WorldWideScience

Sample records for benzene metabolite levels

  1. Benzene metabolite levels in blood and bone marrow of B6C3F{sub 1} mice after low-level exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechtold, W.E.; Strunk, M.R.; Thornton-Manning, J.R. [and others

    1995-12-01

    Studies at the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute (ITRI) have explored the species-specific uptake and metabolism of benzene. Results have shown that metabolism is dependent on both dose and route of administration. Of particular interest were shifts in the major metabolic pathways as a function of exposure concentration. In these studies, B6C3F{sub 1} mice were exposed to increasing levels of benzene by either gavage or inhalation. As benzene internal dose increased, the relative amounts of muconic acid and hydroquinone decreased. In contrast, the relative amount of catechol increased with increasing exposure. These results show that the relative levels of toxic metabolites are a function of exposure level. Based on these results and assuming a linear relationship between exposure concentration and levels of bone marrow metabolites, it would be difficult to detect an elevation of any phenolic metabolites above background after occupational exposures to the OSHA Permissible Exposure Limit of 1 ppm benzene.

  2. The effect of dose, dose rate, route of administration, and species on tissue and blood levels of benzene metabolites.

    OpenAIRE

    Henderson, R F; Sabourin, P J; Bechtold, W E; Griffith, W. C.; Medinsky, M A; Birnbaum, L S; Lucier, G W

    1989-01-01

    Studies were completed in F344/N rats and B6C3F1 mice to determine the effect of dose, dose rate, route of administration, and rodent species on formation of total and individual benzene metabolites. Oral doses of 50 mg/kg or higher saturated the capacity for benzene metabolism in both rats and mice, resulting in an increased proportion of the administered dose being exhaled as benzene. The saturating air concentration for benzene metabolism during 6-hr exposures was between 130 and 900 ppm. ...

  3. Exposure to benzene metabolites causes oxidative damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Abhishek; Nachiappan, Vasanthi

    2016-06-01

    Hydroquinone (HQ) and benzoquinone (BQ) are known benzene metabolites that form reactive intermediates such as reactive oxygen species (ROS). This study attempts to understand the effect of benzene metabolites (HQ and BQ) on the antioxidant status, cell morphology, ROS levels and lipid alterations in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. There was a reduction in the growth pattern of wild-type cells exposed to HQ/BQ. Exposure of yeast cells to benzene metabolites increased the activity of the anti-oxidant enzymes catalase, superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase but lead to a decrease in ascorbic acid and reduced glutathione. Increased triglyceride level and decreased phospholipid levels were observed with exposure to HQ and BQ. These results suggest that the enzymatic antioxidants were increased and are involved in the protection against macromolecular damage during oxidative stress; presumptively, these enzymes are essential for scavenging the pro-oxidant effects of benzene metabolites. PMID:27016252

  4. Formation of reactive metabolites from benzene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rat liver mitoplasts were incubated first with [3H]dGTP, to form DNA labeled in G, and then with [14C]benzene. The DNA was isolated and upon isopycnic density gradient centrifugation in CsCl yielded a single fraction of DNA labeled with both [3H] and [14C]. These data are consistent with the covalent binding of one or more metabolites of benzene to DNA. The DNA was enzymatically hydrolyzed to deoxynucleosides and chromatographed to reveal at least seven deoxyguanosine adducts. Further studies with labeled deoxyadenine revealed one adduct on deoxyadenine. [3H]Deoxyguanosine was reacted with [14C]hydroquinone or benzoquinone. The product was characterized using uv, fluorescence, mass and NMR spectroscopy. A proposed structure is described. (orig.)

  5. Modulation of mast cell and basophil functions by benzene metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triggiani, Massimo; Loffredo, Stefania; Granata, Francescopaolo; Staiano, Rosaria I; Marone, Gianni

    2011-11-01

    Benzene is a carcinogenic compound used in industrial manufacturing and a common environmental pollutant mostly derived from vehicle emissions and cigarette smoke. Benzene exposure is associated with a variety of clinical conditions ranging from hematologic diseases to chronic lung disorders. Beside its direct toxicity, benzene exerts multiple effects after being converted to reactive metabolites such as hydroquinone and benzoquinone. Mast cells and basophils are primary effector cells involved in the development of respiratory allergies such as rhinitis and bronchial asthma and they play an important role in innate immunity. Benzene and its metabolites can influence mast cell and basophil responses either directly or by interfering with other cells, such as T cells, macrophages and monocytes, which are functionally connected to mast cells and basophils. Hydroquinone and benzoquinone inhibit the release of preformed mediators, leukotriene synthesis and cytokine production in human basophils stimulated by IgE- and non IgE-mediated agonists. Furthermore, these metabolites reduce IgE-mediated degranulation of mast cells and the development of allergic lung inflammation in rats. Both in vitro and in vivo studies indicate that benzene metabolites alter biochemical and functional activities of other immunocompetent cells and may impair immune responses in the lung. These inhibitory effects of benzene metabolites are primarily mediated by interference with early transduction signals such as PI3 kinase. Together, currently available studies indicate that benzene metabolites interfere by multiple mechanisms with the role of basophils and mast cells in innate immunity and in chronic inflammation in the lung. PMID:22103854

  6. Albumin Adducts of Electrophilic Benzene Metabolites in Benzene-Exposed and Control Workers

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Yu-Sheng; Vermeulen, Roel; Tsai, Chin H.; Waidyanatha, Suramya; Lan, Qing; Rothman, Nathaniel; Smith, Martyn T.; Zhang, Luoping; Shen, Min; Li, Guilan; Yin, Songnian; Kim, Sungkyoon; Rappaport, Stephen M.

    2006-01-01

    Background Metabolism of benzene produces reactive electrophiles, including benzene oxide (BO), 1,4-benzoquinone (1,4-BQ), and 1,2-benzoquinone (1,2-BQ), that are capable of reacting with blood proteins to produce adducts. Objectives The main purpose of this study was to characterize relationships between levels of albumin adducts of these electrophiles in blood and the corresponding benzene exposures in benzene-exposed and control workers, after adjusting for important covariates. Because se...

  7. Peroxidase-dependent metabolism of benzene's phenolic metabolites and its potential role in benzene toxicity and carcinogenicity.

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, M T; Yager, J W; Steinmetz, K L; Eastmond, D A

    1989-01-01

    The metabolism of two of benzene's phenolic metabolites, phenol and hydroquinone, by peroxidase enzymes has been studied in detail. Studies employing horseradish peroxidase and human myeloperoxidase have shown that in the presence of hydrogen peroxide phenol is converted to 4,4'-diphenoquinone and other covalent binding metabolites, whereas hydroquinone is converted solely to 1,4-benzoquinone. Surprisingly, phenol stimulates the latter conversion rather than inhibiting it, an effect that may ...

  8. Genome-wide functional profiling reveals genes required for tolerance to benzene metabolites in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew North

    Full Text Available Benzene is a ubiquitous environmental contaminant and is widely used in industry. Exposure to benzene causes a number of serious health problems, including blood disorders and leukemia. Benzene undergoes complex metabolism in humans, making mechanistic determination of benzene toxicity difficult. We used a functional genomics approach to identify the genes that modulate the cellular toxicity of three of the phenolic metabolites of benzene, hydroquinone (HQ, catechol (CAT and 1,2,4-benzenetriol (BT, in the model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Benzene metabolites generate oxidative and cytoskeletal stress, and tolerance requires correct regulation of iron homeostasis and the vacuolar ATPase. We have identified a conserved bZIP transcription factor, Yap3p, as important for a HQ-specific response pathway, as well as two genes that encode putative NAD(PH:quinone oxidoreductases, PST2 and YCP4. Many of the yeast genes identified have human orthologs that may modulate human benzene toxicity in a similar manner and could play a role in benzene exposure-related disease.

  9. Reverse isotope dilution method for determining benzene and metabolites in tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechtold, W.E.; Sabourin, P.J.; Henderson, R.F.

    1988-07-01

    A method utilizing reverse isotope dilution for the analysis of benzene and its organic soluble metabolites in tissues of rats and mice is presented. Tissues from rats and mice that had been exposed to radiolabeled benzene were extracted with ethyl acetate containing known, excess quantities of unlabeled benzene and metabolites. Butylated hydroxytoluene was added as an antioxidant. The ethyl acetate extracts were analyzed with semipreparative reversed-phase HPLC. Isolated peaks were collected and analyzed for radioactivity (by liquid scintillation spectrometry) and for mass (by UV absorption). The total amount of each compound present was calculated from the mass dilution of the radiolabeled isotope. This method has the advantages of high sensitivity, because of the high specific activity of benzene, and relative stability of the analyses, because of the addition of large amounts of unlabeled carrier analogue.

  10. Metabolites of benzene are potent inhibitors of gap-junction intercellular communication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivedal, Edgar [Norwegian Radium Hospital, Institute for Cancer Research, Montebello, Oslo (Norway); Witz, Gisela [Robert Wood Johnson Medical School/UMDNJ, Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute and Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, Piscataway, New Jersey (United States)

    2005-06-01

    Chronic exposure to benzene has been shown to lead to bone marrow depression and the development of leukemia. The mechanism underlying the carcinogenicity of benzene is unknown, although a number of genetic changes including chromosomal aberrations have been associated with benzene toxicity. Metabolism of benzene is required for the induced toxicological effects. We have investigated the effect of trans,trans-muconaldehyde (MUC), hydroquinone (HQ), and four MUC metabolites on gap-junction intercellular communication (GJIC). Inhibition of GJIC has been considered a possible predictor of tumor promoters and non-genotoxic carcinogens, and shown to result in perturbation of hematopoiesis. MUC was found to be a strong inhibitor of GJIC (EC50=12 {mu}mol L{sup -1}) in rat liver epithelial cells IAR20, with potency similar to that of chlordane (EC50=7 {mu}mol L{sup -1}). HQ inhibited GJIC with an EC50 of 25 {mu}mol L{sup -1}, and the metabolite OH/CHO with an EC50 of 58 {mu}mol L{sup -1}. The other MUC metabolites tested, CHO/COOH and OH/COOH were weak inhibitors of GJIC whereas COOH/COOH had no effect. Benzene itself had no effect on GJIC when tested in concentrations up to 20 mmol L{sup -1}. The relative potency observed for the metabolites on GJIC is similar to their hematotoxic effects. The effect of MUC on GJIC was observed to take place concordant with a dramatic loss of connexin 43 (Cx43) from the cells as visualized by Western blotting. Substances with the ability to inhibit Cx43-dependent GJIC have previously been observed to interfere with normal hematopoietic development. The ability of benzene metabolites to interfere with gap-junction functionality, and especially the dramatic loss of Cx43 induced by MUC, should therefore be considered as a possible mechanism for benzene-induced hematotoxicity and development of leukemia. (orig.)

  11. Human urine certified reference material CZ 6010: creatinine and toluene metabolites (hippuric acid and o-cresol) and a benzene metabolite (phenol)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šperlingová, I.; Dabrowská, L.; Stránský, V.; Kučera, Jan; Tichý, M.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 387, č. 7 (2007), s. 2419-2424. ISSN 1618-2642 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : toluene metabolites * benzene metabolite * human urine Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 2.867, year: 2007

  12. Cytochromes P450 in benzene metabolism and involvement of their metabolites and reactive oxygen species in toxicity.

    OpenAIRE

    I. Gut; Nedelcheva, V; Soucek, P; Stopka, P.; Tichavská, B

    1996-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2E1 was the most efficient CYP enzyme that oxidized benzene to soluble and covalently bound metabolites in rat and human liver microsomes. The covalent binding was due mostly to the formation of benzoquinone (BQ), the oxidation product of hydroquinone (HQ), and was inversely related to the formation of soluble metabolites. In rats, inhalation of benzene (4 mg/liter of air) caused a rapid destruction of CYP2B1 previously induced by phenobarbital. The ability of benzene me...

  13. Modulation of Ras signaling alters the toxicity of hydroquinone, a benzene metabolite and component of cigarette smoke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benzene is an established human leukemogen, with a ubiquitous environmental presence leading to significant population exposure. In a genome-wide functional screen in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, inactivation of IRA2, a yeast ortholog of the human tumor suppressor gene NF1 (Neurofibromin), enhanced sensitivity to hydroquinone, an important benzene metabolite. Increased Ras signaling is implicated as a causal factor in the increased pre-disposition to leukemia of individuals with mutations in NF1. Growth inhibition of yeast by hydroquinone was assessed in mutant strains exhibiting varying levels of Ras activity. Subsequently, effects of hydroquinone on both genotoxicity (measured by micronucleus formation) and proliferation of WT and Nf1 null murine hematopoietic precursors were assessed. Here we show that the Ras status of both yeast and mammalian cells modulates hydroquinone toxicity, indicating potential synergy between Ras signaling and benzene toxicity. Specifically, enhanced Ras signaling increases both hydroquinone-mediated growth inhibition in yeast and genotoxicity in mammalian hematopoetic precursors as measured by an in vitro erythroid micronucleus assay. Hydroquinone also increases proliferation of CFU-GM progenitor cells in mice with Nf1 null bone marrow relative to WT, the same cell type associated with benzene-associated leukemia. Together our findings show that hydroquinone toxicity is modulated by Ras signaling. Individuals with abnormal Ras signaling could be more vulnerable to developing myeloid diseases after exposure to benzene. We note that hydroquinone is used cosmetically as a skin-bleaching agent, including by individuals with cafe-au-lait spots (which may be present in individuals with neurofibromatosis who have a mutation in NF1), which could be unadvisable given our findings

  14. Inhibitory effect of benzene metabolites on nuclear DNA synthesis in bone marrow cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effects of endogenously produced and exogenously added benzene metabolites on the nuclear DNA synthetic activity were investigated using a culture system of mouse bone marrow cells. Effects of the metabolites were evaluated by a 30-min incorporation of [3H]thymidine into DNA following a 30-min interaction with the cells in McCoy's 5a medium with 10% fetal calf serum. Phenol and muconic acid did not inhibit nuclear DNA synthesis. However, catechol, 1,2,4-benzenetriol, hydroquinone, and p-benzoquinone were able to inhibit 52, 64, 79, and 98% of the nuclear DNA synthetic activity, respectively, at 24 μM. In a cell-free DNA synthetic system, catechol and hydroquinone did not inhibit the incorporation of [3H]thymidine triphosphate into DNA up to 24 μM but 1,2,4-benzenetriol and p-benzoquinone did. The effect of the latter two benzene metabolites was completely blocked in the presence of 1,4-dithiothreitol (1 mM) in the cell-free assay system. Furthermore, when DNA polymerase α, which requires a sulfhydryl (SH) group as an active site, was replaced by DNA polymerase 1, which does not require an SH group for its catalytic activity, p-benzoquinone and 1,2,4-benzenetriol were unable to inhibit DNA synthesis. Thus, the data imply the p-benzoquinone and 1,2,4-benzenetriol inhibited DNA polymerase α, consequently resulting in inhibition of DNA synthesis in both cellular and cell-free DNA synthetic systems. The present study identifies catechol, hydroquinone, p-benzoquinone, and 1,2,4-benzenetriol as toxic benzene metabolites in bone marrow cells and also suggests that their inhibitory action on DNA synthesis is mediated by mechanism(s) other than that involving DNA damage as a primary cause

  15. The molecular mechanisms of liver and islets of Langerhans toxicity by benzene and its metabolite hydroquinone in vivo and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadar, Haji; Maqbool, Faheem; Mostafalou, Sara; Baeeri, Maryam; Gholami, Mahdi; Ghafour-Boroujerdi, Elmira; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Benzene (C6H6) is one of the most commonly used industrial chemicals causing environmental pollution. This study aimed to examine the effect of benzene and its metabolite hydroquinone on glucose regulating organs, liver and pancreas, and to reveal the involved toxic mechanisms, in rats. In the in vivo part, benzene was dissolved in corn oil and administered through intragastric route at doses of 200, 400 and 800 mg/kg/day, for 4 weeks. And, in the in vitro part, toxic mechanisms responsible for weakening the antioxidant system in islets of Langerhans by hydroquinone at different concentrations (0.25, 0.5 and 1 mM), were revealed. Benzene exposure raised the activity of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), glucose 6-phosphatase (G6Pase) enzymes and increased fasting blood sugar (FBS) in comparison to control animals. Also, the activity of hepatic glucokinase (GK) was decreased significantly. Along with, a significant increase was observed in hepatic tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) and plasma insulin in benzene treated rats. Moreover, benzene caused a significant rise in hepatic lipid peroxidation, DNA damage and oxidation of proteins. In islets of Langerhans, hydroquinone was found to decrease the capability of antioxidant system to fight free radicals. Also, the level of death proteases (caspase 3 and caspase 9) was found higher in hydroquinone exposed islets. The current study demonstrated that benzene and hydroquinone causes toxic effects on liver and pancreatic islets by causing oxidative impairment. PMID:26056850

  16. Effect of repeated benzene inhalation exposures on benzene metabolism, binding to hemoglobin, and induction of micronuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metabolism of benzene is thought to be necessary to produce the toxic effects, including carcinogenicity, associated with benzene exposure. To extrapolate from the results of rodent studies to potential health risks in man, one must know how benzene metabolism is affected by species, dose, dose rate, and repeated versus single exposures. The purpose of our studies was to determine the effect of repeated inhalation exposures on the metabolism of [14C]benzene by rodents. Benzene metabolism was assessed by characterizing and quantitating urinary metabolites, and by quantitating 14C bound to hemoglobin and micronuclei induction. F344/N rats and B6C3F1 mice were exposed, nose-only, to 600 ppm benzene or to air (control) for 6 hr/day, 5 days/week for 3 weeks. On the last day, both benzene-pretreated and control animals were exposed to 600 ppm, 14C-labeled benzene for 6 hr. Individual benzene metabolites in urine collected for 24 hr after the exposure were analyzed. There was a significant decrease in the respiratory rate of mice (but not rats) pretreated with benzene which resulted in lower levels of urinary [14C]benzene metabolites. The analyses indicated that the only effects of benzene pretreatment on the metabolite profile in rat or mouse urine were a slight shift from glucuronidation to sulfation in mice and a shift from sulfation to glucuronidation in rats. Benzene pretreatment also had no effect, in either species, on formation of [14C]benzene-derived hemoglobin adducts. Mice and rats had similar levels of hemoglobin adduct binding, despite the higher metabolism of benzene by mice. This indicates that hemoglobin adduct formation occurs with higher efficiency in rats. After 1 week of exposure to 600 ppm benzene, the frequency of micronucleated, polychromatic erythrocytes (PCEs) in mice was significantly increased

  17. Elevated Atmospheric Levels of Benzene and Benzene-Related Compounds from Unconventional Shale Extraction and Processing: Human Health Concern for Residential Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Alisa L.; Orimoloye, Helen T.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The advancement of natural gas (NG) extraction across the United States (U.S.) raises concern for potential exposure to hazardous air pollutants (HAPs). Benzene, a HAP and a primary chemical of concern due to its classification as a known human carcinogen, is present in petroleum-rich geologic formations and is formed during the combustion of bypass NG. It is a component in solvents, paraffin breakers, and fuels used in NG extraction and processing (E&P). OBJECTIVES The objectives of this study are to confirm the presence of benzene and benzene-related compounds (benzene[s]) in residential areas, where unconventional shale E&P is occurring, and to determine if benzene[s] exists in elevated atmospheric concentrations when compared to national background levels. METHODS Ambient air sampling was conducted in six counties in the Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex with passive samples collected in evacuated 6-L Summa canisters. Samples were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, with sampling performed at variable distances from the facility fence line. RESULTS Elevated concentrations of benzene[s] in the atmosphere were identified when compared to U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Urban Air Toxics Monitoring Program. The 24-hour benzene concentrations ranged from 0.6 parts per billion by volume (ppbv) to 592 ppbv, with 1-hour concentrations from 2.94 ppbv to 2,900.20 ppbv. CONCLUSION Benzene is a known human carcinogen capable of multisystem health effects. Exposure to benzene is correlated with bone marrow and blood-forming organ damage and immune system depression. Sensitive populations (children, pregnant women, elderly, immunocompromised) and occupational workers are at increased risk for adverse health effects from elevated atmospheric levels of benzene[s] in residential areas with unconventional shale E&P. PMID:27199565

  18. Preliminary study to prepare a reference material of toluene metabolite - o-cresol and benzene metabolite-phenol - in human

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šperlingová, I.; Dabrowská, L.; Stránský, V.; Kučera, Jan; Tichý, M.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 5 (2006), s. 231-235. ISSN 0949-1775 R&D Projects: GA MZd NR7831 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : reference material * toluene metabolites * o-cresol Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 0.640, year: 2006

  19. Metabolism of trans, trans-muconaldehyde, a cytotoxic metabolite of benzene, in mouse liver by alcohol dehydrogenase Adh1 and aldehyde reductase AKR1A4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reductive metabolism of trans, trans-muconaldehyde, a cytotoxic metabolite of benzene, was studied in mouse liver. Using an HPLC-based stopped assay, the primary reduced metabolite was identified as 6-hydroxy-trans, trans-2,4-hexadienal (OH/CHO) and the secondary metabolite as 1,6-dihydroxy-trans, trans-2,4-hexadiene (OH/OH). The main enzymes responsible for the highest levels of reductase activity towards trans, trans-muconaldehyde were purified from mouse liver soluble fraction first by Q-sepharose chromatography followed by either blue or red dye affinity chromatography. In mouse liver, trans, trans-muconaldehyde is predominantly reduced by an NADH-dependent enzyme, which was identified as alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh1). Kinetic constants obtained for trans, trans-muconaldehyde with the native Adh1 enzyme showed a V max of 2141 ± 500 nmol/min/mg and a K m of 11 ± 4 μM. This enzyme was inhibited by pyrazole with a K I of 3.1 ± 0.57 μM. Other fractions were found to contain muconaldehyde reductase activity independent of Adh1, and one enzyme was identified as the NADPH-dependent aldehyde reductase AKR1A4. This showed a V max of 115 nmol/min/mg and a K m of 15 ± 2 μM and was not inhibited by pyrazole

  20. Decreased levels of CXC-chemokines in serum of benzene-exposed workers identified by array-based proteomics

    OpenAIRE

    Vermeulen, Roel; Lan, Qing; Zhang, Luoping; Gunn, Laura; McCarthy, Diane; Woodbury, Ronald L; McGuire, Marielena; Podust, Vladimir N.; Li, Guilan; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Mu, Ruidong; Yin, Songnian; Rothman, Nathaniel; Smith, Martyn T.

    2005-01-01

    Benzene is an important industrial chemical and environmental contaminant that causes leukemia. To obtain mechanistic insight into benzene's mechanism of action, we examined the impact of benzene on the human serum proteome in a study of exposed healthy shoe-factory workers and unexposed controls. Two sequential studies were performed, each using sera from 10 workers exposed to benzene (overall mean benzene air level >30 ppm) and 10 controls. Serum samples were subjected to anion-exchange fra...

  1. Characterization of changes in gene expression and biochemical pathways at low levels of benzene exposure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reuben Thomas

    Full Text Available Benzene, a ubiquitous environmental pollutant, causes acute myeloid leukemia (AML. Recently, through transcriptome profiling of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC, we reported dose-dependent effects of benzene exposure on gene expression and biochemical pathways in 83 workers exposed across four airborne concentration ranges (from 10 ppm compared with 42 subjects with non-workplace ambient exposure levels. Here, we further characterize these dose-dependent effects with continuous benzene exposure in all 125 study subjects. We estimated air benzene exposure levels in the 42 environmentally-exposed subjects from their unmetabolized urinary benzene levels. We used a novel non-parametric, data-adaptive model selection method to estimate the change with dose in the expression of each gene. We describe non-parametric approaches to model pathway responses and used these to estimate the dose responses of the AML pathway and 4 other pathways of interest. The response patterns of majority of genes as captured by mean estimates of the first and second principal components of the dose-response for the five pathways and the profiles of 6 AML pathway response-representative genes (identified by clustering exhibited similar apparent supra-linear responses. Responses at or below 0.1 ppm benzene were observed for altered expression of AML pathway genes and CYP2E1. Together, these data show that benzene alters disease-relevant pathways and genes in a dose-dependent manner, with effects apparent at doses as low as 100 ppb in air. Studies with extensive exposure assessment of subjects exposed in the low-dose range between 10 ppb and 1 ppm are needed to confirm these findings.

  2. Human CYP2E1-dependent and human sulfotransferase 1A1-modulated induction of micronuclei by benzene and its hydroxylated metabolites in Chinese hamster V79-derived cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hao; Lai, Yanmei; Hu, Keqi; Wei, Qinzhi; Liu, Yungang

    2014-12-01

    Benzene is a ubiquitous environmental pollutant and a confirmed human carcinogen, which requires metabolic activation, primarily by CYP2E1, for most of its biological actions. Chromosome damages in benzene-exposed workers and rodents have been observed, and in their urine sulfo- and glucuronide-conjugates of phenol and hydroquinone were present. Yet, direct evidence for human CYP2E1-activated mutagenicity of benzene and the exact significance of phase II metabolism for inactivating benzene metabolites are still missing. In the present study, benzene and its oxidized metabolites (phenol, hydroquinone, catechol, 1,2,4-trihydroxybenzene and 1,4-benzoquinone) were investigated for induction of micronuclei in a V79-derived cell line genetically engineered for expression of both human CYP2E1 and human sulfotransferase (SULT) 1A1 (indicated by active micronuclei induction by 1-hydroxymethylpyrene). The results demonstrated concentration-dependent induction of micronuclei by benzene and phenol, though with lower potency or efficacy than the other metabolites. Inhibition of CYP2E1 by 1-aminobenzotriazole did not change the effect of benzoquinone, but completely abolished that of benzene and phenol, and attenuated that of the other compounds. Moreover, inhibition of SULT1A1 by pentachlorophenol potentiated the effects of benzene, hydroquinone, catechol and trihydroxybenzene. Ascorbic acid, a reducing and free radical-scavenging agent, significantly lowered the effects of hydroquinone, catechol, trihydroxybenzene as well as N-nitrosodimethylamine (a known CYP2E1-dependent promutagen), with that of benzoquinone unaffected. These results suggest that in addition to activating benzene and phenol, human CYP2E1 may further convert hydroquinone, catechol and trihydroxybenzene to more genotoxic metabolites, and sulfo-conjugation of the multi-hydroxylated metabolites of benzene by human SULT1A1 may represent an important detoxifying pathway. PMID:25771868

  3. Incense, sparklers and cigarettes are significant contributors to indoor benzene and particle levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner Tirler

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The increased use of incense, magic candles and other flameless products often produces indoor pollutants that may represent a health risk for humans. Today, in fact, incense and air fresheners are used inside homes as well as in public places including stores, shopping malls and places of worship. As a source of indoor contamination, the impact of smoke, incense and sparklers on human health cannot be ignored. Aim. In the present work, we report the results of an emission study regarding particles (PM10 and particle number concentration, PNC and benzene, produced by various incense sticks and sparklers. Results and discussion.The results obtained for benzene, PM10 and PNC, showed a strong negative influence on air quality when these products were used indoors. Various incense sticks gave completely different benzene results: from a small increase of the benzene concentration in the air, just slightly above the background levels of ambient air, to very high concentrations, of more than 200 µg/m³ of benzene in the test room after the incense sticks had been tested.

  4. Synergistic action of the benzene metabolite hydroquinone on myelopoietic stimulating activity of granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irons, R. D.; Stillman, W. S.; Colagiovanni, D. B.; Henry, V. A.; Clarkson, T. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    The effects of in vitro pretreatment with benzene metabolites on colony-forming response of murine bone marrow cells stimulated with recombinant granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rGM-CSF) were examined. Pretreatment with hydroquinone (HQ) at concentrations ranging from picomolar to micromolar for 30 min resulted in a 1.5- to 4.6-fold enhancement in colonies formed in response to rGM-CSF that was due to an increase in granulocyte/macrophage colonies. The synergism equaled or exceeded that reported for the effects of interleukin 1, interleukin 3, or interleukin 6 with GM-CSF. Optimal enhancement was obtained with 1 microM HQ and was largely independent of the concentration of rGM-CSF. Pretreatment with other authentic benzene metabolites, phenol and catechol, and the putative metabolite trans, trans-muconaldehyde did not enhance growth factor response. Coadministration of phenol and HQ did not enhance the maximal rGM-CSF response obtained with HQ alone but shifted the optimal concentration to 100 pM. Synergism between HQ and rGM-CSF was observed with nonadherent bone marrow cells and lineage-depleted bone marrow cells, suggesting an intrinsic effect on recruitment of myeloid progenitor cells not normally responsive to rGM-CSF. Alterations in differentiation in a myeloid progenitor cell population may be of relevance in the pathogenesis of acute myelogenous leukemia secondary to drug or chemical exposure.

  5. Phase II metabolism of benzene.

    OpenAIRE

    Schrenk, D.; Orzechowski, A.; Schwarz, L R; Snyder, R.; Burchell, B; Ingelman-Sundberg, M; K. W. DE BOCK

    1996-01-01

    The hepatic metabolism of benzene is thought to be a prerequisite for its bony marrow toxicity. However, the complete pattern of benzene metabolites formed in the liver and their role in bone marrow toxicity are not fully understood. Therefore, benzene metabolism was studied in isolated rodent hepatocytes. Rat hepatocytes released benzene-1,2-dihydrodiol, hydroquinone (HQ), catechol (CT), phenol (PH), trans-trans-muconic acid, and a number of phase II metabolites such as PH sulfate and PH glu...

  6. Benzene activates caspase-4 and -12 at the transcription level, without an association with apoptosis, in mouse bone marrow cells lacking the p53 gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Jung-Yeon; Han, Jeong-Hee; Yoon, Byung-Il [Kangwon National University, School of Veterinary Medicine, Chuncheon, Gangwon (Korea); Hirabayashi, Yoko; Kodama, Yukio; Kanno, Jun [National Institute of Health Sciences, Division of Cellular and Molecular Toxicology, Center for Biological Safety and Research, Tokyo (Japan); Choi, Yang-Kyu [Konkuk University, College of Veterinary Medicine, Seoul (Korea); Inoue, Tohru [National Institute of Health Sciences, Biological Safety and Research Center, Tokyo (Japan)

    2009-08-15

    Benzene is a well-known environmental pollutant that can induce hematotoxicity, aplastic anemia, acute myelogenous leukemia, and lymphoma. However, although benzene metabolites are known to induce oxidative stress and disrupt the cell cycle, the mechanism underlying lympho/leukemogenicity is not fully understood. Caspase-4 (alias caspase-11) and -12 are inflammatory caspases implicated in inflammation and endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced apoptosis. The objectives of this study were to investigate the altered expression of caspase-4 and -12 in mouse bone marrow after benzene exposure and to determine whether their alterations are associated with benzene-induced bone marrow toxicity, especially cellular apoptosis. In addition, we evaluated whether the p53 gene is involved in regulating the mechanism, using both wild-type (WT) mice and mice lacking the p53 gene. For this study, 8-week-old C57BL/6 mice [WT and p53 knockout (KO)] were administered a benzene solution (150 mg/kg diluted in corn oil) via oral gavage once daily, 5 days/week, for 1 or 2 weeks. Blood and bone marrow cells were collected and cell counts were measured using a Coulter counter. Total mRNA and protein extracts were prepared from the harvested bone marrow cells. Then qRT-PCR and Western blotting were performed to detect changes in the caspases at the mRNA and protein level, respectively. A DNA fragmentation assay and Annexin-V staining were carried out on the bone marrow cells to detect apoptosis. Results indicated that when compared to the control, leukocyte number and bone marrow cellularity decreased significantly in WT mice. The expression of caspase-4 and -12 mRNA increased significantly after 12 days of benzene treatment in the bone marrow cells of benzene-exposed p53KO mice. However, apoptosis detection assays indicated no evidence of apoptosis in p53KO or WT mice. In addition, no changes of other apoptosis-related caspases, such as caspase-3 and -9, were found in WT or p53KO mice at the

  7. Simultaneous determination of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene metabolites in human urine using electromembrane extraction combined with liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Joon Hyuk; Lee, Hye Yeon; Kim, Unyong; Eom, Han Young; Kim, Junghyun; Cho, Hyun-Deok; Han, Sang Beom

    2015-12-01

    For the first time, electromembrane extraction combined with liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry was applied for the determination of urinary benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene metabolites. S-Phenylmercapturic acid, hippuric acid, phenylglyoxylic acid, and methylhippuric acid isomers were extracted from human urine through a supported liquid membrane consisting of 1-octanol into an alkaline acceptor solution filling the inside of a hollow fiber by application of an electric field. Various extraction factors were investigated and optimized using response surface methodology, the statistical method. The optimum conditions were established to be 300 V applied voltage, 15 min extraction time, 1500 rpm stirring speed, and 5 mM ammonium acetate (pH 10.2) acceptor solution. The method was validated with respect to selectivity, linearity, accuracy, precision, limit of detection, limit of quantification, recovery, and reproducibility. The results showed good linearity (r(2) > 0.995), precision, and accuracy. The extract recoveries were 52.8-79.0%. Finally, we applied this method to real samples and successfully measured benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene metabolites. PMID:26500147

  8. Lack of correlation between environmental or biological indicators of benzene exposure at parts per billion levels and micronuclei induction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite growing concern for possible carcinogenic effects associated with environmental benzene exposure in the general population, few studies exist at parts per billion (ppb) levels. We investigated the existence of a relationship between airborne/biological measurements of benzene exposure i.e., personal/area sampling and unmodified urinary benzene/trans,trans-muconic acid; t,t-MA) and micronuclei induction cytochalasin B technique) among exposed chemical laboratory workers (n=47) and traffic wardens (n=15). Although urinary t,t-MA (106.9±123.17 μg/Lurine) correlated (R2=0.37) with urinary benzene (0.66±0.99 μg/Lurine), neither biological measurement correlated with environmental benzene exposure (14.04±9.71 μg/m3; 4.39±3.03 ppb), suggesting that, at ppb level (1 ppb=3.2 μg/m3), airborne benzene constitutes a fraction of the total intake. Traffic wardens and laboratory workers had comparable numbers of micronuclei (4.70±2.63 versus .76±3.11; n.s.), similar to levels recorded in the general population. With univariate/multivariate analysis, no association was found between micronuclei induction and air/urinary benzene exposure variables. Notably, among the personal characteristics examined (including age, gender, smoking, drinking, etc.), high body mass index correlated with micronuclei induction while, among females, use of hormonal medication was associated with less micronuclei. Thus the present study provides no evidence that ppb levels of environmental benzene exposure appreciably affect micronuclei incidence against the background of other relevant factors). However, this should not be taken as an argument against efforts aiming to reduce environmental benzene pollution

  9. Maternal Exposure to Ambient Levels of Benzene and Neural Tube Defects among Offspring: Texas, 1999–2004

    OpenAIRE

    Lupo, Philip J.; Symanski, Elaine; Waller, D. Kim; Chan, Wenyaw; Langlois, Peter H; Canfield, Mark A.; Mitchell, Laura E

    2010-01-01

    Background Previous studies have reported positive associations between maternal exposure to air pollutants and several adverse birth outcomes. However, there have been no studies assessing the association between environmental levels of hazardous air pollutants, such as benzene, and neural tube defects (NTDs), a common and serious group of congenital malformations. Objective Our goal was to conduct a case–control study assessing the association between ambient air levels of benzene, toluene,...

  10. Phthalate metabolite levels and menopausal hot flashes in midlife women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziv-Gal, Ayelet; Gallicchio, Lisa; Chiang, Catheryne; Ther, Sara N; Miller, Susan R; Zacur, Howard A; Dills, Russell L; Flaws, Jodi A

    2016-04-01

    During the menopausal transition, a woman's reproductive capacity declines, her hormone milieu changes, and her risk of hot flashes increases. Exposure to phthalates, which can be found in personal care products, can also result in altered reproductive function. Here, we investigated the associations between phthalate metabolite levels and midlife hot flashes. Eligible women (45-54 years of age) provided detailed information on hot flashes history and donated urine samples (n=195). Urinary phthalate metabolite levels were measured by HPLC-MS/MS. A higher total sum of phthalate metabolites commonly found in personal care products was associated with an increased risk of ever experiencing hot flashes (odds ratio (OR)=1.45; 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.07-1.96), hot flashes in the past 30days (OR=1.43; 95%CI=1.04-1.96), and more frequent hot flashes (OR=1.47; 95%CI=1.06-2.05). These data suggest that some phthalate exposures from personal care products are associated with menopausal hot flashes in women. PMID:26867866

  11. Spatial variability in levels of benzene, formaldehyde, and total benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes in New York City: a land-use regression study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kheirbek Iyad

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hazardous air pollutant exposures are common in urban areas contributing to increased risk of cancer and other adverse health outcomes. While recent analyses indicate that New York City residents experience significantly higher cancer risks attributable to hazardous air pollutant exposures than the United States as a whole, limited data exist to assess intra-urban variability in air toxics exposures. Methods To assess intra-urban spatial variability in exposures to common hazardous air pollutants, street-level air sampling for volatile organic compounds and aldehydes was conducted at 70 sites throughout New York City during the spring of 2011. Land-use regression models were developed using a subset of 59 sites and validated against the remaining 11 sites to describe the relationship between concentrations of benzene, total BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes and formaldehyde to indicators of local sources, adjusting for temporal variation. Results Total BTEX levels exhibited the most spatial variability, followed by benzene and formaldehyde (coefficient of variation of temporally adjusted measurements of 0.57, 0.35, 0.22, respectively. Total roadway length within 100 m, traffic signal density within 400 m of monitoring sites, and an indicator of temporal variation explained 65% of the total variability in benzene while 70% of the total variability in BTEX was accounted for by traffic signal density within 450 m, density of permitted solvent-use industries within 500 m, and an indicator of temporal variation. Measures of temporal variation, traffic signal density within 400 m, road length within 100 m, and interior building area within 100 m (indicator of heating fuel combustion predicted 83% of the total variability of formaldehyde. The models built with the modeling subset were found to predict concentrations well, predicting 62% to 68% of monitored values at validation sites. Conclusions Traffic and

  12. Urinary phthalate metabolite concentrations and blood glucose levels during pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robledo, Candace A.; Peck, Jennifer D.; Stoner, Julie; Calafat, Antonia M.; Carabin, Hélène; Cowan, Linda; Goodman, Jean R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To examine associations between phthalate metabolite urinary concentrations during early pregnancy and blood glucose levels obtained at the time of screening for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Methods Upon initiation of prenatal care, women with a mean gestational age of 12.8 weeks were recruited for a study of environmental chemical exposures (n = 110) and provided a spot urinary specimen. Blood glucose concentrations (mg/dl) were obtained from the electronic medical record for those patients who did not experience a pregnancy loss and did not transfer care to another facility prior to glucose screening (n = 72). Urinary concentrations of nine phthalate metabolites and creatinine were measured at the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Associations between tertiles of phthalate metabolites concentrations and blood glucose levels were estimated using linear regression. Results Compared to pregnant women in the lowest concentration tertile, women with the highest urinary concentrations (≥3rd tertile) of mono-iso-butyl phthalate (tertile: ≥15.3 μg/l, β = −18.3, 95% CI: −35.4, −1.2) and monobenzyl phthalate (tertile: ≥30.3 μg/l, β = −17.3, 95% CI: −34.1, −0.4) had lower blood glucose levels at the time of GDM screening after adjustment for urinary creatinine and demographic covariates. Conclusion Because maternal glucose levels increase during pregnancy to provide adequate nutrition for fetal growth and development, these findings may have implications for fetal health. However, given the limitations of our study, findings should be interpreted cautiously. PMID:25726127

  13. Interphase cytogenetics of workers exposed to benzene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, L.; Wang, Yunxia; Venkatesh, P. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a powerful new technique that allows numerical chromosome aberrations (aneuploidy) to be detected in interphase cells. In previous studies, FISH has been used to demonstrate that the benzene metabolites hydroquinone and 1,2,4-benzenetriol induce aneuploidy of chromosomes 7 and 9 in cultures of human cells. In the present study, we used an interphase FISH procedure to perform cytogenetic analyses on the blood cells of 43 workers exposed to benzene (median=31 ppm, 8-hr time-weighted average) and 44 matched controls from Shanghai, China. High benzene exposure (>31 ppm, n=22) increased the hyperdiploid frequency of chromosome 9 (p<0.01), but lower exposure (<31 ppm, n=21) did not. Trisomy 9 was the major form of benzene-induced hyperdiploidy. The level of hyperdiploidy in exposed workers correlated with their urinary phenol level (r= 0.58, p < 0.0001), a measure of internal benzene close. A significant correlation was also found between hyperdiploicly and decreased absolute lymphocyte count, an indicator of benzene hematotoxicity, in the exposed group (r=-0.44, p=0.003) but not in controls (r=-0.09, P=0.58). These results show that high benzene exposure induces aneuploidy of chromosome 9 in nondiseased individuals, with trisomy being the most prevalent form. They further highlight the usefulness of interphase cytogenetics and FISH for the rapid and sensitive detection of aneuploidy in exposed human populations. 35 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Species differences in the metabolism of benzene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, R.F. [Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-12-01

    The pathways of metabolism of benzene appear to be qualitatively similar in all species studied thus far. However, there are quantitative differences in the fraction of benzene metabolized by the different pathways. These species differences become important for risk assessments based on animal data. Mice have a greater overall capacity to metabolize benzene than rats or primates, based on mass balance studies conducted in vivo using radiolabled benzene. Mice and monkeys metabolize more of the benzene to hydroquinone metabolites than do rats or chimpanzees, especially at low doses. Nonhuman primates metabolize less of the benzene to muconic acid than do rodents or humans. In all species studied, a greater proportion of benzene is converted to hydroquinone and ring-breakage metabolites at low doses than at high doses. This finding should be considered in attempting to extrapolate the toxicity of benzene observed at high doses to predicted toxicity at low doses. Because ring-breakage metabolites and hydroquinone have both been implicated in the toxicity of benzene, the higher formation of those metabolites in the mouse may partially explain why mice are more sensitive to benzene than are rats. Metabolism of benzene in humans, the species of interest, does not exactly mimic that of any animal species studied. More information on the urinary and blood metabolites of occupationally exposed people is required to determine the fractional conversion of benzene to putative toxic metabolites and the degree of variability present in human subjects. 12 refs., 4 tabs.

  15. Pesticide Urinary Metabolite Levels of Children in Eastern North Carolina Farmworker Households

    OpenAIRE

    Arcury, Thomas A.; Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Barr, Dana B.; Tapia, Janeth; Chen, Haiying; Quandt, Sara A.

    2007-01-01

    Background In this investigation we documented the pesticide urinary metabolite levels of farmworker children in North Carolina, determined the number of different metabolites detected for each child, and delineated risk factors associated with the number of metabolites. Methods Urine samples were collected from 60 Latino farmworker children 1–6 years of age (34 female, 26 male). Interviews were completed by their mothers in Spanish. We analyzed urine samples for 14 pesticide metabolites, inc...

  16. Competition between benzene and styrene in forming radicals under different solvent conditions observed by muon level crossing resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The muon level-crossing-resonance technique has been used to resolve major discrepancies that exist in muon-spin-resonance studies (both free-radical formation and muonium decay rates) in the competition between benzene and styrene. The results, obtained for ∼30 mM solutions in ethanol and for 2.5 mM aqueous micelles solutions, show that muonium atoms (Mu) react 8 (±2) times faster with styrene than with benzene. In the above cases thermalized Mu is unquestionably the reactive species, which is known to show nucleophilic intra-molecular selectivity in the case of styrene. But a similar value, 9 (±2), was also obtained for undiluted mixtures of liquid benzene and styrene (neat mixture) - where the precursor might have been 'hot Mu' (which should display weaker selectivity than Mu) or cations derived from μ+ (which should show higher selectivity). These results support the view that thermalized Mu is the predominant reactive species in liquid benzene and styrene. (orig.)

  17. Mechanistic considerations in benzene physiological model development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medinsky, M.A.; Kenyon, E.M.; Seaton, M.J.; Schlosser, P.M. [Chemical Industry Institute of Toxicology, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    1996-12-01

    Benzene, an important industrial solvent, is also present in unleaded gasoline and cigarette smoke. The hematotoxic effects of benzene in humans are well documented and include aplastic anemia, pancytopenia, and acute myelogenous leukemia. However, the risks of leukemia at low exposure concentrations have not been established. A combination of metabolites (hydroquinone and phenol, for example) may be necessary to duplicate the hematotoxic effect of benzene, perhaps due in part to the synergistic effect of phenol on myeloperoxidase-mediated oxidation of hydroquinone to the reactive metabolite benzoquinone. Because benzene and its hydroxylated metabolites (phenol, hydroquinone, and catechol) are substrates for the same cytochrome P450 enzymes, competitive interactions among the metabolites are possible. In vivo data on metabolite formation by mice exposed to various benzene concentrations are consistent with competitive inhibition of phenol oxidation by benzene. In vitro studies of the metabolic oxidation of benzene, phenol, and hydroquinone are consistent with the mechanism of competitive interaction among the metabolites. The dosimetry of benzene and its metabolites in the target tissue, bone marrow, depends on the balance of activation processes such as enzymatic oxidation and deactivation processes such as conjugation and excretion. Phenol, the primary benzene metabolite, can undergo both oxidation and conjugation. Thus the potential exists for competition among various enzymes for phenol. Zonal localization of phase I and phase 11 enzymes in various regions of the liver acinus also impacts this competition. Biologically based dosimetry models that incorporate the important determinants of benzene flux, including interactions with other chemicals, will enable prediction of target tissue doses of benzene and metabolites at low exposure concentrations relevant for humans. 39 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Parts per billion-level detection of benzene using SnO2/graphene nanocomposite composed of sub-6 nm SnO2 nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: SnO2/graphene nanocomposite composed of 4–5 nm SnO2 nanoparticles was synthesized by one-step wet chemical method and the form mechanism of the nanocomposite is clearly interpreted. The detection limit of the nanocomposite was as low as 5 ppb to toxic benzene. Highlights: ► We synthesized SnO2/graphene nanocomposite using a simple one-step wet chemical method. ► The nanocomposite composed of 4–5 nm SnO2 nanoparticles. ► Toxic benzene was detected by such kind of nanocomposite. ► The detection limit to toxic benzene was as low as 5 ppb. - Abstract: In the present work, the SnO2/graphene nanocomposite composed of 4–5 nm SnO2 nanoparticles was synthesized using a simple wet chemical method for ppb-level detection of benzene. The formation mechanism of the nanocomposite was investigated systematically by means of simultaneous thermogravimetry analysis, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy cooperated with transmission electron microscopy observations. The SnO2/graphene nanocomposite showed a very attractive improved sensitivity to toxic volatile organic compounds, especially to benzene, compared to a traditional SnO2. The responses of the nanocomposite to benzene were a little higher than those to ethanol and the detection limit reached 5 ppb to benzene which is, to our best knowledge, far lower than those reported previously.

  19. Comparative metabolism of [14C]benzene to excretable products and bioactivation to DNA-binding derivatives in maternal and neonatal mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lactating adult female mice treated with a single dose of 880 mg/kg i.p. [14C]benzene, and their 2-day-old sucklings similarly treated or nursed by their treated dams were compared in terms of their ability to metabolize benzene to urinary products or reactive intermediates as assessed by covalently-bound benzene derivatives in whole blood or liver DNA. Six metabolite fractions were identified in the urine of sucklings by high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) analysis at 5 h following intraperitoneal (direct) treatment with benzene. Three of the metabolite fractions co-chromatographed with authentic phenol, phenyl glucuronide, and muconic acid, and contributed 11, 6.9 and 0.6%, respectively, to the total urinary benzene metabolites. Two of the fractions were unidentified. The sixth and most polar fraction consisted of multiple metabolites, 21% of which were conjugates, and accounted for 72% of the total urinary metabolites. A similar metabolite profile was observed in 24-h urine samples from treated dams with the exception that one of the unidentified fractions in the sucklings was absent and levels of the metabolites were quantitatively higher than those observed in sucklings 5 h following their treatment with benzene. Furthermore, 78% of the most polar fraction from the dams consisted of conjugates compared with 21% of that from the sucklings. The metabolite pattern in urine of sucklings nursed by treated dams was qualitatively similar to, but quantitatively different from the pattern in treated dams. Five hours following intraperitoneal treatment with benzene, covalent binding of the compound to DNA (expressed as pmol benzene equivalents/mg DNA) in sucklings was slightly higher in whole blood (1.15±0.07) than in liver (0.77±0.07), whereas in the dam, it was slightly lower in whole blood (0.88±0.48) than in liver (1.63±0.61). Twenty four hours following benzene exposure in sucklings of benzene-treated dams, DNA binding by the compound in whole blood

  20. Muonated cyclohexadienyl radicals observed by level crossing resonance in dilute solutions of benzene in hexane subjected to muon-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benzene is used here as a scavenger of muonium to produce the muonated cyclohexadienyl radical in dilute solutions in n-hexane. The radical was identified by level crossing resonance spectroscopy (LFR) by observing the proton resonance of the -CHMu group occurring at 2.059T. Its yield is found to equal the sum of the muonium atom yield and the ''missing'' muon yield in hexane (total 35% of the incident muons). Consequently, the complete dispersement of muons in different chemical associations is now accounted for in a saturated hydrocarbon liquid, and is seen to be similar to that in water. (author)

  1. Muonated cyclohexadienyl radicals observed by level crossing resonance in dilute solutions of benzene in hexane subjected to muon-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benzene is used here as a scavenger of muonium to produce the muonated cyclohexadienyl radical in dilute solutions in n-hexane. The radical was identified by level crossing resonance spectroscopy (LCR) by observing the proton resonance of the -CHMu group occurring at 2.059T. Its yield is found to equal the sum of the muonium atom yield and the 'missing' muon yield in hexane (total 35% of the incident muons). Consequently, the complete dispersement of muons in different chemical associations is now accounted for in a saturated hydrocarbon liquid, and is seen to be similar to that in water

  2. Gut Microbial Fatty Acid Metabolites Reduce Triacylglycerol Levels in Hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanthirudjanar, Tharnath; Furumoto, Hidehiro; Zheng, Jiawen; Kim, Young-Il; Goto, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Kawada, Teruo; Park, Si-Bum; Hirata, Akiko; Kitamura, Nahoko; Kishino, Shigenobu; Ogawa, Jun; Hirata, Takashi; Sugawara, Tatsuya

    2015-11-01

    Hydroxy and oxo fatty acids were recently found to be produced as intermediates during gut microbial fatty acid metabolism. Lactobacillus plantarum produces these fatty acids from unsaturated fatty acids such as linoleic acid. In this study, we investigated the effects of these gut microbial fatty acid metabolites on the lipogenesis in liver cells. We screened their effect on sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) expression in HepG2 cells treated with a synthetic liver X receptor α (LXRα) agonist (T0901317). The results showed that 10-hydroxy-12(Z)-octadecenoic acid (18:1) (HYA), 10-hydroxy-6(Z),12(Z)-octadecadienoic acid (18:2) (γHYA), 10-oxo-12(Z)-18:1 (KetoA), and 10-oxo-6(Z),12(Z)-18:2 (γKetoA) significantly decreased SREBP-1c mRNA expression induced by T0901317. These fatty acids also downregulated the mRNA expression of lipogenic genes by suppressing LXRα activity and inhibiting SREBP-1 maturation. Oral administration of KetoA, which effectively reduced triacylglycerol accumulation and acetyl-CoA carboxylase 2 (ACC2) expression in HepG2 cells, for 2 weeks significantly decreased Srebp-1c, Scd-1, and Acc2 expression in the liver of mice fed a high-sucrose diet. Our findings suggest that the hypolipidemic effect of the fatty acid metabolites produced by L. plantarum can be exploited in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases or dyslipidemia. PMID:26399511

  3. Levels of seven urinary phthalate metabolites in a human reference population.

    OpenAIRE

    Blount, B.C.; M.J. Silva; Caudill, S P; Needham, L L; Pirkle, J L; Sampson, E J; Lucier, G W; Jackson, R J; Brock, J.W.

    2000-01-01

    Using a novel and highly selective technique, we measured monoester metabolites of seven commonly used phthalates in urine samples from a reference population of 289 adult humans. This analytical approach allowed us to directly measure the individual phthalate metabolites responsible for the animal reproductive and developmental toxicity while avoiding contamination from the ubiquitous parent compounds. The monoesters with the highest urinary levels found were monoethyl phthalate (95th percen...

  4. Benzene metabolism by human liver microsomes in relation to cytochrome P450 2E1 activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaton, M J; Schlosser, P M; Bond, J A; Medinsky, M A

    1994-09-01

    Low levels of benzene from sources including cigarette smoke and automobile emissions are ubiquitous in the environment. Since the toxicity of benzene probably results from oxidative metabolites, an understanding of the profile of biotransformation of low levels of benzene is critical in making a valid risk assessment. To that end, we have investigated metabolism of a low concentration of [14C]benzene (3.4 microM) by microsomes from human, mouse and rat liver. The extent of phase I benzene metabolism by microsomal preparations from 10 human liver samples and single microsomal preparations from both mice and rats was then related to measured activities of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2E1. Measured CYP 2E1 activities, as determined by hydroxylation of p-nitrophenol, varied 13-fold (0.253-3.266 nmol/min/mg) for human samples. The fraction of benzene metabolized in 16 min ranged from 10% to 59%. Also at 16 min, significant amounts of oxidative metabolites were formed. Phenol was the main metabolite formed by all but two human microsomal preparations. In those samples, both of which had high CYP 2E1 activity, hydroquinone was the major metabolite formed. Both hydroquinone and catechol formation showed a direct correlation with CYP 2E1 activity over the range of activities present. A simulation model was developed based on a mechanism of competitive inhibition between benzene and its oxidized metabolites, and was fit to time-course data for three human liver preparations. Model calculations for initial rates of benzene metabolism ranging from 0.344 to 4.442 nmol/mg/min are directly proportional to measured CYP 2E1 activities. The model predicted the dependence of benzene metabolism on the measured CYP 2E1 activity in human liver samples, as well as in mouse and rat liver samples. These results suggest that differences in measured hepatic CYP 2E1 activity may be a major factor contributing to both interindividual and interspecies variations in hepatic metabolism of benzene

  5. Low-dose metabolism of benzene in humans: science and obfuscation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappaport, Stephen M; Kim, Sungkyoon; Thomas, Reuben; Johnson, Brent A; Bois, Frederic Y; Kupper, Lawrence L

    2013-01-01

    Benzene is a ubiquitous air pollutant that causes human leukemia and hematotoxic effects. Although the mechanism by which benzene causes toxicity is unclear, metabolism is required. A series of articles by Kim et al. used air and biomonitoring data from workers in Tianjin, China, to investigate the dose-specific metabolism (DSM) of benzene over a wide range of air concentrations (0.03-88.9 p.p.m.). Kim et al. concluded that DSM of benzene is greatest at air concentrations American Petroleum Institute to fund a study by Price et al. to reanalyze the original data. Although their formal 'reanalysis' reproduced Kim's finding of enhanced DSM at sub-p.p.m. benzene concentrations, Price et al. argued that Kim's methods were inappropriate for assigning benzene exposures to low exposed subjects (based on measurements of urinary benzene) and for adjusting background levels of metabolites (based on median values from the 60 lowest exposed subjects). Price et al. then performed uncertainty analyses under alternative approaches, which led them to conclude that '… the Tianjin data appear to be too uncertain to support any conclusions …' regarding the DSM of benzene. They also argued that the apparent low-dose metabolism of benzene could be explained by 'lung clearance.' In addressing these criticisms, we show that the methods and arguments presented by Price et al. are scientifically unsound and that their results are unreliable. PMID:23222815

  6. Fecal estradiol and progesterone metabolite levels in the three-toed sloth (Bradypus variegatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mühlbauer

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study was carried out to assess the possibility of measuring fecal steroid hormone metabolites as a noninvasive technique for monitoring reproductive function in the three-toed sloth, Bradypus variegatus. Levels of the estradiol (E2 and progesterone (P4 metabolites were measured by radioimmunoassay in fecal samples collected over 12 weeks from 4 captive female B. variegatus sloths. The validation of the radioimmunoassay for evaluation of fecal steroid metabolites was carried out by collecting 10 blood samples on the same day as defecation. There was a significant direct correlation between the plasma and fecal E2 and P4 levels (P < 0.05, Pearson's test, thereby validating this noninvasive technique for the study of the estrous cycle in these animals. Ovulation was detected in two sloths (SL03 and SL04 whose E2 levels reached 2237.43 and 6713.26 pg/g wet feces weight, respectively, for over four weeks, followed by an increase in P4 metabolites reaching 33.54 and 3242.68 ng/g wet feces weight, respectively. Interestingly, SL04, which presented higher levels of E2 and P4 metabolites, later gave birth to a healthy baby sloth. The results obtained indicate that this is a reliable technique for recording gonadal steroid secretion and thereby reproduction in sloths.

  7. Pyometra in Bitches Induces Elevated Plasma Endotoxin and Prostaglandin F2α Metabolite Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagman R

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Endotoxemia in bitches with pyometra can cause severe systemic effects directly or via the release of inflammatory mediators. Plasma endotoxin concentrations were measured in ten bitches suffering from pyometra with moderately to severely deteriorated general condition, and in nine bitches admitted to surgery for non-infectious reasons. Endotoxin samples were taken on five occasions before, during and after surgery. In addition, urine and uterine bacteriology was performed and hematological, blood biochemical parameters, prostaglandin F2α metabolite 15-ketodihydro-PGF2α (PG-metabolite, progesterone and oestradiol (E2-17β levels were analysed. The results confirm significantly increased plasma levels of endotoxin in bitches with pyometra and support previous reports of endotoxin involvement in the pathogenesis of the disease. Plasma concentrations of PG-metabolite were elevated in pyometra bitches and provide a good indicator of endotoxin release since the concentrations were significantly correlated to the endotoxin levels and many other hematological and chemistry parameters. The γ-globulin serum protein electrophoresis fraction and analysis of PG-metabolite can be valuable in the diagnosis of endotoxin involvement if a reliable, rapid and cost-effective test for PG-metabolite analysis becomes readily available in the future. Treatment inhibiting prostaglandin biosynthesis and related compounds could be beneficial for bitches suffering from pyometra.

  8. Human benzene metabolism following occupational and environmental exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappaport, Stephen M; Kim, Sungkyoon; Lan, Qing; Li, Guilan; Vermeulen, Roel; Waidyanatha, Suramya; Zhang, Luoping; Yin, Songnian; Smith, Martyn T; Rothman, Nathaniel

    2010-03-19

    We previously reported evidence that humans metabolize benzene via two enzymes, including a hitherto unrecognized high-affinity enzyme that was responsible for an estimated 73% of total urinary metabolites [sum of phenol (PH), hydroquinone (HQ), catechol (CA), E,E-muconic acid (MA), and S-phenylmercapturic acid (SPMA)] in nonsmoking females exposed to benzene at sub-saturating (ppb) air concentrations. Here, we used the same Michaelis-Menten-like kinetic models to individually analyze urinary levels of PH, HQ, CA and MA from 263 nonsmoking Chinese women (179 benzene-exposed workers and 84 control workers) with estimated benzene air concentrations ranging from less than 0.001-299 ppm. One model depicted benzene metabolism as a single enzymatic process (1-enzyme model) and the other as two enzymatic processes which competed for access to benzene (2-enzyme model). We evaluated model fits based upon the difference in values of Akaike's Information Criterion (DeltaAIC), and we gauged the weights of evidence favoring the two models based upon the associated Akaike weights and Evidence Ratios. For each metabolite, the 2-enzyme model provided a better fit than the 1-enzyme model with DeltaAIC values decreasing in the order 9.511 for MA, 7.379 for PH, 1.417 for CA, and 0.193 for HQ. The corresponding weights of evidence favoring the 2-enzyme model (Evidence Ratios) were: 116.2:1 for MA, 40.0:1 for PH, 2.0:1 for CA and 1.1:1 for HQ. These results indicate that our earlier findings from models of total metabolites were driven largely by MA, representing the ring-opening pathway, and by PH, representing the ring-hydroxylation pathway. The predicted percentage of benzene metabolized by the putative high-affinity enzyme at an air concentration of 0.001 ppm was 88% based upon urinary MA and was 80% based upon urinary PH. As benzene concentrations increased, the respective percentages of benzene metabolized to MA and PH by the high-affinity enzyme decreased successively to 66 and

  9. Human Benzene Metabolism Following Occupational and Environmental Exposures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappaport, Stephen M.; Kim, Sungkyoon; Lan, Qing; Li, Guilan; Vermeulen, Roel; Waidyanatha, Suramya; Zhang, Luoping; Yin, Songnian; Smith, Martyn T.; Rothman, Nathaniel

    2011-01-01

    We previously reported evidence that humans metabolize benzene via two enzymes, including a hitherto unrecognized high-affinity enzyme that was responsible for an estimated 73 percent of total urinary metabolites [sum of phenol (PH), hydroquinone (HQ), catechol (CA), E,E-muconic acid (MA), and S-phenylmercapturic acid (SPMA)] in nonsmoking females exposed to benzene at sub-saturating (ppb) air concentrations. Here, we used the same Michaelis-Menten-like kinetic models to individually analyze urinary levels of PH, HQ, CA and MA from 263 nonsmoking Chinese women (179 benzene-exposed workers and 84 control workers) with estimated benzene air concentrations ranging from less than 0.001 ppm to 299 ppm. One model depicted benzene metabolism as a single enzymatic process (1-enzyme model) and the other as two enzymatic processes which competed for access to benzene (2-enzyme model). We evaluated model fits based upon the difference in values of Akaike’s Information Criterion (ΔAIC), and we gauged the weights of evidence favoring the two models based upon the associated Akaike weights and Evidence Ratios. For each metabolite, the 2-enzyme model provided a better fit than the 1-enzyme model with ΔAIC values decreasing in the order 9.511 for MA, 7.379 for PH, 1.417 for CA, and 0.193 for HQ. The corresponding weights of evidence favoring the 2-enzyme model (Evidence Ratios) were: 116.2:1 for MA, 40.0:1 for PH, 2.0:1 for CA and 1.1:1 for HQ. These results indicate that our earlier findings from models of total metabolites were driven largely by MA, representing the ring-opening pathway, and by PH, representing the ring-hydroxylation pathway. The predicted percentage of benzene metabolized by the putative high-affinity enzyme at an air concentration of 0.001 ppm was 88% based upon urinary MA and was 80% based upon urinary PH. As benzene concentrations increased, the respective percentages of benzene metabolized to MA and PH by the high-affinity enzyme decreased successively

  10. Do optimally ripe blackberries contain the highest levels of metabolites?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikulic-Petkovsek, Maja; Koron, Darinka; Zorenc, Zala; Veberic, Robert

    2017-01-15

    Five blackberry cultivars were selected for the study ('Chester Thornless', 'Cacanska Bestrna', 'Loch Ness', 'Smoothstem' and 'Thornfree') and harvested at three different maturity stages (under-, optimal- and over-ripe). Optimally ripe and over-ripe blackberries contained significantly higher levels of total sugars compared to under-ripe fruit. 'Loch Ness' cultivar was characterized by 2.2-2.6-fold higher levels of total sugars than other cultivars and consequently, the highest sugar/acids ratio. 'Chester Thornless' stands out as the cultivar with the highest level of vitamin C in under-ripe (125.87mgkg(-1)) and optimally mature fruit (127.66mgkg(-1)). Maturity stage significantly affected the accumulation of phenolic compounds. The content of total anthocyanins increased for 43% at optimal maturity stage and cinnamic acid derivatives for 57% compared to under-ripe fruit. Over-ripe blackberries were distinguished by the highest content of total phenolics (1251-2115mg GAE kg(-1) FW) and greatest FRAP values (25.9-43.2mM TE kg(-1) FW). PMID:27542448

  11. A unique automation platform for measuring low level radioactivity in metabolite identification studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Krauser

    Full Text Available Generation and interpretation of biotransformation data on drugs, i.e. identification of physiologically relevant metabolites, defining metabolic pathways and elucidation of metabolite structures, have become increasingly important to the drug development process. Profiling using (14C or (3H radiolabel is defined as the chromatographic separation and quantification of drug-related material in a given biological sample derived from an in vitro, preclinical in vivo or clinical study. Metabolite profiling is a very time intensive activity, particularly for preclinical in vivo or clinical studies which have defined limitations on radiation burden and exposure levels. A clear gap exists for certain studies which do not require specialized high volume automation technologies, yet these studies would still clearly benefit from automation. Use of radiolabeled compounds in preclinical and clinical ADME studies, specifically for metabolite profiling and identification are a very good example. The current lack of automation for measuring low level radioactivity in metabolite profiling requires substantial capacity, personal attention and resources from laboratory scientists. To help address these challenges and improve efficiency, we have innovated, developed and implemented a novel and flexible automation platform that integrates a robotic plate handling platform, HPLC or UPLC system, mass spectrometer and an automated fraction collector.

  12. Association of plasma IL-6 and Hsp70 with HRV at different levels of PAHs metabolites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Ye

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs is associated with reduced heart rate variability (HRV, a strong predictor of cardiovascular diseases, but the mechanism is not well understood. OBJECTIVES: We hypothesized that PAHs might induce systemic inflammation and stress response, contributing to altered cardiac autonomic function. METHODS: HRV indices were measured using a 3-channel digital Holter monitor in 800 coke oven workers. Plasma levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6 and heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70 were determined using ELISA. Twelve urinary PAHs metabolites (OH-PAHs were measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. RESULTS: We found that significant dose-dependent relationships between four urinary OH-PAHs and IL-6 (all Ptrend<0.05; and an increase in quartiles of IL-6 was significantly associated with a decrease in total power (TP and low frequency (LF (Ptrend = 0.014 and 0.006, respectively. In particular, elevated IL-6 was associated in a dose-dependent manner with decreased TP and LF in the high-PAHs metabolites groups (all Ptrend<0.05, but not in the low-PAHs metabolites groups. No significant association between Hsp70 and HRV in total population was found after multivariate adjustment. However, increased Hsp70 was significantly associated with elevated standard deviation of NN intervals (SDNN, TP and LF in the low-PAHs metabolites groups (all Ptrend<0.05. We also observed that both IL-6 and Hsp70 significantly interacted with multiple PAHs metabolites in relation to HRV. CONCLUSIONS: In coke oven workers, increased IL-6 was associated with a dose-response decreased HRV in the high-PAHs metabolites groups, whereas increase of Hsp70 can result in significant dose-related increase in HRV in the low-PAHs metabolites groups.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of composite polymer, polyethylene glycol grafted flower-like cupric nano oxide for solid phase microextraction of ultra-trace levels of benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene and o-xylene in human hair and water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarafraz-Yazdi, Ali; Zendegi-Shiraz, Amene; Es'haghi, Zarrin; Hassanzadeh-Khayyat, Mohammad

    2015-10-30

    In this research, poly (ethylene glycol)-poly (ethylene glycol) grafted flower-like cupric oxidenano particles (PEG-PEG-g-CuO NPs) as a novel fiber coating of solid-phase microextraction (SPME) were synthesized by using sol-gel technology. This fiber was successfully applied to extract and determine the ultra-trace levels of benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene and o-xylene in human hair using head space-solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) coupled to gas chromatography-flame ionization detector. Characterization and chemical composition of the nano particle was performed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), energy dispersion spectroscopy (EDS) and back scatter analysis (BSA). These methods confirmed the successful fabrication of PEG-g-CuO NPs. The surface morphology of the fibers were inspected by scanning electron microscopy. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed many "crack-like" features and highly porous structure on the surface of fiber. The synthesized nanocomposites were used for preconcentration and extraction of benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene and o-xylene (BTEX). The effects of operating parameters such as: desorption temperature and time, extraction temperature, extraction time, stirring speed and salt effect were investigated and optimized. Under the optimal conditions, the method detection limits and the limits of quantification were between 0.00025-50.00000pgmL(-1) and 0.00200-200.00000pgmL(-1), respectively. Linearity was observed over a range 0.00200-200000.00000pgmL(-1). The relative standard deviations for one fiber (repeatability; n=5) were obtained from 3.30 up to 5.01% and between fibers or batch to batch (n=3; reproducibility) in the range of 3.63-6.21%. The developed method was successfully applied to simultaneous determination of BTEX in human hairs, tap water and distillate water. PMID:26411479

  14. Biomarkers of environmental benzene exposure.

    OpenAIRE

    Weisel, C; Yu, R; Roy, A; Georgopoulos, P.

