WorldWideScience

Sample records for benzodiazepines risk abuse

  1. Use and abuse of benzodiazepines*

    OpenAIRE

    1983-01-01

    Benzodiazepines are widely used for the treatment of anxiety, insomnia, and certain neuromuscular and convulsive disorders. However, their widespread availability has given rise to fears that they are over-prescribed. The problem is compounded by the fact that there is no universal agreement among medical practitioners as to the clinical indications warranting the use of these drugs. Although most industrialized countries exercise control over the sale and manufacture of benzodiazepines, many...

  2. Benzodiazepines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... longer duration of action are utilized to treat insomnia in patients with daytime anxiety. These benzodiazepines ... of abuse Abuse is frequently associated with adolescents and young adults who take the drug orally or crush it ...

  3. Genetic Markers of a Munc13 Protein Family Member, BAIAP3, Are Gender Specifically Associated with Anxiety and Benzodiazepine Abuse in Mice and Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Wojcik, Sonja M; Tantra, Martesa; Stepniak, Beata; Man, Kwun-nok M; Müller-Ribbe, Katja; Begemann, Martin; Ju, Anes; Papiol, Sergi; Ronnenberg, Anja; Gurvich, Artem; Shin, Yong; Augustin, Iris; Brose, Nils; Ehrenreich, Hannelore

    2013-01-01

    Anxiety disorders and substance abuse, including benzodiazepine use disorder, frequently occur together. Unfortunately, treatment of anxiety disorders still includes benzodiazepines, and patients with an existing comorbid benzodiazepine use disorder or a genetic susceptibility for benzodiazepine use disorder may be at risk of adverse treatment outcomes. The identification of genetic predictors for anxiety disorders, and especially for benzodiazepine use disorder, could aid the selection of th...

  4. Drugs of abuse and benzodiazepines in the Madrid Region (Central Spain): seasonal variation in river waters, occurrence in tap water and potential environmental and human risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, A; Rodríguez-Gil, J L; González-Alonso, S; Mastroianni, N; López de Alda, M; Barceló, D; Valcárcel, Y

    2014-09-01

    This work analyzes the seasonal variation (winter and summer) of ten drugs of abuse, six metabolites and three benzodiazepines in surface waters from the Jarama and Manzanares Rivers in the Madrid Region, the most densely populated area in Spain. The occurrence of these compounds in tap water in this region is also investigated and a preliminary human health risk characterization performed for those substances found in tap water. Finally, a screening level risk assessment that combines the measured environmental concentrations (MECs) with dose-response data to estimate Hazard Quotients (HQs) for the compounds studied is also presented. The results of this study show the presence of fourteen out of the nineteen compounds analyzed in winter and twelve of them in summer. The most ubiquitous compounds, with a frequency of detection of 100% in both seasons, were the cocaine metabolite benzoylecgonine (BE), the amphetamine-type stimulant (ATS) ephedrine (EPH), the opioid methadone (METH), the METH metabolite 2-ethylene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine (EDDP), and the three benzodiazepines investigated, namely alprazolam (ALP), diazepam (DIA) and lorazepam (LOR). The highest concentrations observed corresponded to EPH (1020ngL(-1) in winter and 250ngL(-1) in summer). The only compounds not detected in both seasons were heroin (HER) and its metabolite 6-acetylmorphine (6ACM), lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) and its metabolite 2-oxo-3-hydroxy-LSD (O-H-LSD), and Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). In terms of overall concentration, all sampling points presented higher concentrations in winter than in summer. Statistical analyses performed to gather evidence concerning occasional seasonal differences in the concentrations of individual substances between summer and winter showed statistically significantly higher concentrations (pmetabolite 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH) were present in at least one of the sampling sites in a concentration leading

  5. Occurrence of drugs of abuse and benzodiazepines in river waters from the Madrid Region (Central Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, A; López de Alda, M; González-Alonso, S; Mastroianni, N; Barceló, D; Valcárcel, Y

    2014-01-01

    This work investigates, for the first time, the occurrence of 10 drugs of abuse, six metabolites, and three benzodiazepines in surface waters from the Jarama and Manzanares Rivers in the Madrid Region, the most densely populated area in Spain and one of the most densely populated in Europe. The results of this study have shown the presence of 14 out of the 19 compounds analyzed at concentrations ranging from 1.45 to 1020 ng L(-1). The most ubiquitous compounds, found in 100% of the samples, were the cocaine metabolite benzoylecgonine (BE), the amphetamine-like compound ephedrine (EPH), the opioids morphine (MOR), methadone (METH), and the METH metabolite 2-ethylene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine (EDDP), and the three investigated benzodiazepines alprazolam (ALP), diazepam (DIA) and lorazepam (LOR). Meanwhile, the largest concentrations observed corresponded to EPH (up to 1020 ng L(-1)), BE (823 ng L(-1)), EDDP (151 ng L(-1)), and LOR (167 ng L(-1)). The only not detected compounds were heroin (HER) and its metabolite 6-acetylmorphine (6ACM), lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) and its metabolite 2-oxo-3-hydroxy-LSD (OH-LSD), and Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Overall, the levels measured are comparatively higher than those previously reported in Europe. Comparison of the results obtained for samples collected on different days (Thursday and Sunday) did not show meaningful differences between weekdays and weekends. The lack of (eco)toxicological data does not permit to predict or disregard potential adverse effects on wildlife. Risk assessment in humans would require further knowledge, not currently available, on exposure to these compounds through other routes like drinking water and/or food. PMID:24083902

  6. Genetic markers of a Munc13 protein family member, BAIAP3, are gender specifically associated with anxiety and benzodiazepine abuse in mice and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojcik, Sonja M; Tantra, Martesa; Stepniak, Beata; Man, Kwun-Nok M; Müller-Ribbe, Katja; Begemann, Martin; Ju, Anes; Papiol, Sergi; Ronnenberg, Anja; Gurvich, Artem; Shin, Yong; Augustin, Iris; Brose, Nils; Ehrenreich, Hannelore

    2013-01-01

    Anxiety disorders and substance abuse, including benzodiazepine use disorder, frequently occur together. Unfortunately, treatment of anxiety disorders still includes benzodiazepines, and patients with an existing comorbid benzodiazepine use disorder or a genetic susceptibility for benzodiazepine use disorder may be at risk of adverse treatment outcomes. The identification of genetic predictors for anxiety disorders, and especially for benzodiazepine use disorder, could aid the selection of the best treatment option and improve clinical outcomes. The brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor I-associated protein 3 (Baiap3) is a member of the mammalian uncoordinated 13 (Munc13) protein family of synaptic regulators of neurotransmitter exocytosis, with a striking expression pattern in amygdalae, hypothalamus and periaqueductal gray. Deletion of Baiap3 in mice leads to enhanced seizure propensity and increased anxiety, with the latter being more pronounced in female than in male animals. We hypothesized that genetic variation in human BAIAP3 may also be associated with anxiety. By using a phenotype-based genetic association study, we identified two human BAIAP3 single-nucleotide polymorphism risk genotypes (AA for rs2235632, TT for rs1132358) that show a significant association with anxiety in women and, surprisingly, with benzodiazepine abuse in men. Returning to mice, we found that male, but not female, Baiap3 knockout (KO) mice develop tolerance to diazepam more quickly than control animals. Analysis of cultured Baiap3 KO hypothalamus slices revealed an increase in basal network activity and an altered response to diazepam withdrawal. Thus, Baiap3/BAIAP3 is gender specifically associated with anxiety and benzodiazepine use disorder, and the analysis of Baiap3/BAIAP3-related functions may help elucidate mechanisms underlying the development of both disorders. PMID:23698091

  7. Use of benzodiazepines or benzodiazepine related drugs and the risk of cancer: a population-based case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pottegård, Anton; Friis, Søren; Andersen, Morten;

    2013-01-01

    AIM: Studies of the carcinogenic potential of benzodiazepines and related drugs (BZRD) have been equivocal. A recent study reported a 35% excess cancer risk among users of hypnotics, including benzodiazepines. METHOD: Using Danish nationwide registers, we conducted a matched case-control study of...... 1.01, 2.02), liver 1.81 (95% CI 1.18, 2.80), lung 1.38 (95% CI 1.23, 1.54), pancreas 1.35 (95% CI 1.02, 1.79) and kidney 1.39 (95% CI 1.01, 1.91). For tobacco-related cancers, the OR was 1.15 (95% CI 1.09, 1.22) and for the remaining cancer sites 1.01 (95% CI 0.94, 1.08). Sub-group analyses revealed...

  8. Benzodiazepine Misuse in the Elderly: Risk Factors, Consequences, and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airagnes, Guillaume; Pelissolo, Antoine; Lavallée, Mélanie; Flament, Martine; Limosin, Frédéric

    2016-10-01

    Benzodiazepine (BZD) inappropriate use (i.e., misuse and overuse) is a worldwide public health problem. Despite current knowledge about increased sensitivity to side effects in the elderly, that should lead to more caution, only a third of BZD prescriptions in this age group are considered appropriate. The most frequent inadequate situations are excessive duration and/or dosage of a medical prescription or self-medication, especially in a context where it would be contraindicated, e.g., long-acting BZD in the elderly. Polypharmacy and comorbidities are major risk factors. Consequences of BZD inappropriate use are falls, delirium and other cognitive dysfunction, acute respiratory failure, car accidents, dependence, and withdrawal symptoms. An emerging concern is a potentially increased risk of dementia. Contrary to most clinicians' belief, discontinuation of chronic BZD use in elderly patients is feasible, with adequate psychotherapeutic or pharmacological strategies, and can lead to long-term abstinence. Brief cognitive therapy mostly relies on psychoeducation and motivational enhancement and is particularly useful in this context. Further research is needed, notably in three areas: (1) assessing the impact of public health programs to prevent BZD inappropriate use in the elderly, (2) developing alternative strategies to treat anxiety and insomnia in elderly patients, and (3) exploring the association between chronic BZD use and dementia. PMID:27549604

  9. Long-Term Use of Benzodiazepines: Implications and guidelines

    OpenAIRE

    Potts, Nicholas L.S.; K Ranga R Krishnan

    1992-01-01

    Problems associated with physical dependence and abuse of benzodiazepines by a small percentage of patients have reduced their popularity from the most commonly prescribed psychoactive drug in the 1970s to being prescribed for mainly short periods. Patients who benefit from long-term benzodiazepine use are nearly ignored by the medical community as a whole. This article details what patient population can improve from long-term benzodiazepine therapy, the risks and benefits of treatment, and ...

  10. Assessing the efficacy of melatonin to curtail benzodiazepine/Z drug abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinali, Daniel P; Golombek, Diego A; Rosenstein, Ruth E; Brusco, Luis I; Vigo, Daniel E

    2016-07-01

    The abuse of benzodiazepine (BZP) and Z drugs has become, due to the tolerance and dependence they produce, a serious public health problem. Thirty years ago, we demonstrated in experimental animals the interaction of melatonin with central BZD receptors, and in 1997 we published the first series of elderly patients who reduced BZP consumption after melatonin treatment. Almost every single neuron in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN), the central pacemaker of the circadian system, contains γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and many results in animals point out to a melatonin interaction with GABA-containing neurons. In addition, central-type BZD antagonism, that obliterates GABAA receptor function, blunted most behavioral effects of melatonin including sleep. Melatonin is involved in the regulation of human sleep. This is supported by the temporal relationship between the rise of plasma melatonin levels and sleep propensity as well as by the sleep-promoting effects of exogenously administered melatonin. Both meta-analyses and consensus agreements give support to the therapeutic use of melatonin in sleep disorders. This action is attributed to MT1 and MT2 melatoninergic receptors localized in the SCN, as well as in other brain areas. This review discusses available data on the efficacy of melatonin to curtail chronic BZD/Z drug use in insomnia patients. A major advantage is that melatonin has a very safe profile, it is usually remarkably well tolerated and, in some studies, it has been administered to patients at very large doses and for long periods of time, without any potentiality of abuse. Further studies on this application of melatonin are warranted. PMID:26438969

  11. Types of abuse and risk factors associated with elder abuse

    OpenAIRE

    Lacher, Simone; Wettstein, Albert; Senn, Oliver; Rosemann, Thomas; Hasler, Susann

    2016-01-01

    PRINCIPLES Detecting elder abuse is challenging because it is a taboo, and many cases remain unreported. This study aimed to identify types of elder abuse and to investigate its associated risk factors. METHODS Retrospective analyses of 903 dossiers created at an Independent Complaints Authority for Old Age in the Canton of Zurich, Switzerland, from January 1, 2008 to October 31, 2012. Characteristics of victims and perpetrators, types of abuse, and associated risk factors related to...

  12. Inhalant abuse: youth at risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahern, Nancy R; Falsafi, Nasrin

    2013-08-01

    Inhalant abuse is a significant problem affecting many people, particularly youth. The easy availability of products containing volatile substances (e.g., aerosol sprays, cleaning products, paint) provides opportunity for mind-altering experiences. Unfortunately, serious complications such as brain, cardiovascular, liver, and renal damage or even death may ensue. Adolescents perceive the risk as low, and parents may be unaware of the risks. Health care providers, particularly psychiatric nurses, should undertake strategies of prevention, assessment, and treatment of this challenging problem. PMID:23786241

  13. Evaluating the risk of child abuse: the Child Abuse Risk Assessment Scale (CARAS)

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, KL

    2011-01-01

    The present study developed the Child Abuse Risk Assessment Scale (CARAS), an actuarial instrument for the assessment of the risk of physical child abuse. Data of 2,363 Chinese parents (47.7% male) living in Hong Kong were used in the analyses. Participants were individually interviewed with a questionnaire assessing their perpetration of child abuse and some theoretically or empirically tested factors associated with child abuse. Using the split-half validation procedure, the 5-factor, 64-it...

  14. Abuse and HIV-related risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, J D

    1995-04-01

    Research has been conducted on the effects of childhood abuse that may lead to HIV risk-taking behaviors in adolescence and adulthood. There is evidence of a higher incidence of childhood abuse among HIV-infected individuals and those at highest risk, but not enough evidence to confirm childhood abuse as a root cause of risk-taking. Research is beginning to show important connections between psychological trauma and risk, and to suggest therapeutic approaches. The trauma of childhood sexual abuse is retained by the victims, which can cause dissociative defenses and damaging feelings of self-efficacy which may affect safer sex practices. To identify sexual abuse as an issue in therapy, it is advised that counselors develop client histories regarding relationships, sexual expression and identity, substance use, suicidality, and other recurring self-destructive patterns of thought and behavior. The treatment goal is to assist the patient in understanding how abuse has affected feelings, thoughts, and relationship styles, and to recognize patterns that lead directly to HIV-related risk or that set the stage for risky activities. The critical aspect of treatment is to accurately assess the patient's coping skills when determining the course of treatment. ¿¿¿¿¿¿¿ PMID:11362459

  15. Evaluating the Risk of Child Abuse: The Child Abuse Risk Assessment Scale (CARAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Ko Ling

    2012-01-01

    The present study developed the Child Abuse Risk Assessment Scale (CARAS), an actuarial instrument for the assessment of the risk of physical child abuse. Data of 2,363 Chinese parents (47.7% male) living in Hong Kong were used in the analyses. Participants were individually interviewed with a questionnaire assessing their perpetration of child…

  16. Risk of hip fractures associated with benzodiazepines: Applying common protocol to a multi-database nested case-control study. The protect project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Requena, Gema; Logie, John; González-González, Rocío; Gardarsdottir, Helga; Afonso, Ana; Souverein, Patrick C.; Merino, Elisa Martin; Boudiaf, Nada; Huerta, Consuelo; Bate, Andrew; Alvarez, Yolanda; García-Rodríguez, Luis A.; Reynolds, Robert; Schlienger, Raymond G.; De Groot, Mark C.H.; Klungel, Olaf H.; De Abajo, Francisco J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The association between benzodiazepines (BZD) and hip fractures has been estimated in several observational studies although diverse methodologies and definitions have hampered comparability. Objectives: To evaluate the discrepancies in the risk estimates of hip/femur fractures associate

  17. Forensic aspect of elder abuse: risk factors and characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    Arash Ghodousi; Safa Maghsoodloo; Seyed Mohsen Sadat Hoseini

    2011-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to determine the types of elder abuse, their risk factors and the characteristics of abusers among abused elderly people aged above 60 years in Isfahan. Methods: In a cross-sectional study, abused elderly individuals aged above 60 years that referred to the centers of competent jurisdiction with complaint against a person harassing them were studied during 2008-2009. The demographic profiles of the abused and abusers were collected by physicians who worked in f...

  18. Benzodiazepine poisoning in elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perković-Vukčević Nataša

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Benzodiazepines are among the most frequently ingested drugs in self-poisonings. Elderly may be at greater risk compared with younger individuals due to impaired metabolism and increased sensitivity to benzodiazepines. The aim of this study was to assess toxicity of benzodiazepines in elderly attempted suicide. Methods. A retrospective study of consecutive presentations to hospital after self-poisoning with benzodiazepines was done. Collected data consisted of patient's characteristics (age, gender, benzodiazepine ingested with its blood concentrations at admission, clinical findings including vital signs and Glasgow coma score, routine blood chemistry, complications of poisoning, details of management, length of hospital stay and outcome. According the age, patients are classified as young (15-40-year old, middle aged (41-65-year old and elderly (older than 65. Results. During a 2-year observational period 387 patients were admitted because of pure benzodiazepine poisoning. The most frequently ingested drug was bromazepam, the second was diazepam. The incidence of coma was significantly higher, and the length of hospital stay significantly longer in elderly. Respiratory failure and aspiration pneumonia occurred more frequently in old age. Also, flumazenil was more frequently required in the group of elderly patients. Conclusion. Massive benzodiazepines overdose in elderly may be associated with a significant morbidity, including deep coma with aspiration pneumonia, respiratory failure, and even death. Flumazenil is indicated more often to reduce CNS depression and prevent complications of prolonged unconsciousness, but supportive treatment and proper airway management of comatose patients is the mainstay of the treatment of acute benzodiazepine poisoning.

  19. Phenobarbital compared to benzodiazepines in alcohol withdrawal treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Askgaard, Gro; Hallas, Jesper; Fink-Jensen, Anders; Molander, Anna Camilla; Madsen, Kenneth Grønkjær; Pottegård, Anton

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Long-acting benzodiazepines such as chlordiazepoxide are recommended as first-line treatment for alcohol withdrawal. These drugs are known for their abuse liability and might increase alcohol consumption among problem drinkers. Phenobarbital could be an alternative treatment option......, possibly with the drawback of a more pronounced acute toxicity. We evaluated if phenobarbital compared to chlordiazepoxide decreased the risk of subsequent use of benzodiazepines, alcohol recidivism and mortality. METHODS: The study was a register-based cohort study of patients admitted for alcohol...... withdrawal 1998-2013 and treated with either phenobarbital or chlordiazepoxide. Patients were followed for one year. We calculated hazard ratios (HR) for benzodiazepine use, alcohol recidivism and mortality associated with alcohol withdrawal treatment, while adjusting for confounders. RESULTS: A total of...

  20. Are Children More at Risk of Being Sexually Abused if Their Mothers Were Sexually Abused as Children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savich, Nancy L.

    Due to the increase in child sexual abuse allegations, it is essential to know possible predictors or risk factors to aid in prevention. This study examines the correlation between a mother who was sexually abused as a child and the increased risk of her children being sexually abused. The sample consisted of 60 child sexual abuse investigations…

  1. Relationships between parental alcohol abuse and social support, peer substance abuse risk and social support, and substance abuse risk among South Korean adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sookyung; Kim, Haeryun; Kim, Haesung

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the roles played by parental alcohol abuse and social support, peer substance abuse risk and social support, and substance abuse risk among adolescents in South Korea. Participants were adolescents between the ages of 15 and 22 years (mean, 18), residing in Seoul city and in surrounding Kyung-gi Province. Of 259 participants, 41.3% scored 2 or more on the POSIT scale, which suggested they met the problematic criteria for substance abuse risk. Logistic regression results suggested that the influence of social support on substance abuse risk among adolescents depended on the source of support--parents or peers. These findings need to be considered in the development of intervention programs for adolescents at risk for substance abuse. PMID:19435169

  2. Risk and Protection in the Perpetration of Child Abuse

    OpenAIRE

    Dodge, Kenneth A.

    2005-01-01

    Michelle Hughes and her colleagues provide a comprehensive and accurate summary of the literature on predictors of child abuse in this issue of the North Carolina Medical Journal.1 Their review is organized in layers that conform to an ecological model of the factors that lead someone to engage in abuse or neglect of a child. The factors are further organized into risk factors (those that increase the likelihood of abuse) and protective factors (those that buffer a parent from engaging in abu...

  3. Risk factors of abuse of parents by their ADHD children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanizadeh, Ahmad; Jafari, Peyman

    2010-01-01

    It is interesting that there is scant research of abuse of parents by their children and no study was found on the abuse of parents by their attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) children. Seventy-four children and adolescents suffering from ADHD and their parents were interviewed. The diagnoses were made according to DSM-IV diagnostic criteria. A questionnaire was developed to assess the children's abuse toward parents. More than half of the parents are suffering from at least one of the forms of abuse by their ADHD children. Scores of parental abuse were not related to gender. Different types of abuse correlated with oppositional defiant disorder (ODD), tic, and separation anxiety disorder (SAD). Fathers' and mothers' age, the level of education, and type of occupation were not risk factors of the abuse scores. ODD and mother's major depressive disorder were predictors of the abuse. There was a very disturbing high rate of abuse by children against parents. There is an interrelation of different forms of abuse. This study contributes to increasing awareness on the abuse of parents by their ADHD children. PMID:19820986

  4. Child Physical Abuse and Concurrence of Other Types of Child Abuse in Sweden--Associations with Health and Risk Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annerback, E. M.; Sahlqvist, L.; Svedin, C. G.; Wingren, G.; Gustafsson, P. A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine the associations between child physical abuse executed by a parent or caretaker and self-rated health problems/risk-taking behaviors among teenagers. Further to evaluate concurrence of other types of abuse and how these alone and in addition to child physical abuse were associated with bad health status and risk-taking…

  5. Risk of hip fractures associated with benzodiazepines: Applying common protocol to a multi-database nested case-control study. The protect project

    OpenAIRE

    Requena, Gema; Logie, John; González-González, Rocío; Gardarsdottir, Helga; Afonso, Ana; Souverein, Patrick C.; Merino, Elisa Martin; Boudiaf, Nada; Huerta, Consuelo; Bate, Andrew; Alvarez, Yolanda; García-Rodríguez, Luis A; Reynolds, Robert; Schlienger, Raymond G.; De Groot, Mark C.H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The association between benzodiazepines (BZD) and hip fractures has been estimated in several observational studies although diverse methodologies and definitions have hampered comparability. Objectives: To evaluate the discrepancies in the risk estimates of hip/femur fractures associated with BDZs across different databases and to assess the impact of different matching strategies. Methods: A case control study nested in a cohort of BZD users, examining their association with the...

  6. Elder Abuse and Neglect Risk Alleviation in Protective Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnes, David P R; Rizzo, Victoria M; Courtney, Erin

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about conditions associated with favorable elder mistreatment (EM) case outcomes. The fundamental goal of EM protective service programs is to alleviate risk associated with substantiated cases of elder abuse and neglect. Using the EM socio-cultural model, this study examined victim, perpetrator, victim-perpetrator relationship, social embeddedness, and socio-cultural factors predicting risk alleviation of EM cases. Data from a random sample of EM protective social service cases (n = 250) at a large community agency in New York City were collected and coded by multiple, independent raters. Multinomial and binary logistic regression were used to examine undifferentiated risk alleviation for the entire sample of EM cases as well as differentiated financial, emotional, and physical abuse sub-types. Undifferentiated EM risk alleviation was associated with male victim gender, older victim age, previous community help-seeking, and victim-perpetrator dyads characterized by a separate living arrangement and shorter term abuse longevity. Financial abuse cases with younger perpetrators were less likely to have risk reduction. Physical abuse risk reduction was less likely when the perpetrator was male and the victim-perpetrator dyad included different genders. Distinct findings across EM sub-types suggest a need to develop targeted practice strategies with clients experiencing different forms of EM. Findings highlight a need to develop EM protective service infrastructure around perpetrator rehabilitation. PMID:24407144

  7. Fathers and Maternal Risk for Physical Child Abuse

    OpenAIRE

    Guterman, Neil B.; Lee, Yookyong; Lee, Shawna J.; Waldfogel, Jane; Rathouz, Paul J.

    2009-01-01

    This study set out to examine father-related factors predicting maternal physical child abuse risk in a national birth cohort of 1,480 families. In-home and phone interviews were conducted with mothers when index children were 3 years old. Predictor variables included the mother–father relationship status; father demographic, economic, and psychosocial variables; and key background factors. Outcome variables included both observed and self-reported proxies of maternal physical child abuse ris...

  8. Risk Factors for Suicide Attempt in Drug Abusers

    OpenAIRE

    farideh faraji; Neda Kakayi; Mohammad Kazem Atef Vahid; Ahmad Sohraby; Samira Purghorbani

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The present study was conducted to identify risk and prediction factors of suicide attempts among drug abusers. Method: This causal-comparative study was conducted on 91 drug abusers that included 42 male and female suicide attempters and 49 male and female counterparts. Millon multi-axial personality inventory-II (MCMI-II), Dass-42 (depression, anxiety, stress), and coping styles inventory were used for data collection purposes. Results: The highest rate of suicide attempt was fou...

  9. Risk Factors for Suicide Attempt in Drug Abusers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    farideh faraji

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The present study was conducted to identify risk and prediction factors of suicide attempts among drug abusers. Method: This causal-comparative study was conducted on 91 drug abusers that included 42 male and female suicide attempters and 49 male and female counterparts. Millon multi-axial personality inventory-II (MCMI-II, Dass-42 (depression, anxiety, stress, and coping styles inventory were used for data collection purposes. Results: The highest rate of suicide attempt was found in young male drug abusers with these characteristics: single, junior school graduate, unemployed, suicide history, sex and physical abuse history during childhood, legal problems, suicide and self-injury witness, and violence and suicide in family members. Compared to non-attempters, suicide attempters obtained higher scores in depressive, obsessive, masochistic, and borderline personality disorders clinical somatoform symptoms, alcohol abuse in addition to drug use, major depressive disorder, and stress. Suicide attempters also used lower levels of task-focused and avoidance-focused strategies and higher levels of emotion-focused strategies to cope with stressors. Conclusion: The findings of this study can contribute to suicide identification and prevention among drug abusers.

  10. Risk Assessment in Child Sexual Abusers Working With Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Daniel; Rettenberger, Martin; Yoon, Dahlnym; Klein, Verena; Eher, Reinhard; Briken, Peer

    2016-09-01

    Child sexual abuse occurring in a child- or youth-serving institution or organization has attracted great public and scientific attention. In light of the particular personal and offense-related characteristics of men who have abused children within such an institution or organization, it is of special importance to evaluate the predictive performance of currently applied risk assessment instruments in this offender population. Therefore, the present study assessed the risk ratings and predictive performance of four risk assessment instruments and one instrument assessing protective factors concerning any, violent and sexual recidivism in child sexual abusers working with children (CSA-W) in comparison with extra-familial child sexual abusers (CSA-E) and intra-familial child sexual abusers (CSA-I). The results indicate that CSA-W mostly recidivate with a sexual offense. Although all included risk measures seem to function with CSA-W, the Static-99 seems to be the instrument that performs best in predicting sexual recidivism in CSA-W. CSA-W had the most protective factors measured with the Structured Assessment of PROtective Factors (SAPROF). While the SAPROF could not predict desistance from recidivism in CSA-W, it predicted desistance from any recidivism in all CSA. As CSA-W frequently hold many indicators for pedophilic sexual interests but only a few for antisocial tendencies, it can be suggested that CSA-W are at an increased risk for sexual recidivism and thus risk measures especially designed for sexual recidivism work best in CSA-W. Nevertheless, CSA-W also hold many protective factors; however, their impact on CSA-W is not clear yet and needs further study. PMID:25527631

  11. Does Childhood Disability Increase Risk for Child Abuse and Neglect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeb, Rebecca T.; Bitsko, Rebecca H.; Merrick, Melissa T.; Armour, Brian S.

    2012-01-01

    In this article we review the empirical evidence for the presumptions that children with disabilities are at increased risk for child maltreatment, and parents with disabilities are more likely to perpetrate child abuse and neglect. Challenges to the epidemiological examination of the prevalence of child maltreatment and disabilities are…

  12. Do ADHD Medicines Boost Substance Abuse Risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... risk was actually lower when medicines such as Ritalin and Adderall were started earlier and taken longer. " ... Although some parents have expressed the fear that Ritalin and other stimulant medications could be 'gateway drugs' ...

  13. A Model of Substance Abuse Risk

    OpenAIRE

    Anne Chandrika Ismail; Rohini De Alwis Seneviratne; Newcombe, Peter A; Shamil Wanigaratne

    2009-01-01

    This study translated and validated the Substance Use Risk Profile Scale (SURPS) among 13 to 18 year old Sri Lankan adolescents attending school. A standard systematic translation procedure was followed to translate the original SURPS into Sinhala language. A Delphi process was conducted to determine judgmental validity of Sinhala SURPS. Confirmatory factor analysis was performed to test the translated version against the original theoretical model of the SURPS. Test-retest and internal consi...

  14. Adolescent Health-Risk Sexual Behaviors: Effects of a Drug Abuse Intervention

    OpenAIRE

    Hops, Hyman; Ozechowski, Timothy J.; Waldron, Holly B.; Davis, Betsy; Turner, Charles W.; Brody, Janet L.; Barrera, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    Adolescents who abuse substances are more likely to engage in health-risking sexual behavior (HRSB) and are at particularly high risk for HIV/AIDS. Thus, substance abuse treatment presents a prime opportunity to target HIV-risk behaviors. The present study evaluated a one-session HIV-risk intervention embedded in a controlled clinical trial for drug-abusing adolescents. The trial was conducted in New Mexico and Oregon with Hispanic and Anglo adolescents. Youths were randomly assigned to indiv...

  15. Child Physical Abuse and concurrence of other types of Child Abuse : associations with health and risk behaviors

    OpenAIRE

    Annerbäck, Eva-Maria; Sahlqvist, L.; Svedin, Carl Göran; Wingren, Gun; Gustafsson, Per

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine the associations between child physical abuse and health problems/risk-taking behaviors among teen-agers. Further to evaluate concurrence of other types of abuse and how these alone and in addition to child physical abuse were associated with bad health status and risk-taking behaviors. Methods: A population-based survey was carried out in 2008 among all the pupils in two different grades (15 respectively 17 years old) in Södermanland County, Sweden (N=7 262). The respon...

  16. Exposure to child abuse and risk for mental health problems in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Renee; Baumrind, Nikki; Kimerling, Rachel

    2007-01-01

    Risk for adult mental health problems associated with child sexual, physical, or emotional abuse and multiple types of child abuse was examined. Logistic regression analyses were used to test study hypotheses in a population-based sample of women (N = 3,936). As expected, child sexual, physical, and emotional abuse were independently associated with increased risk for mental health problems. History of multiple types of child abuse was also associated with elevated risk for mental health problems. In particular, exposure to all three types of child abuse was linked to a 23-fold increase in risk for probable posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Findings underscore relations between child emotional abuse and adult mental health problems and highlight the need for mental health services for survivors of multiple types of child abuse. PMID:18064973

  17. Benzodiazepines: Sedation and Agitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Dental anxiety is common and frequently poses a barrier to necessary dental treatment. The increasing availability of conscious sedation in dental practice has made treatment much more accessible for anxious patients. At present, benzodiazepines are the most commonly used drugs in sedation practice and provide a pleasant experience for most, but not all, patients. An understanding of the mechanism of action of benzodiazepines should inform our practice and deepen our understanding of why and how sedation may fail. CPD/CLINICAL RELEVANCE: As an increasing number of dentists provide sedation for their patients an update on benzodiazepines is timely. PMID:27024905

  18. Adolescent Substance Abuse: Risk Factors and Prevention Strategies. Maternal & Child Health Technical Information Bulletin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Mark J.

    The high prevalence of alcohol and substance abuse by adolescents poses a significant threat to the wellness of youth. Adolescents appear to use drugs for a variety of reasons. In addition to the multiple etiologic and risk factors present for substance abuse, there are many pathways teenagers may follow on their way to substance abuse. The…

  19. Prevalence of and Risk Factors for Male Sexual Abuse: The Case of South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, In Young; Lee, Yongwoo; Yoo, Seo Koo; Hong, Jun Sung

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the prevalence of and risk factors for sexual abuse of boys in South Korea by asking a national sample of 1,043 adult males whether they had experienced sexual abuse during childhood. The results indicate that 13.5% experienced at least one of the nine types of child sexual abuse assessed. In addition, the majority of the…

  20. Emotion Recognition in Fathers and Mothers at High-Risk for Child Physical Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asla, Nagore; de Paul, Joaquin; Perez-Albeniz, Alicia

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The present study was designed to determine whether parents at high risk for physical child abuse, in comparison with parents at low risk, show deficits in emotion recognition, as well as to examine the moderator effect of gender and stress on the relationship between risk for physical child abuse and emotion recognition. Methods: Based…

  1. Recreational Viagra Use and Sexual Risk among Drug Abusing Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis G. Fisher

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Until recently, the Viagra connection to HIV was anchored in older adults. However, CDC investigation showed stability in 50+ HIV diagnoses on the heels of upward trends in risk indicators among men who have sex with men (MSM and substance abusing populations. Signs have increasingly pointed to recreational drug use among younger populations, to which Viagra is being added to the mix. Currently, the field is still locating the substance abuse, sexual risk and age-related dimensions of Viagra misuse. Recent studies identify it primarily as substance abuse, but the majority reports a combination of risky sex and risky drug use. At the very least, Viagra appears related to the enhancement of sexual experience or performance, even when it is used to compensate for erectile dysfunction caused by other drugs—either illicit or prescribed (e.g., antidepressants and highly active antiretroviral therapy or HAART. The populations studied, however, frequently have limited the generalizability of findings. This report analyzes the relationship among Viagra, Club Drugs and HIV sexual risk behavior in drug using men with a sample diverse in sexual orientation and demographic scope. Participants were 640 males recruited from three HIV prevention programs in Los Angeles County. Mean age was 43.97 years, ranging from 18.7 to 70.3 with almost 25% over 50. Sexual orientation was 79% heterosexual, 8% bisexual and 12% gay. Racial composition was 45% white, 35% black and 19% Hispanic. NIDA’s Risk Behavior Assessment and a Club Drug/Viagra addendum were used to collect socio-demographic, substance use and sexual risk data. Multiple logistic regression models were constructed along with chi-square tests of association and some t-tests. White race was a major risk factor. No age effect was found. MSM were more likely to use Viagra. Insertive anal sex was a significant co-factor among heterosexual Viagra users involved in transactional sex with women. In the overall

  2. Adverse effects of benzodiazepines

    OpenAIRE

    Claire Gudex

    1990-01-01

    The growing realisation that the benzodiazepines have potential for causing serious harm has caused concern due to their wide and common use. This has stimulated interest in the costs and benefits of their use. This paper is a review of the adverse effects of benzodiazepines, and concentrates on four areas of particular concern: drug dependence which the consequent withdrawal symptoms; psychological effects while on the drugs; use by the elderly’ and tolerance to the drug effects. Although th...

  3. Substance Abuse among High-Risk Sexual Offenders: Do Measures of Lifetime History of Substance Abuse Add to the Prediction of Recidivism over Actuarial Risk Assessment Instruments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looman, Jan; Abracen, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    There has been relatively little research on the degree to which measures of lifetime history of substance abuse add to the prediction of risk based on actuarial measures alone among sexual offenders. This issue is of relevance in that a history of substance abuse is related to relapse to substance using behavior. Furthermore, substance use has…

  4. Chronic use of benzodiazepines among older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jussara Mendonça Alvarenga

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To analyze the perception of and motivation for the chronic use of benzodiazepine among older adults. METHODS A qualitative study was conducted on 22 older adults living in Bambuí, MG, Southeastern Brazil, who were taking benzodiazepines and had the clinical and cognitive ability to respond to interview questions. The collected data were analyzed on the basis of the “signs, meanings, and actions” model. RESULTS The main reasons pointed out for the use of benzodiazepines were “nervousness”, “sleep problems”, and “worry” due to family and financial problems, everyday problems, and existential difficulties. None of the interviewees said that they used benzodiazepines in a dose higher than that recommended or had been warned by health professionals about any risks of their continuous use. Different strategies were used to obtain the prescription for the medication, and any physician would prescribe it, indicating that a bond was established with the drug and not with the health professional or healthcare service. Obtaining and consuming the medication turned into a crucial issue because benzodiazepine assumes the status of an essential food, which leads users to not think but sleep. It causes a feeling of relief from their problems such as awareness of human finitude and fragility, existential difficulties, and family problems. CONCLUSIONS Benzodiazepine assumes the characteristics of polyvalence among older adults, which extrapolate specific clinical indications, and of essentiality to deal with life’s problems in old age. Although it relieves the “nerves”, the chronic use of benzodiazepines buffers suffering and prevents older adults from going through the suffering. This shows important difficulties in the organization and planning of strategies that are necessary for minimizing the chronic use in this population.

  5. Chronic use of benzodiazepines among older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarenga, Jussara Mendonça; Giacomin, Karla Cristina; Loyola Filho, Antônio Ignácio de; Uchoa, Elizabeth; Firmo, Josélia Oliveira Araújo

    2014-12-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the perception of and motivation for the chronic use of benzodiazepine among older adults. METHODS A qualitative study was conducted on 22 older adults living in Bambuí, MG, Southeastern Brazil, who were taking benzodiazepines and had the clinical and cognitive ability to respond to interview questions. The collected data were analyzed on the basis of the "signs, meanings, and actions" model. RESULTS The main reasons pointed out for the use of benzodiazepines were "nervousness", "sleep problems", and "worry" due to family and financial problems, everyday problems, and existential difficulties. None of the interviewees said that they used benzodiazepines in a dose higher than that recommended or had been warned by health professionals about any risks of their continuous use. Different strategies were used to obtain the prescription for the medication, and any physician would prescribe it, indicating that a bond was established with the drug and not with the health professional or healthcare service. Obtaining and consuming the medication turned into a crucial issue because benzodiazepine assumes the status of an essential food, which leads users to not think but sleep. It causes a feeling of relief from their problems such as awareness of human finitude and fragility, existential difficulties, and family problems. CONCLUSIONS Benzodiazepine assumes the characteristics of polyvalence among older adults, which extrapolate specific clinical indications, and of essentiality to deal with life's problems in old age. Although it relieves the "nerves", the chronic use of benzodiazepines buffers suffering and prevents older adults from going through the suffering. This shows important difficulties in the organization and planning of strategies that are necessary for minimizing the chronic use in this population. PMID:26039388

  6. Physical Abuse is Associated with HIV-related Drug Risk

    OpenAIRE

    Reddy, Madhavi K.; Anderson, Bradley J; Liebschutz, Jane; Stein, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Those who have experienced abuse may be prone to engaging in risky sexual behavior and risky drug use. The relationship between sexual abuse and risky behavior has been well established in the literature, but the association between physical abuse and risky drug use has been equivocal. We hypothesize that the experience of PTSD symptoms following physical abuse leads to risky drug use. Therefore, we examined the associations among physical abuse history, PTSD symptoms, and HIV-related drug ri...

  7. Preventing Child Abuse and Neglect

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Abuse & Neglect Fatalities Preventing Child Abuse & Neglect National Child Abuse Prevention Month Overview Promoting Child & Family Well-Being Public ... Abuse & Neglect Preventing Child Abuse & Neglect Resources on child abuse prevention, protecting children from risk of abuse, and strengthening ...

  8. Gender as Individual Risk Factor for Elderly Abuse: Findings from First National Prevalence Study in Macedonia

    OpenAIRE

    Marijana Markovik; Dimitrinka Jordanova Peshevska

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND:  National prevalence study of elderly abuse in Macedonia intended to explore prevalence and risk factors of elder abuse and neglect.  This paper is focused on influence of the gender as individual risk factor, according to ecological model, on elderly abuse and neglect. METHODS: Culturally validated questionnaire and Geriatric Depression scale was used for data collection. Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) test, was used for sample selection. Cutting score was 20. The resea...

  9. Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Paying for Care Insurance Medicare Medicare Part D Benefits Medicaid Tax Deductions & Credits Legal Matters Planning Ahead Legal Documents alz.org » Caregiver Center » Safety » Abuse Text size: A A A Special Situations First Responders Traveling In a Disaster Abuse Find your local Chapter ...

  10. Female Adolescents with a History of Sexual Abuse: Risk Outcome and Protective Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandy, Joseph M.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Examined the school performance, suicidal involvement, disordered eating behaviors, pregnancy risk, and chemical use of female teenagers with a history of sexual abuse. Found that they reported higher rates of adverse outcomes than did teenagers without a background of abuse. Lists protective factors and risk factors that influenced outcomes. (RJM)

  11. A Model Linking Diverse Women's Child Sexual Abuse History with Sexual Risk Taking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Laurel B.; Matheny, Kenneth B.; Gagne, Phill; Brack, Greg; Ancis, Julie R.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to examine the role that child sexual abuse may play in body surveillance and sexual risk behaviors among undergraduate women. First, a measured variable path analysis was conducted, which assessed the relations among a history of child sexual abuse, body surveillance, and sexual risk behaviors. Furthermore, body…

  12. Aging and Risk: Physical and Sexual Abuse of Elders in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brozowski, Kari; Hall, David R.

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we review the literature on physical and sexual elder abuse within the context of risk theory and feminist sociology. Employing data from the 1999 General Social Survey, we also examine several variables potentially associated with the risk for physical or sexual abuse of elders. Women, Aboriginal Canadians, and elders who are…

  13. Dispositional Empathy in Neglectful Mothers and Mothers at High Risk for Child Physical Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Paul, Joaquin; Perez-Albeniz, Alicia; Guibert, Maria; Asla, Nagore; Ormaechea, Amaia

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates whether mothers who are neglectful and at high risk for child physical abuse present a deficit in empathy. Participants were neglectful mothers (n = 37), mothers at high risk for child physical abuse (n = 22), and nonmaltreating mothers (n = 37). The Interpersonal Reactivity Index, a self-report measure assessing specific…

  14. Adolescent Suicidal Behavior: Associations with Preadolescent Physical Abuse and Selected Risk and Protective Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzinger, Suzanne; Rosario, Margaret; Feldman, Richard S.; Ng-Mak, Daisy S.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: To determine whether preadolescent physical abuse raises the risk of adolescent suicidal behavior, to examine potential mediators and moderators of the relationship between preadolescent abuse and adolescent suicidality, and to examine whether distal (preadolescent) risk factors add to proximal (adolescent) factors in predicting…

  15. Abuse of Prescription Pain Medications Risks Heroin Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... close link between prescription drug abuse and more traditional, and perhaps better understood, drugs of abuse. Text ... page was last updated January 2014 Related Topics Addiction Science Adolescent Brain Comorbidity College-Age & Young Adults ...

  16. Isotopically labelled benzodiazepines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on the benzodiazepines which are a class of therapeutic agents. Improvements in the analytical methodology in the areas of biochemistry and pharmacology were significant, particularly in the application of chromatographic and spectroscopic techniques. In addition, the discovery and subsequent development of tritium and carbon-14 as an analytical tool in the biological sciences were essentially post-world war II phenomena. Thus, as these new chemical entities were found to be biologically active, they could be prepared in labeled form for metabolic study, biological half-life determination (pharmacokinetics), tissue distribution study, etc. This use of tracer methodology has been liberally applied to the benzodiazepines and also more recently to the study of receptor-ligand interactions, in which tritium, carbon-11 or fluorine-18 isotopes have been used. The history of benzodiazepines as medicinal agents is indeed an interesting one; an integral part of that history is their use in just about every conceivable labeled form

  17. [Benzodiazepine and nonbenzodiazepine hypnotics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Masaki; Inoue, Yuichi

    2015-06-01

    The prevalence of insomnia shows an age-associated increase. Especially, persons with age over 60 years frequently suffer from arousal during sleep and early-morning awakening. The reason of this phenomenon can be explained by age-related change in sleepwake regulation, comorbid diseases and psycho-social status. Benzodiazepine derivatives and benzodiazepine agonists have been widely used for treatment of insomnia. These GABA-A receptor agonist hypnotics have sedative effect, possibly causing various adverse events, i.e. falls and hip fracture, anterograde amnesia, next morning hangover especially in the elderly. When making a choice of treatment drugs for the elderly, low dose benzodiazepine hypnotics with relatively high Ω1-selectivity, and newer hypnotics including melatonic receptor agonist or orexin receptor antagonist can become important candidates considering their comorbid diseases or drug interaction with other medications. PMID:26065134

  18. Life-time risk for substance use among offspring of abusive family environment from the community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Yoko; Hurd, Yasmin L; Pilowsky, Daniel J

    2012-10-01

    The current study examined the cumulative risk, age of initiation, and functional impairments among adults with substance use problems (N = 1748) by child abuse status. Child abuse was associated with earlier initiation of marijuana, cocaine, and heroin use, and had greater risks for all the drugs studied (hazard ratios, 1.7-3.2). Furthermore, child abuse was associated with increased medical and functional impairments, including ER visits, health problems, drug dealing, drug dependence, and drug cravings. Provision of social services and parenting education during the perinatal period may prevent the long-term impact of child abuse on substance use and related impairments. The study's limitations are noted. PMID:22780838

  19. Long-term correlates of childhood abuse among adults with severe mental illness: Adult victimization, substance abuse, and HIV sexual risk behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Meade, Christina S.; Kershaw, Trace S.; Hansen, Nathan B.; Sikkema, Kathleen J.

    2007-01-01

    The prevalence of childhood sexual and physical abuse among persons with severe mental illness (SMI) is disproportionately high. Adults with SMI also engage in high rates of HIV risk behaviors. This study examined the association between childhood abuse and adult victimization, substance abuse, and lifetime HIV sexual risk in a sample of 152 adults with SMI receiving community mental health services. Structured interviews assessed psychiatric, psychosocial, and behavioral risk factors. Sevent...

  20. Child Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... puts a child at risk of harm. Child abuse can be physical, sexual or emotional. Neglect, or not providing for a child's needs, is also a form of abuse. Most abused children suffer greater emotional than physical ...

  1. THE COMPARISON OF SEXUAL BEHAVIOR HIGH RISK SEXUAL BEHAVIOUR AND SELF-HARM BEHAVIOUR IN STIMULANTS/NARCOTIC SUBSTANCE ABUSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lale Mirsoleimani

    2009-05-01

    CONCLUSIONS, the level of sexual behavior in cocaine abuses was at the most and in crack abusers was at the least. Also, the level of high risk sexual behavior in ice and cocaine was more than opium, heroin and crack. The level of self harm behavior in crack abuses was more than ice and opium abuses.

  2. Sexual Abuse History, Alcohol Intoxication, and Women’s Sexual Risk Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Schacht, Rebecca L.; George, William H.; Davis, Kelly Cue; Heiman, Julia R.; Norris, Jeanette; Stoner, Susan A.; Kajumulo, Kelly F.

    2009-01-01

    We examined potential differences in women’s likelihood of sexual risk taking in a laboratory setting based on alcohol intoxication and sexual abuse history. Participants (n = 64) were classified as sexually non-abused (NSA) or as having experienced sexual abuse in childhood only (CSA) or adulthood only (ASA) and randomly assigned to consume alcoholic (.06%, .08%, or .10% target blood alcohol content) or non-alcoholic drinks, after which participants read and responded to a risky sex vignette...

  3. ABUSE VICTIMIZATION IN CHILDHOOD OR ADOLESCENCE AND RISK OF FOOD ADDICTION IN ADULT WOMEN

    OpenAIRE

    Mason, Susan M.; Flint, Alan J.; Field, Alison E.; Austin, S. Bryn; Rich-Edwards, Janet W.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Child abuse appears to increase obesity risk in adulthood, but the mechanisms are unclear. This study examined the association between child abuse victimization and food addiction, a measure of stress-related overeating, in 57,321 adult participants in the Nurses’ Health Study II (NHSII). Design and Methods The NHSII ascertained physical and sexual child abuse histories in 2001 and current food addiction in 2009. Food addiction was defined as ≥3 clinically significant symptoms on a ...

  4. Autonomy and intimacy in the family as risk factors for sexual abuse

    OpenAIRE

    Tanja Repič

    2006-01-01

    The study examined the level of two risk factors (autonomy and intimacy) for healthy functional family among sexually abused and sexually non-abused individuals. Autonomy and intimacy were measured with Family-of-Origin Scale (FOS; Hovestadt, Anderson, Piercy, Cochran, & Fine, 1985). 261 participants (194 girls and 67 boys) completed the FOS, average age was 25 years (SD = 7). Among all participants 18% were sexually abused (N = 46), approximately every fifth (5.7) girl and every seventh (6.7...

  5. Modeling Risk for Child Abuse and Harsh Parenting in Families with Depressed and Substance-abusing Parents

    OpenAIRE

    Kelley, Michelle L.; Lawrence, Hannah R.; Milletich, Robert R.; Hollis, Brittany F.; Henson, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Children with substance abusing parents are at considerable risk for child maltreatment. The current study applied an actor-partner interdependence model to examine how father only (n = 52) and dual couple (n = 33) substance use disorder, as well as their depressive symptomology influenced parents’ own (actor effects) and the partner's (partner effects) overreactivity in disciplinary interactions with their children, as well as their risk for child maltreatment. Parents completed the Center f...

  6. Sexual and Physical Abuse History and Adult Sexual Risk Behaviors: Relationships among Women and Potential Mediators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littleton, Heather; Breitkopf, Carmen Radecki; Berenson, Abbey

    2007-01-01

    Objective: While research has supported associations between experiencing abuse and engaging in risky sexual behaviors during adolescence, research regarding these associations among adult women is much more equivocal. In addition, few studies have attempted to identify potential pathways from abuse experiences to sexual risk behaviors. The…

  7. Stimulant ADHD medication and risk for substance abuse

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Z.(Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, 77843, USA); Lichtenstein, P.; Halldner, L; D'Onofrio, B; Serlachius, E.; Fazel, S.; Långström, N.; Larsson, H

    2013-01-01

    Background: There are persistent concerns of long-term effects of stimulant ADHD medication on the development of substance abuse. Methods: Using Swedish national registers, we studied all individuals born between 1960 and 1998 and diagnosed with ADHD (26,249 men and 12,504 women). We investigated the association between stimulant ADHD medication in 2006 and substance abuse during 2009. Substance abuse was indexed by substance-related death, crime, or hospital visits. Results: ADHD medication...

  8. Benzodiazepines misuse: The study community level Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puangkot Sukdepat

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Benzodiazepines (BZD misuse, abuse, and dependence are becoming a new problem in medicine, in Thailand, and the pharmacoepidemiology knowledge is insufficient. The aim of this study is to estimate the prevalence of benzodiazepine use, misuse, abuse, and dependence in the general population of the Ubon Rachathani province, in Thailand. Aims: To estimate the prevalence of benzodiazepine use, misuse, abuse, and dependence in the general population. Settings and Design: The cross-sectional household survey research was conducted from October 2008 to June 2009, with a target population age of 15 years and above. This took place in Ubon Ratchathani Province, in Thailand. Materials and Methods: A total sample size of 2280 were selected from three-stage stratified random sampling. BZD were identified with an accuracy of generic name, trade name, and drug characteristics. The DSM-IV questionnaire was used to define misuse, abuse, and dependence. The accuracy of dependence was interpreted with the help of the judgment of a psychiatric nurse. Statistical analysis: For the statistical analyses, prevalence was estimated with weight adjustment, variances estimated by the Teylor Series Linearization method, and interpreted with 95% confidence interval (CI. Results: There were 46,805 current users [3.9% (95% CI: 2.2-6.4], 26,404 misusers [2.2% (95% CI: 1.6-6.2], 7,203 abusers [0.6% (95% CI: 0.1 - 4.1], and 2,402 with dependence [0.2% (0.1-9.2]. When considering the group of current users in this study, 57.2% misusers, 16.6% abusers, and 5.9% with dependence were found, respectively. Conclusions: All prevalence of use was higher than previously reported, in Thailand, while more than half of the current users had a behavior of misuse. Surveillance of misuse should be undertaken in the current use. The medical professional should counsel the patient on the harm of misuse and limit the amount of medicine, with necessary dispensing.

  9. Association between Physical Abuse, Physical Neglect and Health Risk Behaviours among Young Adolescents: Results from the National Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrinka Jordanova Peshevska

    2014-06-01

    CONCLUSION: The results demonstrated a relationship between physical abuse and later manifestation of health risk behaviours such as: smoking and early pregnancy. Physical neglect increased the chances for drug abuse, drink-driving, having early sex, having more sexual partners.

  10. Desperately Driven and No Brakes: Developmental Stress Exposure and Subsequent Risk for Substance Abuse

    OpenAIRE

    Andersen, Susan L.; Teicher, Martin H.

    2008-01-01

    ANDERSEN, S.L. and TEICHER, M.H. Desperately driven and no brakes: Developmental stress exposure and subsequent risk for substance abuse. NEUROSCI BIOBEHAV REV XX(X) XXX-XXX, 2008. Adverse life events are associated with a wide range of psychopathology, including an increased risk for substance abuse. In this review, we focus on the inter-relationship between exposure to adversity and brain development, and relate this to enhanced windows of vulnerability. This review encompasses clinical and...

