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Sample records for benzodiazepine bdz receptor

  1. Effects of vitamin B-6 nutrition on benzodiazepine (BDZ) receptor binding in the developing rat brain

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    Borek, J.P.; Guilarte, T.R. (Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States))

    1990-02-26

    A dietary deficiency of vitamin B-6 promotes seizure activity in neonatal animals and human infants. Previous studied have shown that neonatal vitamin B-6 deprivation results in reduced levels of brain gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and increased binding at the GABA site of the GABA/BDZ receptor complex. Since the GABA and BDZ receptors are allosterically linked, this study was undertaken to determine if vitamin B-6 deprivation had an effect on BDZ receptor binding. Benzodiazepine receptor binding isotherms using {sup 3}H-flunitrazepam as ligand were performed in the presence and absence of 10 {mu}M GABA. The results indicate a significant increase in the binding affinity (Kd) in the presence of GABA in cerebellar membranes from deficient rat pups at 14 days of age with no effect on receptor number (Bmax). By 28 days of age, the increase in Kd was no longer present. No change in Kd or Bmax was observed in cortical tissue from deficient animals at 14 or 28 days of age. Preliminary studies of GABA-enhancement of {sup 3}H-flunitrazepam binding indicate that vitamin B-6 deficiency also induces alterations in the ability of GABA to enhance BZD receptor binding. In summary, these results indicate that the effects of vitamin B-6 deprivation on BDZ receptor binding are region specific and age related.

  2. Molecular size of benzodiazepine receptor in rat brain in situ: evidence for a functional dimer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doble, A.; Iversen, L. L.

    1982-02-01

    Benzodiazepine tranquillizers such as diazepam and chlordiazepoxide interact with high-affinity binding sites in nervous tissue1,2. The correlation between the affinities of various benzodiazepines for these sites with their clinical potencies and activity in behavioural and electrophysiological tests in animals suggests that the sites represent the functional `receptor' whereby benzodiazepines exert their effects3. The intimate involvement of benzodiazepines with γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and chloride channels raised the possibility that the benzodiazepine binding site (BDZ-R) may be a protein in the GABA receptor-effector complex4,5. GABA agonists enhance the affinity of BDZ-R for benzodiazepines6, although BDZ-R is distinct from the GABA receptor itself3. However, electrophysiological evidence suggests that the action of benzodiazepines is chloride channel, rather than receptor, directed7-10. Several attempts have been made to measure the molecular weight (Mr) of BDZ-R after solubilization from brain membranes: treatment with 1% Triton X-100 followed by assay of binding activity in solute fractions separated according to molecular weight suggested11 a value of ~200,000, photoaffinity labelling of BDZ-R with 3H-flunitrazepam (3H-FNZ) followed by more rigorous solubilization and gel chromatography indicated12,13 an apparent Mr of ~55,000 and a third approach14 a value of ~100,000. The measured molecular weight seems to depend critically on the solubilization procedure used. Chang et al.15 recently described the use of radiation inactivation to determine the size of BDZ-R in situ in calf brain membranes, and estimated a Mr, of 216,000. We have also used this approach; the results reported here indicate a Mr of between 90,000 and 100,000, but this is reduced to 60,000-63,000 in membranes pretreated with GABA, suggesting the disaggregation of a normally dimeric form.

  3. In vivo molecular imaging of the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor complex in the aged rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoekzema, Elseline; Rojas, Santiago; Herance, Raúl; Pareto, Deborah; Abad, Sergio; Jiménez, Xavier; Figueiras, Francisca P; Popota, Foteini; Ruiz, Alba; Flotats, Núria; Fernández, Francisco J; Rocha, Milagros; Rovira, Mariana; Víctor, Víctor M; Gispert, Juan D

    2012-07-01

    The GABA-ergic system, known to regulate neural tissue genesis during cortical development, has been postulated to play a role in cerebral aging processes. Using in vivo molecular imaging and voxel-wise quantification, we aimed to assess the effects of aging on the benzodiazepine (BDZ) recognition site of the GABA(A) receptor. To visualize BDZ site availability, [(11)C]-flumazenil microPET acquisitions were conducted in young and old rats. The data were analyzed and region of interest analyses were applied to validate the voxel-wise approach. We observed decreased [(11)C]-flumazenil binding in the aged rat brains in comparison with the young control group. More specifically, clusters of reduced radioligand uptake were detected in the bilateral hippocampus, cerebellum, midbrain, and bilateral frontal and parieto-occipital cortex. Our results support the pertinence of voxel-wise quantification in the analysis of microPET data. Moreover, these findings indicate that the aging process involves declines in neural BDZ recognition site availability, proposed to reflect alterations in GABA(A) receptor subunit polypeptide expression.

  4. Characterization of astrocytic and neuronal benzodiazepine receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, A.S.

    1988-01-01

    Primary cultures of astrocytes and neurons express benzodiazepine receptors. Neuronal benzodiazepine receptors were of high-affinity, K{sub D} values were 7.5-43 nM and the densities of receptors (B{sub max}) were 924-4131 fmol/mg protein. Astrocytes posses a high-affinity benzodiazepine receptor, K{sub D} values were 6.6-13 nM. The B{sub max} values were 6,033-12,000 fmol/mg protein. The pharmacological profile of the neuronal benzodiazepine receptor was that of the central-type benzodiazepine receptor, where clonazepam has a high-affinity and Ro 5-4864 (4{prime}-chlorodiazepam) has a low-affinity. Whereas astrocytic benzoidazepine receptor was characteristic of the so called peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptors, which shows a high-affinity towards Ro 5-4863, and a low-affinity towards clonazepam. The astrocytic benzodiazepine receptors was functionally correlated with voltage dependent calcium channels, since dihydropyridines and benzodiazepines interacted with ({sup 3}H) diazepam and ({sup 3}H) nitrendipine receptors with the same rank order of potency, showing a statistically significant correlation. No such correlation was observed in neurons.

  5. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists for hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, B; Gluud, L L; Gluud, C

    2004-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy may be associated with accumulation of substances that bind to a receptor-complex in the brain resulting in neural inhibition. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists may have a beneficial effect on patients with hepatic encephalopathy.......Hepatic encephalopathy may be associated with accumulation of substances that bind to a receptor-complex in the brain resulting in neural inhibition. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists may have a beneficial effect on patients with hepatic encephalopathy....

  6. Mechanism and site of inhibition of AMPA receptors: substitution of one and two methyl groups at the 4-aminophenyl ring of 2,3-benzodiazepine and implications in the "E" site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Congzhou; Wu, Andrew; Shen, Yu-Chuan; Ettari, Roberta; Grasso, Silvana; Niu, Li

    2015-08-19

    2,3-Benzodiazepines are a well-known group of compounds for their potential antagonism against AMPA receptors. It has been previously reported that the inhibitory effect of 2,3-benzodiazepine derivatives with a 7,8-ethylenedioxy moiety can be enhanced by simply adding a chlorine atom at position 3 of the 4-aminophenyl ring. Here we report that adding a methyl group at position 3 on the 4-aminophenyl ring, termed as BDZ-11-7, can similarly enhance the inhibitory activity, as compared with the unsubstituted one or BDZ-11-2. Our kinetic studies have shown that BDZ-11-7 is a noncompetitive antagonist of GluA2Q homomeric receptors and prefers to inhibit the closed-channel state. However, adding another methyl group at position 5 on the 4-aminophenyl ring, termed as BDZ-11-6, fails to yield extra inhibition on GluA2Q receptors. Instead, BDZ-11-6 exhibits a diminished inhibition of GluA2Q. Site interaction test indicates the two compounds, BDZ-11-6 and BDZ-11-7, bind to the same site on GluA2Q, which is also the binding site for their prototype, BDZ-11-2. Based on the results from this and our earlier studies, we propose that the binding site that accommodates the 4-aminophenyl ring must contain two interactive points, with one preferring polar groups like chlorine and the other preferring nonpolar groups such as a methyl group. Either adding a chlorine or a methyl group may enhance the inhibitory activity of 2,3-benzodiazepine derivatives with a 7,8-ethylenedioxy moiety. Adding any two of the same group on positions 3 and 5 of the 4-aminophenyl ring, however, significantly reduces the interaction between these 2,3-benzodiazepines and their binding site, because one group is always repelled by one interactive point. We predict therefore that adding a chlorine atom at position 3 and a methyl group at position 5 of the 4-aminophenyl ring of 2,3-benzodiazepine derivatives with a 7,8-ethylenedioxy moiety may produce a new compound that is more potent.

  7. The clobazam metabolite N-desmethyl clobazam is an α2 preferring benzodiazepine with an improved therapeutic window for antihyperalgesia

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Data from genetically modified mice suggest that benzodiazepine (BDZ)-site agonists with improved selectivity for α2-subtype GABAA receptors (α2GABAAR) are potentially useful for the treatment of neuropathic pain. Subtype-selective compounds available for preclinical tests in rodents support this concept but have not been approved for human use, hindering proof-of-concept studies in patients. We recently proposed that N-desmethyl clobazam (NDMC), the main metabolite of the licensed BDZ clobaz...

  8. Mitochondrial benzodiazepine receptors regulate steroid biosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukhin, A.G.; Papadopoulos, V.; Costa, E.; Krueger, K.E. (Georgetown Univ. School of Medicine, Washington, DC (USA))

    1989-12-01

    Recent observations on the steroid synthetic capability within the brain open the possibility that benzodiazepines may influence steroid synthesis in nervous tissue through interactions with peripheral-type benzodiazepine recognition sites, which are highly expressed in steroidogenic cells and associated with the outer mitochondrial membrane. To examine this possibility nine molecules that exhibit a greater than 10,000-fold difference in their affinities for peripheral-type benzodiazepine binding sites were tested for their effects on a well-established steroidogenic model system, the Y-1 mouse adrenal tumor cell line. 4{prime}-Chlorodiazepam, PK 11195, and PK 14067 stimulated steroid production by 2-fold in Y-1 cells, whereas diazepam, flunitrazepam, zolpidem, and PK 14068 displayed a lower (1.2- to 1.5-fold) maximal stimulation. In contrast, clonazepam and flumazenil did not stimulate steroid synthesis. The potencies of these compounds to inhibit {sup 3}H-labeled PK 11195 binding to peripheral-type benzodiazepine recognition sites correlated with their potencies to stimulate steroid production. Similar findings were observed in bovine and rat adrenocortical cell preparations. These results suggest that ligands of the peripheral-type benzodiazepine recognition site acting on this mitochondrial receptor can enhance steroid production. This action may contribute specificity to the pharmacological profile of drugs preferentially acting on the benzodiazepine recognition site associated with the outer membrane of certain mitochondrial populations.

  9. Autoradiographic localization of benzodiazepine receptor downregulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tietz, E.I.; Rosenberg, H.C.; Chiu, T.H.

    1986-01-01

    Regional differences in downregulation of brain benzodiazepine receptors were studied using a quantitative autoradiographic method. Rats were given a 4-week flurazepam treatment known to cause tolerance and receptor downregulation. A second group of rats was given a similar treatment, but for only 1 week. A third group was given a single acute dose of diazepam to produce a brain benzodiazepine-like activity equivalent to that found after the chronic treatment. Areas studied included hippocampal formation, cerebral cortex, superior colliculus, substantia nigra, dorsal geniculate nucleus, lateral amygdala and lateral hypothalamus. There was a regional variation in the degree of downregulation after 1 week of flurazepam treatment, ranging from 12% to 25%. Extending the flurazepam treatment to 4 weeks caused little further downregulation in those areas studied, except for the pars reticulata of the substantia nigra, which showed a 13% reduction in (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam binding after 1 week and a 40% reduction after 4 weeks of treatment. In a few areas, such as the lateral hypothalamus, no significant change in binding was found after 4 weeks. Acute diazepam treatment caused no change in binding. This latter finding as well as results obtained during the development of the methodology show that downregulation was not an artifact due to residual drug content of brain slices. The regional variations in degree and rate of downregulation suggest areas that may be most important for benzodiazepine tolerance and dependence and may be related to the varying time courses for tolerance to different benzodiazepine actions.

  10. The bovine peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor: A receptor with low affinity for benzodiazepines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parola, A.L.; Laird, H.E. II (Univ. of Arizona, Tucson (USA))

    1991-01-01

    The density of bovine peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptors (PBR) in four tissues was highest in adrenal cortex. The adrenal cortex PBR cofractionated with a mitochondrial membrane marker enzyme and could be solubilized with intact ligand binding properties using digitonin. The membrane bound and soluble mitochondrial receptors were pharmacologically characterized and showed the rank order of potency to inhibit ({sup 3}H)PK 11195 binding was PK 11195 > protoporphyrin IX > benzodiazepines. ({sup 3}H)PK 11195 binding to bovine adrenal mitochondria was unaffected by diethylpyrocarbonate, a histidine residue modifying reagent that decreased binding to rat liver mitochondria by 70%. ({sup 3}H)PK 14105 photolabeled the bovine PBR and the Mr was estimated under nondenaturing and denaturing conditions. These results demonstrate the bovine peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor is pharmacologically and biochemically distinct from the rat receptor, but the receptor component photolabeled by an isoquinoline ligand has a similar molecular weight.

  11. Long-term studies on anticonvulsant tolerance and withdrawal characteristics of benzodiazepine receptor ligands in different seizure models in mice. I. Comparison of diazepam, clonazepam, clobazam and abecarnil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löscher, W; Rundfeldt, C; Hönack, D; Ebert, U

    1996-11-01

    We have reported recently that the seizure model and experimental protocol may markedly influence anticonvulsant tolerance and withdrawal characteristics of benzodiazepine (BDZ) receptor ligands so that predictions on tolerance and dependence liability of novel drugs should be based on a battery of chronic experiments. In the present study, we compared BDZ receptor ligands with different intrinsic efficacy and/or gamma-aminobutyric acidA/BDZ receptor subtype selectivity in two seizure models, by using different experimental approaches to assess the tolerance and dependence liability. In one approach, mice were chronically treated with either diazepam, clonazepam, clobazam or the novel anxiolytic and anticonvulsant beta-carboline derivative abecarnil for 4 weeks, at doses which were about equipotent to increase the threshold for myoclonic seizures induced by pentylenetetrazole. Anticonvulsant activity was determined several times during the period of chronic treatment as well as up to 2 weeks after termination of treatment in the same group of animals per drug. The threshold for electroshock-induced tonic seizures was used as a second seizure model in separate groups of mice. In another approach, drug treatment protocols were the same but the seizures were induced only twice during the 4-week period of treatment to reduce the number of trials which could lead to "learned" tolerance. In additional groups of mice, the seizure thresholds were only determined before and after the period of treatment to assess whether repeated seizure induction during the chronic treatment affects the development of dependence. All four drugs lost anticonvulsant activity during the chronic treatment in the different models and experimental approaches, without indication for a significant involvement of learned tolerance. However, marked protocol-related differences were seen with respect to withdrawal symptoms, i.e., measures of physical dependence-inducing properties of the different

  12. Repeated swim stress alters brain benzodiazepine receptors measured in vivo

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    Weizman, R.; Weizman, A.; Kook, K.A.; Vocci, F.; Deutsch, S.I.; Paul, S.M.

    1989-06-01

    The effects of repeated swim stress on brain benzodiazepine receptors were examined in the mouse using both an in vivo and in vitro binding method. Specific in vivo binding of (/sup 3/H)Ro15-1788 to benzodiazepine receptors was decreased in the hippocampus, cerebral cortex, hypothalamus, midbrain and striatum after repeated swim stress (7 consecutive days of daily swim stress) when compared to nonstressed mice. In vivo benzodiazepine receptor binding was unaltered after repeated swim stress in the cerebellum and pons medulla. The stress-induced reduction in in vivo benzodiazepine receptor binding did not appear to be due to altered cerebral blood flow or to an alteration in benzodiazepine metabolism or biodistribution because there was no difference in (14C)iodoantipyrine distribution or whole brain concentrations of clonazepam after repeated swim stress. Saturation binding experiments revealed a change in both apparent maximal binding capacity and affinity after repeated swim stress. Moreover, a reduction in clonazepam's anticonvulsant potency was also observed after repeated swim stress (an increase in the ED50 dose for protection against pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures), although there was no difference in pentylenetetrazol-induced seizure threshold between the two groups. In contrast to the results obtained in vivo, no change in benzodiazepine receptor binding kinetics was observed using the in vitro binding method. These data suggest that environmental stress can alter the binding parameters of the benzodiazepine receptor and that the in vivo and in vitro binding methods can yield substantially different results.

  13. Hooked on benzodiazepines: GABAA receptor subtypes and addiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Kelly R.; Rudolph, Uwe; Lüscher, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Benzodiazepines are widely used clinically to treat anxiety and insomnia. They also induce muscle relaxation, control epileptic seizures, and can provoke amnesia. Moreover, benzodiazepines are often abused after chronic clinical treatment but also for recreational purposes. Within weeks, tolerance to the pharmacological effects can develop, in addition to dependence and even addiction in vulnerable individuals. Here, we review recent observations from animal models regarding the cellular and molecular basis that may underlie the addictive properties of benzodiazepines. These data reveal how benzodiazepines, acting through specific GABAA receptor subtypes, activate midbrain dopamine neurons and how this may hijack the mesolimbic reward system. Such findings have important implications for the future design of benzodiazepines with reduced or even absent addiction liability. PMID:21353710

  14. Imaging of a glioma using peripheral benzodiazepine receptor ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starosta-Rubinstein, S.; Ciliax, B.J.; Penney, J.B.; McKeever, P.; Young, A.B.

    1987-02-01

    Two types of benzodiazepine receptors have been demonstrated in mammalian tissues, one which is localized on neuronal elements in brain and the other, on glial cells and in peripheral tissues such as kidney. In vivo administration of /sup 3/H-labeled PK 11195 (1-(2-chlorophenyl-N-methyl-N-(1-methylpropyl)-3-isoquinoline carboxamide) or (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam with 5 mg of clonazepam per kg to rats with intracranial C6 gliomas resulted in high levels of tritiated-drug binding to the tumor as shown by quantitative autoradiography. Pharmacological studies indicated that the bound drugs labeled the peripheral benzodiazepine binding site. Binding to the peripheral benzodiazepine site was confirmed primarily to malignant cells with little binding to adjacent normal brain tissue or to necrotic tissue. Tumor cell binding was completely inhibited by preadministration of the peripheral benzodiazepine blocking agent PK 11195 at 5 mg/kg. The centrally selective benzodiazepine ligand clonazepam had no effect on PK 11195 binding to the tumor cells. When binding to other tumor cell lines grown in nude mice and nude athymic rats was evaluated, little or no peripheral benzodiazepine binding was detected on human pheochromocytoma (RN1) and neuroblastoma (SK-N-MC, SK-N-SH) tumor cells, respectively. However, high densities of peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites were observed on tumors derived from a human glioma cell line (ATCC HTB 14, U-87 MG). The presence of high concentrations of specific peripheral benzodiazepine receptors on glial tumors suggests that human primary central nervous system tumors could be imaged and diagnosed using peripheral benzodiazepine ligands labeled with positron- or gamma-emitting isotopes.

  15. High affinity ligands for 'diazepam-insensitive' benzodiazepine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, G; Skolnick, P

    1992-01-14

    Structurally diverse compounds have been shown to possess high affinities for benzodiazepine receptors in their 'diazepam-sensitive' (DS) conformations. In contrast, only the imidazobenzodiazepinone Ro 15-4513 has been shown to exhibit a high affinity for the 'diazepam-insensitive' (DI) conformation of benzodiazepine receptors. We examined a series of 1,4-diazepines containing one or more annelated ring systems for their affinities at DI and DS benzodiazepine receptors, several 1,4-diazepinone carboxylates including Ro 19-4603, Ro 16-6028 and Ro 15-3505 were found to possess high affinities (Ki approximately 2.6-20 nM) for DI. Nonetheless, among the ligands examined, Ro 15-4513 was the only substance with a DI/DS potency ratio approximately 1; other substances had ratios ranging from 13 to greater than 1000. Ligands with high to moderate affinities at DI were previously classified as partial agonists, antagonists, or partial inverse agonists at DS benzodiazepine receptors, but behaved as 'GABA neutral' (antagonist) substances at DI. The identification of several additional high affinity ligands at DI benzodiazepine receptors may be helpful in elucidating the pharmacological and physiological importance of these sites.

  16. High-affinity benzodiazepine receptor ligands among benzodiazepines and betacarbolines with different intrinsic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yliniemelae, A.; Gynther, J. (Univ. of Kuopio (Finland)); Konschin, H.; Tylli, H. (Univ. of Helsinki (Finland)); Rouvinen, J. (Univ. of Joensuu (Finland))

    1989-01-01

    Structural and electrostatic features of diazepam, flumazenil, and methyl betacarboline-3-carboxylate (BCCM) have been investigated using the molecular superimposition method. These high-affinity benzodiazepine (BZ) receptor ligands are structurally unrelated and they have different intrinsic activity. These ligands are superimposed in such a way that common structural and electrostatic features essential for the high receptor binding affinity overlap. In addition to this binding pharmacophore, there are roughly three separate binding zones in the BZ receptor, one for each class of ligands. The intrinsic activity of BZ receptor ligands depends on the molecular structures and the way the ligand approaches the receptor.

  17. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists for acute and chronic hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, B; Kjaergard, L L; Gluud, C

    2001-01-01

    The pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy is unknown. It has been suggested that liver failure leads to the accumulation of substances that bind to a receptor-complex in the brain resulting in neural inhibition which may progress to coma. Several trials have assessed benzodiazepine receptor...

  18. Fluorescent-labeled ligands for the benzodiazepine receptor - Part 1 : Synthesis and characterization of fluorescent-labeled benzodiazepines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, MJ; Hulst, R; Kellogg, RM; Hendriks, MMWB; Ensing, K; De Zeeuw, RA

    2000-01-01

    Because radioactive labeled ligands in receptor assays have several disadvantages, we synthesized a number of fluorescent-labeled benzodiazepines. Several fluorophores were attached at different positions of 1,4-benzodiazepine molecules in order to assess the impact of the fluorophores and their cou

  19. A fluorescent receptor assay for benzodiazepines using coumarin labeled desethylflumazenil as ligand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, M.J; Ensing, K; de Zeeuw, R.A

    2001-01-01

    This article describes a novel nonisotopic receptor assay for benzodiazepines with fluorescence detection, As labeled ljgand (coumarin-labeled desethylflumazenil, CLDEF), a metabolite of the benzodiazepine antagonist flumazenil (desetheylflumazenil, Ro15-3890) has been coupled to a coumarin fluoroph

  20. Effects of peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor ligands on Ehrlich tumor cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Mônica; Fonseca, Evelise Souza Monteiro; Oloris, Silvia Catarina Salgado; Matsuzaki, Patrícia; Otake, Andréia Hanada; Leite, Kátia Ramos Moura; Massoco, Cristina Oliveira; Dagli, Maria Lúcia Zaidan; Palermo-Neto, João

    2006-11-21

    Peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptors have been found throughout the body, and particularly, in high numbers, in neoplastic tissues such as the ovary, liver, colon, breast, prostate and brain cancer. Peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor expression has been associated with tumor malignity, and its subcellular localization is important to define its function in tumor cells. We investigated the presence of peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptors in Ehrlich tumor cells, and the in vitro effects of peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptors ligands on tumor cell proliferation. Our results demonstrate the presence of peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor in the nucleus of Ehrlich tumor cells (85.53+/-12.60%). They also show that diazepam and Ro5-4864 (peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor agonists) but not clonazepam (a molecule with low affinity for the peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor) decreased the percentage of tumor cells in G0-G1 phases and increased that of cells in S-G2-M phases. The effects of those agonists were prevented by PK11195 (a peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor antagonist) that did not produce effects by itself. Altogether, these data suggest that the presence of peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor within the nucleus of Ehrlich tumor cells is associated with tumor malignity and proliferation capacity.

  1. Micromolar-Affinity Benzodiazepine Receptors Regulate Voltage-Sensitive Calcium Channels in Nerve Terminal Preparations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taft, William C.; Delorenzo, Robert J.

    1984-05-01

    Benzodiazepines in micromolar concentrations significantly inhibit depolarization-sensitive Ca2+ uptake in intact nerve-terminal preparations. Benzodiazepine inhibition of Ca2+ uptake is concentration dependent and stereospecific. Micromolar-affinity benzodiazepine receptors have been identified and characterized in brain membrane and shown to be distinct from nanomolar-affinity benzodiazepine receptors. Evidence is presented that micromolar, and not nanomolar, benzodiazepine binding sites mediate benzodiazepine inhibition of Ca2+ uptake. Irreversible binding to micromolar benzodiazepine binding sites also irreversibly blocked depolarization-dependent Ca2+ uptake in synaptosomes, indicating that these compounds may represent a useful marker for identifying the molecular components of Ca2+ channels in brain. Characterization of benzodiazepine inhibition of Ca2+ uptake demonstrates that these drugs function as Ca2+ channel antagonists, because benzodiazepines effectively blocked voltage-sensitive Ca2+ uptake inhibited by Mn2+, Co2+, verapamil, nitrendipine, and nimodipine. These results indicate that micromolar benzodiazepine binding sites regulate voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels in brain membrane and suggest that some of the neuronal stabilizing effects of micromolar benzodiazepine receptors may be mediated by the regulation of Ca2+ conductance.

  2. Benzodiazepine receptor ligands: a patent review (2006 -- 2012)

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Ligands at the benzodiazepine site of the GABAA receptor (GABAA-R) act by modulating the effect of GABAA (g-aminobutyric acid). The selective modulator effects of such ligands are related to the a-subunits type (i.e., a1, a2, a3, and a5), being shown that the a1 subunit is associated with sedative, anticonvulsant and amnesic effects; whereas the a2 and a3 subunits mediate anxiolytic and myorelaxant effects. Recently it was shown the involvement of a5 subunit in...

  3. Flumazenil-sensitive dose-related physical dependence in planarians produced by two benzodiazepine and one non-benzodiazepine benzodiazepine-receptor agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffa, Robert B; Cavallo, Federica; Capasso, Anna

    2007-06-14

    Two benzodiazepine (midazolam and clorazepate) and one non-benzodiazepine (zolpidem) benzodiazepine-receptor agonists produced dose-related physical dependence, as evidenced by abstinence-induced decrease in planarian locomotor velocity (pLMV) when drug-exposed planarians were placed into drug-free water, but not when they were placed into drug-containing water (i.e., an abstinence-induced withdrawal, since the effect was only obtained in the removal of drug and not in the continued presence of drug). We have previously shown that the decrease in pLMV is associated with specific and transient withdrawal signs. In the present study, the selective benzodiazepine-receptor antagonist flumazenil significantly antagonized (Pbenzodiazepine-receptor agonists, for two different chemical categories, produce dose-related physical dependence manifested as abstinence-induced withdrawal in this simple and convenient model, and (2) in the absence of cloning or radioligand binding literature, suggest a possible specific interaction site (receptor?) for these compounds in planarians.

  4. Central benzodiazepine receptor imaging and quantitation with single photon emission computerised tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okocha, C I; Kapczinski, F; Lassen, N

    1995-01-01

    This review discusses the current use of single photon emission computerised tomography (SPECT) for central benzodiazepine receptor imaging and quantitation. The general principles underlying SPECT imaging and receptor quantitation methods such as the kinetic, pseudo-equilibrium and steady...

  5. Biochemical study of multiple drug recognition sites on central benzodiazepine receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trifiletti, R.R.

    1986-01-01

    The benzodiazepine receptor complex of mammalian brain possesses recognition sites which mediate (at least in part) the pharmacologic actions of the 1,4-benzodiazepines and barbiturates. Evidence is provided suggesting the existence of least seven distinct drug recognition sites on this complex. Interactions between the various recognition sites have been explored using radioligand binding techniques. This information is utilized to provide a comprehensive scheme for characterizing receptor-active drugs on an anxiolytic-anticonvulsant/proconvulsant continuum using radioligand binding techniques, as well as a comprehensive program for identifying potential endogenous receptor-active substances. Further evidence is provided here supporting the notion of benzodiazepine recognition site heterogeneity. Classical 1,4-benzodiazepines do not appear to differentiate two populations of benzodiazepine receptors in an equilibrium sense, but appear to do so in a kinetic sense. An apparent physical separation of the two receptor subtypes can be achieved by differential solubilization. The benzodiazepine binding subunit can be identified by photoaffinity labeling with the benzodiazepine agonist (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepan. Conditions for reproducible partial proteolytic mapping of (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam photoaffinity labeled receptors are established. From these maps, it is concluded that there are probably no major differences in the primary sequence of the benzodiazepine binding subunit in various regions of the rat central nervous system.

  6. Purification of high affinity benzodiazepine receptor binding site fragments from rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klotz, K.L.

    1984-01-01

    In central nervous system benzodiazepine recognition sites occur on neuronal cell surfaces as one member of a multireceptor complex, including recognition sites for benzodiazepines, gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), barbiturates and a chloride ionophore. During photoaffinity labelling, the benzodiazepine agonist, /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam, is irreversibly bound to central benzodiazepine high affinity recognition sites in the presence of ultraviolet light. In these studies a /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam radiolabel was used to track the isolation and purification of high affinity agonist binding site fragments from membrane-bound benzodiazepine receptor in rat brain. The authors present a method for limited proteolysis of /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam photoaffinity labeled rat brain membranes, generating photolabeled benzodiazepine receptor fragments containing the agonist binding site. Using trypsin chymotrypsin A/sub 4/, or a combination of these two proteases, they have demonstrated the extent and time course for partial digestion of benzodiazepine receptor, yielding photolabeled receptor binding site fragments. These photolabeled receptor fragments have been further purified on the basis of size, using ultrafiltration, gel permeation chromatography, and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) as well as on the basis of hydrophobicity, using a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) precolumn, several HPLC elution schemes, and two different HPLC column types. Using these procedures, they have purified three photolabeled benzodiazepine receptor fragments containing the agonist binding site which appear to have a molecular weight of less than 2000 daltons each.

  7. Benzodiazepines may have protective effects against Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fastbom, J; Forsell, Y; Winblad, B

    1998-03-01

    In this study, we examined the association between benzodiazepine use and the occurrence of Alzheimer disease and vascular dementia. The study was based on longitudinal data from a case-control study of 668 individuals aged 75 and older. The elderly were examined extensively by physicians, and family interviews were assessed. Dementia diagnosis was made by using DSM-III-R criteria. Individuals with a history of continuous use of benzodiazepines (BDZ+) were compared with nonusers (BDZ-), with respect to the incidence of Alzheimer disease or vascular dementia at follow-up 3 years later. It was found that there was a significantly lower incidence of Alzheimer disease in the BDZ+ group than in the BDZ- group. This negative association remained significant when controlling for age, gender, level of education, use of nonsteriodal antiinflammatory drugs, and estrogens. These results suggest that benzodiazepines may have protective effects against the disease.

  8. Abuse and dependence liability of benzodiazepine-type drugs: GABA(A) receptor modulation and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licata, Stephanie C; Rowlett, James K

    2008-07-01

    Over the past several decades, benzodiazepines and the newer non-benzodiazepines have become the anxiolytic/hypnotics of choice over the more readily abused barbiturates. While all drugs from this class act at the GABA(A) receptor, benzodiazepine-type drugs offer the clear advantage of being safer and better tolerated. However, there is still potential for these drugs to be abused, and significant evidence exists to suggest that this is a growing problem. This review examines the behavioral determinants of the abuse and dependence liability of benzodiazepine-type drugs. Moreover, the pharmacological and putative biochemical basis of the abuse-related behavior is discussed.

  9. The benzodiazepine receptor in rat brain and its interaction with ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, I.L.; Doble, A.

    1983-06-01

    (3H)Ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate ((3H) beta-CCE) binds to a homogeneous population of recognition sites in rat whole brain membranes with high affinity. The (3H)beta-CCE binding is completely displaceable by low concentrations of a number of benzodiazepines with similar potencies found when using a 3H-benzodiazepine as the ligand. This suggests that the recognition sites for beta-CCE and the benzodiazepines are identical or that they are involved in a close interaction. The binding of (3H)beta-CCE does not obey simple mass-action kinetics. (3H)Flunitrazepam dissociation from its receptor population is biphasic, and different methods of initiation of this dissociation indicate that cooperative interactions take place within the receptor population. We conclude that the benzodiazepine receptor is a single entity that can exist in two conformations, the equilibrium between which may be controlled by some as yet unidentified factor.

  10. Extraction and purification from Ceratonia siliqua of compounds acting on central and peripheral benzodiazepine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avallone, R; Cosenza, F; Farina, F; Baraldi, C; Baraldi, M

    2002-08-01

    The presence of molecules with high affinity for central and peripheral benzodiazepine receptors was determined in the pod and leaves of Ceratonia siliqua (carob). The amount of the substances able to selectively bind the central benzodiazepine receptor recovered from carob pods and leaves was respectively 12.17 and 18.7 ng diazepam equivalent/g. The amount of compounds active on peripheral benzodiazepine receptor in both pods and leaves was higher in comparison with the central one, being 49.83 and 40.00 PK 11195 equivalent/g, respectively. In particular the compounds acting on peripheral benzodiazepine receptors were found to be extremely concentrated in the young leaves (2572.57 ng PK 11195 equivalent/g). The presence of substances with central benzodiazepine activity in carob extracts seems of great importance in view of the possibility to use carob extract as potential natural products with anxiolytic-sedative effects. Moreover, the prevalence in leaves of substances acting on peripheral benzodiazepine receptor suggests the possible utilisation of leave extracts as chemopreventive agents.

  11. Soman- or kainic acid-induced convulsions decrease muscarinic receptors but not benzodiazepine receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Churchill, L.; Pazdernik, T.L.; Cross, R.S.; Nelson, S.R.; Samson, F.E. (Univ. of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City (USA))

    (3H)Quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB) binding to muscarinic receptors decreased in the rat forebrain after convulsions induced by a single dose of either soman, a potent inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase, or kainic acid, an excitotoxin. A Rosenthal plot revealed that the receptors decreased in number rather than affinity. When the soman-induced convulsions were blocked, the decrease in muscarinic receptors at 3 days was less extensive than when convulsions occurred and at 10 days they approached control levels in most of the brain areas. The most prominent decrements in QNB binding were in the piriform cortex where the decline in QNB binding is probably related to the extensive convulsion-associated neuropathology. The decrements in QNB binding after convulsions suggest that the convulsive state leads to a down-regulation of muscarinic receptors in some brain areas. In contrast to the decrease in QNB binding after convulsions, (3H)flunitrazepam binding to benzodiazepine receptors did not change even in the piriform cortex where the loss in muscarinic receptors was most prominent. Thus, it appears that those neuronal processes that bear muscarinic receptors are more vulnerable to convulsion-induced change than those with benzodiazepine receptors.

  12. Regulation of renal peripheral benzodiazepine receptors by anion transport inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basile, A.S.; Lueddens, W.M.; Skolnick, P.

    1988-01-01

    The in vitro and in vivo regulation of (/sup 3/H)Ro 5-4864 binding to peripheral benzodiazepine receptors (PBR) by ion transport/exchange inhibitors was studied in the kidney. The potencies of 9-anthroic acid, furosemide, bumetanide, hydrochlorothiazide and SITS as inhibitors of (/sup 3/H)Ro 5-4864 binding to renal membranes were consistent with their actions as anion transport inhibitors (Ki approx. = 30 - 130 ..mu..M). In contrast, spironolactone, amiloride, acetazolamide, and ouabain were less potent (Ki=100-1000 ..mu..M). Administration of furosemide to rats for five days resulted in a profound diuresis accompanied by a significant increase in PBR density (43%) that was apparent by the fifth day of treatment. Administration of hydrochlorothiazide or Ro 5-4864 for five days also caused diuresis and increased renal PBR density. Both the diuresis and increased density of PBR produced by Ro 5-4864 were blocked by coadministration of PK 11195, which alone had no effect on either PBR density or urine volume. The equilibrium binding constants of (/sup 3/H)Ro 5-4864 to cardiac membranes were unaffected by administration of any of these drugs. These findings suggest that renal PBR may be selectively modulated in vivo and in vitro by administration of ion transport/exchange inhibitors. 36 references, 4 tables.

  13. Peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor in neurosteroid biosynthesis, neuropathology and neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, V; Lecanu, L; Brown, R C; Han, Z; Yao, Z-X

    2006-01-01

    The peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor is a mitochondrial protein expressed at high levels in steroid synthesizing tissues, including the glial cells of the brain. Peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor binds cholesterol with high affinity and is a key element of the cholesterol mitochondrial import machinery responsible for supplying the substrate cholesterol to the first steroidogenic enzyme, thus initiating and maintaining neurosteroid biosynthesis. Neurosteroid formation and metabolism of steroid intermediates are critical components of normal brain function. Peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor also binds with high affinity various classes of compounds. Upon ligand activation peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor-dependent cholesterol transport into mitochondria is accelerated leading in increased formation of neuroactive steroids. These steroids, such as allopregnanolone, have been shown to be involved in various neurological disorders, such as anxiety and mood disorders. Thus, peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor drug ligand-induced neuroactive steroid formation offers a means to regulate brain dysfunction. Peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor basal expression is upregulated in a number of neuropathologies, including gliomas and neurodegenerative disorders, as well as in various forms of brain injury and inflammation. In Alzheimer's disease pathology neurosteroid biosynthesis is altered and a decrease in the intermediate 22R-hydroxycholesterol levels is observed. This steroid was found to exert neuroprotective properties against beta-amyloid neurotoxicity. Based on this observation, a stable spirostenol derivative showing to display neuroprotective properties was identified, suggesting that compounds developed based on critical intermediates of neurosteroid biosynthesis could offer novel means for neuroprotection. In conclusion, changes in peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor and neurosteroid levels are part of the phenotype seen in

  14. Daily rhythms of benzodiazepine receptor numbers in frontal lobe and cerebellum of the rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brennan, M.J.W.; Volicer, L.; Moore-Ede, M.C.; Borsook, D.

    1985-06-17

    Behavioral, biochemical and neurophysiological evidence suggests that gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) may play an important role in the neural control of circadian rhythms. Central receptors for benzodiazepines are functionally coupled to GABA receptors and appear to mediate behavioral effects of exogenous benzodiazepines. The binding of /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam to synaptic plasma membranes prepared from various regions of rat brain was examined at 6-hour intervals over a 36-hour period. Prominent daily rhythms in receptor number (Bmax) were observed in the frontal lobe and the cerebellum but not in the temporoparietal regions, hypothalamus or medulla/pons. Binding was highest during periods of sleep/low activity with a significant decrease occurring just prior to waking. These results suggest that daily fluctuations in benzodiazepine receptor numbers may be related to the temporal control of sleep/wake and muscle activity cycles. 23 references, 1 figure, 1 table.

  15. Characterization of ( sup 3 H)alprazolam binding to central benzodiazepine receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCabe, R.T.; Mahan, D.R.; Smith, R.B.; Wamsley, J.K. (Neuropsychiatric Research Institute, Fargo, ND (USA))

    1990-10-01

    The binding of the triazolobenzodiazepine ({sup 3}H)alprazolam was studied to characterize the in vitro interactions with benzodiazepine receptors in membrane preparations of rat brain. Studies using nonequilibrium and equilibrium binding conditions for ({sup 3}H)alprazolam resulted in high specific to nonspecific (signal to noise) binding ratios. The binding of ({sup 3}H)alprazolam was saturable and specific with a low nanomolar affinity for benzodiazepine receptors in the rat brain. The Kd was 4.6 nM and the Bmax was 2.6 pmol/mg protein. GABA enhanced ({sup 3}H)alprazolam binding while several benzodiazepine receptor ligands were competitive inhibitors of this drug. Compounds that bind to other receptor sites had a very weak or negligible effect on ({sup 3}H)alprazolam binding. Alprazolam, an agent used as an anxiolytic and in the treatment of depression, acts in vitro as a selective and specific ligand for benzodiazepine receptors in the rat brain. The biochemical binding profile does not appear to account for the unique therapeutic properties which distinguish this compound from the other benzodiazepines in its class.

  16. Peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor: a protein of mitochondrial outer membranes utilizing porphyrins as endogenous ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snyder, S.H.; Verma, A.; Trifiletti, R.R.

    1987-10-01

    The peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor is a site identified by its nanomolar affinity for (/sup 3/H)diazepam, similar to the affinity of diazepam for the central-type benzodiazepine receptor in the brain. The peripheral type benzodiazepine receptor occurs in many peripheral tissues but has discrete localizations as indicated by autoradiographic studies showing uniquely high densities of the receptors in the adrenal cortex and in Leydig cells of the testes. Subcellular localization studies reveal a selective association of the receptors with the outer membrane of mitochondria. Photoaffinity labeling of the mitochondrial receptor with (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam reveals two discrete labeled protein bands of 30 and 35 kDa, respectively. The 35-kDa band appears to be identical with the voltage-dependent anion channel protein porin. Fractionation of numerous peripheral tissues reveals a single principal endogenous ligand for the receptor, consisting of porphyrins, which display nanomolar affinity. Interactions of porphyrins with the mitochondrial receptor may clarify its physiological role and account for many pharmacological actions of benzodiazepines.

  17. A Unified Model of the GABA(A) Receptor Comprising Agonist and Benzodiazepine Binding Sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsbak, Kristine Grønning; Bergmann, Rikke; Sørensen, Pernille Louise

    2013-01-01

    We present a full-length a1b2c2 GABA receptor model optimized for agonists and benzodiazepine (BZD) allosteric modulators. We propose binding hypotheses for the agonists GABA, muscimol and THIP and for the allosteric modulator diazepam (DZP). The receptor model is primarily based on the glutamate...

  18. Reduction of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors during development of benzodiazepine dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Ritsuko; Itoh, Yoshinori; Murata, Yusuke; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Hosoi, Masako; Mine, Kazunori

    2013-01-01

    Prolonged use of benzodiazepines often leads to dependence and withdrawal syndrome. However, the cellular mechanisms underlying benzodiazepine dependence have not been fully clarified. Several investigators have shown an involvement of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) in the pathophysiology of dependence or withdrawal. This study was performed to elucidate the role of mGluRs in benzodiazepine dependence. Withdrawal signs were precipitated in mice by flumazenil injection (25 mg/kg) after continuous subcutaneous infusion of benzodiazepines for 7 days, and the effects of several Gi-coupled receptor ligands on forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation were examined in the cerebral cortex of mice. The mRNA expression for mGluRs was determined by RT-PCR. A single injection of flumazenil precipitated typical withdrawal signs such as tail elevation and tremor in mice treated with diazepam or alprazolam, but not quazepam. The inhibitory effect of nonselective mGluR ligands on adenylate cyclase activity was diminished in mice that showed signs of benzodiazepine withdrawal. The mRNA expression levels of mGluR2 and mGluR3 were lowered in the cerebral cortex of mice pretreated with diazepam or alprazolam. Our findings suggest that the reduction in the expression of group II mGluRs subunits may be involved in the development of benzodiazepine dependence.

  19. The active analog approach applied to the pharmacophore identification of benzodiazepine receptor ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tebib, Souhail; Bourguignon, Jean-Jacques; Wermuth, Camille-Georges

    1987-07-01

    Applied to seven potent benzodiazepine-receptor ligands belonging to chemically different classes, the active analog approach allowed the stepwise identification of the pharmacophoric pattern associated with the recognition by the benzodiazepine receptor. A unique pharmacophore model was derived which involves six critical zones: (a) a π-electron rich aromatic (PAR) zone; (b) two electron-rich zones δ1 and δ2 placed at 5.0 and 4.5 Å respectively from the reference centroid in the PAR zone; (c) a freely rotating aromatic ring (FRA) region; (d) an out-of-plane region (OPR), strongly associated with agonist properties; and (e) an additional hydrophobic region (AHR). The model accommodates all presently known ligands of the benzodiazepine receptor, identifies sensitivity to steric hindrance close to the δ1 zone, accounts for R and S differential affinities and distinguishes requirements for agonist versus non-agonist activity profiles.

  20. [Participation of GABA--benzodiazepine receptor complex in the anxiolytic effect of piracetam].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldavkin, G M; Voronina, T A; Neznamov, G G; Maletova, O K; Eliava, N V

    2006-01-01

    It is established that bicuculline, picrotoxin, and flumazenil (agents blocking different sites of GABA receptor) decrease the anxiolytic effect of piracetam as manifested in the conflict situation test. The most pronounced interaction was observed between piracetam and flumazenyl. On the background of antagonist action, piracetam inhibited the effects of flumazenil (but not those of bicuculline and picrotoxin). Based on these data, it is assumed that the anxiolytic effect of piracetam is mediated to some extent by benzodiazepine site of the GABA-benzodiazepine receptor complex.

  1. 5-HT1A and benzodiazepine receptors in the basolateral amygdala modulate anxiety in the social interaction test, but not in the elevated plus-maze.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, L E; Andrews, N; File, S E

    1996-09-01

    In order to investigate the role of the 5-HT1A receptors of the amygdala in modulating anxiety, rats were implanted with bilateral cannulae aimed at the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala complex and infused with either artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) or the selective 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT (50-200 ng) and tested in two animal models of anxiety. In the elevated plus-maze test, no significant effects were detected in this dose range. In contrast, 8-OH-DPAT caused an overall reduction in levels of social investigation, thus indicating anxiogenic actions in the social interaction test. At 50 ng, 8-OH-DPAT had a selective action on anxiety, while at 200 ng there was a concomitant reduction in locomotor activity and, in some animals, signs of the 5-HT1A syndrome. Evidence that the anxiogenic effect of 8-OH-DPAT (50 ng) was due to activation of 5-HT1A receptors came from the finding that (-)-tertatolol, a 5-HT1A receptor antagonist, reversed this effect at a dose (1.5 micrograms) which was silent when given alone. The benzodiazepine receptor agonist, midazolam (1 and 2 micrograms) was bilaterally administered into the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala and evoked clear-cut anxiolytic effects in the social interaction test. These data indicate that the agonist activation of post-synaptic 5-HT1A receptors in the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala may produce anxiogenic effects, while agonist activation of BDZ receptors in the same areas evokes anxiolytic effects. Our results from the social interaction test are similar to those previously reported from tests of anxiety using punished paradigms, but contrast with those found in the elevated plus-maze. Thus, it is concluded that either the two tests have different sensitivities to midazolam and 8-OH-DPAT or more intriguingly, the tests are evoking fundamentally different states of anxiety, with that evoked by the plus-maze being mediated via brain areas or receptors different from those studied here.

  2. GABA(A)-benzodiazepine receptor complex sensitivity in 5-HT(1A) receptor knockout mice on a 129/Sv background.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pattij, T.; Groenink, L.; Oosting, R.S.; Gugten, J. van der; Maes, R.A.A.; Olivier, B.

    2002-01-01

    Previous studies in 5-HT(1A) receptor knockout (1AKO) mice on a mixed Swiss Websterx129/Sv (SWx129/Sv) and a pure 129/Sv genetic background suggest a differential gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA(A))-benzodiazepine receptor complex sensitivity in both strains, independent from the anxious phenotype. To

  3. Azaflavones compared to flavones as ligands to the benzodiazepine binding site of brain GABAA receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Jakob; Nielsen, Elsebet Østergaard; Liljefors, Tommy

    2008-01-01

    A series of azaflavone derivatives and analogues were prepared and evaluated for their affinity to the benzodiazepine binding site of the GABA(A) receptor, and compared to their flavone counterparts. Three of the compounds, the azaflavones 9 and 12 as well as the new flavone 13, were also assayed...

  4. Triazoloquinazolinediones as novel high affinity ligands for the benzodiazepine site of GABA(A) receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Jakob; Gidlöf, Ritha; Nielsen, Elsebet Østergaard

    2011-01-01

    Based on a pharmacophore model of the benzodiazepine-binding site of GABA(A) receptors, a series of 2-aryl-2,6-dihydro[1,2,4]triazolo[4,3-c]quinazoline-3,5-diones (structure type I) were designed, synthesized, and identified as high-affinity ligands of the binding site. For several compounds, K...

  5. Allosteric modulation by benzodiazepine receptor ligands of the GABAA receptor channel expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigel, E; Baur, R

    1988-01-01

    Chick brain mRNA was isolated and injected into Xenopus oocytes. This led to the expression in the surface membrane of functional GABA-activated channels with properties reminiscent of vertebrate GABAA channels. The GABA-induced current was analyzed quantitatively under voltage-clamp conditions. Picrotoxin inhibited this current in a concentration-dependent manner with IC50 = 0.6 microM. The allosteric modulation of GABA currents by a number of drugs acting at the benzodiazepine binding site was characterized quantitatively. In the presence of the benzodiazepine receptor ligands diazepam and clorazepate, GABA responses were enhanced, and in the presence of the convulsant beta-carboline compound methyl 6,7-dimethoxy-4-ethyl-beta-carboline-3-carboxylate (DMCM), they were depressed. Maximal stimulation of the response elicited by 10 microM GABA was 160% with diazepam and 90% with clorazepate, and maximal inhibition was 42% with DMCM, 30% with methyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate (beta-CCM), 15% with ethyl-8-fluoro-5,6-dihydro-5-methyl-6-oxo-4H-imidazo [1,5a][1,4]benzodiazepine-3-carboxylate (Ro 15-1788), and 12% with ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate (beta-CCE). Half-maximal stimulation was observed with 20 nM diazepam and 390 nM clorazepate, respectively, and half-maximal inhibition with 6 nM DMCM. beta-CCM had a similar effect to DMCM, whereas beta-CCE and Ro 15-1788 showed only small inhibition at low concentrations (less than 1 microM). All the tested carboline compounds and Ro 15-1788 showed a biphasic action and stimulated GABA current at concentrations higher than 1 microM.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Behavioural effects of the benzodiazepine receptor partial agonist RO 16-6028 in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belzung, C; Misslin, R; Vogel, E

    1989-01-01

    The imidazo-diazepinone RO 16-6028 is a benzodiazepine receptor partial agonist which exhibits some anti-conflict effects in the two-chambered light/dark test without significantly affecting the behaviour of mice confronted with the staircase test. In addition, this drug slightly reduced locomotion and more markedly rearing in a free exploration procedure. These results indicate that RO 16-6028 appears to produce some anxiolytic and sedative properties like full agonists, but with weaker magnitude. This could be related to the benzodiazepine partial agonistic profile of the compound.

  7. Affinity of 3-acyl substituted 4-quinolones at the benzodiazepine site of GABAA receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lager, Erik; Nilsson, Jakob; Nielsen, Elsebet Østergaard

    2008-01-01

    The finding that alkyl 1,4-dihydro-4-oxoquinoline-3-carboxylate and N-alkyl-1,4-dihydro-4-oxoquinoline-3-carboxamide derivatives may be high-affinity ligands at the benzodiazepine binding site of the GABA(A) receptor, prompted a study of 3-acyl-1,4-dihydro-4-oxoquinoline (3-acyl-4-quinolones......). In general, the affinity of the 3-acyl derivatives was found to be comparable with the 3-carboxylate and the 3-carboxamide derivatives, and certain substituents (e.g., benzyl) in position 6 were again shown to be important. As it is believed that the benzodiazepine binding site is situated between an alpha...

  8. Interactions between modulators of the GABA(A) receptor: Stiripentol and benzodiazepines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Janet L

    2011-03-05

    Many patients with refractory epilepsy are treated with polytherapy, and nearly 15% of epilepsy patients receive two or more anti-convulsant agents. The anti-convulsant stiripentol is used as an add-on treatment for the childhood epilepsy syndrome known as severe myoclonic epilepsy in infancy (Dravet syndrome). Stiripentol has multiple mechanisms of action, both enhancing GABA(A) receptors and reducing activity of metabolic enzymes that break down other drugs. Stiripentol is typically co-administered with other anti-convulsants such as benzodiazepines which also act through GABA(A) receptor modulation. Stiripentol slows the metabolism of some of these drugs through inhibition of a variety of cytochrome P450 enzymes, but could also influence their effects on GABAergic neurotransmission. Is it rational to co-administer drugs which can act through the same target? To examine the potential interaction between these modulators, we transiently transfected HEK-293T cells to produce α3β3γ2L or α3β3δ recombinant GABA(A) receptors. Using whole-cell patch clamp recordings, we measured the response to each benzodiazepine alone and in combination with a maximally effective concentration of stiripentol. We compared the responses to four different benzodiazepines: diazepam, clonazepam, clobazam and norclobazam. In all cases we found that these modulators were equally effective in the presence and absence of stiripentol. The δ-containing receptors were insensitive to modulation by the benzodiazepines, which did not affect potentiation by stiripentol. These data suggest that stiripentol and the benzodiazepines act independently at GABA(A) receptors and that polytherapy could be expected to increase the maximum effect beyond either drug alone, even without consideration of changes in metabolism.

  9. THIP and isoguvacine are partial agonists of GABA-stimulated benzodiazepine receptor binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karobath, M; Lippitsch, M

    1979-10-15

    The effects of THIP and isoguvacine on 3H-flunitrazepam binding to washed membranes prepared from the cerebral cortex of adult rats have been examined. THIP, which has only minimal stimulatory effects on benzodiazepine (BZ) receptor binding, has been found to inhibit the stimulation induced by small concentrations (2 microM) of exogenous GABA. While isoguvacine stimulates BZ receptor binding, although to a smaller extent than GABA, it also antagonizes the stimulation of BZ receptor binding induced by GABA. Thus THIP and isoguvacine exhibit the properties of a partial agonist of GABA-stimulated BZ receptor binding.

  10. Benzodiazepine receptor-mediated behavioral effects of nitrous oxide in the rat social interaction test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quock, R M; Wetzel, P J; Maillefer, R H; Hodges, B L; Curtis, B A; Czech, D A

    1993-09-01

    The present study was conducted to ascertain whether an anxiolytic effect of nitrous oxide was demonstrable in rats using the social interaction test and whether this drug effect might be mediated by benzodiazepine receptors. Compared to behavior of vehicle-pretreated, room air-exposed rats, rat pairs exposed to nitrous oxide showed a generally inverted U-shaped dose-response curve with the maximum increase in social interaction encounters occurring at 25% and significant increase in time of active social interaction at 15-35%; higher concentrations produced a sedative effect that reduced social interaction. Treatment with 5.0 mg/kg of the anxiolytic benzodiazepine chlordiazepoxide also increased social interaction. Pretreatment with 10 mg/kg of the benzodiazepine receptor blocker flumazenil, which alone had no effect, significantly antagonized the social interaction-increasing effects of both nitrous oxide and chlordiazepoxide. In summary, these findings suggest that nitrous oxide produces a flumazenil-sensitive effect comparable to that of chlordiazepoxide and implicate central benzodiazepine mechanisms in mediation of the anxiolytic effect of nitrous oxide.

  11. Imaging benzodiazepine receptors in man with C-11-suriclone and positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frost, J.J.; Dannals, R.F.; Ravert, H.T.; Wilson, A.A.; Links, J.M.; Trifiletti, R.; Snyder, S.H.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1985-05-01

    Suriclone is a potent cyclopyrrolone, anti-anxiety drug which binds to the benzodiazepine receptor complex (BZR) with high affinity. Suriclone binds to a site on the BZR distinct from the site where benzodiazepines bind. The K/sub D/ of suriclone at 37oC is 0.03 nM. C-11-suriclone (SUR) was synthesized by reacting C-CH3I with the appropriate amine precursor. SUR (1 ..mu..g/kg) was injected IV into a baboon alone or with 1 mg/kg of Ro-151788, a benzodiazepine antagonist, and serial PET scans of the brain were obtained. High radioactivity concentrations were observed in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum which contain high densities of BZR, intermediate concentrations in thalamus and low concentrations in the striatum. When Ro-151788 was given a uniform distribution of radioactivity was observed; the radioactivity was reduced to ca. 25% of control values in the brain which was contained within the PET slice. SUR (0.2 ..mu..g/kg) was next administered to a human subject. From 30-60 minutes after injection high radioactivity concentrations were observed in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum, intermediate concentrations in the thalamus and a low concentration in the caudate. Radioactivity in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum decreased slowly with time, implying that binding of SUR to a high affinity site had occurred. These results demonstrate utility of SUR for measuring binding to the benzodiazepine receptor complex non-invasively in man.

  12. Abnormal benzodiazepine and zinc modulation of GABAA receptors in an acquired absence epilepsy model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jie; Ellsworth, Kevin; Ellsworth, Marc; Schroeder, Katherine M; Smith, Kris; Fisher, Robert S

    2004-07-01

    Brain cholesterol synthesis inhibition (CSI) at a young age in rats has been shown to be a faithful model of acquired absence epilepsy, a devastating condition for which few therapies or models exist. We employed the CSI model to study cellular mechanisms of acquired absence epilepsy in Long-Evans Hooded rats. Patch-clamp, whole-cell recordings were compared from neurons acutely dissociated from the nucleus reticularis of thalamus (nRt) treated and untreated with a cholesterol synthesis inhibitor, U18666A. In U18666A-treated animals, 91% of rats developed EEG spike-waves (SWs). Patchclamp results revealed that although there was no remarkable change in GABAA receptor affinity, both a loss of ability of benzodiazepines to enhance GABAA-receptor responses and an increase of Zn2+ inhibition of GABAA-receptor responses of nRt neurons occurred in Long-Evans Hooded rats previously administered U18666A. This change was specific, since no significant changes were found in neurons exposed to the GABA allosteric modulator, pentobarbital. Taken collectively, these findings provide evidence for abnormalities in benzodiazepine and Zn2+ modulation of GABAA receptors in the CSI model, and suggest that decreased gamma2 subunit expression may underlie important aspects of generation of thalamocortical SWs in atypical absence seizures. The present results are also consistent with recent findings that mutation of the gamma2 subunit of the GABAA receptor changes benzodiazepine modulation in families with generalized epilepsy syndromes.

  13. Benzodiazepine/GABA receptor complex during severe ethanol intoxication and withdrawal in the rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemmingsen, R.; Braestrup, C.; Nielsen, M.; Barry, D.I. (Dept. of Psychiatry, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, St. Hans Mental Hospital, Roskilde, and Ferrosan Research Laboratory, Soeborg, Denmark)

    1982-01-01

    The benzodiazepine/GABA (gammaaminobutyric acid) receptor complex was investigated during severe ethanol intoxication and withdrawal in the rat. The intragastric intubation technique was used to establish physical ethanol dependence in the animals. Cerebral cortex from male Wistar rats was studied 1) after 31/2 days of severe ethanol intoxication, 2) during the ethanol withdrawal reaction and 3) in a control group. The effect of GABA-ergic activation by muscimol and THIP (4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazole(5,4-c)pyridin-3-01) on /sup 3/H-diazepam binding was unchanged during ethanol intoxication and withdrawal, as was the affinity constant (Ksub(D)) and the maximal number of binding sites (Bsub(max)) for /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam. In conclusion, the benzodiazepine/GABA receptor complex is unlikely to play any causual part in physical ethanol dependence.

  14. Benzodiazepine effect of {sup 125}I-iomazenil-benzodiazepine receptor binding and serum corticosterone level in a rat model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukumitsu, Nobuyoshi [Proton Medical Research Center, University of Tsukuba, Ibaragi, 305-8575 (Japan)]. E-mail: gzl13162@nifty.ne.jp; Ogi, Shigeyuki [Department of Radiology, Jikei University School of Medicine, Tokyo, 105-8461 (Japan); Uchiyama, Mayuki [Department of Radiology, Jikei University School of Medicine, Tokyo, 105-8461 (Japan); Mori, Yutaka [Department of Radiology, Jikei University School of Medicine, Tokyo, 105-8461 (Japan)

    2005-01-01

    To test the change in free or unoccupied benzodiazepine receptor (BZR) density in response to diazepam, we investigated {sup 125}I-iomazenil ({sup 125}I-IMZ) binding and serum corticosterone levels in a rat model. Wistar male rats, which received psychological stress using a communication box for 5 days, were divided into two groups according to the amount of administered diazepam: no diazepam [D (0)] group and 10 mg/kg per day [D (10)] group of 12 rats each. The standardized uptake value (SUV) of {sup 125}I-IMZ of the D (10) group were significantly lower (P<.05) than those of the D (0) group in the frontal, parietal and temporal cortices, globus pallidus, hippocampus, amygdala and hypothalamus. The serum corticosterone level ratio in the D (10) group was significantly lower than that in the D (0) group (P<.05). From the change in serum corticosterone levels, diazepam attenuated the psychological stress produced by the physical stress to animals in adjacent compartments. From the reduced binding of {sup 125}I-IMZ, it is clear that diazepam competed with endogenous ligand for the free BZR sites, and the frontal, parietal and temporal cortices, globus pallidus, hippocampus, amygdala and hypothalamus are important areas in which {sup 125}I-IMZ binding is strongly affected by administration of diazepam.

  15. Multicomponent Synthesis of Diverse 1,4-Benzodiazepine Scaffolds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, Yijun; Khoury, Kareem; Chanas, Tyler; Domling, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    The 1,4-benzodiazepine (BDZ) scaffold is of particular interest in drug design due to a balanced ensemble of beneficial physicochemical properties including a semirigid and compact diazepine ring with spatial placements of several substituents, combined with low number of rotatable bonds, hydrogen b

  16. Study on measurement of free ligand concentration in blood and quantitative analysis of brain benzodiazepine receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, Kenji; Goromaru, Tsuyoshi; Inoue, Osamu; Itoh, Takashi; Yamasaki, Toshiro.

    1988-11-01

    We developed the method to determine rapidly the free ligand concentration in the blood as an input function for the purpose of quantitative analysis of binding potential (B/sub max//K/sub d/) of brain benzodiazepine receptor in vivo. It was found that the unmetabolized radioligand in the blood after intravenous administration of /sup 3/H-Ro 15 - 1788 could be extracted by chloroform, whereas the radioactive metabolites could not be extracted. And the plasma protein binding of /sup 3/H-Ro 15 - 1788 was determined using an ultrafiltration method. The biodistribution of /sup 3/H-Ro 15 - 1788 in the cerebral cortex, cerebellum and pons-medulla after intravenous administration of the radiotracer in the control and forced-swimmed mice was examined. And the time course of the free ligand concentration in the blood was determined as described above. Further, the binding potential of benzodiazepine receptor in the mouse brain was analyzed using a simple mathematical model. It was suggested that the binding potential of benzodiazepine receptor in the mouse brain was significantly decreased by forced-swimming. In conclusion, it was found that these methods would be useful for quantitative analysis of clinical data in the human brain using /sup 11/C-Ro 15 - 1788 and positron emission tomography (PET).

  17. GABA/benzodiazepine receptor complex in long-sleep and short-sleep mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marley, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    LS mice are more sensitive to benzodiazepine-induced anesthesia; however, the two lines do not differ in their hypothermic response to flurazepam. SS mice are more resistant to 3-mercaptopropionic acid-induced seizures and more sensitive to the anticonvulsant effects of benzodiazepines. The various correlates of GABA and benzodiazepine actions probably are the results of different mechanisms of action and/or differential regional control. Bicuculline competition for /sup 3/H-GABA binding sites is greater in SS cerebellar tissue and /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam binding is greater in the mid-brain region of LS mice. GABA enhancement of /sup 3/H-flunitrazepma binding is greater in SS mice. Ethanol also enhances /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam binding and increases the levels of /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam binding above those observed for GABA. Using correlational techniques on data from LS and SS mice and several inbred mouse strains, it was demonstrated that a positive relationship exists between the degree of receptor coupling within the GABA receptor complex and the degree of resistance to seizures.

  18. Altered response to benzodiazepine anxiolytics in mice lacking GABA B(1) receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mombereau, Cedric; Kaupmann, Klemens; van der Putten, Herman; Cryan, John F

    2004-08-16

    Recently, we demonstrated that mice lacking the GABA(B(1)) subunit were more anxious than wild-type animals in several behavioural paradigms, most notably in the light-dark test. In an attempt to assess the effects of classical benzodiazepine anxiolytics on anxiety-like behaviour observed in these mice, animals were administered either chlordiazepoxide (10 mg/kg, p.o.) or diazepam (7.5 mg/kg, p.o.) prior to testing in the light-dark box. Surprisingly, in contrast with the wild-type mice, neither benzodiazepines decreased anxiety-like behaviour in GABA(B(1))(-/-) mice. These data suggest that targeted deletion of GABA(B(1)) subunit alters GABA(A) receptor function in vivo.

  19. Fibrous and protoplasmic astrocytes express GABAA receptors that differ in benzodiazepine pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosewater, K; Sontheimer, H

    1994-02-04

    Astrocytes cultured from spinal cord contain two morphologically distinguishable types of astrocytes: fibrous and protoplasmic cells. Both astrocyte subtypes, in culture, are able to express GABAA receptors, and their activation results in inward currents at the resting potential. Using patch-clamp electrophysiology we characterized their basic receptor pharmacology and compared it to spinal cord neurons that were also present in small numbers in these cultures. As in neuronal GABAA receptors, the local anesthetic pentobarbital effectively potentiated GABA-induced currents in both astrocyte subtypes. Similarly, the benzodiazepine diazepam, on average doubled GABA-induced currents in both astrocytes subtypes. In contrast to these effects that were similar in both astrocytes types and similar to spinal cord neurons, the response to the convulsant methyl-4-ethyl-6,7-dimethoxy-beta-carboline-3-carboxylate (DMCM), which is an inverse benzodiazepine agonist differs between astrocyte subtypes. DMCM reduced GABA-induced currents by about 50% in fibrous astrocytes as we also observed with spinal cord neurons. In contrast, DMCM increased GABA currents in protoplasmic astrocytes by up to 150%, an effect never observed in neurons. DMCM potentiations of GABA currents have recently been attributed to differences in receptor subunit composition. Our results thus indicate that subtypes of astrocytes express GABAA receptors that differ pharmacologically and likely differ also in subunit composition.

  20. Pattern of benzodiazepine use in psychiatric outpatients in Pakistan: a cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haider Imran

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Benzodiazepines (BDZ are the largest-selling drug group in the world. The potential of dependence with BDZ has been known for almost three decades now. In countries like Pakistan where laws against unlicensed sale of BDZ are not implemented vigorously the risk of misuse of and dependence on these drugs is even higher. Previous studies have shown that BDZ prevalence among patients/visitors to general outpatient clinics in Pakistan may be as high as 30%. However, no research has been carried out on the prevalence of BDZ use in psychiatric patients in Pakistan. Methods We carried out a cross-sectional survey over 3 months in psychiatry outpatient clinics of two tertiary care hospitals in Karachi and Lahore. Besides basic socio-demographic data the participants were asked if they were taking a BDZ at present and if yes, the frequency, route and dosage of the drug, who had initiated the drug and why it had been prescribed. We used chi-square test and t-test to find out which socio-demographic or clinical factors were associated with an increased risk of BDZ use. We used Logistic Regression to find out which variable(s best predicted the increased likelihood of BDZ use. Results Out of a total of 419 participants 187 (45% of the participants had been currently using at least one BDZ. Seventy-three percent of the users had been using the drug for 4 weeks or longer and 87% were taking it every day. In 90% of cases the BDZ had been initiated by a doctor, who was a psychiatrist in 70% of the cases. Female gender, increasing age, living in Lahore, and having seen a psychiatrist before, were associated with an increased likelihood of using BDZ. Conclusion The study shows how high BDZ use is in psychiatric outpatients in Pakistan. Most of the users were taking it for a duration and with a frequency which puts them at risk of becoming dependent on BDZ. In most of the cases it had been initiated by a doctor. Both patients and doctors need to

  1. Interactions between modulators of the GABAA receptor: Stiripentol and benzodiazepines

    OpenAIRE

    Fisher, Janet L.

    2011-01-01

    Many patients with refractory epilepsy are treated with polytherapy, and nearly 15% of epilepsy patients receive two or more anti-convulsant agents. The anti-convulsant stiripentol is used as an add-on treatment for the childhood epilepsy syndrome known as severe myoclonic epilepsy in infancy (Dravet Syndrome). Stiripentol has multiple mechanisms of action, both enhancing GABAA receptors and reducing activity of metabolic enzymes that break down other drugs. Stiripentol is typically co-admini...

  2. Multiple benzodiazepine receptors in the ovine brain: ontogenesis, properties, and distribution of /sup 3/H-diazepam binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villiger, J.W.; Taylor, K.M.; Gluckman, P.D.

    1982-01-01

    Benzodiazepine receptors in the ovine frontal cortex were present at 56 days gestation and developed slowly until 96 days when the number increased rapidly, reaching adult levels by 120 days gestation. Scatchard analysis of 3H-diazepam specifically bound to cortical membranes suggested high (KD approximately equal to 2.0 nM) and low (KD approximately equal to 20.0 nM) affinity benzodiazepine receptors at all stages of development. Whereas the affinity of these receptors for 3H-diazepam did not alter during development, the number of both high and low affinity receptors increased significantly between 56 and 120 days gestation. The number of low affinity receptors were higher in late gestation and early neonatal life than in adulthood. The functional state of these receptors as determined by sensitivity to GABA did not alter during development. However, in the adult, nitrazepam, flunitrazepam, midazolam, and 1-methylisoguanosine were more potent in displacing 3H-diazepam at the low affinity than the high affinity receptor, whereas chlordiazepoxide and diazepam had greater potency at the high affinity binding site. Development of the benzodiazepine receptor in the majority of other brain regions studied occurred primarily after 68 days gestation, as was the case in frontal cortex. In contrast, hindbrain and midbrain benzodiazepine receptors had reached adult levels by 68 days gestation.

  3. Treatment with dehydroepiandrosterone increases peripheral benzodiazepine receptors of mitochondria from cerebral cortex in D-galactose-induced aged rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chunfu; Lang, Senyang; Zuo, Pingping; Yang, Nan; Wang, Xiangqing

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) could regulate the expression of peripheral benzodiazepine receptors of mitochondria in cerebral cortex. The rats were divided into five groups. Those, in the vehicle-physiological or senescent group, received physiological or d-galactose (subcutaneously) once a day. Rats, in the vehicle-dimethyl sulfoxide- or DHEA-treated senescent group, received 2% of dimethyl sulfoxide or DHEA (intraperitoneally) every other day besides D-galactose (subcutaneously) once a day. Rats in the DHEA-treated normal group received physiological once a day and DHEA every other day. After 8-week, spatial learning was assessed for 5 days by water maze methods. Following behavioural testing, the cerebral cortex mitochondria were purified for PK11195 binding analysis. When compared to the respective vehicle, D-galactose alone induced a significant impairment in water maze performance accompanied by a reduction (30.7%) in peripheral benzodiazepine receptor density of mitochondria, and DHEA displayed a significant enhancement in learning memory accompanied by the elevation (18.3%) of peripheral benzodiazepine receptor density but not affinity in senescent rats. DHEA showed insignificant effects on both learning/memory ability and peripheral benzodiazepine receptors in normal rats when compared to physiological saline. These results suggest that chronic treatment with DHEA enhance cognitive function and increase peripheral benzodiazepine receptor density in cerebral cortex mitochondria in middle-aged senescent rats.

  4. GABA(A) receptors implicated in REM sleep control express a benzodiazepine binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tin Quang; Liang, Chang-Lin; Marks, Gerald A

    2013-08-21

    It has been reported that non-subtype-selective GABAA receptor antagonists injected into the nucleus pontis oralis (PnO) of rats induced long-lasting increases in REM sleep. Characteristics of these REM sleep increases were identical to those resulting from injection of muscarinic cholinergic agonists. Both actions were blocked by the muscarinic antagonist, atropine. Microdialysis of GABAA receptor antagonists into the PnO resulted in increased acetylcholine levels. These findings were consistent with GABAA receptor antagonists disinhibiting acetylcholine release in the PnO to result in an acetylcholine-mediated REM sleep induction. Direct evidence has been lacking for localization in the PnO of the specific GABAA receptor-subtypes mediating the REM sleep effects. Here, we demonstrated a dose-related, long-lasting increase in REM sleep following injection (60 nl) in the PnO of the inverse benzodiazepine agonist, methyl-6,7-dimethoxy-4-ethyl-β-carboline (DMCM, 10(-2)M). REM sleep increases were greater and more consistently produced than with the non-selective antagonist gabazine, and both were blocked by atropine. Fluorescence immunohistochemistry and laser scanning confocal microscopy, colocalized in PnO vesicular acetylcholine transporter, a presynaptic marker of cholinergic boutons, with the γ2 subunit of the GABAA receptor. These data provide support for the direct action of GABA on mechanisms of acetylcholine release in the PnO. The presence of the γ2 subunit at this locus and the REM sleep induction by DMCM are consistent with binding of benzodiazepines by a GABAA receptor-subtype in control of REM sleep.

  5. 3-Alkyl- and 3-amido-isothiazoloquinolin-4-ones as ligands for the benzodiazepine site of GABAA receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Jakob; Nielsen, Elsebet Østergaard; Liljefors, Tommy

    2012-01-01

    Based on a pharmacophore model of the benzodiazepine binding site of the GABA(A) receptors, developed with synthetic flavones and potent 3-carbonylquinolin-4-ones, 3-alkyl- and 3-amido-6-methylisothiazoloquinolin-4-ones were designed, prepared and assayed. The suggestion that the interaction...... interaction with the lipophilic pockets of the pharmacophore model. The most potent 3-alkyl derivative, 3-pentyl-6-methylisothiazoloquinolin-4-one, has an affinity (K(i) value) for the benzodiazepine binding site of the GABA(A) receptors of 13nM. However, by replacing the 3-pentyl with a 3-butyramido group...

  6. Anticonvulsive Activity in Audiogenic DBA/2 Mice of 1,4-Benzodiazepines and 1,5-Benzodiazepines with Different Activities at Cerebellar Granule Cell GABAA Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatta, Elena; Cupello, Aroldo; Di Braccio, Mario; Grossi, Giancarlo; Robello, Mauro; Scicchitano, Francesca; Russo, Emilio; De Sarro, Giovambattista

    2016-12-01

    Herein, we tested in a model of generalized reflex epilepsy in mice different 1,4-benzodiazepines and 1,5-benzodiazepines with agonistic activity at the GABAA receptor population contributing to the peak component of the chloride current elicited by GABA in cerebellar granule cells (CGCs) in culture. The substances have all higher lipophilia than clobazam, an antiepileptic drug well known and used in human therapy. This ensures that they all can pass relatively easily the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The benzodiazepines were administered intraperitoneally (i.p.) and tested for their activity against sound-induced tonic and clonic seizures in a genetic model of experimental epilepsy, the DBA/2 mouse. Our data demonstrates an interesting inverse correlation between the ED50s and the efficacy (E %) of the drugs in increasing the peak chloride current elicited by GABA in cerebellar granule cells in culture. There is indication of the existence of a threshold of E % above which the increase of ED50 with increasing E % becomes linear. This is statistically significant for the clonic phase, whereas it is at the limit of significance for the tonic one. A possible interpretation of these results is that in this epilepsy model, projections from the cerebellum exert a convulsion prevention activity.

  7. Modulation of acetylcholine release from rat striatal slices by the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Supavilai, P.; Karobath, M.