    1996-01-01

    Environmental exposures to benzene result in increases in body burden that are reflected in various biomarkers of exposure, including benzene in exhaled breath, benzene in blood and urinary trans-trans-muconic acid and S-phenylmercapturic acid. A review of the literature indicates that these biomarkers can be used to distinguish populations with different levels of exposure (such as smokers from nonsmokers and occupationally exposed from environmentally exposed populations) and to determine d...

  15. Urinary metabolite levels and symptoms in Filipino workers using organic solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucueco, M T; Espinosa, N C; Villanueva, M B; Castro, F T; Sison, S Y; Ortega, V S; Hisanaga, N

    1993-01-01

    To compare symptoms with urinary metabolite levels, 900 workers from 7 organic solvent-using industries were studied. Urinary metabolites were determined using a high performance liquid chromatograph. Urinary hippuric acid concentrations exceeding the reference value (2.5 g/g creatinine) were found in 78 (8.7%) workers. However, only 3 (0.3%) and 1 (0.1%) of the participants exceeded the reference value for mandelic (0.8 g/g creatinine) and total methylhippuric acid (1.5 g/g creatinine), respectively. The sum of the values of the ratio of measured urinary metabolite concentration to the corresponding ACGIH's biological exposure indices (BEI) [(HA/BEI of HA + MHA/BEI of MHA + MA/BEI of MA)] exceeded 1.0 in 166 (18.4%) workers. Majority of them were from the footwear manufacturing industry (63/129 or 49.2%). Questionnaire interviews were also administered to determine the prevalence of symptoms while at work (acute symptoms) or within the past 6 months (chronic symptoms). Urinary metabolite levels of individual and mixed solvents were compared with the symptoms of all workers. Analysis using Spearman's rank correlation showed in workers whose urinary hippuric acid exceeded 3.75 g/g creatine (1.5 x BEI), significant correlation between their hippuric acid levels and subjective complaints. Workers whose sum of the values of the ratio of measured urinary metabolite concentration to corresponding BEI exceeded 1.5 were selected and comparing this level with their symptoms, significant correlation was also noted in some complaints. PMID:8406919

  16. Urinary organophosphate metabolite levels in Palestinian pregnant women: results of the Middle East Regional Cooperation Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdeen, Ziad; Berman, Tamar; Azmi, Kifaya; Abu Seir, Rania; Agha, Hazem; Ein-Mor, Eliana; Göen, Thomas; Stein, Yael; Richter, Elihu; Calderon-Margalit, Ronit

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to measure urinary organophosphate (OP) metabolites in Palestinian pregnant women, and to compare levels with those in pregnant women in Jerusalem and women from the general population in Israel. We measured six dialkyl phosphates in urine samples collected from 148 pregnant women from the West Bank area. Median total dimethyl phosphate (DMtotal) levels were significantly lower in Palestinian women compared to Jerusalem pregnant women and women in Israel (p = 0.041). In Palestinian women reporting that their place of residence was near an agricultural field, DMtotal levels were significantly higher (p = 0.037). Lower urinary excretion of dimethyl phosphate pesticide metabolites in Palestinian women compared to Israeli women may result from lower consumption of fruits and vegetables in the Palestinian population. Our findings highlight differences in OP pesticide exposure in populations with close geographical proximity but with differences in culture, diet, lifestyle, and regulatory oversight of pesticides. PMID:26578062

  17. Sub-lethal levels of electric current elicit the biosynthesis of plant secondary metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaimoyo, Evans; Farag, Mohamed A; Sumner, Lloyd W; Wasmann, Catherine; Cuello, Joel L; VanEtten, Hans

    2008-01-01

    Many secondary metabolites that are normally undetectable or in low amounts in healthy plant tissue are synthesized in high amounts in response to microbial infection. Various abiotic and biotic agents have been shown to mimic microorganisms and act as elicitors of the synthesis of these plant compounds. In the present study, sub-lethal levels of electric current are shown to elicit the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites in transgenic and non-transgenic plant tissue. The production of the phytoalexin (+)-pisatin by pea was used as the main model system. Non-transgenic pea hairy roots treated with 30-100 mA of electric current produced 13 times higher amounts of (+)-pisatin than did the non-elicited controls. Electrically elicited transgenic pea hairy root cultures blocked at various enzymatic steps in the (+)-pisatin biosynthetic pathway also accumulated intermediates preceding the blocked enzymatic step. Secondary metabolites not usually produced by pea accumulated in some of the transgenic root cultures after electric elicitation due to the diversion of the intermediates into new pathways. The amount of pisatin in the medium bathing the roots of electro-elicited roots of hydroponically cultivated pea plants was 10 times higher 24 h after elicitation than in the medium surrounding the roots of non-elicited control plants, showing not only that the electric current elicited (+)-pisatin biosynthesis but also that the (+)-pisatin was released from the roots. Seedlings, intact roots or cell suspension cultures of fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum), barrel medic, (Medicago truncatula), Arabidopsis thaliana, red clover (Trifolium pratense) and chickpea (Cicer arietinum) also produced increased levels of secondary metabolites in response to electro-elicitation. On the basis of our results, electric current would appear to be a general elicitor of plant secondary metabolites and to have potential for application in both basic and commercial research. PMID:18331050

  18. Critical issues in benzene toxicity and metabolism: The effect of interactions with other organic chemicals on risk assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medinsky, M.A.; Schlosser, P.M.; Bond, J.A. [Chemical Industry Institute of Toxicology, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    1994-11-01

    Benzene, an important industrial solvent, is also present in unleaded gasoline and cigarette smoke. The hematotoxic effects of benzene are well documented and include aplastic anemia and pancytopenia. Some individuals exposed repeatedly to cytotoxic concentrations of benzene develop acute myeloblastic anemia. It has been hypothesized that metabolism of benzene is required for its toxicity, although administration of no single benzene metabolite duplicates the toxicity of benzene. Several investigators have demonstrated that a combination of metabolites (hydroquinone and phenol, for example) is necessary to duplicate the hematotoxic effect of benzene. Enzymes implicated in the metabolic activation of benzene and its metabolites include the cytochrome P450 monooxygenases and myeloperoxidase. Since benzene and its hydroxylated metabolites (phenol, hydroquinone, and catechol) are substrates for the same cytochrome P450 enzymes, competitive interactions among the metabolites are possible. In vivo data on metabolite formation by mice exposed to various benzene concentrations are consistent with competitive inhibition of phenol oxidation by benzene. Other organic molecules that are substrates for cytochrome P450 can inhibit the metabolism of benzene. For example, toluene has been shown to inhibit the oxidation of benzene in a noncompetitive manner. Enzyme inducers, such as ethanol, can alter the target tissue dosimetry of benzene metabolites by inducing enzymes responsible for oxidation reactions involved in benzene metabolism. 24 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Altered serous levels of monoamine neurotransmitter metabolites in patiens with refractory and non-refractory depression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guiqing Zhang; Yanxia Zhang; Jianxia Yang; Min Hu; Yueqi Zhang; Xia Liang

    2012-01-01

    The study examined plasma metabolite changes of monoamine neurotransmitters in patients with treatment-resistant depression (TRD) and non-TRD before and after therapy. All 30 TRD and 30 non-TRD patients met the diagnostic criteria for a depressive episode in accordance with the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision. Before treatment, and at 4, 6, and 8 weeks after treatment, the plasma metabolite products of monoamine neurotransmitters in TRD group, including 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenyl ethylene glycol and homovanillic acid, were significantly lower than those in the non-TRD group. After two types of anti-depressive therapy with 5-serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, combined with psychotherapy, the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale scores were significantly reduced in both groups of patients, and the serous levels of 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid and 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenyl ethylene glycol were significantly increased. In contrast, the homovanillic acid level exhibited no significant change. The levels of plasma metabolite products of peripheral monoamine neurotransmitters in depressive patients may predict the degree of depression and the therapeutic effects of treatment.

  20. Quantitative analysis of trace-level benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene in cellulose acetate tow using headspace heart-cutting multidimensional gas chromatography with mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Xiaorong; Zhang, Jing; Guo, Yinlong

    2016-06-01

    This study describes a method for the quantification of trace-level benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene in cellulose acetate tow by heart-cutting multidimensional gas chromatography with mass spectrometry in selected ion monitoring mode. As the major volatile component in cellulose acetate tow samples, acetone would be overloaded when attempting to perform a high-resolution separation to analyze trace benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene. With heart-cutting technology, a larger volume injection was achieved and acetone was easily cut off by employing a capillary column with inner diameter of 0.32 mm in the primary gas chromatography. Only benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene were directed to the secondary column to result in an effective separation. The matrix interference was minimized and the peak shapes were greatly improved. Finally, quantitative analysis of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene was performed using an isotopically labeled internal standard. The headspace multidimensional gas chromatography mass spectrometry system was proved to be a powerful tool for analyzing trace volatile organic compounds in complex samples. PMID:27080077

  1. Factors influencing plasma level/dose ratios of carbamazepine and its major metabolites in epileptic children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, R; Lucock, M D; Ng, P C; Forsythe, W I; McLain, B; Bowmer, C J

    1990-09-01

    The relationship between daily dose and plasma concentrations of carbamazepine (CBZ), CBZ-10,11-epoxide (CBZ-EP), and 10,11-dihydro-10,11-trans-dihydroxy-CBZ (CBZ-DIOL) was investigated in 21 children aged 7-16 years who received CBZ monotherapy, twice daily in equally divided doses. Significant linear correlations between CBZ dose and plasma levels were obtained for CBZ and its metabolites (p less than 0.01). In addition, the effects of daily dose and patients' age on the plasma level/dose ratios for CBZ, CBZ-EP, and CBZ-DIOL were evaluated. A significant negative correlation was observed between the daily dose of CBZ and the CBZ plasma level/dose ratio (p less than 0.01). By contrast, plasma level/dose ratios for CBZ-EP and CBZ-DIOL were independent of dose (p greater than 0.1). On the basis of these observations, we consider that the decrease in CBZ plasma level/dose ratio with increasing CBZ dose appears to be due to dose-dependent metabolic clearance of CBZ. The influence of age on plasma level/dose ratios for CBZ and its metabolites was not significant (p greater than 0.05). However, there was considerable interdose and diurnal variation in the plasma level/dose ratios, particularly for CBZ (28-41%); this must be taken into account when making dose adjustments based on plasma level/dose ratios. PMID:2293405

  2. Increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines and nitric oxide metabolites in neuropsychiatric lupus erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svenungsson, E; Andersson, M; Brundin, L; van Vollenhoven, R; Khademi, M; Tarkowski, A; Greitz, D; Dahlstrom, M; Lundberg, I; Klareskog, L; Olsson, T

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To investigate systemic and intrathecal production of proinflammatory cytokines in relation to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) nitric oxide (NO) release in patients with neuropsychiatric lupus erythematosus (NPLE).
METHODS—Thirty patients with NPLE rated as mild, moderate, or severe were studied and CSF was obtained from 21 of these. Cytokine mRNA expressing cells were detected by in situ hybridisation. Soluble cytokines were assessed by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Nitrite and nitrate were determined by capillary electrophoresis.
RESULTS—Patients with NPLE had high numbers of lymphocytes expressing mRNA for tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα), interferon γ, and interleukin 10 in blood. The number of peripheral blood TNFα mRNA positive cells correlated strongly with the level of NO metabolites in the CSF (r2=0.69). Both the number of peripheral blood mononuclear cells expressing mRNA for TNFα as well as the CSF level of NO metabolites correlated with NPLE disease severity.
CONCLUSION—These data suggest that increased peripheral production of proinflammatory cytokines such as TNFα may contribute both to an increased production of NO in the central nervous system and to generation of clinical NPLE. The data also support the possibility that measurements of NO metabolites in CSF may be of value in the diagnosis of neurological symptoms related to SLE.

 PMID:11247868

  3. Correlation of thiamine metabolite levels with cognitive function in the non-demented elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jingwen; Pan, Xiaoli; Fei, Guoqiang; Wang, Changpeng; Zhao, Lei; Sang, Shaoming; Liu, Huimin; Liu, Meng; Wang, Hui; Wang, Zhiliang; Zhong, Chunjiu

    2015-12-01

    Thiamine metabolism is critical for glucose metabolism and also vital for brain function, which is susceptible to decline in the elderly. This study aimed to investigate whether thiamine metabolites correlate with cognitive function in the non-demented elderly and their impact factors. Volunteers >60 years old were recruited and their blood thiamine metabolites and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores were measured. The apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype, routine blood parameters, liver and kidney function, and levels of fasting blood glucose and triglycerides were also measured. The results showed that the thiamine diphosphate (TDP) level weakly correlated with MMSE score in the non-demented elderly. Participants with high TDP levels performed better in Recall and Attention and Calculation than those with low TDP. TDP levels were associated with the APOE ε2 allele, body mass index, hemoglobin level, fasting blood glucose, and triglycerides. Our results suggest that TDP, which is easily affected by many factors, impacts cognitive function in the elderly. PMID:26519048

  4. Increased biogenic catecholamine and metabolite levels in two patients with malignant catatonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisijima K

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Koichi Nisijima Department of Psychiatry, Jichi Medical University, Tochigi, Japan Abstract: The pathophysiology of malignant catatonia, a rare life-threatening psychiatric syndrome, has not yet been elucidated. This paper reports on two patients with malignant catatonia who showed elevated urinary or plasma catecholamine levels. Patient 1 had high catecholamine and metabolite levels in a 24-hour urine sample, and patient 2 had elevated plasma catecholamine levels. These findings indicate the presence of peripheral sympathetic nervous system hyperactivity in malignant catatonia. Symptoms of autonomic dysfunction, including tachycardia, labile blood pressure, and diaphoresis, are typical features of malignant catatonia and may be related to the increased levels of biogenic amines in these cases. Although the findings in the present study cannot entirely explain the pathophysiology of malignant catatonia, they do indicate that hyperactivity of the sympathetic nervous system may be involved in the pathology of this condition. Keywords: malignant catatonia, catecholamine levels, neuroleptic malignant syndrome

  5. Metabolite profiling during cold acclimation of Lolium perenne genotypes distinct in the level of frost tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocian, Aleksandra; Zwierzykowski, Zbigniew; Rapacz, Marcin; Koczyk, Grzegorz; Ciesiołka, Danuta; Kosmala, Arkadiusz

    2015-11-01

    Abiotic stresses, including low temperature, can significantly reduce plant yielding. The knowledge on the molecular basis of stress tolerance could help to improve its level in species of relatively high importance to agriculture. Unfortunately, the complex research performed so far mainly on model species and also, to some extent, on cereals does not fully cover the demands of other agricultural plants of temperate climate, including forage grasses. Two Lolium perenne (perennial ryegrass) genotypes with contrasting levels of frost tolerance, the high frost tolerant (HFT) and the low frost tolerant (LFT) genotypes, were selected for comparative metabolomic research. The work focused on the analysis of leaf metabolite accumulation before and after seven separate time points of cold acclimation. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) was used to identify amino acids (alanine, proline, glycine, glutamic and aspartic acid, serine, lysine and asparagine), carbohydrates (fructose, glucose, sucrose, raffinose and trehalose) and their derivatives (mannitol, sorbitol and inositol) accumulated in leaves in low temperature. The observed differences in the level of frost tolerance between the analysed genotypes could be partially due to the time point of cold acclimation at which the accumulation level of crucial metabolite started to increase. In the HFT genotype, earlier accumulation was observed for proline and asparagine. The increased amounts of alanine, glutamic and aspartic acids, and asparagine during cold acclimation could be involved in the regulation of photosynthesis intensity in L. perenne. Among the analysed carbohydrates, only raffinose revealed a significant association with the acclimation process in this species. PMID:26025228

  6. Reduction of thyroid hormone levels by methylsulfonyl metabolites of polychlorinated biphenyl congeners in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Yoshihisa; Shibahara, Tomoo; Kimura, Ryohei [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Shizuoka (Japan); Haraguchi, Koichi; Masuda, Yoshito [Daiichi College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Fukuoka (Japan)

    1998-07-01

    Male Sprague-Dawley rats received four consecutive intraperitoneal doses of four kinds of methylsulfonyl (MeSO{sub 2}) metabolites of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners: 3-MeSO{sub 2}-2,2`,3`,4`,5,6-hexachlorobiphenyl (3-MeSO{sub 2}-CB132); 3-MeSO{sub 2}-2,2`,3`,4`, 5,5`-hexachlorobiphenyl (3-MeSO{sub 2}-CB141); 3-MeSO{sub 2}-2,2`,4`,5,5`,6-hexachlorobiphenyl (3-MeSO{sub 2}-CB149) and 4-MeSO{sub 2}-2,2`,4`,5,5`,6-hexachlorobiphenyl (4-MeSO{sub 2}-CB149). The congeners were major MeSO{sub 2}-PCBs determined in human milk, liver and adipose tissue, and the aim was to determine their effect on thyroid hormone levels. All four tested MeSO{sub 2} metabolites (20 {mu}mol/kg once daily for 4 days) reduced serum total thyroxine levels by 22-44% at a much lower dose than phenobarbital (PB; 431 {mu}mol/kg once daily for 4 days) on days 2, 3, 4 and 7 after the final doses. Total triiodothyronine levels were reduced 37% by treatment with 4-MeSO{sub 2}-CB149 at day 7. A 30% increase in thyroid weight was produced by 3-MeSO{sub 2}-CB141 treatment. Total cytochrome P450 content was increased by 3-MeSO{sub 2}-CB132, 3-MeSO{sub 2}-CB141 and 3-MeSO{sub 2}-CB149, but not by 4-MeSO{sub 2}-CB149. Thus, it is likely that the 3-MeSO{sub 2}-hexachlorobiphenyls and 4-MeSO{sub 2}-CB149 could influence the thyroid hormone metabolism by different mechanism(s). The results show that tested 3- and 4-MeSO{sub 2} metabolites of PCB congeners reduce thyroid hormone levels much more than PB in rats. Our finding suggests that the metabolites may act as endocrine-disrupters. (orig.) With 2 figs., 1 tab., 25 refs.

  7. Longitudinal MRI study of cortical thickness, perfusion, and metabolite levels in major depressive disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Järnum, Hanna; Eskildsen, Simon Fristed; Steffensen, Elena G.;

    2011-01-01

    disorder (MDD) display morphologic, functional, and metabolic brain abnormalities in limbic-cortical regions at a baseline magnetic resonance (MR) scan and whether these changes are normalized in MDD patients in remission at a follow-up scan. Method:  A longitudinal 3.0-Tesla (T) magnetic resonance imaging......Järnum H, Eskildsen SF, Steffensen EG, Lundbye-Christensen S, Simonsen CW, Thomsen IS, Fründ E-T, Théberge J, Larsson E-M. Longitudinal MRI study of cortical thickness, perfusion, and metabolite levels in major depressive disorder. Objective:  To determine whether patients with major depressive...

  8. Brain met-enkephalin immunostaining after subacute and subchronic exposure to benzene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gandarias, J.M. de; Echevarria, E.; Martinez-Millan, L.; Casis, L. [Univ. of the Basque Country, Bilbao (Spain); Martinez-Garcia, F. [Univ. of Valencia (Spain)

    1994-01-01

    Benzene is used in a wide variety of domestic and occupational activities, and due to its lipophilic nature, it accumulates in lipid-rich tissues like the brain. In this sense, neurotoxic action has long been associated with organic solvent exposure and it has been shown that benzene, injected in a single dose or during a prolongued administration, modifies the content of dopamine, noradrenaline, serotonin and its main metabolite 5-hydroxy indolacetic acid, in several brain regions of the rat, then revealing a stimulating action on brain monoamine synthesis and turnover. However, information concerning neurotoxic action of benzene exposure in vivo on peptidergic neuromodulatory systems is still lacking. Nevertheless, it has been recently described that subacute benzene exposure in rats generates regional changes in brain aminopeptidase activity. These proteolytic enzymes have been widely associated with metabolic control of neuropeptides and it has been suggested that they could play a role in benzene neurotoxic mechanism by hypothetically changing regional neuropeptide levels. This being the case, we focused on analyzing met-enkephalin immunostaining in different brain regions of the rat after subacute and subchronic administration of benzene. 12 refs., 3 figs.

  9. Lower glial metabolite levels in brains of young children with prenatal nicotine exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Linda; Cloak, Christine C; Jiang, Caroline S; Hoo, Aaron; Hernandez, Antonette B; Ernst, Thomas M

    2012-03-01

    Many pregnant women smoke cigarettes during pregnancy, but the effect of nicotine on the developing human brain is not well understood, especially in young children. This study aims to determine the effects of prenatal nicotine exposure (PNE) on brain metabolite levels in young (3-4 years old) children, using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H MRS). Twenty-six children with PNE and 24 nicotine-unexposed children (controls) were evaluated with a structured examination, a battery of neuropsychological tests, and MRI/(1)H MRS (without sedation). Concentrations of N-acetyl compounds (NA), total creatine (tCR), choline-containing compounds (CHO), myo-inositol (MI), and glutamate+glutamine (GLX) were measured in four brain regions. Children with PNE had similar performance to controls on neuropsychological testing. However, compared to controls, the PNE group had lower MI (repeated measures ANOVA-p = 0.03) and tCr levels (repeated measures ANOVA-p = 0.003), especially in the basal ganglia of the girls (-19.3%, p = 0.01). In contrast, GLX was elevated in the anterior cingulate cortex of the PNE children (+9.4%, p = 0.03), and those with the highest GLX levels had the poorest performance on vocabulary (r = -0.67; p metabolite concentrations. These findings suggest that PNE may lead to subclinical abnormalities in glial development, especially in the basal ganglia, and regionally specific changes in other neurometabolites. These alterations were not influenced by the amount of nicotine exposure prenatally. However, the effects of PNE on energy metabolism may be sex specific, with greater alterations in girls. PMID:21912896

  10. Protozoan growth rates on secondary-metabolite-producing Pseudomonas spp. correlate with high-level protozoan taxonomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Annette L.; Winding, Anne; Altenburger, Andreas;

    2011-01-01

    Different features can protect bacteria against protozoan grazing, for example large size, rapid movement, and production of secondary metabolites. Most papers dealing with these matters focus on bacteria. Here, we describe protozoan features that affect their ability to grow on secondary...... chlororaphis MA342 and Pseudomonas sp. DSS73, as well as the two nonproducers P. fluorescens DSM50090T and P. chlororaphis ATCC43928. Secondary metabolite producers affected protozoan growth differently. In particular, bacteria with extracellular secondary metabolites seemed more inhibiting than bacteria with...... membrane-bound metabolites. Interestingly, protozoan response seemed to correlate with high-level protozoan taxonomy, and amoeboid taxa tolerated a broader range of Pseudomonas strains than did the non-amoeboid taxa. This stresses the importance of studying both protozoan and bacterial characteristics in...

  11. Feasibility of hair sampling to assess levels of organophosphate metabolites in rural areas of Sri Lanka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knipe, D.W.; Jayasumana, C.; Siribaddana, S.; Priyadarshana, C.; Pearson, M.; Gunnell, D.; Metcalfe, C.; Tzatzarakis, M.N.; Tsatsakis, A.M.

    2016-01-01

    Measuring chronic pesticide exposure is important in order to investigate the associated health effects. Traditional biological samples (blood/urine) are difficult to collect, store and transport in large epidemiological studies in settings such as rural Asia. We assessed the acceptability of collecting hair samples from a rural Sri Lankan population and found that this method of data collection was feasible. We also assessed the level of non-specific metabolites (DAPS) of organophosphate pesticides in the hair samples. The median concentration (pg/mg) of each DAP was: diethyl phosphate: 83.3 (IQI 56.0, 209.4); diethyl thiophosphate: 34.7 (IQI 13.8, 147.9); diethyl dithiophosphate: 34.5 (IQI 23.4, 55.2); and dimethyl phosphate: 3 (IQI 3, 109.7). Total diethylphosphates were recovered in >80% of samples and were positively correlated with self-reported pesticide exposure. PMID:26894816

  12. Feasibility of hair sampling to assess levels of organophosphate metabolites in rural areas of Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knipe, D W; Jayasumana, C; Siribaddana, S; Priyadarshana, C; Pearson, M; Gunnell, D; Metcalfe, C; Tzatzarakis, M N; Tsatsakis, A M

    2016-05-01

    Measuring chronic pesticide exposure is important in order to investigate the associated health effects. Traditional biological samples (blood/urine) are difficult to collect, store and transport in large epidemiological studies in settings such as rural Asia. We assessed the acceptability of collecting hair samples from a rural Sri Lankan population and found that this method of data collection was feasible. We also assessed the level of non-specific metabolites (DAPS) of organophosphate pesticides in the hair samples. The median concentration (pg/mg) of each DAP was: diethyl phosphate: 83.3 (IQI 56.0, 209.4); diethyl thiophosphate: 34.7 (IQI 13.8, 147.9); diethyl dithiophosphate: 34.5 (IQI 23.4, 55.2); and dimethyl phosphate: 3 (IQI 3, 109.7). Total diethylphosphates were recovered in >80% of samples and were positively correlated with self-reported pesticide exposure. PMID:26894816

  13. A Unique Automation Platform for Measuring Low Level Radioactivity in Metabolite Identification Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Krauser, Joel; Walles, Markus; Wolf, Thierry; Graf, Daniel; Swart, Piet

    2012-01-01

    Generation and interpretation of biotransformation data on drugs, i.e. identification of physiologically relevant metabolites, defining metabolic pathways and elucidation of metabolite structures, have become increasingly important to the drug development process. Profiling using 14C or 3H radiolabel is defined as the chromatographic separation and quantification of drug-related material in a given biological sample derived from an in vitro, preclinical in vivo or clinical study. Metabolite p...

  14. Drought Responses of Leaf Tissues from Wheat Cultivars of Differing Drought Tolerance at the Metabolite Level

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jairus B.Bowne; Tim A.Erwin; Juan Juttner; Thorsten Schnurbusch; Peter Langridge; Antony Bacic; Ute Roessner

    2012-01-01

    Drought has serious effects on the physiology of cereal crops.At the cellular and specifically the metabolite level,many individual compounds are increased to provide osmoprotective functions,prevent the dissociation of enzymes,and to decrease the number of reactive oxygen species present in the cell.We have used a targeted GC-MS approach to identify compounds that differ in three different cultivars of bread wheat characterized by different levels of tolerance to drought under drought stress (Kukri,intolerant; Excalibur and RAC875,tolerant).Levels of amino acids,most notably proline,tryptophan,and the branched chain amino acids leucine,isoleucine,and valine were increased under drought stress in all cultivars.In the two tolerant cultivars,a small decrease in a large number of organic acids was also evident.Excalibur,a cultivar genotypically related to Kukri,showed a pattern of response that was more similar to Kukri under well-watered conditions.Under drought stress,Excalibur and RAC875 had a similar response; however,Excalibur did not have the same magnitude of response as RAC875.Here,the results are discussed in the context of previous work in physiological and proteomic analyses of these cultivars under drought stress.

  15. Association of serum reactive oxygen metabolite levels with normal tissue damages by carbon-ion radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxygen is required for respiration and the energetic processes that enable aerobic life. Free radical and reactive oxygen metabolite (ROM) formations create oxidative stress and contribute to various processes including aging, degenerative diseases and cancer. Additionally, they may have a role in the radiotherapy for various types of cancer. In this study, we aimed to investigate the degree of oxidative stress for carbon-ion radiotherapy in locally recurrent rectal cancer and pancreas cancer, and to find out whether the degree of oxidative stress shows any difference among different grade of normal tissue damages. It can be used as an index for their differential diagnosis. Sixteen patients with locally recurrent rectal cancer and 6 pancreas cancers were included in the study. The BAP levels were lower before carbon-ion treatment than after treatment. The ROM levels were significantly lower before treatment than after treatment. It might be possible to conclude that the serum BAP and ROM levels may be an index parameter for normal tissue damages. (author)

  16. Natural Biological Attenuation of Benzene in Groundwater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Benzene has been found in subsurface unsaturated soil and groundwater beneath a petro-chemical plant. Although the groundwater contained several mg/L of benzene in the area immediately beneath the source, benzene was not detected in monitoring wells approximately 800m down stream. All kinds of physical processes such as adsorption and advection/dispersion are considered to account for the observed attenuation. The results indicated that the attenuation was primarily due to natural biological processes occurring within the aquifer. The evidence for the natural bioremediation of benzene from the groundwater included: (1) analysis of groundwater chemistry, (2) laboratory studies demonstrating benzene biodegradation in aquifer samples, and (3) computer simulations examining benzene transport. Laboratory experiments indicated that for conditions similar to those in the plume, the aerobic degradation of benzene by the naturally occurring microorganisms in the polluted groundwater samples was quite rapid with a half-life time of from 5 to 15 days. In situ analyses indicated the level of dissolved oxygen in the groundwater was over 2mg/L. Thus, oxygen should not limit the biodegradation. In fact, the benzene was also shown to degrade under anaerobic conditions. The results from the modeling simulations indicate that biodegradation is the dominant process influencing attenuation of the benzene.

  17. p-Benzoquinone, a reactive metabolite of benzene, prevents the processing of pre-interleukins-1{alpha} and -1{beta} to active cytokines by inhibition of the processing enzymes, calpain, and interleukin-1{beta} converting enzyme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalf, G.F.; Renz, J.F.; Niculescu, R. [Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1996-12-01

    Chronic exposure of humans to benzene affects hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells and leads to aplastic anemia. The stromal macrophage, a target of benzene toxicity, secretes interieukin-1 (IL-1), which induces the stromal fibroblast to synthesize hematopoietic colony-stimulating factors. In a mouse model, benzene causes an acute marrow hypocellularity that can be prevented by the concomitant administration of IL-1{alpha}. The ability of benzene to interfere with the production and secretion of IL-1{alpha} was tested. Stromal macrophages from benzene-treated mice were capable of the transcription of the IL-1{alpha} gene and the translation of the message but showed an inability to process the 34-kDa pre-IL-1{alpha} precursor to the 17-kDa biologically active cytokine. Treatment of normal murine stromal macrophages in culture with hydroquinone (HQ) also showed an inhibition in processing of pre-IL-1{alpha}. Hydroquinone is oxidized by a peroxidase-mediated reaction in the stromal macrophage to p-benzoquinone, which interacts with the sulfhydryl (SH) groups of proteins and was shown to completely inhibit the activity of calpain, the SH-dependent protease that cleaves pre-IL-1{alpha}. In a similar manner, HQ, via peroxidase oxidation to p-benzoquinone, was capable of preventing the IL-1{beta} autocrine stimulation of growth of human B1 myeloid tumor cells by preventing the processing of pre-IL-1{beta} to mature cytokine. Benzoquinone was also shown to completely inhibit the ability of the SH-dependent IL-1{beta} converting enzyme. Thus benzene-induced bone marrow hypocellularity may result from apoptosis of hematopoietic progenitor cells brought about by lack of essential cylokines and deficient IL-1{alpha} production subsequent to the inhibition of calpain by p-benzoquinone and the prevention of pre-IL-1 processing. 34 refs., 8 figs.

  18. Fecal cortisol metabolite levels in free-ranging North American red squirrels: Assay validation and the effects of reproductive condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantzer, Ben; McAdam, Andrew G; Palme, Rupert; Fletcher, Quinn E; Boutin, Stan; Humphries, Murray M; Boonstra, Rudy

    2010-06-01

    Patterns in stress hormone (glucocorticoid: GC) levels and their relationship to reproductive condition in natural populations are rarely investigated. In this study, we (1) validate an enzyme-immunoassay to measure fecal cortisol metabolite (FCM) levels in North American red squirrels (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus), and (2) examine relationships between FCM levels and reproductive condition in a free-ranging red squirrel population. Injected radiolabeled cortisol was entirely metabolized and excreted in both the urine (mean+/-SE; 70.3+/-0.02%) and feces (29.7+/-0.02%), with a lag time to peak excretion in the feces of 10.9+/-2.3h. Our antibody reacted with several cortisol metabolites, and an adrenocorticotropic injection significantly increased FCM levels above baseline levels at 8h post-injection. Relative to baseline levels, manipulation by handling also tended to increase FCM levels at 8h post-manipulation, but this difference was not significant. FCM levels did not differ significantly between samples frozen immediately and 5h after collection. Reproductive condition significantly affected FCM levels in free-ranging females (pregnant>lactating>post-lactating>non-breeding) but not males (scrotal testes vs. abdominal testes). Among females with known parturition dates, FCM levels increased during gestation, peaked at parturition, and declined during lactation. The difference between pregnant and lactating females was therefore dependent upon when the fecal samples were obtained during these periods, suggesting caution in categorizing reproductive stages. This study demonstrates the utility of fecal hormone metabolite assays to document patterns of glucocorticoid levels in free-ranging animals. PMID:20346362

  19. 32P analysis of DNA adducts in tissues of benzene-treated rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solid tumors have been reported in the Zymbal gland, oral and nasal cavities, liver, and mammary gland of Sprague-Dawley rats following chronic, high-dose administration of benzene. The carcinogenic activity of benzene is thought to be caused by activation to toxic metabolites that can interact with DNA, forming covalent adducts. A nuclease P1-enhanced 32P-postlabeling assay, having a sensitivity limit of 1 adduct in 10(9-10) DNA nucleotides, was found suitable for measuring aromatic DNA adducts derived in vitro from catechol, benzenetriol (BT), phenol, hydroquinone (HQ), and benzoquinone (BQ), potential metabolites of benzene. When DNA specimens isolated from tissues of female Sprague-Dawley rats at 24 hr after an oral gavage dose of 200 to 500 mg/kg, 5 days/week, in olive oil (3 mL/kg) for 1 day, 1 week, 5 weeks, and 10 weeks were analyzed by the 32P-postlabeling procedure, no aromatic adducts were detected unequivocally with DNA samples of liver, kidney, bone marrow, and mammary gland. With Zymbal gland DNA, three weak spots at levels totaling four lesions per 10(9) DNA nucleotides were seen only after 10 weeks of treatment, and these adducts did not correspond chromatographically to major adducts in vitro from the above specified compounds. Consequently, this finding requires confirmatory experiments. This distinct adduct pattern may relate to tumor induction in this organ following benzene administration. Our results also indicate that DNA adducts derived from catechol, BT, phenol, HQ, and BQ are either not formed in vivo with benzene or formed at levels below the detection limit of 1 adduct per 10(9-10) DNA nucleotides

  20. Impacts of rising tropospheric ozone on photosynthesis and metabolite levels on field grown soybean

    Science.gov (United States)

    The response of leaf photosynthesis and metabolite profiles to ozone (O3) exposure ranging from 37 to 116 nL L-1 was investigated in two soybean cultivars Dwight and IA3010 in the field under fully open-air conditions. Leaf photosynthesis, total non-structural carbohydrates (TNC) and total free amin...

  1. High-performance Liquid Chromatographic Determination of Urinary Trans, Trans-Muconic Acid Excreted by Workers Occupationally Exposed to Benzene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA-MIN HU; SHI-ZHEN SONG; FANG-LI YE; LI-WEN LIU

    2006-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between trans, trans-muconic acid (ttMA) as benzene metabolite of occupational workers and benzene concentration in air. Methods A rapid and sensitive high-performance liquid chromatography was developed to determine the level of urinary ttMA. ttMA was extrated from urinary samples in liquid-liquid phase a ODS (2) (5u) column (Φ4.6 mm× 150 mm) and detected at wavelength 264 nm in a UV detector using vanillic acid as an internal standard. The mobile phase was acetaticacid/tetrahydrofuran/methanol/water (v/v, 1:2:10:87). The method was validated with 56 urine samples collected from occupationally benzene-exposed individuals. Results A correlation coefficient (r = 0.9963 ) was found for ttMA ranging 0.10-10.00 μg/mL. The limit of detection was 0.10 μg/mL. The recovery and reproducibility were generally over 90%. There was a positive correlation between ttMA and benzene level in air. The equation was Y=0.859+0.108C (before work, r=-0.6200) or Y=1.980+0.179C (after work, r=0.7930). Conclusion This method can be used to determine and control the level of urinary ttMA in those who are occupationally exposed to benzene.

  2. Benzene from Traffic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palmgren, F.; Berkowicz, R.; Skov, H.;

    The measurements of benzene showed very clear decreasing trends in the air concentrations and the emissions since 1994. At the same time the measurements of CO and NOx also showed a decreasing trend, but not so strong as for benzene. The general decreasing trend is explained by the increasing...... number of petrol vehicles with three way catalysts, 60-70% in 1999. The very steep decreasing trend for benzene at the beginning of the period from 1994 was explained by the combination of more catalyst vehicles and reduced benzene content in Danish petrol. The total amount of aromatics in petrol......, including toluene, increased only weakly. The analyses of air concentrations were confirmed by analyses of petrol sold in Denmark. The concentration of benzene at Jagtvej in Copenhagen is still in 1998 above the expected new EU limit value, 5 µg/m3 as annual average. However, the reduced content of benzene...

  3. Metabolite profiling reveals novel multi-level cold responses in the model Fragaria vesca (woodland strawberry)

    OpenAIRE

    Rohloff, Jens; Kopka, Joachim; Erban, Alexander; Winge, Per; Wilson, Robert Charles; Bones, Atle M.; Davik, Jahn Eldar; Randall, Stephen K.; Alsheikh, Muath

    2012-01-01

    Winter freezing damage is a crucial factor in overwintering crops such as the octoploid strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa Duch.) when grown in a perennial cultivation system. Our study aimed at assessing metabolic processes and regulatory mechanisms in the close-related diploid model woodland strawberry (Fragaria vesca L.) during a 10-days cold acclimation experiment. Based on gas chromatography/ time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (GC/TOF-MS) metabolite profiling of three F. vesca genotypes, clea...

  4. Brain Levels of the Neurotoxic Pyridinium Metabolite HPP+ and Extrapyramidal Symptoms in Haloperidol-Treated Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Crowley, James J; Ashraf-Khorassani, Mehdi; Castagnoli, Neal; Sullivan, Patrick F.

    2013-01-01

    The typical antipsychotic haloperidol is a highly effective treatment for schizophrenia but its use is limited by a number of serious, and often irreversible, motor side effects. These adverse drug reactions, termed extrapyramidal syndromes (EPS), result from an unknown pathophysiological mechanism. One theory relates to the observation that the haloperidol metabolite HPP+ (4-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-[4-(4-fluorophenyl)-4-oxobutyl]-pyridinium) is structurally similar to MPP+ (1-methyl-4-phenylpyrid...

  5. Differential metabolite levels in response to spawning-induced inappetence in Atlantic salmon Salmo salar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipriano, Rocco C; Smith, McKenzie L; Vermeersch, Kathleen A; Dove, Alistair D M; Styczynski, Mark P

    2015-03-01

    Atlantic salmon Salmo salar undergo months-long inappetence during spawning, but it is not known whether this inappetence is a pathological state or one for which the fish are adapted. Recent work has shown that inappetent whale sharks can exhibit circulating metabolite profiles similar to ketosis known to occur in humans during starvation. In this work, metabolite profiling was used to explore differences in analyte profiles between a cohort of inappetent spawning run Atlantic salmon and captively reared animals that were fed up to and through the time of sampling. The two classes of animals were easily distinguished by their metabolite profiles. The sea-run fish had elevated ɷ-9 fatty acids relative to the domestic feeding animals, while other fatty acid concentrations were reduced. Sugar alcohols were generally elevated in inappetent animals, suggesting potentially novel metabolic responses or pathways in fish that feature these compounds. Compounds expected to indicate a pathological catabolic state were not more abundant in the sea-run fish, suggesting that the animals, while inappetent, were not stressed in an unnatural way. These findings demonstrate the power of discovery-based metabolomics for exploring biochemistry in poorly understood animal models. PMID:25668602

  6. CEST-MRI detects metabolite levels altered by breast cancer cell aggressiveness and chemotherapy response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kannie W Y; Jiang, Lu; Cheng, Menglin; Wijnen, Jannie P; Liu, Guanshu; Huang, Peng; van Zijl, Peter C M; McMahon, Michael T; Glunde, Kristine

    2016-06-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) is an MRI contrast mechanism that detects the exchange of protons from distinct hydroxyl, amine, and amide groups to tissue water through the transfer of signal loss, with repeated exchange enhancing their effective signal. We applied CEST to detect systematically 15 common cellular metabolites in a panel of differentially aggressive human breast cancer cell lines. The highest CEST contrast was generated by creatine, myo-inositol, glutamate, and glycerophosphocholine, whose cellular concentrations decreased with increasing breast cancer aggressiveness. These decreased metabolite concentrations resulted in turn in a decreased CEST profile with increasing breast cancer aggressiveness in water-soluble extracts of breast cell lines. Treatment of both breast cancer cell lines with the chemotherapy drug doxorubicin resulted in increased metabolic CEST profiles, which correlated with significant increases in creatine, phosphocreatine, and glycerophosphocholine. CEST can detect breast cancer aggressiveness and response to chemotherapy in water-soluble extracts of breast cell lines. The presented results help shed light on possible contributions from CEST-active metabolites to the CEST contrast produced by breast cancers. The metabolic CEST profile may improve detection sensitivity over conventional MRS, and may have the potential to assess breast cancer aggressiveness and response to chemotherapy non-invasively using MRI if specialized metabolic CEST profile detection can be realized in vivo. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27100284

  7. Variability in urinary phthalate metabolite levels across pregnancy and sensitive windows of exposure for the risk of preterm birth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Kelly K.; McElrath, Thomas F.; Ko, Yi-An; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Meeker, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Preterm birth is a significant public health problem, affecting over 1 in 10 live births and contributing largely to infant mortality and morbidity. Everyday exposure to environmental chemicals such as phthalates could contribute, and may be modifiable. In the present study we examine variability in phthalate exposure across gestation and identify windows of susceptibility for the relationship with preterm birth. Methods Women were recruited early in pregnancy as part of a prospective, longitudinal birth cohort at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts. Urine samples were collected at up to 4 time points during gestation for phthalate measurement, and birth outcomes were recorded at delivery. From this population we selected all 130 cases of preterm birth, defined as delivery before 37 weeks completed gestation, as well as 352 random controls. Results Urinary phthalate metabolite levels were moderately variable over pregnancy, but levels measured at multiple time points were associated with increased odds of preterm birth. Adjusted odds ratios (aOR) for spontaneous preterm birth were strongest in association with phthalate metabolite concentrations measured at the beginning of the third trimester (aOR for summed di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate metabolites [∑DEHP]=1.33, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.02, 1.73). Odds ratios for placental preterm birth, defined as delivery with presentation of preeclampsia or intrauterine growth restriction, were slightly elevated in the first trimester for DEHP metabolites (aOR for ∑DEHP=1.33, 95% CI=0.99, 1.78). Conclusions Pregnant women with exposure to phthalates both early and late in pregnancy are at increased risk of delivering preterm, but mechanisms may differ based on etiology. PMID:24934852

  8. Multinomial logistic regression model to assess the levels in trans, trans-muconic acid and inferential-risk age group among benzene-exposed group

    OpenAIRE

    Mala A; Ravichandran B; Raghavan S; Rajmohan H

    2010-01-01

    There are only a few studies performed on multinomial logistic regression on the benzene-exposed occupational group. A study was carried out to assess the relationship between the benzene concentration and trans-trans-muconic acid (t,t-MA), biomarkers in urine samples from petrol filling workers. A total of 117 workers involved in this occupation were selected for this current study. Generally, logistic regression analysis (LR) is a common statistical technique that could be used to predict t...

  9. Brain metabolite levels in recently sober individuals with alcohol use disorder: Relation to drinking variables and relapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahr, Natalie M; Carr, Rebecca A; Rohlfing, Torsten; Mayer, Dirk; Sullivan, Edith V; Colrain, Ian M; Pfefferbaum, Adolf

    2016-04-30

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies in alcohol use disorder (AUD) typically report lower levels of N-acetylaspartate (NAA) and choline-containing compounds (Cho) in several brain regions. Metabolite levels, however, are labile and can be affected by several competing factors, some related to drinking variables.. This in vivo MRS study included 20 recently sober (19.6±12.6 days) individuals with AUD and 15 controls. MRS was performed in single voxels placed in frontal white matter and thalamic regions using Constant-Time Point Resolved Spectroscopy (CT-PRESS) for absolute quantification of NAA, Cho, total creatine (tCr), and glutamate (Glu). A trend toward a thalamic NAA deficit in the total AUD group compared with controls was attributable to the subgroup of alcoholics who relapsed 3 or so months after scanning. In the total AUD group, frontal and thalamic NAA and Cho levels were lower with more recent drinking; frontal and thalamic Cho levels were also lower in AUD individuals with past stimulant abuse. Thalamic Cho levels were higher in binge-drinking AUD individuals and in those with longer length of alcohol dependence. MRS-visible metabolite peaks appear to be modulated by variables related to drinking behaviors, suggesting a sensitivity of MRS in tracking and predicting the dynamic course of alcoholism. PMID:27035062

  10. Densities and Kinematic Viscosities for the Systems Benzene + Methyl Formate, Benzene + Ethyl Formate, Benzene + Propyl Formate, and Benzene + Butyl Formate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emmerling, Uwe; Rasmussen, Peter

    1998-01-01

    Densities and kinematic viscosities have been measured for the system benzene + methyl formate at 20°C and for the systems benzene + ethyl formate, benzene + propyl formate, and benzene + butyl formate from 20°C to 50°C. The results for the system benzene + methyl formate have been correlated using...... a Redlich-Kister type of expression with temperature-independent parameters and the data for the systems benzene + ethyl formate, benzene + propyl formate, and benzene + butyl formate with temperature-dependent parameters. The viscosities have furthermore been compared to values predicted by means...

  11. Benzene exposure is associated with epigenetic changes (Review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenga, Concettina; Gangemi, Silvia; Costa, Chiara

    2016-04-01

    Benzene is a volatile aromatic hydrocarbon solvent and is known as one of the predominant air pollutants in the environment. Chronic exposure to benzene is known to cause aplastic anemia and increased risk of acute myelogenous leukemia in humans. Although the mechanisms by which benzene causes toxicity remain to be fully elucidated, it is widely accepted that its metabolism is crucial to its toxicity, with involvement of one or more reactive metabolites. Novel approaches aimed at evaluating different mechanisms by which benzene can impact on human health by altering gene regulation have been developed. Among these novel approaches, epigenetics appears to be promising. The present review article summarizes the most important findings, reported from the literature, on epigenetic modifications correlated to benzene exposure. A computerized search in PubMed was performed in November 2014, using search terms, including 'benzene', 'epigenetic', 'histone modifications', 'DNA methylation' and 'microRNA'. Epidemiological and experimental studies have demonstrated the potential epigenetic effects of benzene exposure. Several of the epigenomic changes observed in response to environmental exposures may be mechanistically associated with susceptibility to diseases. However, further elucidation of the mechanisms by which benzene alters gene expression may improve prediction of the toxic potential of novel compounds introduced into the environment, and allow for more targeted and appropriate disease prevention strategies. PMID:26936331

  12. Benzene release. Status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scoping benzene release measurements were conducted on 4 wt percent KTPB 'DEMO' formulation slurry using a round, flat bottomed 100-mL flask containing 75 mL slurry. The slurry was agitated with a magnetic stirrer bar to keep the surface refreshed without creating a vortex. Benzene release measurements were made by purging the vapor space at a constant rate and analyzing for benzene by gas chromatography with automatic data acquisition. Some of the data have been rounded or simplified in view of the scoping nature of this study

  13. FORMATION OF HEMOGLOBIN AND ALBUMIN ADDUCTS OF BENZENE OXIDE IN MOUSE, RAT, AND HUMAN BLOOD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little is known about the formation and disposition of benzene oxide (BO), the initial metabolite arising from oxidation of benzene by cytochrome P450. In this study, reactions of BO with hemoglobin (Hb) and albumin (Alb) were investigated in blood from B6C3F1 mice, F344 rats, ...

  14. Benzene exposure: an overview of monitoring methods and their findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisel, Clifford P

    2010-03-19

    Benzene has been measured throughout the environment and is commonly emitted in several industrial and transportation settings leading to widespread environmental and occupational exposures. Inhalation is the most common exposure route but benzene rapidly penetrates the skin and can contaminant water and food resulting in dermal and ingestion exposures. While less toxic solvents have been substituted for benzene, it still is a component of petroleum products, including gasoline, and is a trace impurity in industrial products resulting in continued sub to low ppm occupational exposures, though higher exposures exist in small, uncontrolled workshops in developing countries. Emissions from gasoline/petrochemical industry are its main sources to the ambient air, but a person's total inhalation exposure can be elevated from emissions from cigarettes, consumer products and gasoline powered engines/tools stored in garages attached to homes. Air samples are collected in canisters or on adsorbent with subsequent quantification by gas chromatography. Ambient air concentrations vary from sub-ppb range, low ppb, and tens of ppb in rural/suburban, urban, and source impacted areas, respectively. Short-term environmental exposures of ppm occur during vehicle fueling. Indoor air concentrations of tens of ppb occur in microenvironments containing indoor sources. Occupational and environmental exposures have declined where regulations limit benzene in gasoline (<1%) and cigarette smoking has been banned from public and work places. Similar controls should be implemented worldwide to reduce benzene exposure. Biomarkers of benzene used to estimate exposure and risk include: benzene in breath, blood and urine; its urinary metabolites: phenol, t,t-muconic acid (t,tMA) and S-phenylmercapturic acid (sPMA); and blood protein adducts. The biomarker studies suggest benzene environmental exposures are in the sub to low ppb range though non-benzene sources for urinary metabolites, differences

  15. Biological monitoring of workers exposed to benzene in the coke oven industry.

    OpenAIRE

    Drummond, L; Luck, R; Afacan, A. S.; Wilson, H K

    1988-01-01

    Workers in the coke oven industry are potentially exposed to low concentrations of benzene. There is a need to establish a well validated biological monitoring procedure for low level benzene exposure. The use of breath and blood benzene and urinary phenol has been explored in conjunction with personal monitoring data. At exposures of about 1 ppm benzene, urinary phenol is of no value as an indicator of uptake/exposure. Benzene in blood was measured by head space gas chromatography but the co...

  16. Brassica napus L. cultivars show a broad variability in their morphology, physiology and metabolite levels in response to sulfur limitations and to pathogen attack

    OpenAIRE

    Weese, Annekathrin; Pallmann, Philip; Papenbrock, Jutta; Riemenschneider, Anja

    2015-01-01

    Under adequate sulfur supply, plants accumulate sulfate in the vacuoles and use sulfur-containing metabolites as storage compounds. Under sulfur-limiting conditions, these pools of stored sulfur-compounds are depleted in order to balance the nitrogen to sulfur ratio for protein synthesis. Stress conditions like sulfur limitation and/or pathogen attack induce changes in the sulfate pool and the levels of sulfur-containing metabolites, which often depend on the ecotypes or cultivars. We are int...

  17. Facts about Benzene

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lab Info Chemical Emergencies A–Z Abrin Adamsite Ammonia Arsenic Arsine Barium Benzene Brevetoxin Bromine BZ Carbon ... used to make some types of lubricants, rubbers, dyes, detergents, drugs, and pesticides. How you could be ...

  18. Benzene Monitor System report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Livingston, R.R.

    1992-10-12

    Two systems for monitoring benzene in aqueous streams have been designed and assembled by the Savannah River Technology Center, Analytical Development Section (ADS). These systems were used at TNX to support sampling studies of the full-scale {open_quotes}SRAT/SME/PR{close_quotes} and to provide real-time measurements of benzene in Precipitate Hydrolysis Aqueous (PHA) simulant. This report describes the two ADS Benzene Monitor System (BMS) configurations, provides data on system operation, and reviews the results of scoping tests conducted at TNX. These scoping tests will allow comparison with other benzene measurement options being considered for use in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) laboratory. A report detailing the preferred BMS configuration statistical performance during recent tests has been issued under separate title: Statistical Analyses of the At-line Benzene Monitor Study, SCS-ASG-92-066. The current BMS design, called the At-line Benzene Monitor (ALBM), allows remote measurement of benzene in PHA solutions. The authors have demonstrated the ability to calibrate and operate this system using peanut vials from a standard Hydragard{trademark} sampler. The equipment and materials used to construct the ALBM are similar to those already used in other applications by the DWPF lab. The precision of this system ({+-}0.5% Relative Standard Deviation (RSD) at 1 sigma) is better than the purge & trap-gas chromatograpy reference method currently in use. Both BMSs provide a direct measurement of the benzene that can be purged from a solution with no sample pretreatment. Each analysis requires about five minutes per sample, and the system operation requires no special skills or training. The analyzer`s computer software can be tailored to provide desired outputs. Use of this system produces no waste stream other than the samples themselves (i.e. no organic extractants).

  19. Urinary levels of eight phthalate metabolites and bisphenol A in mother-child pairs from two Spanish locations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutanda, Francisco; Koch, Holger M; Esteban, Marta; Sánchez, Jinny; Angerer, Jürgen; Castaño, Argelia

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to some phthalate diesters and bisphenol A in the general population is a cause of increasing concern because of their potential adverse effects on the reproductive and endocrine systems and their broad presence in foodstuff and consumer products. The aims of this work are to assess patterns of exposure to phthalates and bisphenol A in a pilot sample of Spanish mothers and their children, and to provide basic information to address priorities in future Spanish surveys/research. Urinary levels of eight phthalate metabolites and bisphenol A have been measured in samples from 120 mother-child pairs in one rural and one urban location in central Spain, recruited as part of the European project DEMOCOPHES. More than 96% of the participants were exposed to all the compounds studied here with generally higher levels in children than their mothers. The sum of secondary DEHP metabolites gave a GM of 33.3μg/g creatinine (95% CI 30.2-36.6) for mothers and 63.0μg/g creatinine (95% CI 56.8-69.8) for children. Mono-ethyl phthalate (MEP) was the metabolite with the highest levels, with geometric means (GM) of 150.8μg/g creatinine (95% CI 124.0-183.5) for mothers and 198.9μg/g creatinine (95% CI 165.2-239.6) for children. Bisphenol A urinary levels were relatively low with geometric means of 2.0μg/g (95% CI 1.6-2.4) for mothers and 2.01μg/g (95% CI 1.7-2.4) for children. Personal care products like body lotions and fragrances showed associations with MEHP, MEP, MnBP and cx-MiNP and canteen food with MBzP and bisphenol A. Exposure of mothers and their children are correlated, except for MEP. As phthalates and bisphenol A are non-persistent chemicals, a daily, intermittent exposure of the population is taking place. PMID:25159680

  20. Potentialities of polyurethane foams for trace level analysis of triazinic metabolites in water matrices by stir bar sorptive extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portugal, Fátima C M; Pinto, Moisés L; Pires, João; Nogueira, J M F

    2010-06-01

    Polyurethane (PU) foams were applied for stir bar sorptive extraction of five triazinic metabolites (desethyl-2-hydroxyatrazine, desisopropylatrazine, desethylatrazine, 2-hydroxyatrazine and desethylterbuthylazine) in water matrices, followed by liquid desorption and high performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection (SBSE(PU)-LD/HPLC-DAD). The optimum conditions for SBSE(PU)-LD were 5h of extraction (1000 rpm) and 5% (v/v) of methanol for the analysis of desethyl-2-hydroxyatrazine and 2-hydroxyatrazine, 15% (w/v) of sodium chloride for the remaining compounds and acetonitrile as back-extraction solvent (5 mL) under ultrasonic treatment (60 min). The methodology provided recoveries up to 26.3%, remarkable precision (RSD0.9993) and convenient detection limits (0.4-1.3 microg/L). The proposed method was applied in the analysis of triazinic metabolites in tap, river and ground waters, with remarkable performance and negligible matrix effects. The comparison of the recoveries obtained by PU and commercial stir bars was also performed, where the yields achieved with the former were up to ten times higher proving that PU is appropriate for analysis at trace level of this type of polar compounds in water matrices. PMID:20434162

  1. Season of sampling and season of birth influence serotonin metabolite levels in human cerebrospinal fluid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurjen J Luykx

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Animal studies have revealed seasonal patterns in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF monoamine (MA turnover. In humans, no study had systematically assessed seasonal patterns in CSF MA turnover in a large set of healthy adults. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Standardized amounts of CSF were prospectively collected from 223 healthy individuals undergoing spinal anesthesia for minor surgical procedures. The metabolites of serotonin (5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, 5-HIAA, dopamine (homovanillic acid, HVA and norepinephrine (3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol, MPHG were measured using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. Concentration measurements by sampling and birth dates were modeled using a non-linear quantile cosine function and locally weighted scatterplot smoothing (LOESS, span = 0.75. The cosine model showed a unimodal season of sampling 5-HIAA zenith in April and a nadir in October (p-value of the amplitude of the cosine = 0.00050, with predicted maximum (PC(max and minimum (PC(min concentrations of 173 and 108 nmol/L, respectively, implying a 60% increase from trough to peak. Season of birth showed a unimodal 5-HIAA zenith in May and a nadir in November (p = 0.00339; PC(max = 172 and PC(min = 126. The non-parametric LOESS showed a similar pattern to the cosine in both season of sampling and season of birth models, validating the cosine model. A final model including both sampling and birth months demonstrated that both sampling and birth seasons were independent predictors of 5-HIAA concentrations. CONCLUSION: In subjects without mental illness, 5-HT turnover shows circannual variation by season of sampling as well as season of birth, with peaks in spring and troughs in fall.

  2. High levels of PAH-metabolites in urine of e-waste recycling workers from Agbogbloshie, Ghana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldt, Torsten, E-mail: feldt@bni-hamburg.de [Clinical Research Unit, Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine, Bernhard-Nocht Str. 74, 20359 Hamburg (Germany); Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Infectious Diseases, University Hospital Düsseldorf, Moorenstr. 5, 40225 Düsseldorf (Germany); Fobil, Julius N., E-mail: jfobil@ug.edu.gh [Department of Biological, Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Ghana, P.O. Box LG13, Legon (Ghana); Wittsiepe, Jürgen [Department of Hygiene, Social and Environmental Medicine, Ruhr-University Bochum, Universitätsstr. 150, 44801 Bochum (Germany); Wilhelm, Michael, E-mail: wilhelm@hygiene.rub.de [Department of Hygiene, Social and Environmental Medicine, Ruhr-University Bochum, Universitätsstr. 150, 44801 Bochum (Germany); Till, Holger, E-mail: holger.till@giz.de [GIZ — Regional Coordination Unit for HIV and TB (GiZ-ReCHT), 32 Cantonment Crescent, Cantonments, Accra (Ghana); Zoufaly, Alexander [Department of Medicine, Section Infectious Diseases and Tropical Medicine, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistr. 52, 20246 Hamburg (Germany); Burchard, Gerd, E-mail: gerd.burchard@bni-hamburg.de [Clinical Research Unit, Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine, Bernhard-Nocht Str. 74, 20359 Hamburg (Germany); Department of Medicine, Section Infectious Diseases and Tropical Medicine, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistr. 52, 20246 Hamburg (Germany); Göen, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.goeen@ipasum.med.uni-erlangen.de [Institute and Outpatient Clinic of Occupational, Social and Environmental Medicine, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Schillerstr. 25/29, 91054 Erlangen (Germany)

    2014-01-01

    The informal recycling of electronic waste (e-waste) is an emerging source of environmental pollution in Africa. Among other toxins, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a major health concern for exposed individuals. In a cross-sectional study, the levels of PAH metabolites in the urine of individuals working on one of the largest e-waste recycling sites of Africa, and in controls from a suburb of Accra without direct exposure to e-waste recycling activities, were investigated. Socioeconomic data, basic health data and urine samples were collected from 72 exposed individuals and 40 controls. In the urine samples, concentrations of the hydroxylate PAH metabolites (OH-PAH) 1-hydroxyphenanthrene (1-OH-phenanthrene), the sum of 2- and 9-hydroxyphenanthrene (2-/9-OH-phenanthrene), 3-hydroxyphenanthrene (3-OH-phenanthrene), 4-hydroxyphenanthrene (4-OH-phenanthrene) and 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OH-pyrene), as well as cotinine and creatinine, were determined. In the exposed group, median urinary concentrations were 0.85 μg/g creatinine for 1-OH-phenanthrene, 0.54 μg/g creatinine for 2-/9-OH-phenanthrene, 0.99 μg/g creatinine for 3-OH-phenanthrene, 0.22 μg/g creatinine for 4-OH-phenanthrene, and 1.33 μg/g creatinine for 1-OH-pyrene, all being significantly higher compared to the control group (0.55, 0.37, 0.63, 0.11 and 0.54 μg/g creatinine, respectively). Using a multivariate linear regression analysis including sex, cotinine and tobacco smoking as covariates, exposure to e-waste recycling activities was the most important determinant for PAH exposure. On physical examination, pathological findings were rare, but about two thirds of exposed individuals complained about cough, and one quarter about chest pain. In conclusion, we observed significantly higher urinary PAH metabolite concentrations in individuals who were exposed to e-waste recycling compared to controls who were not exposed to e-waste recycling activities. The impact of e-waste recycling on exposure to

  3. High levels of PAH-metabolites in urine of e-waste recycling workers from Agbogbloshie, Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The informal recycling of electronic waste (e-waste) is an emerging source of environmental pollution in Africa. Among other toxins, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a major health concern for exposed individuals. In a cross-sectional study, the levels of PAH metabolites in the urine of individuals working on one of the largest e-waste recycling sites of Africa, and in controls from a suburb of Accra without direct exposure to e-waste recycling activities, were investigated. Socioeconomic data, basic health data and urine samples were collected from 72 exposed individuals and 40 controls. In the urine samples, concentrations of the hydroxylate PAH metabolites (OH-PAH) 1-hydroxyphenanthrene (1-OH-phenanthrene), the sum of 2- and 9-hydroxyphenanthrene (2-/9-OH-phenanthrene), 3-hydroxyphenanthrene (3-OH-phenanthrene), 4-hydroxyphenanthrene (4-OH-phenanthrene) and 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OH-pyrene), as well as cotinine and creatinine, were determined. In the exposed group, median urinary concentrations were 0.85 μg/g creatinine for 1-OH-phenanthrene, 0.54 μg/g creatinine for 2-/9-OH-phenanthrene, 0.99 μg/g creatinine for 3-OH-phenanthrene, 0.22 μg/g creatinine for 4-OH-phenanthrene, and 1.33 μg/g creatinine for 1-OH-pyrene, all being significantly higher compared to the control group (0.55, 0.37, 0.63, 0.11 and 0.54 μg/g creatinine, respectively). Using a multivariate linear regression analysis including sex, cotinine and tobacco smoking as covariates, exposure to e-waste recycling activities was the most important determinant for PAH exposure. On physical examination, pathological findings were rare, but about two thirds of exposed individuals complained about cough, and one quarter about chest pain. In conclusion, we observed significantly higher urinary PAH metabolite concentrations in individuals who were exposed to e-waste recycling compared to controls who were not exposed to e-waste recycling activities. The impact of e-waste recycling on exposure to

  4. Content of the Nitrogen Oxide Metabolites in a Condensate of Exhaling Air in Children with a Bronchial Asthma Control Different Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliseeva T.I.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim of investigation is establishment of regularity of the nitrogen oxide metabolite content change in the exhaling air condensate (EAC in children with a bronchial asthma control different level, assessed with a use of the ACQ day and week scales (Asthma Control Questionnaire. Materials and Methods. A summarized content of nitrites and nitrates in the exhaling air condensate in 61 infants with a bronchial asthma control different level is analyzed; it is analyzed in a disease dynamics in a part of them. Results. A summarized content of the nitrogen oxide metabolites in the EAC in patients with an absolute and full control of a bronchial asthma, not receiving the glucocorticosteroid therapy, was trustworthy higher than in patients, receiving that therapy. A trustworthy dependence between a summarized content of the nitrogen oxide metabolites in the EAC and a level of a bronchial asthma control in patients, receiving a similar therapy (with the glucocorticosteroid inclusion, is established.

  5. Development of liquid chromatography mass spectrometric methods for quantification of metabolites from cellular level to clinical biomarkers

    OpenAIRE

    Tohmola, Niina

    2015-01-01

    Metabolites are low molecular weight compounds participating in different functions of cellular systems. Metabolites can be used as diagnostic biomarkers for numerous diseases. Liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) is a powerful tool in quantification of metabolites from various sample matrices. Good sensitivity and specificity are the main benefits of the technique. Mass spectrometry is commonly used in industry, drug research and clinical diagnostics. Extensive validatio...

  6. Evaluation of plasma reactive oxygen metabolites levels in obese subjects with periodontal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snophia Suresh

    2016-01-01

    Result and Conclusion: In this study, obese subjects with chronic periodontitis (Group I had mean plasma ROM levels (442.3 ± 15.65 Carratelli unit [CARR U] showing 100% subjects with high oxidative stress. Obese subjects with chronic gingivitis (Group II had mean plasma ROM levels (358.7 ± 20.61 CARR U indicating 86.7% subjects with oxidative stress. Obese subjects with healthy periodontium (Group III had 46.7% subjects with slight oxidative stress, and the mean ROM level was 320.2 ± 17.57. Nonobese subjects with healthy periodontium (Group IV had 80% of subjects with normal oxidative stress and the mean plasma ROM level was 296.9 ± 20.35 CARR U. The intra- and inter-group comparison showed significant difference (P < 0.001. From our study, we report that obese subjects with periodontitis have more oxidative stress compared to obese subjects with healthy periodontium.