  11. Child abuse history in teen mothers and parent-child risk processes for offspring externalizing problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasalich, Dave S; Cyr, Maeve; Zheng, Yao; McMahon, Robert J; Spieker, Susan J

    2016-06-01

    This study examined whether child abuse history in teen mothers impacts offspring externalizing problems indirectly, through its influence on attachment and maternal hostility. In a longitudinal sample of 112 teen mother-child dyads, mothers reported on their own abuse experiences, attachment and maternal hostility were assessed via direct observations, and externalizing problems were measured using maternal reports. Compared with mothers with no abuse history, mothers with a history of sexual and physical abuse were more likely to have an insecurely attached infant, which predicted higher externalizing problems in preschool, which in turn predicted subsequent increases in externalizing problems in Grade 3. Furthermore, relative to the no abuse history group, mothers with a history of sexual and physical abuse showed more hostility toward their child at preschool, which in turn predicted elevated externalizing problems in Grade 3. Mothers' history of either sexual or physical abuse alone did not have significant indirect effects on externalizing problems. Fostering secure attachment and reducing risk for maternal hostility might be important intervention goals for prevention programs involving at-risk mothers with abuse histories. PMID:27174770

  12. Dispositional Empathy in High- and Low-Risk Parents for Child Physical Abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Albeniz, A.; de Paul, Joaquin

    2003-01-01

    Parents identified as either at high risk (n=36) or low-risk (n=38) for child physical abuse were assessed for dispositional empathy. High-risk parents showed lower total scores on the Hogan Empathy Scale and the Questionnaire Measure of Emotional Empathy. They also scored higher on the Interpersonal Reactivity Index "personal distress" dimension.…

  13. Comparison of the Risks of Shopping Behavior and Opioid Abuse Between Tapentadol and Oxycodone and Association of Shopping Behavior and Opioid Abuse

    OpenAIRE

    Cepeda, M. Soledad; Fife, Daniel; Kihm, Mary A.; Mastrogiovanni, Greg; Yuan, Yingli

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: This study compared the risks of opioid shopping behavior and opioid abuse between tapentadol immediate release and oxycodone immediate release and, to validate the definition of shopping, examined the association between opioid shopping and opioid abuse further. Materials and Methods: This retrospective cohort study using linked dispensing and diagnosis databases followed opioid-naive patients for development of shopping behavior and/or opioid abuse during 1 year after initial ex...

  14. [Benzodiazepin addiction: a silent addiction among older people].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oude Voshaar, R C

    2012-06-01

    Benzodiazepines are frequently prescribed for a longer period of time for anxiety disorders and insomnia in spite of the many guidelines to prescribe these drugs only short-term. These guidelines are based on the risk-benefit balance between long-term effectiveness and side effects like addiction, anterograde amnesia, and increased risk on falling (resulting in hip fractures), traffic accidents and even mortality. Also low-dose benzodiazepine use can lead to benzodiazepine dependence. Although initially most attention has been paid to the physical withdrawal syndrome, psychological aspects of benzodiazepine dependence have received more and more attention in the past decades. Recently, a relationship between the brain-reward system, involved in addiction, and benzodiazepine use, was demonstrated. When long-term benzodiazepine use is recognised as problematic by both physician and patient, different treatment modalities are available to support patients in achieving abstinence. One of every four patients is able to stop by themselves with the aid of a minimal intervention providing psychoeducation and encouragement. Two out of three long-term uses are able to stop their usage with the aid of systematic tapering protocols guided by a physician or psychologist. In case of an underlying insomnia or anxiety disorder, cognitive-behavioural therapy should be added to the tapering protocol. In contrast to the general opinion, advanced old age has no negative impact on the treatment response. PMID:22826915

  15. Parental substance use disorder and the risk of adolescent drug abuse: an event history analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, John P; Cerbone, Felicia G

    2002-05-01

    A common observation in the research literature is that children of drug-dependent parents are at significantly heightened risk of adolescent drug use, abuse, and dependence. Recent research indicates that several psychological and interpersonal factors may affect the association between parents' psychoactive substance use disorder (PSUD) and drug use risks among adolescents, yet studies have failed to examine explicitly whether these factors moderate the association between PSUD and adolescent substance abuse. This paper explores these potential relationships using longitudinal data from a study that has followed three cohorts of adolescents and their families over a 7-year period. The cohorts are defined by parental diagnoses of PSUD, affective disorders, or no diagnosable disorder. The results indicate that PSUD is positively associated with adolescent drug abuse, yet this association is attenuated by strong family cohesion. Affective disorders among parents are associated with a higher risk of alcohol, but not drug, abuse. The associations are stronger in the presence of lower stress and higher self-esteem. PSUD is also associated more strongly with offspring drug and alcohol abuse when levels of use are lower. Hence, some unobserved mechanism that may involve physiological sensitivities to drugs and alcohol appears to put children of parents with drug problems at particular risk of drug and alcohol abuse. Limitations of the data and analysis are discussed. PMID:12062460

  16. Modeling risk for child abuse and harsh parenting in families with depressed and substance-abusing parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Michelle L; Lawrence, Hannah R; Milletich, Robert J; Hollis, Brittany F; Henson, James M

    2015-05-01

    Children with substance abusing parents are at considerable risk for child maltreatment. The current study applied an actor-partner interdependence model to examine how father only (n=52) and dual couple (n=33) substance use disorder, as well as their depressive symptomology influenced parents' own (actor effects) and the partner's (partner effects) overreactivity in disciplinary interactions with their children, as well as their risk for child maltreatment. Parents completed the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D; Radloff, 1977), the overreactivity subscale from the Parenting Scale (Arnold, O'Leary, Wolff, & Acker, 1993), and the Brief Child Abuse Potential Inventory (Ondersma, Chaffin, Mullins, & LeBreton, 2005). Results of multigroup structural equation models revealed that a parent's own report of depressive symptoms predicted their risk for child maltreatment in both father SUD and dual SUD couples. Similarly, a parent's report of their own depressive symptoms predicted their overreactivity in disciplinary encounters both in father SUD and dual SUD couples. In all models, partners' depressive symptoms did not predict their partner's risk for child maltreatment or overreactivity. Findings underscore the importance of a parent's own level of depressive symptoms in their risk for child maltreatment and for engaging in overreactivity during disciplinary episodes. PMID:25724658

  17. Parental Alcoholism, Adverse Childhood Experiences, and Later Risk of Personal Alcohol Abuse among Chinese Medical Students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIN XIAO; MA-XIA DONG; JIE YAO; WEN-XIAN LI; DONG-QING YE

    2008-01-01

    Objective To determine the status of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and the association of multiple ACEs with both parental alcoholism and later personal alcohol abuse among Chinese medical students with a view of improving adolescent health and reducing alcohol abuse among them. Methods In this cross-sectional study, 2073 Chinese medical students completed a survey on ten categories of ACEs in Anhui province of China. The association of parental alcoholism with ACEs and personal lcohol abuse was assessed by logistic regression analyses. Results The adjusted odds ratio (OR) for each category of ACEs in the subjects whose parents (either fathers or mothers or oth) had alcohol abuse was 2 to 14 times higher than that inthose with parental alcoholism (P<0.05). Subjects with i-parental alcoholism had the highest likelihood of ACEs. Compared with the subjects without ACEs, the risk of personal alcohol abuse was increased by 2-4-folds in the subjects with ACEs, irrespective of parental alcoholism (P<0.05). The total number of ACEs (ACE score) had a graded relationship to 4 categories of personal alcohol abuse with or without parental alcoholism. The prevalence of personal alcohol abuse among the subjects with parental alcoholism was higher, which was ndependent of ACE scores. Conclusion The prevalence of ACEs is generally serious in China. Efforts should be made to prevent and treat children with ACEs and subsequently to reduce alcohol abuse and later problems.

  18. Autonomy and intimacy in the family as risk factors for sexual abuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Repič

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available The study examined the level of two risk factors (autonomy and intimacy for healthy functional family among sexually abused and sexually non-abused individuals. Autonomy and intimacy were measured with Family-of-Origin Scale (FOS; Hovestadt, Anderson, Piercy, Cochran, & Fine, 1985. 261 participants (194 girls and 67 boys completed the FOS, average age was 25 years (SD = 7. Among all participants 18% were sexually abused (N = 46, approximately every fifth (5.7 girl and every seventh (6.7 boy. There were 78% girls and 22% boys among sexually abused participants. Families of sexually abused participants in comparison with the families of sexually non-abused showed many statistically significant differences in elements of autonomy (clarity of expressing emotions, responsibility, respect for others, openness to others, and acceptance of separation and loss and intimacy (encouraging expression of a range of feelings, creating a warm atmosphere in the home, dealing with conflict resolution without undue stress, promoting empathy among family members, trust and developing trust. In general the sexually abused group had a statistically significantly lower level of autonomy and intimacy in comparison with sexually non-abused group.

  19. Risk of Behaviors Associated with Lethal Violence and Functional Outcomes for Abused Women Who Do and Do Not Return to the Abuser Following a Community-Based Intervention

    OpenAIRE

    McFarlane, Judith; Nava, Angeles; Gilroy, Heidi; Maddoux, John

    2015-01-01

    Background: To determine the differential risk of behaviors associated with lethal violence and functioning outcomes for abused women with children who received an intervention of shelter or justice services and return to the abuser were compared with women who did not return.

  20. A Model of Sexual Risk Behaviors among Young Gay and Bisexual Men: Longitudinal Associations of Mental Health, Substance Abuse, Sexual Abuse, and the Coming-Out Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosario, Margaret; Schrimshaw, Eric W.; Hunter, Joyce

    2006-01-01

    Sexual risk behaviors of young gay and bisexualmen must be understood within the context of other health concerns (e.g., anxiety, substance abuse), population specific factors (i.e., the coming-out process and gay-related stress), childhood sexual abuse, and other theoretical factors (e.g., safer-sex intentions). The current report proposes and…

  1. Corporal Punishment of Adolescents by Parents: A Risk Factor in the Epidemiology of Depression, Suicide, Alcohol Abuse, Child Abuse, and Wife Beating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straus, Murray A.; Kantor, Glenda Kaufman

    1994-01-01

    Studied large national sample of U.S. adults, finding that almost one-half recalled having been corporally punished during adolescence. Data analysis revealed that children who experienced corporal punishment in adolescence had increased risk later in life of depressive symptoms, suicidal thoughts, alcohol abuse, physical abuse of children, and…

  2. Relationship of child abuse with personality features and high risk behaviors in adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Ghezelseflo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Children are one of the most vulnerable groups of the society and are constantly threatened by different people in their family or society. The aim of this study was investigating the correlation of child abuse with personality features and high risk behavior in high school students of Islamshahr, Iran. Methods: This study cross-sectional analytical was conducted on the high school girls and boys of Islamshahr in spring 2014.528 students were selected by cluster random sampling among 4 high schools (two female and two male high schools. Childhood trauma questionnaire, NEO-Five Factor Inventory and Youth Risk-Taking Scale were used for data collection. Data were analyzed by independence t-test, Pearson's correlation coefficient and multiple linear regression. Results: The results of independence t-test indicated significant differences between girls and boys in terms of child abuse and high risk experience (t=-2.16,p=0.03 and t=-5.03, P=0.001, respectively. Also, the results demonstrated a significant relationship between child abuse and personality characteristics, high risk behavior and all its subscales (P<0.05. The findings of multiple linear regressionindicated that child abuse could explain 14% total risk-taking, 25% neurotic personality feature , 14% extroversion, 10% agreeableness, 1% flexibility and 13% conscientiousness (P<0.05. Conclusion: According to the research findings, appropriate behavior with children is of great importance. Therefore, child abuse would form inappropriate personality features and increase risk behaviors among children.

  3. African American Caregivers and Substance Abuse in Child Welfare: Identification of Multiple Risk Profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Eusebius; Kohl, Patricia L

    2012-07-01

    Despite the strong correlation between caregiver substance abuse and child maltreatment, little information exists to understand the typology of African American caregivers with substance abuse problems in the child welfare system. Research shows African American caregivers contend with multiple problems stemming from substance abuse. Unfortunately, we do not yet know how to best tailor resources to be responsive to varying groups of African American caregivers. Using data from the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-being (NSCAW), this investigation tested for distinct multivariate profiles among a subset of African American caregivers with substance abuse problems (n=258). Latent Class Analysis (LCA) was used to classify caregivers, and five classes were identified among this high risk sample - each with distinct risk profiles. Based on these findings, we discuss implications for tailored practices to enhance the safety and stability of children involved with child welfare. PMID:22962521

  4. The Effect of Substance Abuse Treatment on High Risk Behaviors in the National Treatment Improvement Evaluation Study (NTIES).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenfield, Lawrence; Finkbiner, Richard; Bishop, Sharon

    Substance abusers are at particular risk for becoming infected with, and for spreading, a number of serious communicable diseases. The value of substance abuse treatment in helping to reduce the associated risk behaviors for these diseases is the focus of this technical report. This analysis examines the risk behaviors of injection drug use and…

  5. Iudicium: An Educational Intervention for addressing Risk Perception of Alcohol Abuse in Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajac, Héctor; Feliu-Soler, Albert; Meerhoff, Diana; Latorre, Laura; Elices, Matilde

    2016-01-01

    Negative consequences of alcohol abuse during adolescence have been extensively described. Consequently, different interventions have been developed to address this issue. This article describes the implementation and evaluation of Iudicium, an educational drama-based intervention designed to increase risk perception of alcohol abuse. In this activity, high school students judge a case in which alcohol consumption had negative consequences (e.g., fights, unwanted pregnancy, and car accident). A trial is simulated and after that, a debriefing takes place during which the activity is discussed and informational materials on the effects of alcohol is provided and commented. A total of 318 students (55.7% females and 44.3% males) from five high schools participated in the study. Data regarding risk perception of alcohol abuse and adequacy of the activity was collected before and after the intervention. Results suggest that Iudicium was effective in increasing risk perception of abusive drinking, reaching a 34% of increase regarding risk perception. Participants highlighted the experiential component of Iudicium as a strength. The intervention was well-accepted, easy to understand and apparently an effective tool for increasing risk perception of alcohol abuse amongst high school students. PMID:26990389

  6. Longitudinal HIV Risk Behavior among the Drug Abuse Treatment Outcome Studies (DATOS) Adult Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Debra A.; Brecht, Mary-Lynn; Herbeck, Diane; Evans, Elizabeth; Huang, David; Hser, Yih-Ing

    2008-01-01

    Longitudinal trajectories for HIV risk were examined over 5 years following treatment among 1,393 patients who participated in the nationwide Drug Abuse Treatment Outcome Studies. Both injection drug use and sexual risk behavior declined over time, with most of the decline occurring between intake and the first-year follow-up. However, results of…

  7. Childhood Sexual Abuse, Relationship Satisfaction, and Sexual Risk Taking in a Community Sample of Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testa, Maria; VanZile-Tamsen, Carol; Livingston, Jennifer A.

    2005-01-01

    Childhood sexual abuse (CSA) has been proposed to influence both women's adult sexual risk behaviors and the quality of their intimate relationships. Among a household sample of women (n = 732), good fit was obtained for a model in which CSA predicted Wave 1 male partner sexual risk and aggression characteristics, resulting in lower relationship…

  8. Prevalence, risk factors and outcome of childhood abuse reported by female university students in jeddah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Nahla K; Jalali, Ekram A; Al-Ahmadi, Jawaher R; Al-Bar, Adnan A

    2008-01-01

    Child abuse constitutes all forms of physical and /or emotional ill treatment, sexual abuse, neglect or negligent treatment or commercial or other exploitation, resulting in actual or potential harm to the child's health, survival, development or dignity in the context of a relationship of responsibility, trust or power. The objective of the study was to determine the prevalence, types, main predictors and outcome of child abuse, retrospectively reported by female university students in Jeddah. A cross sectional study was conducted and the Standardized Arabic Version of Child Abuse Screening Tool for Young Adult (18-24 years old) was used. Ethical standards of confidentiality and freedom to participate were followed. Multistage stratified random sample was used with selection of 1,897 females. About two-thirds (68.3 %) of students reported exposure to some form of child abuse. Physical and emotional forms were recalled by 45.1 % & 50.6 % of students, respectively, while, 2.9 % reported exposure to forced contact sexual assault. Parents and siblings were the commonest perpetrators of both physical & emotional abuse, while other relatives and extra-familial persons were the main offenders of sexual violence. The predictors of exposure to three forms of abuse together were: existence of parent who hit the other (aOR= 2.54; 95 % CI: 1.88-3.42), non-university graduated mother (aOR =1.83; p problems (pcause, fearing of other sex and obtaining violent behavior. Conclusion and Recommended:Child abuse represents a public health problem, and there is a strong influence of familial risk factors in its occurrence. Programs for prevention of child abuse and for treating and rehabilitating victims are urgently needed. PMID:19493505

  9. Discontinuing benzodiazepines: best practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guaiana, G; Barbui, C

    2016-06-01

    In July 2015, the Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (CADTH) released a Rapid Response report summary, with a critical appraisal, on discontinuation strategies for patients with long-term benzodiazepines (BDZ) use. The CADTH document is a review of the literature. It includes studies whose intervention is BDZ discontinuation. Also, clinical guidelines, systematic reviews and meta-analyses are included. What emerges from the CADTH guidelines is that the best strategy remains gradual tapering of BDZ with little evidence for the use of adjunctive medications. The results show that simple interventions such as discontinuation letters from clinicians, self-help information and support in general, added to gradual tapering may be associated with a two- to three-fold higher chance of successful withdrawal, compared with treatment as usual. We suggest possible implications for day-to-day clinical practice. PMID:26818890

  10. Risk factors of child physical abuse by parents with mixed anxiety-depressive disorder or posttraumatic stress disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Kalebić Jakupčević, Katija; Ajduković, Marina

    2011-01-01

    Aim To determine the risk that parents with mixed anxiety and depressive disorder (MADD) or posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) will physically abuse their child and evaluate the specific contribution of mental health, perceived social support, experience of childhood abuse, and attributes of family relations to the risk of child physical abuse. Method The study conducted in 2007 included men (n = 25) and women (n = 25) with a diagnosis of MADD, men with a diagnosis o...

  11. Identifying and assessing the risk of opioid abuse in patients with cancer: an integrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmichael AN

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Ashley-Nicole Carmichael,1 Laura Morgan,1 Egidio Del Fabbro2 1School of Pharmacy, 2Division of Hematology, Oncology, and Palliative Care, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA Background: The misuse and abuse of opioid medications in many developed nations is a health crisis, leading to increased health-system utilization, emergency department visits, and overdose deaths. There are also increasing concerns about opioid abuse and diversion in patients with cancer, even at the end of life. Aims: To evaluate the current literature on opioid misuse and abuse, and more specifically the identification and assessment of opioid-abuse risk in patients with cancer. Our secondary aim is to offer the most current evidence of best clinical practice and suggest future directions for research. Materials and methods: Our integrative review included a literature search using the key terms “identification and assessment of opioid abuse in cancer”, “advanced cancer and opioid abuse”, “hospice and opioid abuse”, and “palliative care and opioid abuse”. PubMed, PsycInfo, and Embase were supplemented by a manual search. Results: We found 691 articles and eliminated 657, because they were predominantly noncancer populations or specifically excluded cancer patients. A total of 34 articles met our criteria, including case studies, case series, retrospective observational studies, and narrative reviews. The studies were categorized into screening questionnaires for opioid abuse or alcohol, urine drug screens to identify opioid misuse or abuse, prescription drug-monitoring programs, and the use of universal precautions. Conclusion: Screening questionnaires and urine drug screens indicated at least one in five patients with cancer may be at risk of opioid-use disorder. Several studies demonstrated associations between high-risk patients and clinical outcomes, such as aberrant behavior, prolonged opioid use, higher morphine-equivalent daily dose

  12. Paternal Alcoholism and Youth Substance Abuse: The Indirect Effects of Negative Affect, Conduct Problems, and Risk Taking

    OpenAIRE

    Ohannessian, Christine McCauley; Hesselbrock, Victor M.

    2008-01-01

    This longitudinal study followed 200 adolescents into early adulthood to explore the potential mediating roles that hostility, sadness, conduct problems, and risk taking play in the relationship between paternal alcoholism and substance abuse. Results indicated that paternal alcoholism predicted hostility; in turn, hostility predicted risk taking, which predicted substance abuse.

  13. Randomized Trial of a Statewide Home Visiting Program to Prevent Child Abuse: Impact in Reducing Parental Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggan, Anne; Fuddy, Loretta; Burrell, Lori; Higman, Susan M.; McFarlane, Elizabeth; Windham, Amy; Sia, Calvin

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the impact of a home visiting program in reducing malleable parental risk factors for child abuse in families of newborns identified, through population-based screening, as at-risk of child abuse. Methods: This randomized trial focused on Healthy Start Program (HSP) sites operated by three community-based organizations on…

  14. ‘South Asian cocktail’ - the concurrent use of opioids, benzodiazepines and antihistamines among injecting drug users in Nepal and associations with HIV risk behaviour

    OpenAIRE

    Ojha, Saroj Prasad; Sigdel, Suraj; Meyer-Thompson, Hans-Günter; Oechsler, Harald; Verthein, Uwe

    2014-01-01

    Background Data of the Central Bureau of Statistic of Nepal from 2008 show a total of more than 46,000 illegal drug users, out of which 61% are injecting drug users (IDU). An injecting mix of medicines like opioids, benzodiazepines and antihistamines (the so-called South Asian cocktail) was prevalent. Furthermore, it is estimated that about 70,000 people are living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The government of Nepal has started realizing and recognizing drug use and HIV as signif...

  15. Proposal for a new detection method of substance abuse risk in Croatian adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanja Tatalovic Vorkapic

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important factors of successful substance abuse treatment is the early start of the same treatment. Recent selection method for identification of Croatian adolescents in the substance abuse risk that has been using drug tests from urine samples, has been simple and exact on the one hand, but on the other, has been very rare and usually guided by the pressure of parents or the court. Besides, such method presented the source of legal and ethical questions. So, the proposal of application of standardized psychological tests during systematic medical exams of Croatian adolescents at the age range of 15-22 years could help with the early detection of those adolescents who were in the substance abuse risk or already had the developed addiction problem.

  16. Proposal for a new detection method of substance abuse risk in Croatian adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatalovic Vorkapic, Sanja; Dadic-Hero, Elizabeta; Ruzic, Klementina; Roncevic, Dobrica; Knez, Rajna

    2011-01-01

    One of the most important factors of successful substance abuse treatment is the early start of the same treatment. Recent selection method for identification of Croatian adolescents in the substance abuse risk that has been using drug tests from urine samples, has been simple and exact on the one hand, but on the other, has been very rare and usually guided by the pressure of parents or the court. Besides, such method presented the source of legal and ethical questions. So, the proposal of application of standardized psychological tests during systematic medical exams of Croatian adolescents at the age range of 15-22 years could help with the early detection of those adolescents who were in the substance abuse risk or already had the developed addiction problem. PMID:21952159

  17. Risk Factors for Drug Abuse among Nepalese Samples Selected from a Town of Eastern Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niraula, Surya Raj; Chhetry, Devendra Bahadur; Singh, Girish Kumar; Nagesh, S.; Shyangwa, Pramod Mohan

    2009-01-01

    The study focuses on the serious issue related to the adolescents' and adults' behavior and health. It aims to identify the risk factors for drug abuse from samples taken from a town of Eastern Nepal. This is a matched case-control study. The conditional logistic regression method was adopted for data analysis. The diagnosis cut off was determined…

  18. Parental Perceptions of Neighborhood Processes, Stress, Personal Control, and Risk for Physical Child Abuse and Neglect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guterman, Neil B.; Lee, Shawna J.; Taylor, Catherine A.; Rathouz, Paul J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This study set out to examine whether mothers' individual perceptions of their neighborhood social processes predict their risk for physical child abuse and neglect directly and/or indirectly via pathways involving parents' reported stress and sense of personal control in the parenting role. Methods: In-home and phone interview data…

  19. Hostility Ratings by Parents at Risk for Child Abuse: Impact of Chronic and Temporary Schema Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farc, Maria-Magdalena; Crouch, Julie L.; Skowronski, John J.; Milner, Joel S.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Two studies examined whether accessibility of hostility-related schema influenced ratings of ambiguous child pictures. Based on the social information processing model of child physical abuse (CPA), it was expected that CPA risk status would serve as a proxy for chronic accessibility of hostile schema, while priming procedures were used…

  20. Patterns of Risk in Adult Protection Referrals for Sexual Abuse and People with Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambridge, Paul; Beadle-Brown, Julie; Milne, Alisoun; Mansell, Jim; Whelton, Beckie

    2011-01-01

    Background: Adult protection monitoring data held by local authorities in England provide opportunities to examine referrals for alleged sexual abuse for people with intellectual disability to identify patterns of risk. Methods: Adult protection monitoring data collected by two local authorities was analysed, with referrals for alleged sexual…

  1. Bad experience, good birthing: Dutch low-risk pregnant women with a history of sexual abuse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.A.M. van der Hulst; G.J. Bonsel; M. Eskes; E. Birnie; E. van Teijlingen; O.P. Bleker

    2006-01-01

    Objective. The long-term effects on women in childbirth with a history of sexual abuse have only been studied to a limited degree. We estimated the prevalence of lifetime experience among low-risk pregnant women (non-clinical) in the Netherlands as well as the association with (1) psycho-social outc

  2. Cultural Protective and Risk Factors: Professional Perspectives about Child Sexual Abuse in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plummer, Carol A.; Njuguna, Wambui

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to explore perspectives on cultural risks and protective factors among professionals in Kenya. Method: An exploratory/descriptive survey of Kenyan professionals working to prevent or intervene with child sexual abuse was undertaken to determine their perspectives on how tribal culture impacts vulnerability to…

  3. Pathways from Childhood Abuse and Neglect to HIV-Risk Sexual Behavior in Middle Adulthood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Helen W.; Widom, Cathy Spatz

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This study examines the relationship between childhood abuse and neglect and sexual risk behavior in middle adulthood and whether psychosocial factors (risky romantic relationships, affective symptoms, drug and alcohol use, and delinquent and criminal behavior) mediate this relationship. Method: Children with documented cases of…

  4. Social-Relational Risk Factors for Predicting Elder Physical Abuse: An Ecological Bi-Focal Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Heydrich, Levente; Schiamberg, Lawrence B.; Chee, Grace

    2012-01-01

    Annually in the United States, 1 to 5 million older adults, 65 and above, are physically or sexually injured or mistreated by their caregivers in family settings. This study examined the prevalence and risk factors involved in elder physical abuse by adult child caregivers, moving from the immediate elderly parent/adult child relationship context…

  5. Psychogenic Amnesia for Childhood Sexual Abuse and Risk for Sexual Revictimisation in Both Adolescence and Adulthood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wager, Nadia

    2012-01-01

    This study was an investigation of the additional risk conferred by the experience of psychogenic amnesia for memories of childhood sexual abuse (CSA) on the likelihood of becoming a victim of sexual assault in later life. A total of 210 community respondents completed a retrospective web-based trauma survey. The majority of respondents were…

  6. Sexual Risk-Taking among High-Risk Urban Women with and without Histories of Childhood Sexual Abuse: Mediating Effects of Contextual Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosack, Katie E.; Randolph, Mary E.; Dickson-Gomez, Julia; Abbott, Maryann; Smith, Ellen; Weeks, Margaret R.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the mechanisms of risk for urban women at high risk for HIV with and without childhood sexual abuse histories. Childhood sexual abuse survivors reported more unprotected intercourse and sexually transmitted infections (STIs). The association of STI locus of control with frequency of unprotected sex was fully mediated by…

  7. A Model of Sexual Risk Behaviors Among Young Gay and Bisexual Men: Longitudinal Associations of Mental Health, Substance Abuse, Sexual Abuse, and the Coming-Out Process

    OpenAIRE

    Rosario, Margaret; Schrimshaw, Eric W.; Hunter, Joyce

    2006-01-01

    Sexual risk behaviors of young gay and bisexual men must be understood within the context of other health concerns (e.g., anxiety, substance abuse), population-specific factors (i.e., the coming-out process and gay-related stress), childhood sexual abuse, and other theoretical factors (e.g., safer sex intentions). The current report proposes and longitudinally examines a model of risk factors for subsequent sexual risk behaviors among young gay and bisexual men in New York City. As hypothesiz...

  8. Child Maltreatment and Women’s Adult Sexual Risk Behavior: Childhood Sexual Abuse as a Unique Risk Factor

    OpenAIRE

    Senn, Theresa E; Michael P. Carey

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated (a) whether childhood sexual abuse (CSA) was uniquely associated with adult sexual risk behavior, after controlling for other types of childhood maltreatment, and (b) whether there were additive or interactive effects of different types of maltreatment on adult sexual risk behavior. Participants were 414 women (M age = 28 years) attending a publicly-funded STD clinic. All women completed a computerized survey assessing childhood maltreatment (sexual, physical, psycholo...

  9. Alcohol Abuse Prevention Among High-Risk Youth: Computer-Based Intervention

    OpenAIRE

    Schinke, Steven P.; Schwinn, Traci M.; Ozanian, Alfred J.

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the feasibility of a CD-ROM intervention to prevent alcohol abuse among high-risk youths. Youths from 41 community-based agencies in greater New York City participated in a randomized trial of a skills-based interactive CD-ROM. Outcome data were collected on 489 early adolescents in these agencies before and after a randomized subset of youths interacted with a 10-session alcohol abuse prevention program on CD-ROM. Compared to control participants, youths in the interventi...

  10. Proposal for a new detection method of substance abuse risk in Croatian adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Sanja Tatalovic Vorkapic; Elizabeta Dadic-Hero; Klementina Ruzic; Dobrica Roncevic; Rajna Knez

    2011-01-01

    One of the most important factors of successful substance abuse treatment is the early start of the same treatment. Recent selection method for identification of Croatian adolescents in the substance abuse risk that has been using drug tests from urine samples, has been simple and exact on the one hand, but on the other, has been very rare and usually guided by the pressure of parents or the court. Besides, such method presented the source of legal and ethical questions. So, the proposal of a...

  11. Drug Abuse Prevalence and Risk Factors in Students of Shaheed Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z Poormovahed

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Addiction and drug abuse in one of the most important health, social and political problems in the world, especially in developing countries. Nowadays this problem has higher prevalence in young people, and so students of the universities are at risk. The aim of this study was to identify drug abuse prevalence and risk factors in students of Shaheed Sadoughi Medical University, Iran, Yazd Methods: This was a descriptive cross sectional study and 534 students were selected through random sampling from different medical sciences colleges. The data was collected by self-designed questionnaire and interview, and then analyzed using SPSS software and chi-square test. Results: Data showed the prevalence of drug abuse in students to be 21.5%, frequency of drug abuse was as follows: Hookah 15.9%, cigarette 24.13%, opium 2.8%. The major risk factors were amusement 47.4% and unemployment 42.98%. It was higher in single males who lived in university dormitories. Conclusion: According to the study results, it is recommended that families and university managers facilitate student's entertainment, marriage and occupation. The high prevalence of smoking hookah which is usually accompanied by use of other drugs should be considered in educational programs.

  12. A case-control study on alcohol and psychiatric disorders as risk factors for drug abuse pattern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopes Claudia S.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated alcohol and psychiatric disorders as risk factors for the pattern of drug abuse/dependence in a matched case-control study (370 adults. Cases (drug abusers and controls were selected in the community using the snowball technique and matched by sex, age, and friendship. Information was gathered using the "Composite International Diagnostic Interview" (CIDI. Three patterns of drug abuse/dependence were evaluated: any drug abuse/dependence, only cannabis, and cocaine and other drugs. Logistic conditional regression showed that alcohol dependence was strongly associated with pattern of drug abuse/dependence. Thus, compared to the "no drug abuse group", the odds ratio for association with diagnosis of abuse/dependence on cocaine and other drugs was 10.2 (95% CI: 4.9-21.2, whereas for abuse/dependence on cannabis only, the odds ratio was 1.0. For affective disorders, the odds ratio was 2.0 (95% CI: 1.10-3.64 for the group that received a diagnosis of abuse/dependence on cocaine and other drugs, whereas no association was found for those with abuse/dependence on cannabis only. In conclusion, there is not a homogeneous group of "drug users", and the role of risk factors depends on the drug use pattern.

  13. A case-control study on alcohol and psychiatric disorders as risk factors for drug abuse pattern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia S. Lopes

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated alcohol and psychiatric disorders as risk factors for the pattern of drug abuse/dependence in a matched case-control study (370 adults. Cases (drug abusers and controls were selected in the community using the snowball technique and matched by sex, age, and friendship. Information was gathered using the "Composite International Diagnostic Interview" (CIDI. Three patterns of drug abuse/dependence were evaluated: any drug abuse/dependence, only cannabis, and cocaine and other drugs. Logistic conditional regression showed that alcohol dependence was strongly associated with pattern of drug abuse/dependence. Thus, compared to the "no drug abuse group", the odds ratio for association with diagnosis of abuse/dependence on cocaine and other drugs was 10.2 (95% CI: 4.9-21.2, whereas for abuse/dependence on cannabis only, the odds ratio was 1.0. For affective disorders, the odds ratio was 2.0 (95% CI: 1.10-3.64 for the group that received a diagnosis of abuse/dependence on cocaine and other drugs, whereas no association was found for those with abuse/dependence on cannabis only. In conclusion, there is not a homogeneous group of "drug users", and the role of risk factors depends on the drug use pattern.

  14. Childhood abuse increases the risk of depressive and anxiety symptoms and history of suicidal behavior in Mexican pregnant women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma. Asunción Lara

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective:To explore the relationship between individual and co-occurring childhood sexual, physical, and verbal abuse, prenatal depressive (PDS and anxiety symptoms (PAS, and history of suicidal behavior (HSB among Mexican pregnant women at risk of depression.Methods:A sample of 357 women screened for PDS was interviewed using the Childhood Experience of Care and Abuse Questionnaire (CECA-Q, the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II, the anxiety subscale of the Hopkins Symptoms Checklist (SCL-90, and specific questions on verbal abuse and HSB.Results:Logistic regression analyses showed that women who had experienced childhood sexual abuse (CSA were 2.60 times more likely to develop PDS, 2.58 times more likely to develop PAS, and 3.71 times more likely to have HSB. Childhood physical abuse (CPA increased the risk of PAS (odds ratio [OR] = 2.51 and HSB (OR = 2.62, while childhood verbal abuse (CVA increased PDS (OR = 1.92. Experiencing multiple abuses increased the risk of PDS (OR = 3.01, PAS (OR = 3.73, and HSB (OR = 13.73.Conclusions:Childhood sexual, physical, and verbal abuse, especially when they co-occur, have an impact on PDS and PAS and lifetime HSB. These findings suggest that pregnant women at risk for depression should also be screened for trauma as a risk factor for perinatal psychopathology.

  15. Delinquent Risks of Parental Abuse at the Age of 11 Years among At-Risk Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Chau-kiu

    2014-01-01

    Parental abuse is supposedly objectionable because it is the instigation of the child's delinquency. This instigation is likely to stem from the impairment of parental control arising from parental abuse, with respect to social control theory. For the substantiation of this likelihood, the present study surveyed 229 users of youth social work…

  16. Risk Factors and Protective Factors in Relation to Subjective Health among Adult Female Victims of Child Sexual Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonzon, Eva; Lindblad, Frank

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationships between risk and protective factors and health outcome in a sample of adult females who had been victims of child sexual abuse. Method: Both person- and variable-oriented analyses were applied to questionnaire data from a non-clinical group of women (n=152) reporting sexual abuse during childhood.…

  17. Effects of Trauma Intervention on HIV Sexual Risk Behaviors among Women with Co-Occurring Disorders in Substance Abuse Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaro, Hortensia; Larson, Mary Jo; Zhang, Annie; Acevedo, Andrea; Dai, Jianyu; Matsumoto, Atsushi

    2007-01-01

    Women in substance abuse treatment often have co-occurring mental health disorders and a history of trauma; they are also at high risk for HIV infection and other sexually transmitted diseases via unprotected sex. A quasi-experimental study evaluated the effectiveness of trauma-enhanced substance abuse treatment combined with HIV/AIDS prevention…

  18. Effects of Community Based Educational Prevention Program of Drug Abuse in Reduction of High Risk Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Aranpour

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Overcoming social problems requires a participatory approach. This study was performed in order to determine the effect of community based educational prevention program of drug abuse in reduction of high risk behavior. Methods: This study was a community based participatory research. According to planned approach to community health model, "the health companion group" was established with participation of public representatives of villages, researchers, and managers of health sectors. Need assessment and priority setting of health problems was done. Drug abuse was selected as the topmost priority of health problems. By interviewing 10 year olds and older members of households, the questionnaires were completed. By conducting workshops, distributing educational pamphlets and face to face training for six months, the educational program was carried out. After this period, the study population was interviewed again. Data was analyzed by SPSS software, X2, and T tests. Results: The mean score of drug abuse related high risk behavior was 26.8 +/- 2.05 before educational program and 25.2 ±2.3 after the program. The mean score of psychological health was 26.2±5.8 before educational program and 26.4±5.7 after the program. The rate of negative drug abusing related behavior decreased and positive behavior increased after the educational program. Conclusion: The community based participatory research with participation of the public can be a proper pattern to prevent drug abuse and related high risk behaviors and as a result reduce costs and complications of this problem.

  19. Risk factors for femicide-suicide in abusive relationships: results from a multisite case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koziol-McLain, Jane; Webster, Daniel; McFarlane, Judith; Block, Carolyn Rebecca; Ulrich, Yvonne; Glass, Nancy; Campbell, Jacquelyn C

    2006-02-01

    The killing of women by men who then take their own lives (femicide-suicide) is the most common form of homicide-suicide. This study identified femicide-suicide risk factors in an 11-city case-control study of femicide in the United States. Perpetrator, victim, relationship, and incident characteristics were analyzed for femicide-suicide cases (n = 67) and controls (n = 356, women living in the community with nonfatal physical abuse) using logistic regression modeling. Two risk factors emerged that were unique to femicide-suicides cases compared to overall femicide risk analyses: prior perpetrator suicide threats and victims having ever been married to the perpetrator. PMID:16494130

  20. Child sexual abuse, links to later sexual exploitation/high-risk sexual behavior, and prevention/treatment programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalor, Kevin; McElvaney, Rosaleen

    2010-10-01

    This paper reviews the literature on the nature and incidence of child sexual abuse, explores the link between child sexual abuse and later sexual exploitation, and reviews the literature on prevention strategies and effective interventions in child sexual abuse services. Our understanding of the international epidemiology of child sexual abuse is considerably greater than it was just 10 years ago, and studies from around the world are examined. Childhood sexual abuse can involve a wide number of psychological sequelae, including low self-esteem, anxiety, and depression. Numerous studies have noted that child sexual abuse victims are vulnerable to later sexual revictimization, as well as the link between child sexual abuse and later engagement in high-risk sexual behaviour. Survivors of child sexual abuse are more likely to have multiple sex partners, become pregnant as teenagers, and experience sexual assault as adults. Various models which attempt to account for this inter-relationship are presented; most invoke mediating variables such as low self-esteem, drug/alcohol use, PTSD and distorted sexual development. Prevention strategies for child sexual abuse are examined including media campaigns, school-based prevention programmes, and therapy with abusers. The results of a number of meta-analyses are examined. However, researchers have identified significant methodological limitations in the extant research literature that impede the making of recommendations for implementing existing therapeutic programmes unreservedly. PMID:20679329

  1. Relationship Power and Sexual Risk among Women in Community-Based Substance Abuse Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Campbell, Aimee N. C.; Tross, Susan; Dworkin, Shari L.; Hu, Mei-Chen; Manuel, Jennifer; Pavlicova, Martina; Nunes, Edward V.

    2009-01-01

    Relationship power has been highlighted as a major factor influencing women’s safer sex practices. Little research, however, has specifically examined relationship power in drug-involved women, a population with increased risk for HIV transmission. Using baseline data from a National Institute on Drug Abuse Clinical Trials Network multisite trial of a women’s HIV prevention intervention in community-based drug treatment programs, this paper examined the association between sexual relationship...

  2. Impulsivity and HIV Risk Among Adjudicated Alcohol- and Other Drug-Abusing Adolescent Offenders

    OpenAIRE

    Dévieux, Jessy; Malow, Robert; Stein, Judith A.; Jennings, Terri E; Lucenko, Barbara A.; Averhart, Cara; Kalichman, Seth

    2002-01-01

    Although impulsivity is likely to be related to HIV risk—particularly in incarcerated substance-abusing youth—this area of research has been understudied. To investigate the relationship between impulsivity and various HIV/AIDS risk behaviors and attitudes, a sample of court-referred and incarcerated culturally diverse inner-city adolescents (males: N = 266; females: N = 111) were divided into high and low impulsive groups based on the Millon Adolescent Clinical Inventory Impulsivity Scale. F...

  3. Assessment and Treatment of Abuse Risk in Opioid Prescribing for Chronic Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Juliana Serraillier; Jamison, Robert N.; Edward Michna

    2011-01-01

    Opioid analgesics provide effective treatment for noncancer pain, but many physicians have concerns about adverse effects, tolerance, and addiction. Misuse of opioids is prominent in patients with chronic back pain and early recognition of misuse risk could help physicians offer adequate patient care while implementing appropriate levels of monitoring to reduce aberrant drug-related behaviors. In this review, we discuss opioid abuse and misuse issues that often arise in the treatment of patie...

  4. Early and mid-adolescence risk factors for later substance abuse by African Americans and European Americans.

    OpenAIRE

    Gil, Andres G.; Vega, William A.; Turner, R. Jay

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study examines the relationship between risk factors experienced during adolescence by African Americans and European Americans and DSM-IV alcohol dependence and marijuana abuse or dependence in early adulthood. METHODS: The authors followed a cohort of adolescents from 1990-91 (grades 6 and 7) to 1998-2000 (ages 19-21), evaluating risk factors during early adolescence as predictors of DSM-IV alcohol dependence and marijuana abuse and dependence. RESULTS: African Americans had...

  5. Relationships and Community Risk Factors for Elder Abuse and Neglect: Findings from the First National Prevalence Study on Elder Maltreatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrinka Jordanova Peshevska

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The objective of the study was to mesaure the 12-months prevalence of elder abuse and neglect in private huousehold and to examine the relationship and community level risk factors for elder abuse and neglect. METHOD: Total of 960 respondents aged 65 years and above in private households, from all eight statistical regions participated in the study.  Nationally stratified quota sampling procedure was applied, through four stages. Information was collected in face-to face interview on socio-demographic, healthy life style, physical and mental health, and abuse and neglect types characteristics of elder population. Data were examined using descriptive statistics, binary logistic regression, and odd ratios (OR. Statistical significance was set up at p < 0.05. RESULTS: The respondents reported prevalence of psychological abuse 25.7%, followed by financial abuse 12 %, neglect 6.6%, physical abuse 5.7%, physical injury 3.1%, and sexual abuse 1.3% (reported only in female respondents in the previous 12-months. Living with close relatives, dissatisfaction with the household income, less equipped households, lacking property of house/flat are associated risk factors for elder maltreatment on relationship level. Living in the northeast, southeast, and Polog region are associated risk for elder maltreatment. CONCLUSION: Study findings emphasised the previous data obtained with regards to the community and relationships risk factors for elder maltreatment.

  6. Risk factors of child physical abuse by parents with mixed anxiety-depressive disorder or posttraumatic stress disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Kalebić Jakupčević, Katija; Ajduković, Marina

    2011-01-01

    Aim To determine the risk that parents with mixed anxiety and depressive disorder (MADD) or posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) will physically abuse their child and evaluate the specific contribution of mental health, perceived social support, experience of childhood abuse, and attributes of family relations to the risk of child physical abuse. Method The study conducted in 2007 included men (n = 25) and women (n = 25) with a diagnosis of MADD, men with a diagnosis of PTSD (n = 30), and a c...

  7. Childhood Risk Factors in Substance Abuse Among a Group of Abuser 20-30 Year-Old Group in Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.R. Zahiredin

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Substance use disorder is the second most common psychiatric disorders and is far more prevalent among young adults (ages;18-34y/0. Because of its importance and main effect in society, this study performed for evaluation of association fourteen childhood and adoleseence pathologic factors with substance use disorder among a group of abuser (20-30/0that referred to five addiction center in Tehran . The sample consist 100 patient: including 50 case and 50 control who were selected by DSM- IV based semi-structured diagnostic interviews for decrease memory biases in this retrospective cohart study. The patient’s parents also evaluated by DSM- IV based Semi-structured diagnostic interviews. The analysis showed significant relation between: parents control on the siblings, addiction in relatives of pt (except parents, addicted peers and friends, to be affected with the peers and friends and substance use disorder at the ages (20-30y/o. There wasn’t any association between: Disruptive childhood behaviors (under 11y/o, diagnosed medical illness (under 11y/o diagnosed Psychiatric illness (under 6 mo , family size, socio economic state and substance use disorder at the age(20-30y/0 . Finally some childhood and adolescence pathologic factors has association with Substance use disorder at the ages ( 20-30y/5 that these can be used for education all planning , prevention , design high risk group and remedical plans.

  8. Mothers of Children with Externalizing Behavior Problems: Cognitive Risk Factors for Abuse Potential and Discipline Style and Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElroy, Erika M.; Rodriguez, Christina M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Utilizing the conceptual framework of the Social Information Processing (SIP) model ([Milner, 1993] and [Milner, 2000]), associations between cognitive risk factors and child physical abuse risk and maladaptive discipline style and practices were examined in an at-risk population. Methods: Seventy-three mothers of 5-12-year-old…

  9. A cross-sectional study of factors underlying the risk of female nurses' suffering abuse by their partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Borrego, María-Aurora; Vaquero-Abellán, Manuel; Rosa, Liana Bertagnolli da

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to identify factors underlying the risk of suffering abuse by a partner. A cross-sectional study of 622 female nurses was accomplished, randomly chosen at their place of work, at a hospital and health centers. We used a self-administered validated questionnaire that covered psychological, physical and sexual abuse, complemented by a set of sociodemographic questions. The nurses at most risk of being abused by their partners were those who supported their family by their own salary (Odds Ratio: 2.41 [0.63-9.15]), those who lived with dependents (Odds Ratio: 4.27 [1.43-2.78]) and had a partner from social class IIIa (Odds Ratio: 2.62 [1.37-5.00]). The data appear to indicate financial independence as a risk factor for this type of abuse. PMID:22481716

  10. Risk, resilience, and the rorschach: a longitudinal study of children who experienced sexual abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Douglas; Heinze, Hillary J; Arble, Eamonn

    2013-01-01

    Experiencing sexual abuse increases the risk that children will report or otherwise demonstrate problems with emotion, behavior, and health. This longitudinal study of 44 children who experienced sexual abuse examined whether information processing as assessed via the Rorschach Inkblot Test was associated with child-reported depression symptoms assessed via the Children's Depression Inventory (Kovacs, 1992) concurrently and an average of 15 months later. Children whose Rorschach protocols were relatively free of scores suggesting intense distress, complex processing, and sexual content were more likely to experience remission of depression symptoms at follow-up. Findings provide incremental validity for certain Rorschach indexes to inform prognosis regarding depression symptoms and perhaps their treatment. PMID:23941130

  11. Antisocial Psychopathy and HIV Risk among Alcohol and Other Drug (AOD Abusing Adolescent Offenders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert M. Malow

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available While the consensus is that HIV prevalence has remained low among adolescent offenders, the prevalence of STDs and HIV transmission risk behaviors is alarming, particularly for those abusing alcohol and other drugs and those displaying antisocial or conduct disorder characteristics. In the current study, 269 male and 110 female inner city, culturally diverse alcohol and other drug (AOD abusing adolescent offenders completed measures of (a psychopathy, using the Millon Adolescent Clinical Inventory (MACI (b HIV transmission risk behavior, (c prevention skills and attitudes and (d social desirability. Results showed that those with high levels of psychopathy reported more AOD use, overall unprotected sex and more sexual activity when influenced by alcohol and/or marijuana. High psychopathy adolescent offenders also reported lower self-efficacy and sexual response-efficacy, less favorable safer sex and condom attitudes and less favorable intentions to engage in safer sex behaviors, when controlling for social desirability. Data suggest that adolescent offenders, who are either in court-ordered treatment or detention, should be assessed for psychopathy and provided with tailored risk reduction interventions, geared toward attitudinal and behavioral change. A discussion of integrating neurobiological measures to improve the next generation of tailored interventions for this risk group is offered in conclusion.

  12. Sensation Seeking and Risk-Taking Propensity as Mediators in the Relationship between Childhood Abuse and HIV-Related Risk Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornovalova, Marina A.; Gwadz, Marya A.; Kahler, Christopher; Aklin, W. M.; Lejuez, C. W.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: Although a wealth of literature suggests that childhood physical, emotional, and sexual abuse are related to later-life HIV-related risk behaviors, few studies have explored disinhibition (e.g., impulsivity, risk-taking propensity, and sensation-seeking) as a risk factor in this relationship. Method: This cross-sectional study examined…

  13. Benzodiazepine metabolism: an analytical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandrioli, Roberto; Mercolini, Laura; Raggi, Maria Augusta

    2008-10-01

    Benzodiazepines are currently among the most frequently prescribed drugs all over the world. They act as anxiolytics, sedatives, hypnotics, amnesics, antiepileptics and muscle relaxants. Despite their common chemical scaffold, these drugs differ in their pharmacokinetic and metabolic properties. In particular, they are biotransformed by different cytochrome P450 isoforms and also by different UDP-glucuronosyltransferase subtypes. The most important studies on the metabolic characteristics of several 1,4-benzodiazepines, carried out from 1998 onwards, are reported and briefly discussed in this review. Moreover, the analytical methods related to these studies are also described and commented upon and their most important characteristics are highlighted. Most methods are based on liquid chromatography, which provides wide applicability and good analytical performance granting high precision, accuracy and feasibility. Mass spectrometry is gaining widespread acceptance, particularly if the matrix is very complex and variable, such as human or animal blood. However, spectrophotometric detection is still used for this purpose and can grant sufficient selectivity and sensitivity when coupled to suitable sample pre-treatment procedures. A monograph is included for each of the following benzodiazepines: alprazolam, bromazepam, brotizolam, clotiazepam, diazepam, etizolam, flunitrazepam, lorazepam, midazolam, oxazepam and triazolam. PMID:18855614

  14. Drugged drivers in Norway with benzodiazepine detections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skurtveit, Svetlana; Abotnes, Bjørg; Christophersen, Asbjørg S

    2002-01-24

    Norwegian drugged drivers with benzodiazepine (BZD) detections have been studied with regard to drug use pattern and rearrest rate. During 1995, 3343 drivers were apprehended by the police in Norway due to the suspicion of influence by drugs. Blood samples from all drivers were sent to the National Institute of Forensic Toxicology (NIFT). The samples were analysed using a standard program covering the most commonly abused drugs on the marked in Norway. BZDs, representing some of the most frequently detected drugs, were found in approximately 30% (n = 1051) of the cases, represented by 14% (n = 150) female and 86% (n = 901) male drivers. In 8% of the cases, one BZD only was detected, half of these cases with one BZD could reflect therapeutic use. One or more BZDs were combined with illegal drug(s) (73%), other prescribed drugs (10%), and/or alcohol (24%). 62% of the drivers with BZD detections, had earlier been arrested for the same offence, or six cases per rearrested driver. The frequency of earlier arrests were lower for female (34%) than for male (67%) drivers. Alcohol was most frequently found for those arrested for the first time before 1992, while BZD or illegal drugs were most frequently found for those with their first arrest during 1992-1995. Our study shows that apprehended drivers using BZD are mainly represented by drug abusers due to frequent multi-drug use, blood concentrations representing doses above therapeutic levels and high rearrest rate for the same offence. A treatment program or other reactions, are thus necessary in addition to fines, prison penalty and suspension of driving licence. PMID:11852205

  15. Application of satellite imagery to monitoring human rights abuse of vulnerable communities, with minimal risk to relief staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavers, C.; Bishop, C.; Hawkins, O.; Grealey, E.; Cox, C.; Thomas, D.; Trimel, S.

    2009-07-01

    Space imagery offers remote surveillance of ethnic people groups at risk of human rights abuse. We highlight work in alleged violations in Burma and Sudan, using satellite imagery for verification with Amnesty International. We consider how imaging may effectively support small to medium-sized Non Governmental Organisations and charities, e.g. HART, working in dangerous zones on the ground. Satellite based sensing applications are now at a sufficiently mature stage for moderate Governmental funding levels to help prevent human rights abuse, rather than the greater cost of rebuilding communities and healing sectarian divisions after abuse has taken place.

  16. Application of satellite imagery to monitoring human rights abuse of vulnerable communities, with minimal risk to relief staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Space imagery offers remote surveillance of ethnic people groups at risk of human rights abuse. We highlight work in alleged violations in Burma and Sudan, using satellite imagery for verification with Amnesty International. We consider how imaging may effectively support small to medium-sized Non Governmental Organisations and charities, e.g. HART, working in dangerous zones on the ground. Satellite based sensing applications are now at a sufficiently mature stage for moderate Governmental funding levels to help prevent human rights abuse, rather than the greater cost of rebuilding communities and healing sectarian divisions after abuse has taken place.

  17. Risk Factors for Physical Injury Among Help-Seeking Battered Women: An Exploration of Multiple Abuse Dimensions

    OpenAIRE

    Mechanic, Mindy B.; Weaver, Terri L.; Resick, Patricia A.

    2008-01-01

    Physical injuries among battered women represent risks for both acute and long-term physical health functioning. The current study assessed the nature and extent of minor and severe injuries among a help-seeking sample of battered women. Hierarchical regression analyses were conducted to assess the unique roles of physical violence, sexual coercion, psychological abuse, and stalking to the prediction of minor and severe injuries in battered women. Not unexpectedly, length of relationship abus...

  18. Benzodiazepines and postoperative cognitive dysfunction in the elderly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, L.S.; Steentoft, Anni; Rasmussen, H.; Kristensen, P.A.; Møller, J.T.

    1999-01-01

    hypnotics benzodiazepine,diazepam,age factor,anaesthesia,geriatric,psychological responses,postoperative......hypnotics benzodiazepine,diazepam,age factor,anaesthesia,geriatric,psychological responses,postoperative...

