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Sample records for benzoic acid

  1. 21 CFR 184.1021 - Benzoic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Benzoic acid. 184.1021 Section 184.1021 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1021 Benzoic acid. (a) Benzoic acid is the chemical benzenecarboxylic acid (C7H6O2), occurring in nature in free and combined forms. Among the foods in which benzoic acid occurs...

  2. 21 CFR 582.3021 - Benzoic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Benzoic acid. 582.3021 Section 582.3021 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... Benzoic acid. (a) Product. Benzoic acid. (b) Tolerance. This substance is generally recognized as safe for...

  3. Benzoic acid degradation of polyacrylonitrile fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varma, D. S.; Needles, H. L.; Cagliostro, D. E.

    1981-01-01

    The reactions of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) fibers in the presence of benzoic acid have been studied. Polyacrylonitrile fibers oxidize more readily in the presence of benzoic acid than in air at temperatures in the range of 170 C. The product decreased in solubility with extent of reaction. Gel permeation chromatography of the soluble fraction showed change in polydispersity. The insoluble product exhibited differences in weight loss as a function of decomposition temperature compared to PAN fibers. Infrared analyses of the fiber product showed absorption peaks similar to air-oxidized PAN. High-energy photoelectron spectral analysis showed a carbon-rich surface which contained oxygen and nitrogen. An air oxidized sample of fiber contained more oxygen at the surface than a fiber treated first with benzoic acid and then air oxidized.

  4. Estimated intake of benzoic and sorbic acids in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Torben; Christensen, Tue; Larsen, I. K.

    2010-01-01

    for marmalade show some variation. Most foods in the categories soft drinks, dressings, fat-based salads, pickled herrings, and marmalade contain benzoic and sorbic acid, and sliced bread also contains in some cases sorbic acid. The median daily intake and intake distribution of benzoic and sorbic acids were......-1 for benzoic and sorbic acid, respectively. However, the 90th percentile based on the average of the samples with a content of benzoic acid is higher than the acceptable daily intake for both men and women, with the highest value of 16 mg kg-1 bw day-1 for both boys and girls in the 4-6-year...... to benzoic acid intake. The sorbic acid intake based on the average of all samples is well below the acceptable daily intake. However, for the intake based on the average of samples with content, the 95th percentile exceeds the acceptable daily intake. This is caused by the dominating contribution...

  5. Synthesis and anticancer activity of new isatin-benzoic acid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A series of new isatin-benzoic acid conjugates (9a - n) were synthesized via conjugation of isatin (3a) and its derivatives (3b - d, 4, 5 and 6) with 4-amino-5 chloro-2-ethoxybenzoic acid or 4-amino-5-(ethylsulfonyl)-2- methoxybenzoic acid by using chloroacetyl chloride as a bifunctional linker. Compounds 3a - d were ...

  6. Benzoic acid intermediates in the anaerobic biodegradation of phenols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Londry, K.L.; Fedorak, P.M

    1992-01-01

    Phenols have many environmental sources, including plants producing simple phenols to the complex phenolic polymers such as lignins. Phenols from industrial processes such as petroleum refining, coal conversion, and wood preservation are of greater concern because of their potential toxicity and recalcitrance. A review is presented describing the sources and types of phenols released into the environment, the role of various electron acceptors in environmental situations, and the common occurrence of benzoic acid intermediates in the biotransformations of lignin-derived aromatic compounds. The anaerobic metabolism of phenol and the three cresol isomers is addressed in detail to illustrate that the formation of benzoic acid is a common feature in phenol biodegradation. Finally, the known pathways for benzoic acid metabolism under anaerobic conditions are reviewed. 101 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. 40 CFR 721.10098 - Disubstituted benzoic acid, alkali metal salt (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Disubstituted benzoic acid, alkali... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10098 Disubstituted benzoic acid, alkali metal salt... identified generically as disubstituted benzoic acid, alkali metal salt (PMN P-03-643) is subject to...

  8. Mn (II) complexes with bipyridine, phenanthroline and benzoic acid ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mn(II) complexes with bipyridine, phenanthroline and benzoic acid: Biological and catalase-like activity. Ibrahim Kani Özlem Atlier Kiymet Güven. Regular ... The in vitro antimicrobial activities of all the complexes were also tested against seven bacterial strains by microdilution tests. All the bacterial isolates demonstrated ...

  9. Photoelectrocatalytic degradation of benzoic acid using immobilized tungsten trioxide photocatalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohite, S.V.; Ganbavle, V.V.; Patil, V.V.; Rajpure, K.Y., E-mail: rajpure@yahoo.com

    2016-11-01

    The thin films of WO{sub 3} were deposited with different solution quantities using chemical spray pyrolysis technique. The WO{sub 3} film thickness effect on the photoelectrochemical, structural, morphological and optical properties is studied. Polycrystalline, monoclinic WO{sub 3} films possess photoelectrochemical performance having onset potentials around +0.3 V/SCE in 0.01 M HClO{sub 4}. The maximum photocurrent density (I{sub ph} = 635 μA/cm{sup 2}) is observed for the film deposited with 75 ml solution quantity. The FE-SEM image shows compact structure with petals like morphology. The estimated indirect band gap of WO{sub 3} films lies in the range of 2.60–2.65 eV. The photoelectrocatalytic degradation of benzoic acid is studied using WO{sub 3} photoelectrode under UV light illumination and 57 ± 3% removal of benzoic acid is achieved. The mineralization of benzoic acid in aqueous solution has been studied by measuring COD values. - Highlights: • The photoactivity of sprayed tungsten trioxide (WO{sub 3}) thin film. • Structural analysis of WO{sub 3} thin films. • Photoelectrocatalytic and photocatalytic degradation of benzoic acid. • Reaction kinetics and mineralization of pollutants by COD.

  10. benzoic acid Schiff base and evaluation as corrosion

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    ABSTRACT: The synthesis of 4-[(E)-(-2,5- dimethoxybenzylidene)amino] benzoic acid. Schiff base, SBDAB was carried out inorder to determine its inhibitory efficiency at higher temperature using weight loss and gasometric techniques. The results showed that the inhibition efficiency of the studied Schiff base increased with ...

  11. A Direct, Biomass-Based Synthesis of Benzoic Acid: Formic Acid-Mediated Deoxygenation of the Glucose-Derived Materials Quinic Acid and Shikimic Acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arceo, Elena; Ellman, Jonathan; Bergman, Robert

    2010-05-03

    An alternative biomass-based route to benzoic acid from the renewable starting materials quinic acid and shikimic acid is described. Benzoic acid is obtained selectively using a highly efficient, one-step formic acid-mediated deoxygenation method.

  12. Thermal Decomposition Kinetics of Labile Chromium Complex with Benzoic Acid

    OpenAIRE

    Mishra, M. K.; Misra, N. M.

    2011-01-01

    Complex [CrO2 (C7H5O2) C2H5OH) (H2O)2] was prepared by using benzoic acid. Its spectral characterization was done by using Elemental analysis (C and H), Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP - OES), Ultraviolet - visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and Fast Atomic Bombardment (FAB) Mass spectrometry. Whereas thermal decomposition was investigated by differential scanning calorimetric (DSC). The low value of activation energy of...

  13. ATP requirements for benzoic acid tolerance in Zygosaccharomyces bailii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyva, J S; Peinado, J M

    2005-01-01

    To calculate the energetic requirements for benzoic acid tolerance in Zygosaccharomyces bailii in chemostat experiments. A 5.6-l stirred-tank chemostat was used. The yield of ATP (Y(ATP)) was calculated under nitrogen atmosphere, assuming equimolar ATP and ethanol production. Under these conditions Y(ATP), equal to 20 g mol(-1) of ATP, was not affected by the acid, whereas the maintenance coefficient (m(ATP)) increased from 1.0 mmol of ATP g(-1) h(-1) in the absence of the acid to 4.8 in the presence of 0.67 mmol l(-1) undissociated benzoic acid. These ATP requirements were similar to those found in Saccharomyces cerevisiae with other weak acids. No significant differences have been found in the energy expended to cope with the acid between sensitive and tolerant species. Therefore, the main difference between tolerant and sensitive species could rely on cellular features that would not need extra energy in terms of ATP. The potential mechanisms involved in the tolerance to weak acids in yeasts have been extensively studied but their actual relevance has not been assessed. Our results suggest that future efforts should concentrate on nonexpending energy features as membrane permeability and metabolic tolerance in the cytoplasm.

  14. 3-[4-(Acetamidobenzenesulfonamido]benzoic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Shafiq

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, C15H14N2O5S, the dihedral angle between the aromatic rings is 63.20 (11 Å. The crystal structure displays classical intermolecular O—H...O hydrogen bonding typical for carboxylic acids, forming centrosymmetric dimers. These dimers are further connected by N—H...O and C—H...O hydrogen bonds to form an extended network.

  15. Thermal Decomposition Kinetics of Labile Chromium Complex with Benzoic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. K. Mishra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Complex [CrO2 (C7H5O2 C2H5OH (H2O2] was prepared by using benzoic acid. Its spectral characterization was done by using Elemental analysis (C and H, Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP - OES, Ultraviolet - visible (UV-Vis spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy and Fast Atomic Bombardment (FAB Mass spectrometry. Whereas thermal decomposition was investigated by differential scanning calorimetric (DSC. The low value of activation energy of exothermic change indicated lability of complex.

  16. Effects of benzoic acid and cadmium toxicity on wheat seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavita Yadav

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Benzoic acid (BA and Cd exhibit cumulative effects on plants due to their accumulation in the soil. The present study reports the effects of BA an allelochemical, Cd and their combinations on seed germination, seedling growth, biochemical parameters, and response of antioxidant enzymes in Triticum aestivum L. The experiment was conducted in sand supplemented with Hoagland nutrient solution. Benzoic acid was applied at concentrations of 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 mM with or without Cd (7 mg L-1 to observe effects of allelochemical and Cd alone and in combination on wheat. Both stresses exhibited inhibitory effect on growth and metabolism of wheat seedlings. The allelochemical in single and combined treatments with Cd decreased seedling growth as compared to Cd stress. The two stresses significantly enhanced malondialdehyde content of wheat seedlings. The activity of other antioxidant enzymes, viz. superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, ascorbate peroxidase (APX, and guaiacol peroxidase (POX were also recorded. SOD increased in seedlings under the two stresses. CAT more prominently ameliorates the toxic effects of H2O2 as compared with APX and POX and protected wheat seedlings from oxidative stress. Allelochemical buttressed the toxic effect of Cd on wheat seedlings.

  17. An Optical Test Strip for the Detection of Benzoic Acid in Food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatimah Abu Bakar

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Fabrication of a test strip for detection of benzoic acid was successfully implemented by immobilizing tyrosinase, phenol and 3-methyl-2-benzothiazolinone hydrazone (MBTH onto filter paper using polystyrene as polymeric support. The sensing scheme was based on the decreasing intensity of the maroon colour of the test strip when introduced into benzoic acid solution. The test strip was characterized using optical fiber reflectance and has maximum reflectance at 375 nm. It has shown a highly reproducible measurement of benzoic acid with a calculated RSD of 0.47% (n = 10. The detection was optimized at pH 7. A linear response of the biosensor was obtained in 100 to 700 ppm of benzoic acid with a detection limit (LOD of 73.6 ppm. At 1:1 ratio of benzoic acid to interfering substances, the main interfering substance is boric acid. The kinetic analyses show that, the inhibition of benzoic is competitive inhibitor and the inhibition constant (Ki is 52.9 ppm. The activity of immobilized tyrosinase, phenol, and MBTH in the test strip was fairly sustained during 20 days when stored at 3 °C. The developed test strip was used for detection of benzoic acid in food samples and was observed to have comparable results to the HPLC method, hence the developed test strip can be used as an alternative to HPLC in detecting benzoic acid in food products.

  18. Pd(II)-catalysed meta-C–H functionalizations of benzoic acid derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shangda; Cai, Lei; Ji, Huafang; Yang, Long; Li, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Benzoic acids are highly important structural motifs in drug molecules and natural products. Selective C–H bond functionalization of benzoic acids will provide synthetically useful tools for step-economical organic synthesis. Although direct ortho-C–H functionalizations of benzoic acids or their derivatives have been intensely studied, the ability to activate meta-C–H bond of benzoic acids or their derivatives in a general manner via transition-metal catalysis has been largely unsuccessful. Although chelation-assisted meta-C–H functionalization of electron-rich arenes was reported, chelation-assisted meta-C–H activation of electron-poor arenes such as benzoic acid derivatives remains a formidable challenge. Herein, we report a general protocol for meta-C–H olefination of benzoic acid derivatives using a nitrile-based sulfonamide template. A broad range of benzoic acid derivatives are meta-selectively olefinated using molecular oxygen as the terminal oxidant. The meta-C–H acetoxylation, product of which is further transformed at the meta-position, is also reported. PMID:26813919

  19. Effect of benzoic acid supplementation on acid-base status and mineralmetabolism in catheterized growing pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Jan Værum; Fernández, José Adalberto; Sørensen, Kristina Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    Benzoic acid (BA) in diets for growing pigs results in urinary acidification and reduced ammonia emission. The objective was to study the impact of BA supplementation on the acid-base status and mineral metabolism in pigs. Eight female 50-kg pigs, fitted with a catheter in the abdominal aorta, were...

  20. Caldensinic acid, a benzoic acid derivative and others compounds from Piper carniconnectivum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, Harley da Silva; Souza, Maria de Fatima Vanderlei de; Chaves, Maria Celia de Oliveira, E-mail: cchaves@ltf.ufpb.b [Universidade Federal da Paraiba (UFPB), Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil). Lab. de Tecnologia Farmaceutica

    2010-07-01

    A benzoic acid derivative - caldensinic acid, E-phythyl hexadecanoate, {beta}-sitosterol and stigmasterol mixture and phaeophytin a were isolated from the aerial parts of Piper carniconnectivum. The structures of these compounds were established unambiguously by IR, MS, 1D and 2D NMR analysis. (author)

  1. Differential changes in taste perception induced by benzoic acid prickling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero-Losada, M E

    2003-03-01

    Benzoic acid (Bz) is a prickling compound used to preserve foods. However, its effects on taste are unknown. This work examines Bz-taste interaction using psychophysical methods [magnitude estimation (ME) and paired comparison (PC)] to measure taste intensity in aqueous solutions of pure tastants (T) and their respective mixtures with 10 mM Bz (Mix). Prototypical tastants induced basic taste qualities (mM): sucrose [90-1440, sweetness (Sw)], citric acid [1-64, sourness (So)], NaCl [15-960, saltiness (Sa)], quinine [0.01-0.64, bitterness (Bitt)], KCl (12.5-400, Sa and Bitt). MEs were analysed using Steven's and Beidler's equations. Bz increased Sw (all concentrations) and ionic tastes (low concentrations) and Bz effects were reduced by concentration increase according with quality and tastant Bz reduced Bitt(Quinine) (high concentrations). Bz reduced taste slopes (percentage decrease): Sw 45% (PT(intensity)' answers/total answers): Sw 79-69% (90-1440 mM sucrose), So 75% (1 mM citric acid) and 71% (2 mM citric acid), Sa 75-71% (15-120 mM NaCl). Negative concentration dependence of taste increases by Bz suggests different levels of interaction. Biophysical and neurophysiological changes are discussed in relation with Bz properties and mechanism of interaction with taste.

  2. The Ability of Benzoic Acid to Reduce Cr(VI Heavy Metal Content in Aqueous Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anugrah Windy Mustikarini

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Chromium (VI is an ionic heavy metal which has to be handled properly when dissolved in water due to its toxicity, corosive, carsinogenic activity.. According to the State Minister for Population and Environment’s regulation, the quality standards of waste water, which is allowed to be discharge on surface water contains Cr(VI is 0.05-1 mg/L. This research used benzoic acid which is a kind of organic acid to reduce Cr(VI content in water. Benzoic acid has an active carboxyl group which interact this metal. This paper, the elimination of Cr(VI using benzoic acid is undertaken through pH adjustment by regulating with phosphoric acid. The result showed the best condition to reducing Cr(VI content 41.99% when 400 ppm of benzoic acid and pH 7 was applied, respectively.

  3. Numerical simulation of reactive extraction of benzoic acid from wastewater via membrane contactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghadiri, Mehdi; Shirazian, Saeed

    2017-04-01

    Membrane-based non-dispersive solvent extraction is used in many chemical processes due to its significant benefits such as straightforward scale-up and low energy consumption. A mechanistic model was developed to predict recovery of benzoic acid (BA) from wastewater using membrane contactors. Model equations were derived for benzoic acid transport in the membrane module, and solved using FEM. The model findings were compared with experimental results, and an average deviation of 4% was observed between experimental and simulation results. Simulations showed that change in organic phase flowrate and initial concentration of BA does not have considerable effect on the removal efficiency of benzoic acid. In addition, increasing feed flowrate leads to the enhancement of convective mass transfer flux in the tube side of membrane contactor which decreases removal efficiency of benzoic acid.

  4. Expanded solubility parameter approach. I: Naphthalene and benzoic acid in individual solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beerbower, A; Wu, P L; Martin, A

    1984-02-01

    An expanded solubility parameter system was tested in conjunction with the extended Hansen solubility approach and the UNIFAC method to calculate the solubilities of naphthalene and benzoic acid in polar and nonpolar solvents. The expanded parameter system is characterized by delta d for the dispersion force, delta p for dipolar forces, a basic or electron-donor parameter, delta b, and an acidic or electron-acceptor parameter delta a. The correlation between the calculated and observed solubilities of benzoic acid was increased by use of the four-parameter system. An indicator variable was required to bring the solubilities into line in strongly dipolar solvents such as N,N-dimethylformamide. For naphthalene, use of the four-parameter approach proved not to be an improvement over the three-parameter extended Hansen solubility approach. The UNIFAC method was not successful in calculating solubilities of benzoic acid in the 40 polar and nonpolar solvents. A triangular plot of the three Hansen parameters for benzoic acid, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, and methyl p-hydroxybenzoate illustrated the contributions of dispersion, dipolar, and Lewis acid-base (hydrogen bonding) interaction forces among the three benzoic acid compounds and the various classes of solvents. A multiple regression procedure for calculating the four partial solubility parameters of drug solutes was developed.

  5. Catalytic Ring Hydrogenation of Benzoic Acid with Supported Transition Metal Catalysts in scCO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengyu Zhao

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The ring hydrogenation of benzoic acid to cyclohexanecarboxylic acid overcharcoal-supported transition metal catalysts in supercritical CO2 medium has been studiedin the present work. The cyclohexanecarboxylic acid can be produced efficiently insupercritical CO2 at the low reaction temperature of 323 K. The presence of CO2 increasesthe reaction rate and several parameters have been discussed.

  6. Solubilities of benzoic acid in binary (benzyl alcohol + benzaldehyde) solvent mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Hui; Wang, Qinbo; Xiong, Zhenhua; Chen, Chuxiong; Shen, Binwei

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Solubilities of benzoic acid in (benzyl alcohol + benzaldehyde) mixtures were measured at 1 atm. • The experimental temperature ranges at (298.35 to 355.65) K. • Effects of benzyl alcohol mass concentration at (0.00 to 1.00) on the solubilities of benzoic acid were studied. • The experimental data were correlated with NRTL model. • Thermodynamic functions of dissolution of benzoic acid in (benzyl alcohol + benzaldehyde) mixtures were discussed. - Abstract: The solubility of benzoic acid in binary (benzyl alcohol + benzaldehyde) solvent mixtures was measured at temperature from (298.35 to 355.65) K and atmospheric pressure. The measured solubility increases with the increasing temperature at constant solvent composition. The effects of mass fraction benzaldehyde in the solvent mixtures at (0.0 to 1.00) on the solubility were studied. The measured solubility decreases with the increasing mass fraction of benzaldehyde. The experimental results were correlated with the non-random two-liquid (NRTL) equations, and good agreement between the correlated and the experimental values was obtained. Thermodynamic functions for the solution of benzoic acid in binary (benzyl alcohol + benzaldehyde) solvent mixtures were calculated with the van’t Hoff plot. The apparent dissolution Gibbs free energy change was also calculated

  7. Preliminary Study on Benzoic Acid Adsorption from Crude Active Coals and Bentonite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbes Boucheta

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We studied the adsorption of pollutant benzoic acid by the modified bentonite of Maghnia (west of Algeria, and coal (Coal from the mines, southwest of Algeria, Bechar area under three forms, crude and activated. Kinetic data show that the balance of bentonite (as amended adsorbs organic acids better than activated and raw coal. Indeed, the intercalation of bentonite with benzoic acid causes an improvement in the texture of porous material, which allows its use in the adsorption of organic compounds. The adsorption isotherms (Langmuir and Freundlich indicate that the adsorption of benzoic acid by the coal and bentonite yielded results favorably. The results obtained showed the practical value of using the activated coal and bentonite (as amended in the field of remediation of water contaminated with organic pollutants

  8. Placental passage of benzoic acid, caffeine, and glyphosate in an ex vivo human perfusion system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mose, Tina; Kjaerstad, Mia Birkhoej; Mathiesen, Line

    2008-01-01

    group of compounds. Benzoic acid, caffeine, and glyphosate were chosen as model compounds because they are small molecules with large differences in physiochemical properties. Caffeine crossed the placenta by passive diffusion. The initial transfer rate of benzoic acid was more limited in the first part...... of the perfusion compared to caffeine, but reached the same steady-state level by the end of perfusion. The transfer of glyphosate was restricted throughout perfusion, with a lower permeation rate, and only around 15% glyphosate in maternal circulation crossed to the fetal circulation during the study period....

  9. EXTRACTION AND SORPTION BENZOIC ACID FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS OF POLYMERS BASED ON N-VINYLAMIDES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Savvina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The widespread use of aromatic acids (benzoic acid, salicylic as preservatives necessitates their qualitative and quantitative determination in food. Effective and common way to separation and concentration of aromatic acids liquid extraction. Biphasic system of water-soluble polymers based on (poly-N-vinyl pyrrolidone, and poly-N-vinylcaprolactam satisfy the requirements of the extraction system. When sorption concentration improved definition of the metrological characteristics, comply with the requirements for sensitivity and selectivity definition appears possible, use of inexpensive and readily available analytical equipment. When studying the adsorption of benzoic acid used as a sorbent crosslinked polymer based on N-vinyl pyrrolidone, obtained by radical polymerisation of a functional monomer and crosslinker. In the extraction of benzoic acid to maximize the allocation of water and the organic phase of the polymer used salt solutions with concentrations close to saturation. Regardless of the nature of the anion salt is used as salting-out agent, aromatic acids sorption increases with the size of the cations. In the experiment the maximum recovery rate (80% benzoic acid obtained in the PVP (0.2 weight%. Ammonium sulphate. The dependence stepepni benzoic acid extraction from time sorption sorbent mass and the pH of the aqueous phase. To establish equilibrium in the system, for 20 minutes. The dependence of the degree of extraction of the acid pH indicates that the acid is extracted into the molecular form. The maximum adsorption is reached at pH 3,5, with its efficiency decreases symbatically reduce the amount of undissociated acid molecules in solution.

  10. Energetic and metabolic transient response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to benzoic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kresnowati, M T A P; van Winden, W A; van Gulik, W M; Heijnen, J J

    2008-11-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is known to be able to adapt to the presence of the commonly used food preservative benzoic acid with a large energy expenditure. Some mechanisms for the adaptation process have been suggested, but its quantitative energetic and metabolic aspects have rarely been discussed. This study discusses use of the stimulus response approach to quantitatively study the energetic and metabolic aspects of the transient adaptation of S. cerevisiae to a shift in benzoic acid concentration, from 0 to 0.8 mM. The information obtained also serves as the basis for further utilization of benzoic acid as a tool for targeted perturbation of the energy system, which is important in studying the kinetics and regulation of central carbon metabolism in S. cerevisiae. Using this experimental set-up, we found significant fast-transient (consumption and CO(2) production rates, of approximately 50%, which reflect a high energy requirement for the adaptation process. We also found that with a longer exposure time to benzoic acid, S. cerevisiae decreases the cell membrane permeability for this weak acid by a factor of 10 and decreases the cell size to approximately 80% of the initial value. The intracellular metabolite profile in the new steady-state indicates increases in the glycolytic and tricarboxylic acid cycle fluxes, which are in agreement with the observed increases in specific glucose and O(2) uptake rates.

  11. Synthesis of metabolites of the insecticide Deltamethrine: 3-phenoxy (carboxyl-14C) benzoic acids and 3-phenoxy (hydroxymethyl-14C) benzyl alcohols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Do-Cao-Thang; Nguyen-Hoang-Nam; Hoellinger, H.; Pichat, L.; CEA Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette

    1985-01-01

    Procedures are described for the synthesis of the following metabolites of Deltamethrin, the pyrethroid insecticide: 3-phenoxy (carboxyl- 14 C) benzoic acid, 3-(4'-hydroxyphenoxy) (carboxyl- 14 C) benzoic acid, 3-(2'-hydroxyphenoxy) (carboxyl- 14 C) benzoic acid and the corresponding 3-phenoxybenzyl alcohols, specific activity = 47-57 mCi/mmol. (author)

  12. 4-[(2-Hydroxy-4-pentadecyl-benzylidene-amino]-benzoic Acid Methyl Ester

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gadada Naganagowda

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A new Schiff base, 4-[(2-hydroxy-4-pentadecyl-benzylidene-amino]-benzoic acid methyl ester was synthesized and its UV, IR, 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR and ESI-MS spectroscopic data are presented.

  13. Pharmacological Studies of p, N-(3, 4-Methylenedioxy phenyl Benzoic Acid (RRL-1364 - Part-I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dahanukar Sharadini

    1978-01-01

    Full Text Available Detailed pharmacological investigations of p-N-(3, 4-methylene dioxy phenyl benzoic acid revealed marked hypotensive action which was dose dependent and most marked in cats; it was absent in rats. Atropine could block this hypotensive action, thus suggest-ing cholinomimetic mechanism. Further studies indicated that the hypotension produced was central and possibly medullary in origin.

  14. Dietary exposure estimates for the food preservatives benzoic acid and sorbic acid in the total diet in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Min-Pei; Lien, Keng-Wen; Wu, Chiu-Hua; Ni, Shih-Pei; Huang, Hui-Ying; Hsieh, Dennis P H

    2015-02-25

    The purpose was to assess the health risk to general consumers in Taiwan associated with dietary intake of benzoic acid and sorbic acid by conducting a total diet study (TDS). The hazard index (HI) in percent acceptable daily intake (%ADI) of benzoic acid and sorbic acid for eight exposure groups classified by age were calculated. In high-intake consumers, the highest HI of benzoic acid was 54.1%ADI for males aged 1-2 years old at the 95th percentile, whereas for females, the HI was 61.7%ADI for aged over 66 years old. The highest HI of sorbic acid for male and female consumers aged 3-6 years old at the 95th percentile were 14.0%ADI and 12.2%ADI, respectively. These results indicate that the use of benzoic acid and sorbic acid as preservatives at the current level of use in the Taiwanese diet does not constitute a public health and safety concern.

  15. Benzoic acid fermentation from starch and cellulose via a plant-like β-oxidation pathway in Streptomyces maritimus

    OpenAIRE

    Noda, Shuhei; Kitazono, Eiichi; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Ogino, Chiaki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Benzoic acid is one of the most useful aromatic compounds. Despite its versatility and simple structure, benzoic acid production using microbes has not been reported previously. Streptomyces are aerobic, Gram-positive, mycelia-forming soil bacteria, and are known to produce various kinds of antibiotics composed of many aromatic residues. S. maritimus possess a complex amino acid modification pathway and can serve as a new platform microbe to produce aromatic building-block...

  16. Urine acidification and mineral metabolism in growing pigs feddiets supplemented with dietary methionine and benzoic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Jan Værum; Fernández, José Adalberto; Eriksen, Jørgen

    2010-01-01

    Benzoic acid (BA) reduces pH of urine and thereby reduces the emission of ammonia and possibly also odorous sulphur-compounds from slurry. The effect of BA on mineral metabolism in growing pigs is not clear. The objective was therefore to study the effect of BA and methionine (Met) as a sulphur (S......) source in diets for pigs on urine acidification and mineral metabolism. Twenty-four 45 kg pigs in a 2 × 2 factorial design were fed one of 4 diets, containing 0 or 2% BA and a low or high dietary S level provided through diet supplementation of 0 or 1% Met. The pigs were placed in metabolic cages for a 5...... d adaptation period and a 7 d period with collection of faeces and urine. Benzoic acid was metabolized into hippuric acid which reduced urinary pH by 0.8 pH units (P 

  17. Interactions of benzoic acid and phosphates with iron oxide colloids using chemical force titration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jana; Horton, J Hugh

    2005-11-08

    Colloidal iron oxides are an important component in soil systems and in water treatment processes. Humic-based organic compounds, containing both phenol and benzoate functional groups, are often present in these systems and compete strongly with phosphate species for binding sites on the iron oxide surfaces. Here, we examine the interaction of benzoate and phenolic groups with various iron oxide colloids using atomic force microscopy (AFM) chemical force titration measurements. Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of 4-(12-mercaptododecyloxy)benzoic acid and 4-(12-mercaptododecyloxy)phenol were used to prepare chemically modified Au-coated AFM tips, and these were used to probe the surface chemistry of a series of iron oxide colloids. The SAMs formed were also characterized using scanning tunneling microscopy, reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The surface pK(a) of 4-(12- mercaptododecyloxy)benzoic acid has been determined to be 4.0 +/- 0.5, and the interaction between the tip and the sample coated with a SAM of this species is dominated by hydrogen bonding. The chemical force titraton profile for an AFM probe coated with 4-(12- mercaptododecyloxy)benzoic acid and a bare iron oxide colloid demonstrates that the benzoic acid function group interacts with all three types of iron oxide sites present on the colloid surface over a wide pH range. Similar experiments were carried out on colloids precipitated in the presence of phosphoric, gallic, and tannic acids. The results are discussed in the context of the competitive binding interactions of solution species present in soils or in water treatment processes.

  18. Regioselective hydrogen isotope exchange reaction in benzoic acid and its alkali metal salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Akiko; Hasegawa, Hideaki; Oohashi, Kunio; Seki, Hiroko.

    1997-01-01

    The hydrogen isotope exchange reaction of benzoic and acid its alkali metal salts with deuterium oxide was studied in the presence of RhCl 3 ·3H 2 O. The products were analyzed by 1 H- and 13 C-NMR spectroscopies. High regioselectivity of the exchange at the ortho positions was established, and the extent of deuterium labeling and the distribution of d 0 , d 1 , and d 2 were determined. The reaction mechanism was briefly discussed. (author)

  19. 2-Hydroxy-benzoic acid-purin-6-amine (3/1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Lian-Cai; Zeng, Wu-Lan; Liu, Xue-Ying; Jian, Fang-Fang

    2009-07-08

    In the title 3:1 adduct, 3C(7)H(6)O(3)·C(5)H(5)N(5), an intra-molecular O-H⋯O hydrogen bond occurs in each of the three 2-hydroxy-benzoic acid mol-ecules. In the crystal, the components are linked by N-H⋯O and O-H⋯N hydrogen bonds.

  20. Influence of benzoic acid on thermal, crystallization and mechanical properties of isotactic polypropylene under irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Shamshad; Basfar, A. A.

    1999-05-01

    Degree of super-cooling is denoted by the temperature difference between the melting temperature of the polymer Tm, and peak crystallization temperature Tp. Upon addition of progressively increasing amounts of benzoic acid (BA) to isotactic polypropylene {(is)-PP}, the degree of super-cooling was found to decrease, which leads to considerable reduction in moulding cycle time and savings in production cost. Haze % was found to progressively decrease with the corresponding increase in the amount of benzoic acid in (is)-PP, resulting in much improved transparency of the (is)-PP-benzoic acid blends. Irradiation to an absorbed dose of 25 kGy affected the transparency of blends slightly. Thermogravimetric analysis of (is)-PP-BA blends showed that there is no adverse effect on thermal stability of the polypropylene. Also, the irradiation of (is)-PP-BA blends did not bring about any significant changes in their thermal stability. (is)-PP-BA blends demonstrated, in general, improved tensile strength when compared to pure (is)-PP. Moreover, no significant detrimental influence of irradiation was observed on the tensile strength of (is)-PP-BA blends.

  1. Immobilization of Tyrosinase from Avocado Crude Extract in Polypyrrole Films for Inhibitive Detection of Benzoic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Brisolari

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Inhibition-based biosensors were developed by immobilizing tyrosinase (Tyr, polyphenol oxidase from the crude extract of avocado fruit on electrochemically prepared polypyrrole (PPy films. The biosensors were prepared during the electropolymerization of pyrrole in a solution containing a fixed volume of the crude extract of avocado. The dependence of the biosensor responses on the volume used from the crude extract, values of pH and temperature was studied, and a substrate, catechol, at different concentrations, was amperometrically detected by these biosensors. Benzoic acid, a competitive inhibitor of Try, was added to the catechol solutions at specific concentrations aimed at obtaining the inhibition constant, K’m, which ranged from 1.7 to 4.6 mmol∙L−1 for 0.0 and 60 µmol∙L−1 of benzoic acid, respectively. Studies on the inhibition caused by benzoic acid by using PPy/Try films, and catechol as a substrate, allowed us propose how to develop, under optimized conditions, simple and low-cost biosensors based on the use of avocado fruit.

  2. Detection of Benzoic Acid by an Amperometric Inhibitor Biosensor Based on Mushroom Tissue Homogenate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Kemal Sezgintürk

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available An amperometric benzoic acid-sensing inhibitor biosensor was prepared by immobilizing mushroom (Agaricus bisporus tissue homogenate on a Clark-type oxygen electrode. The effects of the quantity of mushroom tissue homogenate, the quantity of gelatin and the effect of the crosslinking agent glutaraldehyde percent on the biosensor were studied. The optimum concentration of phenol used as substrate was 200 μM. The bioanalytical properties of the proposed biosensor, such as dependence of the biosensor response on the pH value and the temperature, were investigated. The biosensor responded linearly to benzoic acid in a concentration range of 25–100 μM. Standard deviation (s.d. was ±0.49 μM for 7 successive determinations at a concentration of 75 μM. The inhibitor biosensor based on mushroom tissue homogenate was applied for the determination of benzoic acid in fizzy lemonade, some fruits and groundwater samples. Results were compared to those obtained using AOAC method, showing a good agreement.

  3. Accurate prediction of the toxicity of benzoic acid compounds in mice via oral without using any computer codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keshavarz, Mohammad Hossein; Gharagheizi, Farhad; Shokrolahi, Arash; Zakinejad, Sajjad

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A novel method is introduced for desk calculation of toxicity of benzoic acid derivatives. ► There is no need to use QSAR and QSTR methods, which are based on computer codes. ► The predicted results of 58 compounds are more reliable than those predicted by QSTR method. ► The present method gives good predictions for further 324 benzoic acid compounds. - Abstract: Most of benzoic acid derivatives are toxic, which may cause serious public health and environmental problems. Two novel simple and reliable models are introduced for desk calculations of the toxicity of benzoic acid compounds in mice via oral LD 50 with more reliance on their answers as one could attach to the more complex outputs. They require only elemental composition and molecular fragments without using any computer codes. The first model is based on only the number of carbon and hydrogen atoms, which can be improved by several molecular fragments in the second model. For 57 benzoic compounds, where the computed results of quantitative structure–toxicity relationship (QSTR) were recently reported, the predicted results of two simple models of present method are more reliable than QSTR computations. The present simple method is also tested with further 324 benzoic acid compounds including complex molecular structures, which confirm good forecasting ability of the second model.

  4. Modeling molecular acidity with electronic properties and Hammett constants for substituted benzoic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ying; Liu, Lianghong; Liu, Wanhui; Liu, Shaogang; Liu, Shubin

    2011-12-29

    Molecular acidity is an important physiochemical property essential in many fields of molecular studies, but an efficient and reliable computational approach to make accurate predictions is still missing. In this work, based on our previous studies to use gas phase electronic properties such as molecular electrostatic potential and valence natural atomic orbitals of the acidic atom and leaving proton, we demonstrate here that different approaches can be employed to tackle this problem. To that end, we employ 196 singly, doubly, and triply substituted benzoic acids for the study. We show that two different approaches are possible, one focusing on the carboxyl group through its localized electronic properties and the other on the substituting groups via Hammett constants and their additivity rule. Our present results clearly exhibit that with the linear models built from the singly substituted species, one can accurately predict the pK(a) values for the doubly and triply substituted species with both of these two approaches. The predictions from these approaches are consistent with each other and agree well with the experimental data. These intrinsically different approaches are the two manifestations of the same molecular acidity property, both valid and complementary to each other. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  5. Exposure assessment of food preservatives (sulphites, benzoic and sorbic acid) in Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mischek, Daniela; Krapfenbauer-Cermak, Christine

    2012-01-01

    An exposure assessment was performed to estimate the potential intake of preservatives in the Austrian population. Food consumption data of different population groups, such as preschool children aged 3-6 years, female and male adults aged 19-65 years were used for calculation. Levels of the preservatives in food were derived from analyses conducted from January 2007 to August 2010. Dietary intakes of the preservatives were estimated and compared to the respective acceptable daily intakes (ADIs). In the average-intake scenario, assuming that consumers randomly consume food products that do or do not contain food additives, estimated dietary intakes of all studied preservatives are well below the ADI for all population groups. Sulphite exposure accounted for 34%, 84% and 89% of the ADI in preschool children, females and males, respectively. The mean estimated daily intake of benzoic acid was 32% (preschool children), 31% (males) and 36% (females) of the ADI. Sorbic acid intakes correspond to 7% of the ADI in preschool children and 6% of the ADI in adults. In the high-intake scenario assuming that consumers always consume food products that contain additives and considering a kind of brand loyalty of consumers, the ADI is exceeded for sulphites among adults (119 and 124%, respectively). Major contributors to the total intake of sulphites were wine and dried fruits for adults. Mean estimated dietary intakes of benzoic acid exceeded the ADI in all population groups, 135% in preschool children, 124% in females and 118% of the ADI in males, respectively. Dietary intakes of sorbic acid are well below the ADI, accounting for a maximum of 30% of the ADI in preschool children. The highest contributors to benzoic and sorbic acid exposure were fish and fish products mainly caused by high consumption data of this large food group, including also mayonnaise-containing fish salads. Other important sources of sorbic acid were bread, buns and toast bread and fruit and vegetable

  6. Kinetic Study of the Effect of Benzoic Acid Derivatives on Copper Electrodeposition

    OpenAIRE

    Howaida M. El-Kashlan

    2008-01-01

    The effect of anodic oxygen bubbles on the rate of mass transfer in presence of benzoic acid, p-nitro, p-chloro and p-aminobenzoic acids were studied by measuring the limiting current of cathodic deposition of copper from acidified copper sulphate solution using lead anode. It is found that the rate of deposition decreases by adding organic substances. The rate of deposition depends on the type of inhibitor as well as its concentration. The ability of inhibitors to decrease the limiting curre...

  7. Direct quantitation of the preservatives benzoic and sorbic acid in processed foods using derivative spectrophotometry combined with micro dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiyoshi, Tomoharu; Ikami, Takahito; Kikukawa, Koji; Kobayashi, Masato; Takai, Rina; Kozaki, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Atsushi

    2018-02-01

    The preservatives benzoic acid and sorbic acid are generally quantified with separation techniques, such as HPLC or GC. Here we describe a new method for determining these compounds in processed food samples based on a narrowness of the UV-visible spectral band width with derivative processing. It permits more selective identification and determination of target analytes in matrices. After a sample is purified by micro dialysis, UV spectra of sample solutions were measured and fourth order derivatives of the spectrum were calculated. The amplitude between the maximum and minimum values in a high-order derivative spectrum was used for the determination of benzoic acid and sorbic acid. Benzoic acid and sorbic acid levels in several commercially available processed foods were measured by HPLC and the proposed spectrometry method. The levels obtained by the two methods were highly correlated (r 2 >0.97) for both preservatives. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Dietary exposure of secondary school students in Hong Kong to benzoic acid in prepackaged non-alcoholic beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ka Ming; Chan, Cheok Man; Chung, Stephen Wai Cheung; Ho, Yuk Yin; Xiao, Ying

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated the dietary exposure of secondary school students in Hong Kong to benzoic acid from pre-packaged non-alcoholic beverages. Exposure was estimated using local food consumption data of secondary school students obtained by a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire in 2000 and the benzoic acid level detected in pre-packaged beverages, including soft drink (both diet/light and regular types), fruit juice, soy milk, Chinese tea and coffee/tea) available locally in late 2006. The estimated dietary exposure to benzoic acid from pre-packaged beverages of average and high consumers (95(th) percentile) was 0.31 and 0.97 mg kg(-1) bw day(-1), respectively. These exposures accounted for 6.1 and 19.3% of the acceptable daily intake (ADI: 0-5 mg kg(-1) bw) of benzoic acid for average and high consumers, respectively. As in other countries, soft drinks contributed most to dietary exposure to benzoic acid from pre-packaged beverages in Hong Kong.

  9. Determination of Benzoic Acid, Sodium Saccharin, And Caffeine By High Performance Liquid Chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arief Yandra Putra

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Concentrations of benzoic acid, sodium saccharin and caffeine in soft drink samples were determined by using Reverse Phase High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC. The optimum analytical conditions of those three samples was methanol-phosphate buffer (1:7 as mobile phases, with pH 4.5 and flow rate 1.0 mL/min, column C18 (150x4.6 mm i.d. as stationary phases at 400C with UV-Vis Spectrophotometer detection at 220 nm. The concentration level of those compounds observed was not beyond the maximum limit of SNI 01-011101995 for sodium saccharin and benzoic acid and SNI 01-6684-2002 for caffeine. The relative standard deviation based on retention time and peak area, as 0.37% and 0.59% for benzoic acid, 0.16% and 0.21% for sodium saccharin, 0.38% and 0.6% for caffeine. Finally, the recovery for benzoic acid, sodium saccharin and caffeine was 100.82%, 94.92% and 90.32%, respectively. The relative standard deviation and recovery of all samples met AOAC method requirements.ABSTRAKPenelitian tentang penentuan asam benzoat, natrium sakarin dan kafein telah dilakukansecara Kromatografi Cair Kinerja Tinggi (KCKT Fasa Balik. Kondisi optimum analisis dariketiga senyawa di atas adalah fasa gerak metanol-bufer fosfat (1:7 dengan pH 4,5, laju alir 1 mL/min, kolom C18 (150 x 4,6 mm i.d. dengan temperatur 40oC dan pendeteksiandengan Spektrofotometer UV/Vis pada panjang gelombang 220 nm. Metoda ini diaplikasikan pada beberapa sampel minuman ringan. Kadar ketiga senyawa ini di dalam sampel tidak melebihi batas maksimum yang diizinkan yaitu berdasarkan SNI 01-0222-1995 untuk natrium sakarin dan asam benzoat serta SNI 01-6684-2002 untuk kafein. Standar Deviasi Relatif ketiga senyawa ini berdasarkan waktu retensi dan luas puncak secara berturut-turut adalah; asam benzoat 0,37% dan 0,59%, natrium sakarin 0,16% dan 0,21%, kafein 0,38% dan 0,60%. Hasil perolehan kembali dari ketiga senyawa ini adalah asam benzoat 100,82%, natrium sakarin 94,92%, kafein 90,32%. Standar

  10. Homo- and Heteroligand Nickel(II Complexes with Benzoic and para-Methoxybenzoic Acid Hydrazides and L-Histidine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.V. Troshanin

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Complex formation of nickel(II with benzoic, para-methoxybenzoic acid hydrazides, and L-histidine have been studied by the methods of pH-metric titrimetry, spectrophotometry, and mathematical modelling in aqueous solutions with 1.0 mol dm–3 KNO3 as background at 298 K. Dissociation constants of ligands, as well as composition, formation constants, and spectral parameters of homo- and heteroligand complexes have been determined. It has been shown that stability of the complexes formed with para-methoxybenzoic acid hydrazide is higher than with benzoic acid hydrazide, which is consistent with the electron-donor properties of the methoxy group. Extra stabilization of the nickel(II heteroligand complexes with benzoic (para-methoxybenzoic acid hydrazide and L-histidine has been discovered and interpreted.

  11. The mechanism and kinetics of the electrochemical cleavage of azo bond of 2-hydroxy-5-sulfophenyl-azo-benzoic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandic, Zoran; Nigovic, Biljana; Simunic, Branimir

    2004-01-01

    The electrochemical reduction of 2-hydroxy-5-[(4-sulfophenyl)azo]benzoic acid, 2-hydroxy-5-[(3-sulfophenyl)azo]benzoic acid, 2-hydroxy-5-[(2-sulfophenyl)azo]benzoic acid and 2-hydroxy-5-azo-benzoic acid has been carried out in aqueous solutions at glassy carbon electrode using cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry. The position of sulfo substituent relative to azo bridge as well as pH of the solution have significant impact on the electrochemical behavior of these compounds. It has been proposed that these compounds are reduced predominantly as hydrazone tautomers resulting in corresponding hydrazo compounds. The overall electrochemical reduction follows DISP2 mechanism, ultimately leading to the 5-amino salicylic acid and sulfanilic acid. The rate determining step is the homogenous redox reaction between intermediate hydrazo compound and 5-amino salicylic acid quinoneimine. The mechanism is proposed in which activated complex of 5-amino salicylic acid quinoneimine and intermediate hydrazo compound is formed with the simultaneous loss of one proton

  12. Discovery and characterization of [(cyclopentyl)ethyl]benzoic acid inhibitors of microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partridge, Katherine M; Antonysamy, Stephen; Bhattachar, Shobha N; Chandrasekhar, Srinivasan; Fisher, Matthew J; Fretland, Adrian; Gooding, Karen; Harvey, Anita; Hughes, Norman E; Kuklish, Steven L; Luz, John G; Manninen, Peter R; McGee, James E; Mudra, Daniel R; Navarro, Antonio; Norman, Bryan H; Quimby, Steven J; Schiffler, Matthew A; Sloan, Ashley V; Warshawsky, Alan M; Weller, Jennifer M; York, Jeremy S; Yu, Xiao-Peng

    2017-03-15

    We describe a novel class of acidic mPGES-1 inhibitors with nanomolar enzymatic and human whole blood (HWB) potency. Rational design in conjunction with structure-based design led initially to the identification of anthranilic acid 5, an mPGES-1 inhibitor with micromolar HWB potency. Structural modifications of 5 improved HWB potency by over 1000×, reduced CYP2C9 single point inhibition, and improved rat clearance, which led to the selection of [(cyclopentyl)ethyl]benzoic acid compound 16 for clinical studies. Compound 16 showed an IC 80 of 24nM for inhibition of PGE 2 formation in vitro in LPS-stimulated HWB. A single oral dose resulted in plasma concentrations of 16 that exceeded its HWB IC 80 in both rat (5mg/kg) and dog (3mg/kg) for over twelve hours. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Natural oils affect the human skin integrity and the percutaneous penetration of benzoic acid dose-dependently

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jesper Bo

    2006-01-01

    three natural oils (eucalyptus oil, tea tree oil, peppermint oil) would affect the skin integrity and the percutaneous penetration of benzoic acid when applied topically in relevant concentrations. An experimental in vitro model using static diffusion cells mounted with human breast or abdominal skin...... was applied. The three natural oils decreased the skin integrity dose-dependently. Concomitant dermal exposure to low concentrations of peppermint oil reduced the percutaneous penetration of benzoic acid. The present study lends support to the notion that low concentrations of peppermint oil may act...... protective against percutaneous penetration of some chemicals, whereas higher concentrations may decrease the integrity of the dermal barrier....

  14. A limited LCA of bio-adipic acid: Manufacturing the nylon-6,6 precursor adipic acid using the benzoic acid degradation pathway from different feedstocks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duuren, van J.B.J.H.; Brehmer, B.; Mars, A.E.; Eggink, G.; Martins Dos Santos, V.A.P.; Sanders, J.P.M.

    2011-01-01

    A limited life cycle assessment (LCA) was performed on a combined biological and chemical process for the production of adipic acid, which was compared to the traditional petrochemical process. The LCA comprises the biological conversion of the aromatic feedstocks benzoic acid, impure aromatics,

  15. 3,5-Bis[(pyridin-4-ylmethoxy]benzoic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Lin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Single crystals of the title compound, C19H16N2O4, were obtained under hydrothermal conditions by an unintended recrystallization of the employed microcrystalline starting material. The [(pyridin-4-ylmethoxy]benzoic acid unit is nearly planar, with a maximum deviation from the least-squares plane of 0.194 (2 Å. This plane is inclined by 35.82 (6° to that defined by the second (pyridin-4-ylmethoxy group [in which the largest deviation from the least-squares plane is 0.013 (2 Å]. In the crystal, molecules are linked by O—H...N hydrogen bonds involving the acid hydroxy group and a pyridine N atom into chains parallel to [-201].

  16. Preparation and Physical Properties of Chitosan Benzoic Acid Derivatives Using a Phosphoryl Mixed Anhydride System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyu Yun Chai

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Direct benzoylation of the two hydroxyl groups on chitosan was achieved using a phosphoryl mixed anhydride system, derived from trifluoroacetic anhydride (TFAA, benzoic acids (BAs, and phosphoric acid (PA. The reaction is operated as a one pot process under mild conditions that does not require neither an inert atmosphere nor dry solvents. The structures of the synthesized compounds were confirmed by NMR and IR spectroscopy. Solubility tests on the products revealed that they were soluble in organic solvents such as N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF, dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO, and acetone. In the meantime, a morphological study by scanning electron microscopy (SEM evidently indicated that the chitosan benzoates underwent significant structural changes after the benzoylation.

  17. Benzoic Acid Derivatives with Trypanocidal Activity: Enzymatic Analysis and Molecular Docking Studies toward Trans-Sialidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Kashif

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Chagas, or American trypanosomiasis, remains an important public health problem in developing countries. In the last decade, trans-sialidase has become a pharmacological target for new anti-Chagas drugs. In this work, the aims were to design and find a new series of benzoic acid derivatives as trans-sialidase (TS inhibitors and anti-trypanosomal agents. Three compounds (14, 18, and 19 sharing a para-aminobenzoic acid moiety showed more potent trypanocidal activity than the commercially available drugs nifurtimox and benznidazole in both strains: the lysis concentration of 50% of the population (LC50 was <0.15 µM on the NINOA strain, and LC50 < 0.22 µM on the INC-5 strain. Additionally, compound 18 showed a moderate inhibition (47% on the trans-sialidase enzyme and a binding model similar to DANA (pattern A.

  18. The crystal structure of benzoic acid: a redetermination with X-rays at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feld, R.; Lehmann, M.S.; Muir, K.W.; Speakman, J.C.

    1981-01-01

    The crystal structure of benzoic acid, C 6 H 5 CO 2 H, has been redetermined by X-ray diffraction at room temperature. Extensive neutron-diffraction measurements have also been made; by single-crystal methods at room temperature and 130 K; and, at 130 K and 5 K, by powder-profile analysis on C 6 D 5 CO 2 H. The structure consists of centrosymmetric dimers, in which two molecules are linked by a pair of hydrogen bonds between their carboxyl groups. Better precision attaches to the X-ray results. Full-matrix refinement, on 1011 independent reflexions, converged at R = 3.7%. This refinement was indeed based on a model that was formally ordered, so far as concerns all atoms except the acidic hydrogen. However the structural results implied an averaged molecule, with the C - O distances 1.258, 1.268(2)Angstroem and the C - C - O angles 118.7, 117.8(1) 0 ; and the acidic hydrogen appeared as two half atoms on the hydrogen bond, 0.9 Angstroem from each oxygen atom. These findings are most simply interpreted as due to disorder; the two configurations, A and B (of Fig. 1), occur randomly and in nearly equal proportions. Owing to difficulties inherent in the crystal texture of benzoic acid, the neutron results were less satisfactory. Large single crystals were affected by twinning. Though the powder method avoids this difficulty, the structure, further confused by modulation, is rather too complicated for profile refinement. At 5 K however, the structure may be ordered, consisting wholly of dimers in the A-configuration. (orig.)

  19. Comparison of inhibition effects of some benzoic acid derivatives on sheep heart carbonic anhydrase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiliç, Deryanur; Yildiz, Melike; Şentürk, Murat; Erdoǧan, Orhan; Küfrevioǧlu, Ömer Irfan

    2016-04-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) is a family of metalloenzymes that requires Zn as a cofactor and catalyze the quick conversion of CO2 to HCO3- and H+. Inhibitors of the carbonic anhydrases (CAs) have medical usage of significant diseases such as glaucoma, epilepsy, gastroduodenal ulcers, acid-base disequilibria and neurological disorders. In the present study, inhibition of CA with some benzoic derivatives (1-6) were investigated. Sheep heart CA (shCA) enzyme was isolated by means of designed affinity chromatography gel (cellulose-benzyl-sulfanylamide) 42.45-fold in a yield of 44 % with 564.65 EU/mg. Purified shCA enzyme was used in vitro studies. In the studies, IC50 values were calculated for 3-aminobenzoic acid (1), 4-aminobenzoic acid (2), 2-hydroxybenzoic acid (3), 2-benzoylbenzoic acid (4), 2,3-dimethoxybenzoic acid (5), and 3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoic acid (6), showing the inhibition effects on the purified enzyme. Such molecules can be used as pioneer for discovery of novel effective CA inhibitors for medicinal chemistry applications.

  20. Influence of Bleaching on Flavor of 34% Whey Protein Concentrate and Residual Benzoic Acid Concentration in Dried Whey Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previous studies have shown that bleaching negatively affects the flavor of 70% whey protein concentrate (WPC70), but bleaching effects on lower-protein products have not been established. Benzoyl peroxide (BP), a whey bleaching agent, degrades to benzoic acid (BA) and may elevate BA concentrations...

  1. Influence of bleaching on flavor of 34% whey protein concentrate and residual benzoic acid concentration in dried whey products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previous studies have shown that bleaching negatively affects the flavor of 70% whey protein concentrate (WPC70), but bleaching effects on lower-protein products have not been established. Benzoyl peroxide (BP), a whey bleaching agent, degrades to benzoic acid (BA) and may elevate BA concentrations...

  2. NMR study of the epoxidation of liquid hydrolyzed poly-butadiene and meta-chloro-per-benzoic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguiar, Marcelo; Akcelrud, L.; Menezes, Sonia Cabral de

    1993-01-01

    This work presents a study concerning the selectivity of the different configurations of the double bond present in liquid hydrolyzed poly-butadiene towards the epoxidation reaction with meta-chloro-per-benzoic acid through hydrogen-1, carbon-13 NMR aiming the production of new materials, varying the epoxidation level

  3. Contribution towards a Metabolite Profile of the Detoxification of Benzoic Acid through Glycine Conjugation: An Intervention Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Cindy; van Reenen, Mari; Mason, Shayne; Mienie, Lodewyk J; Westerhuis, Johan A; Reinecke, Carolus J

    2016-01-01

    Benzoic acid is widely used as a preservative in food products and is detoxified in humans through glycine conjugation. Different viewpoints prevail on the physiological significance of the glycine conjugation reaction and concerns have been raised on potential public health consequences following uncontrolled benzoic acid ingestion. We performed a metabolomics study which used commercial benzoic acid containing flavored water as vehicle for designed interventions, and report here on the controlled consumption of the benzoic acid by 21 cases across 6 time points for a total of 126 time points. Metabolomics data from urinary samples analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy were generated in a time-dependent cross-over study. We used ANOVA-simultaneous component analysis (ASCA), repeated measures analysis of variance (RM-ANOVA) and unfolded principal component analysis (unfolded PCA) to supplement conventional statistical methods to uncover fully the metabolic perturbations due to the xenobiotic intervention, encapsulated in the metabolomics tensor (three-dimensional matrices having cases, spectral areas and time as axes). Identification of the biologically important metabolites by the novel combination of statistical methods proved the power of this approach for metabolomics studies having complex data structures in general. The study disclosed a high degree of inter-individual variation in detoxification of the xenobiotic and revealed metabolic information, indicating that detoxification of benzoic acid through glycine conjugation to hippuric acid does not indicate glycine depletion, but is supplemented by ample glycine regeneration. The observations lend support to the view of maintenance of glycine homeostasis during detoxification. The study indicates also that time-dependent metabolomics investigations, using designed interventions, provide a way of interpreting the variation induced by the different factors of a designed experiment-an approach with

  4. Probe depth matters in dermal microdialysis sampling of benzoic acid after topical application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmgaard, R; Benfeldt, E; Bangsgaard, N

    2012-01-01

    chromatography. Probe depth was measured by 20-MHz ultrasound scanning. The area under the time-versus-concentration curve (AUC) describes the drug exposure in the tissue during the experiment and is a relevant parameter to compare for the 3 dermal probe depths investigated. The AUC(0-12) were: superficial...... between the depth of the sampling device - the probe - in the dermis and the amount of drug sampled following topical drug administration. This study evaluates the relation between probe depth and drug sampling using dermal DMD sampling ex vivo in human skin. We used superficial (...-2 mm) and deep (>2 mm) positioning of the linear MD probe in the dermis of human abdominal skin, followed by topical application of 4 mg/ml of benzoic acid (BA) in skin chambers overlying the probes. Dialysate was sampled every hour for 12 h and analysed for BA content by high-performance liquid...

  5. DFT and ab initio study of structure of dyes derived from 2-hydroxy and 2,4-dihydroxy benzoic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabbagh, Hossein A; Teimouri, Abbas; Chermahini, Alireza Najafi; Shahraki, Maryam

    2008-02-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the structural, infrared spectra and visible spectra of a series of azo dyes preparation of salicylic acid and 2,4-dihydroxy benzoic acid derivatives as the coupling component. The preparation of these azo dyes with salicylic acid and 2,4-dihydroxy benzoic acid derivatives (salicylic acid, methyl salicylate, ethyl salicylate, butyl salicylate, methyl 2,4-dihydroxy benzoate, ethyl 2,4-dihydroxy benzoate, salicylaldehyde, salicylamide, 2,4-dihydroxy benzamide, salicylaldoxime) have been investigated theoretically by performing HF and DFT levels of theory using the standard 6-31G* basis set. The optimized geometries and calculated vibrational frequencies are evaluated via comparison with experimental values. The vibrational spectral data obtained from solid phase FT-IR spectra are assigned modes based on the results of the theoretical calculations. The observed spectra are found to be in good agreement with the calculations.

  6. ON THE FORMATION OF BENZOIC ACID AND HIGHER-ORDER BENZENE CARBOXYLIC ACIDS IN INTERSTELLAR MODEL ICE GRAINS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMurtry, Brandon M.; Saito, Sean E. J.; Turner, Andrew M.; Chakravarty, Harish K.; Kaiser, Ralf I.

    2016-01-01

    With a binary ice mixture of benzene (C 6 H 6 ) and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) at 10 K under contamination-free ultrahigh vacuum conditions, the formation of benzene carboxylic acids in interstellar ice grains was studied. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to probe for the formation of new species during the chemical processing of the ice mixture and during the following temperature-programmed desorption. Newly formed benzene carboxylic acid species, i.e., benzoic acid, as well as meta - and para -benzene dicarboxylic acid, were assigned using newly emerging bands in the infrared spectrum; a reaction mechanism, along with rate constants, was proposed utilizing the kinetic fitting of the coupled differential equations.

  7. Rh(III) -Catalyzed C-H Olefination of Benzoic Acids under Mild Conditions using Oxygen as the Sole Oxidant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Quandi; Zhu, Changlei; Zhao, Huaiqing; Su, Weiping

    2016-02-04

    Phthalide skeletons have been synthesized for the first time through a Rh(III) -catalyzed C-H olefination of benzoic acids under mild conditions using oxygen as the sole oxidant. Aromatic acids bearing a variety of functional groups could react with diverse alkenes to afford the desired cyclized lactones or uncyclized alkenylarenes in moderate-to-excellent yields. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. 4-[(4-Amino-phen-yl)sulfon-yl]aniline-3,5-dinitro-benzoic acid (1/1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Graham; Wermuth, Urs D

    2012-03-01

    The title compound, C(7)H(4)N(2)O(6)·C(12)H(12)N(2)O(2)S, is a 1:1 cocrystal of the drug dapsone with 3,5-dinitro-benzoic acid. The dihedral angle between the two aromatic rings of the dapsone mol-ecule is 75.4 (2)°, and the dihedral angles between these rings and that of the 3,5-dinitro-benzoic acid are 64.5 (2) and 68.4 (2)°. A strong inter-molecular carb-oxy-lic acid O-H⋯N(amine) hydrogen bond is found, together with inter-molecular amine N-H⋯O hydrogen-bonding associations with carboxyl, nitro and sulfone O-atom acceptors. In addition, weak π-π inter-actions between one of the dapsone benzene rings and the 3,5-dinitro-benzoic acid ring [ring centroid separation = 3.774 (2) Å] results in a two-dimensional network structure.

  9. Mechanism of action of benzoic acid on Zygosaccharomyces bailii: effects on glycolytic metabolite levels, energy production, and intracellular pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warth, A D

    1991-01-01

    The effects of benzoic acid in the preservative-resistant yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii were studied. At concentrations of benzoic acid up to 4 mM, fermentation was stimulated and only low levels of benzoate were accumulated. Near the MIC (10 mM), fermentation was inhibited, ATP levels declined, and benzoate was accumulated to relatively higher levels. Intracellular pH was reduced but not greatly. Changes in the levels of metabolites at different external benzoic acid levels showed that glycolysis was limited at pyruvate kinase and glyceraldehyde dehydrogenase-phosphoglycerate kinase steps. Inhibition of phosphofructokinase and several other glycolytic enzymes was not responsible for the inhibition of fermentation. Instead, the results suggest that the primary action of benzoic acid in Z. bailii is to cause a general energy loss, i.e., ATP depletion. PMID:1785916

  10. Oxidation of benzoic acid by heat-activated persulfate: Effect of temperature on transformation pathway and product distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zrinyi, Nick; Pham, Anh Le-Tuan

    2017-09-01

    Heat activates persulfate (S 2 O 8 2- ) into sulfate radical (SO 4 - ), a powerful oxidant capable of transforming a wide variety of contaminants. Previous studies have shown that an increase in temperature accelerates the rates of persulfate activation and contaminant transformation. However, few studies have considered the effect of temperature on contaminant transformation pathway. The objective of this study was to determine how temperature (T = 22-70 °C) influences the activation of persulfate, the transformation of benzoic acid (i.e., a model compound), and the distribution of benzoic acid oxidation products. The time-concentration profiles of the products suggest that benzoic acid was transformed via decarboxylation and hydroxylation mechanisms, with the former becoming increasingly important at elevated temperatures. The pathway through which the products were further oxidized was also influenced by the temperature of persulfate activation. Our findings suggest that the role of temperature in the persulfate-based treatment systems is not limited only to controlling the rates of sulfate and hydroxyl radical generation. The ability of sulfate radical to initiate decarboxylation reactions and, more broadly, fragmentation reactions, as well as the effect of temperature on these transformation pathways could be important to the transformation of a number of organic contaminants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Co-culture engineering for microbial biosynthesis of 3-amino-benzoic acid in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haoran; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2016-07-01

    3-amino-benzoic acid (3AB) is an important building block molecule for production of a wide range of important compounds such as natural products with various biological activities. In the present study, we established a microbial biosynthetic system for de novo 3AB production from the simple substrate glucose. First, the active 3AB biosynthetic pathway was reconstituted in the bacterium Escherichia coli, which resulted in the production of 1.5 mg/L 3AB. In an effort to improve the production, an E. coli-E. coli co-culture system was engineered to modularize the biosynthetic pathway between an upstream strain and an downstream strain. Specifically, the upstream biosynthetic module was contained in a fixed E. coli strain, whereas a series of E. coli strains were engineered to accommodate the downstream biosynthetic module and screened for optimal production performance. The best co-culture system was found to improve 3AB production by 15 fold, compared to the mono-culture approach. Further engineering of the co-culture system resulted in biosynthesis of 48 mg/L 3AB. Our results demonstrate co-culture engineering can be a powerful new approach in the broad field of metabolic engineering. Copyright © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Metabolic engineering of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 for the production of para-hydroxy benzoic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiqin Yu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available para-hydroxy benzoic acid (PHBA is the key component for preparing parabens, a common preservatives in food, drugs and personal care products, as well as high performance bioplastics such as liquid crystal polymers (LCP. Pseudomonas putida KT2440 was engineered to produce PHBA from glucose via the shikimate pathway intermediate chorismate. To obtain the PHBA production strain, chorismate lyase UbiC from Escherichia coli and a feedback resistant 3-deoxy-D-arabino-heptulosonate-7-phosphate synthase encoded by gene aroGD146N were overexpressed individually and simultaneously. In addition, genes related to product degradation (pobA or competing for the precursor chorismate (pheA and trpE were deleted from the genome. To further improve PHBA production, the glucose metabolism repressor hexR was knocked out in order to increase erythrose-4- phosphate and NAPH supply. The best strain achieved a maximum titre of 1.73 g L-1 and a carbon yield of 18.1 % (C-mol C-mol-1 in a non-optimized fed-batch fermentation. This is to date the highest PHBA concentration produced by P. putida using a chorismate lyase.

