parameters was found in accordance with the predicted values. High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) analysis at optimized condition reveals 6 phenolic compounds. The results suggest that optimization of the extraction conditions is critical for accurate quantification of phenolics and antioxidants in Berberis asiatica fruits, which may further be utilized for industrial extraction procedure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Legitimate seed dispersal by lizards in an alpine habitat: The case of Berberis empetrifolia (Berberidaceae) dispersed by Liolaemus belii (Tropiduridae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celedón-Neghme, Constanza; San Martin, Leonardo A.; Victoriano, Pedro F.; Cavieres, Lohengrin A.

    2008-05-01

    In this study we determined the effect of seed passage through Liolaemus bellii lizard digestive tracts on germination of fleshy-fruited Andean shrub species Berberis empetrifolia (Berberidaceae), and evaluated the effect of this passage on seed coat characteristics. In addition, we assessed the spatial patterns of fecal deposition by lizards onto various microhabitats available in the Andean environments of central Chile. The germination rate and the final percentage of lizard-ingested B. empetrifolia seeds was greater than control seeds. Comparing photographs and seed coat histological cuts, we suggest that the cutine wax present on seed coats from lizard-ingested seeds was probably removed by abrasion inside the lizards' digestive tract. Sixty-two percent of the lizard's feces was deposited on bare soil near rocks commonly inhabited by lizards. However, this microhabitat represents only 29% of the available ground cover at the study site. By enhancing seed germination and depositing seeds onto potential safe sites for recruitment, the lizard Liolaemus bellii is acting, at least qualitatively, as an effective disperser of Berberis empetrifolia.

  9. Radiating sterilization of fruits of the barberry ordinary berberis vulgaris L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abilova, I.E.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: The riches of flora of Azerbaijan with its specific saturation represent a huge raw-material base for a farmaceutical industry. In territory of republic 3 kinds of a barberry wildly grow, a perspective kind is the barberry ordinary Berberis vulgaris L.In the medical purposes leaves, a root, stalks and fruits of a barberry are applied. Berries as water tincture are applied at rheumatism, a malaria, a diabetes [I.A.Damirov and etn-tilde 1988; Hofbauer F., Askeril M, 2002, etc.], at diseases of a gastroenteric path, easy, at diseases of a mouth [Ikram M, 1975]. Biochemical processes in the collected raw material during first time proceed, as in an alive plant, that is synthesis of biologi-cally active substances prevails. On a measure natural losing water in connection with the termination of receipt of a moisture and nutrients, processes of an exchange are shifted aside disintegration that results in decrease of biologically active substances in vegetative raw material. However in some cases the processes proceeding in drying raw material result on the contrary, in increase in the maintenance of working substances. Therefore improvement of ways of drying and processing of medicinal raw material by influence of small dozes ? - radiations c the purpose of reception of the high-quality raw material, connected with growing need of a global farmaceutical industry for herbs and phitopreparats is an actual problem. As a result of experimental researches conditions of radiating sterilization of fruits of a barberry ?-radiation are picked up at small dozes and at different values ionizating radiations. Fruits of a barberry were irradiated with ?-radiation on radioisotope installation 60n-tildei-circumflex at values of a doze of an irradiation in limits from 1.0 up to 1.5eGr at duration of an irradiation till 30 minutes. The qualitative control were carried out chromatografic (thin layer chromatography) and spectral (UV-VIS and IR) methods later 6, 12 and 24 months

  10. An improved method for extraction of nutraceutically important polyphenolics from Berberis jaeschkeana C.K. Schneid. fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belwal, Tarun; Giri, Lalit; Bhatt, Indra D; Rawal, Ranbeer S; Pande, Veena

    2017-09-01

    Berberis jaeschkeana fruits, source of nutraceutically important polyphenolics were investigated. A total of 32 experimental run were conducted under Plackett-Burman and central composite design. Microwave power, methanol and HCl concentration significantly (pextraction of polyphenols under linear, quadratic and interactive effect. The model showed good fitness with significant (pextraction (MAE) condition the total phenolics, flavonoids, tannins and antioxidant activity were in closed context with predicted values. As compared to ultrasonic (UAE) and maceration extraction (ME), MAE showed significantly (pantioxidant activity. HPLC-DAD analysis detects a total of 10 polyphenolic compounds under MAE as compared to 9 under UAE and ME. Designing of MAE conditions showed promising results for polyphenolic antioxidants extraction as revealed by higher yield with lesser time and solvent consumption, which can contribute in green extraction technology and its application in nutraceutical industry. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Evaluation of Nutritive Value, Phenolic Compounds and in vitro Digestion Charactristics of Barberry (Berberis Vulgaris Foliage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Jalal Modaresi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction This study was intended to evaluate the nutritional value, phenolic compounds and digestibility coefficients of barberry leaves. Berberis vulgaris is one of the major crops in the province. The province has more than 70 percent and 95 percent of the total area under cultivation of barberry. Waste and foliage of barberry harvest traditionally used to feed livestock Tannin concentration greater than 3 to 4 percent in food, can have negative effects on digestibility in ruminants and in particular to reduce the absorption of dietary protein. So it can be expected that high amounts of tannins within waste foliage of barberry reduce its efficiency in ruminants to be fed. Several studies have shown that the addition of certain compounds such as urea, polyethylene Due to the high volume of barberry foliage that remains after harvesting and the possibility of its use in animal nutrition, this study tried to determine some nutrient compounds, phenolic compounds and degradation parameters were barberry leaves. In addition, in this study to determine the best additives are effective in reducing the concentration of tannins and phenolic compounds, urea, polyethylene glycol, sodium hydroxide and calcium hydroxide were compared. Materials and method As the samples were dried by the sun for 6 days. The amount of 5% by weight (dry matter basis urea, polyethylene glycol, sodium hydroxide or calcium hydroxide that was prepared with distilled water, was sprayed on 5 kg of the sample and thoroughly mixed. Each of the treatments were prepared in triplicate. Treatments include: 1 control (foliage without additives, 2 foliage with 5% solution of urea, 3 foliage with 5% polyethylene glycol, 4 foliage with 5% sodium hydroxide, 5 with 5% calcium hydroxide was foliage. The sample were kept in anaerobic plastic containers for 3 days and then opened and dried at room temperature. Samples were analyzed for crude protein, neutral detergent fiber, acid detergent

  12. Rapid screening and distribution of bioactive compounds in different parts of Berberis petiolaris using direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry

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    Awantika Singh

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Berberis petiolaris Wall. ex G. Don, an unexplored medicinal plant belonging to the family Berberidaceae, is a large deciduous shrub found in Western Himalaya between 1800–3000 m. Chemical profiling of fruit, leaf, root and stem was done by direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry followed by multivariate analysis for discrimination among the plant parts. The bioactive compounds, including magnoflorine, berberine, jatrorrhizine, thalifendine/berberrubine, demethyleneberberine, reticuline, 8-oxoberberine, N-methyltetrahydroberberine, tetrahydropalmatine, tetrahydroberberine and palmatine, were identified by their exact mass measurement and the corresponding molecular formula of each compound. A comparative study of distribution pattern for all these bioactive alkaloids showed qualitative and quantitative variations in different parts of B. petiolaris. Principal component analysis clearly discriminated each part of B. petiolaris plant. Keywords: Berberis petiolaris, Alkaloids, Profiling, DART–TOF–MS, Statistical analysis

  13. Cutting of the Berberis laurina Billb. Using Different Concentrations of Indolebutyric Acid Estaquia de Berberis laurina Billb. utilizando diferentes concentrações de ácido indol butírico

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    Michelle Melissa Althaus

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Berberis laurina Billb. (Berberidaceae is a native shrub from Floresta Ombrófila Mista ecological formation, very ornamental and useful specie for recovery of degraded areas. With medical applications, its fruit is edible and its roots are used as dye. This paper aims to analyze lhe induction of lhe rooting of Berberis laurina stem cuttings employing indolebutyric acid (IBA in O, 1000 and 2000 mgL-1 concentrations, using the vermiculite as growing medium. In october 2003, stem cuttings were collected from eight stock plants, located in Fazenda Rio Grande - PR. Semi-hardwood cuttings were preppared with 8.0 cm long by 0.35 cm of diameter shape, containing three leaves on the top, cut in a half,  the base was cut in diagonal and the top was cut straight, receiving a treatment with sodium hipochlorite (0.5% for 10 minutes. The experiment was being conducted in a greenhouse. After 90 days an analysis was taken from the rooting rate, rate of the number of roots formed per cuttings, length of the three biggest  roots formed per cuttings, rate of the initial leaves which have survived since the cutting’s manufacture per cutting, rate of sprout presence per cutting, rate of not rooted living cuttings and rate of dead cuttings. The analyzed variables did not show a significative difference using 5% of probability, except for the rate of not rooted living cuttings which had differed  statistically; however, the rooting rate was above the ones found in studies made with another species of  Berberis (20.0 - 30.0 %. IBA did not improve the  rooting of B. laurina.Berberis Iaurina (Berberidaceae é um arbusto nativo da Floresta Ombrófila Mista, de grande potencial ornamental, também utilizado em recuperação de áreas degradadas. Possui aplicação medicinal, seu  fruto é comestível e suas raízes são utilizadas como  corantes. Este trabalho teve como objetivo analisar a indução do enraizamento de estacas caulinares

  14. Evaluation of Drought Stress Thresholds in Ornamental Barberry (Berberis thunbergii cv. Atropurpurea Shrub in Mashhad Condition

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    Reyhane Setayesh

    2017-08-01

    this regard, drought stress tolerance thresholds of ornamental barberry plant in Mashhad landscape were evaluated. Materials and Methods: In order to determine the qualitative and quantitative drought stress tolerance thresholds of ornamental barberry (Berberis thunbergii plant an experiment was conducted basis on randomized complete block design with three replications in Plant Production Complex of Mashhad Municipality. Treatments included; 100, 80, 60, 40, and 20% of culculated water requirements based on evaporation pan data. Two years old plants with similar size were transplanted from pots to field in 16 March 2012. Treatments were applied after establishment in 28 April and sampling was arranged in 6 August, 23 August, 6 September, and 7 October. During the growing season, the evaporation level was daily measured from pan Class A. In each sampling two plants sampled randomly from each plot for measuring the plant height, highest branches, number of branches, fresh and dry weight, dry mater percentage, irrigation water use index and freshness index. Results and Discussion: Results showed that with increasing severity of drought stress plant height of barberry reduced significantly, but there were no significant difference between 100 and 80% of water requirement treatments. The highest branches reduced by diminishing water application volume but there were no significant difference among 100, 80 and 60% of water requirement application. The maximum of branch number was observed at 60 percent water requirement, however, there were no significant difference between 100 and 60% of water requirement treatments. The number of branches in 60% was 26% lower than 80% of water requirement. Therefore, application of 60% water requirement with 23 branches per plant produced highest branch number. The highest and lowest plant fresh weight was measured in 100% and 20% water requirement application, respectively. Application of 60% of water requirement produced statistically

  15. Antioxidant Properties of Berberis aetnensis C. Presl (Berberidaceae Roots Extract and Protective Effects on Astroglial Cell Cultures

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    Agata Campisi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Berberis aetnensis C. Presl (Berberidaceae is a bushy-spiny shrub common on Mount Etna (Sicily. We demonstrated that the alkaloid extract of roots of B. aetnensis C. Presl contains prevalently berberine and berbamine, possesses antimicrobial properties, and was able to counteract the upregulation evoked by glutamate of tissue transglutaminase in primary rat astroglial cell cultures. Until now, there are no reports regarding antioxidant properties of B. aetnensis C. Presl collected in Sicily. Air-dried, powdered roots of B. aetnensis C. Presl were extracted, identified, and quantified by HPLC. We assessed in cellular free system its effect on superoxide anion, radicals scavenging activity of antioxidants against free radicals like the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical, and the inhibition of xanthine oxidase activity. In primary rat astroglial cell cultures, exposed to glutamate, we evaluated the effect of the extract on glutathione levels and on intracellular production of reactive oxygen species generated by glutamate. The alkaloid extract of B. aetnensis C. Presl inhibited superoxide anion, restored to control values, the decrease of GSH levels, and the production of reactive oxygen species. Potent antioxidant activities of the alkaloid extract of roots of B. aetnensis C. Presl may be one of the mechanisms by which the extract is effective against health disorders associated to oxidative stress.

  16. Antiglycation and antioxidation properties of berberis lyceum and terminalia chebula: possible role in curing diabetes and slowing aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, I.; Ahmad, H.; Ahmad, B.; Azam, S.

    2014-01-01

    Plants have been shown to possess a great potential to benefit mankind. Extracts from plants that have antiglycation and antioxidation abilities can be of great therapeutic value in reducing complication of diabetes and slowing down aging. Advanced glycation end-products (AGE's) formation due to non-enzymatic glycation and oxidative stress has been demonstrated in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications and aging processes. In this study we investigated the antiglycation and antioxidation potential of methanolic extracts of Berberis lyceum and Terminalia chebula. Results indicated that the methanolic extract of B. lyceum had more antiglycation ability with a Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC50) of 123 meu g/mL as compared to the MIC50 of 110 meu g/ml of T. chebula. While the results of antioxidation assay showed that T. chebula has more antioxidation potential than B. lyceum. T. chebula had 46.55, 35.01 and 32.81% antioxidation potential at 0.5 mg, 0.25 mg and 0.125 mg respectively as compared to the 16.53, 16.09 and 15.10 % oxidation inhibition at same mass values by B. lycium. (author)

  17. In Vitro Inhibitory Effect of Berberis vulgaris (Berberidaceae) and Its Main Component, Berberine against Different Leishmania Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudvand, Hossein; Sharififar, Fariba; Sharifi, Iraj; Ezatpour, Behrouz; Fasihi Harandi, Majid; Makki, Mahsa Sadat; Zia-Ali, Naser; Jahanbakhsh, Sareh

    2014-03-01

    Leishmaniasis has been identified as a major public health problem in tropical and sub-tropical countries. The present study was aimed to investigate antileishmanial effects of various extracts of Berberis vulgaris also its active compoenent, berberine against Leishmania tropica and L. infantum species on in vitro experiments. In this study in vitro antileishmanial activity of various extracts of B. vulgaris also its active compoenent, berberine against promastigote and amastigote stages of L. tropica and L. infantum was evaluated, using MTT assay and in a macrophage model, respectively. Furthermore, infectivity rate and cytotoxicity effects of B. vulgaris and berberine in murine macrophage cells were investigated. The findings of optical density (OD) and IC50 indicated that B. vulgaris particulary berberine significantly (P<0.05) inhibited the growth rate of promastigote stage of L.tropica and L.infantum in comparison to meglumine antimoniate (MA). In addition, B. vulgaris and berberine significantly (P<0.05) decreased the mean number of amastigotes in each macrophage as compared with positive control. In the evaluation of cytotoxicity effects, it could be observed that berberine as compared with B. vulgaris exhibited more cytotoxicity against murine macrophages. Results also showed that when parasites were pre-incubated with B. vulgaris their ability to infect murine macrophages was significantly decreased. B.vulgaris particularly berberine exhibited potent in vitro leishmanicidal effects against L. tropica and L.infantum. Further works are required to evaluate the antileishmanial effects of B.vulgaris on Leishmania species using clinical settings.

  18. Antioxidant properties of Berberis aetnensis C. Presl (Berberidaceae) roots extract and protective effects on astroglial cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campisi, Agata; Acquaviva, Rosaria; Bonfanti, Roberta; Raciti, Giuseppina; Amodeo, Andrea; Mastrojeni, Silvana; Ragusa, Salvatore; Iauk, Liliana

    2014-01-01

    Berberis aetnensis C. Presl (Berberidaceae) is a bushy-spiny shrub common on Mount Etna (Sicily). We demonstrated that the alkaloid extract of roots of B. aetnensis C. Presl contains prevalently berberine and berbamine, possesses antimicrobial properties, and was able to counteract the upregulation evoked by glutamate of tissue transglutaminase in primary rat astroglial cell cultures. Until now, there are no reports regarding antioxidant properties of B. aetnensis C. Presl collected in Sicily. Air-dried, powdered roots of B. aetnensis C. Presl were extracted, identified, and quantified by HPLC. We assessed in cellular free system its effect on superoxide anion, radicals scavenging activity of antioxidants against free radicals like the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical, and the inhibition of xanthine oxidase activity. In primary rat astroglial cell cultures, exposed to glutamate, we evaluated the effect of the extract on glutathione levels and on intracellular production of reactive oxygen species generated by glutamate. The alkaloid extract of B. aetnensis C. Presl inhibited superoxide anion, restored to control values, the decrease of GSH levels, and the production of reactive oxygen species. Potent antioxidant activities of the alkaloid extract of roots of B. aetnensis C. Presl may be one of the mechanisms by which the extract is effective against health disorders associated to oxidative stress.

  19. Antidiabetic and Synergistic Effects of Anthocyanin Fraction from Berberis integerrima Fruit on Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats Model

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    Zahra Sabahi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is a complex endocrine disorder. There is a serious attempt to identify antidiabetic compounds from natural sources to use with other drugs for reduction of diabetes complications. Present study is based on the investigation of antihyperglycemic effect of anthocyanin fraction of Berberis integerrima Bunge (AFBI fruits on some physiological parameters (glucose level, glycogen content, and body weight in normal and streptozotocin-induced (STZ-induced diabetic rats and evaluation of synergic effect of this fraction with metformin and glibenclamide. Male Sprague dawley rats were divided into nine groups: healthy control group, diabetic control group, diabetic groups treated with anthocyanin fraction (200, 400 and 1000 mg/kg, respectively; diabetic groups treated with glibenclamide and metformin separately, diabetic groups treated with glibenclamide + anthocyanin fraction (1000 mg/kg, metformin + anthocyanin fraction (1000 mg/kg. Treatment of diabetic rats with AFBI (400, 1000mg/kg significantly decreased blood glucose as compared with control. Moreover, AFBI (400, 1000mg/kg significantly increased liver glycogen and body weight compared to control. Nevertheless, there were no synergistic effects between anthocyanin fraction and metformin or glibenclamide on blood glucose, liver glycogen, and body weight. The results of this study indicate that AFBI possesses hypoglycemic effects and may be considered for evaluation in future diabetes clinical studies.

  20. Anti-inflammatory and anti-granuloma activity of Berberis aristata DC. in experimental models of inflammation

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    Kumar, Rohit; Gupta, Yogendra Kumar; Singh, Surender

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Berberis aristata (Berberidaceae) is an important medicinal plant used in traditional system of medicine for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and other inflammatory disorders. The aim of the present study is to scientifically validate the traditional use of BA in the treatment of inflammatory disorders. Materials and Methods: Anti-inflammatory and anti-granuloma activity of BA hydroalcoholic extract (BAHE) were evaluated in experimental models, viz., carrageenan-induced paw edema, cotton pellet-induced granuloma formation, and complete Freund's adjuvant-induced stimulation of peritoneal macrophages in rats. Expression of inflammatory mediators, viz., tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, IL-10, TNF-R1, and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) was carried out in serum and peritoneal macrophages to derive the plausible mechanism of BAHE in activated peritoneal macrophages. Results: Pretreatment with BAHE produced a dose-dependent reduction (P < 0.01) in carrageenan-induced paw edema and cotton pellet-induced granuloma model. BAHE treatment produced significant (P < 0.01) reduction in serum inflammatory cytokine levels as compared to control. Protein expression of pro-inflammatory markers, IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-R1, and COX-2, was found to be reduced in stimulated macrophages whereas anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-10, was upregulated in peritoneal macrophages. Conclusion: The result of the present study thus demonstrates the anti-inflammatory and anti-granuloma activity of BAHE which may be attributed to its inhibitory activity on macrophage-derived cytokine and mediators. PMID:27114638

  1. In Vitro Inhibitory Effect of Berberis vulgaris (Berberidaceae and Its Main Component, Berberine against Different Leishmania Species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Mahmoudvand

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Leishmaniasis has been identified as a major public health problem in tropical and sub-tropical countries. The present study was aimed to investigate antileishmanial effects of various extracts of Berberis vulgaris also its active compoenent, berberine against Leishmania tropica and L. infantum species on in vitro experiments.In this study in vitro antileishmanial activity of various extracts of B. vulgaris also its active compoenent, berberine against promastigote and amastigote stages of L. tropica and L. infantum was evaluated, using MTT assay and in a macrophage model, respectively. Furthermore, infectivity rate and cytotoxicity effects of B. vulgaris and berberine in murine macrophage cells were investigated.The findings of optical density (OD and IC50 indicated that B. vulgaris particulary berberine significantly (P<0.05 inhibited the growth rate of promastigote stage of L.tropica and L.infantum in comparison to meglumine antimoniate (MA. In addition, B. vulgaris and berberine significantly (P<0.05 decreased the mean number of amastigotes in each macrophage as compared with positive control. In the evaluation of cytotoxicity effects, it could be observed that berberine as compared with B. vulgaris exhibited more cytotoxicity against murine macrophages. Results also showed that when parasites were pre-incubated with B. vulgaris their ability to infect murine macrophages was significantly decreased.B.vulgaris particularly berberine exhibited potent in vitro leishmanicidal effects against L. tropica and L.infantum. Further works are required to evaluate the antileishmanial effects of B.vulgaris on Leishmania species using clinical settings.