  7. Low level 14C measurements in freshly prepared benzene samples with simultaneous 214Bi/214Po pairs counting for routine 222Rn contamination correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we present the application of a known method for simultaneous measurements of the 14C and 222Rn in benzene dating samples. Measurements are performed with a laboratory-made multichannel analyzer that records the height of each pulse and the time interval between the subsequent pulses. This feature is used to detect pairs of pulses from two subsequent decays of 222Rn products, 214Bi and 214Po, what occur in less than 800 μs and have amplitudes corresponding to more than 160 keVe. The measured decay pairs' background count rate is 3.4 day−1 which is much larger than the theoretically expected rate of 0.36 day−1, this suggests a possible source of 222Rn in the LSC cocktails. The 214Bi/214Po pairs count rate is used to correct a count rate in the fixed energy 14C window. Prolonged measurements were performed on a set of 4 test samples starting immediately after the benzene synthesis. The obtained results show good reproducibility and high efficiency in detecting 222Rn presence. The measurements of the chemically prepared benzene from the samples tend to be contaminated with 222Rn are also presented and these clearly show the influence the of 222Rn contamination on the 14C activity measurements. - Highlights: • Delayed coincidence was used for the detection of Bi-214/Po-214 pairs. • Measurement of C-14 activity and Rn-222 activity through Bi-214/Po-214 pairs is performed at the same time. • We report significant Rn-222 contamination of benzene obtained from samples

  8. Interactions of valproic acid with carbamazepine and its metabolites' concentrations, concentrations ratios, and level/dose ratios in epileptic children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H; Delgado, M R; Browne, R H

    1995-02-01

    In two groups of epileptic children receiving carbamazepine (CBZ) therapy with or without valproic acid (VPA) comedication, we investigate the drug interactions of VPA on serum CBZ and its metabolites' concentrations, concentration ratios, and level/dose ratios. Serum total and free CBZ-10, 11-epoxide (CBZ-E) concentrations are significantly increased in patients taking CBZ plus VPA, together with higher CBZ-E/CBZ concentration ratios and CBZ-E level/dose ratios. These results reflect the accumulation of CBZ-E. The decreased concentration ratios of trans-10, 11-dihydroxy-10, 11-dihydro-CBZ (CBZ-H)/CBZ-E observed in patients taking CBZ plus VPA suggest an inhibition in the biotransformation from CBZ-E to CBZ-H. Significant negative correlations are found between serum VPA level and CBZ-H/CBZ-E concentration ratios, indicating that the inhibition of CBZ-E hydrolysis by VPA may depend on the concentration of VPA (total or free CBZ-H/CBZ-E concentration ratio = [formula: see text], respectively). VPA concentration also shows significant positive correlations with CBZ-E and CBZ level/dose ratios. Patients taking CBZ plus VPA have significant higher free fractions of CBZ and CBZ-E than do patients on CBZ alone, suggesting a protein-binding displacement by VPA. PMID:8665529

  9. Nutritionally related blood metabolites and performance of finishing pigs fed on graded levels of dietary fibre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakare, Archibold Garikayi; Ndou, Saymore Petros; Madzimure, James; Chimonyo, Michael

    2016-06-01

    The objective of the study was to determine effect of feeding fibrous diets on performance and biochemical profiles of finishing pigs. A total of 84 clinically healthy male pigs were used in the experiment. Body weight of the pigs at the beginning of the experiment was 85 ± 10.1 kg. Maize cob (MC), sunflower hulls (SH), lucerne hay (LH) and dried citrus pulp (PU) were incorporated in a basal diet for finishing pigs at different inclusion levels of 0, 80, 160, 240, 320 and 400 g/kg. Effects of week of feeding, fibre source and inclusion level of fibre were significant (P < 0.05). Pigs consumed more LH compared to MC, SH and PU. Average daily gain was high for pigs consuming diets with inclusion levels of 0, 80, 160 and 240 g/kg and low for pigs consuming 320 and 400 g/kg inclusion level of fibre in a diet. There was an increase in serum total concentration (TP) with an increase in PU, MC and LH in pig diets (P < 0.05). Creatine kinase (CK) concentrations decreased as levels of PU, LH and MC increased (P < 0.05). Increasing inclusion level of LH and SH in pig diets resulted in an increase in glycated haemoglobin concentration (P < 0.05). It can be concluded that level of PU, LH, MC and SH in diets of finishing pigs negatively influences average daily feed intake, average daily gain and biochemical profiles. PMID:26984596

  10. Association of Plasma IL-6 and Hsp70 with HRV at Different Levels of PAHs Metabolites

    OpenAIRE

    Jian Ye; Rui Zhu; Xiaosheng He; Yingying Feng; Liangle Yang; Xiaoyan Zhu; Qifei Deng; Tangchun Wu; Xiaomin Zhang

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is associated with reduced heart rate variability (HRV), a strong predictor of cardiovascular diseases, but the mechanism is not well understood. OBJECTIVES: We hypothesized that PAHs might induce systemic inflammation and stress response, contributing to altered cardiac autonomic function. METHODS: HRV indices were measured using a 3-channel digital Holter monitor in 800 coke oven workers. Plasma levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) a...

  11. Maternal serum level of the DDT metabolite DDE in relation to fetal loss in previous pregnancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Use of 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane (DDT) continues in about 25 countries. This use has been justified partly by the belief that it has no adverse consequences on human health. Evidence has been increasing, however, for adverse reproductive effects of DDT, but additional data are needed. Pregnant women who enrolled in the Collaborative Perinatal Project (United States, 1959-1965) were asked about their previous pregnancy history; blood samples were drawn and the serum frozen. In 1997-1999, the sera of 1717 of these women who had previous pregnancies were analyzed for 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethylene (DDE), the major breakdown product of DDT. The odds of previous fetal loss was examined in relation to DDE level in logistic regression models. Compared with women whose DDE level was <15 μg/L, the adjusted odds ratios of fetal loss according to category of DDE were as follows: 15-29 μg/L, 1.1; 30-44 μg/L, 1.4; 45-59 μg/L, 1.6; and 60+μg/L, 1.2. The adjusted odds ratio per 60 μg/L increase was 1.4 (95% confidence interval 1.1-1.6). The results were consistent with an adverse effect of DDE on fetal loss, but were inconclusive owing to the possibility that previous pregnancies ending in fetal loss decreased serum DDE levels less than did those carried to term

  12. Actions of mammalian insulin on a Neurospora variant: effects on intracellular metabolite levels as monitored by P-31 NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fourier transform P-31 NMR spectroscopy (81 MHz) was used to investigate the biochemical nature of insulin action upon the cell wall-deficient slime mutant of Neurospora crassa. Spectra of oxygenated, living cells (ca.109/ml.) in late logarithmic-early stationary phase of growth were accumulated for approximately 20 min. (350-450 pulses). Pronounced differences were seen in the metabolite levels of cells cultured for 18-21 hours in the presence of insulin (100 nM) as compared to cells cultured in its absence. Differences in the insulin-grown cells included higher levels of sugar phosphates, inorganic (cytoplasmic) phosphate, NAD+/NADH and UDP-glucose (UDPG) compared to control cells, in which UDP-N-acetylglucosamine (UDPNAG) was the prominent sugar nucleotide. When 100 mM glucose was administered with insulin immediately prior to measurement, short term effects were seen. There were significant increases of sugar phosphates, inorganic phosphate, NAD+/NADH, phosphodiesters and UDPG relative to the case of glucose addition alone. These results are wholly consistent with the known influence of insulin upon mammalian metabolism: stimulation of glucose uptake, phosphorylation and oxidation, phosphatide synthesis and Pi uptake

  13. Levels of DDT and its metabolites in placenta, maternal and cord blood and their potential influence on neonatal anthropometric measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous studies of in utero exposure to dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) have shown mixed results for the harmful effects on fetal growth and development. This cross-sectional study was designed to: (1) examine the extent of DDT exposure in 1578 women, aged 28.5 ± 6.0 who delivered between June 2005 and 2006 in the area of Al-Kharj, Saudi Arabia; and (2) assess its influence on neonatal anthropometric measurement of newly born babies. DDT and its metabolites, namely 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis (p-chlorophenyl) ethylene (p,p′-DDE), 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis (p-chlorophenyl) ethane (p,p′-DDD) and 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2′ bis (p-chlorophenyl) ethane (p,p′-DDT) were measured in cord and maternal serum as well as placenta by Gas Chromatography coupled with an Electron Capture Detector (GC/ECD). p,p′-DDE was detected in 28.3% of cord and 54.4% of maternal serum, reflecting past exposure, whereas the p,p′-DDT was only found in 0.46% cord and 1.2% maternal samples. As expected the p,p′-DDE cord levels (0.197 ± 0.961 μg/L) were 2.8 times lower than the maternal levels (0.551 ± 1.778 μg/L), and both were significantly correlated (r = 0.517) suggesting its transplacental transfer. The picture was different in placental tissues. p,p′-DDE and p,p′-DDT were detected in 84% and 99% of placental tissues, with the highest p,p′-DDT in placental tissues (29.62 ± 158.282 µg/kg dry wt.) compare to p,p′-DDE (10.167 ± 18.851 μg/kg dry wt.). In general, the presence of DDT metabolites in our participants indicates that these chemicals are still relevant despite the fact that they have been banned or restricted in the study area for many years. Our results support the view for an association between low in utero exposure to DDT and the anthropometric development of the fetus leading to a reduction in its head circumference, crown–heel length, birth weight and birth height. Since the reduction in these measures was independent of gestational age and/or preterm births

  14. Levels of DDT and its metabolites in placenta, maternal and cord blood and their potential influence on neonatal anthropometric measures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Saleh, Iman, E-mail: iman@kfshrc.edu.sa [Environmental Health Section, Biological and Medical Research Department, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, P.O. Box 3354, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Al-Doush, Inaam; Alsabbaheen, Ammar [Environmental Health Section, Biological and Medical Research Department, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, P.O. Box 3354, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Mohamed, Gamal El Din [Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Scientific Computing Department, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, P.O. Box 3354, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Rabbah, Abdullah [Department of Pediatrics, King Khalid Hospital, Al-Kharj (Saudi Arabia)

    2012-02-01

    Previous studies of in utero exposure to dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) have shown mixed results for the harmful effects on fetal growth and development. This cross-sectional study was designed to: (1) examine the extent of DDT exposure in 1578 women, aged 28.5 {+-} 6.0 who delivered between June 2005 and 2006 in the area of Al-Kharj, Saudi Arabia; and (2) assess its influence on neonatal anthropometric measurement of newly born babies. DDT and its metabolites, namely 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis (p-chlorophenyl) ethylene (p,p Prime -DDE), 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis (p-chlorophenyl) ethane (p,p Prime -DDD) and 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2 Prime bis (p-chlorophenyl) ethane (p,p Prime -DDT) were measured in cord and maternal serum as well as placenta by Gas Chromatography coupled with an Electron Capture Detector (GC/ECD). p,p Prime -DDE was detected in 28.3% of cord and 54.4% of maternal serum, reflecting past exposure, whereas the p,p Prime -DDT was only found in 0.46% cord and 1.2% maternal samples. As expected the p,p Prime -DDE cord levels (0.197 {+-} 0.961 {mu}g/L) were 2.8 times lower than the maternal levels (0.551 {+-} 1.778 {mu}g/L), and both were significantly correlated (r = 0.517) suggesting its transplacental transfer. The picture was different in placental tissues. p,p Prime -DDE and p,p Prime -DDT were detected in 84% and 99% of placental tissues, with the highest p,p Prime -DDT in placental tissues (29.62 {+-} 158.282 Micro-Sign g/kg dry wt.) compare to p,p Prime -DDE (10.167 {+-} 18.851 {mu}g/kg dry wt.). In general, the presence of DDT metabolites in our participants indicates that these chemicals are still relevant despite the fact that they have been banned or restricted in the study area for many years. Our results support the view for an association between low in utero exposure to DDT and the anthropometric development of the fetus leading to a reduction in its head circumference, crown-heel length, birth weight and birth height. Since the reduction in these

  15. Effect of 14 days of bed rest on urine metabolite excretion and plasma enzyme levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, N.; Grunbaum, B. W.; Kodama, A. M.; Rahlmann, D. F.; Newsom, B. D.

    1974-01-01

    After 1 week of ambulatory base-line measurement, a group of 8 men 19-26 years of age remained continuously recumbent for 14 days. Studies were continued for 1 week following the prolonged recumbency. Urine excretion rates for a number of constituents were determined 2 days before bed rest, on day 14 of bed rest, and day 6 after bed rest. Blood plasma samples were also obtained at these times, and analyzed for several enzymes. On day 14 of bed rest significant increases were observed in urine excretion of total osmotically-active substances, magnesium, calcium, phosphate, creatinine, hydroxyproline, and 17-OH corticosteroids. A decrease occurred in urinary glucose excretion. Plasma levels of alkaline phosphatase and LDH-3 were depressed, while plasma GPT was elevated. Many of these changes persisted on day 6 after bed rest, and are interpreted as concomitants of the disuse atrophy of the musculoskeletal system that characterizes prolonged bed rest and weightlessness.

  16. Economical benzene emission reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benzene has been classified as a toxic compound under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act. This has prompted the Alberta Energy and Utilities Board (AEUB) to introduce specific reporting and monitoring guidelines for the oil and gas industry regarding excessive benzene emissions. Glycol dehydration units have been determined to be the major single source of benzene emissions causing air and soil pollution. DualTank Corp. has designed a condensation and storage tank unit to enhance emission reduction, odour elimination and liquid recovery from dehydration units. Their newly designed combined tank unit consists of a large, uninsulated surface area for cooling, and an excessive internal volume for increased retention time. The first prototype was installed in December 1998 at an Enerplus Resources Site. The system provides excellent benzene emission reduction and the elimination of odours and visual plumes. Effective January 1, 1999, the petroleum and natural gas industry must either clean up excessive emissions voluntarily or face government imposed regulations, facility shutdowns and/or fines. 1 fig

  17. Benzene as a Chemical Hazard in Processed Foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vânia Paula Salviano dos Santos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a literature review on benzene in foods, including toxicological aspects, occurrence, formation mechanisms, and mitigation measures and analyzes data reporting benzene levels in foods. Benzene is recognized by the IARC (International Agency for Research on Cancer as carcinogenic to humans, and its presence in foods has been attributed to various potential sources: packaging, storage environment, contaminated drinking water, cooking processes, irradiation processes, and degradation of food preservatives such as benzoates. Since there are no specific limits for benzene levels in beverages and food in general studies have adopted references for drinking water in a range from 1–10 ppb. The presence of benzene has been reported in various food/beverage substances with soft drinks often reported in the literature. Although the analyses reported low levels of benzene in most of the samples studied, some exceeded permissible limits. The available data on dietary exposure to benzene is minimal from the viewpoint of public health. Often benzene levels were low as to be considered negligible and not a consumer health risk, but there is still a need of more studies for a better understanding of their effects on human health through the ingestion of contaminated food.

  18. Levels of Pesticides and Their Metabolites in Wistar Rat Amniotic Fluids and Maternal Urine upon Gestational Exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bossi, Rossana; Vinggaard, Anne Marie; Taxvig, Camilla; Boberg, Julie; Bonefeld-Jørgensen, Eva Cecilie

    2013-01-01

    Concentrations of pesticides and selected metabolites in rat urine and amniotic fluid were determined as biomarker upon oral administration of Wistar rats to two pesticide mixtures consisting of three to five pesticides (bitertanol, propiconazole, cypermethrin, malathion, and terbuthylazine). The...... pesticides and their metabolites were found in rat amniotic fluid and urine, generally in dose-response concentrations in relation to dosage. The measurement of the substances in the amniotic fluid indicated that the fetus was exposed to the pesticides as well as their metabolites. Moreover, the pesticides...... detected in urine demonstrated the exposure as well as the ability of the rat to excrete these compounds....

  19. Effects of fluticasone propionate inhalation on levels of arachidonic acid metabolites in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gert T. Verhoeven

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In smoking COPD patients the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid contains high numbers of inflammatory cells. These cells might produce arachidonic acid (AA metabolites, which contribute to inflammation and an increased bronchomotor tone.

  20. Intrahepatic Cholestasis of Pregnancy Levels of Sulfated Progesterone Metabolites Inhibit Farnesoid X Receptor Resulting in a Cholestatic Phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Abu-Hayyeh, Shadi; Papacleovoulou, Georgia; Lövgren-Sandblom, Anita; Tahir, Mehreen; Oduwole, Olayiwola; Jamaludin, Nurul Akmal; Ravat, Sabiha; Nikolova, Vanya; Chambers, Jenny; Selden, Clare; Rees, Myrddin; Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich; Parker, Malcolm G.; Williamson, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) is the most prevalent pregnancy-specific liver disease and is associated with an increased risk of adverse fetal outcomes, including preterm labor and intrauterine death. The endocrine signals that cause cholestasis are not known but 3α-sulfated progesterone metabolites have been shown to be elevated in ICP, leading us to study the impact of sulfated progesterone metabolites on farnesoid X receptor (FXR)-mediated bile acid homeostasis pathways. Here...

  1. Levels of Pesticides and Their Metabolites in Wistar Rat Amniotic Fluids and Maternal Urine upon Gestational Exposure

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Concentrations of pesticides and selected metabolites in rat urine and amniotic fluid were determined as biomarker upon oral administration of Wistar rats to two pesticide mixtures consisting of three to five pesticides (bitertanol, propiconazole, cypermethrin, malathion, and terbuthylazine). The pesticides and their metabolites were found in rat amniotic fluid and urine, generally in dose-response concentrations in relation to dosage. The measurement of the substances in the amniotic fluid i...

  2. Toxicogenomic analysis of gene expression changes in rat liver after a 28-day oral benzene exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijne, W.H.M.; Jonker, D.; Stierum, R.H.; Ommen, B. van; Groten, J.P.

    2005-01-01

    Benzene is an industrial chemical, component of automobile exhaust and cigarette smoke. After hepatic bioactivation benzene induces bone marrow, blood and hepatic toxicity. Using a toxicogenomics approach this study analysed the effects of benzene at three dose levels on gene expression in the liver

  3. Hesperetin and its sulfate and glucuronide metabolites inhibit TNF-α induced human aortic endothelial cell migration and decrease plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giménez-Bastida, Juan Antonio; González-Sarrías, Antonio; Vallejo, Fernando; Espín, Juan Carlos; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco A

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological, clinical and preclinical studies have reported the protection offered by citrus consumption, mainly orange, against cardiovascular diseases, which is primarily mediated by the antiatherogenic and vasculoprotective effects of the flavanone hesperetin-7-O-rutinoside (hesperidin). However, flavanone aglycones or glycosides are not present in the bloodstream but their derived phase-II metabolites could be the actual bioactive molecules. To date, only a few studies have explored the effects of circulating hesperetin-derived metabolites (glucuronides and sulfates) on endothelial cells. Herein, we describe for the first time the effects of hesperetin 3'-O-glucuronide, hesperetin 7-O-glucuronide, hesperetin 3'-O-sulfate, hesperetin 7-O-sulfate and hesperetin on human aortic endothelial cell (HAEC) migration upon pro-inflammatory stimuli as an essential step to angiogenesis. Hesperetin and its derived metabolites, at physiologically relevant concentrations (1-10 μM), significantly attenuated cell migration in the presence of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α (50 ng mL(-1)), which was accompanied and perhaps mediated by a significant decrease in the levels of the thrombogenic plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). However, hesperetin metabolites did not counteract the TNF-α-induced production of pro-inflammatory interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-8. We also study here for the first time, the metabolism of hesperetin and its derived metabolites by HAEC with and without a pro-inflammatory stimulus. All these results reinforce the concept according to which circulating phase-II hesperetin metabolites are critical molecules contributing to the cardioprotective effects upon consumption of citrus fruits such as orange. PMID:26456097

  4. Metabolism of benzene and phenol by a reconstituted purified phenobarbital induced rat liver mixed function oxidase system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cytochrome P-450 and the electron-donor, NADPH-cytochrome c reductase were isolated from phenobarbital induced rat liver microsomes. Both benzene and its primary metabolite phenol, were substrates for the reconstituted purified phenobarbital induced rat liver mixed function oxidase system. Benzene was metabolized to phenol and the polyhydroxylated metabolites; catechol, hydroquinone and 1,2,4 benzenetriol. Benzene elicited a Type I spectral change upon its interaction with the cytochrome P-450 while phenol's interaction with the cytochrome P-450 produced a reverse Type I spectra. The formation of phenol showed a pH optimum of 7.0 compared with 6.6-6.8 for the production of the polyhyrdoxylated metabolites. Cytochrome P-450 inhibitors, such as metyrapone and SKF 525A, diminished the production of phenol from benzene but not the production of the polyhydroxylated metabolites from phenol. The radical trapping agents, DMSO, KTBA and mannitol, decreased the recovery of polyhydroxylated metabolites, from 14C-labeled benzene and/or phenol. As KTBA and DMSO interacted with OH. There was a concomitant release of ethylene and methane, which was measured. Desferrioxamine, an iron-chelator and catalase also depressed the recovery of polyhydroxylated metabolites. In summary, benzene and phenol were both substrates for this reconstituted purified enzyme system, but they differed in binding to cytochrome P-450, pH optima and mode of hydroxylation

  5. Metabolism of benzene and phenol by a reconstituted purified phenobarbital induced rat liver mixed function oxidase system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffiths, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    Cytochrome P-450 and the electron-donor, NADPH-cytochrome c reductase were isolated from phenobarbital induced rat liver microsomes. Both benzene and its primary metabolite phenol, were substrates for the reconstituted purified phenobarbital induced rat liver mixed function oxidase system. Benzene was metabolized to phenol and the polyhydroxylated metabolites; catechol, hydroquinone and 1,2,4 benzenetriol. Benzene elicited a Type I spectral change upon its interaction with the cytochrome P-450 while phenol's interaction with the cytochrome P-450 produced a reverse Type I spectra. The formation of phenol showed a pH optimum of 7.0 compared with 6.6-6.8 for the production of the polyhyrdoxylated metabolites. Cytochrome P-450 inhibitors, such as metyrapone and SKF 525A, diminished the production of phenol from benzene but not the production of the polyhydroxylated metabolites from phenol. The radical trapping agents, DMSO, KTBA and mannitol, decreased the recovery of polyhydroxylated metabolites, from /sup 14/C-labeled benzene and/or phenol. As KTBA and DMSO interacted with OH. There was a concomitant release of ethylene and methane, which was measured. Desferrioxamine, an iron-chelator and catalase also depressed the recovery of polyhydroxylated metabolites. In summary, benzene and phenol were both substrates for this reconstituted purified enzyme system, but they differed in binding to cytochrome P-450, pH optima and mode of hydroxylation.

  6. The effects of dietary omega fatty acids on pregnancy rate, plasma prostaglandin metabolite levels, serum progesterone levels, and milk fatty-acid profile in beef cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Gavin F; McNiven, Mary A; Petit, Hélène V; Duynisveld, John L

    2013-10-01

    The objectives were to determine the effects of feeding supplements rich in omega-6 or omega-3 fatty acids (FA) during the late gestation to the early postpartum and breeding periods on reproduction and milk FA profile in beef cows. For each of two years, at the beginning of period 1 (mid-December), 72 beef cows, calving in January or February, were assigned to diets supplemented with roasted flaxseed (Flax) or roasted soybean (Soybean). For each of two years, after 11 wk (end of period 1), 18 cows of 36 in the Flax group were switched to the soybean supplement and 18 cows of 36 in the Soybean group were switched to the flax supplement (start of Period 2). Cows were bred by timed artificial insemination (TAI) in week 5 of period 2. The FA composition of the milk reflected the FA profile of the oilseed supplements. There were no differences in pregnancy rates among the 4 groups. The treatments had no effect on plasma prostaglandin metabolite levels or ratios at 4 to 11 d postpartum. At 5 to 6 d post- TAI, pregnant cows fed Flax in period 1 had lower (P Flax in period 2 had higher (P < 0.05) serum progesterone levels at 5 to 6 d post-TAI than cows fed Soybean, but there was no difference at 19 to 20 d post-TAI. The dietary treatments had no effect on pregnancy rates, but there were some effects on plasma PGFM levels, PGFM to PGEM ratios, and serum progesterone levels. The FA supplements influenced the FA composition of milk. PMID:24124276

  7. Dehydrin, alcohol dehydrogenase, and central metabolite levels are associated with cold tolerance in diploid strawberry (Fragaria spp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davik, Jahn; Koehler, Gage; From, Britta; Torp, Torfinn; Rohloff, Jens; Eidem, Petter; Wilson, Robert C; Sønsteby, Anita; Randall, Stephen K; Alsheikh, Muath

    2013-01-01

    The use of artificial freezing tests, identification of biomarkers linked to or directly involved in the low-temperature tolerance processes, could prove useful in applied strawberry breeding. This study was conducted to identify genotypes of diploid strawberry that differ in their tolerance to low-temperature stress and to investigate whether a set of candidate proteins and metabolites correlate with the level of tolerance. 17 Fragaria vesca, 2 F. nilgerrensis, 2 F. nubicola, and 1 F. pentaphylla genotypes were evaluated for low-temperature tolerance. Estimates of temperatures where 50 % of the plants survived (LT₅₀) ranged from -4.7 to -12.0 °C between the genotypes. Among the F. vesca genotypes, the LT₅₀ varied from -7.7 °C to -12.0 °C. Among the most tolerant were three F. vesca ssp. bracteata genotypes (FDP821, NCGR424, and NCGR502), while a F. vesca ssp. californica genotype (FDP817) was the least tolerant (LT₅₀) -7.7 °C). Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), total dehydrin expression, and content of central metabolism constituents were assayed in select plants acclimated at 2 °C. The LT₅₀ estimates and the expression of ADH and total dehydrins were highly correlated (r(adh) = -0.87, r (dehyd) = -0.82). Compounds related to the citric acid cycle were quantified in the leaves during acclimation. While several sugars and acids were significantly correlated to the LT₅₀ estimates early in the acclimation period, only galactinol proved to be a good LT₅₀ predictor after 28 days of acclimation (r(galact) = 0.79). It is concluded that ADH, dehydrins, and galactinol show great potential to serve as biomarkers for cold tolerance in diploid strawberry. PMID:23014928

  8. [Update on benzene: from industrial toxicant to environmental carcinogen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manno, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    Benzene, an industrial chemical myelotoxic at high doses in workers, is now an almost ubiquitous pollutant. It is also a no-threshold genotoxic carcinogen causing acute leukemia and other lymphoaematological tumours. Although its mechanism of action has not been fully clarified, benzene toxicity and carcinogenicity depend on metabolic activation. Polymorphism of activating and detoxifying enzymes (CYP, GST, NQO1) may be critical, therefore, in modulating individual susceptibility to benzene. Further uncertainty factors in assessing low level benzene exposure are the limited sensitivity and specificity of most exposure biomarkers, the frequent coexposure to other volatile organic chemicals (VOC), and the presence of non occupational sources of exposure, such as cigarette smoke and veicular traffic. The aim of this presentation is to introduce the main current critical issues in the risk assessment and the biological monitoring of occupational exposure to benzene at low doses. PMID:24303704

  9. The excited state antiaromatic benzene ring: a molecular Mr Hyde?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Raffaello; Ottosson, Henrik

    2015-09-21

    The antiaromatic character of benzene in its first ππ* excited triplet state (T1) was deduced more than four decades ago by Baird using perturbation molecular orbital (PMO) theory [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1972, 94, 4941], and since then it has been confirmed through a range of high-level quantum chemical calculations. With focus on benzene we now first review theoretical and computational studies that examine and confirm Baird's rule on reversal in the electron count for aromaticity and antiaromaticity of annulenes in their lowest triplet states as compared to Hückel's rule for the ground state (S0). We also note that the rule according to quantum chemical calculations can be extended to the lowest singlet excited state (S1) of benzene. Importantly, Baird, as well as Aihara [Bull. Chem. Soc. Jpn. 1978, 51, 1788], early put forth that the destabilization and excited state antiaromaticity of the benzene ring should be reflected in its photochemical reactivity, yet, today these conclusions are often overlooked. Thus, in the second part of the article we review photochemical reactions of a series of benzene derivatives that to various extents should stem from the excited state antiaromatic character of the benzene ring. We argue that benzene can be viewed as a molecular "Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde" with its largely unknown excited state antiaromaticity representing its "Mr Hyde" character. The recognition of the "Jekyll and Hyde" split personality feature of the benzene ring can likely be useful in a range of different areas. PMID:25960203

  10. Benzene vapor recovery and processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants, or NESHAPs, have provided a powerful motivation for interest in, and attention to, benzene vapor emissions in recent times. Benzene and its related aromatics are volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which marks them for surveillance as potential contributors to air pollution. In addition, benzene is a suspected carcinogen, which applies a special urgency to its control. The regulations governing the control of benzene emissions were issued as Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 61, subpart Y (Storage Vessels); subpart BB (Transfer Operations); and subpart FF (Waste Operations). These regulations specify very particular emission reduction guidelines for various generating sources. The problem in the hydrocarbon processing industry is to identify significant sources of benzene vapors in plants, and then to collect and process these vapors in an environmentally acceptable manner. This paper discusses various methods for collecting benzene fumes in these facilities

  11. Involvement of Carbohydrate, Protein and Phenylanine Ammonia Lyase in Up-Regulation of Secondary Metabolites in Labisia pumila under Various CO2 and N2 Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Hafiz Ibrahim

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available A split plot factorial 2 × 3 experiment was designed to examine and characterize the relationships among secondary metabolites (total phenolics, TP; total flavonoids, TF, carbohydrate content, C/N ratio, protein synthesis and L–phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL; EC 4.3.1.5 activity in the Malaysian medicinal herb Labisia pumila (Blume Fern-Vill. under different CO2 concentrations (400 = ambient and 1,200 µmol mol−1 CO2 and three levels of nitrogen fertilization (0, 90 and 270 kg N ha−1 for 15 weeks. The interaction between CO2 and nitrogen levels imposed a significant impact on plant secondary metabolite production, protein, PAL activity and fructose levels. Highest TP and TF were recorded under 1,200 µmol mol−1 CO2 when N fertilizer was not applied; lowest values were obtained at 400 µmol mol−1 CO2 fertilized with the highest N level. Concurrently, fructose contents increased tremendously. Increase in fructose content might also enhance erythose-4-phosphate production (substrate for lignin and phenolic compounds, which shares a common precursor transdalolase in the pentose phosphate pathway. PAL activity was noted to be highest under 1,200 µmol mol−1 CO2 + 0 kg N ha−1 coinciding with subsequent recording of the lowest protein content. The results implied that the increase in plant secondary metabolites production under the tested conditions might be due to diversion of phenylalanine for protein synthesis to production of secondary metabolites. It was also found that the sucrose to starch ratio was also high under high levels of nitrogen fertilization, indicating an enhanced sucrose phosphate synthase activity (SPS; EC 2.4.1.14 under such condition.

  12. Benzene exposures in urban areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benzene exposures in urban areas were reviewed. Available data confirm that both in USA and Europe, benzene concentrations measured by fixed outdoor monitoring stations underestimate personal exposures of urban residents. Indoor sources, passive smoke and the high exposures during commuting time may explain this difference. Measures in European towns confirm that very frequently mean daily personal exposures to benzene exceed 10 μg/m3, current European air quality guideline for this carcinogenic compound

  13. Effect of prepartal and postpartal dietary fat level on performance and plasma concentration of metabolites in transition dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimian, M; Khorvash, M; Forouzmand, M A; Alikhani, M; Rahmani, H R; Ghaffari, M H; Petit, H V

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of 2 levels of dietary fat (low and high) offered during the prepartal and postpartal periods on dry matter intake (DMI), plasma concentration of metabolites, and milk yield and composition. Twenty-four Holstein dry cows were assigned on d 21 relative to expected parturition date to 1 of 4 treatments in a 2×2 factorial arrangement of 2 levels of fat fed during the prepartal period and 2 levels of fat fed during the postpartal period: prepartal low fat and postpartal low fat (LF-LF), prepartal low fat and postpartal high fat (LF-HF), prepartal high fat and postpartal low fat (HF-LF), or prepartal high fat and postpartal high fat (HF-HF). Prepartal and postpartal LF diets contained no fat supplement. Prepartal HF diets contained 1.60% calcium salts of soybean oil. The proportion of calcium salts of soybean oil was increased to 1.70% of DM for the first 21 d of lactation and to 2.27% of DM from d 21 to 56 of lactation in the HF diet. Diets were fed for ad libitum intake from d 21 before calving until d 56 of gestation. Prepartal DMI was lower for cows fed the HF diet compared with those fed the LF diet (12.6 vs. 16.2kg/d). Postpartum, cows fed the HF-HF and HF-LF diets had, respectively, the lowest and highest DMI, although no significant differences existed between HF-LF and LF-LF. Net energy intake was higher for cows fed the postpartal HF diets compared with those fed the LF diets. Prepartal fat level had no effect on net energy intake. Cows offered the prepartal HF diet had higher milk yield when offered the postpartal LF diet compared with those offered the postpartal HF diet and no effect of the postpartal fat level was detected when cows were fed the prepartal LF diet. Milk composition was similar among treatments. Plasma cholesterol concentration postpartum was higher for cows fed the prepartal LF diet than for those fed the prepartal HF diet (5.16 vs. 3.74mmol/L) and postpartal fat level had no effect

  14. Temporal variability of pyrethroid metabolite levels in bedtime, morning, and 24-hr urine samples for 50 adults in North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyrethroid insecticides are widely used to control insects in both agricultural and residential settings worldwide. Few data are available on the temporal variability of pyrethroid metabolites in the urine of non-occupationally exposed adults. In this work, we describe the study ...

  15. Validation of an enzyme immunoassay for assessing adrenocortical activity and evaluation of factors that affect levels of fecal glucocorticoid metabolites in two New World primates.

    OpenAIRE

    Rimbach, Rebecca; Heymann, Eckhard W; Link, Andrés; Heistermann, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Non-invasive methods to assess stress hormone output via fecal glucocorticoid metabolites (FGCMs) have become a powerful tool in behavioral studies and conservation biology because they allow exploring the link between behavior, an animal's socio-ecological environment and its adrenocortical activity. However, FGCM levels are influenced by numerous other factors which often confound their interpretation. Thus, before applying these methods, knowledge on the impact of these factors is importan...

  16. The prognostic value of multivoxel magnetic resonance spectroscopy determined metabolite levels in white and grey matter brain tissue for adverse outcome in term newborns following perinatal asphyxia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doormaal, Pieter Jan van [University Medical Center Groningen and University of Groningen, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, Groningen (Netherlands); Meander Medical Center Amersfoort, Department of Radiology, PO Box 1502, Amersfoort (Netherlands); Meiners, Linda C.; Sijens, Paul E. [University Medical Center Groningen and University of Groningen, Department of Radiology, Groningen (Netherlands); Horst, Hendrik J. ter; Veere, Christa N. van der [University Medical Center Groningen and University of Groningen, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2012-04-15

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy can identify brain metabolic changes in perinatal asphyxia by providing ratios of metabolites, such as choline (Cho), creatine (Cr), N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) and lactate (Lact) [Cho/Cr, Lact/NAA, etc.]. The purpose of this study was to quantify the separate white and grey matter metabolites in a slab cranial to the ventricles and relate these to the outcome. A standard 2D-chemical shift imaging protocol was used for measuring a transverse volume of interest located cranial to the ventricles allowing for direct comparison of the metabolites in white and grey matter brain tissue in 24 term asphyxiated newborns aged 3 to 16 days. Cho, NAA and Lact showed significant differences between four subgroups of asphyxiated infants with more and less favourable outcomes. High levels of Cho and Lact in the grey matter differentiated non-survivors from survivors (P = 0.003 and P = 0.017, respectively). In perinatal asphyxia the levels of Cho, NAA and Lact in both white and grey matter brain tissue are affected. The levels of Cho and Lact measured in the grey matter are the most indicative of survival. It is therefore advised to include grey matter brain tissue in the region of interest examined by multivoxel MR spectroscopy. (orig.)

  17. The metabolite generated by dipeptidyl-peptidase 4 metabolism of glucagon-like peptide-1 has no influence on plasma glucose levels in patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zander, M; Madsbad, S; Deacon, C F;

    2006-01-01

    AIM/HYPOTHESIS: Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is metabolised by the enzyme dipeptidyl-peptidase 4 (DPP-4), generating a metabolite with potential antagonistic properties. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of that metabolite on plasma glucose levels in patients with type 2 diabetes...... the metabolite increased from 1+/-3 (SAL) and 2+/-6 (IB) pmol/l to 42+/-4 (LSC), 64+/-8 (IV) and 327+/-16 (HSC) pmol/l, p<0.0001. Mean plasma glucose levels at 6 h decreased from 12.4+/-1.1 (SAL) mmol/l to 10.4+/-1.1 (LSC), 8.6+/-0.6 (IB), 8.8+/-0.8 (IV) and 9.1+/-0.9 (HSC) mmol/l, p<0....... MATERIALS AND METHODS: The randomised crossover study consisted of five regimens: (1) i.v. infusion of GLP-1 (1.2 pmol kg(-1) min(-1); IV); (2 and 3) s.c. infusion of GLP-1 (2.4 and 9.6 pmol kg(-1) min(-1); LSC, HSC); (4) s.c. infusion of GLP-1 (2.4 pmol kg(-1) min(-1)) in combination with a DPP-4 inhibitor...

  18. [Effect of the new potential anti-Parkinson agent, hymantane, on levels of monoamines and their metabolites in rat striatum (a microdialysis study)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andiarzhanova, E A; Val'dman, E A; Kudrin, V S; Raevskiĭ, K S; Voronina, T A

    2001-01-01

    The new aminoadamantane derivative N-(2-adamantyl)hexamethyleneimine hydrochloride (A-7, hemantane) exhibited a pronounced antiparkinsonian effect on various experimental models. Hemantane showed a broad activity spectrum, being superior to amantadine (midantane) in some tests. Administered in an effective antiparkinsonian dose, hemantane increased the extracellular dopamine content in the striatum. The drug also produced a dose-dependent decrease in the extracellular level of dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and homovanillic acid (DOPAC and HVA, the dopamine metabolites) and 5-hydroxyindoloacetic acid (5-HIAc, a serotonin metabolite) in the striatum, which may reflect inhibition of the monoamine oxidase activity in the brain. These results show that the dopaminergic and serotoninergic nigrostriatial systems are involved in the mechanism of hemantane action. PMID:11871228

  19. A high-throughput approach to identify genomic variants of bacterial metabolite producers at the single-cell level

    OpenAIRE

    Binder, Stephan; Schendzielorz, Georg; Stäbler, Norma; Krumbach, Karin; Hoffmann, Kristina; Bott, Michael; Eggeling, Lothar

    2012-01-01

    We present a novel method for visualizing intracellular metabolite concentrations within single cells of Escherichia coli and Corynebacterium glutamicum that expedites the screening process of producers. It is based on transcription factors and we used it to isolate new L-lysine producing mutants of C. glutamicum from a large library of mutagenized cells using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). This high-throughput method fills the gap between existing high-throughput methods for mut...

  20. Genetic association between the COMT genotype and urinary levels of tea polyphenols and their metabolites among daily green tea drinkers

    OpenAIRE

    Inoue-Choi, Maki; Yuan, Jian-Min; Yang, Chung S.; Van Den Berg, David J.; Lee, Mao-Jung; Gao, Yu-Tang; Yu, Mimi C.

    2010-01-01

    Available in vitro and animal studies have shown cancer protective effects of tea polyphenols. Recent study suggests a greater protective effect of green tea intake on breast cancer risk among women possessing the low-activity associated genotype of the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), which may modulate the metabolism and excretion of tea polyphenols through urine. To determine the effect of COMT genotype on urinary excretion of tea polyphenol metabolites of daily green tea drinkers, a c...

  1. Plasma level monitoring of the major metabolites of diacetylmorphine (heroin) by the "chasing the dragon" route in severe heroin addicts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, N; Demaret, I; Ansseau, M; Rozet, E; Hubert, Ph; Charlier, C

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to verify if severe physical health problems frequently encountered in heroin addicts and the concomitant use of alcohol and legal or illegal drugs other than heroin influenced the pharmacokinetics of the major metabolites of heroin. We conducted a 90 minutes follow-up of the plasma concentrations of the pharmaceutical heroin, named diacetylmorphine (DAM), in patients recruited in a DAM assisted treatment centre. TADAM (Traitement Assisté par DiAcétylMorphine) aimed to compare the efficacy of heroin-assisted treatment (HAT) compared with methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) for heroin users considered as treatment resistant patients and who have severe physical and mental health problems. Eleven patients were recruited. Blood samples were collected at baseline and 15, 45 and 90 minutes after DAM administration. All patients received DAM by the "chasing the dragon" route. Plasma samples were analyzed by a previously described ultra-high pressure liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC/MS-MS) method. A principal component analysis (PCA) was performed and 8 metabolite concentrations ratios were calculated to evaluate the influence of various factors (DAM dose, patient pathologies, concomitant use of medications, methadone, street heroin, alcohol and cocaine) on heroin metabolite pharmacokinetics. It seemed to be not affected by the DAM dose, patient pathologies and the concomitant use of medications, methadone, street heroin and alcohol. Cocaine use was the only parameter which showed differences in heroin pharmacokinetics. PMID:24579243

  2. Spatial and temporal variations in atmospheric VOCs, NO2, SO2, and O3 concentrations at a heavily industrialized region in Western Turkey, and assessment of the carcinogenic risk levels of benzene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civan, Mihriban Yılmaz; Elbir, Tolga; Seyfioglu, Remzi; Kuntasal, Öznur Oğuz; Bayram, Abdurrahman; Doğan, Güray; Yurdakul, Sema; Andiç, Özgün; Müezzinoğlu, Aysen; Sofuoglu, Sait C.; Pekey, Hakan; Pekey, Beyhan; Bozlaker, Ayse; Odabasi, Mustafa; Tuncel, Gürdal

    2015-02-01

    Ambient concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), sulphur dioxide (SO2) and ground-level ozone (O3) were measured at 55 locations around a densely populated industrial zone, hosting a petrochemical complex (Petkim), a petroleum refinery (Tupras), ship-dismantling facilities, several iron and steel plants, and a gas-fired power plant. Five passive sampling campaigns were performed covering summer and winter seasons of 2005 and 2007. Elevated concentrations of VOCs, NO2 and SO2 around the refinery, petrochemical complex and roads indicated that industrial activities and vehicular emissions are the main sources of these pollutants in the region. Ozone concentrations were low at the industrial zone and settlement areas, but high in rural stations downwind from these sources due to NO distillation. The United States Environmental Protection Agency's positive matrix factorization receptor model (EPA PMF) was employed to apportion ambient concentrations of VOCs into six factors, which were associated with emissions sources. Traffic was found to be highest contributor to measured ∑VOCs concentrations, followed by the Petkim and Tupras. Median cancer risk due to benzene inhalation calculated using a Monte Carlo simulation was approximately 4 per-one-million population, which exceeded the U.S. EPA benchmark of 1 per one million. Petkim, Tupras and traffic emissions were the major sources of cancer risk due to benzene inhalation in the Aliaga airshed. Relative contributions of these two source groups changes significantly from one location to another, demonstrating the limitation of determining source contributions and calculating health risk using data from one or two permanent stations in an industrial area.

  3. Photosynthetic induction in a C4, Flaveria trinervia. I. Initial products of 14CO2 assimilation and levels of whole leaf C4 metabolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labeling patterns from 14CO2 pulses to leaves and whole leaf metabolite contents were examined during photosynthetic induction in Flaveria trinervia, a C4 dicot of the NADP-malic enzyme subgroup. During the first one to two minutes of illumination, malate was the primary initial product of 14CO2 assimilation (about 77% of total 14C incorporated). After about 5 minutes of illumination, the proportion of initial label to aspartate increased from 16 to 66%, and then gradually declined during the following 7 to 10 minutes of illumination. Nutrition experiments showed that the increase in 14CO2 partitioning to aspartate was delayed about 2.5 minutes in plants grown with limiting N, and was highly dampened in plants previously treated 10 to 12 days with ammonia as the sole N source. Measurements of C4 leaf metabolites revealed several transients in metabolite pools during the first few minutes of illumination, and subsequently, more gradual adjustments in pool sizes. These include a large initial decrease in malate (about 1.6 micromoles per milligram chlorophyll) and a small initial decrease in pyruvate. There was a transient increase in alanine levels after 1 minute of illumination, which was followed by a gradual, prolonged decrease during the remainder of the induction period. Total leaf aspartate decreased initially, but temporarily doubled in amount between 5 and 10 minutes of illumination (after its surge as a primary product). These results are discussed in terms of a plausible sequence of metabolic events which lead to the formation of the intercellular metabolite gradients required in C4 photosynthesis

  4. A high-throughput approach to identify genomic variants of bacterial metabolite producers at the single-cell level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Stephan; Schendzielorz, Georg; Stäbler, Norma; Krumbach, Karin; Hoffmann, Kristina; Bott, Michael; Eggeling, Lothar

    2012-01-01

    We present a novel method for visualizing intracellular metabolite concentrations within single cells of Escherichia coli and Corynebacterium glutamicum that expedites the screening process of producers. It is based on transcription factors and we used it to isolate new L-lysine producing mutants of C. glutamicum from a large library of mutagenized cells using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). This high-throughput method fills the gap between existing high-throughput methods for mutant generation and genome analysis. The technology has diverse applications in the analysis of producer populations and screening of mutant libraries that carry mutations in plasmids or genomes. PMID:22640862

  5. Relation between the level of self-mutilation and theconcentration of fecal metabolites of glucocorticoids incaptive chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane S. Pizzutto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of stress in an environment, according with the behavioral and endocrine variables of primates, are increasingly being studied by a diversity of authors, and have shown that abnormal behaviors associated with increased glucocorticoids may be directly related with the impairment of their well-being. In this work were used 22 adult chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes, 11 males and 11 females, kept in captivity in three different institutions. All animals had their behavior registered by focal session using a 30 seconds sample interval, during six months, totaling 4,800 registries per each animal. During this period, fecal samples were collected 3 times a week for the extraction and measurement of the concentration of fecal metabolites of glucocorticoid by radioimmunoassay. Of the total observed, stereotypical behaviors represented 13,45±2.76%, and among them, self-mutilation represented 38.28±3.98 %. The animals were classified into three different scores, according with the percentage of body surface with alopecia due to self-mutilation. It was found a positive correlation of high intensity between the scores of alopecia due to the observed mutilation and the average concentrations of fecal metabolites of glucocorticoids. This result strongly suggests that this measurement of self-mutilation in a chimpanzee can be used as an important auxiliary tool to evaluate de conditions of adaptation of an animal in captivity, functioning as a direct indicator of the presence of chronic stress.

  6. DNA Extraction Protocol for Plants with High Levels of Secondary Metabolites and Polysaccharides without Using Liquid Nitrogen and Phenol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Sunil Kumar; Thangaraj, Muthusamy; Kathiresan, Kandasamy

    2012-01-01

    Mangroves and salt marsh species are known to synthesize a wide spectrum of polysaccharides and polyphenols including flavonoids and other secondary metabolites which interfere with the extraction of pure genomic DNA. Although a plethora of plant DNA isolation protocols exist, extracting DNA from mangroves and salt marsh species is a challenging task. This study describes a rapid and reliable cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) protocol suited specifically for extracting DNA from plants which are rich in polysaccharides and secondary metabolites, and the protocol also excludes the use of expensive liquid nitrogen and toxic phenols. Purity of extracted DNA was excellent as evident by A260/A280 ratio ranging from 1.78 to 1.84 and A260/A230 ratio was >2, which also suggested that the preparations were sufficiently free of proteins and polyphenolics/polysaccharide compounds. DNA concentration ranged from 8.8 to 9.9 μg μL−1. The extracted DNA was amenable to RAPD, restriction digestion, and PCR amplification of plant barcode genes (matK and rbcl). The optimized method is suitable for both dry and fresh leaves. The success of this method in obtaining high-quality genomic DNA demonstrated the broad applicability of this method.

  7. Nanostructure Imaging Mass Spectrometry: The Role of Fluorocarbons in Metabolite Analysis and the Road to Yoctomole Level Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurczy, Michael E.; Northen, Trent R.; Trauger, Sunia A.; Siuzdak, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Nanostructure Imaging mass spectrometry (NIMS) has become an effective technology for generating ions in the gas phase, providing high sensitivity and imaging capabilities on small molecules, metabolites, drugs, and drug metabolites. Specifically, laser desorption from the nanostructure surfaces results in efficient energy transfer, low background chemical noise, and the nondestructive release of analyte ions into the gas phase. The modification of nanostructured surfaces with fluorous compounds, either covalent or non-covalent, has played an important role in gaining high efficiency/sensitivity by facilitating analyte desorption from the non-adhesive surfaces, and minimizing the amount of laser energy required. In addition, the hydrophobic fluorinated nanostructure surfaces have aided in concentrating deposited samples into fine micrometer sized spots, a feature that further facilitates efficient desorption/ionization. These fluorous nanostructured surfaces have opened up NIMS to very broad applications including enzyme activity assays and imaging, providing low background, efficient energy transfer, nondestructive analyte ion generation, super-hydrophobic surfaces, and ultra-high detection sensitivity. PMID:25361674

  8. Involvement of Carbohydrate, Protein and Phenylanine Ammonia Lyase in Up-Regulation of Secondary Metabolites in Labisia pumila under Various CO2 and N2 Level

    OpenAIRE

    Mohd Hafiz Ibrahim; Jaafar, Hawa Z. E.

    2011-01-01

    A split plot factorial 2 × 3 experiment was designed to examine and characterize the relationships among secondary metabolites (total phenolics, TP; total flavonoids, TF), carbohydrate content, C/N ratio, protein synthesis and L–phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL; EC 4.3.1.5) activity in the Malaysian medicinal herb Labisia pumila (Blume) Fern-Vill. under different CO2 concentrations (400 = ambient and 1,200 µmol mol−1 CO2) and three levels of nitrogen fertilization (0, 90 and 270 kg N ha−1) fo...

  9. Urinary levels of N-acetyl-S-(2-carbamoylethyl)-cysteine (AAMA), an acrylamide metabolite, in Korean children and their association with food consumption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Kyunghee [School of Public Health, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biomedical Veterinary Sciences and Toxicology Centre, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 5B3 (Canada); Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, Yongin University, Yongin, 449-714 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Sungeun; Lee, Gowoon; Lee, Saeram; Jo, Areum; Kwak, Kyunghee; Kim, Dohyung; Kho, Dohyun; Lee, Sangwoo; Kim, Sunmi; Kim, Sungkyoon [School of Public Health, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Hiuang, Yuh-Fang; Wu, Kuen-Yuh [Public Health and Institute of Occupational Medicine and Industrial Hygiene, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, 10617, Taiwan (China); Choi, Kyungho, E-mail: kyungho@snu.ac.kr [School of Public Health, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    Acrylamide (AA), a probable human carcinogen, is present in high-temperature-processed foods, and has frequently been detected in humans worldwide. In the present study, the levels of a major AA metabolite, N-acetyl-S-(2-carbamoylethyl)-cysteine (AAMA) were measured in urine samples collected in two separate events with 3 d interval from Korean children (n = 31, 10–13 years old), and their diets were surveyed for 4 d period prior to the second urine sampling. Daily AA intake was estimated from AAMA urinary levels and the influence of food consumption on urinary AAMA levels was investigated. The concentrations of metabolite AAMA in urine ranged between 15.4 and 196.3 ng/mL, with a median level of 68.1 ng/mL, and the levels varied by day considerably even in a given child. Children who were exposed to environmental smoke at home exhibited significantly higher levels of AAMA in urine, suggesting the importance of passive smoking as a source of AA exposure among children. Median (95th percentile) values of daily AA intake in Korean children were 1.04 (2.47) μg/kg body weight/day, which is higher than those reported elsewhere. After adjustment for gender, body mass index, and smoking status of family members, the consumptions of cracker and chocolate were identified to be significantly associated with the concentrations of AAMA in urine. The result of this study will provide information useful for developing public health and safety management for AA. - Highlights: • Urinary AAMA concentrations varied over time by the changes in diet. • Consumption of cracker and chocolate were correlated with urinary AAMA levels. • Urinary AAMA levels were significantly correlated with passive smoking. • AA intake estimates among Korean children are higher than those reported elsewhere.

  10. Urinary levels of N-acetyl-S-(2-carbamoylethyl)-cysteine (AAMA), an acrylamide metabolite, in Korean children and their association with food consumption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acrylamide (AA), a probable human carcinogen, is present in high-temperature-processed foods, and has frequently been detected in humans worldwide. In the present study, the levels of a major AA metabolite, N-acetyl-S-(2-carbamoylethyl)-cysteine (AAMA) were measured in urine samples collected in two separate events with 3 d interval from Korean children (n = 31, 10–13 years old), and their diets were surveyed for 4 d period prior to the second urine sampling. Daily AA intake was estimated from AAMA urinary levels and the influence of food consumption on urinary AAMA levels was investigated. The concentrations of metabolite AAMA in urine ranged between 15.4 and 196.3 ng/mL, with a median level of 68.1 ng/mL, and the levels varied by day considerably even in a given child. Children who were exposed to environmental smoke at home exhibited significantly higher levels of AAMA in urine, suggesting the importance of passive smoking as a source of AA exposure among children. Median (95th percentile) values of daily AA intake in Korean children were 1.04 (2.47) μg/kg body weight/day, which is higher than those reported elsewhere. After adjustment for gender, body mass index, and smoking status of family members, the consumptions of cracker and chocolate were identified to be significantly associated with the concentrations of AAMA in urine. The result of this study will provide information useful for developing public health and safety management for AA. - Highlights: • Urinary AAMA concentrations varied over time by the changes in diet. • Consumption of cracker and chocolate were correlated with urinary AAMA levels. • Urinary AAMA levels were significantly correlated with passive smoking. • AA intake estimates among Korean children are higher than those reported elsewhere

  11. The Impact of Glyphosate, Its Metabolites and Impurities on Viability, ATP Level and Morphological changes in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatkowska, Marta; Jarosiewicz, Paweł; Michałowicz, Jaromir; Koter-Michalak, Maria; Huras, Bogumiła; Bukowska, Bożena

    2016-01-01

    The toxicity of herbicides to animals and human is an issue of worldwide concern. The present study has been undertaken to assess toxic effect of widely used pesticide—glyphosate, its metabolites: aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) and methylphosphonic acid and its impurities: N-(phosphonomethyl)iminodiacetic acid (PMIDA), N-methylglyphosate, hydroxymethylphosphonic acid and bis-(phosphonomethyl)amine on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). We have evaluated the effect of those compounds on viability, ATP level, size (FSC-A parameter) and granulation (SSC-A parameter) of the cells studied. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells were exposed to different concentrations of glyphosate, its metabolites and impurities (0.01–10 mM) for 4 and 24 h. It was found that investigated compounds caused statistically significant decrease in viability and ATP level of PBMCs. The strongest changes in cell viability and ATP level were observed after 24 h incubation of PBMCs with bis-(phosphonomethyl)amine, and particularly PMIDA. Moreover, all studied compounds changed cell granularity, while PMIDA and bis-(phosphonomethyl)amine altered PBMCs size. It may be concluded that bis-(phosphonomethyl)amine, and PMIDA caused a slightly stronger damage to PBMCs than did glyphosate. Changes in the parameters studied in PBMCs were observed only at high concentrations of the compounds examined, which clearly shows that they may occur in this cell type only as a result of acute poisoning of human organism with these substances. PMID:27280764

  12. The Impact of Glyphosate, Its Metabolites and Impurities on Viability, ATP Level and Morphological changes in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatkowska, Marta; Jarosiewicz, Paweł; Michałowicz, Jaromir; Koter-Michalak, Maria; Huras, Bogumiła; Bukowska, Bożena

    2016-01-01

    The toxicity of herbicides to animals and human is an issue of worldwide concern. The present study has been undertaken to assess toxic effect of widely used pesticide-glyphosate, its metabolites: aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) and methylphosphonic acid and its impurities: N-(phosphonomethyl)iminodiacetic acid (PMIDA), N-methylglyphosate, hydroxymethylphosphonic acid and bis-(phosphonomethyl)amine on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). We have evaluated the effect of those compounds on viability, ATP level, size (FSC-A parameter) and granulation (SSC-A parameter) of the cells studied. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells were exposed to different concentrations of glyphosate, its metabolites and impurities (0.01-10 mM) for 4 and 24 h. It was found that investigated compounds caused statistically significant decrease in viability and ATP level of PBMCs. The strongest changes in cell viability and ATP level were observed after 24 h incubation of PBMCs with bis-(phosphonomethyl)amine, and particularly PMIDA. Moreover, all studied compounds changed cell granularity, while PMIDA and bis-(phosphonomethyl)amine altered PBMCs size. It may be concluded that bis-(phosphonomethyl)amine, and PMIDA caused a slightly stronger damage to PBMCs than did glyphosate. Changes in the parameters studied in PBMCs were observed only at high concentrations of the compounds examined, which clearly shows that they may occur in this cell type only as a result of acute poisoning of human organism with these substances. PMID:27280764

  13. Validation of an enzyme immunoassay for assessing adrenocortical activity and evaluation of factors that affect levels of fecal glucocorticoid metabolites in two New World primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimbach, Rebecca; Heymann, Eckhard W; Link, Andrés; Heistermann, Michael

    2013-09-15

    Non-invasive methods to assess stress hormone output via fecal glucocorticoid metabolites (FGCMs) have become a powerful tool in behavioral studies and conservation biology because they allow exploring the link between behavior, an animal's socio-ecological environment and its adrenocortical activity. However, FGCM levels are influenced by numerous other factors which often confound their interpretation. Thus, before applying these methods, knowledge on the impact of these factors is important. In this study we investigated the effect of (1) time of day, (2) age, (3) sex and (4) female reproductive state on FGCM levels in brown spider monkeys (Ateles hybridus) and red howler monkeys (Alouatta seniculus). Initially, we validated a 11β-hydroxyetiocholanolone enzyme immunoassay for monitoring the physiological stress response via fecal analysis in both species. We determined FGCM levels in fecal samples collected from two and six groups of wild spider monkeys (n=461 samples) and howler monkeys (n=166 samples), respectively. Our analyses revealed a strong effect of time of day on FGCM levels in spider monkeys, but no effect in howler monkeys. Adults of both species had significantly higher FGCM levels than subadults. In neither of the two species we found a sex-effect on FGCM output. Reproductive condition strongly affected FGCM levels in female spider monkeys which showed increasing concentrations with progressing gestation. This was not investigated in female howler monkeys due to an insufficient sample size. Our data indicate that the influence of the tested factors on fecal glucocorticoid metabolite output is species-specific, and that these variables need to be considered when interpreting FGCM levels in the species. PMID:23707497

  14. Genotype-phenotype modeling considering intermediate level of biological variation: a case study involving sensory traits, metabolites and QTLs in ripe tomatoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huange; Paulo, Joao; Kruijer, Willem; Boer, Martin; Jansen, Hans; Tikunov, Yury; Usadel, Björn; van Heusden, Sjaak; Bovy, Arnaud; van Eeuwijk, Fred

    2015-11-01

    Modeling genotype-phenotype relationships is a central objective in plant genetics and breeding. Commonly, variations in phenotypic traits are modeled directly in relation to variations at the DNA level, regardless of intermediate levels of biological variation. Here we present an integrative method for the simultaneous modeling of a set of multilevel phenotypic responses to variations at the DNA level. More specifically, for ripe tomato fruits, we use Gaussian graphical models and causal inference techniques to learn the dependencies of 24 sensory traits on 29 metabolites and the dependencies of those sensory and metabolic traits on 21 QTLs. The inferred dependency network which, though not essentially representing biological pathways, suggests how the effects of allele substitutions propagate through multilevel phenotypes. Such simultaneous study of the underlying genetic architecture and multifactorial interactions is expected to enhance the prediction and manipulation of complex traits. PMID:26344654

  15. Evaluation of benzene exposure in petrol pump attendants and in mechanics by urinary trans, trans-muconic acid (t, t-MA determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Cirillo

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available

    Occupational exposure to benzene in petrol pump attendants and in mechanics was studied by examining the benzene content in both the air breathed and in the urinary metabolite trans,trans-muconic acid (t,t-MA. Thirty petrol pump attendants and thirty mechanics (as exposed workers and thirty adult male office workers (as non exposed workers were involved in the study. Measures were taken at the begin and at the end of the working shifts.

     The benzene concentrations in the breathing air samples varied from 2 to 88 μg m-3, lower than the EU acceptable limit for occupational environment. The average urinary t,t-MA in the petrol pump attendants at the begin and at the end of the working shifts ranged between 133 ± 69 and 255 ± 174 μg g-1 creatinine and in the mechanics between 204 ± 139 and 300 ± 211 μg g-1 creatinine, respectively.

    In all the participants the mean levels of urinary t,t-MA at the end of the working shifts were significantly higher than those at the beginning. In the exposed workers mean levels of urinary t,t-MA were significantly higher than in those of the non-exposed workers. The influence of the smoking was demonstrated by the urinary t,t-MA levels in smoking non-exposed subjects.

  16. A lack of consensus in the literature findings on the removal of airborne benzene by houseplants: Effect of bacterial enrichment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriprapat, Wararat; Strand, Stuart E.

    2016-04-01

    Removal rates of benzene and formaldehyde gas by houseplants reported by several laboratories varied by several orders of magnitude. We hypothesized that these variations were caused by differential responses of soil microbial populations to the high levels of pollutant used in the studies, and tested responses to benzene by plants and soils separately. Five houseplant species and tobacco were exposed to benzene under hydroponic conditions and the uptake rates compared. Among the test plants, Syngonium podophyllum and Chlorophytum comosum and Epipremnum aureum had the highest benzene removal rates. The effects of benzene addition on populations of soil bacteria were determined using reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) assays targeting microbial genes involved in benzene degradation. The total bacterial population increased as shown by increases in the levels of eubacteria 16S rRNA, which was significantly higher in the high benzene incubations than in the low benzene incubations. Transcripts (mRNA) of genes encoding phenol monooxygenases, catechol-2,3-dioxygenase and the housekeeping gene rpoB increased in all soils incubated with high benzene concentrations. Therefore the enrichment of soils with benzene gas levels typical of experiments with houseplants in the literature artificially increased the levels of total soil bacterial populations, and especially the levels and activities of benzene-degrading bacteria.

  17. Benzene Uptake and Glutathione S-transferase T1 Status as Determinants of S-Phenylmercapturic Acid in Cigarette Smokers in the Multiethnic Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haiman, Christopher A.; Patel, Yesha M.; Stram, Daniel O.; Carmella, Steven G.; Chen, Menglan; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Le Marchand, Loic; Hecht, Stephen S.

    2016-01-01

    Research from the Multiethnic Cohort (MEC) demonstrated that, for the same quantity of cigarette smoking, African Americans and Native Hawaiians have a higher lung cancer risk than Whites, while Latinos and Japanese Americans are less susceptible. We collected urine samples from 2,239 cigarette smokers from five different ethnic groups in the MEC and analyzed each sample for S-phenylmercapturic acid (SPMA), a specific biomarker of benzene uptake. African Americans had significantly higher (geometric mean [SE] 3.69 [0.2], p<0.005) SPMA/ml urine than Whites (2.67 [0.13]) while Japanese Americans had significantly lower levels than Whites (1.65 [0.07], p<0.005). SPMA levels in Native Hawaiians and Latinos were not significantly different from those of Whites. We also conducted a genome-wide association study in search of genetic risk factors related to benzene exposure. The glutathione S-transferase T1 (GSTT1) deletion explained between 14.2–31.6% (p = 5.4x10-157) and the GSTM1 deletion explained between 0.2%-2.4% of the variance (p = 1.1x10-9) of SPMA levels in these populations. Ethnic differences in levels of SPMA remained strong even after controlling for the effects of these two deletions. These results demonstrate the powerful effect of GSTT1 status on SPMA levels in urine and show that uptake of benzene in African American, White, and Japanese American cigarette smokers is consistent with their lung cancer risk in the MEC. While benzene is not generally considered a cause of lung cancer, its metabolite SPMA could be a biomarker for other volatile lung carcinogens in cigarette smoke. PMID:26959369

  18. Benzene Uptake and Glutathione S-transferase T1 Status as Determinants of S-Phenylmercapturic Acid in Cigarette Smokers in the Multiethnic Cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher A Haiman

    Full Text Available Research from the Multiethnic Cohort (MEC demonstrated that, for the same quantity of cigarette smoking, African Americans and Native Hawaiians have a higher lung cancer risk than Whites, while Latinos and Japanese Americans are less susceptible. We collected urine samples from 2,239 cigarette smokers from five different ethnic groups in the MEC and analyzed each sample for S-phenylmercapturic acid (SPMA, a specific biomarker of benzene uptake. African Americans had significantly higher (geometric mean [SE] 3.69 [0.2], p<0.005 SPMA/ml urine than Whites (2.67 [0.13] while Japanese Americans had significantly lower levels than Whites (1.65 [0.07], p<0.005. SPMA levels in Native Hawaiians and Latinos were not significantly different from those of Whites. We also conducted a genome-wide association study in search of genetic risk factors related to benzene exposure. The glutathione S-transferase T1 (GSTT1 deletion explained between 14.2-31.6% (p = 5.4x10-157 and the GSTM1 deletion explained between 0.2%-2.4% of the variance (p = 1.1x10-9 of SPMA levels in these populations. Ethnic differences in levels of SPMA remained strong even after controlling for the effects of these two deletions. These results demonstrate the powerful effect of GSTT1 status on SPMA levels in urine and show that uptake of benzene in African American, White, and Japanese American cigarette smokers is consistent with their lung cancer risk in the MEC. While benzene is not generally considered a cause of lung cancer, its metabolite SPMA could be a biomarker for other volatile lung carcinogens in cigarette smoke.

  19. Benzene hemoglobin adducts in mice and rats: Characterization of formation and physiological modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benzene is a myelotoxin and a human leukemogen. Humans are exposed to this compound, both occupationally and environmentally. This study was conducted to determine whether formation of benzene-derived adducts with blood hemoglobin (Hb) can be used as a biomarker of exposure to benzene. B6C3F1 mice and F344/N rats were given 0.1 to 10,000 mumol [14C]benzene/kg body wt, orally. Twenty-four hours later, animals were euthanized, and globin was isolated from blood samples. The globin was analyzed by liquid scintillation spectrometry for the presence of [14C]benzene-derived adducts. Hb adduct formation was linear with respect to dose for amounts of up to 500 mumol [14C]benzene/kg body wt, for both rodent species. Within this linear dose-response range, mice formed adducts from [14C]benzene approximately 3.5 times less efficiently [0.022 +/- 0.010 (pmol adducts/mg globin)/(mumol/kg body wt dose)] than did rats [0.076 +/- 0.014 (pmol adducts)/(mumol/kg body wt dose)]. Benzene-derived Hb adducts also accumulated linearly when mice and rats were given up to three daily doses of 500 mumol [14C]benzene/kg body wt. These data were used to develop a physiological model for benzene-derived Hb adduct formation. Both first-order and saturable pathways for adduct formation were incorporated. The results showed that the model simulated the levels of Hb adducts in both mice and rats after oral exposures to benzene and predicted the levels of Hb adducts present after inhalation exposure. These studies suggest that Hb adducts might be useful biomarkers for human exposures to benzene

  20. Species differences in the metabolism of benzene.

    OpenAIRE

    Henderson, R F

    1996-01-01

    The pathways of metabolism of benzene appear to be qualitatively similar in all species studied thus far. However, there are quantitative differences in the fraction of benzene metabolized by the different pathways. These species differences become important for risk assessments based on animal data. Mice have a greater overall capacity to metabolize benzene than rats or primates, based on mass balance studies conducted in vivo using radiolabled benzene. Mice and monkeys metabolize more of th...

  1. Lymphocyte chromosome breakage in low benzene exposure among Indonesian workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewi S. Soemarko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Benzene has been used in industry since long time and its level in environment should be controled. Although environmental benzene level has been controlled to less than 1 ppm, negative effect of benzene exposure is still observed, such as chromosome breakage. This study aimed to know the prevalence of lymphocyte chromosome breakage and the influencing factors among workers in low level benzene exposure.Methods: This was a cross sectional study in oil & gas industry T, conducted between September 2007 and April 2010. The study subjects consisted of 115 workers from production section and head office. Data on type of work, duration of benzene exposure, and antioxidant consumption were collected by interview as well as observation of working process. Lymphocyte chromosome breakage was examined by banding method. Analysis of relationship between chromosome breakage and risk factors was performed by chi-square and odd ratio, whereas the role of determinant risk factors was analyzed by multivariate forward stepwise.Results: Overall lymphocyte chromosome breakage was experieced by 72 out of 115 subjects (62.61%. The prevalence among workers at production section was 68.9%, while among administration workers was 40% (p > 0.05. Low antioxidant intake increases the risk of chromosome breakage (p = 0.035; ORadjusted = 2.90; 95%CI 1.08-7.78. Other influencing factors are: type of work (p = 0,10; ORcrude = 3.32; 95% CI 1.33-8.3 and chronic benzene exposure at workplace (p = 0.014; ORcrude = 2.61; 95% CI 1.2-5.67, while the work practice-behavior decreases the lymphocyte chromosome breakage (p = 0.007; ORadjusted = 0.30; 95% CI 0.15-0.76.Conclusion: The prevalence of lymphocyte chromosome breakage in the environment with low benzene exposure is quite high especially in production workers. Chronic benzene exposure in the workplace, type of work, and low antioxidant consumption is related to lymphocyte chromosome breakage. Thus, benzene in the

  2. Canada-wide standard for benzene phase 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On the basis of available data, benzene is classified as carcinogenic to humans, and it led to the establishment, pursuant to the 1998 Canada-wide Accord on Environmental Harmonization of the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment (CCME) and its Canada-wide Environmental Standards Sub-Agreement, of the Canada-Wide Standard (CWS) for benzene. It is generally considered that any level of exposure carries some probability of harmful effects. A balancing act between achieving the best health and environmental protection possible and feasibility and costs associated with the reduction of emissions contributing to elevated levels of benzene in the air was performed for the development of this CWS. In June 2000, the Ministers of the Environment agreed to a phased approach to benzene reduction. To this effect, the Canada-Wide Standard for Benzene Phase 1 was ratified. By the end of 2000, a 30 per cent reduction in total benzene emissions form 1995 emission inventory levels was expected, according to Phase 1. The measures initiated during Phase 1 will continue beyond the time frame, and Phase 2 calls for a follow-through on those measures. Best management practices and jurisdictional regulations that will minimize emissions are recognized as part of Phase 2. Joint action in conjunction with other air issue programs should lead to additional reductions. Specifically, Phase 2 calls for an additional reduction of 6 kilotonnes in benzene emissions for existing facilities by the end of 2010. The minimization of benzene emissions through the application of best available pollution prevention and control techniques is contained for new and expanding facilities. The implementation of the CWS comprises the follow-up of existing initiatives resulting from the application of Phase 1 and the promotion and application of best management practices for new and expanding facilities, the determination and tracking of ancillary emission reductions of benzene realized as a result of

  3. Can Volatile Organic Metabolites Be Used to Simultaneously Assess Microbial and Mite Contamination Level in Cereal Grains and Coffee Beans?