  13. Kinetic study of adsorption and degradation of aniline, benzoic acid, phenol, and diuron in soil suspensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dao, T.H.; Lavy, T.L.

    1987-01-01

    Laboratory studies were conducted to investigate the effects of low temperature and accelerated soil-solution contact on soil adsorption of labile organic chemicals. The authors measured the kinetics of adsorption and degradation of 14 C-aniline, 14 C-benzoic acid, 14 C-phenol, and 14 C-diuron in the solution phase at 3 and 22 0 C. In the initial stages of reactions, the adsorption of all four chemicals was instantaneous at both temperatures under accelerated soil and solution mixing. A steady state was observed after the onset of equilibrium for the adsorption reaction for all compounds within 10 to 30 min. Its length varied according to the expected order of susceptibility to microbial degradation, i.e., diuron > aniline > phenol ≥ benzoate. It was apparent that the steady-state period without or in combination with low temperature could be advantageously used to obtain adsorption measurements in microbially active systems. A mechanistic sorption-catalyzed degradation model was evaluated to uncouple mathematically these processes. The model described satisfactorily the disappearance of labile chemicals in soil suspensions. Numerical analysis allowed the concurrent determination of adsorption, desorption, and biodegradation rate coefficients

  14. Spontaneous adsorption of 3,5-bis(3,5-dinitrobenzoylamino) benzoic acid onto carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paez, Julieta I.; Strumia, Miriam C.; Passeggi, Mario C.G.; Ferron, Julio; Baruzzi, Ana M.; Brunetti, Veronica

    2009-01-01

    Dendritic molecules contain multifunctional groups that can be used to efficiently control the properties of an electrode surface. We are developing strategies to generate a highly functionalized surface using multifunctional and rigid dendrons immobilized onto different substrates. In the present work, we explore the immobilization of a dendritic molecule: 3,5-bis(3,5-dinitrobenzoylamino) benzoic acid (D-NO 2 ) onto carbon surfaces showing a simple and rapid way to produce conductive surfaces with electroactive chemical functions. The immobilized D-NO 2 layer has been characterized using atomic force microscopy and cyclic voltammetry. D-NO 2 adsorbs onto carbon surfaces spontaneously by dipping the electrode in dendron solutions. Reduction of this layer generates the hydroxylamine product. The resulting redox-active layer exhibits a well-behaved redox response for the adsorbed nitroso/hydroxylamine couple. The film permeability of the derivatized surface has been analyzed employing the electrochemical response of redox probes: Ru(NH 3 ) 6 3+ /Ru(NH 3 ) 6 2+ and Fe(CN) 6 3- /Fe(CN) 6 4- . Electrocatalytic oxidation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide onto a modified carbon surface was also observed.

  15. Stable Isotope Labeled 4-(Dimethylamino)benzoic Acid Derivatives of Glycerophosphoethanolamine Lipids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Karin A. Zemski; Turner, William W.; VanNieuwenhze, Michael S.; Murphy, Robert C.

    2010-01-01

    A set of four (d0, d4, d6, and d10) deuterium enriched 4-(dimethylamino)benzoic acid (DMABA) N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) ester reagents was developed that react with the primary amine group of glycerophosphoethanolamine (PE) lipids to create derivatives where all subclasses of DMABA labeled PE are detected by a common precursor ion scan. The positive ion collision induced dissociation data from (d0, d4, d6, and d10)-DMABA labeled PE standards indicated that a precursor ion scan of m/z 191.1, 195.1, 197.1, and 201.1 could be used to selectively detect (d0, d4, d6, and d10)-DMABA modified PE, respectively, in a complex biological mixture. The PE lipids from a time course (0, 30, 60, and 300 min) of AAPH treatment of liposomes made of RAW 264.7 cell phospholipids were each labeled with the d0-, d4-, d10-, and d6-DMABA NHS ester reagents, respectively. The DMABA derivatives revealed loss of endogenous PE lipids and an increase in oxidized PE lipid throughout the time course of AAPH treatment. These DMABA NHS ester reagents provide a universal scan for diacyl, ether, and plasmalogen PE lipids that can not be readily observed otherwise, enable differential labeling, and provide an internal standard for each PE lipid. PMID:20337376

  16. Modified ferrous ammonium sulfate benzoic acid xyelenol orange (MFBX) and thermoluminescent dosimeters - a comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brindha, S.; Rose, J.V.R.; Sathyan, S.; Singh, Rabi Raja I.; Ravindran, B. Paul

    2002-01-01

    Radiation dosimetry deals with the determination of absorbed dose to the medium exposed to ionizing radiation. Chemical dosimetry depends on oxidation or reduction of chemicals by ionizing radiation. A ferrous ammonium sulfate benzoic acid xyelenol orange (FBX) dosimeter based on this principle is being used as a clinical dosimeter at present. Certain modifications were carried out in the preparation and storage of the FBX dosimeter to increase its shelf life. The resulting dosimeter was called a modified FBX (MFBX) dosimeter and has been used in our department for the past few years. An extensive study of the dose, dose rate and energy response of the dosimeter was carried out and compared with a thermoluminescent (LiF 7 ) dosimeter. The results obtained were found to be comparable to the thermoluminescent (LiF 7 ) dosimeter. Hence it was concluded that the MFBX dosimeter could be used for phantom dosimetry, data collection and in vivo measurements. Easier preparation and availability of the reagents are added advantages of using MFBX as a clinical dosimeter in small radiotherapy departments. (author)

  17. Spectroscopic investigation on structure and pH dependent Cocrystal formation between gamma-aminobutyric acid and benzoic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yong; Xue, Jiadan; Cai, Qiang; Zhang, Qi

    2018-02-01

    Vibrational spectroscopic methods, including terahertz absorption and Raman scattering spectroscopy, were utilized for the characterization and analysis of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), benzoic acid (BA), and the corresponding GABA-BA cocrystal formation under various pH values of aqueous solution. Vibrational spectroscopic results demonstrated that the solvent GABA-BA cocrystal, similar as grinding counterpart, possessed unique characteristic features compared with that of starting parent compounds. The change of vibrational modes for GABA-BA cocrystal comparing with starting components indicates there is strong inter-molecular interaction between GABA and BA molecules during its cocrystallization process. Formation of GABA-BA cocrystal under slow solvent evaporation is impacted by the pH value of aqueous solution. Vibrational spectra indicate that the GABA-BA cocrystal could be stably formed with the solvent condition of 2.00 ≤ pH ≤ 7.00. In contrast, such cocrystallization did not occur and the cocrystal would dissociate into its parent components when the pH value of solvent is lower than 2.00. This study provides experimental benchmark to discriminate and identify the structure of cocrystal and also pH-dependent cocrystallization effect with vibrational spectroscopic techniques in solid-state pharmaceutical fields.

  18. Augmenting the activity of antifungal agents against aspergilli using structural analogues of benzoic acid as chemosensitizing agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong H; Campbell, Bruce C; Mahoney, Noreen; Chan, Kathleen L; Molyneux, Russell J; Balajee, Arunmozhi

    2010-10-01

    A number of benzoic acid analogues showed antifungal activity against strains of Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus fumigatus and Aspergillus terreus, causative agents of human aspergillosis, in in vitro bioassays. Structure-activity analysis revealed that antifungal activities of benzoic and gallic acids were increased by addition of a methyl, methoxyl or chloro group at position 4 of the aromatic ring, or by esterification of the carboxylic acid with an alkyl group, respectively. Thymol, a natural phenolic compound, was a potent chemosensitizing agent when co-applied with the antifungal azole drugs fluconazole and ketoconazole. The thymol-azole drug combination demonstrated complete inhibition of fungal growth at dosages far lower than the drugs alone. Co-application of thymol with amphotericin B had an additive effect on all strains of aspergilli tested with the exception of two of three strains of A. terreus, where there was an antagonistic effect. Use of two mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) mutants of A. fumigatus, sakAΔ and mpkCΔ, having gene deletions in the oxidative stress response pathway, indicated antifungal and/or chemosensitization activity of the benzo analogues was by disruption of the oxidative stress response system. Results showed that both these genes play overlapping roles in the MAPK system in this fungus. The potential of safe, natural compounds or analogues to serve as chemosensitizing agents to enhance efficacy of commercial antifungal agents is discussed. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Inhibitors of HIV-1 maturation: Development of structure-activity relationship for C-28 amides based on C-3 benzoic acid-modified triterpenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swidorski, Jacob J; Liu, Zheng; Sit, Sing-Yuen; Chen, Jie; Chen, Yan; Sin, Ny; Venables, Brian L; Parker, Dawn D; Nowicka-Sans, Beata; Terry, Brian J; Protack, Tricia; Rahematpura, Sandhya; Hanumegowda, Umesh; Jenkins, Susan; Krystal, Mark; Dicker, Ira B; Meanwell, Nicholas A; Regueiro-Ren, Alicia

    2016-04-15

    We have recently reported on the discovery of a C-3 benzoic acid (1) as a suitable replacement for the dimethyl succinate side chain of bevirimat (2), an HIV-1 maturation inhibitor that reached Phase II clinical trials before being discontinued. Recent SAR studies aimed at improving the antiviral properties of 2 have shown that the benzoic acid moiety conferred topographical constraint to the pharmacophore and was associated with a lower shift in potency in the presence of human serum albumin. In this manuscript, we describe efforts to improve the polymorphic coverage of the C-3 benzoic acid chemotype through modifications at the C-28 position of the triterpenoid core. The dimethylaminoethyl amides 17 and 23 delivered improved potency toward bevirimat-resistant viruses while increasing C24 in rat oral PK studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Analysis of Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas sp. QTF5 Reveals Its Benzoic Acid Degradation Ability and Heavy Metal Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas sp. QTF5 was isolated from the continuous permafrost near the bitumen layers in the Qiangtang basin of Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau in China (5,111 m above sea level. It is psychrotolerant and highly and widely tolerant to heavy metals and has the ability to metabolize benzoic acid and salicylic acid. To gain insight into the genetic basis for its adaptation, we performed whole genome sequencing and analyzed the resistant genes and metabolic pathways. Based on 120 published and annotated genomes representing 31 species in the genus Pseudomonas, in silico genomic DNA-DNA hybridization (<54% and average nucleotide identity calculation (<94% revealed that QTF5 is closest to Pseudomonas lini and should be classified into a novel species. This study provides the genetic basis to identify the genes linked to its specific mechanisms for adaptation to extreme environment and application of this microorganism in environmental conservation.

  1. Functionalization of Chitosan with 3,4,5-Trihydroxy Benzoic Acid Moiety for The Uptake of Chromium Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhmad Sabarudin

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Chitosan-based chelating resin, the cross-linked chitosan functionalized with 3,4,5-trihydroxy benzoic acid moiety (CCTS-THBA resin, was newly synthesized and its adsorption behavior toward appropriate elements was investigated. At pH 5-9, the CCTS-THBA resin showed quantitative adsorption (87-91% for Cr (VI, while only < 15% for Cr (III. The addition of cyclohexanediamine tetraacetic acid (CyDTA to the samples resulted in a considerably increase of the adsorption of both chromium species. In this condition, Cr (III is chelated with CyDTA to form anionic complexes at pH 3-5, which was then completely adsorbed on the resin by ion exchange mechanism. Similarly, the adsorption of Cr (VI reached almost 100% in pH range of 3-6. The adsorption capacity of CCTS-THBA resin for Cr (VI was 109 mg g-1.

  2. Protective effect of ketotifen and disodium cromoglycate against bronchoconstriction induced by aspirin, benzoic acid or tartrazine in intolerant asthmatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wüthrich, B

    1979-01-01

    Oral challenge tests with acetylsalicylic acid, tartrazine or benzoic acid were performed in 7 intolerant asthmatic patients after a 3-day treatment with either orally taken ketotifen (1 mg twice daily) or inhaled disodium cromoglycate (20 mg four times daily) at random. Protection was noted with ketotifen in 5, with DSCG in 3 patients. On the evaluation of the mean percentage of the maximum decline in the forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1) only ketotifen afforded significant protection statistically (p less than 0.05). All the intolerant asthmatics studies showed, as an immunological abnormity, a slight, but significant decrease of the C1-inhibitor levels. Moreover, in three out of these the alpha 1-antitrypsin serum values were under the lower normal range.

  3. Benzoic acid fermentation from starch and cellulose via a plant-like β-oxidation pathway in Streptomyces maritimus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, Shuhei; Kitazono, Eiichi; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Ogino, Chiaki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2012-04-30

    Benzoic acid is one of the most useful aromatic compounds. Despite its versatility and simple structure, benzoic acid production using microbes has not been reported previously. Streptomyces are aerobic, Gram-positive, mycelia-forming soil bacteria, and are known to produce various kinds of antibiotics composed of many aromatic residues. S. maritimus possess a complex amino acid modification pathway and can serve as a new platform microbe to produce aromatic building-block compounds. In this study, we carried out benzoate fermentation using S. maritimus. In order to enhance benzoate productivity using cellulose as the carbon source, we constructed endo-glucanase secreting S. maritimus. After 4 days of cultivation using glucose, cellobiose, or starch as a carbon source, the maximal level of benzoate reached 257, 337, and 460 mg/l, respectively. S. maritimus expressed β-glucosidase and high amylase-retaining activity compared to those of S. lividans and S. coelicolor. In addition, for effective benzoate production from cellulosic materials, we constructed endo-glucanase-secreting S. maritimus. This transformant efficiently degraded the phosphoric acid swollen cellulose (PASC) and then produced 125 mg/l benzoate. Wild-type S. maritimus produce benzoate via a plant-like β-oxidation pathway and can assimilate various carbon sources for benzoate production. In order to encourage cellulose degradation and improve benzoate productivity from cellulose, we constructed endo-glucanase-secreting S. maritimus. Using this transformant, we also demonstrated the direct fermentation of benzoate from cellulose. To achieve further benzoate productivity, the L-phenylalanine availability needs to be improved in future.

  4. Benzoic acid fermentation from starch and cellulose via a plant-like β-oxidation pathway in Streptomyces maritimus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noda Shuhei

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Benzoic acid is one of the most useful aromatic compounds. Despite its versatility and simple structure, benzoic acid production using microbes has not been reported previously. Streptomyces are aerobic, Gram-positive, mycelia-forming soil bacteria, and are known to produce various kinds of antibiotics composed of many aromatic residues. S. maritimus possess a complex amino acid modification pathway and can serve as a new platform microbe to produce aromatic building-block compounds. In this study, we carried out benzoate fermentation using S. maritimus. In order to enhance benzoate productivity using cellulose as the carbon source, we constructed endo-glucanase secreting S. maritimus. Results After 4 days of cultivation using glucose, cellobiose, or starch as a carbon source, the maximal level of benzoate reached 257, 337, and 460 mg/l, respectively. S. maritimus expressed β-glucosidase and high amylase-retaining activity compared to those of S. lividans and S. coelicolor. In addition, for effective benzoate production from cellulosic materials, we constructed endo-glucanase-secreting S. maritimus. This transformant efficiently degraded the phosphoric acid swollen cellulose (PASC and then produced 125 mg/l benzoate. Conclusions Wild-type S. maritimus produce benzoate via a plant-like β-oxidation pathway and can assimilate various carbon sources for benzoate production. In order to encourage cellulose degradation and improve benzoate productivity from cellulose, we constructed endo-glucanase-secreting S. maritimus. Using this transformant, we also demonstrated the direct fermentation of benzoate from cellulose. To achieve further benzoate productivity, the L-phenylalanine availability needs to be improved in future.

  5. Comparison of open-flow microperfusion and microdialysis methodologies when sampling topically applied fentanyl and benzoic Acid in human dermis ex vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmgaard, R; Benfeldt, Eva; Nielsen, J B

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare two sampling methods-dermal Open-Flow Microperfusion (dOFM) and dermal Microdialysis (dMD) in an international joint experiment in a single-laboratory setting. We used human ex-vivo skin and sampled topically administered Fentanyl and Benzoic Acid. The second...

  6. An azobenzene-containing metal-organic framework as an efficient heterogeneous catalyst for direct amidation of benzoic acids: synthesis of bioactive compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Linh T M; Ngo, Long H; Nguyen, Ha L; Nguyen, Hanh T H; Nguyen, Chung K; Nguyen, Binh T; Ton, Quang T; Nguyen, Hong K D; Cordova, Kyle E; Truong, Thanh

    2015-12-14

    An azobenzene-containing zirconium metal-organic framework was demonstrated to be an effective heterogeneous catalyst for the direct amidation of benzoic acids in tetrahydrofuran at 70 °C. This finding was applied to the synthesis of several important, representative bioactive compounds.

  7. Photoinduced Birefringent Pattern and Photoinactivation of Liquid-Crystalline Copolymer Films with Benzoic Acid and Phenylaldehyde Side Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawatsuki, Nobuhiro; Inada, Shogo; Fujii, Ryosuke; Kondo, Mizuho

    2018-02-06

    In situ formation of N-benzylideneaniline (NBA) side groups achieved photoinduced cooperative reorientation of photoinactive copolymers with phenylaldehyde (PA) and benzoic acid (BA) side groups doped with 4-methoxyaniline (AN) molecules. Thermally stimulated molecular reorientation of the side groups was generated due to the axis-selective photoreaction of the NBA moieties. Selective coating with AN on the copolymer film formed NBA moieties in the desired region, resulting in a photoinduced birefringent pattern. Additionally, postannealing at an elevated temperature for a long time attained photoinactivation of the reoriented film, and recoating with AN to form NBA achieved the multiple birefringent patterns and repatterning of the reoriented structures. The slow thermal hydrolysis of NBA, which was 50 times slower than the thermally stimulated self-organization of the side groups due to the presence of BA side groups, contributed to the photodurability of the reoriented film and multiple birefringent patterns.

  8. Cloning and characterization of a benzoic acid/salicylic acid carboxyl methyltransferase gene involved in floral scent production from lily (Lilium 'Yelloween').

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H; Sun, M; Li, L L; Xie, X H; Zhang, Q X

    2015-11-19

    In lily flowers, the volatile ester methyl benzoate is one of the major and abundant floral scent compounds; however, knowledge regarding the biosynthesis of methyl benzoate remains unknown for Lilium. In this study, we isolated a benzoic acid/salicylic acid carboxyl methyltransferase (BSMT) gene, LiBSMT, from petals of Lilium 'Yelloween'. The gene has an open reading frame of 1083 base pairs (bp) and encodes a protein of 41.05 kDa. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analyses of LiBSMT revealed 40-50% similarity with other known benzenoid carboxyl methyltransferases in other plant species, and revealed homology to BSMT of Oryza sativa. Heterologous expression of this gene in Escherichia coli yielded an enzyme responsible for catalyzing benzoic acid and salicylic acid to methyl benzoate and methyl salicylate, respectively. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that LiBSMT was preferentially expressed in petals. Moreover, the expression of LiBSMT in petals was developmentally regulated. These expression patterns correlate well with the emission of methyl benzoate. Our results indicate that LiBSMT plays an important role in floral scent methyl benzoate production and emission in lily flowers.

  9. A limited LCA of bio-adipic acid: manufacturing the nylon-6,6 precursor adipic acid using the benzoic acid degradation pathway from different feedstocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Duuren, J B J H; Brehmer, B; Mars, A E; Eggink, G; Dos Santos, V A P Martins; Sanders, J P M

    2011-06-01

    A limited life cycle assessment (LCA) was performed on a combined biological and chemical process for the production of adipic acid, which was compared to the traditional petrochemical process. The LCA comprises the biological conversion of the aromatic feedstocks benzoic acid, impure aromatics, toluene, or phenol from lignin to cis, cis-muconic acid, which is subsequently converted to adipic acid through hydrogenation. Apart from the impact of usage of petrochemical and biomass-based feedstocks, the environmental impact of the final concentration of cis, cis-muconic acid in the fermentation broth was studied using 1.85% and 4.26% cis, cis-muconic acid. The LCA focused on the cumulative energy demand (CED), cumulative exergy demand (CExD), and the CO(2) equivalent (CO(2) eq) emission, with CO(2) and N(2) O measured separately. The highest calculated reduction potential of CED and CExD were achieved using phenol, which reduced the CED by 29% and 57% with 1.85% and 4.26% cis, cis-muconic acid, respectively. A decrease in the CO(2) eq emission was especially achieved when the N(2) O emission in the combined biological and chemical process was restricted. At 4.26% cis, cis-muconic acid, the different carbon backbone feedstocks contributed to an optimized reduction of CO(2) eq emissions ranging from 14.0 to 17.4 ton CO(2) eq/ton adipic acid. The bulk of the bioprocessing energy intensity is attributed to the hydrogenation reactor, which has a high environmental impact and a direct relationship with the product concentration in the broth. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Spectroscopic and first principles investigation on 4-[(4-pyridinylmethylene)amino]-benzoic acid bearing pyridyl and carboxyl anchoring groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Wang, Qiaoyi

    2018-03-01

    We report a combined experimental and computational investigation on the structure and photophysics of 4-[(4-pyridinylmethylene)amino]-benzoic acid, a functional molecule bearing two anchoring groups for attachment onto a TiO2 surface and perovskite surface, for potential solar cell application. This molecule possesses interesting adsorption properties in perovskite solar cell because the pyridyl group serves as the Lewis base and targets Lewis acidic sites in the perovskite surface, while the carboxyl group targets TiO2 surface, improving the coupling between the perovskite surface and the TiO2 surface. The electronic structures of the molecule and its photochemistry are revealed by the UV-vis absorption spectra and the fluorescence spectra under visible light irradiation, which are combined with density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) analysis. Considering the bi-anchoring groups and the conjugated π system embedded in the molecule, we anticipate it can molecular engineer the TiO2/perovskite interface in perovskite solar cell.

  11. Comparison of salicylic acid, benzoic acid and p-hydroxybenzoic acid for their ability to induce flowering in Lemna Gibba G3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleland, F.C.; Kang, B.G.; Khurana, J.P.

    1986-01-01

    The long-day plant Lemna gibba G3 fails to flower under continuous light on NH 4 + -free 0.5 H medium. This inhibition is completely reversed by 10 μM salicyclic acid (SA) or 32 μM benzoic acid (BA). By contrast, p-hydroxybenzoic acid (p-OH-BA) has virtually no effect on flowering at levels as high as 320 μM. Uptake rates for the three compounds are comparable. Competition studies using 14 C-SA indicate that, compared to SA, BA is about 10-fold less effective and p-OH-BA is nearly 100-fold less effective in competing against 14 C-SA uptake. Both the effectiveness of SA for inducing flowering and the uptake of 14 C-SA are substantially increased as the pH of the medium is lowered from 8 to 4.5. Under a nitrogen atmosphere the uptake of 14 C-SA is partially inhibited above pH 5. Phosphate metabolism may be important for flowering since increasing the phosphate level in the medium 10-15 fold results in substantial flowering, and suboptimal levels of Sa and phosphate interact synergistically to stimulate flowering. The interaction of phosphate with BA and p-OH-BA will be presented

  12. 4-[(4-Amino­phen­yl)sulfon­yl]aniline–3,5-dinitro­benzoic acid (1/1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Graham; Wermuth, Urs D.

    2012-01-01

    The title compound, C7H4N2O6·C12H12N2O2S, is a 1:1 cocrystal of the drug dapsone with 3,5-dinitro­benzoic acid. The dihedral angle between the two aromatic rings of the dapsone mol­ecule is 75.4 (2)°, and the dihedral angles between these rings and that of the 3,5-dinitro­benzoic acid are 64.5 (2) and 68.4 (2)°. A strong inter­molecular carb­oxy­lic acid O—H⋯Namine hydrogen bond is found, together with inter­molecular amine N—H⋯O hydrogen-bonding associations with carboxyl, nitro and sulfone O-atom acceptors. In addition, weak π–π inter­actions between one of the dapsone benzene rings and the 3,5-dinitro­benzoic acid ring [ring centroid separation = 3.774 (2) Å] results in a two-dimensional network structure. PMID:22412568

  13. Fermi resonance and strong anharmonic effects in the absorption spectra of the ν-OH ( ν-OD) vibration of solid H- and D-benzoic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaremko, A. M.; Ratajczak, H.; Barnes, A. J.; Baran, J.; Durlak, P.; Latajka, Z.

    2009-10-01

    The vibrational spectra of polycrystalline benzoic acid (BA) and its deuterated derivative were studied over the wide frequency region 4000-10 cm -1 by IR and Raman methods. A theoretical analysis of the hydrogen bond frequency region and calculations at the B3LYP/6-311++G(2d, 2p) level for the benzoic acid cyclic dimer in the gas phase were made. In order to study the dynamics of proton transfer two formalisms were applied: Car-Parrinello Molecular Dynamics (CPMD) and Path Integrals Molecular Dynamics (PIMD). It was shown that the experimentally observed very broad ν-OH band absorption is the result of complex anharmonic interaction: Fermi resonance between the OH-stretching and bending vibrations and strong interaction of the ν-OH stretching with the low frequency phonons. The theoretical analysis in the framework of such an approach gave a good correlation with experiment. From the CPMD calculations it was confirmed that the O-H⋯O bridge is not rigid, with the O⋯O distance being described by a large amplitude motion. For the benzoic acid dimer we observed stepwise (asynchronous) proton transfer.

  14. New Polyketides and New Benzoic Acid Derivatives from the Marine Sponge-Associated Fungus Neosartorya quadricincta KUFA 0081.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prompanya, Chadaporn; Dethoup, Tida; Gales, Luís; Lee, Michael; Pereira, José A C; Silva, Artur M S; Pinto, Madalena M M; Kijjoa, Anake

    2016-07-16

    Two new pentaketides, including a new benzofuran-1-one derivative (1) and a new isochromen-1-one (5), and seven new benzoic acid derivatives, including two new benzopyran derivatives (2a, b), a new benzoxepine derivative (3), two new chromen-4-one derivatives (4b, 7) and two new benzofuran derivatives (6a, b), were isolated, together with the previously reported 2,3-dihydro-6-hydroxy-2,2-dimethyl-4H-1-benzopyran-4-one (4a), from the culture of the marine sponge-associated fungus Neosartorya quadricincta KUFA 0081. The structures of the new compounds were established based on 1D and 2D NMR spectral analysis, and in the case of compounds 1, 2a, 4b, 5, 6a and 7, the absolute configurations of their stereogenic carbons were determined by an X-ray crystallographic analysis. None of the isolated compounds were active in the tests for antibacterial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, as well as multidrug-resistant isolates from the environment (MIC > 256 μg/mL), antifungal activity against yeast (Candida albicans ATTC 10231), filamentous fungus (Aspergillus fumigatus ATTC 46645) and dermatophyte (Trichophyton rubrum FF5) (MIC > 512 µg/mL) and in vitro growth inhibitory activity against the MCF-7 (breast adenocarcinoma), NCI-H460 (non-small cell lung cancer) and A375-C5 (melanoma) cell lines (GI50 > 150 µM) by the protein binding dye SRB method.

  15. Solubility and partial molar volumes of naphthalene, phenanthrene, benzoic acid, and 2-methoxynaphthalene in supercritical carbon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goenenc, Z.S.; Akman, U. [Univ. of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering]|[Bogaziici Univ., Istanbul (Turkey). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Sunol, A.K. [Univ. of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1995-07-01

    The effect of temperature, pressure, and supercritical fluid density on the retention and solubility in the mobile phase of solutes in supercritical fluid chromatography was investigated. New retention data for naphthalene, phenanthrene, benzoic acid, and 2-methoxynaphthalene were obtained as a function of pressure at different temperatures. Most of the data were taken near the critical region of the fluid phase where the anomalities such as enhanced solubility/selectivity and retrogate behavior are expected. These data were then used to compare two different approaches for modeling the pressure dependence of solute retention on the column. In these approaches, mobile-phase partial molar volumes of the solutes were determined either from bulk solubility data or from infinite-dilution fugacity coefficients. In both approaches, an integrated expression for the change of retention with pressure was utilized to explicitly reveal the nature of interactions between the stationary phase and the solute. The approach that utilizes the infinite-dilution fugacity coefficient predicts the pressure dependence of solute retention more accurately, especially for solutes that are substantially soluble in the mobile phase near the critical point of the mobile phase. Relationships between the pressure and temperature dependence of the solute solubility in the mobile phase and the retention of solutes on the column were also investigated.

  16. New Polyketides and New Benzoic Acid Derivatives from the Marine Sponge-Associated Fungus Neosartorya quadricincta KUFA 0081

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chadaporn Prompanya

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Two new pentaketides, including a new benzofuran-1-one derivative (1 and a new isochromen-1-one (5, and seven new benzoic acid derivatives, including two new benzopyran derivatives (2a, b, a new benzoxepine derivative (3, two new chromen-4-one derivatives (4b, 7 and two new benzofuran derivatives (6a, b, were isolated, together with the previously reported 2,3-dihydro-6-hydroxy-2,2-dimethyl-4H-1-benzopyran-4-one (4a, from the culture of the marine sponge-associated fungus Neosartorya quadricincta KUFA 0081. The structures of the new compounds were established based on 1D and 2D NMR spectral analysis, and in the case of compounds 1, 2a, 4b, 5, 6a and 7, the absolute configurations of their stereogenic carbons were determined by an X-ray crystallographic analysis. None of the isolated compounds were active in the tests for antibacterial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, as well as multidrug-resistant isolates from the environment (MIC > 256 μg/mL, antifungal activity against yeast (Candida albicans ATTC 10231, filamentous fungus (Aspergillus fumigatus ATTC 46645 and dermatophyte (Trichophyton rubrum FF5 (MIC > 512 µg/mL and in vitro growth inhibitory activity against the MCF-7 (breast adenocarcinoma, NCI-H460 (non-small cell lung cancer and A375-C5 (melanoma cell lines (GI50 > 150 µM by the protein binding dye SRB method.

  17. Collision-induced dissociation processes of protonated benzoic acid and related compounds: competitive generation of protonated carbon dioxide or protonated benzene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Sihang; Pavlov, Julius; Attygalle, Athula B

    2017-04-01

    Upon activation in the gas phase, protonated benzoic acid (m/z 123) undergoes fragmentation by several mechanisms. In addition to the predictable water loss followed by a CO loss, the m/z 123 ion more intriguingly eliminates a molecule of benzene to generate protonated carbon dioxide (H - O +  ═ C ≡ O, m/z 45), or a molecule of carbon dioxide to yield protonated benzene (m/z 79). Experimental evidence shows that the incipient proton ambulates during the fragmentation processes. For the CO 2 or benzene loss, protonated benzoic acid transfers the charge-imparting proton initially to the ortho position and then to the ipso position to generate a transient species which dissociates to form an ion-neutral complex between benzene and protonated CO 2 . The formation of the m/z 45 ion is not a phenomenon unique to benzoic acid: spectra from protonated isophthalic acid, terephthalic acid, trans-cinnamic acid and some aliphatic acids also displayed a peak for m/z 45. However, the m/z 45 peak is structurally diagnostic only for certain benzene polycarboxylic acids because the spectra of compounds with two carboxyl groups on adjacent ring carbons do not produce a peak at m/z 45. For the m/z 79 ion to be formed, an intramolecular reaction should take place in which protonated CO 2 within the ion-neutral complex acts as the attacking electrophile to transfer a proton to benzene. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Reactions of OH-radicals with hydroxylated and methoxylated benzoic acids and cinnamic acids. Radiation-induced chemical changes in mushrooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaisberger, B.

    2001-05-01

    In the first part of this work the radiation induced chemical changes of methoxylated and hydroxylated benzoic acids and cinnamic acids were investigated. Methoxylated compounds were also used as model components for acid derivatives with no free-OH groups. The latter are essentials parts of vegetable foodstuff. A comparison of the radiolytic behaviour of single substituted methoxy- and hydroxybenzoic acids was given at first, data of literature was included. The priority of the investigation was the hydroxylation process induced by OH-radicals. The OH-adduct distribution is generally the same for the hydroxy- as well as for the methoxybenzoic acid isomers. This could be proved by oxidation of these OH-adducts with K 3 Fe(CN) 6 . In the presence of air 68-77 % of the hydroxybenzoic acids are converted into hydroxylation products, whereas with the methoxylated acids this reaction leads only to about 10%. An explanation gives the different decay pathways of the intermediate peroxylradical. The multiple methoxy- and hydroxybenzoic acids show three different reaction possibilities: hydroxylation, replacement of -OCH 3 by -OH and -in case of the cinnamic acids-oxidative decomposition of the rest of the propenic acid under formation of the corresponding benzaldehydes. All these reactions can be expected when irradiating foodstuff, containing these acid compounds. The characteristic formation of these components and their linear dose/concentration relationship make these substrates very promising for the use as markers for irradiation treatment of foodstuff. The second part of this work deals with the gamma-radiation induced chemical changes in mushrooms. The irradiated and non-irradiated samples were freeze-dried and purified from matrix components chromatographically on polyamid columns. In case of the phenolic compounds for 4-hydroxybenzoic acid and three unknown components linear dose/concentration relationships could be obtained. Two of these unknown compounds seem

  19. Crystal structure of (E-4-{2-[4-(allyloxyphenyl]diazenyl}benzoic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Lutfor Rahman

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, C16H14N2O3, has an E conformation about the azobenzene [—N=N– = 1.2481 (16 Å] linkage. The benzene rings are almost coplanar [dihedral angle = 1.36 (7°]. The O atoms of the carboxylic acid group are disordered over two sets of sites and were refined with an occupancy ratio of 0.5:0.5. The two disordered components of the carboxylic acid group make dihedral angles of 1.5 (14 and 3.8 (12° with the benzene ring to which they are attached. In the crystal, molecules are linked via pairs of O—H...O hydrogen bonds, forming inversion dimers. The dimers are connected via C—H...O hydrogen bonds, forming ribbons lying parallel to [120]. These ribbons are linked via C—H...π interactions, forming slabs parallel to (001.

  20. Analysis of benzoic and cinnamic acid derivatives of some medicinal plants in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đurđević L.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural phenolics, which are ubiquitously distributed in plants, have been reported as functional factors in phytotherapy. We have examined phenolic compounds in the leaves and inflorescences of five significant medicinal plants of different plant families: Salvia officinalis (Lamiaceae; Achillea clypeolata (Asteraceae; Nymphaea alba (Nymphaeaceae; Rumex acetosella (Polygonaceae and Allium ursinum (Alliaceae. The examined species were rich in total phenolics (up to 30.88 mg/g dry weight. According to their total phenolics contents, the plants can be arranged in the following order: A. clypeolata>N. alba>S. officinalis>R. acetosella>A. ursinum. Free phenolics prevailed in all species in comparison to the bound forms (63.72-82.68% of total phenolics. The highest content of total free phenolics was measured in the tissues of A. clypeolata and N. alba, and the lowest in A. ursinum. Five phenolic acids were isolated and measured. p-Coumaric and ferulic acids as derivatives of cinnamic acid prevailed in the leaves of R. acetosella and A. ursinum (up to 4.81%. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 173018

  1. Quantitative DFT modeling of product concentration in organometallic reactions: Cu-mediated pentafluoroethylation of benzoic acid chlorides as a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jover, Jesús

    2017-11-08

    DFT calculations are widely used for computing properties, reaction mechanisms and energy profiles in organometallic reactions. A qualitative agreement between the experimental and the calculated results seems to usually be enough to validate a computational methodology but recent advances in computation indicate that a nearly quantitative agreement should be possible if an appropriate DFT study is carried out. Final percent product concentrations, often reported as yields, are by far the most commonly reported properties in experimental metal-mediated synthesis studies but reported DFT studies have not focused on predicting absolute product amounts. The recently reported stoichiometric pentafluoroethylation of benzoic acid chlorides (R-C 6 H 4 COCl) with [(phen)Cu(PPh 3 )C 2 F 5 ] (phen = 1,10-phenanthroline, PPh 3 = triphenylphosphine) has been used as a case study to check whether the experimental product concentrations can be reproduced by any of the most popular DFT approaches with high enough accuracy. To this end, the Gibbs energy profile for the pentafluoroethylation of benzoic acid chloride has been computed using 14 different DFT methods. These computed Gibbs energy profiles have been employed to build kinetic models predicting the final product concentration in solution. The best results are obtained with the D3-dispersion corrected B3LYP functional, which has been successfully used afterwards to model the reaction outcomes of other simple (R = o-Me, p-Me, p-Cl, p-F, etc.) benzoic acid chlorides. The product concentrations of more complex reaction networks in which more than one position of the substrate may be activated by the copper catalyst (R = o-Br and p-I) are also predicted appropriately.

  2. Application of chitosan functionalized with 3,4-dihydroxy benzoic acid moiety for on-line preconcentration and determination of trace elements in water samples

    OpenAIRE

    Sabarudin, Akhmad; Noguchi, Osamu; Oshima, Mitsuko; Higuchi, Keiro; Motomizu, Shoji

    2007-01-01

    Chitosan resin functionalized with 3,4-dihydroxy benzoic acid (CCTS-DHBA resin) was used as a packing material for flow injection (FI) on-line mini-column preconcentration in combination with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) for the determination of trace elements such as silver, bismuth, copper, gallium, indium, molybdenum, nickel, uranium, and vanadium in environmental waters. A 5-mL aliquot of sample (pH 5.5) was introduced to the minicolumn for the adsorpt...

  3. Synthesis and Protective Effect of New Ligustrazine-Benzoic Acid Derivatives against CoCl2-Induced Neurotoxicity in Differentiated PC12 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haimin Lei

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A series of novel ligustrazine-benzoic acid derivatives were synthesized and evaluated for their protective effect against cobalt chloride-induced neurotoxicity in differentiated PC12 cells. Combining hematoxylin and eosin staining, we found compound that (3,5,6-trimethylpyrazin-2-ylmethyl 3-methoxy-4-[(3,5,6-trimethylpyrazin-2-ylmethoxy]benzoate (4a displayed promising protective effect on the proliferation of the injured PC12 cells (EC50 = 4.249 µM. Structure-activity relationships are briefly discussed.

  4. catena-Poly[[aqua(benzoato-κ2O,O′(benzoic acid-κOcalcium]-μ3-benzoato-κ4O:O,O′:O′

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olimjon Azizov

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In title compound, [Ca(C7H5O22(C7H6O2(H2O]n, the eightfold-coordinated CaII ion is bonded to four carboxylate O atoms from two benzoate ions, an O atom from benzoic acid and a water O atom. One of the carboxylate groups bridges adjacent Ca2+ ions, forming a polymeric ribbon structure parallel to [010]. In the crystal, the benzoate anions and water molecule interact by way of inter- and intramolecular O—H...O hydrogen bonds.

  5. The fragment ion C13H9O2 m/z 197 in the mass spectra of 2-(2'-R-phenyl)benzoic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gills, R.G.; Porter, Q.N.

    1990-01-01

    In the electron impact mass spectrum of 2-( ' -R-phenyl)benzoic acids where R = H, NO 2 , OCH 3 , COOH, or Br, and abundant fragment ion m/z 197 is formed by an ipso substitution in which R is expelled as a radical. The structure of the ion m/z 197 has been shown by collision-activated dissociation to be identical with that of the protonated molecule formed by methane chemical ionization of 6H-dibenzo[b,d]pyran-6-one. 11 refs., 1 fig., ills

  6. Identification of ortho-Substituted Benzoic Acid/Ester Derivatives via the Gas-Phase Neighboring Group Participation Effect in (+)-ESI High Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blincoe, William D.; Rodriguez-Granillo, Agustina; Saurí, Josep; Pierson, Nicholas A.; Joyce, Leo A.; Mangion, Ian; Sheng, Huaming

    2018-02-01

    Benzoic acid/ester/amide derivatives are common moieties in pharmaceutical compounds and present a challenge in positional isomer identification by traditional tandem mass spectrometric analysis. A method is presented for exploiting the gas-phase neighboring group participation (NGP) effect to differentiate ortho-substituted benzoic acid/ester derivatives with high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS1). Significant water/alcohol loss (>30% abundance in MS1 spectra) was observed for ortho-substituted nucleophilic groups; these fragment peaks are not observable for the corresponding para and meta-substituted analogs. Experiments were also extended to the analysis of two intermediates in the synthesis of suvorexant (Belsomra) with additional analysis conducted with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), density functional theory (DFT), and ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) studies. Significant water/alcohol loss was also observed for 1-substituted 1, 2, 3-triazoles but not for the isomeric 2-substituted 1, 2, 3-triazole analogs. IMS-MS, NMR, and DFT studies were conducted to show that the preferred orientation of the 2-substituted triazole rotamer was away from the electrophilic center of the reaction, whereas the 1-subtituted triazole was oriented in close proximity to the center. Abundance of NGP product was determined to be a product of three factors: (1) proton affinity of the nucleophilic group; (2) steric impact of the nucleophile; and (3) proximity of the nucleophile to carboxylic acid/ester functional groups. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  7. Simultaneous determination of salicylic, 3-methyl salicylic, 4-methyl salicylic, acetylsalicylic and benzoic acids in fruit, vegetables and derived beverages by SPME-LC-UV/DAD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aresta, Antonella; Zambonin, Carlo

    2016-03-20

    Salicylic and benzoic acid are phenolic acids occurring in plant cells, thus they can be present in fruit and vegetables at various levels. They possess anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial properties, however they may induce symptoms and health problems in a small percentage of the population. Therefore, a low phenolic acid diet may be of clinical benefit to such individuals. In order to achieve this goal, the concentration of these substances in different food and beverages should be assessed. The present work describes for the first time a new method, based on solid phase microextraction (polydimethylsiloxane-divinylbenzene fiber) coupled to liquid chromatography with UV diode array detection, for the simultaneous determination of salicylic acid, 3-methyl salicylic acid, 4-methyl salicylic acid, acetylsalicylic acid and benzoic acid in selected fruit, vegetables and beverages. All the aspects influencing fiber adsorption (time, temperature, pH, salt addition) and desorption (desorption and injection time, desorption solvent mixture composition) of the analytes have been investigated. An isocratic separation was performed using an acetonitrile-phosphate buffer (pH 2.8; 2 mM) mixture (70:30, v/v) as the mobile phase. The estimated LOD and LOQ values (μg/mL) were in the range 0.002-0.028 and 0.007-0.095. The within-day and day-to-day precision values (RSD%) were between 4.7-6.1 and 6.6-9.4, respectively. The method has been successfully applied to the analysis of fava beans, blueberries, kiwi, tangerines, lemons, oranges and fruit juice (lemon and blueberry) samples. The major advantage of the method is that it only requires simple homogenization and/or centrifugation and dilution steps prior to SPME and injection in the LC system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Induced Smectic X Phase Through Intermolecular Hydrogen-Bonded Liquid Crystals Formed Between Citric Acid and p- n-(Octyloxy)Benzoic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaram, S.; Subhasri, P.; Rajasekaran, T. R.; Jayaprakasam, R.; Senthil, T. S.; Vijayakumar, V. N.

    2017-08-01

    Hydrogen-bonded liquid crystal (HBLC) is synthesized from citric acid (CA) and 4-(octyloxy)benzoic acid (8OBA) with different mole ratios. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) confirms the presence of hydrogen bond between CA and 8OBA. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic studies validate the intermolecular complementary, cyclic type of hydrogen bond, and molecular environment in the designed HBLC complex. Powder X-ray diffraction analysis reveals the monoclinic nature of liquid crystal complex in solid phase. Liquid crystal parameters such as phase transition temperature and enthalpy values for the corresponding mesogenic phases are investigated using a polarizing optical microscope (POM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). It is observed that the change in chain length and steric hindrance while increasing the mole ratio in HBLC complex induces a new smectic X (Sm X) along with higher-order smectic G (Sm G) phases by quenching of smectic C (Sm C). From the experimental observations, induced Sm X phase has been identified as a finger print texture. Also, Sm G is a multi-colored mosaic texture in 1:1, 1:2, and 1:3 mol ratios. The optical tilt angle, thermal stability factor, and enhanced thermal span width of CA + 8OBA complex are discussed.

  9. Systemic exposure to benzoic acid and hippuric acid following topical application of clindamycin 1%/benzoyl peroxide 3% fixed-dose combination gel in Japanese patients with acne vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ino, Hiroko; Takahashi, Naoki; Saenz, Alessandra Alio; Wakamatsu, Akira; Hashimoto, Hirofumi; Nakahara, Norie; Hasegawa, Setsuo

    2015-01-01

    Clindamycin 1%/benzoyl peroxide 3% fixed-dose combination gel (CLDM/BPO3%) is a topical product for the treatment of acne vulgaris. In this study, plasma and urine concentrations of benzoic acid (BA) and hippuric acid (HA) were analyzed to estimate the pharmacokinetics (PK) of BPO after application of CLDM/BPO3% twice-daily for 7 days in Japanese patients with acne vulgaris. Seven-day repeated application of CLDM/BPO3% appears to be safe in this patient population. Concentrations of plasma and urine BA were below the limit of quantification before and after repeated application in most of the 12 adult male patients. Mean difference in Cmax and AUC0-last for plasma HA indicated increased exposures after repeated application, but with wide 90% confidence intervals. Mean Ae0-12 for urine HA was similar before and after repeated application. Repeated application of CLDM/BPO3% is thus unlikely to result in accumulation of BA and HA. The study suggests negligible systemic exposure to BPO metabolites from CLDM/BPO3% after 7-day repeated application in male patients with acne vulgaris. © 2014, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  10. APMP.QM-S8: determination of mass fraction of benzoic acid, methyl paraben and n-butyl paraben in soy sauce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Tang Lin; Gui, Ee Mei; Lu, Ting; Sze Cheow, Pui; Giannikopoulou, Panagiota; Kakoulides, Elias; Lampi, Evgenia; Choi, Sik-man; Yip, Yiu-chung; Chan, Pui-kwan; Hui, Sin-kam; Wollinger, Wagner; Carvalho, Lucas J.; Garrido, Bruno C.; Rego, Eliane C. P.; Ahn, Seonghee; Kim, Byungjoo; Li, Xiuqin; Guo, Zhen; Styarini, Dyah; Aristiawan, Yosi; Putri Ramadhaningtyas, Dillani; Aryana, Nurhani; Ebarvia, Benilda S.; Dacuaya, Aaron; Tongson, Alleni; Aganda, Kim Christopher; Junvee Fortune, Thippaya; Tangtrirat, Pradthana; Mungmeechai, Thanarak; Ceyhan Gören, Ahmet; Gündüz, Simay; Yilmaz, Hasibe

    2017-01-01

    The supplementary comparison APMP.QM-S8: determination of mass fraction of benzoic acid, methyl paraben and n-butyl paraben in soy sauce was coordinated by the Health Sciences Authority, Singapore under the auspices of the Organic Analysis Working Group (OAWG) of the Comité Consultatif pour la Quantité de Matière (CCQM). Ten national metrology institutes (NMIs) or designated institutes (DIs) participated in the comparison. All the institutes participated in the comparison for benzoic acid, while six NMIs/DIs participated in the comparison for methyl paraben and n-butyl paraben. The comparison was designed to enable participating institutes to demonstrate their measurement capabilities in the determination of common preservatives in soy sauce, using procedure(s) that required simple sample preparation and selective detection in the mass fraction range of 50 to 1000 mg/kg. The demonstrated capabilities can be extended to include other polar food preservatives (e.g. sorbic acid, propionic acid and other alkyl benzoates) in water, aqueous-based beverages (e.g. fruit juices, tea extracts, sodas, sports drinks, etc) and aqueous-based condiments (e.g. vinegar, fish sauce, etc). Liquid--liquid extraction and/or dilution were applied, followed by instrumental analyses using LC-MS/MS, LC-MS, GC-MS (with or without derivatisation) or HPLC-DAD. Isotope dilution mass spectrometry was used for quantification, except in the case of a participating institute, where external calibration method was used for quantification of all three measurands. The assigned Supplementary Comparison Reference Values (SCRVs) were the medians of ten results for benzoic acid, six results for methyl paraben and six results for n-butyl paraben. Benzoic acid was assigned a SCRV of 154.55 mg/kg with a combined standard uncertainty of 0.94 mg/kg, methyl paraben was assigned a SCRV of 100.95 mg/kg with a combined standard uncertainty of 0.40 mg/kg, and n-butyl paraben was assigned a SCRV of 99.05 mg

  11. Synthesis and Antiradical/Antioxidant Activities of Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester and Its Related Propionic, Acetic, and Benzoic Acid Analoguesc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Touaibia

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE is a bioactive component isolated from propolis. A series of CAPE analogues was synthesized and their antiradical/antioxidant effects analyzed. The effect of the presence of the double bond and of the conjugated system on the antioxidant effect is evaluated with the analogues obtained from 3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl propanoic acid. Those obtained from 2-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl acetic acid and 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid allow the evaluation of the effect of the presence of two carbons between the carbonyl and aromatic system.

  12. Synthesis and antiradical/antioxidant activities of caffeic acid phenethyl ester and its related propionic, acetic, and benzoic acid analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, Luc M; Paré, Aurélie F; Jean-François, Jacques; Hébert, Martin J G; Surette, Marc E; Touaibia, Mohamed

    2012-12-10

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) is a bioactive component isolated from propolis. A series of CAPE analogues was synthesized and their antiradical/antioxidant effects analyzed. The effect of the presence of the double bond and of the conjugated system on the antioxidant effect is evaluated with the analogues obtained from 3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl) propanoic acid. Those obtained from 2-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl) acetic acid and 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid allow the evaluation of the effect of the presence of two carbons between the carbonyl and aromatic system.

  13. Alteration of the phospho- or neutral lipid content and fatty acid composition in Listeria monocytogenes due to acid adaptation mechanisms for hydrochloric, acetic and lactic acids at pH 5.5 or benzoic acid at neutral pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastronicolis, Sofia K; Berberi, Anita; Diakogiannis, Ioannis; Petrova, Evanthia; Kiaki, Irene; Baltzi, Triantafillia; Xenikakis, Polydoros

    2010-10-01

    This study provides a first approach to observe the effects on Listeria monocytogenes of cellular exposure to acid stress at low or neutral pH, notably how phospho- or neutral lipids are involved in this mechanism, besides the fatty acid profile alteration. A thorough investigation of the composition of polar and neutral lipids from L. monocytogenes grown at pH 5.5 in presence of hydrochloric, acetic and lactic acids, or at neutral pH 7.3 in presence of benzoic acid, is described relative to cells grown in acid-free medium. The results showed that only low pH values enhance the antimicrobial activity of an acid. We suggest that, irrespective of pH, the acid adaptation response will lead to a similar alteration in fatty acid composition [decreasing the ratio of branched chain/saturated straight fatty acids of total lipids], mainly originating from the neutral lipid class of adapted cultures. Acid adaptation in L. monocytogenes was correlated with a decrease in total lipid phosphorus and, with the exception of cells adapted to benzoic acid, this change in the amount of phosphorus reflected a higher content of the neutral lipid class. Upon acetic or benzoic acid stress the lipid phosphorus proportion was analysed in the main phospholipids present: cardiolipin, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphoaminolipid and phosphatidylinositol. Interestingly only benzoic acid had a dramatic effect on the relative quantities of these four phospholipids.

  14. Quantification of centimeter-scale spatial variation in PAH, glucose and benzoic acid mineralization and soil organic matter in road-side soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hybholt, Trine K; Aamand, Jens; Johnsen, Anders R

    2011-05-01

    The aim of the study was to determine centimeter-scale spatial variation in mineralization potential in diffusely polluted soil. To this end we employed a 96-well microplate method to measure the mineralization of 14C-labeled organic compounds in deep-well microplates and thereby compile mineralization curves for 348 soil samples of 0.2-cm3. Centimeter-scale spatial variation in organic matter and the mineralization of glucose, benzoic acid, and PAHs (phenanthrene and pyrene) was determined for urban road-side soil sampled as arrays (7×11cm) of 96 subsamples. The spatial variation in mineralization was visualized by means of 2-D contour maps and quantified by means of semivariograms. The geostatistical analysis showed that the easily degradable compounds (glucose and benzoic acid) exhibited little spatial variation in mineralization potential, whereas the mineralization was highly heterogeneous for the PAH compounds that require specialized degraders. The spatial heterogeneity should be taken into account when estimating natural attenuation rates. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. D77, one benzoic acid derivative, functions as a novel anti-HIV-1 inhibitor targeting the interaction between integrase and cellular LEDGF/p75

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Li; Zhao Yaxue; Chen, Jing; Yang Liumeng; Zheng Yongtang; Tang Yun; Shen Xu; Jiang Hualiang

    2008-01-01

    Integration of viral-DNA into host chromosome mediated by the viral protein HIV-1 integrase (IN) is an essential step in the HIV-1 life cycle. In this process, Lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF/p75) is discovered to function as a cellular co-factor for integration. Since LEDGF/p75 plays an important role in HIV integration, disruption of the LEDGF/p75 interaction with IN has provided a special interest for anti-HIV agent discovery. In this work, we reported that a benzoic acid derivative, 4-[(5-bromo-4-{[2,4-dioxo-3-(2-oxo-2-phenylethyl) -1,3-thiazolidin-5-ylidene]methyl}-2-ethoxyphenoxy)methyl]benzoic acid (D77) could potently inhibit the IN-LEDGF/p75 interaction and affect the HIV-1 IN nuclear distribution thus exhibiting antiretroviral activity. Molecular docking with site-directed mutagenesis analysis and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) binding assays has clarified possible binding mode of D77 against HIV-1 integrase. As the firstly discovered small molecular compound targeting HIV-1 integrase interaction with LEDGF/p75, D77 might supply useful structural information for further anti-HIV agent discovery

  16. Synthesis and antitubercular activities of substituted benzoic acid N'-(substituted benzylidene/furan-2-ylmethylene)-N-(pyridine-3-carbonyl)-hydrazides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pradeep; Narasimhan, Balasubramanian; Yogeeswari, Perumal; Sriram, Dharmarajan

    2010-12-01

    A series of benzoic acid hydrazones and its nicotinyl derivatives (1-10) were prepared and evaluated for their antitubercular activity towards a strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). The structures of newly synthesized compounds were confirmed by infrared (IR) and 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectral data and elemental analysis. The in vitro antitubercular activity of synthesized compounds against MTB was carried out in Middlebrook 7H11agar medium supplemented with OADC by agar dilution method. The antitubercular activity results indicated that nicotinic acid N-(3,5-dinitro-benzoyl)-N'-(4-methoxy-benzylidene)-hydrazide (1) is the most potent among the synthesized compounds with MIC of 3.5×10(-3) μM. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Copper(II) complexes with 4-(1H-1, 2, 4-trizol-1-ylmethyl) benzoic acid: Syntheses, crystal structures and antifungal activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, Pingping [Key Laboratory of Synthetic and Natural Functional Molecule Chemistry of Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Northwest University, Xi' an 710069 (China); Li, Jie [Key Laboratory of Resource Biology and Biotechnology in Western China (Ministry of Education), Shaanxi Provincial Key Laboratory of Biotechnology, Xi' an 710069 (China); Bu, Huaiyu, E-mail: 7213792@qq.com [Key Laboratory of Resource Biology and Biotechnology in Western China (Ministry of Education), Shaanxi Provincial Key Laboratory of Biotechnology, Xi' an 710069 (China); Wei, Qing [Key Laboratory of Synthetic and Natural Functional Molecule Chemistry of Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Northwest University, Xi' an 710069 (China); Zhang, Ruolin [Key Laboratory of Resource Biology and Biotechnology in Western China (Ministry of Education), Shaanxi Provincial Key Laboratory of Biotechnology, Xi' an 710069 (China); Chen, Sanping, E-mail: sanpingchen@126.com [Key Laboratory of Synthetic and Natural Functional Molecule Chemistry of Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Northwest University, Xi' an 710069 (China)

    2014-07-01

    Reaction of Cu(II) with an asymmetric semi-rigid organic ligand 4-(1H-1, 2, 4-trizol-1-ylmethyl) benzoic acid (HL), yielded five compounds, [Cu{sub 0.5}L]{sub n} (1), [Cu(HL){sub 2}Cl{sub 2}]{sub n} (2), [Cu(HL){sub 2}Cl{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)] (3), [Cu(L){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)]{sub n} (4) and [Cu(L)(phen)(HCO{sub 2})]{sub n} (5), which have been fully characterized by infrared spectroscopy, elemental analysis, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. As for compounds 1, 2 and 5, Cu(II) is bridged through HL, Cl{sup -}, and formic acid, respectively, featuring 1D chain-structure. In compound 3, Cu(II) with hexahedral coordination sphere is assembled through hydrogen-bonding into 3D supramolecular framework. In compound 4, 1D chain units –Cu–O–Cu–O– are ligand-bridged into a 3D network. All compounds were tested on fungi (Fusarium graminearum, Altemaria solani, Macrophoma kawatsukai, Alternaria alternata and Colletotrichum gloeosporioides). Compound 1 exhibits a better antifungal effect compared to other compounds. An effect of structure on the antifungal activity has also been correlated. - Graphical abstract: Copper(II) compounds with 4-(1H-1, 2, 4-trizol-1-ylmethyl) benzoic acid, were prepared, structurally characterized and investigated for antifungal activity. - Highlights: • The title compounds formed by thermodynamics and thermokinetics. • The five compounds show higher inhibition percentage than reactants. • The structure effect on the antifungal activity.

  18. Silver(I) compounds of the anti-inflammatory agents salicylic acid and p-hydroxyl-benzoic acid which modulate cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banti, C N; Giannoulis, A D; Kourkoumelis, N; Owczarzak, A M; Kubicki, M; Hadjikakou, S K

    2015-01-01

    Silver nitrate reacts with salicylic acid (salH2) or p-hydroxy-benzoic acid (p-HbzaH2) and equimolar amount of NaOH to yield a white precipitations which are then treated with tri(p-tolyl)phosphine (tptp) or tri(m-tolyl)phosphine (tmtp) to yield the complexes [Ag(tptp)2(salH)] (1), [Ag(tptp)2(p-Hbza)] (2) and [Ag(tmtp)2(salH)] (3). Complexes 1 and 3 are also obtained when aspirin (aspH) is used. The acetic ester of salicylic acid is hydrolyzed to form the complexes 1 and 3. However, when aspirin and tptp are used, a mixture of products was obtained which contains both 1 and an ionic complex of formula {[Ag(tptp)4](+)[(salH)(-)]∙[(CH3)2NCHO)]∙(H2O)} (1a). The complexes were characterized by m.p., e.a., mid-FT-IR, (1)H-,(31)P-NMR, HRMS, UV-vis spectroscopic techniques and X-ray crystallography. Two phosphorus and one carboxylic oxygen atoms form a trigonal planar geometry around Ag(I) ions in complexes 1-3. Complex 1a consists of a [Ag(tptp)4](+) cation and a deprotonated salH(-) counter anion. The influence of 1-3 on the viability of MCF-7 (breast) and HeLa (cervix) adenocarcinoma cells, is evaluated. DNA binding tests indicate the ability of 1-3 to modify the activity of cells. The binding constants of 1-3 towards calf-thymus DNA, reveal stronger interaction of 2. Changes in fluorescent emission light of ethidium bromide (EB) in the presence of DNA suggest intercalation or electrostatic interactions into DNA for 1 and 3. Docking studies on DNA-complex interactions confirm the binding of 1-3 in the minor groove of B-DNA. Moreover, the influence of 1-3 on the peroxidation of linoleic acid to hydroperoxylinoleic acid by the enzyme lipoxygenase (LOX) was kinetically and theoretically studied. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. NMR study of the epoxidation of liquid hydrolyzed poly-butadiene and meta-chloro-per-benzoic acid; Estudo atraves de RMN da reacao de epoxidacao de polibutadieno liquido hidroxilado (PBLH) e acido m-cloro perbenzoico (AMCPB)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguiar, Marcelo [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica; Akcelrud, L. [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Escola de Quimica; Menezes, Sonia Cabral de [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas

    1993-12-31

    This work presents a study concerning the selectivity of the different configurations of the double bond present in liquid hydrolyzed poly-butadiene towards the epoxidation reaction with meta-chloro-per-benzoic acid through hydrogen-1, carbon-13 NMR aiming the production of new materials, varying the epoxidation level 12 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. 4-[3,5-Bis(2-hydroxyphenyl-1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl]benzoic acid dimethylformamide monosolvate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. S. Yathirajan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In the molecule of deferasirox dimethylformamide solvate, C21H15N3O4·C3H7NO, the central 1,2,4-triazole ring is tilted with respect to the benzoic acid and one of the 2-hydroxyphenyl units but coplanar with the other 2-hydroxyphenyl group, as indicated by the dihedral angles of 33.69 (9, 72.57 (8 and 5.18 (9°, respectively. Intramolecular O—H...N hydrogen bonds generate an S(6 ring motif. In the crystal, deferasirox molecules are linked by O—H...N hydrogen bonds and weak C—H...O interactions into chains along the c axis. The dimethylformamide solvent molecules are located between the deferasirox chains and are linked to the deferasirox molecules by O—H...O hydrogen bonds and weak C—H...O interactions.

  1. Synthesis and Luminescence Properties of the Binary/Ternary Complex of Samarium Ion with Phenacylmethyl P-Tolyl Sulfoxide and Benzoic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Kui-Suo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A new ligand phenacylmethyl p-tolyl sulfoxide (denoted as L1 has been synthesized by an asymmetric synthesis method. Its novel binary complex Sm(L17·(ClO43·6H2O, and ternary complex Sm(L16·(L2·(ClO42·6H2O (benzoic acid denoted as L2 have been synthesized. The structure and composition of the samarium complexes characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductivity, IR, UV, and 1HNMR. Additionally, fluorescence spectra measurements shows that the complexes display stronger fluorescence intensity in solid state, indicating the ligands could efficiently transfer the energy to Sm3+ ions in the complexes. The ternary complex has stronger fluorescence intensity than the binary complex.