  2. In Vitro Study of Berberis vulgaris, Actinidia deliciosa and Allium cepa L. Antibacterial Effects on Listeria monocytogenes

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    Anzabi Younes

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: One control method of pathogenic microorganisms is using synthetic chemical preservatives and antibiotics. Because of being generally recognized as safe, antibacterial compounds with organic origin are considered important for health. This study was done in order to investigate the antibacterial effects of methanol extracts of the Berberis vulgaris (Barberry, Actinidia deliciosa (Kiwi and Allium cepa L. (Onions on the standard strain (ATCC:19114 of Listeria monocytogenes (L. monocytogenes, as it seems that it is possible to find some important organic and health safe anti-Listerial compounds. Materials and Methods: After collecting the mentioned plants phytology study was done. Then methanol extracts of named plants were prepared and antibacterial effects of these plants against the mentioned strain of L. monocytogenes by the Disk Diffusion, minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC methods were performed. Also Ampicillin (10 μg/disc was used as the reference antibacterial substance. In order to find the relationship between antibacterial properties of plants extracts independent t test, chi-square and analysis of variance (ANOVA tests were used. Results: Results showed that the extracts of all the three studied plants had antibacterial effects on L. monocytogenes. Average diagonal of growing area in disk diffusion test for barberry, kiwi and onions in order was 12, 15.5 and 11 mm. Also MIC of mentioned plants extracts in order was 125, 62.5, and 125 μg/ml and MBC of named plants was 500, 250 and 500 μg/ ml, respectively. Conclusion: The results of this work showed that methanol extracts of kiwi had stronger anti-Listerial effect than barberry’s and onion’s extracts.

  3. In vitro and in vivo antimutagenic effects of DIG, a herbal preparation of Berberis vulgaris, Taraxacum officinale and Arctium lappa, against mitomycin C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giorgio, C; Boyer, L; De Meo, M; Laurant, C; Elias, R; Ollivier, E

    2015-07-01

    DIG, a liquid herbal preparation made from a mixture of diluted mother tinctures of Berberis vulgaris, Taraxacum officinale and Arctium lappa, was assessed for its antimutagenic properties against mitomycin C. The micronucleus assay on Chinese hamster ovary (CHO)-K1 cells was used to evaluate the in vitro anticlastogenic activity of DIG compared to those of separately diluted mother tinctures. The micronucleus assay was performed on mouse erythrocytes and the comet assay was performed on mouse liver, kidney, lung, brain and testicles to assess the protective effects of DIG (0.2 and 2 % at libitum) against an intraperitoneal injection of mitomycin C (1 mg Kg(-1)) in mice. DIG exerted a powerful anticlastogenic activity, under both pretreatment and simultaneous treatment conditions as assessed by the micronucleus assay in CHO-K1 cells. Its protective activity was greater than that observed for each mother tincture. DIG reduced micronuclei levels in mouse erythrocytes and suppressed >80 % of DNA strand breaks in the liver, kidney, lung, brain and testicles of mice exposed to mitomycin C.

  4. Elevated native terrestrial snail abundance and diversity in association with an invasive understory shrub, Berberis thunbergii, in a North American deciduous forest

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    Utz, Ryan M.; Pearce, Timothy A.; Lewis, Danielle L.; Mannino, Joseph C.

    2018-01-01

    Invasive terrestrial plants often substantially reshape environments, yet how such invasions affect terrestrial snail assemblages remains understudied. We investigated how snail assemblages in deciduous forest soils with dense Berberis thunbergii (Japanese barberry), an invasive shrub in eastern North America, differ from forest areas lacking the shrub. Leaf litter and soil samples were collected from forest patches with dense B. thunbergii understories and adjacent control areas within two exurban forest tracts in western Pennsylvania, U.S.A. Snails were identified to species and quantified by standard diversity metrics. Contrary to our expectations, snails were significantly more abundant and diverse in B. thunbergii-invaded areas. Despite differences in abundance, the snail community composition did not differ between invaded and control habitats. The terrestrial snail assemblage we observed, which was composed entirely of native species, appears to respond favorably to B. thunbergii invasion and therefore may not be negatively impacted by physicochemical changes to soils typically observed in association with the plant. Such findings could reflect the fact that B. thunbergii likely creates more favorable habitat for snails by creating cooler, more humid, and more alkaline soil environments. However, the snail assemblages we retrieved may consist mostly of species with high tolerance to environmental degradation due to a legacy of land use change and acid deposition in the region.

  5. Biosynthesis, characterization, and acute toxicity of Berberis tinctoria-fabricated silver nanoparticles against the Asian tiger mosquito, Aedes albopictus, and the mosquito predators Toxorhynchites splendens and Mesocyclops thermocyclopoides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Palanisamy Mahesh; Murugan, Kadarkarai; Madhiyazhagan, Pari; Kovendan, Kalimuthu; Amerasan, Duraisamy; Chandramohan, Balamurugan; Dinesh, Devakumar; Suresh, Udaiyan; Nicoletti, Marcello; Alsalhi, Mohamad Saleh; Devanesan, Sandhanasamy; Wei, Hui; Kalimuthu, Kandasamy; Hwang, Jiang-Shiou; Lo Iacono, Annalisa; Benelli, Giovanni

    2016-02-01

    Aedes albopictus is an important arbovirus vector, including dengue. Currently, there is no specific treatment for dengue. Its prevention solely depends on effective vector control measures. In this study, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were biosynthesized using a cheap leaf extract of Berberis tinctoria as reducing and stabilizing agent and tested against Ae. albopictus and two mosquito natural enemies. AgNPs were characterized by using UV–vis spectrophotometry, X-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy. In laboratory conditions, the toxicity of AgNPs was evaluated on larvae and pupae of Ae. albopictus. Suitability Index/Predator Safety Factor was assessed on Toxorhynchites splendens and Mesocyclops thermocyclopoides. The leaf extract of B. tinctoria was toxic against larval instars (I–IV) and pupae of Ae. albopictus; LC50 was 182.72 ppm (I instar), 230.99 ppm (II), 269.65 ppm (III), 321.75 ppm (IV), and 359.71 ppm (pupa). B. tinctoria-synthesized AgNPs were highly effective, with LC50 of 4.97 ppm (I instar), 5.97 ppm (II), 7.60 ppm (III), 9.65 ppm (IV), and 14.87 ppm (pupa). Both the leaf extract and AgNPs showed reduced toxicity against the mosquito natural enemies M. thermocyclopoides and T. splendens. Overall, this study firstly shed light on effectiveness of B. tinctoria-synthesized AgNPs as an eco-friendly nanopesticide, highlighting the concrete possibility to employ this newer and safer tool in arbovirus vector control programs.

  6. Long-Term Effects of Berberis thunbergii (Ranunculales: Berberidaceae) Management on Ixodes scapularis (Acari: Ixodidae) Abundance and Borrelia burgdorferi (Spirochaetales: Spirochaetaceae) Prevalence in Connecticut, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Scott C; Linske, Megan A; Ward, Jeffrey S

    2017-12-08

    Japanese barberry (Berberis thunbergii de Candolle; Ranunculales: Berberidaceae) is an exotic invasive shrub that escaped cultivation in the United States and is now permanently established in many eastern and midwestern states. This study examined the long-term impacts of Japanese barberry management on blacklegged tick (Ixodes scapularis Say; Acari: Ixodidae) abundances and associated prevalence of Borrelia burgdorferi (Johnson, Schmid, Hyde, Steigerwalt, and Brenner; Spirochaetales: Spirochaetaceae), the etiologic agent of Lyme disease. At six locations across Connecticut, adult I. scapularis were sampled for up to 10 yr. At each location, we sampled an area where barberry infestations were unmanipulated, adjacent areas where barberry was virtually nonexistent, and areas where barberry was managed utilizing a variety of techniques. Barberry management reduced B. burgdorferi-infected adult I. scapularis (BBIAIS) abundances (191/ha ± 64 SE) over 6 yr to statistically indifferent from that of no barberry areas (140/ha ± 47 SE; P = 0.080) and significantly less than intact barberry stands (458/ha ± 80 SE; P = 0.026). Over 9 yr, BBIAIS abundances in managed barberry remained lower than intact barberry stands (P = 0.037), but increased to be significantly greater than no barberry areas (P = 0.007) as cover increased over time. Longer-term data further document that Japanese barberry infestations are favorable habitat for I. scapularis. Control of Japanese barberry and other invasives should be at least on a 5-yr rotation to maintain low levels of invasive cover and eliminate humidity refugia to expose juvenile I. scapularis to more hostile environmental conditions in the interest of public health. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Berberine and a Berberis lycium extract inactivate Cdc25A and induce α-tubulin acetylation that correlate with HL-60 cell cycle inhibition and apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Musa; Giessrigl, Benedikt; Vonach, Caroline; Madlener, Sibylle; Prinz, Sonja; Herbaceck, Irene; Hoelzl, Christine; Bauer, Sabine; Viola, Katharina; Mikulits, Wolfgang; Quereshi, Rizwana Aleem; Knasmueller, Siegfried; Grusch, Michael; Kopp, Brigitte; Krupitza, Georg

    2010-01-01

    Berberis lycium Royle (Berberidacea) from Pakistan and its alkaloids berberine and palmatine have been reported to possess beneficial pharmacological properties. In the present study, the anti-neoplastic activities of different B. lycium root extracts and the major constituting alkaloids, berberine and palmatine were investigated in p53-deficient HL-60 cells. The strongest growth inhibitory and pro-apoptotic effects were found in the n-butanol (BuOH) extract followed by the ethyl acetate (EtOAc)-, and the water (H 2 O) extract. The chemical composition of the BuOH extract was analyzed by TLC and quantified by HPLC. 11.1 μg BuOH extract (that was gained from 1 mg dried root) contained 2.0 μg berberine and 0.3 μg/ml palmatine. 1.2 μg/ml berberine inhibited cell proliferation significantly, while 0.5 μg/ml palmatine had no effect. Berberine and the BuOH extract caused accumulation of HL-60 cells in S-phase. This was preceded by a strong activation of Chk2, phosphorylation and degradation of Cdc25A, and the subsequent inactivation of Cdc2 (CDK1). Furthermore, berberine and the extract inhibited the expression of the proto-oncogene cyclin D1. Berberine and the BuOH extract induced the acetylation of α-tubulin and this correlated with the induction of apoptosis. The data demonstrate that berberine is a potent anti-neoplastic compound that acts via anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic mechanisms independent of genotoxicity.

  8. Retrospective analysis of the effects of a highly standardized mixture of Berberis aristata, Silybum marianum, and monacolins K and KA in patients with dyslipidemia

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    Di Pierro F

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Francesco Di Pierro,1 Pietro Putignano,2 Tarcisio Ferrara,3 Carmela Raiola,4 Giuliana Rapacioli,5 Nicola Villanova6 1Scientific Department, Velleja Research, Milan, Italy; 2Outpatient Diabetic Clinic, University Hospital San Gerardo, Monza, Italy; 3District 63, Cava de’ Tirreni-Costa d’Amalfi, Salerno, Italy; 4Outpatient Clinic “Ordine di Malta”, Naples, Italy; 5AIOR, Piacenza, Italy; 6Metabolic Disorders, S. Orsola Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy Background: Berberis aristata, because of its berberine content, and Monascus purpureus fermented rice, because of the presence of monacolins (naturally derived statins, are widely investigated food-grade ingredients used to formulate cholesterol-lowering supplements. Although they are extensively used, berberine is poorly absorbed and monacolins are poorly chemically characterized, not standardized, and possibly contaminated with toxic compounds. Silymarin is reported to enhance berberine absorption, while Monakopure™-K20 (MK-20 is a highly standardized red yeast rice containing monacolins K and KA in the ratio of 1:1 but not secondary monacolins, dehydromonacolins, or citrinin.Aim: The effects of a cholesterol-lowering supplement (Berberol®K containing berberine, silymarin, and MK-20 (BSM in patients with dyslipidemia were clinically analyzed.Methods: The clinical role of BSM in naïve and in statin-intolerant patients was retrospectively evaluated and the effects observed were compared with those obtained in patients without treatment or treated with lovastatin.Results: Total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein, and triglyceride levels were approximately 4%, 6%, and 11% lower, respectively, and the creatine phosphokinase increase was reduced in patients treated with BSM compared to those treated with lovastatin. Similar results were also obtained in statin-intolerant subjects where BSM was administered as add-on therapy to ezetimibe or fenofibrate. Conclusion: BSM is a food supplement

  9. Evaluation of Apoptosis and Autophagy Inducing Potential of Berberis aristata, Azadirachta indica, and Their Synergistic Combinations in Parental and Resistant Human Osteosarcoma Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Pracheta; Raman, Sukanya; Chowdhury, Rajdeep; Lohitesh, K.; Saini, Heena; Mukherjee, Sudeshna; Paul, Atish

    2017-01-01

    Cancer is a multifactorial disease and hence can be effectively overcome by a multi-constituently therapeutic strategy. Medicinal plant extracts represent a perfect example of such stratagem. However, minimal studies have been done till date that portray the effect of extraction techniques on the phyto-constituent profile of plant extracts and its impact on anticancer activity. In the present study, we have evaluated the anticancer potential of methanolic extracts of Berberis aristata root and Azadirachta indica seeds prepared by various extraction techniques in human osteosarcoma (HOS) cells. Soxhlation extract of B. aristata (BAM-SX) and sonication extract of A. indica (AIM-SO) were most effective in inducing apoptosis in parental drug sensitive, as well as resistant cell type developed by repeated drug exposure. Generation of reactive oxygen species and cell cycle arrest preceded caspase-mediated apoptosis in HOS cells. Interestingly, inhibition of autophagy enhanced cell death suggesting the cytoprotective role of autophagy. Combination studies of different methanolic extracts of BAM and AIM were performed, among which, the combination of BAM-SO and AIM-SO (BAAISO) was found to show synergism (IC50 10.27 µg/ml) followed by combination of BAM-MC and AIM-MC (BAAIMC) with respect to other combinations in the ratio of 1:1. BAAISO also showed synergism when it was added to cisplatin-resistant HOS cells (HCR). Chromatographic profiling of BAM-SX and AIM-SO by high performance thin layer chromatography resulted in identification of berberine (Rf 0.55), palmitine (Rf 0.50) in BAM-SX and azadirachtin A (Rf 0.36), azadirachtin B (Rf 0.56), nimbin (Rf 0.80), and nimbolide (Rf 0.43) in AIM-SO. The cytotoxic sensitivity obtained can be attributed to the above compounds. Our results highlight the importance of extraction technique and subsequent mechanism of action of multi-constituential B. aristata and A. indica against both sensitive and drug refractory HOS cells. PMID

  10. Evaluation of Apoptosis and Autophagy Inducing Potential of Berberis aristata, Azadirachta indica, and Their Synergistic Combinations in Parental and Resistant Human Osteosarcoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pracheta Sengupta

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a multifactorial disease and hence can be effectively overcome by a multi-constituently therapeutic strategy. Medicinal plant extracts represent a perfect example of such stratagem. However, minimal studies have been done till date that portray the effect of extraction techniques on the phyto-constituent profile of plant extracts and its impact on anticancer activity. In the present study, we have evaluated the anticancer potential of methanolic extracts of Berberis aristata root and Azadirachta indica seeds prepared by various extraction techniques in human osteosarcoma (HOS cells. Soxhlation extract of B. aristata (BAM-SX and sonication extract of A. indica (AIM-SO were most effective in inducing apoptosis in parental drug sensitive, as well as resistant cell type developed by repeated drug exposure. Generation of reactive oxygen species and cell cycle arrest preceded caspase-mediated apoptosis in HOS cells. Interestingly, inhibition of autophagy enhanced cell death suggesting the cytoprotective role of autophagy. Combination studies of different methanolic extracts of BAM and AIM were performed, among which, the combination of BAM-SO and AIM-SO (BAAISO was found to show synergism (IC50 10.27 µg/ml followed by combination of BAM-MC and AIM-MC (BAAIMC with respect to other combinations in the ratio of 1:1. BAAISO also showed synergism when it was added to cisplatin-resistant HOS cells (HCR. Chromatographic profiling of BAM-SX and AIM-SO by high performance thin layer chromatography resulted in identification of berberine (Rf 0.55, palmitine (Rf 0.50 in BAM-SX and azadirachtin A (Rf 0.36, azadirachtin B (Rf 0.56, nimbin (Rf 0.80, and nimbolide (Rf 0.43 in AIM-SO. The cytotoxic sensitivity obtained can be attributed to the above compounds. Our results highlight the importance of extraction technique and subsequent mechanism of action of multi-constituential B. aristata and A. indica against both sensitive and drug refractory HOS

  11. Environ: E00613 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available E00613 Berberis root Crude drug ... Berberis sibirica, Berberis vulgaris [TAX:258209], Berber...is [TAX:22774] ... Berberidaceae (barberry family) Berberis sibirica, Berberis vulgaris root ...

  12. Antifungal, Antileishmanial, and Cytotoxicity Activities of Various Extracts of Berberis vulgaris (Berberidaceae) and Its Active Principle Berberine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudvand, Hossein; Ayatollahi Mousavi, Seyyed Amin; Sepahvand, Asghar; Sharififar, Fariba; Ezatpour, Behrouz; Gorohi, Fatemeh; Saedi Dezaki, Ebrahim; Jahanbakhsh, Sareh

    2014-01-01

    In this study, in vitro antidermatophytic activity against Trichophyton mentagrophytes, Trichophyton rubrum, Microsporum canis, and Microsporum gypseum was studied by disk diffusion test and assessment of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) using CLSI broth macrodilution method (M38-A2). Moreover, antileishmanial and cytotoxicity activity of B. vulgaris and berberine against promastigotes of Leishmania major and Leishmania tropica were evaluated by colorimetric MTT assay. The findings indicated that the various extracts of B. vulgaris particularly berberine showed high potential antidermatophytic against pathogenic dermatophytes tested with MIC values varying from 0.125 to >4 mg/mL. The results revealed that B. vulgaris extracts as well as berberine were effective in inhibiting L. major and L. tropica promastigotes growth in a dose-dependent manner with IC50 (50% inhibitory concentration) values varying from 2.1 to 26.6  μ g/mL. Moreover, it could be observed that berberine as compared with B. vulgaris exhibited more cytotoxicity against murine macrophages with CC50 (cytotoxicity concentration for 50% of cells) values varying from 27.3 to 362.6  μ g/mL. Results of this investigation were the first step in the search for new antidermatophytic and antileishmanial drugs. However, further works are required to evaluate exact effect of these extracts in animal models as well as volunteer human subjects.

  13. Evaluation of the effects of hydroalcoholic extract of Berberis vulgaris root on the activity of liver enzymes in male hypercholesterolemic rats

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    Soheila Taheri

    2012-06-01

    Conclusion: Noticing the antioxidant properties of B. vulgaris root extract  and its effects on reducing the activity of liver enzymes, the extract of this plant can be a good choice for improving the function of liver.

  14. Clinical role of a fixed combination of standardized Berberis aristata and Silybum marianum extracts in diabetic and hypercholesterolemic patients intolerant to statins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Pierro F

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Francesco Di Pierro,1 Iaele Bellone,2 Giuliana Rapacioli,3 Pietro Putignano4 1Scientific Department, Velleja Research, Milan, Italy; 2ASL TO1, Turin, Italy; 3AIOR, Pontenure, Province of Piacenza, Italy; 4University Hospital San Gerardo, Monza, Italy Background: Statin intolerance is a medical condition often leading patients to nonadherence to the prescribed therapy or to a relevant reduction of the statin dosage. Both situations determine a totally or partially uncontrolled lipid profile, and these conditions unquestionably increase the risk of cardiovascular events. Methods: We enrolled hypercholesterolemic, type 2 diabetic patients complaining of intolerance to statins. Some of them had reduced the statin dose ‘until the disappearance of symptoms’; others had opted for treatment with ezetimibe; and yet others were not undergoing any treatment at all. All patients of the three groups were then given a fixed combination of berberine and silymarin (Berberol®, known from previous papers to be able to control both lipidic and glycemic profiles. Results: The tested product both as a single therapy and as add-on therapy to low-dose statin or to ezetimibe reduced triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, fasting blood glucose, and glycosylated hemoglobin in a significant manner without inducing toxicity conditions that might be somehow ascribed to a statin-intolerant condition. Conclusion: Our study demonstrates that use of Berberol®, administered as a single or add-on therapy in statin-intolerant subjects affected by diabetes and hypercholesterolemia is a safe and effective tool capable of improving the patients' lipidic and glycemic profiles. Keywords: berberine, silymarin, Berberol®, ezetimibe, cholesterol, type 2 diabetes

  15. Pollen Flora of Pakistan-LXV, berberidaceae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perveen, A.

    2010-01-01

    Pollen morphology of 12 species representing 2 genera of the family Berberidaceae from Pakistan has been examined by light and scanning electron microscope. Pollen grains usually radially symmetrical, iso polar or apolar, spheroidal or sub-prolate, spiroaperturate rarely colpate (3- more), sexine thicker than nexine. Tectal surface mostly foveolate-fossulate or sub-psilate, often rugulate - reticulate. On the basis of apertutal types and exine ornamentation four distinct pollen types are recognized, viz., Berberis calliobotrys-type, Berberis jaeschkeana-type, Berberis kunawurensis-type and Epimedium elatum-type. (author)

  16. Brief communication

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-22

    Jan 22, 2016 ... Male function for ensuring pollination and reproductive success in Berberis lycium Royle: A novel ... angiosperms and may also influence pollination mechanism. (Buchmann 1983 ..... is seed set very low? Sex. Plant Reprod.