  19. Abuse victimization and risk of breast cancer in the Black Women’s Health Study: Abuse and breast cancer risk in black women

    OpenAIRE

    Wise, Lauren A; Palmer, Julie R.; Boggs, Deborah A; Adams-Campbell, Lucile L.; Rosenberg, Lynn

    2011-01-01

    Few studies have examined the relation between abuse victimization and breast cancer, and results have been inconclusive. Using data from 35,728 participants in the Black Women’s Health Study, we conducted multivariable Cox regression to estimate incidence rate ratios (IRRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association of abuse across the life span (childhood, adolescence, and adulthood) with breast cancer. Incident breast cancer diagnoses were reported during 1995–2009, and abuse hi...

  20. Assessment and Treatment of Abuse Risk in Opioid Prescribing for Chronic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert N. Jamison

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Opioid analgesics provide effective treatment for noncancer pain, but many physicians have concerns about adverse effects, tolerance, and addiction. Misuse of opioids is prominent in patients with chronic back pain and early recognition of misuse risk could help physicians offer adequate patient care while implementing appropriate levels of monitoring to reduce aberrant drug-related behaviors. In this review, we discuss opioid abuse and misuse issues that often arise in the treatment of patients with chronic back pain and present an overview of assessment and treatment strategies that can be effective in improving compliance with the use of prescription opioids for pain. Many persons with chronic back pain have significant medical, psychiatric and substance use comorbidities that affect treatment decisions and a comprehensive evaluation that includes a detailed history, physical, and mental health evaluation is essential. Although there is no “gold standard” for opioid misuse risk assessment, several validated measures have been shown to be useful. Controlled substance agreements, regular urine drug screens, and interventions such as motivational counseling have been shown to help improve patient compliance with opioids and to minimize aberrant drug-related behavior. Finally, we discuss the future of abuse-deterrent opioids and other potential strategies for back pain management.

  1. Characterization of astrocytic and neuronal benzodiazepine receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, A.S.

    1988-01-01

    Primary cultures of astrocytes and neurons express benzodiazepine receptors. Neuronal benzodiazepine receptors were of high-affinity, K{sub D} values were 7.5-43 nM and the densities of receptors (B{sub max}) were 924-4131 fmol/mg protein. Astrocytes posses a high-affinity benzodiazepine receptor, K{sub D} values were 6.6-13 nM. The B{sub max} values were 6,033-12,000 fmol/mg protein. The pharmacological profile of the neuronal benzodiazepine receptor was that of the central-type benzodiazepine receptor, where clonazepam has a high-affinity and Ro 5-4864 (4{prime}-chlorodiazepam) has a low-affinity. Whereas astrocytic benzoidazepine receptor was characteristic of the so called peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptors, which shows a high-affinity towards Ro 5-4863, and a low-affinity towards clonazepam. The astrocytic benzodiazepine receptors was functionally correlated with voltage dependent calcium channels, since dihydropyridines and benzodiazepines interacted with ({sup 3}H) diazepam and ({sup 3}H) nitrendipine receptors with the same rank order of potency, showing a statistically significant correlation. No such correlation was observed in neurons.

  2. Clonazepam as Agonist Substitution Treatment for Benzodiazepine Dependence: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Angelo Giovanni Icro Maremmani; Luca Rovai; Fabio Rugani; Silvia Bacciardi; Matteo Pacini; Liliana Dell'Osso; Icro Maremmani

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays, the misuse of benzodiazepines (BZDs) is a cause for a serious concern among pharmacologically inexperienced patients, whether treated or untreated, that could lead to significant complications, including tolerance, dependence, and addiction. We present a case report in which an Italian patient affected by anxiety disorder and treated with BZDs presented a severe case of dependence on BZDs. We treated him according to an agonist substitution approach, switching from the abused BZD to...

  3. Suicide risk and alcohol and drug abuse in outpatients with HIV infection and Chagas disease

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    Patrícia M. Guimarães

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate psychiatric comorbidities in outpatients receiving care for HIV and Chagas disease at Instituto de Pesquisa Clínica Evandro Chagas (IPEC, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz (Fiocruz, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Methods: Cross-sectional study with a consecutive sample of 125 patients referred to an outpatient psychiatric clinic from February to December 2010. The Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI was used. Factors associated with more frequent mental disorders were estimated by odds ratios (OR with 95% confidence intervals (95%CI by multiple logistic regression. Results: Seventy-six (60.8% patients with HIV, 40 (32% patients with Chagas disease, and nine (7.2% patients with human T-lymphotropic virus were interviewed. The majority were women (64%, with up to 8 years of formal education (56%, and unemployed (81.6%. The median age was 49 years. Suicide risk (n=71 (56%, agoraphobia (n=65 (52%, major depressive episode (n=56 (44.8%, and alcohol/drug abuse (n=43 (34.4% predominated, the latter being directly associated with lower family income (OR = 2.64; 95%CI 1.03-6.75 and HIV infection (OR = 5.24; 95%CI 1.56-17.61. Suicide risk was associated with non-white skin color (OR = 2.21; 95%CI 1.03-4.75, unemployment (OR = 2.72; 95%CI 1.01-7.34, and diagnosis of major depression (OR = 3.34; 95%CI 1.54-7.44. Conclusion: Measures targeting adverse socioeconomic conditions and psychiatric and psychological monitoring and care should be encouraged in this population, considering the association with abuse of alcohol/other psychoactive drugs and suicide risk.

  4. Addressing the Issue of Chronic, Inappropriate Benzodiazepine Use: How Can Pharmacists Play a Role?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen C. Gallagher

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Prescribing guidelines do not recommend the long-term use of benzodiazepines since their effectiveness with chronic use is out-weighed by risks including dependence, memory and cognitive impairment, hip fractures and traffic accidents. Despite these guidelines, historical data points to an increasing proportion of inappropriate, repeat prescribing of benzodiazepines in Ireland and elsewhere, with up to 33% of patients who use these drugs doing so long-term. The typical long-term benzodiazepine user is an older, socio-economically disadvantaged patient who has been prescribed these medicines by their general practitioner (GP and dispensed them by their community pharmacist. Misuse of benzodiazepines in nursing homes and psychiatric institutions is also of concern, with one Irish study indicating that almost half of all admissions to a psychiatric hospital were prescribed these drugs, usually despite a lack of clear clinical need. Discontinuation of benzodiazepines has proven to be of benefit, as it is followed by improvements in cognitive and psychomotor function, particularly in elderly patients. It is obvious that an inter-professional effort, focusing on the primary care setting, is required to address benzodiazepine misuse and to ensure appropriate pharmaceutical care. Pharmacists must be an integral part of this inter-professional effort, not least because they are uniquely positioned as the health professional with most frequent patient contact. There is already some supporting evidence that pharmacists’ involvement in interventions to reduce benzodiazepine use can have positive effects on patient outcomes. Here, this evidence is reviewed and the potential for pharmacists to play an expanded role in ensuring the appropriate use of benzodiazepines is discussed.

  5. Childhood Risk Factors in Substance Abuse Among a Group of Abuser 20-30 Year-Old Group in Tehran

    OpenAIRE

    A.R. Zahiredin; A. Kiany

    2004-01-01

    Substance use disorder is the second most common psychiatric disorders and is far more prevalent among young adults (ages;18-34y/0). Because of its importance and main effect in society, this study performed for evaluation of association fourteen childhood and adoleseence pathologic factors with substance use disorder among a group of abuser (20-30/0)that referred to five addiction center in Tehran . The sample consist 100 patient: including 50 case and 50 control who...

  6. ELISA Detection of Phenazepam, Etizolam, Pyrazolam, Flubromazepam, Diclazepam and Delorazepam in Blood Using Immunalysis® Benzodiazepine Kit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Lauren C; Torrance, Hazel J; McKeown, Denise A

    2016-03-01

    Phenazepam and etizolam were the first uncontrolled benzodiazepines available for sale in the UK. Pyrazolam, flubromazepam and diclazepam are not used medicinally anywhere in the world; they are produced exclusively for the uncontrolled, recreational market. It is important to know whether potentially abused drugs like these can be detected in routine toxicological screening tests. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the Immunalysis® Benzodiazepines ELISA kit could detect phenazepam, etizolam, pyrazolam, flubromazepam, diclazepam and its metabolite delorazepam. Their cross-reactivity was assessed by comparing the absorbance of the drug with that of oxazepam, the reference standard. This study found that these uncontrolled benzodiazepines cross-react sufficiently to produce a positive result with the Immunalysis® Benzodiazepine ELISA kit. Cross-reactivity ranged from 79 to 107% for phenazepam, etizolam, pyrazolam, flubromazepam, diclazepam and delorazepam fortified into blood. The results show that it is possible to detect these newer benzodiazepines with traditional forensic toxicology laboratory tools and it is important to include these benzodiazepines in the confirmation tests. PMID:26518230

  7. Antidepressant Induced Mania : Is it a risk factor for Antidepressant Abuse?

    OpenAIRE

    Ramesh, S; Khandelwal, Sudhir K

    2003-01-01

    Induction of mania is a common occurrence with antidepressant use. A case of antidepressant induced hypomania leading to antidepressant abuse is presented. The clinical implications of antidepressant abuse in bipolar disorder are discussed.

  8. Sex Differences and HIV Risk Behaviors: The Interaction Between the Experience of Multiple Types of Abuse and Self-Restraint on HIV Risk Behaviors

    OpenAIRE

    Conrad, Selby M.; Swenson, Rebecca R.; Hancock, Evan; Brown, Larry K.

    2014-01-01

    Adolescents with abuse histories have been shown to be at increased risk to acquire Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Sexually Transmitted Infections (HIV/STI). Additionally, teens with lower levels of self-restraint or higher levels of distress, such as those with psychiatric concerns, have also demonstrated increased sexual risk behaviors. This study explored sex differences in sexual risk behaviors among a sample of adolescents in a therapeutic/alternative high school setting. Moderated regress...

  9. At Risk: The Relationship between Experiences of Child Sexual Abuse and Women's HIV Status in Papua New Guinea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Ione R.

    2012-01-01

    Child sexual abuse in Papua New Guinea is a human rights issue as well as an indicator of HIV risk in women. This study aimed to develop knowledge about the link between violence experienced by women and their HIV status. The study used a mixed method approach to collect quantitative and qualitative data through structured interviews with a sample…

  10. Risk Factors of Parents Abused as Children: A Mediational Analysis of the Intergenerational Continuity of Child Maltreatment (Part I)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Louise; Browne, Kevin; Hamilton-Giachritsis, Catherine

    2005-01-01

    Background: This study provides an exploration of factors implicated in the intergenerational cycle of child maltreatment. Families with newborns where at least one of the parents was physically and/or sexually abused as a child (AP families) were compared in terms of risk factors to families where the parents had no childhood history of…

  11. A scale for home visiting nurses to identify risks of physical abuse and neglect among mothers with newborn infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grietens, H; Geeraert, L; Hellinckx, W

    2004-01-01

    Objective: The aim was to construct and test the reliability (utility, internal consistency, interrater agreement) and the validity (internal validity, concurrent validity) of a scale for home visiting social nurses to identify risks of physical abuse and neglect in mothers with a newborn child. Met

  12. Cross-Cultural Comparisons of Child-Reported Emotional and Physical Abuse: Rates, Risk Factors and Psychosocial Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebre, Sandra; Sprugevica, Ieva; Novotni, Antoni; Bonevski, Dimitar; Pakalniskiene, Vilmante; Popescu, Daniela; Turchina, Tatiana; Friedrich, William; Lewis, Owen

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: This study was designed to assess the incidence of child emotional and physical abuse, associated risk factors and psychosocial symptoms in a cross-cultural comparison between post-communist bloc countries. Method: One-thousand one-hundred forty-five children ages 10-14 from Latvia (N=297), Lithuania (N=300), Macedonia (N=302), and…

  13. Pathways from childhood abuse and other adversities to adult health risks: The role of adult socioeconomic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Font, Sarah A; Maguire-Jack, Kathryn

    2016-01-01

    Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs), including child abuse, have been linked with poor health outcomes in adulthood. The mechanisms that explain these relations are less understood. This study assesses whether associations of ACEs and health risks are mediated by adult socioeconomic conditions, and whether these pathways are different for maltreatment than for other types of adversities. Using the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System 2012 survey (N=29,229), we employ structural equation modeling to (1) estimate associations of the number and type of ACEs with five health risks-depression, obesity, tobacco use, binge drinking, and self-reported sub-optimal health; and (2) assess whether adult socioeconomic conditions-marriage, divorce and separation, educational attainment, income and insurance status-mediate those associations. Findings suggest both direct and indirect associations between ACEs and health risks. At high numbers of ACEs, 15-20% of the association between number of ACEs and adult health risks was attributable to socioeconomic conditions. Associations of three ACEs (exposure to domestic violence, parental divorce, and residing with a person who was incarcerated) with health risks were nearly entirely explained by socioeconomic conditions in adulthood. However, child physical, emotional, and sexual abuse were significantly associated with several adult health risks, beyond the effects of other adversities, and socioeconomic conditions explained only a small portion of these associations. These findings suggest that the pathways to poor adult health differ by types of ACEs, and that childhood abuse is more likely than other adversities to have a direct impact. PMID:26059537

  14. History of Childhood Abuse, Drinking Motives, Alcohol Use, and Sexual Risk Behavior Among STD Clinic Patients in St. Petersburg, Russia: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdala, Nadia; Li, Fangyong; Shaboltas, Alla V; Skochilov, Roman V; Krasnoselskikh, Tatiana V

    2016-03-01

    The relationship between level of childhood abuse (physical and emotional) and sexual risk behavior of sexually transmitted disease clinic patients in St. Petersburg, Russia was examined through path analyses. Mediating variables investigated were: Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test (AUDIT), drinking motives (for social interaction, to enhance mood, to facilitate sexual encounters), intimate partner violence (IPV), anxiety, and depression symptoms. Results showed a significant indirect effect of childhood abuse on women's sexual risk behavior: higher level of childhood abuse was associated with a greater likelihood of IPV, motivations to drink, leading to higher AUDIT scores and correlated to higher likelihood of having multiple, new or casual sexual partner(s). No significant effect was identified in paths to condom use. Among men, childhood abuse had no significant effect on sexual risk behavior. Reduction in alcohol-related sexual risk behavior may be achieved by addressing the effects of childhood abuse among female participants. PMID:25801476

  15. Evaluation of WaySafe: A Disease-Risk Reduction Curriculum for Substance-Abusing Offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, Wayne E K; Rowan, Grace A; Greener, Jack M; Joe, George W; Yang, Yang; Knight, Kevin

    2015-11-01

    With a focus on reducing disease risk behavior in the community, a six-session curriculum, WaySafe, was developed to increase positive decision-making skills among soon-to-be-released inmates participating in a therapeutic community substance abuse treatment program. The intervention used TCU Mapping-Enhanced Counseling as an approach to focus on cognitive aspects of risky sexual and drug use behaviors in an effort to improve problem recognition, commitment to change, and strategies for avoiding behavioral risks of infections. A total of 1393 inmates from eight different institutions in two states were randomly assigned to receive WaySafe or treatment as usual (TAU). Baseline and follow-up surveys measured knowledge, confidence, and motivation regarding general HIV information, risky sex and drug use, HIV testing, and risk reduction skills. WaySafe participants had significantly better scores on all measures at follow-up than did TAU participants, supporting the efficacy of WaySafe in improving knowledge, motivation, and confidence in avoiding risky behaviors. PMID:26059002

  16. Does Age of Onset of Risk Behaviors Mediate the Relationship between Child Abuse and Neglect and Outcomes in Middle Adulthood?

    OpenAIRE

    Horan, Jacqueline M.; Widom, Cathy Spatz

    2014-01-01

    Child maltreatment has been linked with a number of risk behaviors that are associated with long-lasting maladaptive outcomes across multiple domains of functioning. This study examines whether the ages of onset of four risk behaviors—sexual intercourse, alcohol use, drug use, and criminal behavior—mediate the relationship between child maltreatment and outcomes in middle adulthood among a sample of court-documented victims of child abuse/neglect and matched controls (N = 1,196; 51.7% female;...

  17. Risk factors of parents abused as children: a mediational analysis of the intergenerational continuity of child maltreatment (Part I)

    OpenAIRE

    Dixon, Louise; Browne, Kevin; Hamilton-Giachritsis, Catherine

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study provides an exploration of factors implicated in the intergenerational cycle of child maltreatment. Families with newborns where at least one of the parents was physically and/or sexually abused as a child (AP families) were compared in terms of risk factors to families where the parents had no childhood history of victimization (NAP families). The mediational properties of risk factors in the intergenerational cycle of maltreatment were then explored. METHODS: Infor...

  18. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists for hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, B; Gluud, L L; Gluud, C

    2004-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy may be associated with accumulation of substances that bind to a receptor-complex in the brain resulting in neural inhibition. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists may have a beneficial effect on patients with hepatic encephalopathy.......Hepatic encephalopathy may be associated with accumulation of substances that bind to a receptor-complex in the brain resulting in neural inhibition. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists may have a beneficial effect on patients with hepatic encephalopathy....

  19. Mitochondrial benzodiazepine receptors regulate steroid biosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukhin, A.G.; Papadopoulos, V.; Costa, E.; Krueger, K.E. (Georgetown Univ. School of Medicine, Washington, DC (USA))

    1989-12-01

    Recent observations on the steroid synthetic capability within the brain open the possibility that benzodiazepines may influence steroid synthesis in nervous tissue through interactions with peripheral-type benzodiazepine recognition sites, which are highly expressed in steroidogenic cells and associated with the outer mitochondrial membrane. To examine this possibility nine molecules that exhibit a greater than 10,000-fold difference in their affinities for peripheral-type benzodiazepine binding sites were tested for their effects on a well-established steroidogenic model system, the Y-1 mouse adrenal tumor cell line. 4{prime}-Chlorodiazepam, PK 11195, and PK 14067 stimulated steroid production by 2-fold in Y-1 cells, whereas diazepam, flunitrazepam, zolpidem, and PK 14068 displayed a lower (1.2- to 1.5-fold) maximal stimulation. In contrast, clonazepam and flumazenil did not stimulate steroid synthesis. The potencies of these compounds to inhibit {sup 3}H-labeled PK 11195 binding to peripheral-type benzodiazepine recognition sites correlated with their potencies to stimulate steroid production. Similar findings were observed in bovine and rat adrenocortical cell preparations. These results suggest that ligands of the peripheral-type benzodiazepine recognition site acting on this mitochondrial receptor can enhance steroid production. This action may contribute specificity to the pharmacological profile of drugs preferentially acting on the benzodiazepine recognition site associated with the outer membrane of certain mitochondrial populations.

  20. Mitochondrial benzodiazepine receptors regulate steroid biosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent observations on the steroid synthetic capability within the brain open the possibility that benzodiazepines may influence steroid synthesis in nervous tissue through interactions with peripheral-type benzodiazepine recognition sites, which are highly expressed in steroidogenic cells and associated with the outer mitochondrial membrane. To examine this possibility nine molecules that exhibit a greater than 10,000-fold difference in their affinities for peripheral-type benzodiazepine binding sites were tested for their effects on a well-established steroidogenic model system, the Y-1 mouse adrenal tumor cell line. 4'-Chlorodiazepam, PK 11195, and PK 14067 stimulated steroid production by 2-fold in Y-1 cells, whereas diazepam, flunitrazepam, zolpidem, and PK 14068 displayed a lower (1.2- to 1.5-fold) maximal stimulation. In contrast, clonazepam and flumazenil did not stimulate steroid synthesis. The potencies of these compounds to inhibit 3H-labeled PK 11195 binding to peripheral-type benzodiazepine recognition sites correlated with their potencies to stimulate steroid production. Similar findings were observed in bovine and rat adrenocortical cell preparations. These results suggest that ligands of the peripheral-type benzodiazepine recognition site acting on this mitochondrial receptor can enhance steroid production. This action may contribute specificity to the pharmacological profile of drugs preferentially acting on the benzodiazepine recognition site associated with the outer membrane of certain mitochondrial populations

  1. Noninvasive assessment of the risk of tobacco abuse in oral mucosa using fluorescence spectroscopy: a clinical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazeer, Shaiju S.; Asish, Rajashekharan; Venugopal, Chandrashekharan; Anita, Balan; Gupta, Arun Kumar; Jayasree, Ramapurath S.

    2014-05-01

    Tobacco abuse and alcoholism cause cancer, emphysema, and heart disease, which contribute to high death rates, globally. Society pays a significant cost for these habits whose first demonstration in many cases is in the oral cavity. Oral cavity disorders are highly curable if a screening procedure is available to diagnose them in the earliest stages. The aim of the study is to identify the severity of tobacco abuse, in oral cavity, as reflected by the emission from endogenous fluorophores and the chromophore hemoglobin. A group who had no tobacco habits and another with a history of tobacco abuse were included in this study. To compare the results with a pathological condition, a group of leukoplakia patients were also included. Emission from porphyrin and the spectral filtering modulation effect of hemoglobin were collected from different sites. Multivariate analysis strengthened the spectral features with a sensitivity of 60% to 100% and a specificity of 76% to 100% for the discrimination. Total hemoglobin and porphyrin levels of habitués and leukoplakia groups were comparable, indicating the alarming situation about the risk of tobacco abuse. Results prove that fluorescence spectroscopy along with multivariate analysis is an effective noninvasive tool for the early diagnosis of pathological changes due to tobacco abuse.

  2. Diabetes mellitus and drug abuse during pregnancy and the risk for orofacial clefts and related abnormalities 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trindade-Suedam, Ivy Kiemle; von Kostrisch, Lília Maria; Pimenta, Luiz André Freire; Negrato, Carlos Antônio; Franzolin, Solange Braga; Trindade, Alceu Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to assessed the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) and drug abuse in mothers of children with orofacial clefts (OFC). Methods: 325 women who had children (0-3y) with clefts were interviewed. Data regarding type of diabetes, use of legal/illegal drugs during pregnancy, waist girth and fasting blood sugar at the first prenatal consult were collected. Results: twenty seven percent of the women had DM, out of these, 89% had gestational DM, 5,5% type 1 DM and 5,5% type 2 DM. The prevalence of DM in mothers of children with OFC was 27%, it is significantly higher than the average Brazilian population which is 7.6% (p<0.01) (OR=4.5, 95%CI=3.5-5.8). Regarding drug abuse during pregnancy, 32% of the mothers used drugs and a significant positive correlation was observed between drug abuse and the occurrence of clefts and other craniofacial anomalies (p=0.028) (OR=2.87; 95%CI=1.1-7.4). Conclusions: DM and drug abuse during pregnancy increases the risk for OFC and related anomalies and early diagnosis of DM and prevention of drug abuse, especially in pregnant women, should be emphasized. PMID:27508899

  3. Parenting and Family Support for Families 'at risk' - Implications from Child Abuse Reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Marie Halpenny

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The importance of family experiences on children’s development and wellbeing has been widely documented. Yet, recent reports generated by inquiries into child abuse and neglect in the Irish context raise disturbing questions with regard to how the severe maltreatment of children can occur within the family context. It is imperative that the messages generated from these inquiries can effectively inform policy and practice in terms of protecting children from harm and providing support to families at-risk. The present paper draws together key issues for parenting and family support for families ‘at risk’ based on the Roscommon and Monageer inquiries with a view to gaining insight into key issues which need to be addressed in terms of protecting children from harm and providing support for parents experiencing adversity. A number of implications arising from these reports are outlined and discussed. Specifically, the need to amplify the focus on support for parenting in the context of poverty and substance abuse is highlighted with a particular emphasis on developing sensitive screening and assessment for parents who may be difficult to engage with due to chronic mental health issues. The importance of accessing the voice of children within the provision of family support is also underlined in these findings. A key recommendation from these reports is that the needs, wishes and feelings of each child must be considered as well as the totality of the family situation. Moreover, the need for staff in child welfare and protection services to have access to ongoing training and professional development to meet the complex and changing needs of the children and families they are working with is also highlighted. Specifically, ongoing training for frontline staff in understanding the effects of drug and alcohol dependency, and, in particular, the effects on parenting and parent-child relationships is underscored in findings from these reports.

  4. Pattern of utilization of benzodiazepines in patients with hypertension: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divac Nevena

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. The analysis of drug prescribing in general practice in Serbia showed that the use of benzodiazepines is most frequently associated with hypertension. The aim of this study was to establish the correlation of the characteristics of patients with hypertension to antihypertensive drug therapy, and the intake of benzodiazepines. Methods. A special questionnaire was used for interviewing the patients (n = 171 chronically treated for hypertenson. Statistical tests used were χ2-test and Student's t-test. Results. No differences were noted in terms of age, gender, education, body weight, smoking habits and blood pressure (155±4.9/100±2.7 mmHg vs. 160±2.2/105±3.7 mmHg, between the group I (antihypertensive drugs+benzodiazepines: n = 79, and the group II (antihypertensives only: n = 92. The patients taking benzodiazepines received a lower number of different antihypertensive drugs (2.3±0.09 vs. 2.7±0.10; p < 0.01, but the total antihypertensive drug load was significantly greater than in the group II (2.6±0.10 vs. 1.9±0.15 defined daily doses (DDD/patient/day; p < 0.01. Benzodiazepines were taken for anxiety (62% and hypertension (21%, rarely for insomnia, mostly once a day, at bedtime. About half the patients took benzodiazepines regularly for months or years aware of the risk for addiction. Diazepam was used by 82% of the patients. The average daily exposure to benzodiazepines was 0.45±0.05 DDD/patient/day. The drug was bought without prescription in 25% of the patients, and without consulting a physician in 12% of them. Conclusion. The study confirmed a close association of hypertension with the use of benzodiazepines. The frequent use of benzodiazepines in the patients with hypertension might be caused by an inadequate response to antihypertensive drug therapy, besides anxiety and insomnia. The therapeutic efficacy of a long-term use of low doses of benzodiazepines in hypertension requires further investigation.

  5. Development of a screening MRI for infants at risk for abusive head trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abusive head trauma (AHT) is an important cause of morbidity in infants. Identifying which well-appearing infants are at risk for AHT and need neuroimaging is challenging, and concern about radiation exposure limits the use of head CT. Availability of an MRI protocol that is highly sensitive for intracranial hemorrhage would allow for AHT screening of well-appearing infants without exposing them to radiation. To develop a screening MRI protocol to identify intracranial hemorrhage in well-appearing infants at risk for AHT. Infants enrolled in a parent study of well-appearing infants at increased risk for AHT were eligible for the current study if they underwent both head CT and conventional brain MRI. A derivation cohort of nine infants with AHT was used to identify sequences that provided the highest sensitivity for intracranial hemorrhage. A validation cohort of 78 infants including both controls with normal neuroimaging and cases with AHT was used to evaluate the accuracy of the selected sequences. Three pulse sequences - axial T2, axial gradient recalled echo (GRE) and coronal T1-W inversion recovery - were 100% sensitive for intracranial hemorrhage in the derivation cohort. The same sequences were 100% sensitive (25/25) and 83% specific (44/53) for intracranial hemorrhage in the validation cohort. A screening MRI protocol including axial T2, axial GRE and coronal T1-W inversion recovery sequences is highly sensitive for intracranial hemorrhage and may be useful as a screening tool to differentiate well-appearing infants at risk for AHT who should undergo head CT from those who can safely be discharged without head CT. Additional research is needed to evaluate the feasibility of this approach in clinical practice. (orig.)

  6. Development of a screening MRI for infants at risk for abusive head trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flom, Lynda; Panigrahy, Ashok [Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, Department of Radiology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Fromkin, Janet [University of Pittsburgh, Department of Pediatrics, Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Tyler-Kabara, Elizabeth [University of Pittsburgh, Department of Neurosurgery, Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Berger, Rachel P. [University of Pittsburgh, Department of Pediatrics, Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); University of Pittsburgh, Safar Center for Resuscitation Research, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2016-04-15

    Abusive head trauma (AHT) is an important cause of morbidity in infants. Identifying which well-appearing infants are at risk for AHT and need neuroimaging is challenging, and concern about radiation exposure limits the use of head CT. Availability of an MRI protocol that is highly sensitive for intracranial hemorrhage would allow for AHT screening of well-appearing infants without exposing them to radiation. To develop a screening MRI protocol to identify intracranial hemorrhage in well-appearing infants at risk for AHT. Infants enrolled in a parent study of well-appearing infants at increased risk for AHT were eligible for the current study if they underwent both head CT and conventional brain MRI. A derivation cohort of nine infants with AHT was used to identify sequences that provided the highest sensitivity for intracranial hemorrhage. A validation cohort of 78 infants including both controls with normal neuroimaging and cases with AHT was used to evaluate the accuracy of the selected sequences. Three pulse sequences - axial T2, axial gradient recalled echo (GRE) and coronal T1-W inversion recovery - were 100% sensitive for intracranial hemorrhage in the derivation cohort. The same sequences were 100% sensitive (25/25) and 83% specific (44/53) for intracranial hemorrhage in the validation cohort. A screening MRI protocol including axial T2, axial GRE and coronal T1-W inversion recovery sequences is highly sensitive for intracranial hemorrhage and may be useful as a screening tool to differentiate well-appearing infants at risk for AHT who should undergo head CT from those who can safely be discharged without head CT. Additional research is needed to evaluate the feasibility of this approach in clinical practice. (orig.)

  7. Risk factors associated with retinal hemorrhage in suspected abusive head trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhart, Zachary N.; Thurber, Clinton J.; Chuang, Alice Z.; Kumar, Kartik S.; Davis, Garvin H.; Kellaway, Judianne

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine risk factors associated with retinal hemorrhage (RH) in pediatric abusive head trauma (AHT) suspects. Methods Records of children aged 0–3 years hospitalized for suspected AHT from January 2007 to November 2011 were retrospectively reviewed in this case–control study. Children were classified into case and control groups based on RH presence. Medical history, presenting symptoms, reasons, and characteristics of injury were recorded. Logistic regression analysis was performed to identify risk factors. Results A total of 168 children (104 males) were included. Of these, 103 were classified as cases and 65 as controls. The mean age (with standard deviation) was 9.3 ± 8.3 months (range, 1 day-36 months). Of the 103 cases, 22 (21%) had subretinal hemorrhage, 9 (9%) had retinoschisis, and 1 (1%) had vitreous hemorrhage. Children presenting with lethargy or altered mental status (P children with skull or nonskull fracture without intracranial hemorrhage did not have RH (P < 0.0001 both categories). Conclusions Retinal hemorrhages were almost never found in the absence of intracranial hemorrhage and not found in the setting of fracture without intracranial hemorrhage. PMID:25828822

  8. The effects of early prevention programs for families with young children at risk for physical child abuse and neglect : A meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geeraert, L; Van den Noortgate, W; Grietens, H; Onghena, P

    2004-01-01

    In this article, a meta-analysis is presented on 40 evaluation studies of early prevention programs for families with young children at risk for physical child abuse and neglect with mostly nonrandomized designs. The main aim of all programs was to prevent physical child abuse and neglect by providi

  9. Risk and Consequences of Child Abuse in Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    s. Gulin Evinc; Dilsad Foto-Ozdemir

    2015-01-01

    Awareness about child physical and emotional abuse and ndash;as well as sexual abuse- is increasing day by day. It is stated that the physical or emotional harm given to a child can result in serious psychological problems both in short and long terms. In addition to this, it is known that, the traditional discipline styles, especially applied in developing countries, can be physically and emotionally harmful and sometimes abusive. The stress level of the parent determines the parent's choic...

  10. Intimate partner abuse before and during pregnancy as risk factors for postpartum mental health problems

    OpenAIRE

    Desmarais, Sarah; Pritchard, Ashley; Lowder, Evan; Janssen, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Background Although research has established the profound effects that intimate partner abuse can have on postpartum mental health, little is known regarding how this association may change as a function of the timing and type of abuse. This study examined associations of psychological, physical and sexual abuse experienced as adults before and during pregnancy with symptoms of postpartum mental health problems in a non-clinical sample of women. Methods English-speaking mothers aged ...

  11. Intimate Partner Abuse among Gay and Bisexual Men: Risk Correlates and Health Outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Houston, Eric; McKirnan, David J.

    2007-01-01

    Little is known about the patterns and types of intimate partner abuse in same-sex male couples, and few studies have examined the psychosocial characteristics and health problems of gay and bisexual men who experience such abuse. Using a cross-sectional survey sample of 817 men who have sex with men (MSM) in the Chicago area, this study tested the effect of psychological and demographic factors generally associated with intimate partner abuse and examined their relationship to various health...

  12. Risk evaluation and mitigation strategies for drugs with abuse liability: public interest, special interest, conflicts of interest, and the industry perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Curtis; Schnoll, Sidney; Bernstein, David

    2008-10-01

    Risk evaluation and mitigation strategies (REMS) formerly known as Risk Minimization Action Plans (RiskMAPs) are a regulatory technique for dealing with anticipated risks of new medications and are especially important for new drugs with abuse potential. This paper describes the origin and history of risk-management plans for drugs that might be abused, the proper use of these plans in minimizing the risk to the public, and the special difficulties inherent in managing risks for drugs with abuse potential. Drugs with abuse liability are distinctive since the risks inherent in manufacture and distribution include not only risks to patients prescribed the medications, but also risks to the general public including subgroups in the population not intended to get the drug and who receive no medical benefit from the medication. The crafting of risk-management plans intended to protect nonpatient populations is unique for these products. The content, extent, and level of intensity of these plans affect areas of medical ethics, civil liability, and criminal prosecution. The need for risk-management plans for drugs with abuse liability can potentially act as a deterrent to investment and is a factor in decisions concerning the development of new medications for the treatments of pain, ADHD, anxiety disorders, and addictions. This paper provides a framework for moving the process of REMS development forward and criteria for evaluating the probity and adequacy of such programs. PMID:18991964

  13. Victim and victimizer: the role of traumatic experiences as risk factors for sexually abusive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Lucinda A

    2012-01-01

    The Victim to Victimizer paradigm purports to explain the connection between being a victim of sexual abuse and becoming a perpetrator, attributing sexually abusive behavior to a predictable cycle of cognitive distortions and self-destructive and/or abusive behaviors. Integration of two ecological models, Trauma Outcome Process Assessment and Family Lovemap provides a more comprehensive explanation of salient contributors to sexually abusive behavior in youth (i.e., trauma). A case example illustrates the parallel Trauma Outcome Process in a victim, and the victim's perpetrator, identifying protective factors beneficial for trauma recovery. PMID:23585464

  14. [Association between risky drinking behaviors and risk groups of substance abuse: a study in Japanese college freshmen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimane, Takuya; Wada, Kiyoshi; Mishima, Kenichi; Fujiwara, Michihiro

    2009-12-01

    This study examines the prevalence of risky drinking and the association between risky drinking behaviors and risk groups of substance abuse among college freshmen. A total of 376 college freshmen (126 boys and 248 girls) in a Japanese university participated in the study. The subjects were asked to complete self-administered, anonymous questionnaires during their class. The number of participants who had used drugs was small. The following 2 items for substance abuse were included in the questionnaires: (1) those who had drug using peers who used drugs and (2) those who had been persuaded to use drugs by their peers. On the basis of the responses, the participants were classified into 3 groups: (1) high-risk group (HRG), which accounted for 1.4% of the subjects and comprised those who answered "yes" to both the above-mentioned two items; (2) risk group (RG), which accounted for 7.4% and comprised participants who answered "yes" to one of the two items; and (3) control group (CG), which accounted for 91.2% and comprised those who did not answer "yes" to either of the two items. Bivariate analyses were performed to evaluate the association between risky drinking behaviors and risk groups of substance abuse. The results of our study indicated that 87.0% of the participants reported lifetime alcohol use, and 69.4% reported the consumption of alcohol during the past 30 days. Of the former group, 21.4% had engaged in binge drinking, 8.6% had experienced alcohol-related harassment, 9.5% had experienced alcohol-induced blackouts, and 82.0% had experienced drinking alcohol with peers without adults. There were significant associations between risk groups of substance abuse and risky drinking such as binge drinking (p = 0.001), alcohol-induced blackouts (p = 0.020), alcohol-related harassment (p = 0.012), alcohol consumption during the past 30 days (p = 0.047). However, lifetime alcohol use (p = 0.264) and experience of drinking alcohol with peers without adults (p = 0

  15. Elder Abuse and Substance Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navigation Physical Abuse Sexual Abuse Domestic Violence Psychological Abuse Financial Abuse Neglect Critical Issues The Role of Culture in Elder ... factor in all types of elder abuse, including physical mistreatment, emotional abuse, financial exploitation, and neglect. It is also a ...

  16. Alternate Routes of Administration and Risk for HIV among Prescription Opioid Abusers

    OpenAIRE

    Surratt, Hilary; Kurtz, Steven P.; Cicero, Theodore J.

    2011-01-01

    Route of administration is an important contributor to the adverse health consequences of prescription medication abuse. The present study examines characteristics associated with non-oral routes of administration among a large sample of prescription opioid abusers, and explores needle related

  17. The cost and cost-effectiveness of an enhanced intervention for people with substance abuse problems at risk for HIV.

    OpenAIRE

    Zarkin, G A; Lindrooth, R C; Demiralp, B; Wechsberg, W

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the costs, effectiveness, and cost-effectiveness of prevention interventions for out-of-treatment substance abusers at risk for HIV. This is the first cost-effectiveness study of an AIDS intervention that focuses on drug use as an outcome. STUDY DESIGN: We examined data from the North Carolina Cooperative Agreement site (NC CoOp). All individuals in the study were given the revised NIDA standard intervention and randomly assigned to either a longer, more personalized en...

  18. Risk Reduction for HIV-Positive African American and Latino Men with Histories of Childhood Sexual Abuse

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, John K.; Wyatt, Gail E.; Rivkin, Inna; Ramamurthi, Hema Codathi; Li, Xiaomin; Liu, Honghu

    2008-01-01

    While the HIV epidemic has disproportionately affected African American and Latino men who have sex with men (MSM), few HIV prevention interventions have focused on African American and Latino men who have sex with both men and women (MSMW). Even fewer interventions target HIV-positive African American and Latino MSM and MSMW with histories of childhood sexual abuse (CSA), a population that may be vulnerable to high-risk sexual behaviors, having multiple sexual partners, and depression. The M...

  19. Sexual Risk Behaviors, Alcohol Abuse, and Intimate Partner Violence among Sex Workers in Mongolia: Implications for HIV Prevention Intervention Development

    OpenAIRE

    Witte, Susan S.; Batsukh, Altantsetseg; Chang, Mingway

    2010-01-01

    This study examines HIV/STI risk behaviors, alcohol abuse, intimate partner violence, and psychological distress among 48 female sex workers in Mongolia to inform the design of a gender-specific, HIV/STI prevention intervention for this population. Quantitative findings demonstrate that over 85% of women reported drinking alcohol at harmful levels; 70% reported using condoms inconsistently with any sexual partner; 83% reported using alcohol before engaging in sex with paying partners, and 38%...

  20. Project Towards No Drug Abuse (TND): Needs Assessment of a Social Service Referral Telephone Program for High Risk Youth

    OpenAIRE

    Sussman, Steve; SKARA, SILVANA; Pumpuang, Patchareeya

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct a needs assessment of a potential social service resource telephone program component among high risk youth who received the Project Towards No Drug Abuse (TND) classroom-based program (approximately 1 year earlier). Results supported youths’ overwhelming receptiveness of a social service referral program. The vast majority of respondents indicated a strong desire for resource and referral information on vocational, educational, recreational, transport...

  1. Understanding Elder Abuse in Italy:Perception and Prevalence, Types and Risk Factors From a Review of the Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Melchiorre, Maria Gabriella; Penhale, Bridget; Lamura, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    The paper aims to perform a review of studies on elder abuse in Italy. Hand searching was undertaken of grey literature and reviews of published papers concerning local, national, and cross-national studies, both in Italian and English languages. Inferences mainly about perception and prevalence, types and risk factors, but also concerning victims and perpetrators when data were available, have been derived through the quantitative and qualitative information collected. On the whole, elder ab...

  2. Association between Physical Abuse, Physical Neglect and Health Risk Behaviours among Young Adolescents: Results from the National Study

    OpenAIRE

    Dimitrinka Jordanova Peshevska; Marija Raleva; Izabela Filov; Dinesh Sethi; Tamara Jordanova; Kadri HazdiHamza; Fimka Tozija; Vesna Damchevska Ilievska

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: One of the main objectives of this paper is to analyze the associations between physical abuse and neglect and health risk behaviours among young adolescents in the country. METHOD: A representative sample consisted of total 1277 students (58.6% female and 41.6%), aged 18 and above. About 664 of them are in last (fourth) year of secondary school and 613 respondents are first- and second-year university students. The data were obtained using Adverse Childhood Experiences Study ...

  3. Prevalence of oral lesions among HIV-infected intravenous drug abusers and other risk groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, R; Ficarra, G; Gaglioti, D; Orsi, A; Mazzotta, F

    1990-02-01

    To study the prevalence of oral manifestations, we examined 217 patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Most of our patients were intravenous drug abusers (IVDAs) (65%). Other risk categories were represented by IVDAs who were also male homosexuals or bisexuals (11%), male homosexuals and bisexuals (16%), sexual partners of HIV-infected patients (5%), and hemophilic persons and recipients of blood transfusions (3%). Forty-six patients were women and 171 were men, with a median age of 27 years (range, 11 to 65 years). At the time of first examination, 38% of patients had asymptomatic HIV infection, 36% had lymphadenopathy syndrome, 17% had AIDS-related complex, and 9% had AIDS. Oral manifestations were observed in 89 (41%) patients. Of these, 15 had asymptomatic infection, 23 had lymphadenopathy syndrome, 27 had AIDS-related complex, and 24 had AIDS. Increasing severity of disease was significantly associated with higher prevalence of oral lesions (p less than or equal to 0.0001). Candidiasis was the most common oral lesion, followed by hairy leukoplakia. Kaposi's sarcoma, melanotic macules, herpes labialis, condyloma acuminatum, perioral molluscum contagiosum, and bacterial glossitis due to Escherichia coli infection were found in a small number of patients. Results of culture for fungi, available for 203 patients, revealed that 51% of patients with positive Candida cultures had clinical evidence of candidiasis. Our study demonstrates that oral lesions are also important signs of HIV infection among IVDAs. Early diagnosis of these manifestations is becoming increasingly significant in the practice of dentistry. PMID:2304743

  4. Prevalence and risk factors of alcohol and substance abuse among motorcycle drivers in Fars province, Iran

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Seyed Taghi Heydari; Mehrdad Vossoughi; Armin Akbarzadeh; Kamran B.Lankarani; Yaser Sarikhani; Kazem Javanmardi; Ali Akbary

    2016-01-01

    Purpose:The aim of this present study is to investigate the prevalence of alcohol and substance abuse (ASA) and its relationship with other risky driving behaviors among motorcycle drivers.Methods:This is a cross sectional study which is performed at Shiraz city of Iran.Data from motorcycle drivers were collected using a standard questionnaire in eight major streets at different times of the dayThe data includes consumption of alcohol and other substances two hours before driving and some of the risky behaviors during driving.Results:A total of 414 drivers with a mean ± SD age of(27.0 + 9.3) years participated in the study.Alcohol or substance consumptions two hours before driving was significantly associated with risky driving behaviors such as using mobile phone during driving,poor maneuvering,and driving over the speed limit (both p < 0.001).It was also associated with carelessness about safety such as driving with technical defects (p < 0.001) and not wearing a crash helmet (p =0.008).Conclusion:Screening for alcohol and substance consumption among motorcycle drivers is an efficient way to identifiy drivers that are at a greater risk for road traffic accidents.

  5. Nonpharmacological Alternatives to Benzodiazepine Drugs for the Treatment of Anxiety in Outpatient Populations: A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Lois M; Whitburn, Amy Irene; Platt-Koch, Alexander G; Koch, Ronald L

    2016-08-01

    Overuse of benzodiazepine drugs to treat anxiety, mood, and sleep disorders is a growing problem in clinical practice. GABAergic medications (benzodiazepine drugs in particular) have side effects, drug interactions, and the potential to create tolerance and dependence in users. GABA-enhancing dietary supplements have similar and unique risks. Natural, non-chemical, anxiolytic treatments exist and can be safely recommended to patients. Three such treatments have been the focus of study in the past 20 years: mindfulness, meditation, and yoga. Growing evidence exists that these treatments can be safely recommended to patients with anxiety. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 54(8), 35-42.]. PMID:27479478

  6. ZNF804A variants confer risk for heroin addiction and affect decision making and gray matter volume in heroin abusers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yan; Zhao, Li-Yan; Wang, Gui-Bin; Yue, Wei-Hua; He, Yong; Shu, Ni; Lin, Qi-Xiang; Wang, Fan; Li, Jia-Li; Chen, Na; Wang, Hui-Min; Kosten, Thomas R; Feng, Jia-Jia; Wang, Jun; Tang, Yu-De; Liu, Shu-Xue; Deng, Gui-Fa; Diao, Gan-Huan; Tan, Yun-Long; Han, Hong-Bin; Lin, Lu; Shi, Jie

    2016-05-01

    Drug addiction shares common neurobiological pathways and risk genes with other psychiatric diseases, including psychosis. One of the commonly identified risk genes associated with broad psychosis has been ZNF804A. We sought to test whether psychosis risk variants in ZNF804A increase the risk of heroin addiction by modulating neurocognitive performance and gray matter volume (GMV) in heroin addiction. Using case-control genetic analysis, we compared the distribution of ZNF804A variants (genotype and haplotype) in 1035 heroin abusers and 2887 healthy subjects. We also compared neurocognitive performance (impulsivity, global cognitive ability and decision-making ability) in 224 subjects and GMV in 154 subjects based on the ZNF804A variants. We found significant differences in the distribution of ZNF804A intronic variants (rs1344706 and rs7597593) allele and haplotype frequencies between the heroin and control groups. Decision-making impairment was worse in heroin abusers who carried the ZNF804A risk allele and haplotype. Subjects who carried more risk alleles and haplotypes of ZNF804A had greater GMV in the bilateral insular cortex, right temporal cortex and superior parietal cortex. The interaction between heroin addiction and ZNF804A variants affected GMV in the left sensorimotor cortex. Our findings revealed several ZNF804A variants that were significantly associated with the risk of heroin addiction, and these variants affected decision making and GMV in heroin abusers compared with controls. The precise neural mechanisms that underlie these associations are unknown, which requires future investigations of the effects of ZNF804A on both dopamine neurotransmission and the relative increases in the volume of various brain areas. PMID:25708696

  7. Contributions of Child Sexual Abuse, Self-Blame, Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms, and Alcohol Use to Women's Risk for Forcible and Substance-Facilitated Sexual Assault.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokma, Taylor R; Eshelman, Lee R; Messman-Moore, Terri L

    2016-01-01

    Child sexual abuse and adult sexual assault have been linked to increased self-blame, posttraumatic stress symptoms, and alcohol use. The current study aims to examine (a) whether these constructs explain women's risk for later adult sexual assault and revictimization, (b) whether such factors differentially confer risk for specific types of adult sexual assault (i.e., substance-facilitated and forcible), and (c) if self-blame confers risk indirectly through other risk factors. Multiple types of self-blame, posttraumatic stress, and alcohol use were examined among 929 female college students as serial mediators of the relationship between child sexual abuse and adult sexual assault and as risk factors for sexual revictimization among child sexual abuse survivors. In the model predicting risk for substance-facilitated adult sexual assault, child sexual abuse indirectly predicted greater risk for substance-facilitated adult sexual assault mediated through two separate paths: global blame-to-posttraumatic-stress and global blame-to-alcohol use. In the model predicting risk for forcible adult sexual assault, child sexual abuse directly predicted greater risk for forcible adult sexual assault, and this relation was mediated by the global blame-to-posttraumatic-stress path. Among child sexual abuse survivors, child sexual abuse specific characterological and behavioral self-blame directly predicted greater risk for forcible and substance-facilitated revictimization, but the pathways were not mediated by posttraumatic stress or alcohol use. Results emphasize the importance of assessing different types of self-blame in predicting posttraumatic stress symptoms as well as examining risk for sexual victimization and revictimization. Findings did not support hypotheses that increased posttraumatic stress would predict increased alcohol use but did indicate that heightened self-blame is consistently associated with heightened posttraumatic stress and that heightened global self

  8. Mitigating the risk of opioid abuse through a balanced undergraduate pain medicine curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morley-Forster PK

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Patricia K Morley-Forster,1,2 Joseph V Pergolizzi,3–5 Robert Taylor Jr,5 Robert A Axford-Gatley,6 Edward M Sellers71Department of Anesthesia and Perioperative Medicine, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada; 2Outpatient Pain Clinic, St Joseph’s Hospital, London, ON, Canada; 3Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA; 4Department of Pharmacology, Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 5NEMA Research Inc, Naples, FL, USA; 6Clinical Content and Editorial Services, Complete Healthcare Communications, Inc, Chadds Ford, PA, USA; 7DL Global Partners Inc, Toronto, ON, CanadaAbstract: Chronic pain is highly prevalent in the United States and Canada, occurring in an estimated 30% of the adult population. Despite its high prevalence, US and Canadian medical schools provide very little training in pain management, including training in the safe and effective use of potent analgesics, most notably opioids. In 2005, the International Association for the Study of Pain published recommendations for a core undergraduate pain management curriculum, and several universities have implemented pilot programs based on this curriculum. However, when outcomes have been formally assessed, these initiatives have resulted in only modest improvements in physician knowledge about chronic pain and its treatment. This article discusses strategies to improve undergraduate pain management curricula and proposes areas in which those efforts can be augmented. Emphasis is placed on opioids, which have great potency as analgesics but also substantial risks in terms of adverse events and the risk of abuse and addiction. The authors conclude that the most important element of an undergraduate pain curriculum is clinical experience under mentors who are capable of reinforcing didactic learning by modeling best practices.Keywords: chronic pain, curricular content, medical education, opioids, pain

  9. Prevalence of hepatitis C virus infection and its related risk factors in drug abuser prisoners in Hamedan - Iran

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Amir Houshang Mohammad Alizadeh; Seyed Moayed Alavian; Khalil Jafari; Nastaran Yazdi

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Recent studies in Iran has shown that prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection among Iranian prisoners is high, in spite of low HCV seroprevalence in general population.METHODS: This study was carried out in the central prison of Hamedan - Iran, in year 2002. Inmates were interviewed using a standard questionnaire including demographic,imprisonment history and HCV-related risk behaviors items. Thereafter, the sera drawn from the participants were tested for anti-HIV and anti-HCV antibodies.RESULTS: A total number of 427 drug abuser inmates participated in our study. Three hundred and ninety-seven (93%) were men and 30 (7%) were women. Total number of Ⅳ drug abusers (IDA) and non-Ⅳ drug abusers (NIDA)was 149 (34.9%) and 278 (65.1%), respectively. The overall rate of antibody positivity among inmates was 0.9% for HIV and 30% for HCV. Of all IDAs, 31.5% and of NIDAs, 29.1% had serological evidence of HCV infection.CONCLUSION: The seroprevalence of HCV infection among drug abuser prisoners in comparison with the general population in Iran, is very high (30% vs in italics 0.2%).Our results indicate the importance of policies to prevent transmission of HCV infection during and following incarceration.

  10. Objective and subjective sleep quality: Melatonin versus placebo add-on treatment in patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder withdrawing from long-term benzodiazepine use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baandrup, Lone; Glenthøj, Birte Yding; Jennum, Poul Jørgen

    2016-06-30

    Benzodiazepines are frequently long-term prescribed for the treatment of patients with severe mental illness. This prescribing practice is problematic because of well-described side effects including risk of dependence. We examined the efficacy of prolonged-release melatonin on objective and subjective sleep quality during benzodiazepine discontinuation and whether sleep variables were associated with benzodiazepine withdrawal. Eligible patients included adults with a diagnosis of schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, or bipolar disorder and long-term use of benzodiazepines in combination with antipsychotics. All participants gradually tapered the use of benzodiazepines after randomization to add-on treatment with melatonin versus placebo. Here we report a subsample of 23 patients undergoing sleep recordings (one-night polysomnography) and 55 patients participating in subjective sleep quality ratings. Melatonin had no effect on objective sleep efficiency, but significantly improved self-reported sleep quality. Reduced benzodiazepine dosage at the 24-week follow-up was associated with a significantly decreased proportion of stage 2 sleep. These results indicate that prolonged-release melatonin has some efficacy for self-reported sleep quality after gradual benzodiazepine dose reduction, and that benzodiazepine discontinuation is not associated with rebound insomnia in medicated patients with severe mental illness. However, these findings were limited by a small sample size and a low retention rate. PMID:27107670

  11. Elder Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nursing home . Types of Abuse There are many types of abuse: Physical abuse happens when someone causes bodily harm by hitting, pushing, or slapping. Emotional abuse , sometimes called psychological abuse, can include a caregiver saying hurtful words, ...

  12. Identifying and assessing the risk of opioid abuse in patients with cancer: an integrative review

    OpenAIRE

    Carmichael AN; Morgan L; Del Fabbro E

    2016-01-01

    Ashley-Nicole Carmichael,1 Laura Morgan,1 Egidio Del Fabbro2 1School of Pharmacy, 2Division of Hematology, Oncology, and Palliative Care, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA Background: The misuse and abuse of opioid medications in many developed nations is a health crisis, leading to increased health-system utilization, emergency department visits, and overdose deaths. There are also increasing concerns about opioid abuse and diversion in patients with cancer, even at the en...

  13. Peer effects, unobserved factors and risk behaviours: an analysis of alcohol abuse and truancy among adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Duarte, Rosa; Escario, José-Julián; Molina, José Alberto

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to examine the factors which affect alcohol abuse and truancy among adolescents. We propose a new theoretical specification in which alcohol abuse and truancy appear as derived demands, given that they condition peer group and family acceptance, and we introduce unobserved individual effects that can influence both behaviours. Empirically, our paper develops an analysis where, after controlling for the existence of unobserved individual factors affecting both de...