    1985-02-04

    GABA, THIP and muscimol enhance spontaneous and inhibit electrically induced release of tritium labelled compounds from rat striatal slices which have been pre-labelled with /sup 3/H-choline. Baclofen is inactive in this model. Muscimol can inhibit electrically induced release of tritiated material by approximately 75% with half maximal effects at 2 ..mu..M. The response to muscimol can be blocked by the GABA antagonists bicuculline methobromide, picrotoxin, anisatin, R 5135 and CPTBO (cyclopentylbicyclophosphate). Drugs which act on the benzodiazepine receptor (BR) require the presence of muscimol to be effective and they modulate the effects of muscimol in a bidirectional manner. Thus BR agonists enhance and inverse BR agonists attenuate the inhibitory effects of muscimol on electrically induced release. Ro15-1788, a BR antagonist, does not modulate the inhibitory effects of muscimol but antagonizes the actions of clonazepam, a BR agonist, and of DMCM, an inverse BR agonist. These results demonstrate that a GABA/benzodiazepine receptor complex can modulate acetylcholine release from rat striatal slices in vitro. 24 references, 3 figures, 5 table.

  8. Imidazo-thiazine, -diazinone and -diazepinone derivatives. Synthesis, structure and benzodiazepine receptor binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieć-Kononowicz, K; Karolak-Wojciechowska, J; Müller, C E; Schumacher, B; Pekala, E; Szymańska, E

    2001-05-01

    In our search for new compounds acting on benzodiazepine receptors among the fused 2-thiohydantoin derivatives, a series of arylidene imidazo[2,1-b]thiazines was synthesized. The 1,2- and 2,3- cyclized derivatives of mono- and di-substituted Z-5-arylidene-2-thiohydantoins were examined (the X-ray crystal structure of Z-2-cinnamylidene-6,7-dihydro-5H-imidazo[2,1-b][1,3]thiazin-3(2H)-one was determined) and compared with the diphenyl derivatives. To investigate the influence of the type of annelated ring on the biological activity, imidazo[2,1-b]pyrimidinone and imidazo[2,1-b]diazepinone derivatives were obtained. The method used in annelation (1,2- and 2,3-cyclized isomers with the exception of fused arylidene imidazothiazines), the substitution pattern (arylidene towards diphenyl) as well as the character of the annelated ring had minor influence on the benzodiazepine receptor affinity of the investigated compounds. It appears that the greatest influence on the biological activity has the character and position of the substituents on the arylidene ring.

  9. Comparison of anticonvulsant tolerance, crosstolerance, and benzodiazepine receptor binding following chronic treatment with diazepam or midazolam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey-Williams, V A; Wu, Y; Rosenberg, H C

    1994-07-01

    In a previous study, rats treated chronically with flurazepam were tolerant to the anticonvulsant action of some benzodiazepines (BZs), but not others (34). To determine if this differential crosstolerance was unique to flurazepam, rats were treated chronically with diazepam or midazolam, and tested for tolerance to the anticonvulsant actions of diazepam, midazolam, clonazepam, and clobazam. Regional benzodiazepine receptor binding in brain was also studied. In contrast to previous findings with flurazepam, 1 week treatment with diazepam or with midazolam did not cause tolerance. Rats treated with diazepam for 3 weeks were tolerant to diazepam, clonazepam, clobazam, and midazolam. In contrast, rats treated 3 weeks with midazolam were tolerant to diazepam and midazolam, but not clobazam or clonazepam. Neither diazepam nor midazolam treatment for 3 weeks altered BZ binding in cerebral cortex, cerebellum, or hippocampus. The effects of chronic BZ treatment depended not only on the BZ given chronically, but also on the BZ used to evaluate these effects, suggesting drug-specific interactions of different BZs with their receptors.

  10. Differential expression of the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor and gremlin during adipogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, F Marlene; Wakade, Chandramohan; Mahesh, Virendra B; Brann, Darrell W

    2005-05-01

    This study used the mRNA differential display technique to identify differentially expressed genes during the process of adipogenesis in the preadipocyte cell line, 3T3-L1. 3T3-L1 cells were treated with dexamethasone, isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, and insulin to induce differentiation into mature adipocytes. Cells were collected at three time-points during differentiation: Day 0 (d0), or nondifferentiated; Day 3 (d3), during differentiation; and Day 10 (d10), >90% of the cells had differentiated into mature adipocytes. Initial studies yielded 18 potentially differentially regulated cDNA candidates (8 down-regulated and 10 up-regulated). Reverse Northern and Northern blots confirmed differential expression of six of the candidates. Four of the candidates up-regulated on d3 and d10 were identified by sequence analysis to be lipoprotein lipase, a well-known marker of adipocyte differentiation. A fifth candidate that was expressed in d0, but not d3 or d10, was identified as DRM/gremlin, a bone morphogenetic protein antagonist. Finally, a sixth candidate that was increased at d3 and d10 was identified as the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor, which has been implicated in proliferation, differentiation, and cholesterol transport in cells. This study is the first to show that peripheral benzodiazepine receptor and DRM/gremlin are expressed in preadipocyte cell lines and that they are differentially regulated during adipogenesis.

  11. Efficacy and tolerability of benzodiazepines versus antidepressants in anxiety disorders: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offidani, Emanuela; Guidi, Jenny; Tomba, Elena; Fava, Giovanni Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Placebo-controlled trials showed that both benzodiazepines (BDZ) and antidepressant drugs (AD) are effective in treating anxiety disorders. However, in the last years a progressive shift in the prescribing pattern from BDZ to newer AD has taken place. The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis is to analyze whether controlled comparisons support such a shift. CINHAL, the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, PubMed and Web of Science were searched from inception up to December 2012. A total of 22 studies met the criteria for inclusion. They were mostly concerned with tricyclic antidepressants (TCA; 18/22) and involved different anxiety disorders. In order to reduce clinical heterogeneity, only the 10 investigations that dealt with the comparison between TCA and BDZ in panic disorder were submitted to meta-analysis, whereas the remaining papers were individually summarized and critically examined. According to the systematic review, no consistent evidence emerged supporting the advantage of using TCA over BDZ in treating generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), complex phobias and mixed anxiety-depressive disorders. Indeed, BDZ showed fewer treatment withdrawals and adverse events than AD. In panic disorder with and without agoraphobia our meta-analysis found BDZ treatments more effective in reducing the number of panic attacks than TCA (risk ratio, RR = 1.13; 95% CI = 1.01-1.27). Furthermore, BDZ medications were significantly better tolerated than TCA drugs, causing less discontinuation (RR = 0.40; 95% CI = 0.20-0.57) and side effects (RR = 0.41; 95% CI = 0.34-0.50). As to newer AD, BDZ trials resulted in comparable or greater improvements and fewer adverse events in patients suffering from GAD or panic disorder. The change in the prescribing pattern favoring newer AD over BDZ in the treatment of anxiety disorders has occurred without supporting evidence. Indeed, the role and usefulness of BDZ need to be reappraised.

  12. Relation of cell proliferation to expression of peripheral benzodiazepine receptors in human breast cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beinlich, A; Strohmeier, R; Kaufmann, M; Kuhl, H

    2000-08-01

    Peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) agonist [(3)H]Ro5-4864 has been shown to bind with high affinity to the human breast cancer cell line BT-20. Therefore, we investigated different human breast cancer cell lines with regard to binding to [(3)H]Ro5-4864 and staining with the PBR-specific monoclonal antibody 8D7. Results were correlated with cell proliferation characteristics. In flow cytometric analysis, the estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer cell lines BT-20, MDA-MB-435-S, and SK-BR-3 showed significantly higher PBR expression (relative fluorescence intensity) than the ER-positive cells T47-D, MCF-7 and BT-474 (Pdiazepam-binding inhibitor are possibly involved in the regulation of cell proliferation of human breast cancer cell lines.

  13. Souroubea sympetala (Marcgraviaceae): a medicinal plant that exerts anxiolysis through interaction with the GABAA benzodiazepine receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullally, Martha; Cayer, Christian; Kramp, Kari; Otárola Rojas, Marco; Sanchez Vindas, Pablo; Garcia, Mario; Poveda Alvarez, Luis; Durst, Tony; Merali, Zul; Trudeau, Vance L; Arnason, John T

    2014-09-01

    The mode of action of the anxiolytic medicinal plant Souroubea sympetala was investigated to test the hypothesis that extracts and the active principle act at the pharmacologically important GABAA-benzodiazepine (GABAA-BZD) receptor. Leaf extracts prepared by ethyl acetate extraction or supercritical extraction, previously determined to have 5.54 mg/g and 6.78 mg/g of the active principle, betulinic acid, respectively, reduced behavioural parameters associated with anxiety in a rat model. When animals were pretreated with the GABAA-BZD receptor antagonist flumazenil, followed by the plant extracts, or a more soluble derivative of the active principle, the methyl ester of betulinic acid (MeBA), flumazenil eliminated the anxiety-reducing effect of plant extracts and MeBA, demonstrating that S. sympetala acts via an agonist action on the GABAA-BZD receptor. An in vitro GABAA-BZD competitive receptor binding assay also demonstrated that S. sympetala extracts have an affinity for the GABAA-BZD receptor, with an EC50 value of 123 μg/mL (EtOAc leaf extract) and 154 μg/mL (supercritical CO2 extract). These experiments indicate that S. sympetala acts at the GABAA-BZD receptor to elicit anxiolysis.

  14. Effects of PhD examination stress on allopregnanolone and cortisol plasma levels and peripheral benzodiazepine receptor density.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Droogleever Fortuyn, H.A.; Broekhoven, F. van; Span, P.N.; Backstrom, T.; Zitman, F.G.; Verkes, R.J.

    2004-01-01

    Peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) density in blood platelets and plasma allopregnanolone concentration in humans were determined following acute stress as represented by PhD examination. Fifteen healthy PhD students participated. Heart rate, blood pressure, plasma allopregnanolone, plasma cor

  15. Single dose efficacy evaluation of two partial benzodiazepine receptor agonists in photosensitive epilepsy patients : A placebo-controlled pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kasteleijn-Nolst Trenite, Dorothée G A|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304819298; Groenwold, Rolf H H|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/30481203X; Schmidt, Bernd; Löscher, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Benzodiazepines (BZDs) are highly effective to suppress various types of seizures; however, their clinical use is limited due to adverse effects and tolerance and dependence liability. Drugs that act only as partial agonists at the BZD recognition site (initially termed "BZD receptor") of the GABAA

  16. Single dose efficacy evaluation of two partial benzodiazepine receptor agonists in photosensitive epilepsy patients : A placebo-controlled pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kasteleijn-Nolst Trenite, Dorothée G A; Groenwold, Rolf H H; Schmidt, Bernd; Löscher, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Benzodiazepines (BZDs) are highly effective to suppress various types of seizures; however, their clinical use is limited due to adverse effects and tolerance and dependence liability. Drugs that act only as partial agonists at the BZD recognition site (initially termed "BZD receptor") of the GABAA

  17. Binding of (/sup 3/H)ethyl-. beta. -carboline-3-carboxylate to brain benzodiazepine receptors. Effect of drugs and anions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, E.F.; Paul, S.M.; Rice, K.C.; Skolnick, P. (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (USA)); Cain, M. (Wisconsin Univ., Milwaukee (USA). Dept. of Chemistry)

    1981-09-28

    It is reported that in contrast to the changes in affinity of (/sup 3/H)benzodiazepines elicited by halide ions, barbiturates, and pyrazolopyridines, the apparent affinity of ..beta..-(/sup 3/H)CCE (ethyl-..beta..-carboline-3-carboxylate) is unaffected by these agents. Furthermore, Scatchard analysis of ..beta..-(/sup 3/H)CCE binding to cerebral cortical and cerebellar membranes revealed a significantly greater number of binding sites than was observed with either (/sup 3/H)diazepam or (/sup 3/H)flunitazepam, suggesting that at low concentrations benzodiazepines selectively label a subpopulation of the receptors labelled with ..beta..-(/sup 3/H)CCE. Alternatively, ..beta..-(/sup 3/H)CCE may bind to sites that are distinct from those labelled with (/sup 3/H)-benzodiazepines.

  18. Radioreceptor assay to study the affinity of benzodiazepines and their receptor binding activity in human plasma including their active metabolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorow, R.G.; Seidler, J.; Schneider, H.H. (Schering A.G., Berlin (Germany, F.R.))

    1982-04-01

    A radioreceptor assay has been established to measure the receptor affinities of numerous benzodiazepines in clinical use. The time course of receptor binding activity was studied by this method in the plasma of eight healthy subjects randomly treated with 1mg lormetazepam (Noctamid(R)), 2mg flunitrazepam (Rohypnol(R)), and 10mg diazepam (Valium(R)), and placebo on a cross-over basis. Blood samples were collected up to 154h after treatment. Receptor affinities of numerous benzodiazepines in vitro show good correlation with therapeutic human doses (r=0.96) and may be predictive of drug potency in man. Mean peak plasma levels of lormetazepam binding equivalents were 4.8+-1 ng/ml at 2h after lormetazepam, 7.2+-1.8 ng/ml at 8h after flunitrazepam, and 17.9+-2.7 ng/ml at 15h after diazepam. Plasma elimination halflives of benzodiazepine binding equivalents were 9.3, 23 and 63h, respectively. Slow elimination of benzodiazepine binding equivalents following flunitrazepam and diazepam may be due to persistent active metabolites.

  19. Methodology for benzodiazepine receptor binding assays at physiological temperature. Rapid change in equilibrium with falling temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawson, R.M.

    1986-12-01

    Benzodiazepine receptors of rat cerebellum were assayed with (/sup 3/H)-labeled flunitrazepam at 37/sup 0/C, and assays were terminated by filtration in a cold room according to one of three protocols: keeping each sample at 37 degrees C until ready for filtration, taking the batch of samples (30) into the cold room and filtering sequentially in the order 1-30, and taking the batch of 30 samples into the cold room and filtering sequentially in the order 30-1. the results for each protocol were substantially different from each other, indicating that rapid disruption of equilibrium occurred as the samples cooled in the cold room while waiting to be filtered. Positive or negative cooperativity of binding was apparent, and misleading effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid on the affinity of diazepam were observed, unless each sample was kept at 37/sup 0/C until just prior to filtration.

  20. The role of the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor in the apoptotic response to photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, D; Antolovich, M; Smith, K M

    2001-08-01

    Several previous studies have suggested that the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) on the mitochondrial surface was an important target for photodynamic therapy (PDT). In this study we compared PBR affinity vs photodynamic efficacy of protoporphyrin-IX (PP-IX) and two structural analogs, PP-III and PP-XIII, using murine leukemia L1210 cells in culture. The results indicate that the three agents have approximately equal hydrophobicity, affinity for L1210 cells and ability to initiate photodamage leading to an apoptotic response. But only PP-IX had significant affinity for the PBR. These data indicate that the relationship between PDT efficacy and PBR affinity may hold only for sensitizers with the PP-IX configuration.

  1. GABA(A) receptor physiology and its relationship to the mechanism of action of the 1,5-benzodiazepine clobazam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar, Raman

    2012-03-01

    Clobazam was initially developed in the early 1970s as a nonsedative anxiolytic agent, and is currently available as adjunctive therapy for epilepsy and anxiety disorders in more than 100 countries. In October 2011, clobazam (Onfi™; Lundbeck Inc., Deerfield, IL, USA) was approved by the US FDA for use as adjunctive therapy for the treatment of seizures associated with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome in patients aged 2 years and older. It is a long-acting 1,5-benzodiazepine whose structure distinguishes it from the classic 1,4-benzodiazepines, such as diazepam, lorazepam and clonazepam. Clobazam is well absorbed, with peak concentrations occurring linearly 1-4 hours after administration. Both clobazam and its active metabolite, N-desmethylclobazam, are metabolized in the liver via the cytochrome P450 pathway. The mean half-life of N-desmethylclobazam (67.5 hours) is nearly double the mean half-life of clobazam (37.5 hours). Clobazam was synthesized with the anticipation that its distinct chemical structure would provide greater efficacy with fewer benzodiazepine-associated adverse effects. Frequently reported adverse effects of clobazam therapy include dizziness, sedation, drowsiness and ataxia. Evidence gathered from approximately 50 epilepsy clinical trials in adults and children indicated that the sedative effects observed with clobazam treatment were less severe than those reported with 1,4-benzodiazepines. In several studies of healthy volunteers and patients with anxiety, clobazam appeared to enhance participants' performance in cognitive tests, further distinguishing it from the 1,4-benzodiazepines. The anxiolytic and anticonvulsant effects of clobazam are associated with allosteric activation of the ligand-gated GABA(A) receptor. GABA(A) receptors are found extensively throughout the CNS, occurring synaptically and extrasynaptically. GABA(A) receptors are composed of five protein subunits, two copies of a single type of α subunit, two copies of one type of

  2. A Review of the Updated Pharmacophore for the Alpha 5 GABA(A Benzodiazepine Receptor Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry Clayton

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An updated model of the GABA(A benzodiazepine receptor pharmacophore of the α5-BzR/GABA(A subtype has been constructed prompted by the synthesis of subtype selective ligands in light of the recent developments in both ligand synthesis, behavioral studies, and molecular modeling studies of the binding site itself. A number of BzR/GABA(A α5 subtype selective compounds were synthesized, notably α5-subtype selective inverse agonist PWZ-029 (1 which is active in enhancing cognition in both rodents and primates. In addition, a chiral positive allosteric modulator (PAM, SH-053-2′F-R-CH3 (2, has been shown to reverse the deleterious effects in the MAM-model of schizophrenia as well as alleviate constriction in airway smooth muscle. Presented here is an updated model of the pharmacophore for α5β2γ2 Bz/GABA(A receptors, including a rendering of PWZ-029 docked within the α5-binding pocket showing specific interactions of the molecule with the receptor. Differences in the included volume as compared to α1β2γ2, α2β2γ2, and α3β2γ2 will be illustrated for clarity. These new models enhance the ability to understand structural characteristics of ligands which act as agonists, antagonists, or inverse agonists at the Bz BS of GABA(A receptors.

  3. Systematic review of modulators of benzodiazepine receptors in irritable bowel syndrome:Is there hope?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pooneh Salari; Mohammad Abdollahi

    2011-01-01

    Several drugs are used in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) but all have side effects and variable efficacy.Considering the role of the gut-brain axis,immune,neural,and endocrine pathways in the patho-genesis of IBS and possible beneficial effects of ben-zodiazepines (BZD) in this axis,the present systematic review focuses on the efficacy of BZD receptor modulators in human IBS.For the years 1966 to February 2011,all literature was searched for any articles on the use of BZD receptor modulators and IBS.After thorough evaluation and omission of duplicate data,10 out of 69 articles were included.BZD receptor modulators can be helpful,especially in the diarrhea-dominant form of IBS,by affecting the inflammatory,neural,and psychologic pathways,however,controversies still exist.Recently,a new BZD receptor modulator,dextofisopam was synthesized and studied in human subjects,but the studies are limited to phase II b clinical trials.None of the existing trials considered the neuroimmunomodulatory effectof BZDs in IBS,but bearing in mind the concentration-dependent effect of BZDs on cytokines and cell proliferation,future studies using pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic approaches are highly recommended.

  4. Biological properties of 2'-[18F]fluoroflumazenil for central benzodiazepine receptor imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Young Soo; Jeong, Jae Min; Yoon, Young Hyun; Kang, Won Jun; Lee, Seung Jin; Lee, Dong Soo; Chung, June-Key; Lee, Myung Chul

    2005-04-01

    A novel positron emitting agent, 2'-[18F]fluoroflumazenil (fluoroethyl 8-fluoro-5-methyl-6-oxo-5,6-dihydro-4H-benzo-[f]imidazo[1,5-a][1,4]diazepine-3-carboxylate, FFMZ), has been reported for benzodiazepine imaging. In the present study, biological properties of [18F]FFMZ were investigated. Stability tests of [18F]FFMZ in human and rat sera were performed. Biodistribution was investigated in mice and phosphorimages of brains were obtained from rats. A receptor binding assay was performed using rat brain (mixture of cortex and cerebellum) homogenate. A static positron emission tomography (PET) image was obtained from a normal human volunteer. Although [18F]FFMZ was stable in human serum, it was rapidly hydrolyzed in rat serum. The hydrolysis was 39%, 63% and 92% at 10, 30 and 60 min, respectively. According to the biodistribution study in mice, somewhat even distribution (between 2 approximately 3% ID/g) was observed in most organs. Intestinal uptake increased up to 6% ID/g at 1 h due to biliary excretion. Bone uptake slowly increased from 1.5% to 3.5% ID/g at 1 h. High uptakes in the cortex, thalamus and cerebellum, which could be completely blocked by coinjection of cold FMZ, were observed by phosphorimaging study using rats. Determination of Kd value and Bmax using rat brain tissue was performed by Scatchard plotting and found 1.45+/-0.26 nM and 1.08+/-0.03 pmol/mg protein, respectively. The PET image of the normal human volunteer showed high uptake in the following decreasing order: frontal cortex, temporal cortex, occipital cortex, cerebellum, parietal cortex and thalamus. In conclusion, the new FMZ derivative, [18F]FFMZ appears to be a promising PET agent for central benzodiazepine receptor imaging with a convenient labeling procedure and a specific binding property.

  5. Effects of hippocampal injections of a novel ligand selective for the alpha 5 beta 2 gamma 2 subunits of the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor on Pavlovian conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, David J; Tetzlaff, Julie E; Cook, James M; He, Xiaohui; Helmstetter, Fred J

    2002-07-01

    Benzodiazepine pharmacology has led to greater insight into the neural mechanisms underlying learning and anxiety. The synthesis of new compounds capable of modulating responses produced by these receptors has been made possible by the development of an isoform model of the GABA(A)/benzodiazepine receptor complex. In the current experiment, rats were pretreated with several concentrations of the novel ligand RY024 (an alpha 5 beta 2 gamma 2 -selective benzodiazepine receptor inverse agonist) in the hippocampus and were trained in a Pavlovian fear conditioning paradigm. RY024 independently produced fear-related behavior prior to training and, at the highest concentration, decreased the strength of conditioning observed 24 h after training. These data provide further evidence for the involvement of hippocampal GABA(A)/benzodiazepine receptors in learning and anxiety.

  6. Opioid receptors are involved in the sedative and antinociceptive effects of hesperidin as well as in its potentiation with benzodiazepines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loscalzo, Leonardo M; Wasowski, Cristina; Paladini, Alejandro C; Marder, Mariel

    2008-02-12

    Previous reports from our laboratory described the sedative activity of hesperidin (hesperetin-7-rhamnoglucoside). This property is greatly increased when the glycoside is injected jointly with diazepam and this interaction has been shown to be synergistic. In the present work the generality of the synergistic phenomenon is proved, since potentiation also occurs with several other benzodiazepines, namely alprazolam, bromazepam, midazolam and flunitrazepam. In order to advance in the study of the mechanism of action of hesperidin, the possible participation of several brain receptors, which are implicated in the control of numerous behavioral and physiological functions, was explored by investigating the effects of a variety of their antagonists on hesperidin actions. The results showed that the 5-HT2 receptor and the alpha1-adrenoceptor seem unlikely to be involved in the behavioral effects of hesperidin. Naltrexone, a nonselective antagonist of opioid receptors, totally blocked hesperidin effects on locomotion, and partially antagonized hesperidin-induced decreased exploration in the hole board test. Nor-binaltorphimine, a selective kappa opioid receptor antagonist, was able to partially block hesperidin effects on locomotor activity. Furthermore, hesperidin-induced antinociception was partially blocked by naltrexone, and potentiated by co-administration with alprazolam. Hence, the participation of the opioid system in the sedative, antinociceptive and potentianting effects of hesperidin with benzodiazepines in mice is highly probable. Our results suggest a possible beneficial use of the association of hesperidin with benzodiazepines, not only to improve human sedative therapy, but also in the management of pain.

  7. Subchronic treatment with antiepileptic drugs modifies pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures in mice: Its correlation with benzodiazepine receptor binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Rocha

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Luisa RochaPharmacobiology Department, Center for Research and Advanced Studies, Calz, Tenorios, MéxicoAbstract: Experiments using male CD1 mice were carried out to investigate the effects of subchronic (daily administration for 8 days pretreatments with drugs enhancing GABAergic transmission (diazepam, 10 mg/kg, ip; gabapentin, 100 mg/kg, po; or vigabatrin, 500 mg/kg, po on pentylenetetrazol (PTZ-induced seizures, 24 h after the last injection. Subchronic administration of diazepam reduced latencies to clonus, tonic extension and death induced by PTZ. Subchronic vigabatrin produced enhanced latency to the first clonus but faster occurrence of tonic extension and death induced by PTZ. Subchronic gabapentin did not modify PTZ-induced seizures. Autoradiography experiments revealed reduced benzodiazepine receptor binding in several brain areas after subchronic treatment with diazepam or gabapentin, whereas subchronic vigabatrin did not induce significant receptor changes. The present results indicate differential effects induced by the subchronic administration of diazepam, vigabatrin, and gabapentin on the susceptibility to PTZ-induced seizures, benzodiazepine receptor binding, or both.Keywords: diazepam, gabapentin, vigabatrin, pentylenetetrazol, benzodiazepine receptors

  8. The "peripheral-type" benzodiazepine (omega 3) receptor in hyperammonemic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjardins, Paul; Butterworth, Roger F

    2002-01-01

    Increased levels of brain ammonia occur in both congenital and acquired hyperammonemic syndromes including hepatic encephalopathy, fulminant hepatic failure, Reye's syndrome and congenital urea cycle disorders. In addition to its effect on neurotransmission and energy metabolism, ammonia modulates the expression of various genes including the astrocytic "peripheral-type" benzodiazepine (or omega 3) receptor (PTBR). Increased expression of the isoquinoline carboxamide binding protein (IBP), one of the components of the PTBR complex, is observed in brain and peripheral tissues following chronic liver failure as well as in cultured astrocytes exposed to ammonia. Increased densities of binding sites for the PTBR ligand [3H]-PK11195 are also observed in these conditions as well as in brains of animals with acute liver failure, congenital urea cycle disorders and in patients who died in hepatic coma. The precise role of PTBR in brain function has not yet fully elucidated, but among other functions, PTBR mediates the transport of cholesterol across the mitochondrial membrane and thus plays a key role in the biosynthesis of neurosteroids some of which modulate major neurotransmitter systems such as the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA(A)) and glutamate (N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)) receptors. Activation of PTBR in chronic and acute hyperammonemia results in increased synthesis of neurosteroids which could lead to an imbalance between excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission in the CNS. Preliminary reports suggest that positron emission tomography (PET) studies using [11C]-PK11195 may be useful for the assessment of the neurological consequences of chronic liver failure.

  9. Development of a unique 3D interaction model of endogenous and synthetic peripheral benzodiazepine receptor ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinone, Nunzia; Höltje, Hans-Dieter; Carotti, Angelo

    2000-11-01

    Different classes of Peripheral-type Benzodiazepine Receptor (PBR) ligands were examined and common structural elements were detected and used to develop a rational binding model based on energetically allowed ligand conformations. Two lipophilic regions and one electrostatic interaction site are essential features for high affinity ligand binding, while a further lipophilic region plays an important modulator role. A comparative molecular field analysis, performed over 130 PBR ligands by means of the GRID/GOLPE methodology, led to a PLS model with both high fitting and predictive values (r2 = 0.898, Q2 = 0.761). The outcome from the 3D QSAR model and the GRID interaction fields computed on the putative endogenous PBR ligands DBI (Diazepam Binding Inhibitor) and TTN (Tetracontatetraneuropeptide) was used to identify the amino acids most probably involved in PBR binding. Three amino acids, bearing lipophilic side chains, were detected in DBI (Phe49, Leu47 and Met46) and in TTN (Phe33, Leu31 and Met30) as likely residues underlying receptor binding. Moreover, a qualitative comparison of the molecular electrostatic potentials of DBI, TTN and selected synthetic ligands indicated also similar electronic properties. Convergent results from the modeling studies of synthetic and endogenous ligands suggest a common binding mode to PBRs. This may help the rational design of new high affinity PBR ligands.

  10. Decreased benzodiazepine receptor binding in epileptic El mice: A quantitative autoradiographic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirasaka, Y.; Ito, M.; Tsuda, H.; Shiraishi, H.; Oguro, K.; Mutoh, K.; Mikawa, H. (Kyoto Univ. (Japan))

    1990-09-01

    Benzodiazepine receptors and subtypes were examined in El mice and normal ddY mice with a quantitative autoradiographic technique. Specific (3H)flunitrazepam binding in stimulated El mice, which had experienced repeated convulsions, was significantly lower in the cortex and hippocampus than in ddY mice and unstimulated El mice. In the amygdala, specific ({sup 3}H)flunitrazepam binding in stimulated El mice was lower than in ddY mice. There was a tendency for the ({sup 3}H)flunitrazepam binding in these regions in unstimulated El mice to be intermediate between that in stimulated El mice and that in ddY mice, but there was no significant difference between unstimulated El mice and ddY mice. ({sup 3}H)Flunitrazepam binding displaced by CL218,872 was significantly lower in the cortex of stimulated El mice than in that of the other two groups, and in the hippocampus of stimulated than of unstimulated El mice. These data suggest that the decrease in ({sup 3}H)flunitrazepam binding in stimulated El mice may be due mainly to that of type 1 receptor and may be the result of repeated convulsions.

  11. Central and peripheral benzodiazepine receptors in rat brain and platelets: effects of treatment with diazepam and clobazam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, J G; Thompson, G G; Scobie, G; Brodie, M J

    1992-09-01

    Tolerance to the effects of benzodiazepines (BZ) may be mediated by changes in benzodiazepine receptors (BZRs). Peripheral BZRs (in brain and platelets) and central BZRs (in brain) were measured in rats following intraperitoneal administration of diazepam and clobazam each for 4 and 12 days. BZRs were measured by binding assays using [3H] PK 11195 (peripheral) and [3H] flunitrazepam (central) as radioligands. Diazepam, but not clobazam, increased peripheral BZR numbers in platelets (both P < 0.005), but not in brain, after 4 and 12 days' treatment compared with appropriate controls. Neither drug altered central BZR affinities or numbers in rat brain. BZ effects on peripheral BZRs in platelets cannot be extrapolated to predict changes in brain receptors, either peripheral or central.

  12. Synthesis and in vivo evaluation of [{sup 11}C]zolpidem, an imidazopyridine with agonist properties at central benzodiazepine receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumont, Filip; Waterhouse, Rikki N. E-mail: rnw7@columbia.edu; Montoya, Julie A.; Mattner, Filomena; Katsifis, Andrew; Kegeles, Lawrence S.; Laruelle, Marc

    2003-05-01

    The synthesis and evaluation of [{sup 11}C]zolpidem, an imidazopyridine with agonist properties at central benzodiazepine receptors, is reported herein. The reaction of desmethylzolpidem with [{sup 11}C] methyl iodide afforded the title compound [{sup 11}C]zolpidem in a yield of 19.19 {+-} 3.23% in 41 {+-} 2 min in specific activities of 0.995-1.19 Ci/{mu}mol (1.115 {+-} 0.105 Ci/{mu}mol) (n = 3; decay corrected, EOB). The amount of radioactivity in the brain after tail vein injection in male Wistar rats was low, and the regional distribution was homogeneous and not consistent with the known distribution of the central benzodiazepine receptors. The frontal cortex/cerebellum ratio was not significantly greater than one (1.007 {+-} 0.266 at 5 min) and did not increase from 5 to 40 min post-injection. A PET brain imaging study in one baboon confirmed the results obtained in rats. Therefore, it can be concluded that [{sup 11}C]zolpidem is not a suitable tracer for in vivo visualization of central benzodiazepine receptors.

  13. Inhibitory effects of benzodiazepines on the adenosine A(2B) receptor mediated secretion of interleukin-8 in human mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Kristina; Xifró, Rosa Altarcheh; Hartweg, Julia Lisa; Spitzlei, Petra; Meis, Kirsten; Molderings, Gerhard J; von Kügelgen, Ivar

    2013-01-30

    The activation of adenosine A(2B) receptors in human mast cells causes pro-inflammatory responses such as the secretion of interleukin-8. There is evidence for an inhibitory effect of benzodiazepines on mast cell mediated symptoms in patients with systemic mast cell activation disease. Therefore, we investigated the effects of benzodiazepines on adenosine A(2B) receptor mediated interleukin-8 production in human mast cell leukaemia (HMC1) cells by an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. The adenosine analogue N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA, 0.3-3 μM) increased interleukin-8 production about 5-fold above baseline. This effect was attenuated by the adenosine A(2B) receptor antagonist MRS1754 (N-(4-cyanophenyl)-2-{4-(2,3,6,7-tetrahydro-2,6-dioxo-1,3-dipropyl-1H-purin-8-yl)phenoxy}-acetamide) 1 μM. In addition, diazepam, 4'-chlorodiazepam and flunitrazepam (1-30 μM) markedly reduced NECA-induced interleukin-8 production in that order of potency, whereas clonazepam showed only a modest inhibition. The inhibitory effect of diazepam was not altered by flumazenil 10 μM or PK11195 (1-(2-chlorophenyl)-N-methyl-N-(1-methylpropyl)-3-isoquinolinecarboxamide) 10 μM. Diazepam attenuated the NECA-induced expression of mRNA encoding for interleukin-8. Moreover, diazepam and flunitrazepam reduced the increasing effects of NECA on cAMP-response element- and nuclear factor of activated t-cells-driven luciferase reporter gene activities in HMC1 cells. Neither diazepam nor flunitrazepam affected NECA-induced increases in cellular cAMP levels in CHO Flp-In cells stably expressing recombinant human adenosine A(2B) receptors, excluding a direct action of benzodiazepines on human adenosine A(2B) receptors. In conclusion, this is the first study showing an inhibitory action of benzodiazepines on adenosine A(2B) receptor mediated interleukin-8 production in human mast (HMC1) cells. The rank order of potency indicates the involvement of an atypical benzodiazepine binding site.

  14. Peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptors in bronchoalveolar lavage cells of patients with interstitial lung disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branley, Howard M. [Imperial College London, Hammersmith Campus, W12 OHS London (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: howard.branley@whittington.nhs.uk; Bois, Roland M. du [Royal Brompton Hospital, SW3 6NP London (United Kingdom); Wells, Athol U. [Royal Brompton Hospital, SW3 6NP London (United Kingdom); Jones, Hazel A. [Imperial College London, Hammersmith Campus, W12 OHS London (United Kingdom)

    2007-07-15

    Introduction: PK11195 is a ligand with high affinity for peripheral benzodiazepine receptors (PBRs), which are present in large numbers in macrophages. PBRs play a role in antioxidant pathways and apoptosis, key factors in control of lung health. Intrapulmonary PBRs, assessed in vivo by positron emission tomography (PET), are decreased in interstitial lung disease (ILD) despite increased macrophage numbers. We wished to ascertain whether the observed decrease in in vivo expression of PBRs in the PET scans could be accounted for by a reduction in PBRs per cell by saturation-binding assays of R-PK11195 in cells obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). Methods: We performed receptor saturation-binding assays with [{sup 3}H]-R-PK11195 on a mixed population of cells recovered by BAL to quantify the number of R-PK11195 binding sites per macrophage in 10 subjects with ILD and 10 normal subjects. Results: Receptor affinity [dissociation constant (Kd)] was similar in ILD patients and controls. However, R-PK11195 binding sites per cell [(maximal binding sites available (B {sub max})] were decreased in macrophages obtained by BAL from subjects with ILD compared to normal (P<.0005). Microautoradiography confirmed localization of R-PK11195 to macrophages in a mixed inflammatory cell population obtained by BAL. Conclusion: These results demonstrate that in vitro PBR expression per cell on macrophages obtained by BAL is reduced in patients with ILD indicating a potentially functionally different macrophage phenotype. As PBRs are involved in the orchestration of lung inflammatory responses, this finding offers further insight into the role of macrophages in the pathogenesis of ILDs and offers a potential avenue for pharmacological strategy.

  15. Interactions of pyrethroid insecticides with GABA sub A and peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devaud, L.L.

    1988-01-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides are potent proconvulsants in the rat. All pyrethroids evincing proconvulsant activity elicited a similar 25-30% maximal reduction of seizure threshold. The Type II pyrethroids were the most potent proconvulsants with 1R{alpha}S, cis cypermethrin having an ED{sub 50} value of 6.3 nmol/kg. The proconvulsant activity of both Type I and Type II pyrenthroids was blocked by pretreatment with PK 11195, the peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor (PTBR) antagonist. In contrast, phenytoin did not antagonize the proconvulsant activity of either deltamethrin or permethrin. Pyrethroids displaced the specific binding of ({sup 3}H)Ro5-4864 to rat brain membranes with a significant correlation between the log EC{sub 50} values for their activities as proconvulsants and the log IC{sub 50} values for their inhibition of ({sup 3}H)Ro5-4864 binding. Both Ro5-4864 and pyrethroid insecticides were found to influence specific ({sup 35}S)TBPS binding in a GABA-dependent manner. PK 11195 and the Type II pyrethroid, deltamethrin antagonized the Ro5-4864-induced modulation of ({sup 35}S)TBPS binding. Pyrethroid insecticides, Ro5-4864 and veratridine influenced GABA-gated {sup 36}Chloride influx. Moreover, the Type II pyrethroids elicited an increase in {sup 36}chloride influx in the absence of GABA-stimulation. Both of these actions were antagonized by PK 11195 and tetrodotoxin.

  16. Benzodiazepine receptor imaging with iomazenil SPECT in aphasic patients with cerebral infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koshi, Yasuhiko; Kitamura, Shin; Ohyama, Masashi [Nippon Medical School, Tokyo (Japan)] (and others)

    1999-08-01

    To investigate the relationship between prognosis of aphasia and neuronal damage in the cerebral cortex, we evaluated the distribution of central-type benzodiazepine receptor (BZR) binding in post-stroke aphasics with [{sup 123}I]iomazenil and SPECT. We performed iomazenil SPECT in six aphasic patients (aged from 45 to 75 years; all right-handed) with unilateral left cerebral infarction. Three patients showed signs of Broca's aphasia and the other three Wernicke's aphasia. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) imaging was performed with [{sup 123}I]iodoamphetamine (IMP). The regions of interest (ROIs) on both images were set in the cerebral cortex, cerebellar cortex and language relevant area in both hemispheres. Three patients were classified in the mild prognosis group and the other three in the moderate prognosis group. The left language-relevant area was more closely concerned with the difference in aphasic symptoms than the right one in both BZR and CBF distribution, but the ipsilateral to the contralateral ratio (I/C ratio) in the language-relevant areas in the BZR distribution was significantly lower in the moderate prognosis group than in the mild prognosis group, although no difference was seen for these values between the two groups in the CBF distribution. These results suggest that BZR imaging, which makes possible an increase in neuronal cell viability in the cerebral cortex, is useful not only for clarifying the aphasic symptoms but also for evaluating the prognosis of aphasia in patients with cerebral infarction. (author)

  17. In Vivo Imaging of Peripheral Benzodiazepine Receptors in Mouse Lungs: A Biomarker of Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J. Hardwick

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The ability to visualize the immune response with radioligands targeted to immune cells will enhance our understanding of cellular responses in inflammatory diseases. Peripheral benzodiazepine receptors (PBR are present in monocytes and neutrophils as well as in lung tissue. We used lipopolysaccharide (LPS as a model of inflammation to assess whether the PBR could be used as a noninvasive marker of inflammation in the lungs. Planar imaging of mice administrated 10 or 30 mg/kg LPS showed increased [123I]-(R-PK11195 radioactivity in the thorax 2 days after LPS treatment relative to control. Following imaging, lungs from control and LPS-treated mice were harvested for ex vivo gamma counting and showed significantly increased radioactivity above control levels. The specificity of the PBR response was determined using a blocking dose of nonradioactive PK11195 given 30 min prior to radiotracer injection. Static planar images of the thorax of nonradioactive PK11195 pretreated animals showed a significantly lower level of radiotracer accumulation in control and in LPS-treated animals (p < .05. These data show that LPS induces specific increases in PBR ligand binding in the lungs. We also used in vivo small-animal PET studies to demonstrate increased [11C]-(R-PK11195 accumulation in the lungs of LPS-treated mice. This study suggests that measuring PBR expression using in vivo imaging techniques may be a useful biomarker to image lung inflammation.

  18. Blood flow dependence of the intratumoral distribution of peripheral benzodiazepine receptor binding in intact mouse fibrosarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amitani, Misato [Radiochemistry Section, Department of Molecular Probes, Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan) and Course of Allied Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)]. E-mail: amitani@sahs.med.osaka-u.ac.jp; Zhang, Ming-Rong [Radiochemistry Section, Department of Molecular Probes, Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Noguchi, Junko [Radiochemistry Section, Department of Molecular Probes, Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); SHI Accelerator Service, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 141-8686 (Japan); Kumata, Katsushi [Radiochemistry Section, Department of Molecular Probes, Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Ito, Takehito [Radiochemistry Section, Department of Molecular Probes, Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); SHI Accelerator Service, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 141-8686 (Japan); Takai, Nobuhiko [Radiochemistry Section, Department of Molecular Probes, Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Suzuki, Kazutoshi [Radiochemistry Section, Department of Molecular Probes, Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Hosoi, Rie [Course of Allied Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Inoue, Osamu [Course of Allied Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2006-11-15

    The intratumoral distribution of [{sup 11}C]AC-5216 binding, a novel peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) ligand, was examined by autoradiography both in vitro and in vivo using a murine fibrosarcoma model. The regional distribution of [{sup 11}C]AC-5216 in a tumor in vivo was significantly heterogeneous; the uptake of [{sup 11}C]AC-5216 was comparatively higher in the outer rim of the tumor and was lower in the central area. In contrast, the images obtained following the injection of [{sup 11}C]AC-5216 with a large amount of nonlabeled PK11195 showed a relatively homogeneous distribution, suggesting that [{sup 11}C]AC-5216 uptake represented specific binding to PBRs. In vitro autoradiograms of [{sup 11}C]AC-5216 binding were also obtained using the section of the fibrosarcoma that was the same as that used to examine in vivo binding. In vitro autoradiographic binding images showed homogeneous distribution, and significant discrepancies of the intratumoral distribution of [{sup 11}C]AC-5216 were observed between in vivo and in vitro images. The in vivo images of [{sup 11}C]AC-5216 uptake, compared with those of [{sup 14}C]iodoantipyrine uptake, obtained by dual autoradiography to evaluate the influence of blood flow revealed the similar intratumoral distributions of both tracers. These results indicate that the delivery process from the plasma to the tumor might be the rate-limiting step for the intratumoral distribution of PBR binding in vivo in a fibrosarcoma model.

  19. Maternal Characteristics of Women Exposed to Hypnotic Benzodiazepine Receptor Agonist during Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjarke Askaa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. There is little knowledge regarding the characteristics of women treated with hypnotic benzodiazepine receptor agonists (HBRAs during pregnancy. In this large Danish cohort study, we characterize women exposed to HBRA during pregnancy. We determined changes in prevalence of HBRA use from 1997 to 2010 and exposure to HBRAs in relation to pregnancy. Methods. We performed a retrospective cohort study including 911,017 pregnant women in the period from 1997 to 2010. Information was retrieved from The Danish Birth Registry and The Registry of Medicinal Product Statistics to identify pregnant women redeeming a prescription of HBRAs. Results. We identified 2,552 women exposed to HBRAs during pregnancy, increasing from 0.18% in 1997 to 0.23% in 2010. Compared to unexposed women, exposed women were characterized by being older, with higher BMI, in their third or fourth parity, of lower income and education level, more frequently smokers, and more likely to be comedicated with antipsychotic, anxiolytic, or antidepressant drugs (P<0.0001. Conclusion. Women using HBRAs during their pregnancy differ from unexposed women in socioeconomic factors and were more likely to receive comedication. The consumption of HBRAs was reduced during pregnancy compared to before conception.

  20. Effects of peripheral benzodiazepine receptor ligands on proliferation and differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, D H; Kang, S K; Lee, R H; Ryu, J M; Park, H Y; Choi, H S; Bae, Y C; Suh, K T; Kim, Y K; Jung, Jin Sup

    2004-01-01

    The peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) has been known to have many functions such as a role in cell proliferation, cell differentiation, steroidogenesis, calcium flow, cellular respiration, cellular immunity, malignancy, and apoptosis. However, the presence of PBR has not been examined in mesenchymal stem cells. In this study, we demonstrated the expression of PBR in human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) and human adipose stromal cells (hATSCs) by RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry. To determine the roles of PBR in cellular functions of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs), effects of diazepam, PK11195, and Ro5-4864 were examined. Adipose differentiation of hMSCs was decreased by high concentration of PBR ligands (50 microM), whereas it was increased by low concentrations of PBR ligands (<10 microM). PBR ligands showed a biphasic effect on glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH) activity. High concentration of PBR ligands (from 25 to 75 microM) inhibited proliferation of hMSCs. However, clonazepam, which does not have an affinity to PBR, did not affect adipose differentiation and proliferation of hMSCs. The PBR ligands did not induce cell death in hMSCs. PK11195 (50 microM) and Ro5-5864 (50 microM) induced cell cycle arrest in the G(2)/M phase. These results indicate that PBR ligands play roles in adipose differentiation and proliferation of hMSCs.

  1. Potential role of cortical 5-HT(2A) receptors in the anxiolytic action of cyamemazine in benzodiazepine withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benyamina, Amine; Naassila, Mickaël; Bourin, Michel

    2012-07-30

    The antipsychotic cyamemazine is a potent serotonin 5-HT(2A) receptor (5-HT(2AR)) antagonist. A positron emission tomography (PET) study in human patients showed that therapeutic doses of cyamemazine produced near saturation of 5-HT(2AR) occupancy in the frontal cortex, whereas dopamine D(2) occupancy remained below the level for motor side effects observed with typical antipsychotics. Recently, numerous studies have revealed the involvement of 5-HT(2AR) in the pathophysiology of anxiety and a double-blind, randomized clinical trial showed similar efficacy of cyamemazine and bromazepam in reducing the anxiety associated with benzodiazepine withdrawal. Therefore, we reviewed the above articles about 5-HT(2AR) and anxiety in order to understand better the anxiolytic mechanisms of cyamemazine in benzodiazepine withdrawal. The 5-HT(2AR) is the most abundant serotonin receptor subtype in the cortex. Non-pharmacological studies with antisense oligodeoxynucleotides and genetically modified mice clearly showed that cortical 5-HT(2AR) signaling positively modulates anxiety-like behavior. With a few exceptions, most other studies reviewed here further support this view. Therefore, the anxiolytic efficacy of cyamemazine in benzodiazepine withdrawal can be due to a 5-HT(2AR) antagonistic activity at the cortical level. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Increased densities of peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptors in brain autopsy samples from cirrhotic patients with hepatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie, J; Layrargues, G P; Butterworth, R F

    1990-05-01

    Peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptors were evaluated using the specific ligand [3H]-PK 11195 in brain homogenates from nine cirrhotic patients who died in hepatic coma and from an equal number of age-matched control subjects. Histopathological studies showed evidence of severe Alzheimer type II astrocytosis in the brains of all cirrhotic patients. Saturation-binding assays revealed a single saturable binding site for [3H]-PK 11195 in brain, with affinities in the 2- to 3-nmol/L range. Diazepam was found to be a relatively potent inhibitor of 3H-PK 11195 binding (IC50 = 253 nmol/L), whereas the central benzodiazepine antagonist Ro 15-1788 displaced 3H-PK 11195 binding with low affinity (IC50 greater than 40 mumols/L). Densities of [3H]-PK 11195 binding sites were found to be increased by 48% (p less than 0.01) and 25% (p less than 0.05) in frontal cortex and caudate nuclei, respectively, from cirrhotic patients. Densities of [3H]-PK 11195 binding sites in frontal cortex from two nonencephalopathic cirrhotic patients were not significantly different from control values. No concomitant changes of affinities of these binding sites were observed. Because it has been suggested that peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptors may be localized on mitochondrial membranes and may therefore be involved in cerebral oxidative metabolism, the alterations observed in this study could be of pathophysiological significance in hepatic encephalopathy.

  3. Discriminative stimulus effects of benzodiazepine (BZ)(1) receptor-selective ligands in rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Lance R; Gerak, Lisa R; Carter, Lawrence; Ma, Chunrong; Cook, James M; France, Charles P

    2002-02-01

    Drug discrimination was used to examine the effects of benzodiazepine (BZ)(1) receptor-selective ligands in rhesus monkeys. In diazepam-treated (5.6 mg/kg, p.o.) monkeys discriminating the nonselective BZ antagonist flumazenil (0.32 mg/kg, s.c.), the BZ(1)-selective antagonist beta-carboline-3-carboxylate-t-butyl ester (beta-CCt) substituted for flumazenil. The onset of action of beta-CCt was delayed with a dose of 5.6 mg/kg beta-CCt substituting for flumazenil 2 h after injection. In monkeys discriminating the nonselective BZ agonist midazolam (0.56 mg/kg, s.c.), the BZ(1)-selective agonists zaleplon (ED(50) = 0.78 mg/kg) and zolpidem (ED(50) = 1.73 mg/kg) substituted for midazolam. The discriminative stimulus effects of midazolam, zaleplon, and zolpidem were antagonized by beta-CCt (1.0-5.6 mg/kg, s.c.), and the effects of zaleplon and zolpidem were also antagonized by flumazenil (0.01-0.32 mg/kg, s.c.). Schild analyses supported the notion of a simple, competitive interaction between beta-CCt and midazolam (slope = -1.08; apparent pA(2) = 5.41) or zaleplon (slope = -1.57; apparent pA(2) = 5.49) and not between beta-CCt and zolpidem. Schild analyses also were consistent with a simple, competitive interaction between flumazenil and zaleplon (slope = -1.03; apparent pA(2) = 7.45) or zolpidem (slope = -1.11; apparent pA(2) = 7.63). These results suggest that the same BZ receptor subtype(s) mediate(s) the effects of midazolam, zolpidem, and zaleplon under these conditions and that selective binding of BZ ligands does not necessarily confer selective effects in vivo.

  4. Pharmacological properties of AC-3933, a novel benzodiazepine receptor partial inverse agonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, T; Kiyoshi, T; Kohayakawa, H; Iwamura, Y; Yoshida, N

    2014-01-01

    We investigated in this study the pharmacological properties of AC-3933 (5-(3-methoxyphenyl)-3-(5-methyl-1,2,4-oxadiazol-3-yl)-1,6-naphthyridin-2(1H)-one), a novel benzodiazepine receptor (BzR) partial inverse agonist. AC-3933 potently inhibited [3H]-flumazenil binding to rat whole brain membrane with a Ki value of 5.15 ± 0.39 nM and a GABA ratio of 0.84 ± 0.03. AC-3933 exhibited almost no affinity for the other receptors, transporters and ion channels used in this study. In addition, AC-3933, in the presence of GABA (1 μM), gradually but significantly increased [³⁵S] tert-butylbicyclophosphorothionate binding to rat cortical membrane to 117.1% of the control (maximum increase ratio) at 3000 nM. However, this increase reached a plateau at 30 nM with hardly any change at a concentration range of 100-3000 nM (from 115.2% to 117.1%). AC-3933 (0.1-10 μM) significantly enhanced KCl-evoked acetylcholine (ACh) release from rat hippocampal slices in a concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, in vivo brain microdialysis showed that intragastric administration of AC-3933 at the dose of 10 mg/kg significantly increased extracellular ACh levels in the hippocampus of freely moving rats (area under the curve (AUC₀₋₂ h) of ACh level; 288.3% of baseline). These results indicate that AC-3933, a potent and selective BzR inverse agonist with low intrinsic activity, might be useful in the treatment of cognitive disorders associated with degeneration of the cholinergic system.

  5. Evidence for involvement of the astrocytic benzodiazepine receptor in the mechanism of action of convulsant and anticonvulsant drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, A.S.; Hertz, L.

    1988-01-01

    The anticonvulsant drugs carbamazepine, phenobarbital, trimethadione, valproic acid and ethosuximide at pharmacologically relevant concentrations inhibit (/sup 3/H)diazepam binding to astrocytes in primary cultures but have much less effect on a corresponding preparation of neurons. Phenytoin as well as pentobarbital (which is not used chronically as an anticonvulsant) are equipotent in the two cell types. The convulsants picrotoxinin and pentylenetetrazol, the convulsant benzodiazepine RO 5-3663 and the two convulsant barbiturates DMBB and CHEB similarly inhibit diazepam binding to astrocytes but have little effect on neurons. On the basis of these findings it is suggested that these convulsants and anticonvulsants owe at least part of their effect to an interaction with the astrocytic benzodiazepine receptor, perhaps by interference with a calcium channel.

  6. Decrease in benzodiazepine receptor binding in a patient with Angelman syndrome detected by iodine-123 iomazenil and single-photon emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odano, Ikuo [Dept. of Radiology, Niigata Univ. School of Medicine, Niigata (Japan); Anezaki, Toshiharu [Dept. of Neurology, Brain Research Inst., Niigata Univ., Niigata (Japan); Ohkubo, Masaki [Dept. of Radiology, Niigata Univ. School of Medicine, Niigata (Japan); Yonekura, Yoshiharu [Nihon Medi-Physics Co. Ltd., Hyogo (Japan); Onishi, Yoshihiro [Biomedical Imaging Research Center, Fukui Medical School, Fukui (Japan); Inuzuka, Takashi [Dept. of Neurology, Brain Research Inst., Niigata Univ., Niigata (Japan); Takahashi, Makoto [Dept. of Radiology, Niigata Univ. School of Medicine, Niigata (Japan); Tsuji, Shoji [Dept. of Neurology, Brain Research Inst., Niigata Univ., Niigata (Japan)

    1996-05-01

    A receptor mapping technique using iodine-123 iomazenil and single-photon emission tomography (SPET) was employed to examine benzodiazepine receptor binding in a patient with Angelman syndrome (AS). AS is characterized by developmental delay, seizures, inappropriate laughter and ataxic movement. In this entity there is a cytogenic deletion of the proximal long arm of chromosome 15q11-q13, where the gene encoding the GABA{sub A} receptor {beta}3 subunit (GABRB3) is located. Since the benzodiazepine receptor is constructed as a receptor-ionophore complex that contains the GABA{sub A} receptor, it is a suitable marker for GABA-ergic synapsis. To determine whether benzodiazepine receptor density, which indirectly indicates changes in GABA{sub A} receptor density, is altered in the brain in patients with AS, we investigated a 27-year-old woman with AS using {sup 123}I-iomazenil and SPET. Receptor density was quantitatively assessed by measuring the binding potential using a simplified method. Regional cerebral blood flow was also measured with N-isopropyl-p-[{sup 123}]iodoamphetamine. We demonstrated that benzodiazepine receptor density is severely decreased in the cerebellum, and mildly decreased in the frontal and temporal cortices and basal ganglia, a result which is considered to indicate decreased GABA{sub A} receptor density in these regions. Although the deletion of GABRB3 was not observed in the present study, we indirectly demonstrated the disturbance of inhibitory neurotransmission mediated by the GABA{sub A} receptor in the investigated patient. {sup 123}I-iomazenil with SPET was useful to map benzodiazepine receptors, which indicate GABA{sub A} receptor distribution and their density. (orig.)

  7. Peripheral benzodiazepine receptors and cerebral ischemia%外周型苯二氮革受体与脑缺血

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程超; 陈春富

    2009-01-01

    1he increased peripheral benzodiazepine receptors are more significant than normal ones after cerebral ischemia. Its main reactions are the multiple pathological changes,including microglial activation, participating in neuroinflammation response, and regulation of mitochondrial function. Using radionuclide-laheled specific ligands of the peripheral benzodiaz-epine receptor (such as PK11195) for in vivo imaging contribute to the location and quantitative detection for brain injury and the study of the pathophysiological changes after cerebral ischemi-a. In addition, this receptor is promising to become a new target of neuroprotective treatment.This article reviews the recent progress in research on peripheral benzodiazepine receptors and cerebral ischemia.%脑缺血后,外周型苯二氮革受体较正常时有明显增加,主要反应为小胶质细胞的活化、参与神经炎症反应以及线粒体功能调节等多途径病理学变化.应用放射性核素标记的特异性外周型苯二氮革受体配体(如PK11195)进行体内成像,有助于对脑损伤进行定位和定量检测以及研究脑缺血后病理生理学改变.另外,该受体还有望成为神经保护治疗的新靶点.文章就外周型苯二氮革受体与脑缺血的研究进展做一综述.

  8. Delayed image of iodine-123 iomazenil as a relative map of benzodiazepine receptor binding: the optimal scan time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onishi, Yoshihiro [Nihon Medi-Physics Co. Ltd., Nishinomiya (Japan); Yonekura, Yoshiharu [Fukui Medical School, Fukui (Japan); Tanaka, Fumiko [Kyoto University School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Nishizawa, Sadahiko [Kyoto University School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Okazawa, Hidehiko [Kyoto University School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Ishizu, Koichi [Kyoto University School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Fujita, Toru [Kyoto University School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Konishi, Junji [Kyoto University School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Mukai, Takao [Kyoto College of Medical Technology, Kyoto (Japan)

    1996-11-01

    ``Delayed`` single-photon emission tomograpic (SPET) images after an intravenous bolus injection of iodine-123 iomazenil have been used as a relative map of benzodiazepine receptor binding. We determined the optimal scan time for obtaining such a map and assessed the errors of the map. SPET and blood data from six healthy volunteers and five patients were used. A three-compartment kinetic model was employed in simulation studies and analyses of actual data. The simulation studies suggested that, in the normal brain, the scan time at which a single SPET image best represented the relative receptor binding was 3.0-3.5 h post-injection. This finding was supported by actual data from the volunteers. The simulation studies also suggested that the optimal scan time was not greatly changed by the variability of the input functions, and that the error in the SPET image contrast in the vicinity of the optimal scan time was not increased by changes in the tracer kinetics in the entire brain. The SPET image contrast in the patients at 3.0 h post-injection agreed well with the reference receptor binding estimated by kinetic analysis, with a mean error of 3.6%. These findings support the use of a single SPET image after bolus injection of [{sup 123}I]iomazenil as a relative map of benzodiazepine receptor binding. For this purpose, a SPET scan time of 3.0-3.5 h post-injection is recommended. (orig.). With 5 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Benzodiazepine receptor equilibrium constants for flumazenil and midazolam determined in humans with the single photon emission computer tomography tracer [123I]iomazenil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Videbaek, C; Friberg, L; Holm, S

    1993-01-01

    twice, once without receptor blockade and once with a constant degree of partial blockade of the benzodiazepine receptors by infusion of nonradioactive flumazenil (Lanexat) or midazolam (Dormicum). Single photon emission computer tomography and blood sampling were performed intermittently for 6 h after...

  10. Antiplasmodial and GABA(A)-benzodiazepine receptor binding activities of five plants used in traditional medicine in Mali, West Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bah, Sekou; Jäger, Anna K; Adsersen, Anne; Diallo, Drissa; Paulsen, Berit Smestad

    2007-04-04

    Extracts of five medicinal plants: Boscia angustifolia, Cissus quadrangularis, Securidaca longipedunculata, Stylosanthes erecta and Trichilia emetica, used traditionally in Malian traditional medicine were screened for in vitro antiplasmodial activity and GABA(A)-benzodiazepine receptor binding activity. Four extracts showed significant antiplasmodial activities, with the dichloromethane extract of leaf of Securidaca longipedunculata being the most active (IC(50) of 7 microg/ml [95% CI: 5-9]). The dichloromethane extract of leaf of Trichilia emetica, in addition to its antiplasmodial activity (IC(50): 12 microg/ml [95% CI: 12-14]), exhibited a good binding activity to the GABA(A)-benzodiazepine receptor, while water and methanol extracts of the same plant did not show any activity. A strong GABA(A)-receptor complex binding activity was observed in the methanol extract of aerial part of Stylosanthes erecta. The results in this study justify some of the traditional indications of the plants investigated and may thus be candidates for Improved Traditional Medicines in Mali.

  11. GABAA-benzodiazepine receptor availability in smokers and nonsmokers: relationship to subsyndromal anxiety and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esterlis, Irina; Cosgrove, Kelly P; Batis, Jeffery C; Bois, Frederic; Kloczynski, Tracy A; Stiklus, Stephanie M; Perry, Edward; Tamagnan, Gilles D; Seibyl, John P; Makuch, Robert; Krishnan-Sarin, Suchitra; O'Malley, Stephanie; Staley, Julie K

    2009-12-01

    Many smokers experience subsyndromal anxiety symptoms while smoking and during acute abstinence, which may contribute to relapse. We hypothesized that cortical gamma aminobutyric acid(A)-benzodiazepine receptor (GABA(A)-BZR) availability in smokers and nonsmokers might be related to the expression of subsyndromal anxiety, depressive, and pain symptoms. Cortical GABA(A)-BZRs were imaged in 15 smokers (8 men and 7 women), and 15 healthy age and sex-matched nonsmokers, and 4 abstinent tobacco smokers (3 men; 1 woman) using [(123)I]iomazenil and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Anxiety and depressive symptoms were measured using the Spielberger's State-Trait Anxiety Index (STAI) and the Center for Epidemiology Scale for Depressive Symptoms (CES-D). The cold pressor task was administered to assess pain tolerance and sensitivity. The relationship between cortical GABA(A)-BZR availability, smoking status, and subsyndromal depression and anxiety symptoms, as well as pain tolerance and sensitivity, were evaluated. Surprisingly, there were no statistically significant differences in overall GABA(A)-BZR availability between smokers and nonsmokers or between active and abstinent smokers; however, cortical GABA(A)-BZR availability negatively correlated with subsyndromal state anxiety symptoms in nonsmokers but not in smokers. In nonsmokers, the correlation was seen across many brain areas with state anxiety [parietal (r = -0.47, P = 0.03), frontal (r = -0.46, P = 0.03), anterior cingulate (r = -0.47, P = 0.04), temporal (r = -0.47, P = 0.03), occipital (r = -0.43, P = 0.05) cortices, and cerebellum (r = -0.46, P = 0.04)], trait anxiety [parietal (r = -0.72, P = 0.02), frontal (r = -0.72, P = 0.02), and occipital (r = -0.65, P = 0.04) cortices] and depressive symptoms [parietal (r = -0.68; P = 0.02), frontal (r = -0.65; P = 0.03), anterior cingulate (r = -0.61; P = 0.04), and temporal (r = -0.66; P = 0.02) cortices]. The finding that a similar relationship

  12. Peripheral benzodiazepine receptors in the brain of cirrhosis patients with manifest hepatic encephalopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iversen, Peter; Bender, Dirk; Munk, Ole L.; Cumming, Paul [Aarhus University Hospital, PET Centre, Aarhus (Denmark); Aagaard Hansen, Dorthe; Keiding, Susanne [Aarhus University Hospital, PET Centre, Aarhus (Denmark); Aarhus University Hospital, Department of Medicine V (Hepatology), Aarhus (Denmark); Rodell, Anders [Aarhus University Hospital, Centre of Functionally Integrative Neuroscience (CFIN), Aarhus (Denmark)

    2006-07-15

    It has been suggested that ammonia-induced enhancement of peripheral benzodiazepine receptors (PBRs) in the brain is involved in the development of hepatic encephalopathy (HE). This hypothesis is based on animal experiments and studies of post-mortem human brains using radiolabelled PK11195, a specific ligand for PBR, but to our knowledge has not been tested in living patients. The aim of the present study was to test this hypothesis by measuring the number of cerebral PBRs in specific brain regions in cirrhotic patients with an acute episode of clinically manifest HE and healthy subjects using dynamic {sup 11}C-PK11195 brain PET. Eight cirrhotic patients with an acute episode of clinically manifest HE (mean arterial ammonia 81 {mu}mol/l) and five healthy subjects (22 {mu}mol/l) underwent dynamic {sup 11}C-PK11195 and {sup 15}O-H{sub 2}O PET, co-registered with MR images. Brain regions (putamen, cerebellum, cortex and thalamus) were delineated on co-registered {sup 15}O-H{sub 2} {sup 15}O and MR images and copied to the dynamic {sup 15}O-H{sub 2}O and {sup 11}C-PK11195 images. Regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) ({sup 15}O-H{sub 2}O scan) and the volume of distribution of PK11195 ({sup 11}C-PK11195 scan) were calculated by kinetic analysis. There were regional differences in the CBF, with lowest values in the cortex and highest values in the putamen in both groups of subjects (p<0.05), but no significant differences between the groups. There were no significant differences in the volume of distribution of PK11195 (V{sub d}) between regions or between the two groups of subjects. Mean values of V{sub d} ranged from 1.0 to 1.1 in both groups of subjects. The results do not confirm the hypothesis of an increased number of PBRs in patients with HE. (orig.)

  13. {sup 125}I-iomazenil - benzodiazepine receptor binding and serum corticosterone level during psychological stress in a rat model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukumitsu, Nobuyoshi E-mail: GZL13162@nifty.ne.jp; Ogi, Shigeyuki; Uchiyama, Mayuki; Mori, Yutaka

    2004-02-01

    To test the hypothesis that benzodiazepine receptor density decreases in response to stress, we correlated {sup 125}I-iomazenil ({sup 125}I-IMZ) binding with serum corticosterone levels in a rat model. Wistar male rats were divided into four groups; control group (CON, 10 rats), no physical or psychological stress; and one-, three-, and five-day stress groups of 12 rats each (1-DAY, 3-DAY, and 5-DAY, respectively), receiving psychological stress for the given number of days. Psychological stress were given to rats with a communication box. The standardized uptake value (SUV) of {sup 125}I-iomazenil of the 3-DAY and 5-DAY showed that {sup 125}I-iomazenil - benzodiazepine receptor binding was significantly reduced in the cortices, accumbens nuclei, amygdala and caudate putamen (p<0.05). Serum corticosterone level ratio appeared to be slightly elevated in 3-DAY and 5-DAY, although this elevation was not significant. These data suggest that {sup 125}I-IMZ is a useful radioligand to reflect received stress and its binding in the cortices, accumbens nuclei, amygdala and caudate putamen is strongly affected by psychological stress.

  14. Structure-activity relationship of miltirone, an active central benzodiazepine receptor ligand isolated from Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge (Danshen)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, H.M.; Chui, K.Y.; Tan, F.W.; Yang, Y.; Zhong, Z.P.; Lee, C.M.; Sham, H.L.; Wong, H.N. (Chinese Univ. of Hong Kong, Shatin (Hong Kong))

    1991-05-01

    Twenty one o-quinonoid-type compounds and one coumarin-type compound related to miltirone (1) have been synthesized with the aim to identify the key structural elements involved in miltirone's interaction with the central benzodiazepine receptor. On the basis of their inhibition of ({sup 3}H)flunitrazepam binding to bovine cerebral cortex membranes, it is apparent that ring A of miltirone is essential for affinity. Although increasing the size of ring A from six-membered to seven- and eight-membered is well-tolerated, the introduction of polar hydroxyl groups greatly reduces binding affinity. The presence of 1,1-dimethyl groups on ring A is, however, not essential. On the other hand, the isopropyl group on ring C appears to be critical for binding as its removal decreases affinity by more than 30-fold. It can, however, be replaced with a methyl group with minimal reduction in affinity. Finally, linking ring A and B with a -CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}- bridge results in analogue 89, which is 6 times more potent than miltirone at the central benzodiazepine receptor (IC50 = 0.05 microM).

  15. GABAA receptor γ2 subunit knockdown mice have enhanced anxiety-like behavior but unaltered hypnotic response to benzodiazepines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Blas Angel L

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptors (GABAA-Rs are the major inhibitory receptors in the mammalian brain and are modulated by a number of sedative/hypnotic drugs including benzodiazepines and anesthetics. The significance of specific GABAA-Rs subunits with respect to behavior and in vivo drug responses is incompletely understood. The γ2 subunit is highly expressed throughout the brain. Global γ2 knockout mice are insensitive to the hypnotic effects of diazepam and die perinatally. Heterozygous γ2 global knockout mice are viable and have increased anxiety-like behaviors. To further investigate the role of the γ2 subunit in behavior and whole animal drug action, we used gene targeting to create a novel mouse line with attenuated γ2 expression, i.e., γ2 knockdown mice. Results Knockdown mice were created by inserting a neomycin resistance cassette into intron 8 of the γ2 gene. Knockdown mice, on average, showed a 65% reduction of γ2 subunit mRNA compared to controls; however γ2 gene expression was highly variable in these mice, ranging from 10–95% of normal. Immunohistochemical studies demonstrated that γ2 protein levels were also variably reduced. Pharmacological studies using autoradiography on frozen brain sections demonstrated that binding of the benzodiazepine site ligand Ro15-4513 was decreased in mutant mice compared to controls. Behaviorally, knockdown mice displayed enhanced anxiety-like behaviors on the elevated plus maze and forced novelty exploration tests. Surprisingly, mutant mice had an unaltered response to hypnotic doses of the benzodiazepine site ligands diazepam, midazolam and zolpidem as well as ethanol and pentobarbital. Lastly, we demonstrated that the γ2 knockdown mouse line can be used to create γ2 global knockout mice by crossing to a general deleter cre-expressing mouse line. Conclusion We conclude that: 1 insertion of a neomycin resistance gene into intron 8 of the γ2 gene variably

  16. The clobazam metabolite N-desmethyl clobazam is an α2 preferring benzodiazepine with an improved therapeutic window for antihyperalgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralvenius, William T; Acuña, Mario A; Benke, Dietmar; Matthey, Alain; Daali, Youssef; Rudolph, Uwe; Desmeules, Jules; Zeilhofer, Hanns Ulrich; Besson, Marie

    2016-10-01

    Data from genetically modified mice suggest that benzodiazepine (BDZ)-site agonists with improved selectivity for α2-subtype GABAA receptors (α2GABAAR) are potentially useful for the treatment of neuropathic pain. Subtype-selective compounds available for preclinical tests in rodents support this concept but have not been approved for human use, hindering proof-of-concept studies in patients. We recently proposed that N-desmethyl clobazam (NDMC), the main metabolite of the licensed BDZ clobazam (CBZ), is responsible for most of the antihyperalgesia observed in mice after CBZ administration. In order to assess a potentially favorable pharmacological profile of NDMC, we analyzed differences in the GABAAR subtype specificity of CBZ, NDMC and diazepam (DZP) in recombinant receptors. DZP and CBZ potentiated sedating α1GABAARs and antihyperalgesic α2GABAARs with similar efficacies, whereas NDMC preferred α2GABAARs over α1GABAARs across a wide concentration range. In vivo, DZP and NDMC reduced neuropathic pain at doses between 3 and 30 mg/kg. At these doses, DZP had strong locomotor sedating effects while NDMC caused no or only weak sedation. Sedative effects of NDMC became apparent when the action of NDMC was restricted to α1GABAARs. However, when GABAAR point-mutated mice were studied that allow the analysis of antihyperalgesia and sedation in isolation, we found that, compared to DZP, NDMC had a significantly improved therapeutic window, consistent with its more favorable α2/α1 in vitro activity ratio. Given that NDMC should share the safety profile of its parent compound CBZ, it should be well-suited for proof-of-concept studies in human volunteers or patients.

  17. [Benzodiazepine and nonbenzodiazepine hypnotics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Masaki; Inoue, Yuichi

    2015-06-01

    The prevalence of insomnia shows an age-associated increase. Especially, persons with age over 60 years frequently suffer from arousal during sleep and early-morning awakening. The reason of this phenomenon can be explained by age-related change in sleepwake regulation, comorbid diseases and psycho-social status. Benzodiazepine derivatives and benzodiazepine agonists have been widely used for treatment of insomnia. These GABA-A receptor agonist hypnotics have sedative effect, possibly causing various adverse events, i.e. falls and hip fracture, anterograde amnesia, next morning hangover especially in the elderly. When making a choice of treatment drugs for the elderly, low dose benzodiazepine hypnotics with relatively high Ω1-selectivity, and newer hypnotics including melatonic receptor agonist or orexin receptor antagonist can become important candidates considering their comorbid diseases or drug interaction with other medications.

  18. Human studies on the benzodiazepine receptor antagonist beta-carboline ZK 93 426: antagonism of lormetazepam's psychotropic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duka, T; Goerke, D; Dorow, R; Höller, L; Fichte, K

    1988-01-01

    The effects of lormetazepam (0.03 mg/kg IV) a benzodiazepine (BZ) derivative in combination with ZK 93 426 (0.04 mg/kg IV) a beta-carboline, benzodiazepine receptor antagonist were evaluated in humans. Independently, the effects of ZK 93 426 on its own were investigated. A psychometric test battery to evaluate sedation (visual analog scales (VAS), anxiolysis (state-trait-anxiety inventory scale (STAIG X1) and cognitive functions [logical reasoning test (LR), letter detection test (LD)] was applied before and several hours after initiation of treatment. Multiple sleep latency test (MSLT), which measures day time sleepiness, was also applied. Vigilosomnograms analysed from standard EEG recordings were evaluated shortly before and for 1 h after treatment. Treatment started with an intravenous injection of either lormetazepam (LMZ) or placebo (PLA), which was followed 30 min later by administration of either ZK 93 426 or placebo; thus four treatment groups were created (PLA + PLA, LMZ + PLA, LMZ + ZK 93 426 and PLA + ZK 93 426). ZK 93 426 antagonized the sedative and hypnotic effect of LMZ as estimated by MSLT and vigilosomnograms, respectively. Impairment of cognitive functions (LR and LD) induced by LMZ was also antagonized by ZK 93 426. ZK 93 426 had no effect on the changes in the time estimation seen in the LMZ group. Furthermore, ZK 93 426 on its own increased vigilance (alertness) as measured by the vigilosomnogram. A competitive antagonism at the benzodiazepine binding site between ZK 93 426 and LMZ is suggested by their combination effects; the intrinsic activity of ZK 93 426 seems to be due to its weak partial inverse agonist component.

  19. Influences of housing conditions and ethanol intake on binding characteristics of D2, 5-HT1A, and benzodiazepine receptors of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rilke, O; May, T; Oehler, J; Wolffgramm, J

    1995-09-01

    The effects of different housing conditions and ethanol treatment (6 vol % in the drinking water) on the in vitro binding characteristics of striatal dopaminergic D2 ([3H]spiperone), hippocampal serotonergic 5-HT1A ([3H]8-OH-DPAT), and cortical benzodiazepine ([3H]flunitrazepam) receptors have been examined. Social deprivation due to contact caging, short- (1 day) and long-term isolation (5 weeks) yielded a significant decrease of striatal D2 receptor density with the greatest decrease after long-term isolation (-21% Bmax) without changes of Kd in comparison to group animals. The effect of ethanol on striatal D2 receptor density depended on the housing conditions. Whereas ethanol treatment reduced receptor density of group animals (down to 88%), chronic exposure to ethanol under long-term isolation elicited no significant alteration of D2 receptor density compared with group animals. Different housing and ethanol treatment had no effect on 5-HT1A receptor affinity and density. Alterations of benzodiazepine receptor density were not found, but social deprivation as well as ethanol treatment of group animals caused an increased affinity of [3H]flunitrazepam (reduced Kd value). These results indicate that different housing conditions of adult rats evoked significant alterations in D2 and benzodiazepine receptor binding assays, which were modified by ethanol treatment in the case of striatal D2 receptor density.