  2. Absorption mechanism study of benzoic acid on calcite. Influence on the wettability; Etude du mecanisme d`absorption de l`acide benzoique sur la calcite. Incidence sur la mouillabilite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legens, Ch.

    1997-12-03

    A pure carbonate rock is strongly water-wet whereas oil accumulations study shows that most of carbonate reservoirs are oil-wet or of mixed-wettability. This is one of the main difficulties to extract crude oil. This change of behavior is due to the adsorption of some crude oil compounds on the mineral surface. We have mainly studied the interactions between acid molecules by adsorption on a calcite powder in an organic phase (benzoic acid and lauric acid) and in an aqueous phase (benzoic acid and lauric sodium salt). The technics which enabled us to define and characterize adsorption are thermogravimetry infrared diffuse reflection and thermal analysis with controlled kinetic linked to a mass spectrometer. Molecular modelling calculations have completed these analysis. It has been showed that when crude oil fills the biggest pores of the reservoir rock, the aqueous film is unstable and acids adsorb via ionic bonds on mineral calcium ions. Wettability is evaluated thanks to contact angle measurements of a water droplet deposited on a compacted powder pellet. Calcite wettability changes were all the greater as hydro-carbonated chains were longer, as it confers molecule hydrophobia. It has been also investigated acid molecules diffusion from the organic to the aqueous phase which saturates the smallest pores. Molecules which are able to diffuse from the first to the second medium do not adsorb on the surface. As a consequence, carbonate rock wettability changes require a direct contact between crude oil and mineral that involves aqueous film instability. (author) 128 refs.

  3. Novel mononuclear and 1D-polymeric derivatives of lanthanides and (η6-benzoic acid)tricarbonylchromium: synthesis, structure and magnetism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrikov, Andrey V; Koroteev, Pavel S; Efimov, Nikolay N; Dobrokhotova, Zhanna V; Ilyukhin, Andrey B; Kostopoulos, Andreas K; Ariciu, Ana-Maria; Novotortsev, Vladimir M

    2017-03-07

    Two series of novel heteroleptic derivatives of lanthanides and (η 6 -benzoic acid)tricarbonylchromium (benchrotrenecarboxylic acid) were synthesized and characterized: mononuclear complexes [Ln(BcrCOO)(acac) 2 (H 2 O) 2 ] (Ln = Eu (1), Gd (2), Tb (3a), Dy (4a), Ho (5a)) and 1D-polymeric ones [Ln(BcrCOO)(acac) 2 (H 2 O)] n (Ln = Tb (3b), Dy (4b), Ho (5b), Er (6), Tm (7), Yb (8) and Y (9)), Bcr = (η 6 -C 6 H 5 )Cr(CO) 3 . The molecular and crystal structures of the obtained compounds were determined. Complexes 3a, 4a, 4b, 6 and 8 were found to exhibit SMM properties. Two maxima were observed on χ''(ν) dependencies (LF and HF) for 4a, 4b and 6. For 4a, the anisotropy barriers are Δ eff /k B = 100 K and 118 K in zero dc-field (128 K and 143 K in 2000 Oe field) for the LF (low frequency) and HF (high frequency) signals, respectively. These values are the highest ones for Ln carboxylate complexes. The nature of the appearance of two maxima in the system is discussed.

  4. Adsorption orientation effects of porphyrin dyes on the performance of DSSC: Comparison of benzoic acid and tropolone anchoring groups binding onto the TiO2 anatase (101) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Han-Cheng; Zhang, Ji; Wang, Ying-Lin

    2018-03-01

    A new porphyrin dye with tropolone anchoring group showing superior stability but lower efficiency versus the promising dye YD2-o-C8 with benzoic acid anchoring group was theoretically investigated for the first time. A series of important parameters related to the efficiency of DSSC were calculated to explore the nature of the experimentally observed lower efficiency and superior stability of tropolone-based solar cells. We found these two dyes with different anchoring groups show comparable electron injection and dye regeneration process. Interestingly, the red-shifted absorption spectrum, relatively weaker ability of releasing protons, and the larger conduction band energy shift of tropolone-based dyes all demonstrated it should show better performance than the benzoic acid dyes, which contradicts with the experimental results. However, through investigating the interaction between the porphyrin dye and the semiconductor by analyzing the electron localization function of the porphyrin dye and preforming energy decomposition analysis, we found that the direction of lone-pair electrons of carbonyl oxygen in the tropolone-based dye makes the dye prefer to adsorb on the surface in an inclined way, in contrary to the benzoic acid-based dye that favored a vertical adsorption. The inclined adsorption could significantly accelerate the charge recombination process between the injected electrons and the oxidized dye, leading to a decreased efficiency of DSSC.

  5. Modulation of dual fluorescence modes and emissions of 2-(1,4-dioxo-1,4-dihydro-naphthalen-2-yl-amino)benzoic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Munendra Pal; Baruah, Jubaraj B.

    2017-12-01

    Intra-molecularly hydrogen bonded compound 2-(1,4-dioxo-1,4-dihydronaphthalen-2-yl-amino)benzoic acid (ANQ) shows emission at single wavelength upon excitation in UV-region whereas it shows dual fluorescence emissions on excitation in visible region. Such emissions depend on solvent, concentration and pH. Solvent dependent structural changes of ANQ are reflected in solution studies carried out by 1HNMR, UV-visible and fluorescence spectroscopy. DLS study has showed that in addition to monomers, self-assemblies with 415 nm average sized particles are formed in DMF solution. HOMO-LUMO of three tautomeric forms of the compound was calculated by DFT using CAMB3LYP/6-31 + G(d,p) as basis set shows that naphthoquinone form has about 86.30 kJ/mol higher stability over an imino-quinone form. From various studies relating concentration dependence, pH, life-time, study on dual-emissions caused by visible excitation has established the observed emissions to originate from aggregation contributing as charge-transfer and deprotonated species. Whereas the single emission caused by UV-excitation occurs through excited state intra-molecular proton transfer.

  6. Molecular structure, vibrational, UV, NMR, HOMO-LUMO, MEP, NLO, NBO analysis of 3,5 di tert butyl 4 hydroxy benzoic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathammal, R.; Sangeetha, K.; Sangeetha, M.; Mekala, R.; Gadheeja, S.

    2016-09-01

    In this study, we report a combined experimental and theoretical study on molecular structure and vibrational spectra of 3,5 di tert butyl 4 hydroxy benzoic acid. The properties of title compound have been evaluated by quantum chemical calculation (DFT) using B3LYP functional and 6-31 + G (d, p) as basis set. IR Spectra has been recorded using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) in the region 4000-400 cm-1. The vibrational assignment of the calculated normal modes has been made on the basis set. The isotropic chemical shifts computed by 13C and 1H NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) analyses also show good agreement with experimental observations. The theoretical UV-Vis spectrum of the compound are used to study the visible absorption maxima (λ max). The structure activity relationship have been interpreted by mapping electrostatic potential surface (MEP), which is valuable information for the quality control of medicines and drug receptor interactions. The Mullikan charges, HOMO (Highest Occupied Molecular Orbital) - LUMO (Lowest Unoccupied Molecular Orbital) energy are analyzed. HOMO-LUMO energy gap and other related molecular properties are also calculated. The Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) analysis is carried out to investigate the various intra and inter molecular interactions of molecular system. The Non-linear optical properties such as dipole moment (μ), polarizability (αtot) and molecular first order hyperpolarizability (β) of the title compound are computed with B3LYP/6-31 + G (d,p) level of theory.

  7. Determination of structural, spectrometric and nonlinear optical features of 2-(4-hydroxyphenylazo)benzoic acid by experimental techniques and quantum chemical calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinar, Mehmet; Yildiz, Nihat; Karabacak, Mehmet; Kurt, Mustafa

    2013-03-01

    The optimized geometrical structure, vibrational and electronic transitions, chemical shifts and nonlinear optical properties of 2-(4-hydroxyphenylazo)benzoic acid (HABA) compound were presented in this study. The ground state geometrical structure and vibrational wavenumbers were carried out by using density functional (DFT/B3LYP) method with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The vibrational spectra of title compound were recorded in solid state with FT-IR and FT-Raman spectrometry in the range of 4000-400 cm-1 and 4000-10 cm-1; respectively. The fundamental assignments were done on the basis of the recorded spectra and total energy distribution (TED) of the vibrational modes. The 1H and 13C NMR spectra were recorded in deuterated DMSO solution, and gauge-invariant atomic orbitals (GIAOs) method was used to predict the isotropic chemical shifts. The UV-Vis absorption spectra of the compound were observed in the range of 200-800 nm in ethanol, methanol and water solvents. To investigate the nonlinear optical properties, the polarizability, anisotropy of polarizability and molecular first hyperpolarizability were computed. A detailed description of spectroscopic behaviors of compound was given based on the comparison of experimental measurements and theoretical computations.

  8. A new thiourea derivative [2-(3-ethylthioureido)benzoic acid] for cloud point extraction of some trace metals in water, biological and food samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortada, W I; Kenawy, I M M; Abdel-Rhman, M H; El-Gamal, G G; Moalla, S M N

    2017-12-01

    2-(3-Ethylthioureido)benzoic acid was prepared and characterized by electronic spectrum, elemental analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum and mass spectrum. The produced ligand was applied for the preconcentrative of Fe 3+ , Co 2+ , Cu 2+ and Zn 2+ in aqueous samples by cloud point extraction methodology. Triton X-114 was used as extractant. Experimental parameters that may affect the extraction process were examined and optimized; such as pH, ligand and triton concentrations, type of diluting solvent, extraction temperature and ionic strength. The calibration curves were linear upto 500μgL -1 for Fe 3+ , Cu 2+ and Zn 2+ and upto 200μgL -1 for Co 2+ . The achieved detection limits were 1.5, 0.23, 0.71 and 0.35μgL -1 for Fe 3+ , Co 2+ , Cu 2+ and Zn 2+ respectively. The accuracy was established by analysis of certified reference materials (Seronorm whole blood L2 and ZCS ZC85006 Tomato). The proposed procedure was used for preconcentration of these metal ions in water, biological and food samples prior to their determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. An innovative nano-sorbent for selective solid-phase extraction and spectrophotometric determination of p-amino benzoic acid in cosmetic products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdolmohammad-Zadeh, H; Falaghi, S; Rahimpour, E

    2014-04-01

    A novel nano-sorbent was developed for selective extraction and pre-concentration of p-amino benzoic acid (PABA) prior to determination by spectrophotometry. Selective extraction of PABA from aqueous solutions was performed using a solid-phase extraction column packed with 200 mg of nickel-zinc-aluminium layered double hydroxide (Ni-Zn-Al LDH) as a nano-sorbent. Extraction procedure is based on the adsorption of p-amino benzoate ions on the Ni-Zn-Al-nitrate LDH and/or their exchanging with LDH interlayer nitrate ions. After elution of extracted analyte by 2.5 mL of 2 mol L(-1) NaCl solution, its concentration was determined spectrophotometrically at λmax = 268 nm. The spectrophotometry method gave a linear response for PABA within the range of 12.5-425.0 μg L(-1) with a correlation coefficient of 0.9994. In the optimum experimental conditions, the limit of detection and sorption capacity were 3.78 μg L(-1) and 21.25 mg g(-1) , respectively. The presented method uses mild separation conditions and is a sensitive, reproducible, simple, low-cost and environment-friendly technique that could be used for the extraction and determination of PABA in various cosmetic samples. © 2013 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  10. Internalisation of hybrid titanium dioxide/para-amino benzoic acid nanoparticles in human dendritic cells did not induce toxicity and changes in their functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migdal, Camille; Rahal, Raed; Rubod, Alain; Callejon, Sylvie; Colomb, Evelyne; Atrux-Tallau, Nicolas; Haftek, Marek; Vincent, Claude; Serres, Mireille; Daniele, Stéphane

    2010-11-10

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have been reported to penetrate into human skin through lesional skin or follicular structures. Therefore, their ability to interact with dendritic cell (DC) was investigated using DCs generated from monocytes (mono-DCs). Hybrid titanium dioxide/para-amino benzoic acid (TiO(2)/PABA) NPs did not induce any cell toxicity. NPs were internalised into DCs through macropinocytosis and not by a receptor-mediated mechanism. Confocal microscopy showed that NPs were not detected in the nucleus. These data are confirmed by electronic microscopy which demonstrated that hybrid NPs were rapidly in contact with cellular membrane and localised into cytoplasmic vesicles without colocalisation with clathrin-coated vesicles. Hybrid NPs did not induce CD86 or HLA-DR overexpression or cytokine secretion (IL-8 and TNF-α) indicating no DC activation. Internalisation of hybrid NPs did not modify DC response towards sensitisers such as nickel and thimerosal or LPS used as positive controls. Moreover, hybrid NPs did not induce any oxidative stress implicated in DC activation process. After mono-DC irradiation by ultraviolet A (UVA), hybrid NP-treated cells did not produce UVA-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) and exhibited a better cell viability compared with UVA-irradiated control cells, suggesting a protecting effect of hybrid TiO(2)/PABA NPs against UVA-induced ROS. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Synthesis and spectroscopic characterization on 4-(2,5-di-2-thienyl-1H-pyrrol-1-yl) benzoic acid: A DFT approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurt, M; Sas, E Babur; Can, M; Okur, S; Icli, S; Demic, S; Karabacak, M; Jayavarthanan, T; Sundaraganesan, N

    2016-01-05

    A complete structural and vibrational analysis of the 4-(2,5-di-2-thienyl-1H-pyrrol-1-yl) benzoic acid (TPBA), was carried out by ab initio calculations, at the density functional theory (DFT) method. Molecular geometry, vibrational wavenumbers and gauge including atomic orbital (GIAO) (13)C NMR and (1)H NMR chemical shift values of (TPBA), in the ground state have been calculated by using ab initio density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP) method with 6-311G(d,p) as basis set for the first time. Comparison of the observed fundamental vibrational modes of (TPBA) and calculated results by DFT/B3LYP method indicates that B3LYP level of theory giving yield good results for quantum chemical studies. Vibrational wavenumbers obtained by the DFT/B3LYP method are in good agreement with the experimental data. The study was complemented with a natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis, to evaluate the significance of hyperconjugative interactions and electrostatic effects on such molecular structure. By using TD-DFT method, electronic absorption spectra of the title compound have been predicted and a good agreement with the TD-DFT method and the experimental one is determined. In addition, the molecular electrostatic potential (MEP), frontier molecular orbitals analysis and thermodynamic properties of TPBA were investigated using theoretical calculations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. In-capillary derivatization with o-phthalaldehyde in the presence of 3-mercaptopropionic acid for the simultaneous determination of monosodium glutamate, benzoic acid, and sorbic acid in food samples via capillary electrophoresis with ultraviolet detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aung, Hnin-Pwint; Pyell, Ute

    2016-06-03

    For the rapid simultaneous determination of monosodium glutamate (MSG), benzoic acid (BA), and sorbic acid (SA) in canned food and other processed food samples, we developed a method that combines in-capillary derivatization with separation by capillary electrophoresis. This method employs the rapid derivatization of MSG with o-phthalaldehyde (OPA) in the presence of 3-mercaptopropionic acid (3-MPA) and enables the detection of the resulting OPA-MSG derivative and of non-derivatized BA and SA at 230nm. The composition of the background electrolyte and the parameters of derivatization and separation are as follows: 25mM borax containing 5mM OPA and 6mM 3-MPA, separation voltage 25mV, injection at 30mbar for 20s, and column temperature 25°C. Because of the high reaction rate and suitably adapted effective electrophoretic mobilities, band broadening due to the derivatization reaction at the start of the separation process is kept to a minimum. The optimized method is validated with respect to LOD, LOQ, linearity, recovery, and precision. This method can be applied to real samples such as soy, fish, oyster and sweet and sour chili sauces after application of appropriate clean-up steps. Mechanisms of zone broadening and zone focusing are discussed showing the validity of the employed theoretical approach regarding the dependence of the peak shape for OPA-MSG on the concentration of MSG in the sample. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Photophysical properties and excited state intramolecular proton transfer in 2-hydroxy-5-[(E)-(4-methoxyphenyl)diazenyl]benzoic acid in homogeneous solvents and micro-heterogeneous environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gashnga, Pynsakhiat Miki; Singh, T. Sanjoy; Baul, Tushar S. Basu; Mitra, Sivaprasad

    2014-01-01

    A systematic study on the photophysical properties and excited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) behavior of 2-hydroxy-5-[(E)-(4-methoxyphenyl)diazenyl]benzoic acid, is reported using steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy in homogeneous solvents as well as in different micro-heterogeneous environments. Depending on the nature of intramolecular hydrogen bond (IHB), the salicylic acid derivative may exist in two different ground state conformers (I and II). Structure I having IHB between the carbonyl oxygen and phenolic hydrogen can undergo ESIPT upon excitation as evidenced by largely Stokes-shifted fluorescence at ∼455 nm; whereas, normal fluorescence in the blue side of the spectrum (∼410 nm) is due to the spontaneous emission from conformer II. The results in homogeneous solvents were compared with those in bio-mimicking environments of β-cyclodextrin (CD) and surfactants. The intensity of the ESIPT fluorescence increases substantially upon encapsulation of the probe into the cyclodextrin as well as micellar nano-cavities. Detailed analysis of the spectroscopic data indicates that the probe forms 1:1 complex with CD in aqueous medium. Binding constant of the probe with the micelles as well as critical micelle concentration was obtained from the variation of fluorescence intensity on increasing concentration of different surfactants in aqueous medium. -- Highlights: • Steady state and time resolved fluorescence study on ESIPT in HMBA. • Dual fluorescence corresponding to the pro- and non-ESIPT structures. • Modulation of ESIPT fluorescence in micro-heterogeneous environments. • 1:1 stoichiometry for interaction with cyclodextrin. • Calculation of binding constant and other physico-chemical properties from fluorescence titration data in surfactants

  14. Manganese [III] Tetrakis [5,10,15,20]-Benzoic Acid Porphyrin Reduces Adiposity and Improves Insulin Action in Mice with Pre-Existing Obesity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan R Brestoff

    Full Text Available The superoxide dismutase mimetic manganese [III] tetrakis [5,10,15,20]-benzoic acid porphyrin (MnTBAP is a potent antioxidant compound that has been shown to limit weight gain during short-term high fat feeding without preventing insulin resistance. However, whether MnTBAP has therapeutic potential to treat pre-existing obesity and insulin resistance remains unknown. To investigate this, mice were treated with MnTBAP or vehicle during the last five weeks of a 24-week high fat diet (HFD regimen. MnTBAP treatment significantly decreased body weight and reduced white adipose tissue (WAT mass in mice fed a HFD and a low fat diet (LFD. The reduction in adiposity was associated with decreased caloric intake without significantly altering energy expenditure, indicating that MnTBAP decreases adiposity in part by modulating energy balance. MnTBAP treatment also improved insulin action in HFD-fed mice, a physiologic response that was associated with increased protein kinase B (PKB phosphorylation and expression in muscle and WAT. Since MnTBAP is a metalloporphyrin molecule, we hypothesized that its ability to promote weight loss and improve insulin sensitivity was regulated by heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1, in a similar fashion as cobalt protoporphyrins. Despite MnTBAP treatment increasing HO-1 expression, administration of the potent HO-1 inhibitor tin mesoporphyrin (SnMP did not block the ability of MnTBAP to alter caloric intake, adiposity, or insulin action, suggesting that MnTBAP influences these metabolic processes independent of HO-1. These data demonstrate that MnTBAP can ameliorate pre-existing obesity and improve insulin action by reducing caloric intake and increasing PKB phosphorylation and expression.

  15. Pasture, multi-enzymes, benzoic acid and essential oils positively influence performance, intestinal organ weight and egg quality in free-range laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Z; Roberts, J; Perez-Maldonado, R A; Goodarzi Boroojeni, F; Swick, R A; Ruhnke, I

    2018-04-01

    1. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of range type, multi-enzyme applications, and a combination of benzoic acid (BA) and essential oils (EO) on the productive performance, organ weight and egg quality of free-range laying hens. 2. Three hundred laying hens were evaluated for the short-term (6 weeks) and long-term (12 weeks) effects of range type (G = no pasture, P = pasture) and feed additives (T1 = control; T2 = betaglucanase/pectinase/protease; T3 = BA/EO). Body weight, feed intake (FI), feed conversion ratio (FCR), egg production (EP), digestive organ weight, and egg quality (EQ) were evaluated. Data were analysed using SPSS 2.2 in a 2×2×3 factorial arrangement. 3. Hens that ranged on pasture were significantly heavier (2043 g vs. 1996 g; p eggs (61.9 g vs. 60.3 g; p ranged on gravel. Hens fed T2 were significantly heavier (2050 g) compared to hens fed T1 (2005 g) or T3 (2008 g). Organ weights (gizzard, liver and pancreas) were significantly heavier in hens ranged on pasture (16.8 g/kg BW, 22.3 g/kg BW and 1.89 g/kg BW, respectively) compared to hens ranged on gravel (14.2 g/kg BW, 21.7 g/kg BW and 1.83 g/kg BW, respectively). Over time, body weight (1970-2070 g; p egg weight (59.5-62.8 g; p eggs with darker yolk colour. Pasture intake and enzyme supplementation increased digestive organ weight significantly.

  16. Nonlinear optical studies on 4-(ferrocenylmethylimino)-2-hydroxy-benzoic acid thin films deposited by matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matei, Andreea; Marinescu, Maria; Constantinescu, Catalin; Ion, Valentin; Mitu, Bogdana; Ionita, Iulian; Dinescu, Maria; Emandi, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A newly synthesized ferrocene-derivative exhibits SHG potential. • Matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation is employed for thin film fabrication. • The optical properties of the films are investigated, presented and discussed. • At maximum laser output power, the SHG signal is strongly influenced by thin film thickness. - Abstract: We present results on a new, laboratory synthesized ferrocene-derivative, i.e. 4-(ferrocenylmethylimino)-2-hydroxy-benzoic acid. Thin films with controlled thickness are deposited by matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE), on quartz and silicon substrates, with the aim of evaluating the nonlinear optical properties for potential optoelectronic applications. Dimethyl sulfoxide was used as matrix, with 1% wt. concentration of the guest compound. The frozen target is irradiated by using a Nd:YAG laser (4ω/266 nm, 7 ns pulse duration, 10 Hz repetition rate), at low fluences ranging from 0.1 to 1 J/cm 2 . Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) are used to probe the surface morphology of the films. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy reveal similar structure of the thin film material when compared to the starting material. The optical properties of the thin films are investigated by spectroscopic-ellipsometry (SE), and the refractive index dependence with respect to temperature is studied. The second harmonic generation (SHG) potential is assessed by using a femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser (800 nm, 60–100 fs pulse duration, 80 MHz repetition rate), at 200 mW maximum output power, revealing that the SHG signal intensity is strongly influenced by the films’ thickness.

  17. Lead(II) coordination polymers based on rigid-flexible 3,5-bis-oxyacetate-benzoic acid: Structural transition driven by temperature control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yong-Qiang, E-mail: chenjzxy@126.com; Tian, Yuan

    2017-03-15

    Three Pb(II) complexes ([Pb{sub 3}(BOABA){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)]·H{sub 2}O){sub n} (1), ([Pb{sub 4}(BOABA){sub 2}(µ{sub 4}-O)(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]·H{sub 2}O){sub n} (2), and [Pb{sub 3}(BOABA){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)]{sub n} (3) (H{sub 3}BOABA=3,5-bis-oxyacetate-benzoic acid) were obtained under the same reaction systems with different temperatures. Complexes 1 and 2 are two dimensional (2D) networks based on Pb-BOABA chains and Pb{sub 4}(µ{sub 4}-O)(COO){sub 6} SBUs, respectively. Complex 3 presents an interesting three dimensional (3D) framework, was obtained by increasing the reaction temperature. Structural transition of the crystallization products is largely dependent on the reaction temperature. Moreover, the fluorescence properties of complexes 1–3 have been investigated. - Graphical abstract: Three Pb(II) coordination polymers were obtained under the same reaction systems with different temperatures. Both of complexes 1 and 2 are 2D network. 3 presents a 3D framework based on Pb–O–C rods SBUs. The 2D to 3D structures transition between three complexes was achieved successfully by temperature control. - Highlights: • Three Pb(II) complexes were obtained under the same reaction systems with different temperatures. • Structural transition of the crystallization products is largely dependent on the reaction temperature. • The luminescence properties studies reveal that three complexes exhibit yellow fluorescence emission behavior, which might be good candidates for obtaining photoluminescent materials.

  18. p-Hydroxy benzoic acid-conjugated dendrimer nanotherapeutics as potential carriers for targeted drug delivery to brain: an in vitro and in vivo evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swami, Rajan; Singh, Indu [National Institute of Pharmaceutical Education & Research (NIPER), Department of Pharmaceutics (India); Kulhari, Hitesh [CSIR-Indian Institute of Chemical Technology, Medicinal Chemistry & Pharmacology Division (India); Jeengar, Manish Kumar [National Institute of Pharmaceutical Education & Research (NIPER), Departmentof Pharmacology (India); Khan, Wahid, E-mail: wahid@niperhyd.ac.in; Sistla, Ramakrishna, E-mail: sistla@iict.res.in, E-mail: rksistla@yahoo.com [National Institute of Pharmaceutical Education & Research (NIPER), Department of Pharmaceutics (India)

    2015-06-15

    Dendrimers which are discrete nanostructures/nanoparticles are emerging as promising candidates for many nanomedicine applications. Ligand-conjugated dendrimer facilitate the delivery of therapeutics in a targeted manner. Small molecules such as p-hydroxyl benzoic acid (pHBA) were found to have high affinity for sigma receptors which are prominent in most parts of central nervous system and tumors. The aim of this study was to synthesize pHBA-dendrimer conjugates as colloidal carrier for site-specific delivery of practically water insoluble drug, docetaxel (DTX) to brain tumors and to determine its targeting efficiency. pHBA, a small molecule ligand was coupled to the surface amine groups of generation 4-PAMAM dendrimer via a carbodiimide reaction and loaded with DTX. The conjugation was confirmed by {sup 1}HNMR and FT-IR spectroscopy. In vitro release of drug from DTX-loaded pHBA-conjugated dendrimer was found to be less as compared to unconjugated dendrimers. The prepared drug delivery system exhibited good physico-chemical stability and decrease in hemolytic toxicity. Cell viability and cell uptake studies were performed against U87MG human glioblastoma cells and formulations exerted considerable anticancer effect than plain drug. Conjugation of dendrimer with pHBA significantly enhanced the brain uptake of DTX which was shown by the recovery of a higher percentage of the dose from the brain following administration of pHBA-conjugated dendrimers compared with unconjugated dendrimer or formulation in clinical use (Taxotere{sup ®}). Therefore, pHBA conjugated dendrimers could be an efficient delivery vehicle for the targeting of anticancer drugs to brain tumors.

  19. Luminescence and Electronic Spectral Studies of Some Synthesized Lanthanide Complexes Using Benzoic Acid Derivative and o-Phenanthroline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wankar, Sneha; Limaye, S N

    2015-07-01

    Lanthanide complexes of p-nitrobenzoic acid(p-NBA) and o-phenanthroline(o-phen) namely [Ln2(Phen)2(p-NBA)3(NO3)2].2H2O where, Ln = Sm(III),Tb(III),Dy(III) and [Eu2(Phen)2(p-NBA)3].4H2O were synthesized and further characterized by Elemental analysis, UV spectroscopy, IR spectroscopy, (1)HNMR spectroscopy. Luminescence measurements were performed on all compounds in ethanolic solution. These complexes have showed narrow emission indicating that the organic ligands are better energy absorber and capable of transferring energy to the Ln (III) ion. Furthermore, we reported electronic spectral studies on [Eu2 (Phen)2 (p-NBA)3].4H2O in order to calculate following parameters, viz: Oscillator strength (f), Judd-Ofelt parameters Ωλ (λ = 2,4,6) and Radiative parameters. [Eu2 (o-Phen)2 (p-NBA)3].4H2O showed the strongest emission at 613 nm corresponds to (5)D0→(7)F2 hypersensitive transition, this emission is very sensitive to the environment. However, the larger value of Ω2 supports the presence of the hypersensitive transition (5)D0→(7)F2 which strictly depends on the nature of ligand. All electronic spectral parameters were calculated systemically.

  20. Neutral losses of sodium benzoate and benzoic acid in the fragmentation of the [M + Na]+ ions of methoxyfenozide and tebufenozide via intramolecular rearrangement in electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Yunfeng; Gao, Guanwei; Shen, Shanshan; Liu, Xin; Lu, Chengyin

    2017-02-15

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) tandem mass spectrometry can be applied to determine structural information about organic compounds. The [M + Na] + ion is one of the major precursor ions in ESI mass spectrometry, but its fragmentation mechanism study is still insufficient. This study reveals the interesting fragmentation reactions of the [M + Na] + ions of methoxyfenozide and tebufenozide. The fragmentations of the [M + Na] + , [M + Li] + , and [M + H] + ions of methoxyfenozide and tebufenozide were studied using a hybrid quadrupole-orbitrap mass spectrometer and an ion trap mass spectrometer. A hydrogen/deuterium (H/D)-exchange experiment in the amide group of methoxyfenozide allowed for the confirmation of the fragmentation mechanism. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed for a further understanding of the fragmentation mechanism of the [M + Na] + ion of methoxyfenozide. Neutral losses of sodium benzoate and benzoic acid in the fragmentation of the [M + Na] + ions of methoxyfenozide and tebufenozide were observed as the major fragmentation pathways. In contrast, similar fragmentations were not observed or minor pathways in the fragmentation of the [M + Li] + and [M + H] + ions of methoxyfenozide and tebufenozide. In addition, a minor product ion resulting from loss of NaOH was identified, which was the first reported example in the fragmentation of sodiated compounds in mass spectrometry. Losses of sodium benzoate and benzoic acid in the fragmentation of the [M + Na] + ions of methoxyfenozide and tebufenozide are proposed to be formed through an intramolecular rearrangement reaction, which is supported by DFT calculations. An H/D-exchange experiment confirms that the carboxyl hydrogen of benzoic acid and the hydrogen of NaOH exclusively derive from the amide hydrogen of the precursor ion. This study enriches our knowledge on the Na + -induced fragmentation reactions. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright

  1. Optimized Dispersive Liquid-Liquid Microextraction Method and High Performance Liquid Chromatography with Ultraviolet Detection for Simultaneous Determination of Sorbic and Benzoic Acids and Evaluation of Contamination of These Preservatives in Iranian Foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javanmardi, Fardin; Arefhosseini, Seyyed Rafie; Ansarin, Masood; Nemati, Mahboob

    2015-01-01

    A rapid, simple, and sensitive dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction procedure followed by HPLC-UV was applied to determine the benzoate and sorbate in foods. The method was optimized for some variables including extraction solvent type and volume, dispersing solvent type and volume, and the effects of salt and pH. Optimum conditions were determined as follows: sample volume, 5 mL; extraction solvent (chloroform) volume, 250 μL; disperser solvent (acetone) volume, 1.2 mL; NaCl amount, 0.75 g/5 mL at pH 4. Sixty samples were analyzed, including 15 doogh, 15 fruit juice, 15 cookie, and 15 tomato paste; benzoic acid was detected in 57 samples (95%) at levels up to 448.1 μg/mL and sorbic acid in 31 samples (51.6%) at levels up to 1369 μg/mL. Under the optimum experimental conditions, the LOD and LOQ were determined as 0.1 and 0.5 μg/mL for benzoate and 0.08 and 0.3 μg/mL for sorbate, respectively. The results showed that these preservatives are commonly used at high levels in yogurt drinks (dooghs) and cookies. Also, the concentration of benzoic acid that was detected in the tomato paste and fruit juice samples was low but may affect children and sensitive persons.

  2. Dicarboxylic acids, oxoacids, benzoic acid, α-dicarbonyls, WSOC, OC, and ions in spring aerosols from Okinawa Island in the western North Pacific Rim: size distributions and formation processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, D. K.; Kawamura, K.; Lazaar, M.; Kunwar, B.; Boreddy, S. K. R.

    2015-09-01

    Size-segregated aerosols (9-stages from 11.3 μm in diameter) were collected at Cape Hedo, Okinawa in spring 2008 and analyzed for water-soluble diacids (C2-C12), ω-oxoacids (ωC2-ωC9), pyruvic acid, benzoic acid and α-dicarbonyls (C2-C3) as well as water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC), organic carbon (OC) and major ions. In all the size-segregated aerosols, oxalic acid (C2) was found as the most abundant species followed by malonic and succinic acids whereas glyoxylic acid (ωC2) was the dominant oxoacid and glyoxal (Gly) was more abundant than methylglyoxal. Diacids (C2-C5), ωC2 and Gly as well as WSOC and OC peaked at 0.65-1.1 μm in fine mode whereas azelaic (C9) and 9-oxononanoic (ωC9) acids peaked at 3.3-4.7 μm in coarse mode. Sulfate and ammonium are enriched in fine mode whereas sodium and chloride are in coarse mode. These results imply that water-soluble species in the marine aerosols could act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) to develop the cloud cover over the western North Pacific Rim. The organic species are likely produced by a combination of gas-phase photooxidation, and aerosol-phase or in-cloud processing during long-range transport. The coarse mode peaks of malonic and succinic acids were obtained in the samples with marine air masses, suggesting that they may be associated with the reaction on sea salt particles. Bimodal size distributions of longer-chain diacid (C9) and oxoacid (ωC9) with a major peak in the coarse mode suggest their production by photooxidation of biogenic unsaturated fatty acids via heterogeneous reactions on sea salt particles.

  3. Effect of oregano essential oil and benzoic acid supplementation to a low-protein diet on meat quality, fatty acid composition, and lipid stability of longissimus thoracis muscle in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chuanshang; Zhang, Xiaming; Xia, Mao; Liu, Zuhong; Wei, Hongkui; Deng, Zhao; Wang, Chao; Jiang, Siwen; Peng, Jian

    2017-08-31

    Consumers are becoming increasingly interested in food containing appropriately high concentration of intramuscular fat (IMF) and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). The supplementation of feed with antioxidants decreases degradation of lipids in muscles thereby enhances nutritional and sensory properties of meat. Two experiments were conducted to determine the effects of adding oregano essential oil (OEO) and benzoic acid (BA) to low-protein, amino acid-supplemented diets on meat quality, sensory profile, fatty acid composition, and lipid oxidation of longissimus thoracis (LT) muscle in pigs. In Exp. 1, 21 barrows were housed in metabolism cages and randomly allotted to 1 of 3 diets. The three diets were normal protein diet (NPD), medium protein diet (MPD) and low protein diet (LPD) with 1% and 2% less than NPD, respectively. In Exp. 2, 36 barrows were randomly divided into three experimental groups, namely, NPD, LPD, and identical LPD supplemented with blends of OEO (250 mg/kg feed) and BA (1000 mg/kg feed) (LPOB) groups. No significant effects of diets on meat quality were observed in Exp. 1. The b* 45min , tenderness, and IMF content in LPD muscle were higher than those in NPD and LPOB muscle. The LT muscle in LPD group contained a higher percentage of oleic acid (C18:1n-9) and a lower percentage of linoleic acid (C18:2n-6) than those in NPD group. Dietary LPOB improved oxidative stability, total superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase but decreased drip loss in LT muscle. These findings suggest that growing-finishing pigs fed with a low-protein, amino acid-supplemented diet show a high content of intramuscular fat in the longissimus thoracis muscle. Dietary LPOB enhances the anti-oxidative status by improving antioxidative capacity but deteriorates the sensory attributes by decreasing IMF content of meat.

  4. Homologous series of low molecular weight (C1-C10) monocarboxylic acids, benzoic acid and hydroxyacids in fine-mode (PM2.5) aerosols over the Bay of Bengal: Influence of heterogeneity in air masses and formation pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boreddy, Suresh K. R.; Mochizuki, Tomoki; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Bikkina, Srinivas; Sarin, M. M.

    2017-10-01

    Low molecular weight monocarboxylic acids (LMW monoacids) are most abundant volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the atmosphere and often act as important contributors to the acidity of precipitation in addition to inorganic acids. However, there is a large uncertainty in the sources and secondary formations of these acids in the atmosphere. This study reports homologous series of LMW monoacids, including normal (C1-C10), branched chain (iC4-iC6), aromatic (benzoic acid) and hydroxyacids (lactic and glycolic acids) in the fine-mode (PM2.5) aerosols collected over the Bay of Bengal (BoB) during a winter cruise (December 2008 to January 2009). The samples were associated with two distinct continental air masses arriving from the Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP-outflow) and Southeast Asia (SEA-outflow). The molecular distributions of organic acids are characterized by the dominance of formic acid (C1) followed by acetic acid (C2) and nonanoic acid (C9) in the IGP-outflow, whereas dominance of C1 or C9 was observed in the SEA-outflow followed by C2. Formic-to-acetic acid (C1/C2) ratios were higher than unity (mean: 1.3 ± 0.3) in the IGP-outflow, whereas they were less than unity (0.9 ± 0.5) in the SEA-outflow. These results suggest that secondary formation of organic acids is largely important in the IGP-outflow whereas primary emission is a major source of organic acids in the SEA-outflow. Based on the correlation coefficient matrix analysis and C1/C2 and C4/C3 ratios, we consider that the sources of C1 are probably associated with the secondary formation via the oxidation of biogenic VOCs, while C2 has both primary and secondary formations associated with anthropogenic sources in the IGP-outflow. On the other hand, C1 and C2 have similar sources (both primary and secondary) originated from biomass burning and bacterial activities via long-range atmospheric transport in the SEA-outflow, as inferred from the MODIS fire spot data, significant concentrations of isovaleric

  5. Electron localization-delocalization matrices in the prediction of pKa's and UV-wavelengths of maximum absorbance of p-benzoic acids and the definition of super-atoms in molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumar, Ismat; Ayers, Paul W.; Matta, Chérif F.

    2014-09-01

    An integration of chemical graph theory and the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) is proposed. QTAIM localization and delocalization indices organized as matrices are shown useful in the modeling of ground and excited state molecular properties. The pKa's of 14 para-substituted benzoic acids and the λmax's of a subset of those are predicted with accuracy (pKa: r2 = 0.986, q2 = 0.982; λmax: r2 = 0.973, q2 = 0.944). 'Super-atoms' obtained by pruning the branches of the substituents' graphs equalize the matrices of all molecules of the set. The pKa of p-dimethylaminobenzoic acid is found to be 5.02 rather than the reported value of 6.03.

  6. Presença dos ácidos benzóico e sórbico em vinhos e sidras produzidos no Brasil Presence of benzoic and sorbic acids in Brazilian wines and ciders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Margarete Donato Machado

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do presente trabalho foi a determinação dos níveis de ácido benzóico e ácido sórbico em uma variedade de vinhos e sidras brasileiros, de modo a comparar os valores com os máximos permitidos pela legislação. Um total de 49 amostras (sendo 35 vinhos tintos, 11 vinhos brancos e 3 sidras, disponíveis comercialmente, foram analisadas por CLAE com detector de arranjo de diodos. Apesar do uso de ácido benzóico em vinhos e sidras não ser permitido, esse conservador foi detectado em 3 amostras: 1 vinho e 2 sidras em níveis de 295,6, 424,7 e 608,4 mg.L-1, respectivamente. O ácido sórbico foi detectado em 49% das amostras analisadas com níveis variando de 91,0 a 309,5 mg.L-1. Considerando apenas as amostras nas quais o ácido sórbico foi detectado, o valor médio encontrado foi de 171,2 mg.L-1. Em seis amostras de vinho tinto os níveis de ácido sórbico estavam acima do permitido pela legislação brasileira. Os resultados encontrados no presente trabalho mostram que em algumas amostras, os níveis dos ácidos benzóico e sórbico nos vinhos e sidras analisados, assim como a rotulagem desses produtos não estão de acordo com a legislação vigente no Brasil.This study determined benzoic and sorbic acid contents in Brazilian wines and ciders in order to verify whether these preservatives are used in accordance with Brazilian regulations. Forty-nine samples of commercially available wines (35 red wines, 11 white wines and 3 ciders were analyzed by HPLC coupled to a photodiode array detector. Although the use of benzoic acid in wines and ciders is not permitted, this preservative was detected in three samples, one wine and two ciders, which contained benzoic acid levels of 295.6, 424.7 and 608.4 mg.L-1, respectively. Sorbic acid was detected in 49% of the analyzed samples, with levels ranging from 91.0 to 309.5 mg.L-1. Considering only the samples containing sorbic acid, the mean content detected was 171.2 mg.L-1. Six red wine

  7. Dicarboxylic acids, oxoacids, benzoic acid, α-dicarbonyls, WSOC, OC, and ions in spring aerosols from Okinawa Island in the western North Pacific Rim: size distributions and formation processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. K. Deshmukh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Size-segregated aerosols (nine stages from < 0.43 to > 11.3 µm in diameter were collected at Cape Hedo, Okinawa, in spring 2008 and analyzed for water-soluble diacids (C2–C12, ω-oxoacids (ωC2–ωC9, pyruvic acid, benzoic acid, and α-dicarbonyls (C2–C3 as well as water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC, organic carbon (OC, and major ions (Na+, NH4+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Cl−, NO3−, SO42−, and MSA−. In all the size-segregated aerosols, oxalic acid (C2 was found to be the most abundant species, followed by malonic and succinic acids, whereas glyoxylic acid (ωC2 was the dominant oxoacid and glyoxal (Gly was more abundant than methylglyoxal. Diacids (C2–C5, ωC2, and Gly as well as WSOC and OC peaked at fine mode (0.65–1.1 µm whereas azelaic (C9 and 9-oxononanoic (ωC9 acids peaked at coarse mode (3.3–4.7 µm. Sulfate and ammonium were enriched in fine mode, whereas sodium and chloride were in coarse mode. Strong correlations of C2–C5 diacids, ωC2 and Gly with sulfate were observed in fine mode (r =  0.86–0.99, indicating a commonality in their secondary formation. Their significant correlations with liquid water content in fine mode (r =  0.82–0.95 further suggest an importance of the aqueous-phase production in Okinawa aerosols. They may also have been directly emitted from biomass burning in fine mode as supported by strong correlations with potassium (r =  0.85–0.96, which is a tracer of biomass burning. Bimodal size distributions of longer-chain diacid (C9 and oxoacid (ωC9 with a major peak in the coarse mode suggest that they were emitted from the sea surface microlayers and/or produced by heterogeneous oxidation of biogenic unsaturated fatty acids on sea salt particles.

  8. Monitoring of Para-Hydroxy Benzoic Acid Esters (Antimicrobial and Preservative in Tehran Wastewater Treatment Plants and Performance Evaluation of Various Wastewater Treatment Method in the Removal of These Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Yegane Badi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Parabens are a group of Para-hydroxy Benzoic acid alkyl esters which extensively used as preservative in personal care products. Parabens have been recently found in wastewater, rivers, soil and dust. Therefore, the purpose of this study aimed to Monitor the occurrence of parabens from selected wastewater treatment plants (Shahrak Ghods and south of Tehran and evaluate the performance of different treatment methods for removing these compounds. Methods: In this study, the samples from influent and effluent were collected from Shahrak Ghods and South of Tehran wastewater treatment plant as Seasonal and Three samples per season. Concentration of Para-hydroxy Benzoic acid esters was determined by HPLC, CECIL, 4100 at 242 nm. Result: After sampling in the different seasons from the west and south treatment plants, two selective paraben concentrations (Methyl paraben and Ethyl paraben were measured. The results showed that average concentration of Methyl paraben (MeP and Ethyl paraben EtP( respectively were 740.7 and 277.7 ng/L in the Influent and 179.3 and 45.8 ng/L in the effluent of Shahrak Ghods treatment plant. Also, the average concentration of MeP and EtP respectively were 835.3 and 295.3 ng/L in Influent and 132.8 and 29.7 ng/L in the effluent of South of Tehran treatment plant. In the next step, Risk assessment of effluent treatment plants discharging to environment with comparing the studies was done. According to the paraben concentration in the effluent of both treatment plants, discharge of effluent treatment plants whit selective contaminants, have little biological effects on ecosystems. Conclusions: The removal efficiency of Shahrak Ghods treatment plant in removing parabens, was lower than the South of Tehran. But the effluent quality of both treatment plant was less than the Effluent discharge standard. So both of treatment plant have appropriate performance to removal contaminants.

  9. Synthesis, structural characterization and Hirshfeld analysis studies of three novel co-crystals of trans-4-[(2-amino-3,5-dibrobenzyl) amino] cyclohexanol with hydroxyl benzoic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yu-heng; Lou, Ming; Sun, Qing-yang; Ge, Shu-wang; Sun, Bai-wang

    2015-03-01

    Combination of active pharmaceutical ingredients, trans-4-[(2-amino-3,5-dibrobenzyl) amino] cyclohexanol (AMB) and some organic acids, e.g., p-hydroxybenzoic acid (PHBA), m-hydroxybenzoic acid (MHBA), and 3,4-dihydroxy benzoic acid (DHBA), yield three novel co-crystals characterized by X-ray single-crystal, Fluorescence spectroscopy and thermal analysis (DSC and TGA), which included co-crystal 1 with 2:2: 1 stoichiometry of AMB, PHBA and H2O, co-crystal 2 with 1:1 stoichiometry of AMB and MHBA, and co-crystal 3 with 1:1:1 stoichiometry of AMB, DHBA and CH3OH. Constituents of the co-crystalline phase were also investigated in terms of Hirshfeld surfaces. In the crystal lattice, a three-dimensional hydrogen-bonded network is observed, including formation of a two-dimensional molecular scaffolding motif. Hirshfeld surfaces and fingerprint plots of three co-crystals show that structures are stabilized by H⋯H, N-H⋯O, H⋯Br and C⋯H intermolecular interactions. Besides, the studies of the solubility showed that this co-crystal strategy could promote the solubility of AMB and follow the order: co-crystal 1 < co-crystal 2 < co-crystal 3.

  10. Synthesis of Mannich bases: 2-(3-Phenylaminopropionyloxy)-benzoic acid and 3-Phenylamino-1-(2,4,6-trimethoxy-phenyl)-propan-1-one, their toxicity, ionization constant, antimicrobial and antioxidant activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oloyede, Ganiyat K; Willie, Itoro E; Adeeko, Oluwakemi O

    2014-12-15

    Mannich bases 2-(3-Phenylaminopropionyloxy)-benzoic acid (A) and 3-Phenylamino-1-(2,4,6-trimethoxy-phenyl)-propan-1-one (B) were synthesized. Structures were confirmed by ultraviolet/visible and infra-red spectroscopies. The ionization constant (pKa) values at 8.3 and 8.0 reported for compounds A and B, respectively, indicated that protonation might occur at physiological pH. The LC50 values of 145,595 μg/ml (A) and 82,526 μg/ml (B) obtained from Brine shrimp lethality testing showed that both compounds were non-toxic. The two compounds possessed significant antimicrobial activity against bacterial and fungal strains; Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aereus, Bacillus subtilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Salmonellae typhi, Candida albicans, Rhizopus stolonifer, Aspergillus niger and Penicillium notatum when compared with standards, gentamicin and tioconazole for bacteria and fungi, respectively. In vitro antioxidant screening by the DPPH free radical scavenging method and the scavenging effect on hydrogen peroxide showed that the compounds possessed significant antioxidant activity when compared with antioxidant standards ascorbic acid, butylated hydroxylanisole and α-tocopherol. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Modeling, Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Potential Retinoid-X-Receptor (RXR) Selective Agonists: Novel Analogs of 4-[1-(3,5,5,8,8- Pentamethyl-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-2- naphthyl)ethynyl]benzoic Acid (Bexarotene)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Carl E.; Jurutka, Peter W.; Marshall, Pamela A.; Groy, Thomas L.; van der Vaart, Arjan; Ziller, Joseph W.; Furmick, Julie K.; Graeber, Mark E.; Matro, Erik; Miguel, Belinda V.; Tran, Ivy T.; Kwon, Jeng Eun S.; Tedeschi, Jamie N.; Moosavi, Shahram; Danishyar, Amina; Philp, Joshua S.; Khamees, Reina O.; Jackson, Jevon N.; Grupe, Darci K.; Badshah, Syed L.; Hart, Justin W.

    2009-01-01

    This report describes the synthesis of analogs of 4-[1-(3,5,5,8,8-pentamethyl-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-2-naphthyl)ethynyl]benzoic acid (1), commonly known as bexarotene, and their analysis in acting as retinoid-X-receptor (RXR)-specific agonists. Compound 1 has FDA approval to treat cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL); however, its use can cause side effects such as hypothyroidism and increased triglyceride concentrations, presumably by disruption of RXR heterodimerization with other nuclear receptors. The novel analogs in the present study have been evaluated for RXR activation in an RXR mammalian-2-hybrid assay as well as an RXRE-mediated transcriptional assay, and for their ability to induce apoptosis, as well as for their mutagenicity and cytotoxicity. Analysis of 11 novel compounds revealed the discovery of 3 analogs that best induce RXR-mediated transcriptional activity, stimulate apoptosis, have comparable Ki and EC50 values to 1, and are selective RXR agonists. Our experimental approach suggests that rational drug design can develop new rexinoids with improved biological properties. PMID:19791803

  12. Modeling, synthesis and biological evaluation of potential retinoid X receptor (RXR) selective agonists: novel analogues of 4-[1-(3,5,5,8,8-pentamethyl-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-2-naphthyl)ethynyl]benzoic acid (bexarotene).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Carl E; Jurutka, Peter W; Marshall, Pamela A; Groy, Thomas L; van der Vaart, Arjan; Ziller, Joseph W; Furmick, Julie K; Graeber, Mark E; Matro, Erik; Miguel, Belinda V; Tran, Ivy T; Kwon, Jungeun; Tedeschi, Jamie N; Moosavi, Shahram; Danishyar, Amina; Philp, Joshua S; Khamees, Reina O; Jackson, Jevon N; Grupe, Darci K; Badshah, Syed L; Hart, Justin W

    2009-10-08

    This report describes the synthesis of analogues of 4-[1-(3,5,5,8,8-pentamethyl-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-2-naphthyl)ethynyl]benzoic acid (1), commonly known as bexarotene, and their analysis in acting as retinoid X receptor (RXR)-specific agonists. Compound 1 has FDA approval to treat cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL); however, its use can cause side effects such as hypothyroidism and increased triglyceride concentrations, presumably by disruption of RXR heterodimerization with other nuclear receptors. The novel analogues in the present study have been evaluated for RXR activation in an RXR mammalian-2-hybrid assay as well as an RXRE-mediated transcriptional assay and for their ability to induce apoptosis as well as for their mutagenicity and cytotoxicity. Analysis of 11 novel compounds revealed the discovery of three analogues that best induce RXR-mediated transcriptional activity, stimulate apoptosis, have comparable K(i) and EC(50) values to 1, and are selective RXR agonists. Our experimental approach suggests that rational drug design can develop new rexinoids with improved biological properties.

  13. A neutron diffraction study of the crystal of benzoic acid from 6 to 293 K and a macroscopic-scale quantum theory of the lattice of hydrogen-bonded dimers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fillaux, François, E-mail: francois.fillaux@upmc.fr [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 8233, MONARIS, F-7505 Paris (France); Cousson, Alain, E-mail: alain-f.cousson@cea.fr [Laboratoire Léon Brillouin (CEA-CNRS), C.E. Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France)

    2016-11-10

    Highlights: • Proton transfer and tautomerism are revisited from quantum viewpoint. • Neutron-diffraction gives evidence for long-range correlations for protons. • We introduce a decoherence-free macroscopic-scale crystal-state. • All observations accord with the principle of complementarity. • Computational-chemistry models are inappropriate. - Abstract: Measurements via different techniques of the crystal of benzoic acid have led to conflicting conceptions of tautomerism: statistical disorder for diffraction; semiclassical jumps for relaxometry; quantum states for vibrational spectroscopy. We argue that these conflicts follow from the prejudice that nuclear positions and eigenstates are pre-existing to measurements, what is at variance with the principle of complementarity. We propose a self-contained quantum theory. First of all, new single-crystal neutron-diffraction data accord with long-range correlation for proton-site occupancies. Then we introduce a macroscopic-scale quantum-state emerging from phonon condensation, for which nuclear positions and eigenstates are indefinite. As to quantum-measurements, an incoming wave (neutron or photon) entangled with the condensate realizes a transitory state, either in the space of static nuclear-coordinates (diffraction), or in that of the symmetry coordinates (spectroscopy and relaxometry). We derive temperature-laws for proton-site occupancies and for the relaxation rate, which compare favorably with measurements.

  14. 4-[(4-Amino­phen­yl)sulfon­yl]aniline–3,5-dinitro­benzoic acid (1/1)

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Graham; Wermuth, Urs D.

    2012-01-01

    The title compound, C7H4N2O6·C12H12N2O2S, is a 1:1 cocrystal of the drug dapsone with 3,5-dinitrobenzoic acid. The dihedral angle between the two aromatic rings of the dapsone molecule is 75.4 (2)°, and the dihedral angles between these rings and that of the 3,5-dinitrobenzoic acid are 64.5 (2) and 68.4 (2)°. A strong intermolecular carboxylic acid O—H...Namine hydrogen bond is found, together with intermolecular amine N&#...

  15. Simultaneous Photocatalytic Reduction of Cr(VI and Oxidation of Benzoic Acid in Aqueous N-F-Codoped TiO2 Suspensions: Optimization and Modeling Using the Response Surface Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Antonopoulou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The simultaneous photocatalytic reduction of Cr(VI and oxidation of benzoic acid (BA in aqueous suspensions using N-F-codoped TiO2 and simulated solar irradiation were investigated in the present study. Chemometric optimization tools such as response surface methodology (RSM and experimental design were used to model and optimize selected operational parameters of the simultaneous photocatalytic reduction of Cr(VI and oxidation of BA. RSM was developed by considering a central composite design with three input variables, that are, N-F-codoped TiO2 mass, ratio of Cr/BA, and pH. The removal of Cr(VI and BA in binary systems, containing both Cr(VI and BA, showed a synergistic photocatalytic decontamination as BA significantly facilitated Cr(VI reduction, whereas Cr(VI accelerated also BA degradation. Due to the anionic-type adsorption onto TiO2 and its acid-catalyzed photocatalytic reduction, the removal of Cr(VI decreased with increasing pH, while the degradation of BA followed also the same trend. Under the optimum conditions (N-F-TiO2 = 600 mg L−1, ratio of Cr(VI/BA = 5, pH = 4, the removal for both Cr and BA followed a pseudo first-order kinetic model. It was found that the selected variables have significant effect both on Cr(VI removal and BA degradation efficiency. The results revealed the feasibility and the effectiveness of using N-F-codoped TiO2 as photocatalyst for simultaneous decontamination of Cr(VI and organic pollutants such as BA due to the appropriate oxidation and reduction ability of the photogenerated h+VB-e−CB pairs.

  16. 4-[(E-(4-Fluorobenzylideneamino]benzoic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanca M. Muñoz-Flores

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, C14H10FNO2, the benzene rings make a dihedral angle of 57.50 (13°, and the molecule has an E configuration about the C=N bond. In the crystal, molecules are linked via pairs of O—H...O hydrogen bonds, forming inversion dimers.

  17. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 20, Revision 3 (FGE.20Rev3): Benzyl alcohols, benzaldehydes, a related acetal, benzoic acids, and related esters from chemical groups 23 and 30

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to consider in this revision 3 of Flavouring Group Evaluation 20, the SCF Opinion on benzoic acid. Furthermore information on stereoisomeric composition for two...... substances [FL-no: 06.104 and 09.570] and new information to support the re-allocation of the structural class for the candidate substance piperonyl alcohol [FL-no: 02.205] has been submitted. The 41 flavouring substances in Flavouring Group Evaluation 20 were evaluated using the Procedure in Commission...... Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. None of the substances were considered to have genotoxic potential. The substances were evaluated through a stepwise approach (the Procedure) that integrates information on structure-activity relationships, intake from current uses, toxicological threshold of concern...

  18. Synthetic and structure/activity studies on acid-substituted 2-arylphenols: discovery of 2-[2-propyl-3-[3-[2-ethyl-4-(4-fluorophenyl)-5- hydroxyphenoxy]-propoxy]phenoxy]benzoic acid, a high-affinity leukotriene B4 receptor antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, J S; Bach, N J; Baker, S R; Baldwin, R F; Borromeo, P S; Cockerham, S L; Fleisch, J H; Floreancig, P; Froelich, L L; Jackson, W T

    1995-10-27

    Structural derivatives of LY255283 have been studied as receptor antagonists of leukotriene B4. Substitution of the 2-hydroxyacetophenone subunit of 1 (LY255283) with a 2-arylphenol group provided entry into several new series that feature various mono- and diacidic core functionality. These new analogues, the subject of a broad structure-activity investigation, displayed significantly increased in vitro and in vivo activity as receptor antagonists of LTB4. A series of diaryl ether carboxylic acids demonstrated especially interesting activity and led to the discovery of compound 43b, 2-[2-propyl-3-[3-[2-ethyl-4-(4- fluorophenyl)-5-hydroxyphenoxy]-propoxy]phenoxy]benzoic acid (LY293111), a 2-arylphenol-substituted diaryl ether carboxylic acid which displayed potent binding to human neutrophils (IC50 = 17 +/- 4.6 nM) and guinea pig lung membranes (IC50 = 6.6 +/- 0.71 nM), inhibition of LTB4-induced expression of the CD11b/CD18 receptor on human neutrophils (IC50 = 3.3 +/- 0.81 nM), and inhibition of LTB4-induced contraction of guinea pig lung parenchyma (pKB = 8.7 +/- 0.16). In vivo, 43b demonstrated potent activity in inhibiting LTB4-induced airway obstruction in the guinea pig when dosed by the oral (ED50 = 0.40 mg/kg) or intravenous (ED50 = 0.014 mg/kg) routes. A specific LTB4 receptor antagonist, 43b had little effect on inhibiting contractions of guinea pig lung parenchyma induced by leukotriene D4 (LTD4), histamine, carbachol, or U46619. Compound 43b has been chosen as a clinical candidate and is currently in phase I studies for a variety of inflammatory diseases.

  19. Inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase by cis-4-[4-(3-adamantan-1-ylureido)cyclohexyl-oxy]benzoic acid exhibits antihypertensive and cardioprotective actions in transgenic rats with angiotensin II-dependent hypertension

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Neckář, Jan; Kopkan, L.; Husková, Z.; Kolář, František; Papoušek, František; Kramer, H. J.; Hwang, S.H.; Hammock, B.D.; Imig, J. D.; Malý, J.; Netuka, I.; Ošťádal, Bohuslav; Červenka, L.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 122, č. 11 (2012), s. 513-525 ISSN 0143-5221 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAAX01110901; GA AV ČR(CZ) KAN200520703; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0510 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : hypertension * angiotensin II * kidney * epoxyeicosatrienoic acids * soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitor * myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery Impact factor: 4.859, year: 2012

  20. Mn(II) complexes with bipyridine, phenanthroline and benzoic acid ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... complexes and the antifungal (anticandidal) activities of the Mn(II) complexes were remarkably higher than the reference drug ketoconazole. Keywords. Manganese complex; catalase; biological activity; hydrogen peroxide; bipyridine; phenanthroline. 1. Introduction. The synthesis of transition metal complexes that exhibit.

  1. Oxidation of styrene to benzaldehyde/benzoic acid

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    spectroscopy and powder X-ray crystallography. Keywords. Heptamolybdate type polyoxometalate cluster anion; transition metal coordination complexes; oxidation of styrene; hydrogen peroxide as an oxidant; catalysis. 1. Introduction. Over the last ...

  2. Mn(II) complexes with bipyridine, phenanthroline and benzoic acid ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    of two different types and the number of chelating NN-donor neutral ligands allowed for analysis of their ... N-N chelating coordination of neutral bipy and phen .... phenicol was used as the standard antibacterial agent whereas ketoconazole was used as an antifungal agent. The antimicrobial activity of the compounds.

  3. Crystal structures of three anhydrous salts of the Lewis base 1,8-diazabicyclo[5.4.0]undec-7-ene (DBU with the ring-substituted benzoic acid analogues 4-aminobenzoic acid, 3,5-dinitrobenzoic acid and 3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Smith

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The anhydrous salts of the Lewis base 1,8-diazabicyclo[5.4.0]undec-7-ene (DBU with 4-aminobenzoic acid [1-aza-8-azoniabicyclo[5.4.0]undec-7-ene 4-aminobenzoate, C9H17N2+·C7H6NO2− (I], 3,5-dinitrobenzoic acid [1-aza-8-azoniabicyclo[5.4.0]undec-7-ene 3,5-dinitrobenzoate, C9H17N2+·C7H3N2O6−, (II] and 3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid (DNSA [1-aza-8-azoniabicyclo[5.4.0]undec-7-ene 2-hydroxy-3,5-dinitrobenzoate, C9H17N2+·C7H3N2O7−, (III] have been determined and their hydrogen-bonded structures are described. In both (II and (III, the DBU cations have a common disorder in three of the C atoms of the six-membered ring moieties [site-occupancy factors (SOF = 0.735 (3/0.265 (3 and 0.686 (4/0.314 (4, respectively], while in (III, there is additional rotational disorder in the DNSA anion, giving two sites (SOF = 0.72/0.28, values fixed for the phenol group. In the crystals of (I and (III, the cation–anion pairs are linked through a primary N—H...Ocarboxyl hydrogen bond [2.665 (2 and 2.869 (3 Å, respectively]. In (II, the ion pairs are linked through an asymmetric three-centre R12(4, N—H...O,O′ chelate association. In (I, structure extension is through amine N—H...Ocarboxyl hydrogen bonds between the PABA anions, giving a three-dimensional structure. The crystal structures of (II and (III are very similar, the cation–anion pairs being associated only through weak C—H...O hydrogen bonds, giving in both overall two-dimensional layered structures lying parallel to (001. No π–π ring associations are present in any of the structures.

  4. Organosulfates and organic acids in Arctic aerosols: speciation, annual variation and concentration levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, A. M. K.; Kristensen, K.; Nguyen, Q. T.

    2014-01-01

    organosulfates - from both anthropogenic and biogenic precursors were in focus. A total of 11 organic acids (terpenylic acid, benzoic acid, phthalic acid, pinic acid, suberic acid, azelaic acid, adipic acid, pimelic acid, pinonic acid, diaterpenylic acid acetate and 3-methyl-1,2,3-butanetricarboxylic acid), 12...

  5. Comparing the Effect of Diets Treated with Different Organic Acids ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An experiment was conducted to compare the growth and economics of adding organic acids to diets of broiler chickens. The organic acids were sorbic benzoic lactic and propionic acids. 150 day old Hubbard chicks were used. There were five treatments. Diet 1 which served as control contained no organic acid. Diets 2, 3 ...

  6. Efficacy of fatty acid chemistry : candidate mold and decay fungicides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert Coleman; Vina Yang; Bessie Woodward; Patti Lebow; Carol Clausen

    2010-01-01

    Although organic, lipophilic acids, such as acetic, propionic, sorbic and benzoic, have a long history as preservatives in the food industry, relatively high concentrations are required and their bioactivities generally pertain to retarding microbial growth rather than eliminating pathogens. Moreover, exclusive use of organic acids such as lactic or citric acid, alone...