  14. A cost/effectiveness evaluation of lay therapy treatment for child abusing and high risk parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornick, J P; Clarke, M E

    1986-01-01

    This longitudinal investigation tested the effectiveness and cost-efficiency of a lay therapy treatment program in comparison with a standard social work treatment approach. A pretest-extended posttest research design was used to follow a group of child abusing and high risk mothers who received lay therapy (N = 27) and a randomized control group of similar clients (N = 28) over a 12-month period. Outcome data were obtained through interview and direct observation of the parents and children at six-month intervals. A variety of standardized instruments were used including Cattell's 16 Personality Factor Test, Coopersmith's Self-Opinion Form, and the Nurturance and Parent Observation Scales, adapted from Baumrind. Treatment success was defined as progression toward the mean scores of a matched comparison group (N = 21) obtained from the general population of the community during the pretest. The results indicated a trend toward improvement on the outcome measures for both treatment groups. The group receiving lay therapy treatment improved only slightly more than the group receiving standard treatment; however, there was also significantly less attrition with the lay therapy group. Analysis of time budget study data indicated that the lay therapists spent an average of 17.46 hours per month with each of their clients thus permitting the social workers to spend considerably less time with lay therapy clients. Analysis of the direct costs of the programs, based on time budget information, indicated that the lay therapy treatment involved more direct client contact than the standard treatment approach and was also substantially more costly. The high cost of the program was attributed to low caseloads and redundancy in supervision. This study presents several practical program and research recommendations. PMID:3091196

  15. Temperament and character traits associated with the use of alcohol, cannabis, cocaine, benzodiazepines, and hallucinogens: evidence from a large Brazilian web survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Schneider Jr.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate how personality traits are associated with occasional use, abuse, and dependence of alcohol, cannabis, cocaine, benzodiazepines, and hallucinogens in a large availability sample of adults via online questionnaires. Methods: The sample consisted of 8,646 individuals (24.7% men and 75.3% women who completed an anonymous web survey. Involvement with drugs and temperament/character traits were assessed through the Alcohol, Smoking and Substance Involvement Screening Test (ASSIST and the Temperament and Character Inventory - Revised (TCI-R, respectively. Interactions among variables were analyzed using MANOVA with Bonferroni adjustment. Results: Novelty seeking was the trait most associated with increased involvement with alcohol, cannabis, and cocaine. There was a significant association between harm avoidance and benzodiazepine use. Persistence was lower in cannabis-, benzodiazepine-, and cocaine-dependent subjects, as well as in hallucinogen abusers. Self-directedness was reduced in dependents of all drug classes. No strong relationships were found between other temperament or character dimensions and the severity of drug use. Conclusions: Novelty seeking was associated with increased involvement with all drugs studied in this sample, although to a lesser extent with benzodiazepines and hallucinogens. The temperament and character profile for benzodiazepine use was different from that of other drugs due to the relationship with higher harm avoidance and self-transcendence and lower self-directedness.

  16. Benzodiazepine pathways in the chronically ill

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Hulten, Rolf; Heerdink, Eibert R.; Bakker, Albert; Leufkens, Hubert G.

    1999-01-01

    The association between patterns of use of benzodiazepines and chronic somatic morbidity was examined by applying the Chronic Disease Score (CDS). In the only pharmacy in a Dutch community, 6921 patients with data available covering a 10-year period (1983-1992) were included. In 1992, two-thirds of

  17. Benzodiazepine Synthesis and Rapid Toxicity Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, James T.; Boriraj, Grit

    2010-01-01

    A second-year organic chemistry laboratory experiment to introduce students to general concepts of medicinal chemistry is described. Within a single three-hour time window, students experience the synthesis of a biologically active small molecule and the assaying of its biological toxicity. Benzodiazepine rings are commonly found in antidepressant…

  18. A Prospective Study of Sex Differences in the Lifetime Risk of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Among Abused and Neglected Children Grown Up

    OpenAIRE

    Koenen, Karestan C.; Widom, Cathy Spatz

    2009-01-01

    In the general population, women’s lifetime risk of developing posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is twice that of men’s. However, evidence is contradictory as to whether this sex difference is present among child abuse/neglect victims. The authors examined sex differences in PTSD among a sample of 674 individuals with documented child abuse/neglect histories assessed for PTSD in adulthood. Across all types of abuse/neglect, women were more than twice as likely to develop PTSD as men. The s...

  19. Co-occurrence of intimate partner violence and child sexual abuse: Prevalence, risk factors and related issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidarra, Zelimar S; Lessard, Geneviève; Dumont, Annie

    2016-05-01

    This article proposes a review of the scientific literature on the cooccurrence of intimate partner violence and intrafamilial child sexual abuse. The review of these two types of violence has evolved in distinct research fields and their cooccurrence has rarely been examined. The objective of this article is to examine the existing knowledge about this cooccurrence. A systematic examination of the scientific literature in several relevant databases was conducted using combinations of 20 keywords so as to identify scientific articles, published between 2003 and 2013, that investigated this cooccurrence. The final sample comprised 10 studies. These studies revealed the presence of much heterogeneity regarding the prevalence of the cooccurrence for intimate partner violence with sexual abuse and other maltreatment (from 12% to 70%). The review also highlighted a greater risk for children to be victims of sexual abuse or other maltreatment when exposed to intimate partner violence. The implications of these results and the ensuing recommendations for practice and future research are considered in the discussion section. PMID:27060785

  20. Risk factors for distress in the adolescent children of HIV-positive and HIV-negative drug-abusing fathers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook, D W; Brook, J S; Rubenstone, E; Zhang, C; Castro, F G; Tiburcio, N

    2008-01-01

    In contrast to previous research on parental drug abuse, the present study examined comorbid drug addiction and HIV infection in the father as related to his adolescent child's psychological distress. Individual structured interviews were administered to 505 HIV-positive and HIV-negative drug-abusing fathers and one of their children, aged 12-20. Structural equation modelling tested an hypothesized model linking paternal latent variables, ecological factors and adolescent substance use to adolescent distress. Results demonstrated a direct pathway between paternal distress and adolescent distress, as well as an indirect pathway; namely, paternal distress was linked with impaired paternal teaching of coping skills to the child, which in turn was related to adolescent substance use and, ultimately, to the adolescent's distress. There was also an association between paternal drug addiction/HIV and adolescent distress, which was mediated by both ecological factors and adolescent substance use. Findings suggest an increased risk of distress in the adolescent children of fathers with comorbid drug addiction and HIV/AIDS, which may be further complicated by paternal distress. Results suggest several opportunities for prevention and treatment programmes for the children of drug-abusing fathers. PMID:18278619

  1. Predictors and moderators of outcomes of HIV/STD sex risk reduction interventions in substance abuse treatment programs: a pooled analysis of two randomized controlled trials

    OpenAIRE

    Crits-Christoph, Paul; Gallop, Robert; Sadicario, Jaclyn S; Markell, Hannah M.; Calsyn, Donald A.; Tang, Wan; He, Hua; Tu, Xin; Woody, George

    2014-01-01

    Background The objective of the current study was to examine predictors and moderators of response to two HIV sexual risk interventions of different content and duration for individuals in substance abuse treatment programs. Methods Participants were recruited from community drug treatment programs participating in the National Institute on Drug Abuse Clinical Trials Network (CTN). Data were pooled from two parallel randomized controlled CTN studies (one with men and one with women) each exam...

  2. A Cotwin-Control Analysis of Drug Use and Abuse/Dependence Risk associated with Early-onset Cannabis Use

    OpenAIRE

    Grant, Julia D.; Lynskey, Michael T.; Scherrer, Jeffrey F.; Agrawal, Arpana; Andrew C Heath; Bucholz, Kathleen K.

    2009-01-01

    We assessed whether, after controlling for genetic and shared environmental influences, early cannabis use remains a significant predictor of other drug use, abuse, and dependence, and whether the risk for early users is greater than that for later cannabis users. Data from a 1992 telephone diagnostic interview of 8169 male twins (M = 42.0 years at interview) who served in the U.S. military during the Vietnam-era were used to identify a subsample of 293 monozygotic (MZ) and dizygotic (DZ) twi...

  3. New drugs of abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rech, Megan A; Donahey, Elisabeth; Cappiello Dziedzic, Jacqueline M; Oh, Laura; Greenhalgh, Elizabeth

    2015-02-01

    Drug abuse is a common problem and growing concern in the United States, and over the past decade, novel or atypical drugs have emerged and have become increasingly popular. Recognition and treatment of new drugs of abuse pose many challenges for health care providers due to lack of quantitative reporting and routine surveillance, and the difficulty of detection in routine blood and urine analyses. Furthermore, street manufacturers are able to rapidly adapt and develop new synthetic isolates of older drugs as soon as law enforcement agencies render them illegal. In this article, we describe the clinical and adverse effects and purported pharmacology of several new classes of drugs of abuse including synthetic cannabinoids, synthetic cathinones, salvia, desomorphine, and kratom. Because many of these substances can have severe or life-threatening adverse effects, knowledge of general toxicology is key in recognizing acute intoxication and overdose; however, typical toxidromes (e.g., cholinergic, sympathomimetic, opioid, etc.) are not precipitated by many of these agents. Medical management of patients who abuse or overdose on these drugs largely consists of supportive care, although naloxone may be used as an antidote for desomorphine overdose. Symptoms of aggression and psychosis may be treated with sedation (benzodiazepines, propofol) and antipsychotics (haloperidol or atypical agents such as quetiapine or ziprasidone). Other facets of management to consider include treatment for withdrawal or addiction, nutrition support, and potential for transmission of infectious diseases. PMID:25471045

  4. African American and White Mothers' Substance Abuse, Depression, and Criminality as Risk Factors for School Suspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith-McKeever, Chedgzsey; Gao, Weihua

    2010-01-01

    School social workers are often responsible for developing and implementing programs to prevent school suspension, particularly for African American students, who are overrepresented among all students suspended. This article uses data from the National Longitudinal Survey to examine the relative roles of maternal substance and alcohol abuse,…

  5. Assessing Abuse Risk beyond Self-Report: Analog Task of Acceptability of Parent-Child Aggression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Christina M.; Russa, Mary Bower; Harmon, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The present investigation reports on the development and initial validation of a new analog task, the Parent-Child Aggression Acceptability Movie Task (P-CAAM), intended to assess respondents' acceptance of parent-child aggression, including both physical discipline and physical abuse. Methods: Two independent samples were utilized to…

  6. Violence against Pregnant Women Can Increase the Risk of Child Abuse: A Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Ko Ling; Brownridge, Douglas A.; Fong, Daniel Y. T.; Tiwari, Agnes; Leung, Wing Cheong; Ho, Pak Chung

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess the impact of intimate partner violence (IPV) against pregnant women on subsequent perpetration of child abuse and neglect (CAN) by parents; and to test the mediation effect of recent IPV on the link between IPV during pregnancy and subsequent CAN. Methods: This study was a longitudinal follow-up of a population-based study on…

  7. Employment and the Risk of Domestic Abuse among Low-Income Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson-Davis, Christina M.; Magnuson, Katherine; Gennetian, Lisa A.; Duncan, Greg J.

    2005-01-01

    This paper uses data from 2 randomized evaluations of welfare-to-work programs--the Minnesota Family Investment Program and the National Evaluation of Welfare-to-Work Strategies--to estimate the effect of employment on domestic abuse among low-income single mothers. Unique to our analysis is the application of a 2-stage least squares method, in…

  8. Witnessing Domestic Abuse in Childhood as an Independent Risk Factor for Depressive Symptoms in Young Adulthood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, David; Springer, Kristen W.; Greenfield, Emily A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This study addresses the relationship between retrospective reports of witnessing domestic abuse in childhood and levels of depressive symptoms in young adulthood. We examine whether the association between having witnessed violence in childhood and depression is independent of having been the direct target of sexual and/or physical…

  9. At-Risk Youth in Crisis: A Handbook for Collaboration between Schools and Social Services, Volume 3: Child Abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linn-Benton Education Services District, Albany, OR.

    After defining numerous terms related to physical and mental child abuse and neglect and presenting information on the prevalence and causes of abuse, this document explains areas of immediate concern for schools: (1) identification; (2) communicating with the student about possible abuse; (3) reporting suspected abuse; (4) assisting the abused…

  10. Physical Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Additional Resources Return to: What is Elder Abuse? Physical Abuse Physical abuse is physical force or violence that results in ... may be acquaintances, sons, daughters, grandchildren, or others. Physical abuse that is perpetrated by spouses or intimate partners ...

  11. Childhood Sexual Abuse and Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... abused and controlling for other adversities. 1 o Victims of child sexual abuse were more likely to report having a psychiatric disorder in the last 12 months, which puts victims at a higher risk of a suicide attempt ...

  12. Pharmacology of benzodiazepine receptors: an update.

    OpenAIRE

    Sieghart, W.

    1994-01-01

    Benzodiazepine receptors are allosteric modulatory sites on GABAA receptors. GABAA receptors are probably composed of five protein subunits, at least some of which belong to different subunit classes. So far six alpha-, four beta-, three gamma-, and delta- and two rho = p subunits of GABAA receptors have been identified. A large number of different subunit combinations, each of which will result in a GABAA receptor with distinct electrophysiological and pharmacological properties, are therefo...

  13. Epistatic interactions involving DRD2, DRD4, and COMT polymorphisms and risk of substance abuse in women with binge-purge eating disturbances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiger, Howard; Thaler, Lea; Gauvin, Lise; Joober, Ridha; Labbe, Aurelie; Israel, Mimi; Kucer, Audrey

    2016-06-01

    Substance abuse is common in individuals with bulimia-spectrum (binge-purge) eating disturbances, a co-occurrence that has been attributed to shared neurobiological substrates--notably alterations in dopaminergic activity. We examined the implications of variations of selected, dopamine-relevant polymorphisms (DRD2 Taq1A, DRD4 7R, and COMT) for risk of substance abuse in women with binge-purge eating syndromes. We genotyped 183 women (66.1% showing full-threshold BN and 33.9% showing sub-syndromic variants), and assessed lifetime presence of alcohol, cannabis, cocaine, and stimulant abuse or dependence using structured interviews. Tests for main and interaction effects of various allele combinations revealed that individuals who carried high function COMT and low-function DRD4 7R alleles (a combination expected to be associated with higher risk) did indeed show more lifetime substance abuse and, specifically, more cannabis abuse. Our findings suggest that a gene combination that, in theory, codes for low levels of dopaminergic neurotransmission coincides with sensitivity to substance abuse in a sample displaying binge-purge eating-disorder variants. PMID:26950642

  14. Child Sexual Abuse, Links to Later Sexual Exploitation/High-Risk Sexual Behavior, and Prevention/Treatment Programs

    OpenAIRE

    Lalor, Kevin; McElvaney, Rosaleen

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews the literature on the nature and incidence of child sexual abuse, explores the link between child sexual abuse and later sexual exploitation, and reviews the literature on prevention strategies and effective interventions in child sexual abuse services. Our understanding of the international epidemiology of child sexual abuse is considerably greater than it was just 10 years ago, and studies from around the world are examined. Childhood sexual abuse can involve a wide numbe...

  15. Sexual Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navigation Physical Abuse Sexual Abuse Domestic Violence Psychological Abuse Financial Abuse Neglect Critical Issues What Communities Can Do The Role ... Abuse and Neglect Ramsey-Klawsnik, H. (1996). Assessing physical and sexual abuse in health care settings. In L.A. Baumhover & S. ...

  16. [The use of benzodiazepines and Z-drugs for patients with sleeping problems - A survey among hospital doctors and nurses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiß, V; Heinemann, S; Himmel, W; Nau, R; Hummers-Pradier, E

    2016-07-01

    Aim | Benzodiazepines and Z-drugs are frequently prescribed sleep medications in spite of their poor risk-benefit ratio when used over a longer period of time. The aim of the study was to find out how the medical and nursing staff in a general hospital estimated the frequency of use for these drugs, and the risk-benefit ratio for elderly patients as well as the factors which positively influence the perceived use of these drugs. Methods | All members of the medical and nursing staff of a hospital received a questionnaire about their use of, and attitudes towards, benzodiazepines and Z-drugs. Absolute and relative frequencies were calculated to estimate the perceived frequency of use and the risk-benefit ratio. Multiple logistic regressions were used to analyze which factors are associated with a perceived high use of benzodiazepines or Z-drugs for insomnia. Results | More nurses than hospital doctors believed that they dispensed benzodiazepines often or always (57 % vs. 29 %) to patients with insomnia; this was also the case for Z-drugs (66 % vs. 29 %). Nearly half of the hospital doctors and 29 % of the nurses perceived more harms than benefits for benzodiazepines in the elderly. The following factors were associated with a high perceived usage of Z-drugs: working as a nurse (OR: 13,95; 95%-CI: 3,87-50,28), working in a non-surgical department (5,41; 2,00-14,61), having nursing staff perceived the frequency of prescription of benzodiazepines and Z-drugs and the risk-benefit ratio in different ways. Other aspects, such as working in a non-surgical department or having a smaller amount of working experience may also influence the decision to use Z-drugs. PMID:27359319

  17. Correlation Between Intimate Partner Violence Victimization and Risk of Substance Abuse and Depression among African-American Women Seen in an Urban Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houry, Debra

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess rates of substance abuse (including tobacco, alcohol, and drug abuse as well as rates of intimate partner violence (IPV among African-American women seen in an urban Emergency Department (ED. Methods: Eligible participants included all African-American women between the ages of 21-55 years old who were seen in an urban ED for any complaint, and who were triaged to the waiting room. Eligible women who consented to participate were taken to complete a computer-based survey that focused on demographic information and general health questions as well as standardized instruments including the Index of Spouse Abuse (ISA, the Tolerance, Worried, Eye openers, Amnesia, K(Cut down (TWEAK screen for alcohol abuse, Drug Abuse Screening Test (DAST20, and Hooked on Nicotine Checklist (HONC. This analysis uses results from a larger study evaluating the effects of providing patients with targeted educational literature based on the results of their screening. Results: 610 women were surveyed. Among these, 85 women (13.9% screened positive for IPV. Women who screened positive for IPV were significantly more likely to also screen positive for tobacco abuse (56% vs. 37.5%, p< 0.001, alcohol abuse (47.1% vs. 23.2%, p < 0.001, and drug abuse (44.7% vs. 9.5%, p<0.001. Women who screened positive for IPV were also more likely to screen positive for depression and to report social isolation. Conclusion: African-American women seen in the ED, who screen positive for IPV, are at significantly higher risk of drug, alcohol, tobacco abuse, depression and social isolation than women who do not screen positive for IPV. These findings have important implications for ED-based and community-based social services for women who are victims of intimate partner violence. [West J Emerg Med. 2010; 11(3: 253-257.

  18. Parenting and Family Support for Families 'at risk' - Implications from Child Abuse Reports

    OpenAIRE

    Ann Marie Halpenny

    2012-01-01

    The importance of family experiences on children’s development and wellbeing has been widely documented. Yet, recent reports generated by inquiries into child abuse and neglect in the Irish context raise disturbing questions with regard to how the severe maltreatment of children can occur within the family context. It is imperative that the messages generated from these inquiries can effectively inform policy and practice in terms of protecting children from harm and providing support to fami...

  19. Prevalence and risk factors of alcohol and substance abuse among motorcycle drivers in Fars province, Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Heydari, Seyed Taghi; Vossoughi, Mehrdad; Akbarzadeh, Armin; Lankarani, Kamran B.; Sarikhani, Yaser; Javanmardi, Kazem; Akbary, Ali; Akbari, Maryam; Mahmoodi, Mojtaba; Shirazi, Mohammad Khabaz; Tabrizi, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this present study is to investigate the prevalence of alcohol and substance abuse (ASA) and its relationship with other risky driving behaviors among motorcycle drivers. Methods This is a cross sectional study which is performed at Shiraz city of Iran. Data from motorcycle drivers were collected using a standard questionnaire in eight major streets at different times of the day. The data includes consumption of alcohol and other substances two hours before driving and some...

  20. Risk-Taking Propensity Changes Throughout the Course of Residential Substance Abuse Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Aklin, Will M.; Tull, Matthew T.; Kahler, Christopher W.; Lejuez, C.W.

    2009-01-01

    High rates of relapse following treatment have compelled researchers to elucidate the individual difference factors that change among those who receive substance abuse treatment. Previous research has suggested that trait-disinhibition variables may be of particular relevance. Given that these variables are primarily considered to be trait-level factors, the extent to which they are malleable by treatment is an important consideration. Thus, the purpose of this study was to examine the effect...

  1. Drug abuse among the students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Zaman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT:Drug abuse is the willful misuse of either licit or illicit drugs for the purpose of recreation, perceived necessity or convenience. Drug abuse is a more intense and often willful misuse of drugs often to the point of addiction. In the eastern world the incidence shows a decline or a static pattern but the number of drug addicts is still enormous.. The major drug of abuse are heroin and marijuana but designer drugs are shown to be on the increase. The aim of the study is to determine the ratio of the drug abuse in student. For this purpose we selected different institutions including “the university of Lahore”, “Forman Christian college”(private sector and Punjab university(Govt sector and conducted survey in 500 student. High proportion of students was found abusing drugs. From this study, we came across multiple factors which are the main cause of drug abuse in medical student including depression, anxiety, schizophrenia, as well as personality disorder like antisocial personality disorder. The most commonly abused drugs include stimulants, opioids, and benzodiazepines, antihistamines. Although survey have indicated high rate of illicit and prescription drugs misuse among college students, few have assessed the negative consequences, personel concerns, or interest in intervention for drugs use. Drug abuse although regarded as a personality disorder, may also be seen as worldwide epidemic with evolutionary genetic, physiology and environmental influences Controlling and affecting human behavior. Globally, the use has reached all time high. The study showed males are more drug abusers as compared to females. The drug abuse ratio in students of private sector is more as compared to Govt sector.

  2. Effects of benzodiazepines and non-benzodiazepine compounds on the GABA-induced response in frog isolated sensory neurones.

    OpenAIRE

    Yakushiji, T; Fukuda, T.; Oyama, Y.; Akaike, N.

    1989-01-01

    1. The effects of benzodiazepines and non-benzodiazepine compounds on the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-induced chloride current (ICl) were studied in frog isolated sensory neurones by use of a concentration-jump (termed 'concentration-clamp') technique, under single-electrode voltage-clamp conditions. The drugs used were classified into four categories as follows: full benzodiazepine receptor agonists (diazepam, clonazepam, nitrazepam, midazolam, clotiazepam and etizolam), partial agonists ...

  3. Addressing risk factors for child abuse among high risk pregnant women: design of a randomised controlled trial of the nurse family partnership in Dutch preventive health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mejdoubi Jamila

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low socio-economic status combined with other risk factors affects a person's physical and psychosocial health from childhood to adulthood. The societal impact of these problems is huge, and the consequences carry on into the next generation(s. Although several studies show these consequences, only a few actually intervene on these issues. In the United States, the Nurse Family Partnership focuses on high risk pregnant women and their children. The main goal of this program is primary prevention of child abuse. The Netherlands is the first country outside the United States allowed to translate and culturally adapt the Nurse Family Partnership into VoorZorg. The aim of the present study is to assess whether VoorZorg is as effective in the Netherland as in the United States. Methods The study consists of three partly overlapping phases. Phase 1 was the translation and cultural adaptation of Nurse Family Partnership and the design of a two-stage selection procedure. Phase 2 was a pilot study to examine the conditions for implementation. Phase 3 is the randomized controlled trial of VoorZorg compared to the care as usual. Primary outcome measures were smoking cessation during pregnancy and after birth, birth outcomes, child development, child abuse and domestic violence. The secondary outcome measure was the number of risk factors present. Discussion This study shows that the Nurse Family Partnership was successfully translated and culturally adapted into the Dutch health care system and that this program fulfills the needs of high-risk pregnant women. We hypothesize that this program will be effective in addressing risk factors that operate during pregnancy and childhood and compromise fetal and child development. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN16131117

  4. A dimensional approach to understanding severity estimates and risk correlates of marijuana abuse and dependence in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Li-Tzy; Woody, George E; Yang, Chongming; Pan, Jeng-Jong; Reeve, Bryce B; Blazer, Dan G

    2012-06-01

    While item response theory (IRT) research shows a latent severity trait underlying response patterns of substance abuse and dependence symptoms, little is known about IRT-based severity estimates in relation to clinically relevant measures. In response to increased prevalences of marijuana-related treatment admissions, an elevated level of marijuana potency, and the debate on medical marijuana use, we applied dimensional approaches to understand IRT-based severity estimates for marijuana use disorders (MUDs) and their correlates while simultaneously considering gender- and race/ethnicity-related differential item functioning (DIF). Using adult data from the 2008 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (N = 37,897), Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) criteria for MUDs among past-year marijuana users were examined by IRT, logistic regression, and multiple indicators-multiple causes (MIMIC) approaches. Among 6917 marijuana users, 15% met criteria for a MUD; another 24% exhibited subthreshold dependence. Abuse criteria were highly correlated with dependence criteria (correlation = 0.90), indicating unidimensionality; item information curves revealed redundancy in multiple criteria. MIMIC analyses showed that MUD criteria were positively associated with weekly marijuana use, early marijuana use, other substance use disorders, substance abuse treatment, and serious psychological distress. African Americans and Hispanics showed higher levels of MUDs than Whites, even after adjusting for race/ethnicity-related DIF. The redundancy in multiple criteria suggests an opportunity to improve efficiency in measuring symptom-level manifestations by removing low-informative criteria. Elevated rates of MUDs among African Americans and Hispanics require research to elucidate risk factors and improve assessments of MUDs for different racial/ethnic groups. PMID:22351489

  5. [Pilot study on prescription of benzodiazepines in Switzerland: does cognitive availability of legal rules affect medical prescribing behavior].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frick, U; Lerch, S; Rehm, J; Crotti, C

    2004-01-01

    All 481 prescriptions of benzodiazepines from five Zurich pharmacies during a 6 week period were evaluated with respect to their compliance with the Swiss Law on Narcotics, which was formulated to prevent benzodiazepine dependence. Three weeks into the study, all 17 physicians with prescriptions of benzodiazepines practising in the catchment areas of two of the five pharmacies randomly selected were faxed an information sheet explaining formal juridical requirements for benzodiazepine prescription stipulated by the law. 28 % of all prescriptions were not compliant with the law. The older a patient, the greater his/her risk of receiving a non-compliant prescription. Neither sex of patients nor professional specialization of the prescribing doctor did impact prescription compliance. The preventive intervention, i. e. information on legal requirements, also had no significant impact on the compliance of prescriptions with the law. As other studies with soft interventions and educational measures directed to the prescribing physician also failed to reduce inappropriate prescription of benzodiazepines, it is concluded that sanctions against incompliant prescription behaviour should be considered as a preventive alternative. PMID:15372350

  6. Scalability, reliability and validity of the benzodiazepine dependence self report questionnaire in outpatient benzodiazepine users

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kan, C.C.; Breteler, M.H.M.; Timmermans, M.A.Y.; Ven, A.H.G.S. van der; Zitman, F.G.

    1999-01-01

    As there is no multidimensional instrument available which reflects the severity of BZD dependence comprehensively, the Benzodiazepine Dependence Self-Report Questionnaire (Bendep-SRQ) was developed and investigated. The Bendep-SRQ, Symptom Checlist-90, Schedules for Clinical Assessments in Neuropsy

  7. How Do People with Intellectual Disabilities View Abuse and Abusers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northway, Ruth; Melsome, Melissa; Flood, Samantha; Bennett, Davey; Howarth, Joyce; Thomas, Becki

    2013-01-01

    People with intellectual disabilities have a higher risk of being abused than other people, but to date research has not explored their views regarding abuse. This article reports the findings relating to one question within a participatory research study concerning the abuse of people with intellectual disabilities. This question asked what…

  8. Untangling Risk of Maltreatment from Events of Maltreatment: An Analysis of the 2008 Canadian Incidence Study of Reported Child Abuse and Neglect (CIS-2008)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallon, Barbara; Trocme, Nico; MacLaurin, Bruce; Sinha, Vandna; Black, Tara

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the methodological changes that occurred across cycles of the Canadian Incidence Study of Reported Child Abuse and Neglect (CIS), specifically outlining the rationale for tracking investigations of families with children at risk of maltreatment in the CIS-2008 cycle. This paper also presents analysis of data from the CIS-2008…

  9. Child Sexual Abuse and Its Relationship With Health Risk Behaviors Among Adolescents and Young Adults in Taipei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qianqian; Gao, Ersheng; Cheng, Yan; Chuang, Yi-Li; Zabin, Laurie S; Emerson, Mark R; Lou, Chaohua

    2015-09-01

    This study explores the association of child sexual abuse (CSA) with subsequent health risk behaviors among a cross-section of 4354 adolescents and young adults surveyed in urban and rural Taipei. Descriptive analysis and logistic regressions were employed. The overall proportion of CSA was 5.15%, with more females (6.14%) than males (4.16%) likely to experience CSA. CSA was differently associated with multiple adverse health outcomes, after adjusting other factors, such as age, residence, economic status, education, employment status, and household instability. Both males and females with CSA experience were more likely to report drinking, gambling, and suicidal ideation compared with those who had no history of CSA. However, the significant association between CSA and smoking, fighting, and suicidal attempt was not observed among females. Effective interventions are needed to reduce CSA and its adverse effects on adolescent well-being. PMID:25720535

  10. Commentary: Gender, Disability, and Abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldson, Edward J.

    1997-01-01

    This commentary discusses the research article "Gender Differences in Abused Children with and without Disabilities" (Sobsey and others) that follows, which found that children with disabilities are at greater risk for being maltreated, that boys are more frequently abused, and that boys with disabilities are sexually abused more frequently than…

  11. Hepatitis-B Infections among the Injection Drug Abusers: An Emerging Risk in Public Health, Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, K J; Nandi, A K

    2015-10-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the incidence of Hepatitis-B (HBV) infection among the injection drugs abusers (IDUs). The research work was a cross-sectional study. A total of 400 IDUs were selected from July 2012 to June 2013 at the Outpatient Department of the Central Drug Addiction Treatment Center, Tejgaon, Dhaka, Bangladesh. They were selected consecutively following the purposive sampling method on the basis of defined selection criteria. Research instruments were a pre-tested interviewer questionnaire and blood specimen. Results showed that 79.70%(315) of the IDUs were found literate and 20.3%(85) illiterate. In present occupation, majority of them 60.5%(242) had no work and 39.5%(158) specific occupation. The mean age of them was 27.9±6.4 years. In marital status, 46.5%(186) were unmarried, 20.7%(83) married after addiction and 30.3%(121) married before addiction. Majority of the IDUs 75.2%(289) started their addiction with cannabis. In addition to injection drugs use, all of them were multiple drug abusers. In response to the sharing of needle, 35.7%(143) of the IDUs shared needle uncommonly and 64.3%(257) did not shared it at all. Ninety-three percent (372) of them were heterosexual and polygamous having extramarital sex with multiple partners. The quality of sex-partners was wife, friends, brothel & hotel based sex sellers and street sex sellers. Majority of IDUs {82.0%(328)} did not use condom at all and 15.5(62) sold blood several times in their lifetime. Seven percent {7.0%(28)} injection drug abusers had been suffering from hepatitis-B virus (HBV) infection. HBV infection was found to be significantly (p≥0.05) associated with the quality of sex partners and number of sex partners, and age and marital status. There is no significant association with sharing of needle particularly occasional sharing of needle. Altering the behaviors of IDUs, especially their sexual lifestyles, drug habit, using of disposable syringe without sharing of

  12. Violence against Native Women in Substance Abuse Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saylors, Karen; Daliparthy, Nalini

    2006-01-01

    Many mental health problems among substance abusing populations are directly linked to high rates of abuse and trauma. There is increasing evidence of associations between childhood physical and sexual abuse to adult substance use and HIV-risk behavior. The relationship of abuse, mental health problems, substance abuse, and high-risk sexual…

  13. Mediators of the Relation between Childhood Sexual Abuse and Women’s Sexual Risk Behavior: A Comparison of Two Theoretical Frameworks

    OpenAIRE

    Senn, Theresa E.; Carey, Michael P.; Coury-Doniger, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    Childhood sexual abuse (CSA) is associated with sexual risk behavior in adulthood, but little research has investigated processes that might mediate this relation. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether constructs suggested by the traumagenic dynamics (TD) model (a theory of the effects of CSA) or constructs suggested by the Information-Motivation-Behavioral skills (IMB) model (a theory of the antecedents of sexual risk behavior) better mediated the relation between CSA and sexu...

  14. A Pilot Trial of Integrated Behavioral Activation and Sexual Risk Reduction Counseling for HIV-Uninfected Men Who Have Sex with Men Abusing Crystal Methamphetamine

    OpenAIRE

    Mimiaga, Matthew J.; Reisner, Sari L.; Pantalone, David W.; O'Cleirigh, Conall; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Safren, Steven A.

    2012-01-01

    Crystal methamphetamine use is a major driver behind high-risk sexual behavior among men who have sex with men (MSM). Prior work suggests a cycle of continued crystal methamphetamine use and high-risk sex due to loss of the ability to enjoy other activities, which appears to be a side effect of this drug. Behavioral activation (BA) is a treatment for depression that involves learning to reengage in life's activities. We evaluated a novel intervention for crystal methamphetamine abuse and high...

  15. Stable Dynamic Risk Factors in Child Sexual Abusers: the Incremental Predictive Power of Narcissistic Personality Traits beyond the Static-99/Stable-2007 Priority Categories on Sexual Reoffense

    OpenAIRE

    Reinhard Eher; Martin Rettenberger; Anna Matthes; Frank Schilling

    2010-01-01

    A group of hands on child sexual abusers were diagnosed according to DSM-IVR criteria within a routinely performed risk assessment process in the Austrian prison system. Actuarials showed moderate to good predictive accuracy, and a combination of static and stable risk factors (Static-99 and Stable-2007) significantly improved the predictive power for sexual reoffense.In addition, the clinical diagnosis of narcissistic personality disorder significantly added incremental validity once the Sta...

  16. Elder Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... facilities or nursing homes. The mistreatment may be Physical, sexual, or emotional abuse Neglect or abandonment Financial abuse - stealing of money or belongings Possible signs of elder abuse include unexplained bruises, burns, ...

  17. Alcohol drinking by parents and risk of alcohol abuse by adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antipkin, Yuri

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE(S: To investigate associations between alcohol drinking by parents at different time of their life and alcohol use by adolescents.DESIGN: The longitudinal epidemiological study design was used to answer the proposed research questions. This study is based on the data of the Family and Children of Ukraine Study (FCOU, which is a prospective cohort study of women and children. PARTICIPANTS: Recruited subjects were pregnant women with last menstrual period (LMP between 25 December 1992 and 23 July 1994. Self-completed questionnaires and the medical record data were collected at the first antenatal clinic visit and at the delivery. The sample in the city of Dniprodzerzhynsk consists of 2148 women, their children and partners (if any, but at 15-17-years-old follow-up only data about 1020 participants were available. MAIN EXPOSURES: Use of alcohol by mother/father before pregnancy, during pregnancy, and at 15-17 years of child’s age.OUTCOME MEASURE: Use of alcohol by 15-17-year-old adolescent.RESULTS: Use of alcohol more than once a week by mother before pregnancy was associated with alcohol abuse by adolescents, unlike father’s use of alcohol before and during pregnancy. Use of alcohol both by mother and father during adolescence of their offspring was strongly associated with alcohol abuse by the child. In the multivariate analysis only alcohol use by mother during adolescence of the child was significantly associated with alcohol use by the adolescent.CONCLUSIONS: This study supports the hypothesis that concurrent social factors influence regular alcohol use among adolescents more intensively than early life factors.

  18. Temperament and character traits associated with the use of alcohol, cannabis, cocaine, benzodiazepines, and hallucinogens: evidence from a large Brazilian web survey

    OpenAIRE

    Ricardo Schneider Jr.; Gustavo L. Ottoni; Hudson W. de Carvalho; Elaine Elisabetsky; Diogo R. Lara

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate how personality traits are associated with occasional use, abuse, and dependence of alcohol, cannabis, cocaine, benzodiazepines, and hallucinogens in a large availability sample of adults via online questionnaires. Methods: The sample consisted of 8,646 individuals (24.7% men and 75.3% women) who completed an anonymous web survey. Involvement with drugs and temperament/character traits were assessed through the Alcohol, Smoking and Substance Involvement Screening Test ...

  19. A Concise Review on Validated Risk Assessment Tools For Sexually Abusive Youth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. C. Miccio-Fonseca

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Reviewed are validated and cross-validated risk assessment tools for assessing sexual improprieties in youth: J-SOAP-II, ERASOR,2.0, and MEGA♪. Assessments are significantly more accurate when tools focused on specific populations of youth are employed. The review affirms a New Paradigm of ecologically based, developmentally and gender sensitive risk assessment tools.

  20. Childhood sexual abuse and HIV-related risks among men who have sex with men in Washington, DC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Gregory; Magnus, Manya; Kuo, Irene; Rawls, Anthony; Peterson, James; Montanez, Luz; West-Ojo, Tiffany; Jia, Yujiang; Opoku, Jenevieve; Greenberg, Alan E

    2014-05-01

    Childhood sexual abuse (CSA) has been reported to be disproportionately higher among men who have sex with men (MSM) than among heterosexual men; it has also been found to be significantly positively associated with HIV status and HIV risk factors, including unprotected anal intercourse. The purpose of this study was to assess the correlates of CSA in a sample of community-recruited MSM, investigate race as a potential effect modifier, and describe the independent association between CSA and HIV infection in Washington, DC. A total of 500 MSM were recruited by venue-based sampling in 2008 as part of the National HIV Behavioral Surveillance. More than one-half of MSM identified as White, while one-third identified as Black. CSA was reported by 17.5 % of the 451 MSM, with the first instance of abuse occurring at a median age of 8.3 (interquartile range = 5.0, 11.0). In multivariable analysis, HIV-positive men were significantly more likely to report a history of CSA compared to HIV-negative men after adjusting for intimate partner violence in the last 12 months, having been arrested in the last 12 months, and depressive symptoms. HIV-positive MSM had more than four times the odds of reporting CSA after controlling for other correlates (aOR = 4.19; 95 % CI 2.26, 7.75). Despite hypothesizing that race modified the effect of CSA on HIV infection we found this was not the case in this sample. More research is needed to investigate the potential pathway between a history of CSA and HIV infection, and how this contributes to driving the HIV epidemic among MSM in Washington, DC. PMID:24573398

  1. Prolonged-release melatonin versus placebo for benzodiazepine discontinuation in patients with schizophrenia: a randomized clinical trial - the SMART trial protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oranje Bob

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treatment of schizophrenia frequently includes prolonged benzodiazepine administration despite a lack of evidence of its use. It is often difficult to discontinue benzodiazepines because of the development of dependence. We aim to assess if melatonin can facilitate the withdrawal of prolonged benzodiazepine administration in patients with schizophrenia. Furthermore, we aim to investigate the association of benzodiazepine dose reduction with the following clinically important variables: sleep, psychophysiology, cognition, social function, and quality of life. Methods/Design Randomized, blinded, two-armed, parallel superiority trial. We plan to include 80 consenting outpatients diagnosed with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder, 18-55 years of age, treated with antipsychotic drug(s and at least one benzodiazepine derivative for the last three months before inclusion. Exclusion criteria: currently under treatment for alcohol or drug abuse, aggressive or violent behavior, known mental retardation, pervasive developmental disorder, dementia, epilepsy, terminal illness, severe co morbidity, inability to understand Danish, allergy to melatonin, lactose, starch, gelatin, or talc, hepatic impairment, pregnancy or nursing, or lack of informed consent. After being randomized to prolonged-release melatonin (Circadin® 2 mg daily or matching placebo, participants are required to slowly taper off their benzodiazepine dose. The primary outcome measure is benzodiazepine dose at 6 months follow-up. Secondary outcome measures include sleep, psychophysiological, and neurocognitive measures. Data are collected at baseline and at 6 months follow-up regarding medical treatment, cognition, psychophysiology, sleep, laboratory tests, adverse events, psychopathology, social function, and quality of life. Data on medical treatment, cognition, psychophysiology, adverse events, social function, and quality of life are also collected at 2 and 4

  2. What predicts incident use of cannabis and progression to abuse and dependence? A 4-year prospective examination of risk factors in a community sample of adolescents and young adults

    OpenAIRE

    Sydow, Kirsten von; Lieb, Roselind; Pfister, Hildegard; Höfler, Michael; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To determine risk factors of incident onset of use, abuse and dependence of cannabis in a community sample of adolescents and young adults. Methods: Risk factors were examined in a prospective longitudinal design across 4 years in a representative sample (N=2446) aged 14-24 at the outset of the study (EDSP). Patterns of DSM-IV defined cannabis use, abuse and dependence were assessed with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (M-CIDI). Potential risk factors were ass...

  3. The impact of benzodiazepine use on methadone maintenance treatment outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brands, Bruna; Blake, Joan; Marsh, David C; Sproule, Beth; Jeyapalan, Renuka; Li, Selina

    2008-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to examine predictors of benzodiazepine use among methadone maintenance treatment patients, to determine whether baseline benzodiazepine use influenced ongoing use during methadone maintenance treatment, and to assess the effect of ongoing benzodiazepine use on treatment outcomes (i.e., opioid and cocaine use and treatment retention). A retrospective chart review of 172 methadone maintenance treatment patients (mean age = 34.6 years; standard deviation = 8.5 years; 64% male) from January 1997 to December 1999 was conducted. At baseline, 29% were "non-users" (past year) of benzodiazepine, 36% were "occasional users," and 35% were "regular/problem users." Regular/problem users were more likely to have started opioid use with prescription opioids, experienced more overdoses, and reported psychiatric comorbidity. Being female, more years of opioid use, and a history of psychiatric treatment were significant predictors of baseline benzodiazepine use. Ongoing benzodiazepine users were more likely to have opioid-positive and cocaine-positive urine screens during methadone maintenance treatment. Only ongoing cocaine use was negatively related to retention. Benzodiazepine use by methadone maintenance treatment patients is associated with a more complex clinical picture and may negatively influence treatment outcomes. PMID:18956528

  4. Repeated swim stress alters brain benzodiazepine receptors measured in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weizman, R.; Weizman, A.; Kook, K.A.; Vocci, F.; Deutsch, S.I.; Paul, S.M.

    1989-06-01

    The effects of repeated swim stress on brain benzodiazepine receptors were examined in the mouse using both an in vivo and in vitro binding method. Specific in vivo binding of (/sup 3/H)Ro15-1788 to benzodiazepine receptors was decreased in the hippocampus, cerebral cortex, hypothalamus, midbrain and striatum after repeated swim stress (7 consecutive days of daily swim stress) when compared to nonstressed mice. In vivo benzodiazepine receptor binding was unaltered after repeated swim stress in the cerebellum and pons medulla. The stress-induced reduction in in vivo benzodiazepine receptor binding did not appear to be due to altered cerebral blood flow or to an alteration in benzodiazepine metabolism or biodistribution because there was no difference in (14C)iodoantipyrine distribution or whole brain concentrations of clonazepam after repeated swim stress. Saturation binding experiments revealed a change in both apparent maximal binding capacity and affinity after repeated swim stress. Moreover, a reduction in clonazepam's anticonvulsant potency was also observed after repeated swim stress (an increase in the ED50 dose for protection against pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures), although there was no difference in pentylenetetrazol-induced seizure threshold between the two groups. In contrast to the results obtained in vivo, no change in benzodiazepine receptor binding kinetics was observed using the in vitro binding method. These data suggest that environmental stress can alter the binding parameters of the benzodiazepine receptor and that the in vivo and in vitro binding methods can yield substantially different results.

  5. Repeated swim stress alters brain benzodiazepine receptors measured in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of repeated swim stress on brain benzodiazepine receptors were examined in the mouse using both an in vivo and in vitro binding method. Specific in vivo binding of [3H]Ro15-1788 to benzodiazepine receptors was decreased in the hippocampus, cerebral cortex, hypothalamus, midbrain and striatum after repeated swim stress (7 consecutive days of daily swim stress) when compared to nonstressed mice. In vivo benzodiazepine receptor binding was unaltered after repeated swim stress in the cerebellum and pons medulla. The stress-induced reduction in in vivo benzodiazepine receptor binding did not appear to be due to altered cerebral blood flow or to an alteration in benzodiazepine metabolism or biodistribution because there was no difference in [14C]iodoantipyrine distribution or whole brain concentrations of clonazepam after repeated swim stress. Saturation binding experiments revealed a change in both apparent maximal binding capacity and affinity after repeated swim stress. Moreover, a reduction in clonazepam's anticonvulsant potency was also observed after repeated swim stress [an increase in the ED50 dose for protection against pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures], although there was no difference in pentylenetetrazol-induced seizure threshold between the two groups. In contrast to the results obtained in vivo, no change in benzodiazepine receptor binding kinetics was observed using the in vitro binding method. These data suggest that environmental stress can alter the binding parameters of the benzodiazepine receptor and that the in vivo and in vitro binding methods can yield substantially different results

  6. Imaging of a glioma using peripheral benzodiazepine receptor ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starosta-Rubinstein, S.; Ciliax, B.J.; Penney, J.B.; McKeever, P.; Young, A.B.

    1987-02-01

    Two types of benzodiazepine receptors have been demonstrated in mammalian tissues, one which is localized on neuronal elements in brain and the other, on glial cells and in peripheral tissues such as kidney. In vivo administration of /sup 3/H-labeled PK 11195 (1-(2-chlorophenyl-N-methyl-N-(1-methylpropyl)-3-isoquinoline carboxamide) or (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam with 5 mg of clonazepam per kg to rats with intracranial C6 gliomas resulted in high levels of tritiated-drug binding to the tumor as shown by quantitative autoradiography. Pharmacological studies indicated that the bound drugs labeled the peripheral benzodiazepine binding site. Binding to the peripheral benzodiazepine site was confirmed primarily to malignant cells with little binding to adjacent normal brain tissue or to necrotic tissue. Tumor cell binding was completely inhibited by preadministration of the peripheral benzodiazepine blocking agent PK 11195 at 5 mg/kg. The centrally selective benzodiazepine ligand clonazepam had no effect on PK 11195 binding to the tumor cells. When binding to other tumor cell lines grown in nude mice and nude athymic rats was evaluated, little or no peripheral benzodiazepine binding was detected on human pheochromocytoma (RN1) and neuroblastoma (SK-N-MC, SK-N-SH) tumor cells, respectively. However, high densities of peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites were observed on tumors derived from a human glioma cell line (ATCC HTB 14, U-87 MG). The presence of high concentrations of specific peripheral benzodiazepine receptors on glial tumors suggests that human primary central nervous system tumors could be imaged and diagnosed using peripheral benzodiazepine ligands labeled with positron- or gamma-emitting isotopes.

  7. Imaging of a glioma using peripheral benzodiazepine receptor ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two types of benzodiazepine receptors have been demonstrated in mammalian tissues, one which is localized on neuronal elements in brain and the other, on glial cells and in peripheral tissues such as kidney. In vivo administration of 3H-labeled PK 11195 [1-(2-chlorophenyl-N-methyl-N-(1-methylpropyl)-3-isoquinoline carboxamide] or [3H]flunitrazepam with 5 mg of clonazepam per kg to rats with intracranial C6 gliomas resulted in high levels of tritiated-drug binding to the tumor as shown by quantitative autoradiography. Pharmacological studies indicated that the bound drugs labeled the peripheral benzodiazepine binding site. Binding to the peripheral benzodiazepine site was confirmed primarily to malignant cells with little binding to adjacent normal brain tissue or to necrotic tissue. Tumor cell binding was completely inhibited by preadministration of the peripheral benzodiazepine blocking agent PK 11195 at 5 mg/kg. The centrally selective benzodiazepine ligand clonazepam had no effect on PK 11195 binding to the tumor cells. When binding to other tumor cell lines grown in nude mice and nude athymic rats was evaluated, little or no peripheral benzodiazepine binding was detected on human pheochromocytoma (RN1) and neuroblastoma (SK-N-MC, SK-N-SH) tumor cells, respectively. However, high densities of peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites were observed on tumors derived from a human glioma cell line (ATCC HTB 14, U-87 MG). The presence of high concentrations of specific peripheral benzodiazepine receptors on glial tumors suggests that human primary central nervous system tumors could be imaged and diagnosed using peripheral benzodiazepine ligands labeled with positron- or gamma-emitting isotopes

  8. Performance enhancing drug abuse and cardiovascular risk in athletes: implications for the clinician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angell, Peter J; Chester, Neil; Sculthorpe, Nick; Whyte, Greg; George, Keith; Somauroo, John

    2012-11-01

    The use of performance-enhancing and social drugs by athletes raises a number of ethical and health concerns. The World Anti-Doping Agency was constituted to address both of these issues as well as publishing a list of, and testing for, banned substances in athletes. Despite continuing methodological developments to detect drug use and associated punishments for positive dope tests, there are still many athletes who choose to use performance and image enhancing drugs. Of primary concern to this review are the health consequences of drug use by athletes. For such a large topic we must put in place delimitations. Specifically, we will address current knowledge, controversies and emerging evidence in relation to cardiovascular (CV) health of athletes taking drugs. Further, we delimit our discussion to the CV consequences of anabolic steroids and stimulant (including amphetamines and cocaine) use. These drugs are reported in the majority of adverse findings in athlete drug screenings and thus are more likely to be relevant to the healthcare professionals responsible for the well-being of athletes. In detailing CV health issues related to anabolic steroid and stimulant abuse by athletes we critique current research evidence, present exemplar case studies and suggest important avenues for on-going research. Specifically we prompt the need for awareness of clinical staff when assessing the potential CV consequences of drug use in athletes. PMID:23097484

  9. Disability pension as predictor of later use of benzodiazepines among benzodiazepine users

    OpenAIRE

    Hartz, Ingeborg; Tverdal, Aage; Skille, Eivind Å.; Skurtveit, Svetlana

    2010-01-01

    The proportion of Norwegians on disability pensions has doubled since the 1980s. The Norwegian Government wants action to stimulate the working capacity in those disability pensioners who have the potential to work. Information on factors that may impair rehabilitation efforts, including the unfavourable use of benzodiazepines, may be useful in this context. A longitudinal design, including data on 40–42 year old participants in Norwegian health surveys (year 1985–1989) linked to a prescripti...

  10. PTSD Symptom Severities, Interpersonal Traumas, and Benzodiazepines Are Associated with Substance-Related Problems in Trauma Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Guina

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Trauma is commonly associated with substance-related problems, yet associations between specific substances and specific posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms (PTSSs are understudied. We hypothesized that substance-related problems are associated with PTSS severities, interpersonal traumas, and benzodiazepine prescriptions. Methods: Using a cross-sectional survey methodology in a consecutive sample of adult outpatients with trauma histories (n = 472, we used logistic regression to examine substance-related problems in general (primary, confirmatory analysis, as well as alcohol, tobacco, and illicit drug problems specifically (secondary, exploratory analyses in relation to demographics, trauma type, PTSSs, and benzodiazepine prescriptions. Results: After adjusting for multiple testing, several factors were significantly associated with substance-related problems, particularly benzodiazepines (AOR = 2.78; 1.99 for alcohol, 2.42 for tobacco, 8.02 for illicit drugs, DSM-5 PTSD diagnosis (AOR = 1.92; 2.38 for alcohol, 2.00 for tobacco, 2.14 for illicit drugs, most PTSSs (especially negative beliefs, recklessness, and avoidance, and interpersonal traumas (e.g., assaults and child abuse. Conclusion: In this clinical sample, there were consistent and strong associations between several trauma-related variables and substance-related problems, consistent with our hypotheses. We discuss possible explanations and implications of these findings, which we hope will stimulate further research, and improve screening and treatment.

  11. PTSD Symptom Severities, Interpersonal Traumas, and Benzodiazepines Are Associated with Substance-Related Problems in Trauma Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guina, Jeffrey; Nahhas, Ramzi W.; Goldberg, Adam J.; Farnsworth, Seth

    2016-01-01

    Background: Trauma is commonly associated with substance-related problems, yet associations between specific substances and specific posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms (PTSSs) are understudied. We hypothesized that substance-related problems are associated with PTSS severities, interpersonal traumas, and benzodiazepine prescriptions. Methods: Using a cross-sectional survey methodology in a consecutive sample of adult outpatients with trauma histories (n = 472), we used logistic regression to examine substance-related problems in general (primary, confirmatory analysis), as well as alcohol, tobacco, and illicit drug problems specifically (secondary, exploratory analyses) in relation to demographics, trauma type, PTSSs, and benzodiazepine prescriptions. Results: After adjusting for multiple testing, several factors were significantly associated with substance-related problems, particularly benzodiazepines (AOR = 2.78; 1.99 for alcohol, 2.42 for tobacco, 8.02 for illicit drugs), DSM-5 PTSD diagnosis (AOR = 1.92; 2.38 for alcohol, 2.00 for tobacco, 2.14 for illicit drugs), most PTSSs (especially negative beliefs, recklessness, and avoidance), and interpersonal traumas (e.g., assaults and child abuse). Conclusion: In this clinical sample, there were consistent and strong associations between several trauma-related variables and substance-related problems, consistent with our hypotheses. We discuss possible explanations and implications of these findings, which we hope will stimulate further research, and improve screening and treatment. PMID:27517964

  12. Wife abuse in rural Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalal, Koustuv; Rahman, Fazlur; Jansson, Bjarne

    2009-09-01

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a global public health and gender problem, especially in low-income countries. The study focused on verbal abuse, physical abuse and abuse by restricting food provision to wives by their husbands by victim and perpetrator characteristics, emphasizing the socioeconomic context of rural Bangladesh. Using a cross-sectional household survey of 4411 randomly selected married women of reproductive age, the study found that a majority of the respondents are exposed to verbal abuse (79%), while 41% are exposed to physical abuse. A small proportion (5%) of the women had suffered food-related abuse. Risk factors observed were age of the wife, illiteracy (of both victims and perpetrators), alcohol misuse, dowry management, husband's monetary greed involving parents-in-law, and wife's suspicions concerning husband's extramarital affairs. Well-established risk factors for wife abuse, along with dowry and husband's monetary greed, have a relatively high prevalence in rural Bangladesh. PMID:19534836

  13. Predicting substance abuse among youth with, or at high risk for, HIV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huba, GJ; Melchoir, LA; Greenberg, B; Trevithick, L; Feudo, R; Tierney, S; Sturdevant, M; Hodgins, A; Remafedi, G; Woods, ER; Wallace, M; Schneir, A; Kawata, AK; Brady, RE; Singer, B; Marconi, K; Wright, E; Panter, AT

    2000-01-01

    This article describes data from 4,111 males and 4,085 females participating in 10 HIV/AIDS service demonstration projects. The sample was diverse in age, gender, ethnicity, HIV status, and risk for HIV transmission. Logistic regression was used to determine the attributes that best predict substanc

  14. The Family Map: A Tool for Understanding the Risks for Children in Families with Substance Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokony, Patti A.; Conners-Burrow, Nicola A.; Whiteside-Mansell, Leanne; Johnson, Danya; McKelvey, Lorraine; Bradley, Robert H.