  20. New insight into the central benzodiazepine receptor-ligand interactions: design, synthesis, biological evaluation, and molecular modeling of 3-substituted 6-phenyl-4H-imidazo[1,5-a][1,4]benzodiazepines and related compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzini, Maurizio; Valenti, Salvatore; Braile, Carlo; Cappelli, Andrea; Vomero, Salvatore; Alcaro, Stefano; Ortuso, Francesco; Marinelli, Luciana; Limongelli, Vittorio; Novellino, Ettore; Betti, Laura; Giannaccini, Gino; Lucacchini, Antonio; Daniele, Simona; Martini, Claudia; Ghelardini, Carla; Di Cesare Mannelli, Lorenzo; Giorgi, Gianluca; Mascia, Maria Paola; Biggio, Giovanni

    2011-08-25

    3-Substituted 6-phenyl-4H-imidazo[1,5-a][1,4]benzodiazepines and related compounds were synthesized as central benzodiazepine receptor (CBR) ligands. Most of the compounds showed high affinity for bovine and human CBR, their K(i) values spanning from the low nanomolar to the submicromolar range. In particular, imidazoester 5f was able to promote a massive flow of (36)Cl(-) in rat cerebrocortical synaptoneurosomes overlapping its efficacy profile with that of a typical full agonist. Compound 5f was then examined in mice for its pharmacological effects where it proved to be a safe anxiolytic agent devoid of the unpleasant myorelaxant and amnesic effects of the classical 1,4-benzodiazepines. Moreover, the selectivity of some selected compounds has been assessed in recombinant α(1)β(2)γ(2)L, α(2)β(1)γ(2)L, and α(5)β(2)γ(2)L human GABA(A) receptors. Finally, some compounds were submitted to molecular docking calculations along with molecular dynamics simulations in the Cromer's GABA(A) homology model.

  1. PK11195 binding to the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor as a marker of microglia activation in multiple sclerosis and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vowinckel, E; Reutens, D; Becher, B

    1997-01-01

    Activated glial cells are implicated in regulating and effecting the immune response that occurs within the CNS as part of multiple sclerosis (MS) and its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). The peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) is expressed in glial cells. We...

  2. Comparison of blood flow and distribution of benzodiazepine receptors in focal epilepsy: Preliminary results of a SPECT study. Vergleich von Blutfluss und Benzodiazepin-Rezeptorverteilung bei fokaler Epilepsie: Vorlaeufige Ergebnisse einer SPECT-Studie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartenstein, P.; Schober, O.; Lottes, G.; Boettger, I. (Muenster Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin); Ludolph, A. (Muenster Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Neurologie); Beer, H.F. (Paul Scherrer Inst., Wuerenlingen (Switzerland))

    1989-10-01

    {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO-SPECT and SPECT with the {sup 123}I-labelled benzodiazepine (Bz) receptor ligand Ro 16-0154 were performed in 10 patients suffering from partial epilepsy, without cerebral lesion in MRT or CT.2 h p.i. of Ro 16-0154 the distribution of activity correlated with the known distribution of Bz-receptors in the human brain. Perfusion and receptor-binding were found decreased in 7 patients of each study in the suspicious brain-area. {sup 123}I-labelled Ro 16-0154 is suitable for Bz-receptor mapping by SPECT. The decrease of Bz-receptor binding in epileptic foci, as described in PET-studies, was also detected by SPECT in 7 of 10 patients. (orig.).

  3. Structure-activity relationship of benzodiazepine derivatives as LXXLL peptide mimetics that inhibit the interaction of vitamin D receptor with coactivators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mita, Yusuke; Dodo, Kosuke; Noguchi-Yachide, Tomomi; Hashimoto, Yuichi; Ishikawa, Minoru

    2013-02-15

    Suppression of vitamin D receptor (VDR)-mediated transcription is expected to be of therapeutic value in Paget's disease of bone. It is known that interaction between VDR and coactivators is necessary for VDR transactivation, and the interaction occurs when VDR recognizes an LXXLL peptide motif of coactivators. We previously reported that benzodiazepine derivatives designed as LXXLL peptide mimetics inhibited the interaction of VDR and coactivators, and reduced VDR transcription. Here, we investigated the structure-activity relationship of 7- and 8-substituted benzodiazepine derivatives, and established that the amino group at the 8-position is critical for the inhibitory activity.

  4. Expression of peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) in human tumors: relationship to breast, colorectal, and prostate tumor progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zeqiu; Slack, Rebecca S; Li, Wenping; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2003-01-01

    High levels of peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor (PBR), the alternative-binding site for diazepam, are part of the aggressive human breast cancer cell phenotype in vitro. We examined PBR levels and distribution in normal tissue and tumors from multiple cancer types by immunohistochemistry. Among normal breast tissues, fibroadenomas, primary and metastatic adenocarcinomas, there is a progressive increase in PBR levels parallel to the invasive and metastatic ability of the tumor (p cancers, such as those of breast, colon-rectum and prostate tissues, where elevated PBR expression is associated with tumor progression. Thus, we propose that PBR overexpression could serve as a novel prognostic indicator of an aggressive phenotype in breast, colorectal and prostate cancers.

  5. HZ166, a novel GABAA receptor subtype-selective benzodiazepine site ligand, is antihyperalgesic in mouse models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Diminished GABAergic and glycinergic inhibition in the spinal dorsal horn contributes significantly to chronic pain of different origins. Accordingly, pharmacological facilitation of GABAergic inhibition by spinal benzodiazepines (BDZs) has been shown to reverse pathological pain in animals as well as in human patients. Previous studies in GABA(A) receptor point-mutated mice have demonstrated that the spinal anti-hyperalgesic effect of classical BDZs is mainly mediated by GABA(A) receptors co...

  6. Transcranial Random Noise Stimulation-induced plasticity is NMDA-receptor independent but sodium-channel blocker and benzodiazepines sensitive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila eChaieb

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Application of transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS between 0.1 and 640 Hz of the primary motor cortex (M1 for 10 minutes induces a persistent excitability increase lasting for at least 60 minutes. However, the mechanism of tRNS-induced cortical excitability alterations is not yet fully understood. Objective: The main aim of this study was to get first efficacy data with regard to the possible neuronal effect of tRNS. Methods: Single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS was used to measure levels of cortical excitability before and after combined application of tRNS at an intensity of 1mA for 10mins stimulation duration and a pharmacological agent (or sham on 8 healthy male participants. Results: The sodium channel blocker carbamazepine showed a tendency towards inhibiting MEPs 5-60 mins poststimulation. The GABAA agonist lorazepam suppressed tRNS-induced cortical excitability increases at 0-20 and 60 min time points. The partial NMDA receptor agonist D-cycloserine, the NMDA receptor antagonist dextromethorphan and the D2/D3 receptor agonist ropinirole had no significant effects on the excitability increases seen with tRNS.Conclusions: In contrast to transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS, aftereffects of tRNS are seem to be not NMDA receptor dependent and can be suppressed by benzodiazepines suggesting that tDCS and tRNS depend upon different mechanisms.

  7. Changes of brain neuropeptide Y and its receptors in rats with flurazepam tolerance and dependence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-ping ZHANG; Li WANG

    2005-01-01

    Aim: Anticonvulsant tolerance and dependence are two obstacles that restrict the clinical use of benzodiazepines (BDZ). In order to explore the mechanism of these two adverse reactions, changes of neuropeptide Y (NPY) and its receptors in the hippocampus of rat models, in relation to flurazepam (FZP, a member of BDZ) tolerance and dependence, were investigated. Methods: The mRNA of preproNPY and its receptors (Y1, Y2, and Y5) in the hippocampus were determined by competitive RT-PCR, and the distribution of NPY in the hippocampus was examined by immunohistochemistry. Results: A decrease of preproNPY mRNA in the hippocampus was foundin tolerant and dependent rats. The level ofpreproNPY mRNA in the hippocampus was reversely correlated with the degree of tolerance and dependence, measured by the threshold of pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures.Immunohistochemistry indicated a decrease of NPY-immunoreactive material in neurons of the CA1, CA3, and dentate gyrus regions of both tolerant and dependent rats. The mRNA of NPY receptors Y1 and Y5 decreased in tolerant rats but did not change in dependent rats. The mRNA of NPY receptor Y2 increased in tolerant rats but decreased in dependent rats. Conclusion: A decrease of NPY in the hippocampus might be involved in anticonvulsant tolerance and dependence following long-term treatment with FZP. Y1, Y2, and Y5 mRNA were also altered in FZP tolerance and dependence.

  8. Benzodiazepine-induced anxiolysis and reduction of conditioned fear are mediated by distinct GABAA receptor subtypes in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kiersten S; Engin, Elif; Meloni, Edward G; Rudolph, Uwe

    2012-08-01

    GABA(A) receptor modulating drugs such as benzodiazepines (BZs) have been used to treat anxiety disorders for over five decades. In order to determine whether the same or different GABA(A) receptor subtypes are necessary for the anxiolytic-like action of BZs in unconditioned anxiety and conditioned fear models, we investigated the role of different GABA(A) receptor subtypes by challenging wild type, α1(H101R), α2(H101R) and α3(H126R) mice bred on the C57BL/6J background with diazepam or chlordiazepoxide in the elevated plus maze and the fear-potentiated startle paradigms. Both drugs significantly increased open arm exploration in the elevated plus maze in wild type, α1(H101R) and α3(H126R), but this effect was abolished in α2(H101R) mice; these were expected results based on previous published results. In contrast, while administration of diazepam and chlordiazepoxide significantly attenuated fear-potentiated startle (FPS) in wild type mice and α3(H126R) mice, the fear-reducing effects of these drugs were absent in both α1(H101R) and α2(H101R) point mutants, indicating that both α1- and α2-containing GABA(A) receptors are necessary for BZs to exert their effects on conditioned fear responses. Our findings illustrate both an overlap and a divergence between the GABA(A) receptor subtype requirements for the impact of BZs, specifically that both α1- and α2-containing GABA(A) receptors are necessary for BZs to reduce conditioned fear whereas only α2-containing GABA(A) receptors are needed for BZ-induced anxiolysis in unconditioned tests of anxiety. This raises the possibility that GABAergic pharmacological interventions for specific anxiety disorders can be differentially tailored.

  9. Functional modulation of cerebral gamma-aminobutyric acidA receptor/benzodiazepine receptor/chloride ion channel complex with ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate: Presence of independent binding site for ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taguchi, J.; Kuriyama, K. (Kyoto Prefectural Univ. of Medicine (Japan))

    1990-05-01

    Effect of ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate (beta-CCE) on the function of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptor/benzodiazepine receptor/chloride ion channel complex was studied. Beta-CCE noncompetitively and competitively inhibited (3H)flunitrazepam binding to benzodiazepine receptor, but not (3H)muscimol binding to GABAA receptor as well as t-(3H)butylbicycloorthobenzoate (( 3H) TBOB) binding to chloride ion channel, in particulate fraction of the mouse brain. Ro15-1788 also inhibited competitively (3H) flunitrazepam binding. On the other hand, the binding of beta-(3H)CCE was inhibited noncompetitively and competitively by clonazepam and competitively by Ro15-1788. In agreement with these results, benzodiazepines-stimulated (3H)muscimol binding was antagonized by beta-CCE and Ro15-1788. Gel column chromatography for the solubilized fraction from cerebral particulate fraction by 0.2% sodium deoxycholate (DOC-Na) in the presence of 1 M KCl indicated that beta-(3H)CCE binding site was eluted in the same fraction (molecular weight, 250,000) as the binding sites for (3H)flunitrazepam, (3H)muscimol and (3H)TBOB. GABA-stimulated 36Cl- influx into membrane vesicles prepared from the bovine cerebral cortex was stimulated and attenuated by flunitrazepam and beta-CCE, respectively. These effects of flunitrazepam and beta-CCE on the GABA-stimulated 36Cl- influx were antagonized by Ro15-1788. The present results suggest that the binding site for beta-CCE, which resides on GABAA receptor/benzodiazepine receptor/chloride ion channel complex, may be different from that for benzodiazepine. Possible roles of beta-CCE binding site in the allosteric inhibitions on benzodiazepine binding site as well as on the functional coupling between chloride ion channel and GABAA receptor are also suggested.

  10. Functional characterization of the 1,5-benzodiazepine clobazam and its major active metabolite N-desmethylclobazam at human GABA(A) receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Harriet; Ebert, Bjarke; Jensen, Henrik Sindal; Jensen, Anders A

    2015-01-01

    The 1,5-benzodiazepine clobazam is indicated for the adjunctive treatment of seizures associated with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome in patients 2 years of age or older in the United States, and for treatment of anxiety and various forms of epilepsy elsewhere. Clobazam has been reported to exhibit different in vivo adverse effects and addiction liability profile than the classic 1,4-benzodiazepines. In this study, it was investigated whether the in vitro pharmacological properties of clobazam and its major active metabolite N-desmethylclobazam could explain some of these clinical differences. The functional properties of the two 1,5-benzodiazepines were characterized at the human γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABA(A)R) subtypes α1β2γ(2S), α2β2γ(2S), α3β2γ(2S), α5β2γ(2S) and α6β2δ expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes by use of two-electrode voltage-clamp electrophysiology and compared to those exhibited by the 1,4-benzodiazepine clonazepam. All three compounds potentiated GABA EC20-evoked responses through the α(1,2,3,5)β2γ(2S) GABA(A)Rs in a reversible and concentration-dependent manner, with each displaying similar EC50 values at the four subtypes. Furthermore, the degrees of potentiation of the GABA EC20 currents through the four receptors mediated by saturating modulator concentrations did not differ substantially for any of the three benzodiazepines. The three compounds were substantially less potent (200-3900 fold) as positive allosteric modulators at the α6β2δ GABA(A)R than at the α(1,2,3,5)β2γ(2S) receptors. Interestingly, however, clobazam and especially N-desmethylclobazam were highly efficacious potentiators of α6β2δ receptor signaling. Although this activity component is unlikely to contribute to the in vivo effects of clobazam/N-desmethylclobazam, the 1,5-benzodiazepine could constitute an interesting lead for novel modulators targeting this low-affinity binding site in GABAARs. In conclusion, the non-selective modulation

  11. Functional characterization of the 1,5-benzodiazepine clobazam and its major active metabolite N-desmethylclobazam at human GABA(A receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harriet Hammer

    Full Text Available The 1,5-benzodiazepine clobazam is indicated for the adjunctive treatment of seizures associated with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome in patients 2 years of age or older in the United States, and for treatment of anxiety and various forms of epilepsy elsewhere. Clobazam has been reported to exhibit different in vivo adverse effects and addiction liability profile than the classic 1,4-benzodiazepines. In this study, it was investigated whether the in vitro pharmacological properties of clobazam and its major active metabolite N-desmethylclobazam could explain some of these clinical differences. The functional properties of the two 1,5-benzodiazepines were characterized at the human γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABA(AR subtypes α1β2γ(2S, α2β2γ(2S, α3β2γ(2S, α5β2γ(2S and α6β2δ expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes by use of two-electrode voltage-clamp electrophysiology and compared to those exhibited by the 1,4-benzodiazepine clonazepam. All three compounds potentiated GABA EC20-evoked responses through the α(1,2,3,5β2γ(2S GABA(ARs in a reversible and concentration-dependent manner, with each displaying similar EC50 values at the four subtypes. Furthermore, the degrees of potentiation of the GABA EC20 currents through the four receptors mediated by saturating modulator concentrations did not differ substantially for any of the three benzodiazepines. The three compounds were substantially less potent (200-3900 fold as positive allosteric modulators at the α6β2δ GABA(AR than at the α(1,2,3,5β2γ(2S receptors. Interestingly, however, clobazam and especially N-desmethylclobazam were highly efficacious potentiators of α6β2δ receptor signaling. Although this activity component is unlikely to contribute to the in vivo effects of clobazam/N-desmethylclobazam, the 1,5-benzodiazepine could constitute an interesting lead for novel modulators targeting this low-affinity binding site in GABAARs. In conclusion, the non

  12. SPECT imaging of GABA{sub A}/benzodiazepine receptors and cerebral perfusion in mild cognitive impairment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pappata, Sabina; Varrone, Andrea; Vicidomini, Caterina; Sansone, Valeria; Comerci, Marco; Panico, Maria Rosaria; Quarantelli, Mario [CNR, Institute of Biostructure and Bioimaging, Naples (Italy); Milan, Graziella; De Falco, Caterina; Lore, Elisa; Postiglione, Alfredo [University ' ' Federico II' ' , Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Naples (Italy); Iavarone, Alessandro [Neurologic and Stroke Unit, CTO Hospital, Naples (Italy); Salvatore, Marco [CNR, Institute of Biostructure and Bioimaging, Naples (Italy); University ' ' Federico II' ' , Department of Biomorphological and Functional Sciences, Naples (Italy)

    2010-06-15

    The involvement of neocortical and limbic GABA{sub A}/benzodiazepine (BZD) receptors in Alzheimer's disease (AD) is controversial and mainly reported in advanced stages. The status of these receptors in the very early stages of AD is unclear and has not been explored in vivo. Our aims were to investigate in vivo the integrity of cerebral cortical GABA{sub A}/BZD receptors in subjects with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and to compare possible receptor changes to those in cerebral perfusion. [{sup 123}I]Iomazenil and [{sup 99m}Tc]HMPAO SPECT images were acquired in 16 patients with amnestic MCI and in 14 normal elderly control subjects (only [{sup 123}I]iomazenil imaging in 5, only [{sup 99m}Tc]HMPAO imaging in 4, and both [{sup 123}I]iomazenil and [{sup 99m}Tc]HMPAO imaging in 5). Region of interest (ROI) analysis and voxel-based analysis were performed with cerebellar normalization. Neither ROI analysis nor voxel-based analysis showed significant [{sup 123}I]iomazenil binding changes in MCI patients compared to control subjects, either as a whole group or when considering only those patients with MCI that converted to AD within 2 years of clinical follow-up. In contrast, the ROI analysis revealed significant hypoperfusion of the precuneus and posterior cingulate cortex in the whole group of MCI patients and in MCI converters as compared to control subjects. Voxel-based analysis showed similar results. These results indicate that in the very early stages of AD, neocortical and limbic neurons/synapses expressing GABA{sub A}/BZD receptors are essentially preserved. They suggest that in MCI patients functional changes precede neuronal/synaptic loss in neocortical posterior regions and that [{sup 99m}Tc]HMPAO rCBF imaging is more sensitive than [{sup 123}I]iomazenil GABA{sub A}/BZD receptor imaging in detecting prodromal AD. (orig.)

  13. Synthesis and PET imaging of the benzodiazepine receptor tracer [N-methyl-{sup 11}C]iomazenil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldwin, Ronald M.; Horti, Andrew G.; Bremner, J. Douglas; Stratton, Morgan D.; Dannals, Robert F.; Ravert, Hayden T.; Zea-Ponce, Yolanda; Ng, Chin K.; Dey, Holley M.; Soufer, Robert; Charney, Dennis S.; Mazza, Samuel M.; Sparks, Richard B.; Stubbs, James B.; Innis, Robert B

    1995-07-01

    The central benzodiazepine receptor tracer [N-methyl-{sup 11}C]iomazenil (Ro 16-0154) was synthesized by alkylation of the desmethyl precursor noriomazenil with [{sup 11}C]methyl iodide. The [{sup 11}C]CH{sub 3}I (prepared by reduction of [{sup 11}C]CO{sub 2} with LiAlH{sub 4} followed by reaction with HI) was reacted with noriomazenil inN,N -dimethylformamide and Bu{sub 4}N{sup +}OH{sup -} for 1 min at 80 deg. C and purified by HPLC (C{sub 18}, 34% CH{sub 3}CN/H{sub 2}O, 7 mL/min). The product was obtained with synthesis time 35 {+-} 5 min (mean {+-} SD, n = 7), radiochemical yield (EOB) 36 {+-} 16%, radiochemical purity 99 {+-} 1%, and specific activity 5100 {+-} 2800 mCi/{mu}mol. Absorbed radiation doses were calculated from previously acquired human biodistribution data. The urinary bladder wall received the highest dose (0.099 mGy/MBq) for 4.8 h voiding interval and the effective dose equivalent was 0.015 mSv/MBq. After i.v. injection of [{sup 11}C]iomazenil in an adult baboon or healthy human volunteer, radioactivity accumulated in the cortex with time-activity curves in agreement with results obtained with [{sup 11}C]flumazenil PET and [{sup 123}I]iomazenil SPECT studies. The count rate was sufficient to obtain quantitative images up to 2 h post-injection with a 14 mCi injection. These results suggest that [{sup 11}C]iomazenil will be a useful agent for measuring benzodiazepine receptorsin vivo by positron emission tomography.

  14. Quantification of human brain benzodiazepine receptors using [{sup 18}F]fluoroethylflumazenil: a first report in volunteers and epileptic patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leveque, Philippe [Unite de Tomographie par Positrons, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Unite de Chimie Pharmaceutique et de Radiopharmacie, CMFA/REMA, Universite Catholique de Louvain, 73-40 Avenue Mounier, 1200, Bruxelles (Belgium); Sanabria-Bohorquez, Sandra [Imaging Research, Merck Research Laboratories, West Point, Philadelphia (United States); Bol, Anne; Volder, Anne de; Labar, Daniel [Unite de Tomographie par Positrons, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Rijckevorsel, K. van [Service de Neurologie, Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Bruxelles (Belgium); Gallez, Bernard [Unite de Chimie Pharmaceutique et de Radiopharmacie, CMFA/REMA, Universite Catholique de Louvain, 73-40 Avenue Mounier, 1200, Bruxelles (Belgium); Unite de Resonance Magnetique Biomedicale, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Bruxelles (Belgium)

    2003-12-01

    Fluorine-18 fluoroethylflumazenil ([{sup 18}F]FEF) is a tracer for central benzodiazepine (BZ) receptors which is proposed as an alternative to carbon-11 flumazenil for in vivo imaging using positron emission tomography (PET) in humans. In this study, [{sup 18}F]FEF kinetic data were acquired using a 60-min two-injection protocol on three normal subjects and two patients suffering from mesiotemporal epilepsy as demonstrated by abnormal magnetic resonance imaging and [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography. First, a tracer bolus injection was performed and [{sup 18}F]FEF rapidly distributed in the brain according to the known BZ receptor distribution. Thirty minutes later a displacement injection of 0.01 mg/kg of unlabelled flumazenil was performed. Activity was rapidly displaced from all BZ receptor regions demonstrating the specific binding of [{sup 18}F]FEF. No displacement was observed in the pons. Plasma input function was obtained from arterial blood sampling, and metabolite analysis was performed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Metabolite quantification revealed a fast decrease in tracer plasma concentration, such that at 5 min post injection about 70% of the total radioactivity in plasma corresponded to [{sup 18}F]FEF, reaching 24% at 30 min post injection. The interactions between [{sup 18}F]FEF and BZ receptors were described using linear compartmental models with plasma input and reference tissue approaches. Binding potential values were in agreement with the known distribution of BZ receptors in human brain. Finally, in two patients with mesiotemporal sclerosis, reduced uptake of [{sup 18}F]FEF was clearly observed in the implicated left hippocampus. (orig.)

  15. Novel one-pot one-step synthesis of 2'-[{sup 18}F]fluoroflumazenil (FFMZ) for benzodiazepine receptor imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, Hyun Yoon; Jae, Min Jeong E-mail: jmjng@snu.ac.kr; Hyung, Woo Kim; Sung, Hyun Hong; Lee, Yun-Sang; Hee, Sup Kil; Dae, Yoon Chi; Dong, Soo Lee; Chung, June-Key; Myung, Chul Lee

    2003-05-01

    We describe the synthesis of 2'-[{sup 18}F]fluoroflumazenil (FFMZ), which differs from the typically used [{sup 18}F]fluoroethylflumazenil (FEFMZ) for benzodiazepine receptor imaging. For one-pot one-step labeling, the precursors, 2'-tosyloxyflumazenil (TFMZ) and 2'-mesyloxyflumazenil (MFMZ), were synthesized in three steps. The precursors were successfully labeled with no-carrier-added {sup 18}F-fluoride which was activated by repeated azeotropic distillation with Kryptofix 2.2.2./potassium carbonate in MeCN. An automated system for labeling and purification of [{sup 18}F]FFMZ was developed. Labeling efficiency and radiochemical purity of [{sup 18}F]FFMZ after synthesis by the automated system were 68% and 98%, respectively. Specific binding of [{sup 18}F]FFMZ to central benzodiazepine receptor of rats was demonstrated by phosphoimaging.

  16. Prescription patterns of benzodiazepines in the Lebanese adult population: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramadan WH

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Wijdan H Ramadan,1 Ghada M El Khoury,1 Mary E Deeb,2 Marwan Sheikh-Taha1 1School of Pharmacy, 2School of Medicine, Lebanese American University, Byblos, Lebanon Abstract: This study assessed the profile of benzodiazepine (BDZ users in Lebanon. Adult patients visiting the pharmacies with prescriptions of BDZs were included in the study. Seven hundred and eighty-six current BDZ users were included, of whom 54.2% were females. Twenty-three percent reported being alcohol consumers and were mostly males. The two most commonly used BDZs were alprazolam (34.6% and bromazepam (33.6%. The indication for use was mainly anxiety (44.4%, insomnia (22.5%, and depression (15.9%. The prescribing physicians were primarily psychiatrists (43.2%, followed by general practitioners (29.7%. Forty percent had been taking the drug for more than a year. Among those using BDZs for at least 1 month, 35.5% increased the dose with time. Thirty-three percent reported having experienced side effects. Eighteen patients (2.3% reported taking more than one BDZ concomitantly, while 18.3% were taking drugs that should not be prescribed along with BDZs. In conclusion, the use of BDZs is highest among females, especially for the treatment of anxiety. Moreover, continuous use of the drugs for more than a year as well as significant potential drug interactions was identified. Keywords: benzodiazepines, prescribing patterns, controlled substances 

  17. Bromine-76 and carbon-11 labelled NNC 13-8199, metabolically stable benzodiazepine receptor agonists as radioligands for positron emission tomography (PET)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foged, C. [Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry Section, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden)]|[Novo Nordisk A/S, Health Care Discovery and Development, Maaloev (Denmark); Halldin, C.; Pauli, S.; Suhara, T.; Swahn, C.G.; Karlsson, P.; Farde, L. [Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry Section, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Loc`h, C.; Maziere, B.; Maziere, M. [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, CEA, Orsay (France); Hansen, H.C. [Novo Nordisk A/S, Health Care Discovery and Development, Maaloev (Denmark)

    1997-10-01

    NNC 13-8241 has recently been labelled with iodine-123 and developed as a metabolically stable benzodiazepine receptor ligand for single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in monkeys and man. NNC 13-8199 is a bromo-analogue of NNC 13-8241. This partial agonist binds selectively and with subnanomolar affinity to the benzodiazepine receptors. We prepared {sup 76}Br labelled NNC 13-8199 from the trimethyltin precursor by the chloramine-T method. Carbon-11 labelled NNC 13-8199 was synthesised by N-alkylation of the nitrogen of the amide group with [{sup 11}C]methyl iodide. Positron emission tomography (PET) examination with the two radioligands in monkeys demonstrated a high uptake of radioactivity in the occipital, temporal and frontal cortex. In the study with [{sup 76}Br]NNC 13-8199, the monkey brain uptake continued to increase until the time of displacement with flumazenil at 215 min after injection. For both radioligands the radioactivity in the cortical brain regions was markedly reduced after displacement with flumazenil. More than 98% of the radioactivity in monkey plasma represented unchanged radioligand 40 min after injection. The low degree of metabolism indicates that NNC 13-8199 is metabolically much more stable than hitherto developed PET radioligands for imaging of benzodiazepine receptors in the primate brain. [{sup 76}Br]NNC 13-8199 has potential as a radioligand in human PET studies using models where a slow metabolism is an advantage. (orig.) With 8 figs., 28 refs.

  18. Stiripentol is anticonvulsant by potentiating GABAergic transmission in a model of benzodiazepine-refractory status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosenbaugh, Denise K; Mott, David D

    2013-04-01

    Benzodiazepines (BZDs) are first-line therapy for treatment of status epilepticus (SE). However, BZD treatment is negatively affected by seizure duration due to decreases in BZD-sensitive GABA(A) receptors during prolonged SE. Stiripentol (STP) is an anticonvulsant that is used as add-on treatment for Dravet Syndrome. Recent studies have shown that STP is a positive allosteric modulator of the GABA(A) receptor. The subunit selectivity of STP at this receptor suggests that it would be anticonvulsant in both brief as well as prolonged SE. We tested this possibility by comparing the ability of STP and diazepam (DZP), a commonly used BZD, to terminate behavioral convulsions in a rodent model of pharmacoresistant SE. We found that STP was anticonvulsant in this model and remained effective during prolonged SE, unlike DZP which exhibited a 14 fold increase in its ED(50). Whole cell recording from hippocampal slices from these animals revealed that STP potentiated GABAergic IPSCs, as well as tonic GABAergic current by acting at a site on the GABA(A) receptor separate from the BDZ binding site. Potentiation of GABAergic currents by STP remained intact during prolonged SE, while potentiation by DZP was lost. Both IPSC potentiation and anticonvulsant activity of STP were greater in younger animals than in adults. These findings suggest that at doses that yield therapeutically relevant concentrations, STP is anticonvulsant by potentiating GABAergic inhibition and that the subunit selectivity profile of STP enables it to remain effective despite GABA(A) receptor subunit changes during prolonged SE.

  19. Wavelet denoising for voxel-based compartmental analysis of peripheral benzodiazepine receptors with {sup 18}F-FEDAA1106

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shidahara, Miho; Ikoma, Yoko; Seki, Chie; Kanno, Iwao; Kimura, Yuichi [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Biophysics Group, Molecular Imaging Center, Chiba (Japan); Fujimura, Yota; Ito, Hiroshi; Suhara, Tetsuya [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Molecular Neuroimaging Group, Molecular Imaging Center, Chiba (Japan); Naganawa, Mika [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Biophysics Group, Molecular Imaging Center, Chiba (Japan); Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Tokyo (Japan)

    2008-02-15

    We evaluated the noise reduction capability of wavelet denoising for estimated binding potential (BP) images (k{sub 3}/k{sub 4}) of the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor using {sup 18}F-FEDAA1106 and nonlinear least-square fitting. Wavelet denoising within a three-dimensional discrete dual-tree complex wavelet transform was applied to simulate data and clinical dynamic positron emission tomography images of {sup 18}F-FEDAA1106. To eliminate noise components in wavelet coefficients, real and imaginary coefficients for each subband were thresholded individually using NormalShrink. A simulated dynamic brain image of {sup 18}F-FEDAA1106 was generated and Gaussian noise was added to mimic PET dynamic scan. The derived BP images were compared with true images using 156 rectangular regions of interest. Wavelet denoising was also applied to data derived from seven young normal volunteers. In the simulations, estimated BP by denoised image showed better correlation with the true BP values (Y = 0.83X + 0.94, r = 0.80), although no correlation was observed in the estimates between noise-added and true images (Y = 1.2X + 0.78, r = 0.49). For clinical data, there were visual improvements in the signal-to-noise ratio for estimated BP images. Wavelet denoising improved the bias and reduced the variation of pharmacokinetic parameters for BP. (orig.)

  20. [{sup 11}C]DAA1106: radiosynthesis and in vivo binding to peripheral benzodiazepine receptors in mouse brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Mingrong E-mail: zhang@nirs.go.jp; Kida, Takayo; Noguchi, Junko; Furutsuka, Kenji; Maeda, Jun; Suhara, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Kazutoshi

    2003-05-01

    DAA1106 (N-(2,5-Dimethoxybenzyl)-N-(5-fluoro-2-phenoxyphenyl)acetamide), is a potent and selective ligand for peripheral benzodiazepine receptors (PBR) in mitochondrial fractions of rat (K{sub i}=0.043 nM) and monkey (K{sub i}=0.188 nM) brains. This compound was labeled by [{sup 11}C]methylation of a corresponding desmethyl precursor (DAA1123) with [{sup 11}C]CH{sub 3}I in the presence of NaH, with a 72{+-}16% (corrected for decay) incorporation yield of radioactivity. After HPLC purification, [{sup 11}C]DAA1106 was obtained with {>=}98% radiochemical purity and specific activity of 90-156 GBq/{mu}mol at the end of synthesis. After iv injection of [{sup 11}C]DAA1106 into mice, high accumulations of radioactivity were found in the olfactory bulb and cerebellum, the high PBR density regions in the brain. Coinjection of [{sup 11}C]DAA1106 with unlabeled DAA1106 and PBR-selective PK11195 displayed a significant reduction of radioactivity, suggesting a high specific binding of [{sup 11}C]DAA1106 to PBR. Although this tracer was rapidly metabolized in the plasma, only [{sup 11}C]DAA1106 was detected in the brain tissues, suggesting the specific binding in the brain due to the tracer itself. These findings revealed that [{sup 11}C]DAA1106 is a potential and selective positron emitting radioligand for PBR.

  1. Anxiolytic-like effects of standardized extract of Justicia pectoralis (SEJP) in mice: Involvement of GABA/benzodiazepine in receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venâncio, E T; Rocha, N F M; Rios, E R V; Feitosa, M L; Linhares, M I; Melo, F H C; Matias, M S; Fonseca, F N; Sousa, F C F; Leal, L K A M; Fonteles, M M F

    2011-03-01

    Justicia pectoralis (Acanthaceae) is used as an antiinflammatory, antimicrobial and bronchodilator, and its extract exerts an anxiolytic-like effect profile in animal models. This work presents the behavioral effects of an aqueous standardized extract of Justicia pectoralis (SEJP) in animal models, such as the elevated plus maze (EPM), light/dark, open field, rota rod and pentobarbital sleep time. The extract was administered intragastrically to male mice at single doses of 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg, while diazepam 1 or 2 mg/kg was used as a standard drug and flumazenil 2.5 mg/kg was used to evaluate the participation of benzodiazepinic receptors. The results showed that, similar to diazepam (1 mg/kg), SEJP significantly modified all the observed parameters in the EPM test, without altering the general motor activity in the open field, rota rod and pentobarbital sleep time tests. Flumazenil reversed not only the diazepam effect but also the SEJP effect. In the same way, all doses of SEJP increased the time of permanence in the light box in the light/dark test. The results showed that SEJP presented an anxiolytic-like effect, disproving sedative effects.

  2. In vivo pharmacological characterization of AC-3933, a benzodiazepine receptor partial inverse agonist for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatayama, Y; Hashimoto, T; Kohayakawa, H; Kiyoshi, T; Nakamichi, K; Kinoshita, T; Yoshida, N

    2014-04-18

    GABAergic neurons are known to inhibit neural transduction and therefore negatively affect excitatory neural circuits in the brain. We have previously reported that 5-(3-methoxyphenyl)-3-(5-methyl-1,2,4-oxadiazol-3-yl)-1,6-naphthyridin-2(1H)-one (AC-3933), a partial inverse agonist for the benzodiazepine receptor (BzR), reverses GABAergic inhibitory effect on cholinergic neurons, and thus enhances acetylcholine release from these neurons in rat hippocampal slices. In this study, we evaluated AC-3933 potential for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease, a disorder characterized by progressive decline mainly in cholinergic function. Oral administration of AC-3933 (0.01-0.03mg/kg) resulted in the amelioration of scopolamine-induced amnesia, as well as a shift in electroencephalogram (EEG) relative power characteristic of pro-cognitive cholinergic activators, such as donepezil. In addition, treatment with AC-3933 even at the high dose of 100mg/kg p.o. produced no seizure or anxiety, two major adverse effects of BzR inverse agonists developed in the past. These findings indicate that AC-3933 with its low risk for side effects may be useful in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

  3. Alterations of benzodiazepine receptor binding potential in anxiety and somatoform disorders measured by {sup 123}I-iomazenil SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokunaga, Mari; Ida, Ituro; Mikuni, Masahiko [Gunma Univ., Maebashi (Japan). School of Medicine; Higuchi, Teruhiko

    1997-05-01

    {sup 123}I-iomazenil (IMZ), a newly developed radioligand which acts on benzodiazepine receptors (BZR) as a partial inverse agonist, made it possible to evaluate the function of central BZR by single photon emission tomography (SPECT). To examine the alterations of the binding potential (BP) in the anxiety state, {sup 123}I-IMZ SPECT was performed in five patients with anxiety and somatoform disorders, and five epileptic patients without anxiety symptoms served as a reference. The BP of BZR was determined by using a table look-up procedure based on a three-compartment, two-parameter model in the bilateral superior frontal, inferior frontal, temporal, parietal, occipital, and cerebellar cortex. The mean BP of patients with anxiety and somatoform disorders was significantly decreased in the superior frontal, temporal, and parietal cortex, in comparison with that of epileptic patients. A significant correlation was observed between the anxiety levels scored on the Hamilton anxiety scale and BP in the right temporal cortex and left superior frontal cortex. These changes in BZR revealed by SPECT suggest the usefulness of {sup 123}I-IMZ SPECT to objectively evaluate anxiety levels in patients with anxiety symptoms. (author)

  4. Reducing Prescriptions of Long-acting Benzodiazepine Drugs in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Sophie Isabel; Bjerrum, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Prolonged consumption of benzodiazepine drugs (BZD) and benzodiazepine receptor agonists (zolpidem, zaleplon, zopiclone; altogether Z drugs) is related to potential physiological and psychological dependence along with other adverse effects. This study aimed to analyse the prescribing of long...

  5. Experiment K-6-18. Study of muscarinic and gaba (benzodiazepine) receptors in the sensory-motor cortex, hippcampus and spinal code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daunton, N.; Damelio, F.; Krasnov, I.

    1990-01-01

    Frontal lobe samples of rat brains flown aboard Cosmos 1887 were processed for the study of muscarinic (cholinergic) and GABA (benzodiazepine) receptors and for immunocytochemical localization of the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). Although radioactive labeling of both muscarinic cholinergic and GABA (benzodiazepine) receptors proved to be successful with the techniques employed, distinct receptor localization of individual laminae of the frontal neocortex was not possible since the sampling of the area was different in the various groups of animals. In spite of efforts made for proper orientation and regional identification of laminae, it was found that a densitometric (quantitation of autoradiograms) analysis of the tissue did not contribute to the final interpretation of the effects of weightlessness on these receptors. As to the immunocytochemical studies the use of both markers, GFAP and GABA antiserum, confirmed the suitability of the techniques for use in frozen material. However, similar problems to those encountered in the receptor studies prevented an adequate interpretation of the effects of micro-G exposure on the localization and distribution of GABA and GFAP. This study did, however, confirm the feasibility of investigating neurotransmitters and their receptors in future space flight experiments.

  6. GABAA Receptors Implicated in REM Sleep Control Express a Benzodiazepine Binding Site

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Tin Quang; Liang, Chang-Lin; Marks, Gerald A.

    2013-01-01

    It has been reported that non-subtype-selective GABAA receptor antagonists injected into the nucleus pontis oralis (PnO) of rats induced long-lasting increases in REM sleep. Characteristics of these REM sleep increases were identical to those resulting from injection of muscarinic cholinergic agonists. Both actions were blocked by the muscarinic antagonist, atropine. Microdialysis of GABAA receptor antagonists into the PnO resulted in increased acetylcholine levels. These findings were consis...

  7. Study of the Interaction of 1,4- and 1,5-Benzodiazepines with GABAA Receptors of Rat Cerebellum Granule Cells in Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikas, Periklis; Gatta, Elena; Cupello, Aroldo; Di Braccio, Mario; Grossi, Giancarlo; Pellistri, Francesca; Robello, Mauro

    2015-08-01

    The effects of a classical 1,4-benzodiazepine agonist, such as diazepam, its catabolite N-desmethyl-diazepam (nordiazepam), and 1,5-benzodiazepines such as clobazam and RL 214 (a triazolobenzodiazepine previously synthesized in our labs) were evaluated on native GABAA receptors of cerebellar granule cells in culture. The parameter studied was the increase of GABA-activated chloride currents caused by these substances. The contributions of α6 β2/3 γ2 and α1 α6 β2/3 γ2 receptor subtypes to the increase of GABA-activated chloride current were investigated by comparing the effects of such substances in the presence vs. the absence of furosemide. Furosemide is in fact able to block such receptors. It was found that the percent enhancement of peak GABA-activated current doubled for diazepam, clobazam, and RL 214. However, it did not change for N-desmethyl-diazepam. These results indicate that diazepam, clobazam, and RL 214 interact exclusively with α1 β2/3 γ2 receptors, while N-desmethyl-diazepam seems to interact with not only α1- but also α6-containing receptors.

  8. GABA receptors and benzodiazepine binding sites modulate hippocampal acetylcholine release in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moor, E; de Boer, P; Westerink, B.H.C.

    1998-01-01

    In the present study, the regulation of acetylcholine release from the ventral hippocampus by gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) was investigated in vivo. GABA receptor agonists and antagonists were administered locally in the medial septum and the adjacent vertical limb of the diagonal band of Broca, o

  9. Stimulation of Hepatic Apolipoprotein A-I Production by Novel Thieno-Triazolodiazepines: Roles of the Classical Benzodiazepine Receptor, PAF Receptor, and Bromodomain Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempen, Herman J; Bellus, Daniel; Fedorov, Oleg; Nicklisch, Silke; Filippakopoulos, Panagis; Picaud, Sarah; Knapp, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Expression and secretion of apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) by cultured liver cells can be markedly stimulated by triazolodiazepines (TZDs). It has been shown previously that the thieno-TZD Ro 11-1464 increases plasma levels of apoA-I and in vivomacrophage reverse cholesterol transport in mice. However, these effects were only seen at high doses, at which the compound could act on central benzodiazepine (BZD) receptors or platelet activating factor (PAF) receptors, interfering with its potential utility. In this work, we describe 2 new thieno-TZDs MDCO-3770 and MDCO-3783, both derived from Ro 11-1464. These compounds display the same high efficacy on apoA-I production, metabolic stability, and lack of cytotoxicity in cultured hepatocytes as Ro 11-1464, but they do not bind to the central BZD receptor and PAF receptor. The quinazoline RVX-208 was less efficacious in stimulating apoA-I production and displayed signs of cytotoxicity. Certain TZDs stimulating apoA-I production are now known to be inhibitors of bromodomain (BRD) extra-terminal (BET) proteins BRDT, BRD2, BRD3, and BRD4, and this inhibition was inferred as a main molecular mechanism for their effect on apoA-I expression. We show here that the thieno-TZD (+)-JQ1, a potent BET inhibitor, strongly stimulated apoA-I production in Hep-G2 cells, but that its enantiomer (-)-JQ1, which has no BET inhibitor activity, also showed considerable effect on apoA-I production. MDCO-3770 and MDCO-3783 also inhibited BRD3 and BRD4 in vitro, with potency somewhat below that of (+)-JQ1. We conclude that the effect of thieno-TZDs on apoA-I expression is not due to inhibition of the BZD or PAF receptors and is not completely explained by transcriptional repression by BET proteins.

  10. Alterations in in-vivo benzodiazepine-receptor binding of C-11-Ro15-1788 (flumazepil)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamasaki, T.; Inoue, O.; Shinoto, H.; Ito, T.; Hashimoto, K.; Suzuki, K.; Tateno, Y.

    1985-05-01

    Alterations of the central benzodiazepine - receptor function caused by the change of physiological or psychological conditions, were recognized in both animal and human studies. Before the human study, animal experiments using tritiated Ro15-1788 were carried out. The stress was produced by forcing the mice to swim in a water-basin at 16/sup 0/C for 5 min. Within 3 min after the forced swimming, the tracer was injected. Brain radioactivities in stress-loaded mice increased over a period of 15 min after the intra-venous injection of tracers, while brain activities of carrier-added tracer decreased. In human study, approximately 5 mCi of C-11-Ro15-1788, which specific activity is 0.3-1.0 Ci/..mu..mol, were intravenously injected to each case. Measurements of the brain activity were performed using positron-CT, with blood sample collection. 31 human studies were performed on. Cerebral cortex time activity curves in several volunteers in nervous and stressful state, showed the same pattern to that in the stress-loaded animal experiment. It is important that the significant different time course of cerebral activity after the injection of labelled Ro15-1788, was observed in stressful state, compared with control, in both human and animal study. From these results, it will be concluded the positron CT study using /sup 11/C-Ro15-1788 will become a new technic to detect the change of psychological conditions in human brain and to diagnose some kind of neuropsychiatric disease.

  11. Radiosynthesis and initial evaluation of [{sup 18}F]-FEPPA for PET imaging of peripheral benzodiazepine receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Alan A. [PET Centre, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Ontario, M5T 1R8 (Canada); Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, M5T 1R8 (Canada)], E-mail: alan.wilson@camhpet.ca; Garcia, Armando; Parkes, Jun [PET Centre, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Ontario, M5T 1R8 (Canada); McCormick, Patrick [PET Centre, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Ontario, M5T 1R8 (Canada); Institute of Medical Science, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 1A8 (Canada); Stephenson, Karin A. [PET Centre, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Ontario, M5T 1R8 (Canada); Houle, Sylvain; Vasdev, Neil [PET Centre, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Ontario, M5T 1R8 (Canada); Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, M5T 1R8 (Canada)

    2008-04-15

    Introduction: A novel [{sup 18}F]-radiolabelled phenoxyanilide, [{sup 18}F]-FEPPA, has been synthesized and evaluated, in vitro and ex vivo, as a potential positron emission tomography imaging agent for the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR). Methods: [{sup 18}F]-FEPPA and two other radiotracers for imaging PBR, namely [{sup 11}C]-PBR28 and [{sup 11}C]-PBR28-d3, were synthesised and evaluated in vitro and ex vivo as potential PBR imaging agents. Results: [{sup 18}F]-FEPPA is efficiently prepared in one step from its tosylate precursor and [{sup 18}F]-fluoride in high radiochemical yields and at high specific activity. FEPPA displayed a K{sub i} of 0.07 nM for PBR in rat mitochondrial membrane preparations and a suitable lipophilicity for brain penetration (log P of 2.99 at pH 7.4). Upon intravenous injection into rats, [{sup 18}F]-FEPPA showed moderate brain uptake [standard uptake value (SUV) of 0.6 at 5 min] and a slow washout (SUV of 0.35 after 60 min). Highest uptake of radioactivity was seen in the hypothalamus and olfactory bulb, regions previously reported to be enriched in PBR in rat brain. Analysis of plasma and brain extracts demonstrated that [{sup 18}F]-FEPPA was rapidly metabolized, but no lipophilic metabolites were observed in either preparation and only 5% radioactive metabolites were present in brain tissue extracts. Blocking studies to determine the extent of specific binding of [{sup 18}F]-FEPPA in rat brain were problematic due to large perturbations in circulating radiotracer and the lack of a reference region. Conclusions: Further evaluation of the potential of [{sup 18}F]-FEPPA will require the employment of rigorous kinetic models and/or appropriate animal models.

  12. Functional characterization of the 1,5-benzodiazepine clobazam and its major active metabolite N-desmethylclobazam at human GABAA receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer, Harriet; Ebert, Bjarke; Jensen, Henrik S.

    2015-01-01

    The 1,5-benzodiazepine clobazam is indicated for the adjunctive treatment of seizures associated with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome in patients 2 years of age or older in the United States, and for treatment of anxiety and various forms of epilepsy elsewhere. Clobazam has been reported to exhibit...... different in vivo adverse effects and addiction liability profile than the classic 1,4-benzodiazepines. In this study, it was investigated whether the in vitro pharmacological properties of clobazam and its major active metabolite N-desmethylclobazam could explain some of these clinical differences....... The functional properties of the two 1,5-benzodiazepines were characterized at the human γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABAAR) subtypes α1β2γ2S, α2β2γ2S, α3β2γ2S, α5β2γ2S and α6β2δ expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes by use of two-electrode voltage-clamp electrophysiology and compared to those exhibited...

  13. Interaction of pyracetam with specific /sup 3/H-imipramine binding sites and GABA-benzodiazepine receptor complex of brain membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozhanets, V.V.; Chakhbra, K.K.; Danchev, N.D.; Malin, K.M.; Rusakov, D.Yu.; Val' dman, A.V.

    1986-06-01

    This paper studies the effect of pyracetam on parameters of specific binding of tritium-imipramine and GABA-activated binding of tritium-flunitrazepam with rat brain membranes. The experimental method is described and it is shown that pyracetam and mebicar in experiments in vivo on normal animals can exert their anxiolytic action without the participation of bensodiazepine receptors. Either the interaction of pyracetam and mebicar with benzodiazeprine receptors has a different interpretation than competition of these compounds with specific binding sites of tritium-flunitrazepam, or in experiments on normal animals in vivo GABA-benzodiazepine receptor complex does not accept pyracetam and mebicar, for it contains endogenous inhibitors of GABA-modulating action.

  14. A comparison of the effects of a subtype selective and non-selective benzodiazepine receptor agonist in two CO(2) models of experimental human anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, J E; Papadopoulos, A; Seddon, K; Nutt, D J

    2009-03-01

    Studies in human volunteers that can demonstrate proof of concept are attractive in that possible mechanisms and potential new drug treatments can be examined. We have been developing models of anxiety disorders using the inhalation of 7.5% CO(2) for 20 min to model generalised anxiety disorder, as well as using the previously reported 35% CO(2) as a model for panic anxiety. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled, three-way crossover study in 12 healthy volunteer subjects, we compared a full agonist at the benzodiazepine receptor that binds to four alpha-subtypes of the receptor (alpha-1,-2,-3,-5) (alprazolam 1 mg), with zolpidem (5 mg), an agonist selective for the alpha-1 subtype of the gamma amino butyric acid-receptor subtype A (GABA-A) receptor, which is a widely used hypnotic drug. Compared with placebo, both drugs significantly attenuated peak CO(2)-induced changes in subjective feelings after the inhalation of 7.5% CO(2) for 20 min. However, there were fewer significant differences after a single vital capacity inhalation of 35% CO(2), where zolpidem was less efficacious than alprazolam at reducing CO(2)-induced symptoms. In conclusion, our results show that zolpidem shows some anxiolytic efficacy in the 7.5% CO(2) model, similar to alprazolam, and this is the first report of such an effect of zolpidem in a model of anxiety. These and other studies of benzodiazepines in clinical and volunteer studies suggest a definite role of the GABA-A receptor in CO(2)-induced anxiety, and it would be of interest to examine other GABA-A receptor subtype selective drugs, which are now in early phase clinical studies and are showing selective efficacy in pharmacodynamic studies.

  15. The human peripheral benzodiazepine receptor gene: cloning and characterization of alternative splicing in normal tissues and in a patient with congenital lipoid adrenal hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, D; Chang, Y J; Strauss, J F; Miller, W L

    1993-12-01

    The mitochondrial benzodiazepine receptor (mBzR) appears to be a key factor in the flow of cholesterol into mitochondria to permit the initiation of steroid hormone synthesis. The mBzR consists of three components; the 18-kDa component on the outer mitochondrial membrane appears to contain the benzodiazepine binding site, and is hence often termed the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR). Using a cloned human PBR cDNA as probe, we have cloned the human PBR gene. The 13-kb gene is divided into four exons, with exon 1 encoding only a short 5' untranslated segment. The 5' flanking DNA lacks TATA and CAAT boxes but contains a cluster of SP-1 binding sites, typical of "house-keeping" genes. The encoded PBR mRNA is alternately spliced into two forms: "authentic" PBR mRNA retains all four exons, while a short form termed PBR-S lacks exon 2. While PBR-S contains a 102-codon open reading frame with a typical initiator sequence, the reading frame differs from that of PBR, so that the encoded protein is unrelated to PBR. RT-PCR and RNase protection experiments confirm that both PBR and PBR-S are expressed in all tissues examined and that expression PBR-S is about 10 times the level of PBR. Expression of PBR cDNA in pCMV5 vectors transfected into COS-1 cells resulted in increased binding of [3H]PK11195, but expression of PBR-S did not. It has been speculated that patients with congenital lipoid adrenal hyperplasia, who cannot make any steroids, might have a genetic lesion in mBzR. RT-PCR analysis of testicular RNA from such a patient, sequencing of the cDNA, and blotting analysis of genomic DNA all indicate that the gene and mRNA for the PBR component of mBzR are normal in this disease.

  16. A simple method for the quantification of benzodiazepine receptors using iodine-123 iomazenil and single-photon emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Hiroshi [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Radiology, Div. of Brain Sciences, Inst. of Development, Aging and Cancer, Tohoku Univ. Sendai (Japan); Goto, Ryoui [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Radiology, Div. of Brain Sciences, Inst. of Development, Aging and Cancer, Tohoku Univ. Sendai (Japan); Koyama, Masamichi [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Radiology, Div. of Brain Sciences, Inst. of Development, Aging and Cancer, Tohoku Univ. Sendai (Japan); Kawashima, Ryuta [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Radiology, Div. of Brain Sciences, Inst. of Development, Aging and Cancer, Tohoku Univ. Sendai (Japan); Ono, Shuichi [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Radiology, Div. of Brain Sciences, Inst. of Development, Aging and Cancer, Tohoku Univ. Sendai (Japan); Sato, Kazunori [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Radiology, Div. of Brain Sciences, Inst. of Development, Aging and Cancer, Tohoku Univ. Sendai (Japan); Fukuda, Hiroshi [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Radiology, Div. of Brain Sciences, Inst. of Development, Aging and Cancer, Tohoku Univ. Sendai (Japan)

    1996-07-01

    Iodine-123 iomazenil (Iomazenil) is a ligand for central type benzodiazepine receptors that is suitable for single-photon emission tomography (SPET). The purpose of this study was to develop a simple method for the quantification of its binding potential (BP). The method is based on a two-compartment model (K{sub 1}, influx rate constant; k{sub 2}`, efflux rate constant; V{sub T}`(=K{sub 1}/k{sub 2}`), the total distribution volumes relative to the total arterial tracer concentration), and requires two SPET scans and one blood sampling. For a given input function, the radioactivity ratio of the early to delayed scans can be considered to tabulate as a function of k{sub 2}`, and a table lookup procedure provides the corresponding k{sub 2}` value, from which K{sub 1} and V{sub t}` values are then calculated. The arterial input function is obtained by calibration of the standard input function by the single blood sampling. SPET studies were performed on 14 patients with cerebrovascular diseases, dementia or brain tumours (mean age {+-}SD, 56.0{+-}12.2). None of the patients had any heart, renal or liver disease. A dynamic SPET scan was performed following intravenous bolus injection of Iomazenil. A static SPET scan was performed at 180 min after injection. Frequent blood sampling from the brachial artery was performed on all subjects for determination of the arterial input function. Two-compartment model analysis was validated for calculation of the V{sub T}` value of Iomazenil. Good correlations were observed between V{sub T}` values calculated by three-compartment model analysis and those calculated by the present method, in which the scan time combinations (early scan/delayed scan) used were 15/180 min, 30/180 min or 45/180 min (all combinations: r=0.92), supporting the validity of this method. The present method is simple and applicable for clinical use. (orig.)

  17. Prescription patterns of benzodiazepines in the Lebanese adult population: a cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadan, Wijdan H; El Khoury, Ghada M; Deeb, Mary E; Sheikh-Taha, Marwan

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed the profile of benzodiazepine (BDZ) users in Lebanon. Adult patients visiting the pharmacies with prescriptions of BDZs were included in the study. Seven hundred and eighty-six current BDZ users were included, of whom 54.2% were females. Twenty-three percent reported being alcohol consumers and were mostly males. The two most commonly used BDZs were alprazolam (34.6%) and bromazepam (33.6%). The indication for use was mainly anxiety (44.4%), insomnia (22.5%), and depression (15.9%). The prescribing physicians were primarily psychiatrists (43.2%), followed by general practitioners (29.7%). Forty percent had been taking the drug for more than a year. Among those using BDZs for at least 1 month, 35.5% increased the dose with time. Thirty-three percent reported having experienced side effects. Eighteen patients (2.3%) reported taking more than one BDZ concomitantly, while 18.3% were taking drugs that should not be prescribed along with BDZs. In conclusion, the use of BDZs is highest among females, especially for the treatment of anxiety. Moreover, continuous use of the drugs for more than a year as well as significant potential drug interactions was identified. PMID:27660452

  18. Region-selective effects of neuroinflammation and antioxidant treatment on peripheral benzodiazepine receptors and NMDA receptors in the rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biegon, A.; Alvarado, M.; Budinger, T.F.; Grossman, R.; Hensley, K.; West, M.S.; Kotake, Y.; Ono, M.; Floyd, R.A.

    2001-12-10

    Following induction of acute neuroinflammation by intracisternal injection of endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide) in rats, quantitative autoradiography was used to assess the regional level of microglial activation and glutamate (NMDA) receptor binding. The possible protective action of the antioxidant phenyl-tert-butyl nitrone in this model was tested by administering the drug in the drinking water for 6 days starting 24 hours after endotoxin injection. Animals were killed 7 days post-injection and consecutive cryostat brain sections labeled with [3H]PK11195 as a marker of activated microglia and [125I]iodoMK801 as a marker of the open-channel, activated state of NMDA receptors. Lipopolysaccharide increased [3H]PK11195 binding in the brain, with the largest increases (2-3 fold) in temporal and entorhinal cortex, hippocampus, and substantia innominata. A significant (>50 percent) decrease in [125I]iodoMK801 binding was found in the same brain regions. Phenyl-tert-butyl nitrone treatment resulted in a partial inhibition ({approx}25 percent decrease) of the lipopolysaccharide-induced increase in [3H]PK11195 binding but completely reversed the lipopolysaccharide-induced decrease in [125I]iodoMK80 binding in the entorhinal cortex, hippocampus, and substantia innominata. Loss of NMDA receptor function in cortical and hippocampal regions may contribute to the cognitive deficits observed in diseases with a neuroinflammatory component, such as meningitis or Alzheimer's disease.

  19. A [11C]Ro15 4513 PET study suggests that alcohol dependence in man is associated with reduced α5 benzodiazepine receptors in limbic regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingford-Hughes, Anne; Reid, Alastair G; Myers, James; Feeney, Adrian; Hammers, Alexander; Taylor, Lindsay G; Rosso, Lula; Turkheimer, Federico; Brooks, David J; Grasby, Paul; Nutt, David J

    2012-02-01

    Preclinical evidence suggests the α5 subtype of the GABA-benzodiazepine receptor is involved in some of the actions of alcohol and in memory. The positron emission tomography (PET) tracer, [(11)C]Ro15 4513 shows relative selectivity in labelling the α5 subtype over the other GABA-benzodiazepine receptor subtypes in limbic regions of the brain. We used this tracer to investigate the distribution of α5 subtype availability in human alcohol dependence and its relationship to clinical variables. Abstinent (>6 weeks) alcohol-dependent men and healthy male controls underwent an [(11)C]Ro15 4513 PET scan. We report [(11)C]Ro15 4513 brain uptake for 8 alcohol-dependent men and 11 healthy controls. We found a significant reduction in [(11)C]Ro15 4513 binding in the nucleus accumbens, parahippocampal gyri, right hippocampus and amygdala in the alcohol-dependent compared with the healthy control group. Levels of [(11)C]Ro15 4513 binding in both hippocampi were significantly and positively associated with performance on a delayed verbal memory task in the alcohol-dependent but not the control group. We speculate that the reduced limbic [(11)C]Ro15 4513 binding seen here results from the effects of alcohol, though we cannot currently distinguish whether they are compensatory in nature or evidence of brain toxicity.

  20. Is there a way to curb benzodiazepine addiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalive, Arnaud L; Rudolph, Uwe; Lüscher, Christian; Tan, Kelly R

    2011-10-19

    Benzodiazepines are widely prescribed drugs used to treat anxiety and insomnia, induce muscle relaxation, control epileptic seizures, promote anaesthesia or produce amnesia. Benzodiazepines are also abused for recreational purposes and the number of benzodiazepine abusers is unfortunately increasing. Within weeks of chronic use, tolerance to the pharmacological effects can develop and withdrawal becomes apparent once the drug is no longer available, which are both conditions indicative of benzodiazepine dependence. Diagnosis of addiction (i.e. compulsive use despite negative consequences) may follow in vulnerable individuals. Here, we review the historical and current use of benzodiazepines from their original synthesis, discovery and commercialisation to the recent identification of the molecular mechanism by which benzodiazepines induce addiction. These results have identified the mechanisms underlying the activation of midbrain dopamine neurons by benzodiazepines, and how these drugs can hijack the mesocorticolimbic reward system. Such knowledge calls for future developments of new receptor subtype specific benzodiazepines with a reduced addiction liability.

  1. Research Progress in Physical Dependence of Benzodiazepine-type Drugs and Receptor Mechanism%苯二氮(艹卓)类药物的躯体依赖及受体机制研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王丽华

    2011-01-01

    Prolonged use of benzodiazepines can lead to physical dependence. The diverse behavioral effects of benzodiazepines may reflect the actions on different subtypes of GABAA receptors. Benzodiazepine action appears to be determined by the presence of particular ct subunits. But a complex picture is emerging with respect to abuse of benzodiazepines and the roles of different GABAA receptor subtypes. Recent researches suggest an interaction with all GABAA receptor subtypes is required for physical dependence of benzodiazepines. This article reviews physical dependence of benzodiazepine and mediating GABAA receptor subunits.%苯二氮(艹卓)类药物的长期使用会使患者产生躯体依赖.不同的苯二氮(艹卓)类药物的行为效应可能由不同的GABAA受体亚单位介导.苯二氮(艹卓)类药物主要作用于特定的α亚单位.然而,苯二氮艹 卓类药物的滥用和不同的GABAA受体亚单位所起的作用之间却是复杂的.研究表明,苯二氮(艹卓)类药物躯体依赖的发生需要所有GABAA受体亚单位的相互作用.现重点介绍国内外有关苯二氮(艹卓)类药物的躯体依赖的产生,GABAA受体亚单位介导的苯二氮(艹卓)类药物的躯体依赖等研究情况.

  2. Synthesis and evaluation of sup 11 C-PK 11195 for in vivo study of peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptors using positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, Kenji (Fukuyama Univ., Hiroshima (Japan). Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences); Inoue, Osamu; Suzuki, Kazutoshi; Yamasaki, Toshiro; Kojima, Masaharu

    1989-07-01

    The biodistribution of {sup 3}H-PK 11195, an antagonist of the peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptors, was studied in mice. High accumulations of radioactivity in the heart, lung, spleen, kidney and adrenal were observed after intravenous injection of tracer amounts of {sup 3}H-PK 11195 into the mice. The radioactivity in the heart, lung, spleen, kidney and adrenal was significantly decreased by the coadministration of carrier PK 11195, which indicated that PK 11195 specifically binds to the receptors. No radioactive metabolites were observed in the heart, lung and brain 20 min after intravenous administration of {sup 3}H-PK 11195. The accumulation of {sup 3}H-PK 11195 in the lung was not affected by pretreatment with either {alpha}-methyl benzylamine or imipramine, suggesting that {sup 3}H-PK 11195 specifically binds to the receptors. The ratios of radioactivity of the kidney, adrenal and spleen to blood increased as a function of time, whereas that of the lung and heart rapidly reached to a steady state. {sup 11}C-PK 11195 was synthesized by the N-methylation of desmethyl precursor yielding more than 100 mCi with high specific activity (more than 1.4 Ci/{mu}mol). The lebeling and purification procedure was completed within 23 min after the end of bombardment (EOB). The {sup 11}C-PK 11195 solution for injection seems to have a high potential for the in vivo study of the peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptors in the living human by means of positron emission tomography (PET). (author).

  3. Effects of ZK 93,426, a beta-carboline benzodiazepine receptor antagonist on night sleep pattern in healthy male volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duka, T; Goerke, D; Fichte, K

    1995-01-01

    The beta-carboline ZK 93,426, a benzodiazepine-antagonist with weak inverse agonist activity, was administered intravenously to human volunteers at a dose of 0.04 mg/kg when they initially reached slow-wave sleep during their night's sleep. Eight subjects, subjected to half a night of sleep withdrawal, took part in the study, which was performed according to a double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over design. Sleep parameters as determined by electroencephalography, actometry (wrist actometer) and temperature (rectal thermometer) were monitored for the whole night. Vital functions (blood pressure and heart rate) as well as subjectively experienced effects via visual analogue scales were evaluated and blood samples for hormone plasma level estimation were taken before and after sleep. ZK 93,426 was well tolerated. Sleep parameters were reduced under the influence of the drug indicating a stimulant effect. Slow wave sleep (sleep stages 3 and 4) was significantly reduced in favour of light sleep stages 1 and 2 during the first 30 min after the administration of ZK 93,426 (P = 0.02). In keeping with these findings subjects exhibited a significantly (P < 0.02) elevated number and intensity of movements during the first 90 min after the beta-carboline injection. Effects on self-ratings, in body temperature and on hormonal changes were not found. It is assumed that the benzodiazepine-antagonist ZK 93,426 is able to induce activation and disturb sleep via modulation of GABAergic transmission mainly by benzodiazepine receptor blocking properties.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. PET and SPECT in medically non-refractory complex partial seizures. Temporal asymmetries of glucose consumption, Benzodiazepine receptor density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matheja, P.; Kuwert, T.; Wolf, K.; Schober, O. [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Kliniken und Polikliniken fuer Nuklearmedizin; Stodieck, S.R.G.; Diehl, B.; Ringelstein, E.B. [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Neurologie; Schuierer, G. [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie

    1998-12-31

    Aim: In contrast to medically refractory complex partial seizures (CPS), only limited knowledge exists on cerebral perfusion and metabolism in medically non-refractory CPS. The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of temporal asymmetries in regional cerebral glucose consumption (rCMRGlc), regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), and regional cerebral benzodiazepine receptor density (BRD) in this group of patients. Methods: The study included 49 patients with medically non-refractory cryptogenic CPS (age: 36.0{+-}16.1 years). rCMRGlc was studied with F-18-FDG-PET (FDG), rCBF with Tc-99m-ECD-SPECT (ECD), and BRD with I-123-iomazenil-SPECT (IMZ). All studies were performed interictally and within four weeks in each patient. Duration of epilepsy ranged from 0.1 to 42 years (median 4.0 years). SPECT was performed with the triple-headed SPECT camera Multispect 3, PET with the PET camera ECAT EXACT 47. Using linear profiles, glucose consumption, as well as uptake of ECD and IMZ, were measured in four temporal regions of interest (ROIs), and asymmetry indices were calculated (ASY). The results were compared to 95% confidence intervals determined in control subjects. Results: Thirty-five of the 49 (71%) patients had at least one significantly elevated ASY; temporal rCMRGlc was asymmetrical in 41% of the patients, temporal BRD in 29%, and temporal rCBF in 24%. One patient had an asymmetry of all three variables, two of temporal rCMRGlc and BRD, three of temporal rCMRGlc and rCBF, and another four of rCBF and BRD. Fourteen patients had an isolated temporal asymmetry in rCMRGlc, seven in BRD, and four in rCBF. A discrepancy in lateralization between the three modalities was not observed. Conclusion: The majority of patients with medically non-refractory CPS have focal abnormalities of blood flow and metabolism in their temporal lobe. In this group of patients, FDG-PET demonstrates abnormalities with the highest frequency of the three modalities studied, followed by

  5. Synthesis of [{sup 123}I]iodine labelled imidazo[1,2-b] pyridazines as potential probes for the study of peripheral benzodiazepine receptors using SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katsifis, A.; Mattner, F.; Dikic, B. [Radiopharmaceuticals Div. ANSTO, Menai, NSW (Australia); Barlin, G. [Div. of Neurosciences, John Curtin School of Medical Research, Australian National Univ., Canberra (Australia)

    2004-07-01

    The pyridazines 3-acetamidomethyl-6-chloro-2-(4'-iodophenyl)imidazo[1,2-b]pyridazine 1 (IC{sub 50} = 1.6 nM) and 3-benzamidomethyl-6-iodo-2-(4'-t-butylphenyl)imidazo[1,2-b] pyridazine 2 (IC{sub 50} = 4.2 nM), are high affinity and selective ligands for the peripheral benzodiazepine receptors (PBR) compared to the central benzodiazepine counterparts. The [{sup 123}I]1 and [{sup 123}I]2 labelled analogues of these compounds were subsequently synthesised for the potential study of the PBR in vivo using SPECT. Radioiodination of [{sup 123}I]1 was achieved by iododestannylation of the corresponding tributyl tin precursor with Na[{sup 123}I] in the presence of peracetic acid or chloramine-T and the product isolated by C-18 RP HPLC. Radioiodination of [{sup 123}I]2 was achieved by copper assisted bromine [{sup 123}I]iodine exchange of the corresponding bromo precursor in the presence of acetic acid and sodium bisulfate as reducing agent at 200 C. Purification of the crude products were achieved by semi-preparative C-18 RP HPLC to give the products in radiochemical yields > 90%. The products were obtained in > 97% chemical and radiochemical purity and with specific activities > 180 GBq/{mu}mol. (orig.)

  6. Anxiolytic-like profiles of histamine H3 receptor agonists in animal models of anxiety: a comparative study with antidepressants and benzodiazepine anxiolytic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Fumikazu; Yamauchi, Miki; Oyama, Masayo; Okuma, Kunihiro; Onozawa, Kaname; Nagayama, Takako; Shinei, Rie; Ishikawa, Makoto; Sato, Yasuo; Kakui, Nobukazu

    2009-08-01

    Histamine H3 receptor functions as a presynaptic auto- and hetero-receptor on histaminergic and non-histaminergic neurons in the brain regulating the synaptic release of numerous neurotransmitters. Therefore, the ligands for this receptor have been proposed to be of therapeutic interest for the treatment of various neuropsychiatric disorders. At present, however, the psychopharmacological profiles of H3 ligands, particularly H3 agonists, have not been extensively studied. The present study investigated the anxiolytic-like profiles of H3-selective agonists in a variety of classical (benzodiazepine-sensitive) and atypical (antidepressant-effective) animal models of anxiety. Comparator drugs used were diazepam and both fluvoxamine and desipramine in the former and latter models, respectively. H3 agonist R-alpha-methylhistamine and immepip were inactive in rat elevated plus maze test and Vogel type conflict test where diazepam (5 mg/kg) produced significant anxiolytic-like effects. Meanwhile, these H3 agonists (10-30 mg/kg) significantly reduced isolation-induced vocalizations in guinea pig pups and isolation-induced aggressive behavior in mouse resident-intruder test. Moreover, in rat conditioned fear stress test, R-alpha-methylhistamine (30 mg/kg) and immepip (10 mg/kg) significantly decreased freezing time, which were completely reversed by concomitant treatment with H3 antagonist, thioperamide (10 mg/kg). In contrast to the limited efficacy obtained with desipramine (30 mg/kg), fluvoxamine (20-60 mg/kg) exhibited anxiolytic-like effects in all the latter three atypical models. These data suggest that the H3 agonists may have anxiolytic-like effects similar to those of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors but not benzodiazepine anxiolytics and represent a novel strategy for the treatment of some anxiety disorders in which selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are prescribed.

  7. Intracerebroventricular administration of inosine is anticonvulsant against quinolinic acid-induced seizures in mice: an effect independent of benzodiazepine and adenosine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganzella, Marcelo; Faraco, Rafael Berger; Almeida, Roberto Farina; Fernandes, Vinícius Fornari; Souza, Diogo Onofre

    2011-12-01

    Inosine (INO) has an anticonvulsant effect against seizures induced by antagonists of GABAergic system. Quinolinic acid (QA) is an agonist NMDA receptors implicated in the neurobiology of seizures. In the present study, we investigated the anticonvulsant effect of intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) INO administration against QA-induced seizures in adult mice. We also investigated whether the benzodiazepines (BZ) or adenosine (ADO) receptors were involved in the INO effects. Animals were pretreated with an i.c.v. injection of either vehicle or INO before an i.c.v. administration of 4 μl QA (36.8 nmol). All animals pretreated with vehicle followed by QA presented seizures. INO protected against QA-induced seizures in a time and dose dependent manner (up to 60% at 400 nmol, 5 min before QA injection). Diazepam (DZ) and ADO (i.c.v.) also exhibited anticonvulsant effect against QA induced seizures. Additionally, i.p. administration of either flumazenil, a BZ receptor antagonist, or caffeine, an ADO receptor antagonist, did not change the anticonvulsant potency of INO i.c.v. injection, but completely abolished the DZ and ADO anticonvulsant effects, respectively. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that INO exert anticonvulsant effect against hyperactivity of the glutamatergic system independently of BZ or ADO receptors activation.

  8. The mouse defense test battery: evaluation of the effects of non-selective and BZ-1 (omega1) selective, benzodiazepine receptor ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griebel, G.; Sanger, D.J.; Perrault, G.

    1996-11-01

    The behavioral effects of several benzodiazepine (BZ) (omega) receptor ligands were compared using the Mouse Defense Test Battery which has been designed to assess defensive reactions of Swiss mice confronted with a natural threat (a rat) and situations associated with this threat. Primary measures taken before, during and after rat confrontation were escape attempts, flight, risk assessment and defensive threat and attack. The drugs used included non-selective BZ (omega) full (clonazepam, clorazepate, chlordiazepoxide and diazepam) and partial (bretazenil and imidazenil) agonists, and BZ-1 (omega1) selective (abecarnil, CL 218,872 and zolpidem) receptor ligands. With the exception of clonazepam, non-selective BZ (omega) receptor compounds only partially affected flight behaviors. The drugs reduced some but not all flight measures in response to the approaching rat, whereas clonazepam attenuated all flight reactions. In contrast to their mild and inconsistent actions on flight, the non-selective BZ (omega) receptor agonists displayed clear effects on risk assessment when subjects were chased by the rat. When contact was forced between the subject and the rat, the non-selective BZ (omega) receptor full agonists reduced defensive threat and attack reactions, while the partial agonists imidazenil and bretazenil only weakly attenuated defensive attack behavior. Similarly, after the rat had been removed from the test area, the non-selective BZ (omega) receptor full agonists displayed greater efficacy than the partial agonists in reducing escape attempts. Overall, results obtained with the selective BZ-1 (omega1) receptor ligands demonstrated either no clear effects or no specific action on defensive reactions. Taken together, these data demonstrate that: (1) non-selective BZ (omega) agonists displaying high intrinsic activity affect a wider range of defensive behaviors than non-selective BZ (omega) receptor partial agonists; (2) the defense system does not involve

  9. Increased densities of binding sites for the peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor ligand [3H]PK 11195 in congenital ornithine transcarbamylase-deficient sparse fur mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, V L; Qureshi, I A; Butterworth, R F

    1993-12-01

    Peripheral-type (mitochondrial) benzodiazepine receptors (PTBR) were studied in the brain and peripheral organs (kidney, liver, and testis) of normal male mice (CD-1/Y) and the congenitally hyperammonemic sparse fur (spf/Y) mouse. Radioligand binding assays were performed with [3H]PK 11195, a ligand with high selectivity and affinity for PTBR. Densities (maximal number of binding sites) of [3H]PK 11195 binding sites were greatest in kidney, followed by liver, testis, and brain. Densities of [3H]PK 11195 binding sites were significantly increased in all tissues of spf mice compared with control animals. In view of the localization of PTBR on the outer mitochondrial membrane, changes in PTBR in spf mouse tissues may modulate the altered mitochondrial function and oxidative metabolism, in brain and peripheral tissues, in congenital OTC deficiency. The positron emission tomography ligand 11C-PK 11195 could find an application in the assessment of end organ dysfunction in this disorder.