  7. Metabolite Profiles of Lactic Acid Bacteria in Grass Silage▿

    OpenAIRE

    Broberg, Anders; Jacobsson, Karin; Ström, Katrin; Schnürer, Johan

    2007-01-01

    The metabolite production of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) on silage was investigated. The aim was to compare the production of antifungal metabolites in silage with the production in liquid cultures previously studied in our laboratory. The following metabolites were found to be present at elevated concentrations in silos inoculated with LAB strains: 3-hydroxydecanoic acid, 2-hydroxy-4-methylpentanoic acid, benzoic acid, catechol, hydrocinnamic acid, salicylic acid, 3-phenyllactic acid, 4-hydro...

  8. Orthorhombic polymorph of 4-[(1H-benzimidazol-1-ylmethyl]benzoic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Wei Kuai

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available We reported recently the first polymorph of the title compound [Kuai & Cheng (2011a. Acta Cryst., E67, o2787]. A second polymorph of the title compound, C15H12N2O2, was unexpectedly obtained by the hydrothermal reaction of the title compound with manganese chloride in the presence of potassium hydroxide at 413 K. The benzimidazole ring system is almost planar, with a maximum deviation from the mean plane of 0.015 (2 Å. The benzimidazole and benzene rings are inclined at a dihedral angle of 79.00 (1°. In the crystal, adjacent molecules are connected through O—H...N hydrogen bonds into a one-dimensional chain along the [001] direction.

  9. New Static Apparatus and Vapor Pressure of Reference Materials: Naphthalene, Benzoic Acid, Benzophenone, and Ferrocene

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Monte, M.J.S.; Santos, L.M.N.F.; Fulem, Michal; Fonseca, J.M.S.; Sousa, C.A.D.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 51, - (2006), s. 757-766 ISSN 0021-9568 Grant - others:FCT(PT) POCTI/QUI/43144/2001; FEDER(PT) SFRH/ BPD /18065/2004 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : vapor pressure * reference substance * thermochemistry * construction Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.642, year: 2006

  10. Determination of Aspartame, Caffeine, Saccharin, and Benzoic Acid in Beverages by High Performance Liquid Chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, Michael F.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Describes a simple and reliable new quantitative analysis experiment using liquid chromatography for the determinaiton of caffeine, saccharin, and sodium benzoate in beverages. Background information, procedures used, and typical results obtained are provided. (JN)

  11. 3-[(Z-(4-Diethylamino-6-oxocyclohexa-2,4-dien-1-ylidenemethylamino]benzoic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Narayana

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, C18H20N2O3, crystallizes as the keto tautomer, unlike the vast majority of similar structures that have been reported that contain the hydroxy tautomer. There are two strong hydrogen bonds in the crystal structure, both accepted by the same carbonyl group: one intramolecular N—H...O and one intermolecular O—H...O. As a result, the carbonyl C=O distance is long, at 1.310 (2 Å, which may suggest the molecule has a significant zwitterionic character. The dihedral angle between the benzene ring planes is 15.05 (7°. As a result of the intramolecular hydrogen bond, the bridging C—C=N—C group is almost coplanar with the benzene ring that has the diethylamino substituent [dihedral angle 2.35 (15°].

  12. Non-catalytic oxidation of water-slurried coal with oxygen: Identification of fulvic acids and acute toxicity

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bergh, JJ

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Methylmalonic acid X 4-Hydroxybutyric acid X X X 3-Hydroxypropionic acid X Benzoic acid X X X Isonicotinic acid X Nicotinic acid X X Acetoacetic acid X X Succinic acid X X X X X Methylsuccinic acid X X X Itaconic acid X... of similarity, and most of these compounds were also present in the steam distillate. Significant additions were thymol (2-isopropyl-5-methylphenol, which occurs naturally in many essential oils) and the nitrogen compounds nicotinic...

  13. 4-Chloro-2,3,5-trifluorobenzoic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuitao Yu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A new tetrahalogenated benzoic acid 4-chloro-2,3,5-trifluorobenzoic acid was synthesized from methyl 2,3,4,5-tetrafluorobenzoate via three steps. The structure of the newly synthesized compound was established by FTIR, NMR, MS and elemental analysis.

  14. Mechanistic chemistry of oxidation of balsalazide with acidic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2-hydroxy-5-nitroso-benzoic acid and 3-(4-nitroso-benzoylamino)-propionic acid are identified as the oxidation products of BSZ with both CAT and BAT. The rate of oxidation of BSZ is about five-fold faster with BAT than with CAT. Plausible mechanism and related rate law have been deduced for the observed kinetics.

  15. ascorbic acid retention in canned lime juice preserved with sulfur ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ASCORBIC ACID RETENTION IN CANNED LIME JUICE. PRESERVED WITH SULFUR DIOXIDE AND BENZOIC ACID. Francis M Malhooko“ and Elizabeth N Kiniiya'. ABSTRACT. The effects of two levels each of sodium metabisulfite and sodium benzoate on the shelf-life of canned lime juice stored at ambient temperature ...

  16. Studies of the acidic components of the Colorado Green River formation oil shale-Mass spectrometric identification of the methyl esters of extractable acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haug, P.; Schnoes, H. K.; Burlingame, A. L.

    1971-01-01

    Study of solvent extractable acidic constituents of oil shale from the Colorado Green River Formation. Identification of individual components is based on gas chromatographic and mass spectrometric data obtained for their respective methyl esters. Normal acids, isoprenoidal acids, alpha, omega-dicarboxylic acids, mono-alpha-methyl dicarboxylic acids and methyl ketoacids were identified. In addition, the presence of monocyclic, benzoic, phenylalkanoic and naphthyl-carboxylic acids, as well as cycloaromatic acids, is demonstrated by partial identification.

  17. Deprotonation of p-Hydroxybenzoic Acid: Does Electrospray Ionization Sample Solution or Gas-Phase Structures?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schröder, Detlef; Buděšínský, Miloš; Roithová, J.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 134, č. 38 (2012), s. 15897-15905 ISSN 0002-7863 Grant - others:European Research Council(XE) AdG HORIZOMS Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : mobility-mass-spectrometry * 4-hydroxybenzoic acid * air/water interfase * DFT calculations * aqueous-solution * benzoic-acids Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 10.677, year: 2012

  18. Selective bio-availability of phenolic acids from Scottish strawberries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Wendy R; Scobbie, Lorraine; Labat, Aurélie; Duthie, Garry G

    2009-05-01

    Scottish strawberries were found to be a rich source of phenolic acids, namely benzoic (1287.95 +/- 279.98 mg/kg) and cinnamic (1159.40 +/- 233.96 mg/kg) acids, both free and attached to other plant components. Studies suggest a chemopreventive role for such compounds in several major clinical conditions, but the anticipated benefits are likely to be affected by their bio-availability and metabolic fate. In this pilot study, strawberries (750 g) was consumed by four healthy human volunteers (32 +/- 6 years). Only the benzoic acids were detected in the plasma. Of these, the major free (gentisic, protocatechuic and p-hydroxybenzoic acid) and conjugated (syringic acid) benzoic acids were 26-27% recovered in the urine within 5 h. Cinnamic acids were completely undetected in plasma and only trace amounts were found in the urine. Since, the cinnamic acids escaped absorption early in the gastrointestinal tract, their release and/or metabolism is dependent on the host colonic microbiota. Results indicate that there is a high degree of selective absorption of strawberry phenolic acids into the systemic circulation. If selective absorption of phenolic acids is observed with consumption of other plant-based foods, this is likely to have implications for the bioactive role of these compounds in chronic disease prevention.

  19. Production of aromatic acids during anaerobic digestion of citrus peel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lane, A.G.

    1980-06-01

    Commercially prepared citrus oils, distilled citrus oils, limonene and the non-volatile fraction of lemon oils were all found to be toxic to the anaerobic digestion process for conversion of citrus waste to methane. Toxicity was characterised by appearance of benzoic, phenylacetic and phenylpropionic acids in the digestion liquors, though these acids were not in themselves toxic. The bulk of the phenylpropionic acid was derived from flavonoids.

  20. Elucidating adsorption mechanisms of phthalate esters upon carbon nanotubes/graphene and natural organic acid competitive effects in water by DFT and MD calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Zhuang; Wang, Se; Chen, Min Dong; Xu, Defu; Tang, Lili; Wang, Degao

    2015-01-01

    Simulations at multiple levels were performed to investigate the aqueous adsorption of phthalate esters (PAEs) on carbon nanoparticles and to find the competitive effect of a low molecular weight natural organic acid (benzoic acid) on the adsorption process. Six PAEs of varying alkyl side chain lengths and three carbon-based nanomaterials including a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT), double-walled carbon nanotube (DWNT), and graphene (G) were studied. Results showed that the adsorption energies calculated using density functional theory increase with increasing length of the PAE alkyl chain. G exhibits higher adsorption capacity for the PAEs than SWNT and DWNT. The absolute adsorption energies of these systems also display a positive linear correlation with the hydrophobicity of the PAE molecules. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the presence of neutral/anionic benzoic acid in water alleviates the PAE adsorption. Furthermore, anionic benzoic acid exerts more impact on the PAE adsorption than the neutral form

  1. Interactions between cranberries and fungi: the proposed function of organic acids in virulence suppression of fruit rot fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz eTadych

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Cranberry fruit are a rich source of bioactive compounds that may function as constitutive or inducible barriers against rot-inducing fungi. The content and composition of these compounds change as the season progresses. Several necrotrophic fungi cause cranberry fruit rot disease complex. These fungi remain mostly asymptomatic until the fruit begins to mature in late August. Temporal fluctuations and quantitative differences in selected organic acid profiles between fruit of six cranberry genotypes during the growing season were observed. The concentration of benzoic acid in fruit increased while quinic acid decreased throughout fruit development. In general, more rot-resistant genotypes showed higher levels of benzoic acid early in fruit development and more gradual decline in quinic acid levels than that observed in the more rot-susceptible genotypes. We evaluated antifungal activities of selected cranberry constituents and found that most bioactive compounds either had no effects or stimulated growth or reactive oxygen species (ROS secretion of four tested cranberry fruit rot fungi, while benzoic acid and quinic acid reduced growth and suppressed secretion of ROS by these fungi. We propose that variation in the levels of ROS suppressive compounds, such as benzoic and quinic acids, may influence virulence by the fruit rot fungi. Selection for crops that maintain high levels of virulence suppressive compounds could yield new disease resistant varieties. This could represent a new strategy for control of disease caused by necrotrophic pathogens that exhibit a latent or endophytic phase.

  2. Biochemical characterization and substrate profiling of a reversible 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid decarboxylase for biocatalytic Kolbe-Schmitt reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuemei; Ren, Jie; Yao, Peiyuan; Gong, Rui; Wang, Min; Wu, Qiaqing; Zhu, Dunming

    2018-06-01

    Reversible benzoic acid decarboxylases are versatile biocatalysts by taking advantage of both decarboxylation and carboxylation reactions, especially for the biocatalytic Kolbe-Schmitt reaction. In the course of developing a benzoic acid decarboxylase tool-box, a putative benzoic acid decarboxylase gene from Fusarium oxysporum was heterologously over-expressed in Escherichia coli, the recombinant protein was purified and characterized. The purified enzyme exhibited relatively high catalytic efficiencies for the decarboxylation of 2, 3-dihydroxybenzoic acid and carboxylation of catechol (k cat /K m  = 2.03 × 10 2 and 1.88 mM -1  min -1 , respectively), and thus characterized as 2, 3-dihydroxybenzoic acid decarboxylase (2, 3-DHBD_Fo). The enzyme also catalyzed the decarboxylation of various substituted salicylic acids with different groups at varied positions except 5-position and the carboxylation of phenol and the substituted phenols. In a preparative reaction, catechol was carboxylated into 2, 3-dihydroxybenoic acid with 95% conversion by adding dodecyldimethylbenzylammonium chloride into the reaction system, and the product was isolated in 72% yield. These results demonstrate that 2, 3-DHBD_Fo is a valuable addition to the benzoic acid decarboxylase tool-box with potential practical applications. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Rapid Access to Ortho-Alkylated Vinylarenes from Aromatic Acids by Dearomatization and Tandem Decarboxylative C-H Olefination/Rearomatization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hung-Chang; Huang, Yen-Hsiang; Chou, Chih-Ming

    2018-03-02

    A two-step straightforward method for the preparation of ortho-alkylated vinylarenes from readily available benzoic acids is described. The synthetic route involves the dearomatization of benzoic acids by Birch reduction providing alkylated cyclohexa-2,5-dienyl-1-carboxylic acids. The diene subsequently undergoes a decarboxylative C-H olefination followed by rearomatization to deliver ortho-alkylated vinylarene. Mechanistic studies suggest that a Pd/Ag bimetallic catalytic system is important in the tandem decarboxylative C-H olefination/rearomatization step.

  4. New 3,4-diaminobenzoic acid Schiff base compounds and their complexes: synthesis, characterization and thermodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Khosro; Niad, Mahmood; Jafari, Tahereh

    2014-03-25

    Some new tetradentate Schiff base ligands (H3L) were prepared via condensation of 3,4-diaminobenzoic acid with 2-hydroxybenzaldehyde derivatives, such as 3,4-bis((E)-2,4-dihydroxybenzylideneamino)benzoic acid (H3L(1)), 3,4-bis((E)-2-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzylideneamino)benzoic acid (H3L(2)) and 3,4-bis((E)-5-bromo-2-hydroxybenzylideneamino)benzoic acid (H3L(4)). Additionally, a tetradentate Schiff base ligand 3,4-bis((E)-2-hydroxybenzylideneamino)benzoic acid (H3L(3)) and its complexes were synthesized. Their metal complexes of Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) were prepared in good yields from the reaction of the ligands with the corresponding metal acetate. They were characterized based on IR, (1)H NMR, Mass spectroscopy and UV-Vis spectroscopy. Also, the formation constants of the complexes were measured by UV-Vis spectroscopic titration at constant ionic strength 0.1M (NaClO4), at 25 °C in dimethylformamide (DMF) as a solvent. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Phenylpropanoid Metabolism in Suspension Cultures of Vanilla planifolia Andr. : III. Conversion of 4-Methoxycinnamic Acids into 4-Hydroxybenzoic Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, C; Brodelius, P E

    1990-09-01

    Feeding of 4-methoxycinnamic acid, 3,4-dimethoxycinnamic acid and 3,4,5-trimethoxycinnamic acid to cell suspension cultures of Vanilla planifolia resulted in the formation of 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid, and syringic acid, respectively. The homologous 4-methoxybenzoic acids were demethylated to the same products. It is concluded that the side chain degrading enzyme system accepts the 4-methoxylated substrates while the demethylation occurs at the benzoic acid level. The demethylating enzyme is specific for the 4-position. Feeding of [O-(14)C-methyl]-3,4-dimethoxycinnamic acid revealed that the first step in the conversion is the glycosylation of the cinnamic acid to its glucose ester. A partial purification of a UDP-glucose: trans-cinnamic acid glucosyltransferase is reported. 4-Methoxy substituted cinnamic acids are better substrates for this enzyme than 4-hydroxy substituted cinnamic acid. It is suggested that 4-methoxy substituted cinnamic acids are intermediates in the biosynthetic conversion of cinnamic acids to benzoic acids in cells of V. planifolia.

  6. UPS and DFT investigation of the electronic structure of gas-phase trimesic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reisberg, L., E-mail: rebban@ut.ee [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, W. Oswaldi 1, EE-50411 Tartu (Estonia); Pärna, R. [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, W. Oswaldi 1, EE-50411 Tartu (Estonia); MAX IV Laboratory, Lund University, Fotongatan 2, 225 94 Lund (Sweden); Kikas, A.; Kuusik, I.; Kisand, V. [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, W. Oswaldi 1, EE-50411 Tartu (Estonia); Hirsimäki, M.; Valden, M. [Surface Science Laboratory, Optoelectronics Research Centre, Tampere University of Technology, FIN-33101 Tampere (Finland); Nõmmiste, E. [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, W. Oswaldi 1, EE-50411 Tartu (Estonia)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • In the current study outer valence band electronic structure of benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxylic acid was interpreted. • Experimental and calculated trimesic acid (TMA) spectrum were compared to ones of benzene and benzoic acid. • It is shown that similarities between MO energies and shapes for benzene and TMA exists. • Addition of carboxyl groups to the benzene ring clearly correlates with increasing binding energy of HOMO. - Abstract: Benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxylic acid (trimesic acid, TMA) molecules in gas-phase have been investigated by using valence band photoemission. The photoelectron spectrum in the binding energy region from 9 to 22 eV is interpreted by using density functional theory calculations. The electronic structure of TMA is compared with benzene and benzoic acid in order to demonstrate changes in molecular orbital energies induced by addition of carboxyl groups to benzene ring.

  7. Synthesis and HPLC evaluation of carboxylic acid phases on a hydride surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesek, Joseph J; Matyska, Maria T; Gangakhedkar, Surekha; Siddiq, Rukhsana

    2006-04-01

    Three organic moieties containing carboxylic acid functional groups are attached to a particulate silica surface through silanization/hydrosilation. Two compounds (undecylenic acid and 10-undecynoic acid) have 11 carbon chains and the other is a five-carbon acid (pentenoic acid). Bonding is confirmed through carbon elemental analysis, diffuse reflectance infrared fourier transform spectroscopy, and carbon-13 and silicon-29 CP-MAS NMR spectroscopy. The bonded phases are tested by HPLC using PTH amino acids, nucleic acids, theophylline-related compounds, anilines, benzoic acid compounds, choline, and tobramycin. The latter two compounds are used to investigate the aqueous normal phase properties of the three bonded materials.

  8. Greener Friedel-Crafts Acylation using Microwave-enhanced reactivity of Bismuth Triflate in the Friedel-Crafts Benzoylation of Aromatic Compounds with Benzoic Anhydride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tran, Phuong Hoang; Nguyen, Hai Truong; Hansen, Poul Erik

    2017-01-01

    An efficient and facile bismuth trifluoromethanesulfonate-catalyzed benzoylation of aromatic compounds using benzoic anhydride under solvent-free microwave irradiation has been developed. The microwave-assisted Friedel-Crafts benzoylation results in good yields within short reaction times. Bismuth...

  9. Cyclopentadithiophene-benzoic acid copolymers as conductive binders for silicon nanoparticles in anode electrodes of lithium ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kuo-Lung; Kuo, Tzu-Husan; Yao, Chun-Feng; Chang, Shu-Wei; Yang, Yu-Shuo; Huang, Hsin-Kai; Tsai, Cho-Jen; Horie, Masaki

    2017-02-02

    Cyclopentadithiophene and methyl-2,5-dibromobenzoate have been copolymerised via palladium complex catalysed direct arylation. The methyl ester group in the benzoate unit is converted to the carboxyl group via saponification. The polymers are mixed with Si nanoparticles for use as conducting binders in the fabrication of an anode electrode in lithium ion batteries. The battery with the electrode incorporating the saponified polymer shows much higher specific capacity of up to 1820 mA h g -1 (total weight) and a higher stability compared with the battery including the polymer before the saponification.

  10. Antioxidant and α-glucosidase activities of benzoic acid derivate from the bark of Myristica fatua Houtt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megawati, Darmawan, Akhmad; Fajriah, Sofa; Primahana, Gian; Dewi, Rizna Triana; Minarti, Meiliawati, Lia

    2017-11-01

    Myrictica fatua Houtt widely used in Indonesian as one of the traditional medicinal plants. Cancer and diabetic mellitus (DM) type 2 are two degenerative diseases caused by the presence of excessive free radicals in the body. Antioxidant and anti-diabetic active compounds were needed to reduce the risk of the diseases. One of the chemical compound groups that can be used as antioxidant and antidiabetic is phenolic compound. Isolation of the methanolic extract of the bark of M. fatua Houtt using chromatography methods led to the isolation of phenolic compound. Methyl 3,4-dihydroxybenzoate showed antioxidant and antidiabetic activities through DPPH free radicals scavenger and α-glucosidase inhibitions activities test showed IC50 value 7.96 and 7.68 ug / mL, respectively

  11. Theoretical Hammett Plot for the Gas-Phase Ionization of Benzoic Acid versus Phenol: A Computational Chemistry Lab Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Blake E.

    2013-01-01

    Computational chemistry undergraduate laboratory courses are now part of the chemistry curriculum at many universities. However, there remains a lack of computational chemistry exercises available to instructors. This exercise is presented for students to develop skills using computational chemistry software while supplementing their knowledge of…

  12. In vitro predictions of skin absorption of caffeine, testosterone, and benzoic acid: A multi-centre comparison study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sandt, J.J.M. van de; Burgsteden, J.A. van; Cage, S.; Carmichael, P.L.; Dick, I.; Kenyon, S.; Korinth, G.; Larese, F.; Limasset, J.C.; Maas, W.J.M.; Montomoli, L.; Nielsen, J.B.; Payan, J.-P.; Robinson, E.; Sartorelli, P.; Schaller, K.H.; Wilkinson, S.C.; Williams, F.M.

    2004-01-01

    To obtain better insight into the robustness of in vitro percutaneous absorption methodology, the intra- and inter-laboratory variation in this type of study was investigated in 10 European laboratories. To this purpose, the in vitro absorption of three compounds through human skin (9 laboratories)

  13. Natural oils affect the human skin integrity and the percutaneous penetration of benzoic acid dose-dependently

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jesper Bo

    2006-01-01

    Abstract: Natural oils are extensively used in cosmetics and as treatment for a growing number of more or less specific ailments. Skin irritation and cases of allergy have repeatedly been described in the literature following exposure to these oils. The present study evaluated the extent to which...

  14. RESEARCH OF THE ADSORPTION OF ORGANIC ACIDS IN SUGARCANE BAGASSE ASH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Omar Prieto García

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this research a study of the adsorption of acetic, benzoic, butanoic, fumaric, maleic and succinic acids on sugarcane baggase ash is made. The adsorber material is characterized through physical criteria such as apparent and pictometric density, compressibility, porosity, superficial area and tortuosity. The sample has been examined by X-rays Diffraction, thermal analysis, IR-quality analysis. The isotherm for the sorption process is determined, where it is shown that the Freundlich model is adjusted to benzoic acid, the Langmuir and Toth model to acetic acid, Bunauer- Emmett- Teller (BET model to succinic acid and the butiric, maleic and fumaric acids are adjusted to Langmoir model. It is established that the first-order model is adjusted to the adsorption kinetics of the acetic and benzoic acids; while the rest of the acids are adjusted to a second-order model, in the case of the butanoic, succinic and maleic acids it is possible the occurrence of chemisorption processes.

  15. In vitro effects of some organic acids on swine cecal microflora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Piva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of different organic acids on bacterial growth and ammonia production by swine cecal microflora in an in vitro fermentation system. Formic, acetic, propionic, lactic, butyric, sorbic, fumaric, malic, citric, α-ketoglutaric, and benzoic acids were used at different concentrations (60, 120 and 240 mmol/l to assess if any effect on cecal microflora could be shown. Cecal microbial growth was evaluated using the cumulative gas production technique. Fermentation fluid was analyzed for ammonia concentration. Lactic acid was the only acid that enhanced bacterial fermentation at every concentration tested (+30%, 73%, and 35% gas final volume at 60, 120, and 240mmol/l, respectively; P<0.05. Citric acid strongly increased gas final volume when used at 60 and 120mmol/l (+92% and 52%, respectively; P<0.05 and almost completely inhibited bacterial activity at 240mmol/l (–85% gas final volume; P<0.05. Sorbic acid showed the strongest antibacterial activity and was the only acid that reduced final gas volume when used at 60 mmol/l (–34%; P<0.05. Only sorbic (–34%, 47%, and 67%, fumaric (–57%, 35%, and 26%, citric (–31%, 18%, and 28%, and benzoic (–33%, 29%, and 38% acids reduced ammonia after 24h of fermentation at any given concentration (P<0.05. Other acids, such as formic, acetic, propionic, butyric, and malic acids failed to exert an effective control of ammonia levels in the fermentation liquor. After the first set of fermentations, sorbic, α-ketoglutaric, and benzoic acids were further tested at the final concentration of 7.5, 15, and 30mmol/l. At these lower levels of inclusion, sorbic acid was the only acid that reduced final gas volume at every concentration tested (–31%, 35%, and 39% at 7.5, 15, and 30mmol/l, respectively; P<0.05. Compared with control, ammonia was reduced after 24h of fermentation by all treatments (with an average reduction of 34%, 20%, and 24% for sorbic,

  16. Separation and determination of some carboxylic acids by capillary electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sladkov, V.; Fourest, B.

    2006-01-01

    Separation and determination of some organic acids, mono-carboxylic (formic and acetic), dicarboxylic (oxalic and tartaric), tricarboxylic (citric) acids and aromatic acids (phtalic, benzoic, mellitic and trimellitic), by capillary electrophoresis are reviewed. The method development parameters, such as separation and injection mode, are discussed. Special attention is paid to the comparison of different detection types (spectroscopic and electrochemical). The optimisation of the carrier electrolyte composition (choice of carrier electrolyte, effect of pH, ionic strength, electro-osmotic flow modifier) is treated. Different additives (alkali-earth and transition metal ions, cyclodextrins and alcohol), which are often used for improving organic acid separation, are also considered. (authors)

  17. Separation and determination of some carboxylic acids by capillary electrophoresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sladkov, V.; Fourest, B

    2006-07-01

    Separation and determination of some organic acids, mono-carboxylic (formic and acetic), dicarboxylic (oxalic and tartaric), tricarboxylic (citric) acids and aromatic acids (phtalic, benzoic, mellitic and trimellitic), by capillary electrophoresis are reviewed. The method development parameters, such as separation and injection mode, are discussed. Special attention is paid to the comparison of different detection types (spectroscopic and electrochemical). The optimisation of the carrier electrolyte composition (choice of carrier electrolyte, effect of pH, ionic strength, electro-osmotic flow modifier) is treated. Different additives (alkali-earth and transition metal ions, cyclodextrins and alcohol), which are often used for improving organic acid separation, are also considered. (authors)

  18. Thermodynamic properties of isomeric iso-butoxybenzoic acids: Experimental and theoretical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakubczyk, Michał; Sporzyński, Andrzej [Faculty of Chemistry, Warsaw University of Technology, 00-664 Warszawa (Poland); Emel’yanenko, Vladimir N.; Varfolomeev, Mikhail A. [Department of Physical Chemistry, Kazan Federal University, 420008 Kazan (Russian Federation); Verevkin, Sergey P., E-mail: sergey.verevkin@uni-rostock.de [Department of Physical Chemistry, Kazan Federal University, 420008 Kazan (Russian Federation); Department of Physical Chemistry and Department, Science and Technology of Life, Light and Matter, University of Rostock, D-18059 Rostock (Germany)

    2015-09-10

    Highlights: • Vapor pressures of butoxy benzoic acid derivatives were measured. • Vaporization, sublimation and fusion enthalpies were derived. • Molar enthalpies of formation were measured by calorimetry. • Thermochemical data tested for consistency using additivity rules and computations. • Simple additivity method suggested for prediction thermochemical properties. - Abstract: Standard (p° = 0.1 MPa) molar enthalpies of formation at the temperature T = 298.15 K of the 2-, 3-, and 4-iso-butoxybenzoic acids were measured using the combustion calorimetry. Standard molar enthalpies of vaporization and sublimation were derived from the vapor pressure temperature dependencies measured by the transpiration method. Molar enthalpies of the solid state phase transitions were measured by the DSC. Thermodynamic data on alkoxy substituted benzoic acids available in the literature were collected and combined with own experimental results. This data set on alkoxybenzoic acids was evaluated by using quantum-chemical and group-additivity methods.

  19. Mechanistic studies of nitrations and oxidations in solutions of dinitrogen pentaoxide in nitric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willmer, R.F.

    1992-01-01

    Mechanisms of nitrations in solutions of dinitrogen pentaoxide in nitric acid of 1,2,4-trichloro-5-nitrobenzene and 1,2-dichloro-4-nitrobenzene have been proposed. The kinetics and products of the nitration, in the title medium, of substantially deactivated benzoic acids and benzaldehydes have been investigated. Kinetics of nitration of some substituted benzoic acids in nitric acid solutions containing dinitrogen pentaoxide or nitronium trifluoro-methanesulphonate (nitronium triflate) have been compared. Rate coefficients for reactions in dinitrogen pentaoxide solutions were generally similar to those from nitronium triflate solutions of the same estimated nitronium ion concentration. Yields of aromatic products of nitration of some benzoic acid derivatives in the nitric acid solutions have been determined. Nitrodecarboxylation of 4-fluorobenzoic acid occurs as a result of nitronium ion attach at C(1). The competition between oxidation to the corresponding benzoic acid and nitration in the aromatic ring of some substituted benzaldehydes has been probed by kinetic and product studies. 4-Carboxybenzaldehyde is nitrated but more deactivated substrates are predominantly oxidized. Rapid reversible gem-dinitrate formation occurs in concentrated dinitrogen pentaoxide solutions. The equilibrium extent of formation of [alpha]-deuterio-(4-nitropheny)-dinitratomethane from [alpha]-deuterio-4-nitrobenzaldehyde is reported. 4-nitrobenzaldehyde and the gem-dinitrate are oxidized in processes in which [alpha]-hydrogen loss is at least partially rate determining. The relative rates of oxidation in nitronium triflate solutions suggest that the [alpha]-hydrogen is removed as a hydride ion in that medium. There is evidence for the intrusion of a radical mechanism of nitration in concentrated solutions of dinitrogen pentaoxide. (4-Nitrophenyl)dinitratomethane was produced on the addition of 4-nitrobenzaldehyde to a solution of dinitrogen pentaoxide in dichloromethane.

  20. Effect of phenols and carboxylic acids on photochromism of 1-alkyl-2-(arylazo)imidazoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gayen, Pallab; Sinha, Chittaranjan

    2012-01-01

    Light irradiated trans-to-cis isomerization of 1-alkyl-2-(arylazo)imidazole in the presence of phenol, catechol, benzoic acid and salicylic acid (called co-factors) has been studied in this work. The rate of trans→cis photoisomerization is decreased in the presence of co-factor in the medium and is dependent on the concentration of active quotient about photochrome. The decrease in rate follows catechol>benzoic acid>phenol>salicylic acid. This trend is due to the effects of dissociation ability of –O–H/–COOH, intermolecular association of the molecules etc. The reverse change, cis-to-trans, is very slow in light irradiation and has been carried out by a thermal process in the dark. The quantum yield of isomerization follows the same sequence of effects of co-factors. - Highlights: ► Photoisomerisation of 1-alkyl-2-(arylazo)imidazoles, trans-to-cis, is described in this work. ► The process is sensitive to the environment of the photochrome and the solution. ► The rate of photoisomerization decreases as catechol>benzoic acid>phenol>salicylic acid. ► The reverse isomerization, cis-to-trans is very slow with light and has been carried out with heat. ► The activation energy is less than these values when carried out in fresh solution only.

  1. Growth and membrane fluidity of food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes in the presence of weak acid preservatives and hydrochloric acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis eDiakogiannis

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This study addresses a major issue in microbial food safety, the elucidation of correlations between acid stress and changes in membrane fluidity of the pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. In order to assess the possible role that membrane fluidity changes play in L. monocytogenes tolerance to antimicrobial acids (acetic, lactic, hydrochloric acid at low pH or benzoic acid at neutral pH, the growth of the bacterium and the gel-to-liquid crystalline transition temperature point (Tm of cellular lipids of each adapted culture was measured and compared with unexposed cells. The Tm of extracted lipids was measured by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC. A trend of increasing Tm values but not of equal extent was observed upon acid tolerance for all samples and this increase is not directly proportional to each acid antibacterial action. The smallest increase in Tm value was observed in the presence of lactic acid, which presented the highest antibacterial action. In the presence of acids with high antibacterial action such as acetic, hydrochloric acid or low antibacterial action such as benzoic acid, increased Tm values were measured. The Tm changes of lipids were also correlated with our previous data about fatty acid changes to acid adaptation. The results imply that the fatty acid changes are not the sole adaptation mechanism for decreased membrane fluidity (increased Tm. Therefore, this study indicates the importance of conducting an in-depth structural study on how acids commonly used in food systems affect the composition of individual cellular membrane lipid molecules.

  2. Studies on electrochemical hydrodebromination mechanism of 2,5-dibromobenzoic acid on Ag electrode by in situ FTIR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Meichao; Bao Dandan; Ma Chunan

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Silver is a good catalyst for the hydrodebromination of 2,5-dibromobenzoic acid. → 3-Bromobenzoic acid as main intermediate product. → The finally product is benzoic acid. → In situ FTIR is useful to study the electrochemical hydrodebromination mechanism. - Abstract: Cyclic voltammetry and in situ FTIR were employed to study the electrochemical hydrodebromination (EHB) mechanism of 2,5-dibromobenzoic acid (2,5-DBBA) in NaOH solution. Compared with titanium and graphite electrodes, silver electrode exhibited a high electrocatalytic activity for the hydrodebromination reaction of 2,5-DBBA. On the basis of in situ FTIR data, EHB reaction of 2,5-DBBA on Ag cathode might be represented as a sequence of electron additions and bromine expulsions. Firstly, from potential at approximately -1100 mV, 2,5-DBBA received an electron to form 2,5-DBBA radical anion, which lost a bromine ion in the 2-position to form 3-bromobenzoic acid (3-BBA) free radical. Then the free radical received a proton to give 3-BBA. Finally, 3-BBA further took off another bromine ion to produce benzoic acid free radical and the end product benzoic acid was obtained by receiving another electron and a proton with the potential shifting to more negative values.

  3. Volatile organic acids generated from kerogen during laboratory heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, K; Tannenbaum, E; Huizinga, B J; Kaplan, I R

    1986-01-01

    Low molecular weight organic acids were studied in the course of pyrolysis experiments (200-400 degrees C, 2-1,000 h) of kerogen (Green River Formation and Monterey Formation) with and without the presence of water and minerals (montmorillonite, illite and calcite). C1-C10 aliphatic acids and benzoic acid were identified in the pyrolysis products of kerogen. Their distribution is characterized by a dominance of acetic acid followed by formic and propionic acids with an even/odd preference in the range of C4-C10. Total concentrations of these acids amounted to 0.3% of initial kerogen, indicating that kerogen has a good potential for producing organic acids. Geochemical implications of these organic acids are; (1) they are possible intermediates from kerogen to natural gas (CO2, H2, CH4, C2H6, etc.) by decarboxylation, and (2) they may be important and potential contributors to the generation of secondary porosity by dissolving minerals.

  4. Aerobic Oxidation of Alcohols over Gold Catalysts: Role of Acid and Base

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klitgaard, Søren Kegnæs; DeLa Riva, Andrew T.; Helveg, Stig

    2008-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles are deposited on potassium titanate nanowires and used as heterogeneous catalysts in the aerobic oxidation of benzyl alcohol in methanol to methyl benzoate at ambient conditions. The presence of a catalytic amount of base promotes the reaction and the formation of free benzoic...... acid during the reaction poisons the catalyst. The activity however, of the catalyst can be restored again by addition of base....

  5. Synthesis and Characterization of Two New Thiophene Acetyl Salicylic Acid Esters and their ortho- and para-effect on Anticancer Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unver, Hakan; Canturk, Zerrin

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to explore the cytotoxic effect of ortho- and para-positional isomers of thiophene acetyl salicylic acid esters against cancer and normal cell lines. Two new thiophene-2-acetic acid esters (2-((2-(thiophen-2-yl)acetyl)thio)benzoic acid and 4-((2-(thiophen-2- yl)acetyl)thio)benzoic acid) were synthesized and characterized by Elemental analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), 13C-NMR and High-resolution mass spectroscopy. The compounds were tested for their in vitro cytotoxic activity against A549 and Caco2 tumor cell lines and CCD- 19Lu and CCD 841 CoN normal cell lines using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,4,diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. 2-((2-(thiophene-2-yl)acetyl)thio)benzoic acid showed a higher activity with (IC50 = 239.88µM/mL) compared with a reference drug nearly as active as cyclophosphamide (IC50 = 257.11 µM/mL) on Caco2 cell line. Apoptosis was observed by flow cytometric analysis on Caco2 cells. Thus, positional isomerism is critical for the pharmacological properties of thiophene acetyl salicylic acid esters against colon cancer cell line compared with nonsmall cell lung cancer cell line. The ortho-isomer induced cell death and was much more potent than the para-isomer. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  6. 2-arylureidobenzoic acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valgeirsson, Jon; Nielsen, Elsebet Ø; Peters, Dan

    2003-01-01

    A series of 2-arylureidobenzoic acids (AUBAs) was prepared by a short and effective synthesis, and the pharmacological activity at glutamate receptors was evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The compounds showed noncompetitive antagonistic activity at the kainate receptor subtype GluR5. The most potent...... on the benzoic acid moiety (ring A), whereas ring B tolerated a variety of substituents, but with a preference for lipophilic substituents. The most potent compounds had a 4-chloro substituent on ring A and 3-chlorobenzene (6b), 2-naphthalene (8h), or 2-indole (8k) as ring B and had IC(50) values of 1.3, 1.......2, and 1.2 microM, respectively, in a functional GluR5 assay. Compound 6c (IC(50) = 4.8 microM at GluR5) showed activity in the in vivo ATPA rigidity test, indicating that 6c has better pharmacokinetic properties than 8h, which was inactive in this test. The AUBAs are the first example of a series...

  7. The application of hydrogen-palladium electrode for potentiometric acid-base determinations in tetrahydrofuran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jokić Anja B.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of the hydrogen-palladium electrode (H2/Pd as the indicator electrode for the determination of relative acidity scale (Es, mV of tetrahydrofuran (THF and the potentiometric titrations of acids in this solvent was investigated. The relative acidity scale tetrahydrofuran was determined from the difference half-neutralization potentials of perchloric acid and tetrabutylammonium hydroxide (TBAH, which were measured by using both H2/Pd-SCE and glass-SCE electrode pairs. The experimentally obtained value of Es scale THF with a H2/Pd-SCE electrode pair was 1155 mV, and those obtained with glass-SCE electrode pair 880 mV. By using a H2/Pd indicator electrode, the individual acids (benzoic acid, palmitic acid, maleic acid, acetyl acetone, α-naphthol and two component acid mixtures (benzoic acid + α-naphthol, palmitic acid + α-naphthol, maleic acid + α-naphthol and maleic acid + ftalic acid were titrated with a standard solution of TBAH. In addition, sodium methylate and potassium hydroxide proved to be very suitable titrating agents for titrating of the individual acids and the acids in mixtures, respectively. The relative error of the determination of acids in mixture was less than 3%. The results are in agreement with those obtained by a conventional glass electrode. The advantages of H2/Pd electrode over a glass electrode in potentiometric acid-base determinations in tetrahydrofuran lie in the following: this electrode gives wider relative acidity scale THF, higher the potential jumps at the titration end-point and relatively fast response time; furthermore, it is very durable, simple to prepare and can be used in the titrations of small volumes. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br.172051

  8. Effect of phenolic acids on functions of rat aorta, vas deferens and on metabolic changes in streptozotocin-induced diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Nurcan Bektas; Yusuf Ozturk

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the effects of antioxidant treatment on streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic metabolic and smooth muscle (SM) complications in rats. Materials and Methods: Threeweeks after STZ injection (i.v.), vehicle, p-OH benzoic (p-OHBA), protocatechic (PA) and gallic acids (GA) were separately administered (10 mg/kg each, i.p.) to the rats everyday for 3 weeks. Metabolic functions were observedregularly. The rats in all groups were sacrificed andaorta and ...

  9. Acidic organic compounds in beverage, food, and feed production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quitmann, Hendrich; Fan, Rong; Czermak, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Organic acids and their derivatives are frequently used in beverage, food, and feed production. Acidic additives may act as buffers to regulate acidity, antioxidants, preservatives, flavor enhancers, and sequestrants. Beneficial effects on animal health and growth performance have been observed when using acidic substances as feed additives. Organic acids could be classified in groups according to their chemical structure. Each group of organic acids has its own specific properties and is used for different applications. Organic acids with low molecular weight (e.g. acetic acid, lactic acid, and citric acid), which are part of the primary metabolism, are often produced by fermentation. Others are produced more economically by chemical synthesis based on petrochemical raw materials on an industrial scale (e.g. formic acid, propionic and benzoic acid). Biotechnology-based production is of interest due to legislation, consumer demand for natural ingredients, and increasing environmental awareness. In the United States, for example, biocatalytically produced esters for food applications can be labeled as "natural," whereas identical conventional acid catalyst-based molecules cannot. Natural esters command a price several times that of non-natural esters. Biotechnological routes need to be optimized regarding raw materials and yield, microorganisms, and recovery methods. New bioprocesses are being developed for organic acids, which are at this time commercially produced by chemical synthesis. Moreover, new organic acids that could be produced with biotechnological methods are under investigation for food applications.

  10. Dissociation and homoconjugation equilibria of some acids and bases in N,N-dimethylformamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roletto, E; Vanni, A

    1977-01-01

    The following monoprotic acids have been studied in N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF): p-toluenesulphonic acid; 2,6-dichlorobenzoic acid; 2,5-dichlorophenol; the anilinium ion; the N-methyl-anilinium ion. The first dissociation step of malonic and succinic acids has also been studied. Dissociation and homoconjugation constants have been determined potentiometrically, at 25 degrees , in buffer solutions containing either the acid and its tetraethylammonium salt or the base and its picrate. Homoconjugation equilibria between unchanged acid and univalent conjugate base have been found not only for benzoic acid and phenol derivatives, but also between undissociated diprotic carboxylic acids and the corresponding monoanions, which are strongly intramolecularly hydrogen-bonded. Results are discussed with reference to previously published values.

  11. Growth and membrane fluidity of food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes in the presence of weak acid preservatives and hydrochloric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diakogiannis, Ioannis; Berberi, Anita; Siapi, Eleni; Arkoudi-Vafea, Angeliki; Giannopoulou, Lydia; Mastronicolis, Sofia K

    2013-01-01

    This study addresses a major issue in microbial food safety, the elucidation of correlations between acid stress and changes in membrane fluidity of the pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. In order to assess the possible role that membrane fluidity changes play in L. monocytogenes tolerance to antimicrobial acids (acetic, lactic, hydrochloric acid at low pH or benzoic acid at neutral pH), the growth of the bacterium and the gel-to-liquid crystalline transition temperature point (T m) of cellular lipids of each adapted culture was measured and compared with unexposed cells. The T m of extracted lipids was measured by differential scanning calorimetry. A trend of increasing T m values but not of equal extent was observed upon acid tolerance for all samples and this increase is not directly proportional to each acid antibacterial action. The smallest increase in T m value was observed in the presence of lactic acid, which presented the highest antibacterial action. In the presence of acids with high antibacterial action such as acetic, hydrochloric acid or low antibacterial action such as benzoic acid, increased T m values were measured. The T m changes of lipids were also correlated with our previous data about fatty acid changes to acid adaptation. The results imply that the fatty acid changes are not the sole adaptation mechanism for decreased membrane fluidity (increased T m). Therefore, this study indicates the importance of conducting an in-depth structural study on how acids commonly used in food systems affect the composition of individual cellular membrane lipid molecules.

  12. Callophycoic acids and callophycols from the Fijian red alga Callophycus serratus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Amy L; Stout, Elizabeth P; Hay, Mark E; Prusak, Anne C; Hardcastle, Kenneth; Fairchild, Craig R; Franzblau, Scott G; Le Roch, Karine; Prudhomme, Jacques; Aalbersberg, William; Kubanek, Julia

    2007-09-14

    Callophycoic acids A-H (1-8) and callophycols A and B (9 and 10) were isolated from extracts of the Fijian red alga Callophycus serratus, and identified by NMR, X-ray, and mass spectral analyses. These natural products represent four novel carbon skeletons, providing the first examples of diterpene-benzoic acids and diterpene-phenols in macroalgae. Compounds 1-10 exhibited antibacterial, antimalarial, and anticancer activity, although they are less bioactive than diterpene-benzoate macrolides previously isolated from this red alga.

  13. A new p-hydroxybenzoic acid derivative from an endophytic fungus Penicillium sp. of Nerium indicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yang-Min; Qiao, Ke; Kong, Yang; Guo, Lin-Xin; Li, Meng-Yun; Fan, Chao

    2017-12-01

    A new p-hydroxybenzoic acid derivative named 4-(2'R, 4'-dihydroxybutoxy) benzoic acid (1) was isolated from the fermentation of Penicillium sp. R22 in Nerium indicum. The structure was elucidated by means of spectroscopic (HR-ESI-MS, NMR, IR, UV) and X-ray crystallographic methods. The antibacterial and antifungal activity of compound 1 was tested, and the results showed that compound 1 revealed potent antifungal activity against Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, Alternaria alternata, and Alteranria brassicae with MIC value of 31.2 μg/ml.

  14. Optical sensing of 3-phenoxybenzoic acid as a pyrethroid pesticides exposure marker by surface imprinting polymer capped on manganese-doped zinc sulfide quantum dots

    OpenAIRE

    Vivek Pandey; Abhishek Chauhan; Gajanan Pandey; Mohana Krishna Reddy Mudiam

    2015-01-01

    The present communication deals with the synthesis of luminescent Mn-doped ZnS quantum dots (QDs) anchored to surface imprinted polymer for the optical sensing of 3-phenoxy benzoic acid (3-PBA) in urine samples. The combination of sensing and surface functionalization not only improves the selectivity of the method, but also increases the optosensing ability of the material for non-phosphorescent substances. The developed material was utilized for the selective and sensitive detection of 3-PB...

  15. Erratum: Correction to: p-Hydroxy benzoic acid-conjugated dendrimer nanotherapeutics as potential carriers for targeted drug delivery to brain: an in vitro and in vivo evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swami, Rajan; Singh, Indu; Kulhari, Hitesh; Jeengar, Manish Kumar; Khan, Wahid; Sistla, Ramakrishna

    2017-11-01

    In the published manuscript https://doi.org/10.1007/s11051-015-3063-9, a qualitative cellular uptake image in UT87MG cell line in Fig. 4c is incorrectly provided. The provided fluorescent images in Fig. 4 correspond to our other concurrent project on same cell line.

  16. Synthesis, crystal structure and luminescent properties of lanthanide extended structure with asymmetrical dinuclear units based on 2-(methylthio)benzoic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Cristiane K.; Souza, Viviane P. de; Luz, Leonis L. da [Departamento de Química Fundamental, UFPE, 50.740-560 Recife, PE (Brazil); Menezes Vicenti, Juliano R. de [Escola de Química e Alimento, FURG, 96203-900 Rio Grande, RS (Brazil); Burrow, Robert A. [Departamento de Química, UFSM, 97105-900 Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Severino Alves; Longo, Ricardo L. [Departamento de Química Fundamental, UFPE, 50.740-560 Recife, PE (Brazil); Malvestiti, Ivani, E-mail: ivani@ufpe.br [Departamento de Química Fundamental, UFPE, 50.740-560 Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2016-02-15

    The extended structures [Ln{sub 2}(L){sub 6}(OH{sub 2}){sub 4}] with L=2-(methylthio)benzoato (2-CH{sub 3}S–C{sub 6}H{sub 4}COO{sup −}) and Ln=Tb (1), Eu (2) and Gd (3) were successfully synthesized and characterized. The single crystal structure of compound 1 was determined and showed an extended structure made up of asymmetrical dinuclear units with the formula catena-poly[{Tb(H_2O)_4}-(μ-L-1κO:2κO'){sub 2}-{Tb(L-κO,O')_2}-(μ-L-1κO:2κO'){sub 2}]. In the molecule of 1, there are two distinct metal sites. The Tb atom in site 1 is bound to four coordinated water molecules and four oxygen atoms from four different benzoate ligands, two of which bridge to site 2 Tb atoms on one side and two to site 2 Tb atoms on the other side. The site 2 Tb atom is bound to four oxygen atoms from two chelating benzoate ligands and four oxygen atoms from four different benzoate ligands, two of which bridge to site 1 Tb atoms on one side and two to site 1 Tb atoms on the other side. The bridging benzoate ligands extend the framework in one-dimension with alternating site 1/site 2 Tb atoms. The luminescent properties of these asymmetric dinuclear extended structures are quite peculiar and showed a single emitting lanthanide center. The quantum yields of 1 (ca. 50–55%) is practically independent of the excitation energy, whereas those of 2 are vanishing small (<1%) when excited at the ligand states and become sizable (ca. 10–20%) upon excitation at the intra-4f manifold. To reconcile these experimental observations in conjunction with the spectral data for compounds 1 and 3, a strong interaction between the lanthanide emitting states at sites 1 and 2 was proposed. For compound 1, the numerical solutions of the rate equations provided evidences that when the transition rates between the emitting states at both sites are larger than the highest decaying rate of these states, the system becomes an effective single emitter. This establishes, for the first time, quantitative relationships between the transition rates between the lanthanide centers and their decaying rates. In the case of compound 2, the same strong interactions are present and, additionally, a ligand-to-metal charge transfer (LMCT) state was invoked to account for the dependence of the quantum yields with the excitation wavelength. Hydrothermal syntheses were also performed; however, X-ray powder diffraction and luminescence spectra showed more asymmetric structures around the lanthanide ion when compared to the crystalline compounds. - Highlights: • A symmetric dinuclear lanthanide units. • Spectral lanthanide–lanthanide interactions. • Energy transfer between lanthanide centers.

  17. How to Plant Apple Trees to Reduce Replant Disease in Apple Orchard: A Study on the Phenolic Acid of the Replanted Apple Orchard.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengmiao Yin

    Full Text Available Apple replant disease (ARD is an important problem in the production of apple. The phenolic acid is one of the causes of ARD. How phenolic acid affects the ARD was not well known. In this study, we analyzed the type, concentration and annual dynamic variation of phenolic acid in soil from three replanted apple orchards using an accelerated solvent extraction system with high performance liquid chromatography (ASE-HPLC. We found that the type and concentration of phenolic acid were significantly differed among different seasons, different sampling positions and different soil layers. Major types of phenolic acid in three replanted apple orchards were phlorizin, benzoic acid and vanillic aldehyde. The concentration of phenolic acid was highest in the soil of the previous tree holes and it was increased from the spring to autumn. Moreover, phenolic acid was primarily distributed in 30-60 cm soil layer in the autumn, while it was most abundant in 0-30 cm soil layer in the spring. Our results suggest that phlorizin, benzoic acid and vanillic aldehyde may be the key phenolic acid that brought about ARD in the replanted apple orchard.

  18. Phenolic Acids from Wheat Show Different Absorption Profiles in Plasma: A Model Experiment with Catheterized Pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørskov, Natalja; Hedemann, Mette Skou; Theil, Peter Kappel

    2013-01-01

    consumed. Benzoic acid derivatives showed low concentration in the plasma (diets. The exception was p-hydroxybenzoic acid, with a plasma concentration (4 ± 0.4 μM), much higher than the other plant phenolic acids, likely because it is an intermediate in the phenolic acid metabolism......The concentration and absorption of the nine phenolic acids of wheat were measured in a model experiment with catheterized pigs fed whole grain wheat and wheat aleurone diets. Six pigs in a repeated crossover design were fitted with catheters in the portal vein and mesenteric artery to study....... It was concluded that plant phenolic acids undergo extensive interconversion in the colon and that their absorption profiles reflected their low bioavailability in the plant matrix....

  19. Do carboximide–carboxylic acid combinations form co-crystals? The role of hydroxyl substitution on the formation of co-crystals and eutectics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramanpreet Kaur

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Carboxylic acids, amides and imides are key organic systems which provide understanding of molecular recognition and binding phenomena important in biological and pharmaceutical settings. In this context, studies of their mutual interactions and compatibility through co-crystallization may pave the way for greater understanding and new applications of their combinations. Extensive co-crystallization studies are available for carboxylic acid/amide combinations, but only a few examples of carboxylic acid/imide co-crystals are currently observed in the literature. The non-formation of co-crystals for carboxylic acid/imide combinations has previously been rationalized, based on steric and computed stability factors. In the light of the growing awareness of eutectic mixtures as an alternative outcome in co-crystallization experiments, the nature of various benzoic acid/cyclic imide combinations is established in this paper. Since an additional functional group can provide sites for new intermolecular interactions and, potentially, promote supramolecular growth into a co-crystal, benzoic acids decorated with one or more hydroxyl groups have been systematically screened for co-crystallization with one unsaturated and two saturated cyclic imides. The facile formation of an abundant number of hydroxybenzoic acid/cyclic carboximide co-crystals is reported, including polymorphic and variable stoichiometry co-crystals. In the cases where co-crystals did not form, the combinations are shown invariably to result in eutectics. The presence or absence and geometric disposition of hydroxyl functionality on benzoic acid is thus found to drive the formation of co-crystals or eutectics for the studied carboxylic acid/imide combinations.

  20. Do carboximide-carboxylic acid combinations form co-crystals? The role of hydroxyl substitution on the formation of co-crystals and eutectics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Ramanpreet; Gautam, Raj; Cherukuvada, Suryanarayan; Guru Row, Tayur N

    2015-05-01

    Carboxylic acids, amides and imides are key organic systems which provide understanding of molecular recognition and binding phenomena important in biological and pharmaceutical settings. In this context, studies of their mutual interactions and compatibility through co-crystallization may pave the way for greater understanding and new applications of their combinations. Extensive co-crystallization studies are available for carboxylic acid/amide combinations, but only a few examples of carboxylic acid/imide co-crystals are currently observed in the literature. The non-formation of co-crystals for carboxylic acid/imide combinations has previously been rationalized, based on steric and computed stability factors. In the light of the growing awareness of eutectic mixtures as an alternative outcome in co-crystallization experiments, the nature of various benzoic acid/cyclic imide combinations is established in this paper. Since an additional functional group can provide sites for new intermolecular inter-actions and, potentially, promote supramolecular growth into a co-crystal, benzoic acids decorated with one or more hydroxyl groups have been systematically screened for co-crystallization with one unsaturated and two saturated cyclic imides. The facile formation of an abundant number of hydroxybenzoic acid/cyclic carboximide co-crystals is reported, including polymorphic and variable stoichiometry co-crystals. In the cases where co-crystals did not form, the combinations are shown invariably to result in eutectics. The presence or absence and geometric disposition of hydroxyl functionality on benzoic acid is thus found to drive the formation of co-crystals or eutectics for the studied carboxylic acid/imide combinations.

  1. Hydrogen atoms in acetylsalicylic acid (Aspirin): the librating methyl group and probing the potential well in the hydrogen-bonded dimer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Chick C.

    2001-02-01

    The structure of acetylsalicylic acid (2-(acetoyloxy)benzoic acid; Aspirin) has been studied by variable temperature single crystal neutron diffraction. The usual large torsional librational motion of the terminal methyl group is observed and its temperature dependence analysed using a simple model for the potential, yielding the force constant and barrier height for this motion. In addition, asymmetry of the scattering density of the proton involved in the hydrogen bond forming the carboxylic acid dimer motif is observed at temperatures above 200 K. This asymmetry is discussed in terms of its possible implications for the shape of the hydrogen bonding potential well.

  2. Aerobic biodegradation of 2,2'-dithiodibenzoic acid produced from dibenzothiophene metabolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, R.F.; Cheng, S.M.; Fedorak, P.M. [University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Biological Science

    2006-01-15

    Dibenzothiophene is a sulfur heterocycle found in crude oils and coal. The biodegradation of dibenzothiophene through the Kodama pathway by Pseudomonas sp. strain BT1d leads to the formation of three disulfides: 2-oxo-2-(2-thiophenyl)ethanoic acid disulfide, 2-oxo-2-(2-thiophenyl)ethanoic acid-2-benzoic acid disulfide, and 2,2'-dithiodibenzoic acid. When provided as the carbon and sulfur source in liquid medium, 2,2'-dithiodibenzoic acid was degraded by soil enrichment cultures. Two bacterial isolates, designated strains RM1 and RM6, degraded 2,2'-dithiodibenzoic acid when combined in the medium. Isolate RM6 was found to have an absolute requirement for vitamin B{sub 12}, and it degraded 2,2'-dithiodibenzoic acid in pure culture when the medium was supplemented with this vitamin. Isolate RM6 also degraded 2,2'-dithiodibenzoic acid in medium containing sterilized supernatants from cultures of isolate RM1 grown on glucose or benzoate. Isolate RM6 was identified as a member of the genus Variovorax using the Biolog system and 16S rRNA gene analysis. Although the mechanism of disulfide metabolism could not be determined, benzoic acid was detected as a transient metabolite of 2,2'-dithiodibenzoic acid biodegradation by Variovorax sp. strain RM6. In pure culture, this isolate mineralized 2,2'-dithiodibenzoic acid, releasing 59% of the carbon as carbon dioxide and 88% of the sulfur as sulfate.

  3. Aerobic Biodegradation of 2,2′-Dithiodibenzoic Acid Produced from Dibenzothiophene Metabolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Rozlyn F.; Cheng, Stephanie M.; Fedorak, Phillip M.

    2006-01-01

    Dibenzothiophene is a sulfur heterocycle found in crude oils and coal. The biodegradation of dibenzothiophene through the Kodama pathway by Pseudomonas sp. strain BT1d leads to the formation of three disulfides: 2-oxo-2-(2-thiophenyl)ethanoic acid disulfide, 2-oxo-2-(2-thiophenyl)ethanoic acid-2-benzoic acid disulfide, and 2,2′-dithiodibenzoic acid. When provided as the carbon and sulfur source in liquid medium, 2,2′-dithiodibenzoic acid was degraded by soil enrichment cultures. Two bacterial isolates, designated strains RM1 and RM6, degraded 2,2′-dithiodibenzoic acid when combined in the medium. Isolate RM6 was found to have an absolute requirement for vitamin B12, and it degraded 2,2′-dithiodibenzoic acid in pure culture when the medium was supplemented with this vitamin. Isolate RM6 also degraded 2,2′-dithiodibenzoic acid in medium containing sterilized supernatants from cultures of isolate RM1 grown on glucose or benzoate. Isolate RM6 was identified as a member of the genus Variovorax using the Biolog system and 16S rRNA gene analysis. Although the mechanism of disulfide metabolism could not be determined, benzoic acid was detected as a transient metabolite of 2,2′-dithiodibenzoic acid biodegradation by Variovorax sp. strain RM6. In pure culture, this isolate mineralized 2,2′-dithiodibenzoic acid, releasing 59% of the carbon as carbon dioxide and 88% of the sulfur as sulfate. PMID:16391083

  4. Actions of four organic acids in radix isatidis on endotoxin-neutralization investigated by kinetic turbidimetric assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Li; He, Ying-jun; Li, You; Gong, Mu-xin

    2012-06-01

    To investigate anti-endotoxin action of four OAs reacted with endotoxin by the LAL assay with KTA. Using a incubating kinetic tube reader and kinetic turbidimetric assay (KTA), the concentration-response time curve of endotoxin reacted with limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL) at 37 degrees C were obtained and the action of four organic acids (OAs) on it were investigated. The four OAs were benzoic acid, salicylic acid, syringic acid and 2-amino-benzoic acid from Radix isatidis. Meanwhile, the temperature variation caused by endotoxin with the four OAs was studied by the rabbit pyrogen test (RPT). It was showed that a low concentration (1 mg/mL) of the four OAs had a little effect of anti-endotoxin, and when the concentrations of the four OAs were 30 mg/mL, the endotoxin was neutralized completely. The relationships between the concentrations of endotoxin and the OAs were all linear with correlation coefficients of greater than 0.9995, indicating that the four OAs all had strong anti-endotoxin action, while syringic acid had the strongest action among the four OAs with IC50 of 12.84 mg/mL. The investigations of KTA agreed well with the results obtained by means of RPT.

  5. Effect of acidity on the energy level of curcumin dye extracted from Curcuma longa L

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agustia, Yuda Virgantara, E-mail: yuda.mechanical.engineer@student.uns.ac.id; Suyitno,, E-mail: suyitno@uns.ac.id; Sutanto, Bayu, E-mail: bayu.sutanto@student.uns.ac.id [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Sebelas Maret University, Jl. Ir. Sutami 36 A, Surakarta (Indonesia); Arifin, Zainal, E-mail: zainal-a@uns.ac.id [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Sebelas Maret University, Jl. Ir. Sutami 36 A, Surakarta (Indonesia); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Brawijaya University, Malang (Indonesia)

    2016-03-29

    The purpose of this research is to investigate the effect of acidity on the energy level of curcumin dye. The natural dye, curcumin, was synthesized from Curcuma longa L. using a simple extraction technique. The purification of curcumin dye was conducted in a column of chromatography and its characteristics were studied. Next, the purified curcumin dye was added by benzoic acids until various acidities of 3.0, 3.5, 4.0, 4.5, and 5.0. The absorbance spectra and the functionality groups found in the dyes were detected by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, respectively. Meanwhile, the energy level of the dyes, E{sub HOMO} and E{sub LUMO} was measured by cyclic voltammetry. The best energy level of curcumin dye was achieved at pH 3.5 where E{sub red} = −0.37V, E{sub LUMO} = −4.28 eV, E{sub ox} = 1.15V, E{sub HOMO} = −5.83 eV, and E{sub band} {sub gap} = 1.55 eV. Therefore, the purified curcumin dye added by benzoic acid was promising for sensitizing the dye-sensitized solar cells.

  6. Effect of acidity on the energy level of curcumin dye extracted from Curcuma longa L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agustia, Yuda Virgantara; Suyitno,; Sutanto, Bayu; Arifin, Zainal

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate the effect of acidity on the energy level of curcumin dye. The natural dye, curcumin, was synthesized from Curcuma longa L. using a simple extraction technique. The purification of curcumin dye was conducted in a column of chromatography and its characteristics were studied. Next, the purified curcumin dye was added by benzoic acids until various acidities of 3.0, 3.5, 4.0, 4.5, and 5.0. The absorbance spectra and the functionality groups found in the dyes were detected by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, respectively. Meanwhile, the energy level of the dyes, E HOMO and E LUMO was measured by cyclic voltammetry. The best energy level of curcumin dye was achieved at pH 3.5 where E red = −0.37V, E LUMO = −4.28 eV, E ox = 1.15V, E HOMO = −5.83 eV, and E band gap = 1.55 eV. Therefore, the purified curcumin dye added by benzoic acid was promising for sensitizing the dye-sensitized solar cells.

  7. Effect of acidity on the energy level of curcumin dye extracted from Curcuma longa L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agustia, Yuda Virgantara; Suyitno, Arifin, Zainal; Sutanto, Bayu

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate the effect of acidity on the energy level of curcumin dye. The natural dye, curcumin, was synthesized from Curcuma longa L. using a simple extraction technique. The purification of curcumin dye was conducted in a column of chromatography and its characteristics were studied. Next, the purified curcumin dye was added by benzoic acids until various acidities of 3.0, 3.5, 4.0, 4.5, and 5.0. The absorbance spectra and the functionality groups found in the dyes were detected by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, respectively. Meanwhile, the energy level of the dyes, EHOMO and ELUMO was measured by cyclic voltammetry. The best energy level of curcumin dye was achieved at pH 3.5 where Ered = -0.37V, ELUMO = -4.28 eV, Eox = 1.15V, EHOMO = -5.83 eV, and Eband gap = 1.55 eV. Therefore, the purified curcumin dye added by benzoic acid was promising for sensitizing the dye-sensitized solar cells.

  8. Attenuated total reflectance Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy of carboxylic acids adsorbed onto mineral surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubicki, J. D.; Schroeter, L. M.; Itoh, M. J.; Nguyen, B. N.; Apitz, S. E.