    OpenAIRE

    Angelo C Salvador; Inês Baptista; Barros, António S.; Gomes, Newton C M; Angela Cunha; Adelaide Almeida; Silvia M Rocha

    2013-01-01

    A novel approach based on headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) combined with comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC-ToFMS) was developed for the simultaneous screening of microbial and mite contamination level in cereals and coffee beans. The proposed approach emerges as a powerful tool for the rapid assessment of the microbial contamination level (ca. 70 min versus ca. 72 to 120 h for bacteria and fungi, respectively, using convent...

  4. Effect of levels of urea and cassava chip on feed intake, rumen fermentation, blood metabolites and microbial populations in growing goats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metha Wanapat

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted to assess effect of levels of urea and cassava chip (CC on feed intake, rumen ecology, blood metabolites and microbial populations. Four, Thai Native X Anglo Nubian crossbred growing male goats with an average liveweight 19.0+1 kg were randomly assigned according to a 4x4 Latin square design to receive one of four diets: T1=urea at 0 % (CC=30%, T2=urea at 1% (CC=40%, T3=urea at 2% (CC = 50% and T4=urea at 3%(CC=60%, of DM basis, respectively. Elephant grass (Pennisetum purpureum was offered on an ad lib basis. The results revealed that total DM intake (%BW and g/kg W0.75 and BW change were similar among treatments (p>0.05. Likewise, rumen pH, BUN, blood glucose, PCV and microbial populations were similar among treatments (p>0.05, while NH3-N increased as the urea level increased and were found highest (p<0.05 in T4 at 12.8 mg/dL. Based on this experiment, it can be concluded that a higher level of urea (3% could be used with a high level of CC in concentrate and it was good approach in exploiting the use of local feed resources for goat production.

  5. 27 CFR 21.97 - Benzene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Benzene. 21.97 Section 21... TREASURY LIQUORS FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specifications for Denaturants § 21.97 Benzene. (a..., Standard No. D 836-77; for incorporation by reference, see § 21.6(b).) When 100 ml of benzene are...

  6. Role of Hydroquinone-Thiol Conjugates in Benzene-Mediated Toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Lau, Serrine S.; Kuhlman, Christopher; Bratton, Shawn B.; Monks, Terrence J.

    2009-01-01

    Hydroquinone (HQ) is a metabolite of benzene, and in combination with phenol (PHE), reproduces benzene myelotoxicity. HQ readily oxidizes to 1,4-benzoquinone (1,4-BQ) followed by the reductive addition of glutathione (GSH). Subsequent cycles of oxidation and GSH addition give rise to a variety of mono-, and multi-GSH substituted conjugates. Following administration of PHE/HQ (1.1 mmol/kg/0.9 mmol/kg, ip) to male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats, 2-(glutathion-S-yl)HQ [GS-HQ], 2,5-bis-(glutathion-S-yl...

  7. Volatile Metabolites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daryl D. Rowan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Volatile organic compounds (volatiles comprise a chemically diverse class of low molecular weight organic compounds having an appreciable vapor pressure under ambient conditions. Volatiles produced by plants attract pollinators and seed dispersers, and provide defense against pests and pathogens. For insects, volatiles may act as pheromones directing social behavior or as cues for finding hosts or prey. For humans, volatiles are important as flavorants and as possible disease biomarkers. The marine environment is also a major source of halogenated and sulfur-containing volatiles which participate in the global cycling of these elements. While volatile analysis commonly measures a rather restricted set of analytes, the diverse and extreme physical properties of volatiles provide unique analytical challenges. Volatiles constitute only a small proportion of the total number of metabolites produced by living organisms, however, because of their roles as signaling molecules (semiochemicals both within and between organisms, accurately measuring and determining the roles of these compounds is crucial to an integrated understanding of living systems. This review summarizes recent developments in volatile research from a metabolomics perspective with a focus on the role of recent technical innovation in developing new areas of volatile research and expanding the range of ecological interactions which may be mediated by volatile organic metabolites.

  8. Basal levels and diurnal variations of some hormones and metabolites in blood of dairy cows treated daily with rbSTin early and late lactation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurgen Blum

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The variations of basal value (before morning feeding at 3-4 days interval and daily pattern (on 4and 18day of treat-  ment with 8 blood collections within 24h of hormones and metabolites were studied in four dairy cows; 2 in early and  2 in late lactation, which were alternatively injected daily for a period of 21 days with 26.3 mg rbST or saline.  The rbST  injection significantly increased the basal and daily levels of GH, IGF-I in both stages of lactation. Daily levels of NEFA  were significantly increased by rbST in both stages of lactation and their variations, due to the effect of meals, were coun-  teracted by the rbST; the higher level of NEFA allowed a greater sparing of glucose, the blood level of which resulted  higher (P  blood urea level (P  ticular the high availability of glucose, determined a significantly higher blood level of insulin and T3, and lower level of  glucagon. Despite the similar GH, IGF-I and NEFA increases observed in the cows treated in early and late lactation, other  metabolic and endocrine consequences resulted more evident in late lactation. Furthermore, some of these variations  were affected by the forage meals. It can be concluded, therefore, that the changes occurring in the blood subsequent  to a rbST treatment are not equal to those which occur at the start of lactation; moreover, they are affected by the daily  feeding pattern and perhaps by the stage of  lactation. 

  9. Coordinate changes in histone modifications, mRNA levels, and metabolite profiles in clonal INS-1 832/13 β-cells accompany functional adaptations to lipotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmgren, Siri; Spégel, Peter; Danielsson, Anders P H; Nagorny, Cecilia L; Andersson, Lotta E; Nitert, Marloes Dekker; Ridderstråle, Martin; Mulder, Hindrik; Ling, Charlotte

    2013-04-26

    Lipotoxicity is a presumed pathogenetic process whereby elevated circulating and stored lipids in type 2 diabetes cause pancreatic β-cell failure. To resolve the underlying molecular mechanisms, we exposed clonal INS-1 832/13 β-cells to palmitate for 48 h. We observed elevated basal insulin secretion but impaired glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in palmitate-exposed cells. Glucose utilization was unchanged, palmitate oxidation was increased, and oxygen consumption was impaired. Halting exposure of the clonal INS-1 832/13 β-cells to palmitate largely recovered all of the lipid-induced functional changes. Metabolite profiling revealed profound but reversible increases in cellular lipids. Glucose-induced increases in tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates were attenuated by exposure to palmitate. Analysis of gene expression by microarray showed increased expression of 982 genes and decreased expression of 1032 genes after exposure to palmitate. Increases were seen in pathways for steroid biosynthesis, cell cycle, fatty acid metabolism, DNA replication, and biosynthesis of unsaturated fatty acids; decreases occurred in the aminoacyl-tRNA synthesis pathway. The activity of histone-modifying enzymes and histone modifications of differentially expressed genes were reversibly altered upon exposure to palmitate. Thus, Insig1, Lss, Peci, Idi1, Hmgcs1, and Casr were subject to epigenetic regulation. Our analyses demonstrate that coordinate changes in histone modifications, mRNA levels, and metabolite profiles accompanied functional adaptations of clonal β-cells to lipotoxicity. It is highly likely that these changes are pathogenetic, accounting for loss of glucose responsiveness and perturbed insulin secretion. PMID:23476019

  10. Coordinate Changes in Histone Modifications, mRNA Levels, and Metabolite Profiles in Clonal INS-1 832/13 β-Cells Accompany Functional Adaptations to Lipotoxicity*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmgren, Siri; Spégel, Peter; Danielsson, Anders P.H.; Nagorny, Cecilia L.; Andersson, Lotta E.; Nitert, Marloes Dekker; Ridderstråle, Martin; Mulder, Hindrik; Ling, Charlotte

    2013-01-01

    Lipotoxicity is a presumed pathogenetic process whereby elevated circulating and stored lipids in type 2 diabetes cause pancreatic β-cell failure. To resolve the underlying molecular mechanisms, we exposed clonal INS-1 832/13 β-cells to palmitate for 48 h. We observed elevated basal insulin secretion but impaired glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in palmitate-exposed cells. Glucose utilization was unchanged, palmitate oxidation was increased, and oxygen consumption was impaired. Halting exposure of the clonal INS-1 832/13 β-cells to palmitate largely recovered all of the lipid-induced functional changes. Metabolite profiling revealed profound but reversible increases in cellular lipids. Glucose-induced increases in tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates were attenuated by exposure to palmitate. Analysis of gene expression by microarray showed increased expression of 982 genes and decreased expression of 1032 genes after exposure to palmitate. Increases were seen in pathways for steroid biosynthesis, cell cycle, fatty acid metabolism, DNA replication, and biosynthesis of unsaturated fatty acids; decreases occurred in the aminoacyl-tRNA synthesis pathway. The activity of histone-modifying enzymes and histone modifications of differentially expressed genes were reversibly altered upon exposure to palmitate. Thus, Insig1, Lss, Peci, Idi1, Hmgcs1, and Casr were subject to epigenetic regulation. Our analyses demonstrate that coordinate changes in histone modifications, mRNA levels, and metabolite profiles accompanied functional adaptations of clonal β-cells to lipotoxicity. It is highly likely that these changes are pathogenetic, accounting for loss of glucose responsiveness and perturbed insulin secretion. PMID:23476019

  11. Can volatile organic metabolites be used to simultaneously assess microbial and mite contamination level in cereal grains and coffee beans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador, Angelo C; Baptista, Inês; Barros, António S; Gomes, Newton C M; Cunha, Angela; Almeida, Adelaide; Rocha, Silvia M

    2013-01-01

    A novel approach based on headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) combined with comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC-ToFMS) was developed for the simultaneous screening of microbial and mite contamination level in cereals and coffee beans. The proposed approach emerges as a powerful tool for the rapid assessment of the microbial contamination level (ca. 70 min versus ca. 72 to 120 h for bacteria and fungi, respectively, using conventional plate counts), and mite contamination (ca. 70 min versus ca. 24 h). A full-factorial design was performed for optimization of the SPME experimental parameters. The methodology was applied to three types of rice (rough, brown, and white rice), oat, wheat, and green and roasted coffee beans. Simultaneously, microbiological analysis of the samples (total aerobic microorganisms, moulds, and yeasts) was performed by conventional plate counts. A set of 54 volatile markers was selected among all the compounds detected by GC×GC-ToFMS. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was applied in order to establish a relationship between potential volatile markers and the level of microbial contamination. Methylbenzene, 3-octanone, 2-nonanone, 2-methyl-3-pentanol, 1-octen-3-ol, and 2-hexanone were associated to samples with higher microbial contamination level, especially in rough rice. Moreover, oat exhibited a high GC peak area of 2-hydroxy-6-methylbenzaldehyde, a sexual and alarm pheromone for adult mites, which in the other matrices appeared as a trace component. The number of mites detected in oat grains was correlated to the GC peak area of the pheromone. The HS-SPME/GC×GC-ToFMS methodology can be regarded as the basis for the development of a rapid and versatile method that can be applied in industry to the simultaneous assessment the level of microbiological contamination and for detection of mites in cereals grains and coffee beans. PMID:23613710

  12. Can volatile organic metabolites be used to simultaneously assess microbial and mite contamination level in cereal grains and coffee beans?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo C Salvador

    Full Text Available A novel approach based on headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME combined with comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC-ToFMS was developed for the simultaneous screening of microbial and mite contamination level in cereals and coffee beans. The proposed approach emerges as a powerful tool for the rapid assessment of the microbial contamination level (ca. 70 min versus ca. 72 to 120 h for bacteria and fungi, respectively, using conventional plate counts, and mite contamination (ca. 70 min versus ca. 24 h. A full-factorial design was performed for optimization of the SPME experimental parameters. The methodology was applied to three types of rice (rough, brown, and white rice, oat, wheat, and green and roasted coffee beans. Simultaneously, microbiological analysis of the samples (total aerobic microorganisms, moulds, and yeasts was performed by conventional plate counts. A set of 54 volatile markers was selected among all the compounds detected by GC×GC-ToFMS. Principal Component Analysis (PCA was applied in order to establish a relationship between potential volatile markers and the level of microbial contamination. Methylbenzene, 3-octanone, 2-nonanone, 2-methyl-3-pentanol, 1-octen-3-ol, and 2-hexanone were associated to samples with higher microbial contamination level, especially in rough rice. Moreover, oat exhibited a high GC peak area of 2-hydroxy-6-methylbenzaldehyde, a sexual and alarm pheromone for adult mites, which in the other matrices appeared as a trace component. The number of mites detected in oat grains was correlated to the GC peak area of the pheromone. The HS-SPME/GC×GC-ToFMS methodology can be regarded as the basis for the development of a rapid and versatile method that can be applied in industry to the simultaneous assessment the level of microbiological contamination and for detection of mites in cereals grains and coffee beans.

  13. 46 CFR 151.05-2 - Compliance with requirements for tank barges carrying benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or butyl acrylate cargoes. 151.05-2 Section 151.05-2 Shipping... Compliance with requirements for tank barges carrying benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or butyl acrylate cargoes. A tank barge certificated to carry benzene and benzene containing cargoes or...

  14. Macromolecular and elemental composition analysis and extracellular metabolite balances of Pichia pastoris growing at different oxygen levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattanovich Diethard

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Analysis of the cell operation at the metabolic level requires collecting data of different types and to determine their confidence level. In addition, the acquired information has to be combined in order to obtain a consistent operational view. In the case of Pichia pastoris, information of its biomass composition at macromolecular and elemental level is scarce particularly when different environmental conditions, such as oxygen availability or, genetic backgrounds (e.g. recombinant protein production vs. non production conditions are compared. Results P. pastoris cells growing in carbon-limited chemostat cultures under different oxygenation conditions (% O2 in the bioreactor inlet gas: 21%, 11% and 8%, corresponding to normoxic, oxygen-limiting and hypoxic conditions, respectively, as well as under recombinant protein (antibody fragment, Fab producing and non-producing conditions, were analyzed from different points of view. On the one hand, the macromolecular and elemental composition of the biomass was measured using different techniques at the different experimental conditions and proper reconciliation techniques were applied for gross error detection of the measured substrates and products conversion rates. On the other hand, fermentation data was analyzed applying elemental mass balances. This allowed detecting a previously missed by-product secreted under hypoxic conditions, identified as arabinitol (aka. arabitol. After identification of this C5 sugar alcohol as a fermentation by-product, the mass balances of the fermentation experiments were validated. Conclusions After application of a range of analytical and statistical techniques, a consistent view of growth parameters and compositional data of P. pastoris cells growing under different oxygenation conditions was obtained. The obtained data provides a first view of the effects of oxygen limitation on the physiology of this microorganism, while recombinant Fab

  15. Changes in the levels of abscisic acid and its metabolites in excised leaf blades of Xanthium strumarium during and after water stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeevaart, J.A.D.

    1980-10-01

    The time course of abscisic acid (ABA) accumulation during water stress and of degradation following rehydration was investigated by analyzing the levels of ABA and its metabolites phaseic acid (PA) and alkalihydrolyzable conjugated ABA in excised leaf blades of Xanthium strumarium. Initial purification was by reverse-phase, preparative, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) which did not require prior partitioning. ABA and PA were purified further by analytical HPLC with a ..mu..Bondapak-NH/sub 2/ column, and quantified by GLC with an electron capture detector. The ABA content of stressed leaves increased for 4 to 5 hours and then leveled off due to a balance between synthesis and degradation. Since PA accumulated at a constant rate throughout the wilting period, it was concluded that the rate of ABA synthesis decreased after the first 4 to 5 hours stress. Conjugated ABA increased at a low rate during stress. This is interpreted to indicate that free ABA was converted to the conjugated form, rather than the reverse. Following rehydration of wilted leaves, the ABA level immediately ceased increasing; it remained constant for 1 hour and then declined rapidly to the prestress level over a 2- to 3-hour period with a concomitant rise in the PA level. In contrast to the rapid disappearance of ABA after relief of stress, the high PA content of rehydrated leaves declined only slowly. The level of conjugated ABA did not change following rehydration, indicating that conjugation of ABA was irreversible. Detached Xanthium leaves that were subjected to a wilting-recovery-rewilting cycle in darkness responded to the second wilting period by formation of the same amount of ABA as accumulated after the first stress period.

  16. Current understanding of the mechanism of benzene-induced leukemia in humans: implications for risk assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHale, Cliona M.; Zhang, Luoping; Smith, Martyn T.

    2012-01-01

    Benzene causes acute myeloid leukemia and probably other hematological malignancies. As benzene also causes hematotoxicity even in workers exposed to levels below the US permissible occupational exposure limit of 1 part per million, further assessment of the health risks associated with its exposure, particularly at low levels, is needed. Here, we describe the probable mechanism by which benzene induces leukemia involving the targeting of critical genes and pathways through the induction of genetic, chromosomal or epigenetic abnormalities and genomic instability, in a hematopoietic stem cell (HSC); stromal cell dysregulation; apoptosis of HSCs and stromal cells and altered proliferation and differentiation of HSCs. These effects modulated by benzene-induced oxidative stress, aryl hydrocarbon receptor dysregulation and reduced immunosurveillance, lead to the generation of leukemic stem cells and subsequent clonal evolution to leukemia. A mode of action (MOA) approach to the risk assessment of benzene was recently proposed. This approach is limited, however, by the challenges of defining a simple stochastic MOA of benzene-induced leukemogenesis and of identifying relevant and quantifiable parameters associated with potential key events. An alternative risk assessment approach is the application of toxicogenomics and systems biology in human populations, animals and in vitro models of the HSC stem cell niche, exposed to a range of levels of benzene. These approaches will inform our understanding of the mechanisms of benzene toxicity and identify additional biomarkers of exposure, early effect and susceptibility useful for risk assessment. PMID:22166497

  17. Electronic Conductivity of Polypyrrole−Dodecyl Benzene Sulfonate Complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    West, Keld; Bay, Lasse; Nielsen, Martin Meedom;

    2004-01-01

    The electronic conductivity of the electroactive polymer polypyrrole-dodecyl benzene sulfonate (PPy-DBS) has been characterized as function of the redox level. The polymer was synthesized with different isomers of the dopant anions: the common mixed DBS tenside and three well-defined synthetic...... dodecyl isomers (with the benzene group at positions 1, 2 and 6). The conductivity was measured both by van der Pauw measurements on PPy-DBS in the oxidized, dry state as function of temperature, and by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy as function of potential in 0.1 M NaCl aqueous electrolyte...

  18. Double photoionization of halogenated benzene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have experimentally investigated the double-photoionization process in C6BrF5 using monochromatized synchrotron radiation. We compare our results with previously published data for partially deuterated benzene (C6H3D3) over a wide range of photon energies from threshold to 270 eV. A broad resonance in the ratio of doubly to singly charged parent ions at about 65 eV appears shifted in energy compared to benzene data. This shift is due to the difference in the bond lengths in two molecules. A simple model can explain the shape of this resonance. At higher photon energies, we observe another broad resonance that can be explained as a second harmonic of the first resonance

  19. Double photoionization of halogenated benzene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    AlKhaldi, Mashaal Q. [Institut für Optik und Atomare Physik, Technische Universität Berlin, Hardenbergstr. 36, D-10623 Berlin (Germany); Wehlitz, Ralf, E-mail: rwehlitz@gmail.com [Synchrotron Radiation Center, University of Wisconsin–Madison, Stoughton, Wisconsin 53589 (United States)

    2016-01-28

    We have experimentally investigated the double-photoionization process in C{sub 6}BrF{sub 5} using monochromatized synchrotron radiation. We compare our results with previously published data for partially deuterated benzene (C{sub 6}H{sub 3}D{sub 3}) over a wide range of photon energies from threshold to 270 eV. A broad resonance in the ratio of doubly to singly charged parent ions at about 65 eV appears shifted in energy compared to benzene data. This shift is due to the difference in the bond lengths in two molecules. A simple model can explain the shape of this resonance. At higher photon energies, we observe another broad resonance that can be explained as a second harmonic of the first resonance.

  20. Slow Neutron Scattering by Benzene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have calculated the scattering of slow neutrons by the benzene molecule. The calculations are carried out within the framework of the time dependent formalism of Zemach and Glauber. Detailed account is taken of the effects of the molecular vibrations on the neutron scattering. Among the results explicitly calculated are the slow neutron total scattering cross-section as a function of energy and the energy angular distribution of singly scattered sections. (author)

  1. Benzene emission from the actual car fleet in relation to petrol composition in Denmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study covers an investigation of the trends in air pollution levels of benzene in Danish cities and their relationship with the benzene content in petrol. Petrol samples from the two refineries in Denmark as well as sold petrol from some representative Danish petrol stations were analysed. The benzene content in Danish petrol was reduced from 3.5% for 95 octane prior to 1995 to approx. 2% in 1995 and further to 1% in 1998. Air quality measurements of aromatic VOC are available from two Danish cities; Copenhagen since 1994 and Odense since 1997. Measurements of benzene, CO and NOx from these two locations were analysed using the Operational Street Pollution Model (OSPM) and trends in the actual emissions of these pollutants were determined. It is shown that the decrease in both the concentration levels and in the emissions was significantly larger for benzene than for CO and NOx. The decreasing trends of NOx and CO could be explained by the increasing fraction of petrol-fuelled vehicles with three way catalysts (TWC). The much steeper decreasing trend for benzene can most likely be attributed to a combination of the effect of the increasing share of the TWC vehicles and a simultaneous reduction of benzene content in Danish petrol. The reduction of benzene concentrations and emissions is observed despite that the total amount of aromatics in petrol has increased slightly in the same period. (Author)

  2. Benzene emission from the actual car fleet in relation to petrol composition in Denmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmgren, Finn; Hansen, Asger B.; Berkowicz, Ruwim; Skov, Henrik

    The present study covers an investigation of the trends in air pollution levels of benzene in Danish cities and their relationship with the benzene content in petrol. Petrol samples from the two refineries in Denmark as well as sold petrol from some representative Danish petrol stations were analysed. The benzene content in Danish petrol was reduced from 3.5% for 95 octane prior to 1995 to approx. 2% in 1995 and further to 1 % in 1998. Air quality measurements of aromatic VOC are available from two Danish cities; Copenhagen since 1994 and Odense since 1997. Measurements of benzene, CO and NO x from these two locations were analysed using the Operational Street Pollution Model (OSPM) and trends in the actual emissions of these pollutants were determined. It is shown that the decrease in both the concentration levels and in the emissions was significantly larger for benzene than for CO and NO x. The decreasing trends of NO x and CO could be explained by the increasing fraction of petrol-fuelled vehicles with three way catalysts (TWC). The much steeper decreasing trend for benzene can most likely be attributed to a combination of the effect of the increasing share of the TWC vehicles and a simultaneous reduction of benzene content in Danish petrol. The reduction of benzene concentrations and emissions is observed despite that the total amount of aromatics in petrol has increased slightly in the same period.

  3. Impact of a new gasoline benzene regulation on ambient air pollutants in Anchorage, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Yuriko; Morris, Stephen S.; Salerno, Christopher; Schlapia, Anne M.; Stichick, Mathew

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the impact of a new U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standard that limits the amount of benzene allowed in gasoline on ambient benzene concentrations. This new standard, together with two companion regulations that limit cold-temperature automotive emissions and the permeability of portable fuel containers, was expected to lower the levels of ambient benzene and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs) nationwide. In this study the impact of the gasoline benzene standard was evaluated in Anchorage, Alaska in a two-phase ambient air monitoring study conducted before and after the new gasoline standard was implemented. Gasoline sold by Anchorage retailers was also evaluated in each phase to determine the content of benzene and other gasoline components. The average benzene content in Anchorage gasoline was reduced by 70%, from 5.05% (w/w) to 1.53% (w/w) following the implementation of the standard. The annual mean ambient benzene concentration fell by 51%, from 0.99 ppbv in Phase 1 to 0.49 ppbv in Phase 2. Analysis suggests the change in gasoline benzene content alone reduced benzene emissions by 46%. The changes in toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene content in gasoline between Phase 1 and 2 were relatively small and the differences in the mean ambient concentrations of these compounds between phases were modest. Our results suggest that cold winter communities in high latitude and mountainous regions may benefit more from the gasoline benzene standard because of high benzene emissions resulting from vehicle cold start and a tendency to develop atmospheric stagnation conditions in the winter.

  4. Risk estimation of benzene-induced leukemia by radiation equivalent dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the Hiroshima and Nagasaki epidemiological study, risk assessment system for radiation has been well developed and is practically applied to the international protection standards. Hence, defining the radiation equivalent dose for chemical agents could place in the order of their risk. As well as the radiation, benzene causes leukemia to humans. Therefore, we evaluated the radiation-equivalent dose for benzene based on chromosome aberration rates induced by its metabolites and low-dose rate radiation because chromosome aberration is thought to be closely related to the leukemogenesis. Using radiation risk coefficient, the leukemia risk caused by 1 mg/m3 benzene inhalation was estimated 5.5 - 7.3 x 10-8, which is underestimated compared to other studies based on human epidemiological researches. (author)

  5. Density functional theory study of the interaction of vinyl radical, ethyne, and ethene with benzene, aimed to define an affordable computational level to investigate stability trends in large van der Waals complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maranzana, Andrea, E-mail: andrea.maranzana@unito.it, E-mail: anna.giordana@hotmail.com, E-mail: vincenzo.barone@sns.it, E-mail: mauro.causa@unina.it, E-mail: mipavone@unina.it; Giordana, Anna, E-mail: andrea.maranzana@unito.it, E-mail: anna.giordana@hotmail.com, E-mail: vincenzo.barone@sns.it, E-mail: mauro.causa@unina.it, E-mail: mipavone@unina.it; Indarto, Antonius, E-mail: antonius.indarto@che.itb.ac.id; Tonachini, Glauco, E-mail: glauco.tonachini@unito.it [Dipartimento di Chimica, Università di Torino, Corso Massimo D’Azeglio 48, I-10125 Torino (Italy); Barone, Vincenzo, E-mail: andrea.maranzana@unito.it, E-mail: anna.giordana@hotmail.com, E-mail: vincenzo.barone@sns.it, E-mail: mauro.causa@unina.it, E-mail: mipavone@unina.it [Scuola Normale Superiore, Piazza dei Cavalieri 7, I-56126, Pisa (Italy); Causà, Mauro, E-mail: andrea.maranzana@unito.it, E-mail: anna.giordana@hotmail.com, E-mail: vincenzo.barone@sns.it, E-mail: mauro.causa@unina.it, E-mail: mipavone@unina.it [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica, dei Materiali e della Produzione Industriale, Università di Napoli “Federico II,” Via Cintia, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Pavone, Michele, E-mail: andrea.maranzana@unito.it, E-mail: anna.giordana@hotmail.com, E-mail: vincenzo.barone@sns.it, E-mail: mauro.causa@unina.it, E-mail: mipavone@unina.it [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche, Università di Napoli “Federico II,” Complesso Universitario di Monte Sant’Angelo, Via Cintia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy)

    2013-12-28

    Our purpose is to identify a computational level sufficiently dependable and affordable to assess trends in the interaction of a variety of radical or closed shell unsaturated hydro-carbons A adsorbed on soot platelet models B. These systems, of environmental interest, would unavoidably have rather large sizes, thus prompting to explore in this paper the performances of relatively low-level computational methods and compare them with higher-level reference results. To this end, the interaction of three complexes between non-polar species, vinyl radical, ethyne, or ethene (A) with benzene (B) is studied, since these species, involved themselves in growth processes of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and soot particles, are small enough to allow high-level reference calculations of the interaction energy ΔE{sub AB}. Counterpoise-corrected interaction energies ΔE{sub AB} are used at all stages. (1) Density Functional Theory (DFT) unconstrained optimizations of the A−B complexes are carried out, using the B3LYP-D, ωB97X-D, and M06-2X functionals, with six basis sets: 6-31G(d), 6-311 (2d,p), and 6-311++G(3df,3pd); aug-cc-pVDZ and aug-cc-pVTZ; N07T. (2) Then, unconstrained optimizations by Møller-Plesset second order Perturbation Theory (MP2), with each basis set, allow subsequent single point Coupled Cluster Singles Doubles and perturbative estimate of the Triples energy computations with the same basis sets [CCSD(T)//MP2]. (3) Based on an additivity assumption of (i) the estimated MP2 energy at the complete basis set limit [E{sub MP2/CBS}] and (ii) the higher-order correlation energy effects in passing from MP2 to CCSD(T) at the aug-cc-pVTZ basis set, ΔE{sub CC-MP}, a CCSD(T)/CBS estimate is obtained and taken as a computational energy reference. At DFT, variations in ΔE{sub AB} with basis set are not large for the title molecules, and the three functionals perform rather satisfactorily even with rather small basis sets [6-31G(d) and N07T], exhibiting

  6. Density functional theory study of the interaction of vinyl radical, ethyne, and ethene with benzene, aimed to define an affordable computational level to investigate stability trends in large van der Waals complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maranzana, Andrea; Giordana, Anna; Indarto, Antonius; Tonachini, Glauco; Barone, Vincenzo; Causà, Mauro; Pavone, Michele

    2013-12-28

    Our purpose is to identify a computational level sufficiently dependable and affordable to assess trends in the interaction of a variety of radical or closed shell unsaturated hydro-carbons A adsorbed on soot platelet models B. These systems, of environmental interest, would unavoidably have rather large sizes, thus prompting to explore in this paper the performances of relatively low-level computational methods and compare them with higher-level reference results. To this end, the interaction of three complexes between non-polar species, vinyl radical, ethyne, or ethene (A) with benzene (B) is studied, since these species, involved themselves in growth processes of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and soot particles, are small enough to allow high-level reference calculations of the interaction energy ΔEAB. Counterpoise-corrected interaction energies ΔEAB are used at all stages. (1) Density Functional Theory (DFT) unconstrained optimizations of the A-B complexes are carried out, using the B3LYP-D, ωB97X-D, and M06-2X functionals, with six basis sets: 6-31G(d), 6-311 (2d,p), and 6-311++G(3df,3pd); aug-cc-pVDZ and aug-cc-pVTZ; N07T. (2) Then, unconstrained optimizations by Møller-Plesset second order Perturbation Theory (MP2), with each basis set, allow subsequent single point Coupled Cluster Singles Doubles and perturbative estimate of the Triples energy computations with the same basis sets [CCSD(T)//MP2]. (3) Based on an additivity assumption of (i) the estimated MP2 energy at the complete basis set limit [EMP2/CBS] and (ii) the higher-order correlation energy effects in passing from MP2 to CCSD(T) at the aug-cc-pVTZ basis set, ΔECC-MP, a CCSD(T)/CBS estimate is obtained and taken as a computational energy reference. At DFT, variations in ΔEAB with basis set are not large for the title molecules, and the three functionals perform rather satisfactorily even with rather small basis sets [6-31G(d) and N07T], exhibiting deviation from the computational

  7. Survey results of benzene in soft drinks and other beverages by headspace gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyman, Patricia J; Diachenko, Gregory W; Perfetti, Gracia A; McNeal, Timothy P; Hiatt, Michael H; Morehouse, Kim M

    2008-01-23

    Benzene, a carcinogen that can cause cancer in humans, may form at nanogram per gram levels in some beverages containing both benzoate salts and ascorbic or erythorbic acids. Through a series of reactions, a hydroxyl radical forms that can decarboxylate benzoate to form benzene. Elevated temperatures and light stimulate these reactions, while sugar and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) can inhibit them. A headspace gas chromatography/mass spectrometry method for the determination of benzene in beverages was developed and validated. The method was used to conduct a survey of 199 soft drinks and other beverages. The vast majority of beverages sampled contained either no detectable benzene or levels below the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's drinking water limit of 5 ng/g. Beverages found to contain 5 ng/g benzene or more were reformulated by the manufacturers. The amount of benzene found in the reformulated beverages ranged from none detected to 1.1 ng/g. PMID:18072742

  8. Progress of epidemiological and molecular epidemiological studies on benzene in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guilan; Yin, Songnian

    2006-09-01

    Benzene is an organic solvent that has been used in industry for about 100 years throughout the world. Since 1973, a series of toxicological and molecular epidemiological studies on benzene were conducted by researchers at the Chinese Academy of Preventive Medicine (CAPM) (1973-1986) and subsequently by a collaboration between the CAPM and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) in the United States that began in 1986, which was joined by investigators from the University of California at Berkeley, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and New York University. The findings demonstrated that the risk of leukemia and lymphoma among benzene-exposed workers was significantly increased, with elevated risks for leukemia present not only at higher exposure but also among workers exposed to under 10 ppm. Therefore, the benzene permissible level was decreased to 1.8 ppm (6 mg/m(3)) and benzene-induced leukemia is treated as an occupational cancer in China. The benzene permissible level is 1.0 in the United States and in several other developed countries and it has been suggested to be decreased to 0.5 ppm (ACGIH). A number of potential biomarkers are related to benzene exposure and poisoning. Some of these are benzene oxide-protein adducts, chromosome aberration of lymphocytes, and GPA mutations in erythrocytes, a decrease in B cell and CD4(-)T cell counts in peripheral blood, and altered expression of CXCL16, ZNF331, JUN, and PF4 in lymphocytes. Variation in multiple benzene metabolizing genes may be associated with risk of benzene hematotoxicity, including CYP2E1, MPO, NQO1, and GSTT1. PMID:17119257

  9. Electrochemical behaviour of benzene on platinum electrodes

    OpenAIRE

    Montilla Jiménez, Francisco; Huerta Arráez, Francisco; Morallón Núñez, Emilia; Vázquez Picó, José Luis

    1999-01-01

    The adsorption and oxidation of benzene in acidic media on platinum electrodes (polycrystalline and single-crystal electrodes) have been studied by cyclic voltammetry and in-situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The oxidation characteristics of benzene depend on the surface structure of the platinum electrode used. In all platinum electrodes studied, the main reduction product of benzene is cyclohexane, and the oxidation products detected by infrared spectroscopy have been CO2 and ben...

  10. Small scale spatial gradients of outdoor and indoor benzene in proximity of an integrated steel plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licen, Sabina; Tolloi, Arianna; Briguglio, Sara; Piazzalunga, Andrea; Adami, Gianpiero; Barbieri, Pierluigi

    2016-05-15

    Benzene is known as a human carcinogen, whose annual mean concentration exceeded the EU limit value (5 μg/m(3)) only in very few locations in Europe during 2012. Nevertheless 10% to 12% of the EU-28 urban population was still exposed to benzene concentrations above the WHO reference level of 1.7 μg/m(3). WHO recommended a wise choice of monitoring stations positioning in proximity of "hot spots" to define and assess the representativeness of each site paying attention to micro-scale conditions. In this context benzene and other VOCs of health concern (toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes) concentrations have been investigated, with weekly passive sampling for one year, both in outdoor and indoor air in inhabited buildings in close proximity (180 m far up to 1100 m) of an integrated steel plant in NE of Italy. Even though the outdoor mean annual benzene concentration was below the EU limit in every site, in the site closest to the works the benzene concentration was above 5 μg/m(3) in 14 weeks. These events were related to a benzene over toluene ratio above one, which is diagnostic for the presence of an industrial source, and to meteorological factors. These information pointed at the identification of the coke ovens of the plant as the dominant outdoor source of benzene. Benzene gradients with the increasing distance from coke ovens have been found for both outdoor and indoor air. Linear models linking outdoor to indoor benzene concentrations have been then identified, allowing to estimate indoor exposure from ambient air benzene data. In the considered period, a narrow area of about 250 m appeared impacted at a higher degree than the other sites both considering outdoor and indoor air. Passive BTEX sampling permits to collect information on both ambient air and daily life settings, allowing to assemble a valuable data support for further environmental cost-benefit analyses. PMID:26930323

  11. Probabilistic Approach for Evaluating Metabolite Sample Integrity

    OpenAIRE

    Slaff, Barry M.; Jensen, Shane T.; Weljie, Aalim M.

    2015-01-01

    The success of metabolomics studies depends upon the "fitness" of each biological sample used for analysis: it is critical that metabolite levels reported for a biological sample represent an accurate snapshot of the studied organism's metabolite profile at time of sample collection. Numerous factors may compromise metabolite sample fitness, including chemical and biological factors which intervene during sample collection, handling, storage, and preparation for analysis. We propose a probabi...

  12. 46 CFR 30.25-3 - Benzene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Benzene. 30.25-3 Section 30.25-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Commodities Regulated § 30.25-3 Benzene. The provisions contained in 46 CFR part 197, subpart C, apply to liquid cargoes containing 0.5% or more...

  13. 46 CFR 151.50-60 - Benzene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Benzene. 151.50-60 Section 151.50-60 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-60 Benzene. The person in charge of...

  14. 29 CFR 1926.1128 - Benzene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Benzene. 1926.1128 Section 1926.1128 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1926.1128 Benzene....

  15. 29 CFR 1915.1028 - Benzene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Benzene. 1915.1028 Section 1915.1028 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED... Benzene. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under this section are identical...

  16. Bio sensing Benzene in the refinery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A biosensor based on Pseudomonas putida cells was utilized for Benzene analysis in air of an oil refinery. Biosensoristic approach was compared to gaschromatografic essay. We also developed bio sensing Benzene genetically modified Escherichia coli and tested them with refinery samples. Microbial biosensor were useful to determine air pollution.

  17. Production of Metabolites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    A recombinant micro-organism such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae which produces and excretes into culture medium a stilbenoid metabolite product when grown under stilbenoid production conditions, which expresses in above native levels a ABC transporter which transports said stilbenoid out of said...... micro-organism cells to the culture medium. The genome of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae produces an auxotrophic phenotype which is compensated by a plasmid which also expresses one or more of said enzymes constituting said metabolic pathway producing said stilbenoid, an expression product of the plasmid...

  18. Supplementary measurements for air monitoring under NOVANA - Benzene and PAH; Supplerende maalinger til luftovervaagning under NOVANA - benzen og PAH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellermann, T.; Klenoe Noejgaard, J.; Bossi, R.

    2011-10-15

    The report presents results from a project carried out for the Danish Environmental Protection Agency. The aim of the project was to carry out several measuring campaigns in order to be able to better assess the monitoring needs for PAH and benzene in relation to EU's air quality directives. The results show that the mean concentrations of benzene are almost at the same level in Denmark's four largest cities, and that the concentrations are both below the threshold value (5mug/m3) as well as below the lower assessment threshold (2mug/m3). The report presents a method for objectively estimation the benzene concentration based on measurements of CO. The method can be applied to fulfil the monitoring need for benzene in those zones where no measurements of benzene are made. Measurements of PAH, especially benzo(a)pyrene, have been made during 12 months in the period 2010-2011 in an area with many wood burning furnaces are used (the town Jyllinge). The concentrations of benzo(a)pyrene in Jyllinge is almost three times higher than in the street H.C. Andersens Boulevard in Copenhagen. The concentrations of benzo(a)pyrene in Jylllinge are 0,6 ng/m3, which corresponds to the upper assessment threshold (0,6 ng/m3) and is 40% below the measuring value (1 ng/m3). On this basis, there is a need for re-evaluating the monitoring of PAH in the sub-programme for air under NOVANA. Measurements of PM{sub 10} showed that the levels in the towns Jyllinge, Lille Valby/Risoe and at the H.C. Oersted Institute in Copenhagen are all at about 20-22 mug/m3. (LN)

  19. Apo-10'-lycopenoic acid, a lycopene 1 metabolite, increases sirtuin 1 mRNA and protein levels and decreases hepatic fat accumulation in ob/ob mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lycopene has been shown to be beneficial in protecting against high-fat diet-induced fatty liver. The recent demonstration that lycopene can be converted by carotene 99,10’-oxygenase into a biologically active metabolite, ALA, led us to propose that the function of lycopene can be mediated by ALA. I...

  20. Combined effects of CO2 enrichment, diurnal light levels and water stress on foliar metabolites of potato plants grown in naturally sunlit controlled environment chambers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnaby, Jinyoung Y; Fleisher, David; Reddy, Vangimalla; Sicher, Richard

    2015-02-01

    Experiments were conducted in outdoor, naturally sunlit, soil-plant-atmosphere research (SPAR) chambers using plants grown in pots. Drought treatments were imposed on potato plants (Solanum tuberosum cv. Kennebec) beginning 10 days after tuber initiation. A total of 23 out of 37 foliar metabolites were affected by drought when measured 11 days after initiating water stress treatments. Compounds that accumulated in response to drought were hexoses, polyols, branched chain amino acids (BCAAs) and aromatic amino acids, such as proline. Conversely, leaf starch, alanine, aspartate and several organic acids involved in respiratory metabolism decreased with drought. Depending upon harvest date, a maximum of 12 and 17 foliar metabolites also responded to either CO2 enrichment or diurnal treatments, respectively. In addition, about 20% of the measured metabolites in potato leaflets were simultaneously affected by drought, CO2 enrichment and diurnal factors combined. This group contained BCAAs, hexoses, leaf starch and malate. Polyols and proline accumulated in response to water stress but did not vary diurnally. Water stress also amplified diurnal variations of hexoses and starch in comparison to control samples. Consequently, specific drought responsive metabolites in potato leaflets were dramatically affected by daily changes of photosynthetic carbon metabolism. PMID:24888746

  1. Sex-Related Difference in Nitric Oxide Metabolites Levels after Nephroprotectant Supplementation Administration against Cisplatin-Induced Nephrotoxicity in Wistar Rat Model: The Role of Vitamin E, Erythropoietin, or N-Acetylcysteine

    OpenAIRE

    Nematbakhsh, Mehdi; Pezeshki, Zahra

    2013-01-01

    Background. Nitric oxide (NO) concentration in serum is altered by cisplatin (CP), and NO influences CP-induced nephrotoxicity. The effect of nephroprotectant agent supplementation (vitamin E, human recombinant erythropoietin (EPO), or n-acetylcysteine (NAC)) on the NO metabolites levels after CP administration in the two genders was determined. Methods. Sixty-four adult Wistar rats were randomly divided into 10 groups. Male and female rats in different groups received vehicle (saline), CP (7...

  2. Molecular dynamics simulation of benzene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trumpakaj, Zygmunt; Linde, Bogumił B. J.

    2016-03-01

    Intermolecular potentials and a few models of intermolecular interaction in liquid benzene are tested by Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations. The repulsive part of the Lennard-Jones 12-6 (LJ 12-6) potential is too hard, which yields incorrect results. The exp-6 potential with a too hard repulsive term is also often used. Therefore, we took an expa-6 potential with a small Gaussian correction plus electrostatic interactions. This allows to modify the curvature of the potential. The MD simulations are carried out in the temperature range 280-352 K under normal pressure and at experimental density. The Rayleigh scattering of depolarized light is used for comparison. The results of MD simulations are comparable with the experimental values.

  3. Elevada concentración de metabolitos de cotinina en hijos de padres fumadores High levels of cotinine metabolite in smoker's parents children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Lazcano-Ponce

    2007-01-01

    ños, no sólo de padres fumadores sino también de padres no fumadores. Esto pone de relevancia que la exposición al HTSM no es sólo un problema de salud pública que se presenta en hogares de padres fumadores, sino que la exposición en niños mexicanos es frecuente en diversos lugares públicos. Es necesario implementar estudios adicionales en México para evaluar el impacto de intervenciones que garanticen hogares y espacios libres de humo de tabaco.INTRODUCTION: Children and adult exposure to SecondHand Smoke (SHS may occur in government offices, work and public places as well as in vehicles. Nevertheless, SHS is particularly important at home. High exposure levels in children may be the main reason to prevent parents and other family members from smoking at home. This study aims at establishing SHS levels by measuring biomakers in serum in pairs of parents and their younger than five years old children in Mexico, included in the 2000 National Health Survey. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Seventy-six parents-children pairs were taken from households with non smokers adults, as well as 83 pairs with adult smokers at home. Selection was limited to the adult population in households with children under five years old. Serum samples were analyzed through liquid chromatographic. Correlation exposure models between parents-children pairs were built and stratified according to parents’ background concerning smoking. RESULTS: In the smokers group, people with more than 15ng/mL of cotinine metabolites in serum showed prevalence of 100%. Minimum quantification was 18.50 and maximum 221.5ng/mL. In adults, cotinine metabolite levels in serun were 50 times higher in smokers (107.4ng/mL, than in non smokers (1.99 ng/mL. Concerning 3-hydroxycotinine, something similar was observed (0.60 in non smokers vs. 33.50 ng/mL in smokers. A significant difference three times higher in cotinine levels (0.10 vs. 0.60ng/mL and 3-hydroxycotinine (0.06 vs. 0.19ng/mL was found in those children with, at

  4. Prevention of benzene-induced myelotoxicity by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalf, G.F.; Schlosser, M.J.; Renz, J.F.; Pirozzi, S.J. (Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (USA))

    1989-07-01

    Benzene affects hematopoietic progenitor cells leading to bone marrow depression and genotoxic effects such as micronucleus formation. Progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation are inhibited by prostaglandins produced by macrophages. Administration of benzene to DBA/2 or C57BL/6 mice caused a dose-dependent bone marrow depression and a significant increase in marrow prostaglandin E level and both were prevented by the coadministration of indomethacin and other inhibitors of the cyclooxygenase component of prostaglandin H synthase. Levels of benzene that decreased bone marrow cellularity also caused genotoxic effects measured as increased micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes in peripheral blood, which was also prevented by the coadministration of indomethacin. These results suggest a possible role for prostaglandin synthase in benzene myelotoxicity; a mechanism by which this might occur is presented.

  5. Human risk assessment of benzene after a gasoline station fuel leak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam dos Anjos Santos

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the health risk of exposure to benzene for a community affected by a fuel leak. METHODS: Data regarding the fuel leak accident with, which occurred in the Brasilia, Federal District, were obtained from the Fuel Distributor reports provided to the environmental authority. Information about the affected population (22 individuals was obtained from focal groups of eight individuals. Length of exposure and water benzene concentration were estimated through a groundwater flow model associated with a benzene propagation model. The risk assessment was conducted according to the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry methodology. RESULTS: A high risk perception related to the health consequences of the accident was evident in the affected community (22 individuals, probably due to the lack of assistance and a poor risk communication from government authorities and the polluting agent. The community had been exposed to unsafe levels of benzene (> 5 µg/L since December 2001, five months before they reported the leak. The mean benzene level in drinking water (72.2 µg/L was higher than that obtained by the Fuel Distributer using the Risk Based Corrective Action methodology (17.2 µg/L.The estimated benzene intake from the consumption of water and food reached a maximum of 0.0091 µg/kg bw/day (5 x 10-7 cancer risk per 106 individuals. The level of benzene in water vapor while showering reached 7.5 µg/m3 for children (1 per 104 cancer risk. Total cancer risk ranged from 110 to 200 per 106 individuals. CONCLUSIONS: The population affected by the fuel leak was exposed to benzene levels that might have represented a health risk. Local government authorities need to develop better strategies to respond rapidly to these types of accidents to protect the health of the affected population and the environment.

  6. Benzene dispersion and natural attenuation in an alluvial aquifer with strong interactions with surface water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batlle-Aguilar, Jordi; Brouyère, Serge; Dassargues, Alain; Morasch, Barbara; Hunkeler, Daniel; Höhener, Patrick; Diels, Ludo; Vanbroekhoven, Karolien; Seuntjens, Piet; Halen, Henri

    2009-05-01

    levels, leading to the hypothesis that benzene dispersion is mainly controlled by natural attenuation.

  7. Excited state of protonated benzene and toluene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present photo-fragmentation electronic spectra of the simplest protonated aromatic molecules, protonated benzene and toluene, recorded under medium resolution conditions and compared with the photo-fragmentation spectrum of protonated pyridine. Despite the resolution and cold temperature achieved in the experiment, the electronic spectra of protonated benzene and toluene are structure-less, thus intrinsically broadened. This is in agreement with the large geometrical changes and the fast dynamic toward internal conversion predicted by ab initio calculations for protonated benzene [Rode et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 113, 5865–5873 (2009)

  8. The effects of fish hydrolysate (CPSP) level on Octopus maya (Voss and Solis) diet: Digestive enzyme activity, blood metabolites, and energy balance

    OpenAIRE

    Aguila, J; Cuzon, Gerard; Pascual, C; Domingues, P; Gaxiola, G; Sanchez, A.; T. Maldonado; Rosas, C

    2007-01-01

    As has been demonstrated in previous studies, Octopus maya can be fed on artificial diets. In the present study six different diets were assayed. Five diets were designed to test the effect of percentage of inclusion of fish protein concentrate (CPSP: 0, 5, 10, 15, and 20%) and were offered to octopuses as a specifically designed artificial diet. The sixth diet consisted of frozen crab (Callinectes spp) and was used as control diet. Blood metabolites and energy budget of octopuses were evalua...

  9. A non-invasive biomonitoring method for assessing levels of urinary pyrethroid metabolites in diapered children by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Shun; Ueyama, Jun; Kondo, Takaaki; Saito, Isao; Shibata, Eiji; Gotoh, Masahiro; Nomura, Hiroshi; Wakusawa, Shinya; Nakai, Kunihiko; Kamijima, Michihiro

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a method for quantitative measurement of urinary metabolites of pyrethroid (PYR) insecticides, trans-chrysanthemumdicarboxylic acid (CDCA) and 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3-PBA), extracted from disposable diapers. This study was approved by the university ethics committees, and informed consent was obtained from all the parents for their children and from adult volunteers. After extraction of PYR metabolites in the absorber of diapers with 5 ml acetone, the metabolites in the eluents were extracted with tert-butyl methyl ether, derivatized with 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoroisopropanol and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The limits of quantitation (LOQs) were 0.55 μg/l for CDCA and 0.09 μg/l for 3-PBA in 2 ml urine extracted from diapers. Within-series and between-day precisions were adults both in a general population and pest control operators, on diapers, good correlations were shown between the measured results and the concentrations measured directly for the respective urine with the conventional method (Spearman's rank correlation coefficient 0.889 for CDCA and 0.989 for 3-PBA; n=27-28). The developed method would be applicable to epidemiological studies. PMID:23756699

  10. Analysis of naltrexone urinary metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, R; de la Torre, R; Segura, J

    1988-01-01

    A reversed-phase HPLC method using ion-pair formation has been developed for the simultaneous determination of naltrexone and three urinary metabolites. The extraction of the free and conjugated metabolites was studied by liquid-solid procedures using styrene-divinylbenzene copolymers (Amberlite XAD-2) and bonded octadecyl silica supports (ODS-silica). Optimum recovery was obtained with ODS-silica extraction using 25% acetonitrile in a 5 mM diammonium phosphate buffer pH 2.1 as elution solvent. The chromatographic behaviour of naltrexone metabolites and naloxone (internal standard) was examined by varying the mobile phase composition. Increments of both the diammonium phosphate buffer concentration and the percentage of organic solvent in the eluent decreases the retention of compounds in a non-linear manner. Increments of the dodecyl sulphate (counter-ion) concentration, increases the retention time. The method was applied to determine the urinary levels of major naltrexone metabolites in a volunteer receiving a 50 mg oral dose. This is the first method reported which permits the simultaneous quantitative determination of naltrexone and its metabolites, 6beta-naltrexol, naltrexone glucuronide and 6beta-naltrexol glucuronide, in urine. PMID:16867358

  11. Four component catalysis for the hydroalkylation of benzene to cyclohexyl benzene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fahy, J.; Trimm, D.L. [School of Chemical Engineering and Industrial Chemistry, University of New South Wales, NSW 2052 Sydney (Australia); Cookson, D.J. [BHP Melbourne Research Laboratories, Vic. Melbourne (Australia)

    2001-04-13

    Patent claims that benzene can be hydroalkylated to form cyclohexyl benzene - a potential diesel fuel - over a four component catalyst have been verified, and the role of the individual components has been explored. The hydrogenation of benzene over nickel on zeolite 13X produced reasonably high (ca. 30%) yields of cyclohexane, but the product distribution favoured cyclohexyl benzene in the presence of rare earth ions. The addition of small (ca. 1%) of platinum produced good yields and selectivities to cyclohexyl benzene at ca. 450K, a performance which was matched only at ca. 670K in the absence of platinum. Temperature programmed studies showed that Pt promoted the low temperature reduction of the catalyst to produce better performance. The acidic 13X molecular sieve promoted alkylation, but acidity was not the only factor involved. Rare earth additions were suggested to induce electron transfer to the nickel, weakening adsorption of benzene and promoting hydroalkylation rather than hydrogenation.

  12. 46 CFR 197.565 - Notifying personnel of benzene hazards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... appendices A and B of this subpart or a MSDS on benzene meeting the requirements of 29 CFR 1910.1200(g) is... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Notifying personnel of benzene hazards. 197.565 Section... AND HEALTH STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Benzene § 197.565 Notifying personnel of benzene hazards....

  13. Recommended sublimation pressure and enthalpy of benzene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Sublimation pressures of benzene were measured. • Benzene thermodynamic properties in the state of ideal gas were calculated. • Recommended sublimation pressure and enthalpy of benzene were developed. -- Abstract: Recommended vapor pressures of solid benzene (CAS Registry Number: 71-43-2) which are consistent with thermodynamically related crystalline and ideal-gas heat capacities as well as with properties of the liquid phase at the triple point temperature (vapor pressure, enthalpy of vaporization) were established. The recommended data were developed by a multi-property simultaneous correlation of vapor pressures and related thermal data. Vapor pressures measured in this work using the static method in the temperature range from 233 K to 260 K, covering pressure range from 99 Pa to 1230 Pa, were included in the simultaneous correlation. The enthalpy of sublimation was established with uncertainty significantly lower than the previously recommended values

  14. NMR spectroscopy analysis of phosphorus metabolites and the effect of adriamycin on these metabolite levels in an adriamycin-sensitive and -resistant human small cell lung carcinoma cell line

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Steven; Mulder, N H; de Vries, Liesbeth; Robillard, G T

    1991-01-01

    P-31 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of cells and of cell extracts revealed high levels of phosphorylcholine (PC) and phosphocreatine (PCr) in an adriamycin-resistant human small cell lung carcinoma cell line (GLC4/ADR) and the adriamycin-sensitive parental cell line (GLC4). PCr levels in e

  15. A case report of motor neuron disease in a patient showing significant level of DDTs, HCHs and organophosphate metabolites in hair as well as levels of hexane and toluene in blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanavouras, Konstantinos; Tzatzarakis, Manolis N; Mastorodemos, Vasileios; Plaitakis, Andreas; Tsatsakis, Aristidis M

    2011-11-01

    Motor neuron disease is a devastating neurodegenerative condition, with the majority of sporadic, non-familial cases being of unknown etiology. Several epidemiological studies have suggested that occupational exposure to chemicals may be associated with disease pathogenesis. We report the case of a patient developing progressive motor neuron disease, who was chronically exposed to pesticides and organic solvents. The patient presented with leg spasticity and developed gradually clinical signs suggestive of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, which was supported by the neurophysiologic and radiological findings. Our report is an evidence based case of combined exposure to organochlorine (DDTs), organophosphate pesticides (OPs) and organic solvents as confirmed by laboratory analysis in samples of blood and hair confirming systematic exposure. The concentration of non-specific dialkylphosphates metabolites (DAPs) of OPs in hair (dimethyphopshate (DMP) 1289.4 pg/mg and diethylphosphate (DEP) 709.4 pg/mg) and of DDTs (opDDE 484.0 pg/mg, ppDDE 526.6 pg/mg, opDDD 448.4 pg/mg, ppDDD+opDDT 259.9 pg/mg and ppDDT 573.7 pg/mg) were considerably significant. Toluene and n-hexane were also detected in blood on admission at hospital and quantified (1.23 and 0.87 μg/l, respectively), while 3 months after hospitalization blood testing was found negative for toluene and n-hexane and hair analysis was provided decrease levels of HCHs, DDTs and DAPs. PMID:21851830

  16. Influence of Benzene on the Optical Properties of Titan Haze Laboratory Analogs in the Mid-Visible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Y. Heidi; Trainer, Melissa G.; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    2012-01-01

    The Cassini Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (Waite, Jr., et al., 2007) and the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (Coustenis, A., et al., 2007) have detected benzene in the upper atmosphere and stratosphere of Titan. Photochemical reactions involving benzene in Titan's atmosphere may influence polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon formation, aerosol formation, and the radiative balance of Titan's atmosphere. We measure the effect of benzene on the optical properties of Titan analog particles in the laboratory. Using cavity ring-down aerosol extinction spectroscopy, we determine the real and imaginary refractive index at 532 nm of particles formed by benzene photolysis and Titan analog particles formed with ppm-levels of benzene. These studies are compared to the previous study by Hasenkopf, et a1. (2010) of Titan analog particles formed by methane photolysis.

  17. A case report of motor neuron disease in a patient showing significant level of DDTs, HCHs and organophosphate metabolites in hair as well as levels of hexane and toluene in blood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanavouras, Konstantinos [Department of Neurology, Medical School, University of Crete, Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Tzatzarakis, Manolis N. [Center of Toxicology Science and Research, University of Crete, Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Mastorodemos, Vasileios; Plaitakis, Andreas [Department of Neurology, Medical School, University of Crete, Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Tsatsakis, Aristidis M., E-mail: aris@med.uoc.gr [Center of Toxicology Science and Research, University of Crete, Heraklion, Crete (Greece)

    2011-11-15

    Motor neuron disease is a devastating neurodegenerative condition, with the majority of sporadic, non-familial cases being of unknown etiology. Several epidemiological studies have suggested that occupational exposure to chemicals may be associated with disease pathogenesis. We report the case of a patient developing progressive motor neuron disease, who was chronically exposed to pesticides and organic solvents. The patient presented with leg spasticity and developed gradually clinical signs suggestive of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, which was supported by the neurophysiologic and radiological findings. Our report is an evidence based case of combined exposure to organochlorine (DDTs), organophosphate pesticides (OPs) and organic solvents as confirmed by laboratory analysis in samples of blood and hair confirming systematic exposure. The concentration of non-specific dialkylphosphates metabolites (DAPs) of OPs in hair (dimethyphopshate (DMP) 1289.4 pg/mg and diethylphosphate (DEP) 709.4 pg/mg) and of DDTs (opDDE 484.0 pg/mg, ppDDE 526.6 pg/mg, opDDD 448.4 pg/mg, ppDDD + opDDT 259.9 pg/mg and ppDDT 573.7 pg/mg) were considerably significant. Toluene and n-hexane were also detected in blood on admission at hospital and quantified (1.23 and 0.87 {mu}g/l, respectively), while 3 months after hospitalization blood testing was found negative for toluene and n-hexane and hair analysis was provided decrease levels of HCHs, DDTs and DAPs. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Exposure to pesticides and organic solvents might be a risk factor for sporadic MND. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We report a patient who developed progressive upper and lower motor neuron disease. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The patient had a history of occupational exposure to pesticides and solvents. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High DDTs' levels and increased levels of DMP and DEP were measured in his hair. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The patients' exposure to chemicals might

  18. A case report of motor neuron disease in a patient showing significant level of DDTs, HCHs and organophosphate metabolites in hair as well as levels of hexane and toluene in blood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motor neuron disease is a devastating neurodegenerative condition, with the majority of sporadic, non-familial cases being of unknown etiology. Several epidemiological studies have suggested that occupational exposure to chemicals may be associated with disease pathogenesis. We report the case of a patient developing progressive motor neuron disease, who was chronically exposed to pesticides and organic solvents. The patient presented with leg spasticity and developed gradually clinical signs suggestive of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, which was supported by the neurophysiologic and radiological findings. Our report is an evidence based case of combined exposure to organochlorine (DDTs), organophosphate pesticides (OPs) and organic solvents as confirmed by laboratory analysis in samples of blood and hair confirming systematic exposure. The concentration of non-specific dialkylphosphates metabolites (DAPs) of OPs in hair (dimethyphopshate (DMP) 1289.4 pg/mg and diethylphosphate (DEP) 709.4 pg/mg) and of DDTs (opDDE 484.0 pg/mg, ppDDE 526.6 pg/mg, opDDD 448.4 pg/mg, ppDDD + opDDT 259.9 pg/mg and ppDDT 573.7 pg/mg) were considerably significant. Toluene and n-hexane were also detected in blood on admission at hospital and quantified (1.23 and 0.87 μg/l, respectively), while 3 months after hospitalization blood testing was found negative for toluene and n-hexane and hair analysis was provided decrease levels of HCHs, DDTs and DAPs. -- Highlights: ► Exposure to pesticides and organic solvents might be a risk factor for sporadic MND. ► We report a patient who developed progressive upper and lower motor neuron disease. ► The patient had a history of occupational exposure to pesticides and solvents. ► High DDTs’ levels and increased levels of DMP and DEP were measured in his hair. ► The patients’ exposure to chemicals might have played a role in MND development.

  19. Radiolysis of Aqueous Benzene Solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aerated and deaerated aqueous solutions of benzene have been irradiated with 60Co γ-rays. The products of radiolysis in deaerated, unbuffered or acid, solutions were phenol, biphenyl, hydrogen and in acid solutions also hydrogen peroxide with the following yields: G(phenol) = 0. 37 (0. 37), G(biphenyl) = 1.3 (1.7), G(H2) = 0.44 (0. 43) and G(H2O2) = 0 (0.60), the figures in brackets giving the results for acid solutions. The results are shown to agree with the conclusion that k(e-aq + H2O2) >> k(H + H2O2). Furthermore, the results indicate that a competition takes place between the reactions: 2 C6H6OH · -> dimer -> biphenyl. C6H7 · + C6H6OH · -> dimer -> biphenyl. The yields in aerated, unbuffered or acid, solutions were: G(phenol) = 2.1 (2.3), G(biphenyl) = 0 (0), and G(H2O2) = 2.2 (3.1), the figures in brackets being valid for acid solutions. The ratio k(H + C6H6)/k(H + O2) was 1.4x10-2. The results indicate that peroxides, or more probably hydroperoxides, take part in the reactions. After the addition of Fe2+ or Fe3+ to aerated acid solutions G(phenol) was increased to 6.6 and 3.4 respectively. Oxygen was consumed more rapidly in the presence of Fe. Reaction mechanisms are discussed

  20. The Relationship of Nitrogen and C/N Ratio with Secondary Metabolites Levels and Antioxidant Activities in Three Varieties of Malaysian Kacip Fatimah (Labisia pumila Blume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Hafiz Ibrahim

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Kacip Fatimah (Labisia pumila Blume, one of the most famous and widely used herbs, especially in Southeast Asia, is found to have interesting bioactive compounds and displays health promoting properties. In this study, the antioxidant activities of the methanol extracts of leaves, stems and roots of three varieties of L. pumila (var. alata, pumila and lanceolata were evaluated in an effort to compare and validate the medicinal potential of this indigenous Malaysian herb species. The antioxidant activity determined by the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH assay, as well as the total amount of phenolics and flavonoids were the highest in the leaves, followed by the stems and roots in all the varieties. A similar trend was displayed by the ferric reducing antioxidant potential (FRAP activity, suggesting that the L. pumila varieties possess high foliar antioxidant properties. At low FRAP activity concentrations, the values of the leaves’ inhibition activity in the three varieties were significantly higher than those of the stems and roots, with var. alata exhibiting higher antioxidant activities and total contents of phenolics and flavonoids compared to the varieties pumila and lanceolata. The high production of secondary metabolites and antioxidant activities in var. alata were firmly related to low nitrogen content and high C/N ratio in plant parts. The study also demonstrated a positive correlation between secondary metabolite content and antioxidant activities, and revealed that the consumption of L. pumila could exert several beneficial effects by virtue of its antioxidant activity.

  1. The relationship of nitrogen and C/N ratio with secondary metabolites levels and antioxidant activities in three varieties of Malaysian kacip Fatimah (Labisia pumila Blume).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Mohd Hafiz; Jaafar, Hawa Z E

    2011-01-01

    Kacip Fatimah (Labisia pumila Blume), one of the most famous and widely used herbs, especially in Southeast Asia, is found to have interesting bioactive compounds and displays health promoting properties. In this study, the antioxidant activities of the methanol extracts of leaves, stems and roots of three varieties of L. pumila (var. alata, pumila and lanceolata) were evaluated in an effort to compare and validate the medicinal potential of this indigenous Malaysian herb species. The antioxidant activity determined by the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay, as well as the total amount of phenolics and flavonoids were the highest in the leaves, followed by the stems and roots in all the varieties. A similar trend was displayed by the ferric reducing antioxidant potential (FRAP) activity, suggesting that the L. pumila varieties possess high foliar antioxidant properties. At low FRAP activity concentrations, the values of the leaves' inhibition activity in the three varieties were significantly higher than those of the stems and roots, with var. alata exhibiting higher antioxidant activities and total contents of phenolics and flavonoids compared to the varieties pumila and lanceolata. The high production of secondary metabolites and antioxidant activities in var. alata were firmly related to low nitrogen content and high C/N ratio in plant parts. The study also demonstrated a positive correlation between secondary metabolite content and antioxidant activities, and revealed that the consumption of L. pumila could exert several beneficial effects by virtue of its antioxidant activity. PMID:21716173

  2. Protective effects of zinc and selenium against benzene toxicity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Khadiga S; Saleh, Zeinab A; Farrag, Abdel-Razik H; Shaban, Eman E

    2011-07-01

    The presented study investigates the protective role of zinc (Zn) and selenium (Se) in attenuating benzene-induced toxicity in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected with benzene (0.5 mL/kg body weight ip) and received a diet supplement containing Zn and Se. Several hematological and biochemical parameters (representing antioxidant status) were estimated. Histopathological examinations were performed. Results showed that food intake and body weight gain of benzene-injected rats were significantly lower than that of the control rats. Benzene-injected rats showed increased plasma malondialdehyde (MDA) and decreased activity of: glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), catalase, superoxide dismutase (SOD) enzymes, as well as reduced glutathione (GSH) when compared to the control group. Histopathological investigations revealed structural changes in benzene-injected rats' liver. Supplementation with Zn and Se resulted in a significant decrease in MDA, elevation in GSH, GSH-Px, SOD and catalase levels. This study shows that Zn and Se supplementation can improve the activity of antioxidant enzymes in rats and decrease the histological anomalies induced by benzene toxicity as well. PMID:21511895

  3. The Metabolic Response of Arabidopsis Roots to Oxidative Stress is Distinct from that of Heterotrophic Cells in Culture and Highlights a Complex Relationship between the Levels of Transcripts,Metabolites,and Flux

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Martin Lehmann; Markus Schwarzl(a)inder; Toshihiro Obata; Supaart Sirikantaramas; Meike Burow; Carl Erik Olsen; Takayuki Tohge; Mark D.Fricker; Birger Lindberg Mφller; Alisdair R.Fernie; Lee J.Sweetloveb; Miriam Laxa

    2009-01-01

    Metabolic adjustments are a significant,but poorly understood,part of the response of plants to oxidative stress.In a previous study (Baxter et al.,2007),the metabolic response of Arabidopsis cells in culture to induction of ox-idative stress by menadione was characterized.An emergency survival strategy was uncovered in which anabolic primary metabolism was largely down-regulated in favour of catabolic and antioxidant metabolism.The response in whole plant tissues may be different and we have therefore investigated the response of Arabidopsis roots to menadione treatment,analyzing the transcriptome,metabolome and key metabolic fluxes with focus on primary as well as secondary metab-olism.Using a redox-sensitive GFP,it was also shown that menadione causes redox perturbation,not just in the mitochon-drion,but also in the cytosol and plastids of roots.In the first 30 min of treatment,the response was similar to the cell culture:there was a decrease in metabolites of the TCA cycle and amino acid biosynthesis and the transcriptomic response was dominated by up-regulation of DNA regulatory proteins.After 2 and 6 h of treatment,the response of the roots was different to the cell culture.Metabolite levels did not remain depressed,but instead recovered and,in the case of pyruvate,some amino acids and aliphatic glucosinolates showed a steady increase above control levels.However,no major changes in fluxes of central carbon metabolism were observed and metabolic transcripts changed largely independently of the corresponding metabolites.Together,the results suggest that root tissues can recover metabolic activity after oxidative inhibition and highlight potentially important roles for glycolysis and the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway.