  10. Peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor levels correlate with the ability of human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cell line to grow in SCID mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardwick, M; Rone, J; Han, Z; Haddad, B; Papadopoulos, V

    2001-11-01

    MDA-MB-231 (MDA-231) human breast cancer cells have a high proliferation rate, lack the estrogen receptor, express the intermediate filament vimentin, the hyaluronan receptor CD44, and are able to form tumors in nude mice. The MDA-231 cell line has been used in our laboratory to examine the role of the peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) in the progression of cancer. During these studies 2 populations of MDA-231 cells were subcloned based on the levels of PBR. The subclones proliferated at approximately the same rate, lacked the estrogen receptor, expressed vimentin and CD44, and had the same in vitro chemoinvasive and chemotactic potential. Both restriction fragment length polymorphism and comparative genomic hybridization analyses of genomic DNA from these cells indicated that both subclones are of the same genetic lineage. Only the subclone with high PBR levels, however, was able to form tumors when injected in SCID mice. These data suggest that the ability of MDA-231 cells to form tumors in vivo may depend on the amount of PBR present in the cells.

  11. The human peripheral benzodiazepine receptor gene: Cloning and characterization of alternative splicing in normal tissues and in a patient with congenital lipoid adrenal hyperplasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, D.; Miller, W.L. (Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)); Chang, Y.J.; Strauss, J.F. III (Univ. of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States))

    1993-12-01

    The mitochondrial benzodiazepine receptor (mBzR) appears to be a key factor in the flow of cholesterol into mitochondia to permit the initiation of steroid hormone synthesis. The mBzR consists of three components; the 18-kDa component on the outer mitochondrial membrane appears to contain the benzodiazepine binding site, and is hence often termed the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR). Using a cloned human PBR cDNA as probe, the authors have cloned the human PBR gene. The 13-kb gene is divided into four exons, with exon 1 encoding only a short 5[prime] untranslated segment. The 5[prime] flanking DNA lacks TATA and CAAT boxes but contains a cluster of SP-1 binding sites, typical of [open quotes]housekeeping[close quotes] genes. The encoded PBR mRNA is alternately spliced into two forms: [open quotes]authentic[close quotes] PBR mRNA retains all four exons, while a short form termed PBR-S lacks exon 2. While PBR-S contains a 102-codon open reading frame with a typical initiator sequence, the reading frame differs from that of PBR, so that the encoded protein is unrelated to PBR. RT-PCR and RNase protection experiments confirm that both PBR and PBR-S are expressed in all tissues examined and that expression of PBR-S is about 10 times the level of PBR. Expression of PBR cDNA in pCMV5 vectors transfected into COS-1 cells resulted in increased binding of [[sup 3]H]PK11195, but expression of PBR-S did not. It has been speculated that patients with congenital lipoid adrenal hyperplasia, who cannot make any steroids, might have a genetic lesion in mBzR. RT-PCR analysis of testicular RNA from such a patient, sequencing of the cDNA, and blotting analysis of genomic DNA all indicate that the gene and mRNA for the PBR component of mBzR are normal in this disease. 36 refs., 6 figs.

  12. Using [(11)C]Ro15 4513 PET to characterise GABA-benzodiazepine receptors in opiate addiction: Similarities and differences with alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingford-Hughes, Anne; Myers, James; Watson, Ben; Reid, Alastair G; Kalk, Nicola; Feeney, Adrian; Hammers, Alexander; Riaño-Barros, Daniela A; McGinnity, Colm J; Taylor, Lindsay G; Rosso, Lula; Brooks, David J; Turkheimer, Federico; Nutt, David J

    2016-05-15

    The importance of the GABA-benzodiazepine receptor complex and its subtypes are increasingly recognised in addiction. Using the α1/α5 benzodiazepine receptor PET radioligand [(11)C]Ro15 4513, we previously showed reduced binding in the nucleus accumbens and hippocampus in abstinent alcohol dependence. We proposed that reduced [(11)C]Ro15 4513 binding in the nucleus accumbens was a marker of addiction whilst the reduction in hippocampus and positive relationship with memory was a consequence of chronic alcohol abuse. To examine this further we assessed [(11)C]Ro15 4513 binding in another addiction, opiate dependence, and used spectral analysis to estimate contributions of α1 and α5 subtypes to [(11)C]Ro15 4513 binding in opiate and previously acquired alcohol-dependent groups. Opiate substitute maintained opiate-dependent men (n=12) underwent an [(11)C]Ro15 4513 PET scan and compared with matched healthy controls (n=13). We found a significant reduction in [(11)C]Ro15 4513 binding in the nucleus accumbens in the opiate-dependent compared with the healthy control group. There was no relationship between [(11)C]Ro15 4513 binding in the hippocampus with memory. We found that reduced [(11)C]Ro15 4513 binding was associated with reduced α5 but not α1 subtypes in the opiate-dependent group. This was also seen in an alcohol-dependent group where an association between memory performance and [(11)C]Ro15 4513 binding was primarily driven by α5 and not α1 subtype. We suggest that reduced α5 levels in the nucleus accumbens are associated with addiction since we have now shown this in dependence to two pharmacologically different substances, alcohol and opiates.

  13. Imaging brain inflammation with [(11)C]PK11195 by PET and induction of the peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor after transient focal ischemia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Santiago; Martín, Abraham; Arranz, Maria J; Pareto, Deborah; Purroy, Jesús; Verdaguer, Esther; Llop, Jordi; Gómez, Vanessa; Gispert, Joan D; Millán, Olga; Chamorro, Angel; Planas, Anna M

    2007-12-01

    [(11)C]PK11195 is used in positron emission tomography (PET) studies for imaging brain inflammation in vivo as it binds to the peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) expressed by reactive glia and macrophages. However, features of the cellular reaction required to induce a positive [(11)C]PK11195 signal are not well characterized. We performed [(11)C]PK11195 PET and autoradiography in rats after transient focal cerebral ischemia. We determined [(3)H]PK11195 binding and PBR expression in brain tissue and examined the lesion with several markers. [(11)C]PK11195 standard uptake value increased at day 4 and grew further at day 7 within the ischemic core. Accordingly, ex vivo [(3)H]PK11195 binding increased at day 4, and increases further at day 7. The PET signal also augmented in peripheral regions, but to a lesser extent than in the core. Binding in the region surrounding infarction was supported by [(11)C]PK11195 autoradiography at day 7 showing that the radioactive signal extended beyond the infarcted core. Enhanced binding was preceded by increases in PBR mRNA expression in the ipsilateral hemisphere, and a 18-kDa band corresponding to PBR protein was detected. Peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor immunohistochemistry showed subsets of ameboid microglia/macrophages within the infarcted core showing a distinctive strong PBR expression from day 4. These cells were often located surrounding microhemorrhages. Reactive astrocytes forming a rim surrounding infarction at day 7 also showed some PBR immunostaining. These results show cellular heterogeneity in the level of PBR expression, supporting that PBR is not a simple marker of inflammation, and that the extent of [(11)C]PK11195 binding depends on intrinsic features of the inflammatory cells.

  14. Increased expression of mitochondrial benzodiazepine receptors following low-level light treatment facilitates enhanced protoporphyrin IX production in glioma-derived cells in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisland, S. K.; Hassanali, N. S.; Johnson, C.; Wilson, B. C.

    2007-02-01

    This study investigates whether low level light treatment (LLLT) can enhance the expression of Peripheral-type mitochondrial benzodiazepine receptors (PBRs) on the glioma-derived tumour cell line, CNS-1, and by doing so promote the synthesis of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) and increase the photodynamic therapy (PDT)-induced cell kill using 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA). The endogenous photosensitizer, (PpIX) and related metabolites including coproporphyrin III are known to traffic via the PBRs on the outer mitochondrial membrane on their passage into or out of the mitochondria. Astrocyte-derived cells within the brain express PBRs, while neurons express the central-type of benzodiazepine receptor. CNS-1 cells were exposed to a range of differing low-level light protocols immediately prior to PDT. LLLT involved using broad-spectrum light or monochromatic laser light specific to 635 or 905 nm wavelength. Cells (5μ10 5) were exposed to a range of LLLT doses (0, 1 or 5 J/cm2) using a fixed intensity of 10 mW/cm2 and subsequently harvested for cell viability, immunofluorescence or western blot analysis of PBR expression. The amount of PpIX within the cells was determined using chemical extraction techniques. Results confirm the induction of PBR following LLLT is dependent on the dose and wavelength of light used. Broadspectrum light provided the greatest cell kill following PDT, although LLLT with 635 nm or 905 nm also increased cell kill as compared to PDT alone. All LLLT regimens increased PBR expression compared to controls with corresponding increases in PpIX production. These data suggest that by selectively increasing PBR expression in tumour cells, LLLT may facilitate enhanced cell kill using ALA-PDT without damaging surrounding normal brain.

  15. Detection of viable cortical neurons using benzodiazepine receptor imaging after reversible focal ischaemia in rats: comparison with regional cerebral blood flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Yoshiyuki [Dept. of Radiology, Osaka National Hospital (Japan); Nakano, Takayuki; Yutani, Kenji; Nishimura, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Tsunehiko [Div. of Tracer Kinetics, Osaka University Medical School (Japan); Kusuoka, Hideo [Clinical Research Institute, Osaka National Hospital (Japan); Nakamura, Hironobu [Dept. of Radiology, Osaka University Medical School (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    To elucidate the utility of benzodiazepine receptor imaging for the detection of viable cortical neurons, dual-tracer autoradiography using iodine-125 iomazenil (IMZ) and iodine-123 N-isopropyl-4-iodoamphetamine (IMP) was performed in a model of reversible focal ischaemia during the acute and subacute phases. The right middle cerebral artery of anaesthetized rats was occluded for 60 min using an intraluminal filament and reperfused. In the acute phase study, {sup 125}I-IMZ (370 kBq) was injected via the femoral vein at 2 h after reperfusion, and {sup 123}I-IMP (37 MBq) was injected at 50 min post-injection. Rats were sacrificed 10 min after the injection of {sup 123}I-IMP. In the subacute phase study, the same procedure was performed at 5 days after reperfusion. In the acute phase, the IMP uptake was significantly decreased in almost all areas of the lesioned hemisphere, an exception being the cerebellum; however, the IMZ uptake was significantly decreased only in ischaemic cores. The discrepancy between IMZ and IMP uptake was observed in the lateral neocortex and the lateral caudate putamen (CPu), which were most frequently damaged in this ischaemic model. In the subacute phase, the IMZ uptake in lesioned rats was significantly decreased only in the parietal lobe and hippocampus, though the IMP uptake was decreased in many regions of lesioned hemispheres (the frontal, parietal cortex, CPu, hippocampus and thalamus). Histopathological findings indicated that both the IMP and the IMZ uptake was markedly decreased in necrotic areas. Although the IMP uptake was significantly decreased in the ischaemic areas, the IMZ uptake was maintained in these areas. These results suggest that benzodiazepine receptor imaging is superior to regional cerebral blood flow imaging for the detection of viable cortical neurons in both the acute and subacute phases of ischaemia. (orig.)

  16. Benzodiazepines and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzodiazepines and Pregnancy In every pregnancy, a woman starts out with a 3-5% chance of having ... risk. This sheet talks about whether exposure to benzodiazepines may increase the risk for birth defects over ...

  17. Synthesis of ethyl 8-fluoro-5,6-dihydro-5-(/sup 11/C)methyl-6-oxo-4H-imidazo(1,5-a)(1,4)benzodiazepine-3-carboxylate (RO 15. 1788-/sup 11/C): a specific radioligand for the in vivo study of central benzodiazepine receptors by positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maziere, M.; Hantraye, P.; Prenant, C.; Sastre, J.; Comar, D. (CEA, 91 - Orsay (France). Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot)

    1984-10-01

    A method of labelling ethyl 8-fluoro-5,6-dihydro-5-(/sup 11/C) methyl-6-oxo-4H-imidazo(1,5-a)(1,4)benzodiazepine-3-carboxylate (RO 15.1788 /sup 11/C), a benzodiazepine antagonist with carbon-11 has been developed. RO 15.1788-/sup 11/C was prepared by methylation of the nor derivative by I/sup 11/CH/sub 3/. About 100 mCi (maximum 153 mCi, 5.66 GBq) of the chemically and radiochemically pure labelled product were obtained within 25 min with a specific activity on average of 1100 mCi/..mu.. mol (maximum 1740 mCi/..mu..mol-64.4 GBq/..mu..mol). Preliminary results obtained after i.v. administration in the baboon have shown RO 15.1788-/sup 11/C to be of interest as a benzodiazepine radioligand for the in vivo study of benzodiazepine receptors by positron emission tomography.

  18. Flumazenil, a Benzodiazepine Receptor Anatagonist, in the Reversal of Conscious Sedation following Gastroscopy. A Placebo Controlled, Dose Finding Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lloyd Sutherland

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available Tim double-blind, placebo controlled, study assessed the efficacy and safety of flumazenil, a benzodiazepine antagonist, in reversing diazepam-induced sedation in 60 patients undergoing endoscopy. Patients were randomly assigned to one of six treatment groups (placebo, 5, 10, 15, 20 or 25 μg/kg flumazenil. Patient psychomotor function was determined using four standard assessments – Trieger, digit substitution, track tracing and cancellation tests. Flumazenil was well tolerated by all patients. All doses of Flumazenil were superior to placebo in reversing sedation. No significant differences were detected between the various treatment groups. Forty-five minutes after the flumazenil infusion, there were no differences between flumazenil- and placebo-treated patients in psychomotor function. Flumazenil is a safe, effective medication which reverses diazepam-induced conscious sedation. For most patients 0.5 mg given intravenously will reverse sedation.

  19. [Suicidal poisoning with benzodiazepines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chodorowski, Z; Sein Anand, J

    1997-01-01

    In the period from 1987 to 1996, 103 patients with suicidal benzodiazepines poisoning were treated, including 62 women and 41 men from 16 to 79 (mean 34) years old. 23 persons were poisoned only by benzodiazepines, in 80 remaining cases intoxications were mixed eg. including benzodiazepines and alcohol, tricyclic antidepressants, barbiturates, opioids, phenothiazines. The main causes of suicides were mainly depression, drug addiction and alcoholism. Nobody died in the benzodiazepines group, while mortality rate in the group of mixed poisoning was 4%. Prescribing benzodiazepines by physicians was quite often not justified and facilitated, among others, accumulation of the dose sufficient for suicide attempt. Flumazenil was efficient for leading out from coma in 86% of cases with poisoning only by benzodiazepines and 13% of cases with mixed intoxications mainly containing benzodiazepines and alcohol or carbamazepine.

  20. GABA systems, benzodiazepines, and substance dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malcolm, Robert J

    2003-01-01

    Alterations in the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor complex and GABA neurotransmission influence the reinforcing and intoxicating effects of alcohol and benzodiazepines. Chronic modulation of the GABA(A)-benzodiazepine receptor complex plays a major role in central nervous system dysregulation during alcohol abstinence. Withdrawal symptoms stem in part from a decreased GABAergic inhibitory function and an increase in glutamatergic excitatory function. GABA(A) receptors play a role in both reward and withdrawal phenomena from alcohol and sedative-hypnotics. Although less well understood, GABA(B) receptor complexes appear to play a role in inhibition of motivation and diminish relapse potential to reinforcing drugs. Evidence suggests that long-term alcohol use and concomitant serial withdrawals permanently alter GABAergic function, down-regulate benzodiazepine binding sites, and in preclinical models lead to cell death. Benzodiazepines have substantial drawbacks in the treatment of substance use-related disorders that include interactions with alcohol, rebound effects, alcohol priming, and the risk of supplanting alcohol dependency with addiction to both alcohol and benzodiazepines. Polysubstance-dependent individuals frequently self-medicate with benzodiazepines. Selective GABA agents with novel mechanisms of action have anxiolytic, anticonvulsant, and reward inhibition profiles that have potential in treating substance use and withdrawal and enhancing relapse prevention with less liability than benzodiazepines. The GABA(B) receptor agonist baclofen has promise in relapse prevention in a number of substance dependence disorders. The GABA(A) and GABA(B) pump reuptake inhibitor tiagabine has potential for managing alcohol and sedative-hypnotic withdrawal and also possibly a role in relapse prevention.

  1. Further evidence for differences between non-selective and BZ-1 (omega 1) selective, benzodiazepine receptor ligands in murine models of "state" and "trait" anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griebel, G; Sanger, D J; Perrault, G

    1996-01-01

    -1 (omega 1) receptor subtype cannot be considered as the primary target mediating the anxiolytic action of drugs interacting with the GABAA benzodiazepine receptor complex.

  2. Benzodiazepines do not potentiate GABA responses in neonatal hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovira, C; Ben-Ari, Y

    1991-09-16

    Benzodiazepines (midazolam; flunitrazepam) and pentobarbital increase the response to exogenous gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in adult hippocampal cells. We report in this paper that in contrast pentobarbital but not benzodiazepine potentiate the effects of exogenous (GABA) in neurons recorded from slices of less than two weeks old. This finding suggests that the functional association of benzodiazepine and GABAA receptors is changed during early postnatal life.

  3. Receptor binding characterization of the benzodiazepine radioligand sup 125 I-Ro16-0154: Potential probe for SPECT (Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography) brain imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, E.W.; Woods, S.W.; Zoghbi, S.; Baldwin, R.M.; Innis, R.B. (Yale Univ., West Haven, CT (USA)); McBride, B.J. (Medi-Physics, Inc., Emeryville, CA (USA))

    1990-01-01

    The binding of an iodinated benzodiazepine (BZ) radioligand has been characterized, particularly in regard to its potential use as a neuroreceptor brain imaging agent with SPECT (Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography). Ro16-0154 is an iodine-containing BZ antagonist and a close analog of Ro15-1788. In tissue homogenates prepared from human and monkey brain, the binding of {sup 125}I-labeled Ro16-0154 was saturable, of high affinity, and had high ratios of specific to non-specific binding. Physiological concentrations of NaCl enhanced specific binding approximately 15% compared to buffer without this salt. Kinetic studies of association and dissociation demonstrated a temperature dependent decrease in affinity with increasing temperature. Drug displacement studies confirmed that {sup 125}I-Ro16-0154 binds to the central type BZ receptor: binding is virtually identical to that of {sup 3}H-Ro15-1788 except that {sup 125}I-Ro16-0154 shows an almost 10 fold higher affinity at 37{degree}C. These in vitro results suggest that {sup 123}I-labeled Ro16-0154 shows promise as a selective, high affinity SPECT probe of the brain's BZ receptor.

  4. Tissue-specific alterations of binding sites for peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor ligand [3H]PK11195 in rats following portacaval anastomosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, V L; Audet, R; Therrien, G; Butterworth, R F

    1994-05-01

    Kinetics of binding of [3H]PK11195, an antagonist ligand with high selectivity for the peripheral-type (mitochondrial) benzodiazepine receptor (PTBR), was studied in homogenates of cerebral cortex, kidney, heart, and testis of portacaval shunted rats and sham-operated controls. Portacaval anastomosis resulted in a significant two- to threefold increase in the number of [3H]PK11195 binding sites in cerebral cortex and kidney. A reduction in the number of [3H]PK11195 binding sites was observed in testis preparations, while the number of binding sites in the heart remained unaltered. These differences in the response of PTBRs to portacaval anastomosis, in different organs suggest that the physiological function of these receptors and the factors regulating them are modulated by distinct mechanisms. The finding of increased densities of [3H]PK11195 binding sites in brain and kidney following portacaval anastomosis parallels the cellular hypertrophy in these tissues and, together with previous observations of similar increases of these binding sites in brain and kidney in congenital hyperammonemia, suggest a pathophysiologic role for ammonia in these changes. In contrast, the significant loss of [3H]PK11195 binding sites in testicular preparations following portacaval anastomosis together with the known effects of steroid hormones on these sites suggests a role for PTBRs in the pathogenesis of testicular atrophy in chronic liver disease.

  5. The Anticonvulsant Activity of a Flavonoid-Rich Extract from Orange Juice Involves both NMDA and GABA-Benzodiazepine Receptor Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Citraro

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The usage of dietary supplements and other natural products to treat neurological diseases has been growing over time, and accumulating evidence suggests that flavonoids possess anticonvulsant properties. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of a flavonoid-rich extract from orange juice (OJe in some rodent models of epilepsy and to explore its possible mechanism of action. The genetically audiogenic seizures (AGS-susceptible DBA/2 mouse, the pentylenetetrazole (PTZ-induced seizures in ICR-CD1 mice and the WAG/Rij rat as a genetic model of absence epilepsy with comorbidity of depression were used. Our results demonstrate that OJe was able to exert anticonvulsant effects on AGS-sensible DBA/2 mice and to inhibit PTZ-induced tonic seizures, increasing their latency. Conversely, it did not have anti-absence effects on WAG/Rij rats. Our experimental findings suggest that the anti-convulsant effects of OJe are likely mediated by both an inhibition of NMDA receptors at the glycine-binding site and an agonistic activity on benzodiazepine-binding site at GABAA receptors. This study provides evidences for the antiepileptic activity of OJe, and its results could be used as scientific basis for further researches aimed to develop novel complementary therapy for the treatment of epilepsy in a context of a multitarget pharmacological strategy.

  6. The history of benzodiazepines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wick, Jeannette Y

    2013-09-01

    After more than 50 years of experience with benzodiazepines, the American health care system has a love-hate relationship with them. In 1955, Hoffmann-La Roche chemist Leo Sternbach serendipitously identified the first benzodiazepine, chlordiazepoxide (Librium). By 1960, Hoffmann-La Roche marketed it as Librium, and it pursued molecular modifications for enhanced activity. Valium (diazepam) followed in 1963. Hoffmann-La Roche's competitors also began looking for analogues. Initially, benzodiazepines appeared to be less toxic and less likely to cause dependence than older drugs. A specific improvement was their lack of respiratory depression, a safety concern with barbiturates. Medical professionals greeted benzodiazepines enthusiastically at first, skyrocketing their popularity and patient demand. In the mid-to-late 1970s, benzodiazepines topped all "most frequently prescribed" lists. It took 15 years for researchers to associate benzodiazepines and their effect on gamma-aminobutyric acid as a mechanism of action. By the 1980s, clinicians' earlier enthusiasm and propensity to prescribe created a new concern: the specter of abuse and dependence. As information about benzodiazepines, both raising and damning, accumulated, medical leaders and legislators began to take action. The result: individual benzodiazepines and the entire class began to appear on guidelines and in legislation giving guidance on their use. Concurrently, clinicians began to raise concerns about benzodiazepine use by elderly patients, indicating that elders'lesser therapeutic response and heightened sensitivity to side effects demanded prescriber caution. The benzodiazepine story continues to evolve and includes modern-day issues and concerns beyond those ever anticipated.

  7. Development of a multiplex non-radioactive receptor assay : the benzodiazepine receptor, the serotonin transporter and the beta-adrenergic receptor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Lutea A. A.; Jeronimus-Stratingh, C. Margot; Cremers, Thomas I. F. H.

    2007-01-01

    Binding assays still form a fundamental part of modem drug development. Receptor binding assays are mostly based on radioactivity because of their speed, ease of use and reproducibility. Disadvantages, such as health hazards and production of radioactive waste, have prompted the development of non-r

  8. Differential effects of benzodiazepines on phospholipid methylation in hippocampus and cerebellum of rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tacconi, M.T.; Salmona, M.

    1988-01-01

    To elucidate the relationship between the occupancy of BDZ binding sites and phospholipid methylation in brain, the authors examined phosphatidylethanolamine-N-methyltransferase (PEMT) activity in synaptosomes of rat hippocampi and cerebella in the presence of BDZ ligands with different modes of action. We found that Ro 5-4864, a specific ligand for peripheral type receptors, increased PL methylation in hippocampal and cerebellar synaptosomes. This effect was directly related to receptor occupancy, since the specific antagonist PK11195 inhibited the rise in PEMT activity induced by Ro 5-4864. Clonazepam, on the other hand, tended to reduce PL production in cerebellum and hippocampus except for hiccocampal (/sup 3/H)-phosphatidyl-N-monomethylethanolamine which was elevated by 40 to 70% at doses ranging from 10/sup -9/ to 10/sup -6/M. When equimolar concentrations of the antagonist Ro 15-1788 were given in association the clonazepam-induced phosphatidyl-N-monomethylethanolamine increase was reduced by 70%. These data support the involvement of structural and functional membrane alterations in the action of BDZ. 20 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  9. Neural bases for addictive properties of benzodiazepines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Kelly R; Brown, Matthew; Labouèbe, Gwenaël; Yvon, Cédric; Creton, Cyril; Fritschy, Jean-Marc; Rudolph, Uwe; Lüscher, Christian

    2010-02-11

    Benzodiazepines are widely used in clinics and for recreational purposes, but will lead to addiction in vulnerable individuals. Addictive drugs increase the levels of dopamine and also trigger long-lasting synaptic adaptations in the mesolimbic reward system that ultimately may induce the pathological behaviour. The neural basis for the addictive nature of benzodiazepines, however, remains elusive. Here we show that benzodiazepines increase firing of dopamine neurons of the ventral tegmental area through the positive modulation of GABA(A) (gamma-aminobutyric acid type A) receptors in nearby interneurons. Such disinhibition, which relies on alpha1-containing GABA(A) receptors expressed in these cells, triggers drug-evoked synaptic plasticity in excitatory afferents onto dopamine neurons and underlies drug reinforcement. Taken together, our data provide evidence that benzodiazepines share defining pharmacological features of addictive drugs through cell-type-specific expression of alpha1-containing GABA(A) receptors in the ventral tegmental area. The data also indicate that subunit-selective benzodiazepines sparing alpha1 may be devoid of addiction liability.

  10. Radiosynthesis and in vivo evaluation of N-[{sup 11}C]methylated imidazopyridineacetamides as PET tracers for peripheral benzodiazepine receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekimata, Katsuhiko [Department of Brain Sciences and Molecular Imaging, National Institute for Longevity Sciences, National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology, Obu, Aichi 474-8522 (Japan); Hatano, Kentaro [Department of Brain Sciences and Molecular Imaging, National Institute for Longevity Sciences, National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology, Obu, Aichi 474-8522 (Japan)], E-mail: hatanok@nils.go.jp; Ogawa, Mikako [Photon Medical Research Center, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Shizuoka 431-3192 Japan (Japan); Abe, Junichiro [Department of Brain Sciences and Molecular Imaging, National Institute for Longevity Sciences, National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology, Obu, Aichi 474-8522 (Japan); Magata, Yasuhiro [Photon Medical Research Center, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Shizuoka 431-3192 Japan (Japan); Biggio, Giovanni; Serra, Mariangela [Department of Experimental Biology, University of Cagliari, Cagliari 09100 (Italy); Laquintana, Valentino; Denora, Nunzio; Latrofa, Andrea; Trapani, Giuseppe; Liso, Gaetano [Pharmaco-Chemistry Department, University of Bari, Bari 70125 (Italy); Ito, Kengo [Department of Brain Sciences and Molecular Imaging, National Institute for Longevity Sciences, National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology, Obu, Aichi 474-8522 (Japan)

    2008-04-15

    Imidazopyridineacetoamide 5-8, a series of novel and potentially selective peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) ligands with affinities comparable to those of known PBR ligands, was investigated. Radiosyntheses of [{sup 11}C]5, 6, 7 or 8 was accomplished by N-methylation of the corresponding desmethyl precursors with [{sup 11}C]methyl iodide in the presence of NaH in dimethylformamide (DMF), resulting in 25% to 77% radiochemical yield and specific activitiy of 20 to 150 MBq/nmol. Each of the labeled compounds was injected in ddY mice, and the radioactivity and weight of dissected peripheral organs and brain regions were measured. Organ distribution of [{sup 11}C]7 was consistent with the known PBR distribution. Moreover, [{sup 11}C]7 showed the best combination of brain uptake and PBR binding, leading to its high retention in the olfactory bulb and cerebellum, areas where PBR density is high in mouse brain. Coinjection of PK11195 or unlabeled 7 significantly reduced the brain uptake of [{sup 11}C]7. These results suggest that [{sup 11}C]7 could be a useful radioligand for positron emission tomography imaging of PBRs.

  11. Different sensitivities to competitive inhibition of benzodiazepine receptor binding of {sup 11}C-iomazenil and {sup 11}C-flumazenil in rhesus monkey brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Osamu; Hosoi, Rie; Kobayashi, Kaoru [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Medical School; Itoh, Takashi; Gee, A.; Suzuki, Kazutoshi

    2001-04-01

    The in vivo binding kinetics of {sup 11}C-iomazenil were compared with those of {sup 11}C-flumazenil binding in rhesus monkey brain. The monkey was anesthetized with ketamine and intravenously injected with either {sup 11}C-iomazenil or {sup 11}C-flumazenil in combination with the coadministration of different doses of non-radioactive flumazenil (0, 5 and 20 {mu}g/kg). The regional distribution of {sup 11}C-iomazenil in the brain was similar to that of {sup 11}C-flumazenil, but the sensitivity of {sup 11}C-iomazenil binding to competitive inhibition by non-radioactive flumazenil was much less than that of {sup 11}C-flumazenil binding. A significant reduction in {sup 11}C-flumazenil binding in the cerebral cortex was observed with 20 {mu}g/kg of flumazenil, whereas a relatively smaller inhibition of {sup 11}C-iomazenil binding in the same region was observed with the same dose of flumazenil. These results suggest that {sup 11}C-flumazenil may be a superior radiotracer for estimating benzodiazepine receptor occupancy in the intact brain. (author)

  12. Improved synthesis of the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor ligand [{sup 11}C]DPA-713 using [{sup 11}C]methyl triflate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thominiaux, C. [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, Departement de Recherche Medicale, CEA/DSV, 4 place du General Leclerc, F-91401 Orsay (France); Dolle, F. [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, Departement de Recherche Medicale, CEA/DSV, 4 place du General Leclerc, F-91401 Orsay (France); James, M.L. [Department of Pharmacology, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)] (and others)

    2006-05-15

    Recently, the pyrazolopyrimidine, [{sup 11}C] N,N-Diethyl-2-[2-(4-methoxyphenyl)-5,7-dimethylpyrazolo [1,5-a]pyrimidin-3-yl]acetamide (DPA-713) has been reported as a new promising marker for the study of peripheral benzodiazepine receptors with positron emission tomography. In the present study, DPA-713 has been labelled from the corresponding nor-analogue using [{sup 11}C]methyl triflate (CH{sub 3}OTf). Conditions for HPLC were also modified to include physiological saline (aq. 0.9% NaCl)/ethanol:60/40 as mobile phase making it suitable for injection. The total time of radiosynthesis, including HPLC purification, was 18-20 min. This reported synthesis of [{sup 11}C]DPA-713, using [{sup 11}C]CH{sub 3}OTf, resulted in an improved radiochemical yield (30-38%) compared to [{sup 11}C]methyl iodide (CH{sub 3}I) (9) with a simpler purification method. This ultimately enhances the potential of [{sup 11}C]DPA-713 for further pharmacological and clinical evaluation. These improvements make this radioligand more suitable for automated synthesis which is of benefit where multi-dose preparations and repeated syntheses of radioligand are required.

  13. Rapid and efficient radiosynthesis of [{sup 123}I]I-PK11195, a single photon emission computed tomography tracer for peripheral benzodiazepine receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pimlott, Sally L. [Department of Clinical Physics, West of Scotland Radionuclide Dispensary, Western Infirmary, G11 6NT Glasgow (United Kingdom)], E-mail: s.pimlott@clinmed.gla.ac.uk; Stevenson, Louise [Department of Chemistry, WestCHEM, University of Glasgow, G12 8QQ Glasgow (United Kingdom); Wyper, David J. [Institute of Neurological Sciences, Southern General Hospital, G51 4TF Glasgow (United Kingdom); Sutherland, Andrew [Department of Chemistry, WestCHEM, University of Glasgow, G12 8QQ Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2008-07-15

    Introduction: [{sup 123}I]I-PK11195 is a high-affinity single photon emission computed tomography radiotracer for peripheral benzodiazepine receptors that has previously been used to measure activated microglia and to assess neuroinflammation in the living human brain. This study investigates the radiosynthesis of [{sup 123}I]I-PK11195 in order to develop a rapid and efficient method that obtains [{sup 123}I]I-PK11195 with a high specific activity for in vivo animal and human imaging studies. Methods: The synthesis of [{sup 123}I]I-PK11195 was evaluated using a solid-state interhalogen exchange method and an electrophilic iododestannylation method, where bromine and trimethylstannyl derivatives were used as precursors, respectively. In the electrophilic iododestannylation method, the oxidants peracetic acid and chloramine-T were both investigated. Results: Electrophilic iododestannylation produced [{sup 123}I]I-PK11195 with a higher isolated radiochemical yield and a higher specific activity than achievable using the halogen exchange method investigated. Using chloramine-T as oxidant provided a rapid and efficient method of choice for the synthesis of [{sup 123}I]I-PK11195. Conclusions: [{sup 123}I]I-PK11195 has been successfully synthesized via a rapid and efficient electrophilic iododestannylation method, producing [{sup 123}I]I-PK11195 with a higher isolated radiochemical yield and a higher specific activity than previously achieved.

  14. Increased binding of peripheral benzodiazepine receptor in mild cognitive impairment-dementia converters measured by positron emission tomography with [¹¹C]DAA1106.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuno, Fumihiko; Kosaka, Jun; Ota, Miho; Higuchi, Makoto; Ito, Hiroshi; Fujimura, Yota; Nozaki, Shoko; Takahashi, Sho; Mizukami, Katsuyoshi; Asada, Takashi; Suhara, Tetsuya

    2012-07-30

    Subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) have "prodromal or incipient" dementia with neuropathological changes. Peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) binding was shown to reflect activated microglia, one of the predictive biomarkers of conversion to dementia. We sought to evaluate PBR binding in MCI subjects using positron emission tomography (PET). PET scans with [¹¹C]DAA1106, a potent and selective ligand for PBR, were performed on seven MCI subjects, 10 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and 10 age-matched control subjects. PBR binding in the regions of interest was quantified by binding potential (BP). Five MCI subjects were clinically followed for 5 years after their initial PET scans. [¹¹C]DAA1106 binding to PBR was significantly increased in widespread areas in MCI subjects when compared to healthy controls. We found no significant difference in BP between MCI and AD patients. MCI subjects with [¹¹C]DAA1106 binding values higher than the control mean +0.5 standard deviation (S.D.) developed dementia within 5 years. Our finding of higher DAA binding in MCI subjects indicated that microglial activation may occur before the onset of dementia. In vivo detection of microglial activation may provide useful prognostic information with respect to stratifying MCI subjects at increased risk of dementia.

  15. Imaging of peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor in tumor: carbon ion irradiation reduced the uptake of a positron emission tomography ligand [11C]DAC in tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Tomoteru; Koike, Sachiko; Hatori, Akiko; Yanamoto, Kazuhiko; Kawamura, Kazunori; Yui, Joji; Kumata, Katsushi; Ando, Koichi; Zhang, Ming-Rong

    2010-01-01

    We aimed to determine the effect of carbon ion irradiation on the uptake of N-benzyl-N-11C-methyl-2-(7-methyl-8-oxo-2-phenyl-7,8-dihydro-9H-purin-9-yl)acetamide ([(11)C]DAC), a positron emission tomography (PET) ligand for the peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor (PBR), in tumor cells and tumor-bearing mice. Spontaneous murine fibrosarcoma (NFSa) cells were implanted into the right hind legs of syngeneic C3H male mice. Conditioning irradiation with 290 MeV/u carbon ions was delivered to the 7- to 8-mm tumors In vitro uptake of [(11)C]DAC was measured in single NFSa cells isolated from NFSa-bearing mice after irradiation. In vivo biodistribution of [(11)C]DAC in NFSa-bearing mice was determined by small animal PET scanning and dissection. In vitro autoradiography was performed using tumor sections prepared from mice after PET scanning. In vitro and in vivo uptake of [(11)C]DAC in single NFSa cells and NFSa-bearing mice was significantly reduced by carbon ion irradiation. The decrease in [(11)C]DAC uptake in the tumor sections was mainly due to the change in PBR expression. In conclusion, [(11)C]DAC PET responded to the change in PBR expression in tumors caused by carbon ion irradiation in this study. Thus, [(11)C]DAC is a promising predictor for evaluating the effect of carbon ion radiotherapy.

  16. Contextual fear conditioning and baseline startle responses in the rat fear-potentiated startle test: a comparison of benzodiazepine/gamma-aminobutyric acid-A receptor agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guscott, M R; Cook, G P; Bristow, L J

    2000-09-01

    In the rat, fear-potentiated startle (FPS) test animals are first trained to associate brief light presentations with a mild electric footshock and then tested for startle responses to acoustic stimuli, delivered either in darkness (i.e. baseline startle) or after the conditioning stimulus. Following light presentation the magnitude of the startle response is markedly increased, and the test is commonly used to distinguish anxiolytic drug effects (i.e. a reduction in FPS) from non-specific effects such as sedation/muscle relaxation. However, recent studies suggest that the environment in which the animal is trained may also contribute towards the acquisition of a conditioned fear response (i.e. contextual fear conditioning) and that this may elevate startle responses recorded in the dark. In the present study, therefore, we have compared the benzodiazepine/gamma-aminobutyric acid-A receptor agonist chlordiazepoxide with the partial agonists FG 8205 and bretazenil, which are known to have a reduced propensity to produce sedation/myorelaxation, using two different FPS procedures: (i) conditioning and testing in stabilimeter chambers, and (ii) conditioning and testing in different environments. The results show that FPS can be demonstrated in both procedures and that treatment with chlordiazepoxide, FG 8205 or bretazenil dose-dependently attenuates the response. However, animals conditioned and tested in stabilimeter chambers also showed a significant increase in dark-startle amplitudes compared with non-shocked rats, suggesting that this response was elevated by contextual fear conditioning. Furthermore, despite clear differences in side-effect liabilities, FG 8205 and bretazenil significantly reduced dark-startle responses, suggesting that this measure is also sensitive to the anxiolytic effects of benzodiazepines. In contrast, when animals were conditioned and tested in different environments, dark-startle responses were not significantly different from those

  17. The 18 kDa translocator protein (peripheral benzodiazepine receptor) expression in the bone of normal, osteoprotegerin or low calcium diet treated mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kam, Winnie Wai-Ying; Meikle, Steven R; Zhou, Hong; Zheng, Yu; Blair, Julie M; Seibel, Marcus; Dunstan, Colin R; Banati, Richard B

    2012-01-01

    The presence of the translocator protein (TSPO), previously named as the mitochondrial or peripheral benzodiazepine receptor, in bone cells was studied in vitro and in situ using RT-qPCR, and receptor autoradiography using the selective TSPO ligand PK11195.In vitro, the TSPO is highly expressed in osteoblastic and osteoclastic cells.In situ, constitutive expression of TSPO is found in bone marrow and trabecular bone, e.g., spongiosa. Mice with a reduction of bone turnover induced by a 4-day treatment of osteoprotegerin reduces [(3)H]PK11195 binding in the spongiosa (320±128 Bq x mg(-1), 499±106 Bq x mg(-1) in saline-treated controls). In contrast, mice with an increase in bone turnover caused by a 4-day low calcium diet increases [(3)H]PK11195 binding in the spongiosa (615±90 Bq x mg(-1)). Further, our study includes technical feasibility data on [(18)F]fluoride microPET imaging of rodent bone with altered turnover. Despite [(18)F]fluoride having high uptake, the in vivo signal differences were small. Using a phantom model, we describe the spillover effect and partial volume loss that affect the quantitative microPET imaging of the small bone structures in experimental mouse models. In summary, we demonstrate the expression of TSPO in small rodent bone tissues, including osteoblasts and osteoclasts. A trend increase in TSPO expression was observed in the spongiosa from low to high bone turnover conditions. However, despite the potential utility of TSPO expression as an in vivo biomarker of bone turnover in experimental rodent models, our small animal PET imaging data using [(18)F]fluoride show that even under the condition of a good biological signal-to-noise ratio and high tracer uptake, the currently achievable instrument sensitivity and spatial resolution is unlikely to be sufficient to detect subtle differences in small structures, such as mouse bone.

  18. The 18 kDa translocator protein (peripheral benzodiazepine receptor expression in the bone of normal, osteoprotegerin or low calcium diet treated mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winnie Wai-Ying Kam

    Full Text Available The presence of the translocator protein (TSPO, previously named as the mitochondrial or peripheral benzodiazepine receptor, in bone cells was studied in vitro and in situ using RT-qPCR, and receptor autoradiography using the selective TSPO ligand PK11195.In vitro, the TSPO is highly expressed in osteoblastic and osteoclastic cells.In situ, constitutive expression of TSPO is found in bone marrow and trabecular bone, e.g., spongiosa. Mice with a reduction of bone turnover induced by a 4-day treatment of osteoprotegerin reduces [(3H]PK11195 binding in the spongiosa (320±128 Bq x mg(-1, 499±106 Bq x mg(-1 in saline-treated controls. In contrast, mice with an increase in bone turnover caused by a 4-day low calcium diet increases [(3H]PK11195 binding in the spongiosa (615±90 Bq x mg(-1. Further, our study includes technical feasibility data on [(18F]fluoride microPET imaging of rodent bone with altered turnover. Despite [(18F]fluoride having high uptake, the in vivo signal differences were small. Using a phantom model, we describe the spillover effect and partial volume loss that affect the quantitative microPET imaging of the small bone structures in experimental mouse models. In summary, we demonstrate the expression of TSPO in small rodent bone tissues, including osteoblasts and osteoclasts. A trend increase in TSPO expression was observed in the spongiosa from low to high bone turnover conditions. However, despite the potential utility of TSPO expression as an in vivo biomarker of bone turnover in experimental rodent models, our small animal PET imaging data using [(18F]fluoride show that even under the condition of a good biological signal-to-noise ratio and high tracer uptake, the currently achievable instrument sensitivity and spatial resolution is unlikely to be sufficient to detect subtle differences in small structures, such as mouse bone.

  19. Benzodiazepine poisoning in elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukcević, Natasa Perković; Ercegović, Gordana Vuković; Segrt, Zoran; Djordjević, Snezana; Stosić, Jasmina Jović

    2016-03-01

    Benzodiazepines are among the most frequently ingested drugs in self-poisonings. Elderly may be at greater risk compared with younger individuals due to impaired metabolism and increased sensitivity to benzodiazepines. The aim of this study was to assess toxicity of benzodiazepines in elderly attempted suicide. A retrospective study of consecutive presentations to hospital after self-poisoning with benzodiazepines was done. Collected data consisted of patient's characteristics (age, gender), benzodiazepine ingested with its blood concentrations at admission, clinical findings including vital signs and Glasgow coma score, routine blood chemistry, complications of poisoning, details of management, length of hospital stay and outcome. According the age, patients are classified as young (15-40-year old), middle aged (41-65-year old) and elderly (older than 65). During a 2-year observational period 387 patients were admitted because of pure benzodiazepine poisoning. The most frequently ingested drug was bromazepam, the second was diazepam. The incidence of coma was significantly higher, and the length of hospital stay significantly longer in elderly. Respiratory failure and aspiration pneumonia occurred more frequently in old age. Also, flumazenil was more frequently required in the group of elderly patients. Massive benzodiazepines overdose in elderly may be associated with a significant morbidity, including deep coma with aspiration pneumonia, respiratory failure, and even death. Flumazenil is indicated more often to reduce CNS depression and prevent complications of prolonged unconsciousness, but supportive treatment and proper airway management of comatose patients is the mainstay of the treatment of acute benzodiazepine poisoning.

  20. Effects of 2,3-benzodiazepine AMPA receptor antagonists on dopamine turnover in the striatum of rats with experimental parkinsonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megyeri, Katalin; Marko, Bernadett; Sziray, Nora; Gacsalyi, Istvan; Juranyi, Zsolt; Levay, Gyorgy; Harsing, Laszlo G

    2007-03-15

    Although levodopa is the current "gold standard" for treatment of Parkinson's disease, there has been disputation on whether AMPA receptor antagonists can be used as adjuvant therapy to improve the effects of levodopa. Systemic administration of levodopa, the precursor of dopamine, increases brain dopamine turnover rate and this elevated turnover is believed to be essential for successful treatment of Parkinson's disease. However, long-term treatment of patients with levodopa often leads to development of dyskinesia. Therefore, drugs that feature potentiation of dopamine turnover rate and are able to reduce daily levodopa dosages might be used as adjuvant in the treatment of patients suffering from Parkinson's disease. To investigate such combined treatment, we have examined the effects of two non-competitive AMPA receptor antagonists, GYKI-52466 and GYKI-53405, alone or in combination with levodopa on dopamine turnover rate in 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned striatum of the rat. We found here that repeated administration of levodopa, added with the peripheral DOPA decarboxylase inhibitor carbidopa, increased dopamine turnover rate after lesioning the striatum with 6-hydroxydopamine. Moreover, combination of levodopa with GYKI-52466 or GYKI-53405 further increased dopamine turnover enhanced by levodopa administration while the AMPA receptor antagonists by themselves failed to influence striatal dopamine turnover. We concluded from the present data that potentiation observed between levodopa and AMPA receptor antagonists may reflect levodopa-sparing effects in clinical treatment indicating the therapeutic potential of such combination in the management of Parkinson's disease.

  1. Triton X-100 inhibits agonist-induced currents and suppresses benzodiazepine modulation of GABA(A) receptors in Xenopus oocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Rikke; Ebert, Bjarke; Klaerke, Dan

    2009-01-01

    Changes in lipid bilayer elastic properties have been proposed to underlie the modulation of voltage-gated Na(+) and L-type Ca(2+) channels and GABA(A) receptors by amphiphiles. The amphiphile Triton X-100 increases the elasticity of lipid bilayers at micromolar concentrations, assessed from its ...

  2. Benzodiazepine dependence and its treatment with low dose flumazenil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Sean David; Norman, Amanda; Hince, Dana Adelle; Melichar, Jan Krzysztof; Hulse, Gary Kenneth

    2014-02-01

    Globally benzodiazepines remain one of the most prescribed medication groups, especially in the primary care setting. With such high levels of prescribing it is not surprising that benzodiazepine dependence is common, cutting across all socioeconomic levels. Despite recognition of the potential for the development of iatrogenic dependence and the lack of any effective treatment, benzodiazepines continue to be widely prescribed in general practice. Conventional dependence management, benzodiazepine tapering, is commonly a protracted process over several weeks or months. It is often associated with significant withdrawal symptoms and craving leading to patient drop out and return to use. Accordingly, there is a worldwide need to find effective pharmacotherapeutic interventions for benzodiazepine dependence. One drug of increasing interest is the GABAA benzodiazepine receptor antagonist/partial agonist, flumazenil. Multiple bolus intravenous infusions of low dose flumazenil used either with or without benzodiazepine tapering can reduce withdrawal sequelae, and/or longer term symptoms in the months following withdrawal. Preliminary data suggest that continuous intravenous or subcutaneous flumazenil infusion for 4 days significantly reduces acute benzodiazepine withdrawal sequelae. The subcutaneous infusion was shown to be tissue compatible so the development of a longer acting (i.e. several weeks) depot flumazenil formulation has been explored. This could be capable of managing both acute and longer term benzodiazepine withdrawal sequelae. Preliminary in vitro water bath and in vivo biocompatibility data in sheep show that such an implant is feasible and so is likely to be used in clinical trials in the near future.

  3. Biodistribution and dosimetry of [{sup 123}I]iodo-Pk 11195: a potential agent for SPET imaging of the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Versijpt, J. [Groningen Univ. Hospital (Netherlands). Dept. of Biological Psychiatry; Div. of Nuclear Medicine, Ghent Univ. Hospital (Belgium); Dumont, F.; Vos, F. de; Slegers, G. [Dept. of Radiopharmacy, Ghent Univ. (Belgium); Thierens, H. [Dept. of Biomedical Physics and Radiation Protection, Ghent Univ. (Belgium); Jansen, H.; Dierckx, R.A. [Div. of Nuclear Medicine, Ghent Univ. Hospital (Belgium); Santens, P. [Dept. of Neurology, Ghent Univ. Hospital (Belgium); Korf, J. [Groningen Univ. Hospital (Netherlands). Dept. of Biological Psychiatry

    2000-09-01

    The highest concentrations of the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) are found in the kidneys and heart. In addition, the PBR has been reported to reflect neuro-inflammatory damage by co-localisation with activated microglia. PK 11195 is a high-affinity ligand for the PBR. The aim of this study was to investigate in humans the biodistribution and dosimetry of [{sup 123}I]iodo-PK 11195, a potential single-photon emission tomography tracer for the PBR. Five healthy volunteers were injected with 112 MBq of [{sup 123}I]iodo-PK 11195. Sequential whole-body scans were performed up to 72 h post injection. Multiple blood samples were taken, and urine was collected to measure the fraction voided by the renal system. Decay-corrected regions of interest of the whole-body images were analysed, and geometric mean count rates were used to determine organ activity. Organ absorbed doses and effective dose were calculated using the MIRD method. [{sup 123}I]iodo-PK 11195 was rapidly cleared from the blood, mainly by the hepatobiliary system. Approximately 22% was voided in urine after 48 h. Average organ residence times were 0.74, 0.44 and 0.29 h for the liver, upper large intestine and lower large intestine, respectively. The testes received the highest dose, 109.4 {mu}Gy/MBq. All other organs investigated received doses of less than 50 {mu}Gy/MBq. The effective dose was 40.3 {mu}Sv/MBq. In conclusion, [{sup 123}I]iodo-PK 11195 is a suitable agent for the visualisation of the PBR and indirectly for the imaging of neuro-inflammatory lesions. Taking into account the radiation burden of 7.46 mSv following an administration of 185 MBq, a [{sup 123}I]iodo-PK 11195 investigation has to be considered an ICRP risk category IIb investigation. (orig.)

  4. Imaging of peripheral benzodiazepine receptor expression as biomarkers of detrimental versus beneficial glial responses in mouse models of Alzheimer's and other CNS pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Bin; Maeda, Jun; Sawada, Makoto; Ono, Maiko; Okauchi, Takashi; Inaji, Motoki; Zhang, Ming-Rong; Suzuki, Kazutoshi; Ando, Kiyoshi; Staufenbiel, Matthias; Trojanowski, John Q; Lee, Virginia M Y; Higuchi, Makoto; Suhara, Tetsuya

    2008-11-19

    We demonstrate the significance of peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) imaging in living mouse models of Alzheimer's disease (AD) as biomarkers and functional signatures of glial activation. By radiochemically and immunohistochemically analyzing murine models of the two pathological hallmarks of AD, we found that AD-like Abeta deposition is concurrent with astrocyte-dominant PBR expression, in striking contrast with nonastroglial PBR upregulation in accumulations of AD-like phosphorylated tau. Because tau-induced massive neuronal loss was distinct from the marginal neurodegeneration associated with Abeta plaques in these models, cellular localization of PBR reflected deleterious and beneficial glial reactions to tau versus Abeta pathologies, respectively. This notion was subsequently examined in models of various non-AD neuropathologies, revealing the following reactive glial dynamics underlying differential PBR upregulation: (1) PBR(-) astrogliosis uncoupled with microgliosis or coupled with PBR(+) microgliosis associated with irreversible neuronal insults; and (2) PBR(+) astrogliosis coupled with PBR(- or +/-) microgliosis associated with minimal or reversible neuronal toxicity. Intracranial transplantation of microglia also indicated that nontoxic microglia drives astroglial PBR expression. Moreover, levels of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) in astrocytes were correlated with astroglial PBR, except for increased GDNF in PBR(-) astrocytes in the model of AD-like tau pathology, thereby suggesting that PBR upregulation in astrocytes is an indicator of neurotrophic support. Together, PBR expressions in astrocytes and microglia reflect beneficial and deleterious glial reactions, respectively, in diverse neurodegenerative disorders including AD, pointing to new applications of PBR imaging for monitoring the impact of gliosis on the pathogenesis and treatment of AD.

  5. Midazolam ameliorates the behavior deficits of a rat posttraumatic stress disorder model through dual 18 kDa translocator protein and central benzodiazepine receptor and neurosteroidogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Liang Miao

    Full Text Available Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD is a debilitating anxiety disorder that may develop after an individual has experienced or witnessed a severe traumatic event. It has been shown that the 18 kDa translocator protein (TSPO may be correlated with PTSD and that the TSPO ligand improved the behavioral deficits in a mouse model of PTSD. Midazolam, a ligand for TSPO and central benzodiazepine receptor (CBR, induces anxiolytic- and anti-depressant-like effects in animal models. The present study aimed to determine whether midazolam ameliorates PTSD behavior in rats as assessed by the single prolonged stress (SPS model. The SPS rats received daily Sertraline (Ser (15 mg/kg, i.p. [corrected] and midazolam (0.125, 0.25, 0.5, and 1 mg/kg, i.p. [corrected] during the exposure to SPS and behavioral assessments, which included the open field (OF test, the contextual fear paradigm (CFP, and the elevated plus-maze (EPM. The results showed that, like Ser (15 mg/kg, i.p. [corrected], midazolam (0.25 and 0.5 mg/kg, i.p. [corrected] significantly reversed the behavioral deficiencies of the SPS rats, including PTSD-associated freezing and anxiety-like behavior but not the effects on spontaneous locomotor activity. In addition, the anti-PTSD effects of midazolam (0.5 mg/kg, i.p. [corrected] were antagonized by the TSPO antagonist PK11195 (3 mg/kg, i.p., the CBR antagonist flumazenil (15 mg/kg, i.p. [corrected] and the inhibitor of steroidogenic enzymes finasteride (30 mg/kg, i.p. [corrected], which by themselves had no effect on PTSD-associated freezing and anxiety-like behavior. In summary, this study demonstrated that midazolam improves the behavioral deficits in the SPS model through dual TSPO and CBR and neurosteroidogenesis.

  6. Midazolam Ameliorates the Behavior Deficits of a Rat Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Model through Dual 18 kDa Translocator Protein and Central Benzodiazepine Receptor and Neurosteroidogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Wei-Wu; Liu, Yan; Liu, Ji; Li, Bao-Wei; Wu, Wei; Li, Yun-Feng

    2014-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a debilitating anxiety disorder that may develop after an individual has experienced or witnessed a severe traumatic event. It has been shown that the 18 kDa translocator protein (TSPO) may be correlated with PTSD and that the TSPO ligand improved the behavioral deficits in a mouse model of PTSD. Midazolam, a ligand for TSPO and central benzodiazepine receptor (CBR), induces anxiolytic- and anti-depressant-like effects in animal models. The present study aimed to determine whether midazolam ameliorates PTSD behavior in rats as assessed by the single prolonged stress (SPS) model. The SPS rats received daily Sertraline (Ser) (15 mg/kg, p.o.) and midazolam (0.125, 0.25, 0.5, and 1 mg/kg, p.o.) during the exposure to SPS and behavioral assessments, which included the open field (OF) test, the contextual fear paradigm (CFP), and the elevated plus-maze (EPM). The results showed that, like Ser (15 mg/kg, p.o.), midazolam (0.25 and 0.5 mg/kg, p.o.) significantly reversed the behavioral deficiencies of the SPS rats, including PTSD-associated freezing and anxiety-like behavior but not the effects on spontaneous locomotor activity. In addition, the anti-PTSD effects of midazolam (0.5 mg/kg, p.o.) were antagonized by the TSPO antagonist PK11195 (3 mg/kg, i.p.), the CBR antagonist flumazenil (15 mg/kg, p.o.) and the inhibitor of steroidogenic enzymes finasteride (30 mg/kg, p.o.), which by themselves had no effect on PTSD-associated freezing and anxiety-like behavior. In summary, this study demonstrated that midazolam improves the behavioral deficits in the SPS model through dual TSPO and CBR and neurosteroidogenesis. PMID:24988461

  7. Comparison of benzodiazepine receptor and regional cerebral blood flow imagings of epileptiform foci in hippocampal kindled rabbits; A study with a double tracer autoradiography using [sup 125]I-Ro 16-0154 and [sup 99m]Tc-HMPAO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurokawa, Kenzo (Kanazawa Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1993-10-01

    To compare the benzodiazepine (Bz) receptor imaging and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) imaging in the detection of epileptic foci, the distribution pattern of the Bz receptor and rCBF in hippocampal kindled rabbits was examined by a double tracer autoradiography using ethyl 7-[[sup 125]I]-5,6-dihydro-5-methyl-6-oxo-4H-imidazo [1, 5-a][1,4] benzodiazepine-3-carboxylate ([sup 125]I-Ro 16-0154) and [sup 99m]Tc-hexamethyl-propyleneamine oxime ([sup 99m]Tc-HMPAO). In visual and quantitative analyses, [sup 125]I-Ro 16-0154 accumulation in brain slices extracted after the completion of the kindling was markedly and extensively decreased in the kindled CA1 region mimicking a primary epileptic focus. [sup 125]I-Ro 16-0154 accumulation was moderately decreased in the ipsilateral temporal lobe, dentate gyrus, CA2, CA4, and bilateral CA3 regions, regarded as the propagated sites of seizure discharges. [sup 99m]Tc-HMPAO accumulation was found to be decreased in the ipsilateral CA1, frontal, temporal and dentate gyri. However, the decrease was much more slight and less extensive than that in [sup 125]I-Ro 16-0154 accumulation. These results suggest that Bz receptor imaging is much more sensitive in the detection of epileptic foci than rCBF imaging, and therefore that Bz receptor imaging is useful in clinical epilepsy. (author).

  8. [Benzodiazepines in geriatrics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, W

    2013-12-01

    About 10 % of community dwelling elderly people are chronically consuming benzodiazepines. This proportion rises to 30 % in nursing homes or hospitals. Particularly in older patients, this usage leads to a higher risk of adverse drug reactions. Exposure contributes to delirium and falls with subsequent femoral neck fractures. The WHO has classified the risk potential of the new z-drugs to be the same as that associated with benzodiazepines. It is recommended that benzodiazepines should be discontinued step by step under supervision of a doctor or the dosage should be reduced.

  9. Benzodiazepines: Sedation and Agitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Dental anxiety is common and frequently poses a barrier to necessary dental treatment. The increasing availability of conscious sedation in dental practice has made treatment much more accessible for anxious patients. At present, benzodiazepines are the most commonly used drugs in sedation practice and provide a pleasant experience for most, but not all, patients. An understanding of the mechanism of action of benzodiazepines should inform our practice and deepen our understanding of why and how sedation may fail. CPD/CLINICAL RELEVANCE: As an increasing number of dentists provide sedation for their patients an update on benzodiazepines is timely.

  10. Benzodiazepine poisoning in elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perković-Vukčević Nataša

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Benzodiazepines are among the most frequently ingested drugs in self-poisonings. Elderly may be at greater risk compared with younger individuals due to impaired metabolism and increased sensitivity to benzodiazepines. The aim of this study was to assess toxicity of benzodiazepines in elderly attempted suicide. Methods. A retrospective study of consecutive presentations to hospital after self-poisoning with benzodiazepines was done. Collected data consisted of patient's characteristics (age, gender, benzodiazepine ingested with its blood concentrations at admission, clinical findings including vital signs and Glasgow coma score, routine blood chemistry, complications of poisoning, details of management, length of hospital stay and outcome. According the age, patients are classified as young (15-40-year old, middle aged (41-65-year old and elderly (older than 65. Results. During a 2-year observational period 387 patients were admitted because of pure benzodiazepine poisoning. The most frequently ingested drug was bromazepam, the second was diazepam. The incidence of coma was significantly higher, and the length of hospital stay significantly longer in elderly. Respiratory failure and aspiration pneumonia occurred more frequently in old age. Also, flumazenil was more frequently required in the group of elderly patients. Conclusion. Massive benzodiazepines overdose in elderly may be associated with a significant morbidity, including deep coma with aspiration pneumonia, respiratory failure, and even death. Flumazenil is indicated more often to reduce CNS depression and prevent complications of prolonged unconsciousness, but supportive treatment and proper airway management of comatose patients is the mainstay of the treatment of acute benzodiazepine poisoning.

  11. Enhancement of peripheral benzodiazepine receptor ligand-induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest of esophageal cancer cells by simultaneous inhibition of MAPK/ERK kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, Andreas P; Maaser, Kerstin; Gerst, Bastian; Krahn, Antje; Zeitz, Martin; Scherübl, Hans

    2004-05-01

    Specific ligands of the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) activate pro-apoptotic and anti-proliferative signaling pathways. Previously, we found that PBR ligands activated the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway in esophageal cancer cells, and that the activation of p38MAPK contributed to tumor cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. Here, we report that PBR ligands also activate the pro-survival MAPK/ERK kinase (MEK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway in esophageal cancer cells, which might compromise the efficacy of PBR ligands. Hence, a combination treatment of PBR ligands and MEK inhibitors, which are emerging as promising anticancer agents, was pursued to determine whether this treatment could lead to enhanced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. Using Western blotting we demonstrated a time- and dose-dependent phosphorylation of ERK1/2 in response to PBR ligands. Apoptosis was investigated by assessment of mitochondrial alterations and caspase-3 activity. Cell cycle arrest was measured by flow cytometric analysis of stained isolated nuclei. The inhibition of MEK/ERK with a pharmacologic inhibitor, 2'-amino-3'-methoxyflavone (PD 98059), resulted in a synergistic enhancement of PBR-ligand-induced growth inhibition, apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. Specifity of the pharmacologic inhibitor was confirmed by the use of 1,4-diamino-2,3-dicyano-1,4-bis(2-aminophenylthio)butadiene (U 0126), a second MEK/ERK inhibitor, and 1,4-diamino-2,3-dicyano-1,4-bis(methylthio)butadiene (U 0124), a structural analogue of it which does not display any affinity to MEK. Enhanced pro-apoptotic and anti-proliferative effects were observed both in KYSE-140 esophageal squamous cancer and OE-33 adenocarcinoma cells, suggesting that this effect was not cell-type specific. In addition, the PBR-mediated overexpression of the stress response gene (growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible gene gadd153) was synergistically enhanced by MEK inhibition. This is the

  12. Evaluation of a radiolabelled peripheral benzodiazepine receptor ligand in the central nervous system inflammation of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis: a possible probe for imaging multiple sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattner, F.; Katsifis, A.; Ballantyne, P. [ANSTO, Radiopharmaceuticals Division, Lucas Heights (Australia); Staykova, M.; Willenborg, D.O. [Australian National University Medical School, The Canberra Hospital, Neurosciences Research Unit, Woden, Canberra (Australia)

    2005-04-01

    Peripheral benzodiazepine receptors (PBRs) are upregulated on macrophages and activated microglia, and radioligands for the PBRs can be used to detect in vivo neuroinflammatory changes in a variety of neurological insults, including multiple sclerosis. Substituted 2-phenyl imidazopyridine-3-acetamides with high affinity and selectivity for PBRs have been prepared that are suitable for radiolabelling with a number of positron emission tomography and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) isotopes. In this investigation, the newly developed high-affinity PBR ligand 6-chloro-2-(4'-iodophenyl)-3-(N,N-diethyl)imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine-3-acetamide, or CLINDE, was radiolabelled with{sup 123}I and its biodistribution in the central nervous system (CNS) of rats with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) evaluated. EAE was induced in male Lewis rats by injection of an emulsion of myelin basic protein and incomplete Freund's adjuvant containing Mycobacterium butyricum. Biodistribution studies with{sup 123}I-CLINDE were undertaken on EAE rats exhibiting different clinical disease severity and compared with results in controls. Disease severity was confirmed by histopathology in the spinal cord of rats. The relationship between inflammatory lesions and PBR ligand binding was investigated using ex vivo autoradiography and immunohistochemistry on rats with various clinical scores. {sup 123}I-CLINDE uptake was enhanced in the CNS of all rats exhibiting EAE when compared to controls. Binding reflected the ascending nature of EAE inflammation, with lumbar/sacral cord > thoracic cord > cervical cord > medulla. The amount of ligand binding also reflected the clinical severity of disease. Ex vivo autoradiography and immunohistochemistry revealed a good spatial correspondence between radioligand signal and foci of inflammation and in particular ED-1{sup +} cells representing macrophages and microglia. These results demonstrate the ability of {sup 123}I

  13. Evaluation of C.L.I.N.D.E. as potent peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor tracer in a rat model of micro-glial activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arlicot, N.; Guilloteau, D.; Chalon, S. [Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale (INSERM), U619, 37 - Tours (France); Universite Francois Rabelais de Tours, 37 (France); Katsifis, A.; Mattner, F. [ANSTO, Sydney (Australia)

    2008-02-15

    The peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptors (P.B.R.) are localized in mitochondria of glial cells and are very low expressed in normal brain. Their expression rises after micro-glial activation consecutive to brain injury. Accordingly, P.B.R. are potential targets to evaluate neuro inflammatory changes in a variety of C.N.S. disorders. To date no effective tool is available to explore P.B.R. by SPECT. We characterized here 6-chloro-2-(4 iodophenyl)-3-(N,N-diethyl)-imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine- 3-acetamide, C.L.I.N.D.E., in a rat model of excitotoxic lesion. Excitotoxicity was induced in male Wistar rats by unilateral intra striatal injection of different amounts of quinolinic acid (Q.A.: 75, 150 or 300 nmol). One week later, 2 groups of rats (n = 5-6/group) were i.v. injected with [{sup 125}I]-C.L.I.N.D.E. (0.4 MBq), one group being pre-injected with P.K.11195 (5 mg/kg). Brains were removed 30 min after tracer injection and the radioactivity of cerebral areas measured. Complementary ex vivo autoradiography and immunohistochemical studies using O.X.-42 were performed on brain sections In the control group, [{sup 125}I]-C.L.I.N.D.E. binding was significantly higher ( p < 0.001) in lesioned than that in intact side (striatum: 0.552 {+-} 0.109 vs. 0.123 {+-} 0.012% I.D./g tissue; cortex: 0.385 {+-} 0.126 vs. 0.131 {+-} 0.007% with 300 nmol Q.A.). This binding disappeared in rats pretreated with P.K.11195 ( p < 0.001), showing specific binding of C.L.I.N.D.E. to P.B.R.. Ex vivo autoradiography and immunohistochemistry were consistent with this, revealing a spatial correspondence between radioactivity signal and activated micro-glia. Regression analysis yielded a significant correlation ( p < 0.001) between the ligand binding and the dose of Q.A.. These results demonstrate that C.L.I.N.D.E. is suitable for P.B.R. in vivo SPECT imaging to explore their involvement in neuro degenerative disorders associated with micro-glial activation. (authors)

  14. Ethanol-related changes in benzodiazepine receptor ligand modulation of GABA[sub A] receptor-operated chloride channels: Relevance to ethanol tolerance and dependence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buck, K.J.

    1990-01-01

    This study focuses on how ethanol exposure affects biochemical processes associated with the GABA[sub A] complex in the mammalian CNS, and examines the role of these changes in the development of alcohol tolerance and withdrawal. In vitro studies of control mice and those acutely or chronically exposed to alcohol were conducted. Radioligand binding using the low-affinity GABA[sub A] receptor-selective antagonist [[sup 3]H]SR95531 showed no changes in saturation binding analysis of receptor affinity or density. Muscimol-activated [sup 36]Cl[sup [minus

  15. Gamma-aminobutyric acid-modulated benzodiazepine binding sites in bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lummis, S.C.R.; Johnston, G.A.R. (Univ. of Sydney, New South Wales (Australia)); Nicoletti, G. (Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech. (Australia)); Holan, G. (CSIRO, Melbourne (Australia))

    1991-01-01

    Benzodiazepine binding sites, which were once considered to exist only in higher vertebrates, are here demonstrated in the bacteria E. coli. The bacterial ({sup 3}H)diazepam binding sites are modulated by GABA; the modulation is dose dependent and is reduced at high concentrations. The most potent competitors of E.Coli ({sup 3}H)diazepam binding are those that are active in displacing ({sup 3}H)benzodiazepines from vertebrate peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites. These vertebrate sites are not modulated by GABA, in contrast to vertebrate neuronal benzodiazepine binding sites. The E.coli benzodiazepine binding sites therefore differ from both classes of vertebrate benzodiazepine binding sites; however the ligand spectrum and GABA-modulatory properties of the E.coli sites are similar to those found in insects. This intermediate type of receptor in lower species suggests a precursor for at least one class of vertebrate benzodiazepine binding sites may have existed.

  16. Individual and combined manipulation of muscarinic, NMDA, and benzodiazepine receptor activity in the water maze task: implications for a rat model of Alzheimer dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, D P; Ighanian, K; Boon, F

    2000-06-15

    Recent evidence indicates that Alzheimer disease typically involves different degrees of impairment in a variety of neurotransmitter systems, behaviors, and cognitive abilities in different patients. To investigate the relations between neurotransmitter system, behavioral, and cognitive impairments in an animal model of Alzheimer disease we studied spatial learning in a Morris water maze in male Long-Evans rats given neurochemical agents that targeted muscarinic cholinergic, NMDA, or benzodiazepine systems. Naive rats given a single agent or a combination of agents were severely impaired in place responding and had behavioral strategy impairments. Rats made familiar with the required water maze behavioral strategies by non-spatial pretraining performed as well as controls if given a single agent. Non-spatially pretrained rats with manipulation of both muscarinic cholinergic and NMDA or muscarinic cholinergic and benzodiazepine systems had a specific place response impairment but no behavioral strategy impairments. The results suggest that impairment of both muscarinic cholinergic and NMDA, or muscarinic cholinergic and benzodiazepine systems may model some aspects of human Alzheimer disease (impairments in navigation in familiar environments), but not other aspects of this disorder (global dementia leading to general loss of adaptive behavior). Previous research suggests that impairment of both muscarinic cholinergic and serotonergic systems may provide a better model of global dementia. The water maze testing and detailed behavioral analysis techniques used here appear to provide a means of investigating the contributions of various combinations of neurotransmitter system impairments to an animal model of Alzheimer disease.

  17. A Quantum of Solace: molecular electronics of benzodiazepines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turin, Luca; Horsfield, Andrew; Stoneham, Marshall

    2011-03-01

    Benzodiazepines and related drugs modulate the activity of GABA-A receptors, the main inhibitory receptor of the central nervous system. The prevailing view is that these drugs bind at the interface between two receptor subunits and allosterically modulate the response to GABA. In this talk I shall present evidence that benzodiazepines work instead by facilitating electron transport from the cytoplasm to a crucial redox-sensitive group in the gamma subunit. If this idea is correct, benzodiazepines should not only be regarded as keys fitting into a lock, but also as one-electron chemical field-effect transistors fitting into an electronic circuit. Supported by DARPA Grant N66001-10-1-4062.

  18. 2-Phenyl-imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine compounds containing hydrophilic groups as potent and selective ligands for peripheral benzodiazepine receptors: synthesis, binding affinity and electrophysiological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denora, Nunzio; Laquintana, Valentino; Pisu, Maria Giuseppina; Dore, Riccardo; Murru, Luca; Latrofa, Andrea; Trapani, Giuseppe; Sanna, Enrico

    2008-11-13

    A series of imidazopyridine acetamides were synthesized to evaluate the effects of structural changes at both central (CBRs) and peripheral benzodiazepine receptors (PBRs). These changes include the introduction of polar substituents or ionizable functional groups at the 2- and 8-position of the imidazopyridine skeleton. The results suggest that substituents endowed with hydrogen bonding acceptor and/or donor properties in the para position of the phenyl ring lead to high affinity for PBR. In electrophysiological studies, it was found that compounds 9, 12, 13, and 28 markedly enhanced GABA-evoked Cl (-) currents in Xenopus oocytes expressing alpha 1beta 2gamma 2 GABA A receptors. The capability of flumazenil to reduce the stimulatory effect exerted by compound 9 supports the conclusion that the modulatory effects of the examined compounds occur involving the CBR. The ability of compound 16 to increase GABA A receptor-mediated miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents in CA1 pyramidal neurons is indicative of its ability to stimulate the local synthesis and secretion of neurosteroids.

  19. High density of benzodiazepine binding sites in the substantia innominata of the rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarter, M.; Schneider, H.H.

    1988-07-01

    In order to study the neuronal basis of the pharmacological interactions between benzodiazepine receptor ligands and cortical cholinergic turnover, we examined the regional distribution of specific benzodiazepine binding sites using in vitro autoradiography. In the basal forebrain, the substantia innominata contained a high density of (/sup 3/H)lormetazepam (LMZ) binding sites (Bmax = 277 fmol/mg tissue; Kd = 0.55 nM). The label could be displaced by diazepam (IC50 = 100 nM), the benzodiazepine receptor antagonist beta-carboline ZK 93426 (45 nM) and the partial inverse agonist beta-carboline FG 7142 (540 nM). It is hypothesized that the amnesic effects of benzodiazepine receptor agonists are exerted through benzodiazepine receptors which are situated on cholinergic neurons in the substantia innominata and are involved in a tonic inhibition of cortical acetylcholine release. The benzodiazepine receptor antagonist ZK 93426 may exert its nootropic effects via benzodiazepine receptors in the substantia innominata and, consequently, by disinhibiting cortical acetylcholine release.

  20. Benzodiazepine use, abuse, and dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'brien, Charles P

    2005-01-01

    Although benzodiazepines are invaluable in the treatment of anxiety disorders, they have some potential for abuse and may cause dependence or addiction. It is important to distinguish between addiction to and normal physical dependence on benzodiazepines. Intentional abusers of benzodiazepines usually have other substance abuse problems. Benzodiazepines are usually a secondary drug of abuse-used mainly to augment the high received from another drug or to offset the adverse effects of other drugs. Few cases of addiction arise from legitimate use of benzodiazepines. Pharmacologic dependence, a predictable and natural adaptation of a body system long accustomed to the presence of a drug, may occur in patients taking therapeutic doses of benzodiazepines. However, this dependence, which generally manifests itself in withdrawal symptoms upon the abrupt discontinuation of the medication, may be controlled and ended through dose tapering, medication switching, and/or medication augmentation. Due to the chronic nature of anxiety, long-term low-dose benzodiazepine treatment may be necessary for some patients; this continuation of treatment should not be considered abuse or addiction.

  1. Predictors of long-term benzodiazepine abstinence in participants of a randomized controlled benzodiazepine withdrawal program.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oude Voshaar, R.C.; Gorgels, W.J.M.J.; Mol, A.J.J.; Balkom, A.J.L.M. van; Mulder, J.; Lisdonk, E.H. van de; Breteler, M.H.M.; Zitman, F.G.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify predictors of resumed benzodiazepine use after participation in a benzodiazepine discontinuation trial. METHOD: We performed multiple Cox regression analyses to predict the long-term outcome of a 3-condition, randomized, controlled benzodiazepine discontinuation trial in gener

  2. Treating acute seizures with benzodiazepines: does seizure duration matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, David E

    2014-10-01

    Several clinical trials have shown improved seizure control and outcome by early initiation of treatment with benzodiazepines, before arrival in the emergency department and before intravenous access can be established. Here, evidence is provided and reviewed for rapid treatment of acute seizures in order to avoid the development of benzodiazepine pharmacoresistance and the emergence of self-sustaining status epilepticus. Alterations in the physiology, pharmacology, and postsynaptic level of GABA-A receptors can develop within minutes to an hour and hinder the ability of synaptic inhibition to stop seizures while also impairing the efficacy of GABAergic agents, such as benzodiazepines, to boost impaired inhibition. In addition, heightened excitatory transmission further exacerbates the inhibitory/excitatory balance and makes seizure control even more resistant to treatment. The acute increase in the surface expression of NMDA receptors during prolonged seizures also may cause excitotoxic injury, cell death, and other pathological expressions and re-arrangements of receptor subunits that all contribute to long-term sequelae such as cognitive impairment and chronic epilepsy. In conclusion, a short window of opportunity exists when seizures are maximally controlled by first-line benzodiazepine treatment. After that, multiple pathological mechanisms quickly become engaged that make seizures increasingly more difficult to control with high risk for long-term harm.