    1999-09-01

    A suite of naturally-occurring carboxylic acids (acetic, oxalic, citric, benzoic, salicylic and phthalic) and their corresponding sodium salts were adsorbed onto a set of common mineral substrates (quartz, albite, illite, kaolinite and montmorillonite) in batch slurry experiments. Solution pH's of approximately 3 and 6 were used to examine the effects of pH on sorption mechanisms. Attenuated total reflectance Fourier-transform infrared (ATR FTIR) spectroscopy was employed to obtain vibrational frequencies of the organic ligands on the mineral surfaces and in solution. UV/visible spectroscopy on supernatant solutions was also employed to confirm that adsorption from solution had taken place for benzoic, salicylic and phthalic acids. Molecular orbital calculations were used to model possible surface complexes and interpret the experimental spectra. In general, the tectosilicates, quartz and albite feldspar, did not chemisorb (i.e., strong, inner-sphere adsorption) the carboxylate anions in sufficient amounts to produce infrared spectra of the organics after rinsing in distilled water. The clays (illite, kaolinite and montmorillonite) each exhibited similar ATR FTIR spectra. However, the illite sample used in this study reacted to form strong surface and aqueous complexes with salicylic acid before being treated to remove free Fe-hydroxides. Chemisorption of carboxylic acids onto clays is shown to be limited without the presence of Fe-hydroxides within the clay matrix.

  9. Probing acid-amide intermolecular hydrogen bonding by NMR spectroscopy and DFT calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhari, Sachin Rama; Suryaprakash, N.

    2012-05-01

    Benzene carboxylic acids and benzamide act as their self-complement in molecular recognition to form inter-molecular hydrogen bonded dimers between amide and carboxylic acid groups, which have been investigated by 1H, 13C and 15N NMR spectroscopy. Extensive NMR studies using diffusion ordered spectroscopy (DOSY), variable temperature 1D, 2D NMR, established the formation of heterodimers of benzamide with benzoic acid, salicylic acid and phenyl acetic acid in deuterated chloroform solution. Association constants for the complex formation in the solution state have been determined. The results are ascertained by X-ray diffraction in the solid state. Intermolecular interactions in solution and in solid state were found to be similar. The structural parameters obtained by X-ray diffraction studies are compared with those obtained by DFT calculations.

  10. pH-dependent and carrier-mediated transport of salicylic acid across Caco-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takanaga, H; Tamai, I; Tsuji, A

    1994-07-01

    The transport of monocarboxylic acid drugs such as salicylic acid was examined in the human colon adenocarcinoma cell line, Caco-2 cells that possess intestinal epithelia-like properties. [14C]Salicylic acid transport was pH-dependent and appeared to follow the pH-partition hypothesis. However, 10 mM unlabelled salicylic acid significantly reduced the permeability coefficient of [14C]salicylic acid. Kinetic analysis of the concentration dependence of the permeation rate of salicylic acid across Caco-2 cells showed both saturable (Kt = 5.28 +/- 0.72 mM Jmax = 36.6 +/- 3.54 nmol min-1 (mg protein)-1) and nonsaturable (kd = 0.37 +/- 0.08 microL min-1 (mg protein)-1) processes. The permeation rate of [14C]salicylic acid was competitively inhibited by both acetic acid and benzoic acid, which were demonstrated in our previous studies to be transported in the carrier-mediated-transport mechanism which is responsible for monocarboxylic acids. Furthermore, certain monocarboxylic acids significantly inhibited [14C]salicylic acid transport, whereas salicylamide and dicarboxylic acids such as succinic acid did not. From these results, it was concluded that the transcellular transport of [14C]salicylic acid across Caco-2 cells is by the pH-dependent and carrier-mediated transport mechanism specific for monocarboxylic acids.

  11. Transport of acetic acid in Zygosaccharomyces bailii: effects of ethanol and their implications on the resistance of the yeast to acidic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, M J; Miranda, L; Côrte-Real, M; Leão, C

    1996-01-01

    Cells of Zygosaccharomyces bailii ISA 1307 grown in a medium with acetic acid, ethanol, or glycerol as the sole carbon and energy source transported acetic acid by a saturable transport system. This system accepted propionic and formic acids but not lactic, sorbic, and benzoic acids. When the carbon source was glucose or fructose, the cells displayed activity of a mediated transport system specific for acetic acid, apparently not being able to recognize other monocarboxylic acids. In both types of cells, ethanol inhibited the transport of labelled acetic acid. The inhibition was noncompetitive, and the dependence of the maximum transport rate on the ethanol concentration was found to be exponential. These results reinforced the belief that, under the referenced growth conditions, the acid entered the cells mainly through a transporter protein. The simple diffusion of the undissociated acid appeared to contribute, with a relatively low weight, to the overall acid uptake. It was concluded that in Z. bailii, ethanol plays a protective role against the possible negative effects of acetic acid by inhibiting its transport and accumulation. Thus, the intracellular concentration of the acid could be maintained at levels lower than those expected if the acid entered the cells only by simple diffusion. PMID:8795203

  12. Quantitative analysis of the modes of growth inhibition by weak organic acids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Azmat; Orij, Rick; Brul, Stanley; Smits, Gertien J

    2012-12-01

    Weak organic acids are naturally occurring compounds that are commercially used as preservatives in the food and beverage industries. They extend the shelf life of food products by inhibiting microbial growth. There are a number of theories that explain the antifungal properties of these weak acids, but the exact mechanism is still unknown. We set out to quantitatively determine the contributions of various mechanisms of antifungal activity of these weak acids, as well as the mechanisms that yeast uses to counteract their effects. We analyzed the effects of four weak organic acids differing in lipophilicity (sorbic, benzoic, propionic, and acetic acids) on growth and intracellular pH (pH(i)) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although lipophilicity of the acids correlated with the rate of acidification of the cytosol, our data confirmed that not initial acidification, but rather the cell's ability to restore pH(i), was a determinant for growth inhibition. This pH(i) recovery in turn depended on the nature of the organic anion. We identified long-term acidification as the major cause of growth inhibition under acetic acid stress. Restoration of pH(i), and consequently growth rate, in the presence of this weak acid required the full activity of the plasma membrane ATPase Pma1p. Surprisingly, the proposed anion export pump Pdr12p was shown to play an important role in the ability of yeast cells to restore the pH(i) upon lipophilic (sorbic and benzoic) acid stress, probably through a charge interaction of anion and proton transport.

  13. Characterization and quantification of flavonoids and organic acids over fruit development in American cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) cultivars using HPLC and APCI-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yifei; Johnson-Cicalese, Jennifer; Singh, Ajay P; Vorsa, Nicholi

    2017-09-01

    Cranberry flavonoids, including anthocyanins, flavonol glycosides and proanthocyanidins, and organic acids were characterized and quantified by HPLC and LC-MS/MS during fruit development and ripening in eight cranberry cultivars. Anthocyanin biosynthesis initiated at early fruit development and reached highest level in mature fruit, with significant differences between cultivars. Major flavonol glycosides, including the most abundant quercetin-3-galactoside and myricetin-3-galactoside, showed consistent concentrations during the season with moderate fluctuation, and were at similar levels in mature fruits of the eight cultivars. Proanthocyanidins declined during fruit development and then increased slightly in later maturation stages. Levels of various proanthocyanidin oligomers/polymers with different degree-of-polymerization were highly correlated within a cultivar during fruit development. Cultivars with coancestry exhibited similar levels (high/low) of anthocyanins or proanthocyanidins, indicating genetic effects on biosynthesis of such flavonoids. All cultivars showed similar levels of malic and citric acids, and declining levels of quinic acid during fruit development. Benzoic acid was extremely low early in the season and increased sharply during fruit ripening. Levels of quinic and citric acids were significantly different among cultivars in the mature fruit. Concentrations of proanthocyanidins, anthocyanins, quinic acid and benzoic acid have a strong developmental association in developing ovaries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Transport of Salicylic Acid in Tobacco Necrosis Virus-Infected Cucumber Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molders, W.; Buchala, A.; Metraux, J. P.

    1996-01-01

    The transport of salicylic acid (SA) was studied in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) using 14C-labeled benzoic acid that was injected in the cotyledons at the time of inoculation. Primary inoculation with tobacco necrosis virus (TNV) on the cotyledons led to an induction of systemic resistance of the first primary leaf above the cotyledon against Colletotrichum lagenarium as early as 3 d after inoculation. [14C]SA was detected in the phloem or in the first leaf 2 d after TNV inoculation, whereas [14C]benzoic acid was not detected in the phloem during the first 3 d after TNV inoculation of the cotyledons, indicating phloem transport of [14C]SA from cotyledon. In leaf 1, the specific activity of [14C]SA decreased between 1.7 and 8.6 times compared with the cotyledons, indicating that, in addition to transport, leaf 1 also produced more SA. The amount of SA transported after TNV infection of the cotyledon was 9 to 160 times higher than in uninfected control plants. Thus, SA can be transported to leaf 1 before the development of systemic acquired resistance, and SA accumulation in leaf 1 results both from transport from the cotyledon and from synthesis in leaf 1. PMID:12226421

  15. Synthesis and Biological Activity of Novel Amino Acid-(N'-Benzoyl Hydrazide and Amino Acid-(N'-Nicotinoyl Hydrazide Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherine N. Khattab

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The coupling reaction of benzoic acid and nicotinic acid hydrazides with N- protected L-amino acids including valine, leucine, phenylalanine, glutamic acid and tyrosine is reported. The target compounds, N-Boc-amino acid-(N`-benzoyl- and N- Boc-amino acid-(N`-nicotinoyl hydrazides 5a-5e and 6a-6e were prepared in very high yields and purity using N-[(dimethylamino-1H-1,2,3-triazolo[4,5-b]pyridin-1-yl- methylene]-N-methyl-methanaminium hexafluorophosphate N-oxide (HATU as coupling reagent. The antimicrobial activity of the Cu and Cd complexes of the designed compounds was tested. The products were deprotected affording the corresponding amino acid-(N`-benzoyl hydrazide hydrochloride salts (7a-7e and amino acid-(N`- nicotinoyl hydrazide hydrochloride salts (8a-8e. These compounds and their Cu and Cd complexes were also tested for their antimicrobial activity. Several compounds showed comparable activity to that of ampicillin against S. aureus and E. coli.

  16. Ion-exclusion chromatographic behavior of aliphatic carboxylic acids and benzenecarboxylic acids on a sulfonated styrene--divinylbenzene co-polymer resin column with sulfuric acid containing various alcohols as eluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Kazutoku; Towata, Atsuya; Ohashi, Masayoshi

    2003-05-16

    The addition of C1-C7 alcohols (methanol, ethanol, propanol, butanol, heptanol, hexanol and heptanol) to dilute sulfuric acid as eluent in ion-exclusion chromatography using a highly sulfonated styrene-divinylbenzene co-polymer resin (TSKgel SCX) in the H+ form as the stationary phase was carried out for the simultaneous separations of both (a) C1-C7 aliphatic carboxylic acids (formic, acetic, propionic, isobutyric, butyric, isovaleric, valeric, 2-methylvaleric, isocaproic, caproic, 2,2-dimethyl-n-valeric, 2-methylhexanoic, 5-methylhexanoic and heptanoic acids) and (b) benzenecarboxylic acids (pyromellitic, hemimellitic, trimellitic, o-phthalic, m-phthalic, p-phthalic, benzoic and salicylic acids and phenol). Heptanol was the most effective modifier in ion-exclusion chromatography for the improvement of peak shapes and a reduction in retention volumes for higher aliphatic carboxylic acids and benzenecarboxylic acids. Excellent simultaneous separation and relatively highly sensitive conductimetric detection for these C1-C7 aliphatic carboxylic acids were achieved on the TSKgel SCX column (150 x 6 mm I.D.) in 30 min using 0.5 mM sulfuric acid containing 0.025% heptanol as eluent. Excellent simultaneous separation and highly sensitive UV detection at 200 nm for these benzenecarboxylic acids were also achieved on the TSKgel SCX column in 30 min using 5 mM sulfuric acid containing 0.075% heptanol as eluent.

  17. Extreme resistance to weak-acid preservatives in the spoilage yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratford, Malcolm; Steels, Hazel; Nebe-von-Caron, Gerhard; Novodvorska, Michaela; Hayer, Kimran; Archer, David B.

    2013-01-01

    Weak-acid preservatives, such as sorbic acid and acetic acid, are used in many low pH foods to prevent spoilage by fungi. The spoilage yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii is notorious for its extreme resistance to preservatives and ability to grow in excess of legally-permitted concentrations of preservatives. Extreme resistance was confirmed in 38 strains of Z. bailii to several weak-acid preservatives. Using the brewing yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a control, tests showed that Z. bailii was ~ 3-fold more resistant to a variety of weak-acids but was not more resistant to alcohols, aldehydes, esters, ethers, ketones, or hydrophilic chelating acids. The weak acids were chemically very diverse in structure, making it improbable that the universal resistance was caused by degradation or metabolism. Examination of Z. bailii cell populations showed that extreme resistance to sorbic acid, benzoic acid and acetic acid was limited to a few cells within the population, numbers decreasing with concentration of weak acid to bailii is due to population heterogeneity, with a small proportion of cells having a lower intracellular pH. This reduces the level of accumulation of any weak acid in the cytoplasm, thus conferring resistance to all weak acids, but not to other inhibitors. PMID:23856006

  18. Extreme resistance to weak-acid preservatives in the spoilage yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratford, Malcolm; Steels, Hazel; Nebe-von-Caron, Gerhard; Novodvorska, Michaela; Hayer, Kimran; Archer, David B

    2013-08-16

    Weak-acid preservatives, such as sorbic acid and acetic acid, are used in many low pH foods to prevent spoilage by fungi. The spoilage yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii is notorious for its extreme resistance to preservatives and ability to grow in excess of legally-permitted concentrations of preservatives. Extreme resistance was confirmed in 38 strains of Z. bailii to several weak-acid preservatives. Using the brewing yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a control, tests showed that Z. bailii was ~3-fold more resistant to a variety of weak-acids but was not more resistant to alcohols, aldehydes, esters, ethers, ketones, or hydrophilic chelating acids. The weak acids were chemically very diverse in structure, making it improbable that the universal resistance was caused by degradation or metabolism. Examination of Z. bailii cell populations showed that extreme resistance to sorbic acid, benzoic acid and acetic acid was limited to a few cells within the population, numbers decreasing with concentration of weak acid to bailii is due to population heterogeneity, with a small proportion of cells having a lower intracellular pH. This reduces the level of accumulation of any weak acid in the cytoplasm, thus conferring resistance to all weak acids, but not to other inhibitors. © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. A Novel Synthetic Pathway Enables Microbial Production of Polyphenols Independent from the Endogenous Aromatic Amino Acid Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallscheuer, Nicolai; Vogt, Michael; Marienhagen, Jan

    2017-03-17

    Numerous plant polyphenols have potential applications as pharmaceuticals or nutraceuticals. Stilbenes and flavonoids as most abundant polyphenols are synthesized from phenylpropanoids, which are exclusively derived from aromatic amino acids in nature. Several microorganisms were engineered for the synthesis of biotechnologically interesting plant polyphenols; however, low activity of heterologous ammonia lyases, linking endogenous microbial aromatic amino acid biosynthesis to phenylpropanoid synthesis, turned out to be the limiting step during microbial synthesis. We here developed an alternative strategy for polyphenol production from cheap benzoic acids by reversal of a β-oxidative phenylpropanoid degradation pathway avoiding any ammonia lyase activity. The synthetic pathway running in the non-natural direction is feasible with respect to thermodynamics and involved reaction mechanisms. Instantly, product titers of 5 mg/L resveratrol could be achieved in recombinant Corynebacterium glutamicum strains indicating that phenylpropanoid synthesis from 4-hydroxybenzoic acid can in principle be implemented independently from aromatic amino acids and ammonia lyase activity.

  20. Arabidopsis thaliana GH3.5 acyl acid amido synthetase mediates metabolic crosstalk in auxin and salicylic acid homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westfall, Corey S; Sherp, Ashley M; Zubieta, Chloe; Alvarez, Sophie; Schraft, Evelyn; Marcellin, Romain; Ramirez, Loren; Jez, Joseph M

    2016-11-29

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, the acyl acid amido synthetase Gretchen Hagen 3.5 (AtGH3.5) conjugates both indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and salicylic acid (SA) to modulate auxin and pathogen response pathways. To understand the molecular basis for the activity of AtGH3.5, we determined the X-ray crystal structure of the enzyme in complex with IAA and AMP. Biochemical analysis demonstrates that the substrate preference of AtGH3.5 is wider than originally described and includes the natural auxin phenylacetic acid (PAA) and the potential SA precursor benzoic acid (BA). Residues that determine IAA versus BA substrate preference were identified. The dual functionality of AtGH3.5 is unique to this enzyme although multiple IAA-conjugating GH3 proteins share nearly identical acyl acid binding sites. In planta analysis of IAA, PAA, SA, and BA and their respective aspartyl conjugates were determined in wild-type and overexpressing lines of A thaliana This study suggests that AtGH3.5 conjugates auxins (i.e., IAA and PAA) and benzoates (i.e., SA and BA) to mediate crosstalk between different metabolic pathways, broadening the potential roles for GH3 acyl acid amido synthetases in plants.

  1. Effects of Solvents on Polymorphism and Shape of Mefenamic Acid Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Mudalip Siti Kholijah

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Mefenamic acid [2-(2, 3-dimethylphenyl amino benzoic acid] is an active pharmaceutical compound that exist in different polymorphic form and shape. In this work the effect of solvents on polymorphism and shape of mefenamic acid crystals were examined. The solvents used were ethanol, isopropanol, ethyl acetate, dimethyl acetamide, dimethyl formamide, and acetone. Natural cooling was employed during the crystallisation process. The crystals produced were dried and analysed using optical microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, thermal gravimetric analysis, x-ray powder diffraction (XRPD and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR. The analysis confirmed that the crystals obtained using ethyl acetate, ethanol, isopropanol, and acetone are pure Form I with a needle-like flat shape. Meanwhile, the crystallisation using DMF produced polymorphic Form II in cubic shape.

  2. Crystal structure of olivetolic acid: a natural product from Cetrelia sanguinea (Schaer.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismed, Friardi; Farhan, Aulia; Bakhtiar, Amri; Zaini, Erizal; Nugraha, Yuda Prasetya; Dwichandra Putra, Okky; Uekusa, Hidehiro

    2016-11-01

    The title compound, C 12 H 16 O 4 (systematic name: 2,4-dihy-droxy-6-pentyl-benzoic acid) is a natural product isolated from C. sanguinea (Schaer.) and is reported to have various pharmacological activities. The mol-ecule is approximately planar (r.m.s. deviation for the non-H atoms = 0.096 Å) and features an intra-molecular O-H⋯O hydrogen bond. In the crystal, each olivetolic acid mol-ecule is connected to three neighbours via O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, generating (10-1) sheets. This crystal is essentially isostructural with a related resorcinolic acid with a longer alkyl chain.

  3. Separation of aliphatic carboxylic acids and benzenecarboxylic acids by ion-exclusion chromatography with various cation-exchange resin columns and sulfuric acid as eluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Kazutoku; Ohashi, Masayoshi; Jin, Ji-Ye; Takeuchi, Toyohide; Fujimoto, Chuzo; Choi, Seong-Ho; Ryoo, Jae-Jeong; Lee, Kwang-Pill

    2003-05-16

    The application of various hydrophilic cation-exchange resins for high-performance liquid chromatography (sulfonated silica gel: TSKgel SP-2SW, carboxylated silica gel: TSKgel CM-2SW, sulfonated polymethacrylate resin: TSKgel SP-5PW, carboxylated polymethacrylate resins: TSKgel CM-5PW and TSKgel OA-Pak A) as stationary phases in ion-exclusion chromatography for C1-C7 aliphatic carboxylic acids (formic, acetic, propionic, butyric, isovaleric, valeric, isocaproic, caproic, 2-methylhexanoic and heptanoic acids) and benzenecarboxylic acids (pyromellitic, trimellitic, hemimellitic, o-phthalic, m-phthalic, p-phthalic, benzoic, salicylic acids and phenol) was carried out using diluted sulfuric acid as the eluent. Silica-based cation-exchange resins (TSKgel SP-2SW and TSKgel CM-2SW) were very suitable for the ion-exclusion chromatographic separation of these benzenecarboxylic acids. Excellent simultaneous separation of these benzenecarboxylic acids was achieved on a TSKgel SP-2SW column (150 x 6 mm I.D.) in 17 min using a 2.5 mM sulfuric acid at pH 2.4 as the eluent. Polymethacrylate-based cation-exchange resins (TSKgel SP-5PW, TSKgel CM-5PW and TSKgel OA-Pak A) acted as advanced stationary phases for the ion-exclusion chromatographic separation of these C1-C7 aliphatic carboxylic acids. Excellent simultaneous separation of these C1-C7 acids was achieved on a TSKgel CM-5PW column (150 x 6 mm I.D.) in 32 min using a 0.05 mM sulfuric acid at pH 4.0 as the eluent.

  4. Antifungal Activity and Biochemical Response of Cuminic Acid against Phytophthora capsici Leonian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Sun, Yang; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Xing; Feng, Juntao

    2016-06-11

    Phytophthora blight of pepper caused by Phytophthora capsici Leonian is a destructive disease throughout the world. Cuminic acid, extracted from the seed of Cuminum cyminum L., belongs to the benzoic acid chemical class. In this study, the sensitivity and biochemical response of P. capsici to cuminic acid was determined. The mean EC50 (50% effective concentration) values for cuminic acid in inhibiting mycelial growth and zoospore germination of the 54 studied P. capsici isolates were 14.54 ± 5.23 μg/mL and 6.97 ± 2.82 μg/mL, respectively. After treatment with cuminic acid, mycelial morphology, sporangium formation and mycelial respiration were significantly influenced; cell membrane permeability and DNA content increased markedly, but pyruvic acid content, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content, and ATPase activity decreased compared with the untreated control. In pot experiments, cuminic acid exhibited both protective and curative activity. Importantly, POD and PAL activity of the pepper leaves increased after being treated with cuminic acid. These indicated that cuminic acid not only showed antifungal activity, but also could improve the defense capacity of the plants. All the results suggested that cuminic acid exhibits the potential to be developed as a new phytochemical fungicide, and this information increases our understanding of the mechanism of action of cuminic acid against Phytophthora capsici.

  5. Synthesis, coordination and biological aspects of organotin(IV derivatives of 4-[(2,4-dinitrophenylamino]-4-oxo-2-butenoic acid and 2-{[(2,4-dinitrophenylamino]carbonyl}benzoic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KHADIJA SHAHID

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available New series of organotin(IV complexes of aniline derivatives, R2SnL2 and R3SnL [where R = Me, n-Bu, Ph, n-Oct] have been synthesized by the reaction of HL1 and HL2 with respective organotin halides or oxides. Experimental details for the preparation and characterization (including elemental analysis, IR and multinuclear NMR (1H-, 13C- and 119Sn- spectra in CDCl3 and EI mass spectra of both series are provided. The binding sites of the ligands were identified by means of FTIR spectroscopic measurements. It was found that in all cases the organotin(IV moiety reacts with the oxygen of COO– group to form new complexes. In the diorganotin complexes, the COO– group is coordinated to the organotin(IV centres in a bidentate manner in the solid state. The 119Sn NMR data and the nJ(13C‑119/117Sn coupling constant support the tetrahedral coordination geometry of the organotin complexes in non-coordinating solvents. Biological activities (antibacterial, antifungal, cytotoxicity, antileishmanial and insecticidal of these compounds are also reported.

  6. Radiation chemistry of salicylic and methyl substituted salicylic acids: Models for the radiation chemistry of pharmaceutical compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayatollahi, Shakiba; Kalnina, Daina; Song, Weihua; Turks, Maris; Cooper, William J.

    2013-01-01

    Salicylic acid and its derivatives are components of many medications and moieties found in numerous pharmaceutical compounds. They have been used as models for various pharmaceutical compounds in pharmacological studies, for the treatment of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs), and, reactions with natural organic matter (NOM). In this study, the radiation chemistry of benzoic acid, salicylic acid and four methyl substituted salicylic acids (MSA) is reported. The absolute bimolecular reaction rate constants for hydroxyl radical reaction with benzoic and salicylic acids as well as 3-methyl-, 4-methyl-, 5-methyl-, and 6-methyl-salicylic acid were determined (5.86±0.54)×10 9 , (1.07±0.07)×10 10 , (7.48±0.17)×10 9 , (7.31±0.29)×10 9 , (5.47±0.25)×10 9 , (6.94±0.10)×10 9 (M −1 s −1 ), respectively. The hydrated electron reaction rate constants were measured (3.02±0.10)×10 9 , (8.98±0.27)×10 9 , (5.39±0.21)×10 9 , (4.33±0.17)×10 9 , (4.72±0.15)×10 9 , (1.42±0.02)×10 9 (M −1 s −1 ), respectively. The transient absorption spectra for the six model compounds were examined and their role as model compounds for the radiation chemistry of pharmaceuticals investigated. - Highlights: • Free radical chemistry of salicylic and 4 methyl salicylic acids is investigated. • The transient absorptions spectra for model compounds are measured. • Absolute bimolecular reaction rate constants for hydroxyl radical are determined. • Solvated electron reaction rate constants are calculated. • The use of salicylic acids as models for pharmaceuticals is explored

  7. Phenolic and short-chained aliphatic organic acid constituents of wild oat (Avena fatua L.) seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, R S; Ananth, R; Granger, K; Bradley, B; Anderson, J V; Fuerst, E P

    2010-01-13

    The objective of this research was to identify and quantify the phenolic and short-chained aliphatic organic acids present in the seeds of three wild-type populations of wild oat and compare these results to the chemical composition of seeds from two commonly utilized wild oat isolines (M73 and SH430). Phenolic acids have been shown to serve as germination inhibitors, as well as protection for seeds from biotic and abiotic stress factors in other species, whereas aliphatic organic acids have been linked to germination traits and protection against pathogens. Wild oat populations were grown under a "common garden" environment to remove maternal variation, and the resulting seeds were extracted to remove the readily soluble and chemically bound phenolic and aliphatic organic acid components. Compounds were identified and quantified using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Ferulic and p-coumaric acid comprised 99% of the total phenolic acids present in the seeds, of which 91% were contained in the hulls and 98% were in the chemically bound forms. Smaller quantities of OH benzoic and vanillic acid were also detected. Soluble organic acids concentrations were higher in the M73 isoline compared to SH430, suggesting that these chemical constituents could be related to seed dormancy. Malic, succinic, fumaric and azelaic acid were the dominant aliphatic organic acids detected in all seed and chemical fractions.

  8. Chemical and enzymatic stability of amino acid prodrugs containing methoxy, ethoxy and propylene glycol linkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Deepak; Gupta, Sheeba Varghese; Lee, Kyung-Dall; Amidon, Gordon L

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated the chemical and enzymatic stabilities of prodrugs containing methoxy, ethoxy and propylene glycol linkers in order to find a suitable linker for prodrugs of carboxylic acids with amino acids. l-Valine and l-phenylalanine prodrugs of model compounds (benzoic acid and phenyl acetic acid) containing methoxy, ethoxy and propylene glycol linkers were synthesized. The hydrolysis rate profile of each compound was studied at physiologically relevant pHs (1.2, 4, 6 and 7.4). Enzymatic hydrolysis of propylene glycol containing compounds was studied using Caco-2 homogenate as well as purified enzyme valacyclovirase. It was observed that the stability of the prodrugs increases with the linker length (propyl > ethyl > methyl). The model prodrugs were stable at acidic pH as compared to basic pH. It was observed that the prodrug with the aliphatic amino acid promoiety was more stable compared to its aromatic counterpart. The comparison between benzyl and the phenyl model compounds revealed that the amino acid side chain is significant in determining the stability of the prodrug whereas the benzyl or phenyl carboxylic acid had little or no effect on the stability. The enzymatic activation studies of propylene glycol linker prodrug in the presence of valacyclovirase and cell homogenate showed faster generation of the parent drug at pH 7.4. The half-life of prodrugs at pH 7.4 was more than 12 h, whereas in the presence of cell homogenate the half-lives were less than 1 h. Hydrolysis by Caco-2 homogenate generated the parent compound in two steps, where the prodrug was first converted to the intermediate, propylene glycol benzoate, which was then converted to the parent compound (benzoic acid). Enzymatic hydrolysis of propylene glycol containing prodrugs by valacyclovirase showed hydrolysis of the amino acid ester part to generate the propylene glycol ester of model compound (propylene glycol benzoate) as the major product. The amino acid prodrugs containing methoxy

  9. Antagonist Effects of Veratric Acid against UVB-Induced Cell Damages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deokhoon Park

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Ultraviolet (UV radiation induces DNA damage, oxidative stress, and inflammatory processes in human epidermis, resulting in inflammation, photoaging, and photocarcinogenesis. Adequate protection of skin against the harmful effect of UV irradiation is essential. In recent years naturally occurring herbal compounds such as phenolic acids, flavonoids, and high molecular weight polyphenols have gained considerable attention as beneficial protective agents. The simple phenolic veratric acid (VA, 3,4-dimethoxybenzoic acid is one of the major benzoic acid derivatives from vegetables and fruits and it also occurs naturally in medicinal mushrooms which have been reported to have anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant activities. However, it has rarely been applied in skin care. This study, therefore, aimed to explore the possible roles of veratric acid in protection against UVB-induced damage in HaCaT cells. Results showed that veratric acid can attenuate cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs formation, glutathione (GSH depletion and apoptosis induced by UVB. Furthermore, veratric acid had inhibitory effects on the UVB-induced release of the inflammatory mediators such as IL-6 and prostaglandin-E2. We also confirmed the safety and clinical efficacy of veratric acid on human skin. Overall, results demonstrated significant benefits of veratric acid on the protection of keratinocyte against UVB-induced injuries and suggested its potential use in skin photoprotection.

  10. Antagonist effects of veratric acid against UVB-induced cell damages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Seoung Woo; Jung, Eunsun; Kim, Seungbeom; Lee, Kyung-Eun; Youm, Jong-Kyung; Park, Deokhoon

    2013-05-10

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation induces DNA damage, oxidative stress, and inflammatory processes in human epidermis, resulting in inflammation, photoaging, and photocarcinogenesis. Adequate protection of skin against the harmful effect of UV irradiation is essential. In recent years naturally occurring herbal compounds such as phenolic acids, flavonoids, and high molecular weight polyphenols have gained considerable attention as beneficial protective agents. The simple phenolic veratric acid (VA, 3,4-dimethoxybenzoic acid) is one of the major benzoic acid derivatives from vegetables and fruits and it also occurs naturally in medicinal mushrooms which have been reported to have anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant activities. However, it has rarely been applied in skin care. This study, therefore, aimed to explore the possible roles of veratric acid in protection against UVB-induced damage in HaCaT cells. Results showed that veratric acid can attenuate cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) formation, glutathione (GSH) depletion and apoptosis induced by UVB. Furthermore, veratric acid had inhibitory effects on the UVB-induced release of the inflammatory mediators such as IL-6 and prostaglandin-E2. We also confirmed the safety and clinical efficacy of veratric acid on human skin. Overall, results demonstrated significant benefits of veratric acid on the protection of keratinocyte against UVB-induced injuries and suggested its potential use in skin photoprotection.

  11. Crystal growth, vibrational, optical, thermal and theoretical studies of a nonlinear optical material: 2-Methyl 3,5-dinitrobenzoic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sangeetha, K. [Department of Physics, Sri Sarada College for Women, Salem-16 (India); Guru Prasad, L. [Department of Science & Humanities, M. Kumarasamy College of Engineering, Karur (India); Mathammal, R. [Department of Physics, Sri Sarada College for Women, Salem-16 (India)

    2016-11-15

    Single crystals of 2-methyl 3,5-dinitro benzoic acid with reasonable size have been grown by slow evaporation solution growth method using ethanol as solvent. Quantum chemical calculation of 2-methyl 3,5-Dinitro benzoic acid was carried out by using DFT/B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) method. The powder X-ray diffraction pattern was recorded and indexed. Both the experimental and theoretical vibrational spectrum validates the presence of functional groups. Polarizability, first order hyperpolarizability and the electric dipole moment values have been computed theoretically. The {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR chemical shift of the molecule was calculated and compared with experimental results. TG/DSC analysis has been employed to understand the thermal and physio-chemical stability of the title compound. Frequency conversion property of the crystal was tested by Kurtz and Perry method. Optical absorption behavior of the grown crystal was examined by recording the optical spectrum and band gap energy was also estimated. The calculated HOMO and LUMO energy shows the charge transfer nature of the molecule.

  12. THE ACTIVATION OF STARFISH EGGS BY ACIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillie, Ralph S.

    1926-01-01

    1. Exposure of unfertilized starfish eggs to dilute solutions of weak acids (fatty acids, benzoic and carbonic acids) in isotonic balanced salt solution causes complete activation with the proper durations of exposure. For each acid the rate of activation (reciprocal of optimum duration) varies with concentration and temperature; at a given temperature and within a considerable range of concentrations (e.g. 0.00075 to 0.004 M for butyric acid), this rate is approximately proportional to concentration. We may thus speak of a molecular rate of action characteristic of each acid. 2. In general the molecular rate of action increases with the dissociation constant and surface activity of the acids. In the fatty acid series (up to caproic), formic acid has the most rapid effect, acting about four times as rapidly as acetic; for the other acids the order is: acetic = propionic ≦ butyric Carbonic acid acts qualitatively like the fatty acids, but its molecular rate of action is only about one-fourteenth that of acetic acid. 3. Hydrochloric and lactic acids are relatively ineffective as activating agents, apparently because of difficulty of penetration. Lactic acid is decidedly the more effective. The action of both acids is only slightly modified by dissolving in pure (isotonic NaCl and CaCl2) instead of in balanced salt solution. 4. The rate of action of acetic acid, in concentrations of 0.002 M to 0.004 M is increased (by 10 to 20 per cent) by adding Na-acetate (0.002 to 0.016) to the solution. The degree of acceleration is closely proportional to the estimated increase in undissociated acetic acid molecules. Activation thus appears to be an effect of the undissociated acid molecules in the external solution and not of the ions. Acetate anions and H ions acting by themselves, in concentrations much higher than those of the solutions used, have no activating effect. The indications are that the undissociated molecules penetrate rapidly, the ions slowly. Having penetrated

  13. Spectroscopic (FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV absorption, 1H and 13C NMR) and theoretical (in B3LYP/6-311++G** level) studies on alkali metal salts of caffeic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Świsłocka, Renata

    2013-01-01

    The effect of some metals on the electronic system of benzoic and nicotinic acids has recently been investigated by IR, Raman and UV spectroscopy [1-3]. Benzoic and nicotinic acids are regarded model systems representing a wide group of aromatic ligands which are incorporated into enzymes. In this work the FT-IR (in solid state and in solution), FT-Raman, UV absorption and (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra of caffeic acid (3,4-dihydroxycinnamic acid) and its salts with lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium and caesium were registered, assigned and analyzed. The effect of alkali metals on the electronic system of ligands was discussed. Studies of differences in the number and position of bands from the IR, Raman, UV absorption spectra and chemical shifts from NMR spectra allowed to conclude on the distribution of electronic charge in the molecules, the delocalization energy of π electrons and the reactivity of ligands in metal complexes. Optimized geometrical structures of studied compounds were calculated by B3LYP method using 6-311++G** basis set. Bond lengths, angles and dipole moments for the optimized structures of caffeic acid and lithium, sodium, potassium caffeinates were also calculated. The theoretical wavenumbers and intensities of IR spectra were obtained. The calculated parameters were compared to the experimental characteristics of investigated compounds. Microbial activity of studied compounds was tested against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Proteus vulgaris. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Structurally modified fatty acids - clinical potential as tracers of metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudczak, R.; Schmoliner, R.; Angelberger, P.; Knapp, F.F.; Goodman, M.M.

    1985-01-01

    Recently 15-p-iodophenyl-betamethyl-pentadecanoic acid (BMPPA) was proposed for myocardial scintigraphy, as possible probe of metabolic processes other than β-oxidation. In 19 patients myocardial scintigraphy was done after i.v. BMPPA (2 to 4 mCi). Data were collected (LAO 45 0 /14; anterior/5) for 100 minutes in the fasted patients. From heart (H) and liver (L) organ to background (BG) ratios were calculated, and the elimination (E) behavior was analyzed from BG (V. cava region) corrected time activity curves. In 10 patients plasma and urine were examined. By CHCl 3 /MeOH extraction of plasma samples (90 min. pi) both in water and in organic medium soluble catabolites were found. TLC fractionation showed that those were co-migrating, compared to standards, with benzoic acid, BMPPA and triglycerides. In urine (0 to 2h pi: 4.1% dose) hippuric acid was found. It is concluded that BMPPA is a useful agent for myocardial scintigraphy. Its longer retention in the heart compared to unbranched radioiodinated fatty acids may facilitate SPECT studies. Rate of elimination and plasma analysis indicate the metabolic breakdown of BMPPA. Yet, the complexity of the supposed mechanism may impede curve interpretation in terms of specific metabolic pathways. 19 refs., 5 tabs

  15. Long-range atmospheric transport of volatile monocarboxylic acids with Asian dust over a high mountain snow site, central Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Mochizuki

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available To understand the long-range transport of monocarboxylic acids from the Asian continent to the Japanese islands, we collected snowpack samples from a pit sequence (depth ca. 6 m at the Murodo-Daira snowfield near the summit of Mt. Tateyama, central Japan, in 2009 and 2011. Snow samples (n = 16 were analyzed for normal (C1–C10, branched chain (iC4–iC6, aromatic (benzoic and toluic acid isomers, and hydroxyl (glycolic and lactic monocarboxylic acids, together with inorganic ions and dissolved organic carbon (DOC. Acetic acid (C2 was found to be a dominant species (average 125 ng g−1, followed by formic acid (C1 (85.7 ng g−1 and isopentanoic acid (iC5 (20.0 ng g−1. We found a strong correlation (r =  0.88 between formic plus acetic acids and non-sea-salt Ca2+ that is a proxy of Asian dust. Contributions of total monocarboxylic acids to DOC in 2009 (21.2 ± 11.6 % were higher than that in 2011 (3.75 ± 2.62 %, being consistent with higher intensity of Asian dust in 2009 than in 2011. Formic plus acetic acids also showed a positive correlation (r =  0.90 with benzoic acid that is a tracer of automobile exhaust, indicating that monocarboxylic acids and their precursors are largely emitted from anthropogenic sources in China and/or secondarily produced in the atmosphere by photochemical processing. In addition, the ratio of formic plus acetic acids to nss–Ca2+ (0.27 was significantly higher than those (0.00036–0.0018 obtained for reference dust materials of Chinese loess deposits from the Tengger and Gobi deserts. This result suggests that volatile and semi-volatile organic acids are adsorbed on the alkaline dust particles during long-range atmospheric transport. Entrainment of organic acids by dusts is supported by a good correlation (r = 0.87 between formic plus acetic acids and pH of melt snow samples. Our study suggests that Asian alkaline dusts may be a carrier of volatile monocarboxylic

  16. Characterization of Phytochemicals and Antioxidant Activities of Red Radish Brines during Lactic Acid Fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pu Jing

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Red radish (Raphanus L. pickles are popular appetizers or spices in Asian-style cuisine. However, tons of radish brines are generated as wastes from industrial radish pickle production. In this study, we evaluated the dynamic changes in colour properties, phenolics, anthocyanin profiles, phenolic acid composition, flavonoids, and antioxidant properties in radish brines during lactic acid fermentation. The results showed that five flavonoids detected were four anthocyanins and one kaempferol derivative, including pelargonidin-3-digluoside-5-glucoside derivatives acylated with p-coumaric acid, ferulic acid, p-coumaric and manolic acids, or ferulic and malonic acids. Amounts ranged from 15.5–19.3 µg/mL in total monomeric anthocyanins, and kaempferol-3,7-diglycoside (15–30 µg/mL. 4-Hydroxy-benzoic, gentisic, vanillic, syringic, p-coumaric, ferulic, sinapic and salicylic acids were detected in amounts that varied from 70.2–92.2 µg/mL, whereas the total phenolic content was 206–220 µg/mL. The change in colour of the brine was associated with the accumulation of lactic acid and anthocyanins. The ORAC and Fe2+ chelation capacity of radish brines generally decreased, whereas the reducing power measured as FRAP values was increased during the fermentation from day 5 to day 14. This study provided information on the phytochemicals and the antioxidative activities of red radish fermentation waste that might lead to further utilization as nutraceuticals or natural colorants.

  17. Formation of β-glucogallin, the precursor of ellagic acid in strawberry and raspberry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulenburg, Katja; Feller, Antje; Hoffmann, Thomas; Schecker, Johannes H; Martens, Stefan; Schwab, Wilfried

    2016-04-01

    Ellagic acid/ellagitannins are plant polyphenolic antioxidants that are synthesized from gallic acid and have been associated with a reduced risk of cancer and cardiovascular diseases. Here, we report the identification and characterization of five glycosyltransferases (GTs) from two genera of the Rosaceae family (Fragaria and Rubus; F. × ananassa FaGT2*, FaGT2, FaGT5, F. vesca FvGT2, and R. idaeus RiGT2) that catalyze the formation of 1-O-galloyl-β-D-glucopyranose (β-glucogallin) the precursor of ellagitannin biosynthesis. The enzymes showed substrate promiscuity as they formed glucose esters of a variety of (hydroxyl)benzoic and (hydroxyl)cinnamic acids. Determination of kinetic values and site-directed mutagenesis revealed amino acids that affected substrate preference and catalytic activity. Green immature strawberry fruits were identified as the main source of gallic acid, β-glucogallin, and ellagic acid in accordance with the highest GT2 gene expression levels. Injection of isotopically labeled gallic acid into green fruits of stable transgenic antisense FaGT2 strawberry plants clearly confirmed the in planta function. Our results indicate that GT2 enzymes might contribute to the production of ellagic acid/ellagitannins in strawberry and raspberry, and are useful to develop strawberry fruit with additional health benefits and for the biotechnological production of bioactive polyphenols. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  18. A novel ionic liquid-modified organic-polymer monolith as the sorbent for in-tube solid-phase microextraction of acidic food additives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting-Ting; Chen, Yi-Hui; Ma, Jun-Feng; Hu, Min-Jie; Li, Ying; Fang, Jiang-Hua; Gao, Hao-Qi

    2014-08-01

    A novel ionic liquid-modified organic-polymer monolithic capillary column was prepared and used for in-tube solid-phase microextraction (SPME) of acidic food additives. The primary amino group of 1-aminopropyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride was reacted with the epoxide group of glycidyl methacrylate. The as-prepared new monomer was then copolymerized in situ with acrylamide and N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide in the presence of polyethylene glycol (PEG)-8000 and PEG-10,000 as porogens. The extraction performance of the developed monolithic sorbent was evaluated for benzoic acid, 3-hydroxybenzoic acid, cinnamic acid, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, and 3-(trifluoromethyl)-cinnamic acid. Such a sorbent, bearing hydrophobic and anion-exchange groups, had high extraction efficiency towards the test compounds. The adsorption capacities for the analytes dissolved in water ranged from 0.18 to 1.74 μg cm(-1). Good linear calibration curves (R(2) > 0.99) were obtained, and the limits of detection (S/N = 3) for the analytes were found to be in the range 1.2-13.5 ng mL(-1). The recoveries of five acidic food additives spiked in Coca-Cola beverage samples ranged from 85.4 % to 98.3 %, with RSD less than 6.9 %. The excellent applicability of the ionic liquid (IL)-modified monolithic column was further tested by the determination of benzoic acid content in Sprite samples, further illustrating its good potential for analyzing food additives in complex samples.

  19. Hydrogen bonded 2-methyl-1H-imidazol-3-ium 3,5-dinitrobenzoate 3,5-dinitrobenzoic acid, a new optical crystal: Evaluation of properties by structural, spectral, quantum chemical calculations, Z-scan and Hirshfeld studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathya, K.; Dhamodharan, P.; Dhandapani, M.

    2018-03-01

    A new hydrgen bonded proton transfer complex, 2-methyl imidazolium 3, 5-dinitrobenzoate 3,5-dinitro benzoic acid (MIDB) was synthesized by the reaction between 2-methyl imidazole with 3,5-dinitro benzoic acid (1:2) in methanol solvent at room temperature. The crystals were subjected to FT-IR spectral analysis to confirm the functional groups of the new compound. Single crystal XRD analysis reveals that MIDB belongs to monoclinic system with P21/c space group. The asymmetric unit consists of one 2-methyl imidazolium cation, one 3, 5-dinitrobenzoate anion and one uncharged 3,5-dinitro benzoic acid moiety. Experimental NMR spectroscopic data and theoretically calculated NMR data correlated very well to estabilish the exact carbon skeleton and hydrogen environment in the molecular structure of MIDB. The thermal stability of the compound was investigated by thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA). Computational studies such as optimization of molecular geometry, natural bond analysis (NBO), Mulliken population analysis and HOMO-LUMO analysis were performed using Gaussian 09 software by B3LYP method at 6-31 g basis set level. The calculated first-order polarizability (β) of MIDB from computational studies is 4.1752 × 10-30 esu, which is 32 times greater than that of urea. UV-vis-NIR spectral studies revealed that the MIDB has a large optical transparency window. The optical nonlinearities of MIDB have been investigated by Z-scan technique with Hesbnd Ne laser radiation of wavelength 632.8 nm. Hirshfeld analysis indicate O⋯H/H⋯O interactions are the superior interactions confirming excessive hydrogen bond net work in the molecular structure.

  20. In situ infrared spectroscopic analysis of the adsorption of aromatic carboxylic acids to TiO 2, ZrO 2, Al 2O 3, and Ta 2O 5 from aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Kevin D.; McQuillan, A. James

    2000-02-01

    In situ infrared spectroscopy has been used to investigate the adsorption of a range of simple aromatic carboxylic acids from aqueous solution to metal oxides. Thin films of TiO 2, ZrO 2, Al 2O 3 and Ta 2O 5 were prepared by evaporation of aqueous sols on single reflection ZnSe prisms. Benzoic acid adsorbed very strongly to ZrO 2, in a bridging bidentate fashion, but showed only weak adsorption to TiO 2 and Ta 2O 5. Substituted aromatic carboxylic acids; salicylic, phthalic and thiosalicylic, were found to adsorb to each metal oxide. Salicylic and phthalic acids adsorbed to the metal oxides via bidentate interactions, involving coordination through both carboxylate and substituent groups. Thiosalicylic acid adsorbed to the metal oxides as a bridging bidentate carboxylate with no coordination through the thiol substituent group.

  1. Effect of carbonyl inhibitors and their H₂O₂ detoxification on lactic acid fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Zhu, Caiqing; Tu, Maobing; Han, Pingping; Wu, Yonnie

    2015-04-01

    Biomass degradation compounds significantly inhibit biochemical conversion of biomass prehydrolysates to biofuels and chemicals, such as lactic acid. To characterize the structure-activity relationship of carbonyl inhibition on lactic acid fermentation, we examined effects of eight carbonyl compounds (furfural, 5-hydroxymethyl furfural, vanillin, syringaldehyde, 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde, phthalaldehyde, benzoic acid, and pyrogallol aldehyde) and creosol on lactic acid production by Lactobacillus delbrueckii. Pyrogallol aldehyde reduced the cell growth rate by 35 % at 1.0 mM and inhibited lactic acid production completely at 2.0 mM. By correlating the molecular descriptors to the inhibition constants in lactic acid fermentation, we found a good relationship between the hydrophobicity (Log P) of aldehydes and their inhibition constants in fermentation. The inhibitory effect of carbonyl inhibitors appeared to correlate with their thiol reactivity as well. In addition, we found that H2O2 detoxified pyrogallol aldehyde and phthalaldehyde inhibitory activity. H2O2 detoxification was applied to real biomass prehydrolysates in lactic acid fermentation.

  2. Molecular acidity: An accurate description with information-theoretic approach in density functional reactivity theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xiaofang; Rong, Chunying; Zhong, Aiguo; Lu, Tian; Liu, Shubin

    2018-01-15

    Molecular acidity is one of the important physiochemical properties of a molecular system, yet its accurate calculation and prediction are still an unresolved problem in the literature. In this work, we propose to make use of the quantities from the information-theoretic (IT) approach in density functional reactivity theory and provide an accurate description of molecular acidity from a completely new perspective. To illustrate our point, five different categories of acidic series, singly and doubly substituted benzoic acids, singly substituted benzenesulfinic acids, benzeneseleninic acids, phenols, and alkyl carboxylic acids, have been thoroughly examined. We show that using IT quantities such as Shannon entropy, Fisher information, Ghosh-Berkowitz-Parr entropy, information gain, Onicescu information energy, and relative Rényi entropy, one is able to simultaneously predict experimental pKa values of these different categories of compounds. Because of the universality of the quantities employed in this work, which are all density dependent, our approach should be general and be applicable to other systems as well. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Folic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folic acid is a B vitamin. It helps the body make healthy new cells. Everyone needs folic acid. For women who may get pregnant, it is really important. Getting enough folic acid before and during pregnancy can prevent major birth ...

  4. Fatty acids, essential oil, and phenolics modifications of black cumin fruit under NaCl stress conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgou, Soumaya; Bettaieb, Iness; Saidani, Moufida; Marzouk, Brahim

    2010-12-08

    This research evaluated the effect of saline conditions on fruit yield, fatty acids, and essential oils compositions and phenolics content of black cumin (Nigella sativa). This plant is one of the most commonly found aromatics in the Mediterranean kitchen. Increasing NaCl levels to 60 mM decreased significantly the fruits yield by 58% and the total fatty acids amount by 35%. Fatty acids composition analysis indicated that linoleic acid was the major fatty acid (58.09%) followed by oleic (19.21%) and palmitic (14.77%) acids. Salinity enhanced the linoleic acid percentage but did not affect the unsaturation degree of the fatty acids pool and thus the oil quality. The essential oil yield was 0.39% based on the dry weight and increased to 0.53, 0.56, and 0.72% at 20, 40, and 60 mM NaCl. Salinity results on the modification of the essential oil chemotype from p-cymene in controls to γ-terpinene/p-cymene in salt-stressed plants. The amounts of total phenolics were lower in the treated plants. Salinity decreased mainly the amount of the major class, benzoics acids, by 24, 29, and 44% at 20, 40, and 60 mM NaCl. The results suggest that salt treatment may regulate bioactive compounds production in black cumin fruits, influencing their nutritional and industrial values.

  5. Transport properties and association behaviour of the zwitterionic drug 5-aminolevulinic acid in water. A precision conductometric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merclin, Nadia; Beronius, Per

    2004-02-01

    The behavior of the hydrochloride salt of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA-HCl) with respect to transport properties and dissociation in aqueous solution at 25 degrees C has been studied using precision conductometry within the concentration range 0.24-5.17mM. The conductivity data are interpreted according to elaborated conductance theory. The carboxyl group appears to be, in practice, undissociated. The dissociation constant, K(a), of the NH(3)(+) form of the amino acid molecules is determined to 6.78x10(-5) (molarity scale); pK(a)=4.17. The limiting molar conductivity of the ALA-H(+) ion, lambda(0)=33.5cm(2)Omega(-1)mol(-1); electric mobility u=3.47x10(-4)cm(2)V(-1)s(-1), is close to the electric mobilites of the acetate and benzoic ions.

  6. Synthesis and role of salicylic acid in wheat varieties with different levels of cadmium tolerance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovács, Viktória; Gondor, Orsolya K.; Szalai, Gabriella; Darkó, Éva; Majláth, Imre; Janda, Tibor; Pál, Magda

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Cd induces the salicylic acid metabolism in wheat. • Salicylic acid is synthesized via benzoic acid and/or ortho-hydroxy-cinnamic acid. • Cd tolerance can be explained by the highly induced glutathione metabolism. • Salicylic acid signalling is correlated with glutathione-related mechanisms. - Abstract: Wheat genotypes with different endogenous SA contents were investigated, in order to reveal how cadmium influences salicylic acid (SA) synthesis, and to find possible relationships between SA and certain protective compounds (members of the antioxidants and the heavy metal detoxification system) and between the SA content and the level of cadmium tolerance. Cadmium exposure induced SA synthesis, especially in the leaves, and it is suggested that the phenyl-propanoid synthesis pathway is responsible for the accumulation of SA observed after cadmium stress. Cadmium influenced the synthesis and activation of protective compounds to varying extents in wheat genotypes with different levels of tolerance; the roots and leaves also responded differently to cadmium stress. Although a direct relationship was not found between the initial SA levels and the degree of cadmium tolerance, the results suggest that the increase in the root SA level during cadmium stress in the Mv varieties could be related with the enhancement of the internal glutathione cycle, thus inducing the antioxidant and metal detoxification systems, which promote Cd stress tolerance in wheat seedlings. The positive correlation between certain SA-related compounds and protective compounds suggests that SA-related signalling may also play a role in the acclimation to heavy metal stress

  7. Ruminal Methane Production on Simple Phenolic Acids Addition in in Vitro Gas Production Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Jayanegara

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Methane production from ruminants contributes to total global methane production, which is an important contributor to global warming. In this experiment, six sources of simple phenolic acids (benzoic, cinnamic, phenylacetic, caffeic, p-coumaric and ferulic acids at two different levels (2 and 5 mM added to hay diet were evaluated for their potential to reduce enteric methane production using in vitro Hohenheim gas production method. The measured variables were gas production, methane, organic matter digestibility (OMD, and short chain fatty acids (SCFA. The results showed that addition of cinnamic, caffeic, p-coumaric and ferulic acids at 5 mM significantly (P p-coumaric > ferulic > cinnamic. The addition of simple phenols did not significantly decrease OMD. Addition of simple phenols tends to decrease total SCFA production. It was concluded that methane decrease by addition of phenolic acids was relatively small, and the effect of phenolic acids on methane decrease depended on the source and concentration applied.

  8. Process monitored spectrophotometric titration coupled with chemometrics for simultaneous determination of mixtures of weak acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Lifu; Yang, Jing; Yuan, Jintao

    2007-05-15

    A new spectrophotometric titration method coupled with chemometrics for the simultaneous determination of mixtures of weak acids has been developed. In this method, the titrant is a mixture of sodium hydroxide and an acid-base indicator, and the indicator is used to monitor the titration process. In a process of titration, both the added volume of titrant and the solution acidity at each titration point can be obtained simultaneously from an absorption spectrum by least square algorithm, and then the concentration of each component in the mixture can be obtained from the titration curves by principal component regression. The method only needs the information of absorbance spectra to obtain the analytical results, and is free of volumetric measurements. The analyses are independent of titration end point and do not need the accurate values of dissociation constants of the indicator and the acids. The method has been applied to the simultaneous determination of the mixtures of benzoic acid and salicylic acid, and the mixtures of phenol, o-chlorophenol and p-chlorophenol with satisfactory results.

  9. Use of deuterated tyrosine and phenylalanine in the study of catecholamine and aromatic acid metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtius, H.C.; Redweik, U.; Steinmann, B.; Leimbacher, W.; Wegmann, H.

    1975-01-01

    Deuterated tyrosine and phenylalanine have been used for the study of their respective metabolism in patients with phenylketonuria (PKU) and in healthy persons. Urinary excretion of dopamine and its metabolites was studied by GC-MS after oral administration of deuterated L-tyrosine in 2 patients with PKU and in normal controls at low and high plasma phenylalanine levels. From these studies it seemed that the in vivo tyrosine 3-hydroxylase activity and thus the formation of L-dopa depend on the phenylalanine concentration in plasma and also in tissues. After loading 3 mentally retarded patients with 3,5-[ 2 H 2 ]-4-hydroxyphenylalanine, we found, among others, excretion of deuterated m-hydroxyphenyl-hydracrylic acid, p-hydroxymandelic acid, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, p-hydroxyhippuric acid, benzoic acid and hippuric acid. An intramolecular rearrangement is postulated. Deuterated phenylalanine was used to investigate phenylalanine and dopa metabolism in PKU. In addition, one untreated person with PKU of normal intelligence and normal excretion of catecholamines at high plasma phenylalanine concentration was investigated in order to see whether there exists an alternative metabolic pathway from phenylalanine to dopa formation

  10. Synthesis and role of salicylic acid in wheat varieties with different levels of cadmium tolerance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovács, Viktória; Gondor, Orsolya K.; Szalai, Gabriella; Darkó, Éva; Majláth, Imre; Janda, Tibor; Pál, Magda, E-mail: pal.magda@agrar.mta.hu

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • Cd induces the salicylic acid metabolism in wheat. • Salicylic acid is synthesized via benzoic acid and/or ortho-hydroxy-cinnamic acid. • Cd tolerance can be explained by the highly induced glutathione metabolism. • Salicylic acid signalling is correlated with glutathione-related mechanisms. - Abstract: Wheat genotypes with different endogenous SA contents were investigated, in order to reveal how cadmium influences salicylic acid (SA) synthesis, and to find possible relationships between SA and certain protective compounds (members of the antioxidants and the heavy metal detoxification system) and between the SA content and the level of cadmium tolerance. Cadmium exposure induced SA synthesis, especially in the leaves, and it is suggested that the phenyl-propanoid synthesis pathway is responsible for the accumulation of SA observed after cadmium stress. Cadmium influenced the synthesis and activation of protective compounds to varying extents in wheat genotypes with different levels of tolerance; the roots and leaves also responded differently to cadmium stress. Although a direct relationship was not found between the initial SA levels and the degree of cadmium tolerance, the results suggest that the increase in the root SA level during cadmium stress in the Mv varieties could be related with the enhancement of the internal glutathione cycle, thus inducing the antioxidant and metal detoxification systems, which promote Cd stress tolerance in wheat seedlings. The positive correlation between certain SA-related compounds and protective compounds suggests that SA-related signalling may also play a role in the acclimation to heavy metal stress.

  11. Permeability and morphology of dentin after erosion induced by acidic drinks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prati, Carlo; Montebugnoli, Lucio; Suppa, Pietro; Valdrè, Giovanni; Mongiorgi, Romano

    2003-04-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate 1) the alterations of dentin permeability after single exposure of dentin to several acidic soft drinks with different acid composition; 2) the effectiveness of smear layer on dentin surface to prevent erosion of sound dentin; and 3) the role of brushing procedures. Dentin discs from human third molars were prepared. Each disc was treated with 0.5 M neutral EDTA for 5 minutes to remove the smear layer and to calculate the maximum fluid flow rate for each disc (to which an arbitrary value of 100% was assigned) using a pressure apparatus working at 1.0 psi. An homogeneous thin smear layer was then recreated with an abrasive paper under water. The following acidic drinks were applied for 5 minutes onto dentin surface: cola drink (phosphoric acid), orange fruit juice (ascorbic + citric acid), white wine (tartaric acid), vinegar (acetic acid), and mucolytic syrup (benzoic and tartaric acid). Each sample was then brushed for 3 minutes. Finally, each sample was brushed with a toothpaste and, as the final step, etched with phosphoric acid for 1 minute. Permeability was measured after each step. All acidic drinks were able to statistically increase dentin permeability and to open dentinal tubules by removing the smear layer. The study demonstrated that acidic drinks increased dentin permeability by removing and dissolving the smear layer and smear plugs. The erosion of peritubular dentin and smear plug removal is the main agent responsible for the increase in dentin permeability and probably for clinical dentin hypersensitivity. Brushing procedures reduced dentin permeability, creating a new fine and thin smear layer. Toothpaste may play a protective role in preventing complete smear layer removal and reducing dentin hypersensitivity by producing a new artificial smear layer and deposit inside tubules. The use and the abuse of acidic drinks may damage dentin and increase the risk for dentin hypersensitivity.

  12. Transcriptome analysis of acetic-acid-treated yeast cells identifies a large set of genes whose overexpression or deletion enhances acetic acid tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yeji; Nasution, Olviyani; Choi, Eunyong; Choi, In-Geol; Kim, Wankee; Choi, Wonja

    2015-08-01

    Acetic acid inhibits the metabolic activities of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Therefore, a better understanding of how S. cerevisiae cells acquire the tolerance to acetic acid is of importance to develop robust yeast strains to be used in industry. To do this, we examined the transcriptional changes that occur at 12 h post-exposure to acetic acid, revealing that 56 and 58 genes were upregulated and downregulated, respectively. Functional categorization of them revealed that 22 protein synthesis genes and 14 stress response genes constituted the largest portion of the upregulated and downregulated genes, respectively. To evaluate the association of the regulated genes with acetic acid tolerance, 3 upregulated genes (DBP2, ASC1, and GND1) were selected among 34 non-protein synthesis genes, and 54 viable mutants individually deleted for the downregulated genes were retrieved from the non-essential haploid deletion library. Strains overexpressing ASC1 and GND1 displayed enhanced tolerance to acetic acid, whereas a strain overexpressing DBP2 was sensitive. Fifty of 54 deletion mutants displayed enhanced acetic acid tolerance. Three chosen deletion mutants (hsps82Δ, ato2Δ, and ssa3Δ) were also tolerant to benzoic acid but not propionic and sorbic acids. Moreover, all those five (two overexpressing and three deleted) strains were more efficient in proton efflux and lower in membrane permeability and internal hydrogen peroxide content than controls. Individually or in combination, those physiological changes are likely to contribute at least in part to enhanced acetic acid tolerance. Overall, information of our transcriptional profile was very useful to identify molecular factors associated with acetic acid tolerance.

  13. Some characteristics of two azoreductase systems in rat liver. Relevance to the activity of 2-[4'-di(2"-bromopropyl)-aminophenylazo]benzoic acid (CB10-252), a compound possessing latent cytotoxic activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Autrup, Herman; Warwick, Gerald P.

    1975-01-01

    properties in most respects similar to CBlO-252-azoreductase implying the importance of the 2'-car☐yl group in determining substrate specificity. The use of enzyme inhibitors and other additives showed that CB10-252 was not xanthine oxidase or dihydrofolate reductase. Its activity was not affected by carbon...

  14. 4-[(5R*,10bR*-2-Methyl-1,10b-dihydropyrazolo[1,5-c][1,3]benzoxazin-5-yl]benzoic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Světlík

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, C18H16N2O3, a potential inhibitor of the cyclooxygenase-2 isoenzyme, the pyrazoline ring exists in a flattened envelope conformation with one C atom deviating by 0.463 Å from the mean plane of the remaining four atoms. The puckering of the central oxazine ring is more severe, with one N atom and one C atom displaced by 0.235 (6 and 0.370 (2 Å, respectively, on opposite sides of the mean plane defined by the other four atoms; the conformation is that of a half-chair. As a result, the molecule as a whole is not planar. The carboxyl group is involved in an intermolecular O—H...N hydrogen bond, which links the molecules into centrosymmetric dimers.

  15. QUALITATIVE COMPOSITION AND ORGANI C ACIDS CONTENT IN THE ABOVEGROUN D PART OF PLANTS FRO M FAMILIES LAMIACEAE, ASTERACEAE, APIACEAE AND CHENOPODIACEAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Marchyshyn

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. Organic acids are the compounds of aliphatic or aromatic orders, which are widespread in flora and have a wide range of biological activity. We studied the qualitative composition and quantitative contents of organic acids in the aboveground part of some unofficial medicinal plants from families Lamiaceae, Asteraceae, Apiaceae and Chenopodiaceae is relevant. Objective. The objects of the research are the aboveground part of unofficial medicinal plants from families Lamiaceae, Asteraceae, Apiaceae and Chenopodiaceae. Methods. Identification of organic acids was performed by means of thin-layer and paper chromatography, their content was determined by means of gas chromatography, the quantitative amount of organic acids was defined by titrimetric analysis. Results. In the studied raw plants the quality of organic acids and their total contents were determined (in terms of malic acid. It is established that the maximum content of organic acids is accumulated in the grass Hyssopus officinalis L. (Lamiaceae, and the minimal is in the leaves of Chrysánthemum xhortorum L. variety Apro (Asteraceae. In all studied raw plants the dominance of aliphatic acids (citric, malic, oxalic and malonic was determined by means of gas chromatography. Benzoic is predominant among the aromatic acids. Conclusions. In the studied raw plants the quality of organic acids and their total content were determined. The following results can be used in developing the methods of quality control of the studied raw plants and during the study of new bioactive substances.