  17. Antimicrobial activity of four species of Berberidaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ai-Rong; Zhu, Yue; Li, Xiao-Na; Tian, Xing-Jun

    2007-07-01

    Ethanolic extracts of the stems and leaves of Nandina domestica, Mahonia fortunei, Mahonia bealei and Berberis thunbergii were tested for their antibacterial and antifungal activity. Most of the extracts have been proved to be active against Gram(+) bacteria.

  18. Berberidaceae endémicas del Perú

    OpenAIRE

    Ulloa Ulloa, Carmen; Sagástegui, Abundio; Sánchez, Isidoro

    2013-01-01

    The Berberidaceae are represented in Peru by 32 species in the genus Berberis (Brako & Zarucchi, 1993), most of them shrubs. Most of the 14 endemic species grow in the Mesoandean region, between 2000 and 4200 m elevation. Two of these endemic species have been reported in the Peruvian System of Protected Natural Areas. La familia Berberidaceae es reconocida en el Perú con un género, Berberis, y 32 especies (Brako & Zarucchi, 1993), mayormente arbustos. Esta familia incluye 14 endemismos. L...

  19. An assessment of Japanese barberry in northern U.S. forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassandra M. Kurtz; Mark H. Hansen

    2018-01-01

    Japanese barberry (Berberis thunbergii), a member of the barberry family (Berberidaceae), is a low-growing perennial shrub. This ornamental shrub was sent to Boston from Russia in 1875 as a substitute for common barberry, a nuisance plant that harbors black stem rust (Puccinia graminis), which affects several cereal crops (...

  20. Controlling Japanese barberry: Alternative methods and impact on tick populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey S. Ward; Scott C. Williams; Thomas E. Worthley

    2011-01-01

    Japanese barberry (Berberis thunbergii) is classified as invasive in 20 states and four Canadian provinces. It is also established in another 11 states. In addition to forming dense thickets that can inhibit forest regeneration and native herbaceous plant populations, barberry understories can harbor greatly enhanced levels of blacklegged ticks (

  1. Application of Autofluorescence for Analysis of Medicinal Plants

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    Victoria V. Roshchina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Autofluorescence of secondary compounds contained in plant secretory cells may be applied to the analysis of medicinal plants for pharmacy. Emission and prevailing fluorescent pharmaceuticals have been estimated in several models of species such as Salvia officinalis, Berberis vulgaris, Humulus lupulus, and Matricaria chamomilla, by luminescence microscopy, microspectrofluorimetry, and confocal microscopy.

  2. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Phase variation of Opa proteins of Neisseria meningitidis and the effects of bacterial transformation ... Male function for ensuring pollination and reproductive success in Berberis ... Environmental fluctuations do not select for increased variation or ... orthologue of the human ribosomal RNA transcription initiation factor-IA.

  3. [Ability of typical greenery shrubs of Beijing to adsorb and arrest PM2.5 ].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Dan; Wang, Bin; Wang, Yun-qi; Zhang, Hui-lan; Yang, Song-nan; Li, Ang

    2014-09-01

    Four typical types of green shrubs of Beijing (Euonymus japonicus, Buxus microphylla, Berberis thunbergii cv. atropurpurea, Taxus cuspidate cv. nana) were selected to study their capacities in adsorbing and arresting PM2.5 using both field observations and air chamber simulations. Concurrently, in order to analyze the pollution characteristics of Beijing in winter and spring, the PM2.5 concentrations of December 2012 to May 2013 were collected. Experimental results showed that: From the gas chamber experiments, the ability to adsorb and arrest PM2.5 was in the order of Berberis thunbergii cv. atropurpurea > Buxus microphylla > Taxus cuspidate cv. nana > Euonymus japonicus, mainly due to the differences in leaf characteristics; Outside measurement results showed that the ability to adsorb and arrest PM2.5 was ranked as Buxus microphylla > Berberis thunbergii cv. atropurpurea > Taxus cuspidate cv. nana > Euonymus japonicus. Chamber simulation and outdoor observation showed that Buxus microphylla and Berberis thunbergii cv. atropurpurea had strong ability to adsorb and arrest PM2.5; Meanwhile, the slight differences between the chamber simulation and outdoor observation results might be related to plant structure. Compared to tree species, the planting condition of shrub species was loose, and it greened quickly; By analyzing the Beijing PM2.5 concentration values in winter and spring, it was found that the PM2.5 concentration was particularly high in the winter of Beijing, and evergreen shrubs maintained the ability to adsorb and arrest PM2.5.

  4. Quality Evaluation of Ayurvedic Crude Drug Daruharidra, Its Allied Species, and Commercial Samples from Herbal Drug Markets of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharad Srivastava

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Berberis aristata known as “Daruharidra” in Ayurveda is a versatile medicinal plant used singly or in combination with other medicinal plants for treating a variety of ailments like jaundice, enlargement of spleen, leprosy, rheumatism, fever, morning/evening sickness, snakebite, and so forth. A major bioactive marker of this genus is an alkaloid berberine, which is known for its activity against cholera, acute diarrhea, amoebiasis, and latent malaria and for the treatment of oriental sore caused by Leishmania tropica. Although the roots of B. aristata are considered as the official drug (Ayurvedic Pharmacopoeia of India, the study revealed that different species of Berberis, namely. B. asiatica, B. chitria, and B. lycium are also used under the name of Daruharidra in different parts of the country. Detailed physicochemical and phytochemical studies of subjects like total ash, acid insoluble ash, tannins, and total alkaloids were calculated from the shade dried powdered material according to the recommended procedures. Further, heavy metal studies and quantitative estimation of berberine through HPTLC have also been performed as per ICH guidelines. A detailed study of four Berberis species, namely B. aristata, B. asiatica, B. chitria, and B. lycium, which are implicated as Daruharidra and collected from wild and ten commercial samples procured from various important drug markets in India has been carried out, which may be useful to pharmaceutical industries for the authentication of the commercial samples and exploring the possibilities of using other species as a substitute of B. aristata.

  5. Indicator species of essential forest tree species in the Burdur district.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negiz, Mehmet Güvenç; Eser, Yunus; Kuzugüdenll, Emre; Izkan, Kürşad

    2015-01-01

    The forests of Burdur district for long have been subjected to over grazing and individual selection. As a result of this, majority of the forest areas in the district were degraded. In the district, afforestation efforts included majority of forestry implementations. It is well known that selecting suitable species plays an important role for achieving afforestation efforts. In this context, knowing the indicator species among the target species would be used in afforestation efforts, studies on the interrelationships between environmental factors and target species distribution is vital for selecting suitable species for a given area. In this study, Anatolian Black pine (Pinus nigra), Red pine (Pinus brutia), Crimean juniper (Juniperus excelsa) and Taurus cedar (Cedrus libani), essential tree species, were considered as target species. The data taken from 100 sample plots in Burdur district was used. Interspecific correlation analysis was performed to determine the positive and negative indicator species among each of the target species. As a result of ICA, 2 positive (Berberis crataegina, Juniperus oxycedrus), 2 negative (Phillyrea latifolia, Quercus coccifera) for Crimean Juniper, I positive (Juniperus oxycedrus), 3 negative (Onopordium acanthium, Fraxinus ornus, Phillyrea latifolia) for Anatolian black pine, 3 positive (Paliurus spina-christi, Quercus coccifer, Crataegus orientalis), 2 negative (Berberis crataegina, Astragalus nanus) for Red pine and 3 positive (Berberis crataegina, Rhamnus oleoides, Astragalus prusianus) 2 negative (Paliurus spina-christi, Quercus cerris) for Taurus cedarwere defined as indicator plant species. In this way, practical information was obtained for selecting the most suitable species, among the target species, for afforestation efforts in Burdur district.

  6. Phytomining Perspectives in Rehabilitation of Mining and Industrial Areas of South Ural

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timofeeva, S. S.; Ulrikh, D. V.; Timofeev, S. S.

    2017-05-01

    The ability of midland hawthorn (Crataegus laevigata (Poir)), common barberry (Berberis vulgaris), red elder (Sambucus racemosa), cinnamon rose (Rosa cinnamomea L.), couch grass (Elytrigia repens), crested wheat grass (Agropyron cristatum), meadow fescue (Festuca pratensis) and meadow grass (Poa pratensis) for phytoextraction of heavy metals from technogenic soil is proved in the article. The possibility of effective phytoextraction with the use of hawthorn and elder is shown. Maximum accumulation of zinc takes place in the surface mass of couch grass and meadow fescue. In regard to the conditions of South Ural, planting of elder and hawthorn with seeding of couch grass and meadow fescue is recommended for phytomining purposes.

  7. EXTRACT OF BARBERRY AS ENTIRELY GREEN CATALYST FOR THE SYNTHESIS OF STRUCTURALLY DIVERSE 3,4,5-SUBSTITUTED FURAN-2(5H-ONES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nourallah Hazeri

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available An eco-friendly and environmentally benign synthesis of 3,4,5-substituted furan-2(5H-ones employing Iranian seedless barberry, known as Zereshk, (Berberis integerrima “Bidaneh”, Berberidaceae as a biocatalyst, was developed. For the fi rst time, we found that the barberry juice could be effectively used for three-component condensation reaction of aldehydes, amines, and dialkyl acetylenedicarboxylates. The merits of this method include the environmentally friendly reaction conditions, simple operation, broad substrate, satisfying yields, and the generation of less waste rather than the conventional chemical reagents.

  8. Berberidaceae endémicas del Perú

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Ulloa Ulloa

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available La familia Berberidaceae es reconocida en el Perú con un género, Berberis, y 32 especies (Brako & Zarucchi, 1993, mayormente arbustos. Esta familia incluye 14 endemismos. La mayoría de estas especies endémicas ocupan la región Mesoandina, entre los 2000 y 4200 m de altitud. Dos de estos taxones endémicos están representados dentro del Sistema Nacional de Áreas Naturales Protegidas por el Estado.

  9. Ethnopharmacological studies of indigenous plants in Kel village, Neelum Valley, Azad Kashmir, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Khawaja Shafique; Hamid, Abdul; Nawaz, Fahim; Hameed, Mansoor; Ahmad, Farooq; Deng, Jiabin; Akhtar, Noreen; Wazarat, Ambreen; Mahroof, Sehrish

    2017-12-01

    This explorative study was undertaken for the first time in Kel village located in the Upper Neelum Valley, Azad Kashmir, Pakistan. The purpose was to document the indigenous knowledge of the native people used in the preparation of herbal medicines. To get the data on traditional uses of medicinal plants, 20 informants were interviewed. Quantitative ethnobotanical indices, i.e., use value (UV), relative frequencies of citation (RFC), informant consensus factor (Fic), fidelity level (FL), data matrix ranking (DMR), preference ranking (PR), and jaccard index (JI), were calculated for the recorded medicinal plants. A total of 50 medicinal plants belonging to 33 families used in 13 disease categories were documented. Leaves were the frequently used plant parts, and decoction was the commonly used method for herbal medicine. Plants with high use value were Berberis lycium (2.05), Impatiens glandulifera (1.95), Artemisia scoparia (1.75), Ageratum conozoides (1.75), and Achillea millefolium (1.7). The highest RFC value was calculated for Berberis lycium (0.75), Cynoglossum lanceolatum (0.65), and Impatiens glandulifera and Achillea millefolium (0.60 each). The maximum informant consensus factor was for urinary system, cardiac diseases, baldness, and abortion and miscarriage (1.00). Berberis lyceum (95%) used in jaundice, hepatitis, typhoid, fever, and tuberculosis disorders. Plants with maximum fidelity level (FL) were Berberis lycium (95%) followed by Dioscorea bulbifera, Impatiens glandulifera, and Artemisia vulgaris (90%). Olea ferruginea was the most multipurpose plant and exports (21.2%) was the leading threat in the area. The pearson correlation coefficient (0.500) showed a positive correlation between the use value and relative frequency of citation. The present study provides useful information about traditional uses of medicinal plants used by local communities in different ailments. The plants with the highest use values could be employed in pharmacological

  10. Studying preventive effects of Berberisintegerrimaon root on carbon tetrachloride induced hepatotoxicity in broilers

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    mohammadreza mohammadimalayeri

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Liver diseases and their economic losses have gained more importancealongside the development of integrated poultry industry. Studies have proved hepatotoxicity induced by carbon tetrachloride as one of the best experimental models of hepatotocicity. Barberries have been used widely in traditional medicine.The purpose of the present study was to evaluaterthe preventive effects of Berberisintegerrima root on carbon tetrachloride induced liver lesions in broilers.For this purpose, 80 day old Ross strain broilers were divided randomly to 8 study groupsconsisting of negative control, positive control which received IP 4ml/kg b.w. carbon tetrachloride twice in 25th and 28thdays , treatment controls consisting of 10,20 and 30 grams of  Berberisintegerrima root per kilogram of diet and treatment groups consisting of 10,20 and 30 gr. Of Berberis root / Kg diet + IPcarbontetrachloride 4ml/Kg b.w. twice in 25th and 28th days.At 29th day, blood samples were collected from animals, then they were sacrificed and their liver samples were fixed in 10% formalin solution. The blood samples were sent to laboratory to measure ALT,AST and ALP activities.Biochemical results didn't show any significant changes of ALT,AST and ALP activities between all study groups (P>0.05. Microscopic results showed significant decrease in pathologic lesions of 20 gr Berberis root /Kg diet treatment group in comparison with the positive control group(P

  11. Antibacterial Dyeing of Wool with Natural Cationic Dye Using Metal Mordants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aminoddin HAJI

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, Berberine colorant extracted from berberis vulgaris root was applied on wool fiber using alum (aluminum potassium sulfate, copper sulfate and potassium dichromate as mordant. The effect of treatment variables such as amount of mordant, time and temperature on the color strength of dyed fibers was examined. The fastness properties of dyed wool against washing, light and wet rubbing were evaluated. the use of metal mordants increased the color strength of the dyed goods. Increase in dyeing time and temperature caused deeper shades. All mordants, increased the rub fastness and wash fastness of dyed samples, but the light fastness was increased except in case of alum. Berberine is a cationic dye and because of it's quaternary ammonium structure can act as an antibacterial agent. So, dyed samples were tested for antibacterial activity using AATCC test method 100-2004. The dyed wool represented a high level of antibacterial activity. The extract of the berberis vulgaris can be considered as a natural dye of acceptable fastness properties together with excellent antibacterial activity for woolen textiles.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.18.3.2437

  12. Pigment content (chlorophyll and carotenoids) in 37 species of trees and shrubs in northeastern mexico during summer season

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, H.G.; Avendano, E.; Maiti, R.; Kumari, C.A.

    2017-01-01

    Plant pigments play an important role in plant assimilatory systems and plant growth. A study was undertaken to determine chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b and carotenoids contents of thirty seven species of trees and shrubs in summer season, in Linares, northeastern Mexico. Large variations were observed in the contents of chlorophyll (a, b and total) and also carotenoids among species. Chlorophyll a was minimum (around 0.6 mg) in Leucophyllum frutescens and Acacia berlandieri and maximum (1.8 mg) in Ebenopsis ebano. Chlorophyll b was minimum in Forestiera angustifolia, Acacia berlandieri, and Leucophyllum frutescens (0.1 to 0.2 mg), while Ebenopsis ebano contained maximum (0.4 mg). Carotenoids content was minimum (around 0.2 mg) in Leucophyllum frutescens, Acacia berlandieri and Parkinsonia aculeata and others but maximum value (around 0.6 mg) was observed in Berberis trifoliata. Total chlorophyll (a+b) content minimum values (around 0.6 mg) were recorded in Leucophyllum frutescens, Forestiera angustifolia, Croton suaveolens and Acacia berlandieri, while maximum value (around 2 mg) was obtained in Ebenopsis ebano. Maximum values of chlorophyll (a:b) ratio (around 7) was seen in Forestiera angustifolia, Salix lasiolepis followed by Diospyros texana (around 6). The ratio of total chlorophyll/carotenoids was maximum in Parkinsonia aculeata (nearing 8), while minimum value was obtained in Berberis trifoliata (around 2). (author)

  13. [Models for biomass estimation of four shrub species planted in urban area of Xi'an city, Northwest China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zheng-Yang; Liu, Jian-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Four common greening shrub species (i. e. Ligustrum quihoui, Buxus bodinieri, Berberis xinganensis and Buxus megistophylla) in Xi'an City were selected to develop the highest correlation and best-fit estimation models for the organ (branch, leaf and root) and total biomass against different independent variables. The results indicated that the organ and total biomass optimal models of the four shrubs were power functional model (CAR model) except for the leaf biomass model of B. megistophylla which was logarithmic functional model (VAR model). The independent variables included basal diameter, crown diameter, crown diameter multiplied by height, canopy area and canopy volume. B. megistophylla significantly differed from the other three shrub species in the independent variable selection, which were basal diameter and crown-related factors, respectively.

  14. Activity of a crude extract formulation in experimental hepatic amoebiasis and in immunomodulation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohni, Y R; Bhatt, R M

    1996-11-01

    The activity of a crude extract formulation was evaluated in experimental amoebic liver abscess in golden hamsters and in immunomodulation studies. The formulation comprises the following five plants-Boerhavia diffusa, Tinospora cordifolia, Berberis aristata, Terminalia chebula and Zingiber officinale. The formulation had a maximum cure rate of 73% at a dose of 800 mg/kg/day in hepatic amoebiasis reducing the average degree of infection (ADI) to 1.3 as compared to 4.2 for sham-treated controls. In immunomodulation studies humoral immunity was enhanced as evidenced by the haemagglutination titre. The T-cell counts remained unaffected in the animals treated with the formulation but cell-mediated immune response was stimulated as observed in the leukocyte migration inhibition (LMI) tests.

  15. Biosynthesis, characterization and antimicrobial action of silver nanoparticles from root bark extract of Berberislycium Royle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehmood, Ansar; Murtaza, Ghulam; Bhatti, Tariq Mahmood; Kausar, Rehana; Ahmed, Muhammad Jamil

    2016-01-01

    Various biological methods are being recognized for the fabrication of silver nanoparticles, which are used in several fields. The phytosynthesis of nanoparticles came out as a cost effective and enviro-friendly approach. When root bark extract of Berberis lycium was treated with silver ions, they reduced to silver nanoparticles, which were spherical, crystalline, size ranged from 10-100nm and capped by biomolecules. Synthesized silver nanoparticles were characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDX), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Fourier Transform Infra Red Spectroscopy (FTIR). The plant mediated synthesized silver nanoparticles showed pronounced antimicrobial activities against both Gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, Klebseilla pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and Gram positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis). The plant mediated process proved to be non-toxic and low cost contender as reducing agent for synthesizing stable silver nanoparticles.