  3. Automated radiosynthesis of [{sup 18}F]PBR111 and [{sup 18}F]PBR102 using the Tracerlab FX{sub FN} and Tracerlab MX{sub FDG} module for imaging the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor with PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourdier, Thomas, E-mail: thomas@nucmed.rpa.cs.nsw.gov.au [PET and Nuclear Medicine Department, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Missenden road, Camperdown NSW 2050, Sydney (Australia); Pham, Tien Q. [LifeSciences, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Locked Bag 2001, Kirrawee DC NSW 2232, Sydney (Australia); Henderson, David [PET and Nuclear Medicine Department, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Missenden road, Camperdown NSW 2050, Sydney (Australia); Jackson, Timothy [LifeSciences, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Locked Bag 2001, Kirrawee DC NSW 2232, Sydney (Australia); Lam, Peter [PET and Nuclear Medicine Department, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Missenden road, Camperdown NSW 2050, Sydney (Australia); Izard, Michael; Katsifis, Andrew [LifeSciences, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Locked Bag 2001, Kirrawee DC NSW 2232, Sydney (Australia)

    2012-01-15

    [{sup 18}F]PBR111 and [{sup 18}F]PBR102 are selective radioligands for imaging of the Peripheral Benzodiazepine Receptor (PBR). We have developed a fully automated method for the radiosynthesis of [{sup 18}F]PBR111 and [{sup 18}F]PBR102 in the Tracerlab FX{sub FN} (30{+-}2% radiochemical yield non-decay-corrected for both tracers) and Tracerlab MX{sub FDG} (25{+-}2% radiochemical yield non-decay-corrected for both tracers) from the corresponding p-toluenesulfonyl precursors. For all tracers, radiochemical purity was >99% and specific activity was >150 GBq/{mu}mol after less than 60 min of preparation time. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Radiosynthesis of novel ligands PBR111 and PBR102 with fluorine-18. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fully automated synthesis undertaken using the GE Tracerlab FX{sub FN} and MX{sub FDG} modules. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reproducible high yields suitable for clinical applications. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Radiosynthesis and formulation achieved in less than 60 mins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PBR111 and PBR102 prepared in high radiochemical yield and specific activity.

  4. The GABA-A benzodiazepine receptor complex: Role of pet and spect in neurology and psychiatry; Der GABA-A-benzodiazepinrezeptorkomplex: Rolle von PET und SPECT in Neurologie und Psychiatrie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juengling, F.D. [Abt. fuer Nuklearmedizin, Radiologie III, Universitaetsklinik Ulm (Germany); Schaefer, M.; Heinz, A. [Klinik fuer Psychiatrie und Psychotherapie, Charite, Humboldt-Univ. zu Berlin (Germany)

    2002-09-01

    Nuclear medicine imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission tomography (SPECT) for selective depiction of GABA-A-benzodiazepine receptor (GBZR) binding are complementary investigations in the diagnostic process of neurological and psychiatric disorders. This review summarizes the current knowledge about options and limitations of PET and SPECT for in vivo diagnostics in neurology and psychiatry. The growing importance of GBZR-imaging for the understanding of pathophysiology and pharmacological treatment in different psychiatric syndromes is discussed. (orig.) [German] Mit der Entwicklung selektiver Liganden fuer den GABA-A-Benzodiazepinrezeptorkomplex (GBZR) hat die nuklearmedizinische Bildgebung mittels positronen-emissionstomographie (PET) und single-photon-emissionscomputertomographie (SPECT) einen festen Stellenwert fuer Klinik und Forschung in der Neurologie und Psychiatrie erlangt. Die vorliegende Ueberblicksarbeit fasst den aktuellen Wissensstand von Anwendungsmoeglichkeiten und -grenzen der nuklearmedizinischen Bildgebung der GBZR in vivo zusammen und beleuchtet ihren klinischen Nutzen. Die wachsende Bedeutung fuer das Verstaendnis der Pathophysiologie und pharmakotherapeutischer Konzepte unterschiedlicher psychiatrischer Erkrankungen wird herausgestellt. (orig.)

  5. Contribution of prolonged-release melatonin and anti-benzodiazepine campaigns to the reduction of benzodiazepine and z-drugs consumption in nine European countries

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Background Benzodiazepines (BZD) and benzodiazepine receptor agonists (zolpidem, zaleplon, zopiclone, altogether Z-drugs) are most commonly prescribed for the treatment of insomnia. However, long-term use of BZD/Z-drugs is associated with major adverse events including, but not limited to, falls and fractures, domestic and traffic accidents, confusion, cognitive impairment, Alzheimer's disease and cancer. The prolonged use of these drugs is thought to be related to severe withdrawal symptoms ...

  6. [Benzodiazepines in the treatment of catatonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dalfsen, A N; Van Den Eede, F; Van Den Bossche, B; Sabbe, B G C

    2006-01-01

    A patient who developed acute catatonia during benzodiazepine withdrawal is discussed. The case prompted us to review the literature on the role of benzodiazepines in the treatment of acute catatonia. Only retrospective and open studies were found which indicate that benzodiazepines do have a beneficial effect. Lorazepam is the most widely studied benzodiazepine and at present is the best treatment option. In the specific case of acute catatonia brought on by benzodiazepine withdrawal the recommended dosage is the same as for acute catatonia caused by something other than benzodiazepine withdrawal.

  7. A comparative autoradiography study in post mortem whole hemisphere human brain slices taken from Alzheimer patients and age-matched controls using two radiolabelled DAA1106 analogues with high affinity to the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulyás, Balázs; Makkai, Boglárka; Kása, Péter; Gulya, Károly; Bakota, Lidia; Várszegi, Szilvia; Beliczai, Zsuzsa; Andersson, Jan; Csiba, László; Thiele, Andrea; Dyrks, Thomas; Suhara, Tetsua; Suzuki, Kazutoshi; Higuchi, Makato; Halldin, Christer

    2009-01-01

    The binding of two radiolabelled analogues (N-(5-[125I]Iodo-2-phenoxyphenyl)-N-(2,5-dimethoxybenzyl)acetamide ([125I]desfluoro-DAA1106) and N-(5-[125I]Fluoro-2-phenoxyphenyl)-N-(2-[125I]Iodo-5-methoxybenzyl)acetamide ([125I]desmethoxy-DAA1106) of the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) (or TSPO, 18kDa translocator protein) ligand DAA1106 was examined by in vitro autoradiography on human post mortem whole hemisphere brain slices obtained from Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and age-matched controls. Both [(125)I]desfluoro-IDAA1106 and [(125)I]desmethoxy-IDAA1106 were effectively binding to various brain structures. The binding could be blocked by the unlabelled ligand as well as by other PBR specific ligands. With both radiolabelled compounds, the binding showed regional inhomogeneity and the specific binding values proved to be the highest in the hippocampus, temporal and parietal cortex, the basal ganglia and thalamus in the AD brains. Compared with age-matched control brains, specific binding in several brain structures (temporal and parietal lobes, thalamus and white matter) in Alzheimer brains was significantly higher, indicating that the radioligands can effectively label-activated microglia and the up-regulated PBR/TSPO system in AD. Complementary immunohistochemical studies demonstrated reactive microglia activation in the AD brain tissue and indicated that increased ligand binding coincides with increased regional microglia activation due to neuroinflammation. These investigations yield further support to the PBR/TSPO binding capacity of DAA1106 in human brain tissue, demonstrate the effective usefulness of its radio-iodinated analogues as imaging biomarkers in post mortem human studies, and indicate that its radiolabelled analogues, labelled with short half-time bioisotopes, can serve as prospective in vivo imaging biomarkers of activated microglia and the up-regulated PBR/TSPO system in the human brain.

  8. A Way of Conceptualizing Benzodiazepines to Guide Clinical Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preskorn, Sheldon H

    2015-11-01

    Benzodiazepines are medications that are widely used for a number of different therapeutic indications and in a wide range of patients in terms of age and health status. Presented here is a simple 2 by 2 way of classifying all of the most commonly used benzodiazepines. This conceptualization is based on the most clinically relevant ways of differentiating these drugs: (a) their affinity for their common and predominant mechanism of action, the benzodiazepine-binding site of the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-A iontropic receptor (ie, the chloride ion channel); and (b) their pharmacokinetics (ie, their half-lives and metabolism). The science underlying this conceptualization is presented and then its clinical applicability is discussed. This system can help clinicians select the most appropriate benzodiazepine for their patients and better understand how to switch between these medications to minimize withdrawal symptoms; it also provides a rational basis for cautiously using these agents in combination when necessary, in a manner analogous to the combined use of short-acting and long-acting forms of insulin.

  9. [Benzodiazepine dependence: causalities and treatment options].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heberlein, A; Bleich, S; Kornhuber, J; Hillemacher, T

    2009-01-01

    Benzodiazepines are very often prescribed because of their anxiolytic, sedative and hypnotic properties. However, long term treatment is associated with development of benzodiazepine dependence. Besides development of physical dependence, which is linked to a typical benzodiazepine withdrawal syndrome when drug intake is discontinued, also behavioural addiction to benzodiazepines has been described. Benzodiazepines are known to enhance GABAergic neurotransmission. Counter regulation of enhanced GABAergic neurotransmission by enhancement of glutamatergic neurotransmission is thought to be one reason underlying the typical symptoms of benzodiazepine withdrawal. Also alterations in the expression of neuropeptides like Corticotropin Releasing Hormone and Neuropeptide Y are thought to be involved in the development of benzodiazepine dependence. However, until today the knowledge of neural mechanisms underlying the development of benzodiazepine dependence remains incomplete. Because even long term treatment with small doses of benzodiazepines is associated with adverse reactions like cognitive dysfunctions withdrawal from benzodiazepines should be aimed. Anticonvulsants and antidepressants seem to reduce the intensity of benzodiazepine withdrawal and to enhance long term prognosis of dependence.

  10. Strategy for improved [{sup 11}C]DAA1106 radiosynthesis and in vivo peripheral benzodiazepine receptor imaging using microPET, evaluation of [{sup 11}C]DAA1106

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Probst, Katrin C. [Wolfson Brain Imaging Centre, Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Cambridge, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, CB2 2QQ Cambridge (United Kingdom)]|[BHF Carotid Imaging Group, University of Cambridge, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, CB2 2QQ Cambridge (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: kp296@wbic.cam.ac.uk; Izquierdo, David [Wolfson Brain Imaging Centre, Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Cambridge, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, CB2 2QQ Cambridge (United Kingdom)]|[BHF Carotid Imaging Group, University of Cambridge, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, CB2 2QQ Cambridge (United Kingdom); Bird, Joseph L.E. [BHF Carotid Imaging Group, University of Cambridge, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, CB2 2QQ Cambridge (United Kingdom)]|[Department of Medicine, Cardiovascular Medicine Division, University of Cambridge, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, CB2 2QQ Cambridge (United Kingdom); Brichard, Laurent; Franck, Dominic; Fryer, Tim D.; Clark, John C. [Wolfson Brain Imaging Centre, Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Cambridge, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, CB2 2QQ Cambridge (United Kingdom); Davies, John R. [Cardiovascular Medicine Division, University of Cambridge, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, CB2 2QQ Cambridge (United Kingdom); Richards, Hugh K. [Neurology Unit, University of Cambridge, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, CB2 2QQ Cambridge (United Kingdom); Davenport, Anthony P. [Clinical Pharmacology Unit, University of Cambridge, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, CB2 2QQ Cambridge (United Kingdom); Weissberg, Peter L. [Cardiovascular Medicine Division, University of Cambridge, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, CB2 2QQ Cambridge (United Kingdom); Warburton, Elizabeth A. [BHF Carotid Imaging Group, University of Cambridge, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, CB2 2QQ Cambridge (United Kingdom)]|[Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Cambridge, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, CB2 2QQ Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2007-05-15

    Introduction: The peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) has shown considerable potential as a clinical marker of neuroinflammation and tumour progression. [{sup 11}C]DAA1106 ([{sup 11}C]N-(2,5-dimethoxybenzyl)-N-(5-fluoro-2-phenoxyphenyl)-acetamide) is a promising positron emission tomography (PET) radioligand for imaging PBRs. Methods: A four-step synthetic route was devised to prepare DAA1123, the precursor for [{sup 11}C]DAA1106. Two robust, high yielding methods for radiosynthesis based on [{sup 11}C]-O-methylation of DAA1123 were developed and implemented on a nuclear interface methylation module, producing [{sup 11}C]DAA1106 with up to 25% radiochemical yields at end-of-synthesis based on [{sup 11}C]CH{sub 3}I trapped. Evaluation of [{sup 11}C]DAA1106 for in vivo imaging was performed in a rabbit model with microPET, and the presence of PBR receptor in the target organ was further corroborated by immunohistochemistry. Results: The standard solution method produced 2.6-5.2 GBq (n=19) of [{sup 11}C]DAA1106, whilst the captive solvent method produced 1.6-6.3 GBq (n=10) of [{sup 11}C]DAA1106. Radiochemical purities obtained were 99% and specific radioactivity at end-of-synthesis was up to 200 GBq/{mu}mol for both methods. Based on radiochemical product, shorter preparation times and simplicity of synthesis, the captive solvent method was chosen for routine productions of [{sup 11}C]DAA1106. In vivo microPET [{sup 11}C]DAA1106 scans of rabbit kidney demonstrated high levels of binding in the cortex. The subsequent introduction of nonradioactive DAA1106 (0.2 {mu}mol) produced considerable displacement of the radioactive signal in this region. The presence of PBR in kidney cortex was further corroborated by immunohistochemistry. Conclusions: A robust, high yielding captive solvent method of [{sup 11}C]DAA1106 production was developed which enabled efficacious in vivo imaging of PBR expressing tissues in an animal model.

  11. Withdrawing benzodiazepines in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lader, Malcolm; Tylee, Andre; Donoghue, John

    2009-01-01

    The use of benzodiazepine anxiolytics and hypnotics continues to excite controversy. Views differ from expert to expert and from country to country as to the extent of the problem, or even whether long-term benzodiazepine use actually constitutes a problem. The adverse effects of these drugs have been extensively documented and their effectiveness is being increasingly questioned. Discontinuation is usually beneficial as it is followed by improved psychomotor and cognitive functioning, particularly in the elderly. The potential for dependence and addiction have also become more apparent. The licensing of SSRIs for anxiety disorders has widened the prescribers' therapeutic choices (although this group of medications also have their own adverse effects). Melatonin agonists show promise in some forms of insomnia. Accordingly, it is now even more imperative that long-term benzodiazepine users be reviewed with respect to possible discontinuation. Strategies for discontinuation start with primary-care practitioners, who are still the main prescribers.This review sets out the stratagems that have been evaluated, concentrating on those of a pharmacological nature. Simple interventions include basic monitoring of repeat prescriptions and assessment by the doctor. Even a letter from the primary-care practitioner pointing out the continuing usage of benzodiazepines and questioning their need can result in reduction or cessation of use. Pharmacists also have a role to play in monitoring the use of benzodiazepines, although mobilizing their assistance is not yet routine. Such stratagems can avoid the use of specialist back-up services such as psychiatrists, home care, and addiction and alcohol misuse treatment facilities.Pharmacological interventions for benzodiazepine dependence have been reviewed in detail in a recent Cochrane review, but only eight studies proved adequate for analysis. Carbamazepine was the only drug that appeared to have any useful adjunctive properties for

  12. Synthesis of substituted [{sup 123}I]imidazo[1,2-a]pyridines as potential probes for the study of the peripheral benzodiazepine receptors using SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katsifis, A.; Mattner, F.; Dikic, B.; Papazian, V. [Radiopharmaceuticals Div. R and D, ANSTO, Menai, NSW (Australia)

    2000-07-01

    The imidazo[1,2-a]pyridines N,N'-dimethyl-6-chloro-(4'-iodophenyl)imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine-3-acetamide 1. N,N'-diethyl-6-chloro-(4'-iodophenyl)imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine-3-acetamide 2, and N-methyl-6-chloro-(4'-iodophenyl)imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine-3-acetamide 3, are high affinity and selective ligands for the peripheral benzodiazepineodiazepine receptors (PBR). The [{sup 123}I]1-3 labelled analogues of these compounds were subsequently synthesised for the potential study of the PBR in vivo using SPECT. Radioiodination was achieved by iododestannylation reactions of the corresponding tributyl tin precursors with Na[{sup 123}I] in the presence of peracetic acid, chloramine-T or Iodogen. Purification of the crude product was achieved by semipreparative C-18 RP HPLC to give the products in radiochemical yields of 40-85%. The products were obtained in >97% chemical and radiochemical purity and with specific activities >80 GBq/{mu}mol. (orig.)

  13. Experiment K-7-18: Effects of Spaceflight in the Muscle Adductor Longus of Rats Flown in the Soviet Biosatellite Cosmos 2044. Part 2; Quantitative Autoradiographic Analysis of Gaba (Benzodiazepine) and Muscarinic (Cholinergic) Receptors in the Forebrain of Rats Flown on Cosmos 2044

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, L.; Daunton, N. G.; Krasnov, I. B.; DAmelio, F.; Hyde, T. M.; Sigworth, S. K.

    1994-01-01

    Quantitative autoradiographic analysis of receptors for GABA and acetylcholine in the forebrain of rats flown on COSMOS 2044 was undertaken as part of a joint US-Soviet study to determine the effects of microgravity on the central nervous system, and in particular on the sensory and motor portions of the forebrain. Changes in binding of these receptors in tissue from animals exposed to microgravity would provide evidence for possible changes in neural processing as a result of exposure to microgravity. Tritium-labelled diazepam and Quinuclidinyl-benzilate (QNB) were used to visualize GABA (benzodiazepine) and muscarinic (cholinergic) receptors, respectively. The density of tritium-labelled radioligands bound to various regions in the forebrain of both flight and control animals were measured from autoradiograms. Data from rats flown in space and from ground-based control animals that were not exposed to microgravity were compared.

  14. Benzodiazepine use and mortality of incident dialysis patients in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkelmayer, W C; Mehta, J; Wang, P S

    2007-12-01

    Benzodiazepines and other omega-receptor agonists are frequently used for sleep and anxiety disorders. We studied the rates, correlates, and safety of individual benzodiazepines and zolpidem use from the records of 3690 patients in a national cohort of Dialysis Morbidity and Mortality Study Wave 2 data. We assessed drug utilization and an association between drug use and all-cause mortality. Overall, 14% of incident dialysis patients used a benzodiazepine or zolpidem. Women, Caucasians, current smokers, and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were more likely to use these drugs, whereas patients with cerebrovascular disease were less likely to use these drugs. In adjusted analyses, benzodiazepine or zolpidem use was associated with a 15% higher mortality rate. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease significantly modified this association, suggesting that these patients were at higher risk. No association was found between benzodiazepine use and greater risk for hip fracture. We conclude that benzodiazepine or zolpidem use is common in incident dialysis patients and may be associated with greater mortality. Further studies are needed to elucidate the safety of these drugs in the dialysis population, which may lead to cautious and restrictive utilization of omega-receptor agonists in dialysis patients.

  15. Process for determining the concentration of benzodiazepines in a body fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braestrup, C.; Squires, R.F.

    1981-07-28

    A process for determining the concentration of benzodiazepines in a body liquid comprising the steps of contacting freeze-dried brain tissue with tritium labelled flunitrazepam to bond labelled flunitrazepam to receptor sites of the brain tissue, determining the concentration of labelled flunitrazepam of the brain tissue, incubating the brain tissue containing labelled flunitrazepam with a sample of body liquid containing benzodiazepine, the concentration of which is to be determined, to induce displacement of labelled flunitrazepam from said brain tissue, determining the concentration of labelled flunitrazepam bonded to the brain tissue after establishing equilibrium conditions and determining the concentration of benzodiazepine in the body liquid based on the change of concentration of labelled flunitrazepam induced by benzodiazepine contained in the sample.

  16. Radiosynthesis of [{sup 11}C]D.P.A.-713, [{sup 11}C]D.P.A.-715 and [{sup 11}C]clinme, selected carbon-11-labelled novel potential radioligands for imaging the peripheral benzodiazepine receptors with PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolle, F.; Thominiaux, C.; Hinnen, F.; Demphel, S.; Le helleix, S.; Chauveau, F.; Boutin, H.; Herard, A.S.; Hantraye, P.; Tavitian, B. [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, I2BM/DSV, 91 - Orsay (France); Kassiou, M.; James, M.; Creelman, A.; Fulton, R. [Sydney Univ., Brain and Mind Research Institute, NSW (Australia); Kassiou, M. [Sydney Univ., Discipline of Medical Radiations, Sciences and School of Chemistry, NSW (Australia); Katsifis, A.; Greguric, I.; Mattner, F.; Loch, C. [Radiopharmaceuticals Research Institute, ANSTO, NSW (Australia); Selleri, S. [Degli Studi di Firenze Univ., Dipt. di Scienze Farmaceutiche (Italy)

    2008-02-15

    {sup 11}C P.K.11195 is not only the oldest, but also the most widely used PET radiotracer for in vivo imaging of the peripheral benzodiazepine receptors (P.B.R. or translocator protein (18 kDa, T.S.P.O.). With the aim of developing a new PET imaging probe for the in vivo study of the P.B.R., two pyrazol [1,5-a]pyrimidineacetamides (D.P.A.-713 and D.P.A.-715) and one imidazol[1,2-a]pyridine-acetamide (C.L.I.N.M.E.) were radiolabelled with the positron emitters carbon{sup 11} (half life: 20.38 min) [1-5]. Briefly, C.L.I.N.M.E. (2-[6-chloro-2(4-iodophenyl)-imidazol[1,2-a]pyridin-3-yl] -N-ethyl-N-methyl-acetamide) was labelled at its methyl-acetamide moity chain from the corresponding nor-analogue using[{sup 11}C]methyl iodide (in D.M.S.O./D.M.F (100/200 {mu}L) containing powdered K.O.H. (3-5 mg) at 110 degrees C for 3 min. D.P.A.-713 (N,N-diethyl-2-[2-(4-methoxy-phenyl)-5,7-dimethyl-pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin -3-yl]acetamide) and D.P.A.-715 (N,N-diethyl-2-[2-(4-methoxy-phenyl)-5,7-bis-tri-fluoro-methyl-pyrazolo [1,5-a]pyrimidin-3-yl]acetamide) were labelled at their aromatic methoxy groups from the corresponding nor-derivatives using [{sup 11}C]methyl triflate (in acetone (300{mu}L) containing aq. 3 M NaOH (4{mu}L) at 110 degrees C for 1 min). All radioligands were purified using semi preparative Zorbax reverse phase H.P.L.C., were adequately formulated for in vivo injection within 30 min and were found to be > 95% chemically and radiochemically pure. (N.C.)

  17. [{sup 18}F]D.P.A.-714: a novel fluorine-18-labelled pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine acetamide for imaging the peripheral benzodiazepine receptors with PET - radiosynthesis on a zymate-xp robotic system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolle, F.; Damont, A.; Hinnen, F.; Kuhnast, B.; Chauveau, F.; Van camp, N.; Hantraye, P.; Tavitian, B. [Servvice Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, I2BM/DSV, 91 - Orsay (France); James, M.; Creelman, A.; Fulton, R.; Kassiou, M. [Sydney Univ., Brain and Mind Research Institute, NSW (Australia); Vercouillie, J.; Guilloteau, D. [Universite Francois Rabelais de Tours, 37 (France); Vercouillie, J.; Guilloteau, D. [Centre Hospitalier Regional Universitaire, 37 - Tours (France); Selleri, S.; Kassiou, M. [Sydney Univ., Discipline of Medical Radiations, Sciences and School of Chemistry, NSW (Australia)

    2008-02-15

    {sup 11}C D.P.A.-713 (N,N-diethyl-2-[2-(4-[{sup 11}C]methoxy-phenyl)-5,7-dimethyl-pyrazolo [1,5-a]pyrimidin-3-yl]acetamide) is a recently developed carbon-11-labelled (half life: 20.4 min)pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine acetamide for the in vivo imaging of the peripheral benzodiazepine receptors (P.B.R. or translocator protein (18 kDa, T.S.P.O.)). Preliminary results obtained in a rodent-model demonstrates that {sup 11}C D.P.A.-713 showed a high potential to in vivo image neuro-inflammation and additionally, this radioligand allowed a higher contrast between the lesioned area and the corresponding area in the intact contralateral hemisphere when compared to the radioligand of reference. D.P.A-714 (N,N-diethyl-2-[2-[4-(2-fluoro-ethoxy)phenyl] -5,7-dimethyl-pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-3-yl]acetamide), a chemically closely related derivative of D.P.A.-713, had been designed with a fluorine atom in its structure, allowing ultimate labelling with fluorine-18, a longer-lived positron-emitter (half life:109.8 min) and today one of the most attractive PET isotopes for radiopharmaceutical chemistry. D.P.A.-714 as well as its corresponding tosylated derivative have been re-synthesized in 2 chemicals steps from D.P.A.-713. D.P.A.-714 has then been labelled at its aromatic fluoro-ethoxy group from the corresponding tosyl-derivative using the K{sup 18}FF-kryptofix{sub 222} (in CH{sub 3}CN (3 mL) at 85 degrees C for 5 min or D.M.S.O. (600 {mu}L) at 130 degrees C for 5 min). {sup 18}FD.P.A.-714 was then purified using semi preparative X terra reverse phase H.P.L.C., adequately formulated for i.v. injection and was found to be > 95% chemically and radiochemically pure. The total synthesis time was less than 90 min and the specific radioactivities at the end of the radiosynthesis ranged from 1 to 3 Ci/micro-mole. (N.C.)

  18. Synthesis and evaluation of N-(5-fluoro-2-phenoxyphenyl)-N-(2-[(18)F]fluoromethoxy-d(2)-5-methoxybenzyl)acetamide: a deuterium-substituted radioligand for peripheral benzodiazepine receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ming-Rong; Maeda, Jun; Ito, Takehito; Okauchi, Takashi; Ogawa, Masanao; Noguchi, Junko; Suhara, Tetsuya; Halldin, Christer; Suzuki, Kazutoshi

    2005-03-01

    N-(5-Fluoro-2-phenoxyphenyl)-N-(2-[(18)F]fluoromethoxy-d(2)-5-methoxybenzyl)acetamide ([(18)F]2) is a potent ligand (IC(50): 1.71 nM) for peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR). However, in vivo evaluation on rodents and primates showed that this ligand was unstable and rapidly metabolized to [(18)F]F(-) by defluorination of the [(18)F]fluoromethyl moiety. In this study, we designed a deuterium-substituted analogue, N-(5-fluoro-2-phenoxyphenyl)-N-(2-[(18)F]fluoromethoxy-d(2)-5-methoxybenzyl)acetamide ([(18)F]5) as a radioligand for PBR to reduce the in vivo metabolic rate of the non-deuterated [(18)F]2. The design principle was based on the hypothesis that the deuterium substitution may reduce the rate of defluorination initiated by cleavage of the C-H bond without altering the binding affinity for PBR. The non-radioactive 5 was prepared by reacting diiodomethane-d(2) (CD(2)I(2), 6) with a phenol precursor 7, followed by treatment with tetrabutylammonium fluoride. The ligand [(18)F]5 was synthesized by the alkylation of 7 with [(18)F]fluoromethyl iodide-d(2) ([(18)F]FCD(2)I, [(18)F]9). Compound 5 displayed a similar in vitro affinity to PBR (IC(50): 1.90 nM) with 2. In vivo evaluation demonstrated that [(18)F]5 was metabolized by defluorination to [(18)F]F(-) as a main radioactive component, but its metabolic rate was slower than that of [(18)F]2 in the brain of mice. The deuterium substitution decreased the radioactivity level of [(18)F]5 in the bone of mouse, augmented by the percentage of specific binding to PBR in the rat brain determined by ex vivo autoradiography. However, the PET image of [(18)F]5 for monkey brain showed high radioactivity in the brain and skull, suggesting a possible species difference between rodents and primates.

  19. Development of a new radioligand, N-(5-fluoro-2-phenoxyphenyl)-N-(2-[18F]fluoroethyl-5-methoxybenzyl)acetamide, for pet imaging of peripheral benzodiazepine receptor in primate brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ming-Rong; Maeda, Jun; Ogawa, Masanao; Noguchi, Junko; Ito, Takehito; Yoshida, Yuichiro; Okauchi, Takashi; Obayashi, Shigeru; Suhara, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Kazutoshi

    2004-04-22

    To develop a positron emission tomography (PET) ligand for imaging the 'peripheral benzodiazepine receptor' (PBR) in brain and elucidating the relationship between PBR and brain diseases, four analogues (4-7) of N-(2,5-dimethoxybenzyl)-N-(5-fluoro-2-phenoxyphenyl)acetamide (2) were synthesized and evaluated as ligands for PBR. Of these compounds, fluoromethyl (4) and fluoroethyl (5) analogues had similar or higher affinities for PBR than the parent compound 2 (K(i) = 0.16 nM for PBR in rat brain sections). Iodomethyl analogue 6 displayed a moderate affinity, whereas tosyloxyethyl analogue 7 had weak affinity. Radiolabeling was performed for the fluoroalkyl analogues 4 and 5 using fluorine-18 ((18)F, beta(+); 96.7%, T(1/2) = 109.8 min). Ligands [(18)F]4 and [(18)F]5 were respectively synthesized by the alkylation of desmethyl precursor 3 with [(18)F]fluoromethyl iodide ([(18)F]8) and 2-[(18)F]fluoroethyl bromide ([(18)F]9). The distribution patterns of [(18)F]4 and [(18)F]5 in mice were consistent with the known distribution of PBR. However, compared with [(18)F]5, [(18)F]4 displayed a high uptake in the bone of mice. The PET image of [(18)F]4 for monkey brain also showed significant radioactivity in the bone, suggesting that this ligand was unstable for in vivo defluorination and was not a useful PET ligand. Ligand [(18)F]5 displayed a high uptake in monkey brain especially in the occipital cortex, a region with richer PBR than the other regions in the brain. The radioactivity level of [(18)F]5 in monkey brain was 1.5 times higher than that of [(11)C]2, and 6 times higher than that of (R)-(1-(2-chlorophenyl)-N-[(11)C]methyl,N-(1-methylpropyl)isoquinoline ([(11)C]1). Moreover, the in vivo binding of [(18)F]5 was significantly inhibited by PBR-selective 2 or 1, indicating that the binding of [(18)F]5 in the monkey brain was mainly due to PBR. Metabolite analysis revealed that [(18)F]4 was rapidly metabolized by defluorination to [(18)F]F(-) in the plasma and brain of

  20. Benzodiazepine dependence: focus on withdrawal syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Authier, N; Balayssac, D; Sautereau, M; Zangarelli, A; Courty, P; Somogyi, A A; Vennat, B; Llorca, P-M; Eschalier, A

    2009-11-01

    Benzodiazepines are potentially addictive drugs: psychological and physical dependence can develop within a few weeks or years of regular or repeated use. The socioeconomic costs of the present high level of long-term benzodiazepine use are considerable. These consequences could be minimised if prescriptions for long-term benzodiazepines were decreased. However, many physicians continue to prescribe benzodiazepines and patients wishing to withdraw receive little advice or support. Particular care should be taken in prescribing benzodiazepines for vulnerable patients such as elderly persons, pregnant women, children, alcohol- or drug-dependent patients and patients with comorbid psychiatric disorders. The following update gives recent research results on the withdrawal pathophysiology and practical information in order to treat or prevent benzodiazepine withdrawal syndrome.

  1. Benzodiazepine metabolism: an analytical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandrioli, Roberto; Mercolini, Laura; Raggi, Maria Augusta

    2008-10-01

    Benzodiazepines are currently among the most frequently prescribed drugs all over the world. They act as anxiolytics, sedatives, hypnotics, amnesics, antiepileptics and muscle relaxants. Despite their common chemical scaffold, these drugs differ in their pharmacokinetic and metabolic properties. In particular, they are biotransformed by different cytochrome P450 isoforms and also by different UDP-glucuronosyltransferase subtypes. The most important studies on the metabolic characteristics of several 1,4-benzodiazepines, carried out from 1998 onwards, are reported and briefly discussed in this review. Moreover, the analytical methods related to these studies are also described and commented upon and their most important characteristics are highlighted. Most methods are based on liquid chromatography, which provides wide applicability and good analytical performance granting high precision, accuracy and feasibility. Mass spectrometry is gaining widespread acceptance, particularly if the matrix is very complex and variable, such as human or animal blood. However, spectrophotometric detection is still used for this purpose and can grant sufficient selectivity and sensitivity when coupled to suitable sample pre-treatment procedures. A monograph is included for each of the following benzodiazepines: alprazolam, bromazepam, brotizolam, clotiazepam, diazepam, etizolam, flunitrazepam, lorazepam, midazolam, oxazepam and triazolam.

  2. [The addicted patient in anaesthesia - benzodiazepine dependence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneemilch, Christine; Brinkers, Michael

    2015-06-01

    As a result of the demographic change, the proportions of elderly patients undergoing operations and anesthesia are increasingly important. The consumption of benzodiazepines evidently rises with increasing age. Associated with the increasing consumption in the elderly is the risk of cognitive impairment, delirium, falls and fractures. Also long-term benzodiazepine use in low-dose may induce perioperative withdrawal syndrome. The following article will present characteristics and complications accompanied by critical benzodiazepine use especially in the elderly patients.

  3. Do benzodiazepines contribute to respiratory problems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vozoris, Nicholas T

    2014-12-01

    Non-selective benzodiazepines are a class of sedative and anxiolytic medication that are commonly prescribed. Physiology studies and animal studies suggest that non-selective benzodiazepines may adversely impact respiration through a variety of mechanisms. Several recent, well-designed, population-based observational studies confirm that benzodiazepine-related negative respiratory outcomes are a concern. In this article, the mechanisms and clinical evidence for non-selective benzodiazepine-related adverse respiratory outcomes, as well as the methodological issues relating to the evaluation of adverse drug effects are reviewed.

  4. Effect of variations in treatment regimen and liver cirrhosis on exposure to benzodiazepines during treatment of alcohol withdrawal syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershkovich, Pavel; Wasan, Kishor M; Ribeyre, Charles; Ibrahim, Fady; McNeill, John H

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Benzodiazepines (BDZs) are the drugs of choice to prevent the symptoms of alcohol withdrawal syndrome (AWS). Various treatment protocols are published and have been shown to be effective in both office-managed and facility-managed treatment of AWS. The aim of this scientific commentary is to demonstrate the differences in the expected exposure to BDZs during AWS treatment using different treatment regimens available in the literature, in patients with or without alcoholic liver cirrhosis. Methods: Diazepam and lorazepam AWS protocols were examined and reviewed in the literature, and blood plasma levels were examined and compared, respectively. Results: Considerable variation in the blood levels with the different dosing schedules was found. Because the drugs are metabolized differently, we have also shown that liver disease affects the blood levels of diazepam, but not of lorazepam. Conclusions: Differences in treatment regimens, the choice of BDZ, as well as the presence of liver cirrhosis can substantially alter the exposure of patients to drugs used for AWS treatment. Outpatient treatment of AWS has been shown to be relatively safe and effective for the treatment of AWS but patients should be carefully monitored. PMID:26322116

  5. Attention Span, Anxiety and Benzodiazepine Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-02-26

    membranes from Ro 15-1788 exposed animals: in the nontreated animals, CABA +NaCl significantly increased the Bmax by 11% (Pɘ.OI), while in the Ro 15-1788...3Hlflunitrazepam binding (Squires, 1981). Thus, the small but significant increase in Bmax values might represent cooperativity of CABA and NaCI in...facilitating [ 3 Hjflunitrazepam binding. 9. TABLE 2 CABA (10 tiM) +~ NaCl (200 m;’) enhancement of 13H-1flunitrazeoam binding to synaptosomal membranes of

  6. Benzodiazepines and postoperative cognitive dysfunction in the elderly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, L.S.; Steentoft, Anni; Rasmussen, H.

    1999-01-01

    hypnotics benzodiazepine,diazepam,age factor,anaesthesia,geriatric,psychological responses,postoperative......hypnotics benzodiazepine,diazepam,age factor,anaesthesia,geriatric,psychological responses,postoperative...

  7. Prescribing of benzodiazepines by casualty officers.

    OpenAIRE

    1989-01-01

    The prescribing of benzodiazepines by casualty officers in a busy district hospital over a three month period was examined by a retrospective review of case notes. Benzodiazepines, mainly diazepam, were given to 1.1% of attenders, the majority of whom had disorders involving minor muscle spasm. The efficacy of diazepam in these conditions, as well as its potential for dependence, is discussed.

  8. Impact of pharmacist and clinician dual intervention on prescribed benzodiazepines in prisoner patients: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerat, Marie-Cecile; Cabelguenne, Delphine; Lassia, Jerome; Meunier, Frederic; Zimmer, Luc

    2011-12-01

    High-dose benzodiazepine (BDZs) represents an important risk factor for dependence, particularly in a prison environment. In Lyon's prison, BDZs and/or opioid maintenance treatment are often prescribed to patients with mental disorders. The aim of this retrospective study was to assess the impact of psychiatrist and pharmacist collaboration on reducing the BDZs dose prescribed to prisoner patients. Since 2001, clinicians and pharmacists have been holding monthly meetings to develop prescribing guidelines and discuss those patients receiving high-dose BDZs. All prescribed psychotropic drugs were noted for each included patient in the control (before guidelines) and intervention groups. Criteria used to define each patient profile included age, diagnosis (mental disorder), and concomitant treatment (opioids, antidepressants). To compare each group, the daily dose of prescribed BDZs was used as a quantitative variable and expressed in diazepam equivalent. Four hundred and seventy-three patients were included, 222 in the control group and 251 in the intervention group. The two groups showed no difference in terms of diagnosis. The daily dose of BDZ was higher in the control group when all patients were considered (mean(CONTROL GROUP) = 46 mg in diazepam equivalent vs. mean(INTERVENTIION GROUP) = 34 mg) and for each of the following patient categories: 'mental disorder' (48 mg vs. 30 mg), 'no opioid treatment' (44 mg vs. 31 mg), 'buprenorphin treatment' (58 mg vs. 63 mg), 'no antidepressant treatment' (41 mg vs. 29 mg), and 'antidepressant treatment' (53 mg vs. 38 mg). The results of this retrospective study show the positive impact of multidisciplinary intervention on reducing the prescribed daily dose of BDZs. This experience confirms the positive impact that pharmacist feedback on prescriptions and the development of treatment guidelines by clinician and pharmacist collaboration have on improving the prescribing practice in a prison environment.

  9. Management of benzodiazepine misuse and dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brett, Jonathan; Murnion, Bridin

    2015-10-01

    There are well-recognised harms from long-term use of benzodiazepines. These include dependency, cognitive decline and falls. It is important to prevent and recognise benzodiazepine dependence. A thorough risk assessment guides optimal management and the necessity for referral. The management of dependence involves either gradual benzodiazepine withdrawal or maintenance treatment. Prescribing interventions, substitution, psychotherapies and pharmacotherapies can all contribute. Unless the patient is elderly, it is helpful to switch to a long-acting benzodiazepine in both withdrawal and maintenance therapy. The dose should be gradually reduced over weeks to lower the risk of seizures. Harms from drugs such as zopiclone and zolpidem are less well characterised. Dependence is managed in the same manner as benzodiazepine dependence.

  10. Benzodiazepines: risks and benefits. A reconsideration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, David S; Aitchison, Katherine; Bateson, Alan; Curran, H Valerie; Davies, Simon; Leonard, Brian; Nutt, David J; Stephens, David N; Wilson, Sue

    2013-11-01

    Over the last decade there have been further developments in our knowledge of the risks and benefits of benzodiazepines, and of the risks and benefits of alternatives to benzodiazepines. Representatives drawn from the Psychopharmacology Special Interest Group of the Royal College of Psychiatrists and the British Association for Psychopharmacology together examined these developments, and have provided this joint statement with recommendations for clinical practice. The working group was mindful of widespread concerns about benzodiazepines and related anxiolytic and hypnotic drugs. The group believes that whenever benzodiazepines are prescribed, the potential for dependence or other harmful effects must be considered. However, the group also believes that the risks of dependence associated with long-term use should be balanced against the benefits that in many cases follow from the short or intermittent use of benzodiazepines and the risk of the underlying conditions for which treatment is being provided.

  11. Application of gamma-aminobutyric acid type A-benzodiazepine receptor imaging for study of neuropsychiatric disorders%γ-氨基丁酸A型-苯二氮革受体显像剂在神经系统疾病中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鲍伟奇; 邱春; 管一晖

    2012-01-01

    γ-氨基丁酸A型-苯二氮革(GABAA-BZ)受体广泛分布于中枢神经系统,是嵌于神经细胞膜上的异质性多肽五聚体,不同的亚单位组合发挥不同的神经抑制性药理作用,如镇静催眠、抗惊厥、抗焦虑等.PET可用于活体内受体结合的研究.GABAA-BZ受体PET显像剂分为拮抗剂、激动剂、反向激动剂3类,其中以拮抗剂显像剂11C-氟马西尼最为成熟,在癫癎、焦虑症、抑郁症、植物状态、成瘾等神经精神疾病中广泛应用.%Gamma-aminobutyric acid type A-benzodiazepine receptors are heterogeneous polypeptide pentamers widely spread in the central nervous system on the neuron membrane.Different subunit combinations educe various neuro-inhibitory pharmacological effects such as sedative,hypnosis,anticonvulsion and anxiolysis.PET can be utilized to study the binding of the receptors in vivo.PET radioligands of gammaaminobutyric acid type A-benzodiazepine receptors can be classified into 3 types:antagonists,agonists and reverse agonists,of which antagonist radiotracer 11C-flumazenil is the most commonly applied in epilepsy,anxiety disorders,depression,vegetative state,addiction and other neuro-psychiatric disorders.

  12. 21 CFR 862.3170 - Benzodiazepine test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Benzodiazepine test system. 862.3170 Section 862....3170 Benzodiazepine test system. (a) Identification. A benzodiazepine test system is a device intended to measure any of the benzodiazepine compounds, sedative and hypnotic drugs, in blood, plasma,...

  13. Application of radioreceptor assay of benzodiazepines for toxicology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaltonen, L.; Scheinin, M. (Department of Pharmacology and the Department of Internal Medicine, University of Turku, Finland)

    1982-01-01

    A radioreceptor assay (RRA) for determining benzodiazepines (BZ) has been developed and applied to toxicological analysis of serum samples from 21 patients with acute BZ overdosage. The method was sensitive (e.g., lorazepam 17 nM, diazepam 41 nM), and specific for pharmacologically active BZ derivatives. The reproducibility of the results was good (intra-assay variation < 8%, inter-assay variation < 10%). Concentrations measured by the RRA showed a good correlation with those obtained by gas-liquid chromatographic analysis of the same samples. The quantitative results represent the sum of one or several parent substances and all biologically active metabolites, in proportion to their receptor binding affinities.

  14. AHR-11797: a novel benzodiazepine antagonist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, D.N.; Kilpatrick, B.F.; Hannaman, P.K.

    1986-03-01

    AHR-11797(5,6-dihydro-6-methyl-1-phenyl-/sup 3/H-pyrrolo(3,2,1-ij)quinazolin-3-one) displaced /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam (IC/sub 50/ = 82 nM) and /sup 3/H-Ro 15-1877 (IC/sub 50/ = 104 nM) from rat brain synaptosomes. AHR-11797 did not protect mice from seizures induced by maximal electroshock or subcutaneous Metrazol (scMET), nor did it induce seizures in doses up to the lethal dose. However, at 31.6 mg/kg, IP, it significantly increased the anticonvulsant ED/sub 50/ of chlordiazepoxide (CDPX) from 1.9 to 31.6 mg/kg, IP. With 56.7 mg/kg, IP, of AHR-11797, CDPX was inactive in doses up to 100 mg/kg, IP. AHR-11797 did not significantly increase punished responding in the Geller and Seifter conflict procedure, but it did attenuate the effects of diazepam. Although the compound is without anticonvulsant or anxiolytic activity, it did have muscle relaxant properties. AHR-11797 blocked morphine-induced Straub tail in mice (ED/sub 50/ = 31 mg/kg, IP) and it selectively suppressed the polysnaptic linguomandibular reflex in barbiturate-anesthetized cats. The apparent muscle relaxant activity of AHR-11797 suggests that different receptor sites are involved for muscle relaxant vs. anxiolytic/anticonvulsant activities of the benzodiazepines.

  15. [Knowledge regarding Proper Use Guidelines for Benzodiazepines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inada, Ken

    2016-01-01

      Benzodiazepines (BZs) work by agonising gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-BZ-receptor complex and thereby produce sedation and anti-anxiety effects. BZs are commonly used in several clinical areas as hypnotics or anti-anxiety drugs. However, these drugs once supplied by medical institutions often lead to abuse and dependence. Thus it is important for institutions to supply and manage BZs properly. At Tokyo Women's Medical University Hospital educational activities about proper use of BZs are performed by not only medical doctors but also pharmacists. We coordinate distribution of leaflets and run an educational workshop. As a result of these activities, the number of patients receiving BZ prescriptions was reduced. Performing these activities, pharmacists were required to work for patients, doctors, and nurses; they acquired knowledge about BZs such as action mechanisms, efficacy, adverse effects, problems about co-prescription, and methods of discontinuing BZs, as well as information on coping techniques other than medication. The most important point to attend the patients is to answer their anxieties.

  16. Perceptions of Benzodiazepine Dependence Among Women Age 65 and Older

    OpenAIRE

    Canham, Sarah L.; Gallo, Joseph; Simoni-Wastila, Linda

    2014-01-01

    A phenomenological study explored whether older women who are chronic benzodiazepine users identified themselves as dependent, how dependence was perceived, and how meanings and understandings shaped experiences of benzodiazepine use. Self-reported benzodiazepine dependence was associated with being unable to reduce use or a desire to discontinue use and reliance on benzodiazepines to remain comfortable and able to handle daily life. Themes included: 1) benzodiazepine dependence is similar to...

  17. Benzodiazepines consumption: does dependence vary with age?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gérardin, Marie; Victorri-Vigneau, Caroline; Guerlais, Marylène; Guillou-Landreat, Morgane; Grall-Bronnec, Marie; Jolliet, Pascale

    2014-09-01

    We have compared two groups of chronic benzodiazepines (or zolpidem/zopiclone) users: "Seniors," aged 65 years or more, and "Adults," aged less than 65 years. The study took place in the Pays de Loire region. The questionnaire assesses dependence based on items from the DSM-IV. The analysis was based on 176 Senior questionnaires and 212 Adult questionnaires. Whereas Senior patients take benzodiazepines routinely with little negative consequences, Adults suffer from underlying psychological trouble, mention a higher consumption than planned, which causes negative consequences. 35.2% of Seniors are dependent on benzodiazepines versus 49.8% of Adults.

  18. The use of benzodiazepines in the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy-Byrne, P P; Cowley, D S

    1990-01-01

    Benzodiazepines differ from many of the other abused substances in that there are legitimate medical indications for their use. Any prescription for benzodiazepines must be preceded by a careful risk-benefit analysis that considers the specifics of an individual's particular life situation, personality style, and psychiatric diagnosis. The risk of benzodiazepine abuse by chemically dependent individuals and the problems of cognitive and/or psychomotor impairment and dependence for all individuals have to be balanced against the therapeutic benefits of these drugs for patients who experience disabling anxiety disorders or anxiety that accompanies chronic medical illness. Problems of dependence can be minimized by utilizing a variety of pharmacologic and psychotherapeutic strategies to ameliorate withdrawal symptoms that might accompany the discontinuation of long-term benzodiazepine treatment.

  19. Pharmacological analysis of the effects of benzodiazepines on punished schedule-induced polydipsia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellón, Ricardo; Ruíz, Ana; Lamas, Esmeralda; Rodríguez, Cilia

    2007-02-01

    Food-deprived Wistar rats were exposed to a fixed-time 60-s food delivery schedule until they developed schedule-induced polydipsia. Every fifth lick was then followed by an electric shock during two, signalled, 5-min periods, which ran concurrently with the food delivery schedule. Shock intensities were adjusted to reduce licking to 60-70% of the unpunished licking rates. The benzodiazepine full agonists, diazepam (0.3-3.0 mg/kg), chlordiazepoxide (0.3-10.0 mg/kg), oxazepam (0.3-3.0 mg/kg) and the benzodiazepine partial agonist, RU-32698 (3.0-17.0 mg/kg), led to increases in punished responding at intermediate doses and decreases at the highest doses tested. All benzodiazepine agonists brought about dose-dependent decreases in unpunished schedule-induced polydipsia, with doses required to reduce drinking proving higher than doses required to increase punished schedule-induced polydipsia. The antipunishment effect of 0.3 mg/kg of diazepam was dose-dependently antagonized by flumazenil and the benzodiazepine inverse agonist, RU-34000. Flumazenil effects, however, could reflect actions of flumazenil as a partial inverse agonist at GABAA receptors. RU-32698 at 10.0 mg/kg further facilitated the rate-increasing effect of 0.3 mg/kg of diazepam, but at 17.0 mg/kg partially blocked such antipunishment effect. Overall, the present results extend the similarities of the effects of benzodiazepine compounds on adjunctive and operant patterns of behaviour by showing similar interactions within the benzodiazepine receptor complex.

  20. [Why benzodiazepines are still in wide use?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlastelica, Mirela; Jelaska, Marin

    2012-05-01

    The advent of benzodiazepines in the 1960s provided their wide use in neurology and psychiatry. They proved to be myorelaxant and anticonvulsive therapy in neurology; their anxiolytic and hypnotic properties have made them the treatment of choice for insomnia and anxiety problems; they have also been used in alcohol withdrawal and in anesthesia, and for a wide range of treatments in other clinical branches. However, reports giving rise to a prescription controversy including abuse, harmful effects, intoxication and dependence toward addiction appeared soon. On the other hand, the revolutionary appearance of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) overshadowed benzodiazepines. According to recommendations of many scientific and professional institutions, the use of benzodiazepines has been gradually excluded or reduced or limited to short-term use. However, clinical experience showed that benzodiazepines are frequently used for long-term treatment, and there are many reasons for this, e.g., prescribing tradition, patient preference, difficulties associated with benzodiazepine withdrawal (even in patients taking low doses) because they have a rapid clinical onset of action, and good efficacy with few initial adverse effects. Moreover, SSRIs as alternative drugs are associated with incomplete therapeutic response and more uncomfortable adverse effects. Some authors therefore point out that the rationale for the shift from benzodiazepines to SSRIs is inappropriate.

  1. Benzodiazepine-like discriminative stimulus effects of toluene vapor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Keith L; Nicholson, Katherine L

    2013-11-15

    In vitro studies show that the abused inhalant toluene affects a number of ligand-gated ion channels.The two most consistently implicated of these are γ-aminobutyric acid type A(GABAA) receptors which are positively modulated by toluene and N-methyl-D-aspartate(NMDA) receptors which are negatively modulated by toluene. Behavioral studies also suggest an interaction of toluene with GABAA and/or NMDA receptors but it is unclear if these receptors underlie the abuse-related intoxicating effects of toluene. Seventeen B6SJLF1/J mice were trained using a two-choice operant drug discrimination procedure to discriminate 10 min of exposure to 2000 ppm toluene vapor from 10 min of exposure to air. The discrimination was acquired in a mean of 65 training sessions. The stimulus effects of 2000 ppm toluene vapor were exposure concentration-dependent but rapidly diminished following the cessation of vapor exposure. The stimulus effects of toluene generalized to the chlorinated hydrocarbon vapor perchloroethylene but not 1,1,2-trichloroethane nor the volatile anesthetic isoflurane. The competitive NMDA antagonist CGS-19755, the uncompetitive antagonist dizocilpine and the glycine-site antagonist L701,324 all failed to substitute for toluene. The classical nonselective benzodiazepines midazolam and chlordiazepoxide produced toluene-like stimulus effects but the alpha 1 subunit preferring positive GABAA modulator zaleplon failed to substitute for toluene. The barbiturates pentobarbital and methohexital and the GABAA positive modulator neurosteroid allopregnanolone did not substitute for toluene. These data suggest that the stimulus effects of toluene may be at least partially mediated by benzodiazepine-like positive allosteric modulation of GABAA receptors containing alpha 2, 3 or 5 subunits.

  2. Cross-validation of the benzodiazepine dependence self-report questionnaire in outpatient benzodiazepine users.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kan, C.C.; Breteler, M.H.M.; Ven, A.H.G.S. van der; Zitman, F.G.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to cross-validate the Benzodiazepine Dependence Self-Report Questionnaire (Bendep-SRQ), which reflects the severity of benzodiazepine (BZD) dependence. The Bendep-SRQ, Symptom Checklist-90 (SCL-90) Schedules for Clinical Assessments in Neuropsychiatry (SCAN), and Addiction

  3. Cross-validation of the Benzodiazepine Dependence Self-Report Questionnaire in Outpatient Benzodiazepine Users

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kan, C.C.; Breteler, M.H.M.; Ven, A.H.G.S. van der; Zitman, F.G.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to cross-validate the Benzodiazepine Dependence Self-Report Questionnaire (Bendep-SRQ), which reflects the severity of benzodiazepine (BZD) dependence. The Bendep-SRQ, Symptom Checklist-90 (SCL-90) Schedules for Clinical Assessments in Neuropsychiatry (SCAN), and Addiction

  4. Social-cognitive predictors of intended and actual benzodiazepine cessation among chronic benzodiazepine users

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ten Wolde, Geeske B.; Dijkstra, Arie; Van Empelen, Pepijn; Neven, Arie Knuistingh; Zitman, Frans G.

    2008-01-01

    Long-term benzodiazepine use is associated with a variety of negative health consequences. Cessation of long-term use is therefore an important health goal. In a prospective study among chronic benzodiazepinc users (N=356) social-cognitive factors of benzodiazepine cessation were examined with a nin

  5. Perceptions of benzodiazepine dependence among women age 65 and older.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canham, Sarah L; Gallo, Joseph; Simoni-Wastila, Linda

    2014-01-01

    A phenomenological study explored whether older women who are chronic benzodiazepine users identified themselves as dependent, how dependence was perceived, and how meanings and understandings shaped experiences of benzodiazepine use. Self-reported benzodiazepine dependence was associated with being unable to reduce use or a desire to discontinue use and reliance on benzodiazepines to remain comfortable and able to handle daily life. Themes included: (a) benzodiazepine dependence is similar to dependence to diabetes or blood pressure medications; (b) dependence is distinctive from addiction/abuse; (c) addiction/abuse is perceived as worse than dependence; and (d) concerns of addiction/abuse result in low-dose benzodiazepine use.

  6. GABA receptor imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Doo [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    GABA is primary an inhibitory neurotransmitter that is localized in inhibitory interneurons. GABA is released from presynaptic terminals and functions by binding to GABA receptors. There are two types of GABA receptors, GABA{sub A}-receptor that allows chloride to pass through a ligand gated ion channel and GABA{sub B}-receptor that uses G-proteins for signaling. The GABA{sub A}-receptor has a GABA binding site as well as a benzodiazepine binding sites, which modulate GABA{sub A}-receptor function. Benzodiazepine GABAA receptor imaging can be accomplished by radiolabeling derivates that activates benzodiazepine binding sites. There has been much research on flumazenil (FMZ) labeled with {sup 11}C-FMZ, a benzodiazepine derivate that is a selective, reversible antagonist to GABAA receptors. Recently, {sup 18}F-fluoroflumazenil (FFMZ) has been developed to overcome {sup 11}C's short half-life. {sup 18}F-FFMZ shows high selective affinity and good pharmacodynamics, and is a promising PET agent with better central benzodiazepine receptor imaging capabilities. In an epileptic focus, because the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor amount is decreased, using '1{sup 1}C-FMZ PET instead of {sup 18}F-FDG, PET, restrict the foci better and may also help find lesions better than high resolution MR. GABA{sub A} receptors are widely distributed in the cerebral cortex, and can be used as an viable neuronal marker. Therefore it can be used as a neuronal cell viability marker in cerebral ischemia. Also, GABA-receptors decrease in areas where neuronal plasticity develops, therefore, GABA imaging can be used to evaluate plasticity. Besides these usages, GABA receptors are related with psychological diseases, especially depression and schizophrenia as well as cerebral palsy, a motor-related disorder, so further in-depth studies are needed for these areas.

  7. Disability pension as predictor of later use of benzodiazepines among benzodiazepine users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartz, Ingeborg; Tverdal, Aage; Skille, Eivind; Skurtveit, Svetlana

    2010-03-01

    The proportion of Norwegians on disability pensions has doubled since the 1980s. The Norwegian Government wants action to stimulate the working capacity in those disability pensioners who have the potential to work. Information on factors that may impair rehabilitation efforts, including the unfavourable use of benzodiazepines, may be useful in this context. A longitudinal design, including data on 40-42 year old participants in Norwegian health surveys (year 1985-1989) linked to a prescription database (year 2004-2006), was used to describe risk of long-term use of benzodiazepines among disability pension recipients. The study population constituted benzodiazepine users at baseline. More than half of those on disability pensions, 57% of all men and 65% of all women, retrieved benzodiazepine prescriptions 20 years later, a span covering a large part of the potential active workforce period. Further, the observed amount of benzodiazepines dispensed over a three-year period indicated more than sporadic use e.g. half of the female disability pensioners were dispensed an amount of benzodiazepines corresponding to the use of a daily dose every second day over a three year period (median 450 daily doses). The majority of those who were dispensed benzodiazepines, were dispensed opioids as well: half of all men and 3 out of four women. And last, being on a disability pension was a predictor of benzodiazepine use 20 years later. Our study suggests that benzodiazepines are extensively and unfavourably used among disability pensioners, and that disability pension may have an independent effect on long-term use. Improved management of benzodiazepine use may be one alternative to get disability pensioners with the potential to work back into employment.

  8. Chronic use of benzodiazepines among older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jussara Mendonça Alvarenga

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To analyze the perception of and motivation for the chronic use of benzodiazepine among older adults. METHODS A qualitative study was conducted on 22 older adults living in Bambuí, MG, Southeastern Brazil, who were taking benzodiazepines and had the clinical and cognitive ability to respond to interview questions. The collected data were analyzed on the basis of the “signs, meanings, and actions” model. RESULTS The main reasons pointed out for the use of benzodiazepines were “nervousness”, “sleep problems”, and “worry” due to family and financial problems, everyday problems, and existential difficulties. None of the interviewees said that they used benzodiazepines in a dose higher than that recommended or had been warned by health professionals about any risks of their continuous use. Different strategies were used to obtain the prescription for the medication, and any physician would prescribe it, indicating that a bond was established with the drug and not with the health professional or healthcare service. Obtaining and consuming the medication turned into a crucial issue because benzodiazepine assumes the status of an essential food, which leads users to not think but sleep. It causes a feeling of relief from their problems such as awareness of human finitude and fragility, existential difficulties, and family problems. CONCLUSIONS Benzodiazepine assumes the characteristics of polyvalence among older adults, which extrapolate specific clinical indications, and of essentiality to deal with life’s problems in old age. Although it relieves the “nerves”, the chronic use of benzodiazepines buffers suffering and prevents older adults from going through the suffering. This shows important difficulties in the organization and planning of strategies that are necessary for minimizing the chronic use in this population.

  9. Chronic use of benzodiazepines among older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarenga, Jussara Mendonça; Giacomin, Karla Cristina; Loyola Filho, Antônio Ignácio de; Uchoa, Elizabeth; Firmo, Josélia Oliveira Araújo

    2014-12-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the perception of and motivation for the chronic use of benzodiazepine among older adults. METHODS A qualitative study was conducted on 22 older adults living in Bambuí, MG, Southeastern Brazil, who were taking benzodiazepines and had the clinical and cognitive ability to respond to interview questions. The collected data were analyzed on the basis of the "signs, meanings, and actions" model. RESULTS The main reasons pointed out for the use of benzodiazepines were "nervousness", "sleep problems", and "worry" due to family and financial problems, everyday problems, and existential difficulties. None of the interviewees said that they used benzodiazepines in a dose higher than that recommended or had been warned by health professionals about any risks of their continuous use. Different strategies were used to obtain the prescription for the medication, and any physician would prescribe it, indicating that a bond was established with the drug and not with the health professional or healthcare service. Obtaining and consuming the medication turned into a crucial issue because benzodiazepine assumes the status of an essential food, which leads users to not think but sleep. It causes a feeling of relief from their problems such as awareness of human finitude and fragility, existential difficulties, and family problems. CONCLUSIONS Benzodiazepine assumes the characteristics of polyvalence among older adults, which extrapolate specific clinical indications, and of essentiality to deal with life's problems in old age. Although it relieves the "nerves", the chronic use of benzodiazepines buffers suffering and prevents older adults from going through the suffering. This shows important difficulties in the organization and planning of strategies that are necessary for minimizing the chronic use in this population.

  10. [The influence of piracetam on behavior and brain receptors in C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice: nootropic and anxiolytic effects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalev, G I; Kondrakhin, E A; Salimov, R M; Neznamov, G G

    2013-01-01

    The influence of acute and long-term piracetam administration on the dynamics of rapid (non-specific, anxiolytic) and slow (specific, nootropic) behavioral drug effects, as well as on their interrelation with NMDA- and BDZ-receptors was studied in inbred mice strains differing in cognitive and emotional status--C57BL/6 and BALB/c. The BALB/c strain contained 17% less [3H]-flunitrazepam binding sites in frontal cortex and 22% less [3H]-MK801 binding sites in hippocampus as compared to those in C57BL/6 mice. Based on these data, BALB/c strain was used as a model of psychopathology, combining increased anxiety and cognitive deficit. Under the action of single, 7-fold, and 14-fold piracetam i.p. injections (200 mg/kg body weight, daily), a fast increase in NMDA-receptor density and slow escalation of the specific nootropic effect was observed in BALB/c mice. Non-specific anxiolytic effects in these mice increased for the first 1 - 7 days without any changes in BDZ-binding and then decreased to initial values accompanied by decrement of brain receptor concentration. Thus, in BALB/c mice, a slowly manifested specific nootropic action of piracetam develops, following an increase in NMDA receptor density, whereas the non-specific anxiolytic effect precedes the fast-paced changes in BDZ-binding site density.

  11. Views of general practitioners and benzodiazepine users on benzodiazepines: a qualitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parr, Jannette M; Kavanagh, David J; Young, Ross McD; McCafferty, Kelly

    2006-03-01

    Effectively assisting benzodiazepine users to cease use requires a greater understanding of general practitioners' (GPs) and benzodiazepine users' views on using and ceasing benzodiazepines. This paper reports the findings from a qualitative study that examined the views of 28 GPs and 23 benzodiazepine users (BUs) in Cairns, Australia. A semi-structured interview was conducted with all participants and the information gained was analysed using the Consensual Qualitative Research Approach, which allowed comparisons to be made between the views of the two groups of interviewees. There was commonality between GPs and BUs on reasons for commencing benzodiazepines, the role of dependence in continued use, and the importance of lifestyle change in its cessation. However, several differences emerged regarding commencement of use and processes of cessation. In particular, users felt there was greater need for GPs to routinely advise patients about non-pharmacological management of their problems and potential adverse consequences of long-term use before commencing benzodiazepines. Cessation could be discussed with all patients who use benzodiazepines for longer than 3 months, strategies offered to assist in management of withdrawal and anxiety, and referral to other health service providers for additional support. Lifestyle change could receive greater focus at all stages of treatment.

  12. Electrocardiographic Manifestations of Benzodiazepine Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahid Kazemzadeh

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the clinical and electrocardiographic (ECG manifestations of benzodiazepines (BZs. Methods: In this retrospective study, all BZ-poisoned patients hospitalized at Loghman Hakim Hospital between September 2010 and March 2011 were evaluated. Patients’ information including age, sex, time elapsed between the ingestion and presentation, and type of the BZ used were extracted from the patients' charts and recorded. ECGs on presentation to the emergency department (ED were evaluated and parameters such as PR interval, QRS duration, corrected QT, amplitude of S wave in lead I, height of R wave and R/S ratio in the lead aVR were also measured and recorded. Results: Oxazepam, chlordiazepoxide, lorazepam, alprazolam, diazepam, and clonazepam were ingested by 9 (3%, 13 (4.4%, 29 (9.9%, 105 (35.8%, 65 (22.2%, and 72 (24.6% patients, respectively. Mean PR interval was reported to be 0.16 ± 0.03 sec and PR interval of greater than 200 msec was detected in 12 (4.5% patients. Mean QRS duration was 0.07 ± 0.01sec and QRS≥120 msec was observed in 7 (2.6% cases. Conclusion: Diazepam is the only BZ that does not cause QRS widening and oxazepam is the only one not causing PR prolongation. It can be concluded that if a patient refers with a decreased level of consciousness and accompanying signs of BZ toxicity, QRS widening in ECG rules out diazepam, whereas PR prolongation rules out oxazepam toxicity.

  13. Influence of benzodiazepines on antiparkinsonian drug treatment in levodopa users

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Vijver, D A M C; Roos, R A C; Jansen, P A F; Porsius, A J; de Boer, A

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Animal studies showed that benzodiazepines decrease the concentration of dopamine in the striatum. Benzodiazepines may therefore affect the treatment of Parkinson's disease. This study determined whether start of a benzodiazepine in patients on levodopa was followed by a faster increase

  14. Synthesis of 3-Substituted 1,4-Benzodiazepin-2-ones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyungjin Kim

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The preparation of 3-substituted 1,4-benzodiazepines by benzodiazepine enolate alkylation has been explored. Employing this approach, multigram quantities of benzodiazepine 1 have been prepared for animal studies to evaluate a new approach for the treatment of the autoimmune disease systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE.

  15. AC-3933, a benzodiazepine partial inverse agonist, improves memory performance in MK-801-induced amnesia mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Takashi; Iwamura, Yoshihiro

    2016-05-01

    AC-3933, a novel benzodiazepine receptor partial inverse agonist, is a drug candidate for cognitive disorders including Alzheimer's disease. We have previously reported that AC-3933 enhances acetylcholine release in the rat hippocampus and ameliorates scopolamine-induced memory impairment and age-related cognitive decline in both rats and mice. In this study, we further evaluated the procognitive effect of AC-3933 on memory impairment induced by MK-801, an N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist, in mice. Unlike the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor donepezil and the benzodiazepine receptor inverse agonist FG-7142, oral administration of AC-3933 significantly ameliorated MK-801-induced memory impairment in the Y-maze test and in the object location test. Interestingly, the procognitive effects of AC-3933 on MK-801-induced memory impairment were not affected by the benzodiazepine receptor antagonist flumazenil, although this was not the case for the beneficial effects of AC-3933 on scopolamine-induced memory deficit. Moreover, the onset of AC-3933 ameliorating effect on scopolamine- or MK-801-induced memory impairment was different in the Y-maze test. Taken together, these results indicate that AC-3933 improves memory deficits caused by both cholinergic and glutamatergic hypofunction and suggest that the ameliorating effect of AC-3933 on MK-801-induced memory impairment is mediated by a mechanism other than inverse activation of the benzodiazepine receptor.

  16. Quantitative structure-activity relationship study on some benzodiazepine derivatives as anti-Alzheimer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnath, Bikash; Gayen, Shovanlal; Basu, Anindya; Srikanth, Kolluru; Jha, Tarun

    2004-12-01

    A QSAR study was performed in an attempt to explore the pharmacophore of some benzodiazepine derivatives as anti-Alzheimer agents for the inhibition of gamma-secretase. The study, which used the electrotopological state atom (ETSA) index, which encodes electronic and topological information, reveals the importance of two phenyl rings-one substituted and another unsubstituted, for the inhibition of the enzyme. Fluorine substitution on the substituted phenyl ring has an important contribution to the activity. R-configurations of the aliphatic chain substituents provide the exact conformation of the molecules to enter into the binding pockets of the receptor(s). [figure: see text]. General structure of benzodiazepine containing gamma-secretase inhibitors.

  17. Predictors of benzodiazepine discontinuation in subjects manifesting complicated dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorma, Helena; Naukkarinen, Hannu H; Sarna, Seppo J; Kuoppasalmi, Kimmo I

    2005-01-01

    We described characteristics of subjects with benzodiazepine dependence that was typically complicated by harmful and hazardous alcohol use or high benzodiazepine doses, and assessed predictors of successful discontinuation of benzodiazepines for this group. Seventy-six patients who participated in a randomized clinical trial of two different gradual withdrawal treatment approaches were assessed. The trial was conducted between February 1995 and July 1999. The mean age +/- SD of subjects was 40.0 +/- 9.6 years, 55% were male, 38% were married or cohabiting, and 70% had received more than nine years of education. The median benzodiazepine dose was 35 mg/day (range 2.5-180) in diazepam equivalents. The median duration of benzodiazepine use was 84 (range 8-360) months. Subjects with lower benzodiazepine doses and no previous withdrawal attempts were more successful at benzodiazepine discontinuation. Cluster B personality/borderline personality disorder was associated with an inability to stop benzodiazepine use and with "dropping out" of treatment. Alcohol use-related disorders or other psychiatric diagnoses were not associated with outcome. Further studies on predictors of successful benzodiazepine discontinuation in different populations are required. Patients manifesting cluster B personality/borderline personality disorder and benzodiazepine dependence may need concomitant treatment for their personality disorders to benefit from benzodiazepine discontinuation treatment.

  18. Defining benzodiazepine dependence: The confusion persists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linsen, S.M.; Zitman, F.G.; Breteler, M.H.M.

    1995-01-01

    Little consensus exists on the risk of benzodiazepine (BZD) dependence. We investigated how often BZD dependence and related concepts have been defined in the literature on BZD effects in humans. In addition, the definitions of BZD dependence were compared in order to assess the similarity of conten

  19. Benzodiazepine pathways in the chronically ill

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Hulten, Rolf; Heerdink, Eibert R.; Bakker, Albert; Leufkens, Hubert G.

    1999-01-01

    The association between patterns of use of benzodiazepines and chronic somatic morbidity was examined by applying the Chronic Disease Score (CDS). In the only pharmacy in a Dutch community, 6921 patients with data available covering a 10-year period (1983-1992) were included. In 1992, two-thirds of

  20. [Benzodiazepines in the treatment of epilepsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakken, Karl O; Rytter, Elisif M; Brockmeier, Frans

    2010-04-22

    In epilepsy benzodiazepines are mainly used to stop ongoing attacks. In hospitals intravenous diazepam is the drug of choice for status epilepticus. Outside of hospitals buccal midazolam is in the process of replacing rectal diazepam. Clonazepam, clobazam and nitrazepam (to children) are partially used as additional medication to prevent seizures.

  1. Catatonia in mixed alcohol and benzodiazepine withdrawal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aniruddha Basu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Catatonia is mostly caused by different neuropsychiatric conditions. We report a case of a 30 year old man suffering from both alcohol and benzodiazepine dependence who exhibited catatonic features soon after stopping the intake of substances. This case will help clinicians to recognize catatonic features within the varied symptomatology of substance withdrawal and thereby helping in its early diagnosis and management.

  2. Benzodiazepine use in Denmark 1997-2008

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, E.; Pedersen, H.; Fosbol, E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Analysis of the pattern of benzodiazepine (BZD) use over time in the period 1997-2008 in relation to age and comorbidity. Methods: All Danish citizens more than or equal to 10 years on January 1, 1997 were included in the study based on data from national databases. Main outcome measures...

  3. Benzodiazepine Synthesis and Rapid Toxicity Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, James T.; Boriraj, Grit

    2010-01-01

    A second-year organic chemistry laboratory experiment to introduce students to general concepts of medicinal chemistry is described. Within a single three-hour time window, students experience the synthesis of a biologically active small molecule and the assaying of its biological toxicity. Benzodiazepine rings are commonly found in antidepressant…

  4. Benzodiazepines, benzodiazepine-like drugs, and typical antipsychotics impair manual dexterity in patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasayama, Daimei; Hori, Hiroaki; Teraishi, Toshiya; Hattori, Kotaro; Ota, Miho; Matsuo, Junko; Kinoshita, Yukiko; Okazaki, Mitsutoshi; Arima, Kunimasa; Amano, Naoji; Higuchi, Teruhiko; Kunugi, Hiroshi

    2014-02-01

    Impaired dexterity is a major psychomotor deficit reported in patients with schizophrenia. In the present study, the Purdue pegboard test was used to compare the manual dexterity in patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls. We also examined the influence of antipsychotics, benzodiazepines, and benzodiazepine-like drugs on manual dexterity. Subjects were 93 patients with schizophrenia and 93 healthy controls, matched for sex and age distributions. Control subjects scored significantly higher on all scores of Purdue pegboard than patients with schizophrenia. Age, PANSS negative symptom scale, typical antipsychotic dose, and use of benzodiazepines and/or benzodiazepine-like drugs were negatively correlated with the pegboard scores in patients with schizophrenia. The present results indicate that patients with schizophrenia have impaired gross and fine fingertip dexterity compared to healthy controls. The use of typical antipsychotics and benzodiazepines and/or benzodiazepine-like drugs, but not atypical antipsychotics, had significant negative impact on dexterity in patients with schizophrenia. Psychiatrists should be aware that some psychotropic medications may enhance the disability caused by the impairment of dexterity in patients with schizophrenia.

  5. Synthesis of new N-substituted benzodiazepine derivatives with potential anxiolytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossakowski, J; Zawadowski, T; Turło, J

    1997-01-01

    In continuation of the development of antipsychotic and anxiolytic agents with a reduced propensity toward extrapyramidal side-effects, a series of N-aminoalkyl derivatives of (s)-(+)-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[2,1-c][1,4]benzodiazepine-5,11-(10H, 11aH)-dione was prepared. Evaluation of these compounds in revealed a very low affinity for 5-HT1A receptor.

  6. Baclofen in the short-term maintenance treatment of benzodiazepine dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lekhansh Shukla

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Benzodiazepine (BZD dependence is a significant public health problem. Apart from the long-term tapering doses of BZD, no others drugs are available for the maintenance treatment of BZD dependence. Baclofen has been used in alcohol and other drug dependence as long-term anti-craving agent. Since alcohol and BZD act through the GABA receptor, we attempted to study the effect of Baclofen as maintenance treatment in a series of five cases with BZD dependence.

  7. Baclofen in the short-term maintenance treatment of benzodiazepine dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Lekhansh; Kandasamy, Arun; Kesavan, Muralidharan; Benegal, Vivek

    2014-11-01

    Benzodiazepine (BZD) dependence is a significant public health problem. Apart from the long-term tapering doses of BZD, no others drugs are available for the maintenance treatment of BZD dependence. Baclofen has been used in alcohol and other drug dependence as long-term anti-craving agent. Since alcohol and BZD act through the GABA receptor, we attempted to study the effect of Baclofen as maintenance treatment in a series of five cases with BZD dependence.