  4. Benzene and lead exposure assessment among occupational bus drivers in Bangkok traffic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHING TET LEONG; PREECHA LAORTANAKUL

    2004-01-01

    Four environmental and biological monitoring sites were strategically established to evaluate benzene and lead exposure assessment at various traffic zones of Bangkok Metropolitan Region(BMR). Biological measurement of 48 non air-conditioned, male bus drivers was carried to study the relationship between individual exposure levels and exposure biomarkers. The study group was further subdivided into four age groups( 16-25, 26-35, 36-45 and 46-55 years old) to monitor the age-related exposure effects. A total of 12unexposed persons were deliberately chosen as the control group. Measurement of unmetobolized benzene in blood and analysis of urinary tt-Muconic acid urine and urinary creatinine are recommended as biomarkers of benzene exposure. Measurement of lead in blood and urine is also recommended for the biological monitoring of lead exposure.During the monitoring period, benzene and lead levels at Yaowarat Road was C6H6: 42.46 + 3.88 μg/m3 , Pb: 0.29 + 0.03 μg/m3 and decreased to C6 H6: 33.5 ± 1.35 μg/m3 , Pb: O. 13 + 0.01 μg/m3 at Phahonyothin Road. Significant difference was established between the nonsmoking exposed group and nonsmoking control group for blood benzene concentrations ( P < 0.001, two-tailed, Mann-Whiteney U test). Strong correlations were also found between trans-trans-Muconic acid concentrations in post shift samples and atmospheric benzene concentrations. Similarly, good correlation between all of biomarkers and lead level in air is established from automobile emissions.The analysis revealed that among the occupational population in the urban sites, the driver groups were found to have the highest risk of benzene and lead exposures derived from automobile emission.

  5. Benzene and lead exposure assessment among occupational bus drivers in Bangkok traffic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muttamara, S; Leong, Shing Tet; Arayasiri, M

    2004-01-01

    Four environmental and biological monitoring sites were strategically established to evaluate benzene and lead exposure assessment at various traffic zones of Bangkok Metropolitan Region(BMR). Biological measurement of 48 non air-conditioned, male bus drivers was carried to study the relationship between individual exposure levels and exposure biomarkers. The study group was further subdivided into four age groups(16-25, 26-35, 36-45 and 46-55 years old) to monitor the age-related exposure effects. A total of 12 unexposed persons were deliberately chosen as the control group. Measurement of unmetobolized benzene in blood and analysis of urinary tt-Muconic acid urine and urinary creatinine are recommended as biomarkers of benzene exposure. Measurement of lead in blood and urine is also recommended for the biological monitoring of lead exposure. During the monitoring period, benzene and lead levels at Yaowarat Road was C6H6: 42.46 +/- 3.88 microg/m3 , Pb: 0.29 +/- 0.03 microg/m3 and decreased to C6H6: 33.5 +/- 1.35 microg/m3, Pb: 0.13 +/- 0.01 microg/m3 at Phahonyothin Road. Significant difference was established between the nonsmoking exposed group and nonsmoking control group for blood benzene concentrations (P < 0.001, two-tailed, Mann-Whiteney U test). Strong correlations were also found between trans-trans-Muconic acid concentrations in post shift samples and atmospheric benzene concentrations. Similarly, good correlation between all of biomarkers and lead level in air is established from automobile emissions. The analysis revealed that among the occupational population in the urban sites, the driver groups were found to have the highest risk of benzene and lead exposures derived from automobile emission. PMID:14971454

  6. Dehydrogenation of benzene on Pt(111) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, W.; Zheng, W. T.; Jiang, Q.

    2008-10-01

    The dehydrogenation of benzene on Pt(111) surface is studied by ab initio density functional theory. The minimum energy pathways for benzene dehydrogenation are found with the nudge elastic band method including several factors of the associated barriers, reactive energies, intermediates, and transient states. The results show that there are two possible parallel minimum energy pathways on the Pt(111) surface. Moreover, the tilting angle of the H atom in benzene can be taken as an index for the actual barrier of dehydrogenation. In addition, the properties of dehydrogenation radicals on the Pt(111) surface are explored through their adsorption energy, adsorption geometry, and electronic structure on the surface. The vibrational frequencies of the dehydrogenation radicals derived from the calculations are in agreement with literature data.

  7. Ionic Liquid Catalyst Used in Deep Desulfuration of the Coking Benzene for Producing Sulfurless Benzene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Xia-Ping; WANG Yan-Liang; MENG Fan-Wei; FAN Xing-Ming; QIN Song-Bo

    2008-01-01

    For the widening need of benzene used in organic synthesis, ionic liquid catalyst was prepared to study the process of deep desulfuration in the coking benzene. The result shows that the effect of de-thiophene by the ionic liquid catalyst (N-methyl imidazolium hydrogen sulfate [Hmim][HSO4]) is related to its acid function value.Hammett indicator was used to determine the acid function value H0 of the ionic liquid. It can be concluded that while the acid function value is in the range from -4 to -12, the ionic liquid catalyst can make the concentration certain acid quantity and strength, the ionic liquid catalyst helps to form alkyl thiophene through Friedel-Crafts reaction, which differs from the character of benzene and it is absolutely necessary for the separation and refinement of benzene. But overabundant quantity and higher acid value of [Hmim][HSO4] are more suitable for the side copolymerization of benzene, thiophene and alkene, thereby affecting repeated use of the ionic liquid catalyst([Hmim][HSO4]). In our research, thiophene derivant produced by desulfurization in the coking benzene was used as the polymer to provide the passing channel of the charges. The ionic liquid composition in poor performance after repeated use was made to prepare conductive material (resisting to static electricity) as an "electron-receiving" and "electron-giving" doping agent. The result shows that thiophene derivant after desulfuration in the coking benzene can be used to prepare doping conductive materials.

  8. The pyrolysis of toluene and ethyl benzene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolovskaya, V. G.; Samgin, V. F.; Kalinenko, R. A.; Nametkin, N. S.

    1987-01-01

    The pyrolysis of toluene at 850 to 950 C gave mainly H2, CH4, and benzene; PhEt at 650 to 750 C gave mainly H2, CH4, styrene, benzene, and toluene. The rate constants for PhEt pyrolysis were 1000 times higher than those for toluene pyrolysis; the chain initiation rate constants differed by the same factor. The activation energy differences were 46 kJ/mole for the total reaction and 54 kJ/mole for chain initiation. The chain length was evaluated for the PhEt case (10 + or - 2).

  9. Metabolites of 1,2,3,4-tetrachlorobenzene in monkey urine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    [14C(U)]-Labeled 1,2,3,4-tetrachlorobenzene was administered orally to squirrel monkeys. Urine was collected from these animals, pooled and analyzed for metabolites by thin-layer chromatography, high-performance liquid chromatography, and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. N-Acetyl-s(2,3,4,5-tetrachlorophenyl) cysteine was shown to be the major metabolite and accounted for 85% of the radioactivity found in urine. A minor metabolite was identified at 2,3,4,5-tetrachlorophenol. This study demonstrates for the first time that an N-acetyl cysteine conjugate has been isolated and identified as metabolite of a chlorinated benzene. This pattern of chlorobenzene metabolism is significantly different from the one obtained with the rat and rabbit, where tetrachlorophenols constitute the major metabolites

  10. An epidemiologic study of early biologic effects of benzene in Chinese workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothman, N.; Hayes, R.B.; Dosemeci, M. [National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-01

    Benzene is a recognized hepatotoxin and leukemogen, but its mechanisms of action in humans are still uncertain. To provide insight into these processes, we carried out a cross-sectional study of 44 healthy workers currently exposed to benzene (median 8-hr time-weighted average; 31 ppm), and unexposed controls in Shanghai, China. Here we provide an overview of the study results on peripheral blood cell levels and somatic cell mutation frequency measured by the glycophorin A (GPA) gene loss assay and report on peripheral cytokine levels. 41 refs., 5 tabs.

  11. Measuring levels of biogenic amines and their metabolites in rat brain tissue using high-performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Min-Jung; Jeon, Ji-Hyun; Oh, Myung Sook; Hong, Seon-Pyo

    2016-01-01

    We developed a method to detect biogenic amines and their metabolites in rat brain tissue using simultaneous high-performance liquid chromatography and a photodiode array detection. Measurements were made using a Hypersil Gold C-18 column (250 × 2.1 mm, 5 µm). The mobile phase was 5 mM perchloric acid containing 5 % acetonitrile. The correlation coefficient was 0.9995-0.9999. LODs (S/N = 3) and LOQs (S/N = 10) were as follows: dopamine 0.4 and 1.3 pg, 3, 4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid 8.4 and 28.0 pg, serotonin 0.4 and 1.3 pg, 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid 3.4 and 11.3 pg, and homovanillic acid 8.4 and 28.0 pg. This method does not require derivatization steps, and is more sensitive than the widely used HPLC-UV method. PMID:26463700

  12. Genetic effects of benzene and radiation in ICR and X/Gf mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X/Gf mice (a tumor-resistant strain) were compared with ICR mice (moderately tumor-sensitive) for their sensitivity to chromosomal damage caused by benzene, cyclophosphamide (CP), benzo(a)pyrene (BP) and radiation. There was no difference between strains in the level of micronucleus formation caused by BP, CP or radiation. Although X/Gf mice metabolized somewhat less of the dose of benzene per weight than ICR mice, and had somewhat higher levels of genetic damage, it is not known whether X/Gf mice would be measurably more resistant to benzene carcinogenicity. Short-term genotoxicity tests are used as indicators of initiation, therefore, equal sensitivity to a set of standard clastogens suggests that tumor resistance in X/Gf mice is a function of later stages of carcinogenesis. (author)

  13. Recommended sublimation pressure and enthalpy of benzene

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Růžička, K.; Fulem, Michal; Červinka, C.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 68, Jan (2014), s. 40-47. ISSN 0021-9614 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : benzene * vapor pressure * heat capacity * ideal-gas thermodynamic properties * sublimation enthalpy * recommended vapor pressure Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.679, year: 2014

  14. 46 CFR 153.1060 - Benzene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Benzene. 153.1060 Section 153.1060 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Operations Special Cargo Procedures § 153.1060...

  15. Formation of Benzene in the Interstellar Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Brant M.; Zhang, Fangtong; Kaiser, Ralf I.; Jamal, Adeel; Mebel, Alexander M.; Cordiner, Martin A.; Charnley, Steven B.; Crim, F. Fleming (Editor)

    2010-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and related species have been suggested to play a key role in the astrochemical evolution of the interstellar medium, but the formation mechanism of even their simplest building block-the aromatic benzene molecule-has remained elusive for decades. Here we demonstrate in crossed molecular beam experiments combined with electronic structure and statistical calculations that benzene (C6H6) can be synthesized via the barrierless, exoergic reaction of the ethynyl radical and 1,3- butadiene, C2H + H2CCHCHCH2 --> C6H6, + H, under single collision conditions. This reaction portrays the simplest representative of a reaction class in which aromatic molecules with a benzene core can be formed from acyclic precursors via barrierless reactions of ethynyl radicals with substituted 1,3-butadlene molecules. Unique gas-grain astrochemical models imply that this low-temperature route controls the synthesis of the very first aromatic ring from acyclic precursors in cold molecular clouds, such as in the Taurus Molecular Cloud. Rapid, subsequent barrierless reactions of benzene with ethynyl radicals can lead to naphthalene-like structures thus effectively propagating the ethynyl-radical mediated formation of aromatic molecules in the interstellar medium.

  16. Canada-wide standard for benzene phase 1 : Progress report 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In June 2000, the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment (CCME) ratified the Canada-Wide Standard (CWS) for Benzene Phase 1. Benzene is classified as a carcinogen to humans and any level of exposure is generally considered to carry some probability of harmful effects. The Ministers committed to reducing national benzene emissions by 30 per cent between 1995 and 2000. This report presents the progress thus far and describes how the Alberta Government has focused on effecting emission reductions in the natural gas sector, dehydrators, petroleum refineries and in chemical manufacturing plants. Their initiatives led to a 66 per cent decrease in benzene emissions by 1999. In addition, overall emissions in the province were reduced by 50 per cent from industry and mobile sources. The measures initiated during Phase 1 will continue beyond the time frame, and Phase 2, not yet ratified, will call for a follow-through on those measures. Phase 2 recognizes best management practices and jurisdictional regulations that will minimize emissions. Specifically, Phase 2 calls for an additional reduction of 6 kilotonnes in benzene emissions for existing facilities by the end of 2010. The minimization of benzene emissions through the application of best available pollution prevention and control techniques is contained for new and expanding facilities. The implementation of the CWS comprises the follow-up of existing initiatives resulting from the application of Phase 1 and the promotion and application of best management practices for new and expanding facilities, the determination and tracking of ancillary emission reductions of benzene realized as a result of other CWS initiatives, and the monitoring and reporting of progress. 13 refs., 4 tabs., 3 figs

  17. Contrastive Analysis of the Raman Spectra of Polychlorinated Benzene: Hexachlorobenzene and Benzene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengjun Zhang

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Detection of persistent pollutants such as polychlorinated benzene in environment in trace amounts is challenging, but important. It is more difficult to distinguish homologues and isomers of organic pollutantd when present in trace amounts because of their similar physical and chemical properties. In this work we simulate the Raman spectra of hexachlorobenzene and benzene, and figure out the vibration mode of each main peak. The effect on the Raman spectrum of changing substituents from H to Cl is analyzed to reveal the relations between the Raman spectra of homologues and isomers of polychlorinated benzene, which should be helpful for distinguishing one kind of polychlorinated benzene from its homologues and isomers by surface enhanced Raman scattering.

  18. 40 CFR 721.1350 - Benzene, (1-methylethyl)(2-phenylethyl)-.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Benzene, (1-methylethyl)(2-phenylethyl... Substances § 721.1350 Benzene, (1-methylethyl)(2-phenylethyl)-. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as benzene,...

  19. 40 CFR 721.1210 - Benzene, (2-chloroethoxy)-.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Benzene, (2-chloroethoxy)-. 721.1210... Substances § 721.1210 Benzene, (2-chloroethoxy)-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as benzene, (2-chloroethoxy)- (PMN P-87-1471) is subject...

  20. 40 CFR 721.1187 - Bis(imidoethylene) benzene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bis(imidoethylene) benzene. 721.1187... Substances § 721.1187 Bis(imidoethylene) benzene. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance bis(imidoethylene)benzene (PMN P-93-1447) is subject to...

  1. NIOSH (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health) testimony to DOL (Department of Labor) on OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration) proposed rule for occupational exposure to benzene, by R. Lemen, March 20, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The testimony reviewed the history of benzene exposure and the development of recommended exposure limits. Data were reviewed on pharmacokinetics, cytotoxicity, long- and short-term exposures, and skin absorption of benzene. Benzene or its metabolites have been shown to remain in the body for a long period of time following inhalation exposure. Studies in mice revealed exposure-related increases in the frequency of sister chromatid exchanges and micronuclei at all exposure concentrations. Some epidemiological standards relating to the benzene standard were cited. NIOSH recommended that the Permissible Exposure Limit for benzene be reduced to 0.1 ppm as an 8-hour time-weighted average, and that there be a limit on short-term exposures of 1.0ppm for any 15-minute period. These recommendations were made to protect against inhalation of benzene and did not relate to skin absorption. Reports indicated that significant benzene absorption can result among workers exposed to solvents containing about 0.5 percent benzene. It was recommended that steps be taken to eliminate this route of exposure. The use of pressure-demand supplied air respirators with an auxiliary self-contained breathing apparatus or a pressure-demand apparatus was recommended

  2. Enhanced metabolite generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chidambaram, Devicharan

    2012-03-27

    The present invention relates to the enhanced production of metabolites by a process whereby a carbon source is oxidized with a fermentative microbe in a compartment having a portal. An electron acceptor is added to the compartment to assist the microbe in the removal of excess electrons. The electron acceptor accepts electrons from the microbe after oxidation of the carbon source. Other transfers of electrons can take place to enhance the production of the metabolite, such as acids, biofuels or brewed beverages.

  3. Pulsed (13)C2-Acetate Protein-SIP Unveils Epsilonproteobacteria as Dominant Acetate Utilizers in a Sulfate-Reducing Microbial Community Mineralizing Benzene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starke, Robert; Keller, Andreas; Jehmlich, Nico; Vogt, Carsten; Richnow, Hans H; Kleinsteuber, Sabine; von Bergen, Martin; Seifert, Jana

    2016-05-01

    In a benzene-degrading and sulfate-reducing syntrophic consortium, a clostridium affiliated to the genus Pelotomaculum was previously described to ferment benzene while various sulfate-reducing Deltaproteobacteria and a member of the Epsilonproteobacteria were supposed to utilize acetate and hydrogen as key metabolites derived from benzene fermentation. However, the acetate utilization network within this community was not yet unveiled. In this study, we performed a pulsed (13)C2-acetate protein stable isotope probing (protein-SIP) approach continuously spiking low amounts of acetate (10 μM per day) in addition to the ongoing mineralization of unlabeled benzene. Metaproteomics revealed high abundances of Clostridiales followed by Syntrophobacterales, Desulfobacterales, Desulfuromonadales, Desulfovibrionales, Archaeoglobales, and Campylobacterales. Pulsed acetate protein-SIP results indicated that members of the Campylobacterales, the Syntrophobacterales, the Archaeoglobales, the Clostridiales, and the Desulfobacterales were linked to acetate utilization in descending abundance. The Campylobacterales revealed the fastest and highest (13)C incorporation. Previous experiments suggested that the activity of the Campylobacterales was not essential for anaerobic benzene degradation in the investigated community. However, these organisms were consistently detected in various hydrocarbon-degrading and sulfate-reducing consortia enriched from the same aquifer. Here, we demonstrate that this member of the Campylobacterales is the dominant acetate utilizer in the benzene-degrading microbial consortium. PMID:26846217

  4. Annoyance Caused by Noise and Air Pollution during Pregnancy: Associated Factors and Correlation with Outdoor NO2 and Benzene Estimations.

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Fernández-Somoano; Sabrina Llop; Inmaculada Aguilera; Ibon Tamayo-Uria; María Dolores Martínez; Maria Foraster; Ferran Ballester; Adonina Tardón

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to describe the degree of annoyance among pregnant women in a Spanish cohort and to examine associations with proximity to traffic, NO2 and benzene exposure. We included 2457 participants from the Spanish Childhood and Environment study. Individual exposures to outdoor NO2 and benzene were estimated, temporally adjusted for pregnancy. Interviews about sociodemographic variables, noise and air pollution were carried out. Levels of annoyance were assessed using a scale from 0 (...

  5. THE INFLUENCE OF BENZENE AS A TRACE REACTANT IN TITAN AEROSOL ANALOGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benzene has been detected in Titan's atmosphere by Cassini instruments, with concentrations ranging from sub-ppb in the stratosphere to ppm in the ionosphere. Sustained levels of benzene in the haze formation region could signify that it is an important reactant in the formation of Titan's organic aerosol. To date, there have not been laboratory investigations to assess the influence of benzene on aerosol properties. We report a laboratory study on the chemical composition of organic aerosol formed from C6H6/CH4/N2 via far ultraviolet irradiation (120-200 nm). The compositional results are compared to those from aerosol generated by a more ''traditional Titan'' mixture of CH4/N2. Our results show that even a trace amount of C6H6 (10 ppm) has significant impact on the chemical composition and production rates of organic aerosol. There are several pathways by which photolyzed benzene may react to form larger molecules, both with and without the presence of CH4, but many of these reaction mechanisms are only beginning to be explored for the conditions at Titan. Continued work investigating the influence of benzene in aerosol growth will advance understanding of this previously unstudied reaction system.

  6. Theoretical investigation on the interaction between beryllium, magnesium and calcium with benzene, coronene, cirumcoronene and graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The binding energies between benzene and Be, Mg and Ca are 1.8, 2.3 and 3.2 kcal/mol. • The alkaline earth complexes with benzene favor the non ionic configuration. • For these complexes charge transfer does not take place. • The performance of the DFT functionals assayed was poor. - Abstract: The interaction energies (IE) between benzene and beryllium, magnesium and calcium were calculated at the CCSD(T)/CBS level and including corrections for core-valence and relativistic effects. The IE are 1.8, 2.3 and 3.2 kcal/mol for Be, Mg and Ca, respectively, In contrast with our previous findings for the benzene–Li complex, we found that the non-ionic structure is more stable than the ionic configuration. Thus, charge-transfer from alkaline earths to benzene would not take place. The performance of MP2 and DFT functionals is poor. At the complete basis set limit, M06-2X, M06-L, B97D and MP2 exhibited similar MAD (∼ 0.7–0.8 kcal/mol). When larger aromatic models were considered, the IE were similar to those computed for benzene. Finally, taking into account the drawbacks of the DFT functionals, the computed IE for the non-ionic adsorption of Be, Mg and Ca onto graphene, are tentatively estimated as 2.1, 2.7 and 2.9 kcal/mol, respectively

  7. THE INFLUENCE OF BENZENE AS A TRACE REACTANT IN TITAN AEROSOL ANALOGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trainer, Melissa G. [Planetary Environments Laboratory, Code 699, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Sebree, Joshua A. [NASA Postdoctoral Program Fellow, Code 699, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Heidi Yoon, Y.; Tolbert, Margaret A., E-mail: melissa.trainer@nasa.gov [Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado at Boulder, Box 216 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States)

    2013-03-20

    Benzene has been detected in Titan's atmosphere by Cassini instruments, with concentrations ranging from sub-ppb in the stratosphere to ppm in the ionosphere. Sustained levels of benzene in the haze formation region could signify that it is an important reactant in the formation of Titan's organic aerosol. To date, there have not been laboratory investigations to assess the influence of benzene on aerosol properties. We report a laboratory study on the chemical composition of organic aerosol formed from C{sub 6}H{sub 6}/CH{sub 4}/N{sub 2} via far ultraviolet irradiation (120-200 nm). The compositional results are compared to those from aerosol generated by a more ''traditional Titan'' mixture of CH{sub 4}/N{sub 2}. Our results show that even a trace amount of C{sub 6}H{sub 6} (10 ppm) has significant impact on the chemical composition and production rates of organic aerosol. There are several pathways by which photolyzed benzene may react to form larger molecules, both with and without the presence of CH{sub 4}, but many of these reaction mechanisms are only beginning to be explored for the conditions at Titan. Continued work investigating the influence of benzene in aerosol growth will advance understanding of this previously unstudied reaction system.

  8. Diffusive Motions in Benzene and Toluene Studied with Slow Neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The viscosity of benzene is described by the Arrhenius equation ή = const. exp (E/kBT), where E is the activation energy for viscous flow. The viscosity of toluene, however, follows this law only in the higher temperature region of its liquid range, i.e. above the Arrhenius temperature TA. In the whole normal liquid range the benzene molecule is supposed to be able to rotate many times about at least two symmetry axes between translational jumps. Davies and Matheson suggest that the onset of non-Arrhenius viscosity behaviour in toluene occurs at that temperature at which rotation about two axes becomes restricted, while rotation about the third remains free. Inelastic scattering experiments of slow neutrons have been performed on the two substances using a time-of-flight spectrometer for cold neutrons with an energy resolution of 12 %. The quasi-elastic scattering has been studied for small momentum transfer as a function of temperature. Diffusion coefficients have been determined assuming a Lorentzian cross-section. The temperature dependence of the diffusion coefficient for benzene follows an exponential law, but the coefficient is a few times larger than the macroscopic coefficient, showing that a large amount of rotational diffusion exists. For toluene there is a change in the temperature dependence of the coefficient at about TA. This is taken as an indication of a change in the number of degrees of rotational freedom of the toluene molecule around TA. The methyl group in toluene has a low barrier to rotation (≲500 cal/mole). Therefore the hindered rotation levels of the methyl group as well as molecular rotation will contribute significantly to the inelastic scattering spectrum which overlaps the quasi-elastic peak. Th e inelastic component is subtracted by extrapolation but the possible contribution of the CH3 rotation to the quasi-elastic peak itself is neglected. (author)

  9. Model-based meta-analysis for development of a population-pharmacokinetic (PPK) model for Vitamin D3 and its 25OHD3 metabolite using both individual and arm-level data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocampo-Pelland, Alanna S; Gastonguay, Marc R; French, Jonathan F; Riggs, Matthew M

    2016-04-01

    Clinical studies investigating relationships between D3 and 25OHD3 vary in dosing regimen, assays, demographics, and control of exogenous D3. This leads to uncertain and conflicting exposure-related associations with D3 and 25OHD3. To elucidate this parent-metabolite system, a PPK model was developed to predict mean D3 and 25OHD3 exposure from varied doses and administration routes. Sources of exposure variability related to metabolite baseline, weight, and assay type were explored. Specific search criteria were used in PUBMED to identify public source PK data pertaining to D3 and 25OHD3 in healthy or osteoporotic populations. Overall 57 studies representing 5395 individuals were selected, including 25 individual-level profiles and treatment-arm data. IV, oral, single and multiple dose data were used, with D3 and 25OHD3 dosing. A nonlinear mixed effects model was developed to simultaneously model PK dispositions of D3 and 25OHD3 (NONMEM v7.2), which were described by 2-compartment models with nonlinear and linear clearances, respectively. Proportional and additive assay variances were included on the 25OHD3 prediction. Unit-level random effects were weighted by treatment-arm size. D3 model estimates, relative to bioavailability were: maximum rate of metabolism ([Formula: see text], 1.62 nmol/h), Michaelis-Menten constant ([Formula: see text], 6.39 nmol/L), central volume of distribution ([Formula: see text], 15.5 L), intercompartmental clearance ([Formula: see text], 0.185 L/h), peripheral volume of distribution ([Formula: see text], 2333 L/h), and baseline concentration ([Formula: see text], 3.75 nmol/L). For 25OHD3 ([Formula: see text] = metabolite): [Formula: see text] = 0.0153 L/h, [Formula: see text] = 4.35 L, [Formula: see text] = 6.87 L, [Formula: see text] = 0.0507 L/h. Simulations of 25OHD3 concentration indicated an inverse relationship between 25OHD3 baseline and response, as well as a less than proportional 25OHD3 response. Estimation of assay bias

  10. Spin-polarization reversal at the interface between benzene and Fe(100)

    KAUST Repository

    Goumri-Said, Souraya

    2013-01-03

    The spin-polarization at the interface between Fe(100) and a benzene is investigated theoretically using density functional theory for two positions of the organic molecule: planar and perpendicular with respect to the substrate. The electronic and magnetic properties as well as the spin-polarization close to the Fermi level strongly depend on the benzene position on the iron surface. An inversion of the spin-polarization is induced by p-d hybridization and charge transfer from the iron to the carbon sites in both configurations.

  11. OH-initiated oxidation of benzene - Part II. Influence of elevated NOx concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klotz, B; Volkamer, R; Hurley, MD;

    2002-01-01

    The present work represents a continuation of part I of this series of papers, in which we investigated the phenol yields in the OH-initiated oxidation of benzene under conditions of low to moderate concentrations of NOx, to elevated NOx levels. The products of the OH-initiated oxidation of benzene...... in 700 760 Torr of N-2/O-2 diluent at 297 +/- 4 K were investigated in 3 different photochemical reaction chambers. In situ spectroscopic techniques were employed for the detection of products, and the initial concentrations of benzene, NOx, and O-2 were widely varied (by factors of 6300, 1500, and...... 13, respectively). In contrast to results from previous studies, a pronounced dependence of the product distribution on the NOx concentration was observed. The phenol yield decreases from approximately 50-60% in the presence of low concentrations (10 000 ppb) NOx concentrations. In the presence of...

  12. The Self-Assembly Properties of a Benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxamide Derivative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stals, Patrick J. M.; Haveman, Jan F.; Palmans, Anja R. A.; Schenning, Albertus P. H. J.

    2009-01-01

    A series of experiments involving the synthesis and characterization of a benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxamide derivative and its self-assembly properties are reported. These laboratory experiments combine organic synthesis, self-assembly, and physical characterization and are designed for upper-level undergraduate students to introduce the topic of…

  13. Test of electron beam technology on Savannah River Laboratory low-activity aqueous waste for destruction of benzene, benzene derivatives, and bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dougal, R.A. [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    1993-08-01

    High energy radiation was studied as a means for destroying hazardous organic chemical wastes. Tests were conducted at bench scale with a {sup 60}Co source, and at full scale (387 l/min) with a 1.5 MV electron beam source. Bench scale tests for both benzene and phenol included 32 permutations of water quality factors. For some water qualities, as much as 99.99% of benzene or 90% of phenol were removed by 775 krads of {sup 60}Co irradiation. Full scale testing for destruction of benzene in a simulated waste-water mix showed loss of 97% of benzene following an 800 krad dose and 88% following a 500 krad dose. At these loss rates, approximately 5 Mrad of electron beam irradiation is required to reduce concentrations from 100 g/l to drinking water quality (5 {mu}g/l). Since many waste streams are also inhabited by bacterial populations which may affect filtering operations, the effect of irradiation on those populations was also studied. {sup 60}Co and electron beam irradiation were both lethal to the bacteria studied at irradiation levels far lower than were necessary to remove organic contaminants.

  14. Test of electron beam technology on Savannah River Laboratory low-activity aqueous waste for destruction of benzene, benzene derivatives, and bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High energy radiation was studied as a means for destroying hazardous organic chemical wastes. Tests were conducted at bench scale with a 60Co source, and at full scale (387 l/min) with a 1.5 MV electron beam source. Bench scale tests for both benzene and phenol included 32 permutations of water quality factors. For some water qualities, as much as 99.99% of benzene or 90% of phenol were removed by 775 krads of 60Co irradiation. Full scale testing for destruction of benzene in a simulated waste-water mix showed loss of 97% of benzene following an 800 krad dose and 88% following a 500 krad dose. At these loss rates, approximately 5 Mrad of electron beam irradiation is required to reduce concentrations from 100 g/l to drinking water quality (5 μg/l). Since many waste streams are also inhabited by bacterial populations which may affect filtering operations, the effect of irradiation on those populations was also studied. 60Co and electron beam irradiation were both lethal to the bacteria studied at irradiation levels far lower than were necessary to remove organic contaminants

  15. Nonlinear diffusion in Acetone-Benzene Solution

    CERN Document Server

    Obukhovsky, Vjacheslav V

    2010-01-01

    The nonlinear diffusion in multicomponent liquids under chemical reactions influence has been studied. The theory is applied to the analysis of mass transfer in a solution of acetone-benzene. It has been shown, that the creation of molecular complexes should be taken into account for the explanation of the experimental data on concentration dependence of diffusion coefficients. The matrix of mutual diffusivities has been found and effective parameters of the system have been computed.

  16. Omega-3 Fatty Acids Protect Renal Functions by Increasing Docosahexaenoic Acid-Derived Metabolite Levels in SHR.Cg-Leprcp/NDmcr Rats, a Metabolic Syndrome Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanori Katakura

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFAs docosahexaenoic acid (DHA and/or eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA protect against diabetic nephropathy by inhibiting inflammation. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of highly purified DHA and EPA or EPA only administration on renal function and renal eicosanoid and docosanoid levels in an animal model of metabolic syndrome, SHR.Cg-Leprcp/NDmcr (SHRcp rats. Male SHRcp rats were divided into 3 groups. Control (5% arabic gum, TAK-085 (300 mg/kg/day, containing 467 mg/g EPA and 365 mg/g DHA, or EPA (300 mg/kg/day was orally administered for 20 weeks. The urinary albumin to creatinine ratio in the TAK-085-administered group was significantly lower than that in other groups. The glomerular sclerosis score in the TAK-085-administered group was significantly lower than that in the other groups. Although DHA levels were increased in total kidney fatty acids, the levels of nonesterified DHA were not significantly different among the 3 groups, whereas the levels of protectin D1, resolvin D1, and resolvin D2 were significantly increased in the TAK-085-administered group. The results show that the use of combination therapy with DHA and EPA in SHRcp rats improved or prevented renal failure associate with metabolic syndrome with decreasing triglyceride levels and increasing ω-3 PUFA lipid mediators.

  17. Accumulation of chlorinated benzenes in earthworms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyer, W.N. [Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, Laurel, MD (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Chlorinated benzenes are widespread in the environment. Hexachlorobenzene, pentachlorobenzene and all isomers of dichlorobenzenes, trichlorobenzenes, and tetrachlorobenzenes, have been detected in fish, water, and sediments from the Great Lakes. They probably entered the water as leachates from chemical waste dumps and as effluents from manufacturing. Hexachlorobenzene and pentachlorobenzene are commonly present in Herring gull (Larus argentatus) eggs from the Great Lakes, and some of the isomers of trichlorobenzene and tetrachlorobenzene are occasionally detected at low concentrations. Hexachlorobenzene, which was formerly used as a fungicide, has been the most thoroughly studied chlorinated benzene, and has been detected in many species. Its use as a fungicide in the United States was canceled in 1984. Since about 1975 hexachlorobenzene has been formed mainly in the production of chlorinated solvents. It is highly persistent in the environment and some species are poisoned by hexachlorobenzene at very low chronic dietary exposures. As little as 1 ppm in the diet of mink (Mustela vison) reduced the birth weights of young, and 5 ppm in the diet of Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica) caused slight liver damage. This paper describes a long-term (26 wk) experiment relating the concentrations of chlorinated benzenes in earthworms to length of exposure and three 8 wk experiments relating concentration to the concentration in soil the soil organic matter content, and the degree of chlorination. 20 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  18. PROCESS SIMULATION OF BENZENE SEPARATION COLUMN OF LINEAR ALKYL BENZENE (LABPLANT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaid A. AbdelRahman

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available       CHEMCAD process simulator was used for the analysis of existing benzene separation column in LAB plant(Arab Detergent Company/Beiji-Iraq.         Simulated column performance curves were constructed. The variables considered in this study are the thermodynamic model option, top and bottom temperatures, feed temperature, feed composition & reflux ratio. Also simulated columns profiles for the temperature, vapor & liquid flow rates compositions, were constructed. Four different thermodynamic models options (SRK, TSRK, PR, and ESSO were used, affecting the results within 1-25% variation for the most cases.            For Benzene Column (32 real stages, feed stage 14, the simulated results show that bottom temperature above 200 oC the weight fractions of top components, except benzene, increases sharply, where as benzene top weight fraction decreasing sharply. Also, feed temperature above 180 oC  shows same trends. The column profiles remain fairly constant from tray 3 (immediately below condenser to tray 10 (immediately above feed and from tray 15 (immediately below feed to tray 25 (immediately above reboiler. Simulation of the benzene separation column in LAB production plant using CHEMCAD simulator, confirms the real plant operation data. The study gives evidence about a successful simulation with CHEMCAD.

  19. Diffusion and adsorption of benzene in Regina clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surface or near-surface spills of hydrocarbons such as gasoline and diesel often occur in clay soils which are fractured and unsaturated. For cost-effective remediation, the extent of contamination and the distribution of the various phases should be determined before the development of remediation methods. The four volatile compounds that are commonly associated with gasoline leaking from underground fuel storage tanks are benzene, toluene, ethlybenzene and xylene. Existing diffusion test methods have been used successfully for inorganic species, but the successful application of these methods to volatile organic compounds is limited. The main difficulty with experiments using volatile organics is that there is a need for careful sample handling and sensitive analytical methods to accurately measure the aqueous concentration. Work was carried out to develop an apparatus that could be used to measure the diffusion and adsorption of volatile organics in clay. The best visual fit to the experimental data for the single reservoir test was an effective diffusion coefficient of 0.01 mL/g, and an adsorption coefficient of 0.1 mL/g. Based on diffusion cell tests, there are relatively low levels of retardation for benzene as it moves in clay soils with low organic carbon content. The implications for remediation are summarized. 28 refs., 16 figs., 5 tabs

  20. Applying 1H NMR Spectroscopy to Detect Changes in the Urinary Metabolite Levels of Chinese Half-Pipe Snowboarders after Different Exercises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuqiu Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring physical training is important for the health and performance of athletes, and real-time assessment of fatigue is crucial to improve training efficiency. The relationship between key biomarkers and exercise has been reported. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of different levels of training exercises on the urine metabolome. 1H NMR-based metabolomics analysis was performed on urine samples from half-pipe snowboarders, and spectral profiles were subjected to PCA and PLS-DA. Our results show that metabolic profiles varied during different stages of exercises. Lactate, alanine, trimethylamine, malonate, taurine, and glycine levels decreased while TMAO and phenylalanine levels increased in the stage with higher amount and intensity of exercise. Although the amount of exercise was reduced in subsequent stage, no significant variations of metabolic profile were found. Metabolic changes induced by training level were analyzed with related metabolic pathway. Studying metabolome changes can provide a better understanding of the physiology of athletes and could aid in adjusting training.

  1. At-line benzene monitor for measuring benzene in precipitate hydrolysis aqueous

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenkins, W.J.

    1992-10-14

    A highly accurate and repeatable at-line benzene monitor (ALBM) has been developed to measure the benzene concentration in precipitate hydrolysis aqueous (PHA) in the DWPF. This analyzer was conceived and jointly developed within SRTC by the Analytical Development and the Defense Waste Process Technology Sections with extensive support from the Applied Statistics Group and the TNX Operations Section. It is recommended that an ALBM specifically adapted to DWPF analytical requirements be used to measure benzene in PHA; calibrations be performed using a 10% methanol solution matrix (for standard stability); and based on experience gained in development at TNX, the services of ADS and ASG be employed to both adapt the ALBM to DWPF requirements and develop statistical control procedures.

  2. At-line benzene monitor for measuring benzene in precipitate hydrolysis aqueous

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A highly accurate and repeatable at-line benzene monitor (ALBM) has been developed to measure the benzene concentration in precipitate hydrolysis aqueous (PHA) in the DWPF. This analyzer was conceived and jointly developed within SRTC by the Analytical Development and the Defense Waste Process Technology Sections with extensive support from the Applied Statistics Group and the TNX Operations Section. It is recommended that an ALBM specifically adapted to DWPF analytical requirements be used to measure benzene in PHA; calibrations be performed using a 10% methanol solution matrix (for standard stability); and based on experience gained in development at TNX, the services of ADS and ASG be employed to both adapt the ALBM to DWPF requirements and develop statistical control procedures

  3. Benzene exposures caused by traffic in Munich public transportation systems between 1993 and 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roemmelt, H.; Pfaller, A.; Fruhmann, G.; Nowak, D. [Institute and Outpatient Clinic for Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, Ziemssenstr. 1, D-80336 Munich (Germany)

    1999-10-29

    Volatile aromatics (benzene, toluene, xylenes, the BTX-aromatics) were measured between 1993 and 1997 in buses and trams in Munich center and along main roads during regular rides. The sampling time was between 07.00 and 00.00 h. A total of 631 probes were sampled and centrally analyzed. In the mean of 5 years we found 15.0 {mu}g benzene/m{sup 3}, 50% above the limit of the 23. BImSchV and 107.5 {mu}g BTX aromates/m{sup 3} along the strongly traffic loaded main streets. Splitting up these mean emissions into single years we observed a trend toward a decline of mean immission of all volatile aromatics (benzene from 23.8 {mu}g/m{sup 3} to 7.4 {mu}g/m{sup 3}) and the sum of BTX aromatics (from 147.5 {mu}g/m{sup 3} to 59.4 {mu}g/m{sup 3}). The measured hydrocarbon concentrations in Munich center were consistent with the long range theoretical calculations concerning the decrease of traffic-caused benzene immissions in cities. If the current trends continue, we can expect benzene concentrations to be below 5 {mu}g/m{sup 3} by the year 2001 and below 2.5 {mu}g/m{sup 3} by the year 2008. At these levels, the carcinogenic risk from benzene is probably less significant than the risks to public health from other car exhaust components.

  4. Protective role of glycerol against benzene stress: insights from the Pseudomonas putida proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaganna, Prashanth; Bielecka, Agata; Molinari, Gabriella; Hallsworth, John E

    2016-05-01

    Chemical activities of hydrophobic substances can determine the windows of environmental conditions over which microbial systems function and the metabolic inhibition of microorganisms by benzene and other hydrophobes can, paradoxically, be reduced by compounds that protect against cellular water stress (Bhaganna et al. in Microb Biotechnol 3:701-716, 2010; Cray et al. in Curr Opin Biotechnol 33:228-259, 2015a). We hypothesized that this protective effect operates at the macromolecule structure-function level and is facilitated, in part at least, by genome-mediated adaptations. Based on proteome profiling of the soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida, we present evidence that (1) benzene induces a chaotrope-stress response, whereas (2) cells cultured in media supplemented with benzene plus glycerol were protected against chaotrope stress. Chaotrope-stress response proteins, such as those involved in lipid and compatible-solute metabolism and removal of reactive oxygen species, were increased by up to 15-fold in benzene-stressed cells relative to those of control cultures (no benzene added). By contrast, cells grown in the presence of benzene + glycerol, even though the latter grew more slowly, exhibited only a weak chaotrope-stress response. These findings provide evidence to support the hypothesis that hydrophobic substances induce a chaotropicity-mediated water stress, that cells respond via genome-mediated adaptations, and that glycerol protects the cell's macromolecular systems. We discuss the possibility of using compatible solutes to mitigate hydrocarbon-induced stresses in lignocellulosic biofuel fermentations and for industrial and environmental applications. PMID:26612269

  5. Metabolic characterization of loci affecting sensory attributes in tomato allows an assessment of the influence of the levels of primary metabolites and volatile organic contents

    OpenAIRE

    Zanor, Maria Inés; Rambla, José-Luis; Chaib, Jamila; Steppa, Agnes; Medina, Aurore; Grannell, Antonio; Fernie, Alisdair; Causse, Mathilde

    2009-01-01

    Numerous studies have revealed the extent of genetic and phenotypic variation between both species and cultivars of tomato. Using a series of tomato lines resulting from crosses between a cherry tomato and three independent large fruit cultivar (Levovil, VilB, and VilD), extensive profiling of both central primary metabolism and volatile organic components of the fruit was performed. In this study, it was possible to define a number of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) which determined the level...

  6. A general static-headspace gas chromatographic method for determination of residual benzene in oral liquid pharmaceutical products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Tang, Qinglin; Markovich, Robert J; Rustum, Abu M

    2011-01-25

    Sodium benzoate is used in oral liquid pharmaceutical products for its anti-microbial properties. The benzoate salts present in liquid pharmaceutical products can potentially generate residual levels of free benzene during manufacturing of the drug product and or during the shelf-life of the product under its storage conditions. To ensure the safety and quality of the pharmaceutical products (containing benzoate in the formulation), a selective and sensitive analytical method is required to monitor residual benzene in oral liquid pharmaceutical products. In this paper, we report the development and validation of a general static-headspace gas chromatographic (SH-GC) method to determine residual benzene in oral liquid pharmaceutical products. The liquid pharmaceutical drug product sample is dissolved in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) in a GC headspace vial. A DB-624 capillary column (30 m x 0.32 mm I.D. and 1.8 μm film thickness) was used under isothermal conditions with a flame ionization detection (FID). The benzene peak was well separated from all other volatile compounds that are present in the formulation of a number of liquid drug products. This method was successfully validated using a representative oral liquid pharmaceutical drug product. The limit of detection of the method for benzene is 0.5 ppm which met the 2 ppm limit of current ICH guideline for residual benzene in pharmaceutical products. PMID:20926217

  7. Benzene exposure: An overview of monitoring methods and their findings

    OpenAIRE

    Weisel, Clifford P.

    2010-01-01

    Benzene has been measured throughout the environment and is commonly emitted in several industrial and transportation settings leading to widespread environmental and occupational exposures. Inhalation is the most common exposure route but benzene rapidly penetrates the skin and can contaminant water and food resulting in dermal and ingestion exposures. While less toxic solvents have been substituted for benzene, it still is a component of petroleum products, including gasoline, and is a trac...

  8. 40 CFR 80.1238 - How is a refinery's or importer's average benzene concentration determined?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... average benzene concentration determined? 80.1238 Section 80.1238 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene Gasoline Benzene Requirements § 80.1238 How is a refinery's or importer's average benzene concentration determined? (a) The average benzene concentration of gasoline produced at a refinery or...

  9. Physiological and phylogenetic characterization of a stable benzene-degrading, chlorate-reducing microbial community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weelink, S.A.B.; Tan, N.C.G.; Broeke, H. ten; Doesburg, W. van; Langenhoff, A.A.M.; Gerritse, J.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2007-01-01

    A stable anoxic enrichment culture was obtained that degraded benzene with chlorate as an electron acceptor. The benzene degradation rate was 1.65 mM benzene per day, which is similar to reported aerobic benzene degradation rates but 20-1650 times higher than reported for anaerobic benzene degradati

  10. Metabolite profiling of sex developmental steroid conjugates reveals an association between decreased levels of steroid sulfates and adiposity in obese girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Su Hyeon; Kim, Shin Hye; Lee, Won-Yong; Chung, Bong Chul; Park, Mi Jung; Choi, Man Ho

    2016-09-01

    Free and conjugated steroids coexist in a dynamic equilibrium due to complex biosynthetic and metabolic processes. This may have clinical significance related to various physiological conditions, including sex development involving the reproductive system. Therefore, we performed quantitative profiling of 16 serum steroids conjugated with glucuronic and sulfuric acids using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). All steroid conjugates were purified by solid-phase extraction and then separated through a 3-μm particle size C18 column (150mm×2.1mm) at a flow rate of 0.3 mL/min in the negative ionization mode. The LC-MS-based analysis was found to be linear (r(2)>0.99), and all steroid conjugates had a limit-of-quantification (LOQ) of 10ng/mL, except for cholesterol sulfate and 17β-estradiol-3,17-disulfate (20ng/mL). The extraction recoveries of all steroid conjugates ranged from 97.9% to 110.7%, while the overall precision (% CV) and accuracy (% bias) ranged from 4.8% to 10.9% and from 94.4% to 112.9% at four different concentrations, respectively. Profiling of steroid conjugates corrected by adiposity revealed decreased levels of steroid sulfates (Psteroid conjugates and for understanding the pathophysiology and relative contributions of adiposity in childhood obesity. PMID:27154415

  11. Can the excretion of metabolites by bacteria be manipulated?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konings, Wil N.; Poolman, Bert; Driessen, Arnold J.M.

    1992-01-01

    Bacteria can release metabolites into the environment by various mechanisms. Excretion may occur by passive diffusion or by the reversal of the uptake process when the internal concentration of the metabolite exceeds the thermodynamic equilibrium level. In other cases, solutes are excreted against t

  12. Metabolomics for Secondary Metabolite Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eriko Takano

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Metabolomics, the global characterization of metabolite profiles, is becoming an increasingly powerful tool for research on secondary metabolite discovery and production. In this review we discuss examples of recent technological advances and biological applications of metabolomics in the search for chemical novelty and the engineered production of bioactive secondary metabolites.

  13. Nonlinear response of the benzene molecule to strong magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagola, G. I.; Caputo, M. C.; Ferraro, M. B.; Lazzeretti, P.

    2005-02-01

    The fourth-rank hypermagnetizability tensor of the benzene molecule has been evaluated at the coupled Hartree-Fock level of accuracy within the conventional common-origin approach, adopting gaugeless basis sets of increasing size and flexibility. The degree of convergence of theoretical tensor components has been estimated allowing for two different coordinate systems. It is shown that a strong magnetic field perpendicular to the plane of the molecule causes a distortion of the electron charge density, which tends to concentrate in the region of the C-C bonds. This charge contraction has a dynamical origin, and can be interpreted as a feedback effect in terms of the classical Lorentz force acting on the electron current density.

  14. Retrospective benzene exposure assessment for a multi-center case-cohort study of benzene-exposed workers in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portengen, Lützen; Linet, Martha S; Li, Gui-Lan; Lan, Qing; Dores, Graça M; Ji, Bu-Tian; Hayes, Richard B; Yin, Song-Nian; Rothman, Nathaniel; Vermeulen, Roel

    2016-05-01

    Quality of exposure assessment has been shown to be related to the ability to detect risk of lymphohematopoietic disorders in epidemiological investigations of benzene, especially at low levels of exposure. We set out to build a statistical model for reconstructing exposure levels for 2898 subjects from 501 factories that were part of a nested case-cohort study within the NCI-CAPM cohort of more than 110,000 workers. We used a hierarchical model to allow for clustering of measurements by factory, workshop, job, and date. To calibrate the model we used historical routine monitoring data. Measurements below the limit of detection were accommodated by constructing a censored data likelihood. Potential non-linear and industry-specific time-trends and predictor effects were incorporated using regression splines and random effects. A partial validation of predicted exposures in 2004/2005 was performed through comparison with full-shift measurements from an exposure survey in facilities that were still open. Median cumulative exposure to benzene at age 50 for subjects that ever held an exposed job (n=1175) was 509 mg/m(3) years. Direct comparison of model estimates with measured full-shift personal exposure in the 2004/2005 survey showed moderate correlation and a potential downward bias at low (<1 mg/m(3)) exposure estimates. The modeling framework enabled us to deal with the data complexities generally found in studies using historical exposure data in a comprehensive way and we therefore expect to be able to investigate effects at relatively low exposure levels. PMID:26264985

  15. Differences in xenobiotic detoxifying activities between bone marrow stromal cells from mice and rats: Implications for benzene-induced hematotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Hong; Li, Yunbo; Trush, M.A. [Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Hygiene and Public Health, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    1995-10-01

    benzene is a human carcinogen; exposure can result in aplastic anemia and leukemia. Data from animal models are frequently used in benzene risk assessment. In rodent studies, mice are more sensitive to benzene-induced hematotoxicity than rats. Bone marrow stromal cells from mice were significantly more susceptible to the cytotoxicity induced by the benzene metabolites hydroquinone (HQ) and benzoquinone (BQ) than cells from rats. Since cellular gluthathione (GSH) and quinone reductase (QR) are known to play critical roles in modulating HQ-induced cytotoxicity, the GSH content and the QR and glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity in stromal cells from both species was measured. In rat cells, the GSH content and the QR specific activity were 2 and 28 times as much as those from mice, respectively. GSH and QR in both mouse and rat stromal cells were inducible by 1,2-dithiole-3-thione (D3T). D3T pretreatment of both mouse and rat stromal cells resulted in a marked protection against HQ-induced toxicity. Pretreatment of both mouse and rat stromal cells with GSH ethyl ester also provided a dramatic protection against HQ-induced toxicity. Conversely, dicoumarol, an inhibitor of QR, enhanced the HQ-induced toxicity in stromal cells from both mice and rats, indicating an important role for QR in modulating HQ-induced stromal toxicity. Buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), which depleted GSH significantly in both species, potentiated the HQ-induced toxicity in mouse but not in rat stromal cells. Surprisingly, incubation of stromal cells with BSO resulted in a significant induction of QR, especially in rats. Overall, this study demonstrates that the differences in stromal cellular GSH content and QR activity between mice and rats contribute to their respective susceptibility to HQ-induced cytotoxicity in vitro, and may be involved in the greater in vivo sensitivity of mice to benzene-induced hematotoxicity. 51 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  16. [Autism and Autism-associated Metabolites].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kunitomo

    2016-06-01

    Gene-microbiota interactions are now proposed to be a special case of gene-environmental interaction. Preclinical and clinical data summarized in this article reveal that a specific serum metabolite, associated with alterations in gut microbiome composition, might have an emerging role in the onset and pathogenesis of autism. Altered level of this specified metabolite may induce perturbations in the epigenome and modulate the expression of key disease susceptible genes in neurons and their associated cells during critical periods of neurodevelopment. The gut microbiota itself is now regarded as a reservoir for environmental epigenetic factors. PMID:27279160

  17. A field-grown transgenic tomato line expressing higher levels of polyamines reveals legume cover crop mulch-specific perturbations in fruit phenotype at the levels of metabolite profiles, gene expression, and agronomic characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neelam, Anil; Cassol, Tatiana; Mehta, Roshni A; Abdul-Baki, Aref A; Sobolev, Anatoli P; Goyal, Ravinder K; Abbott, Judith; Segre, Anna L; Handa, Avtar K; Mattoo, Autar K

    2008-01-01

    Genetic modification of crop plants to introduce desirable traits such as nutritional enhancement, disease and pest resistance, and enhanced crop productivity is increasingly seen as a promising technology for sustainable agriculture and boosting food production in the world. Independently, cultural practices that utilize alternative agriculture strategies including organic cultivation subscribe to sustainable agriculture by limiting chemical usage and reduced tillage. How the two together affect fruit metabolism or plant growth in the field or whether they are compatible has not yet been tested. Fruit-specific yeast S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (ySAMdc) line 579HO, and a control line 556AZ were grown in leguminous hairy vetch (Vicia villosa Roth) (HV) mulch and conventional black polyethylene (BP) mulch, and their fruit analysed. Significant genotypexmulch-dependent interactions on fruit phenotype were exemplified by differential profiles of 20 fruit metabolites such as amino acids, sugars, and organic acids. Expression patterns of the ySAMdc transgene, and tomato SAMdc, E8, PEPC, and ICDHc genes were compared between the two lines as a function of growth on either BP or HV mulch. HV mulch significantly stimulated the accumulation of asparagine, glutamate, glutamine, choline, and citrate concomitant with a decrease in glucose in the 556AZ fruits during ripening as compared to BP. It enables a metabolic system in tomato somewhat akin to the one in higher polyamine-accumulating transgenic fruit that have higher phytonutrient content. Finally, synergism was found between HV mulch and transgenic tomato in up-regulating N:C indicator genes PEPC and ICDHc in the fruit. PMID:18469323

  18. Altered Expression of Genes in Signaling Pathways Regulating Proliferation of Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells in Mice with Subchronic Benzene Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongli Sun

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Leukemias and hematopoietic disorders induced by benzene may arise from the toxicity of benzene to hematopoietic stem or progenitor cells (HS/PCs. Since there is a latency period between initial benzene exposure and the development of leukemia, subsequent impact of benzene on HS/PCs are crucial for a deeper understanding of the carcinogenicity and hematotoxicity in post-exposure stage. This study aims to explore the effects of benzene on HS/PCs and gene-expression in Wnt, Notch and Hh signaling pathways in post-exposure stage. The C3H/He mice were injected subcutaneously with benzene (0, 150, 300 mg/kg/day for three months and were monitored for another 10 months post-exposure. The body weights were monitored, the relative organ weights, blood parameters and bone marrow smears were examined. Frequency of lineage- sca-1+ c-kit+ (LSK cells, capability of colony forming and expression of genes in Wnt, Notch and Hedghog (Hh signaling pathways were also analyzed. The colony formation of the progenitor cells for BFU-E, CFU-GEMM and CFU-GM was significantly decreased with increasing benzene exposure relative to controls, while no significant difference was observed in colonies for CFU-G and CFU-M. The mRNA level of cyclin D1 was increased and Notch 1 and p53 were decreased in LSK cells in mice exposed to benzene but with no statistical significance. These results suggest that subsequent toxic effects of benzene on LSK cells and gene expression in Wnt, Notch and Hh signaling pathways persist in post-exposure stage and may play roles in benzene-induced hematotoxicity.

  19. Application of toxicogenomic profiling to evaluate effects of benzene and formaldehyde: from yeast to human

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHale, Cliona M.; Smith, Martyn T.; Zhang, Luoping

    2014-01-01

    Genetic variation underlies a significant proportion of the individual variation in human susceptibility to toxicants. The primary current approaches to identify gene–environment (GxE) associations, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and candidate gene association studies, require large exposed and control populations and an understanding of toxicity genes and pathways, respectively. This limits their application in the study of GxE associations for the leukemogens benzene and formaldehyde, whose toxicity has long been a focus of our research. As an alternative approach, we applied innovative in vitro functional genomics testing systems, including unbiased functional screening assays in yeast and a near-haploid human bone marrow cell line (KBM7). Through comparative genomic and computational analyses of the resulting data, we have identified human genes and pathways that may modulate susceptibility to benzene and formaldehyde. We have validated the roles of several genes in mammalian cell models. In populations occupationally exposed to low levels of benzene, we applied peripheral blood mononuclear cell transcriptomics and chromosome-wide aneuploidy studies (CWAS) in lymphocytes. In this review of the literature, we describe our comprehensive toxicogenomic approach and the potential mechanisms of toxicity and susceptibility genes identified for benzene and formaldehyde, as well as related studies conducted by other researchers. PMID:24571325

  20. An efficient synthesis of substituted benzene-1,2-dicarboxaldehydes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Peter C; WANG Dei-Haw; LU Kaitao; MANI Neelakandha

    2007-01-01

    Substituted-benzene-1,2-dicarbaldehydes were synthesized by the reaction of substituted-1,2-bis (dibromomethyl) benzenes with fuming sulfuric acid, followed by hydrolysis, The yields were significantly improved by introducing solid sodium bicarbonate into the reaction mixture before hydrolysis and workup.

  1. An efficient synthesis of substituted benzene-1,2-dicarboxaldehydes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU; Peter; C; WANG; Der-Haw; MANI; Neelakandha

    2007-01-01

    Substituted-benzene-1,2-dicarbaldehydes were synthesized by the reaction of substituted-1,2-bis(dibromomethyl) benzenes with fuming sulfuric acid,followed by hydrolysis. The yields were signifi-cantly improved by introducing solid sodium bicarbonate into the reaction mixture before hydrolysis and workup.

  2. 1,4-Bis[(2-pyridylethyliminomethyl]benzene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haleden Chiririwa

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, C22H22N4, the centroid of the benzene ring is located on an inversion centre. The dihedral angle between the benzene and pyridine rings is 10.94 (5°. The crystal structure displays weak intermolecular C—H...N hydrogen bonding and C—H...π interactions.

  3. Air pollution monitoring in Como urban areas. Benzene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work presents the results of a physical - statistical analysis of concentrations of benzene, measured in the Como Center station from 1996 to 1999. The analysis, conducted by means of the development, by steps, of a multifactorial linear regression model, permitted to find an annual trend of benzene, independently from the influence of meteorologicals variables. It has been seen a decrease of concentrations of benzene, from 1997 to 1999, that may be correlate to a decrease of tenor of benzene in the petrol. At the same time, the results of the model permit to understand the role and the relative weight of different climatic factors on the concentrations of benzene. It has been investigated the presence of daily, weekly and seasonal trend, too

  4. Catalytic conversion of alcohols to hydrocarbons with low benzene content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Davison, Brian H.; Keller, Martin

    2016-09-06

    A method for converting an alcohol to a hydrocarbon fraction having a lowered benzene content, the method comprising: converting said alcohol to a hydrocarbon fraction by contacting said alcohol, under conditions suitable for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon fraction, with a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon fraction, and contacting said hydrocarbon fraction with a benzene alkylation catalyst, under conditions suitable for alkylating benzene, to form alkylated benzene product in said hydrocarbon fraction. Also described is a catalyst composition useful in the method, comprising a mixture of (i) a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon, and (ii) a benzene alkylation catalyst, in which (i) and (ii) may be in a mixed or separated state. A reactor for housing the catalyst and conducting the reaction is also described.

  5. Catalytic conversion of alcohols to hydrocarbons with low benzene content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Davison, Brian H.; Keller, Martin

    2016-03-08

    A method for converting an alcohol to a hydrocarbon fraction having a lowered benzene content, the method comprising: converting said alcohol to a hydrocarbon fraction by contacting said alcohol, under conditions suitable for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon fraction, with a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon fraction, and contacting said hydrocarbon fraction with a benzene alkylation catalyst, under conditions suitable for alkylating benzene, to form alkylated benzene product in said hydrocarbon fraction. Also described is a catalyst composition useful in the method, comprising a mixture of (i) a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon, and (ii) a benzene alkylation catalyst, in which (i) and (ii) may be in a mixed or separated state. A reactor for housing the catalyst and conducting the reaction is also described.

  6. Competitive Nitration of Benzene-Fluorobenzene and Benzene-Toluene Mixtures: Orientation and Reactivity Studies Using HPLC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankespoor, Ronald L.; Hogendoorn, Stephanie; Pearson, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    The reactivity and orientation effects of a substituent are analyzed by using HPLC to determine the competitive nitration of the benzene-toluene and benzene-fluorobenzene mixtures. The results have shown that HPLC is an excellent instrumental method to use in analyzing these mixtures.

  7. A Quantum Monte Carlo Study of mono(benzene)TM and bis(benzene)TM Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Bennett, M Chandler; Mitas, Lubos

    2016-01-01

    We present a study of mono(benzene)TM and bis(benzene)TM systems, where TM={Mo,W}. We calculate the binding energies by quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) approaches and compare the results with other methods and available experiments. The orbitals for the determinantal part of each trial wave function were generated from several types of DFT in order to optimize for fixed-node errors. We estimate and compare the size of the fixed-node errors for both the Mo and W systems with regard to the electron density and degree of localization in these systems. For the W systems we provide benchmarking results of the binding energies, given that experimental data is not available.

  8. Crude Oil Metabolites in Groundwater at Two Spill Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekins, Barbara A.; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.; Erickson, Melinda L.; Steenson, Ross; Thorn, Kevin A.

    2016-01-01

    Two groundwater plumes in north central Minnesota with residual crude oil sources have 20 to 50 mg/L of nonvolatile dissolved organic carbon (NVDOC). These values are over 10 times higher than benzene and two to three times higher than Diesel Range Organics in the same wells. On the basis of previous work, most of the NVDOC consists of partial transformation products from the crude oil. Monitoring data from 1988 to 2015 at one of the sites located near Bemidji, MN show that the plume of metabolites is expanding toward a lakeshore located 335 m from the source zone. Other mass balance studies of the site have demonstrated that the plume expansion is driven by the combined effect of continued presence of the residual crude oil source and depletion of the electron accepting capacity of solid phase iron oxide and hydroxides on the aquifer sediments. These plumes of metabolites are not covered by regulatory monitoring and reporting requirements in Minnesota and other states. Yet, a review of toxicology studies indicates that polar metabolites of crude oil may pose a risk to aquatic and mammalian species. Together the results suggest that at sites where residual sources are present, monitoring of NVDOC may be warranted to evaluate the fates of plumes of hydrocarbon transformation products.

  9. Evaluation of genotoxicity in workers exposed to benzene and atmospheric pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göethel, Gabriela; Brucker, Natália; Moro, Angela M; Charão, Mariele F; Fracasso, Rafael; Barth, Anelise; Bubols, Guilherme; Durgante, Juliano; Nascimento, Sabrina; Baierle, Marília; Saldiva, Paulo H; Garcia, Solange C

    2014-08-01

    Gas station attendants and taxi drivers are occupationally exposed to xenobiotics which may be harmful to their health. Atmospheric pollutants and benzene can lead to DNA damage. Genotoxicity and mutagenicity assays can be used to evaluate the effects of these pollutants. We have evaluated genotoxicity and mutagenicity in workers occupationally exposed to xenobiotics, by application of the 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), comet, and micronucleus (MN) assays. Biomarkers of benzene and carbon monoxyde exposure were also measured: urinary t,t-muconic acid (t,t-MA) and carboxyhaemoglobin (COHb) in whole blood, respectively. The study groups comprised 43 gas station attendants (GSA), 34 taxi drivers (TD), and 22 persons without known occupational exposures (NE). Levels of t,t-MA in the GSA group were significantly elevated compared to the NE group (p0.05). DNA damage index (DI) and 8-OHdG levels were significantly higher for both the GSA and TD groups, compared to the NE group (p<0.001), but MN frequencies were not elevated. Spearman correlation analysis showed that the frequency of MN was positively correlated with 8-OHdG. A positive correlation between DNA DI levels and 8-OHdG was also observed. In conclusion, our results indicated that low levels of occupational exposure to benzene and atmospheric pollutants may be linked to genotoxicity and oxidative DNA damage. PMID:25344165

  10. Higher body weight patients on clopidogrel maintenance therapy have lower active metabolite concentrations, lower levels of platelet inhibition, and higher rates of poor responders than low body weight patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Henrik; Angiolillo, Dominick J; Ten Berg, Jurrien M; Bergmeijer, Thomas O; Jakubowski, Joseph A; Small, David S; Moser, Brian A; Zhou, Chunmei; Brown, Patricia; James, Stefan; Winters, Kenneth J; Erlinge, David

    2014-01-01

    Body weight is a predictor of clopidogrel response. However, no prospective studies have compared pharmacodynamic (PD) and pharmacokinetic (PK) data based on body weight. We compared PD and PK effects of clopidogrel 75 mg in low body weight (LBW, aspirin-treated patients received clopidogrel 75 mg for 10-14 days. The area under the concentration-time curve of active metabolite (Clop-AM) calculated through the last quantifiable concentration up to 4 h postdose, AUC(0-tlast), was calculated by noncompartmental methods. Light transmission aggregometry (LTA) (maximum platelet aggregation and inhibition of platelet aggregation to 20 μM adenosine diphosphate (ADP), and residual platelet aggregation to 5 μM ADP), VerifyNow(®) P2Y12 reaction units (PRU), and vasodilator-associated stimulated phosphoprotein phosphorylation platelet reactivity index (VASP-PRI) were performed. Mean AUC(0-tlast) was lower in HBW than LBW patients: 12.8 versus 17.9 ng h/mL. HBW patients had higher platelet reactivity as measured by LTA (all p ≤ 0.01), PRU (207 ± 68 vs. 152 ± 57, p < 0.001), and VASP-PRI (56 ± 18 vs. 39 ± 17, p < 0.001). More HBW patients exhibited high on-treatment platelet reactivity (HPR) using PRU (35 vs. 9%) and VASP-PRI (65 vs. 27%). Body weight correlated with PRU and VASP-PRI (both p < 0.001), and inversely with log transformed AUC(0-tlast) (p < 0.001). In conclusion, HBW patients had lower levels of Clop-AM, and higher platelet reactivity and rates of HPR than LBW subjects, contributing to their suboptimal response to clopidogrel. PMID:24043374

  11. [Antiviral properties of basidiomycetes metabolites].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avtonomova, A V; Krasnopolskaya, L M

    2014-01-01

    The data on the antiviral action of the Ganoderma lucidum, Lentinus edodes, Grifola frondosa, Agaricus brasiliensis and other basidiomycetes metabolites are summurized. The metabolites of these species of basidiomycetes exhibit a direct antiviral effect on herpes simplex virus types I and II, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus, vesicular stomatitis virus, influenza virus, Epstein-Barr virus, and others. Moreover, metabolites of basidiomycetes increased antiviral immunity. PMID:25975107

  12. Calculations of Hyperpolarizabilities for Para-disubstituted Benzenes with the QSPR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xian Dong ZENG; Xuan XU; Bing Feng WANG; Bing Can WANG

    2004-01-01

    A quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) was made for the prediction of the hyperpolarizabilities(β) of para-disubstituted benzenes with the nonlinear optical properties, and the βcal2 calculated by this model accorded better with the experimental values (βexpt) compared with theβcal1 calculated at the CPHF/6-31G*//HF/STO-3G level of theory, especially whenβ was big.