  16. Evaluación, en condiciones de laboratorio, de la actividad insecticida de extractos Etanolicos de cinco especies de plantas sobre Tecia solanivora (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae Laboratory evaluation of the insecticidal activity of five plant species on Tecia solanivora (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castillo Gonzalo

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available En el laboratorio de Control Biológico de la Facultad de Agronomía de la Universidad Nacional de Colombia, sede Bogotá, se realizó un experimento con el objeto de evaluar la actividad insecticida de extractos etanólicos de las plantas Berberis samacana, Berberis saboyana, Nycandria physaloides, Eucaliptus globulus y Salpicroa difussa, cuando son usados en  concentraciones de 100, 1.000 y 10.000 ppm, con el fin de determinar efectos favorables o desfavorables para el desarrollo de Tecia solanivora (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae. Se usó un Diseño Completamernte al Azar, tomando como unidad experimental 500 gramos de papa criolla Solanum phureja, a los cuales se aplicaron los tratamientos, consistentes en sumergir los tubérculos en los extractos por un tiempo de 5 minutos e infestando cada unidad con 15 larvas de primer instar, luego de comprobada la evaporación del solvente. Se midieron las variables porcentaje de empupamiento, días a empupamiento, emergencia de adultos y nivel de daño en los tubérculos.
    Se encontró que la actividad de los extractos se registra a partir de 1.000 ppm y que los extractos de E globulus, B samacana y N physaloides afectan la tasa de empupamiento; el mayor nivel de daño se registró en los niveles 1 y 2 ( O- 25% y 26 - 50% respectivamente. En las unidades tratadas
    con el extracto de B samacana se presentaron valores similares en las tasas de empupamiento para los períodos de 20 y 25 días después del tratamiento (ddt: no hubo diferencias en la emergencia de adultos por causa de los extractos.
    At the Laboratory of Biological Control of the Agronomy Facultity at the Universidad Nacional de Colombia, in Bogotá, the insecticidal activity of an ethanolic extract from Berberis samacana, Berberis saboyana, Nycandra physaloides, Eucaliptus globulus and Salpichroa diffussa was evaluated.
    Extract were used 100, 1.000 and 10.000 ppm,to determine effects on the development of Tecia solanivora

  17. In vitro dissolution of gallbladder stone by edible leaves, fruits and homoeopathic medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Ishwar; Singh, Yogendra; Ansari, Shoeb A.; Agrawal, Namita R.

    2005-10-01

    Gallbladder stone sample of a female patient was analysed by diagnostic, spectroscopic methods and by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Besides cholesterol as the major constituent, bilirubin, creatinine and blood urea were also found to be present in the sample. Bile acid (ursodeoxycholic acid) was used to study its effect on the dissolution of cholestrol present in the stone. Extracts of edible leaves and fruits (amla, lemon and mausammi) and the homoeopathic medicines Berberis vulgaris Q. Dioscorea Q. and Calcarea carb 200 in the concentration range 0-3% (v/v) were found to be effective in the dissolution process in the following sequences: B. vulgaris Q. and Dioscorea Q.> C. carb 200, lemon>mausammi, amla was found to be more effective than jamun and tulsi leaf extracts in the given concentration range.

  18. The complete chloroplast genome of a medicinal plant Epimedium koreanum Nakai (Berberidaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung-Hoon; Kim, Kyunghee; Kim, Na-Rae; Lee, Sang-Choon; Yang, Tae-Jin; Kim, Young-Dong

    2016-11-01

    Epimedium koreanum is a perennial medicinal plant distributed in Eastern Asia. The complete chloroplast genome sequences of E. koreanum was obtained by de novo assembly using whole genome next-generation sequences. The chloroplast genome of E. koreanum was 157 218 bp in length and separated into four distinct regions such as large single copy region (89 600 bp), small single copy region (17 222 bp) and a pair of inverted repeat regions (25 198 bp). The genome contained a total of 112 genes including 78 protein-coding genes, 30 tRNA genes, and 4 rRNA genes. Phylogenetic analysis with the reported chloroplast genomes revealed that E. koreanum is most closely related to Berberis bealei, a traditional medicinal plant in the Berberidaceae family.

  19. Eriophyoid mites from Qinghai Province, northwestern China with descriptions of nine new species (Acari, Eriophyoidea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao-Sen Li

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Eriophyoid mites from Qinghai Province, northwestern China were studied herein. Up to now, only six species have been reported from Qinghai Province. In field surveys, 17 eriophyoid mite species were collected, among which nine species were found new to science. The new species and their host plants are listed as follows: Acaphyllisa tuberculumae sp. n. on Populus sp. (Salicaceae; Proiectus xiningensis sp. n. on Pinus sp. (Pinaceae; Phyllocoptes beishaniensis sp. n. on Spiraea mongolica Maxim. (Rosaceae; Tetra pruniana sp. n. on Prunus tomentosa Thunb. (Rosaceae Rupr. (Berberidaceae; Tetra pyriana sp. n. on Pyrus calleryana Decne. (Rosaceae; Tetra simonia sp. n. on Populus simonii Carr. (Salicaceae; Diptacus berberinus sp. n. on Berberis amurensis Rupr. (Berberidaceae; Diptacus mengdaensis sp. n. on Lonicera elisae Franch. (Caprifoliaceae; Rhyncaphytoptus spinus sp. n. on Lonicera rupicola Hook. f. et Thoms. (Caprifoliaceae. Aculops ulmi Hong & Xue, 2005 was re-described.

  20. Biodiversity Status, Distribution and Use Pattern of Some Ethno-Medicinal Plants

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    Priti KUMARI

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The erosion of plant biodiversity is a matter of global concern. Due to unawareness the building blocks of entire ecosystems are disappearing. Some medicinal plants like Taxus baccata Linn., Thymus serpyllum Linn., Coleus forskohli Will., Oroxylum indicum Linn., Valeriana hardwickii Wall., Malaxis acuminata D.Don, Habenaria edgeworthii Hook. f.ex.Collett., Costus speciosus (Koen. Sm., Dioscorea deltodea Wall., Gloriosa superba Linn., Polygonatum cirrhifolium Wall. and Polygonatum verticillatum Linn., Thalictrum foliolosum DC., Berberis aristata DC., Baliospermum montanum Will., Bergenia ciliata (Haworth Sternb., Clerodendrum serratum Linn., Valeriana jatamansii Jones, Celastrus paniculatus Will., Habenaria intermedeia D. Don, and Curculigo orchioides Gaerth are reached on the border of extinction. The 2008 IUCN Red List shows that the number of threatened plant species is increasing gradually (IUCN 2008. Therefore, there is an immediate need for conservation steps to be taken up along with promotion of conservation of medicinal plants.

  1. Biochemical changes in barberries during adventitious root formation: the role of indole-3-butyric acid and hydrogen peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Tehranifar

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Peroxidase, polyphenol oxidase (PPO, phenolic compounds and total sugars (TS were investigated during root formation in cuttings of Berberis vulgaris var. asperma (BVA and Berberis thunbergii var. atropurpurea (BTA treated with indole-3-butyric acid (IBA and IBA+H2O2. Rooting was observed on BTA cuttings but not on BVA cuttings. The BTA cuttings treated with IBA and IBA+H2O2 showed higher rooting percentages, number of roots, and root length over the control. Those treated with IBA+H2O2 recorded the lowest peroxidase activity after planting. BTA cuttings treated with IBA+H2O2 showed the highest peroxidase activity at 50 d after planting; BVA cuttings under different treatments showed no significant difference for peroxidase activity at planting time or up to 80 d after planting. PPO activity for the BTA cuttings in the control treatment was lower than for other treatments during root formation. The cuttings in the IBA and IBA+H2O2 treatments showed increased PPO activity from 0 to 50 d after planting and a slight decrease in PPO activity from 60 to 80 d after planting. PPO activity for the BVA cuttings was significantly lower than for BTA during root formation. The BTA cuttings treated with IBA and IBA+H2O2 showed the highest phenolic compound content during root formation. The BVA cuttings displayed higher TS than BTA during the initial stage of root formation. A comparison of the anatomical structure of easy-to-root and difficult-to-root cuttings indicated that physical inhibitors did not affect the rooting capacity of BVA.

  2. Ethnoveterinary medicines used for ruminants in British Columbia, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lans, Cheryl; Turner, Nancy; Khan, Tonya; Brauer, Gerhard; Boepple, Willi

    2007-01-01

    Background The use of medicinal plants is an option for livestock farmers who are not allowed to use allopathic drugs under certified organic programs or cannot afford to use allopathic drugs for minor health problems of livestock. Methods In 2003 we conducted semi-structured interviews with 60 participants obtained using a purposive sample. Medicinal plants are used to treat a range of conditions. A draft manual prepared from the data was then evaluated by participants at a participatory workshop. Results There are 128 plants used for ruminant health and diets, representing several plant families. The following plants are used for abscesses: Berberis aquifolium/Mahonia aquifolium Echinacea purpurea, Symphytum officinale, Bovista pila, Bovista plumbea, Achillea millefolium and Usnea longissima. Curcuma longa L., Salix scouleriana and Salix lucida are used for caprine arthritis and caprine arthritis encephalitis.Euphrasia officinalis and Matricaria chamomilla are used for eye problems. Wounds and injuries are treated with Bovista spp., Usnea longissima, Calendula officinalis, Arnica sp., Malva sp., Prunella vulgaris, Echinacea purpurea, Berberis aquifolium/Mahonia aquifolium, Achillea millefolium, Capsella bursa-pastoris, Hypericum perforatum, Lavandula officinalis, Symphytum officinale and Curcuma longa. Syzygium aromaticum and Pseudotsuga menziesii are used for coccidiosis. The following plants are used for diarrhea and scours: Plantago major, Calendula officinalis, Urtica dioica, Symphytum officinale, Pinus ponderosa, Potentilla pacifica, Althaea officinalis, Anethum graveolens, Salix alba and Ulmus fulva. Mastitis is treated with Achillea millefolium, Arctium lappa, Salix alba, Teucrium scorodonia and Galium aparine. Anethum graveolens and Rubus sp., are given for increased milk production.Taraxacum officinale, Zea mays, and Symphytum officinale are used for udder edema. Ketosis is treated with Gaultheria shallon, Vaccinium sp., and Symphytum officinale. Hedera

  3. Ethnoveterinary medicines used for ruminants in British Columbia, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brauer Gerhard

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of medicinal plants is an option for livestock farmers who are not allowed to use allopathic drugs under certified organic programs or cannot afford to use allopathic drugs for minor health problems of livestock. Methods In 2003 we conducted semi-structured interviews with 60 participants obtained using a purposive sample. Medicinal plants are used to treat a range of conditions. A draft manual prepared from the data was then evaluated by participants at a participatory workshop. Results There are 128 plants used for ruminant health and diets, representing several plant families. The following plants are used for abscesses: Berberis aquifolium/Mahonia aquifolium Echinacea purpurea, Symphytum officinale, Bovista pila, Bovista plumbea, Achillea millefolium and Usnea longissima. Curcuma longa L., Salix scouleriana and Salix lucida are used for caprine arthritis and caprine arthritis encephalitis.Euphrasia officinalis and Matricaria chamomilla are used for eye problems. Wounds and injuries are treated with Bovista spp., Usnea longissima, Calendula officinalis, Arnica sp., Malva sp., Prunella vulgaris, Echinacea purpurea, Berberis aquifolium/Mahonia aquifolium, Achillea millefolium, Capsella bursa-pastoris, Hypericum perforatum, Lavandula officinalis, Symphytum officinale and Curcuma longa. Syzygium aromaticum and Pseudotsuga menziesii are used for coccidiosis. The following plants are used for diarrhea and scours: Plantago major, Calendula officinalis, Urtica dioica, Symphytum officinale, Pinus ponderosa, Potentilla pacifica, Althaea officinalis, Anethum graveolens, Salix alba and Ulmus fulva. Mastitis is treated with Achillea millefolium, Arctium lappa, Salix alba, Teucrium scorodonia and Galium aparine. Anethum graveolens and Rubus sp., are given for increased milk production.Taraxacum officinale, Zea mays, and Symphytum officinale are used for udder edema. Ketosis is treated with Gaultheria shallon, Vaccinium sp., and

  4. Medicinal plants with hepatoprotective activity in Iranian folk medicine

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    Majid Asadi-Samani

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available There are a number of medicinal combinations in the Iranian traditional medicine which are commonly used as tonic for liver. In this review, we have introduced some medicinal plants that are used mainly for the treatment of liver disorders in Iranian folk medicine, with focus on their hepatoprotective effects particularly against CC14 agent. In this study, online databases including Web of Science, PubMed, Scopus, and Science Direct were searched for papers published from January 1970 to December 2013. Search terms consisted of medicinal plants, traditional medicine, folk medicine, hepatoprotective, Iran, liver, therapeutic uses, compounds, antioxidant, CC14, anti-inflammatory, and antihepatotoxic, hepatitis, alone or in combination. Allium hirtifolium Boiss., Apium graveolens L., Cynara scolymus, Berberis vulgaris L., Calendula officinalis, Nigella sativa L., Taraxacum officinale, Tragopogon porrifolius, Prangos ferulacea L., Allium sativum, Marrubium vulgare, Ammi majus L., Citrullus lanatus Thunb, Agrimonia eupatoria L. and Prunus armeniaca L. are some of the medicinal plants that have been used for the treatment of liver disorders in Iranian folk medicine. Out of several leads obtained from plants containing potential hepatoprotective agents, silymarin, β-sitosterol, betalain, neoandrographolide, phyllanthin, andrographolide, curcumin, picroside, hypophyllanthin, kutkoside, and glycyrrhizin have been demonstrated to have potent hepatoprotective properties. Despite encouraging data on possibility of new discoveries in the near future, the evidence on treating viral hepatitis or other chronic liver diseases by herbal medications is not adequate.

  5. Ethnopharmacological application of medicinal plants to cure skin diseases and in folk cosmetics among the tribal communities of North-West Frontier Province, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Arshad Mehmood; Khan, M A; Ahmad, Mushtaq; Zafar, Muhammad; Jahan, Sarwat; Sultana, Shahzia

    2010-03-24

    The present investigation is an attempt to find out ethnopharmacological application of medicinal plants to cure skin diseases and in folk cosmetics. We interviewed respondents in 30 remote sites of North-West Frontier Province by a structured interview form in the local language and respondents were queried for the type of herbal cure known to him. A total of 66 plant species belonging to 45 families have been recorded. Seventy-five medications for 15 skin diseases and cosmetics were documented. The mode of application was topical as well as oral administration. Water, milk, ghee, oil, eggs, sulphur and butter are used during administration of herbal remedies. About 15 plant species are known for their use to cure multiple skin diseases. Among these Berberis lyceum, Bergenia ciliata, Melia azedarach, Otostegia limbata, Phyla nodiflora, Prunus persica and Zingiber officinale constitutes major plants. The herbal cosmetics products range from face freshness, removal of ugly spots, hair care, and colouring of palm, feet, gums, and teeth. Most of the reported species are wild and rare; this demands an urgent attention to conserve such vital resources so as to optimize their use in the primary health care system. Since most of the skin diseases are caused by bacteria, viruses and fungi in this context, phytochemical screening for active constituents, biological activities and clinical studies is of global importance. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Floristic diversity and distribution pattern of plant communities along altitudinal gradient in Sangla Valley, Northwest Himalaya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Pankaj; Rana, J C; Devi, Usha; Randhawa, S S; Kumar, Rajesh

    2014-01-01

    Himalayas are globally important biodiversity hotspots and are facing rapid loss in floristic diversity and changing pattern of vegetation due to various biotic and abiotic factors. This has necessitated the qualitative and quantitative assessment of vegetation here. The present study was conducted in Sangla Valley of northwest Himalaya aiming to assess the structure of vegetation and its trend in the valley along the altitudinal gradient. In the forest and alpine zones of the valley, 15 communities were recorded. Study revealed 320 species belonging to 199 genera and 75 families. Asteraceae, Rosaceae, Apiaceae, and Ranunculaceae were dominant. Among genera, Artemisia followed by Polygonum, Saussurea, Berberis, and Thalictrum were dominant. Tree and shrub's density ranged from 205 to 600 and from 105 to 1030 individual per hectare, respectively, whereas herbs ranged from 22.08 to 78.95 individual/m(2). Nearly 182 species were native to the Himalaya. Maximum altitudinal distribution of few selected climate sensitive species was found to be highest in northeast and north aspects. This study gives an insight into the floristic diversity and community structure of the fragile Sangla Valley which was hitherto not available.

  7. Evaluation of Synergetic Anticancer Activity of Berberine and Curcumin on Different Models of A549, Hep-G2, MCF-7, Jurkat, and K562 Cell Lines

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    Acharya Balakrishna

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ayurvedic system of medicine is using Berberis aristata and Curcuma longa herbs to treat different diseases including cancer. The study was performed to evaluate the synergetic anticancer activity of Berberine and Curcumin by estimating the inhibition of the cell proliferation by cytotoxicity assay using MTT method on specified human cell lines (A549, Hep-G2, MCF-7, Jurkat, and K562. All the cells were harvested from the culture and seeded in the 96-well assay plates at seeding density of 2.0 × 104 cells/well and were incubated for 24 hours. Test items Berberine with Curcumin (1 : 1, Curcumin 95% pure, and Berberine 95% pure were exposed at the concentrations of 1.25, 0.001, and 0.5 mg/mL, respectively, and incubated for a period of 48 hours followed by dispensing MTT solution (5 mg/mL. The cells were incubated at 37 ± 1°C for 4 hours followed by addition of DMSO for dissolving the formazan crystals and absorbance was read at 570 nm. Separate wells were prepared for positive control, controls (only medium with cells, and blank (only medium. The results had proven the synergetic anticancer activity of Berberine with Curcumin inducing cell death greater percentage of >77% when compared to pure curcumin with <54% and pure Berberine with <45% on average on all cell line models.

  8. Potential Benefits of Berberine in the Management of Perimenopausal Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiana Caliceti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular diseases are one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in women after menopause and 56% of all causes of death in Western European countries. Nowadays, with increasing life span, women spend approximately one-third of their life-time in postmenopausal state; therefore, the development of new strategies to improve the prevention and treatment of menopause-associated pathologies is important topic in clinical practice. The studies to assess the safety of hormone replacement therapy in women with estrogen deficiency have not been conclusive due to the relative contraindications; therefore, hormone replacement therapy is prescribed only in selected cases and for a limited time. For this reason, today women are encouraged to use naturally available compounds to prevent or to attenuate menopausal symptoms and correlated pathologies, with fewer side effects. Among these compounds, berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid derived from plants of the generis Berberis, has been recognized as being capable of decreasing oxidative stress, LDL, triglycerides, and insulin resistance and of improving the mood. This review describes the cellular and clinical effects associated with the use of berberine, which suggest that this molecule could be an effective natural supplement to ensure a smooth peri- and postmenopausal transition.

  9. Barberry rust survey – developing tools for diagnosis, analysis and data management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Annemarie Fejer; Hansen, Jens Grønbech; Hovmøller, Mogens Støvring

    Barberry (Berberis spp.) may serve as alternate host of several Puccinia species including Puccinia graminis and P. striiformis causing stem and yellow rust on cereals and grasses, respectively. In order to study the importance of barberry in the epidemiology of Puccinia species in the CWANA regi...... a rust survey was initiated. The aim was to 1) develop a surveillance protocol 2) develop molecular diagnostic tools for identifying Puccinia spp. from aecial samples, and 3) develop a data management and display system of results as part of the Wheat Rust ToolBox (http....... Due to variable quality of aecial samples DNA extraction was not successful for 40% of the samples. Sequences of EF1α, β-tubulin or ITS were analysed and compared to reference sequences of rust fungi infecting cereals and grasses. The analysis supported the presence of P. graminis s.l., P....... arrhenatheri and P. striiformoides on barberry species. Survey and DNA sample maps with species designation were displayed in the Wheat Rust ToolBox. The future aim is to integrate barberry rust survey data based on molecular diagnostics and infection assays from research groups world-wide in order to gain...

  10. Slow-release fertilizers and possibilities of their utilizing in nursery

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    Petr Salaš

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Reserve, slow-release fertilizers (SRF enable to simplify the whole system of plant nutrition and fertilisation. Tabletted fertilizers of the Silvamix series represent a prospective product of Czech provenience. At our university, these fertilizers have been tested and used since the year 1991. Ornamental woody species grown in containers were investigated in two stages. Experiments with ornamental plants were established using one-year-old cuttings and seedlings of the following deciduous and evergreen woody species: Cotoneaster dammeri Skogholm, Berberis thunbergii, Potentilla fruticosa Snowflake, Ligustrum vulgare Atrovirens and Picea omorika. After planting into containers, fertilizers in the dose of 1 tablet (i.e. 10 g per litre of substrate were applied either to roots level or on the soil surface in the container. Silvamix in the dose of 5 g.l-1 was used as the tested fertilizer in the second stage. It was applied during the planting in the form of tablets and/or a powder. Control plants were fertilized in the course of growing season using a common agricultural fertilizer Cererit Z. The annual plants increments were measured. These experiments demonstrated a long-term optimum effect of this product on woody species and an equal quality and efficiency of its tabletted and powdered forms.