  8. Imaging of peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor in tumor: in vitro binding and in vivo biodistribution of N-benzyl-N-[{sup 11}C]methyl-2- (7-methyl-8-oxo-2-phenyl-7,8-dihydro-9H-purin-9-yl) acetamide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamasaki, Tomoteru; Kumata, Katsushi; Yanamoto, Kazuhiko; Hatori, Akiko [Department of Molecular Probes, Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Takei, Makoto; Nakamura, Yukio [Tokyo Nuclear Service Co. Ltd., Tokyo 141-8686 (Japan); Koike, Sachiko; Ando, Koichi [Heavy-ion Radiobiology Research Group, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Suzuki, Kazutoshi [Department of Molecular Probes, Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Zhang, Ming-Rong [Department of Molecular Probes, Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)], E-mail: zhang@nirs.go.jp

    2009-10-15

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to evaluate N-benzyl-N-[{sup 11}C]methyl-2- (7-methyl-8-oxo-2-phenyl-7,8-dihydro-9H-purin-9-yl) acetamide ([{sup 11}C]DAC) as a novel peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) ligand for tumor imaging. Methods: [{sup 11}C]DAC was synthesized by the reaction of a desmethyl precursor with [{sup 11}C]CH{sub 3}I. In vitro uptake of [{sup 11}C]DAC was examined in PBR-expressing C6 glioma and intact murine fibrosarcoma (NFSa) cells. In vivo distribution of [{sup 11}C]DAC was determined using NFSa-bearing mice and small-animal positron emission tomography (PET). Results: [{sup 11}C]DAC showed specific binding to PBR in C6 glioma cells, a standard cell line with high PBR expression. Specific binding of [{sup 11}C]DAC was also confirmed in NFSa cells, a target tumor cell line in this study. Results of PET experiments using NFSa-bearing mice, showed that [{sup 11}C]DAC was taken up specifically into the tumor, and pretreatment with PK11195 abolished the uptake. Conclusions: [{sup 11}C]DAC was taken up into PBR-expressing NFSa. [{sup 11}C]DAC is a promising PET ligand that can be used for imaging PBR in tumor-bearing mice.

  9. Partial chemical characterization of cyclopyrrolones ((/sup 3/H) suriclone) and benzodiazepines ((/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam) binding site: Differences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zundel, J.L.; Blanchard, J.C.; Julou, L.

    1985-06-10

    Rat hippocampus membranes were treated with several protein modifying reagents (iodoacetamide, N-ethylmaleimide, tetranitromethane and N-acetylimidazole). The effects of these treatments on the binding sites of cyclopyrrolones ((/sup 3/H) suriclone), a new chemical family of minor tranquilizers, and benzodiazepines ((/sup 3/H) flunitrazepam) were investigated. Here the authors show that both ligands are similarly sensitive to cysteine alkylation: (/sup 3/H) suriclone and (/sup 3/H) flunitrazepam binding are reduced by iodoacetamide and slightly increased by N-ethylmaleimide. On the contrary they are clearly differentiated by tyrosine modification: (/sup 3/H) suriclone binding is not changed whereas (/sup 3/H) flunitrazepam binding is increased by tetranitromethane and decreased by N-acetylimidazole. The present findings and published evidence suggest cyclopyrrolones and benzodiazepines bind to distinct sites or to different allosteric forms of the benzodiazepine receptor. 28 references, 6 figures.

  10. [Drug dependence on benzodiazepines and antidepressants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbanck, P

    2009-09-01

    Since years, the concepts of drug abuse and drug dependence changed, due to new knowledge coming from the neurosciences. Specifically, the role of a brain structure called "reward circuit" was emphasized. Therefore, the diagnosis criteria for abuse and dependence on drugs are presently defined mostly from a behavioral point of view: both in animal models and in clinical situations, it was stressed the importance of drug-seeking behavior and of the loss of control of the consumption. The occurrence of a pharmacological dependence is in fact of concern for only some of addictive drugs. According to these new criteria, dependence on benzodiazepines or antidepressants is certainly not frequent, even if withdrawal manifestations can occur after a long-term exposition. Furthermore, it is important to keep in mind the risk for non-medical use of benzodiazepines in persons with illicit drug use.

  11. Defining benzodiazepine dependence: The confusion persists

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    Little consensus exists on the risk of benzodiazepine (BZD) dependence. We investigated how often BZD dependence and related concepts have been defined in the literature on BZD effects in humans. In addition, the definitions of BZD dependence were compared in order to assess the similarity of contents. From a total of 250 papers (published between 1988 and 1991) 51 provided 126 dependence-related definitions. Six studies referred to the DSM definitions and one to the WHO definition. The obsol...

  12. Brain concentrations of benzodiazepines are elevated in an animal model of hepatic encephalopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basile, A.S.; Pannell, L.; Jaouni, T.; Gammal, S.H.; Fales, H.M.; Jones, E.A.; Skolnick, P. (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1990-07-01

    Brain extracts from rats with hepatic encephalopathy due to thioacetamide-induced fulminant hepatic failure contained 4- to 6-fold higher concentrations of substances that inhibit radioligand binding to benzodiazepine receptors than corresponding control rat extracts. Both isocratic and gradient-elution HPLC indicated that this inhibitory activity was localized in 3-8 peaks with retention times corresponding to deschlorodiazepam, deschlorolorazepam, lorazepam, oxazepam, diazepam, and N-desmethyldiazepam. The presence of diazepam and N-desmethyldiazepam was confirmed by mass spectroscopy. Both mass spectroscopic and radiometric techniques indicated that the concentrations of N-desmethyldiazepam and diazepam in brain extracts from encephalopathic rats were 2-9 and 5-7 times higher, respectively, than in control brain extracts. While benzodiazepines have been identified previously in mammalian and plant tissues, this report demonstrates that concentrations of these substances are increased in a pathophysiological condition. These findings provide a rational basis for the use of benzodiazepine receptor antagonists in the management of hepatic encephalopathy in humans.

  13. Benzodiazepines in epilepsy: pharmacology and pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riss, J; Cloyd, J; Gates, J; Collins, S

    2008-08-01

    Benzodiazepines (BZDs) remain important agents in the management of epilepsy. They are drugs of first choice for status epilepticus and seizures associated with post-anoxic insult and are also frequently used in the treatment of febrile, acute repetitive and alcohol withdrawal seizures. Clinical advantages of these drugs include rapid onset of action, high efficacy rates and minimal toxicity. Benzodiazepines are used in a variety of clinical situations because they have a broad spectrum of clinical activity and can be administered via several routes. Potential shortcomings of BZDs include tolerance, withdrawal symptoms, adverse events, such as cognitive impairment and sedation, and drug interactions. Benzodiazepines differ in their pharmacologic effects and pharmacokinetic profiles, which dictate how the drugs are used. Among the approximately 35 BZDs available, a select few are used for the management of seizures and epilepsy: clobazam, clonazepam, clorazepate, diazepam, lorazepam and midazolam. Among these BZDs, clorazepate has a unique profile that includes a long half-life of its active metabolite and slow onset of tolerance. Additionally, the pharmacokinetic characteristics of clorazepate (particularly the sustained-release formulation) could theoretically help minimize adverse events. However, larger, controlled studies of clorazepate are needed to further examine its role in the treatment of patients with epilepsy.

  14. Enhanced regional brain metabolic responses to benzodiazepines in cocaine abusers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkow, N.D.; Wang, G.J.; Fowler, J.S. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [and others

    1997-05-01

    While dopamine (DA) appears to be crucial for cocaine reinforcement, its involvement in cocaine addiction is much less clear. Using PET we have shown persistent reductions in striatal DA D2 receptors (which arc predominantly located on GABA cells) in cocaine abusers. This finding coupled to GABA`s role as an effector for DA led us to investigate if there were GABAergic abnormalities in cocaine abusers. In this study we measured regional brain metabolic responses to lorazepam, to indirectly assess GABA function (benzodiazepines facilitate GABAergic neurotransmission). Methods: The experimental subjects consisted of 12 active cocaine abusers and 32 age matched controls. Each subject underwent two PET FDG scans obtained within 1 week of each other. The first FDG scan was obtained after administration of placebo (3 cc of saline solution) given 40-50 minutes prior to FDG; and the second after administration of lorazepam (30 {mu}g/kg) given 40-50 minutes prior to FDG. The subjects were blind to the drugs received. Results: Lorazepam-induced sleepiness was significantly greater in abusers than in controls (p<0.001). Lorazepam-induced decreases in brain glucose metabolism were significantly larger in cocaine abusers than in controls. Whereas in controls whole brain metabolism decreased 13{+-}7 %, in cocaine abusers it decreased 21{+-}13 % (p < 0.05). Lorazepam-induced decrements in regional metabolism were significantly larger in striatum (p < 0.0 1), thalamus (p < 0.01) and cerebellum (p < 0.005) of cocaine abusers than of controls (ANOVA diagnosis by condition (placebo versus lorazepam) interaction effect). The only brain region for which the absolute metabolic changes-induced by lorazepam in cocaine abusers were equivalent to those in controls was the orbitofrontal cortex. These results document an accentuated sensitivity to benzodiazepines in cocaine abusers which is compatible with disrupted GABAergic function in these patients.

  15. Benzodiazepine use among the elderly in the community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, M; Denihan, A; Bruce, I; Radic, A; Coakley, D; Lawlor, B A

    1999-04-01

    Benzodiazepines are the most commonly prescribed psychotropic drug in the elderly. Benzodiazepines with a long duration of action can produce marked sedation and psychomotor impairment in older people, and are associated with an increased risk of hip fracture and of motor vehicle crash. One thousand seven hundred and one individuals of 65 years and over, identified from General Practitioner lists, were interviewed using the Geriatric Mental State-AGECAT package and current psychotropic drug use was recorded. Benzodiazepines were classified as having a short or long elimination half-life. Two hundred and ninety-five (17.3%) individuals were taking a benzodiazepine, with use in females being twice that in males. Of the 295, 152 (51.5%) were taking a long acting benzodiazepine and the use of long acting anxiolytic type benzodiazepines was particularly common. Fifty-two (17.6%) benzodiazepine users were taking one or more other psychotropic drugs. A benzodiazepine was used by eight of 18 (44.4%) subjects with an anxiety disorder, 62 of 180 (34.4%) individuals with depression, and seven of 71 (9.9%) people with dementia. Four-fifths of older people on a psychotropic drug were taking a benzodiazepine, highlighting the importance of this class of drug in the elderly population. The choice of a benzodiazepine with a long duration of action, which have been shown to be associated with serious adverse events in the elderly in over one half of benzodiazepine users, is of concern. The potential for adverse effects was further accentuated by polypharmacy practices. The choice of benzodiazepine for an older person has important consequences and should be addressed in greater detail with primary care.

  16. Influence of benzodiazepines on antiparkinsonian drug treatment in levodopa users

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Animal studies showed that benzodiazepines decrease the concentration of dopamine in the striatum. Benzodiazepines may therefore affect the treatment of Parkinson's disease. This study determined whether start of a benzodiazepine in patients on levodopa was followed by a faster increase of antiparkinsonian drug treatment. METHODS: Data came from the PHARMO database, which includes information on drug dispensing for all residents of six Dutch cities. Selected were all patients aged...

  17. Benzodiazepines and adequacy of initial antidepressant treatment for depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Paul N; Ganoczy, Dara; Zivin, Kara; Valenstein, Marcia

    2011-06-01

    In short-term efficacy studies, coprescription of a benzodiazepine improves first-month adherence and response to antidepressant treatment. We used Veterans Health Administration data to examine the impact of coprescribed benzodiazepines on initial antidepressant adherence in routine clinical practice and the risks of long-term benzodiazepine use, abuse, and dependence. Our study population was 43,915 Veterans Health Administration patients diagnosed with depression and started on an antidepressant between October 2006 and September 2007. Using logistic regression, adjusting for demographic and clinical covariates, we predicted the likelihood that patients received antidepressant treatment for an adequate duration (90 days), with our primary independent variable of interest being receipt of a benzodiazepine on the same day as the start of the antidepressant. We also assessed the frequency and characteristics of patients whose benzodiazepine use persisted for 1 year or who were diagnosed with anxiolytic abuse or dependence after receiving combined treatment. The adjusted probability of receiving antidepressant treatment of adequate duration was 42.4% for patients who received a benzodiazepine with their initial antidepressant compared with 39.3% for patients initially treated with an antidepressant alone (P benzodiazepines for at least 1 year, and 0.7% were diagnosed with anxiolytic abuse or dependence. Anxiolytic abuse or dependence, but not long-term benzodiazepine use, was associated with other substance use disorders. These findings should be considered by clinicians when assessing the individual risks and benefits of combining a benzodiazepine with antidepressant treatment.

  18. Benzodiazepines and amphetamine on avoidance behaviour in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansone, M

    1975-11-01

    Six benzodiazepine derivatives, given alone or in combination with amphetamine, were tested in mice subjected to five 100-trial avoidance sessions in the shuttle-box. All derivatives, execpt bromazepam, showed some facilitating effects on avoidance responding when given alone. Facilitation was particularly evident following the administration of chlordiazepoxide (2.5 mg/kg), medazepam (10 mg/kg) and nitrazepam (0.25, 0.5 and 1 mg/kg). Favourable effects were obtained by combining each benzodiazepine compound with amphetamine. The levels of avoidance respinses were usually higher under benzodiazepine-amphetamine combinations than under benzodiazepines alone.

  19. Differential interactions engendered by benzodiazepine and neuroactive steroid combinations on schedule-controlled responding in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunter, Barak W.; Platt, Donna M.; Rowlett, James K.

    2015-01-01

    Benzodiazepines are positive allosteric modulators of the GABAA receptor and are prescribed as anxiolytics, hypnotics, and anticonvulsants. While these drugs clearly have clinical value, their use is associated with unwanted side effects such as sedation and motor impairment. Neuroactive steroids are endogenous modulators of GABAA receptors and recent evidence has shown that combinations of the triazolo-benzodiazepine triazolam and the endogenous neuroactive steroid pregnanolone can produce both supra-additive anxiolytic effects and infra-additive reinforcing effects. In the present study, we investigated these same combinations as well as combinations of two clinically-relevant drugs from different chemical classes, the 1, 4 substituted (7-nitro) benzodiazepine clonazepam and the synthetic neuroactive steroid ganaxolone, in rats trained under a 10-response, fixed ratio (FR) schedule of food reinforcement. All four drugs induced a significant and dose-dependent suppression of food-maintained responding. From the dose-response functions, ED50s (i.e., the doses that engendered 50% of the maximum rate-decreasing effect) were generated for each drug. Dose-response functions for combinations of triazolam/pregnanolone, clonazepam/ganaxolone, triazolam/ganaxolone, and clonazepam/pregnanolone were then determined. Isobolographic analysis of the rate-decreasing effects of these combinations revealed that the potencies of the triazolam/pregnanolone combinations were supra-additive while the clonazepam/ganaxolone combinations were additive or infra-additive in relation to predicted values based on dose-additive effects. Furthermore, mixtures of clonazepam/pregnanolone were supra-additive while triazolam/ganaxolone combinations were additive, infra-additive and supra-additive. These results suggest that the ability of benzodiazepine and neuroactive steroid combinations to attenuate rates of food-maintained responding depends critically on both the constituent drugs and the

  20. Whole-body distribution and metabolism of [N-methyl-{sup 11}C](R)-1-(2-chlorophenyl)-N-(1-methylpropyl)-3-isoquinolinecarboxamide in humans; an imaging agent for in vivo assessment of peripheral benzodiazepine receptor activity with positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roivainen, Anne; Hirvonen, Jussi; Oikonen, Vesa; Virsu, Pauliina; Tolvanen, Tuula [Turku University Hospital, Turku PET Centre, Turku (Finland); Naagren, Kjell [University of Turku, Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry Laboratory, Turku (Finland); Rinne, Juha O. [Turku University Hospital, Turku PET Centre, Turku (Finland); Turku Imanet, GE Healthcare Medical Diagnostics, Turku (Finland)

    2009-04-15

    {sup 11}C-PK11195 is a radiopharmaceutical for in vivo assessment of peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) activity using PET. We sought to clarify the metabolic fate of {sup 11}C-PK11195 in a test-retest setting using radio-HPLC in comparison with radio-TLC, and the whole-body distribution in humans. In order to evaluate the reproducibility of radio-HPLC metabolite analyses, ten patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) underwent two successive {sup 11}C-PK11195 examinations on separate days. For comparison of different analytical methods, plasma samples from seven patients were also analysed by radio-TLC. In addition, we evaluated the whole-body distribution of {sup 11}C-PK11195 and its uptake in the brain. The level of unmetabolized {sup 11}C-PK11195 decreased slowly from 96.3 {+-} 1.6% (mean{+-}SD) at 5 min to 62.7 {+-} 8.3% at 40 min after injection. Large individual variation was observed in the amount of plasma {sup 11}C-PK11195 radiometabolites. The whole-body distribution of {sup 11}C-PK11195 showed the highest radioactivity levels in urinary bladder, adrenal gland, liver, salivary glands, heart, kidneys, and vertebral column. In addition, the hip bone and breast bone were clearly visualized by PET. In patients with AD, {sup 11}C-PK11195 uptake in the brain was the highest in the basal ganglia and thalamus, followed by the cortical grey matter regions and the cerebellum. Low {sup 11}C-PK11195 uptake was observed in the white matter. Our results indicate that {sup 11}C-PK11195 is eliminated both through the renal and hepatobiliary systems. Careful analysis of plasma metabolites is required to determine the accurate arterial input function for quantitative PET measurement. (orig.)

  1. Protracted treatment with diazepam increases the turnover of putative endogenous ligands for the benzodiazepine/. beta. -carboline recognition site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyata, M.; Mocchetti, I.; Ferrarese, C.; Guidotti, A.; Costa, E.

    1987-03-01

    DBI (diazepam-binding inhibitor) is a putative neuromodulatory peptide isolated from rat brain that acts on ..gamma..-aminobutyric acid-benzodiazepine-Cl/sup -/ ionosphore receptor complex inducing ..beta..-carboline-like effects. The authors used a cDNA probe complementary to DBI mRNA and a specific antibody for rat DBI to study in rat brain how the dynamic state of DBI can be affected after protected (three times a day for 10 days) treatment with diazepam and chlordiazepoxide by oral gavage. Both the content of DBI and DBI mRNA increased in the cerebellum and cerebral cortex but failed to change in the hippocampus and striatum of rats receiving this protracted benzodiazepine treatment. Acute treatment with diazepam did not affect the dynamic state of brain DBI. An antibody was raised against a biologically active octadecaneuropeptide derived from the tryptic digestion of DBI. The combined HPLC/RIA analysis of rat cerebellar extracts carried out with this antibody showed that multiple molecular forms of the octadecaneuropeptide-like reactivity are present and all of them are increased in rats receiving repeated daily injections of diazepam. It is inferred that tolerance to benzodiazepines in associated with an increase in the turnover rate of DBI, which may be responsible for the ..gamma..-aminobutyric acid receptor desensitization that occurs after protracted benzodiazepine administration.

  2. Scalability, reliability and validity of the benzodiazepine dependence self report questionnaire in outpatient benzodiazepine users

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kan, C.C.; Breteler, M.H.M.; Timmermans, M.A.Y.; Ven, A.H.G.S. van der; Zitman, F.G.

    1999-01-01

    As there is no multidimensional instrument available which reflects the severity of BZD dependence comprehensively, the Benzodiazepine Dependence Self-Report Questionnaire (Bendep-SRQ) was developed and investigated. The Bendep-SRQ, Symptom Checlist-90, Schedules for Clinical Assessments in Neuropsy

  3. Development and psychometric evaluation of the Benzodiazepine Craving Questionnaire.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mol, A.J.J.; Oude Voshaar, R.C.; Gorgels, W.J.M.J.; Breteler, M.H.M.; Balkom, A.J.L.M. van; Lisdonk, E.H. van de; Ven, A.H. van der; Zitman, F.G.

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To assess the scalability, reliability and validity of a newly constructed self-report questionnaire on craving for benzodiazepines (BZs), the Benzodiazepine Craving Questionnaire (BCQ). SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: The BCQ was administered once to a sample of 113 long-term and 80 former long-term

  4. [Leo Sternbach, an inventor of benzodiazepines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchibayashi, Masao

    2007-01-01

    A biography of Leo Sternbach, an inventor of benzodiazepine tranquillizers, is presented. It consists of (1) a societal desire for lifestyle pills, (2) Leo's birth in 1908 and youth, (3) education, (4) in Vienna, (5) in Zurich, (6) at Hoffmann-La Roche, Basel, (7) to the New World, (8) at Roche, Nutley NJ, (9) invention of the new drugs, (10) revolution of people's lifestyle, and (11) reward, retirement and obituary in 2005. This paper may be the first comprehensive biography of this remarkable chemist written in Japanese.

  5. Using Tutte polynomials to analyze the structure of the benzodiazepines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadavid Muñoz, Juan José

    2014-05-01

    Graph theory in general and Tutte polynomials in particular, are implemented for analyzing the chemical structure of the benzodiazepines. Similarity analysis are used with the Tutte polynomials for finding other molecules that are similar to the benzodiazepines and therefore that might show similar psycho-active actions for medical purpose, in order to evade the drawbacks associated to the benzodiazepines based medicine. For each type of benzodiazepines, Tutte polynomials are computed and some numeric characteristics are obtained, such as the number of spanning trees and the number of spanning forests. Computations are done using the computer algebra Maple's GraphTheory package. The obtained analytical results are of great importance in pharmaceutical engineering. As a future research line, the usage of the chemistry computational program named Spartan, will be used to extent and compare it with the obtained results from the Tutte polynomials of benzodiazepines.

  6. Use of benzodiazepines or benzodiazepine related drugs and the risk of cancer: a population-based case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pottegård, Anton; Friis, Søren; Andersen, Morten

    2013-01-01

    AIM: Studies of the carcinogenic potential of benzodiazepines and related drugs (BZRD) have been equivocal. A recent study reported a 35% excess cancer risk among users of hypnotics, including benzodiazepines. METHOD: Using Danish nationwide registers, we conducted a matched case-control study...

  7. Withdrawing Benzodiazepines in Patients With Anxiety Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lader, Malcolm; Kyriacou, Andri

    2016-01-01

    The large class of CNS-depressant medications-the benzodiazepines-have been extensively used for over 50 years, anxiety disorders being one of the main indications. A substantial proportion (perhaps up to 20-30 %) of long-term users becomes physically dependent on them. Problems with their use became manifest, and dependence, withdrawal difficulties and abuse were documented by the 1980s. Many such users experience physical and psychological withdrawal symptoms on attempted cessation and may develop clinically troublesome syndromes even during slow tapering. Few studies have been conducted to establish the optimal withdrawal schedules. The usual management comprises slow withdrawal over weeks or months together with psychotherapy of various modalities. Pharmacological aids include antidepressants such as the SSRIs especially if depressive symptoms supervene. Other pharmacological agents such as the benzodiazepine antagonist, flumazenil, and the hormonal agent, melatonin, remain largely experimental. The purpose of this review is to analyse the evidence for the efficacy of the usual withdrawal regimes and the newer agents. It is concluded that little evidence exists outside the usual principles of drug withdrawal but there are some promising leads.

  8. Chlordiazepoxide enhances the anxiogenic action of CGS 8216 in the social interaction test: evidence for benzodiazepine withdrawal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    File, S E; Pellow, S

    1985-07-01

    The benzodiazepine receptor 'inverse agonist' CGS 8216 has a specific anxiogenic action in the social interaction test that cannot be reversed by other compounds acting at the benzodiazepine site: Ro 15-1788, FG 7142 or beta-CCE. We tried to reverse the anxiogenic effect with chlordiazepoxide, which is able to antagonise the anxiogenic effects of several other compounds acting at benzodiazepine or related sites. Chlordiazepoxide given acutely (10-20 mg/kg) was unable to antagonise the anxiogenic action of CGS 8216 (5-10 mg/kg); instead there was a tendency to enhance its effects. The effects of chlordiazepoxide after 5 days pretreatment were then assessed, since chronic treatment is necessary to reverse the anxiogenic actions of Ro 15-1788 and Ro 5-4864. At 5 mg/kg chronically, chlordiazepoxide was unable to antagonise the anxiogenic effect of CGS 8216, and at 20 mg/kg there was a significant enhancement of the effects of CGS 8216 on social interaction without an effect on locomotor activity. These results are discussed in terms of withdrawal from benzodiazepine treatment.

  9. Rapid detoxification of benzodiazepine or Z-drugs dependence using acetylcholinesterase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shih-Ku

    2014-07-01

    Dependence on benzodiazepines (BZDs) or Z-drugs (zolpidem, zopicline and zaleplon) is a common clinical phenomenon. Traditional detoxification of BZDs dependence includes tapering used dose gradually and using equivalent doses of long-acting BZDs as substitutes. This kind of regimen tends to take a long time (up to 4weeks) and may require hospitalization. Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors have been shown to reverse BZDs induced sedation. We propose that oral form acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (donepezil, galantamine and rivastigmine) also posses the effect of inhibiting GABA receptors, and act as indirect antagonist, to be applied in the rapid detoxification treatment of BZDs and Z-drug dependence.

  10. Prevalence and correlates of inappropriate use of benzodiazepines in Kosovo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahiri, Zejdush; Kellici, Suela; Mone, Iris; Shabani, Driton; Qazimi, Musa; Burazeri, Genc

    2017-08-01

    In post-war Kosovo, the magnitude of inappropriate use of benzodiazepines is unknown to date. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence and correlates of continuation of intake of benzodiazepines beyond prescription (referred to as "inappropriate use") in the adult population of Gjilan region in Kosovo. A cross-sectional study was conducted in Gjilan region in 2015 including a representative sample of 780 individuals attending different pharmacies and reporting use of benzodiazepines (385 men and 395 women; age range 18-87 years; response rate: 90%). A structured questionnaire was administered to all participants inquiring about the use of benzodiazepines and socio-demographic characteristics. Overall, the prevalence of inappropriate use of benzodiazepines was 58%. In multivariable-adjusted models, inappropriate use of benzodiazepines was significantly associated with older age (OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.1-2.7), middle education (OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.2-2.7), daily use (OR 1.4, 95% CI 1.1-2.0) and addiction awareness (OR 2.7, 95% CI 2.0-3.8). Furthermore, there was evidence of a borderline relationship with rural residence (OR 1.2, 95% CI 0.9-1.7). Our study provides novel evidence about the prevalence and selected correlates of inappropriate use of benzodiazepines in Gjilan region of Kosovo. Health professionals and policymakers in Kosovo should be aware of the magnitude and determinants of drug misuse in this transitional society.

  11. Reduction of aggression during benzodiazepine withdrawal: effects of flumazenil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxon, L; Borg, S; Hiltunen, A J

    2010-08-01

    Benzodiazepine withdrawal has been associated with hostile and aggressive behavior. The benzodiazepine antagonist flumazenil has reduced, increased or not affected hostility and aggression in animal and human studies. In the present study we analyzed data collected in a placebo-controlled study of the effects of the benzodiazepine antagonist flumazenil in patients previously treated for benzodiazepine dependency, and healthy controls. The aim was to analyze the effects of flumazenil on hostility and aggression. Ten patients and 10 controls received, on two separate occasions, cumulative doses of flumazenil (0.05, 0.1, 0.25, 0.5 and 1mg at 15min intervals) or placebo. Withdrawal symptoms were rated after each injection. Patients had been free from benzodiazepines for 47 (4-266) weeks on the first occasion. A three-way interaction (groupxtreatmentxdose) was found, and was explained by: 1) patients rating aggression and hostility higher than controls at all times during placebo, while 2) during the flumazenil provocation i) the initial significant difference between patients and controls was no longer significant above the 0.5mg dose, and ii) patients rated aggression and hostility significantly lower above the 0.5mg dose compared to base-line. The results suggest that self-rated aggression and hostility in patients treated for benzodiazepine dependency was reduced by the partial benzodiazepine agonist flumazenil.

  12. Opioid and benzodiazepine withdrawal symptoms in paediatric intensive care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franck, Linda S; Naughton, Ita; Winter, Ira

    2004-12-01

    The purposes of this prospective repeated measures study were to: (a) describe the occurrence of withdrawal symptoms with the use of a standardised protocol to slowly taper opioids and benzodiazepines; and (b) to test the predictive validity of an opioid and benzodiazepine withdrawal assessment scoring tool in critically ill infants and young children after prolonged opioid and benzodiazepine therapy. Fifteen children (6 weeks-28 months of age) with complex congenital heart disease and/or respiratory failure who received opioids and benzodiazepines for 4 days or greater were evaluated for withdrawal symptoms using a standardized assessment tool. Thirteen children showed moderate to severe withdrawal symptoms a median 3 days after commencement of tapering. Symptom intensity was not related to prior opioid or benzodiazepine exposure, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) therapy or length of tapering. Children who received fentanyl in addition to morphine more often exhibited signs of withdrawal. This study demonstrated that significant withdrawal symptoms occur in critically ill children even with the use of a standardised assessment tool and tapering management protocol. The predictive validity and utility of the Opioid and Benzodiazepine Withdrawal Score (OBWS) was adequate for clinical use, but areas for further improvement of the tool were identified. Problems with the clinical withdrawal prevention and management guidelines were also identified. More research is needed to establish the optimal methods for prevention and management of iatrogenic opioid and benzodiazepine withdrawal in paediatric critical care.

  13. Benzodiazepine stability in postmortem samples stored at different temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Paula; Bastos, M Lourdes; Teixeira, Helena M

    2012-01-01

    Benzodiazepine (lorazepam, estazolam, chlordiazepoxide, and ketazolam) stability was studied in postmortem blood, bile, and vitreous humor stored at different temperatures over six months. The influence of NaF, in blood and bile samples, was also investigated. A solid-phase extraction technique was used on all the studied samples, and benzodiazepine quantification was performed by high-performance liquid chromatography-diode-array detection. Benzodiazepine concentration remained almost stable in all samples stored at -20°C and -80°C. Estazolam appeared to be a stable benzodiazepine during the six-month study, and ketazolam proved to be the most unstable benzodiazepine. A 100% loss of ketazolam occurred in all samples stored over 1 or 2 weeks at room temperature and over 8 or 12 weeks at 4°C, with the simultaneous detection of diazepam. Chlordiazepoxide suffered complete degradation in all samples, except preserved bile samples, stored at room temperature. Samples stored at 4°C for 6 months had a 29-100% decrease in chlordiazepoxide concentration. The data obtained suggest that results from samples with these benzodiazepines stored long-term should be cautiously interpreted. Bile and vitreous humor proved to be the most advantageous samples in cases where degradation of benzodiazepines by microorganisms may occur.

  14. Benzodiazepines misuse: The study community level Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puangkot Sukdepat

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Benzodiazepines (BZD misuse, abuse, and dependence are becoming a new problem in medicine, in Thailand, and the pharmacoepidemiology knowledge is insufficient. The aim of this study is to estimate the prevalence of benzodiazepine use, misuse, abuse, and dependence in the general population of the Ubon Rachathani province, in Thailand. Aims: To estimate the prevalence of benzodiazepine use, misuse, abuse, and dependence in the general population. Settings and Design: The cross-sectional household survey research was conducted from October 2008 to June 2009, with a target population age of 15 years and above. This took place in Ubon Ratchathani Province, in Thailand. Materials and Methods: A total sample size of 2280 were selected from three-stage stratified random sampling. BZD were identified with an accuracy of generic name, trade name, and drug characteristics. The DSM-IV questionnaire was used to define misuse, abuse, and dependence. The accuracy of dependence was interpreted with the help of the judgment of a psychiatric nurse. Statistical analysis: For the statistical analyses, prevalence was estimated with weight adjustment, variances estimated by the Teylor Series Linearization method, and interpreted with 95% confidence interval (CI. Results: There were 46,805 current users [3.9% (95% CI: 2.2-6.4], 26,404 misusers [2.2% (95% CI: 1.6-6.2], 7,203 abusers [0.6% (95% CI: 0.1 - 4.1], and 2,402 with dependence [0.2% (0.1-9.2]. When considering the group of current users in this study, 57.2% misusers, 16.6% abusers, and 5.9% with dependence were found, respectively. Conclusions: All prevalence of use was higher than previously reported, in Thailand, while more than half of the current users had a behavior of misuse. Surveillance of misuse should be undertaken in the current use. The medical professional should counsel the patient on the harm of misuse and limit the amount of medicine, with necessary dispensing.

  15. [Dependence on benzodiazepines. Clinical and biological aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelissolo, A; Bisserbe, J C

    1994-01-01

    The high rate of benzodiazepines (BZD) consumption has been repeatedly confirmed by epidemiological surveys in most major western world countries. In a recent french survey 7% of chronic users of BZD (use in 5/7 days for the last 12 months) were found the general population (17% in the population aged above 65). It has been suggested that the high BZD consumption rate could be related to dependence. The existence of BZD dependence was described in the early sixties with very high dose of chlordiazepoxide but it has become a real concern for the medical community since the late seventies with increasing number of reports of withdrawal symptoms. The extend of the actual rate of withdrawal symptoms at BZD tapering is still very controversial and according to the different studies it varies from 39 to 90%. The between studies difference in parameters such as: the patient populations (psychopathology, treatment duration), the type of tapering employed (duration, nature of the medical and psychological support) and the used operational criteria for withdrawal definition most likely explain this wide variation in the rate of occurrence of withdrawal manifestations. According to the American Psychiatric Association Task Force on Benzodiazepine Dependence, Toxicity and Abuse three type of pathological events can happen after treatment discontinuation: rebound, withdrawal syndrome and recurrence. The rebound consists in the early and transitory reappearance of the anxiety symptoms pre-existing to the treatment but in an exacerbated from; the withdrawal syndrome associates the resurgence of the pre-existing anxiety symptoms and new symptoms as sensory disturbances (metallic taste, hyperosmia, cutaneous exacerbated sensitivity, photophobia...) nausea, headache, motor disturbance in some rare cases depersonalization, paranoid reaction, confusion, convulsion. Rebound or withdrawal syndrome appearance delay varies from hours to few days according mostly to compounds elimination

  16. Safety and efficacy of flumazenil for reversal of iatrogenic benzodiazepine-associated delirium toxicity during treatment of alcohol withdrawal, a retrospective review at one center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Philip W; Donovan, J Ward; Burkhart, Keith K; Waskin, Jeffrey A; Hieger, Michelle A; Adkins, Audrey R; Wert, Yijin; Haggerty, David A; Rasimas, J J

    2014-06-01

    Both alcohol withdrawal syndrome (AWS) and benzodiazepines can cause delirium. Benzodiazepine-associated delirium can complicate AWS and prolong hospitalization. Benzodiazepine delirium can be diagnosed with flumazenil, a GABA-A receptor antagonist. By reversing the effects of benzodiazepines, flumazenil is theorized to exacerbate symptoms of AWS and precludes its use. For patients being treated for alcohol withdrawal, flumazenil can diagnose and treat benzodiazepine delirium without precipitating serious or life-threatening adverse events. Hospital admission records were retrospectively reviewed for patients with the diagnosis of AWS who received both benzodiazepines and flumazenil from December 2006 to June 2012 at a university-affiliated inpatient toxicology center. The day of last alcohol consumption was estimated from available blood alcohol content or subjective history. Corresponding benzodiazepine, flumazenil, and adjunctive sedative pharmacy records were reviewed, as were demographic, clinical course, and outcome data. Eighty-five patients were identified (average age 50.3 years). Alcohol concentrations were detectable for 42 patients with average 261 mg/dL (10-530 mg/dL). Eighty patients were treated with adjunctive agents for alcohol withdrawal including antipsychotics (n = 57), opioids (n = 27), clonidine (n = 35), and phenobarbital (n = 23). Average time of flumazenil administration was 4.7 days (1-11 days) after abstinence, and average dose was 0.5 mg (0.2-1 mg). At the time of flumazenil administration, delirium was described as hypoactive (n = 21), hyperactive (n = 15), mixed (n = 41), or not specified (n = 8). Response was not documented in 11 cases. Sixty-two (72.9 %) patients had significant objective improvement after receiving flumazenil. Fifty-six patients required more than one dose (average 5.6 doses). There were no major adverse events and minor adverse effects included transiently increased anxiety

  17. Transfer in vitro of three benzodiazepines across the human placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerre-Millo, M; Rey, E; Challier, J C; Turquais, J M; d'Athis, P; Olive, G

    1979-04-17

    A comparative study of the placental transfer to the foetus of three benzodiazepines was performed using a dual perfusion system of the human placental lobule. A transport fraction was calculated for each benzodiazepine and was compared with reference substances. Relative to antipyrine, the transport fraction of diazepam was 85%, and that of nordiazepam was 84%. The transport fraction of clorazepate represented only 20% of that of tritiated water. The relatively high transfer of diazepam and nordiazepam can be attributed to their high lipid solubility, and the lower transfer of clorazepate is due to its polar nature. It is suggested that in certain instances this benzodiazepine may be of especial value to obstetricians.

  18. Terahertz spectroscopic study of benzodiazepine sedative hypnotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Fusheng; Shen, Jingling; Wang, Xianfeng

    2011-08-01

    Terahertz time domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) is used to the pure active ingredient of three benzodiazepine sedative hypnotics with similar molecular structure. The absorption spectra of them are studied in the range of 0.2~2.6THz. Based on the experiment, the theoretical simulation results of diazepam, nitrazepam and clonazepam are got by the Gaussian03 package of DFT/B3LYP/6-31G* method in single-molecule models. The experimental results show that even if the molecular structure and medicine property of them are similar, the accurate identification of them can still be done with their characteristic absorption spectra. Theoretical simulation results are well consistent with the experimental results. It demonstrates that absorption peaks of them in THz range mainly come from intra-molecular forces and are less affected by the intermolecular interaction and crystal effects.ô

  19. Radioiodinated benzodiazepines: agents for mapping glial tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Dort, M.E.; Ciliax, B.J.; Gildersleeve, D.L.; Sherman, P.S.; Rosenspire, K.C.; Young, A.B.; Junck, L.; Wieland, D.M.

    1988-11-01

    Two isomeric iodinated analogues of the peripheral benzodiazepine binding site (PBS) ligand Ro5-4864 have been synthesized and labeled in high specific activity with iodine-125. Competitive binding assays conducted with the unlabeled analogues indicate high affinity for PBS. Tissue biodistribution studies in rats with these /sup 125/I-labeled ligands indicate high uptake of radioactivity in the adrenals, heart, and kidney--tissues known to have high concentrations of PBS. Preadministration of the potent PBS antagonist PK 11195 blocked in vivo uptake in adrenal tissue by over 75%, but to a lesser degree in other normal tissues. In vivo binding autoradiography in brain conducted in C6 glioma bearing rats showed dense, PBS-mediated accumulation of radioactivity in the tumor. Ligand 6 labeled with /sup 123/I may have potential for scintigraphic localization of intracranial glioma.

  20. Specific binding of benzodiazepines to human breast cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beinlich, A; Strohmeier, R; Kaufmann, M; Kuhl, H

    1999-01-01

    Binding of [3H]Ro5-4864, a peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) agonist, to BT-20 human, estrogen- (ER) and progesterone- (PR) receptor negative breast cancer cells was characterized. It was found to be specific, dose-dependent and saturable with a single population of binding sites. Dissociation constant (K(D)) was 8.5 nM, maximal binding capacity (Bmax) 339 fM/10(6) cells. Ro5-4864 (IC50 17.3 nM) and PK 11195 (IC50 12.3 nM) were able to compete with [3H]Ro5-4864 for binding, indicating specificity of interaction with PBR. Diazepam was able to displace [3H]Ro5-4864 from binding only at high concentrations (>1 microM), while ODN did not compete for PBR binding. Thymidine-uptake assay showed a biphasic response of cell proliferation. While low concentrations (100 nM) of Ro5-4864, PK 11195 and diazepam increased cell growth by 10 to 20%, higher concentrations (10-100 microM) significantly inhibited cell proliferation. PK 11195, a potent PBR ligand, was able to attenuate growth of BT-20 cells stimulated by 100 nM Ro5-4864 and to reverse growth reduction caused by 1 and 10 microM Ro5-4864, but not by 50 microM and 100 microM. This indicates that the antimitotic activity of higher concentrations of Ro5-4864 is independent of PBR binding. It is suggested, that PBR are involved in growth regulation of certain human breast cancer cell lines, possibly by supplying proliferating cells with energy, as their endogenous ligand is a polypeptide transporting Acyl-CoA.

  1. [In utero exposure to benzodiazepine. Is there a risk for anal atresia with lorazepam?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnot, O; Vollset, S-E; Godet, P-F; d'Amato, T; Dalery, J; Robert, E

    2003-01-01

    Drugs of the Benzodiazepine family are among the most frequently prescribed in France. Since anxiety disorders, for which these substances are mostly indicated, affect 10% of pregnant women, it is very likely that such a treatment could expose many foetuses to BZD during the first three Months of pregnancy. We know that the teratologic effect is not necessarily based on dose rate, but that it is associated with fetal drug exposure during the first 12 weeks of gestation, when organ formation occurs. Most epidemiologists concur that the baseline incidence of congenital damage is 2-2,5% in Europe. The results from a large number of stu-dies on associations between the use of BZDs in pregnancy and congenital malformations are conflicting. An in-depth analysis of existing literature shows results that are hardly comparable, if not contradictory, due to extreme differences in methodological approaches. In a recent meta-analysis case-control studies and cohort studies were analyzed separately. Among the case-control studies significant associations were found between BZD exposure and both, major malformations and oral clefts, whereas the cohort studies showed no association between BZD and any kind of malformation. The purpose of our study is to search for a specific teratogenic effect of this class of drugs, using data collected (1976-1997) by the French Central-East (FCE) registry of congenital malformations, member of the International Clearinghouse for Birth Defects Monitoring Systems (ICBDMS) located in Lyon, France. This registry monitor malformations among 100,000 births per Year. We analyzed 13,703 cases where information is available on whether or not the mother took a drug during her first trimester of pregnancy. Among them, 3,603 (28%) actually took a drug, and 262 (6.8%) took some sort of benzodiazepine (BDZ). BZD were divided into 9 categories, 8 being the most frequently present, plus one broad category of "others". Malformations were divided into ten

  2. Studies of the electronic structure and biological activity of chosen 1,4-benzodiazepines by {sup 35}Cl NQR spectroscopy and DFT calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bronisz, K. [Department of Physics, Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznan (Poland); Ostafin, M. [Department of Physics, Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznan (Poland)], E-mail: ostifnqr@amu.edu.pl; Poleshchuk, O. Kh. [Department of Chemistry, Tomsk Pedagogical University, Komsomolskii 75, 634041 Tomsk (Russian Federation); Mielcarek, J. [Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Medical Sciences, Grunwaldzka 6, 60-780 Poznan (Poland); Nogaj, B. [Department of Physics, Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznan (Poland)

    2006-11-08

    Selected derivatives of 1,4-benzodiazepine: lorazepam, lormetazepam, oxazepam and temazepam, used as active substances in anxiolytic drugs, have been studied by {sup 35}Cl NQR method in order to find the correlation between electronic structure and biological activity. The {sup 35}Cl NQR resonance frequencies ({nu} {sub Q}) measured at 77 K have been correlated with the following parameters characterising their biological activity: biological half-life period (t {sub 0.5}), affinity to benzodiazepine receptor (IC{sub 50}) and mean dose equivalent. The results of experimental study of some benzodiazepine derivatives by nuclear quadrupole resonance of {sup 35}Cl nuclei are compared with theoretical results based on DFT calculations which were carried out by means of Gaussian'98 W software.

  3. Studies of the electronic structure and biological activity of chosen 1,4-benzodiazepines by 35Cl NQR spectroscopy and DFT calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronisz, K.; Ostafin, M.; Poleshchuk, O. Kh.; Mielcarek, J.; Nogaj, B.

    2006-11-01

    Selected derivatives of 1,4-benzodiazepine: lorazepam, lormetazepam, oxazepam and temazepam, used as active substances in anxiolytic drugs, have been studied by 35Cl NQR method in order to find the correlation between electronic structure and biological activity. The 35Cl NQR resonance frequencies ( νQ) measured at 77 K have been correlated with the following parameters characterising their biological activity: biological half-life period ( t0.5), affinity to benzodiazepine receptor (IC 50) and mean dose equivalent. The results of experimental study of some benzodiazepine derivatives by nuclear quadrupole resonance of 35Cl nuclei are compared with theoretical results based on DFT calculations which were carried out by means of Gaussian'98 W software.

  4. Eight principles for safer opioid prescribing and cautions with benzodiazepines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Lynn R; Reisfield, Gary M; Dasgupta, Nabarun

    2015-01-01

    The provision of long-term opioid analgesic therapy for chronic pain requires a careful risk/benefit analysis followed by clinical safety measures to identify and reduce misuse, abuse, and addiction and their associated morbidity and mortality. Multiple data sources show that benzodiazepines, prescribed for comorbid insomnia, anxiety, and mood disorders, heighten the risk of respiratory depression and other adverse outcomes when combined with opioid therapy. Evidence is presented for hazards associated with coadministration of opioids and benzodiazepines and the need for caution when initiating opioid therapy for chronic pain. Clinical recommendations follow, as drawn from 2 previously published literature reviews, one of which proffers 8 principles for safer opioid prescribing; the other review presents risks associated with benzodiazepines, suggests alternatives for co-prescribing benzodiazepines and opioids, and outlines recommendations regarding co-prescribing if alternative therapies are ineffective.

  5. Benzodiazepine absetzen im Alter. Wann und, wenn ja, wie?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolter, Dirk

    2017-01-01

    Although viewed critically in geriatrics, benzodiazepine use is still common among old people. Before reducing the dosage the following questions must be considered: 1. Are there indications for benzodiazepine treatment and will discontinuation cause relevant rebound symptoms of the initial...... disorder treated? 2. To what extent do the patient and other key persons consider discontinuation to be reasonable and will they support discontinuation? 3. Is the target complete withdrawal, a dose reduction or shift to another benzodiazepine drug which is more suitable in old age for pharmacokinetic...... reasons? This article provides assistance in answering these questions and some guidelines for the practical management of discontinuation. It is mandatory 1) to periodically address the problem of long-term benzodiazepine use when counseling the patient and key persons and 2) to be aware that several...

  6. [Should we continue to use benzodiazepines in clinical practice?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampogna, Gaia; Del Vecchio, Valeria; Luciano, Mario; De Rosa, Corrado; Albert, Umberto; Dell'Osso, Bernardo; Fiorillo, Andrea

    2015-06-01

    The discovery of benzodiazepines has represented a milestone in the history of pharmacological treatments and in relation to the management of anxiety, sleep and other psychiatric disorders. After several decades, these agents still represent one of the largest and most widely prescribed groups of medications, not only in the psychiatric clinical practice, but also in the whole medical field. Over the last decade, however, multiple concerns have been raised on the risks related to the prescription of benzodiazepines, for their addictive potential and for cognitive side-effects. Therefore, benzodiazepines are today considered as a double-edge sword, which should be carefully handled and preferentially prescribed by specialists (or at least under their supervision), after an adequate training. Unfortunately, this is not the case in many situations, and the need to improve training on benzodiazepines management has been recently emphasized.

  7. The Benzodiazepine-Dementia Disorders Link: Current State of Knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pariente, Antoine; de Gage, Sophie Billioti; Moore, Nicholas; Bégaud, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    The short-term effects of benzodiazepines on memory are well established and are suspected in the long term. Eleven studies have been published so far concerning benzodiazepine use and the risk of dementia disorders; nine of these studies concluded these drugs have a deleterious effect, one found a protective effect, and one (the most recently published) observed no effect. The positive association found in some studies could be due to a reverse causation bias since the main indications for benzodiazepines (e.g. sleep disorders, anxiety) can also be prodromes of dementia disorders. This bias is less likely for treatments started more than 10 years before the diagnosis. Among others, three mechanisms could underlie the potential influence of benzodiazepines on the development of dementia disorders. First, benzodiazepines can decrease beta-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE-1) and γ-secretase activity and slow down the accumulation of Aβ oligomers in the brain. This potential positive effect has never been confirmed; the same is true for the prevention of excitotoxicity through benzodiazepine anti-glutamatergic action. Second, since astrocytes located in the area of amyloid plaques could have gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-secreting activity, patients with pre-dementia lesions could be at increased risk of presenting with more pronounced deleterious cognitive effects of benzodiazepines. Finally, owing to the neural compensation and cognitive reserve concepts, some subjects could cope with initial lesions by using/developing alternative networks. By lowering the brain activation level, benzodiazepines could limit this capacity. In conclusion, it is essential that animal studies explore the mechanistic hypotheses of this association found by most of the pharmacoepidemiological studies conducted on this topic.

  8. Comparison of urine and oral fluid as matrices for screening of thirty-three benzodiazepines and benzodiazepine-like substances using immunoassay and LC–MS(–MS).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smink, B.E. Mathijssen, M.P.M. Lusthof, K.J. Gier, J.J. de Egberts, A.C.G. & Uges, D.R.A.

    2006-01-01

    Benzodiazepines are the most frequently detected medicinal drugs in drivers. The use of benzodiazepines is associated with an increased road accident risk. In this study, the presence of benzodiazepines detected by liquid chromatography–(tandem) mass spectrometry [LC–MS(–MS)] in oral fluid and urine

  9. Effects of exposure to benzodiazepine during fetal life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, U; Rosa, F W; Baum, C; Wiholm, B E; Faich, G A

    1992-09-19

    Dysmorphism and mental retardation have been reported in 7 Swedish children born of mothers who had taken high doses of benzodiazepines regularly during pregnancy. To explore this association further, we examined benzodiazepine use during pregnancy in 104,000 women whose deliveries were registered by the US public health insurance system, Medicaid, during 1980-83. Fetal outcomes were assessed from the health claims profiles of their offspring, up to 6-9 years after delivery. 80 pregnant women had received 10 or more benzodiazepine prescriptions during the 4 years. Their records showed heavy general use of health care and frequent alcohol and substance abuse, and other disorders that could confound any effect of the benzodiazepines. For the 80 pregnancies, 3 intrauterine deaths were identified as well as 2 infants with congenital abnormalities whose curtailed records suggested neonatal death. Records of 64 surviving children could be linked to these 80 pregnancies whilst records for 11 apparent survivors could not be located. 6 of the 64 survivors had diagnoses consistent with teratogenic abnormalities. The high rate of teratogenicity after heavy maternal benzodiazepine use occurs with multiple alcohol and substance exposure and thus may not be due to benzodiazepine exposure.

  10. Analytical methodologies for the determination of benzodiazepines in biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persona, Karolina; Madej, Katarzyna; Knihnicki, Paweł; Piekoszewski, Wojciech

    2015-09-10

    Benzodiazepine drugs belong to important and most widely used medicaments. They demonstrate such therapeutic properties as anxiolytic, sedative, somnifacient, anticonvulsant, diastolic and muscle relaxant effects. However, despite the fact that benzodiazepines possess high therapeutic index and are considered to be relatively safe, their use can be dangerous when: (1) co-administered with alcohol, (2) co-administered with other medicaments like sedatives, antidepressants, neuroleptics or morphine like substances, (3) driving under their influence, (4) using benzodiazepines non-therapeutically as drugs of abuse or in drug-facilitated crimes. For these reasons benzodiazepines are still studied and determined in a variety of biological materials. In this article, sample preparation techniques which have been applied in analysis of benzodiazepine drugs in biological samples have been reviewed and presented. The next part of the article is focused on a review of analytical methods which have been employed for pharmacological, toxicological or forensic study of this group of drugs in the biological matrices. The review was preceded by a description of the physicochemical properties of the selected benzodiazepines and two, very often coexisting in the same analyzed samples, sedative-hypnotic drugs.

  11. Anxiolytics not acting at the benzodiazepine receptor: beta blockers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyrer, P

    1992-01-01

    1. Although there is clear evidence for many controlled trials in the past 25 years that beta blockers are effective in anxiety disorders clear indications for their use are lacking. 2. The balance of evidence suggests that the mechanism of action of beta-blocking drugs is through peripheral blockade of beta-mediated symptoms. 3. Most evidence to the efficacy of beta-blockers comes from study of their use in generalized anxiety and in acute stress. 4. Because beta-blockers carry no risks of pharmacological dependence they may be preferred to many other anti-anxiety drugs.

  12. Modulation of benzodiazepine by lysine and pipecolic acid on pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Y.F.; Hargest, V.; Chen, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    L-lysine and its metabolite pipecolic acid (PA) have been studied for their effects on pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-induced seizures in mice. L-Lysine of L-Pa i.p. significantly increased clonic and tonic latencies in a dose-dependent manner against 90 mg/kg PTZ-induced seizures. L-Lysine but not L-Pa enhanced the anticonvulsant effect of diazepam (DZ). L-Pa i.c.v. showed a slight decrease in clonic latency; it did not enhance the antiseizure activity of DZ; it caused seizures at 0.6 mmol/kg. D-PA i.c.v. displayed an opposite effect compared to its L-isomer. The anticonvulsant effect of L-lysine in terms of increase in seizure latency and survival was even more amplified when tested with a submaximal PTZ concentration. L-Lysine showed an enhancement of specific /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam(FZ) binding to mouse brain membranes both in vitro an din vivo. The possibility of L-lysine acting as a modulator for the GABA/benzodiazepine receptors was demonstrated. Since L-PA showed enhancement of /sup 3/H-FZ binding only in vitro but not in vivo, the anticonvulsant effect of L-PA may not be linked to the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor.

  13. Positron emission tomography assessment of effects of benzodiazepines on regional glucose metabolic rate in patients with anxiety disorder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchsbaum, M.S.; Wu, J.; Haier, R.; Hazlett, E.; Ball, R.; Katz, M.; Sokolski, K.; Lagunas-Solar, M.; Langer, D.

    1987-06-22

    Patients with generalized anxiety disorder (n = 18) entered a 21-day, double-blind, placebo-controlled random assignment trial of clorazepate. Positron emission tomography with YF-deoxyglucose was carried out before and after treatment. Decreases in glucose metabolic rate in visual cortex and relative increases in the basal ganglia and thalamus were found. A correlation between regional changes in metabolic rate and regional benzodiazepine receptor binding density from other human autopsy studies was observed; brain regions highest in receptor density showed the greatest decrease in rate.

  14. Do benzodiazepines mimic reverse-turn structures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, Masayuki; Marshall, Garland R.

    2006-05-01

    The role of benzodiazepine derivatives (BZD) as a privileged scaffold that mimics β-turn structures (Ripka et al. (1993) Tetrahedron 49:3593-3608) in peptide/protein recognition was reexamined in detail. Stable BZD ring conformers were determined with MM3, and experimental reverse-turn structures were extracted from the basis set of protein crystal structures previously defined by Ripka et al. Ideal β-turns were also modeled and similarly compared with BZD conformers. Huge numbers of conformers were generated by systematically scanning the torsional degrees of freedom for BZDs, as well as those of ideal β-turns for comparison. Using these structures, conformers of BZDs were fit to experimental structures as suggested by Ripka et al., or modeled classical β-turn conformers, and the root-mean-square deviation (RMSD) values were calculated for each pairwise comparison. Pairs of conformers with the smallest RMSD values for overlap of the four α-β side-chain orientations were selected. All overlaps of BZD conformers with experimental β-turns yielded one or more comparisons where the least RMSD was significantly small, 0.48-0.86 Å, as previously suggested. Utilizing a different methodology, the overall conclusion that benzodiazepines could serve as reverse-turn mimetics of Ripka et al. is justified. The least RMSD values for the overlap of BZDs and modeled classical β-turns were also less than 1 Å. When comparing BZDs with experimental or classical β-turns, the set of experimental β-turns selected by Ripka et al. fit the BZD scaffolds better than modeled classical β-turns; however, all the experimental β-turns did not fit a particular BZD scaffold better. A single BZD ring conformation, and/or chiral orientation, can mimic some, but not all, of the experimental β-turn structures. BZD has two central ring conformations and one chiral center that explains why the four variations of the BZD scaffold can mimic all types of β-turn structure examined. It was

  15. 1,4-Benzodiazepine N-Nitrosoamidines: Useful Intermediates in the Synthesis of Tricyclic Benzodiazepines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos del Pozo

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available 1,4-Benzodiazepine N-nitrosoamidines have been used as scaffolds for the preparation of different tricyclic derivatives. Replacement of the N-nitrosoamidine moiety through treatment with the nucleophiles acetylhydrazine, aminoacetaldehyde dimethylacetal and 1-amino-2-propanol, followed by an acid-catalyzed cyclization step, afforded triazolo and imidazobenzodiazepines 1, 6, and 7, respectively, in good yields. When acetylhydrazine is used as a nucleophile, the overall process provides an alternative route to alprazolam (1b and triazolam (1c, respectively.

  16. Benzodiazepine harm: how can it be reduced?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lader, Malcolm

    2014-02-01

    The benzodiazepines (BZDs) are anxiolytics, hypnotics, anticonvulsants, muscle-relaxants and induce anaesthesia. Adverse effects comprise sedation subjectively and cognitive and psychomotor impairment objectively. Complex skills such as driving can be compromised. Paradoxical excitement can have forensic implications. Long term use beyond the licensed durations is common but both efficacy and adverse effects associated with this have been poorly documented. Withdrawal and dependence have excited particular concern, and even polemic. Perhaps a third of long term (beyond 6  months) users experience symptoms and signs on attempting to withdraw - anxiety, insomnia, muscle spasms and tension and perceptual hypersensitivity. Uncommonly, fits or a psychosis may supervene. The patterns following withdrawal vary widely. The usual method of withdrawal is slow tapering but it may not obviate the problems completely. BZDs are also drugs of abuse either on their own or in conjunction with opioids and stimulants. Claims have been made that the use of BZDs is associated with increased mortality. This is a concern in view of the widespread usage of these drugs, particularly in the elderly. All of these factors impinge on the risk : benefit ratio and the severity of the indications. Harm reduction should focus on choice of alternative treatments both psychological and pharmacological. Guidelines emphasise that BZDs are not drugs of first choice and should only be used short term. Schedules are available to educate about methods of withdrawal in current users, emphasising the slow rate of taper. General principles of harm minimization in the addiction field are appropriate to BZD abuse.

  17. Is benzodiazepine use during pregnancy really teratogenic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ornoy, A; Arnon, J; Shechtman, S; Moerman, L; Lukashova, I

    1998-01-01

    Benzodiazepines (BDs) have a widespread use among people suffering from anxiety. These drugs easily cross the placenta and may affect the developing embryo and fetus. The literature is divided as to whether BD may cause an increase in spontaneous abortions or congenital anomalies. From the years 1988 to 1996, 756 women called the Israeli TIS concerning exposures to BD prior to or during pregnancy. Of 599 women who called us during pregnancy, we have follow-up information on 460 pregnancies (76.6%). The incidence of congenital anomalies (3.1%) was not different from that found in 424 control pregnancies (2.6%). There was a significantly higher incidence of induced abortions (14.1% vs. 4.7%, P = 0.00) and of spontaneous abortions (8.7% vs. 5.2%, P = 0.01). From an examination of our results, it does not appear that BD during pregnancy caused an increase in the incidence of birth defects. There was no specific defect in the offspring. The increase in the rate of induced abortions is probably related to the counseling of the callers, and the increase in spontaneous abortions seems to be a result of the lower gestational age at the time of counseling in the women exposed to BD. It is unknown whether BD could be responsible for developmental or behavioral problems, which are observed only at a later stage.

  18. Electrophoretic fingerprinting of benzodiazepine tablets in spike drinks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáiz, Jorge; Ortega-Ojeda, Fernando; López-Melero, Lucía; Montalvo, Gema; García-Ruiz, Carmen

    2014-11-01

    Over the last few years, there has been an increase in the reports of drug-facilitated crimes. The list of drugs associated with these crimes is extensive and benzodiazepines constitute one of the groups of substances more commonly used. The sedative properties, which characterize benzodiazepines, are enhanced when such drugs are combined with alcohol, being more attractive for committing these types of crimes. In this work, a capillary electrophoresis method was applied to the analysis of 63 different samples of club drinks spiked with benzodiazepine tablets. The resulting electropherograms were processed and analyzed with the chemometric multivariate techniques: principal component analysis (PCA) and soft independent modeling of class analogies (SIMCA) classification. The PCA results allowed a clear differentiation of each drug class in a 3D plot. In addition, the SIMCA classification model (5% significance level) showed that eight out of nine test samples were automatically assigned by software to their proper sample class. The conflicting sample was correctly classified in the Coomans' plot (95% confidence). This novel approach based on the comparison of electrophoretic profiles of spiked drinks by chemometric tools allows determining the benzodiazepine used for drink spiking without the use of drug standards. Moreover, it provides an opportunity for the forensic laboratories to incorporate the identification capability provided by the electrophoretic fingerprinting of benzodiazepine solutions in existing or new databases. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Withdrawal-induced delirium associated with a benzodiazepine switch: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bosshart Herbert

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Introduced in the early 1960s, diazepam remains among the most frequently prescribed benzodiazepine-type sedatives and hypnotics. Patients with chronic use of short-acting benzodiazepines are frequently switched to diazepam because the accumulating, long-acting metabolite, N-desmethyl-diazepam, prevents benzodiazepine-associated withdrawal symptoms, which can occur during trough plasma levels of short-acting benzodiazepines. Although mild to moderate withdrawal symptoms are frequently observed during benzodiazepine switching to diazepam, severe medical complications associated with this treatment approach have thus far not been reported. Case presentation A 64-year-old female Caucasian with major depression, alcohol dependence and benzodiazepine dependence was successfully treated for depression and, after lorazepam-assisted alcohol detoxification, was switched from lorazepam to diazepam to facilitate benzodiazepine discontinuation. Subsequent to the benzodiazepine switch, our patient unexpectedly developed an acute delirious state, which quickly remitted after re-administration of lorazepam. A newly diagnosed early form of mixed dementia, combining both vascular and Alzheimer-type lesions, was found as a likely contributing factor for the observed vulnerability to benzodiazepine-induced withdrawal symptoms. Conclusion Chronic use of benzodiazepines is common in the elderly and a switch to diazepam often precedes benzodiazepine discontinuation trials. However, contrary to common clinical practice, benzodiazepine switching to diazepam may require cross-titration with slow tapering of the first benzodiazepine to allow for the build-up of N-desmethyl-diazepam, in order to safely prevent severe withdrawal symptoms. Alternatively, long-term treatment with low doses of benzodiazepines may be considered, especially in elderly patients with chronic use of benzodiazepines and proven vulnerability to benzodiazepine

  20. Substance misuse in young people in Ireland - a focus on benzodiazepines

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Benzodiazepines are a class of drugs that are prescribed for the treatment of anxiety and insomnia. Due to the powerful tolerance that can develop as a result of sustained use, benzodiazepines can also be dependence-forming. Benzodiazepine dependence can occur from prescribed and from recreational use, and is a significant issue for young people. The consequences of benzodiazepine dependence include cognitive and learning impairment, depressive symptoms, and increased suicide risk. Despite th...

  1. Withdrawal-induced delirium associated with a benzodiazepine switch: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Introduced in the early 1960s, diazepam remains among the most frequently prescribed benzodiazepine-type sedatives and hypnotics. Patients with chronic use of short-acting benzodiazepines are frequently switched to diazepam because the accumulating, long-acting metabolite, N-desmethyl-diazepam, prevents benzodiazepine-associated withdrawal symptoms, which can occur during trough plasma levels of short-acting benzodiazepines. Although mild to moderate withdrawal symptoms ...

  2. Benzodiazepines should still be first-line treatment for alcohol withdrawal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Askgaard, Gro; Pottegård, Anton; Fink-Jensen, Anders

    2017-01-01

    In this review, we summarize the evidence for benzodiazepines and barbiturates as alcohol withdrawal treatment and outline a treatment guideline. A number of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) indicate that benzodiazepine treatment decreases alcohol withdrawal seizures and is safe....... For barbiturates, only a few RCTs have been undertaken, and barbiturates were not found to be superior to benzodiazepines. Consequently, we suggest that benzodiazepines should still be first-line treatment for alcohol withdrawal....

  3. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy and Catatonia in the Setting of Benzodiazepine Withdrawal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teng J. Peng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report two serious and unusual complications of benzodiazepine withdrawal in a single patient: takotsubo cardiomyopathy and catatonia. This 61-year-old female patient was brought to the emergency department with lethargy and within hours had declined into a state of catatonia. Although there was never a complaint of chest pain, ECG showed deep anterior T-wave inversions and cardiac enzymes were elevated. An echocardiogram was consistent with takotsubo cardiomyopathy. She later received 1 mg of midazolam and within minutes had resolution of catatonic symptoms. Careful history revealed that she had omitted her daily dose of lorazepam for 3 days prior to admission. To our knowledge, the case presented herein is the first report of simultaneous catatonia and takotsubo cardiomyopathy in the setting of benzodiazepine withdrawal. The pathogenesis of both conditions is poorly understood but may be indirectly related to the sudden decrease in γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA signaling during benzodiazepine withdrawal.

  4. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy and Catatonia in the Setting of Benzodiazepine Withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Teng J; Patchett, Nicholas D; Bernard, Sheilah A

    2016-01-01

    We report two serious and unusual complications of benzodiazepine withdrawal in a single patient: takotsubo cardiomyopathy and catatonia. This 61-year-old female patient was brought to the emergency department with lethargy and within hours had declined into a state of catatonia. Although there was never a complaint of chest pain, ECG showed deep anterior T-wave inversions and cardiac enzymes were elevated. An echocardiogram was consistent with takotsubo cardiomyopathy. She later received 1 mg of midazolam and within minutes had resolution of catatonic symptoms. Careful history revealed that she had omitted her daily dose of lorazepam for 3 days prior to admission. To our knowledge, the case presented herein is the first report of simultaneous catatonia and takotsubo cardiomyopathy in the setting of benzodiazepine withdrawal. The pathogenesis of both conditions is poorly understood but may be indirectly related to the sudden decrease in γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) signaling during benzodiazepine withdrawal.

  5. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy and Catatonia in the Setting of Benzodiazepine Withdrawal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Teng J.

    2016-01-01

    We report two serious and unusual complications of benzodiazepine withdrawal in a single patient: takotsubo cardiomyopathy and catatonia. This 61-year-old female patient was brought to the emergency department with lethargy and within hours had declined into a state of catatonia. Although there was never a complaint of chest pain, ECG showed deep anterior T-wave inversions and cardiac enzymes were elevated. An echocardiogram was consistent with takotsubo cardiomyopathy. She later received 1 mg of midazolam and within minutes had resolution of catatonic symptoms. Careful history revealed that she had omitted her daily dose of lorazepam for 3 days prior to admission. To our knowledge, the case presented herein is the first report of simultaneous catatonia and takotsubo cardiomyopathy in the setting of benzodiazepine withdrawal. The pathogenesis of both conditions is poorly understood but may be indirectly related to the sudden decrease in γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) signaling during benzodiazepine withdrawal. PMID:27547472

  6. Phenobarbital compared to benzodiazepines in alcohol withdrawal treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Askgaard, Gro; Hallas, Jesper; Fink-Jensen, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Background: Long-acting benzodiazepines such as chlordiazepoxide are recommended as first-line treatment for alcohol withdrawal. These drugs are known for their abuse liability and might increase alcohol consumption among problem drinkers. Phenobarbital could be an alternative treatment option......, possibly with the drawback of a more pronounced acute toxicity. We evaluated if phenobarbital compared to chlordiazepoxide decreased the risk of subsequent use of benzodiazepines, alcohol recidivism and mortality. Methods: The study was a register-based cohort study of patients admitted for alcohol...... withdrawal 1998-2013 and treated with either phenobarbital or chlordiazepoxide. Patients were followed for one year. We calculated hazard ratios (HR) for benzodiazepine use, alcohol recidivism and mortality associated with alcohol withdrawal treatment, while adjusting for confounders. Results: A total...

  7. UV-guided screening of benzodiazepine producing species in Penicillium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Thomas Ostenfeld; Frydenvang, K.; Frisvad, Jens Christian

    2000-01-01

    The benzodiazepine sclerotigenin (auranthine B) recently described as a metabolite of Penicillium sclerotigenum, has been isolated as the major metabolite from an isolate of P. commune. The structure of sclerotigenin was established by a single-crystal X-ray diffraction study and by NMR spectrosc......The benzodiazepine sclerotigenin (auranthine B) recently described as a metabolite of Penicillium sclerotigenum, has been isolated as the major metabolite from an isolate of P. commune. The structure of sclerotigenin was established by a single-crystal X-ray diffraction study and by NMR...... spectroscopy, UV-guided screening for benzodiazepine production by other penicillia revealed that sclerotigenin was also produced by isolates of P. clavigerum, P. lanosum, P. melanoconidium, P. sclerotigenum and P. verrucosum. Sclerotigenin was detected both intra- and extracellularly, Apparently, P...

  8. UV-guided screening of benzodiazepine producing species in Penicillium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostenfeld Larsen T; Frydenvang, Karla Andrea; Christian Frisvad J

    2000-01-01

    The benzodiazepine sclerotigenin (auranthine B) recently described as a metabolite of Penicillium sclerotigenum, has been isolated as the major metabolite from an isolate of P. commune. The structure of sclerotigenin was established by a single-crystal X-ray diffraction study and by NMR spectrosc......The benzodiazepine sclerotigenin (auranthine B) recently described as a metabolite of Penicillium sclerotigenum, has been isolated as the major metabolite from an isolate of P. commune. The structure of sclerotigenin was established by a single-crystal X-ray diffraction study and by NMR...... spectroscopy. UV-guided screening for benzodiazepine production by other penicillia revealed that sclerotigenin was also produced by isolates of P. clavigerum, P. lanosum, P. melanoconidium, P. sclerotigenum and P. verrucosum. Sclerotigenin was detected both intra- and extracellularly. Apparently, P...

  9. The proapoptotic benzodiazepine Bz-423 affects the growth and survival of malignant B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boitano, Anthony; Ellman, Jonathan A; Glick, Gary D; Opipari, Anthony W

    2003-10-15

    Bz-423 is a novel proapoptotic 1,4-benzodiazepine that induces cell death via a superoxide signal. Previous work has shown that Bz-423 ameliorates disease in animal models of systemic lupus erythematosus that also have features of lymphoproliferative disease. Here we describe the effects of Bz-423 against a group of malignant B-cell lines derived from Burkitt's lymphoma. These experiments demonstrate that Bz-423 has cytotoxic activity against all B-cell lines tested, regardless of EBV status or Bcl-2 and Bcl-x(L) expression levels. In addition to its cytotoxic properties, we found that Bz-423 is also a potent antiproliferative agent that induces a G(1)-phase arrest independent of p53. Mechanistically, both the cytotoxicity and growth arrest are mediated by increased reactive oxygen species levels and appear independent of binding to the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor. This work further defines the biological activities of Bz-423 that are consistent with those of other compounds in clinical development for antineoplastic therapies.

  10. Initial benzodiazepine use and improved health-related quality of life.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hulten, Rolf; Teeuw, Bart; Bakker, Albert; Leufkens, Hubert G

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of initial benzodiazepine users was measured over time. Furthermore, benzodiazepine usage characteristics as determinants of change in mental and physical health status of the benzodiazepine users were examined. METHODS: In the only pharmacy of a

  11. Prospective cohort study into post-disaster benzodiazepine use demonstrated only short-term increase.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorn, T.; Yzermans, C.J.; Zee, J. van der

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Benzodiazepines are typically prescribed for anxiety and insomnia, two complaints often reported after disasters. Benzodiazepines can cause mental or physical dependence, especially when taken for a long time. This study aims at evaluating benzodiazepine use in a disaster-stricken commun

  12. Benzodiazepines and risk of dementia: true association or reverse causation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbui, C; Gastaldon, C; Cipriani, A

    2013-12-01

    According to a recently published population study conducted in France, exposure to benzodiazepines may be associated with an approximately 50% increase in the risk of dementia in the elderly. However, the clinical interpretation of this finding raised some concerns. A causal link between benzodiazepine use and diagnosis of dementia may be real, but it is nevertheless possible that the increased risk might be due to other confounding factors. In this article, the main strengths and weaknesses of this study are briefly analysed, including the possibility of reverse causation. Implications for research and current practice are discussed.

  13. FG 7142 specifically reduces meal size and the rate and regularity of sustained feeding in female rats: evidence that benzodiazepine inverse agonists reduce food palatability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottone, Pietro; Sabino, Valentina; Steardo, Luca; Zorrilla, Eric P

    2007-05-01

    Benzodiazepine receptor inverse agonists reduce food intake in males, but their actions in females, in whom stress-related eating disorders are more common, as well as their behavioral mode of action remain unclear. The consummatory effects of benzodiazepine receptor ligands have alternately been hypothesized to reflect changes in the hedonic evaluation of food or secondary effects of anxiety-related or cognitive properties. To test the anorectic mode of action of benzodiazepine inverse agonists, the effects of FG 7142 on feeding microstructure were studied in nondeprived female Wistar rats (n=32). Microstructure analysis used a novel meal definition that recognizes prandial drinking. On pharmacologically synchronized diestrus I, rats were pretreated (-30 min dark onset) with the benzodiazepine partial inverse agonist FG 7142 (i.p. 0, 3.75, 7.5, 15 mg/kg) in a between-subjects design. FG 7142 delayed the onset of (16-541%), decreased the amount eaten (36-52%) and drunk (63-87%), and reduced the time spent drinking (59-87%) within the first nocturnal meal. Dose-dependent incremental anorexia continued 6 h into the dark cycle, whereas FG 7142 did not suppress the quantity, duration or rate of drinking past the first meal. Treated rats ate smaller meals (17-42%) of normal duration. This reflected that FG 7142 slowed feeding within meals (9-38%) by decreasing the regularity and maintenance of feeding from pellet-to-pellet. FG 7142 did not influence postprandial satiety; meal frequency and inter-meal intervals were unaffected. FG 7142 anorexia was blocked by the benzodiazepine receptor antagonist flumazenil in a 2:1 molar ratio (n=17 rats). The very early, nonspecific (+10 min), but not subsequent (2.5, 4.5 h) feeding-specific phase, of FG 7142 anorexia was mirrored by anxiogenic-like behavior in FG 7142-treated (7.5 mg/kg) female rats (n=48) in the elevated plus-maze. Thus, benzodiazepine receptor inverse agonists preferentially lessen the maintenance of feeding in

  14. [Benzodiazepin addiction: a silent addiction among older people].

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oude Voshaar, R.C.

    2012-01-01

    Benzodiazepines are frequently prescribed for a longer period of time for anxiety disorders and insomnia in spite of the many guidelines to prescribe these drugs only short-term. These guidelines are based on the risk-benefit balance between long-term effectiveness and side effects like addiction, a

  15. Lack of evidence of teratogenicity of benzodiazepine drugs in Hungary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czeizel, A

    In order to investigate possible teratogenic effects of commonly used benzodiazepines (diazepam, chlordiazepoxide, nitrazepam) in Hungary, four approaches were used: 1. A retrospective case-control study of 630 cases with isolated cleft lip +/- cleft palate, 179 cases with isolated cleft palate, 392 cases of multiple congenital anomalies including cleft lip and/or cleft palate, and their matched control cases; 2. The Case-Control Surveillance System of Congenital Anomalies in Hungary, 1980 to 1984, involving 355 cases with isolated cleft palate, 417 cases with multiple congenital anomalies, and 186 cases with Down's syndrome (as positive controls). Benzodiazepines were taken by 14.9% of 11,073 control pregnant women studied; 3. A prospective study of 33 pregnant women attending the Counselling Clinic following ingestion of benzodiazepines during the first trimester of pregnancy; 4. An observational study involving 12 pregnant women who attempted suicide and one with accidental overdosage with benzodiazepines during pregnancy. None of these four approaches gave any indication of an association between facial clefting and in utero exposure to these substances.