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews the findings from our assessments of children and their families in two Head Start programs using the Family Map. Specifically, we used the Family Map assessment tool to identify risks to children associated with alcohol and drug use in families with young children. Practical suggestions are offered to administrators about the…

  15. Borderline Personality Symptoms and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Risk in Alcohol and Other Drug Abusing Adolescent Offenders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessy G. Dévieux

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Incarcerated youth with borderline symptomatology represent a particularly at risk-population due to their enggement in risky behaviors. Five hundred twenty two adolescents were assessed for borderline symptomatology (MACI, engagement in risky behaviors and attitudes/knowledge. Approach:Adolescents were divided into two groups: low borderline (below the 60 scale score cutoff and high borderline (subclinical and clinical range. Multivariate analyses were used to test for group differences. Results: The high borderline group had higher perceived susceptibility, greater knowledge, less favorable sexual and condom attitudes and less favorable behavioral intentions. There were no significant differences by group on sexual risk or substance use behaviors. A subset (n = 156 participating in a risk reduction experimental trial were followed three months post-intervention for differences in sexual risk and substance use. The high borderline experimental participants reported significantly more anal sex than the low borderline adolescents at 3 month follow-up. High borderline adolescents in the control group reported greater cocaine use than low borderline controls at 3 months, including trends suggesting more marijuana and alcohol use. At 3 month follow-up, no differences in cocaine, alcohol or marijuana use were detected between high and low borderline adolescents in the experimental group. Adolescents with higher borderline tendencies appear to realistically assess that they are at high risk of contracting HIV but may have less confidence in their ability to adopt HIV preventive behaviors. The results indicate that borderline personality symptoms may represent an important indicator of attitudes conducive to HIV transmission. Conclusion:Three-month follow-up data indicate the importance of examining borderline characteristics more microanalytically within research studies, including

  16. Childhood history of abuse and child abuse potential: the role of parent’s gender and timing of childhood abuse

    OpenAIRE

    Romero-Martínez, Angel; Figueiredo, Bárbara; Moya-Albiol, Luis

    2014-01-01

    It has been suggested that being physically abused leads to someone becoming a perpetrator of abuse which could be associated to parents' gender, timing of the physical abuse and specific socio-demographic variables. This study aims to investigate the role the parents' gender, timing of childhood abuse and socio-demographic variables on the relationship between parents' history of childhood physical abuse and current risk for children. The sample consisted of 920 parents (414 fathers, 506 mot...

  17. Identification of Sexually Abused Female Adolescents at Risk for Suicidal Ideations: A Classification and Regression Tree Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brabant, Marie-Eve; Hebert, Martine; Chagnon, Francois

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the clinical profiles of 77 female teenager survivors of sexual abuse and examined the association of abuse-related and personal variables with suicidal ideations. Analyses revealed that 64% of participants experienced suicidal ideations. Findings from classification and regression tree analysis indicated that depression,…

  18. The Association between Foster Care and Substance Abuse Risk Factors and Treatment Outcomes: An Exploratory Secondary Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blome, Wendy Whiting; Shields, Joseph; Verdieck, Mary Jeanne

    2009-01-01

    The child welfare and substance abuse systems are integrally linked through the children and families they both serve. There is a dearth of knowledge, however, on how children who have experienced foster care fare when they are treated for substance abuse issues as adults. This article presents an exploratory study using the Alcohol and Drug…

  19. Maternal versus Paternal Physical and Emotional Abuse, Affect Regulation and Risk for Depression from Adolescence to Early Adulthood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, Marlene M.; Craig, Stephanie G.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Current research has established that depression is a common outcome of child abuse. The current study extends previous research by examining the relationship between parental emotional and physical abuse and adolescents' depressive symptoms using a prospective longitudinal design. We anticipated that this relationship would be mediated…

  20. Clonazepam as Agonist Substitution Treatment for Benzodiazepine Dependence: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Giovanni Icro Maremmani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the misuse of benzodiazepines (BZDs is a cause for a serious concern among pharmacologically inexperienced patients, whether treated or untreated, that could lead to significant complications, including tolerance, dependence, and addiction. We present a case report in which an Italian patient affected by anxiety disorder and treated with BZDs presented a severe case of dependence on BZDs. We treated him according to an agonist substitution approach, switching from the abused BZD to a slow-onset, long-acting, high potency agonist (clonazepam, and looking at the methadone treatment model as paradigm. We decided to use clonazepam for its pharmacokinetic properties. The advantage of choosing a slow-onset, long-lasting BZD for the treatment of our patient was that it led us to a remarkable improvement in the clinical situation, including the cessation of craving, absence of withdrawal symptoms, reduced anxiety, improvements in social functioning, and a better cognition level.

  1. A Question About the Safety of Buprenorphine/Naloxone and Benzodiazepine Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howland, Robert H

    2015-12-01

    Drug overdose is the leading cause of injury death in the United States, and most deaths are related to prescription drugs. A substantial proportion of these deaths involve opioid or benzodiazepine drugs, and many overdoses include a combination of both drug classes. Buprenorphine/naloxone has an unusual pharmacology that distinguishes it from other opioid drugs. Animal and human studies have found that buprenorphine is associated with a ceiling to its cardio-respiratory depressant effect at higher doses, such that it may have a wider safety margin compared to other opioid drugs. Compared to buprenorphine alone, buprenorphine/naloxone is associated with less cardiorespiratory depression. Drug safety data from the National Poison Data System, Drug Abuse Warning Network, and other sources suggest that the safety of buprenorphine/naloxone is favorable compared to the morbidity and mortality associated with other opioid drugs and other classes of psychotropic drugs. PMID:26653090

  2. Improving benzodiazepine prescribing in family practice through review and education.

    OpenAIRE

    Rosser, W.W.; Simms, J. G.; Patten, D W; J. Forster

    1981-01-01

    Indications for and dosages of four commonly prescribed benzodiazepines were recorded at a family medicine centre with the aid of a computerized data collection system. Four guidelines were then developed for appropriate prescribing of these drugs: (a) benzodiazepines should be used less frequently with increasing age; (b) short-acting drugs are preferable to long-acting drugs; (c) patients 65 years of age and over should receive half the daily dose prescribed for younger patients; and (d) us...

  3. Alcohol and benzodiazepines generate anxiety, panic and phobias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, S I

    1995-01-01

    In almost half the patients seeking advice for anxiety, panic and phobias the cause was alcohol or benzodiazepines. In the remainder it was psychological, usually a state of conflict or a traumatic event. When symptoms are persistent following a distressing event it is often the case that alcohol or benzodiazepines are keeping them going. There is a large variation in individual vulnerability and the mechanism responsible for these symptoms is rebound arousal. PMID:7769598

  4. Alcohol and benzodiazepines generate anxiety, panic and phobias.

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, S I

    1995-01-01

    In almost half the patients seeking advice for anxiety, panic and phobias the cause was alcohol or benzodiazepines. In the remainder it was psychological, usually a state of conflict or a traumatic event. When symptoms are persistent following a distressing event it is often the case that alcohol or benzodiazepines are keeping them going. There is a large variation in individual vulnerability and the mechanism responsible for these symptoms is rebound arousal.

  5. The abuse of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different aspects of possible abuse of nuclear power by countries or individuals are discussed. Special attention is paid to the advantage of nuclear power, despite the risk of weapon proliferation or terrorism. The concepts of some nuclear power critics, concerning health risks in the nuclear sector are rejected as untrue and abusive

  6. The Prevalence of Child Sexual Abuse in Out-of-Home Care: Increased Risk for Children with a Mild Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euser, Saskia; Alink, Lenneke R. A.; Tharner, Anne; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H.; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Children without disabilities in out-of-home care have a higher risk of child sexual abuse [CSA (Euser et al. 2013)]. In this study, we examined the year prevalence of CSA in out-of-home care for children with a mild intellectual disability, and compared it with the prevalence in out-of-home care for non-disabled children and children…

  7. A Risk Assessment Tool to Predict Sustained PTSD Symptoms Among Women Reporting Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddoux, John; McFarlane, Judith; Pennings, Jacquelyn

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Nationally and worldwide, 30% or more of women are likely to have experienced intimate partner violence. Maternal mental health symptoms predict child function. When mothers have sustained posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), their children at are risk for growth and developmental delays and poor behavioral outcomes that may adversely affect the course of their lives. While many who experience trauma will recover without intervention, a significant proportion will experience PTSD, with negative consequences for their personal lives and the lives of their families. Early identification of those at high risk for PTSD symptoms will support early interventions to prevent PTSD and its negative consequences. Methods: This paper describes the development of a tool that can predict PTSD symptoms at 8 months in mothers who are primarily of low socioeconomic status and primarily members of underrepresented groups. The tool consists of four key measures. Conclusions: Using this tool to identify mothers at high risk for sustained PTSD and entering them into early intervention programs may protect mothers and their children from negative outcomes and promote their health and wellbeing. PMID:26267645

  8. Toxicity ratios: Their use and abuse in predicting the risk from induced cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The toxicity ratio concept assumes the validity of certain relationships. In some examples for bone sarcoma induction, the approximate toxicity of 239Pu in man can be calculated algebraically from the observed toxicity in the radium-dial painters and the ratio of 239Pu/226Ra toxicities in suitable laboratory mammals. In a species highly susceptible to bone sarcoma induction, the risk coefficients for both 239Pu and 226Ra are elevated, but the toxicity ratio of 239Pu to 226Ra tends to be similar to the ratio in resistant species. Among the tested species the toxicity ratio of 239Pu to 226Ra ranged from 6 to 22 (a fourfold range), whereas their relative sensitivities to 239Pu varied by a factor of 150. The toxicity ratio approach can also be used to estimate the actinide risk to man from liver cancer, by comparing to the Thorotrast patients; from lung cancer, by comparing to the uranium miners and the atomic-bomb survivors; and from neutron-induced cancers, by comparing to cancers induced by gamma rays. The toxicity ratio can be used to predict the risk to man from a specific type of cancer that has been reliably induced by a reference radiation in humans and that can be induced by both the reference and the investigated radiation in suitable laboratory animals. 26 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  9. Risk factors for drug abuse among middle school students in Shenzhen%深圳市中学生药物滥用危险因素分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王倩; 刘小瑜; 吴斌; 邹江勇; 毛秋荣; 朱天; 胡东生

    2013-01-01

    目的 探讨深圳市中学生药物滥用行为的危险因素,为制定预防控制中学生药物滥用的措施提供科学依据.方法 以深圳市635例精神活性物质滥用的中学生作为病例组,按照性别、年龄1:1配对原则,选取635例非药物滥用的中学生作为对照组,进行病例对照研究,采用单因素和多因素条件Logistic回归分析.结果 多因素Logistic逐步回归分析显示,中学生的学习成绩较差(OR=1.32,95%CI=1.02~1.71)、父母滥用药物(OR=3.43,95%CI=1.84~6.40)、亲戚朋友滥用药物(OR=2.08,95% CI=1.26~ 3.43)、同学滥用药物(OR=2.05,95% CI=1.38 ~3.06)、过去吸烟但现在不吸(0R=2.53,95%CI=1.43~4.47)、目前吸烟(OR=2.55,95%CI=1.32 ~4.96)、目前饮酒(OR=1.60,95%CI=1.17~2.17)均为中学生精神活性物质滥用的危险因素(P值均<0.05).结论 对中学生进行药物滥用宣传教育的同时,应加强对其周围人群的干预,建立健康的生活和学习环境,从而有效控制中学生药物滥用行为的发生.%Objective To investigate risk factors for drug abuse among middle school students to provide prevention policies. Methods A total of 635 drug abuse adolescents were 1:1 matched with adolescents with no drug abuse history, based on sex and age. Univariate and conditional multivariate Logistic regression were recruited to explore the possible relationships between risk factors and drug abuse. Results The conditional multivariate Logistic regression analyses indicated that poor academic performance (OR = 1.32,95%CI = 1.02-1.71) , parents drug abuse history! OR =3. 43,95%CI = 1. 84 -6.40) , family member drug abuse history (OR= 2. 08, 95% CI = 1.26-3.43) , peer drug abuse ( OR = 2. 05, 95%CI = 1. 38-3. 06) , former smoker ( OR = 2. 53, 95%C/ = 1.43-4.47), present smoking( OR = 2. 55, 95%CI = 1.32 -4.96) , and alcohol using ( OR = 1. 60, 95%CI = 1.17 -2. 17) were significant independent risk factors for drug abuse. Conclusion

  10. Benzodiazepine use in COPD: empirical evidence from Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halvorsen T

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Thomas Halvorsen,1 Pål E Martinussen21SINTEF Technology and Society, Department for Health Research, 2Department of Sociology and Political Science, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, NorwayBackground: The common comorbidities associated with COPD include, among others, anxiety, depression, and insomnia, for which the typical treatment involves the use of benzodiazepines (BZD. However, these medicines should be used with extra caution among COPD patients, since treatment with traditional BZD may compromise respiratory function. Aims: This study investigated the use of BZD among persons suffering from COPD by analyzing three relevant indicators: 1 the sum of defined daily doses (DDD; 2 the number of prescribers involved; and 3 the number of different types of BZD used. Data and methods: The study builds on a linkage of national prescription data and patient–administrative data, which includes all Norwegian drug prescriptions to persons hospitalized with a COPD diagnosis during 2009, amounting to a total of 5,380 observations. Regression techniques were used to identify the patients and the clinical characteristics associated with BZD use. Results: Of the 5,380 COPD patients treated in hospital during 2009, 3,707 (69% were dispensed BZD during the following 12 months. Moreover, they were dispensed on average 197.08 DDD, had 1.22 prescribers, and used 0.98 types of BZD during the year. Women are more likely to use BZD for all levels of BZD use. Overnight planned care not only increases the risk of BZD use (DDD, but also the number of prescribers and the types of BZD in use.Conclusion: In light of the high levels of BZD prescription found in this study, especially among women, it is recommended that general practitioners, hospital specialists, and others treating COPD patients should aim to acquire a complete picture of their patients’ BZD medication before more is prescribed in order to keep the use to a minimum

  11. Genetic influences on impulsivity, risk taking, stress responsivity and vulnerability to drug abuse and addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreek MJ; Nielsen DA; Butelman ER; LaForge KS

    2005-11-01

    Genetic variation may partially underlie complex personality and physiological traits--such as impulsivity, risk taking and stress responsivity--as well as a substantial proportion of vulnerability to addictive diseases. Furthermore, personality and physiological traits themselves may differentially affect the various stages of addiction, defined chronologically as initiation of drug use, regular drug use, addiction/dependence and potentially relapse. Here we focus on recent approaches to the study of genetic variation in these personality and physiological traits, and their influence on and interaction with addictive diseases.

  12. Family Checkup: Positive Parenting Prevents Drug Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Facebook Twitter Family Checkup: Positive Parenting Prevents Drug Abuse Could your kids be at risk for substance ... drugs. Research supported by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) has shown the important role that parents ...

  13. Abuse of elderly people by their carers.

    OpenAIRE

    Homer, A C; Gilleard, C

    1990-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess the prevalence of abuse of elderly people by their carers and the characteristics of abusers and the abused. DESIGN--Information on abuse and risk factors was collected over six months from carers and patients. Risk factors were identified in the abused group and compared with those in a non-abused control group. SETTING--Carers were interviewed at home; patients were examined in the wards of Putney and Barnes geriatric hospitals, London. SUBJECTS--All patients referred f...

  14. Modest abuse-related subjective effects of zolpidem in drug-naïve volunteers

    OpenAIRE

    Licata, Stephanie C.; Mashhoon, Yasmin; MacLean, Robert R.; Lukas, Scott E.

    2011-01-01

    Recent case reports suggest that the short-acting benzodiazepine-like hypnotic zolpidem may have abuse potential among individuals who have no personal history of abusing drugs or alcohol, particularly at doses higher than those recommended for treating insomnia. The present study recruited drug-naïve volunteers to assess the subjective effects of multiple doses of zolpidem (0, 5, 10, or 20 mg) administered in a within-subject double-blind design. Participants (n=11) answered computerized que...

  15. Benzodiazepine use in Denmark 1997-2008

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, E.; Pedersen, H.; Fosbol, E.;

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Analysis of the pattern of benzodiazepine (BZD) use over time in the period 1997-2008 in relation to age and comorbidity. Methods: All Danish citizens more than or equal to 10 years on January 1, 1997 were included in the study based on data from national databases. Main outcome measures...... were changes in BZD prevalence of use and intensity of use with respect to age, gender and comorbidity. Results: Prevalence of at least one prescription per individual within a year declined from 12.0% in 1997 to 10.7% in 2008 (P <0.0001). Among people aged 75-84 years use of BZDs dropped from 35.8% to.......27 (CI 3.25-3.30), OR for using more than 180 ddd/year 6.7 (CI 6.7-6.8). Conclusion: BZD-use has been markedly reduced in the Danish population from 1997-2008; however, one in four people aged 75-85 years and almost one in three of patients over 85 years still use BZDs. © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS and...

  16. Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrome: Benzodiazepines and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachdeva, Ankur; Choudhary, Mona; Chandra, Mina

    2015-09-01

    Alcohol dependence is an increasing and pervasive problem. Alcohol withdrawal symptoms are a part of alcohol dependence syndrome and are commonly encountered in general hospital settings, in most of the departments. Alcohol withdrawal syndrome ranges from mild to severe. The severe complicated alcohol withdrawal may present with hallucinations, seizures or delirium tremens. Benzodiazepines have the largest and the best evidence base in the treatment of alcohol withdrawal, and are considered the gold standard. Others, such as anticonvulsants, barbiturates, adrenergic drugs, and GABA agonists have been tried and have evidence. Supportive care and use of vitamins is essential in the management. Symptom triggered regime is favoured over fixed tapering dose regime, although monitoring through scales is cumbersome. This article aims to review the evidence base for appropriate clinical management of the alcohol withdrawal syndrome. We searched Pubmed for articles published in English on 'Alcohol withdrawal syndrome' in humans during the last 10 years. A total of 1182 articles came up. Articles not relevant to clinical utility and management were excluded based on the titles and abstract available. Full text articles, meta-analyses, systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials were obtained from this list and were considered for review. PMID:26500991

  17. Delineating Selection and Mediation Effects among Childhood Personality and Environmental Risk Factors in the Development of Adolescent Substance Abuse

    OpenAIRE

    Hicks, Brian M.; Johnson, Wendy; Durbin, C. Emily; Blonigen, Daniel M.; Iacono, William G.; McGue, Matt

    2014-01-01

    Utilizing the large, longitudinal Minnesota Twin Family Study (N = 2510; 96% European American ancestry), we examined the influence of several person-environment transactions on adolescent substance abuse. We focused on the two childhood personality traits found to be most predictive of substance abuse in this sample—socialization (willingness to follow rules and endorse conventional values) and boldness (social engagement and assurance, stress resilience, thrill seeking)—and the environmenta...

  18. Drug Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as drugged driving, violence, stress, and child abuse. Drug abuse can lead to homelessness, crime, and missed work or problems with keeping a job. It harms unborn babies and destroys families. There are different types of treatment for drug abuse. But the best is to prevent drug ...

  19. Elder abuse

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    Elder abuse takes many forms and occurs in a variety of settings; it is both under-recognised and under-reported. Despite a lack of statutory guidelines or legislation, effective management is possible. More could be done to recognise abuse, and healthcare workers need to be vigilant, paying attention to both the circumstances in which abuse occurs and its warning signs.

  20. The potential role of salt abuse on the risk for kidney stone formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakhaee, K.; Harvey, J. A.; Padalino, P. K.; Whitson, P.; Pak, C. Y.

    1993-01-01

    The kidney stone-forming risk of a high sodium diet was evaluated by assessing the effect of such a diet on the crystallization of stone-forming salts in urine. Fourteen normal subjects participated in 2 phases of study of 10 days duration each, comprising a low sodium phase (basal metabolic diet containing 50 mmol. sodium per day) and a high sodium phase (basal diet plus 250 mmol. sodium chloride per day). The high sodium intake significantly increased urinary sodium (34 +/- 12 to 267 +/- 56 mmol. per day), calcium (2.73 +/- 1.03 to 3.93 +/- 1.51 mmol. per day) and pH (5.79 +/- 0.44 to 6.15 +/- 0.25), and significantly decreased urinary citrate (3.14 +/- 1.19 to 2.52 +/- 0.83 mmol. per day). Arterialized venous blood bicarbonate and total serum carbon dioxide concentrations decreased significantly during the high sodium diet, whereas serum chloride concentration increased. However, no change in arterialized venous pH was detected. Thus, a high sodium intake not only increased calcium excretion, but also increased urinary pH and decreased citrate excretion. The latter effects are probably due to sodium-induced bicarbonaturia and a significant decrease in serum bicarbonate concentration, respectively. Commensurate with these changes, the urinary saturation of calcium phosphate (brushite) and monosodium urate increased, and the inhibitor activity against calcium oxalate crystallization (formation product) decreased. The net effect of a high sodium diet was an increased propensity for the crystallization of calcium salts in urine.

  1. Child abuse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Child abuse is common in most, if not all, Western nations; it probably occurs worldwide. It may be a major factor in the increase in violence throughout much of the world. Radiologists who treat children should think of the possibilitys of abuse whenever they diagnose a fracture, intracranial bleed, ar visceral injury, especially when the history is not compatible with their findings. Metaphyseal 'corner' fractures in infants usually are caused by abuse. Less than 20% of abused children, however, present injuries that can be recognized by radiologic techniques. Consequently normal roentgenograms, nuclear medicine scans, ultrasound studies, and computed tomograms do not exclude child abuse. (orig.)

  2. Long term benzodiazepine use for insomnia in patients over the age of 60: discordance of patient and physician perceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upshur Ross EG

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to determine and compare patients' and physicians' perceptions of benefits and risks of long term benzodiazepine use for insomnia in the elderly. Methods A cross-sectional study (written survey was conducted in an academic primary care group practice in Toronto, Canada. The participants were 93 patients over 60 years of age using a benzodiazepine for insomnia and 25 physicians comprising sleep specialists, family physicians, and family medicine residents. The main outcome measure was perception of benefit and risk scores calculated from the mean of responses (on a Likert scale of 1 to 5 to various items on the survey. Results The mean perception of benefit score was significantly higher in patients than physicians (3.85 vs. 2.84, p Conclusions There is a significant discordance between older patients and their physicians regarding the perceptions of benefits and risks of using benzodiazepines for insomnia on a long term basis. The challenge is to openly discuss these perceptions in the context of the available evidence to make collaborative and informed decisions.

  3. Adverse Events Associated with Flumazenil Treatment for the Management of Suspected Benzodiazepine Intoxication - A Systematic Review with Meta-Analyses of Randomised Trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penninga, Elisabeth I; Graudal, Niels; Ladekarl, Morten Baekbo;

    2016-01-01

    the blinded phase of the RCTs. The use of flumazenil in a population admitted at the emergency department with known or suspected benzodiazepine intoxication is associated with a significantly increased risk of (S)AEs compared with placebo. Flumazenil should not be used routinely, and the harms and...

  4. ABUSE OF ANABOLIC ANDROGENIC STEROIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Yavari

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available According to the International Olympic Committee, the abuse of anabolic androgenic steroids (AASS is found in over 50% of positive doping tests. AASS abuse is not restricted to the organized sports andwidespread use. It remains as an unsolved public-health problem.Lower black market price, easier access to AASS, bodybuilding clubs and internet advertising are factors of this increasingly misuse. There is not real data about the prevalence of AASS abuse in various populations or countries, because most of athletes or students, due to their prohibition or ethical aspects do not admit to AASS abuse. Often they are aware of the risks of their choice and yet, are eager to put themselves at risk without deeper consideration. The abusers use them to improve their physical fitness and appearance.Present article has been collected to elucidate the risks and adverse effects of AASS and explanation of mechanisms of these events.

  5. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy and Catatonia in the Setting of Benzodiazepine Withdrawal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Teng J.

    2016-01-01

    We report two serious and unusual complications of benzodiazepine withdrawal in a single patient: takotsubo cardiomyopathy and catatonia. This 61-year-old female patient was brought to the emergency department with lethargy and within hours had declined into a state of catatonia. Although there was never a complaint of chest pain, ECG showed deep anterior T-wave inversions and cardiac enzymes were elevated. An echocardiogram was consistent with takotsubo cardiomyopathy. She later received 1 mg of midazolam and within minutes had resolution of catatonic symptoms. Careful history revealed that she had omitted her daily dose of lorazepam for 3 days prior to admission. To our knowledge, the case presented herein is the first report of simultaneous catatonia and takotsubo cardiomyopathy in the setting of benzodiazepine withdrawal. The pathogenesis of both conditions is poorly understood but may be indirectly related to the sudden decrease in γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) signaling during benzodiazepine withdrawal. PMID:27547472

  6. Initial benzodiazepine use and improved health-related quality of life.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hulten, Rolf; Teeuw, Bart; Bakker, Albert; Leufkens, Hubert G

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of initial benzodiazepine users was measured over time. Furthermore, benzodiazepine usage characteristics as determinants of change in mental and physical health status of the benzodiazepine users were examined. METHODS: In the only pharmacy of a

  7. Opportunities for computer abuse

    OpenAIRE

    Willison, Robert; Backhouse, James

    2005-01-01

    Systems risk refers to the likelihood that an IS is inadequately guarded against certain types of damage or loss. While risks are posed by acts of God, hackers and viruses, consideration should also be given to the ‘insider’ threat of dishonest employees, intent on undertaking some form of computer abuse. Against this backdrop, a number of researchers have addressed the extent to which security managers are cognizant of the very nature of systems risk. In particular, they note how security pr...

  8. UV-guided screening of benzodiazepine producing species in Penicillium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostenfeld Larsen T; Frydenvang, Karla Andrea; Christian Frisvad J

    2000-01-01

    The benzodiazepine sclerotigenin (auranthine B) recently described as a metabolite of Penicillium sclerotigenum, has been isolated as the major metabolite from an isolate of P. commune. The structure of sclerotigenin was established by a single-crystal X-ray diffraction study and by NMR spectrosc......The benzodiazepine sclerotigenin (auranthine B) recently described as a metabolite of Penicillium sclerotigenum, has been isolated as the major metabolite from an isolate of P. commune. The structure of sclerotigenin was established by a single-crystal X-ray diffraction study and by NMR...

  9. A case-control study on alcohol and psychiatric disorders as risk factors for drug abuse pattern Estudo caso-controle sobre distúrbios psiquiátricos e com álcool como fatores de risco para padrão de abuso de drogas

    OpenAIRE

    Claudia S Lopes; Rosely Sichieri

    2002-01-01

    We evaluated alcohol and psychiatric disorders as risk factors for the pattern of drug abuse/dependence in a matched case-control study (370 adults). Cases (drug abusers) and controls were selected in the community using the snowball technique and matched by sex, age, and friendship. Information was gathered using the "Composite International Diagnostic Interview" (CIDI). Three patterns of drug abuse/dependence were evaluated: any drug abuse/dependence, only cannabis, and cocaine and other dr...

  10. Diagnostic imaging of child abuse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oguma, Eiji; Aihara, Toshinori [Saitama Children' s Medical Center, Iwatsuki (Japan)

    2002-04-01

    The major role of imaging in cases of suspected child abuse is to identify the physical injuries and to confirm the occurrence of abuse. In severely abused infants, the imaging findings may be the only evidence for a diagnosis of inflicted injury. Imaging may be the first clue to abuse in children seen with apparent other conditions and lead to appropriate measures to protect them from the risk of more serious injury. The radiologist must be familiar with imaging findings of inflicted injuries to fulfill these roles. (author)

  11. Diagnostic imaging of child abuse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The major role of imaging in cases of suspected child abuse is to identify the physical injuries and to confirm the occurrence of abuse. In severely abused infants, the imaging findings may be the only evidence for a diagnosis of inflicted injury. Imaging may be the first clue to abuse in children seen with apparent other conditions and lead to appropriate measures to protect them from the risk of more serious injury. The radiologist must be familiar with imaging findings of inflicted injuries to fulfill these roles. (author)

  12. Depression and Anger as Risk Factors Underlying the Relationship between Maternal Substance Involvement and Child Abuse Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hien, Denise; Cohen, Lisa R.; Caldeira, Nathilee A.; Flom, Peter; Wasserman, Gail

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This study examines how emotion regulation deficits in the area of anger arousal and reactivity are associated with child abuse potential in mothers with substance use and depressive disorders in order to identify targeted areas for prevention and treatment. Methods: A sample of 152 urban mothers was interviewed on measures of substance…

  13. Comparative efficacy of two primary care interventions to assist withdrawal from long term benzodiazepine use: A protocol for a clustered, randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roca Miguel

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although benzodiazepines are effective, long-term use is not recommended because of potential adverse effects; the risks of tolerance and dependence; and an increased risk of hip fractures, motor vehicle accidents, and memory impairment. The estimated prevalence of long-term benzodiazepine use in the general population is about 2,2 to 2,6%, is higher in women and increases steadily with age. Interventions performed by General Practitioners may help patients to discontinue long-term benzodiazepine use. We have designed a trial to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of two brief general practitioner-provided interventions, based on gradual dose reduction, and will compare the effectiveness of these interventions with that of routine clinical practice. Methods/Design In a three-arm cluster randomized controlled trial, general practitioners will be randomly allocated to: a a group in which the first patient visit will feature a structured interview, followed by visits every 2-3 weeks to the end of dose reduction; b a group in which the first patient visit will feature a structured interview plus delivery of written instructions to self-reduce benzodiazepine dose, or c routine care. Using a computerized pharmaceutical prescription database, 495 patients, aged 18-80 years, taking benzodiazepine for at least 6 months, will be recruited in primary care health districts of three regions of Spain (the Balearic Islands, Catalonia, and Valencia. The primary outcome will be benzodiazepine use at 12 months. The secondary outcomes will include measurements of anxiety and depression symptoms, benzodiazepine dependence, quality of sleep, and alcohol consumption. Discussion Although some interventions have been shown to be effective in reducing benzodiazepine consumption by long-term users, the clinical relevance of such interventions is limited by their complexity. This randomized trial will compare the effectiveness and safety of two

  14. Liganden des Benzodiazepin-Rezeptors: Studien über Benzodiazepine in pflanzlichen Geweben sowie über Hispidulin

    OpenAIRE

    Kavvadias, Dominique

    2003-01-01

    Im Rahmen dieser Arbeit wurden Liganden des zentralen Benzodiazepin-Rezeptors (BZD-R) aus pflanzlichen Geweben untersucht. Der erste Teil war dem Studium „natürlicher“ Benzodiazepine (BZD) gewidmet. Deren Vorkommen ist vielfach belegt; an ihrer Biogenese sind möglicherweise Mikroorganismen beteiligt. Es war nun zu prüfen, ob BZD auch unter Sterilbedingungen, d.h. nach Ausschluss mikrobieller Aktivität auftreten können. Hierzu wurden steril kultivierte pflanzliche Kalli und Regenerate, unter a...

  15. Effects of benzodiazepines and non-benzodiazepine compounds on the GABA-induced response in frog isolated sensory neurones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakushiji, T; Fukuda, T; Oyama, Y; Akaike, N

    1989-11-01

    1. The effects of benzodiazepines and non-benzodiazepine compounds on the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-induced chloride current (ICl) were studied in frog isolated sensory neurones by use of a concentration-jump (termed 'concentration-clamp') technique, under single-electrode voltage-clamp conditions. The drugs used were classified into four categories as follows: full benzodiazepine receptor agonists (diazepam, clonazepam, nitrazepam, midazolam, clotiazepam and etizolam), partial agonists (CL 218,872, Ro 16-6028, Ro 17-1812 and Ro 23-0364), inverse agonists (Ro 15-3505, FG 7142 and beta-CCE) and a benzodiazepine receptor antagonist, Ro 15-1788 (flumazenil). 2. All full agonists at concentrations of 3 x 10(-6) M or less increased dose-dependently the peak amplitude of ICl elicited by 3 x 10(-6) M GABA to twice to three times larger than the control. However, no further augmentation of the GABA response was observed at concentrations of 1 x 10(-5) M or higher. Partial agonists also showed a dose-dependent augmentation of the GABA response at concentrations ranging from 3 x 10(-8) M to 3 x 10(-5) M, but their efficacies of augmentation of the GABA response were only about half or less of those of full agonists. Of the inverse agonists, beta-CCE had a unique dose-dependent effect on the GABA response. Beta-CCE reduced dose-dependently the GABA response at concentrations of less than 3 x 10(-6) M, but augmented it at concentrations of 3 x 10(-5) M and 6 x 10(-5) M. The inverse agonists reduced dose-dependently the GABA response. The benzodiazepine antagonist, flumazenil, slightly augmented the GABA response at concentrations between 3 x 10 7M and 3 x 10 5 M. 3. These results show clear differences in the effects on the GABA response between these four categories of compounds known to affect the benzodiazepine recognition site of the GABA/ benzodiazepine receptor-chloride channel complex. Our experimental system of frog isolated sensory neurones and a 'concentration

  16. Improving the use of benzodiazepines-Is it possible? A non-systematic review of interventions tried in the last 20 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tett Susan E

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Benzodiazepines are often used on a long term basis in the elderly to treat various psychological disorders including sleep disorders, some neurological disorders and anxiety. This is despite the risk of dependence, cognitive impairment, and falls and fractures. Guidelines, campaigns and prescribing restrictions have been used to raise awareness of potentially inappropriate use, however long term use of benzodiazepine and related compounds is currently increasing in Australia and worldwide. The objective of this paper is to explore interventions aimed at improving the prescribing and use of benzodiazepines in the last 20 years. Methods Medline, EMBASE, PsychINFO, IPA were searched for the period 1987 to June 2007. Results Thirty-two articles met the study eligibility criteria (interventions solely focusing on increasing appropriate prescribing and reducing long term use of benzodiazepines and were appraised. Insufficient data were presented in these studies for systematic data aggregation and synthesis, hence critical appraisal was used to tabulate the studies and draw empirical conclusions. Three major intervention approaches were identified; education, audit and feedback, and alerts. Conclusions Studies which used a multi-faceted approach had the largest and most sustained reductions in benzodiazepines use. It appears that support groups for patients, non-voluntary recruitment of GPs, and oral delivery of alerts or feedback may all improve the outcomes of interventions. The choice of outcome measures, delivery style of educational messages, and requests by GPs to stop benzodiazepines, either in a letter or face to face, showed no differences on the success rates of the intervention.

  17. Change in healthcare utilization and costs following initiation of benzodiazepine therapy for long-term treatment of generalized anxiety disorder: a retrospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berger Ariel

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, and benzodiazepine anxiolytics are used in the US to treat generalized anxiety disorder (GAD. While benzodiazepines typically provide rapid symptomatic relief, long-term use is not recommended due to risks of dependency, sedation, falls, and accidents. Methods Using a US health insurance database, we identified all persons with GAD (ICD-9-CM diagnosis code 300.02 who began a long-term course of treatment (≥90 days with a benzodiazepine anxiolytic between 1/1/2003 and 12/31/2007, We compared healthcare utilization and costs over the six-month periods preceding and following the date of treatment initiation (“pretreatment” and “post-treatment”, respectively, and focused attention on accident-related encounters (e.g., for treatment of fractures and care received for other reasons possibly related benzodiazepine use (e.g., sedation, dizziness. Results A total of 866 patients met all study entry criteria; 25% of patients began treatment on an add-on basis (i.e., adjunctive to escitalopram, paroxetine, sertraline, or venlafaxine, while 75% of patients did not receive concomitant therapy. Mean total healthcare costs increased by $2334 between the pretreatment and post-treatment periods (from $4637 [SD=$9840] to $6971 [$17,002]; p Conclusions Healthcare costs increase in patients with GAD beginning long-term (≥90 days treatment with a benzodiazepine anxiolytic; a substantial proportion of this increase is attributable to care associated with accidents and other known sequelae of long-term benzodiazepine use.

  18. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists for acute and chronic hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, B; Kjaergard, L L; Gluud, C

    2001-01-01

    The pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy is unknown. It has been suggested that liver failure leads to the accumulation of substances that bind to a receptor-complex in the brain resulting in neural inhibition which may progress to coma. Several trials have assessed benzodiazepine receptor...

  19. Psychological determinants of the intention to educate patients about benzodiazepines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ten Wolde, Geeske Brecht; Dijkstra, A.; Van Empelen, P.; Neven, A. Knuistingh; Zitman, F. G.

    2008-01-01

    Objective General practitioners and pharmacists do not properly educate their patients about the disadvantages of benzodiazepines. In order to increase and improve education, this study will investigate which psychological factors (i.e., beliefs, outcome expectation, social norm and self-efficacy) p

  20. Gamma-aminobutyric acid-modulated benzodiazepine binding sites in bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benzodiazepine binding sites, which were once considered to exist only in higher vertebrates, are here demonstrated in the bacteria E. coli. The bacterial [3H]diazepam binding sites are modulated by GABA; the modulation is dose dependent and is reduced at high concentrations. The most potent competitors of E.Coli [3H]diazepam binding are those that are active in displacing [3H]benzodiazepines from vertebrate peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites. These vertebrate sites are not modulated by GABA, in contrast to vertebrate neuronal benzodiazepine binding sites. The E.coli benzodiazepine binding sites therefore differ from both classes of vertebrate benzodiazepine binding sites; however the ligand spectrum and GABA-modulatory properties of the E.coli sites are similar to those found in insects. This intermediate type of receptor in lower species suggests a precursor for at least one class of vertebrate benzodiazepine binding sites may have existed

  1. Prolonged-release melatonin versus placebo for benzodiazepine discontinuation in patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baandrup, Lone; Lindschou, Jane; Winkel, Per;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We assessed if prolonged-release melatonin can facilitate withdrawal of long-term benzodiazepine usage in patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. METHODS: Randomised, placebo-controlled, blinded, parallel superiority trial of 24 weeks duration. Participants were randomised to...... prolonged-release melatonin 2 mg daily versus matching placebo and were continuously guided to gradually reduce their usual benzodiazepine dosage. The primary outcome was mean benzodiazepine daily dosage at 24 weeks. Secondary outcomes included pattern of benzodiazepine dosage over time, benzodiazepine...... cessation proportion, and benzodiazepine withdrawal symptoms. RESULTS: In total, 86 patients (21-74 years) were enrolled: 42 were randomised to melatonin versus 44 to placebo. We found no significant effect of melatonin on mean benzodiazepine dosage at 24 weeks (melatonin group 8.01 mg versus placebo group...

  2. Detection and identification of the designer benzodiazepine flubromazepam and preliminary data on its metabolism and pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosmann, Bjoern; Huppertz, Laura M; Hutter, Melanie; Buchwald, Armin; Ferlaino, Sascha; Auwärter, Volker

    2013-11-01

    The appearance of pyrazolam in Internet shops selling 'research chemicals' in 2012 marked the beginning of designer benzodiazepines being sold as recreational drugs or 'self medication'. With recent changes in national narcotics laws in many countries, where two uncontrolled benzodiazepines (phenazepam and etizolam), which were marketed by pharmaceutical companies in some countries, were scheduled, clandestine laboratories seem to turn to poorly characterized research drug candidates as legal substitutes. Following the appearance of pyrazolam, it comes with no surprise that recently, flubromazepam (7-bromo-5-(2-fluorophenyl)-1,3-dihydro-2H-1,4-benzodiazepin-2-one), a second designer benzodiazepine, was offered on the market. In this article, this new compound was characterized using nuclear magnetic resonance, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight MS (LC-Q-ToF-MS). Additionally, a study was carried out, in which one of the authors consumed 4 mg of flubromazepam to gain preliminary data on the pharmacokinetic properties and the metabolism of this compound. For this purpose, serum as well as urine samples were collected for up to 31 days post-ingestion and analyzed applying LC-MS/MS and LC-Q-ToF-MS techniques. On the basis of this study, flubromazepam appears to have an extremely long elimination half-life of more than 100 h. One monohydroxylated compound and the debrominated compound could be identified as the predominant metabolites, the first allowing a detection of a consumption for up to 28 days post-ingestion when analyzing urine samples in our case. Additionally, various immunochemical assays were evaluated, showing that the cross-reactivity of the used assay seems not to be sufficient for safe detection of the applied dose in urine samples, bearing the risk that it could be misused in drug-withdrawal settings or in other circumstances requiring

  3. How to Handle Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... abuse: physical, sexual, verbal or emotional, and neglect. Physical abuse: Physical abuse is hitting hard with a hand or an ... choking, painful grabbing, and kicking also can be physical abuse. Sexual abuse: Your body has private parts. These ...

  4. Childhood history of abuse and child abuse potential: the role of parent's gender and timing of childhood abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Martínez, A; Figueiredo, B; Moya-Albiol, L

    2014-03-01

    It has been suggested that being physically abused leads to someone becoming a perpetrator of abuse which could be associated to parents' gender, timing of the physical abuse and specific socio-demographic variables. This study aims to investigate the role the parents' gender, timing of childhood abuse and socio-demographic variables on the relationship between parents' history of childhood physical abuse and current risk for children. The sample consisted of 920 parents (414 fathers, 506 mothers) from the Portuguese National Representative Study of Psychosocial Context of Child Abuse and Neglect who completed the Childhood History Questionnaire and the Child Abuse Potential Inventory. The results showed that fathers had lower current potential risk of becoming physical abuse perpetrators with their children than mothers although they did not differed in their physical victimization history. Moreover, the risk was higher in parents (both genders) with continuous history of victimization than in parents without victimization. Prediction models showed that for fathers and mothers separately similar socio-demographic variables (family income, number of children at home, employment status and marital status) predicted the potential risk of becoming physical abuses perpetrators. Nevertheless, the timing of victimization was different for fathers (before 13 years old) and mothers (after 13 years old). Then our study targets specific variables (timing of physical abuse, parents' gender and specific socio-demographic variables), which may enable professionals to select groups of parents at greater need of participating in abuse prevention programs. PMID:24269330

  5. Inhalant Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... she is likely to try other kinds of drugs, especially alcohol and marijuana. Symptoms How can I tell if my child is abusing inhalants? It can be hard to recognize the signs of inhalant abuse. Teenagers who use inhalants may have some of the ...

  6. Abusive Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... leaving. Where to Get Help Ending abuse and violence in teen relationships is a community effort with plenty of ... other ways to get involved in making sure dating abuse doesn’t happen to people in your school. Reviewed by: D'Arcy Lyness, PhD Date reviewed: May ... For Teens For Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC ...

  7. Behavioral and Neurophysiological Signatures of Benzodiazepine-Related Driving Impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Bradly T; Correa, Kelly A; Brown, Timothy L; Spurgin, Andrew L; Stikic, Maja; Johnson, Robin R; Berka, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Impaired driving due to drug use is a growing problem worldwide; estimates show that 18-23.5% of fatal accidents, and up to 34% of injury accidents may be caused by drivers under the influence of drugs (Drummer et al., 2003; Walsh et al., 2004; NHTSA, 2010). Furthermore, at any given time, up to 16% of drivers may be using drugs that can impair one's driving abilities (NHTSA, 2009). Currently, drug recognition experts (DREs; law enforcement officers with specialized training to identify drugged driving), have the most difficult time with identifying drivers potentially impaired on central nervous system (CNS) depressants (Smith et al., 2002). The fact that the use of benzodiazepines, a type of CNS depressant, is also associated with the greatest likelihood of causing accidents (Dassanayake et al., 2011), further emphasizes the need to improve research tools in this area which can facilitate the refinement of, or additions to, current assessments of impaired driving. Our laboratories collaborated to evaluate both the behavioral and neurophysiological effects of a benzodiazepine, alprazolam, in a driving simulation (miniSim(TM)). This drive was combined with a neurocognitive assessment utilizing time synched neurophysiology (electroencephalography, ECG). While the behavioral effects of benzodiazepines are well characterized (Rapoport et al., 2009), we hypothesized that, with the addition of real-time neurophysiology and the utilization of simulation and neurocognitive assessment, we could find objective assessments of drug impairment that could improve the detection capabilities of DREs. Our analyses revealed that (1) specific driving conditions were significantly more difficult for benzodiazepine impaired drivers and (2) the neurocognitive tasks' metrics were able to classify "impaired" vs. "unimpaired" with up to 80% accuracy based on lane position deviation and lane departures. While this work requires replication in larger studies, our results not only identified

  8. The EARLY ALLIANCE prevention trial: an integrated set of interventions to promote competence and reduce risk for conduct disorder, substance abuse, and school failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, J E; Prinz, R J; Smith, E P; Laughlin, J

    1999-03-01

    Describes the EARLY ALLIANCE interventions, an integrated set of four programs designed to promote competence and reduce risk for early-onset conduct disorder, substance abuse, and school failure. These interventions are evaluated as part of a prevention trial that begins at school entry and targets child functioning and socializing practices across multiple contexts (school, peer group, family) and multiple domains (affective, social, and achievement coping-competence). The paper presents the conceptual foundation of the four interventions, including a synopsis of the risk and protective factors associated with conduct disorder and related outcomes, and of the coping-competence model driving EARLY ALLIANCE. The developmental rationale, intended impact, and procedures are described for each intervention: a universally administered classroom program and indicated, peer, reading-mentoring, and family programs. Interventions are currently being tested in a prevention trial, which is briefly summarized. PMID:11324096

  9. Stable Dynamic Risk Factors in Child Sexual Abusers: the Incremental Predictive Power of Narcissistic Personality Traits beyond the Static-99/Stable-2007 Priority Categories on Sexual Reoffense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinhard Eher

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A group of hands on child sexual abusers were diagnosed according to DSM-IVR criteria within a routinely performed risk assessment process in the Austrian prison system. Actuarials showed moderate to good predictive accuracy, and a combination of static and stable risk factors (Static-99 and Stable-2007 significantly improved the predictive power for sexual reoffense.In addition, the clinical diagnosis of narcissistic personality disorder significantly added incremental validity once the Static-99/Stable-2007 factors were accounted for. Clinical diagnoses of an exclusive pedophilia, exhibitionism, voyeurism and a paranoid personality disorder - although linked to sexual recidivism - failed to add predictive utility beyond the Static-99/Stable-2007 priority factors.

  10. Child Abuse and Aggression among Seriously Emotionally Disturbed Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Julian D.; Fraleigh, Lisa A.; Connor, Daniel F.

    2010-01-01

    Abused children may be at risk for problems with aggression. In a sample of 397 seriously emotionally disturbed children, reactive aggression was associated with documented history of physical abuse but not sexual abuse. Girls were equally likely to be classified as reactively aggressive regardless of physical abuse history, but boys with physical…

  11. Caregiver Unresolved Loss and Abuse and Child Behavior Problems: Intergenerational Effects in a High-Risk Sample

    OpenAIRE

    Zajac, Kristyn; Kobak, Roger

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the intergenerational effects of caregivers’ Unresolved loss and abuse on children’s behavior problems from middle childhood to early adolescence in an economically disadvantaged sample. One hundred twenty four caregivers completed the Adult Attachment Interview (AAI) and a lifetime trauma interview during the age 13 wave of the study. Child behavior problems were assessed at four time points (ages 6, 8, 10, and 13) with teacher-reported CBCL total problem scales. The chil...

  12. A dimensional approach to understanding severity estimates and risk correlates of marijuana abuse and dependence in adults

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Li-Tzy; Woody, George E.; Yang, Chongming; Pan, Jeng-Jong; Reeve, Bryce B.; Blazer, Dan G.

    2012-01-01

    While item response theory (IRT) research shows a latent severity trait underlying response patterns of substance abuse and dependence symptoms, little is known about IRT-based severity estimates in relation to clinically relevant measures. In response to increased prevalences of marijuana-related treatment admissions, an elevated level of marijuana potency, and the debate on medical marijuana use, we applied dimensional approaches to understand IRT-based severity estimates for marijuana use ...

  13. Intergenerational violence in Burundi: Experienced childhood maltreatment increases the risk of abusive child rearing and intimate partner violence

    OpenAIRE

    Crombach, Anselm; Bambonyé, Manassé

    2015-01-01

    Background: Experiencing abuse during childhood affects the psychological well-being of individuals throughout their lives and may even influence their offspring by enhancing the likelihood of an intergenerational transmission of violence. Understanding the effects of childhood maltreatment on child-rearing practices and intimate partner violence might be of particular importance to overcome the consequences of violent conflicts in African societies.Objective: Using Burundi as an example, we ...

  14. Reported physical and sexual abuse in childhood and adult HIV risk behaviour in three African countries: findings from Project Accept (HPTN-043).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Linda; Komárek, Arnošt; Desmond, Chris; Celentano, David; Morin, Steve; Sweat, Michael; Chariyalertsak, Suwat; Chingono, Alfred; Gray, Glenda; Mbwambo, Jessie; Coates, Tom

    2014-02-01

    Childhood sexual and physical abuse have been linked to adolescent and adult risky sexual behaviors, including early sexual debut, an increased number of sexual partners, unprotected sex, alcohol and drug use during sex and sexual violence. This paper explores these relationships among both men and women who report histories of childhood abuse from representative samples of communities in three countries in southern and eastern Africa (South Africa, Zimbabwe and Tanzania). Data were collected as part of a 3-year randomized community trial to rapidly increase knowledge of HIV status and to promote community responses through mobilisation, mobile testing, provision of same-day HIV test results and post-test support for HIV. The results indicate that reported childhood sexual and physical abuse is high in all three settings, also among men, and shows strong relationships with a range of sexual risk behaviors, including age at first sex (OR -0.6 (CI: -0.9, -0.4, p < 0.003)-among men, OR -0.7 (CI: -0.9, -0.5, p < 0.001)-among women), alcohol (OR 1.43 (CI: 1.22, 1.68, p < 0.001)-men, OR 1.83 (CI: 1.50, 2.24, p < 0.001)-women) and drug use (OR 1.65 (CI: 1.38, 1.97, p < 0.001)-men, OR 3.14 (CI: 1.95, 5.05, p < 0.001)-women) and two forms of partner violence-recent forced sex (OR 2.22 (CI: 1.66, 2.95, p < 0.001)-men, OR 2.76 (CI: 2.09, 3.64, p < 0.001)-women) and ever being hurt by a partner (OR 3.88 (CI: 2.84, 5.29, p < 0.001)-men, OR 3.06 (CI: 2.48, 3.76, p < 0.001)-women). Individuals abused in childhood comprise between 6 and 29 % of young adult men and women living in these African settings and constitute a population at high risk of HIV infection. PMID:23474641

  15. A cross-sectional study of factors underlying the risk of female nurses' suffering abuse by their partners Estudio transversal sobre factores de riesgo de sufrir violencia por compañero íntimo en la mujer enfermera Estudo transversal sobre fatores de risco de violência por parceiro íntimo entre enfermeiras

    OpenAIRE

    María-Aurora Rodríguez-Borrego; Manuel Vaquero-Abellán; Liana Bertagnolli da Rosa

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to identify factors underlying the risk of suffering abuse by a partner. A cross-sectional study of 622 female nurses was accomplished, randomly chosen at their place of work, at a hospital and health centers. We used a self-administered validated questionnaire that covered psychological, physical and sexual abuse, complemented by a set of sociodemographic questions. The nurses at most risk of being abused by their partners were those who supported their family by their own s...

  16. Research Progress in Physical Dependence of Benzodiazepine-type Drugs and Receptor Mechanism%苯二氮(艹卓)类药物的躯体依赖及受体机制研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王丽华

    2011-01-01

    Prolonged use of benzodiazepines can lead to physical dependence. The diverse behavioral effects of benzodiazepines may reflect the actions on different subtypes of GABAA receptors. Benzodiazepine action appears to be determined by the presence of particular ct subunits. But a complex picture is emerging with respect to abuse of benzodiazepines and the roles of different GABAA receptor subtypes. Recent researches suggest an interaction with all GABAA receptor subtypes is required for physical dependence of benzodiazepines. This article reviews physical dependence of benzodiazepine and mediating GABAA receptor subunits.%苯二氮(艹卓)类药物的长期使用会使患者产生躯体依赖.不同的苯二氮(艹卓)类药物的行为效应可能由不同的GABAA受体亚单位介导.苯二氮(艹卓)类药物主要作用于特定的α亚单位.然而,苯二氮艹 卓类药物的滥用和不同的GABAA受体亚单位所起的作用之间却是复杂的.研究表明,苯二氮(艹卓)类药物躯体依赖的发生需要所有GABAA受体亚单位的相互作用.现重点介绍国内外有关苯二氮(艹卓)类药物的躯体依赖的产生,GABAA受体亚单位介导的苯二氮(艹卓)类药物的躯体依赖等研究情况.