  11. [Effects of grazing disturbance on soil active organic carbon in mountain forest-arid valley ecotone in the upper reaches of Minjiang River].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shan-Shan; Zhang, Xing-Hua; Gong, Yuan-Bo; Li, Yuan; Wang, Yan; Yin, Yan-Jie; Ma, Jin-Song; Guo, Ting

    2014-02-01

    Effects of grazing disturbance on the soil carbon contents and active components in the four vegetations, i.e., artificial Robinia pseudoacacia plantation, artificial poplar plantation, Berberis aggregate shrubland and grassland, were studied in the mountain forest-arid valley ecotone in the upper Minjiang River. Soil organic carbon and active component contents in 0-10 cm soil layer were greater than in 10-20 cm soil layer at each level of grazing disturbance. With increasing the grazing intensity, the total organic carbon (TOC), light fraction organic carbon (LFOC), particulate organic carbon (POC) and easily oxidized carbon (LOC) contents in 0-10 cm soil layer decreased gradually in the artificial R. pseudoacacia plantation. The LFOC content decreased, the POC content increased, and the TOC and LOC contents decreased initially and then increased with increasing the grazing intensity in the artificial poplar plantation. The POC content decreased, and the TOC, LFOC and LOC contents decreased initially and then increased with increasing the grazing intensity in the B. aggregate shrubland. The POC and TOC contents decreased, and the LFOC and LOC contents decreased initially and then increased with increasing the grazing intensity in the grassland. The decreasing ranges of LOC, LFOC and POC contents were 0.1-7.9 times more than that of TOC content. There were significant positive relationships between TOC and LOC, LFOC and POC, suggesting that the active organic carbon components could reflect the change of soil total carbon content.

  12. Conservation of indigenous knowledge of medicinal plants of Western Himalayan region Rawalakot, Azad Kashmir, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Sajjad; Murtaza, Ghulam; Mehmood, Ansar; Qureshi, Rizwana Aleem

    2017-05-01

    The aim of present was to document indigenous knowledge of medicinal plants traditionally used by inhabitants of Rawalakot Azad Kashmir and to screen selected medicinal plants for their antibacterial potential. Several field surveys were conducted to document indigenous knowledge of medicinal plants through interviews from local inhabitants during 2010-2013. During the study, 58 plant species, belonging to 37 families, were identified and their medicinal uses were recorded. Ethnobotanical data indicates that inhabitants of Rawalakot use medicinal plant mainly for the treatment of stomach, liver and sexual disorders. Usually fresh plant materials were used for medicinal preparations and administrated orally. Among all the species studied, three most frequently used medicinal plants Achillea millefolium, Berberis lycium and Zanthoxylum armatum were screened for their antibacterial potential by using disc diffusion method. The crude aqueous, petroleum ether and ethanolic extracts were found to be very active against selected bacterial strains. The present study contributes significantly to the medicinal plant knowledge and shows that medicinal plant knowledge is deteriorating among younger generations. Therefore, further research is needed to document indigenous knowledge, to find conservation status of medicinal plant species and to find antimicrobial compounds for more sophisticated usage of medicinal plants in future.

  13. Antibacterial activity of local herbs collected from Murree (Pakistan) against multi-drug resistant Klebsiella pneumonae, E. coli and methyciline resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansoor, Qaisar; Shaheen, Saira; Javed, Uzma; Shaheen, Uzma; Iqrar, Irum; Ismail, Muhammad

    2013-07-01

    Exploring healing power in plants emerged in prehistory of human civilization. Sustaining good health has been achieved over the millions of years by use of plant products in various traditional sockets. A major contribution of medicinal plants to health care systems is their limitless possession of bioactive components that stimulate explicit physiological actions. Luckily Pakistan is blessed with huge reservoir of plants with medicinal potential and some of them; we focused in this study for their medicinal importance.In this study we checked the antibacterial activity inherent in Ricinus communis, Solanum nigrum, Dodonaea viscose and Berberis lyceum extracts for multidrug resistance bacterial strains Klebsiella pneumonae, E. coli and methyciline resistant Staphylococcus aureus. MRSA showed sensitivity for Ricinus communis. Multidrug resistant Klebsiella pneumonae was sensitive with Pine roxburgii and Ricinus communis but weakly susceptible for Solanum nigrum. Multidrug resistant E. coli was resistant to all plant extracts. Treatment of severe infections caused by the bacterial strains used in this study with Ricinus communis, Pine roxburgii and Solanum nigrum can lower the undesired side effects of synthetic medicine and also reduce the economic burden.

  14. Mud-plastered granary-baskets at a Celtic Oppidum near Čarnok (Vojvodina, Serbia

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    Medović Aleksandar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the Celtic Oppidum near Čarnok (Bačka, Vojvodina, Serbia remains of four mud-plastered granarybaskets were discovered. They are all dated to the period Gomolava VI-B (first half of the 1st century B.C.. Hulled barley and broomcorn millet were stored in the granary-baskets. The mesh of the granary-baskets was composed of young branches of oak tree (Quercus, common English elm tree (Ulmus cf. campestris L., poplar / willow (Populus / Salix, purgin buckthorn (Rhamnus cf. cathartica L., wayfaring tree (Viburnum cf. lantana L., spindle tree (Euonymus cf. europaeus L., barberry (Berberis vulgaris L. and a Pomoidae-tree. At least four different tree taxa were used for basket making. Construction of two-thousand-year old mud-plastered granary-baskets from the Pannonian plain is very similar to that of traditional granaries in some present-day villages in Africa. Additionally, one non-plastered basket was also discovered at Oppidum. It was build out of maple (Acer, barberry, buckthorn (Rhamnus and branches of a pomaceous fruits tree (Pomoidae. .

  15. Diet and nutrient balance of red panda in Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panthi, Saroj; Coogan, Sean C. P.; Aryal, Achyut; Raubenheimer, David

    2015-10-01

    We identified the winter plant species consumed by red panda in the Dhorpatan Hunting Reserve of eastern Nepal and compared this to the early-summer diet which was determined previously by Panthi et al. (2012). In addition, we estimated the proximate nutritional content of the leaves identified in red panda diet for both seasons, and we used nutritional geometry to explore macronutrient balance of leaves from the two different sampling periods. We identified six different plants in winter scats, which were the same as found in the previously determined early-summer diet. Arundinaria spp. bamboos were the main species found (82.1 % relative frequency), followed by Acer spp. (6.3 %), Betula utilis (4.6 %), Quercus semicarpifolia (3.7 %), Berberis spp. (1.3 %), and lichens (1.0 %), leaving 2.0 % unidentified. Geometric analysis suggested that the macronutrient balance of seasonal diets were similar in nutrient balance to the most frequently consumed Arundinaria spp. Differences in macronutrient balance may indicate seasonal nutrient preferences, such as increased carbohydrate intake in winter for thermogenesis, and increased protein and lipid intake in early summer to support reproduction and lactation; however, these differences may also indicate differences in resource availability. Habitat conserved for red panda in the region should include sufficient Arundinaria spp. as well as lesser consumed plants which may serve as complimentary foods.

  16. FARKLI KÖKLENDİRME ORTAMLARININ BERBERİS BİTKİSİNDE ÇELİK KÖKLENMESİ ÜZERİNE ETKİLERİ

    OpenAIRE

    UZUNOĞLU, Fulya; MAVİ, Kazım; MELEK ÇAĞIL, Hacer

    2018-01-01

    Özet Berberis thunbergii ‘Atropurpurea’ süs bitkisi türüne ait çeliklerin farklı köklendirme ortamlarında köklenme durumlarının belirlenmesi amaçlanan çalışmada, köklendirme ortamı olarak perlit, kokopit, pomza, kayayünü, vermikulit ve torf kullanılmıştır. Bu ortamların çeliklerin köklenmesi üzerine olan etkisi incelenmiştir. Ocak ayında alınan çelikler farklı ortamların kullanıldığı kasalara dikilerek sisleme altında köklendirilmiştir. Çeliklerde köklenme oranı, köklenme durumu, kök sayısı, ...

  17. Managing Japanese barberry (Ranunculales: Berberidaceae) infestations reduces blacklegged tick (Acari: Ixodidae) abundance and infection prevalence with Borrelia burgdorferi (Spirochaetales: Spirochaetaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Scott C; Ward, Jeffrey S; Worthley, Thomas E; Stafford, Kirby C

    2009-08-01

    In many Connecticut forests with an overabundance of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus Zimmermann), Japanese barberry (Berberis thunbergii DC) has become the dominant understory shrub, which may provide a habitat favorable to blacklegged tick (Ixodes scapularis Say) and white-footed mouse (Peromyscus leucopus Rafinesque) survival. To determine mouse and larval tick abundances at three replicate sites over 2 yr, mice were trapped in unmanipulated dense barberry infestations, areas where barberry was controlled, and areas where barberry was absent. The number of feeding larval ticks/mouse was recorded. Adult and nymphal ticks were sampled along 200-m draglines in each treatment, retained, and were tested for Borrelia burgdorferi (Johnson, Schmid, Hyde, Steigerwalt, and Brenner) presence. Total first-captured mouse counts did not differ between treatments. Mean number of feeding larval ticks per mouse was highest on mice captured in dense barberry. Adult tick densities in dense barberry were higher than in both controlled barberry and no barberry areas. Ticks sampled from full barberry infestations and controlled barberry areas had similar infection prevalence with B. burgdorferi the first year. In areas where barberry was controlled, infection prevalence was reduced to equal that of no barberry areas the second year of the study. Results indicate that managing Japanese barberry will have a positive effect on public health by reducing the number of B. burgdorferi-infected blacklegged ticks that can develop into motile life stages that commonly feed on humans.

  18. UPLC-MS/MS Profile of Alkaloids with Cytotoxic Properties of Selected Medicinal Plants of the Berberidaceae and Papaveraceae Families

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    Anna Och

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is one of the most occurring diseases in developed and developing countries. Plant-based compounds are still researched for their anticancer activity and for their quantity in plants. Therefore, the modern chromatographic methods are applied to quantify them in plants, for example, UPLC-MS/MS (ultraperformance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the content of sanguinarine, berberine, protopine, and chelidonine in Dicentra spectabilis (L. Lem., Fumaria officinalis L., Glaucium flavum Crantz, Corydalis cava L., Berberis thunbergii DC., Meconopsis cambrica (L. Vig., Mahonia aquifolium (Pursh Nutt., Macleaya cordata Willd., and Chelidonium majus L. For the first time, N,N-dimethyl-hernovine was identified in M. cambrica, B. thunbergii, M. aquifolium, C. cava, G. flavum, and C. majus; methyl-hernovine was identified in G. flavum; columbamine was identified in B. thunbergii; and methyl-corypalmine, chelidonine, and sanguinarine were identified in F. officinalis L. The richest source of protopine among all the examined species was M. cordata (5463.64 ± 26.3 μg/g. The highest amounts of chelidonine and sanguinarine were found in C. majus (51,040.0 ± 1.8 μg/g and 7925.8 ± 3.3 μg/g, resp., while B. thunbergi contained the highest amount of berberine (6358.4 ± 4.2 μg/g.

  19. In vitro and in vivo antifungal activity, liver profile test, and mutagenic activity of five plants used in traditional Mexican medicine

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    Jorge Cornejo-Garrido

    Full Text Available Berberis hartwegii Benth., Berberidaceae, Hamelia patens Jacq., Rubiaceae, Dendropanax arboreus (L. Decne & Planch., Araliaceae, Erythrina herbacea L., Fabaceae, and Zanthoxylum caribaeum Lam., Rutaceae, acetone extracts were selected on the basis of their use in traditional Mexican medicine to treat scabies or skin diseases. Anti-dermatophyte activity in vitro was evaluated using the agar dilution assay, and the therapeutic efficacy of B. hartwegii and Z. caribaeum were tested against experimental tinea pedis. The infected animals were treated intragastrically daily for seven days with 2.5 and 5 mg/kg of acetone extracts. The acetone extract of H. patens exhibited 100% growth inhibition against T. mentagrophytes and E. floccosum at 100.0 and 50.0 µg/ml, respectively, and B. hartwegii inhibited growth of M. canis and T. mentagrophytes at 100.0 µg/ml. Effective treatments with 2.5 mg/kg of Z. caribaeum and B. hartwegii extract were comparable with 1 mg/kg of clotrimazole in mice. Liver profile tests and histological analyses did not exhibit any signs of toxicity and the Ames test indicated that both extracts were safe when evaluated in strains TA98, TA100 and TA102. Our results suggest the potential for the future development of new antifungal drugs from B. hartwegii or Z. caribaeum.

  20. The Elevation of LC-ESI-Q-TOF-MS Response in the Analysis of Isoquinoline Alkaloids from Some Papaveraceae and Berberidaceae Representatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukula-Koch, Wirginia

    2017-01-01

    Twenty-five methanol extracts obtained from various representatives of Papaveraceae and Berberidaceae botanical families (genera: Papaver , Argemone , Eschscholzia , Chelidonium , Glaucium , and Berberis ) were screened for their alkaloid content in an optimized method suitable for the LC-ESI-Q-TOF-MS analysis. Twelve pharmacologically important isoquinoline alkaloids from four groups, aporphines, benzylisoquinolines, protoberberines, and benzophenanthridines, present in these traditionally used plant species were quantitatively determined in each studied sample, providing their alkaloid profile. A Zorbax Stable Bond RP-18 column and a mobile phase composed of 0.1% formic acid and 0.1% formic acid in acetonitrile (v/v) were used at the flow rate of 0.2 mL/min. A profound study on the optimization of MS response to four groups of isoquinoline alkaloids (validation of capillary voltage, gas flows, nebulizer pressure, skimmer, and fragmentor voltages), repeatability of results, and stability and linearity of measurements were described, showing, among others, 3000 V of capillary voltage, 350°C of gas temperature, 12 L/min of gas flows, nebulizer pressure of 35 psig, 65 V for skimmer voltage, and 30 V for collision energy as the most advantageous operation parameters.

  1. UPLC-MS/MS Profile of Alkaloids with Cytotoxic Properties of Selected Medicinal Plants of the Berberidaceae and Papaveraceae Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Och, Anna; Szewczyk, Katarzyna; Pecio, Łukasz; Stochmal, Anna; Załuski, Daniel; Bogucka-Kocka, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Cancer is one of the most occurring diseases in developed and developing countries. Plant-based compounds are still researched for their anticancer activity and for their quantity in plants. Therefore, the modern chromatographic methods are applied to quantify them in plants, for example, UPLC-MS/MS (ultraperformance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry). Therefore, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the content of sanguinarine, berberine, protopine, and chelidonine in Dicentra spectabilis (L.) Lem., Fumaria officinalis L., Glaucium flavum Crantz, Corydalis cava L., Berberis thunbergii DC., Meconopsis cambrica (L.) Vig., Mahonia aquifolium (Pursh) Nutt., Macleaya cordata Willd., and Chelidonium majus L. For the first time, N,N-dimethyl-hernovine was identified in M. cambrica , B. thunbergii , M. aquifolium , C. cava , G. flavum , and C. majus ; methyl-hernovine was identified in G. flavum ; columbamine was identified in B. thunbergii ; and methyl-corypalmine, chelidonine, and sanguinarine were identified in F. officinalis L. The richest source of protopine among all the examined species was M. cordata (5463.64 ± 26.3  μ g/g). The highest amounts of chelidonine and sanguinarine were found in C. majus (51,040.0 ± 1.8  μ g/g and 7925.8 ± 3.3  μ g/g, resp.), while B. thunbergi contained the highest amount of berberine (6358.4 ± 4.2  μ g/g).

  2. The Elevation of LC-ESI-Q-TOF-MS Response in the Analysis of Isoquinoline Alkaloids from Some Papaveraceae and Berberidaceae Representatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wirginia Kukula-Koch

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-five methanol extracts obtained from various representatives of Papaveraceae and Berberidaceae botanical families (genera: Papaver, Argemone, Eschscholzia, Chelidonium, Glaucium, and Berberis were screened for their alkaloid content in an optimized method suitable for the LC-ESI-Q-TOF-MS analysis. Twelve pharmacologically important isoquinoline alkaloids from four groups, aporphines, benzylisoquinolines, protoberberines, and benzophenanthridines, present in these traditionally used plant species were quantitatively determined in each studied sample, providing their alkaloid profile. A Zorbax Stable Bond RP-18 column and a mobile phase composed of 0.1% formic acid and 0.1% formic acid in acetonitrile (v/v were used at the flow rate of 0.2 mL/min. A profound study on the optimization of MS response to four groups of isoquinoline alkaloids (validation of capillary voltage, gas flows, nebulizer pressure, skimmer, and fragmentor voltages, repeatability of results, and stability and linearity of measurements were described, showing, among others, 3000 V of capillary voltage, 350°C of gas temperature, 12 L/min of gas flows, nebulizer pressure of 35 psig, 65 V for skimmer voltage, and 30 V for collision energy as the most advantageous operation parameters.

  3. Biodiversity Conservation through Traditional Beliefs System: A Case Study from Kumaon Himalayas, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harsh SINGH

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study was carried out in Malay Nath sacred grove of Kumaon Himalaya, India, in appreciation of its role in biodiversity conservation. The whole grove is dedicated to the local deity “Malay Nath”, and showing semi-temperate type vegetation of the region. Rituals and cultural beliefs of the local peoples of Kumaon are plays significant role in conserving biodiversity. The study aimed at the documentation and inventory of the sacred grove, its phytodiversity, threats and conservation in the Indian Himalayan of Kumaon region, and to this, systematic field surveys were conducted during 2007-2010 covering all four seasons viz., summer, rainy, winter and spring. A total of 64 species in 58 genera under 47 families were identified, of which 35 species are flowering plants and 29 species are non-flowering plants. The dominant family was Parmeliaceae of lichen which recorded the maximum 6 species. 35 plant species under 32 genera and 23 families are used as an ethno-medicinal and the information about the ethno-medicinal plants was gathered from knowledgeable elderly local peoples of the area. Hedychium spicatum, Bergenia ciliata, Origanum vulgare, Berberis asiatica, etc. are highly exploited species and need to be conserved.

  4. Legacy effects overwhelm the short-term effects of exotic plant invasion and restoration on soil microbial community structure, enzyme activities, and nitrogen cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgersma, Kenneth J; Ehrenfeld, Joan G; Yu, Shen; Vor, Torsten

    2011-11-01

    Plant invasions can have substantial consequences for the soil ecosystem, altering microbial community structure and nutrient cycling. However, relatively little is known about what drives these changes, making it difficult to predict the effects of future invasions. In addition, because most studies compare soils from uninvaded areas to long-established dense invasions, little is known about the temporal dependence of invasion impacts. We experimentally manipulated forest understory vegetation in replicated sites dominated either by exotic Japanese barberry (Berberis thunbergii), native Viburnums, or native Vacciniums, so that each vegetation type was present in each site-type. We compared the short-term effect of vegetation changes to the lingering legacy effects of the previous vegetation type by measuring soil microbial community structure (phospholipid fatty acids) and function (extracellular enzymes and nitrogen mineralization). We also replaced the aboveground litter in half of each plot with an inert substitute to determine if changes in the soil microbial community were driven by aboveground or belowground plant inputs. We found that after 2 years, the microbial community structure and function was largely determined by the legacy effect of the previous vegetation type, and was not affected by the current vegetation. Aboveground litter removal had only weak effects, suggesting that changes in the soil microbial community and nutrient cycling were driven largely by belowground processes. These results suggest that changes in the soil following either invasion or restoration do not occur quickly, but rather exhibit long-lasting legacy effects from previous belowground plant inputs.

  5. Berberine-induced pigment dispersion in Bufo melanostictus melanophores by stimulation of beta-2 adrenergic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Sharique A; Naaz, Ishrat; Choudhary, Ram Kumar

    2014-02-01

    Reduced production of melanin by decreased or the absence of melanocytes leads to various hypopigmentation disorders, and the development of melanogenetic agents for photoprotection and hypopigmentation disorders is one of the top priority areas of research. Hence, the present study was carried out to elucidate the ability of berberine, a principal active ingredient present in the roots of the herb Berberis vulgaris to stimulate pigment dispersion in the isolated skin melanophores of the toad Bufo melanostictus. In the present study, mean melanophore size index of the isolated skin melanophores of B. melanostictus was assayed after treating with various concentrations of berberine. A marked melanin dispersion response leading to skin darkening was observed in the isolated melanophores of toad in response to berberine, which was found to be mediated through beta-2 adrenergic receptors. The physiologically significant dose-related melanin dispersion effects of berberine per se were found to be completely abolished by propranolol, which is a specific beta-2 adrenergic receptor blocker. These per se melanin dispersal effects were also found to be markedly potentiated by isoprenaline, which is a specific beta-adrenoceptor agonist. The results indicate that berberine causes a tremendous, dose-dependent, physiologically significant pigment dispersing in the isolated skin melanophores of B. melanostictus.