  16. Different study criteria affect the prevalence of benzodiazepine use.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zandstra, S.M.; Furer, J.W.; Lisdonk, E.H. van de; Hof, M.A. van 't; Bor, J.H.J.; Weel, C. van; Zitman, F.G.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Different prevalences of benzodiazepine (BZ) use are described in the literature. The present study assessed the effects of employing various definitions of BZ use and various observation periods on the prevalence rate of BZ use in an open population aged 18-74 years. METHOD: In a litera

  17. Environmental occurrence, fate and transformation of benzodiazepines in water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosjek, T; Perko, S; Zupanc, M; Zanoški Hren, M; Landeka Dragičević, T; Zigon, D; Kompare, B; Heath, E

    2012-02-01

    Benzodiazepine derivatives are prescribed in large quantities globally and are potentially new emerging environmental contaminants. Unfortunately, a dearth of data exists concerning occurrence, persistence and fate in the environment. This paper redresses this by reviewing existing literature, assessing the occurrence of selected benzodiazepine anxiolytics (diazepam, oxazepam and bromazepam) in wastewater influent and effluent and surface water from Slovenia, evaluating their removal during water treatment and identifying the transformation products formed during water treatment. Their occurrence was monitored in hospital effluent, river water and in wastewater treatment plant influent and effluent. The study reveals the presence of benzodiazepine derivatives in all samples with the highest amounts in hospital effluents: 111 ng L(-1), 158 ng L(-1) and 72 ng L(-1) for diazepam, bromazepam and oxazepam, respectively. Removal efficiencies with respect to biological treatment of diazepam were 16-18% (oxic), 18-32% (anoxic→oxic), 53-76% (oxic→anoxic) and 83% (oxic→anoxic→oxic→anoxic cascade bioreactors), while the removal oxazepam was 20-24% under anoxic conditions. Coupled biological and photochemical treatment followed by the adsorption to activated carbon resulted in a removal efficiency of 99.99%. Results reveal the recalcitrant nature of benzodiazepine derivatives and suggest that only combinational treatment is sufficient to remove them. In addition, eight novel diazepam and four novel oxazepam transformation products are reported. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Association between Benzodiazepine Use and Dementia: A Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GuoChao Zhong

    Full Text Available The association between long-term benzodiazepine use and risk of dementia remains controversial. Therefore, current study aimed to quantify this association, and to explore a potential dose-response pattern.We searched PubMed, Embase and the Cochrane Library through August 17, 2014. We included nested case-control or prospective cohort studies that provided risk estimates on the association of benzodiazepine use with risk of dementia, and a clear definition of status of benzodiazepine use. Overall effect size was calculated using a random-effects model.Six studies were eligible for inclusion, involving 11,891 dementia cases and 45,391 participants. Compared with never users, pooled adjusted risk ratios (RRs for dementia were 1.49 (95% confidence interval (CI 1.30-1.72 for ever users, 1.55 (95% CI 1.31-1.83 for recent users, and 1.55 (95% CI 1.17-2.03 for past users. The risk of dementia increased by 22% for every additional 20 defined daily dose per year (RR, 1.22, 95%CI 1.18-1.25. When we restricted our meta-analyses to unadjusted RRs, all initial significant associations persisted.Long-term benzodiazepine users have an increased risk of dementia compared with never users. However, findings from our study should be treated with caution due to limited studies and potential reverse causation. Large prospective cohort studies with long follow-up duration are warranted to confirm these findings.

  19. Patterns of chronic benzodiazepine use in the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Sgnaolin

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In several countries, prevalence studies demonstrate that chronic use of BZD in the elderly population is very high. This scenario has reached pandemic proportions for decades and is an important public health problem. Objectives To examine the independent association between chronic benzodiazepine use in depression, anxiety and bipolar disorder, as well as other clinical and sociodemographic factors. Methods This cross-sectional study was developed from a population-based survey and conducted from March, 2011 to December, 2012 using a random sample of 550 elderly people who were enrolled in the Family Health Strategy in Porto Alegre, Brazil. Data was collected from identifying epidemiological and health data (sociodemographic, self-perception health, self-reported diseases, smoking, alcohol and pharmacotherapeutic evaluation and from the diagnoses of mood and anxiety disorders. Results Elderly patients diagnosed with depression, anxiety, concomitant depression/anxiety and bipolar disorders, and those who were using antidepressants have a higher risk of benzodiazepine use. Individuals who self-reported drinking alcohol had a lower risk of benzodiazepine use. Discussion Benzodiazepines are often used by the elderly for long periods, which has a direct impact on the treatment of mood and anxiety disorders and on vulnerable groups such as the elderly, who may be unnecessarily taking these drugs.

  20. Benzodiazepine-associated delirium in critically ill adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaal, Irene J.; Devlin, John W.; Hazelbag, Marijn; Klein Klouwenberg, Peter M. C.; van der Kooi, Arendina W.; Ong, David S. Y.; Cremer, Olaf L.; Groenwold, Rolf H.; Slooter, Arjen J. C.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The association between benzodiazepine use and delirium risk in the ICU remains unclear. Prior investigations have failed to account for disease severity prior to delirium onset, competing events that may preclude delirium detection, other important delirium risk factors, and an adequate nu

  1. Benzodiazepine Administration Induces Exogenic Psychosis: A Case of Child Abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Alexander; And Others

    1995-01-01

    An 11-year-old boy with psychiatric symptoms (anxiety, panic reactions, rage, and disorientation) was brought to the pediatric clinic by his father. Purposeful administration by his mother of benzodiazepine, a prescription drug available in the household, was suspected as responsible for the psychotic symptoms. (DB)

  2. Prediction of benzodiazepines solubility using different cosolvency models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nokhodchi, A; Shokri, J; Barzegar-Jalali, M; Ghafourian, T

    2002-07-01

    The solubility of four benzodiazepines (BZPs) including diazepam (DIZ), lorazepam (LRZ) clonazepam (CLZ), and chlordiazepoxide (CHZ) in water-cosolvent (ethanol propylene glycol and polyethylene glycol 200) binary systems were studied. In general, increasing the volume fraction of cosolvents resulted in an increase in the solubility of benzodiazepines. The mole fraction solubilities were fitted to the various cosolvency models, namely extended Hildebrand approach (EHA), excess free energy (EFE), combined nearly ideal binary solvent/Redlich-Kister (CNIBS/R-K), general single model (GSM), mixture response surface (MR-S). double log-log (DL-L), and linear double log-log (LDL-L). The results showed that DL-L model was the best model in predicting the solubility of all drugs in all the water-cosolvent mixtures (OAE% = 4.71). The minimum and maximum errors were observed for benzodiazepine's solubility in water-propylene glycol and water-ethanol mixtures which were 2.67 and 11.78%, respectively. Three models (EFE, CNIBS/R-K and LDL-L) were chosen as general models for solubility descriptions of these structurally similar drugs in each of the solvent systems. Among these models, the EFE model was the best in predicting the solubility of benzodiazepines in binary solvent mixtures (OAE% = 11.19).

  3. Reimbursement restriction moderately decreases Benzodiazepine use in general practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoebert, J.M.; Souverein, P.C.; Mantel-Teeuwisse, A.K.; Leufkens, H.G.M.; Dijk, L. van

    2011-01-01

    Problem Statement: On January 1st 2009, benzodiazepines were excluded from the Dutch positive reimbursement list when used as anxiolytic, hypnotic or sedative, to limit misuse and for cost savings. Thus far, the (un)intended effects of this reimbursement restriction are unknown. Objective(s): To ass

  4. Reimbursement restriction moderately decreases benzodiazepine use in general practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoebert, J.M.; Souverein, P.C.; Mantel, A.K.; Leufkens, B.G.M.; Dijk, L. van

    2011-01-01

    Background: On January 1st 2009, benzodiazepines were excluded from the Dutch positive reimbursement list when used as anxiolytic, hypnotic or sedative, to limit misuse and for cost savings. Thus far, the (un)intended effects of this reimbursement restriction are unknown. Objectives: To assess the i

  5. Estimation of Cessation Rates among Danish Users of Benzodiazepines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Støvring, Henrik; Gasse, Christiane

    Background: Widespread and longterm use of benzodiazepines constitute a public health problem. Health care authorities hence advice that use should not exceed three months, in particular for the elderly and patients with a past diagnosis of drug addiction. Objectives: Estimate the shape...

  6. Sex differences among recipients of benzodiazepines in Dutch general practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waals, F.W. van der; Mohrs, J.; Foets, M.

    1993-01-01

    Objective: To analyse sex differences among recipients of benzodiazepines in Dutch general practice. Design-Study of consultations and associated interventions as recorded in the Dutch national survey of general practice. Setting: Practices of 45 general practitioners monitored during 1 April to 30

  7. Neighbourhood characteristics and use of benzodiazepines in The Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenewegen, P.P.; Leufkens, H.G.; Spreeuwenberg, P.; Worm, W.

    1999-01-01

    This paper analyses the relationship between individual and neighbourhood characteristics and the use of benzodiazepines within a Dutch city. It is hypothesized that the proportion of users is lower in more socially integrated and less deprived neighbourhoods. Hypotheses have been tested by using mu

  8. Associations between Benzodiazepine Use and Neuropsychological Test Scores in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmes, Edward; Østbye, Truls

    2015-06-01

    Benzodiazepines are widely prescribed for anxiety, although use of this class of medications has been associated with dependency and cognitive changes. This article describes the study in which we investigated the relationship between the class of benzodiazepine available for use and associated performance on neuropsychological tests in a community sample of 1,754 older Canadians from the Canadian Study of Health and Aging. Benzodiazepines were classified as short-, intermediate-, and long-acting. Associations were calculated between each class of benzodiazepine and eight neuropsychological measures, using multiple regression analysis and controlling for demographic variables. Results showed different effects of the co-variates across the three drug classes, and short half-life benzodiazepines were not associated with any neuropsychological measure. Intermediate half-life and long half-life benzodiazepine use were each associated with two measures. Increased focus on specific domains of cognitive function is needed to improve our understanding of how benzodiazepine use influences cognition.

  9. Prolonged-release melatonin versus placebo for benzodiazepine discontinuation in patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baandrup, Lone; Lindschou, Jane; Winkel, Per

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We assessed if prolonged-release melatonin can facilitate withdrawal of long-term benzodiazepine usage in patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. METHODS: Randomised, placebo-controlled, blinded, parallel superiority trial of 24 weeks duration. Participants were randomised...... to prolonged-release melatonin 2 mg daily versus matching placebo and were continuously guided to gradually reduce their usual benzodiazepine dosage. The primary outcome was mean benzodiazepine daily dosage at 24 weeks. Secondary outcomes included pattern of benzodiazepine dosage over time, benzodiazepine...... cessation proportion, and benzodiazepine withdrawal symptoms. RESULTS: In total, 86 patients (21-74 years) were enrolled: 42 were randomised to melatonin versus 44 to placebo. We found no significant effect of melatonin on mean benzodiazepine dosage at 24 weeks (melatonin group 8.01 mg versus placebo group...

  10. Convulsions induced by centrally administered NMDA in mice: effects of NMDA antagonists, benzodiazepines, minor tranquilizers and anticonvulsants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, J. L.; Pieri, L.; Prud'hon, B.

    1989-01-01

    1. Convulsions were induced reproducibly by intracerebroventricular injection of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) to conscious mice. 2. Competitive (carboxypiperazine-propylphosphonic acid, CPP; 2-amino-7-phosphonoheptanoic acid, AP7) and non-competitive (MK801; phencyclidine, PCP; thienylcyclohexylpiperidine, TCP; dextrorphan; dextromethorphan) NMDA antagonists prevented NMDA-induced convulsions. 3. Benzodiazepine receptor agonists and partial agonists (triazolam, diazepam, clonazepam, Ro 16-6028), classical anticonvulsants (diphenylhydantoin, phenobarbitone, sodium valproate) and meprobamate were also found to prevent NMDA-induced convulsions. 4. Flumazenil (a benzodiazepine receptor antagonist) and the GABA agonists THIP and muscimol (up to subtoxic doses) were without effect. 5. Flumazenil reversed the anticonvulsant action of diazepam, but not that of MK801. 6. Results obtained in this model differ somewhat from those described in a seizure model with systemic administration of NMDA. An explanation for this discrepancy is offered. 7. This model is a simple test for assessing the in vivo activity of NMDA antagonists and also expands the battery of chemically-induced seizure models for characterizing anticonvulsants not acting at NMDA receptors. PMID:2574061

  11. Benzodiazepines and traffic safety : forensic, analytical-toxicological and epidemiological aspects of driving under the influence of benzodiazepines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smink, Beitske Eelkje

    2008-01-01

    Driving under the influence of alcohol, illicit and medicinal drugs (e.g. benzodiazepines) is under discussion world-wide because many studies have shown that its use is associated with impaired driving and increased accident risk despite sometimes conflicting results. In The Netherlands, the number

  12. Benzodiazepines and traffic safety : forensic, analytical-toxicological and epidemiological aspects of driving under the influence of benzodiazepines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smink, Beitske Eelkje

    2008-01-01

    Driving under the influence of alcohol, illicit and medicinal drugs (e.g. benzodiazepines) is under discussion world-wide because many studies have shown that its use is associated with impaired driving and increased accident risk despite sometimes conflicting results. In The Netherlands, the number

  13. GABAA receptor signaling in the lateral septum regulates maternal aggression in mice

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Maternal aggression (maternal defense) is a fierce aggression produced by lactating females towards intruders that plays an important role in protection of vulnerable offspring. Enhancement of GABAA receptor signaling by benzodiazepines increases maternal aggression and we recently found indirect evidence that lateral septum (LS) could be a key site where benzodiazepines elevate aggression. In this study, we directly tested the hypothesis that activation of GABAA receptors in LS would promote...

  14. Learning and memory deficits in male adult mice treated with a benzodiazepine sleep-inducing drug during the juvenile period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Furukawa

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA, the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system, is also known to be important for brain development. Therefore, disturbances of GABA receptor (GABA-R mediated signaling (GABA-R signal during brain development may influence normal brain maturation and cause late-onset brain malfunctions. In this study, we examined whether the temporal stimulation of the GABA-R signal during brain development induces late-onset adverse effects on the brain in adult male mice. To stimulate the GABA-R signal, we used either the benzodiazepine sleep-inducing drug triazolam (TZ or the non-benzodiazepine drug zolpidem (ZP. We detected deficits in learning and memory in mice treated with TZ during the juvenile period, as seen in the fear conditioning test. On the other hand, ZP administration during the juvenile period had little effect. In addition, decreased protein expression of GluR1 and GluR4, which are excitatory neurotransmitter receptors, was detected in the hippocampi of mice treated with TZ during the juvenile period. We measured mRNA expression of the immediate early genes (IEGs, which are neuronal activity markers, in the hippocampus shortly after the administration of TZ or ZP to juvenile mice. Decreased IEG expression was detected in mice with juvenile TZ administration, but not in mice with juvenile ZP administration. Our findings demonstrate that TZ administration during the juvenile period can induce irreversible brain dysfunction in adult mice. It may need to take an extra care for the prescription of benzodiazepine sleep-inducing drugs to juveniles because it might cause late onset learning and memory defects.

  15. Characterization and in vitro phase I microsomal metabolism of designer benzodiazepines - an update comprising adinazolam, cloniprazepam, fonazepam, 3-hydroxyphenazepam, metizolam and nitrazolam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosmann, Bjoern; Bisel, Philippe; Franz, Florian; Huppertz, Laura M; Auwärter, Volker

    2016-11-01

    Designer benzodiazepines represent an emerging class of new psychoactive substances. While other classes of new psychoactive substances such as cannabinoid receptor agonists and designer stimulants are mainly consumed for hedonistic reasons, designer benzodiazepines may also be consumed as 'self-medication' by persons suffering from anxiety or other psychiatric disorders or as stand-by 'antidote' by users of stimulant and hallucinogenic drugs. In the present study, five benzodiazepines (adinazolam, cloniprazepam, fonazepam, 3-hydroxyphenazepam and nitrazolam) and one thienodiazepine (metizolam) offered as 'research chemicals' on the Internet were characterized and their main in vitro phase I metabolites tentatively identified after incubation with pooled human liver microsomes. For all compounds, the structural formula declared by the vendor was confirmed by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (MS), liquid chromatography MS/MS and liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight MS analysis. The detected in vitro phase I metabolites of adinazolam were N-desmethyladinazolam and N-didesmethyladinazolam. Metizolam showed a similar metabolism to other thienodiazepines comprising monohydroxylations and dihydroxylation. Cloniprazepam was metabolized to numerous metabolites with the main metabolic steps being N-dealkylation, hydroxylation and reduction of the nitro function. It has to be noted that clonazepam is a metabolite of cloniprazepam, which may lead to difficulties when interpreting analytical findings. Nitrazolam and fonazepam both underwent monohydroxylation and reduction of the nitro function. In the case of 3-OH-phenazepam, no in vitro phase I metabolites were detected. Formation of licensed benzodiazepines (clonazepam after uptake of cloniprazepam) and the sale of metabolites of prescribed benzodiazepines (fonazepam, identical to norflunitrazepam, and 3-hydroxyphenazepam) present the risk of incorrect interpretation of

  16. Symptom-triggered benzodiazepine therapy for alcohol withdrawal syndrome in the emergency department: a comparison with the standard fixed dose benzodiazepine regimen.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cassidy, Eugene M

    2012-10-01

    The aim of the study was to compare symptom-triggered and standard benzodiazepine regimens for the treatment of alcohol withdrawal syndrome in an emergency department clinical decision unit. The authors found that the symptom-triggered approach reduced cumulative benzodiazepine dose and length of stay.

  17. Limited in vivo bioassays on some benzodiazepines: lack of experimental initiating or promoting effect of the benzodiazepine tranquillizers diazepam, clorazepate, oxazepam and lorazepam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazue, G; Remandet, B; Gouy, D; Berthe, J; Roncucci, R; Williams, G M

    1982-05-01

    Four benzodiazepine tranquillizers were tested for their ability to initiate or promote the development of preneoplastic and neoplastic rat liver lesions. In comparison with the liver carcinogen, N-2-fluorenylacetamide, the benzodiazepines exhibited no initiating activity during a 14-week period of daily administration by gavage. To study the promoting activity, N-2-fluorenylacetamide was used to initiate altered foci and neoplastic nodules in rat liver during 8 weeks and then the benzodiazepines were administered by daily gavage for a period of 12 weeks. The liver tumor promoter phenobarbital had a substantial enhancing effect upon the persistence of nodules but none of the benzodiazepines showed a similar effect. Thus, in the process model systems used, to detect initiating or promoting potential effect, the benzodiazepine tranquillizers failed to exhibit either an initiating or a promoting action.

  18. Positron-emissionstomografisk kortlaegning af den levende menneskehjernes receptorer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjedde, A

    2001-01-01

    tracers are used in diseases of the basal ganglia, whereas serotonin, benzodiazepine, and opiate tracers are used in lesions of the cerebral cortex. PET has revealed loss of dopaminergic terminals and dopamine synthetic capacity in Parkinson's disease, MPTP intoxication, and Lesch-Nyhan's syndrome...... receptors in Alzheimer's disease, and benzodiazepine and opiate receptors in stroke, epilepsy, and Huntington's chorea; altered opiate receptors in chronic pain and drug abuse; and release of opiates in analgesia; but changes in serotonin synthesis, transport, and binding in affective or psychotic disorders...

  19. Electronic and conformational properties of 2,3-benzodiazepine derivates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelaggi, M.; Girlanda, R. [Messina Univ. (Italy). Dip. di Fisica della Materia e Fisica dell`Ambiente; Chimirri, A.; Gitto, R. [Messina Univ. (Italy). Dip. Farmaco-Chimico

    1996-04-01

    The molecular geometric and electronic structures of 2,3-benzodiazepine derivates have been studied by means of the MNDO-PM3 method. A number of electronic properties have been computed and examined in order to find indication of the role of the electronic characteristics of the different molecules and their pharmacological properties. Theoretical data indicate that both electronic and structural properties appear responsible for the varying degree of anticonvulsant activity exhibited by compounds 1-4.

  20. Benzodiazepines for conscious sedation in the dental office

    OpenAIRE

    Theodoro Weissheimert; Alexandre da Silveira Gerzson; Henderson Eduarth Schwengber; Angelo Menuci Neto

    2016-01-01

    Conventional behavioral conditioning techniques are usually suf fi cient for management of patients with fear and anxiety during dental treatment. When such techniques do not produce the expected results, dental anxiety can be managed using drug-based treatments known as conscious sedation. Anxiety can complicate dental procedures because of effects such as increased blood pressure, hyperventilation, and fainting. Medications such as benzodiazepines can be used to avoid these complicat...

  1. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy and Catatonia in the Setting of Benzodiazepine Withdrawal

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, Teng J; Patchett, Nicholas D.; Bernard, Sheilah A.

    2016-01-01

    We report two serious and unusual complications of benzodiazepine withdrawal in a single patient: takotsubo cardiomyopathy and catatonia. This 61-year-old female patient was brought to the emergency department with lethargy and within hours had declined into a state of catatonia. Although there was never a complaint of chest pain, ECG showed deep anterior T-wave inversions and cardiac enzymes were elevated. An echocardiogram was consistent with takotsubo cardiomyopathy. She later received 1 m...

  2. Binding of several benzodiazepines to bovine serum albumin: Fluorescence study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machicote, Roberta G.; Pacheco, María E.; Bruzzone, Liliana

    2010-10-01

    The interactions of lorazepam, oxazepam and bromazepam with bovine serum albumin (BSA) were studied by fluorescence spectrometry. The Stern-Volmer quenching constants and corresponding thermodynamic parameters Δ H, Δ G and Δ S were calculated. The binding constants and the number of binding sites were also investigated. The distances between the donor (BSA) and the acceptors (benzodiazepines) were obtained according to fluorescence resonance energy transfer and conformational changes of BSA were observed from synchronous fluorescence spectra.

  3. Influence of bleaching on stability of benzodiazepines in hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yegles, M; Marson, Y; Wennig, R

    2000-01-10

    In order to study the influence of hair bleaching on benzodiazepines concentrations, hair was treated with a bleaching product (Poly Blonde, Schwarzkopf & Henkel) for 20 min. The treated hair specimen was obtained from a person who died after an overdose of several illicit drugs associated with benzodiazepines. Bleached and non bleached hair were washed (acetone and water), pulverised and then incubated for 2 h in a thioglycolic solution. In the extracts obtained by solid-phase extraction on C18 columns, the different drugs with the corresponding deuterated standards were derivatized and determined by GC-MS in a SIM mode. These results show that the concentrations of all the drug detected decreased in bleached hair in comparison with non treated hair. Whereas the diminution was less important for cocaine and benzoylecgonine (decrease of 24.6 and 36.4%, respectively), concentrations for codeine, 6-monoacetylmorphine and morphine decreased more significantly (decrease of 57.5, 88.6 and 67.4%, respectively) as well as those of diazepam, nordazepam and 7-aminoflunitrazepam (decrease of 39.7, 67.7 and 61.8%, respectively). The results in this study agree with those of other authors that bleaching affects the stability of cocaine and opiates incorporated in hair. These findings also point out that bleaching influences the stability of entrapped benzodiazepines in hair. Finally, these results reconfirm that it is very important to consider the cosmetic history of a hair sample in the interpretation of hair analysis results.

  4. Determinants of benzodiazepine brain uptake: lipophilicity versus binding affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendt, R M; Greenblatt, D J; Liebisch, D C; Luu, M D; Paul, S M

    1987-01-01

    Factors influencing brain uptake of benzodiazepine derivatives were evaluated in adult Sprague Dawley rats (n = 8-10 per drug). Animals received single intraperitoneal doses of alprazolam, triazolam, lorazepam, flunitrazepam, diazepam, midazolam, desmethyldiazepam, or clobazam. Concentrations of each drug (and metabolites) in whole brain and serum 1 h after dosage were determined by gas chromatography. Serum free fraction was measured by equilibrium dialysis. In vitro binding affinity (apparent Ki) of each compound was estimated based on displacement of tritiated flunitrazepam in washed membrane preparations from rat cerebral cortex. Lipid solubility of each benzodiazepine was estimated using the reverse-phase liquid chromatographic (HPLC) retention index at physiologic pH. There was no significant relation between brain:total serum concentration ratio and either HPLC retention (r = 0.18) or binding Ki (r = -0.34). Correction of uptake ratios for free as opposed to total serum concentration yielded a highly significant correlation with HPLC retention (r = 0.78, P less than 0.005). However, even the corrected ratio was not correlated with binding Ki (r = -0.22). Thus a benzodiazepine's capacity to diffuse from systemic blood into brain tissue is much more closely associated with the physicochemical property of lipid solubility than with specific affinity. Unbound rather than total serum or plasma concentration most accurately reflects the quantity of drug available for diffusion.

  5. Contingent reinforcement for benzodiazepine-free urines: evaluation of a drug abuse treatment intervention.

    OpenAIRE

    Stitzer, M L; Bigelow, G E; Liebson, I A; Hawthorne, J W

    1982-01-01

    This study evaluated contingent reinforcement for benzodiazepine-free urines as a therapeutic intervention for promoting reduced use of supplemental benzodiazepine drugs among methadone maintenance outpatients. Ten methadone maintenance patients were selected for participation on the basis of positive urinalysis results. During a 12-week intervention period these patients were offered clinic privileges, including monetary payments or methadone take-home doses, contingent on benzodiazepine neg...

  6. Differences in health status between long-term and short-term benzodiazepine users.

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite generally accepted advice to keep treatment short, benzodiazepines are often prescibed for more than six months. Prevention of long-term benzodiazepine use could be facilitated by the utilisation of risk indicators for long-term use. However, the characteristics of long-term benzodiazepine users described in the literature are based on studies in which long-term users were compared with non-users. Thus these characteristics may be imprecise. AIM: To study the characteristi...

  7. Association between risk factors for injurious falls and new benzodiazepine prescribing in elderly persons

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Benzodiazepines are frequently prescribed to elderly patients' despite concerns about adverse effects leading to injurious falls. Previous studies have not investigated the extent to which patients with pre-existing risk factors for falls are prescribed benzodiazepines. The objective of this study is to assess if some of the risk factors for falls are associated with new benzodiazepine prescriptions in elderly persons. Methods Using provincial administrative databases, eld...

  8. Use of Benzodiazepines in Alzheimer’s Disease: A Systematic Review of Literature

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Background: Benzodiazepines are frequently prescribed in patients with Alzheimer’s disease. Unfortunately, studies evaluating their benefits and risks in these patients are limited. Methods: Clinical trials focusing on the effect of benzodiazepines on cognitive functions, disease progression, behavioral symptoms, sleep disturbances, and the general frequency of benzodiazepine use were included in this review. Published articles from January 1983 to January 2015 were identified using specific ...

  9. Association between risk factors for injurious falls and new benzodiazepine prescribing in elderly persons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvestre Marie-Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Benzodiazepines are frequently prescribed to elderly patients' despite concerns about adverse effects leading to injurious falls. Previous studies have not investigated the extent to which patients with pre-existing risk factors for falls are prescribed benzodiazepines. The objective of this study is to assess if some of the risk factors for falls are associated with new benzodiazepine prescriptions in elderly persons. Methods Using provincial administrative databases, elderly Quebec residents were screened in 1989 for benzodiazepine use and non-users were followed for up to 5 years. Logistic regression models were used to evaluate potential predictors of new benzodiazepine use among patient baseline characteristics. Results In the 252,811 elderly patients who had no benzodiazepine prescription during the baseline year (1989, 174,444 (69% never filled a benzodiazepine prescription and 78,367 (31% filled at least one benzodiazepine prescription. In the adjusted analysis, several risk factors for falls were associated with statistically significant increases in the risk of receiving a new benzodiazepine prescription including the number of prescribing physicians seen at baseline (OR: 1.12; 95% CI 1.11–1.13, being female (OR: 1.20; 95% CI 1.18–1.22 or a diagnosis of arthritis (OR: 1.11; 95% CI 1.09–1.14, depression (OR: 1.42; 95% CI 1.35–1.49 or alcohol abuse (OR: 1.24; 95% CI 1.05–1.46. The strongest predictor for starting a benzodiazepine was the use of other medications, particularly anti-depressants (OR: 1.85; 95% CI 1.75–1.95. Conclusion Patients with pre-existing conditions that increase the risk of injurious falls are significantly more likely to receive a new prescription for a benzodiazepine. The strength of the association between previous medication use and new benzodiazepine prescriptions highlights an important medication safety issue.

  10. Emission and absorption spectra of some bridged 1,5-benzodiazepines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellor, J. M.; Pathirana, R. N.; Stibbard, J. H. A.

    Absorption spectra in neutral and acidic media are reported for a series of bridged 1,5-benzodiazepines, which are unable to tautomerize. Comparison is made with non-bridged 1,5-benzodiazepines capable of tautomeric rearrangement. Both bridged and non-bridged 1,5-benzodiazepines are essentially non-fluorescent due to the "proximity effect" of interaction between singlet ηπ* and ππ* states of similar energy, a phenomenon previously recognised in six-membered nitrogen heterocycles.

  11. Reinforcing Effects Of Compounds Lacking Intrinsic Efficacy At α1 Subunit-Containing GABAA Receptor Subtypes in Midazolam- But Not Cocaine-Experienced Rhesus Monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinday, Nina M; Sawyer, Eileen K; Fischer, Bradford D; Platt, Donna M; Licata, Stephanie C; Atack, John R; Dawson, Gerard R; Reynolds, David S; Rowlett, James K

    2013-01-01

    Benzodiazepines are prescribed widely but their utility is limited by unwanted side effects, including abuse potential. The mechanisms underlying the abuse-related effects of benzodiazepines are not well understood, although α1 subunit-containing GABAA receptors have been proposed to have a critical role. Here, we examine the reinforcing effects of several compounds that vary with respect to intrinsic efficacy at α2, α3, and α5 subunit-containing GABAA receptors but lack efficacy at α1 subunit-containing GABAA receptors (‘α1-sparing compounds'): MRK-623 (functional selectivity for α2/α3 subunit-containing receptors), TPA023B (functional selectivity for α2/α3/α5 subunit-containing receptors), and TP003 (functional selectivity for α3 subunit-containing receptors). The reinforcing effects of the α1-sparing compounds were compared with those of the non-selective benzodiazepine receptor partial agonist MRK-696, and non-selective benzodiazepine receptor full agonists, midazolam and lorazepam, in rhesus monkeys trained to self-administer midazolam or cocaine, under a progressive-ratio schedule of intravenous (i.v.) drug injection. The α1-sparing compounds were self-administered significantly above vehicle levels in monkeys maintained under a midazolam baseline, but not under a cocaine baseline over the dose ranges tested. Importantly, TP003 had significant reinforcing effects, albeit at lower levels of self-administration than non-selective benzodiazepine receptor agonists. Together, these results suggest that α1 subunit-containing GABAA receptors may have a role in the reinforcing effects of benzodiazepine-type compounds in monkeys with a history of stimulant self-administration, whereas α3 subunit-containing GABAA receptors may be important mediators of the reinforcing effects of benzodiazepine-type compounds in animals with a history of sedative-anxiolytic/benzodiazepine self-administration. PMID:23303046

  12. Caffeine consumption among adults on benzodiazepine therapy: United States 1988-1994.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Michael; Safran, Marc; Eberhardt, Mark

    2004-08-01

    The concomitant use of benzodiazepines and caffeine was studied to learn if caffeine consumption varied as a function of benzodiazepine use. Caffeine may antagonize the effects of benzodiazepine and even relatively small amounts can aggravate symptoms associated with anxiety disorders. In addition, caffeine can cause or aggravate insomnia, one of the main reasons cited for use by the subjects in this analysis. Given this, there would seem to be sufficient reason for at least some users of benzodiazepines to consider, with their physicians, avoiding or limiting caffeine consumption. Data from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were analyzed to obtain a nationally representative sample of benzodiazepine users. Subjects included 253 individuals (64% women) whose median age was 54 yr. Approximately 88% of benzodiazepine users reported caffeine consumption in the 24-hr. Dietary Recall. 26% of benzodiazepine users and 23% of nonusers reported consuming greater than 250 mg of caffeine during the 24-hr. reference period. In regression analyses, no significant relationships were found between reported caffeine consumption and benzodiazepine use. This study suggests that users and nonusers of benzodiazepines ingest similar amounts of caffeine even though some users should probably avoid or limit caffeine use.

  13. Balneotherapy Together with a Psychoeducation Program for Benzodiazepine Withdrawal: A Feasibility Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. De Maricourt

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Benzodiazepines should be prescribed on a short-term basis, but a significant proportion of patients (% use them for more than 6 months, constituting a serious public health issue. Indeed, few strategies are effective in helping patients to discontinue long-term benzodiazepine treatments. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility and the impact of a program including cognitive behavioural therapy, psychoeducation, and balneotherapy in a spa resort to facilitate long-term discontinuation of benzodiazepines. We conducted a prospective multicentre cohort study. Patients with long-term benzodiazepine use were recruited with the aim of anxiolytic withdrawal by means of a psychoeducational program and daily balneotherapy during 3 weeks. The primary efficacy outcome measure was benzodiazepine use 6 months after the program, compared to use at baseline. A total of 70 subjects were enrolled. At 6 months, overall benzodiazepine intake had decreased by 75.3%, with 41.4% of patients completely stopping benzodiazepine use. The results also suggest a significantly greater improvement in anxiety and depression symptoms among patients who discontinued benzodiazepines compared to patients who only reduced their use. Our findings suggest that balneotherapy in association with a psychoeducative program is efficient in subjects with benzodiazepine addiction.

  14. Balneotherapy Together with a Psychoeducation Program for Benzodiazepine Withdrawal: A Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Maricourt, P.; Hergueta, Th.; Galinowski, A.; Salamon, R.; Diallo, A.; Vaugeois, C.; Lépine, J. P.; Olié, J. P.

    2016-01-01

    Benzodiazepines should be prescribed on a short-term basis, but a significant proportion of patients (%) use them for more than 6 months, constituting a serious public health issue. Indeed, few strategies are effective in helping patients to discontinue long-term benzodiazepine treatments. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility and the impact of a program including cognitive behavioural therapy, psychoeducation, and balneotherapy in a spa resort to facilitate long-term discontinuation of benzodiazepines. We conducted a prospective multicentre cohort study. Patients with long-term benzodiazepine use were recruited with the aim of anxiolytic withdrawal by means of a psychoeducational program and daily balneotherapy during 3 weeks. The primary efficacy outcome measure was benzodiazepine use 6 months after the program, compared to use at baseline. A total of 70 subjects were enrolled. At 6 months, overall benzodiazepine intake had decreased by 75.3%, with 41.4% of patients completely stopping benzodiazepine use. The results also suggest a significantly greater improvement in anxiety and depression symptoms among patients who discontinued benzodiazepines compared to patients who only reduced their use. Our findings suggest that balneotherapy in association with a psychoeducative program is efficient in subjects with benzodiazepine addiction. PMID:27956923

  15. Behavioral and neurophysiological signatures of benzodiazepine-related driving impairments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradly T Stone

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Impaired driving due to drug use is a growing problem, worldwide; estimates show that 18-23.5% of fatal accidents, and up to 34% of injury accidents may be caused by drivers under the influence of drugs (Drummer et al., 2003; NHTSA, 2010; Walsh et al., 2004. Furthermore, at any given time, up to 16% of drivers may be using drugs that can impair one’s driving abilities (NHTSA, 2009. Currently, drug recognition experts (law enforcement officers with specialized training to identify drugged driving, have the most difficult time with identifying drivers potentially impaired on central nervous system (CNS depressants (Smith, Hayes, Yolton, Rutledge, & Citek, 2002. The fact that the use of benzodiazepines, a type of CNS depressant, is also associated with the greatest likelihood of causing accidents (Dassanayake, Michie, Carter, & Jones, 2011, further emphasizes the need to improve research tools in this area which can facilitate the refinement of, or additions to, current assessments of impaired driving. Our laboratories collaborated to evaluate both the behavioral and neurophysiological effects of a benzodiazepine, alprazolam, in a driving simulation (miniSim™. This drive was combined with a neurocognitive assessment utilizing time synched neurophysiology (EEG, ECG. While the behavioral effects of benzodiazepines are well characterized (Rapoport et al., 2009, we hypothesized that, with the addition of real-time neurophysiology and the utilization of simulation and neurocognitive assessment, we could find objective assessments of drug impairment that could improve the detection capabilities of drug recognition experts. Our analyses revealed that 1 specific driving conditions were significantly more difficult for benzodiazepine impaired drivers and; 2 the neurocognitive tasks’ metrics were able to classify impaired vs. unimpaired with up to 80% accuracy based on lane position deviation and lane departures. While this work requires replication in

  16. Benzodiazepines and risk of death: Results from two large cohort studies in France and UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmaro, Aurore; Dupouy, Julie; Lapeyre-Mestre, Maryse

    2015-10-01

    Benzodiazepines are widely prescribed for the treatment of anxiety or insomnia, but their impact on mortality is still debated. This study investigated the impact of benzodiazepine use on short term mortality. Exposed-unexposed cohorts were constructed with the Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD) in the UK and with the General Sample of Beneficiaries (EGB) in France. Benzodiazepine incident users were matched to incident users of antidepressants/non-benzodiazepine sedatives and to controls (non-users of antidepressants or anxiolytics/hypnotics) according to age and gender in both sources (and practice for the CPRD only). Survival at one year was studied using Cox regression model. In the CPRD, the final population comprised 94 123 patients per group (57 287 in the EGB). In the CPRD, adjusted HR was 3.73 in benzodiazepine users (95% CI, 3.43-4.06), and 1.61 (1.47-1.76) in antidepressant/non-benzodiazepine users compared to controls. When considering benzodiazepine use as a time-dependent covariate, adjusted HR for current use at 12 months was 1.70 (1.36-2.12). In the EGB, adjusted HR was 1.26 in benzodiazepine users (95% CI, 1.08-1.48), and 1.07 (95% CI, 0.91-1.27) in antidepressant/non-benzodiazepine users. When considering benzodiazepine use as a time-dependent covariate, adjusted HR for current use at 12 months was 1.03 (0.74-1.44). Using two nationally representative databases, we found a significant while moderate increase in all-cause mortality in relation to benzodiazepines, in a population of incident and mostly occasional users. This issue need to be monitored given the extensive use of these drugs.

  17. receptores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salete Regina Daronco Benetti

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Se trata de un estudio etnográfico, que tuvo lo objetivo de interpretar el sistema de conocimiento y del significado atribuidos a la sangre referente a la transfusión sanguínea por los donadores y receptores de un banco de sangre. Para la colecta de las informaciones se observaron los participantes y la entrevista etnográfica se realizó el análisis de dominio, taxonómicos y temáticos. Los dominios culturales fueron: la sangre es vida: fuente de vida y alimento valioso; creencias religiosas: fuentes simbólicas de apoyos; donación sanguínea: un gesto colaborador que exige cuidarse, gratifica y trae felicidad; donación sanguínea: fuente simbólica de inseguridad; estar enfermo es una condición para realizar transfusión sanguínea; transfusión sanguínea: esperanza de vida; Creencias populares: transfusión sanguínea como riesgo para la salud; donadores de sangre: personas benditas; donar y recibir sangre: como significado de felicidad. Temática: “líquido precioso que origina, sostiene, modifica la vida, provoca miedo e inseguridad”.

  18. Potential Impact of Benzodiazepine Use on the Rate of Hip Fractures in Five Large European Countries and the United States

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Benzodiazepine use increases the risk of falls and has been associated with an increased risk of hip fractures. Our aim was to estimate the possible population impact of the use of benzodiazepines on the rate of hip fracture in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, the United Kingdom, and the United States. We conducted a literature review to estimate the pooled relative risk (RR) for hip fractures and use of benzodiazepines. Prevalence rates of benzodiazepine use in 2009 were calculated for each co...

  19. Prescription of benzodiazepines in general practice in the context of a man-made disaster: a longitudinal study.

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mental health problems associated with benzodiazepine treatment are often highly prevalent in the aftermath of disasters. Nevertheless, not much is known about benzodiazepine use after disasters. Considering the negative effects associated with prolonged use and the adverse effects of benzodiazepines on recovery of patients with acute stress, the aim of the present study was to explore benzodiazepine use in the context of the Enschede fireworks disaster of 13 May 2000. METHODS: A ...

  20. Assessment of Benzodiazepine dependence in alcohol and drug dependent outpatients: A research report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kan, C.C.; Breteler, M.H.M.; Ven, A.H.G.S. van der; Timmermans, M.A.Y.; Zitman, F.G.

    2001-01-01

    In this study on 99 outpatients who were being treated for alcohol and/or drug dependence and also using benzodiazepines (BZDs), prevalence rates of DSM-III-R and ICD-10 substance dependence diagnoses were ascertained and scalability, reliability and validity of the scales of the Benzodiazepine Depe

  1. The relation between the blood benzodiazepine concentration and performance in suspected impaired drivers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smink, B.E.; Lusthof, K.J.; de Gier, J.J.; Uges, D.R.; Egberts, A.C.

    2008-01-01

    Several experimental studies have shown a negative influence of benzodiazepines on driving skills. The objective of this study is to study the relationship between the blood concentration of benzodiazepines and the influence on performance in field sobriety tests. A retrospective case file evaluatio

  2. Benzodiazepine Discontinuation among Adults with GAD: A Randomized Trial of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosselin, Patrick; Ladouceur, Robert; Morin, Charles M.; Dugas, Michel J.; Baillargeon, Lucie

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluated the specific effectiveness of cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) combined with medication tapering for benzodiazepine discontinuation among generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) patients by using a nonspecific therapy control group. Sixty-one patients who had used benzodiazepines for more than 12 months were randomly assigned to…

  3. Influence of benzodiazepine tranquilizers on scopolamine-induced locomotor stimulation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansone, M

    1980-01-01

    Four benzodiazepine tranquilizers have been tested, alone or in combination with scopolamine, on the spontaneous locomotor activity of BALB/c mice. Scopolamine-induced locomotor stimulation was enhanced by chlordiazepoxide, diazepam, and medazepam, but not by bromazepam. These effects are similar to those exerted by the four benzodiazepines on amphetamine-induced locomotor stimulation and allow the same differentiation between the four derivatives.

  4. Influence of benzodiazepine tranquilizers on amphetamine-induced locomotor stimulation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansone, M

    1980-01-01

    Four benzodiazepine tranquilizers have been tested, alone or in combination with amphetamine, on spontaneous locomotor activity of C57BL/6 mice. Amphetamine-induced locomotor stimulation was enhanced by chlordiazepoxide, diazepam, and medazepam, but not by bromazepam. The results indicate that benzodiazepine derivatives may be somewhat differentiated on the basis of their interactions with amphetamine.

  5. Differences in health status between long-term and short-term benzodiazepine users.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zandstra, S.M.; Furer, J.W.; Lisdonk, E.H. van de; Bor, J.H.J.; Zitman, F.G.; Weel, C. van

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite generally accepted advice to keep treatment short, benzodiazepines are often prescibed for more than six months. Prevention of long-term benzodiazepine use could be facilitated by the utilisation of risk indicators for long-term use. However, the characteristics of long-term benz

  6. Determinants of chronic benzodiazepine use in the elderly: A longitudinal study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.J. Luijendijk (Hendrika); H.W. Tiemeier (Henning); A. Hofman (Albert); J. Heeringa (Jan); B.H.Ch. Stricker (Bruno)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractAIMS: The risk of adverse events due to chronic benzodiazepine use is high in the elderly. Clinicians need to be able to identify those persons who are at risk of chronic benzodiazepine use, but little is known about the determinants. This study determined social and health related facto

  7. The Relationship between Benzodiazepine Use and Traffic Accidents A Systematic Literature Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smink, Beitske E.; Egberts, Antoine C. G.; Lusthof, Klaas J.; Uges, Donald R. A.; de Gier, Johan I.

    2010-01-01

    In many countries, benzodiazepines are the most commonly used and misused psychoactive medicinal drugs. Results of epidemiological studies investigating the association between benzodiazepine use and traffic accidents seem to be inconclusive or inconsistent at first sight. However, the outcome of ep

  8. Benzodiazepine Discontinuation among Adults with GAD: A Randomized Trial of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosselin, Patrick; Ladouceur, Robert; Morin, Charles M.; Dugas, Michel J.; Baillargeon, Lucie

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluated the specific effectiveness of cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) combined with medication tapering for benzodiazepine discontinuation among generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) patients by using a nonspecific therapy control group. Sixty-one patients who had used benzodiazepines for more than 12 months were randomly assigned to…

  9. High affinity, bioavailable 3-amino-1,4-benzodiazepine-based gamma-secretase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Andrew P; Nadin, Alan; Talbot, Adam C; Clarke, Earl E; Harrison, Timothy; Lewis, Huw D; Reilly, Michael; Wrigley, Jonathan D J; Castro, José L

    2003-11-17

    In this paper, we describe the development of a novel series of high affinity, orally bioavailable 3-amino-1,4 benzodiazepine-based gamma-secretase inhibitors for the potential treatment of Alzheimer's disease. We disclose structure-activity relationships based around the 1, 3 and 5 positions of the benzodiazepine core structure.

  10. Tapering off benzodiazepines in long-term users : an economic evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oude Voshaar, Richard C; Krabbe, Paul F M; Gorgels, Wim J M J; Adang, Eddy M M; van Balkom, Anton J L M; van de Lisdonk, Eloy H; Zitman, Frans G

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Discontinuation of benzodiazepine usage has never been evaluated in economic terms. This study aimed to compare the relative costs and outcomes of tapering off long-term benzodiazepine use combined with group cognitive behavioural therapy (TO+CBT), tapering off alone (TOA) and usual care

  11. Tapering off benzodiazepines in long-term users: an economic evaluation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oude Voshaar, R.C.; Krabbe, P.F.M.; Gorgels, W.J.M.J.; Adang, E.M.M.; Balkom, A.J.L.M. van; Lisdonk, E.H. van de; Zitman, F.G.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Discontinuation of benzodiazepine usage has never been evaluated in economic terms. This study aimed to compare the relative costs and outcomes of tapering off long-term benzodiazepine use combined with group cognitive behavioural therapy (TO+CBT), tapering off alone (TOA) and usual care

  12. Benzodiazepiner og cyclopyrroloner før, under og efter hospitalsindlaeggelse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Stig Ejdrup; Møller, Frederik Trier

    2010-01-01

    The aim was to describe the prescription patterns of benzodiazepines (BZD) and cyclopyrrolones (Z-drugs) in a population of medical and surgical patients prior to, during and after hospital admission.......The aim was to describe the prescription patterns of benzodiazepines (BZD) and cyclopyrrolones (Z-drugs) in a population of medical and surgical patients prior to, during and after hospital admission....

  13. Tolerance to benzodiazepines among long-term users in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, Inge A. T.; Gorgels, Wim J. M. J.; Voshaar, Richard C. Oude; Mulder, Jan; Lucassen, Peter L. B. J.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tolerance towards the effects of benzodiazepines is observed in various animal and human studies. Therefore, it is assumed that patients who use benzodiazepines for a longer period of time need to increase their dose over time to experience the same effect. OBJECTIVE: To observe whether

  14. A control study on treatment for benzodiazepine dependence with trazodone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Hong-ju

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective To determine the efficacy and safety of trazodone in the treatment of benzodiazepine dependence. Methods Forty insomnia patients who met the Classification and Diagnostic Criteria of Mental Disorders in China Third Edition (CCMD-3 of dependence syndrome due to benzodiazepine were involved in the study. Patients were randomly assigned to trazodone group and placebo group for 3 months. The efficacy were assessed by Withdrawal Symptoms Checklist, Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAMA and polysomnography (PSG. Adverse events were assessed by Treatment Emergent Symptom Scale (TESS. Results The Withdrawal Symptoms Checklist of trazodone group was significantly lower after 7 d treatment than that of placebo group (P = 0.000, and HAMA score of the trazodone group was also significantly lower after 15 d treatment than that of placebo group (P = 0.000. There were no difference in Withdrawal Symptoms Checklist and HAMA of placebo group before and after treatment. Withdrawal Symptoms Checklist and HAMA of the trazodone group were decreased after treatment (P = 0.000. In comparison with placebo group, sleep parameters of the trazodone, including total sleep time (TST, sleep efficiency (SE, sleep latency (SL and slow wave sleep (SWS time presented improvement after 7 d treatment (P = 0.000, for all. After trazodone treatment, total sleep time, slow wave sleep time, sleep efficiency and sleep latency were improved (P = 0.000, for all. No obvious adverse reaction occurred. There were no significant differences in TESS scores between pre? and post?treatment in both groups (P > 0.05. Conclusion Trazodone is markedly effective and safe in the treatment for benzodiazepine dependence.

  15. [Benzodiazepines and limbic system. Anxiety and vigilance (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gekiere, F; Allegre, G; Brindeau, F; Borenstein, P

    1980-01-01

    A neurophysiological study of 4 benzodiazepines in the free implanted cat serves as basis to a discussion concerning tranquilizers, anxiety and vigilance. The electrophysiological and behavioural effects of diazepam, nitrazepam, lorazepam and of clorazepate dipotassique are analysed and compared between them and other psychotropic drugs. Their mode of action on the behaviour, on the bioelectric cortical and hippocampal rhythms, is explained according to recent biochemical data. The relations with anxiety, vigilance and neuro-psycho-physiologic mechanisms which subtend them are discussed at the light of clinical effects provoked by substances called tranquillizers.

  16. Off-Label Use of Medications for Treatment of Benzodiazepine Use Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabioni, Pamela; Bertram, Jonathan; Le Foll, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    There is a high rate of benzodiazepine use in the population. Benzodiazepines are used for multiple indications (anxiety, seizures, alcohol withdrawal, muscular relaxation and anesthesia). Benzodiazepines are also addictive substances and a non-negligible fraction of regular users will develop dependence. There is currently no approved pharmacotherapy for benzodiazepine use disorder treatment and optimal strategies for treatment are unclear. In this review, we aimed to summarize the findings on off-label pharmacologic therapy that have been used for BZD dependence. One classical approach is to provide a slow taper associated with counseling. Anti-epileptic drugs appear also to alleviate symptoms of withdrawal. The long-term strategies of maintenance therapy (with benzodiazepine) or of blocking therapy (with a GABA antagonist such as flumazenil) could provide some clinical benefit but have not yet been tested appropriately. Pregabalin appears promising and deserves further investigation. There is a clear need for more clinical trials in this area to improve care.

  17. An audit of prescribing practices for benzodiazepines and Z-drugs.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cadogan, C

    2015-03-01

    Concerns persist over the use of benzodiazepines and Z-drugs in Ireland. A prospective prescription audit was conducted in 81 community pharmacies across Ireland over a four week period. The study sought to assess the level of prescription compliance with key components of benzodiazepine and Z-drug prescribing guidelines. 28% of audit booklets issued were returned, yielding data on 4,418 prescriptions. The findings suggest that little progress has been made in improving the prescribing of benzodiazepines and Z-drugs in Ireland in the decade since publication of the Benzodiazepine Committee\\'s report. Fewer than one fifth of prescriptions (18.8%) were fully compliant with the assessment criteria and the majority (53.7%) had multiple discrepancies. This study highlights the importance of monitoring and auditing benzodiazepine and Z-drug prescribing practices. Interventions involving patients, prescribers and pharmacists are required to improve the prescribing and use of these medications in Ireland.

  18. Recent development in [1,4]benzodiazepines as potent anticancer agents: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Rupinder Kaur; Kaushik, Shiv Om; Chugh, Jasreen; Bansal, Sumit; Shah, Anamik; Bariwal, Jitender

    2014-01-01

    The [1,4]benzodiazepine is an important class of heterocyclic compounds and clinically used for many ailments in humans. The [1,4]benzodiazepine has unique structure that mimics the peptide linkage. This interesting observation completely shifted the interest of medicinal chemist for [1,4]benzodiazepine from CNS acting drugs to anticancer agents. During last few decades, a large number of reports have appeared in the literature highlighting the anticancer activity of [1,4]benzodiazepines. Here, in this article, we have discussed the brief synthesis, origin of [1,4]benzodiazepines as anticancer agent, their mechanism of action and latest developments in this field. We have compiled the most important literature reports from last few decades till date.

  19. Peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites on striated muscles of the rat: Properties and effect of denervation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, W.E.; Ickstadt, A. (Mainz Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Pharmakologisches Inst.); Hopf, H.Ch. (Mainz Univ. (Germany, F.R.))

    1985-01-01

    In order to test the hypothesis that peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites mediate some direct effects of benzodiazepines on striated muscles, the properties of specific /sup 3/H-Ro 5-4864 binding to rat biceps and rat diaphragm homogenates were investigated. In both tissues a single population of sites was found with a Ksub(D) value of 3 nmol/l. The density of these sites in both muscles was higher than the density in rat brain, but was considerably lower than in rat kidney. Competition experiments indicate a substrate specificity of specific /sup 3/H-Ro 5-4864 binding similar to the properties already demonstrated for the specific binding of this ligand to peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites in many other tissues. The properties of these sites in the rat diaphragm are not changed after motoric denervation by phrenicectomy. It is concluded that peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites are not involved in direct effects of benzodiazepines on striated muscles.

  20. Exogenous melatonin abolishes mechanical allodynia but not thermal hyperalgesia in neuropathic pain. The role of the opioid system and benzodiazepine-gabaergic mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurowski, D; Nowak, L; Machowska, A; Wordliczek, J; Thor, P J

    2012-12-01

    Melatonin (MT) is a neurohormone synthesized and secreted by the pineal gland. MT plays an important role in the regulation of physiological and neuroendocrine functions. The purpose of this study was to assess the overall effect of melatonin on neuropathic pain, the type of melatonin receptor involved, and potential role of the opioid system and GABA(A) receptors. The experiments were conducted by using the animal neuropathic pain model (CCI). The rats with CCI showed the characteristic for the mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia signs that were calculated by using the von Frey's and Hargreaves' tests. The conducted studies measured the effects of intraperitoneal administration of naloxone (opioid antagonist), prazosin (MT3 antagonist), luzindole (MT1/MT2 receptor antagonist), picrotoxin (GABA(A) antagonist) and flumazenil (benzodiazepine antagonist) on the antinociceptive effects caused by melatonin. Melatonin caused the increase in the pain threshold of the mechanical allodynia and the slight increase in the threshold of the thermal hyperalgesia. The pre-treatment with naloxone completely abolished the antinociceptive effects of melatonin in von Frey's test, but not thermal sensation in the Hargreaves's test. Prazosin did not have any effects, while administration of luzindole significantly suppressed the antinociceptive effect of melatonin. The antiallodynic effect of MT was also abolished by flumazenil and picrotoxin. Melatonin influences the mechanical allodynia but not thermal hyperalgesia via activation of opioid system and benzodiazepine-GABAergic pathway. Antinociceptive effects of melatonin are mostly related to the MT1/MT2 receptors interaction.

  1. AMPA receptor mediated excitotoxicity in neocortical neurons is developmentally regulated and dependent upon receptor desensitization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J B; Schousboe, A; Pickering, D S;

    1998-01-01

    was blocked was seen as early as 5 DIV since 10 microM MK-801 did not completely block the response whereas 10 microM NBQX did. The 2,3-benzodiazepine GYKI compounds, which have been reported to be selective non-competitive AMPA receptor antagonists, were here observed to block the AMPA toxicity...

  2. GABA(A) receptor subtype-selectivity of novel bicuculline derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramerstorfer, Joachim; Foppa, Verena; Thiery, Hanna; Hermange, Philippe; Janody, Simon; Berger, Michael L; Dodd, Robert H; Sieghart, Werner

    2015-01-01

    GABA(A) receptors are the major inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors in the central nervous system and are targets of clinically important drugs modulating GABA induced ion flux by interacting with distinct allosteric binding sites. ROD 185 is a previously investigated structural analogue of the GABA site antagonist bicuculline, and a positive allosteric modulator acting via the benzodiazepine binding site. Here, we investigated 13 newly synthesized structural analogues of ROD 185 for their interaction with rat GABA(A) receptors. Using [(3)H]flunitrazepam binding assays, we identified four compounds exhibiting a higher affinity for the benzodiazepine binding site than ROD 185. Two electrode voltage clamp electrophysiology at recombinant GABA(A) receptors indicated that most of these compounds positively modulated GABA-induced currents at these receptors. Additionally, these experiments revealed that this compound class not only interacts with the benzodiazepine binding site at αβγ receptors but also with a novel, so far unidentified binding site present in αβ receptors. Compounds with a high affinity for the benzodiazepine binding site stimulated GABA-induced currents stronger at αβγ than at αβ receptors and preferred α3β3γ2 receptors. Compounds showing equal or smaller effects at αβγ compared to αβ receptors differentially interacted with various αβ or αβγ receptor subtypes. Surprisingly, five of these compounds interacting with αβ receptors showed a strong stimulation at α6β3γ2 receptors. The absence of any direct effects at GABA(A) receptors, as well as their potential selectivity for receptor subtypes not being addressed by benzodiazepines, make this compound class to a starting point for the development of drugs with a possible clinical importance.

  3. Benzodiazepine use among adults residing in the urban settlements of Karachi, Pakistan: A cross sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tharani Ambreen

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are hardly any studies carried out in Pakistan on the usage of benzodiazepines at the level of community. This research was aimed to determine the frequency of benzodiazepine use, along with its associations with socio-demographic and clinical characteristics among community dwelling adults, residing in two urban settlements of Karachi, Pakistan. Methods We performed a cross sectional study from August 2008 to December 2009, in 2 areas of Karachi, namely Garden and Sultanabad. We followed the systematic sampling strategy to randomly select the households, with an adult of either sex and of age 18 years or more. Data collection was carried out through interview, using a pre-tested questionnaire, with items on socio-demographic position, medical history and benzodiazepine use. Student's t-test and χ2 test was employed to determine the associations between socio-demographic and clinical characteristics, and their relationship with benzodiazepine use was determined using applied logistic regression. Results The overall percentage of benzodiazepine consumption was estimated to be 14%. There were significantly more benzodiazepine users in the peri-urban Sultanabad community to the urban community of Garden (p-value = 0.001. The mean age (± SD for users was 51.3 (± 15.6 years compared to 37.1 (± 14.4 years among non-users. Bromazepam was the most widely used benzodiazepine (29%; followed by diazepam, with a median duration on primary use being 144 weeks (IQR = 48-240. The adjusted logistic regression model revealed that increasing age, location, female sex, unemployment and psychiatric consultation were associated with increased likelihood of benzodiazepine use. Conclusion We believe the unregulated over-the-counter sales of benzodiazepines and social conditions might be playing a role in this high consumption of benzodiazepines in the community.

  4. Benzodiazepine use among adults residing in the urban settlements of Karachi, Pakistan: A cross sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background There are hardly any studies carried out in Pakistan on the usage of benzodiazepines at the level of community. This research was aimed to determine the frequency of benzodiazepine use, along with its associations with socio-demographic and clinical characteristics among community dwelling adults, residing in two urban settlements of Karachi, Pakistan. Methods We performed a cross sectional study from August 2008 to December 2009, in 2 areas of Karachi, namely Garden and Sultanabad. We followed the systematic sampling strategy to randomly select the households, with an adult of either sex and of age 18 years or more. Data collection was carried out through interview, using a pre-tested questionnaire, with items on socio-demographic position, medical history and benzodiazepine use. Student's t-test and χ2 test was employed to determine the associations between socio-demographic and clinical characteristics, and their relationship with benzodiazepine use was determined using applied logistic regression. Results The overall percentage of benzodiazepine consumption was estimated to be 14%. There were significantly more benzodiazepine users in the peri-urban Sultanabad community to the urban community of Garden (p-value = 0.001). The mean age (± SD) for users was 51.3 (± 15.6) years compared to 37.1 (± 14.4) years among non-users. Bromazepam was the most widely used benzodiazepine (29%); followed by diazepam, with a median duration on primary use being 144 weeks (IQR = 48-240). The adjusted logistic regression model revealed that increasing age, location, female sex, unemployment and psychiatric consultation were associated with increased likelihood of benzodiazepine use. Conclusion We believe the unregulated over-the-counter sales of benzodiazepines and social conditions might be playing a role in this high consumption of benzodiazepines in the community. PMID:21801457

  5. The relationship between benzodiazepine use and traffic accidents: A systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smink, Beitske E; Egberts, Antoine C G; Lusthof, Klaas J; Uges, Donald R A; de Gier, Johan J

    2010-08-01

    In many countries, benzodiazepines are the most commonly used and misused psychoactive medicinal drugs. Results of epidemiological studies investigating the association between benzodiazepine use and traffic accidents seem to be inconclusive or inconsistent at first sight. However, the outcome of epidemiological studies may be influenced by several methodological factors like study design, study population, exposure measurement, outcome definitions and possible confounders. Our objective was to conduct a systematic literature review of epidemiological studies that investigated the association between benzodiazepine use and traffic accidents, including related outcomes like culpability and injury or accident severity. We searched EMBASE, PubMed and Forensic Science Abstracts 3/0 (FORS) for references included in these databases at 1 June 2009 using the term 'benzodiazepines' in combination with 'driving performance' or 'accident risk' or 'traffic accident'. For inclusion in this review, the study design had to be comparative, include road users involved in accidents and provide specific data about benzodiazepines. Sixty-six studies were included in the review. The study populations varied from the general (driving) population, accident-involved road users with or without injury and persons admitted to a hospital to fatally injured accident-involved drivers. Exposure assessment was performed by using toxicological results, prescription data or questionnaires. The divergent study populations and comparison groups and the variety of methods used to express the outcome of interest hampered comparison between results. Evidence is growing that exposure to benzodiazepines is related to increased accident risk. The literature indicates that the greatest accident risk is associated with the use of long half-life benzodiazepines, increasing dosage and the first few weeks of use of benzodiazepines. Clear evidence of increased culpability associated with benzodiazepine use is

  6. Across-sectional survey on benzodiazepine use among older people in an Italian region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Donato

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available

    Background. Benzodiazepines are among the most commonly prescribed drugs in Italy and they are often used inappropriately according to guidelines for their rational use.

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and pattern of use of benzodiazepine amongst the general population aged 65-84 years in the Friuli-Venezia Giulia Region, in North-East Italy.

    Methods. A total of 40 general practitioners participated in the study. Two data sources were used in the research. The first was the Health Search Database, the second was a short questionnaire administered by the general practitioners to the 65 to 84 year old patients attending their surgeries for any reason during the study period. Data on the use of benzodiazepines between 1st February and 31st July 2001 were extracted from both the Health Search Database using drug prescriptions and the questionnaires.

    Results. Of the 10,468 patients aged 65-84 years with complete demographical data in the general practitioners’ patient lists, 2,369 subjects used benzodiazepines, hypnotics and over the counter drugs. Overall prevalence of benzodiazepine use was 21.5% (95% confidence interval: 19.8-23.1%. Of the benzodiazepine users, 66.9% consumed a short-intermediate half-life and 33.1% a long half-life benzodiazepine. Most patients took benzodiazepines at night (68.2%, less frequently in the daytime and at night (23.7%, or in the daytime only (8.1%. Most users (89.2% said they had been taking benzodiazepine for years.

    Conclusions. Benzodiazepine use was associated with patient characteristics, such as being female, using analgesics or antidepressants and the presence of a chronic disease especially cancer or chronic heart failure.

  7. Benzodiazepine prescribing behaviour and attitudes: a survey among general practitioners practicing in northern Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Critchley Julia

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over-prescribing of benzodiazepines appears common in many countries, a better understanding of prescribing practices and attitudes may help develop strategies to reduce prescribing. This study aimed to evaluate benzodiazepine prescribing behaviour and attitudes in general practitioners practising in Chiang Mai and Lampoon, Thailand. Methods Questionnaire survey of general practitioners in community hospitals, to estimate: i use of benzodiazepines for anxiety/insomnia, panic disorder, depression, essential hypertension, and uncomplicated low back pain and ii views on the optimal duration of benzodiazepine use. Results Fifty-five of 100 general practitioners returned the completed questionnaires. They reported use of benzodiazepines for anxiety/insomnia (n = 51, 93%, panic disorder (n = 43, 78%, depression (n = 26, 43%, essential hypertension (n = 15, 27 % and uncomplicated low back pain (n = 10, 18%. Twenty-eight general practitioners would prescribe benzodiazepines for non-psychiatric conditions, 17 for use as muscle relaxants. Seventy-five per cent, 62% and 29% of the general practitioners agreed or totally agreed with the use of benzodiazepines for insomnia, anxiety and depression, respectively. Practitioners agreed that prescribing should be less than one week (80%; or from 1 week to 1 month (47%; or 1 to 4 months (16%; or 4 to 6 months (5% or more than 6 months (2%. Twenty-five general practitioners (45% accepted that they used benzodiazepines excessively in the past year. Conclusion A considerable proportion of general practitioners in Chiang Mai and Lampoon, Thailand inappropriately use benzodiazepines for physical illnesses, especially essential hypertension and uncomplicated low back pain. However, almost half of them thought that they overused benzodiazepines. General practitioner's lack of time, knowledge and skills should be taken into account in improving prescribing behaviour and attitudes.

  8. Effects of chlordiazepoxide and buspirone on plasma catecholamine and corticosterone levels in rats under basal and stress conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, S.F.; Slangen, J L; van der Gugten, J

    The effects of the classical benzodiazepine (BDZ) anxiolytic drug chlordiazepoxide (CDP) and the non-BDZ anxiolytic agent buspirone (BUSP) on basal and stress-induced plasma noradrenaline (NA), adrenaline (A) and corticosterone (CS) release were investigated. Male Wistar rats provided with a

  9. Neuropharmacological profile of clobazam, a new 1',5'-benzodiazepine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhards, H J

    1978-06-15

    The effect of the new 1,5-benzodiazepine clobazam on visual evoked potentials (VEP) and spontaneous EEG in the conscious rabbit and on spinal polysynaptic reflexes in the decerebrated cat was studied in comparison to the 1,4-benzodiazepine diazepam. Clobazam was half as potent as diazepam in depressing the amplitude of visual evoked potentials in the nonanaesthetized rabbit, whereas the depressing effect on spinal polysynaptic reflexes in the decerebrated cat was only 1/7 --1/30 of the diazepam effect. The action of clobazam and diazepam on VEP also showed differences in time course, i.e., the peak effect of clobazam lasted from 1 to 6 h after application, whereas the effect of diazepam appeared after 10 min and declined already after 1 h. Both compounds had similar effects on computer-analyzed spontaneous EEG in the rabbit (power spectrum analysis), with an increase of power in the beta-band (13-39Hz) and a decrease in the alpha (8-13 Hz) and theta (4-8Hz) bands.

  10. Potentiation of muscimol-induced long-term depression by benzodiazepines but not zolpidem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhondzadeh, Shahin; Mohammadi, Mohammad Reza; Kashani, Ladan

    2002-10-01

    Zolpidem is a rapid-onset, short-duration, quickly eliminated imidazopyridine hypnotic. It has been suggested that zolpidem may produce less memory and cognitive impairment than benzodiazepines (BZs) due to its low binding affinity for BZ receptor subtypes found in areas of the brain that are involved in learning and memory, in particular the hippocampus. A novel protocol for inducing long-term synaptic depression through activation of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA(A)) receptors in the hippocampal slices has been recently reported. The authors used the CA1 region of rat hippocampal slices to compare the effects of classic BZs, which bind equipotently to BZ1 and BZ2 sites, and of nonbenzodiazepine zolpidem, which binds preferentially to the BZ1 sites of GABA(A) receptors, on the GABA(A)-induced long-term depression (LTD), a possible cellular mechanism for their different cognition-impairment profile. Extracellular recordings were made in the CA1 pyramidal cell layer of rat hippocampal slices following orthodromic stimulation of Schaffer collateral fibres in stratum radiatum (0.01 Hz). It was observed that diazepam and cholordiazepoxide at concentrations of 10 and 20 microM, which did not have any effect themselves on the population spike, potentiate the ability of muscimol to induce LTD, whereas zolpidem at concentrations of 10 and 20 microM failed to potentiate muscimol-induced LTD. The results suggest that the potentiation of muscimol-induced LTD by diazepam or chlordiazepoxide and the lack of this effect by zolpidem may explain their different cognition impairment profiles.

  11. Assessing the efficacy of melatonin to curtail benzodiazepine/Z drug abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinali, Daniel P; Golombek, Diego A; Rosenstein, Ruth E; Brusco, Luis I; Vigo, Daniel E

    2016-07-01

    The abuse of benzodiazepine (BZP) and Z drugs has become, due to the tolerance and dependence they produce, a serious public health problem. Thirty years ago, we demonstrated in experimental animals the interaction of melatonin with central BZD receptors, and in 1997 we published the first series of elderly patients who reduced BZP consumption after melatonin treatment. Almost every single neuron in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN), the central pacemaker of the circadian system, contains γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and many results in animals point out to a melatonin interaction with GABA-containing neurons. In addition, central-type BZD antagonism, that obliterates GABAA receptor function, blunted most behavioral effects of melatonin including sleep. Melatonin is involved in the regulation of human sleep. This is supported by the temporal relationship between the rise of plasma melatonin levels and sleep propensity as well as by the sleep-promoting effects of exogenously administered melatonin. Both meta-analyses and consensus agreements give support to the therapeutic use of melatonin in sleep disorders. This action is attributed to MT1 and MT2 melatoninergic receptors localized in the SCN, as well as in other brain areas. This review discusses available data on the efficacy of melatonin to curtail chronic BZD/Z drug use in insomnia patients. A major advantage is that melatonin has a very safe profile, it is usually remarkably well tolerated and, in some studies, it has been administered to patients at very large doses and for long periods of time, without any potentiality of abuse. Further studies on this application of melatonin are warranted.

  12. Modulation of synaptic GABAA receptor function by zolpidem in substantia nigra pars reticulata

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-li ZHANG; Lei CHEN; Yan XUE; Wing-ho YUNG

    2008-01-01

    Aim: The substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr) constitutes one of the output centers of the basal ganglia, and its abnormal activity is believed to contribute to some basal ganglia motor disorders. Different lines of evidence revealed a major contribution of GABAA receptor-mediated synaptic inhibition in controlling the activity of SNr. The benzodiazepine binding site within the GABAA receptor is a modulation site of significant clinical interest. A high density of benzodiazepine binding sites has been reported in the rat SNr. In the present study, we investi-gate the effects of activating benzodiazepine binding sites in the SNr. Methods: Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings and motor behavior were applied. Results: Superfusion of zolpidem, a benzodiazepine binding agonist, at 100 nmol/L signifi-cantly prolonged the decay time of GABAA receptor-mediated postsynaptic currents. The prolongation on decay time induced by zolpidem was sensitive to the benzodiazepine antagonist flumazenil, confirming the specificity on the ben-zodiazepine site. Zolpidem at 1 μmol/L exerted a stronger prolongation on the decay time. A further experiment was performed on behaving rats. A unilateral microinjection of zolpidem into the rat SNr caused a robust contralateral rotation, which was significantly different from that of control animals receiving the vehicle injection. Conclusion: The present in vitro and in vivo findings that zolpidem significantly potentiated GABA currents and thus inhibited the activity of the SNr provide a rationale for further investigations into its potential in the treatment of basal ganglia disorders.

  13. Benzodiazepines and risk of hip fractures in older people: a review of the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumming, Robert G; Le Couteur, David G

    2003-01-01

    A hip fracture epidemic is occurring in developed countries in association with population aging. The increasing number of people with a hip fracture has major implications for clinicians and health service managers. More importantly, a hip fracture is a devastating event in the life of an older person, as it often leads to loss of independence and death. Identification of risk factors for hip fracture is an essential first step towards prevention. The use of psychotropic medications is an established risk factor for hip fracture. The purpose of this article is to systematically review epidemiological studies of the relationship between use of benzodiazepines and risk of hip fracture and, then, to see how the findings of these studies fit with what is known about the pharmacology of benzodiazepines. Eleven primary epidemiological studies were identified. The results of these studies were not consistent; however, the inconsistency appeared to be almost entirely explained by research design. The studies that did not show an association between increased hip fracture risk and benzodiazepine use were nearly all hospital-based case-control studies, a type of study that often lacks validity because of the difficulty of finding an appropriate control group. After excluding the hospital-based case-control studies, all but one of the remaining seven studies found that use of benzodiazepines was associated with an increased risk of hip fracture that varied between 50% and 110%. The only higher quality study that did not find an association between benzodiazepine use and hip fracture was also the only study conducted entirely in nursing homes. There was no evidence that the risk of hip fracture differed between short- and long-acting benzodiazepines. People using higher doses of benzodiazepines and those who had recently started using benzodiazepines were at the highest risk of hip fracture. In very old people, there was some preliminary evidence that benzodiazepines that

  14. Agonist substitution--a treatment alternative for high-dose benzodiazepine-dependent patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebrenz, Michael; Boesch, Lukas; Stohler, Rudolf; Caflisch, Carlo

    2010-11-01

    There is vast evidence for the superiority of agonist treatments (methadone, buprenorphine) over a withdrawal approach in opioid-dependent populations. Little research, however, has been conducted on the same approach for the treatment of high-dose benzodiazepine (BZD) dependence. Even large-scale reviews and meta-analyses discussing treatment strategies for benzodiazepine-dependent patients focus solely upon approaches that aim at achieving abstinence, namely on complete BZD withdrawal. While the types of interventions differ (e.g. gradual benzodiazepine taper with a long or a short half-life benzodiazepine, switching to non-benzodiazepine anxiolytics or prescribing adjunctive medications such as antidepressants or anticonvulsants on an in- or out-patient basis), the common aim of treatment still is total abstinence from benzodiazepines. However, the majority of patients suffering from high-dose BZD dependence do not succeed with long-term abstinence, irrespective of the procedure, and clinicians have been using BZD 'substitution' treatment in such cases for decades. Therefore, we suggest the evaluation of a substitution approach in this group, consisting of maintenance treatment with a slow-onset, long-acting BZD. Advantages of such a procedure may be improved health, less craving, fewer withdrawal complications, reduced anxiety, increased treatment retention, improvements in social functioning and less illegal activity. Cognitive impairments, the most problematic side effects of substitution treatment with benzodiazepines, could possibly be minimized by using an optimal agonist.