  13. Benzene conversion by manganese dioxide assisted silent discharge plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Bin; JI Min; YU Xin; FENG Tao; YAO Shuiliang

    2007-01-01

    Non-thermal plasma technologies have shown their promising potential specially for the low concentration of volatile organic compound control in indoor air in recent years.But it is also high energy consuming.So,to improve the energy efficiency,adding catalysts which enhance the plasma chemical reactions to plasma reactors may be a good selection.Therefore,in this study the manganese dioxide assisted silent discharge plasma was developed for benzene conversion at a relatively high energy efficiency.The results show that MnO2 could promote complete oxidation of benzene with O2 and O3 produced in the plasma discharge zone.The energy efficiency of benzene conversion with MnO2 was two folds as much as that without catalysts.It was also found that the site of MnO2 in the reactor and the energy density had effects on benzene conversion.While the energy density was lower than 48 J/L,benzene conversion decreased with the increase in the distance between MnO2 bed and the plasma discharge zone.Whereas when the energy density was higher than 104 J/L,benzene conversion had an optimal value that was governed by the distance between MnO2 bed and the plasma discharge zone.The mechanism of benzene oxidation in plasma discharges and over MnO2 is discussed in detail.

  14. Top-down estimates of benzene and toluene emissions in the Pearl River Delta and Hong Kong, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xuekun; Shao, Min; Stohl, Andreas; Zhang, Qiang; Zheng, Junyu; Guo, Hai; Wang, Chen; Wang, Ming; Ou, Jiamin; Thompson, Rona L.; Prinn, Ronald G.

    2016-03-01

    Benzene (C6H6) and toluene (C7H8) are toxic to humans and the environment. They are also important precursors of ground-level ozone and secondary organic aerosols and contribute substantially to severe air pollution in urban areas in China. Discrepancies exist between different bottom-up inventories for benzene and toluene emissions in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) and Hong Kong (HK), which are emission hot spots in China. This study provides top-down estimates of benzene and toluene emissions in the PRD and HK using atmospheric measurement data from a rural site in the area, Heshan, an atmospheric transport model, and an inverse modeling method. The model simulations captured the measured mixing ratios during most pollution episodes. For the PRD and HK, the benzene emissions estimated in this study for 2010 were 44 (12-75) and 5 (2-7) Gg yr-1 for the PRD and HK, respectively, and the toluene emissions were 131 (44-218) and 6 (2-9) Gg yr-1, respectively. Temporal and spatial differences between the inversion estimate and four different bottom-up emission estimates are discussed, and it is proposed that more observations at different sites are urgently needed to better constrain benzene and toluene (and other air pollutant) emissions in the PRD and HK in the future.

  15. Top-down estimates of benzene and toluene emissions in Pearl River Delta and Hong Kong, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, X.; Shao, M.; Stohl, A.; Zhang, Q.; Zheng, J.; Guo, H.; Wang, C.; Wang, M.; Ou, J.; Thompson, R. L.; Prinn, R. G.

    2015-09-01

    Benzene (C6H6) and toluene (C7H8) are toxic to humans and the environment. They are also important precursors of ground-level ozone and secondary organic aerosols and contribute substantially to severe air pollution in urban areas in China. Discrepancies exist between different bottom-up inventories for benzene and toluene emissions in Pearl River Delta (PRD) and Hong Kong (HK), which are emission hot spots in China. This study provides top-down estimates of benzene and toluene emissions in PRD and HK using atmospheric measurement data from a rural site in the area, Heshan, an atmospheric transport model and an inverse modeling method. The model simulations captured the measured mixing ratios during most pollution episodes. For PRD and HK, the benzene emissions estimated in this study for 2010 were 44 (12-75) Gg yr-1 and 5 (2-7) Gg yr-1 for PRD and HK, respectively, and the toluene emissions were 131 (44-218) Gg yr-1 and 6 (2-9) Gg yr-1, respectively. Temporal and spatial differences between the inversion estimate and four different bottom-up emission estimates are discussed, and it is proposed that more observations at different sites are urgently needed to better constrain benzene and toluene (and other air pollutants) emissions in PRD and HK in the future.

  16. Identification of metabolites with anticancer properties by computational metabolomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bowen Nathan J

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Certain endogenous metabolites can influence the rate of cancer cell growth. For example, diacylglycerol, ceramides and sphingosine, NAD+ and arginine exert this effect by acting as signaling molecules, while carrying out other important cellular functions. Metabolites can also be involved in the control of cell proliferation by directly regulating gene expression in ways that are signaling pathway-independent, e.g. by direct activation of transcription factors or by inducing epigenetic processes. The fact that metabolites can affect the cancer process on so many levels suggests that the change in concentration of some metabolites that occurs in cancer cells could have an active role in the progress of the disease. Results CoMet, a fully automated Computational Metabolomics method to predict changes in metabolite levels in cancer cells compared to normal references has been developed and applied to Jurkat T leukemia cells with the goal of testing the following hypothesis: Up or down regulation in cancer cells of the expression of genes encoding for metabolic enzymes leads to changes in intracellular metabolite concentrations that contribute to disease progression. All nine metabolites predicted to be lowered in Jurkat cells with respect to lymphoblasts that were examined (riboflavin, tryptamine, 3-sulfino-L-alanine, menaquinone, dehydroepiandrosterone, α-hydroxystearic acid, hydroxyacetone, seleno-L-methionine and 5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole, exhibited antiproliferative activity that has not been reported before, while only two (bilirubin and androsterone of the eleven tested metabolites predicted to be increased or unchanged in Jurkat cells displayed significant antiproliferative activity. Conclusion These results: a demonstrate that CoMet is a valuable method to identify potential compounds for experimental validation, b indicate that cancer cell metabolism may be regulated to reduce the intracellular concentration of

  17. Exposure to methyl tert-butyl ether, benzene, and total hydrocarbons at the Singapore-Malaysia causeway immigration checkpoint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, C.; Ong, H.Y.; Kok, P.W. [and others

    1996-12-31

    The primary aim of this study was to determine the extent and levels of exposure to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from automobile emissions in a group of immigration officers at a busy cross-border checkpoint. A majority (80%) of the workers monitored were exposed to benzene at levels between 0.01 and 0.5 ppm, with only 1.2% exceeding the current Occupational Safety and Health Administration occupational exposure limit of 1 ppm. The geometric mean (GM) concentrations of 8-hr time-weighted average exposure were 0.03 ppm, 0.9 ppm, and 2.46 ppm for methyl-tert-butyl ether (MTBE), benzene, and total hydrocarbons (THC), respectively. The highest time-weighted average concentrations measured were 1.05 ppm for MTBE, 2.01 ppm for benzene, and 34 ppm for THC. It was found that motorbikes emitted a more significant amount of pollutants compared with motor cars. On average, officers at the motorcycle booths were exposed to four to five times higher levels of VOCs (GMs of 0.07 ppm, 0.23 ppm, and 4.7 ppm for MTBE, benzene, and THC) than their counterparts at the motor car booths (GMs of 0.01 ppm, 0.05 ppm, and 1.5 ppm). The airborne concentrations of all three pollutants correlated with the flow of vehicle traffic. Close correlations were also noted for the concentrations in ambient air for the three pollutants measured. Benzene and MTBE had a correlation coefficient of 0.97. The overall findings showed that the concentrations of various VOCs were closely related to the traffic density, suggesting that they were from a common source, such as exhaust emissions from the vehicles. The results also indicated that although benzene, MTBE, and THC are known to be volatile, a significant amount could still be detected in the ambient environment, thus contributing to our exposure to these compounds. 4 refs., 6 figs.

  18. Urinary excretion of androgen metabolites, comparison with excretion of radioactive metabolites after injection of [4-14C]testosterone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of age on the metabolic pattern of [4-14C]testosterone was studied in 20 young and 8 elderly males and compared to the metabolic pattern of endogenous androgens; the latter was also studied in 16 young and 8 elderly women. In both young and elderly males, androsterone and aetiocholanolone glucuronide represent 65% of [4-14C]testosterone metabolites: together with their suephoconjugates as well as with 5α- and 5β-androstane-3α, 17β-diol they represent even more than 75% of total urinary metabolites. The 5α/5β ratio of metabolites of [4-14C]testosterone was significantly (P14C]testosterone metabolites was generally higher than the ratio of metabolites of endogenous androgens, suggesting that the transformation of T to ring A saturated metabolites occurs at least partially in another compartment than the transformation of DHEA to these metabolites. For both [4-14C]testosterone and endogenous androgen metabolites we observed a statistically significant reduction of the 5α/5β ratio with age, a general phenomenon in both males and females. This reduction concern also 11-OH-androst-4-ene-3.17-dione metabolism. Neither sex hormone levels, nor specific binding seems to determine this age dependent shift; neither is there convincing evidence for latent hypothyroisism or liver dysfunction in the elderly. An age associated primary decrease of the 5α-reductase activity seems the most likely explanation. (author)

  19. Hydroxylation of yohimbine in superacidic media: one-step access to human metabolites 10 and 11-hydroxyyohimbine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duflos, A; Redoules, F; Fahy, J; Jacquesy, J C; Jouannetaud, M P

    2001-02-01

    Two major human metabolites of yohimbine (1), 10- and 11-hydroxyyohimbine (2 and 3), were prepared by direct hydroxylation of 1 under superacidic conditions. In this medium, the four positions of the benzene part of yohimbine were hydroxylated and the corresponding monohydroxylated compounds (2-5) were isolated. The structures of 2-5 were elucidated by spectroscopic methods including 1D and 2D NMR techniques. PMID:11429998

  20. 40 CFR 80.1285 - How does a refiner apply for a benzene baseline?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How does a refiner apply for a benzene... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Averaging, Banking and Trading (abt) Program § 80.1285 How does a refiner apply for a benzene baseline? (a) A benzene...

  1. 40 CFR 80.1220 - What are the implementation dates for the gasoline benzene program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... the gasoline benzene program? 80.1220 Section 80.1220 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene General Information § 80.1220 What are the implementation dates for the gasoline benzene program? (a) Benzene standard. (1) For the annual averaging period beginning January 1, 2011, and for...

  2. Sun, shade, and secondary metabolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    My research program focuses on understanding plant primary and secondary metabolites. Grape secondary metabolites, such as phenolics, have long been valuable for the organoleptic properties they impart to fruit and wine, and, more recently, for their possible health benefits. These compounds develop...

  3. Secondary metabolites from Eremostachys laciniata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calis, Ihsan; Güvenc, Aysegül; Armagan, Metin;

    2008-01-01

    metabolites were elucidated from spectroscopic (UV, IR, 1D- and 2D-NMR) and ESI-MS evidence, as well as from their specific optical rotation. The presence of these metabolites of three different classes strongly supports the close relationship of the genera Eremostachys and Phlomis....

  4. Variability of benzene exposure among filling station attendants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A monitoring survey of filling station attendants aimed at identifying sources of variability of exposure to benzene and other aromatics was carried out. Concurrent samples of the worker's breathing zone air, atmospheric air in the service station proximity, and gasoline were collected, along with information about daily workloads and other exposure-related factors. Benzene personal exposure was characterised by a small between-worker variability and a predominant within-worker variance component. Such elevated day-to-day variability yields to imprecise estimates of mean personal exposure. Almost 70% of the overall personal exposure variance was explained by a model including daily benzene from dispensed fuel, presence of a shelter over the refueling area, amount of fuel supplied to the station if a delivery occurred, and background atmospheric benzene concentration

  5. Electronic structure of benzene adsorbed on Ni and Cu surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinelt, M.; Nilsson, A.; Wassdahl, N. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Benzene has for a long time served as a prototype adsorption system of large molecules. It adsorbs with the molecular plane parallel to the surface. The bonding of benzene to a transition metal is typically viewed to involve the {pi} system. Benzene adsorbs weakly on Cu and strongly on Ni. It is interesting to study how the adsorption strength is reflected in the electronic structure of the adsorbate-substrate complex. The authors have used X-ray Emission (XE) and X-ray Absorption (XA) spectroscopies to selectively study the electronic states localized on the adsorbed benzene molecule. Using XES the occupied states can be studies and with XAS the unoccupied states. The authors have used beamline 8.0 and the Swedish endstation equipped with a grazing incidence x-ray spectrometer and a partial yield absorption detector. The resolution in the XES and XAS were 0.5 eV and 0.05 eV, respectively.

  6. Intrinsic and enhanced biodegradation of benzene in strongly reduced aquifers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heiningen, W.N.M. van; Rijnaarts, H.H.M; Langenhoff, A.A.M.

    1999-01-01

    Laboratory microcosm studies were performed to examine intrinsic and enhanced benzene bioremediation using five different sediment and groundwater samples from three deeply anaerobic aquifers sited in northern Netherlands. The influence of addition of nitrate, sulfate, limited amounts of oxygen, and

  7. Magnetically rotational reactor for absorbing benzene emissions by ionic liquids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yangyang; Jiang; Chen; Guo; Huizhou; Liu

    2007-01-01

    A magnetically rotational reactor (MRR) has been developed and used in absorbing benzene emissions. The MRR has a permanent magnet core and uses magnetic ionic liquid [bmim]FeCl4 as absorbent. Benzene emissions were carried by N2 into the MRR and were absorbed by the magnetic ionic liquid. The rotation of the permanent magnet core provided impetus for the agitation of the magnetic ionic liquid, enhancing mass transfer and making benzene better dispersed in the absorbent. 0.68 g benzene emissions could be absorbed by a gram of [bmim]FeCl4, 0.27 and 0.40 g/ghigher than that by [bmim]PF6 and [bmim]BF4, respectively. The absorption rate increased with increasing rotation rate of the permanent magnet.

  8. Positronium quenching in liquid and solid octanol and benzene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shantarovich, V.P.; Mogensen, O.E.; Goldanskii, V.I.

    1970-01-01

    The lifetimes of orthopositronium in several solutions in liquid and solid octanol and benzene have been measured. The Ps-quenching constant was found to be two to thirty times higher in the solid than in the liquid phase.......The lifetimes of orthopositronium in several solutions in liquid and solid octanol and benzene have been measured. The Ps-quenching constant was found to be two to thirty times higher in the solid than in the liquid phase....

  9. Optimal voxel size for measuring global gray and white matter proton metabolite concentrations using chemical shift imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanson, Lars Peter Grüner; Adalsteinsson, E; Pfefferbaum, A;

    2000-01-01

    Quantification of gray and white matter levels of spectroscopically visible metabolites can provide important insights into brain development and pathological conditions. Chemical shift imaging offers a gain in efficiency for estimation of global gray and white matter metabolite concentrations co...

  10. Urinary pesticide metabolites in school students from northern Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panuwet, Parinya; Prapamontol, Tippawan; Chantara, Somporn; Barr, Dana B

    2009-05-01

    We evaluated exposure to pesticides among secondary school students aged 12-13 years old in Chiang Mai Province, Thailand. Pesticide-specific urinary metabolites were used as biomarkers of exposure for a variety of pesticides, including organophosphorus insecticides, synthetic pyrethroid insecticides and selected herbicides. We employed a simple solid-phase extraction with analysis using isotope dilution high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS). A total of 207 urine samples from Thai students were analyzed for 18 specific pesticide metabolites. We found 14 metabolites in the urine samples tested; seven of them were detected with a frequency > or=17%. The most frequently detected metabolites were 2-[(dimethoxyphosphorothioyl) sulfanyl] succinic acid (malathion dicarboxylic acid), para-nitrophenol (PNP), 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TPCY; metabolite of chlorpyrifos), 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), cis- and trans-3-(2,2-dichlorovinyl)-2,2-dimethylcyclopropane-1-carboxylic acids (c-DCCA and t-DCCA; metabolite of permethrin) and 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3-PBA; metabolite of pyrethroids). The students were classified into 4 groups according to their parental occupations: farmers (N=60), merchants and traders (N=39), government and company employees (N=52), and laborers (N=56). Children of farmers had significantly higher urinary concentrations of pyrethroid insecticide metabolites than did other children (pmetabolite concentrations. Males had significantly higher values of PNP (Mann-Whitney test, p=0.009); however, no other sex-related differences were observed. Because parental occupation and agricultural activities seemed to have little influence on pesticide levels, dietary sources were the likely contributors to the metabolite levels observed. PMID:18760967

  11. Concentrations of benzene and toluene in the atmosphere of the southwestern area at the Mexico City Metropolitan Zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bravo, H.; Sosa, R.; Sanchez, P. [Universidad Autonoma de Mexico, Ciudad Universitaria (Mexico). Centro de Ciencias de la Atmosfera; Bueno, E.; Gonzalez, L. [Centro Nacional de Investigacion y Capacitacion Ambiental, Instituto Nacional de Ecologia, SEMARNAP, Mexico (Mexico)

    2002-08-01

    The Mexico City Metropolitan Zone (MCMZ) presents important emissions of hazardous air pollutants. It is well documented that the MCMZ suffers a critical air pollution problem due to high ozone and particulate matter concentrations. However, toxic air pollutants such as benzene and toluene have not been considered. Benzene has accumulated sufficient evidence as a human carcinogen, and the ratio benzene/toluene is an excellent indicator to evaluate control strategies efficiency. In order to evaluate the levels of these two air toxic pollutants in the MCMZ, ambient air samples were collected in canisters and analyzed with a gas chromatograph with a flame ionization detector, according to procedures described in the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) method TO-15. Quality assurance was performed collecting duplicate samples which were analyzed in replicate to quantify the precision of air-quality measurements. Three different sites located in the Southwestern area in the MCMZ were selected for the sampling: the University campus, a gas station, and a vertical condominium area, in the same neighborhood, which presents different activities. At these sites, grab air samples were collected during the morning hours (7-8 a.m.), while for the University area, 24 h integrated air samples were collected simultaneously, with grab samples. Benzene concentrations (24 h sampling) in the atmosphere around the University campus have similar present levels as in other cities of North America. Mean values in this site were about 1.7 ppb. A significant variation exists between the benzene and toluene concentrations in the studied sites, being the more critical values than those registered at the gas station (an average of 25.8 ppb and a maximum of 141 ppb of benzene). There is a fuel regulation for gasoline in Mexico, which allows a maximum of 1 percent of benzene. However, since more than 60 percent of vehicles do not have catalytic converters (models before 1991

  12. Combined effects of simultaneous γ-rays irradiation and inhalation of benzene, toluene and carbon monoxide on rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combined effects on rabbits induced by γ-rays irradiation in combination with inhalation of benzene, toluene and carbon monoxide and the interactive characteristics (antagonistic, additive or synergistic) of these agents were studied. Ninety healthy male rabbits were equally divided into 9 groups, eight of which were test groups assigned according to four factor- two-dose-level orthogonal layout [L8(27)] program and one was the control. The two dose-levels of the four factors were: for γ-rays irradiation, 0.0075 Gy/d and 0.0375 Gy/d, and for benzene, toluene and carbon monoxide, 40 +- 15 mg/m3 and 182 +- 33 mg/m3, 90 +- 30 mg/m3 and 407 +- 68 mg/m3, 93 +- 4 mg/m3 and 278 +- 8 mg/m3 respectively. The animals were exposed to γ-rays irradiation combined with benzene, toluene and CO vapor 2h a day and 5 days a week for a period of 8 weeks. Experimental results were analysed with the method of variance analysis and the test groups were compared. The results showed that (1) the interactive factor, the ratio (ω) of the combined effects caused by the four agents to the sum of the four independent effects induced by those agents, was 2.16, 1.58, 2.07, 2.67, 1.31 and 1.18 for dicentric + ring, acentric, aberration cells, total aberration, micronuclei and SCEs/C in lymphocytes respectively, and the ratio for aberrant sperms was as high as 5.97. The ratios showed that interactions were mainly synergistic (ω > 1). However, for acentric interactions between γ-rays and benzene was antagonistic. (2) The four agents could all obviously cause decrease in testis weight index, and γ-rays, benzene and CO could markedly reduce the number of sperms and increase the ratio of aberrant sperms. The interactions between γ-rays and benzene for the decrease in testis weight index and for the elevation of the ratio of aberrant sperms were synergistic. (3) CO could cause decrease in total amount of leucocytes, thrombocytes and hemoglobin, and toluene cause decrease in lymphocytes. (4

  13. 2H NMR study of dynamics of benzene-d6 interacting with humic and fulvic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastman, Margaret A; Brothers, Lucinda A; Nanny, Mark A

    2011-05-01

    Samples of three humic acids and one fulvic acid with 1% loading of benzene-d(6) in sealed glass tubes have been studied with solid-state deuterium quadrupole-echo nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Calculated spectra combining three motional models, two isotropic models and a third more restricted small-angle wobble (SAW) motional model, are fit to the experimental spectra. One isotropic motion (ISO(v)) is assigned to vaporous benzene-d(6) due to the small line width, short T(1), and the loss of this component by about -25 °C when the temperature is lowered. The remaining two motional components, ISO(s) and SAW, are sorbed by the humic or fulvic acid. Benzene-d(6) slowly interacts with the humic substances, progressively filling SAW sites as ISO(s) motion diminishes. Both the sorption and increase in percentage of SAW motion are for the most part complete within 200 days but continue to a lesser extent over a period of a few years. For the SAW motion there are at least two and most likely a series of T(1) values, indicating more than one adsorption environment. Enthalpies of sorption, obtained from application of the van't Hoff equation to the percentages of the different motional models derived from a series of variable temperature spectra, are comparable in magnitude to the enthalpy of vaporization of benzene. In Leonardite humic acid, ΔH and ΔS for the ISO(s) to SAW transition change from positive to negative values with age, implying a transition in the driving force from an entropic effect associated with expansion and deformation in the molecular structure of the humic substance to accommodate benzene-d(6) to an enthalpic effect of strong benzene-d(6)-humic substance interactions. In contrast, at advanced ages, Suwannee River humic and fulvic acids have small positive or near zero ΔH and positive ΔS for the ISO(s) to SAW transition. PMID:21456559

  14. Exposition by inhalation to the benzene, toluene, ethyl-benzene and xylenes (BTEX) in the air. Sources, measures and concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document presents the main techniques today available to characterize the benzene, toluene, ethyl-benzene and xylene (BTEX) concentrations in the air for different contexts: urban and rural areas or around industrial installations but also indoor and occupational area. It provides information to guide laboratories and research departments. A synthesis gives also the main emissions sources of these compounds as reference concentrations measured in different environments. (A.L.B.)

  15. Vibrationally averaged dipole moments of methane and benzene isotopologues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arapiraca, A. F. C.; Mohallem, J. R.

    2016-04-01

    DFT-B3LYP post-Born-Oppenheimer (finite-nuclear-mass-correction (FNMC)) calculations of vibrationally averaged isotopic dipole moments of methane and benzene, which compare well with experimental values, are reported. For methane, in addition to the principal vibrational contribution to the molecular asymmetry, FNMC accounts for the surprisingly large Born-Oppenheimer error of about 34% to the dipole moments. This unexpected result is explained in terms of concurrent electronic and vibrational contributions. The calculated dipole moment of C6H3D3 is about twice as large as the measured dipole moment of C6H5D. Computational progress is advanced concerning applications to larger systems and the choice of appropriate basis sets. The simpler procedure of performing vibrational averaging on the Born-Oppenheimer level and then adding the FNMC contribution evaluated at the equilibrium distance is shown to be appropriate. Also, the basis set choice is made by heuristic analysis of the physical behavior of the systems, instead of by comparison with experiments.

  16. Active and passive monitoring of benzene in Milan from 1992 up to today

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The air quality degradation in large urban areas, mainly due to the traffic, is evaluated through the measurement of pollutants coming, directly or indirectly, from the traffic itself. Due to its cancerogenicity, a quality standard for benzene has been settled by D.M.25/11/1994, which obliges this measure in towns having more than 150.000 inhabitants.Starting from 1992, Milan P.M.I.P. has been controlling benzene and other homologues concentrations in air with routine and campaign measurements. Concentrations change depends both on variations of fuel formulation and on the renewal of the cars fleet. As a matter of fact, the lower benzene percentage in fuels and the use of tailpipes with catalytic converter greatly reduced the emission of these compounds in air, giving an estimate annual average lower than the impose limit. In an urban area, an estimate of an average concentration starting from the three sampling points according to the low can give a value far from the real average level; to solve this problem Milan P.M.I.P. programmed an annual campaign with daily sampling in 24 sites homogeneously located in Milan territory

  17. Vitamin D metabolites in human milk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concentrations of unconjugated 25-OHD, 24, 25(OH)2D, and 1,25(OH)2D were measured in human milk by competitive protein-binding radioassays following successive preparative Sephadex LH-20 chromatography and HPLC. The mean (+/- SE) concentration of 25-OHD was 0.37 +/- 0.03 ng/ml, of 24,25(OH)2D was 24.8 +/- 1.9 pg/ml, and of 1,25(OH)2D was 2.2 +/-0.1 pg/ml. The concentration of 25-OHD3 in milk as determined by HPLC and UV detection at 254 nm was 0.27 +/- 0.08 ng/ml. The milk concentrations of vitamin D metabolites did not correlate with the maternal serum 25-OHD levels. The total amounts of unconjugated vitamin D metabolites correspond to the known low bioassayable vitamin D antirachitic activity in human milk

  18. Evaluation of Trans, Trans-Muconic Acid in Urine of Exposed Workers to Benzene in a Cokery Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rahiminejad

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Benzene is a light yellow liquid with aromatic odor and has effects to human body. The main and dangerous health effect of chronic exposure to benzene in workplace is hematopoetic system disease or blood cancer that it's primarily clinical figures are anemia, leucopenia, thrombocytopenia. The objective of this study was evaluation of benzene exposure by analysis of urinary trans, trans-muconic acid (t,t-ma in post shift of workers.Materials & Methods: A case-control study was conducted. The urine samples were collected from 42 workers exposed to benzene at a cokery plant and it’s by –product refinery site and 40 non exposed villagers from rural areas without nearby factories. The t,t-ma was extracted from urine by solid phase extraction (SPE and analyzed via high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. The urinary creatinine level was measured by Kone – Pro autoanalyzer . Results: The mean urinary t,t – ma level was 3.33 mg/g creatinine for exposed workers and 0.1007 mg/g creatinine for non exposed workers. The urinary levels in exposed group differed among workplaces, and were higher for subjects that worked in cokery plant ( cokery plant, 3.68 mg / g creatinine; its by product refinery site, 0.64 mg / g creatinine.Conclusion: The results showed that the mean level of urinary t,t-ma was about 6 to 7 times more than biological exposure index; thus, there is a high risk of hematopoetic damage and other adverse effects in these workers. We suggest that the company must decrease benzene exposure via engineering and management controls to lower than threshold limit value.

  19. Modeling Studies on the Transport of Benzene and H2S in CO2-Water Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, L.; Spycher, N.; Xu, T.; Apps, J.; Kharaka, Y.; Birkholzer, J.T.

    2010-11-05

    In this study, reactive transport simulations were used to assess the mobilization and transport of organics with supercritical CO{sub 2} (SCC), and the co-injection and transport of H{sub 2}S with SCC. These processes were evaluated at conditions of typical storage reservoirs, and for cases of hypothetical leakage from a reservoir to an overlying shallower fresh water aquifer. Modeling capabilities were developed to allow the simulation of multiphase flow and transport of H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S, as well as specific organic compounds (benzene), coupled with multicomponent geochemical reaction and transport. This included the development of a new simulator, TMVOC-REACT, starting from existing modules of the TOUGH2 family of codes. This work also included an extensive literature review, calculation, and testing of phase-partitioning properties for mixtures of the phases considered. The reactive transport simulations presented in this report are primarily intended to illustrate the capabilities of the new simulator. They are also intended to help evaluate and understand various processes at play, in a more qualitative than quantitative manner, and only for hypothetical scenarios. Therefore, model results are not intended as realistic assessments of groundwater quality changes for specific locations, and they certainly do not provide an exhaustive evaluation of all possible site conditions, especially given the large variability and uncertainty in hydrogeologic and geochemical parameter input into simulations. The first step in evaluating the potential mobilization and transport of organics was the identification of compounds likely to be present in deep storage formations, and likely to negatively impact freshwater aquifers if mobilized by SCC. On the basis of a literature review related to the occurrence of these organic compounds, their solubility in water and SCC, and their toxicity (as reflected by their maximum contaminant levels MCL), benzene was

  20. Occupational and ambient exposure to benzene and total hydrocarbons in the downstream petroleum industries and effectiveness of controls for exposure at distribution networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambient and occupational exposure to benzene and total hydrocarbon in the downstream petroleum industries were evaluated. Benzene is a minor component in gasoline and is considered to be toxic by the Canadian Environmental Protection Act. It has been classified as a human carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. Data was collected from the following sectors of the downstream petroleum industry: refineries, pipelines, marine, bulk terminal, rail car, trucks, service stations, underground storage tanks and site remediation. A comparison of facilities with and without vapour controls was included in this study. A review of the existing literature and previous studies pertaining to benzene exposure revealed a notable lack of Canadian studies on occupational and environmental benzene levels. Traditional methods of benzene and total hydrocarbons (THC) occupational sampling has been long term, providing only time-weighted-average exposure data. Such data does not provide information as to which task of a particular job contributes most to workers' exposure. This data could lead to the development of control measures to reduce environmental benzene and gasoline vapour load. Data in this study was divided into three sections: (1) personal occupational long term samples, i.e.greater than one hour in duration, (2) personal occupational short term samples, i.e. less than one hour in duration, and (3) area and ambient samples, i.e. samples collected within or near the facility. 133 refs., 59 tabs., 6 figs

  1. Network analysis of metabolite GWAS hits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matone, Alice; Scott-Boyer, Marie-Pier; Carayol, Jerome;

    2016-01-01

    RESULTS: A genome wide association study identified SNPs associated with plasma glycine levels within the CPS1 (Carbamoyl-Phosphate Synthase 1) gene (rs10206976, p-value = 4.709e-11 and rs12613336, p-value = 1.368e-08). Furthermore, gene expression in the adipose tissue showed that CPS1 expression levels...... were associated with successful weight maintenance and with several SNPs within CPS1 (cis-eQTL). In order to contextualize these results, a gene-metabolite interaction network of CPS1 and glycine has been built and analyzed, showing functional enrichment in genes involved in lipid metabolism and one...

  2. Outdoor NO 2 and benzene exposure in the INMA (Environment and Childhood) Asturias cohort (Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Somoano, Ana; Estarlich, Marisa; Ballester, Ferran; Fernández-Patier, Rosalía; Aguirre-Alfaro, Amelia; Herce-Garraleta, Ma Dolores; Tardón, Adonina

    2011-09-01

    Air pollution exposure during pregnancy has been linked to a wide range of negative health effects. NO 2, a traffic pollution marker, and benzene, an industrial pollution indicator, stand out among the types of air pollution linked to these effects. The aim of this work is to show the methodology used to assign exposure levels for both pollutants and preliminary reports in the INMA (Environment and Childhood) Asturias cohort in Spain. This cohort consists of 494 pregnant women and their children, who have been recruited and followed since 2004. Air pollution levels were measured at 67 points by means of passive samplers. The mean NO 2 measured value was 21.2 μg m -3 (range 3.5 μg m -3 to 44.5 μg m -3), and the mean benzene value was 2.72 μg m -3 (range 0.18 μg m -3 to 9.17 μg m -3) at urban sampling points and 0.64 μg m -3 (range 0.04 μg m -3 to 2.62 μg m -3) in rural locations. The Pearson correlation coefficient among pollutants was 0.42. Land Use Regression models were built to predict exposure at the homes of pregnant women. Altitude, road distances and land use were part of the models. The percent of explained variance was 52% for NO 2 and 73% for benzene in the urban zones. No residual autocorrelation was found. Predictions were corrected based on the Air Quality Network of the Principality of Asturias taking into account pregnancy seasonality. Exposure indicators were determined for each term and for the entire pregnancy for each woman. Values for urban locations were higher than those for rural and benzene estimations for 5% of the cohort women were above the European Union annual limit value. Air pollution exposure for the INMA-Asturias cohort clearly depends on the place of residence. In particular, benzene concentrations are remarkably high if an individual lives in an urban and industrial area, which is an issue of management intervention and regulatory concern. Exposure assessment for different pollutants will allow us to evaluate potential

  3. Possible endocrine disrupting effects of parabens and their metabolites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boberg, Julie; Taxvig, Camilla; Christiansen, Sofie;

    2010-01-01

    Parabens are preservatives used in a wide range of cosmetic products, including products for children, and some are permitted in foods. However, there is concern for endocrine disrupting effects. This paper critically discusses the conclusions of recent reviews and original research papers...... and provides an overview of studies on toxicokinetics. After dermal uptake, parabens are hydrolyzed and conjugated and excreted in urine. Despite high total dermal uptake of paraben and metabolites,little intact paraben can be recovered in blood and urine. Paraben metabolites may play a role in the endocrine...... disruption seen in experimental animals and studies are needed to determine human levels of parabens and metabolites. Overall, the estrogenic burden of parabens and their metabolites in blood may exceed the action of endogenous estradiol in childhood and the safety margin for propylparaben is very low when...

  4. Metabolite essentiality elucidates robustness of Escherichia coli metabolism

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Pan-Jun; Kim, Tae Yong; Lee, Kwang Ho; Jeong, Hawoong; Lee, Sang Yup; Park, Sunwon

    2007-01-01

    Complex biological systems are very robust to genetic and environmental changes at all levels of organization. Many biological functions of Escherichia coli metabolism can be sustained against single-gene or even multiple-gene mutations by using redundant or alternative pathways. Thus, only a limited number of genes have been identified to be lethal to the cell. In this regard, the reaction-centric gene deletion study has a limitation in understanding the metabolic robustness. Here, we report the use of flux-sum, which is the summation of all incoming or outgoing fluxes around a particular metabolite under pseudo-steady state conditions, as a good conserved property for elucidating such robustness of E. coli from the metabolite point of view. The functional behavior, as well as the structural and evolutionary properties of metabolites essential to the cell survival, was investigated by means of a constraints-based flux analysis under perturbed conditions. The essential metabolites are capable of maintaining a...

  5. Secondary metabolites from marine microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KELECOM ALPHONSE

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available After 40 years of intensive research, chemistry of marine natural products has become a mature field. Since 1995, there are signals of decreased interest in the search of new metabolites from traditional sources such as macroalgae and octocorals, and the number of annual reports on marine sponges stabilized. On the contrary, metabolites from microorganisms is a rapidly growing field, due, at least in part, to the suspicion that a number of metabolites obtained from algae and invertebrates may be produced by associated microorganisms. Studies are concerned with bacteria and fungi, isolated from seawater, sediments, algae, fish and mainly from marine invertebrates such as sponges, mollusks, tunicates, coelenterates and crustaceans. Although it is still to early to define tendencies, it may be stated that the metabolites from microorganisms are in most cases quite different from those produced by the invertebrate hosts. Nitrogenated metabolites predominate over acetate derivatives, and terpenes are uncommon. Among the latter, sesquiterpenes, diterpenes and carotenes have been isolated; among nitrogenated metabolites, amides, cyclic peptides and indole alkaloids predominate.

  6. Products of the Benzene + O(3P) Reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taatjes, Craig A.; Osborn, David L.; Selby, Talitha M.; Meloni, Giovanni; Trevitt, Adam J.; Epifanovsky, Evgeny; Krylov, Anna I.; Sirjean, Baptiste; Dames, Enoch; Wang, Hai

    2009-12-21

    The gas-phase reaction of benzene with O(3P) is of considerable interest for modeling of aromatic oxidation, and also because there exist fundamental questions concerning the prominence of intersystem crossing in the reaction. While its overall rate constant has been studied extensively, there are still significant uncertainties in the product distribution. The reaction proceeds mainly through the addition of the O atom to benzene, forming an initial triplet diradical adduct, which can either dissociate to form the phenoxy radical and H atom, or undergo intersystem crossing onto a singlet surface, followed by a multiplicity of internal isomerizations, leading to several possible reaction products. In this work, we examined the product branching ratios of the reaction between benzene and O(3P) over the temperature range of 300 to 1000 K and pressure range of 1 to 10 Torr. The reactions were initiated by pulsed-laser photolysis of NO2 in the presence of benzene and helium buffer in a slow-flow reactor, and reaction products were identified by using the multiplexed chemical kinetics photoionization mass spectrometer operating at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Phenol and phenoxy radical were detected and quantified. Cyclopentadiene and cyclopentadienyl radical were directly identified for the first time. Finally, ab initio calculations and master equation/RRKM modeling were used to reproduce the experimental branching ratios, yielding pressure-dependent rate expressions for the reaction channels, including phenoxy + H, phenol, cyclopentadiene + CO, which are proposed for kinetic modeling of benzene oxidation.

  7. Benzene oxygenation and oxidation by the peroxygenase of Agrocybe aegerita.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karich, Alexander; Kluge, Martin; Ullrich, René; Hofrichter, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Aromatic peroxygenase (APO) is an extracellular enzyme produced by the agaric basidiomycete Agrocybe aegerita that catalyzes diverse peroxide-dependent oxyfunctionalization reactions. Here we describe the oxygenation of the unactivated aromatic ring of benzene with hydrogen peroxide as co-substrate. The optimum pH of the reaction was around 7 and it proceeded via an initial epoxide intermediate that re-aromatized in aqueous solution to form phenol. Identity of the epoxide intermediate as benzene oxide was proved by a freshly prepared authentic standard using GC-MS and LC-MS analyses. Second and third [per]oxygenation was also observed and resulted in the formation of further hydroxylation and following [per]oxidation products: hydroquinone and p-benzoquinone, catechol and o-benzoquinone as well as 1,2,4-trihydroxybenzene and hydroxy-p-benzoquinone, respectively. Using H218O2 as co-substrate and ascorbic acid as radical scavenger, inhibiting the formation of peroxidation products (e.g., p-benzoquinone), the origin of the oxygen atom incorporated into benzene or phenol was proved to be the peroxide. Apparent enzyme kinetic constants (kcat, Km) for the peroxygenation of benzene were estimated to be around 8 s-1 and 3.6 mM. These results raise the possibility that peroxygenases may be useful for enzymatic syntheses of hydroxylated benzene derivatives under mild conditions. PMID:23327645

  8. Discovering Regulated Metabolite Families in Untargeted Metabolomics Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treutler, Hendrik; Tsugawa, Hiroshi; Porzel, Andrea; Gorzolka, Karin; Tissier, Alain; Neumann, Steffen; Balcke, Gerd Ulrich

    2016-08-16

    The identification of metabolites by mass spectrometry constitutes a major bottleneck which considerably limits the throughput of metabolomics studies in biomedical or plant research. Here, we present a novel approach to analyze metabolomics data from untargeted, data-independent LC-MS/MS measurements. By integrated analysis of MS(1) abundances and MS/MS spectra, the identification of regulated metabolite families is achieved. This approach offers a global view on metabolic regulation in comparative metabolomics. We implemented our approach in the web application "MetFamily", which is freely available at http://msbi.ipb-halle.de/MetFamily/ . MetFamily provides a dynamic link between the patterns based on MS(1)-signal intensity and the corresponding structural similarity at the MS/MS level. Structurally related metabolites are annotated as metabolite families based on a hierarchical cluster analysis of measured MS/MS spectra. Joint examination with principal component analysis of MS(1) patterns, where this annotation is preserved in the loadings, facilitates the interpretation of comparative metabolomics data at the level of metabolite families. As a proof of concept, we identified two trichome-specific metabolite families from wild-type tomato Solanum habrochaites LA1777 in a fully unsupervised manner and validated our findings based on earlier publications and with NMR. PMID:27452369

  9. Aggregation of deuterodichlormethane molecules with benzene molecules. Quantum-chemical calculations and spectroscopic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    C-D vibration band of deuterodichlormethane CD2Cl2 at its low concentration in benzene is slitted into components with frequency 2198 and 2193 cm-1 that is related to formation of weak benzene+deuterodichlormethane complexes. Quantum-chemical calculations confirm a formation of deuterodichlormethane+benzene dimer with participation of benzene's π -electron. Steric factors lead to a difference in orientation of one of deuterium atoms from the central orientation with respect to benzene ring. According to calculations the energy of deuterodichlormethane+benzene dimer is 1.2 kcal/mole. (author)

  10. Phthalate Metabolites, Consumer Habits and Health Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Wallner

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Phthalates are multifunctional chemicals used in a wide variety of consumer products. The aim of this study was to investigate whether levels of urinary phthalate metabolites in urine samples of Austrian mothers and their children were associated with consumer habits and health indicators. Within an Austrian biomonitoring survey, urine samples from 50 mother-child pairs of five communities (two-stage random stratified sampling were analysed. The concentrations of 14 phthalate metabolites were determined, and a questionnaire was administered. Monoethyl phthalate (MEP, mono-n-butyl phthalate (MnBP, mono-isobutyl phthalate (MiBP, monobenzyl phthalate (MBzP, mono-(2-ethylhexyl phthalate (MEHP, mono-(2-ethyl-5-hydroxyhexyl phthalate (5OH-MEHP, mono-(2-ethyl-5-oxohexyl phthalate (5oxo-MEHP, mono-(5-carboxy-2-ethylpentyl phthalate (5cx-MEPP, and 3-carboxy-mono-propyl phthalate (3cx-MPP could be quantified in the majority of samples. Significant correlations were found between the use of hair mousse, hair dye, makeup, chewing gum, polyethylene terephthalate (PET bottles and the diethyl phthalate (DEP metabolite MEP. With regard to health effects, significant associations of MEP in urine with headache, repeated coughing, diarrhoea, and hormonal problems were observed. MBzP was associated with repeated coughing and MEHP was associated with itching.

  11. Decomposition of benzene in a corona discharge at atmospheric pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satoh, Kohki [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Muroran Institute of Technology, 27-1 Mizumoto, Muroran 050-8585 (Japan); Centre of Environmental Science and Disaster Mitigation for Advanced Research, Muroran Institute of Technology, 27-1 Mizumoto, Muroran 050-8585 (Japan); Matsuzawa, Toshiharu; Itoh, Hidenori [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Muroran Institute of Technology, 27-1 Mizumoto, Muroran 050-8585 (Japan)

    2008-05-01

    We investigated the decomposition characteristics of benzene in a positive DC corona discharge between multineedle and plane electrodes with a background gas of nitrogen-oxygen mixture at atmospheric pressure. We obtained C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, HCN, HCOOH, CO and CO{sub 2} as benzene fragments and by-products, and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} and HCN as minor intermediate products. Benzene was primarily converted into CO{sub 2} via CO at low oxygen concentrations (0.2%) and via CO and HCOOH at the atmospheric oxygen concentration (20%). Further, 57% and 24% of carbon atoms were deposited on the plane electrode and the discharge chamber at oxygen concentrations of 0.2% and 20%, respectively.

  12. Does borazine-water behave like benzene-water? A matrix isolation infrared and ab initio study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, P.; Verma, K.; Bawari, D.; Viswanathan, K. S.

    2016-06-01

    Borazine is isoelectronic with benzene and is popularly referred to as inorganic benzene. The study of non-covalent interactions with borazine and comparison with its organic counterpart promises to show interesting similarities and differences. The motivation of the present study of the borazine-water interaction, for the first time, stems from such interesting possibilities. Hydrogen-bonded complexes of borazine and water were studied using matrix isolation infrared spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations. Computations were performed at M06-2X and MP2 levels of theory using 6-311++G(d,p) and aug-cc-pVDZ basis sets. At both the levels of theory, the complex involving an N-H⋯O interaction, where the N-H of borazine serves as the proton donor to the oxygen of water was found to be the global minimum, in contrast to the benzene-water system, which showed an H-π interaction. The experimentally observed infrared spectra of the complexes corroborated well with our computations for the complex corresponding to the global minimum. In addition to the global minimum, our computations also located two local minima on the borazine-water potential energy surface. Of the two local minima, one corresponded to a structure where the water was the proton donor to the nitrogen of borazine, approaching the borazine ring from above the plane of the ring; a structure that resembled the global minimum in the benzene-water H-π complex. The second local minimum corresponded to an interaction of the oxygen of water with the boron of borazine, which can be termed as the boron bond. Clearly the borazine-water system presents a richer landscape than the benzene-water system.

  13. Research on biological effects induced by γ-irradiation combined with benzene, toluene and carbon monoxide inhalation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To explore the patterns of biological effects induced by γ-rays irradiation combined with simultaneous inhalation benzene, toluene or carbon monoxide and to analyze their antagonistic,additive or synergistic interaction. Methods: Ninety healthy male rabbits were equally divided into 9 groups. Eight of which were assigned to be test groups according to four-factor-two-dose-level orthogonal layout {L8(27) } program and the other one was the control group. The two dose-levels of these four agents were: the γ-irradiation doses were 0.0075 Gy/d and 0.0375 Gy/d, and the two concentrations of benzene, toluene and carbon monoxide were 40 +-15 and 162 +- 33 mg/m3, 90 +- 30 and 407 +- 68 mg/m3, 93 +- 4 and 278 +- 8 mg/m3, respectively. The animals were exposed to γ-irradiation combined with benzene,toluene or CO vapour 2 h a day and 5 days a week for successive 8 weeks. Variance analysis and comparison between test groups were made for analyzing the test data. Results: (1) It was showed that γ-irradiation, benzene and toluene could all induce chromosome aberrations, SCEs and micronuclei of lymphocytes and chromosome aberrations of bone marrow cells; but no effect could be seen in CO alone treated group. (2) The ratios (ω) of biological effects jointly induced by the four agents and the sum of those induced separately by them were 2.16, 1.58, 2.07, 2.67, 1.25 and 1.18 for dicentric + ring,acentric, aberration cells, total aberration, micronuclei and micronucleus cells, respectively,and it was as high as 5.97 for aberrant sperms.The ratios showed that the interactions were synergistic(ω>1). However,interactions between γ-rays and benzene was antagonistic for acentric of lymphocytes. (3) The four agents could all obviously cause decrease of weight index of testis, γ-rays,toluene and CO could all markedly reduce the number of sperms and increase the ratio of aberrant sperms. Conclusion: γ-irradiation combined with benzene, toluene and CO inhalation can lead

  14. Benzene/nitrous oxide flammability in the precipitate hydrolysis process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, R A [Du Pont de Nemours (E.I.) and Co., Aiken, SC (USA). Savannah River Lab.

    1989-09-18

    The HAN (hydroxylamine nitrate) process for destruction of nitrite in precipitate hydrolysis produces nitrous oxide (N2O) gas as one of the products. N2O can form flammable mixtures with benzene which is also present due to radiolysis and hydrolysis of tetraphenylborate. Extensive flame modeling and explosion testing was undertaken to define the minimum oxidant for combustion of N2O/benzene using both nitrogen and carbon dioxide as diluents. The attached memorandum interprets and documents the results of the studies.

  15. Oxidation of benzene by radiolytically produced OH radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiolysis of N2O saturated-aqueous solutions of benzene-14C has been examined using radio-liquid chromatographic methods to follow the quantitative aspects of the reactions of hydroxycyclohexadienyl radicals. In the absence of a radical oxidant, at least five important products are produced. The total yield of 5.8 observed for the incorporation of benzene into products accounts for essentially all of the radicals initially produced from the water. Dimeric products predominate with a total yield of 4.1. Phenol is produced with a yield of only 0.8 indicating a disproportionation/ combination ratio for hydroxycyclohexadienyl radicals of 2O saturated aqueous solutions. (author)

  16. Spectroscopic study on deuterated benzenes. II. High-resolution laser spectroscopy and rotational structure in the S(1) state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunishige, Sachi; Katori, Toshiharu; Baba, Masaaki; Hayashi, Masato; Hasegawa, Hirokazu; Ohshima, Yasuhiro

    2015-12-28

    High-resolution spectra of the S1←S0 transition in jet-cooled deuterated benzenes were observed using pulse dye amplification of single-mode laser light and mass-selective resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) detection. The vibrational and rotational structures were accurately analyzed for the vibronic levels in the S1 state. The degenerate 6(1) levels of C6H6 or C6D6 are split into 6a(1) and 6b(1) in many of deuterated benzenes. The rigid-rotor rotational constants were assessed and found to be slightly different between 6a and 6b because of different mean molecular structures. Their rotational levels are significantly shifted by Coriolis interactions. It was found that the Coriolis parameter proportionally changed with the number of substituted D atoms. PMID:26723667

  17. Spectroscopic study on deuterated benzenes. II. High-resolution laser spectroscopy and rotational structure in the S1 state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunishige, Sachi; Katori, Toshiharu; Baba, Masaaki; Hayashi, Masato; Hasegawa, Hirokazu; Ohshima, Yasuhiro

    2015-12-01

    High-resolution spectra of the S1←S0 transition in jet-cooled deuterated benzenes were observed using pulse dye amplification of single-mode laser light and mass-selective resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) detection. The vibrational and rotational structures were accurately analyzed for the vibronic levels in the S1 state. The degenerate 61 levels of C6H6 or C6D6 are split into 6a1 and 6b1 in many of deuterated benzenes. The rigid-rotor rotational constants were assessed and found to be slightly different between 6a and 6b because of different mean molecular structures. Their rotational levels are significantly shifted by Coriolis interactions. It was found that the Coriolis parameter proportionally changed with the number of substituted D atoms.

  18. Spectroscopic study on deuterated benzenes. II. High-resolution laser spectroscopy and rotational structure in the S1 state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-resolution spectra of the S1←S0 transition in jet-cooled deuterated benzenes were observed using pulse dye amplification of single-mode laser light and mass-selective resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) detection. The vibrational and rotational structures were accurately analyzed for the vibronic levels in the S1 state. The degenerate 61 levels of C6H6 or C6D6 are split into 6a1 and 6b1 in many of deuterated benzenes. The rigid-rotor rotational constants were assessed and found to be slightly different between 6a and 6b because of different mean molecular structures. Their rotational levels are significantly shifted by Coriolis interactions. It was found that the Coriolis parameter proportionally changed with the number of substituted D atoms

  19. The dose-response decrease in heart rate variability: any association with the metabolites of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in coke oven workers?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohai Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Air pollution has been associated with an increased risk of cardiopulmonary mortality and decreased heart rate variability (HRV. However, it is unclear whether coke oven emissions (COEs and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs are associated with HRV. OBJECTIVES: Our goal in the present study was to investigate the association of exposure to COEs and the urinary metabolite profiles of PAHs with HRV of coke oven workers. METHODS: We measured benzene soluble matter, carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide, particulate matters, and PAHs at different workplaces of a coke oven plant. We determined 10 urinary PAH metabolites and HRV indices of 1333 workers using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and a 3-channel digital Holter monitor, respectively. RESULTS: Our results showed that there was a significant COEs-related dose-dependent decrease in HRV, and an inverse relationship between the quartiles of urinary 2-hydroxynaphthalene and five HRV indices (p(trend<0.01 for all. After adjustment for potential confounders, elevation per interquartile range (IQR (1.81 µg/mmol creatinine of urinary 2-hydroxynaphthalene was associated with a 5.46% (95% CI, 2.50-8.32 decrease in standard deviation of NN intervals (SDNN. As workers worked more years, SDNN gradually declined in the same quartiles of 2-hydroxynaphthalene levels (p(trend = 1.40×10(-4, especially in workers with the highest levels of 2-hydroxynaphthalene. CONCLUSIONS: Occupational exposure to COEs is associated with a dose-response decrease in HRV. In particular, increased exposure to 2-hydroxynaphthalene is associated with significantly decreased HRV. Increase of working years and exposure levels has resulted in a gradual decline of HRV.

  20. The Dose–Response Decrease in Heart Rate Variability: Any Association with the Metabolites of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Coke Oven Workers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Huaxin; Zhang, Wangzhen; Kuang, Dan; Deng, Qifei; Dai, Xiayun; Lin, Dafeng; Huang, Suli; Xin, Lili; He, Yunfeng; Huang, Kun; He, Meian; Guo, Huan; Zhang, Xiaomin; Wu, Tangchun

    2012-01-01

    Background Air pollution has been associated with an increased risk of cardiopulmonary mortality and decreased heart rate variability (HRV). However, it is unclear whether coke oven emissions (COEs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are associated with HRV. Objectives Our goal in the present study was to investigate the association of exposure to COEs and the urinary metabolite profiles of PAHs with HRV of coke oven workers. Methods We measured benzene soluble matter, carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide, particulate matters, and PAHs at different workplaces of a coke oven plant. We determined 10 urinary PAH metabolites and HRV indices of 1333 workers using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry and a 3-channel digital Holter monitor, respectively. Results Our results showed that there was a significant COEs-related dose-dependent decrease in HRV, and an inverse relationship between the quartiles of urinary 2-hydroxynaphthalene and five HRV indices (ptrend<0.01 for all). After adjustment for potential confounders, elevation per interquartile range (IQR) (1.81 µg/mmol creatinine) of urinary 2-hydroxynaphthalene was associated with a 5.46% (95% CI, 2.50–8.32) decrease in standard deviation of NN intervals (SDNN). As workers worked more years, SDNN gradually declined in the same quartiles of 2-hydroxynaphthalene levels (ptrend = 1.40×10−4), especially in workers with the highest levels of 2-hydroxynaphthalene. Conclusions Occupational exposure to COEs is associated with a dose-response decrease in HRV. In particular, increased exposure to 2-hydroxynaphthalene is associated with significantly decreased HRV. Increase of working years and exposure levels has resulted in a gradual decline of HRV. PMID:23024753

  1. Targeted Metabolomics Identifies Reliable and Stable Metabolites in Human Serum and Plasma Samples

    OpenAIRE

    Breier, Michaela; Wahl, Simone; Prehn, Cornelia; Fugmann, Marina; Ferrari, Uta; Weise, Michaela; Banning, Friederike; Seissler, Jochen; Grallert, Harald; Adamski, Jerzy; Lechner, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Background Information regarding the variability of metabolite levels over time in an individual is required to estimate the reproducibility of metabolite measurements. In intervention studies, it is critical to appropriately judge changes that are elicited by any kind of intervention. The pre-analytic phase (collection, transport and sample processing) is a particularly important component of data quality in multi-center studies. Methods Reliability of metabolites (within-and between-person ...

  2. The past suppression of industry knowledge of the toxicity of benzene to humans and potential bias in future benzene research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infante, Peter F

    2006-01-01

    Petrochemical industry representatives often withhold information and misinterpret positive evidence of toxicity of benzene, even from their own research, also discouraging or delaying disclosure of findings of adverse effects to the public. They now appear to be attempting to influence study results in industry's favor by offering predetermined conclusions about study results as part of an effort to draw financial support for the studies. The American Petroleum Institute is currently raising funds for benzene research being conducted in China for which it has already announced the intended conclusions. PMID:16967835

  3. Hydroxylation and Carboxylation—Two Crucial Steps of Anaerobic Benzene Degradation by Dechloromonas Strain RCB

    OpenAIRE

    Chakraborty, Romy; Coates, John D.

    2005-01-01

    Benzene is a highly toxic industrial compound that is essential to the production of various chemicals, drugs, and fuel oils. Due to its toxicity and carcinogenicity, much recent attention has been focused on benzene biodegradation, especially in the absence of molecular oxygen. However, the mechanism by which anaerobic benzene biodegradation occurs is still unclear. This is because until the recent isolation of Dechloromonas strains JJ and RCB no organism that anaerobically degraded benzene ...

  4. Are there Efimov trimers in hexafluorobenzene rather than in benzene vapor itself?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Is there a spectroscopic method to detect an Efimov state? Following our proposal of an Efimov state arising from three pseudo bosons (generalized Cooper pairs) in benzene, our spectroscopic studies have found no evidence of Efimov trimers (ET) in h6- or d6-benzene. However, hexafluoro-benzene has shown peaks that we attributed to ET and the pseudo bosons. The experimental evidence suggests that benzene pseudo bosons and subsequently ET are quite sensitive to the surroundings

  5. Electrochemical study of benzene on Pt of various surface structures in alkaline and acidic solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Montilla Jiménez, Francisco; Morallón Núñez, Emilia; Vázquez Picó, José Luis

    2002-01-01

    The electrochemical behaviour of benzene on platinum electrodes (polycrystalline and single-crystal electrodes) has been studied in acidic and alkaline solutions. In acid solutions the reduction of benzene to cyclohexane takes place in all the platinum surface structure employed, however it does not occur in alkaline media (0.1 M NaOH). In this case, the hydrogen adsorption/desorption processes displace the adsorbed benzene from the electrode surface. The oxidation of benzene is also af...

  6. Study on serum metabonomics of rats exposed to low-dose ionizing radiation, carbon monoxide, benzene and noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-rong WANG

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the combined effects of low-dose ionizing radiation, carbon monoxide, benzene and noise on serum metabolites and the mechanism of injury induced by these complex environmental factors in rats. Methods  Sixteen adult SD rats were randomly divided into control group and exposed group (8 each. The exposed group received the combined effect every day for 7 days. At the end of experiment, sera were collected from the abdominal aorta of rats. The metabolic fingerprint of serum was obtained by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR spectroscopy and determined with pattern recognition techniques of principal component analysis (PCA and orthogonal signal correction-partial least squares (OSC-PLS. The similarities and differences in metabolic profiles between two groups were visualized by SIMCA-P software. Results The rat serum 1H NMR spectra revealed different metabolic spectra between the control group and exposed group. The OSC-PLS plots of the serum samples presented respectively marked clustering between the two groups. Compared with the control group, the contents of lipid, high density lipoprotein, glycine/glucose, N-acetyl glycoprotein 1, N-acetyl glycoprotein 2, phosphatidyl choline and unsaturated fatty acid increased, while those of lactic acid, threonine/lipid, alanine, creatine, glycerylphosphorylcholine/ trimethylamine oxide, low density lipoprotein/high density lipoprotein, low density lipoprotein, very low density lipoprotein/ low density lipoprotein, very low density lipoprotein and saturated fatty acid decreased. Conclusions Combination of low-dose ionizing radiation, carbon monoxide, benzene and noise could induce changes of serum metabolites in rats, involving in immune function, renal function and energy metabolism. The NMR-based-metabonomics method has potential of application in research on combined biological effects of the complex environmental factors. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.07.09

  7. Genotoxicity and apoptosis in Drosophila melanogaster exposed to benzene, toluene and xylene: Attenuation by quercetin and curcumin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (MAHs) such as benzene, toluene and xylene are being extensively used for various industrial and household purposes. Exposure to these hydrocarbons, occupationally or non-occupationally, is harmful to organisms including human. Several studies tested for toxicity of benzene, toluene and xylene, and interestingly, only a few studies looked into the attenuation. We used Drosophila model to test the genotoxic and apoptotic potential of these compounds and subsequently evaluated the efficiency of two phytochemicals, namely, quercetin and curcumin in attenuating test chemical induced toxicity. We exposed third instar larvae of wild type Drosophila melanogaster (Oregon R+) to 1.0-100.0 mM benzene, toluene or xylene, individually, for 12, 24 and 48 h and examined their apoptotic and genotoxic potential. We observed significantly (P < 0.001) increased apoptotic markers and genotoxicity in a concentration- and time-dependent manner in organisms exposed to benzene, toluene or xylene. We also observed significantly (P < 0.001) increased cytochrome P450 activity in larvae exposed to test chemicals and this was significantly reduced in the presence of 3',4'-dimethoxyflavone, a known Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) blocker. Interestingly, we observed a significant reduction in cytochrome P450 activity, GST levels, oxidative stress parameters, genotoxic and apoptotic endpoints when organisms were exposed simultaneously to test chemical along with quercetin or curcumin. The study further suggests the suitability of D. melanogaster as an alternate animal model for toxicological studies involving benzene, toluene and xylene and its potential in studying the protective role(s) of phytochemicals.

  8. A Density Functional Theory Study of the Adsorption of Benzene on Hematite (α-Fe2O3 Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Y. Dzade

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The reactivity of mineral surfaces in the fundamental processes of adsorption, dissolution or growth, and electron transfer is directly tied to their atomic structure. However, unraveling the relationship between the atomic surface structure and other physical and chemical properties of complex metal oxides is challenging due to the mixed ionic and covalent bonding that can occur in these minerals. Nonetheless, with the rapid increase in computer processing speed and memory, computer simulations using different theoretical techniques can now probe the nature of matter at both the atomic and sub-atomic levels and are rapidly becoming an effective and quantitatively accurate method for successfully predicting structures, properties and processes occurring at mineral surfaces. In this study, we have used Density Functional Theory calculations to study the adsorption of benzene on hematite (α-Fe2O3 surfaces. The strong electron correlation effects of the Fe 3d-electrons in α-Fe2O3 were described by a Hubbard-type on-site Coulomb repulsion (the DFT+U approach, which was found to provide an accurate description of the electronic and magnetic properties of hematite. For the adsorption of benzene on the hematite surfaces, we show that the adsorption geometries parallel to the surface are energetically more stable than the vertical ones. The benzene molecule interacts with the hematite surfaces through π-bonding in the parallel adsorption geometries and through weak hydrogen bonds in the vertical geometries. Van der Waals interactions are found to play a significant role in stabilizing the absorbed benzene molecule. Analyses of the electronic structures reveal that upon benzene adsorption, the conduction band edge of the surface atoms is shifted towards the valence bands, thereby considerably reducing the band gap and the magnetic moments of the surface Fe atoms.

  9. Evaluation of the occupational risk for exposition to Benzene, Toluene and Xylene in a paintings industry in Bogota

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was determined Benzene, Toluene and Xylene (BTX) levels in air from paint manufacture assigned to Instituto Colombiano de Seguro Social with the purpose to evaluate the occupational hazard caused by the use of these solvents. These results were compared with the threshold limit value (TLV). It was selected as sampling strategy, the methodology of partial period with consecutive samples and charcoal tubes as adsorbent of solvents. The extraction was realized with carbon disulfide and it was used gas chromatography with FID as analysis method. It was found that the method is highly selective because in presence of the others ten solvents, utilized in paint manufacture, were obtained a good separation for BTX. The precision, expressed a variance coefficient, was lower than 10%, the accuracy varied between 85 and 99 % for the three solvents. The airborne concentration found was between no detectable and 55,1 mg/m3 for benzene, 18,3 and 253 mg/m3 for toluene and 11,8 and 122,2 mg/m3 for xylene. The corrected TLV values for benzene, toluene and xylenes according to the brief and scale model for the ten hours shift were 1,1, 132 and 304 mg/m3 respectively. It was found occupational risk for benzene in some workplaces; this one is worried because benzene is not used as raw material for the paint manufacture. It was determinate that exist occupational risk in almost every workplace of the industry when it is considered the mixture of the three solvents

  10. Carcinogenic Effects of Benzene: An Update (1997 External Review Draft)

    Science.gov (United States)

    In 1992, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Office of Mobile Sources (OMS) requested the National Center for Environmental Assessment (NCEA) to provide an updated characterization of the cancer risk of benzene to humans. The previous characterization of the carcin...

  11. Instrument for benzene and toluene emission measurements of glycol regenerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We introduce an in-field and in-explosive atmosphere useable instrument, which can measure the benzene and toluene concentration in two gas and two glycol samples produced by natural gas dehydration units. It is a two-phase, on-line gas chromatograph with a photoacoustic spectroscopy based detector. The time resolution is 10 min per cycle and the minimum detectable concentrations are 2 mg m−3 for benzene, 3 mg m−3 for toluene in natural gas, and 5 g m−3 for benzene and 6 g m−3 for toluene in glycol. Test measurements were carried out at a dehydration plant belonging to MOL Hungarian Oil and Gas Company. Benzene and toluene emissions of gas dehydration unit are calculated from the measured values based on mass balance of a glycol regenerator. The relationship between the outdoor temperature and the measured concentration was observed which is caused by temperature-dependent operation of the whole dehydration unit. Emission decreases with increase of outdoor temperature. (paper)

  12. Upstream petroleum industry glycol dehydrator benzene emissions status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The population of dehydrators referred to are located in the Western Sedimentary Basin in northeast British Columbia, Alberta and Saskatchewan, and includes units installed at wellsites, compressor stations, gas plants, central crude oil treating facilities, and reservoir or salt cavern gas storage facilities. Benzene emissions from the still column vent on glycol dehydrators occur as a result of glycol's strong affinity for aromatic hydrocarbons, including benzene. A study was carried out to: 1) develop a list of oil and gas companies operating in Canada, 2) develop an equipment and benzene emissions inventory of glycol dehydrators, 3) develop a database in Microsoft Access format to gather and maintain inventory and emission data, 4) evaluate and validate at least 10% of the reported data, 5) develop a list of companies that manufacture dehydrators and incinerators to determine how many new dehydrators were sold for use in Canada in 1998, and 6) prepare a report summarizing findings and recommendations. The companies included in the survey were the oil and gas companies identified by the Nickels' Oil and Gas Index and others provided by CAPP, CGA, and SEPAC. The project was carried out to gather glycol dehydrator equipment and still column vent benzene emissions information. 8 refs

  13. Degradation of benzene and other aromatic hydrocarbons by anaerobic bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weelink, S.A.B.

    2008-01-01

    Accidental spills, industrial discharges and gasoline leakage from underground storage tanks have resulted in serious pollution of the environment with monoaromatic hydrocarbons, such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene (so-called BTEX). High concentrations of BTEX have been detected in soi

  14. The ototoxic effects of ethyl benzene in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cappaert, N.L.M.; Klis, S.F.L.; Muijser, H.; Groot, J.C.M.J. de; Kulig, B.M.; Smoorenburg, G.F.

    1999-01-01

    Exposure to organic solvents has been shown to be ototoxic in animals and there is evidence that these solvents can induce hearing loss in humans. In this study, the effects of inhalation of the possibly ototoxic solvent ethyl benzene on the cochlear function and morphology were evaluated using thre

  15. Extraction of cadmium thiocyanate complex by tributyl phosphate in benzene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, D.; Tandon, S.N. (Roorkee Univ. (India). Dept. of Chemistry)

    1981-09-01

    The extraction of cadmium thiocyanate complex has been studied in benzene solution of tri-n-butyl phosphate. The species extracted is shown to be Cd(SCN)X.4TBP, where X is a common anion. The extraction data have also been used for achieving some metal ion separation.

  16. Selective Oxidation of Benzene to Phenol. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherif, F.; Kung, H.; Marshall, C.

    2000-09-30

    Direct catalytic oxidation of commodity aromatics to phenolic compounds was studied by a team from Akzo Nobel Chemicals, Argonne National Lab., and Northwestern University. Results did not exceed previously published performance. The object of the project was to selectively oxidize benzene to phenol using a conventional oxidant.

  17. 40 CFR 80.1295 - How are gasoline benzene credits used?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How are gasoline benzene credits used... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Averaging, Banking and Trading (abt) Program § 80.1295 How are gasoline benzene credits used? (a) Credit use. (1) Gasoline...

  18. 40 CFR 80.1225 - Who must register with EPA under the gasoline benzene program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... gasoline benzene program? 80.1225 Section 80.1225 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene General Information § 80.1225 Who must register with EPA under the gasoline benzene program? (a) Refiners...

  19. 40 CFR 80.1358 - What acts are prohibited under the gasoline benzene program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... gasoline benzene program? 80.1358 Section 80.1358 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Violations and Penalties § 80.1358 What acts are prohibited under the gasoline benzene program? No person shall—...

  20. 40 CFR 80.1361 - What penalties apply under the gasoline benzene program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... gasoline benzene program? 80.1361 Section 80.1361 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Violations and Penalties § 80.1361 What penalties apply under the gasoline benzene program? (a) Any person liable for...

  1. 40 CFR 80.1290 - How are standard benzene credits generated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How are standard benzene credits... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Averaging, Banking and Trading (abt) Program § 80.1290 How are standard benzene credits generated? (a) The standard credit...

  2. 40 CFR 721.1325 - Benzene, 1-(1-methyl-bu-toxy)-4-nitro-.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Benzene, 1-(1-methyl-bu-toxy)-4-nitro... Substances § 721.1325 Benzene, 1-(1-methyl-bu-toxy)-4-nitro-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as benzene, 1-(1-methylbutoxy)-4-nitro- (PMN...

  3. 40 CFR 721.9595 - Alkyl benzene sulfonic acids and alkyl sulfates, amine salts (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkyl benzene sulfonic acids and alkyl... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9595 Alkyl benzene sulfonic acids and alkyl...) The chemical substances identified generically as alkyl benzene sulfonic acids and alkyl...