  6. Ethnomedicine in Himalaya: a case study from Dolpa, Humla, Jumla and Mustang districts of Nepal

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    Kshhetri Hari B

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Traditional plant use in Nepal has been documented for millennia. The importance of plants as medicine has not diminished in any way in recent times, and traditional medicines are still the most important health care source for the vast majority of the population. This paper examines the ethnobotany and traditional use of plants extracted from the vulnerable alpine zone in the Dolpa, Humla, Jumla and Mustang districts of Nepal. The results of this ethnobotanical study indicate that a very large number of plant species is used as traditional medicines. There were 107, 59, 44 and 166 species of ethnomedicinal importance in surveyed areas of Dolpa, Humla, Jumla and Mustang district respectively. Of these, 84 common species, used at least in two districts, were selected to enumerate their ethnomedicinal properties. The 84 species belonged to 75 genera and 39 families. The commonest species in this pharmacopoeia were: Allium wallichii, Cordyceps sinensis, Dactylorhiza hatagirea, and Rheum australe. A total of 21 species were most common in three districts and 59 in two districts. The genera Aconitum, Allium, Arisaema, Berberis, Corydalis, Gentiana, Hippophae, Juniperus and Rhododendron each possessed two species with ethnomedicinal use. Labiatae was the most medicinally important family with five species used, followed by Araceae, Compositae, Liliaceae, Polygonaceae, Ranunculaceae, Scrophulariaceae and Umbelliferae, each contributing four species.

  7. An ethnobotanical study of medicinal plants administered for the treatment of hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baharvand-Ahmadi, Babak; Bahmani, Mahmoud; Tajeddini, Pegah; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud; Naghdi, Nasrollah

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) is very high in human societies and their prevention and treatment are the most important priority in many countries. Hypertension makes an important contribution to the development of CVDs. This study aimed to collect the ethno-medicinal knowledge of the traditional healers of Shiraz on medicinal plants used in the treatment of hypertension. Ethno-medicinal data were collected from September 2012 to July 2013 through direct interview. Twenty-five healers were interviewed using semi-structured questionnaires and their traditional ethno-medicinal knowledge was recorded. Questionnaires were included apothecary personal information, plant local name, plant parts used, method of preparation, season of harvest and traditional use. Data collected from surveys and interviews were transferred to Microsoft Excel 2007 and analyzed. Analysis of data showed that, 27 medicinal plants from 22 families are used for the treatment of hypertension. The families with most antihypertensive species were Apiaceae (8%), Rosaceae (8%) and Papaveraceae (8%). The most frequently used plant parts were leaves (36%) followed by fruits (30%), aerial part (17%) and branches (7%). The most frequently used preparation method was decoction (95%). Borago officinalis (51.85%), Berberis vulgaris (51.58%) had the highest frequency of mention. The ethno-medicinal survey of medicinal plants recommended by traditional healers for the treatment of hypertension provides new areas of research on the antihypertensive effect of medicinal plants. In the case of safety and effectiveness, they can be refined and processed to produce natural drugs.

  8. Microencapsulation optimization of natural anthocyanins with maltodextrin, gum Arabic and gelatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhavan Mahdavi, Sahar; Jafari, Seid Mahdi; Assadpoor, Elham; Dehnad, Danial

    2016-04-01

    The barberry (Berberis vulgaris) extract which is a rich source of anthocyanins was used for spray drying encapsulation with three different wall materials, i.e., combination of maltodextrin and gum Arabic (MD+GA), maltodextrin and gelatin (MD+GE), and maltodextrin (MD). Response Surface Methodology (RSM) was applied for optimization of microencapsulation efficiency and physical properties of encapsulated powders considering wall material type as well as different ratios of core to wall materials as independent variables. Physical characteristics of spray-dried powders were investigated by further analyses of moisture content, hygroscopicity, degree of caking, solubility, bulk and absolute density, porosity, flowability and microstructural evaluation of encapsulated powders. Our results indicated that samples produced with MD+GA as wall materials represented the highest process efficiency and best powder quality; the optimum conditions of microencapsulation process for barberry anthocyanins were found to be the wall material content and anthocyanin load of 24.54% and 13.82%, respectively. Under such conditions, the microencapsulation efficiency (ME) of anthocyanins could be as high as 92.83%. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A novel survey of the ethno medicinal knowledge of dental problems in Manoor Valley (Northern Himalaya), Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Inayat Ur; Ijaz, Farhana; Iqbal, Zafar; Afzal, Aftab; Ali, Niaz; Afzal, Muhammad; Khan, Muhammad Azhar; Muhammad, Said; Qadir, Ghulam; Asif, Muhammad

    2016-12-24

    Juglans regia having (RFCs=0.69) and Rumex dentatus (0.58). CI results show that most respondents percentage was for Juglans regia having CI%=69%, followed by Rumex dentatus (57.7%). Medicinal plants with high fidelity level and reported for one dental disorder were Berberis lycium, Geranium wallichianum, Lathyrus aphaca, Platanus orientalis, Sedum spp. and Urtica dioica for toothache. Further, new medicinal uses of Abies pindrow, Ajuga integrifolia, Berberis lycium, Urtica dioica, Indigofera heterantha were recorded for the first time from Pakistan and Astragalus grahamianus, Corydalis cornuta, Prunella vulgaris, Ranunculus muricatus, Rumex hastatus, Stellaria media, Tagetes minuta, Taraxacum officinale and Lathyrus aphaca, across the world for the current reported medicinal uses. All mentioned plant species are reported for the first time ever for dental disorders from Manoor Valley. Nonetheless, this is a novel study as no single ethno medicinal study on dental disorder up-till now has been reported from Pakistan. The present study is the first ever documentation of ethno medicinal practices aiming at the dental disorders in Pakistan, which resulted in 64% of medicinal uses new claims. So, the reported species of remote valley should be further evaluated for proper experimentation and pharmacological activities to authenticate their current traditional usage. Field observation revealed vegetation of the area was generally threatened due to its unwise use by the local communities. Trends like deforestation, over grazing, habitat fragmentation and introduction of the exotic taxa were the visible threats. So conservation of such an important natural God gifted treasure is mandatory. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Preserving Traditional Botanical Knowledge: The Importance of Phytogeographic and Ethnobotanical Inventory of Peruvian Dye Plants

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    José Mostacero León

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Peru is a megadiverse country with native species of all kinds, including dye plants, which have been used for hundreds of years by the local population. Despite the fact that many of these natural dyes are of a superior quality compared to synthetic ones and do not have the harmful effects that the latter may cause to human health, due to the lack of documentation and dissemination, ethnobotanical knowledge is unfortunately being lost with the passing of generations. In order to preserve and spread such valuable knowledge, this study conducted a comprehensive taxonomic, phytogeographic, and ethnobotanical inventory of dye plants based on periodical botanical explorations in selected locations of Northern Peru during the span of two decades. A critical review of the specialized bibliography was then carried out and the findings were verified with the personal knowledge and experience of both the researchers and the local and regional people. The results of the inventory record 32 species of dye plants from Northern Peru distributed in 22 families, of which the following stand out due to the number of species: Fabaceae (5, Anacardiaceae (2, Annonaceae (2, Asteraceae (2, Berberidaceae (2, Rosaceae (2, and Solanaceae (2. Of the 32 dye species identified, four are considered endemic from Peru: Berberis buceronis J.F. Macbr., Caesalpinia paipai Ruiz & Pav., Coreopsis senaria S.F. Blake & Sherf., and Lomatia hirsuta (Lam. Diels. The study also found that species such as Bixa orellana L., Indigofera suffruticosa Mill., Sambucus peruviana, and the lichen Usnea baileyi (Stirton Zahlbr have not been commercially exploited in Peru despite the fact that they already constitute a great economic source for several countries.

  11. Homeostasis in leaf water potentials on leeward and windward sides of desert shrub crowns: water loss control vs. high hydraulic efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iogna, Patricia A; Bucci, Sandra J; Scholz, Fabián G; Goldstein, Guillermo

    2013-11-01

    Phenotypic plasticity in morphophysiological leaf traits in response to wind was studied in two dominant shrub species of the Patagonian steppe, used as model systems for understanding effects of high wind speed on leaf water relations and hydraulic properties of small woody plants. Morpho-anatomical traits, hydraulic conductance and conductivity and water relations in leaves of wind-exposed and protected crown sides were examined during the summer with nearly continuous high winds. Although exposed sides of the crowns were subjected to higher wind speeds and air saturation deficits than the protected sides, leaves throughout the crown had similar minimum leaf water potential (ΨL). The two species were able to maintain homeostasis in minimum ΨL using different physiological mechanisms. Berberis microphylla avoided a decrease in the minimum ΨL in the exposed side of the crown by reducing water loss by stomatal control, loss of cell turgor and low epidermal conductance. Colliguaja integerrima increased leaf water transport efficiency to maintain transpiration rates without increasing the driving force for water loss in the wind-exposed crown side. Leaf physiological changes within the crown help to prevent the decrease of minimum ΨL and thus contribute to the maintenance of homeostasis, assuring the hydraulic integrity of the plant under unfavorable conditions. The responses of leaf traits that contribute to mechanical resistance (leaf mass per area and thickness) differed from those of large physiological traits by exhibiting low phenotypic plasticity. The results of this study help us to understand the unique properties of shrubs which have different hydraulic architecture compared to trees.

  12. Pilot study on the additive effects of berberine and oral type 2 diabetes agents for patients with suboptimal glycemic control

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    Di Pierro F

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Francesco Di Pierro,1 Nicola Villanova,2 Federica Agostini,2 Rebecca Marzocchi,2 Valentina Soverini,2 Giulio Marchesini21Scientific Department, Velleja Research, Milano, 2Diseases of Metabolism, S Orsola Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, ItalyBackground: Suboptimal glycemic control is a common situation in diabetes, regardless of the wide range of drugs available to reach glycemic targets. Basic research in diabetes is endeavoring to identify new actives working as insulin savers, use of which could delay the introduction of injectable insulin or reduce the insulin dose needed. Commonly available as a nutraceutical, berberine is a potential candidate.Methods and results: Because its low oral bioavailability can be overcome by P-glycoprotein inhibitors like herbal polyphenols, we have tested the nutraceutical combination of Berberis aristata extract and Silybum marianum extract (Berberol® in type 2 diabetes in terms of its additive effect when combined with a conventional oral regimen for patients with suboptimal glycemic control. After 90 days of treatment, the nutraceutical association had a positive effect on glycemic and lipid parameters, significantly reducing glycosylated hemoglobin, basal insulin, homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance, total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides. A relevant effect was also observed in terms of liver function by measuring aspartate transaminase and alanine transaminase. The product had a good safety profile, with distinctive gastrointestinal side effects likely due to its acarbose-like action.Conclusion: Although further studies should be carried out to confirm our data, Berberol could be considered a good candidate as an adjunctive treatment option in diabetes, especially in patients with suboptimal glycemic control.Keywords: berberine, silymarin, glycosylated hemoglobin, diabetes

  13. Preserving Traditional Botanical Knowledge: The Importance of Phytogeographic and Ethnobotanical Inventory of Peruvian Dye Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostacero León, José; López Medina, Segundo E; Yabar, Helmut; De La Cruz Castillo, Jordan

    2017-12-18

    Abstract : Peru is a megadiverse country with native species of all kinds, including dye plants, which have been used for hundreds of years by the local population. Despite the fact that many of these natural dyes are of a superior quality compared to synthetic ones and do not have the harmful effects that the latter may cause to human health, due to the lack of documentation and dissemination, ethnobotanical knowledge is unfortunately being lost with the passing of generations. In order to preserve and spread such valuable knowledge, this study conducted a comprehensive taxonomic, phytogeographic, and ethnobotanical inventory of dye plants based on periodical botanical explorations in selected locations of Northern Peru during the span of two decades. A critical review of the specialized bibliography was then carried out and the findings were verified with the personal knowledge and experience of both the researchers and the local and regional people. The results of the inventory record 32 species of dye plants from Northern Peru distributed in 22 families, of which the following stand out due to the number of species : Fabaceae (5), Anacardiaceae (2), Annonaceae (2), Asteraceae (2), Berberidaceae (2), Rosaceae (2), and Solanaceae (2). Of the 32 dye species identified, four are considered endemic from Peru: Berberis buceronis J.F. Macbr., Caesalpinia paipai Ruiz & Pav., Coreopsis senaria S.F. Blake & Sherf., and Lomatia hirsuta (Lam.) Diels. The study also found that species such as Bixa orellana L., Indigofera suffruticosa Mill., Sambucus peruviana , and the lichen Usnea baileyi (Stirton) Zahlbr have not been commercially exploited in Peru despite the fact that they already constitute a great economic source for several countries.

  14. Chilean Native Fruit Extracts Inhibit Inflammation Linked to the Pathogenic Interaction Between Adipocytes and Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Farias, Marjorie; Vasquez, Karla; Ovalle-Marin, Angelica; Fuentes, Francisco; Parra, Claudia; Quitral, Vilma; Jimenez, Paula

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Obesity is characterized by an increase in the infiltration of monocytes into the adipose tissue, causing an inflammatory condition associated with, for example, the development of insulin resistance. Thus, anti-inflammatory-based treatments could emerge as a novel and interesting approach. It has been reported that Chilean native fruits maqui (Aristotelia chilensis) and calafate (Berberis microphylla) present high contents of polyphenols, which are known for their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of extracts of these fruits to block the pathogenic interaction between adipocytes and macrophages in vitro and to compare its effect with blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum) extract treatment, which has been already described to possess several biomedical benefits. RAW264.7 macrophages were treated with 5 μg/mL lipopolysaccharides (LPS), with conditioned media (CM) from fully differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes, or in a coculture (CC) with 3T3-L1 adipocytes, in the presence or absence of 100 μM [total polyphenolic content] of each extract for 24 h. The gene expression and secretion profile of several inflammatory markers were evaluated. Nitric oxide secretion induced by LPS, CM, and CC was reduced by the presence of maqui (−12.2%, −45.6%, and −14.7%, respectively) and calafate (−27.6%, −43.9%, and −11.8%, respectively) extracts. Gene expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and TNF-α was inhibited and of IL-10 was induced by maqui and calafate extract incubation. In conclusion, the extracts of these fruits present important inhibitory-like features over the inflammatory response of the interaction between adipocytes and macrophages, comprising a potential therapeutic tool against comorbidities associated with obesity development. PMID:25302660

  15. Chilean native fruit extracts inhibit inflammation linked to the pathogenic interaction between adipocytes and macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Farias, Marjorie; Vasquez, Karla; Ovalle-Marin, Angelica; Fuentes, Francisco; Parra, Claudia; Quitral, Vilma; Jimenez, Paula; Garcia-Diaz, Diego F

    2015-05-01

    Obesity is characterized by an increase in the infiltration of monocytes into the adipose tissue, causing an inflammatory condition associated with, for example, the development of insulin resistance. Thus, anti-inflammatory-based treatments could emerge as a novel and interesting approach. It has been reported that Chilean native fruits maqui (Aristotelia chilensis) and calafate (Berberis microphylla) present high contents of polyphenols, which are known for their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of extracts of these fruits to block the pathogenic interaction between adipocytes and macrophages in vitro and to compare its effect with blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum) extract treatment, which has been already described to possess several biomedical benefits. RAW264.7 macrophages were treated with 5 μg/mL lipopolysaccharides (LPS), with conditioned media (CM) from fully differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes, or in a coculture (CC) with 3T3-L1 adipocytes, in the presence or absence of 100 μM [total polyphenolic content] of each extract for 24 h. The gene expression and secretion profile of several inflammatory markers were evaluated. Nitric oxide secretion induced by LPS, CM, and CC was reduced by the presence of maqui (-12.2%, -45.6%, and -14.7%, respectively) and calafate (-27.6%, -43.9%, and -11.8%, respectively) extracts. Gene expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and TNF-α was inhibited and of IL-10 was induced by maqui and calafate extract incubation. In conclusion, the extracts of these fruits present important inhibitory-like features over the inflammatory response of the interaction between adipocytes and macrophages, comprising a potential therapeutic tool against comorbidities associated with obesity development.

  16. Berberine prevents nigrostriatal dopaminergic neuronal loss and suppresses hippocampal apoptosis in mice with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mia; Cho, Ki-Ho; Shin, Mal-Soon; Lee, Jae-Min; Cho, Han-Sam; Kim, Chang-Ju; Shin, Dong-Hoon; Yang, Hyeon Jeong

    2014-04-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the selective loss of nigral dopaminergic neurons and a reduction in striatal dopaminergic fibers, which result in tremors, rigidity, bradykinesia and gait disturbance. In addition to motor dysfunction, dementia is a widely recognized symptom of patients with PD. Berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid isolated from Berberis vulgaris L., is known to exert anxiolytic, analgesic, anti-inflammatory, antipsychotic, antidepressant and anti-amnesic effects. In the present study, we investigated the effects of berberine on short-term memory in relation to dopamine depletion and hippocampal neurogenesis using a mouse model of PD, induced by 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine/probenecid (MPTP/P) treatment. Mice in the berberine-treated groups were orally administered berberine once a day for a total of 5 weeks. Our results revealed that the injection of MPTP/P induced dopaminergic neuronal death in the substantia nigra and fiber loss in the striatum. This resulted in impaired motor balance and coordination, as assessed by the beam walking test. We further demonstrated that MPTP/P-induced apoptosis in the hippocampus deteriorated short-term memory, as shown by the step-down avoidance task. By contrast, neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus, which is a compensatory adaptive response to excessive apoptosis, was increased upon PD induction. However, treatment with berberine enhanced motor balance and coordination by preventing dopaminergic neuronal damage. Treatment with berberine also improved short-term memory by inhibiting apoptosis in the hippocampus. Berberine demonstrated maximal potency at 50 mg/kg. Based on these data, treatment with berberine may serve as a potential therapeutic strategy for the alleviation of memory impairment and motor dysfunction in patients with PD.

  17. Long-Term Effects of White-Tailed Deer Exclusion on the Invasion of Exotic Plants: A Case Study in a Mid-Atlantic Temperate Forest.

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    Xiaoli Shen

    Full Text Available Exotic plant invasions and chronic high levels of herbivory are two of the major biotic stressors impacting temperate forest ecosystems in eastern North America, and the two problems are often linked. We used a 4-ha deer exclosure maintained since 1991 to examine the influence of a generalist herbivore, white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus, on the abundance of four exotic invasive (Rosa multiflora, Berberis thunbergii, Rubus phoenicolasius and Microstegium vimineum and one native (Cynoglossum virginianum plant species, within a 25.6-ha mature temperate forest dynamics plot in Virginia, USA. We identified significant predictors of the abundance of each focal species using generalized linear models incorporating 10 environmental and landscape variables. After controlling for those predictors, we applied our models to a 4-ha deer exclusion site and a 4-ha reference site, both embedded within the larger plot, to test the role of deer on the abundance of the focal species. Slope, edge effects and soil pH were the most frequent predictors of the abundance of the focal species on the larger plot. The abundance of C. virginianum, known to be deer-dispersed, was significantly lower in the exclosure. Similar patterns were detected for B. thunbergii, R. phoenicolasius and M. vimineum, whereas R. multiflora was more abundant within the exclosure. Our results indicate that chronic high deer density facilitates increased abundances of several exotic invasive plant species, with the notable exception of R. multiflora. We infer that the invasion of many exotic plant species that are browse-tolerant to white-tailed deer could be limited by reducing deer populations.