  17. Integrating Substance Abuse Treatment and Child Welfare Services: Findings from the Illinois Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse Waiver Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Joseph P.; Marsh, Jeanne C.; Testa, Mark F.; Louderman, Richard

    2006-01-01

    Alcohol and other drug abuse is a major problem for children and families involved with public child welfare. Substance abuse compromises appropriate parenting practices and increases the risk of child maltreatment. A substantial proportion of substantiated child abuse and neglect reports involve parental substance abuse. Once in the system,…

  18. Child Abuse and Domestic Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Traumatic Stress Disorder Reporting Domestic Abuse Reporting Suspected Child Abuse or Neglect Traumatic Brain Injury Family & Relationships There’s more to a military family than moving and deployments — take us along through each phase of your military ... Care and Youth Programs Parenting Military Youth on ...

  19. Recent trends in benzodiazepine use by injecting drug users in Victoria and Tasmania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Craig L; Bruno, Raimondo B

    2002-12-01

    To address the lack of data on patterns of benzodiazepine use among injecting drug users (IDU) in Victoria and Tasmania, convenience samples of 152 Melbourne and 100 Hobart IDU were recruited from needle and syringe programme outlets and administered a structured survey on patterns of benzodiazepine use, injection-related health problems and drug use history. Most respondents had used benzodiazepines during the preceding 6 months, and more than one-third (Melbourne 36%, 95% CI, 28-44; Hobart 37%, 95% CI, 27-47) had injected benzodiazepines during this period. Diazepam was the preferred benzodiazepine for those using orally, while intravenous benzodiazepine users preferred to inject temazepam. Benzodiazepine injection for Melbourne IDU was related to greater levels of injection-related health problems. Patterns of benzodiazepine use amongst Melbourne and Hobart IDU are different to that in other Australian jurisdictions, with available data suggesting that prevalence of injection may be increasing. Ongoing monitoring of benzodiazepine injection, together with in-depth studies of supply characteristics and health impacts in jurisdictions where significant trends are detected is needed. Consideration of regulatory, supply, education and training options for the prevention of benzodiazepine injection is also indicated. PMID:12537706

  20. Peer abuse

    OpenAIRE

    Alikaşifoğlu, Müjgan

    2011-01-01

    Peer abuse is commonly seen as bullying behaviors The most common definition of bullying used in the literature was formulated by Dan nbsp;Olweus According to Olweus bullying is an aggressive behavior that: a is intended to cause harm or distress b occurs repeatedly over nbsp;time and c occurs in a relationship in which there is an imbalance of power Peer abuse shares many characteristics with other types of nbsp;abuse namely child maltreatment and domestic violence Bullying behaviors may be ...

  1. Symptom-triggered benzodiazepine therapy for alcohol withdrawal syndrome in the emergency department: a comparison with the standard fixed dose benzodiazepine regimen.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cassidy, Eugene M

    2012-10-01

    The aim of the study was to compare symptom-triggered and standard benzodiazepine regimens for the treatment of alcohol withdrawal syndrome in an emergency department clinical decision unit. The authors found that the symptom-triggered approach reduced cumulative benzodiazepine dose and length of stay.

  2. Carisoprodol: abuse potential and withdrawal syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Roy R; Burke, Randy S

    2010-03-01

    Carisoprodol (N-isopropyl-2 methyl-2-propyl-1,3-propanediol dicarbamate; N-isopropylmeprobamate) is a centrally acting skeletal muscle relaxant whose primary active metabolite is meprobamate, a substance with well established abuse potential similar to that of benzodiazepines. A number of reports show that carisoprodol has been abused for its sedative and relaxant effects, to augment or alter the effects of other drugs, and by the intentional combination of carisoprodol and other noncontrolled medications because of the relative ease (as compared to controlled substances) of obtaining prescriptions. The diversion and abuse of carisoprodol and its adverse health effects appear to have dramatically increased over the last several years. Clinicians have begun to see a withdrawal syndrome consisting of insomnia, vomiting, tremors, muscle twitching, anxiety, and ataxia in patients who abruptly cease intake of large doses of carisoprodol. Hallucinations and delusions may also occur. The withdrawal symptoms are very similar to those previously described for meprobamate withdrawal, suggesting that what may actually be occurring is withdrawal from meprobamate accumulated as a result of intake of excessive amounts of carisoprodol. However carisoprodol itself is capable of modulating GABA(A) function, and this may contribute both to the drugs abuse potential and to the occurrence of a withdrawal syndrome with abrupt cessation of intake. Carisoprodol has been classified as a controlled substance in several states in the US and restrictions on the use of the drug have been imposed in some European countries. Carisoprodol is metabolized to a controlled substance, has clear evidence of abuse potential and increasing incidence of abuse, and has shown evidence of a withdrawal syndrome with abrupt cessation from intake. This article will discuss the abuse potential of carisoprodol and the associated withdrawal syndrome, and consider implications for future use of the drug. PMID

  3. Drug abuse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports that this study used SPECT to examine patients who have abused drugs to determine whether SPECT could identify abnormalities and whether these findings have clinical importance. Fifteen patients with a history of substance abuse (eight with cocaine, six with amphetamine, and one with organic solvent) underwent SPECT performed with a triple-headed camera and Tc-99m HMPAO both early for blood flow and later for functional information. These images were then processed into a 3D videotaped display used in group therapy. All 15 patients had multiple areas of decreased tracer uptake peppered throughout the cortex but mainly affecting the parietal lobes, expect for the organic solvent abuser who had a large parietal defect. The videotapes were subjectively described by a therapist as an exceptional tool that countered patient denial of physical damage from substance abuse. Statistical studies of recidivism between groups is under way

  4. The relationship between child abuse and handicapping conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, J B

    1986-04-01

    This article discusses the relationship of child abuse, including neglect and sexual abuse, to the presence of handicapping conditions, both physical and psychological. Child abuse can cause physical and psychological disabilities in children who otherwise would have been normal. Studies show that children who are handicapped, or otherwise perceived as different by potentially abusive parents, are at high risk for abuse. Evidence also indicates that the handicaps of some children who were diagnosed originally as disabled are exacerbated by abuse. While cause and effect are not easily determined in specific cases, researchers agree that a pervasive relationship exists between handicapping conditions and abuse. Abused children are overrepresented in special education classes and handicapped children are overrepresented in the abused population. Many abused children become abusers as adults. Several suggestions concerning the problem are offered for school personnel. PMID:2937963

  5. Substance Abuse and Medication Adherence Among HIV-Positive Women with Histories of Child Sexual Abuse

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Honghu; Longshore, Doug; Williams, John K.; Rivkin, Inna; Loeb, Tamra; Warda, Umme S.; Carmona, Jennifer; Wyatt, Gail

    2006-01-01

    Substance abuse increases the risks for infections and impairs medication adherence among HIV/AIDS patients. However, little is known about the characteristics of substance abuse and its impact on medication adherence among HIV-positive women with a history of child sexual abuse (CSA). In the present study, 148 HIV-positive women with a history of CSA completed a structured interview assessing CSA severity, psychological status, substance abuse, medication adherence, and sexual decision-makin...

  6. History of childhood sexual abuse and risk of prenatal and postpartum depression or depressive symptoms: an epidemiologic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wosu, Adaeze C; Gelaye, Bizu; Williams, Michelle A

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this review is to summarize the literature (and to the extent possible, report the magnitude and direction of the association) concerning history of childhood sexual abuse (CSA) and depression or depressive symptoms among pregnant and postpartum women. Publications were identified through literature searches of seven databases (PubMed, EMBASE, PyscINFO, CINAHL, Web of Science, BIOSIS, and Science Direct) using keywords including "child abuse," "depression," "pregnancy," "prenatal," "pregnancy," and "postpartum." The literature search yielded seven eligible studies on the prenatal period and another seven studies on the postpartum period. All but one prenatal study observed statistically significant positive associations of CSA with depression or depressive symptoms during pregnancy. Findings on the association of CSA with postpartum depression or depressive symptoms were inconsistent; pooled unadjusted and adjusted odds ratios were 1.82 (95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.92, 3.60) and 1.20 (95 % CI 0.81, 1.76). In sum, findings suggest a positive association of history of CSA with depression and depressive symptoms in the prenatal period. Findings on the postpartum period were inconsistent. Clinical and public health implications of evidence from the available literature are discussed, as are desirable study design characteristics of future research. PMID:25956589

  7. Risk and protective factors for physical and sexual abuse of children and adolescents in Africa: a review and implications for practice.

    OpenAIRE

    Meinck, F.; Cluver, LD; Boyes, ME; Mhlongo, EL

    2014-01-01

    There is now conclusive evidence of the major and long-lasting negative effects of physical and sexual abuse on children. Within Africa, studies consistently report high rates of child abuse, with prevalence as high as 64%. However, to date, there has been no review of factors associated with physical and sexual child abuse and polyvictimization in Africa. This review identified 23 quantitative studies, all of which showed high levels of child abuse in varying samples of children and adults. ...

  8. Estimation of Cessation Rates among Danish Users of Benzodiazepines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Støvring, Henrik; Gasse, Christiane

    cessation hazards among incident users of benzodiazepines, in particular with respect to potential changes after three months use. Methods: Follow-up on a 25% randomly selected cohort of all Danes (n = 1,612,171) in the period Jan 1, 1995, to Jul 1, 2007, identified through the Danish civil registration...... of cessation rates should be preferred over duration, as they can explicitly account for censoring and provide cause specific hazard estimates of cessation rates....

  9. Identification, characterization, and developmental regulation of embryonic benzodiazepine binding sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the identification and characterization of 2 classes of benzodiazepine binding sites in the embryonic chick CNS. Binding was examined by competition and saturation binding experiments, using as radioligands 3H-flunitrazepam, a classical benzodiazepine anxiolytic, and 3H-Ro5-4864, a convulsant benzodiazepine. The results demonstrate that high-affinity (KD = 2.3 nM) 3H-flunitrazepam binding sites (site-A) are present by embryonic day 5 (Hamburger and Hamilton stage 27) and increase throughout development (Bmax = 0.3 and 1.3 pmol/mg protein in 7 and 20 d brain membranes, respectively). When 7 or 20 d brain membranes are photoaffinity-labeled with 3H-flunitrazepam and ultraviolet light, the radioactivity migrates as 2 bands on SDS-PAGE, consistent with Mrs of 48,000 and 51,000. GABA potentiates 3H-flunitrazepam binding at both 7 and 20 d of development, indicating that site-A is coupled to receptors for GABA early in development. Importantly, we have also identified a novel site (site-B) that binds classical benzodiazepine agonists with low affinity (micromolar) but displays high affinity for Ro5-4864 (KD = 41 nM). Site-B displays characteristics expected for a functional receptor, including stereospecificity and sensitivity to inactivation by heat and protease treatment. Saturation binding studies employing 3H-Ro5-4864 indicate that the levels of site-B are similar in 7 and 20 d brain (ca. 2.5 pmol/mg protein). The function of site-B is not known, but its preponderance in 7 d brain, relative to site-A, suggests that it might be important during early embryonic development

  10. Determinants of benzodiazepine brain uptake: lipophilicity versus binding affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendt, R M; Greenblatt, D J; Liebisch, D C; Luu, M D; Paul, S M

    1987-01-01

    Factors influencing brain uptake of benzodiazepine derivatives were evaluated in adult Sprague Dawley rats (n = 8-10 per drug). Animals received single intraperitoneal doses of alprazolam, triazolam, lorazepam, flunitrazepam, diazepam, midazolam, desmethyldiazepam, or clobazam. Concentrations of each drug (and metabolites) in whole brain and serum 1 h after dosage were determined by gas chromatography. Serum free fraction was measured by equilibrium dialysis. In vitro binding affinity (apparent Ki) of each compound was estimated based on displacement of tritiated flunitrazepam in washed membrane preparations from rat cerebral cortex. Lipid solubility of each benzodiazepine was estimated using the reverse-phase liquid chromatographic (HPLC) retention index at physiologic pH. There was no significant relation between brain:total serum concentration ratio and either HPLC retention (r = 0.18) or binding Ki (r = -0.34). Correction of uptake ratios for free as opposed to total serum concentration yielded a highly significant correlation with HPLC retention (r = 0.78, P less than 0.005). However, even the corrected ratio was not correlated with binding Ki (r = -0.22). Thus a benzodiazepine's capacity to diffuse from systemic blood into brain tissue is much more closely associated with the physicochemical property of lipid solubility than with specific affinity. Unbound rather than total serum or plasma concentration most accurately reflects the quantity of drug available for diffusion. PMID:2888155

  11. Pentameric ligand-gated ion channel ELIC is activated by GABA and modulated by benzodiazepines

    OpenAIRE

    Spurny, R.; Ramerstorfer, J.; Price, K; Brams, M.; M. Ernst; Nury, H.; Verheij, M.; Legrand, P.; Bertrand, D.; Bertrand, S.; Dougherty, D A; de Esch, I. J. P.; Corringer, P.-J.; Sieghart, W.; Lummis, S. C. R.

    2012-01-01

    GABA_A receptors are pentameric ligand-gated ion channels involved in fast inhibitory neurotransmission and are allosterically modulated by the anxiolytic, anticonvulsant, and sedative-hypnotic benzodiazepines. Here we show that the prokaryotic homolog ELIC also is activated by GABA and is modulated by benzodiazepines with effects comparable to those at GABA_A receptors. Crystal structures reveal important features of GABA recognition and indicate that benzodiazepines, depending on their conc...

  12. Benzodiazepine prescribing behaviour and attitudes: a survey among general practitioners practicing in northern Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Critchley Julia; Garner Paul; Srisurapanont Manit; Wongpakaran Nahathai

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background Over-prescribing of benzodiazepines appears common in many countries, a better understanding of prescribing practices and attitudes may help develop strategies to reduce prescribing. This study aimed to evaluate benzodiazepine prescribing behaviour and attitudes in general practitioners practising in Chiang Mai and Lampoon, Thailand. Methods Questionnaire survey of general practitioners in community hospitals, to estimate: i) use of benzodiazepines for anxiety/insomnia, pa...

  13. Child abuse and neglect--recognition and reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needleman, H L

    1994-01-01

    The dental profession has a legal, ethical and moral responsibility to report suspected cases of abuse and neglect. The risk to the child is significant. In non-fatal cases of abuse, 35 percent will be abused again within one year. To this end, dentists should discuss child abuse and neglect at staff meetings and establish office procedures if a case is identified. Encourage staff to discuss concerns they have regarding possible abuse they suspect in the office. Keep the child abuse hotline number or local agency responsible for receiving reports in the office rolodex. Abuse and neglect is a real problem in all neighborhoods and dentistry can make a difference. PMID:8051332

  14. MAOA Alters the Effects of Heavy Drinking and Childhood Physical Abuse on Risk for Severe Impulsive Acts of Violence Among Alcoholic Violent Offenders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikkanen, Roope; Ducci, Francesca; Goldman, David; Holi, Matti; Lindberg, Nina; Tiihonen, Jari; Virkkunen, Matti

    2011-01-01

    Background A polymorphism in the promoter region of the monoamine oxidase A gene (MAOA) has been shown to alter the effect of persistent drinking and childhood maltreatment on the risk for violent and antisocial behaviors. These findings indicate that MAOA could contribute to inter-individual differences in stress resiliency. Methods Recidivism in severe violent crimes was assessed after 8 years of nonincarcerated follow-up in a male sample of 174 impulsive Finnish alcoholic violent offenders, the majority of whom exhibited antisocial (ASPD) or borderline personality disorder (BPD) or both. We examined whether MAOA genotype alters the effects of heavy drinking and childhood physical abuse (CPA) on the risk for committing impulsive recidivistic violent crimes. Results Logistic regression analyses showed that both heavy drinking and CPA were significant independent predictors of recidivism in violent behavior (OR 5.2, p = 0.004 and OR 5.3, p = 0.003) among offenders having the high MAOA activity genotype (MAOA-H), but these predictors showed no effect among offenders carrying the low MAOA activity genotype (MAOA-L). Conclusion Carriers of the MAOA-H allele have a high risk to commit severe recidivistic impulsive violent crimes after exposure to heavy drinking and CPA. PMID:20201935

  15. Early childhood sexual abuse increases suicidal intent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Castroman, Jorge; Melhem, Nadine; Birmaher, Boris; Greenhill, Laurence; Kolko, David; Stanley, Barbara; Zelazny, Jamie; Brodsky, Beth; Garcia-Nieto, Rebeca; Burke, Ainsley K; Mann, J John; Brent, David A; Oquendo, Maria A

    2013-06-01

    Childhood sexual abuse has been consistently associated with suicidal behavior. We studied suicide attempt features in depressed individuals sexually abused as children. On average, sexual abuse started before age 9. It frequently coexisted with physical abuse. Suicide attempters more often had personality disorders and had endured abuse for longer, but did not differ in terms of other clinical characteristics from non-attempters. Earlier onset of sexual abuse and its duration were associated with more suicide attempts. However, when personality disorders were included in the regression model, only these disorders predicted number of attempts. The severity of sexual abuse and the coexistence of physical abuse were correlated with age at first suicide attempt. However, only severity of sexual abuse was marginally associated with age at first suicide attempt in the regression model. Finally, the earlier the age of onset of sexual abuse, the higher the intent, even after controlling for age, sex and personality disorders. This suggests that the characteristics of childhood sexual abuse, especially age of onset, should be considered when studying the risk for suicidal behavior in abused populations. PMID:23737424

  16. Behavioral and neurophysiological signatures of benzodiazepine-related driving impairments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradly T Stone

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Impaired driving due to drug use is a growing problem, worldwide; estimates show that 18-23.5% of fatal accidents, and up to 34% of injury accidents may be caused by drivers under the influence of drugs (Drummer et al., 2003; NHTSA, 2010; Walsh et al., 2004. Furthermore, at any given time, up to 16% of drivers may be using drugs that can impair one’s driving abilities (NHTSA, 2009. Currently, drug recognition experts (law enforcement officers with specialized training to identify drugged driving, have the most difficult time with identifying drivers potentially impaired on central nervous system (CNS depressants (Smith, Hayes, Yolton, Rutledge, & Citek, 2002. The fact that the use of benzodiazepines, a type of CNS depressant, is also associated with the greatest likelihood of causing accidents (Dassanayake, Michie, Carter, & Jones, 2011, further emphasizes the need to improve research tools in this area which can facilitate the refinement of, or additions to, current assessments of impaired driving. Our laboratories collaborated to evaluate both the behavioral and neurophysiological effects of a benzodiazepine, alprazolam, in a driving simulation (miniSim™. This drive was combined with a neurocognitive assessment utilizing time synched neurophysiology (EEG, ECG. While the behavioral effects of benzodiazepines are well characterized (Rapoport et al., 2009, we hypothesized that, with the addition of real-time neurophysiology and the utilization of simulation and neurocognitive assessment, we could find objective assessments of drug impairment that could improve the detection capabilities of drug recognition experts. Our analyses revealed that 1 specific driving conditions were significantly more difficult for benzodiazepine impaired drivers and; 2 the neurocognitive tasks’ metrics were able to classify impaired vs. unimpaired with up to 80% accuracy based on lane position deviation and lane departures. While this work requires replication in

  17. Child Abuse and Disabled Children

    OpenAIRE

    Obilade, Titilola T.

    2004-01-01

    Abstract for presentation given at the Annual General Scientific Meeting/Workshop of the Medical Women’s Association of Nigeria in Lagos, Nigeria, on December 28, 2004. Children with disabilities are a population at a higher risk of abuse and maltreatment. Studies have shown that children with disabilities are 3.4 times more likely to be abused than nondisabled peers. These disabilities include children who are visually-impaired, hearing-impaired, chronically-ill, developmentally ...

  18. Paid Family Leave Tied to Decline in Child Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_157492.html Paid Family Leave Tied to Decline in Child Abuse California ... 2016 FRIDAY, Feb. 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Paid family leave might lead to reduced risk of abuse- ...

  19. Dependence and withdrawal reactions to benzodiazepines and sellective serotonin reuptake inhibitors: How did the health authorities react?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Margrethe

    2013-01-01

    AIM: Our objective was to explore communications from drug agencies about benzodiazepine dependence and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) withdrawal reactions over time. METHODS: Documentary study. We searched the web-sites of the European Medicines Agency and the drug agencies in USA...... it is difficult for many patients to stop treatment. In the perspective of a precautionary principle, drug agencies have failed to acknowledge that SSRIs can cause dependence and have minimised the problem with regard to its frequency and severity. In the perspective of a risk management principle, the drug...

  20. Sexual Risk Behaviours and Sexual Abuse in Persons with Severe Mental Illness in Uganda: A Qualitative Study

    OpenAIRE

    Patric Lundberg; Eva Johansson; Elialilia Okello; Peter Allebeck; Anna Thorson

    2012-01-01

    Persons with severe mental illness (SMI) engage in risky sexual behaviours and have high prevalence of HIV in high-income countries. Little is known about sexual behaviours and HIV risk among persons with SMI in sub-Saharan Africa. In this qualitative study we explored how SMI may influence sexual risk behaviours and sexual health risks in Uganda. Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted with 7 male and 13 female psychiatric patients aged 18-49 years. Participants were interviewed...

  1. Emotion Regulation in Sexually Abused Preschoolers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langevin, Rachel; Cossette, Louise; Hébert, Martine

    2016-02-01

    Emotion regulation is closely related to mental health in children and adults. Low emotion regulation competencies have been found in school-aged sexually abused girls. The aim of the present study was to investigate emotion regulation competencies in sexually abused preschool girls and boys using a multi-informant approach. Emotion regulation was assessed in 62 sexually abused and 65 non-abused preschoolers using the Emotion Regulation Checklist and the MacArthur Story Stem Battery. Both parents and educators reported lower emotion regulation competencies in sexually abused preschoolers, especially boys, than in non-abused children. The narrative task completed by the children also revealed lower emotion regulation competencies in sexually abused boys. These findings could have an important impact on intervention programs offered to these at-risk children. PMID:25724803

  2. Sexual risk behaviours and sexual abuse in persons with severe mental illness in Uganda: a qualitative study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patric Lundberg

    Full Text Available Persons with severe mental illness (SMI engage in risky sexual behaviours and have high prevalence of HIV in high-income countries. Little is known about sexual behaviours and HIV risk among persons with SMI in sub-Saharan Africa. In this qualitative study we explored how SMI may influence sexual risk behaviours and sexual health risks in Uganda. Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted with 7 male and 13 female psychiatric patients aged 18-49 years. Participants were interviewed in hospital when clinically stable and capable of giving informed consent. Interview transcripts were analysed using manifest content analysis, generating the categories: (1 casual sex during illness episodes, (2 rape by non-partners, (3 exploitation by partners, (4 non-monogamous partners, and (5 sexual inactivity. Our findings suggest that SMI exacerbated sexual vulnerability in the women interviewed, by contributing to casual sex, to exploitative and non-monogamous sexual relationships, and to sexual assault by non-partners. No link could be established between SMI and increased sexual risk behaviours in the men interviewed, due to a small sample of men, and given that men's accounts showed little variability. Our findings also suggest that SMI caused sexual inactivity due to decreased sexual desire, and in men, due to difficulties forming an intimate relationship. Overall, our study highlights how SMI and gender inequality can contribute to the shaping of sexual risk behaviours and sexual health risks, including HIV risk, among persons with SMI in this Ugandan setting.

  3. A Guide for Pain Management in Low and Middle Income Communities. Managing the Risk of Opioid Abuse in Patients with Cancer Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pergolizzi, Joseph V; Zampogna, Gianpietro; Taylor, Robert; Gonima, Edmundo; Posada, Jose; Raffa, Robert B

    2016-01-01

    Most patients who present with cancer have advanced disease and often suffer moderate to severe pain. Opioid therapy can be safe and effective for use in cancer patients with pain, but there are rightful concerns about inappropriate opioid use even in the cancer population. Since cancer patients live longer than ever before in history (and survivors may have long exposure times to opioid therapy), opioid misuse among cancer patients is an important topic worthy of deeper investigation. Cancer patients with pain must be evaluated for risk factors for potential opioid misuse and aberrant drug-taking behaviors assessed. A variety of validated screening tools should be used. Of particular importance is the fact that pain in cancer patients changes frequently, whether it is related to their underlying disease (progression or remission), pain related to treatment (such as painful chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy), and concomitant pain unrelated to cancer (such as osteoarthritis, headache, or back pain). Fortunately, clinicians can use universal precautions to help reduce the risk of opioid misuse while still assuring that cancer patients get the pain therapy they need. Another important new "tool" in this regard is the emergence of abuse-deterrent opioid formulations. PMID:26973529

  4. Analysis of drug abuse data reported by medical institutions in Taiwan from 2002 to 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jui Hsu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Drug abuse has become a global issue of concern. It affects not only individual users, but also their families and communities. Data were retrieved from the database of the Taiwan Surveillance System of Drug Abuse and Addiction Treatment (SSDAAT from 2002 to 2011, and 147,660 cases reported by medical institutions in Taiwan were reviewed. This study showed that the top five reported abused drugs by medical institutions during the last decade were heroin, methamphetamine, benzodiazepines, ketamine, and zolpidem. Heroin and methamphetamine continued to be the first two abused drugs reported by medical institutions. Heroin abuse was significant, but has shown a downward trend. However, emerging abused drugs, such as ketamine and zolpidem, presented upward trends. 3,4-Methylenedioxy-N-methylamphetamine (MDMA abuse seems to have re-emerged and has increased gradually since 2010. Injection without needle sharing has become the most common route of administration of abused drugs since 2002. The majority of causes for these reported drug abuses were drug dependence, followed by peer influence and stress relief. Hepatitis C was the most commonly reported infectious disease, followed by hepatitis B and AIDS in the drug abusers reported by medical institutions. It should be noted that access to drugs via the Internet increased year by year, and this is clearly an area needing constant monitoring.

  5. Risk assessment of parents' concerns at 18 months in preventive child health care predicted child abuse and neglect

    OpenAIRE

    Staal, I.I.E.; Hermanns, J.M.A.; Schrijvers, A.J.P.; Stel, van, H.F.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: As child maltreatment has a major impact, prevention and early detection of parenting problems are of great importance. We have developed a structured interview which uses parents’ concerns for a joint needs assessment by parents and a child health care nurse, followed by a professional judgment on the risk level of future parenting and developmental problems: the Structured Problem Analysis of Raising Kids (SPARK). Previous results have shown that the risk assessment of the SPARK ...

  6. Purification of high affinity benzodiazepine receptor binding site fragments from rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In central nervous system benzodiazepine recognition sites occur on neuronal cell surfaces as one member of a multireceptor complex, including recognition sites for benzodiazepines, gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), barbiturates and a chloride ionophore. During photoaffinity labelling, the benzodiazepine agonist, 3H-flunitrazepam, is irreversibly bound to central benzodiazepine high affinity recognition sites in the presence of ultraviolet light. In these studies a 3H-flunitrazepam radiolabel was used to track the isolation and purification of high affinity agonist binding site fragments from membrane-bound benzodiazepine receptor in rat brain. The authors present a method for limited proteolysis of 3H-flunitrazepam photoaffinity labeled rat brain membranes, generating photolabeled benzodiazepine receptor fragments containing the agonist binding site. Using trypsin chymotrypsin A4, or a combination of these two proteases, they have demonstrated the extent and time course for partial digestion of benzodiazepine receptor, yielding photolabeled receptor binding site fragments. These photolabeled receptor fragments have been further purified on the basis of size, using ultrafiltration, gel permeation chromatography, and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) as well as on the basis of hydrophobicity, using a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) precolumn, several HPLC elution schemes, and two different HPLC column types. Using these procedures, they have purified three photolabeled benzodiazepine receptor fragments containing the agonist binding site which appear to have a molecular weight of less than 2000 daltons each

  7. Some considerations on the role of benzodiazepines in the treatment of depression

    OpenAIRE

    Cassano, G B; Conti, L.

    1981-01-01

    1 Benzodiazepines are regarded as pure anxiolytics, and their value in the treatment of depression is controversial. Nevertheless, symptoms of anxiety and depression coexist in patients with endogenous or neurotic depression, and clinical trials indicate that depressed patients respond better to a benzodiazepine-tricyclic antidepressant combination than to either drug alone.

  8. A control study on treatment for benzodiazepine dependence with trazodone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Hong-ju

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective To determine the efficacy and safety of trazodone in the treatment of benzodiazepine dependence. Methods Forty insomnia patients who met the Classification and Diagnostic Criteria of Mental Disorders in China Third Edition (CCMD-3 of dependence syndrome due to benzodiazepine were involved in the study. Patients were randomly assigned to trazodone group and placebo group for 3 months. The efficacy were assessed by Withdrawal Symptoms Checklist, Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAMA and polysomnography (PSG. Adverse events were assessed by Treatment Emergent Symptom Scale (TESS. Results The Withdrawal Symptoms Checklist of trazodone group was significantly lower after 7 d treatment than that of placebo group (P = 0.000, and HAMA score of the trazodone group was also significantly lower after 15 d treatment than that of placebo group (P = 0.000. There were no difference in Withdrawal Symptoms Checklist and HAMA of placebo group before and after treatment. Withdrawal Symptoms Checklist and HAMA of the trazodone group were decreased after treatment (P = 0.000. In comparison with placebo group, sleep parameters of the trazodone, including total sleep time (TST, sleep efficiency (SE, sleep latency (SL and slow wave sleep (SWS time presented improvement after 7 d treatment (P = 0.000, for all. After trazodone treatment, total sleep time, slow wave sleep time, sleep efficiency and sleep latency were improved (P = 0.000, for all. No obvious adverse reaction occurred. There were no significant differences in TESS scores between pre? and post?treatment in both groups (P > 0.05. Conclusion Trazodone is markedly effective and safe in the treatment for benzodiazepine dependence.

  9. Cross-sectional and longitudinal risk of physical impairment in a cohort of postmenopausal women who experience physical and verbal abuse

    OpenAIRE

    Cannell, M. Brad; Weitlauf, Julie C.; Garcia, Lorena; Andresen, Elena M; Margolis, Karen L.; Todd M. Manini

    2015-01-01

    Background Exposure to interpersonal violence, namely verbal and physical abuse, is a highly prevalent threat to women’s health and well-being. Among older, post-menopausal women, several researchers have characterized a possible bi-directional relationship of abuse exposure and diminished physical functioning. However, studies that prospectively examine the relationship between interpersonal abuse exposure and physical functioning across multiple years of observation are lacking. To address ...

  10. Opportunities for computer abuse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willison, Robert Andrew; Backhouse, James

    2005-01-01

    Systems risk refers to the likelihood that an IS is inadequately guarded against certain types of damage or loss. While risks are posed by acts of God, hackers and viruses, consideration should also be given to the `insider' threat of dishonest employees, intent on undertaking some form of computer...... for the offender. To achieve this goal a model known as the `Crime Specific Opportunity Structure' is advanced. Focussing on the opportunities for computer abuse, the model addresses the nature of such opportunities with regards to the organisational context and the threats posed by rogue employees. Drawing...

  11. Benzodiazepine receptor and neurotransmitter studies in the brain of suicides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manchon, M.; Kopp, N.; Rouzioux, J.J.; Lecestre, D.; Deluermoz, S.; Miachon, S.

    1987-12-14

    The characteristics of benzodiazepine binding sites were studied on frozen sections of hippocampus of 7 suicides and 5 controls subjects, using biochemical and autoradiographic techniques. /sup 3/H flunitrazepam was used as ligand, clonazepam and CL 218,872 as displacing agents. Some neurotransmitters or their derivatives were evaluated quantitatively in parallel in the hippocampal tissue by liquid chromatography. The authors observed mainly an increase in the Ki of CL 218,872 subtype I binding sites in suicides, and an increase in % of type I binding sites. Among neurotransmitters, only norepinephrine differed significantly between controls and suicides. 36 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  12. Benzodiazepine receptor and neurotransmitter studies in the brain of suicides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The characteristics of benzodiazepine binding sites were studied on frozen sections of hippocampus of 7 suicides and 5 controls subjects, using biochemical and autoradiographic techniques. 3H flunitrazepam was used as ligand, clonazepam and CL 218,872 as displacing agents. Some neurotransmitters or their derivatives were evaluated quantitatively in parallel in the hippocampal tissue by liquid chromatography. The authors observed mainly an increase in the Ki of CL 218,872 subtype I binding sites in suicides, and an increase in % of type I binding sites. Among neurotransmitters, only norepinephrine differed significantly between controls and suicides. 36 references, 3 figures, 1 table

  13. Imaging of a glioma using peripheral benzodiazepine receptor ligands.

    OpenAIRE

    Starosta-Rubinstein, S; Ciliax, B J; Penney, J B; McKeever, P; Young, A B

    1987-01-01

    Two types of benzodiazepine receptors have been demonstrated in mammalian tissues, one which is localized on neuronal elements in brain and the other, on glial cells and in peripheral tissues such as kidney. In vivo administration of 3H-labeled PK 11195 [1-(2-chlorophenyl-N-methyl-N-(1-methylpropyl)-3-isoquinoline carboxamide] or [3H]flunitrazepam with 5 mg of clonazepam per kg to rats with intracranial C6 gliomas resulted in high levels of tritiated-drug binding to the tumor as shown by quan...

  14. An audit of prescribing practices for benzodiazepines and Z-drugs.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cadogan, C

    2015-03-01

    Concerns persist over the use of benzodiazepines and Z-drugs in Ireland. A prospective prescription audit was conducted in 81 community pharmacies across Ireland over a four week period. The study sought to assess the level of prescription compliance with key components of benzodiazepine and Z-drug prescribing guidelines. 28% of audit booklets issued were returned, yielding data on 4,418 prescriptions. The findings suggest that little progress has been made in improving the prescribing of benzodiazepines and Z-drugs in Ireland in the decade since publication of the Benzodiazepine Committee\\'s report. Fewer than one fifth of prescriptions (18.8%) were fully compliant with the assessment criteria and the majority (53.7%) had multiple discrepancies. This study highlights the importance of monitoring and auditing benzodiazepine and Z-drug prescribing practices. Interventions involving patients, prescribers and pharmacists are required to improve the prescribing and use of these medications in Ireland.

  15. Etiology of Drug Abuse: A Narrative Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Nadjme Jadidi; Nouzar Nakhaee

    2014-01-01

    Introduction and Aim. Further gains in the prevention of drug abuse disorders require in-depth and holistic understanding of the risk factors of addiction from different perspectives. Lay persons and experts have different concepts of risk which could complement each other. The purpose of this study was to elaborate drug abuse risk factors through the story of individuals who had become drug dependent. Design and Methods. In this qualitative research, 33 individuals attending treatment centre...

  16. Intergenerational violence in Burundi: Experienced childhood maltreatment increases the risk of abusive child rearing and intimate partner violence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anselm Crombach

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Experiencing abuse during childhood affects the psychological well-being of individuals throughout their lives and may even influence their offspring by enhancing the likelihood of an intergenerational transmission of violence. Understanding the effects of childhood maltreatment on child-rearing practices and intimate partner violence might be of particular importance to overcome the consequences of violent conflicts in African societies. Objective: Using Burundi as an example, we aimed to explore the associations between childhood maltreatment, intimate partner violence, perceived partner intimidation, gender and the probability of violently acting out against one's own children or romantic partner. Methods: Amongst a sample of 141 men and 141 women in the capital of Burundi, we identified those who had biological children and those who lived or had lived in relationships. Using culturally appropriate instruments, we enquired about their exposure to childhood maltreatment and partner violence as well as their inclinations to act out violently. Results: We found that childhood maltreatment and perceived partner intimidation were strong predictors for the perpetration of violence against children. Moreover, we found that women were more likely to use violence against children if they experienced partner violence and less likely to resort to violence if they felt intimidated. Men were more likely to perpetrate violence against their partner. Childhood maltreatment was again a strong predictor. The more women experienced partner violence, the more they fought back. Conclusions: Childhood maltreatment is a strong predictor for domestic violence and has to be addressed to interrupt the cycle of violence in post-conflict countries.

  17. A pilot trial of integrated behavioral activation and sexual risk reduction counseling for HIV-uninfected men who have sex with men abusing crystal methamphetamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimiaga, Matthew J; Reisner, Sari L; Pantalone, David W; O'Cleirigh, Conall; Mayer, Kenneth H; Safren, Steven A

    2012-11-01

    Crystal methamphetamine use is a major driver behind high-risk sexual behavior among men who have sex with men (MSM). Prior work suggests a cycle of continued crystal methamphetamine use and high-risk sex due to loss of the ability to enjoy other activities, which appears to be a side effect of this drug. Behavioral activation (BA) is a treatment for depression that involves learning to reengage in life's activities. We evaluated a novel intervention for crystal methamphetamine abuse and high-risk sex in MSM, incorporating 10 sessions of BA with integrated HIV risk reduction counseling (RR). Forty-four subjects were screened, of whom 21 met initial entry criteria. A total of 19 participants enrolled; 16 completed an open-phase study of the intervention. Behavioral assessments were conducted at baseline, 3 months postbaseline, and 6 months postbaseline. Linear mixed effects regression models were fit to assess change over time. Mean unprotected anal intercourse (UAI) episodes decreased significantly from baseline to acute postintervention (β=-4.86; 95% confidence interval [CI]=-7.48, -2.24; p=0.0015) and from baseline to 6 months postbaseline (β=-5.07; 95% CI=-7.85, -2.29; p=0.0017; test of fixed effects χ(2)=16.59; df=2,13; p=0.0002). On average, there was a significant decrease over time in the number of crystal methamphetamine episodes in the past 3 months (χ(2)=22.43; df=2,15; p<0.0001), and the number of days of crystal methamphetamine use in the past 30 days (χ(2)=9.21; df=2,15; p=0.010). Statistically significant reductions in depressive symptoms and poly-substance use were also maintained. Adding behavioral activation to risk reduction counseling for MSM with problematic crystal methamphetamine use may augment the potency of a risk reduction intervention for this population. Due to the small sample size and time intensive intervention, future testing in a randomized design is necessary to determine efficacy, with subsequent effectiveness testing. PMID

  18. The risk of abuse of legal firearms by old and young individuals with acquired cognitive impairments: a review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Alfredo Clerici

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available

    Background: Risk assessment in relation to firearms and cognitive impairments is complex, and no guidelines exist regarding the appropriate management of people with dementia who may own or have access to a firearm. In Italy, approximately 4.8 million people either own a firearm or use one for recreational, sporting or professional reasons. Recent studies report that firearms were used in 35.7% of suicides committed by people over 65 years old and that 5% of all suicides were committed by over 65-year-olds using firearms. As for the figures related to homicides committed with firearms by people over 65, these represented 31.8% of all homicides committed with firearms.

    Results: The aim of the present study was to conduct a critical review of the procedures currently used in relation to the use of firearms by elderly people. We conducted a review of the international scientific literature published over the last 20 years on the phenomenon of firearms abuse by elderly people and its prevention, drawn from the Medline and PsychINFO online databases. We considered all studies published in journals and books from 1990 to 2010 using the following keywords: violence, firearms, suicide, homicide, dementia and cognitive impairments, and searching for quantitative studies, case reports and literature reviews.

    Conclusions: Family physicians and specialists (geriatricians, neuropsychiatrists, clinical psychologists can act as an indispensable observatory of the related risks in people who own firearms, but their role should be supported by suitable training on the procedures used to assess and report on any such risks.

  19. Across-sectional survey on benzodiazepine use among older people in an Italian region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Donato

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available

    Background. Benzodiazepines are among the most commonly prescribed drugs in Italy and they are often used inappropriately according to guidelines for their rational use.

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and pattern of use of benzodiazepine amongst the general population aged 65-84 years in the Friuli-Venezia Giulia Region, in North-East Italy.

    Methods. A total of 40 general practitioners participated in the study. Two data sources were used in the research. The first was the Health Search Database, the second was a short questionnaire administered by the general practitioners to the 65 to 84 year old patients attending their surgeries for any reason during the study period. Data on the use of benzodiazepines between 1st February and 31st July 2001 were extracted from both the Health Search Database using drug prescriptions and the questionnaires.

    Results. Of the 10,468 patients aged 65-84 years with complete demographical data in the general practitioners’ patient lists, 2,369 subjects used benzodiazepines, hypnotics and over the counter drugs. Overall prevalence of benzodiazepine use was 21.5% (95% confidence interval: 19.8-23.1%. Of the benzodiazepine users, 66.9% consumed a short-intermediate half-life and 33.1% a long half-life benzodiazepine. Most patients took benzodiazepines at night (68.2%, less frequently in the daytime and at night (23.7%, or in the daytime only (8.1%. Most users (89.2% said they had been taking benzodiazepine for years.

    Conclusions. Benzodiazepine use was associated with patient characteristics, such as being female, using analgesics or antidepressants and the presence of a chronic disease especially cancer or chronic heart failure.

  20. Benzodiazepine prescribing behaviour and attitudes: a survey among general practitioners practicing in northern Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Critchley Julia

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over-prescribing of benzodiazepines appears common in many countries, a better understanding of prescribing practices and attitudes may help develop strategies to reduce prescribing. This study aimed to evaluate benzodiazepine prescribing behaviour and attitudes in general practitioners practising in Chiang Mai and Lampoon, Thailand. Methods Questionnaire survey of general practitioners in community hospitals, to estimate: i use of benzodiazepines for anxiety/insomnia, panic disorder, depression, essential hypertension, and uncomplicated low back pain and ii views on the optimal duration of benzodiazepine use. Results Fifty-five of 100 general practitioners returned the completed questionnaires. They reported use of benzodiazepines for anxiety/insomnia (n = 51, 93%, panic disorder (n = 43, 78%, depression (n = 26, 43%, essential hypertension (n = 15, 27 % and uncomplicated low back pain (n = 10, 18%. Twenty-eight general practitioners would prescribe benzodiazepines for non-psychiatric conditions, 17 for use as muscle relaxants. Seventy-five per cent, 62% and 29% of the general practitioners agreed or totally agreed with the use of benzodiazepines for insomnia, anxiety and depression, respectively. Practitioners agreed that prescribing should be less than one week (80%; or from 1 week to 1 month (47%; or 1 to 4 months (16%; or 4 to 6 months (5% or more than 6 months (2%. Twenty-five general practitioners (45% accepted that they used benzodiazepines excessively in the past year. Conclusion A considerable proportion of general practitioners in Chiang Mai and Lampoon, Thailand inappropriately use benzodiazepines for physical illnesses, especially essential hypertension and uncomplicated low back pain. However, almost half of them thought that they overused benzodiazepines. General practitioner's lack of time, knowledge and skills should be taken into account in improving prescribing behaviour and attitudes.

  1. Domestic abuse victims’ perceptions of abuse and support: a narrative study

    OpenAIRE

    Spruin, Elizabeth; Alleyne, Emma; Papadaki, I.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose – While there is a large body of research exploring the various avenues of support for domestic abuse victims and the risk factors which put women at risk of victimization, there is little research exploring the perceptions of these women. The purpose of this paper is therefore to explore the personal views of victimized women; in particular, the risk factors that they believe put them at risk for abuse and what they feel support services should offer. Design/methodology/approach ...

  2. Accessing Substance Abuse Prevention Programs for Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Jennifer L.; Johnson, Gail E.

    2009-01-01

    Current estimates indicate that over 6 million children live with at least one parent who is a substance abuser or is substance dependent. Children who are exposed to drug and alcohol abuse are at a greater risk of experiencing academic and behavior difficulties. Additionally, several studies have shown that students with emotional and behavioral…

  3. Women and Substance Abuse. Technical Assistance Packet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Join Together, Boston, MA.

    There are many issues concerning women of all ages and substance abuse. Women who abuse alcohol or other drugs are particularly at risk for sexual assault; unprotected sex; unwanted pregnancies; and sexually transmitted diseases. Females between the ages of 12 and 17 surpass males in their use of cigarettes; cocaine; crack; inhalants; and…

  4. Parental Personality Factors in Child Abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinetta, John J.

    1978-01-01

    Demonstrated that abusing parents differ from nonabusing parents in personality variables. Mothers differed in relationship to one's parents, tendency to become upset, tendency toward loneliness, expectations of one's children, inability to separate parental and child feelings, and fear of external threat. Abusers scored at the highest risk levels…

  5. A Prospective Examination of the Path from Child Abuse and Neglect to Illicit Drug Use in Middle Adulthood: The Potential Mediating Role of Four Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Helen W.; Widom, Cathy Spatz

    2009-01-01

    This study examines prostitution, homelessness, delinquency and crime, and school problems as potential mediators of the relationship between childhood abuse and neglect (CAN) and illicit drug use in middle adulthood. Children with documented cases of physical and sexual abuse and neglect (ages 0-11) during 1967-1971 were matched with…

  6. Occurrence of drugs of abuse in surface water from four Spanish river basins: Spatial and temporal variations and environmental risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastroianni, Nicola; Bleda, Maria Jose; López de Alda, Miren; Barceló, Damià

    2016-10-01

    The present work investigates the occurrence of 22 drugs of abuse (DAs) and metabolites in surface water from four Spanish River basins: Llobregat, Ebro, Jucar and Guadalquivir. To this end, samples were collected from 77 selected sites in two sampling campaigns conducted in 2010 and 2011. Analyses were performed by means of on-line solid phase extraction-liquid chromatography-electrospray-tandem mass spectrometry (on-line SPE-LC-ESI-MS/MS). Cocaine, its metabolite benzoylecgonine, ephedrine, MDMA (ecstasy), and methadone and its metabolite EDDP were the most ubiquitous compounds, being present in more than 50% of the samples. Overall, DAs were present at low ng/L levels, showing comparatively higher concentrations in small tributary rivers impacted by wastewater treatment plant effluents. The results obtained did not show a clear relationship between the concentrations of DAs and the hydrological conditions of the river basins. Differences in the occurrence of DAs between river basins were observed, but only for MDMA this finding could be confirmed in both sampling campaigns. These results overall suggest similar drugs consumption in the studied areas. Estimation of potential ecotoxicological effects using Hazard Quotient (HQ) ratios and a concentration addition model showed that in four samples the presence of DAs could represent certain risk to aquatic organisms. PMID:27232724

  7. Hormone Abuse Prevention and What You Need to Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your Body in Balance › Diseases and Conditions › Hormone Abuse › Prevention Overview Hormonal Substances of Abuse Health Effects, Risks, ... may be able to see symptoms of steroid abuse in your child. Check out the section of this Web page ...

  8. To Guard School Students against Narcotics and Substance Abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazakov, L.; Kolesov, D.

    1993-01-01

    Reports that a questionnaire of students and parents indicates most parents and teachers lack knowledge about drug use and abuse among Russian school students. Maintains that students in families with a history of alcoholism and substance abuse are at high risk of becoming drug abusers. Presents a series of classroom activities to help students…

  9. Addressing risk factors for child abuse among high risk pregnant women: design of a randomised controlled trial of the nurse family partnership in Dutch preventive health care

    OpenAIRE

    Mejdoubi Jamila; van den Heijkant Silvia; Struijf Elle; van Leerdam Frank; HiraSing Remy; Crijnen Alfons

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Low socio-economic status combined with other risk factors affects a person's physical and psychosocial health from childhood to adulthood. The societal impact of these problems is huge, and the consequences carry on into the next generation(s). Although several studies show these consequences, only a few actually intervene on these issues. In the United States, the Nurse Family Partnership focuses on high risk pregnant women and their children. The main goal of this progr...

  10. Treatment of Anxiety Disorders and Comorbid Alcohol Abuse with Buspirone in a Patient with Antidepressant-Induced Platelet Dysfunction: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mir Mazhar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The risk of abnormal bleeding with serotonin reuptake inhibitors has been known, but there is insufficient evidence base to guide pharmacological treatment of anxiety in patients with underlying haematological conditions. The following case report is about a 50-year-old female with generalized anxiety disorder, social phobia, obsessive compulsive disorder, and alcohol abuse where pharmacological treatment of anxiety symptoms has been difficult as it would lead to bruising due to the patient’s underlying qualitative platelet dysfunction. Treatment with venlafaxine, citalopram, escitalopram, and clomipramine resulted in improvement and anxiety symptoms, as well as reduction in alcohol use, but pharmacological treatment has to be discontinued because of bruising and hematomas. In view of an active substance use disorder, benzodiazepines were avoided as a treatment option. The patient’s anxiety symptoms and comorbid alcohol abuse responded well to pharmacological treatment with buspirone which gradually titrated up to a dose of 30 mg BID. Patient was followed for around a six-month period while she was on buspirone before being discharged to family doctor’s care. Buspirone is unlikely to have a significant effect on platelet serotonin transponder and could be an effective alternative for pharmacological treatment of anxiety in patients with a bleeding diathesis.

  11. Treatment of anxiety disorders and comorbid alcohol abuse with buspirone in a patient with antidepressant-induced platelet dysfunction: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazhar, Mir; Hassan, Tariq; Munshi, Tariq

    2013-01-01

    The risk of abnormal bleeding with serotonin reuptake inhibitors has been known, but there is insufficient evidence base to guide pharmacological treatment of anxiety in patients with underlying haematological conditions. The following case report is about a 50-year-old female with generalized anxiety disorder, social phobia, obsessive compulsive disorder, and alcohol abuse where pharmacological treatment of anxiety symptoms has been difficult as it would lead to bruising due to the patient's underlying qualitative platelet dysfunction. Treatment with venlafaxine, citalopram, escitalopram, and clomipramine resulted in improvement and anxiety symptoms, as well as reduction in alcohol use, but pharmacological treatment has to be discontinued because of bruising and hematomas. In view of an active substance use disorder, benzodiazepines were avoided as a treatment option. The patient's anxiety symptoms and comorbid alcohol abuse responded well to pharmacological treatment with buspirone which gradually titrated up to a dose of 30 mg BID. Patient was followed for around a six-month period while she was on buspirone before being discharged to family doctor's care. Buspirone is unlikely to have a significant effect on platelet serotonin transponder and could be an effective alternative for pharmacological treatment of anxiety in patients with a bleeding diathesis. PMID:24416612

  12. Review: The neuropathology of drug abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büttner, A

    2011-02-01

    Drug abuse represents a significant health issue. The major substances abused include cannabis, opiates, cocaine, amphetamine, methamphetamine and 'ecstasy'. Alterations of intracellular messenger pathways, transcription factors and immediate early genes within the brain reward system seem to be fundamentally important for the development of addiction and chronic drug abuse. Genetic risk factors and changes in gene expression associated with drug abuse are still poorly understood. Besides cardiovascular complications, psychiatric and neurologic symptoms are the most common manifestations of drug toxicity. A broad spectrum of changes affecting the central nervous system is seen in drug abusers. The major findings result from the consequences of ischaemia and cerebrovascular diseases. Except for a few observations of vasculitis, the aetiology of these cerebrovascular accidents is not fully understood. The abuse of amphetamine, methamphetamine and MDMA has been related to neurotoxicity in human long-term abusers and to the risk of developing Parkinson's disease. However, whether such neurotoxicity occurs remain to be established. Systematic histological, immunohistochemical and morphometric investigations have shown profound morphological alterations in the brains of polydrug abusers. The major findings comprise neuronal loss, neurodegenerative alterations, a reduction of glial fibrillary acidic protein-immunopositive astrocytes, widespread axonal damage with concomitant microglial activation as well as reactive and degenerative changes of the cerebral microvasculature. These observations demonstrate that drugs of abuse initiate a cascade of interacting toxic, vascular and hypoxic factors, which finally result in widespread disturbances within the complex network of central nervous system cell-to-cell interactions. PMID:20946118

  13. Physiology and physiopathology of central type Benzodiazepine receptors: Study in the monkey and in human brain using positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new non-invasive technique that allows to study in a living subject central type benzodiazepine receptors is developed. A combined approach is applied using a specific positron-emitting radiotracer for the in vivo labelling of the receptors and positron emission tomography allowing, by external detection, a quantitative determination of tissue radioactivity. The radioligand used for the in vivo labelling of benzodiazepine receptors is the antagonist RO 15-1788 labelled with carbon 11. The various stages of the study are described: in vivo characterization in the monkey of central type benzodiazepine receptors; characterization of central type benzodiazepine receptors in human brain using selective molecules for the BZ1 benzodiazepine subclass; demonstration of the heterogeneity of central type benzodiazepine receptors in the brain; study of pathological alteration of benzodiazepine receptors in experimental epilepsy

  14. Prevent Child Abuse America

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... call the police . Crisis and support contacts For Child Abuse Reporting Numbers in your State please visit: Child ... suspected child abuse and neglect. Parent Resources Prevent Child Abuse America (800) CHILDREN A resource for tips, referrals, ...

  15. Child Sexual Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexual abuse is one form of child abuse. It includes a wide range of actions between a child ... to children or pressuring them for sex is sexual abuse. Using a child for pornography is also sexual ...

  16. What is Elder Abuse?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to another, but broadly defined, abuse may be: Physical Abuse —inflicting physical pain or injury on a senior, ... abrasions, and burns may be an indication of physical abuse, neglect, or mistreatment. Unexplained withdrawal from normal activities, ...

  17. High density of benzodiazepine binding sites in the substantia innominata of the rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarter, M.; Schneider, H.H.

    1988-07-01

    In order to study the neuronal basis of the pharmacological interactions between benzodiazepine receptor ligands and cortical cholinergic turnover, we examined the regional distribution of specific benzodiazepine binding sites using in vitro autoradiography. In the basal forebrain, the substantia innominata contained a high density of (/sup 3/H)lormetazepam (LMZ) binding sites (Bmax = 277 fmol/mg tissue; Kd = 0.55 nM). The label could be displaced by diazepam (IC50 = 100 nM), the benzodiazepine receptor antagonist beta-carboline ZK 93426 (45 nM) and the partial inverse agonist beta-carboline FG 7142 (540 nM). It is hypothesized that the amnesic effects of benzodiazepine receptor agonists are exerted through benzodiazepine receptors which are situated on cholinergic neurons in the substantia innominata and are involved in a tonic inhibition of cortical acetylcholine release. The benzodiazepine receptor antagonist ZK 93426 may exert its nootropic effects via benzodiazepine receptors in the substantia innominata and, consequently, by disinhibiting cortical acetylcholine release.