  4. 40 CFR 80.1354 - What are the reporting requirements for the gasoline benzene program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... for the gasoline benzene program? 80.1354 Section 80.1354 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene Recordkeeping and Reporting Requirements § 80.1354 What are the reporting requirements for the gasoline benzene program? (a) Beginning with earliest applicable date specified in § 80.1347(a)(2),...

  5. 40 CFR 721.1193 - Benzene, 2-bromo-1,4-dimethoxy-.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Benzene, 2-bromo-1,4-dimethoxy-. 721... Substances § 721.1193 Benzene, 2-bromo-1,4-dimethoxy-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as benzene, 2-bromo-1,4-dimethoxy- (PMN...

  6. 40 CFR 80.1275 - How are early benzene credits generated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How are early benzene credits... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Averaging, Banking and Trading (abt) Program § 80.1275 How are early benzene credits generated? (a) For each averaging period...

  7. 40 CFR 721.10096 - Benzene, 1,4-bis (methoxymethyl)-.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Benzene, 1,4-bis (methoxymethyl)-. 721... Substances § 721.10096 Benzene, 1,4-bis (methoxymethyl)-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as benzene, 1,4-bis (methoxymethyl)- (PMN...

  8. 40 CFR 721.1580 - Disubstituted benzene ether, polymer with substituted phenol (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Disubstituted benzene ether, polymer... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1580 Disubstituted benzene ether, polymer with... chemical substance generically identified as disubstituted benzene ether, polymer with substituted...

  9. 40 CFR 80.1235 - What gasoline is subject to the benzene requirements of this subpart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What gasoline is subject to the... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Gasoline Benzene Requirements § 80.1235 What gasoline is subject to the benzene requirements...

  10. The Dose–Response Decrease in Heart Rate Variability: Any Association with the Metabolites of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Coke Oven Workers?

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaohai Li; Yingying Feng; Huaxin Deng; Wangzhen Zhang; Dan Kuang; Qifei Deng; Xiayun Dai; Dafeng Lin; Suli Huang; Lili Xin; Yunfeng He; Kun Huang; Meian He; Huan Guo; Xiaomin Zhang

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Air pollution has been associated with an increased risk of cardiopulmonary mortality and decreased heart rate variability (HRV). However, it is unclear whether coke oven emissions (COEs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are associated with HRV. OBJECTIVES: Our goal in the present study was to investigate the association of exposure to COEs and the urinary metabolite profiles of PAHs with HRV of coke oven workers. METHODS: We measured benzene soluble matter, carbon mono...

  11. Spectroscopic study on deuterated benzenes. III. Vibronic structure and dynamics in the S1 state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunishige, Sachi; Katori, Toshiharu; Kawabata, Megumi; Yamanaka, Takaya; Baba, Masaaki

    2015-12-01

    We observed the fluorescence excitation spectra and mass-selected resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) excitation spectra for the 6 01 , 6 01 10 1 , and 6 01 10 2 bands of the S1←S0 transition of jet-cooled deuterated benzene and assigned the vibronic bands of C6D6 and C6HD5. The 60 1 10 n (n = 0, 1, 2) and 00 0 transition energies were found to be dependent only on the number of D atoms (ND), which was reflected by the zero-point energy of each H/D isotopomer. In some isotopomers some bands, such as those of out-of-plane vibrations mixed with 611n, make the spectra complex. These included the 611021n level or combination bands with ν12 which are allowed because of reduced molecular symmetry. From the lifetime measurements of each vibronic band, some enhancement of the nonradiative intramolecular vibrational redistribution (IVR) process was observed. It was also found that the threshold excess energy of "channel three" was higher than the 6112 levels, which were similar for all the H/D isotopomers. We suggest that the channel three nonradiative process could be caused mainly by in-plane processes such as IVR and internal conversion at the high vibrational levels in the S1 state of benzene, although the out-of-plane vibrations might contribute to some degree.

  12. Use of Mass spectrometry for imaging metabolites in plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young Jin; Perdian, David C.; Song, Zhihong; Yeung, Edward S.; Nikolau, Basil

    2012-03-27

    We discuss and illustrate recent advances that have been made to image the distribution of metabolites among cells and tissues of plants using different mass spectrometry technologies. These technologies include matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization, desorption electrospray ionization, and secondary ion mass spectrometry. These are relatively new technological applications of mass spectrometry and they are providing highly spatially resolved data concerning the cellular distribution of metabolites. We discuss the advantages and limitations of each of these mass spectrometric methods, and provide a description of the technical barriers that are currently limiting the technology to the level of single-cell resolution. However, we anticipate that advances in the next few years will increase the resolving power of the technology to provide unprecedented data on the distribution of metabolites at the subcellular level, which will increase our ability to decipher new knowledge concerning the spatial organization of metabolic processes in plants.

  13. Use of mass spectrometry for imaging metabolites in plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young-Jin; Perdian, David; Song, Zhihong; Yeung, Edward; Nikolau, Basil

    2012-03-27

    We discuss and illustrate recent advances that have been made to image the distribution of metabolites among cells and tissues of plants using different mass spectrometry technologies. These technologies include matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization, desorption electrospray ionization, and secondary ion mass spectrometry. These are relatively new technological applications of mass spectrometry and they are providing highly spatially resolved data concerning the cellular distribution of metabolites. We discuss the advantages and limitations of each of these mass spectrometric methods, and provide a description of the technical barriers that are currently limiting the technology to the level of single-cell resolution. However, we anticipate that advances in the next few years will increase the resolving power of the technology to provide unprecedented data on the distribution of metabolites at the subcellular level, which will increase our ability to decipher new knowledge concerning the spatial organization of metabolic processes in plants.

  14. A comprehensive study of benzene concentrations and emissions in Houston

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Markus; Eichler, Philipp; Berk Knighton, W.; Estes, Mark; Crawford, James H.; Mikoviny, Tomas; Wisthaler, Armin

    2014-05-01

    The Houston Metropolitan Area (Greater Houston) has a population of over 6 million people, it ranks among the three fastest growing metropolises in the developed world and population growth scenarios predict it to reach megacity status in the coming two to four decades. Greater Houston is home to the largest petrochemical-manufacturing complex in the world with important consequences for the environment in the region. Direct and fugitive emissions of hydrocarbons adversely affect Houston's air quality which has been subject to intense studies over the past two decades. In 2013, NASA conducted the DISCOVER-AQ field campaign in support of developing a satellite-based capability to assess Houston's air quality in the future. Amongst other measurements, airborne, mobile ground-based and stationary ground-based measurements of benzene were carried out. Benzene is a carcinogenic air toxic with strict exposure regulations in the U.S. and in Europe. We have used the obtained comprehensive dataset to map benzene concentrations in the Houston metropolitan area, locate and identify point sources, compare industrial and traffic emissions and put them in relation to previous measurements and emission inventories. The obtained data will allow a better assessment of health risks associated with benzene exposure in a large metropolitan area that includes both traffic and industrial benzene sources. This work was funded by BMVIT / FFG-ALR in the frame of the Austrian Space Application Programme (ASAP 8, project 833451). PE was funded through the PIMMS ITN (EU-FP7, agreement number 287382). Additional resources were provided through NASA's Earth Venture program (EV-1) and the NASA Postdoctoral Program (NPP). We want to thank Scott Herndon and Aerodyne Research for their support.

  15. Natural products: Hunting microbial metabolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Eric W.

    2015-05-01

    Symbiotic bacteria synthesize many specialized small molecules; however, establishing the role these chemicals play in human health and disease has been difficult. Now, the chemical structure and mechanism of the Escherichia coli product colibactin provides insight into the link between this secondary metabolite and colorectal cancer.

  16. Primary expectations of secondary metabolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant secondary metabolites (e.g., phenolics) are important for human health, in addition to the organoleptic properties they impart to fresh and processed foods. Consumer expectations such as appearance, taste, or texture influence their purchasing decisions. Thorough identification of phenolic com...

  17. The secondary metabolite bioinformatics portal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, Tilmann; Kim, Hyun Uk

    2016-01-01

    . In this context, this review gives a summary of tools and databases that currently are available to mine, identify and characterize natural product biosynthesis pathways and their producers based on ‘omics data. A web portal called Secondary Metabolite Bioinformatics Portal (SMBP at http...

  18. Effects of Controlled Atmospheres on Production of Sesquiterpenoid Stress Metabolites by White Potato Tuber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Leo M.; Heisler, Edward G.; Kissinger, John C.; Patterson, Joseph M.; Kalan, Edwin B.

    1979-01-01

    Levels of katahdinone (solavetivone), lubimin, rishitin, and phytuberin, sesquiterpenoid stress metabolites of white potato (Solanum tuberosum), were monitored in tuber slices which were challenged with an extract of Phytophthora infestans and incubated under controlled atmospheres. A mixture of ethylene in air enhanced stress metabolite production. This enhancement was amplified by higher partial pressures of oxygen. Stress metabolite production was inhibited by salicylhydroxamic acid. These results suggest the involvement of cyanide-resistant respiration in the production of potato stress metabolites, compounds which may serve as phytoalexins. PMID:16660728

  19. Spatio-temporal distribution and natural variation of metabolites in citrus fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shouchuang; Tu, Hong; Wan, Jian; Chen, Wei; Liu, Xianqing; Luo, Jie; Xu, Juan; Zhang, Hongyan

    2016-05-15

    To study the natural variation and spatio-temporal accumulation of citrus metabolites, liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS) based metabolome analysis was performed on four fruit tissues (flavedo, albedo, segment membrane and juice sacs) and different Citrus species (lemon, pummelo and grapefruit, sweet orange and mandarin). Using a non-targeted metabolomics approach, more than 2000 metabolite signals were detected, from which more than 54 metabolites, including amino acids, flavonoids and limonoids, were identified/annotated. Differential accumulation patterns of both primary metabolites and secondary metabolites in various tissues and species were revealed by our study. Further investigation indicated that flavedo accumulates more flavonoids while juice sacs contain more amino acids. Besides this, cluster analysis based on the levels of metabolites detected in 47 individual Citrus accessions clearly grouped them into four distinct clusters: pummelos and grapefruits, lemons, sweet oranges and mandarins, while the cluster of pummelos and grapefruits lay distinctly apart from the other three species. PMID:26775938

  20. Buckwheat phenolic metabolites in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreft, Marko

    2016-06-01

    Buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench, F. tataricum Gaertner) groats and flour have been established globally as nutritional foods because of their high levels of proteins, polyphenols and minerals. In some regions, buckwheat herb is used as a functional food. In the present study, reports of in vitro studies, preclinical and clinical trials dealing with the effect of buckwheat and its metabolites were reviewed. There are numerous reports of potential health benefits of consuming buckwheat, which may be in the form of food, dietary supplements, home remedies or possibly pharmaceutical drugs; however, adverse effects, including those resulting from contamination, must be considered. There are reports of antioxidative activity of buckwheat, which contains high levels of rutin and quercetin. On the other hand, both cytotoxic and antigenotoxic effects have been shown. Reduction of hyperlipidaemia, reduction of blood pressure and improved weight regulation have been suggested. Consuming buckwheat may have a beneficial effect on diabetes, since lower postprandial blood glucose and insulin response have been reported. In addition, buckwheat metabolites, such as rutin, may have intrinsic protective effects in preserving insulin signalling. Rutin has also been suggested to have potential therapeutic applications for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. The literature indicates that buckwheat is safe to consume and may have various beneficial effects on human health. PMID:27046048

  1. Synthesis and nucleophilic aromatic substitution of 3-fluoro-5-nitro-1-(pentafluorosulfanyl)benzene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajenjo, Javier; Greenhall, Martin; Zarantonello, Camillo; Beier, Petr

    2016-01-01

    3-Fluoro-5-nitro-1-(pentafluorosulfanyl)benzene was prepared by three different ways: as a byproduct of direct fluorination of 1,2-bis(3-nitrophenyl)disulfane, by direct fluorination of 4-nitro-1-(pentafluorosulfanyl)benzene, and by fluorodenitration of 3,5-dinitro-1-(pentafluorosulfanyl)benzene. The title compound was subjected to a nucleophilic aromatic substitution of the fluorine atom with oxygen, sulfur and nitrogen nucleophiles affording novel (pentafluorosulfanyl)benzenes with 3,5-disubstitution pattern. Vicarious nucleophilic substitution of the title compound with carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen nucleophiles provided 3-fluoro-5-nitro-1-(pentafluorosulfanyl)benzenes substituted in position four. PMID:26977178

  2. The Grand Canonical Monte Carlo Simulations of Benzene and Propylene in ITQ-1 Zeolite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Grand Canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulations have been performed to study the localization and adsorption behavior of benzene and propylene, in purely siliceous MWW zeolite (ITQ-1). By analyzing the locations of benzene and propylene in ITQ-1, it can be deduced that the alkylation of benzene and propylene will mainly happen in 12-MR supercages at the external surface or close to the external surface. The adsorption isotherms of benzene and propylene at 315K and 0~3.5kPa are predicted, and the results for benzene generally coincide with the trend from the experiments of a series of aromatic compounds.

  3. Product formation from thiophene by a mixed bacterial culture. Influence of benzene as growth substrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rivas, Isabelle Marie; Mosbæk, Hans; Arvin, Erik

    2003-01-01

    The influence of benzene as a growth substrate on the cometabolic conversion of thiophene was investigated in batch systems with microorganisms originating from an creosote contaminated site. Benzene was shown to stimulate the conversion of thiophene with a first-order rate, during the initial...... phase of transformation. The microorganisms were able to transform thiophene in the absence of benzene at a zero-order rate. Thiophene was converted to five oxidation products, regardless of the presence of benzene. Benzene had no influence on the distribution of these oxidation products. The main...

  4. The benzene radical anion: A computationally demanding prototype for aromatic anions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The benzene radical anion is studied with ab initio coupled-cluster theory in large basis sets. Unlike the usual assumption, we find that, at the level of theory investigated, the minimum energy geometry is non-planar with tetrahedral distortion at two opposite carbon atoms. The anion is well known for its instability to auto-ionization which poses computational challenges to determine its properties. Despite the importance of the benzene radical anion, the considerable attention it has received in the literature so far has failed to address the details of its structure and shape-resonance character at a high level of theory. Here, we examine the dynamic Jahn-Teller effect and its impact on the anion potential energy surface. We find that a minimum energy geometry of C2 symmetry is located below one D2h stationary point on a C2h pseudo-rotation surface. The applicability of standard wave function methods to an unbound anion is assessed with the stabilization method. The isotropic hyperfine splitting constants (Aiso) are computed and compared to data obtained from experimental electron spin resonance experiments. Satisfactory agreement with experiment is obtained with coupled-cluster theory and large basis sets such as cc-pCVQZ

  5. A PHARMACOKINETIC STUDY ON RU 486 AND ITS METABOLITES AFTER ORAL ADMINISTRATION AT VARIOUS DOSES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHIYong-En; YEZhi-Hou; HEChang-Hai; ZHANGGuo-Qin; XUJian-Qiu; BAJXiu-Mei

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to obtain pharmacokinetic parameters of RU486 and its metabolites and then to find out an optimal regimen of the compound for termination of human early pregnancy. Plasma levels of RU486 and its metabolites,

  6. Methodological considerations for measuring glucocorticoid metabolites in feathers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berk, Sara A.; McGettrick, Julie R.; Hansen, Warren K.; Breuner, Creagh W.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, researchers have begun to use corticosteroid metabolites in feathers (fCORT) as a metric of stress physiology in birds. However, there remain substantial questions about how to measure fCORT most accurately. Notably, small samples contain artificially high amounts of fCORT per millimetre of feather (the small sample artefact). Furthermore, it appears that fCORT is correlated with circulating plasma corticosterone only when levels are artificially elevated by the use of corticosterone implants. Here, we used several approaches to address current methodological issues with the measurement of fCORT. First, we verified that the small sample artefact exists across species and feather types. Second, we attempted to correct for this effect by increasing the amount of methanol relative to the amount of feather during extraction. We consistently detected more fCORT per millimetre or per milligram of feather in small samples than in large samples even when we adjusted methanol:feather concentrations. We also used high-performance liquid chromatography to identify hormone metabolites present in feathers and measured the reactivity of these metabolites against the most commonly used antibody for measuring fCORT. We verified that our antibody is mainly identifying corticosterone (CORT) in feathers, but other metabolites have significant cross-reactivity. Lastly, we measured faecal glucocorticoid metabolites in house sparrows and correlated these measurements with corticosteroid metabolites deposited in concurrently grown feathers; we found no correlation between faecal glucocorticoid metabolites and fCORT. We suggest that researchers should be cautious in their interpretation of fCORT in wild birds and should seek alternative validation methods to examine species-specific relationships between environmental challenges and fCORT. PMID:27335650

  7. In-situ Investigation of BBr_3/benzene Solution by Fourier Transformation Infrared Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Li-li; GAI Li-gang; CUI De-Hang; WANG Qi-long

    2009-01-01

    By means of the in-situ Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy(FTIR), the properties of BBr_3/ benzene solution, which is usually used as the reactant and solution to synthesize BN by benzene-thermal method, have been investigated. The results show that there are some side reactions between BBr_3 and benzene: (1) BBr_3 as an electron-deficient molecule reacts with benzene at room temperature; (2) below 100℃, substitution of Br atom for H atom of benzene(ring-H) dominates in BBr_3/benzene solution; (3) cracking of benzene ring occurs at a temperature above 100℃; (4) decomposition of benzene molecules and formation of long-chain aliphatic compounds feature the spectra of BBr_3/benzene solution collected at above 160℃. They are unfavor for BN to form when BBr_3 is excessive in the synthesis of BN by benzene-thermal route. On the basis of the experimental results, a coordination reaction mechanism via a η~2-C_6H_6 binding mode in BBr_3/benzene solution is suggested.

  8. Identification of Epoxide-Derived Metabolite(s) of Benzbromarone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai; Wang, Hui; Peng, Ying; Zheng, Jiang

    2016-04-01

    Benzbromarone (BBR) is a benzofuran derivative that has been quite useful for the treatment of gout; however, it was withdrawn from European markets in 2003 because of reported serious incidents of drug-induced liver injury. BBR-induced hepatotoxicity has been suggested to be associated with the formation of a quinone intermediate. The present study reported epoxide-derived intermediate(s) of BBR. An N-acetylcysteine (NAC) conjugate derived from epoxide metabolite(s) was detected in both microsomal incubations of BBR and urine samples of mice treated with BBR. The NAC conjugate was identified as 6-NAC BBR. Ketoconazole suppressed the bioactivation of BBR to the epoxide intermediate(s), and the CYP3A subfamily was the primary enzyme responsible for the formation of the epoxide(s). The present study provided new information on metabolic activation of BBR. PMID:26792818

  9. Experimental study of removing benzene from indoor air by needle-matrix to plate streamer discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The degradation of benzene by needle-matrix to plate streamer discharge was investigated at normal temperature and pressure in indoor air. The effects of benzene initial concentration, air speed, discharge power and relative humidity (RH) on benzene removal rate were systematically studied. Meanwhile, the benzene removal efficiencies by adding MnO2/SiO2-active carbon catalyst to the system were also studied. The results showed that the benzene removal rate increased with the rise of the air speed and discharge power, decreased with the rise of the benzene initial concentration, and firstly increased and then decreased with the rise of the of RH. Under the same experimental conditions, adding MnO2 catalyst to the system did not significantly improve the removal efficiency of benzene.

  10. Assessment of benzene induced oxidative impairment in rat isolated pancreatic islets and effect on insulin secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadar, Haji; Maqbool, Faheem; Mostafalou, Sara; Baeeri, Maryam; Rahimifard, Mahban; Navaei-Nigjeh, Mona; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2015-05-01

    Benzene (C6H6) is an organic compound used in petrochemicals and numerous other industries. It is abundantly released to our environment as a chemical pollutant causing widespread human exposure. This study mainly focused on benzene induced toxicity on rat pancreatic islets with respect to oxidative damage, insulin secretion and glucokinase (GK) activity. Benzene was dissolved in corn oil and administered orally at doses 200, 400 and 800mg/kg/day, for 4 weeks. In rats, benzene significantly raised the concentration of plasma insulin. Also the effect of benzene on the release of glucose-induced insulin was pronounced in isolated islets. Benzene caused oxidative DNA damage and lipid peroxidation, and also reduced the cell viability and total thiols groups, in the islets of exposed rats. In conclusion, the current study revealed that pancreatic glucose metabolism is susceptible to benzene toxicity and the resultant oxidative stress could lead to functional abnormalities in the pancreas. PMID:25935538

  11. Identification of genes specifically required for the anaerobic metabolism of benzene in Geobacter metallireducens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Tian; Tremblay, Pier-Luc; Chaurasia, Akhilesh Kumar;

    2014-01-01

    Although the biochemical pathways for the anaerobic degradation of many of the hydrocarbon constituents in petroleum reservoirs have been elucidated, the mechanisms for anaerobic activation of benzene, a very stable molecule, are not known. Previous studies have demonstrated that Geobacter...... metallireducens can anaerobically oxidize benzene to carbon dioxide with Fe(III) as the sole electron acceptor and that phenol is an intermediate in benzene oxidation. In an attempt to identify enzymes that might be involved in the conversion of benzene to phenol, whole-genome gene transcript abundance was...... compared in cells metabolizing benzene and cells metabolizing phenol. Eleven genes had significantly higher transcript abundance in benzene-metabolizing cells. Five of these genes had annotations suggesting that they did not encode proteins that could be involved in benzene metabolism and were not further...

  12. A methodological frame for assessing benzene induced leukemia risk mitigation due to policy measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study relies on the development of a methodology for assessing the determinants that comprise the overall leukemia risk due to benzene exposure and how these are affected by outdoor and indoor air quality regulation. An integrated modeling environment was constructed comprising traffic emissions, dispersion models, human exposure models and a coupled internal dose/biology-based dose–response risk assessment model, in order to assess the benzene imposed leukemia risk, as much as the impact of traffic fleet renewal and smoking banning to these levels. Regarding traffic fleet renewal, several “what if” scenarios were tested. The detailed full-chain methodology was applied in a South-Eastern European urban setting in Greece and a limited version of the methodology in Helsinki. Non-smoking population runs an average risk equal to 4.1 · 10−5 compared to 23.4 · 10−5 for smokers. The estimated lifetime risk for the examined occupational groups was higher than the one estimated for the general public by 10–20%. Active smoking constitutes a dominant parameter for benzene-attributable leukemia risk, much stronger than any related activity, occupational or not. From the assessment of mitigation policies it was found that the associated leukemia risk in the optimum traffic fleet scenario could be reduced by up to 85% for non-smokers and up to 8% for smokers. On the contrary, smoking banning provided smaller gains for (7% for non-smokers, 1% for smokers), while for Helsinki, smoking policies were found to be more efficient than traffic fleet renewal. The methodology proposed above provides a general framework for assessing aggregated exposure and the consequent leukemia risk from benzene (incorporating mechanistic data), capturing exposure and internal dosimetry dynamics, translating changes in exposure determinants to actual changes in population risk, providing a valuable tool for risk management evaluation and consequently to policy support. - Highlights:

  13. 40 CFR 80.1240 - How is a refinery's or importer's compliance with the gasoline benzene requirements of this...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... compliance with the gasoline benzene requirements of this subpart determined? 80.1240 Section 80.1240... FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Gasoline Benzene Requirements § 80.1240 How is a refinery's or importer's compliance with the gasoline benzene requirements of this subpart determined? (a) A...

  14. 40 CFR 80.1334 - What are the requirements for early compliance with the gasoline benzene program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... compliance with the gasoline benzene program? 80.1334 Section 80.1334 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene Hardship Provisions § 80.1334 What are the requirements for early compliance with the gasoline benzene program? (a)(1) A refinery may comply with the benzene requirements at § 80.1230 for its RFG...

  15. Secondary Metabolites from Three Florida Sponges with Antidepressant Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochanowska, Anna J.; Rao, Karumanchi V.; Childress, Suzanne; El-Alfy, Abir; Matsumoto, Rae R.; Kelly, Michelle; Stewart, Gina S.; Sufka, Kenneth J.; Hamann, Mark T.

    2016-01-01

    Brominated indole alkaloids are a common class of metabolites reported from sponges of the order Verongida. Herein we report the isolation, structure determination, and activity of metabolites from three Florida sponges, namely, Verongula rigida (order Verongida, family Aplysinidae), Smenospongia aurea, and S. cerebriformis (order Dictyoceratida, family Thorectidae). All three species were investigated chemically, revealing similarities in secondary metabolites. Brominated compounds, as well as sesquiterpene quinones and hydroquinones, were identified from both V. rigida and S. aurea despite their apparent taxonomic differences at the ordinal level. Similar metabolites found in these distinct sponge species of two different genera provide evidence for a microbial origin of the metabolites. Isolated compounds were evaluated in the Porsolt forced swim test (FST) and the chick anxiety–depression continuum model. Among the isolated compounds, 5,6-dibromo-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (1) exhibited significant antidepressant-like action in the rodent FST model, while 5-bromo-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (2) caused significant reduction of locomotor activity indicative of a potential sedative action. The current study provides ample evidence that marine natural products with the diversity of brominated marine alkaloids will provide potential leads for antidepressant and anxiolytic drugs. PMID:18217716

  16. Study on the decomposition of trace benzene over V2O5–WO3/TiO2-based catalysts in simulated flue gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trace levels (1 and 10 ppm) of gaseous benzene were catalytically decomposed in a fixed-bed catalytic reactor with monolithic oxides of vanadium and tungsten supported on titanium oxide (V2O5–WO3/TiO2) catalysts under conditions simulating the cooling of waste incineration flue g...

  17. Electron transport in single molecules: from benzene to graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, F; Tao, N J

    2009-03-17

    Electron movement within and between molecules--that is, electron transfer--is important in many chemical, electrochemical, and biological processes. Recent advances, particularly in scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM), scanning-tunneling microscopy (STM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM), permit the study of electron movement within single molecules. In this Account, we describe electron transport at the single-molecule level. We begin by examining the distinction between electron transport (from semiconductor physics) and electron transfer (a more general term referring to electron movement between donor and acceptor). The relation between these phenomena allows us to apply our understanding of single-molecule electron transport between electrodes to a broad range of other electron transfer processes. Electron transport is most efficient when the electron transmission probability via a molecule reaches 100%; the corresponding conductance is then 2e(2)/h (e is the charge of the electron and h is the Planck constant). This ideal conduction has been observed in a single metal atom and a string of metal atoms connected between two electrodes. However, the conductance of a molecule connected to two electrodes is often orders of magnitude less than the ideal and strongly depends on both the intrinsic properties of the molecule and its local environment. Molecular length, means of coupling to the electrodes, the presence of conjugated double bonds, and the inclusion of possible redox centers (for example, ferrocene) within the molecular wire have a pronounced effect on the conductance. This complex behavior is responsible for diverse chemical and biological phenomena and is potentially useful for device applications. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) afford unique insight into electron transport in single molecules. The simplest one, benzene, has a conductance much less than 2e(2)/h due to its large LUMO-HOMO gap. At the other end of the spectrum, graphene

  18. Thermodynamics of mixtures involving some (benzene derivatives+benzonitrile)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interactions of binary mixtures involving some benzene derivatives (ethylbenzene, o-, m-, p-xylene, isopropylbenzene, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene, and methoxybenzene) with benzonitrile were investigated in continuation of our previous studies on binary systems (benzene or toluene+benzonitrile). Heat capacities by volume unit, determined with a Picker flow calorimeter at T=298.15K, and densities, measured by using Picker vibrating densimeters at the temperatures (298.15 and 308.15)K, are reported. Measurements were made over the entire range of mole fraction. From the primary measurements, the corresponding excess quantities VE and Cp,mE are obtained. The magnitude of these experimental quantities together with HE literature data is discussed in terms of the nature and type of intermolecular interactions in binary mixtures

  19. Molecular Dynamics Investigation of Benzene in Supercritical Water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Microscopic structure and diffusion properties of benzene in ambient water (298 K, 0.1 MPa) and super critical water (673-773 K, 25-35 MPa) are investigated by molecular dynamics simulation with site-site models. It is found that at the ambient condition, the water molecules surrounding a benzene molecule form a hydrogen bond network. The hydrogen bond interaction between supercritical water molecules decreases dramatically under supercritical conditions. The diffusion coefficients of both the solute molecule and solvent molecule at supercritical conditions increase by 30-180 times than those at the ambient condition. With the temperature approaching the critical temperature, the change of diffusion coefficient with pressure becomes pronounced.

  20. Benzene leaks in sight; Benzeenlekken in het vizier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okkerse, W.J.; Van Doorn, R.; Bison, H. [DCMR Milieudienst Rijnmond, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2013-02-15

    About five years ago, elevated concentrations of benzene were detected at air measuring stations of the DCMR Environmental Protection Agency in the Botlek area, the Netherlands. Extensive research of potential sources in industry followed. A wide range of advanced techniques were deployed. A smart combination of techniques has ultimately resulted in the identification and clean-up of the benzene sources. A bright future is anticipated for these techniques [Dutch] Ongeveer vijf jaar geleden werden rond het Botlekgebied verhoogde benzeenconcentraties geconstateerd op luchtmeetstations van de DCMR Milieudienst Rijnmond. Een uitgebreid onderzoek naar de potentiele bronnen in de industrie was het gevolg. Daarbij is een scala aan geavanceerde technieken ingezet. Toepassing van een slimme combinatie van technieken heeft er uiteindelijk toe geleid dat benzeenbronnen werden opgespoord en gesaneerd. Een grote toekomst wordt voorzien voor deze technieken.

  1. Catalytic transformation of methyl benzenes over zeolite catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Khattaf, S.

    2011-02-01

    Catalytic transformation of three methyl benzenes (toluene, m-xylene, and 1,2,4-trimethyl benzene) has been investigated over ZSM-5, TNU-9, mordenite and SSZ-33 catalysts in a novel riser simulator at different operating conditions. Catalytic experiments were carried out in the temperature range of 300-400 °C to understand the transformation of these alkyl benzenes over large pore (mordenite and SSZ-33) in contrast to medium-pore (ZSM-5 and TNU-9) zeolite-based catalysts. The effect of reaction conditions on the isomerization to disproportionation product ratio, distribution of trimethylbenzene (TMB) isomers, and p-xylene/o-xylene ratios are reported. The sequence of reactivity of the three alkyl benzenes depends upon the pore structure of zeolites. The zeolite structure controls primarily the diffusion of reactants and products while the acidity of these zeolites is of a secondary importance. In the case of medium pore zeolites, the order of conversion was m-xylene > 1,2,4-TMB > toluene. Over large pore zeolites the order of reactivity was 1,2,4-TMB > m-xylene > toluene for SSZ-33 catalyst, and m-xylene ∼ 1,2,4-TMB > toluene over mordenite. Significant effect of pore size between ZSM-5 and TNU-9 was observed; although TNU-9 is also 3D 10-ring channel system, its slightly larger pores compared with ZSM-5 provide sufficient reaction space to behave like large-pore zeolites in transformation of aromatic hydrocarbons. We have also carried out kinetic studies for these reactions and activation energies for all three reactants over all zeolite catalysts under study have been calculated. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  2. Atomic Structure of Benzene Which Accounts for Resonance Energy

    OpenAIRE

    Heyrovska, Raji

    2008-01-01

    Benzene is a hexagonal molecule of six carbon atoms, each of which is bound to six hydrogen atoms. The equality of all six CC bond lengths, despite the alternating double and single bonds, and the surplus (resonance) energy, led to the suggestion of two resonanting structures. Here, the new atomic structure shows that the bond length equality is due to three carbon atoms with double bond radii bound to three other carbon atoms with resonance bond radii (as in graphene). Consequently, there ar...

  3. Degradation of benzene and other aromatic hydrocarbons by anaerobic bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Weelink, S.A.B.

    2008-01-01

    Accidental spills, industrial discharges and gasoline leakage from underground storage tanks have resulted in serious pollution of the environment with monoaromatic hydrocarbons, such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene (so-called BTEX). High concentrations of BTEX have been detected in soils, sediments and groundwater. The mobility and toxicity of the BTEX compounds are of major concern. In situ bioremediation of BTEX by using naturally occurring microorganisms or introduced microor...

  4. ADSORPTION OF WATER AND BENZENE VAPOUR IN MESOPOROUS MATERIALS

    OpenAIRE

    Paulina Taba

    2008-01-01

    Mesoporous materials have attracted the attention of many researchers due to the potential applications promised by the materials. This article discusses adsorption of water and benzene vapour in mesoporous materials (mesoporous silica: MCM-41, MCM-48 and their modification). MCM-41 and MCM-48 were synthesized hydrothermally at 100 oC using cethyltrimethylammonium chloride or dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide for MCM-41 (C16) or MCM-41 (C12) respectively and a mixture of cethyltrimethylammoniu...

  5. Pure Benzene Will Be Serous Short of Supply

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John Zheng

    2007-01-01

    @@ Benzene is one of the important ba-sic raw materials for petrochemicals.It can be used to synthesize a seriesof important chemical products suchas synthetic rubbers, synthetic resins,synthetic fibers, pharmaceuticals,pesticides, explosives and dyestuffs.It can also be used as a solvent forcoatings and rubbers and as a blend-ing agent to increase gasoline's oc-tane number in the refining sector.

  6. LED Irradiation of a Photocatalyst for Benzene, Toluene, Ethyl Benzene,and Xylene Decomposition%LED Irradiation of a Photocatalyst for Benzene,Toluene,Ethyl Benzene,and Xylene Decomposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JO Wan-Kuen; KANG Hyun-Jung

    2012-01-01

    Studies on the use of gas phase applications of light emitting diodes (LEDs) in photocatalysis are scarce although their photocatalytic decomposition kinetics of environmental pollutants are likely different from those in aqueous solutions.The present study evaluated the use of chips of visible light LEDs to irradiate nitrogen doped titania (N-TiO2) prepared by hydrolysis to decompose gaseous benzene,toluene,ethyl benzene,m-xylene,p-xylene,and o-xylene.Photocatalysts calcined at different temperatures were characterized by various analytical instruments.The degradation efficiency of benzene was close to zero for all conditions.For the other compounds,a conventional 8 W daylight lamp/N-TiO2 unit gave a higher photocatalytic degradation efficiency as compared with that of visible-LED/N-TiO2 units.However,the ratios of degradation efficiency to electric power consumption were higher for the photocatalytic units that used two types of visible-LED lamps (blue and white LEDs).The highest degradation efficiency was observed with the use of a calcination temperature of 350 ℃.The average degradation efficiencies for toluene,ethyl benzene,m-xylene,p-xylene,and o-xylene were 35%,68%,94%,and 93%,respectively.The use of blue-and white-LEDs,high light intensity,and low initial concentrations gave high photocatalytic activities for the photocatalytic units using visible-LEDs.The morphological and optical properties of the photocatalysts were correlated to explain the dependence of photocatalytic activity on calcination temperature.The results suggest that visible-LEDs are energy efficient light source for photocatalytic gas phase applications,but the activity depends on the operational conditions.

  7. 2-Phenylimidazolium hemi(benzene-1,3-dicarboxylate monohydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Yu Zhang

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The asymmetric unit of the title compound, C9H9N2+·0.5C8H4O4−·H2O, contains one 2-phenylimidazolium cation, half a benzene-1,3-dicarboxylate anion and one water molecule. In the crystal, components are connected by N—H...O and O—H...O hydrogen-bonding interactions into a three-dimensional network.

  8. Secondary Metabolites from Rubiaceae Species

    OpenAIRE

    Daiane Martins; Cecilia Veronica Nunez

    2015-01-01

    This study describes some characteristics of the Rubiaceae family pertaining to the occurrence and distribution of secondary metabolites in the main genera of this family. It reports the review of phytochemical studies addressing all species of Rubiaceae, published between 1990 and 2014. Iridoids, anthraquinones, triterpenes, indole alkaloids as well as other varying alkaloid subclasses, have shown to be the most common. These compounds have been mostly isolated from the genera Uncaria, Psych...

  9. Autism and Phthalate Metabolite Glucuronidation

    OpenAIRE

    Stein, T. Peter; Schluter, Margaret D.; Steer, Robert A.; Ming, Xue

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to environmental chemicals may precipitate autism spectrum disorders (ASD) in genetically susceptible children. Differences in the efficiency of the glucuronidation process may substantially modulate substrate concentrations and effects. To determine whether the efficiency of this pathway is compromised in children with ASD, we measured the efficiency of glucuronidation for a series of metabolites derived from the commonly used plasticizer, diethylhexyl phthalate. Spot urines were co...

  10. Epigenome targeting by probiotic metabolites

    OpenAIRE

    Licciardi Paul V; Wong Sook-San; Tang Mimi LK; Karagiannis Tom C

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The intestinal microbiota plays an important role in immune development and homeostasis. A disturbed microbiota during early infancy is associated with an increased risk of developing inflammatory and allergic diseases later in life. The mechanisms underlying these effects are poorly understood but are likely to involve alterations in microbial production of fermentation-derived metabolites, which have potent immune modulating properties and are required for maintenance of...

  11. Intracellular Metabolite Pool Changes in Response to Nutrient Depletion Induced Metabolic Switching in Streptomyces coelicolor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Wentzel

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available A metabolite profiling study of the antibiotic producing bacterium Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2 has been performed. The aim of this study was to monitor intracellular metabolite pool changes occurring as strains of S. coelicolor react to nutrient depletion with metabolic re-modeling, so-called metabolic switching, and transition from growth to secondary metabolite production phase. Two different culture media were applied, providing depletion of the key nutrients phosphate and L-glutamate, respectively, as the triggers for metabolic switching. Targeted GC-MS and LC-MS methods were employed to quantify important primary metabolite groups like amino acids, organic acids, sugar phosphates and other phosphorylated metabolites, and nucleotides in time-course samples withdrawn from fully-controlled batch fermentations. A general decline, starting already in the early growth phase, was observed for nucleotide pools and phosphorylated metabolite pools for both the phosphate and glutamate limited cultures. The change in amino acid and organic acid pools were more scattered, especially in the phosphate limited situation while a general decrease in amino acid and non-amino organic acid pools was observed in the L-glutamate limited situation. A phoP deletion mutant showed basically the same metabolite pool changes as the wild-type strain M145 when cultivated on phosphate limited medium. This implies that the inactivation of the phoP gene has only little effect on the detected metabolite levels in the cell. The energy charge was found to be relatively constant during growth, transition and secondary metabolite production phase. The results of this study and the employed targeted metabolite profiling methodology are directly relevant for the evaluation of precursor metabolite and energy supply for both natural and heterologous production of secondary metabolites in S. coelicolor.

  12. Dissociative electron attachment to laser-excited benzene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have conducted comprehensive measurements on enhanced electron attachment to ArF and KrF laser-excited benzene in the presence of Ar and N2 buffer gases. At both these laser lines, two-photon absorption leads to excitation of benzene to energies above its ionization potential. Such excitations have been shown to lead to a population of long-lived, core-excited high-Rydberg states in addition to the ionization of the molecule. Present measurements on the dependence of negative ion yield on laser fluence, benzene pressure, and applied electric field verify that the observed negative ion formation is due to the attachment of the photoelectrons to the concomitantly produced high-Rydberg states. Using a rate equation analysis, the electron attachment rate constant for the core-excited Rydberg states was estimated to be of the order of 10-4-10-3 cm3 s-1. Laser photoionization cross sections were also estimated, and the cross section at the KrF laser line is in agreement (author)

  13. Adsorption Of Water And Benzene Vapour In Mesoporous Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Taba

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Mesoporous materials have attracted the attention of many researchers due to the potential applications promised by the materials. This article discusses adsorption of water and benzene vapour in mesoporous materials (mesoporous silica: MCM-41, MCM-48 and their modification. MCM-41 and MCM-48 were synthesized hydrothermally at 100 oC using cethyltrimethylammonium chloride or dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide for MCM-41 (C16 or MCM-41 (C12 respectively and a mixture of cethyltrimethylammonium bromide and Triton X-100 for MCM-48 as templates. Their modifications were conducted by silylation of MCM-41 (C16 and MCM-48 with trimethylchloro silane (MCM16-TMCS and MCM48-TMCS and t-butyldimethylchloro silane (MCM16-TBDMCS and MCM48-TBDMCS. Results showed that MCM-41 and MCM-48 materials had hydrophobic features which were shown in the small amount of water adsorption at low P/P0. The hydrophobicity of samples used in this study decrease in the sequence: MCM-41 (C16 > MCM-48 > MCM-41 (C12. The hydrophobicity increased when MCM-41 and MCM-48 were silylated with TMCS or TBDMCS. All unsilylated MCM materials show higher affinity to benzene at low P/P0 than the silylated samples. The results of water and benzene adsorption showed that silylated samples are promising candidates as selective adsorbents for organic compounds.

  14. Methane from benzene in argon dielectric barrier discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Efficient on-line conversion of benzene to methane at room temperature. ► Absence of other H-atom donor suggests new type of chemistry. ► For parent loss > 90%, methane yield was ∼40% of limit due to H-atom availability. ► Surface moisture contributed ·OH radical for trace phenolic products’ formation. ► This method may emerge as an exploitable tactic for pollutants’ usable alterations. -- Abstract: A first-time account of direct, on-line, instantaneous and efficient chemical conversion of gas phase benzene to methane in argon Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) is presented. In the absence of another overt hydrogen-donating source, potency of analogous parents toward methane generation is found to follow the order: benzene > toluene > p-xylene. Simultaneous production of trace amounts of phenolic surface deposits suggest (a) prompt decomposition of the parent molecules, including a large fraction yielding atomic transients (H-atom), (b) continuous and appropriate recombination of such parts, and (c) trace moisture in parent contributing ·OH radicals and additional H-atoms, which suitably react with the unreacted fraction of the parent, and also other intermediates. Results highlight Ar DBD to be a simple and exploitable technology for transforming undesirable hazardous aromatics to usable/useful low molecular weight open-chain products following the principles of green chemistry and engineering

  15. Adsorption of trichloroethylene and benzene vapors onto hypercrosslinked polymeric resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this research, the adsorption equilibria of trichloroethylene (TCE) and benzene vapors onto hypercrosslinked polymeric resin (NDA201) were investigated by the column adsorption method in the temperature range from 303 to 333 K and pressures up to 8 kPa for TCE, 12 kPa for benzene. The Toth and Dubinin-Astakov (D-A) equations were tested to correlate experimental isotherms, and the experimental data were found to fit well by them. The good fits and characteristic curves of D-A equation provided evidence that a pore-filling phenomenon was involved during the adsorption of TCE and benzene onto NDA-201. Moreover, thermodynamic properties such as the Henry's constant and the isosteric enthalpy of adsorption were calculated. The isosteric enthalpy curves varied with the surface loading for each adsorbate, indicating that the hypercrosslinked polymeric resin has an energetically heterogeneous surface. In addition, a simple mathematic model developed by Yoon and Nelson was applied to investigate the breakthrough behavior on a hypercrosslinked polymeric resin column at 303 K and the calculated breakthrough curves were in high agreement with corresponding experimental data.

  16. Benzene exposure assessed by metabolite excretion in Estonian oil shale mineworkers: influence of glutathione s-transferase polymorphisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mette; Poole, Jason; Autrup, Herman;

    2004-01-01

    oil shale mine were compared with the excretion in workers engaged in various production assignments above ground. In addition, possible modifying effects of genetic polymorphisms in glutathione S-transferases T1 (GSTT1), M1 (GSTM1), and P1 (GSTP1) on the excretion of S-PMA and t,t-MA were......,t-MA and S-PMA excretion were significantly higher in smokers compared with nonsmokers. Subjects carrying the GSTT1 wild-type excreted higher concentrations of S-PMA than subjects carrying the null genotype, suggesting that it is a key enzyme in the glutathione conjugation that leads to S-PMA. The results...

  17. Proton spectroscopic imaging of brain metabolites in basal ganglia of healthy older adults

    OpenAIRE

    Parikh, Jehill; Thrippleton, Michael J.; Murray, Catherine; Armitage, Paul A.; Harris, Bridget A.; Andrews, Peter J D; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; Starr, John M.; Deary, Ian J.; Marshall, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Object We sought to measure brain metabolite levels in healthy older people. Materials and methods Spectroscopic imaging at the level of the basal ganglia was applied in 40 participants aged 73–74 years. Levels of the metabolites N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), choline, and creatine were determined in "institutional units" (IU) corrected for T1 and T2 relaxation effects. Structural imaging enabled determination of grey matter (GM), white matter (WM), and cerebrospinal fluid content. ANOVA analysis ...

  18. Comparative Analysis between Conventional PI and Fuzzy LogicPI Controllers for Indoor Benzene Concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nun Pitalúa-Díaz

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to hazardous concentrations of volatile organic compounds indoors in small workshops could affect the health of workers, resulting in respirative diseases, severe intoxication or even cancer. Controlling the concentration of volatile organic compounds is required to prevent harmful conditions for workers in indoor environments. In this document, PI and fuzzy PI controllers were used to reduce hazardous indoor air benzene concentrations in small workplaces. The workshop is represented by means of a well-mixed room model. From the knowledge obtained from the model, PI and fuzzy PI controllers were designed and their performances were compared. Both controllers were able to maintain the benzene concentration within secure levels for the workers. The fuzzy PI controller performed more efficiently than the PI controller. Both approaches could be expanded to control multiple extractor fans in order to reduce the air pollution in a shorter time. The results from the comparative analysis showed that implementing a fuzzy logic PI controller is promising for assuring indoor air quality in this kind of hazardous work environment.

  19. Biodegradation kinetics of benzene, toluene and xylene compounds: microbial growth and evaluation of models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feisther, Vódice Amoroz; Ulson de Souza, Antônio Augusto; Trigueros, Daniela Estelita Goes; de Mello, Josiane Maria Muneronde; de Oliveira, Déborade; Guelli Ulson de Souza, Selene M A

    2015-07-01

    The biodegradation kinetics of BTX compounds (benzene, toluene, and xylene) individually and as mixtures was studied using models with different levels of sophistication. To compare the performance of the unstructured models applied in this work we used experimental data obtained here and some results published in the literature. The system description was based on the material balances of key components for batch operations, where the Monod and Andrews models were applied to predict the biodegradation of individual substrates. To simulate the biodegradation kinetics of substrate mixtures, models of substrate inhibition were applied along with the Sum Kinetics with Interaction Parameters (SKIP) models, where for two-component association toluene-xylene SKIP model presented better performance and for tri-component association benzene-toluene-xylene, the uncompetitive inhibition model was better. The kinetic parameters were estimated via a global search method known as Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO). The main result of this study is that the sophisticated biodegradation kinetics of BTX mixtures can be successfully described by applying the SKIP model, with the main advantage being the consideration of the substrate interactions. PMID:25627469

  20. SOLID PHASE MICROEXTRACTION FOR TRACE ANALYSIS OF BENZENE IN ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. J. Shahtaheri, H. R. Heidari, F. Golbabaei, M. Alimohammadi, A. Rahimi Froshani

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Conventional analytical method for organic pollutants in water requires extraction of the pollutants, using hazardous solvent. Solid phase microextraction is a solvent free equilibrium extraction method, in which, proper calibration can allow quantitative determinations of organic pollutants at a very good sensitivity without the use of any organic solvent. Because individual volatile organic carbons are generally exposed environmentally and present in urine only at trace levels, a sensitive and accurate determination technique is essential. So, this study describes the optimization of headspace solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME followed by GC-FID for benzene in spiked urine. Through this investigations, the parameters affecting the extraction and gas chromatographic determination of analytes, including extraction time, temperature, desorption temperature, desorption time, salt addition, sample pH, sample volume and sample agitation were studied. An optimized headspace extraction was carried out at 30°C for 6 min in the presence of 0.2 g/mL of NaCl in the sample solution. Desorption of the analytes was carried out for 60 sec. at 250°C. The optimized procedure was also validated with three different pools of spiked urine samples and showed a good reproducibility over six consecutive days as well as six within-day experiments. The accuracy, linearity, detection limits were also determined. The headspace solid phase microextraction, GC-FID technique provides a relatively simple, convenient, practical procedure, which was here successfully applied to determine benzene in spiked urine.

  1. π Type Lithium Bond Interaction between Ethylene,Acetylene,or Benzene and Amido-lithium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN,Kun; LIU,Yanzhi; L(U),Lingling; ZHU,Yuancheng; ZHANG,Ji; ZHANG,dunyan

    2009-01-01

    The optimization geometries and interaction energy corrected by basis set super-position error (BSSE) of the lithium bond complexes between ethylene,acetylene,or benzene and amido-lithium have been calculated at the B3L YP/6-311++G** and MP2/6-311 ++-G** levels.And only one configuration was obtained for each lithium bond system.All the equilibrium geometries were confirmed to be stable state by analytical frequency computations.The calculations showed that all the N(2)-Li(4) bond lengths increased obviously and the red shift of N(2)-Li(4) stretching frequency occurred after complexes formed.The calculated binding energies with BSSE and zero-point vibrational energy corrections of complexes Ⅰ,Ⅱ and Ⅲ are -26.04,-24.86 and -30.02 kJ·mol-1 via an MP2 method,respectively.Natural bond orbital (NBO) theory analysis revealed that the three complexes were all formed with π type lithium bond interaction between ethylene,acetylene,or benzene and amido-lithium.

  2. Wetlands for the remediation of BTEX [benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes] contamination: Amalgamation of policy and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fate and transport of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) as they pass from a groundwater to a surface water environment was studied in three separate field experiments. The first examined the fate of BTEX from a spilled gasoline plume as it travelled vertically in the groundwater flow regime from a mineral soil unit through an organic soil unit to a surface wetland. The second considered surface water processes in the swamp that result in losses of BTEX concentrations. The final experiment evaluated the effects of seasonal and temporal changes on the processes occurring in the swamp that affect the fate and transport of BTEX under natural flow conditions. Significant reductions in BTEX were observed as the plume travelled vertically to reach the surface water. Reductions in contaminant levels were primarily due to sorption and biodegradation. On reaching the surface, overall reduction of compound concentration over 6 m of horizontal flow ranged from 92% for benzene to 85% for m-xylene. BTEX losses were mainly due to dilution, volatilization, and sorption. Limitations existing in the approach taken by present legislation and guidelines for wetland protection are discussed. Reactive legislation and guidelines should allow natural remediation of contamination in wetlands to be considered, especially when contaminant remediation requires alteration of the hydrologic flow regime or removal of contaminated material that may result in elimination of the wetland. 70 refs., 20 figs., 14 tabs

  3. Convulsive liability of bupropion hydrochloride metabolites in Swiss albino mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McMahon Louis

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is known that following chronic dosing with bupropion HCl active metabolites are present in plasma at levels that are several times higher than that of the parent drug, but the possible convulsive effects of the major metabolites are not known. Methods We investigated the convulsive liability and dose-response of the three major bupropion metabolites following intraperitoneal administration of single doses in female Swiss albino mice, namely erythrohydrobupropion HCl, threohydrobupropion HCl, and hydroxybupropion HCl. We compared these to bupropion HCl. The actual doses of the metabolites administered to mice (n = 120; 10 per dose group were equimolar equivalents of bupropion HCl 25, 50 and 75 mg/kg. Post treatment, all animals were observed continuously for 2 h during which the number, time of onset, duration and intensity of convulsions were recorded. The primary outcome variable was the percentage of mice in each group who had a convulsion at each dose. Other outcome measures were the time to onset of convulsions, mean convulsions per mouse, and the duration and intensity of convulsions. Results All metabolites were associated with a greater percentage of seizures compared to bupropion, but the percentage of convulsions differed between metabolites. Hydroxybupropion HCl treatment induced the largest percentage of convulsing mice (100% at both 50 and 75 mg/kg followed by threohydrobupropion HCl (50% and 100%, and then erythrohydrobupropion HCl (10% and 90%, compared to bupropion HCl (0% and 10%. Probit analysis also revealed the dose-response curves were significantly different (p 50 values of 35, 50, 61 and 82 mg/kg, respectively for the four different treatments. Cox proportional hazards model results showed that bupropion HCl, erythrohydrobupropion HCl, and threohydrobupropion HCl were significantly less likely to induce convulsions within the 2-h post treatment observation period compared to hydroxybupropion HCl. The

  4. STABILITY OF HEMOGLOBIN AND ALBUMIN ADDUCTS OF BENZENE OXIDE AND 1,4-BENZOQUINONE AFTER ADMINISTRATION OF BENZENE TO F344 RATS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The stability of cysteinyl adducts of benzene oxide (BO) and mono-S-substituted cysteinyl adducts of 1,4-benzoquinone (1,4-BQ) was investigated in both hemoglobin (Hb) and albumin (Alb) following administration of a single oral dose of 400 mg [U-14C/13C6]benzene/kg body weight ...

  5. INVESTIGATION OF BENZENE OXIDE IN BONE MARROW AND OTHER TISSUES OF F344 RATS FOLLOWING METABOLISM OF BENZENE IN VITRO AND IN VIVO

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study examines the initial activation of benzene, exploring key aspects of its metabolism by measurement of benzene oxide (BO) and BO-protein adducts in vitro and in vivo. To assess the potential influence of various factors on the production of BO, microsomes were prepare...

  6. Differences in the pathways for metabolism of benzene in rats and mice simulated by a physiological model.

    OpenAIRE

    Medinsky, M A; Sabourin, P J; Henderson, R F; Lucier, G; Birnbaum, L S

    1989-01-01

    Studies conducted by the National Toxicology Program on the chronic toxicity of benzene indicated that B6C3F1 mice were more sensitive to the carcinogenic effects of benzene than were F344 rats. A physiological model was developed to describe the uptake and metabolism of benzene in rats and mice. Our objective was to determine if differences in toxic effects could be explained by differences in pathways for benzene metabolism or by differences in total uptake of benzene. Compartments incorpor...

  7. Sorption of phenanthrene and benzene on differently structural kerogen: Important role of micropore-filling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shale was thermally treated to obtain a series of kerogen with varied maturation. Their chemical, structural and porous properties were related to the sorption and/or desorption behaviors of phenanthrene and benzene. As the treatment temperature increases, aliphatic and carbonyl carbon of the kerogen samples decrease, while their aromaticity and maturation increase. Meanwhile, the isothermal nonlinearity of phenanthrene and benzene increases whereas the sorption capacity and micropore adsorption volumes (Vo,d) initially increase and then decrease. The Vo,d of benzene is significantly correlated with, but higher than that of phenanthrene, suggesting similar micropore filling mechanism and molecular sieve effect. The benzene desorption exhibits hysteresis, which is related to the pore deformation of the kerogen and the entrapment of solute in the kerogen matrix. The Vo,d of phenanthrene and benzene on the kerogen samples accounts for 23–46% and 36–65% of the maximum sorption volumes, respectively, displaying the importance of the micropore filling. -- Highlights: • The microporosity estimated by benzene vapor differs greatly from that by N2. • The micropore volume changes with kerogen maturation. • The phenanthrene or benzene sorption is related to the microporosity of kerogen. • Higher adsorption volume for benzene than for phenanthrene suggests molecular sieve effect. • The pore-filling plays an important role in the sorption of phenanthrene and benzene. -- The sorption behaviors of benzene and phenanthrene are related to the microporosity of the differently matured kerogen, indicating the importance of pore-filling

  8. Current understandings and perspectives on non-cancer health effects of benzene: A global concern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahadar, Haji [International Campus, Tehran University of Medical Sciences (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center and Faculty of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mostafalou, Sara [Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center and Faculty of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Abdollahi, Mohammad, E-mail: Mohammad.Abdollahi@UToronto.Ca [Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center and Faculty of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    Objective: Benzene, as a volatile organic compound, is known as one of the main air pollutants in the environment. The aim of this review is to summarize all available evidences on non-cancerous health effects of benzene providing an overview of possible association of exposure to benzene with human chronic diseases, specially, in those regions of the world where benzene concentration is being poorly monitored. Methodology: A bibliographic search of scientific databases including PubMed, Google Scholar, and Scirus was conducted with key words of “benzene toxic health effects”, “environmental volatile organic compounds”, “diabetes mellitus and environmental pollutants”, “breast cancer and environmental pollution”, “prevalence of lung cancer”, and “diabetes prevalence”. More than 300 peer reviewed papers were examined. Experimental and epidemiologic studies reporting health effects of benzene and volatile organic compounds were included in the study. Results: Epidemiologic and experimental studies suggest that benzene exposure can lead to numerous non-cancerous health effects associated with functional aberration of vital systems in the body like reproductive, immune, nervous, endocrine, cardiovascular, and respiratory. Conclusion: Chronic diseases have become a health burden of global dimension with special emphasis in regions with poor monitoring over contents of benzene in petrochemicals. Benzene is a well known carcinogen of blood and its components, but the concern of benzene exposure is more than carcinogenicity of blood components and should be evaluated in both epidemiologic and experimental studies. Aspect of interactions and mechanism of toxicity in relation to human general health problems especially endocrine disturbances with particular reference to diabetes, breast and lung cancers should be followed up. - Highlights: • Benzene is a volatile organic compound and established blood carcinogen. • Exposure to benzene needs to be

  9. Current understandings and perspectives on non-cancer health effects of benzene: A global concern

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: Benzene, as a volatile organic compound, is known as one of the main air pollutants in the environment. The aim of this review is to summarize all available evidences on non-cancerous health effects of benzene providing an overview of possible association of exposure to benzene with human chronic diseases, specially, in those regions of the world where benzene concentration is being poorly monitored. Methodology: A bibliographic search of scientific databases including PubMed, Google Scholar, and Scirus was conducted with key words of “benzene toxic health effects”, “environmental volatile organic compounds”, “diabetes mellitus and environmental pollutants”, “breast cancer and environmental pollution”, “prevalence of lung cancer”, and “diabetes prevalence”. More than 300 peer reviewed papers were examined. Experimental and epidemiologic studies reporting health effects of benzene and volatile organic compounds were included in the study. Results: Epidemiologic and experimental studies suggest that benzene exposure can lead to numerous non-cancerous health effects associated with functional aberration of vital systems in the body like reproductive, immune, nervous, endocrine, cardiovascular, and respiratory. Conclusion: Chronic diseases have become a health burden of global dimension with special emphasis in regions with poor monitoring over contents of benzene in petrochemicals. Benzene is a well known carcinogen of blood and its components, but the concern of benzene exposure is more than carcinogenicity of blood components and should be evaluated in both epidemiologic and experimental studies. Aspect of interactions and mechanism of toxicity in relation to human general health problems especially endocrine disturbances with particular reference to diabetes, breast and lung cancers should be followed up. - Highlights: • Benzene is a volatile organic compound and established blood carcinogen. • Exposure to benzene needs to be

  10. Contribution of Network Connectivity in Determining the Relationship between Gene Expression and Metabolite Concentration Changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zelezniak, Aleksej; Sheridan, Steven; Patil, Kiran Raosaheb

    2014-01-01

    of reaction kinetics in metabolite concentration control is well studied at the level of individual reactions, the contribution of network connectivity has remained relatively unclear. Here we report a modeling framework that integrates both reaction kinetics and network connectivity constraints...... for describing the interplay between metabolite concentrations and mRNA levels. We used this framework to investigate correlations between the gene expression and the metabolite concentration changes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae during its metabolic cycle, as well as in response to three fundamentally different......One of the primary mechanisms through which a cell exerts control over its metabolic state is by modulating expression levels of its enzyme-coding genes. However, the changes at the level of enzyme expression allow only indirect control over metabolite levels, for two main reasons. First...

  11. Traffic-related air pollution and the onset of myocardial infarction: disclosing benzene as a trigger? A small-area case-crossover study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Bard

    Full Text Available Exposure to traffic is an established risk factor for the triggering of myocardial infarction (MI. Particulate matter, mainly emitted by diesel vehicles, appears to be the most important stressor. However, the possible influence of benzene from gasoline-fueled cars has not been explored so far.We conducted a case-crossover study from 2,134 MI cases recorded by the local Coronary Heart Disease Registry (2000-2007 in the Strasbourg Metropolitan Area (France. Available individual data were age, gender, previous history of ischemic heart disease and address of residence at the time of the event. Nitrogen dioxide, particles of median aerodynamic diameter <10 µm (PM10, ozone, carbon monoxide and benzene air concentrations were modeled on an hourly basis at the census block level over the study period using the deterministic ADMS-Urban air dispersion model. Model input data were emissions inventories, background pollution measurements, and meteorological data. We have found a positive, statistically significant association between concentrations of benzene and the onset of MI: per cent increase in risk for a 1 µg/m3 increase in benzene concentration in the previous 0, 0-1 and 1 day was 10.4 (95% confidence interval 3-18.2, 10.7 (2.7-19.2 and 7.2 (0.3-14.5, respectively. The associations between the other pollutants and outcome were much lower and in accordance with the literature.We have observed that benzene in ambient air is strongly associated with the triggering of MI. This novel finding needs confirmation. If so, this would mean that not only diesel vehicles, the main particulate matter emitters, but also gasoline-fueled cars--main benzene emitters-, should be taken into account for public health action.

  12. Can we predict the intracellular metabolic state of a cell based on extracellular metabolite data?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granucci, Ninna; Pinu, Farhana R; Han, Ting-Li; Villas-Boas, Silas G

    2015-12-01

    The analysis of extracellular metabolites presents many technical advantages over the analysis of intracellular compounds, which made this approach very popular in recent years as a high-throughput tool to assess the metabolic state of microbial cells. However, very little effort has been made to determine the actual relationship between intracellular and extracellular metabolite levels. The secretion of intracellular metabolites has been traditionally interpreted as a consequence of an intracellular metabolic overflow, which is based on the premise that for a metabolite to be secreted, it must be over-produced inside the cell. Therefore, we expect to find a secreted metabolite at increased levels inside the cells. Here we present a time-series metabolomics study of Saccharomyces cerevisiae growing on a glucose-limited chemostat with parallel measurements of intra- and extracellular metabolites. Although most of the extracellular metabolites were also detected in the intracellular samples and showed a typical metabolic overflow behaviour, we demonstrate that the secretion of many metabolites could not be explained by the metabolic overflow theory. PMID:26400772

  13. Environmental and occupational exposure to benzene by analysis of breath and blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perbellini, L; Faccini, G B; Pasini, F; Cazzoli, F; Pistoia, S; Rosellini, R; Valsecchi, M; Brugnone, F

    1988-05-01

    Benzene exposure of chemical workers was studied, during the entire workshift, by continuous monitoring of workplace benzene concentration, and 16 hours after the end of the workshift by the measurement of alveolar and blood benzene concentrations and excretion of urinary phenol. Exposure of hospital staff was studied by measuring benzene concentrations in the alveolar and blood samples collected during the hospital workshift. Instantaneous environmental air samples were also collected, at the moment of the biological sampling, for all the subjects tested. A group of 34 chemical workers showed an eight hour exposure to benzene, as a geometric mean, of 1.12 micrograms/l which corresponded, 16 hours after the end of the workshift, to a geometric mean benzene concentration of 70 ng/l in the alveolar air and 597 ng/l in the blood. Another group of 27 chemical workers (group A) turned out to be exposed to an indeterminable eight hour exposure to benzene that corresponded, the morning after, to a geometric mean benzene concentration of 28 ng/l in the alveolar air and 256 ng/l in the blood. The group of hospital staff (group B) had a benzene concentration of 14 ng/l in the alveolar air and 269 ng/l in the blood. Instantaneous environmental samples showed that in the infirmaries the geometric mean benzene concentration was 58 ng/l during the examination of the 34 chemical workers, 36 ng/l during the examination of the 27 chemical workers (group A), and 5 ng/l during the examination of the 19 subjects of the hospital staff (group B). Statistical analysis showed that the alveolar and blood benzene concentrations in the 34 workers exposed to 1.12 microgram/l of benzene differed significantly from those in groups A and B. It was found, moreover, that the alveolar and blood benzene concentrations were higher in the smokers in groups A and B but not in the smokers in the group of 34 chemical workers. The slope of the linear correlation between the alveolar and the instantaneous

  14. The study of hippocampal metabolites level and volumetric changes in AD%在 AD 病程中海马代谢水平与体积改变的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    武文博; 刘任远; 张鑫; 朱斌; 张冰; 徐运

    2015-01-01

    hippocampus in Alzheimer disease (AD),mild cognitive impairment(MCI) and normal controls(NC).Methods: AD(n =20) and MCI(n=30) patients were recruited at the Memory Clinic of Neurology Department in Nanjing Drum Tower Hospital, and age-and sex-matched NC( n=30) were identified.MRI examinations were performed at 3 Tesla using an SENSE-8-channel phased array coil ( Achieva 3.0 T TX dual gradient and dual-source parallel RF excitation and transmission technology, Philips Medical Systems, The Netherlands).The structural MRI and 2D-PRESS 1H MRS data were acquired and preprocessed.Hippocampal volume was calculated by FreeSurFer.And the ratio of N-acetylaspartate ( NAA)/creatine( Cr) and myoinositol( mI)/Cr in hippocampal subfields ( head, body and tail) were calculated in Philips Work-station.The hippocampal volume and metabolite ratios were compared in AD, MCI and NC group. And correlation analysis between volume and metabolite ratios was also included in this study.Results: Bilateral hippocampal volumes were significantly reduced in AD compared with MCI and NC ( P0.05 ) .Compared with MCI and NC, NAA/Cr ratio in AD was significantly decreased in right hippocampus(head) and left hippocampus(head, body and tail ) , mI/Cr ratio in AD was significantly increased in left hippocampus ( head and tail ) and right hippocampus(head, body and tail)(P<0.05).Compared with NC, MCI patients showed significantly decreased NAA/Cr ratio and increased mI/Cr ratio in left hippocampus head ( P <0.05 ) .There were significant positive correlations between bilateral hippocampal volumes and MMSE, MoCA score( P<0.05) .Left hippocampal volume was positively correlated with NAA/Cr ratio and negatively correlated with mI/Cr ratio in left hippocampal head (P<0.05).Conclusion:Bilateral hippocampal volumes significantly reduce in AD.Hippocampal atrophy seems not obvious in MCI stage while changes of NAA/Cr and mI/Cr ratio in left hippocampal head could be detected, indicating that hippocampal metabolic changes

  15. Eucalyptus urograndis and Pinus taeda enhance removal of chlorobenzene and benzene in sand culture: A greenhouse study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcellos, Diego; Morris, Lawrence A; Nzengung, Valentine; Moura, Tiago; Mantripragada, Nehru; Thompson, Aaron

    2016-10-01

    Contamination of soils and groundwater by chlorobenzene and benzene is a common problem at industrial sites worldwide. Since chemical remediation techniques are rarely completely effective, remnants of these contaminants often persist at levels that can still influence ecosystem health. We evaluated the potential of Pinus taeda and Eucalyptus urograndis to accelerate the removal of these compounds from sand/water systems using a completely randomized block greenhouse experiment with a no-plant control. At 2-day intervals, we added a solution containing both chlorobenzene and benzene with the same concentration of 50 mg L(-1) (25 mg pot(-1)), and we monitored leachate concentrations daily. The planted treatments showed greater decrease of contaminants over time. In the absence of plants, the contaminant mass decreased 50-60% during each 2-day cycle; whereas, in the planted treatments the contaminant mass decreased 91-98%. At the end of the experiment the plant roots, leaves, and the sand-substrate each contained less than 1 mg kg(-1) of contaminants, which is ∼1% of the total contaminant mass added. In addition, we observed no tree mortality even at concentrations exceeding the aqueous solubility limit of both compounds. Our results suggest both trees are good candidates for remediating chlorobenzene and benzene in soils and groundwater. PMID:27159839

  16. Functional antidopaminergic and anticholinergic effects of thioridazine and its metabolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niedzwiecki, D.