  15. Benzodiazepines: a major component in unintentional prescription drug overdoses with opioid analgesics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jann, Michael; Kennedy, William Klugh; Lopez, Gaylord

    2014-02-01

    The misuse and abuse of prescription medications in the United States continues to increase despite interventions by health care professionals, regulatory, and law enforcement agencies. Opioid analgesics are the leading class of prescription drugs that have caused unintentional overdose deaths. Benzodiazepines when taken alone are relatively safe agents in overdose. However, a 5-fold increase in deaths attributed to benzodiazepines occurred from 1999 to 2009. Emergency department visits related to opioid analgesics increased by 111% followed by benzodiazepines 89%. During 2003 to 2009, the 2 prescriptions drugs with the highest increase in death rates were oxycodone 264.6% and alprazolam 233.8%. Therefore, benzodiazepines have a significant impact on prescription drug unintentional overdoses second only to the opioid analgesics. The combination prescribing of benzodiazepines and opioid analgesics commonly takes place. The pharmacokinetic drug interactions between benzodiazepines and opioid analgesics are complex. The pharmacodynamic actions of these agents differ as their combined effects produce significant respiratory depression. Physician and pharmacy shopping by patients occurs, and prescription drug-monitoring programs can provide important information on benzodiazepine and opioid analgesic prescribing patterns and patient usage. Health care professionals need to inform patients and work closely with regulatory agencies and legislatures to stem the increasing fatalities from prescription drug unintentional overdoses.

  16. Nootropic nefiracetam inhibits proconvulsant action of peripheral-type benzodiazepines in epileptic mutant EL mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamoto, Yurie; Shiotani, Tadashi; Watabe, Shigeo; Nabeshima, Toshitaka; Yoshii, Mitsunobu

    2004-10-01

    Piracetam and structurally related nootropics are known to potentiate the anticonvulsant effects of antiepileptic drugs. It remains to be seen, however, whether these nootropics inhibit proconvulsant actions of many toxic agents including Ro 5-4864, a specific agonist for peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptors (PBR). The present study was designed to address this issue using EL mice, an animal model of epilepsy. In behavioral pharmacological experiments, EL mice were highly susceptible to convulsions induced by Ro 5-4864 (i.p.) in comparison with nonepileptic DDY mice. Nefiracetam administered orally to EL mice inhibited spontaneous seizures. In DDY mice, convulsions induced by Ro 5-4864 were prevented by nefiracetam when administered by i.v. injection. Aniracetam (i.v.) was partially effective, but piracetam and oxiracetam were ineffective as anticonvulsants. Binding assay for brain tissues revealed a higher density of mitochondrial PBR in EL mice compared with DDY mice. Binding of the PBR ligands Ro 5-4864 to either EL or DDY mouse brain was inhibited by micromolar concentrations of these nootropic agents in the sequence of nefiracetam > aniracetam > oxiracetam, piracetam. This rank order is identical to potency as anticonvulsants. These data suggest that nefiracetam may prevent toxic effects of PBR agonists through interacting with PBR.

  17. Mathematical modeling of tetrahydroimidazole benzodiazepine-1-one derivatives as an anti HIV agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojha, Lokendra Kumar

    2017-07-01

    The goal of the present work is the study of drug receptor interaction via QSAR (Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship) analysis for 89 set of TIBO (Tetrahydroimidazole Benzodiazepine-1-one) derivatives. MLR (Multiple Linear Regression) method is utilized to generate predictive models of quantitative structure-activity relationships between a set of molecular descriptors and biological activity (IC50). The best QSAR model was selected having a correlation coefficient (r) of 0.9299 and Standard Error of Estimation (SEE) of 0.5022, Fisher Ratio (F) of 159.822 and Quality factor (Q) of 1.852. This model is statistically significant and strongly favours the substitution of sulphur atom, IS i.e. indicator parameter for -Z position of the TIBO derivatives. Two other parameter logP (octanol-water partition coefficient) and SAG (Surface Area Grid) also played a vital role in the generation of best QSAR model. All three descriptor shows very good stability towards data variation in leave-one-out (LOO).

  18. Adjunctive benzodiazepine treatment of hospitalized schizophrenia patients in Asia from 2001 to 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tor, Phern-Chern; Ng, Tze Pin; Yong, Kian-Hui; Sim, Kang; Xiang, Yu-Tao; Wang, Chuan-Yue; Lee, Edwin Ho Ming; Fujii, Senta; Yang, Shu-Yu; Chong, Mian-Yoon; Ungvari, Gabor S; Si, Tianmei; He, Yan Ling; Chung, Eun Kee; Chee, Kok-Yoon; Trivedi, Jintendra; Udomratn, Pichet; Shinfuku, Naotaka; Kua, Ee Heok; Tan, Chay Hoon; Sartorius, Norman; Baldessarini, Ross J

    2011-07-01

    Benzodiazepines are commonly prescribed to patients with schizophrenia in many countries, but as little is known about such treatment in Asia, we evaluated their adjunctive use for 6761 in-patients diagnosed with schizophrenia in nine Asian countries using a cross-sectional study design in 2001, 2004 and 2008. Multivariate logistic regression and multivariate linear regression analyses were performed to assess predictors of benzodiazepine use and dose, respectively. Overall, 54% of the patients received adjunctive benzodiazepines at an average daily dose equivalent to 30.3 mg diazepam, with minor changes over the years sampled. Benzodiazepine use was highest in Taiwan and Japan, lowest in Thailand and China, and was associated with fewer years ill, presence of delusions (OR 1.24), hallucinations (OR 1.22), disorganized speech (OR 1.17), social or occupational dysfunction (OR 1.16), and use of mood stabilizers (OR 3.15), antiparkinsonian (OR 1.79) or antidepressant drugs (OR 1.33), and lower doses of antipsychotics (all p=0.016 to Benzodiazepine doses were highest in Taiwan and China, lowest in Korea and Singapore; higher doses were associated with being young, male, physically aggressive, receiving mood stabilizers, and having electroconvulsive treatment (all p=0.019 to Benzodiazepine use was associated with neurological and systemic adverse effects. In conclusion, benzodiazepine use was common in Asian patients with schizophrenia. Predictors of benzodiazepine use and dose differed in this population. Critical clinical guidelines should be developed specifically for Asian countries to address sound practices in regard to use of benzodiazepines for psychotic disorders.

  19. Risk of pneumonia associated with incident benzodiazepine use among community-dwelling adults with Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taipale, Heidi; Tolppanen, Anna-Maija; Koponen, Marjaana; Tanskanen, Antti; Lavikainen, Piia; Sund, Reijo; Tiihonen, Jari; Hartikainen, Sirpa

    2017-04-10

    Knowledge regarding whether benzodiazepines and similarly acting non-benzodiazepines (Z-drugs) are associated with an increased risk of pneumonia among older adults is lacking. We sought to investigate this association among community-dwelling adults with Alzheimer disease, a condition in which both sedative/hypnotic use and pneumonia are common. We obtained data on all community-dwelling adults with a recent diagnosis of Alzheimer disease in Finland (2005-2011) from the Medication use and Alzheimer disease (MEDALZ) cohort, which incorporates national registry data on prescriptions, reimbursement, hospital discharges and causes of death. Incident users of benzodiazepines and Z-drugs were identified using a 1-year washout period and matched with nonusers using propensity scores. The association with hospital admission or death due to pneumonia was analyzed with the Cox proportional hazards model and adjusted for use of other psychotropic drugs in a time-dependent manner. Among 49 484 eligible participants with Alzheimer disease, 5232 taking benzodiazepines and 3269 taking Z-drugs were matched 1:1 with those not taking these drugs. Collectively, use of benzodiazepines and Z-drugs was associated with an increased risk of pneumonia (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 1.22, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.05-1.42). When analyzed separately, benzodiazepine use was significantly associated with an increased risk of pneumonia (adjusted HR 1.28, 95% CI 1.07-1.54), whereas Z-drug use was not (adjusted HR 1.10, 95% CI 0.84-1.44). The risk of pneumonia was greatest within the first 30 days of benzodiazepine use (HR 2.09, 95% CI 1.26-3.48). Benzodiazepine use was associated with an increased risk of pneumonia among patients with Alzheimer disease. Risk of pneumonia should be considered when weighing the benefits and risks of benzodiazepines in this population. © 2017 Canadian Medical Association or its licensors.

  20. A comparative study on the effects of the benzodiazepine midazolam and the dopamine agents, apomorphine and sulpiride, on rat behavior in the two-way avoidance test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Juliana Dias Melo; de Oliveira, Amanda R; da Silva, Regina Claudia Barbosa; Brandão, Marcus L

    2009-04-01

    In recent years, studies in behavioral pharmacology have shown the involvement of dopaminergic mechanisms in avoidance behavior as assessed by the two-way active avoidance test (CAR). Changes in dopaminergic transmission also occur in response to particularly threatening challenges. However, studies on the effects of benzodiazepine (BZD) drugs in this test are still unclear. Given the interplay of dopamine and other neurotransmitters in the neurobiology of anxiety and schizophrenia the aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of systemic administration of midazolam, the dopaminergic agonist apomorphine, and the D2 receptor antagonist sulpiride using the CAR, a test that shows good sensitivity to typical neuroleptic drugs. Whereas midazolam did not alter the avoidance response, apomorphine increased and sulpiride reduced them in this test. Escape was not affected by any drug treatments. Heightened avoidance was not associated with the increased motor activity caused by apomorphine. In contrast with the benzodiazepine midazolam, activation of post-synaptic D2 receptors with apomorphine facilitates, whereas the D2 receptor antagonism with sulpiride inhibited the acquisition of the avoidance behavior. Together, these results bring additional evidence for a role of D2 mechanisms in the acquisition of the active avoidance.

  1. Simple synthesis, structure and ab initio study of 1,4-benzodiazepine-2,5-diones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadidi, Khosrow; Aryan, Reza; Mehrdad, Morteza; Lügger, Thomas; Ekkehardt Hahn, F.; Ng, Seik Weng

    2004-04-01

    A simple procedure for the synthesis of pyrido[2,1-c][1,4] benzodiazepine-6,12-dione ( 1) and 1,4-benzodiazepine-2,5-diones ( 2a- 2d), using microwave irradiation and/or conventional heating is reported. The configuration of 1 was determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. A detailed ab initio B3LYP/6-31G* calculation of structural parameters and substituent effects on ring inversion barriers (Δ G#) and also free energy differences (Δ G0) for benzodiazepines are reported.

  2. 1,4-Benzodiazepine drugs adsorption on the Ag colloidal surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cîntã, S.; Iliescu, T.; Astilean, S.; David, L.; Cozar, O.; Kiefer, W.

    1999-05-01

    The adsorption behaviour in the SERS complex of diazepam (7-chloro-1-methyl-5-phenyl-3-dihydro-1,4-benzodiazepin-2-one) and nitrazepam (1,3-dihydro-7-nitro-5-phenyl-1,4-benzodiazepin-2-one) with the Ag colloidal particles is reported and discussed. In both cases, the CN bond vibration of the 1,4-benzodiazepine is strongly affected by adsorption and enhanced. The SERS system of Ag colloid with diazepam or nitrazepam allow the recognition of the drug sample at concentration of 10 -7 mol l -1.

  3. [Are z-hypnotics better and safer sleeping pills than benzodiazepines?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellingsaeter, Trude C; Bramness, Jørgen G; Slørdal, Lars

    2006-11-16

    Benzodiazepines and the benzodiazepine-like z-hypnotics (zopiclone, zolpidem, and zaleplon) have the same mode of action and many of the same effects. The use of z-hypnotics has had a steady and large increase since their introduction in Norway, and sales data suggest extensive use among the elderly. The relatively short half-lives of these drugs may cause less hangover effects, but z-hypnotics are hardly more effective or safer than benzodiazepines. The two classes of drugs should be prescribed with similar caution.

  4. Synthesis of a Benzodiazepine-derived Rhodium NHC Complex by C-H Bond Activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergman, Roberg G.; Gribble, Jr., Michael W.; Ellman, Jonathan A.

    2008-01-30

    The synthesis and characterization of a Rh(I)-NHC complex generated by C-H activation of 1,4-benzodiazepine heterocycle are reported. This complex constitutes a rare example of a carbene tautomer of a 1,4-benzodiazepine aldimine stabilized by transition metal coordination and demonstrates the ability of the catalytically relevant RhCl(PCy{sub 3}){sub 2} fragment to induce NHC-forming tautomerization of heterocycles possessing a single carbene-stabilizing heteroatom. Implications for the synthesis of benzodiazepines and related pharmacophores via C-H functionalization are discussed.

  5. Detection of benzodiazepines in different tissues, including bone, using a quantitative ELISA assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorczynski, L Y; Melbye, F J

    2001-07-01

    Benzodiazepines were analyzed in different tissue samples, including hone, by ELISA. The sensitivity of detection for different benzodiazepines was consistent with the manufacturer's reports of the cross reactivities of the antibodies used, with the greatest sensitivity for midazolam and the least for diazepam; in addition the pharmacokinetics was consistent with the known duration of action of the different benzodiazepines, with midazolam cleared rapidly, and diazepam slowly. Following intramuscular injection of 300 microg of midazolam at 16 h intervals for ten days, the drug was detectable in bone tissue samples obtained from skeletonized remains buried in soil at room temperature for three weeks.

  6. A New Method of Separation of Four Benzodiazepines by RP-CEC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Lan ZHANG; Tong Hui ZHOU

    2004-01-01

    A new method to separate diazepam, nitrazepam, estazolam, alprazolam was established on both C18 and C8 CEC columns.The influence of separation voltage, Tris concentration, column temperature and the percentage of acetonitrile on the resolution and retention behavior of four benzodiazepines was investigated.The results showed that the percentage of acetonitrile had the largest effect on the resolution and retention behavior of the four benzodiazepines.Other separation conditions had also effects on the resolution and retention behavior, but smaller than the concentration of acetonitrile.Optimum separation conditions were obtained to separate four benzodiazepines on C18 and C8 CEC columns.

  7. Pregabalin in the treatment of alcohol and benzodiazepines dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oulis, Panagiotis; Konstantakopoulos, George

    2010-01-01

    We review all available studies on the use of the newer anticonvulsant drug pregabalin (PGB) in the treatment of both alcohol dependence (AD) and benzodiazepine dependence (BD). In AD, the available evidence includes one open-label and one double-blind randomized studies, whereas in BD, only a few case reports and one open-label study are as yet available. In both conditions, PGB was found efficacious with significant improvement in withdrawal symptoms at the dosage ranges of 150-450 mg/day (AD) and 225-900 mg/day (BD). Moreover, its side effects were mild and transient. Despite the limited quality of the studies design, their findings suggest that PGB might constitute a novel efficacious and safe option in the treatment of both AD and BD.

  8. Clinical observations in children after prenatal benzodiazepine exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laegreid, L

    1990-01-01

    Eight children excessively exposed to benzodiazepines (BZD) in utero are described. Five of the 8 mothers admitted regular use of BZD and in 3 mothers, stored serum from early pregnancy could be analysed and found positive for BZD and its metabolite. All the children had similar dysmorphic features, in addition, 1 child had aplasia of one kidney and 2 had cleft palate. At follow-up 2 children had become microcephalic. 2 were severely mentally retarded, 5 had a mild mental retardation and only 1 was of normal intelligence. In a case-control study, 4 neonatal diagnoses of congenital malformations, in our experience characteristic of fetal BZD exposure, were chosen as inclusion criteria. In 8 of 18 cases, blood samples from early pregnancy were positive for BZD as compared to 2 of 60 control samples. An association between BZD-positive serum tests and the particular diagnoses could be demonstrated (p = 0.00006).

  9. [Benzodiazepine drug ingestion and evaluation of after care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandelot, D; Bertholon, F; Pascalis, J G

    1994-01-01

    Voluntary drug ingestion with benzodiazepine represent today the most frequent method of attempt of autolysis. One must note the difficulties the doctor may find in front such problems to judge the reliability of interviews made in such difficult conditions. Residual disturbances of superior functions, more precisely of vigilance during the period with follow the suicidal action must not be overlooked. Thanks to a clinical scale easily used the residual disturbances have been put in evidence on a sample of 20 subjects who had been admitted with this aim in view in a university ward specialized in psychiatric emergencies. The possibility of continuity within middle range care must allow an improvement of minimum care of such pathologies.

  10. Effect on postural sway of various benzodiazepine tranquillizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patat, A; Foulhoux, P

    1985-01-01

    The effects of various benzodiazepine tranquillizers (clobazam 20 mg, bromazepam 6 mg and lorazepam 2 mg) were investigated by posturography in 16 subjects in a controlled trial. Twelve received each of the three anxiolytics for 1 week in a cross-over design, four received placebo for 1 week during the three successive treatment periods. A pharmacodynamic study was carried out after the first administration, and another assessment was done after 1 week of treatment. The first administration of lorazepam caused the most marked disturbances of body sway (increase of spectral energies, length and amplitude of the stabilogram). The first administration of bromazepam was also accompanied by an increase of the posturographic parameters, although less marked. Administration of clobazam did not produce any impairment of equilibrium, indicating that it is devoid of any sedative effect measurable by posturography. No changes of the postural sway can be detected on the measurement recorded 10 h after the last dose of 1 week's treatment. PMID:2862898

  11. In vitro effect of benzodiazepines on polymorphonuclear leukocyte oxidative activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfarb, G; Belghiti, J; Gautero, H; Boivin, P

    1984-01-01

    The effect of three benzodiazepine compounds, diazepam, flunitrazepam, and clorazepate, on oxidative activity of human polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) was investigated. The oxidative activity of zymosan-stimulated PMN in the presence of three concentrations (10, 20, and 40 micrograms/ml) of these compounds was measured polarographically. In addition, zymosan-stimulated nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) reduction was measured in the presence of various concentrations of flunitrazepam. All three compounds inhibited oxygen consumption of the PMN. The extent of inhibition was linear with respect to log-concentrations; oxygen consumption was reduced 50% for concentrations of diazepam, flunitrazepam, and clorazepate of 13 micrograms/ml, 56 micrograms/ml, and 285 micrograms/ml, respectively. In addition 30% and 100% inhibition of NBT reduction by flunitrazepam were observed at respective concentrations of 10 micrograms/ml and 60 micrograms/ml. The clinical relevance of these findings remains to be determined.

  12. Complexity of illness and adjunctive benzodiazepine use in outpatients with bipolar I or II disorder: results from the Bipolar CHOICE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobo, William V; Reilly-Harrington, Noreen A; Ketter, Terence A; Brody, Benjamin D; Kinrys, Gustavo; Kemp, David E; Shelton, Richard C; McElroy, Susan L; Sylvia, Louisa G; Kocsis, James H; McInnis, Melvin G; Friedman, Edward S; Singh, Vivek; Tohen, Mauricio; Bowden, Charles L; Deckersbach, Thilo; Calabrese, Joseph R; Thase, Michael E; Nierenberg, Andrew A; Rabideau, Dustin J; Schoenfeld, David A; Faraone, Stephen V; Kamali, Masoud

    2015-02-01

    Benzodiazepines are widely prescribed for patients with bipolar disorders in clinical practice, but very little is known about the subtypes of patients with bipolar disorder or aspects of bipolar illness that contribute most to benzodiazepine use. We examined the prevalence of and factors associated with benzodiazepine use among 482 patients with bipolar I or II disorder enrolled in the Bipolar CHOICE study. Eighty-one subjects were prescribed benzodiazepines at study entry and were considered benzodiazepine users. Stepwise logistic regression was used to model baseline benzodiazepine use versus nonuse, using entry and exit criteria of P benzodiazepine users were prescribed a significantly higher number of other psychotropic medications and were more likely to be prescribed lamotrigine or antidepressants as compared with benzodiazepine nonusers. Benzodiazepine users were more likely to have a diagnosis of bipolar I disorder and comorbid anxiety disorder, but not comorbid alcohol or substance use disorders. Benzodiazepine users also had experienced more anxiety and depressive symptoms and suicidality, but not irritability or manic symptoms, than did benzodiazepine nonusers. In the multivariate model, anxiety symptom level (regardless of diagnosis), lamotrigine use, number of concomitant psychotropic medications, college education, and high household income predicted benzodiazepine use. Benzodiazepine use in patients with bipolar disorders is associated with greater illness complexity as indicated by a higher number of concomitant psychotropic medications and higher anxiety symptom burden, regardless of a comorbid anxiety disorder diagnosis. Demographic factors were also important determinants of benzodiazepine use, which may be related to access to care and insurance coverage for benzodiazepines.

  13. Benzodiazepine whole blood concentrations in cases with positive oral fluid on-site screening test results using the DrugWipe(®) single for benzodiazepines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blencowe, Tom; Vimpari, Kari; Lillsunde, Pirjo

    2011-07-01

    Reliable on-site oral fluid screening devices are a useful and convenient means of policing traffic. In Finland, benzodiazepines represent a particular challenge to traffic safety. This study presents a retrospective examination of toxicological analysis results from whole blood in cases which gave a positive screening result for benzodiazepines in oral fluid using the DrugWipe Single device (Securetec). Use of oral fluid on-site screening tests and blood confirmation analyses reflects the real situation in many countries. The data were compiled from the databases of Alcohol and Drug Analytics Unit at the National Institute for Health and Welfare. Confirmation analysis results in whole blood were obtained using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Data were from 224 real cases in which the Finnish police had conducted a DrugWipe Single benzodiazepines test on drivers suspected of driving under the influence of drugs (DUID). The benzodiazepine concentrations encountered in positive oral fluid screening cases in this study indicate that the device is able to detect these substances even at relatively low levels. However, the DrugWipe device does not enable any distinction between therapeutic use and harmful use of benzodiazepines at higher doses.

  14. Ethyl loflazepate: a prodrug from the benzodiazepine series designed to dissociate anxiolytic and sedative activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambon, J P; Perio, A; Demarne, H; Hallot, A; Dantzer, R; Roncucci, R; Bizière, K

    1985-01-01

    Ethyl loflazepate (Victan) is an original 1,4-benzodiazepine (BZD) being used as a potent, nonsedative, minor tranquillizer. Ethyl loflazepate was designed to be a prodrug that would gradually release within the organism an active 1,4-BZD. It was hypothesized that this type of pharmacokinetic profile would dissociate anxiolytic from sedative activities. Previously published pharmacokinetic studies performed in rats, baboons and humans have confirmed that ethyl loflazepate gradually releases in the plasma an active 1,4-BZD, descarboxyloflazepate. In the present study, the activity of ethyl loflazepate and its main plasmatic metabolites were examined in rodent models predictive of anxiolytic, anticonvulsant, myorelaxant and sedative properties. The activities of ethyl loflazepate and its metabolites were compared to those of reference BZDs: diazepam, bromazepam, nitrazepam, flunitrazepam, lorazepam, clorazepate. Ethyl loflazepate and its metabolites revealed the typical profile of activity of minor tranquillizers. The activity of ethyl loflazepate was long-lasting. The overall anxiolytic potency of ethyl loflazepate was similar to that of diazepam but ethyl loflazepate appeared to be less sedative than diazepam. Thus in the approach-avoidance conflict procedure in rats the threshold anxiolytic doses were 1 and 2 mg/kg i.p. for ethyl loflazepate and diazepam, respectively, whereas the threshold sedative doses were 16 and 8 mg/kg i.p., respectively. In vitro ethyl loflazepate exhibited a weak affinity for the BZD receptor site. In vivo ethyl loflazepate displaced [3H]-flunitrazepam from mice brain membranes with a potency comparable to that of lorazepam. In vitro, descarboxyloflazepate, the main plasmatic metabolites of ethyl loflazepate, revealed a 4-fold greater affinity for the BZD receptor than diazepam.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Sensitivity of P-glycoprotein tryptophan residues to benzodiazepines and ATP interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Sofia A C; Cordeiro-da-Silva, Anabela; de Castro, Baltazar; Gameiro, Paula

    2007-01-01

    Plasma membrane P-glycoprotein is a member of the ATP-binding cassette family of membrane transporters. In the present study tryptophan intrinsic fluorescence was used to understand the P-glycoprotein response to three benzodiazepines (bromazepam, chlordiazepoxide and flurazepam) in the presence and absence of ATP. Fluorescence emission spectra showed a red shift on the maximal emission wavelength upon interaction of P-glycoprotein with all benzodiazepines. Benzodiazepine association with nucleotide-bound P-glycoprotein also showed this trend and the quenching profile was attributed to a sphere-of-action model, for static fluorescence. Furthermore, quenching data of benzodiazepine-bound P-glycoprotein with ATP were concentration dependent and saturable, indicating that nucleotide binds to P-glycoprotein whether drug is present or not. These results seems in agreement with the proposal of the ATP-switch model by Higgins and Linton, where substrate binding to the transporters initiates the transport cycle by increasing the ATP binding affinity.

  16. Correlates of (inappropriate) benzodiazepine use : the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manthey, Leonie; van Veen, Tineke; Giltay, Erik J.; Stoop, Jose E.; Neven, Arie Knuistingh; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; Zitman, Frans G.

    2011-01-01

    AIM Results on determinants of benzodiazepine (BZD) use in general and inappropriate use were inconsistent and mostly univariate. The relative importance of sociodemographic, psychological and physical determinants has never been investigated in a comprehensive, multivariate model. METHODS We includ

  17. An efficient synthesis of 1,5-benzodiazepine derivatives catalyzed by boric acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Zhou; Mei Yue Zhang; Shu Tao Gao; Jing Jun Ma; Chun Wang; Chao Liu

    2009-01-01

    1,5-Benzodiazepine derivatives have been synthesized by the condensation of o-phenylenediamines and ketones in the presence of boric acid as catalyst under mild conditions. This method is simple, environmentally benign and high yielding.

  18. Sulfanilic acid catalyzed solvent-free synthesis of 1,5-benzodiazepine derivatives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Sulfanilic acid has been found to be an efficient catalyst for the synthesis of 1,5-benzodiazepines from o-phenylenediamine and ketones. This method is simple, effective and environmentally friendly and gives better yields.

  19. Iodine-125 radioimmunoassay for the direct detection of benzodiazepines in blood and urine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goddard, C.P.; Stead, A.H.; Mason, P.A.; Law, B.; Moffat, A.C.; McBrien, M.; Cosby, S.

    1986-05-01

    A radioimmunoassay (RIA) for the direct detection of benzodiazepines in blood and urine is described. It is based on a commercially available antiserum and an easily synthesised radio-iodinated derivative of clonazepam that allows the use of relatively simple gamma-counting procedures. The assay can detect low therapeutic levels of all of the benzodiazepines currently available in the UK in 50-..mu..l samples of blood and urine (1-50 ng ml/sup -1/, depending on the drug); no prior sample preparation is required. It is inexpensive, rapid, simple to perform and is broadly specific for the benzodiazepine class of drugs. The assay offers a most suitable means of screening large numbers of samples of forensic interest for the presence of the benzodiazepines.

  20. [Benzodiazepine or non-benzodiazepine hypnotics withdrawal syndrome during hospitalization: A series of 22 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorel, Marine; Fummi, Camille; Gras, Valérie; Masmoudi, Kamel

    2016-06-01

    Twenty-two cases related to benzodiazepine (BZD) withdrawal syndrome were identified and reported to Amiens's regional pharmacovigilance center between January 1st, 1995 and March 25th, 2014, all with a favourable outcome after reintroduction of a BZD. Despite being a very classical well-known side effect, physicians may underestimate this risk. Our series also confirms that the patient is misinformed about the consequences of an abrupt BZD discontinuation especially when the BZD has been consumed for many years. Interviewing patient and his family on the nature of the current medical treatments should be systematic and an early diagnostic step taken by physicians faced with a recent behavioral disorder. Moreover, this would prevent unnecessary, sometimes invasive, expensive investigations and a prolonged hospitalization.

  1. PET in neuroscience. Dopaminergic, CABA/benzodiazepine, and opiate system; PET in den Neurowisssenschaften: dopaminerges, GABA/Benzodiazepin- und Opiatsystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartenstein, P. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2004-02-01

    This article gives an overview on radiotracer imaging with positron emission tomography (PET) in measuring various aspects of neurotransmission. The review focusses on the dopaminergic system, the GABA/benzodiazepine system, and the opiate system. Besides dealing with the current clinical applications for brain PET studies with specific radiopharmaceuticals this article outlines an idea on potential future developments for the use of these methods in basic neuroscience. (orig.) [German] Diese Arbeit praesentiert eine Uebersicht zur aktuellen Forschung und klinischen Anwendung von PET-Untersuchungen mit Radiopharmaka, die verschiedene Komponenten der Neurotransmission erfassen. Ausserdem werden Perspektiven und Trend der Methodik gezeigt. Im Mittelpunkt stehen das dopaminerge System, das GABA/Benzodiazepinsystem, und das Opiatsystem. Ausfuehrlich dargestellt werden aktuelle klinische und kliniknahe Moeglichkeiten sowie methodische Aspekte der grundlagenorientierten Forschung, die fuer eine zukunftsorientierte Anwendung von PET-Studien mit Rezeptorliganden u.a. Radiopharmaka zur Bildgebung komplexer biochemischer Prozesse von Bedeutung sind. (orig.)

  2. Addressing the Issue of Chronic, Inappropriate Benzodiazepine Use: How Can Pharmacists Play a Role?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen C. Gallagher

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Prescribing guidelines do not recommend the long-term use of benzodiazepines since their effectiveness with chronic use is out-weighed by risks including dependence, memory and cognitive impairment, hip fractures and traffic accidents. Despite these guidelines, historical data points to an increasing proportion of inappropriate, repeat prescribing of benzodiazepines in Ireland and elsewhere, with up to 33% of patients who use these drugs doing so long-term. The typical long-term benzodiazepine user is an older, socio-economically disadvantaged patient who has been prescribed these medicines by their general practitioner (GP and dispensed them by their community pharmacist. Misuse of benzodiazepines in nursing homes and psychiatric institutions is also of concern, with one Irish study indicating that almost half of all admissions to a psychiatric hospital were prescribed these drugs, usually despite a lack of clear clinical need. Discontinuation of benzodiazepines has proven to be of benefit, as it is followed by improvements in cognitive and psychomotor function, particularly in elderly patients. It is obvious that an inter-professional effort, focusing on the primary care setting, is required to address benzodiazepine misuse and to ensure appropriate pharmaceutical care. Pharmacists must be an integral part of this inter-professional effort, not least because they are uniquely positioned as the health professional with most frequent patient contact. There is already some supporting evidence that pharmacists’ involvement in interventions to reduce benzodiazepine use can have positive effects on patient outcomes. Here, this evidence is reviewed and the potential for pharmacists to play an expanded role in ensuring the appropriate use of benzodiazepines is discussed.

  3. Intramolecular azide to alkene cycloadditions for the construction of pyrrolobenzodiazepines and azetidino-benzodiazepines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemming, Karl; Chambers, Christopher S; Jamshaid, Faisal; O'Gorman, Paul A

    2014-10-17

    The coupling of proline- and azetidinone-substituted alkenes to 2-azidobenzoic and 2-azidobenzenesulfonic acid gives precursors that undergo intramolecular azide to alkene 1,3-dipolar cycloadditions to give imine-, triazoline- or aziridine-containing pyrrolo[1,4]benzodiazepines (PBDs), pyrrolo[1,2,5]benzothiadiazepines (PBTDs), and azetidino[1,4]benzodiazepines. The imines and aziridines are formed after loss of nitrogen from a triazoline cycloadduct. The PBDs are a potent class of antitumour antibiotics.

  4. Intramolecular Azide to Alkene Cycloadditions for the Construction of Pyrrolobenzodiazepines and Azetidino-Benzodiazepines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Hemming

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The coupling of proline- and azetidinone-substituted alkenes to 2-azidobenzoic and 2-azidobenzenesulfonic acid gives precursors that undergo intramolecular azide to alkene 1,3-dipolar cycloadditions to give imine-, triazoline- or aziridine-containing pyrrolo[1,4]benzodiazepines (PBDs, pyrrolo[1,2,5]benzothiadiazepines (PBTDs, and azetidino[1,4]benzodiazepines. The imines and aziridines are formed after loss of nitrogen from a triazoline cycloadduct. The PBDs are a potent class of antitumour antibiotics.

  5. Inappropriate benzodiazepine use in older adults and the risk of fracture

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    textabstractAIMS: The Beers criteria for prescribing in elderly are well known and used for many drug utilization studies. We investigated the clinical value of the Beers criteria for benzodiazepine use, notably the association between inappropriate use and risk of fracture. METHODS: We performed a nested case-control study within the Rotterdam Study, a population-based cohort study in 7983 elderly. The proportion of 'inappropriate' benzodiazepine use according to the Beers criteria was compa...

  6. Positive Drug Screen for Benzodiazepine Due to a Chinese Herbal Product

    OpenAIRE

    Eachus, Patricia L.

    1996-01-01

    A female athlete tested positive for benzodiazepine on a random drug screen. She denied taking any illicit or prescription drugs. The positive screen was found to be caused by undeclared addiction of diazepam to a Chinese herbal product, “Miracle Herb.” Some foreign vitamins, health care products, or herbal tea may contain banned or dangerous additives unknown to the consumer. These additives may include ingredients such as benzodiazepine, mefenamic acid, or corticosteroids. Possible physical...

  7. Phenobarbital compared to benzodiazepines in alcohol withdrawal treatment: A register-based cohort study of subsequent benzodiazepine use, alcohol recidivism and mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askgaard, Gro; Hallas, Jesper; Fink-Jensen, Anders; Molander, Anna Camilla; Madsen, Kenneth Grønkjær; Pottegård, Anton

    2016-04-01

    Long-acting benzodiazepines such as chlordiazepoxide are recommended as first-line treatment for alcohol withdrawal. These drugs are known for their abuse liability and might increase alcohol consumption among problem drinkers. Phenobarbital could be an alternative treatment option, possibly with the drawback of a more pronounced acute toxicity. We evaluated if phenobarbital compared to chlordiazepoxide decreased the risk of subsequent use of benzodiazepines, alcohol recidivism and mortality. The study was a register-based cohort study of patients admitted for alcohol withdrawal 1998-2013 and treated with either phenobarbital or chlordiazepoxide. Patients were followed for one year. We calculated hazard ratios (HR) for benzodiazepine use, alcohol recidivism and mortality associated with alcohol withdrawal treatment, while adjusting for confounders. A total of 1063 patients treated with chlordiazepoxide and 1365 patients treated with phenobarbital were included. After one year, the outcome rates per 100 person-years in the phenobarbital versus the chlordiazepoxide cohort were 9.20 vs. 5.13 for use of benzodiazepine, 37.9 vs. 37.9 for alcohol recidivism and 29 vs. 59 for mortality. Comparing phenobarbital to chlordiazepoxide treated, the HR of subsequent use of benzodiazepines was 1.56 (95%CI 1.05-2.30). Similarly, the HR for alcohol recidivism was 0.99 (95%CI 0.84-1.16). Lastly, the HR for 30-days and 1 year mortality was 0.25 (95%CI 0.08-0.78) and 0.51 (95%CI 0.31-0.86). There was no decreased risk of subsequent benzodiazepine use or alcohol recidivism in patients treated with phenobarbital compared to chlordiazepoxide. Phenobarbital treatment was associated with decreased mortality, which might be confounded by somatic comorbidity among patients receiving chlordiazepoxide. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. α2-containing GABAA receptors: A target for the development of novel treatment strategies for CNS disorders

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    GABAA receptors have important physiological functions, as revealed by pharmacological studies and experiments involving gene-targeted mouse models, and are the target of widely used drugs such as the benzodiazepines. In this review, we are summarizing current knowledge about the function of α2-containing GABAA receptors, a receptor subtype representing approximately 15–20% of all GABAA receptors. This receptor subtype mediates anxiolytic-like, reward-enhancing, and antihyperalgesic actions o...

  9. Prescription pattern of benzodiazepines for inpatients at a tertiary care university hospital in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khawaja, Muhammad Rizwanulhaq; Khawaja, Muhammad Rizwanullah; Majeed, A; Malik, F; Merchant, K A; Maqsood, M; Malik, R; Mazahir, S; Naqvi, H

    2005-06-01

    To determine the point prevalence of benzodiazepine prescriptions for inpatients at a tertiary care university hospital in Pakistan and to correlate it with prescription patterns of various specialties, indications and demographic variables of the patients. This 24-hours point prevalence study was done at The Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi. By convenient random sampling, 208 inpatients were interviewed. Patients' files were also studied to record the drugs administered. Data was entered into questionnaires and analyzed by SPSS 10.0. The point prevalence of the benzodiazepines was 21.2%. It was higher among males than females and among surgical than non-surgical patients. Midazolam was the most commonly used benzodiazepine, followed by Alprazolam and Lorazepam. Pre-anesthesia and psychiatric symptoms were the two most common indications. Oral route was used in 84% patients for drug administration and mean Valium equivalent dosage was 4.86 mg/day. Mean length of prescription was 3 days. Longer duration of hospitalization was a significant predictor of the requirement of benzodiazepine prescription (p-value = 0.020). Prescription pattern of benzodiazepines at a tertiary care university hospital is similar to that reported in the developed countries through monitoring at various levels by physicians, clinical pharmacist and nursing staff. Data regarding the prescription pattern of benzodiazepines is scarce, and it needs to be expanded to formulate clear guidelines regarding their prescription.

  10. An Update on the Synthesis of Pyrrolo[1,4]benzodiazepines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Varvounis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyrrolo[1,4]benzodiazepines are tricyclic compounds that are considered “privileged structures” since they possess a wide range of biological activities. The first encounter with these molecules was the isolation of anthramycin from cultures of Streptomyces, followed by determination of the X-ray crystal structure of the molecule and a study of its interaction with DNA. This opened up an intensive synthetic and biological study of the pyrrolo[2,1-c][1,4]benzodiazepines that has culminated in the development of the dimer SJG-136, at present in Phase II clinical trials. The synthetic efforts have brought to light some new synthetic methodology, while the contemporary work is focused on building trimeric pyrrolo[2,1-c][1,4]benzodiazepines linked together by various heterocyclic and aliphatic chains. It is the broad spectrum of biological activities of pyrrolo[1,2-a][1,4]benzodiazepines that has maintained the interest of researchers to date whereas several derivatives of the even less studied pyrrolo[1,2-d][1,4]benzodiazepines were found to be potent non-nucleoside HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors. The present review is an update on the synthesis of pyrrolo[2,1-c][1,4]benzodiazepines since the last major review of 2011, while the overview of the synthesis of the other two tricyclic isomers is comprehensive.

  11. Benzodiazepines for insomnia in community-dwelling elderly: a review of benefit and risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grad, R M

    1995-11-01

    To critically assess and summarize the beneficial effects of benzodiazepine therapy for insomnia in community-dwelling elders, a systematic search was undertaken to review all published clinical trials and sleep laboratory studies. The risk of injury for benzodiazepine users was also reviewed. Ten studies met inclusion criteria for assessing benefit. There are no studies regarding the long-term effectiveness of benzodiazepines for the treatment of sleep disorders in the elderly. In the sleep laboratory setting, triazolam 0.125 mg, flurazepam 15 mg, and estazolam 1 mg improved sleep latency by 27 to 30 minutes and increased total sleep time by 47 to 81 minutes for the first 2 to 3 nights of treatment, compared with baseline measurements taken while the patients were receiving placebo. In contrast to these modest short-term benefits, there is an association between the use of benzodiazepines with a long half-life, eg, flurazepam, diazepam, and chlordiazepoxide, and an increased risk of hip fracture in the elderly. Triazolam can cause rebound insomnia as well as anterograde amnesia. Clinicians should discontinue their prescribing of long-acting benzodiazepines for elderly patients with insomnia. More research is needed on the effects of nondrug interventions as well as on short- and intermediate-acting benzodiazepines, such as oxazepam and temazepam, to treat insomnia in community-dwelling elderly.

  12. Benzodiazepine drug use and adverse respiratory outcomes among older adults with COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vozoris, Nicholas T; Fischer, Hadas D; Wang, Xuesong; Stephenson, Anne L; Gershon, Andrea S; Gruneir, Andrea; Austin, Peter C; Anderson, Geoffrey M; Bell, Chaim M; Gill, Sudeep S; Rochon, Paula A

    2014-08-01

    Our purpose was to evaluate the association of new benzodiazepine use relative to non-use with adverse clinical respiratory outcomes among older adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This was a retrospective population-based cohort study of Ontario, Canada, residents between 2003 and 2010. A validated algorithm was applied to health administrative data to identify adults aged 66 years and older with COPD. Relative risks (RRs) of several clinically important respiratory outcomes were examined within 30 days of incident benzodiazepine use compared with non-use, applying propensity score matching. New benzodiazepine users were at significantly higher risk for outpatient respiratory exacerbations (RR 1.45, 95% CI 1.36-1.54) and emergency room visits for COPD or pneumonia (RR 1.92, 95% CI 1.69-2.18) compared to non-users. Risk of hospitalisation for COPD or pneumonia was also increased in benzodiazepine users, but was nonsignificant (RR 1.09, 95% CI 1.00-1.20). There were no significant differences in intensive care unit admissions between the two groups and all-cause mortality was slightly lower among new versus non-users. Benzodiazepines were associated with increased risk for several serious adverse respiratory outcomes among older adults with COPD. The findings suggest that decisions to use benzodiazepines in older patients with COPD need to consider potential adverse respiratory outcomes.

  13. Cross-reactivities and structure-reactivity relationships of six benzodiazepines to EMIT(®) immunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertol, Elisabetta; Vaiano, Fabio; Furlanetto, Sandra; Mari, Francesco

    2013-10-01

    Benzodiazepines are among the most frequently prescribed drugs due to their sedative, hypnotic, anxiolytic, muscle relaxant and antiepileptic properties. Considering the high consumption of benzodiazepines worldwide, there is increased potential for addiction and abuse in cases of crime, driving under the influence of drugs, suicide and drug-facilitated sexual assault (DFSA). For these reasons, this class of drugs and their metabolites are frequently present in both clinical and forensic cases. In a forensic toxicology laboratory, typical screening analysis for benzodiazepine involves various immunoassay screening methods. The present study investigates the cross-reactivity profiles of six benzodiazepines not included in the manufacturer's instructions (3-hydroxy-flunitrazepam, 7-amino-nitrazepam, brotizolam, delorazepam, pinazepam, α-hydroxy-midazolam) to EMIT(®) II Plus Benzodiazepine Assay. Pinazepam, delorazepam and brotizolam are the most reactive molecules, while the other ones present a very low cross-reactivity. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was used to confirm the concentrations of the spiked urines for immunoassay test and to make a comparison between the quantitative results of the different methods. Structure-reactivity relationships to EMIT(®) II Plus Benzodiazepine Assay were also evaluated. This paper draws attention to the problem of careless use of immunoassay tests for forensic purposes as they may provide false positive and/or negative results.

  14. An Update on the Synthesis of Pyrrolo[1,4]benzodiazepines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varvounis, George

    2016-01-28

    Pyrrolo[1,4]benzodiazepines are tricyclic compounds that are considered "privileged structures" since they possess a wide range of biological activities. The first encounter with these molecules was the isolation of anthramycin from cultures of Streptomyces, followed by determination of the X-ray crystal structure of the molecule and a study of its interaction with DNA. This opened up an intensive synthetic and biological study of the pyrrolo[2,1-c][1,4]benzodiazepines that has culminated in the development of the dimer SJG-136, at present in Phase II clinical trials. The synthetic efforts have brought to light some new synthetic methodology, while the contemporary work is focused on building trimeric pyrrolo[2,1-c][1,4]benzodiazepines linked together by various heterocyclic and aliphatic chains. It is the broad spectrum of biological activities of pyrrolo[1,2-a][1,4]benzodiazepines that has maintained the interest of researchers to date whereas several derivatives of the even less studied pyrrolo[1,2-d][1,4]benzodiazepines were found to be potent non-nucleoside HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors. The present review is an update on the synthesis of pyrrolo[2,1-c][1,4]benzodiazepines since the last major review of 2011, while the overview of the synthesis of the other two tricyclic isomers is comprehensive.

  15. Synthesis, characterisation, stereochemistry and antimicrobial activity of 5 -piperazino- and 5-morpholinoacetyl-2,2,4-trimethyl-1, 5-benzodiazepines

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Ponnuswamy; A Akila; D Deepa Rajakumari; V Shreevidhyaa Suressh; G Usha

    2015-11-01

    Three 1,5-benzodiazepines viz., 5-chloroacetyl-, 5-piperazinoacetyl- and N5 -morpholinoacetyl-2,2,4-trimethyl-1H-1,5-benzodiazepines have been synthesized. The structural characterisation and the conformational preferences of the compounds have been carried out using IR, 1D and 2D NMR spectral data. The NMR spectral data show that the -acetyltetrahydro-1,5-benzodiazepines prefer to exist in boat conformation with exo orientation of >C=O at 5 position in the solution state. The X-ray crystal structure of 5-morpholinoacetyl-2,2,4-trimethyl-1H-1,5-benzodiazepine also supports boat conformation in the solid state. The antimicrobial activity for -acetyltetrahydro-1,5-benzodiazepines have been carried out. -morpholinoacetyl-2,2,4-trimethyl-1H-1,5-benzodiazepine demonstrated better antibacterial and antifungal activities.

  16. Antagonism by exifone, a new cognitive enhancing agent, of the amnesias induced by four benzodiazepines in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porsolt, R D; Lenègre, A; Avril, I; Doumont, G

    1988-01-01

    Exifone is a novel compound proposed for treating cognitive decline associated with age and shows corrective effects in animal models of memory dysfunction. The present experiments examined the antagonism by exifone of the amnesias induced in mice in a passive avoidance test by four benzodiazepines: bromazepam, diazepam, lorazepam and triazolam. Subsequent experiments investigated the specificity of exifone's antagonism of benzodiazepine-induced amnesia by examining its interaction with the effects of the benzodiazepines in the staircase test (anxiolytic/sedative activity) and the electroshock test (anticonvulsant activity). The results indicated that exifone clearly antagonised the amnesias induced by the four benzodiazepines, but was without intrinsic effects in the staircase or electroshock test and did not antagonise the effects of the benzodiazepines in these two tests. These results suggest that exifone might be useful for decreasing the amnesias induced by commonly used benzodiazepines without affecting their anxiolytic or anticonvulsant activity.

  17. Patients' and physicians' characteristics associated with the purchase of benzodiazepines by older primary care patients in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayalon, Liat; Gross, Revital; Yaari, Aviv; Feldhamer, Elan; Balicer, Ran D; Goldfracht, Margalit

    2013-03-01

    This study evaluated patients' and physicians' characteristics associated with the purchase of benzodiazepines by older primary care patients in Israel. The analytic sample consists of those 6,421 patients age 65 and older. We used multi-level analysis with whether or not benzodiazepines were purchased at least once between June 2005 and 2007 as an outcome. We also evaluated patients' and physicians' characteristics associated with the purchase of benzodiazepines for 6 months or longer. Almost half the sample (41.5%) purchased benzodiazepines at least once during the study period and more than half (54.5%) of those purchasing benzodiazepines had a continued purchase for 6 months or longer. Physicians' characteristics explained only a small portion of the variance associated with purchasing, whereas patients' demographic and clinical characteristics were associated with purchasing. Any intervention to improve the use of benzodiazepines should be directed at both patients and physicians.

  18. Benzodiazepine use in COPD: empirical evidence from Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halvorsen T

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Thomas Halvorsen,1 Pål E Martinussen21SINTEF Technology and Society, Department for Health Research, 2Department of Sociology and Political Science, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, NorwayBackground: The common comorbidities associated with COPD include, among others, anxiety, depression, and insomnia, for which the typical treatment involves the use of benzodiazepines (BZD. However, these medicines should be used with extra caution among COPD patients, since treatment with traditional BZD may compromise respiratory function. Aims: This study investigated the use of BZD among persons suffering from COPD by analyzing three relevant indicators: 1 the sum of defined daily doses (DDD; 2 the number of prescribers involved; and 3 the number of different types of BZD used. Data and methods: The study builds on a linkage of national prescription data and patient–administrative data, which includes all Norwegian drug prescriptions to persons hospitalized with a COPD diagnosis during 2009, amounting to a total of 5,380 observations. Regression techniques were used to identify the patients and the clinical characteristics associated with BZD use. Results: Of the 5,380 COPD patients treated in hospital during 2009, 3,707 (69% were dispensed BZD during the following 12 months. Moreover, they were dispensed on average 197.08 DDD, had 1.22 prescribers, and used 0.98 types of BZD during the year. Women are more likely to use BZD for all levels of BZD use. Overnight planned care not only increases the risk of BZD use (DDD, but also the number of prescribers and the types of BZD in use.Conclusion: In light of the high levels of BZD prescription found in this study, especially among women, it is recommended that general practitioners, hospital specialists, and others treating COPD patients should aim to acquire a complete picture of their patients’ BZD medication before more is prescribed in order to keep the use to a minimum

  19. Pattern of utilization of benzodiazepines in patients with hypertension: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divac Nevena

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. The analysis of drug prescribing in general practice in Serbia showed that the use of benzodiazepines is most frequently associated with hypertension. The aim of this study was to establish the correlation of the characteristics of patients with hypertension to antihypertensive drug therapy, and the intake of benzodiazepines. Methods. A special questionnaire was used for interviewing the patients (n = 171 chronically treated for hypertenson. Statistical tests used were χ2-test and Student's t-test. Results. No differences were noted in terms of age, gender, education, body weight, smoking habits and blood pressure (155±4.9/100±2.7 mmHg vs. 160±2.2/105±3.7 mmHg, between the group I (antihypertensive drugs+benzodiazepines: n = 79, and the group II (antihypertensives only: n = 92. The patients taking benzodiazepines received a lower number of different antihypertensive drugs (2.3±0.09 vs. 2.7±0.10; p < 0.01, but the total antihypertensive drug load was significantly greater than in the group II (2.6±0.10 vs. 1.9±0.15 defined daily doses (DDD/patient/day; p < 0.01. Benzodiazepines were taken for anxiety (62% and hypertension (21%, rarely for insomnia, mostly once a day, at bedtime. About half the patients took benzodiazepines regularly for months or years aware of the risk for addiction. Diazepam was used by 82% of the patients. The average daily exposure to benzodiazepines was 0.45±0.05 DDD/patient/day. The drug was bought without prescription in 25% of the patients, and without consulting a physician in 12% of them. Conclusion. The study confirmed a close association of hypertension with the use of benzodiazepines. The frequent use of benzodiazepines in the patients with hypertension might be caused by an inadequate response to antihypertensive drug therapy, besides anxiety and insomnia. The therapeutic efficacy of a long-term use of low doses of benzodiazepines in hypertension requires further investigation.

  20. Evaluation of native GABA(A) receptors containing an alpha 5 subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, M; Szabo, A; Rosenberg, H C

    2001-02-09

    The type A receptor for gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), or GABA(A) receptor, is a pentamer of highly variable quaternary structure. It includes two alpha subunits, drawn from a pool of six genes, which largely determine benzodiazepine pharmacology of the receptor. In brain sections, both [(3)H]RY-80 (ethyl-8-acetylene-5,6-dihydro-5-methyl-6-oxo-4H-imidazo[1,5a][1,4]benzodiazepine-3-carboxylate) and [(3)H]L-655,708 (ethyl (S)-11,12,13,13a-tetrahydro-7-methoxy-9-oxo-9H-imidazo[1,5-a]pyrrolo[2,1-c][1,4]benzodiazepine-1-carboxylate), which are selective for the benzodiazepine site of alpha 5 subunit-containing receptors, showed high-affinity, specific binding, but to fewer regions than did the nonselective benzodiazepine, [(3)H]flunitrazepam. The pattern mirrored alpha 5 mRNA distribution, and was similar to that previously reported for [(3)H]L-655,708 binding. Displacement of [(3)H]RY-80 bound to hippocampal homogenates, and of [(3)H]flunitrazepam bound to cerebellar and hippocampal homogenates showed comparable displacement by flumazenil (K(i)'s 5--7 nM). However, the K(i)'s for diazepam and for clobazam to displace [(3)H]RY-80 binding in hippocampus were about fourfold higher than for [(3)H]flunitrazepam, and the K(i) for clonazepam was sixfold larger, suggesting that these benzodiazepine receptor agonists bind with relatively lower affinity at hippocampal alpha 5-containing receptors.

  1. GABAA receptor subtypes in the mouse brain: Regional mapping and diazepam receptor occupancy by in vivo [(18)F]flumazenil PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller Herde, Adrienne; Benke, Dietmar; Ralvenius, William T; Mu, Linjing; Schibli, Roger; Zeilhofer, Hanns Ulrich; Krämer, Stefanie D

    2017-02-10

    Classical benzodiazepines, which are widely used as sedatives, anxiolytics and anticonvulsants, exert their therapeutic effects through interactions with heteropentameric GABAA receptors composed of two α, two β and one γ2 subunit. Their high affinity binding site is located at the interface between the γ2 and the adjacent α subunit. The α-subunit gene family consists of six members and receptors can be homomeric or mixed with respect to the α-subunits. Previous work has suggested that benzodiazepine binding site ligands with selectivity for individual GABAA receptor subtypes, as defined by the benzodiazepine-binding α subunit, may have fewer side effects and may even be effective in diseases, such as schizophrenia, autism or chronic pain, that do not respond well to classical benzodiazepines. The distributions of the individual α subunits across the CNS have been extensively characterized. However, as GABAA receptors may contain two different α subunits, the distribution of the subunits does not necessarily reflect the distribution of receptor subtypes with respect to benzodiazepine pharmacology. In the present study, we have used in vivo [(18)F]flumazenil PET and in vitro [(3)H]flumazenil autoradiography in combination with GABAA receptor point-mutated mice to characterize the distribution of the two most prevalent GABAA receptor subtypes (α1 and α2) throughout the mouse brain. The results were in agreement with published in vitro data. High levels of α2-containing receptors were found in brain regions of the neuronal network of anxiety. The α1/α2 subunit combinations were predictable from the individual subunit levels. In additional experiments, we explored in vivo [(18)F]flumazenil PET to determine the degree of receptor occupancy at GABAA receptor subtypes following oral administration of diazepam. The dose to occupy 50% of sensitive receptors, independent of the receptor subtype(s), was 1-2mg/kg, in agreement with published data from ex vivo

  2. Affinity Labeling of Membrane Receptors Using Tissue-Penetrating Radiations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Franklin C.; Boja, John; Ho, Beng; Kuhar, Michael J.; Wong, Dean F.

    2013-01-01

    Photoaffinity labeling, a useful in vivo biochemical tool, is limited when applied in vivo because of the poor tissue penetration by ultraviolet (UV) photons. This study investigates affinity labeling using tissue-penetrating radiation to overcome the tissue attenuation and irreversibly label membrane receptor proteins. Using X-ray (115 kVp) at low doses (affinity labeling of membrane receptors in a manner similar to UV with photoreactive ligands of the dopamine transporter, D2 dopamine receptor (D2R), and peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBDZR). It may provide specific noninvasive irreversible block or stimulation of a receptor using tissue-penetrating radiation targeting selected anatomic sites. PMID:23936811

  3. Involvement of endothelium-dependent and -independent mechanisms in midazolam-induced vasodilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colussi, Gian Luca; Di Fabio, Alessandro; Catena, Cristiana; Chiuch, Alessandra; Sechi, Leonardo A

    2011-08-01

    Benzodiazepine (BDZ) infusion has been shown to reduce blood pressure in both humans and animals. Although the inhibitory effects of BDZ on the central nervous system have been well documented, less is known about the direct effects of BDZ on the vascular bed. The aims of this study were to assess the effects of the BDZ midazolam on the vascular system in C57/BL6 mouse aortic rings and to investigate the mechanisms of its direct vascular action. We found that midazolam induced reversible, dose-dependent vasodilation in potassium- and phenylephrine-precontracted rings. In rings that were precontracted with potassium or phenylephrine, treatment with 10 μmol l(-1) midazolam increased vasodilation by 15 and 60%, respectively, compared with baseline. Vasodilation increased by 80 and 87%, respectively, after treatment with 50 μmol l(-1) midazolam. Only the low concentration of midazolam (10 μmol l(-1)) induced endothelium-dependent vasodilation in phenylephrine-precontracted rings. Vasodilation increased by 60% in rings with endothelium and by 20% in rings without endothelium. Conversely, only the high concentration of midazolam (50 μmol l(-1)) reduced the CaCl(2)-induced vasoconstriction of aortic rings with EC(50) (the concentration giving 50% of the maximal effect) values of 1 and 6 mmol l(-1) for vehicle- and midazolam-treated rings, respectively. Furthermore, the incubation of phenylephrine-precontracted rings with an inhibitor of the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester or the inhibitors of central or peripheral type BDZ receptors (flumazenil or PK 11195, respectively) produced no change in midazolam-induced vasodilation. Thus, low concentrations of midazolam induce vasodilation via an endothelium-dependent mechanism that does not involve NO production. In contrast, high concentrations of midazolam induce vasodilation via an endothelium-independent mechanism that implies reduced sensitivity of aortic rings to calcium ions. Additionally

  4. Risk of a new benzodiazepine prescription in relation to recent hospitalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grad, R; Tamblyn, R; Holbrook, A M; Hurley, J; Feightner, J; Gayton, D

    1999-02-01

    To determine if recent hospital admission was associated with new outpatient prescribing of benzodiazepines among community-dwelling older people. Nested case-control study using administrative data sets of the provincial health insurance board. Province of Quebec. Cases were 4127 community-dwelling older people who were newly dispensed a benzodiazepine during an 8-month period in 1990. Controls were 16,486 community-dwelling older people who were dispensed any drug (except a benzodiazepine) on the same day as the case-defining index prescription. EXPOSURE AND OUTCOME MEASURES: Admission to an acute care hospital within a 30-day period before a new dispensing of a benzodiazepine. Other variables measured were patient age, gender, number of ambulatory physician visits, healthcare region, Chronic Disease Score (CDS), and use of drugs for depression and psychosis. Cases were more than three times as likely as controls to have been hospitalized in the 30-day period before the index date (adjusted odds ratio (OR) 3.09; 95% CI, 2.78-3.45). The use of prescription drugs for physical health problems modified this association in that cases who used more medication were also more likely to receive a new benzodiazepine prescription following a recent hospital admission (adjusted OR 4.09; 95% CI, 3.59-4.65 when the CDS was equal to 5 vs adjusted OR 1.96; 95% CI, 1.66-2.31 when the CDS was equal to 0). Recent hospitalization confers an increased risk of a new outpatient benzodiazepine prescription among community-dwelling older people in Quebec. Those who use more medication, and who may be more vulnerable to drug-related adverse events, are more likely to be newly dispensed a benzodiazepine following a recent, acute-care hospital admission.

  5. Intramuscular ziprasidone: influence of alcohol and benzodiazepines on vital signs in the emergency setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Michael P; MacDonald, Kai; Vilke, Gary M; Ronquillo, Linda; Feifel, David

    2013-12-01

    Ziprasidone is a second-generation antipsychotic (SGA) approved for agitation. Few previous studies have examined ziprasidone in the emergency department (ED). For instance, it is unknown how often emergency physicians prescribe ziprasidone, whether it is typically prescribed in combination with a benzodiazepine, or whether use of intramuscular (i.m.) ziprasidone and benzodiazepines affects vital signs compared to i.m. ziprasidone alone. Our aims were to determine the demographics of patients receiving ziprasidone in an urban-suburban ED; the relative frequency with which ziprasidone is prescribed; and the effects on vital signs, repeat medication dosage, and lengths of stay. This is a multicentered structured chart review from 2003 to 2010 of ziprasidone use at two hospitals. If documented, vital signs were compared in patients who received concurrent benzodiazepines and in those who did not, and in patients who ingested alcohol and in those who did not. Patients on 95 visits received ziprasidone during the study period, with one third of these receiving accompanying benzodiazepines. Forty-nine unique patients who were treated with i.m. ziprasidone had documented vital signs. In these patients, alcohol intoxication was associated with decreased oxygen saturations irrespective of benzodiazepines. Concurrent benzodiazepines had no other deleterious effect on vital signs but resulted in longer ED stays. This study suggests that many ED physicians, who commonly prescribe a benzodiazepine with a first-generation antipsychotic like haloperidol, have transferred this practice to SGAs like ziprasidone. In this sample, this pairing did not adversely affect vital signs but was associated with marginally longer ED stays. Caution should be exercised when treating alcohol-intoxicated patients with ziprasidone, as this can decrease oxygen saturations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. In vitro correlates of benzodiazepine cerebrospinal fluid uptake, pharmacodynamic action and peripheral distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendt, R M; Greenblatt, D J; deJong, R H; Bonin, J D; Abernethy, D R; Ehrenberg, B L; Giles, H G; Sellers, E M; Shader, R I

    1983-10-01

    Factors influencing the rate and extent of benzodiazepine uptake into cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), peripheral tissue distribution and electroencephalographic (EEG) effects were evaluated in a model utilizing anesthetized male cats. A single (0.25-10 mg/kg) dose of the following eight benzodiazepines was administered i.v.: diazepam, desmethyldiazepam, midazolam, lorazepam, alprazolam, triazolam, flunitrazepam and clobazam. Multiple samples were simultaneously drawn from arterial blood and cisternal CSF over the next 4 hr and the EEG was continuously monitored. Concentrations of benzodiazepines in plasma and CSF samples were measured by electron-capture gas-liquid chromatography and plasma protein binding determined by equilibrium dialysis. Physicochemical properties of lipophilicity of each benzodiazepine were determined by measurement of the octanol/buffer partition ratio at physiologic pH and by the high-pressure liquid chromatographic (HPLC) retention on a reverse-phase C18 column at neutral pH. Disappearance of all benzodiazepines from plasma was consistent with a linear sum of two or three exponential terms. After correction for individual differences in protein binding, volume of distribution (Vd) of unbound drug was highly correlated with HPLC retention (r = 0.91), but not significantly related to octanol/buffer partition coefficient. Diazepam and midazolam, having the longest HPLC retention also had the largest unbound Vd. All benzodiazepines rapidly entered CSF, with peak concentrations usually attained within 15 min of dosage. More lipophilic drugs tended to enter CSF most rapidly, but associations of entry rate and in vitro lipophilicity were not significant. After distribution equilibrium was attained, disappearance of benzodiazepines from both plasma and CSF occurred in parallel. Equilibrium CSF/total plasma concentration ratios of all drugs were much less than unity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Effects of Benzodiazepines on Acinar and Myoepithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattioli, Tatiana M. F.; Alanis, Luciana R. A.; Sapelli, Silvana da Silva; de Lima, Antonio A. S.; de Noronha, Lucia; Rosa, Edvaldo A. R.; Althobaiti, Yusuf S.; Almalki, Atiah H.; Sari, Youssef; Ignacio, Sergio A.; Johann, Aline C. B. R.; Gregio, Ana M. T.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Benzodiazepines (BZDs), the most commonly prescribed psychotropic drugs with anxiolytic action, may cause hyposalivation. It has been previously shown that BZDs can cause hypertrophy and decrease the acini cell number. In this study, we investigated the effects of BZDs and pilocarpine on rat parotid glands, specifically on acinar, ductal, and myoepithelial cells. Methods: Ninety male Wistar rats were divided into nine groups. Control groups received a saline solution for 30 days (C30) and 60 days (C60), and pilocarpine (PILO) for 60 days. Experimental groups received lorazepam (L30) and midazolam (M30) for 30 days. Another group (LS60 or MS60) received lorazepam or midazolam for 30 days, respectively, and saline for additional 30 days. Finally, other groups (LP60 or MP60) received either lorazepam or midazolam for 30 days, respectively, and pilocarpine for additional 30 days. The expression of calponin in myoepithelial cells and the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in acinar and ductal cells were evaluated. Results: Animals treated with lorazepam showed an increase in the number of positive staining cells for calponin as compared to control animals (p acinar and ductal cells and a decrease in the positive staining cells for calponin as compared to midazolam administered with saline (MS60). Conclusion: We found that myoepithelial cells might be more sensitive to the effects of BZD than acinar and ductal cells in rat parotid glands. PMID:27445812

  8. Evaluation of anti-hyperalgesic and analgesic effects of two benzodiazepines in human experimental pain: a randomized placebo-controlled study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal H Vuilleumier

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Compounds that act on GABA-receptors produce anti-hyperalgesia in animal models, but little is known on their effects in humans. The aim of this study was to explore the potential usefulness of GABA-agonism for the control of pain in humans. Two agonists at the benzodiazepine-binding site of GABAA-receptors (clobazam and clonazepam were studied using multiple experimental pain tests. Positive results would support further investigation of GABA agonism for the control of clinical pain. METHODS: In a randomized double-blind crossover design, 16 healthy male volunteers received clobazam 20 mg, clonazepam 1 mg and tolterodine 1 mg (active placebo. The area of static hyperalgesia after intradermal capsaicin injection was the primary endpoint. Secondary endpoints were: area of dynamic hyperalgesia, response to von Frey hair stimulation, pressure pain thresholds, conditioned pain modulation, cutaneous and intramuscular electrical pain thresholds (1, 5 and 20 repeated stimulation, and pain during cuff algometry. RESULTS: For the primary endpoint, an increase in the area of static hyperalgesia was observed after administration of placebo (p<0.001, but not after clobazam and clonazepam. Results suggestive for an anti-hyperalgesic effect of the benzodiazepines were obtained with all three intramuscular pain models and with cuff algometry. No effect could be detected with the other pain models employed. CONCLUSIONS: Collectively, the results are suggestive for a possible anti-hyperalgesic effect of drugs acting at the GABAA-receptors in humans, particularly in models of secondary hyperalgesia and deep pain. The findings are not conclusive, but support further clinical research on pain modulation by GABAergic drugs. Because of the partial results, future research should focus on compounds acting selectively on subunits of the GABA complex, which may allow the achievement of higher receptor occupancy than unselective drugs. Our data also

  9. AMPA and GABA receptor antagonists and their interaction in rats with a genetic form of absence epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaminski, R.M.; Rijn, C.M. van; Turski, W.A.; Czuczwar, S.J.; Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van

    2001-01-01

    The effects of combined and single administration of the -amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor antagonist, 7,8-methylenedioxy-1-(4-aminophenyl)-4-methyl-3-acetyl-4,5-dihydro-2,3 -benzodiazepine (LY 300164), and of the GABAB receptor antagonist -aminopropyl-n-butyl-phosp

  10. Association between Benzodiazepine Use and Dementia: Data Mining of Different Medical Databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Mitsutaka; Fujimoto, Mai; Hosomi, Kouichi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Some studies have suggested that the use of benzodiazepines in the elderly is associated with an increased risk of dementia. However, this association might be due to confounding by indication and reverse causation. To examine the association between benzodiazepine anxiolytic drug use and the risk of dementia, we conducted data mining of a spontaneous reporting database and a large organized database of prescriptions. Methods: Data from the US Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) from the first quarter of 2004 through the end of 2013 and data from the Canada Vigilance Adverse Reaction Online Database from the first quarter of 1965 through the end of 2013 were used for the analyses. The reporting odds ratio (ROR) and information component (IC) were calculated. In addition, prescription sequence symmetry analysis (PSSA) was performed to identify the risk of dementia after using benzodiazepine anxiolytic drugs over the period of January 2006 to May 2014. Results: Benzodiazepine use was found to be associated with dementia in analyses using the FAERS database (ROR: 1.63, 95% CI: 1.61-1.64; IC: 0.66, 95% CI: 0.65-0.67) and the Canada Vigilance Adverse Reaction Online Database (ROR: 1.88, 95% CI: 1.83-1.94; IC: 0.85, 95% CI: 0.80-0.89). ROR and IC values increased with the duration of action of benzodiazepines. In the PSSA, a significant association was found, with adjusted sequence ratios of 1.24 (1.05-1.45), 1.20 (1.06-1.37), 1.23 (1.11-1.37), 1.34 (1.23-1.47), 1.41 (1.29-1.53), and 1.44 (1.33-1.56) at intervals of 3, 6, 12, 24, 36, and 48 months, respectively. Furthermore, the additional PSSA, in which patients who initiated a new treatment with benzodiazepines and anti-dementia drugs within 12- and 24-month periods were excluded from the analysis, demonstrated significant associations of benzodiazepine use with dementia risk. Conclusion: Multi-methodological approaches using different methods, algorithms, and databases suggest

  11. Association between Benzodiazepine Use and Dementia: Data Mining of Different Medical Databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Mitsutaka; Fujimoto, Mai; Hosomi, Kouichi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Some studies have suggested that the use of benzodiazepines in the elderly is associated with an increased risk of dementia. However, this association might be due to confounding by indication and reverse causation. To examine the association between benzodiazepine anxiolytic drug use and the risk of dementia, we conducted data mining of a spontaneous reporting database and a large organized database of prescriptions. Methods: Data from the US Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) from the first quarter of 2004 through the end of 2013 and data from the Canada Vigilance Adverse Reaction Online Database from the first quarter of 1965 through the end of 2013 were used for the analyses. The reporting odds ratio (ROR) and information component (IC) were calculated. In addition, prescription sequence symmetry analysis (PSSA) was performed to identify the risk of dementia after using benzodiazepine anxiolytic drugs over the period of January 2006 to May 2014. Results: Benzodiazepine use was found to be associated with dementia in analyses using the FAERS database (ROR: 1.63, 95% CI: 1.61-1.64; IC: 0.66, 95% CI: 0.65-0.67) and the Canada Vigilance Adverse Reaction Online Database (ROR: 1.88, 95% CI: 1.83-1.94; IC: 0.85, 95% CI: 0.80-0.89). ROR and IC values increased with the duration of action of benzodiazepines. In the PSSA, a significant association was found, with adjusted sequence ratios of 1.24 (1.05-1.45), 1.20 (1.06-1.37), 1.23 (1.11-1.37), 1.34 (1.23-1.47), 1.41 (1.29-1.53), and 1.44 (1.33-1.56) at intervals of 3, 6, 12, 24, 36, and 48 months, respectively. Furthermore, the additional PSSA, in which patients who initiated a new treatment with benzodiazepines and anti-dementia drugs within 12- and 24-month periods were excluded from the analysis, demonstrated significant associations of benzodiazepine use with dementia risk. Conclusion: Multi-methodological approaches using different methods, algorithms, and databases suggest

  12. Downregulation of (3H)Ro5-4864 binding sites after exposure to peripheral-type benzodiazepines in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, M.D.; Wang, J.K.; Morgan, J.I.; Spector, S.

    1986-09-01

    Peripheral-type benzodiazepine (BZD) binding sites undergo a rapid and pronounced downregulation after exposure to these compounds in vitro. Friend erythroleukemia cells were incubated with micromolar concentrations of BZD after which they were washed thoroughly and the binding of the specific peripheral-type BZD radioligand (/sup 3/H)Ro5-4864 was determined. Exposure to the peripheral-type BZD Ro7-3351 decreased the number of (/sup 3/H)Ro5-4864 binding sites from 324 to 41 fmol/10(6) cells with no change in affinity. Downregulation appears to require active cellular processes because it is blocked when exposure to BZD is at 4/sup 0/C rather than at 37/sup 0/C. Furthermore, whereas (/sup 3/H)Ro5-4864 binding is decreased substantially in membrane preparations made from downregulated cells, it is not altered when membrane preparations from control cells are exposed to BZD. The time course of downregulation is quite rapid, as it occurs within minutes. In contrast, the return of sites requires days and there is a close relationship between return of sites and growth of new cells. The ability of BZDs to downregulate correlates more closely with affinity for the peripheral-type site than with biological activity. The ability to undergo downregulation is characteristic of receptors and its occurrence suggests that peripheral-type BZD binding sites are functional receptors.

  13. Benzodiazepines prescription in Dakar: a study about prescribing habits and knowledge in general practitioners, neurologists and psychiatrists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dièye, Amadou Moctar; Sylla, Mbaye; Ndiaye, Awa; Ndiaye, Mamadou; Sy, Guata Yoro; Faye, Babacar

    2006-06-01

    Benzodiazepines are relatively well-tolerated medicines but can induce serious problems of addiction and that is why their use is regulated. However, in developing countries like Senegal, these products are used without clear indications on their prescription, their dispensation or their use. This work focuses on the prescription of these medicines with a view to make recommendations for their rational use. Benzodiazepine prescription was studied with psychiatrists or neurologists and generalists in 2003. Specialist doctors work in two Dakar university hospitals and generalists in the 11 health centres in Dakar. We did a survey by direct interview with 29 of 35 specialists and 23 of 25 generalists. All doctors were interviewed in their office. The questionnaire focused on benzodiazepine indications, their pharmacological properties, benzodiazepines prescribed in first intention against a given disease and the level of training in benzodiazepines by doctors. Comparisons between specialists and generalists were made by chi-square test. Benzodiazepines were essentially used for anxiety, insomnia and epilepsy. With these diseases, the most benzodiazepines prescribed are prazepam against anxiety and insomnia and diazepam against epilepsy. About 10% of doctors do not know that there is a limitation for the period of benzodiazepine use. The principal reasons of drugs choice are knowledge of the drugs, habit and low side effects of drugs. All generalists (100%) said that their training on benzodiazepines is poor vs. 62.1% of specialists, and doctors suggest seminars, journals adhesions and conferences to complete their training in this field. There are not many differences between specialists and generalists except the fact that specialists prefer prazepam in first intention in the insomnia treatment where generalists choose bromazepam. In addition, our survey showed that specialists' training in benzodiazepines is better than that of generalists. Overall, benzodiazepine

  14. [New use of benzodiazepines and the risk of hip fracture: A case-crossover study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, F; Glaeske, G

    2006-04-01

    Benzodiazepines appear to increase the incidence of hip fractures. Their role as a time-dependent risk factor remains unclear. We therefore conducted a case-crossover study to determine whether the new use of benzodiazepines is associated with a rise in hip fractures. We analysed 49 months of the statutory health insurance Gmünder Ersatzkasse (GEK) and enrolled all first hip fractures. The index date was the day of hospital admission. Exposure to new use of benzodiazepines was compared within the five periods preceding the index date. Out of 1630 subjects, 223 (13.7%) had at least one prescription of benzodiazepines in the preceding 150 days before the index date, 74 (4.5%) of them as a first prescription. The average age of the population was 79.8 years (SD: 7.7). Odds ratio (OR) of hip fracture was highest during the initial 5 days of new use (OR: 3.43; 95% CI 1.15-10.20) and then declined to a non-significant OR of 1.59 (95% CI 0.96-2.63) after 30 days. In conclusion, the start of a new benzodiazepine is associated with an increased risk of hip fractures. However, the population attributable risk (PAR) and, therefore, the percentage of preventable events is small (PAR: 0.55%; 95% CI 0.05-1.06%).

  15. Anxiety sensitivity and nonmedical benzodiazepine use among adults with opioid use disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, R Kathryn; Votaw, Victoria R; Bogunovic, Olivera; Karakula, Sterling L; Griffin, Margaret L; Weiss, Roger D

    2017-02-01

    Nonmedical benzodiazepine use is common among adults with opioid use disorder; however, little is known about this co-occurrence. Anxiety sensitivity-the fear of anxiety symptoms and sensations-motivates behaviors to escape and avoid distressing states, and accordingly is associated with coping motives for substance use. This might be particularly relevant among women, who report using substances to cope with negative emotions more often than men. The aim of the current study was to examine whether nonmedical benzodiazepine use was associated with higher anxiety sensitivity among treatment-seeking adults diagnosed with opioid use disorder, and to investigate whether gender moderated this association. A sample of adults (ranging in age from 18 to 81years) receiving inpatient treatment for opioid use disorder (N=257) completed measures of anxiety, anxiety sensitivity, and benzodiazepine use frequency. Results of an analysis of variance indicated that frequency of past-month nonmedical benzodiazepine use was associated with significantly higher anxiety sensitivity. This effect remained when controlling for the effect of anxiety symptoms (F[1, 251]=3.91, p=0.049, ηp(2)=0.02). Gender mo