  18. The ultrastructural changes in the liver cells induced by high doses of Benzodiazepine Tranquilizing drugs: An experimental transmission electron microscopic study on male guinea pigs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benzodiazepines are tranquilizing psychotropic drugs. Unfortunately, despite their therapeutic benefits, they are illegally consumed in high doses by some addicts to reach a sedative, exhilarative and euphoria state similar to that produced by narcotic substances. The present study, using transmission electron microscope on male guinea pigs, aims to investigate the potential ultrastructural changes in the liver cells induced by the high doses of Benzodiazepines. Animals in three treated groups administrated a daily combined dose consisted of (10mg Alprazolam with 10mg Diazepam/day/animal) for three different treatment periods: 7, 15, and 25 days. The ultrastructural examination of the hepatocytes of the animals treated for 15 days showed limited changes in the form of marginal heterochromatine accompanied with marginal nucleoli enlargement. On the other hand, severe ultrastructural damages are observed in the animals treated for 25 days, which appeared in the following various patterns: fatty degeneration of the hepatocytes as indicated by the accumulation of large number of lipid droplets in the cytoplasm, marked nuclear atrophy in some necrotic hepatocytes, massive nuclear degeneration in other hepatocytes, mitochondrial damages in the form of cristea destruction accompanied with abnormal oval shape, massive lysis of the cytoplasmic organelles with severe plasma membrane rupture. In conclusion, the observed ultrastructural damages in the present study may refer to the potential hepatotoxic effects of the high dose of Benzodiazepins. It is recommended that much more official restrictions should be applied on the pharmacies sector to prevent any illegal selling of these drugs in order to prevent abusers from obtaining them, as unfortunately in some developing countries the illegal selling of these drugs is known to occur due to the absence of official control. (author)

  19. Abused and Neglected Elderly: What Can the Family Physician Do?

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen, Niels H.

    1986-01-01

    Family abuse involving children and spouses is estimated to occur with one Canadian child or spouse in 10. The same figures probably apply to elderly persons cared for by a family member. This paper defines and describes abuse and neglect of the elderly, reviews the stress factors that often underlie it and profiles high-risk candidates for giving and receiving abuse. It provides guidance in detecting the occurrence of abuse of the elderly and suggests means of handling such occurrences in a ...

  20. Risk and protective factors for physical and sexual abuse of children and adolescents in Africa: a review and implications for practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinck, Franziska; Cluver, Lucie D; Boyes, Mark E; Mhlongo, Elsinah L

    2015-01-01

    There is now conclusive evidence of the major and long-lasting negative effects of physical and sexual abuse on children. Within Africa, studies consistently report high rates of child abuse, with prevalence as high as 64%. However, to date, there has been no review of factors associated with physical and sexual child abuse and polyvictimization in Africa. This review identified 23 quantitative studies, all of which showed high levels of child abuse in varying samples of children and adults. Although studies were very heterogeneous, a range of correlates of abuse at different levels of the Model of Ecologic Development were identified. These included community-level factors (exposure to bullying, sexual violence, and rural/urban location), household-level factors (poverty, household violence, and non-nuclear family), caregiver-level factors (caregiver illness in particular AIDS and mental health problems, caregiver changes, family functioning, parenting, caregiver-child relationship, and substance abuse), and child-level factors (age, disability, physical health, behavior, and gender). These findings identify key associated factors that are potential foci of child abuse prevention interventions. In addition, there is a clear need for further rigorous longitudinal research into predictive factors and culturally relevant interventions. PMID:24648489

  1. Combating Misuse and Abuse of Prescription Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... prescription. According to SAMHSA, the majority of these teenagers are obtaining the drugs from friends or relatives for free. Most concerning, the perception of risk of prescription drug abuse declined 20 percent from 1992 to 2008, based ...

  2. The social production of substance abuse and HIV/HCV risk: an exploratory study of opioid-using immigrants from the former Soviet Union living in New York City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guarino Honoria

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several former Soviet countries have witnessed the rapid emergence of major epidemics of injection drug use (IDU and associated HIV/HCV, suggesting that immigrants from the former Soviet Union (FSU may be at heightened risk for similar problems. This exploratory study examines substance use patterns among the understudied population of opioid-using FSU immigrants in the U.S., as well as social contextual factors that may increase these immigrants' susceptibility to opioid abuse and HIV/HCV infection. Methods In-depth interviews were conducted with 10 FSU immigrants living in New York City who initiated opioid use in adolescence or young adulthood, and with 6 drug treatment providers working with this population. Informed by a grounded theory approach, interview transcripts were inductively coded and analyzed to identify key themes. Results The "trauma" of the immigration/acculturation experience was emphasized by participants as playing a critical role in motivating opioid use. Interview data suggest that substance use patterns formed in the high-risk environment of the FSU may persist as behavioral norms within New York City FSU immigrant communities - including a predilection for heroin use among youth, a high prevalence of injection, and a tolerance for syringe sharing within substance-using peer networks. Multiple levels of social context may reproduce FSU immigrants' vulnerability to substance abuse and disease such as: peer-based interactional contexts in which participants typically used opioids; community workplace settings in which some participants were introduced to and obtained opioids; and cultural norms, with roots in Soviet-era social policies, stigmatizing substance abuse which may contribute to immigrants' reluctance to seek disease prevention and drug treatment services. Conclusion Several behavioral and contextual factors appear to increase FSU immigrants' risk for opioid abuse, IDU and infectious disease

  3. A New Method of Separation of Four Benzodiazepines by RP-CEC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Lan ZHANG; Tong Hui ZHOU

    2004-01-01

    A new method to separate diazepam, nitrazepam, estazolam, alprazolam was established on both C18 and C8 CEC columns.The influence of separation voltage, Tris concentration, column temperature and the percentage of acetonitrile on the resolution and retention behavior of four benzodiazepines was investigated.The results showed that the percentage of acetonitrile had the largest effect on the resolution and retention behavior of the four benzodiazepines.Other separation conditions had also effects on the resolution and retention behavior, but smaller than the concentration of acetonitrile.Optimum separation conditions were obtained to separate four benzodiazepines on C18 and C8 CEC columns.

  4. Synthesis of a Benzodiazepine-derived Rhodium NHC Complex by C-H Bond Activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergman, Roberg G.; Gribble, Jr., Michael W.; Ellman, Jonathan A.

    2008-01-30

    The synthesis and characterization of a Rh(I)-NHC complex generated by C-H activation of 1,4-benzodiazepine heterocycle are reported. This complex constitutes a rare example of a carbene tautomer of a 1,4-benzodiazepine aldimine stabilized by transition metal coordination and demonstrates the ability of the catalytically relevant RhCl(PCy{sub 3}){sub 2} fragment to induce NHC-forming tautomerization of heterocycles possessing a single carbene-stabilizing heteroatom. Implications for the synthesis of benzodiazepines and related pharmacophores via C-H functionalization are discussed.

  5. Synthesis, structure and affinity of novel 3-alkoxy-1,2-dihydro-3H-1,4-benzodiazepin-2-ones for CNS central and peripheral benzodiazepine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andronati, Sergey; Semenishyna, Ekaterina; Pavlovsky, Victor; Simonov, Yuriy; Makan, Svetlana; Boyko, Irina; Burenkova, Natalya; Gdaniec, Maria; Cardinael, Pascal; Bouillon, Jean-Philippe; Mazepa, Alexander

    2010-04-01

    A series of novel 3-alkoxy-1,2-dihydro-3H-1,4-benzodiazepin-2-ones (7-15) was synthesized and their in vitro affinity for both the central benzodiazepine receptor (CBR) and the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) of rat brain was studied. Racemic mixture of 7-bromo-3-(2-methoxy)ethoxy-5-phenyl-1,2-dihydro-3H-1,4-benzodiazepin-2-one (13) was separated into enantiomers 14, 15 by chiral HPLC. Absolute configuration of R-enantiomer 15 was determined by the method of X-ray diffraction analysis. The affinity of S-enantiomer 14 for CBR ( IC50)=245 nM) is 20-fold higher than the affinity of R-enantiomer 15 (IC50)=4,930 nM). A high selectivity for CBR versus PBR (IC50) (PBR)>10,000 nM) was shown by all reported compounds. Compound 12 was revealed as a potent (IC50)=9 nM) and selective CBR ligand among the synthesized 3-alkoxy-1,2-dihydro-3H-1,4-benzodiazepin-2-ones. PMID:20061068

  6. Differences in methylphenidate abuse rates among methadone maintenance treatment patients in two clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peles, Einat; Schreiber, Shaul; Linzy, Shirley; Domani, Yoav; Adelson, Miriam

    2015-07-01

    Methylphenidate, an amphetamine-like prescription medication for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) was suspected as being abused among methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) patients. We tested its presence in the routine urine monitoring of all patients in both Tel Aviv and Las Vegas MMT clinics. Data on demographic and addiction history, ADHD (Wender Utah Rating Scale), cognitive impairment (Mini Mental State Exam), and lifetime DSM-IV-TR psychiatric diagnosis from admission were retrieved, and retention following 6 months. None of the 190 patients in Las Vegas tested positive for methylphenidate, while 14.7% (45/306) did in Tel Aviv. Abusers were less educated (p = 0.01), had higher ADHD scores (p = 0.02), lower cognitive scores (p = 0.05), and a higher benzodiazepine (BDZ) abuse rate (p cannabis, opiates, and cocaine abuse and infectious disease. Of the methylphenidate abuse 42.2% have take-home methadone dose privileges. Not like opiate use, being methylphenidate positive did not relate to 6-months retention. Compared to Tel Aviv, Las Vegas patients were more educated, with lower BDZ, and cocaine abuse. The greater abuse of methylphenidate among ADHD subjects might indicate their using it as self-medication, raising a possible indication for its prescription for that subgroup of MMT patients. The high rate of methylphenidate abuse in Israel needs future study. PMID:25605438

  7. A case of drug abuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Pacini

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Methadone maintenance is one of the well-known harm reduction strategies for public health intervention in heroin addiction. The significance of methadone treatment in preventing needle sharing, which in turn reduces the risk of HIV and HCV transmission among injectors, has been demonstrated. Methadone maintenance is also considered gathering site where heroin addicts can effectively acquire knowledge on harm reduction and drug rehabilitation. We report a case of a 34-years-old patient with a history of heroin abuse. Therapy with methadone was essential for an adequate management of the case. The article describe difficulties and complexities of heroin abuse management and the therapeutic role of methadone.

  8. Iodine-125 radioimmunoassay for the direct detection of benzodiazepines in blood and urine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goddard, C.P.; Stead, A.H.; Mason, P.A.; Law, B.; Moffat, A.C.; McBrien, M.; Cosby, S.

    1986-05-01

    A radioimmunoassay (RIA) for the direct detection of benzodiazepines in blood and urine is described. It is based on a commercially available antiserum and an easily synthesised radio-iodinated derivative of clonazepam that allows the use of relatively simple gamma-counting procedures. The assay can detect low therapeutic levels of all of the benzodiazepines currently available in the UK in 50-..mu..l samples of blood and urine (1-50 ng ml/sup -1/, depending on the drug); no prior sample preparation is required. It is inexpensive, rapid, simple to perform and is broadly specific for the benzodiazepine class of drugs. The assay offers a most suitable means of screening large numbers of samples of forensic interest for the presence of the benzodiazepines.

  9. An iodine-125 radioimmunoassay for the direct detection of benzodiazepines in blood and urine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radioimmunoassay (RIA) for the direct detection of benzodiazepines in blood and urine is described. It is based on a commercially available antiserum and an easily synthesised radio-iodinated derivative of clonazepam that allows the use of relatively simple gamma-counting procedures. The assay can detect low therapeutic levels of all of the benzodiazepines currently available in the UK in 50-μl samples of blood and urine (1-50 ng ml-1, depending on the drug); no prior sample preparation is required. It is inexpensive, rapid, simple to perform and is broadly specific for the benzodiazepine class of drugs. The assay offers a most suitable means of screening large numbers of samples of forensic interest for the presence of the benzodiazepines. (author)

  10. Association between Exposure to Benzodiazepines and Related Drugs and Survivorship of Total Hip Replacement in Arthritis: A Population-Based Cohort Study of 246,940 Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Beziz

    Full Text Available Total hip replacement (THR is successful in treating hip arthritis. Prosthetic survivorship may depend on the medications taken by the patient; particularly, the role of benzodiazepines and related drugs (Z-drugs with THR revision has been poorly investigated. Our objective was to compare THR short-term survivorship according to level of exposure to benzodiazepine and Z-drugs.All French patients aged 40 years or older, having undergone primary THR from January 1, 2009, through December 31, 2012, for arthritis according to French national health insurance databases were included in the cohort. Outcome of interest was THR revision, including any surgical procedure in which the implant or any component was changed or removed. Follow-up started the day the primary THR was performed. Observations were right-censored on December 31, 2014, if neither revision nor death had yet occurred. Exposure of interest was the cumulative defined daily doses per day (cDDD/day of benzodiazepines and Z-drugs dispensed within 6 months before or after inclusion. We defined four exposure groups; cDDD/d = 0: unexposed; 0.38: high exposure. THR survivorship was assessed according to level of exposure to benzodiazepines and Z-drugs in univariate and multivariate Cox models adjusted for patient, THR and implanting center characteristics.The study cohort comprised 246,940 individuals: mean age at baseline, 69.9 years; women, 57.9%; unexposed: 51.7%; low exposure: 16.7%; medium exposure: 15.9%; and high exposure: 15.7%. During the median 45-month follow-up, 9043 individuals underwent prosthetic revision. Adjusted hazard ratios in low, medium and high exposed groups were 1.18 (95%CI, 1.12-1.26; P<0.001, 1.32 (95%CI, 1.24-1.40; P<0.001 and 1.37 (95%CI, 1.29-1.45; P<0.001, respectively, compared to unexposed.Exposure to benzodiazepines and Z-drugs is associated with an increased risk of THR revision, with a dose-response relationship. Cautious prescribing might be needed as well

  11. Association between Exposure to Benzodiazepines and Related Drugs and Survivorship of Total Hip Replacement in Arthritis: A Population-Based Cohort Study of 246,940 Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beziz, Dan; Colas, Sandrine; Collin, Cédric; Dray-Spira, Rosemary; Zureik, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Background Total hip replacement (THR) is successful in treating hip arthritis. Prosthetic survivorship may depend on the medications taken by the patient; particularly, the role of benzodiazepines and related drugs (Z-drugs) with THR revision has been poorly investigated. Our objective was to compare THR short-term survivorship according to level of exposure to benzodiazepine and Z-drugs. Design, Setting and Participants All French patients aged 40 years or older, having undergone primary THR from January 1, 2009, through December 31, 2012, for arthritis according to French national health insurance databases were included in the cohort. Outcome of interest was THR revision, including any surgical procedure in which the implant or any component was changed or removed. Follow-up started the day the primary THR was performed. Observations were right-censored on December 31, 2014, if neither revision nor death had yet occurred. Exposure of interest was the cumulative defined daily doses per day (cDDD/day) of benzodiazepines and Z-drugs dispensed within 6 months before or after inclusion. We defined four exposure groups; cDDD/d = 0: unexposed; 0.38: high exposure. THR survivorship was assessed according to level of exposure to benzodiazepines and Z-drugs in univariate and multivariate Cox models adjusted for patient, THR and implanting center characteristics. Results The study cohort comprised 246,940 individuals: mean age at baseline, 69.9 years; women, 57.9%; unexposed: 51.7%; low exposure: 16.7%; medium exposure: 15.9%; and high exposure: 15.7%. During the median 45-month follow-up, 9043 individuals underwent prosthetic revision. Adjusted hazard ratios in low, medium and high exposed groups were 1.18 (95%CI, 1.12–1.26; P<0.001), 1.32 (95%CI, 1.24–1.40; P<0.001) and 1.37 (95%CI, 1.29–1.45; P<0.001), respectively, compared to unexposed. Conclusion and Relevance Exposure to benzodiazepines and Z-drugs is associated with an increased risk of THR revision, with a

  12. Benzodiazepine receptor binding in vivo with (/sup 3/)-Ro 15-1788

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goeders, N.E.; Kuhar, M.J.

    1985-07-29

    In vivo benzodiazepine receptor binding has generally been studied by ex vivo techniques. In this investigation, the authors identify the conditions where (/sup 3/H)-Ro 15-1788 labels benzodiazepine receptors by true in vivo binding, i.e. where workable specific to nonspecific ratios are obtained in intact tissues without homogenization or washing. (/sup 3/H)-Flunitrazepam and (/sup 3/H)-clonazepam did not exhibit useful in vivo receptor binding. 39 references, 5 figures, 1 table.

  13. Benzodiazepine receptor binding in vivo with [3]-Ro 15-1788

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In vivo benzodiazepine receptor binding has generally been studied by ex vivo techniques. In this investigation, the authors identify the conditions where [3H]-Ro 15-1788 labels benzodiazepine receptors by true in vivo binding, i.e. where workable specific to nonspecific ratios are obtained in intact tissues without homogenization or washing. [3H]-Flunitrazepam and [3H]-clonazepam did not exhibit useful in vivo receptor binding. 39 references, 5 figures, 1 table

  14. Positive Drug Screen for Benzodiazepine Due to a Chinese Herbal Product

    OpenAIRE

    Eachus, Patricia L.

    1996-01-01

    A female athlete tested positive for benzodiazepine on a random drug screen. She denied taking any illicit or prescription drugs. The positive screen was found to be caused by undeclared addiction of diazepam to a Chinese herbal product, “Miracle Herb.” Some foreign vitamins, health care products, or herbal tea may contain banned or dangerous additives unknown to the consumer. These additives may include ingredients such as benzodiazepine, mefenamic acid, or corticosteroids. Possible physical...

  15. The histopathology of drugs of abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milroy, Christopher Mark; Parai, Jacqueline Louise

    2011-10-01

    The use of drugs for recreational purposes is widespread. The drugs used can be divided into groups including stimulants (cocaine, amphetamines, etc.), opiates and opioids (heroin, oxycodone, methadone, fentanyl, etc.), sedatives (benzodiazepines and related substances) and miscellaneous drugs, including ketamine and cannabis (marijuana). These drugs can have profound effects on all organ systems in the body. The method of administration, whether by injection or inhalation, can cause localized and systemic effects, including the transmission of infection and granulomata at the site of injection and in the lungs. Suppurative abscesses from injection can result in systemic amyloidosis. Stimulants have profound effects on the cardiovascular and cerebrovascular systems, with enlarged hearts with fibrosis seen microscopically and cerebral infarction and haemorrhage. Crack cocaine use is also associated with changes in the pulmonary system, including carbon pigmented intra-alveolar macrophages, emphysema and pulmonary arterial changes. Cannabis use is associated with brown pigmented macrophages in the lung as well as changes in the respiratory tract epithelium. Opiates/opioids are associated with inhalational pneumonitis and hypoxic brain damage due to their respiratory depressant effects. Heroin use has been associated with focal segmental glomerulonephritis (heroin-associated nephropathy: HAN). 3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA; ecstasy) use is associated with changes in the cardiovascular system. Its use can lead to hyperpyrexia, which results in systemic changes. Ketamine abuse has been associated with cystitis. Drugs of abuse may affect testicular function. In analysing the effects of drugs at autopsy a systematic approach to sampling of histology is required. PMID:21261690

  16. Cancer morbidity in alcohol abusers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tønnesen, H; Møller, Henrik; Andersen, J R;

    1994-01-01

    = 1.5; 95% CI 1.3-1.8). Significantly increased incidences were found of cancer in the tongue, mouth, pharynx, oesophagus, liver, larynx, lung and pleura and secondary cancer. The women had significantly increased risk of cervical cancer (RR = 2.0; 95% CI 1.2-3.0). The men developed prostatic cancer...... and the liver are confirmed. In addition, this study indicates an increased occurrence of cancer of the prostate gland, pleura and uterine cervix in alcohol abusers.......Data on the association between alcohol abuse and cancer morbidity are scarce in large cohorts of non-hospitalised alcoholic men and women. Of 18,368 alcohol abusers who entered an outpatient clinic in Copenhagen during 1954-87, 18,307 were followed and their cancer incidence was compared...

  17. Pros and cons of benzodiazepines screening in human saliva by ion mobility spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armenta, S; Blanco, M

    2011-10-01

    The usefulness of ion mobility spectrometry as a screening methodology for the on-site benzodiazepine analysis in saliva samples has been critically evaluated. The procedure involved the injection of clear supernatant extracts after centrifugation and provided limit of detection values ranging from 2.0 to 18 μg L(-1), and a precision, expressed as relative standard deviation, from 2.9% to 16%, depending on the different benzodiazepines studied. Those values are appropriate for their positive identification in saliva samples in which benzodiazepine concentration, after a chronic or acute dose, is in the range of 2-30 μg L(-1). Problems related with overlapped benzodiazepine signals have been successfully overcome by application of multivariate curve resolution, which is a helpful tool to improve the resolution of the technique, without sacrificing the method simplicity and frequency of analysis. The possibility of false positives caused by the presence of interferents with the same drift time as the benzodiazepines and the possibility of false negatives due to the presence of interferents by competitive ionization have been critically evaluated. The satisfactory results obtained for the analysis of real saliva samples after an acute dose of diazepam through sublingual and oral intakes confirm the capability of the technique to be used as a screening methodology in the analysis of benzodiazepines in oral fluids. PMID:21805317

  18. Testing the sexually abused-sexual abuser hypothesis: A prospective longitudinal birth cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Chelsea; Stewart, Anna; Smallbone, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    The sexually abused-sexual abuser hypothesis posits that persons, especially males, who are sexually abused as children are at particular risk of sexually abusing others later in life. We tested this hypothesis by prospectively examining associations between maltreatment and offending in a birth cohort of 38,282 males with a maltreatment history and/or at least one finalized offense. We examined these associations within the context of the wider birth population. Proportionally few boys were the subject of official notifications for sexual abuse (14.8% of maltreated boys, and 1.4% of the birth population); proportionally very few of these sexually abused boys (3%) went on to become sexual offenders; and, contrary to findings typically reported in retrospective clinical studies, proportionally few sexual offenders (4%) had a confirmed history of sexual abuse. Poly-victimization (exposure to multiple types of maltreatment) was significantly associated with sexual offending, violent offending, and general (nonsexual, nonviolent) offending. We found no specific association between sexual abuse and sexual offending, and nor did we find any association between sexual abuse and sexual offending specifically within the poly-victimized group. The total number of sexual abuse notifications did make a small unique contribution to the variance in sexual offending compared to other offending. Implications concerning maltreated boys and male sexual offenders are discussed. PMID:26615777

  19. Synthesis, characterisation, stereochemistry and antimicrobial activity of 5 -piperazino- and 5-morpholinoacetyl-2,2,4-trimethyl-1, 5-benzodiazepines

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Ponnuswamy; A Akila; D Deepa Rajakumari; V Shreevidhyaa Suressh; G Usha

    2015-11-01

    Three 1,5-benzodiazepines viz., 5-chloroacetyl-, 5-piperazinoacetyl- and N5 -morpholinoacetyl-2,2,4-trimethyl-1H-1,5-benzodiazepines have been synthesized. The structural characterisation and the conformational preferences of the compounds have been carried out using IR, 1D and 2D NMR spectral data. The NMR spectral data show that the -acetyltetrahydro-1,5-benzodiazepines prefer to exist in boat conformation with exo orientation of >C=O at 5 position in the solution state. The X-ray crystal structure of 5-morpholinoacetyl-2,2,4-trimethyl-1H-1,5-benzodiazepine also supports boat conformation in the solid state. The antimicrobial activity for -acetyltetrahydro-1,5-benzodiazepines have been carried out. -morpholinoacetyl-2,2,4-trimethyl-1H-1,5-benzodiazepine demonstrated better antibacterial and antifungal activities.

  20. A History of Abuse and Operative Delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schei, Berit; Lukasse, Mirjam; Ryding, Elsa Lena;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The main aim of this study was to assess whether a history of abuse, reported during pregnancy, was associated with an operative delivery. Secondly, we assessed if the association varied according to the type of abuse and if the reported abuse had been experienced as a child or an adult....... DESIGN: The Bidens study, a cohort study in six European countries (Belgium, Iceland, Denmark, Estonia, Norway, and Sweden) recruited 6724 pregnant women attending routine antenatal care. History of abuse was assessed through questionnaire and linked to obstetric information from hospital records...... and multinomial regression analysis were used to assess the associations. RESULTS: Among 3308 primiparous women, sexual abuse as an adult (≥ 18 years) increased the risk of an elective CS, Adjusted Odds Ratio 2.12 (1.28-3.49), and the likelihood for a non-obstetrically indicated CS, OR 3.74 (1.24-11.24). Women...

  1. The impact of the Good Behavior Game, a universal classroom-based preventive intervention in first and second grades, on high-risk sexual behaviors and drug abuse and dependence disorders into young adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellam, Sheppard G; Wang, Wei; Mackenzie, Amelia C L; Brown, C Hendricks; Ompad, Danielle C; Or, Flora; Ialongo, Nicholas S; Poduska, Jeanne M; Windham, Amy

    2014-02-01

    The Good Behavior Game (GBG), a method of teacher classroom behavior management, was tested in first- and second-grade classrooms in 19 Baltimore City Public Schools beginning in the 1985-1986 school year. The intervention was directed at the classroom as a whole to socialize children to the student role and reduce aggressive, disruptive behaviors, confirmed antecedents of a profile of externalizing problem outcomes. This article reports on the GBG impact on the courses and interrelationships among aggressive, disruptive behavior through middle school, risky sexual behaviors, and drug abuse and dependence disorders through ages 19-21. In five poor to lower-middle class, mainly African American urban areas, classrooms within matched schools were assigned randomly to either the GBG intervention or the control condition. Balanced assignment of children to classrooms was made, and teachers were randomly assigned to intervention or control. Analyses involved multilevel growth mixture modeling. By young adulthood, significant GBG impact was found in terms of reduced high-risk sexual behaviors and drug abuse and dependence disorders among males who in first grade and through middle school were more aggressive, disruptive. A replication with the next cohort of first-grade children with the same teachers occurred during the following school year, but with minimal teacher mentoring and monitoring. Findings were not significant but generally in the predicted direction. A universal classroom-based prevention intervention in first- and second-grade classrooms can reduce drug abuse and dependence disorders and risky sexual behaviors. PMID:23070695

  2. Attachment Styles and Aggression in Physically Abused and Neglected Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finzi, Ricky; Ram, Anca; Har-Even, Dov; Shnit, Dan; Weizman, Abraham

    2001-01-01

    Compared physically abused (n=41) and neglected (n=38) children with nonabused, nonneglected children (n=35) aged 6 to 12 years in terms of their attachment styles and their levels of aggression. Findings show that physically abused children are at risk of antisocial behavior and suspicion toward others, and neglected children are at risk of…

  3. Laboratory approach for diagnosis of toluene-based inhalant abuse in a clinical setting

    OpenAIRE

    Raka Jain; Arpita Verma

    2016-01-01

    The steady increase of inhalant abuse is a great challenge for analytical toxicologists. This review describes an overview of inhalant abuse including the extent of the problem, types of products abused, modes of administration, pharmacology and effects of inhalants, the role of laboratory, interpretation of laboratory results and clinical considerations. Regular laboratory screening for inhalant abuse as well as other substance abuse and health risk behaviors must be a part of standard clini...

  4. Laboratory approach for diagnosis of toluene-based inhalant abuse in a clinical setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raka Jain

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The steady increase of inhalant abuse is a great challenge for analytical toxicologists. This review describes an overview of inhalant abuse including the extent of the problem, types of products abused, modes of administration, pharmacology and effects of inhalants, the role of laboratory, interpretation of laboratory results and clinical considerations. Regular laboratory screening for inhalant abuse as well as other substance abuse and health risk behaviors must be a part of standard clinical care.

  5. Correlation Between Intimate Partner Violence Victimization and Risk of Substance Abuse and Depression among African-American Women Seen in an Urban Emergency Department

    OpenAIRE

    Hankin, Abigail; Smith, L. Shakiyla; Daugherty, Jill; Houry, Debra

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To assess rates of substance abuse (including tobacco, alcohol, and drug abuse) as well as rates of intimate partner violence (IPV) among African-American women seen in an urban Emergency Department (ED). Methods: Eligible participants included all African-American women between the ages of 21-55 years old who were seen in an urban ED for any complaint, and who were triaged to the waiting room. Eligible women who consented to participate were taken to complete a computer-b...

  6. Correlation Between Intimate Partner Violence Victimization and Risk of Substance Abuse and Depression among African-American Women in an Urban Emergency Department

    OpenAIRE

    Hankin, Abigail; Smith, L. Shakiyla; Daugherty, Jill; Houry, Debra

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To assess rates of substance abuse (including tobacco, alcohol, and drug abuse) as well as rates of intimate partner violence (IPV) among African-American women seen in an urban emergency department (ED). Methods: Eligible participants included all African-American women between the ages of 21–55 years old who were seen in an urban ED for any complaint and triaged to the waiting room. Eligible women who consented to participate completed a computer-based survey that focused on demo...

  7. Maternal Exposure to Intimate Partner Abuse before Birth Is Associated with Autism Spectrum Disorder in Offspring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Andrea L.; Lyall, Kristen; Rich-Edwards, Janet W.; Ascherio, Alberto; Weisskopf, Marc G.

    2016-01-01

    We sought to determine whether maternal (a) physical harm from intimate partner abuse during pregnancy or (b) sexual, emotional, or physical abuse before birth increased risk of autism spectrum disorder. We calculated risk ratios for autism spectrum disorder associated with abuse in a population-based cohort of women and their children (54,512…

  8. Patterns of Partners' Abusive Behaviors as Reported by Latina and Non-Latina Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Nancy; Perrin, Nancy; Hanson, Ginger; Mankowski, Eric; Bloom, Tina; Campbell, Jacquelyn

    2009-01-01

    This study builds on the existing knowledge of risk factors for lethal intimate partner violence (IPV) and typologies of IPV abusers by exploring patterns of abusive partners' behaviors among known risk factors for intimate partner femicide (i.e., murder of women) and determines if groups of survivors with similar patterns of abusive behaviors…

  9. Effects of various combinations of benzodiazepines with buprenorphine on arterial blood gases in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirnay, Stéphane O; Mégarbane, Bruno; Borron, Stephen W; Risède, Patricia; Monier, Claire; Ricordel, Ivan; Baud, Frédéric J

    2008-09-01

    Fatalities have been attributed to combinations of high-dose buprenorphine with benzodiazepines. In rats, high-dose buprenorphine combined with midazolam was shown to induce sustained respiratory acidosis, while buprenorphine alone did not. However, the effects of buprenorphine combined with pharmacological doses of benzodiazepines remain unknown. Our objective was to compare the acute effects of four selected benzodiazepines used intravenously at equi-efficacious doses in rats, alone and in combination with buprenorphine on sedation, respiratory rate and arterial blood gases. Buprenorphine (30 mg/kg) did not significantly modify sedation level or respiratory rate, but induced mild and transient effects on pH and PaCO(2) (P < 0.05). Similarly, despite having no effects on respiratory rate, nordiazepam (10 mg/kg), bromazepam (1 mg/kg) and oxazepam (12 mg/kg) mildly and transiently altered pH and PaCO(2) (P < 0.05), whereas clonazepam (5 mg/kg) did not. Buprenorphine combined with each benzodiazepine induced no significant effects on respiratory rate or blood gases, in comparison with buprenorphine alone. However, combinations of oxazepam or nordiazepam with buprenorphine significantly deepened sedation. While both combinations reduced respiratory rate, buprenorphine + 30 mg/kg clonazepam significantly increased PaCO(2) and buprenorphine + 30 mg/kg nordiazepam decreased PaO(2). In conclusion, not all benzodiazepines induce significant respiratory depression at therapeutic doses. We were unable to demonstrate significant effects on rat ventilatory parameters of buprenorphine combined with equi-efficacious pharmacological doses of benzodiazepines in comparison with buprenorphine alone. Our results may suggest that effects of these combinations are rather mild. Respiratory failure may, however, result from the association of buprenorphine with elevated doses of benzodiazepines. PMID:18684226

  10. Effect of chronic (-)-nicotine treatment on rat cerebral benzodiazepine receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the effect of (-)-nicotine on cerebral benzodiazepine receptors (BzR) with radiotracer methods. The effect of (-)-nicotine on BzR was examined in in vitro studies using chronic (-)-nicotine-treated rats using 3H-diazepam. The in vitro radioreceptor assay showed a 14% increase in the maximum number of binding sites of BzR in chronic (-)-nicotine-treated rats in comparison with the control rats. Moreover, a convenient in vivo uptake index of 125I-iomazenil was calculated and a higher uptake of the radioactivity was observed in the chronic (-)-nicotine-treated group than in the control group. Although further studies of the mechanism of (-)-nicotine on such BzR changes are required, an increase in the amount of BzR in the cerebral cortex was found in rats that underwent chronic (-)-nicotine treatment, and this result contributed to the understanding of the effects of (-)-nicotine and smoking on neural functions

  11. Autoradiographic localization of benzodiazepine receptors in the rat kidney

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaumont, K.; Healy, D.P.; Fanestil, D.D.

    1984-11-01

    The localization of benzodiazepine (BZD) receptors in the rat kidney was studied by autoradiography after in vitro labeling of kidney slices with flunitrazepam. The affinity, density, and rank order of displacement of (/sup 3/H)-flunitrazepam by several BZDs (RO 5-4864 > diazepam > clonazepam) demonstrated that binding was to BZD receptors of the peripheral type. In autoradiograms obtained with tritium-sensitive film, a high density of silver grains was obtained in the outer medulla, with lower densities in the cortex. Binding was absent from the inner medulla (papilla). In higher resolution autoradiograms obtained with an emulsion-coated cover slip procedure, silver grains were seen to be concentrated over a tubular element in both outer medulla and cortex, identifiable by morphology and distribution as the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle and the distal convoluted tubule. The identity of the labeled tubules was confirmed by immunofluorescent localization in adjacent slices of Tamm-Horsfall protein, a specific marker for these segments of tubules. Investigation of the effects of peripherally specific BZDs such as RO 5-4864 on distal tubule function is indicated.

  12. Use of benzodiazepines in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starcevic, Vladan; Berle, David; do Rosário, Maria Conceição; Brakoulias, Vlasios; Ferrão, Ygor A; Viswasam, Kirupamani; Shavitt, Roseli; Miguel, Euripedes; Fontenelle, Leonardo F

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the frequency of benzodiazepine (BDZ) use in a large sample of patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and ascertain the type of BDZ used and the correlates and predictors of BDZ use in OCD. The sample consisted of 955 patients with OCD from a comprehensive, cross-sectional, multicentre study conducted by the Brazilian Research Consortium on Obsessive-Compulsive Spectrum Disorders between 2003 and 2009. The rate of BDZ use over time in this OCD sample was 38.4%. Of individuals taking BDZs, 96.7% used them in combination with other medications, usually serotonin reuptake inhibitors. The most commonly used BDZ was clonazepam. Current age, current level of anxiety and number of additional medications for OCD taken over time significantly predicted BDZ use. This is the first study to comprehensively examine BDZ use in OCD patients, demonstrating that it is relatively common, despite recommendations from treatment guidelines. Use of BDZs in combination with several other medications over time and in patients with marked anxiety suggests that OCD patients taking BDZs may be more complex and more difficult to manage. This calls for further research and clarification of the role of BDZs in the treatment of OCD. PMID:26426443

  13. Autoradiographic localization of benzodiazepine receptors in the rat kidney

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The localization of benzodiazepine (BZD) receptors in the rat kidney was studied by autoradiography after in vitro labeling of kidney slices with flunitrazepam. The affinity, density, and rank order of displacement of [3H]-flunitrazepam by several BZDs (RO 5-4864 > diazepam > clonazepam) demonstrated that binding was to BZD receptors of the peripheral type. In autoradiograms obtained with tritium-sensitive film, a high density of silver grains was obtained in the outer medulla, with lower densities in the cortex. Binding was absent from the inner medulla (papilla). In higher resolution autoradiograms obtained with an emulsion-coated cover slip procedure, silver grains were seen to be concentrated over a tubular element in both outer medulla and cortex, identifiable by morphology and distribution as the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle and the distal convoluted tubule. The identity of the labeled tubules was confirmed by immunofluorescent localization in adjacent slices of Tamm-Horsfall protein, a specific marker for these segments of tubules. Investigation of the effects of peripherally specific BZDs such as RO 5-4864 on distal tubule function is indicated

  14. Platelet peripheral benzodiazepine receptors are decreased in Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peripheral benzodiazepine (BDZ) receptors are located in a variety of tissues, including platelets, in the nuclear and/or mitochondrial membranes. The authors studied the density of peripheral BDZ receptors in platelets of 10 de novo Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, 18 PD patients treated with a levodopa/carbidopa combination, and in 15 healthy subjects matched for sex and age. The binding assay was conducted using [3H]PK 11195, a specific ligand for peripheral BDZ receptors. A significant decrease in the density of [3H]PK 11195 binding sites has been observed in PD patients with respect to controls but not between de novo and treated PD patients. No correlation has been found between the decrease in density of [3H]PK 11195 binding sites in platelets and either the duration or severity of PD. Peripheral BDZ receptors are implicated in the regulation of mitochondrial respiratory function. Thus, their decrease in PD might parallel the abnormalities in mitochondrial function recently found in this neurologic disease

  15. Effects of Benzodiazepines on Acinar and Myoepithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattioli, Tatiana M. F.; Alanis, Luciana R. A.; Sapelli, Silvana da Silva; de Lima, Antonio A. S.; de Noronha, Lucia; Rosa, Edvaldo A. R.; Althobaiti, Yusuf S.; Almalki, Atiah H.; Sari, Youssef; Ignacio, Sergio A.; Johann, Aline C. B. R.; Gregio, Ana M. T.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Benzodiazepines (BZDs), the most commonly prescribed psychotropic drugs with anxiolytic action, may cause hyposalivation. It has been previously shown that BZDs can cause hypertrophy and decrease the acini cell number. In this study, we investigated the effects of BZDs and pilocarpine on rat parotid glands, specifically on acinar, ductal, and myoepithelial cells. Methods: Ninety male Wistar rats were divided into nine groups. Control groups received a saline solution for 30 days (C30) and 60 days (C60), and pilocarpine (PILO) for 60 days. Experimental groups received lorazepam (L30) and midazolam (M30) for 30 days. Another group (LS60 or MS60) received lorazepam or midazolam for 30 days, respectively, and saline for additional 30 days. Finally, other groups (LP60 or MP60) received either lorazepam or midazolam for 30 days, respectively, and pilocarpine for additional 30 days. The expression of calponin in myoepithelial cells and the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in acinar and ductal cells were evaluated. Results: Animals treated with lorazepam showed an increase in the number of positive staining cells for calponin as compared to control animals (p < 0.05). Midazolam administered with pilocarpine (MP60) induced an increase in the proliferation of acinar and ductal cells and a decrease in the positive staining cells for calponin as compared to midazolam administered with saline (MS60). Conclusion: We found that myoepithelial cells might be more sensitive to the effects of BZD than acinar and ductal cells in rat parotid glands.

  16. Childhood Sexual Abuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evrim Aktepe

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Sexual abuse is defined as use of child or adolescent by the adults for satisfying of sexual urges and needs with forcing, threatening or tricking. Sexual abuse can be in the form of sexual abuse without touch, sexual touch, interfemoral intercourse, sexual penetration, and sexual exploitation. The prevalence of sexual abuse is reported as 10-40%. It is seen in female four times more than in males. Abusers are frequently male, only 5-15% of them are female. The abuse by females is usually towards male child. Thirty-fifty percent of abuse cases among child and adolescent are outside the family including strangers or familiar person. Some features of abusers are introvert personality, pedophilic and antisocial personality. Most of the abusers have a history of sexual abuse or aggression during childhood. Sexual intercourse between two people who are not allowed to marry by law is called as incest. Family pattern of incest is defined globally as disorganized and dysfunctional. The most commonly reported familial pattern is rigid and patriarchal family pattern with a harsh father using force quite frequently. The clinical features and impacts of the sexual abuse on the child varies according to the relation between abusers and the child, form of abuse, duration of abuse, presence of physical assault, developmental phase, child age and psychological development before the abuse. Sexual abuse history may result in psychiatric disorders including anxiety, depression, substance dependence, suicide act, borderline personality disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder. Abuse negatively affects interpersonal relationships and self esteem of abused individuals. Several studies reported close association between risky sexual behaviors in adulthood and a history of of sexual abuse during childhood. Four traumatic dynamics including traumatic sexuality with abuse, feeling of betrayal, weakness, and stigmatization exist in childhood abuse. Trauma can cause

  17. Childhood sexual abuse.

    OpenAIRE

    Evrim Aktepe

    1993-01-01

    Sexual abuse is defined as use of child or adolescent by the adults for satisfying of sexual urges and needs with forcing, threatening or tricking. Sexual abuse can be in the form of sexual abuse without touch, sexual touch, interfemoral intercourse, sexual penetration, and sexual exploitation. The prevalence of sexual abuse is reported as 10-40%. It is seen in female four times more than in males. Abusers are frequently male, only 5-15% of them are female. The abuse by females is usually tow...

  18. Childhood Sexual Abuse

    OpenAIRE

    Aktepe, Evrim

    2009-01-01

    Sexual abuse is defined as use of child or adolescent by the adults for satisfying of sexual urges and needs with forcing, threatening or tricking. Sexual abuse can be in the form of sexual abuse without touch, sexual touch, interfemoral intercourse, sexual penetration, and sexual exploitation. The prevalence of sexual abuse is reported as 10-40%. It is seen in female four times more than in males. Abusers are frequently male, only 5-15% of them are female. The abuse by females is usually tow...

  19. Cough and Cold Medicine Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Cold Medicine Abuse DrugFacts: Cough and Cold Medicine Abuse Email Facebook Twitter Revised May 2014 Some ... diverted for abuse. How Are Cough and Cold Medicines Abused? Cough and cold medicines are usually consumed ...

  20. Changes in the Prevalence of Child Sexual Abuse, Its Risk Factors, and Their Associations as a Function of Age Cohort in a Finnish Population Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laaksonen, Toni; Sariola, Heikki; Johansson, Ada; Jern, Patrick; Varjonen, Markus; von der Pahlen, Bettina; Sandnabba, N. Kenneth; Santtila, Pekka

    2011-01-01

    Objective: We examined (1) the prevalence of childhood sexual abuse (CSA) experiences as a function of cohort and gender, (2) the prevalence of factors associated with CSA as a function of cohort and whether the association of these factors with CSA remained the same irrespective of cohort, and (3) whether any cohort differences could be…

  1. Neonatal withdrawal from maternal volatile substance abuse.

    OpenAIRE

    Tenenbein, M; Casiro, O. G.; Seshia, M. M.; Debooy, V. D.

    1996-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether neonates born to mothers who are volatile substance abusers are at risk for an abstinence syndrome. METHODS: A consecutive sample of infants born to volatile substance abusing mothers was studied over four years, in a university affiliated medical centre with a variable mix of primary, secondary, and tertiary care patients. Infants were clinically scored with the Finnegan Neonatal Abstinence Scoring System. Those who fulfilled a priori scoring criteria were treated w...

  2. Transtornos mentais como fatores de risco para o desenvolvimento de abuso/dependência de cocaína: estudo caso-controle Mental disorders as risk factors for the development of cocaine abuse/dependence: case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia S Lopes

    1999-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar o papel dos transtornos mentais e da dependência ao álcool como possíveis fatores de risco para o abuso/dependência de cocaína. MÉTODOS: Utilizou-se o desenho caso-controle e a técnica de bola-de-neve (snowball technique para selecionar uma amostra de usuários de cocaína não tratados na comunidade (casos e parear casos e controles por sexo, idade e amizade. A coleta de dados foi feita através da utilização do questionário CIDI (Composite International Diagnostic Interview que gera diagnósticos de acordo com os critérios do Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-III-R. A análise dos dados foi feita através de regressão logística condicional. RESULTADOS: O estudo incluiu 208 indivíduos. Os principais resultados mostraram que história passada de dependência ao álcool era o principal fator associado a um aumento no risco de desenvolvimento de abuso de cocaína (OR=15,1; IC 95% 3,8-60,2; nenhum outro transtorno mental isolado manteve-se significativamente associado ao aumento deste risco após a análise multivariada. Aumento no risco de abuso de cocaína também foi encontrado entre os indivíduos que relataram pensamentos suicidas (OR=3,1; IC 95% 0,91-10,8, sugerindo associação entre quadros mais graves de depressão e abuso de cocaína. CONCLUSÕES: Esses achados sugerem que os programas voltados para a prevenção e tratamento do abuso de cocaína devem estar preparados para o manejo de questões relacionadas à co-morbidade do abuso de drogas com o álcool e outros distúrbios psiquiátricos.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the role of psychiatric disorders and alcohol dependence as possible risk factors for cocaine abuse/dependence. METHODS: The case-control study used the "snowball" technique in order to select untreated cocaine users (cases and to match sex, age and friendship. Information was gathered using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI, and computer diagnosis were

  3. 女性吸毒者艾滋病相关知识及高危性行为调查%Investigation on AIDS related knowledge and high risk sex behaviors among female drug abusers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王玮; 任桂秋; 肇恒伟; 赵子阳

    2012-01-01

    Objective; To understand the awareness situation of AIDS related knowledge and high risk sex behaviors among female drug abusers. Methods: Stratified random cluster sampling method and questionnaire survey were used to investigate 236 female drug abusers in Liaoning province, 1: 1 matched case - control study was carried out, female prison inmates during the same period were selected as control group, then they were surveyed by a questionnaire, Logistic regression analysis was used to analyze the influencing factors of high risk sex behaviors among female drug abusers. Results: The mean correct awareness rate of AIDS related knowledge among female drug abusers was 57. 6% , 69. 9% of the respondents had multiple sexual partners, and 69. 1% of the respondents never used condom; the results of mult-ivariate Logistic regression analysis showed that the scores of intravenous drug abuse and basic knowledge of AIDS were low, the respondents with low positive attitude to condom were easily to have high risk sex behaviors. Conclusion: The female drug abusers had misunderstanding toward AIDS related knowledge and attitudes, it is necessary to carry out interventional strategies targeting to their high risk sex behaviors.%目的:了解女性吸毒者艾滋病相关知识的知晓情况和高危性行为情况.方法:采用分层、随机、整群抽样相结合的方法对辽宁省236例女性吸毒者进行问卷调查,同时采用1:1病例对照研究方法,选择同期调查中女性监所服刑人员作为对照进行问卷调查,应用Logistic回归分析对女性吸毒者高危性行为的影响因素进行分析.结果:女性吸毒者艾滋病相关知识平均答对率为57.6%,69.9%的调查者与多个性伙伴发生性行为,69.1%的调查者从未使用安全套;多因素Logistic回归结果显示,静脉注射吸毒、艾滋病基本知识得分低,以及对安全套正性态度较低者更容易发生高危性行为.结论:女性吸毒者对艾滋病相关

  4. Skin manifestations of child abuse

    OpenAIRE

    Ermertcan Aylin; Ertan Pelin

    2010-01-01

    Child abuse is a major public health problem all over the world. There are four major types of abuse: physical abuse, sexual abuse, emotional abuse and neglect. The most common manifestations of child abuse are cutaneous and their recognition; and differential diagnosis is of great importance. Clinicians, especially dermatologists, should be alert about the skin lesions of child abuse. In the diagnosis and management of child abuse, a multidisciplinary approach with ethical and legal procedur...

  5. Benzodiazepine effect of {sup 125}I-iomazenil-benzodiazepine receptor binding and serum corticosterone level in a rat model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukumitsu, Nobuyoshi [Proton Medical Research Center, University of Tsukuba, Ibaragi, 305-8575 (Japan)]. E-mail: gzl13162@nifty.ne.jp; Ogi, Shigeyuki [Department of Radiology, Jikei University School of Medicine, Tokyo, 105-8461 (Japan); Uchiyama, Mayuki [Department of Radiology, Jikei University School of Medicine, Tokyo, 105-8461 (Japan); Mori, Yutaka [Department of Radiology, Jikei University School of Medicine, Tokyo, 105-8461 (Japan)

    2005-01-01

    To test the change in free or unoccupied benzodiazepine receptor (BZR) density in response to diazepam, we investigated {sup 125}I-iomazenil ({sup 125}I-IMZ) binding and serum corticosterone levels in a rat model. Wistar male rats, which received psychological stress using a communication box for 5 days, were divided into two groups according to the amount of administered diazepam: no diazepam [D (0)] group and 10 mg/kg per day [D (10)] group of 12 rats each. The standardized uptake value (SUV) of {sup 125}I-IMZ of the D (10) group were significantly lower (P<.05) than those of the D (0) group in the frontal, parietal and temporal cortices, globus pallidus, hippocampus, amygdala and hypothalamus. The serum corticosterone level ratio in the D (10) group was significantly lower than that in the D (0) group (P<.05). From the change in serum corticosterone levels, diazepam attenuated the psychological stress produced by the physical stress to animals in adjacent compartments. From the reduced binding of {sup 125}I-IMZ, it is clear that diazepam competed with endogenous ligand for the free BZR sites, and the frontal, parietal and temporal cortices, globus pallidus, hippocampus, amygdala and hypothalamus are important areas in which {sup 125}I-IMZ binding is strongly affected by administration of diazepam.

  6. Benzodiazepine use in medical out-patient clinics: a study from a developing country

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To estimate the prevalence of Benzodiazepine use in the outpatient setting of general medicine clinics at a single tertiary care centre. Methods: The prospective prevalence study was conducted in the outpatient setting of Internal Medicine Clinics at Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, from November to December 2009. All subjects were interviewed after informed consent and variables were recorded on a specially-designed proforma. Apart from basic demographics and comorbid conditions, duration, frequency and route of benzodiazepine use, as well as the reason and who initiated it was noted. Chi-square test and t test was applied to see the association of socio demographic or clinical factors with the use of benzodiazepine. Results: Of the 355 patients, 129 (36.33%) reported using the drug. The majority (n=86; 24.2%) were taking it on a daily basis. The highest numbers of patients using the drug were suffering from cardiovascular problems, 32 (25%) followed by 22 (17%) from endocrinology. Diazepam equivalent dose was around 7.04+-4, with a inter-quartile range of 3-96 weeks. Alprazolam (9%) was the most frequently prescribed Benzodiazepine. Conclusion: Benzodiazepine use is alarmingly high in the outpatient clinics of General Internal Medicine Department. There is no implementation of law to prevent its hazardous sale. In this regard all concerned should work collectively for awareness and irrational drug sale and use. (author)

  7. Child abuse - physical

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001552.htm Child abuse - physical To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Physical child abuse is a serious problem. Here are some facts: ...

  8. Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... their drinking causes distress and harm. It includes alcoholism and alcohol abuse. Alcoholism, or alcohol dependence, is a disease that causes ... groups. NIH: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

  9. Who Owns Child Abuse?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald Cradock

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Expectations of contemporary child protection apparatuses are strongly influenced by beliefs inherited from the nineteenth century child rescue movement. In particular, the belief that child abuse determination is obvious. However, this assumption fails to make a distinction between nineteenth century’s emphasis on impoverished environments and the twentieth century introduction of the pathological child abuser. Moreover, the proliferation of kinds of child abuse, and the need to distinguish child abusers from non-abusers, means knowledge is now spread across an array of disciplines and professions, which necessarily destabilizes the definition of child abuse. The increasing exposure of alternate care systems as potentially abusive has similarly destabilized the old common sense solution to neglected children—namely removal. Finally, as uncertainty increases, and definitions become more divergent, the question of what child abuse is, and what should be done about it, becomes increasingly politicized.

  10. Prescription Drug Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... what the doctor prescribed, it is called prescription drug abuse. It could be Taking a medicine that ... purpose, such as getting high Abusing some prescription drugs can lead to addiction. These include narcotic painkillers, ...

  11. Abuse during Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... partner may try to hurt your body. This physical abuse can include hitting, slapping, kicking, choking, pushing or ... your unborn baby in grave danger. During pregnancy, physical abuse can lead to miscarriage and vaginal bleeding . It ...

  12. Prescription Drug Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a drug abuser aggressive or paranoid. Although stimulant abuse might not lead to physical dependence and withdrawal, the feelings these drugs give people can cause them to use the drugs more and more ...

  13. Parental sexual abuse and suicidal behaviour among women with major depressive disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Çankaya, Banu; Talbot, Nancy L.; Ward, Erin A.; Duberstein, Paul R.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Women with major depressive disorder (MDD) and childhood sexual abuse histories have an increased risk for suicidal behaviours, but it is unclear whether specific abuse characteristics contribute to risk. We aimed to examine the contributions of abuse characteristics to lifetime history of suicide attempts and multiple suicide attempts, independent of posttraumatic stress disorder and borderline personality disorder. Method: Women with MDD and sexual abuse histories (n = 106) w...

  14. Exploring the belief systems of domestic abuse victims using Smallest Space Analysis (SSA)

    OpenAIRE

    Spruin, E.; Alleyne, E.; Baker, R.; Papadaki, I.; Franz, A.

    2016-01-01

    Research exploring domestic abuse victims has primarily focused on the shorter term avenues of support for victims and the risk factors which put women at risk of victimization. There is limited research exploring the belief systems of domestically abused women that need to be targeted to achieve longer term effects. The present study therefore explored the association between the beliefs of abused women and their experiences as victims. Twenty-one women with a history of domestic abuse were ...

  15. Drug and Substance Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are common in later life. The Most Common Types of Drug and Substance Abuse Prescription and Over-the-Counter Medications Abuse Among ... older population than in younger people. But, other types of substance abuse, such as inappropriate use of prescription and over- ...

  16. Child Abuse and Neglect

    OpenAIRE

    Yaşar Tıraşçı; Süleyman Gören

    2007-01-01

    Child abuse is the physical or psychological maltreatment of a child by an adult. In recent years, the affinity and aware of child abuse have been increased in Turkey. But, it is not enough. The purpose of this article was to defined child abuse and to attract attention of population and medical worker.