  16. A comprehensive evaluation of the toxicology of cigarette ingredients: aliphatic and aromatic carboxylic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coggins, Christopher R E; Liu, Jianmin; Merski, Jerome A; Werley, Michael S; Oldham, Michael J

    2011-06-01

    Aromatic and aliphatic carboxylic acids are present in tobacco and tobacco smoke. A battery of tests was used to compare the toxicity of mainstream smoke from experimental cigarettes containing eight aromatic and aliphatic carboxylic acids and the salt of one acid that were added individually at three different levels (lowest and highest target inclusions were 100 and 90,000 ppm, respectively). Mainstream smoke from cigarettes containing each of the test ingredients was evaluated using analytical chemistry and assays to measure in vitro cytotoxicity (neutral red uptake) and Salmonella (five strains) mutagenicity. For four of the compounds (citric, lactic, benzoic acids, and sodium benzoate), 90-day rodent inhalation studies were also performed. Although sporadic statistically significant differences in some experimental cigarette smoke constituents occurred, none resulted in significant changes in mutagenicity or cytotoxicity responses, nor in responses measured in the inhalation studies, except for lactic acid (LA). Inclusion of LA resulted in dose-dependent increase in water and caused a dose-dependent decrease in cytotoxicity. Incorporation of LA into cigarettes resulted in several dose-related reductions in histopathology, which were largely restricted to the nasal passages. Incorporation of LA also ameliorated some of the typical decrease in body weight gain seen in cigarette smoke-exposed rats. Inclusion of these ingredients at exaggerated use levels resulted in sporadic dose-related and treatment effects for some smoke constituents, but no toxicological response was noted in the in vitro and in vivo tests performed.

  17. Adsorption Equilibrium Equation of Carboxylic Acids on Anion-Exchange Resins in Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanazawa, Nobuhiro; Urano, Kohei; Kokado, Naohiro; Urushigawa, Yoshikuni

    2001-06-01

    The adsorption of propionic acid and benzoic acid on anion-exchange resins was analyzed, and an adsorption equilibrium equation of carboxylic acids was proposed. The adsorption of carboxylic acids on the anion-exchange resins was considered to be the sum of the physical adsorption of the molecule and the ion-exchange adsorption of the ion, which were independent of each other. For the physical adsorption of carboxylic acids, it was conformed to the Freundlich equation. For the ion-exchange adsorption of carboxylate ions, the equilibrium equation corresponded well with the experimental results for wide ranges of concentration and pH. The equation contains a selectivity coefficient S(A)(Cl) for the chloride ion versus the carboxylate ion, which was considered essentially a constant. The influent of the bicarbonate ion from carbon dioxide in air could also be expressed by the additional equilibrium equation with the selectivity coefficient S(HCO(3))(Cl) for the chloride ion versus the bicarbonate ion. Consequently, an adsorption equilibrium equation can estimate the equilibrium adsorption amounts. Even the effect of a coexisting bicarbonate ion is inconsequential when the parameters of the Freundlich isotherm equation and the selectivity coefficients of the carboxylate ion and the bicarbonate ion in each resin are determined in advance. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  18. Ascorbic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascorbic acid is used to prevent and treat scurvy, a disease caused by a lack of vitamin C in ... Ascorbic acid comes in extended-release (long-acting) capsules and tablets, lozenges, syrup, chewable tablets, and liquid drops to ...

  19. Obeticholic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obeticholic acid is used alone or in combination with ursodiol (Actigall, Urso) to treat primary biliary cholangitis (PBC; a ... were not treated successfully with ursodiol alone. Obeticholic acid is in a class of medications called farnesoid ...

  20. Aminocaproic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminocaproic acid is used to control bleeding that occurs when blood clots are broken down too quickly. This type ... the baby is ready to be born). Aminocaproic acid is also used to control bleeding in the ...

  1. Ethacrynic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethacrynic acid, a 'water pill,' is used to treat swelling and fluid retention caused by various medical problems. It ... Ethacrynic acid comes as a tablet to take by mouth. It is usually taken once or twice a day ...

  2. Mefenamic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mefenamic acid is used to relieve mild to moderate pain, including menstrual pain (pain that happens before or during a menstrual period). Mefenamic acid is in a class of medications called NSAIDs. ...

  3. Organosulfates and organic acids in Arctic aerosols: speciation, annual variation and concentration levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, A. M. K.; Kristensen, K.; Nguyen, Q. T.; Zare, A.; Cozzi, F.; Nøjgaard, J. K.; Skov, H.; Brandt, J.; Christensen, J. H.; Ström, J.; Tunved, P.; Krejci, R.; Glasius, M.

    2014-08-01

    Sources, composition and occurrence of secondary organic aerosols in the Arctic were investigated at Zeppelin Mountain, Svalbard, and Station Nord, northeastern Greenland, during the full annual cycle of 2008 and 2010, respectively. Speciation of organic acids, organosulfates and nitrooxy organosulfates - from both anthropogenic and biogenic precursors were in focus. A total of 11 organic acids (terpenylic acid, benzoic acid, phthalic acid, pinic acid, suberic acid, azelaic acid, adipic acid, pimelic acid, pinonic acid, diaterpenylic acid acetate and 3-methyl-1,2,3-butanetricarboxylic acid), 12 organosulfates and 1 nitrooxy organosulfate were identified in aerosol samples from the two sites using a high-performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC) coupled to a quadrupole Time-of-Flight mass spectrometer. At Station Nord, compound concentrations followed a distinct annual pattern, where high mean concentrations of organosulfates (47 ± 14 ng m-3) and organic acids (11.5 ± 4 ng m-3) were observed in January, February and March, contrary to considerably lower mean concentrations of organosulfates (2 ± 3 ng m-3) and organic acids (2.2 ± 1 ng m-3) observed during the rest of the year. At Zeppelin Mountain, organosulfate and organic acid concentrations remained relatively constant during most of the year at a mean concentration of 15 ± 4 ng m-3 and 3.9 ± 1 ng m-3, respectively. However during four weeks of spring, remarkably higher concentrations of total organosulfates (23-36 ng m-3) and total organic acids (7-10 ng m-3) were observed. Elevated organosulfate and organic acid concentrations coincided with the Arctic haze period at both stations, where northern Eurasia was identified as the main source region. Air mass transport from northern Eurasia to Zeppelin Mountain was associated with a 100% increase in the number of detected organosulfate species compared with periods of air mass transport from the Arctic Ocean, Scandinavia and Greenland. The results from this

  4. Ibotenic acid and thioibotenic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermit, Mette B; Greenwood, Jeremy R; Nielsen, Birgitte

    2004-01-01

    In this study, we have determined and compared the pharmacological profiles of ibotenic acid and its isothiazole analogue thioibotenic acid at native rat ionotropic glutamate (iGlu) receptors and at recombinant rat metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors expressed in mammalian cell lines....... Thioibotenic acid has a distinct pharmacological profile at group III mGlu receptors compared with the closely structurally related ibotenic acid; the former is a potent (low microm) agonist, whereas the latter is inactive. By comparing the conformational energy profiles of ibotenic and thioibotenic acid...... with the conformations preferred by the ligands upon docking to mGlu1 and models of the other mGlu subtypes, we propose that unlike other subtypes, group III mGlu receptor binding sites require a ligand conformation at an energy level which is prohibitively expensive for ibotenic acid, but not for thioibotenic acid...

  5. Hydrogen sulfide acts as a downstream signal molecule in salicylic acid-induced heat tolerance in maize (Zea mays L.) seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhong-Guang; Xie, Lin-Run; Li, Xiao-Juan

    2015-04-01

    Salicylic acid (SA), 2-hydroxy benzoic acid, is a small phenolic compound with multifunction that is involved in plant growth, development, and the acquisition of stress tolerance. In recent years, hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been found to have similar functions, but cross talk between SA and H2S in the acquisition of heat tolerance is not clear. In this study, pretreatment of maize seedlings with SA improved the survival percentage of seedlings under heat stress, indicating that SA pretreatment could improve the heat tolerance of maize seedlings. In addition, treatment with SA enhanced the activity of L-cysteine desulfhydrase (L-DES), a key enzyme in H2S biosynthesis, which in turn induced accumulation of endogenous H2S. Interestingly, SA-induced heat tolerance was enhanced by addition of NaHS, a H2S donor, but weakened by specific inhibitors of H2S biosynthesis DL-propargylglycine (PAG) and its scavenger hydroxylamine (HT). Furthermore, pretreatment with paclobutrazol (PAC) and 2-aminoindan-2-phosphonic acid (AIP), inhibitors of SA biosynthesis, had no significant effect on NaHS-induced heat tolerance of maize seedlings. Similarly, significant change in the activities of phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) and benzoic-acid-2-hydroxylase (BA2H), the key enzymes in SA biosynthesis, and the content of endogenous SA, was not observed in maize seedlings by NaHS treatment. All of the above-mentioned results suggest that SA pretreatment could improve the heat tolerance of maize seedlings, and H2S might be a novel downstream signal molecule in SA-induced heat tolerance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Influence of the acidity level change in aprotic media on the voltammetric behavior of nitrogabacinamamides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bautista-Martinez, J.A.; Gonzalez, I.; Aguilar-Martinez, M.

    2004-01-01

    This work presents a comparative voltammetric study of o-, m- and p-nitrogabacinamamides (N-[3(X-nitrophenyl)-(2E)-propenyl]-4-aminobutanoic acids), NG, in acetonitrile. These compounds, a HDR-NO 2 nitro compounds type, display three reduction waves, two of them are waves similar to those appearing in the reduction of the nitro compounds lacking a proton donor group and one new wave at less negative potentials, associated with the nitro-to-hydroxylamine reduction through a self-protonation reaction. Experiments were carried out in the presence of different chemical species giving an acidity level control by homogeneous buffer systems. The presence of tetraethylammonium phenolate achieves complete inhibition of self-protonation reactions, thus recovering the behavior established by ( - DR-NO 2 / - DR-NO 2 · - ) system. When the conjugated acid of the above mentioned base is added to the acetonitrile solution, where the acidity level was controlled by the phenol/phenolate system (acidity level buffer), only the second electroreduction wave ( - DR-NO 2 · - /HDR-NHOH) shows to be affected by the presence of phenol in the electrolytic medium and displaces towards less negative potential values. On the other hand, in the benzoic acid (HBz)/benzoate (Bz - ) medium, the electrochemical behavior of these nitro compounds changes completely passing from ( - DR-NO 2 / - DR-NO 2 · - ) system to (HDR-NO 2 + 4HBz/HDR-NHOH + 4Bz - ) type system, in which both the stoichiometry of the electroreduction process and the energetic requirement for its realization are changed. The comparison of the different voltammetric behavior in the presence of the different acidic and basic additives allowed constructing an acidity level scale where the different acid base couples of the intermediaries of the NG electroreduction were placed. This kind of scale allows choosing the chemical conditions necessaries to drive the pathway of the electrochemical transformation of nitro compounds

  7. Sensitive Determination of 6-Thioguanine Using Caffeic Acid-functionalized Fe3O4 Nanoparticles as an Electrochemical Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir, Md.; Tunesi, Mawada M.; Soomro, Razium A.; Baykal, Abdülhadi; Kalwar, Nazar H.

    2018-01-01

    The study demonstrates the potential application of caffeic acid-functionalized magnetite nanoparticles (CA-Fe3O4 NPs) as an effective electrode modifying material for the electrochemical oxidation of the 6-thioguanine (6-TG) drug. The functionalized Fe3O4 NPs were prepared using simple wet-chemical methodology where the used caffeic acid acted simultaneously as growth controlling and functionalizing agent. The study discusses the influence of an effective functionalization on the signal sensitivity observed for the electro-oxidation of 6-TG over CA-Fe3O4 NPs in comparison to a glassy carbon electrode modified with bare and nicotinic acid (NA)-functionalized Fe3O4 NPs. The experiment results provided sufficient evidence to support the importance of favorable functionality to achieve higher signal sensitivity for the electro-oxidation of 6-TG. The presence of favorable interactions between the active functional moieties of caffeic acid and 6-TG synergized with the greater surface area of magnetic NPs produces a stable electro-oxidation signal within the working range of 0.01-0.23 μM with sensitive up to 0.001 μM. Additionally, the sensor showed the strong anti-interference potential against the common co-existing drug molecules such as benzoic acid, acetaminophen, epinephrine, norepinephrine, glucose, ascorbic acid and uc(l)-cysteine. In addition, the successful quantification of 6-TG from the commercial tablets obtained from local pharmacy further signified the practical capability of the discussed sensor.

  8. Sensitive Determination of 6-Thioguanine Using Caffeic Acid-functionalized Fe3O4 Nanoparticles as an Electrochemical Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir, Md.; Tunesi, Mawada M.; Soomro, Razium A.; Baykal, Abdülhadi; Kalwar, Nazar H.

    2018-04-01

    The study demonstrates the potential application of caffeic acid-functionalized magnetite nanoparticles (CA-Fe3O4 NPs) as an effective electrode modifying material for the electrochemical oxidation of the 6-thioguanine (6-TG) drug. The functionalized Fe3O4 NPs were prepared using simple wet-chemical methodology where the used caffeic acid acted simultaneously as growth controlling and functionalizing agent. The study discusses the influence of an effective functionalization on the signal sensitivity observed for the electro-oxidation of 6-TG over CA-Fe3O4 NPs in comparison to a glassy carbon electrode modified with bare and nicotinic acid (NA)-functionalized Fe3O4 NPs. The experiment results provided sufficient evidence to support the importance of favorable functionality to achieve higher signal sensitivity for the electro-oxidation of 6-TG. The presence of favorable interactions between the active functional moieties of caffeic acid and 6-TG synergized with the greater surface area of magnetic NPs produces a stable electro-oxidation signal within the working range of 0.01-0.23 μM with sensitive up to 0.001 μM. Additionally, the sensor showed the strong anti-interference potential against the common co-existing drug molecules such as benzoic acid, acetaminophen, epinephrine, norepinephrine, glucose, ascorbic acid and l-cysteine. In addition, the successful quantification of 6-TG from the commercial tablets obtained from local pharmacy further signified the practical capability of the discussed sensor.

  9. Effect of Cooking on Isoflavones, Phenolic Acids, and Antioxidant Activity in Sprouts of Prosoy Soybean (Glycine max).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Shweta; Chang, Sam K C

    2016-07-01

    Soy sprouts possess health benefits and is required to be cooked before consumption. The effects of cooking on the phenolic components and antioxidant properties of soy sprouts with different germination days were investigated. A food-grade cultivar Prosoy with a high protein content was germinated for 1, 2, 3, 5, and 7 d and cooked till palatable for 20, 20, 5, 5, and 7 min, respectively. Total phenolic content (TPC), total flavonoids content (TFC), condensed tannins content (CTC), individual phenolic acids, isoflavones, DPPH, ferric-reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), and oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) of raw and cooked sprouts were measured. Cooking caused significant losses in phenolic content and antioxidant activities, and maximum loss was on day 3 > 5 > 7, including TPC (32%, 23%, and 15%), TFC (50%, 44%, and 20%), CTC (73%, 47%, and 12%), DPPH (31%, 15%, and 5%), FRAP (34%, 25%, and 1%), and ORAC (34%, 22%, 32%), respectively. Cooking caused significant losses in most individual phenolic acid, benzoic group, cinnamic group, total phenolic composition, individual isoflavones, and total isoflavones. The losses of phenolic acids such as gallic, protocatechuic, hydroxybenzoic, syringic, chlorogenic, or sinapic acids during cooking were not compensated by the increases in trihydroxybenzoic, vanillic or coumaric acids on certain days of germination. Cooking caused minimal changes in phenolic acid composition of day 1 and 2 sprouts compared to 3, 5, and 7 d sprouts. © 2016 Institute of Food Technologists®

  10. Okadaic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, E Michael; Hansen, Gert H; Severinsen, Mai C K

    2014-01-01

    Okadaic acid (OA) is a polyether fatty acid produced by marine dinoflagellates and the causative agent of diarrhetic shellfish poisoning. The effect of OA on apical endocytosis in the small intestine was studied in organ cultured porcine mucosal explants. Within 0.5-1 h of culture, the toxin caused...... in acidic organelles, implying a different toxic mechanism of action. We propose that rapid induction of LBs, an indicator of phospholipidosis, should be included in the future toxicity profile of OA....

  11. Nitric-phosphoric acid oxidation of solid and liquid organic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierce, R.A.; Smith, J.R.; Poprik, D.C.

    1995-01-01

    Nitric-phosphoric acid oxidation has been developed specifically to address issues that face the Savannah River Site, other defense-related facilities, private industry, and small-volume generators such as university and medical laboratories. Initially tested to destroy and decontaminate SRS solid, Pu-contaminated job-control waste, the technology has also exhibited potential for remediating hazardous and mixed-hazardous waste forms. The process is unique to Savannah River and offers a valuable alternative to other oxidation processes that require extreme temperatures and/or elevated pressures. To address the broad categories of waste, many different organic compounds which represent a cross-section of the waste that must be treated have been successfully oxidized. Materials that have been quantitatively oxidized at atmospheric pressure below 180 degrees C include neoprene, cellulose, EDTA, tributylphosphate, and nitromethane. More stable compounds such as benzoic acid, polyethylene, oils, and resins have been completely decomposed below 200 degrees C and 10 psig. The process uses dilute nitric acid in a concentrated phosphoric acid media as the main oxidant for the organic compounds. Phosphoric acid allow nitric acid to be retained in solution well above its normal boiling point. The reaction forms NOx vapors which can be reoxidized and recycled using air and water. The addition of 0.001M Pd(II) reduces CO generation to near 1% of the released carbon gases. The advantages of this process are that it is straightforward, uses relatively inexpensive reagents, operates at relatively low temperature and pressure, and produces final solutions which are compatible with stainless steel equipment. For organic wastes, all carbon, hydrogen, and nitrogen are converted to gaseous products. If interfaced with an acid recovery system which converts NOx back to nitric acid, the net oxidizer would be oxygen from air

  12. Intraspecific variability of dihydrochalcone, chromenes and benzoic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    methoxy-dihydrochalcone (6)] (Lago et al., 2004;. Baldoqui et al., 1999). Plant material. Leaves from 18 specimens of P. aduncun L. (Piperaceae) were collected at ... from plants growing in two habitats: nine specimens were located at a stational ...

  13. Normal level of sepsis-associated phenylcarboxylic acids in human serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beloborodova, N V; Moroz, V V; Osipov, A A; Bedova, A Yu; Olenin, A Yu; Getsina, M L; Karpova, O V; Olenina, E G

    2015-03-01

    Previous studies showed that large amounts of phenylcarboxylic acids (PhCAs) are accumulated in a septic patient's blood due to increased endogenous and microbial phenylalanine and tyrosine biotransformation. Frequently, biochemical aromatic amino acid transformation into PhCAs is considered functionally insignificant for people without monogenetic hereditary diseases. The blood of healthy people contains the same PhCAs that are typical for septic patients as shown in this paper. The overall serum PhCAs level was 6 µM on average as measured by gas chromatography with flame ionization detection. This level is a stable biochemical parameter indicating the normal metabolism of aromatic amino acids. The concentrations of PhCAs in the metabolic profile of healthy people are distributed as follows: phenylacetic ≈ p-hydroxyphenyllactic > p-hydroxyphenylacetic > phenyllactic ≈ phenylpropionic > benzoic. We conclude that maintaining of stable PhCAs level in the serum is provided as the result of integration of human endogenous metabolic pathways and microbiota.

  14. Aristolochic Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... often used as herbal medicines or in other botanical products in the United States and abroad. Aristolochic ... individuals with kidney or renal disease who consumed botanical products containing aristolochic acids. Animal Studies The findings ...

  15. Treatment of purified terephthalic acid wastewater using a bio-waste-adsorbent bagasse fly ash (BFA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Shilpi; Prasad, Basheshwar; Mishra, Indra Mani

    2017-01-01

    Purified terephthalic acid (PTA) plant of a petrochemical unit generates wastewater having high pollution load. Acid treatment of this wastewater reduces the chemical oxygen demand (COD) load by more than 50%, still leaving substantial COD load (>1500 mg/L) which should be removed. The present study reports on the use of a bio-waste-adsorbent bagasse fly ash (BFA) for the reduction of COD and other recalcitrant acids from this wastewater. The BFA showed basic character and was mesoporous with a BET specific surface area of 82.4 m 2 /g. Optimum conditions for the adsorptive treatment of acid-pretreated PTA wastewater were found to be as follows: initial pH (pH i ) = 4, BFA dosage = 15 g/L, and contact time = 3 h. Adsorption treatment resulted in 58.2% removal of COD, 96.3% removal of terephthalic acid (TA), and 99.9% removal of benzoic acid (BA). TA and BA were removed from the pretreated PTA wastewater through precipitation and sedimentation of un-dissociated acid molecules inside the mesopores of the BFA. The results showed that the COD removed by the BFA followed pseudo-second-order kinetics. Equilibrium sorption data were best correlated by the Freundlich isotherm. The process of adsorptive removal of COD was found to be exothermic. The change in the Gibbs free energy was found to be negative, suggesting that the adsorption process is spontaneous and feasible for the treatment of PTA wastewater.

  16. Structural basis for substrate recognition in the salicylic acid carboxyl methyltransferase family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubieta, Chloe; Ross, Jeannine R; Koscheski, Paul; Yang, Yue; Pichersky, Eran; Noel, Joseph P

    2003-08-01

    Recently, a novel family of methyltransferases was identified in plants. Some members of this newly discovered and recently characterized methyltransferase family catalyze the formation of small-molecule methyl esters using S-adenosyl-L-Met (SAM) as a methyl donor and carboxylic acid-bearing substrates as methyl acceptors. These enzymes include SAMT (SAM:salicylic acid carboxyl methyltransferase), BAMT (SAM:benzoic acid carboxyl methyltransferase), and JMT (SAM:jasmonic acid carboxyl methyltransferase). Moreover, other members of this family of plant methyltransferases have been found to catalyze the N-methylation of caffeine precursors. The 3.0-A crystal structure of Clarkia breweri SAMT in complex with the substrate salicylic acid and the demethylated product S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine reveals a protein structure that possesses a helical active site capping domain and a unique dimerization interface. In addition, the chemical determinants responsible for the selection of salicylic acid demonstrate the structural basis for facile variations of substrate selectivity among functionally characterized plant carboxyl-directed and nitrogen-directed methyltransferases and a growing set of related proteins that have yet to be examined biochemically. Using the three-dimensional structure of SAMT as a guide, we examined the substrate specificity of SAMT by site-directed mutagenesis and activity assays against 12 carboxyl-containing small molecules. Moreover, the utility of structural information for the functional characterization of this large family of plant methyltransferases was demonstrated by the discovery of an Arabidopsis methyltransferase that is specific for the carboxyl-bearing phytohormone indole-3-acetic acid.

  17. Alternative kynurenic acid synthesis routes studied in the rat cerebellum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonali eBlanco Ayala

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Kynurenic acid (KYNA, an astrocyte-derived, endogenous antagonist of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine and excitatory amino acid receptors, regulates glutamatergic, GABAergic, cholinergic and dopaminergic neurotransmission in several regions of the rodent brain. Synthesis of KYNA in the brain and elsewhere is generally attributed to the enzymatic conversion of L-kynurenine (L-KYN by kynurenine aminotransferases (KATs. However, alternative routes, including KYNA formation from D-kynurenine (D-KYN by D-amino acid oxidase (DAAO and the direct transformation of kynurenine to KYNA by reactive oxygen species (ROS, have been demonstrated in the rat brain. Using the rat cerebellum, a region of low KAT activity and high DAAO activity, the present experiments were designed to examine KYNA production from L-KYN or D-KYN by KAT and DAAO, respectively, and to investigate the effect of ROS on KYNA synthesis. In chemical combinatorial systems, both L-KYN and D-KYN interacted directly with peroxynitrite (ONOO- and hydroxyl radicals (OH•, resulting in the formation of KYNA. In tissue homogenates, the non-specific KAT inhibitor aminooxyacetic acid (AOAA; 1 mM reduced KYNA production from L-KYN and D-KYN by 85.1 ± 1.7% and 27.1 ± 4.5%, respectively. Addition of DAAO inhibitors (benzoic acid, kojic acid or 3-methylpyrazole-5-carboxylic acid; 5 µM each attenuated KYNA formation from L-KYN and D-KYN by ~35% and ~66%, respectively. ONOO- (25 µM potentiated KYNA production from both L-KYN and D-KYN, and these effects were reduced by DAAO inhibition. AOAA attenuated KYNA production from L-KYN + ONOO- but not from D-KYN + ONOO-. In vivo, extracellular KYNA levels increased rapidly after perfusion of ONOO- and, more prominently, after subsequent perfusion with L-KYN or D-KYN (100 µM. Taken together, these results suggest that different mechanisms are involved in KYNA production in the rat cerebellum, and that, specifically, DAAO and ROS can function as alternative routes

  18. Zoledronic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Robert; Burkinshaw, Roger; Winter, Matthew; Neville-Webbe, Helen; Lester, Jim; Woodward, Emma; Brown, Janet

    2011-01-01

    Both bone metastases and fragility fractures due to bone loss result in considerable morbidity affecting quality of life and independence as well as placing complex demands on healthcare resources. Zoledronic acid is a widely used intravenous bisphosphonate that reduces this skeletal morbidity in both benign and malignant conditions. The incidence, clinical importance and prevention strategies to minimize side effects associated with the use of zoledronic acid are discussed with a particular focus on use in oncology where intensive monthly scheduling is required. This potentially increases the risk for adverse events over the 6-12 monthly administration used to treat benign bone diseases. A detailed understanding of the generally favorable safety profile of zoledronic acid, but particularly the potential for renal dysfunction and osteonecrosis of the jaw. When compared to many other therapies, especially in the cancer setting, the severity of adverse events related to zoledronic acid is generally mild and, with the exception of the acute phase response causing transient fever, myalgia and bone pain, side effects are infrequent. Thus, the benefits of treatment with zoledronic acid within its licensed indications almost always outweigh the risks.

  19. Dihydroxylated phenolic acids derived from microbial metabolism reduce lipopolysaccharide-stimulated cytokine secretion by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monagas, María; Khan, Nasiruddin; Andrés-Lacueva, Cristina; Urpí-Sardá, Mireia; Vázquez-Agell, Mónica; Lamuela-Raventós, Rosa María; Estruch, Ramón

    2009-07-01

    Oligomers and polymers of flavan-3-ols (proanthocyanidins) are very abundant in the Mediterranean diet, but are poorly absorbed. However, when these polyphenols reach the colon, they are metabolised by the intestinal microbiota into various phenolic acids, including phenylpropionic, phenylacetic and benzoic acid derivatives. Since the biological properties of these metabolites are not completely known, in the present study, we investigated the effect of the following microbial phenolic metabolites: 3,4-dihydroxyphenylpropionic acid (3,4-DHPPA), 3-hydroxyphenylpropionic acid, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (3,4-DHPAA), 3-hydroxyphenylacetic acid, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid and 4-hydroxyhippuric acid (4-HHA), on modulation of the production of the main pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-alpha, IL-1beta and IL-6). The production of these cytokines by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) pre-treated with the phenolic metabolites was studied in six healthy volunteers. With the exception of 4-HHA for TNF-alpha secretion, only the dihydroxylated compounds, 3,4-DHPPA and 3,4-DHPAA, significantly inhibited the secretion of these pro-inflammatory cytokines in LPS-stimulated PBMC. Mean inhibition of the secretion of TNF-alpha by 3,4-DHPPA and 3,4-DHPAA was 84.9 and 86.4 %, respectively. The concentrations of IL-6 in the culture supernatant were reduced by 88.8 and 92.3 % with 3,4-DHPPA and 3,4-DHPAA pre-treatment, respectively. Finally, inhibition was slightly higher for IL-1beta, 93.1 % by 3,4-DHPPA and 97.9 % by 3,4-DHPAA. These results indicate that dihydroxylated phenolic acids derived from microbial metabolism present marked anti-inflammatory properties, providing additional information about the health benefits of dietary polyphenols and their potential value as therapeutic agents.

  20. IL-4-induced gene-1 is a leukocyte L-amino acid oxidase with an unusual acidic pH preference and lysosomal localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, James M; Naidu, Mamta D; Barcia, Michele; Porti, Debra; Chavan, Sangeeta S; Chu, Charles C

    2004-10-01

    IL-4-induced gene-1 (Il4i1 or Fig1) initially isolated as a gene of unknown function from mouse B lymphocytes, is limited in expression to primarily immune tissues and genetically maps to a region of susceptibility to autoimmune disease. The predicted Il4i1 protein (IL4I1) sequence is most similar to apoptosis-inducing protein and Apoxin I, both l-amino acid oxidases (LAAO; Enzyme Commission 1.4.3.2). We demonstrate that IL4I1 has unique LAAO properties. IL4I1 has preference for aromatic amino acid substrates, having highest specific activity with phenylalanine. In support of this selectivity, IL4I1 is inhibited by aromatic competitors (benzoic acid and para-aminobenzoic acid), but not by nonaromatic LAAO inhibitors. Il4i1 protein and enzyme activity is found in the insoluble fraction of transient transfections, implying an association with cell membrane and possibly intracellular organelles. Indeed, IL4I1 has the unique property of being most active at acidic pH (pH 4), suggesting it may reside preferentially in lysosomes. IL4I1 is N-linked glycosylated, a requirement for lysosomal localization. Confocal microscopy of cells expressing IL4I1 translationally fused to red fluorescent protein demonstrated that IL4I1 colocalized with GFP targeted to lysosomes and with acriflavine, a green fluorescent dye that is taken up into lysosomes. Thus, IL4I1 is a unique mammalian LAAO targeted to lysosomes, an important subcellular compartment involved in Ag processing.

  1. Acid Rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bricker, Owen P.; Rice, Karen C.; Dietrich, W.E.; Sposito, Garrison

    1997-01-01

    Acid deposition, or acid rain as it is more commonly referred to, has become a widely publicized environmental issue in the U.S. over the past decade. The term usually conjures up images of fish kills, dying forests, "dead" lakes, and damage to monuments and other historic artifacts. The primary cause of acid deposition is emission of S02 and NOx to the atmosphere during the combustion of fossil fuels. Oxidation of these compounds in the atmosphere forms strong acids - H2SO4 and HNO3 - which are returned to the Earth in rain, snow, fog, cloud water, and as dry deposition.Although acid deposition has only recently been recognized as an environmental problem in the U.S., it is not a new phenomenon (Cogbill & Likens 1974). As early as the middle of the 17th century in England, the deleterious effects of industrial emissions on plants, animals, and humans, and the atmospheric transport of pollutants between England and France had become issues of concern (Evelyn 1661, Graunt 1662). It is interesting that well over three hundred years ago in England, recommendations were made to move industry outside of towns and build higher chimneys to spread the pollution into "distant parts." Increasing the height of smokestacks has helped alleviate local problems, but has exacerbated others. In the U.S. the height of the tallest smokestack has more than doubled, and the average height of smokestacks has tripled since the 1950s (Patrick et al 1981). This trend occurred in most industrialized nations during the 20th century and has had the effect of transforming acid rain from a local urban problem into a problem of global scale.

  2. Enhanced levels of atmospheric low-molecular weight monocarboxylic acids in gas and particulates over Mt. Tai, North China, during field burning of agricultural wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, Tomoki; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Nakamura, Shinnosuke; Kanaya, Yugo; Wang, Zifa

    2017-12-01

    To understand the source and atmospheric behaviour of low molecular weight monocarboxylic acids (monoacids), gaseous (G) and particulate (P) organic acids were collected at the summit of Mt. Tai in the North China Plain (NCP) during field burning of agricultural waste (wheat straw). Particulate organic acids were collected with neutral quartz filter whereas gaseous organic acids were collected with KOH-impregnated quartz filter. Normal (C1-C10), branched (iC4-iC6), hydroxy (lactic and glycolic), and aromatic (benzoic) monoacids were determined with a capillary gas chromatography employing p-bromophenacyl esters. We found acetic acid as the most abundant gas-phase species whereas formic acid is the dominant particle-phase species. Concentrations of formic (G/P 1 570/1 410 ng m-3) and acetic (3 960/1 120 ng m-3) acids significantly increased during the enhanced field burning of agricultural wastes. Concentrations of formic and acetic acids in daytime were found to increase in both G and P phases with those of K+, a field-burning tracer (r = 0.32-0.64). Primary emission and secondary formation of acetic acid is linked with field burning of agricultural wastes. In addition, we found that particle-phase fractions (Fp = P/(G + P)) of formic (0.50) and acetic (0.31) acids are significantly high, indicating that semi-volatile organic acids largely exist as particles. Field burning of agricultural wastes may play an important role in the formation of particulate monoacids in the NCP. High levels (917 ng m-3) of particle-phase lactic acid, which is characteristic of microorganisms, suggest that microbial activity associated with terrestrial ecosystem significantly contributes to the formation of organic aerosols.

  3. Lipoic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramazan Tetikcok

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Lipoic acid, which is defined as a miralce antioxidan, is used by many departments. Eventhough clinical using data are very limited , it is used in treatment of diabetic neuropathy, physical therapy and rehabilitation clinic, dermatology clinic, geriatric clinics. It has usage area for cosmetic purposes. Although there are reports there are the direction of the effectiveness in these areas, the works done are not enough. Today lipoic acid , used in many areas ,is evaluated as universal antioxidant [J Contemp Med 2015; 5(3.000: 206-209

  4. Degradation of 3-phenoxybenzoic acid by a Bacillus sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaohua Chen

    Full Text Available 3-Phenoxybenzoic acid (3-PBA is of great environmental concern with regards to endocrine disrupting activity and widespread occurrence in water and soil, yet little is known about microbial degradation in contaminated regions. We report here that a new bacterial strain isolated from soil, designated DG-02, was shown to degrade 95.6% of 50 mg·L(-1 3-PBA within 72 h in mineral salt medium (MSM. Strain DG-02 was identified as Bacillus sp. based on the morphology, physio-biochemical tests and 16S rRNA sequence. The optimum conditions for 3-PBA degradation were determined to be 30.9°C and pH 7.7 using response surface methodology (RSM. The isolate converted 3-PBA to produce 3-(2-methoxyphenoxy benzoic acid, protocatechuate, phenol, and 3,4-dihydroxy phenol, and subsequently transformed these compounds with a q(max, K(s and K(i of 0.8615 h(-1, 626.7842 mg·L(-1 and 6.7586 mg·L(-1, respectively. A novel microbial metabolic pathway for 3-PBA was proposed on the basis of these metabolites. Inoculation of strain DG-02 resulted in a higher degradation rate on 3-PBA than that observed in the non-inoculated soil. Moreover, the degradation process followed the first-order kinetics, and the half-life (t(1/2 for 3-PBA was greatly reduced as compared to the non-inoculated control. This study highlights an important potential application of strain DG-02 for the in situ bioremediation of 3-PBA contaminated environments.

  5. Salicylhydroxamic acids

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    to as topological indices, can be used for establishing QSAR of interest in pharmacology. A number of successful QSAR studies were made 4 based on Wms by means of which we can determine the ways in which the structural features of SHA and SHA derivatives influence the course of nucleic acid synthesis in a tumour ...

  6. Synthesis and Characterization of Group-6 Metal Carbonyl Complexes of Aroyl Hydrazone Derivatives

    OpenAIRE

    Saleem, Mohd; Sharma, Mohita; Mahajan, Simpy; Sheikh, H. N.; Kalsotra, B. L.

    2012-01-01

    Carbonyl complexes of Chromium, molybdenum and tungsten of composition, [M(CO)4L-L], (where M= Cr, Mo or W and L-L= benzoic acid[1-(Furan-2-yl)methylene]hydrazide (BFMH), benzoic acid[(thiophene-2-yl)methylene]hydrazide (BTMH), benzoic acid[1-(thiophene-2-yl)ethylidene] hydrazide (BTEH), benzoic acid (phenylmethylene)hydrazide (BPMH) and benzoic acid[1-(anisol-3-yl)methylene] hydrazide (BAMH) are reported. These have been prepared by refluxing metal carbonyls and the ligands in 1:1molar ratio...

  7. Crystal structure of ethylenedioxytetrathiafulvalene-4,5-bis(thiolbenzoic acid 0.25-hydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanyuan Zhang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound (systematic name: 4,4′-{[2-(5,6-dihydro-[1,3]dithiolo[4,5-b][1,4]dioxin-2-ylidene-1,3-dithiole-4,5-diyl]bis(sulfanediyl}dibenzoic acid 0.25-hydrate, C22H14O6S6·0.25H2O, the tetrathiafulvalene (TTF core adopts a boat conformation, where the central S2C=CS2 plane makes dihedral angles of 31.34 (4 and 26.83 (6°, respectively, with the peripheral S2C=CS2 and S2C2O2 planes. In the crystal, the benzoic acid molecules are linked via O—H...O hydrogen bonds, forming inversion dimers with R22(8 motifs. The dimers are linked through weak C—H...O hydrogen bonds into a chain structure along [-101]. The chains stack along the a axis through S...S and S...C short contacts, forming layers parallel to the ac plane.

  8. Uptake of perfluorooctanoic acid by Caco-2 cells: Involvement of organic anion transporting polypeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Osamu; Fujii, Yukiko; Haraguchi, Koichi; Kato, Yoshihisa; Ohta, Chiho; Koga, Nobuyuki; Endo, Tetsuya

    2017-08-05

    The mechanism underlying the intestinal absorption of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) was investigated using Caco-2 cells. The uptake of PFOA from the apical membrane of Caco-2 cells was fast, and pH, temperature, and concentration dependent, but Na + independent. Coincubation with sulfobromophthalein (BSP), glibenclamide, estron-3-sulfate, cyclosporine A or rifamycin SV, which are typical substrates or inhibitors of organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATPs), significantly decreased the uptake of PFOA. However, coincubation with probenecid or p-aminohippuric acid, typical substrates of organic anion transporters, did not decrease the uptake of PFOA. Furthermore, coincubation with l-lactic acid or benzoic acid, substrates of monocarboxylic acid transporters, did not decrease PFOA uptake. The relationship between the initial uptake of PFOA and its concentration was saturable, suggesting the involvement of a carrier-mediated process. The calculated K m and uptake clearance (V max /K m ) values for PFOA were 8.3μM and 55.0μL/mg protein/min, respectively. This clearance value was about 3-fold greater than that of the non-saturable uptake clearance (K d : 18.1μL/mg protein/min). Lineweaver-Burk plots revealed that BSP competitively inhibits the uptake of PFOA, with a K i value of 23.1μM. These results suggest that the uptake of PFOA from the apical membranes of Caco-2 cells could be, at least in part, mediated by OATPs along with BSP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Molecular and biochemical characterization of the jasmonic acid methyltransferase gene from black cottonwood (Populus trichocarpa)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Nan [ORNL; Yao, Jianzhuang [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Chaiprasongsuk, Minta [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Li, Guanglin [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Guan, Ju [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Tschaplinski, Timothy J [ORNL; Guo, Hong [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Chen, Feng [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2013-01-01

    Methyl jasmonate is a metabolite known to be produced by many plants and has roles in diverse biological processes. It is biosynthesized by the action of S-adenosyl-L-methionine:jasmonic acid carboxyl methyltransferase (JMT), which belongs to the SABATH family of methyltransferases. Herein is reported the isolation and biochemical characterization of a JMT gene from black cottonwood (Populus trichocarpa). The genome of P. trichocarpa contains 28 SABATH genes (PtSABATH1 to PtSABATH28). Recombinant PtSABATH3 expressed in Escherichia coli showed the highest level of activity with jasmonic acid (JA) among carboxylic acids tested. It was therefore renamed PtJMT1. PtJMT1 also displayed activity with benzoic acid (BA), with which the activity was about 22% of that with JA. PtSABATH2 and PtSABATH4 were most similar to PtJMT1 among all PtSABATHs. However, neither of them had activity with JA. The apparent Km values of PtJMT1 using JA and BA as substrate were 175 lM and 341 lM, respectively. Mutation of Ser-153 and Asn-361, two residues in the active site of PtJMT1, to Tyr and Ser respectively, led to higher specific activity with BA than with JA. Homology-based structural modeling indicated that substrate alignment, in which Asn-361 is involved, plays a role in determining the substrate specificity of PtJMT1. In the leaves of young seedlings of black cottonwood, the expression of PtJMT1 was induced by plant defense signal molecules methyl jasmonate and salicylic acid and a fungal elicitor alamethicin, suggesting that PtJMT1 may have a role in plant defense against biotic stresses. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that PtJMT1 shares a common ancestor with the Arabidopsis JMT, and functional divergence of these two apparent JMT orthologs has occurred since the split of poplar and Arabidopsis lineages.

  10. Synthesis and Characterization of Tin (IV Tungstate Nanoparticles – A Solid Acid Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj Sadanandan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Tin (IV tungstate, a tetravalent metal acid salt was synthesized in the nanoform by chemical coprecipitation method using EDTA as capping agent. The material was found to be stable in mineral acids, bases and organic solvents except  in HF and aquaregia. The material was characterized using EDS, TG/DTA, FTIR, XRD, SEM, HRTEM and BET surface area measurement. The molecular formula of the compound is 2SnO2 3WO3.5H2O determined from elemental analysis using TG/DTA. Surface morphology and particle size were obtained using SEM and HRTEM. The surface area was found to be 205-225m2/g. The Na+ exchange capacity found to be 3.8 meq/g, indicates the presence of surface hydroxyl group and hence the presence of Bronsted acid sites. The catalytic activity of the material was tested by using esterification and oxidation as model reactions. For the esterification of different alcohols, the percentage yield was found to be high for n-alcohol compared to isomeric alcohols. Oxidation of benzyl alcohol gives benzaldehyde and benzoic acid as the only products. Copyright © 2012 by BCREC UNDIP. All rights reservedReceived: 12nd June 2012, Revised: 23rd July 2012, Accepted: 29th July 2012[How to Cite: S. Manoj, R. Beena, (2012. Synthesis and Characterization of tin(IV Tungstate Nanoparticles – A Solid Acid Catalyst. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 7 (2: 105-111. doi:10.9767/bcrec.7.2.3622.105-111] [How to Link / DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.7.2.3622.105-111 ] | View in 

  11. New CE-ESI-MS analytical method for the separation, identification and quantification of seven phenolic acids including three isomer compounds in virgin olive oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevado, Juan José Berzas; Peñalvo, Gregorio Castañeda; Robledo, Virginia Rodríguez; Martínez, Gabriela Vargas

    2009-10-15

    A sensitive and expeditious CE-ESI-MS analytical method for the separation, identification and determination of seven selected antioxidants (cinnamic and benzoic acids), including three isomers of coumaric acid (ortho-, meta- and para-) has been developed. In order to obtain the analytical separation, capillary electrophoresis and CE-MS interface parameters (e.g., buffer pH and composition, sheath liquid and gas flow rates, sheath liquid composition, electrospray voltage, etc.) were carefully optimized. The polar fraction containing the selected phenolic acids was obtained using a previously optimized SPE pretreatment. An MS detector in order to extract structural information about the target compounds and facilitate their qualitative analysis was used in the negative ion mode. The proposed off-line SPE CE-ESI-MS method was validated by assessing its precision, LODs and LOQs, linearity range and accuracy. The optimized and validated method was used in order to quantify the selected antioxidants in various samples of virgin olive oil and extra-virgin olive oil obtained from the main olive varieties cropped in Castilla-La Mancha, Spain. Salicylic acid was used as internal standard throughout in order to ensure reproducibility in the quantitative analysis of the oil samples. The results confirmed the presence of hydroxyphenyl acetic, p-coumaric, ferulic and vanillic acids in substantial amounts (microg g(-1) level) in all samples.

  12. Levulinic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Hachuła

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The title compound (systematic name: 4-oxopentanoic acid, C5H8O3, is close to planar (r.m.s. deviation = 0.0762 Å. In the crystal, the molecules interact via O—H...O hydrogen bonds in which the hydroxy O atoms act as donors and the ketone O atoms in adjacent molecules as acceptors, forming C(7 chains along [20-1].

  13. In vitro and in vivo evaluations of the activities of lauric acid monoester formulations against Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouse, Mark S; Rotger, Margalida; Piper, Kerryl E; Steckelberg, James M; Scholz, Matthew; Andrews, Jeffrey; Patel, Robin

    2005-08-01

    Due to increasing mupirocin resistance, alternatives for Staphylococcus aureus nasal decolonization are needed. Lauric acid monoesters combined with lactic, mandelic, malic, or benzoic acid are being evaluated as possible alternatives. We determined the in vitro activity of 13 lauric acid monoester (LAM) formulations and mupirocin against 30 methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) isolates and 30 methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) isolates. We then used a murine model of MRSA nasopharyngeal colonization to compare the in vivo activity of mupirocin with three LAM formulations. MSSA and MRSA MIC(90) values were 0.25 microg/ml for mupirocin and

  14. Plasma amino acid and metabolite signatures tracking diabetes progression in the UCD-T2DM rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccolo, Brian D; Graham, James L; Stanhope, Kimber L; Fiehn, Oliver; Havel, Peter J; Adams, Sean H

    2016-06-01

    Elevations of plasma concentrations of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) are observed in human insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM); however, there has been some controversy with respect to the passive or causative nature of the BCAA phenotype. Using untargeted metabolomics, plasma BCAA and other metabolites were assessed in lean control Sprague-Dawley rats (LC) and temporally during diabetes development in the UCD-T2DM rat model, i.e., prediabetic (PD) and 2 wk (D2W), 3 mo (D3M), and 6 mo (D6M) post-onset of diabetes. Plasma leucine, isoleucine, and valine concentrations were elevated only in D6M rats compared with D2W rats (by 28, 29, and 30%, respectively). This was in contrast to decreased plasma concentrations of several other amino acids in D3M and/or D6M relative to LC rats (Ala, Arg, Glu, Gln, Met, Ser, Thr, and Trp). BCAAs were positively correlated with fasting glucose and negatively correlated with plasma insulin, total body weight, total adipose tissue weight, and gastrocnemius muscle weight in the D3M and D6M groups. Multivariate analysis revealed that D3M and D6M UCD-T2DM rats had lower concentrations of amino acids, amino acid derivatives, 1,5-anhydroglucitol, and conduritol-β-opoxide and higher concentrations of uronic acids, pantothenic acids, aconitate, benzoic acid, lactate, and monopalmitin-2-glyceride relative to PD and D2W UCD-T2DM rats. The UCD-T2DM rat does not display elevated plasma BCAA concentrations until 6 mo post-onset of diabetes. With the acknowledgement that this is a rodent model of T2DM, the results indicate that elevated plasma BCAA concentrations are not necessary or sufficient to elicit an insulin resistance or T2DM onset. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Maleopimaric acid acetic acid solvate

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Meng; Zhou, Yong-hong; Guo, Xiao-xin; Hu, Li-hong

    2009-01-01

    The title compound, C24H32O5·C2H4O2, is a derivative of abietic acid. The two fused and unbridged cyclohexane rings have chair conformations and the anhydride ring is planar. Of the other three six-membered rings, two have boat conformations and one has a twist-boat conformation. The crystal structure is stabilized by intermolecular O—H...O and C—H...O hydrogen bonds.

  16. Folic Acid and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Folic Acid and Pregnancy KidsHealth / For Parents / Folic Acid and ... conception and during early pregnancy . What Is Folic Acid? Folic acid, sometimes called folate, is a B ...

  17. Constructions of a set of novel hydrogen-bonded supramolecules from reactions of cobalt(II) salt with bis(3,5-dimethylpyrazolyl)methane and different carboxylic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiao-Yun; Tang, Xiao-Yan; Zhang, Wen-Hua; Wang, Jing; Ren, Zhi-Gang; Li, Hong-Xi; Zhang, Yong; Lang, Jian-Ping

    2008-05-01

    Reactions of CoX 2·6H 2O (X = Cl -, ClO 4-) with bis(3,5-dimethylpyrazolyl)methane (dmpzm) and formic acid, acetic acid, benzoic acid, salicylic acid, maleic acid, or fumaric acid under the presence of KOH solution produced a new family of Co(II)/dmpzm complexes, [Co(dmpzm) 2L]X· nH 2O ( 1: L = O 2CH, X = Cl, n = 2; 2: L = OAc, X = Cl, n = 3; 3: L = benzoate, X = ClO 4, n = 1/3; 4: L = salicylate, X = ClO 4, n = 1/3) and [Co 2(dmpzm) 4L](ClO 4) 2· nSolv ( 5: L = maleate, n = 3, Solv = H 2O; 6: L = fumarate, n = 2, Solv = MeOH). These compounds were structurally characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Compounds 1- 4 are mononuclear while 5- 6 are binuclear. Each cobalt atom of 1- 6 is hexacoordinate, with a distorted octahedral CoN 4O 2 coordination geometry incorporating two N, N'-bidentate dmpzm ligands and one O, O'-bidentate carboxylate ligand. There are rich intra- and intermolecular hydrogen bonds in the crystals of 1- 6, thereby forming either 2D hydrogen-bonded networks ( 1 and 2) or 3D hydrogen-bonded networks ( 3- 6). In addition, the thermal behaviors of 1- 6 were also investigated.

  18. High fluorescence emission of carboxylic acid functionalized polystyrene/BaTiO{sub 3} nanocomposites and rare earth metal complexes: Preparation and characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, X. T.; Showkat, A. M.; Wang, Z.; Lim, K. T., E-mail: ktlim@pknu.ac.kr [Department of Imaging System Engineering, Pukyong National University, Busan 608-737 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-30

    Noble fluorescence nanocomposite compound based on barium titanate nanoparticles (BTO), polystyrene (PSt), and terbium ion (Tb{sup 3+}) was synthesized by a combination of surface-initiated reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization, Friedel-Crafts alkylation reaction and coordinate chemistry. Initially, a modification of surface of BTO was conducted by an exchange process with S-benzyl S’-trimethoxysilylpropyltrithiocarbonate to create macro-initiator for polymerization of styrene. Subsequently, aryl carboxylic acid functionalized polystyrene grafted barium titanate (BTO-g-PSt-COOH) was generated by substitution reaction between 4-(Chloromethyl) benzoic acid and PSt chains. The coordination of the nanohybrids with Tb{sup 3+} ions afforded fluorescent Tb{sup 3+} tagged aryl carboxylic acid functionalized polystyrene grafted barium titanate (BTO-g-PSt-Tb{sup 3+}) complexes. Structure, morphology, and fluorescence properties of nanohybrid complexes were investigated by respective physical and spectral studies. FT-IR and SEM analyses confirmed the formation of BTO-g-PSt-Tb{sup 3+}nanohybrids. Furthermore, TGA profiles demonstrated the grafting of aryl carboxylic acid functionalized polystyrene on BTO surface. Optical properties of BTO-g-PSt-Tb{sup 3+} complexes were investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy.

  19. Antimicrobial activity of different sodium and potassium salts of carboxylic acid against some common foodborne pathogens and spoilage-associated bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabezas-Pizarro, Jorge; Redondo-Solano, Mauricio; Umaña-Gamboa, Christian; Arias-Echandi, María Laura

    Cleaning and disinfection represent the most important activities associated with the elimination of dirt and microorganisms at food processing plants. Improper procedures may lead to cross contamination of food leading to its spoilage or even the transmission of foodborne pathogens. Several strategies have been used in order to achieve a good disinfection of surfaces and products; nevertheless, microbial resistance to common-use-products has developed lately. Due to this fact, the development of new non-toxic-food compatible chemical agents that reduce the impact of foodborne pathogens and spoilage causing microorganisms is desirable for the food industry. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of different sodium and potassium salts of aliphatic and aromatic carboxylic acid on the growth of common food spoilage and pathogenic microorganisms. Growth curves were determined for Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Lactobacillus plantarum, Enterococcus faecalis, Candida albicans, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella Enteritidis, and Listeria monocytogenes in contact with different concentrations of carboxylic acid salts. The inhibitory effect of both aliphatic and aromatic carboxylic acid salts, in accordance with concentration levels, was 100>50>25mg/ml. The inhibitory effect of aliphatic salts was butanoic>hexanoic> octanoic>decanoic and, benzoic>gallic>caffeic acid salts for aromatic salts. In general, sodium salts were more inhibitory than potassium salts (p≤0.05). Copyright © 2017 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Dehydroabietic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Ping Rao

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The title compound [systematic name: (1R,4aS,10aR-7-isopropyl-1,4a-dimethyl-1,2,3,4,4a,9,10,10a-octahydrophenanthrene-1-carboxylic acid], C20H28O2, has been isolated from disproportionated rosin which is obtained by isomerizing gum rosin with a Pd-C catalyst.. Two crystallographically independent molecules exist in the asymmetric unit. In each molecule, there are three six-membered rings, which adopt planar, half-chair and chair conformations. The two cyclohexane rings form a trans ring junction with the two methyl groups in axial positions. The crystal structure is stabilized by intermolecular O—H...O hydrogen bonds.

  1. [Acne therapy with topical benzoyl peroxide, antibiotics and azelaic acid].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worret, Wolf-Ingo; Fluhr, Joachim W

    2006-04-01

    Benzoyl peroxide (BPO) was introduced in the treatment of acne in 1934. Despite the fact that only few randomized trials have been published, BPO is considered the standard in topical acne treatment. Anaerobic bacteria are reduced by oxidative mechanisms and the induction of resistant strains is reduced. Topical formulations are available at concentrations of 2.5, 5, 10 and 20 %. The effect is dose-dependent, but the irritation increases with higher concentrations. Usually 5 % BPO is sufficient to control acne grade I-II. Due to its strong oxidative potential, patients should be advised that BPO may bleach colored and dark clothing, bedding and even hair. BPO is safe for use in pregnant and lactating females because it is degraded to benzoic acid. It is a cost-effective treatment for acne grade I-II. Patients with papulopustular acne grade I-II, particularly with marked inflammation, show satisfactory improvement with topical antibiotic treatment. The following compounds are available and effective: erythromycin, clindamycin and tetracycline (the latter being less frequently used). A review in 1990 suggested that topical tetracycline was ineffective in the treatment of acne. Along with eliminating Propionibacterium acnes, the main mechanism of topical antibiotics is their antiinflammatory effect. All three penetrate the epidermal barrier well and are similarly efficacious. Randomized trials have shown that in concentrations of 2-4 %, their effects are comparable to oral tetracycline and minocycline. Combination therapy with retinoids or benzoyl peroxide (BPO) increases efficacy. Retinoids increase penetration and reduce comedones, while topical antibiotics primarily address inflammation. One side effect of topical antibacterial treatment is an increase in drug-resistant resident skin flora with gram-negative microorganisms prevailing, which can lead to gram-negative folliculitis. All three antibiotics fluoresce under black light which may produce interesting

  2. The effect of long-term acidifying feeding on digesta organic acids, mineral balance, and bone mineralization in growing pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Jan Værum; Højberg, Ole; Sørensen, Kristina Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Acidification of slurry through dietary manipulation of urinary pH is a means of mitigating nitrogen emission from pig production, but long-term effects of diet acidification on bone mineralization and mineral balance is less investigated. The objective was therefore to study the long-term effects...... of feeding benzoic acid (BA) and calcium chloride (CaCl2) on the mineral balance and microbial activity in the gastrointestinal tract of pigs. Four diets containing the combinations of 0 or 10 g/kg BA and 0 or 20 g/kg CaCl2 were fed to 24 pigs in a factorial design. For the diets without CaCl2, calcium...... carbonate (CaCO3) was added to provide equimolar levels of Ca. The pigs were fed the diets from 36 kg until slaughter at 113 kg BW, and they were housed in balance cages for 12 d from 60 to 66 kg BW. Supplementation of BA and/or CaCl2 had only minor effect on accumulation of digesta organic acids (acetate...

  3. Ultraviolet light and ozone stimulate accumulation of salicylic acid, pathogenesis-related proteins and virus resistance in tobacco

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yalpani, N.; Enyedi, A.J.; León, J.; Raskin, I.

    1994-01-01

    In tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Xanthinc), salicylic acid (SA) levels increase in leaves inoculated by necrotizing pathogens and in healthy leaves located above the inoculated site. Systemic SA increase may trigger disease resistance and synthesis of pathogenesis-related proteins (PR proteins). Here we report that ultraviolet (UV)-C light or ozone induced biochemical responses similar to those induced by necrotizing pathogens. Exposure of leaves to UV-C light or ozone resulted in a transient ninefold increase in SA compared to controls. In addition, in UV-light-irradiated plants, SA increased nearly fourfold to 0.77 μg·g −1 fresh weight in leaves that were shielded from UV light. Increased SA levels were accompanied by accumulation of an SA conjugate and by an increase in the activity of benzoic acid 2-hydroxylase which catalyzes SA biosynthesis. In irradiated and in unirradiated leaves of plants treated with UV light, as well as in plants fumigated with ozone, PR proteins 1a and 1b accumulated. This was paralleled by the appearance of induced resistance to a subsequent challenge with tobacco mosaic virus. The results suggest that UV light, ozone fumigation and tobacco mosaic virus can activate a common signal-transduction pathway that leads to SA and PR-protein accumulation and increased disease resistance. (author)

  4. Effect of phenolic acids on functions of rat aorta, vas deferens and on metabolic changes in streptozotocin-induced diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bektas, Nurcan; Ozturk, Yusuf

    2012-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of antioxidant treatment on streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic metabolic and smooth muscle (SM) complications in rats. Threeweeks after STZ injection (i.v.), vehicle, p-OH benzoic (p-OHBA), protocatechic (PA) and gallic acids (GA) were separately administered (10 mg/kg each, i.p.) to the rats everyday for 3 weeks. Metabolic functions were observedregularly. The rats in all groups were sacrificed andaorta and Vas deferens were dissected. Theresponses of isolated organs to agonists (acetylcholine and phenylephrine) were recorded. Protocatechic acid prevented increase in food consumption and feces output significantly. The responses of isolated organs to agonists increased in the STZ-diabetic rats. The test drugs either prevented, exacerbated or didnot affect the SMchanges in the STZ-diabetic rats. It was concluded that p-OHBA, PA and GA may cause effects independently of their antioxidant effect and/or of diabeticcomplications. They may exhibit pro-oxidant activities in the experimental conditions applied.

  5. Organosulfates and organic acids in Arctic aerosols: speciation, annual variation and concentration levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, A. M. K.; Kristensen, K.; Nguyen, Q. T.; Zare, A.; Cozzi, F.; Nøjgaard, J. K.; Skov, H.; Brandt, J.; Christensen, J. H.; Ström, J.; Tunved, P.; Krejci, R.; Glasius, M.

    2014-02-01

    Sources, composition and occurrence of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) in the Arctic were investigated at Zeppelin Mountain, Svalbard, and Station Nord, northeast Greenland, during the full annual cycle of 2008 and 2010 respectively. We focused on the speciation of three types of SOA tracers: organic acids, organosulfates and nitrooxy organosulfates from both anthropogenic and biogenic precursors, here presenting organosulfate concentrations and compositions during a full annual cycle and chemical speciation of organosulfates in Arctic aerosols for the first time. Aerosol samples were analysed using High Performance Liquid Chromatography coupled to a quadrupole Time-of-Flight mass spectrometer (HPLC-q-TOF-MS). A total of 11 organic acids (terpenylic acid, benzoic acid, phthalic acid, pinic acid, suberic acid, azelaic acid, adipic acid, pimelic acid, pinonic acid, diaterpenylic acid acetate (DTAA) and 3-methyl-1,2,3-butanetricarboxylic acid (MBTCA)), 12 organosulfates and one nitrooxy organosulfate were identified at the two sites. Six out of the 12 organosulfates are reported for the first time. Concentrations of organosulfates follow a distinct annual pattern at Station Nord, where high concentration were observed in late winter and early spring, with a mean total concentration of 47 (±14) ng m-3, accounting for 7 (±2)% of total organic matter, contrary to a considerably lower organosulfate mean concentration of 2 (±3) ng m-3 (accounting for 1 (±1)% of total organic matter) observed during the rest of the year. The organic acids followed the same temporal trend as the organosulfates at Station Nord; however the variations in organic acid concentrations were less pronounced, with a total mean organic acid concentration of 11.5 (±4) ng m-3 (accounting for 1.7 (±0.6)% of total organic matter) in late winter and early spring, and 2.2 (±1) ng m-3 (accounting for 0.9 (±0.4)% of total organic matter) during the rest of the year. At Zeppelin Mountain

  6. 5 prime -Azido-(3,6- sup 3 H sub 2 )-1-naphthylphthalamic acid, a photoactivatable probe for naphthylphthalamic acid receptor proteins from higher plants: Identification of a 23-kDa protein from maize coleoptile plasma membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zettl, R.; Feldwisch, J.; Schell, J.; Palme, K. (Max-Planck-Inst. fuer Zuechtungsforschung, Koeln (West Germany)); Boland, W. (Univ. Karlsruhe (West Germany))

    1992-01-15

    1-Naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) is a specific inhibitor of polar auxin transport that blocks carrier mediated auxin efflux from plant cells. To allow identification of the NPA receptor thought to be part of the auxin efflux carrier, the authors have synthesized a tritiated, photolabile NPA analogue, 5{prime}-azido-(3,6-{sup 3}H{sub 2})NPA (({sup 3}H{sub 2})N{sub 3}NPA). This analogue was used to identify NPA-binding proteins in fractions highly enriched for plasma membrane vesicles isolated from maize coleoptiles (Zea mays L.). Competition studies showed that binding of ({sup 3}H{sub 2})N{sub 3}NPA to maize plasma membrane vesicles was blocked by nonradioactive NPA but not by benzoic acid. After incubation of plasma membrane vesicles with ({sup 3}H{sub 2})N{sub 3}NPA and exposure to UV light, they observed specific photoaffinity labeling of a protein with an apparent molecular mass of 23 kDa. Pretreatment of the plasma membrane vesicles with indole-3-acetic acid or with the auxin-transport inhibitors NPA and 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid strongly reduced specific labeling of this protein. This 23-kDa protein was also labeled by addition of 5-azido-(7-{sup 3}H)indole-3-acetic acid to plasma membranes prior to exposure to UV light. The 23-kDa protein was solubilized from plasma membranes by 1% Triton X-100. The possibility that this 23-kDa polypeptide is part of the auxin efflux carrier system is discussed.