    1986-01-01

    The relative potency of thioridazine and two of its clinically active metabolites, mesoridazine and sulforidazine was studied. In each of three separate methods, mesoridazine and sulforidazine exhibited greater potency than did thioridazine. Both metabolites showed greater affinities for striatal DA receptors as estimated by their competition for (/sup 3/H)spiperone binding sites in crude striatal membrane preparations. On a more functional level, both metabolites more potently antagonized the inhibitory effects of either the direct acting DA agonist apomorphine, or of endogenous DA, on the electrically evoked release of radiolabeled DA and ACh from perfused striatal slices. While thioridazine effectively blocked the agonist-induced inhibition at those striatal DA receptors which control DA release, it showed significantly lower potency at the striatal DA receptors which modulate ACh release. Thioridazine exhibited moderate affinity for striatal muscarinic cholinergic receptors. It was only five times less potent than atropine in competing for (/sup 3/H) quinuclidinylbenzilate binding sites in striatal membrane preparations. Unlike dopamine receptors, thioridazine showed greater antimuscarinic potency than did its metabolites. Despite this significant affinity for muscarinic binding sites in striatal homogenates, neither thioridezine nor its metabolites could block the inhibitory effects of the full muscarinic agonist carbachol, on the evoked release of ACh from striatal slices. This lack of effect contrasted with the antagonism of the carbachol-induced inhibition by such classical muscarinic blockers as quinuclindinylbenzilate or atropine. In combination with available pharmacokinetic data, these studies have demonstrated that the metabolites of thioridazine probably contribute to the antidopaminergic effects of this drug within the CNS.

  17. Metabolite Profiling of Induced Mutants of Rice and Soybean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The low phytic acid (lpa) rice (Os-lpa-XS110-1, Os-lpa-XS110-2) and soybean (Gm-lpa-TW-75-1, Gm-lpa-ZC-2) mutants generated by γ-irradiation were studied, aimed at comparing these mutants to the corresponding wild-types by means of metabolite profiling based on capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The usefulness of this approach to assist in the elucidation of the types of mutation resulting in reduced contents of phytic acid should be explored. Metabolite profiling aspires to provide a comprehensive picture of the metabolites present in biological systems. It aims at extracting, detecting, identifying, and quantifying a broad spectrum of compounds in a single sample, to provide a deeper insight into complex biological systems. The extraction and fractionation method used allowed a comprehensive coverage of a broad spectrum of low molecular weight metabolites ranging from lipophilic (fatty acids methyl esters, hydrocarbons, free fatty acids, sterols, tocopherols) to hydrophilic (sugars, sugar alcohols, organic acids, amino acids) compounds. For rice, considerable amounts of the peaks detected were statistically significantly different between wild-types and lpa mutants grown in the same field trial. However, only a few of these differences could be consistently observed in all analyzed field trials, indicating a strong influence of the biological variability. Metabolites consistently shown to be significantly different between wild-type and lpa rice mutants, were found to be closely related to the biogenetic pathways leading to phytic acid. This allowed a prediction of the mutation targets for the lpa rice mutants in the biosynthetic pathway of phytic acid. Similar effects, i.e. statistically significantly different levels of metabolites closely related to the biosynthesis of phytic acid, were consistently observed for soybean. (author)

  18. Benzene, toluene, ozone, NO 2 and SO 2 measurements in an urban street canyon in Thessaloniki, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourtidis, Kostas A.; Ziomas, Ioannis; Zerefos, Christos; Kosmidis, Evangelos; Symeonidis, Panayotis; Christophilopoulos, Epaminondas; Karathanassis, Stavros; Mploutsos, Antonios

    Benzene, toluene, sulphur dioxide, ozone and nitrogen dioxide were measured at a mean level of 13.5 m above ground in a narrow, four-lane street canyon (height 30 m, width 20 m) in Thessaloniki, Greece during the period January-July 1997 by means of a commercial differential optical absorption spectrometer (OPSIS DOAS). Primary pollutant levels were found to be 2.5-4.4 times higher during the cold part of the year than during the warm part of the year, the winter/summer ratio increasing with the reaction rate constant with OH for each of the measured species. Ozone, on the other hand, exhibited a winter/summer ratio of 0.36. NO 2 originates from both primary and secondary sources; its winter/summer concentration ratio of 1.4 lies, therefore, between those of primary pollutants and ozone. Pollution levels were influenced considerably by wind speed, while for the street canyon under study wind direction did not influence pollutant levels considerably. While primary pollution was found to decrease with increasing wind speed, ozone increased. Benzene mean levels during the study period were around 6 ppb and hence much higher than the EU annual limit value of 5 μg m -3 (1.44 ppb at STP). Toluene mean levels were around 14 ppb and hence also several times above the WHO recommendation of 2 ppb for 24 h. The apportionment of traffic emissions in four time zones used in most inventories in urban airshed models was tested using benzene and toluene measurements at low (<1 m s -1) wind speeds. The agreement between model emissions and calculated emissions apportionment into the four time zones was good, except for Zone D (23:00-1:59), where model inventory emissions were somewhat too low.

  19. Epigenome targeting by probiotic metabolites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Licciardi Paul V

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The intestinal microbiota plays an important role in immune development and homeostasis. A disturbed microbiota during early infancy is associated with an increased risk of developing inflammatory and allergic diseases later in life. The mechanisms underlying these effects are poorly understood but are likely to involve alterations in microbial production of fermentation-derived metabolites, which have potent immune modulating properties and are required for maintenance of healthy mucosal immune responses. Probiotics are beneficial bacteria that have the capacity to alter the composition of bacterial species in the intestine that can in turn influence the production of fermentation-derived metabolites. Principal among these metabolites are the short-chain fatty acids butyrate and acetate that have potent anti-inflammatory activities important in regulating immune function at the intestinal mucosal surface. Therefore strategies aimed at restoring the microbiota profile may be effective in the prevention or treatment of allergic and inflammatory diseases. Presentation of the hypothesis Probiotic bacteria have diverse effects including altering microbiota composition, regulating epithelial cell barrier function and modulating of immune responses. The precise molecular mechanisms mediating these probiotic effects are not well understood. Short-chain fatty acids such as butyrate are a class of histone deacetylase inhibitors important in the epigenetic control of host cell responses. It is hypothesized that the biological function of probiotics may be a result of epigenetic modifications that may explain the wide range of effects observed. Studies delineating the effects of probiotics on short-chain fatty acid production and the epigenetic actions of short-chain fatty acids will assist in understanding the association between microbiota and allergic or autoimmune disorders. Testing the hypothesis We propose that treatment with

  20. Occupational Exposure to Benzene from Painting with Epoxy and Other High Performance Coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JAHN, STEVEN

    2005-04-20

    Following the discovery of trace benzene in paint products, an assessment was needed to determine potential for benzene exposures to exceed the established ACGIH Threshold Limit Value (TLV) during painting operations. Sample data was collected by area industrial hygienists for benzene during routine maintenance and construction activities at Savannah River Site. A set of available data from the IH database, Sentry, was analyzed to provide guidance to the industrial hygiene staff and draw conclusions on the exposure potential during typical painting operations.

  1. Anaerobic degradation of benzene by enriched consortia with humic acids as terminal electron acceptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Enriched consortia were able to couple the anaerobic degradation of benzene to the reduction of humic acids. → Electron-equivalents derived from anaerobic benzene oxidation were highly recovered as reduced humic acids. → Several species from classes β-, δ- and γ-Proteobacteria were enriched during the anaerobic degradation of benzene. - Abstract: The anaerobic degradation of benzene coupled to the reduction of humic acids (HA) was demonstrated in two enriched consortia. Both inocula were able to oxidize benzene under strict anaerobic conditions when the humic model compound, anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), was supplied as terminal electron acceptor. An enrichment culture originated from a contaminated soil was also able to oxidize benzene linked to the reduction of highly purified soil humic acids (HPSHA). In HPSHA-amended cultures, 9.3 μM of benzene were degraded, which corresponds to 279 ± 27 micro-electron equivalents (μEq) L-1, linked to the reduction of 619 ± 81 μEq L-1 of HPSHA. Neither anaerobic benzene oxidation nor reduction of HPSHA occurred in sterilized controls. Anaerobic benzene oxidation did not occur in soil incubations lacking HPSHA. Furthermore, negligible reduction of HPSHA occurred in the absence of benzene. The enrichment culture derived from this soil was dominated by two γ-Proteobacteria phylotypes. A benzene-degrading AQDS-reducing enrichment originated from a sediment sample showed the prevalence of different species from classes β-, δ- and γ-Proteobacteria. The present study provides clear quantitative demonstration of anaerobic degradation of benzene coupled to the reduction of HA.

  2. Anaerobic degradation of benzene by enriched consortia with humic acids as terminal electron acceptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cervantes, Francisco J., E-mail: fjcervantes@ipicyt.edu.mx [Division de Ciencias Ambientales, Instituto Potosino de Investigacion Cientifica y Tecnologica (IPICyT), Camino a la Presa San Jose 2055, Col. Lomas 4a. Seccion, San Luis Potosi, SLP, 78216 Mexico (Mexico); Mancilla, Ana Rosa; Toro, E. Emilia Rios-del [Division de Ciencias Ambientales, Instituto Potosino de Investigacion Cientifica y Tecnologica (IPICyT), Camino a la Presa San Jose 2055, Col. Lomas 4a. Seccion, San Luis Potosi, SLP, 78216 Mexico (Mexico); Alpuche-Solis, Angel G.; Montoya-Lorenzana, Lilia [Division de Biologia Molecular, Instituto Potosino de Investigacion Cientifica y Tecnologica (IPICyT), Camino a la Presa San Jose 2055, Col. Lomas 4a. Seccion, San Luis Potosi, SLP, 78216 Mexico (Mexico)

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: {yields} Enriched consortia were able to couple the anaerobic degradation of benzene to the reduction of humic acids. {yields} Electron-equivalents derived from anaerobic benzene oxidation were highly recovered as reduced humic acids. {yields} Several species from classes {beta}-, {delta}- and {gamma}-Proteobacteria were enriched during the anaerobic degradation of benzene. - Abstract: The anaerobic degradation of benzene coupled to the reduction of humic acids (HA) was demonstrated in two enriched consortia. Both inocula were able to oxidize benzene under strict anaerobic conditions when the humic model compound, anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), was supplied as terminal electron acceptor. An enrichment culture originated from a contaminated soil was also able to oxidize benzene linked to the reduction of highly purified soil humic acids (HPSHA). In HPSHA-amended cultures, 9.3 {mu}M of benzene were degraded, which corresponds to 279 {+-} 27 micro-electron equivalents ({mu}Eq) L{sup -1}, linked to the reduction of 619 {+-} 81 {mu}Eq L{sup -1} of HPSHA. Neither anaerobic benzene oxidation nor reduction of HPSHA occurred in sterilized controls. Anaerobic benzene oxidation did not occur in soil incubations lacking HPSHA. Furthermore, negligible reduction of HPSHA occurred in the absence of benzene. The enrichment culture derived from this soil was dominated by two {gamma}-Proteobacteria phylotypes. A benzene-degrading AQDS-reducing enrichment originated from a sediment sample showed the prevalence of different species from classes {beta}-, {delta}- and {gamma}-Proteobacteria. The present study provides clear quantitative demonstration of anaerobic degradation of benzene coupled to the reduction of HA.

  3. Solar Powered Vapor Absorption System Using Propane And Alkylated Benzene Ab300 Oil

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Dadah, R.K.; Jackson, G.; Rezk, Ahmed

    2011-01-01

    Abstract This paper describes experimental work on a solar assisted vapour absorption air conditioning system using Propane (refrigerant) and Alkylated Benzene (AB300?refrigeration lubrication oil, absorbent). Preliminary experiments to assess the miscibility of propane in various lubricating oils namely Shell Clavus oils 32 and 64 and Alkylated Benzene oils AB150 and AB300 indicated that Propane is most miscible in Alkylated Benzene AB300. The vapour absorption system is a single ...

  4. Geographical distribution of benzene in air in northwestern Italy and personal exposure.

    OpenAIRE

    Gilli, G.; Scursatone, E; Bono, R.

    1996-01-01

    Benzene is a solvent strictly related to some industrial activities and to automotive emissions. After the reduction in lead content of fuel gasoline, and the consequent decrease in octane number, an increase in benzene and other aromatic hydrocarbons in gasoline occurred. Therefore, an increase in the concentration of these chemicals in the air as primary pollutants and as precursors of photochemical smog could occur in the future. The objectives of this study were to describe the benzene ai...

  5. ANALYSES OF CHROMOSOME ABERRATIONS IN LYMPHOCYTES AND BONE MARROW CELLS INDUCED BY RADIATION OR BENZENE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张鸿源; 王兰金; 等

    1995-01-01

    The chromosomoe and chromatid type aberration can be induced by benzene and the dicentric and ring ones were not observed in vitro experiment but observed in vivo one.In vitro experiment a good linear reression can be given between benzene concentrations and total aberration cells while power regression for radiation dose.The chromosome aberrations induced by benzene combined with radiation in rabbit blood lymphocytes are higher than in bone marryow cells.

  6. Spectroscopic study on deuterated benzenes. III. Vibronic structure and dynamics in the S(1) state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunishige, Sachi; Katori, Toshiharu; Kawabata, Megumi; Yamanaka, Takaya; Baba, Masaaki

    2015-12-28

    We observed the fluorescence excitation spectra and mass-selected resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) excitation spectra for the 6(0)(1), 6(0)(1)1(0)(1), and 6(0)(1)1(0)(2) bands of the S1←S0 transition of jet-cooled deuterated benzene and assigned the vibronic bands of C6D6 and C6HD5. The 6(0)(1)1(0)(n) (n = 0, 1, 2) and 0(0)(0) transition energies were found to be dependent only on the number of D atoms (ND), which was reflected by the zero-point energy of each H/D isotopomer. In some isotopomers some bands, such as those of out-of-plane vibrations mixed with 6(1)1(n), make the spectra complex. These included the 6(1)10(2)1(n) level or combination bands with ν12 which are allowed because of reduced molecular symmetry. From the lifetime measurements of each vibronic band, some enhancement of the nonradiative intramolecular vibrational redistribution (IVR) process was observed. It was also found that the threshold excess energy of "channel three" was higher than the 6(1)1(2) levels, which were similar for all the H/D isotopomers. We suggest that the channel three nonradiative process could be caused mainly by in-plane processes such as IVR and internal conversion at the high vibrational levels in the S1 state of benzene, although the out-of-plane vibrations might contribute to some degree. PMID:26723668

  7. Enhancement of Leaf Gas Exchange and Primary Metabolites under Carbon Dioxide Enrichment Up-Regulates the Production of Secondary Metabolites in Labisia pumila Seedlings

    OpenAIRE

    Mohd Hafiz Ibrahim; Jaafar, Hawa Z. E.

    2011-01-01

    A split plot 3 by 3 experiment was designed to investigate and distinguish the relationships among production of primary metabolites (soluble sugar and starch), secondary metabolites (total phenolics, TP; total flavonoids, TF) and leaf gas exchange of three varieties of the Malaysian medicinal herb Labisia pumila Blume, namely the varieties alata, pumila and lanceolata, under three levels of CO2 enrichment (400, 800 and 1,200 µmol mol−1) for 15 weeks. The treatment effects were solely contrib...

  8. Antifungal Activity of Microbial Secondary Metabolites

    OpenAIRE

    Jeffrey J Coleman; Ghosh, Suman; Okoli, Ikechukwu; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2011-01-01

    Secondary metabolites are well known for their ability to impede other microorganisms. Reanalysis of a screen of natural products using the Caenorhabditis elegans-Candida albicans infection model identified twelve microbial secondary metabolites capable of conferring an increase in survival to infected nematodes. In this screen, the two compound treatments conferring the highest survival rates were members of the epipolythiodioxopiperazine (ETP) family of fungal secondary metabolites, acetylg...

  9. Secondary metabolites in fungus-plant interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Pusztahelyi, Tünde; Holb, Imre J.; Pócsi, István (1961-) (biológus)

    2015-01-01

    Fungi and plants are rich sources of thousands of secondary metabolites. The genetically coded possibilities for secondary metabolite production, the stimuli of the production, and the special phytotoxins basically determine the microscopic fungi-host plant interactions and the pathogenic lifestyle of fungi. The review introduces plant secondary metabolites usually with antifungal effect as well as the importance of signaling molecules in induced systemic resistance and systemic acquired resi...

  10. Spectroscopic study of water-NaCl-benzene mixtures at high temperatures and pressures

    OpenAIRE

    Ohya, Tomoyuki; Kitagawa, Masaaki; Jin, Yusuke; Ikawa, Shun-ichi

    2005-01-01

    Near-infrared and ultraviolet spectra of water-NaCl-benzene mixtures have been measured in the 473–573 K and 100–400 bar range and 373–498 K and 50–300 bar range, respectively. Concentrations of water in the benzene-rich phase and benzene in the water-rich phase were estimated from integrated intensities of the absorption bands. It is found that addition of NaCl in the aqueous phase suppresses transfer of water into the benzene-rich phase, and the relative decrease in water solubility in ...

  11. Human hemoglobin structural and functional alterations and heme degradation upon interaction with benzene: A spectroscopic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinzadeh, Reza; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar

    2016-03-01

    Here, the effect of benzene on hemoglobin structure, stability and heme prosthetic group integrity was studied by different methods. These included UV-vis absorption spectrophotometry, normal and synchronous fluorescence techniques, and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Our results indicated that benzene has high hemolytic potential even at low concentrations. The UV-vis spectroscopic results demonstrated that benzene altered both the globin chain and the heme prosthetic group of hemoglobin increasing met- and deoxy-Hb, while decreasing oxy-Hb. However, with increasing benzene the concentration of all species decreased due to heme destruction. The spectrophotometric results show that benzene has a high potential for penetrating the hydrophobic pocket of hemoglobin. These results were consistent with the molecular docking simulation results of benzene-hHb. Aggregation and thermal denaturation studies show that the increased benzene concentration induced hemoglobin aggregation with a decrease in stability, which is consistent with the DSC results. Conventional fluorescence spectroscopy revealed that the heme degradation species were produced in the presence of benzene. The results of constant wavelength synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy (CWSFS) indicated that at least five heme-degraded species were produced. Together, our results indicated that benzene has adverse effects on hemoglobin structure and function, and heme degradation.

  12. Determination of benzene in different food matrices by distillation and isotope dilution HS-GC/MS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benzene is classified by the IARC as carcinogenic to humans. Several sources may contribute for the occurrence of benzene in foods, such as, environmental contamination and the reaction of benzoate salts with ascorbic acid (naturally present or added as food additives). Matrix effect on benzene recovery (e.g. in fatty foods) and artefactual benzene formation from benzoate during analysis in the presence of ascorbate are some of the challenges presented when determining benzene in a wide range of foodstuffs. Design of experiment (DOE) was used to determine the most important variables in benzene recovery from headspace GC/MS. Based on the results of the DOE, a versatile method for the extraction of benzene from all kind of food commodities was developed. The method which consisted of distillation and isotope dilution HS-GC/MS was in-house validated. Artefactual benzene was prevented by addition of a borate buffer solution (pH 11) under distillation conditions. The method presented in this study allows the use of a matrix-independent calibration with detection limits below the legal limit established by the European Council for benzene in drinking water (1 μg L-1).

  13. Revisiting the glass transition and dynamics of supercooled benzene by calorimetric studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Wenkang; Chen, Zeming; Li, Xiangqian; Gao, Yanqin; Liu, Riping; Wang, Li-Min

    2015-10-01

    The glass transition and dynamics of benzene are studied in binary mixtures of benzene with five glass forming liquids, which can be divided into three groups: (a) o-terphenyl and m-xylene, (b) N-butyl methacrylate, and (c) N,N-dimethylpropionamide and N,N-diethylformamide to represent the weak, moderate, and strong interactions with benzene. The enthalpies of mixing, ΔHmix, for the benzene mixtures are measured to show positive or negative signs, with which the validity of the extrapolations of the glass transition temperature Tg to the benzene-rich regions is examined. The extrapolations for the Tg data in the mixtures are found to converge around the point of 142 K, producing Tg of pure benzene. The fragility m of benzene is also evaluated by extrapolating the results of the mixtures, and a fragility m ˜ 80 is yielded. The obtained Tg and m values for benzene allow for the construction of the activation plot in the deeply supercooled region. The poor glass formability of benzene is found to result from the high melting point, which in turn leads to low viscosity in the supercooled liquid.

  14. Pressure Dependence of Molar Volume near the Melting Point in Benzene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The pressure dependence of the molar volume was at constant temperatures close to the melting point in benzene. The molar volume of benzene was calculated using experimental data for the thermal expansivity for constant temperatures of 25℃, 28.5℃, 40℃, and 51℃ at various pressures for both the solid and liquid phases. The predictions are in good agreement with the observed volumes in both the solid and liquid phases of benzene. The predicted values of the molar volume for a constant temperature of 28.5℃ in the liquid phase of benzene agree well with experimental data in the literature.

  15. Modeling of Pervaporation Separation Benzene from Dilute Aqueous Solutions Through Polydimethylsiloxane Membranes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭福兵; 姜忠义

    2005-01-01

    A modified solution-diffusion model was established based on Flory-Huggins thermodynamic theory and Fujita's free volume theory. This model was used for description of the mass transfer of removal benzene from dilute aqueous solutions through polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membranes. The effect of component concentration on the interaction parameter between components, that of the polymer membrane on the selectivity to benzene, and that of feed concentration and temperature on the permeation flux and separation factor of benzene/water through PDMS membranes were investigated. Calculated pervaporation fluxes of benzene and water were compared with the experimental results and were in good agreement with the experimental data.

  16. Exposure to benzene in urban workers: environmental and biological monitoring of traffic police in Rome

    OpenAIRE

    Crebelli, R; Tomei, F.; Zijno, A; Ghittori, S; M Imbriani; Gamberale, D; Martini, A.; Carere, A

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To evaluate the contribution of traffic fumes to exposure to benzene in urban workers, an investigation on personal exposure to benzene in traffic police from the city of Rome was carried out.
METHODS—The study was performed from December 1998 to June 1999. Diffusive Radiello personal samplers were used to measure external exposures to benzene and alkyl benzenes during the workshift in 139 policemen who controlled medium to high traffic areas and in 63 office police. Moreover, as b...

  17. The effect of occlusive and unocclusive exposure to xylene and benzene on skin irritation and molecular responses in hairless rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatterjee, A.; Babu, R.J.; Ahaghotu, E.; Singh, M. [Florida A and M University, College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tallahassee, FL (United States)

    2005-05-01

    Aromatic hydrocarbons readily penetrate the skin on dermal exposure, leading to irritation, inflammation and cytotoxicity. The effects of short-term occlusive and long-term unocclusive dermal exposure to benzene and xylene on the skin irritation response (transepidermal water loss (TEWL), skin moisture content and erythema) and cytokine/chemokine expression (interleukin-1{alpha} (IL-1{alpha}), tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1)) were investigated in hairless rats. Occlusive dermal exposure was carried out with 230 {mu}L of the chemicals for 1 h using Hill top chambers. In unocclusive dermal exposure, 15 {mu}L of the chemicals were applied to the skin every 2 h, for 8 h a day, for 4 days. The occlusive dermal exposure revealed a clear difference in the TEWL and erythema response of these chemicals (xylene>benzene) whereas unocclusive exposure revealed similar TEWL and erythema scores for both benzene and xylene. The expression of IL-1{alpha} was elevated 2.5- and 3.8-fold in response to occlusive and unocclusive exposure, respectively, vs control (P<0.01) for both the chemicals (benzene and xylene). Similarly, TNF-{alpha} levels were elevated about 2.4- and 6.0-fold as a result of occlusive and unocclusive exposure, respectively, vs control (P<0.01). These results show that unocclusive exposure induced significantly higher TNF-{alpha} expression than occlusive exposure (P<0.05). The MCP-1 expression in blood was slightly elevated compared with the control group, but this increase was not statistically significant (P>0.05). Similarly, MCP levels in skin were increased approximately 1.7- and 1.8-fold by occlusive and unocclusive exposure, respectively, compared with the control group (P<0.05). Our study demonstrates that the skin irritation profiles of benzene and xylene are similar and unocclusive long-term exposure to small amounts of these chemicals can induce more skin irritation and cytokine response than

  18. Velocity-dependent emission factors of benzene, toluene and C{sub 2}-benzenes of a passenger car equipped with and without a regulated 3-way catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heeb, N.V.; Forss, A.-M.; Bach, C.; Mattrel, P. [Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Testing and Research, Duebendorf (Switzerland)

    2000-07-01

    Time-resolved chemical ionization mass spectrometry (Cl-MS) has been used to investigate the velocity-dependent emission factors for benzene, toluene, the C{sub 2}-benzenes (xylenes and ethyl benzene) and nitrogen monoxide of a gasoline-driven passenger car (1.4 l, model year 1995) driven with or without catalytic exhaust gas treatment. A set of seven different driving cycles - including the European Driving Cycle (EDC), the US Urban (FTP 75) and the Highway driving cycles - with a total driving time of 12,000 s have been studied. From the obtained emission data, two sets of 15,300 and 17,200 data points which represent transient driving in the velocity range of 0-150 km h{sup -1} and in an acceleration window of - 2-3 m s{sup -2} were explored to gain velocity-dependent emission factors. The passenger car, equipped with a regulated rhodium-platinum based three-way catalyst, showed optimal conversion efficiency (> 95%) for benzene in the velocity range of 60-120 km h{sup -1}. The conversion of benzene was reduced (< 80%) when driving below 50 km h{sup -1} and the BTXE emissions significantly increased when driven at higher speed and engine load (> 130 km h{sup -1}). Whereas the conversion efficiency for the class of C{sub 2}-benzenes was reduced to 10%, no net conversion could be found for toluene and benzene when driven above 130 km h{sup -1}. In contrast, the benzene and toluene emissions exceeded those of the untreated exhaust gas in the velocity range of 130-150 km h{sup -1} by 50-92% and by 10-34%, respectively. Thus, benzene and toluene were formed across the examined three-way catalyst if the engine is operated for an extended time in a fuel-rich mode (lambda < 1). (author)

  19. Metabolites from Alternaria Fungi and Their Bioactivities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ligang Zhou

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Alternaria is a cosmopolitan fungal genus widely distributing in soil and organic matter. It includes saprophytic, endophytic and pathogenic species. At least 268 metabolites from Alternaria fungi have been reported in the past few decades. They mainly include nitrogen-containing metabolites, steroids, terpenoids, pyranones, quinones, and phenolics. This review aims to briefly summarize the structurally different metabolites produced by Alternaria fungi, as well as their occurrences, biological activities and functions. Some considerations related to synthesis, biosynthesis, production and applications of the metabolites from Alternaria fungi are also discussed.

  20. Atomic Structure of Benzene Which Accounts for Resonance Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Heyrovska, Raji

    2008-01-01

    Benzene is a hexagonal molecule of six carbon atoms, each of which is bound to six hydrogen atoms. The equality of all six CC bond lengths, despite the alternating double and single bonds, and the surplus (resonance) energy, led to the suggestion of two resonanting structures. Here, the new atomic structure shows that the bond length equality is due to three carbon atoms with double bond radii bound to three other carbon atoms with resonance bond radii (as in graphene). Consequently, there are two kinds of CH bonds of slightly different lengths. The bond energies account for the resonance energy.

  1. 4-Benzene­sulfonamido­benzoic acid

    OpenAIRE

    Sharif, Hafiz Muhammad Adeel; Dong, Gui-Ying; Arshad, Muhammad Nadeem; Khan, Islam Ullah

    2009-01-01

    In the mol­ecule of the title sulfonamide compound, C13H11NO4S, the dihedral angle between the planes of the benzene ring and the carboxyl substituent group is 6.7 (4)°. The two aromatic rings are inclined at 45.36 (15)° to one another. In the crystal, adjacent mol­ecules are linked via classical inter­molecular N—H⋯O and O—H⋯O, and non-classical C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, which stabilize the crystal structure.

  2. 4-Benzene­sulfonamido­benzoic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif, Hafiz Muhammad Adeel; Dong, Gui-Ying; Arshad, Muhammad Nadeem; Khan, Islam Ullah

    2009-01-01

    In the mol­ecule of the title sulfonamide compound, C13H11NO4S, the dihedral angle between the planes of the benzene ring and the carboxyl substituent group is 6.7 (4)°. The two aromatic rings are inclined at 45.36 (15)° to one another. In the crystal, adjacent mol­ecules are linked via classical inter­molecular N—H⋯O and O—H⋯O, and non-classical C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, which stabilize the crystal structure. PMID:21578816

  3. Alkylation of benzene with normal olefins from coker distillate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aboul-Gheit, A.K.; Moustafa, O.F.; Habbib, R.M.

    1985-10-01

    The normal olefins separated from a coker distillate were used to alkylate benzene on catalysts containing silicotungstic acid supported on silica, silica-alumina and activated natural clays. The alkylation activity was found to increase as the surface area and silica/alumina ratio of the catalysts increase, irrespective of the support texture. The activation energy of the reaction was very low (proportional3 k cal mol/sup -1/), assuming catalytic intraparticle diffusion limitation. Equilibrium shift towards dealkylation was observed beyond 300/sup 0/C. (orig.).

  4. Bis[diethyl(hydroxyammonium] benzene-1,4-dicarboxylate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De-Ming Xie

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available In the centrosymmetric title compound, 2C4H12NO+·C8H4O42−, two N,N-diethyl(hydroxyammonium cations are linked to a benzene-1,4-dicarboxylate dianion by a combination of O—H...O and N—H...O hydrogen bonds, which can be described in graph-set terminology as R22(7. The crystal structure is further stabilized by C—H...O hydrogen bonds, leading to the fomation of a ribbon-like network.

  5. Metabolic Profiling of Developing Pear Fruits Reveals Dynamic Variation in Primary and Secondary Metabolites, Including Plant Hormones

    OpenAIRE

    Akira Oikawa; Takao Otsuka; Ryo Nakabayashi; Yusuke Jikumaru; Kanji Isuzugawa; Hideki Murayama; Kazuki Saito; Katsuhiro Shiratake

    2015-01-01

    Metabolites in the fruits of edible plants include sweet sugars, visually appealing pigments, various products with human nutritional value, and biologically active plant hormones. Although quantities of these metabolites vary during fruit development and ripening because of cell division and enlargement, there are few reports describing the actual dynamics of these changes. Therefore, we applied multiple metabolomic techniques to identify the changes in metabolite levels during the developme...

  6. Exposition by inhalation to the benzene, toluene, ethyl-benzene and xylenes (BTEX) in the air. Sources, measures and concentrations; Exposition par inhalation au benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene et xylenes (BTEX) dans l'air. Source, mesures et concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Gratta, F.; Durif, M.; Fagault, Y.; Zdanevitch, I

    2004-12-15

    This document presents the main techniques today available to characterize the benzene, toluene, ethyl-benzene and xylene (BTEX) concentrations in the air for different contexts: urban and rural areas or around industrial installations but also indoor and occupational area. It provides information to guide laboratories and research departments. A synthesis gives also the main emissions sources of these compounds as reference concentrations measured in different environments. (A.L.B.)

  7. An integrated strategy for in vivo metabolite profiling using high-resolution mass spectrometry based data processing techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Jian, E-mail: jian.guo@astrazeneca.com [DMPK of Infection Innovative Medicine, AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals, 35 Gatehouse Drive, Waltham, MA 02451 (United States); Zhang, Minli [DMPK of Infection Innovative Medicine, AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals, 35 Gatehouse Drive, Waltham, MA 02451 (United States); Elmore, Charles S. [DMPK of Innovative Medicine, Isotope Chemistry, AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals, Mölndal SE 431 83 (Sweden); Vishwanathan, Karthick [DMPK of Infection Innovative Medicine, AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals, 35 Gatehouse Drive, Waltham, MA 02451 (United States)

    2013-05-30

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Profiling the metabolites of model compounds in rats using high resolution mass spectrometry based data processing techniques. •Demonstrating an integrated strategy in vivo metabolite profiling using data mining tools. •Unusual metabolites generated via thiazole-ring opening were characterized based on processed LC–MS.data. -- Abstract: An ongoing challenge of drug metabolite profiling is to detect and identify unknown or low-level metabolites in complex biological matrices. Here we present a generic strategy for metabolite detection using multiple accurate-mass-based data processing tools via the analysis of rat samples of two model drug candidates, AZD6280 and AZ12488024. First, the function of isotopic pattern recognition was proved to be highly effective in the detection of metabolites derived from [{sup 14}C]-AZD6280 that possesses a distinct isotopic pattern. The metabolites revealed using this approach were in excellent qualitative correlation to those observed in radiochromatograms. Second, the effectiveness of accurate mass based untargeted data mining tools such as background subtraction, mass defect filtering, or a data mining package (MZmine) used for metabolomic analysis in detection of metabolites of [{sup 14}C]-AZ12488024 in rat urine, feces, bile and plasma samples was examined and a total of 33 metabolites of AZ12488024 were detected. Among them, at least 16 metabolites were only detected by the aid of the data mining packages and not via radiochromatograms. New metabolic pathways such as S-oxidation and thiomethylation reactions occurring on the thiazole ring were proposed based on the processed data. The results of these experiments also demonstrated that accurate mass-based mass defect filtering (MDF) and data mining techniques used in metabolomics are complementary and can be valuable tools for delineating low-level metabolites in complex matrices. Furthermore, the application of distinct multiple

  8. An integrated strategy for in vivo metabolite profiling using high-resolution mass spectrometry based data processing techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Profiling the metabolites of model compounds in rats using high resolution mass spectrometry based data processing techniques. •Demonstrating an integrated strategy in vivo metabolite profiling using data mining tools. •Unusual metabolites generated via thiazole-ring opening were characterized based on processed LC–MS.data. -- Abstract: An ongoing challenge of drug metabolite profiling is to detect and identify unknown or low-level metabolites in complex biological matrices. Here we present a generic strategy for metabolite detection using multiple accurate-mass-based data processing tools via the analysis of rat samples of two model drug candidates, AZD6280 and AZ12488024. First, the function of isotopic pattern recognition was proved to be highly effective in the detection of metabolites derived from [14C]-AZD6280 that possesses a distinct isotopic pattern. The metabolites revealed using this approach were in excellent qualitative correlation to those observed in radiochromatograms. Second, the effectiveness of accurate mass based untargeted data mining tools such as background subtraction, mass defect filtering, or a data mining package (MZmine) used for metabolomic analysis in detection of metabolites of [14C]-AZ12488024 in rat urine, feces, bile and plasma samples was examined and a total of 33 metabolites of AZ12488024 were detected. Among them, at least 16 metabolites were only detected by the aid of the data mining packages and not via radiochromatograms. New metabolic pathways such as S-oxidation and thiomethylation reactions occurring on the thiazole ring were proposed based on the processed data. The results of these experiments also demonstrated that accurate mass-based mass defect filtering (MDF) and data mining techniques used in metabolomics are complementary and can be valuable tools for delineating low-level metabolites in complex matrices. Furthermore, the application of distinct multiple data

  9. Alterations of urinary metabolite profile in model diabetic nephropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • 1H NMR spectroscopy was employed to study urinary metabolite profile in diabetic mouse models. • Mouse urinary metabolome showed major changes that are also found in human diabetic nephropathy. • These models can be new tools to study urinary biomarkers that are relevant to human disease. - Abstract: Countering the diabetes pandemic and consequent complications, such as nephropathy, will require better understanding of disease mechanisms and development of new diagnostic methods. Animal models can be versatile tools in studies of diabetic renal disease when model pathology is relevant to human diabetic nephropathy (DN). Diabetic models using endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) knock-out mice develop major renal lesions characteristic of human disease. However, it is unknown whether they can also reproduce changes in urinary metabolites found in human DN. We employed Type 1 and Type 2 diabetic mouse models of DN, i.e. STZ-eNOS−/− C57BLKS and eNOS−/− C57BLKS db/db, with the goal of determining changes in urinary metabolite profile using proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Six urinary metabolites with significantly lower levels in diabetic compared to control mice have been identified. Specifically, major changes were found in metabolites from tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and aromatic amino acid catabolism including 3-indoxyl sulfate, cis-aconitate, 2-oxoisocaproate, N-phenyl-acetylglycine, 4-hydroxyphenyl acetate, and hippurate. Levels of 4-hydroxyphenyl acetic acid and hippuric acid showed the strongest reverse correlation to albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR), which is an indicator of renal damage. Importantly, similar changes in urinary hydroxyphenyl acetate and hippurate were previously reported in human renal disease. We demonstrated that STZ-eNOS−/− C57BLKS and eNOS−/− C57BLKS db/db mouse models can recapitulate changes in urinary metabolome found in human DN and therefore can be useful new tools in metabolomic

  10. Endocrine-mediated effects of two benzene related compounds, 1-chloro-4-(chloromethyl)benzene and 1,3-diethyl benzene, based on subacute oral toxicity studies using rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Kanji; Ishii, Satoko; Kikuno, Tsukasa; Minobe, Yasushi

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the endocrine-mediated effects of the benzene-related compounds with reference to Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Test Guideline No. 407. Rats were orally gavaged with 0, 10, 50, and 250 mg/kg/day of 1-chloro-4-(chloromethyl)benzene, and 0, 25, 150, and 1000 mg/kg/day of 1,3-diethyl benzene for at least 28 days, beginning at 8 weeks of age. Thyroid dysfunction was observed in rats given the 1,3-diethyl benzene. Serum T4 values increased in all groups of male rats and in the 1000 mg/kg group of female rats, and TSH values also increased in the 1000 mg/kg groups of both sexes after 28 days' administration. Decreased T3 values were observed in the 1000 mg/kg group of female rats after 28 days' administration, and hormone values increased in the 1000 mg/kg groups of both sexes after the 14-day recovery period. In addition, thyroid weight increased in the 1000 mg/kg groups and thyroid follicular cell hyperplasia was detected in one male rat from the 1000 mg/kg group after 28 days' administration. Endocrine-mediated effects, including thyroid dysfunction were not observed in any groups of rats treated with 1-chloro-4-(chloromethyl)benzene. Our results indicated that endocrine-mediated effects such as thyroid dysfunction were associated with some benzene-related compounds. PMID:22643015

  11. INTERCELLULAR AND INTRACELLULAR TRAFFICKING OF NAD+ AND NAD+ PRECURSORS, INTERMEDIATE METABOLITES AND SIGNAL METABOLITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio De Flora

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Although being currently illustrated in Biochemistry textbooks, NAD+ metabolism is still largely undefined in its features. Specifically, enzymes involved in NAD+ biosynthesis and some of the enzymes involved in its utilization localize to distinct subcellular compartments of the same cell and, functionally, also to different cell types of the same organism. These findings lead to revolutionize current ideas. For instance, 1 NAD+ biosynthesis from several precursors (e.g., Nicotinamide, Nicotinic Acid, Nicotinamide mononucleotide, Nicotinamide riboside, Tryptophan, collectively defined Vit. B3 is a systemic yet segmentary process, whose individual steps may occur in different cells/tissues/organs. These activate a crosstalk via the exchange of intermediate metabolites in biological fluids and the eventual NAD+ biosynthesis takes place in selected cells able to utilize it in diverse, fundamental processes. Therefore, NAD+ metabolism is an organ- ismal process encompassing local events. 2 Utilization of NAD+ for regulation of cell functions involves the trafficking, both subcellular (autocrine and intercellular (paracrine, of signal-metabolites including NAD+ itself and NAD+-derived second messengers, e.g. Cyclic ADP-ribose and ADP-ribose. This hitherto unrecognized trafficking involves a complex in-terplay of ectoenzymes (e.g. CD38, plasmamembrane receptors and related signal transduction pathways, equilibrative and concentrative transporters, ion channels, whose outcome is the fine control of intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis and of Ca2+-dependent cell functions. Further elucidation of compartmentation of NAD+ and more extensive identification of its precursors/metabolites is expected to unveil at the mechanistic level a number of physiological and pathological processes, e.g. aging and age-related diseases.

  12. Modeling annual benzene, toluene, NO2, and soot concentrations on the basis of road traffic characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The investigation of potential adverse health effects of urban traffic-related air pollution is hampered by difficulties encountered with exposure assessment. Usually public measuring sites are few and thereby do not adequately describe spatial variation of pollutant levels over an urban area. In turn, individual monitoring of pollution exposure among study subjects is laborious and expensive. We therefore investigated whether traffic characteristics can be used to adequately predict benzene, NO2, and soot concentrations at individual addresses of study subjects in the city area of Munich, Germany. For all road segments with expected traffic volumes of at least 4000 vehicles a day (n=1840), all vehicles were counted manually or a single weekday in 1995. The proportion of vehicles in 'stop-go' mode, n estimate of traffic jam, was determined. Furthermore, annual concentrations of benzene, NO2, and soot from 18 high-concentration sites means: 8.7, 65.8, and 12.9 μg/m3, respectively) and from 16 school sites with moderate concentrations (means: 2.6, 32.2, and 5.7 μg/m3, respectively) were measured from 1996 to 1998. Statistical analysis of the data was performed using components of two different statistical models recently used to predict air pollution levels in comparable settings. Two traffic characteristics, traffic volume and traffic jam percentage, adequately described air pollutant concentrations (R2: 0.76-0.80, P=0.0001). This study shows that air pollutant concentrations can be accurately predicted by two traffic characteristics and that these models compare favorably with other more complex models in the literature

  13. Aggregation of Benzene Molecules with Molecules of Methanol and Formic Acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calculations and experimental studies of Raman scattering spectra show that there is a dimeric aggregation of benzene molecules with the molecule of methyl alcohol with the use of π-electrons of the benzene ring. In this process, the H-active hydrogen atom of O-H group is oriented to the edge of the benzene ring (a distance along the normal to the plane of the benzene ring is 2.850 A). The unusual position of the H-active hydrogen atom is conditioned by the interaction of two hydrogen atoms of the alcohols methyl group with π-electrons of the benzene ring. In Raman scattering spectra, the aggregation of molecules in the liquid state of the substance leads to a broadening of the band of full-symmetric vibrations with the maximum at 992 cm-1, as well as to a shift of this band toward lower frequencies by ∼ 1 cm-1. The band at 992 cm-1 is narrowed more than twice at the strong dilution of the benzene-methyl alcohol mixture by a large amount of heptane. The aggregation of benzene molecules takes place also with the molecules of formic acid with the use of π-electrons of the benzene ring. As in the case of the benzene-methyl alcohol mixture, the H-active hydrogen atom of O-H group of the acid is shifted toward the edge of the benzene ring. The energy of the benzene-formic acid dimerization is 9.2 kJ/mole.

  14. A joint analysis of transcriptomic and metabolomic data uncovers enhanced enzyme-metabolite coupling in breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auslander, Noam; Yizhak, Keren; Weinstock, Adam; Budhu, Anuradha; Tang, Wei; Wang, Xin Wei; Ambs, Stefan; Ruppin, Eytan

    2016-07-01

    Disrupted regulation of cellular processes is considered one of the hallmarks of cancer. We analyze metabolomic and transcriptomic profiles jointly collected from breast cancer and hepatocellular carcinoma patients to explore the associations between the expression of metabolic enzymes and the levels of the metabolites participating in the reactions they catalyze. Surprisingly, both breast cancer and hepatocellular tumors exhibit an increase in their gene-metabolites associations compared to noncancerous adjacent tissues. Following, we build predictors of metabolite levels from the expression of the enzyme genes catalyzing them. Applying these predictors to a large cohort of breast cancer samples we find that depleted levels of key cancer-related metabolites including glucose, glycine, serine and acetate are significantly associated with improved patient survival. Thus, we show that the levels of a wide range of metabolites in breast cancer can be successfully predicted from the transcriptome, going beyond the limited set of those measured.

  15. A comprehensive study of the relation between serum concentrations, concentration ratios, and level/dose ratios of carbamazepine and its metabolites with age, weight, dose, and clearances in epileptic children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H; Delgado, M R

    1994-01-01

    We made a comprehensive study of the relation between age, weight, carbamazepine (CBZ) dose, total clearance (TC), and intrinsic clearance (IC) and concentrations, concentration ratios, and level/dose ratios of CBZ, carbamazepine-10,11-epoxide (CBZ-E) and trans-10,11-dihydroxy-10,11- dihydro-carbamazepine (CBZ-H) in a group of epileptic children receiving CBZ monotherapy. Body weight and age showed negative correlations with TC, IC, CBZ dose, and CBZ-E/CBZ and CBZ-H/CBZ concentration ratios, and had positive relation with CBZ, CBZ-E, and CBZ-H level/dose ratios. These results indicate decreased CBZ metabolism with patient maturity. Correlations between CBZ dose with TC, IC, and the concentration ratios of CBZ-E/CBZ, CBZ-H/CBZ-E, and CBZ-H/CBZ were positive. CBZ dose also had negative associations with CBZ and CBZ-E level/dose ratios, indicating dose-dependent autoinduction of CBZ metabolism. Our data suggest that weight, age, and CBZ dose have less influence on epoxide-hydrolase activities than on epoxidase activities. The CBZ-E/CBZ concentration ratio can be used as an indicator of the degree of autoinduction of CBZ metabolism, even in patients receiving CBZ monotherapy. PMID:7988515

  16. Chemical accuracy from quantum Monte Carlo for the benzene dimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azadi, Sam; Cohen, R E

    2015-09-14

    We report an accurate study of interactions between benzene molecules using variational quantum Monte Carlo (VMC) and diffusion quantum Monte Carlo (DMC) methods. We compare these results with density functional theory using different van der Waals functionals. In our quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) calculations, we use accurate correlated trial wave functions including three-body Jastrow factors and backflow transformations. We consider two benzene molecules in the parallel displaced geometry, and find that by highly optimizing the wave function and introducing more dynamical correlation into the wave function, we compute the weak chemical binding energy between aromatic rings accurately. We find optimal VMC and DMC binding energies of -2.3(4) and -2.7(3) kcal/mol, respectively. The best estimate of the coupled-cluster theory through perturbative triplets/complete basis set limit is -2.65(2) kcal/mol [Miliordos et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 118, 7568 (2014)]. Our results indicate that QMC methods give chemical accuracy for weakly bound van der Waals molecular interactions, comparable to results from the best quantum chemistry methods. PMID:26374029

  17. Chemical accuracy from quantum Monte Carlo for the benzene dimer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report an accurate study of interactions between benzene molecules using variational quantum Monte Carlo (VMC) and diffusion quantum Monte Carlo (DMC) methods. We compare these results with density functional theory using different van der Waals functionals. In our quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) calculations, we use accurate correlated trial wave functions including three-body Jastrow factors and backflow transformations. We consider two benzene molecules in the parallel displaced geometry, and find that by highly optimizing the wave function and introducing more dynamical correlation into the wave function, we compute the weak chemical binding energy between aromatic rings accurately. We find optimal VMC and DMC binding energies of −2.3(4) and −2.7(3) kcal/mol, respectively. The best estimate of the coupled-cluster theory through perturbative triplets/complete basis set limit is −2.65(2) kcal/mol [Miliordos et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 118, 7568 (2014)]. Our results indicate that QMC methods give chemical accuracy for weakly bound van der Waals molecular interactions, comparable to results from the best quantum chemistry methods

  18. Chemical accuracy from quantum Monte Carlo for the Benzene Dimer

    CERN Document Server

    Azadi, Sam

    2015-01-01

    We report an accurate study of interactions between Benzene molecules using variational quantum Monte Carlo (VMC) and diffusion quantum Monte Carlo (DMC) methods. We compare these results with density functional theory (DFT) using different van der Waals (vdW) functionals. In our QMC calculations, we use accurate correlated trial wave functions including three-body Jastrow factors, and backflow transformations. We consider two benzene molecules in the parallel displaced (PD) geometry, and find that by highly optimizing the wave function and introducing more dynamical correlation into the wave function, we compute the weak chemical binding energy between aromatic rings accurately. We find optimal VMC and DMC binding energies of -2.3(4) and -2.7(3) kcal/mol, respectively. The best estimate of the CCSD(T)/CBS limit is -2.65(2) kcal/mol [E. Miliordos et al, J. Phys. Chem. A 118, 7568 (2014)]. Our results indicate that QMC methods give chemical accuracy for weakly bound van der Waals molecular interactions, compar...

  19. Local Field Factors and Dielectric Properties of Liquid Benzene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davari, Nazanin; Daub, Christopher D; Åstrand, Per-Olof; Unge, Mikael

    2015-09-01

    Local electric field factors are calculated for liquid benzene by combining molecular dynamic simulations with a subsequent force-field model based on a combined charge-transfer and point-dipole interaction model for the local field factor. The local field factor is obtained as a linear response of the local field to an external electric field, and the response is calculated at frequencies through the first absorption maximum. It is found that the largest static local field factor is around 2.4, while it is around 6.4 at the absorption frequency. The linear susceptibility, the dielectric constant, and the first absorption maximum of liquid benzene are also studied. The electronic contribution to the dielectric constant is around 2.3 at zero frequency, in good agreement with the experimental value around 2.2, while it increases to 6.3 at the absorption frequency. The π → π* excitation energy is around 6.0 eV, as compared to the gas-phase value of around 6.3 eV, while the experimental values are 6.5 and 6.9 eV for the liquid and gas phase, respectively, demonstrating that the gas-to-liquid shift is well-described. PMID:26241379

  20. Irradiated Benzene Ice Provides Clues to Meteoritic Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Michael Patrick; Gerakines, Perry Alexander; Martin, Mildred G.; Hudson, Reggie L.; Peeters, Zan

    2013-01-01

    Aromatic hydrocarbons account for a significant portion of the organic matter in carbonaceous chondrite meteorites, as a component of both the low molecular weight, solvent-extractable compounds and the insoluble organic macromolecular material. Previous work has suggested that the aromatic compounds in carbonaceous chondrites may have originated in the radiation-processed icy mantles of interstellar dust grains. Here we report new studies of the organic residue made from benzene irradiated at 19 K by 0.8 MeV protons. Polyphenyls with up to four rings were unambiguously identified in the residue by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Atmospheric pressure photoionization Fourier transform mass spectrometry was used to determine molecular composition, and accurate mass measurements suggested the presence of polyphenyls, partially hydrogenated polyphenyls, and other complex aromatic compounds. The profile of low molecular weight compounds in the residue compared well with extracts from the Murchison and Orgueil meteorites. These results are consistent with the possibility that solid phase radiation chemistry of benzene produced some of the complex aromatics found in meteorites.

  1. Thermodynamic investigation of the binary system of ethanol + benzene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The molar heat capacity of the binary system ethanol + benzene was measured by an adiabatic calorimeter in the temperature range from 80 to 320 K. The glass transition and phase transitions of the mixture were determined based on the curve of the heat capacity with respect to temperature. The glass transition occurred at 97.536 K, the enthalpy and entropy of the glass transition were calculated to be 1.796 kJ mol-1, 18.414 J mol-1 K-1, respectively. The phase transitions took place in temperature ranges 115.875-128.400, 146.778-159.015 and 256.645-274.981 K corresponding to the solid-solid phase transition of ethanol, solid-liquid phase transition of ethanol and solid-liquid phase transition of benzene, respectively. The corresponding enthalpies and entropies of the phase transition were calculated to be -1.266 kJ mol-1, -10.745 J K-1 mol-1; 2.166 kJ mol-1, 13.818 J K-1 mol-1; 5.390 kJ mol-1, 19.856 J K-1 mol-1, respectively. The thermodynamic functions and the excess thermodynamic functions of the mixture relative to standard temperature 298.15 K were derived based on the relationships of the thermodynamic functions and the function of the measured heat capacity with respect to temperature

  2. Sonochemical treatment of benzene/toluene contaminated wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thoma, G.; Gleason, M. [Univ. of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Popov, V. [Scientific Production Association Typhoon, Obninsk (Russian Federation). Inst. of Experimental Meterology

    1998-12-31

    Studies of the destruction of benzene and toluene in water were undertaken using ultrasonic irradiation in a parallel place Near Field Acoustic Processor (NAP). This magnetostrictive system is capable of degrading both benzene and toluene in a continuous stirred tank reactor configuration. The reaction kinetics were characterized by first order rate constants for the disappearance of the parent compound; these ranged from 2.7 {times} 1{sup {minus}3} to 3.7 {times} 10{sup {minus}2} mm{sup {minus}1} over an applied power density range of 0.6 to 3.6 watt mL{sup {minus}1} and target concentration of approximately 25 to 900 {micro}M. The rate constant is shown to be inversely proportional to the target compound concentration, indicating higher order reaction kinetics. The conversion efficiency for the system was characterized through the G efficiency commonly used in radiation chemistry. The G efficiency ranged between 4 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} to 2.2 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} molecules destroyed per 100 eV of electrical energy drawn from the wall outlet. These values are comparable to those of other advanced oxidation processes. Suggestions are made regarding methods to improve this technology.

  3. Alkylation of Benzene with Propylene Catalyzed by Ionic Liquids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Xuewen; Zhao Suoqi

    2006-01-01

    The alkylation of benzene with propylene catalyzed by ionic liquids to obtain cumene was investigated. Propylene conversion and cumene selectivity under mild reaction conditions were improved greatly after the ionic liquid was modified with HCl. Under the conditions of 20 oC, 0.1MPa, 5 min of reaction time, and a molar ratio of benzene to propylene of 10:1, propylene conversion increased from 83.6% to 100%, and cumene selectivity increased from 90.86% to 98.47%. In addition, it was found that the reaction could be carried out in two different stages so as to obtain a better result. At the first stage, the key reaction was alkylation and a higher propylene conversion was obtained at a lower temperature;At the second stage, the key reaction was transalkylation and a higher temperature was used to improve cumene selectivity. The reaction temperature, pressure and the amount of catalyst used in this work were lower than those used in traditional alkylation processes.

  4. Separation of Benzene and Cyclohexane by Batch Extractive Distillation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Jiao; ZHANG Weijiang; GUI Xia

    2007-01-01

    Azeotropic liquid mixture cannot be separated by conventional distillation. But extractive distillation or combination of the two can be valid for them. An experiment to separate benzene and cyclohexane by batch extractive distillation was carried out with N, N-dimethylformide (DMF), dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and their mixture as extractive solvent. The effect of the operation parameterssuch as solvent flow rate and reflux ratio on the separation was studied under the same operating conditions. The results show that the separation effect was improved with the increase of solvent flow rate and the reflux ratio; all the three extractive solvents can separate benzene and cyclohexane, with DMF being the most efficient one, the mixture the second, and DMSO the least. In the experiment the best operation conditions are with DMF as extractive solvent, the solvent flow rate being 12.33 mL/min, and the reflux ratio being 6. As a result, we can get cyclohexane from the top of tower with the average product content being 86.98%, and its recovering ratio being 83.10%.

  5. The Chemistry and Flow Dynamics of Molecular Biological Tools Used to Confirm In Situ Bioremediation of Benzene, TBA, and MTBE

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, K. P.; Mackay, D. M.; Scow, K. M.

    2010-12-01

    so within the first eight days. The lab experiment assessed a trap designed as an in situ microcosm, containing 13C-labeled benzene and a sulfate source, in order to quantify the amount of benzene leached from the trap and the rate of sulfate dissolution into the surrounding area. An “aquifer” was built in a tank and designed to mimic the well installations at a benzene-contaminated, sulfate-reducing site in Fillmore, CA. Multi-level upgradient and downgradient monitoring points were sampled throughout the six-week deployment and analyzed for sulfate and benzene. The trap and “aquifer” chemistry will be discussed and compared to the field experiment results.

  6. Effect of substrate interaction on oxidation of methane and benzene in enriched microbial consortia from landfill cover soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun-Hee; Park, Hyunjung; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2011-01-01

    The interaction of methane and benzene during oxidation in enriched methane-oxidizing consortium (MOC) and in benzene-oxidizing consortium (BOC) from landfill cover soil was characterized. Oxidation of both methane and benzene occurred in the MOC due to the coexistence of bacteria responsible for benzene oxidation, as well as methanotrophs, whereas in the BOC, only benzene was oxidized, not methane. Methane oxidation rates in the MOC were decreased with increasing benzene/methane ratio (mol/mol), indicating its methane oxidation was inhibited by the benzene coexistence. Benzene oxidation rates in the MOC, however, were increased with increasing benzene/methane ratio. The benzene oxidation in the BOC was not affected by the coexistence of methane or by the ratio of methane/benzene ratio (mol/mol). No effect of methane or benzene was found on the dynamics of functional genes, such as particulate methane monooxygenase and toluene monooxygenase, in association with oxidation of methane and benzene in the MOC and BOC. PMID:21847790

  7. Exposure Evaluation for Benzene, Lead and Noise in Vehicle and Equipment Repair Shops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sweeney, Lynn C. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States)

    2013-04-01

    An exposure assessment was performed at the equipment and vehicle maintenance repair shops operating at the U. S. Department of Energy Hanford site, in Richland, Washington. The maintenance shops repair and maintain vehicles and equipment used in support of the Hanford cleanup mission. There are three general mechanic shops and one auto body repair shop. The mechanics work on heavy equipment used in construction, cranes, commercial motor vehicles, passenger-type vehicles in addition to air compressors, generators, and farm equipment. Services include part fabrication, installation of equipment, repair and maintenance work in the engine compartment, and tire and brake services. Work performed at the auto body shop includes painting and surface preparation which involves applying body filler and sanding. 8-hour time-weighted-average samples were collected for benzene and noise exposure and task-based samples were collected for lead dust work activities involving painted metal surfaces. Benzene samples were obtained using 3M™ 3520 sampling badges and were analyzed for additional volatile organic compounds. These compounds were selected based on material safety data sheet information for the aerosol products used by the mechanics for each day of sampling. The compounds included acetone, ethyl ether, toluene, xylene, VM&P naphtha, methyl ethyl ketone, and trichloroethylene. Laboratory data for benzene, VM&P naphtha, methyl ethyl ketone and trichloroethylene were all below the reporting detection limit. Airborne concentrations for acetone, ethyl ether, toluene and xylene were all less than 10% of their occupational exposure limit. The task-based samples obtained for lead dusts were submitted for a metal scan analysis to identify other metals that might be present. Laboratory results for lead dusts were all below the reporting detection limit and airborne concentration for the other metals observed in the samples were less than 10% of the occupational exposure limit

  8. Novel rapid liquid chromatography tandem masspectrometry method for vemurafenib and metabolites in human plasma, including metabolite concentrations at steady state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikingsson, Svante; Strömqvist, Malin; Svedberg, Anna; Hansson, Johan; Höiom, Veronica; Gréen, Henrik

    2016-08-01

    A novel, rapid and sensitive liquid chromatography tandem-mass spectrometry method for quantification of vemurafenib in human plasma, that also for the first time allows for metabolite semi-quantification, was developed and validated to support clinical trials and therapeutic drug monitoring. Vemurafenib was analysed by precipitation with methanol followed by a 1.9 min isocratic liquid chromatography tandem masspectrometry analysis using an Acquity BEH C18 column with methanol and formic acid using isotope labelled internal standards. Analytes were detected in multireaction monitoring mode on a Xevo TQ. Semi-quantification of vemurafenib metabolites was performed using the same analytical system and sample preparation with gradient elution. The vemurafenib method was successfully validated in the range 0.5-100 μg/mL according to international guidelines. The metabolite method was partially validated owing to the lack of commercially available reference materials. For the first time concentration levels at steady state for melanoma patients treated with vemurafenib is presented. The low abundance of vemurafenib metabolites suggests that they lack clinical significance. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26683023

  9. Secondary metabolites from marine Penicillium brevicompactum

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    In a screening of Basidiomycete cultures isolated from marine invertebrates collected along the Chilean coastline for the production of antibiotics we identified a Penicillium brevicompactum strain as a producer of metabolites inhibiting the growth of bacteria and fungi. Bioactivity guided purification resulted in the isolation of four known metabolites. Their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic methods.

  10. Variability of benzene exposure among filling station attendants; Variabilita` dell`esposizione a benzene tra gli addetti all`erogazione di carburanti

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carere, A.; Iacovella, N.; Turrio Baldassarri, L. [Istituto Superiore di Sanita`, Rome (Italy). Lab. di Tossicologia Comparata ed Ecotossicologia; Fuselli, S.; Iavarone, I.; Lagorio, S.; Proietto, A.R. [Istituto Superiore di Sanita`, Rome (Italy). Lab. di Igiene Ambientale

    1996-12-01

    A monitoring survey of filling station attendants aimed at identifying sources of variability of exposure to benzene and other aromatics was carried out. Concurrent samples of the worker`s breathing zone air, atmospheric air in the service station proximity, and gasoline were collected, along with information about daily workloads and other exposure-related factors. Benzene personal exposure was characterised by a small between-worker variability and a predominant within-worker variance component. Such elevated day-to-day variability yields to imprecise estimates of mean personal exposure. Almost 70% of the overall personal exposure variance was explained by a model including daily benzene from dispensed fuel, presence of a shelter over the refueling area, amount of fuel supplied to the station if a delivery occurred, and background atmospheric benzene concentration.

  11. Targeted metabolomics identifies reliable and stable metabolites in human serum and plasma samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Breier

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Information regarding the variability of metabolite levels over time in an individual is required to estimate the reproducibility of metabolite measurements. In intervention studies, it is critical to appropriately judge changes that are elicited by any kind of intervention. The pre-analytic phase (collection, transport and sample processing is a particularly important component of data quality in multi-center studies. METHODS: Reliability of metabolites (within-and between-person variance, intraclass correlation coefficient and stability (shipment simulation at different temperatures, use of gel-barrier collection tubes, freeze-thaw cycles were analyzed in fasting serum and plasma samples of 22 healthy human subjects using a targeted LC-MS approach. RESULTS: Reliability of metabolite measurements was higher in serum compared to plasma samples and was good in most saturated short-and medium-chain acylcarnitines, amino acids, biogenic amines, glycerophospholipids, sphingolipids and hexose. The majority of metabolites were stable for 24 h on cool packs and at room temperature in non-centrifuged tubes. Plasma and serum metabolite stability showed good coherence. Serum metabolite concentrations were mostly unaffected by tube type and one or two freeze-thaw cycles. CONCLUSION: A single time point measurement is assumed to be sufficient for a targeted metabolomics analysis of most metabolites. For shipment, samples should ideally be separated and frozen immediately after collection, as some amino acids and biogenic amines become unstable within 3 h on cool packs. Serum gel-barrier tubes can be used safely for this process as they have no effect on concentration in most metabolites. Shipment of non-centrifuged samples on cool packs is a cost-efficient alternative for most metabolites.

  12. Spectroscopic study on deuterated benzenes. II. High-resolution laser spectroscopy and rotational structure in the S{sub 1} state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunishige, Sachi; Katori, Toshiharu; Baba, Masaaki, E-mail: baba@kuchem.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Division of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Hayashi, Masato [Institute for Molecular Science, National Institute of Natural Science, Myodaiji, Okazaki 444-8585 (Japan); Hasegawa, Hirokazu [Department of Basic Science, Graduated School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Ohshima, Yasuhiro [Institute for Molecular Science, National Institute of Natural Science, Myodaiji, Okazaki 444-8585 (Japan); Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Ohokayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan)

    2015-12-28

    High-resolution spectra of the S{sub 1}←S{sub 0} transition in jet-cooled deuterated benzenes were observed using pulse dye amplification of single-mode laser light and mass-selective resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) detection. The vibrational and rotational structures were accurately analyzed for the vibronic levels in the S{sub 1} state. The degenerate 6{sup 1} levels of C{sub 6}H{sub 6} or C{sub 6}D{sub 6} are split into 6a{sup 1} and 6b{sup 1} in many of deuterated benzenes. The rigid-rotor rotational constants were assessed and found to be slightly different between 6a and 6b because of different mean molecular structures. Their rotational levels are significantly shifted by Coriolis interactions. It was found that the Coriolis parameter proportionally changed with the number of substituted D atoms.

  13. Benzene bioremediation using cow dung microflora in two phase partitioning bioreactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bioremediation of benzene has been carried out using cow dung microflora in a bioreactor. The bioremediation of benzene under the influence of cow dung microflora was found to be 100% and 67.5%, at initial concentrations of 100 mg/l and 250 mg/l within 72 h and 168 h respectively; where as at higher concentration (500 mg/l), benzene was found to be inhibitory. Hence the two phase partitioning bioreactor (TPPB) has been designed and developed to carryout biodegradation at higher concentration. In TPPB 5000 mg/l benzene was biodegraded up to 50.17% over a period of 168 h. Further the Pseudomonas putida MHF 7109 was isolated from cow dung microflora as potential benzene degrader and its ability to degrade benzene at various concentrations was evaluated. The data indicates 100%, 81% and 65% degradation at the concentrations of 50 mg/l, 100 mg/l, 250 mg/l within the time period of 24 h, 96 h and 168 h respectively. The GC-MS data also shows the presence of catechol and 2-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde, which confirms the established pathway of benzene biodegradation. The present research proves the potential of cow dung microflora as a source of biomass for benzene biodegradation in TPPB.

  14. 40 CFR 721.1230 - Benzene, ethenyl-, ar-bromo derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... removed from a container that has held the substance, unless the container is empty as defined in 40 CFR... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Benzene, ethenyl-, ar-bromo... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1230 Benzene, ethenyl-, ar-bromo derivatives. (a) Chemical substance...

  15. 78 FR 25476 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Benzene...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    ... information, see the related notice published in the Federal Register on February 28, 2013 (78 FR 13707...; Benzene Standard ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: On April 30, 2013, the Department of Labor (DOL) will submit the..., ``Benzene Standard,'' to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and approval for continued...

  16. 40 CFR 721.1240 - Benzene, (2-bromoethyl)-, ar-bromo derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... that has held the substance, unless the container is empty as defined in 40 CFR 261.7(b)(3); any... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Benzene, (2-bromoethyl)-, ar-bromo... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1240 Benzene, (2-bromoethyl)-, ar-bromo derivatives. (a)...

  17. Genotoxic and histotoxic effects of air pollutants at a benzene station on albino rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Abousalem

    2014-02-01

    Conclusions: The findings of the present study indicated that benzene exposure may lead to toxic effects including, genotoxicities and histotoxicities. In order to minimize the predicted toxic effect of occupational exposure to benzene the strict protective measures should be put in consideration. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2014; 3(1.000: 144-150

  18. Homolytic iodination and nitration of some benzene derivatives in the gas phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two gas phase reactions, involving the iodination and nitration of benzene derivatives, are described. The experimental techniques of the apparatus and the methods used are outlined. The kinetic H/D isotope effect in the gas phase nitration of benzene with NO2 is determined. (C.F.)

  19. 46 CFR Appendix B to Subpart C to... - Substance Technical Guidelines, Benzene

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...) Benzene is classified as a flammable liquid for the purpose of conforming to the requirements of 49 CFR... locations for the purposes of conforming to the requirements of 46 CFR parts 30 through 40, 151, and 153.... (Benzin, petroleum benzin, and benzine do not contain benzene). (2) Formula: C6 H6 (CAS Registry...

  20. Benzene bioremediation using cow dung microflora in two phase partitioning bioreactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Dipty [Environmental Biotechnology Laboratory, Department of Life Sciences, University of Mumbai, Vidyanagari Campus, Santacruz (E), Mumbai-400 098 (India); Fulekar, M.H., E-mail: mhfulekar@yahoo.com [Environmental Biotechnology Laboratory, Department of Life Sciences, University of Mumbai, Vidyanagari Campus, Santacruz (E), Mumbai-400 098 (India)

    2010-03-15

    Bioremediation of benzene has been carried out using cow dung microflora in a bioreactor. The bioremediation of benzene under the influence of cow dung microflora was found to be 100% and 67.5%, at initial concentrations of 100 mg/l and 250 mg/l within 72 h and 168 h respectively; where as at higher concentration (500 mg/l), benzene was found to be inhibitory. Hence the two phase partitioning bioreactor (TPPB) has been designed and developed to carryout biodegradation at higher concentration. In TPPB 5000 mg/l benzene was biodegraded up to 50.17% over a period of 168 h. Further the Pseudomonas putida MHF 7109 was isolated from cow dung microflora as potential benzene degrader and its ability to degrade benzene at various concentrations was evaluated. The data indicates 100%, 81% and 65% degradation at the concentrations of 50 mg/l, 100 mg/l, 250 mg/l within the time period of 24 h, 96 h and 168 h respectively. The GC-MS data also shows the presence of catechol and 2-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde, which confirms the established pathway of benzene biodegradation. The present research proves the potential of cow dung microflora as a source of biomass for benzene biodegradation in TPPB.