  17. Preventing Child Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvy, Kerby T.

    1975-01-01

    Focuses on two major and general approaches to analyzing the problems of child abuse; briefly discusses the prevention implications; deals with the individual physical abuse of children, with particular emphasis on the relationship between theoretical formulations of the causes of individual physical abuse and preventative programs; and, finally,…

  18. Prolonged-release melatonin versus placebo for benzodiazepine discontinuation in patients with schizophrenia: a randomized clinical trial - the SMART trial protocol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baandrup, Lone; Fagerlund, Birgitte; Jennum, Poul; Lublin, Henrik; Hansen, Jane L; Winkel, Per; Gluud, Christian Nyfeldt; Oranje, Bob; Glenthoj, Birte Y

    2011-01-01

    Treatment of schizophrenia frequently includes prolonged benzodiazepine administration despite a lack of evidence of its use. It is often difficult to discontinue benzodiazepines because of the development of dependence. We aim to assess if melatonin can facilitate the withdrawal of prolonged...... benzodiazepine administration in patients with schizophrenia. Furthermore, we aim to investigate the association of benzodiazepine dose reduction with the following clinically important variables: sleep, psychophysiology, cognition, social function, and quality of life....

  19. Prolonged-release melatonin versus placebo for benzodiazepine discontinuation in patients with schizophrenia: a randomized clinical trial - the SMART trial protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Oranje Bob; Gluud Christian; Winkel Per; Hansen Jane L; Lublin Henrik; Jennum Poul; Fagerlund Birgitte; Baandrup Lone; Glenthoj Birte Y

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Treatment of schizophrenia frequently includes prolonged benzodiazepine administration despite a lack of evidence of its use. It is often difficult to discontinue benzodiazepines because of the development of dependence. We aim to assess if melatonin can facilitate the withdrawal of prolonged benzodiazepine administration in patients with schizophrenia. Furthermore, we aim to investigate the association of benzodiazepine dose reduction with the following clinically importa...

  20. An approach to assessing elder abuse and neglect in the dental office.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osei, Anthony D

    2009-07-01

    Elder abuse and neglect is a complex phenomenon with no clear markers identified as both reliable and valid in the dental operatory. Applying the concepts and definition of abuse and attention to risk factors for abuse could lead the clinician, as the head of the care team to situations where abuse of an elder could be suspected. Once abuse is suspected, direct questioning and comprehensive assessment of an elders' physical, emotional, and emotional state could be recorded as part of social history in their dental records. A multidisciplinary team approach is encouraged to combat elder abuse. In Texas, state statutes on suspected abuse mandate reporting to appropriate Adult Protective Services within your region with stipulated penalties for failure to report suspected abuse or neglect. Elder abuse hotlines are (800) 252-5400 or (512) 834-3784 (elder abuse domestic or community). PMID:19753814

  1. Nurses' attitudes toward emotional, sexual, and physical abusers of children with disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, M P; Seidl, A; Pillitteri, A; Smith, C

    1994-01-01

    Some studies have linked birth defects, disability, and chronic illness with an increased incidence of child abuse. Nurses who are involved with disabled children face a challenge in preventing child abuse and intervening in cases in which abuse has occurred. Nurse must become aware of the risk factors and signs of abuse, understand the role of their personal attitudes toward abuse and abusers, and develop the skills to intervene effectively and deal with abusers. Thus, the authors of this article undertook a study to ascertain nurses' attitudes about emotional, sexual, and physical abuse of children with disabilities and to determine if nurses' anticipated level of comfort differed when dealing with abusers of children with disabilities in contrast to abusers of children without disabilities. PMID:7831522

  2. Binding of [3H]ethyl-β-carboline-3-carboxylate to brain benzodiazepine receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is reported that in contrast to the changes in affinity of [3H]benzodiazepines elicited by halide ions, barbiturates, and pyrazolopyridines, the apparent affinity of β-[3H]CCE (ethyl-β-carboline-3-carboxylate) is unaffected by these agents. Furthermore, Scatchard analysis of β-[3H]CCE binding to cerebral cortical and cerebellar membranes revealed a significantly greater number of binding sites than was observed with either [3H]diazepam or [3H]flunitazepam, suggesting that at low concentrations benzodiazepines selectively label a subpopulation of the receptors labelled with β-[3H]CCE. Alternatively, β-[3H]CCE may bind to sites that are distinct from those labelled with [3H]-benzodiazepines. (Auth.)

  3. Early ontogeny of the central benzodiazepine receptor in human embryos and fetuses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hebebrand, J.; Hofmann, D.; Reichelt, R.; Schnarr, S.; Knapp, M.; Propping, P.; Foedisch, H.J.

    1988-01-01

    The early ontogeny of the central benzodiazepine receptor (BZR) was investigated in human embryos and fetuses between 7 and 26 weeks of gestation. Brain tissue was gained from terminated pregnancies or spontaneous abortions. Binding studies, which were performed with /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam (FNZ), revealed that specific benzodiazepine binding is already detectable at an embryonal age of 7 weeks post conception. Binding at this early stage can be displaced potently by clonazepam and the inverse agonist ..beta..-CCE. Additionally, /sup 3/H-FNZ binding is enhanced by GABA. Thus, benzodiazepine binding is of the central type. Receptor density increases steeply in whole brain between weeks 8 and 11 of gestation. In frontal cortex receptor density increases gradually between weeks 12 and 26 of gestation. No specific fetal disease entity (including trisomy 21) was consistently associated with exceptionally high or low B/sub max/-values.

  4. Early ontogeny of the central benzodiazepine receptor in human embryos and fetuses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The early ontogeny of the central benzodiazepine receptor (BZR) was investigated in human embryos and fetuses between 7 and 26 weeks of gestation. Brain tissue was gained from terminated pregnancies or spontaneous abortions. Binding studies, which were performed with 3H-flunitrazepam (FNZ), revealed that specific benzodiazepine binding is already detectable at an embryonal age of 7 weeks post conception. Binding at this early stage can be displaced potently by clonazepam and the inverse agonist β-CCE. Additionally, 3H-FNZ binding is enhanced by GABA. Thus, benzodiazepine binding is of the central type. Receptor density increases steeply in whole brain between weeks 8 and 11 of gestation. In frontal cortex receptor density increases gradually between weeks 12 and 26 of gestation. No specific fetal disease entity (including trisomy 21) was consistently associated with exceptionally high or low B/sub max/-values

  5. Chronic caffeine or theophylline exposure reduces gamma-aminobutyric acid/benzodiazepine receptor site interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca, D J; Schiller, G D; Farb, D H

    1988-05-01

    Methylxanthines, such as caffeine and theophylline, are adenosine receptor antagonists that exert dramatic effects upon the behavior of vertebrate animals by increasing attentiveness, anxiety, and convulsive activity. Benzodiazepines, such as flunitrazepam, generally exert behavioral effects that are opposite to those of methylxanthines. We report the finding that chronic exposure of embryonic brain neurons to caffeine or theophylline reduces the ability of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) to potentiate the binding of [3H]flunitrazepam to the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor. This theophylline-induced "uncoupling" of GABA- and benzodiazepine-binding site allosteric interactions is blocked by chloroadenosine, an adenosine receptor agonist, indicating that the chronic effects of theophylline are mediated by a site that resembles an adenosine receptor. We speculate that adverse central nervous system effects of long-term exposure to methylxanthines such as in caffeine-containing beverages or theophylline-containing medications may be exerted by a cell-mediated modification of the GABAA receptor. PMID:2835648

  6. Study protocol for a group randomized controlled trial of a classroom-based intervention aimed at preventing early risk factors for drug abuse: integrating effectiveness and implementation research

    OpenAIRE

    Keegan Natalie; Windham Amy; Ford Carla; Brown C Hendricks; Kellam Sheppard; Poduska Jeanne; Wang Wei

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background While a number of preventive interventions delivered within schools have shown both short-term and long-term impact in epidemiologically based randomized field trials, programs are not often sustained with high-quality implementation over time. This study was designed to support two purposes. The first purpose was to test the effectiveness of a universal classroom-based intervention, the Whole Day First Grade Program (WD), aimed at two early antecedents to drug abuse and o...

  7. Strategies and Outcomes of HIV Status Disclosure in HIV-Positive Young Women with Abuse Histories

    OpenAIRE

    Clum, Gretchen A.; Czaplicki, Lauren; Andrinopoulos, Katherine; Muessig, Kathryn; Hamvas, L.; Ellen, Jonathan M.

    2013-01-01

    Young women with HIV and histories of physical and/or sexual abuse in childhood may be vulnerable to difficulties with disclosure to sexual partners. Abuse in childhood is highly prevalent in HIV-positive women, and has been associated with poorer communication, low assertiveness, low self worth, and increased risk for sexual and other risk behaviors that increase the risk of secondary transmission of HIV. HIV disclosure may be an important link between abuse and sexual risk behaviors. Qualit...

  8. Inhalant Abuse and Dextromethorphan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storck, Michael; Black, Laura; Liddell, Morgan

    2016-07-01

    Inhalant abuse is the intentional inhalation of a volatile substance for the purpose of achieving an altered mental state. As an important, yet underrecognized form of substance abuse, inhalant abuse crosses all demographic, ethnic, and socioeconomic boundaries, causing significant morbidity and mortality in school-aged and older children. This review presents current perspectives on epidemiology, detection, and clinical challenges of inhalant abuse and offers advice regarding the medical and mental health providers' roles in the prevention and management of this substance abuse problem. Also discussed is the misuse of a specific "over-the-counter" dissociative, dextromethorphan. PMID:27338970

  9. Child Abuse in India

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Reza Iravani

    2011-01-01

    Child abuse is harm to, or neglect of, a child by another person, whether adult or child. Child abuse happens in all cultural, ethnic, and income groups. Child abuse can be physical, emotional - verbal, sexual or through neglect. Abuse may cause serious injury to the child and may even result in death. A problem that is only beginning to come into light in India rape, sexual abuse, and sexual harassment are worldwide issues of gender violence. There is very little research done in this area i...

  10. Demographic and clinical profile of substance abusing women seeking treatment at a de-addiction center in north India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naresh Nebhinani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the recent decades increasing number of women have been seeking deaddiction services. Despite that the report data is very limited from India. Objectives: The present research aimed to study the demographic and clinical profile of women seeking deaddiction treatment at a tertiary care center in North India. Materials and Methods: Retrospective structured chart review of 100 women substance abusers seeking treatment at a deaddiction center between September 1978 and December 2011. Results: A typical case was of 36.3 years age, married (65%, urban (61%, nuclear family (59% based housewife (56%, with good to fair social support (69%. The commonest substance of abuse was tobacco (60%, followed by opioids (27%, alcohol (15%, and benzodiazepines (13%. The common reasons for initiation of substance use were to alleviate frustration or stress (49% and curiosity (37%. Family history of drug dependence (43%, comorbidity (25%, and impairments in health (74%, family (57%, and social domains (56% were common. Only a third of the sample paid one or more follow visit, and of those 58% were abstinent at the last follow-up. Significant predictors identified were being non-Hindu and higher educational years for abstinent status at follow-up. Conclusion: The common substances of abuse were tobacco, opioids, and alcohol and benzodiazepines; and family history of drug abuse and comorbidity were common. The follow-up and outcome were generally poor. This profile gives us some clues to address a hidden health problem of the community.

  11. Bridging the gap between education and appropriate use of benzodiazepines in psychiatric clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dell’Osso B

    2015-07-01

    Public Health, Clinical and Molecular Medicine, Unit of Psychiatry, University of Cagliari, Cagliari, 18Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Psychiatric Division, University of Insubria, Varese, 19Department of Neurosciences, Mental Health and Sensory Organs, Suicide Prevention Center, Sant’ Andrea Hospital, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, 20Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, Bologna University, Bologna, 21Section of Psychiatry, Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Verona, Verona, Italy *These authors contributed equally as first authors Abstract: More than half a century after their discovery, benzodiazepines (BDZs still represent one of the largest and most widely prescribed groups of psychotropic compounds, not only in clinical psychiatry but also in the entire medical field. Over the last two decades, however, there has been an increased focus on the development of antidepressants and antipsychotics on the part of the pharmaceutical industry, clinicians, and researchers, with a reduced interest in BDZs, in spite of their widespread clinical use. As a consequence, many psychiatric residents, medical students, nurses, and other mental health professionals might receive poor academic teaching and training regarding these agents, and have the false impression that BDZs represent an outdated chapter in clinical psychopharmacology. However, recent advances in the field, including findings concerning epidemiology, addiction risk, and drug interactions, as well as the introduction of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition with related diagnostic changes, strongly encourage an updated appraisal of the use of BDZs in clinical practice. During a recent thematic event convened with the aim of approaching this topic in a critical manner, a group of young Italian psychiatrists attempted to highlight possible flaws in current teaching pathways, identify the main clinical pros and cons

  12. Gender and racial/ethnic differences in addiction severity, HIV risk, and quality of life among adults in opioid detoxification: results from the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce Burchett

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Li-Tzy Wu1,2, Walter Ling3, Bruce Burchett1, Dan G Blazer1,2, Jack Shostak2, George E Woody41Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, School of Medicine, 2Duke Clinical Research Institute, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA; 3David Geffen School of Medicine, NPI/Integrated Substance Abuse Programs, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 4Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania and Treatment Research Institute, Philadelphia, PA, USAPurpose: Detoxification often serves as an initial contact for treatment and represents an opportunity for engaging patients in aftercare to prevent relapse. However, there is limited information concerning clinical profiles of individuals seeking detoxification, and the opportunity to engage patients in detoxification for aftercare often is missed. This study examined clinical profiles of a geographically diverse sample of opioid-dependent adults in detoxification to discern the treatment needs of a growing number of women and whites with opioid addiction and to inform interventions aimed at improving use of aftercare or rehabilitation.Methods: The sample included 343 opioid-dependent patients enrolled in two national multisite studies of the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network (CTN001-002. Patients were recruited from 12 addiction treatment programs across the nation. Gender and racial/ethnic differences in addiction severity, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV risk, and quality of life were examined.Results: Women and whites were more likely than men and African Americans to have greater psychiatric and family/social relationship problems and report poorer health-related quality of life and functioning. Whites and Hispanics exhibited higher levels of total HIV risk scores and risky injection drug use scores than African Americans, and Hispanics showed a higher level of unprotected sexual behaviors than whites. African Americans were

  13. Pattern of benzodiazepine use in psychiatric outpatients in Pakistan: a cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haider Imran

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Benzodiazepines (BDZ are the largest-selling drug group in the world. The potential of dependence with BDZ has been known for almost three decades now. In countries like Pakistan where laws against unlicensed sale of BDZ are not implemented vigorously the risk of misuse of and dependence on these drugs is even higher. Previous studies have shown that BDZ prevalence among patients/visitors to general outpatient clinics in Pakistan may be as high as 30%. However, no research has been carried out on the prevalence of BDZ use in psychiatric patients in Pakistan. Methods We carried out a cross-sectional survey over 3 months in psychiatry outpatient clinics of two tertiary care hospitals in Karachi and Lahore. Besides basic socio-demographic data the participants were asked if they were taking a BDZ at present and if yes, the frequency, route and dosage of the drug, who had initiated the drug and why it had been prescribed. We used chi-square test and t-test to find out which socio-demographic or clinical factors were associated with an increased risk of BDZ use. We used Logistic Regression to find out which variable(s best predicted the increased likelihood of BDZ use. Results Out of a total of 419 participants 187 (45% of the participants had been currently using at least one BDZ. Seventy-three percent of the users had been using the drug for 4 weeks or longer and 87% were taking it every day. In 90% of cases the BDZ had been initiated by a doctor, who was a psychiatrist in 70% of the cases. Female gender, increasing age, living in Lahore, and having seen a psychiatrist before, were associated with an increased likelihood of using BDZ. Conclusion The study shows how high BDZ use is in psychiatric outpatients in Pakistan. Most of the users were taking it for a duration and with a frequency which puts them at risk of becoming dependent on BDZ. In most of the cases it had been initiated by a doctor. Both patients and doctors need to

  14. Understanding the Diverse Needs of Children whose Parents Abuse Substances

    OpenAIRE

    Solis, Jessica M.; Shadur, Julia M.; Burns, Alison R.; Hussong, Andrea M.

    2012-01-01

    In this review, we consider the potential service needs of children of substance abusing parents based on what we know about the risk outcomes faced by these children and the parenting deficits often present in these families. Importantly, our review does not address the etiological role of parental substance abuse in children's negative outcomes but instead we discuss the complex inter-related risk factors that often co-occur with and exacerbate risk associated with parental alcohol and drug...

  15. Using [(11)C]Ro15 4513 PET to characterise GABA-benzodiazepine receptors in opiate addiction: Similarities and differences with alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingford-Hughes, Anne; Myers, James; Watson, Ben; Reid, Alastair G; Kalk, Nicola; Feeney, Adrian; Hammers, Alexander; Riaño-Barros, Daniela A; McGinnity, Colm J; Taylor, Lindsay G; Rosso, Lula; Brooks, David J; Turkheimer, Federico; Nutt, David J

    2016-05-15

    The importance of the GABA-benzodiazepine receptor complex and its subtypes are increasingly recognised in addiction. Using the α1/α5 benzodiazepine receptor PET radioligand [(11)C]Ro15 4513, we previously showed reduced binding in the nucleus accumbens and hippocampus in abstinent alcohol dependence. We proposed that reduced [(11)C]Ro15 4513 binding in the nucleus accumbens was a marker of addiction whilst the reduction in hippocampus and positive relationship with memory was a consequence of chronic alcohol abuse. To examine this further we assessed [(11)C]Ro15 4513 binding in another addiction, opiate dependence, and used spectral analysis to estimate contributions of α1 and α5 subtypes to [(11)C]Ro15 4513 binding in opiate and previously acquired alcohol-dependent groups. Opiate substitute maintained opiate-dependent men (n=12) underwent an [(11)C]Ro15 4513 PET scan and compared with matched healthy controls (n=13). We found a significant reduction in [(11)C]Ro15 4513 binding in the nucleus accumbens in the opiate-dependent compared with the healthy control group. There was no relationship between [(11)C]Ro15 4513 binding in the hippocampus with memory. We found that reduced [(11)C]Ro15 4513 binding was associated with reduced α5 but not α1 subtypes in the opiate-dependent group. This was also seen in an alcohol-dependent group where an association between memory performance and [(11)C]Ro15 4513 binding was primarily driven by α5 and not α1 subtype. We suggest that reduced α5 levels in the nucleus accumbens are associated with addiction since we have now shown this in dependence to two pharmacologically different substances, alcohol and opiates. PMID:26876472

  16. Using [11C]Ro15 4513 PET to characterise GABA-benzodiazepine receptors in opiate addiction: Similarities and differences with alcoholism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingford-Hughes, Anne; Myers, James; Watson, Ben; Reid, Alastair G.; Kalk, Nicola; Feeney, Adrian; Hammers, Alexander; Riaño-Barros, Daniela A.; McGinnity, Colm J.; Taylor, Lindsay G.; Rosso, Lula; Brooks, David J.; Turkheimer, Federico; Nutt, David J.

    2016-01-01

    The importance of the GABA-benzodiazepine receptor complex and its subtypes are increasingly recognised in addiction. Using the α1/α5 benzodiazepine receptor PET radioligand [11C]Ro15 4513, we previously showed reduced binding in the nucleus accumbens and hippocampus in abstinent alcohol dependence. We proposed that reduced [11C]Ro15 4513 binding in the nucleus accumbens was a marker of addiction whilst the reduction in hippocampus and positive relationship with memory was a consequence of chronic alcohol abuse. To examine this further we assessed [11C]Ro15 4513 binding in another addiction, opiate dependence, and used spectral analysis to estimate contributions of α1 and α5 subtypes to [11C]Ro15 4513 binding in opiate and previously acquired alcohol-dependent groups. Opiate substitute maintained opiate-dependent men (n = 12) underwent an [11C]Ro15 4513 PET scan and compared with matched healthy controls (n = 13). We found a significant reduction in [11C]Ro15 4513 binding in the nucleus accumbens in the opiate-dependent compared with the healthy control group. There was no relationship between [11C]Ro15 4513 binding in the hippocampus with memory. We found that reduced [11C]Ro15 4513 binding was associated with reduced α5 but not α1 subtypes in the opiate-dependent group. This was also seen in an alcohol-dependent group where an association between memory performance and [11C]Ro15 4513 binding was primarily driven by α5 and not α1 subtype. We suggest that reduced α5 levels in the nucleus accumbens are associated with addiction since we have now shown this in dependence to two pharmacologically different substances, alcohol and opiates. PMID:26876472

  17. Determination of co-administrated opioids and benzodiazepines in urine using column-switching solid-phase extraction and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Lingjuan; Wang, Rong; Liang, Chen; Teng, Xiaomei; Jiang, Fengli; Zeng, Libo; Ye, Haiying; Ni, Chunfang; Yuan, Xiaoliang; Rao, Yulan; Zhang, Yurong

    2015-05-22

    Co-administration of opioids with benzodiazepines is very common around the world. A semi-automated method was developed for the determination of four opioids and two benzodiazepines as well as their metabolites (including glucuronide metabolites) in human urine, based on on-line column-switching-solid-phase extraction (CS-SPE) and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The CS-SPE was performed by loading 200μL of urine sample to an Oasis HLB cartridge. Detection was achieved using a LC-MS/MS system equipped with an electrospray ionization source (ESI). For unequivocal identification and confirmation, two selected reaction monitoring transitions were registered for each compound, and no co-elution of interferences was observed at the expected retention time. Significant ion suppressions were observed for most analytes during chromatographic runs, but isotope-labeled internal standards (ISs) were used and found to be useful to compensate for the determination error caused by the matrix effect. The assay's linearity ranged from 1-20ng/mL to 800-1000ng/mL for 23 compounds, except for lorazepam (LOR), whose linearity was in the range of 1-100ng/mL. This method showed to be precise and accurate. The relative standard deviation (RSD) % values of within-run precision, between-run precision and total precision were not greater than 10.4% (n=3), 12.9% (n=5) and 15.1% (n=15), respectively. Accuracy values were in the range of 87.5-110%. Limits of detection (LODs) ranged from 0.2ng/mL to 5ng/mL, and limits of quantification (LOQs) ranged from 1ng/mL to 20ng/mL. The method was applied to the assay of 12 samples from forensic cases, which exemplified the co-administration of benzodiazepines (BZDs) by some heroin abusers. This method was of high sensitivity, selectivity and reliability, minimum sample manipulation, semi-automation, and fairly high throughput (analysis time per sample was 20min). The method developed will be useful for the detection of co

  18. First steps: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial of the effectiveness of the Group Family Nurse Partnership (gFNP) program compared to routine care in improving outcomes for high-risk mothers and their children and preventing abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Evidence from the USA suggests that the home-based Family Nurse Partnership program (FNP), extending from early pregnancy until infants are 24 months, can reduce the risk of child abuse and neglect throughout childhood. FNP is now widely available in the UK. A new variant, Group Family Nurse Partnership (gFNP) offers similar content but in a group context and for a shorter time, until infants are 12 months old. Each group comprises 8 to 12 women with similar expected delivery dates and their partners. Its implementation has been established but there is no evidence of its effectiveness. Methods/Design The study comprises a multi-site randomized controlled trial designed to identify the benefits of gFNP compared to standard care. Participants (not eligible for FNP) must be either aged after the collection of baseline information. Researchers are blind to group assignment. The primary outcomes at 12 months are child abuse potential based on the revised Adult-Adolescent Parenting Inventory and parent/infant interaction coded using the CARE Index based on a video-taped interaction. Secondary outcomes are maternal depression, parenting stress, health related quality of life, social support, and use of services. Discussion This is the first study of the effectiveness of gFNP in the UK. Results should inform decision-making about its delivery alongside universal services, potentially enabling a wider range of families to benefit from the FNP curriculum and approach to supporting parenting. Trial registration ISRCTN78814904. PMID:24011061

  19. Alcohol abuse and postoperative morbidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tønnesen, Hanne

    2003-01-01

    patients admitted to surgery should be offered a health promoting dialogue with the surgeon, anaesthesiologist, general practitioner, or other health professionals, which focuses on alcohol among other risk factors in relation to the operative treatment, diagnosis and prognosis. A beneficial effect......Patients who drink too much have more complications after surgery. The aim of this thesis was to evaluate the evidence, possible mechanisms, and prevention of the increased postoperative morbidity in alcohol abusers, defined by a consumption of at least five drinks per day. The literature could...... be criticised for several methodological flaws. Nevertheless, the results are in agreement showing moderate to strong evidence of increased postoperative morbidity after surgical procedures on alcohol abusers. There is weak to moderate evidence of increased postoperative mortality, hospital stay, and re...

  20. Adolescent Substance Abuse: A Comprehensive Approach to Prevention Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wodarski, John S.; Smyth, Nancy J.

    1994-01-01

    Presents data on the extent, nature, and consequences of adolescent substance abuse. Definition of substance abuse is considered. Discusses primary and secondary prevention programs, including programs targeting high-risk youth, school and peer group, families, and communities. Outlines tertiary prevention efforts and emphasizes the need for…

  1. Sexual abuse of children in residential care : an international review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmerman, Margaretha; Schreuder, Pauline

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports the results of an international review of academic literature on sexual abuse in residential child and youth care, 1945-2011. The review focusses on questions related to the nature and scope of sexual abuse, on personal and institutional factors providing either protection or risk

  2. Educational Attainment and Child Abuse Potential: Implications for Adult Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Sandy; Seibel, Donnie

    1990-01-01

    Analysis of data from 138 women, infants, children participants who completed Child Abuse Potential Inventory showed mothers with higher educational attainment appeared less likely to be abusive regardless of such factors as low income, single parenthood, or large family size. Mothers who did not complete high school were at greater risk for…

  3. Drug Abuse in the Military: An Adolescent Misbehavior Problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beary, John F.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Describes drug abuse in the military. Survey data of military personnel (N=15,268) revealed that single, enlisted males under age 25 were the population most at risk. Alcohol and cannabis were the most common substances of abuse. Some work impairment and dependence were reported but were not typical. (Author/JAC)

  4. Ambivalence of Nonoffending Guardians after Child Sexual Abuse Disclosure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolen, Rebecca M.; Lamb, J. Leah

    2004-01-01

    A concern in the intervention with sexually abused children is the support of their nonoffending guardians after disclosure of the abuse. Approximately a third of nonoffending guardians respond with vacillation in support, and these nonoffending guardians are at greater risk for having their children removed. This article reconceptualizes…

  5. Association of Childhood Abuse with Homeless Women's Social Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Harold D., Jr.; Tucker, Joan S.; Wenzel, Suzanne L.; Golinelli, Daniela; Kennedy, David P.; Ryan, Gery W.; Zhou, Annie J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Childhood abuse has been linked to negative sequelae for women later in life including drug and alcohol use and violence as victim or perpetrator and may also affect the development of women's social networks. Childhood abuse is prevalent among at-risk populations of women (such as the homeless) and thus may have a stronger impact on…

  6. 氨酚羟考酮依赖性及滥用风险分析%Oxycodone and Acetaminophen Dependence and Abuse Risk Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马军丽; 逄立艳; 周立新; 张黎明

    2012-01-01

    Oxycodone hydrochloride is a derivative of morphine. The pharmacological effects of the oxycodone hy— drochloride is similar to morphine. There has been animal experiments show that oxycodone and morphine are similar in strengthening effect, and they have the same potential for psychological dependence. In the United States and Australia, oxycodone products are one of the most common drugs being diverted and abused. Although the single and compound preparations of oxycodone hydrochloride are both likely to cause abuse, In China, oxycodone acetaminophen(oxycodone hydrochloride compound) is managed in accordance with prescription drug, so it is more likely to be lossed and abused compared to the single preparation of oxycodone hydrochloride which is managed in accordance with narcotic drugs. Medical institutions and drug regulatory departments shall strengthen the management and monitoring of oxycodone acetaminophen to prevent loss and abuse.%盐酸羟考酮是盐酸吗啡的衍生物,药理作用与吗啡相似,已有动物实验表明羟考酮与吗啡的强化效应相似,具有相同的精神依赖性潜力.在美国和澳大利亚等国,羟考酮类产品是最常被遭到转移和滥用的药品之一.虽然盐酸羟考酮的单方和复方制剂都有可能引发滥用,但在我国盐酸羟考酮的复方制剂即氨酚羟考酮是按照处方药管理,相对于按照麻醉药品管理的单方制剂流失和滥用的可能性更大.医疗机构和药品监管部门应当加强对氨酚羟考酮的管理和监测,积极避免流失和滥用的发生.

  7. Intimate Partner Violence by Men Abusing and Non-abusing Alcohol in Poland

    OpenAIRE

    Katarzyna Gustaw; Marta Makara-Studzinska

    2007-01-01

    Alcohol use is to one of the most of risk factors for intimate partner violence. The aim of this study was to check the difference of demographic characteristics and type of violence between of the perpetrators with a history of alcohol abuse (A) versus the perpetrators without a history of alcohol abuse (N). Data were obtained from the survey conducted in the office of the Association for Violence Prevention in the city of Lublin, Poland. 400 perpetrators and their victims (400 subjects) wer...

  8. Health risks of alcohol use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcoholism - risks; Alcohol abuse - risks; Alcohol dependence - risks; Risky drinking - risks ... Beer, wine, and liquor all contain alcohol. If you are drinking any of these, you are using alcohol. Your drinking patterns may vary, depending on who you are with ...

  9. Child abuse: multiple foreign bodies in gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadhera, Raman; Kalra, Vijay; Gulati, Sat Paul; Ghai, Anju

    2013-02-01

    The incidents of foreign body ingestion in infants and children are usually viewed as accidents, but these events may be a form of child abuse. We are reporting a case of child abuse who presented with multiple foreign bodies in the gastrointestinal tract. Physicians are required to report abuse when they have reason to believe or to suspect that it occurred. The purpose of reporting is not punishment of the perpetrator - it is the protection of the child. It is certainly in the best interest of the child, because child abuse is a recurrent and usually escalating problem that exposes the child to substantial risk. PMID:23164499

  10. [Drug abuse and adolescence: neurobiology and psychiatric implications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luciani, A; Todini, L; Majorana, M; Orso, L

    2012-07-01

    Drug abuse in adolescence is a main public health concern. About 60% of people who abuse substances is younger than 18 years old. Early addiction increases other drug abuse and it is associated to greater risk in the development of Substance Use Disorders and psychiatric disorders. In the management of adolescent addiction, the awareness of recent researches on alcohol, cannabis, cocaine and methamphetamine abuse, can represent a fundamental tool in terms of prevention, early detection and treatment for clinicians, researches and parents. PMID:23007831

  11. Consequences of early postnatal benzodiazepines exposure in rats. I. Cognitive-like behavior

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mikulecká, Anna; Šubrt, Martin; Stuchlík, Aleš; Kubová, Hana

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 8, Mar 28 (2014), s. 101. ISSN 1662-5153 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069; GA ČR(CZ) GA305/09/0846 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : benzodiazepines * clonazepam * cognitive functions * development * rats Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.270, year: 2014

  12. Determinants of Initiated and Continued Benzodiazepine Use in the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manthey, Leonie; Giltay, Erik J.; van Veen, Tineke; Neven, Arie Knuistingh; Zitman, Frans G.; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Longitudinal research on determinants of initiated and continued benzodiazepine (BZD) use is inconsistent and has identified many possible determinants. It is unclear which of those are most important in the prediction of BZD use. We aimed to identify the most important predictors of ini

  13. Late-Life Benzodiazepine Use among Russian-Speaking Immigrants in Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isralowitz, Richard; Reznik, Alex; Borkin, Sofia

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: In this prospective study, we examine the reasons for benzodiazepine use among Russian-speaking elderly people in Israel, and we discuss issues related to immigrants. We provide information that can be applied to the improvement of age-related health and social services. Design and Methods: During a 6-month period, we interviewed…

  14. Long-Term Benzodiazepine Use and Salivary Cortisol The Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manthey, Leonie; Giltay, Erik J.; van Veen, Tineke; Neven, Arie Knuistingh; Vreeburg, Sophie A.; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; Zitman, Frans G.

    2010-01-01

    Background: As benzodiazepines (BZDs) have anxiolytic effects, it is expected that they influence the stress system. During short-term treatment, BZD use was found to suppress cortisol levels. However, little research has been done on the effects of long-term BZD administration on the hypothalamic-p

  15. Quantitative autoradiography of muscarinic and benzodiazepine receptors in the forebrain of the turtle, Pseudemys scripta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The distribution of muscarinic and benzodiazepine receptors was investigated in the turtle forebrain by the technique of in vitro receptor autoradiography. Muscarinic binding sites were labeled with 1 nM 3H-quinuclidinyl benzilate (3H-QNB), and benzodiazepine sites were demonstrated with the aid of 1 nM 3H-flunitrazepam (3H-FLU). Autoradiograms generated on 3H-Ultrofilm apposed to tissue slices revealed regionally specific distributions of muscarinic and benzodiazepine binding sites that are comparable with those for mammalian brain. Dense benzodiazepine binding was found in the anterior olfactory nucleus, the lateral and dorsal cortices, and the dorsal ventricular ridge (DVR), a structure with no clear mammalian homologue. Muscarinic binding sites were most dense in the striatum, accumbens, DVR, lateral geniculate, and the anterior olfactory nucleus. Cortical binding sites were studied in greater detail by quantitative analysis of autoradiograms generated by using emulsion-coated coverslips. Laminar gradients of binding were observed that were specific for each radioligand; 3H-QNB sites were most dense in the inner molecular layer in all cortical regions, whereas 3H-FLU binding was generally most concentrated in the outer molecular layer and was least dense through all layers in the dorsomedial cortex. Because pyramidal cells are arranged in register in turtle cortex, the laminar patterns of receptor binding may reflect different receptor density gradients along pyramidal cell dendrites

  16. Improved benzodiazepine radioreceptor assay using the MultiScreen (R) Assay System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, MJ; Ensing, K; de Zeeuw, RA

    1999-01-01

    In this article, an improved benzodiazepine radioreceptor assay is described, which allows substantial reduction in assay time, The filtration in this method was performed by using the MultiScreen(R) Assay System. The latter consists of a 96-well plate with glass fibre filters sealed at the bottom,

  17. Comparative Study of Intranasal Midazolam and Intravenous Benzodiazepines in Control of Seizures in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janki Panchal

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Seizures are very common in pediatric patients. As duration of seizures impacts morbidity and mortality to child’s life, control of seizures should be achieved as early as possible, preferably at home. Rectal diazepam and intranasal midazolam are available methods for control of seizures and can be learnt by parents. Methods: We assessed safety and efficacy of intranasal midazolam for control of seizures and also compared its effect with other benzodiazepines given by intravenous route. Results: Among 84 patients, success rate of treatment with Midazolam (intranasal was 45.5% and success rate with Benzodiazepines (intravenous was 90%. The difference is statistically significant. In present study, average time recorded to give drug after arrival at hospital in IN Midazolam group was 0.379 min, where as it was 1.598 min in IV Benzodiazepine group. Average time for cessation of seizures after giving drug was 3.001 min in IN Midazolam group, where as it was 1.009 min in IV Benzodiazepine group. Conclusion: Intra-venous route for control of seizures is most effective compare to Inta-nasal Midazolam. However intranasal Midazolam can be use full when IV access is not available at home or during transport of patient to health care centre. [Natl J of Med Res 2013; 3(1.000: 30-33

  18. Phenylboronic acid catalysed synthesis of 1,5-benzodiazepines via cyclocondensation of -phenylenediamine and ketones

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Santosh V Goswami; Prashant B Thorat; Sudhakar R Bhusare

    2013-07-01

    Phenylboronic acid has been found to be an efficient catalyst for the synthesis of 1,5-benzodiazepine derivatives via cyclocondensation of -phenylenediamine and various ketones in good to excellent yields (82-91%) using acetonitrile as solvent at reflux condition. The remarkable advantages offered by this method are easy mild reaction condition, experimental work up and good to excellent yields of products.

  19. Synthesis and Anticonvulsant Activity of Various Mannich and Schiff Bases of 1,5-Benzodiazepines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surendra N. Pandeya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Benzodiazepines have a various behavioral effects in addition to their anxiolytic action. There is every reason to believe that the BZ/GABA receptor complex is involved in these effects, since GABAmimetic manipulations modify the effect of BZ in tests of convulsive activity, motor function, and appetitive behavior. 1,5-Benzodiazepines are biologically important molecules and are extensively used clinically as analgesic, hypnotic, sedative, and antidepressive agents. Hence, 1,5-Benzodiazepines were synthesized by condensation of o-phenylenediamine and ketones, for example, cyclohexanone and acetone in presence of sulfated zirconia (catalyst. Mannich bases were synthesized with acetophenone, p-nitroacetophenone, p-chloroacetophenone, and formaldehyde. Schiff bases were synthesized using Mannich base of 1,5-benzodiazepines with p-chloroaniline and p-chlorophenylsemicarbazide in the presence of glacial acetic acid. All the synthesized compounds were characterized by 1H NMR and IR spectral analyses. All the synthesized derivatives were evaluated at the dose of 30 mg/kg b.w for anticonvulsant activity by isoniazid induced convulsion model, and the compounds NBZD-3 and NBZD-8 were found to be the most active among all compounds. Among all the synthesized derivatives, compounds NBZD-13 and NBZD-17 were found to be the most active among all compounds using thiosemicarbazide induced model. Although NBZD-8, NBZD-10, and NBZD-18 are the compounds which had shown good anticonvulsant activity and have an advantage over that, they were not sedative.

  20. Identification, characterization, and purification of a 65,000 dalton protein in rat brain is photolabeled by nitro-containing benzodiazepines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benzodiazepines bind to two well-characterized classes of nanomolar-affinity binding sites, the central and the peripheral types. Although these sites appear to mediate many of the effects of these compounds, they cannot account for all of the biochemical and physiologic effects of the benzodiazepines. In this investigation, a protein that is photolabeled by NO2-containing benzodiazepines was identified and characterized in rat brain by performing photaffinity labeling experiments with [3H]-clonazepam and [3H]-flunitrazepam. These experiments demonstrate that this photolabeled protein has a molecular weight of 65,000 daltons. Photolabeling of the protein was saturable, inhibited in a stereoselective manner by benzodiazepine enantiomers, inhibited by therapeutically-relevant concentrations of many different NO2-containing benzodiazepines, and was not inhibited by more than 70 non-benzodiazepine compounds. The photolabeled protein is distinct from the central and peripheral sites on the basis of molecular weight, benzodiazepine inhibitory potencies, subcellular localization, and tissue distribution

  1. Contextos e padrões do uso indevido de benzodiazepínicos entre mulheres Contexts and patterns of undue use benzodiazepine among women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Rosa Lins de Souza

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available O uso indevido de benzodiazepínicos, especialmente entre mulheres, tem despertado preocupação na área de saúde pública. Este estudo objetivou compreender qualitativamente crenças e valores associados ao consumo indevido dessa substância por mulheres. Foram entrevistadas trinta e três mulheres (18-60 anos com histórico de uso indevido de benzodiazepínicos no último ano, selecionadas intencionalmente e por critérios. Os discursos foram transcritos e submetidos à análise de conteúdo com auxílio do software NVivo. A maioria das entrevistadas referiu tempo de uso bem superior ao recomendado (mediana: 7 anos e compra com receita médica. Os motivos de uso mais citados foram diminuição da ansiedade, problemas de insônia e fuga dos problemas. Apesar de reconhecerem a possibilidade de dependência, esta não motivou a interrupção do uso. O acompanhamento médico não pareceu, necessariamente, estimular a percepção de risco dos benzodiazepínicos, sendo um fator que favoreceu a manutenção do uso prolongado.The undue use of benzodiazepines particularly among women has raised concern in the public health area. This qualitative study aimed at understanding the beliefs and values associated with undue use of benzodiazepines among women. Thirty-three participants (aged between 18 and 60 with a history of undue use of benzodiazepines in the past year were selected intentionally using specific criteria. The interviews were fully transcribed and subjected to content analysis using NVivo software. The majority of respondents reported use for longer than the recommended duration (median 7 years and they purchased the drug with a medical prescription. Reasons for use most given were to deal with anxiety, to improve sleep and to "flee from problems." Even those who acknowledged the possibility of being addicted were not motivated to stop taking the drug. Medical supervision did not necessarily seem to influence the perception of risk of

  2. Sh-h-h-h: Representations of Perpetrators of Sexual Child Abuse in Picturebooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampert, Jo

    2012-01-01

    Children's picturebooks dealing with the topic of child sexual abuse first appeared in the early 1980s with the aim of addressing the need for age-appropriate texts to teach sexual abuse prevention concepts and to provide support for young children who may be at risk of or have already experienced sexual abuse. Despite the apparent potential of…

  3. The Impact of Sexual Abuse on Sexual Identity Formation in Gay Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    Emerging data suggests that as children, gay males have an increased risk for physical and sexual abuse. Anecdotal evidence suggests that a significant subset of children abused by clergy identify as gay as adults. However, we know very little about the impact of clergy-perpetrated sexual abuse in childhood on the development and psychosocial…

  4. Therapeutic Groupwork with Young Children and Mothers Who Have Experienced Domestic Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Lynda Warren

    2009-01-01

    There is mounting recognition that exposure to domestic abuse causes far-reaching damage to children's lives, development and psychological well-being. Studies estimate 10% to 20% of children are at risk of exposure to domestic abuse--thus domestic abuse must be seen as a crucial issue for educational psychologists (EPs). This study investigates…

  5. Preventing Child Abuse: A Meta-Analysis of Parent Training Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundahl, Brad W.; Nimer, Janelle; Parsons, Bruce

    2006-01-01

    Objective: A meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the ability of parent training programs to reduce parents' risk of abusing a child. Method: A total of 23 studies were submitted to a meta-analysis. Outcomes of interest included parents' attitudes toward abuse, emotional adjustment, child-rearing skills, and actual abuse. Conclusions:…

  6. Acute benzodiazepine toxicity exacerbated by concomitant oral olanzapine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Marc S; Overman, Michael J; Nates, Joseph L

    2016-04-01

    Improvements in antiemetic therapy constitute a major advance in oncology. A recent poll of the oncology community by the American Society of Clinical Oncology ranked it as one of the top 5 advances in cancer in the last 50 years. Emetogenicity of chemotherapy is defined by risk of emesis in the patient given no antiemetics; high-risk regimens cause nausea and vomiting in >90% of patients, moderate risk in 30%-90%, and low risk in <30%. This risk profile serves as the basis for empiric antiemetic prophylaxis and offers alternatives to refractory patients. Modern antiemetic prophylaxis is extremely effective for high-risk chemotherapy, reducing the risk for breakthrough nausea and vomiting to 0%-13% in the acute setting (<24 hours from receipt of chemotherapy) and to 25%-30% in the delayed setting (24-72 hours from receipt of chemotherapy). PMID:27152518

  7. Etiology of Drug Abuse: A Narrative Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadjme Jadidi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and Aim. Further gains in the prevention of drug abuse disorders require in-depth and holistic understanding of the risk factors of addiction from different perspectives. Lay persons and experts have different concepts of risk which could complement each other. The purpose of this study was to elaborate drug abuse risk factors through the story of individuals who had become drug dependent. Design and Methods. In this qualitative research, 33 individuals attending treatment centres for drug abuse were interviewed about the story of their addiction in Kerman, Iran. Interview questions were around the story of the participants. Results. All participants were male and in the age range of 18–40 years. Narrative analysis identified five themes as the main risk factors: family factors, peer pressure, the effect of gateway drugs (especially waterpipe, individual characteristics, and the community factors. More emphasis was placed upon the role of family factors, peer influence, and gateway effect. Discussion and Conclusion. This study elicited information from drug dependent subjects regarding the risk factors of drug abuse. According to drug dependent individuals’ views, more attention should be devoted to family and peer influences by policy makers, in developing culture-based preventive strategies.

  8. Etiology of drug abuse: a narrative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadidi, Nadjme; Nakhaee, Nouzar

    2014-01-01

    Introduction and Aim. Further gains in the prevention of drug abuse disorders require in-depth and holistic understanding of the risk factors of addiction from different perspectives. Lay persons and experts have different concepts of risk which could complement each other. The purpose of this study was to elaborate drug abuse risk factors through the story of individuals who had become drug dependent. Design and Methods. In this qualitative research, 33 individuals attending treatment centres for drug abuse were interviewed about the story of their addiction in Kerman, Iran. Interview questions were around the story of the participants. Results. All participants were male and in the age range of 18-40 years. Narrative analysis identified five themes as the main risk factors: family factors, peer pressure, the effect of gateway drugs (especially waterpipe), individual characteristics, and the community factors. More emphasis was placed upon the role of family factors, peer influence, and gateway effect. Discussion and Conclusion. This study elicited information from drug dependent subjects regarding the risk factors of drug abuse. According to drug dependent individuals' views, more attention should be devoted to family and peer influences by policy makers, in developing culture-based preventive strategies. PMID:25247105

  9. Maltreated and abused children

    OpenAIRE

    HOUFOVÁ, Jana

    2011-01-01

    According to the statistics there are forty thousand of battered and abused children in the Czech Republic. Maltreatment and abuse are not revealed in most cases and thus they accompany the children during their whole childhood. The reason is that children cannot defend themselves. The maltreatment or the abuse of a child is revealed only if somebody from the child?s neighbourhood observes anything suspicious and decides to report it, which is both a moral and a legal obligation. A person, wh...

  10. Who Owns Child Abuse?

    OpenAIRE

    Gerald Cradock

    2014-01-01

    Expectations of contemporary child protection apparatuses are strongly influenced by beliefs inherited from the nineteenth century child rescue movement. In particular, the belief that child abuse determination is obvious. However, this assumption fails to make a distinction between nineteenth century’s emphasis on impoverished environments and the twentieth century introduction of the pathological child abuser. Moreover, the proliferation of kinds of child abuse, and the need to distinguis...

  11. Child abuse and neglect

    OpenAIRE

    Kiran, K

    2011-01-01

    Child abuse and neglect are important public health problems and recent estimates of their prevalence suggest that they are considerably more common than had hitherto been realized. Intervening to change parenting practices may, however, be important in their treatment. Despite their frequent occurrence among dental patients, neglect is the least known and identified type of abuse. The present case reports a 3-year-old girl suffering from abuse and neglect. The girl had dental neglect and als...

  12. [The dentist's role in the child abuse: diagnosis and report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, Manuela; Andrade, David; Alves, Ana La-Salete; Magalhães, Teresa

    2011-12-01

    Child Abuse is a frequent problem worldwide that surpasses ethnicity, religion, culture, economic and social classes. In the United States of America child protective services account, per year, over one million cases of child abuse or neglect. In Portugal, the incidence of the problem is unknown but each year thousands of abused children are accompanied by the Commissions for the Protection of Children and Youth at Risk. This abuse threatens children's physical, emotional and intellectual development, as well as their dignity, security, well-being and even their own lives. The body regions most frequently affected in physical abuse, are the cranium, neck and orofacial region, in fact, about 50% of the injuries arising from child abuse occur in the orofacial region. These data place the dentist in a privileged position to make the detection, diagnosis and report of child abuse. Therefore, these professionals must be prepared to recognize, diagnose and report their suspicions to the appropriate authorities, which play a key role in victims protection and criminal investigation. This review intends to stress the important role of the dentist in the detection, diagnosis and report of child abuse, systematizing child abuse risk factors and indicators essential to the intervention of these professionals. This problem's approach is multidisciplinary, involving particularly dentists, who must obtain continuing education and training in this area. PMID:22863503

  13. "Death Is Better Than Misery": Elders' Accounts of Abuse and Neglect in Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chane, Samson; Adamek, Margaret E

    2015-12-01

    As the proportion of elders in developing nations increases and the ability of families to meet their needs is stretched thin, the risk of elder abuse will grow. This study examined the types and nature of abuse and neglect from the perspective of elders in Ethiopia who experienced abuse in noninstitutional settings. A qualitative design guided by hermeneutic phenomenology was used to explore the lived experiences of abuse and neglect of 15 Ethiopian elders. Nine women and six men ranging in age from 64 to 93 years were interviewed. Most were victims of multiple forms of abuse, especially financial exploitation, emotional abuse, and neglect. Economic vulnerability was a clear underlying factor contributing to elders' risk for encountering abuse. Effective prevention efforts must address the societal level factors that ultimately contribute to elder abuse while also holding individuals responsible for their harmful behaviors against elders. PMID:26738998

  14. SUBSTANCE ABUSE IN INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bano Rubeena

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The epidemic of substance abuse in young generation has assumed alarming dimensions in India. Changing cultural values, increasing economic stress and dwindling supportive bonds are leading to initiation into substance use. Cannabis, heroin, and Indian-produced pharmaceutical drugs are the most frequently abused drugs in India. Drug use, misuse or abuse is also primarily due to the nature of the drug abused, the personality of the individual and the addict’s immediate environment. The processes of industrialization, urbanization and migration have led to loosening of the traditional methods of social control rendering an individual vulnerable to the stresses and strains of modern life.

  15. Child Sexual Abuse

    OpenAIRE

    HROBAŘOVÁ, Petra

    2008-01-01

    My thesis deals with the problems of sexual abuse of children. It is divided into nine chapters, each of which has a subhead. In the first part, I focused on the term of child sexual abuse. In the second part, I focused on the problem of sexual abuse of children by family members. In the third part, I explained the term of commercial sexual violence committed against children. In the fourth part, I focused on the victims of sexual abuse and in the following part, I focused on the perpetrators...

  16. Elder Abuse and Neglect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muge Gulen

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Abuse and neglect are preventable societal problems that influence elderly individuals physically, spiritually and socially. Elder abuse is neglected for many years and is a growing problem all over the world. The aim of this article is to review the evaluation of elderly individuals who are exposed to abuse and neglect with systematic detailed history and physical examination and to describe individual, familial, and social measures that should be taken to prevent these abuses. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(3.000: 393-407

  17. Elder abuse and neglect in a population offering care by a primary health care center in Izmir, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissal, Aygul; Beşer, Ayşe

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the prevalence of abuse and neglect of the elderly aged 65 years and older, living with their relative in a primary health care center area and affecting factors. A descriptive study included 331 people aged 65 years. The most frequent type of abuse was psychological abuse and the least frequent was sexual abuse. Female gender, low education levels, living with spouses and children, and perception of familial relationships as average or below average significantly increased abuse. The nurses providing primary health care should be able to identify and observe the elderly at risk of abuse and conduct programs preventing abuse. PMID:21347984

  18. Drugs of abuse, cytostatic drugs and iodinated contrast media in tap water from the Madrid region (central Spain):A case study to analyse their occurrence and human health risk characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, A; Zonja, B; Mastroianni, N; Negreira, N; López de Alda, M; Pérez, S; Barceló, D; Gil, A; Valcárcel, Y

    2016-01-01

    This work analyses the presence of forty-eight emerging pollutants, including twenty-five drugs of abuse and metabolites, seventeen cytostatic drugs and six iodinated contrast media, in tap water from the Madrid Region. Analysis of the target compounds in the tap water was performed by means of (on-line or off-line) solid-phase extraction followed by analysis by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. A preliminary human health risk characterization was undertaken for each individual compound and for different groups of compounds with a common mechanism of action found in tap water. The results of the study showed the presence of eight out of the twenty-five drugs of abuse and metabolites analysed, namely, the cocainics cocaine and benzoylecgonine, the amphetamine-type stimulants ephedrine, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine and methamphetamine, the opioid methadone and its metabolite 2-ethylene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine and, finally caffeine at concentrations ranging from 0.11 to 502 ng L(-1). Four out of the six analysed iodinated contrast media, namely, diatrizoate, iohexol, iomeprol and iopromide, were detected in at least one sample, with concentration values varying between 0.4 and 5 ng L(-1). Cytostatic compounds were not detected in any sample. Caffeine was the substance showing the highest concentrations, up to 502 ng L(-1), mainly in the drinking water sampling point located in Madrid city. Among the other drugs of abuse, the most abundant compounds were cocaine and benzoylecgonine, detected at concentrations ranging from 0.11 to 86 ng L(-1) and from 0.11 to 53 ng L(-1), respectively. Regarding iodinated contrast media, iohexol was the most ubiquitous and abundant compound, with a frequency of detection of 100% and concentrations from 0.5 to 5.0 ng L(-1) in basically the same range in all sampling points. Taking into account the results and types of treatment applied, ozonisation plus granular activated carbon filtration appears to be

  19. Substance Abuse in the Military

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... DrugFacts » Substance Abuse in the Military DrugFacts: Substance Abuse in the Military Email Facebook Twitter Revised March ... alcohol and tobacco use, and especially prescription drug abuse, are much more prevalent and are on the ...

  20. Is Zolpidem Associated with Increased Risk of Fractures in the Elderly with Sleep Disorders? A Nationwide Case Cross-Over Study in Taiwan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yih-Jing Tang

    Full Text Available We conducted a study using a case-crossover design to clarify the risk of acute effects of zolpidem and benzodiazepine on all-sites of fractures in the elderly.Case-crossover design.Elderly enrollees (n = 6010 in Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database with zolpidem or benzodiazepine use were analyzed for the risk of developing fractures.After adjusting for medications such as antipsychotics, antidepressants, and diuretics, or comorbidities such as hypertension, osteoarthritis, osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis and depression, neither zolpidem nor benzodiazepine was found to be associated with increased risk in all-sites fractures. Subjects without depression were found to have an increased risk of fractures. Diazepam is the only benzodiazepine with increased risk of fractures after adjusting for medications and comorbidities. Hip and spine were particular sites for increased fracture risk, but following adjustment for comorbidities, the associations were found to be insignificant.Neither zolpidem nor benzodiazepine was associated with increased risk of all-site fractures in this case cross-over study after adjusting for medications or comorbidities in elderly individuals with insomnia. Clinicians should balance the benefits and risks for prescribing zolpidem or benzodiazepine in the elderly accordingly.