  7. Different Chromatographic Methods for Simultaneous Determination of Mefenamic Acid and Two of Its Toxic Impurities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morcoss, Martha M; Abdelwahab, Nada S; Ali, Nouruddin W; Elsaady, Mohammed T

    2017-08-01

    Two sensitive, accurate and precise chromatographic methods mentioned as TLC-densitometric method and RP-HPLC-DAD method, were developed and validated for the simultaneous determination of mefenamic acid (MEF) and its two toxic impurities, benzoic acid (BA) and 2,3-dimethylaniline (DMA). In the proposed TLC-densitometric method a developing system consisting of chloroform:acetone:acetic acid:ammonia solution(70:30:2:2, v/v/v/v) was used, TLC aluminum plates 60 F254 was used as a stationary phase and the separated bands were UV-scanned at 225 nm. While the proposed RP-HPLC-DAD method depended on chromatographic separation on C18 column using 0.05 M KH2PO4 buffer: acetonitrile (40:60, v/v) as a mobile phase at constant flow rate of 1 mL/min with UV detection at 225 nm. Linear relationships were obtained in the ranges of 0.3-2, 0.3-2 and 0.3-1.8 μg/band (for TLC-densitometric method) and in the ranges of 7-50, 10-50 and 7-50 μg/mL (for HPLC-DAD method) for MEF, BA and DMA, respectively. Factors affecting the developed methods have been studied and optimized. Moreover ,the proposed methods were successfully applied for determination of the studied drug in its pharmaceutical dosage form. The methods showed no significance difference when compared with the reported method using F-test and Student's-t test. The low of detection and quantization limits of the proposed methods get them suitable for quality control and stability studies of MEF in pharmaceutical formulation. The developed methods have advantages of being more selective and sensitive than the published methods. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. In-vial liquid-liquid microextraction-capillary electrophoresis method for the determination of phenolic acids in vegetable oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Bakar, Nur Bahiyah; Makahleh, Ahmad; Saad, Bahruddin

    2012-09-12

    An in-vial liquid-liquid microextraction method was developed for the selective extraction of the phenolic acids (caffeic, gallic, cinnamic, ferulic, chlorogenic, syringic, vanillic, benzoic, p-hydroxybenzoic, 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic, o-coumaric, m-coumaric and p-coumaric) in vegetable oil samples. The optimised extraction conditions for 20 g sample were: volume of diluent (n-hexane), 2 mL; extractant, methanol: 5 mM sodium hydroxide (60:40; v/v); volume of extractant, 300 μL (twice); vortex, 1 min; centrifugation, 5 min. Recoveries for the studied phenolic acids were 80.1-119.5%. The simultaneous determination of the phenolic acid extracts was investigated by capillary electrophoresis (CE). Separations were carried out on a bare fused-silica capillary (50 μm i.d.× 40 cm length) involving 25 mM sodium tetraborate (pH 9.15) and 5% methanol as CE background electrolyte in the normal polarity mode, voltage of 30 kV, temperature of 25°C, injection time of 4s (50 mbar) and electropherograms were recorded at 200 nm. The phenolic acids were successfully separated in less than 10 min. The validated in-vial LLME-CE method was applied to the determination of phenolic acids in vegetable oil samples (extra virgin olive oil, virgin olive oil, pure olive oil, walnut oil and grapeseed oil). The developed method shows significant advantages over the current methods as lengthy evaporation step is not required. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. [Acid-base equilibrium of hydrazone derivatives 4-R-3R1-thazol-2-one. I. Ionization constants of alpha-methyl-beta-(4-R-thiazol-2-yl)- and alpha-methyl-beta-(4-R-3-R1-thiazol-2-ylidene)-hydrazides of benzoic acid].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielak, L; Kiełczykowska, M; Biliński, S

    1992-01-01

    The ionization constants of the following compounds have been determined spectrophotometrically in aqueous solution: [table: see text] The comparison of absorption spectra in UV and pK values of the compounds being described in this work and of the derivatives having a thiazole or thiazoline structure which were studied previously let us suggest that in the II-H neutral molecule and the I-H and II-H mono-anion the thiazole form prevails while in the case of the I-H neutral molecule the thiazoline form is more probable.

  10. [Teichoic acids from lactic acid bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livins'ka, O P; Harmasheva, I L; Kovalenko, N K

    2012-01-01

    The current view of the structural diversity of teichoic acids and their involvement in the biological activity of lactobacilli has been reviewed. The mechanisms of effects of probiotic lactic acid bacteria, in particular adhesive and immunostimulating functions have been described. The prospects of the use of structure data of teichoic acid in the assessment of intraspecific diversity of lactic acid bacteria have been also reflected.

  11. Uric acid test (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uric acid urine test is performed to check for the amount of uric acid in urine. Urine is collected over a 24 ... for testing. The most common reason for measuring uric acid levels is in the diagnosis or treatment of ...

  12. Uric acid - urine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003616.htm Uric acid urine test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The uric acid urine test measures the level of uric acid ...

  13. Plasma amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amino acids blood test ... types of methods used to determine the individual amino acid levels in the blood. ... test is done to measure the level of amino acids in the blood. An increased level of a ...

  14. Facts about Folic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information For… Media Policy Makers Facts About Folic Acid Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ... of the baby’s brain and spine. About folic acid Folic acid is a B vitamin. Our bodies ...

  15. Methylmalonic acid blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003565.htm Methylmalonic acid blood test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The methylmalonic acid blood test measures the amount of methylmalonic acid in the ...

  16. Crystal structure of a 2:1 piroxicam-gentisic acid co-crystal featuring neutral and zwitterionic piroxicam mol-ecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horstman, Elizabeth M; Bertke, Jeffery A; Woods, Toby J; Kenis, Paul J A

    2016-12-01

    A new 2:1 co-crystal of piroxicam and gentisic acid [systematic name: 4-hy-droxy-1,1-dioxo- N -(pyridin-2-yl)-2 H -1λ 6 ,2-benzo-thia-zine-3-carboxamide-2-(4-oxido-1,1-dioxo-2 H -1λ 6 ,2-benzo-thia-zine-3-amido)-pyridin-1-ium-2,5-di-hydroxy-benzoic acid, 2C 15 H 13 N 3 O 4 S·C 7 H 6 O 4 ] has been synthesized using a microfluidic platform and initially identified using Raman spectroscopy. In the co-crystal, one piroxicam mol-ecule is in its neutral form and an intra-molecular O-H⋯O hydrogen bond is observed. The other piroxicam mol-ecule is zwitterionic (proton transfer from the OH group to the pyridine N atom) and two intra-molecular N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds occur. The gentisic acid mol-ecule shows whole-mol-ecule disorder over two sets of sites in a 0.809 (2):0.191 (2) ratio. In the crystal, extensive hydrogen bonding between the components forms layers propagating in the ab plane.

  17. Acid distribution in phosphoric acid fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okae, I.; Seya, A.; Umemoto, M. [Fuji Electric Co., Ltd., Chiba (Japan)

    1996-12-31

    Electrolyte acid distribution among each component of a cell is determined by capillary force when the cell is not in operation, but the distribution under the current load conditions had not been clear so far. Since the loss of electrolyte acid during operation is inevitable, it is necessary to store enough amount of acid in every cell. But it must be under the level of which the acid disturbs the diffusion of reactive gases. Accordingly to know the actual acid distribution during operation in a cell is very important. In this report, we carried out experiments to clarify the distribution using small single cells.

  18. Assessment of Envi-Carb™ as a passive sampler binding phase for acid herbicides without pH adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seen, Andrew; Bizeau, Oceane; Sadler, Lachlan; Jordan, Timothy; Nichols, David

    2014-05-01

    The graphitised carbon solid phase extraction (SPE) sorbent Envi-Carb has been used to fabricate glass fibre filter- Envi-Carb "sandwich" disks for use as a passive sampler for acid herbicides. Passive sampler uptake of a suite of herbicides, including the phenoxyacetic acid herbicides 4-chloro-o-tolyloxyacetic acid (MCPA), 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and 3,6-dichloro-2-methoxybenzoic acid (Dicamba), was achieved without pH adjustment, demonstrating for the first time a suitable binding phase for passive sampling of acid herbicides at neutral pH. Passive sampling experiments with Duck River (Tasmania, Australia) water spiked at 0.5 μg L(-1) herbicide concentration over a 7 d deployment period showed that sampling rates in Duck River water decreased for seven out of eight herbicides, and in the cases of 3,6-dichloro-2-pyridinecarboxylic acid (Clopyralid) and Dicamba no accumulation of the herbicides occurred in the Envi-Carb over the deployment period. Sampling rates for 4-amino-3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinecarboxylic acid (Picloram), 2,4-D and MCPA decreased to approximately 30% of the sampling rates in ultrapure water, whilst sampling rates for 2-(4,6-dimethylpyrimidin-2-ylcarbamoylsulfamoyl) benzoic acid, methyl ester (Sulfometuron-methyl) and 3,5,6-Trichloro-2-pyridinyloxyacetic acid (Triclopyr) were approximately 60% of the ultrapure water sampling rate. For methyl N-(2,6-dimethylphenyl)-N-(methoxyacetyl)-D-alaninate (Metalaxyl-M) there was little variation in sampling rate between passive sampling experiments in ultrapure water and Duck River water. SPE experiments undertaken with Envi-Carb disks using ultrapure water and filtered and unfiltered Duck River water showed that not only is adsorption onto particulate matter in Duck River water responsible for a reduction in herbicide sampling rate, but interactions of herbicides with dissolved or colloidal matter (matter able to pass through a 0.2 μm membrane filter) also reduces the herbicide sampling

  19. Determination of Carboxypeptidase Activity in Clinical Pathogens by Gas Chromatography?Mass Spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Lough, Fraser; Perry, John D.; Stanforth, Stephen P.; Dean, John R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A novel method for the determination of benzoic acid has been employed to identify carboxypeptidase activities in clinically relevant pathogens. Benzoic acid was determined after chemical derivatization by gas chromatography?mass spectrometry (GC?MS). N-Benzoyl amino acid substrates were evaluated for the detection of carboxypeptidase activities in a number of clinical pathogens. Upon enzymatic hydrolysis of these substrates, benzoic acid was produced which was detected by extraction...

  20. Reaction pathway of the degradation of the p-hydroxybenzoic acid by sulfate radical generated by ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Criquet, Justine; Leitner, Nathalie Karpel Vel

    2015-01-01

    The degradation of p-hydroxybenzoic acid (HBA) in aqueous solutions by ionizing radiation was studied. The phenolic pollutant was easily removed by the electron beam irradiation, as more than 80% of the initial 100 µM introduced was degraded for a dose of 600 Gy. It was shown that the addition of persulfate, producing the sulfate radical as additional reactive species, induced a change in the reaction pathway. LC–MS analyses were performed in order to identify the different by-products formed. In the absence of persulfate, the main by-product formed was 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid, while in presence of persulfate, 1,4-benzoquinone was detected and the hydroxylated by-products were not present. A reaction pathway of HBA degradation by hydroxyl and sulfate radicals was proposed from the identification of the chemical structure of the different by-products detected. The influences of pH and dissolved oxygen were also studied. A high decline of HBA degradation was observed at pH 11 compared to pH 4.5, this decrease was minimized in the presence of persulfate. The dissolved oxygen concentration was found to be a limiting parameter of HBA degradation, however an excess of dissolved oxygen in solution did not improve the degradation to a large extent. - Highlights: • p-Hydroxybenzoic acid (HBA) is easily removed by e-beam irradiation. • The sulfate radicals formed from persulfate induce loss of the benzoic acid skeleton. • The dissolved oxygen concentration is a limiting parameter of the HBA degradation. • The effect of pH is minimized in presence of persulfate

  1. 2-(2-Methylbenzoylbenzoic acid: catemeric hydrogen bonding in a γ-keto acidThis paper is dedicated to the memory of HWT; he was a wonderful mentor, teacher and friend at Rutgers University-Newark for over 44 years.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia A. Platosz

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The crystal structure of the title compound, C15H12O3, displays catemeric aggregation involving O—H...O hydrogen bonds progressing from the carboxyl group of one molecule to the ketone O atom of another glide-related neighbor. The molecule is twisted, with the toluene 80.61 (3° out of plane with respect to the phenyl group of the benzoic acid. The acid group makes a dihedral angle of 13.79 (14° with the attached phenyl ring. The molecules are achiral, but the space group glide planes create alternating conformational chirality in the chain units. The four hydrogen-bonding chains progress along [001] in an A—A—B—B pattern (right-to-left versus left-to-right, and are related to each other by the center of symmetry at (0.5, 0.5, 0.5 in the chosen cell. There is one close contact (2.54 Å between a phenyl H atom and the acid carbonyl from a symmetry-related molecule.

  2. Salicylic Acid Alleviates Aluminum Toxicity in Soybean Roots through Modulation of Reactive Oxygen Species Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Liu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available As an important signal molecule, salicylic acid (SA improves plant tolerance to aluminum (Al stress. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of exogenous SA application on the dynamics of endogenous SA and reactive oxygen species in soybean (Glycine max L. exposed to Al stress. The roots of soybean seedlings were exposed to a combination of AlCl3 (30 μM and SA (10 μM/PAC (100 μM, paclobutrazol, SA biosynthesis inhibitor for 3, 6, 9, and 12 h. Al stress induced an increase in endogenous SA concentration in a time-dependent manner, also verified by the up-regulated expression of GmNPR1, an SA-responsive gene. Al stress increased the activities of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL and benzoic acid 2-hydroxylase (BA2H, and the contents of SA, O2- and malondialdehyde (MDA in the root apex. The application of exogenous SA increased PAL and BA2H, and reduced O2- and MDA contents in soybean roots under Al stress. PAC inhibited the SA induced increase in BA2H activity. In addition, the SA application resulted in a rapid increase in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 concentration under Al stress, followed by a sharp decrease. Compared with the plants exposed to Al alone, Al+SA plants possessed higher activities of superoxide dismutase, peroxidase, and ascorbate peroxidase, and lower catalase activity, indicating that SA alleviated Al-induced oxidative damage. These results suggested that PAL and BA2H were involved in Al-induced SA production and showed that SA alleviated the adverse effects of Al toxicity by modulating the cellular H2O2 level and the antioxidant enzyme activities in the soybean root apex.

  3. Endogenous salicylic acid accumulation is required for chilling tolerance in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chun-Juan; Li, Liang; Shang, Qing-Mao; Liu, Xin-Yan; Zhang, Zhi-Gang

    2014-10-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is an important plant hormone, and its exogenous application can induce tolerance to multiple environmental stresses in plants. In this study, we examine the potential involvement of endogenous SA in response to chilling in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) seedlings. A low temperature of 8 °C induces a moderate increase in endogenous SA levels. Chilling stimulates the enzymatic activities and the expression of genes for phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) and benzoic acid-2-hydroxylase rather than isochorismate synthase. This indicates that the PAL enzymatic pathway contributes to chilling-induced SA production. Cucumber seedlings pretreated with SA biosynthesis inhibitors accumulate less endogenous SA and suffer more from chilling damage. The expression of cold-responsive genes is also repressed by SA inhibitors. The reduction in stress tolerance and in gene expression can be restored by the exogenous application of SA, confirming the critical roles of SA in chilling responses in cucumber seedlings. Furthermore, the inhibition of SA biosynthesis under chilling stress results in a prolonged and enhanced hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) accumulation. The application of exogenous SA and the chemical scavenger of H2O2 reduces the excess H2O2 and alleviates chilling injury. In contrast, the protective effects of SA are negated by foliar spraying with high concentrations of H2O2 and an inhibitor of the antioxidant enzyme. These results suggest that endogenous SA is required in response to chilling stress in cucumber seedlings, by modulating the expression of cold-responsive genes and the precise induction of cellular H2O2 levels.

  4. Toxicity of adipic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Gerald L

    2002-05-01

    Adipic acid has very low acute toxicity in rats with an LD50 > 5000 mg/kg. Adipic acid produced mild to no skin irritation on intact guinea pig skin as a 50% concentration in propylene glycol; it was not a skin sensitizer. Adipic acid caused mild conjunctival irritation in washed rabbit eyes; in unwashed rabbit eyes, there was mild conjunctival irritation, minimal iritis, but no corneal effects. Adipic acid dust may irritate the mucous membranes of the lungs and nose. In a 2-year feeding study, rats fed adipic acid at concentrations up to 5% in the diet exhibited only weight loss. Adipic acid is not genetically active in a wide variety of assay systems. Adipic acid caused no developmental toxicity in mice, rats, rabbits, or hamsters when administered orally. Adipic acid is partially metabolized in humans; the balance is eliminated unchanged in the urine. Adipic acid is slightly to moderately toxic to fish, daphnia, and algae in acute tests.

  5. Acid Thunder: Acid Rain and Ancient Mesoamerica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahl, Jonathan D. W.; Berg, Craig A.

    2006-01-01

    Much of Mesoamerica's rich cultural heritage is slowly eroding because of acid rain. Just as water dissolves an Alka-Seltzer tablet, acid rain erodes the limestone surfaces of Mexican archaeological sites at a rate of about one-half millimeter per century (Bravo et al. 2003). A half-millimeter may not seem like much, but at this pace, a few…

  6. High-capacity hollow porous dummy molecular imprinted polymers using ionic liquid as functional monomer for selective recognition of salicylic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Haiyan; Peng, Mijun; Li, Hui; Peng, Sheng; Shi, Shuyun

    2017-01-30

    The existence of strong intramolecular hydrogen bond in salicylic acid (SA) weakens its intermolecular hydrogen bonding with functional monomer, then it is a challenge work to fabricate molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) for SA recognition with high capacity and good selectivity. Here, hollow porous dummy MIPs (HPDMIPs) were prepared using benzoic acid (BA) as dummy template, ionic liquid (i.e. 1-vinyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride) as functional monomer, and MCM-48 as sacrificial support. Factors that affected adsorption, such as type of template and porogen, mole ratio of template-functional monomer-cross-linker and type of binding solvent, were optimized in detail. Multiple strong interactions between SA and ionic liquid in HPDMIPs deduced higher binding capacity (29.75mg/g), imprinting factor (5.61) and selectivity than any previously reported MIPs by traditional or surface imprinting technology. The large surface area (543.9m 2 /g) with hollow porous structure resulted in faster kinetic binding (25min). The equilibrium data fitted well to Freundlich equation and the adsorption process could be described by pseudo-second order model. Finally, HPDMIPs were successfully applied to selectively extract and enrich SA from Actinidia chinensis with a relatively high recovery (84.6-94.5%). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Acid Deposition Phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramadan, A.E.K.

    2004-01-01

    Acid deposition, commonly known as acid rain, occurs when emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels and other industrial processes undergo complex chemical reactions in the atmosphere and fall to the earth as wet deposition (rain, snow, cloud, fog) or dry deposition (dry particles, gas). Rain and snow are already naturally acidic, but are only considered problematic when less than a ph of 5.0 The main chemical precursors leading to acidic conditions are atmospheric concentrations of sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ) and nitrogen oxides (NO x ). When these two compounds react with water, oxygen, and sunlight in the atmosphere, the result is sulfuric (H 2 SO 4 ) and nitric acids (HNO 3 ), the primary agents of acid deposition which mainly produced from the combustion of fossil fuel and from petroleum refinery. Airborne chemicals can travel long distances from their sources and can therefore affect ecosystems over broad regional scales and in locations far from the sources of emissions. According to the concern of petroleum ministry with the environment and occupational health, in this paper we will discussed the acid deposition phenomena through the following: Types of acidic deposition and its components in the atmosphere Natural and man-made sources of compounds causing the acidic deposition. Chemical reactions causing the acidic deposition phenomenon in the atmosphere. Factors affecting level of acidic deposition in the atmosphere. Impact of acid deposition. Procedures for acidic deposition control in petroleum industry

  8. The volatile profiles of a rare apple (Malus domestica Borkh.) honey: shikimic acid-pathway derivatives, terpenes, and others.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuś, Piotr Marek; Jerković, Igor; Tuberoso, Carlo Ignazio Giovanni; Šarolić, Mladenka

    2013-09-01

    The volatile profiles of rare Malus domestica Borkh. honey were investigated for the first time. Two representative samples from Poland (sample I) and Spain (sample II) were selected by pollen analysis (44-45% of Malus spp. pollen) and investigated by GC/FID/MS after headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) and ultrasonic solvent extraction (USE). The apple honey is characterized by high percentage of shikimic acid-pathway derivatives, as well as terpenes, norisoprenoids, and some other compounds such as coumaran and methyl 1H-indole-3-acetate. The main compounds of the honey headspace were (sample I; sample II): benzaldehyde (9.4%; 32.1%), benzyl alcohol (0.3%; 14.4%), hotrienol (26.0%, 6.2%), and lilac aldehyde isomers (26.3%; 1.7%), but only Spanish sample contained car-2-en-4-one (10.2%). CH2 Cl2 and pentane/Et2 O 1 : 2 (v/v) were used for USE. The most relevant compounds identified in the extracts were: benzaldehyde (0.9-3.9%), benzoic acid (2.0-11.2%), terpendiol I (0.3-7.4%), coumaran (0.0-2.8%), 2-phenylacetic acid (2.0-26.4%), methyl syringate (3.9-13.1%), vomifoliol (5.0-31.8%), and methyl 1H-indole-3-acetate (1.9-10.2%). Apple honey contained also benzyl alcohol, 2-phenylethanol, (E)-cinnamaldehyde, (E)-cinnamyl alcohol, eugenol, vanillin, and linalool that have been found previously in apple flowers, thus disclosing similarity of both volatile profiles. Copyright © 2013 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG, Zürich.

  9. Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... acids are "building blocks" that join together to form proteins. If you have one of these disorders, your body may have trouble breaking down certain amino acids. Or there may be a problem getting the ...

  10. Uric acid - blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... acid in blood Images Blood test Uric acid crystals References Edwards NL. Crystal deposition diseases. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. ... M. is among the first to achieve this important distinction for online health information and services. Learn ...

  11. Omega-6 Fatty Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omega-6 fatty acids are types of fats. Some types are found in vegetable oils, including corn, evening primrose seed, safflower, and soybean oils. Other types of omega-6 fatty acids are found in black currant seed, borage seed, ...

  12. Pantothenic acid and biotin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/article/002410.htm Pantothenic acid and biotin To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Pantothenic acid and biotin are types of B vitamins. They are water- ...

  13. Acid-fast stain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003766.htm Acid-fast stain To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The acid-fast stain is a laboratory test that determines ...

  14. Hydrochloric acid poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydrochloric acid is a clear, poisonous liquid. It is highly corrosive, which means it immediately causes severe damage, such ... poisoning due to swallowing or breathing in hydrochloric acid. This article is for information only. Do NOT ...

  15. Aminolevulinic Acid Topical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminolevulinic acid is used in combination with photodynamic therapy (PDT; special blue light) to treat actinic keratoses (small crusty ... skin cancer) of the face or scalp. Aminolevulinic acid is in a class of medications called photosensitizing ...

  16. Zoledronic Acid Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoledronic acid (Reclast) is used to prevent or treat osteoporosis (condition in which the bones become thin and weak ... of life,' end of regular menstrual periods). Zoledronic acid (Reclast) is also used to treat osteoporosis in ...

  17. Azelaic Acid Topical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azelaic acid gel and foam is used to clear the bumps, lesions, and swelling caused by rosacea (a skin ... redness, flushing, and pimples on the face). Azelaic acid cream is used to treat the pimples and ...

  18. Aminocaproic Acid Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminocaproic acid injection is used to control bleeding that occurs when blood clots are broken down too quickly. This ... the baby is ready to be born). Aminocaproic acid injection is also used to control bleeding in ...

  19. Deoxycholic Acid Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deoxycholic acid injection is used to improve the appearance and profile of moderate to severe submental fat ('double chin'; fatty tissue located under the chin). Deoxycholic acid injection is in a class of medications called ...

  20. Valproic Acid and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... live chat Live Help Fact Sheets Share Valproic Acid Monday, 01 January 2018 In every pregnancy, a ... This sheet talks about whether exposure to valproic acid may increase the risk for birth defects over ...

  1. Lactic acid test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003507.htm Lactic acid test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Lactic acid is mainly produced in muscle cells and red ...

  2. Sulfuric acid poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulfuric acid is a very strong chemical that is corrosive. Corrosive means it can cause severe burns and ... or mucous membranes. This article discusses poisoning from sulfuric acid. This article is for information only. Do NOT ...

  3. Acid Rain Study Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunger, Carolyn; And Others

    Acid rain is a complex, worldwide environmental problem. This study guide is intended to aid teachers of grades 4-12 to help their students understand what acid rain is, why it is a problem, and what possible solutions exist. The document contains specific sections on: (1) the various terms used in conjunction with acid rain (such as acid…

  4. The Acid Rain Reader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbs, Harriett S.; And Others

    A topic which is often not sufficiently dealt with in elementary school textbooks is acid rain. This student text is designed to supplement classroom materials on the topic. Discussed are: (1) "Rain"; (2) "Water Cycle"; (3) "Fossil Fuels"; (4) "Air Pollution"; (5) "Superstacks"; (6) "Acid/Neutral/Bases"; (7) "pH Scale"; (8) "Acid Rain"; (9)…

  5. Amino acids and proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Goudoever, Johannes B.; Vlaardingerbroek, Hester; van den Akker, Chris H.; de Groof, Femke; van der Schoor, Sophie R. D.

    2014-01-01

    Amino acids and protein are key factors for growth. The neonatal period requires the highest intake in life to meet the demands. Those demands include amino acids for growth, but proteins and amino acids also function as signalling molecules and function as neurotransmitters. Often the nutritional

  6. Stomach acid test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastric acid secretion test ... of the cells in the stomach to release acid. The stomach contents are then removed and analyzed. ... 3.5). These numbers are converted to actual acid production in units of milliequivalents per hour (mEq/ ...

  7. Immunoglobulin and fatty acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention relates to a composition comprising 0.1-10 w/w % immunoglobulin (Ig), 4-14 w/w % saturated fatty acids, 4-14 w/w % mono-unsaturated fatty acids and 0-5 w/w % poly-unsaturated fatty acids, wherein the weight percentages are based on the content of dry matter in the composition...

  8. Bioreduction of aryl azides during mutasynthesis of new ansamitocins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancuso, Lena; Jürjens, Gerrit; Hermane, Jekaterina; Harmrolfs, Kirsten; Eichner, Simone; Fohrer, Jörg; Collisi, Wera; Sasse, Florenz; Kirschning, Andreas

    2013-09-06

    Supplementing a culture of a mutant strain of Actinosynnema pretiosum that is unable to biosynthesize aminohydroxy benzoic acid (AHBA), with 3-azido-5-hydroxy-benzoic acid and 3-azido-5-amino-benzoic acid, unexpectedly yielded anilino ansamitocins instead of the expected azido derivatives. This is the first example of the bioreduction of organic azides. The unique nature of these results was demonstrated when 3-azido-5-amino-benzoic acid was fed to the corresponding AHBA blocked mutant of Streptomyces hygroscopicus, the geldanamycin producer. This mutasynthetic experiment yielded the fully processed azido derivative of geldanamycin.

  9. Amino acid analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winitz, M.; Graff, J. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    The process and apparatus for qualitative and quantitative analysis of the amino acid content of a biological sample are presented. The sample is deposited on a cation exchange resin and then is washed with suitable solvents. The amino acids and various cations and organic material with a basic function remain on the resin. The resin is eluted with an acid eluant, and the eluate containing the amino acids is transferred to a reaction vessel where the eluant is removed. Final analysis of the purified acylated amino acid esters is accomplished by gas-liquid chromatographic techniques.

  10. Molecular Interaction of Pinic Acid with Sulfuric Acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elm, Jonas; Kurten, Theo; Bilde, Merete

    2014-01-01

    from the corresponding ΔG values. The first two additions of sulfuric acid to pinic acid are found to be favorable with ΔG values of -9.06 and -10.41 kcal/mol. Addition of a third sulfuric acid molecule is less favorable and leads to a structural rearrangement forming a bridged sulfuric acid-pinic acid...... without the further possibility for attachment of either sulfuric acid or pinic acid. This suggests that pinic acid cannot be a key species in the first steps in nucleation, but the favorable interactions between sulfuric acid and pinic acid imply that pinic acid can contribute to the subsequent growth...

  11. [Biosynthesis of adipic acid].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Li; Chen, Wujiu; Yuan, Fei; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Qinhong; Ma, Yanhe

    2013-10-01

    Adipic acid is a six-carbon dicarboxylic acid, mainly for the production of polymers such as nylon, chemical fiber and engineering plastics. Its annual demand is close to 3 million tons worldwide. Currently, the industrial production of adipic acid is based on the oxidation of aromatics from non-renewable petroleum resources by chemo-catalytic processes. It is heavily polluted and unsustainable, and the possible alternative method for adipic acid production should be developed. In the past years, with the development of synthetic biology and metabolic engineering, green and clean biotechnological methods for adipic acid production attracted more attention. In this study, the research advances of adipic acid and its precursor production are reviewed, followed by addressing the perspective of the possible new pathways for adipic acid production.

  12. Process for the preparation of lactic acid and glyceric acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, James E [Haslett, MI; Miller, Dennis J [Okemos, MI; Marincean, Simona [Dewitt, MI

    2008-12-02

    Hexose and pentose monosaccharides are degraded to lactic acid and glyceric acid in an aqueous solution in the presence of an excess of a strongly anionic exchange resin, such as AMBERLITE IRN78 and AMBERLITE IRA400. The glyceric acid and lactic acid can be separated from the aqueous solution. Lactic acid and glyceric acid are staple articles of commerce.

  13. Improvement of glassy sol-gel sensors for preventive conservation of historical materials against acidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmona, N.

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Sensors based on sol-gel glassy coatings doped with 2[4-(dimethyl-amino phenylazo] benzoic acid are able to change their optical absorption when they are submitted to different concentration of H3O+ and OH-. The sensors behaviour in field tests was studied in Cracow (Poland, varying the normal procedure of operation to improve their response. Both the sensors optical parameters and the environmental conditions (temperature, humidity, pressure, SO2 and NOx concentrations were measured. The sensors response was analysed in terms of their visible absorbance changes, which are due to local neutralisation reactions in the sensors surface by the join effect of acid pollutants and humidity. Correlations between the main acid pollutant (SO2 concentration and the sensors response are established to provide a relation between the optical absorption and the environmental pH. The sensors are able to detect and monitorise environmental acidity, as well as to alert on the pollutant concentration that may damage most of the historical materials.

    Los sensores a base de recubrimientos vítreos sol-gel dopados con ácido 2[4-(dimetil-amino fenilazo] benzoico son capaces de cambiar su absorción óptica cuando se someten a distintas concentraciones de iones H3O+ y OH-. La respuesta de los sensores en ensayos de campo se estudió en Cracovia (Polonia variando el procedimiento normal de uso, con el fin de mejorar su respuesta. Se midieron tanto los parámetros ópticos de los sensores como las condiciones ambientales (temperatura, humedad, presión y concentraciones de SO2 y de NOx. La respuesta de los sensores se analizó en términos de los cambios de su absorción visible. Dichos cambios se deben a reacciones locales de neutralización que tienen lugar en la superficie de los sensores, debido al efecto conjunto de los contaminantes de carácter ácido y a la humedad ambiental. Se establecieron correlaciones entre la concentración del contaminante

  14. Chlorogenic Acid and Its Microbial Metabolites Exert Anti-Proliferative Effects, S-Phase Cell-Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis in Human Colon Cancer Caco-2 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi Ekbatan, Shima; Li, Xiu-Qing; Ghorbani, Mohammad; Azadi, Behnam; Kubow, Stan

    2018-03-03

    Chlorogenic acid (CGA) decreases colon cancer-cell proliferation but the combined anti-cancer effects of CGA with its major colonic microbial metabolites, caffeic acid (CA), 3-phenylpropionic acid (3-PPA) and benzoic acid (BA), needs elucidation as they occur together in colonic digesta. Caco-2 cancer cells were treated for 24 h with the four compounds individually (50-1000 µM) and as an equimolar ratio (1:1:1:1; MIX). The effective concentration to decrease cell proliferation by 50% (EC 50 ) was lower for MIX (431 ± 51.84 µM) and CA (460 ± 21.88) versus CGA (758 ± 19.09 µM). The EC 50 for cytotoxicity measured by lactate dehydrogenase release in MIX (527 ± 75.34 µM) showed more potency than CA (740 ± 38.68 µM). Cell proliferation was decreased by 3-PPA and BA at 1000 µM with no cytotoxicity. Cell-cycle arrest was induced at the S-phase by CA (100 µM), MIX (100 µM), CGA (250 µM) and 3-PPA (500 µM) with activation of caspase-3 by CGA, CA, MIX (500 and 1000 µM). Mitochondrial DNA content was reduced by 3-PPA (1000 µM). The anti-cancer effects occurred at markedly lower concentrations of each compound within MIX than when provided singly, indicating that they function together to enhance anti-colon cancer activities.

  15. Bile acid sequestrants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten; Sonne, David P; Knop, Filip K

    2014-01-01

    Bile acids are synthesized in the liver from cholesterol and have traditionally been recognized for their role in absorption of lipids and in cholesterol homeostasis. In recent years, however, bile acids have emerged as metabolic signaling molecules that are involved in the regulation of lipid...... and glucose metabolism, and possibly energy homeostasis, through activation of the bile acid receptors farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and TGR5. Bile acid sequestrants (BASs) constitute a class of drugs that bind bile acids in the intestine to form a nonabsorbable complex resulting in interruption...... of the enterohepatic circulation. This increases bile acid synthesis and consequently reduces serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Also, BASs improve glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes. Despite a growing understanding of the impact of BASs on glucose metabolism, the mechanisms behind their glucose...

  16. Citric Acid Alternative to Nitric Acid Passivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Pattie L. (Compiler)

    2013-01-01

    The Ground Systems Development and Operations GSDO) Program at NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has the primary objective of modernizing and transforming the launch and range complex at KSC to benefit current and future NASA programs along with other emerging users. Described as the launch support and infrastructure modernization program in the NASA Authorization Act of 2010, the GSDO Program will develop and implement shared infrastructure and process improvements to provide more flexible, affordable, and responsive capabilities to a multi-user community. In support of the GSDO Program, the purpose of this project is to demonstratevalidate citric acid as a passivation agent for stainless steel. Successful completion of this project will result in citric acid being qualified for use as an environmentally preferable alternative to nitric acid for passivation of stainless steel alloys in NASA and DoD applications.

  17. DEOXYRIBONUCLEIC ACID HYBRIDS OF ACETIC ACID BACTERIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Ley, J.; Friedman, S.

    1964-01-01

    De Ley, J. (State University, Ghent, Belgium), and S. Friedman. Deoxyribonucleic acid hybrids of acetic acid bacteria. J. Bacteriol. 88:937–945. 1964.—Deuterated N15-labeled deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) from Acetobacter aceti (mesoxydans 4) forms hybrids with ordinary DNA from other species of this genus (A. xylinum, A. pasteurianus, A. estunensis, and possibly A. xylinoides) when the guanine plus cytosine base composition does not vary by more than 1 to 2%. Beyond this limit (A. aceti Ch31 and A. muciparus 5) no hybrids are formed. The hybrids are apparently derived from an asymmetrical part of the compositional distribution. The results lend strength to the concept of a genetic species rather than to a division of a genus into sharply separated species, based on small phenotypic differences. Taxonomic implications are discussed. PMID:14219057

  18. Characterization of polygalacturonases from fruit spoilage Fusarium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The most chemical compounds caused moderate inhibitory effect except benzoic and citric acids which had strong inhibitory effect on the polygalacturonases. The benzoic and citric acids were used as antifungal compounds for F. oxysporum and A. tubingensis. The citric acid was found to be more effective against fungal ...

  19. Azetidinic amino acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Bunch, Lennart; Chopin, Nathalie

    2005-01-01

    A set of ten azetidinic amino acids, that can be envisioned as C-4 alkyl substituted analogues of trans-2-carboxyazetidine-3-acetic acid (t-CAA) and/or conformationally constrained analogues of (R)- or (S)-glutamic acid (Glu) have been synthesized in a diastereo- and enantiomerically pure form from...... of two diastereoisomers that were easily separated and converted in two steps into azetidinic amino acids. Azetidines 35-44 were characterized in binding studies on native ionotropic Glu receptors and in functional assays at cloned metabotropic receptors mGluR1, 2 and 4, representing group I, II and III...

  20. Recovery of organic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verser, Dan W.; Eggeman, Timothy J.

    2009-10-13

    A method is disclosed for the recovery of an organic acid from a dilute salt solution in which the cation of the salt forms an insoluble carbonate salt. A tertiary amine and CO.sub.2 are introduced to the solution to form the insoluble carbonate salt and a complex between the acid and an amine. A water immiscible solvent, such as an alcohol, is added to extract the acid/amine complex from the dilute salt solution to a reaction phase. The reaction phase is continuously dried and a product between the acid and the solvent, such as an ester, is formed.

  1. The acid rain primer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nugent, O.

    2006-10-01

    Acid rain continues to be a major problem in North America, and particularly in eastern Canada. This report introduced the topic of acid rain and discussed its formation, measurement, sources, and geographic distribution. The major sources of sulphur dioxide in Canada are smelting metals, burning coal for electrical power generation, industrial emissions (e.g., pulp and paper, petroleum and aluminum industry), and oil and gas extraction and refining. In Canada, the largest source of nitrogen oxide is the burning of fossil fuels by the transportation sector. Problem areas for acid rain in Canada were identified. The effects of acid rain were examined on lakes and aquatic ecosystems, forests and soils, human-made structures and materials, human health, and on visibility. Acid rain policies and programs were then presented from a historical and current context. Ecosystem recovery from acid rain was discussed with reference to acid rain monitoring, atmospheric response to reductions in acid-causing emissions, and ecosystem recovery of lakes, forests, and aquatic ecosystems. Challenges affecting ecosystem recovery were also presented. These challenges include drought and dry weather, decrease of base cations in precipitation, release of sulphate previously stored in soil, mineralization and immobilization of sulphur/sulphates. Last, the report discussed what still needs to be done to improve the problem of acid rain as well as future concerns. These concerns include loss of base cations from forested watersheds and nitrogen deposition and saturation. 21 refs., 2 tabs., 17 figs

  2. Folic Acid Quiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Other Health Outcomes Folic Acid Fortification and Supplementation Neural Tube Defects Surveillance References Data and Statistics Research Birth Defects COUNT Articles & Key Findings Recommendations Links to ...

  3. Recovery of organic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verser, Dan W [Menlo Park, CA; Eggeman, Timothy J [Lakewood, CO

    2011-11-01

    A method is disclosed for the recovery of an organic acid from a dilute salt solution in which the cation of the salt forms an insoluble carbonate salt. A tertiary amine and CO.sub.2 are introduced to the solution to form the insoluble carbonate salt and a complex between the acid and an amine. A water immiscible solvent, such as an alcohol, is added to extract the acid/amine complex from the dilute salt solution to a reaction phase. The reaction phase is continuously dried and a product between the acid and the solvent, such as an ester, is formed.

  4. USGS Tracks Acid Rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, John D.; Nilles, Mark A.; Schroder, LeRoy J.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been actively studying acid rain for the past 15 years. When scientists learned that acid rain could harm fish, fear of damage to our natural environment from acid rain concerned the American public. Research by USGS scientists and other groups began to show that the processes resulting in acid rain are very complex. Scientists were puzzled by the fact that in some cases it was difficult to demonstrate that the pollution from automobiles and factories was causing streams or lakes to become more acidic. Further experiments showed how the natural ability of many soils to neutralize acids would reduce the effects of acid rain in some locations--at least as long as the neutralizing ability lasted (Young, 1991). The USGS has played a key role in establishing and maintaining the only nationwide network of acid rain monitoring stations. This program is called the National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN). Each week, at approximately 220 NADP/NTN sites across the country, rain and snow samples are collected for analysis. NADP/NTN site in Montana. The USGS supports about 72 of these sites. The information gained from monitoring the chemistry of our nation's rain and snow is important for testing the results of pollution control laws on acid rain.

  5. Self-Assembly and Soft Material Preparation of Binary Organogels via Aminobenzimidazole/Benzothiazole and Acids with Different Alkyl Substituent Chains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tifeng Jiao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The gelation behaviors of binary organogels composed of aminobenzimidazole/benzothiazole derivatives and benzoic acid with single-/multialkyl substituent chain in various organic solvents were designed and investigated. Their gelation behaviors in 20 solvents were tested as new binary organic gelators. This showed that the number and length of alkyl substituent chains and benzimidazole/benzothiazole segment have played a crucial role in the gelation behavior of all gelator mixtures in various organic solvents. More alkyl chains in molecular skeletons in present gelators are favorable for the gelation of organic solvents. The length of alkyl substituent chains has also played an important role in changing the gelation behaviors and assembly states. Morphological studies revealed that the gelator molecules self-assemble into different aggregates from wrinkle, lamella, belt, to fiber with change of solvents. Spectral studies indicated that there existed different H-bond formation and hydrophobic force, depending on benzimidazole/benzothiazole segment and alkyl substituent chains in molecular skeletons. The prepared nanostructured materials have wide perspectives and many potential applications in nanoscience and material fields due to their scientific values. The present work may also give new clues for designing new binary organogelators and soft materials.

  6. Optical sensing of 3-phenoxybenzoic acid as a pyrethroid pesticides exposure marker by surface imprinting polymer capped on manganese-doped zinc sulfide quantum dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Pandey

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The present communication deals with the synthesis of luminescent Mn-doped ZnS quantum dots (QDs anchored to surface imprinted polymer for the optical sensing of 3-phenoxy benzoic acid (3-PBA in urine samples. The combination of sensing and surface functionalization not only improves the selectivity of the method, but also increases the optosensing ability of the material for non-phosphorescent substances. The developed material was utilized for the selective and sensitive detection of 3-PBA in urine samples. The proposed method shows good linearity with a regression coefficient (R2 of 0.98. The limit of detection was found to be 0.117 μM. The method has an acceptable precision and accuracy which are found to be less than 8% and 80–90% respectively at three different concentrations. The quenching constant of quantum dot-molecular imprinted polymer was found to be 3.4 times higher to that of the quantum dot-non imprinted polymer (QD-NIP as calculated by Stern–Volmer equation. The sensing method developed has shown immense utility to detect 3-PBA in complex biological samples like urine.

  7. Chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid are absorbed in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Olthof, M.R.; Hollman, P.C.H.; Katan, M.B.

    2001-01-01

    Chlorogenic acid, an ester of caffeic acid and quinic acid, is a major phenolic compound in coffee; daily intake in coffee drinkers is 0.5-1 g. Chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid are antioxidants in vitro and might therefore contribute to the prevention of cardiovascular disease. However, data on the absorption of chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid in humans are lacking. We determined the absorption of chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid in a cross-over study with 4 female and 3 male healthy ileo...

  8. Characterization of acid tars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonard, Sunday A., E-mail: sunday.leonard@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Civil Environmental and Geomatic Engineering, University College London, Chadwick Building, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Stegemann, Julia A. [Department of Civil Environmental and Geomatic Engineering, University College London, Chadwick Building, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Roy, Amitava [J. Bennett Johnston, Sr., Centre for Advance Microstructures and Devices (CAMD), 6980 Jefferson Highway, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, 70806 (United States)

    2010-03-15

    Acid tars from the processing of petroleum and petrochemicals using sulfuric acid were characterized by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), inductively coupled plasma/optical emission spectrometry (ICP/OES), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometry, and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray (SEM/EDX) micro-analysis. Leaching of contaminants from the acid tars in 48 h batch tests with distilled water at a liquid-to-solid ratio 10:1 was also studied. GC/MS results show that the samples contained aliphatic hydrocarbons, cyclic hydrocarbons, up to 12 of the 16 USEPA priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and numerous other organic groups, including organic acids (sulfonic acids, carboxylic acids and aromatic acids), phenyl, nitrile, amide, furans, thiophenes, pyrroles, and phthalates, many of which are toxic. Metals analysis shows that Pb was present in significant concentration. DSC results show different transition peaks in the studied samples, demonstrating their complexity and variability. FTIR analysis further confirmed the presence of the organic groups detected by GC/MS. The SEM/EDX micro-analysis results provided insight on the surface characteristics of the samples and show that contaminants distribution was heterogeneous. The results provide useful data on the composition, complexity, and variability of acid tars; information which hitherto have been scarce in public domain.

  9. Science of acid rain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizoguchi, Tsuguo

    1992-01-01

    In this report, the mechanism of forming acid rain in the atmosphere and the process of its fall to ground, the mechanism of withering forests by acid substances, and the process of acidifying lakes and marshes are explained. Moreover, the monitoring networks for acid rain and the countermeasures are described. Acid rain is the pollution phenomena related to all environment, that is, atmosphere, hydrosphere, soilsphere, biosphere and so on, and it is a local environmental pollution problem, and at the same time, an international, global environmental pollution problem. In Japan, acid rain has fallen, but the acidification of lakes and marshes is not clear, and the damage to forests is on small scale. However in East Asia region, the release of sulfur oxides and nitrogen oxides is much, and the increase of the effects of acid rain is expected. It is necessary to devise the measures for preventing the damage due to acid rain. The global monitoring networks of World Meteorological Organization and United Nations Environment Program, and those in Europe, USA and Japan are described. The monitoring of acid rain in Japan is behind that in Europe and USA. (K.I.)

  10. Omega-3 Fatty Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omega-3 fatty acids are used together with lifestyle changes (diet, weight-loss, exercise) to reduce the amount of triglycerides (a fat- ... in people with very high triglycerides. Omega-3 fatty acids are in a class of medications called antilipemic ...

  11. Locked nucleic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Jan Stenvang; Sørensen, Mads D; Wengel, Jesper

    2004-01-01

    Locked nucleic acid (LNA) is a class of nucleic acid analogs possessing very high affinity and excellent specificity toward complementary DNA and RNA, and LNA oligonucleotides have been applied as antisense molecules both in vitro and in vivo. In this review, we briefly describe the basic...

  12. Peptide Nucleic Acid Synthons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2004-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  13. Amino Acid Crossword Puzzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    Learning the 20 standard amino acids is an essential component of an introductory course in biochemistry. Later in the course, the students study metabolism and learn about various catabolic and anabolic pathways involving amino acids. Learning new material or concepts often is easier if one can connect the new material to what one already knows;…

  14. Halogenated fatty acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mu, Huiling; Wesén, Clas; Sundin, Peter

    1997-01-01

    Chlorinated fatty acids have been found to be major contributors to organohalogen compounds in fish, bivalves, jellyfish, and lobster, and they have been indicated to contribute considerably to organohalogens in marine mammals. Brominated fatty acids have been found in marine sponges. Also, chlor...

  15. Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  16. Peptide Nucleic Acids (PNA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2002-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  17. Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1998-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  18. Acid dissociation characteristics of humic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tochiyama, Osamu; Sakakibara, Tetsuro; Inoue, Yasushi

    1995-01-01

    Based on the results from potentiometric titrations carried out on polyacrylic acid and some commercially available humic acids, the equation for the proton dissociation of weak polymeric acids is proposed to be K app (H + )α/(1-α) = K 1/2 {(1-α)/α}((Na + )/(Na + ) s ), where α is the degree of dissociation, K 1/2 is the dissociation constant at α = 1/2, and the brackets with subscript s denote the concentration at the surface of the polymer. This equation has been derived on the assumptions: (i) Each polymer molecule is a polybasic acid (H N R N ) having different acidic sites with K values from K 1 to K N . (ii) Binding energies of protons on these sites are all equal. (iii) The ratios of the dissociation constants of H N-i R N i- and H N-j R N j- is expressed by K i /K j = {(N-i+1)/i}/{(N-j+1)/j} since the probabilities to release or bind a proton are proportional to the numbers of protons or numbers of available anionic sites on the polymer. (iv) The effective concentration of protons at the surface of the polymer ((H + ) s ) is related by (H + ) s /(H + ) = (Na + ) s /(Na + ), where (Na + ) s can be estimated by the relation, (Na + ) s = (Cl - ) s + (R - ) s (where (R - ) s Σi(H N-i R N i- )). This leads to (Na + ) s ≅ (Cl - ) s , which in turn leads to (Na + ) s ≅ (Na + ) at high ionic strength and (Na + ) s ≅ (R - ) s = C R α at low ionic strength. (author)

  19. Chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid are absorbed in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olthof, Margreet R.; Hollman, Peter C H; Katan, Martijn B.

    2001-01-01

    Chlorogenic acid, an ester of caffeic acid and quinic acid, is a major phenolic compound in coffee; daily intake in coffee drinkers is 0.5-1 g. Chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid are antioxidants in vitro and might therefore contribute to the prevention of cardiovascular disease. However, data on the

  20. Production of shikimic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Saptarshi; Chisti, Yusuf; Banerjee, Uttam C

    2012-01-01

    Shikimic acid is a key intermediate for the synthesis of the antiviral drug oseltamivir (Tamiflu®). Shikimic acid can be produced via chemical synthesis, microbial fermentation and extraction from certain plants. An alternative production route is via biotransformation of the more readily available quinic acid. Much of the current supply of shikimic acid is sourced from the seeds of Chinese star anise (Illicium verum). Supply from star anise seeds has experienced difficulties and is susceptible to vagaries of weather. Star anise tree takes around six-years from planting to bear fruit, but remains productive for long. Extraction and purification from seeds are expensive. Production via fermentation is increasing. Other production methods are too expensive, or insufficiently developed. In the future, production in recombinant microorganisms via fermentation may become established as the preferred route. Methods for producing shikimic acid are reviewed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. 2-Methylaspartic acid monohydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ray J. Butcher

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, C5H9NO4·H2O, is an isomer of the α-amino acid glutamic acid that crystallizes from water in its zwitterionic form as a monohydrate. It is not one of the 20 proteinogenic α-amino acids that are used in living systems and differs from the natural amino acids in that it has an α-methyl group rather than an α-H atom. In the crystal, an O—H...O hydrogen bond is present between the acid and water molecules while extensive N—H...O and O—H...O hydrogen bonds link the components into a three-dimensional array.

  2. Acidity in rainfall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tisue, G.T.; Kacoyannakis, J.

    1975-01-01

    The reported increasing acidity of rainfall raises many interesting ecological and chemical questions. In spite of extensive studies in Europe and North America there are, for example, great uncertainties in the relative contributions of strong and weak acids to the acid-base properties of rainwater. Unravelling this and similar problems may require even more rigorous sample collection and analytical procedures than previously employed. Careful analysis of titration curves permits inferences to be made regarding chemical composition, the possible response of rainwater to further inputs of acidic components to the atmosphere, and the behavior to be expected when rainwater interacts with the buffers present in biological materials and natural waters. Rainwater samples collected during several precipitation events at Argonne National Laboratory during October and November 1975 have been analyzed for pH, acid and base neutralizing properties, and the ions of ammonium, nitrate, chloride, sulfate, and calcium. The results are tabulated

  3. Conjugated Fatty Acid Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawat, Richa; Yu, Xiao-Hong; Sweet, Marie; Shanklin, John

    2012-01-01

    Conjugated linolenic acids (CLNs), 18:3 Δ9,11,13, lack the methylene groups found between the double bonds of linolenic acid (18:3 Δ9,12,15). CLNs are produced by conjugase enzymes that are homologs of the oleate desaturases FAD2. The goal of this study was to map the domain(s) within the Momordica charantia conjugase (FADX) responsible for CLN formation. To achieve this, a series of Momordica FADX-Arabidopsis FAD2 chimeras were expressed in the Arabidopsis fad3fae1 mutant, and the transformed seeds were analyzed for the accumulation of CLN. These experiments identified helix 2 and the first histidine box as a determinant of conjugase product partitioning into punicic acid (18:3 Δ9cis,11trans,13cis) or α-eleostearic acid (18:3 Δ9cis,11trans,13trans). This was confirmed by analysis of a FADX mutant containing six substitutions in which the sequence of helix 2 and first histidine box was converted to that of FAD2. Each of the six FAD2 substitutions was individually converted back to the FADX equivalent identifying residues 111 and 115, adjacent to the first histidine box, as key determinants of conjugase product partitioning. Additionally, expression of FADX G111V and FADX G111V/D115E resulted in an approximate doubling of eleostearic acid accumulation to 20.4% and 21.2%, respectively, compared with 9.9% upon expression of the native Momordica FADX. Like the Momordica conjugase, FADX G111V and FADX D115E produced predominantly α-eleostearic acid and little punicic acid, but the FADX G111V/D115E double mutant produced approximately equal amounts of α-eleostearic acid and its isomer, punicic acid, implicating an interactive effect of residues 111 and 115 in punicic acid formation. PMID:22451660

  4. [Chemical Constituents from Leaves of Liquidambar formosana].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yuan-yue; Fu, Hui-zheng; Zhou, Guo-ping; Zhong, Rui-jian; Yuan, Hui; Guo, Qing; Yan, Qing-wei

    2014-12-01

    To study the chemical constituents of the leaves of Liquidambarformosana. The chemical constituents were isolated and purified by column chromatography on silicagel, Sephadex LH-20 and MPLC. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of physicochemical properties and special analysis. Eight compounds were isolated from the leaves of Liquidambar formosana, whose structures were elucidated as gallic acid (1), p-hydroxy-benzoic acid (2), 3-methoxy-4-hydroxy-benzoic acid (3), 3,5-dihydroxy-4-methoxy-benzoic acid (4) kaempferol (5), 3,4-dihydroxy-benzoic acid (6), 3,4-dihydroxy-5-methoxy-benzoic acid (7) and 3β,23,29-trihydroxy-olean-12-en-28-oic acid-β-D-glucopyranosyl ester (8). Compounds 1-8 are isolated from the leaves of Liquidambar formosana for the first time.

  5. Analysis of nine food additives in red wine by ion-suppression reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography using trifluoroacetic acid and ammonium acetate as ion-suppressors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yong-Gang; Chen, Xiao-Hong; Yao, Shan-Shan; Pan, Sheng-Dong; Li, Xiao-Ping; Jin, Mi-Cong

    2012-01-01

    A reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) method was developed for the simultaneous determination of nine food additives, i.e., acesulfame, saccharin, caffeine, aspartame, benzoic acid, sorbic acid, stevioside, dehydroacetic acid and neotame in red wine. The effects of ion-suppressors, i.e., trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) and ammonium acetate (AmAc) on retention behavior of nine food additives in RP-HPLC separation were discussed in detail. The relationships between retention factors of solutes and volume percent of ion-suppressors in the mobile-phase systems of acetonitrile-TFA aqueous solution and acetonitrile-TFA-AmAc aqueous solution were quantitatively established, respectively. The results showed that the ion suppressors had not only an ion suppression effect, but also an organic modification effect on the acidic analytes. The baseline separation of nine food additives was completed by a gradient elution with acetonitrile-TFA(0.01%, v/v)-AmAc(2.5 mmol L(-1)) aqueous solution as the mobile phase. The recoveries were between 80.2 - 99.5% for all analytes with RSDs in the range of 1.5 - 8.9%. The linearities were in the range of 0.2 - 100.0 mg L(-1) with determination coefficients (r(2)) higher than 0.9991 for all analytes. The limits of quantification (LOQs) were between 0.53 - 0.99 mg L(-1). The applicability of the proposed method to detect and quantify food additives has been demonstrated in the analysis of 30 real samples.

  6. Trans Fatty Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Ellin

    1997-09-01

    Fats and their various fatty acid components seem to be a perennial concern of nutritionists and persons concerned with healthful diets. Advice on the consumption of saturated, polyunsaturated, monounsaturated, and total fat bombards us from magazines and newspapers. One of the newer players in this field is the group of trans fatty acids found predominantly in partially hydrogenated fats such as margarines and cooking fats. The controversy concerning dietary trans fatty acids was recently addressed in an American Heart Association (AHA) science advisory (1) and in a position paper from the American Society of Clinical Nutrition/American Institute of Nutrition (ASCN/AIN) (2). Both reports emphasize that the best preventive strategy for reducing risk for cardiovascular disease and some types of cancer is a reduction in total and saturated fats in the diet, but a reduction in the intake of trans fatty acids was also recommended. Although the actual health effects of trans fatty acids remain uncertain, experimental evidence indicates that consumption of trans fatty acids adversely affects serum lipid levels. Since elevated levels of serum cholesterol and triacylglycerols are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease, it follows that intake of trans fatty acids should be minimized.

  7. Sulfuric Acid on Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Frozen sulfuric acid on Jupiter's moon Europa is depicted in this image produced from data gathered by NASA's Galileo spacecraft. The brightest areas, where the yellow is most intense, represent regions of high frozen sulfuric acid concentration. Sulfuric acid is found in battery acid and in Earth's acid rain. This image is based on data gathered by Galileo's near infrared mapping spectrometer.Europa's leading hemisphere is toward the bottom right, and there are enhanced concentrations of sulfuric acid in the trailing side of Europa (the upper left side of the image). This is the face of Europa that is struck by sulfur ions coming from Jupiter's innermost moon, Io. The long, narrow features that crisscross Europa also show sulfuric acid that may be from sulfurous material extruded in cracks. Galileo, launched in 1989, has been orbiting Jupiter and its moons since December 1995. JPL manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington DC. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA.

  8. Glycosyltransferase glycosylating flavokermesic acid and/or kermesic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    An isolated glycosyltransferase (GT) polypeptide capable of: (I) : conjugating glucose to flavokermesic acid (FK); and/or (II) : conjugating glucose to kermesic acid (KA) and use of this GT to e.g. make Carminic acid.......An isolated glycosyltransferase (GT) polypeptide capable of: (I) : conjugating glucose to flavokermesic acid (FK); and/or (II) : conjugating glucose to kermesic acid (KA) and use of this GT to e.g. make Carminic acid....

  9. GLYCOSYLTRANSFERASE GLYCOSYLATING FLAVOKERMESIC ACID AND/OR KERMESIC ACID

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    An isolated glycosyltransferase (GT) polypeptide capable of: (I): conjugating glucose to flavokermesic acid (FK); and/or (II): conjugating glucose to kermesic acid (KA) and use of this GT to e.g. make Carminic acid.......An isolated glycosyltransferase (GT) polypeptide capable of: (I): conjugating glucose to flavokermesic acid (FK); and/or (II): conjugating glucose to kermesic acid (KA) and use of this GT to e.g. make Carminic acid....

  10. Fusidic acid in dermatology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schöfer, Helmut; Simonsen, Lene

    1995-01-01

    Studies on the clinical efficacy of fusidic acid in skin and soft-tissue infections (SSTIs), notably those due to Staphylococcus aureus, are reviewed. Oral fusidic acid (tablets dosed at 250 mg twice daily, or a suspension for paediatric use at 20 mg/kg/day given as two daily doses) has shown good...... excellent results in infected eczema by addressing both inflammation and infection. A new lipid-rich combination formulation provides an extra moisturizing effect. Development of resistance to fusidic acid has remained generally low or short-lived and can be minimized by restricting therapy to no more than...

  11. octadecenoic acid in tomato

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    octadecenoic acid which is proba- bly involved in plant defense responses is synthesized in tomato fruits and subjected to metabo- lism. Its catabolism or conversion was thus further characterized. The endogenous level of.

  12. Folic acid in diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Institute of Medicine, Food and Nutrition Board. Dietary Reference Intakes: Thiamin, Riboflavin, Niacin, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin B12, Pantothenic Acid, Biotin, and Choline. National Academies Press. Washington, DC, 1998. PMID: 23193625 ...

  13. Amino Acids and Chirality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Jamie E.

    2012-01-01

    Amino acids are among the most heavily studied organic compound class in carbonaceous chondrites. The abundance, distributions, enantiomeric compositions, and stable isotopic ratios of amino acids have been determined in carbonaceous chondrites fi'om a range of classes and petrographic types, with interesting correlations observed between these properties and the class and typc of the chondritcs. In particular, isomeric distributions appear to correlate with parent bodies (chondrite class). In addition, certain chiral amino acids are found in enantiomeric excess in some chondrites. The delivery of these enantiomeric excesses to the early Earth may have contributed to the origin of the homochirality that is central to life on Earth today. This talk will explore the amino acids in carbonaceous chondritcs and their relevance to the origin of life.

  14. Amino acid racemisation dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray-Wallace, C.V.

    1999-01-01

    The potential of the time-dependent amino acid racemisation reaction as a method of age assessment was first reported by Hare and Abelson (1968). They noted that in specimens of the bivalve mollusc Mercenaria sp., greater concentrations of amino acids in the D-configuration with increasing fossil age. Hare and Abelson (1968) also reported negligible racemisation in a modern specimen of Mecanaria sp. On this basis they suggested that the extent of amino acid racemisation (epimerisation in the case of isoleucine) may be used to assess the age of materials within and beyond the range of radiocarbon dating. For the past thirty years amino acid racemisation has been extensively applied in Quaternary research as a method of relative and numeric dating, and a particularly large literature has emerged on the subject

  15. Hydrofluoric acid poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... mouth (intubation), and breathing machine (ventilator) Blood and urine tests Camera down the throat to see burns in the esophagus and the stomach (endoscopy) Fluids through a vein (IV) Magnesium and calcium solutions to neutralize the acid Medicines ...

  16. Acid Mine Drainage Treatment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fripp, Jon

    2000-01-01

    .... Acid mine drainage (AMD) can have severe impacts to aquatic resources, can stunt terrestrial plant growth and harm wetlands, contaminate groundwater, raise water treatment costs, and damage concrete and metal structures...

  17. Methylmalonic Acid Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Iron-binding Capacity (TIBC, UIBC) Trichomonas Testing Triglycerides Troponin Tryptase Tumor Markers Uric Acid Urinalysis Urine ... very small amounts and is necessary for human metabolism and energy production. In one step of metabolism, ...

  18. Neutron Nucleic Acid Crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatake, Toshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    The hydration shells surrounding nucleic acids and hydrogen-bonding networks involving water molecules and nucleic acids are essential interactions for the structural stability and function of nucleic acids. Water molecules in the hydration shells influence various conformations of DNA and RNA by specific hydrogen-bonding networks, which often contribute to the chemical reactivity and molecular recognition of nucleic acids. However, X-ray crystallography could not provide a complete description of structural information with respect to hydrogen bonds. Indeed, X-ray crystallography is a powerful tool for determining the locations of water molecules, i.e., the location of the oxygen atom of H2O; however, it is very difficult to determine the orientation of the water molecules, i.e., the orientation of the two hydrogen atoms of H2O, because X-ray scattering from the hydrogen atom is very small.Neutron crystallography is a specialized tool for determining the positions of hydrogen atoms. Neutrons are not diffracted by electrons, but are diffracted by atomic nuclei; accordingly, neutron scattering lengths of hydrogen and its isotopes are comparable to those of non-hydrogen atoms. Therefore, neutron crystallography can determine both of the locations and orientations of water molecules. This chapter describes the current status of neutron nucleic acid crystallographic research as well as the basic principles of neutron diffraction experiments performed on nucleic acid crystals: materials, crystallization, diffraction experiments, and structure determination.

  19. Fatty Acid Biosynthesis IX

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carey, E. M.; Hansen, Heinz Johs. Max; Dils, R.

    1972-01-01

    # 1. I. [I-14C]Acetate was covalently bound to rabbit mammary gland fatty acid synthetase by enzymic transacylation from [I-14C]acetyl-CoA. Per mole of enzyme 2 moles of acetate were bound to thiol groups and up to I mole of acetate was bound to non-thiol groups. # 2. 2. The acetyl-fatty acid...... synthetase complex was isolated free from acetyl-CoA. It was rapidly hydrolysed at 30°C, but hydrolysis was greatly diminished at o°C and triacetic lactone synthesis occurred. In the presence of malonyl-CoA and NADPH, all the acetate bound to fatty acid synthetase was incorporated into long-chain fatty acids....... Hydrolysis of bound acetate and incorporation of bound acetate into fatty acids were inhibited to the same extent by guanidine hydrochloride. # 3. 3. Acetate was also covalently bound to fatty acid synthetase by chemical acetylation with [I-14C]acetic anhydride in the absence of CoASH. A total of 60 moles...