  18. Effects of Japanese barberry (Ranunculales: Berberidaceae) removal and resulting microclimatic changes on Ixodes scapularis (Acari: Ixodidae) abundances in Connecticut, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Scott C; Ward, Jeffrey S

    2010-12-01

    Japanese barberry (Berberis thunbergii de Candolle) is a thorny, perennial, exotic, invasive shrub that is well established throughout much of the eastern United States. It can form dense thickets that limit native herbaceous and woody regeneration, alter soil structure and function, and harbor increased blacklegged tick (Ixodes scapularis Say) populations. This study examined a potential causal mechanism for the link between Japanese barberry and blacklegged ticks to determine if eliminating Japanese barberry could reduce tick abundance and associated prevalence of Borrelia burgdorferi (Johnson, Schmid, Hyde, Steigerwalt, and Brenner). Japanese barberry was controlled at five study areas throughout Connecticut; adult ticks were sampled over three years. Each area had three habitat plots: areas where barberry was controlled, areas where barberry remained intact, and areas where barberry was minimal or absent. Sampled ticks were retained and tested for B. burgdorferi presence. At two study areas, temperature and relative humidity data loggers were deployed in each of the three habitat plots over two growing seasons. Intact barberry stands had 280 ± 51 B. burgdorferi-infected adult ticks/ha, which was significantly higher than for controlled (121 ± 17/ha) and no barberry (30 ± 10/ha) areas. Microclimatic conditions where Japanese barberry was controlled were similar to areas without barberry. Japanese barberry infestations are favorable habitat for ticks, as they provide a buffered microclimate that limits desiccation-induced tick mortality. Control of Japanese barberry reduced the number of ticks infected with B. burgdorferi by nearly 60% by reverting microclimatic conditions to those more typical of native northeastern forests. © 2010 Entomological Society of America

  19. Preserving Traditional Botanical Knowledge: The Importance of Phytogeographic and Ethnobotanical Inventory of Peruvian Dye Plants

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    Mostacero León, José; López Medina, Segundo E.; Yabar, Helmut; De La Cruz Castillo, Jordan

    2017-01-01

    Peru is a megadiverse country with native species of all kinds, including dye plants, which have been used for hundreds of years by the local population. Despite the fact that many of these natural dyes are of a superior quality compared to synthetic ones and do not have the harmful effects that the latter may cause to human health, due to the lack of documentation and dissemination, ethnobotanical knowledge is unfortunately being lost with the passing of generations. In order to preserve and spread such valuable knowledge, this study conducted a comprehensive taxonomic, phytogeographic, and ethnobotanical inventory of dye plants based on periodical botanical explorations in selected locations of Northern Peru during the span of two decades. A critical review of the specialized bibliography was then carried out and the findings were verified with the personal knowledge and experience of both the researchers and the local and regional people. The results of the inventory record 32 species of dye plants from Northern Peru distributed in 22 families, of which the following stand out due to the number of species: Fabaceae (5), Anacardiaceae (2), Annonaceae (2), Asteraceae (2), Berberidaceae (2), Rosaceae (2), and Solanaceae (2). Of the 32 dye species identified, four are considered endemic from Peru: Berberis buceronis J.F. Macbr., Caesalpinia paipai Ruiz & Pav., Coreopsis senaria S.F. Blake & Sherf., and Lomatia hirsuta (Lam.) Diels. The study also found that species such as Bixa orellana L., Indigofera suffruticosa Mill., Sambucus peruviana, and the lichen Usnea baileyi (Stirton) Zahlbr have not been commercially exploited in Peru despite the fact that they already constitute a great economic source for several countries. PMID:29258279

  20. Acceleration of exotic plant invasion in a forested ecosystem by a generalist herbivore.

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    Eschtruth, Anne K; Battles, John J

    2009-04-01

    The successful invasion of exotic plants is often attributed to the absence of coevolved enemies in the introduced range (i.e., the enemy release hypothesis). Nevertheless, several components of this hypothesis, including the role of generalist herbivores, remain relatively unexplored. We used repeated censuses of exclosures and paired controls to investigate the role of a generalist herbivore, white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), in the invasion of 3 exotic plant species (Microstegium vimineum, Alliaria petiolata, and Berberis thunbergii) in eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis) forests in New Jersey and Pennsylvania (U.S.A.). This work was conducted in 10 eastern hemlock (T. canadensis) forests that spanned gradients in deer density and in the severity of canopy disturbance caused by an introduced insect pest, the hemlock woolly adelgid (Adelges tsugae). We used maximum likelihood estimation and information theoretics to quantify the strength of evidence for alternative models of the influence of deer density and its interaction with the severity of canopy disturbance on exotic plant abundance. Our results were consistent with the enemy release hypothesis in that exotic plants gained a competitive advantage in the presence of generalist herbivores in the introduced range. The abundance of all 3 exotic plants increased significantly more in the control plots than in the paired exclosures. For all species, the inclusion of canopy disturbance parameters resulted in models with substantially greater support than the deer density only models. Our results suggest that white-tailed deer herbivory can accelerate the invasion of exotic plants and that canopy disturbance can interact with herbivory to magnify the impact. In addition, our results provide compelling evidence of nonlinear relationships between deer density and the impact of herbivory on exotic species abundance. These findings highlight the important role of herbivore density in determining impacts on

  1. Extracts of Canadian first nations medicinal plants, used as natural products, inhibit neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates with different antibiotic resistance profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cybulska, Paulina; Thakur, Sidharath D; Foster, Brian C; Scott, Ian M; Leduc, Renée I; Arnason, John T; Dillon, Jo-Anne R

    2011-07-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae (Ng) has developed resistance to most antimicrobial agents and the antibiotics recommended for therapy are restricted, for the most part, to third generation cephalosporins. In order to investigate new potential sources of antimicrobial agents, the antibacterial properties of 14 Canadian plants used in traditional First Nations' medicine were tested against Ng isolates having differing antimicrobial susceptibility profiles. Ethanolic extracts of 14 Canadian botanicals, analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography, were tested for their antimicrobial activity (disc diffusion and/or agar dilution assays) against susceptible Ng reference strains and a panel of 28 Ng isolates with various antimicrobial resistance profiles. Extracts of Arctostaphylos uva ursi (kinnikinnick or bearberry), Hydrastis canadensis (goldenseal), Prunus serotina (black cherry), and Rhodiola rosea (roseroot) inhibited the growth of all Ng isolates with minimum inhibitory concentrations of 32 μg/mL, 4 to 32 μg/mL, 16 to >32 μg/mL, and 32 to 64 μg/mL, respectively. Extracts of Acorus americanus (sweet flag), Berberis vulgaris (barberry), Cimicifuga racemosa (black cohosh), Equisetum arvense (field horsetail), Gaultheria procumbens (wintergreen), Ledum groenlandicum (Labrador tea), Ledum palustre (marsh Labrador tea), Oenothera biennis (common evening primrose), Sambucus nigra (elderberry), and Zanthoxylum americanum (prickly ash) had weak or no antimicrobial activity against the Ng isolates with minimum inhibitory concentrations ≥256 μg/mL. The phytochemical berberine from H. canadensis inhibited the growth of all Ng isolates. The phytochemicals, salidroside and rosavin, present in R. rosea, also showed inhibitory activity against Ng strains. Canadian botanicals represent a potential source of novel compounds which inhibit Ng, including isolates resistant to antibiotics.

  2. Screening of potential medicinal plants from District Sawat specific for controlling women diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarwat, A.; Shinwari, Z.K.; Ahmad, N.

    2012-01-01

    Ethnobotany provides a scientific rationale to identify medicinally important plant species, especially for finding new drugs that play vital role in the treatment of different diseases. This ethnobotanical survey of Swat, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KP) was carried out to identify medicinally important plant species that are traditionally used to treat gynecological disorders and infectious diseases, and to study their antimicrobial potential against pathogens that cause infections in females. The antimicrobial activities were investigated using the well diffusion method against four different bacterial strains and one fungal strain. Results showed that out of 12 plants studied, seven plants exhibited inhibitory effects against Candida albicans, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli. Woodfordia fruticosa, Quercus dilatata, Erythrina variegata, Ficus religiosa and Berberis lycium showed high antifungal activity against C. albicans with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of 2.5, 1.25, 0.625, 1.25, 0.3125 mg/ml and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) values of 5, 2.5, 1.25, 2.5, 0.625 mg/ml, respectively. Both Woodfordia fruticosa and Quercus dilatata showed antimicrobial potential against E. coli and K. pneumoniae with similar MIC values of 2.5 mg/ml and MBC values of 5 mg/ml. Plants exhibiting inhibitory potential against S. aureus were Woodfordia fruticosa, Quercus dilatata, Azadirachta indica and Curcuma longa and all of them possessed similar MIC values of 5 mg/ml and MBC values of 2.5 mg/ml, respectively. None of the plants showed antimicrobial activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Proximate analysis showed that in comparative assessment of the various species, Zanthoxylum alatum had the highest fat and energy values. (author)

  3. [An investigation on rare and endangered Tibetan medicinal plants in Lhasa region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jie; Lan, Xiao-Zhong

    2013-01-01

    To investigate and study the endangered Tibetan medicinal plant species, their moisture content, biomass and resources reserves in Lhasa region. The rare and endangered Tibetan medicinal plant resources were investigated by plot-quadrat method, walking and inquiry ways, sampling and drying method. There were 37 species of rare and endangered plants, belonging to 22 families and 34 genera in Lhasa region. The moisture content of aerial part was higher than that of underground part in many plants. The moisture content of Przewalskia tangutica was the highest (91.97%), and the lowest one was Fritillaria delavayi (only 25.99%). The mean biomass of Rubus biflorus was the highest (1 830.480 g), that of Cordyceps sinensis was the lowest (0.291 g). The root-shoot ratio of Asparagus filicinus was the maximum (5.313), the minimum was Aconitum gymnandrum (0.286). The largest output was 18.000 kg x hm(-2) for Berberis agricola, the output of Saxifraga pasumensis was the lowest (0.007 kg x hm(-2)). The resources reserves of the rare and endangered plants were 15683.697 t in Lhasa region, the maximum was 7690.230 t for B. agricola, 49.03% of the total reserves, the minimum was 2.393 t for S. pasumensis, only 0.015%. The characteristics of rare and endangered plants were as follows: abundant species and complex habitats, widely distribution but uneven, rich reserves and high economic value. We suggested to update the endangered level of medicinal plants, strengthen the scientific research on these plants, maintain sustainable utilization of the rare and endangered plants in Lhasa region.

  4. Citizen science contributes to our knowledge of invasive plant species distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crall, Alycia W.; Jarnevich, Catherine S.; Young, Nicholas E.; Panke, Brendon; Renz, Mark; Stohlgren, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Citizen science is commonly cited as an effective approach to expand the scale of invasive species data collection and monitoring. However, researchers often hesitate to use these data due to concerns over data quality. In light of recent research on the quality of data collected by volunteers, we aimed to demonstrate the extent to which citizen science data can increase sampling coverage, fill gaps in species distributions, and improve habitat suitability models compared to professionally generated data sets used in isolation. We combined data sets from professionals and volunteers for five invasive plant species (Alliaria petiolata, Berberis thunbergii, Cirsium palustre, Pastinaca sativa, Polygonum cuspidatum) in portions of Wisconsin. Volunteers sampled counties not sampled by professionals for three of the five species. Volunteers also added presence locations within counties not included in professional data sets, especially in southern portions of the state where professional monitoring activities had been minimal. Volunteers made a significant contribution to the known distribution, environmental gradients sampled, and the habitat suitability of P. cuspidatum. Models generated with professional data sets for the other four species performed reasonably well according to AUC values (>0.76). The addition of volunteer data did not greatly change model performance (AUC > 0.79) but did change the suitability surface generated by the models, making them more realistic. Our findings underscore the need to merge data from multiple sources to improve knowledge of current species distributions, and to predict their movement under present and future environmental conditions. The efficiency and success of these approaches require that monitoring efforts involve multiple stakeholders in continuous collaboration via established monitoring networks.

  5. Ethnobotany of medicinal plants in district Mastung of Balochistan province-Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibi, Tahira; Ahmad, Mushtaq; Bakhsh Tareen, Rsool; Mohammad Tareen, Niaz; Jabeen, Rukhsana; Rehman, Saeed-Ur; Sultana, Shazia; Zafar, Muhammad; Yaseen, Ghulam

    2014-11-18

    The aim of this study was to document the medicinal uses of plants in district Mastung of Balochistan province, Pakistan. The ethnobotanical results contain quantitative information on medicinal plants diversity documented for the first time in the area. The information was collected through semi-structured interviews, rapid appraisal approach, open ended questionnaire and personal observations. Results were analyzed using quantitative indices of information consent factor (ICF), fidelity level (FL), use value (UV), frequency citation (FC) and relative frequency citation (RFC). In total of 102 plant species belonging to 47 families were reported for the medicinal purposes. Asteraceae was found to be dominant family in terms of species in the area with 11 species. The whole plant and leaves were noted as most frequently used parts (24%). Decoction (31% with 40 species) was the most commonly used preparation method. Highest ICF value (1) was recorded for antidote category. 100% fidelity level was found for four plant species i.e. Achillea welhemsii, Caralluma tuberculata, Citrullus colocynthis, and Seripidium quettense. The highest use value was reported for the Acroptilon repens (0.5) while highest RFC value was calculated for Berberis balochistanica and Citrullus colocynthis (0.18). Highest use report was calculated for Caralluma tuberculata, Citrullus colocynthis, Malva neglecta and Mentha longifolia with five use reports for each. The area is rich in medicinal plants and these plants are still commonly used for medicinal purposes among the people in their daily lives. However, there is a gradual loss of traditional knowledge about these plants in new generation. This study provides basis for the conservation of the local flora, its use as food and medicine. It also provides various socio-economic dimensions associated with the common people. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Medicinal plants, traditional medicine, markets and management in far-west Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunwar, Ripu M; Mahat, Laxmi; Acharya, Ram P; Bussmann, Rainer W

    2013-04-12

    Modern therapeutic medicine is historically based on indigenous therapies and ethnopharmacological uses, which have become recognized tools in the search for new sources of pharmaceuticals. Globalization of herbal medicine along with uncontrolled exploitative practices and lack of concerted conservation efforts, have pushed many of Nepal's medicinal plants to the verge of extinction. Sustainable utilization and management of medicinal plants, based on traditional knowledge, is therefore necessary. After establishing verbal informed consent with participating communities, five field surveys, roughly 20 days in duration, were carried out. In all, 176 schedules were surveyed, and 52 participants were consulted through focus group discussions and informal meetings. Altogether, 24 key informants were surveyed to verify and validate the data. A total of 252 individuals, representing non-timber forest product (NTFP) collectors, cultivators, traders, traditional healers (Baidhya), community members, etc. participated in study. Medicinal plants were free-listed and their vernacular names and folk uses were collected, recorded, and applied to assess agreement among respondents about traditional medicines, markets and management. Within the study area, medicinal herbs were the main ingredients of traditional therapies, and they were considered a main lifeline and frequently were the first choice. About 55% plants were ethnomedicinal, and about 37% of ethnomedicinal plants possessed the highest informant consensus value (0.86-1.00). Use of Cordyceps sinensis as an aphrodisiac, Berberis asiatica for eye problems, Bergenia ciliata for disintegration of calculi, Sapindus mukorossi for dandruff, and Zanthoxylum armatum for toothache were the most frequently mentioned. These species possess potential for pharmacology. Medicinal plants are inseparable from local livelihoods because they have long been collected, consumed, and managed through local customs and knowledge. Management

  7. L’herbari de l’Institut Botànic de Barcelona com una eina per la conservació dels tàxons endèmics i amenaçats de Catalunya

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    Gavioli, L.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The herbarium of the Botanic Institute of Barcelona (BC is the largest collection of plants of Catalonia and the second of Spain due to its volume, and it is representative of the flora of the western Mediterranean region. It includes, apart from the general collection, other historical collections (from 17th to early 20th century. The main objectives of this study were to evaluate if the endemic and threatened taxa of Catalonia are represented in the herbarium. We also provide chronological and geographical information of herborization intensity, as well as altitudinal, chorological, chronological, phenological and over-collection risk new data. We analyzed the general collection and part of informatized historical herbaria (Cadevall, Hieraciotheca Gallica et Hispanica, Institució Catalana d’Història Natural, Salvador, Societat Botànica Barcelonesa and Trèmols [volumes I-XXI]. Specimens collected from Catalonia have been found to represent 82.24% of the 304 endemic and threatened taxa. The areas with more herborization pressure were Ribes Valley, Montserrat, Port Massif, Cardó Mountains, Montseny and Montsec Mountains. The new chorological data provided expands the distribution of Berberis vulgaris L. subsp. seroi O. Bolòs & Vigo and Stachys maritima Gouan. New altitudinal and phenological data are provided for nine and 40 taxa, respectively.

    El herbario del Instituto Botánico de Barcelona (BC es la colección de plantas más importante de Cataluña y la segunda de España y es representativo de la flora de la región mediterránea occidental. Incluye la colección general y otras colecciones históricas (desde el siglo XVII hasta principios del XX. Los objetivos principales de este trabajo han sido evaluar la representatividad de los táxones endémicos y amenazados de Cataluña en el herbario así como aportar información de tipo cronológico y geográfico de intensidad de recolección y

  8. Discovery of new angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors from medicinal plants to treat hypertension using an in vitro assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose of the study Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors plays a critical role in treating hypertension. The purpose of the present investigation was to evaluate ACE inhibition activity of 50 Iranian medicinal plants using an in vitro assay. Methods The ACE activity was evaluated by determining the hydrolysis rate of substrate, hippuryl-L-histidyl-L-leucine (HHL), using reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). Total phenolic content and antioxidant activity were determined by Folin-Ciocalteu colorimetric method and DPPH radical scavenging assay respectively. Results Six extracts revealed > 50% ACE inhibition activity at 330 μg/ml concentration. They were Berberis integerrima Bunge. (Berberidaceae) (88.2 ± 1.7%), Crataegus microphylla C. Koch (Rosaceae) (80.9 ± 1.3%), Nymphaea alba L. (Nymphaeaceae) (66.3 ± 1.2%), Onopordon acanthium L. (Asteraceae) (80.2 ± 2.0%), Quercus infectoria G. Olivier. (Fagaceae) (93.9 ± 2.5%) and Rubus sp. (Rosaceae) (51.3 ± 1.0%). Q. infectoria possessed the highest total phenolic content with 7410 ± 101 mg gallic acid/100 g dry plant. Antioxidant activity of Q. infectoria (IC50 value 1.7 ± 0.03 μg/ml) was more than that of BHT (IC50 value of 10.3 ± 0.15 μg/ml) and Trolox (IC50 value of 3.2 ± 0.06 μg/ml) as the positive controls. Conclusions In this study, we introduced six medicinal plants with ACE inhibition activity. Despite the high ACE inhibition and antioxidant activity of Q. infectoria, due to its tannin content (tannins interfere in ACE activity), another plant, O. acanthium, which also had high ACE inhibition and antioxidant activity, but contained no tannin, could be utilized in further studies for isolation of active compounds. PMID:24359711

  9. An ethnobotanical survey of medicinal plants in western part of central Taurus Mountains: Aladaglar (Nigde - Turkey).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özdemir, Ebru; Alpınar, Kerim

    2015-05-26

    With this study, we aimed to document traditional uses of medicinal plants in the western part of Aladaglar/Nigde. This study was conducted between 2003 and 2005. The research area was in the western part of the Aladaglar mountains. The settlements in Aladaglar (5 towns and 10 villages) were visited during the field work. The plants collected by the help of medicinal plant users. The plants were identified and voucher specimens prepared. These voucher specimens were kept at the Herbarium of Istanbul University Faculty of Pharmacy (ISTE). We collected the information by means of semi-structured interviews with 170 informants (90 men and 80 women). In addition, the relative importance value of the species was determined and the informant consensus factor (FIC) was calculated for the medicinal plants researched in the study. According to the results of the identification, among 126 plants were used by the inhabitants and 110 species belonging to 40 families were used for medicinal purposes. Most of the medicinal plants used in Aladaglar/Nigde belong to the families Lamiaceae (25 species), Asteraceae (16 species), Apiaceae (7 species), Fabaceae (6 species) and Brassicaceae (5 species). The most commonly used plant species were Hypericum perforatumThymus sipyleus var. sipyleus, Rosa canina, Urtica dioica, Malva neglecta, Thymus leucotrichus, Salix alba, Mentha longifolia, Berberis crataegina, Juniperus oxycedrus, Viscum album subsp. abietis, Allium rotundum and Taraxacum stevenii. The most common preparations were infusion and decoction. The traditional medicinal plants have been mostly used for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases (86%), hemorrhoids (79%), urinary diseases (69%), diabetes (68%) and respiratory diseases (61%). The use of traditional medicine was still widespread among the inhabitants of Aladaglar mountains/Nigde region. Due to the lack of medical facilities in the villages of Aladaglar mountains, local people prefer herbal treatment rather than

  10. Whole-plant allocation to storage and defense in juveniles of related evergreen and deciduous shrub species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyka, T P; Karolewski, P; Żytkowiak, R; Chmielarz, P; Oleksyn, J

    2016-05-01

    In evergreen plants, old leaves may contribute photosynthate to initiation of shoot growth in the spring. They might also function as storage sites for carbohydrates and nitrogen (N). We hence hypothesized that whole-plant allocation of carbohydrates and N to storage in stems and roots may be lower in evergreen than in deciduous species. We selected three species pairs consisting of an evergreen and a related deciduous species: Mahonia aquifolium (Pursh) Nutt. and Berberis vulgaris L. (Berberidaceae), Prunus laurocerasus L. and Prunus serotina Ehrh. (Rosaceae), and Viburnum rhytidophyllum Hemsl. and Viburnum lantana L. (Adoxaceae). Seedlings were grown outdoors in pots and harvested on two dates during the growing season for the determination of biomass, carbohydrate and N allocation ratios. Plant size-adjusted pools of nonstructural carbohydrates in stems and roots were lower in the evergreen species of Berberidaceae and Adoxaceae, and the slope of the carbohydrate pool vs plant biomass relationship was lower in the evergreen species of Rosaceae compared with the respective deciduous species, consistent with the leading hypothesis. Pools of N in stems and roots, however, did not vary with leaf habit. In all species, foliage contained more than half of the plant's nonstructural carbohydrate pool and, in late summer, also more than half of the plant's N pool, suggesting that in juvenile individuals of evergreen species, leaves may be a major storage site. Additionally, we hypothesized that concentration of defensive phenolic compounds in leaves should be higher in evergreen than in deciduous species, because the lower carbohydrate pool in stems and roots of the former restricts their capacity for regrowth following herbivory and also because of the need to protect their longer-living foliage. Our results did not support this hypothesis, suggesting that evergreen plants may rely predominantly on structural defenses. In summary, our study indicates that leaf habit has

  11. Exploration of ethno-medicinal knowledge among rural communities of Pearl Valley; Rawalakot, District Poonch Azad Jammu and Kashmir.