  20. [Acids in coffee. XI. The proportion of individual acids in the total titratable acid].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhardt, U H; Maier, H G

    1985-07-01

    22 acids in ground roast coffees and instant coffees were determined by GLC of their silyl derivatives (after preseparation by gel electrophoresis) or isotachophoresis. The contribution to the total acidity (which was estimated by titration to pH 8 after cation exchange of the coffee solutions) was calculated for each individual acid. The mentioned acids contribute with 67% (roast coffee) and 72% (instant coffee) to the total acidity. In the first place citric acid (12.2% in roast coffee/10.7% in instant coffee), acetic acid (11.2%/8.8%) and the high molecular weight acids (8%/9%) contribute to the total acidity. Also to be mentioned are the shares of chlorogenic acids (9%/4.8%), formic acid (5.3%/4.6%), quinic acid (4.7%/5.9%), malic acid (3.9%/3%) and phosphoric acid (2.5%/5.2%). A notable difference in the contribution to total acidity between roast and instant coffee was found for phosphoric acid and pyrrolidonecarboxylic acid (0.7%/1.9%). It can be concluded that those two acids are formed or released from e.g. their esters in higher amounts than other acids during the production of instant coffee.

  1. Acidification and Acid Rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, S. A.; Veselã½, J.

    2003-12-01

    Air pollution by acids has been known as a problem for centuries (Ducros, 1845; Smith, 1872; Camuffo, 1992; Brimblecombe, 1992). Only in the mid-1900s did it become clear that it was a problem for more than just industrially developed areas, and that precipitation quality can affect aquatic resources ( Gorham, 1955). The last three decades of the twentieth century saw tremendous progress in the documentation of the chemistry of the atmosphere, precipitation, and the systems impacted by acid atmospheric deposition. Chronic acidification of ecosystems results in chemical changes to soil and to surface waters and groundwater as a result of reduction of base cation supply or an increase in acid (H+) supply, or both. The most fundamental changes during chronic acidification are an increase in exchangeable H+ or Al3+ (aluminum) in soils, an increase in H+ activity (˜concentration) in water in contact with soil, and a decrease in alkalinity in waters draining watersheds. Water draining from the soil is acidified and has a lower pH (=-log [H+]). As systems acidify, their biotic community changes.Acidic surface waters occur in many parts of the world as a consequence of natural processes and also due to atmospheric deposition of strong acid (e.g., Canada, Jeffries et al. (1986); the United Kingdom, Evans and Monteith (2001); Sweden, Swedish Environmental Protection Board (1986); Finland, Forsius et al. (1990); Norway, Henriksen et al. (1988a); and the United States (USA), Brakke et al. (1988)). Concern over acidification in the temperate regions of the northern hemisphere has been driven by the potential for accelerating natural acidification by pollution of the atmosphere with acidic or acidifying compounds. Atmospheric pollution ( Figure 1) has resulted in an increased flux of acid to and through ecosystems. Depending on the ability of an ecosystem to neutralize the increased flux of acidity, acidification may increase only imperceptibly or be accelerated at a rate that

  2. Inhibitory effect of ethanol, acetic acid, propionic acid and butyric acid on fermentative hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Bo; Wan, Wei; Wang, Jianlong [Laboratory of Environmental Technology, INET, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2008-12-15

    The inhibitory effect of added ethanol, acetic acid, propionic acid and butyric acid on fermentative hydrogen production by mixed cultures was investigated in batch tests using glucose as substrate. The experimental results showed that, at 35 C and initial pH 7.0, during the fermentative hydrogen production, the substrate degradation efficiency, hydrogen production potential, hydrogen yield and hydrogen production rate all trended to decrease with increasing added ethanol, acetic acid, propionic acid and butyric acid concentration from 0 to 300 mmol/L. The inhibitory effect of added ethanol on fermentative hydrogen production was smaller than those of added acetic acid, propionic acid and butyric acid. The modified Han-Levenspiel model could describe the inhibitory effects of added ethanol, acetic acid, propionic acid and butyric acid on fermentative hydrogen production rate in this study successfully. The modified Logistic model could describe the progress of cumulative hydrogen production. (author)

  3. The effect of organic acid mixture and bacterial inoculant on fermentation in laboratory silos of climper high moisture maize grain corn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Václav Pyrochta

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In the experiment, the effect of chemical (A and biological (B additiva on the fermentation quality of climper high moisture maize grain corn was examined, compared with the untreated control (K. The chemical means contained propionic, formic and benzoic acids and ammonium formate as effective substances. As effective substances of bacterial water–soluble inoculants, selected were bacterial strains of Propionibacterium shermanii JS and Lactobacillus casei LC-705. Both conservative preservatives were added equally to the ensilaged material. The addition of chemical additivum under conditions of our experiment increased statistically significantly (P<0.01 the contents of acetic acid (7.66±0.95 g/kg DM, ethanol (11.22±0.65 g/kg DM and pH values (4.33±0.02 in experimental silages. Simultaneously, a statistically significant (P<0.01 inhibition of lactic acid formation (15.17±2.75 g/kg DM and of total content of all fermentation acids (22.33±2.38 g/kg DM occurred. The bacterial inoculant increased significantly (P<0.05 the content of lactic acid (26.78±2.63 g/kg DM and the total acid content (32.87±2.88 g/kg DM in inoculated silages. The inoculation positive effect was demonstrated highly significantly (P<0.01 in reduction of ethanol amount (2.14±0.40 g/kg DM and of totat acidification. The pH value (4.21±0.02 was significantly lower (P<0.05 than that in the control silage (4.24±0.02. The fermentation characteristics in the inoculated silages by us were more favourable. The addition of organic acid mixture in the used concentration of 3.5 L/t did not confirm the positive effect on climper maize grain corn quality as expected.

  4. Fulltext PDF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mn(II) complexes with bipyridine, phenanthroline and benzoic acid: Biological and catalase-like activity. Ibrahim Kani, Özlem Atlier and Kiymet Güven . . . . . . . . . 523–536. Five Mn(II) complexes of 2,2´-bipyridine / 1,10´-phenanthroline and benzoic acid have been synthesized and characterized through X-ray crystallography.

  5. The effects of different preservation methods on the quality of nunu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The chemical preservatives used were sodium benzoate and benzoic acid (1% concentration, w/v of sample). Sodium benzoate proved to be the most effective of all methods of preservation. The microbial count was significantly reduced (p < 0.05) and there were very slight biochemical changes. Benzoic acid was also ...

  6. Amino acids in the sedimentary humic and fulvic acids

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sardessai, S.

    Humic and fulvic acids isolated from a few sediment samples from Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal were analysed for total hydrolysable amino acids concentration and their composition. The amono acids content of fulvic acids was higher than in the humic...

  7. Synthesis and anticonvulsant activity of novel bicyclic acidic amino acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conti, Paola; De Amici, Marco; Joppolo Di Ventimiglia, Samuele

    2003-01-01

    Bicyclic acidic amino acids (+/-)-6 and (+/-)-7, which are conformationally constrained homologues of glutamic acid, were prepared via a strategy based on a 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition. The new amino acids were tested toward ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptor subtypes; both of them...

  8. Amino-acid contamination of aqueous hydrochloric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolman, Y.; Miller, S. L.

    1971-01-01

    Considerable amino-acid contamination in commercially available analytical grade hydrochloric acid (37% HCl) was found. One bottle contained 8,300 nmol of amino-acids per liter. A bottle from another supplier contained 6,700 nmol per liter. The contaminants were mostly protein amino-acids and several unknowns. Data on the volatility of the amino-acids during HCl distillation were also obtained.

  9. Domoic Acid Epileptic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John S. Ramsdell

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Domoic acid epileptic disease is characterized by spontaneous recurrent seizures weeks to months after domoic acid exposure. The potential for this disease was first recognized in a human case study of temporal lobe epilepsy after the 1987 amnesic shellfish-poisoning event in Quebec, and was characterized as a chronic epileptic syndrome in California sea lions through investigation of a series of domoic acid poisoning cases between 1998 and 2006. The sea lion study provided a breadth of insight into clinical presentations, unusual behaviors, brain pathology, and epidemiology. A rat model that replicates key observations of the chronic epileptic syndrome in sea lions has been applied to identify the progression of the epileptic disease state, its relationship to behavioral manifestations, and to define the neural systems involved in these behavioral disorders. Here, we present the concept of domoic acid epileptic disease as a delayed manifestation of domoic acid poisoning and review the state of knowledge for this disease state in affected humans and sea lions. We discuss causative mechanisms and neural underpinnings of disease maturation revealed by the rat model to present the concept for olfactory origin of an epileptic disease; triggered in dendodendritic synapases of the olfactory bulb and maturing in the olfactory cortex. We conclude with updated information on populations at risk, medical diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis.

  10. Biodegradation of Cyanuric Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldick, Jerome

    1974-01-01

    Cyanuric acid biodegrades readily under a wide variety of natural conditions, and particularly well in systems of either low or zero dissolved-oxygen level, such as anaerobic activated sludge and sewage, soils, muds, and muddy streams and river waters, as well as ordinary aerated activated sludge systems with typically low (1 to 3 ppm) dissolved-oxygen levels. Degradation also proceeds in 3.5% sodium chloride solution. Consequently, there are degradation pathways widely available for breaking down cyanuric acid discharged in domestic effluents. The overall degradation reaction is merely a hydrolysis; CO2 and ammonia are the initial hydrolytic breakdown products. Since no net oxidation occurs during this breakdown, biodegradation of cyanuric acid exerts no primary biological oxygen demand. However, eventual nitrification of the ammonia released will exert its usual biological oxygen demand. PMID:4451360

  11. Acid rain in Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatti, Neeloo; Streets, David G.; Foell, Wesley K.

    1992-07-01

    Acid rain has been an issue of great concern in North America and Europe during the past several decades. However, due to the passage of a number of recent regulations, most notably the Clean Air Act in the United States in 1990, there is an emerging perception that the problem in these Western nations is nearing solution. The situation in the developing world, particularly in Asia, is much bleaker. Given the policies of many Asian nations to achieve levels of development comparable with the industrialized world—which necessitate a significant expansion of energy consumption (most derived from indigenous coal reserves)—the potential for the formation of, and damage from, acid deposition in these developing countries is very high. This article delineates and assesses the emissions patterns, meteorology, physical geology, and biological and cultural resources present in various Asian nations. Based on this analysis and the risk factors to acidification, it is concluded that a number of areas in Asia are currently vulnerable to acid rain. These regions include Japan, North and South Korea, southern China, and the mountainous portions of Southeast Asia and southwestern India. Furthermore, with accelerated development (and its attendant increase in energy use and production of emissions of acid deposition precursors) in many nations of Asia, it is likely that other regions will also be affected by acidification in the near future. Based on the results of this overview, it is clear that acid deposition has significant potential to impact the Asian region. However, empirical evidence is urgently needed to confirm this and to provide early warning of increases in the magnitude and spread of acid deposition and its effects throughout this part of the world.

  12. Whither Acid Rain?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Brimblecombe

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Acid rain, the environmental cause célèbre of the 1980s seems to have vanished from popular conscience. By contrast, scientific research, despite funding difficulties, has continued to produce hundreds of research papers each year. Studies of acid rain taught much about precipitation chemistry, the behaviour of snow packs, long-range transport of pollutants and new issues in the biology of fish and forested ecosystems. There is now evidence of a shift away from research in precipitation and sulfur chemistry, but an impressive theoretical base remains as a legacy.

  13. 2-(Benzylcarbamoylnicotinic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Cao Mao

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, C14H12N2O3, the pyridine ring is twisted with respect to the phenyl ring and the carboxylic acid group at angles of 37.1 (5 and 8.1 (3°, respectively; the phenyl ring forms a dihedral angle of 41.4 (1° with the mean plane of the C—NH—C=O fragment. An intramolecular O—H...O hydrogen bond occurs between the carboxylic acid and carbonyl groups. In the crystal, N—H...O hydrogen bonds link molecules into a supramolecular chain running along the a-axis direction.

  14. Boric acid concentration monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kysela, J.; Mickal, V.; Racek, J.

    1978-01-01

    Boric acid concentration was measured by thermal neutron absorption in the study of the boric acid sorption and desorption curves on an anion exchange resin. Ra-Be 18.5 GBq and Am-Be 111 GBq sources and water as a moderator were used. The SNM 12 cylindrical corona detector with 10 B placed in the middle of the measuring cell was used for neutron flux measurement. The HP 9600 E computer system was used for measured data collection and evaluation. (Ha)

  15. Omega-3 fatty acids: new insights into the pharmacology and biology of docosahexaenoic acid, docosapentaenoic acid, and eicosapentaenoic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Michael H

    2013-12-01

    Fish oil contains a complex mixture of omega-3 fatty acids, which are predominantly eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosapentaenoic acid, and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Each of these omega-3 fatty acids has distinct biological effects that may have variable clinical effects. In addition, plasma levels of omega-3 fatty acids are affected not only by dietary intake, but also by the polymorphisms of coding genes fatty acid desaturase 1-3 for the desaturase enzymes that convert short-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids to long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids. The clinical significance of this new understanding regarding the complexity of omega-3 fatty acid biology is the purpose of this review. FADS polymorphisms that result in either lower levels of long-chain omega-3 fatty acids or higher levels of long-chain omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids, such as arachidonic acid, are associated with dyslipidemia and other cardiovascular risk factors. EPA and DHA have differences in their effects on lipoprotein metabolism, in which EPA, with a more potent peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha effect, decreases hepatic lipogenesis, whereas DHA not only enhances VLDL lipolysis, resulting in greater conversion to LDL, but also increases HDL cholesterol and larger, more buoyant LDL particles. Overall, these results emphasize that blood concentrations of individual long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, which reflect both dietary intake and metabolic influences, may have independent, but also complementary- biological effects and reinforce the need to potentially provide a complex mixture of omega-3 fatty acids to maximize cardiovascular risk reduction.

  16. Catalytic acetoxylation of lactic acid to 2-acetoxypropionic acid, en route to acrylic acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beerthuis, R.; Granollers, M.; Brown, D.R.; Salavagione, H.J.; Rothenberg, G.; Shiju, N.R.

    2015-01-01

    We present an alternative synthetic route to acrylic acid, starting from the platform chemical lactic acid and using heterogeneous catalysis. To improve selectivity, we designed an indirect dehydration reaction that proceeds via acetoxylation of lactic acid to 2-acetoxypropionic acid. This

  17. The Acid-Base Titration of a Very Weak Acid: Boric Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celeste, M.; Azevedo, C.; Cavaleiro, Ana M. V.

    2012-01-01

    A laboratory experiment based on the titration of boric acid with strong base in the presence of d-mannitol is described. Boric acid is a very weak acid and direct titration with NaOH is not possible. An auxiliary reagent that contributes to the release of protons in a known stoichiometry facilitates the acid-base titration. Students obtain the…

  18. Usnic acid controls the acidity tolerance of lichens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauck, Markus; Juergens, Sascha-Rene

    2008-01-01

    The hypotheses were tested that, firstly, lichens producing the dibenzofuran usnic acid colonize substrates characterized by specific pH ranges, secondly, this preferred pH is in a range where soluble usnic acid and its corresponding anion occur in similar concentrations, and thirdly, usnic acid makes lichens vulnerable to acidity. Lichens with usnic acid prefer an ambient pH range between 3.5 and 5.5 with an optimum between 4.0 and 4.5. This optimum is close to the pK a1 value of usnic acid of 4.4. Below this optimum pH, dissolved SO 2 reduces the chlorophyll fluorescence yield more in lichens with than without their natural content of usnic acid. This suggests that usnic acid influences the acidity tolerance of lichens. The putative mechanism of the limited acidity tolerance of usnic acid-containing lichens is the acidification of the cytosol by molecules of protonated usnic acid shuttling protons through the plasma membrane at an apoplastic pH a1 . - Combined field and experimental data suggest that usnic acid makes lichens sensitive to acidity at pH <3.5

  19. Oxalic acid excretion after intravenous ascorbic acid administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robitaille, Line; Mamer, Orval A.; Miller, Wilson H.; Levine, Mark; Assouline, Sarit; Melnychuk, David; Rousseau, Caroline; Hoffer, L. John

    2012-01-01

    Ascorbic acid is frequently administered intravenously by alternative health practitioners and, occasionally, by mainstream physicians. Intravenous administration can greatly increase the amount of ascorbic acid that reaches the circulation, potentially increasing the risk of oxalate crystallization in the urinary space. To investigate this possibility, we developed gas chromatography mass spectrometry methodology and sampling and storage procedures for oxalic acid analysis without interference from ascorbic acid and measured urinary oxalic acid excretion in people administered intravenous ascorbic acid in doses ranging from 0.2 to 1.5 g/kg body weight. In vitro oxidation of ascorbic acid to oxalic acid did not occur when urine samples were brought immediately to pH less than 2 and stored at –30°C within 6 hours. Even very high ascorbic acid concentrations did not interfere with the analysis when oxalic acid extraction was carried out at pH 1. As measured during and over the 6 hours after ascorbic acid infusions, urinary oxalic acid excretion increased with increasing doses, reaching approximately 80 mg at a dose of approximately 100 g. We conclude that, when studied using correct procedures for sample handling, storage, and analysis, less than 0.5% of a very large intravenous dose of ascorbic acid is recovered as urinary oxalic acid in people with normal renal function. PMID:19154961

  20. Comparison of Buffer Effect of Different Acids During Sandstone Acidizing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shafiq, Mian Umer; Mahmud, Hisham Khaled Ben; Hamid, Mohamed Ali

    2015-01-01

    The most important concern of sandstone matrix acidizing is to increase the formation permeability by removing the silica particles. To accomplish this, the mud acid (HF: HCl) has been utilized successfully for many years to stimulate the sandstone formations, but still it has many complexities. This paper presents the results of laboratory investigations of different acid combinations (HF: HCl, HF: H 3 PO 4 and HF: HCOOH). Hydrofluoric acid and fluoboric acid are used to dissolve clays and feldspar. Phosphoric and formic acids are added as a buffer to maintain the pH of the solution; also it allows the maximum penetration of acid into the core sample. Different tests have been performed on the core samples before and after the acidizing to do the comparative study on the buffer effect of these acids. The analysis consists of permeability, porosity, color change and pH value tests. There is more increase in permeability and porosity while less change in pH when phosphoric and formic acids were used compared to mud acid. From these results it has been found that the buffer effect of phosphoric acid and formic acid is better than hydrochloric acid. (paper)

  1. Synthesis of acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinic acid from 5-bromo levulinic acid esters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moens, Luc

    2003-06-24

    A process of preparing an acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinc acid comprising: a) dissolving a lower alkyl 5-bromolevulinate and hexamethylenetetramine in a solvent selected from the group consisting of water, ethyl acetate, chloroform, acetone, ethanol, tetrahydrofuran and acetonitrile, to form a quaternary ammonium salt of the lower alkyl 5-bromolevulinate; and b) hydrolyzing the quaternary ammonium salt with an inorganic acid to form an acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinic acid.

  2. Acid Ceramidase in Melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Realini, Natalia; Palese, Francesca; Pizzirani, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Acid ceramidase (AC) is a lysosomal cysteine amidase that controls sphingolipid signaling by lowering the levels of ceramides and concomitantly increasing those of sphingosine and its bioactive metabolite, sphingosine 1-phosphate. In the present study, we evaluated the role of AC-regulated sphing...

  3. Accidents with sulfuric acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajković Miloš B.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Sulfuric acid is an important industrial and strategic raw material, the production of which is developing on all continents, in many factories in the world and with an annual production of over 160 million tons. On the other hand, the production, transport and usage are very dangerous and demand measures of precaution because the consequences could be catastrophic, and not only at the local level where the accident would happen. Accidents that have been publicly recorded during the last eighteen years (from 1988 till the beginning of 2006 are analyzed in this paper. It is very alarming data that, according to all the recorded accidents, over 1.6 million tons of sulfuric acid were exuded. Although water transport is the safest (only 16.38% of the total amount of accidents in that way 98.88% of the total amount of sulfuric acid was exuded into the environment. Human factor was the common factor in all the accidents, whether there was enough control of the production process, of reservoirs or transportation tanks or the transport was done by inadequate (old tanks, or the accidents arose from human factor (inadequate speed, lock of caution etc. The fact is that huge energy, sacrifice and courage were involved in the recovery from accidents where rescue teams and fire brigades showed great courage to prevent real environmental catastrophes and very often they lost their lives during the events. So, the phrase that sulfuric acid is a real "environmental bomb" has become clearer.

  4. Salicylic Acid Topical

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the package label for more information.Apply a small amount of the salicylic acid product to one or two small areas you want to treat for 3 days ... know that children and teenagers who have chicken pox or the flu should not use topical salicylic ...

  5. Multifunctional Cinnamic Acid Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aikaterini Peperidou

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Our research to discover potential new multitarget agents led to the synthesis of 10 novel derivatives of cinnamic acids and propranolol, atenolol, 1-adamantanol, naphth-1-ol, and (benzylamino ethan-1-ol. The synthesized molecules were evaluated as trypsin, lipoxygenase and lipid peroxidation inhibitors and for their cytotoxicity. Compound 2b derived from phenoxyphenyl cinnamic acid and propranolol showed the highest lipoxygenase (LOX inhibition (IC50 = 6 μΜ and antiproteolytic activity (IC50 = 0.425 μΜ. The conjugate 1a of simple cinnamic acid with propranolol showed the higher antiproteolytic activity (IC50 = 0.315 μΜ and good LOX inhibitory activity (IC50 = 66 μΜ. Compounds 3a and 3b, derived from methoxylated caffeic acid present a promising combination of in vitro inhibitory and antioxidative activities. The S isomer of 2b also presented an interesting multitarget biological profile in vitro. Molecular docking studies point to the fact that the theoretical results for LOX-inhibitor binding are identical to those from preliminary in vitro study.

  6. Koetjapic acid chloroform hemisolvate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. D. Nassar

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The asymmetric unit of the title compound, C30H46O4·0.5CHCl3, consists of one koetjapic acid [systematic name: (3R,4aR,4bS,7S,8S,10bS,12aS-7-(2-carboxyethyl-3,4b,7,10b,12a-pentamethyl-8-(prop-1-en-2-yl-1,2,3,4,4a,4b,5,6,7,8,9,10,10b,11,12,12a-hexadecahydrochrysene-3-carboxylic acid] molecule and one half-molecule of chloroform solvent, which is disordered about a twofold rotation axis. The symmetry-independent component is further disordered over two sites, with occupancies of 0.30 and 0.20. The koetjapic acid contains a fused four-ring system, A/B/C/D. The A/B, B/C and C/D junctions adopt E/trans/cis configurations, respectively. The conformation of ring A is intermediate between envelope and half-chair and ring B adopts an envelope conformation whereas rings C and D adopt chair conformations. A weak intramolecular C—H...O hydrogen bond is observed. The koetjapic acid molecules are linked into dimers by two pairs of intermolecular O—H...O hydrogen bonds. The dimers are stacked along the c axis.

  7. Acid dip for dosemeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, J.C.; McWhan, A.F.

    1982-01-01

    Background signal in a PTFE based dosemeter caused by impurities in the PTFE and in the active component such as lithium fluoride is substantially reduced by treating the dosemeter with acid. The optimum treatment involves use of hydrofluoric acid at room temperature for approximately one minute, followed by thorough washing with methanol, and finally drying. This treatment is best applied after the original manufacture of the dosemeters. It may also be applied to existing dosemeters after they have been in use for some time. The treatment produces a permanent effect in reducing both the light induced signal and the non-light induced signal. The process may be applied to all types of dosemeter manufactured from PTFE or other plastics or resins which are able to resist brief exposure to acid. The treatment works particularly well with dosemeters based on PTFE and lithium fluoride. It is also applicable to dosemeters based on calcium sulphate, lithium borate and magnesium borate. Acids which may be used include hydrofluoric, hydrochloric, nitric, phosphoric and sulphuric. (author)

  8. Hyaluronic Acid Assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Itenov, Theis Skovsgaard; Kirkby, Nikolai S; Bestle, Morten H

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUD: Hyaluronic acid (HA) is proposed as a marker of functional liver capacity. The aim of the present study was to compare a new turbidimetric assay for measuring HA with the current standard method. METHODS: HA was measured by a particle-enhanced turbidimetric immunoassay (PETIA) and enzyme...

  9. Halogenated fatty acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mu, Huiling; Sundin, Peter; Wesén, Clas

    1997-01-01

    Halogenated fatty acids are the major contributors to organohalogen compounds in lipids of marine mammals, fish, and bivalves. For the initial characterization of these recently noticed compounds, a determination of the halogen concentration has usually been combined with some lipid isolation and...

  10. and amino acids

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    (L-Trp), were obtained from Sigma Chemical Company (USA). All the metal ions Cu(II),. Ni(II) and .... respective free amino acids show characteristic band positions, shifts and intensities, which can be correlated to ..... Financial support from the University Grants Commission, New Delhi to Prof P Rabindra. Reddy is gratefully ...

  11. [Acid hydrolysis of mandioca].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, A J; Schneiderman, B; Baruffaldi, R; Nacco, R

    1975-01-01

    The influence of time of hydrolysis, pression of the process, ratio of mass of flour and volume and concentration of the acid solution was studied in the hydrolytic processes for Cassava flour. The aim was to obtain fermentable sugars, and the results were submitted to variance analysis.

  12. Hurnic acid protein complexation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, W. F.; Koopal, L. K.; Weng, L. P.; van Riemsdijk, W. H.; Norde, W.

    2008-01-01

    Interactions of purified Aldrich humic acid (PAHA) with lysozyme (LSZ) are investigated. In solution LSZ is moderately positively and PAHA negatively charged at the investigated pH values. The proton binding of PAHA and of LSZ is determined by potentiometric proton titrations at various KCl

  13. Nanoclusters of Cyanuric Acid

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hydrogen bonding; molecular clusters; cyanuric acid; self-assembly; symmetry. ... Chemical Laboratory, CSIR-Central Leather Research Institute, Adyar, Chennai 600 020, India; Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721, USA; Indian Institute of Science Education and ...

  14. Proton and deuterium NMR experiments in zero field. [Perdeuterated p-demethoxybenzene, perdeuterated malonic acid, diethyl terephthalate-d4, nonadecane-2,2'-D2, sodium propionate-D2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millar, J.M.

    1986-02-01

    High field solid-state NMR lineshapes suffer from inhomogeneous broadening since resonance frequencies are a function of molecular orientation. Time domain zero field NMR is a two-dimensional field-cycling technique which removes this broadening by probing the evolution of the spin system under zero applied field. The simplest version, the sudden transition experiment, induces zero field evolution by the sudden removal of the applied magnetic field. Theory and experimental results of this experiment and several variations using pulsed dc magnetic fuelds to initiate zero field evolution are presented. In particular, the pulsed indirect detection method allows detection of the zero field spectrum of one nuclear spin species via another (usually protons) by utilizing the level crossings which occur upon adiabatic demagnetization to zero field. Experimental examples of proton/deuteron systems are presented which demonstrate the method results in enhanced sensitivity relative to that obtained in sudden transition experiments performed directly on deuterium. High resolution /sup 2/H NQR spectra of a series of benzoic acid derivatives are obtained using the sudden transition and indirect detection methods. Librational oscillations in the water molecules of barium chlorate monohydrate are studied using proton and deuterium ZF experiments. 177 refs., 88 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Kainic acid and 1'-hydroxykainic acid from Palmariales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, U P; Bird, C J; Shacklock, P F; Laycock, M V; Wright, J L

    1994-01-01

    The distribution of kainic acid among various red algae was investigated. Analysis of free amino acids from different populations of Palmaria palmata showed that some were unable to accumulate kainic acid to detectable concentrations, whereas in two dwarf mutants it was a major component of the free amino acid composition. The amino acid profiles were also examined for unknown amino acids in the search for possible intermediates in kainic acid biosynthesis. The only unknown amino acid present in P. palmata extracts was isolated and identified by NMR spectroscopy as 1'-hydroxykainic acid. This compound was found in all samples that contained kainic acid. To investigate the effect of growth conditions on kainic acid production different strains of P. palmata were grown at 5, 10, and 15 degrees C with or without added nitrate. No effect on production was observed, suggesting that the growth conditions in these experiments do not affect the level of gene expression in the pathway of kainic acid biosynthesis. Furthermore, changing the growth conditions did not induce synthesis of kainic acid in the non-producing strains of Palmariales.

  16. Fatty acid-producing hosts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfleger, Brian F; Lennen, Rebecca M

    2013-12-31

    Described are hosts for overproducing a fatty acid product such as a fatty acid. The hosts include an exogenous nucleic acid encoding a thioesterase and, optionally, an exogenous nucleic acid encoding an acetyl-CoA carboxylase, wherein an acyl-CoA synthetase in the hosts are functionally delected. The hosts prefereably include the nucleic acid encoding the thioesterase at an intermediate copy number. The hosts are preferably recominantly stable and growth-competent at 37.degree. C. Methods of producing a fatty acid product comprising culturing such hosts at 37.degree. C. are also described.

  17. Progress in engineering acid stress resistance of lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chongde; Huang, Jun; Zhou, Rongqing

    2014-02-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are widely used for the production of a variety of fermented foods, and are considered as probiotic due to their health-promoting effect. However, LAB encounter various environmental stresses both in industrial fermentation and application, among which acid stress is one of the most important survival challenges. Improving the acid stress resistance may contribute to the application and function of probiotic action to the host. Recently, the advent of genomics, functional genomics and high-throughput technologies have allowed for the understanding of acid tolerance mechanisms at a systems level, and many method to improve acid tolerance have been developed. This review describes the current progress in engineering acid stress resistance of LAB. Special emphasis is placed on engineering cellular microenvironment (engineering amino acid metabolism, introduction of exogenous biosynthetic capacity, and overproduction of stress response proteins) and maintaining cell membrane functionality. Moreover, strategies to improve acid tolerance and the related physiological mechanisms are also discussed.

  18. Adipic acid tolerance screening for potential adipic acid production hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Emma; Mapelli, Valeria; Olsson, Lisbeth

    2017-02-01

    Biobased processes for the production of adipic acid are of great interest to replace the current environmentally detrimental petrochemical production route. No efficient natural producer of adipic acid has yet been identified, but several approaches for pathway engineering have been established. Research has demonstrated that the microbial production of adipic acid is possible, but the yields and titres achieved so far are inadequate for commercialisation. A plausible explanation may be intolerance to adipic acid. Therefore, in this study, selected microorganisms, including yeasts, filamentous fungi and bacteria, typically used in microbial cell factories were considered to evaluate their tolerance to adipic acid. Screening of yeasts and bacteria for tolerance to adipic acid was performed in microtitre plates, and in agar plates for A. niger in the presence of adipic acid over a broad range of concentration (0-684 mM). As the different dissociation state(s) of adipic acid may influence cells differently, cultivations were performed with at least two pH values. Yeasts and A. niger were found to tolerate substantially higher concentrations of adipic acid than bacteria, and were less affected by the undissociated form of adipic acid than bacteria. The yeast exhibiting the highest tolerance to adipic acid was Candida viswanathii, showing a reduction in maximum specific growth rate of no more than 10-15% at the highest concentration of adipic acid tested and the tolerance was not dependent on the dissociation state of the adipic acid. Tolerance to adipic acid was found to be substantially higher among yeasts and A. niger than bacteria. The explanation of the differences in adipic acid tolerance between the microorganisms investigated are likely related to fundamental differences in their physiology and metabolism. Among the yeasts investigated, C. viswanathii showed the highest tolerance and could be a potential host for a future microbial cell factory for adipic acid.

  19. Boswellic acid inhibits expression of acid sphingomyelinase in intestinal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duan Rui-Dong

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Boswellic acid is a type of triterpenoids with antiinflammatory and antiproliferative properties. Sphingomyelin metabolism generates multiple lipid signals affecting cell proliferation, inflammation, and apoptosis. Upregulation of acid sphingomyelinase (SMase has been found in several inflammation-related diseases such as inflammatory bowel diseases, atherosclerosis, and diabetes. Methods The present study is to examine the effect of 3-acetyl-11-keto-β-boswellic acids (AKBA, a potent boswellic acid, on acid SMase activity and expression in intestinal cells. Both transformed Caco-2 cells and non-transformed Int407 cells were incubated with AKBA. After incubation, the change of acid SMase activity was assayed biochemically, the enzyme protein was examined by Western blot, and acid SMase mRNA was quantified by qPCR. Results We found that AKBA decreased acid SMase activity in both intestinal cell lines in dose and time dependent manners without affecting the secretion of the enzyme to the cell culture medium. The effect of AKBA was more effective in the fetal bovine serum-free culture medium. Among different types of boswellic acid, AKBA was the most potent one. The inhibitory effect on acid SMase activity occurred only in the intact cells but not in cell-free extract in the test tubes. At low concentration, AKBA only decreased the acid SMase activity but not the quantity of the enzyme protein. However, at high concentration, AKBA decreased both the mass of acid SMase protein and the mRNA levels of acid SMase in the cells, as demonstrated by Western blot and qPCR, respectively. Under the concentrations decreasing acid SMase activity, AKBA significantly inhibited cell proliferation. Conclusion We identified a novel inhibitory effect of boswellic acids on acid SMase expression, which may have implications in human diseases and health.

  20. Selective hydrodeoxygenation of tartaric acid to succinic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Jiayi [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering; University of Delaware; Newark; USA; Catalysis Center for Energy Innovation; Vasiliadou, Efterpi S. [Catalysis Center for Energy Innovation; University of Delaware; Newark; USA; Goulas, Konstantinos A. [Catalysis Center for Energy Innovation; University of Delaware; Newark; USA; Saha, Basudeb [Catalysis Center for Energy Innovation; University of Delaware; Newark; USA; Vlachos, Dionisios G. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering; University of Delaware; Newark; USA; Catalysis Center for Energy Innovation

    2017-01-01

    A novel one-step process for the selective production of succinic acid from tartaric acid is developed. High succinic yield is achieved in an efficient catalytic system comprised of MoOx/BC, HBr and acetic acid under hydrogen atmosphere.

  1. Formic acid assisted hydrogenation of levulinic acid to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Muppala Ashokraju

    2018-02-07

    Feb 7, 2018 ... formic acid) as it is obtained through the hydrolysis of biomass that contains water. In this context, we have per- formed the hydrogenation of levulinic acid with formic acid in presence of water (LA: FA: H2O 1:5:1) and the results are displayed in Figure 7b. The results indicate better performance of the cat-.

  2. Acetic acid extraction from aqueous solutions using fatty acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    IJmker, H.M.; Gramblicka, M.; Kersten, Sascha R.A.; van der Ham, Aloysius G.J.; Schuur, Boelo

    2014-01-01

    A major challenge for production of acetic acid via bio-based routes is cost-effective concentration and purification of the acetic acid from the aqueous solutions, for which liquid–liquid extraction is a possible method. A main challenge in extraction of acetic acid from dilute aqueous solutions is

  3. Cytotoxic effect of betulinic acid and betulinic acid acetate isolated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cytotoxic effect of betulinic acid and betulinic acid acetate isolated from Melaleuca cajuput on human myeloid leukemia (HL-60) cell line. ... The cytotoxic effect of betulinic acid (BA), isolated from Melaleuca cajuput a Malaysian plant and its four synthetic derivatives were tested for their cytotoxicity in various cell line or ...

  4. (Radioiodinated free fatty acids)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, Jr., F. F.

    1987-12-11

    The traveler participated in the Second International Workshop on Radioiodinated Free Fatty Acids in Amsterdam, The Netherlands where he presented an invited paper describing the pioneering work at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) involving the design, development and testing of new radioiodinated methyl-branched fatty acids for evaluation of heart disease. He also chaired a technical session on the testing of new agents in various in vitro and in vivo systems. He also visited the Institute for Clinical and Experimental Nuclear Medicine in Bonn, West Germany, to review, discuss, plan and coordinate collaborative investigations with that institution. In addition, he visited the Cyclotron Research Center in Liege, Belgium, to discuss continuing collaborative studies with the Osmium-191/Iridium-191m radionuclide generator system, and to complete manuscripts and plan future studies.

  5. Acid hydrolysis of cellulose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salazar, H.

    1980-12-01

    One of the alternatives to increase world production of etha nol is by the hydrolysis of cellulose content of agricultural residues. Studies have been made on the types of hydrolysis: enzimatic and acid. Data obtained from the sulphuric acid hydrolysis of cellulose showed that this process proceed in two steps, with a yield of approximately 95% glucose. Because of increases in cost of alternatives resources, the high demand of the product and the more economic production of ethanol from cellulose materials, it is certain that this technology will be implemented in the future. At the same time further studies on the disposal and reuse of the by-products of this production must be undertaken.

  6. Bile acids for viral hepatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Weikeng; Liu, J; Gluud, C

    2007-01-01

    Trials have assessed bile acids for patients with viral hepatitis, but no consensus has been reached regarding their usefulness.......Trials have assessed bile acids for patients with viral hepatitis, but no consensus has been reached regarding their usefulness....

  7. Omega-3 fatty acids (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omega-3 fatty acids are a form of polyunsaturated fat that the body derives from food. Omega-3s (and omega-6s) are known as essential fatty acids (EFAs) because they are important for good health. ...

  8. Electrochemistry of nucleic acids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Paleček, Emil; Bartošík, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 112, č. 6 (2012), s. 3427-3481 ISSN 0009-2665 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP301/11/2055; GA MŠk(CZ) ME09038; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06035 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : nucleic acids electrochemistry * DNA biosensors * DNA damage Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 41.298, year: 2012

  9. Whence the acid raindrop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heaton, T.H.E.

    1987-01-01

    Absorption of NO 2 can cause damage in animals and plants and, if present trends for NO x emissions continue, their by-product nitric acid may soon overtake sulphuric acid as the main acidifying agent of 'acid' rain. In response to this problem the feasibility of reducing NO x emissions from power stations is being studied. Although there can be no doubt that these expensive controls are desirable, their benefits are difficult to predict for two reasons: NO x is not only emitted by fuel combustion and the degree to which an industrialised country benefits from the implementation of NO x emission controls depends on how much its pollutant 'fall out' is immediately returned from the atmosphere, and how much is exported to neighbouring countries. The above factors involve questions regarding the source and reaction mechanisms for nitrogen compounds in the atmosphere. Because stable isotope ratio analysis has proved to be of value in providing answers to such questions in other environments, an investigation of the 15 N/ 14 N ratios of atmospheric gases (NO x , NH 3 ) and their solution products in rain (NO 3 , NH + 4 ) seemed to be justified

  10. LACTIC ACID BACTERIA: PROBIOTIC APPLICATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    NEENA GARG

    2015-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) is a heterotrophic Gram-positive bacteria which under goes lactic acid fermentations and leads to production of lactic acid as an end product. LAB includes Lactobacillus, Leuconostoc, Pediococcus, Lactococcus and Streptococcus which are grouped together in the family lactobacillaceae. LAB shows numerous antimicrobial activities due to production of antibacterial and antifungal compounds such as organic acids, bacteriocins, diacetyl, hydrogen peroxide and reutrin. LA...

  11. Levulinic acid in organic synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timokhin, Boris V; Baransky, V A; Eliseeva, G D

    1999-01-01

    Data concerning the methods of synthesis, chemical transformations and application of levulinic acid are analysed and generalised. The wide synthetic potential of levulinic acid, particularly as a key compound in the synthesis of various heterocyclic systems, saturated and unsaturated ketones and diketones, difficultly accessible acids and other compounds is demonstrated. The accessibility of levulinic acid from hexose-containing wood-processing and agricultural wastes is noted. The bibliography includes 260 references.

  12. Acids and bases solvent effects on acid-base strenght

    CERN Document Server

    Cox, Brian G

    2013-01-01

    Acids and bases are ubiquitous in chemistry. Our understanding of them, however, is dominated by their behaviour in water. Transfer to non-aqueous solvents leads to profound changes in acid-base strengths and to the rates and equilibria of many processes: for example, synthetic reactions involving acids, bases and nucleophiles; isolation of pharmaceutical actives through salt formation; formation of zwitter- ions in amino acids; and chromatographic separation of substrates. This book seeks to enhance our understanding of acids and bases by reviewing and analysing their behaviour in non-aqueous solvents. The behaviour is related where possible to that in water, but correlations and contrasts between solvents are also presented.

  13. Macrocyclic polyether complexes of amino acids and amino acid salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bidzilya, V.A.; Oleksenko, LP.

    1985-01-01

    This paper deals with the isolation of the complexes formed between various types of amino acid derivatives and macrocyclic polyethers, and the characterisation of their physical and chemical properties. The study shows that macrocyclic polyethers form 1:1 complexes with amino acids and amino acid derivatives, and that these complexes can be isolated in pure form. Amino acids can be bound to these complexes in their anionic forms, in switterionic forms, as well as in their protonated forms. These types of complexes may be useful for the transport of amino acids or their derivatives across both synthetic and natural membranes

  14. Sequential injection redox or acid-base titration for determination of ascorbic acid or acetic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenghor, Narong; Jakmunee, Jaroon; Vilen, Michael; Sara, Rolf; Christian, Gary D; Grudpan, Kate

    2002-12-06

    Two sequential injection titration systems with spectrophotometric detection have been developed. The first system for determination of ascorbic acid was based on redox reaction between ascorbic acid and permanganate in an acidic medium and lead to a decrease in color intensity of permanganate, monitored at 525 nm. A linear dependence of peak area obtained with ascorbic acid concentration up to 1200 mg l(-1) was achieved. The relative standard deviation for 11 replicate determinations of 400 mg l(-1) ascorbic acid was 2.9%. The second system, for acetic acid determination, was based on acid-base titration of acetic acid with sodium hydroxide using phenolphthalein as an indicator. The decrease in color intensity of the indicator was proportional to the acid content. A linear calibration graph in the range of 2-8% w v(-1) of acetic acid with a relative standard deviation of 4.8% (5.0% w v(-1) acetic acid, n=11) was obtained. Sample throughputs of 60 h(-1) were achieved for both systems. The systems were successfully applied for the assays of ascorbic acid in vitamin C tablets and acetic acid content in vinegars, respectively.

  15. Excitatory amino acid receptor antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, T N; Frydenvang, Karla Andrea; Ebert, B

    1997-01-01

    We have previously shown that (RS)-2-amino-2-(5-tert-butyl-3-hydroxyisoxazol-4-yl)acetic acid (ATAA) is an antagonist at N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) and (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazol-4-yl)propionic acid (AMPA) receptors. We have now resolved ATAA via diastereomeric salt formation...

  16. Pantothenic acid biosynthesis in zymomonas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, Luan; Tomb, Jean-Francois; Viitanen, Paul V.

    2014-07-01

    Zymomonas is unable to synthesize pantothenic acid and requires this essential vitamin in growth medium. Zymomonas strains transformed with an operon for expression of 2-dehydropantoate reductase and aspartate 1-decarboxylase were able to grow in medium lacking pantothenic acid. These strains may be used for ethanol production without pantothenic acid supplementation in seed culture and fermentation media.

  17. Fumaric acid production by fermentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roa Engel, C.A.; Straathof, A.J.J.; Zijlmans, T.W.; Van Gulik, W.M.; Van der Wielen, L.A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract The potential of fumaric acid as a raw material in the polymer industry and the increment of cost of petroleum-based fumaric acid raises interest in fermentation processes for production of this compound from renewable resources. Although the chemical process yields 112% w/w fumaric acid

  18. Waste acid detoxification and reclamation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brouns, T.M.; Stewart, T.L.

    1988-01-01

    Economically feasible processes that reduce the volume, quantity, and toxicity of metal-bearing waste acids by reclaiming, reusing, and recycling spent acids and metal salts are being developed and demonstrated. The acids used in the demonstrations are generated during metal-finishing operations used in nuclear fuel fabrication; HF-HNO 3 , HNO 3 , and HNO 3 -H 2 SO 4 wastes result from Zr etching, Cu stripping, and chemical milling of U. At discharge, wastes contain high concentrations of acid and one major metal impurity. The waste minimization process used to reclaim acid from these three streams incorporates three processes for acid regeneration and reclamation. Normally, HNO 3 remains in the bottoms when an aqueous acid solution is distilled; however, in the presence of H 2 SO 4 , HNO 3 will distill to the overhead stream. In this process, nitrates and fluorides present as free acid and metal salts can be reclaimed as acid for recycle to the metal-finishing processes. Uranium present in the chemical milling solution can be economically recovered from distillation bottoms and refined. Using acid distillation, the volume of chemical milling solution discharged as waste can be reduced by as much as 60% depending on the H 2 SO 4 concentration. A payback period of 2.2 years has been estimated for this process. The development and demonstration of precipitation and distillation processes for detoxification and reclamation of waste acid is supported by the US Department of Energy's Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program (HAZWRAP)

  19. Acidic aerosol in urban air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuda, M.; Yamaoka, S.; Miyazaki, T.; Oka, M.

    1982-01-01

    The distribution and chemical composition of acidic aerosol in Osaka City were investigated. Samples were collected at five sites in the city from June to September, 1979. Acidic aerosol was determined by the acid-base titration method, sulfate ion by barium chloride turbidimetry, nitrate ion by the xylenol method, and chloride ion by the mercury thiocyanate method. The concentration of acidic aerosol at five sites ranged from 7.7 micrograms per cubic meter to 10.0 micrograms per cubic meter, but mean concentrations in the residential area were slightly higher than those in the industrial area. When acidic aerosol concentrations were compared with concentrations of sulfate, nitrate, and chloride ions, a significant correlation was found between acidic aerosol and sulfate ion. The sum of the ion equivalents of the three types showed good correlation with the acidic aerosol equivalent during the whole period.

  20. Adsorption of humic acid on acid-activated Greek bentonite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doulia, Danae; Leodopoulos, Ch; Gimouhopoulos, K; Rigas, F

    2009-12-15

    The adsorption of humic acid on bentonite from Milos Island (Greece) acid-treated with dilute H(2)SO(4) solutions over a concentration range between 0.25 and 13M has been studied. Bentonite activated with 3M sulfuric acid (AAS) showed a higher efficiency in removing humic acid from aqueous solutions and was selected for further investigation. The specific surface area of acid-activated bentonite was estimated using the methylene blue adsorption method. The morphology of untreated, activated, and HA-sorbed bentonite was studied under scanning electron microscope (SEM). The effects of contact time, adsorbate concentration, adsorbent dose, and temperature on the adsorption of humic acid onto bentonite activated with 3M H(2)SO(4) were studied using a batch adsorption technique. Acidic pH and high ionic strength proved to be favorable for the adsorption efficiency. Pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, and intraparticle diffusion models were used to describe the kinetic data and the rate constants were evaluated. The experimental isotherm data were analyzed using Langmuir, Freundlich, and Temkin equations and the isotherm constants were determined. Thermodynamic parameters (DeltaH(o), DeltaS(o), and DeltaG(o)) of adsorption of humic acid onto acid-activated bentonite with 3M sulfuric acid were also evaluated.

  1. Cytenamide acetic acid solvate

    OpenAIRE

    Johnston, Andrea; Florence, Alastair J.; Fabianni, Francesca J. A.; Shankland, Kenneth; Bedford, Colin T.

    2008-01-01

    In the crystal structure of the title compound (systematic name: 5H-dibenzo[a,d]cycloheptatriene-5-carboxamide ethanoic acid solvate), C16H13NO C2H4O2, the cytenamide and solvent molecules form a hydrogen-bonded R2 2(8) dimer motif, which is further connected to form a centrosymmetric double ring motif arrangement. The cycloheptene ring adopts a boat conformation and the dihedral angle between the leastsquares planes through the two aromatic rings is 54.7 (2) . peer...

  2. Crassulacean acid metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas David Geydan

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available A review of Crassulacean acid metabolism is presented, characterized by showing the occurrence, activity and plasticity of these complex mechanism at the physiological, biochemical and molecular level, framed by the presence of the denominated four phases in CAM and its repercussion and expression due to different stresses in an ecological context. The basic enzymes, and metabolites necessary for the optional functioning of CAM are presented as well as their mode of action and cellular control. Finally, it is shown how environmental conditions and molecular signalling mediate the phenotypic plasticity.

  3. New Acid Combination for a Successful Sandstone Acidizing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiq, M. U.; Mahmud, H. K. B.; Rezaee, R.

    2017-05-01

    With the development of new enhanced oil recovery techniques, sandstone acidizing has been introduced and played a pivotal role in the petroleum industry. Different acid combinations have been applied, which react with the formation, dissolve the soluble particles; thus increase the production of hydrocarbons. To solve the problems which occurred using current preflush sandstone acidizing technology (hydrochloric acid); a new acid combination has been developed. Core flooding experiments on sandstone core samples with dimensions 1.5 in. × 3 in. were conducted at a flow rate of 2 cm3/min. A series of hydrochloric-acetic acid mixtures with different ratios were tested under 150°F temperature. The core flooding experiments performed are aimed to dissolve carbonate, sodium, potassium and calcium particles from the core samples. These experiments are followed by few important tests which include, porosity-permeability, pH value, Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) analysis and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR measurements). All the results are compared with the results of conventional hydrochloric acid technology. NMR and porosity analysis concluded that the new acid combination is more effective in creating fresh pore spaces and thus increasing the reservoir permeability. It can be seen from the pore distribution before and after the acidizing. Prior applying acid; the large size of pores appears most frequently in the pore distribution while with the applied acid, it was found that the small pore size is most the predominant of the pore distribution. These results are validated using ICP analysis which shows the effective removal of calcium and other positive ions from the core sample. This study concludes that the combination of acetic-hydrochloric acid can be a potential candidate for the preflush stage of sandstone acidizing at high temperature reservoirs.

  4. Simultaneous liquid-chromatographic quantitation of salicylic acid, salicyluric acid, and gentisic acid in urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cham, B E; Bochner, F; Imhoff, D M; Johns, D; Rowland, M

    1980-01-01

    We have developed a specific and sensitive method for the determination of salicylic acid, salicyluric acid, and gentisic acid in urine. Any proteins present are precipitated with methyl cyanide. After centrifugation, an aliquot of the supernate is directly injected into an octadecyl silane reversed-phase chromatographic column, then eluted with a mixture of water, butanol, acetic acid, and sodium sulfate, and quantitated at 313 nm by ultraviolet detection according to peak-height ratios (with internal standard, o-methoxybenzoic acid) or peak heights (no internal standard). The method allows estimates within 25 min. Sensitivity was 0.2 mg/L for gentisic acid, and 0.5 mg/L for both salicyluric and salicylic acid (20-micro L injection volume); response was linear with concentration to at least 2.000 g/L for salicylic acid and metabolites. Analytical recovery of salicylic acid and metabolites from urine is complete. Intra-assay precision (coefficient of variation) is 5.52% at 7.5 mg/L for salicylic acid, 5.01% at 9.33 mg/L for salicyluric acid, and 3.07% at 7.96 mg/L for gentisic acid. Interassay precision is 7.32% at 7.51 mg/L for salicylic acid, 5.52% at 8.58 mg/L for salicyluric acid, and 3.97% at 8.32 mg/L for gentisic acid. We saw no significant interference in urine from patients being treated with various drugs other than aspirin.

  5. Vibrational structure of the polyunsaturated fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid and arachidonic acid studied by infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Johannes; Noack, Kristina; Bartelmess, Juergen; Walter, Christian; Dörnenburg, Heike; Leipertz, Alfred

    2010-02-01

    The spectroscopic discrimination of the two structurally similar polyunsaturated C 20 fatty acids (PUFAs) 5,8,11,14,17-eicosapentaenoic acid and 5,8,11,14-eicosatetraenoic acid (arachidonic acid) is shown. For this purpose their vibrational structures are studied by means of attenuated total reflection (ATR) Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. The fingerprint regions of the recorded spectra are found to be almost identical, while the C-H stretching mode regions around 3000 cm -1 show such significant differences as results of electronic and molecular structure alterations based on the different degree of saturation that both fatty acids can be clearly distinguished from each other.

  6. Solid acid catalysis from fundamentals to applications

    CERN Document Server

    Hattori, Hideshi

    2014-01-01

    IntroductionTypes of solid acid catalystsAdvantages of solid acid catalysts Historical overviews of solid acid catalystsFuture outlookSolid Acids CatalysisDefinition of acid and base -Brnsted acid and Lewis acid-Acid sites on surfacesAcid strengthRole of acid sites in catalysisBifunctional catalysisPore size effect on catalysis -shape selectivity-Characterization of Solid Acid Catalysts Indicator methodTemperature programmed desorption (TPD) of ammoniaCalorimetry of adsorption of basic moleculesInfrare

  7. Maleic acid and succinic acid in fermented alcoholic beverages are the stimulants of gastric acid secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teyssen, S; González-Calero, G; Schimiczek, M; Singer, M V

    1999-03-01

    Alcoholic beverages produced by fermentation (e.g., beer and wine) are powerful stimulants of gastric acid output and gastrin release in humans. The aim of this study was to separate and specify the gastric acid stimulatory ingredients in alcoholic beverages produced by fermentation. Yeast-fermented glucose was used as a simple model of fermented alcoholic beverages; it was stepwise separated by different methods of liquid chromatography, and each separated solution was tested in human volunteers for its stimulatory action on gastric acid output and gastrin release. Five substances were detected by high-performance liquid chromatography and were analyzed by mass spectrometry and 1H-13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. At the end of the separation process of the five identified substances, only the two dicarboxylic acids, maleic acid and succinic acid, had a significant (P fermented glucose, respectively), but not on gastrin release. When given together, they increased gastric acid output by 100% of fermented glucose and by 95% of maximal acid output. We therefore conclude that maleic acid and succinic acid are the powerful stimulants of gastric acid output in fermented glucose and alcoholic beverages produced by fermentation, and that gastrin is not their mediator of action.

  8. Effect of baseline plasma fatty acids on eicosapentaenoic acid levels in individuals supplemented with alpha-linolenic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFilippis, Andrew P; Harper, Charles R; Cotsonis, George A; Jacobson, Terry A

    2009-01-01

    We previously reported a >50% increase in mean plasma eicosapentaenoic acid levels in a general medicine clinic population after supplementation with alpha-linolenic acid. In the current analysis, we evaluate the variability of changes in eicosapentaenoic acid levels among individuals supplemented with alpha-linolenic acid and evaluated the impact of baseline plasma fatty acids levels on changes in eicosapentaenoic acid levels in these individuals. Changes in eicosapentaenoic acid levels among individuals supplemented with alpha-linolenic acid ranged from a 55% decrease to a 967% increase. Baseline plasma fatty acids had no statistically significant effect on changes in eicosapentaenoic levels acid after alpha-linolenic acid supplementation. Changes in eicosapentaenoic acid levels varied considerably in a general internal medicine clinic population supplemented with alpha-linolenic acid. Factors that may impact changes in plasma eicosapentaenoic acid levels after alpha-linolenic acid supplementation warrant further study.

  9. Uric acid nephrolithiasis: An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicerello, Elisa

    2018-04-01

    Uric acid nephrolithiasis appears to increase in prevalence. While a relationship between uric acid stones and low urinary pH has been for long known, additional association with various metabolic conditions and pathophysiological basis has recently been elucidated. Some conditions such as diabetes and metabolic syndrome disease, excessive dietary intake, and increased endogenous uric acid production and/or defect in ammoniagenesis are associated with low urinary pH. In addition, the phenomenon of global warming could result in an increase in areas with greater climate risk for uric acid stone formation. There are three therapeutic steps to be taken for management of uric acid stones: identification of urinary pH profiles, assessment of urinary volume status, and identification of disorders leading to excessive uric acid production. However, the most important factor for uric acid stone formation is acid urinary pH, which is a prerequisite for uric acid precipitation. This article reviews recent insights into the pathophysiology of uric acid stones and their management.

  10. Dissociation of weak acids during Gran plot free acidity titrations

    OpenAIRE

    Lindberg, Steven E:; Cole, Jan M.

    2011-01-01

    A comparison of weak and free acid concentrations measured by base titration and hydrogen ionactivities determined by direct pH measurement is described for several of our data sets for raincollected above and below a forest canopy in the eastern United States. These data illustrate theinfluence of weak acid dissociation during titration and the possible effect of activity coefficientson calculated free acid concentrations.DOI: 10.1111/j.1600-0889.1984.tb00240.x

  11. Electrolytic nature of aqueous sulfuric acid. 2. Acidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraenkel, Dan

    2012-09-27

    In part 1 of this study, I reported that the Debye-Hückel limiting law and the smaller-ion shell (SiS) model of strong electrolyte solutions fit nicely with the experimental mean ionic activity coefficient (γ(±)) of aqueous sulfuric acid as a function of concentration and of temperature when the acid is assumed to be a strong 1-3 electrolyte. Here, I report that the SiS-derived activity coefficient of H(+), γ(H(+)), of the 1-3 acid is comparable to that of aqueous HCl. This agrees with titration curves showing, as well-known, that sulfuric acid in water is parallel in strength to aqueous HCl. The calculated pH is in good accord with the Hammett acidity function, H(0), of aqueous sulfuric acid at low concentration, and differences between the two functions at high concentration are discussed and explained. This pH-H(0) relation is consistent with the literature showing that the H(0) of sulfuric acid (in the 1-9 M range) is similar to those of HCl and the other strong mineral monoprotic acids. The titration of aqueous sulfuric acid with NaOH does not agree with the known second dissociation constant of 0.010 23; rather, the constant is found to be ~0.32 and the acid behaves upon neutralization as a strong diprotic acid practically dissociating in one step. A plausible reaction pathway is offered to explain how the acid may transform, upon base neutralization, from a dissociated H(4)SO(5) (as 3H(+) and HSO(5)(3-)) to a dissociated H(2)SO(4) even though the equilibrium constant of the reaction H(+) + HSO(5)(3-) ↔ SO(4)(2-) + H(2)O, at 25 °C, is 10(-37) (part 1).

  12. Adipic acid tolerance screening for potential adipic acid production hosts

    OpenAIRE

    Karlsson, Emma; Mapelli, Valeria; Olsson, Lisbeth

    2017-01-01

    Background Biobased processes for the production of adipic acid are of great interest to replace the current environmentally detrimental petrochemical production route. No efficient natural producer of adipic acid has yet been identified, but several approaches for pathway engineering have been established. Research has demonstrated that the microbial production of adipic acid is possible, but the yields and titres achieved so far are inadequate for commercialisation. A plausible explanation ...

  13. Counter current extraction of phosphoric acid: Food grade acid production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shlewit, H.; AlIbrahim, M.

    2009-01-01

    Extraction, scrubbing and stripping of phosphoric acid from the Syrian wet-phosphoric acid was carried out using Micro-pilot plant of mixer settler type of 8 l/h capacity. Tributyl phosphate (TBP)/di-isopropyl ether (DIPE) in kerosene was used as extractant. Extraction and stripping equilibrium curves were evaluated. The number of extraction and stripping stages to achieve the convenient and feasible yield was determined. Detailed flow sheet was suggested for the proposed continuous process. Data obtained include useful information for the design of phosphoric acid extraction plant. The produced phosphoric acid was characterized using different analytical techniques. (author)

  14. Phytanic acid metabolism in health and disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wanders, Ronald J. A.; Komen, Jasper; Ferdinandusse, Sacha

    2011-01-01

    Phytanic acid (3,7,11,15-tetramethylhexadecanoic acid) is a branched-chain fatty acid which cannot be beta-oxidized due to the presence of the first methyl group at the 3-position. Instead, phytanic acid undergoes alpha-oxidation to produce pristanic acid (2,6,10,14-tetramethylpentadecanoic acid)

  15. 49 CFR 173.158 - Nitric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nitric acid. 173.158 Section 173.158... Nitric acid. (a) Nitric acid exceeding 40 percent concentration may not be packaged with any other material. (b) Nitric acid in any concentration which does not contain sulfuric acid or hydrochloric acid as...

  16. Acid mine drainage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigham, Jerry M.; Cravotta, Charles A.

    2016-01-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) consists of metal-laden solutions produced by the oxidative dissolution of iron sulfide minerals exposed to air, moisture, and acidophilic microbes during the mining of coal and metal deposits. The pH of AMD is usually in the range of 2–6, but mine-impacted waters at circumneutral pH (5–8) are also common. Mine drainage usually contains elevated concentrations of sulfate, iron, aluminum, and other potentially toxic metals leached from rock that hydrolyze and coprecipitate to form rust-colored encrustations or sediments. When AMD is discharged into surface waters or groundwaters, degradation of water quality, injury to aquatic life, and corrosion or encrustation of engineered structures can occur for substantial distances. Prevention and remediation strategies should consider the biogeochemical complexity of the system, the longevity of AMD pollution, the predictive power of geochemical modeling, and the full range of available field technologies for problem mitigation.

  17. Synthesis of aminoaldonic acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Christel Thea

    With the aim of synthesising aminoaldonic acids, two 2-acetamido-2-deoxyaldonolactones with D-galacto (6) and D-arabino (11) configuration were prepared from acetylated sugar formazans in analogy with a known procedure. Empolying the same procedure to acetylated sugar phenylhydrazones gave mixtures......,4-lactone, respectively. A 2,3-aziridino-2,3-dideoxypentonamide 70 was also prepared from D-glucono-1,5-lactone. The lactones were converted into methyl 3,4-O-isopropylidene-2-O-sulfonyl esters 42, 50, 62 and 68, which upon treatment with concentrated aqueous ammonia yielded the aziridino compounds...... and 82, respectively. The aminolactone 84 was converted into the corresponding amino sugar 89.With the aim of synthesising substrates for the Pictet-Spengler reaction three 4-aldehydo acetamidodideoxytetronolactones 92, 97 and 103 were prepared by periodate cleavage of the corresponding hexonolactones...

  18. Uranium extraction from phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo Figueiredo, C. de

    1984-01-01

    The recovery of uranium from phosphoric liquor by two extraction process is studied. First, uranium is reduced to tetravalent condition and is extracted by dioctypyrophosphoric acid. The re-extraction is made by concentrated phosphoric acid with an oxidizing agent. The re-extract is submitted to the second process and uranium is extracted by di-ethylhexilphosphoric acid and trioctylphosphine oxide. (M.A.C.) [pt

  19. Acid digestion of organic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capp, P.D.

    1988-01-01

    To overcome the high temperatures involved in straight incineration of organic waste and the difficulty of extracting actinides from the ash various research establishments throughout the world, including Winfrith and Harwell in the UK, have carried out studies on an alternative chemical combustion method known as acid digestion. The basis of the technique is to digest the waste in concentrated sulphuric acid containing a few percent of nitric acid at a temperature of about 250 0 C. Acid digestion residues consist mainly of non-refractory inorganic sulphates and oxides from which any actinide materials can easily be extracted. (author)

  20. Antibiofilm Properties of Acetic Acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Alhede, Morten; Jensen, Peter Østrup

    2014-01-01

    of the infected implant, tissue, or organ and thereby the biofilm. Acetic acid is known for its antimicrobial effect on bacteria in general, but has never been thoroughly tested for its efficacy against bacterial biofilms. In this article, we describe complete eradication of both Gram-positive and Gram......-negative biofilms using acetic acid both as a liquid and as a dry salt. In addition, we present our clinical experience of acetic acid treatment of chronic wounds. In conclusion, we here present the first comprehensive in vitro and in vivo testing of acetic acid against bacterial biofilms....