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    Humaira Shaheen

    Full Text Available Medicinal plants are the basic source of health care in the Pearl Valley District Poonch, Azad Jammu, and Kashmir. The basic aim of present study was to record information about the use of plants in herbal preparation and quantification of recorded data.The research was conducted with the null hypothesis that there was no differential distribution of knowledge among the communities between genders and among different age groups in the study area and across cultural medicinal uses of the plants are similar. To check these hypotheses information about medicinal plants was collected from 46 laypeople and 18 herbalists by using an open ended and semistructured questionnaire. Different ethnobotanical indices were calculated in order to quantify the knowledge on the medicinal plants reported in the study.Our study recorded 136 species of medicinal plants belonging to 45 families with Asteraceae (14 species as the dominant family of the area. Decoction (26 species, juice and powder (24 species each were most common methods of preparation. Spearman's correlation analysis showed that age and gender had the significant effect on both numbers of mentioned species and different uses. A number of known medicinal plants and the number of different uses (H: 38.51; p < 0.001 differ significantly as indicated by Kruskal-Wallis tests. These results showed that the knowledge about the plant varies among different age groups, which were the first hypothesis of the present study. The highest use values (UVs were reported for Berberis lyceum and Ajuga bracteosa (1.13 each followed by Abies pindrow (1.03. Highest informant consensus factor (ICF values were recorded for digestive system diseases (ICF = 0.90 and muscular and skeletal system diseases (ICF = 0.89. The value of Jaccarad index ranged from 6.11 to 32.97 with an average value of 19.84, percentage of similarity was highest between study area and Pir Lasura National Park (34.62%.High similarity might be due to

  12. A novel berbamine derivative inhibits cell viability and induces apoptosis in cancer stem-like cells of human glioblastoma, via up-regulation of miRNA-4284 and JNK/AP-1 signaling.

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    Fan Yang

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma (GBM is the most common primary brain tumor, accounting for approximately 40% of all central nervous system malignancies. Despite standard treatment consisting of surgical resection, radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy, the prognosis for GBM is poor; with a median survival of 14.6 months. The cancer stem cell or cancer-initiating cell model has provided a new paradigm for understanding development and recurrence of GBM following treatment. Berbamine (BBM is a natural compound derived from the Berberis amurensis plant, and along with its derivatives, has been shown to exhibit antitumor activity in several cancers. Here, we reported that a novel synthetic Berbamine derivative, BBMD3, inhibits cell viability and induces apoptosis of cancer stem-like cells (CSCs in a time- and dose-dependent manner when the CSCs from four GBM patients (PBT003, PBT008, PBT022, and PBT030 were cultured. These CSCs grew in neurospheres and expressed CD133 and nestin as markers. Treatment with BBMD3 destroyed the neurosphere morphology, and led to the induction of apoptosis in the CSCs. Induction of apoptosis in these CSCs is dependent upon activation of caspase-3 and cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP. MicroRNA-4284 (miR-4284 was shown to be over-expressed about 4-fold in the CSCs following BBMD3 treatment. Furthermore, transfection of synthetic anti-sense oligonucleotide against human miR-4284 partially blocked the anticancer effects of BBMD3 on the GBM derived CSCs. BBMD3 also increased phosphorylation of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK/stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK, resulting in an increase expression of phosphorylated c-Jun and total c-Fos; the major components of transcriptional factor AP-1. The JNK-c-Jun/AP-1 signaling pathway plays an important role in the induction of apoptosis in response to UV irradiation and some drug treatments. Targeting glioblastoma stem-like cells with BBMD3 is therefore novel, and may have promise as an

  13. Traditional uses of medicinal plants reported by the indigenous communities and local herbal practitioners of Bajaur Agency, Federally Administrated Tribal Areas, Pakistan.

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    Aziz, Muhammad Abdul; Khan, Amir Hasan; Adnan, Muhammad; Izatullah, Izatullah

    2017-02-23

    In the study area, knowledge related to the traditional uses of medicinal plants is totally in the custody of elder community members and local herbalists. The younger generation is unaware of the traditional knowledge, however with only few exceptions. Therefore, this study was planned with objective to document the medicinal importance of plants, conserve this precious indigenous knowledge, and share it among other communities through published literature. Data was collected through semi-structured interviews from the community members and local herbalists. The reported plants were collected post interviews and later on pressed on herbarium vouchers for reference. Afterwards, the data was analyzed through Use value (UV) and Relative Frequency of Citation (RFC). In total, 79 medicinal plant species were used for the treatment of different ailments in the study region. Out of the total plant species, 28 species were not reported from any other mountainous communities across the country. In this study, the ethno-medicinal value of Opuntia littoralis (Engelm.) Cockerell and Viola indica W.Becker was reported for the first time, which have moderate confidential level in terms of their medicinal uses in the study area. Important medicinal plants of the region with high UV are Berberis lycium Royle (0.94), V. indica (0.90), Isodon rugosus (Wall. ex Benth.) Codd (0.88), Foeniculum vulgare Mill. (0.87), Peganum harmala L (0.86), Solanum virginianum L. (0.85), and Cassia fistula L. (0.79). Medicinal plants with higher RFC values are Calotropis procera (Aiton) Dryand. (0.86), Cannabis sativa L. (0.82), Mentha piperita L. (0.82), Mentha longifolia (L.) Huds. (0.76), Allium sativum L. (0.73), Coriandrum sativum L. (0.73), and F. vulgare (0.72). Traditional knowledge on folk medicines is directly linked to the local culture, faith and perception. This knowledge is gaining high threat of extinction because of its limitation to a small portion of the society in the region

  14. Evaluation and comparison of polyphenols and bioactivities of wild edible fruits of North-West Himalaya, India

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    Himani Singh

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate and compare the polyphenol contents, antioxidant, anti-elastase, anti-collagenase, anti-tyrosinase and anti-inflammatory activities of 13 wild edible fruits [Pyracantha crenulata, Berberis asiatica (B. asiatica, Ficus subincisa (F. subincisa, Morus serrata, Ziziphus nummularia, Leea asiatica (L. asiatica, Dendrobenthamia capitata, Ziziphus mauritiana, Prunus cerasoides, Ampelocissus latifolia (A. latifolia, Vitis jacquemontii, Morus alba and Grewia optiva] of North-West Himalayan Region of India. Methods: Fruits extracts were prepared with 80% aqueous acetone and evaluated for total phenolic contents (TPC and total flavonoid contents (TFC. Free radical scavenging activities [against 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl, 2,2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid, linoleate hydroperoxyl and superoxide radicals], ferric reducing ability, ferrous metal chelating capacity, anti-elastase, anti-collagenase, anti-tyrosinase and anti-inflammatory activities were determined by using various in vitro assays. Results: TPC varied from 58.83 to 4 496.39 mg gallic acid equivalents/100 g fruit weight (FW, being highest in A. latifolia and lowest in F. subincisa. TFC ranged from 108.00 to 1 963.75 mg catechin equivalents/100 g FW, standing highest in L. asiatica and lowest in Prunus cerasoides. A. latifolia and L. asiatica possessed the highest antioxidant activities while B. asiatica and L. asiatica owned uppermost anti-elastase and anti-collagenase activities, respectively. B. asiatica revealed the highest anti-tyrosinase activity and F. subincisa demonstrated the highest antiinflammatory activity. The present study revealed differential contribution of TPC and TFC in various antioxidant activities. However, no obvious relationship was visible between antielastase/anti-collagenase/anti-tyrosinase/anti-inflammatory activities and TPC/TFC, suggesting the role of individual or combination of specific phenolics and flavonoids

  15. Phenacoccinae de Centro y Sudamérica (Hemiptera: Coccoidea: Pseudococcidae: Sistemática y Filogenia Central and South American Phenacoccinae (Hemiptera: Coccoidea: Pseudococcidae: Systematics and Phylogeny

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    María Cristina Granara De Willink

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta un estudio sistemático y cladístico de las especies de Phenacoccus Cockerell neotropicales. Se describen e ilustran 18 especies nuevas: Phenacoccus argentinus Granara de Willink, Ph. berberis Granara de Willink, Ph. chubutensis Granara de Willink, Ph. ornatus Granara de Willink, Ph. persimilis Granara de Willink (Argentina; Ph. erythrinus Granara de Willink (Brasil y Argentina; Ph. peruvianus Granara de Willink (Argentina y Perú; Ph. sisymbriifolium Granara de Willink (Argentina y Uruguay; Ph. chilindrinae Granara de Willink, Ph. cornicirculus Granara de Willink, Ph. ruellia Granara de Willink, Ph. setosus Granara de Willink, Ph. sonoraensis Granara de Willink (México; Ph. hirsutus Granara de Willink (Puerto Rico; Ph. multicerarii Granara de Willink (Venezuela; Ph. sisalanus Granara de Willink (Haití y República Dominicana; Ph. toconaoensis Granara de Willink (Chile, y Ph. uruguayensis Granara de Willink (Uruguay. Todas las especies de Phenacoccus conocidas anteriormente para la región (24 en total son diagnosticadas. También se citan, ilustran y describen Phenacoccus artemisiae Ehrhorn y Ph. graminicola Leonardi, encontradas por primera vez en la Argentina. Se incluyen claves de géneros de Phenacoccinae neotropicales y de las especies de Phenacoccus neotropicales y también una lista de plantas hospederas de los Phenacoccus, que contiene 48 Familias Botánicas y 124 especies. Finalmente se realizó un análisis cladístico de los Phenacoccinae neotropicales, que incluye además de Phenacoccus los siguientes géneros: Brasiliputo Williams & Granara de Willink, Brevennia Goux, Chileputo Williams & Granara de Willink, Heliococcus Sulc, Heterococcus Ferris, Mammicoccus Balachowsky, Peliococcus Borchsenius, Pellizzaricoccus Kozár. Una matriz de 60 taxones (que incluye 10 géneros y 111 caracteres morfológicos, fue analizada mediante el criterio de parsimonia con el género Puto Signoret como taxón raíz. Los resultados

  16. POSSIBILITY FOR APPLICATION OF LIQUEFIED GASES FOR PURIFICATION OF BARBERRY ALKALOIDS

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    Demyanenko D.V.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Biologically active substances (BAS of barberry roots represented by alkaloids of isoquinoline group are perspective substances for development of preparations with multiple pharmacological activities. However, now manufacture of them in Ukraine is stopped. One of the reasons of this is out-of-date production technologies of alkaloids involving use of toxic and/or flammable solvents. In the article possibility for application of liquefied gases in technology of obtaining of alkaloids from barberry roots has been studied. Materials and methods. Initial raw herb drug were barberry (Berberis vulgaris roots harvested in spring on the territory of Southern Ukraine. Their moisture content was 11%, comminuting degree was 0,5-1,4 mm. At the first stage purification of raw herb drug from lipophilic impurities (defatting was made with use of some liquefied gases: tetrafluoroethane, isobutane, difluorochloromethane and difluoromethane. Extraction of the alkaloid sum was made with difluoromethane mixed with various quantities of liquid ammonia or diethylamine as alkaline agent. Crude extracts were exposed to two-level liquefied-gas purification. At first the alkaloid bases were transformed into saline forms with aqueous solutions of acids and purified from ballast impurities with liquefied freon-22. Then alkaloid salts were reextracted from aqueous phase in the base form with liquefied mixture of difluoromethane and ammonia. Mixing of liquid phases was provided by creation of alternate gradients of temperatures and, as consequence, pressures between separators feeding alternately cool water into jacket of one of them, and warm water – into jacket of another one. Quantity of lipophilic ballast impurities and also weight of extractives were determined gravimetrically. Quantitative analysis of the alkaloid sum was made by titrimetric method after sedimentation of alkaloids with volumetric solution of phosphomolybdic acid. Results and discussion

  17. A ten-year audit of traditional Chinese medicine and other natural product research published in the Chinese Medical Journal (2000-2009)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Richard A. Collins

    2011-01-01

    Background Clinical research encompasses a wide variety of disciplines. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and natural product research have made great contributions to preventing and treating illness. The number and content of original research reports evaluating TCM and natural products have not previously been described. Information in this area will identify areas of relative strength and weakness in terms of knowledge gaps with respect to clinical conditions and natural product remedies.Methods Original research reports (i.e. original articles, brief reports, and research letters) published in the Chinese Medical Journal (CMJ) from January 2000 to December 2009 evaluating TCM and other natural products were reviewed.The United Kingdom Clinical Research Collaboration (UK-CRC) Health Research Classification System was used to analyze the type of health research conducted. Further analysis on the major illnesses addressed and the major herbal components utilized was conducted.Results One hundred and seventeen original research reports involving TCM or other natural products were identified,comprising 3.82% of the CMJ output in the period covered by this study. Of the different materia medica described in these reports, 74.4% were derived exclusively from plant material, 10.3% from animals, 3.4% from fungi, 1.7% from minerals, and 10.3% were of mixed (plant / animal / fungal / mineral) composition. Twelve herbs were investigated exclusively or were constituents of 66/87 (75.9%) of the plant-based materia medica investigated. Panax ginseng was the most commonly investigated herb or constituent (14/87, 16.1%), followed by Astragalus membranaceus (9/87, 10.3%),Coptis chinensis/Berberis spp. (7/87, 8.0%) and Rheum spp. (7/87, 8.0%). Four UK-CRC health categories accounted for the majority of TCM and other natural product research (cancer, 20.9%; cardiovascular, 19.2%; oral/gastrointestinal,9.8%; and inflammatory/immune, 9.0%). The most common research activity was

  18. The endemic medicinal plants of Northern Balochistan, Pakistan and their uses in traditional medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibi, Tahira; Ahmad, Mushtaq; Mohammad Tareen, Niaz; Jabeen, Rukhsana; Sultana, Shazia; Zafar, Muhammad; Zain-ul-Abidin, Sheikh

    2015-09-15

    The highlands of Northern Balochistan are the hot spots of medicinal and endemic plant in Pakistan. These plants are still commonly used for medicinal purposes by local people in their daily lives. This study first documented the information about the medicinal uses of endemic species of Balochistan-province Pakistan. A survey was performed using open ended questionnaires, free listening and personal observations with 152 informants (54% female, 46% male). In addition, the use value (MUV), use report (UR), fidelity level (FL), frequency citation (FC), relative frequency citation (RFC), family importance value (FIV) of species were determined and the informant consensus factor (ICF) was calculated for the medicinal plants included in the study. A total of 24 endemic plants belonging to 19 genera and 14 families were used by the local inhabitants to treat 12 categories of various diseases. The most common families of endemic plant species as depicted by its number of species (6 species) and FIV (9.9) was Fabaceae as the dominant family. The endemic plant species comprised perennial herbs (30%), annual herbs (25%), shrubs (29%) and under shrubs (16% each), no endemic tree species was reported in the study area. The highest number of species were used in the treatment of gastrointestinal diseases (12 species). The main route of administration is oral injection (62%) while the most frequently used form of external administration of herbal medicine was paste (5.4%) and the most commonly applied methods of preparation are powder (48.2%). Highest use report were calculated for Allium baluchistanicum and Viola makranica, (8 UR each), and least use report were calculated for two species Heliotropium remotiflorum and Tetracme stocksii (1 UR for each). Use values of the recorded plant species have been calculated which showed a highest use value of (0.73) for A. baluchistanicum and (0.56) for Berberis baluchistanica while the lowest UVs were attained for T. stocksii (0

  19. Descriptive study of plant resources in the context of the ethnomedicinal relevance of indigenous flora: A case study from Toli Peer National Park, Azad Jammu and Kashmir, Pakistan.

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    Muhammad Shoaib Amjad

    hepatobiliary complaints (0.90. Berberis lycium Ajuga bracteosa, Prunella vulgaris, Adiantum capillus-veneris, Desmodium polycarpum, Pinus roxburgii, Albizia lebbeck, Cedrella serrata, Rosa brunonii, Punica granatum, Jasminum mesnyi and Zanthoxylum armatum were the most valuable plants with the highest UV, RFC and relative importance values. The Pearson correlation coefficient between UV and RFC (0.881 reflects a significant positive correlation between the use value and relative frequency of citation. The coefficient of determination indicated that 77% of the variability in UV could be explained in terms of RFC.Systematic documentation of the medicinal plants in the Toli Peer National Park shows that the area is rich in plants with ethnomedicinal value and that the inhabitants of the area have significant knowledge about the use of such plants with herbal drugs commonly used to cure infirmities. The results of this study indicate that carrying out subsequent pharmacological and phytochemical investigations in this part of Pakistan could lead to new drug discoveries.

  20. Descriptive study of plant resources in the context of the ethnomedicinal relevance of indigenous flora: A case study from Toli Peer National Park, Azad Jammu and Kashmir, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amjad, Muhammad Shoaib; Qaeem, Mirza Faisal; Ahmad, Israr; Khan, Sami Ullah; Chaudhari, Sunbal Khalil; Zahid Malik, Nafeesa; Shaheen, Humaira; Khan, Arshad Mehmood

    2017-01-01

    hepatobiliary complaints (0.90). Berberis lycium Ajuga bracteosa, Prunella vulgaris, Adiantum capillus-veneris, Desmodium polycarpum, Pinus roxburgii, Albizia lebbeck, Cedrella serrata, Rosa brunonii, Punica granatum, Jasminum mesnyi and Zanthoxylum armatum were the most valuable plants with the highest UV, RFC and relative importance values. The Pearson correlation coefficient between UV and RFC (0.881) reflects a significant positive correlation between the use value and relative frequency of citation. The coefficient of determination indicated that 77% of the variability in UV could be explained in terms of RFC. Systematic documentation of the medicinal plants in the Toli Peer National Park shows that the area is rich in plants with ethnomedicinal value and that the inhabitants of the area have significant knowledge about the use of such plants with herbal drugs commonly used to cure infirmities. The results of this study indicate that carrying out subsequent pharmacological and phytochemical investigations in this part of Pakistan could lead to new drug discoveries.

  1. Seyahatnamelerde Hadîs Kültürü: İbn Battûta Örneği Hadith Culture in Travelogues: The Case of Ibn Battuta

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    Yunus MACİT

    2012-09-01

    önemin tarihi, coğrafi ve sosyo-kültürel özelliklerini günümüze ulaştırması bakımından önemli işlevlere sahiptirler. Öte yandan, seyahat ya da seyyahlık, İslam kültüründe Müslümanların bilgi ve deneyimlerini genişletmeleri açından iyi bir gelenek olarak benimsenmiştir. Bu yüzden İslam dünyasında meşhur seyyahlar yetişmiştir. Bilindiği gibi Müslüman seyyahların en meşhuru, Şemseddin (1304–1368 olarak da bilinen İbn Battûta’dır. O, Berberi-Faslı Müslüman bir seyyahtır ve gezdiği yerleri seyahatnamesinde anlatmaktadır. İbn Battuta otuz yıllık bir süre içinde, İslam dünyasının pek çok yerini olduğu kadar, Müslüman olmayan yerleri de gezmiş, Kuzey Afrika, Batı Afrika, Güney Avrupa, Doğu Avrupa, Güney Asya, Orta Asya ve Çin’e değin pek çok yeri gezmiştir. Bu gezileriyle, yakın-çağdaşı Morco Polo’nun üç katı yere seyahat ederek onu geçmiştir. Bu yüzden İbn Battuta, tüm zamanların en büyük seyyahı olarak kabul edilir. Dindar bir kişi olarak İbn Battûta, seyahatleri boyunca, gittiği yerlerin dini özelliklerini ve dini grupları öğrenmeye büyük özen göstermiş; din adamları ve dini gruplarla sıkı ilişkiler kurmuş, ayrıca dini otoriteleri ziyaret ederek onlardan bilgiler aktarmıştır. Bunlarla da yetinmeyen İbn Battûta, gezdiği yerler hakkında Hz. Peygamber’den rivayet edilen hadisler var ise onları da zikretmiştir. Bu nedenle onun seyahatnamesi, dönemindeki ortaçağ İslam coğrafyasını, sosyo-kültürel ve ekonomik özelliklerini olduğu kadar, dönemin Müslümanlarının yaşamları, uygarlık düzeyleri ve Hz. Muhammed’in mekânlara, kişilere ve Müslüman yaşamına ilişkin olarak söylediği sözleri anlamamıza da katkılar sağlayacak niteliktedir. Şu halde, İbn Battuta’nın çalışmaları, hadis ve sünnet açısından da önemli bir kaynak durumundadır.